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Sample records for b-cell lymphoproliferative disorders

  1. [Chronic B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders with hairy cells].

    PubMed

    Troussard, Xavier; Cornet, Édouard

    2015-01-01

    The standardized blood smear examination is the first step in the diagnosis of a B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorder and can guide further investigations. In the laboratory, the identification of hairy cells on blood smear is a matter of daily practice. Hairy cell proliferations represent heterogeneous entities and their respective diagnoses can be difficult. If hairy cell leukemia (HCL) and splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) represent separate entities, the variant form of HCL (HCLv) and splenic diffuse red pulp small B-cell lymphoma (SDRPL) remain provisional entities in the 2008 WHO classification. We discuss the main clinical and biological characteristics of these four entities and appropriate means to characterize, identify and distinguish from each other; standardized blood smear examination, multiparameter flow cytometry analysis, analysis of the repertoire of immunoglobulins heavy chains genes and their mutational status (mutated or unmutated profile), molecular analyses: BRAF gene V600E mutation in HCL and MAP2K1 gene mutations in HCLv. We also discuss the main therapeutic aspects with emphasis on the new targeted drugs that enter into force in the therapeutic arsenal. PMID:25858127

  2. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of expanded B-cell clones from multiclonal versus monoclonal B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana; Rodríguez-Caballero, Arancha; Criado, Ignacio; Langerak, Anton W.; Nieto, Wendy G.; Lécrevisse, Quentin; González, Marcos; Cortesão, Emília; Paiva, Artur; Almeida, Julia; Orfao, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Chronic antigen-stimulation has been recurrently involved in the earlier stages of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The expansion of two or more B-cell clones has frequently been reported in individuals with these conditions; potentially, such coexisting clones have a greater probability of interaction with common immunological determinants. Here, we analyzed the B-cell receptor repertoire and molecular profile, as well as the phenotypic, cytogenetic and hematologic features, of 228 chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like and non-chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like clones comparing multiclonal (n=85 clones from 41 cases) versus monoclonal (n=143 clones) monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The B-cell receptor of B-cell clones from multiclonal cases showed a slightly higher degree of HCDR3 homology than B-cell clones from mono clonal cases, in association with unique hematologic (e.g. lower B-lymphocyte counts) and cytogenetic (e.g. lower frequency of cytogenetically altered clones) features usually related to earlier stages of the disease. Moreover, a subgroup of coexisting B-cell clones from individual multiclonal cases which were found to be phylogenetically related showed unique molecular and cytogenetic features: they more frequently shared IGHV3 gene usage, shorter HCDR3 sequences with a greater proportion of IGHV mutations and del(13q14.3), than other unrelated B-cell clones. These results would support the antigen-driven nature of such multiclonal B-cell expansions, with potential involvement of multiple antigens/epitopes. PMID:24488564

  3. Hepatitis C virus upregulates B-cell receptor signaling: a novel mechanism for HCV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Dai, B; Chen, A Y; Corkum, C P; Peroutka, R J; Landon, A; Houng, S; Muniandy, P A; Zhang, Y; Lehrmann, E; Mazan-Mamczarz, K; Steinhardt, J; Shlyak, M; Chen, Q C; Becker, K G; Livak, F; Michalak, T I; Talwani, R; Gartenhaus, R B

    2016-06-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is essential for the development of B cells and has a critical role in B-cell neoplasia. Increasing evidence indicates an association between chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and B-cell lymphoma, however, the mechanisms by which HCV causes B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder are still unclear. Herein, we demonstrate the expression of HCV viral proteins in B cells of HCV-infected patients and show that HCV upregulates BCR signaling in human primary B cells. HCV nonstructural protein NS3/4A interacts with CHK2 and downregulates its activity, modulating HuR posttranscriptional regulation of a network of target mRNAs associated with B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Interestingly, the BCR signaling pathway was found to have the largest number of transcripts with increased association with HuR and was upregulated by NS3/4A. Our study reveals a previously unidentified role of NS3/4A in regulation of host BCR signaling during HCV infection, contributing to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying HCV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:26434584

  4. Hepatitis C virus upregulates B-cell receptor signaling: a novel mechanism for HCV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dai, B; Chen, A Y; Corkum, C P; Peroutka, R J; Landon, A; Houng, S; Muniandy, P A; Zhang, Y; Lehrmann, E; Mazan-Mamczarz, K; Steinhardt, J; Shlyak, M; Chen, Q C; Becker, K G; Livak, F; Michalak, T I; Talwani, R; Gartenhaus, R B

    2016-01-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is essential for the development of B cells and has a critical role in B-cell neoplasia. Increasing evidence indicates an association between chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and B-cell lymphoma, however, the mechanisms by which HCV causes B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder are still unclear. Herein, we demonstrate the expression of HCV viral proteins in B cells of HCV-infected patients and show that HCV upregulates BCR signaling in human primary B cells. HCV nonstructural protein NS3/4A interacts with CHK2 and downregulates its activity, modulating HuR posttranscriptional regulation of a network of target mRNAs associated with B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Interestingly, the BCR signaling pathway was found to have the largest number of transcripts with increased association with HuR and was upregulated by NS3/4A. Our study reveals a previously unidentified role of NS3/4A in regulation of host BCR signaling during HCV infection, contributing to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying HCV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:26434584

  5. Usefulness of CD79b expression in the diagnosis of B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    McCarron, K F; Hammel, J P; Hsi, E D

    2000-06-01

    We evaluated anti-CD79b for its usefulness in the diagnosis of B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders (BCLPDs), particularly chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). We analyzed 100 BCLPDs for CD5, CD19, CD20, CD23, CD79b, and surface immunoglobulin light chain (sIg) expression by 4-color flow cytometry. CD20, CD79b, and sIg expression were quantified. Correlational analysis and univariable and multivariable logistic regression models were used to determine the best combination of antigens for the immunophenotypic classification of CLL vs other BCLPDs. Positive and statistically significant Spearman pairwise correlations between CD20, CD79b, and sIg fluorescence intensity were demonstrated. In the simplest models in which a single variable was considered, cutoff points were chosen that gave misclassification rates for CLL of 16% for CD79b, 19% for sIg, and 18% for CD20. Low-intensity CD79b, CD20, and sIg are associated highly with CLL. A panel containing CD5, CD19, CD23, and sIg allowed correct classification of most cases. Addition of CD20 or CD79b improved diagnostic accuracy; CD79b was slightly better than CD20. CD79b seems to be a useful addition to a standard flow cytometry panel for the evaluation of BCLPDs. PMID:10874881

  6. Detection of cyclin D1 in B cell lymphoproliferative disorders by flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Jain, P; Giustolisi, G M; Atkinson, S; Elnenaei, M O; Morilla, R; Owusu-Ankomah, K; Rafiq-Mohammed, F; Matutes, E; Wotherspoon, A; Catovsky, D

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To describe and revise a flow cytometric assay for evaluating cyclin D1 overexpression in B cell lymphoproliferative disorders (B-LPDs). Methods: Cyclin D1 expression was evaluated in 11 healthy controls and 51 patients with B-LPD by flow cytometry using the 5D4 monoclonal antibody. In 25 cases, experiments were repeated up to four times with mononuclear cells (MNC) fixed in ethanol for 1–120 days to evaluate the consistency of cyclin D1 expression. Flow cytometry results were compared with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) for the t(11;14) translocation in 19 patients and with immunohistochemistry (IHC) using the DCS-6 monoclonal antibody in nine patients. Results: A mean fluorescence intensity ratio (MFIR) of 4.8 was defined as the cut off point for positivity based on cyclin D1 expression in healthy controls (mean + 3 SD). Ten patients overexpressed cyclin D1 by flow cytometry. These included five of eight patients with mantle cell lymphoma, four of 19 with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, and one with follicular lymphoma. MFIR in the repeat experiments differed less than 25% in 20 of 25 patients and in no cases did it cross the cut off point. There was a good correlation between cyclin D1 expression by flow cytometry and FISH for t(11;14) in 15 of 19 patients and six of nine had concordant results with flow cytometry, FISH, and IHC. Conclusion: Cyclin D1 expression remains fairly stable once MNC are fixed in ethanol and the flow cytometric assay can be used for the routine screening of B-LPD. Further comparisons between flow cytometry, IHC, and FISH may be needed to ascertain the diagnostic value of the flow cytometric assay. PMID:12461064

  7. Intrafollicular Epstein-Barr virus-positive large B cell lymphoma. A variant of "germinotropic" lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Luisa; Lonardi, Silvia; Essatari, Murad H M; Pellegrini, Vilma; Fisogni, Simona; Gazzola, Anna; Agostinelli, Claudio; Vermi, William; Rossi, Giuseppe; Massarelli, Giovannino; Pileri, Stefano A; Facchetti, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    Germinotropic lymphoproliferative disorders were previously described as localized disorders associated with coinfection by human herpes virus 8 and Epstein-Barr virus and characterized by good clinical outcome. We report the clinical, morphological, phenotypical, and molecular features of three cases of a hitherto unreported variant of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive, human herpes virus 8 (HHV8)-negative large B cell lymphoma with exclusive intrafollicular localization. All cases occurred in elderly individuals (63, 77, and 65 years old; one male, two females) without obvious immunedeficiency, who presented with high stage disease. Lymph nodes showed an effaced nodular architecture with abnormal B follicles colonized by EBV+ large, pleomorphic atypical cells, including Reed-Sternberg-like cells, showing an activated B cell phenotype (CD10-FOXP1-Bcl6-IRF4+ or CD10-FOXP1+Bcl6+IRF4+) and intense expression of CD30. No monoclonal light-chain restriction was detected by immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridization, and IGH rearrangement was polyclonal; notably, EBV clonality was detectable in one case. Lymphoma cells in all cases showed diffuse expression of the c-Myc protein, while Bcl2 was dim or negative; moreover, the strong expression of phosphorylated-STAT3 in tumor cell nuclei suggested activation of the JAK-STAT pathway. FISH analysis was performed in two cases and showed no translocations of BCL2, BCL6, MYC, and PAX5 genes. Response to treatment was poor in 2/3 patients: one died after 18 months, one is alive with disease after 12 months. The intrafollicular EBV-positive large B cell lymphoma expands the spectrum of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders in immunocompetent individuals. PMID:26762526

  8. EBV-driven B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders: from biology, classification and differential diagnosis to clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Ok, Chi Young; Li, Ling; Young, Ken H

    2015-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous herpesvirus, affecting >90% of the adult population. EBV targets B-lymphocytes and achieves latent infection in a circular episomal form. Different latency patterns are recognized based on latent gene expression pattern. Latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) mimics CD40 and, when self-aggregated, provides a proliferation signal via activating the nuclear factor-kappa B, Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways to promote cellular proliferation. LMP-1 also induces BCL-2 to escape from apoptosis and gives a signal for cell cycle progression by enhancing cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (Rb) protein and by inhibiting p16 and p27. LMP-2A blocks the surface immunoglobulin-mediated lytic cycle reactivation. It also activates the Ras/PI3K/Akt pathway and induces Bcl-xL expression to promote B-cell survival. Recent studies have shown that ebv-microRNAs can provide extra signals for cellular proliferation, cell cycle progression and anti-apoptosis. EBV is well known for association with various types of B-lymphocyte, T-lymphocyte, epithelial cell and mesenchymal cell neoplasms. B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders encompass a broad spectrum of diseases, from benign to malignant. Here we review our current understanding of EBV-induced lymphomagenesis and focus on biology, diagnosis and management of EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:25613729

  9. Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder of recipient origin in a boy with acute T-cell leukemia with detection of B-cell clonality 3 months before stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kontny, Udo; Boppana, Sridhar; Jung, Andreas; Goebel, Heike; Strahm, Brigitte; Peters, Anke; Dormann, Sabine; Werner, Martin; Bader, Peter; Fisch, Paul; Niemeyer, Charlotte

    2005-11-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder is an infrequent complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is hypothesized that lack of T-cell surveillance following transplantation permits reactivation of latent EBV leading to polyclonal B-cell expansion and finally outgrowth of a predominant clone. Most cases are of donor origin. Here, we describe an 8-year old boy with early onset post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder following matched-unrelated stem cell transplantation for high-risk T-cell leukemia whose disease was unusual for two reasons. First, his B-cell clone was of host origin and, in contrast to the few PTLD of host origin described so far, not associated with autologous reconstitution. Secondly, using clonal analysis, we could retrospectively show that the B-cell clone emerged during consolidation chemotherapy for T-cell leukemia, 3 months before stem cell transplantation. PMID:16266918

  10. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Dharnidharka, Vikas R; Webster, Angela C; Martinez, Olivia M; Preiksaitis, Jutta K; Leblond, Veronique; Choquet, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are a group of conditions that involve uncontrolled proliferation of lymphoid cells as a consequence of extrinsic immunosuppression after organ or haematopoietic stem cell transplant. PTLDs show some similarities to classic lymphomas in the non-immunosuppressed general population. The oncogenic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a key pathogenic driver in many early-onset cases, through multiple mechanisms. The incidence of PTLD varies with the type of transplant; a clear distinction should therefore be made between the conditions after solid organ transplant and after haematopoietic stem cell transplant. Recipient EBV seronegativity and the intensity of immunosuppression are among key risk factors. Symptoms and signs depend on the localization of the lymphoid masses. Diagnosis requires histopathology, although imaging techniques can provide additional supportive evidence. Pre-emptive intervention based on monitoring EBV levels in blood has emerged as the preferred strategy for PTLD prevention. Treatment of established disease includes reduction of immunosuppression and/or administration of rituximab (a B cell-specific antibody against CD20), chemotherapy and EBV-specific cytotoxic T cells. Despite these strategies, the mortality and morbidity remains considerable. Patient outcome is influenced by the severity of presentation, treatment-related complications and risk of allograft loss. New innovative treatment options hold promise for changing the outlook in the future. PMID:27189056

  11. Oral Lesions and Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Castellarin, P.; Pozzato, G.; Tirelli, G.; Di Lenarda, R.; Biasotto, M.

    2010-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disorders are heterogeneous malignancy characterized by the expansion of a lymphoid clone more or less differentiated. At the level of the oral cavity, the lymphoproliferative disorder can occur in various ways, most commonly as lymphoid lesions with extranodal externalization, but sometimes, oral lesions may represent a localization of a disease spread. With regard to the primary localizations of lymphoproliferative disorders, a careful examination of the head and neck, oral, and oropharyngeal area is necessary in order to identify suspicious lesions, and their early detection results in a better prognosis for the patient. Numerous complications have been described and frequently found at oral level, due to pathology or different therapeutic strategies. These complications require precise diagnosis and measures to oral health care. In all this, oral pathologists, as well as dental practitioners, have a central role in the treatment and long-term monitoring of these patients. PMID:20871659

  12. Post-transplant T-cell type lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zubair; Ahsan, Aamir; Sheikh, Usman; Minhas, Khurram

    2007-12-01

    Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder (PTLD) is a lymphoma, which develops as a result of immunosuppression in a recipient of a solid organ or bone marrow allograft. Majority are associated with Ebstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infection, are mostly B-cell type and less often T-cell type. We report a case of T-cell PTLD, occurring in a renal transplant recipient. PMID:18182148

  13. Immunological aspects of a case of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Franco, A; Muñoz, C; Aranda, I; Cabezas, A; Perdiguero, M; Prados, C

    1995-01-01

    We describe a female renal transplant recipient with cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections who developed aggressive polymorphous polyclonal B cell proliferation. She received two courses of OKT3. We found a majority of transformed B cells bearing EBV membrane receptor CR2 and EBV nuclear antigen. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders may be associated with a significant immunological activation, detected in this case by the sudden increase of beta 2-microglobulin and immunoglobulin levels, including immunoglobulin D. These raised levels persisted throughout the short and rapid course of the disease. PMID:7733150

  14. Translocation t(2;7)(p11;q21) associated with the CDK6/IGK rearrangement is a rare but recurrent abnormality in B-cell lymphoproliferative malignancies.

    PubMed

    Douet-Guilbert, Nathalie; Tous, Corinne; Le Flahec, Glen; Bovo, Clément; Le Bris, Marie-Josée; Basinko, Audrey; Morel, Frédéric; De Braekeleer, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Structural abnormalities of chromosome 7q have been regularly reported in chronic B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. They include chromosomal translocations involving 7q21, leading to overexpression of the CDK6 gene. Three different translocations, t(7;14)(q21;q32), t(7;22)(q21;q11), and t(2;7)(p11;q21), leading to the juxtaposition of the CDK6 gene with a immunoglobulin gene enhancer during B-cell differentiation, have been described. In the past 2 years, we identified three patients with lymphoproliferative malignancy associated with a t(2;7)(p11;q21). Fluorescent in situ hybridization using an IGK probe and a library of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones located in bands 7q21.2 and 7q21.3, containing CDK6, revealed that the telomeric part of the IGK probe was translocated on the der(7) within a 51-kb region upstream of the transcriptional start site of CDK6. A total of 23 patients with indolent B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and juxtaposition of the IG and CDK6 genes, including 20 with IGK and CDK6 juxtaposition, have been reported thus far. This rearrangement leads to the overexpression of CDK6, which encodes a cyclin-dependent protein kinase involved in cell cycle G1 phase progression and G1/S transition. PMID:24726269

  15. Secondary Epstein-Barr virus associated lymphoproliferative disorder developing in a patient with angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma on vorinostat.

    PubMed

    Smeltzer, Jacob P; Viswanatha, David S; Habermann, Thomas M; Patnaik, Mrinal M

    2012-09-01

    Ebstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-related lymphoproliferative disorders primarily occur in the setting of immunosuppression, most commonly after solid organ transplantation. The frequency depends on the degree of immunosuppression and the specific organ transplanted, but can be as high as 3–9% in heart or lung transplant patients. Less frequent outside of the transplant setting, EBV-related lymphoproliferative disorders classified as other iatrogenic immunodeficiency associated lymphoproliferative disorders in the WHO Classification, which are different than iatrogenically related lymphomas supervening on hematological malignancies, have been associated with other immunosuppressive therapies such as 6-Mercaptopurine, azathioprine, or alemtuzumab. These disorders have also been reported to develop spontaneously in patients with T cell lymphomas (angioimmunoblastic and peripheral T cell NOS). Here we report the case of a patient with an angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma on therapy with vorinostat who developed an EBV related B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder involving bilateral adrenal glands. Angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma is associated with severe immunodeficiency and risk for opportunistic infections. This immune dysregulation has been implicated in its association with EBV related lymphoproliferative disorders. In this patient, vorinostat therapy also appears to be linked to the development of an EBV-related lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:22718468

  16. Malignant pleural effusions in lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shahid; Shahid, Rabia K; Rimawi, Rola; Siddiqui, Anita K; Rossoff, Leonard; Sison, Cristina P; Steinberg, Harry; Rai, Kanti R

    2005-07-01

    In order to determine variables that correlate with malignant pleural effusion and mortality in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders and pleural effusion, a retrospective study was performed. Clinical data of hospitalized patients with a lymphoid malignancy and pleural effusion who underwent thoracentesis from January 1993 to December 2002 were collected. A logistic regression analysis was carried out to determine prognostic variables that predict malignant pleural effusion and hospital mortality. There were 86 patients who were admitted on 91 occasions. The median age was 70 years (range 4 - 92) and the male:female ratio was 44:42. Sixty-four patients (74%) had advanced disease, 43 (50%) had received prior chemotherapy and 9 (10%) were in remission. Of 91 cases of pleural effusions, 44 (48%) were bilateral, 80 (88%) were exudates and 48 (53%) were due to malignant involvement of pleura. In multivariate analysis, symptomatic pleural effusion (odds ratio 10.3, 95% confidence interval 1.7 - 98.3), pleural fluid mesothelial cell count < 5% (odds ratio 8.0, 95% confidence interval 1.4 - 58.2), pleural fluid:serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) > or =1 (odds ratio 6.4, 95% confidence interval 1.2 - 45.6) and pleural fluid lymphocyte percentage > or =50 (odds ratio 6.4, 95% confidence interval 1.2 - 50) were significantly correlated with malignant effusion. A secondary cancer (odds ratio 11.9, 95% confidence interval 2.3 - 88.8), pleural fluid:serum LDH > or =1 (odds ratio 10.9, 95% confidence interval 2.6 - 64.9), and pneumonia (odds ratio 6.4, 95% confidence interval 1.7 - 28.6) were significantly correlated with hospital mortality. In conclusion, malignant pleural effusion is the common etiology of pleural effusion in patients with lymphoid malignancy. Many clinical and cytochemical markers have discriminatory values in identifying malignant effusion. A high pleural fluid to serum LDH level correlates with malignant pleural involvement and hospital mortality. PMID

  17. Epstein-Barr virus, infectious mononucleosis, and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Nalesnik, M A; Starzl, T E

    1994-09-01

    PTLD may be considered as an "opportunistic cancer" in which the immunodeficiency state of the host plays a key role in fostering the environment necessary for abnormal lymphoproliferation. The following discussion reflects our own current thoughts regarding events which may result in PTLD and its sequelae. Many of the individual steps have not been rigorously proved or disproved at this point in time. Following transplantation and iatrogenic immunosuppression, the host:EBV equilibrium is shifted in favor of the virus. Most seronegative patients will become infected either via the graft or through natural means; seropositive patients will begin to shed higher levels of virus and may become secondarily superinfected via the graft. There is a "grace" period of approximately one month posttransplant before increased viral shedding begins. PTLD is almost never seen during this interval. In many cases infection continues to be silent whereas in rare individuals there is an overwhelming polyclonal proliferation of infected B lymphocytes. This is the parallel of infectious mononucleosis occurring in patients with a congenital defect in virus handling (X-linked lymphoproliferative disorder). It is possible that transplant patients with this presentation also suffer a defect in virus handling. In other cases excessive iatrogenic immunosuppression may paralyze their ability to respond to the infection. With CsA and FK506 regimens, individual tumors may occur within a matter of months following transplant. The short time of incubation suggests that these are less than fully developed malignancies. It may be that local events conspire to allow outgrowth of limited numbers of B-lymphocyte clones. A cytokine environment favoring B-lymphocyte growth may be one factor and differential inhibition by the immuno-suppressive drugs of calcium-dependent and -independent B-cell stimulation may be another. In addition, there is some evidence that CsA itself may inhibit apoptosis within B

  18. T-cells fighting B-cell lymphoproliferative malignancies: the emerging field of CD19 CAR T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Heijink, D M; Kater, A P; Hazenberg, M D; Hagenbeek, A; Kersten, M J

    2016-05-01

    CAR T-cells are autologous T-cells transduced with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). The CAR contains an antigen recognition part (originating from an antibody), a T-cell receptor transmembrane and cytoplasmic signalling part, and one or more co-stimulatory domains. While CAR T-cells can be directed against any tumour target, most experience thus far has been obtained with targeting of the B-cell antigen CD19 that is expressed by B-cell acute lymphocytic leukaemia, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and other B-cell lymphomas. The first clinical results are promising, although there are profound differences in response between patients with different haematological malignancies. Treatment-related side effects have been observed that require specific management. This review will explain the mechanism of action, summarise the experience to date and point out future directions for this hopeful new addition to the therapeutic armamentarium in the treatment of lymphoproliferative B-cell malignancies. PMID:27185772

  19. Expression of Ki-67 nuclear antigen in B and T cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, N.; Matutes, E.; Cordone, I.; Morilla, R.; Catovksy, D.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To determine whether the proliferation rates of tumour cells may relate to prognosis and reflect disease activity. METHODS: Blood mononuclear cells from 155 patients with B cell (n = 120) or T cell (n = 35) chronic lymphoproliferative disorders were tested with the monoclonal antibody Ki-67 by indirect immunoperoxidase or immunoalkaline phosphatase techniques. B cell diseases included chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), CLL in prolymphocytic transformation (CLL/PL), prolymphocytic leukaemia (B-PLL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL) in leukaemic phase. The T cell diseases comprised large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukaemia, T-PLL, and T-NHL. RESULTS: These showed significantly higher proportions of Ki-67 positive cells in T cell (11.2%) than in B cell (2.9%) disorders (p < 0.001). The highest values were found in NHL of both B and T cell types, particularly when low grade disease transformed to high grade. The lowest percentages of Ki-67 positive cells were found in CLL (1.4%) and LGL leukaemia (1.7%); intermediate values were seen in B PLL (3.3%) and T PLL (5.8%). CONCLUSIONS: There is a positive correlation between prognosis and proliferation rates in chronic B and T cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Estimation of Ki-67 in circulating leukaemic cells could be used to determine prognosis in low grade malignancies. Images PMID:1401173

  20. Risk factors for lymphoproliferative disorders after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Ethel S.; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Socié, Gérard; Banks, Peter M.; Sobocinski, Kathleen A.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Kingma, Douglas W.; Travis, Lois B.; Flowers, Mary E.; Martin, Paul J.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Curtis, Rochelle E.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated 26 901 patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) at 271 centers worldwide to define patterns of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs). PTLDs developed in 127 recipients, with 105 (83%) cases occurring within 1 year after transplantation. In multivariate analyses, we confirmed that PTLD risks were strongly associated (P < .001) with T-cell depletion of the donor marrow, antithymocyte globulin (ATG) use, and unrelated or HLA-mismatched grafts (URD/HLA mismatch). Significant associations were also confirmed for acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. The increased risk associated with URD/HLA-mismatched donors (RR = 3.8) was limited to patients with T-cell depletion or ATG use (P = .004). New findings were elevated risks for age 50 years or older at transplantation (RR = 5.1; P < .001) and second transplantation (RR = 3.5; P < .001). Lower risks were found for T-cell depletion methods that remove both T and B cells (alemtuzumab and elutriation, RR = 3.1; P = .025) compared with other methods (RR = 9.4; P = .005 for difference). The cumulative incidence of PTLDs was low (0.2%) among 21 686 patients with no major risk factors, but increased to 1.1%, 3.6%, and 8.1% with 1, 2, and more than 3 major risk factors, respectively. Our findings identify subgroups of patients who underwent allogeneic HCT at elevated risk of PTLDs for whom prospective monitoring of Epstein-Barr virus activation and early treatment intervention may be particularly beneficial. PMID:19264919

  1. Epstein-Barr virus-positive lymphoproliferative disorder associated with old organized chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Yasuo; Ohta, Masaru; Ohshima, Koichi; Niino, Daisuke; Nakamura, Yukihiko; Okada, Yosuke; Nakashima, Shinji

    2012-06-01

    This report describes a case of an immunocompetent 77-year-old male with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive lymphoproliferative disorder associated with calcified chronic subdural hematoma (CSH). On the day prior to consultation in our outpatient clinic, the patient fell from his bed, striking his frontal head on the floor. Magnetic resonance imaging showed ill-defined lesions in the right frontal-temporal subdural regions. At surgery, a hard and thickened outer membrane of a CSH and muddy organized subdural hematoma were observed. However, macroscopic neoplastic lesions were not apparent. Histologically, there were atypical lymphoid cells scattered or conglomerated in some areas of the thick outer membrane of the CSH. They were composed of occasional large atypical lymphoid cells. The lesions were accompanied by necrosis. Atypical lymphoid cells were immunopositive for B-cell markers but not for T-cell markers. EBNA2 was seen in the nuclei of tumor cells. Atypical lymphoid cells showed positive signals for EBV-encoded small RNAs (EBERs) on in situ hybridization. These findings were consistent with EBV-positive lymphoproliferative disorder associated with CSH. These results also suggested that EBV and the inflammatory reaction found in the CSH could be the etiological factors in the pathogenesis of lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:22612510

  2. PTEN and PI-3 kinase inhibitors control LPS signaling and the lymphoproliferative response in the CD19+ B cell compartment

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Alok R.; Peirce, Susan K.; Joshi, Shweta; Durden, Donald L.

    2014-09-10

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), e.g. toll receptors (TLRs) that bind ligands within the microbiome have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer. LPS is a ligand for two TLR family members, TLR4 and RP105 which mediate LPS signaling in B cell proliferation and migration. Although LPS/TLR/RP105 signaling is well-studied; our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms controlling these PRR signaling pathways remains incomplete. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for PTEN/PI-3K signaling in B cell selection and survival, however a role for PTEN/PI-3K in TLR4/RP105/LPS signaling in the B cell compartment has not been reported. Herein, we crossed a CD19cre and PTEN{sup fl/fl} mouse to generate a conditional PTEN knockout mouse in the CD19+ B cell compartment. These mice were further crossed with an IL-14α transgenic mouse to study the combined effect of PTEN deletion, PI-3K inhibition and expression of IL-14α (a cytokine originally identified as a B cell growth factor) in CD19+ B cell lymphoproliferation and response to LPS stimulation. Targeted deletion of PTEN and directed expression of IL-14α in the CD19+ B cell compartment (IL-14+PTEN-/-) lead to marked splenomegaly and altered spleen morphology at baseline due to expansion of marginal zone B cells, a phenotype that was exaggerated by treatment with the B cell mitogen and TLR4/RP105 ligand, LPS. Moreover, LPS stimulation of CD19+ cells isolated from these mice display increased proliferation, augmented AKT and NFκB activation as well as increased expression of c-myc and cyclinD1. Interestingly, treatment of LPS treated IL-14+PTEN-/- mice with a pan PI-3K inhibitor, SF1126, reduced splenomegaly, cell proliferation, c-myc and cyclin D1 expression in the CD19+ B cell compartment and normalized the splenic histopathologic architecture. These findings provide the direct evidence that PTEN and PI-3K inhibitors control TLR4/RP105/LPS signaling in the CD19+ B cell compartment and that pan PI

  3. Forced miR-146a expression causes autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in mice via downregulation of Fas in germinal center B cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiuye; Zhang, Jinjun; Li, Jingyi; Zou, Liyun; Zhang, Jinyu; Xie, Zunyi; Fu, Xiaolan; Jiang, Shan; Chen, Gang; Jia, Qingzhu; Li, Fei; Wan, Ying; Wu, Yuzhang

    2013-06-13

    By inhibiting target gene expression, microRNAs (miRNAs) play major roles in various physiological and pathological processes. miR-146a, a miRNA induced upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and virus infection, is also highly expressed in patients with immune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, and psoriasis. Whether the high level of miR-146a contributes to any of these pathogenesis-related processes remains unknown. To elucidate the function of miR-146a in vivo, we generated a transgenic (TG) mouse line overexpressing miR-146a. Starting at an early age, these TG mice developed spontaneous immune disorders that mimicked human autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) with distinct manifestations, including enlarged spleens and lymph nodes, inflammatory infiltration in the livers and lungs, increased levels of double-negative T cells in peripheral blood, and increased serum immunoglobulin G levels. Moreover, with the adoptive transfer approach, we found that the B-cell population was the major etiological factor and that the expression of Fas, a direct target of miR-146a, was significantly dampened in TG germinal center B cells. These results indicate that miR-146a may be involved in the pathogenesis of ALPS by targeting Fas and may therefore serve as a novel therapeutic target. PMID:23645835

  4. Hematopoietic Neoplasias in Horses: Myeloproliferative and Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    MUÑOZ, Ana; RIBER, Cristina; TRIGO, Pablo; CASTEJÓN, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Leukemia, i.e., the neoplasia of one or more cell lines of the bone marrow, although less common than in other species, it is also reported in horses. Leukemia can be classified according to the affected cells (myeloproliferative or lymphoproliferative disorders), evolution of clinical signs (acute or chronic) and the presence or lack of abnormal cells in peripheral blood (leukemic, subleukemic and aleukemic leukemia). The main myeloproliferative disorders in horses are malignant histiocytosis and myeloid leukemia, the latter being classified as monocytic and myelomonocytic, granulocytic, primary erythrocytosis or polycythemia vera and megakaryocytic leukemia. The most common lymphoproliferative disorders in horses are lymphoid leukemia, plasma cell or multiple myeloma and lymphoma. Lymphoma is the most common hematopoietic neoplasia in horses and usually involves lymphoid organs, without leukemia, although bone marrow may be affected after metastasis. Lymphoma could be classified according to the organs involved and four main clinical categories have been established: generalized-multicentric, alimentary-gastrointestinal, mediastinal-thymic-thoracic and cutaneous. The clinical signs, hematological and clinical pathological findings, results of bone marrow aspirates, involvement of other organs, prognosis and treatment, if applicable, are presented for each type of neoplasia. This paper aims to provide a guide for equine practitioners when approaching to clinical cases with suspicion of hematopoietic neoplasia. PMID:24833969

  5. Endogenous CD8+ T cell expansion during regression of monoclonal EBV-associated posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Khatri, V P; Baiocchi, R A; Peng, R; Oberkircher, A R; Dolce, J M; Ward, P M; Herzig, G P; Caligiuri, M A

    1999-07-01

    There are experimental data which suggest that the primary immune effector cell responsible for maintaining immune surveillance against the outgrowth of EBV-transformed B cells in humans is the CTL, but in vivo proof of this is lacking. In this study we perform a series of cellular and molecular assays to characterize an autologous, endogenous immune response against a transplantation-associated, monoclonal, EBV+ posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). Following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, a patient developed a monoclonal PTLD of donor B cell origin. With a decrease in immune suppression, we document the emergence of endogenous, donor-derived CD3+CD8+ CTLs, followed by regression of the PTLD. The TCR Vbeta repertoire went from a polyclonal pattern prior to the development of PTLD to a restricted TCR Vbeta pattern during the outgrowth and regression of PTLD. Donor-derived CD3+CD8+ T lymphocytes displayed MHC class I-restricted cytolytic activity against the autologous EBV+ B cells ex vivo without additional in vitro sensitization. The striking temporal relationship between the endogenous expansion of a TCR Vbeta-restricted, CD3+CD8+ population of MHC class I-restricted CTL, and the regression of an autologous monoclonal PTLD, provides direct evidence in humans that endogenous CD3+CD8+ CTLs can be responsible for effective immune surveillance against malignant transformation of EBV+ B cells. PMID:10384154

  6. Fatal B-cell lymphoproliferative syndrome in allogeneic marrow graft recipients. A clinical, immunobiological and pathological study.

    PubMed

    Simon, M; Bartram, C R; Friedrich, W; Arnold, R; Schmeiser, T; Hampl, W; Müller-Hermelink, H K; Heymer, B

    1991-01-01

    We have studied four cases of fatal B-cell lymphoproliferative syndrome (LPS) developing among 333 patients (incidence 1.2%) treated with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). All four patients had received a T-cell depleted graft. Onset of the first clinical symptoms (palpable lymph node enlargement in three and IgA-lambda paraproteinemia in two patients) occurred between 41 and 188 days post-BMT (median 76 days). The course of the LPS was rapidly progressive in all cases, leading to death in 2-5 weeks. The peripheral blood showed progressive pancytopenia with disproportionally high numbers of activated NK cells, apparently compensating for the T-cell deficiency. Post-mortem histological studies disclosed polymorphic B-cell proliferations, most pronounced in the lymph nodes, spleen, liver, lungs and kidneys. Lymphohemopoietic cells were of donor origin in three patients. In the fourth patient, graft failure suggested a host origin for the proliferating cells. Immunophenotyping and gene rearrangement analysis revealed polyclonal proliferation in one patient, monoclonal proliferation in another patient, and an oligoclonal pattern in the other two patients. The clinical behavior of the LPS was independent of clonality. Immunohistologically, the proliferating cells showed characteristics of relatively mature B-cells in three cases, and pre-B-cell features in one case. Epstein Barr virus (EBV) serology indicated seroconversion (primary infection) in one child, and chronic active EBV infection in both adults. EBV DNA as well as EBV nuclear antigen (EBNA) were detected in infiltrated tissues of all four patients. The labeling pattern on in situ hybridization suggested a replicative EBV infection comparable to that in lymphoblastoid cell lines. We conclude that EBV-associated LPS developing as a result of post-transplant immunodeficiency is a distinct clinicopathologic entity, differing from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (including Burkitt's lymphoma) and infectious

  7. Molecular etiology of an indolent lymphoproliferative disorder determined by whole-genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Jeremy D.K.; Shen, Yaoqing; Pleasance, Erin; Li, Yvonne; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Zhao, Yongjun; Moore, Richard; Wegrzyn-Woltosz, Joanna; Savage, Kerry J.; Weng, Andrew P.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Jones, Steven; Marra, Marco; Laskin, Janessa; Karsan, Aly

    2016-01-01

    In an attempt to assess potential treatment options, whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing were performed on a patient with an unclassifiable small lymphoproliferative disorder. Variants from genome sequencing were prioritized using a combination of comparative variant distributions in a spectrum of lymphomas, and meta-analyses of gene expression profiling. In this patient, the molecular variants that we believe to be most relevant to the disease presentation most strongly resemble a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), whereas the gene expression data are most consistent with a low-grade chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The variant of greatest interest was a predicted NOTCH2-truncating mutation, which has been recently reported in various lymphomas. PMID:27148583

  8. Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in Kidney Transplant Recipients: A Single-Center Experience in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Hiroki; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Unagami, Kohei; Hirai, Toshihito; Toki, Daisuke; Omoto, Kazuya; Okumi, Masayoshi; Imai, Yoichi; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2016-04-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a serious complication of solid organ transplantation; however, few large studies have been performed in Asian institutions. We review our single-center experience with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder patients in Japan. We retrospectively evaluated patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following kidney transplantation between January 1985 and December 2013. The patients were divided into early-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (<1 year) and late-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (≥1 year) groups. Thirteen patients had the disorder, an incidence rate of 0.75% (13/1730). Early-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (N = 3) had not occurred for the last two decades. In the late-onset group (N = 10), the median time of onset was 108.7 months. The Kaplan-Meier 10-year overall survival rates were 76.9% and 95.4% in patients with and without the disorder, respectively (P = 0.0001). Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder significantly affected transplant recipients' mortality. Late-onset occurred even > 10 years after transplantation; therefore, long-term monitoring of patients is needed. PMID:26948427

  9. Epigenetic Control of B Cell Development and B-Cell-Related Immune Disorders.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yan; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-06-01

    B lymphocytes are generally recognized as the essential component of humoral immunity and also a regulator of innate immunity. The development of B cells is precisely regulated by a variety of factors via different mechanisms, including cytokine/cytokine receptors, signal transduction molecules, and transcription factors. Recent findings suggest that epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation, histone modification, and non-coding RNA, play critical roles in establishing B cell lineage-specific gene expression profiles to define and sustain B cell identity and function. Epigenetic modifications are also sensitive to external stimuli and might bridge genetic and environmental factors in the pathogenesis or control of B-cell-related immune disorders, such as autoimmune diseases, lymphoma, and leukemia. Better understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms for regulating B cell development and involving B cell abnormal differentiation and function will shed light on the design of new therapeutic approaches to B-cell-related diseases, and potential candidates of epigenetic modulators may be identified to target epigenetic pathways to prevent or treat B cell disorders. We summarize the relevance of epigenetic marks and landscapes in the stages of B cell development, discuss the interaction of the transcriptional networks and epigenetic changes, and review the involvement of epigenetic risk in the pathogenesis of B-cell-related diseases. Understanding how specific epigenetic alterations contribute to the development of B-cell-related autoimmunity and malignancies is instrumental to control B cell disorders. PMID:26066671

  10. Cladribine and Fludarabine Nucleoside Change the Levels of CD Antigens on B-Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cassano, Carlos; Mactier, Swetlana; Mulligan, Stephen P.; Belov, Larissa; Huang, Pauline; Christopherson, Richard I.

