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Sample records for b-cell lymphoproliferative disorders

  1. [Chronic B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders with hairy cells].

    PubMed

    Troussard, Xavier; Cornet, Édouard

    2015-01-01

    The standardized blood smear examination is the first step in the diagnosis of a B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorder and can guide further investigations. In the laboratory, the identification of hairy cells on blood smear is a matter of daily practice. Hairy cell proliferations represent heterogeneous entities and their respective diagnoses can be difficult. If hairy cell leukemia (HCL) and splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) represent separate entities, the variant form of HCL (HCLv) and splenic diffuse red pulp small B-cell lymphoma (SDRPL) remain provisional entities in the 2008 WHO classification. We discuss the main clinical and biological characteristics of these four entities and appropriate means to characterize, identify and distinguish from each other; standardized blood smear examination, multiparameter flow cytometry analysis, analysis of the repertoire of immunoglobulins heavy chains genes and their mutational status (mutated or unmutated profile), molecular analyses: BRAF gene V600E mutation in HCL and MAP2K1 gene mutations in HCLv. We also discuss the main therapeutic aspects with emphasis on the new targeted drugs that enter into force in the therapeutic arsenal. PMID:25858127

  2. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of expanded B-cell clones from multiclonal versus monoclonal B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana; Rodríguez-Caballero, Arancha; Criado, Ignacio; Langerak, Anton W.; Nieto, Wendy G.; Lécrevisse, Quentin; González, Marcos; Cortesão, Emília; Paiva, Artur; Almeida, Julia; Orfao, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Chronic antigen-stimulation has been recurrently involved in the earlier stages of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The expansion of two or more B-cell clones has frequently been reported in individuals with these conditions; potentially, such coexisting clones have a greater probability of interaction with common immunological determinants. Here, we analyzed the B-cell receptor repertoire and molecular profile, as well as the phenotypic, cytogenetic and hematologic features, of 228 chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like and non-chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like clones comparing multiclonal (n=85 clones from 41 cases) versus monoclonal (n=143 clones) monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The B-cell receptor of B-cell clones from multiclonal cases showed a slightly higher degree of HCDR3 homology than B-cell clones from mono clonal cases, in association with unique hematologic (e.g. lower B-lymphocyte counts) and cytogenetic (e.g. lower frequency of cytogenetically altered clones) features usually related to earlier stages of the disease. Moreover, a subgroup of coexisting B-cell clones from individual multiclonal cases which were found to be phylogenetically related showed unique molecular and cytogenetic features: they more frequently shared IGHV3 gene usage, shorter HCDR3 sequences with a greater proportion of IGHV mutations and del(13q14.3), than other unrelated B-cell clones. These results would support the antigen-driven nature of such multiclonal B-cell expansions, with potential involvement of multiple antigens/epitopes. PMID:24488564

  3. Crystal-storing histiocytosis involving the kidney in a low-grade B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjeev; Cuiffo, Barry P; Pinkus, Geraldine S; Rennke, Helmut G

    2002-01-01

    Intracellular crystal formation in histiocytes in multiple myeloma and other lymphoproliferative disorders is an uncommon presentation. In all cases, crystal formation is associated with accumulation of histiocytes containing light chain or immunoglobulin inclusions, and the disorder has been termed crystal-storing histiocytosis. We report a case of crystal-storing histiocytosis affecting the kidney with prominent infiltration of the mesangium by large mononuclear and multinuclear cells that contained eosinophilic crystalline material in the setting of a low-grade B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. The interstitium did not contain similar crystal-containing histiocytes. On electron microscopy, the mononuclear and multinuclear cells in the mesangium were filled with rhomboid and needle-shaped crystals. Immunofluorescence studies showed the material to be positive for lambda light chains but negative for kappa light chains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of crystal-storing histiocytosis involving the kidney in a low-grade B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder with an immunophenotype of a marginal zone lymphoma and of exclusive expansion of the mesangium by infiltrating histiocytes containing needle-shaped and rhomboid crystals that were positive for lambda light chains. We report this case to illustrate an unusual finding of mesangial infiltration by crystal-storing histiocytes, and we review the literature of renal involvement by crystal-storing histiocytosis and crystal deposition in lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:11774118

  4. EBV-driven B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders: from biology, classification and differential diagnosis to clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Ok, Chi Young; Li, Ling; Young, Ken H

    2015-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous herpesvirus, affecting >90% of the adult population. EBV targets B-lymphocytes and achieves latent infection in a circular episomal form. Different latency patterns are recognized based on latent gene expression pattern. Latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) mimics CD40 and, when self-aggregated, provides a proliferation signal via activating the nuclear factor-kappa B, Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways to promote cellular proliferation. LMP-1 also induces BCL-2 to escape from apoptosis and gives a signal for cell cycle progression by enhancing cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (Rb) protein and by inhibiting p16 and p27. LMP-2A blocks the surface immunoglobulin-mediated lytic cycle reactivation. It also activates the Ras/PI3K/Akt pathway and induces Bcl-xL expression to promote B-cell survival. Recent studies have shown that ebv-microRNAs can provide extra signals for cellular proliferation, cell cycle progression and anti-apoptosis. EBV is well known for association with various types of B-lymphocyte, T-lymphocyte, epithelial cell and mesenchymal cell neoplasms. B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders encompass a broad spectrum of diseases, from benign to malignant. Here we review our current understanding of EBV-induced lymphomagenesis and focus on biology, diagnosis and management of EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:25613729

  5. Expression patterns of CD200 and CD148 in leukemic B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders and their potential value in differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lei; Miao, Yi; Wu, Yu-Jie; Wang, Yan; Guo, Rui; Wang, Li; Shen, An-Li; Chen, Yao-Yu; Xu, Wei; Li, Jian-Yong

    2015-12-01

    Different combinations of biomarkers analyzed by flow cytometry are critical for the accurate diagnosis of leukemic B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders (B-CLPDs). We investigated CD200 and CD148 expression patterns of blood or bone marrow from 374 cases of B-CLPD by multicolor flow cytometry. Our results showed that CD200 and CD148 expression patterns distinguished different types of B-CLPD. CD200 mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) or CD148 MFI had a high sensitivity and specificity to differentiate mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Furthermore, CD148 MFI/CD200 MFI ratio > 4.79 produced a specificity of 94.46% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 91.04-96.87%) and a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI: 88.78-100.0%) in establishing the diagnosis of MCL in differential diagnosis between MCL and CLL. We therefore conclude that the combination of CD200 and CD148 may have a potential differential diagnostic value in leukemic B-CLPDs, especially between CLL and MCL. PMID:25791119

  6. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Other Lymphoproliferative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Wall, Sarah; Woyach, Jennifer A

    2016-02-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia affects less than 1% of US adults but is the most common leukemia and primarily affects older patients. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas are the seventh most common cancers in the United States and also primarily affect older patients. In general, older patients should be treated differently than their younger, fitter counterparts. Fitness level and comorbidities should be taken into account when planning treatment. First-line treatment of most of these B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders consists of chemoimmunotherapy. In relapsed and refractory disease, there is a growing role for therapies targeting the B-cell receptor signaling pathway. PMID:26614867

  7. Plasmacytoma-like post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder, a rare subtype of monomorphic B-cell post-transplant lymphoproliferation, is associated with a favorable outcome in localized as well as in advanced disease: a prospective analysis of 8 cases

    PubMed Central

    Trappe, Ralf; Zimmermann, Heiner; Fink, Susanne; Reinke, Petra; Dreyling, Martin; Pascher, Andreas; Lehmkuhl, Hans; Gärtner, Barbara; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Riess, Hanno

    2011-01-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) with plasmacellular differentiation has been reported as a rare subtype of monomorphic B-cell post-transplant lympho-proliferation with histological and immunophenotypical features of plasmacytoma in the non-transplant population. Here we present clinical, laboratory and histopathological features, treatment and outcome of 8 patients from the German prospective PTLD registry. Clinically, extranodal manifestations were common while osteolytic lesions were rare and none of the patients had bone marrow involvement. Immunohistochemistry showed light chain restriction and expression of CD138 without CD20 expression in all samples. An association with Epstein-Barr virus was found in 3 out of 8 cases. We suggest that the Ann Arbor classification is most useful for this disease entity and report a generally good response to treatment including reduction of immuno-suppression, surgery and irradiation in localized disease and systemic chemotherapy analogous to plasmacell myeloma in advanced disease. PMID:21719885

  8. ?-HHVs and HHV-8 in Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Quadrelli, C.; Barozzi, P.; Riva, G.; Vallerini, D.; Zanetti, E.; Potenza, L.; Forghieri, F.; Luppi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Similarly to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is a ?-herpesvirus, recently recognized to be associated with the occurrence of rare B cell lymphomas and atypical lymphoproliferations, especially in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected subjects. Moreover, the human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6), a ?-herpesvirus, has been shown to be implicated in some non-malignant lymph node proliferations, such as the Rosai Dorfman disease, and in a proportion of Hodgkin’s lymphoma cases. HHV-6 has a wide cellular tropism and it might play a role in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of human diseases, but given its ubiquity, disease associations are difficult to prove and its role in hematological malignancies is still controversial. The involvement of another ?-herpesvirus, the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), has not yet been proven in human cancer, even though recent findings have suggested its potential role in the development of CD4+ large granular lymphocyte (LGL) lymphocytosis. Here, we review the current knowledge on the pathogenetic role of HHV-8 and human ?-herpesviruses in human lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:22110893

  9. Practical Management of CD30? Lymphoproliferative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hughey, Lauren C

    2015-10-01

    Primary cutaneous CD30? lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) account for approximately 25% of cutaneous lymphomas. Although these LPDs are clinically heterogeneous, they can be indistinguishable histologically. Lymphomatoid papulosis rarely requires systemic treatment; however, multifocal primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell cutaneous lymphoma and large cell transformation of mycosis fungoides are typically treated systemically. As CD30? LPDs are rare, there is little published evidence to support a specific treatment algorithm. Most studies are case reports, small case series, or retrospective reviews. This article discusses various treatment choices for each of the CD30? disorders and offers practical pearls to aid in choosing an appropriate regimen. PMID:26433852

  10. Familial Aggregation of Lymphoproliferative Disorders from the Scandinavian Family Cancer Database

    Cancer.gov

    Familial aggregation of lymphoproliferative disorders from the Scandinavian family cancer database Print This Page Familial Aggregation of Lymphoproliferative Disorders from the Scandinavian Family Cancer Database Our Research

  11. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders following liver transplantation: Where are we now?

    PubMed Central

    Dierickx, Daan; Cardinaels, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation has emerged as a life-saving treatment for several patients with acute liver failure, end stage liver disease and primary hepatic malignancies. However, long term immunosuppressive therapy aiming to reduce the risk of transplant rejection increases the incidence of several complications including malignancies. This is illustrated by the observation of a high ratio between observed and expected cases of lymphoproliferative disorders following liver transplantation. Despite a huge heterogeneity in morphological appearance of these disorders ranging from reactive-like lesions to real lymphomas, they are collectively termed posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders. In this review we will provide an overview of this rare but challenging disorder as a complication of liver transplantation. PMID:26494960

  12. Characterization of Primary Cutaneous CD8+/CD30+ Lymphoproliferative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Martires, Kathryn J; Ra, Seong; Abdulla, Farah; Cassarino, David S

    2015-11-01

    CD30 primary cutaneous lymphoproliferative diseases include both lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP) and primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (PCALCL). The neoplastic cell of most primary CD30 lymphoproliferative disorders is CD4 positive. The terminology LyP "type D" has been used to describe a growing number of cases of LyP with a predominantly CD8 infiltrate. PCALCL with a CD8 phenotype has also been described, which presents a particularly difficult diagnostic and management challenge, given the difficulty in distinguishing it histologically from other cytotoxic lymphomas such as primary cutaneous aggressive epidermotropic CD8 cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma and CD8 gamma/delta and natural killer/T-cell lymphoma. We report 7 additional cases of these rare cutaneous CD8/CD30 lymphoproliferative disorders. We also present a unique case of CD8/CD30 LyP with histologic similarities to LyP type B. In all 7 of our cases of CD8 LyP and CD8 anaplastic large cell lymphoma, we found focal to diffuse MUM-1 positivity. We propose that MUM-1 may represent an adjunctive marker for CD8 lymphoproliferative disease. Finally, we review the current literature on cases of CD8 LyP and PCALCL. For the 106 cases examined, we found similar clinical and histologic features to those reported for traditional CD4CD30 LyP and PCALCL. PMID:26485239

  13. Single-Fraction Radiotherapy for CD30+ Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Michelle S.; Martinez-Escala, Maria Estela; Thomas, Tarita O.; Guitart, Joan; Rosen, Steven; Kuzel, Timothy; Mittal, Bharat B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorder is a rare variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Sustained complete response following first-line treatments is rare. This retrospective review evaluates the response of refractory or recurrent lesions to palliative radiation therapy. Methods. The records of 6 patients with 12 lesions, treated with radiation therapy, were reviewed. All patients received previous first-line treatments. Patients with clinical and pathological evidence of symptomatic CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorder, with no history of other cutaneous T-cell lymphoma variants, and with no prior radiation therapy to the index site were included. Results. The median age of patients was 50.5 years (range, 15–83 years). Median size of the treated lesions was 2.5?cm (range, 2–7?cm). Four sites were treated with a single fraction of 750–800?cGy (n = 3) and 8 sites were treated with 4000–4500?cGy in 200–250?cGy fractions (n = 3). Radiation therapy was administered with electrons and bolus. Median follow-up was 113 months (range, 16–147 months). For all sites, there was 100% complete response with acute grade 1-2 dermatitis. Conclusions. For recurrent and symptomatic radiation-naïve CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorder lesions, palliative radiation therapy shows excellent response. A single fraction of 750–800?cGy is as effective as a multifractionated course and more convenient. PMID:26504818

  14. Isolated Upper Extremity Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Halula, Sarah E.; Leino, Daniel G.; Patel, Manish N.; Racadio, John M.; Lungren, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a well-described complication of solid organ and bone marrow transplants. The most common presentation is intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy or single or multiple intraparenchymal masses involving the liver, spleen, or kidneys. Here we describe the imaging and pathology findings of an unusual case of PTLD appearing as an intramuscular forearm lesion in a pediatric male. The manifestation of PTLD as an isolated upper extremity mass in a pediatric patient has to our knowledge not been described. PMID:26167324

  15. Hematopoietic Neoplasias in Horses: Myeloproliferative and Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    MUÑOZ, Ana; RIBER, Cristina; TRIGO, Pablo; CASTEJÓN, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Leukemia, i.e., the neoplasia of one or more cell lines of the bone marrow, although less common than in other species, it is also reported in horses. Leukemia can be classified according to the affected cells (myeloproliferative or lymphoproliferative disorders), evolution of clinical signs (acute or chronic) and the presence or lack of abnormal cells in peripheral blood (leukemic, subleukemic and aleukemic leukemia). The main myeloproliferative disorders in horses are malignant histiocytosis and myeloid leukemia, the latter being classified as monocytic and myelomonocytic, granulocytic, primary erythrocytosis or polycythemia vera and megakaryocytic leukemia. The most common lymphoproliferative disorders in horses are lymphoid leukemia, plasma cell or multiple myeloma and lymphoma. Lymphoma is the most common hematopoietic neoplasia in horses and usually involves lymphoid organs, without leukemia, although bone marrow may be affected after metastasis. Lymphoma could be classified according to the organs involved and four main clinical categories have been established: generalized-multicentric, alimentary-gastrointestinal, mediastinal-thymic-thoracic and cutaneous. The clinical signs, hematological and clinical pathological findings, results of bone marrow aspirates, involvement of other organs, prognosis and treatment, if applicable, are presented for each type of neoplasia. This paper aims to provide a guide for equine practitioners when approaching to clinical cases with suspicion of hematopoietic neoplasia. PMID:24833969

  16. Multispectral Imaging Approach to the Diagnosis of a CD20+ Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Salva, Katrin A; Bennett, Daniel; Longley, Jack; Guitart, Joan; Wood, Gary S

    2015-10-01

    Expression of the pan B-cell marker CD20 by T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is exceedingly rare. We present a 52-year-old man with a unilesional cutaneous CD20 T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. Multispectral imaging analysis of CD3-CD20 double-stained lesional tissue sections allowed (1) the visualization of double-positive T lymphocytes in situ with sensitivity superior to that of conventional immunohistochemistry and (2) the quantitative assessment of marker coexpression. Here, 23% of CD3 signals in the patient's lesion were also CD20, whereas 38% of CD20 signals were also CD3. In contrast, both parameters were below 1% in the tonsil control. Overall, the percentage of double-positive cells in lesional skin was 35%, although only 0.4% of such cells were detected in the tonsil. This is the first demonstration of aberrant CD20 expression by skin-infiltrating T cells using multispectral imaging. PMID:26381030

  17. Treatment of Recurrent Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder with Autologous Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Bharat; Rahal, Ahmad K.; Farhoud, Hussam; Moore, Dennis F.; Kallail, K. James

    2015-01-01

    Background. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) occur after solid organ transplantation. Treatment guidelines include reduction in immunosuppression (RIS), radiation, rituximab, chemotherapy, and immunological agents. We present a rare case of recurrent diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as a PTLD in a heart transplant patient treated with autologous blood stem cell transplant (ASCT) after failure of conventional therapy. Case Presentation. A 66-year-old male presented with a neck mass. He has a history of Hodgkin's disease status after staging laparotomy with splenectomy and heart transplantation due to dilated nonischemic cardiomyopathy 8 years prior to the development of PTLD. His examination was remarkable for right submandibular swelling. An excisional biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell NHL. Patient received RIS, rituximab, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy with a complete remission. His lymphoma relapsed and he subsequently was treated with RICE salvage chemotherapy and consolidative high-dose chemotherapy with BEAC regimen followed by ASCT resulting in a complete remission. Conclusion. Patients with PTLD present a difficult therapeutic challenge. In this case, the patient's prior history of Hodgkin's disease, splenectomy, and a heart transplant appear to be unique features, the significance of which is unclear. ASCT might be a promising therapy for patients with relapsed or refractory PTLD. PMID:26688773

  18. Intracranial involvement of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Wilberger, Adam C; Prayson, Richard A

    2015-11-01

    We report a 61-year-old man with intracranial multiple myeloma (MM) presenting as a posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) following a kidney transplant. Two months after his transplant, the man developed acute rejection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) viremia, requiring aggressive immunosuppression. Twenty months following transplantation, the patient presented with multiple neurologic deficits. Imaging revealed numerous lytic lesions in the skull, most conspicuously a 4.1cm right frontal skull mass with prominent intracranial extension. Histologic sections of the frontal bone lesion showed sheets of atypical plasma cells that were positive for CD138 and kappa immunoglobulin light chains. Chromogenic in situ hybridization for EBV-encoded small RNA was also positive. Plasma cell neoplasms, either as MM or a plasmacytoma, are one of the least common forms of PTLD, and their rarity limits the possibility of major studies to detail their behavior. Most often seen after renal transplantation, the majority are EBV-driven, similarly to other PTLD. While studies have demonstrated several risk factors, behavior and optimal management of PTLD plasma cell neoplasms are unknown. Plasma cell neoplasms affect the nervous system in a variety of ways but rarely via intracranial disease. MM usually presents initially with several classic signs and symptoms, but our patient's presentation was typical of a localized brain tumor with generalized and focal gross neurologic defects. PMID:26375326

  19. Outcome of Rapamycin Therapy for Post-Transplant-Lymphoproliferative Disorder after Kidney Transplantation: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafi, Farzaneh; Shahidi, Shahrzad; Mortazavi, Mojgan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a complication of chronic immunosuppressive therapy in solid organ transplantation with a high mortality rate. Alternative treatments such as rapamycin have been explored. Methods: A detailed retrospective analysis was performed according to data collected from 13 patients with PTLD. At the time of PTLD diagnosis, immunosuppressive therapy was decreased and rapamycin administered. Overall survival, disease-free survival of patients and graft survival were determined. Results: Among 590 kidney transplant recipients, 13 adult patients with PTLD were included in this study. The mean age of the patients was 42.15 (range: 25–58) years at the time of PTLD diagnosis, and 9 patients were male. Histology was distributed in 9 diffuse large B cell, 1 Malt lymphoma, 1 Burkitt lymphoma, 2 Hodgkin-like PTLD. The response rate to rapamycin alone was 30.8%. The mean overall survival period was 23.38 months and 11 patients are still alive. In total, 10 patients (76.9%) achieved a complete remission with functioning graft in 11 (84.6%) patients. Conclusion: Despite the retrospective focus and limited number of patients, this study provides promising results regarding the effectiveness of stopping calcineurin inhibitors and switching to rapamycin for patients with PTLD. PMID:25802698

  20. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders: From epidemiology to pathogenesis-driven treatment.

    PubMed

    Petrara, Maria Raffaella; Giunco, Silvia; Serraino, Diego; Dolcetti, Riccardo; De Rossi, Anita

    2015-12-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) represent the most severe complication of both solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is the main driver of PTLD, particularly those occurring early after transplantation. EBV-driven malignancies are associated with selective expression of latent viral proteins, but uncontrolled lytic replication may favor early phases of cell transformation. Besides immunodepression, persistent immune activation and chronic inflammation play an important role in both virus reactivation and expansion of EBV-infected B cells. EBV-induced immortalization requires the expression of telomerase. TERT, the rate-limiting component of the telomerase complex, is central in the switch from the lytic to the latent viral program, and TERT inhibition induces the EBV lytic cycle and cell death. Immunotherapy and combination of EBV lytic cycle inducers with antiviral drugs are promising strategies to improve the treatment of PTLD patients. This review is aimed at providing an update on the intriguing association between EBV and PTLD, mainly focusing on cases arising after kidney and liver transplantation, which account for the vast majority of transplants. PMID:26279520

  1. Epstein–Barr virus-positive T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qingqing; Chen, Kailin; Young, Ken H

    2015-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus, a ubiquitous human herpesvirus, can induce both lytic and latent infections that result in a variety of human diseases, including lymphoproliferative disorders. The oncogenic potential of Epstein–Barr virus is related to its ability to infect and transform B lymphocytes into continuously proliferating lymphoblastoid cells. However, Epstein–Barr virus has also been implicated in the development of T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases. Epstein–Barr virus encodes a series of products that mimic several growth, transcription and anti-apoptotic factors, thus usurping control of pathways that regulate diverse homeostatic cellular functions and the microenvironment. However, the exact mechanism by which Epstein–Barr virus promotes oncogenesis and inflammatory lesion development remains unclear. Epstein–Barr virus-associated T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases often have overlapping clinical symptoms as well as histologic and immunophenotypic features because both lymphoid cell types derive from a common precursor. Accurate classification of Epstein–Barr virus-associated T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases is a prerequisite for appropriate clinical management. Currently, the treatment of most T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases is less than satisfactory. Novel and targeted therapies are strongly required to satisfy clinical demands. This review describes our current knowledge of the genetics, oncogenesis, biology, diagnosis and treatment of Epstein–Barr virus-associated T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases. PMID:25613730

  2. The MYC/miR-17-92 axis in lymphoproliferative disorders: A common pathway with therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Luis; Gattei, Valter

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding single-stranded RNA molecules acting as master regulators of gene expression post transcriptionally by inhibiting the translation or inducing the degradation of target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). In particular, the miR-17-92 cluster is widely expressed in many different cell types and is essential for many developmental and pathogenic processes. As a strong oncogene, miR-17-92 can regulate multiple cellular processes that favor malignant transformation, promoting cell survival, rapid cell proliferation, and increased angiogenesis. The miR-17-92 cluster has been reported to be involved in hematopoietic malignancies including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Given the multiple and potent effects on cellular proliferation and apoptosis exerted by the miR-17-92 cluster, miRNAs belonging to the cluster surely represent attractive targets for cancer therapy also in the context of lymphoproliferative disorders. In the present review, we focus on the role of the miR-17-92 cluster in lymphoproliferative disorders, including diagnostic/prognostic implications, and on the potential applications of anti-miRNAs based therapies targeting miRNAs belonging to the cluster. PMID:26305986

  3. Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Lymphoproliferative disorders in inflammatory bowel disease patients on immunosuppression: Lessons from other inflammatory disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Grace Y; Halloran, Brendan P; Peters, Anthea C; Fedorak, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive agents, such as thiopurines, methotrexate, and biologics, have revolutionized the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, a number of case reports, case control studies and retrospective studies over the last decade have identified a concerning link between immunosuppression and lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs), the oncological phenomenon whereby lymphocytes divide uncontrollably. These LPDs have been associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in which the virus provides the impetus for malignant transformation while immunosuppression hampers the immune system’s ability to detect and clear these malignant cells. As such, the use of immunosuppressive agents may come at the cost of increased risk of developing LPD. While little is known about the LPD risk in IBD, more is known about immunosuppression in the post-transplantation setting and the development of EBV associated post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD). In review of the PTLD literature, evidence is available to demonstrate that certain immune suppressants such as cyclosporine and T-lymphocyte modulators in particular are associated with an increased risk of PTLD development. As well, high doses of immunosuppressive agents and multiple immunosuppressive agent use are also linked to increased PTLD development. Here, we discuss these findings in context of IBD and what future studies can be taken to understand and reduce the risk of EBV-associated LPD development from immunosuppression use in IBD. PMID:26600976

  5. B-cell survival factors in autoimmune rheumatic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Sandra A.; Vilas-Boas, Andreia

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic disorders have complex etiopathogenetic mechanisms in which B cells play a central role. The importance of factors stimulating B cells, notably the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) and A proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) axis is now recognized. BAFF and APRIL are cytokines essential for B-cell proliferation and survival from the immature stages to the development of plasma cells. Their levels are increased in some subsets of patients with autoimmune disorders. Several recent biologic drugs have been developed to block this axis, namely belimumab [already licensed for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment], tabalumab, atacicept and blisibimod. Many clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these drugs in several autoimmune disorders are ongoing, or have been completed recently. This review updates the information on the use of biologic agents blocking BAFF/APRIL for patients with SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome and myositis. PMID:26288664

  6. Usefullness of IGH/TCR PCR studies in lymphoproliferative disorders with inconclusive clonality by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Ribera, Jordi; Zamora, Lurdes; Juncà, Jordi; Rodríguez, Inés; Marcé, Silvia; Cabezón, Marta; Millá, Fuensanta

    2013-07-25

    In up to 5-15% of studies of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) flow cytometry (FCM) or immunomorphologic methods cannot discriminate malignant from reactive processes. The aim of this work was to determine the usefulness of PCR for solving these diagnostic uncertainties. We analyzed IGH and TCR? genes by PCR in 106 samples with inconclusive FCM results. A clonal result was registered in 36/106 studies, with a LPD being confirmed in 27 (75%) of these cases. Specifically, 9/9 IGH clonal and 16/25 TCR? clonal results were finally diagnosed with LPD. Additionally, 2 clonal TCR? samples with suspicion of undefined LPD were finally diagnosed with T LPD. Although polyclonal results were obtained in 47 of the cases studied (38 IGH and 9 TCR?), hematologic neoplasms were diagnosed in 4/38 IGH polyclonal and in 1/9 TCR? polyclonal studies. There were also 14 PCR polyclonal results (4 IGH, 10 TCR?), albeit non-conclusive. Of these, 2/4 were eventually diagnosed with B-cell lymphoma and 3/10 with T-cell LPD. In 8 IGH samples the results of PCR techniques were non-informative but in 3/8 cases a B lymphoma was finally confirmed. We concluded that PCR is a useful technique to identify LPD when FCM is inconclusive. A PCR clonal B result is indicative of malignancy but IGH polyclonal and non-conclusive results do not exclude lymphoid neoplasms. Interpretation of T-cell clonality should be based on all the available clinical and analytical data. © 2013 Clinical Cytometry Society. PMID:23894019

  7. Usefulness of IGH/TCR PCR studies in lymphoproliferative disorders with inconclusive clonality by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Ribera, Jordi; Zamora, Lurdes; Juncà, Jordi; Rodríguez, Inés; Marcé, Silvia; Cabezón, Marta; Millá, Fuensanta

    2014-01-01

    In up to 5-15% of studies of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD), flow cytometry (FCM) or immunomorphologic methods cannot discriminate malignant from reactive processes. The aim of this work was to determine the usefulness of PCR for solving these diagnostic uncertainties. We analyzed IGH and TCR? genes by PCR in 106 samples with inconclusive FCM results. A clonal result was registered in 36/106 studies, with a LPD being confirmed in 27 (75%) of these cases. Specifically, 9/9 IGH clonal and 16/25 TCR? clonal results were finally diagnosed with LPD. Additionally, two clonal TCR? samples with suspicion of undefined LPD were finally diagnosed with T LPD. Although polyclonal results were obtained in 47 of the cases studied (38 IGH and nine TCR?), hematologic neoplasms were diagnosed in 4/38 IGH polyclonal and in 1/9 TCR? polyclonal studies. There were also 14 PCR polyclonal results (four IGH, 10 TCR?), albeit nonconclusive. Of these, 2/4 were eventually diagnosed with B-cell lymphoma and 3/10 with T-cell LPD. In eight IGH samples, the results of PCR techniques were noninformative but in 3/8 cases a B lymphoma was finally confirmed. We concluded that PCR is a useful technique to identify LPD when FCM is inconclusive. A PCR clonal B result is indicative of malignancy but IGH polyclonal and nonconclusive results do not exclude lymphoid neoplasms. Interpretation of T-cell clonality should be based on all the available clinical and analytical data. PMID:23943305

  8. Comparison of Non-myeloablative Conditioning Regimens for Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sanghee; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Artz, Andrew; McCarthy, Philip L.; Logan, Brent R.; Pasquini, Marcelo C.

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with non-myeloablative conditioning (NMA) for lymphoproliferative diseases (LD) includes fludarabine with and without low-dose total body irradiation (TBI). Transplant outcomes were compared among patients ?40 years with LD who received a HCT with TBI (N=382) and no-TBI (N=515) NMA from 2001 to 2011. The groups were comparable except for donor, graft, prophylaxis for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), disease status and year of HCT. Cumulative incidences of grades II–IV GVHD at 100 days, were 29% and 20% (p=0.001), and chronic GVHD at 1 year were 54% and 44% (p=0.004) for TBI and no-TBI, respectively. Multivariate analysis of progression/relapse, treatment failure and mortality showed no outcome differences by conditioning. Full donor chimerism at day 100 was observed in 82% vs. 64% in the TBI and no-TBI groups, respectively (p=0.006). Subset of four most common conditioning/ GVHD prophylaxis combinations demonstrated higher rates of grades II–IV acute (p<0.001) and chronic GVHD (p<0.001) among recipients of TBI-mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) compared to other combinations. TBI-based NMA conditioning induces faster full donor chimerism but overall survival outcomes are comparable to no-TBI regimens. Combination of TBI and MMF are associated with higher rates of GVHD without impact on survival outcomes in patients with LD. PMID:25437248

  9. B7-H1 (PD-L1, CD274) suppresses host immunity in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Ryan A.; Feldman, Andrew L.; Wada, David A.; Yang, Zhi-Zhang; Comfere, Nneka I.; Dong, Haidong; Kwon, Eugene D.; Novak, Anne J.; Markovic, Svetomir N.; Pittelkow, Mark R.; Witzig, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Stromal elements present within the tumor microenvironment may suppress host immunity and promote the growth of malignant lymphocytes in B cell–derived non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In contrast, little is known about the microenvironment's role in T cell–derived NHL. B7-H1 (PD-L1, CD274), a member of the B7 family of costimulatory/coinhibitory ligands expressed by both malignant cells and stromal cells within the tumor microenvironment, has emerged as an important immune modulator capable of suppressing host immunity. Therefore, B7-H1 expression and function were analyzed in cutaneous and peripheral T-cell NHL. B7-H1 was expressed by tumor cells, monocytes, and monocyte-derived cells within the tumor microenvironment in T-cell NHL and was found to inhibit T-cell proliferation and promote the induction of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells. Collectively, the data presented provide the first evidence implicating B7-H1 in the suppression of host immunity in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and suggest that the targeting of B7-H1 may represent a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:19597183

  10. Combined immunodeficiency with life-threatening EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorder in patients lacking functional CD27.

    PubMed

    Salzer, Elisabeth; Daschkey, Svenja; Choo, Sharon; Gombert, Michael; Santos-Valente, Elisangela; Ginzel, Sebastian; Schwendinger, Martina; Haas, Oskar A; Fritsch, Gerhard; Pickl, Winfried F; Förster-Waldl, Elisabeth; Borkhardt, Arndt; Boztug, Kaan; Bienemann, Kirsten; Seidel, Markus G

    2013-03-01

    CD27, a tumor necrosis factor receptor family member, interacts with CD70 and influences T-, B- and NK-cell functions. Disturbance of this axis impairs immunity and memory generation against viruses including Epstein Barr virus (EBV), influenza, and others. CD27 is commonly used as marker of memory B cells for the classification of B-cell deficiencies including common variable immune deficiency. Flow cytometric immunophenotyping including expression analysis of CD27 on lymphoid cells was followed by capillary sequencing of CD27 in index patients, their parents, and non-affected siblings. More comprehensive genetic analysis employed single nucleotide polymorphism-based homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing. Analysis of exome sequencing data was performed at two centers using slightly different data analysis pipelines, each based on the Genome Analysis ToolKit Best Practice version 3 recommendations. A comprehensive clinical characterization was correlated to genotype. We report the simultaneous confirmation of human CD27 deficiency in 3 independent families (8 patients) due to a homozygous mutation (p. Cys53Tyr) revealed by whole exome sequencing, leading to disruption of an evolutionarily conserved cystein knot motif of the transmembrane receptor. Phenotypes varied from asymptomatic memory B-cell deficiency (n=3) to EBV-associated hemophagocytosis and lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD; n=3) and malignant lymphoma (n=2; +1 after LPD). Following EBV infection, hypogammaglobulinemia developed in at least 3 of the affected individuals, while specific anti-viral and anti-polysaccharide antibodies and EBV-specific T-cell responses were detectable. In severely affected patients, numbers of iNKT cells and NK-cell function were reduced. Two of 8 patients died, 2 others underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation successfully, and one received anti-CD20 (rituximab) therapy repeatedly. Since homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing did not reveal additional modifying factors, our findings suggest that lack of functional CD27 predisposes towards a combined immunodeficiency associated with potentially fatal EBV-driven hemo-phagocytosis, lymphoproliferation, and lymphoma development. PMID:22801960

  11. Combined immunodeficiency with life-threatening EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorder in patients lacking functional CD27

    PubMed Central

    Salzer, Elisabeth; Daschkey, Svenja; Choo, Sharon; Gombert, Michael; Santos-Valente, Elisangela; Ginzel, Sebastian; Schwendinger, Martina; Haas, Oskar A.; Fritsch, Gerhard; Pickl, Winfried F.; Förster-Waldl, Elisabeth; Borkhardt, Arndt; Boztug, Kaan; Bienemann, Kirsten; Seidel, Markus G.

    2013-01-01

    CD27, a tumor necrosis factor receptor family member, interacts with CD70 and influences T-, B- and NK-cell functions. Disturbance of this axis impairs immunity and memory generation against viruses including Epstein Barr virus (EBV), influenza, and others. CD27 is commonly used as marker of memory B cells for the classification of B-cell deficiencies including common variable immune deficiency. Flow cytometric immunophenotyping including expression analysis of CD27 on lymphoid cells was followed by capillary sequencing of CD27 in index patients, their parents, and non-affected siblings. More comprehensive genetic analysis employed single nucleotide polymorphism-based homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing. Analysis of exome sequencing data was performed at two centers using slightly different data analysis pipelines, each based on the Genome Analysis ToolKit Best Practice version 3 recommendations. A comprehensive clinical characterization was correlated to genotype. We report the simultaneous confirmation of human CD27 deficiency in 3 independent families (8 patients) due to a homozygous mutation (p. Cys53Tyr) revealed by whole exome sequencing, leading to disruption of an evolutionarily conserved cystein knot motif of the transmembrane receptor. Phenotypes varied from asymptomatic memory B-cell deficiency (n=3) to EBV-associated hemophagocytosis and lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD; n=3) and malignant lymphoma (n=2; +1 after LPD). Following EBV infection, hypogammaglobulinemia developed in at least 3 of the affected individuals, while specific anti-viral and anti-polysaccharide antibodies and EBV-specific T-cell responses were detectable. In severely affected patients, numbers of iNKT cells and NK-cell function were reduced. Two of 8 patients died, 2 others underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation successfully, and one received anti-CD20 (rituximab) therapy repeatedly. Since homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing did not reveal additional modifying factors, our findings suggest that lack of functional CD27 predisposes towards a combined immunodeficiency associated with potentially fatal EBV-driven hemo-phagocytosis, lymphoproliferation, and lymphoma development. PMID:22801960

  12. Immunohistologic cellular phenotypes of lymphoproliferative disorders. Comprehensive evaluation of 564 cases including 257 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas classified by the International Working Formulation.

    PubMed Central

    Tubbs, R. R.; Fishleder, A.; Weiss, R. A.; Savage, R. A.; Sebek, B. A.; Weick, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    The plethora of classifications for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs) and controversy regarding the merits of the individual classification schemes has led to the articulation of an International Working Formulation for NHL classification by a working group sponsored by the National Cancer Institute. This classification is based on both architectural and cytologic features and has been shown to have clinical relevance, but it is not an immunologic approach. With the use of frozen sections and both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, a comprehensive immunohistologic study was made of 564 biopsy specimens 1) for determination of the utility of the principle of monoclonality in differentiating benign from malignant lymphoproliferative disorders, 2) for definition of the immunohistochemical phenotypes of histologically benign and malignant cellular proliferations, and 3) for evaluation of the immunologic phenotype of 257 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas classified by the International Working Formulation. Two hundred seven "reactive benign" lymphoproliferations demonstrated polyclonal immunostaining. Monoclonal kappa light chain immunostaining was demonstrated in 3 of 4 cases classified as atypical hyperplasia, two of which had coexistent NHL or subsequently developed overt NHL. Frozen tissue sections were found to be essential for demonstration of immunoglobulin and glycoprotein membrane antigens. The results of immunohistochemical studies were readily integrated with the International Formulation. Although diffuse mixed and small lymphocytic lymphomas were immunologically heterogeneous (both T- and B-cell), follicular lymphomas were invariably of B-cell type, and immunoblastic lymphomas originating from homogeneous T- and B-cell populations were identified. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:6605690

  13. Autoimmune phenomena and hepatitis C virus in lymphoproliferative and connective tissue disorders.

    PubMed

    Caligaris-Cappio, F; De Leo, A M; Bertero, M T

    1997-12-01

    Since hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequently detected in patients with lymphoproliferative or autoimmune disorders and since the virus may infect lymphocytes, the question is raised whether malignant transformation and autoimmune manifestations in the presence of HCV are HCV-related or merely fortuitous. A close association has been firmly established between HCV infection and essential type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (ECM), an indolent lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by cryoprecipitable immune-complexes (IC) that may evolve into classical non Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) retaining the ability to produce cryoprecipitable rheumatoid factor (RF). It is reasonable to consider HCV as one cofactor in lymphomagenesis, even if the precise pathogenetic relationship between HCV infection, the chronic presence of cryoprecipitable IC and the development of NHL have not been established yet. Several epidemiological studies have documented the ability of chronic HCV infection to favour the production of autoAb. It is not clear why only some patients with HCV infection develop autoAb, nor why the most frequent autoAb detected in HCV-infected subjects are cryoglobulins. Though a high prevalence of anti-HCV has been found in a variety of systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases, it is likely that several of these associations are fortuitous with the notable exception of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. As HCV can provoke or exacerbate inflammatory signs and cause the production of RF, it is reasonable to suspect that HCV infection may be able to trigger the development of some connective tissue diseases or to exacerbate their clinical course. Nonetheless, it is clinically prudent to conclude that the pathogenetic relationships of Sjögren syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis and polyarthritis with HCV infection are more likely to be regarded as mediated via the intermediate development of ECM. PMID:9498704

  14. High-Dose Y-90-Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Added to Reduced-Intensity Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Regimen for Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-12

    Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  15. Approaches to Managing Autoimmune Cytopenias in Novel Immunological Disorders with Genetic Underpinnings Like Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V. Koneti

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disorder of apoptosis. It is frequently caused by mutations in FAS (TNFRSF6) gene. Unlike most of the self-limiting autoimmune cytopenias sporadically seen in childhood, multi lineage cytopenias due to ALPS are often refractory, as their inherited genetic defect is not going to go away. Historically, more ALPS patients have died due to overwhelming sepsis following splenectomy to manage their chronic cytopenias than due to any other cause, including malignancies. Hence, current recommendations underscore the importance of avoiding splenectomy in ALPS, by long-term use of corticosteroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents like mycophenolate mofetil and sirolimus. Paradigms learnt from managing ALPS patients in recent years is highlighted here and can be extrapolated to manage refractory cytopenias in patients with as yet undetermined genetic bases for their ailments. It is also desirable to develop international registries for children with rare and complex immune problems associated with chronic multilineage cytopenias in order to elucidate their natural history and long-term comorbidities due to the disease and its treatments. PMID:26258116

  16. Epstein-Barr Virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorders: experimental and clinical developments

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lingyun; Wang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), the first human virus related to oncogenesis, was initially identified in a Burkitt lymphoma cell line in 1964. EBV infects over 90% of the world’s population. Most infected people maintain an asymptomatic but persistent EBV infection lifelong. However, in some individuals, EBV infection has been involved in the development of cancer and autoimmune disease. Nowadays, oncogenic potential of EBV has been intensively studied in a wide range of human neoplasms, including Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), gastric carcinoma (GC), etc. EBV encodes a series of viral protein and miRNAs, promoting its persistent infection and the transformation of EBV-infected cells. Although the exact role of EBV in the oncogenesis remains to be clarified, novel diagnostic and targeted therapeutic approaches are encouraging for the management of EBV-related malignancies. This review mainly focuses on the experimental and clinical advances of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:26628948

  17. Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders arising in solid organ transplant recipients are usually of recipient origin.

    PubMed Central

    Chadburn, A.; Suciu-Foca, N.; Cesarman, E.; Reed, E.; Michler, R. E.; Knowles, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    Recent clinical, pathological, and molecular studies have increased our understanding of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PT-LPDs). Studies have shown that the majority of PT-LPDs arising in bone marrow transplant recipients are of donor origin; however, the source (host or donor) of the lymphoid cells that make up PT-LPDs arising in solid organ transplant recipients has not been systemically investigated. In this study, 18 PT-LPDs occurring in 16 organ transplant recipients (13 heart, 2 kidney, 1 lung), 9 donor tissues (for 10 recipients), and 14 uninvolved recipient tissues (from 12 patients) were examined employing restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis to determine their host or donor origin. The PstI-digested DNAs were analyzed by Southern blot hybridization using two highly informative polymorphic probes that map to chromosome 21 (CRI-PAT-pL427-4) and chromosome 7 (CRI-PAT-pS194). All solid organ PT-LPDs with corresponding uninvolved recipient DNA showed identical hybridization patterns; none of the PT-LPDs exhibited a hybridization pattern that matched donor DNA. These findings suggest that the vast majority of PT-LPDs arising in solid organ transplant recipients, in contrast to those arising in bone marrow transplant recipients, are of recipient origin. Images Figure 1 PMID:7495309

  18. Primary pleural effusion posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder: Distinction from secondary involvement and effusion lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ohori, N P; Whisnant, R E; Nalesnik, M A; Swerdlow, S H

    2001-07-01

    Pleural effusion presentation of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is relatively uncommon. Most examples of effusion-based PTLD have been secondary to widespread solid organ involvement, and are associated with an aggressive clinical course. We report on a case of primary effusion PTLD in a 70-yr-old male liver transplant recipient with a history of hepatitis B infection. Cytomorphologically, the pleural fluid specimen showed a monomorphous population of intermediate to large-sized transformed lymphoid cells, with irregular multilobated nuclear contours and readily identifiable mitotic figures. Flow cytometric immunophenotypic studies revealed a CD5-negative, CD10-negative, lambda immunoglobulin light chain-positive, monoclonal B-lymphocyte (CD19-positive/CD20-positive) population. The immunocytochemical stain for CD30 antigen was negative. In situ hybridization study for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) early RNA (EBER) and Southern blot analysis for EBV terminal repeat sequences were both positive. Southern blot analysis for human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8) was negative. No solid-organ PTLD was identified, and the cytologic results supported the diagnosis of primary effusion PTLD. Immunosuppression was decreased, and 8 mo following the diagnosis of pleural fluid PTLD, the patient was stable and his pleural effusion had markedly diminished. Recognition of primary effusion PTLD and its distinction from PTLD secondarily involving the body fluids and from other lymphomas is important, since the behavior and prognosis appear different. PMID:11466813

  19. Detection of monoclonal T populations in patients with KIR-restricted chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK cells.

    PubMed

    Gattazzo, Cristina; Teramo, Antonella; Passeri, Francesca; De March, Elena; Carraro, Samuela; Trimarco, Valentina; Frezzato, Federica; Berno, Tamara; Barilà, Gregorio; Martini, Veronica; Piazza, Francesco; Trentin, Livio; Facco, Monica; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Zambello, Renato

    2014-12-01

    The etiology of chronic large granular lymphocyte proliferations is largely unknown. Although these disorders are characterized by the expansion of different cell types (T and natural killer) with specific genetic features and abnormalities, several lines of evidence suggest a common pathogenetic mechanism. According to this interpretation, we speculated that in patients with natural killer-type chronic lymphoproliferative disorder, together with natural killer cells, also T lymphocytes undergo a persistent antigenic pressure, possibly resulting in an ultimate clonal T-cell selection. To strengthen this hypothesis, we evaluated whether clonal T-cell populations were detectable in 48 patients with killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-restricted natural killer-type chronic lymphoproliferative disorder. At diagnosis, in half of the patients studied, we found a clearly defined clonal T-cell population, despite the fact that all cases presented with a well-characterized natural killer disorder. Follow-up analysis confirmed that the TCR gamma rearrangements were stable over the time period evaluated; furthermore, in 7 patients we demonstrated the appearance of a clonal T subset that progressively matures, leading to a switch between killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-restricted natural killer-type disorder to a monoclonal T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia. Our results support the hypothesis that a common mechanism is involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders. PMID:25193965

  20. Detection of monoclonal T populations in patients with KIR-restricted chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Gattazzo, Cristina; Teramo, Antonella; Passeri, Francesca; De March, Elena; Carraro, Samuela; Trimarco, Valentina; Frezzato, Federica; Berno, Tamara; Barilà, Gregorio; Martini, Veronica; Piazza, Francesco; Trentin, Livio; Facco, Monica; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Zambello, Renato

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of chronic large granular lymphocyte proliferations is largely unknown. Although these disorders are characterized by the expansion of different cell types (T and natural killer) with specific genetic features and abnormalities, several lines of evidence suggest a common pathogenetic mechanism. According to this interpretation, we speculated that in patients with natural killer-type chronic lymphoproliferative disorder, together with natural killer cells, also T lymphocytes undergo a persistent antigenic pressure, possibly resulting in an ultimate clonal T-cell selection. To strengthen this hypothesis, we evaluated whether clonal T-cell populations were detectable in 48 patients with killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-restricted natural killer-type chronic lymphoproliferative disorder. At diagnosis, in half of the patients studied, we found a clearly defined clonal T-cell population, despite the fact that all cases presented with a well-characterized natural killer disorder. Follow-up analysis confirmed that the TCR gamma rearrangements were stable over the time period evaluated; furthermore, in 7 patients we demonstrated the appearance of a clonal T subset that progressively matures, leading to a switch between killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-restricted natural killer-type disorder to a monoclonal T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia. Our results support the hypothesis that a common mechanism is involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders. PMID:25193965

  1. X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Disease (XLP)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Main Content Area X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Disease (XLP) Epstein-Barr virus (green dots) is shown inside B cells ( ... is characterized by a life-long vulnerability to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a common type of herpesvirus that ...

  2. The ambiguous boundary between EBV-related hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and systemic EBV-driven T cell lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Smith, Megan C; Cohen, Daniel N; Greig, Bruce; Yenamandra, Ashwini; Vnencak-Jones, Cindy; Thompson, Mary Ann; Kim, Annette S

    2014-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-related hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (EBV-HLH) is a form of acquired, infection-related HLH which typically represents a fulminant presentation of an acute EBV infection of CD8+ T cells with 30-50% mortality rate. Systemic EBV-positive lymphoproliferative disease of childhood (SE-LPD) is a rare T cell lymphoproliferative disorder predominantly arising in the setting of acute EBV infection, often presenting with HLH. Since both entities have been associated with clonal T cell populations, the discrimination between these diseases is often ambiguous. We report a unique case of a 21 years old female who presented with clinical and laboratory findings of florid HLH in the setting of markedly elevated EBV titers (>1 million) and an aberrant T cell population shown to be clonal by flow cytometry, karyotype, and molecular studies. This case raises the differential of EBV-HLH versus SE-LPD. Review of the literature identified 74 cases of reported EBV-HLH and 21 cases of SE-LPD with associated HLH in 25 studies. Of those cases with available outcome data, 62 of 92 cases (67%) were fatal. Of 60 cases in which molecular clonality was demonstrated, 37 (62%) were fatal, while all 14 cases (100%) demonstrating karyotypic abnormalities were fatal. Given the karyotypic findings in this sentinel case, a diagnosis of SE-LPD was rendered. The overlapping clinical and pathologic findings suggest that EBV-HLH and SE-LPD are a biologic continuum, rather than discrete entities. The most clinically useful marker of mortality was an abnormal karyotype rather than other standards of clonality assessment. PMID:25337215

  3. Alvocidib, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Lymphoproliferative Disorders or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Primary mucosal CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders of the head and neck rarely involving epiglottis: clinicopathological, immunohistomchemical and genetic features of a case

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Wang, Guannan; Zhang, Dandan; Yin, Yuhui; Pang, Xia; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yanpin; Li, Wencai

    2015-01-01

    A case of primary mucosal CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder of the head and neck rarely involving epiglottis in a 59-year-old male was reported. Histologically, the ulcerative mucosa was affected by sheets of mixed inflammatory infiltration, with scattered large atypical lymphoid cells arranging in an individual or small clusters with focal epidermotropism. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells were uniformly immunoreactive to antibodies against CD2, CD3, CD7, CD43, CD4, TIA-1, with a heterogeneous expression of CD30, but negative for CD20, CD79a, CD21, CD8, CD56, ALK, EMA, granzyme B. Epstein-Barr virus encoded RNA (EBER) were detected. Genetically, T-cell receptor (TCR) ? gene showed an oligoclonal rearrangement. This first case developing in epiglottis demonstrates mucosal CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders are characteristic of a broad clinicopathologic spectrum similar to the counterpart in the skin with a favorable prognosis. PMID:26617911

  5. Cellular Immunotherapy Following Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-27

    Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma

  6. Methotrexate-associated lymphoproliferative disorders: management by watchful waiting and observation of early lymphocyte recovery after methotrexate withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Inui, Yumiko; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Yakushijin, Kimikazu; Okamura, Atsuo; Shimada, Takaki; Yano, Shingo; Takeuchi, Mai; Ito, Mitsuhiro; Murayama, Tohru; Yamamoto, Katsuya; Itoh, Tomoo; Aiba, Keisuke; Minami, Hironobu

    2015-11-01

    No optimum treatment of iatrogenic immunodeficiency-associated lymphoproliferative disorders due to methotrexate in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (MTX-LPD) has yet been established, although MTX withdrawal is known to have a substantial effect on tumor regression. Here, we retrospectively analyzed 20 cases of MTX-LPD. Tumor shrinkage occurred in 18 of 20 cases, but only following MTX withdrawal. This tumor regression ratio was considerably better than in previous reports, and appeared due to longer "watchful waiting." Lymphocyte recovery at 2 weeks after MTX withdrawal was significantly higher in cases with tumor regression in 1 month than in those without tumor regression (p = 0.001). Median time to maximal efficacy after MTX cessation in cases without chemotherapy was 12 weeks (range 2-76). In conclusion, watchful waiting for a longer period after MTX cessation with observation of early lymphocyte recovery and uninterrupted continuation of other anti-rheumatoid drugs may be an acceptable management plan for MTX-LPD. PMID:25721751

  7. Spectrum of Epstein-Barr virus-associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder in adolescents and young adults in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ren-Ching; Chang, Sheng-Tsung; Hsieh, Yen-Chuan; Huang, Wan-Ting; Hsu, Jeng-Dong; Tseng, Chih-En; Wang, Ming-Chung; Hwang, Wei-Shou; Wang, John; Chuang, Shih-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is a herpesvirus usually infecting B-cells but may occasionally infect T- or natural killer (NK)-cells. EBV-associated T- or NK-cell lymphoproliferations represent a continuous spectrum of diseases ranging from asymptomatic infection, infectious mononucleosis (IM), to clonal and malignant lymphoproliferations including systemic EBV-positive T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-T/NK-LPD) of childhood and hydroa-vacciniforme-like lymphoma of the skin. The clonal diseases are more prevalent in East Asia and exhibit overlapping clinical and pathological features with chronic active EBV infection. Here we report our experience on 10 cases of EBV-associated T-cell lymphoproliferation from Taiwan including five males and five females with a median age of 18 years old (range, 15-28). The most common clinical symptoms were fever, neck mass and hepatosplenomegaly. Eight of these patients showed elevated lactate dehydrogenase level and half of the patients had cytopenia. All patients had either elevated EBV antibody titers or increased serum EBV DNA levels. Five cases were clinically IM-like with polyclonal (3 cases) or clonal (2 cases) T-cell lymphoproliferation. Two patients each had chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). One patient had both CAEBV and HLH. One of the HLH patients with marrow infiltration by intra-sinusoidal large atypical lymphocytes experienced a fulminant course. In a median follow-up time of 21.5 months, seven patients were free of disease, one was alive with disease, and two died of disease in 31 and 3 months, respectively, despite chemotherapy. We confirmed a wide clinicopathological range of EVB-associated T-cell lymphoproliferation in Taiwan. Furthermore, monomorphic LPD and the single case with fulminant course as defined by Ohshima et al (Pathol Int 2018) as categories A3 and B, respectively, died of disease despite chemotherapy. Our report, the largest series in the recent decade from Taiwan, adds to the understanding of these rare diseases with variable clinical and histopathological presentations. PMID:24966953

  8. Hepatitis C virus syndrome: A constellation of organ- and non-organ specific autoimmune disorders, B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Clodoveo; Sebastiani, Marco; Giuggioli, Dilia; Colaci, Michele; Fallahi, Poupak; Piluso, Alessia; Antonelli, Alessandro; Zignego, Anna Linda

    2015-01-01

    The clinical course of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by possible development of both liver and extrahepatic disorders. The tropism of HCV for the lymphoid tissue is responsible for several immune-mediated disorders; a poly-oligoclonal B-lymphocyte expansion, commonly observed in a high proportion of patients with HCV infection, are responsible for the production of different autoantibodies and immune-complexes, such as mixed cryoglobulins. These serological alterations may characterize a variety of autoimmune or neoplastic diseases. Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis due to small-vessel deposition of circulating mixed cryoglobulins is the prototype of HCV-driven immune-mediated and lymphoproliferative disorders; interestingly, in some cases the disease may evolve to frank malignant lymphoma. In addition, HCV shows an oncogenic potential as suggested by several clinico-epidemiological and laboratory studies; in addition to hepatocellular carcinoma that represents the most frequent HCV-related malignancy, a causative role of HCV has been largely demonstrated in a significant percentage of patients with isolated B-cells non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. The same virus may be also involved in the pathogenesis of papillary thyroid cancer, a rare neoplastic condition that may complicate HCV-related thyroid involvement. Patients with HCV infection are frequently asymptomatic or may develop only hepatic alteration, while a limited but clinically relevant number can develop one or more autoimmune and/or neoplastic disorders. Given the large variability of their prevalence among patients’ populations from different countries, it is possible to hypothesize a potential role of other co-factors, i.e., genetic and/or environmental, in the pathogenesis of HCV-related extra-hepatic diseases. PMID:25848462

  9. A Case Series of Primary Central Nervous System Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder: Imaging and Clinical Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Wendell; Chang, Julie E.; Kennedy, Tabassum; Morgan, Adam; Salamat, Shahriar; Ba?kaya, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Background Primary central nervous system post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PCNS-PTLD) is a rare complication following solid organ transplantation (SOT). With increasing rates of SOT, PCNS-PTLD incidence is increasing. Objective Describe the characteristics of PCNS-PTLD patients requiring neurosurgical intervention. Methods From 2000-2011 ten patients with prior SOT underwent biopsy for evaluation of brain lesions and were diagnosed with PCNS-PTLD. Data collected included imaging characteristics, pathology, treatments administered, and survival outcomes. Results All patients had kidney transplantation, and 3 had concurrent pancreas transplantation. Median age at diagnosis was 49 years, with a median of 4.5 years from SOT to diagnosis (range 1.8-11.4 years). Presenting symptoms most often included focal neurologic deficits (n=6), although several patients had non-specific symptoms of headache and altered mental status. Brain lesions were generally multiple (n=7), supratentorial (n=8), and lobar or periventricular in distribution with ring-enhancement. Diagnosis was established by stereotactic (n=4) and open surgical biopsy (n=6). Treatments most frequently administered included reduction of immunosuppression (n=10), dexamethasone (n=10), rituximab (n=8), high-dose methotrexate (n=3), and whole-brain radiotherapy (n=6). Six patients remain alive without PCNS-PTLD relapse, including 4 patients who have sustained remissions beyond 2 years from diagnosis of PCNS-PTLD. Of 4 observed deaths, 1 was related to progressive PCNS-PTLD. Conclusion PCNS-PTLD must be considered in the differential diagnosis of any patient with prior SOT presenting with an intracranial lesion. Histologic diagnosis with brain biopsy is imperative given the risk for opportunistic infections that may have similar imaging findings and presentation. Prognosis is variable, although long-term survival has been reported. PMID:23685504

  10. STAT3 mutations unify the pathogenesis of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells and T-cell large granular lymphocyte leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jerez, Andres; Clemente, Michael J.; Makishima, Hideki; Koskela, Hanna; LeBlanc, Francis; Peng Ng, Kwok; Olson, Thomas; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Afable, Manuel; Gomez-Segui, Ines; Guinta, Kathryn; Durkin, Lisa; Hsi, Eric D.; McGraw, Kathy; Zhang, Dan; Wlodarski, Marcin W.; Porkka, Kimmo; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; List, Alan; Mustjoki, Satu; Loughran, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of natural killer cells (CLPD-NKs) and T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemias (T-LGLs) are clonal lymphoproliferations arising from either natural killer cells or cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). We have investigated for distribution and functional significance of mutations in 50 CLPD-NKs and 120 T-LGL patients by direct sequencing, allele-specific PCR, and microarray analysis. STAT3 gene mutations are present in both T and NK diseases: approximately one-third of patients with each type of disorder convey these mutations. Mutations were found in exons 21 and 20, encoding the Src homology 2 domain. Patients with mutations are characterized by symptomatic disease (75%), history of multiple treatments, and a specific pattern of STAT3 activation and gene deregulation, including increased expression of genes activated by STAT3. Many of these features are also found in patients with wild-type STAT3, indicating that other mechanisms of STAT3 activation can be operative in these chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. Treatment with STAT3 inhibitors, both in wild-type and mutant cases, resulted in accelerated apoptosis. STAT3 mutations are frequent in large granular lymphocytes suggesting a similar molecular dysregulation in malignant chronic expansions of NK and CTL origin. STAT3 mutations may distinguish truly malignant lymphoproliferations involving T and NK cells from reactive expansions. PMID:22859607

  11. Monocytes promote tumor cell survival in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and are impaired in their ability to differentiate into mature dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Ryan A.; Wada, David A.; Ziesmer, Steven C.; Elsawa, Sherine F.; Comfere, Nneka I.; Dietz, Allan B.; Novak, Anne J.; Witzig, Thomas E.; Feldman, Andrew L.; Pittelkow, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    A variety of nonmalignant cells present in the tumor microenvironment promotes tumorigenesis by stimulating tumor cell growth and metastasis or suppressing host immunity. The role of such stromal cells in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is incompletely understood. Monocyte-derived cells (MDCs), including professional antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs), play a central role in T-cell biology. Here, we provide evidence that monocytes promote the survival of malignant T cells and demonstrate that MDCs are abundant within the tumor microenvironment of T cell–derived lymphomas. Malignant T cells were observed to remain viable during in vitro culture with autologous monocytes, but cell death was significantly increased after monocyte depletion. Furthermore, monocytes prevent the induction of cell death in T-cell lymphoma lines in response to either serum starvation or doxorubicin, and promote the engraftment of these cells in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice. Monocytes are actively recruited to the tumor microenvironment by CCL5 (RANTES), where their differentiation into mature DCs is impaired by tumor-derived interleukin-10. Collectively, the data presented demonstrate a previously undescribed role for monocytes in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:19671921

  12. Fatal Necrotizing Angiotropic Epstein–Barr Virus-negative Large B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Attilio; Sabattini, Elena; Goteri, Gaia; Trappolini, Silvia; Saraceni, Francesco; Samorì, Arduino; Gini, Guido; Leoni, Pietro; Olivieri, Jacopo; Pileri, Stefano A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In the spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL), both T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma (TCHRBCL) and most lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LG) cases are characterized by the relative rarity of the neoplastic B-cell population, with respect to the overwhelming non-neoplastic counterpart of T cells or histiocytes. Here we report a case of aggressive B-cell lymphoma with unusual clinicopathological features partially overlapping these two entities. The patient was a previously healthy 55-year-old male, presenting with a computed tomography finding of a pelvic mass, inguinal lymphadenopathies, and pulmonary nodules. Two excisional lymph node biopsies resulted inconclusive for lymphoproliferative disease. Because of a colonic perforation, the patient underwent an urgent laparotomy, which disclosed a large pelvic abscess. The pathological examination of the surgical specimen could not discriminate between a primary aggressive B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder and an abnormal inflammatory hyper-reaction. The patient developed a septic state, not resolving until death, which occurred because of an abdominal hemorrhage. A second perimortem surgical specimen consisting of a nodal mass revealed a diagnosis of an Epstein–Barr virus-negative high-grade large B-cell lymphoma with massive necrosis, angiocentric pattern of growth, and prominent T-cell infiltrate. The unique clinicopathological features did not allow to classify this tumor within any of the recognized WHO entities, potentially representing a new clinicopathological variant of DLBCL in-between TCHRBCL and LG. PMID:25546693

  13. Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder occurring after bone marrow transplantation for aplastic anemia in Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Aya; Ishida, Mitsuaki; Hodohara, Keiko; Yoshii, Miyuki; Okuno, Hiroko; Horinouchi, Akiko; Nakanishi, Ryota; Harada, Ayumi; Iwai, Muneo; Yoshida, Keiko; Kagotani, Akiko; Yoshida, Takashi; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that Down's syndrome exhibits a predisposition to development of leukemia, however, association between aplastic anemia and Down's syndrome is exceptional. Herein, we describe a case of aplastic anemia occurring in Down's syndrome following post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). A 27-year-old Japanese male with Down's syndrome presented with a headache. Laboratory tests revealed severe pancytopenia, and bone marrow biopsy demonstrated hypocellular bone marrow with decrease of trilineage cells, which led to a diagnosis of aplastic anemia. One year after diagnosis, he was incidentally found to have an anterior mediastinal tumor, which was histopathologically diagnosed as seminoma. Subsequently, he received BMT from a female donor, and engraftment was observed. Three months after transplantation, he experienced cough and high fever. Biopsy specimen from the lung revealed diffuse proliferation of large-sized lymphoid cells expressing CD20 and EBER. These lymphoid cells had XY chromosomes. Thus, a diagnosis of EBV-associated PTLD was made. This is the seventh documented case of aplastic anemia occurring in Down's syndrome. Association between aplastic anemia and Down's syndrome has not been established, therefore, additional clinicopathological studies are needed. Moreover, this is the first case to undergo BMT for aplastic anemia in Down's syndrome. Although engraftment was observed, he developed EBV-positive PTLD. The neoplastic cells of the present case were considered to be of recipient origin, although the majority of PTLD cases with BMT are of donor origin. PMID:24427369

  14. Mucosal CD30-Positive T-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder Arising in the Oral Cavity Following Dental Implants: Report of the First Case.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hye-Jung; Choe, Ji-Young; Jeon, Yoon Kyung

    2015-12-01

    Mucosal CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (CD30+ T-cell LPD) is a novel entity with unique clinicopathological features and an indolent behavior. Here we report the first case of mucosal CD30+ T-cell LPD arising in the oral cavity following dental implant. A 70-year-old woman presented with swelling and redness of the oral mucosa of right maxilla and left mandible surrounding dental implants that had been placed 8 years previously. Radiological examination revealed enhancing oral lesions and multiple cervical lymph nodes. Microscopic examination showed diffuse infiltration of large anaplastic cells with characteristic morphology of hallmark cells described in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. These cells were diffusely positive for CD30, CD3, CD4, CD2, CD5, CD7, TIA-1, and TCR?F1, but negative for CD20, CD8, CD45, EMA, ALK, and Epstein-Barr virus. T-cell monoclonality was detected in a TCR? gene rearrangement study. This a unique case of mucosal CD30+ T-cell LPD with unusual presentation following dental implant. PMID:26261101

  15. Epstein-Barr Virus-Related Post-Transplantation Lymphoproliferative Disorder after Unmanipulated Human Leukocyte Antigen Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Incidence, Risk Factors, Treatment, and Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Chun-Li; Mo, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Chen, Huan; Han, Wei; Chen, Yu-Hong; Wang, Yu; Yan, Chen-Hua; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Wang, Feng-Rong; Zhao, Ting; Liu, Yan-Rong; Liu, Kai-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-12-01

    We examined the incidence, risk factors, treatments, and clinical outcomes of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) after unmanipulated haploidentical (haplo) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 1184 patients between 2006 and 2012. Age-, transplantation time-, and transplantation duration-matched controls were randomly selected from the same cohort. Forty-five patients experienced PTLD. The median time from HSCT to PTLD occurrence was 61 (range, 33 to 360) days and the 1-year cumulative incidence of total PTLD after haplo-HSCT was 3.0%. In multivariate analysis, a lower absolute count of CD8(+) T lymphocytes at day 30, a lower absolute count of immunoglobulin M at day 30, and cytomegalovirus DNAemia after HSCT were significantly associated with higher risk of PTLD. The 2-year probability of overall survival (OS) after HSCT was 42.8%, which was comparable between the probable PTLD and the proven PTLD patients. Patients who received rituximab-based therapy had significantly better 2-year OS (48.2% versus 13.2%, P = .02). Thus, we were able to identify individuals at a high risk of developing PTLD after unmanipulated haplo-HSCT. Rituximab-based therapy can help to improve the outcomes of PTLD patients. PMID:26253005

  16. Association of CLEC16A with human common variable immunodeficiency disorder and role in murine B cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin; Jørgensen, Silje F.; Maggadottir, S. Melkorka; Bakay, Marina; Warnatz, Klaus; Glessner, Joseph; Pandey, Rahul; Salzer, Ulrich; Schmidt, Reinhold E.; Perez, Elena; Resnick, Elena; Goldacker, Sigune; Buchta, Mary; Witte, Torsten; Padyukov, Leonid; Videm, Vibeke; Folseraas, Trine; Atschekzei, Faranaz; Elder, James T.; Nair, Rajan P.; Winkelmann, Juliane; Gieger, Christian; Nöthen, Markus M; Büning, Carsten; Brand, Stephan; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Orange, Jordan S.; Fevang, Børre; Schreiber, Stefan; Lieb, Wolfgang; Aukrust, Pål; Chapel, Helen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Franke, Andre; Karlsen, Tom H.; Grimbacher, Bodo; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hammarström, Lennart; Ellinghaus, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency disorder (CVID) is the most common symptomatic primary immunodeficiency in adults, characterized by B cell abnormalities and inadequate antibody response. CVID patients have considerable autoimmune comorbidity and we therefore hypothesized that genetic susceptibility to CVID may overlap with autoimmune disorders. Here, in the largest genetic study performed in CVID to date, we compare 778 CVID cases with 10,999 controls across 123,127 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the Immunochip. We identify the first non-HLA genome-wide significant risk locus at CLEC16A (rs17806056, P=2.0×10?9) and confirm the previously reported human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations on chromosome 6p21 (rs1049225, P =4.8×10?16). Clec16a knock down (KD) mice showed reduced number of B cells and elevated IgM levels compared to controls, suggesting that CLEC16A may be involved in immune regulatory pathways of relevance to CVID. In conclusion, the CLEC16A associations in CVID represent the first robust evidence of non-HLA associations in this immunodeficiency condition. PMID:25891430

  17. Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder occurring after bone marrow transplantation for aplastic anemia in Down’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Aya; Ishida, Mitsuaki; Hodohara, Keiko; Yoshii, Miyuki; Okuno, Hiroko; Horinouchi, Akiko; Nakanishi, Ryota; Harada, Ayumi; Iwai, Muneo; Yoshida, Keiko; Kagotani, Akiko; Yoshida, Takashi; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that Down’s syndrome exhibits a predisposition to development of leukemia, however, association between aplastic anemia and Down’s syndrome is exceptional. Herein, we describe a case of aplastic anemia occurring in Down’s syndrome following post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). A 27-year-old Japanese male with Down’s syndrome presented with a headache. Laboratory tests revealed severe pancytopenia, and bone marrow biopsy demonstrated hypocellular bone marrow with decrease of trilineage cells, which led to a diagnosis of aplastic anemia. One year after diagnosis, he was incidentally found to have an anterior mediastinal tumor, which was histopathologically diagnosed as seminoma. Subsequently, he received BMT from a female donor, and engraftment was observed. Three months after transplantation, he experienced cough and high fever. Biopsy specimen from the lung revealed diffuse proliferation of large-sized lymphoid cells expressing CD20 and EBER. These lymphoid cells had XY chromosomes. Thus, a diagnosis of EBV-associated PTLD was made. This is the seventh documented case of aplastic anemia occurring in Down’s syndrome. Association between aplastic anemia and Down’s syndrome has not been established, therefore, additional clinicopathological studies are needed. Moreover, this is the first case to undergo BMT for aplastic anemia in Down’s syndrome. Although engraftment was observed, he developed EBV-positive PTLD. The neoplastic cells of the present case were considered to be of recipient origin, although the majority of PTLD cases with BMT are of donor origin. PMID:24427369

  18. CD3-CD4+ lymphoid variant of hypereosinophilic syndrome: nodal and extranodal histopathological and immunophenotypic features of a peripheral indolent clonal T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Guillaume; Copin, Marie-Christine; Roumier, Christophe; Aubert, Hélène; Avenel-Audran, Martine; Grardel, Nathalie; Poulain, Stéphanie; Staumont-Sallé, Delphine; Seneschal, Julien; Salles, Gilles; Ghomari, Kamel; Terriou, Louis; Leclech, Christian; Morati-Hafsaoui, Chafika; Morschhauser, Franck; Lambotte, Olivier; Ackerman, Félix; Trauet, Jacques; Geffroy, Sandrine; Dumezy, Florent; Capron, Monique; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine; Taieb, Alain; Hatron, Pierre-Yves; Dubucquoi, Sylvain; Hachulla, Eric; Prin, Lionel; Labalette, Myriam; Launay, David; Preudhomme, Claude; Kahn, Jean-Emmanuel

    2015-08-01

    The CD3(-)CD4(+) lymphoid variant of hypereosinophilic syndrome is characterized by hypereosinophilia and clonal circulating CD3(-)CD4(+) T cells. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma has been described during this disease course, and we observed in our cohort of 23 patients 2 cases of angio-immunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. We focus here on histopathological (n=12 patients) and immunophenotypic (n=15) characteristics of CD3(-)CD4(+) lymphoid variant of hypereosinophilic syndrome. Atypical CD4(+) T cells lymphoid infiltrates were found in 10 of 12 CD3(-)CD4(+) L-HES patients, in lymph nodes (n=4 of 4 patients), in skin (n=9 of 9) and other extra-nodal tissues (gut, lacrymal gland, synovium). Lymph nodes displayed infiltrates limited to the interfollicular areas or even an effacement of nodal architecture, associated with proliferation of arborizing high endothelial venules and increased follicular dendritic cell meshwork. Analysis of 2 fresh skin samples confirmed the presence of CD3(-)CD4(+) T cells. Clonal T cells were detected in at least one tissue in 8 patients, including lymph nodes (n=4 of 4): the same clonal T cells were detected in blood and in at least one biopsy, with a maximum delay of 23 years between samples. In the majority of cases, circulating CD3(-)CD4(+) T cells were CD2(hi) (n=9 of 14), CD5(hi) (n=12 of 14), and CD7(-)(n=4 of 14) or CD7(low) (n=10 of 14). Angio-immunoblastic T-cell lymphoma can also present with CD3(-)CD4(+) T cells; despite other common histopathological and immunophenotypic features, CD10 expression and follicular helper T-cell markers were not detected in lymphoid variant of hypereosinophilic syndrome patients, except in both patients who developed angio-immunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, and only at T-cell lymphoma diagnosis. Taken together, persistence of tissular clonal T cells and histopathological features define CD3(-)CD4(+) lymphoid variant of hypereosinophilic syndrome as a peripheral indolent clonal T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder, which should not be confused with angio-immunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. PMID:25682606

  19. Polyangiitis with Granulomatosis as a Paraneoplastic Syndrome of B-Cell Lymphoma of the Lacrimal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Wills Sanín, Beatriz; Bolivar, Yenny R. Cárdenas; Carvajal, Jose J.; Quintero, Guillermo E.; Andrade, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The clinical course of an autoimmune paraneoplastic syndrome parallels the natural history of the primary malignancy. In most cases, such paraneoplastic are syndromes hardly distinguishable from idiopathic autoimmune diseases. A case of polyangiitis with granulomatosis as a paraneoplastic syndrome in a patient with B-cell Lymphoma of the lacrimal gland has not yet been reported. Case Presentation. We present the case of a male patient with a B-cell Lymphoma of the lacrimal gland, who debuted with symptoms similar to rheumatoid arthritis and acute renal failure, secondary to polyangiitis with granulomatosis. The current pathophysiological hypotheses explaining the relationship between a lymphoproliferative disease and an autoimmune paraneoplastic disorder are discussed. Conclusion. Tumor-associated segmental necrotizing glomerulopathy is a very rare manifestation of glomerular diseases. Some atypical clinical features should increase the suspicion of an underlying tumor, in which case it is essential to treat the primary neoplasia, in order to control the autoimmune manifestations. PMID:25580314

  20. Tyrosine Phosphorylation within the Intrinsically Disordered Cytosolic Domains of the B-Cell Receptor: An NMR-Based Structural Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenlöw, Joakim; Isaksson, Linnéa; Mayzel, Maxim; Lengqvist, Johan; Orekhov, Vladislav Y.

    2014-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are found extensively in cell signaling pathways where they often are targets of posttranslational modifications e.g. phosphorylation. Such modifications can sometimes induce or disrupt secondary structure elements present in the modified protein. CD79a and CD79b are membrane-spanning, signal-transducing components of the B-cell receptor. The cytosolic domains of these proteins are intrinsically disordered and each has an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). When an antigen binds to the receptor, conserved tyrosines located in the ITAMs are phosphorylated which initiate further downstream signaling. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to examine the secondary structure propensity of the cytosolic domains of CD79a and CD79b in vitro before and after phosphorylation. The phosphorylation patterns are identified through analysis of changes of backbone chemical shifts found for the affected tyrosines and neighboring residues. The number of the phosphorylated sites is confirmed by mass spectrometry. The secondary structure propensities are calculated using the method of intrinsic referencing, where the reference random coil chemical shifts are measured for the same protein under denaturing conditions. Our analysis revealed that CD79a and CD79b both have an overall propensity for ?-helical structure that is greatest in the C-terminal region of the ITAM. Phosphorylation of CD79a caused a decrease in helical propensity in the C-terminal ITAM region. For CD79b, the opposite was observed and phosphorylation resulted in an increase of helical propensity in the C-terminal part. PMID:24769851

  1. Primary and secondary cutaneous CD30(+) lymphoproliferative disorders: a report from the Dutch Cutaneous Lymphoma Group on the long-term follow-up data of 219 patients and guidelines for diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bekkenk, M W; Geelen, F A; van Voorst Vader, P C; Heule, F; Geerts, M L; van Vloten, W A; Meijer, C J; Willemze, R

    2000-06-15

    To evaluate our diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines, clinical and long-term follow-up data of 219 patients with primary or secondary cutaneous CD30(+) lymphoproliferative disorders were evaluated. The study group included 118 patients with lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP; group 1), 79 patients with primary cutaneous CD30(+) large T-cell lymphoma (LTCL; group 2), 11 patients with CD30(+) LTCL and skin and regional lymph node involvement (group 3), and 11 patients with secondary cutaneous CD30(+) LTCL (group 4). Patients with LyP often did not receive any specific treatment, whereas most patients with primary cutaneous CD30(+) LTCL were treated with radiotherapy or excision. All patients with skin-limited disease from groups 1 and 2 who were treated with multiagent chemotherapy had 1 or more skin relapses. The calculated risk for systemic disease within 10 years of diagnosis was 4% for group 1, 16% for group 2, and 20% for group 3 (after initial therapy). Disease-related 5-year-survival rates were 100% (group 1), 96% (group 2), 91% (group 3), and 24% (group 4), respectively. The results confirm the favorable prognoses of these primary cutaneous CD30(+) lymphoproliferative disorders and underscore that LyP and primary cutaneous CD30(+) lymphomas are closely related conditions. They also indicate that CD30(+) LTCL on the skin and in 1 draining lymph node station has a good prognosis similar to that for primary cutaneous CD30(+) LTCL without concurrent lymph node involvement. Multiagent chemotherapy is only indicated for patients with full-blown or developing extracutaneous disease; it is never or rarely indicated for patients with skin-limited CD30(+) lymphomas. (Blood. 2000;95:3653-3661) PMID:10845893

  2. Rituximab in Treating Patients Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-23

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  3. PI3K? inhibition augments the efficacy of rapamycin in suppressing proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)+ B cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, S; Wei, L; Krams, S M; Esquivel, C O; Martinez, O M

    2013-08-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) continues to be a devastating and potentially life-threatening complication in organ transplant recipients. PTLD is associated with EBV infection and can result in malignant B cell lymphomas. Here we demonstrate that the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is highly activated in EBV+ B cell lymphoma lines derived from patients with PTLD. Treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor Rapamycin (RAPA) partially inhibited the proliferation of EBV+ B cell lines. Resistance to RAPA treatment correlated with high levels of Akt phosphorylation. An mTORC1/2 inhibitor and a PI3K/mTOR dual inhibitor suppressed Akt phosphorylation and showed a greater anti-proliferative effect on EBV+ B lymphoma lines compared to RAPA. EBV+ B cell lymphoma lines expressed high levels of PI3K?. We demonstrate that PI3K? is responsible for Akt activation in EBV+ B cell lymphomas, and that selective inhibition of PI3K? by either siRNA, or a small molecule inhibitor, augmented the anti-proliferative effect of RAPA on EBV+ B cell lymphomas. These results suggest that PI3K? is a novel, potential therapeutic target for the treatment of EBV-associated PTLD and that combined blockade of PI3K? and mTOR provides increased efficacy in inhibiting proliferation of EBV+ B cell lymphomas. PMID:23841834

  4. IDEC-C2B8 anti-CD20 (rituximab) immunotherapy in patients with low-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and lymphoproliferative disorders: evaluation of response on 48 patients.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D T; Amess, J A; Doughty, H; Hendry, L; Diamond, L W

    1999-02-01

    This study focused on the efficacy of IDEC-C2B8 (chimeric anti-CD20) immunotherapy relative to specific subtypes of low-grade lymphoproliferative disorders/non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (LPD/NHL). Forty-eight patients with resistant or relapsed disease completed the IDEC-C2B8 infusion schedule of 375 mg/m2/wk x 4 wk. The LPD/NHL subtypes included: (a) follicular centre cell lymphoma (FCC) in 22 patients; (b) mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) in 10; (c) 1 diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL); and (d) the category of small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (SLL/CLL) and related disorders in 15 patients. No patient obtained a complete remission. Ten patients (21%) achieved partial remission: 6 FCC, 2 MCL, 1 DLCL and 1 patient from the SLL/CLL group. Twenty-eight patients had stable disease and 10 progressed during immunotherapy. In patients with CLL and MCL in leukaemic phase, there was no correlation between the marked decrease in circulating neoplastic cells following antibody infusions and amelioration of the tumour burden. The results suggest that the subtype of LPD/NHL and the intensity of CD20 on the tumour cells influence the effectiveness of IDEC-C2B8. The antibody was most efficacious against FCC lymphoma. The efficacy (at the dose schedule of 375 mg/m2/wk x 4) against MCL and SLL/CLL appeared to be limited, however. PMID:10052709

  5. Paediatric nodal marginal zone B-cell lymphadenopathy of the neck: a Haemophilus influenzae-driven immune disorder?

    PubMed

    Kluin, Philip M; Langerak, Anton W; Beverdam-Vincent, Jannetta; Geurts-Giele, Willemina R R; Visser, Lydia; Rutgers, Bea; Schuuring, Ed; Van Baarlen, Joop; Lam, King H; Seldenrijk, Kees; Kibbelaar, Robby E; de Wit, Peter; Diepstra, Arjan; Rosati, Stefano; van Noesel, Max M; Zwaan, C Michel; Hunting, Jarmo C B; Hoogendoorn, Mels; van der Gaag, Ellen J; van Esser, Joost W J; de Bont, Eveline; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C; Winter, Rik H; Lo Ten Foe, Jerome R; van der Zanden, Adri G M

    2015-07-01

    Many hyperplasias and lymphomas of marginal zone B-cells are associated with infection. We identified six children and one adolescent with cervical lymphadenopathy showing prominent polyclonal nodal marginal zone hyperplasia (pNMZH) and four adolescents with monoclonal paediatric nodal marginal zone lymphoma (pNMZL). The clonality status was assessed using BIOMED-2-IG PCR analysis. Haemophilus influenzae was identified in all six cases of pNMZH that could be tested by direct culture (N = 3) or a very sensitive PCR for the H. influenzae gyrase gene in frozen materials (N = 5). H. influenzae was not detected in three pNMZLs and 28 non-specific reactive cervical lymph nodes of age-matched controls, except for a single control node that was obtained during oropharyngeal surgery for a cleft palate showing very low copy numbers of H. influenzae. pNMZH patients were younger than pNMZL patients (median age 12 versus 21 years). pNMZH showed a prominent nodular appearance with variable fibrosis without acute inflammation. Within the nodules, the expanded germinal centres and variably sized marginal zones were colonized by activated B-cells with weak expression of IgD and lack of CD10 and/or BCL6 expression. Some areas showed skewed light chain expression in plasma cells (4/5 cases lambda). In four cases tested, this was confirmed by flow cytometry for surface Ig (3/4 cases lambda). In contrast, pNMZL showed more extensive expansion of marginal zones by centrocytoid cells and often expression of BCL2 protein. Several H. influenzae strains are known to interact with the constant part of IgD on human B-cells, leading to their polyclonal proliferation and activation. We speculate that in vivo stimulation of IgD+ marginal zone B-cells by this bacterium may be implicated in this particular lymphadenopathy that should be distinguished from monoclonal pNMZL. PMID:25722108

  6. How I treat autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, João Bosco

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) represents a failure of apoptotic mechanisms to maintain lymphocyte homeostasis, permitting accumulation of lymphoid mass and persistence of autoreactive cells that often manifest in childhood with chronic nonmalignant lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and recurring multilineage cytopenias. Cytopenias in these patients can be the result of splenic sequestration as well as autoimmune complications manifesting as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, and autoimmune neutropenia. More than 300 families with hereditary ALPS have now been described; nearly 500 patients from these families have been studied and followed worldwide over the last 20 years by our colleagues and ourselves. Some of these patients with FAS mutations affecting the intracellular portion of the FAS protein also have an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. The best approaches to diagnosis, follow-up, and management of ALPS, its associated cytopenias, and other complications resulting from infiltrative lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity are presented. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrial.gov as #NCT00001350. PMID:21885601

  7. [Acquired A hemophilia and lymphoproliferative diseases: A literature review].

    PubMed

    Le Cam-Duchez, V

    2015-12-01

    Acquired A haemophilia is a rare but severe autoimmune disease. It is caused by autoantibodies against the coagulation factor VIII. These autoantibodies could have different consequences: no effect, inhibition of factor VIII or factor VIII activity hydrolyzing. In about half of the cases, no cause is associated with the disorder [idiopathic acquired A haemophilia]. But in remaining 50% of the patients, some circumstances could be associated with acquired hemophilia: post-partum, autoimmune disorders, cancer and sometimes malignant blood disorders. The objective of this article was to review the literature about acquired A hemophilia associated with lymphoproliferative diseases. PMID:26481810

  8. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia: diagnosis, natural history, and risk stratification

    PubMed Central

    Strati, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal B lymphocytosis (MBL) is defined as the presence of a clonal B-cell population in the peripheral blood with fewer than 5 × 109/L B-cells and no other signs of a lymphoproliferative disorder. The majority of cases of MBL have the immunophenotype of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). MBL can be categorized as either low count or high count based on whether the B-cell count is above or below 0.5 × 109/L. Low-count MBL can be detected in ?5% of adults over the age of 40 years when assessed using standard-sensitivity flow cytometry assays. A number of biological and genetic characteristics distinguish low-count from high-count MBL. Whereas low-count MBL rarely progresses to CLL, high-count MBL progresses to CLL requiring therapy at a rate of 1% to 2% per year. High-count MBL is distinguished from Rai 0 CLL based on whether the B-cell count is above or below 5 × 109/L. Although individuals with both high-count MBL and CLL Rai stage 0 are at increased risk of infections and second cancers, the risk of progression requiring treatment and the potential to shorten life expectancy are greater for CLL. This review highlights challenging questions regarding the classification, risk stratification, management, and supportive care of patients with MBL and CLL. PMID:26065657

  9. Pathological Findings in Human Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Megan S.; Straus, Stephen E.; Dale, Janet K.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice; Strober, Warren; Sneller, Michael C.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Lenardo, Michael J.; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S. J.; Lin, Albert Y.; Raffeld, Mark; Jaffe, Elaine S.

    1998-01-01

    The defects in lymphocyte apoptosis that underlie the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) are usually attributable to inherited mutations of the CD95 (Fas) gene. In this report, we present the histopathological and immunophenotypic features seen in the lymph nodes (n = 16), peripheral blood (n = 10), bone marrow (n = 2), spleen (n = 3), and liver (n = 2) from 10 patients with ALPS. Lymph nodes showed marked paracortical hyperplasia. Interfollicular areas were expanded and populated by T cell receptor-?? CD3+ CD4?CD8? (double-negative, DN) T cells that were negative for CD45RO. CD45RA+ T cells were increased in all cases studied. The paracortical infiltrate was a result of both reduced apoptosis and increased proliferation, as measured by in situ detection of DNA fragmentation and staining with MIB-1, respectively. The paracortical proliferation may be extensive enough to suggest a diagnosis of malignant lymphoma. Many of the paracortical lymphocytes expressed markers associated with cytotoxicity, such as perforin, TIA-1, and CD57. CD25 was negative. In addition, most lymph nodes exhibited florid follicular hyperplasia, often with focal progressive transformation of germinal centers; in some cases, follicular involution was seen. A polyclonal plasmacytosis also was present. The spleens were markedly enlarged, more than 10 times normal size. There was expansion of both white pulp and red pulp, with increased DN T cells. DN T cells also were observed in liver biopsies exhibiting portal triaditis. In the peripheral blood, the T cells showed increased expression of HLA-DR and CD57 but not CD25. CD45RA+ T cells were increased in the four cases studied. Polyclonal B cell lymphocytosis with expansion of CD5+ B cells was a characteristic finding. Taken together, the histopathological and immunophenotypic findings, particularly in lymph nodes and peripheral blood, are sufficiently distinctive to suggest a diagnosis of ALPS. Of note, two affected family members of one proband developed lymphoma (T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma and nodular lymphocyte predominance Hodgkin’s disease, respectively). PMID:9811346

  10. EBV Lymphoproliferative Disease after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Rouce, Rayne H; Louis, Chrystal U; Heslop, Helen E

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW EBV reactivation can cause significant morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (SCT). Delays in reconstitution of EBV-specific T lymphocyte activity can lead to life-threatening EBV lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-PTLD). This review highlights recent advances in the understanding of pathophysiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of EBV viremia and PTLD. RECENT FINDINGS During the past decade, early detection strategies, such as serial measurement of EBV-DNA load, have helped to identify high-risk patients and to diagnose early lymphoproliferation. The most significant advances have come in the form of innovative treatment options, including manipulation of the balance between outgrowing EBV-infected B cells and the EBV cytotoxic T lymphocyte (EBV-CTL) response, and targeting infected B cells with monoclonal antibodies, chemotherapy, unmanipulated donor lymphocytes, and donor or more recently third party EBV-CTLs. Defining criteria for preemptive therapy and remains a challenge. SUMMARY EBV reactivation is a significant complication after SCT. Continued improvements in risk-stratification and treatment options are required to improve the morbidity and mortality caused by EBV associated diseases. Current approaches use Rituximab to deplete B cells or adoptive transfer of EBV-CTL to reconstitute immunity. The availability of rapid EBV specific T cell products offers the possibility of improved outcomes. PMID:25159713

  11. Primary CNS lymphoproliferative disease, mycophenolate and calcineurin inhibitor usage.

    PubMed

    Crane, Genevieve M; Powell, Helen; Kostadinov, Rumen; Rocafort, Patrick Tim; Rifkin, Dena E; Burger, Peter C; Ambinder, Richard F; Swinnen, Lode J; Borowitz, Michael J; Duffield, Amy S

    2015-10-20

    Immunosuppression for solid organ transplantation increases lymphoproliferative disease risk. While central nervous system (CNS) involvement is more rare, we noticed an increase in primary CNS (PCNS) disease. To investigate a potential association with the immunosuppressive regimen we identified all post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) cases diagnosed over a 28-year period at our institution (174 total, 29 PCNS) and all similar cases recorded in a United Network for Organ Sharing-Organ Procurement and Transplant Network (UNOS-OPTN) datafile. While no PCNS cases were diagnosed at our institution between 1986 and 1997, they comprised 37% of PTLD cases diagnosed from 2011-2014. PCNS disease was more often associated with renal vs. other organ transplant, Epstein-Barr virus, large B-cell morphology and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as compared to PTLD that did not involve the CNS. Calcineurin inhibitors were protective against PCNS disease when given alone or in combination with MMF. A multivariate analysis of a larger UNOS-OPTN dataset confirmed these findings, where both MMF and lack of calcineurin inhibitor usage were independently associated with risk for development of PCNS PTLD. These findings have significant implications for the transplant community, particularly given the introduction of new regimens lacking calcineurin inhibitors. Further investigation into these associations is warranted. PMID:26460822

  12. Arsenic trioxide induces apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway by upregulating the expression of Bax and Bim in human B cells.

    PubMed

    Baysan, Abdullah; Yel, Leman; Gollapudi, Sastry; Su, Houfen; Gupta, Sudhir

    2007-02-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has been approved for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APML) and it is a promising candidate for the treatment of patients with lymphoproliferative disorders, such as relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma and myelodysplastic syndromes. The effects of As2O3 on B cells, specifically which do not express Bcl-2, have not been studied. In this study, we have demonstrated that As2O3, at clinically achievable therapeutic concentrations, induces apoptosis in Bcl-2 negative human B cell line Ramos. As2O3-induced apoptosis is associated with reduced mitochondrial transmembrane potential (delta psi), enhanced generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria into cytoplasm, activation of caspases, and upregulation of Bax and Bim expression. Exogenous glutathione (GSH) reverses the As2O3-induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Altogether, these data indicate that As2O3 induces apoptosis in B cells, regardless of Bcl-2 expression, via the mitochondrial pathway by enhancing oxidative stress. PMID:17203211

  13. Immune Disorder HSCT Protocol

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-09

    Immune Deficiency Disorders:; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Hyper-IgM; DiGeorge Syndrome; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immune Deficiency; Immune Dysregulatory Disorder:; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; IPEX; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  14. B-Cell-Rich T-Cell Lymphoma Associated with Epstein-Barr Virus-Reactivation and T-Cell Suppression Following Antithymocyte Globulin Therapy in a Patient with Severe Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hanaoka, Nobuyoshi; Murata, Shogo; Hosoi, Hiroki; Shimokado, Aiko; Mushino, Toshiki; Kuriyama, Kodai; Hatanaka, Kazuo; Nishikawa, Akinori; Kurimoto, Miwa; Sonoki, Takashi; Muragaki, Yasuteru; Nakakuma, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (B-LPD) is generally characterized by the proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B lymphocytes. We here report the development of EBV-negative B-LPD associated with EBV-reactivation following antithymocyte globulin (ATG) therapy in a patient with aplastic anemia. The molecular autopsy study showed the sparse EBV-infected clonal T cells could be critically involved in the pathogenesis of EBV-negative oligoclonal B-LPD through cytokine amplification and escape from T-cell surveillances attributable to ATG-based immunosuppressive therapy, leading to an extremely rare B-cell-rich T-cell lymphoma. This report helps in elucidating the complex pathophysiology of intractable B-LPD refractory to rituximab. PMID:26487932

  15. B-Cell-Rich T-Cell Lymphoma Associated with Epstein-Barr Virus-Reactivation and T-Cell Suppression Following Antithymocyte Globulin Therapy in a Patient with Severe Aplastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Nobuyoshi; Murata, Shogo; Hosoi, Hiroki; Shimokado, Aiko; Mushino, Toshiki; Kuriyama, Kodai; Hatanaka, Kazuo; Nishikawa, Akinori; Kurimoto, Miwa; Sonoki, Takashi; Muragaki, Yasuteru; Nakakuma, Hideki

    2015-09-23

    B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (B-LPD) is generally characterized by the proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B lymphocytes. We here report the development of EBV-negative B-LPD associated with EBV-reactivation following antithymocyte globulin (ATG) therapy in a patient with aplastic anemia. The molecular autopsy study showed the sparse EBV-infected clonal T cells could be critically involved in the pathogenesis of EBV-negative oligoclonal B-LPD through cytokine amplification and escape from T-cell surveillances attributable to ATG-based immunosuppressive therapy, leading to an extremely rare B-cell-rich T-cell lymphoma. This report helps in elucidating the complex pathophysiology of intractable B-LPD refractory to rituximab. PMID:26487932

  16. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase in B cells of hepatits C virus-related cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Russi, S; Dammacco, F; Sansonno, S; Pavone, F; Sansonno, D

    2015-12-01

    Immunoglobulin variable region heavy chain (IgVH ) somatic gene diversification is instrumental in the transformation process that characterizes hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related B cell lymphoproliferative disorders. However, the extent to which activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), an enzyme essential for IgV gene somatic hypermutation (SHM), is active in cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis (CV) remains unclear. AID mRNA expression in the peripheral blood of 102 chronically hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients (58 with and 44 without CV) and 26 healthy subjects was investigated using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The features of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) protein and mRNA transcripts were explored in liver tissue biopsies and portal tracts isolated using laser capture microdissection. In chronically HCV-infected patients, AID mRNA expression was almost threefold higher in those with than in those without CV and sevenfold higher than in healthy subjects (median-fold: 6·68 versus 2·54, P?=?0·03 and versus 0·95, P?=?0·0003). AID transcript levels were significantly higher in polyclonal than in clonally restricted B cell preparations in either CV or non-CV patients (median-fold, 15·0 versus 2·70, P?=?0·009 and 3·46 versus 1·58, P?=?0·02, respectively). AID gene expression was found to be related negatively to age and virological parameters. AID protein was found in portal tracts containing inflammatory cells that, in several instances, expressed AID mRNA transcripts. Our data indicate that the aberrant expression of AID may reflect continuous B cell activation and sustained survival signals in HCV-related CV patients. PMID:26219420

  17. Loss-of-function mutations within the IL-2 inducible kinase ITK in patients with EBV-associated lymphoproliferative diseases.

    PubMed

    Linka, R M; Risse, S L; Bienemann, K; Werner, M; Linka, Y; Krux, F; Synaeve, C; Deenen, R; Ginzel, S; Dvorsky, R; Gombert, M; Halenius, A; Hartig, R; Helminen, M; Fischer, A; Stepensky, P; Vettenranta, K; Köhrer, K; Ahmadian, M R; Laws, H-J; Fleckenstein, B; Jumaa, H; Latour, S; Schraven, B; Borkhardt, A

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was the appraisal of the clinical and functional consequences of germline mutations within the gene for the IL-2 inducible T-cell kinase, ITK. Among patients with Epstein-Barr virus-driven lymphoproliferative disorders (EBV-LPD), negative for mutations in SH2D1A and XIAP (n=46), we identified two patients with R29H or D500T,F501L,M503X mutations, respectively. Human wild-type (wt) ITK, but none of the mutants, was able to rescue defective calcium flux in murine Itk(-/-) T cells. Pulse-chase experiments showed that ITK mutations lead to varying reductions of protein half-life from 25 to 69% as compared with wt ITK (107?min). The pleckstrin homology domain of wt ITK binds most prominently to phosphatidylinositol monophosphates (PI(3)P, PI(4)P, PI(5)P) and to lesser extend to its double or triple phosphorylated derivates (PIP2, PIP3), interactions which were dramatically reduced in the patient with the ITK(R29H) mutant. ITK mutations are distributed over the entire protein and include missense, nonsense and indel mutations, reminiscent of the situation in its sister kinase in B cells, Bruton's tyrosine kinase. PMID:22289921

  18. Hunner-Type (Classic) Interstitial Cystitis: A Distinct Inflammatory Disorder Characterized by Pancystitis, with Frequent Expansion of Clonal B-Cells and Epithelial Denudation

    PubMed Central

    Morikawa, Teppei; Kunita, Akiko; Ota, Yasunori; Katoh, Hiroto; Niimi, Aya; Nomiya, Akira; Ishikawa, Shumpei; Goto, Akiteru; Igawa, Yasuhiko; Fukayama, Masashi; Homma, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic bladder disease with urinary frequency, bladder discomfort or bladder pain of unknown etiology. Based on cystoscopic findings, patients with IC are classified as either Hunner-type/classic IC (HIC), presenting with a specific Hunner lesion, or non-Hunner-type IC (NHIC), presenting with no Hunner lesion, but post-hydrodistension mucosal bleeding. Inflammatory cell infiltration, composed predominantly of lymphocytes, plasma cells and epithelial denudation, has in the past been documented as a major pathological IC finding. However, the significance of the pathological evaluation of IC, especially with regard to the difference between HIC and NHIC, has been downplayed in recent years. In this study, we performed immunohistochemical quantification of infiltrating T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes and plasma cells, and measured the amount of residual epithelium in urinary bladder biopsy specimens taken from patients with HIC and NHIC, and those with no IC, using image analysis software. In addition, in situ hybridization of the light chains was performed to examine clonal B-cell expansion. Lymphoplasmacytic infiltration was significantly more severe in HIC specimens than in NHIC specimens (P <0.0001). Substantial lymphoplasmacytic inflammation (?200 cells/mm2) was observed in 93% of HIC specimens, whereas only 8% of NHIC specimens were inflamed. Plasmacytic infiltration was more prominent in HIC specimens compared with NHIC and non-IC cystitis specimens (P <0.005). Furthermore, expansion of light-chain-restricted B-cells was observed in 31% of cases of HIC. The amount of residual epithelium was decreased in HIC specimens compared with NHIC specimens and non-IC cystitis specimens (P <0.0001). These results suggest that NHIC and HIC are distinct pathological entities, with the latter characterized by pancystitis, frequent clonal B-cell expansion and epithelial denudation. An abnormality in the B-cell population may be involved in the pathogenesis of HIC. PMID:26587589

  19. Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Reactivation from B Cells Requires IRF4 but Not XBP-1

    PubMed Central

    Matar, Caline G.; Rangaswamy, Udaya Shankari; Wakeman, Brian S.; Iwakoshi, Neal

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gammaherpesviruses display tropism for B cells and, like all known herpesviruses, exhibit distinct lytic and latent life cycles. One well-established observation among members of the gammaherpesvirus family is the link between viral reactivation from latently infected B cells and plasma cell differentiation. Importantly, a number of studies have identified a potential role for a CREB/ATF family member, X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1), in trans-activating the immediate early BZLF-1 or BRLF1/gene 50 promoters of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), respectively. XBP-1 is required for the unfolded protein response and has been identified as a critical transcription factor in plasma cells. Here, we demonstrate that XBP-1 is capable of trans-activating the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) RTA promoter in vitro, consistent with previous observations for EBV and KSHV. However, we show that in vivo there does not appear to be a requirement for XBP-1 expression in B cells for virus reactivation. The MHV68 M2 gene product under some experimental conditions plays an important role in virus reactivation from B cells. M2 has been shown to drive B cell differentiation to plasma cells, as well as interleukin-10 (IL-10) production, both of which are dependent on M2 induction of interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) expression. IRF4 is required for plasma cell differentiation, and consistent with a role for plasma cells in MHV68 reactivation from B cells, we show that IRF4 expression in B cells is required for efficient reactivation of MHV68 from splenocytes. Thus, the latter analyses are consistent with previous studies linking plasma cell differentiation to MHV68 reactivation from B cells. The apparent independence of MHV68 reactivation from XBP-1 expression in plasma cells may reflect redundancy among CREB/ATF family members or the involvement of other plasma cell-specific transcription factors. Regardless, these findings underscore the importance of in vivo studies in assessing the relevance of observations made in tissue culture models. IMPORTANCE All known herpesviruses establish a chronic infection of their respective host, persisting for the life of the individual. A critical feature of these viruses is their ability to reactivate from a quiescent form of infection (latency) and generate progeny virus. In the case of gammaherpesviruses, which are associated with the development of lymphoproliferative disorders, including lymphomas, reactivation from latently infected B lymphocytes occurs upon terminal differentiation of these cells to plasma cells—the cell type that produces antibodies. A number of studies have linked a plasma cell transcription factor, XBP-1, to the induction of gammaherpesvirus reactivation, and we show here that indeed in tissue culture models this cellular transcription factor can trigger expression of the murine gammaherpesvirus gene involved in driving virus reactivation. However, surprisingly, when we examined the role of XBP-1 in the setting of infection of mice—using mice that lack a functional XBP-1 gene in B cells—we failed to observe a role for XBP-1 in virus reactivation. However, we show that another cellular factor essential for plasma cell differentiation, IRF4, is critical for virus reactivation. Thus, these studies point out the importance of studies in animal models to validate findings from studies carried out in cell lines passaged in vitro. PMID:25078688

  20. Epstein-Barr virus-negative, CD5-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma developing after treatment with oral tacrolimus for mixed connective tissue disease : a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Shimada, Asami; Imai, Hidenori; Wakabayashi, Mutsumi; Sugimoto, Keiji; Nakamura, Noriko; Sawada, Tomonori; Komatsu, Norio; Noguchi, Masaaki

    2012-01-01

    A 69-year-old woman, who had been diagnosed as having Sjögren's syndrome at 37 years old and mixed connective tissue disease at 42 years old, was under treatment with oral prednisolone. In 2009, she was diagnosed as having active systemic lupus erythematosus, and started on treatment with tacrolimus at 3 mg/day. In 2010, para-aortic lymphadenopathy and superficial multiple lymphadenopathy were detected. Tacrolimus was discontinued. Axillary lymph node biopsy revealed Epstein-Barr (EB) virus-negative CD5-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The patient was classified into clinical stage IIIA and as being at high risk according to the international prognostic index. After the discontinuation of tacrolimus, the lymph nodes reduced temporarily in size. In January 2011, the lymphadenopathy increased again, and the patient received a total of 8 courses of therapy with rituximab, pirarubicin, vincristine, cyclophosphamide and prednisolone, followed by intrathecal injection to prevent central nervous system infiltration, which was followed by complete remission. In February 2012, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed relapse in multiple lymph nodes and central nervous system infiltration. The patient was considered to have iatrogenic lymphoproliferative disorder classified as "other iatrogenic immunodeficiency-associated lymphoproliferative disorders" by the WHO, and this is the first reported case of CD5-positive DLBCL and central nervous system infiltration following administration of the drug. The patient was considered to have a poor prognosis as EB virus was negative, discontinuation of tacrolimus was ineffective and there was evidence of central nervous system infiltration. PMID:23269082

  1. Epstein-Barr Virus LMP2A Reduces Hyperactivation Induced by LMP1 to Restore Normal B Cell Phenotype in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vrazo, Alexandra C.; Chauchard, Maria; Raab-Traub, Nancy; Longnecker, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latently infects most of the human population and is strongly associated with lymphoproliferative disorders. EBV encodes several latency proteins affecting B cell proliferation and survival, including latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) and the EBV oncoprotein LMP1. LMP1 and LMP2A signaling mimics CD40 and BCR signaling, respectively, and has been proposed to alter B cell functions including the ability of latently-infected B cells to access and transit the germinal center. In addition, several studies suggested a role for LMP2A modulation of LMP1 signaling in cell lines by alteration of TRAFs, signaling molecules used by LMP1. In this study, we investigated whether LMP1 and LMP2A co-expression in a transgenic mouse model alters B cell maturation and the response to antigen, and whether LMP2A modulates LMP1 function. Naïve LMP1/2A mice had similar lymphocyte populations and antibody production by flow cytometry and ELISA compared to controls. In the response to antigen, LMP2A expression in LMP1/2A animals rescued the impairment in germinal center generation promoted by LMP1. LMP1/2A animals produced high-affinity, class-switched antibody and plasma cells at levels similar to controls. In vitro, LMP1 upregulated activation markers and promoted B cell hyperproliferation, and co-expression of LMP2A restored a wild-type phenotype. By RT-PCR and immunoblot, LMP1 B cells demonstrated TRAF2 levels four-fold higher than non-transgenic controls, and co-expression of LMP2A restored TRAF2 levels to wild-type levels. No difference in TRAF3 levels was detected. While modulation of other TRAF family members remains to be assessed, normalization of the LMP1-induced B cell phenotype through LMP2A modulation of TRAF2 may be a pathway by which LMP2A controls B cell function. These findings identify an advance in the understanding of how Epstein-Barr virus can access the germinal center in vivo, a site critical for both the genesis of immunological memory and of virus-associated tumors. PMID:22536156

  2. Applied Protein and Molecular Techniques for Characterization of B Cell Neoplasms in Horses.

    PubMed

    Badial, Peres R; Tallmadge, Rebecca L; Miller, Steven; Stokol, Tracy; Richards, Kristy; Borges, Alexandre S; Felippe, M Julia B

    2015-11-01

    Mature B cell neoplasms cover a spectrum of diseases involving lymphoid tissues (lymphoma) or blood (leukemia), with an overlap between these two presentations. Previous studies describing equine lymphoid neoplasias have not included analyses of clonality using molecular techniques. The objective of this study was to use molecular techniques to advance the classification of B cell lymphoproliferative diseases in five adult equine patients with a rare condition of monoclonal gammopathy, B cell leukemia, and concurrent lymphadenopathy (lymphoma/leukemia). The B cell neoplasms were phenotypically characterized by gene and cell surface molecule expression, secreted immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype concentrations, Ig heavy-chain variable (IGHV) region domain sequencing, and spectratyping. All five patients had hyperglobulinemia due to IgG1 or IgG4/7 monoclonal gammopathy. Peripheral blood leukocyte immunophenotyping revealed high proportions of IgG1- or IgG4/7-positive cells and relative T cell lymphopenia. Most leukemic cells lacked the surface B cell markers CD19 and CD21. IGHG1 or IGHG4/7 gene expression was consistent with surface protein expression, and secreted isotype and Ig spectratyping revealed one dominant monoclonal peak. The mRNA expression of the B cell-associated developmental genes EBF1, PAX5, and CD19 was high compared to that of the plasma cell-associated marker CD38. Sequence analysis of the IGHV domain of leukemic cells revealed mutated Igs. In conclusion, the protein and molecular techniques used in this study identified neoplastic cells compatible with a developmental transition between B cell and plasma cell stages, and they can be used for the classification of equine B cell lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:26311245

  3. A Novel and Likely Inherited Lymphoproliferative Disease in British Shorthair Kittens.

    PubMed

    Aberdein, D; Munday, J S; Fairley, R A; Vernau, W; Thompson, K G

    2015-11-01

    An unusual lymphoproliferative disease was identified in multiple closely related British Shorthair (BSH) kittens, suggesting an inherited predisposition to disease. Affected kittens typically developed rapidly progressive and marked generalized lymphadenopathy, moderate splenomegaly, and regenerative and likely hemolytic anemia from 6 weeks of age. Microscopic findings were suggestive of multicentric T-cell lymphoma, but additional testing revealed a polyclonal population of CD3+/CD4-/CD8- "double negative" T cells (DNT cells). This is a novel disease presentation with similarities to the human disorder autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), a rare inherited disease causing lymphoproliferation and variable manifestations of autoimmunity. The human disease is most commonly due to the presence of Fas gene mutations causing defective lymphocyte apoptosis, and further investigations of both the mode of inheritance and genetic basis for disease in affected cats are currently in progress. PMID:26041772

  4. B Cells, Antibodies, and More.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, William; Lakkis, Fadi G; Chalasani, Geetha

    2016-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritides and transplant rejection. B cells secrete antibodies that contribute to tissue injury via multiple mechanisms. In addition, B cells contribute to disease pathogenesis in autoimmunity and alloimmunity by presenting antigens as well as providing costimulation and cytokines to T cells. B cells also play an immunomodulatory role in regulating the immune response by secreting cytokines that inhibit disease onset and/or progression. B cell-targeted approaches for treating immune diseases of the kidney and other organs have gained significant momentum. However, much remains to be understood about B-cell biology in order to determine the timing, duration, and context of optimal therapeutic response to B cell-targeted approaches. In this review, we discuss the multifaceted roles of B cells as enhancers and regulators of immunity with relevance to kidney disease and transplantation. PMID:26700440

  5. How Should We Treat Early Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disease After Heart Transplantation?

    PubMed

    Nitta, Daisuke; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Imamura, Teruhiko; Hatano, Masaru; Ono, Minoru; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Kurokawa, Mineo; Komuro, Issei

    2015-12-01

    Although post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is one of the major fatal complications encountered several years after heart transplant (HTx), little is known about early-PTLD emerging within the first year. We here describe the rare case of a 24-year-old female patient who suffered from early-PTLD (DLBCL: diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) associated with an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, that developed around the jejunum at 7 months after HTx. She suffered from acute abdominal peritonitis due to perforation of the jejunum soon after the first chemotherapy. She was treated successfully by emergent partial resection of the jejunum and colostomy after the discontinuation of everolimus (EVL) and successive low-dose chemotherapy under careful monitoring and adjustment of intravenous immunosuppressant including cyclosporine (CyA) and prednisolone to avoid a rejection reaction. Prophylactic strategies for early-PTLD in HTx recipients should be undertaken with caution. PMID:26549285

  6. Ibrutinib for B cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Research over the role of Bruton’s agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK) in B-lymphocyte development, differentiation, signaling and survival has led to better understanding of the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies. Down-regulation of BTK activity is an attractive novel strategy for treating patients with B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib (PCI-32765), a potent inhibitor of BTK induces impressive responses in B-cell malignancies through irreversible bond with cysteine-481 in the active site of BTK (TH/SH1 domain) and inhibits BTK phosphorylation on Tyr223. This review discussed in details the role of BTK in B-cell signaling, molecular interactions between B cell lymphoma/leukemia cells and their microenvironment. Clinical trials of the novel BTK inhibitor, ibrutinib (PCI-32765), in B cell malignancies were summarized. PMID:24472371

  7. High-flux hemodialysis after administering high-dose methotrexate in a patient with posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease and impaired renal function

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnik, Alexander; Scheurig-Muenkler, Christian; van der Giet, Markus; Tölle, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A young patient develops cerebral posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Despite concurrent significantly impaired transplant kidney function use of add-on high-flux hemodialysis for additional clearance made the administration of high-dose methotrexate feasible in this patient without occurence of acute chronic kidney failure and significant hematological toxicity. PMID:26576275

  8. Marginal zone lymphomas with plasmacytic differentiation and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Molina, Thierry J; Lin, Pei; Swerdlow, Steven H; Cook, James R

    2011-08-01

    Marginal zone lymphomas of all types (nodal, splenic, and extranodal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue [MALT]) may show plasmacytic differentiation. Distinguishing marginal zone lymphomas from other small B-cell lymphomas with plasmacytic differentiation, especially lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma, or from plasma cell neoplasms may be challenging. Marginal zone lymphomas with plasmacytic differentiation were discussed in 2 sessions of the 2009 Society for Hematopathology/European Association for Haematopathology Workshop. Session 4 focused on nodal marginal zone lymphomas, including cases exhibiting classic features and cases displaying atypical phenotypes. The difficulties of classification of cases with increased numbers of large cells were also discussed. Session 5 examined nonnodal marginal zone lymphomas and related entities, including splenic marginal zone lymphoma, MALT lymphoma, ? heavy chain disease, and cryoglobulin-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. These cases illustrate the importance of clinical data and, in some cases, phenotypic and cytogenetic findings in appropriately applying the 2008 World Health Organization criteria. PMID:21757594

  9. B Cell Subsets in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Heather M.; Bender, Timothy P.; McNamara, Coleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of heart attacks and strokes, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the artery wall. Immune cells, including lymphocytes modulate atherosclerotic lesion development through interconnected mechanisms. Elegant studies over the past decades have begun to unravel a role for B cells in atherosclerosis. Recent findings provide evidence that B cell effects on atherosclerosis may be subset-dependent. B-1a B cells have been reported to protect from atherosclerosis by secretion of natural IgM antibodies. Conventional B-2 B cells can promote atherosclerosis through less clearly defined mechanism that may involve CD4 T cells. Yet, there may be other populations of B cells within these subsets with different phenotypes altering their impact on atherosclerosis. Additionally, the role of B cell subsets in atherosclerosis may depend on their environmental niche and/or the stage of atherogenesis. This review will highlight key findings in the evolving field of B cells and atherosclerosis and touch on the potential and importance of translating these findings to human disease. PMID:23248624

  10. Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma with Extensive Cutaneous Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Gunes, Gursel; Yayar, Okan; Demiroglu, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we aimed to report a diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) case that had extensive cutaneous relapse with no skin involvement previously. A 59-year-old man presented to hospital in April 2014 with fatigue, anorexia, fever, and anemia. Cervical lymph node biopsy revealed CD20+, BCL2+, MUM1+, BCL6+ high grade B lymphoproliferative neoplasm. After FISH investigation, he was diagnosed as DLBCL. He was given 7 cycles of R-CHOP and achieved remission. However, in November 2014, he had emerging skin lesions that cover nearly all of his body. A control PET-CT revealed diffuse cutaneous involvement. CD20+, BCL2+, MUM1+, BCL6+ high grade B cell lymphoma infiltration was detected with skin biopsy. He was diagnosed as relapse lymphoma, so 2 cycles of R-DHAP were given. There was no treatment response; therefore, R-ICE regimen was started. The patient had achieved second complete remission and his skin lesions were completely regressed. The involvement of skin with CD20+ cells after 7 cycles of rituximab therapy favors that there is a rituximab resistant disease which tends to involve the skin. To conclude, DLBCL may relapse extensively with cutaneous involvement and the best treatment option in these patients is salvage chemotherapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. PMID:26457084

  11. Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma with Extensive Cutaneous Relapse.

    PubMed

    Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Gunes, Gursel; Yayar, Okan; Demiroglu, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we aimed to report a diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) case that had extensive cutaneous relapse with no skin involvement previously. A 59-year-old man presented to hospital in April 2014 with fatigue, anorexia, fever, and anemia. Cervical lymph node biopsy revealed CD20+, BCL2+, MUM1+, BCL6+ high grade B lymphoproliferative neoplasm. After FISH investigation, he was diagnosed as DLBCL. He was given 7 cycles of R-CHOP and achieved remission. However, in November 2014, he had emerging skin lesions that cover nearly all of his body. A control PET-CT revealed diffuse cutaneous involvement. CD20+, BCL2+, MUM1+, BCL6+ high grade B cell lymphoma infiltration was detected with skin biopsy. He was diagnosed as relapse lymphoma, so 2 cycles of R-DHAP were given. There was no treatment response; therefore, R-ICE regimen was started. The patient had achieved second complete remission and his skin lesions were completely regressed. The involvement of skin with CD20+ cells after 7 cycles of rituximab therapy favors that there is a rituximab resistant disease which tends to involve the skin. To conclude, DLBCL may relapse extensively with cutaneous involvement and the best treatment option in these patients is salvage chemotherapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. PMID:26457084

  12. Identification of lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viral-associated lymphoproliferative neoplasia in domestic poultry is caused by infection with a herpesvirus (Marek’s disease virus) or three species of retroviruses [Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), Avian leukosis/sarcoma virus, lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV)]. Previously, retroviral n...

  13. Cytokine-producing B cells: a translational view on their roles in human and mouse autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Lino, Andreia C; Dörner, Thomas; Bar-Or, Amit; Fillatreau, Simon

    2016-01-01

    B-cell depletion therapy has beneficial effects in autoimmune diseases. This is only partly explained by an elimination of autoantibodies. How does B-cell depletion improve disease? Here, we review preclinical studies showing that B cells can propagate autoimmune disorders through cytokine production. We also highlight clinical observations indicating the relevance of these B-cell functions in human autoimmunity. Abnormalities in B-cell cytokine production have been observed in rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus. In the first two diseases, B-cell depletion erases these abnormalities, and improves disease progression, suggesting a causative role for defective B-cell cytokine expression in disease pathogenesis. However, in the last two disorders, the pathogenic role of B cells and the effect of B-cell depletion on cytokine-producing B cells remain to be clarified. A better characterization of cytokine-expressing human B-cell subsets, and their modulation by B cell-targeted therapies might help understanding both the successes and failures of current B cell-targeted approaches. This may even lead to the development of novel strategies to deplete or amplify selectively pathogenic or protective subsets, respectively, which might be more effective than global depletion of the B-cell compartment. PMID:26683150

  14. Evolution of B Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2013-01-01

    Two types of adaptive immune strategies are known to have evolved in vertebrates: the VLR-based system, which is present in jawless organisms and is mediated by VLRA and VLRB lymphocytes, and the BCR/TCR-based system, which is present in jawed species and is provided by B and T cell receptors expressed on B and T cells, respectively. Here we summarize features of B cells and their predecessors in the different animal phyla, focusing the review on B cells from jawed vertebrates. We point out the critical role of nonclassical species and comparative immunology studies in the understanding of B cell immunity. Because nonclassical models include species relevant to veterinary medicine, basic science research performed in these animals contributes to the knowledge required for the development of more efficacious vaccines against emerging pathogens. PMID:25340015

  15. The B-cell receptor orchestrates environment-mediated lymphoma survival and drug resistance in B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Shain, KH; Tao, J

    2015-01-01

    Specific niches within the lymphoma tumor microenvironment (TME) provide sanctuary for subpopulations of tumor cells through stromal cell–tumor cell interactions. These interactions notably dictate growth, response to therapy and resistance of residual malignant B cells to therapeutic agents. This minimal residual disease (MRD) remains a major challenge in the treatment of B-cell malignancies and contributes to subsequent disease relapse. B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling has emerged as essential mediator of B-cell homing, survival and environment-mediated drug resistance (EMDR). Central to EMDR are chemokine- and integrin-mediated interactions between lymphoma and the TME. Further, stromal cell–B cell adhesion confers a sustained BCR signaling leading to chemokine and integrin activation. Recently, the inhibitors of BCR signaling have garnered a substantial clinical interest because of their effectiveness in B-cell disorders. The efficacy of these agents is, at least in part, attributed to attenuation of BCR-dependent lymphoma–TME interactions. In this review, we discuss the pivotal role of BCR signaling in the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of TME-mediated lymphoma survival and drug resistance. PMID:24037527

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is ALPS? ALPS is a rare disorder; its prevalence is unknown. More than 200 affected individuals have ... lymphoma ; mutation ; neurological ; neutropenia ; ovarian ; panniculitis ; platelets ; population ; prevalence ; protein ; recessive ; somatic mutation ; splenomegaly ; syndrome ; thrombocytopenia ; uveitis ; ...

  17. HIV-associated memory B cell perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiliang; Luo, Zhenwu; Wan, Zhuang; Wu, Hao; Li, Wei; Zhang, Tong; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Memory B-cell depletion, hyperimmunoglobulinemia, and impaired vaccine responses are the hallmark of B cell perturbations inhuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. Although B cells are not the targets for HIV infection, there is evidence for B cell, especially memory B cell dysfunction in HIV disease mediated by other cells or HIV itself. This review will focus on HIV-associated phenotypic and functional alterations in memory B cells. Additionally, we will discuss the mechanism underlying these perturbations and the effect of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) on these perturbations. PMID:25887082

  18. Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome Associated With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoid Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kofman, Tomek; Zhang, Shao-Yu; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Moktefi, Anissa; Raimbourg, Quentin; Francois, Hélène; Karras, Alexandre; Plaisier, Emmanuelle; Painchart, Bernard; Favre, Guillaume; Bertrand, Dominique; Gyan, Emmanuel; Souid, Marc; Roos-Weil, Damien; Desvaux, Dominique; Grimbert, Philippe; Haioun, Corinne; Lang, Philippe; Sahali, Djillali; Audard, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have examined the occurrence of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). We report here a series of 18 patients with MCNS occurring among 13,992 new cases of NHL. We analyzed the clinical and pathologic characteristics of this association, along with the response of patients to treatment, to determine if this association relies on a particular disorder. The most frequent NHLs associated with MCNS were Waldenström macroglobulinemia (33.3%), marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (27.8%), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (22.2%). Other lymphoproliferative disorders included multiple myeloma, mantle cell lymphoma, and peripheral T-cell lymphoma. In 4 patients MCNS occurred before NHL (mean delay, 15 mo), in 10 patients the disorders occurred simultaneously, and in 4 patients MCNS was diagnosed after NHL (mean delay, 25 mo). Circulating monoclonal immunoglobulins were present in 11 patients. A nontumoral interstitial infiltrate was present in renal biopsy specimens from 3 patients without significant renal impairment. Acute kidney injury resulting from tubular lesions or renal hypoperfusion was present in 6 patients. MCNS relapse occurred more frequently in patients treated exclusively by steroid therapy (77.8%) than in those receiving steroids associated with chemotherapy (25%). In conclusion, MCNS occurs preferentially in NHL originating from B cells and requires an aggressive therapeutic approach to reduce the risk of MCNS relapse. PMID:25500704

  19. Natural history of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome associated with FAS gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Price, Susan; Shaw, Pamela A.; Seitz, Amy; Joshi, Gyan; Davis, Joie; Niemela, Julie E.; Perkins, Katie; Hornung, Ronald L.; Folio, Les; Rosenberg, Philip S.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Hsu, Amy P.; Lo, Bernice; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Lenardo, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) presents in childhood with nonmalignant lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly associated with a characteristic expansion of mature CD4 and CD8 negative or double negative T-cell receptor ??+ T lymphocytes. Patients often present with chronic multilineage cytopenias due to autoimmune peripheral destruction and/or splenic sequestration of blood cells and have an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. Deleterious heterozygous mutations in the FAS gene are the most common cause of this condition, which is termed ALPS-FAS. We report the natural history and pathophysiology of 150 ALPS-FAS patients and 63 healthy mutation-positive relatives evaluated in our institution over the last 2 decades. Our principal findings are that FAS mutations have a clinical penetrance of <60%, elevated serum vitamin B12 is a reliable and accurate biomarker of ALPS-FAS, and the major causes of morbidity and mortality in these patients are the overwhelming postsplenectomy sepsis and development of lymphoma. With longer follow-up, we observed a significantly greater relative risk of lymphoma than previously reported. Avoiding splenectomy while controlling hypersplenism by using corticosteroid-sparing treatments improves the outcome in ALPS-FAS patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00001350. PMID:24398331

  20. Memory B cells in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, B; Grimsholm, O; Thorarinsdottir, K; Ren, W; Jirholt, P; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2013-08-01

    One of the principles behind vaccination, as shown by Edward Jenner in 1796, and host protection is immunological memory, and one of the cells central to this is the antigen-experienced memory B cell that responds rapidly upon re-exposure to the initiating antigen. Classically, memory B cells have been defined as progenies of germinal centre (GC) B cells expressing isotype-switched and substantially mutated B cell receptors (BCRs), that is, membrane-bound antibodies. However, it has become apparent over the last decade that this is not the only pathway to B cell memory. Here, we will discuss memory B cells in mice, as defined by (1) cell surface markers; (2) multiple layers; (3) formation in a T cell-dependent and either GC-dependent or GC-independent manner; (4) formation in a T cell-independent fashion. Lastly, we will touch upon memory B cells in; (5) mouse models of autoimmune diseases. PMID:23679222

  1. Rationale for B cell targeting in SLE

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Iñaki

    2014-01-01

    B cells are central pathogenic players in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and multiple other autoinmune diseases through antibody production as well as antibody independent functiona. At the same time, B cells are known to play important regulatory functions that may protect against autoimmune manifestations. Yet, the functional role of different B cell populations and their contribution to disease remain to be understood. The advent of agents that specifically target B cells, in particular anti-CD20 and ant-BLyS antibodies, have demonstrated the efficacy of this approach for the treatment of human autoimmunity. The analysis of patients treated with these and other B cell agents provide a unique opportunity to understand the correlates of clinical response and the significance of different B cell subsets. Here we discuss this information and how it could be used to better understand SLE and improve the rational design of B cell directed therapies in this disease. PMID:24763533

  2. IL-17 Enhances Chemotaxis of Primary Human B Cells during Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Halwani, Rabih; Al-Kufaidy, Roua; Vazquez-Tello, Alejandro; Pureza, Mary Angeline; BaHammam, Ahmed S.; Al-Jahdali, Hamdan; Alnassar, Sami A.; Hamid, Qutayba; Al-Muhsen, Saleh

    2014-01-01

    IL-17 is a pro-inflammatory mediator that is believed to play a critical role in regulating tissue inflammation during asthma, COPD, as well as other inflammatory disorders. The level of expression of IL-17 has been shown to be upregulated in lung bronchial tissue of asthmatic patients. Several reports have provided further evidence that this cytokine could play a key role in enhancing the migration of inflammatory as well as structural cells of the bronchial lung tissue during asthma and COPD. B cell infiltration to sites of inflammation during inflammatory disorders such as bowel disease, asthma and COPD has been reported. Accordingly, in this study we hypothesized that IL-17 may exert a chemotactic effect on primary B cells during asthma. We observed that B cells from asthmatic patients expressed significantly higher levels of IL-17RA and IL-17RC, compared to those of healthy subjects. Using an in-vitro migration assay, B cells were shown to migrate towards both IL-17A and IL-17F. Interestingly, blocking IL-17A and IL-17F signaling using either anti-IL-17R antibodies or MAP kinase inhibitors prevented in vitro migration of B cell towards IL-17. These observations indicate a direct chemotactic effect of IL-17 cytokines on primary peripheral blood B cells with higher effect being on asthmatic B cells. These findings revealed a key role for IL-17 in enhancing the migration of B cells to the lung tissue during asthma or COPD. PMID:25494178

  3. Neurotrophins and B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Hillis, Jennifer; O'Dwyer, Michael; Gorman, Adrienne M

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors act as important proliferative and pro-survival factors in a variety of cell types. Neurotrophins are produced by multiple cell types in both pro- and mature forms, and can act in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. The p75(NTR) and Trk receptors can elicit signalling in response to the presence or absence of their corresponding neurotrophin ligands. This signalling, along with neurotrophin and receptor expression, varies between different cell types. Neurotrophins and their receptors have been shown to be expressed by and elicit signalling in B lymphocytes. In general, most neurotrophins are expressed by activated B-cells and memory B-cells. Likewise, the TrkB95 receptor is seen on activated B-cells, while TrkA and p75(NTR) are expressed by both resting and active B-cells as well as memory B-cells. Nerve growth factor stimulates B-cell proliferation, memory B-cell survival, antibody production and CD40 expression. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is involved in B-cell maturation in the bone marrow through TrkB95. Overall neurotrophins and their receptors have been shown to be involved in B-cell proliferation, development, differentiation, antibody secretion and survival. As well as expression and activity in healthy B-cells, the neurotrophins and their receptors can contribute to B-cell malignancies including acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma and multiple myeloma. They are involved in B-cell malignancy survival and potentially in drug resistance. PMID:26399960

  4. Symptomatic Massive Splenomegaly in Persistent Polyclonal B-cell Lymphocytosis Requiring Splenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwandin, Shanel B.; Weisenberg, Elliot S.; Ozer, Howard; Maker, Ajay V.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Persistent polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (PPBL) is a rare lymphoproliferative hematological disease characterized by binucleated lymphocytes, CD 19+ CD 5?lymphocytosis, and elevated levels of serum immunoglobulin M (IgM). It can rarely be associated with splenomegaly, though the disease usually remains indolent. Case Presentation We present a case of PPBL in a young man with massive splenomegaly that mimicked isolated splenic lymphoma requiring splenectomy for persistent pain, symptoms, and diagnosis. Discussion Determining the etiology of splenomegaly in these patients is often confounding due to a lack of a tissue diagnosis and the limited morphological and immuno-histochemical features of PPBL, therefore, the presentation remains highly concerning for lymphoma. Conclusion The presentation, surgical treatment, tissue and peripheral blood molecular analysis, and flow cytometry integral to managing these patients and to prevent an assumptive and misleading diagnosis are reviewed. PMID:26693179

  5. Genetic errors of the human caspase recruitment domain-B-cell lymphoma 10-mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma-translocation gene 1 (CBM) complex: Molecular, immunologic, and clinical heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Pérez de Diego, Rebeca; Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Martínez-Barricarte, Rubén; Cubillos-Zapata, Carolina; Ferreira Cerdán, Antonio; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Three members of the caspase recruitment domain (CARD) family of adaptors (CARD9, CARD10, and CARD11) are known to form heterotrimers with B-cell lymphoma 10 (BCL10) and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma-translocation gene 1 (MALT1). These 3 CARD-BCL10-MALT1 (CBM) complexes activate nuclear factor ?B in both the innate and adaptive arms of immunity. Human inherited defects of the 3 components of the CBM complex, including the 2 adaptors CARD9 and CARD11 and the 2 core components BCL10 and MALT1, have recently been reported. Biallelic loss-of-function mutant alleles underlie several different immunologic and clinical phenotypes, which can be assigned to 2 distinct categories. Isolated invasive fungal infections of unclear cellular basis are associated with CARD9 deficiency, whereas a broad range of clinical manifestations, including those characteristic of T- and B-lymphocyte defects, are associated with CARD11, MALT1, and BCL10 deficiencies. Interestingly, human subjects with these mutations have some features in common with the corresponding knockout mice, but other features are different between human subjects and mice. Moreover, germline and somatic gain-of-function mutations of MALT1, BCL10, and CARD11 have also been found in patients with other lymphoproliferative disorders. This broad range of germline and somatic CBM lesions, including loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations, highlights the contribution of each of the components of the CBM complex to human immunity. PMID:26277595

  6. B cell lymphoma and myeloma in murine Gaucher's disease.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, E V; Wang, S Z; Archer, J; Dekker, N; Aerts, J M F G; Karlsson, S; Cox, T M

    2013-09-01

    Multiple myeloma and B cell lymphoma are leading causes of death in Gaucher's disease but the nature of the stimulus driving the often noted clonal expansion of immunoglobulin-secreting B cells and cognate lymphoid malignancy is unknown. We investigated the long-term development of B cell malignancies in an authentic model of non-neuronopathic Gaucher's disease in mice: selective deficiency of ?-glucocerebrosidase in haematopoietic cells [Gba(tm1Karl/tm1Karl)Tg(Mx1-cre)1Cgn/0, with excision of exons 9-11 of the murine GBA1 gene, is induced by poly[I:C]. Mice with Gaucher's disease showed visceral storage of ?-glucosylceramide and greatly elevated plasma ?-glucosylsphingosine [median 57.9 (range 19.8-159) nm; n = 39] compared with control mice from the same strain [median 0.56 (range 0.04-1.38) nm; n = 29] (p < 0.0001). Sporadic fatal B cell lymphomas developed in 11 of 21 GD mice (6-24 months) but only two of eight control animals developed tumours by age 24 months. Unexpectedly, most mice with overt lymphoma had absent or few Gaucher cells but local inflammatory macrophages were present. Eleven of 39 of Gaucher mice developed monoclonal gammopathy, but in the control group only one animal of 25 had clonal immunoglobulin abnormalities. Seven of 10 of the B cell lymphomas were found to secrete a monoclonal paraprotein and the lymphomas stained intensely for pan-B cell markers; reactive T lymphocytes were also present in tumour tissue. In the Gaucher mouse strain, it was notable that, as in patients with this disease, CD138(+) plasma cells frequently surrounded splenic macrophages engorged with glycosphingolipid. Our strain of mice, with inducible deficiency of ?-glucocerebrosidase in haematopoietic cells and a high frequency of sporadic lethal B cell malignancies, faithfully recapitulates human Gaucher's disease: it serves as a tractable model to investigate the putative role of bioactive sphingolipids in the control of B cell proliferation and the pathogenesis of myelomatosis-the most prevalent human cancer associated with this disorder. PMID:23775597

  7. B-Cell Hematologic Malignancy Vaccination Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-15

    Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Lymphocytosis; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Hematological Malignancies

  8. The expanding family of regulatory B cells

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Madhvi

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade it has become evident that in addition to producing antibody, B cells activate the immune system by producing cytokines and via antigen presentation. In addition, B cells also exhibit immunosuppressive functions via diverse regulatory mechanisms. This subset of B cells, known as regulatory B cells (Bregs), contributes to the maintenance of tolerance, primarily via the production of IL-10. Studies in experimental animal models, as well as in patients with autoimmune diseases, have identified multiple Breg subsets exhibiting diverse mechanisms of immune suppression. In this review, we describe the different Breg subsets identified in mice and humans, and their diverse mechanisms of suppression in different disease settings. PMID:26071023

  9. Altered functional B cell subset populations in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome compared to healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Bradley, A S; Ford, B; Bansal, A S

    2013-04-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a heterogeneous disorder of unknown aetiology characterized by disabling fatigue, headaches, sleep disturbance and several other symptoms. The onset of CFS may follow a viral infection or period of stress. Patients with CFS do not have hypogammaglobulinaemia, predisposition to recurrent bacterial infections or symptoms of autoimmunity. To date, defects in B cell numbers or function have not been shown in the literature. However, treatment with anti-B cell therapy using Rituximab has recently shown benefit to CFS patients. We therefore postulated that patients with CFS had a subtle humoral immune dysfunction, and performed extended B cell immunophenotyping. We undertook a detailed characterization of the proportions of the different B cell subsets in 33 patients with CFS fulfilling the Canadian and Fukada criteria for CFS and compared these with 24 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HC). CFS patients had greater numbers of naive B cells as a percentage of lymphocytes: 6·3 versus 3·9% in HC (P?=?0·034), greater numbers of naive B cells as a percentage of B cells: 65 versus 47% in controls (P?=?0·003), greater numbers of transitional B cells: 1·8 versus 0·8% in controls (P?=?0·025) and reduced numbers of plasmablasts: 0·5 versus 0·9% in controls (P?=?0·013). While the cause of these changes is unclear, we speculate whether they may suggest a subtle tendency to autoimmunity. PMID:23480187

  10. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome due to somatic FAS mutation (ALPS-sFAS) combined with a germline caspase-10 (CASP10) variation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Feito, Ana; Melero, Josefa; Mora-Díaz, Sergio; Rodríguez-Vigil, Carmen; Elduayen, Ramón; González-Granado, Luis I; Pérez-Méndez, Dolores; Sánchez-Zapardiel, Elena; Ruiz-García, Raquel; Menchén, Miguela; Díaz-Madroñero, Josefa; Paz-Artal, Estela; Del Orbe-Barreto, Rafael; Riñón, Marta; Allende, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by impaired Fas/FasL-mediated apoptosis of lymphocytes and is characterized by chronic nonmalignant or benign lymphoproliferation, autoimmune manifestations and expansion of double negative (DN) T-cells (TCR??+CD4-CD8-). Most cases of ALPS are associated with germline (ALPS-FAS) or somatic (ALPS-sFAS) heterozygous FAS mutations or a combination of both. Here we report three unrelated patients with ALPS-sFAS. Only one of them showed impaired Fas function in PHA-activated T-cells. In this patient, the genetic analysis of the caspase-10 gene (CASP10) identified a heterozygous germline change in exon 9 (c.1337A>G) causing Y446C substitution in the caspase-10 protein. In addition, this patient had a dysregulated T- and B-cell phenotype; circulating lymphocytes showed expansion of T effector memory CD45RA+ (TEMRA) CD4 T-cells, effector memory CD8 T-cells, CD21(low) B-cells and reduced memory switched B-cells. Additionally, this patient showed altered expression in T-cells of several molecules that change during differentiation from naïve to effector cells (CD27, CD95, CD57 and perforin). Molecular alterations in genes of the Fas pathway are necessary for the development of ALPS and this syndrome could be influenced by the concurrent effect of other mutations hitting different genes involved in Fas or related pathways. PMID:26323380

  11. Interleukin-5 Supports the Expansion of Fas Ligand-Expressing Killer B Cells that Induce Antigen-Specific Apoptosis of CD4+ T Cells and Secrete Interleukin-10

    PubMed Central

    Klinker, Matthew W.; Reed, Tamra J.; Fox, David A.; Lundy, Steven K.

    2013-01-01

    Beyond their critical role in humoral immunity, B lymphocytes can employ a variety of immunomodulatory mechanisms including expression of the apoptosis-inducing molecule Fas ligand (FasL; CD178). Here, we extensively characterized the surface phenotype of FasL+ killer B cells, showing they are enriched in the IgMhighCD5+CD1dhigh B cell subset previously reported to contain a higher frequency of B cells producing interleukin-10 (IL-10). A rare population of B cells expressing IL-10 was present among FasL+ B cells, but most FasL+ B cells did not produce IL-10. We also identify interleukin-5 (IL-5) as a novel inducer of killer B cell function. Constitutively FasL+ B cells expressed higher levels of the IL-5 receptor, and treating B cells with IL-5 and CD40L resulted in the expansion of a B cell population enriched for FasL+ cells. B cells stimulated with IL-5 and CD40L were potent inducers of apoptosis in activated primary CD4+ T cells, and this killing function was antigen-specific and dependent upon FasL. IL-5 also enhanced IL-10 secretion in B cells stimulated with CD40L. Taken together these findings elucidate the relationship of FasL+ B cells and IL-10-producing B cells and demonstrate that IL-5 can induce or enhance both killer B cell activity and IL-10 secretion in B cells. Finally, we found that the killer B cell activity induced by IL-5 was completely blocked by IL-4, suggesting the existence of a previously unknown antagonistic relationship between these type-2 cytokines in modulating the activity of killer B cells. Targeting this IL-5/IL-4 signaling axis may therefore represent a novel area of drug discovery in inflammatory disorders. PMID:23940537

  12. Memory B-cell reconstitution following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an EBV-associated transformation event.