    2010-01-01

    The purine analogs, fludarabine nucleoside (FdA), and cladribine (CdA) (1 μM, 24 hours), significantly changed the levels of some surface antigens on the human B-cell lines MEC2 and Raji. Changes in the surface proteins were identified using a Cluster of Differentiation (CD) antibody microarray that captures live cells and confirmed by flow cytometry. For Raji cells, CdA up-regulated CD10, CD54, CD80, and CD86, with repression of CD22, while FdA up-regulated CD20, CD54, CD80, CD86 and CD95. For MEC2 cells, CdA up-regulated CD11a, CD20, CD43, CD45, CD52, CD54, CD62L, CD80, CD86, and CD95, but FdA had no effect. Up-regulation of particular CD antigens induced on a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder by a purine analog could provide targets for therapeutic antibodies with synergistic cell killing. PMID:22084681

  11. Cell sizing in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: an aid to differential diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, H D; Markey, G M; Nolan, R L; Morris, T C

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To determine if leucocyte volume distribution analysis (LVDA), obtained using a Coulter Counter Model S Plus IV, can be used to aid differentiation of chronic lymphoproliferative disorder (CLPD) subtypes. METHODS: Mean lymphocyte volume and lymphocyte distribution width were measured on each patient (n = 90) using a hard copy of an amplified LVDA histogram. The mean lymphocyte volume was taken as the mean of the values on either side of the peak at half maximum height. The lymphocyte distribution width was taken as the range of cell values between the two values used to calibrate the mean lymphocyte volume. A template showing typical histograms from commonly occurring CLPD was also produced on an acetate sheet. This was used to examine the histogram from each new patient to evaluate its usefulness as an alternative to the calculation of mean lymphocyte volume and lymphocyte distribution width. RESULTS: Mean lymphocyte volume and lymphocyte distribution width were significantly higher in B cell lymphocytic leukaemia of mixed cell type (B CLL/PL), B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with peripheral blood spill, hairy cell leukaemia and T cell prolymphocytic leukaemia than in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B CLL). The mean lymphocyte volume, but not the lymphocyte distribution width, was also significantly higher in T cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia than in B CLL. The template gave an immediate preliminary indication of possible subtype(s) of disorder and could be used as an alternative to measurement of mean lymphocyte volume and lymphocyte distribution width. CONCLUSIONS: Electronic haematology analysers producing an LVDA provide a useful, cost effective cell sizing analysis which can aid the differentiation of subtypes of CLPD. Images PMID:1430257

  12. [Primary central nervous system post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders].

    PubMed

    Honda, Masaya; Koga, Michiaki; Kanda, Takashi

    2014-08-01

    The post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a heterogeneous disease entity of lymphoid and plasmacytic proliferations that can occur after solid organ and bone marrow/stem cell transplantation. PTLD sometimes involves the central nervous system (CNS), but primary occurrence in central nervous system (PCNS-PTLD) is rare. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) plays a causative role, and up to 90% of the tumors are associated with this virus. Diagnosing PCNS-PTLD is often challenging based solely on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and physical findings; therefore, direct biopsy of the lesion is usually necessary to make a definitive diagnosis. The optimal therapy for PCNS-PTLD remains unknown. Dose reduction or discontinuation of immunosuppressive agents is effective for approximately half of PTLD patients, but not for most patients with PCNS-PTLD. It has been noted that CNS involvement is a poor prognostic factor, but early diagnosis and initiation of chemotherapy or radiotherapy seem critical for maximizing the likelihood of a favorable outcome. PMID:25082316

  13. T-lymphocyte colonies in the lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Dao, C; Marie, J P; Bernadou, A; Bilski-Pasquier, G

    1978-01-01

    Human lymphocytes from peripheral blood, bone marrow spleen and lymph nodes were cultured. Continuous phytoheamagglutinin (PHA) stimulation was used, first during a 24 h liquid preincubation, then during a 5 day culture in methylcellulose. In normal donors a rapid colony formation took place, with a mean of 124+/-82 colonies per 1 times 10(5) preincubated lymphocytes. Cells from such colonies were studied by cytology, scanning electron microscopy and rosette formation techniques; arguments favour the hypothesis that these could be T lymphocytes. Neither granulocytes nor macrophages could be grown, and no lymphoid colony formation occurred without PHA stimulation. The same technique was applied to patients with various lymphoproliferative disorders. Significant colony suppression was observed in nearly every case of chronic lymphatic leukaemia; the number of colonies was reduced in some patients with acute lymphatic leukaemia, lymphosarcoma, dysglobulinaemia and Hodgkin's disease. This lymphoid culture method should be applied to a larger number of patients to determine whether it has a classification value and/or prognostic significance. When colonies were grown in pathological states, rosette formation was identical to that of normal donors; colony formation could be due to persisting normal lymphocytes. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:309852

  14. High-Dose Y-90-Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Added to Reduced-Intensity Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Regimen for Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  15. Outcome of Rapamycin Therapy for Post-Transplant-Lymphoproliferative Disorder after Kidney Transplantation: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafi, Farzaneh; Shahidi, Shahrzad; Mortazavi, Mojgan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a complication of chronic immunosuppressive therapy in solid organ transplantation with a high mortality rate. Alternative treatments such as rapamycin have been explored. Methods: A detailed retrospective analysis was performed according to data collected from 13 patients with PTLD. At the time of PTLD diagnosis, immunosuppressive therapy was decreased and rapamycin administered. Overall survival, disease-free survival of patients and graft survival were determined. Results: Among 590 kidney transplant recipients, 13 adult patients with PTLD were included in this study. The mean age of the patients was 42.15 (range: 25–58) years at the time of PTLD diagnosis, and 9 patients were male. Histology was distributed in 9 diffuse large B cell, 1 Malt lymphoma, 1 Burkitt lymphoma, 2 Hodgkin-like PTLD. The response rate to rapamycin alone was 30.8%. The mean overall survival period was 23.38 months and 11 patients are still alive. In total, 10 patients (76.9%) achieved a complete remission with functioning graft in 11 (84.6%) patients. Conclusion: Despite the retrospective focus and limited number of patients, this study provides promising results regarding the effectiveness of stopping calcineurin inhibitors and switching to rapamycin for patients with PTLD. PMID:25802698

  16. Unusual gingival presentation of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Raut, A; Huryn, J; Pollack, A; Zlotolow, I

    2000-10-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder is a well-documented complication of solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. Histologically, it is characterized by an abnormal proliferation of lymphocytes, which can range from benign B-cell hyperplasia to malignant lymphoma. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is associated with several risk factors, such as congenital or acquired immunodeficiency states, autoimmune disorders, and infectious agents (eg, Epstein-Barr virus). Primary sites of presentation in the head and neck are Waldeyer's ring, paranasal sinuses, salivary glands, the oral cavity, and the larynx. Clinical appearance of gingival NHL varies but is usually found to be an asymptomatic gingival enlargement or mass resembling a pyogenic granuloma. We present a patient with a gingival ulceration that was subsequently diagnosed as Epstein-Barr virus malignant lymphoma resulting from the immunosuppression needed to prevent graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplantation. PMID:11027379

  17. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin in lymphoproliferative disorders and rituximab-related secondary hypogammaglobulinemia: a single-center experience in 61 patients

    PubMed Central

    Compagno, Nicolò; Cinetto, Francesco; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Agostini, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin replacement therapy represents the standard treatment for hypogammaglobulinemia secondary to B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin infusion is an effective, safe and well-tolerated treatment approach in primary immunodeficiencies but no extensive data are available on their use in secondary hypogammaglobulinemia, a frequent phenomenon occurring after treatment with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies in lymphoproliferative disorders. In this retrospective study we evaluated efficacy (serum IgG trough levels, incidence of infections per year, need for antibiotics) and safety (number of adverse events) of intravenous (300 mg/kg/4 weeks) versus subcutaneous (75 mg/kg/week) immunoglobulin replacement therapy in 61 patients. In addition, the impact of the infusion methods on quality of life was compared. All patients were treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulin, and 33 out of them had been previously treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. Both treatments appeared to be effective in replacing Ig production deficiency and in reducing the incidence of infectious events and the need for antibiotics. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin obtained a superior benefit when compared to intravenous immunoglobulin achieving higher IgG trough levels, lower incidence of overall infection and need for antibiotics. The incidence of serious bacterial infections was similar with both infusion ways. As expected, a lower number of adverse events was registered with subcutaneous immunoglobulin, compared to intravenous immunoglobulin, with no serious adverse events. Finally, we observed an improvement in health-related quality of life parameters after the switch to subcutaneous immunoglobulin. Our results suggest that subcutaneous immunoglobulin is safe and effective in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia associated to lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:24682509

  18. EBV-associated B- and T-cell posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders following primary EBV infection in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Yin, C Cameron; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Abruzzo, Lynne V; Jones, Dan; Farhood, Anwar I; Thomazy, Vilmos A

    2005-02-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) usually are of B-cell lineage and associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). PTLDs of T-cell lineage are much less common and infrequently associated with EBV. We report a rare case of a girl in whom B-cell and T-cell PTLDs developed following 2 EBV-negative kidney transplants. Within 2 years of the second transplantation, the originally EBV-negative patient developed both an EBV-associated clonal B-cell PTLD involving lymph nodes and an EBV-positive T-cell PTLD involving bone marrow and liver. These proliferations occurred concurrently with evidence of primary EBV infection and high plasma viral load. The patient eventually died of multiorgan failure 5 years after the initial transplant (3 years after the second transplant). To our knowledge, only 4 cases of both B-cell and T-cell PTLDs have been reported. Only 2 cases have been proven to be monoclonal and EBV-associated, as in this case, the first following kidney transplantation. PMID:15842046

  19. B-cell survival factors in autoimmune rheumatic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Sandra A.; Vilas-Boas, Andreia

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic disorders have complex etiopathogenetic mechanisms in which B cells play a central role. The importance of factors stimulating B cells, notably the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) and A proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) axis is now recognized. BAFF and APRIL are cytokines essential for B-cell proliferation and survival from the immature stages to the development of plasma cells. Their levels are increased in some subsets of patients with autoimmune disorders. Several recent biologic drugs have been developed to block this axis, namely belimumab [already licensed for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment], tabalumab, atacicept and blisibimod. Many clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these drugs in several autoimmune disorders are ongoing, or have been completed recently. This review updates the information on the use of biologic agents blocking BAFF/APRIL for patients with SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome and myositis. PMID:26288664

  20. Early gene expression changes by Epstein-Barr virus infection of B-cells indicate CDKs and survivin as therapeutic targets for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Michele; Ueda, Seigo; Krukowski, Patricia; Bornhauser, Beat C; Ladell, Kristin; Dorner, Marcus; Sigrist, Juerg A; Campidelli, Cristina; Aslandogmus, Roberta; Alessi, Davide; Berger, Christoph; Pileri, Stefano A; Speck, Roberto F; Nadal, David

    2013-11-15

    Lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs) associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection cause significant morbidity and mortality in bone marrow and solid organ transplant recipients. To gain insight into LPD pathogenesis and to identify potential effective therapeutic approaches, we investigated early molecular events leading to B-cell transformation by gene expression profiling of EBV-infected B-cells from tonsils by Affymetrix microarray 72 hr postinfection when the B-cells hyperproliferation phase starts. Cell cycle and apoptosis were the most significantly affected pathways and enriched gene sets. In particular, we found significantly increased expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)1 and CCNB1 (cyclin B1) and of one of their downstream targets BIRC5 (survivin). Importantly, the strong upregulation of the antiapoptotic protein survivin was confirmed in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and 71% of EBV-positive post-transplant EBV-LPD lesions scored positive for survivin. The validity of early transforming events for the identification of therapeutic targets for EBV-LPD was confirmed by the marked antiproliferative effect of the CDK inhibitor flavopiridol on LCLs and by the strong induction of apoptosis by survivin inhibition with YM155 or terameprocol. Our results suggest that targeting of CDKs and/or survivin in post-transplant EBV-LPD by specific inhibitors might be an important approach to control and eliminate EBV-transformed B-cells that should be further considered. PMID:23640782

  1. A case of lymphoproliferative disorder of NK-cells: aggressive immunophenotype but indolent behavior

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Savage, Natasha M; Salman, Huda; Morice, William G

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Distinguishing chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK-cells from aggressive NK-cell leukemia is critical because they have distinct clinical course and management. Immunophenotyping plays a key role in distinguishing these two entities, however, it could not be used as sole criteria and clinical/laboratory findings are equally important. PMID:26401278

  2. Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  3. Lymphoproliferative disorders in inflammatory bowel disease patients on immunosuppression: Lessons from other inflammatory disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Grace Y; Halloran, Brendan P; Peters, Anthea C; Fedorak, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive agents, such as thiopurines, methotrexate, and biologics, have revolutionized the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, a number of case reports, case control studies and retrospective studies over the last decade have identified a concerning link between immunosuppression and lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs), the oncological phenomenon whereby lymphocytes divide uncontrollably. These LPDs have been associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in which the virus provides the impetus for malignant transformation while immunosuppression hampers the immune system’s ability to detect and clear these malignant cells. As such, the use of immunosuppressive agents may come at the cost of increased risk of developing LPD. While little is known about the LPD risk in IBD, more is known about immunosuppression in the post-transplantation setting and the development of EBV associated post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD). In review of the PTLD literature, evidence is available to demonstrate that certain immune suppressants such as cyclosporine and T-lymphocyte modulators in particular are associated with an increased risk of PTLD development. As well, high doses of immunosuppressive agents and multiple immunosuppressive agent use are also linked to increased PTLD development. Here, we discuss these findings in context of IBD and what future studies can be taken to understand and reduce the risk of EBV-associated LPD development from immunosuppression use in IBD. PMID:26600976

  4. Immunophenotyping of selected hematologic disorders--focus on lymphoproliferative disorders with more than one malignant cell population.

    PubMed

    Porwit, A

    2013-06-01

    Currently, clinical laboratories face increasing demand for flow cytometry testing combined with limited funding. Therefore, many laboratories search for panels that would provide sufficient immunophenotyping information and meet economical requirements. At the Flow Cytometry Laboratory, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada, we apply two 10-color tubes of surface markers for diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs). These tubes contain most of the mandatory B- and T-cell markers according to European Leukemia Net (www.leukemia-net.org) recommendations. The B-cell-oriented panel includes the following antibodies: Kappa-FITC/lambda-PE/CD19-ECD/CD38-PC5.5/CD20-PC7/CD34-APC/CD23 APC-AF700/CD10 APC-AF750/CD5-PB/CD45-KO. A different combination is applied to detect cytoplasmic Ig light chain expression and aberrant immunophenotype of plasma cells. The T-cell panel allows enumeration of various T- and NK-cell subsets: CD57-FITC/CD11c-PE/CD8-ECD/CD3-PC5.5/CD2-PC7/CD56-APC/CD7-APC-AF700/CD4-APC-AF750/CD5-PB/CD45-KO. The reported overall incidence of B-cell chronic LPDs presenting with more than one aberrant population is approximately 5%. Multicolor analysis facilitates the detection of multiple aberrant populations in the same sample because expression of multiple antigens can be studied simultaneously in each defined population. Examples of LPDs with multiple aberrant populations are presented. PMID:23590655

  5. Autoimmunity and auto-immune syndromes associated with and preceding the development of lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Polliack, A; Lugassy, G

    1992-11-01

    In this report the association of autoimmunity and autoimmune syndromes with lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) is described in 15 patients. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) developed in 10 patients, Hodgkin's disease (HD) in 3 and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in two. In most instances clinical and laboratory phenomena preceded the development/diagnosis of these disorders. Manifestations ranged from the presence of autoantibodies in the serum to the presence of both ill defined or incomplete autoimmune syndromes including cold urticaria, Raynaud's phenomenon, cold agglutinin disease, thyroiditis, nephrotic syndrome and vasculitis to typical systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and even one of scleroderma. It is suggested that in some patients (in)complete clinical manifestations of autoimmunity may precede the development of lymphoid neoplasias. The link between autoimmunity and lymphoproliferative disorders is briefly discussed. PMID:1434818

  6. Comparison of Non-myeloablative Conditioning Regimens for Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sanghee; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Artz, Andrew; McCarthy, Philip L.; Logan, Brent R.; Pasquini, Marcelo C.

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with non-myeloablative conditioning (NMA) for lymphoproliferative diseases (LD) includes fludarabine with and without low-dose total body irradiation (TBI). Transplant outcomes were compared among patients ≥40 years with LD who received a HCT with TBI (N=382) and no-TBI (N=515) NMA from 2001 to 2011. The groups were comparable except for donor, graft, prophylaxis for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), disease status and year of HCT. Cumulative incidences of grades II–IV GVHD at 100 days, were 29% and 20% (p=0.001), and chronic GVHD at 1 year were 54% and 44% (p=0.004) for TBI and no-TBI, respectively. Multivariate analysis of progression/relapse, treatment failure and mortality showed no outcome differences by conditioning. Full donor chimerism at day 100 was observed in 82% vs. 64% in the TBI and no-TBI groups, respectively (p=0.006). Subset of four most common conditioning/ GVHD prophylaxis combinations demonstrated higher rates of grades II–IV acute (p<0.001) and chronic GVHD (p<0.001) among recipients of TBI-mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) compared to other combinations. TBI-based NMA conditioning induces faster full donor chimerism but overall survival outcomes are comparable to no-TBI regimens. Combination of TBI and MMF are associated with higher rates of GVHD without impact on survival outcomes in patients with LD. PMID:25437248

  7. CD30+ Primary Cutaneous Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder with Signet-ring Cell Features

    PubMed Central

    Malviya, Neeta; Wickless, Heather

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of primary cutaneous CD30+ post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder with an uncommon finding of signet ring cell features in a heart transplant patient. The neoplastic cells were CD4 and CD30 positive, and negative for S-100, pancytokeratin, myeloperoxidase, and CD56. In situ hybridization for Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) was negative, even though the patient did have EBV viremia.

  8. Hepatitis C virus related lymphoproliferative disorder in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Aravindan, A N; Moger, Venkatesh; Sakhuja, Vinay; Kohli, Harbir S; Varma, Neelam; Jha, Vivekanand

    2006-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are commonly caused by Ebstein-Barr Virus infection. The role of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the genesis of lymphomas has been recognized recently. We report a HCV infected renal transplant recipient who developed PTLD 11 months after transplantation. Reduction of immunosuppression led to disappearance of viremia and clearance of PTLD. This is the first such report in the world literature. PMID:16868710

  9. Role of regulatory b cells in neuroimmunologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Han, Jinming; Sun, Li; Fan, Xueli; Wang, Zhongkun; Cheng, Yun; Zhu, Jie; Jin, Tao

    2016-08-01

    B lymphocytes augment the immune response by producing antibodies and activating T cells by antigen presentation. Recent studies have highlighted a specific and functionally significant B-cell subset that could downregulate excessive immune and inflammatory responses through a vast array of inhibitory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). This subset of B cells is generally referred to as regulatory B cells (Bregs). In addition, recent studies have shown that IL-35-producing Bregs also play a role in downregulation of immunity. Diverse phenotypes of Bregs have been proposed to underlie human disorders and their animal models. Most studies have focused on the role of different subsets of Bregs and Bregs-associated molecules such as IL-10, TGF-β, and IL-35 in the pathogenesis of neuroimmunologic disorders. Furthermore, Bregs exert regulatory function mainly through suppressing the differentiation of Th1/Th17 cells and promoting regulatory T-cell expansion. Reduced presence of Bregs is reportedly associated with progression of several neuroimmunologic disorders. This Review summarizes the current knowledge on the role of Bregs in neuroimmunologic disorders, including multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica, and myasthenia gravis. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Neuroscience Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27112131

  10. Targeted activation of human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells controls epstein-barr virus-induced B cell lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zheng; Liu, Yinping; Zheng, Jian; Liu, Ming; Lv, Aizhen; Gao, Yulong; Hu, Huaidong; Lam, Kowk-Tai; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung; Yang, Yuanzhong; Chen, Honglin; Tsao, George Sai-Wah; Bonneville, Marc; Lau, Yu-Lung; Tu, Wenwei

    2014-10-13

    Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD) after transplantation remains a serious and life-threatening complication. Herein we showed that the aminobisphosphonate pamidronate-expanded human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells efficiently killed EBV-transformed autologous lymphoblastoid B cell lines (EBV-LCL) through γ/δ-TCR and NKG2D receptor triggering and Fas and TRAIL engagement. By inoculation of EBV-LCL in Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) mice and humanized mice, we established lethal EBV-LPD with characteristics close to those of the human disease. Adoptive transfer of pamidronate-expanded Vγ9Vδ2-T cells alone effectively prevented EBV-LPD in Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) mice and induced EBV-LPD regression in EBV(+) tumor-bearing Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) mice. Pamidronate treatment inhibited EBV-LPD development in humanized mice through selective activation and expansion of Vγ9Vδ2-T cells. This study provides proof-of-principle for a therapeutic approach using pamidronate to control EBV-LPD through Vγ9Vδ2-T cell targeting. PMID:25220446

  11. Age-related Epstein-Barr Virus-positive lymphoproliferative disorders of the orbit and maxillary sinus : a case report.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Takeki; Mawatari, Momoko; Koiso, Hiromi; Yokohama, Akihiko; Uchiumi, Hideki; Saitoh, Takayuki; Handa, Hiroshi; Hirato, Junko; Karasawa, Masamitsu; Murakami, Hirokazu; Kojima, Masaru; Nakamura, Shigeo; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Tsukamoto, Norifumi

    2012-01-01

    We report a rare case of age-related Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (aEBVBLPD) primarily involving the orbit and maxillary sinus. Lesions in the left orbit and maxillary sinus were observed in a 59-year-old man presenting with pain in the left orbit and maxilla. Owing to the presence of Reed-Sternberg-like cells, the initial diagnosis was nodular sclerosis-type Hodgkin's lymphoma. Clinical stage was IIAE, and response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy was favorable. Further immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization analyses of the Reed-Sternberg-like giant cells revealed CD30, CD15, CD20, Bob-1, Oct-2, EBV-encoded RNAs (EBERs) and latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) expression. The characteristics of the present case, which included immunohistochemical findings, sites of primary lesions, absence of other lymph node lesions and relatively old age, suggested aEBVBLPD. Owing to the similarity in morphology, higher frequency at extranodal sites and poor prognosis, aEBVBLPD represents a differential diagnostic issue from classical Hodgkin's lymphoma when Reed-Sternberg cells are positive for EBV. PMID:23269081

  12. Croup as Unusual Presentation of Post-transplantation Lymphoproliferative Disorder after Liver Transplantation in an 18-month-old Child

    PubMed Central

    Keshtkari, A.; Dehghani, S. M.; Haghighat, M.; Imanieh, M. H.; Nasimfard, A.; Yousefi, G.; Javaherizadeh, H.

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a serious complication of solid organ transplantation that occurs due to immunosuppression and other risk factors. PTLD may present with involvement of other organs and with unusual presentation. The presentation is often extranodal (e.g., in the gastrointestinal tract, lung, or the central nervous system). Herein, we report on a 1.5-year-old girl who underwent liver transplantation almost 5 months prior to admission. She was on medications such as tacrolimus and prednisolone. Her presentation was started with symptoms of the upper respiratory infection followed by croupy cough and respiratory distress with no response to usual treatments. She had respiratory arrest during broncoscopy. Therefore, emergency tracheostomy was done. Biopsy from the paratracheal mass revealed large B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (PTLD, monomorphic and high grade). This case presentation shows that persistent upper airway symptoms, particularly stridor and croupy cough, in children who underwent liver transplant should be further evaluated; the physician needs to have a high degree of clinical suspicion for the diagnosis of PTLD in this situation. PMID:26889375

  13. Croup as Unusual Presentation of Post-transplantation Lymphoproliferative Disorder after Liver Transplantation in an 18-month-old Child.

    PubMed

    Keshtkari, A; Dehghani, S M; Haghighat, M; Imanieh, M H; Nasimfard, A; Yousefi, G; Javaherizadeh, H

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a serious complication of solid organ transplantation that occurs due to immunosuppression and other risk factors. PTLD may present with involvement of other organs and with unusual presentation. The presentation is often extranodal (e.g., in the gastrointestinal tract, lung, or the central nervous system). Herein, we report on a 1.5-year-old girl who underwent liver transplantation almost 5 months prior to admission. She was on medications such as tacrolimus and prednisolone. Her presentation was started with symptoms of the upper respiratory infection followed by croupy cough and respiratory distress with no response to usual treatments. She had respiratory arrest during broncoscopy. Therefore, emergency tracheostomy was done. Biopsy from the paratracheal mass revealed large B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (PTLD, monomorphic and high grade). This case presentation shows that persistent upper airway symptoms, particularly stridor and croupy cough, in children who underwent liver transplant should be further evaluated; the physician needs to have a high degree of clinical suspicion for the diagnosis of PTLD in this situation. PMID:26889375

  14. Unusual Indolent Course of a Chronic Active Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Natural Killer Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Arwa Z.; Al-Farsi, Khalil; Al-Khabori, Murtadha; Al-Huneini, Mohammed; Al-Hadabbi, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell lymphoproliferative disorders are uncommon and the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) plays an important aetiological role in their pathogenesis. We report a 20-year-old male with a chronic active EBV infection associated with a NK cell lymphoproliferative disorder which had an unusual indolent course. He presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in December 2011 with a history of intermittent fever and coughing. Examinations revealed generalised lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, leukocytosis, transaminitis, diffuse bilateral lung infiltrates and bone marrow lymphocyte involvement. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test revealed a high EBV viral load in the peripheral blood cells. The patient received a course of piperacillin-tazobactam for Klebsiella pneumoniae, but no active treatment for the lymphoproliferative disorder. However, his lymphocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase and liver enzymes dropped spontaneously. In addition, EBV PCR copies fluctuated and then decreased significantly. He remained clinically asymptomatic over the following four years. PMID:27226916

  15. Successful treatment of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) following renal allografting is associated with sustained CD8(+) T-cell restoration.

    PubMed

    Porcu, Pierluigi; Eisenbeis, Charles F; Pelletier, Ronald P; Davies, Elizabeth A; Baiocchi, Robert A; Roychowdhury, Sameek; Vourganti, Srinivas; Nuovo, Gerard J; Marsh, William L; Ferketich, Amy K; Henry, Mitchell L; Ferguson, Ronald M; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2002-10-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a life-threatening Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B-cell malignancy occurring in 1% to 2% of renal transplantation patients. Host- and PTLD-related factors determining the likelihood of tumor response following reduction of immune suppression (IS) and antiviral therapy remain largely unknown. Standard therapy for PTLD is not well established. Eleven consecutive renal transplantation patients who developed EBV-positive PTLD 8 to 94 months after allografting were uniformly treated with acyclovir and IS reduction. All PTLDs were EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Ten patients (91%) obtained a durable complete response (CR), and 9 (82%) have remained in continuous CR with a median follow-up of 29 months. Five patients (45%) lost their allograft. Of these, 4 patients had PTLD affecting the transplanted kidney. Peripheral blood CD8(+) T cells increased significantly (P =.0078) from baseline in 8 responders available for analysis. One of 2 patients whose absolute CD8(+) T-cell count subsequently dropped to baseline after IS reduction relapsed. The expanded CD8(+) T cells from 2 responders specifically recognized an immunodominant peptide from the EBV lytic gene BZLF-1. Another lytic EBV gene, thymidine kinase, was expressed in all 8 PTLDs tested. IS reduction and antiviral therapy for PTLD after renal transplantation is a highly successful therapeutic combination, but the risk of graft rejection is significant, particularly in patients with PTLD involving the renal allograft. A sustained expansion of CD8(+) T cells and a cellular immune response to EBV lytic antigens may be important for PTLD clearance in renal transplantation patients. PMID:12239141

  16. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder after kidney transplantation: time to adopt monitoring of Epstein-Barr virus?

    PubMed

    Biller, P; Michaux, L; Pauw, L De; Camboni, A; Mourad, M; Kanaan, N

    2015-06-01

    Although post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a classical complication encountered after kidney transplantation, its diagnosis can still be challenging and its outcome life-threatening. Most cases are related to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and occur mainly in the first year post-transplant, favoured by the seronegative EBV status of the recipient transplanted with a kidney from a seropositive donor, and strong immunosuppression. We report the case of a young kidney-pancreas transplant recipient who developed post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) early after transplantation, with a rapid fatal issue. We review the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of PTLD with a focus on prevention. PMID:25541210

  17. A Primary Cutaneous CD30-Positive T-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder Arising in a Patient With Multiple Myeloma and Cutaneous Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ryan C; Cohen, Daniel N; Howard, Matthew T; Wieland, Carilyn N

    2016-05-01

    CD30-positive cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders, a group of T-cell neoplasms, including lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP) and cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, require careful clinicopathologic correlation for diagnosis. An association between LyP and the development of a second hematolymphoid malignancy has been established in the literature. LyP has also been reported with systemic amyloidosis, but no such reports have documented coexisting cutaneous amyloid deposition with LyP to our knowledge. A 66-year-old woman with cutaneous amyloidosis, secondary to multiple myeloma, in remission, presented with erythematous and dark-brown papules involving the right arm, scalp, and torso. Punch biopsy of the arm showed a dermal infiltrate of intermediate-sized lymphocytes, some of which displayed a plasmacytoid morphology and prominent nodular subepidermal amyloid deposition. Punch biopsy of the scalp similarly showed a nonepidermotropic dense dermal infiltrate of intermediate-sized plasmacytoid lymphocytes and multifocal amyloid deposition. Both infiltrates were immunophenotypically CD30-positive, anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative T-cell lymphoproliferative processes. Subsequent studies showed no systemic involvement, and clinical correlation suggested a final diagnosis of LyP. We present this case of LyP, which histologically mimics a B-cell proliferation with a plasmacytoid morphology arising in association with cutaneous amyloidosis to highlight the importance of clinicopathologic correlation, a thorough battery of immunohistochemical studies, and consideration for a second hematologic malignancy arising in the setting of LyP. PMID:26981738

  18. [Monomorphic post-transplant T-lymphoproliferative disorder after autologous stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Takei, Toshifumi; Koya, Hiroko; Iriuchishima, Hirono; Hosiho, Takumi; Hirato, Junko; Kojima, Masaru; Handa, Hiroshi; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Murakami, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of T cell type monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) after autologous stem cell transplantation. A 53-year-old man with multiple myeloma received autologous stem cell transplantation and achieved a very good partial response. Nine months later, he developed a high fever and consciousness disturbance, and had multiple swollen lymph nodes and a high titer of Epstein-Barr (EB) virus DNA in his peripheral blood. Neither CT nor MRI of the brain revealed any abnormalities. Cerebrospinal fluid contained no malignant cells, but the EB virus DNA titer was high. Lymph node biopsy revealed T cell type monomorphic PTLD. Soon after high-dose treatment with methotrexate and cytosine arabinoside, the high fever and consciousness disturbance subsided, and the lymph node swelling and EB virus DNA disappeared. Given the efficacy of chemotherapy in this case, we concluded that the consciousness disturbance had been induced by central nervous system involvement of monomorphic PTLD. PMID:26861102

  19. Advances in Understanding the Pathogenesis of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Lymphoproliferative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Nishida, Naonori; Zhao, Xiaodong; Kanegane, Hirokazu

    2015-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was discovered 50 years ago  from an african Burkitt lymphoma cell line. EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) are life- threatening diseases, especially in children. In this article, we review EBV-associated LPDs, especially in the area of primary immunodeficiency disease (PID). We searched PubMed for publications with key words including EBV infection, lymphoma, LPDs and PID, and selected the manuscripts written in English that we judged to be relevant to the topic of this review.On the basis of the data in the literature, we grouped the EBV-associated LPDs into four categories: nonmalignant disease, malignant disease, acquired immunodeficiency disease and PID. Each category has its own risk factor for LPD development. EBV-associated LPD is a complex disease, creating new challenges for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26742434

  20. [A case of methotrexate-associated lymphoproliferative disorder diagnosed by liver biopsy].

    PubMed

    Takasumi, Mika; Okai, Ken; Asano, Tomoyuki; Kanno, Yukiko; Abe, Kazumichi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Hashimoto, Yuko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2015-01-01

    In 1998, a 68-year-old woman was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. She was treated with prednisolone, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, methotrexate (MTX), and biological drugs. Retroperitoneal lymph node swelling and hepatosplenomegaly appeared but spontaneously disappeared after drug withdrawal. Anorexia and general fatigue occurred in March 2012. She was admitted to our hospital with retroperitoneal, periaortic, and mediastinal lymph node swelling and was found to have multiple liver tumors. Based on the results of aspiration biopsy of a liver tumor, she was diagnosed with malignant lymphoma (Hodgkin lymphoma). She died from liver failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation before chemotherapy. We present this case of MTX-associated lymphoproliferative disorder, which caused formation of a liver tumor. PMID:25744928

  1. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders and Epstein-Barr virus DNAemia in a cohort of lung transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are serious complications in lung transplant recipients. No consensus on EBV DNAemia levels predictive of PTLD has been reached. In addition, in many instances EBV DNAemia is determined in patients with suggestive symptoms only. Methods The characteristics of five patients with PTLD as well as the prevalence of EBV DNAmia in a cohort of 137 consecutive patients receiving lung transplantation are described. Results Twenty-six out of 137 patients (18.9%) were excluded from the analysis because lost at follow-up or dead from PTLD-independent reasons within three months of transplantation. EBV DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was determined in 83/111 patients (74.8%) because of potential PTLD-related symptoms, while 28 patients (25.2%) showed no symptoms and were not examined. EBV DNAemia was positive in 53/83 patients (63.8%), and negative in 30/83 patients (36.2%). PTLD was diagnosed in five (4.5%) patients at a median time of 270 (range 120-870) days following transplantation. All five PTLD (three large B-cell lymphomas, one Hodgkin lymphoma and one possible pre-neoplastic lesion) were potentially associated with EBV infection. However, only 3/5 patients with PTLD had detectable EBV DNAemia: < 1,000 copies EBV DNA/1 × 105 PBMC in one patient and > 1,000 copies EBV DNA/1 × 105 PBMC in two patients. Conclusion A systematic multidisciplinary (clinical, radiologic, virologic and histologic) approach is mandatory for the diagnosis and management of PTLD in lung transplant recipients, while monitoring of symptomatic patients only may provide an incomplete or late picture of the clinical problem. In addition, staining for EBV antigens and quantification of EBV DNA in biopsy specimens should always be performed to understand the role of EBV infection in the pathogenesis of PTLD. PMID:21892950

  2. Epstein-Barr Virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorders: experimental and clinical developments

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lingyun; Wang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), the first human virus related to oncogenesis, was initially identified in a Burkitt lymphoma cell line in 1964. EBV infects over 90% of the world’s population. Most infected people maintain an asymptomatic but persistent EBV infection lifelong. However, in some individuals, EBV infection has been involved in the development of cancer and autoimmune disease. Nowadays, oncogenic potential of EBV has been intensively studied in a wide range of human neoplasms, including Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), gastric carcinoma (GC), etc. EBV encodes a series of viral protein and miRNAs, promoting its persistent infection and the transformation of EBV-infected cells. Although the exact role of EBV in the oncogenesis remains to be clarified, novel diagnostic and targeted therapeutic approaches are encouraging for the management of EBV-related malignancies. This review mainly focuses on the experimental and clinical advances of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:26628948

  3. KU HAPLOINSUFFIENCY CAUSES A LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDER OF IMMATURE T-CELL PRECURSORS DUE TO IKAROS MALFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Zahide; Qazi, Sanjive; Ishkhanian, Rita; Hasty, Paul; Ma, Hong; Uckun, Fatih M.