    PubMed

    Burns, David M; Tierney, Rose; Shannon-Lowe, Claire; Croudace, Jo; Inman, Charlotte; Abbotts, Ben; Nagra, Sandeep; Fox, Christopher P; Chaganti, Sridhar; Craddock, Charles F; Moss, Paul; Rickinson, Alan B; Rowe, Martin; Bell, Andrew I

    2015-12-17

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) provides a unique opportunity to track Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in the context of the reconstituting B-cell system. Although many allo-HSCT recipients maintain low or undetectable levels of EBV DNA posttransplant, a significant proportion exhibit elevated and rapidly increasing EBV loads which, if left untreated, may lead to potentially fatal EBV-associated posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease. Intriguingly, this high-level EBV reactivation typically arises in the first 3 months posttransplant, at a time when the peripheral blood contains low numbers of CD27(+) memory cells which are the site of EBV persistence in healthy immunocompetent donors. To investigate this apparent paradox, we prospectively monitored EBV levels and B-cell reconstitution in a cohort of allo-HSCT patients for up to 12 months posttransplant. In patients with low or undetectable levels of EBV, the circulating B-cell pool consisted predominantly of transitional and naive cells, with a marked deficiency of CD27(+) memory cells which lasted >12 months. However, among patients with high EBV loads, there was a significant increase in both the proportion and number of CD27(+) memory B cells. Analysis of sorted CD27(+) memory B cells from these patients revealed that this population was preferentially infected with EBV, expressed EBV latent transcripts associated with B-cell growth transformation, had a plasmablastic phenotype, and frequently expressed the proliferation marker Ki-67. These findings suggest that high-level EBV reactivation following allo-HSCT may drive the expansion of latently infected CD27(+) B lymphoblasts in the peripheral blood. PMID:26450987

  13. Altered BCR and TLR signals promote enhanced positive selection of autoreactive transitional B cells in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kolhatkar, Nikita S; Brahmandam, Archana; Thouvenel, Christopher D; Becker-Herman, Shirly; Jacobs, Holly M; Schwartz, Marc A; Allenspach, Eric J; Khim, Socheath; Panigrahi, Anil K; Luning Prak, Eline T; Thrasher, Adrian J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Candotti, Fabio; Torgerson, Troy R; Sanz, Ignacio; Rawlings, David J

    2015-09-21

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked immunodeficiency disorder frequently associated with systemic autoimmunity, including autoantibody-mediated cytopenias. WAS protein (WASp)-deficient B cells have increased B cell receptor (BCR) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, suggesting that these pathways might impact establishment of the mature, naive BCR repertoire. To directly investigate this possibility, we evaluated naive B cell specificity and composition in WASp-deficient mice and WAS subjects (n = 12). High-throughput sequencing and single-cell cloning analysis of the BCR repertoire revealed altered heavy chain usage and enrichment for low-affinity self-reactive specificities in murine marginal zone and human naive B cells. Although negative selection mechanisms including deletion, anergy, and receptor editing were relatively unperturbed, WASp-deficient transitional B cells showed enhanced proliferation in vivo mediated by antigen- and Myd88-dependent signals. Finally, using both BCR sequencing and cell surface analysis with a monoclonal antibody recognizing an intrinsically autoreactive heavy chain, we show enrichment in self-reactive cells specifically at the transitional to naive mature B cell stage in WAS subjects. Our combined data support a model wherein modest alterations in B cell-intrinsic, BCR, and TLR signals in WAS, and likely other autoimmune disorders, are sufficient to alter B cell tolerance via positive selection of self-reactive transitional B cells. PMID:26371186

  14. B Cells and Autoantibodies in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pröbstel, Anne-Katrin; Sanderson, Nicholas S. R.; Derfuss, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    While over the past decades T cells have been considered key players in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), it has only recently become evident that B cells have a major contributing role. Our understanding of the role of B cells has evolved substantially following the clinical success of B cell-targeting therapies and increasing experimental evidence for significant B cell involvement. Rather than mere antibody-producing cells, it is becoming clear that they are team players with the capacity to prime and regulate T cells, and function both as pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. However, despite tremendous efforts, the target antigen(s) of B cells in MS have yet to be identified. The first part of this review summarizes the clinical evidence and results from animal studies pointing to the relevance of B cells in the pathogenesis of MS. The second part gives an overview of the currently known potential autoantigen targets. The third part recapitulates and critically appraises the currently available B cell-directed therapies. PMID:26197319

  15. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: an update and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shaili; Wu, Eveline; Rao, V. Koneti

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized by immune dysregulation due to a defect in lymphocyte apoptosis. The clinical manifestations may be noted in multiple family members and include lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, increased risk of lymphoma and autoimmune disease, which typically involve hematopoietic cell lines manifesting as multilineage cytopenias. Since the disease was first characterized in the early 1990s, there have been many advances in the diagnosis and management of this syndrome. The inherited genetic defect of many ALPS patients has involved (FAS) pathway signaling proteins, but there remain those patients who carry undefined genetic defects. Despite ALPS having historically been considered a primary immune defect presenting in early childhood, adult onset presentation is increasingly becoming recognized, and more so in genetically undefined patients and those with somatic FAS mutations. Thus, future research may identify novel pathways and/or regulatory proteins important in lymphocyte activation and apoptosis. PMID:25086580

  16. [Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: a case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Sun, J P; Lu, X T; Zhao, W H; Hua, Y

    2015-12-18

    We described 1 case of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), first diagnosed in our hospital, and reviewed the recent literature. The 11-month old male patient presented with a history of splenomegaly and hepatomegaly since 1 month after birth. He suffered recurrent infectious diseases including cytomegalovirus infection, parvovirus B19 infection and chronic diarrhea disease. Besides, his symptoms included hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. The laboratory abnormality indicated an expanded population of alpha/beta double-negative T cells (DNTs) (27.18% of lymphocytes, 35.16% of CD3+ T lymphocytes) in peripheral blood, and autoantibodies including antinuclear antibody, double-stranded DNA and rheumatic factor were positive. Hyper gamma globulinemia and positive direct Coombs tests were seen in the patient. His parents were both healthy and denied autoimmune diseases. We identified a heterozygous point mutation in exon 3 of the FAS gene carrying c.309 A>C, resulting in a single base pair substitution in exon 3 of FAS gene which changed the codon of Arg103 to Ser103. Unfortunately, we were unable to obtain the gene results of the child's parents. The patient was treated with glucocorticoids in our hospital and with mycophenolatemofetil in other hospital. And we were informed that his anemia condition relieved through the telephone follow-up, but he still suffered recurrent infections, hepatomegaly and splenomegaly still existed. As we all know ALPS is characterized by defective lymphocyte apoptosis, and thus cause lymphoproliferative disease and autoimmune disease, and increase the risk of lymphoma. It is more likely to be misdiagnosed as other diseases. ALPS should be suspected in the case of chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly and autoimmune features. Flow cytometry approach is helpful for the diagnosis. Immunosuppressive drugs are the necessary treatment. PMID:26679669

  17. Ageing of the B-cell repertoire.

    PubMed

    Martin, Victoria; Bryan Wu, Yu-Chang; Kipling, David; Dunn-Walters, Deborah

    2015-09-01

    Older people are more susceptible to infection, less responsive to vaccination and have a more inflammatory immune environment. Using spectratype analysis, we have previously shown that the B-cell repertoire of older people shows evidence of inappropriate clonal expansions in the absence of challenge, and that this loss of B-cell diversity correlates with poor health. Studies on response to vaccination, using both spectratyping and high-throughput sequencing of the repertoire, indicate that older responses to challenge are lacking in magnitude and/or delayed significantly. Also that some of the biologically significant differences may be in different classes of antibody. We have also previously shown that normal young B-cell repertoires can vary between different phenotypic subsets of B cells. In this paper, we present an analysis of immunoglobulin repertoire in different subclasses of antibody in five different populations of B cell, and show how the repertoire in these different groups changes with age. Although some age-related repertoire differences occur in naive cells, before exogenous antigen exposure, we see indications that there is a general dysregulation of the selective forces that shape memory B-cell populations in older people. PMID:26194751

  18. The impact of telomere erosion on memory CD8+ T cells in patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Plunkett, Fiona J; Franzese, Ornella; Belaramani, Lavina L; Fletcher, Jean M; Gilmour, Kimberly C; Sharifi, Reza; Khan, Naeem; Hislop, Andrew D; Cara, Andrea; Salmon, Mike; Gaspar, H Bobby; Rustin, Malcom H A; Webster, David; Akbar, Arne N

    2005-08-01

    Patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP) experience excessive T cell proliferation after primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, due to mutations in the signalling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) associated protein (SAP) molecule. We examined the impact of dysfunctional proliferative control on the extent of CD8+ T cell differentiation in XLP patients who recovered from primary EBV infection. Although these young patients have normal numbers of lytic and latent EBV-epitope-specific CD8+ T cells, they were extremely differentiated as defined by loss of CCR7 and CD27, low telomerase activity and very short telomeres. This was not a direct effect arising from the loss of SAP, but was due to excessive T cell stimulation due to this defect. Thus, transduction of XLP CD8+ T cells with the catalytic component of telomerase (hTERT), but not SAP, prevented telomere loss and considerably extended proliferative lifespan in vitro. These results indicate that excessive proliferation in CD8+ T cells in XLP patients may lead to end-stage differentiation and loss of functional EBV-specific CD8+ T cells through replicative senescence. This may contribute to the defective immunity found in XLP patients who survive acute EBV infection who develop EBV-related B cell lymphomas before the fourth decade of life. PMID:15992610

  19. Syk Tyrosine Kinase Is Critical for B Cell Antibody Responses and Memory B Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Jochen A.; Nys, Josquin; Schweighoffer, Edina; McCleary, Scott; Smithers, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Signals from the BCR are required for Ag-specific B cell recruitment into the immune response. Binding of Ag to the BCR induces phosphorylation of immune receptor tyrosine-based activation motifs in the cytoplasmic domains of the CD79a and CD79b signaling subunits, which subsequently bind and activate the Syk protein tyrosine kinase. Earlier work with the DT40 chicken B cell leukemia cell line showed that Syk was required to transduce BCR signals to proximal activation events, suggesting that Syk also plays an important role in the activation and differentiation of primary B cells during an immune response. In this study, we show that Syk-deficient primary mouse B cells have a severe defect in BCR-induced activation, proliferation, and survival. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Syk is required for both T-dependent and T-independent Ab responses, and that this requirement is B cell intrinsic. In the absence of Syk, Ag fails to induce differentiation of naive B cells into germinal center B cells and plasma cells. Finally, we show that the survival of existing memory B cells is dependent on Syk. These experiments demonstrate that Syk plays a critical role in multiple aspects of B cell Ab responses. PMID:25862820

  20. Receptor Dissociation and B-Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianying; Reth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) is one of the most abundant receptors on the surface of B cells with roughly 100,000-200,000 copies per cell. Signaling through the BCR is crucial for the activation and differentiation of B cells. Unlike other receptors, the BCR can be activated by a large set of structurally different ligands, but the molecular mechanism of BCR activation is still a matter of controversy. Although dominant for a long time, the cross-link model (CLM) of BCR activation is not supported by recent studies of the nanoscale organization of the BCR on the surface of resting B cells. In contrast to the prediction of CLM, the numerous BCR complexes on these cells are not randomly distributed monomers but rather form oligomers which reside within membrane confinements. This finding is more in line with the dissociation activation model (DAM) , wherein B-cell activation is accompanied by an opening of the auto-inhibited BCR oligomers instead of a cross-linking of the BCR monomers . In this review, we discuss in detail the new findings and their implications for BCR signaling. PMID:26428245

  1. Human norovirus culture in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HunoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HunoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HunoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-sydney HunoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HunoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. analysis of infection or attachment samples, including rna extraction and rt-qpcr, requires ~6 h. PMID:26513671

  2. Human norovirus culture in B cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-12-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HuNoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HuNoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-Sydney HuNoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HuNoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. Analysis of infection or attachment samples, including RNA extraction and RT-qPCR, requires ?6 h. PMID:26513671

  3. B cell Mediated Priming Following Pneumococcal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Rabquer, Bradley; Shriner, Anne K.; Smithson, S. Louise; Julie Westerink, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    The primary reservoir for Streptococcus pneumoniae is the human nasopharynx, and colonization is often the initial step in pathogenesis. Recently we have demonstrated that pneumococcal colonization primes the immune response to subsequent vaccination with the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (CPV). In this study we wished to determine if colonization stimulates the production of B cell memory that is activated following vaccination with CPV. To test this hypothesis, we colonized mice with S. pneumoniae serotype 14, adoptively transferred their B cells and CD4+ T cells into naïve recipients, and vaccinated the recipients with CPV. Our results indicate that pneumococcal colonization stimulates the production of memory B cells which are responsible for enhancing the immune response to CPV vaccination. PMID:17240006

  4. Intravenous Immunoglobulin and Immunomodulation of B-Cell – in vitro and in vivo Effects

    PubMed Central

    Mitrevski, Milica; Marrapodi, Ramona; Camponeschi, Alessandro; Cavaliere, Filomena Monica; Lazzeri, Cristina; Todi, Laura; Visentini, Marcella

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is used as replacement therapy in patients with antibody deficiencies and at higher dosages in immune-mediated disorders. Although different mechanisms have been described in vitro, the in vivo immunomodulatory effects of IVIG are poorly understood. Different studies have suggested that IVIG modulates B-cell functions as activation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Recently, it was shown that IVIG induces in vitro B-cell unresponsiveness similar to anergy. In accord with this, we recently reported that IVIG therapy in patients affected by common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) interferes in vivo with the B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling by increasing constitutive ERK activation and by reducing the phosphorylated ERK increment induced by BCR cross-linking. Moreover, we observed that IVIG induces in CVID patients an increase of circulating CD21low B-cells, an unusual population of anergic-like B-cells prone to apoptosis. Therefore, IVIG at replacement dose in vivo could prime B-cells to an anergic, apoptotic program. Here, we discuss these recent findings, which may improve our understanding of the immunomodulatory effects of IVIG, individualizing single involved molecules for more specific treatments. PMID:25657650

  5. The Transcription Factor PU.1, Necessary for B-Cell Development Is Expressed in Lymphocyte Predominance, But Not Classical Hodgkin’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Torlakovic, Emina; Tierens, Anne; Dang, Hien D.; Delabie, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Hodgkin’s disease (HD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of predominantly B-cell origin. However, the reasons for the incomplete development of the B-cell phenotype and lack of immunoglobulin expression in classical HD (cHD) have not been fully explained. We examined the expression of PU.1 in HD, an Ets-family transcription factor, which regulates the expression of immunoglobulin and other genes that are important for B-cell development. Immunohistochemistry for PU.1 was performed on 35 cases of cHD and 15 cases of lymphocyte predominance HD as well as 67 non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHL). Expression of PU.1 was studied by Western blotting in four cHD-derived cell lines and in five NHL cell lines. We also studied the expression of two additional B-cell transcription factors, B-cell-specific activator protein and Oct-2. Our results show a striking lack of PU.1 expression by neoplastic cells in cHD but not in lymphocyte predominance HD. Our study also confirmed that B-cell-specific activator protein but not Oct-2 is not expressed by cHD. Western blotting showed no PU.1 protein expression in the cHD-derived cell lines, with the exception of one cell line of putative monocyte/histiocyte origin. The lack of PU.1 protein expression in cHD likely contributes to the lack of immunoglobulin expression and incomplete B-cell phenotype characteristic of the Reed-Sternberg cells in cHD. PMID:11696441

  6. DiGeorge syndrome who developed lymphoproliferative mediastinal mass.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyu Yeun; Hur, Ji Ae; Kim, Ki Hwan; Cha, Yoon Jin; Lee, Mi Jung; Kim, Dong Soo

    2015-03-01

    DiGeorge syndrome is an immunodeficient disease associated with abnormal development of 3rd and 4th pharyngeal pouches. As a hemizygous deletion of chromosome 22q11.2 occurs, various clinical phenotypes are shown with a broad spectrum. Conotruncal cardiac anomalies, hypoplastic thymus, and hypocalcemia are the classic triad of DiGeorge syndrome. As this syndrome is characterized by hypoplastic or aplastic thymus, there are missing thymic shadow on their plain chest x-ray. Immunodeficient patients are traditionally known to be at an increased risk for malignancy, especially lymphoma. We experienced a 7-year-old DiGeorge syndrome patient with mediastinal mass shadow on her plain chest x-ray. She visited Severance Children's Hospital hospital with recurrent pneumonia, and throughout her repeated chest x-ray, there was a mass like shadow on anterior mediastinal area. We did full evaluation including chest computed tomography, chest ultrasonography, and chest magnetic resonance imaging. To rule out malignancy, video assisted thoracoscopic surgery was done. Final diagnosis of the mass which was thought to be malignancy, was lymphoproliferative lesion. PMID:25861334

  7. Type II NKT-TFH cells against Gaucher lipids regulate B-cell immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nair, Shiny; Boddupalli, Chandra Sekhar; Verma, Rakesh; Liu, Jun; Yang, Ruhua; Pastores, Gregory M; Mistry, Pramod K; Dhodapkar, Madhav V

    2015-02-19

    Chronic inflammation including B-cell activation is commonly observed in both inherited (Gaucher disease [GD]) and acquired disorders of lipid metabolism. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying B-cell activation in these settings remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that ?-glucosylceramide 22:0 (?GL1-22) and glucosylsphingosine (LGL1), 2 major sphingolipids accumulated in GD, can be recognized by a distinct subset of CD1d-restricted human and murine type II natural killer T (NKT) cells. Human ?GL1-22- and LGL1-reactive CD1d tetramer-positive T cells have a distinct T-cell receptor usage and genomic and cytokine profiles compared with the classical type I NKT cells. In contrast to type I NKT cells, ?GL1-22- and LGL1-specific NKT cells constitutively express T-follicular helper (TFH) phenotype. Injection of these lipids leads to an increase in respective lipid-specific type II NKT cells in vivo and downstream induction of germinal center B cells, hypergammaglobulinemia, and production of antilipid antibodies. Human ?GL1-22- and LGL1-specific NKT cells can provide efficient cognate help to B cells in vitro. Frequency of LGL1-specific T cells in GD mouse models and patients correlates with disease activity and therapeutic response. Our studies identify a novel type II NKT-mediated pathway for glucosphingolipid-mediated dysregulation of humoral immunity and increased risk of B-cell malignancy observed in metabolic lipid disorders. PMID:25499455

  8. Pre-stimulation of CD81 expression by resting B cells increases proliferation following EBV infection, but the overexpression of CD81 induces the apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Bin; Kim, Daejin; Park, Sung Jae; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Yeong Seok; Park, Sae-Gwang; Choi, In-Hak; Yoon, Sung Ho; Lee, Youn Jae; Paeng, Sunghwa; Hur, Dae Young

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 protein binds to CD81, which is a component of the B cell co-stimulatory complex. The E2-CD81 interaction leads to B cell proliferation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and to the hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes. Epidemiological studies have reported a high prevalence of B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in HCV-positive patients, suggesting a potential association between HCV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the genesis of B lymphocyte proliferative disorders. In the present study, in order to investigate the association between EBV and HCV in B cells, we created an in vitro EBV-induced B cell transformation model. CD81 was gradually overexpressed during transformation by EBV. B cells isolated from HCV-positive patients grew more rapidly and clumped together earlier than B cells isolated from healthy donors following EBV infection. Pre-stimulation of CD81 expressed by resting B cells with anti-CD81 monoclonal antibody (mAb) or HCV E2 accelerated the generation of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) by EBV infection. These cells proliferated prominently through the early expression of interleukin-10 and intracellular latent membrane protein (LMP)-l. By contrast, the overexpression of CD81 on EBV-transformed B cells by anti-CD81 mAb or HCV E2 protein induced apoptosis through reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. These results suggest that the engagement of CD81 expressed by B cells has differential effects on B cell fate (proliferation or apoptosis) according to EBV infection and the expression level of CD81. PMID:26498453

  9. Pre-stimulation of CD81 expression by resting B cells increases proliferation following EBV infection, but the overexpression of CD81 induces the apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells

    PubMed Central

    PARK, GA BIN; KIM, DAEJIN; PARK, SUNG JAE; LEE, HYUN-KYUNG; KIM, JI HYUN; KIM, YEONG SEOK; PARK, SAE-GWANG; CHOI, IN-HAK; YOON, SUNG HO; LEE, YOUN JAE; PAENG, SUNGHWA; HUR, DAE YOUNG

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 protein binds to CD81, which is a component of the B cell co-stimulatory complex. The E2-CD81 interaction leads to B cell proliferation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and to the hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes. Epidemiological studies have reported a high prevalence of B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in HCV-positive patients, suggesting a potential association between HCV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the genesis of B lymphocyte proliferative disorders. In the present study, in order to investigate the association between EBV and HCV in B cells, we created an in vitro EBV-induced B cell transformation model. CD81 was gradually overexpressed during transformation by EBV. B cells isolated from HCV-positive patients grew more rapidly and clumped together earlier than B cells isolated from healthy donors following EBV infection. Pre-stimulation of CD81 expressed by resting B cells with anti-CD81 monoclonal antibody (mAb) or HCV E2 accelerated the generation of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) by EBV infection. These cells proliferated prominently through the early expression of interleukin-10 and intracellular latent membrane protein (LMP)-l. By contrast, the overexpression of CD81 on EBV-transformed B cells by anti-CD81 mAb or HCV E2 protein induced apoptosis through reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. These results suggest that the engagement of CD81 expressed by B cells has differential effects on B cell fate (proliferation or apoptosis) according to EBV infection and the expression level of CD81. PMID:26498453

  10. Rituximab does not reset defective early B cell tolerance checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Nicolas; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Cantaert, Tineke; Herold, Kevan C; Meffre, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients show abnormalities in early B cell tolerance checkpoints, resulting in the accumulation of large numbers of autoreactive B cells in their blood. Treatment with rituximab, an anti-CD20 mAb that depletes B cells, has been shown to preserve ? cell function in T1D patients and improve other autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. However, it remains largely unknown how anti-B cell therapy thwarts autoimmunity in these pathologies. Here, we analyzed the reactivity of Abs expressed by single, mature naive B cells from 4 patients with T1D before and 52 weeks after treatment to determine whether rituximab resets early B cell tolerance checkpoints. We found that anti-B cell therapy did not alter the frequencies of autoreactive and polyreactive B cells, which remained elevated in the blood of all patients after rituximab treatment. Moreover, the limited proliferative history of autoreactive B cells after treatment revealed that these clones were newly generated B cells and not self-reactive B cells that had escaped depletion and repopulated the periphery through homeostatic expansion. We conclude that anti-B cell therapy may provide a temporary dampening of autoimmune processes through B cell depletion. However, repletion with autoreactive B cells may explain the relapse that occurs in many autoimmune patients after anti-B cell therapy. PMID:26642366

  11. Skewed T cell receptor repertoire of V?1+ ?? T lymphocytes after human allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the potential role for Epstein–Barr virus-infected B cells in clonal restriction

    PubMed Central

    Fujishima, N; Hirokawa, M; Fujishima, M; Yamashita, J; Saitoh, H; Ichikawa, Y; Horiuchi, T; Kawabata, Y; Sawada, K-I

    2007-01-01

    The proliferation of V?1+ ?? T lymphocytes has been described in various infections including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) and malaria. However, the antigen specificity and functions of the human V?1+ T cells remain obscure. We sought to explore the biological role for this T cell subset by investigating the reconstitution of T cell receptor (TCR) repertoires of V?1+ ?? T lymphocytes after human allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We observed skewed TCR repertoires of the V?1+ T cells in 27 of 44 post-transplant patients. Only one patient developed EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in the present patient cohort. The -WGI- amino acid motif was observed in CDR3 of clonally expanded V?1+ T cells in half the patients. A skew was also detected in certain healthy donors, and the V?1+ T cell clone derived from the donor mature T cell pool persisted in the recipient's blood even 10 years after transplant. This T cell clone expanded in vitro against stimulation with autologous EBV–lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL), and the V?1+ T cell line expanded in vitro from the same patient showed cytotoxicity against autologous EBV–LCL. EBV-infected cells could also induce in vitro oligoclonal expansions of autologous V?1+ T cells from healthy EBV-seropositive individuals. These results suggest that human V?1+ T cells have a TCR repertoire against EBV-infected B cells and may play a role in protecting recipients of allogeneic HSCT from EBV-associated disease. PMID:17425654

  12. Interleukin-12 stimulation of lymphoproliferative responses in Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    Galvão da Silva, Ana Paula; de Almeida Abrahamsohn, Ises

    2001-01-01

    The cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12) is essential for resistance to Trypanosoma cruzi infection because it stimulates the synthesis of interferon-? (IFN-?), a major activator of the parasiticidal effect of macrophages. A less studied property of IL-12 is its ability to amplify the proliferation of T or natural killer (NK) lymphocytes. We investigated the role of endogenously produced IL-12 in the maintenance of parasite antigen (T-Ag)-specific lymphoproliferative responses during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection. We also studied whether treatment with recombinant IL-12 (rIL-12) would stimulate T-Ag-specific or concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated lymphoproliferation and abrogate the suppression that is characteristic of the acute phase of infection. Production of IL-12 by spleen-cell cultures during T. cruzi infection increased in the first days of infection (days 3–5) and decreased as infection progressed beyond day 7. The growth-promoting activity of endogenous IL-12 on T-Ag-specific proliferation was observed on day 5 of infection. Treatment of cultures with rIL-12 promoted a significant increase in Con A-stimulated proliferation by spleen cells from normal or infected mice. Enhanced T-Ag-specific proliferation by rIL-12 was seen in spleen cell cultures from infected mice providing that nitric oxide production was inhibited by treatment with the competitive inhibitor NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (NMMA). Enhancement of proliferation promoted by IL-12 occurred in the presence of neutralizing anti-interleukin-2 (IL-2) antibody, suggesting that this activity of IL-12 was partly independent of endogenous IL-2. Thymidine incorporation levels achieved with rIL-12 treatment of the cultures were ? 50% of those stimulated by rIL-2 in the same cultures. PMID:11722650

  13. Germinal center B cells and mixed leukocyte reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Monfalcone, A.P.; Kosco, M.H.; Szakal, A.K.; Tew, J.G. )

    1989-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine if germinal center (GC) B cells are sufficiently activated to stimulate mixed leukocyte reactions (MLR). Percoll density fractionation and a panning technique with peanut agglutinin (PNA) were used to isolate GC B cells from the lymph nodes of immune mice. The GC B cells were treated with mitomycin C or irradiation and used to stimulate allogeneic or syngeneic splenic T cells in the MLR. Controls included high-density (HD) B cells prepared from spleens of the same mice and HD B cells activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and dextran sulfate. GC B cells bound high amount sof PNA (i.e., PNAhi). Similarly, the LPS-dextran sulfate-activated B cells were PNAhi. Treatment with neuraminidase rendered the PNAlo HD B cells PNAhi. GC B cells and the LPS-dextran sulfate-activated HD B cells stimulated a potent MLR, while the untreated HD B cells did not. However, following neuraminidase treatment, the resulting PNAhi HD B cell population was able to induce an MLR. The PNA marker appeared to be an indicator of stimulatory activity, but incubating the cells with PNA to bind the cell surface ligand did not interfere with the MLR. GC B cells were also capable of stimulating a syngeneic MLR in most experiments although this was not consistently obtained. It appears that germinal centers represent a unique in vivo microenvironment that provides the necessary signals for B cells to become highly effective antigen-presenting cells.

  14. Antigen-specific B-cell receptor sensitizes B cells to infection by influenza virus

    E-print Network

    Dougan, Stephanie K.

    Influenza A virus-specific B lymphocytes and the antibodies they produce protect against infection. However, the outcome of interactions between an influenza haemagglutinin-specific B cell via its receptor (BCR) and virus ...

  15. B-Cell-Activating Factor and Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Ragheb, Samia; Lisak, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    BAFF is a potent B-cell survival factor, and it plays an essential role in B-cell homeostasis and B-cell function in the periphery. Both normal and autoreactive B cells are BAFF dependent; however, excess BAFF promotes the survival, growth, and maturation of autoreactive B cells. When overexpressed, BAFF protects B cells from apoptosis, thereby contributing to autoimmunity. Three independent studies have shown higher BAFF levels in the circulation of MG patients. BAFF may play an important role in the pathogenesis of MG. BAFF antagonists may well provide new treatment options for MG patients, particularly those patients with thymic lymphoid follicular hyperplasia. PMID:22235365

  16. The Ins and Outs of B Cells in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Blauth, Kevin; Owens, Gregory P.; Bennett, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    B cells play a central role in multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology. B and plasma cells may contribute to disease activity through multiple mechanisms: antigen presentation, cytokine secretion, or antibody production. Molecular analyses of B cell populations in MS patients have revealed significant overlaps between peripheral lymphoid and clonally expanded central nervous system (CNS) B cell populations, indicating that B cell trafficking may play a critical role in driving MS exacerbations. In this review, we will assess our current knowledge of the mechanisms and pathways governing B cell migration into the CNS and examine evidence for and against a compartmentalized B cell response driving progressive MS pathology. PMID:26594215

  17. Deregulation of Fas ligand expression as a novel cause of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease.

    PubMed

    Nabhani, Schafiq; Ginzel, Sebastian; Miskin, Hagit; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Harlev, Dan; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Hönscheid, Andrea; Oommen, Prasad T; Kuhlen, Michaela; Thiele, Ralf; Laws, Hans-Jürgen; Borkhardt, Arndt; Stepensky, Polina; Fischer, Ute

    2015-09-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome is frequently caused by mutations in genes involved in the Fas death receptor pathway, but for 20-30% of patients the genetic defect is unknown. We observed that treatment of healthy T cells with interleukin-12 induces upregulation of Fas ligand and Fas ligand-dependent apoptosis. Consistently, interleukin-12 could not induce apoptosis in Fas ligand-deficient T cells from patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. We hypothesized that defects in the interleukin-12 signaling pathway may cause a similar phenotype as that caused by mutations of the Fas ligand gene. To test this, we analyzed 20 patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome of unknown cause by whole-exome sequencing. We identified a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.698G>A, p.R212*) in the interleukin-12/interleukin-23 receptor-component IL12RB1 in one of these patients. The mutation led to IL12RB1 protein truncation and loss of cell surface expression. Interleukin-12 and -23 signaling was completely abrogated as demonstrated by deficient STAT4 phosphorylation and interferon ? production. Interleukin-12-mediated expression of membrane-bound and soluble Fas ligand was lacking and basal expression was much lower than in healthy controls. The patient presented with the classical symptoms of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: chronic non-malignant, non-infectious lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, elevated numbers of double-negative T cells, autoimmune cytopenias, and increased levels of vitamin B12 and interleukin-10. Sanger sequencing and whole-exome sequencing excluded the presence of germline or somatic mutations in genes known to be associated with the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. Our data suggest that deficient regulation of Fas ligand expression by regulators such as the interleukin-12 signaling pathway may be an alternative cause of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease. PMID:26113417

  18. Emerging role of infectious etiologies in the pathogenesis of marginal zone B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Zucca, Emanuele; Bertoni, Francesco; Vannata, Barbara; Cavalli, Franco

    2014-10-15

    Extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphomas of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) arise from lymphoid populations that are induced by chronic inflammation in extranodal sites. The most frequently affected organ is the stomach, where MALT lymphoma is incontrovertibly associated with a chronic gastritis induced by a microbial pathogen, Helicobacter pylori. Gastric MALT lymphoma therefore represents a paradigm for evaluating inflammation-associated lymphomagenesis, which may lead to a deeper understanding of a possible etiologic association between other microorganisms and nongastric marginal zone lymphomas. Besides infectious etiology, chronic inflammation caused by autoimmune diseases, such as Sjögren syndrome or Hashimoto thyroiditis, can also carry a significant risk factor for the development of marginal zone lymphoma. In addition to the continuous antigenic drive, additional oncogenic events play a relevant role in lymphoma growth and progression to the point at which the lymphoproliferative process may eventually become independent of antigenic stimulation. Recent studies on MALT lymphomas have in fact demonstrated genetic alterations affecting the NF-?B) pathway, a major signaling pathway involved in many cancers. This review aims to present marginal zone lymphoma as an example of the close pathogenetic link between chronic inflammation and tumor development, with particular attention to the role of infectious agents and the integration of these observations into everyday clinical practice. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Paradigm Shifts in Lymphoma." PMID:25320370

  19. Targets for Ibrutinib Beyond B Cell Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Berglöf, A; Hamasy, A; Meinke, S; Palma, M; Krstic, A; Månsson, R; Kimby, E; Österborg, A; Smith, C I E

    2015-09-01

    Ibrutinib (Imbruvica™) is an irreversible, potent inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Over the last few years, ibrutinib has developed from a promising drug candidate to being approved by FDA for the treatment of three B cell malignancies, a truly remarkable feat. Few, if any medicines are monospecific and ibrutinib is no exception; already during ibrutinib's initial characterization, it was found that it could bind also to other kinases. In this review, we discuss the implications of such interactions, which go beyond the selective effect on BTK in B cell malignancies. In certain cases, the outcome of ibrutinib treatment likely results from the combined inhibition of BTK and other kinases, causing additive or synergistic, effects. Conversely, there are also examples when the clinical outcome seems unrelated to inhibition of BTK. Thus, more specifically, adverse effects such as enhanced bleeding or arrhythmias could potentially be explained by different interactions. We also predict that during long-term treatment bone homoeostasis might be affected due to the inhibition of osteoclasts. Moreover, the binding of ibrutinib to molecular targets other than BTK or effects on cells other than B cell-derived malignancies could be beneficial and result in new indications for clinical applications. PMID:26111359

  20. Cryptic B cell response to renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, R.J.; Silva, I.A.; Chen, B.J.; Punch, J.D.; Cascalho, M.; Platt, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Renal transplantation reliably evokes allo-specific B cell and T cell responses in mice. Yet, human recipients of kidney transplants with normal function usually exhibit little or no antibody specific for the transplant donor during the early weeks and months after transplantation. Indeed, the absence of anti-donor antibodies is taken to reflect effective immunosuppressive therapy and to predict a favorable outcome. Whether the absence of donor-specific antibodies reflects absence of a B-cell response to the donor, tolerance to the donor or immunity masked by binding of donor-specific antibodies to the graft is not known. To distinguish between these possibilities, we devised a novel ELISPOT, using cultured donor, recipient and third-party fibroblasts as targets. We enumerated donor-specific antibody-secreting cells in the blood of nine renal allograft recipients with normal kidney function before and after transplantation. Although none of the nine subjects had detectable donor-specific antibodies before or after transplantation, all exhibited increases in the frequency of donor-specific antibody-secreting cells eight weeks after transplantation. The responses were directed against the donor HLA-class I antigens. The increase in frequency of donor-specific antibody-secreting cells after renal transplantation indicates that B cells respond specifically to the transplant donor more often than previously thought. PMID:23750851

  1. Estrogen receptor signal in regulation of B cell activation during diverse immune responses.

    PubMed

    Asaba, Josaine; Bandyopadhyay, Mausumi; Kindy, Mark; Dasgupta, Subhajit

    2015-11-01

    The role of signalling through oestrogen receptors (ERs) in the regulation of B cell activation is an area of growing importance not only in terms protective immunity but also in the determination of the mechanisms of the onset of autoimmune disorders and cancers. The mode of signalling action of this single chain nuclear receptor protein molecule depends on its ability to bind to the promoters of Pax5, HOXC4 and apolipoprotein B RNA-editing enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) genes. ER-mediated transcriptional regulation induces class switch recombination of the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (VH) to DH-JH genes and somatic hypermutation in developing B cells. The mode of action of ER is associated with BCR-signal pathways that involve the regulator proteins BAFF and APRIL. Additionally, the plasma membrane-bound G protein-coupled oestrogen receptor-1 (GEPR1) directs diverse cell signalling events in B cells that involve the MAPK pathways. These signals are immensely important during progenitor and precursor B cell activation. We have focused our goals on the medicinal aspects of ER-signalling mechanisms and their effects on polyclonal B cell activation. PMID:26299327

  2. Gastrointestinal B-cell lymphomas: From understanding B-cell physiology to classification and molecular pathology.

    PubMed

    Sagaert, Xavier; Tousseyn, Thomas; Yantiss, Rhonda K

    2012-12-15

    The gut is the most common extranodal site where lymphomas arise. Although all histological lymphoma types may develop in the gut, small and large B-cell lymphomas predominate. The sometimes unexpected finding of a lymphoid lesion in an endoscopic biopsy of the gut may challenge both the clinician (who is not always familiar with lymphoma pathogenesis) and the pathologist (who will often be hampered in his/her diagnostic skill by the limited amount of available tissue). Moreover, the past 2 decades have spawned an avalanche of new data that encompasses both the function of the reactive B-cell as well as the pathogenic pathways that lead to its neoplastic counterpart, the B-cell lymphoma. Therefore, this review aims to offer clinicians an overview of B-cell lymphomas in the gut, and their pertinent molecular features that have led to new insights regarding lymphomagenesis. It addresses the question as how to incorporate all presently available information on normal and neoplastic B-cell differentiation, and how this knowledge can be applied in daily clinical practice (e.g., diagnostic tools, prognostic biomarkers or therapeutic targets) to optimalise the managment of this heterogeneous group of neoplasms. PMID:23443141

  3. Avian oncogenesis induced by lymphoproliferative disease virus: a neglected or emerging retroviral pathogen?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is an exogenous oncogenic retrovirus that induces lymphoid tumors in some galliform species of birds. Historically, outbreaks of LPDV have been reported from Europe and Israel. Although the virus has previously never been detected in North America, herein we ...

  4. B-cell anergy: from transgenic models to naturally occurring anergic B cells?

    PubMed Central

    Cambier, John C.; Gauld, Stephen B.; Merrell, Kevin T.; Vilen, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Anergy, a condition in which cells persist in the periphery but are unresponsive to antigen, is responsible for silencing many self-reactive B cells. Loss of anergy is known to contribute to the development of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus and type 1 diabetes. Multiple transgenic mouse models have enabled the dissection of mechanisms that underlie anergy, and recently, anergic B cells have been identified in the periphery of wild-type mice. Heterogeneity of mechanistic concepts developed using model systems has complicated our understanding of anergy and its biological features. In this Review, we compare and contrast the salient features of anergic B cells with a view to developing unifying mechanistic hypotheses that explain their lifestyles. PMID:17641666

  5. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome and non-Hodgkin lymphoma: what 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography can do in the management of these patients? Suggestions from a case report.

    PubMed

    Cistaro, A; Pazè, F; Durando, S; Cogoni, M; Faletti, R; Vesco, S; Vallero, S; Quartuccio, N; Treglia, G; Ramenghi, U

    2014-01-01

    A young patient with undefined autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS-U) and low back pain underwent a CT and MRI study that showed enhancing vertebral lesions, some pulmonary nodules and diffuse latero-cervical lymphadenopathy. A (18)F-FDG-PET/CT scan showed many areas of intense (18)F-FDG uptake in multiple vertebrae, in some ribs, in the sacrum, in the liver, in both lungs, in multiple lymph nodes spread in the cervical, thoracic and abdominal chains. A bone marrow biopsy showed a "lymphomatoid granulomatosis", a rare variant of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). After the treatment, the (18)F-FDG-PET/CT scan showed a complete metabolic response. PMID:23845452

  6. Dynamics of B cells in germinal centres

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, Nilushi S.; Klein, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Humoral immunity depends on the germinal centre (GC) reaction during which somatically mutated high-affinity memory B cells and plasma cells are generated. Recent studies have uncovered crucial cues that are required for the formation and the maintenance of GCs and for the selection of high-affinity antibody mutants. In addition, it is now clear that these events are promoted by the dynamic movements of cells within and between GCs. These findings have resolved the complexities of the GC reaction in greater detail than ever before. This Review focuses on these recent advances and discusses their implications for the establishment of humoral immunity. PMID:25656706

  7. Dengue Virus Directly Stimulates Polyclonal B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Michelle Premazzi; de Morais, Ana Theresa Silveira; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is associated to vigorous inflammatory response, to a high frequency of activated B cells, and to increased levels of circulating cross-reactive antibodies. We investigated whether direct infection of B cells would promote activation by culturing primary human B lymphocytes from healthy donors with DENV in vitro. B cells were susceptible, but poorly permissive to infection. Even though, primary B cells cultured with DENV induced substantial IgM secretion, which is a hallmark of polyclonal B cell activation. Notably, DENV induced the activation of B cells obtained from either DENV immune or DENV naïve donors, suggesting that it was not dependent on DENV-specific secondary/memory response. B cell stimulation was dependent on activation of MAPK and CD81. B cells cultured with DENV also secreted IL-6 and presented increased expression of CD86 and HLA-DR, which might contribute to B lymphocyte co-stimulatory function. Indeed, PBMCs, but not isolated B cells, secreted high amounts of IgG upon DENV culture, suggesting that interaction with other cell types in vivo might promote Ig isotype switching and IgG secretion from different B cell clones. These findings suggest that activation signaling pathways triggered by DENV interaction with non-specific receptors on B cells might contribute to the exacerbated response observed in dengue patients. PMID:26656738

  8. Intrarenal B Cell Cytokines Promote Transplant Fibrosis and Tubular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Tse, G H; Johnston, C J C; Kluth, D; Gray, M; Gray, D; Hughes, J; Marson, L P

    2015-12-01

    Renal transplantation is the optimum treatment for end-stage renal failure. B cells have been identified in chronic allograft damage (CAD) and associated with the development of tertiary lymphoid tissue within the human renal allograft. We performed renal transplantation in mice to model CAD and identified B cells forming tertiary lymphoid tissue with germinal centers. Intra-allograft B220(+) B cells comprised of IgM(high) CD23(-) B cells, IgM(lo) CD23(+) B cells, and IgM(lo) CD23(-) B cells with elevated expression of CD86. Depletion of B cells with anti-CD20 was associated with an improvement in CAD but only when administered after transplantation and not before. Isolated intra-allograft B cells were cultured and shown to synthesize multiple cytokines, the most abundant of these were GRO-? (CXCL1), RANTES (CCL5), IL-6 and MCP-1 (CCL2). Tubular loss was observed with T cell accumulation within the allograft and development of interstitial fibrosis, whilst type III collagen deposition was observed in areas of F4/80(+) macrophages and PDGFR-?(+) and transgelin(+) fibroblasts, all of which were reduced by B cell depletion. We have shown that intra-allograft B cells are key mediators of CAD. B cells possibly contribute to CAD by intra-allograft secretion of cytokines and chemokines. PMID:26211786

  9. Knockout of Epstein-Barr Virus BPLF1 Retards B-Cell Transformation and Lymphoma Formation in Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guangming; Montgomery, Stephanie A.; Montgomery, Nathan D.; Su, Lishan; Pagano, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT BPLF1 of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is classified as a late lytic cycle protein but is also found in the viral tegument, suggesting its potential involvement at both initial and late stages of viral infection. BPLF1 possesses both deubiquitinating and deneddylating activity located in its N-terminal domain and is involved in processes that affect viral infectivity, viral DNA replication, DNA repair, and immune evasion. A recently constructed EBV BPLF1-knockout (KO) virus was used in conjunction with a humanized mouse model that can be infected with EBV, enabling the first characterization of BPLF1 function in vivo. Results demonstrate that the BPLF1-knockout virus is approximately 90% less infectious than wild-type (WT) virus. Transformation of human B cells, a hallmark of EBV infection, was delayed and reduced with BPLF1-knockout virus. Humanized mice infected with EBV BPLF1-knockout virus showed less weight loss and survived longer than mice infected with equivalent infectious units of WT virus. Additionally, splenic tumors formed in 100% of mice infected with WT EBV but in only 25% of mice infected with BPLF1-KO virus. Morphological features of spleens containing tumors were similar to those in EBV-induced posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) and were almost identical to cases seen in human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The presence of EBV genomes was detected in all mice that developed tumors. The results implicate BPLF1 in human B-cell transformation and tumor formation in humanized mice. PMID:26489865

  10. B-cell lymphoma 6 and the molecular pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ci, Weimin; Polo, Jose M; Melnick, Ari

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review The BCL6 transcriptional repressor is the most commonly involved oncogene in B-cell lymphomas. Sustained expression of BCL6 causes malignant transformation of germinal center (GC) B-cells. Understanding the mechanism of action of BCL6 is crucial for the study of how aberrant transcriptional programming leads to lymphomagenesis and development of targeted anti-lymphoma therapy. Recent findings Identification of BCL6 target genes indicate a critical role for BCL6 in facilitating a state of physiological genomic instability required for GC B-cells to undergo affinity maturation, and suggest its contribution to several additional cellular functions. The discovery of several layers of counter-regulatory mechanisms reveals how B-cells can control and fine-tune the potentially lymphomagenic actions of BCL6. From the biochemical standpoint, BCL6 can regulate distinct biological pathways through different cofactors. This observation explains how the biological actions of BCL6 can be physiologically controlled through separate mechanisms and affords the means for improved therapeutic targeting. The fact that patients with BCL6-dependent lymphoma can be identified based on gene signatures suggests that therapeutic trials of BCL6 inhibitors could be personalized to these individuals. Summary BCL6 plays a fundamental role in lymphomagenesis and is an excellent therapeutic target for development of improved anti-lymphoma therapeutic regimens. PMID:18536578

  11. Gene Expression Profiling of the Response to Interferon Beta in Epstein-Barr-Transformed and Primary B Cells of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Khsheibun, Rana; Paperna, Tamar; Volkowich, Anat; Lejbkowicz, Izabella; Avidan, Nili; Miller, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    The effects of interferon-beta (IFN-?), one of the key immunotherapies used in multiple sclerosis (MS), on peripheral blood leukocytes and T cells have been extensively studied. B cells are a less abundant leukocyte type, and accordingly less is known about the B cell-specific response to IFN-?. To identify gene expression changes and pathways induced by IFN-? in B cells, we studied the in vitro response of human Epstein Barr-transformed B cells (lymphoblast cell lines-LCLs), and validated our results in primary B cells. LCLs were derived from an MS patient repository. Whole genome expression analysis identified 115 genes that were more than two-fold differentially up-regulated following IFN-? exposure, with over 50 previously unrecognized as IFN-? response genes. Pathways analysis demonstrated that IFN-? affected LCLs in a similar manner to other cell types by activating known IFN-? canonical pathways. Additionally, IFN-? increased the expression of innate immune response genes, while down-regulating many B cell receptor pathway genes and genes involved in adaptive immune responses. Novel response genes identified herein, NEXN, DDX60L, IGFBP4, and HAPLN3, B cell receptor pathway genes, CD79B and SYK, and lymphocyte activation genes, LAG3 and IL27RA, were validated as IFN-? response genes in primary B cells. In this study new IFN-? response genes were identified in B cells, with possible implications to B cell-specific functions. The study's results emphasize the applicability of LCLs for studies of human B cell drug response. The usage of LCLs from patient-based repositories may facilitate future studies of drug response in MS and other immune-mediated disorders with a B cell component. PMID:25025430

  12. The majority of human memory B cells recognizing RhD and tetanus resides in IgM+ B cells.

    PubMed

    Della Valle, Luciana; Dohmen, Serge E; Verhagen, Onno J H M; Berkowska, Magdalena A; Vidarsson, Gestur; Ellen van der Schoot, C

    2014-08-01

    B cell memory to T cell-dependent (TD) Ags are considered to largely reside in class-switched CD27(+) cells. However, we previously observed that anti-RhD (D) Igs cloned from two donors, hyperimmunized with D(+) erythrocytes, were predominantly of the IgM isotype. We therefore analyzed in this study the phenotype and frequency of D- and tetanus toxoid-specific B cells by culturing B cells in limiting dilution upon irradiated CD40L-expressing EL4.B5 cells and testing the culture supernatant. Most Ag-specific B cells for both TD Ags were found to reside in the IgM-expressing B cells, including CD27(-) B cells, in both hyperimmunized donors and nonhyperimmunized volunteers. Only shortly after immunization a sharp increase in Ag-specific CD27(+)IgG(+) B cells was observed. Next, B cells were enriched with D(+) erythrocyte ghosts and sorted as single cells. Sequencing of IGHV, IGLV, IGKV, and BCL6 genes from these D-specific B cell clones demonstrated that both CD27(-)IgM(+) and CD27(+)IgM(+) B cells harbored somatic mutations, documenting their Ag-selected nature. Furthermore, sequencing revealed a clonal relationship between the CD27(-)IgM(+), CD27(+)IgM(+), and CD27(+)IgG(+) B cell subsets. These data strongly support the recently described multiple layers of memory B cells to TD Ags in mice, where IgM(+) B cells represent a memory reservoir which can re-enter the germinal center and ensure replenishment of class-switched memory CD27(+) B cells from Ag-experienced precursors. PMID:24965774

  13. Successful Treatment of Leukemic Mature B-Cell Lymphoid Neoplasm with Similar Features to Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma Possessing Aberrant Myeloid Markers

    PubMed Central

    Imashuku, Shinsaku; Kudo, Naoko; Kubo, Kagekatsu; Saigo, Katsuyasu

    2015-01-01

    In splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL), there are cases that cannot accurately be classified as such because of overlapping morphologic and/or immunophenotypic features. We report here a 76-year-old Japanese female, who showed leukemic B-cell lymphoproliferative disease possessing characteristic features identified for SMZL. The patient was leukemic with white blood cell counts 49,400/µL (abnormal cells, 78.5%) and neoplastic cells were characterized by aberrant expression of myeloid markers with CD19+CD13+ (64.2%) and CD20+CD11c+ (25.1%). Considering her history of previous chemotherapy and systemic leukemic phase of the disease, we treated the patient without performing splenectomy, with successful use of a combination of rituximab/bendamustine hydrochloride and of rituximab/cladribine. The patient has been in a complete remission longer than 44 months, with no detectable M-protein. PMID:26558117

  14. Entry of Francisella tularensis into Murine B Cells: The Role of B Cell Receptors and Complement Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Plzakova, Lenka; Krocova, Zuzana; Kubelkova, Klara; Macela, Ales

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the etiological agent of tularemia, is an intracellular pathogen that dominantly infects and proliferates inside phagocytic cells but can be seen also in non-phagocytic cells, including B cells. Although protective immunity is known to be almost exclusively associated with the type 1 pathway of cellular immunity, a significant role of B cells in immune responses already has been demonstrated. Whether their role is associated with antibody-dependent or antibody-independent B cell functions is not yet fully understood. The character of early events during B cell–pathogen interaction may determine the type of B cell response regulating the induction of adaptive immunity. We used fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to identify the basic requirements for the entry of F. tularensis into B cells within in vivo and in vitro infection models. Here, we present data showing that Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica strain LVS significantly infects individual subsets of murine peritoneal B cells early after infection. Depending on a given B cell subset, uptake of Francisella into B cells is mediated by B cell receptors (BCRs) with or without complement receptor CR1/2. However, F. tularensis strain FSC200 ?iglC and ?ftdsbA deletion mutants are defective in the ability to enter B cells. Once internalized into B cells, F. tularensis LVS intracellular trafficking occurs along the endosomal pathway, albeit without significant multiplication. The results strongly suggest that BCRs alone within the B-1a subset can ensure the internalization process while the BCRs on B-1b and B-2 cells need co-signaling from the co receptor containing CR1/2 to initiate F. tularensis engulfment. In this case, fluidity of the surface cell membrane is a prerequisite for the bacteria’s internalization. The results substantially underline the functional heterogeneity of B cell subsets in relation to F. tularensis. PMID:26161475

  15. Entry of Francisella tularensis into Murine B Cells: The Role of B Cell Receptors and Complement Receptors.

    PubMed

    Plzakova, Lenka; Krocova, Zuzana; Kubelkova, Klara; Macela, Ales

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the etiological agent of tularemia, is an intracellular pathogen that dominantly infects and proliferates inside phagocytic cells but can be seen also in non-phagocytic cells, including B cells. Although protective immunity is known to be almost exclusively associated with the type 1 pathway of cellular immunity, a significant role of B cells in immune responses already has been demonstrated. Whether their role is associated with antibody-dependent or antibody-independent B cell functions is not yet fully understood. The character of early events during B cell-pathogen interaction may determine the type of B cell response regulating the induction of adaptive immunity. We used fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to identify the basic requirements for the entry of F. tularensis into B cells within in vivo and in vitro infection models. Here, we present data showing that Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica strain LVS significantly infects individual subsets of murine peritoneal B cells early after infection. Depending on a given B cell subset, uptake of Francisella into B cells is mediated by B cell receptors (BCRs) with or without complement receptor CR1/2. However, F. tularensis strain FSC200 ?iglC and ?ftdsbA deletion mutants are defective in the ability to enter B cells. Once internalized into B cells, F. tularensis LVS intracellular trafficking occurs along the endosomal pathway, albeit without significant multiplication. The results strongly suggest that BCRs alone within the B-1a subset can ensure the internalization process while the BCRs on B-1b and B-2 cells need co-signaling from the co receptor containing CR1/2 to initiate F. tularensis engulfment. In this case, fluidity of the surface cell membrane is a prerequisite for the bacteria's internalization. The results substantially underline the functional heterogeneity of B cell subsets in relation to F. tularensis. PMID:26161475

  16. Scrapie Pathogenesis in Subclinically Infected B-Cell-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Frigg, Rico; Klein, Michael A.; Hegyi, Ivan; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Aguzzi, Adriano

    1999-01-01

    Prion infections can present without clinical manifestations. B-cell deficiency may be a model for subclinical transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, since it protects mice from disease upon intraperitoneal administration of scrapie prions; however, a proportion of B-cell-deficient mice accumulate protease-resistant prion protein in their brains. Here, we have characterized this subclinical disease. In addition, we have studied the possibility that a neurotoxic factor secreted by B cells may contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:10516067

  17. Translating transitions – how to decipher peripheral human B cell development

    PubMed Central

    Bemark, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Abstract During the last two decades our understanding of human B cell differentiation has developed considerably. Our understanding of the human B cell compartment has advanced from a point where essentially all assays were based on the presence or not of class-switched antibodies to a level where a substantial diversity is appreciated among the cells involved. Several consecutive transitional stages that newly formed IgM expressing B cells go through after they leave the bone marrow, but before they are fully mature, have been described, and a significant complexity is also acknowledged within the IgM expressing and class-switched memory B cell compartments. It is possible to isolate plasma blasts in blood to follow the formation of plasma cells during immune responses, and the importance and uniqueness of the mucosal IgA system is now much more appreciated. Current data suggest the presence of at least one lineage of human innate-like B cells akin to B1 and/or marginal zone B cells in mice. In addition, regulatory B cells with the ability to produce IL-10 have been identified. Clinically, B cell depletion therapy is used for a broad range of conditions. The ability to define different human B cell subtypes using flow cytometry has therefore started to come into clinical use, but as our understanding of human B cell development further progresses, B cell subtype analysis will be of increasing importance in diagnosis, to measure the effect of immune therapy and to understand the underlying causes for diseases. In this review the diversity of human B cells will be discussed, with special focus on current data regarding their phenotypes and functions. PMID:26243514

  18. B-cell-activating factor inhibits CD20-mediated and B-cell receptor-mediated apoptosis in human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yohei; Miyagawa, Yoshitaka; Onda, Keiko; Nakajima, Hideki; Sato, Ban; Horiuchi, Yasuomi; Okita, Hajime; Katagiri, Yohko U; Saito, Masahiro; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Fujimoto, Junichiro; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka

    2008-01-01

    B-cell-activating factor (BAFF) is a survival and maturation factor for B cells belonging to the tumour necrosis factor superfamily. Among three identified functional receptors, the BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) is thought to be responsible for the effect of BAFF on B cells though details of how remain unclear. We determined that a hairy-cell leukaemia line, MLMA, expressed a relatively high level of BAFF-R and was susceptible to apoptosis mediated by either CD20 or B-cell antigen receptor (BCR). Using MLMA cells as an in vitro model of mature B cells, we found that treatment with BAFF could inhibit apoptosis mediated by both CD20 and BCR. We also observed, using immunoblot analysis and microarray analysis, that BAFF treatment induced activation of nuclear factor-?B2 following elevation of the expression level of Bcl-2, which may be involved in the molecular mechanism of BAFF-mediated inhibition of apoptosis. Interestingly, BAFF treatment was also found to induce the expression of a series of genes, such as that for CD40, related to cell survival, suggesting the involvement of a multiple mechanism in the BAFF-mediated anti-apoptotic effect. MLMA cells should provide a model for investigating the molecular basis of the effect of BAFF on B cells in vitro and will help to elucidate how B cells survive in the immune system in which BAFF-mediated signalling is involved. PMID:18540961

  19. The development and function of thymic B cells.

    PubMed

    Perera, Jason; Huang, Haochu

    2015-07-01

    Thymic B cells are a unique population of B lymphocytes that reside at the cortico-medullary junction of the thymus, an organ that is specialized for the development and selection of T cells. These B cells are distinct from peripheral B cells both in terms of their origin and phenotype. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that they develop within the thymus from B lineage-committed progenitors and are not recirculating peripheral B cells. Furthermore, thymic B cells have a highly activated phenotype. Because of their location in the thymic medulla, they have been thought to play a role in T cell negative selection. Thymic B cells are capable of inducing negative selection in a number of model antigen systems, including viral super antigen, peptides from immunoglobulin, and cognate self antigen presented by B cell receptor-mediated uptake. These findings establish thymic B cells as a novel and important population to study; however, much work remains to be done to understand how all of these unique aspects of thymic B cell biology inform their function. PMID:25837998

  20. Impairment of neutrophil chemotaxis by serum from patients with chronic lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed Central

    Jayaswal, U; Roper, S; Roath, S

    1983-01-01

    The sera of 74 individuals with chronic lymphoproliferative disease were screened for the presence of inhibitory activity against neutrophil chemotaxis. This was present in more than half the patients with IgA myeloma and Hodgkin's disease but was less common in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, lymphocytic lymphoma and non-IgA paraproteinaemia. Heating the sera prior to testing frequently enhanced inhibitory activity particularly in myeloma and lymphoma. PMID:6833512

  1. Notch activity synergizes with B-cell-receptor and CD40 signaling to enhance B-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Matthew; Calamito, Marco; Srivastava, Bhaskar; Maillard, Ivan; Pear, Warren S; Allman, David

    2007-04-15

    How diverse environmental cues are integrated to regulate B-cell activation and development remains poorly understood. Here we show that Notch activity synergizes with B-cell receptor (BCR) and/or CD40 signaling to enhance several aspects of B-cell activation and function. We find that costimulation of follicular B cells with the Notch ligand Delta-like-1 leads to significant increases in BCR- and CD40-mediated proliferation and enhances production of IgG1(+) cells in vitro and in vivo. We further find that coengagement of Notch and the BCR results in increased activation of the MAPK pathway, and MAPK and Notch inhibitors prevent B-cell activation events mediated by coengagement of Notch and the BCR. These data suggest that the BCR and CD40 signaling pathways collaborate with the Notch pathway to optimize B-cell activation. PMID:17179224

  2. Hepatitis C virus-associated neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders: Advances in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Salvatore; Mariotto, Sara; Ferrari, Sergio; Calabrese, Massimiliano; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Gajofatto, Alberto; Sansonno, Domenico; Dammacco, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Since its identification in 1989, hepatitis C virus (HCV) has emerged as a worldwide health problem with roughly 185 million chronic infections, representing individuals at high risk of developing cirrhosis and liver cancer. In addition to being a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality due to liver disease, HCV has emerged as an important trigger of lymphoproliferative disorders, owing to its lymphotropism, and of a wide spectrum of extra-hepatic manifestations (HCV-EHMs) affecting different organ systems. The most frequently observed HCV-EHMs include mixed cryoglobulinemia and cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, nephropathies, thyreopathies, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, and several neurological conditions. In addition, neuropsychiatric disorders and neurocognitive dysfunction are reported in nearly 50% of patients with chronic HCV infection, which are independent of the severity of liver disease or HCV replication rates. Fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression and reduced quality of life are commonly associated with neurocognitive alterations in patients with non-cirrhotic chronic HCV infection, regardless of the stage of liver fibrosis and the infecting genotype. These manifestations, which are the topic of this review, typically occur in the absence of structural brain damage or signal abnormalities on conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), although metabolic and microstructural changes can be detected by in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, perfusion-weighted and diffusion tensor MRI, and neurophysiological tests of cognitive processing. Several lines of evidence, including comparative and longitudinal neuropsychological assessments in patients achieving spontaneous or treatment-induced viral clearance, support a major pathogenic role for HCV in neuropsychiatric and neurocognitive disorders. PMID:26576086

  3. Hepatitis C virus-associated neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders: Advances in 2015.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Salvatore; Mariotto, Sara; Ferrari, Sergio; Calabrese, Massimiliano; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Gajofatto, Alberto; Sansonno, Domenico; Dammacco, Franco

    2015-11-14

    Since its identification in 1989, hepatitis C virus (HCV) has emerged as a worldwide health problem with roughly 185 million chronic infections, representing individuals at high risk of developing cirrhosis and liver cancer. In addition to being a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality due to liver disease, HCV has emerged as an important trigger of lymphoproliferative disorders, owing to its lymphotropism, and of a wide spectrum of extra-hepatic manifestations (HCV-EHMs) affecting different organ systems. The most frequently observed HCV-EHMs include mixed cryoglobulinemia and cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, nephropathies, thyreopathies, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, and several neurological conditions. In addition, neuropsychiatric disorders and neurocognitive dysfunction are reported in nearly 50% of patients with chronic HCV infection, which are independent of the severity of liver disease or HCV replication rates. Fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression and reduced quality of life are commonly associated with neurocognitive alterations in patients with non-cirrhotic chronic HCV infection, regardless of the stage of liver fibrosis and the infecting genotype. These manifestations, which are the topic of this review, typically occur in the absence of structural brain damage or signal abnormalities on conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), although metabolic and microstructural changes can be detected by in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, perfusion-weighted and diffusion tensor MRI, and neurophysiological tests of cognitive processing. Several lines of evidence, including comparative and longitudinal neuropsychological assessments in patients achieving spontaneous or treatment-induced viral clearance, support a major pathogenic role for HCV in neuropsychiatric and neurocognitive disorders. PMID:26576086

  4. Stemness of B cell progenitors in multiple myeloma bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Kelly; Parquet, Nancy; Widen, Raymond; Shain, Kenneth; Baz, Rachid; Alsina, Melissa; Koomen, John; Anasetti, Claudio; Dalton, William; Perez, Lia E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In myeloma, B cells and plasma cells show a clonal relationship. Clonotypic B cells may represent a tumor-initiating compartment or cancer stem cell responsible for minimal residual disease in myeloma. Experimental Design We report a study of 58 patients with myeloma at time of diagnosis or relapse. B cells in bone marrow were evaluated by multicolor flow cytometry and sorting. Clonality was determined by light chain and/or immunoglobulin chain gene rearrangement PCR. We also determined aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and colony formation growth. Drug sensitivity was tested with conventional and novel agents. Results Marrow CD19+ cells express a light chain identical to plasma cells and are therefore termed light chain restricted (LCR). The LCR B cell mass is small in both newly diagnosed and relapsed patients (?1%). Few marrow LCR B cells (~10%) are CD19+/CD34+, with the rest being more differentiated CD19+/CD34? B cells. Marrow LCR CD19+ B cells exhibit enhanced aldehyde dehydrogenase activity versus healthy controls. Both CD19+/CD34+ and CD19+/CD34? cells showed colony formation activity, with colony growth efficiency optimized when stroma-conditioned medium was used. B cell progenitors showed resistance to melphalan, lenalidomide, and bortezomib. Panobinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, induced apoptosis of LCR B cells and CD138+ cells. LCR B cells are CD117, survivin, and Notch positive. Conclusions We propose that antigen-independent B cell differentiation stages are involved in disease origination and progression in myeloma. Further investigations of myeloma putative stem cell progenitors may lead to novel treatments to eradicate the potential reservoir of minimal residual disease. PMID:22988056

  5. CR2 ligands modulate human B cell activation.

    PubMed

    Bohnsack, J F; Cooper, N R

    1988-10-15

    A considerable body of evidence from this and other laboratories indicates that complement receptor type 2 (CR2) modulates B cell activation and growth. In the present studies we have examined the effects of three different types of CR2 ligands, i.e., monomeric, aggregated, and latex-bound C3dg; mAb to different CR2 epitopes; and UV-inactivated, non-transforming EBV (EBVUV) for their actions on highly purified, high density resting tonsil B cells. Although none of these ligands induced B cells to enter the cell cycle or synergized with either anti-mu or low m.w. B cell growth factor in triggering B cell mitogenesis, aggregated C3dg, latex-bound C3dg, the OKB7 anti-CR2 mAb, and EBVUV-enhanced thymidine incorporation by phorbol ester-activated tonsil B cells. Such enhancement was not T cell or monocyte dependent. The major action of the CR2 ligands thus seems to be to enhance the transition of B cells activated by certain stimuli from the G1 to the S phase of the cell cycle. In contrast to the action of aggregated and latex-bound C3dg, monomeric C3dg was inhibitory for phorbol ester and aggregated C3dg-induced B cell activation. The HB-5 anti-CR2 mAb, which reacts with a different epitope on CR2 from that of OKB7, did not synergize with PMA in B cell activation. These data provide additional evidence for a role for the CR2 in the control of B cell growth and provide a useful model for studying the CR2-mediated signals that affect the growth of B cells. PMID:2459218

  6. Reprint of: B cell elimination in systemic lupus erythematosus. Clin. Immunol. 146(2) 90-103.

    PubMed

    Furtado, João; Isenberg, David A

    2013-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder with a worldwide distribution, potentially life-threatening with considerable morbidity. The elimination of pathogenic B cells has emerged as a rational therapeutic option. Many open label studies have reported encouraging results in which clinical and serological remission have invariably been described, often enabling the reduction of steroid and immunosuppressive treatment. However, the results from randomized controlled studies have been disappointing and several questions remain to be answered. In this review we will focus on results of B cell direct depletion in the treatment of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:23642318

  7. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive sporadic burkitt lymphoma: an age-related lymphoproliferative disorder?

    PubMed

    Satou, Akira; Asano, Naoko; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Osumi, Tomoo; Tsurusawa, Masahito; Ishiguro, Atsushi; Elsayed, Ahmed Ali; Nakamura, Naoya; Ohshima, Koichi; Kinoshita, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Shigeo

    2015-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is detected in 20% to 30% of sporadic Burkitt lymphoma (sBL). However, only a few studies of EBV-positive (EBV) sBL have been reported, and its characteristics still remain controversial. To highlight the features of EBV sBL, we compared the clinicopathologic characteristics of 33 cases of EBV and 117 cases of EBV-negative (EBV) sBL in Japan. EBV sBL showed significantly higher age distribution (median, 42 vs. 13 y; P<0.0001) and higher frequency of patients older than 50 years (48% vs. 16%, P<0.0001). We also revealed the difference of the involved sites. The EBV group showed significantly higher incidence of involvement of tonsil (P=0.027), adrenal gland (P=0.011), and cervical lymph node (P=0.040). In addition, the EBV group tended to have higher incidence of nodal involvement (P=0.078) and involvement of para-aorta lymph node (P=0.084) and heart (P=0.050). In contrast, the gastrointestinal tract was less frequently affected in EBV sBL (P=0.024). In addition, the less positivity for MUM1 (P=0.020) of EBV sBL was highlighted. These results indicate that biological behavior and pathogenesis of EBV sBL might be different from those of EBV sBL. Our results demonstrate that EBV sBL has an aspect of age-related disease and is a distinct clinicopathologic subtype, which should be distinguished from EBV sBL. PMID:25321330

  8. De novo cancers and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in adult liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Aseni, Paolo; Vertemati, Maurizio; De Carlis, Luciano; Sansalone, Cosimo Vincenzo; Bonacina, Edgardo; Minola, Ernesto; Oreste, Pierluigi; Vizzotto, Laura; Rondinara, Gianfranco

    2006-11-01

    De novo cancer is one of the most serious complications after organ transplantation. Chronic immunosuppression, viral agents, pretransplant chronic alcohol-induced and other addictive behavior-induced injury are important conditions associated with the development of de novo cancers in solid organ transplants. The aim of the study was to evaluate types and clinical course of de novo cancers in adult liver transplant recipients. Data regarding 502 adult patients who underwent to 554 liver transplantations have been collected. Sex, age at transplantation, immunosuppressive regimen, time from transplantation to diagnosis of cancer, cancer type, surgical and non-surgical treatments and follow-up time have been analyzed as well as acute rejection episodes and viral status. Thirty patients developed 31 de novo cancers. The predominant tumors were carcinoma of the skin, lymphomas and Kaposi's sarcoma. Kaposi's sarcoma and lung cancer were associated with greater mortality. In lymphomas and Kaposi's sarcoma, a high rate of graft involvement was observed. In liver transplant recipients, de novo cancers demand strategies focusing on prophylactic and careful long-term screening protocols. Lymphomas and Kaposi's sarcoma should be ruled out in all patients with clinical manifestations of chronic biliary obstruction. PMID:17040297

  9. Pre-B cell receptor signaling in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nahar, Rahul; Müschen, Markus

    2014-01-01

    B cell lineage ALL represents by far the most frequent malignancy in children and is also common in adults. Despite significant advances over the past four decades, cytotoxic treatment strategies have recently reached a plateau with cure rates at 80 percent for children and 55 percent for adults. Relapse after cytotoxic drug treatment, initial drug-resistance and dose-limiting toxicity are among the most frequent complications of current therapy approaches. For this reason, pathway-specific treatment strategies in addition to cytotoxic drug treatment seem promising to further improve therapy options for ALL patients. In a recent study on 111 cases of pre-B cell-derived human ALL, we found that ALL cells carrying a BCR-ABL1-gene rearrangement lack expression of a functional pre-B cell receptor in virtually all cases. In a proof-of-principle experiment, we studied pre-B cell receptor function during progressive leukemic transformation of pre-B cells in BCR-ABL1-transgenic mice: Interestingly, signaling from the pre-B cell receptor and the oncogenic BCR-ABL1 kinase are mutually exclusive and only “crippled” pre-B cells that fail to express a functional pre-B cell receptor are permissive to transformation by BCR-ABL1. PMID:19901533

  10. DNA breaks early in replication in B cell cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Research by scientists at the NCI has identified a new class of DNA sites in cells that break early in the replication process. They found that these break sites correlate with damage often seen in B cell cancers, such as diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

  11. What are regulatory B cells? David Gray1

    E-print Network

    of B cells is mediated by the production of the cytokine IL-10, which inhibits both Th1 and Th2 producing significant amounts of inflammatory cytokines as well, these B cells suppress T-cell proliferation polarization, Ag presentation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production by myeloid cells. A suppressive role

  12. Uptake and Presentation of Antigen by B Cells 

    E-print Network

    Brooks, Katharine E

    B cells internalize antigen in a specific manner through the B cell receptor (BCR). The antigen is processed into peptides that are loaded on to MHC class II molecules and presented to CD4+ T cells. I have investigated factors that affect how...