    2013-01-01

    Ikaros (IK) malfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common form of childhood cancer. Therefore, a stringent regulation of IK activity is very important. Here we provide unique genetic and biochemical evidence that the Ku protein components Ku70 and Ku80 act as positive regulators of IK function via formation of IK-Ku70 and IK-Ku80 heterodimers with augmented sequence-specific DNA binding activity. siRNA-mediated depletion of Ku70 or Ku80 reduced the sequence-specific DNA binding activity of IK in EMSA as well as the RT-PCR measured IK target gene expression levels in human cells. The interaction of Ku components with IK likely contributes to the anti-leukemic effects of IK as a tumor suppressor, because Ku70 as well as Ku80 haploinsuffiency in mice caused development of a lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD) involving CD2+CD4+CD8+CD1+IL7R+ thymic T-cell precursors with functional IK deficiency. PMID:24478815

  4. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following kidney transplantation: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Vase, Maja Ølholm; Kampmann, Jan; d'Amore, Francesco; Møller, Michael Boe; Strandhave, Charlotte; Bendix, Knud; Bistrup, Claus; Thiesson, Helle Charlotte; Søndergaard, Esben; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Jespersen, Bente

    2016-04-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) incidence is difficult to determine, mainly because both early and other lesions may go unrecognized and unregistered. Few studies have included systematic pathology review to maximize case identification and decide more accurately PTLD frequency after long-term post-transplantation follow-up. A retrospective population-based cohort study including all kidney transplant recipients at two Danish centres (1990-2011; population covered 3.1 million; 2175 transplantations in 1906 patients). Pathology reports were reviewed for all patient biopsies to identify possible PTLDs. Candidate PTLDs underwent histopathological review and classification. Seventy PTLD cases were identified in 2175 transplantations (3.2%). The incidence rate (IR) after first transplantation was 5.4 cases per 1000 patient-years (95% CI: 4.0-7.3). Most PTLDs were monomorphic (58.5%), or early lesions (21.5%). Excluding early lesions and patients <18 years, IR was 3.7 (95% CI: 2.9-5.5). Ten patients with PTLD were retransplanted, 2 developing further PTLDs. Post-transplant patient survival was inferior in patients with PTLD, while death-censored graft survival was not. Using registry data together with extensive pathological review and long follow-up, a rather high incidence of PTLD was found. PMID:26749337

  5. EBV-induced post transplant lymphoproliferative disorders: a persisting challenge in allogeneic hematopoetic SCT.

    PubMed

    Rasche, L; Kapp, M; Einsele, H; Mielke, S

    2014-02-01

    EBV-induced post transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (EBV-PTLD) is a life-threatening complication after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Profound T-cell depletion of the allograft represents a major risk factor for EBV-PTLD. With regard to the increasing use of alternative stem cell sources such as cord blood or purified haploidentical stem cell grafts both associated with impaired immune reconstitution, the frequent occurrence of EBV-PTLD demands particular vigilance on laboratory changes and early symptoms. Here we have summarized today's knowledge about EBV-PTLD in a comprehensive review explaining the underlying mechanisms of EBV-based transformation, EBV-PTLD development, clinical presentation, incidence, diagnosis, screening, therapy and prognosis. In this context, we emphasize on the necessity of regularly applied screening tools and pre-emptive treatment strategies including anti-CD20 Abs particularly in high-risk patients to avoid disease progression to malignant lymphoma. Although EBV-PTLD has always been associated with a high mortality rate, novel immunotherapeutic approaches such as the transfer of EBV-specific T cells nowadays offer improved chances of disease control even at late stages. PMID:23832092

  6. Approaches to Managing Autoimmune Cytopenias in Novel Immunological Disorders with Genetic Underpinnings Like Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V. Koneti

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disorder of apoptosis. It is frequently caused by mutations in FAS (TNFRSF6) gene. Unlike most of the self-limiting autoimmune cytopenias sporadically seen in childhood, multi lineage cytopenias due to ALPS are often refractory, as their inherited genetic defect is not going to go away. Historically, more ALPS patients have died due to overwhelming sepsis following splenectomy to manage their chronic cytopenias than due to any other cause, including malignancies. Hence, current recommendations underscore the importance of avoiding splenectomy in ALPS, by long-term use of corticosteroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents like mycophenolate mofetil and sirolimus. Paradigms learnt from managing ALPS patients in recent years is highlighted here and can be extrapolated to manage refractory cytopenias in patients with as yet undetermined genetic bases for their ailments. It is also desirable to develop international registries for children with rare and complex immune problems associated with chronic multilineage cytopenias in order to elucidate their natural history and long-term comorbidities due to the disease and its treatments. PMID:26258116

  7. A novel recurrent NPM1-TYK2 gene fusion in cutaneous CD30-positive lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Velusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Kiel, Mark J; Sahasrabuddhe, Anagh A; Rolland, Delphine; Dixon, Catherine A; Bailey, Nathanael G; Betz, Bryan L; Brown, Noah A; Hristov, Alexandra C; Wilcox, Ryan A; Miranda, Roberto N; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Jeon, Yoon K; Inamdar, Kedar V; Lim, Megan S; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S J

    2014-12-11

    The spectrum of cutaneous CD30-positive lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) includes lymphomatoid papulosis and primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Chromosomal translocations targeting tyrosine kinases in CD30-positive LPDs have not been described. Using whole-transcriptome sequencing, we identified a chimeric fusion involving NPM1 (5q35) and TYK2 (19p13) that encodes an NPM1-TYK2 protein containing the oligomerization domain of NPM1 and an intact catalytic domain in TYK2. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed NPM1-TYK2 fusions in 2 of 47 (4%) primary cases of CD30-positive LPDs and was absent in other mature T-cell neoplasms (n = 151). Functionally, NPM1-TYK2 induced constitutive TYK2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), STAT3, and STAT5 activation. Conversely, a kinase-defective NPM1-TYK2 mutant abrogated STAT1/3/5 signaling. Finally, short hairpin RNA-mediated silencing of TYK2 abrogated lymphoma cell growth. This is the first report of recurrent translocations involving TYK2, and it highlights the novel therapeutic opportunities in the treatment of CD30-positive LPDs with TYK2 translocations. PMID:25349176

  8. Using Epstein-Barr Viral Load Assays To Diagnose, Monitor, and Prevent Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gulley, Margaret L.; Tang, Weihua

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA measurement is being incorporated into routine medical practice to help diagnose, monitor, and predict posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in immunocompromised graft recipients. PTLD is an aggressive neoplasm that almost always harbors EBV DNA within the neoplastic lymphocytes, and it is often fatal if not recognized and treated promptly. Validated protocols, commercial reagents, and automated instruments facilitate implementation of EBV load assays by real-time PCR. When applied to either whole blood or plasma, EBV DNA levels reflect clinical status with respect to EBV-related neoplasia. While many healthy transplant recipients have low viral loads, high EBV loads are strongly associated with current or impending PTLD. Complementary laboratory assays as well as histopathologic examination of lesional tissue help in interpreting modest elevations in viral load. Circulating EBV levels in serial samples reflect changes in tumor burden and represent an effective, noninvasive tool for monitoring the efficacy of therapy. In high-risk patients, serial testing permits early clinical intervention to prevent progression toward frank PTLD. Restoring T cell immunity against EBV is a major strategy for overcoming PTLD, and novel EBV-directed therapies are being explored to thwart virus-driven neoplasia. PMID:20375356

  9. Virus and Autoantigen-Specific CD4+ T Cells Are Key Effectors in a SCID Mouse Model of EBV-Associated Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Linnerbauer, Stefanie; Behrends, Uta; Adhikary, Dinesh; Witter, Klaus; Bornkamm, Georg W.; Mautner, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Polyclonal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B cell line (lymphoblastoid cell lines; LCL)-stimulated T-cell preparations have been successfully used to treat EBV-positive post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) in transplant recipients, but function and specificity of the CD4+ component are still poorly defined. Here, we assessed the tumor-protective potential of different CD4+ T-cell specificities in a PTLD-SCID mouse model. Injection of different virus-specific CD4+ T-cell clones showed that single specificities were capable of prolonging mouse survival and that the degree of tumor protection directly correlated with recognition of target cells in vitro. Surprisingly, some CD4+ T-cell clones promoted tumor development, suggesting that besides antigen recognition, still elusive functional differences exist among virus-specific T cells. Of several EBV-specific CD4+ T-cell clones tested, those directed against virion antigens proved most tumor-protective. However, enriching these specificities in LCL-stimulated preparations conferred no additional survival benefit. Instead, CD4+ T cells specific for unknown, probably self-antigens were identified as principal antitumoral effectors in LCL-stimulated T-cell lines. These results indicate that virion and still unidentified cellular antigens are crucial targets of the CD4+ T-cell response in this preclinical PTLD-model and that enriching the corresponding T-cell specificities in therapeutic preparations may enhance their clinical efficacy. Moreover, the expression in several EBV-negative B-cell lymphoma cell lines implies that these putative autoantigen(s) might also qualify as targets for T-cell-based immunotherapy of virus-negative B cell malignancies. PMID:24853673

  10. Detection of monoclonal T populations in patients with KIR-restricted chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Gattazzo, Cristina; Teramo, Antonella; Passeri, Francesca; De March, Elena; Carraro, Samuela; Trimarco, Valentina; Frezzato, Federica; Berno, Tamara; Barilà, Gregorio; Martini, Veronica; Piazza, Francesco; Trentin, Livio; Facco, Monica; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Zambello, Renato

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of chronic large granular lymphocyte proliferations is largely unknown. Although these disorders are characterized by the expansion of different cell types (T and natural killer) with specific genetic features and abnormalities, several lines of evidence suggest a common pathogenetic mechanism. According to this interpretation, we speculated that in patients with natural killer-type chronic lymphoproliferative disorder, together with natural killer cells, also T lymphocytes undergo a persistent antigenic pressure, possibly resulting in an ultimate clonal T-cell selection. To strengthen this hypothesis, we evaluated whether clonal T-cell populations were detectable in 48 patients with killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-restricted natural killer-type chronic lymphoproliferative disorder. At diagnosis, in half of the patients studied, we found a clearly defined clonal T-cell population, despite the fact that all cases presented with a well-characterized natural killer disorder. Follow-up analysis confirmed that the TCR gamma rearrangements were stable over the time period evaluated; furthermore, in 7 patients we demonstrated the appearance of a clonal T subset that progressively matures, leading to a switch between killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-restricted natural killer-type disorder to a monoclonal T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia. Our results support the hypothesis that a common mechanism is involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders. PMID:25193965

  11. Effect of Irradiation on Incidence of Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Miniature Swine.

    PubMed

    Matar, Abraham J; Patil, Aarti R; Al-Musa, Ahmad; Hanekamp, Isabel; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Duran-Struuck, Raimon

    2015-10-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a major complication of clinical organ and cell transplantation. Conditioning and immunosuppressive regimens that significantly impair T cell immunity, including depleting antibodies and calcineurin inhibitors, increase the risk of PTLD after transplantation. Swine PTLD has been shown to closely resemble human PTLD in morphology, histology, and viral-driven reactivation of B cells. Previously, we reported high incidences of PTLD after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in miniature swine recipients conditioned with thymic irradiation (TI) in addition to T cell depletion and cyclosporine A monotherapy after transplantation. Replacement of TI with 100 cGy of total body irradiation resulted in similar numbers of B cells early post-transplantation, greater numbers of T cells at day 0, and markedly decreased incidence of PTLD, suggesting that a threshold number of T cells may be necessary to prevent subsequent B cell proliferation and development of overt PTLD. Results from this large cohort of animals provide insight into the important effect of irradiation and T cell immunity on the incidence of PTLD after HCT and reinforce the pig model as a valuable tool for the study of PTLD and HCT. PMID:26210443

  12. HLA Associations and Risk of Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in a Danish Population-Based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Vase, Maja Ølholm; Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Strandhave, Charlotte; Søndergaard, Esben; Bendix, Knud; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Andersen, Claus; Møller, Michael Boe; Sørensen, Søren Schwartz; Kampmann, Jan; Eiskjær, Hans; Iversen, Martin; Weinreich, Ilse Duus; Møller, Bjarne; Jespersen, Bente; d'Amore, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a feared complication to organ transplantation, associated with substantial morbidity and inferior survival. Risk factors for PTLD include T cell–depleting induction therapy and primary infection or reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus. Possible associations between certain HLA types and the risk of developing PTLD have been reported by other investigators; however, results are conflicting. Methods We conducted a retrospective, population-based study on 4295 Danish solid organ transplant patients from the Scandiatransplant database. Having identified 93 PTLD patients in the cohort, we investigated the association of HLA types with PTLD, Epstein-Barr virus status and time to PTLD onset. The outcomes survival and PTLD were evaluated using Cox regression; mismatching, and the PTLD-specific mortality were evaluated in a competing risk analysis. Results Risk of PTLD was associated with male sex (odds ratio, 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-2.71), and, in women, HLA-DR13 conferred an increased risk (odds ratio, 3.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.41-7.31). In multivariate analysis, HLA-B45 and HLA-DR13 remained independent predictive factors of PTLD. Mismatching in the B locus was associated with a reduced risk of PTLD (P < 0.001). Overall survival was poor after a PTLD diagnosis and was significantly worse than that in the remaining transplant cohort (P < 0.001). Conclusions Our data indicate risk-modifying HLA associations, which can be clinically useful after transplantation in personalized monitoring schemes. Given the strong linkage disequilibrium in the HLA region, the associations must be interpreted carefully. The large size, virtually complete ascertainment of cases and no loss to follow-up remain important strengths of the study. PMID:27500227

  13. PCR Analysis of IgH and TCR-γ Gene Rearrangements as a Confirmatory Diagnostic Tool for Lymphoproliferative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Poopak, Behzad; Valeshabad, Ali Kord; Elahi, Fazel; Rezvani, Hamid; Khosravipour, Gelareh; Jahangirpour, Mohammad Ali; Bolouri, Shirin; Golkar, Tolou; Salari, Fatemeh; Shahjahani, Mohammad; Saki, Najmaldin

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates PCR analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) and T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements on paraffin-embedded tissue sections and bone marrow aspirates of patients suspected to have lymphoproliferative disorders but with inconclusive diagnosis in histopathological examination. 130 samples of patients with inconclusive immunohistochemistry results were evaluated for clonal rearrangement of IgH and TCR genes. Based on histopathology examination, the patients were divided into three groups: the first group without any definite diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders (60 cases, 46.2 %), the second group suspected to have a lymphoproliferative disorder but in favor of benign disorders (19 cases, 14.6 %) and the third group suspect to lymphoproliferative disorders but relatively in favor of malignant disorders (51 cases, 39.2 %). After DNA extraction and quality control, semi-nested PCR was performed using consensus primers for amplification of TCR-γ and CDR-3 regions of IgH genes. PCR products were analyzed after heteroduplex analysis using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and were subject to silver staining. Totally, in over half of the cases (55.4 %), a monoclonal pattern was found in IgH or TCR-γ genes rearrangements. Monoclonal IgH gene rearrangement was detected in 48.1 % of patients, whereas monoclonal TCR-γ gene rearrangement was found in 33.6 % of them, which was not statistically significant (P = 0.008). Only in 32 patients (24.6 %) were the results of TCR-γ and IgH gene rearrangements consistent with respect to the presence (2.3 %) or absence (22.3 %) of monoclonality. Finally, PCR analysis of TCR-γ and IgH gene rearrangements led to definite diagnosis in 105 patients (80.8 %), and only 25 cases (19.2 %) remained inconclusive. Our results emphasize the usefulness of gene rearrangement study in cases without a definite diagnosis in immunohistochemistry studies. Multiple PCR analysis results when combined

  14. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: A metabolic disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Tanios, Georges; Aranguren, Ines M.; Goldstein, Jack S.; Patel, Chirag B.

    2013-01-01

    Patient Male, 81 Final Diagnosis: Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Symptoms: General weakness • hypoglycemia • metabolic acidosis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Hematology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: B cell lymphoma constitutes 80–85% of cases of Non Hodgkin’s lymphoma in the Untied States. Metabolic complications may arise from the disease itself or through its end organ involvement. Case Report: We describe a case of a diffuse large B cell lymphoma diagnosed by abdominal computed tomography after it initially presented as hypoglycemia not correctable by dextrose infusion that instead resulted in increased anion gap metabolic acidosis with elevated lactate levels. Conclusions: The case illustrates how lymphomas can present unusually with hypoglycemia and lactic acidosis, the latter being an ominous sign that can occur without liver involvement. In this regard, the case demonstrates the metabolic sequelae of lymphoma that should raise suspicion for an underlying process. This has implications for diagnosis, treatment, and patient survival. Attention should be paid especially in the primary care setting in order to minimize delays in diagnosis. PMID:24349605

  15. Donor Monoclonal Gammopathy May Cause Lymphoproliferative Disorders in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Felldin, M; Ekberg, J; Polanska-Tamborek, D; Hansson, U; Sender, M; Rizell, M; Svanvik, J; Mölne, J

    2016-09-01

    Prior research on donor monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) has been inadequate regarding the risk for lymphoproliferative disease in solid organ transplantation recipients. Seven organ recipients from two different donors developed lymphoproliferative disease. The origin of the malignancy was determined by use of microsatellite analysis, and the plasma of the two donors was analyzed with the use of electrophoresis. The clinical courses of the seven recipients were followed for 36-60 months. One donor transmitted lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma to two kidney recipients and MGUS to a liver recipient, all IgMκ. A second donor caused IgGλ myeloma in two kidney and one liver recipient, and IgGλ gammopathy in a heart recipient. Transplant nephrectomy was performed in three kidney recipients and remission was achieved. The fourth kidney recipient has kept the graft and the disease has progressed. The liver recipient died from myeloma. There were no clinical signs of lymphoproliferative disease in the donors, but retrospective serum analyses showed M-components, IgMκ (37 g/L) and IgGλ (8 g/L). Donors with MGUS may cause donor-transmitted malignancies via passenger lymphocytes/plasma cells in solid organ recipients. The results call for a large register study of the incidence of donor MGUS and lymphoproliferative disease in their recipients. PMID:27575725

  16. Role of diffusion weighted imaging in diagnosis of post transplant lymphoproliferative disorders: Case reports and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Singh, A.; Das, C. J.; Gupta, A. K.; Bagchi, S.

    2016-01-01

    Post transplant lymphoproliferative disorder include a spectrum of conditions occurring in immunosuppressed post transplant recipients, lymphoma being the most ominous. 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography CT) is the current imaging gold standard for lymphoma imaging as it allows both morphological and functional assessment. CT and/or conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used for morphological evaluation in transplant recipients. Integrating diffusion weighted imaging with apparent diffusion coefficient analysis in MRI protocol enhances its sensitivity and may prove invaluable in response assessment in transplant recipients. PMID:27194838

  17. The expression of Epstein-Barr virus latent proteins is related to the pathological features of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Delecluse, H. J.; Kremmer, E.; Rouault, J. P.; Cour, C.; Bornkamm, G.; Berger, F.

    1995-01-01

    Transplant recipients are at increased risk for the development of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs). PTLDs harbor genomes of the Epstein-Barr virus, a herpesvirus that immortalizes B cells in vitro. At least five viral proteins are required for immortalization. Two of them are particularly important. Latent membrane protein (LMP) has transforming activity in fibroblasts, and Epstein-Barr antigen (EBNA)2 transactivates the expression of numerous cellular and viral genes. To determine whether the expression of EBNA2 and LMP is related to the histological and clinical presentation of PTLD, we tested their expression in 14 Epstein-Barr virus-positive cases. Using monoclonal antibodies to EBNA2 and LMP on paraffin sections, we found an expression of both proteins in 2 of 3 polymorphic PTLD and in 7 of 8 cases of monomorphic, large cell PTLD, without plasmacytic differentiation. One polymorphic and one large cell PTLD expressed LMP only. LMP and EBNA2 were found particularly in immunoblasts. The number of positive cells was extremely variable in the different cases as well as within the same biopsy. Three cases of PTLD had morphological and phenotypical features of plasmacytomas and did not stain for EBNA2 or LMP. This suggests that the expression of EBNA2 and LMP is related to the differentiation stage of the infected cells and that other viral or cellular proteins may contribute to tumor growth. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7747805

  18. Remission of late-onset post-heart transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder following treatment with rituximab and modified mini-CHOP chemotherapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, QIANG; YANG, TIANXIN; JIN, XING; NI, XUMING; QI, HAIYAN; YAN, ZHIKUN

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is one of the most frequent secondary malignancies that can follow immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ transplantation, and may result in severe morbidities and even mortality. A middle-aged Han Chinese patient, prescribed with immunosuppressive cyclosporine and prednisone, developed PTLD that manifested as a painless cervical lymph node enlargement, 12 years following heart transplantation. Histology revealed monomorphic B-cell PTLD (diffuse large-cell lymphoma); as a result the immunosuppressive regimen of the patient was changed to tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. In addition, the patient was changed to 6-cycle rituximab with a modified mini-CHOP (R-mini-CHOP) regimen for induction, and 8-cycle quarterly rituximab treatment and maintenance therapy. R-mini-CHOP therapy was well tolerated, and no allograft rejection occurred. The patient exhibited clinical remission as demonstrated by the results of the positron emission tomography-computed tomography at the 5-year follow-up visit following R-mini-CHOP therapy. In conclusion, R-mini-CHOP therapy following reduced immunosuppression is effective and safe for the treatment of late-onset PTLD following heart transplantation. PMID:27347047

  19. Concomitant Presentation of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis and Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disease-Like Lymphoma in a Mildly Immunosuppressed Leukemia Patient: An Unusual Association.

    PubMed

    Sinno, Mohamad G; Rosen, David; Wittler, Robert

    2016-08-01

    We describe a 4-year-old female with pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia on maintenance chemotherapy, who developed hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) secondary to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, complicated by an aggressive lymphoproliferative disorder. Although there was no history of bone marrow transplant or underlying immunodeficiency, EBV triggered a post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD)-like lymphoma. Multiple regimens of chemotherapy failed to induce remission and patient developed multiorgan failure. The association of HLH with EBV-related PTLD-like lymphoproliferative disorder is rare. We present this case to highlight this unusual association so that this highly fatal disease can be recognized and promptly addressed. PMID:27148941

  20. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound findings of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in a transplanted kidney: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, Alyssa; Duddalwar, Vinay A; Djaladat, Hooman; Aron, Manju; Gulati, Mittul

    2015-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder occurs in approximately one percent of kidney transplant recipients. We evaluated a seventy-seven year-old man with a solid mass in his transplant kidney. On contrast enhanced ultrasound, the mass enhanced but remained persistently hypovascular throughout exam. The enhancement pattern of the mass differed from that typical of clear cell renal cell carcinoma, the main differential diagnosis. Final pathology after partial nephrectomy confirmed post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. This is the first report of contrast enhanced ultrasound findings in a renal mass diagnosed as post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Contrast enhanced ultrasound has a promising role in imaging of renal masses, particularly relevant in transplant patients due to the lack of nephrotoxicity. PMID:26629291

  1. Hodgkin lymphoma post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder: A comparative analysis of clinical characteristics, prognosis, and survival.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Aaron S; Klein, Andreas K; Ruthazer, Robin; Evens, Andrew M

    2016-06-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (HL-PTLD) is an uncommon PTLD with unclear prognosis and differences between HL-PTLD and immunocompetent HL are not well defined. Patient characteristics were compared among 192 patients with HL-PTLD from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients and 13,847 HL patients in SEER (HL-SEER). Overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) were compared after exact matching. Additionally, multivariable analyses were used to identify prognostic markers of survival and associations between treatment and survival. Median time from transplant to HL-PTLD diagnosis was 88 months. When compared with HL-SEER, patients with HL-PTLD were older (median age, 52 vs. 36 years, P = 0.001), more likely male (73% vs. 54%, P < 0.001), Caucasian (81% vs. 70%, P = 0.02), and had extranodal disease (42% vs. 3%, P < 0.001). Five-year OS for patients with HL-PTLD was 57% versus 80% for HL-SEER (P < 0.001); DSS was also inferior (P < 0.001). For patients with HL-PTLD, the use of any chemotherapy was associated with decreased hazard of death (HR = 0.36, P < 0.001). Furthermore, patients who received no chemotherapy or nontraditional HL regimens had increased hazard of death (aHR = 2.94, P = 0.001 and 2.01, P = 0.04) versus HL-specific chemotherapy regimens. In multivariable analysis, advanced age and elevated creatinine were associated with inferior OS (aHR = 1.26/decade P < 0.001 and 1.64/0.1 mg/dL increase P = 0.02). A prognostic score based on the number of these adverse factors (0, 1, 2) was associated with 10-year OS rates of 79%, 53%, and 11%, respectively (P < 0.001). Altogether, HL-PTLD patients have inferior survival when compared with HL-SEER. Furthermore, treatment with HL-specific chemotherapy was associated with improved OS, whereas age and creatinine identified patients with markedly divergent survival. Am. J. Hematol. 91:560-565, 2016. © 2016

  2. Hemophagocytic syndrome in Epstein-Barr virus-associated T-lymphoproliferative disorders: disease spectrum, pathogenesis, and management.

    PubMed

    Su, I J; Wang, C H; Cheng, A L; Chen, R L

    1995-11-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been shown to infect T lymphocytes and is associated with two recently recognized human T-lymphoproliferative disorders: childhood EBV-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (VAHS) representing a primary or active EBV infection of T cells in young children, and the EBV-containing T cell lymphoma in adults predominantly affecting the nose, skin and gastrointestinal tract. In both diseases, hemophagocytic syndrome (HS) accounts for the major cause of mortality. The patients developing HS share common clinicopathologic features such as fever, skin lesions, lung infiltrates, hepatosplenomegaly with jaundice, cytopenias, and coagulopathy. The liver, spleen, lymph nodes, and bone marrow usually show florid histiocytic proliferation with hemophagocytosis in addition to the proliferation of atypical T lymphocytes or immunoblasts. The HS in T cell lymphoma may develop simultaneously with initial lymphoma presentation, at tumor relapse, or even during remission. The cytokines, in particular tumor necrosis factor-alpha, released from the EBV-infected T lymphocytes are presumed to cause the histiocytic activation and the subsequent hemophagocytic process. Chemotherapy or antiviral agents fail to arrest the hemophagocytic process in both diseases. Immunomodulatory treatment incorporating etoposide and intravenous immunoglobulin, however, has been effective in the control of the progression of the hemophagocytic process in a substantial number of VAHS patients. Preliminary data suggest that bone marrow transplantation may be a promising way for eliminating both the virus and the proliferating T cells. Further investigations are mandatory for combating this aggressive hemophagocytic process in EBV-associated T lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:8590839

  3. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder of the cervical spine mimicking an epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Wewel, Joshua T; Harbhajanka, Aparna; Kasliwal, Manish K; Ahuja, Sumeet K; Loew, Jerome M; Fontes, Ricardo B

    2016-07-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a recognized complication following solid organ and stem cell transplants with subsequent immunosuppression and is the most common malignancy complicating solid organ transplantation. Improved survival and use of aggressive immunosuppression following solid organ transplants have led to increased diagnosis of PTLD. Nevertheless, spinal involvement in PTLD is extremely rare. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PTLD causing epidural spinal cord compression of the cervical spine, mimicking the imaging and pathology of an epidural abscess. The patient underwent posterior and subsequent anterior decompression and stabilization. Rarity of occurrence of PTLD in the spine with absence of diagnostic imaging features may preclude differentiating it from the more commonly occurring lesions such as epidural abscess which occurs in a similar clinical setting. As the management strategy and overall prognosis are dramatically different, the importance of considering PTLD in the differential diagnosis for epidural spinal cord compression in a transplant recipient patient cannot be overemphasized. PMID:26916907

  4. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome: an underdiagnosed and misdiagnosed bleeding complication in patients with lymphoproliferative and myeloproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Federici, Augusto B

    2006-01-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) is a rare bleeding disorder with laboratory findings similar to those for congenital von Willebrand disease (VWD). Unlike the congenital disease, AVWS usually occurs in individuals with no personal or family history of bleeding. The prevalence of AVWS in the general population is unknown because data from large prospective studies of this syndrome are not available. Although AVWS is particularly frequent in lymphoproliferative or myeloproliferative disorders, it can also be associated with solid tumors, immunologic and cardiovascular disorders, and other miscellaneous conditions. Diagnosis of AVWS is based on assays measuring the activity of von Willebrand factor (VWF). This tends to be abnormally low, but factor VIII (FVIII) coagulant activity can sometimes be normal. FVIII/VWF inhibiting activity is found in only a minority of cases. Bleeding episodes in patients with AVWS are mostly of the mucocutaneous type and can be managed with desmopressin, plasma-derived FVIII/VWF concentrates, and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). Recombinant activated factor VII can be useful in patients unresponsive to standard therapy. An updated version of the International Registry on AVWS, recently available online, will provide more information on this rare, but underdiagnosed and misdiagnosed, disorder. PMID:16427386

  5. Alvocidib, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Lymphoproliferative Disorders or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  6. Methotrexate-associated lymphoproliferative disorder presenting as extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma arising in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Shogo; Takanashi, Yusuke; Koda, Kenji; Fukayama, Masashi

    2015-12-01

    Patients having rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with methotrexate (MTX) are at an increased risk of developing lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD). Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) sometimes contributes to the development of MTX-associated LPD. Herein, we report the case of a 64-year-old Japanese woman with RA who showed complications of EBV-positive MTX-associated LPD. This case is exceedingly rare in that the LPD was confined to the lungs and its subclassification was extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma. Only four cases of extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma in the setting of MTX-associated LPD have ever been reported in the English language literature, only one of which was an extranasal NK/T-cell lymphoma, similar to our case. Extranasal NK/T-cell lymphomas show more aggressive behavior than nasal NK/T-cell lymphomas, possibly reflected by the considerable re-exacerbation of the lesions in only two months after the cessation of MTX in our case. However, the SMILE regimen (steroid, methotrexate, ifosfamide, l-asparaginase, and etoposide) was able to suppress tumor growth in this case. PMID:26459854

  7. Hodgkin lymphoma post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following pediatric renal transplant: serial imaging with F-18 FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; Lisbona, Robert; Derbekyan, Vilma

    2010-09-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) occurs in 1.2% of pediatric renal transplant patients, and is frequently Epstein-Barr Virus mediated. Hodgkin Lymphoma PTLD is the rarest of the 4 types of PTLDs recognized by the World Health Organization, with an incidence of <4% of all PTLD patients. It has a distinct clinical course and treatment from all other types of PTLD. This is a case of a 16-year-old girl who had a renal transplant in 2000 due to Moya Moya disease. Her first F-18 FDG PET/CT done in 2006 showed mildly FDG-avid mediastinal adenopathy (histologically nonspecific reactive nodes), however in 2009, after presenting with fevers, a repeat PET/CT showed extensive intensely FDG-avid disease. Biopsy of a supraclavicular node identified Hodgkin Lymphoma PTLD. The patient was treated with chemotherapy and reimaged, showing excellent response to therapy. In contrast, classic PTLD is treated by withdrawal of immunosuppression and administration of Rituximab. F-18 FDG PET/CT is known to be very useful in the staging and monitoring of response to therapy in the setting of classic PTLD. In this case, serial F-18 FDG PET/CT scans proved very useful in the evaluation and follow-up of the rare and distinct Hodgkin Lymphoma PTLD subtype. PMID:20706047

  8. Multifocal Epstein-Barr Virus-Negative Posttransplantation Lymphoproliferative Disorder Treated With Reduction of Immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Miyazono, Akinori; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Nagasako, Hironobu; Hamasaki, Yuko; Shishido, Seiichiro; Yoshioka, Takako; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2016-09-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is associated with significant mortality in kidney transplant recipients. PTLD cases associated with poor prognostic factors that are refractory to reduction of immunosuppression generally require chemotherapy and immunotherapy. We present a patient with PTLD who achieved complete remission after reduction of immunosuppression alone despite having a poor prognosis. A boy with a mutation in the WT1 gene developed bilateral Wilms tumor at 15 months and received a kidney transplant at the age of 4 years. At 13 years of age, the patient's condition was managed with methylprednisolone, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil. He developed Epstein-Barr virus-negative monomorphic PTLD with numerous nodular lesions in the liver, vertebral bodies, and gastric wall. To reduce immunosuppression, we discontinued mycophenolate mofetil treatment, decreased tacrolimus dosage to 1mg/d, and increased methylprednisolone dosage to 2mg/d. The PTLD lesions drastically diminished in size within several days and disappeared 144 days after reduction of immunosuppression, although the patient had several factors indicating a poor prognosis. As of 13 months after reduction of immunosuppression for PTLD, the transplanted kidney was still functional. We conclude that even when patients with PTLD have a poor prognosis, reduction of immunosuppression alone may result in complete remission when the early response is excellent. PMID:27178679

  9. Treatment options for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder and other Epstein-Barr virus-associated malignancies.

    PubMed

    Davis, J E; Moss, D J

    2004-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a range of malignancies that largely arise from a defect in EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) immunity and function. Much work has focused on the reconstitution of CTL immunity to EBV in transplant patients, in whom immunosuppression modalities render them susceptible to post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD). Adoptive transfer of autologous CTLs is effective at both preventing and curing PTLD in solid organ transplant recipients and can produce a long-term memory response and protection against recurring disease. In this review, the benefits and restrictions of administering EBV-specific CTLs for the treatment of PTLD are discussed and compared with emerging therapies including the generation of allogeneic human leukocyte antigen-matched CTL banks and the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody therapy, MabThera. Furthermore, studies involving other EBV-associated disorders have described the potential benefit of adoptive transfer of EBV-specific CTLs for Hodgkin's disease, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, chronic active EBV infection, and Burkitt's lymphoma. The challenges of tailor-making therapies for individual diseases and EBV antigen expression latencies are highlighted, in addition to considering vaccination strategies for optimal treatment. PMID:15009802

  10. Phenotypic profile of expanded NK cells in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: a surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality

    PubMed Central

    Bárcena, Paloma; Jara-Acevedo, María; Tabernero, María Dolores; López, Antonio; Sánchez, María Luz; García-Montero, Andrés C.; Muñoz-García, Noemí; Vidriales, María Belén; Paiva, Artur; Lecrevisse, Quentin; Lima, Margarida; Langerak, Anton W.; Böttcher, Sebastian; van Dongen, Jacques J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the lack of a universal and specific marker of clonality hampers the diagnosis and classification of chronic expansions of natural killer (NK) cells. Here we investigated the utility of flow cytometric detection of aberrant/altered NK-cell phenotypes as a surrogate marker for clonality, in the diagnostic work-up of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK). For this purpose, a large panel of markers was evaluated by multiparametric flow cytometry on peripheral blood (PB) CD56low NK cells from 60 patients, including 23 subjects with predefined clonal (n = 9) and polyclonal (n = 14) CD56low NK-cell expansions, and 37 with CLPD-NK of undetermined clonality; also, PB samples from 10 healthy adults were included. Clonality was established using the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) assay. Clonal NK cells were found to show decreased expression of CD7, CD11b and CD38, and higher CD2, CD94 and HLADR levels vs. normal NK cells, together with a restricted repertoire of expression of the CD158a, CD158b and CD161 killer-associated receptors. In turn, NK cells from both clonal and polyclonal CLPD-NK showed similar/overlapping phenotypic profiles, except for high and more homogeneous expression of CD94 and HLADR, which was restricted to clonal CLPD-NK. We conclude that the CD94hi/HLADR+ phenotypic profile proved to be a useful surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality. PMID:26556869

  11. Lymphoproliferative disorder in pleural effusion in a subject with past asbestos exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Naofumi; Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Miyamoto, Yosuke; Yamagishi, Tomoko; Asano, Michiko; Fuchimoto, Yasuko; Wada, Sae; Ozaki, Shinji; Kishimoto, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that presents as serous effusions without detectable masses or organomegaly. Here we report a case of PEL-like lymphoma in a patient with past asbestos exposure. A 65-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to dyspnea upon exertion. He had been exposed to asbestos for three years in the construction industry. Chest X-ray and CT images demonstrated left pleural effusion. Cytological analysis of the pleural effusion revealed large atypical lymphocytes with distinct nuclear bodies and high nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that the cells were CD20+, CD3−, CD5−, and CD10−. These findings led to a diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. PEL or PEL-like lymphoma should be considered a potential cause of pleural effusion in subjects with past asbestos exposure. PMID:26744692

  12. Epstein–Barr Virus-Positive T/NK-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorders Manifested as Gastrointestinal Perforations and Skin Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hai-Juan; Li, Ji; Song, Hong-Mei; Li, Zheng-Hong; Dong, Mei; Zhou, Xiao-Ge

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Systemic Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) of childhood is a highly aggressive EBV-positive T/natural killer (NK)-cell LPD, which emerges in the background of chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) or shortly after primary acute EBV infection. The clinical presentations of CAEBV are varied; patients with atypical manifestations are easily misdiagnosed. We described a 14-year-old boy suffering from digestive disorders and intermittent fever for 1 year and 9 months, whose conditions worsened and skin lesions occurred 2 months before hospitalization. He was diagnosed as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and treated accordingly. His other clinical features, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, anemia, hypoalbuminemia, and elevated inflammatory marks, were found in hospitalization. The boy suffered from repeatedly spontaneous intestinal perforations shortly after hospitalization and died of intestinal hemorrhea. The pathological results of intestine and skin both showed EBV-positive T/NK-cell LPD (lymphoma stage). There are rare studies reporting gastrointestinal perforations in EBV-positive T/NK-cell LPD, let alone repeatedly spontaneous perforations. Based on the clinical features and pathological results of this patient, the disease progressed from CAEBV (T-cell type) to systemic EBV-positive T-cell LPD of childhood (lymphoma). Not all the patients with CAEBV could have unusual patterns of anti-EBV antibodies. However, the presence of high EBV loads (EBV-encoded early small ribonucleic acid (RNA) (EBER) in affected tissues and/or EBV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in peripheral blood) is essential for diagnosing CAEBV. Maybe because of his less common clinical features for CAEBV and negative anti-EBV antibodies, the boy was not diagnosed correctly. We should have emphasized the test for EBER or EBV-DNA. Meanwhile, for the IBD patients whose manifestations were not typical, and whose conditions were not improved by

  13. Cellular Immunotherapy Following Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-29

    Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma

  14. Three Rwandan Children With Massive Splenomegaly and Epstein-Barr Virus-associated Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Case Presentations and the Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Friedman-Klabanoff, DeAnna; Ball, Allison; Rutare, Samuel; McCall, Natalie; Blackall, Douglas P

    2016-07-01

    This report describes 3 Rwandan children with massive splenomegaly and pancytopenia who underwent splenectomy. Each was diagnosed with Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorder (EBV LPD) based on lymphocyte morphology, lymphocyte immunophenotype, and the results of EBV in situ hybridization studies. The differential diagnosis of splenomegaly, with a special emphasis on the sub-Saharan African context, is discussed along with EBV and associated disorders. These cases serve as a call to consider EBV LPD in the differential diagnosis of splenomegaly in children in whom common causes have been ruled out. PMID:27352192

  15. Hepatitis C virus syndrome: A constellation of organ- and non-organ specific autoimmune disorders, B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Clodoveo; Sebastiani, Marco; Giuggioli, Dilia; Colaci, Michele; Fallahi, Poupak; Piluso, Alessia; Antonelli, Alessandro; Zignego, Anna Linda

    2015-01-01

    The clinical course of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by possible development of both liver and extrahepatic disorders. The tropism of HCV for the lymphoid tissue is responsible for several immune-mediated disorders; a poly-oligoclonal B-lymphocyte expansion, commonly observed in a high proportion of patients with HCV infection, are responsible for the production of different autoantibodies and immune-complexes, such as mixed cryoglobulins. These serological alterations may characterize a variety of autoimmune or neoplastic diseases. Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis due to small-vessel deposition of circulating mixed cryoglobulins is the prototype of HCV-driven immune-mediated and lymphoproliferative disorders; interestingly, in some cases the disease may evolve to frank malignant lymphoma. In addition, HCV shows an oncogenic potential as suggested by several clinico-epidemiological and laboratory studies; in addition to hepatocellular carcinoma that represents the most frequent HCV-related malignancy, a causative role of HCV has been largely demonstrated in a significant percentage of patients with isolated B-cells non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. The same virus may be also involved in the pathogenesis of papillary thyroid cancer, a rare neoplastic condition that may complicate HCV-related thyroid involvement. Patients with HCV infection are frequently asymptomatic or may develop only hepatic alteration, while a limited but clinically relevant number can develop one or more autoimmune and/or neoplastic disorders. Given the large variability of their prevalence among patients’ populations from different countries, it is possible to hypothesize a potential role of other co-factors, i.e., genetic and/or environmental, in the pathogenesis of HCV-related extra-hepatic diseases. PMID:25848462

  16. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Panagiotidis, Emmanouil; Quigley, Ann-Marie; Pencharz, Deborah; Ardeshna, Kirit; Syed, Rizwan; Sajjan, Rakesh; Bomanji, Jamshed

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) in the diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), a serious complication of solid organ and bone marrow transplant. Between January 2004 and January 2012, 40 patients (22 males; median age 52 ± 17.4 years, range 11-77 years) underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans in our department for diagnostic evaluation of PTLD. Twenty-three (57.5%) patients had negative (18)F-FDG PET/CT and 17 (42.5%) had a positive examination. In five patients PET/CT revealed extranodal disease (adrenal, pleural, spleen, liver, lung, esophagus and bone involvement). On the basis of our results, (18)F-FDG PET/CT had a sensitivity of 88.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.62-0.98), a specificity of 91.3% (CI 0.70-0.98), a positive predictive value of 88.2% (CI 0.62-0.98) and a negative predictive value of 91.3% (CI 0.70-0.98). The diagnostic performance of CT in patient-based analysis was: a sensitivity of 87.5% (CI 0.60-0.97), a specificity of 88.8% (CI 0.64-0.98), a positive predictive value of 87.5% (CI 0.60-0.97) and a negative predictive value of 88.8% (CI 0.64-0.98). PET/CT in five cases revealed more findings than CT, upstaging the disease, and revealed three extranodal findings, not visualized in conventional imaging. (18)F-FDG PET/CT plays a significant role in the setting of PTLD diagnosis, demonstrating its high accuracy in detecting PTLD. PMID:23772644

  17. Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder of the Thorax: CT and FDG-PET Features in a Single Tertiary Referral Center.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ga Young; Kim, Mi Young; Huh, Joo Rryung; Jo, Kyung-Wook; Shim, Tae Sun

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the chest computed tomography (CT) and F-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomographic (FDG-PET) findings of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in the thorax.From November 2004 to February 2013, the cases of 12 adult patients (3 female and 9 male, age range 34-68, and median age 46 years) with proven PTLD were retrospectively reviewed. The transplanted organs included the kidney (5/12), liver (4/12), heart (1/12), combined kidney and pancreas (1/12), and hematopoietic stem cell (1/12). We investigated the relationship of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to the patients' long-term follow-up, and evaluated the characteristics of the lesions on the chest CT and FDG-PET. The lesions were classified into 2 patterns: that of lymph node and lung involvement.The interval between the transplantation and the onset of PTLD was 2 to 128 months (median, 49). Positive EBV-encoded RNA in the pathologic specimens was found in 10 patients (83.3%). Eight patients were positive for EBV PCR in their blood, and 3 patients showed seroconversion without antiviral therapy. The responses to treatment were complete in 7 cases (58.3%), partial remission in 4 cases (33.3%), and undetermined in 1 case (8.3%). The more common chest CT patterns showed lymph node involvement (10/12) rather than lung involvement (3/12). The median maximum-standardized uptake value on the FDG-PET scans was 7.7 (range, 2.7-25.5).In patients with PTLD involving the thorax, lymphadenopathy was the more common manifestation on the chest CT rather than lung involvement. The lesions showed hypermetabolism on FDG-PET. PMID:26252295

  18. Image findings of monomorphic non-hogdkin lymphoproliferative disorder in a post renal transplant patient diagnosed with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Rajasekar, Thirugnanam; Shibu, Deepu; Radhakrishnan, Edathurthy Kalarikal; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a heterogeneous group of lymphoid proliferations caused by immunosuppression after solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. PTLD is categorized by early lesion, polymorphic PTLD and monomorphic PTLD. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG-PET/CT) scans have clinical significance in the evaluation of PTLD following renal transplantation. We report imaging findings of a monomorphic non-Hodgkin lymphoma, post renal transplant seen on FDG PET/CT in a 32-year-old lactating woman. Whole body FDG- ET/CT demonstrated uptake in right external iliac and inguinal lymph nodes. PMID:25210292

  19. Image findings of monomorphic non-hogdkin lymphoproliferative disorder in a post renal transplant patient diagnosed with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Rajasekar, Thirugnanam; Shibu, Deepu; Radhakrishnan, Edathurthy Kalarikal; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-07-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a heterogeneous group of lymphoid proliferations caused by immunosuppression after solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. PTLD is categorized by early lesion, polymorphic PTLD and monomorphic PTLD. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG-PET/CT) scans have clinical significance in the evaluation of PTLD following renal transplantation. We report imaging findings of a monomorphic non-Hodgkin lymphoma, post renal transplant seen on FDG PET/CT in a 32-year-old lactating woman. Whole body FDG- ET/CT demonstrated uptake in right external iliac and inguinal lymph nodes. PMID:25210292

  20. Fc Receptor-Like Proteins in Pathophysiology of B-cell Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Mollie; Bryant, John Matthew; Sutkowski, Natalie; Haque, Azizul

    2016-01-01

    Members of the family of Fc receptor-like (FcRL) proteins, homologous to FcγRI, have been identified by multiple research groups. Consequently, they have been described using multiple nomenclatures including Fc receptor homologs (FcRH), immunoglobulin superfamily receptor translocation-associated genes (IRTA), immunoglobulin-Fc-gp42-related genes (IFGP), Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase anchor proteins (SPAP), and B cell cross-linked by anti-immunoglobulin M-activating sequences (BXMAS). They are now referred to under a unified nomenclature as FCRL. Eight different human FCRL genes have been identified, all of which appear to be related to the genes of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) of cellular adhesion molecules. These type 1 transmembrane glycoproteins are composed of different combinations of 5 types of immunoglobulin-like domains, with each protein consisting of 3 to 9 domains, and no individual domain type conserved throughout all of the FCRL proteins. Ligands for the majority of the FCRLs remain unknown. In general, FCRL expression is restricted to lymphocytes and is primarily expressed in B-lymphocytes, supporting FCRL’s involvement in a variety of immune disorders. Most FCRLs functionally repress B-cell activation; however, they might have dual roles in lymphocyte functions as these proteins often possess immunoreceptor tyrosine activation (ITAM) and inhibitory (ITIM) motif elements. The biological functions of these newly recognized FCRL proteins are just beginning to emerge, and might provide the insight necessary for understanding pathophysiology of lymphocyte disorders and treating different immune diseases. PMID:27446638

  1. STAT3 mutations unify the pathogenesis of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells and T-cell large granular lymphocyte leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jerez, Andres; Clemente, Michael J.; Makishima, Hideki; Koskela, Hanna; LeBlanc, Francis; Peng Ng, Kwok; Olson, Thomas; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Afable, Manuel; Gomez-Segui, Ines; Guinta, Kathryn; Durkin, Lisa; Hsi, Eric D.; McGraw, Kathy; Zhang, Dan; Wlodarski, Marcin W.; Porkka, Kimmo; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; List, Alan; Mustjoki, Satu; Loughran, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of natural killer cells (CLPD-NKs) and T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemias (T-LGLs) are clonal lymphoproliferations arising from either natural killer cells or cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). We have investigated for distribution and functional significance of mutations in 50 CLPD-NKs and 120 T-LGL patients by direct sequencing, allele-specific PCR, and microarray analysis. STAT3 gene mutations are present in both T and NK diseases: approximately one-third of patients with each type of disorder convey these mutations. Mutations were found in exons 21 and 20, encoding the Src homology 2 domain. Patients with mutations are characterized by symptomatic disease (75%), history of multiple treatments, and a specific pattern of STAT3 activation and gene deregulation, including increased expression of genes activated by STAT3. Many of these features are also found in patients with wild-type STAT3, indicating that other mechanisms of STAT3 activation can be operative in these chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. Treatment with STAT3 inhibitors, both in wild-type and mutant cases, resulted in accelerated apoptosis. STAT3 mutations are frequent in large granular lymphocytes suggesting a similar molecular dysregulation in malignant chronic expansions of NK and CTL origin. STAT3 mutations may distinguish truly malignant lymphoproliferations involving T and NK cells from reactive expansions. PMID:22859607

  2. No evidence of HTLV-I proviral integration in lymphoproliferative disorders associated with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, G. S.; Schaffer, J. M.; Boni, R.; Dummer, R.; Burg, G.; Takeshita, M.; Kikuchi, M.

    1997-01-01

    Several recent studies have reported detection of HTLV-I genetic sequences in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) including mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome. The purpose of this study was to determine whether HTLV-I was detectable in lesional tissues of patients suffering from diseases known to be associated with CTCL. Thirty-five cases were obtained from diverse geographical locations including Ohio, California, Switzerland, and Japan. Six of them had concurrent CTCL. Cases were analyzed using a combination of genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/ Southern blot, dot blot, and Southern blot analyses. All assays were specific for HTLV-I provirus. Sensitivity ranged from approximately 10(-6) for PCR-based studies to 10(-2) for unamplified genomic blotting. Lesional DNA from patients with lymphomatoid papulosis (fourteen cases), Hodgkin's disease (twelve cases), and CD30+ large-cell lymphoma (nine cases) was tested for the HTLV-I proviral pX region using a genomic PCR assay followed by confirmatory Southern blot analysis with a nested oligonucleotide pX probe. All cases were uniformly negative. All of the Hodgkin's disease cases, eight of the large-cell lymphoma cases, and six of the lymphomatoid papulosis cases were then subjected to dot blot analysis of genomic DNA using a full-length HTLV-I proviral DNA probe that spans all regions of the HTLV-I genome. Again, all cases were negative. Finally, eleven of the Hodgkin's disease cases were also subjected to Southern blot analysis of EcoRI-digested genomic DNA using the same full-length HTLV-I probe. Once again, all cases were negative. These findings indicated that, despite utilization of a variety of sensitive and specific molecular biological methods, HTLV-I genetic sequences were not detectable in patients with CTCL-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. These results strongly suggest that the HTLV-I retrovirus is not involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2

  3. Extranodal large B cell lymphoma of the anterior maxilla. Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Webber, Brian; Webber, Mariel; Keinan, David

    2015-01-01

    In the oral cavity, lymphoproliferative disorders can manifest in various ways, often as an extranodal externalization. In the case presented here, it was a B cell lymphoma originating in the periapical bone of the anterior maxilla. X-ray revealed a periapical radiolucency associated with an intact tooth with no decay, fillings or history of trauma. The tooth tested non-vital. After root canal treatment, an apicoectomy was performed with a biopsy. The most common diagnosis would be of dental etiology. The pathology report revealed a non-Hodgkin's B cell lymphoma. Most often, this disease appears as localized dental or oral pathology. Non-specific signs and symptoms present in association with lymphoproliferative disorders include lymphadenopathy, trismus, pain, swelling, sinusitis, fever, sepsis, prosthetic instability and paresthesia. Early detection results in decreased morbidity and a better prognosis for the patient. PMID:25707167

  4. Novelties in the management of B-cell malignancies: B-cell receptor signaling inhibitors and lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Salihoglu, Ayse; Ar, Muhlis Cem; Soysal, Teoman

    2015-12-01

    B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders comprise 85% of Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Despite successful chemoimmunotherapy regimens, responses are not durable and the outcome is fatal in a considerable portion of patients. There is an inevitable need for less toxic and more potent therapeutic agents. Over the recent years, a plethora of agents including monoclonal antibodies, Bcl-2 antagonists, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, mTOR inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs have been developed in B-cell malignancies. The aim of this paper is to focus on B-cell receptor signaling inhibitors and lenalidomide as an immunomodulatory drug and to provide insight on how and when to incorporate these agents into the treatment algorithms. PMID:26413907

  5. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines.

    PubMed

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged. PMID:27365460

  6. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P.; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged. PMID:27365460

  7. The analysis of expanded cells from patients with lymphoproliferative disorders of granular lymphocytes may help to clarify the NK cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zambello, R; Chisesi, T; De Rossi, G; Pandolfi, F; Trentin, L; Vespignani, M; Luciani, M; Cafaro, A; Agostini, C; Martelli, M

    1986-07-01

    Surface phenotype and functional in vitro activities were studied in 2 cases of lymphoproliferative disorders of granular lymphocytes. Cells from both patients presented the same, previously unreported, surface phenotype (i.e. T3+, T8+, T4-, HNK-1-, NK-15+, M1-), were unable to display either Natural Killer (NK) activity or suppressor function in a poke-weed-driven system, and showed a defective response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA). On the basis of available schemes for NK cells ontogenesis, we will discuss the phenotype and functional activities of patients' cells suggesting that the cell population expressing the T3+, T8+, HNK-1-, NK-15+, M1- phenotype might represent a discrete stage along the NK-cell differentiation pathway. PMID:3746877

  8. The use of antibody D8/17 to identify B cells in adults with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Eisen, J L; Leonard, H L; Swedo, S E; Price, L H; Zabriskie, J B; Chiang, S Y; Karitani, M; Rasmussen, S A

    2001-11-30

    Compared with healthy control subjects, individuals with childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have been reported to have a higher percentage of B cells that react with the monoclonal antibody D8/17, a marker for rheumatic fever. This study sought to replicate these findings in adults with OCD. Double-blind analyses of blood samples from 29 consecutive adults with primary OCD and 26 healthy control subjects were conducted to determine the percentage of B cells identified by D8/17. Using a standard criterion of > or =12% labeled B cells to denote positivity, rates of D8/17 positive individuals did not significantly differ between the OCD (58.6%) and control (42.3%) groups. Early age of onset was not a predictor of D8/17 positivity in the OCD group. The percentage of B cells identified by the monoclonal antibody marker D8/17 did not distinguish adults with OCD from control subjects, nor did it distinguish a sub-group of adults with OCD who described pre-pubertal onset of their OCD symptoms. PMID:11728611

  9. GM-CSF and IL-2 induce specific cellular immunity and provide protection against Epstein-Barr virus lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Baiocchi, R A; Ward, J S; Carrodeguas, L; Eisenbeis, C F; Peng, R; Roychowdhury, S; Vourganti, S; Sekula, T; O'Brien, M; Moeschberger, M; Caligiuri, M A

    2001-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD) is a potentially life-threatening complication in immune-deficient patients. We have used the severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mouse engrafted with human leukocytes (hu-PBL-SCID) to evaluate the use of human cytokines in the prevention of EBV-LPD in vivo. Daily low-dose IL-2 therapy can prevent EBV-LPD in the hu-PBL-SCID mouse, but protection is lost if murine natural killer (NK) cells are depleted. Here we demonstrate that combined therapy with human GM-CSF and low-dose IL-2 is capable of preventing EBV-LPD in the hu-PBL-SCID mouse in the absence of murine NK cells. Lymphocyte depletion experiments showed that human NK cells, CD8(+) T cells, and monocytes were each required for the protective effects of GM-CSF and IL-2 combination therapy. This treatment resulted in a marked expansion of human CD3(+)CD8(+) lymphocytes in vivo. Using HLA tetramers complexed with EBV immunodominant peptides, a subset of these lymphocytes was found to be EBV-specific. These data establish that combined GM-CSF and low-dose IL-2 therapy can prevent the immune deficiencies that lead to fatal EBV-LPD in the hu-PBL-SCID mouse depleted of murine NK cells, and they point to a critical role for several human cellular subsets in mediating this protective effect. PMID:11560958

  10. GM-CSF and IL-2 induce specific cellular immunity and provide protection against Epstein-Barr virus lymphoproliferative disorder

    PubMed Central

    Baiocchi, Robert A.; Ward, Jacqueline S.; Carrodeguas, Lester; Eisenbeis, Charles F.; Peng, Ruoqi; Roychowdhury, Sameek; Vourganti, Srinivas; Sekula, Taryn; O’Brien, Maggie; Moeschberger, Melvin; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus–associated lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD) is a potentially life-threatening complication in immune-deficient patients. We have used the severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mouse engrafted with human leukocytes (hu-PBL-SCID) to evaluate the use of human cytokines in the prevention of EBV-LPD in vivo. Daily low-dose IL-2 therapy can prevent EBV-LPD in the hu-PBL-SCID mouse, but protection is lost if murine natural killer (NK) cells are depleted. Here we demonstrate that combined therapy with human GM-CSF and low-dose IL-2 is capable of preventing EBV-LPD in the hu-PBL-SCID mouse in the absence of murine NK cells. Lymphocyte depletion experiments showed that human NK cells, CD8+ T cells, and monocytes were each required for the protective effects of GM-CSF and IL-2 combination therapy. This treatment resulted in a marked expansion of human CD3+CD8+ lymphocytes in vivo. Using HLA tetramers complexed with EBV immunodominant peptides, a subset of these lymphocytes was found to be EBV-specific. These data establish that combined GM-CSF and low-dose IL-2 therapy can prevent the immune deficiencies that lead to fatal EBV-LPD in the hu-PBL-SCID mouse depleted of murine NK cells, and they point to a critical role for several human cellular subsets in mediating this protective effect. PMID:11560958

  11. SGN-35 in CD30-positive Lymphoproliferative Disorders (ALCL), Mycosis Fungoides (MF), and Extensive Lymphomatoid Papulosis (LyP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    CD-30 Positive Anaplastic Large T-cell Cutaneous Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell; Lymphomatoid Papulosis; Mycosis Fungoides; Skin Lymphoma; Cutaneous Lymphomas; Lymphoma; Hematologic Disorder

  12. A meta-analysis of potential relationship between Epstein-Barr-Encoded-RNA (EBER) and onset time of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Khedmat, Hossein; Karbasi-Afshar, Reza; Agah, Shahram; Ghamar-Chehreh, Mohammad Ebrahim; Amini, Mohsen

    2015-03-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encodes two non-polyadenylated RNAs termed EBV-encoded RNAs (EBERs). In this study, we tried to find series in which data of EBER and onset time of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) for patients have been documented to conduct a meta-analysis. A comprehensive search of the literature was performed by Pubmed and Google scholar to find reports indicating test results for EBER and PTLD onset in transplant patients. PTLD was considered "early onset" when it develops within the first post-transplant year. Finally, 265 patients from 15 studies have been included in the meta-analysis. The overall meta-analysis also showed a significant relation between EBER test positivity and early-onset PTLD development [relative risk (RR): 1.36; 95% CI: 1.16-1.59; P <0.001]. The i2 index was 49.8%. Our study suggests that PTLD lesions with positive EBER test are more likely to develop within the early post-transplant period. Since early-onset PTLD is supposed to have better prognosis, having a positive EBER test might not be a bad news. However, for having a precise conclusion, prospective studies are needed to be conducted. PMID:25758868

  13. Association between HLA-A1 and -A2 types and Epstein-Barr virus status of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Amelie; Sundström, Christer; Tufveson, Gunnar; Glimelius, Ingrid

    2016-10-01

    The susceptibility to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) may be affected by the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) type. We investigated HLA-A and HLA-B allele frequencies, focusing on HLA-A1 and -A2, in a population-based case series of EBV + (n = 60) and EBV- (n = 44) PTLD after solid organ transplantation. The proportion of EBV + PTLD was highest in HLA-A1 homozygotes (100%), lower in carriers of HLA-A1/AX (79%), HLA-A1/A2 (55%), HLA-A2/AX (54%), and lowest in HLA-A2 homozygotes (37%). HLA-A1 type was overrepresented (22% versus 7%, p = 0.05) and HLA-A2 type underrepresented (57% versus 80%, p = 0.01) in patients with EBV + compared with EBV - PTLD. EBV + PTLD in HLA-A1 carriers developed almost exclusively in already EBV-seropositive individuals. EBV status of PTLD was not related to any other HLA-A or HLA-B type. Our findings suggest that HLA-A1 carriers may have an increased risk of EBV + PTLD due to a decreased ability to control the latent EBV infection. PMID:27104753

  14. Detection of bone marrow involvement in newly diagnosed post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder: (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography versus bone marrow biopsy.

    PubMed

    Gheysens, Olivier; Thielemans, Sanne; Morscio, Julie; Boeckx, Nancy; Goffin, Karolien E; Deroose, Christophe M; Sagaert, Xavier; Wlodarska, Iwona; Verhoef, Gregor; Dierickx, Daan; Tousseyn, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Detecting bone marrow involvement (BMI) in lymphoma is important as it adversely affects stage. Bone marrow biopsy (BMB) remains the standard to detect BMI but is prone to sampling error. We retrospectively investigated whether (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET/CT) could identify BMI in patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) with sufficient accuracy in comparison with staging BMB. Twenty-five patients diagnosed with PTLD who underwent (18)F-FDG-PET/CT and BMB within one month were evaluated. Based on our criteria, six patients (24%) were considered positive for BMI on (18)F-FDG-PET/CT compared to one by BMB. Although we cannot completely exclude false positive results on (18)F-FDG-PET/CT, our data indicate a significantly higher sensitivity of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT compared to BMB (100% vs 17%) but similar specificity. These data confirm the high diagnostic performance of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT for detecting BMI, but prospective studies are needed to determine whether (18)F-FDG-PET/CT could indeed replace staging BMB in PTLD. PMID:26854937

  15. Mucosal CD30-Positive T-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder Arising in the Oral Cavity Following Dental Implants: Report of the First Case.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hye-Jung; Choe, Ji-Young; Jeon, Yoon Kyung

    2015-12-01

    Mucosal CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (CD30+ T-cell LPD) is a novel entity with unique clinicopathological features and an indolent behavior. Here we report the first case of mucosal CD30+ T-cell LPD arising in the oral cavity following dental implant. A 70-year-old woman presented with swelling and redness of the oral mucosa of right maxilla and left mandible surrounding dental implants that had been placed 8 years previously. Radiological examination revealed enhancing oral lesions and multiple cervical lymph nodes. Microscopic examination showed diffuse infiltration of large anaplastic cells with characteristic morphology of hallmark cells described in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. These cells were diffusely positive for CD30, CD3, CD4, CD2, CD5, CD7, TIA-1, and TCRβF1, but negative for CD20, CD8, CD45, EMA, ALK, and Epstein-Barr virus. T-cell monoclonality was detected in a TCRγ gene rearrangement study. This a unique case of mucosal CD30+ T-cell LPD with unusual presentation following dental implant. PMID:26261101

  16. Association of CLEC16A with human common variable immunodeficiency disorder and role in murine B cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Jørgensen, Silje F; Maggadottir, S Melkorka; Bakay, Marina; Warnatz, Klaus; Glessner, Joseph; Pandey, Rahul; Salzer, Ulrich; Schmidt, Reinhold E; Perez, Elena; Resnick, Elena; Goldacker, Sigune; Buchta, Mary; Witte, Torsten; Padyukov, Leonid; Videm, Vibeke; Folseraas, Trine; Atschekzei, Faranaz; Elder, James T; Nair, Rajan P; Winkelmann, Juliane; Gieger, Christian; Nöthen, Markus M; Büning, Carsten; Brand, Stephan; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Orange, Jordan S; Fevang, Børre; Schreiber, Stefan; Lieb, Wolfgang; Aukrust, Pål; Chapel, Helen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Franke, Andre; Karlsen, Tom H; Grimbacher, Bodo; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hammarström, Lennart; Ellinghaus, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency disorder (CVID) is the most common symptomatic primary immunodeficiency in adults, characterized by B-cell abnormalities and inadequate antibody response. CVID patients have considerable autoimmune comorbidity and we therefore hypothesized that genetic susceptibility to CVID may overlap with autoimmune disorders. Here, in the largest genetic study performed in CVID to date, we compare 778 CVID cases with 10,999 controls across 123,127 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the Immunochip. We identify the first non-HLA genome-wide significant risk locus at CLEC16A (rs17806056, P=2.0 × 10(-9)) and confirm the previously reported human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations on chromosome 6p21 (rs1049225, P=4.8 × 10(-16)). Clec16a knockdown (KD) mice showed reduced number of B cells and elevated IgM levels compared with controls, suggesting that CLEC16A may be involved in immune regulatory pathways of relevance to CVID. In conclusion, the CLEC16A associations in CVID represent the first robust evidence of non-HLA associations in this immunodeficiency condition. PMID:25891430

  17. Lymphoproliferative lesions of the skin

    PubMed Central

    Cerroni, L

    2006-01-01

    Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders is one of the most difficult areas in dermatopathology, and biopsies are often taken to rule out a cutaneous lymphoma in patients with “unclear” or “therapy‐resistant” skin lesions. Histopathological features alone often enable a given case to be classified to a diagnostic group (eg, epidermotropic lymphomas), but seldom allow a definitive diagnosis to be made. Performing several biopsies from morphologically different lesions is suggested, especially in patients with suspicion of mycosis fungoides. Immunohistochemistry is often crucial for proper classification of the cases, but in some instances is not helpful (eg, early lesions of mycosis fungoides). Although molecular techniques provide new, powerful tools for diagnosing cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders, results of molecular methods should always be interpreted with the clinicopathological features, keeping in mind the possibility of false positivity and false negativity. In many cases, a definitive diagnosis can be made only on careful correlation of the clinical with the histopathological, immunophenotypical and molecular features. PMID:16873563

  18. B cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B cell lymphoma and classical hodgkin lymphoma: diagnosis by fine-needle aspiration cytology.

    PubMed

    Lynnhtun, Kyaw; Varikatt, Winny; Pathmanathan, Nirmala

    2014-08-01

    A 58-year-old lady presented with mediastinal lymphadenopathy. A thoracoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration showed large atypical epithelioid cells arranged in cohesive sheets and dispersed as single cells with intact cytoplasm amid a background of lymphocytes and histiocytes. A cytological diagnosis of "a malignant neoplasm" was made, raising a broad list of differential diagnoses. A broad panel of immunocytochemical stains performed on the cell block was indicative of a lymphoproliferative disorder, but the immunophenotype was intermediate between diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). Diffuse and strong reactivity to CD20, CD79a, and PAX-5, and weak reactivity to CD30, was in favor of a DLBCL, or more precisely mediastinal (thymic) large B cell lymphoma (MLBL). However, there were negative staining for LCA, OCT-2, and BOB-1 as well as positive staining for EBV-encoded RNA, which were against a diagnosis of MLBL and raised the possibility of cHL. The absence of RS cells and the typical mileu, the negativity for CD15 and the strong positivity of CD20 and PAX-5 were against a diagnosis of cHL. On this basis, the diagnosis of "B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder with features intermediate between DLBCL and cHL" was rendered. The diagnosis was subsequently confirmed on excisional biopsy. This case report demonstrates broad differential diagnoses raised by this diagnostic entity and the importance of an adequate cell block for accurate designation. PMID:23630122

  19. Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive T/NK-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorders Manifested as Gastrointestinal Perforations and Skin Lesions: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hai-Juan; Li, Ji; Song, Hong-Mei; Li, Zheng-Hong; Dong, Mei; Zhou, Xiao-Ge

    2016-02-01

    Systemic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) of childhood is a highly aggressive EBV-positive T/natural killer (NK)-cell LPD, which emerges in the background of chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) or shortly after primary acute EBV infection. The clinical presentations of CAEBV are varied; patients with atypical manifestations are easily misdiagnosed. We described a 14-year-old boy suffering from digestive disorders and intermittent fever for 1 year and 9 months, whose conditions worsened and skin lesions occurred 2 months before hospitalization. He was diagnosed as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and treated accordingly. His other clinical features, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, anemia, hypoalbuminemia, and elevated inflammatory marks, were found in hospitalization. The boy suffered from repeatedly spontaneous intestinal perforations shortly after hospitalization and died of intestinal hemorrhea. The pathological results of intestine and skin both showed EBV-positive T/NK-cell LPD (lymphoma stage).There are rare studies reporting gastrointestinal perforations in EBV-positive T/NK-cell LPD, let alone repeatedly spontaneous perforations. Based on the clinical features and pathological results of this patient, the disease progressed from CAEBV (T-cell type) to systemic EBV-positive T-cell LPD of childhood (lymphoma). Not all the patients with CAEBV could have unusual patterns of anti-EBV antibodies. However, the presence of high EBV loads (EBV-encoded early small ribonucleic acid (RNA) (EBER) in affected tissues and/or EBV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in peripheral blood) is essential for diagnosing CAEBV. Maybe because of his less common clinical features for CAEBV and negative anti-EBV antibodies, the boy was not diagnosed correctly. We should have emphasized the test for EBER or EBV-DNA. Meanwhile, for the IBD patients whose manifestations were not typical, and whose conditions were not improved by suitable

  20. Autoimmune and Lymphoproliferative Complications of Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Maglione, Paul J

    2016-03-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is frequently complicated by the development of autoimmune and lymphoproliferative diseases. With widespread use of immunoglobulin replacement therapy, autoimmune and lymphoproliferative complications have replaced infection as the major cause of morbidity and mortality in CVID patients. Certain CVID complications, such as bronchiectasis, are likely to be the result of immunodeficiency and are associated with infection susceptibility. However, other complications may result from immune dysregulation rather than immunocompromise. CVID patients develop autoimmunity, lymphoproliferation, and granulomas in association with distinct immunological abnormalities. Mutations in transmembrane activator and CAML interactor, reduction of isotype-switched memory B cells, expansion of CD21 low B cells, heightened interferon signature expression, and retained B cell function are all associated with both autoimmunity and lymphoproliferation in CVID. Further research aimed to better understand that the pathological mechanisms of these shared forms of immune dysregulation may inspire therapies beneficial for multiple CVID complications. PMID:26857017

  1. Methotrexate-associated primary cutaneous CD30-positive cutaneous T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder: a case illustration and a brief review

    PubMed Central

    Claudino, Wederson M; Gibson, Bradley; Tse, William; Krem, Maxwell; Grewal, Jaspreet

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is a commonly used anti-metabolite agent. Increased risk of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been documented with the prolonged use of immunosuppressive medications such as MTX. This is thought to be the result of immune dysregulation and/or chronic immune stimulation. Most cases of LPDs regress following withdrawal of the offending immunosuppressive agent. We present an interesting and rare case of CD30 and EBV positive CD8 primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (PC-ALCL) in a 66-year-old African American woman. Patient had been on MTX for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) which was stopped after the patient was evaluated at our institution. Patient had an incredible response to stopping immunosuppression with spontaneous regression of skin lesions and disappearance of clonal malignant cell population as evidenced on serial biopsy specimens. Primary cutaneous CD30+ LPDs constitute about 30% of the primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTLs) and includes entities such as lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP), primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (PC-ALCL) and other CD30+ borderline LPDs. Histopathological criteria in addition to CD30 positivity is important for identification of these conditions. Treatment options include “wait and see”, phototherapy, radiotherapy, topical agents, systemic therapy and surgical resection. Prognosis is excellent and most cases resolve spontaneously on withdrawal of immunosuppression. Refractory cases may require aggressive local treatment or systemic therapy. Brentuximab Vedontin, an anti-CD30 antibody drug conjugate (ADC), may provide additional therapeutic option in refractory cases. PMID:27335685

  2. Methotrexate-associated primary cutaneous CD30-positive cutaneous T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder: a case illustration and a brief review.