  13. Subcutaneous Dissemination from an Orbital Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bains, Sukhdeep; Vidhya, N; Kim, Usha; Shanti, R; Devanand, J

    2015-12-01

    Secondary cutaneous dissemination from an orbital diffuse large B cell lymphoma has not been described before. The authors report an unusual case of anaplastic variant of diffuse large B cell lymphoma which primarily presented in the orbit and during the course of disease had subcutaneous dissemination. PMID:26452055

  14. B Cells: The Old New Players in Reproductive Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Fettke, Franziska; Schumacher, Anne; Costa, Serban-Dan; Zenclussen, Ana Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Reproductive immunology research has long focused on T cell responses to paternal antigens and tolerance mechanisms supporting fetal well-being. The participation of B cells herein was not widely studied. Because of the fascinating immunological uniqueness of pregnancy, it is however to be expected that such pleiotropic cells play a considerable role. In fact, on the one hand B cells contribute toward pregnancy tolerance by secreting the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-10 but on the other hand can seriously harm pregnancy because of their capacity of producing autoantibodies. As for protective B cells, new evidences in mouse models arise suggesting that IL-10 producing B cells, the so-called B10 cells, help in maintaining tolerance toward semi-allogenic fetal antigens. They may be also important to fight danger signals at the fetal-maternal interface as, e.g., in the case of infections with the aim to restore the disrupted fetal tolerance. In human pregnancies, IL-10 producing B cells increase with pregnancy onset but not in the case of spontaneous abortions. In vitro, they are able to suppress TNF-? production by T cells from pregnant individuals. Their generation and functionality will be discussed throughout this review article. B cells can be deleterious to pregnancy as well. Aberrant B cell compartment is associated with obstetric pathologies. In particular, the capacity of B2 cells to produce specific autoantibodies or of B-1a B cells to secrete natural autoantibodies that can turn autoreactive will be discussed herein. PMID:25002862

  15. Species D Adenoviruses as Oncolytics Against B Cell Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Christopher Y.; Senac, Julien S.; Weaver, Eric A.; May, Shannon M.; Jelinek, Diane F.; Greipp, Philip; Witzig, Thomas; Barry, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Oncolytic viruses are self-amplifying anti-cancer agents that make use of the natural ability of viruses to kill cells. Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) has been extensively tested against solid cancers, but less so against B cell cancers since these cells do not generally express the coxsackie and adenoviral receptor (CAR). To determine if other adenoviruses might have better potency, we “mined” the adenovirus virome of 55 serotypes for viruses that could kill B cell cancers. Experimental Design 15 adenoviruses selected to represent Ad species B, C, D, E, and F were tested in vitro against cell lines and primary patient B cell cancers for their ability to infect, replicate in, and kill these cells. Select viruses were also tested against B cell cancer xenografts in immunodeficient mice. Results Species D adenoviruses mediated most robust killing against a range of B cell cancer cell lines, against primary patient marginal zone lymphoma cells, and against primary patient CD138+ myeloma cells in vitro. When injected into xenografts in vivo, single treatment with select species D viruses Ad26 and Ad45 delayed lymphoma growth. Conclusions Relatively unstudied species D adenoviruses have a unique ability to infect and replicate in B cell cancers as compared to other adenovirus species. These data suggest these viruses have unique biology in B cells and support translation of novel species D adenoviruses as oncolytics against B cell cancers. PMID:21890454

  16. Suppressive functions of B cells in infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ping; Fillatreau, Simon

    2015-11-01

    B lymphocytes are often essential to successfully control invading pathogens and play a primary role in the protection afforded by successful vaccines through the production of specific antibodies. However, recent studies have highlighted the complex roles of B cells in infectious diseases, showing unexpectedly that some activated B cells limited host defense towards pathogens. This B-cell function involves production of regulatory cytokines including IL-10 and IL-35 and is reminiscent of the regulatory functions of B cells initially defined in autoimmune diseases. It is now known that various types of microbes including bacteria, helminths and viruses can induce IL-10-expressing B cells with inhibitory functions, indicating that this response is a general component of anti-microbial immunity. Interestingly, IL-10-producing B cells induced in the course of some microbial infections can inhibit concurrent immune responses directed towards unrelated antigens in a bystander manner and as a consequence ameliorate the course of autoimmune or allergic diseases. This could explain how some micro-organisms might provide protection from these pathologies, as formulated in the 'hygiene hypothesis'. In this review, we discuss the regulatory functions of B cells in bacterial, parasitic and viral infections, taking into account the phenotype of the B cells implicated, the signals controlling their induction and the cell types targeted by their suppressive activities. PMID:26066008

  17. Follicular lymphoma: too many reminders for a memory B cell

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Srividya; Müschen, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Memory B cells are a dynamic subset of the mature B cell population that in some cases can reenter germinal centers (GCs) in response to iterative infections. Such a reactivation can lead to accumulation of genetic lesions in these cells, potentially from repetitive activation of the B cell mutator enzyme AID. Normal memory B cells do not survive repeated reentries into GCs. In this issue, Sungalee et al. demonstrate that memory B cells harboring the oncogenic BCL2:IGH translocation, which results in constitutive BCL2 expression, survive multiple GC entries upon repetitive immunization. Through these multiple GC reentries, the hallmark BCL2:IGH translocation enables AID-induced hypermutation and propagates clonal evolution toward malignant follicular lymphoma. PMID:25384212

  18. Thymic B Cells and Central T Cell Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, Tomoyoshi; Steinert, Madlen; Klein, Ludger

    2015-01-01

    Central T cell tolerance is believed to be mainly induced by thymic dendritic cells and medullary thymic epithelial cells. The thymus also harbors substantial numbers of B cells. These may arise though intrathymic B lymphopoiesis or immigration from the bloodstream. Importantly, and in contrast to resting “mainstream” B cells in the periphery, thymic B cells display elevated levels of MHC class II and constitutively express CD80. Arguably, their most unexpected feature is the expression of autoimmune regulator. These unique features of thymic B cells result from a licensing process that involves cross-talk with CD4 single-positive T cells and CD40 signaling. Together, these recent findings suggest that B cells play a more prominent role as thymic APCs than previously appreciated. PMID:26257742

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of B Cell Antigen Gathering and Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hoogeboom, Robbert; Tolar, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Generation of high-affinity, protective antibodies requires B cell receptor (BCR) signaling, as well as antigen internalization and presentation to helper T cells. B cell antigen internalization is initiated by antigen capture, either from solution or from immune synapses formed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells, and proceeds via clathrin-dependent endocytosis and intracellular routing to late endosomes. Although the components of this pathway are still being discovered, it has become clear that antigen internalization is actively regulated by BCR signaling at multiple steps and, vice versa, that localization of the BCR along the endocytic pathway modulates signaling. Accordingly, defects in BCR internalization or trafficking contribute to enhanced B cell activation in models of autoimmune diseases and in B cell lymphomas. In this review, we discuss how BCR signaling complexes regulate each of the steps of this endocytic process and why defects along this pathway manifest as hyperactive B cell responses in vivo. PMID:26336965

  20. Bone biopsy in haematological disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, R; Frisch, B; Bartl, R

    1982-01-01

    Bone marrow biopsies are now widely used in the investigation and follow-up of many diseases. Semi-thin sections of 8216 undecalcified biopsies of patients with haematological disorders were studied. Observations were made on the cytopenias and the myelodysplastic syndromes, the acute leukaemias the myeloproliferative disorders, Hodgkin's disease and the malignant lymphomas including multiple myeloma, hairy cell leukaemia and angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy. Bone marrow biopsies are essential for the differential diagnosis of most cytopenias and for the early recognition of fibrosis which most frequently occurred as a consequence of megakaryocytic proliferation in the myeloproliferative disorders. Different patterns of bone marrow involvement were found in the lymphoproliferative disorders and both their type and extent constituted factors of prognostic significance. A survey of the literature is given and the conclusion is drawn that bone marrow biopsies provide indispensible information for the diagnostic evaluation and the follow-up of patients with haematological disorders. Images PMID:7040489

  1. ATM deficiency promotes development of murine B-cell lymphomas that resemble diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in humans.

    PubMed

    Hathcock, Karen S; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M; Camps, Jordi; Shin, Dong-Mi; Triner, Daniel; Shaffer, Arthur L; Maul, Robert W; Steinberg, Seth M; Gearhart, Patricia J; Staudt, Louis M; Morse, Herbert C; Ried, Thomas; Hodes, Richard J

    2015-11-12

    The serine-threonine kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a central role in maintaining genomic integrity. In mice, ATM deficiency is exclusively associated with T-cell lymphoma development, whereas B-cell tumors predominate in human ataxia-telangiectasia patients. We demonstrate in this study that when T cells are removed as targets for lymphomagenesis and as mediators of immune surveillance, ATM-deficient mice exclusively develop early-onset immunoglobulin M(+) B-cell lymphomas that do not transplant to immunocompetent mice and that histologically and genetically resemble the activated B cell-like (ABC) subset of human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). These B-cell lymphomas show considerable chromosomal instability and a recurrent genomic amplification of a 4.48-Mb region on chromosome 18 that contains Malt1 and is orthologous to a region similarly amplified in human ABC DLBCL. Of importance, amplification of Malt1 in these lymphomas correlates with their dependence on nuclear factor (NF)-?B, MALT1, and B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling for survival, paralleling human ABC DLBCL. Further, like some human ABC DLBCLs, these mouse B-cell lymphomas also exhibit constitutive BCR-dependent NF-?B activation. This study reveals that ATM protects against development of B-cell lymphomas that model human ABC DLBCL and identifies a potential role for T cells in preventing the emergence of these tumors. PMID:26400962

  2. ATM deficiency promotes development of murine B-cell lymphomas that resemble diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hathcock, Karen S.; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M.; Camps, Jordi; Shin, Dong-Mi; Triner, Daniel; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Maul, Robert W.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Staudt, Louis M.; Morse, Herbert C.; Ried, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The serine-threonine kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a central role in maintaining genomic integrity. In mice, ATM deficiency is exclusively associated with T-cell lymphoma development, whereas B-cell tumors predominate in human ataxia-telangiectasia patients. We demonstrate in this study that when T cells are removed as targets for lymphomagenesis and as mediators of immune surveillance, ATM-deficient mice exclusively develop early-onset immunoglobulin M+ B-cell lymphomas that do not transplant to immunocompetent mice and that histologically and genetically resemble the activated B cell–like (ABC) subset of human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). These B-cell lymphomas show considerable chromosomal instability and a recurrent genomic amplification of a 4.48-Mb region on chromosome 18 that contains Malt1 and is orthologous to a region similarly amplified in human ABC DLBCL. Of importance, amplification of Malt1 in these lymphomas correlates with their dependence on nuclear factor (NF)-?B, MALT1, and B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling for survival, paralleling human ABC DLBCL. Further, like some human ABC DLBCLs, these mouse B-cell lymphomas also exhibit constitutive BCR-dependent NF-?B activation. This study reveals that ATM protects against development of B-cell lymphomas that model human ABC DLBCL and identifies a potential role for T cells in preventing the emergence of these tumors. PMID:26400962

  3. BTK Signaling in B Cell Differentiation and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Corneth, Odilia B J; Klein Wolterink, Roel G J; Hendriks, Rudi W

    2016-01-01

    Since the original identification of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) as the gene defective in the primary immunodeficiency X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) in 1993, our knowledge on the physiological function of BTK has expanded impressively. In this review, we focus on the role of BTK during B cell differentiation in vivo, both in the regulation of expansion and in the developmental progression of pre-B cells in the bone marrow and as a crucial signal transducer of signals downstream of the IgM or IgG B cell antigen receptor (BCR) in mature B cells governing proliferation, survival, and differentiation. In particular, we highlight BTK function in B cells in the context of host defense and autoimmunity. Small-molecule inhibitors of BTK have very recently shown impressive anti-tumor activity in clinical studies in patients with various B cell malignancies. Since promising effects of BTK inhibition were also seen in experimental animal models for lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, BTK may be a good target for controlling autoreactive B cells in patients with systemic autoimmune disease. PMID:26341110

  4. Phenotypic Approaches to Identify Inhibitors of B Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Rex, Elizabeth B; Kim, Suzie; Wiener, Jake; Rao, Navin L; Milla, Marcos E; DiSepio, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    An EPIC label-free phenotypic platform was developed to explore B cell receptor (BCR) and CD40R-mediated B cell activation. The phenotypic assay measured the association of RL non-Hodgkin's lymphoma B cells expressing lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1)-coated EPIC plates. Anti-IgM (immunoglobulin M) mediated BCR activation elicited a response that was blocked by LFA-1/ICAM-1 specific inhibitors and a panel of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors. LFA-1/ICAM-1 association was further increased on coapplication of anti-IgM and mega CD40L when compared to individual application of either. Anti-IgM, mega CD40L, or the combination of both displayed distinct kinetic profiles that were inhibited by treatment with a BTK inhibitor. We also established a FLIPR-based assay to measure B cell activation in Ramos Burkitt's lymphoma B cells and an RL cell line. Anti-IgM-mediated BCR activation elicited a robust calcium response that was inhibited by a panel of BTK inhibitors. Conversely, CD40R activation did not elicit a calcium response in the FLIPR assay. Compared to the FLIPR, the EPIC assay has the propensity to identify inhibitors of both BCR and CD40R-mediated B cell activation and may provide more pharmacological depth or novel mechanisms of action for inhibition of B cell activation. PMID:25948491

  5. B Cells in Chronic Graft versus Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Blazar, Bruce R.; Cutler, Corey; Ritz, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) continues to be a common complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Unlike acute GVHD, which is mediated almost entirely by donor T cells, the immune pathology of cGVHD is more complex and donor B cells have also been found to play an important role. Recent studies from several laboratories have enhanced our understanding of how donor B cells contribute to this clinical syndrome and this has led to new therapeutic opportunities. Here, Dr. Sarantopoulos reviews some of the important mechanisms responsible for persistent B cell activation and loss of B cell tolerance in patients with cGVHD. Dr. Blazar describes recent studies in preclinical models that have identified novel B cell directed agents that may be effective for prevention or treatment of cGVHD. Some B cell directed therapies have already been tested in patients with cGVHD and Dr. Cutler reviews the results of these studies documenting the potential efficacy of this approach. Supported by studies mechanistic studies in patients and preclinical models, new B cell directed therapies for cGVHD will now be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:25452031

  6. Phenotypic Approaches to Identify Inhibitors of B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suzie; Wiener, Jake; Rao, Navin L.; Milla, Marcos E.; DiSepio, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    An EPIC label-free phenotypic platform was developed to explore B cell receptor (BCR) and CD40R-mediated B cell activation. The phenotypic assay measured the association of RL non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma B cells expressing lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1)-coated EPIC plates. Anti-IgM (immunoglobulin M) mediated BCR activation elicited a response that was blocked by LFA-1/ICAM-1 specific inhibitors and a panel of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors. LFA-1/ICAM-1 association was further increased on coapplication of anti-IgM and mega CD40L when compared to individual application of either. Anti-IgM, mega CD40L, or the combination of both displayed distinct kinetic profiles that were inhibited by treatment with a BTK inhibitor. We also established a FLIPR-based assay to measure B cell activation in Ramos Burkitt’s lymphoma B cells and an RL cell line. Anti-IgM-mediated BCR activation elicited a robust calcium response that was inhibited by a panel of BTK inhibitors. Conversely, CD40R activation did not elicit a calcium response in the FLIPR assay. Compared to the FLIPR, the EPIC assay has the propensity to identify inhibitors of both BCR and CD40R-mediated B cell activation and may provide more pharmacological depth or novel mechanisms of action for inhibition of B cell activation. PMID:25948491

  7. Gene therapy delivery of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) via hematopoietic stem cell transfer induces MOG-specific B cell deletion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jie-Yu; Figgett, William; Fairfax, Kirsten; Bernard, Claude; Chan, James; Toh, Ban-Hock; Mackay, Fabienne; Alderuccio, Frank

    2014-03-15

    The various mechanisms that have been described for immune tolerance govern our ability to control self-reactivity and minimize autoimmunity. However, the capacity to genetically manipulate the immune system provides a powerful avenue to supplement this natural tolerance in an Ag-specific manner. We have previously shown in the mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis that transfer of bone marrow (BM) transduced with retrovirus encoding myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) promotes disease resistance and CD4(+) T cell deletion within the thymus. However, the consequence of this strategy on B cell tolerance is not known. Using BM from IgH(MOG) mice that develop MOG-specific B cell receptors, we generated mixed chimeras together with BM-encoding MOG. In these animals, the development of MOG-specific B cells was abrogated, resulting in a lack of MOG-specific B cells in all B cell compartments examined. This finding adds a further dimension to our understanding of the mechanisms of tolerance that are associated with this gene therapy approach to treating autoimmunity and may have important implications for Ab-mediated autoimmune disorders. PMID:24532581

  8. B cell regulation of anti-tumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Morgan, Richard; Podack, Eckhard R; Rosenblatt, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Our laboratory has been investigating the role of B cells on tumor immunity. We have studied the immune response in mice that are genetically lacking in B cells (BCDM) using a variety of syngeneic mouse tumors and compared immune responses in BCDM with those seen in wild type (WT) immunocompetent mice (ICM). A variety of murine tumors are rejected or inhibited in their growth in BCDM, compared with ICM, including the EL4 thymoma, and the MC38 colon carcinoma in C57BL/6 mice, as well as the EMT-6 breast carcinoma in BALB/c mice. In all three murine models, tumors show reduced growth in BCDM which is accompanied by increased T cell and NK cell infiltration, and a more vigorous Th1 cytokine response, and increased cytolytic T cell response in the absence of B cells. Reconstitution of the mice with B cells results in augmented tumor growth due to a diminished anti-tumor immune response and in reduction in CD8+ T cell and NK cell infiltration. Studies involving BCR transgenic mice indicated that B cells inhibit anti-tumor T cell responses through antigen non-specific mechanisms. More recent studies using the EMT-6 model demonstrated that both the number and function of Treg cells in ICM was increased relative to that seen in BCDM. Increased expansion of Treg cells was evident following EMT-6 implantation in ICM relative to that seen in non-tumor-bearing mice or BCDM. The percentage and number of Tregs in spleen, tumor draining lymph nodes, and the tumor bed are increased in ICM compared with BCDM. Treg functional capacity as measured by suppression assays appears to be reduced in BCDM compared with ICM. In contrast to other described types of B regulatory activity, adoptive transfer of B cells can rescue tumor growth independently of the ability of B cells to secrete IL-10, and also independently of MHC-II expression. In experiments using the MC38 adenocarcinoma model, BCDM reconstituted with WT B cells support tumor growth while tumor growth continues to be inhibited in BCDM reconstituted with OX40L(-/-) B cells. This suggests that interaction between OX40 on T cells and OX40-ligand on B cells may be important in modulating anti-tumor immune response. Ongoing experiments in the laboratory indicate that B cells migrate to the site of tumor and acquire expression of immunosuppressive ligands and/or cytokines that contribute to the inhibition of anti-tumor immune response. Significant infiltration of human tumors by Treg cells as well as B cells suggests that observations made in murine systems may be applicable to human tumors as well. PMID:24293009

  9. Primary Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma involving the Mandible.

    PubMed

    Alshahrani, Faleh Ali A; Aljabab, Abdulsalam S; Motabi, Ibraheem Hm; Alrashed, Abdullah; Anil, Sukumaran

    2015-01-01

    Lymphomas of the oral cavity are rare and typically present as intraosseous lesions that are most commonly diffuse large B-cell type. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma histologically characterized by diffuse proliferation of large neoplastic B-lymphoid cells with a nuclear size equal to or exceeding normal histiocytic nuclei. A case of DLBCL of the mandible in an 18 years old male patient is presented. This report discusses this rare malignancy, including clinical presentation, histopathologic features, immunologic profile, treatment and prognosis. Though lymphoma of mandible is rare, it must be considered in differential diagnosis of swellings arising in the region. PMID:26581467

  10. B cell receptor signaling: picky about PI3Ks.

    PubMed

    Limon, Jose J; Fruman, David A

    2010-01-01

    The B cell receptor (BCR) and the pre-BCR control cell fate at many stages of B cell development, survival, and antigen response. Most of these processes require the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Previous work has pointed to p110delta as the key catalytic isoform of PI3K for many B cell responses. A study of mice with different combinations of PI3K mutations confirms the central role of p110delta in agonist-mediated signaling, while identifying an unexpected function for the p110alpha isoform in tonic signaling by the pre-BCR and mature BCR. PMID:20699473

  11. Rituximab-induced Cytokine Storm in the Absence of Overt Lymphoproliferative Disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark; Khalid, Tasneem; Hughes, Stephen; Bonney, Denise; Wynn, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody that first demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of lymphoma but has since seen a dramatic growth in its use for other conditions. Cytokine release syndrome (CRS) is a rare but potentially fatal complication of rituximab infusion that has been described in patients with bulky lymphoproliferative disease. Here we report a convincing case of CRS occurring in a patient with no demonstrable lymphoproliferation. This case has implications for our understanding of the pathogenesis of CRS, our attempts to define an at-risk population and the design of future monoclonal antibodies. PMID:26583621

  12. Characterization of three overlapping deletions causing X-linked lymphoproliferative disease

    SciTech Connect

    Skare, J.; Bailin Wu; Wyandt, H.; Milunsky, A. ); Madan, S.; Pulijaal, V.; Nitowsky, H. ); Purtilo, D.; Grierson, H. ); Haber, D.; Wissink, J.; Housman, D. ); Nelson, D. ); Sylla, B.; Lenoir, G. ); Glaser, J. ); White, B. ); Holden, J. )

    1993-04-01

    Blot hybridization was used to find DNA sequences missing in a male who lacked two-thirds of Xq25. The probes were used to discover two additional males with deletions resulting in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP). All three deletions have a region in common, and DXS739 is within this candidate region. The new deletions were also detectable using chromosome banding, and the smallest removes only one-third of Xq25. XLP is the only consequence of the deletions. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  13. The autoimmunity-associated BLK haplotype exhibits cis-regulatory effects on mRNA and protein expression that are prominently observed in B cells early in development.

    PubMed

    Simpfendorfer, Kim R; Olsson, Lina M; Manjarrez Orduño, Nataly; Khalili, Houman; Simeone, Alyssa M; Katz, Matthew S; Lee, Annette T; Diamond, Betty; Gregersen, Peter K

    2012-09-01

    The gene B lymphocyte kinase (BLK) is associated with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and several other autoimmune disorders. The disease risk haplotype is known to be associated with reduced expression of BLK mRNA transcript in human B cell lines; however, little is known about cis-regulation of BLK message or protein levels in native cell types. Here, we show that in primary human B lymphocytes, cis-regulatory effects of disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in BLK are restricted to naïve and transitional B cells. Cis-regulatory effects are not observed in adult B cells in later stages of differentiation. Allelic expression bias was also identified in primary human T cells from adult peripheral and umbilical cord blood (UCB), thymus and tonsil, although mRNA levels were reduced compared with B cells. Allelic regulation of Blk expression at the protein level was confirmed in UCB B cell subsets by intracellular staining and flow cytometry. Blk protein expression in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells was documented by western blot analysis; however, differences in protein expression levels by BLK genotype were not observed in any T cell subset. Blk allele expression differences at the protein level are thus restricted to early B cells, indicating that the involvement of Blk in the risk for autoimmune disease likely acts during the very early stages of B cell development. PMID:22678060

  14. Bad-deficient mice develop diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    E-print Network

    Datta, Sandeep Robert

    02115; §Division of Neuroscience, Children's Hospital Boston and Department of Neurobiology, Harvard -irradiation resulted in an increased incidence of pre-T cell and pro- pre-B cell lymphoblastic leukemia

  15. Original Research B-cell Ligand Processing Pathways Detected

    E-print Network

    Honavar, Vasant

    and bacteria to the recognition of cancerous cells. B-cells act as the body's most effective line of defense different ligands. First, we compared the degree distributions of the generated networks. Second, we

  16. COMPUTATION MODELING OF TCDD DISRUPTION OF B CELL TERMINAL DIFFERENTIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we established a computational model describing the molecular circuit underlying B cell terminal differentiation and how TCDD may affect this process by impinging upon various molecular targets.

  17. Safety and Tolerability Study of PCI-32765 in B Cell Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Well-differentiated Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma,; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Diffuse Lymphoma

  18. Monovalent engagement of the BCR activates ovalbumin-specific transnuclear B cells

    E-print Network

    Avalos, Ana M.

    Valency requirements for B cell activation upon antigen encounter are poorly understood. OB1 transnuclear B cells express an IgG1 B cell receptor (BCR) specific for ovalbumin (OVA), the epitope of which can be mimicked ...

  19. ?? T Cells Shape Preimmune Peripheral B Cell Populations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yafei; Getahun, Andrew; Heiser, Ryan A; Detanico, Thiago O; Aviszus, Katja; Kirchenbaum, Greg A; Casper, Tamara L; Huang, Chunjian; Aydintug, M Kemal; Carding, Simon R; Ikuta, Koichi; Huang, Hua; Wysocki, Lawrence J; Cambier, John C; O'Brien, Rebecca L; Born, Willi K

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that selective ablation of certain ?? T cell subsets, rather than removal of all ?? T cells, strongly affects serum Ab levels in nonimmunized mice. This type of manipulation also changed T cells, including residual ?? T cells, revealing some interdependence of ?? T cell populations. For example, in mice lacking V?4(+) and V?6(+) ?? T cells (B6.TCR-V?4(-/-)/6(-/-)), we observed expanded V?1(+) cells, which changed in composition and activation and produced more IL-4 upon stimulation in vitro, increased IL-4 production by ?? T cells as well as spontaneous germinal center formation in the spleen, and elevated serum Ig and autoantibodies. We therefore examined B cell populations in this and other ??-deficient mouse strains. Whereas immature bone marrow B cells remained largely unchanged, peripheral B cells underwent several changes. Specifically, transitional and mature B cells in the spleen of B6.TCR-V?4(-/-)/6(-/-) mice and other peripheral B cell populations were diminished, most of all splenic marginal zone (MZ) B cells. However, relative frequencies and absolute numbers of Ab-producing cells, as well as serum levels of Abs, IL-4, and BAFF, were increased. Cell transfers confirmed that these changes are directly dependent on the altered ?? T cells in this strain and on their enhanced potential of producing IL-4. Further evidence suggests the possibility of direct interactions between ?? T cells and B cells in the splenic MZ. Taken together, these data demonstrate the capability of ?? T cells of modulating size and productivity of preimmune peripheral B cell populations. PMID:26582947

  20. Long Noncoding RNA Expression during Human B-Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Petri, Andreas; Dybkær, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin; Thrue, Charlotte Albæk; Hagedorn, Peter H.; Schmitz, Alexander; Bødker, Julie Støve; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as important regulators of diverse cellular processes, but their roles in the developing immune system are poorly understood. In this study, we analysed lncRNA expression during human B-cell development by array-based expression profiling of eleven distinct flow-sorted B-cell subsets, comprising pre-B1, pre-B2, immature, naive, memory, and plasma cells from bone marrow biopsies (n = 7), and naive, centroblast, centrocyte, memory, and plasmablast cells from tonsil tissue samples (n = 6), respectively. A remapping strategy was used to assign the array probes to 37630 gene-level probe sets, reflecting recent updates in genomic and transcriptomic databases, which enabled expression profiling of 19579 long noncoding RNAs, comprising 3947 antisense RNAs, 5277 lincRNAs, 7625 pseudogenes, and 2730 additional lncRNAs. As a first step towards inferring the functions of the identified lncRNAs in developing B-cells, we analysed their co-expression with well-characterized protein-coding genes, a method known as “guilt by association”. By using weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we identified 272 lincRNAs, 471 antisense RNAs, 376 pseudogene RNAs, and 64 lncRNAs within seven sub-networks associated with distinct stages of B-cell development, such as early B-cell development, B-cell proliferation, affinity maturation of antibody, and terminal differentiation. These data provide an important resource for future studies on the functions of lncRNAs in development of the adaptive immune response, and the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies that originate from distinct B-cell subpopulations. PMID:26394393

  1. Cutaneous primary B-cell lymphomas: from diagnosis to treatment.

    PubMed

    Lima, Margarida

    2015-10-01

    AbstractPrimary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of mature B-cells neoplasms with tropism for the skin, whose biology and clinical course differ significantly from the equivalent nodal lymphomas. The most indolent forms comprise the primary cutaneous marginal zone and follicle center B-cell lymphomas that despite the excellent prognosis have cutaneous recurrences very commonly. The most aggressive forms include the primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas, consisting in two major groups: the leg type, with poor prognosis, and others, the latter representing a heterogeneous group of lymphomas from which specific entities are supposed to be individualized over time, such as intravascular large B-cell lymphomas. Treatment may include surgical excision, radiotherapy, antibiotics, corticosteroids, interferon, monoclonal antibodies and chemotherapy, depending on the type of lymphoma and on the type and location of the skin lesions. In subtypes with good prognosis is contraindicated overtreatment and in those associated with a worse prognosis the recommended therapy relies on CHOP-like regimens associated with rituximab, assisted or not with local radiotherapy. We review the primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas, remembering the diagnostic criteria, differential diagnosis, classification, and prognostic factors and presenting the available therapies. PMID:26560215

  2. Development and function of murine B cells lacking RANK.

    PubMed

    Perlot, Thomas; Penninger, Josef M

    2012-02-01

    RANKL-RANK signaling regulates numerous physiologic processes such as bone remodeling, lymph node organogenesis, central thermoregulation, and formation of a lactating mammary gland in pregnancy. Recently, a receptor activator of NF-?B ligand (RANKL)-blocking Ab has been approved for human use in potentially millions of osteoporosis and cancer patients. However, germline deficiencies in RANKL or receptor activator of NF-?B (RANK) also lead to strong B cell defects in mice and human patients, suggesting that RANKL-RANK inhibition could interfere with B cell physiology and thereby trigger immunologic side-effects. To address this key question--that is, whether RANKL-RANK signaling affects B cell physiology directly or the observed defects are secondary because of the severe osteopetrosis--we generated B cell-specific RANK knockout mice. We show that B cells deficient for RANK undergo normal development and do not show any obvious defects in Ab secretion, class switch recombination, or somatic hypermutation. Our data indicate that ablation of the RANKL-RANK pathway has no direct adverse effect on B cell physiology. PMID:22219325

  3. B cells with regulatory properties in transplantation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Justine; Chiffoleau, Elise

    2015-01-01

    Induction of tolerance remains a major goal in transplantation. Indeed, despite potent immunosuppression, chronic rejection is still a real problem in transplantation. The humoral response is an important mediator of chronic rejection, and numerous strategies have been developed to target either B cells or plasma cells. However, the use of anti-CD20 therapy has highlighted the beneficial role of subpopulation of B cells, termed regulatory B cells. These cells have been characterized mainly in mice models of auto-immune diseases but emerging literature suggests their role in graft tolerance in transplantation. Regulatory B cells seem to be induced following inflammation to restrain excessive response. Different phenotypes of regulatory B cells have been described and are functional at various differentiation steps from immature to plasma cells. These cells act by multiple mechanisms such as secretion of immuno-suppressive cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-35, cytotoxicity, expression of inhibitory receptors or by secretion of non-inflammatory antibodies. Better characterization of the development, phenotype and mode of action of these cells seems urgent to develop novel approaches to manipulate the different B cell subsets and the response to the graft in a clinical setting. PMID:26722647

  4. B cells with regulatory properties in transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Durand, Justine; Chiffoleau, Elise

    2015-12-24

    Induction of tolerance remains a major goal in transplantation. Indeed, despite potent immunosuppression, chronic rejection is still a real problem in transplantation. The humoral response is an important mediator of chronic rejection, and numerous strategies have been developed to target either B cells or plasma cells. However, the use of anti-CD20 therapy has highlighted the beneficial role of subpopulation of B cells, termed regulatory B cells. These cells have been characterized mainly in mice models of auto-immune diseases but emerging literature suggests their role in graft tolerance in transplantation. Regulatory B cells seem to be induced following inflammation to restrain excessive response. Different phenotypes of regulatory B cells have been described and are functional at various differentiation steps from immature to plasma cells. These cells act by multiple mechanisms such as secretion of immuno-suppressive cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-35, cytotoxicity, expression of inhibitory receptors or by secretion of non-inflammatory antibodies. Better characterization of the development, phenotype and mode of action of these cells seems urgent to develop novel approaches to manipulate the different B cell subsets and the response to the graft in a clinical setting. PMID:26722647

  5. Decreased production of interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-? in Toll-like receptor-activated intestinal B cells in SAMP1/Yit mice

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Yoshiyuki; Ishihara, Shunji; Aziz, Md Monowar; Oka, Akihiko; Kusunoki, Ryusaku; Otani, Aya; Tada, Yasumasa; Li, Yong-Yu; Moriyama, Ichiro; Oshima, Naoki; Yuki, Takafumi; Amano, Yuji; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2010-01-01

    A unique subset of B cells expressing interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) plays an essential role in preventing inflammation and autoimmunity. We investigated the presence of this cell subset in intestines and its role in the pathogenesis of ileitis using SAMP1/Yit and age-matched control AKR/J mice. Mononuclear cells were isolated from mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and the expressions of B220, CD1d, CD5, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR9 in isolated cells were analysed. Purified B cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or CpG-DNA, then IL-10 and TGF-?1 expressions were examined by enzyme immunoassay and flow cytometry. Production of IL-1? by TLR-mediated macrophages co-cultured with or without purified MLN B cells from SAMP1/Yit and AKR/J mice was evaluated. In addition, interferon-? (IFN-?) production in intestinal T cells co-cultured with MLN B cells were also assessed in SAMP1/Yit and AKR/J strains. The production levels of IL-10 and TGF-?1 stimulated by LPS and CpG-DNA were significantly lower in B cells separated from MLNs from the SAMP1/Yit strain. B cells expressing IL-10 and TGF-?1 were mainly located in a population characterized by the cell surface marker CD1d+. Interleukin-1? production by TLR-activated macrophages co-cultured with MLN B cells from SAMP1/Yit mice was significantly higher than that of those from AKR/J mice. Interestingly, IFN-? production by T cells was noted only when they were co-cultured with SAMP1/Yit but not the AKR/J B cells. These results are the first to show that disorders of regulatory B-cell function under innate immune activation may cause disease pathogenesis in a murine model of Crohn's disease. PMID:20561083

  6. The LRF transcription factor regulates mature B cell development and the germinal center response in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Nagisa; Maeda, Manami; Lee, Sung-Uk; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Li, Min; Williams, John C.; Wang, Lisheng; Su, Leila; Suzuki, Mai; Saito, Toshiki I.; Chiba, Shigeru; Casola, Stefano; Yagita, Hideo; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Tsuzuki, Shinobu; Bhatia, Ravi; Maeda, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    B cells play a central role in immune system function. Deregulation of normal B cell maturation can lead to the development of autoimmune syndromes as well as B cell malignancies. Elucidation of the molecular features of normal B cell development is important for the development of new target therapies for autoimmune diseases and B cell malignancies. Employing B cell–specific conditional knockout mice, we have demonstrated here that the transcription factor leukemia/lymphoma-related factor (LRF) forms an obligate dimer in B cells and regulates mature B cell lineage fate and humoral immune responses via distinctive mechanisms. Moreover, LRF inactivation in transformed B cells attenuated their growth rate. These studies identify what we believe to be a new key factor for mature B cell development and provide a rationale for targeting LRF dimers for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and B cell malignancies. PMID:21646720

  7. TIM-1 signaling in B cells regulates antibody production

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Juan; Usui, Yoshihiko; Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Medical University, 6-7-1 Nishi-shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-0023 ; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Harada, Norihiro; Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421; Research Institute for Diseases of Old Ages, Juntendo University, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 ; Yagita, Hideo; Okumura, Ko; Akiba, Hisaya

    2011-03-11

    Highlights: {yields} TIM-1 is highly expressed on anti-IgM + anti-CD40-stimulated B cells. {yields} Anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and Ig production on activated B cell in vitro. {yields} TIM-1 signaling regulates Ab production by response to TI-2 and TD antigens in vivo. -- Abstract: Members of the T cell Ig and mucin (TIM) family have recently been implicated in the control of T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study, we found TIM-1 expression on anti-IgM- or anti-CD40-stimulated splenic B cells, which was further up-regulated by the combination of anti-IgM and anti-CD40 Abs. On the other hand, TIM-1 ligand was constitutively expressed on B cells and inducible on anti-CD3{sup +} anti-CD28-stimulated CD4{sup +} T cells. In vitro stimulation of activated B cells by anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and expression of a plasma cell marker syndecan-1 (CD138). We further examined the effect of TIM-1 signaling on antibody production in vitro and in vivo. Higher levels of IgG2b and IgG3 secretion were detected in the culture supernatants of the anti-TIM-1-stimulated B cells as compared with the control IgG-stimulated B cells. When immunized with T-independent antigen TNP-Ficoll, TNP-specific IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG3 Abs were slightly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice. When immunized with T-dependent antigen OVA, serum levels of OVA-specific IgG2b, IgG3, and IgE Abs were significantly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice as compared with the control IgG-treated mice. These results suggest that TIM-1 signaling in B cells augments antibody production by enhancing B cell proliferation and differentiation.

  8. Ibrutinib Before and After Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-14

    B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  9. B cells as effectors and regulators of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Mariño, Eliana; Grey, Shane T

    2012-08-01

    A classic understanding of the interplay between B and T cell components of the immune system that drive autoimmunity, where B cells provide an effector function, is represented by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune condition characterised by the production of auto-antibodies. In SLE, CD4+T cells provide cognate help to self-reactive B cells, which in turn produce pathogenic auto-antibodies (1). Thus, B cells act as effectors by producing auto-antibody aided by T cell help such that B and T cell interactions are unidirectional. However, this paradigm of B and T cell interactions is challenged by new clinical data demonstrating that B cell depletion is effective for T cell mediated autoimmune diseases including type I diabetes mellitus (T1D) (2), rheumatoid arthritis (3), and multiple sclerosis (4). These clinical data indicate a model whereby B cells can influence the developing autoimmune T cell response, and therefore act as effectors, in ways that extend beyond the production of autoantibody (5). In this review by largely focusing on type I diabetes we will develop a hypothesis that bi-directional B and T interactions control the course of autoimmunity. PMID:22432804

  10. The Role of Latently Infected B Cells in CNS Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Ana Citlali; Horwitz, Marc Steven

    2015-01-01

    The onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) is caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Among the environmental factors, it is believed that previous infection with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) may contribute in the development of MS. EBV has been associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematous, and cancers like Burkitt’s lymphoma. EBV establishes a life-long latency in B cells with occasional reactivation of the virus throughout the individual’s life. The role played by B cells in MS pathology has been largely studied, yet is not clearly understood. In MS patients, Rituximab, a novel treatment that targets CD20+ B cells, has proven to have successful results in diminishing the number of relapses in remitting relapsing MS; however, the mechanism of how this drug acts has not been clearly established. In this review, we analyze the evidence of how B cells latently infected with EBV might be altering the immune system response and helping in the development of MS. We will also discuss how animal models, such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (?HV-68), can be used as powerful tools in the study of the relationship between EBV, MS, and B cells. PMID:26579121

  11. Perinatal immunotoxicity of benzene toward mouse B cell development

    SciTech Connect

    Wierda, D.; King, A.; Luebke, R.; Reasor, M.; Smialowicz, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Benzene is widely used by chemical industries and exposure to benzene has been shown experimentally to be immunotoxic in adult animals. The present study addressed whether exposure of fetuses in utero to benzene compromises the development of fetal B lymphopoiesis and whether B-lymphocyte development recovers postnatally. Pregnant BALB/C dams were given intraperitoneal injections of benzene (100 mg/kg, twice daily) from day 12.5 of gestation through day 19.5 of gestation. Phenotypic analysis revealed that fetal liver cell suspensions from embryos exposed in utero contained fewer pre-B cells and B cells than corresponding controls. Fetal liver cell cultures established from these embryos also produced fewer B cells. In contrast, pre-B cells were elevated in the livers of 8-day-old neonates that had been exposed to benzene in utero. Moreover, responsiveness to the B-cell mitogen, LPS, was significantly decreased in spleen cell cultures derived from these neonates. The results indicate that in utero exposure to high concentrations of benzene alters fetal B lymphopoiesis and may compromise immune responsiveness postnatally.

  12. Dual mechanisms by which miR-125b represses IRF4 to induce myeloid and B-cell leukemias.

    PubMed

    So, Alex Yick-Lun; Sookram, Reeshelle; Chaudhuri, Aadel A; Minisandram, Aarathi; Cheng, David; Xie, Catherine; Lim, Ee Lyn; Flores, Yvette Garcia; Jiang, Shuai; Kim, Jocelyn Tammy; Keown, Christopher; Ramakrishnan, Parameswaran; Baltimore, David

    2014-08-28

    The oncomir microRNA-125b (miR-125b) is upregulated in a variety of human neoplastic blood disorders and constitutive upregulation of miR-125b in mice can promote myeloid and B-cell leukemia. We found that miR-125b promotes myeloid and B-cell neoplasm by inducing tumorigenesis in hematopoietic progenitor cells. Our study demonstrates that miR-125b induces myeloid leukemia by enhancing myeloid progenitor output from stem cells as well as inducing immortality, self-renewal, and tumorigenesis in myeloid progenitors. Through functional and genetic analyses, we demonstrated that miR-125b induces myeloid and B-cell leukemia by inhibiting interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) but through distinct mechanisms; it induces myeloid leukemia through repressing IRF4 at the messenger RNA (mRNA) level without altering the genomic DNA and induces B-cell leukemia via genetic deletion of the gene encoding IRF4. PMID:25006123

  13. Transcriptional Control of Early T and B Cell Developmental Choices

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Ellen V.

    2014-01-01

    T and B cells share a common somatic gene rearrangement mechanism for assembling the genes that code for their antigen receptors and developmental pathways with many parallels. Shared usage of basic helix-loop-helix E proteins as transcriptional drivers underlies these common features. However, the transcription factor networks in which these E proteins are embedded are different both in membership and in architecture for T and B cell gene regulatory programs. These differences permit lineage commitment decisions to be made in different hierarchical orders. Furthermore, in a contrast to B-cell gene networks, the T-cell gene network architecture for effector differentiation is sufficiently modular so that E protein inputs can be removed. Complete “T-cell-like” effector differentiation can proceed without T-cell receptor rearrangement or selection when E proteins are neutralized, yielding natural killer and other innate lymphoid cells. PMID:24471430

  14. Novel Therapies for Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Foon, Kenneth A.; Takeshita, Kenichi; Zinzani, Pier L.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive B-cell lymphoma (BCL) comprises a heterogeneous group of malignancies, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), Burkitt lymphoma, and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). DLBCL, with its 3 subtypes, is the most common type of lymphoma. Advances in chemoimmunotherapy have substantially improved disease control. However, depending on the subtype, patients with DLBCL still exhibit substantially different survival rates. In MCL, a mature B-cell lymphoma, the addition of rituximab to conventional chemotherapy regimens has increased response rates, but not survival. Burkitt lymphoma, the most aggressive BCL, is characterized by a high proliferative index and requires more intensive chemotherapy regimens than DLBCL. Hence, there is a need for more effective therapies for all three diseases. Increased understanding of the molecular features of aggressive BCL has led to the development of a range of novel therapies, many of which target the tumor in a tailored manner and are summarized in this paper. PMID:22536253

  15. How do viruses trick B-cells into becoming lymphomas?

    PubMed Central

    Cesarman, Ethel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Since the discovery of EBV in Burkitt lymphoma 50 years ago, only one other virus, namely KSHV/HHV-8, has been confirmed to be a direct cause of B cell lymphoma. Here we will review the evidence for EBV and KSHV as causal lymphoma agents. Recent findings A deeper understanding of specific mechanisms by which EBV and KSHV cause B cell lymphomas has been acquired over the past years, in particular with respect to viral protein interactions with host cell pathways, microRNA functions. Specific therapies based on knowledge of viral functions are beginning to be evaluated, mostly in pre-clinical models. Summary Understanding the causal associations of specific infections agents with certain B cell lymphomas has allowed more accurate diagnosis and classification. A deeper knowledge of the specific mechanisms of transformation is essential to begin assessing whether virus-targeted treatment modalities may be used in the future. PMID:24886824

  16. Inferring processes underlying B-cell repertoire diversity

    PubMed Central

    Elhanati, Yuval; Sethna, Zachary; Marcou, Quentin; Callan, Curtis G.; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M.

    2015-01-01

    We quantify the VDJ recombination and somatic hypermutation processes in human B cells using probabilistic inference methods on high-throughput DNA sequence repertoires of human B-cell receptor heavy chains. Our analysis captures the statistical properties of the naive repertoire, first after its initial generation via VDJ recombination and then after selection for functionality. We also infer statistical properties of the somatic hypermutation machinery (exclusive of subsequent effects of selection). Our main results are the following: the B-cell repertoire is substantially more diverse than T-cell repertoires, owing to longer junctional insertions; sequences that pass initial selection are distinguished by having a higher probability of being generated in a VDJ recombination event; somatic hypermutations have a non-uniform distribution along the V gene that is well explained by an independent site model for the sequence context around the hypermutation site. PMID:26194757

  17. The epigenetic basis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanwen; Melnick, Ari

    2015-04-01

    The pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is strongly linked to perturbation of epigenetic mechanisms. The germinal center (GC) B cells from which DLBCLs arise are prone to instability in their cytosine methylation patterns. DLBCLs inherit this epigenetic instability and display variable degrees of epigenetic heterogeneity. Greater epigenetic heterogeneity is linked with poor clinical outcome. Somatic mutations of histone-modifying proteins have also emerged as a hallmark of DLBCL. The effect of these somatic mutations may be to disrupt epigenetic switches that control the GC phenotype and "lock in" certain oncogenic features of GC B cells, resulting in malignant transformation. DNA methyltransferase and histone methyltransferase inhibitors are emerging as viable therapeutic approaches to erase aberrant epigenetic programming, suppress DLBCL growth, and overcome chemotherapy resistance. This review will discuss these recent advances and their therapeutic implications. PMID:25805588

  18. Neutral maltase: the first human B-cell enzymatic marker reflecting terminal differentiation of mature B cells into plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Philip, P J; Giudicelli, J; Delqué, P; Cassuto, J P; Sudaka, P; Ayraud, N

    1983-08-01

    Neutral maltase activity (alpha-D-glucoside glucohydrolase; EC: 3.2.1.20) was measured in B and T lymphocytes from peripheral blood of normal subjects and patients suffering from chronic or acute lymphoid leukemias. Neutral maltase activity is undetectable in T cells from normal subjects as well as in patients with chronic or acute T-lymphoid leukemias. Conversely, whereas this enzyme activity is always undetectable in chronic or acute B-lymphoid leukemia, neutral maltase activity is expressed in mature B cells from normal subjects. The detection of higher neutral maltase activity in plasma cells from myelomas than in normal B cells supports the concept that the expression of neutral maltase activity is related to the stages of differentiation and maturation reached by lymphocytes of the B-cell lineage. Neutral maltase therefore appears as the first B-cell enzymatic marker described that is expressed in the course of terminal differentiation of mature B cells into plasma cells. PMID:6347275

  19. High-efficiency Generation of Multiple Short Noncoding RNA in B-cells and B-cell-derived Extracellular Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Almanza, Gonzalo; Zanetti, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Short noncoding (snc)RNAs are important new players in the landscape of biologics with therapeutic potential. Recently, we reported on a new method for the synthesis and delivery of snc RNA in B-cells transfected with plasmid DNA. Here using the same approach, we demonstrate that B-cells can be programmed for the enforced biogenesis and synchronous release of multiple sncRNAs. Our data show that this goal is feasible and that multiple sncRNA are released in the extracellular compartment in amounts comparable to those from B-cells programmed to express and secrete one scnRNA only. Furthermore, we found that the cargo of extracellular vescicles (EVs) isolated from programmed B-cells is remarkably enriched for multiple sncRNA. On average, we found that the content of multiple sncRNAs in EVs is 3.6 copynumber/EV. Collectively, we demonstrate that B-cells can be easily programmed toward the synthesis and release of multiple sncRNAs, including sncRNA-laden EVs, efficiently and specifically. PMID:26670278

  20. Regulation of AID, the B-cell genome mutator.

    PubMed

    Keim, Celia; Kazadi, David; Rothschild, Gerson; Basu, Uttiya

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which B cells somatically engineer their genomes to generate the vast diversity of antibodies required to challenge the nearly infinite number of antigens that immune systems encounter are of tremendous clinical and academic interest. The DNA cytidine deaminase activation-induced deaminase (AID) catalyzes two of these mechanisms: class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). Recent discoveries indicate a significant promiscuous targeting of this B-cell mutator enzyme genome-wide. Here we discuss the various regulatory elements that control AID activity and prevent AID from inducing genomic instability and thereby initiating oncogenesis. PMID:23307864

  1. Heterogeneity in the differentiation and function of memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Justin J; Jenkins, Marc K; Pape, Kathryn A

    2012-12-01

    Vaccines that induce neutralizing antibodies have led to the eradication of small pox and have severely reduced the prevalence of many other infections. However, even the most successful vaccines do not induce protective antibodies in all individuals, and can fail to induce lifelong immunity. A key to remedying these shortcomings may lie in a better understanding of long-lived memory B cells. Recent studies have revealed novel insights into the differentiation and function of these cells, and have shown that the memory B cell pool is much more heterogeneous than previously appreciated. PMID:22920843

  2. Adult systemic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YOUPING; LIU, XINYUE; CHEN, YAN

    2015-01-01

    Systemic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease (EBV+ T-LPD) occurs mainly in Asia and South America and is extremely rare in adults. The disease is characterized by a clonal proliferation of EBV-infected T cells with a cytotoxic immunophenotype and is associated with a poor clinical outcome and can be life-threatening. The majority of the patients have evidence of systemic disease, often with lymph node, liver and spleen involvement. The present study describes a case of adult systemic EBV+ T-LPD with high fever, systemic lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, nose-pharynx neoplasm, pancytopenia, EB virus infection and proliferative bone marrow, with the aim of improving the understanding of the condition.

  3. FDG-PET/CT in abdominal post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Metser, Ur; Lo, Glen

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality following both solid organ and haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PTLD has a broad range of manifestations with extranodal involvement more common in the abdomen than nodal involvement. Fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT (FDG-PET/CT) is sensitive and specific to detect PTLD and can upstage or detect occult PTLD compared with conventional CT imaging. As functional imaging, FDG-PET/CT also has a role in monitoring treatment response. In this pictorial essay, we will discuss the role of FDG-PET/CT in the diagnosis and staging of abdominal PTLD and describe the advantages of functional imaging in assessing response to therapy. PMID:26544161

  4. Severe Puumala virus infection in a patient with a lymphoproliferative disease treated with icatibant.

    PubMed

    Laine, Outi; Leppänen, Ilona; Koskela, Sirpa; Antonen, Jaakko; Mäkelä, Satu; Sinisalo, Marjatta; Vaheri, Antti; Mustonen, Jukka

    2015-02-01

    Early identification of patients at risk of a severe course of hantaviral disease and lack of effective medication represent a global challenge in the treatment of this emerging infection. We describe a 67-year-old female patient with a history of chronic lymphoproliferative disease involving the spleen and an extremely severe acute Puumala hantavirus infection. She was treated with the bradykinin receptor antagonist icatibant and recovered. She is the second patient with a spleen abnormality and severe Puumala infection treated with icatibant in our hospital. We suggest that patients with spleen abnormalities may be more susceptible to severe hantavirus disease. The activation of the kinin-kallikrein system and the formation of bradykinin in hantavirus-infected endothelial cells indicate that the role of bradykinin receptor antagonist icatibant in the treatment of hantavirus disease is worth studying. PMID:25496418

  5. Control of Viremia Enables Acquisition of Resting Memory B Cells with Age and Normalization of Activated B Cell Phenotypes in HIV-Infected Children.

    PubMed

    Muema, Daniel M; Macharia, Gladys N; Hassan, Amin S; Mwaringa, Shalton M; Fegan, Greg W; Berkley, James A; Nduati, Eunice W; Urban, Britta C

    2015-08-01

    HIV affects the function of all lymphocyte populations, including B cells. Phenotypic and functional defects of B cells in HIV-infected adults have been well characterized, but defects in children have not been studied to the same extent. We determined the proportion of B cell subsets and frequencies of Ag-specific memory B cells in peripheral blood from HIV-infected children and healthy controls, using flow cytometry and B cell ELISPOT, respectively. In addition, we measured the quantities and avidities of plasma Abs against various Ags by ELISA. We also determined plasma levels of BAFF and expression of BAFF receptors on B cells. Children with high HIV viremia had increased proportions of activated mature B cells, tissue-like memory B cells and plasmablasts, and low proportions of naive B cells when compared with community controls and children with low HIV viremia, similar to adults infected with HIV. HIV-infected groups had lower proportions of resting memory B cells than did community controls. Notably, high HIV viremia prevented the age-dependent accumulation of class-switched resting memory B cells. HIV-infected children, regardless of the level of viremia, showed lower quantities and avidities of IgG and lower frequencies of memory B cells against Expanded Program on Immunization vaccines. The HIV-infected children had an altered BAFF profile that could have affected their B cell compartment. Therefore, B cell defects in HIV-infected children are similar to those seen in HIV-infected adults. However, control of HIV viremia is associated with normalization of activated B cell subsets and allows age-dependent accumulation of resting memory B cells. PMID:26116511

  6. Control of Viremia Enables Acquisition of Resting Memory B Cells with Age and Normalization of Activated B Cell Phenotypes in HIV-Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Muema, Daniel M.; Macharia, Gladys N.; Hassan, Amin S.; Mwaringa, Shalton M.; Fegan, Greg W.; Berkley, James A.; Urban, Britta C.

    2015-01-01

    HIV affects the function of all lymphocyte populations, including B cells. Phenotypic and functional defects of B cells in HIV-infected adults have been well characterized, but defects in children have not been studied to the same extent. We determined the proportion of B cell subsets and frequencies of Ag-specific memory B cells in peripheral blood from HIV-infected children and healthy controls, using flow cytometry and B cell ELISPOT, respectively. In addition, we measured the quantities and avidities of plasma Abs against various Ags by ELISA. We also determined plasma levels of BAFF and expression of BAFF receptors on B cells. Children with high HIV viremia had increased proportions of activated mature B cells, tissue-like memory B cells and plasmablasts, and low proportions of naive B cells when compared with community controls and children with low HIV viremia, similar to adults infected with HIV. HIV-infected groups had lower proportions of resting memory B cells than did community controls. Notably, high HIV viremia prevented the age-dependent accumulation of class-switched resting memory B cells. HIV-infected children, regardless of the level of viremia, showed lower quantities and avidities of IgG and lower frequencies of memory B cells against Expanded Program on Immunization vaccines. The HIV-infected children had an altered BAFF profile that could have affected their B cell compartment. Therefore, B cell defects in HIV-infected children are similar to those seen in HIV-infected adults. However, control of HIV viremia is associated with normalization of activated B cell subsets and allows age-dependent accumulation of resting memory B cells. PMID:26116511

  7. The X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome gene product SH2D1A associates with p62dok (Dok1) and activates NF-?B

    PubMed Central

    Sylla, Bakary S.; Murphy, Kerry; Cahir-McFarland, Ellen; Lane, William S.; Mosialos, George; Kieff, Elliott

    2000-01-01

    The X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP) is a genetic disorder in which affected males have a morbid or fatal response to Epstein–Barr virus infection. The XLP deficiency has been mapped to a gene encoding a 128-residue protein, SH2D1A, which is comprised principally of a Src homology 2 (SH2) domain. We now report that SH2D1A associates with Dok1, a protein that interacts with Ras-GAP, Csk, and Nck. An SH2D1A SH2 domain mutant that has been identified in XLP does not associate with Dok1, in accord with the hypothesis that this interaction is linked to XLP. The association of SH2D1A with Dok1 also depends on phosphorylation of Dok1 Y449 in the sequence ALYSQVQK. Further, overexpression of SH2D1A is found to activate NF-?B in 293T cells. NF-?B activation by SH2D1A does not depend on the wild-type SH2 domain and is inhibited by a dominant-negative I?B kinase ?. Thus, SH2D1A can affect multiple intracellular signaling pathways that are potentially important in the normal effective host response to Epstein–Barr virus infection. PMID:10852966

  8. Deletion of receptor for advanced glycation end products exacerbates lymphoproliferative syndrome and lupus nephritis in B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice.

    PubMed

    Goury, Antoine; Meghraoui-Kheddar, Aïda; Belmokhtar, Karim; Vuiblet, Vincent; Ortillon, Jeremy; Jaisson, Stéphane; Devy, Jerôme; Le Naour, Richard; Tabary, Thierry; Cohen, Jacques H M; Schmidt, Ann-Marie; Rieu, Philippe; Touré, Fatouma

    2015-04-15

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern recognition receptor that interacts with advanced glycation end products, but also with C3a, CpG DNA oligonucleotides, and alarmin molecules such as HMGB1 to initiate a proinflammatory reaction. Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disorder associated with the accumulation of RAGE ligands. We generated mice invalidated for RAGE in the lupus-prone B6-MRL Fas lpr/j background to determine the role of RAGE in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. We compared the phenotype of these mice with that of their wild-type and B6-MRL Fas lpr/j littermates. Lymphoproliferative syndrome, production of anti-dsDNA Abs, lupus nephritis, and accumulation of CD3(+)B220(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) autoreactive T cells (in the peripheral blood and the spleen) were significantly increased in B6-MRL Fas lpr/j RAGE(-/-) mice compared with B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice (respectively p < 0.005, p < 0.05, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001). A large proportion of autoreactive T cells from B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice expressed RAGE at their surface. Time course studies of annexin V expression revealed that autoreactive T cells in the spleen of B6-MRL Fas lpr/j-RAGE(-/-) mice exhibited a delay in apoptosis and expressed significantly less activated caspase 3 (39.5 ± 4.3%) than T cells in B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice (65.5 ± 5.2%) or wild-type mice (75.3 ± 2.64%) (p = 0.02). We conclude that the deletion of RAGE in B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice promotes the accumulation of autoreactive CD3(+)B220(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells, therefore exacerbating lymphoproliferative syndrome, autoimmunity, and organ injury. This suggests that RAGE rescues the apoptosis of T lymphocytes when the death receptor Fas/CD95 is dysfunctional. PMID:25762779

  9. On the Meaning of Affinity Limits in B-Cell Epitope Prediction for Antipeptide Antibody-Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Caoili, Salvador Eugenio C.

    2012-01-01

    B-cell epitope prediction aims to aid the design of peptide-based immunogens (e.g., vaccines) for eliciting antipeptide antibodies that protect against disease, but such antibodies fail to confer protection and even promote disease if they bind with low affinity. Hence, the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) was searched to obtain published thermodynamic and kinetic data on binding interactions of antipeptide antibodies. The data suggest that the affinity of the antibodies for their immunizing peptides appears to be limited in a manner consistent with previously proposed kinetic constraints on affinity maturation in vivo and that cross-reaction of the antibodies with proteins tends to occur with lower affinity than the corresponding reaction of the antibodies with their immunizing peptides. These observations better inform B-cell epitope prediction to avoid overestimating the affinity for both active and passive immunization; whereas active immunization is subject to limitations of affinity maturation in vivo and of the capacity to accumulate endogenous antibodies, passive immunization may transcend such limitations, possibly with the aid of artificial affinity-selection processes and of protein engineering. Additionally, protein disorder warrants further investigation as a possible supplementary criterion for B-cell epitope prediction, where such disorder obviates thermodynamically unfavorable protein structural adjustments in cross-reactions between antipeptide antibodies and proteins. PMID:23209458

  10. Primary pleural precursor B-Cell lymphoblastic lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Mark S; Cheesman, Edmund; Kaleem, Musa; Wynn, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Intrathoracic lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL) is classically of T-cell lineage, but these cases of pleural B-cell LBL suggest that this is not always the case. Despite the clinical challenges involved every attempt should be made to secure a biopsy and histological diagnosis, as we move into an era of lineage-directed therapies. PMID:26509024

  11. The Memory Function of the B Cell Antigen Receptor.

    PubMed

    Wienands, Jürgen; Engels, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    Activated B lymphocytes preserve their antigen experience by differentiating into long-lived pools of antibody-secreting plasma cells or various types of memory B cells (MBCs). The former population constantly produces serum immunoglobulins with sufficient specificity and affinity to thwart infections with recurrent pathogens. By contrast, memory B cell populations retain their antigen receptors on the cell surface and hence need pathogen-induced differentiation steps before they can actively contribute to host defense. The terminal differentiation of MBCs into antibody-secreting plasma cells is hallmarked by the absence of the lag phase characteristic for primary antibody responses. Moreover, secondary antibody responses are predominantly driven by MBCs that bear an antigen receptor of the IgG class on their surface although IgM-positive memory populations exist as well. These fundamental principles of B cell memory were enigmatic for decades. Only recently, we have begun to understand the underlying mechanisms. This review summarizes our current understanding of how different subpopulations of MBCs are generated during primary immune responses and how their functional heterogeneity on antigen recall is controlled by different signaling capabilities of B cell antigen receptor (BCR) isotypes and by the nature of the antigen. PMID:26362935

  12. An eruption of European B-cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Cancro, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Volcanic ash clouds disrupted the 2010 ESF/EMBO meeting on B cells and protection. Nevertheless, the delegates who did make it to Catalonia put together their own programme of talks covering a range of themes from mutualism to epigenetics. PMID:20725089

  13. MUC-1 mucin protein expression in B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Donnelly, Gerard B; Goy, Andre; Hegde, Abhijith; Nanjangud, Gouri; Qin, Jing; Thaler, Howard; Gilles, Frederic; Dyomin, Vadim G; Lloyd, Kenneth O; Zelenetz, Andrew D; Houldsworth, Jane; Chaganti, R S K

    2003-03-01

    We have recently shown that MUC1, mapped to the chromosomal band 1q21, is rearranged or amplified in 15% of B-cell lymphomas and that rearrangement led to over-expression of MUC-1 mucin in a case of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). To determine the incidence of MUC-1 mucin expression and its clinical significance in B-cell lymphomas, we investigated a panel of 113 cases by immunohistochemistry (IHC). MUC-1 mucin expression was detected in the majority of cases (92.9%), with moderate to high levels noted in 50.4% of all histologic subsets comprising DLBCL (82 cases), follicular lymphoma (FL) (15 cases), FL with transformation to DLBCL (4 cases), and other B-cell lymphomas (12 cases). No statistically significant correlation was found between MUC-1 mucin expression and MUC1 genomic status (amplification/rearrangement) evaluated by Southern blot analysis, and 1q21 abnormality by karyotypic analysis. For all cases, MUC-1 mucin expression correlated with a previous history of lymphoma (p=0.003). PMID:12610353

  14. Impact of Gastrointestinal Bacillus anthracis Infection on Hepatic B Cells.

    PubMed

    Colliou, Natacha; Sahay, Bikash; Zadeh, Mojgan; Owen, Jennifer L; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2015-09-01

    Ingestion of Bacillus anthracis results in rapid gastrointestinal (GI) infection, known as GI anthrax. We previously showed that during GI anthrax, there is swift deterioration of intestinal barrier function leading to translocation of gut-associated bacteria into systemic circulation. Additionally, we described dysfunction in colonic B cells. In concordance with our previous studies, here, we report early migration of the Sterne strain of B. anthracis along with other gut-resident bacteria into the infected murine liver. Additionally, despite a global decrease in the B cell population, we observed an increase in both B-1a and marginal zone (MZ)-like B cells. Both of these cell types are capable of producing immunoglobulins against common pathogens and commensals, which act as a general antibody barrier before an antigen-specific antibody response. Accumulation of these cells in the liver was associated with an increase in chemokine expression. These data suggest that the presence of Sterne and other commensals in the liver trigger migration of MZ-like B cells from the spleen to the liver to neutralize systemic spread. Further research is required to evaluate the possible cause of their failure to clear the infection within the liver, including the potential role of dysfunctional mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. PMID:26402706

  15. Impact of Gastrointestinal Bacillus anthracis Infection on Hepatic B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Colliou, Natacha; Sahay, Bikash; Zadeh, Mojgan; Owen, Jennifer L.; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Ingestion of Bacillus anthracis results in rapid gastrointestinal (GI) infection, known as GI anthrax. We previously showed that during GI anthrax, there is swift deterioration of intestinal barrier function leading to translocation of gut-associated bacteria into systemic circulation. Additionally, we described dysfunction in colonic B cells. In concordance with our previous studies, here, we report early migration of the Sterne strain of B. anthracis along with other gut-resident bacteria into the infected murine liver. Additionally, despite a global decrease in the B cell population, we observed an increase in both B-1a and marginal zone (MZ)-like B cells. Both of these cell types are capable of producing immunoglobulins against common pathogens and commensals, which act as a general antibody barrier before an antigen-specific antibody response. Accumulation of these cells in the liver was associated with an increase in chemokine expression. These data suggest that the presence of Sterne and other commensals in the liver trigger migration of MZ-like B cells from the spleen to the liver to neutralize systemic spread. Further research is required to evaluate the possible cause of their failure to clear the infection within the liver, including the potential role of dysfunctional mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. PMID:26402706

  16. Manipulation of B-cell responses with histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Waibel, Michaela; Christiansen, Ailsa J; Hibbs, Margaret L; Shortt, Jake; Jones, Sarah A; Simpson, Ian; Light, Amanda; O'Donnell, Kristy; Morand, Eric F; Tarlinton, David M; Johnstone, Ricky W; Hawkins, Edwin D

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are approved for treating certain haematological malignancies, however, recent evidence also illustrates they are modulators of the immune system. In experimental models, HDACi are particularly potent against malignancies originating from the B-lymphocyte lineage. Here we examine the ability of this class of compounds to modify both protective and autoimmune antibody responses. In vitro, HDACi affect B-cell proliferation, survival and differentiation in an HDAC-class-dependent manner. Strikingly, treatment of lupus-prone Mrl/lpr mice with the HDACi panobinostat significantly reduces autoreactive plasma-cell numbers, autoantibodies and nephritis, while other immune parameters remain largely unaffected. Immunized control mice treated with panobinostat or the clinically approved HDACi vorinostat have significantly impaired primary antibody responses, but these treatments surprisingly spare circulating memory B cells. These studies indicate that panobinostat is a potential therapy for B-cell-driven autoimmune conditions and HDACi do not induce major long-term detrimental effects on B-cell memory. PMID:25913720

  17. The Lymph Node B Cell Immune Response: Dynamic

    E-print Network

    Harel, David

    responses. By Naamah Swerdlin, Irun R. Cohen, and David Harel ABSTRACT | Lymph nodes are organs in whichINVITED P A P E R The Lymph Node B Cell Immune Response: Dynamic Analysis In-Silico A computer, the lymph node (LN) has to orchestrate the meeting and interactions between the antigen and various cell

  18. Expansion of Activated Peripheral Blood Memory B Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis, Impact of B Cell Depletion Therapy, and Biomarkers of Response

    PubMed Central

    Adlowitz, Diana G.; Barnard, Jennifer; Biear, Jamie N.; Cistrone, Christopher; Owen, Teresa; Wang, Wensheng; Palanichamy, Arumugam; Ezealah, Ezinma; Campbell, Debbie; Wei, Chungwen; Looney, R. John; Sanz, Inaki; Anolik, Jennifer H.

    2015-01-01

    Although B cell depletion therapy (BCDT) is effective in a subset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, both mechanisms and biomarkers of response are poorly defined. Here we characterized abnormalities in B cell populations in RA and the impact of BCDT in order to elucidate B cell roles in the disease and response biomarkers. In active RA patients both CD27+IgD- switched memory (SM) and CD27-IgD- double negative memory (DN) peripheral blood B cells contained significantly higher fractions of CD95+ and CD21- activated cells compared to healthy controls. After BCD the predominant B cell populations were memory, and residual memory B cells displayed a high fraction of CD21- and CD95+ compared to pre-depletion indicating some resistance of these activated populations to anti-CD20. The residual memory populations also expressed more Ki-67 compared to pre-treatment, suggesting homeostatic proliferation in the B cell depleted state. Biomarkers of clinical response included lower CD95+ activated memory B cells at depletion time points and a higher ratio of transitional B cells to memory at reconstitution. B cell function in terms of cytokine secretion was dependent on B cell subset and changed with BCD. Thus, SM B cells produced pro-inflammatory (TNF) over regulatory (IL10) cytokines as compared to naïve/transitional. Notably, B cell TNF production decreased after BCDT and reconstitution compared to untreated RA. Our results support the hypothesis that the clinical and immunological outcome of BCDT depends on the relative balance of protective and pathogenic B cell subsets established after B cell depletion and repopulation. PMID:26047509

  19. T-cell rich B-cell lymphoma masquerading as Hodgkin disease: excellent outcome to inadequate therapy.

    PubMed

    Acabá, L; Santiago, N; Vélez García, E

    1996-01-01

    T-cell rich B-cell lymphomas (TCRBCL) are characterized as non-Hodgkin lymphomas with a minor population of malignant B-cells scattered among predominant, reactive T-lymphocytes. This entity can easily be confused with lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin disease (HD-LP), resulting in inappropriate therapy and a poor outcome. Because of their similarity, the pathology of patients treated for HD-LP with an inadequate or short-lived response to therapy should always be reviewed by an expert hematopathologist. We describe the first reported patient in Puerto Rico with TCRBCL, originally diagnosed and treated as HD-LP. Although the patient received partial, substandard therapy for TCRBCL, an excellent prolonged complete response ensued, thus, giving further credence to the fact that malignant lymphomas and TCRBCL in particular, are a protean group of disorders which should be precisely and accurately classified before the proper therapeutic strategies can be outlined. PMID:8916437

  20. Establishment of Murine Gammaherpesvirus Latency in B Cells Is Not a Stochastic Event

    PubMed Central

    Fontinha, Diana; Marques, Sofia; Simas, J. Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Murid ?-herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4) promotes polyclonal B cell activation and establishes latency in memory B cells via unclear mechanisms. We aimed at exploring whether B cell receptor specificity plays a role in B cell susceptibility to viral latency and how this is related to B cell activation. We first observed that MuHV-4-specific B cells represent a minority of the latent population, and to better understand the influence of the virus on non-MuHV-4 specific B cells we used the SWHEL mouse model, which produce hen egg lysozyme (HEL)-specific B cells. By tracking HEL+ and HEL? B cells, we showed that in vivo latency was restricted to HEL? B cells while the two populations were equally sensitive to the virus in vitro. Moreover, MuHV-4 induced two waves of B cell activation. While the first wave was characterized by a general B cell activation, as shown by HEL+ and HEL? B cells expansion and upregulation of CD69 expression, the second wave was restricted to the HEL? population, which acquired germinal center (GC) and plasma cell phenotypes. Antigenic stimulation of HEL+ B cells led to the development of HEL+ GC B cells where latent infection remained undetectable, indicating that MuHV-4 does not benefit from acute B cell responses to establish latency in non-virus specific B cells but relies on other mechanisms of the humoral response. These data support a model in which the establishment of latency in B cells by ?-herpesviruses is not stochastic in terms of BCR specificity and is tightly linked to the formation of GCs. PMID:25079788

  1. The B Cell Antigen Receptor and Overexpression of MYC Can Cooperate in the Genesis of B Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Refaeli, Yosef; Young, Ryan M; Turner, Brian C; Duda, Jennifer; Field, Kenneth A; Bishop, J. Michael

    2008-01-01

    A variety of circumstantial evidence from humans has implicated the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) in the genesis of B cell lymphomas. We generated mouse models designed to test this possibility directly, and we found that both the constitutive and antigen-stimulated state of a clonal BCR affected the rate and outcome of lymphomagenesis initiated by the proto-oncogene MYC. The tumors that arose in the presence of constitutive BCR differed from those initiated by MYC alone and resembled chronic B cell lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma (B-CLL), whereas those that arose in response to antigen stimulation resembled large B-cell lymphomas, particularly Burkitt lymphoma (BL). We linked the genesis of the BL-like tumors to antigen stimulus in three ways. First, in reconstruction experiments, stimulation of B cells by an autoantigen in the presence of overexpressed MYC gave rise to BL-like tumors that were, in turn, dependent on both MYC and the antigen for survival and proliferation. Second, genetic disruption of the pathway that mediates signaling from the BCR promptly killed cells of the BL-like tumors as well as the tumors resembling B-CLL. And third, growth of the murine BL could be inhibited by any of three distinctive immunosuppressants, in accord with the dependence of the tumors on antigen-induced signaling. Together, our results provide direct evidence that antigenic stimulation can participate in lymphomagenesis, point to a potential role for the constitutive BCR as well, and sustain the view that the constitutive BCR gives rise to signals different from those elicited by antigen. The mouse models described here should be useful in exploring further the pathogenesis of lymphomas, and in preclinical testing of new therapeutics. PMID:18578569

  2. Retroperitoneal fibrosis due to B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: Responding to rituximab!

    PubMed

    Alvarez Argote, Juliana; Bauer, Frank A; Posteraro, Anthony F; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2016-02-01

    Retroperitoneal fibrosis is a rare disease manifesting as chronic soft tissue fibrosis in the retroperitoneum, with potential anatomic and/or functional compromise of adjacent organs. It can be primary (idiopathic) or secondary to other conditions such as cancers, autoimmune disorders, or drugs. We report herein a 66-year-old patient with symptomatic retroperitoneal fibrosis leading to bilateral hydronephrosis and renal failure, in whom, after a complex diagnostic work-up and protracted clinical course, a B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the retroperitoneal space and several vertebral bodies was identified. The patient was treated with radiation therapy and weekly rituximab infusions, with resolution of hydronephrosis and lower back pain. We include a thorough literature review on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis of retroperitoneal fibrosis. A meticulous search for malignancy is necessary in this rare condition that, if positive, may have significant therapeutic and prognostic implications. PMID:25013186

  3. Lentivirus-induced lymphoproliferative disease. Comparative pathogenicity of phenotypically distinct ovine lentivirus strains.