    PubMed

    Claudino, Wederson M; Gibson, Bradley; Tse, William; Krem, Maxwell; Grewal, Jaspreet

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is a commonly used anti-metabolite agent. Increased risk of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been documented with the prolonged use of immunosuppressive medications such as MTX. This is thought to be the result of immune dysregulation and/or chronic immune stimulation. Most cases of LPDs regress following withdrawal of the offending immunosuppressive agent. We present an interesting and rare case of CD30 and EBV positive CD8 primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (PC-ALCL) in a 66-year-old African American woman. Patient had been on MTX for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) which was stopped after the patient was evaluated at our institution. Patient had an incredible response to stopping immunosuppression with spontaneous regression of skin lesions and disappearance of clonal malignant cell population as evidenced on serial biopsy specimens. Primary cutaneous CD30+ LPDs constitute about 30% of the primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTLs) and includes entities such as lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP), primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (PC-ALCL) and other CD30+ borderline LPDs. Histopathological criteria in addition to CD30 positivity is important for identification of these conditions. Treatment options include "wait and see", phototherapy, radiotherapy, topical agents, systemic therapy and surgical resection. Prognosis is excellent and most cases resolve spontaneously on withdrawal of immunosuppression. Refractory cases may require aggressive local treatment or systemic therapy. Brentuximab Vedontin, an anti-CD30 antibody drug conjugate (ADC), may provide additional therapeutic option in refractory cases. PMID:27335685

  3. Co-existence of acute myeloid leukemia with multilineage dysplasia and Epstein-Barr virus-associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhira, Michihide; Hanzawa, Kyoko; Watanabe, Reiko; Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Nemoto, Tomoe; Toyozumi, Yasuo; Tamaru, Jun-ichi; Itoyama, Shinji; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kameda, Hideto; Mori, Shigehisa; Kizaki, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease mediated by inflammatory processes mainly at the joints. Recently, awareness of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (T-LPD) has been heightened for its association with methotraxate usage in RA patients. In the contrary, acute myeloid leukemia with multilineage dysplasia (AML-MLD) has never been documented to be present concomitantly with the above two conditions. In this report we present a case of an autopsy-proven co-existence of AML-MLD and EBV-associated T-LPD in a patient with RA. PMID:19566938

  4. Inherited perforin and Fas mutations in a patient with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome and lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Rita; Dagna, Lorenzo; Dianzani, Umberto; Dupré, Loïc; Dianzani, Irma; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Cometa, Angela; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Sabbadini, Maria Grazia; Rugarli, Claudio; Ciceri, Fabio; Maccario, Rita; Locatelli, Franco; Danesino, Cesare; Ferrarini, Marina; Bregni, Marco

    2004-09-30

    A 27-year-old man with the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome and a large-B-cell lymphoma had heterozygous mutations in the Fas and perforin (Prf1) genes. The Fas mutation was inherited from his healthy father and was also carried by his healthy brother, whereas the Prf1 mutation was inherited from his healthy mother. The combined effect of the two mutant genes may have contributed to the development of the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome and lymphoma in this patient. PMID:15459303

  5. CD20-negative diffuse large B-cell lymphomas: biology and emerging therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Jorge J; Chavez, Julio C; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco J; Montes-Moreno, Santiago

    2015-06-01

    CD20-negative diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a rare and heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative disorders. Known variants of CD20-negative DLBCL include plasmablastic lymphoma, primary effusion lymphoma, large B-cell lymphoma arising in human herpesvirus 8-associated multicentric Castleman disease and anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive DLBCL. Given the lack of CD20 expression, atypical cellular morphology and aggressive clinical behavior characterized by chemotherapy resistance and inferior survival rates, CD20-negative DLBCL represents a challenge from the diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives. The goals of the present review are to summarize the current knowledge on the biology of the distinct variants of CD20-negative DLBCL, provide future therapeutic directions based on the limited preclinical and clinical data available, and increase awareness concerning these rare malignancies among pathologists and clinicians. PMID:25641215

  6. Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma complicated by invasive pulmonary aspergillosis: a rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mahasneh, Tamadur; Harrington, Zinta; Williamson, Jonathan; Alkhawaja, Darweesh; Duflou, Jo; Shin, Joo-Shik

    2014-01-01

    We describe a patient with persisting fevers, a progressive pulmonary infiltrate, and high levels of serum lactate dehydrogenase. No underlying cause for these changes was found prior to her death despite extensive investigations. Postmortem tissue revealed invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and subsequent brain examination revealed vascular changes in keeping with intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL). On review, subtle yet extensive lymphomatous infiltrates involved the vasculature of multiple other organs, including the lungs. Aspergillosis is a relatively rare presenting feature of lymphoproliferative disorders, and IVLBCL is a rare subtype of diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with, to our knowledge, very few case reports to date. Lymphoma should be considered in patients presenting with pneumonitis with bilateral lung infiltrates on imaging, with a high serum level of lactate dehydrogenase. PMID:25473570

  7. Programmed death 1 and B and T lymphocyte attenuator immunoreceptors and their association with malignant T-lymphoproliferative disorders: brief review.

    PubMed

    Karakatsanis, Stamatis; Bertsias, George; Roussou, Paraskevi; Boumpas, Dimitrios

    2014-09-01

    Malignant T-cell lymphoproliferative diseases are relatively rare. T cells are activated through the T-cell receptor with the aid of costimulating molecules that can be either excitatory or inhibitory. Such pathways have been also implicated in mechanisms of malignant T-cell lymphoproliferative diseases' persistence and relapse by circumventing immune responses. To date, three major immunoinhibitory molecules have been recognized, namely programmed cell death-1 (PD-1), B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4). Although CTLA-4 is considered the 'gatekeeper' of immune tolerance, PD-1 negatively regulates immune responses broadly, whereas BTLA activation has been shown to inhibit CD8+ cancer-specific T cells. Both PD-1 and BTLA downregulate proximal T-cell receptor signalling cascade and are involved in immune evasion of leukaemias and lymphomas, even after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. These immunoregulatory molecules can have seemingly a synergistic effect on weakening the immune response of patients with haematological malignancies, and their manipulation represents a very active field of preclinical as well as clinical interest. PMID:24038528

  8. Disturbed B-lymphocyte selection in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Janda, Ales; Schwarz, Klaus; van der Burg, Mirjam; Vach, Werner; Ijspeert, Hanna; Lorenz, Myriam Ricarda; Elgizouli, Magdeldin; Pieper, Kathrin; Fisch, Paul; Hagel, Joachim; Lorenzetti, Raquel; Seidl, Maximilian; Roesler, Joachim; Hauck, Fabian; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Speckmann, Carsten; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Ehl, Stephan; Eibel, Hermann; Rizzi, Marta

    2016-05-01

    Fas is a transmembrane receptor involved in the maintenance of tolerance and immune homeostasis. In murine models, it has been shown to be essential for deletion of autoreactive B cells in the germinal center. The role of Fas in human B-cell selection and in development of autoimmunity in patients carrying FAS mutations is unclear. We analyzed patients with either a somatic FAS mutation or a germline FAS mutation and somatic loss-of-heterozygosity, which allows comparing the fate of B cells with impaired vs normal Fas signaling within the same individual. Class-switched memory B cells showed: accumulation of FAS-mutated B cells; failure to enrich single V, D, J genes and single V-D, D-J gene combinations of the B-cell receptor variable region; increased frequency of variable regions with higher content of positively charged amino acids; and longer CDR3 and maintenance of polyreactive specificities. Importantly, Fas-deficient switched memory B cells showed increased rates of somatic hypermutation. Our data uncover a defect in B-cell selection in patients with FAS mutations, which has implications for the understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and lymphomagenesis of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. PMID:26907631

  9. [Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Vera; Conde, Marta; Figueiredo, António; Vasconcelos, Júlia; Dias, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    The Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) is an impairment of lymphocyte apoptosis expressed by generalized non-malignant lymphoproliferation, lymphadenopathy and/or splenomegaly. This article describes a seven and 14 year old males. The first one was admitted at 3 years of age with fever, bicytopenia and generalized lymphadenopathy. Hystopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed reactive follicular hyperplasia and marked paracortical expansion. He was readmitted three years later presenting herpes zoster and similar clinical features. High levels of IL-10 and increasing tendency of Fas-L in plasma and serum. The second child was admitted at 13 years of age presenting thigh and gluteus cellulitis, anemia and neutropenia. T lymphocytes aß+CD4-CD8- 3,1%. Hystopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed marked paracortical hyperplasia. Both children are treated with mycophenolate mofetil with good response. ALPS is an underestimated entity that must be considered in non malign lymphoproliferation, autoimmunity and expansion of an unusual population of a/ßCD3+CD4-CD8-(double-negative T cells>1%). PMID:22525637

  10. Rituximab in Treating Patients Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-23

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  11. Issues in diagnosis of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms involving the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Report on the Bone Marrow Workshop of the XVIIth meeting of the European Association for Haematopathology and the Society for Hematopathology.

    PubMed

    Porwit, Anna; Fend, Falko; Kremer, Marcus; Orazi, Attilio; Safali, Mükerrem; van der Walt, Jon

    2016-09-01

    Small B cell lymphoid neoplasms are the most common lymphoproliferative disorders involving peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM). The Bone Marrow Workshop (BMW) organized by the European Bone Marrow Working Group (EBMWG) of the European Association for Haematopathology (EAHP) during the XVIIth EAHP Meeting in Istanbul, October 2014, was dedicated to discussion of cases illustrating how the recent advances in immunophenotyping, molecular techniques and cytogenetics provide better understanding and classification of these entities. Submitted cases were grouped into following categories: (i) cases illustrating diagnostic difficulties in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL); (ii) cases of BM manifestations of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms other than CLL; (iii) transformation of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms in the BM; and (iv) multiclonality and composite lymphomas in the BM. This report summarizes presented cases and conclusions of the BMW and provides practical recommendations for classification of the BM manifestations of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms based on the current state of knowledge. PMID:27208429

  12. Full clinical recovery after topical acyclovir treatment of Epstein-Barr virus associated cutaneous B-cell lymphoma in patient with mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Copur, M Sitki; Deshpande, Anita; Mleczko, Kris; Norvell, Max; Hrnicek, Gordon J; Woodward, Suzette; Frankforter, Scott; Mandolfo, Natalie; Fu, Kai; Chan, Wing C

    2005-06-01

    Primary cutaneous T- and B-cell lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases with varied clinical presentations and prognosis. The use of new molecular, histological, and clinical criteria has improved their recognition. Cutaneous B-cell and T-cell lymphomas are seldom found together in the same patient. Here we report a rare case of mycosis fungoides variant of a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) which later developed Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated cutaneous B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. The patient initially presented with generalized erythroderma, extensive plaques, and axillary lymphadenopathy. Histopathology and immunophenotyping of her tumor from the right breast nodule revealed a T-cell lymphoma consistent with mycosis fungoides. She was initially treated with pentostatin, followed by topical mechlorethamine and topical steroids. After progression of her mycosis fungoides with worsening diffuse skin lesions on this regimen, her treatments were changed to oral bexarotene with an initial partial response followed by stable disease. Three years from her initial presentation, she developed ulcerated cauliflower-like nodules on her forehead. Biopsy of these lesions revealed EBV-positive large- and medium-sized pleomorphic B-cells consistent with EBV-driven B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. She was treated with topical acyclovir cream on the involved skin areas while continuing with oral bexarotene for mycosis fungoides. Skin lesions gradually diminished and totally disappeared after four weeks of topical acyclovir treatment. Bexarotene treatment was continued for another year until the mycosis fungoides progressed and became wide spread causing her death four and a half years after the initial diagnosis. The coexistence of two cutaneous non-Hodgkin lymphomas of different lineage in the same patient and the complete clinical response of EBV-related B-cell cutaneous component to topical acyclovir makes this rare case particularly interesting. PMID

  13. Frequency of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis in relatives of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Franco Alzate, Catalina; Rendón Henao, Javier; Torres Hernández, José Domingo; Jaramillo Arbelaez, Patricia Elena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis is a symptom free condition characterized by the circulation of small clonal population of B lymphocytes in peripheral blood (less than 5x109/L) expressing an immunophenotype similar to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Different studies based on big hospital series have manifested a higher risk in subjects with monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis to progress to a chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The behavior of this hematologic entity is unknown therefore its frequency in sporadic chronic lymphocytic leukemia patient relatives was determined. Methods: Transversal descriptive study, 8 color flow cytometry was performed using two of the tubes of the Euro Flow recommended panel, with modifications, for the diagnose of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of B lymphocytes; besides, a fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed. univariate and bivariate analyses of the information were performed. Results: Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis frequency found in 51 analyzed relatives was 2%, it was a female participant, 59 years old, with a total leukocyte count of 7.7x109/L and a B lymphocyte count of 0.124x109/L; from these, 0.04x109/L were clonal cells with restrictions of the kappa light chain. Rearrangements of the IGH gene (14q32) were found. Conclusion: Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis was detected in one relative of a patient with sporadic chronic lymphocytic leukemia in a frequency similar to the one reported in general population. PMID:27546929

  14. Cerebellar EBV-associated diffuse large B cell lymphoma following angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi; Rosenblum, Marc K.; Dogan, Ahmet; Jungbluth, Achim A.; Chiu, April

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B cell lymphoproliferative disorders may be seen in patients with angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma (AITL). Although both nodal and extranodal sites of involvement have been described, central nervous system involvement by B cell lymphoma following AITL has not previously been documented. We report a first example of such unusual presentation, in which an 80-year-old man developed diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in the cerebellum 4 months after the initial diagnosis of AITL. EBV-encoded RNAs were detected in the DLBCL, suggesting that EBV played a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of high-grade histologic progression of AITL. The patient survived less than 9 months after his initial diagnosis of AITL. We believe that this case expands the spectrum of extranodal manifestation of EBV-positive B cell lymphoma associated with AITL and illustrates the importance of recognition of this association when encountering unusual central nervous system lesions in patients with known AITL.

  15. Outreach monitoring service for patients with indolent B-cell and plasma cell disorders: a UK experience.

    PubMed

    Rawstron, Andy C; Jones, Richard A; Ferguson, Carol; Hughes, Geraint; Selby, Pam; Reid, Carol; Dalal, Surita; Howard, Martin; Smith, Graeme; Hillmen, Peter; Owen, Roger G; Jack, Andrew S

    2007-12-01

    Disease progression occurs in over 1% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and early stage chronic lymphocytic leukaemia patients every year therefore regular monitoring is indicated. We assessed the efficacy of an outreach service to replace clinic monitoring using local phlebotomy with central haematologist review of laboratory parameters and symptoms identified by a patient self-assessment questionnaire. The service was used by 299 patients for 2 years and provided accurate monitoring, improved patient satisfaction, support for primary care and reduced the burden on haematology clinics without an increase in inter-assessment admissions due to disease progression. PMID:17970800

  16. Levels of expression of CD19 and CD20 in chronic B cell leukaemias.

    PubMed Central

    Ginaldi, L; De Martinis, M; Matutes, E; Farahat, N; Morilla, R; Catovsky, D

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate whether the antigen levels of the B cell lineage markers CD19 and CD20 can distinguish between normal and neoplastic B cells or characterise distinct expression patterns among the chronic B cell leukaemias. METHODS: Peripheral blood cells from 70 patients with B cell disorders and 17 healthy donors were analysed by quantitative flow cytometry. Direct immunofluorescence staining was performed with phycoerythrin conjugated CD19 and CD20 monoclonal antibodies. Standard microbeads with different capacities to bind mouse immunoglobulins were used to convert the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) values into number of antigen molecules/cell, expressed as antibody binding capacity (ABC). RESULTS: CD19 and CD20 ABC values in leukaemic B cells differed from those of normal blood B lymphocytes. The results identified distinct profiles of CD19 and CD20 expression in the various types of B cell leukaemias. In all leukaemias studied except hairy cell leukaemia (HCL), CD19 expression was significantly lower than the mean (SD) value in normal B cells (22 (7) x 10(3) molecules/cell), as follows: chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), 13 (7) x 10(3); B prolymphocytic leukaemia (B-PLL), 16 (9) x 10(3); splenic lymphoma with villous lymphocytes (SLVL), 15 (11) x 10(3); mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), 10 (7) x 10(3). In HCL there was strong CD19 expression (38 (16) x 10(3)). In contrast, the level of expression of membrane CD20 was higher than the mean (SD) value in normal B cells (94 (16) x 10(3) molecules/cell) in MCL (123 (51) x 10(3)); B-PLL (129 (47) x 10(3)); SLVL (167 (72) x 10(3)); and HCL (312 (110) x 10(3)); while it was significantly lower (65 (11) x 10(3)) in CLL compared with normal B cells and the other B cell leukaemias. CONCLUSIONS: Quantitative determination of CD19 and CD20 may provide useful diagnostic information for the study of B lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:9708202

  17. Molecular signature of Epstein Barr virus-positive Burkitt lymphoma and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder suggest different roles for Epstein Barr virus

    PubMed Central

    Navari, Mohsen; Fuligni, Fabio; Laginestra, Maria A.; Etebari, Maryam; Ambrosio, Maria R.; Sapienza, Maria R.; Rossi, Maura; De Falco, Giulia; Gibellini, Davide; Tripodo, Claudio; Pileri, Stefano A.; Leoncini, Lorenzo; Piccaluga, Pier P.

    2014-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infection is commonly associated with human cancer and, in particular, with lymphoid malignancies. Although the precise role of the virus in the pathogenesis of different lymphomas is largely unknown, it is well recognized that the expression of viral latent proteins and miRNA can contribute to its pathogenetic role. In this study, we compared the gene and miRNA expression profile of two EBV-associated aggressive B non-Hodgkin lymphomas known to be characterized by differential expression of the viral latent proteins aiming to dissect the possible different contribution of such proteins and EBV-encoded miRNAs. By applying extensive bioinformatic inferring and an experimental model, we found that EBV+ Burkitt lymphoma presented with significant over-expression of EBV-encoded miRNAs that were likely to contribute to its global molecular profile. On the other hand, EBV+ post-transplant diffuse large B-cell lymphomas presented a significant enrichment in genes regulated by the viral latent proteins. Based on these different viral and cellular gene expression patterns, a clear distinction between EBV+ Burkitt lymphoma and post-transplant diffuse large B-cell lymphomas was made. In this regard, the different viral and cellular expression patterns seemed to depend on each other, at least partially, and the latency type most probably played a significant role in their regulation. In conclusion, our data indicate that EBV influence over B-cell malignant clones may act through different mechanisms of transcriptional regulation and suggest that potentially different pathogenetic mechanisms may depend upon the conditions of the interaction between EBV and the host that finally determine the latency pattern. PMID:25566237

  18. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in patient after treatment of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Skugor, Nives Dzeko; Perić, Zinaida; Vrhovac, Radovan; Radić-Kristo, Delfa; Kardum-Skelin, Ika; Jaksić, Branimir

    2010-03-01

    Relatively few cases of Epstein-Barr (EBV)-positive B-cell lymphomas arising in patients with angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) have been reported. We report a case of AITL in which diffuse large B-cell lymphoma arose 13 months after the initial diagnosis of AITL. In a 36-year-old female patient, evaluated for moderate leukocytosis, peripheral and abdominal lymphadenopathy AITL was diagnosed in March 2008, based on results of fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of the enlarged cervical and supraclavicular lymph nodes. The diagnosis was also confirmed by immunophenotyping and histopathology of the cervical lymph nodes. The patient initially recieved FED chemotherapy (fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, dexamethasone) followed by elective autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In April 2009 the patient was hospitalized because of fever, pancytopenia, hyperbilirubinemia and peripheral lymphadenopathy. The FNAC of the enlarged cervical lymph nodes was performed again, but this time the smears were composed of polymorphous population of lymphocytes with the predomination of large cells, CD20+ on immunocytochemical stains. The immunophenotyping confirmed a predomination of monoclonal mature B-cells. Patient had high number of EBV DNA copies in plasma and serologic testing revealed increased titers of EBV VCA IgG and EBV EBNA IgG. CHOP-R chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone and rituximab) was then administered, resulting in good partial response of the disease. Reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation performed thereafter, resulted in complete remission of the disease. AITL is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder in which the neoplastic T-cells represent the minority of the lymph node cell population and almost all cases harbor EBV-infected B-cells. Various authors postulated that immunodeficiency in AITL patients together with immunosuppressive effects of cytotoxic drugs, may be responsible for EBV

  19. A comparison of flow cytometry, bone marrow biopsy, and bone marrow aspirates in the detection of lymphoid infiltration in B cell disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sah, S P; Matutes, E; Wotherspoon, A C; Morilla, R; Catovsky, D

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the diagnostic value of bone marrow aspirates, trephine biopsies (BMB), and flow cytometry (FC) in the assessment of bone marrow infiltration in chronic lymphoid disorders. Methods: Investigations were carried out in 110 diagnostic and follow up specimens from B cell disorders, namely: chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL; 65), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL; 39), and hairy cell leukaemia (HCL; 6). A selected panel of monoclonal antibodies was used both for FC and immunohistochemistry. Results: In CLL there was agreement between the three investigations in 71% of samples and in 88% when only FC and BMB were compared. In nine of 65 samples, FC and BMB were positive, although the aspirate was reported as negative. Four BMB negative samples had minimal residual disease (MRD) detected by FC, whereas two samples were positive both on BMB and aspirate but showed no evidence of disease on FC. In NHL, there was agreement between the three investigations in 22 of 39 cases, and in 27 of 39 cases there was agreement between FC and BMB. In eight of 39 NHL cases, FC was negative but the BMB was either positive (five) or uncertain (three), whereas in three of 39, FC was positive but BMB was either negative (one) or uncertain (two). In three of five uncertain BMB, no clonal population was detected by the polymerase chain reaction, whereas in the remaining two cases the nodular aggregates disappeared on further sectioning. Conclusions: Both BMB and FC are better than bone marrow aspirates for the detection of infiltration in B cell disorders. FC might be slightly more sensitive than BMB to detect MRD in CLL, whereas BMB may be slightly better than FC in NHL. PMID:12560392

  20. Polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis with binucleated lymphocytes (PPBL).

    PubMed

    Troussard, Xavier; Cornet, Edouard; Lesesve, Jean-François; Kourel, Carine; Mossafa, Hossein

    2008-01-01

    Persistent polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (PPBL) is a rare and recently described entity. The review of the literature show PPBL is diagnosed predominantly but not exclusively in women, usually smokers. PPBL is recognized by a moderate, chronic and absolute lymphocytosis (>4 × 10(9)/l) in the peripheral blood. In 10% of cases without lymphocytosis, the PPBL diagnosis has to be suggested by peripheral blood examination showing in all cases atypical binucleated lymphocytes. A polyclonal serum IgM is also associated and HLA-DR7 expression is present in most cases. Contrary to B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders (B-CLPD), peripheral B cells are polyclonal with kappa and lambda light-chain expression and no clonal rearrangement of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes is usually demonstrated. The detection of an extra isochromosome for the long arm of chromosome 3 +i(3)(q10) has to be considered as a specific marker of PPBL. We performed conventional cytogenetic analysis (CCA) in 111 patients with typical PPBL we followed-up more than 4 years. +i(3q) was detected in 34% (33/98), PCC in 8% (8/98) and both abnormalities in 31% (30/98). CCA showed neither +i(3q) nor PCC in 28% (27/98). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was also performed in 84 cases and +i(3q) was detected in 71% (60/84). When combining both procedures in 84 patients, +i(3q) was detected in 17 patients with negative CCA and was confirmed in 43 patients with positive CCA. CCA and FISH were both negative in 24 cases. Whether patients with PPBL are at increased risk of hematological malignancy remains unclear. After a median follow-up of 4.4 years, most PPBL patients presented a stable clinical and biological course. Six patients died from pulmonary cancer, myocardial infarction, cerebral aneurysm rupture or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Two patients had IgM monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) at the time of PPBL diagnosis and two other patients developed IgM MGUS

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat protein modulates cell cycle and apoptosis in Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized B cells.

    PubMed

    Colombrino, Eva; Rossi, Elisabetta; Ballon, Gianna; Terrin, Liliana; Indraccolo, Stefano; Chieco-Bianchi, Luigi; De Rossi, Anita

    2004-05-01

    Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) develop a spectrum of B cell lymphoproliferative disorders ranging from polyclonal B cell activation to B cell lymphomas. While a direct role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is well recognized for most of these lesions, recent findings have suggested that transactivator HIV-1 Tat protein might be involved in the pathogenesis of B cell lymphomas. Tat-expressing EBV-positive B cells were generated by transduction with a retroviral Tat-encoding vector. B(Tat+) cells expressed lower levels of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 than parental and control B(Tat-) cells, generated by transduction with an empty retroviral vector, and were more prone to apoptosis upon serum withdrawal, as assessed by analysis of annexin V-stained cells and cleavage of poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase by caspase 3. Nevertheless, in serum starvation, B(Tat-) cells mainly exhibited the Rb hypo-phosphorylated form, underwent cell cycle arrest, and grew in single cell suspension, while B(Tat+) cells displayed the Rb hyper-phoshorylated form, progressed throughout the cell cycle, and retained the ability to grow in small clumps. Finding that B(Tat+) cells maintained proliferative capacity upon serum withdrawal suggests that cells expressing Tat have growth advantages among the EBV-driven cell proliferations and may originate B cell clones with more oncogenic potential. PMID:15093750

  2. How I treat autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, João Bosco

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) represents a failure of apoptotic mechanisms to maintain lymphocyte homeostasis, permitting accumulation of lymphoid mass and persistence of autoreactive cells that often manifest in childhood with chronic nonmalignant lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and recurring multilineage cytopenias. Cytopenias in these patients can be the result of splenic sequestration as well as autoimmune complications manifesting as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, and autoimmune neutropenia. More than 300 families with hereditary ALPS have now been described; nearly 500 patients from these families have been studied and followed worldwide over the last 20 years by our colleagues and ourselves. Some of these patients with FAS mutations affecting the intracellular portion of the FAS protein also have an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. The best approaches to diagnosis, follow-up, and management of ALPS, its associated cytopenias, and other complications resulting from infiltrative lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity are presented. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrial.gov as #NCT00001350. PMID:21885601

  3. Role of EBNA-3 Family Proteins in EBV Associated B-cell Lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Shaoni; Ghosh Roy, Shatadru; Bose, Priyanka; Saha, Abhik

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is highly ubiquitous in human population and establishes a lifelong asymptomatic infection within the infected host unless the immune system is compromised. Following initial infection in the oropharyngeal epithelial cells, EBV primarily infects naive B-lymphocytes and develops a number of B-cell lymphomas particularly in immune-deficient individuals. In vitro, EBV can also infect and subsequently transform quiescent B-lymphocytes into continuously proliferating lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) resembling EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disorders in which a subset of latent transcripts are detected. Genetic studies revealed that EBNA-3 family comprising of three adjacent genes in the viral genome—EBNA-3A and -3C, but not -3B, are critical for B-cell transformation. Nevertheless, all three proteins appear to significantly contribute to maintain the overall proliferation and viability of transformed cells, suggesting a critical role in lymphoma development. Apart from functioning as important viral transcriptional regulators, EBNA-3 proteins associate with many cellular proteins in different signaling networks, providing a suitable platform for lifelong survival of the virus and concurrent lymphoma development in the infected host. The chapter describes the function of each these EBV nuclear antigen 3 proteins employed by the virus as a means to understand viral pathogenesis of several EBV-associated B-cell malignancies. PMID:27092119

  4. Hepatitis C virus - associated B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mihăilă, Romeo-Gabriel

    2016-07-21

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients are prone to develop bone marrow or various tissue infiltrates with monoclonal B cells, monoclonal B lymphocytosis or different types of B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (BCNHL), of which the most common are splenic marginal zone BCNHL, diffuse large BCNHL and follicular lymphoma. The association between chronic HCV infection and non Hodgkin's lymphoma has been observed especially in areas with high prevalence of this viral infection. Outside the limitations of some studies that have been conducted, there are also geographic, environmental, and genetic factors that contribute to the epidemiological differences. Various microenvironmental signals, such as cytokines, viral antigenic external stimulation of lymphocyte receptors by HCV antigens, and intercellular interactions contribute to B cell proliferation. HCV lymphotropism and chronic antigenic stimulation are involved in B-lymphocyte expansion, as mixted cryoglobulinemia or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, which can progress to BCNHL. HCV replication in B lymphocytes has oncogenic effect mediated by intracellular HCV proteins. It is also involved in an important induction of reactive oxygen species that can lead to permanent B lymphocyte damage, as DNA mutations, after binding to surface B-cell receptors. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder could appear and it has a multiclonal potentiality that may develop into different types of lymphomas. The hematopoietic stem cell transplant made for lymphoma in HCV-infected patients can increase the risk of earlier progression to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. HCV infected patients with indolent BCNHL who receive antiviral therapy can be potentially cured. Viral clearance was related to lymphoma response, fact that highlights the probable involvement of HCV in lymphomagenesis. Direct acting antiviral drugs could be a solution for the patients who did not tolerate or respond to interferon, as they seem to

  5. Hepatitis C virus - associated B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mihăilă, Romeo-Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients are prone to develop bone marrow or various tissue infiltrates with monoclonal B cells, monoclonal B lymphocytosis or different types of B cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (BCNHL), of which the most common are splenic marginal zone BCNHL, diffuse large BCNHL and follicular lymphoma. The association between chronic HCV infection and non Hodgkin’s lymphoma has been observed especially in areas with high prevalence of this viral infection. Outside the limitations of some studies that have been conducted, there are also geographic, environmental, and genetic factors that contribute to the epidemiological differences. Various microenvironmental signals, such as cytokines, viral antigenic external stimulation of lymphocyte receptors by HCV antigens, and intercellular interactions contribute to B cell proliferation. HCV lymphotropism and chronic antigenic stimulation are involved in B-lymphocyte expansion, as mixted cryoglobulinemia or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, which can progress to BCNHL. HCV replication in B lymphocytes has oncogenic effect mediated by intracellular HCV proteins. It is also involved in an important induction of reactive oxygen species that can lead to permanent B lymphocyte damage, as DNA mutations, after binding to surface B-cell receptors. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder could appear and it has a multiclonal potentiality that may develop into different types of lymphomas. The hematopoietic stem cell transplant made for lymphoma in HCV-infected patients can increase the risk of earlier progression to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. HCV infected patients with indolent BCNHL who receive antiviral therapy can be potentially cured. Viral clearance was related to lymphoma response, fact that highlights the probable involvement of HCV in lymphomagenesis. Direct acting antiviral drugs could be a solution for the patients who did not tolerate or respond to interferon, as they

  6. Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus disease in a case of persistent polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis.

    PubMed

    Mitterer, M; Pescosta, N; Fend, F; Larcher, C; Prang, N; Schwarzmann, F; Coser, P; Huemer, H P

    1995-07-01

    Persistent polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (PPBL) is a rare haematological disorder. It is characterized by activated and morphologically atypical B lymphocytes and polyclonal IgM production and has been associated with female sex, cigarette smoking, and HLA-DR7 expression. We report a case of PPBL with intermitting symptoms compatible with a chronic fatigue syndrome, recurrent erythema nodosum and multiforme. Serological findings suggested a chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Messenger RNA of EBV immediate early gene transactivation BZLF1 was detected in peripheral blood lymphocytes by reverse transcriptase PCR indicating a persistent replication of the virus. Over 2 years of observation we detected varying numbers of atypical lymphocytes. These cells hybridized with a probe specific for the EBV internal repeat region (BamHI W) which indicates a productive infection. Of interest, no reaction was observed with a probe specific for the latency-associated small RNAs (EBERs). The immunological phenotype of the polyclonal B cells was similar to B-cell lines immortalized by EBV in vitro, expressing a number of activation molecules (CD23, CD25, CD54) and the bcl-2 protein. In summary, our findings suggest that persistent EBV replication might be crucial in the development of lymphoproliferative disorders such as PPBL. PMID:7646989

  7. B cell conducts the lymphocyte orchestra.

    PubMed

    Youinou, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The interest for B cells has recently been revived. They normally play a role in the development, the regulation, as well as the activation of lymphoid architecture: they regulate dendritic cells and T-cell subsets function through cytokine production. Receptor editing is also essential in B cells and aids in preventing autoimmunity. Both abnormalities in the distribution of B-cell subsets and clinical benefit response to B-cell depletion in autoimmune states illustrate their importance. A new area has thus been reached, whereby B lymphocytes return as a significant contributor to autoimmune disorders. PMID:17363215

  8. MYD88 L265P in Waldenström macroglobulinemia, immunoglobulin M monoclonal gammopathy, and other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders using conventional and quantitative allele-specific polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lian; Hunter, Zachary R.; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Yangsheng; Cao, Yang; Liu, Xia; Morra, Enrica; Trojani, Alessandra; Greco, Antonino; Arcaini, Luca; Varettoni, Maria; Brown, Jennifer R.; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Patterson, Christopher J.; Manning, Robert J.; Tripsas, Christina K.; Lindeman, Neal I.

    2013-01-01

    By whole-genome and/or Sanger sequencing, we recently identified a somatic mutation (MYD88 L265P) that stimulates nuclear factor κB activity and is present in >90% of Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) patients. MYD88 L265P was absent in 90% of immunoglobulin M (IgM) monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) patients. We therefore developed conventional and real-time allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) assays for more sensitive detection and quantification of MYD88 L265P. Using either assay, MYD88 L265P was detected in 97 of 104 (93%) WM and 13 of 24 (54%) IgM MGUS patients and was either absent or rarely expressed in samples from splenic marginal zone lymphoma (2/20; 10%), CLL (1/26; 4%), multiple myeloma (including IgM cases, 0/14), and immunoglobulin G MGUS (0/9) patients as well as healthy donors (0/40; P < 1.5 × 10−5 for WM vs other cohorts). Real-time AS-PCR identified IgM MGUS patients progressing to WM and showed a high rate of concordance between MYD88 L265P ΔCT and BM disease involvement (r = 0.89, P = .008) in WM patients undergoing treatment. These studies identify MYD88 L265P as a widely present mutation in WM and IgM MGUS patients using highly sensitive and specific AS-PCR assays with potential use in diagnostic discrimination and/or response assessment. The finding of this mutation in many IgM MGUS patients suggests that MYD88 L265P may be an early oncogenic event in WM pathogenesis. PMID:23321251

  9. Primary CNS lymphoproliferative disease, mycophenolate and calcineurin inhibitor usage

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Genevieve M.; Powell, Helen; Kostadinov, Rumen; Rocafort, Patrick Tim; Rifkin, Dena E.; Burger, Peter C.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Swinnen, Lode J.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Duffield, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppression for solid organ transplantation increases lymphoproliferative disease risk. While central nervous system (CNS) involvement is more rare, we noticed an increase in primary CNS (PCNS) disease. To investigate a potential association with the immunosuppressive regimen we identified all post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) cases diagnosed over a 28-year period at our institution (174 total, 29 PCNS) and all similar cases recorded in a United Network for Organ Sharing-Organ Procurement and Transplant Network (UNOS-OPTN) data file. While no PCNS cases were diagnosed at our institution between 1986 and 1997, they comprised 37% of PTLD cases diagnosed from 2011–2014. PCNS disease was more often associated with renal vs. other organ transplant, Epstein-Barr virus, large B-cell morphology and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as compared to PTLD that did not involve the CNS. Calcineurin inhibitors were protective against PCNS disease when given alone or in combination with MMF. A multivariate analysis of a larger UNOS-OPTN dataset confirmed these findings, where both MMF and lack of calcineurin inhibitor usage were independently associated with risk for development of PCNS PTLD. These findings have significant implications for the transplant community, particularly given the introduction of new regimens lacking calcineurin inhibitors. Further investigation into these associations is warranted. PMID:26460822

  10. Primary CNS lymphoproliferative disease, mycophenolate and calcineurin inhibitor usage.

    PubMed

    Crane, Genevieve M; Powell, Helen; Kostadinov, Rumen; Rocafort, Patrick Tim; Rifkin, Dena E; Burger, Peter C; Ambinder, Richard F; Swinnen, Lode J; Borowitz, Michael J; Duffield, Amy S

    2015-10-20

    Immunosuppression for solid organ transplantation increases lymphoproliferative disease risk. While central nervous system (CNS) involvement is more rare, we noticed an increase in primary CNS (PCNS) disease. To investigate a potential association with the immunosuppressive regimen we identified all post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) cases diagnosed over a 28-year period at our institution (174 total, 29 PCNS) and all similar cases recorded in a United Network for Organ Sharing-Organ Procurement and Transplant Network (UNOS-OPTN) datafile. While no PCNS cases were diagnosed at our institution between 1986 and 1997, they comprised 37% of PTLD cases diagnosed from 2011-2014. PCNS disease was more often associated with renal vs. other organ transplant, Epstein-Barr virus, large B-cell morphology and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as compared to PTLD that did not involve the CNS. Calcineurin inhibitors were protective against PCNS disease when given alone or in combination with MMF. A multivariate analysis of a larger UNOS-OPTN dataset confirmed these findings, where both MMF and lack of calcineurin inhibitor usage were independently associated with risk for development of PCNS PTLD. These findings have significant implications for the transplant community, particularly given the introduction of new regimens lacking calcineurin inhibitors. Further investigation into these associations is warranted. PMID:26460822

  11. EBV Lymphoproliferative Disease after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Rouce, Rayne H; Louis, Chrystal U; Heslop, Helen E

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW EBV reactivation can cause significant morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (SCT). Delays in reconstitution of EBV-specific T lymphocyte activity can lead to life-threatening EBV lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-PTLD). This review highlights recent advances in the understanding of pathophysiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of EBV viremia and PTLD. RECENT FINDINGS During the past decade, early detection strategies, such as serial measurement of EBV-DNA load, have helped to identify high-risk patients and to diagnose early lymphoproliferation. The most significant advances have come in the form of innovative treatment options, including manipulation of the balance between outgrowing EBV-infected B cells and the EBV cytotoxic T lymphocyte (EBV-CTL) response, and targeting infected B cells with monoclonal antibodies, chemotherapy, unmanipulated donor lymphocytes, and donor or more recently third party EBV-CTLs. Defining criteria for preemptive therapy and remains a challenge. SUMMARY EBV reactivation is a significant complication after SCT. Continued improvements in risk-stratification and treatment options are required to improve the morbidity and mortality caused by EBV associated diseases. Current approaches use Rituximab to deplete B cells or adoptive transfer of EBV-CTL to reconstitute immunity. The availability of rapid EBV specific T cell products offers the possibility of improved outcomes. PMID:25159713

  12. Interphase cytogenetics of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia by FISH-technique

    SciTech Connect

    Peddanna, N.; Gogineni, S.K.; Rosenthal, C.J.

    1994-09-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia [CLL] accounts for about 30% of all lymphoproliferative disorders. In over 95% of these cases, the leukemia is caused by B-cells, rarely T-cells. Fifty percent of B-CLL have chromosomal aberrations and of such cases, one-third have trisomy 12. Malignant B-cells have a very low mitotic index and those metaphases that can be analyzed usually represent the normal T-cell population. Retrospectively, we decided to identify the additional chromosome 12 (trisomy 12) directly at interphase by the FISH-technique using centrometric 12 specific alphoid probe (Oncor, Gaithersburg, MD). Preparations were made from 9 patients with B-CLL. All cultures except one failed to produce metaphases for conventional karyotyping. Eighty percent of the cells have two dots (normal cells) over the interphase nuclei while the remaining 20% have three dots (trisomy 12). The clinical implication of trisomy 12 in the pathogenesis of CLL including age, staging and duration of disease, differentials and immunological markers are correlated with interphase cytogenetic data. The loss and/or gain of specific chromosomes in human neoplasia is common and rapid evaluation of such cases should be considered as a routine approach.

  13. B cells in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dijke, Esme I.; Platt, Jeffrey L.; Blair, Paul; Clatworthy, Menna R.; Patel, Jignesh K.; Kfoury, A.G.; Cascalho, Marilia

    2016-01-01

    B cell responses underlie the most vexing immunological barriers to organ transplantation. Much has been learned about the molecular mechanisms of B cell responses to antigen and new therapeutic agents that specifically target B cells or suppress their functions are available. Yet, despite recent advances, there remains an incomplete understanding about how B cell functions determine the fate of organ transplants and how, whether or when potent new therapeutics should optimally be used. This gap in understanding reflects in part the realization that besides producing antibodies, B cells can also regulate cellular immunity, contribute to the genesis of tolerance and induce accommodation. Whether non-specific depletion of B cells, their progeny or suppression of their functions would undermine these non-cognate functions and whether graft outcome would suffer as a result is unknown. These questions were discussed at a symposium on “B cells in transplantation” at the 2015 ISHLT annual meeting. Those discussions are summarized here and a new perspective is offered. PMID:26996930

  14. [Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in liver transplant recipients--Merkur University Hospital single center experience].

    PubMed

    Filipec-Kanizaj, Tajana; Budimir, Jelena; Colić-Cvrlje, Vesna; Kardum-Skelin, Ika; Sustercić, Dunja; Naumovski-Mihalić, Slavica; Mrzljak, Anna; Kolonić, Slobodanka Ostojić; Sobocan, Nikola; Bradić, Tihomir; Dolić, Zrinka Misetić; Kocman, Branislav; Katicić, Miroslava; Zidovec-Lepej, Snjezana; Vince, Adriana

    2011-09-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is an increasingly recognized condition as the number of solid organ and bone marrow transplant recipients increases. It can be a life threatening fulminant disorder and affects approximately 8% of solid organ transplant recipients. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is closely involved in the pathogenesis of PTLD and the majority of PTLD cases arise in response to primary infection with EBV or to re-activation of previously acquired EBV. The principal risk factors underlying the development of PTLD are the degree of overall immunosuppression and EBV serostatus of the recipient. The most commonly used pathologic classification of PTLD is the World Health Organization classification, which divides PTLD into three categories: early lesions, polymorphic PTLD, and monomorphic PTLD. Early lesions are characterized by reactive plasmacytic hyperplasia. Polymorphic PTLD may be either polyclonal or monoclonal and is characterized by destruction of the underlying lymphoid architecture, necrosis, and nuclear atypia. In monomorphic PTLD, the majority of cases (>80%) arise from B cells, similar to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in immunocompetent hosts. The most common subtype is diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, but Burkitt's/Burkitt's-like lymphoma and plasma cell myeloma are also seen. Rarely T-cell variants occur, which include peripheral T-cell lymphomas and, rarely, other uncommon types, including gamma/delta T-cell lymphoma and T-natural killer (NK) cell varieties. Hodgkin's disease-like lymphoma is very unusual. An accurate diagnosis of PTLD requires a high index of suspicion, since the disorder may present subtly and/or extranodally. Radiologic evidence of a mass or the presence of elevated serum markers (such as increased LDH levels) are suggestive of PTLD, with positive finding on ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance and/or positron emission tomography scanning (possibly indicating metabolically active areas) also

  15. Cutaneous manifestations as presenting sign of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in childhood.

    PubMed

    Auricchio, Luigi; Vitiello, Laura; Adriani, Marsilio; Ferri, Pasqualina; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Pettinato, Guido; Racioppi, Luigi; Maiuri, Luigi; Dianzani, Umberto; Pignata, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome is a disorder due to a defect of lymphocyte apoptosis, whose clinical manifestations consist of hyperplasia of lymphoid tissues and autoimmune diseases. We report on a 26-month-old child who presented with frequent eruptions of weals and angioedema without any apparent triggering factor, who subsequently developed an erythematopapular rash with a histological pattern of a lymphoplasmacellular infiltrate. Familial anamnesis revealed a history of lymphoadenomegaly and massive spleen and liver enlargement in her sister. Functional and molecular analysis led to a diagnosis of type 1a autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. Immunophenotyping of the cutaneous lesion revealed the presence of an inflammatory infiltrate with a considerably high number of Langerhans cells. Cutaneous features such as urticaria, angioedema and vasculitis in children with a personal and familial history of hyperplasia of lymphoid tissues may be a presenting sign of a systemic disease, such as autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. PMID:15942224

  16. Application of polymerase chain reaction to detect rearrangement of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, S H; Siegrist, K; Akhtar, M

    1997-07-01

    As part of our routine work-up in the diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disease, we used a rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to amplify the DNA fragments of the framework 3 (FR3) region of the immunoglobulin heavy (IgH) chain genes. The assay does not involve hybridization, nested priming, or sequencing of the amplified PCR product. It was performed on 66 specimens of B-cell lymphoproliferative disease, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, multiple myeloma, hairy cell leukemia and follicular lymphoma. Twenty-six specimens of negative controls, including acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia in myeloid transformation and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, were also analyzed. The assay was performed with 77% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The standard IgH chain gene rearrangement by Southern blot analysis is reserved for the remaining negative cases if clinically indicated. PMID:17353588

  17. Phenytoin Induced Cutaneous B Cell Pseudolymphoma.

    PubMed

    Riyaz, Najeeba; Sasidharanpillai, Sarita; Aravindan, Karumathil P; Nobin, Babu K; Raghavan, Nisha T; Nikhila, Pappinissery K

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous pseudolymphomas are benign lymphoproliferative processes mimicking lymphomas clinically and histologically. One of the precipitating factors for pseudolymphoma is drugs like anticonvulsants, antidepressants and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. According to existing literature phenytoin-induced cutaneous pseudolymphomas are usually T-cell predominant. Most often withdrawal of the drug with or without short-course systemic steroids can attain a cure. Rarely malignant transformation has been reported years later despite withdrawal of the offending drug, which necessitates a long-term follow up of the affected. We report an 80-year-old male patient who was receiving phenytoin sodium and who presented with diffuse erythema and infiltrated skin lesions which histologically resembled cutaneous B-cell lymphoma. Substituting phenytoin with levetiracetam achieved resolution of symptoms. Further evaluation was suggestive of a reactive process. A detailed drug history is of paramount importance in differentiating drug-induced pseudolymphoma from lymphoma. Searching literature we could not find any previous reports of phenytoin-induced cutaneous B-cell pseudolymphoma. PMID:26538730

  18. Phenytoin Induced Cutaneous B Cell Pseudolymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Riyaz, Najeeba; Sasidharanpillai, Sarita; Aravindan, Karumathil P; Nobin, Babu K; Raghavan, Nisha T; Nikhila, Pappinissery K

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous pseudolymphomas are benign lymphoproliferative processes mimicking lymphomas clinically and histologically. One of the precipitating factors for pseudolymphoma is drugs like anticonvulsants, antidepressants and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. According to existing literature phenytoin-induced cutaneous pseudolymphomas are usually T-cell predominant. Most often withdrawal of the drug with or without short-course systemic steroids can attain a cure. Rarely malignant transformation has been reported years later despite withdrawal of the offending drug, which necessitates a long-term follow up of the affected. We report an 80-year-old male patient who was receiving phenytoin sodium and who presented with diffuse erythema and infiltrated skin lesions which histologically resembled cutaneous B-cell lymphoma. Substituting phenytoin with levetiracetam achieved resolution of symptoms. Further evaluation was suggestive of a reactive process. A detailed drug history is of paramount importance in differentiating drug-induced pseudolymphoma from lymphoma. Searching literature we could not find any previous reports of phenytoin-induced cutaneous B-cell pseudolymphoma. PMID:26538730

  19. B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma linked to Coxiella burnetii.

    PubMed

    Melenotte, Cléa; Million, Matthieu; Audoly, Gilles; Gorse, Audrey; Dutronc, Hervé; Roland, Gauthier; Dekel, Michal; Moreno, Asuncion; Cammilleri, Serge; Carrieri, Maria Patrizia; Protopopescu, Camelia; Ruminy, Philippe; Lepidi, Hubert; Nadel, Bertrand; Mege, Jean-Louis; Xerri, Luc; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria can induce human lymphomas, whereas lymphoproliferative disorders have been described in patients with Q fever. We observed a lymphoma in a patient with Q fever that prompted us to investigate the association between the 2 diseases. We screened 1468 consecutive patients of the 2004 to 2014 French National Referral Center for Q fever database. The standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphoma (FL) were calculated comparatively to the 2012 Francim Registry. The presence of Coxiella burnetii was tested using immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization using a specific 16S ribosomal RNA probe and genomic DNA probe. Seven patients (0.48%) presented mature B-cell lymphoma consisting of 6 DLBCL and 1 FL. An excess risk of DLBCL and FL was found in Q fever patients compared with the general population (SIR [95% confidence interval], 25.4 [11.4-56.4] and 6.7 [0.9-47.9], respectively). C burnetii was detected in CD68(+) macrophages within both lymphoma and lymphadenitis tissues but localization in CD123(+) plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) was found only in lymphoma tissues. Q fever patients with persistent focalized infection were found more at risk of lymphoma (hazard ratio, 9.35 [1.10-79.4]). Interleukin-10 (IL10) overproduction (P = .0003) was found in patients developing lymphoma. These results suggest that C burnetii should be added to the list of bacteria that promote human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, possibly by the infection of pDCs and IL10 overproduction. Screening for early lymphoma diagnosis should be considered in the management of patients with Q fever, especially those with persistent focalized infections. PMID:26463422

  20. Immune Disorder HSCT Protocol

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-09

    Immune Deficiency Disorders:; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Hyper-IgM; DiGeorge Syndrome; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immune Deficiency; Immune Dysregulatory Disorder:; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; IPEX; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  1. Epstein–Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disease in non-immunocompromised hosts: a status report and summary of an international meeting, 8–9 September 2008

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, J. I.; Kimura, H.; Nakamura, S.; Ko, Y.-H.; Jaffe, E. S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recently novel Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs) have been identified in non-immunocompromised hosts, both in Asia and Western countries. These include aggressive T-cell and NK-cell LPDs often subsumed under the heading of chronic active Epstein–Barr virus (CAEBV) infection and EBV-driven B-cell LPDs mainly affecting the elderly. Design: To better define the pathogenesis, classification, and treatment of these disorders, participants from Asia, The Americas, Europe, and Australia presented clinical and experimental data at an international meeting. Results: The term systemic EBV-positive T-cell LPD, as adopted by the WHO classification, is preferred as a pathological classification over CAEBV (the favored clinical term) for those cases that are clonal. The disease has an aggressive clinical course, but may arise in the background of CAEBV. Hydroa vacciniforme (HV) and HV-like lymphoma represent a spectrum of clonal EBV-positive T-cell LPDs, which have a more protracted clinical course; spontaneous regression may occur in adult life. Severe mosquito bite allergy is a related syndrome usually of NK cell origin. Immune senescence in the elderly is associated with both reactive and neoplastic EBV-driven LPDs, including EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Conclusion: The participants proposed an international consortium to facilitate further clinical and biological studies of novel EBV-driven LPDs. PMID:19515747

  2. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis as early manifestation of Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Zoroquiain, Pablo; González, Sergio; Molgó, Montserrat; Rodríguez, Alejandra; Valbuena, José R

    2012-05-01

    Extensive necrotizing vasculitis (ENV) is a rare paraneoplastic phenomenon, and the majority of cases reported are associated with hematolymphoid neoplasms. Histologically, most cases of ENV represent leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV). Here we report the clinicopahological features of a 68-year-old man with ENV associated to a Epstein Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (EBV+DLBCL) of the elderly, a newly recognized lymphoproliferative disorder, most likely representing a paraneoplastic manifestation. The patient was treated with standard chemotherapy regimen for malignant lymphoma. Due to the extensive involvement of the extremities by ENV, surgical debridement was not feasible and a novel therapy based on CHITOSAN apposits was initiated with overall good response and subsequent re-epithelization of the skin lesions. The patient died of sepsis secondary to a Pseudomona pneumonia 17 months after diagnosis. PMID:22197862

  3. Primary Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Liver in a Patient with Sjogren Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gorodetskiy, Vadim; Klapper, Wolfram; Probatova, Natalya; Vasilyev, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) has the highest incidence of malignant lymphoproliferative disorders transformation among autoimmune diseases. We present a case of extranodal high grade lymphoma of the liver in a 52-year-old patient with long history of SS. Lymphoma manifested with sharp significant pain in the right hypochondrium, weakness, and profuse night sweats. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan (CT-scan) of the abdomen revealed multiple low density foci with homogeneous structure and clear contours in both lobes of the liver. Histologically, proliferation of medium sized lymphoma cells with round-oval and slightly irregular nuclei with fine chromatin was shown. Immunohistochemical and molecular features of the tumors allowed diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). To exclude secondary liver lesion by non-Hodgkin lymphoma, chest and small pelvis CT-scan, endoscopy of upper and lower gastrointestinal tract and study of bone marrow were performed. After 8 cycles of R-CHOP chemotherapy (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone), the complete remission was achieved, which persists after 45 months of follow-up. Primary hepatic lymphomas are extremely rare, and previously only low-grade hepatic lymphomas have been described in SS. To our knowledge, the patient described here represents the first reported case of DLBCL with primary liver involvement in SS. PMID:26998372

  4. Primary Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Liver in a Patient with Sjogren Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gorodetskiy, Vadim; Klapper, Wolfram; Probatova, Natalya; Vasilyev, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) has the highest incidence of malignant lymphoproliferative disorders transformation among autoimmune diseases. We present a case of extranodal high grade lymphoma of the liver in a 52-year-old patient with long history of SS. Lymphoma manifested with sharp significant pain in the right hypochondrium, weakness, and profuse night sweats. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan (CT-scan) of the abdomen revealed multiple low density foci with homogeneous structure and clear contours in both lobes of the liver. Histologically, proliferation of medium sized lymphoma cells with round-oval and slightly irregular nuclei with fine chromatin was shown. Immunohistochemical and molecular features of the tumors allowed diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). To exclude secondary liver lesion by non-Hodgkin lymphoma, chest and small pelvis CT-scan, endoscopy of upper and lower gastrointestinal tract and study of bone marrow were performed. After 8 cycles of R-CHOP chemotherapy (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone), the complete remission was achieved, which persists after 45 months of follow-up. Primary hepatic lymphomas are extremely rare, and previously only low-grade hepatic lymphomas have been described in SS. To our knowledge, the patient described here represents the first reported case of DLBCL with primary liver involvement in SS. PMID:26998372

  5. B cells and immunological tolerance.

    PubMed

    Manjarrez-Orduño, Nataly; Quách, Tâm D; Sanz, Iñaki

    2009-02-01

    Work from multiple groups continues to provide additional evidence for the powerful and highly diverse roles, both protective and pathogenic, that B cells play in autoimmune diseases. Similarly, it has become abundantly clear that antibody-independent functions may account for the opposing influences that B cells exercise over other arms of the immune response and ultimately over autoimmunity itself. Finally, it is becoming apparent that the clinical impact of B-cell depletion therapy may be, to a large extent, determined by the functional balance between different B-cell subsets that may be generated by this therapeutic intervention. In this review, we postulate that our perspective of B-cell tolerance and our experimental approach to its understanding are fundamentally changed by this view of B cells. Accordingly, we first discuss current knowledge of B-cell tolerance conventionally defined as the censoring of autoantibody-producing B cells (with an emphasis on human B cells). Therefore, we discuss a different model that contemplates B cells not only as targets of tolerance but also as mediators of tolerance. This model is based on the notion that the onset of clinical autoimmune disease may require a B-cell gain-of-pathogenic function (or a B-cell loss-of-regulatory-function) and that accordingly, disease remission may depend on the restoration of the physiological balance between B-cell pathogenic and protective functions. PMID:19148217

  6. B Cells, Antibodies, and More.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, William; Lakkis, Fadi G; Chalasani, Geetha

    2016-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritides and transplant rejection. B cells secrete antibodies that contribute to tissue injury via multiple mechanisms. In addition, B cells contribute to disease pathogenesis in autoimmunity and alloimmunity by presenting antigens as well as providing costimulation and cytokines to T cells. B cells also play an immunomodulatory role in regulating the immune response by secreting cytokines that inhibit disease onset and/or progression. B cell-targeted approaches for treating immune diseases of the kidney and other organs have gained significant momentum. However, much remains to be understood about B-cell biology in order to determine the timing, duration, and context of optimal therapeutic response to B cell-targeted approaches. In this review, we discuss the multifaceted roles of B cells as enhancers and regulators of immunity with relevance to kidney disease and transplantation. PMID:26700440

  7. Familial Lymphoproliferative Malignancies and Tandem Duplication of NF1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Gustavo; Souto, Mirela; Costa, Frederico; Oliveira, Edite; Garicochea, Bernardo

    2014-01-01

    Background. Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a genetic disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in a tumor suppressor gene (NF1) which codifies the protein neurofibromin. The frequent genetic alterations that modify neurofibromin function are deletions and insertions. Duplications are rare and phenotype in patients bearing duplication of NF1 gene is thought to be restricted to developmental abnormalities, with no reference to cancer susceptibility in these patients. We evaluated a patient who presented with few clinical signs of neurofibromatosis type 1 and a conspicuous personal and familiar history of different types of cancer, especially lymphoproliferative malignancies. The coding region of the NF-1 gene was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed to detect the number of mutant copies. The NF1 gene analysis showed the following alterations: mosaic duplication of NF1, TRAF4, and MYO1D. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using probes (RP5-1002G3 and RP5-92689) flanking NF1 gene in 17q11.2 and CEP17 for 17q11.11.1 was performed. There were three signals (RP5-1002G3conRP5-92689) in the interphases analyzed and two signals (RP5-1002G3conRP5-92689) in 93% of cells. These findings show a tandem duplication of 17q11.2. Conclusion. The case suggests the possibility that NF1 gene duplication may be associated with a phenotype characterized by lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:25580325

  8. Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Reactivation from B Cells Requires IRF4 but Not XBP-1

    PubMed Central

    Matar, Caline G.; Rangaswamy, Udaya Shankari; Wakeman, Brian S.; Iwakoshi, Neal

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gammaherpesviruses display tropism for B cells and, like all known herpesviruses, exhibit distinct lytic and latent life cycles. One well-established observation among members of the gammaherpesvirus family is the link between viral reactivation from latently infected B cells and plasma cell differentiation. Importantly, a number of studies have identified a potential role for a CREB/ATF family member, X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1), in trans-activating the immediate early BZLF-1 or BRLF1/gene 50 promoters of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), respectively. XBP-1 is required for the unfolded protein response and has been identified as a critical transcription factor in plasma cells. Here, we demonstrate that XBP-1 is capable of trans-activating the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) RTA promoter in vitro, consistent with previous observations for EBV and KSHV. However, we show that in vivo there does not appear to be a requirement for XBP-1 expression in B cells for virus reactivation. The MHV68 M2 gene product under some experimental conditions plays an important role in virus reactivation from B cells. M2 has been shown to drive B cell differentiation to plasma cells, as well as interleukin-10 (IL-10) production, both of which are dependent on M2 induction of interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) expression. IRF4 is required for plasma cell differentiation, and consistent with a role for plasma cells in MHV68 reactivation from B cells, we show that IRF4 expression in B cells is required for efficient reactivation of MHV68 from splenocytes. Thus, the latter analyses are consistent with previous studies linking plasma cell differentiation to MHV68 reactivation from B cells. The apparent independence of MHV68 reactivation from XBP-1 expression in plasma cells may reflect redundancy among CREB/ATF family members or the involvement of other plasma cell-specific transcription factors. Regardless, these findings

  9. Translational Mini-Review Series on B cell subsets in disease. Transitional B cells in systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome: clinical implications and effects of B cell-targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Vossenkämper, A; Lutalo, P M K; Spencer, J

    2012-01-01

    OTHER ARTICLES PUBLISHED IN THIS MINI-REVIEW SERIES ON B CELL SUBSETS IN DISEASE B cells in multiple sclerosis: drivers of disease pathogenesis and Trojan horse for Epstein—Barr virus entry to the central nervous system? Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2012, 167: 1–6. Reconstitution after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation – revelation of B cell developmental pathways and lineage phenotypes. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2012, 167: 15–25. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjögren's syndrome are autoimmune disorders which are characterized by a disturbed B cell homeostasis which leads ultimately to dysfunction of various organs. One of the B cell subsets that appear in abnormal numbers is the population of transitional B cells, which is increased in the blood of patients with SLE and Sjögren's syndrome. Transitional B cells are newly formed B cells. In mice, transitional B cells undergo selection checks for unwanted specificity in the bone marrow and the spleen in order to eliminate autoreactive B cells from the circulating naive B cell population. In humans, the exact anatomical compartments and mechanisms of the specificity check-points for transitional B cells remain unclear, but appear to be defective in SLE and Sjögren's syndrome. This review aims to highlight the current understanding of transitional B cells and their defects in the two disorders before and after B cell-targeted therapies. PMID:22132879

  10. Immunophenotypic and gene expression analysis of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis shows biologic characteristics associated with good prognosis CLL.

    PubMed

    Lanasa, M C; Allgood, S D; Slager, S L; Dave, S S; Love, C; Marti, G E; Kay, N E; Hanson, C A; Rabe, K G; Achenbach, S J; Goldin, L R; Camp, N J; Goodman, B K; Vachon, C M; Spector, L G; Rassenti, L Z; Leis, J F; Gockerman, J P; Strom, S S; Call, T G; Glenn, M; Cerhan, J R; Levesque, M C; Weinberg, J B; Caporaso, N E

    2011-09-01

    Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) is a hematologic condition wherein small B-cell clones can be detected in the blood of asymptomatic individuals. Most MBL have an immunophenotype similar to chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and 'CLL-like' MBL is a precursor to CLL. We used flow cytometry to identify MBL from unaffected members of CLL kindreds. We identified 101 MBL cases from 622 study subjects; of these, 82 individuals with MBL were further characterized. In all, 91 unique MBL clones were detected: 73 CLL-like MBL (CD5(+)CD20(dim)sIg(dim)), 11 atypical MBL (CD5(+)CD20(+)sIg(+)) and 7 CD5(neg) MBL (CD5(neg)CD20(+)sIg(neg)). Extended immunophenotypic characterization of these MBL subtypes was performed, and significant differences in cell surface expression of CD23, CD49d, CD79b and FMC-7 were observed among the groups. Markers of risk in CLL such as CD38, ZAP70 and CD49d were infrequently expressed in CLL-like MBL, but were expressed in the majority of atypical MBL. Interphase cytogenetics was performed in 35 MBL cases, and del 13q14 was most common (22/30 CLL-like MBL cases). Gene expression analysis using oligonucleotide arrays was performed on seven CLL-like MBL, and showed activation of B-cell receptor associated pathways. Our findings underscore the diversity of MBL subtypes and further clarify the relationship between MBL and other lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:21617698

  11. Applied Protein and Molecular Techniques for Characterization of B Cell Neoplasms in Horses

    PubMed Central

    Badial, Peres R.; Tallmadge, Rebecca L.; Miller, Steven; Stokol, Tracy; Richards, Kristy; Borges, Alexandre S.

    2015-01-01

    Mature B cell neoplasms cover a spectrum of diseases involving lymphoid tissues (lymphoma) or blood (leukemia), with an overlap between these two presentations. Previous studies describing equine lymphoid neoplasias have not included analyses of clonality using molecular techniques. The objective of this study was to use molecular techniques to advance the classification of B cell lymphoproliferative diseases in five adult equine patients with a rare condition of monoclonal gammopathy, B cell leukemia, and concurrent lymphadenopathy (lymphoma/leukemia). The B cell neoplasms were phenotypically characterized by gene and cell surface molecule expression, secreted immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype concentrations, Ig heavy-chain variable (IGHV) region domain sequencing, and spectratyping. All five patients had hyperglobulinemia due to IgG1 or IgG4/7 monoclonal gammopathy. Peripheral blood leukocyte immunophenotyping revealed high proportions of IgG1- or IgG4/7-positive cells and relative T cell lymphopenia. Most leukemic cells lacked the surface B cell markers CD19 and CD21. IGHG1 or IGHG4/7 gene expression was consistent with surface protein expression, and secreted isotype and Ig spectratyping revealed one dominant monoclonal peak. The mRNA expression of the B cell-associated developmental genes EBF1, PAX5, and CD19 was high compared to that of the plasma cell-associated marker CD38. Sequence analysis of the IGHV domain of leukemic cells revealed mutated Igs. In conclusion, the protein and molecular techniques used in this study identified neoplastic cells compatible with a developmental transition between B cell and plasma cell stages, and they can be used for the classification of equine B cell lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:26311245

  12. EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following in vivo T-cell-depleted allogeneic transplantation: clinical features, viral load correlates and prognostic factors in the rituximab era.

    PubMed

    Fox, C P; Burns, D; Parker, A N; Peggs, K S; Harvey, C M; Natarajan, S; Marks, D I; Jackson, B; Chakupurakal, G; Dennis, M; Lim, Z; Cook, G; Carpenter, B; Pettitt, A R; Mathew, S; Connelly-Smith, L; Yin, J A L; Viskaduraki, M; Chakraverty, R; Orchard, K; Shaw, B E; Byrne, J L; Brookes, C; Craddock, C F; Chaganti, S

    2014-02-01

    EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) following Alemtuzumab-based allo-SCT is a relatively uncommon and challenging clinical problem but has not received detailed study in a large cohort. Quantitative-PCR (qPCR) monitoring for EBV reactivation post allo-SCT is now commonplace but its diagnostic and predictive value remains unclear. Sixty-nine patients with PTLD following Alemtuzumab-based allo-SCT were studied. Marked clinicopathological heterogeneity was evident; lymphadenopathy was frequently absent, whereas advanced extranodal disease was common. The median viral load at clinical presentation was 49 300 copies/mL (50-65 200 000 copies/mL) and, notably, 23% and 45% of cases, respectively, had 10 000 and 40 000 copies/mL. The overall response rate to rituximab as first-line therapy was 70%. For rituximab failures, chemotherapy was ineffectual but DLIs were successful. A four-parameter prognostic index predicted response to therapy (OR 0.30 (0.12-0.74); P=0.009] and PTLD mortality (hazard ratio (HR) 1.81 (1.12-2.93) P=0.02) on multivariate analysis. This is the largest detailed series of EBV-associated PTLD after allo-SCT. At clinical presentation, EBV-qPCR values are frequently below customary thresholds for pre-emptive therapy, challenging current paradigms for monitoring and intervention. A four-point score identifies a proportion of patients at risk of rituximab-refractory disease for whom alternative therapy is needed. PMID:24212561

  13. Ibrutinib for B cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Research over the role of Bruton’s agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK) in B-lymphocyte development, differentiation, signaling and survival has led to better understanding of the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies. Down-regulation of BTK activity is an attractive novel strategy for treating patients with B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib (PCI-32765), a potent inhibitor of BTK induces impressive responses in B-cell malignancies through irreversible bond with cysteine-481 in the active site of BTK (TH/SH1 domain) and inhibits BTK phosphorylation on Tyr223. This review discussed in details the role of BTK in B-cell signaling, molecular interactions between B cell lymphoma/leukemia cells and their microenvironment. Clinical trials of the novel BTK inhibitor, ibrutinib (PCI-32765), in B cell malignancies were summarized. PMID:24472371

  14. B Cells, Antibodies, and More

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, William; Lakkis, Fadi G.

    2016-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritides and transplant rejection. B cells secrete antibodies that contribute to tissue injury via multiple mechanisms. In addition, B cells contribute to disease pathogenesis in autoimmunity and alloimmunity by presenting antigens as well as providing costimulation and cytokines to T cells. B cells also play an immunomodulatory role in regulating the immune response by secreting cytokines that inhibit disease onset and/or progression. B cell–targeted approaches for treating immune diseases of the kidney and other organs have gained significant momentum. However, much remains to be understood about B-cell biology in order to determine the timing, duration, and context of optimal therapeutic response to B cell–targeted approaches. In this review, we discuss the multifaceted roles of B cells as enhancers and regulators of immunity with relevance to kidney disease and transplantation. PMID:26700440

  15. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked lymphoproliferative disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the development of specialized T cells called natural killer T cells. The SAP protein also helps control ... PubMed GeneReview: Lymphoproliferative Disease, X-Linked Latour S. Natural killer T cells and X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome. Curr ...

  16. Prevalence of targetable oncogenic mutations and genomic alterations in Epstein-Barr virus-associated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Niklas; Gebauer, Judith; Hardel, Tim Tristan; Bernard, Veronica; Biersack, Harald; Lehnert, Hendrik; Rades, Dirk; Feller, Alfred Christian; Thorns, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the elderly constitutes a provisional clinicopathological entity in the current World Health Organization (WHO) classification and its genomic features remain sparsely characterized. We investigated a cohort of 26 cases of untreated de novo EBV-positive DLBCL of the elderly by high-resolution array-based comparative genomic profiling and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Moreover, we screened for activating mutations affecting nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway signaling and chromatin remodeling (EZH2, CD79B, CARD11 and MYD88) due to their impact of gene expression signatures and postulated upcoming therapeutic targetability. We identified an overlap between genomic aberrations previously described to be exclusive features of plasmablastic lymphoma (PL), post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) and DLBCL, respectively, indicating a close cytogenetic relationship between these entities. Few mutations affecting CD79B and CARD11 and no MYD88 mutations were detectable, hinting at EBV-mediated activation of NF-κB as an alternative to pathologically enforced B-cell receptor signaling in this rare entity. PMID:25030036

  17. Colonic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in a liver transplant patient with historically very low tacrolimus levels.

    PubMed

    Moore, Christopher M; Lamzabi, Ihab; Bartels, Anne K; Jakate, Shriram; Van Thiel, David H

    2012-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) comprise a wide spectrum of hematologic malignancies that are found increasingly in orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) patients given the rising frequency of these surgeries and their long-term success. PTLDs are highly correlated with both the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and the degree of immunosuppression involved. Herein is reported a case of a 53-year-old male with successfully treated hepatitis C virus genotype 4 and hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent OLT and developed symptoms of weakness and poor appetite 4 years later while on tacrolimus 3 mg b.i.d. with historically very low plasma levels. He was found to be anemic and colonoscopy revealed a 4.5 cm cecal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Further workup revealed mesenteric lymph node enlargement consistent and nodal DLBCL dissemination. He was treated with cyclophosphamide-hydroxyldaunorubicin-oncovin-prednisone-rituximab (CHOP-R) chemotherapy and his tacrolimus dose was lowered. Additionally, he manifested PTLD-associated cryoglobulinemia leading to acute kidney injury. After a prolonged hospitalization he was discharged with close followup. PMID:23259146

  18. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome presenting with glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Kanegane, Hirokazu; Vilela, Maria Marluce dos Santos; Wang, Yue; Futatani, Takeshi; Matsukura, Hiroyoshi; Miyawaki, Toshio

    2003-05-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized clinically by chronic non-malignant lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity and is caused by a genetic defect in programmed cell death (apoptosis). Most patients with ALPS have heterozygous mutations in the Fas gene. We describe an 11-year-old Brazilian boy with hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, hemolytic anemia, and hypergammaglobulinemia since early infancy. T cell lines from the patient were defective in Fas-mediated apoptosis. He was diagnosed as having ALPS and found to have a novel Fas gene mutation (IVS4+1G>A). In addition, he presented with glomerulonephritis in infancy. An aunt and uncle who had the same Fas mutations also had histories of glomerulonephritis. Although glomerulonephritis is common in Fas-deficient mice, it is infrequent in human ALPS. Corticosteroid therapy ameliorated the glomerulonephritis in our patient, as well as his lymphoproliferation, anemia, and hypergammaglobulinemia. This study suggests that glomerulonephritis is one of the characteristic features of ALPS. PMID:12736807

  19. Analysis of the cells involved in the lymphoproliferative response to Coxiella burnetii antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Izzo, A A; Marmion, B P; Hackstadt, T

    1991-01-01

    Vaccination with an inactivated, whole cell, Q fever vaccine (Q-vax) induces lasting antibody conversion and a positive delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin reaction in about 60% of recipients but a long-lasting positive lymphoproliferative or mitogenic response to C. burnetii antigens with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in 85-95% of subjects. Analysis of the lymphoproliferative response to C. burnetii antigens has now been made by fractionation-reconstitution experiments with PBMC from vaccines, from past infections, and from healthy controls. The major contributor to the response in immune subjects proved to be the T lymphocyte. T cells were stimulated by both the phase I and phase II antigens of two prototype strains of C. burnetii and responses were greatly amplified by addition of IL-2. Similar T lymphocyte stimulation profiles were obtained with the 'Priscilla' strain of C. burnetii which represents a different biotype of Coxiella isolated from Q fever endocarditis; Q-vax is therefore likely to protect against endocarditis strains. Fractionation-reconstitution experiments with T and B cells from vaccines and subjects infected in the past, using various antigenic or haptenic fractions from C. burnetii indicate that protein, non-lipopolysaccharide components of the organism are responsible for the mitogenic response of immune T cells. However, the role of the lipopolysaccharide in the protective immunogen has still to be defined. PMID:2070564

  20. Simultaneous detection of the two main proliferation driving EBV encoded proteins, EBNA-2 and LMP-1 in single B cells.

    PubMed

    Rasul, Abu E; Nagy, Noémi; Sohlberg, Ebba; Ádori, Mónika; Claesson, Hans-Erik; Klein, George; Klein, Eva

    2012-11-30

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is carried by almost all adults, mostly without clinical manifestations. Latent virus infection of B lymphocytes induces activation and proliferation that can be demonstrated in vitro. In healthy individuals, generation of EBV induced malignant proliferation is avoided by continuous immunological surveillance. The proliferation inducing set of the virally encoded genes is expressed exclusively in B cells in a defined differentiation window. It comprises nine EBV encoded nuclear proteins, EBNA 1-6, and three cell membrane associated proteins, LMP-1, 2A and 2B, designated as latency Type III. Outside this window the expression of the viral genes is limited. Healthy carriers harbor a low number of B lymphocytes in which the viral genome is either silent or expresses one virally encoded protein, EBNA-1, latency Type I. In addition, EBV genome carrying B cells can lack either EBNA-2 or LMP-1, latency Type IIa or Type IIb respectively. These cells have no inherent proliferation capacity. Detection of both EBNA-2 and LMP-1 can identify B cells with growth potential. We devised therefore a method for their simultaneous detection in cytospin deposited cell populations. Simultaneous detection of EBNA-2 and LMP-1 was reported earlier in tissues derived from infectious mononucleosis (IM), postransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) and from "humanized" mice infected with EBV. We show for the first time the occurrence of Type IIa and Type IIb cells in cord blood lymphocyte populations infected with EBV in vitro. Further, we confirm the variation of EBNA-2 and LMP-1 expression in several Type III lines and that they vary independently in individual cells. We visualize that in Type III LCL, induced for plasmacytoid differentiation by IL-21 treatment, EBV protein expression changes to Type IIa (EBNA-2 negative LMP-1 positive). We also show that when the proliferation of EBV infected cord blood lymphocyte culture is inhibited by the

  1. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Disappearing HDL Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Swetha; Joshi, Avni Y.; Rodriguez, Vilmarie

    2016-01-01

    The term disappearing HDL syndrome refers to development of severe high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) deficiency in noncritically ill patients with previously normal HDL-C and triglyceride levels. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of the immune system due to an inability to regulate lymphocyte homeostasis resulting in lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. We describe a 17-year-old boy who was evaluated in the lipid clinic for history of undetectable or low HDL-C and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Past medical history was significant for ALPS IA diagnosed at 10 years of age when he presented with bilateral cervical adenopathy. He was known to have a missense mutation in one allele of the FAS protein extracellular domain consistent with ALPS type 1A. HDL-C and LDL-C levels had been undetectable on multiple occasions, though lipids had not been measured prior to the diagnosis of ALPS. He had been receiving sirolimus for immunosuppression. The HDL-C and LDL-C levels correlated with disease activity and improved to normal levels during times when the activity of ALPS was controlled. This case highlights the importance of considering ALPS as a cause of low HDL-C and LDL-C levels in a child with evidence of lymphoproliferation.