    PubMed Central

    Lairmore, M. D.; Poulson, J. M.; Adducci, T. A.; DeMartini, J. C.

    1988-01-01

    For investigation of the pathogenicity of lentivirus strains, which have distinctly different cytopathic phenotypes in synovial membrane cell culture, plaque-purified, lytic, and nonlytic ovine lentivirus (OvLV) isolates were inoculated intratracheally into two groups of neonatal lambs. Twelve lambs were inoculated with a lytic OvLV isolate and 3 lambs each with two nonlytic OvLV isolates. Five control lambs were inoculated with either virus-free medium or were left uninoculated. In 8 of 12 lambs inoculated with a lytic OvLV isolate mild to severe lesions of lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP) and pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia developed, 6 of 12 lambs had lesions of pulmonary lymph node follicular hyperplasia, 3 of 9 female lambs had lesions of lymphoproliferative mastitis, 3 of 10 lambs had lesions of lymphocytic/plasmacytic synovitis, and 3 lambs had no lesions. In 3 of 6 lambs inoculated with nonlytic OvLV isolates only mild LIP lesions developed, without concurrent mammary gland or joint lesions. Bronchoalveolar lavage samples from OvLV-diseased lambs contained on average 1.5-fold more numbers of total leukocytes, and 4-fold more numbers of lymphocytes, compared with bronchoalveolar lavage samples of normal lambs. Monoclonal antibodies to ovine lymphocyte surface markers showed that the SBU-T8+ lymphocyte (CD 8 equivalent) was the predominant lymphocyte subset (mean of 65% of total lavaged lymphocytes) in bronchoalveolar lavage samples of 3 diseased lambs. Ovine lentivirus was reisolated from multiple tissues of both groups of OvLV-inoculated lambs, but the percentage of individual tissues infected was greater in lambs inoculated with the lytic viral isolate. Control lambs had no lesions and failed to produce OvLV-specific antibodies or yield OvLV from tissues. All OvLV-inoculated lambs produced either low or undetectable serum virus neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, lambs inoculated with either lytic or nonlytic OvLV produced precipitating antibodies to OvLV glycoprotein and group-specific protein. However, initial detection of precipitating antibodies to OvLV glycoprotein was earlier (mean, 5.8 weeks after inoculation) in OvLV-infected lambs in which severe lymphoproliferative disease developed and delayed (mean, 10.2 weeks after inoculation) in OvLV-infected lambs with mild or no lesions. Together, these results suggest that lentivirus isolates produced disease in a virus strain-dependent manner and suggest that humoral immune responses against OvLV failed to prevent lesion development in lentivirus-infected lambs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3337213

  4. A Soluble BAFF Antagonist, BR3-Fc, Decreases Peripheral Blood B Cells and Lymphoid Tissue Marginal Zone and Follicular B Cells in Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Vugmeyster, Yulia; Seshasayee, Dhaya; Chang, Wesley; Storn, Anahid; Howell, Kathy; Sa, Susan; Nelson, Tenea; Martin, Flavius; Grewal, Iqbal; Gilkerson, Ellen; Wu, Ben; Thompson, Jeff; Ehrenfels, Barbara N.; Ren, Song; Song, An; Gelzleichter, Thomas R.; Danilenko, Dimitry M.

    2006-01-01

    BAFF (also known as BLyS), a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, plays a critical role in the maturation and development of B cells. BAFF has three receptors on B cells, the most crucial of which is BR3. In this study, we demonstrate the biological outcome of BAFF blockade in cynomolgus monkeys using a soluble fusion protein consisting of human BR3 and human IgG1 Fc. In vitro, BR3-Fc blocked BAFF-mediated survival and proliferation of cynomolgus monkey B cells. Weekly treatment of cynomolgus monkeys with BR3-Fc for 13 to 18 weeks resulted in significant B-cell reduction in the peripheral blood and in lymphoid organs. CD21high B cells in lymphoid tissues, a subset analogous to human marginal zone B cells, expressed nearly twofold higher BR3 levels than did CD21med B cells. Lymphoid tissue flow cytometric analysis showed that BR3-Fc reduced this CD21high B-cell subset to a greater extent than it reduced CD21med B cells. Dual-label immunohistochemistry and morphometric image analysis supported these results by demonstrating that BR3-Fc reduced a significant proportion of the B cells within the splenic inner and outer marginal zones. These findings should prove very useful in guiding the desired therapeutic use of BR3-Fc for autoimmune diseases in the clinic. PMID:16436662

  5. A role for B cells in resistance to Cryptococcus neoformans in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, K M; Johnson, L L

    1997-01-01

    The role of B cells in immunity to Cryptococcus neoformans was investigated. Genetically targeted, B-cell-deficient mice (mu Mt) examined at various times after intravenous infection with C. neoformans 184 had lung and brain yeast burdens that were equivalent to tissue burdens in control B-cell-sufficient mice. Both B-cell-deficient and B-cell-sufficient control mice were effectively vaccinated by a sublethal intratracheal instillation of strain 184 yeast against a systemic infection with the C. neoformans strain carrying ura5; vaccinated control and vaccinated B-cell-deficient mice had equivalent brain and lung burdens of the ura5 strain 10 days after intravenous rechallenge. Additionally, B-cell-deficient and B-cell-sufficient vaccinated mice survived an intravenous rechallenge with a dose of yeast cells which is normally lethal for unimmunized mice. In further studies of the role of B cells in murine cryptococcosis, SCID mice were reconstituted with lymphocytes from B-cell-deficient and B-cell-sufficient mice. SCID mice reconstituted with lymphocytes from vaccinated B-cell-deficient animals failed to express effective adoptive immunity to C. neoformans brain infection. In contrast, SCID mice reconstituted with lymphocytes from vaccinated B-cell-sufficient mice had 10-fold fewer yeast cells in their brains than did uninfused SCID controls. However, SCID mice given lymphocytes from B-cell-deficient immune donors had fewer yeast cells in their lungs than did uninfused controls. Fewer CD4+ lymphocytes were recovered at 7 and 11 days after infection from the peripheral blood and spleens of SCID mice reconstituted with lymphocyte suspensions from B-cell-deficient animals than from the peripheral blood and spleens of SCID mice reconstituted with suspensions from B-cell-sufficient control donors. These data suggest that B cells can play an important role in host defense against Cryptococcus in the brain under conditions in which T-cell-mediated immunity is impaired. PMID:9009308

  6. Antibody B cell responses in HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Mouquet, Hugo

    2014-11-01

    In rare cases, B cells can supply HIV-1-infected individuals with unconventional antibodies equipped to neutralize the wide diversity of viral variants. Innovations in single-cell cloning, high-throughput sequencing, and structural biology methods have enabled the capture and thorough characterization of these exceptionally potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). Here, I review the recent findings in humoral responses to HIV-1, focusing on the interplay between naturally occurring bNAbs and the virus both at systemic and mucosal levels. In this context, I discuss how an improved understanding of bNAb generation may provide invaluable insight into the fundamental mechanisms governing adaptive B cell responses to viruses, and how this knowledge is currently contributing to the development of vaccine and therapeutic strategies against HIV-1. PMID:25240985

  7. B cell tolerance and positive selection in lupus.

    PubMed

    Eilat, Dan; Wabl, Matthias

    2012-07-15

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is considered a prototype of systemic autoimmune diseases; however, despite considerable advances in recent years in the understanding of basic mechanisms in immunology, little progress has been made in elucidating the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease. This even holds for inbred mice, such as the lupus-prone New Zealand Black/New Zealand White F(1) mice, which are all genetically programmed to develop lupus at a predetermined age. This frustrating state of affairs calls for a fundamental change in our scientific thinking and the opening of new directions in lupus research. In this study, we suggest that intrinsic B cell tolerance mechanisms are not grossly impaired in lupus-prone mice, but that an unusually strong positive selection event recruits a small number of autoreactive B cells to the germinal centers. This event could be facilitated by nucleic acid-protein complexes that are created by somatic changes in the susceptible animal. PMID:22773662

  8. Nature and nurture: a case of transcending haematological pre-malignancies in a pair of monozygotic twins adding possible clues on the pathogenesis of B-cell proliferations.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Marcus C; Nyvold, Charlotte G; Roug, Anne S; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Villesen, Palle; Nederby, Line; Hokland, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We describe a comprehensive molecular analysis of a pair of monozygotic twins, who came to our attention when one experienced amaurosis fugax and was diagnosed with JAK2+ polycythaemia vera. He (Twin A) was also found to have an asymptomatic B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL). Although JAK2-, Twin B was subsequently shown to have a benign monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL). Flow cytometric and molecular analyses of the B-cell compartments revealed different immunoglobulin light and heavy chain usage in each twin. We hypothesized that whole exome sequencing could help delineating the pattern of germline B-cell disorder susceptibility and reveal somatic mutations potentially contributing to the differential patterns of pre-malignancy. Comparing bone marrow cells and T cells and employing in-house engineered integrative analysis, we found aberrations in Twin A consistent with a myeloid neoplasm, i.e. in TET2, RUNX1, PLCB1 and ELF4. Employing the method for detecting high-ranking variants by extensive annotation and relevance scoring, we also identified shared germline variants in genes of proteins interacting with B-cell receptor signalling mediators and the WNT-pathway, including IRF8, PTPRO, BCL9L, SIT1 and SIRPB1, all with possible implications in B-cell proliferation. Similar patterns of IGHV-gene usage to those demonstrated here have been observed in inherited acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Collectively, these findings may help in facilitating identification of putative master gene(s) involved in B-cell proliferations in general and MBL and B-CLL in particular. PMID:25752595

  9. Early alterations of B cells in patients with septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction It has recently been proposed that B lymphocytes are involved in sepsis pathogenesis. The goal of this study is to investigate potential abnormalities in a subset distribution and activation of circulating B lymphocytes in patients with septic shock. Methods This observational prospective study was conducted in a medical-surgical ICU. All patients with septic shock were eligible for inclusion. B-cell phenotypes (CD19+CD69+, CD19+CD23+, CD19+CD5+, CD19+CD80, CD19+CD86+, CD19+CD40 and CD19+CD95+) were assessed by quantitative flow cytometry upon admission to the ICU and 3, 7, 14 and 28 d later. Results Fifty-two patients were included. Thirty-six healthy volunteers matched for age and sex were used as controls. The patients had lymphopenia that was maintained during 28 d of follow-up. In patients with septic shock who died, the percentage of CD19+CD23+ was lower during the 7 d of follow-up than it was in survival patients. Moreover, the percentage of CD80+ and CD95+ expression on B cells was higher in patients who died than in survivors. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that a CD19+CD23+ value of 64.6% at ICU admission enabled discrimination between survivors and nonsurvivors with a sensitivity of 90.9% and a specificity of 80.0% (P = 0.0001). Conclusions Patients with septic shock who survive and those who don't have different patterns of abnormalities in circulating B lymphocytes. At ICU admission, a low percentage of CD23+ and a high of CD80+ and CD95+ on B cells were associated with increased mortality of patients with septic shock. Moreover, a drop in circulating B cells persisted during 28 d of ICU follow-up. PMID:23721745

  10. Immortalized B lymphocytes produce B-cell growth factor.

    PubMed

    Gordon, J; Ley, S C; Melamed, M D; English, L S; Hughes-Jones, N C

    The activation, clonal expansion and terminal differentiation of small resting B lymphocytes primed by an antigen (or antibodies to its receptors) appear to follow an orderly developmental sequence triggered at each stage by distinct soluble cytokines, primarily produced by T lymphocytes. For man, the only known B-cell mitogen independent of accessory cells for its action is the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Lymphocytes transformed by EBV are released from the usual constraints on B-cell growth, proliferating continuously in the absence of any exogenous cytokine. The resultant cell lines are of special interest as they possess certain features compatible with a preneoplastic state of Burkitt's lymphoma, one of two human cancers with which the virus is intimately associated. We report here that following EBV-transformation, B lymphoblasts release a soluble factor which mimics the B-cell stimulatory product(s) of mitogen-conditioned T lymphocytes. Furthermore, the virally-transformed cells utilize this activity to sustain their own growth. The ectopic production of an otherwise normal growth factor may represent a critical event in the malignant evolution of human lymphomas harbouring the EBV genome. PMID:6610833

  11. Practical guidelines for B-cell receptor repertoire sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Yaari, Gur; Kleinstein, Steven H

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of B-cell immunoglobulin repertoires is increasingly being applied to gain insights into the adaptive immune response in healthy individuals and in those with a wide range of diseases. Recent applications include the study of autoimmunity, infection, allergy, cancer and aging. As sequencing technologies continue to improve, these repertoire sequencing experiments are producing ever larger datasets, with tens- to hundreds-of-millions of sequences. These data require specialized bioinformatics pipelines to be analyzed effectively. Numerous methods and tools have been developed to handle different steps of the analysis, and integrated software suites have recently been made available. However, the field has yet to converge on a standard pipeline for data processing and analysis. Common file formats for data sharing are also lacking. Here we provide a set of practical guidelines for B-cell receptor repertoire sequencing analysis, starting from raw sequencing reads and proceeding through pre-processing, determination of population structure, and analysis of repertoire properties. These include methods for unique molecular identifiers and sequencing error correction, V(D)J assignment and detection of novel alleles, clonal assignment, lineage tree construction, somatic hypermutation modeling, selection analysis, and analysis of stereotyped or convergent responses. The guidelines presented here highlight the major steps involved in the analysis of B-cell repertoire sequencing data, along with recommendations on how to avoid common pitfalls. PMID:26589402

  12. B cells modulate mucosal associated invariant T cell immune responses.

    PubMed

    Salerno-Goncalves, Rosangela; Rezwan, Tasmia; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2014-01-01

    A common finding when measuring?T cell immunity to enteric bacterial vaccines in humans is the presence of background responses among individuals before immunization. Yet the nature of these background responses remains largely unknown. Recent findings show the presence in uninfected individuals of mucosal associated invariant?T (MAIT) cells that mount broad spectrum immune responses against a variety of microorganisms including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and enteric bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella. Therefore, we investigated whether MAIT immune responses to intestinal bacteria might account for the background responses observed before immunization. Here we measured MAIT immune responses to commensal and enteric pathogenic bacteria in healthy individuals with no history of oral immunization with enteric bacteria. We found that MAIT cells were activated by B cells infected with various bacteria strains (commensals and pathogens from the Enterobacteriaceae family), but not by uninfected cells. These responses were restricted by the non-classical MHC-related molecule 1 (MR1) and involved the endocytic pathway. The quality of these responses (i.e., cytokine profile) was dependent on bacterial load but not on the level expression of MR1 or bacterial antigen on B cell surface, suggesting that a threshold level of MR1 expression is required to trigger MAIT activation. These results provide important insights into the role of B cells as a source of antigen-presenting cells to MAIT cells and the gut immune surveillance of commensal microbiota. PMID:24432025

  13. Genetics and diffuse large B-Cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Niroula, Rabin; Butera, James

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B-Cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is one of the most common and aggressive subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Gene expression profiling (GEP) studies have identified at least two distinct molecular subtypes of DLBCL termed as germinal center B-cell (GCB) and activated B-cell (ABC). These molecular subtypes represent lymphomas that are driven by very different intracellular oncogenic signaling pathways which have prognostic value and could potentially be exploited for therapeutic benefit in future. There are other oncogenes, namely BCL-2, BCL-6 and MYC, which have been associated with the pathogenesis of DLBCL. Concurrent presence of two oncogenes is present in about 5% of DLBCL and it is termed "double hit lymphoma" (DHL). DHL are associated with an aggressive clinical course and do not respond well to the standard DLBCL immune-chemotherapy regimen, RCHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone). Other aggressive therapeutic approaches including autologous bone marrow transplant have not shown any survival benefit in this subgroup of DLBCL patients. New strategies in development to address this resistance in DHL include the regimen DA-EPOCH-R (dose adjusted etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab). Recent studies have shown increased sensitivity of DHL to DA-EPOCH-R chemotherapy and will likely be the new standard of care in this subset of DLBCL patients in the future. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2015-11.asp, free with no login]. PMID:26517251

  14. B cells from nuclear factor kB essential modulator deficient patients fail to differentiate to antibody secreting cells in response to TLR9 ligand.

    PubMed

    Giardino, Giuliana; Cirillo, Emilia; Gallo, Vera; Esposito, Tiziana; Fusco, Francesca; Conte, Matilde Immacolata; Quinti, Isabella; Ursini, Matilde Valeria; Carsetti, Rita; Pignata, Claudio

    2015-12-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) consists of disorders resulting from molecular alterations of ectodysplasin-A (EDA) pathway. Hypomorphic mutations in NF-kB essential modulator, downstream EDA, result in HED with immunodeficiency (HED-ID), characterized by susceptibility to encapsulated pyogenic bacteria infections. Increased susceptibility to pneumococcal infections and poor response to polysaccharide antigens are associated with defect in T-independent B-cell immunity. We investigated B-cell differentiation and immunoglobulin secretion induced by the TLR9 ligand CpG in two HED-ID and in a HED patient caused by EDA mutations (XLHED). In HED-ID, only few B cells differentiated into plasma cells upon TLR9 stimulation and memory B cells did not produce IgG and IgA, but small amounts of IgM. Unexpectedly, memory B cells from XLHED patient failed to produce normal IgA or IgG amount upon TLR9 stimulation. Our findings expand the knowledge about the pathogenesis of humoral alterations in HED patients and help explain the susceptibility to pneumococcal infections. PMID:26307434

  15. R-ICE and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With First-Relapse/Primary Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-30

    Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  16. Innate and cognate roles of B cells in T cell differentiation and memory 

    E-print Network

    Morrison, Vicky L.

    2011-01-01

    B cells recognise antigens on micro-organisms through their B cell receptor (BCR) and via Toll-like receptors (TLRs), and thus respond in both innate and adaptive manners during the subsequent immune response. Innate ...

  17. XBP-1 regulates signal transduction, transcription factors and bone marrow colonization in B cells

    E-print Network

    Hu, Chih-Chi Andrew

    XBP-1, a transcription factor that drives the unfolded protein response (UPR), is activated in B cells when they differentiate to plasma cells. Here, we show that in the B cells, whose capacity to secrete IgM has been ...

  18. DIAGNOSING LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISEASE VIRUS IN LIVE WILD TURKEYS (MELEAGRIS GALLOPAVO) USING WHOLE BLOOD.

    PubMed

    Alger, Katrina; Bunting, Elizabeth; Schuler, Krysten; Jagne, Jarra; Whipps, Christopher M

    2015-12-01

    Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is a retrovirus that infects wild and domestic turkeys ( Meleagris gallopavo ). The first cases of LPDV in the United States were diagnosed in 2009, and subsequent surveillance has revealed the virus to be widespread in wild turkey populations throughout the eastern half of the country. More research is needed to determine whether LPDV is having a negative effect on turkey populations, but progress has been impeded by the lack of a simple method for diagnosing the virus in living birds. Infected animals may appear asymptomatic, and diagnostics currently rely on tissue or bone marrow, which can be difficult to obtain. This study investigated the reliability of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect LPDV in whole blood, compared with previous methods using buffy coat (concentrated white blood cells) and bone marrow. Paired samples of whole blood and buffy coat were collected from 137 live turkeys and paired samples of whole blood and bone marrow were collected from 32 turkeys postmortem. Compared with buffy coat, whole blood had 97% sensitivity and 100% specificity. When compared with bone marrow, whole blood had 100% sensitivity and 89% specificity. Both comparisons had a high degree of agreement using Cohen's kappa statistic. Based on these results, PCR of whole blood provides detection of LPDV in living birds that is on par with both buffy coat and bone marrow. PMID:26667537

  19. Targeting Notch1 and proteasome as an effective strategy to suppress T-cell lymphoproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    George, Suraj Konnath; Teng, Rong; You, Xuefen; Xu, Mengqi; Liu, Hong; Sun, Xiaoping; Amin, Hesham M.; Shi, Wenyu

    2015-01-01

    The T-cell lymphoproliferative neoplasms (T-LPN) are characterized by a poor clinical outcome. Current therapeutics are mostly non-selective and may induce harmful side effects. It has been reported that NOTCH1 activation mutations frequently associate T-LPN. Because anti-Notch1 based therapies such as ?-secretase inhibitors (GSI) are less efficient and induce considerable side effects, we hypothesized that combining low concentrations of GSI and the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (BTZ) may provide an effective and tolerable approach to treat T-LPN. Hence, we analyzed the in vitro and in vivo effects of GSI-I and BTZ, alone or in combination, against T-LPN. GSI-I and BTZ synergistically decreased cell viability, proliferation, and colony formation, and induced apoptosis in T-LPN cell lines. Furthermore, combining GSI-I and BTZ decreased the viability of primary T-LPN cells from patients. These effects were accompanied by deregulation of Notch1, AKT, ERK, JNK, p38 MAPK, and NF-?B survival pathways. Moreover, combination treatment inhibited T-LPN tumor growth in nude mice. In all experiments, combining low concentrations of GSI-I and BTZ was superior to using a single agent. Our data support that a synergistic antitumor activity exists between GSI-I and BTZ, and provide a rationale for successful utilization of dual Notch1 and proteasome inhibition to treat T-LPN. PMID:25879451

  20. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein deficiency: more than an X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Claire; Latour, Sylvain

    2015-05-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) deficiency (also known as X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 2, XLP-2) is a rare primary immunodeficiency. Since the disease was first described in 2006, more than 70 patients suffering from XIAP-deficiency have been reported, thus extending the clinical presentations of the disease. The main clinical features of XLP-2 are (i) elevated susceptibility to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH, frequently in response to infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)), (ii) recurrent splenomegaly and (iii) inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with the characteristics of Crohn's disease. XIAP deficiency is now considered to be one of the genetic causes of IBD in infancy. Although XIAP is an anti-apoptotic molecule, it is also involved in many other pathways, including the regulation of innate immunity and inflammation. XIAP is required for signaling through the Nod-like receptors NOD1 and 2, which are intracellular sensors of bacterial infection. XIAP-deficient T cells (including innate natural killer T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells) are overly sensitive to apoptosis. NOD2 function is impaired in XIAP-deficient monocytes. However, the physiopathological mechanisms underlying the clinical phenotypes in XIAP deficiency, notably the HLH and the EBV susceptibility, are not well understood. Here, we review the clinical aspects, molecular etiology and physiopathology of XIAP deficiency. PMID:25737324

  1. High incidence of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A H; Sweet, S C; Mendeloff, E; Mallory, G B; Huddleston, C B; Kraus, M; Kelly, M; Hayashi, R; DeBaun, M R

    2000-04-01

    A major cause of morbidity and mortality following lung transplantation is posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD). In a retrospective cohort analysis of pediatric patients, we evaluated the risk factors associated with PTLD in 128 first-time lung transplant recipients from 1990 to 1997. The greatest risk factor for PTLD was a diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Of the 16 patients in our analysis who had PTLD, 13 had a diagnosis of CF (odds ratio [OR]: 5.8; confidence interval 95% [CI]: 1.6 to 21.4). Because of the high frequency of PTLD in patients with CF (13 of 61; 23%), we performed a retrospective cohort analysis in which patients with CF and PTLD were designated as cases and patients with CF and without PTLD served as controls. In patients with CF, the only risk factor associated with PTLD was two or more episodes of acute rejection within 3 mo after transplantation (OR: 11.0; 95% CI: 2.7 to 55.7). Age, recipient Epstein-Barr virus or cytomegalovirus status, induction with antilymphocyte globulin or antithymocyte globulin (ATG), or use of ATG or OKT3 for acute rejection episodes were not risk factors for PTLD. The high frequency of PTLD in the subgroup of patients with two or more episodes of graft rejection within 2 mo after lung transplantation was unexpected, and warrants further investigation in prospective clinical studies and basic laboratories. PMID:10764320

  2. Molecular Surveillance for Lymphoproliferative Disease Virus in Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from the Eastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jesse M.; Allison, Andrew B.; Holmes, Edward C.; Phillips, Jamie E.; Bunting, Elizabeth M.; Yabsley, Michael J.; Brown, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is a poorly understood, oncogenic avian retrovirus of domestic turkeys that has historically been restricted to Europe and Israel. However, a recent study reported LPDV in multiple wild turkey diagnostic cases from throughout the eastern United States of America (USA). To better understand the distribution of LPDV in the eastern USA, we surveyed 1,164 reportedly asymptomatic hunter-harvested wild turkeys from 17 states for the presence of LPDV proviral DNA by PCR. In total, 564/1,164 (47%) turkeys were positive for LPDV. Wild turkeys from each state had a relatively high prevalence of LPDV, although statewide prevalence varied from 26 to 83%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clades of LPDV in the USA, although one was at a low frequency suggesting restricted transmission, as well as significant clustering by state of isolation. To determine the best tissue to target for diagnostic purposes, liver, spleen, and bone marrow were tested from a subset of 15 hunter-harvested wild turkeys and 20 wild turkey diagnostic cases. Overall, bone marrow provided the highest level of detection for both hunter-harvested turkeys and diagnostic cases. The sensitivity of LPDV detection between tissues was not significantly different for diagnostic cases, but was for hunter-harvested birds. These results indicate that LPDV infection is common and widespread in wild turkey populations throughout the eastern USA, even without overt signs of disease. PMID:25897755

  3. FAS Haploinsufficiency Caused by Extracellular Missense Mutations Underlying Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Bielke, María Gabriela Simesen; Perez, Laura; Yancoski, Judith; Oliveira, João Bosco; Danielian, Silvia

    2015-11-01

    Mutations in the FAS gene are the most common cause of Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS), and the majority of them affect the intracellular domain of FAS protein, particularly the region termed death domain. However, approximately one third of these mutations affect the extracellular region of FAS and most are stop codons, with very few missense changes having been described to date. We previously described 7 patients with a FAS missense extracellular mutation, C107Y, two in homozygozity and 5 in heterozygosity. We investigated here the mechanistic effects of this mutation and observed that the homozygous patients did not show any FAS surface expression, while the heterozygous patients had diminished receptor expression. Aiming to understand why a missense mutation was abolishing receptor expression, we analyzed intracellular FAS protein trafficking using fluorescent fusion proteins of wild type FAS, two missense extracellular mutants (FAS-C107Y and FAS-C104Y) and one missense change localized in the intracellular region, FAS-D260E. The FAS-C107Y and FAS-C104Y mutants failed to reach the cell surface, being retained at the endoplasmic reticulum, unlike the WT or the FAS-D260E which were clearly expressed at the plasma membrane. These results support haploinsufficiency as the underlying mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of ALPS caused by extracellular FAS missense mutations. PMID:26563159

  4. In vivo detection of peripherin-specific autoreactive B cells during type 1 diabetes pathogenesis1

    PubMed Central

    Garabatos, Nahir; Alvarez, Raimon; Carrillo, Jorge; Carrascal, Jorge; Izquierdo, Cristina; Chapman, Harold D.; Presa, Maximiliano; Mora, Conchi; Serreze, David V.; Verdaguer, Joan; Stratmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Autoreactive B cells are essential for the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. The genesis and dynamics of autoreactive B cells remain unknown. Here, we analyzed the immune response in the NOD mouse model to the neuronal protein peripherin (PRPH), a target antigen of islet-infiltrating B cells. PRPH autoreactive B cells recognized a single linear epitope of this protein, in contrast to the multiple epitope recognition commonly observed during autoreactive B cell responses. Autoantibodies to this epitope were also detected in the disease-resistant NOR and C57BL/6 strains. To specifically detect the accumulation of these B cells, we developed a novel approach, octameric peptide display, to follow the dynamics and localization of anti-PRPH B cell during disease progression. Before extended insulitis established, anti-PRPH B cells preferentially accumulated in the peritoneum. Anti-PRPH B cells were likewise detected in C57BL/6 mice, albeit at lower frequencies. As disease unfolded in NOD mice, anti-PRPH B cells invaded the islets and increased in number at the peritoneum of diabetic but not pre-diabetic mice. Isotype switched B cells were only detected in the peritoneum. Anti-PRPH B cells represent a heterogeneous population composed of both B1 and B2 subsets. In the spleen, anti-PRPH B cell were predominantly in the follicular subset. Therefore, anti-PRPH B cells represent a heterogeneous population that is generated early in life but proliferates as diabetes establishes. These findings on the temporal and spatial progression of autoreactive B cells should be relevant for our understanding of B cell function in diabetes pathogenesis. PMID:24610011

  5. The 'zinc knuckle' motif of Early B cell Factor is required for transcriptional activation of B cell-specific genes

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Scott; Ternyak, Kristina; Gao, Hua; Ostraat, Rachel; Akerlund, Janie; Hagman, James

    2008-01-01

    Early B cell factor (EBF) is a critical regulator of B lymphocyte-specific gene transcription. EBF functions, in part, by binding to regulatory sites of genes required for the pre-B- and mature B cell receptors. These DNA targets include the promoters of the mb-1 and Vpreb1 genes that encode Ig-? and one of the components of surrogate light chain, respectively. The biochemical basis of DNA binding and gene activation by EBF is poorly understood. The DNA-binding domain (DBD) of EBF includes a putative zinc-binding motif (HX3CX2CX5C), which we have designated the 'Zn-knuckle'. The Zn-knuckle is required for binding of the mb-1 promoter site in EMSA, but it has not been demonstrated to be important for functional activities of EBF in B cells. Therefore, we expressed EBF with mutations in the Zn-knuckle motif or flanking sequences in plasmacytoma cells in which activation of endogenous mb-1 and Vpreb1 genes is dependent on EBF. EBF with mutations that prevent zinc coordination by the Zn-knuckle did not activate transcription of either target gene. Other mutations affected the sequence preference of DNA binding and differentially inhibited activation of these genes. Our results demonstrate the importance of the Zn-knuckle motif in EBF. These experiments also confirm that EBF can re-activate multiple genes of the early B cell program in plasmacytoma cells, which provide a useful cell-based assay for dissecting mechanisms involving EBF. PMID:18606452

  6. Fanca deficiency reduces A/T transitions in somatic hypermutation and alters class switch recombination junctions in mouse B cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuy Vy; Riou, Lydia; Aoufouchi, Saïd; Rosselli, Filippo

    2014-06-01

    Fanconi anemia is a rare genetic disorder that can lead to bone marrow failure, congenital abnormalities, and increased risk for leukemia and cancer. Cells with loss-of-function mutations in the FANC pathway are characterized by chromosome fragility, altered mutability, and abnormal regulation of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. Somatic hypermutation (SHM) and immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) enable B cells to produce high-affinity antibodies of various isotypes. Both processes are initiated after the generation of dG:dU mismatches by activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Whereas SHM involves an error-prone repair process that introduces novel point mutations into the Ig gene, the mismatches generated during CSR are processed to create double-stranded breaks (DSBs) in DNA, which are then repaired by the NHEJ pathway. As several lines of evidence suggest a possible role for the FANC pathway in SHM and CSR, we analyzed both processes in B cells derived from Fanca(-/-) mice. Here we show that Fanca is required for the induction of transition mutations at A/T residues during SHM and that despite globally normal CSR function in splenic B cells, Fanca is required during CSR to stabilize duplexes between pairs of short microhomology regions, thereby impeding short-range recombination downstream of DSB formation. PMID:24799500

  7. B cells have distinct roles in host protection against different nematode parasites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    B cells may mediate protective responses against nematode parasites by supporting Th2 cell development and/or by producing antibodies. To examine this, B cell-deficient mice were inoculated with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Nb) or Heligmosomoides polygyrus (Hp). B cell-deficient and wild type (WT...

  8. Autoantigen-Specific B-Cell Depletion Overcomes Failed Immune Tolerance in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Rachel A.; Kendall, Peggy L.; Thomas, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Eliminating autoantigen-specific B cells is an attractive alternative to global B-cell depletion for autoimmune disease treatment. To identify the potential for targeting a key autoimmune B-cell specificity in type 1 diabetes, insulin-binding B cells were tracked within a polyclonal repertoire using heavy chain B-cell receptor (BCR) transgenic (VH125Tg) mice. Insulin-specific B cells are rare in the periphery of nonautoimmune VH125Tg/C57BL/6 mice and WT/NOD autoimmune mice, whereas they clearly populate 1% of mature B-cell subsets in VH125Tg/NOD mice. Autoantigen upregulates CD86 in anti-insulin B cells, suggesting they are competent to interact with T cells. Endogenous insulin occupies anti-insulin BCR beginning with antigen commitment in bone marrow parenchyma, as identified by a second anti-insulin monoclonal antibody. Administration of this monoclonal antibody selectively eliminates insulin-reactive B cells in vivo and prevents disease in WT/NOD mice. Unexpectedly, developing B cells are less amenable to depletion, despite increased BCR sensitivity. These findings exemplify how a critical type 1 diabetes B-cell specificity escapes immune tolerance checkpoints. Disease liability is corrected by eliminating this B-cell specificity, providing proof of concept for a novel therapeutic approach for autoimmune disease. PMID:22698916

  9. Autoantigen-specific B-cell depletion overcomes failed immune tolerance in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Henry, Rachel A; Kendall, Peggy L; Thomas, James W

    2012-08-01

    Eliminating autoantigen-specific B cells is an attractive alternative to global B-cell depletion for autoimmune disease treatment. To identify the potential for targeting a key autoimmune B-cell specificity in type 1 diabetes, insulin-binding B cells were tracked within a polyclonal repertoire using heavy chain B-cell receptor (BCR) transgenic (VH125Tg) mice. Insulin-specific B cells are rare in the periphery of nonautoimmune VH125Tg/C57BL/6 mice and WT/NOD autoimmune mice, whereas they clearly populate 1% of mature B-cell subsets in VH125Tg/NOD mice. Autoantigen upregulates CD86 in anti-insulin B cells, suggesting they are competent to interact with T cells. Endogenous insulin occupies anti-insulin BCR beginning with antigen commitment in bone marrow parenchyma, as identified by a second anti-insulin monoclonal antibody. Administration of this monoclonal antibody selectively eliminates insulin-reactive B cells in vivo and prevents disease in WT/NOD mice. Unexpectedly, developing B cells are less amenable to depletion, despite increased BCR sensitivity. These findings exemplify how a critical type 1 diabetes B-cell specificity escapes immune tolerance checkpoints. Disease liability is corrected by eliminating this B-cell specificity, providing proof of concept for a novel therapeutic approach for autoimmune disease. PMID:22698916

  10. Regulatory B cells preferentially accumulate in tumor-draining lymph nodes and promote tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Ganti, Sheila N.; Albershardt, Tina C.; Iritani, Brian M.; Ruddell, Alanna

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies found that B16-F10 melanoma growth in the rear footpad of immunocompetent mice induces marked B cell accumulation within tumor-draining popliteal lymph nodes (TDLN). This B cell accumulation drives TDLN remodeling that precedes and promotes metastasis, indicating a tumor-promoting role for TDLN B cells. Here we show that phenotypic characterization of lymphocytes in mice bearing B16-F10 melanomas identifies preferential accumulation of T2-MZP B cells in the TDLN. Comparison of non-draining LNs and spleens of tumor-bearing mice with LNs and spleens from naïve mice determined that this pattern of B cell accumulation was restricted to the TDLN. B cell-deficient and immunocompetent mice reconstituted with T2-MZP B cells but not with other B cell subsets displayed accelerated tumor growth, demonstrating that T2-MZP B cells possess regulatory activity in tumor-bearing mice. Unlike splenic regulatory B cells, however, these TDLN B cells did not exhibit increased IL-10 production, nor did they promote Treg generation in the TDLN. These findings demonstrate that tumors initially signal via the lymphatic drainage to stimulate the preferential accumulation of T2-MZP regulatory B cells. This local response may be an early and critical step in generating an immunosuppressive environment to permit tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:26193241

  11. Evidence for a regulatory effect of B cells in autoimmune diseases was first provided by

    E-print Network

    disease (IBD) and in col- lagen-induced arthritis (CIA)3,4 , suggesting a general role for IL10producing B of CIA involved provision of IL10 by collagenspecific B cells4 . The autoantigen activating these B cells,15 . Signals from CD40. In EAE and CIA, production of IL10 by autoreactive B cells required simultaneous

  12. The Edges of Pancreatic Islet b Cells Constitute Adhesive and Signaling Microdomains

    E-print Network

    Report The Edges of Pancreatic Islet b Cells Constitute Adhesive and Signaling Microdomains Graphical Abstract Highlights d Pancreatic b cells meet at sharp angles to form distinct edges d Murine b Correspondence benny.shilo@weizmann.ac.il In Brief Pancreatic islet b cells secrete insulin in response

  13. Filtering of Calcium Transients by the Endoplasmic Reticulum in Pancreatic b-Cells

    E-print Network

    Filtering of Calcium Transients by the Endoplasmic Reticulum in Pancreatic b-Cells Richard Bertram in pancreatic b-cells is important for intracellular signaling, the control of electrical activity, and insulin-dependent data on the free Ca21 concentration in pancreatic islets and b-cell clusters can be explained

  14. Definition of Germinal-Center B Cell Migration In Vivo Reveals Predominant

    E-print Network

    von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    Immunity Article Definition of Germinal-Center B Cell Migration In Vivo Reveals Predominant migration patterns of GC B cells. Analysis of time-resolved images revealed unexpected patterns of movement as well as GC B cell mor- phology. Though frequent movement between the DZ and LZ was anticipated, few

  15. Primary rectal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma associated with ulcerative colitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Hiyama, Kazuhiro; Terashima, Hideo; Nakano, Yoritaka; Kamiga, Masahiro; Harada, Kyoichi; Horiguchi, Hisashi; Mamiya, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We need to be aware of primary intestinal lymphoproliferative disease (PILD) associated with ulcerative colitis (UC). We should carefully monitor UC patients, particularly patients who meet the following conditions; a previous Epstein-Barr virus infection, treatment duration ?4 years, male, and age ?50 years. PMID:25838903

  16. Transformation of hematopoietic cell lines to growth-factor independence and induction of a fatal myelo- and lymphoproliferative disease in mice by retrovirally transduced TEL/JAK2 fusion genes.

    PubMed Central

    Schwaller, J; Frantsve, J; Aster, J; Williams, I R; Tomasson, M H; Ross, T S; Peeters, P; Van Rompaey, L; Van Etten, R A; Ilaria, R; Marynen, P; Gilliland, D G

    1998-01-01

    Recent reports have demonstrated fusion of the TEL gene on 12p13 to the JAK2 gene on 9p24 in human leukemias. Three variants have been identified that fuse the TEL pointed (PNT) domain to (i) the JAK2 JH1-kinase domain, (ii) part of and (iii) all of the JH2 pseudokinase domain. We report that all of the human TEL/JAK2 variants, and a human/mouse chimeric hTEL/mJAK2(JH1) fusion gene, transform the interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent murine hematopoietic cell line Ba/F3 to IL-3-independent growth. Transformation requires both the TEL PNT domain and JAK2 kinase activity. Furthermore, all TEL/JAK2 variants strongly activated STAT 5 by phosphotyrosine Western blots and by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Mice (n = 40) transplanted with bone marrow infected with the MSCV retrovirus containing either the hTEL/mJAK2(JH1) fusion or its human counterpart developed a fatal mixed myeloproliferative and T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder with a latency of 2-10 weeks. In contrast, mice transplanted with a TEL/JAK2 mutant lacking the TEL PNT domain (n = 10) or a kinase-inactive TEL/JAK2(JH1) mutant (n = 10) did not develop the disease. We conclude that all human TEL/JAK2 fusion variants are oncoproteins in vitro that strongly activate STAT 5, and cause lethal myelo- and lymphoproliferative syndromes in murine bone marrow transplant models of leukemia. PMID:9736611

  17. Post-Transplantation B Cell Function in Different Molecular Types of SCID

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Rebecca H.; Win, Chan M.; Moser, Barry K.; Parrott, Roberta E.; Sajaroff, Elisa; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a syndrome of diverse genetic cause characterized by profound deficiencies of T, B and sometimes NK cell function. Non-ablative HLA-identical or rigorously T cell-depleted haploidentical parental bone marrow transplantation (BMT) results in thymus-dependent genetically donor T cell development in the recipients, leading to a high rate of long-term survival. However, the development of B cell function has been more problematic. We report here results of analyses of B cell function in 125 SCID recipients prior to and long-term after non-ablative BMT, according to their molecular type. Methods Studies included blood immunoglobulin measurements; antibody titers to standard vaccines, blood group antigens and bacteriophage ? × 174; flow cytometry to examine for markers of immaturity, memory, switched memory B cells and BAFF receptor expression; B cell chimerism; B cell spectratyping; and B cell proliferation. Results The results showed that B cell chimerism was not required for normal B cell function in IL7R?-Def, ADA-Def and CD3-Def SCIDs. In X-linked-SCID, Jak3-Def SCID and those with V-D-J recombination defects, donor B cell chimerism was necessary for B cell function to develop. Conclusion The most important factor determining whether B cell function develops in SCID T cell chimeras is the underlying molecular defect. In some types, host B cells function normally. In those molecular types where host B cell function did not develop, donor B cell chimerism was necessary to achieve B cell function. 236 words PMID:23001410

  18. Characterization of Regulatory B Cells in Graves’ Disease and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Birte; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Lundy, Steven K.; Brimnes, Marie K.; Smith, Terry J.; Nielsen, Claus H.

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of regulatory B cells is IL-10 production, hence their designation as IL-10+ B cells. Little is known about the ability of self-antigens to induce IL-10+ B cells in Graves’ disease (GD), Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT), or other autoimmune disease. Here we pulsed purified B cells from 12 HT patients, 12 GD patients, and 12 healthy donors with the thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin (TG) and added the B cells back to the remaining peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This procedure induced IL-10+ B-cell differentiation in GD. A similar tendency was observed in healthy donors, but not in cells from patients with HT. In GD, B cells primed with TG induced IL-10-producing CD4+ T cells. To assess the maximal frequency of inducible IL-10+ B cells in the three donor groups PBMCs were stimulated with PMA/ionomycin. The resulting IL-10+ B-cell frequency was similar in the three groups and correlated with free T3 levels in GD patients. IL-10+ B cells from both patient groups displayed CD25 or TIM-1 more frequently than did those from healthy donors. B-cell expression of two surface marker combinations previously associated with regulatory B-cell functions, CD24hiCD38hi and CD27+CD43+, did not differ between patients and healthy donors. In conclusion, our findings indicate that autoimmune thyroiditis is not associated with reduced frequency of IL-10+ B cells. These results do not rule out regulatory B-cell dysfunction, however. The observed phenotypic differences between IL-10+ B cells from patients and healthy donors are discussed. PMID:26016954

  19. Mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of Teleost fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene; Zhang, Yong-An; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2012-01-01

    As physical barriers that separate teleost fish from the external environment, mucosae are also active immunological sites that protect them against exposure to microbes and stressors. In mammals, the sites where antigens are sampled from mucosal surfaces and where stimulation of naive T and B lymphocytes occurs are known as inductive sites and are constituted by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). According to anatomical location, the MALT in teleost fish is subdivided into gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT). All MALT contain a variety of leukocytes, including, but not limited to, T cells, B cells, plasma cells, macrophages and granulocytes. Secretory immunoglobulins are produced mainly by plasmablasts and plasma cells, and play key roles in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Until recently, teleost fish B cells were thought to express only two classes of immunoglobulins, IgM and IgD, in which IgM was thought to be the only one responding to pathogens both in systemic and mucosal compartments. However, a third teleost immunoglobulin class, IgT/IgZ, was discovered in 2005, and it has recently been shown to behave as the prevalent immunoglobulin in gut mucosal immune responses. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current knowledge of mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of fish MALT. Moreover, we attempt to integrate the existing knowledge on both basic and applied research findings on fish mucosal immune responses, with the goal to provide new directions that may facilitate the development of novel vaccination strategies that stimulate not only systemic, but also mucosal immunity. PMID:22133710

  20. Treatment of experimental stroke with IL-10-producing B-cells reduces infarct size and peripheral and CNS inflammation in wild-type B-cell-sufficient mice.

    PubMed

    Bodhankar, Sheetal; Chen, Yingxin; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Murphy, Stephanie J; Offner, Halina

    2014-03-01

    Clinical stroke induces inflammatory processes leading to cerebral and splenic injury and profound peripheral immunosuppression. IL-10 expression is elevated during major CNS diseases and limits inflammation in the brain. Recent evidence demonstrated that absence of B-cells led to larger infarct volumes and CNS damage after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) that could be prevented by transfer of IL-10(+) B-cells. The purpose of this study was to determine if the beneficial immunoregulatory effects on MCAO of the IL-10(+) B-cell subpopulation also extends to B-cell-sufficient mice that would better represent stroke subjects. CNS inflammation and infarct volumes were evaluated in male C57BL/6J (WT) mice that received either RPMI or IL-10(+) B-cells and underwent 60 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by 96 h of reperfusion. Transfer of IL-10(+) B-cells markedly reduced infarct volume in WT recipient mice when given 24 h prior to or 4 h after MCAO. B-cell protected (24 h pre-MCAO) mice had increased regulatory subpopulations in the periphery, reduced numbers of activated, inflammatory T-cells, decreased infiltration of T-cells and a less inflammatory milieu in the ischemic hemispheres of the IL-10(+) B-cell-treated group. Moreover, transfer of IL-10(+) B-cells 24 h before MCAO led to a significant preservation of regulatory immune subsets in the IL-10(+) B-cell protected group presumably indicating their role in immunomodulatory mechanisms, post-stroke. Our studies are the first to demonstrate a major immunoregulatory role for IL-10(+) regulatory B-cells in preventing and treating MCAO in WT mice and also implicating their potential role in attenuating complications due to post-stroke immunosuppression. PMID:24374817

  1. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with calf muscle localization.

    PubMed

    Bourdeanu, Laura; Menon, Rashmi; Somlo, George

    2011-01-01

    Although diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) usually occurs in the lymph nodes, approximately 30-40% of the time it can have an extranodal site of involvement and it can arise in nearly every body site such as intestine, bone, breast, liver, skin, lung, and central nervous system. Muscle involvement of DLBCL is especially uncommon, comprising 0.5% of extranodal NHL. We report a case of a 72-year-old man with extranodal DLBCL of a unique manifestation in the calf muscle, involving predominantly the gastrocnemius muscle. The patient achieved complete response and remained free of local recurrence or metastasis following diagnosis. PMID:22937305

  2. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma with Calf Muscle Localization

    PubMed Central

    Bourdeanu, Laura; Menon, Rashmi; Somlo, George

    2011-01-01

    Although diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) usually occurs in the lymph nodes, approximately 30–40% of the time it can have an extranodal site of involvement and it can arise in nearly every body site such as intestine, bone, breast, liver, skin, lung, and central nervous system. Muscle involvement of DLBCL is especially uncommon, comprising 0.5% of extranodal NHL. We report a case of a 72-year-old man with extranodal DLBCL of a unique manifestation in the calf muscle, involving predominantly the gastrocnemius muscle. The patient achieved complete response and remained free of local recurrence or metastasis following diagnosis. PMID:22937305

  3. Polyspecificity of T cell and B cell Receptor Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wucherpfennig, Kai W.; Allen, Paul M.; Celada, Franco; Cohen, Irun R.; De Boer, Rob; Garcia, K. Christopher; Goldstein, Byron; Greenspan, Ralph; Hafler, David; Hodgkin, Philip; Huseby, Erik S.; Krakauer, David C.; Nemazee, David; Perelson, Alan S.; Pinilla, Clemencia; Strong, Roland K.; Sercarz, Eli E.

    2007-01-01

    A recent workshop discussed the recognition of multiple distinct ligands by individual T cell and B cell receptors and the implications of this discovery for lymphocyte biology. The workshop recommends general use of the term polyspecificity because it emphasizes two fundamental aspects, the inherent specificity of receptor recognition and the ability to recognize multiple ligands. Many different examples of polyspecificity and the structural mechanisms were discussed, and the group concluded that polyspecificity is a general, inherent feature of TCR and antibody recognition. This review summarizes the relevance of polyspecificity for lymphocyte development, activation and disease processes. PMID:17398114

  4. Tumor-infiltrating B cells come into vogue.

    PubMed

    Linnebacher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Lymphocyte infiltration into solid tumors has been recognized as a main determinator of positive prognosis. For the most part this is attributed to cytotoxic T cells capable of directly destroying malignant cells. However, when considering the complex composition of the human immune system, recent findings of Nielsen et al on a potentially central role of tumor-infiltrating B cells is not really surprising. In this commentary article, I want to highlight the enormous potential impact of this observation for basic and translational research, prognostic procedures and ultimately for the development of future therapeutic concepts. PMID:23326156

  5. Cutting Edge: Redox Signaling Hypersensitivity Distinguishes Human Germinal Center B Cells.

    PubMed

    Polikowsky, Hannah G; Wogsland, Cara E; Diggins, Kirsten E; Huse, Kanutte; Irish, Jonathan M

    2015-08-15

    Differences in the quality of BCR signaling control key steps of B cell maturation and differentiation. Endogenously produced H2O2 is thought to fine tune the level of BCR signaling by reversibly inhibiting phosphatases. However, relatively little is known about how B cells at different stages sense and respond to such redox cues. In this study, we used phospho-specific flow cytometry and high-dimensional mass cytometry (CyTOF) to compare BCR signaling responses in mature human tonsillar B cells undergoing germinal center (GC) reactions. GC B cells, in contrast to mature naive B cells, memory B cells, and plasmablasts, were hypersensitive to a range of H2O2 concentrations and responded by phosphorylating SYK and other membrane-proximal BCR effectors in the absence of BCR engagement. These findings reveal that stage-specific redox responses distinguish human GC B cells. PMID:26157177

  6. CEACAM1 induces B-cell survival and is essential for protective antiviral antibody production

    PubMed Central

    Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Honke, Nadine; Shaabani, Namir; Pandyra, Aleksandra A.; Seifert, Marc; Pozdeev, Vitaly; Xu, Haifeng C.; Sharma, Piyush; Baldin, Fabian; Marquardsen, Florian; Merches, Katja; Lang, Elisabeth; Kirschning, Carsten; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Florian; Dittmer, Ulf; Küppers, Ralf; Recher, Mike; Hardt, Cornelia; Scheffrahn, Inka; Beauchemin, Nicole; Göthert, Joachim R.; Singer, Bernhard B.; Lang, Philipp A.; Lang, Karl S.

    2015-01-01

    B cells are essential for antiviral immune defence because they produce neutralizing antibodies, present antigen and maintain the lymphoid architecture. Here we show that intrinsic signalling of CEACAM1 is essential for generating efficient B-cell responses. Although CEACAM1 exerts limited influence on the proliferation of B cells, expression of CEACAM1 induces survival of proliferating B cells via the BTK/Syk/NF-?B-axis. The absence of this signalling cascade in naive Ceacam1?/? mice limits the survival of B cells. During systemic infection with cytopathic vesicular stomatitis virus, Ceacam1?/? mice can barely induce neutralizing antibody responses and die early after infection. We find, therefore, that CEACAM1 is a crucial regulator of B-cell survival, influencing B-cell numbers and protective antiviral antibody responses. PMID:25692415

  7. Recent advances in post autologous transplantation maintenance therapies in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Epperla, Narendranath; Fenske, Timothy S; Hari, Parameswaran N; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Lymphomas constitute the second most common indication for high dose therapy (HDT) followed by autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (auto-HCT). The intent of administering HDT in these heterogeneous disorders varies from cure (e.g., in relapsed aggressive lymphomas) to disease control (e.g., most indolent lymphomas). Regardless of the underlying histology or remission status at transplantation, disease relapse remains the number one cause of post auto-HCT therapy failure and mortality. The last decade has seen a proliferation of clinical studies looking at prevention of post auto-HCT therapy failure with various maintenance strategies. The benefit of such therapies is in turn dependent on disease histology and timing of transplantation. In relapsed, chemosensitive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), although post auto-HCT maintenance rituximab seems to be safe and feasible, it does not provide improved survival outcomes and is not recommended. The preliminary results with anti- programmed death -1 (PD-1) antibody therapy as post auto-HCT maintenance in DLBCL is promising but requires randomized validation. Similarly in follicular lymphoma, maintenance therapies including rituximab following auto-HCT should be considered investigational and offered only on a clinical trial. Rituximab maintenance results in improved progression-free survival but has not yet shown to improve overall survival in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), but given the poor prognosis with post auto-HCT failure in MCL, maintenance rituximab can be considered on a case-by-case basis. Ongoing trials evaluating the efficacy of post auto-HCT maintenance with novel compounds (e.g., immunomodulators, PD-1 inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors and bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitors) will likely change the practice landscape in the near future for B cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas patients following HDT and auto-HCT. PMID:26421260

  8. Primary skeletal muscle diffuse large B cell lymphoma: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, LIJUAN; LIN, QUANDE; ZHANG, LINA; DONG, LIHUA; LI, YUFU

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of primary extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) of soft tissue is rare, particularly in skeletal muscle. The present study describes a case of diffuse large B cell lymphoma of the right lower extremity and provides a detailed review of the literature associated with this disorder, with the aim of improving the future diagnosis and therapy of extranodal NHL. The present case report was of a 76-year-old woman who presented with a right thigh and calf mass. In view of the tumor's location and the patient's age, soft tissue tumors were considered to be soft tissue sarcoma. Imaging scans were performed to determine the location and size of the tumor, followed by a biopsy of the muscle. Histopathological examination then yielded a diagnosis of diffuse large B cell lymphoma. The patient then underwent 4 cycles of chemotherapy. There was evident relief of pain and swelling in the right extremity; however, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) determined insufficient treatment efficacy. Chemotherapy was adjusted for 2 cycles; however, the patient suffered an aggravation of edema, so a different chemotherapy regimen of bleomycin, cytarabine, vincristine, cyclosphamide and dexamethasone (BCOAD) was performed for a further 2 cycles. The edema was alleviated and magnetic resonance imaging revealed shrinkage of the lower limb mass and the right thigh mass was undetectable. In conclusion, the present case report demonstrated that PET/CT may help determine the efficacy of chemotherapy treatment and that the BCOAD chemotherapy regimen may be more effective than standard treatments in certain cases. PMID:26622811

  9. Recent advances in post autologous transplantation maintenance therapies in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Epperla, Narendranath; Fenske, Timothy S; Hari, Parameswaran N; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2015-09-24

    Lymphomas constitute the second most common indication for high dose therapy (HDT) followed by autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (auto-HCT). The intent of administering HDT in these heterogeneous disorders varies from cure (e.g., in relapsed aggressive lymphomas) to disease control (e.g., most indolent lymphomas). Regardless of the underlying histology or remission status at transplantation, disease relapse remains the number one cause of post auto-HCT therapy failure and mortality. The last decade has seen a proliferation of clinical studies looking at prevention of post auto-HCT therapy failure with various maintenance strategies. The benefit of such therapies is in turn dependent on disease histology and timing of transplantation. In relapsed, chemosensitive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), although post auto-HCT maintenance rituximab seems to be safe and feasible, it does not provide improved survival outcomes and is not recommended. The preliminary results with anti- programmed death -1 (PD-1) antibody therapy as post auto-HCT maintenance in DLBCL is promising but requires randomized validation. Similarly in follicular lymphoma, maintenance therapies including rituximab following auto-HCT should be considered investigational and offered only on a clinical trial. Rituximab maintenance results in improved progression-free survival but has not yet shown to improve overall survival in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), but given the poor prognosis with post auto-HCT failure in MCL, maintenance rituximab can be considered on a case-by-case basis. Ongoing trials evaluating the efficacy of post auto-HCT maintenance with novel compounds (e.g., immunomodulators, PD-1 inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors and bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors) will likely change the practice landscape in the near future for B cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas patients following HDT and auto-HCT. PMID:26421260

  10. Early B-cell-specific inactivation of ATM synergizes with ectopic CyclinD1 expression to promote pre-germinal center B-cell lymphomas in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Lee, B J; Li, C; Dubois, R L; Hobeika, E; Bhagat, G; Zha, S

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase is a master regulator of the DNA damage response. ATM is frequently inactivated in human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, including ~50% of mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs) characterized by ectopic expression of CyclinD1. Here we report that early and robust deletion of ATM in precursor/progenitor B cells causes cell autonomous, clonal mature B-cell lymphomas of both pre- and post-germinal center (GC) origins. Unexpectedly, naive B-cell-specific deletion of ATM is not sufficient to induce lymphomas in mice, highlighting the important tumor suppressor function of ATM in immature B cells. Although E?CyclinD1 is not sufficient to induce lymphomas, E?CyclinD1 accelerates the kinetics and increases the incidence of clonal lymphomas in ATM-deficient B-cells and skews the lymphomas toward pre-GC-derived small lymphocytic neoplasms, sharing morphological features of human MCL. This is in part due to CyclinD1-driven expansion of ATM-deficient naive B cells with genomic instability, which promotes the deletions of additional tumor suppressor genes (i.e. Trp53, Mll2, Rb1 and Cdkn2a). Together these findings define a synergistic function of ATM and CyclinD1 in pre-GC B-cell proliferation and lymphomagenesis and provide a prototypic animal model to study the pathogenesis of human MCL. PMID:25676421

  11. Systematic Comparison of Gene Expression between Murine Memory and Naive B Cells Demonstrates That Memory B Cells Have Unique Signaling Capabilities1

    PubMed Central

    Tomayko, Mary M.; Anderson, Shannon M.; Brayton, Catherine E.; Sadanand, Saheli; Steinel, Natalie C.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Shlomchik, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Memory B cells play essential roles in the maintenance of long-term immunity and may be important in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, but how these cells are distinguished from their naive precursors is poorly understood. To address this, it would be important to understand how gene expression differs between memory and naive B cells to elucidate memory-specific functions. Using model systems that help overcome the lack of murine memory-specific markers and the low frequency of Agspecific memory and naive cells, we undertook a global comparison of gene expression between memory B cells and their naive precursors. We identified genes with differential expression and confirmed the differential expression of many of these by quantitative RT-PCR and of some of these at the protein level. Our initial analysis revealed differential expression patterns of genes that regulate signaling. Memory B cells have increased expression of genes important in regulating adenosine signaling and in modulating cAMP responses. Furthermore, memory B cells up-regulate receptors that are essential for embryonic stem cell self-renewal. We further demonstrate that one of these, leukemia inhibitory factor receptor, can initiate functional signaling in memory B cells whereas it does not in naive B cells. Thus, memory and naive B cells are intrinsically wired to signal differently from one another and express a functional signaling pathway that is known to maintain stem cells in other lineages. PMID:18566367

  12. Leu 7 (CD57) reactivity distinguishes nodular lymphocyte predominance Hodgkin's disease from nodular sclerosing Hodgkin's disease, T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, O. W.; Gelb, A. B.; Shibuya, R. B.; Warnke, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    Several recent reports have suggested that nodular lymphocyte predominance Hodgkin's disease (NLPHD) may be distinct from other forms of Hodgkin's disease and may be more closely related to B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. This is primarily based on immunophenotypic studies that have shown that the L & H cells in NLPHD demonstrate a B-cell phenotype. In 1989, Poppema reported that the T cells in NLPHD differ from T cells in other forms of Hodgkin's disease in that they demonstrate reactivity for Leu 7 (CD57). In this study we tested the hypothesis that Leu 7 (CD57) reactivity of small lymphocytes in NLPHD is an immunophenotypic feature that distinguishes NLPHD from nodular sclerosing Hodgkin's disease and from certain B-cell lymphomas that may histologically simulate NLPHD, namely T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma. Using an image analysis method, we found Leu 7 (CD57) reactivity in an average of 18.9% of the small lymphocytes in the nodules of NLPHD compared with 3.9% in nodular sclerosing Hodgkin's disease, 4.3% in T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma, and 2.1% in follicular lymphoma. Moreover, Leu 7 (CD57)-reactive small lymphocytes often showed a distinctive pattern in NLPHD, forming a ring of cells around the large L & H cells. While scattered Leu 7 (CD57)-reactive lymphocytes were found in the other disorders, the percentage of reactive cells and the pattern of reactivity were significantly different in NLPHD. These results suggest that Leu 7 (CD57) reactivity may be used as an additional immunophenotypic criterion in distinguishing NLPHD from nodular sclerosing Hodgkin's disease, T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma, and follicular lymphoma. The clinical and biological significance of Leu 7 (CD57) reactivity of small lymphocytes in NLPHD merits further investigation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7679553

  13. Quantifying evolutionary constraints on B-cell affinity maturation

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Connor O.; Bedford, Trevor; Minin, Vladimir N.; Bradley, Philip; Robins, Harlan; Matsen, Frederick A.

    2015-01-01

    The antibody repertoire of each individual is continuously updated by the evolutionary process of B-cell receptor (BCR) mutation and selection. It has recently become possible to gain detailed information concerning this process through high-throughput sequencing. Here, we develop modern statistical molecular evolution methods for the analysis of B-cell sequence data, and then apply them to a very deep short-read dataset of BCRs. We find that the substitution process is conserved across individuals but varies significantly across gene segments. We investigate selection on BCRs using a novel method that side-steps the difficulties encountered by previous work in differentiating between selection and motif-driven mutation; this is done through stochastic mapping and empirical Bayes estimators that compare the evolution of in-frame and out-of-frame rearrangements. We use this new method to derive a per-residue map of selection, which provides a more nuanced view of the constraints on framework and variable regions. PMID:26194758

  14. Gaucher disease and comorbidities: B-cell malignancy and parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Cox, Timothy M; Rosenbloom, Barry E; Barker, Roger A

    2015-07-01

    Data emerging from the International Collaborative Gaucher Group (ICGG) Gaucher Registry together with other contemporary clinical surveys have revealed a close association between Gaucher disease and non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma and myeloma and Gaucher disease and Parkinson's disease. Several possible explanations for increased B-cell proliferation and neoplasia in Gaucher disease have been proposed, including the possible influence of sphingosine (derived from the extra lysosomal metabolism of glucosylceramide), gene modifiers, splenectomy and immune system deregulation induced by cytokines, chemokines, and hydrolases released from Gaucher cells. Parkinson's disease is frequently seen in the otherwise-healthy relatives of Gaucher disease patients leading to the finding that GBA mutations represent a genetic risk factor for Parkinson's disease. The mechanism of the association between GBA mutations and Parkinson's disease has yet to be elucidated but the pathogenesis appears distinct from that of Gaucher disease. Several pathogenic pathways have been proposed including lysosomal and/or mitochondrial dysfunction. The effect of Gaucher disease specific therapies on the incidence of cancer or Parkinson's disease are not clear and will likely be evaluated in future ICGG Gaucher Registry studies. PMID:26096744

  15. The Genetic Basis of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualucci, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive disease featuring heterogeneous genetic, phenotypic and clinical characteristics. Understanding the basis for this heterogeneity represents a critical step toward further progress in the management of this disease, which remains a clinical challenge in approximately one third of patients. This review summarizes current knowledge about the molecular pathogenesis of DLBCL, and describes how recent advances in the genomic characterization of this cancer have provided new insights into its biology, revealing several potential targets for improved diagnosis and therapy. Recent findings In the past few years, the development of high-resolution technologies has provided significant help in identifying genetic lesions and/or disrupted signaling pathways that are required for DLBCL initiation and progression. These studies uncovered the involvement of cellular programs that had not been previously appreciated, including histone/chromatin remodeling and immune recognition. Alterations in these pathways could favor epigenetic reprogramming and escape from cellular immunity. Summary The identification of genetic alterations that contribute to the malignant transformation of a B cell into a DLBCL is helping to better understand the biology of this disease and to identify critical nodes driving tumor progression or resistance to therapy. The rapid pace at which these discoveries are taking place is poised to have significant impact for patients stratification based on molecular predictors and for the development of rational targeted therapies. PMID:23673341

  16. Genetic heterogeneity of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jenny; Grubor, Vladimir; Love, Cassandra L.; Banerjee, Anjishnu; Richards, Kristy L.; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Dunphy, Cherie; Choi, William; Au, Wing Yan; Srivastava, Gopesh; Lugar, Patricia L.; Rizzieri, David A.; Lagoo, Anand S.; Bernal-Mizrachi, Leon; Mann, Karen P.; Flowers, Christopher; Naresh, Kikkeri; Evens, Andrew; Gordon, Leo I.; Czader, Magdalena; Gill, Javed I.; Hsi, Eric D.; Liu, Qingquan; Fan, Alice; Walsh, Katherine; Jima, Dereje; Smith, Lisa L.; Johnson, Amy J.; Byrd, John C.; Luftig, Micah A.; Ni, Ting; Zhu, Jun; Chadburn, Amy; Levy, Shawn; Dunson, David; Dave, Sandeep S.