  2. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Disappearing HDL Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Swetha; Joshi, Avni Y; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Kumar, Seema

    2016-01-01

    The term disappearing HDL syndrome refers to development of severe high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) deficiency in noncritically ill patients with previously normal HDL-C and triglyceride levels. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of the immune system due to an inability to regulate lymphocyte homeostasis resulting in lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. We describe a 17-year-old boy who was evaluated in the lipid clinic for history of undetectable or low HDL-C and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Past medical history was significant for ALPS IA diagnosed at 10 years of age when he presented with bilateral cervical adenopathy. He was known to have a missense mutation in one allele of the FAS protein extracellular domain consistent with ALPS type 1A. HDL-C and LDL-C levels had been undetectable on multiple occasions, though lipids had not been measured prior to the diagnosis of ALPS. He had been receiving sirolimus for immunosuppression. The HDL-C and LDL-C levels correlated with disease activity and improved to normal levels during times when the activity of ALPS was controlled. This case highlights the importance of considering ALPS as a cause of low HDL-C and LDL-C levels in a child with evidence of lymphoproliferation. PMID:27579193

  3. X-linked lymphoproliferative syndromes: brothers or distant cousins?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kejian; Snow, Andrew L.; Marsh, Rebecca A.

    2010-01-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP1), described in the mid-1970s and molecularly defined in 1998, and XLP2, reported in 2006, are prematurely lethal genetic immunodeficiencies that share susceptibility to overwhelming inflammatory responses to certain infectious triggers. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP; encoded by SH2D1A) is mutated in XLP1, and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP; encoded by BIRC4) is mutated in XLP2. XLP1 is a disease with multiple and variable clinical consequences, including fatal hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) triggered predominantly by Epstein-Barr virus, lymphomas, antibody deficiency, and rarer consequences of immune dysregulation. To date, XLP2 has been found to cause HLH with and without exposure to Epstein-Barr virus, and HLH is commonly recurrent in these patients. For both forms of XLP, the only curative therapy at present is allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Beyond their common X-linked locus and their requirement for normal immune responses to certain viral infections, SAP and XIAP demonstrate no obvious structural or functional similarity, are not coordinately regulated with respect to their expression, and do not appear to directly interact. In this review, we describe the genetic, clinical, and immunopathologic features of these 2 disorders and discuss current diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:20660790

  4. Lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild turkeys in southeast United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously, retroviral neoplasms reported in wild upland game birds in the United States of America have typically been associated with reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) infection. The information presented herein described the first reports of lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) infection in ...

  5. Does celiac disease influence survival in lymphoproliferative malignancy?

    PubMed Central

    Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Murray, Joseph A.; Green, Peter HR; Ekbom, Anders; Granath, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is associated with both lymphoproliferative malignancy (LPM) and increased death from LPM. Research suggests that co-existing autoimmune disease may influence survival in LPM. Through Cox regression we examined overall and cause-specific mortality in 316 individuals with CD+LPM vs. 689 individuals with LPM only. CD was defined as having villous atrophy according to biopsy reports at any of Sweden’s 28 pathology departments, and LPM as having a relevant disease code in the Swedish Cancer Register. During follow-up, there were 551 deaths (CD: n=200; non-CD: n=351). Individuals with CD+LPM were at an increased risk of death compared with LPM-only individuals (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR)=1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.02–1.48). However, this excess risk was only seen in the first year after LPM diagnosis (aHR=1.76), with HRs decreasing to 1.09 in years 2–5 after LPM diagnosis and to 0.90 thereafter. Individuals with CD and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) were at a higher risk of any death as compared with NHL-only individuals (aHR=1.23; 95%CI=0.97–1.56). This excess risk was due to a higher proportion of T-cell lymphoma in CD patients. Stratifying for T- and B-cell status, the HR for death in individuals with CD+NHL was 0.77 (95%CI=0.46–1.31 In conclusion, we found no evidence that co-existing CD influences survival in individuals with LPM. The increased mortality in the first year after LPM diagnosis is related to the predominance of T-NHL in CD individuals. Individuals with CD+LPM should be informed that their prognosis is similar to that of individuals with LPM only. However, this study had low statistical power to rule our excess mortality in patients with CD and certain LPM subtypes. PMID:23463575

  6. Evolution of B Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2013-01-01

    Two types of adaptive immune strategies are known to have evolved in vertebrates: the VLR-based system, which is present in jawless organisms and is mediated by VLRA and VLRB lymphocytes, and the BCR/TCR-based system, which is present in jawed species and is provided by B and T cell receptors expressed on B and T cells, respectively. Here we summarize features of B cells and their predecessors in the different animal phyla, focusing the review on B cells from jawed vertebrates. We point out the critical role of nonclassical species and comparative immunology studies in the understanding of B cell immunity. Because nonclassical models include species relevant to veterinary medicine, basic science research performed in these animals contributes to the knowledge required for the development of more efficacious vaccines against emerging pathogens. PMID:25340015

  7. High-flux hemodialysis after administering high-dose methotrexate in a patient with posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease and impaired renal function

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnik, Alexander; Scheurig-Muenkler, Christian; van der Giet, Markus; Tölle, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A young patient develops cerebral posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Despite concurrent significantly impaired transplant kidney function use of add-on high-flux hemodialysis for additional clearance made the administration of high-dose methotrexate feasible in this patient without occurence of acute chronic kidney failure and significant hematological toxicity. PMID:26576275

  8. Targeting neoplastic B cells and harnessing microenvironment: the "double face" of ibrutinib and idelalisib.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Rossana; Fiorcari, Stefania; Martinelli, Silvia; Potenza, Leonardo; Luppi, Mario; Marasca, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) targeting signaling molecules downstream B cell receptor (BCR) are powerfully spreading in the therapeutic landscape of B cell lymphoproliferative disease, due to a manageable toxicity profile and encouraging clinical effectiveness. In particular, ibrutinib, previously called PCI-32765, is a potent inhibitor of Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk), recently approved for the treatment of relapsed mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Moreover, idelalisib (formerly GS-1101 and CAL-101) is a selective reversible inhibitor of the p110δ isoform of phosphoinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) approved for the treatment of patients with relapsed follicular lymphoma (FL) and CLL. These agents directly affect the neoplastic clone, disrupting the supportive platform provided by BCR signaling cascade and by other microenvironmental mutualistic interactions, and also interfering with chemokine gradients and adhesive properties of neoplastic B cells. In the present review, we describe the clinical efficacy of ibrutinib and idelalisib in CLL and B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL), then focusing on the mode of action (MOA) of these TKIs towards the neoplastic B cell compartment. At last, the review would further expand the view on potential additional targets of ibrutinib and idelalisib belonging to other microenvironmental cellular elements. PMID:26022368

  9. Identification of lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viral-associated lymphoproliferative neoplasia in domestic poultry is caused by infection with a herpesvirus (Marek’s disease virus) or three species of retroviruses [Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), Avian leukosis/sarcoma virus, lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV)]. Previously, retroviral n...

  10. Inactivating mutations in an SH2 domain-encoding gene in X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Kim E.; Harkin, D. Paul; Levitz, Seth; Krainer, Michael; Kolquist, Kathryn Ann; Genovese, Cameo; Bernard, Amy; Ferguson, Martin; Zuo, Lin; Snyder, Eric; Buckler, Alan J.; Wise, Carol; Ashley, Jennifer; Lovett, Michael; Valentine, Marcus B.; Look, A. Thomas; Gerald, William; Housman, David E.; Haber, Daniel A.

    1998-01-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP) is an inherited immunodeficiency characterized by increased susceptibility to Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). In affected males, primary EBV infection leads to the uncontrolled proliferation of virus-containing B cells and reactive cytotoxic T cells, often culminating in the development of high-grade lymphoma. The XLP gene has been mapped to chromosome band Xq25 through linkage analysis and the discovery of patients harboring large constitutional genomic deletions. We describe here the presence of small deletions and intragenic mutations that specifically disrupt a gene named DSHP in 6 of 10 unrelated patients with XLP. This gene encodes a predicted protein of 128 amino acids composing a single SH2 domain with extensive homology to the SH2 domain of SHIP, an inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase that functions as a negative regulator of lymphocyte activation. DSHP is expressed in transformed T cell lines and is induced following in vitro activation of peripheral blood T lymphocytes. Expression of DSHP is restricted in vivo to lymphoid tissues, and RNA in situ hybridization demonstrates DSHP expression in activated T and B cell regions of reactive lymph nodes and in both T and B cell neoplasms. These observations confirm the identity of DSHP as the gene responsible for XLP, and suggest a role in the regulation of lymphocyte activation and proliferation. Induction of DSHP may sustain the immune response by interfering with SHIP-mediated inhibition of lymphocyte activation, while its inactivation in XLP patients results in a selective immunodeficiency to EBV. PMID:9811875

  11. Monoclonal B-Cell Lymphocytosis

    PubMed Central

    D’Arena, G.; Musto, P.

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) is an asymptomatic hematologic condition defined by the presence of a small (<5 x 109/L) clonal B-cell population in the peripheral blood in the absence of lymph-node enlargement, cytopenias or autoimmune diseases. It is found in approximately 3-12% of normal persons depending on the accuracy of analytical techniques applied. According to the immunophenotypic profile of clonal B-cells, the majority of MBL cases (75%) are classified as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)-like. This form may progress into CLL at a rate of 1–2% per year. It is thought that CLL is always preceded by MBL. The remaining MBL cases are defined as atypical CLL-like (CD5+/CD20bright) and CD5- MBL. The MBL clone size is quite heterogenous. Accordingly, two forms of MBL are identified: i) high-count, or ‘clinical’ MBL, in which an evidence of lymphocytosis (<5 x 109/L clonal B-cells) is seen, and ii) a low-count MBL, in which a normal leukocyte count is found and that is identified only in population-screening studies. Both forms of MBL may carry the cytogenetic abnormalities that are the hallmark of CLL, including 13q-, 17p- and trisomy 12. Consistent with the indolent phenotype of this condition, genetic lesions, such as TP53, ATM, NOTCH1 and SF3B1 mutations, usually associated with high-risk CLL, are rarely seen. Overall, no prognostic indicator of evolution of MBL to overt CLL has been found at present time. However, taking into account this possibility, a clinical and lab monitoring (at least annually), is recommended. PMID:24779000

  12. Intravenous immunoglobulin replacement therapy in common variable immunodeficiency induces B cell depletion through differentiation into apoptosis-prone CD21(low) B cells.

    PubMed

    Mitrevski, Milica; Marrapodi, Ramona; Camponeschi, Alessandro; Lazzeri, Cristina; Todi, Laura; Quinti, Isabella; Fiorilli, Massimo; Visentini, Marcella

    2014-12-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), besides its use as replacement therapy in patients with antibody deficiencies, is broadly used as an immunomodulatory agent for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. The mechanisms of action of IVIG include Fc receptor blockade, inhibition of cytokines and growth factors, modulation of macrophages and dendritic cells, enhancement of regulatory T cells, and modulation of B cells through the FcγRIIB receptor and CD22. Recent studies suggest that in vitro exposure of human B cells to IVIG determines functional changes reminiscent of anergy and that IVIG treatment of patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) induces in B cells ERK activation, a feature of anergy. Here, we show that IVIG therapy drives the B cells of patients with CVID to down-regulate CD21 expression and to assume the peculiar phenotype of the anergic-like, apoptosis-prone CD21(low) B cells that are spontaneously expanded in a subset of CVID and in some other immunological disorders. The CD21(low) B cells newly generated after IVIG infusion undergo spontaneous apoptosis upon in vitro culture. Furthermore, IVIG infusion is rapidly followed by a significant, although discrete, decrease in the number of circulating B cells, but not of T cells or of natural killer cells. These findings suggest that IVIG therapy may constrain antibody responses by inducing B cell depletion through differentiation into CD21(low) B cells that undergo accelerated apoptosis. PMID:25407649

  13. The B-cell receptor orchestrates environment-mediated lymphoma survival and drug resistance in B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shain, K H; Tao, J

    2014-08-01

    Specific niches within the lymphoma tumor microenvironment (TME) provide sanctuary for subpopulations of tumor cells through stromal cell-tumor cell interactions. These interactions notably dictate growth, response to therapy and resistance of residual malignant B cells to therapeutic agents. This minimal residual disease (MRD) remains a major challenge in the treatment of B-cell malignancies and contributes to subsequent disease relapse. B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling has emerged as essential mediator of B-cell homing, survival and environment-mediated drug resistance (EMDR). Central to EMDR are chemokine- and integrin-mediated interactions between lymphoma and the TME. Further, stromal cell-B cell adhesion confers a sustained BCR signaling leading to chemokine and integrin activation. Recently, the inhibitors of BCR signaling have garnered a substantial clinical interest because of their effectiveness in B-cell disorders. The efficacy of these agents is, at least in part, attributed to attenuation of BCR-dependent lymphoma-TME interactions. In this review, we discuss the pivotal role of BCR signaling in the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of TME-mediated lymphoma survival and drug resistance. PMID:24037527

  14. HIV-associated memory B cell perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiliang; Luo, Zhenwu; Wan, Zhuang; Wu, Hao; Li, Wei; Zhang, Tong; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Memory B-cell depletion, hyperimmunoglobulinemia, and impaired vaccine responses are the hallmark of B cell perturbations inhuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. Although B cells are not the targets for HIV infection, there is evidence for B cell, especially memory B cell dysfunction in HIV disease mediated by other cells or HIV itself. This review will focus on HIV-associated phenotypic and functional alterations in memory B cells. Additionally, we will discuss the mechanism underlying these perturbations and the effect of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) on these perturbations. PMID:25887082

  15. Primary bone marrow diffuse large B-cell lymphoma accompanying cold agglutinin disease: A case report with review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    YAMASHITA, TOMOKO; ISHIDA, MITSUAKI; MORO, HIROKO; YUMOTO, HIROFUMI; UCHIBAYASHI, SACHIKO; YOSHII, MIYUKI; NAKANISHI, RYOTA; OKUNO, HIROKO; YOSHIDA, TAKASHI; OKUNO, TAKAFUMI; HODOHARA, KEIKO; OKABE, HIDETOSHI

    2014-01-01

    Cold agglutinin disease (CAD) is a well-recognized complication of lymphoproliferative disorders. It has been previously recognized that cases of primary CAD frequently exhibit underlying malignant lymphoma in the bone marrow. Lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma is the most common subtype of malignant lymphoma; however, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has also been documented, albeit extremely rare. The current report presents a case of primary bone marrow DLBCL accompanying CAD. A 76-year-old male presented with fever and fatigue. Laboratory tests revealed anemia and elevated bilirubin and cold agglutinins with a titer of 8,192 at 4°C. Bone marrow biopsy demonstrated DLBCL and systemic surveillance failed to detect tumorous lesions or lymphadenopathy. Following R-THP-COP therapy, cold agglutinins titer was markedly decreased (by <4); however, malignant lymphoma relapsed and cold agglutinin levels increased again (4,096). This is the second documented case of primary bone marrow DLBCL accompanying CAD. Previously, malignant lymphoma exclusively involving the bone marrow, namely primary bone marrow lymphoma (PBML), has been recognized as a rare and aggressive subtype. The analyses of the present study revealed that the incidence of hemolytic anemia in primary bone marrow DLBCL may be high compared with conventional DLBCL. Therefore, additional analyses are required to clarify the clinicopathological features of PBML. PMID:24348825

  16. Primary bone marrow diffuse large B-cell lymphoma accompanying cold agglutinin disease: A case report with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Tomoko; Ishida, Mitsuaki; Moro, Hiroko; Yumoto, Hirofumi; Uchibayashi, Sachiko; Yoshii, Miyuki; Nakanishi, Ryota; Okuno, Hiroko; Yoshida, Takashi; Okuno, Takafumi; Hodohara, Keiko; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Cold agglutinin disease (CAD) is a well-recognized complication of lymphoproliferative disorders. It has been previously recognized that cases of primary CAD frequently exhibit underlying malignant lymphoma in the bone marrow. Lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma is the most common subtype of malignant lymphoma; however, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has also been documented, albeit extremely rare. The current report presents a case of primary bone marrow DLBCL accompanying CAD. A 76-year-old male presented with fever and fatigue. Laboratory tests revealed anemia and elevated bilirubin and cold agglutinins with a titer of 8,192 at 4°C. Bone marrow biopsy demonstrated DLBCL and systemic surveillance failed to detect tumorous lesions or lymphadenopathy. Following R-THP-COP therapy, cold agglutinins titer was markedly decreased (by <4); however, malignant lymphoma relapsed and cold agglutinin levels increased again (4,096). This is the second documented case of primary bone marrow DLBCL accompanying CAD. Previously, malignant lymphoma exclusively involving the bone marrow, namely primary bone marrow lymphoma (PBML), has been recognized as a rare and aggressive subtype. The analyses of the present study revealed that the incidence of hemolytic anemia in primary bone marrow DLBCL may be high compared with conventional DLBCL. Therefore, additional analyses are required to clarify the clinicopathological features of PBML. PMID:24348825

  17. JAK2 V617F detected in two B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients without coexisting Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    YANG, YI-NING; QIN, YOU-WEN; WANG, CHUN

    2014-01-01

    The JAK2 V617F mutation has been observed in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-MPNs), including polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and idiopathic myelofibrosis. This mutation has also been observed in a small number of other myeloid malignancies, such as acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. The JAK2 V617F allele has rarely been evaluated in lymphoproliferative disorders. In total, 28 JAK2 V617F-positive B-cell lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients have previously been reported and all presented with Ph-MPN concomitantly. However, following investigation of the JAK2 V617F mutation in 63 B-CLL patients at the Shanghai First People’s Hospital (Shanghai, China) between January 2008 and December 2012 via allele-specific polymerase chain reaction, two B-CLL patients without a history of Ph-MPN were identified to carry the JAK2 V617F allele. PMID:25013507

  18. Bendamustine: new perspective for an old drug in lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Montillo, Marco; Ricci, Francesca; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Vismara, Eleonora; Morra, Enrica

    2010-04-01

    Bendamustine is an old bifunctional alkylating agent that also has potential antimetabolite properties, and only partial cross-resistance with other alkylators. Although it was synthesized in 1963 only few validated study results exist from this early period. More recently, its peculiar mechanism of action has reawakened interest in this drug that has been extensively studied in indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Experience has also been reported in high-grade NHL and Hodgkin disease. Based on its unique structure, various strategies can be used for mechanism-based combination chemotherapeutic regimens with bendamustine. Moreover, data indicates that bendamustine when combined with rituximab is a valid therapeutic choice for patients with CLL or low-grade NHL demonstrating refractoriness to standard chemotherapy regimens. Furthermore, its documented favorable toxicity profile makes it a particularly useful treatment option for elderly patients. PMID:21083456

  19. Constitutive JAK3 activation induces lymphoproliferative syndromes in murine bone marrow transplantation models

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Melanie G.; Kharas, Michael G.; Werneck, Miriam B.; Bras, Séverine Le; Moore, Sandra A.; Ball, Brian; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Rodig, Scott J.; Aster, Jon C.; Lee, Benjamin H.; Cantor, Harvey; Merlio, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase JAK3 plays a well-established role during normal lymphocyte development and is constitutively phosphorylated in several lymphoid malignancies. However, its contribution to lymphomagenesis remains elusive. In this study, we used the newly identified activating JAK3A572V mutation to elucidate the effect of constitutive JAK3 signaling on murine lymphopoiesis. In a bone marrow transplantation model, JAK3A572V induces an aggressive, fatal, and transplantable lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by the expansion of CD8+TCRαβ+CD44+CD122+Ly-6C+ T cellsthat closely resemble an effector/memory T-cell subtype. Compared with wild-type counterparts, these cells show increased proliferative capacities in response to polyclonal stimulation, enhanced survival rates with elevated expression of Bcl-2, and increased production of interferon-γ (IFNγ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), correlating with enhanced cytotoxic abilities against allogeneic target cells. Of interest, the JAK3A572V disease is epidermotropic and produces intraepidermal microabscesses. Taken together, these clinical features are reminiscent of those observed in an uncommon but aggressive subset of CD8+ human cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs). However, we also observed a CD4+ CTCL-like phenotype when cells are transplanted in an MHC-I–deficient background. These data demonstrate that constitutive JAK3 activation disrupts T-cell homeostasis and induces lymphoproliferative diseases in mice. PMID:19139084

  20. B-cell-specific conditional expression of Myd88p.L252P leads to the development of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in mice.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Gero; Liedgens, Paul; Korovkina, Darya; Seeger, Jens M; Al-Baldawi, Yussor; Al-Maarri, Mona; Fritz, Christian; Vlantis, Katerina; Bezhanova, Svetlana; Scheel, Andreas H; Wolz, Olaf-Oliver; Reimann, Maurice; Möller, Peter; López, Cristina; Schlesner, Matthias; Lohneis, Philipp; Weber, Alexander N R; Trümper, Lorenz; Staudt, Louis M; Ortmann, Monika; Pasparakis, Manolis; Siebert, Reiner; Schmitt, Clemens A; Klatt, Andreas R; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Schäfer, Stephan C; Persigehl, Thorsten; Montesinos-Rongen, Manuel; Odenthal, Margarete; Büttner, Reinhard; Frenzel, Lukas P; Kashkar, Hamid; Reinhardt, H Christian

    2016-06-01

    The adaptor protein MYD88 is critical for relaying activation of Toll-like receptor signaling to NF-κB activation. MYD88 mutations, particularly the p.L265P mutation, have been described in numerous distinct B-cell malignancies, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Twenty-nine percent of activated B-cell-type DLBCL (ABC-DLBCL), which is characterized by constitutive activation of the NF-κB pathway, carry the p.L265P mutation. In addition, ABC-DLBCL frequently displays focal copy number gains affecting BCL2 Here, we generated a novel mouse model in which Cre-mediated recombination, specifically in B cells, leads to the conditional expression of Myd88(p.L252P) (the orthologous position of the human MYD88(p.L265P) mutation) from the endogenous locus. These mice develop a lymphoproliferative disease and occasional transformation into clonal lymphomas. The clonal disease displays the morphologic and immunophenotypical characteristics of ABC-DLBCL. Lymphomagenesis can be accelerated by crossing in a further novel allele, which mediates conditional overexpression of BCL2 Cross-validation experiments in human DLBCL samples revealed that both MYD88 and CD79B mutations are substantially enriched in ABC-DLBCL compared with germinal center B-cell DLBCL. Furthermore, analyses of human DLBCL genome sequencing data confirmed that BCL2 amplifications frequently co-occurred with MYD88 mutations, further validating our approach. Finally, in silico experiments revealed that MYD88-mutant ABC-DLBCL cells in particular display an actionable addiction to BCL2. Altogether, we generated a novel autochthonous mouse model of ABC-DLBCL that could be used as a preclinical platform for the development and validation of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of ABC-DLBCL. PMID:27048211

  1. A New Kid on the Block: IL-10+ Regulatory B Cells and a Possible Role In Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Darabi, Kamruz; Jaiswal, Rohit; Hostetler, Sarah G.; Bechtel, Mark A.; Zirwas, Matthew J.; Witman, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    The pivotal role of T cells in the etiology of psoriasis has been elucidated; however, the mechanisms that regulate these T cells are unclear. Recently, it has been shown that an IL-10 producing B cell population may downregulate T cell function and it has been hypothesized that depletion of this B cell population may lead to exacerbation of T-cell mediated autoimmune disease. We present the case of an adolescent male with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) being treated with the anti-CD20 chimeric monoclonal antibody rituximab in addition to intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) for immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) who developed a psoriasiform rash on his hands following mechanical trauma with concomitant severely decreased B cell count. We propose that depletion of the patient's B cells due to rituximab treatment may have led to abrogation of IL-10+ B-cell regulation of T cells. The development of a psoriasiform rash in this predisposed individual may have been triggered by mechanical trauma to his hands (koebnerization). In addition, we believe the patient's rash may have been tempered by concomitant treatment with IVIG, which has been used as treatment in cases of psoriasis. We discuss the immunologic mechanism of psoriasis and the role that a recently described IL-10+ B cell may play in preventing the pathologic process. Further studies are needed to more clearly elucidate this process. PMID:23055903

  2. Diagnostic Utility of a Clonality Test for Lymphoproliferative Diseases in Koreans Using the BIOMED-2 PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young; Choi, Yoo Duk; Choi, Chan

    2013-01-01

    Background A clonality test for immunoglobulin (IG) and T cell receptor (TCR) is a useful adjunctive method for the diagnosis of lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs). Recently, the BIOMED-2 multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay has been established as a standard method for assessing the clonality of LPDs. We tested clonality in LPDs in Koreans using the BIOMED-2 multiplex PCR and compared the results with those obtained in European, Taiwanese, and Thai participants. We also evaluated the usefulness of the test as an ancillary method for diagnosing LPDs. Methods Two hundred and nineteen specimens embedded in paraffin, including 78 B cell lymphomas, 80 T cell lymphomas and 61 cases of reactive lymphadenitis, were used for the clonality test. Results Mature B cell malignancies showed 95.7% clonality for IG, 2.9% co-existing clonality, and 4.3% polyclonality. Mature T cell malignancies exhibited 83.8% clonality for TCR, 8.1% co-existing clonality, and 16.2% polyclonality. Reactive lymphadenitis showed 93.4% polyclonality for IG and TCR. The majority of our results were similar to those obtained in Europeans. However, the clonality for IGK of B cell malignancies and TCRG of T cell malignancies was lower in Koreans than Europeans. Conclusions The BIOMED-2 multiplex PCR assay was a useful adjunctive method for diagnosing LPDs. PMID:24255634

  3. Therapeutic targeting of B cells for rheumatic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Engel, Pablo; Gómez-Puerta, José A; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Lozano, Francisco; Bosch, Xavier

    2011-03-01

    Autoreactive B cells are characterized by their ability to secrete autoantibodies directed against self-peptides. During the last decade, it has become increasingly apparent that B lymphocytes not only produce autoantibodies but also exert important regulatory roles independent of their function as antibody-producing cells. This is especially relevant in the context of autoimmunity, because autoreactive B cells have been shown to possess the ability to activate pathogenic T cells, to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, and to promote the formation of tertiary lymphoid tissue in target organs. The production of monoclonal antibodies against B-cell-surface molecules has facilitated the characterization of several distinct B lymphocyte subsets. These cell-surface molecules have not only served as useful cell differentiation markers but have also helped to unravel the important biological functions of these cells. Some of these molecules, all of which are expressed on the cell surface, have proven to be effective therapeutic targets. In both animal models and in clinical assays, the efficient elimination of B lymphocytes has been shown to be useful in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. The treatment of most rheumatic autoimmune diseases relies mainly on the use of cytotoxic immunosuppressants and corticosteroids. Although this has resulted in improved disease survival, patients may nonetheless suffer severe adverse events and, in some cases, their relapse rate remains high. The increasing need for safer and more effective drugs along with burgeoning new insights into the pathogenesis of these disorders has fueled interest in biological agents; clinical trials involving the B-cell depletion agent rituximab have been especially promising. This article reviews the current knowledge of B-cell biology and pathogenesis as well as the modern therapeutic approaches for rheumatic autoimmune diseases focusing in particular on the targeting of B-cell

  4. Memory B cells in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, B; Grimsholm, O; Thorarinsdottir, K; Ren, W; Jirholt, P; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2013-08-01

    One of the principles behind vaccination, as shown by Edward Jenner in 1796, and host protection is immunological memory, and one of the cells central to this is the antigen-experienced memory B cell that responds rapidly upon re-exposure to the initiating antigen. Classically, memory B cells have been defined as progenies of germinal centre (GC) B cells expressing isotype-switched and substantially mutated B cell receptors (BCRs), that is, membrane-bound antibodies. However, it has become apparent over the last decade that this is not the only pathway to B cell memory. Here, we will discuss memory B cells in mice, as defined by (1) cell surface markers; (2) multiple layers; (3) formation in a T cell-dependent and either GC-dependent or GC-independent manner; (4) formation in a T cell-independent fashion. Lastly, we will touch upon memory B cells in; (5) mouse models of autoimmune diseases. PMID:23679222

  5. Microtubule associated tumor suppressor 1 deficient mice develop spontaneous heart hypertrophy and SLE-like lymphoproliferative disease

    PubMed Central

    ZUERN, CHRISTINA; KRENACS, LASZLO; STARKE, STEPHANIE; HEIMRICH, JUTTA; PALMETSHOFER, ALOIS; HOLTMANN, BETTINA; SENDTNER, MICHAEL; FISCHER, TOBIAS; GALLE, JAN; WANNER, CHRISTOPH; SEIBOLD, STEFAN

    2012-01-01

    The microtubule associated tumor suppressor gene 1 (MTUS1) is a recently published tumor suppressor gene, which has also been shown to act as an early component in the growth inhibitory signaling cascade of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R). In this study we report the generation of MTUS1 knock-out (KO) mice, which develop normally but reveal higher body weights and slightly decreased blood pressure levels. Twenty-eight percent of the studied MTUS1 KO mice also developed heart hypertrophy and 12% developed nephritis, independent of blood pressure levels. Forty-three percent of the MTUS1 KO mice revealed lymphoid hyperplasia affecting spleen (20%), kidney (37%), lung (23%), lymph nodes (17%), and liver (17%) accompanied with leukocytosis, lymphocytosis, and mild anemia. One animal (3%) developed a marginal zone B-cell lymphoma affecting submandibular salivary gland and regional lymph nodes. The symptoms of all mentioned animals are consistent with a B-cell lymphoproliferative disease with features of systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition, body weight of the MTUS1 KO mice was significantly increased and isolated skin fibroblasts showed increased cell proliferation and decreased cell size, compared to wild-type (WT) fibroblasts in response to depleted FCS concentration and lack of growth factors. In conclusion we herein report the first generation of a MTUS1 KO mouse, developing spontaneous heart hypertrophy and increased cell proliferation, confirming once more the anti-proliferative effect of MTUS1, and a SLE-like lymphoproliferative disease suggesting crucial role in regulation of inflammation. These MTUS1 KO mice can therefore serve as a model for further investigations in cardiovascular disease, autoimmune disease and carcinogenesis. PMID:22200760

  6. Microbes and B cell development.

    PubMed

    Wesemann, Duane R

    2015-01-01

    Animals and many of their chronic microbial inhabitants form relationships of symbiotic mutualism, which occurs when coexisting life-forms derive mutual benefit from stable associations. While microorganisms receive a secure habitat and constant food source from vertebrate hosts, they are required for optimal immune system development and occupy niches otherwise abused by pathogens. Microbes have also been shown to provide vertebrate hosts with metabolic capabilities that enhance energy and nutrient uptake from the diet. The immune system plays a central role in the establishment and maintenance of host-microbe homeostasis, and B lineage cells play a key role in this regulation. Here, I reviewed the structure and function of the microbiota and the known mechanisms of how nonpathogenic microbes influence B cell biology and immunoglobulin repertoire development early in life. I also discuss what is known about how B lineage cells contribute to the process of shaping the composition of commensal/mutualistic microbe membership. PMID:25591467

  7. NFκB1 is essential to prevent the development of multiorgan autoimmunity by limiting IL-6 production in follicular B cells.

    PubMed

    de Valle, Elisha; Grigoriadis, George; O'Reilly, Lorraine A; Willis, Simon N; Maxwell, Mhairi J; Corcoran, Lynn M; Tsantikos, Evelyn; Cornish, Jasper K S; Fairfax, Kirsten A; Vasanthakumar, Ajithkumar; Febbraio, Mark A; Hibbs, Margaret L; Pellegrini, Marc; Banerjee, Ashish; Hodgkin, Philip D; Kallies, Axel; Mackay, Fabienne; Strasser, Andreas; Gerondakis, Steve; Gugasyan, Raffi

    2016-04-01

    We examined the role of NFκB1 in the homeostasis and function of peripheral follicular (Fo) B cells. Aging mice lacking NFκB1 (Nfκb1(-/-)) develop lymphoproliferative and multiorgan autoimmune disease attributed in large part to the deregulated activity of Nfκb1(-/-)Fo B cells that produce excessive levels of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6). Despite enhanced germinal center (GC) B cell differentiation, the formation of GC structures was severely disrupted in the Nfκb1(-/-)mice. Bone marrow chimeric mice revealed that the Fo B cell-intrinsic loss of NFκB1 led to the spontaneous generation of GC B cells. This was primarily the result of an increase in IL-6 levels, which promotes the differentiation of Fo helper CD4(+)T cells and acts in an autocrine manner to reduce antigen receptor and toll-like receptor activation thresholds in a population of proliferating IgM(+)Nfκb1(-/-)Fo B cells. We demonstrate that p50-NFκB1 represses Il-6 transcription in Fo B cells, with the loss of NFκB1 also resulting in the uncontrolled RELA-driven transcription of Il-6.Collectively, our findings identify a previously unrecognized role for NFκB1 in preventing multiorgan autoimmunity through its negative regulation of Il-6 gene expression in Fo B cells. PMID:27022143

  8. Natural history of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome associated with FAS gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Price, Susan; Shaw, Pamela A; Seitz, Amy; Joshi, Gyan; Davis, Joie; Niemela, Julie E; Perkins, Katie; Hornung, Ronald L; Folio, Les; Rosenberg, Philip S; Puck, Jennifer M; Hsu, Amy P; Lo, Bernice; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S; Fleisher, Thomas A; Rao, V Koneti; Lenardo, Michael J

    2014-03-27

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) presents in childhood with nonmalignant lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly associated with a characteristic expansion of mature CD4 and CD8 negative or double negative T-cell receptor αβ(+) T lymphocytes. Patients often present with chronic multilineage cytopenias due to autoimmune peripheral destruction and/or splenic sequestration of blood cells and have an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. Deleterious heterozygous mutations in the FAS gene are the most common cause of this condition, which is termed ALPS-FAS. We report the natural history and pathophysiology of 150 ALPS-FAS patients and 63 healthy mutation-positive relatives evaluated in our institution over the last 2 decades. Our principal findings are that FAS mutations have a clinical penetrance of <60%, elevated serum vitamin B12 is a reliable and accurate biomarker of ALPS-FAS, and the major causes of morbidity and mortality in these patients are the overwhelming postsplenectomy sepsis and development of lymphoma. With longer follow-up, we observed a significantly greater relative risk of lymphoma than previously reported. Avoiding splenectomy while controlling hypersplenism by using corticosteroid-sparing treatments improves the outcome in ALPS-FAS patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00001350. PMID:24398331

  9. Natural history of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome associated with FAS gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Price, Susan; Shaw, Pamela A.; Seitz, Amy; Joshi, Gyan; Davis, Joie; Niemela, Julie E.; Perkins, Katie; Hornung, Ronald L.; Folio, Les; Rosenberg, Philip S.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Hsu, Amy P.; Lo, Bernice; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Lenardo, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) presents in childhood with nonmalignant lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly associated with a characteristic expansion of mature CD4 and CD8 negative or double negative T-cell receptor αβ+ T lymphocytes. Patients often present with chronic multilineage cytopenias due to autoimmune peripheral destruction and/or splenic sequestration of blood cells and have an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. Deleterious heterozygous mutations in the FAS gene are the most common cause of this condition, which is termed ALPS-FAS. We report the natural history and pathophysiology of 150 ALPS-FAS patients and 63 healthy mutation-positive relatives evaluated in our institution over the last 2 decades. Our principal findings are that FAS mutations have a clinical penetrance of <60%, elevated serum vitamin B12 is a reliable and accurate biomarker of ALPS-FAS, and the major causes of morbidity and mortality in these patients are the overwhelming postsplenectomy sepsis and development of lymphoma. With longer follow-up, we observed a significantly greater relative risk of lymphoma than previously reported. Avoiding splenectomy while controlling hypersplenism by using corticosteroid-sparing treatments improves the outcome in ALPS-FAS patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00001350. PMID:24398331

  10. Expression of HSV-1 Receptors in EBV-Associated Lymphoproliferative Disease Determines Susceptibility to Oncolytic HSV

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pin-Yi; Currier, Mark A; Hansford, Loen; Kaplan, David; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Uchida, Hiroaki; Goins, William F.; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Mo, Xiaokui; Cripe, Timothy P

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) after hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation remains a life-threatening complication. Expression of the virus-encoded gene product, EBER, has been shown to prevent apoptosis via blockade of PKR activation. Because PKR is a major cellular defense against Herpes simplex virus, and oncolytic HSV-1 (oHSV) mutants have shown promising anti-tumor efficacy in preclinical models, we sought to determine whether EBV-LPD cells are susceptible to infection by oHSVs. We tested three primary EBV-infected lymphocyte cell cultures from neuroblastoma (NB) patients as models of naturally acquired EBV-LPD. NB12 was most susceptible, NB122R was intermediate, and NB88R2 was essentially resistant. Despite EBER expression, PKR was activated by oHSV infection. Susceptibility to oHSV correlated with the expression of the HSV receptor, nectin-1. The resistance of NB88R2 was reversed by exogenous nectin-1 expression, whereas down-regulation of nectin-1 on NB12 decreased viral entry. Xenografts derived from the EBV-LPDs exhibited only mild (NB12) or no (NB88R2) response to oHSV injection, compared with a neuroblastoma cell line that showed a significant response. We conclude that EBV-LPDs are relatively resistant to oHSV virotherapy, in some cases due to low virus receptor expression but also due to intact anti-viral PKR signaling. PMID:23254370

  11. Neurotrophins and B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Hillis, Jennifer; O'Dwyer, Michael; Gorman, Adrienne M

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors act as important proliferative and pro-survival factors in a variety of cell types. Neurotrophins are produced by multiple cell types in both pro- and mature forms, and can act in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. The p75(NTR) and Trk receptors can elicit signalling in response to the presence or absence of their corresponding neurotrophin ligands. This signalling, along with neurotrophin and receptor expression, varies between different cell types. Neurotrophins and their receptors have been shown to be expressed by and elicit signalling in B lymphocytes. In general, most neurotrophins are expressed by activated B-cells and memory B-cells. Likewise, the TrkB95 receptor is seen on activated B-cells, while TrkA and p75(NTR) are expressed by both resting and active B-cells as well as memory B-cells. Nerve growth factor stimulates B-cell proliferation, memory B-cell survival, antibody production and CD40 expression. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is involved in B-cell maturation in the bone marrow through TrkB95. Overall neurotrophins and their receptors have been shown to be involved in B-cell proliferation, development, differentiation, antibody secretion and survival. As well as expression and activity in healthy B-cells, the neurotrophins and their receptors can contribute to B-cell malignancies including acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma and multiple myeloma. They are involved in B-cell malignancy survival and potentially in drug resistance. PMID:26399960

  12. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS). Case report and family history.