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common form of lymphoma in adults. The disease exhibits a striking heterogeneity in gene expression profiles and clinical outcomes, but its genetic causes remain to be fully defined. Through whole genome and exome sequencing, we characterized the genetic diversity of DLBCL. In all, we sequenced 73 DLBCL primary tumors (34 with matched normal DNA). Separately, we sequenced the exomes of 21 DLBCL cell lines. We identified 322 DLBCL cancer genes that were recurrently mutated in primary DLBCLs. We identified recurrent mutations implicating a number of known and not previously identified genes and pathways in DLBCL including those related to chromatin modification (ARID1A and MEF2B), NF-?B (CARD11 and TNFAIP3), PI3 kinase (PIK3CD, PIK3R1, and MTOR), B-cell lineage (IRF8, POU2F2, and GNA13), and WNT signaling (WIF1). We also experimentally validated a mutation in PIK3CD, a gene not previously implicated in lymphomas. The patterns of mutation demonstrated a classic long tail distribution with substantial variation of mutated genes from patient to patient and also between published studies. Thus, our study reveals the tremendous genetic heterogeneity that underlies lymphomas and highlights the need for personalized medicine approaches to treating these patients. PMID:23292937

  17. Towards the Generation of B-Cell Receptor Retrogenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Jenny; Heink, Sylvia; Roth, Edith; Wittmann, Jürgen; Jäck, Hans-Martin; Kamradt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic expression of B- and T-cell receptors (BCRs and TCRs, respectively) has been a standard tool to study lymphocyte development and function in vivo. The generation of transgenic mice is time-consuming and, therefore, a faster method to study the biology of defined lymphocyte receptors in vivo would be highly welcome. Using 2A peptide-linked multicistronic retroviral vectors to transduce stem cells, TCRs can be expressed rapidly in mice of any background. We aimed at adopting this retrogenic technology to the in vivo expression of BCRs. Using a well characterised BCR specific for hen egg lysozyme (HEL), we achieved surface expression of the retrogenically encoded BCR in a Rag-deficient pro B-cell line in vitro. In vivo, retrogenic BCRs were detectable only intracellularly but not on the surface of B cells from wild type or Rag2-deficient mice. This data, together with the fact that no BCR retrogenic mouse model has been published in the 7 years since the method was originally published for TCRs, strongly suggests that achieving BCR-expression in vivo with retrogenic technology is highly challenging if not impossible. PMID:25296340

  18. Mercury Alters B-Cell Protein Phosphorylation Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Nicholas J.; Stemmer, Paul M.; Shin, Namhee; Dombkowski, Alan; Caruso, Joseph A.; Gill, Randal; Rosenspire, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Environmental exposure to mercury is suggested to contribute to human immune dysfunction. To shed light on the mechanism we identified changes in the phosphoproteomic profile of the WEHI-231 B cell line after intoxication with Hg2+. These changes were compared to changes in the phosphoproteome that were induced by pervanadate or okadaic acid exposure. Both 250 ?M HgCl2 and pervanadate, a known phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, caused an increase in the number of proteins identified after TiO2 affinity selection and LC-MS/MS analysis. Pervanadate treatment had a larger effect than Hg2+ on the number of Scansite motifs which were tyrosine-phosphorylated, 17, and Ingenuity canonical signaling pathways activated, 4 with score > 5.0. However, Hg2+ had a more focused effect, primarily causing tyrosine-phosphorylation in SH2 domains in proteins that are in the B cell receptor signaling pathway. The finding that many of the changes induced by Hg2+ overlap with those of pervanadate, indicates that at high concentrations Hg2+ inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatases. PMID:24224561

  19. Retinochoroidal toxoplasmosis in a patient with cerebral post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease of Hodgkin's type: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Ruchi; Thumann, Gabrielle; Souteyrand, George; Kuerten, David; Coupland, Sarah E

    2015-12-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a relatively rare complication in renal transplant patients and can pose diagnostic challenges, especially when it manifests as an ocular inflammation. Authors hereby report an unusual case of a 57-year-old male who developed retinochoroidal toxoplasmosis after 15 years of renal transplant, the diagnoses of which were challenging as the patient was also a known case of cerebral post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) of Hodgkin's type, which misled the ophthalmologists towards a clinical diagnosis of ocular PTLD. Histopathology examination of the enucleated eye revealed numerous toxoplasmosis cysts within the retina and choroid. No ocular PTLD was observed. PMID:26239296

  20. Blood disorders typically associated with renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Chen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation has become one of the most common surgical procedures performed to replace a diseased kidney with a healthy kidney from a donor. It can help patients with kidney failure live decades longer. However, renal transplantation also faces a risk of developing various blood disorders. The blood disorders typically associated with renal transplantation can be divided into two main categories: (1) Common disorders including post-transplant anemia (PTA), post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), post-transplant erythrocytosis (PTE), and post-transplant cytopenias (PTC, leukopenia/neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and pancytopenia); and (2) Uncommon but serious disorders including hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS), thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), therapy-related myelodysplasia (t-MDS), and therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML). Although many etiological factors involve the development of post-transplant blood disorders, immunosuppressive agents, and viral infections could be the two major contributors to most blood disorders and cause hematological abnormalities and immunodeficiency by suppressing hematopoietic function of bone marrow. Hematological abnormalities and immunodeficiency will result in severe clinical outcomes in renal transplant recipients. Understanding how blood disorders develop will help cure these life-threatening complications. A potential therapeutic strategy against post-transplant blood disorders should focus on tapering immunosuppression or replacing myelotoxic immunosuppressive drugs with lower toxic alternatives, recognizing and treating promptly the etiological virus, bacteria, or protozoan, restoring both hematopoietic function of bone marrow and normal blood counts, and improving kidney graft survival. PMID:25853131

  1. Increased STAT3 phosphorylation on CD27(+) B-cells from common variable immunodeficiency disease patients.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Antonio; Pons, Jaume; Lanio, Nallibe; Cunill, Vanesa; Frontera, Guillem; Crespí, Catalina; Matamoros, Núria; Ferrer, Joana M

    2015-12-01

    Maturation and differentiation of B-cells are driven by T-cells' help through IL-21/STAT3 axis in GC centers or through extrafollicular pathways, in a T-independent manner. B-cell differentiation is defective in common variable immunodeficiency disease (CVID) patients. We investigated if IL-21/STAT3 axis alterations could influence B-cell fate. We activated purified CVID B-cells with surrogate T-dependent (anti-CD40), T-independent (TLR-9 ligand) stimuli or through B-cell receptor engagement (anti-IgM) with or without IL-21. IL-21 mediated STAT3 activation was greater on CD27(-) than CD27(+) B-cells depending on the stimulus. IL-21 alone induced STAT3 phosphorylation (pSTAT3) only on CD27(-) B-cells and IL-21 induced higher pSTAT3 levels on CD27(-) than CD27(+) B-cells after anti-IgM or anti-CD40 activation. CVID CD27(+) B-cells showed selective STAT3 hyperphosphorylation after activation with anti-IgM or anti-CD40 alone and anti-IgM, anti-CD40 or ODN combined with IL-21. Increased STAT3 activation during immune responses could result in B-cell differentiation defects in CVID. PMID:26360251

  2. B cell antigen presentation is sufficient to drive neuroinflammation in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Parker Harp, Chelsea R; Archambault, Angela S; Sim, Julia; Ferris, Stephen T; Mikesell, Robert J; Koni, Pandelakis A; Shimoda, Michiko; Linington, Christopher; Russell, John H; Wu, Gregory F

    2015-06-01

    B cells are increasingly regarded as integral to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, in part as a result of the success of B cell-depletion therapy. Multiple B cell-dependent mechanisms contributing to inflammatory demyelination of the CNS have been explored using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a CD4 T cell-dependent animal model for multiple sclerosis. Although B cell Ag presentation was suggested to regulate CNS inflammation during EAE, direct evidence that B cells can independently support Ag-specific autoimmune responses by CD4 T cells in EAE is lacking. Using a newly developed murine model of in vivo conditional expression of MHC class II, we reported previously that encephalitogenic CD4 T cells are incapable of inducing EAE when B cells are the sole APC. In this study, we find that B cells cooperate with dendritic cells to enhance EAE severity resulting from myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) immunization. Further, increasing the precursor frequency of MOG-specific B cells, but not the addition of soluble MOG-specific Ab, is sufficient to drive EAE in mice expressing MHCII by B cells alone. These data support a model in which expansion of Ag-specific B cells during CNS autoimmunity amplifies cognate interactions between B and CD4 T cells and have the capacity to independently drive neuroinflammation at later stages of disease. PMID:25895531

  3. B cell tolerance--how to make it and how to break it.

    PubMed

    Melchers, F; Rolink, A R

    2006-01-01

    A series of checkpoints for antigen receptor fitness and specificity during B cell development ensures the elimination or anergy of primary, high-avidity-autoantigen-reactive B cells. Defects in genes encoding molecules with which this purging of the original B cell repertoires is achieved may break this B cell tolerance, allowing the development of B cell- and autoantibody-mediated immune diseases. Furthermore, whenever tolerance of helper T cells to a part of an autoantigen is broken, a T cell-dependent germinal center-type response of the remaining low--or no--autoreactive B cells is activated. It induces longevity of these B cells, and expression of AiD, which effects Ig class switching and IgV-region hypermutation. The development of V-region-mutant B cells and the selections of high-avidity-autoantigen-reactive antibodies producing B cells by autoantigens from them, again, can lead to the development and propagation of autoimmune diseases such as lupus erythematosus or chronic inflammatory rheumatoid arthritis by the autoantibody BcR-expressing B cells and their secreted autoantibodies. PMID:16724798

  4. A two-scale model for correlation between B cell VDJ usage in zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one of the model animals for study of immunology. The dynamics of the adaptive immune system in zebrafish is similar to that in higher animals. In this work, we built a two-scale model to simulate the dynamics of B cells in primary and secondary immune reactions in zebrafish and to explain the reported correlation between VDJ usage of B cell repertoires in distinct zebrafish. The first scale of the model consists of a generalized NK model to simulate the B cell maturation process in the 10-day primary immune response. The second scale uses a delay ordinary differential equation system to model the immune responses in the 6-month lifespan of zebrafish. The generalized NK model shows that mature B cells specific to one antigen mostly possess a single VDJ recombination. The probability that mature B cells in two zebrafish have the same VDJ recombination increases with the B cell population size or the B cell selection intensity and decreases with the B cell hypermutation rate. The ODE model shows a distribution of correlation in the VDJ usage of the B cell repertoires in two six-month-old zebrafish that is highly similar to that from experiment. This work presents a simple theory to explain the experimentally observed correlation in VDJ usage of distinct zebrafish B cell repertoires after an immune response.

  5. Marginal zone B cells emerge as a critical component of pregnancy well-being.

    PubMed

    Muzzio, Damián O; Ziegler, Katharina B; Ehrhardt, Jens; Zygmunt, Marek; Jensen, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The success of eutherian mammal evolution was certainly supported by the ability of the already existing immune system to adapt to the presence of the semi-allogeneic fetus without losing the capability to defend the mother against infections. This required the acquisition of highly regulated and coordinated immunological mechanisms. Failures in the development of these strategies not only lead to the interruption of pregnancy but also compromise maternal health. Alongside changes on the cytokine profile - expansion of tolerogenic dendritic and regulatory T cells - a profound adaptation of the B cell compartment during pregnancy was recently described. Among others, the suppression of B cell lymphopoiesis and B cell lymphopenia were proposed to be protective mechanisms tending to reduce the occurrence of autoreactive B cells that might recognize fetal structures and put pregnancy on risk. On the other hand, expansion of the pre-activated marginal zone (MZ) B cell phenotype was described as a compensatory strategy launched to overcome B cell lymphopenia thus ensuring a proper defense. In this work, using an animal model of pregnancy disturbances, we demonstrated that the suppression of B cell lymphopoiesis as well as splenic B cell lymphopenia occur independently of pregnancy outcome. However, only animals undergoing normal pregnancies, but not those suffering from pregnancy disturbances, could induce an expansion and activation of the MZ B cells. Hence, our results clearly show that MZ B cells, probably due to the production of natural protective antibodies, participate in the fine balance of immune activation required for pregnancy well-being. PMID:26493101

  6. B-cell development and functions and therapeutic options in adenosine deaminase–deficient patients

    PubMed Central

    Brigida, Immacolata; Sauer, Aisha V.; Ferrua, Francesca; Giannelli, Stefania; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Pistoia, Valentina; Castiello, Maria Carmina; Barendregt, Barbara H.; Cicalese, Maria Pia; Casiraghi, Miriam; Brombin, Chiara; Puck, Jennifer; Müller, Klaus; Notarangelo, Lucia Dora; Montin, Davide; van Montfrans, Joris M.; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Traggiai, Elisabetta; van Dongen, Jacques J. M.; van der Burg, Mirjam; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency causes severe cellular and humoral immune defects and dysregulation because of metabolic toxicity. Alterations in B-cell development and function have been poorly studied. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy (GT) are therapeutic options for patients lacking a suitable bone marrow (BM) transplant donor. Objective We sought to study alterations in B-cell development in ADA-deficient patients and investigate the ability of ERT and HSC-GT to restore normal B-cell differentiation and function. Methods Flow cytometry was used to characterize B-cell development in BM and the periphery. The percentage of gene-corrected B cells was measured by using quantitative PCR. B cells were assessed for their capacity to proliferate and release IgM after stimulation. Results Despite the severe peripheral B-cell lymphopenia, patients with ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency showed a partial block in central BM development. Treatment with ERT or HSC-GT reverted most BM alterations, but ERT led to immature B-cell expansion. In the periphery transitional B cells accumulated under ERT, and the defect in maturation persisted long-term. HSC-GT led to a progressive improvement in B-cell numbers and development, along with increased levels of gene correction. The strongest selective advantage for ADA-transduced cells occurred at the transition from immature to naive cells. B-cell proliferative responses and differentiation to immunoglobulin secreting IgM after B-cell receptor and Toll-like receptor triggering were severely impaired after ERT and improved significantly after HSC-GT. Conclusions ADA-deficient patients show specific defects in B-cell development and functions that are differently corrected after ERT and HSC-GT. PMID:24506932

  7. Rap1b Regulates B Cell Development, Homing, and T Cell-Dependent Humoral Immunity1

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Haiyan; Awasthi, Aradhana; White, Gilbert C.; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, Magdalena; Malarkannan, Subramaniam

    2015-01-01

    Rap1 is a small GTPase that belongs to Ras superfamily. This ubiquitously expressed GTPase is a key regulator of integrin functions. Rap1 exists in two isoforms: Rap1a and Rap1b. Although Rap1 has been extensively studied, its isoform-specific functions in B cells have not been elucidated. In this study, using gene knockout mice, we show that Rap1b is the dominant isoform in B cells. Lack of Rap1b significantly reduced the absolute number of B220+IgM? pro/pre-B cells and B220+IgM+ immature B cells in bone marrow. In vitro culture of bone marrow-derived Rap1b?/? pro/pre-B cells with IL-7 showed similar proliferation levels but reduced adhesion to stromal cell line compared with wild type. Rap1b?/? mice displayed reduced splenic marginal zone (MZ) B cells, and increased newly forming B cells, whereas the number of follicular B cells was normal. Functionally, Rap1b?/? mice showed reduced T-dependent but normal T-independent humoral responses. B cells from Rap1b?/? mice showed reduced migration to SDF-1, CXCL13 and in vivo homing to lymph nodes. MZ B cells showed reduced sphingosine-1-phosphate-induced migration and adhesion to ICAM-1. However, absence of Rap1b did not affect splenic B cell proliferation, BCR-mediated activation of Erk1/2, p38 MAPKs, and AKT. Thus, Rap1b is crucial for early B cell development, MZ B cell homeostasis and T-dependent humoral immunity. PMID:18714009

  8. Lymphoproliferative disease and autoimmunity in mice with elevated miR-17?92 expression in lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Changchun; Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Calado, Dinis Pedro; Patterson, Heide Christine; Zhang, Baochun; Wang, Jing; Henderson, Joel M; Kutok, Jeffrey L; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    The genomic region encoding the miR-17?92 microRNA (miRNA) cluster is often amplified in lymphoma and other cancers, and miRNAs within this cluster are expressed in high amounts in cancer cells carrying this amplification. Retroviral expression of miR-17?92 accelerates cMyc-induced lymphoma development, but precisely how elevated miR-17?92 expression promotes lymphomagenesis remains unclear. Here we generated mice with elevated miR-17?92 expression in lymphocytes. These mice developed lymphoproliferative disease and autoimmunity, and died prematurely. Lymphocytes from these mice showed increased proliferation and reduced activation-induced cell death. miR-17?92 miRNAs suppressed expression of the tumor suppressor Pten and the pro-apoptotic protein Bim. This mechanism likely contributed to the lymphoproliferative disease and autoimmunity observed in miR-17?92 transgenic mice, and to lymphoma development in patients carrying amplifications of the miR-17?92 coding region. PMID:18327259

  9. Antibody levels and in vitro lymphoproliferative responses to Streptococcus pyogenes erythrogenic toxin A and mitogen of patients with rheumatic fever.

    PubMed Central

    Bahr, G M; Yousof, A M; Behbehani, K; Majeed, H A; Sakkalah, S; Souan, K; Jarrad, I; Geoffroy, C; Alouf, J E

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro lymphoproliferative responses to a streptococcal mitogen and erythrogenic toxin A of children with acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and patients with chronic rheumatic heart disease (CRHD). Antibody levels to the streptococcal products were also analyzed in the sera of those with ARF or chronic rheumatic heart disease as well as in the sera of children with streptococcal pharyngitis or poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis. Our results demonstrated that the individuals had depressed lymphoproliferative responses during the active stage of rheumatic fever. The depressed responses were not found either to be induced by time-sensitive mitogen-specific suppressor cells or to be related to a dose-response phenomenon. On the other hand, antibody levels to the extracellular mitogens were significantly elevated in the sera of children with ARF compared with the levels in the rest of the groups. The hyperresponsiveness noted among children with ARF was found to be at a quantitative level and was not due to recognition of more epitopes, as determined by Western blotting (immunoblotting). The profile of immune responsiveness in children with ARF to the streptococcal extracellular mitogens is discussed in relation to the pathogenesis of disease. Images PMID:1774298

  10. B cell–intrinsic deficiency of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) causes severe abnormalities of the peripheral B-cell compartment in mice

    PubMed Central

    Recher, Mike; Burns, Siobhan O.; de la Fuente, Miguel A.; Volpi, Stefano; Dahlberg, Carin; Walter, Jolan E.; Moffitt, Kristin; Mathew, Divij; Honke, Nadine; Lang, Philipp A.; Patrizi, Laura; Falet, Hervé; Keszei, Marton; Mizui, Masayuki; Csizmadia, Eva; Candotti, Fabio; Nadeau, Kari; Bouma, Gerben; Delmonte, Ottavia M.; Frugoni, Francesco; Fomin, Angela B. Ferraz; Buchbinder, David; Lundequist, Emma Maria; Massaad, Michel J.; Tsokos, George C.; Hartwig, John; Manis, John; Terhorst, Cox; Geha, Raif S.; Snapper, Scott; Lang, Karl S.; Malley, Richard; Westerberg, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Wiskott Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is caused by mutations in the WAS gene that encodes for a protein (WASp) involved in cytoskeleton organization in hematopoietic cells. Several distinctive abnormalities of T, B, and natural killer lymphocytes; dendritic cells; and phagocytes have been found in WASp-deficient patients and mice; however, the in vivo consequence of WASp deficiency within individual blood cell lineages has not been definitively evaluated. By conditional gene deletion we have generated mice with selective deficiency of WASp in the B-cell lineage (B/WcKO mice). We show that this is sufficient to cause a severe reduction of marginal zone B cells and inability to respond to type II T-independent Ags, thereby recapitulating phenotypic features of complete WASp deficiency. In addition, B/WcKO mice showed prominent signs of B-cell dysregulation, as indicated by an increase in serum IgM levels, expansion of germinal center B cells and plasma cells, and elevated autoantibody production. These findings are accompanied by hyperproliferation of WASp-deficient follicular and germinal center B cells in heterozygous B/WcKO mice in vivo and excessive differentiation of WASp-deficient B cells into class-switched plasmablasts in vitro, suggesting that WASp-dependent B cell–intrinsic mechanisms critically contribute to WAS-associated autoimmunity. PMID:22302739

  11. B cell-intrinsic deficiency of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) causes severe abnormalities of the peripheral B-cell compartment in mice.

    PubMed

    Recher, Mike; Burns, Siobhan O; de la Fuente, Miguel A; Volpi, Stefano; Dahlberg, Carin; Walter, Jolan E; Moffitt, Kristin; Mathew, Divij; Honke, Nadine; Lang, Philipp A; Patrizi, Laura; Falet, Hervé; Keszei, Marton; Mizui, Masayuki; Csizmadia, Eva; Candotti, Fabio; Nadeau, Kari; Bouma, Gerben; Delmonte, Ottavia M; Frugoni, Francesco; Fomin, Angela B Ferraz; Buchbinder, David; Lundequist, Emma Maria; Massaad, Michel J; Tsokos, George C; Hartwig, John; Manis, John; Terhorst, Cox; Geha, Raif S; Snapper, Scott; Lang, Karl S; Malley, Richard; Westerberg, Lisa; Thrasher, Adrian J; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2012-03-22

    Wiskott Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is caused by mutations in the WAS gene that encodes for a protein (WASp) involved in cytoskeleton organization in hematopoietic cells. Several distinctive abnormalities of T, B, and natural killer lymphocytes; dendritic cells; and phagocytes have been found in WASp-deficient patients and mice; however, the in vivo consequence of WASp deficiency within individual blood cell lineages has not been definitively evaluated. By conditional gene deletion we have generated mice with selective deficiency of WASp in the B-cell lineage (B/WcKO mice). We show that this is sufficient to cause a severe reduction of marginal zone B cells and inability to respond to type II T-independent Ags, thereby recapitulating phenotypic features of complete WASp deficiency. In addition, B/WcKO mice showed prominent signs of B-cell dysregulation, as indicated by an increase in serum IgM levels, expansion of germinal center B cells and plasma cells, and elevated autoantibody production. These findings are accompanied by hyperproliferation of WASp-deficient follicular and germinal center B cells in heterozygous B/WcKO mice in vivo and excessive differentiation of WASp-deficient B cells into class-switched plasmablasts in vitro, suggesting that WASp-dependent B cell-intrinsic mechanisms critically contribute to WAS-associated autoimmunity. PMID:22302739

  12. [T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Vidovi?, A; Tomin, D; Cemeriki?, V; Milivojevi?, G; Colovi?, M

    2000-01-01

    The authors present three patients, one female and two males, with special forms of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the so called T-cell rich B-cell lymphoma (TCRBCL). This is a relatively new entity which has not yet been described in our literature. The first diagnosis in our female patient was Hodgkin's disease. However, the revision of old and new lymph node samples and use of immunohistochemical analysis helped the establishing of diagnosis--TCRBCL. In the other two patients the diagnosis of TCRBCL was established on the basis of immunohistochemical analysis of the lymph node which indicated the dominating T-lymphocytes, positive to pan-T antigen (CD45 RO+), with considerably lower count of B-lymphocyte elements positive to CD20+. The female patient survived 33 months from the time of diagnosis. The other two patients experienced complete remission lasting 10 and 12 months after the end of therapy. PMID:10932621

  13. Benchmarking B cell epitope prediction: underperformance of existing methods.

    PubMed

    Blythe, Martin J; Flower, Darren R

    2005-01-01

    Sequence profiling is used routinely to predict the location of B-cell epitopes. In the postgenomic era, the need for reliable epitope prediction is clear. We assessed 484 amino acid propensity scales in combination with ranges of plotting parameters to examine exhaustively the correlation of peaks and epitope location within 50 proteins mapped for polyclonal responses. After examining more than 10(6) combinations, we found that even the best set of scales and parameters performed only marginally better than random. Our results confirm the null hypothesis: Single-scale amino acid propensity profiles cannot be used to predict epitope location reliably. The implication for studies using such methods is obvious. PMID:15576553

  14. B-cell receptor pathway modulators in NHL.

    PubMed

    Blum, Kristie A

    2015-12-01

    With the recent success of the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor, ibrutinib, and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, idelalisib, in the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), a number of new agents targeting the B-cell receptor (BCR) pathway are in clinical development. In addition, multiple trials combining these agents with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, immunomodulatory agents, monoclonal antibodies, or other kinase inhibitors are underway. This review will summarize the current data with the use of single agent and combination therapy with BCR inhibitors in NHL. In addition, commonly encountered as well as serious toxicities and hypothesized resistance mechanisms will be discussed. Lastly, this review will examine the future of these agents and opportunities to maneuver them into the front-line setting in selected NHL subtypes. PMID:26637705

  15. Conditional Expression of E2A-HLF Induces B-Cell Precursor Death and Myeloproliferative-Like Disease in Knock-In Mice

    PubMed Central

    Duque-Afonso, Jesús; Smith, Kevin S.; Cleary, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are driver mutations of human cancers, particularly leukemias. They define disease subtypes and are used as prognostic markers, for minimal residual disease monitoring and therapeutic targets. Due to their low incidence, several translocations and their biological consequences remain poorly characterized. To address this, we engineered mouse strains that conditionally express E2A-HLF, a fusion oncogene from the translocation t(17;19) associated with 1% of pediatric B-cell precursor ALL. Conditional oncogene activation and expression were directed to the B-cell compartment by the Cre driver promoters CD19 or Mb1 (Ig?, CD79a), or to the hematopoietic stem cell compartment by the Mx1 promoter. E2A-HLF expression in B-cell progenitors induced hyposplenia and lymphopenia, whereas expression in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells was embryonic lethal. Increased cell death was detected in E2A-HLF expressing cells, suggesting the need for cooperating genetic events that suppress cell death for B-cell oncogenic transformation. E2A-HLF/Mb1.Cre aged mice developed a fatal myeloproliferative-like disorder with low frequency characterized by leukocytosis, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly and organ-infiltration by mature myelocytes. In conclusion, we have developed conditional E2A-HLF knock-in mice, which provide an experimental platform to study cooperating genetic events and further elucidate translational biology in cross-species comparative studies. PMID:26588248

  16. IL-10-independent regulatory B-cell subsets and mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Ray, Avijit; Wang, Luman; Dittel, Bonnie N

    2015-11-01

    Although classically B cells are known to play important roles in immune protection via humoral immunity, recently their regulatory mechanisms have been best appreciated in the context of autoimmunity. Several studies have identified different subsets of regulatory B cells that vary not only in their phenotype but also in their mechanism of action. Although the best-studied mechanism of B-cell immune regulation is IL-10 production, other IL-10-independent mechanisms have been proposed. These include maintenance of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells; production of transforming growth factor-?, IL-35, IgM or adenosine or expression of PD-L1 (programmed death 1 ligand 1) or FasL (Fas ligand). Given that B-cell-targeted therapy is being increasingly used in the clinic, a complete understanding of the mechanisms whereby B cells regulate inflammation associated with specific diseases is required for designing safe and effective immunotherapies targeting B cells. PMID:25999596

  17. Rehabilitation or the death penalty: autoimmune B cells in the dock.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Lekh N; Cragg, Mark S

    2015-03-01

    CD20-based monoclonal antibodies have become established as treatments for lymphoma, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitis and dermatomyositis, with the principle therapeutic mechanism relating to B-cell depletion through effector cell engagement. An article by Brühl et al. in this issue of the European Journal of Immunology [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 705-715] reveals a fundamentally distinct mechanism of silencing autoimmune B-cell responses. Rather than B-cell depletion, the authors use anti-CD79b antibodies to induce B-cell tolerance and suppress humoral immune responses against collagen to prevent the development of arthritis in mice. Here we highlight the differences in the mechanisms used by anti-CD20 and anti-CD79b Ab therapy and discuss why depletion of B cells may not be required to treat autoimmune arthritis and other B-cell-associated pathologies. PMID:25639261

  18. Mechanisms of action of BCL6 during germinal center B cell development.

    PubMed

    Huang, ChuanXin; Melnick, Ari

    2015-12-01

    The transcriptional repressor B cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) controls a large transcriptional network that is required for the formation and maintenance of germinal centers (GC). GC B cells represent the normal counterpart of most human B-cell lymphomas, which are often characterized by deregulated BCL6 expression or BCL6-mediated pathways. BCL6 suppresses gene transcription largely through recruitment of its co-repressors through its distinct repression domain. Understanding the precise biological roles of each repression domain in normal and malignant B cells is helpful for development of targeted inhibition of BCL6 functions that is emerging as the basis for design of anti-lymphoma therapies. This review focuses on recent progress in the molecular mechanisms of action of BCL6 in B cells and discusses remaining unresolved questions related to how these mechanisms are linked to normal and malignant B cell development. PMID:26566802

  19. Prognostic Significance of B-cell Differentiation Genes Encoding Proteins in Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma and Follicular Lymphoma Grade 3

    PubMed Central

    Borove?ki, Ana; Kora?, Petra; Nola, Marin; Ivankovi?, Davor; Jakši?, Branimir; Dominis, Mara

    2008-01-01

    Aim To define prognostic significance of B-cell differentiation genes encoding proteins and BCL2 and BCL6 gene abnormalities in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma grade 3 with >75% follicular growth pattern. Methods In 53 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and 20 patients with follicular lymphoma grade 3 with >75% follicular growth pattern the following was performed: 1) determination of protein expression of BCL6, CD10, MUM1/IRF4, CD138, and BCL2 by immunohistochemistry; 2) subclassification into germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) and activated B-cell-like (ABC) groups according to the results of protein expression; 3) detection of t(14;18)(q32;q21)/IgH-BCL2 and BCL6 abnormalities by fluorescent in situ hybridization in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma grade 3 with >75% follicular growth pattern as well as in GCB and ABC groups; and 4) assessment of the influence of the analyzed characteristics and clinical prognostic factors on overall survival. Results Isolated BCL6 expression was more frequently found in follicular lymphoma grade 3 with >75% follicular growth pattern than in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (P?=?0.030). There were no differences in BCL2 and BCL6 gene abnormalities between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma grade 3 with >75% follicular growth pattern. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma grade 3 with >75% follicular growth pattern patients were equally distributed in GCB and ABC groups. t(14;18)(q32;q21) was more frequently recorded in GCB group, and t(14;18)(q32;q21) with BCL2 additional signals or only BCL2 and IgH additional signals in ABC group (P?=?0.004). The GCB and ABC groups showed no difference in BCL6 gene abnormalities. There was no overall survival difference between the patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or follicular lymphoma grade 3 with >75% follicular growth pattern, however, GCB group had longer overall survival than ABC group (P?=?0.047). Multivariate analysis showed that BCL6, CD10, and BCL2 expression, BCL2 and BCL6 abnormalities, and International Prognostic Index were not significantly related to overall survival. Conclusion Patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma grade 3 with >75% follicular growth pattern have very similar characteristics and their prognosis is more influenced by protein expression of B-cell differentiation stage genes than by tumor cells growth pattern, BCL2 and BCL6 abnormalities, and International Prognostic Index. PMID:18925696

  20. Systemic Sclerosis Patients Present Alterations in the Expression of Molecules Involved in B-Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Lilian; Ferrier, Ashley; Aravena, Octavio; Fonseca, Elianet; Berendsen, Jorge; Biere, Andrea; Bueno, Daniel; Ramos, Verónica; Aguillón, Juan Carlos; Catalán, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The activation threshold of B cells is tightly regulated by an array of inhibitory and activator receptors in such a way that disturbances in their expression can lead to the appearance of autoimmunity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of activating and inhibitory molecules involved in the modulation of B cell functions in transitional, naive, and memory B-cell subpopulations from systemic sclerosis patients. To achieve this, blood samples were drawn from 31 systemic sclerosis patients and 53 healthy individuals. Surface expression of CD86, MHC II, CD19, CD21, CD40, CD22, Siglec 10, CD35, and Fc?RIIB was determined by flow cytometry. IL-10 production was evaluated by intracellular flow cytometry from isolated B cells. Soluble IL-6 and IL-10 levels were measured by ELISA from supernatants of stimulated B cells. Systemic sclerosis patients exhibit an increased frequency of transitional and naive B cells related to memory B cells compared with healthy controls. Transitional and naive B cells from patients express higher levels of CD86 and Fc?RIIB than healthy donors. Also, B cells from patients show high expression of CD19 and CD40, whereas memory cells from systemic sclerosis patients show reduced expression of CD35. CD19 and CD35 expression levels associate with different autoantibody profiles. IL-10+ B cells and secreted levels of IL-10 were markedly reduced in patients. In conclusion, systemic sclerosis patients show alterations in the expression of molecules involved in B-cell regulation. These abnormalities may be determinant in the B-cell hyperactivation observed in systemic sclerosis. PMID:26483788

  1. B cell processing P-I-G Dec 2013 1 | P a g e

    E-print Network

    Maizels, Rick

    B cell processing P-I-G Dec 2013 1 | P a g e Protocol for purification of B-cells from frozen PBMC to resuspend cell pellet then resuspend 10 mL thawing medium. Repeat step 6. 8. Flick the tube gently to resuspend the pellet 9. Count cells 10. Proceed immediately to MACS purification of B-cells. B.) CD19 MACs

  2. Systemic Sclerosis Patients Present Alterations in the Expression of Molecules Involved in B-Cell Regulation.

    PubMed

    Soto, Lilian; Ferrier, Ashley; Aravena, Octavio; Fonseca, Elianet; Berendsen, Jorge; Biere, Andrea; Bueno, Daniel; Ramos, Verónica; Aguillón, Juan Carlos; Catalán, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The activation threshold of B cells is tightly regulated by an array of inhibitory and activator receptors in such a way that disturbances in their expression can lead to the appearance of autoimmunity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of activating and inhibitory molecules involved in the modulation of B cell functions in transitional, naive, and memory B-cell subpopulations from systemic sclerosis patients. To achieve this, blood samples were drawn from 31 systemic sclerosis patients and 53 healthy individuals. Surface expression of CD86, MHC II, CD19, CD21, CD40, CD22, Siglec 10, CD35, and Fc?RIIB was determined by flow cytometry. IL-10 production was evaluated by intracellular flow cytometry from isolated B cells. Soluble IL-6 and IL-10 levels were measured by ELISA from supernatants of stimulated B cells. Systemic sclerosis patients exhibit an increased frequency of transitional and naive B cells related to memory B cells compared with healthy controls. Transitional and naive B cells from patients express higher levels of CD86 and Fc?RIIB than healthy donors. Also, B cells from patients show high expression of CD19 and CD40, whereas memory cells from systemic sclerosis patients show reduced expression of CD35. CD19 and CD35 expression levels associate with different autoantibody profiles. IL-10(+) B cells and secreted levels of IL-10 were markedly reduced in patients. In conclusion, systemic sclerosis patients show alterations in the expression of molecules involved in B-cell regulation. These abnormalities may be determinant in the B-cell hyperactivation observed in systemic sclerosis. PMID:26483788

  3. BAFF activation of the ERK5 MAP kinase pathway regulates B cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Jacque, Emilie; Schweighoffer, Edina; Tybulewicz, Victor L.J.

    2015-01-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) stimulation of the BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) is essential for the homeostatic survival of mature B cells. Earlier in vitro experiments with inhibitors that block MEK 1 and 2 suggested that activation of ERK 1 and 2 MAP kinases is required for BAFF-R to promote B cell survival. However, these inhibitors are now known to also inhibit MEK5, which activates the related MAP kinase ERK5. In the present study, we demonstrated that BAFF-induced B cell survival was actually independent of ERK1/2 activation but required ERK5 activation. Consistent with this, we showed that conditional deletion of ERK5 in B cells led to a pronounced global reduction in mature B2 B cell numbers, which correlated with impaired survival of ERK5-deficient B cells after BAFF stimulation. ERK5 was required for optimal BAFF up-regulation of Mcl1 and Bcl2a1, which are prosurvival members of the Bcl-2 family. However, ERK5 deficiency did not alter BAFF activation of the PI3-kinase–Akt or NF-?B signaling pathways, which are also important for BAFF to promote mature B cell survival. Our study reveals a critical role for the MEK5-ERK5 MAP kinase signaling pathway in BAFF-induced mature B cell survival and homeostatic maintenance of B2 cell numbers. PMID:25987726

  4. The regulatory role of B cells in autoimmunity, infections and cancer: Perspectives beyond IL10 production.

    PubMed

    Gorosito Serrán, Melisa; Fiocca Vernengo, Facundo; Beccaria, Cristian G; Acosta Rodriguez, Eva V; Montes, Carolina L; Gruppi, Adriana

    2015-11-14

    The term regulatory B cells (B regs) is ascribed to a heterogeneous population of B cells with the function of suppressing inflammatory responses. They have been described mainly during the last decade in the context of different immune-mediated diseases. Most of the work on B regs has been focused on IL-10-producing B cells. However, B cells can exert regulatory functions independently of IL-10 production. Here we discuss the phenotypes, development and effector mechanisms of B regs and advances in their role in autoimmunity, infections and cancer. PMID:26424657

  5. B cells produce less IL-10, IL-6 and TNF-? in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Vuslat; Oflazer, Piraye; Aysal, Fikret; Parman, Ye?im G; Direskeneli, Haner; Deymeer, Feza; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher

    2015-06-01

    B cells from myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with autoantibodies (Aab) against acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) or with no detectable Aab were investigated as cytokine producing cells in this study. B cells were evaluated for memory phenotypes and expressions of IL-10, IL-6 and IL-12A. Induced productions of IL-10, IL-6, IL-12p40, TNF-? and LT from isolated B cells in vitro were measured by immunoassays. MG patients receiving immunosuppressive treatment had higher proportions of memory B cells compared with healthy controls and untreated patients. With CD40 stimulation MG patients produced significantly lower levels of IL-10, IL-6. With CD40 and B cell receptor stimulation of B cells, TNF-? production also decreased in addition to these cytokines. The lower levels of these cytokine productions were not related to treatment. Our results confirm a disturbance of B cell subpopulations in MG subgroups on immunosuppressive treatment. B cell derived IL-10, IL-6 and TNF-? are down-regulated in MG, irrespective of different antibody productions. Ineffective cytokine production by B cells may be a susceptibility factor in dysregulation of autoimmune Aab production. PMID:25518708

  6. PI3K Signaling in Normal B Cells and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

    PubMed Central

    Okkenhaug, Klaus; Burger, Jan A.

    2016-01-01

    B cells provide immunity to extracellular pathogens by secreting a diverse repertoire of antibodies with high affinity and specificity for exposed antigens. The B cell receptor (BCR) is a transmembrane antibody, which facilitates the clonal selection of B cells producing secreted antibodies of the same specificity. The diverse antibody repertoire is generated by V(D)J recombination of heavy and light chain genes, whereas affinity maturation is mediated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-mediated mutagenesis. These processes, which are essential for the generation of adaptive humoral immunity, also render B cells susceptible to chromosomal rearrangements and point mutations that in some cases lead to cancer. In this chapter, we will review the central role of PI3Ks in mediating signals from the B cell receptor that not only facilitate the development of functional B cell repertoire, but also support the growth and survival of neoplastic B cells, focusing on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B cells. Perhaps because of the central role played by PI3K in BCR signaling, B cell leukemia and lymphomas are the first diseases for which a PI3K inhibitor has been approved for clinical use. PMID:26350103

  7. Nek2 Is a Novel Regulator of B Cell Development and Immunological Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen; Huang, Junwei; Yang, Ye; Wendlandt, Erik; Xu, Hongwei; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2014-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Nek2 is commonly found upregulated in a wide variety of neoplasms including diffuse large B cell lymphoma and multiple myeloma. High expression of Nek2 is implicated in the induction of chromosomal instability, promotion of cell proliferation, and drug resistance in tumor cells as well as a marker for poor clinical outcomes. Despite its well recorded involvement in chromosomal instability and neoplastic growth, little is known about the involvement of Nek2 in B cell development. Here we report the development of a transgenic mouse line with conditional expression of Nek2 in the B cell lineage and the effects it has on the development of B cells. Interestingly, we found that the overexpression of Nek2 does not induce spontaneous tumor formation within the transgenic mice up to 24 months after induction. Instead, overexpression of Nek2 in the B cell lineage affects the development of B cells by increasing the proportion of immature B cells in the bone marrow and decreasing B-1 B cells in peritoneal cavity. Furthermore, Nek2 transgenic mice develop spontaneous germinal centers and exhibit an enhanced T cell dependent immune response. Altogether, our data demonstrates a novel role for Nek2 in regulating B cell development and the immune response. PMID:25485281

  8. Ixazomib Citrate in Treating Patients With Untreated B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-16

    B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Follicular Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  9. B cells help alloreactive T cells differentiate into memory T cells1

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Yue-Harn; Oberbarnscheidt, Martin H.; Chandramoorthy, Harish Chinna Konda; Hoffman, Rosemary; Chalasani, Geetha

    2010-01-01

    B cells are recognized as effector cells in allograft rejection that are dependent upon T cell help to produce alloantibodies causing graft injury. It is not known if B cells can also help T cells differentiate into memory cells in the alloimmune response. We found that in B cell-deficient hosts, differentiation of alloreactive T cells into effectors was intact whereas their development into memory T cells was impaired. To test if B cell help for T cells was required for their continued differentiation into memory T cells, activated T cells were sorted from alloimmunized mice and transferred either with or without B cells into naïve adoptive hosts. Activated T cells co-transferred with B cells gave rise to more memory T cells than those transferred without B cells and upon recall, mediated accelerated rejection of skin allografts. Co-transfer of B cells led to increased memory T cells by enhancing activated CD4 T cell proliferation and activated CD8 T cell survival. These results indicate that B cells help alloreactive T cell differentiation, proliferation and survival to generate optimal numbers of functional memory T cells. PMID:20883532

  10. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 Is Essential for the Activation and Function of Mature B Cells.

    PubMed

    Gerasimcik, Natalija; Dahlberg, Carin I M; Baptista, Marisa A P; Massaad, Michel J; Geha, Raif S; Westerberg, Lisa S; Severinson, Eva

    2015-05-15

    The Rho GTPase Cdc42 coordinates regulation of the actin and the microtubule cytoskeleton by binding and activating the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. We sought to define the role of intrinsic expression of Cdc42 by mature B cells in their activation and function. Mice with inducible deletion of Cdc42 in mature B cells formed smaller germinal centers and had a reduced Ab response, mostly of low affinity to T cell-dependent Ag, compared with wild-type (WT) controls. Spreading formation of long protrusions that contain F-actin, microtubules, and Cdc42-interacting protein 4, and assumption of a dendritic cell morphology in response to anti-CD40 plus IL-4 were impaired in Cdc42-deficient B cells compared with WT B cells. Cdc42-deficient B cells had an intact migratory response to chemokine in vitro, but their homing to the B cell follicles in the spleen in vivo was significantly impaired. Cdc42-deficient B cells induced a skewed cytokine response in CD4(+) T cells, compared with WT B cells. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Cdc42 in the motility of mature B cells, their cognate interaction with T cells, and their differentiation into Ab-producing cells. PMID:25870239

  11. PI3K Signaling in Normal B Cells and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL).

    PubMed

    Okkenhaug, Klaus; Burger, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    B cells provide immunity to extracellular pathogens by secreting a diverse repertoire of antibodies with high affinity and specificity for exposed antigens. The B cell receptor (BCR ) is a transmembrane antibody, which facilitates the clonal selection of B cells producing secreted antibodies of the same specificity. The diverse antibody repertoire is generated by V(D)J recombination of heavy and light chain genes, whereas affinity maturation is mediated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-mediated mutagenesis. These processes, which are essential for the generation of adaptive humoral immunity, also render B cells susceptible to chromosomal rearrangements and point mutations that in some cases lead to cancer. In this chapter, we will review the central role of PI3K s in mediating signals from the B cell receptor that not only facilitate the development of functional B cell repertoire, but also support the growth and survival of neoplastic B cells, focusing on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL ) B cells. Perhaps because of the central role played by PI3K in BCR signaling, B cell leukemia and lymphomas are the first diseases for which a PI3K inhibitor has been approved for clinical use. PMID:26350103

  12. CD317 is over-expressed in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but not B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Shunyou; Osei, Ebenezer S; Kaplan, David; Chen, Youhai H; Meyerson, Howard

    2015-01-01

    CD317 was first identified as a multiple myeloma-associated antigen. Here we report the expression of CD317 in normal B cells and B-cell malignancies. In normal bone marrow, CD317 demonstrates a biphasic expression pattern, with higher expression on stage 1 and stage 3 hematogones, but not on stage 2 hematogones. CD317 is over-expressed in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and appears associated with negative CD38 expression. Moreover, CD317 is barely detectable in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Our results suggest that CD317 expression might be of prognostic significance for B-CLL, and CD317 could be used as a new marker for minimal residual disease detection in B-ALL. PMID:25973046

  13. Cellular Dynamics of Memory B Cell Populations: IgM+ and IgG+ Memory B Cells Persist Indefinitely as Quiescent Cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Derek D; Wilmore, Joel R; Allman, David

    2015-11-15

    Despite their critical role in long-term immunity, the life span of individual memory B cells remains poorly defined. Using a tetracycline-regulated pulse-chase system, we measured population turnover rates and individual t1/2 of pre-established Ag-induced Ig class-switched and IgM-positive memory B cells over 402 d. Our results indicate that, once established, both IgG-positive and less frequent IgM-positive memory populations are exceptionally stable, with little evidence of attrition or cellular turnover. Indeed, the vast majority of cells in both pools exhibited t1/2 that appear to exceed the life span of the mouse, contrasting dramatically with mature naive B cells. These results indicate that recall Ab responses are mediated by stable pools of extremely long-lived cells, and suggest that Ag-experienced B cells employ remarkably efficient survival mechanisms. PMID:26438523

  14. Processing of CD74 by the Intramembrane Protease SPPL2a Is Critical for B Cell Receptor Signaling in Transitional B Cells.

    PubMed

    Hüttl, Susann; Kläsener, Kathrin; Schweizer, Michaela; Schneppenheim, Janna; Oberg, Hans-Heinrich; Kabelitz, Dieter; Reth, Michael; Saftig, Paul; Schröder, Bernd

    2015-08-15

    The invariant chain (CD74), a chaperone in MHC class II-mediated Ag presentation, is sequentially processed by different endosomal proteases. We reported recently that clearance of the final membrane-bound N-terminal fragment (NTF) of CD74 is mediated by the intramembrane protease signal peptide peptidase-like (SPPL)2a, a process critical for B cell development. In mice, SPPL2a deficiency provokes the accumulation of this NTF in endocytic vesicles, which leads to a B cell maturation arrest at the transitional 1 stage. To define the underlying mechanism, we analyzed the impact of SPPL2a deficiency on signaling pathways involved in B cell homeostasis. We demonstrate that tonic as well as BCR-induced activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway is massively compromised in SPPL2a(-/-) B cells and identify this as major cause of the B cell maturation defect in these mice. Altered BCR trafficking induces a reduction of surface IgM in SPPL2a-deficient B cells, leading to a diminished signal transmission via the BCR and the tyrosine kinase Syk. We provide evidence that in SPPL2a(-/-) mice impaired BCR signaling is to a great extent provoked by the accumulating CD74 NTF, which can interact with the BCR and Syk, and that impaired PI3K/Akt signaling and reduced surface IgM are not directly linked processes. In line with disturbances in PI3K/Akt signaling, SPPL2a(-/-) B cells show a dysregulation of the transcription factor FOXO1, causing elevated transcription of proapoptotic genes. We conclude that SPPL2a-mediated processing of CD74 NTF is indispensable to maintain appropriate levels of tonic BCR signaling to promote B cell maturation. PMID:26157172

  15. Genome-Wide Analyses Suggest Mechanisms Involving Early B-Cell Development in Canine IgA Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Frankowiack, Marcel; Kierczak, Marcin; Bergvall, Kerstin; Axelsson, Erik; Tintle, Linda; Marti, Eliane; Roosje, Petra; Leeb, Tosso; Hedhammar, Åke; Hammarström, Lennart; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A deficiency (IgAD) is the most common primary immune deficiency disorder in both humans and dogs, characterized by recurrent mucosal tract infections and a predisposition for allergic and other immune mediated diseases. In several dog breeds, low IgA levels have been observed at a high frequency and with a clinical resemblance to human IgAD. In this study, we used genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify genomic regions associated with low IgA levels in dogs as a comparative model for human IgAD. We used a novel percentile groups-approach to establish breed-specific cut-offs and to perform analyses in a close to continuous manner. GWAS performed in four breeds prone to low IgA levels (German shepherd, Golden retriever, Labrador retriever and Shar-Pei) identified 35 genomic loci suggestively associated (p <0.0005) to IgA levels. In German shepherd, three genomic regions (candidate genes include KIRREL3 and SERPINA9) were genome-wide significantly associated (p <0.0002) with IgA levels. A ~20kb long haplotype on CFA28, significantly associated (p = 0.0005) to IgA levels in Shar-Pei, was positioned within the first intron of the gene SLIT1. Both KIRREL3 and SLIT1 are highly expressed in the central nervous system and in bone marrow and are potentially important during B-cell development. SERPINA9 expression is restricted to B-cells and peaks at the time-point when B-cells proliferate into antibody-producing plasma cells. The suggestively associated regions were enriched for genes in Gene Ontology gene sets involving inflammation and early immune cell development. PMID:26225558

  16. Peripheral CD5+ B Cells in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody–Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Unizony, Sebastian; Lim, Noha; Phippard, Deborah J.; Carey, Vincent J.; Miloslavsky, Eli M.; Tchao, Nadia K.; Iklé, David; Asare, Adam L.; Merkel, Peter A.; Monach, Paul A.; Seo, Philip; St Clair, E. William; Langford, Carol A.; Spiera, Robert; Hoffman, Gary S.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Specks, Ulrich; Stone, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective CD5+ B cells have been conceptualized as a possible surrogate for Breg cells. The aim of the present study was to determine the utility of CD5+ B cells as biomarkers in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody–associated vasculitis (AAV). Methods The absolute and relative numbers (percentages) of CD5+ B cells (explanatory variables) were measured longitudinally during 18 months in 197 patients randomized to receive either rituximab (RTX) or cyclophosphamide (CYC) followed by azathioprine (AZA) for the treatment of AAV (Rituximab in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis [RAVE] trial). Outcome variables included disease activity (status of active disease versus complete remission), responsiveness to induction therapy, disease relapse, disease severity, and, in RTX-treated patients, relapse-free survival according to the percentage of CD5+ B cells detected upon B cell repopulation. Results CD5+ B cell numbers were comparable between the treatment groups at baseline. After an initial decline, absolute CD5+ B cell numbers progressively increased in patients in the RTX treatment arm, but remained low in CYC/AZA-treated patients. In both groups, the percentage of CD5+ B cells increased during remission induction and slowly declined thereafter. During relapse, the percentage of CD5+ B cells correlated inversely with disease activity in RTX-treated patients, but not in patients who received CYC/AZA. No significant association was observed between the numbers of CD5+ B cells and induction treatment failure or disease severity. The dynamics of the CD5+ B cell compartment did not anticipate disease relapse. Following B cell repopulation, the percentage of CD5+ B cells was not predictive of time to flare in RTX-treated patients. Conclusion The percentage of peripheral CD5+ B cells might reflect disease activity in RTX-treated patients. However, sole staining for CD5 as a putative surrogate marker for Breg cells did not identify a subpopulation of B cells with clear potential for meaningful clinical use. Adequate phenotyping of Breg cells is required to further explore the value of these cells as biomarkers in AAV. PMID:25332071

  17. Prediction of linear B-cell epitopes of hepatitis C virus for vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background High genetic heterogeneity in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the major challenge of the development of an effective vaccine. Existing studies for developing HCV vaccines have mainly focused on T-cell immune response. However, identification of linear B-cell epitopes that can stimulate B-cell response is one of the major tasks of peptide-based vaccine development. Owing to the variability in B-cell epitope length, the prediction of B-cell epitopes is much more complex than that of T-cell epitopes. Furthermore, the motifs of linear B-cell epitopes in different pathogens are quite different (e. g. HCV and hepatitis B virus). To cope with this challenge, this work aims to propose an HCV-customized sequence-based prediction method to identify B-cell epitopes of HCV. Results This work establishes an experimentally verified dataset comprising the B-cell response of HCV dataset consisting of 774 linear B-cell epitopes and 774 non B-cell epitopes from the Immune Epitope Database. An interpretable rule mining system of B-cell epitopes (IRMS-BE) is proposed to select informative physicochemical properties (PCPs) and then extracts several if-then rule-based knowledge for identifying B-cell epitopes. A web server Bcell-HCV was implemented using an SVM with the 34 informative PCPs, which achieved a training accuracy of 79.7% and test accuracy of 70.7% better than the SVM-based methods for identifying B-cell epitopes of HCV and the two general-purpose methods. This work performs advanced analysis of the 34 informative properties, and the results indicate that the most effective property is the alpha-helix structure of epitopes, which influences the connection between host cells and the E2 proteins of HCV. Furthermore, 12 interpretable rules are acquired from top-five PCPs and achieve a sensitivity of 75.6% and specificity of 71.3%. Finally, a conserved promising vaccine candidate, PDREMVLYQE, is identified for inclusion in a vaccine against HCV. Conclusions This work proposes an interpretable rule mining system IRMS-BE for extracting interpretable rules using informative physicochemical properties and a web server Bcell-HCV for predicting linear B-cell epitopes of HCV. IRMS-BE may also apply to predict B-cell epitopes for other viruses, which benefits the improvement of vaccines development of these viruses without significant modification. Bcell-HCV is useful for identifying B-cell epitopes of HCV antigen to help vaccine development, which is available at http://e045.life.nctu.edu.tw/BcellHCV. PMID:26680271

  18. A rare case of primary cardiac B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac lymphomas represent an extremely rare entity of extranodal lymphomas and should be distinguished from secondary cardiac involvement of disseminated lymphomas belonging to the non-Hodgkin’s classification of blood cancers. Only 90 cases have been reported in literature. Presentation of cardiac lymphomas on imaging studies may not be unambiguous since they potentially mimic other cardiac neoplasms including myxomas, angiosarcoma or rhadomyomas and therefore require multimodality cardiac imaging, endomyocardial biopsy, excisional intraoperative biopsy and pericardial fluid cytological evaluation to establish final diagnosis. Herein we report the case of a 70 y/o immunocompetent Caucasian female with a rapidly progressing superior vena cava syndrome secondary to a large primary cardiac diffuse large B cell lymphoma (NHL lymphoma) almost completely obstructing the right atrium, right ventricle and affecting both mitral and tricuspid valve. The patient had no clinical evidence of disseminated disease and was successfully treated with extensive debulking during open-heart surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass and 6 cycles of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone chemotherapy (R-CHOP). PMID:24422789

  19. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dabaja, Bouthaina S; Advani, Ranjana; Hodgson, David C; Dhakal, Sughosh; Flowers, Christopher R; Ha, Chul S; Hoppe, Bradford S; Mendenhall, Nancy P; Metzger, Monika L; Plastaras, John P; Roberts, Kenneth B; Shapiro, Ronald; Smith, Sonali M; Terezakis, Stephanie A; Winkfield, Karen M; Younes, Anas; Constine, Louis S

    2015-12-01

    The management of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma depends on the initial diagnosis including molecular and immunophenotypic characteristics, Ann Arbor staging, and International Prognostic Index (IPI score). Treatment approaches with different chemotherapy regimens used is discussed in detail. The role of radiation as a consolidation is discussed including: (1) the prerituximab randomized trials that challenged the role of radiation, (2) recent prospective studies (UNFOLDER/RICOVER-60), and (3) retrospective studies; the last 2 showed a potential benefit of radiation both for early and advanced stage. The document also discusses the role of positron emission tomography/computed tomography for predicting outcome and potentially guiding therapy. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:26583344

  20. Trypanosoma musculi infection in B-cell-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, F D; Viens, P; Kongshavn, P A

    1984-01-01

    The course of infection with Trypanosoma musculi was assessed in mice deprived of B-lymphocytes by administration, from birth, of rabbit antiserum to mouse immunoglobulin M (IgM). Initial control of parasitemia leading to the first crisis and establishment of the plateau phase was unaffected by lack of B-lymphocyte function, although multiplicative forms persisted throughout the infection in anti-IgM-treated mice, instead of disappearing after the first crisis as in intact mice. Elimination of trypanosomes after the second crisis was not observed in anti-IgM-treated mice, which maintained high numbers of parasites in the blood and peritoneal cavity, resulting in some mortality. A temporary reduction in parasitemia was achieved in anti-IgM-treated mice by transfusion of immune plasma. Immunodepression, as measured by splenic mitogen responsiveness, and splenomegaly were both observed in anti-IgM-treated as well as in intact mice, indicating that these features of murine trypanosomiasis are independent of B-lymphocyte function. Since in T. musculi infection parasitemia can be controlled initially but not eliminated in mice lacking B-cell function, the only crucial protection provided by antibody would appear to be in curing the infection after the second crisis. PMID:6608496

  1. Epigenetic Heterogeneity of B-Cell Lymphoma: Chromatin Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, Lydia; Nersisyan, Lilit; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Arakelyan, Arsen; Binder, Hans

    2015-01-01

    We systematically studied the expression of more than fifty histone and DNA (de)methylating enzymes in lymphoma and healthy controls. As a main result, we found that the expression levels of nearly all enzymes become markedly disturbed in lymphoma, suggesting deregulation of large parts of the epigenetic machinery. We discuss the effect of DNA promoter methylation and of transcriptional activity in the context of mutated epigenetic modifiers such as EZH2 and MLL2. As another mechanism, we studied the coupling between the energy metabolism and epigenetics via metabolites that act as cofactors of JmjC-type demethylases. Our study results suggest that Burkitt’s lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell Lymphoma differ by an imbalance of repressive and poised promoters, which is governed predominantly by the activity of methyltransferases and the underrepresentation of demethylases in this regulation. The data further suggest that coupling of epigenetics with the energy metabolism can also be an important factor in lymphomagenesis in the absence of direct mutations of genes in metabolic pathways. Understanding of epigenetic deregulation in lymphoma and possibly in cancers in general must go beyond simple schemes using only a few modes of regulation. PMID:26506391

  2. Biotechnology and the chicken B cell line DT40.

    PubMed

    Bachl, J; Caldwell, R B; Buerstedde, J-M

    2007-01-01

    Protein optimization is a major focus of the biotech and pharmaceutical industry. Various in vitro technologies have been developed to accelerate protein evolution and to achieve protein optimization of functional characteristics such as substrate specificity, enzymatic activity and thermostability. The chicken B cell line DT40 diversifies its immunoglobulin (Ig) gene by gene conversion and somatic hypermutation. This machinery can be directed to almost any gene inserted into the Ig locus. Enormously diverse protein libraries of any gene of interest can be quickly generated in DT40 by utilizing random shuffling of complex genetic domains (gene conversion) and by the introduction of novel non-templated genetic information (random mutagenesis). The unique characteristics of the chicken cell line DT40 make it a powerful in-cell diversification system to improve proteins of interest within living cells. One essential advantage of the DT40 protein optimization approach is the fact that variants are generated within an in-cell system thus allowing the direct screening for desired features in the context of intracellular networks. Utilizing specially designed selection strategies, such as the powerful fluorescent protein technology, enables the reliable identification of protein variants exhibiting the most desirable traits. Thus, DT40 is well positioned as a biotechnological tool to generate optimized proteins by applying a powerful combination of gene specific hypermutation, gene conversion and mutant selection. PMID:17675859

  3. Targeted Therapies in Adult B-Cell Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    B-lymphocytes are programmed for the production of immunoglobulin (Ig) after antigen presentation, in the context of T-lymphocyte control within lymphoid organs. During this differentiation/activation process, B-lymphocytes exhibit different restricted or common surface markers, activation of cellular pathways that regulate cell cycle, metabolism, proteasome activity, and protein synthesis. All molecules involved in these different cellular mechanisms are potent therapeutic targets. Nowadays, due to the progress of the biology, more and more targeted drugs are identified, a situation that is correlated with an extended field of the targeted therapy. The full knowledge of the cellular machinery and cell-cell communication allows making the best choice to treat patients, in the context of personalized medicine. Also, focus should not be restricted to the immediate effects observed as clinical endpoints, that is, response rate, survival markers with conventional statistical methods, but it should consider the prediction of different clinical consequences due to other collateral drug targets, based on new methodologies. This means that new reflection and new bioclinical follow-up have to be monitored, particularly with the new drugs used with success in B-cell malignancies. This review discussed the principal aspects of such evident bioclinical progress. PMID:26425544

  4. Epigenomic evolution in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Heng; Jiang, Yanwen; Boi, Michela; Tabbò, Fabrizio; Redmond, David; Nie, Kui; Ladetto, Marco; Chiappella, Annalisa; Cerchietti, Leandro; Shaknovich, Rita; Melnick, Ari M.; Inghirami, Giorgio G.; Tam, Wayne; Elemento, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of epigenomic alterations to tumour progression and relapse is not well characterized. Here we characterize an association between disease progression and DNA methylation in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). By profiling genome-wide DNA methylation at single-base pair resolution in thirteen DLBCL diagnosis–relapse sample pairs, we show that DLBCL patients exhibit heterogeneous evolution of tumour methylomes during relapse. We identify differentially methylated regulatory elements and determine a relapse-associated methylation signature converging on key pathways such as transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) receptor activity. We also observe decreased intra-tumour methylation heterogeneity from diagnosis to relapsed tumour samples. Relapse-free patients display lower intra-tumour methylation heterogeneity at diagnosis compared with relapsed patients in an independent validation cohort. Furthermore, intra-tumour methylation heterogeneity is predictive of time to relapse. Therefore, we propose that epigenomic heterogeneity may support or drive the relapse phenotype and can be used to predict DLBCL relapse. PMID:25891015

  5. Epigenomic evolution in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Pan, Heng; Jiang, Yanwen; Boi, Michela; Tabbò, Fabrizio; Redmond, David; Nie, Kui; Ladetto, Marco; Chiappella, Annalisa; Cerchietti, Leandro; Shaknovich, Rita; Melnick, Ari M; Inghirami, Giorgio G; Tam, Wayne; Elemento, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of epigenomic alterations to tumour progression and relapse is not well characterized. Here we characterize an association between disease progression and DNA methylation in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). By profiling genome-wide DNA methylation at single-base pair resolution in thirteen DLBCL diagnosis-relapse sample pairs, we show that DLBCL patients exhibit heterogeneous evolution of tumour methylomes during relapse. We identify differentially methylated regulatory elements and determine a relapse-associated methylation signature converging on key pathways such as transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) receptor activity. We also observe decreased intra-tumour methylation heterogeneity from diagnosis to relapsed tumour samples. Relapse-free patients display lower intra-tumour methylation heterogeneity at diagnosis compared with relapsed patients in an independent validation cohort. Furthermore, intra-tumour methylation heterogeneity is predictive of time to relapse. Therefore, we propose that epigenomic heterogeneity may support or drive the relapse phenotype and can be used to predict DLBCL relapse. PMID:25891015

  6. Antibody and B cell responses to Plasmodium sporozoites

    PubMed Central

    Dups, Johanna N.; Pepper, Marion; Cockburn, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are capable of blocking infection of the liver by Plasmodium sporozoites. Accordingly the induction of anti-sporozoite antibodies is a major aim of various vaccine approaches to malaria. In recent years our knowledge of the specificity and quantities of antibodies required for protection has been greatly expanded by clinical trials of various whole sporozoite and subunit vaccines. Moreover, the development of humanized mouse models and transgenic parasites have also aided our ability to assess the specificity of antibodies and their ability to block infection. Nonetheless, considerable gaps remain in our knowledge – in particular in understanding what antigens are recognized by infection blocking antibodies and in knowing how we can induce robust, long-lived antibody responses. Maintaining high levels of circulating antibodies is likely to be of primary importance, as antibodies must block infection in the short time it takes for sporozoites to reach the liver from the skin. It is clear that a better understanding of the development of protective B cell-mediated immunity will aid the development and refinement of malaria vaccines. PMID:25477870

  7. Rituximab and Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-23

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  8. PREDICTING B CELL EPITOPE RESIDUES WITH NETWORK TOPOLOGY BASED AMINO ACID INDICES

    E-print Network

    Wong, Limsoon

    PREDICTING B CELL EPITOPE RESIDUES WITH NETWORK TOPOLOGY BASED AMINO ACID INDICES JIAN HUANG1, 2-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639, Japan We evaluate the performance of six amino acid indices in B cell, the performances improved and the 4 network based indices showed better performance than that of Parker

  9. TLR-mediated stimulation of APC: Distinct cytokine responses of B cells and dendritic cells

    E-print Network

    , MyD88, there is little IL-12 production and a failure of the Th1 response [11]. In relationTLR-mediated stimulation of APC: Distinct cytokine responses of B cells and dendritic cells Tom A APC, B cells make cytokines upon activation and have the potential to modulate T cell responses

  10. Study of BKM120 & Rituximab in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-20

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  11. B Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling and Internalization Are Mutually Exclusive Events

    E-print Network

    Dinner, Aaron

    B Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling and Internalization Are Mutually Exclusive Events Ping Hou1 endocytosed. Each receptor can undergo only one of two mutually exclusive fates because the tyrosine, Massenburg D, et al. (2006) B cell antigen receptor signaling and internalization are mutually exclusive

  12. IgG-Immune Complexes Promote B Cell Memory by Inducing BAFF.

    PubMed

    Kang, SunAh; Keener, Amanda B; Jones, Shannon Z; Benschop, Robert J; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Rathmell, Jeffrey C; Clarke, Stephen H; Matsushima, Glenn K; Whitmire, Jason K; Vilen, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    Memory B cell responses are vital for protection against infections but must also be regulated to prevent autoimmunity. Cognate T cell help, somatic hypermutation, and affinity maturation within germinal centers (GCs) are required for high-affinity memory B cell formation; however, the signals that commit GC B cells to the memory pool remain unclear. In this study, we identify a role for IgG-immune complexes (ICs), Fc?Rs, and BAFF during the formation of memory B cells in mice. We found that early secretion of IgG in response to immunization with a T-dependent Ag leads to IC-Fc?R interactions that induce dendritic cells to secrete BAFF, which acts at or upstream of Bcl-6 in activated B cells. Loss of CD16, hematopoietic cell-derived BAFF, or blocking IC:Fc?R regions in vivo diminished the expression of Bcl-6, the frequency of GC and memory B cells, and secondary Ab responses. BAFF also contributed to the maintenance and/or expansion of the follicular helper T cell population, although it was dispensable for their formation. Thus, early Ab responses contribute to the optimal formation of B cell memory through IgG-ICs and BAFF. Our work defines a new role for Fc?Rs in GC and memory B cell responses. PMID:26621863

  13. Proteomic Changes during B Cell Maturation: 2D-DIGE Approach

    PubMed Central

    Salonen, Johanna; Rönnholm, Gunilla; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Vihinen, Mauno

    2013-01-01

    B cells play a pivotal role in adaptive immune system, since they maintain a delicate balance between recognition and clearance of foreign pathogens and tolerance to self. During maturation, B cells progress through a series of developmental stages defined by specific phenotypic surface markers and the rearrangement and expression of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. To get insight into B cell proteome during the maturation pathway, we studied differential protein expression in eight human cell lines, which cover four distinctive developmental stages; early pre-B, pre-B, plasma cell and immature B cell upon anti-IgM stimulation. Our two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry based proteomic study indicates the involvement of large number of proteins with various functions. Notably, proteins related to cytoskeleton were relatively highly expressed in early pre-B and pre-B cells, whereas plasma cell proteome contained endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi system proteins. Our long time series analysis in anti-IgM stimulated Ramos B cells revealed the dynamic regulation of cytoskeleton organization, gene expression and metabolic pathways, among others. The findings are related to cellular processes in B cells and are discussed in relation to experimental information for the proteins and pathways they are involved in. Representative 2D-DIGE maps of different B cell maturation stages are available online at http://structure.bmc.lu.se/BcellProteome/. PMID:24205016

  14. PDK1 regulates VDJ recombination, cell-cycle exit and survival during B-cell development.

    PubMed

    Venigalla, Ram K C; McGuire, Victoria A; Clarke, Rosemary; Patterson-Kane, Janet C; Najafov, Ayaz; Toth, Rachel; McCarthy, Pierre C; Simeons, Frederick; Stojanovski, Laste; Arthur, J Simon C

    2013-04-01

    Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) controls the activation of a subset of AGC kinases. Using a conditional knockout of PDK1 in haematopoietic cells, we demonstrate that PDK1 is essential for B cell development. B-cell progenitors lacking PDK1 arrested at the transition of pro-B to pre-B cells, due to a cell autonomous defect. Loss of PDK1 decreased the expression of the IgH chain in pro-B cells due to impaired recombination of the IgH distal variable segments, a process coordinated by the transcription factor Pax5. The expression of Pax5 in pre-B cells was decreased in PDK1 knockouts, which correlated with reduced expression of the Pax5 target genes IRF4, IRF8 and Aiolos. As a result, Ccnd3 is upregulated in PDK1 knockout pre-B cells and they have an impaired ability to undergo cell-cycle arrest, a necessary event for Ig light chain rearrangement. Instead, these cells underwent apoptosis that correlated with diminished expression of the pro-survival gene Bcl2A1. Reintroduction of both Pax5 and Bcl2A1 together into PDK1 knockout pro-B cells restored their ability to differentiate in vitro into mature B cells. PMID:23463102

  15. PDK1 regulates VDJ recombination, cell-cycle exit and survival during B-cell development

    PubMed Central

    Venigalla, Ram K C; McGuire, Victoria A; Clarke, Rosemary; Patterson-Kane, Janet C; Najafov, Ayaz; Toth, Rachel; McCarthy, Pierre C; Simeons, Frederick; Stojanovski, Laste; Arthur, J Simon C

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) controls the activation of a subset of AGC kinases. Using a conditional knockout of PDK1 in haematopoietic cells, we demonstrate that PDK1 is essential for B cell development. B-cell progenitors lacking PDK1 arrested at the transition of pro-B to pre-B cells, due to a cell autonomous defect. Loss of PDK1 decreased the expression of the IgH chain in pro-B cells due to impaired recombination of the IgH distal variable segments, a process coordinated by the transcription factor Pax5. The expression of Pax5 in pre-B cells was decreased in PDK1 knockouts, which correlated with reduced expression of the Pax5 target genes IRF4, IRF8 and Aiolos. As a result, Ccnd3 is upregulated in PDK1 knockout pre-B cells and they have an impaired ability to undergo cell-cycle arrest, a necessary event for Ig light chain rearrangement. Instead, these cells underwent apoptosis that correlated with diminished expression of the pro-survival gene Bcl2A1. Reintroduction of both Pax5 and Bcl2A1 together into PDK1 knockout pro-B cells restored their ability to differentiate in vitro into mature B cells. PMID:23463102

  16. Microfluidic squeezing for intracellular antigen loading in polyclonal B-cells as cellular vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee Szeto, Gregory; van Egeren, Debra; Worku, Hermoon; Sharei, Armon; Alejandro, Brian; Park, Clara; Frew, Kirubel; Brefo, Mavis; Mao, Shirley; Heimann, Megan; Langer, Robert; Jensen, Klavs; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2015-05-01

    B-cells are promising candidate autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to prime antigen-specific T-cells both in vitro and in vivo. However to date, a significant barrier to utilizing B-cells as APCs is their low capacity for non-specific antigen uptake compared to “professional” APCs such as dendritic cells. Here we utilize a microfluidic device that employs many parallel channels to pass single cells through narrow constrictions in high throughput. This microscale “cell squeezing” process creates transient pores in the plasma membrane, enabling intracellular delivery of whole proteins from the surrounding medium into B-cells via mechano-poration. We demonstrate that both resting and activated B-cells process and present antigens delivered via mechano-poration exclusively to antigen-specific CD8+T-cells, and not CD4+T-cells. Squeezed B-cells primed and expanded large numbers of effector CD8+T-cells in vitro that produced effector cytokines critical to cytolytic function, including granzyme B and interferon-?. Finally, antigen-loaded B-cells were also able to prime antigen-specific CD8+T-cells in vivo when adoptively transferred into mice. Altogether, these data demonstrate crucial proof-of-concept for mechano-poration as an enabling technology for B-cell antigen loading, priming of antigen-specific CD8+T-cells, and decoupling of antigen uptake from B-cell activation.

  17. Microfluidic squeezing for intracellular antigen loading in polyclonal B-cells as cellular vaccines

    E-print Network

    Lee Szeto, Gregory

    B-cells are promising candidate autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to prime antigen-specific T-cells both in vitro and in vivo. However to date, a significant barrier to utilizing B-cells as APCs is their low ...

  18. A Transcriptional Regulatory Switch Underlying B-Cell Terminal Differentiation and Its Disruption by Dioxin (S)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The terminal differentiation of B cells in lymphoid organs into antibody-secreting plasma cells upon antigen stimulation is a crucial step in the humoral immune response. The architecture of the B-cell transcriptional regulatory network consists of coupled mutually-repressive fee...

  19. A multi-scale model for correlation in B cell VDJ usage of zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael W.

    2011-10-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one of the model animals used for the study of immunology because the dynamics in the adaptive immune system of zebrafish are similar to that in higher animals. In this work, we built a multi-scale model to simulate the dynamics of B cells in the primary and secondary immune responses of zebrafish. We use this model to explain the reported correlation between VDJ usage of B cell repertoires in individual zebrafish. We use a delay ordinary differential equation (ODE) system to model the immune responses in the 6-month lifespan of a zebrafish. This mean field theory gives the number of high-affinity B cells as a function of time during an infection. The sequences of those B cells are then taken from a distribution calculated by a 'microscopic' random energy model. This generalized NK model shows that mature B cells specific to one antigen largely possess a single VDJ recombination. The model allows first-principle calculation of the probability, p, that two zebrafish responding to the same antigen will select the same VDJ recombination. This probability p increases with the B cell population size and the B cell selection intensity. The probability p decreases with the B cell hypermutation rate. The multi-scale model predicts correlations in the immune system of the zebrafish that are highly similar to that from experiment.

  20. STAT3 Targets Suggest Mechanisms of Aggressive Tumorigenesis in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hardee, Jennifer; Ouyang, Zhengqing; Zhang, Yuping; Kundaje, Anshul; Lacroute, Philippe; Snyder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a transcription factor that, when dysregulated, becomes a powerful oncogene found in many human cancers, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common form of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and has two major subtypes: germinal center B-cell?like and activated B–cell—like. Compared with the germinal center B-cell?like form, activated B-cell?like lymphomas respond much more poorly to current therapies and often exhibit overexpression or overactivation of STAT3. To investigate how STAT3 might contribute to this aggressive phenotype, we have integrated genome-wide studies of STAT3 DNA binding using chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing with whole-transcriptome profiling using RNA-sequencing. STAT3 binding sites are present near almost a third of all genes that differ in expression between the two subtypes, and examination of the affected genes identified previously undetected and clinically significant pathways downstream of STAT3 that drive oncogenesis. Novel treatments aimed at these pathways may increase the survivability of activated B-cell?like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. PMID:24142927

  1. Evaluating the B-cell density with various activation functions using White Noise Path Integral Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aban, C. J. G.; Bacolod, R. O.; Confesor, M. N. P.

    2015-06-01

    A The White Noise Path Integral Approach is used in evaluating the B-cell density or the number of B-cell per unit volume for a basic type of immune system response based on the modeling done by Perelson and Wiegel. From the scaling principles of Perelson [1], the B- cell density is obtained where antigens and antibodies mutates and activation function f(|S-SA|) is defined describing the interaction between a specific antigen and a B-cell. If the activation function f(|S-SA|) is held constant, the major form of the B-cell density evaluated using white noise analysis is similar to the form of the B-cell density obtained by Perelson and Wiegel using a differential approach.A piecewise linear functionis also used to describe the activation f(|S-SA|). If f(|S-SA|) is zero, the density decreases exponentially. If f(|S-SA|) = S-SA-SB, the B- cell density increases exponentially until it reaches a certain maximum value. For f(|S-SA|) = 2SA-SB-S, the behavior of B-cell density is oscillating and remains to be in small values.

  2. Affinity maturation in an HIV broadly neutralizing B-cell lineage through reorientation of variable domains

    E-print Network

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    . protein evolution | HIV gp120 | antibody structure | somatic hypermutation Any candidate HIV vaccineAffinity maturation in an HIV broadly neutralizing B-cell lineage through reorientation of variable of the immune response to vaccination or infection. In HIV-infected individuals, viruses and B cells evolve

  3. Primary T Cell Expansion and Differentiation In Vivo Requires Antigen Presentation by B Cells1

    E-print Network

    Primary T Cell Expansion and Differentiation In Vivo Requires Antigen Presentation by B Cells1 Alison Crawford,* Megan MacLeod,* Ton Schumacher, Louise Corlett,* and David Gray2 * B cells are well documented as APC; however, their role in supporting and programming the T cell response in vivo is still

  4. Hapten-specific naïve B cells are biomarkers of vaccine efficacy against drugs of abuse

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, JJ; Laudenbach, M; Tucker, AM; Jenkins, MK; Pravetoni, M

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination against drugs of abuse shows efficacy in animal models, yet few subjects achieve effective serum antibody titers in clinical studies. A barrier to translation is the lack of pre-vaccination screening assays that predict the most effective conjugate vaccines or subjects amenable to vaccination. To address this obstacle, we developed a fluorescent antigen-based enrichment method paired with flow cytometry to characterize hapten-specific B cells. Using this approach, we studied naïve and activated B cells specific for structurally-related model haptens based on derivatization of the morphinan structure at the C6 position on oxycodone or at the C8 position on hydrocodone, and showing different pre-clinical efficacy against the prescription opioid oxycodone. Prior to vaccination, naïve B cells exhibited relative higher affinity for the more effective C6-derivatized oxycodone-based hapten (6OXY) and the 6OXY-specific naïve B cell population contained a higher number of B cells with greater affinity for free oxycodone. Higher affinity of naïve B cells for hapten or oxycodone reflected greater efficacy of vaccination in blocking oxycodone distribution to brain in mice. Shortly after immunization, activated hapten-specific B cells were detected prior to oxycodone-specific serum antibodies and provided earlier evidence of vaccine failure or success. Analysis of hapten-specific naïve and activated B cells may aid rational vaccine design and provide screening tools to predict vaccine clinical efficacy against drugs of abuse or other small molecules. PMID:24462800

  5. The effects of diet-induced obesity on B cell function

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, S R; Haas, K M; Beck, M A; Teague, H

    2015-01-01

    B-1 and B-2 B cell subsets carry out a diverse array of functions that range broadly from responding to innate stimuli, antigen presentation, cytokine secretion and antibody production. In this review, we first cover the functional roles of the major murine B cell subsets. We then highlight emerging evidence, primarily in preclinical rodent studies, to show that select B cell subsets are a therapeutic target in obesity and its associated co-morbidities. High fat diets promote accumulation of select murine B cell phenotypes in visceral adipose tissue. As a consequence, B cells exacerbate inflammation and thereby insulin sensitivity through the production of autoantibodies and via cross-talk with select adipose resident macrophages, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. In contrast, interleukin (IL)-10-secreting regulatory B cells counteract the proinflammatory profile and improve glucose sensitivity. We subsequently review data from rodent studies that show pharmacological supplementation of obesogenic diets with long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids or specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators synthesized from endogenous n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids boost B cell activation and antibody production. This may have potential benefits for improving inflammation in addition to combating the increased risk of viral infection that is an associated complication of obesity and type II diabetes. Finally, we propose potential underlying mechanisms throughout the review by which B cell activity could be differentially regulated in response to high fat diets. PMID:25169121

  6. Microfluidic squeezing for intracellular antigen loading in polyclonal B-cells as cellular vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lee Szeto, Gregory; Van Egeren, Debra; Worku, Hermoon; Sharei, Armon; Alejandro, Brian; Park, Clara; Frew, Kirubel; Brefo, Mavis; Mao, Shirley; Heimann, Megan; Langer, Robert; Jensen, Klavs; Irvine, Darrell J

    2015-01-01

    B-cells are promising candidate autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to prime antigen-specific T-cells both in vitro and in vivo. However to date, a significant barrier to utilizing B-cells as APCs is their low capacity for non-specific antigen uptake compared to “professional” APCs such as dendritic cells. Here we utilize a microfluidic device that employs many parallel channels to pass single cells through narrow constrictions in high throughput. This microscale “cell squeezing” process creates transient pores in the plasma membrane, enabling intracellular delivery of whole proteins from the surrounding medium into B-cells via mechano-poration. We demonstrate that both resting and activated B-cells process and present antigens delivered via mechano-poration exclusively to antigen-specific CD8+T-cells, and not CD4+T-cells. Squeezed B-cells primed and expanded large numbers of effector CD8+T-cells in vitro that produced effector cytokines critical to cytolytic function, including granzyme B and interferon-?. Finally, antigen-loaded B-cells were also able to prime antigen-specific CD8+T-cells in vivo when adoptively transferred into mice. Altogether, these data demonstrate crucial proof-of-concept for mechano-poration as an enabling technology for B-cell antigen loading, priming of antigen-specific CD8+T-cells, and decoupling of antigen uptake from B-cell activation. PMID:25999171

  7. Edinburgh Research Explorer B Cell-Specific S1PR1 Deficiency Blocks Prion Dissemination

    E-print Network

    Millar, Andrew J.

    underdetermined mechanism. The germinal centres in which FDC are situated produce a population of B cells which in lymphopenia in the blood and lymph. We show that in mice treated with the S1PR modulator FTY720, or with S1PR1-deficiency restricted to B cells, the dissemination of prions from the draining lymph node to non

  8. Antigen-Engaged B Cells Undergo Chemotaxis toward the T Zone and Form Motile Conjugates

    E-print Network

    Parker, Ian

    -photon microscopy of intact lymph nodes, we show that upon exposure to antigen, B cells migrate with directional and helper T cells in secondary lymphoid organs is an essential step in T- dependent humoral immune responses by immunohistochemical analysis of Ig-tg B cells and T cell receptor (TCR)­transgenic CD4þ T cells in spleen and lymph

  9. Hormonal milieu at time of B cell activation controls duration of autoantibody response.

    PubMed

    Jeganathan, Venkatesh; Peeva, Elena; Diamond, Betty

    2014-09-01

    A strong gender bias is seen in many autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To investigate the basis for the female preponderance in SLE, we have been studying BALB/c mice in which B cells express the R4A heavy chain of an anti-DNA antibody in association with an endogenous light chain repertoire (R4Atg mice). In unmanipulated mice, approximately 5% of B cells express the R4A transgene. R4Atg mice do not spontaneously develop elevated serum titers of anti-DNA antibodies. Administration of either estradiol (E2) or prolactin (Pr) results in escape from tolerance of autoreactive B cells, expressed as an increase in transgene-expressing B cells and elevated serum titers of anti-DNA antibodies. We previously demonstrated that autoreactive B cells maturing in an estrogenic milieu develop as marginal zone (MZ) B cells; when these same B cells mature in the presence of increased prolactin, they develop as follicular (Fo) B cells. To determine the long term consequence of this differential maturation of DNA-reactive B cells, we treated R4Atg BALB/c mice with E2 or Pr for 6 weeks until serum titers of anti-DNA antibody were high, at which time hormonal exposure was discontinued. In E2-treated mice, the anti-DNA titers remained high even 3 months after discontinuation of hormone exposure. Nascent B cells underwent normal tolerance induction, but existing autoreactive MZ B cells persisted and continued to secrete autoantibody. In contrast, Pr caused only a short-term increase in anti-DNA antibody titers. By 3 months after cessation of hormone treatment, serum anti-DNA antibody titers and B cell subsets were indistinguishable from those in placebo (P) treated mice. These findings suggest that autoantibody responses are sustained for variable lengths of time depending on the B cell subset producing the autoantibodies. This observation may be relevant to understanding the heterogeneous presentation of patients with SLE and to the design of therapies targeting specific B-cell populations in autoimmune disease. PMID:24685232

  10. Preserving the B-Cell Compartment Favors Operational Tolerance in Human Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Hernandez M; Takenaka, Maisa C S; Moraes-Vieira, Pedro M M; Monteiro, Sandra M; Hernandez, Maristela O; Chaara, Wahiba; Six, Adrien; Agena, Fabiana; Sesterheim, Patrícia; Barbé-Tuana, Florencia Maria; Saitovitch, David; Lemos, Francine; Kalil, Jorge; Coelho, Verônica

    2012-01-01

    Transplanted individuals in operational tolerance (OT) maintain long-term stable graft function after completely stopping immunosuppression. Understanding the mechanisms involved in OT can provide valuable information about pathways to human transplantation tolerance. Here we report that operationally tolerant individuals display quantitative and functional preservation of the B-cell compartment in renal transplantation. OT exhibited normal numbers of circulating total B cells, naive, memory and regulatory B cells (Bregs) as well as preserved B-cell receptor repertoire, similar to healthy individuals. In addition, OT also displayed conserved capacity to activate the cluster of differentiation 40 (CD40)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway in Bregs, in contrast, with chronic rejection. Rather than expansion or higher activation, we show that the preservation of the B-cell compartment favors OT. PMID:22252714

  11. Preserving the B-cell compartment favors operational tolerance in human renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Hernandez M; Takenaka, Maisa C S; Moraes-Vieira, Pedro M M; Monteiro, Sandra M; Hernandez, Maristela O; Chaara, Wahiba; Six, Adrien; Agena, Fabiana; Sesterheim, Patrícia; Barbé-Tuana, Florencia Maria; Saitovitch, David; Lemos, Francine; Kalil, Jorge; Coelho, Verônica

    2012-01-01

    Transplanted individuals in operational tolerance (OT) maintain long-term stable graft function after completely stopping immunosuppression. Understanding the mechanisms involved in OT can provide valuable information about pathways to human transplantation tolerance. Here we report that operationally tolerant individuals display quantitative and functional preservation of the B-cell compartment in renal transplantation. OT exhibited normal numbers of circulating total B cells, naive, memory and regulatory B cells (Bregs) as well as preserved B-cell receptor repertoire, similar to healthy individuals. In addition, OT also displayed conserved capacity to activate the cluster of differentiation 40 (CD40)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway in Bregs, in contrast, with chronic rejection. Rather than expansion or higher activation, we show that the preservation of the B-cell compartment favors OT. PMID:22252714

  12. B cells generated by B-1 development can progress to chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kyoko; Formica, Anthony M; Colombo, Matthew J; Ichikawa, Daiju; Shinton, Susan A; Brill-Dashoff, Joni; Hardy, Richard R

    2015-12-01

    B cells generated early during fetal/neonatal B-1 development in mice include autoreactive cells with detectable CD5 upregulation induced by B cell receptor (BCR) signaling (B1a cells). A fraction of B1a cells are maintained by self-renewal for life, with the potential risk of dysregulated growth and progression to chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)/lymphoma during aging. In studies using the E?-hTCL1 transgenic mouse system, it became clear that this B1a subset has a higher potential than other B cell subsets for progression to CLL. We have generated several autoreactive germline BCR gene models to compare B cells generated under conditions of natural exposure to autoantigen. Analysis of the mice has been key in understanding the importance of the BCR and BCR signaling for generating different B cell subsets and for investigating the cellular origin of B-CLL. PMID:25907284

  13. Brg1 activates enhancer repertoires to establish B cell identity and modulate cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Bossen, Claudia; Murre, Caroline S; Chang, Aaron N; Mansson, Robert; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Murre, Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    Early B cell development is orchestrated by the combined activities of the transcriptional regulators E2A, EBF1, Foxo1 and Ikaros. However, how the genome-wide binding patterns of these regulators are modulated during B-lineage development remains to be determined. Here, we found that in lymphoid progenitors the chromatin remodeler Brg1 specified the B cell fate. In committed pro-B cells Brg1 regulated Igh locus contraction and controlled Myc expression to modulate the expression of genes that regulate ribosome biogenesis. In committed pro-B cells Brg1 suppressed a pre-B lineage-specific pattern of gene expression. Finally, we found that Brg1 acted mechanistically to establish B cell fate and modulate cell growth by facilitating access of lineage-specific transcription factors to poised enhancer repertoires. PMID:25985234

  14. DNA Methylation Dynamics of Germinal Center B Cells Are Mediated by AID.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Pilar M; Teater, Matt; Chambwe, Nyasha; Kormaksson, Matthias; Redmond, David; Ishii, Jennifer; Vuong, Bao; Chaudhuri, Jayanta; Melnick, Ari; Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Godley, Lucy A; Papavasiliou, F Nina; Elemento, Olivier; Shaknovich, Rita

    2015-09-29

    Changes in DNA methylation are required for the formation of germinal centers (GCs), but the mechanisms of such changes are poorly understood. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) has been recently implicated in DNA demethylation through its deaminase activity coupled with DNA repair. We investigated the epigenetic function of AID in vivo in germinal center B cells (GCBs) isolated from wild-type (WT) and AID-deficient (Aicda(-/-)) mice. We determined that the transit of B cells through the GC is associated with marked locus-specific loss of methylation and increased methylation diversity, both of which are lost in Aicda(-/-) animals. Differentially methylated cytosines (DMCs) between GCBs and naive B cells (NBs) are enriched in genes that are targeted for somatic hypermutation (SHM) by AID, and these genes form networks required for B cell development and proliferation. Finally, we observed significant conservation of AID-dependent epigenetic reprogramming between mouse and human B cells. PMID:26365193

  15. GIMAP1 Is Essential for the Survival of Naive and Activated B Cells In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Webb, Louise M C; Datta, Preeta; Bell, Sarah E; Kitamura, Daisuke; Turner, Martin; Butcher, Geoffrey W

    2016-01-01

    An effective immune system depends upon regulation of lymphocyte function and homeostasis. In recent years, members of the GTPases of the immunity associated protein (GIMAP) family were proposed to regulate T cell homeostasis. In contrast, little is known about their function and mode of action in B cells. We used a combination of transgenic mice and in vivo and in vitro techniques to conditionally and electively ablate GIMAP1 in resting and activated peripheral B cells. Our data suggest that GIMAP1 is absolutely essential for the survival of peripheral B cells, irrespective of their activation state. Together with recent data showing increased expression of GIMAP1 in B cell lymphomas, our work points to the possible potential of GIMAP1 as a target for manipulation in a variety of B cell-mediated diseases. PMID:26621859

  16. Salmonella Modulates B Cell Biology to Evade CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2014-01-01

    Although B cells and antibodies are the central effectors of humoral immunity, B cells can also produce and secrete cytokines and present antigen to helper T cells. The uptake of antigen is mainly mediated by endocytosis; thus, antigens are often presented by MHC-II molecules. However, it is unclear if B cells can present these same antigens via MHC-I molecules. Recently, Salmonella bacteria were found to infect B cells, allowing possible antigen cross-processing that could generate bacterial peptides for antigen presentation via MHC-I molecules. Here, we will discuss available knowledge regarding Salmonella antigen presentation by infected B cell MHC-I molecules and subsequent inhibitory effects on CD8+ T cells for bacterial evasion of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:25484884

  17. Lymphoproliferative Disease and Hepatitis B Reactivation: Challenges in the Era of Rapidly Evolving Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Colin; Chen, Yunxin; Tan, Daryl

    2016-01-01

    Reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a known complication that occurs in patients receiving chemotherapy especially for malignant lymphoma. The increased risk in lymphoma patients parallels the potency of the immunosuppressive treatment regimens that are provided. B-cell-depleting therapy such as anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, especially when combined with conventional chemotherapy, significantly increases the risk of HBV reactivation, even in patients with resolved HBV infection. The first reports of HBV reactivation with anti-CD20 therapy emerged only 4 years after its US Food and Drug Administration approval. Today, these drugs carry alert warnings on the risk of hepatic dysfunction and reactivation of HBV infection. Many other new/novel agents active against lymphoma have emerged since then, targeting the different pathways involved in lymphoma pathogenesis, including histone deacetylase inhibitors, antibody-drug conjugates, and proteasome inhibitors. These various drugs have differing depths and mechanisms of immunosuppression, necessitating due diligence when administrating these compounds to prevent infective complications such as HBV reactivation, which can lead to liver failure and death. This review focuses on HBV reactivation with non-Hodgkin lymphoma treatment, in particular with the various approved novel agents. We also discuss the current recommendations for screening non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients for HBV and the role of prophylactic antiviral therapy during and after immunosuppressive treatment. PMID:26705677

  18. Monitoring of immune cell response to B cell depletion therapy and nerve root injury using SPIO enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorek, Daniel L.

    2009-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is a robust platform for non-invasive, high-resolution anatomical imaging. However, MR imaging lacks the requisite sensitivity and contrast for imaging at the cellular level. This represents a clinical impediment to greater diagnostic accuracy. Recent advances have allowed for the in vivo visualization of populations and even of individual cells using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) MR contrast agents. These nanoparticles, commonly manifested as a core of a single iron oxide crystal or cluster of crystals coated in a biocompatible shell, function to shorten proton relaxation times. In MR imaging these constructs locally dephase protons, resulting in a decrease in signal (hypointensity) localized to the region of accumulation of SPIO. In the context of immune cell imaging, SPIO can provide insight into the cellular migration patterns, trafficking, temporal dynamics and progression of diseases and their related pathological states. Furthermore, by visualizing the presence and activity of immune cells, SPIO-enabled cellular imaging can help evaluate the efficacy of therapy in immune disorders. This thesis examines the production, modification and application of SPIO in a range of in vitro and in vivo immune-response-relevant cellular systems. The role of different nanoparticle characteristics including diameter, surface charge and concentration are investigated in the labeling of T cells in culture. Following optimization of SPIO loading conditions for lymphocytes, the effect these particles have on the activation of primary B cells are elucidated. B cells are tracked using a variety of modalities, with and without the application of B cell depleting therapy. This is to evaluate the efficacy of SPIO as in vivo marker for B cell distribution. Unmodified SPIO were applied to monitor macrophage infiltration in a transient nerve root compression model, with implications for neck pain diagnosis and treatment. Nanoparticle accumulation and MR hypointensity was correlated to the presence of activated macrophage at the site of injury. Taken together, the application of SPIO to study nanoparticle uptake in vitro and visualization of immune cells in vivo provide a basis for advanced study and diagnosis of diverse pathologies.

  19. B Cells Are Multifunctional Players in Multiple Sclerosis Pathogenesis: Insights from Therapeutic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Claes, Nele; Fraussen, Judith; Stinissen, Piet; Hupperts, Raymond; Somers, Veerle

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a severe disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by autoimmune inflammation and neurodegeneration. Historically, damage to the CNS was thought to be mediated predominantly by activated pro-inflammatory T cells. B cell involvement in the pathogenesis of MS was solely attributed to autoantibody production. The first clues for the involvement of antibody-independent B cell functions in MS pathology came from positive results in clinical trials of the B cell-depleting treatment rituximab in patients with relapsing-remitting (RR) MS. The survival of antibody-secreting plasma cells and decrease in T cell numbers indicated the importance of other B cell functions in MS such as antigen presentation, costimulation, and cytokine production. Rituximab provided us with an example of how clinical trials can lead to new research opportunities concerning B cell biology. Moreover, analysis of the antibody-independent B cell functions in MS has gained interest since these trials. Limited information is present on the effects of current immunomodulatory therapies on B cell functions, although effects of both first-line (interferon, glatiramer acetate, dimethyl fumarate, and teriflunomide), second-line (fingolimod, natalizumab), and even third-line (monoclonal antibody therapies) treatments on B cell subtype distribution, expression of functional surface markers, and secretion of different cytokines by B cells have been studied to some extent. In this review, we summarize the effects of different MS-related treatments on B cell functions that have been described up to now in order to find new research opportunities and contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of MS.

  20. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? B cell-specific-deficient mice have an impaired antibody response.

    PubMed

    Ramon, Sesquile; Bancos, Simona; Thatcher, Thomas H; Murant, Thomas I; Moshkani, Safiehkhatoon; Sahler, Julie M; Bottaro, Andrea; Sime, Patricia J; Phipps, Richard P

    2012-11-15

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PPAR?, a ligand-activated transcription factor, has important anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative functions, and it has been associated with diseases including diabetes, scarring, and atherosclerosis, among others. PPAR? is expressed in most bone marrow-derived cells and influences their function. PPAR? ligands can stimulate human B cell differentiation and promote Ab production. A knowledge gap is that the role of PPAR? in B cells under physiological conditions is not known. We developed a new B cell-specific PPAR? (B-PPAR?) knockout mouse and explored the role of PPAR? during both the primary and secondary immune response. In this article, we show that PPAR? deficiency in B cells decreases germinal center B cells and plasma cell development, as well as the levels of circulating Ag-specific Abs during a primary challenge. Inability to generate germinal center B cells and plasma cells is correlated to decreased MHC class II expression and decreased Bcl-6 and Blimp-1 levels. Furthermore, B-PPAR?-deficient mice have an impaired memory response, characterized by low titers of Ag-specific Abs and low numbers of Ag-experienced, Ab-secreting cells. However, B-PPAR?-deficient mice have no differences in B cell population distribution within primary or secondary lymphoid organs during development. This is the first report, to our knowledge, to show that, under physiological conditions, PPAR? expression in B cells is required for an efficient B cell-mediated immune response as it regulates B cell differentiation and Ab production. PMID:23041568

  1. Enhancing T Cell Immune Responses by B Cell-based Therapeutic Vaccine Against Chronic Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Ki; Lee, Ara; Hwang, Yu Kyeong; Kang, Chang-Yuil

    2014-01-01

    Chronic virus infection leads to the functional impairment of dendritic cells (DCs) as well as T cells, limiting the clinical usefulness of DC-based therapeutic vaccine against chronic virus infection. Meanwhile, B cells have been known to maintain the ability to differentiate plasma cells producing antibodies even during chronic virus infection. Previously, ?-galactosylceramide (?GC) and cognate peptide-loaded B cells were comparable to DCs in priming peptide-specific CD8+ T cells as antigen presenting cells (APCs). Here, we investigated whether B cells activated by ?GC can improve virus-specific T cell immune responses instead of DCs during chronic virus infection. We found that comparable to B cells isolated from naïve mice, chronic B cells isolated from chronically infected mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) clone 13 (CL13) after ?GC-loading could activate CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells to produce effector cytokines and upregulate co-stimulatory molecules in both naïve and chronically infected mice. Similar to naïve B cells, chronic B cells efficiently primed LCMV glycoprotein (GP) 33-41-specific P14 CD8+ T cells in vivo, thereby allowing the proliferation of functional CD8+ T cells. Importantly, when ?GC and cognate epitope-loaded chronic B cells were transferred into chronically infected mice, the mice showed a significant increase in the population of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells and the accelerated control of viremia. Therefore, our studies demonstrate that reciprocal activation between ?GC-loaded chronic B cells and iNKT cells can strengthen virus-specific T cell immune responses, providing an effective regimen of autologous B cell-based therapeutic vaccine to treat chronic virus infection. PMID:25177253

  2. Porin differentiates TLR mediated proinflammatory response of follicular zone B cell from TLR-unresponsive IL-10 expressing marginal zone B cell.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Debolina; Ghosh, Amlan Kanti; Mukherjee, Subhadeep; Biswas, Ratna; Biswas, Tapas

    2015-12-01

    TLR-ligands are frequently chosen as candidates for vaccine or adjuvant development because they can primarily bridge innate signaling with adaptive immune responses. Since the adjuvant action of porin, the major outer membrane protein commonly present on Gram-negative bacteria, has been tested on several antigen-presenting cells, we investigated its role in driving systemic immunity which is considered a benchmark for a successful adjuvant. Here, we show porin differentially regulated splenic marginal zone (MZ) and follicular zone (FO) B cell responses in contrast to other classical TLR2-ligands FSL-1 and Pam3CSK4. The protein up-regulated TLR2 and TLR6 and stimulated the activation and costimulatory molecules on FO B cells skewing the cells toward TLR-dependent type-1 cytokine response. However, porin could not up-regulate the TLRs and activate MZ B cells. These cells responded to porin by expressing toll-interacting protein (TOLLIP), the TLR2 and -4 signaling inhibitor along with stimulation of the intracellular pathogen recognition receptor NLR caspase recruitment domain containing protein 5 (NLRC5). The CD1d(hi) MZ B cells released IL-10 unequivocally demonstrating regulatory B cell feature. Immunization with porin also resulted in transient IL-10 expression by the CD19(+)CD21(hi) B cells prior to plasma cell formation. Moreover, the plasma cells developed from the B-2 cell subsets show marked variation in generation of immunoglobulin subclasses. The work delineates multi-faceted role of B cell subsets induced by porin for robust immunity without compromising with the checks and controls. PMID:26174952

  3. Flow cytometric analysis of the binding of eleven lectins to human T- and B-cells and to human T- and B-cell lines.

    PubMed

    Malin-Berdel, J; Valet, G; Thiel, E; Forrester, J A; Gürtler, L

    1984-03-01

    The relative surface binding of 11 lectins to human peripheral blood T- and B-lymphocytes, to Molt-4 and JM T-cell lines, and to 6410 and NC37 B-cell lines was determined by flow cytometry. The lectins from Lens culinaris (LCA), Ricinus communis (RCA), Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Abrus precatorius (APA), Ulex europaeus (UEA-F), Sarothamnus scoparius (SAS-F), Helix pomatia (HPA), Phaseolus coccineus (L-PHA), Glycine max (SBA), and Triticum vulgare (WGA) were fluoresceinated and incubated with living, formaldehyde-fixed, or neuraminidase-treated cells. Except LCA, which preferentially bound to the two B-cell lines tested in this study, none of the other lectins exhibited selective binding to the undifferentiated cells of the cell lines. The T-cell lines and, in part, the peripheral blood T-cells bound less WGA, APA, LCA, and L-PHA than the B-cell lines and the peripheral blood B-cells. Binding of PNA was found only after neuraminidase treatment of the cells; the binding of PNA, HPA, and UEA-F after neuraminidase treatment was higher for the T-cells than the B-cells from peripheral blood. No significant differences were detected between both cell types for RCA, ConA, SBA, and SAS-F. PMID:6609053

  4. Eosinophilic Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Version Medical Topics Blood Disorders Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's ... students Medical Topics Blood Disorders Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's ...

  5. Mental Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    Mental disorders include a wide range of problems, including Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, ... disorders, including schizophrenia There are many causes of mental disorders. Your genes and family history may play ...

  6. B Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis: From Pathogenic Players to Disease Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Bugatti, Serena; Vitolo, Barbara; Caporali, Roberto; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Manzo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic benefit of depleting B cells in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has refocused attention on B cells with increasing awareness on their role in autoimmunity and their function beyond autoantibody production. The rapid increase in our comprehension of B-cell pathobiology is progressively opening novel perspectives in the area of B cell-targeted therapies with the expectation to define more specific approaches able to preserve the homeostasis of the humoral response while disrupting the pathogenic components. In parallel, B-cell activity in RA is starting to be explored in its clinical value, in search of novel biomarkers embedded in the pathogenic process that could help classifying the disease and predicting its heterogeneous outcome beyond inflammation dynamics. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on the multiple roles that B cells play in several aspects of RA. We also analyze their distribution and potential function in different anatomic compartments with specific reference to the main sites in which the disease may be sustained and exert its detrimental effects: the systemic circulation, synovium, bone marrow, and draining lymph nodes. We also highlight novel data encouraging further research in the field of biomarkers related to B cells and their regulatory factors. PMID:24877127

  7. Rac-mediated Stimulation of Phospholipase C?2 Amplifies B Cell Receptor-induced Calcium Signaling.

    PubMed

    Walliser, Claudia; Tron, Kyrylo; Clauss, Karen; Gutman, Orit; Kobitski, Andrei Yu; Retlich, Michael; Schade, Anja; Röcker, Carlheinz; Henis, Yoav I; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Gierschik, Peter

    2015-07-10

    The Rho GTPase Rac is crucially involved in controlling multiple B cell functions, including those regulated by the B cell receptor (BCR) through increased cytosolic Ca(2+). The underlying molecular mechanisms and their relevance to the functions of intact B cells have thus far remained unknown. We have previously shown that the activity of phospholipase C?2 (PLC?2), a key constituent of the BCR signalosome, is stimulated by activated Rac through direct protein-protein interaction. Here, we use a Rac-resistant mutant of PLC?2 to functionally reconstitute cultured PLC?2-deficient DT40 B cells and to examine the effects of the Rac-PLC?2 interaction on BCR-mediated changes of intracellular Ca(2+) and regulation of Ca(2+)-regulated and nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cell-regulated gene transcription at the level of single, intact B cells. The results show that the functional Rac-PLC?2 interaction causes marked increases in the following: (i) sensitivity of B cells to BCR ligation; (ii) BCR-mediated Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores; (iii) Ca(2+) entry from the extracellular compartment; and (iv) nuclear translocation of the Ca(2+)-regulated nuclear factor of activated T cells. Hence, Rac-mediated stimulation of PLC?2 activity serves to amplify B cell receptor-induced Ca(2+) signaling. PMID:25903139

  8. Thymic B Cells Are Licensed to Present Self Antigens for Central T Cell Tolerance Induction.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Tomoyoshi; Nedjic, Jelena; Hinterberger, Maria; Steinert, Madlen; Koser, Sandra; Pinto, Sheena; Gerdes, Norbert; Lutgens, Esther; Ishimaru, Naozumi; Busslinger, Meinrad; Brors, Benedikt; Kyewski, Bruno; Klein, Ludger

    2015-06-16

    Thymic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as dendritic cells and medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) use distinct strategies of self-antigen expression and presentation to mediate central tolerance. The thymus also harbors B cells; whether they also display unique tolerogenic features and how they genealogically relate to peripheral B cells is unclear. Here, we found that Aire is expressed in thymic but not peripheral B cells. Aire expression in thymic B cells coincided with major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) and CD80 upregulation and immunoglobulin class-switching. These features were recapitulated upon immigration of naive peripheral B cells into the thymus, whereby this intrathymic licensing required CD40 signaling in the context of cognate interactions with autoreactive CD4(+) thymocytes. Moreover, a licensing-dependent neo-antigen selectively upregulated in immigrating B cells mediated negative selection through direct presentation. Thus, autoreactivity within the nascent T cell repertoire fuels a feed forward loop that endows thymic B cells with tolerogenic features. PMID:26070482

  9. IFN Regulatory Factor 8 Regulates MDM2 in Germinal Center B Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jeff X.; Lee, Chang Hoon; Qi, Chen Feng; Wang, Hongsheng; Naghashfar, Zohreh; Abbasi, Sadia; Morse, Herbert C.

    2009-01-01

    IFN regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) is a transcription factor that affects the differentiation and function of myeloid, dendritic, and B cells. Herein we report that IRF8 regulates the expression of Mdm2, a suppressor of p53-dependent and -independent apoptosis pathways, in germinal center (GC) B cells. In GC B cells of IRF8-deficient mice, Mdm2 transcripts were greatly down-regulated, and MDM2 protein was poorly expressed in GC of Irf8?/? mice. Small interfering RNA-induced repression of IRF8 in a GC-derived B cell line resulted in decreased expression of MDM2 at the protein level but increased expression of p53 and p21. We found that IRF8 binds to the Mdm2 P2 promoter, and that cotransfection of an IRF8 expression vector with an Mdm2 reporter construct stimulated significant increases in reporter activity. Additionally, transcripts of the p53 target Pmaip1 (Noxa) were significantly increased in IRF8-deficient GC B cells as well as in the IRF8 knockdown B cell line. Finally, cells deficient in IRF8 exhibited growth suppression and increased sensitivity to apoptosis induced by etoposide or IL-21. These results suggest that by regulating MDM2, IRF8 might allow GC B cells to tolerate physiological DNA breaks that otherwise would trigger apoptosis. PMID:19648273

  10. Germinal center reentries of BCL2-overexpressing B cells drive follicular lymphoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Sungalee, Stéphanie; Mamessier, Emilie; Morgado, Ester; Grégoire, Emilie; Brohawn, Philip Z.; Morehouse, Christopher A.; Jouve, Nathalie; Monvoisin, Céline; Menard, Cédric; Debroas, Guilhaume; Faroudi, Mustapha; Mechin, Violaine; Navarro, Jean-Marc; Drevet, Charlotte; Eberle, Franziska C.; Chasson, Lionel; Baudimont, Fannie; Mancini, Stéphane J.; Tellier, Julie; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Kelly, Rachel; Vineis, Paolo; Ruminy, Philippe; Chetaille, Bruno; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Schiff, Claudine; Hardwigsen, Jean; Tice, David A.; Higgs, Brandon W.; Tarte, Karin; Nadel, Bertrand; Roulland, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that memory B cells can reenter and reengage germinal center (GC) reactions, opening the possibility that multi-hit lymphomagenesis gradually occurs throughout life during successive immunological challenges. Here, we investigated this scenario in follicular lymphoma (FL), an indolent GC-derived malignancy. We developed a mouse model that recapitulates the FL hallmark t(14;18) translocation, which results in constitutive activation of antiapoptotic protein B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) in a subset of B cells, and applied a combination of molecular and immunofluorescence approaches to track normal and t(14;18)+ memory B cells in human and BCL2-overexpressing B cells in murine lymphoid tissues. BCL2-overexpressing B cells required multiple GC transits before acquiring FL-associated developmental arrest and presenting as GC B cells with constitutive activation–induced cytidine deaminase (AID) mutator activity. Moreover, multiple reentries into the GC were necessary for the progression to advanced precursor stages of FL. Together, our results demonstrate that protracted subversion of immune dynamics contributes to early dissemination and progression of t(14;18)+ precursors and shapes the systemic presentation of FL patients. PMID:25384217

  11. Germinal center reentries of BCL2-overexpressing B cells drive follicular lymphoma progression.

    PubMed

    Sungalee, Stéphanie; Mamessier, Emilie; Morgado, Ester; Grégoire, Emilie; Brohawn, Philip Z; Morehouse, Christopher A; Jouve, Nathalie; Monvoisin, Céline; Menard, Cédric; Debroas, Guilhaume; Faroudi, Mustapha; Mechin, Violaine; Navarro, Jean-Marc; Drevet, Charlotte; Eberle, Franziska C; Chasson, Lionel; Baudimont, Fannie; Mancini, Stéphane J; Tellier, Julie; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Kelly, Rachel; Vineis, Paolo; Ruminy, Philippe; Chetaille, Bruno; Jaffe, Elaine S; Schiff, Claudine; Hardwigsen, Jean; Tice, David A; Higgs, Brandon W; Tarte, Karin; Nadel, Bertrand; Roulland, Sandrine

    2014-12-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that memory B cells can reenter and reengage germinal center (GC) reactions, opening the possibility that multi-hit lymphomagenesis gradually occurs throughout life during successive immunological challenges. Here, we investigated this scenario in follicular lymphoma (FL), an indolent GC-derived malignancy. We developed a mouse model that recapitulates the FL hallmark t(14;18) translocation, which results in constitutive activation of antiapoptotic protein B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) in a subset of B cells, and applied a combination of molecular and immunofluorescence approaches to track normal and t(14;18)(+) memory B cells in human and BCL2-overexpressing B cells in murine lymphoid tissues. BCL2-overexpressing B cells required multiple GC transits before acquiring FL-associated developmental arrest and presenting as GC B cells with constitutive activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) mutator activity. Moreover, multiple reentries into the GC were necessary for the progression to advanced precursor stages of FL. Together, our results demonstrate that protracted subversion of immune dynamics contributes to early dissemination and progression of t(14;18)(+) precursors and shapes the systemic presentation of FL patients. PMID:25384217

  12. Characterization of Antigen-Specific B Cells Using Nominal Antigen-Coated Flow-Beads

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Ahmed; Lepetit, Maud; Crochette, Romain; Giral, Magali; Lepourry, Julie; Pallier, Annaick; Castagnet, Stéphanie; Dugast, Emilie; Guillot-Gueguen, Cécile; Jacq-Foucher, Marylène; Saulquin, Xavier; Cesbron, Anne; Laplaud, David; Nicot, Arnaud; Brouard, Sophie; Soulillou, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    In order to characterize the reactivity of B cells against nominal antigens, a method based on the coupling of antigens onto the surface of fluorescent core polystyrene beads was developed. We first demonstrate that murine B cells with a human MOG-specific BCR are able to interact with MOG-coated beads and do not recognize beads coated with human albumin or pp65. B cells purified from human healthy volunteer blood or immunized individuals were tested for their ability to interact with various nominal antigens, including viral, vaccine, self and alloantigens, chosen for their usefulness in studying a variety of pathological processes. A substantial amount of B cells binding self-antigen MOG-coated beads can be detected in normal blood. Furthermore, greater frequencies of B cell against anti-Tetanic Toxin or anti-EBNA1 were observed in primed individuals. This method can reveal increased frequencies of anti-HLA committed B cells in patients with circulating anti-HLA antibodies compared to unsensitized patients and normal individuals. Of interest, those specific CD19 cells were preferentially identified within CD27?IgD+ (i-e naïve) subset. These observations suggest that a broad range of medical situations could benefit from a tool that allows the detection, the quantification and the characterization of antigen-specific blood B cells. PMID:24386360

  13. Transcriptomics Identify CD9 as a Marker of Murine IL-10-Competent Regulatory B Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianbo; Wang, Jiguang; Pefanis, Evangelos; Chao, Jaime; Rothschild, Gerson; Tachibana, Isao; Chen, Jun Kui; Ivanov, Ivaylo I; Rabadan, Raul; Takeda, Yoshito; Basu, Uttiya

    2015-11-10

    Regulatory B cells (Breg) have immune suppressive functions in various autoimmune/inflammation models and diseases and are found to be enriched in diverse B cell subsets. The lack of a unique marker or set of markers efficiently identifying Breg cells impedes detailed investigation into their origin, development, and immunological roles. Here, we perform transcriptome analysis of IL-10-expressing B cells to identify key regulators for Breg biogenesis and function and identify CD9, a tetraspanin-family transmembrane protein, as a key surface marker for most mouse IL-10(+) B cells and their progenitors. CD9 plays a role in the suppressive function of IL-10(+) B cells in ex vivo T cell proliferation assays through a mechanism that is dependent upon B/T cell interactions. CD9(+) B cells also demonstrate inhibition of Th1-mediated contact hypersensitivity in an in vivo model system. Taken together, our findings implicate CD9 in the immunosuppressive activity of regulatory B cells. PMID:26527007

  14. CD23b isoform expression in human schistosomiasis identifies a novel subset of activated B cells.

    PubMed

    Onguru, Daniel; Liang, YanMei; Elliot, Jennifer; Mwinzi, Pauline; Ganley-Leal, Lisa

    2011-09-01

    Resistance to schistosomiasis is associated with increased levels of serum parasite-specific IgE. IgE exerts its functions through its cellular receptors, Fc?RI and Fc?RII/CD23; however, its functional significance in humans requires further characterization. We previously reported that increased levels of CD23(+) B cells correlate with resistance to schistosomiasis in hyperexposed populations and sought to define their potential function and relationship with IgE. We found that CD23(+) B cells are a heterogeneous cell population with functional and phenotypic differences. Circulating CD23(+) B cells are uniquely activated in schistosomiasis and express the CD23b isoform and CXCR5, the homing receptor for lymphoid follicles. High CXCR5 expression by CD23(+) B cells was associated with the capacity to home to the cognate ligand CXCL13. CD23-bound IgE cross-linking increased surface expression of CXCR5, suggesting that CD23(+) B cells home directly into the lymphoid follicles upon antigen capture. As human schistosomiasis is an intravascular parasitic infection associated with a high antigenic burden in the blood, circulating CD23(+) B cells may play a role in the capture and shuttling of antigens directly to splenic follicles, highlighting a new role for circulating B cells. This function likely plays an important role in the development of protective immunity to infection with schistosomes. PMID:21708991

  15. Multiple signaling pathways promote B lymphocyte stimulator–dependent B-cell growth and survival

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Casey J.; Schmidt, Madelyn R.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Opferman, Joseph T.; Korsmeyer, Stanley J.; Hilbert, David M.; Thompson, Craig B.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the mechanism by which B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS)/BAFF, a tumor necrosis factor superfamily ligand, promotes B-cell survival and resistance to atrophy. BLyS stimulation activates 2 independent signaling pathways, Akt/mTOR and Pim 2, associated with cell growth and survival. BLyS blocks the cell volume loss (atrophy) that freshly isolated B cells normally undergo when maintained in vitro while concurrently increasing glycolytic activity and overall metabolism. This atrophy resistance requires Akt/mTOR. We used a genetic approach to resolve the contributions of Akt/mTOR and Pim kinase pathways to BLyS-mediated survival. Pim 2–deficient B cells are readily protected from death by BLyS stimulation, but this protection is completely abrogated by treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Furthermore, rapamycin treatment in vivo significantly reduces both follicular and marginal zone B cells in Pim-deficient but not healthy hosts. BLyS-dependent survival requires the antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1. Mcl-1 protein levels rise and fall in response to BLyS addition and withdrawal, respectively, and conditional deletion of the Mcl-1 gene renders B cells refractory to BLyS-mediated protection. Because BlyS is required for the normal homeostasis of all B cells, these data suggest a therapeutic strategy simultaneously inhibiting mTOR and Pim 2 could target pathogenic B cells. PMID:17942753

  16. Dendritic Cell-Dependent Inhibition of B Cell Proliferation Requires CD221

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Lorna; Draves, Kevin E.; Boton, Mark; Grewal, Prabhjit K.; Marth, Jamey D.; Clark, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that dendritic cells (DCs) regulate B cell functions. In this study, we report that bone marrow (BM)-derived immature DCs, but not mature DCs, can inhibit BCR-induced proliferation of B cells in a contact-dependent manner. This inhibition is overcome by treatment with BAFF and is dependent on the BCR coreceptor CD22; however, it is not dependent on expression of the CD22 glycan ligand(s) produced by ST6Gal-I sialyltransferase. We found that a second CD22 ligand (CD22L) is expressed on CD11c+ splenic and BM-derived DCs, which does not contain ST6Gal-I-generated sialic acids and which, unlike the B cell-associated CD22L, is resistant to neuraminidase treatment and sodium metaperiodate oxidation. Examination of splenic and BM B cell subsets in CD22 and ST6Gal-I knockout mice revealed that ST6Gal-I-generated B cell CD22L plays a role in splenic B cell development, whereas the maintenance of long-lived mature BM B cells depends only on CD22 and not on ?2,6-sialic acids produced by ST6Gal-I. We propose that the two distinct CD22L have different functions. The ?2,6-sialic acid-containing glycoprotein is important for splenic B cell subset development, whereas the DC-associated ST6Gal-I-independent CD22L may be required for the maintenance of long-lived mature B cells in the BM. PMID:18354178

  17. Production of autoantibodies against citrullinated antigens/peptides by human B cells.

    PubMed

    Bellatin, Maria F; Han, Mei; Fallena, Margarita; Fan, Lin; Xia, Donglan; Olsen, Nancy; Branch, Valerie; Karp, David; Stastny, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Autoantibodies against citrullinated protein Ags (ACPA) are associated with the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This immune response against citrullinated protein Ags, which is thought to be facilitated by certain MHC HLA-DR alleles, is highly specific for this disease and has been speculated to be involved in the pathogenesis. We have previously studied cultures of B cells for the production of Abs against HLA Ags. The aim of the current study was to examine the role of B cells in the production of ACPA in patients with RA. Peripheral blood B cells from RA patients and healthy people were cultured with EL4-B5, a murine cell line expressing human CD40L, and with T cell factors to stimulate the in vitro production of Abs by B cells isolated from peripheral blood. ACPA were produced by cultured B cells from RA patients, as determined by reactivity to cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP). The results showed that 22% of the healthy persons tested also had B cells that could produce ACPA. Patients with HLA-DR alleles carrying the RA-associated shared epitope appeared to have more B cells with autoimmune potential for CCP than those without such HLA alleles (odds ratio 8.1, p = 0.001). In healthy individuals, anti-CCP-producing B cells were also observed more frequently if the RA-associated MHC genes were present (odds ratio 8.0, p = 0.01). Analysis of B cells in cultures may shed light on the interaction of genetic and environmental factors in the development of RA. PMID:22345652

  18. Ca(2+) -related signaling events influence TLR9-induced IL-10 secretion in human B cells.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Saskia; Gartner, Katrin; Scheuermann, Uwe; Zoeller, Tanja; Hantzschmann, Julia; Over, Benjamin; Foermer, Sandra; Heeg, Klaus; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle

    2014-05-01

    Suppressory B-cell function controls immune responses and is mainly dependent on IL-10 secretion. Pharmacological manipulation of B-cell-specific IL-10 synthesis could, thus, be therapeutically useful in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, transplantation, autoimmunity and sepsis. TLR are thought to play a protagonistic role in the formation of IL-10-secreting B cells. The aim of the study was to identify the molecular events selectively driving IL-10 production in TLR9-stimulated human B cells. Our data highlight the selectivity of calcineurin inhibitors in blocking TLR9-induced B-cell-derived IL-10 transcription and secretion, while IL-6 transcription and release, B-cell proliferation, and differentiation remain unaffected. Nevertheless, TLR9-induced IL-10 production was found to be independent of calcineurin phosphatase activity and was even negatively regulated by NFAT. In contrast to TLR9-induced IL-6, IL-10 secretion was highly sensitive to targeting of spleen tyrosine kinase (syk) and Bruton's tyrosine kinase. Further analyses demonstrated increased phosphorylation of Ca(2+) /calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) in TLR9-stimulated B cells and selective reduction of TLR9-induced secretion of IL-10 upon treatment with CaMKII inhibitors, with negligible impact on IL-6 levels. Altogether, our results identify calcineurin antagonists as selective inhibitors of IL-10 transcription and syk/Bruton´s tyrosine kinase-induced Ca(2+) /calmodulin- and CaMKII-dependent signaling as a pathway regulating the release of TLR9-induced B-cell-derived IL-10. PMID:24470136

  19. Characterization of B cells in muscle-specific kinase antibody myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Yi, John S.; Sanders, Donald B.; Guidon, Amanda C.; Juel, Vern C.; Massey, Janice M.; Howard, James F.; Scuderi, Flavia; Bartoccioni, Emanuela; Evoli, Amelia; Weinhold, Kent J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To characterize B-cell subsets in patients with muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis (MG). Methods: In accordance with Human Immunology Project Consortium guidelines, we performed polychromatic flow cytometry and ELISA assays in peripheral blood samples from 18 patients with MuSK MG and 9 healthy controls. To complement a B-cell phenotype assay that evaluated maturational subsets, we measured B10 cell percentages, plasma B cell–activating factor (BAFF) levels, and MuSK antibody titers. Immunologic variables were compared with healthy controls and clinical outcome measures. Results: As expected, patients treated with rituximab had high percentages of transitional B cells and plasmablasts and thus were excluded from subsequent analysis. The remaining patients with MuSK MG and controls had similar percentages of total B cells and naïve, memory, isotype-switched, plasmablast, and transitional B-cell subsets. However, patients with MuSK MG had higher BAFF levels and lower percentages of B10 cells. In addition, we observed an increase in MuSK antibody levels with more severe disease. Conclusions: We found prominent B-cell pathology in the distinct form of MG with MuSK autoantibodies. Increased BAFF levels have been described in other autoimmune diseases, including acetylcholine receptor antibody–positive MG. This finding suggests a role for BAFF in the survival of B cells in MuSK MG, which has important therapeutic implications. B10 cells, a recently described rare regulatory B-cell subset that potently blocks Th1 and Th17 responses, were reduced, which suggests a potential mechanism for the breakdown in immune tolerance in patients with MuSK MG. PMID:25745635

  20. Defects in antigen-specific immune tolerance in continuous B cell lines from autoimmune mice.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, M S; Aldo-Benson, M

    1986-01-01

    B cell hyperactivity and resistance to tolerance induction are well-recognized immunologic abnormalities associated with both human and murine models of systemic lupus erythematosus. Studies evaluating the role of B cells in these defects have been complicated by the difficulties of consistently isolating large numbers of B cells from T cells and other host-derived regulatory factors. We have recently developed continuous cell lines of B lymphocytes with a high degree of specificity for the antigen dinitrophenyl (DNP) from both New Zealand black times New Zealand white F1 hybrid (BWF1) and BALB/c mice, and we used them to study intrinsic B cell defects in autoimmunity. We found that the kinetics of the immune response to the antigen DNP-Ficoll of both the BWF1 and BALB/c B cell lines are not different. In addition, the BWF1 cell lines, like the BALB/c cell lines and normal B cells, require nonspecific T cell-derived factors as well as antigen to produce an immune response. Tolerance was tested in the BWF1 B cells by preincubating them with DNP-murine IgG2a (MGG), which can induce tolerance in BALB/c cell line lymphocytes. The BWF1 B cell lines were resistant to tolerance induction by DNP-MGG and required 50-fold higher dose of DNP-MGG than BALB/c cell lines for suppression. They were also relatively resistant to tolerance with trinitrophenyl-d-glutamyl lysine. Thus, DNP-specific B cells from autoimmune mice have an inherent defect in tolerance induction. PMID:2427544

  1. Obligatory Role for B Cells in the Development of Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chan, Christopher T; Sobey, Christopher G; Lieu, Maggie; Ferens, Dorota; Kett, Michelle M; Diep, Henry; Kim, Hyun Ah; Krishnan, Shalini M; Lewis, Caitlin V; Salimova, Ekaterina; Tipping, Peter; Vinh, Antony; Samuel, Chrishan S; Peter, Karlheinz; Guzik, Tomasz J; Kyaw, Tin S; Toh, Ban-Hock; Bobik, Alexander; Drummond, Grant R

    2015-11-01

    Clinical hypertension is associated with raised serum IgG antibodies. However, whether antibodies are causative agents in hypertension remains unknown. We investigated whether hypertension in mice is associated with B-cell activation and IgG production and moreover whether B-cell/IgG deficiency affords protection against hypertension and vascular remodeling. Angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion (0.7 mg/kg per day; 28 days) was associated with (1) a 25% increase in the proportion of splenic B cells expressing the activation marker CD86, (2) an 80% increase in splenic plasma cell numbers, (3) a 500% increase in circulating IgG, and (4) marked IgG accumulation in the aortic adventitia. In B-cell-activating factor receptor-deficient (BAFF-R(-/-)) mice, which lack mature B cells, there was no evidence of Ang II-induced increases in serum IgG. Furthermore, the hypertensive response to Ang II was attenuated in BAFF-R(-/-) (?30±4 mm Hg) relative to wild-type (?41±5 mm Hg) mice, and this response was rescued by B-cell transfer. BAFF-R(-/-) mice displayed reduced IgG accumulation in the aorta, which was associated with 80% fewer aortic macrophages and a 70% reduction in transforming growth factor-? expression. BAFF-R(-/-) mice were also protected from Ang II-induced collagen deposition and aortic stiffening (assessed by pulse wave velocity analysis). Finally, like BAFF-R deficiency, pharmacological depletion of B cells with an anti-CD20 antibody attenuated Ang II-induced hypertension by ?35%. Hence, these studies demonstrate that B cells/IgGs are crucial for the development of Ang II-induced hypertension and vessel remodeling in mice. Thus, B-cell-targeted therapies-currently used for autoimmune diseases-may hold promise as future treatments for hypertension. PMID:26351030

  2. Optimized fluorescent labeling to identify memory B cells specific for Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B vaccine antigens ex vivo

    E-print Network

    Nair, Nitya

    Antigen-specific memory B cells generate anamnestic responses and high affinity antibodies upon re-exposure to pathogens. Attempts to isolate rare antigen-specific memory B cells for in-depth functional analysis at the ...

  3. Omalizumab may decrease IgE synthesis by targeting membrane IgE+ human B cells

    E-print Network

    Chan, Marcia A.; Gigliotti, Nicole M.; Dotson, Abby Louise; Rosenwasser, Lanny J.

    2013-09-02

    , Wu H, Nordstrom T, Andersson LC, Knuutila S, Kaartinen M: Cross-linking of surface IgG induces apoptosis in a bcl-2 expressing human follicular lymphoma line of mature B cell phenotype. Int Immunol 1994, 6:1817–1827. 28. Warner GL, Scott DW: A... polyclonal model of B cell tolerance. I Fc-dependent and Fc-independent induction of nonresponsiveness by pretreatment of normal splenic B cells with anti-Ig. J Immunol 1991, 146:2185–2191. 29. Fulcher DA, Basten A: Reduced life span of anergic self...

  4. Oblimersen Sodium and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Recurrent B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  5. Alisertib and Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell or T-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-27

    Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Follicular Lymphoma; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  6. Cortactin, another player in the Lyn signaling pathway, is over-expressed and alternatively spliced in leukemic cells from patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gattazzo, Cristina; Martini, Veronica; Frezzato, Federica; Trimarco, Valentina; Tibaldi, Elena; Castelli, Monica; Facco, Monica; Zonta, Francesca; Brunati, Anna Maria; Zambello, Renato; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Trentin, Livio

    2014-01-01

    Cortactin, an actin binding protein and Lyn substrate, is up-regulated in several cancers and its level is associated with increased cell migration, metastasis and poor prognosis. The identification that the Src kinase Lyn and its substrate HS1 are over-expressed in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and involved in resistance to chemotherapy and poor prognosis, prompted us to investigate the role of cortactin, an HS1 homolog, in the pathogenesis and progression of this disorder. In this study, we observed that cortactin is over-expressed in leukemic cells of patients (1.10±0.12) with respect to normal B lymphocytes (0.19±0.06; P=0.0065). Fifty-three percent of our patients expressed the WT mRNA and p80/85 protein isoforms, usually lacking in normal B lymphocytes which express the SV1 variant and the p70/75 protein isoforms. Moreover, we found an association of the cortactin overexpression and negative prognostic factors, including ZAP-70 (P<0.01), CD38 (P<0.01) and somatic hypermutations in the immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region (P<0.01). Our results show that patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia express high levels of cortactin with a particular overexpression of the WT isoform that is lacking in normal B cells, and a correlation to poor prognosis, suggesting that this protein could be relevant in the pathogenesis and aggressiveness of the disease. PMID:24532043

  7. Cortactin, another player in the Lyn signaling pathway, is over-expressed and alternatively spliced in leukemic cells from patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gattazzo, Cristina; Martini, Veronica; Frezzato, Federica; Trimarco, Valentina; Tibaldi, Elena; Castelli, Monica; Facco, Monica; Zonta, Francesca; Brunati, Anna Maria; Zambello, Renato; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Trentin, Livio

    2014-06-01

    Cortactin, an actin binding protein and Lyn substrate, is up-regulated in several cancers and its level is associated with increased cell migration, metastasis and poor prognosis. The identification that the Src kinase Lyn and its substrate HS1 are over-expressed in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and involved in resistance to chemotherapy and poor prognosis, prompted us to investigate the role of cortactin, an HS1 homolog, in the pathogenesis and progression of this disorder. In this study, we observed that cortactin is over-expressed in leukemic cells of patients (1.10 ± 0.12) with respect to normal B lymphocytes (0.19 ± 0.06; P=0.0065). Fifty-three percent of our patients expressed the WT mRNA and p80/85 protein isoforms, usually lacking in normal B lymphocytes which express the SV1 variant and the p70/75 protein isoforms. Moreover, we found an association of the cortactin overexpression and negative prognostic factors, including ZAP-70 (P<0.01), CD38 (P<0.01) and somatic hypermutations in the immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region (P<0.01). Our results show that patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia express high levels of cortactin with a particular overexpression of the WT isoform that is lacking in normal B cells, and a correlation to poor prognosis, suggesting that this protein could be relevant in the pathogenesis and aggressiveness of the disease. PMID:24532043

  8. RNA analysis of B cell lines arrested at defined stages of differentiation allows for an approximation of gene

    E-print Network

    Peterson, Carsten

    amounts of antibodies [10­12]. The ex- tensively studied biology of B cell development, in combina- tion of the molecular processes involved in B cell development and to create a map over stage-restricted gene expressionRNA analysis of B cell lines arrested at defined stages of differentiation allows

  9. Primary Diffuse Large B-Cell Dural Lymphoma With Bone and Subcutaneous Tissue Involvement Mimicking Meningioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Long; Ouayang, Taohui; Zhang, Na; Song, Zhibin; Gao, Jianwei; Li, Xuguang; Wang, Fang

    2015-09-01

    Primary dural lymphoma (PDL), a rare subtype of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), is usually a marginal zone B-cell lymphoma or low-grade B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type. Primary dural invasion by diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is extremely rare, with only a few cases reported in the literature. The authors presented an unusual case of primary dural involvement by a high-grade diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that invaded parietal bone and subcutaneous tissue. The patient received tumor complete resection and cranioplasty as well as radiotherapy and chemotherapy as adjuvant treatment after surgery. During 12 months follow-up, no tumor recurrence was found. Primary dural lymphoma should be differentially diagnosed with meningioma. Once the diagnosis of PDL is established, tumor resection and adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy may obtain relatively good prognosis. PMID:26221858

  10. B in TB: B Cells as Mediators of Clinically Relevant Immune Responses in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Martin; Valentini, Davide; Poiret, Thomas; Dodoo, Ernest; Parida, Shreemanta; Zumla, Alimuddin; Brighenti, Susanna; Maeurer, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The protective role of B cells and humoral immune responses in tuberculosis infection has been regarded as inferior to cellular immunity directed to the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, B-cell–mediated immune responses in tuberculosis have recently been revisited in the context of B-cell physiology and antigen presentation. We discuss in this review the diverse functions of B cells in tuberculosis, with a focus on their biological and clinical relevance to progression of active disease. We also present the peptide microarray platform as a promising strategy to discover unknown antigenic targets of M. tuberculosis that could contribute to the better understanding of epitope focus of the humoral immune system against M. tuberculosis. PMID:26409285

  11. Murine B Cell Response to TLR7 Ligands Depends on an IFN-  Feedback Loop

    E-print Network

    Green, Nathaniel M.

    Type I IFNs play an important, yet poorly characterized, role in systemic lupus erythematosus. To better understand the interplay between type I IFNs and the activation of autoreactive B cells, we evaluated the effect of ...

  12. Stepwise B-cell-dependent expansion of T helper clonotypes diversifies the T-cell response.

    PubMed

    Merkenschlager, Julia; Ploquin, Mickaël J; Eksmond, Urszula; Andargachew, Rakieb; Thorborn, Georgina; Filby, Andrew; Pepper, Marion; Evavold, Brian; Kassiotis, George

    2016-01-01

    Antigen receptor diversity underpins adaptive immunity by providing the ground for clonal selection of lymphocytes with the appropriate antigen reactivity. Current models attribute T cell clonal selection during the immune response to T-cell receptor (TCR) affinity for either foreign or self peptides. Here, we report that clonal selection of CD4(+) T cells is also extrinsically regulated by B cells. In response to viral infection, the antigen-specific TCR repertoire is progressively diversified by staggered clonotypic expansion, according to functional avidity, which correlates with self-reactivity. Clonal expansion of lower-avidity T-cell clonotypes depends on availability of MHC II-expressing B cells, in turn influenced by B-cell activation. B cells clonotypically diversify the CD4(+) T-cell response also to vaccination or tumour challenge, revealing a common effect. PMID:26728651

  13. The B-cell antigen receptor integrates adaptive and innate immune signals

    PubMed Central

    Otipoby, Kevin L.; Waisman, Ari; Derudder, Emmanuel; Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Franklin, Andrew; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    B cells respond to antigens by engagement of their B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) and of coreceptors through which signals from helper T cells or pathogen-associated molecular patterns are delivered. We show that the proliferative response of B cells to the latter stimuli is controlled by BCR-dependent activation of phosphoinositidyl 3-kinase (PI-3K) signaling. Glycogen synthase kinase 3? and Foxo1 are two PI-3K-regulated targets that play important roles, but to different extents, depending on the specific mitogen. These results suggest a model for integrating signals from the innate and the adaptive immune systems in the control of the B-cell immune response. PMID:26371314

  14. One process for pancreatic b-cell coalescence into islets involves an epithelialmesenchymal transition

    E-print Network

    Guerriero, Vince

    One process for pancreatic b-cell coalescence into islets involves an epithelial and islet formation. Transcription factors know to regulate pancreas formation, pancreatic duodenal homeobox pattern to coordinate pancreatic bud outgrowth and direct endocrine cell specifi- cation in sheep

  15. Differential asparaginase sensitivity of T-cell and B-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Berenbaum, M. C.; Cope, W. A.; Jeffery, Wendy

    1973-01-01

    The effects of L-asparaginase on the T- and B-cell responses to sheep red blood cells and to bacterial lipopolysaccharide were compared in mice. Asparaginase inhibited the response to sheep cells more than the response to lipopolysaccharide. As the former response requires T-cell help whereas the latter does not, this suggests that asparaginase damages T cells more than B cells. However, in vitro, the responses of mouse peripheral blood lymphocytes to phytohaemagglutinin and to lipopolysaccharide were equally sensitive to asparaginase. The relative in vivo resistance of the response to lipopolysaccharide is therefore unlikely to be due to an inherent insensitivity of B cells compared with T cells. It is suggested that the anatomy of lymphoid tissue provides a micro-environment for B cells that partly protects them from the effects of systemic asparagine depletion, whereas the local environment of T cells does not confer such protection. PMID:4591641

  16. B cells within germinal centers migrate preferentially from dark to light zone

    E-print Network

    de Boer, Rob J.

    random walk include the migration of T cells, B cells, and plasma cells in lymph nodes (2, 6). At these sites, B lympho- cytes mature by somatic hypermutation and clonal selection of the mutants that produce

  17. Simultaneous Assessment of Rotavirus-Specific Memory B Cells and Serological Memory after B Cell Depletion Therapy with Rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Daniel; Rojas, Olga L.; Duarte-Rey, Carolina; Mantilla, Rubén D.; Ángel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that contribute to the maintenance of serological memory are still unclear. Rotavirus (RV) memory B cells (mBc) are enriched in IgM+ and CD27- subpopulations, which are associated with autoimmune diseases pathogenesis. In patients with autoimmune diseases treated with Rituximab (RTX), some autoantibodies (auto-Abs) decrease after treatment, but other auto-Abs and pathogen-specific IgG Abs remain unchanged. Thus, maintenance of autoimmune and pathogen-specific serological memory may depend on the type of antigen and/or Ab isotype evaluated. Antigen-specific mBc and antigen-specific Abs of different isotypes have not been simultaneously assessed in patients after RTX treatment. To study the relationship between mBc subpopulations and serological memory we characterized total, RV- and tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific mBc by flow cytometry in patients with autoimmune diseases before and after treatment with RTX. We also measured total, RV- and TT-Abs, and some auto-Abs by kinetic nephelometry, ELISA, and EliA tests, respectively. Minor differences were observed between the relative frequencies of RV-mBc in healthy controls and patients with autoimmune disease. After RTX treatment, naïve Bc and total, RV- and TT-specific mBc [IgM+, switched (IgA+/IgG+), IgM+ only, IgD+ only, and CD27- (IgA+/IgG+/IgM+)] were significantly diminished. An important decrease in total plasma IgM and minor decreases in total IgG and IgA levels were also observed. IgM rheumatoid factor, IgG anti-CCP, and IgG anti-dsDNA were significantly diminished. In contrast, RV-IgA, RV-IgG and RV-IgG1, and TT-IgG titers remained stable. In conclusion, in patients with autoimmunity, serological memory against RV and TT seem to be maintained by long-lived plasma cells, unaffected by RTX, and an important proportion of total IgM and serological memory against some auto-antigens seem to be maintained by short-lived plasma cells, dependent on mBc precursors depleted by RTX. PMID:24819618

  18. Somatostatin Improved B Cells Mature in Macaques during Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ling; Tan, Qinghua; Hu, Bin; Wu, Hao; Wang, Chunhui; Liu, Rui; Tang, Chengwei

    2015-01-01

    Aims Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion has been taken as an important pathophysiological process for multiple organ dysfunctions in critical patients. Recent studies reported that dual expression programs of the B cells receptors and Toll-like receptors on B-lymphocytes permit these ubiquitous cells to integrate both adaptive and innate immune functions. Our previous studies found that somatostatin inhibited the intestinal inflammatory injury after ischemia-reperfusion in macaques. However, the changes of B cells and the effects of somatostatin on B cells after intestinal ischemia-reperfusion were unclear. Methods 15 macaques were divided into control, intestinal ischemia-reperfusion and somatostatin pretreatment groups. Immunohistochemistry was performed to identify the distributions of adaptive and innate immunity markers in the iliac mucosa. Hmy2.cir B lymphoblastoid cell line was cultured in vitro study. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure IgM, IL-6 and SIgA, and the expressions of B cells transcription factors, PAX-5 and BLIMP-1, were detected by Western blotting. Results B2 lymphocytes in normal Peyer’s patches were presented the phenotype of PAX-5+CD20+CD5-. Ischemia-reperfusion increased the numbers and sizes of Peyer’s patches but with PAX-5+CD20-CD5- B cells, an unmatured set of B cells. Somatostatin partly kept the phenotype of mature B cells during ischemia-reperfusion. The innate immunity of B cells was inhibited whereas the adaptive immunity was increased in the intestinal mucosa in the somatostatin group, compared to the ischemia-reperfusion group. In vitro, somatostatin significantly inhibited IL-6 and promoted IgM by increasing the expression of both PAX-5 and BLIMP-1 in the proinflammatory condition. Conclusion Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion resulted in the proliferation of unmatured B cells which were involved in the augmentation of innate immunity. Somatostatin, with a bi-directional regulation function on innate as well as adaptive immunity of B cells, greatly improved B cells mature in macaques during ischemia-reperfusion. Preventive supplements of somatostatin may greatly limit intestinal injury and bacterial translocation during ischemia-reperfusion. PMID:26222793

  19. Responses of neonatal rat islets to streptozotocin: limited B-cell regeneration and hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Bonner-Weir, S; Trent, D F; Honey, R N; Weir, G C

    1981-01-01

    Streptozotocin (SZ) was given to 2-day-old neonatal rats, and, during their subsequent development, the interrelationships between plasma glucose, plasma insulin, pancreatic islet morphology, and hormone content were examined. At 4 days of age, a peak of hyperglycemia was observed (SZ, 349 plus or minus 8 mg/dl versus control (C), 127 plus or minus 2) that was associated with a marked reduction of B-cell numbers (SZ, 26.5 plus or minus 2.6% B-cell per islet versus C, 72.8 plus or minus 0.8%). By 10 days of age the SZ animals became normoglycemia with partial recovery of the B-cell number (SZ, 39.6 plus or minus 2.1% versus, C, 64.0 plus or minus 2.6%). By six weeks hyperglycemia returned (SZ, 345 plus or minus 5.2 mg/dl versus C, 171 plus or minus 6.2) with B-cell number of the SZ being 72% of the C (SZ, 48.8 plus or minus 2.4% versus C, 67.5 plus or minus 1.5%). This hyperglycemia and reduced B-cell number persisted to at least 13 wk age. Despite a marked reduction of pancreatic insulin content observed during development, there was little effect upon glucagon or somatostatin content. At 6 wk of age, the plasma insulin concentration was only 30% of C, which suggests as insulin secretory defect beyond that which could be accounted for by the modest B-cell reduction. The present study indicates that even though active regeneration of B-cells occurred after early injury, the capacity for ultimate normalization was limited. The resultant moderate reduction in B-cell number may be associated with a functional defect in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. PMID:6112177

  20. An evolutionarily conserved program of B-cell development and activation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Page, Dawne M; Wittamer, Valerie; Bertrand, Julien Y; Lewis, Kanako L; Pratt, David N; Delgado, Noemi; Schale, Sarah E; McGue, Caitlyn; Jacobsen, Bradley H; Doty, Alyssa; Pao, Yvonne; Yang, Hongbo; Chi, Neil C; Magor, Brad G; Traver, David

    2013-08-22

    Teleost fish are among the most ancient vertebrates possessing an adaptive immune system with B and T lymphocytes that produce memory responses to pathogens. Most bony fish, however, have only 2 types of B lymphocytes, in contrast to the 4 types available to mammals. To better understand the evolution of adaptive immunity, we generated transgenic zebrafish in which the major immunoglobulin M (IgM(+)) B-cell subset expresses green fluorescence protein (GFP) (IgM1:eGFP). We discovered that the earliest IgM(+) B cells appear between the dorsal aorta and posterior cardinal vein and also in the kidney around 20 days postfertilization. We also examined B-cell ontogeny in adult IgM1:eGFP;rag2:DsRed animals, where we defined pro-B, pre-B, and immature/mature B cells in the adult kidney. Sites of B-cell development that shift between the embryo and adult have previously been described in birds and mammals. Our results suggest that this developmental shift occurs in all jawed vertebrates. Finally, we used IgM1:eGFP and cd45DsRed;blimp1:eGFP zebrafish to characterize plasma B cells and investigate B-cell function. The IgM1:eGFP reporter fish are the first nonmammalian B-cell reporter animals to be described. They will be important for further investigation of immune cell evolution and development and host-pathogen interactions in zebrafish. PMID:23861249

  1. An evolutionarily conserved program of B-cell development and activation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Wittamer, Valerie; Bertrand, Julien Y.; Lewis, Kanako L.; Pratt, David N.; Delgado, Noemi; Schale, Sarah E.; McGue, Caitlyn; Jacobsen, Bradley H.; Doty, Alyssa; Pao, Yvonne; Yang, Hongbo; Chi, Neil C.; Magor, Brad G.; Traver, David

    2013-01-01

    Teleost fish are among the most ancient vertebrates possessing an adaptive immune system with B and T lymphocytes that produce memory responses to pathogens. Most bony fish, however, have only 2 types of B lymphocytes, in contrast to the 4 types available to mammals. To better understand the evolution of adaptive immunity, we generated transgenic zebrafish in which the major immunoglobulin M (IgM+) B-cell subset expresses green fluorescence protein (GFP) (IgM1:eGFP). We discovered that the earliest IgM+ B cells appear between the dorsal aorta and posterior cardinal vein and also in the kidney around 20 days postfertilization. We also examined B-cell ontogeny in adult IgM1:eGFP;rag2:DsRed animals, where we defined pro-B, pre-B, and immature/mature B cells in the adult kidney. Sites of B-cell development that shift between the embryo and adult have previously been described in birds and mammals. Our results suggest that this developmental shift occurs in all jawed vertebrates. Finally, we used IgM1:eGFP and cd45DsRed;blimp1:eGFP zebrafish to characterize plasma B cells and investigate B-cell function. The IgM1:eGFP reporter fish are the first nonmammalian B-cell reporter animals to be described. They will be important for further investigation of immune cell evolution and development and host-pathogen interactions in zebrafish. PMID:23861249

  2. Role of B Cells in Host Defense against Primary Coxiella burnetii Infection.

    PubMed

    Schoenlaub, Laura; Elliott, Alexandra; Freches, Danielle; Mitchell, William J; Zhang, Guoquan

    2015-12-01

    Despite Coxiella burnetii being an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen, our recent study demonstrated that B cells play a critical role in vaccine-induced immunity to C. burnetii infection by producing protective antibodies. However, the role of B cells in host defense against primary C. burnetii infection remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether B cells play an important role in host defense against primary C. burnetii infection. The results showed that peritoneal B cells were able to phagocytose virulent C. burnetii bacteria and form Coxiella-containing vacuoles (CCVs) and that C. burnetii can infect and replicate in peritoneal B1a subset B cells in vitro, demonstrating a potential role for peritoneal B cells in host defense against C. burnetii infection in vivo. In addition, the results showing that B1a cells secreted a high level of interleukin-10 (IL-10) in response to C. burnetii infection in vitro suggest that B1a cells may play an important role in inhibiting the C. burnetii infection-induced inflammatory response. The observation that adoptive transfer of peritoneal B cells did not significantly affect the severity of C. burnetii infection-induced diseases in both severe combined immunity-deficient (SCID) and ?MT mice indicates that peritoneal B cells alone may not be able to control C. burnetii infection. In contrast, our finding that C. burnetii infection induced more-severe splenomegaly and a higher bacterial burden in the spleens of B1a cell-deficient Bruton's tyrosine kinase x-linked immunity-deficient (BTK(xid)) mice than in their wild-type counterparts further suggests that B1a cells play an important role in host defense against primary C. burnetii infection. PMID:26438792

  3. MicroRNAs in B-cells: from normal differentiation to treatment of malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Sara Correia; Laursen, Maria Bach; Bødker, Julie Støve; Kjeldsen, Malene Krag; Falgreen, Steffen; Schmitz, Alexander; Bøgsted, Martin; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Dybkaer, Karen

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that play important post-transcriptional regulatory roles in a wide range of biological processes. They are fundamental to the normal development of cells, and evidence suggests that the deregulation of specific miRNAs is involved in malignant transformation due to their function as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. We know that miRNAs are involved in the development of normal B-cells and that different B-cell subsets express specific miRNA profiles according to their degree of differentiation. B-cell-derived malignancies contain transcription signatures reminiscent of their cell of origin. Therefore, we believe that normal and malignant B-cells share features of regulatory networks controlling differentiation and the ability to respond to treatment. The involvement of miRNAs in these processes makes them good biomarker candidates. B-cell malignancies are highly prevalent, and the poor overall survival of patients with these malignancies demands an improvement in stratification according to prognosis and therapy response, wherein we believe miRNAs may be of great importance. We have critically reviewed the literature, and here we sum up the findings of miRNA studies in hematological cancers, from the development and progression of the disease to the response to treatment, with a particular emphasis on B-cell malignancies. PMID:25622103

  4. The Charcot Lecture | beating MS: a story of B cells, with twists and turns.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Stephen L

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune B cells play a major role in mediating tissue damage in multiple sclerosis (MS). In MS, B cells are believed to cross the blood-brain barrier and undergo stimulation, antigen-driven affinity maturation and clonal expansion within the supportive CNS environment. These highly restricted populations of clonally expanded B cells and plasma cells can be detected in MS lesions, in cerebrospinal fluid, and also in peripheral blood. In phase II trials in relapsing MS, monoclonal antibodies that target circulating CD20-positive B lymphocytes dramatically reduced disease activity. These beneficial effects occurred within weeks of treatment, indicating that a direct effect on B cells--and likely not on putative autoantibodies--was responsible. The discovery that depletion of B cells has an impact on MS biology enabled a paradigm shift in understanding how the inflammatory phase of MS develops, and will hopefully lead to development of increasingly selective therapies against culprit B cells and related humoral immune system pathways. More broadly, these studies illustrate how lessons learned from the bedside have unique power to inform translational research. They highlight the essential role of clinician scientists, currently endangered, who navigate the rocky and often unpredictable terrain between the worlds of clinical medicine and biomedical research. PMID:25480864

  5. Systemic sclerosis: New evidence re-enforces the role of B cells.

    PubMed

    Sakkas, Lazaros I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2016-02-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is characterized by widespread fibrosis, microangiopathy (vasospasms and stenosis), and formation of autoantibodies. T cell activation has been shown to contribute to fibrosis and microvasculopathy in SSc. However, recent evidence suggests that B cells are also likely to contribute in the pathogenesis of the disease. B cells are hyperactivated in SSc, as indicated by the overexpression of the stimulatory CD19 receptor and impairment of the inhibitory CD22 receptor. They lead to the production of many autoantibodies, some of which induce collagen production and vasoconstriction. They promote fibroblast collagen production through cell contact. Furthermore, B cells can function as antigen-presenting cells to T cells and induce dendritic cell maturation that promotes profibrotic Th2 response. Lately, interleukin (IL)-10-producing B regulatory cells, which induce generation of T regulatory cells and can ameliorate autoimmune diseases, were found to be reduced in SSc, favoring autoaggression of B cells in this disease. Finally, B cell depletion with rituximab improves or stabilizes skin fibrosis and lung function. These finding suggest that new therapeutic strategies targeting B cell function(s) can be developed for SSc. PMID:26497107

  6. Modulation of Ig? is essential for the B cell selection in germinal center

    PubMed Central

    Todo, Kagefumi; Koga, Orie; Nishikawa, Miwako; Hikida, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    The positive and negative selection of antigen-reactive B cells take place in the germinal center (GC) during an immune responses. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying these selection machineries, including the involvement of antigen receptor signaling molecules, remain to be elucidated. We found that expression levels of Ig? and Ig?, which are the essential components of B cell antigen-receptor complex, were differentially regulated in GC B cells and that the expression of Ig? was more prominently down-regulated in a portion of GC B cells. The suppression of Ig? down-regulation reduced the number of GL7+GC B cells and the affinity maturation in T-dependent responses was markedly impaired. In addition, the disease phenotypes in autoimmune-prone mice were ameliorated by blocking of Ig? down-regulation. These results suggest that Ig? down-regulation is involved in the normal positive selection in GC and the accumulation of autoreactive B cells in autoimmune-prone mice. PMID:25980548

  7. B-cell antigen receptor signaling in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: therapeutic targets and translational opportunities.

    PubMed

    Hill, Ronald J; Lou, Yan; Tan, Seng-Lai

    2013-08-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by clonally expanded and molecularly heterogeneous populations of B lymphocytes with impaired apoptotic mechanisms. This occurs as a result of multiple genetic and epigenetic abnormalities, including chromosomal aberrations and enhancer region hypomethylation, often impinging on intracellular signaling pathways that are essential to normal B-cell activation, proliferation, and survival. The B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling is one such pathway usurped by malignant B cells, as exemplified by the early phase clinical success achieved by small-molecule agents targeting key players involved in the pathway. Such new targeted agents, including those that inhibit the function of Spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK), Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K), and B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2), along with the current standard therapy comprising chemo-immunotherapies with or without B-cell depleting biologic agent rituximab (anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody), should expand the armamentarium for CLL therapy. We review the therapeutic agents currently in clinical development which target different effectors of the malignant BCR signaling, and discuss their overlapping and discriminating translational opportunities in the context of CLL treatment. PMID:23886341

  8. Uncoupling CD21 and CD19 of the B-cell coreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Barrington, Robert A.; Schneider, Thomas J.; Pitcher, Lisa A.; Mempel, Thorsten R.; Ma, Minghe; Barteneva, Natasha S.; Carroll, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    Complement receptors (CRs) CD21 and CD35 form a coreceptor with CD19 and CD81 on murine B cells that when coligated with the B-cell receptor lowers the threshold of activation by several orders of magnitude. This intrinsic signaling role is thought to explain the impaired humoral immunity of mice bearing deficiency in CRs. However, CRs have additional roles on B cells independent of CD19, such as transport of C3-coated immune complexes and regulation of C4 and C3 convertase. To test whether association of CR with CD19 is necessary for their intrinsic activation-enhancing role, knockin mice expressing mutant receptors, Cr2?/?gfp, that bind C3 ligands but do not signal through CD19 were constructed. We found that uncoupling of CR and CD19 significantly diminishes survival of germinal center B cells and secondary antibody titers. However, B memory is less impaired relative to mice bearing a complete deficiency in CRs on B cells. These findings confirm the importance of interaction of CR and CD19 for coreceptor activity in humoral immunity but identify a role for CR in B-cell memory independent of CD19. PMID:19706534

  9. The pre-B-cell receptor checkpoint in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Eswaran, J; Sinclair, P; Heidenreich, O; Irving, J; Russell, L J; Hall, A; Calado, D P; Harrison, C J; Vormoor, J

    2015-08-01

    The B-cell receptor (BCR) and its immature form, the precursor-BCR (pre-BCR), have a central role in the control of B-cell development, which is dependent on a sequence of cell-fate decisions at specific antigen-independent checkpoints. Pre-BCR expression provides the first checkpoint, which controls differentiation of pre-B to immature B-cells in normal haemopoiesis. Pre-BCR signalling regulates and co-ordinates diverse processes within the pre-B cell, including clonal selection, proliferation and subsequent maturation. In B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP-ALL), B-cell development is arrested at this checkpoint. Moreover, malignant blasts avoid clonal extinction by hijacking pre-BCR signalling in favour of the development of BCP-ALL. Here, we discuss three mechanisms that occur in different subtypes of BCP-ALL: (i) blocking pre-BCR expression; (ii) activating pre-BCR-mediated pro-survival and pro-proliferative signalling, while inhibiting cell cycle arrest and maturation; and (iii) bypassing the pre-BCR checkpoint and activating pro-survival signalling through pre-BCR independent alternative mechanisms. A complete understanding of the BCP-ALL-specific signalling networks will highlight their application in BCP-ALL therapy. PMID:25943180

  10. Targeting Syk-activated B cells in murine and human chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Ryan; Allen, Jessica L; Luznik, Leo; MacDonald, Kelli P; Paz, Katelyn; Alexander, Kylie A; Vulic, Ante; Du, Jing; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Taylor, Patricia A; Poe, Jonathan C; Serody, Jonathan S; Murphy, William J; Hill, Geoffrey R; Maillard, Ivan; Koreth, John; Cutler, Corey S; Soiffer, Robert J; Antin, Joseph H; Ritz, Jerome; Chao, Nelson J; Clynes, Raphael A; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Blazar, Bruce R

    2015-06-25

    Novel therapies for chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) are needed. Aberrant B-cell activation has been demonstrated in mice and humans with cGVHD. Having previously found that human cGVHD B cells are activated and primed for survival, we sought to further evaluate the role of the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) in cGVHD in multiple murine models and human peripheral blood cells. In a murine model of multiorgan system, nonsclerodermatous disease with bronchiolitis obliterans where cGVHD is dependent on antibody and germinal center (GC) B cells, we found that activation of Syk was necessary in donor B cells, but not T cells, for disease progression. Bone marrow-specific Syk deletion in vivo was effective in treating established cGVHD, as was a small-molecule inhibitor of Syk, fostamatinib, which normalized GC formation and decreased activated CD80/86(+) dendritic cells. In multiple distinct models of sclerodermatous cGVHD, clinical and pathological disease manifestations were not eliminated when mice were therapeutically treated with fostamatinib, though both clinical and immunologic effects could be observed in one of these scleroderma models. We further demonstrated that Syk inhibition was effective at inducing apoptosis of human cGVHD B cells. Together, these data demonstrate a therapeutic potential of targeting B-cell Syk signaling in cGVHD. PMID:25852057

  11. Actin-mediated feedback loops in B-cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wenxia; Liu, Chaohong; Seeley-Fallen, Margaret K.; Miller, Heather; Ketchum, Christina; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2013-01-01

    Summary Upon recognizing cognate antigen, B cells mobilize multiple cellular apparatuses to propagate an optimal response. Antigen binding is transduced into cytoplasmic signaling events through B-cell antigen receptor (BCR)-based signalosomes at the B-cell surface. BCR signalosomes are dynamic and transient and are subsequently endocytosed for antigen processing. The function of BCR signalosomes is one of the determining factors for the fate of B cells: clonal expansion, anergy, or apoptosis. Accumulating evidence underscores the importance of the actin cytoskeleton in B-cell activation. We have begun to appreciate the role of actin dynamics in regulating BCR-mediated tonic signaling and the formation of BCR signalosomes. Our recent studies reveal an additional function of the actin cytoskeleton in the downregulation of BCR signaling, consequently contributing to the generation and maintenance of B-cell self-tolerance. In this review, we discuss how actin remodels its organization and dynamics in close coordination with BCR signaling and how actin remodeling in turn amplifies the activation and subsequent downregulation process of BCR signaling, providing vital feedback for optimal BCR activation. PMID:24117821

  12. The AP-1 transcription factor Fra1 inhibits follicular B cell differentiation into plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    Grötsch, Bettina; Brachs, Sebastian; Lang, Christiane; Luther, Julia; Derer, Anja; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Bozec, Aline; Fillatreau, Simon; Berberich, Ingolf; Hobeika, Elias; Reth, Michael; Wagner, Erwin F.; Schett, Georg

    2014-01-01

    The cornerstone of humoral immunity is the differentiation of B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells. This process is tightly controlled by a regulatory gene network centered on the transcriptional repressor B lymphocyte–induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1). Proliferation of activated B cells is required to foster Blimp1 expression but needs to be terminated to avoid overshooting immune reactions. Activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription factors become quickly up-regulated upon B cell activation. We demonstrate that Fra1, a Fos member of AP-1, enhances activation-induced cell death upon induction in activated B cells. Moreover, mice with B cell–specific deletion of Fra1 show enhanced plasma cell differentiation and exacerbated antibody responses. In contrast, transgenic overexpression of Fra1 blocks plasma cell differentiation and immunoglobulin production, which cannot be rescued by Bcl2. On the molecular level, Fra1 represses Blimp1 expression and interferes with binding of the activating AP-1 member c-Fos to the Blimp1 promoter. Conversely, overexpression of c-Fos in Fra1 transgenic B cells releases Blimp1 repression. As Fra1 lacks transcriptional transactivation domains, we propose that Fra1 inhibits Blimp1 expression and negatively controls plasma cell differentiation through binding to the Blimp1 promoter. In summary, we demonstrate that Fra1 negatively controls plasma cell differentiation by repressing Blimp1 expression. PMID:25288397

  13. Constitutively activated STAT3 promotes cell proliferation and survival in the activated B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Ding, B. Belinda; Yu, J. Jessica; Yu, Raymond Y.-L.; Mendez, Lourdes M.; Shaknovich, Rita; Zhang, Yonghui; Cattoretti, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) consists of at least 2 phenotypic subtypes; that is, the germinal center B-cell–like (GCB-DLBCL) and the activated B-cell–like (ABC-DLBCL) groups. It has been shown that GCB-DLBCL responds favorably to chemotherapy and expresses high levels of BCL6, a transcription repressor known to play a causative role in lymphomagenesis. In comparison, ABC-DLBCL has lower levels of BCL6, constitutively activated nuclear factor-?B, and tends to be refractory to chemotherapy. Here, we report that the STAT3 gene is a transcriptional target of BCL6. As a result, high-level STAT3 expression and activation are preferentially detected in ABC-DLBCL and BCL6-negative normal germinal center B cells. Most importantly, inactivating STAT3 by either AG490 or small interference RNA in ABC-DLBCL cells inhibits cell proliferation and triggers apoptosis. These phenotypes are accompanied by decreased expression of several known STAT3 target genes, including c-Myc, JunB, and Mcl-1, and increased expression of the cell- cycle inhibitor p27. In addition to identifying STAT3 as a novel BCL6 target gene, our results define a second oncogenic pathway, STAT3 activation, which operates in ABC-DLBCL, suggesting that STAT3 may be a new therapeutic target in these aggressive lymphomas. PMID:17951530

  14. Non-CpG Oligonucleotides Exert Adjuvant Effects by Enhancing Cognate B Cell-T Cell Interactions, Leading to B Cell Activation, Differentiation, and Isotype Switching

    PubMed Central

    Herbáth, Melinda; Papp, Krisztián; Erdei, Anna; Prechl, József

    2015-01-01

    Natural and synthetic nucleic acids are known to exert immunomodulatory properties. Notably, nucleic acids are known to modulate immune function via several different pathways and various cell types, necessitating a complex interpretation of their effects. In this study we set out to compare the effects of a CpG motif containing oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) with those of a control and an inhibitory non-CpG ODN during cognate B cell-T cell interactions. We employed an antigen presentation system using splenocytes from TCR transgenic DO11.10 mice and the ovalbumin peptide recognized by the TCR as model antigen. We followed early activation events by measuring CD69 expression, late activation by MHC class II expression, cell division and antibody production of switched, and nonswitched isotypes. We found that both of the tested non-CpG ODN exerted significant immunomodulatory effects on early T cell and on late B cell activation events. Importantly, a synergism between non-CpG effects and T cell help acting on B cells was observed, resulting in enhanced IgG production following cognate T cell-B cell interactions. We propose that non-CpG ODN may perform as better adjuvants when a strong antigen-independent immune activation, elicited by CpG ODNs, is undesirable. PMID:26380319

  15. Overexpression of Fkbp11, a feature of lupus B cells, leads to B cell tolerance breakdown and initiates plasma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ruer-Laventie, Julie; Simoni, Léa; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Soley, Anne; Duval, Monique; Knapp, Anne-Marie; Marcellin, Luc; Lamon, Delphine; Korganow, Anne-Sophie; Martin, Thierry; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Soulas-Sprauel, Pauline

    2015-09-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a severe systemic autoimmune disease, characterized by multi-organ damages, triggered by an autoantibody-mediated inflammation, and with a complex genetic influence. It is today accepted that adult SLE arises from the building up of many subtle gene variations, each one adding a new brick on the SLE susceptibility and contributing to a phenotypic trait to the disease. One of the ways to find these gene variations consists in comprehensive analysis of gene expression variation in a precise cell type, which can constitute a good complementary strategy to genome wide association studies. Using this strategy, and considering the central role of B cells in SLE, we analyzed the B cell transcriptome of quiescent SLE patients, and identified an overexpression of FKBP11, coding for a cytoplasmic putative peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase and chaperone enzyme. To understand the consequences of FKBP11 overexpression on B cell function and on autoimmunity's development, we created lentiviral transgenic mice reproducing this gene expression variation. We showed that high expression of Fkbp11 reproduces by itself two phenotypic traits of SLE in mice: breakdown of B cell tolerance against DNA and initiation of plasma cell differentiation by acting upstream of Pax5 master regulator gene. PMID:26417441

  16. Overexpression of Fkbp11, a feature of lupus B cells, leads to B cell tolerance breakdown and initiates plasma cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ruer-Laventie, Julie; Simoni, Léa; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Soley, Anne; Duval, Monique; Knapp, Anne-Marie; Marcellin, Luc; Lamon, Delphine; Korganow, Anne-Sophie; Martin, Thierry; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Soulas-Sprauel, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a severe systemic autoimmune disease, characterized by multi-organ damages, triggered by an autoantibody-mediated inflammation, and with a complex genetic influence. It is today accepted that adult SLE arises from the building up of many subtle gene variations, each one adding a new brick on the SLE susceptibility and contributing to a phenotypic trait to the disease. One of the ways to find these gene variations consists in comprehensive analysis of gene expression variation in a precise cell type, which can constitute a good complementary strategy to genome wide association studies. Using this strategy, and considering the central role of B cells in SLE, we analyzed the B cell transcriptome of quiescent SLE patients, and identified an overexpression of FKBP11, coding for a cytoplasmic putative peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase and chaperone enzyme. To understand the consequences of FKBP11 overexpression on B cell function and on autoimmunity's development, we created lentiviral transgenic mice reproducing this gene expression variation. We showed that high expression of Fkbp11 reproduces by itself two phenotypic traits of SLE in mice: breakdown of B cell tolerance against DNA and initiation of plasma cell differentiation by acting upstream of Pax5 master regulator gene. PMID:26417441

  17. Anxiety Disorders

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    ... making life feel overwhelming or out of control. Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) . For a person with OCD, anxiety takes ... Disorders Special Needs Factsheet Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder A to Z: Panic Disorder Social Phobia Special ...

  18. Anxiety Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Anxiety Disorders About Anxiety Disorders Anxiety Disorders in Older Adults If you have an ... to treatment for the anxiety disorder. Types of Anxiety Disorders There are several basic types of anxiety ...

  19. Eating Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Submit Home > Body Image > Eating disorders Body Image Eating disorders About eating disorders Over-exercising More information on eating disorders About eating disorders "Mirror, Mirror on the wall...who's the thinnest ...

  20. Bipolar Disorder

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    ... High School How Can I Stop Cutting? Scoliosis Bipolar Disorder KidsHealth > Teens > Mind > Mental Health > Bipolar Disorder Print ... Treat It? Living With Bipolar Disorder What Is Bipolar Disorder? Bipolar disorders are one of several medical conditions ...

  1. Setd1a regulates progenitor B-cell-to-precursor B-cell development through histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation and Ig heavy-chain rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Tusi, Betsabeh Khoramian; Deng, Changwang; Salz, Tal; Zeumer, Leilani; Li, Yangqiu; So, Chi Wai Eric; Morel, Laurence M; Qiu, Yi; Huang, Suming

    2015-04-01

    SETD1A is a member of trithorax-related histone methyltransferases that methylate lysine 4 at histone H3 (H3K4). We showed previously that Setd1a is required for mesoderm specification and hematopoietic lineage differentiation in vitro. However, it remains unknown whether or not Setd1a controls specific hematopoietic lineage commitment and differentiation during animal development. Here, we reported that homozygous Setd1a knockout (KO) mice are embryonic lethal. Loss of the Setd1a gene in the hematopoietic compartment resulted in a blockage of the progenitor B-cell-to-precursor B-cell development in bone marrow (BM) and B-cell maturation in spleen. The Setd1a-cKO (conditional knockout) mice exhibited an enlarged spleen with disrupted spleen architecture and leukocytopenia. Mechanistically, Setd1a deficiency in BM reduced the levels of H3K4me3 at critical B-cell gene loci, including Pax5 and Rag1/2, which are critical for the IgH (Ig heavy-chain) locus contractions and rearrangement. Subsequently, the differential long-range looped interactions of the enhancer E? with proximal 5' DH region and 3' regulatory regions as well as with Pax5-activated intergenic repeat elements and 5' distal VH genes were compromised by the Setd1a-cKO. Together, our findings revealed a critical role of Setd1a and its mediated epigenetic modifications in regulating the IgH rearrangement and B-cell development. PMID:25550471

  2. High-dimensional immune profiling of total and rotavirus VP6-specific intestinal and circulating B cells by mass cytometry.

    PubMed

    Nair, N; Newell, E W; Vollmers, C; Quake, S R; Morton, J M; Davis, M M; He, X S; Greenberg, H B

    2016-01-01

    In-depth phenotyping of human intestinal antibody secreting cells (ASCs) and their precursors is important for developing improved mucosal vaccines. We used single-cell mass cytometry to simultaneously analyze 34 differentiation and trafficking markers on intestinal and circulating B cells. In addition, we labeled rotavirus (RV) double-layered particles with a metal isotope and characterized B cells specific to the RV VP6 major structural protein. We describe the heterogeneity of the intestinal B-cell compartment, dominated by ASCs with some phenotypic and transcriptional characteristics of long-lived plasma cells. Using principal component analysis, we visualized the phenotypic relationships between major B-cell subsets in the intestine and blood, and revealed that IgM(+) memory B cells (MBCs) and naive B cells were phenotypically related as were CD27(-) MBCs and switched MBCs. ASCs in the intestine and blood were highly clonally related, but associated with distinct trajectories of phenotypic development. VP6-specific B cells were present among diverse B-cell subsets in immune donors, including naive B cells, with phenotypes representative of the overall B-cell pool. These data provide a high dimensional view of intestinal B cells and the determinants regulating humoral memory to a ubiquitous, mucosal pathogen at steady-state. PMID:25899688

  3. Diversity of gut microflora is required for the generation of B cell with regulatory properties in a skin graft model

    PubMed Central

    Alhabbab, R.; Blair, P.; Elgueta, R.; Stolarczyk, E.; Marks, E.; Becker, P. D.; Ratnasothy, K.; Smyth, L.; Safinia, N.; Sharif-Paghaleh, E.; O’Connell, S.; Noelle, R. J.; Lord, G. M.; Howard, J. K.; Spencer, J.; Lechler, R. I.; Lombardi, G.

    2015-01-01

    B cells have been reported to promote graft rejection through alloantibody production. However, there is growing evidence that B cells can contribute to the maintenance of tolerance. Here, we used a mouse model of MHC-class I mismatched skin transplantation to investigate the contribution of B cells to graft survival. We demonstrate that adoptive transfer of B cells prolongs skin graft survival but only when the B cells were isolated from mice housed in low sterility “conventional” (CV) facilities and not from mice housed in pathogen free facilities (SPF). However, prolongation of skin graft survival was lost when B cells were isolated from IL-10 deficient mice housed in CV facilities. The suppressive function of B cells isolated from mice housed in CV facilities correlated with an anti-inflammatory environment and with the presence of a different gut microflora compared to mice maintained in SPF facilities. Treatment of mice in the CV facility with antibiotics abrogated the regulatory capacity of B cells. Finally, we identified transitional B cells isolated from CV facilities as possessing the regulatory function. These findings demonstrate that B cells, and in particular transitional B cells, can promote prolongation of graft survival, a function dependent on licensing by gut microflora. PMID:26109230

  4. Focal Adhesion Kinase Regulates the Localization and Retention of Pro-B Cells in Bone Marrow Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Young; Wolfram, Peter; Canty, Kimberly; Harley, Brendan; Nombela-Arrieta, César; Pivarnik, Gregory; Manis, John; Beggs, Hilary E; Silberstein, Leslie E

    2012-01-01

    Progenitor B cells reside in complex bone marrow microenvironments where they receive signals for growth and maturation. We reported previously that the CXCL12-FAK-VLA4 pathway plays an important role in progenitor B cell adhesion and migration. Here we have conditionally targeted in B cells Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK), and find that the numbers of progenitor pro-B, pre-B and immature B cells are reduced by 30–40% in B cell specific FAK knockout mice. When cultured in methylcellulose with IL-7 ± CXCL12, Fak deleted pro-B cells yield significantly fewer cells and colonies. Utilizing in situ quantitative imaging cytometry, we establish that in longitudinal femoral bone marrow sections, pro-B cells are preferentially localized in close proximity to the endosteum of the metaphyses and the diaphysis. Fak deletion disrupts the non-random distribution of pro-B cells and induces the mobilization of pro-B cells to the periphery in vivo. These effects of Fak deletion on pro-B cell mobilization and localization in bone marrow are amplified under inflammatory stress, i.e. following immunization with nitrophenol-conjugated chicken ?-globulin in alum (NP-CGG-alum). Collectively, these studies suggest the importance of FAK in regulating pro-B cell homeostasis and maintenance of their spatial distribution in bone marrow niches. PMID:23264658

  5. Follicular dendritic cells in vitro modulate the expression of Fas and Bcl-2 on germinal center B cells.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, R; Heinen, E; Sugai, N

    2000-03-01

    Germinal center (GC) B cells are highly susceptible to apoptosis. The cellular mechanism regulating this sensitivity, however, has not yet been fully delineated. To investigate whether follicular dendritic cells (FDC) are capable of regulating the susceptibility to apoptosis of GC B cells, we constructed a GC model in vitro: emperipolesis of tonsillar B cells by FDC. We then analyzed the expressions of apoptosis-related proteins (Bcl-2 and Fas) on the cells by three-color flow cytometry. B cells nonentrapped by FDC decreased rapidly in number owing to early apoptosis in vitro, whereas entrapped B cells were rescued for at least 18 h and showed peculiar regulation of Fas and Bcl-2. GC founder cells (CD38+, IgD+; GCFC) and GC B cells (CD38+, IgD-) showed approximately a twofold increased expression of Fas; in contrast, mantle zone B cells (CD38-, IgD+) and memory B cells (CD38-, IgD-) showed no changes. Bcl-2 expression in mantle zone and memory B cells was reduced by approximately one-half; however, GCFC and GC B cells continued to express little Bcl-2 and this did not change. Our findings strongly suggest that FDC play a part in the modulation of the susceptibility to apoptosis on B cells within GC. PMID:10772253

  6. Phosphatase Wip1 controls antigen-independent B-cell development in a p53-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Yi, Weiwei; Hu, Xuelian; Chen, Zhiyang; Liu, Leiming; Tian, Yuan; Chen, Hui; Cong, Yu-Sheng; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Lianfeng; Rudolph, Karl Lenhard; Zhang, Zhixin; Zhao, Yong; Ju, Zhenyu

    2015-07-30

    Wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 (Wip1), a phosphatase previously considered as an oncogene, has been implicated in the regulation of thymus homeostasis and neutrophil maturation. However, the role of Wip1 in B-cell development is unknown. We show that Wip1-deficient mice exhibit a significant reduction of B-cell numbers in the bone marrow, peripheral blood, and spleen. A reciprocal transplantation approach revealed a cell-intrinsic defect in early B-cell precursors caused by Wip1 deficiency. Further experiments revealed that Wip1 deficiency led to a sustained activation of p53 in B cells, which led to increased level of apoptosis in the pre-B-cell compartment. Notably, the impairment of B-cell development in Wip1-deficient mice was completely rescued by genetic ablation of p53, but not p21. Therefore, loss of Wip1 phosphatase induces a p53-dependent, but p21-independent, mechanism that impairs B-cell development by enhancing apoptosis in early B-cell precursors. Moreover, Wip1 deficiency exacerbated a decline in B-cell development caused by aging as evidenced in mice with aging and mouse models with serial competitive bone marrow transplantation, respectively. Our present data indicate that Wip1 plays a critical role in maintaining antigen-independent B-cell development in the bone marrow and preventing an aging-related decline in B-cell development. PMID:26012568

  7. Recognition of Antigen-Specific B Cell Receptors From Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patients By Synthetic Antigen Surrogates

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Mohosin; Liu, Yun; Morimoto, Jumpei; Peng, Haiyong; Aquino, Claudio; Rader, Christoph; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    In patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a single neoplastic antigen-specific B cell accumulates and overgrows other B cells, leading to immune deficiency. CLL is often treated with drugs that ablate all B cells, leading to further weakening of humoral immunity, and a more focused therapeutic strategy capable of targeting only the pathogenic B cells would represent a significant advance. One approach to this would be to develop synthetic surrogates of the CLL antigens allowing differentiation of the CLL cells and healthy B cells in a patient. Here, we describe discovery of non-peptidic molecules capable of targeting antigen-specific B cell receptors with good affinity and selectivity using a combinatorial library screen. We demonstrate that our hit compounds act as synthetic antigen surrogates and recognize CLL cells and not healthy B cells. Additionally, we argue that the technology we developed can be used for discovery of other classes of antigen surrogates. PMID:25467125

  8. Aspiration cytology of an ectopic cervical thymoma misinterpreted as a lymphoproliferative lesion of the thyroid: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LEE, YI-YING; WANG, WEN-CHING; LI, CHIEN-FENG

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic cervical thymoma is a rare tumor that originates from ectopic thymic tissue trapped during the migration of the embryonic thymus. To the best of our knowledge, only 14 cases of ectopic cervical thymoma, which include descriptions of the cytological features based on fine-needle aspiration (FNA), have been reported thus far. The current study describes the case of a 52-year-old male presenting with an enlarging anterior neck mass that been apparent for a number of years and was now accompanied by shortness of breath. FNA cytology revealed large numbers of small lymphocytes admixed with rare groups of large, polygonal cells that were interpreted to be reactive lymphocytes or possible follicular dendritic cells. However, no definite follicular or Hürthle cells were identified. Therefore, the overall cytological features were misinterpreted as a lymphoproliferative lesion. However, subsequent histological analysis of the resected left total lobectomy specimen determined a diagnosis of thymoma, type B1. Thus, awareness of this entity combined with a careful search for thymic epithelial cells may aid in determining a correct diagnosis when FNA is performed for the evaluation of a neck mass.

  9. MicroRNAs in B-cell lymphomas: how a complex biology gets more complex.

    PubMed

    Musilova, K; Mraz, M

    2015-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent important regulators of gene expression besides transcriptional control. miRNA regulation can be involved in the cell developmental fate decisions, but can also have more subtle roles in buffering stochastic fluctuations in gene expression. They participate in pathways fundamental to B-cell development like B-cell receptor (BCR) signalling, B-cell migration/adhesion, cell-cell interactions in immune niches, and the production and class-switching of immunoglobulins. miRNAs influence B-cell maturation, generation of pre-, marginal zone, follicular, B1, plasma and memory B cells. In this review, we discuss miRNAs with essential functions in malignant B-cell development (such as miR-150, miR-155, miR-21, miR-34a, miR-17-92 and miR-15-16). We also put these miRNAs in the context of normal B-cell differentiation, as this is intimately connected to neoplastic B-cell development. We review miRNAs' role in the most common B-cell malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma (FL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). We focus on miR-contribution to the regulation of important signalling pathways (such as NF-?B, PI3K/AKT and TGF-?), BCR signalling and its modulators (such as PTEN, SHIP-1, ZAP-70, GAB1 and BTK), anti- and pro-apoptotic proteins (such as BCL2, MCL1, TCL1, BIM, p53 and SIRT1) and transcription factors (such as MYC, MYB, PU.1, FOXP1 and BCL6). We also discuss the association of miRNAs' expression levels with the patients' survival and response to therapy, summarizing their potential use as predictive and prognostic markers. Importantly, the targeting of miRNAs (like use of anti-miR-155 or miR-34a mimic) could provide a novel therapeutic approach as evidenced by tumour regression in xenograft mouse models and initial promising data from clinical trials. PMID:25541152

  10. Identification of a Highly Antigenic Linear B Cell Epitope within Plasmodium vivax Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA-1)

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Lobo, Francisco Pereira; Morais, Cristiane Guimarães; Mourão, Luíza Carvalho; de Ávila, Ricardo Andrez Machado; Soares, Irene Silva; Fontes, Cor Jesus; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius; Olórtegui, Carlos Chavez; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Braga, Érika Martins

    2011-01-01

    Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) is considered to be a major candidate antigen for a malaria vaccine. Previous immunoepidemiological studies of naturally acquired immunity to Plasmodium vivax AMA-1 (PvAMA-1) have shown a higher prevalence of specific antibodies to domain II (DII) of AMA-1. In the present study, we confirmed that specific antibody responses from naturally infected individuals were highly reactive to both full-length AMA-1 and DII. Also, we demonstrated a strong association between AMA-1 and DII IgG and IgG subclass responses. We analyzed the primary sequence of PvAMA-1 for B cell linear epitopes co-occurring with intrinsically unstructured/disordered regions (IURs). The B cell epitope comprising the amino acid sequence 290–307 of PvAMA-1 (SASDQPTQYEEEMTDYQK), with the highest prediction scores, was identified in domain II and further selected for chemical synthesis and immunological testing. The antigenicity of the synthetic peptide was identified by serological analysis using sera from P. vivax-infected individuals who were knowingly reactive to the PvAMA-1 ectodomain only, domain II only, or reactive to both antigens. Although the synthetic peptide was recognized by all serum samples specific to domain II, serum with reactivity only to the full-length protein presented 58.3% positivity. Moreover, IgG reactivity against PvAMA-1 and domain II after depletion of specific synthetic peptide antibodies was reduced by 18% and 33% (P?=?0.0001 for both), respectively. These results suggest that the linear epitope SASDQPTQYEEEMTDYQK is highly antigenic during natural human infections and is an important antigenic region of the domain II of PvAMA-1, suggesting its possible future use in pre-clinical studies. PMID:21713006

  11. Functional capacities of human IgM memory B cells in early inflammatory responses and secondary germinal center reactions

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Marc; Przekopowitz, Martina; Taudien, Sarah; Lollies, Anna; Ronge, Viola; Drees, Britta; Lindemann, Monika; Hillen, Uwe; Engler, Harald; Singer, Bernhard B.; Küppers, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The generation and functions of human peripheral blood (PB) IgM+IgD+CD27+ B lymphocytes with somatically mutated IgV genes are controversially discussed. We determined their differential gene expression to naive B cells and to IgM-only and IgG+ memory B cells. This analysis revealed a high similarity of IgM+(IgD+)CD27+ and IgG+ memory B cells but also pointed at distinct functional capacities of both subsets. In vitro analyses revealed a tendency of activated IgM+IgD+CD27+ B cells to migrate to B-cell follicles and undergo germinal center (GC) B-cell differentiation, whereas activated IgG+ memory B cells preferentially showed a plasma cell (PC) fate. This observation was supported by reverse regulation of B-cell lymphoma 6 and PR domain containing 1 and differential BTB and CNC homology 1, basic leucine zipper transcription factor 2 expression. Moreover, IgM+IgD+CD27+ B lymphocytes preferentially responded to neutrophil-derived cytokines. Costimulation with catecholamines, carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule 8 (CEACAM8), and IFN-? caused differentiation of IgM+IgD+CD27+ B cells into PCs, induced class switching to IgG2, and was reproducible in cocultures with neutrophils. In conclusion, this study substantiates memory B-cell characteristics of human IgM+IgD+CD27+ B cells in that they share typical memory B-cell transcription patterns with IgG+ post-GC B cells and show a faster and more vigorous restimulation potential, a hallmark of immune memory. Moreover, this work reveals a functional plasticity of human IgM memory B cells by showing their propensity to undergo secondary GC reactions upon reactivation, but also by their special role in early inflammation via interaction with immunomodulatory neutrophils. PMID:25624468

  12. Deoxynucleotide-polymerizing enzyme activities in T- and B-cells of acute lymphoblastic leukemia origin.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, B I

    1976-05-01

    All 5 thymus-dependent cell (T-cell) lines (Molt-3; Molt-4; RPMI-8402; CCRF-CEM; CCRF-HSB-2) and 7 thymus-independent cell (B-cell) lines (RPMI-8382, RPMI-8392, RPMI-8412, RPMI-8422, RPMI-8432, RPMI-8442, CCRF-SB) established so far from acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients were examined for deoxynucleotide polymerizing enzymes. All T- and B-cells had DNA polymerase gamma, DNA polymerase beta, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase both in the soluble (the latter 2 enzymes only in small amounts) and chromatin fraction, whereas DNA polymerase alpha was found only in the soluble fraction. With respect to their sedimentation and chromatographic behavior, template-primer requirements, Km for deoxythymidine triphosphate or deoxyguanosine triphosphate divalent cation preference, effect of NaCI and inhibitors, the enzymes from T- and B-cells resembled each other and those from other mammalian cells. DNA polymerase alpha, beta, and gamma from T-cells like those from "fresh" acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, were more thermolabile than those from B-cells or phytohemagglutinin-stimulated normal lymphocytes. In addition, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase from the above cells was completely inactivated in 5 to 6 min at 50 degrees, whereas the DNA polymerase alpha, beta, and gamma retained considerable activity even after heating for 25 min at 50 degrees. DNA polymerase activity of the soluble fraction from T-cells was of the same magnitude as in B-cells when expressed on a DNA basis but twice that of B-cells when expressed on a protein basis. High terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase activity, equivalent to that observed in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, was found in all T-cell lines that, when expressed on a DNA basis, was 30 to 100 times higher than the B-cell lines tested. These results support the suggestion of earlier investigators that T-cell lines examined here may have originated from leukemic cells. PMID:1083765

  13. B cells are not essential for Lactobacillus-mediated protection against lethal pneumovirus infection*

    PubMed Central

    Percopo, Caroline M.; Dyer, Kimberly D.; Garcia-Crespo, Katia E.; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J.; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown previously that priming of respiratory mucosa with live Lactobacillus species promotes robust and prolonged survival from an otherwise lethal infection with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), a property known as heterologous immunity. Lactobacillus-priming results in a moderate reduction in virus recovery and a dramatic reduction in virus-induced proinflammatory cytokine production; the precise mechanisms underlying these findings remain to be elucidated. As B cells have been shown to promote heterologous immunity against respiratory virus pathogens under similar conditions, here we explore the role of B cells in Lactobacillus-mediated protection against acute pneumovirus infection. We found that Lactobacillus-primed mice feature elevated levels of airway immunoglobulins IgG, IgA and IgM and lung tissues with dense, B cell (B220+) enriched peribronchial and perivascular infiltrates with germinal centers consistent with descriptions of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue. No B cells were detected in lung tissue of Lactobacillus-primed B-cell deficient ?MT mice or Jh mice, and Lactobacillus-primed ?MT mice had no characteristic infiltrates or airway immunoglobulins. Nonetheless, we observed diminished virus recovery and profound suppression of virus-induced proinflammatory cytokines CCL2, IFN-gamma, and CXCL10 in both wild-type and Lactobacillus-primed ?MT mice. Furthermore, L. plantarum-primed, B-cell deficient ?MT and Jh mice were fully protected from an otherwise lethal PVM infection, as were their respective wild-types. We conclude that B cells are dispensable for Lactobacillus-mediated heterologous immunity and were not crucial for promoting survival in response to an otherwise lethal pneumovirus infection. PMID:24748495

  14. B cells are not essential for Lactobacillus-mediated protection against lethal pneumovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Percopo, Caroline M; Dyer, Kimberly D; Garcia-Crespo, Katia E; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Shaffer, Arthur L; Domachowske, Joseph B; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2014-06-01

    We have shown previously that priming of respiratory mucosa with live Lactobacillus species promotes robust and prolonged survival from an otherwise lethal infection with pneumonia virus of mice, a property known as heterologous immunity. Lactobacillus priming results in a moderate reduction in virus recovery and a dramatic reduction in virus-induced proinflammatory cytokine production; the precise mechanisms underlying these findings remain to be elucidated. Because B cells have been shown to promote heterologous immunity against respiratory virus pathogens under similar conditions, in this study we explore the role of B cells in Lactobacillus-mediated protection against acute pneumovirus infection. We found that Lactobacillus-primed mice feature elevated levels of airway Igs IgG, IgA, and IgM and lung tissues with dense, B cell (B220(+))-enriched peribronchial and perivascular infiltrates with germinal centers consistent with descriptions of BALT. No B cells were detected in lung tissue of Lactobacillus-primed B cell deficient ?MT mice or Jh mice, and Lactobacillus-primed ?MT mice had no characteristic infiltrates or airway Igs. Nonetheless, we observed diminished virus recovery and profound suppression of virus-induced proinflammatory cytokines CCL2, IFN-?, and CXCL10 in both wild-type and Lactobacillus-primed ?MT mice. Furthermore, Lactobacillus plantarum-primed, B cell-deficient ?MT and Jh mice were fully protected from an otherwise lethal pneumonia virus of mice infection, as were their respective wild-types. We conclude that B cells are dispensable for Lactobacillus-mediated heterologous immunity and were not crucial for promoting survival in response to an otherwise lethal pneumovirus infection. PMID:24748495

  15. Molecular analysis of single B cells from T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma shows the derivation of the tumor cells from mutating germinal center B cells and exemplifies means by which immunoglobulin genes are modified in germinal center B cells.

    PubMed

    Bräuninger, A; Küppers, R; Spieker, T; Siebert, R; Strickler, J G; Schlegelberger, B; Rajewsky, K; Hansmann, M L

    1999-04-15

    T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma (TCRBCL) belongs to the group of diffuse large cell lymphomas (DLL). It is characterized by a small number of tumor B cells among a major population of nonmalignant polyclonal T cells. To identify the developmental stage of the tumor progenitor cells, we micromanipulated the putative neoplastic large CD20(+) cells from TCRBCLs and amplified and sequenced immunoglobulin (Ig) V gene rearrangements from individual cells. In six cases, clonal Ig heavy, as well as light chain, gene rearrangements were amplified from the isolated B cells. All six cases harbored somatically mutated V gene rearrangements with an average mutation frequency of 15.5% for heavy (VH) and 5.9% for light (VL) chains and intraclonal diversity based on somatic mutation. These findings identify germinal center (GC) B cells as the precursors of the transformed B cells in TCRBCL. The study also exemplifies various means how Ig gene rearrangements can be modified by GC B cells or their malignant counterparts in TCRBCL: In one case, the tumor precursor may have switched from kappa to lambda light chain expression after acquiring a crippling mutation within the initially functional kappa light chain gene. In another case, the tumor cells harbor two in-frame VH gene rearrangements, one of which was rendered nonfunctional by somatic mutation. Either the tumor cell precursor entered the GC with two potentially functional in-frame rearrangements or the second VHDHJH rearrangement occurred in the GC after the initial in-frame rearrangement was inactivated by somatic mutation. Finally, in each of the six cases, at least one cell contained two (or more) copies of a clonal Ig gene rearrangement with sequence variations between these copies. The presence of sequence variants for V region genes within single B cells has so far not been observed in any other normal or transformed B lymphocyte. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) points to a generalized polyploidy of the tumor cells. PMID:10194448

  16. Leishmania infantum Amastigotes Trigger a Subpopulation of Human B Cells with an Immunoregulatory Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Andreani, Guadalupe; Ouellet, Michel; Menasria, Rym; Gomez, Alejandro Martin; Barat, Corinne; Tremblay, Michel J.

    2015-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is caused by the protozoan parasites Leishmania infantum and Leishmania donovani. This infection is characterized by an uncontrolled parasitization of internal organs which, when left untreated, leads to death. Disease progression is linked with the type of immune response generated and a strong correlation was found between disease progression and serum levels of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. Other studies have suggested a role for B cells in the pathology of this parasitic infection and the recent identification of a B-cell population in humans with regulatory functions, which secretes large amounts of IL-10 following activation, have sparked our interest in the context of visceral leishmaniasis. We report here that incubation of human B cells with Leishmania infantum amastigotes resulted in upregulation of multiple cell surface activation markers and a dose-dependent secretion of IL-10. Conditioned media from B cells incubated with Leishmania infantum amastigotes were shown to strongly inhibit CD4+ T-cell activation, proliferation and function (i.e. as monitored by TNF and IFN? secretion). Blockade of IL-10 activity using a soluble IL-10 receptor restored only partially TNF and IFN? production to control levels. The parasite-mediated IL-10 secretion was shown to rely on the activity of Syk, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase and p38, as well as to require intracellular calcium mobilization. Cell sorting experiments allowed us to identify the IL-10-secreting B-cell subset (i.e. CD19+CD24+CD27-). In summary, exposure of human B cells to Leishmania infantum amastigotes triggers B cells with regulatory activities mediated in part by IL-10, which could favor parasite dissemination in the organism. PMID:25710789

  17. Silencing miR-146a influences B cells and ameliorates experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, JunMei; Jia, Ge; Liu, Qun; Hu, Jue; Yan, Mei; Yang, BaiFeng; Yang, Huan; Zhou, WenBin; Li, Jing

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs have been shown to be important regulators of immune homeostasis as patients with aberrant microRNA expression appeared to be more susceptible to autoimmune diseases. We recently found that miR-146a was up-regulated in activated B cells in response to rat acetylcholine receptor (AChR) ?-subunit 97-116 peptide, and this up-regulation was significantly attenuated by AntagomiR-146a. Our data also demonstrated that silencing miR-146a with its inhibitor AntagomiR-146a effectively ameliorated clinical myasthenic symptoms in mice with ongoing experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. Furthermore, multiple defects were observed after miR-146a was knocked down in B cells, including decreased anti-R97-116 antibody production and class switching, reduced numbers of plasma cells, memory B cells and B-1 cells, and weakened activation of B cells. Previously, miR-146a has been identified as a nuclear factor-?B-dependent gene and predicted to base pair with the tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1) genes to regulate the immune response. However, our study proved that miR-146a inhibition had no effect on the expression of TRAF6 and IRAK1 in B cells. This result suggests that the function of miR-146a in B cells does not involve these two target molecules. We conclude that silencing miR-146a exerts its therapeutic effects by influencing the B-cell functions that contribute to the autoimmune pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis. PMID:24962817

  18. B-cell repertoire responses to varicella-zoster vaccination in human identical twins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Yi; Cavanagh, Mary M; Le Saux, Sabine; Qi, Qian; Roskin, Krishna M; Looney, Timothy J; Lee, Ji-Yeun; Dixit, Vaishali; Dekker, Cornelia L; Swan, Gary E; Goronzy, Jörg J; Boyd, Scott D

    2015-01-13

    Adaptive immune responses in humans rely on somatic genetic rearrangements of Ig and T-cell receptor loci to generate diverse antigen receptors. It is unclear to what extent an individual's genetic background affects the characteristics of the antibody repertoire used in responding to vaccination or infection. We studied the B-cell repertoires and clonal expansions in response to attenuated varicella-zoster vaccination in four pairs of adult identical twins and found that the global antibody repertoires of twin pair members showed high similarity in antibody heavy chain V, D, and J gene segment use, and in the length and features of the complementarity-determining region 3, a major determinant of antigen binding. These twin similarities were most pronounced in the IgM-expressing B-cell pools, but were seen to a lesser extent in IgG-expressing B cells. In addition, the degree of antibody somatic mutation accumulated in the B-cell repertoire was highly correlated within twin pair members. Twin pair members had greater numbers of shared convergent antibody sequences, including mutated sequences, suggesting similarity among memory B-cell clonal lineages. Despite these similarities in the memory repertoire, the B-cell clones used in acute responses to ZOSTAVAX vaccination were largely unique to each individual. Taken together, these results suggest that the overall B-cell repertoire is significantly shaped by the underlying germ-line genome, but that stochastic or individual-specific effects dominate the selection of clones in response to an acute antigenic stimulus. PMID:25535378

  19. Functional characterization of IgM+ B cells and adaptive immunity in lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus L.).

    PubMed

    Rønneseth, Anita; Ghebretnsae, Dawit B; Wergeland, Heidrun I; Haugland, Gyri T

    2015-10-01

    The innate immune responses in lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus L.) have been shown to be functional, but little is currently known about the B cells, immunoglobulins or adaptive immune responses in this species. We have used anti-IgM antiserum to isolate B cells and compared them morphologically and functionally with other cell types. The fraction of IgM(+) cells among isolated peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL), head kidney leukocytes (HKL) and spleen leukocytes (SL) was in the range of 40%, 12% and 34%, respectively. The IgM(+) B cells had high phagocytic ability and were the predominant phagocytes in blood with higher capacity than IgM(+) B cells in HKL. Interestingly, among PBL, the most potent phagocytes were, in addition to monocytes, some small agranular uncharacterized IgM(-) cells. The IgM(+) B cells were positive for acid phosphatases (AcP), but negative for myeloperoxidase (MPO). Neutrophils were positive for MPO, while monocytes/macrophages and dendritic-like cells stained negatively. Monocytes/macrophages and the small, agranular IgM(-) cells stained most strongly positive for AcP corresponding to their high phagocytic capacity. Further, the ability to produce specific antibodies upon immunization verified adaptive immunity in the species. The high proportion of phagocytic IgM(+) B cells and their phagocytic ability indicate a significant role of phagocytic B cells in lumpfish innate immunity. The present analyses also give strong indications that vaccination and immunostimulation of farmed lumpfish can be used to prevent disease and mortality caused by pathogenic organisms. PMID:26021455

  20. IL-10-producing B-cells limit CNS inflammation and infarct volume in experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Bodhankar, Sheetal; Chen, Yingxin; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Murphy, Stephanie J; Offner, Halina

    2013-09-01

    Clinical stroke induces inflammatory processes leading to cerebral injury. IL-10 expression is elevated during major CNS diseases and limits inflammation in the brain. Recent evidence demonstrated that absence of B-cells led to larger infarct volumes and increased numbers of activated T-cells, monocytes and microglial cells in the brain, thus implicating a regulatory role of B-cell subpopulations in limiting CNS damage from stroke. The aim of this study was to determine whether the IL-10-producing regulatory B-cell subset can limit CNS inflammation and reduce infarct volume following ischemic stroke in B-cell deficient (?MT(-/-)) mice. Five million IL-10-producing B-cells were obtained from IL-10-GFP reporter mice and transferred i.v. to ?MT(-/-)mice. After 24 h following this transfer, recipients were subjected to 60 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by 48 h of reperfusion. Compared to vehicle-treated controls, the IL-10(+) B-cell-replenished ?MT(-/-)mice had reduced infarct volume and fewer infiltrating activated T-cells and monocytes in the affected brain hemisphere. These effects in CNS were accompanied by significant increases in regulatory T-cells and expression of the co-inhibitory receptor, PD-1, with a significant reduction in the proinflammatory milieu in the periphery. These novel observations provide the first proof of both immunoregulatory and protective functions of IL-10-secreting B-cells in MCAO that potentially could impart significant benefit for stroke patients in the clinic. PMID:23640015

  1. Lunatic, Manic, and Radical Fringe Each Promote T and B Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Song, Yinghui; Kumar, Vivek; Wei, Hua-Xing; Qiu, Ju; Stanley, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Lunatic, Manic, and Radical Fringe (LFNG, MFNG, and RFNG) are N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases that modify Notch receptors and regulate Notch signaling. Loss of LFNG affects thymic T cell development, and LFNG and MFNG are required for marginal zone (MZ) B cell development. However, roles for MFNG and RFNG in T cell development, RFNG in B cell development, or Fringes in T and B cell activation are not identified. In this study, we show that Lfng/Mfng/Rfng triple knockout (Fng tKO) mice exhibited reduced binding of DLL4 Notch ligand to CD4/CD8 double-negative (DN) T cell progenitors, and reduced expression of NOTCH1 targets Deltex1 and CD25. Fng tKO mice had reduced frequencies of DN1/cKit(+) and DN2 T cell progenitors and CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive (DP) T cell precursors, but increased frequencies of CD4(+) and CD8(+) single-positive T cells in the thymus. In spleen, Fng tKO mice had reduced frequencies of CD4(+), CD8(+), central memory T cells and MZ B cells, and an increased frequency of effector memory T cells, neutrophils, follicular, and MZ P B cells. The Fng tKO phenotype was cell-autonomous and largely rescued in mice expressing one allele of a single Fng gene. Stimulation of Fng tKO splenocytes with anti-CD3/CD28 beads or LPS gave reduced proliferation compared with controls, and the generation of activated T cells by Concanavalin A or L-PHA was also reduced in Fng tKO mice. Therefore, each Fringe contributes to T and B cell development, and Fringe is required for optimal in vitro stimulation of T and B cells. PMID:26608918

  2. Identification of the tyrosine phosphatase PTP1C as a B cell antigen receptor-associated protein involved in the regulation of B cell signaling

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Recent data implicating loss of PTP1C tyrosine phosphatase activity in the genesis of the multiple hemopoietic cell defects found in systemic autoimmune/immunodeficient motheaten (me) and viable motheaten (mev) mice suggest that PTP1C plays an important role in modulating intracellular signaling events regulating cell activation and differentiation. To begin elucidating the role for this cytosolic phosphatase in lymphoid cell signal transduction, we have examined early signaling events and mitogenic responses induced by B cell antigen receptor (BCR) ligation in me and mev splenic B cells and in CD5+ CH12 lymphoma cells, which represent the lymphoid population amplified in motheaten mice. Despite their lack of functional PTP1C, me and mev B cells proliferated normally in response to LPS. However, compared with wild-type B cells, cells from the mutant mice were hyperresponsive to normally submitogenic concentrations of F(ab')2 anti- Ig antibody, and they exhibited reduced susceptibility to the inhibitory effects of Fc gamma IIRB cross-linking on BCR-induced proliferation. Additional studies of unstimulated CH12 and wild-type splenic B cells revealed the constitutive association of PTP1C with the resting BCR complex, as evidenced by coprecipitation of PTP1C protein and phosphatase activity with BCR components and the depletion of BCR- associated tyrosine phosphatase activity by anti-PTP1C antibodies. These results suggest a role for PTP1C in regulating the tyrosine phosphorylation state of the resting BCR complex components, a hypothesis supported by the observation that PTP1C specifically induces dephosphorylation of a 35-kD BCR-associated protein likely representing Ig-alpha. In contrast, whereas membrane Ig cross-linking was associated with an increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation of PTP1C and an approximately 140-kD coprecipitated protein, PTP1C was no longer detected in the BCR complex after receptor engagement, suggesting that PTP1C dissociates from the activated receptor complex. Together these results suggest a critical role for PTP1C in modulating BCR signaling capacity, and they indicate that the PTP1C influence on B cell signaling is likely to be realized in both resting and activated cells. PMID:7539038

  3. Disclosing the CXCR4 expression in lymphoproliferative diseases by targeted molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Wester, Hans Jürgen; Keller, Ulrich; Schottelius, Margret; Beer, Ambros; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Hoffmann, Frauke; Šime?ek, Jakub; Gerngross, Carlos; Lassmann, Michael; Herrmann, Ken; Pellegata, Natalia; Rudelius, Martina; Kessler, Horst; Schwaiger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine ligand-receptor interactions play a pivotal role in cell attraction and cellular trafficking, both in normal tissue homeostasis and in disease. In cancer, chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) expression is an adverse prognostic factor. Early clinical studies suggest that targeting CXCR4 with suitable high-affinity antagonists might be a novel means for therapy. In addition to the preclinical evaluation of [(68)Ga]Pentixafor in mice bearing human lymphoma xenografts as an exemplary CXCR4-expressing tumor entity, we report on the first clinical applications of [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-Positron Emission Tomography as a powerful method for CXCR4 imaging in cancer patients. [(68)Ga]Pentixafor binds with high affinity and selectivity to human CXCR4 and exhibits a favorable dosimetry. [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-PET provides images with excellent specificity and contrast. This non-invasive imaging technology for quantitative assessment of CXCR4 expression allows to further elucidate the role of CXCR4/CXCL12 ligand interaction in the pathogenesis and treatment of cancer, cardiovascular diseases and autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. PMID:25825601

  4. Use of Rituximab for Refractory Cytopenias Associated with Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS)

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V. Koneti; Price, Susan; Perkins, Katie; Aldridge, Patricia; Tretler, Jean; Davis, Joie; Dale, Janet K.; Gill, Fred; Hartman, Kip R.; Stork, Linda C.; Gnarra, David J.; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Newburger, Peter E.; Puck, Jennifer; Fleisher, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background ALPS is a disorder of apoptosis resulting in accumulation of autoreactive lymphocytes, leading to marked lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly and multilineage cytopenias due to splenic sequestration and/or autoimmune destruction often presenting in childhood. We summarize our experience of rituximab use during the last 8 years in twelve patients, 9 children and 3 adults, out of 259 individuals with ALPS, belonging to 166 families currently enrolled in studies at the National Institutes of Health. Methods Refractory immune thrombocytopenia (platelet count <20,000) in 9 patients and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in 3 patients led to treatment with rituximab. Among them, 7 patients had undergone prior surgical splenectomy; 3 had significant splenomegaly; and 2 had no palpable spleen. Results In 7 out of 9 patients with ALPS and thrombocytopenia, rituximab therapy led to median response duration of 21months (range 14–36 months). In contrast, none of the 3 children treated with rituximab for AIHA responded. Noted toxicities included profound and prolonged hypogammaglobulinemia in 3 patients requiring replacement IVIG, total absence of antibody response to polysaccharide vaccines lasting up to 4 years after rituximab infusions in 1 patient and prolonged neutropenia in 1 patient. Conclusion Toxicities including hypogammaglobulinemia and neutropenia constitute an additional infection risk burden, especially in asplenic individuals, and may warrant avoidance of rituximab until other immunosuppressive medication options are exhausted. Long term follow up of ALPS patients with cytopenias after any treatment is necessary to determine relative risks and benefits. PMID:19214977

  5. Disclosing the CXCR4 Expression in Lymphoproliferative Diseases by Targeted Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wester, Hans Jürgen; Keller, Ulrich; Schottelius, Margret; Beer, Ambros; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Hoffmann, Frauke; Šime?ek, Jakub; Gerngross, Carlos; Lassmann, Michael; Herrmann, Ken; Pellegata, Natalia; Rudelius, Martina; Kessler, Horst; Schwaiger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine ligand-receptor interactions play a pivotal role in cell attraction and cellular trafficking, both in normal tissue homeostasis and in disease. In cancer, chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) expression is an adverse prognostic factor. Early clinical studies suggest that targeting CXCR4 with suitable high-affinity antagonists might be a novel means for therapy. In addition to the preclinical evaluation of [68Ga]Pentixafor in mice bearing human lymphoma xenografts as an exemplary CXCR4-expressing tumor entity, we report on the first clinical applications of [68Ga]Pentixafor-Positron Emission Tomography as a powerful method for CXCR4 imaging in cancer patients. [68Ga]Pentixafor binds with high affinity and selectivity to human CXCR4 and exhibits a favorable dosimetry. [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET provides images with excellent specificity and contrast. This non-invasive imaging technology for quantitative assessment of CXCR4 expression allows to further elucidate the role of CXCR4/CXCL12 ligand interaction in the pathogenesis and treatment of cancer, cardiovascular diseases and autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. PMID:25825601

  6. Acute Liver Injury Is Independent of B Cells or Immunoglobulin M

    PubMed Central

    Richards, James A.; Bucsaiova, Martina; Hesketh, Emily E.; Ventre, Chiara; Henderson, Neil C.; Simpson, Kenneth; Bellamy, Christopher O. C.; Howie, Sarah E. M.; Anderton, Stephen M.; Hughes, Jeremy; Wigmore, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Acute liver injury is a clinically important pathology and results in the release of Danger Associated Molecular Patterns, which initiate an immune response. Withdrawal of the injurious agent and curtailing any pathogenic secondary immune response may allow spontaneous resolution of injury. The role B cells and Immunoglobulin M (IgM) play in acute liver injury is largely unknown and it was proposed that B cells and/or IgM would play a significant role in its pathogenesis. Methods Tissue from 3 models of experimental liver injury (ischemia-reperfusion injury, concanavalin A hepatitis and paracetamol-induced liver injury) and patients transplanted following paracetamol overdose were stained for evidence of IgM deposition. Mice deficient in B cells (and IgM) were used to dissect out the role B cells and/or IgM played in the development or resolution of injury. Serum transfer into mice lacking IgM was used to establish the role IgM plays in injury. Results Significant deposition of IgM was seen in the explanted livers of patients transplanted following paracetamol overdose as well as in 3 experimental models of acute liver injury (ischemia-reperfusion injury, concanavalin A hepatitis and paracetamol-induced liver injury). Serum transfer into IgM-deficient mice failed to reconstitute injury (p = 0.66), despite successful engraftment of IgM. Mice deficient in both T and B cells (RAG1-/-) mice (p<0.001), but not B cell deficient (?MT) mice (p = 0.93), were significantly protected from injury. Further interrogation with T cell deficient (CD3?KO) mice confirmed that the T cell component is a key mediator of sterile liver injury. Mice deficient in B cells and IgM mice did not have a significant delay in resolution following acute liver injury. Discussion IgM deposition appears to be common feature of both human and murine sterile liver injury. However, neither IgM nor B cells, play a significant role in the development of or resolution from acute liver injury. T cells appear to be key mediators of injury. In conclusion, the therapeutic targeting of IgM or B cells (e.g. with Rituximab) would have limited benefit in protecting patients from acute liver injury. PMID:26406765

  7. Substrate stiffness regulates B-cell activation, proliferation, class switch, and T-cell-independent antibody responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yingyue; Yi, Junyang; Wan, Zhengpeng; Liu, Kai; Song, Ping; Chau, Alicia; Wang, Fei; Chang, Zai; Han, Weidong; Zheng, Wenjie; Chen, Ying-Hua; Xiong, Chunyang; Liu, Wanli

    2015-06-01

    B cells use B-cell receptors (BCRs) to sense antigens that are usually presented on substrates with different stiffness. However, it is not known how substrate stiffness affects B-cell proliferation, class switch, and in vivo antibody responses. We addressed these questions using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates with different stiffness (20 or 1100 kPa). Live cell imaging experiments suggested that antigens on stiffer substrates more efficiently trigger the synaptic accumulation of BCR and phospho-Syk molecules compared with antigens on softer substrates. In vitro expansion of mouse primary B cells shows different preferences for substrate stiffness when stimulated by different expansion stimuli. LPS equally drives B-cell proliferation on stiffer or softer substrates. Anti-CD40 antibodies enhance B-cell proliferation on stiffer substrates, while antigens enhance B-cell proliferation on softer substrates through a mechanism involving the enhanced phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, and FoxO1. In vitro class switch differentiation of B cells prefers softer substrates. Lastly, NP67-Ficoll on softer substrates accounted for an enhanced antibody response in vivo. Thus, substrate stiffness regulates B-cell activation, proliferation, class switch, and T cell independent antibody responses in vivo, suggesting its broad application in manipulating the fate of B cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25756957

  8. B Cells in the Multiple Sclerosis Central Nervous System: Trafficking and Contribution to CNS-Compartmentalized Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Laure; Touil, Hanane; Pikor, Natalia B.; Gommerman, Jennifer L.; Prat, Alexandre; Bar-Or, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trial results of peripheral B cell depletion indicate abnormal proinflammatory B cell properties, and particularly antibody-independent functions, contribute to relapsing MS disease activity. However, potential roles of B cells in progressive forms of disease continue to be debated. Prior work indicates that presence of B cells is fostered within the inflamed MS central nervous system (CNS) environment, and that B cell-rich immune cell collections may be present within the meninges of patients. A potential association is reported between such meningeal immune cell collections and the subpial pattern of cortical injury that is now considered important in progressive disease. Elucidating the characteristics of B cells that populate the MS CNS, how they traffic into the CNS and how they may contribute to progressive forms of the disease has become of considerable interest. Here, we will review characteristics of human B cells identified within distinct CNS subcompartments of patients with MS, including the cerebrospinal fluid, parenchymal lesions, and meninges, as well as the relationship between B cell populations identified in these subcompartments and the periphery. We will further describe the different barriers of the CNS and the possible mechanisms of migration of B cells across these barriers. Finally, we will consider the range of human B cell responses (including potential for antibody production, cytokine secretion, and antigen presentation) that may contribute to propagating inflammation and injury cascades thought to underlie MS progression.

  9. Cooperation of B Cell Lineages in Induction of HIV-1-Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Bonsignori, Mattia; Liao, Hua-Xin; Kumar, Amit; Xia, Shi-Mao; Lu, Xiaozhi; Cai, Fangping; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Song, Hongshuo; Zhou, Tongqing; Lynch, Rebecca M.; Alam, S. Munir; Moody, M. Anthony; Ferrari, Guido; Berrong, Mark; Kelsoe, Garnett; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Montefiori, David C.; Kamanga, Gift; Cohen, Myron; Hraber, Peter; Kwong, Peter D.; Korber, Bette T.; Mascola, John R.; Kepler, Thomas B.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Development of strategies for induction of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) by vaccines is a priority. Determining the steps of bnAb induction in HIV-1-infected individuals who make bnAbs is a key strategy for immunogen design. Here we study the B cell response in a bnAb-producing individual, and report cooperation between two B cell lineages to drive bnAb development. We isolated an autologous virus-neutralizing antibody lineage that targeted an envelope region (loop D) and selected virus escape mutants that resulted in both enhanced bnAb lineage envelope binding and escape mutant neutralization—traits associated with increased B cell antigen drive. Thus, in this individual, two B cell lineages cooperated to induce the development of bnAbs. Design of vaccine immunogens that simultaneously drive both autologous and broadly neutralizing B cell lineages may be important for vaccine-induced recapitulation of events that transpire during the maturation of neutralizing antibodies in HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:25065977

  10. Acidic phospholipids govern the enhanced activation of IgG-B cell