    PubMed

    Ries, F; Ferster, A; Rieux-Laucat, F; Biwer, A; Dicato, M

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disease caused by defective lymphocyte apoptosis and is characterized by non-malignant lymphoproliferation, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmune manifestations and increased risk of both Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Most forms of the disease are due to germ line mutations of the FAS gene and manifest during the first years of life with fluctuating lymphadenopathies, hemolysis, immune thrombocytopenia. During the second decade of life disease manifestations improve spontaneously but autoimmune problems still occur and there is an increased risk of lymphoproliferative malignancy. We describe a typical case of ALPS in a now 44 year old man, followed since the age of 2 for disease manifestations that were unclear at the beginning. PMID:20882745

  13. The Conserved Disulfide Bond within Domain II of Epstein-Barr Virus gH Has Divergent Roles in Membrane Fusion with Epithelial Cells and B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Möhl, Britta S.; Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infects target cells via fusion with cellular membranes. For entry into epithelial cells, EBV requires the herpesvirus conserved core fusion machinery, composed of glycoprotein B (gB) and gH/gL. In contrast, for B cell fusion it requires gB and gH/gL with gp42 serving as a cell tropism switch. The available crystal structures for gH/gL allow the targeted analysis of structural determinants of gH to identify functional regions critical for membrane fusion. Domain II of EBV gH contains two disulfide bonds (DBs). The first is unique for EBV and closely related gammaherpesviruses. The second is conserved across the beta- and gammaherpesviruses and is positioned to stabilize a putative syntaxin-like bundle motif. To analyze the role of these DBs in membrane fusion, gH was mutated by amino acid substitution of the DB cysteines. Mutation of the EBV-specific DB resulted in diminished gH/gL cell surface expression that correlated with diminished B cell and epithelial cell fusion. In contrast, mutation of the conserved DB resulted in wild-type-like B cell fusion, whereas epithelial cell fusion was greatly reduced. The gH mutants bound well to gp42 but had diminished binding to epithelial cells. Tyrosine 336, located adjacent to cysteine 335 of the conserved DB, also was found to be important for DB stabilization and gH/gL function. We conclude that the conserved DB has a cell type-specific function, since it is important for the binding of gH to epithelial cells initiating epithelial cell fusion but not for fusion with B cells and gp42 binding. IMPORTANCE EBV predominantly infects epithelial and B cells in humans, which can result in EBV-associated cancers, such as Burkitt and Hodgkin lymphoma, as well as nasopharyngeal carcinoma. EBV is also associated with a variety of lymphoproliferative disorders, typically of B cell origin, observed in immunosuppressed individuals, such as posttransplant or HIV/AIDS patients. The gH/gL complex plays an

  14. Whole blood EBV-DNA predicts outcome in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tisi, Maria Chiara; Cupelli, Elisa; Santangelo, Rosaria; Maiolo, Elena; Alma, Eleonora; Giachelia, Manuela; Martini, Maurizio; Bellesi, Silvia; D'Alò, Francesco; Voso, Maria Teresa; Pompili, Maurizio; Leone, Giuseppe; Larocca, Luigi Maria; Hohaus, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    An association between Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infection and lymphoproliferative diseases has been reported with EBV + diffuse large B cell-lymphoma (DLBCL) of the elderly described as a distinct entity. In a cohort of 218 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, we detected EBV-DNA in 25% of whole blood (WB) samples at diagnosis. Presence and viral load in WB, mononuclear cells or plasma did not predict the presence of EBV in the tumor biopsy. Positive Hepatitis C virus (HCV) serology was associated with a higher frequency of EBV in WB. Patients with EBV-DNA in WB had a significantly shorter progression-free (p = 0.02) and overall survival (p = 0.05) after immunochemotherapy with R-CHOP (Rituximab, Cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicin, Vincristine, Prednisolone). We conclude that detection of EBV in WB is not a surrogate marker for EBV-association in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, however it associates with worse outcome. PMID:26458141

  15. Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) vFLIP oncoprotein induces B cell transdifferentiation and tumorigenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ballon, Gianna; Chen, Kang; Perez, Rocio; Tam, Wayne; Cesarman, Ethel

    2011-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) is specifically associated with Kaposi sarcoma (KS) and 2 B cell lymphoproliferative diseases, namely primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman disease (MCD). KS, PEL, and MCD are largely incurable and poorly understood diseases most common in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we have revealed the role of viral FLICE-inhibitory protein (vFLIP) in the initiation of PEL and MCD by specifically expressing vFLIP at different stages of B cell differentiation in vivo. Mice showed MCD-like abnormalities and immunological defects including lack of germinal centers (GCs), impaired Ig class switching, and affinity maturation. In addition, they showed increased numbers of cells expressing cytoplasmic IgM-λ, a thus far enigmatic feature of the KSHV-infected cells in MCD. B cell–derived tumors arose at high incidence and displayed Ig gene rearrangement with downregulated expression of B cell–associated antigens, which are features of PEL. Interestingly, these tumors exhibited characteristics of transdifferentiation and acquired expression of histiocytic/dendritic cell markers. These results define immunological functions for vFLIP in vivo and reveal what we believe to be a novel viral-mediated tumorigenic mechanism involving B cell reprogramming. Additionally, the robust recapitulation of KSHV-associated diseases in mice provides a model to test inhibitors of vFLIP as potential anticancer agents. PMID:21339646

  16. B-Cell Hematologic Malignancy Vaccination Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-15

    Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Lymphocytosis; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Hematological Malignancies

  17. Production of RANKL by Memory B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meednu, Nida; Zhang, Hengwei; Owen, Teresa; Sun, Wen; Wang, Victor; Cistrone, Christopher; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Xing, Lianping; Anolik, Jennifer H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that often leads to joint damage. The mechanisms of bone damage in RA are complex, involving activation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) by synoviocytes and Th17 cells. This study was undertaken to investigate whether B cells play a direct role in osteoclastogenesis through the production of RANKL, the essential cytokine for OC development. Methods RANKL production by total B cells or sorted B cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood and synovial tissue from healthy donors or anti–cyclic citrullinated peptide–positive patients with RA was examined by flow cytometry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemical analysis. To define direct effects on osteoclastogenesis, B cells were cocultured with CD14+ monocytes, and OCs were enumerated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Results Healthy donor peripheral blood B cells were capable of expressing RANKL upon stimulation, with switched memory B cells (CD27+IgD−) having the highest propensity for RANKL production. Notably, switched memory B cells in the peripheral blood from RA patients expressed significantly more RANKL compared to healthy controls. In RA synovial fluid and tissue, memory B cells were enriched and spontaneously expressed RANKL, with some of these cells visualized adjacent to RANK+ OC precursors. Critically, B cells supported OC differentiation in vitro in a RANKL-dependent manner, and the number of OCs was higher in cultures with RA B cells than in those derived from healthy controls. Conclusion These findings reveal the critical importance of B cells in bone homeostasis and their likely contribution to joint destruction in RA. PMID:26554541

  18. Reduced numbers of switched memory B cells with high terminal differentiation potential in Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carsetti, Rita; Valentini, Diletta; Marcellini, Valentina; Scarsella, Marco; Marasco, Emiliano; Giustini, Ferruccio; Bartuli, Andrea; Villani, Alberto; Ugazio, Alberto G

    2015-01-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have increased susceptibility to infections and a high frequency of leukemia and autoimmune disorders, suggesting that immunodeficiency and immune dysfunction are integral parts of the syndrome. A reduction in B-cell numbers has been reported, associated with moderate immunodeficiency and normal immunoglobulin levels. Here, we compared B-cell populations of 19 children with DS with those in healthy age-matched controls. We found that all steps of peripheral B-cell development are altered in DS, with a more severe defect during the later stages of B-cell development. Transitional and mature-naïve B-cell numbers are reduced by 50% whereas switched memory B cells represent 10–15% of the numbers in age-matched controls. Serum IgM levels were slightly reduced, but all other immunoglobulin isotypes were in the normal range. The frequency of switched memory B cells specific for vaccine antigens was significantly lower in affected children than in their equivalently vaccinated siblings. In vitro switched memory B cells of patients with DS have an increased ability to differentiate into antibody-forming cells in response to TLR9 signals. Tailored vaccination schedules increasing the number of switched memory B cells may improve protection and reduce the risk of death from infection in DS. PMID:25472482

  19. Novel functional activities of anti-DNA autoantibodies from sera of patients with lymphoproliferative and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Kozyr, A V; Kolesnikov, A V; Aleksandrova, E S; Sashchenko, L P; Gnuchev, N V; Favorov, P V; Kotelnikov, M A; Iakhnina, E I; Astsaturov, I A; Prokaeva, T B; Alekberova, Z S; Suchkov, S V; Gabibov, A G

    1998-10-01

    DNA-hydrolyzing activity of IgG autoantibodies from sera of patients with various types of lymphoproliferative diseases was investigated. The association of DNA-hydrolyzing activity with the antibody (Ab) fraction has been proved by newly developed affinity-capture assay. Study of abzyme incidence in blood tumors and systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE) revealed linkage of anti-DNA Ab catalysts to mature B-cell tumors, and increased probability of DNA-abzymes formation on the background of autoimmune manifestations. These data suggest possible similarity between mechanisms of abzyme formation in SLE and B-cell lymphomas. A new mechanism of formation of DNA-specific catalytic Abs has been proposed based on the increased crossreactivity of polyclonal DNA-abzymes to DNA-depleted nuclear matrix proteins. The possibility of the abzyme production as Ab to the energetically destabilized ground state of the antigen has been discussed. Preliminary results were obtained that indicate the complement-independent cytotoxicity of anti-DNA autoantibodies isolated from blood of patients with SLE and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:10214696

  20. Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome Associated With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoid Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kofman, Tomek; Zhang, Shao-Yu; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Moktefi, Anissa; Raimbourg, Quentin; Francois, Hélène; Karras, Alexandre; Plaisier, Emmanuelle; Painchart, Bernard; Favre, Guillaume; Bertrand, Dominique; Gyan, Emmanuel; Souid, Marc; Roos-Weil, Damien; Desvaux, Dominique; Grimbert, Philippe; Haioun, Corinne; Lang, Philippe; Sahali, Djillali; Audard, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have examined the occurrence of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). We report here a series of 18 patients with MCNS occurring among 13,992 new cases of NHL. We analyzed the clinical and pathologic characteristics of this association, along with the response of patients to treatment, to determine if this association relies on a particular disorder. The most frequent NHLs associated with MCNS were Waldenström macroglobulinemia (33.3%), marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (27.8%), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (22.2%). Other lymphoproliferative disorders included multiple myeloma, mantle cell lymphoma, and peripheral T-cell lymphoma. In 4 patients MCNS occurred before NHL (mean delay, 15 mo), in 10 patients the disorders occurred simultaneously, and in 4 patients MCNS was diagnosed after NHL (mean delay, 25 mo). Circulating monoclonal immunoglobulins were present in 11 patients. A nontumoral interstitial infiltrate was present in renal biopsy specimens from 3 patients without significant renal impairment. Acute kidney injury resulting from tubular lesions or renal hypoperfusion was present in 6 patients. MCNS relapse occurred more frequently in patients treated exclusively by steroid therapy (77.8%) than in those receiving steroids associated with chemotherapy (25%). In conclusion, MCNS occurs preferentially in NHL originating from B cells and requires an aggressive therapeutic approach to reduce the risk of MCNS relapse. PMID:25500704

  1. IFN-gamma gene polymorphisms associate with development of EBV+ lymphoproliferative disease in hu PBL-SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Dierksheide, Julie E; Baiocchi, Robert A; Ferketich, Amy K; Roychowdhury, Sameek; Pelletier, Ronald P; Eisenbeis, Charles F; Caligiuri, Michael A; VanBuskirk, Anne M

    2005-02-15

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a devastating post-transplantation complication often associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Although the type and length of immunosuppression are risk factors, a patient's inherent immune capacity also likely contributes to this disorder. This report uses severe-combined immunodeficient mice given injections of human peripheral blood leukocytes (hu PBL-SCID [Severe Combined Immunodeficient] mice) to test the hypothesis that cytokine genotype associates with the development of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease (LPD). We observed that the A/A (adenosine/adenosine) genotype for base + 874 of the interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) gene was significantly more prevalent in PBLs producing rapid, high-penetrance LPD in hu PBL-SCID mice, compared to PBLs producing late, low-penetrance LPD or no LPD. In examining the relationship between genotype and cytolytic T-lymphocyte (CTL) function, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) inhibited restimulation of CTLs in PBLs with adenosine at IFNG base + 874, but not in PBLs homozygous for thymidine. Importantly, neutralization of TGF-beta in hu PBL-SCID mice injected with A/A genotype PBLs resulted in reduced LPD development and expanded human CD8(+) cells. Thus, our data show that TGF-beta may promote tumor development by inhibiting CTL restimulation and expansion. Further, our data indicate that IFNG genotype may provide valuable information for both identifying transplant recipients at greater risk for PTLD and developing preventive and curative strategies. PMID:15498860

  2. Clinical significance of HLA-DR+, CD19+, CD10+ immature B-cell phenotype and CD34+ cell detection in bone marrow lymphocytes from children affected with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Callea, V; Comis, M; Iaria, G; Sculli, G; Morabito, F; Lombardo, V T

    1997-01-01

    In children with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), bone marrow lymphocytes can express the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA) pattern with no evidence of leukemia or lymphoma. Bone marrow lymphocytes from 23 children and 20 adults affected with ITP were studied to determine the incidence and the clinical impact of lymphocytes with the immature B-cell phenotype and CD34+ cell expression. In this investigation we identified a group consisting of 52% of the children who showed the immature B phenotype, while the remaining 48%, similarly to adult ITP displayed an increase of T-cell antigens. CD34 was positive in 53% of children, but it was present in only half of the patients with the immature B phenotype and it was always absent in adults. IgH genes disclosed a germline configuration in all six patients in the immature B phenotype group. No difference was found in the two groups of children in terms of age, presentation of the disease or final outcome. Finally, no patient in either children's group has developed an acute lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:9299867

  3. B Cells and Autoantibodies in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pröbstel, Anne-Katrin; Sanderson, Nicholas S. R.; Derfuss, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    While over the past decades T cells have been considered key players in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), it has only recently become evident that B cells have a major contributing role. Our understanding of the role of B cells has evolved substantially following the clinical success of B cell-targeting therapies and increasing experimental evidence for significant B cell involvement. Rather than mere antibody-producing cells, it is becoming clear that they are team players with the capacity to prime and regulate T cells, and function both as pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. However, despite tremendous efforts, the target antigen(s) of B cells in MS have yet to be identified. The first part of this review summarizes the clinical evidence and results from animal studies pointing to the relevance of B cells in the pathogenesis of MS. The second part gives an overview of the currently known potential autoantigen targets. The third part recapitulates and critically appraises the currently available B cell-directed therapies. PMID:26197319

  4. Inadequate Reference Datasets Biased toward Short Non-epitopes Confound B-cell Epitope Prediction.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Kh Shamsur; Chowdhury, Erfan Ullah; Sachse, Konrad; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    X-ray crystallography has shown that an antibody paratope typically binds 15-22 amino acids (aa) of an epitope, of which 2-5 randomly distributed amino acids contribute most of the binding energy. In contrast, researchers typically choose for B-cell epitope mapping short peptide antigens in antibody binding assays. Furthermore, short 6-11-aa epitopes, and in particular non-epitopes, are over-represented in published B-cell epitope datasets that are commonly used for development of B-cell epitope prediction approaches from protein antigen sequences. We hypothesized that such suboptimal length peptides result in weak antibody binding and cause false-negative results. We tested the influence of peptide antigen length on antibody binding by analyzing data on more than 900 peptides used for B-cell epitope mapping of immunodominant proteins of Chlamydia spp. We demonstrate that short 7-12-aa peptides of B-cell epitopes bind antibodies poorly; thus, epitope mapping with short peptide antigens falsely classifies many B-cell epitopes as non-epitopes. We also show in published datasets of confirmed epitopes and non-epitopes a direct correlation between length of peptide antigens and antibody binding. Elimination of short, ≤11-aa epitope/non-epitope sequences improved datasets for evaluation of in silico B-cell epitope prediction. Achieving up to 86% accuracy, protein disorder tendency is the best indicator of B-cell epitope regions for chlamydial and published datasets. For B-cell epitope prediction, the most effective approach is plotting disorder of protein sequences with the IUPred-L scale, followed by antibody reactivity testing of 16-30-aa peptides from peak regions. This strategy overcomes the well known inaccuracy of in silico B-cell epitope prediction from primary protein sequences. PMID:27189949

  5. Ikaros limits follicular B cell activation by regulating B cell receptor signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Heizmann, Beate; Sellars, MacLean; Macias-Garcia, Alejandra; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe

    2016-02-12

    The Ikaros transcription factor is essential for early B cell development, but its effect on mature B cells is debated. We show that Ikaros is required to limit the response of naive splenic B cells to B cell receptor signals. Ikaros deficient follicular B cells grow larger and enter cell cycle faster after anti-IgM stimulation. Unstimulated mutant B cells show deregulation of positive and negative regulators of signal transduction at the mRNA level, and constitutive phosphorylation of ERK, p38, SYK, BTK, AKT and LYN. Stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged ERK and p38 phosphorylation, followed by hyper-proliferation. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK and p38 abrogates the increased proliferative response of Ikaros deficient cells. These results suggest that Ikaros functions as a negative regulator of follicular B cell activation. PMID:26775846

  6. IDO2 Modulates T Cell-Dependent Autoimmune Responses through a B Cell-Intrinsic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Lauren M F; DuHadaway, James B; Grabler, Samantha; Prendergast, George C; Muller, Alexander J; Mandik-Nayak, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Mechanistic insight into how adaptive immune responses are modified along the self-nonself continuum may offer more effective opportunities to treat autoimmune disease, cancer, and other sterile inflammatory disorders. Recent genetic studies in the KRN mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis demonstrate that the immunomodulatory molecule IDO2 modifies responses to self-antigens; however, the mechanisms involved are obscure. In this study, we show that IDO2 exerts a critical function in B cells to support the generation of autoimmunity. In experiments with IDO2-deficient mice, adoptive transplant experiments demonstrated that IDO2 expression in B cells was both necessary and sufficient to support robust arthritis development. IDO2 function in B cells was contingent on a cognate, Ag-specific interaction to exert its immunomodulatory effects on arthritis development. We confirmed a similar requirement in an established model of contact hypersensitivity, in which IDO2-expressing B cells are required for a robust inflammatory response. Mechanistic investigations showed that IDO2-deficient B cells lacked the ability to upregulate the costimulatory marker CD40, suggesting IDO2 acts at the T-B cell interface to modulate the potency of T cell help needed to promote autoantibody production. Overall, our findings revealed that IDO2 expression by B cells modulates autoimmune responses by supporting the cross talk between autoreactive T and B cells. PMID:27183624

  7. A distinct plasmablast and naïve B-cell phenotype in primary immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Shaun M.; Gibson, Adele; Lucas, Geoff; Nandigam, Raghava; Taylor, Louise; Provan, Drew; Newland, Adrian C.; Savage, Caroline O.; Henderson, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia is an autoimmune disorder in which platelet destruction is a consequence of both B- and T-cell dysregulation. Flow cytometry was used to further characterize the B- and T-cell compartments in a cross-sectional cohort of 26 immune thrombocytopenia patients including antiplatelet antibody positive (n=14) and negative (n=12) patients exposed to a range of therapies, and a cohort of matched healthy volunteers. Markers for B-cell activating factor and its receptors, relevant B-cell activation markers (CD95 and CD21) and markers for CD4+ T-cell subsets, including circulating T-follicular helper-like cells, were included. Our results indicate that an expanded population of CD95+ naïve B cells correlated with disease activity in immune thrombocytopenia patients regardless of treatment status. A population of CD21-naïve B cells was specifically expanded in autoantibody-positive immune thrombocytopenia patients. Furthermore, the B-cell maturation antigen, a receptor for B-cell activating factor, was consistently and strongly up-regulated on plasmablasts from immune thrombocytopenia patients. These observations have parallels in other autoantibody-mediated diseases and suggest that loss of peripheral tolerance in naïve B cells may be an important component of immune thrombocytopenia pathogenesis. Moreover, the B-cell maturation antigen represents a potential target for plasma cell directed therapies in immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:26969086

  8. Investigational Immunotherapeutics for B-Cell Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso; Wierda, William; O'Brien, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The use of rituximab-based chemoimmunotherapy regimens has remarkably improved the response rates, long-term outcomes, and quality of life of patients with B-cell malignancies. However, a substantial number of patients exhibit either primary or acquired resistance to rituximab, which suggests that novel immunotherapeutics with distinct mechanisms of action are necessary. A series of monoclonal antibodies with specificity against different surface antigens expressed on malignant B cells (eg, CD22, CD23, CD40, CD70) and novel immunotherapeutics (eg, bispecific monoclonal antibodies, small-modular immunopharmaceuticals, T-cell engagers) are currently in clinical or final preclinical stages of development. Although these agents offer reason for optimism, considerable challenges lie ahead in establishing their real clinical value, as well as in integrating them into current therapeutic algorithms for patients with B-cell malignancies. This review describes some of the most promising investigational immunotherapeutics for the treatment of B-cell malignancies. PMID:20048186

  9. Memory B-cell reconstitution following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an EBV-associated transformation event.

    PubMed

    Burns, David M; Tierney, Rose; Shannon-Lowe, Claire; Croudace, Jo; Inman, Charlotte; Abbotts, Ben; Nagra, Sandeep; Fox, Christopher P; Chaganti, Sridhar; Craddock, Charles F; Moss, Paul; Rickinson, Alan B; Rowe, Martin; Bell, Andrew I

    2015-12-17

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) provides a unique opportunity to track Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in the context of the reconstituting B-cell system. Although many allo-HSCT recipients maintain low or undetectable levels of EBV DNA posttransplant, a significant proportion exhibit elevated and rapidly increasing EBV loads which, if left untreated, may lead to potentially fatal EBV-associated posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease. Intriguingly, this high-level EBV reactivation typically arises in the first 3 months posttransplant, at a time when the peripheral blood contains low numbers of CD27+ memory cells which are the site of EBV persistence in healthy immunocompetent donors. To investigate this apparent paradox, we prospectively monitored EBV levels and B-cell reconstitution in a cohort of allo-HSCT patients for up to 12 months posttransplant. In patients with low or undetectable levels of EBV, the circulating B-cell pool consisted predominantly of transitional and naive cells, with a marked deficiency of CD27+ memory cells which lasted >12 months. However, among patients with high EBV loads, there was a significant increase in both the proportion and number of CD27+ memory B cells. Analysis of sorted CD27+ memory B cells from these patients revealed that this population was preferentially infected with EBV, expressed EBV latent transcripts associated with B-cell growth transformation, had a plasmablastic phenotype, and frequently expressed the proliferation marker Ki-67. These findings suggest that high-level EBV reactivation following allo-HSCT may drive the expansion of latently infected CD27+ B lymphoblasts in the peripheral blood. PMID:26450987

  10. Memory B-cell reconstitution following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an EBV-associated transformation event

    PubMed Central

    Burns, David M.; Tierney, Rose; Shannon-Lowe, Claire; Croudace, Jo; Inman, Charlotte; Abbotts, Ben; Nagra, Sandeep; Fox, Christopher P.; Chaganti, Sridhar; Craddock, Charles F.; Moss, Paul; Rickinson, Alan B.; Rowe, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) provides a unique opportunity to track Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in the context of the reconstituting B-cell system. Although many allo-HSCT recipients maintain low or undetectable levels of EBV DNA posttransplant, a significant proportion exhibit elevated and rapidly increasing EBV loads which, if left untreated, may lead to potentially fatal EBV-associated posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease. Intriguingly, this high-level EBV reactivation typically arises in the first 3 months posttransplant, at a time when the peripheral blood contains low numbers of CD27+ memory cells which are the site of EBV persistence in healthy immunocompetent donors. To investigate this apparent paradox, we prospectively monitored EBV levels and B-cell reconstitution in a cohort of allo-HSCT patients for up to 12 months posttransplant. In patients with low or undetectable levels of EBV, the circulating B-cell pool consisted predominantly of transitional and naive cells, with a marked deficiency of CD27+ memory cells which lasted >12 months. However, among patients with high EBV loads, there was a significant increase in both the proportion and number of CD27+ memory B cells. Analysis of sorted CD27+ memory B cells from these patients revealed that this population was preferentially infected with EBV, expressed EBV latent transcripts associated with B-cell growth transformation, had a plasmablastic phenotype, and frequently expressed the proliferation marker Ki-67. These findings suggest that high-level EBV reactivation following allo-HSCT may drive the expansion of latently infected CD27+ B lymphoblasts in the peripheral blood. PMID:26450987

  11. Unusual case of B cell lymphoma after immunosuppressive treatment for psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Nosotti, Lorenzo; Baiocchini, Andrea; Bonifati, Claudio; Visco-Comandini, Ubaldo; Mirisola, Concetta; Del Nonno, Franca

    2015-04-18

    Lymphomas may be induced by the systemic immunosuppressive therapies used to treat psoriasis, such as ciclosporin, methotrexate and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α blockers. The biologic agents currently used in psoriasis include alefacept, efalizumab, and the TNF-α antagonists etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab. Infections and cancer are the main possible consequences of intended or unexpected immunosuppression. We report a 59-year-old man with a history of severe psoriasis vulgaris treated with traditional immunosuppressant drugs followed by anti-TNF-α therapy; the patient was firstly hospitalized for an acute cholestatic toxic hepatitis, which we supposed to be related to adalimumab. The first liver biopsy showed active disease with severe hepatocellular damage caused by heavy lymphocytes infiltrate in portal tracts at in the interface with a not conclusive diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disease. The correct diagnosis of T cell/histiocyte- rich large B cell lymphoma (T/HRBCL) was only reached through a gastric biopsy and a second liver biopsy. T/HRBCL is an uncommon morphologic variant of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma not described until now in psoriatic patients receiving immunosuppressive biologic agents. In psoriatic patients, treated with biologic immunosuppressive agents, the suspect of abdominal lymphoma should always be included as differential diagnosis. Abdominal ultrasound evaluation need therefore to be included in the pre-treatment screening as in the follow-up surveillance. PMID:25914782

  12. Lack of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) deregulates B-cell survival and results in B-cell lymphocytosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bruscoli, Stefano; Biagioli, Michele; Sorcini, Daniele; Frammartino, Tiziana; Cimino, Monica; Sportoletti, Paolo; Mazzon, Emanuela; Bereshchenko, Oxana

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are widely used as antiinflammatory/immunosuppressive drugs and antitumor agents in several types of lymphoma and leukemia. Therapeutic doses of GC induce growth-suppressive and cytotoxic effects on various leukocytes including B cells. Molecular mechanisms of GC action include induction of GC target genes. Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) is a rapidly, potently, and invariably GC-induced gene. It mediates a number of GC effects, such as control of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Here we show that deletion of GILZ in mice leads to an accumulation of B lymphocytes in the bone marrow, blood, and lymphoid tissues. Gilz knockout (KO) mice develop a progressive nonlethal B lymphocytosis, with expansion of B220+ cells in the bone marrow and in the periphery, dependent on increased B-cell survival. Decreased B-cell apoptosis in mice lacking GILZ correlates with increased NF-κB transcriptional activity and Bcl-2 expression. B cell–specific gilz KO mice confirmed that the effect of GILZ deletion is B-cell self-intrinsic. These results establish GILZ as an important regulator of B-cell survival and suggest that the deregulation of GILZ expression could be implicated in the pathogenesis of B-cell disorders. PMID:26276664

  13. Human norovirus culture in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HunoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HunoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HunoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-sydney HunoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HunoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. analysis of infection or attachment samples, including rna extraction and rt-qpcr, requires ~6 h. PMID:26513671

  14. Human norovirus culture in B cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-12-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HuNoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HuNoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-Sydney HuNoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HuNoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. Analysis of infection or attachment samples, including RNA extraction and RT-qPCR, requires ∼6 h. PMID:26513671

  15. Restimulation-induced apoptosis of T cells is impaired in patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease caused by SAP deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Andrew L.; Marsh, Rebecca A.; Krummey, Scott M.; Roehrs, Philip; Young, Lisa R.; Zhang, Kejian; van Hoff, Jack; Dhar, Deepali; Nichols, Kim E.; Filipovich, Alexandra H.; Su, Helen C.; Bleesing, Jack J.; Lenardo, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is a rare congenital immunodeficiency that leads to an extreme, usually fatal increase in the number of lymphocytes upon infection with EBV. It is most commonly defined molecularly by loss of expression of SLAM-associated protein (SAP). Despite this, there is little understanding of how SAP deficiency causes lymphocytosis following EBV infection. Here we show that T cells from individuals with XLP are specifically resistant to apoptosis mediated by TCR restimulation, a process that normally constrains T cell expansion during immune responses. Expression of SAP and the SLAM family receptor NK, T, and B cell antigen (NTB-A) were required for TCR-induced upregulation of key pro-apoptotic molecules and subsequent apoptosis. Further, SAP/NTB-A signaling augmented the strength of the proximal TCR signal to achieve the threshold required for restimulation-induced cell death (RICD). Strikingly, TCR ligation in activated T cells triggered increased recruitment of SAP to NTB-A, dissociation of the phosphatase SHP-1, and colocalization of NTB-A with CD3 aggregates. In contrast, NTB-A and SHP-1 contributed to RICD resistance in XLP T cells. Our results reveal what we believe to be novel roles for NTB-A and SAP in regulating T cell homeostasis through apoptosis and provide mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of lymphoproliferative disease in XLP. PMID:19759517

  16. [Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: a case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jia-peng; Lu, Xin-tian; Zhao, Wei-hong; Hua, Ying

    2015-12-18

    We described 1 case of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), first diagnosed in our hospital, and reviewed the recent literature. The 11-month old male patient presented with a history of splenomegaly and hepatomegaly since 1 month after birth. He suffered recurrent infectious diseases including cytomegalovirus infection, parvovirus B19 infection and chronic diarrhea disease. Besides, his symptoms included hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. The laboratory abnormality indicated an expanded population of alpha/beta double-negative T cells (DNTs) (27.18% of lymphocytes, 35.16% of CD3+ T lymphocytes) in peripheral blood, and autoantibodies including antinuclear antibody, double-stranded DNA and rheumatic factor were positive. Hyper gamma globulinemia and positive direct Coombs tests were seen in the patient. His parents were both healthy and denied autoimmune diseases. We identified a heterozygous point mutation in exon 3 of the FAS gene carrying c.309 A>C, resulting in a single base pair substitution in exon 3 of FAS gene which changed the codon of Arg103 to Ser103. Unfortunately, we were unable to obtain the gene results of the child's parents. The patient was treated with glucocorticoids in our hospital and with mycophenolatemofetil in other hospital. And we were informed that his anemia condition relieved through the telephone follow-up, but he still suffered recurrent infections, hepatomegaly and splenomegaly still existed. As we all know ALPS is characterized by defective lymphocyte apoptosis, and thus cause lymphoproliferative disease and autoimmune disease, and increase the risk of lymphoma. It is more likely to be misdiagnosed as other diseases. ALPS should be suspected in the case of chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly and autoimmune features. Flow cytometry approach is helpful for the diagnosis. Immunosuppressive drugs are the necessary treatment. PMID:26679669

  17. Studies of EBV-lymphoid cell interactions in two patients with the X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome: normal EBV-specific HLA-restricted cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Rousset, F; Souillet, G; Roncarolo, M G; Lamelin, J P

    1986-02-01

    Two X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP) patients with the hypogammaglobulinemia phenotype were investigated at a time remote from their primary infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from these patients expressed the phenotypic markers characteristic of normal mature B lymphocytes and produced normal levels of immunoglobulins (Ig). These observations imply that at least some of their B cells are phenotypically normal. The natural killer (NK) activity of the two patients was low. In one patient, activated lymphocyte killer (ALK) activity was inefficient. These two XLP patients expressed a normal EBV-specific, HLA-restricted cytotoxic activity. It thus appears, from the present findings and those in cases published previously (6/11 patients expressing normal EBV-specific cytotoxic activity), that the notion of poor specific T cell memory for EBV may not be as pivotal ass suggested or, alternatively, that this defect may not be common in hypogammaglobulinemic survivors. PMID:3009061

  18. Bruton's tyrosine kinase: from X-linked agammaglobulinemia toward targeted therapy for B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ponader, Sabine; Burger, Jan A

    2014-06-10

    Discovery of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) mutations as the cause for X-linked agammaglobulinemia was a milestone in understanding the genetic basis of primary immunodeficiencies. Since then, studies have highlighted the critical role of this enzyme in B-cell development and function, and particularly in B-cell receptor signaling. Because its deletion affects mostly B cells, BTK has become an attractive therapeutic target in autoimmune disorders and B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib (PCI-32765) is the most advanced BTK inhibitor in clinical testing, with ongoing phase III clinical trials in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle-cell lymphoma. In this article, we discuss key discoveries related to BTK and clinically relevant aspects of BTK inhibitors, and we provide an outlook into clinical development and open questions regarding BTK inhibitor therapy. PMID:24778403

  19. Regulation of germinal center, B-cell memory, and plasma cell formation by histone modifiers.

    PubMed

    Good-Jacobson, Kim L

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of antibody production and B-cell memory formation and function is core to finding new treatments for B-cell-derived cancers, antibody-mediated autoimmune disorders, and immunodeficiencies. Progression from a small number of antigen-specific B-cells to the production of a large number of antibody-secreting cells is tightly regulated. Although much progress has been made in revealing the transcriptional regulation of B-cell differentiation that occurs during humoral immune responses, there are still many questions that remain unanswered. Recent work on the expression and roles of histone modifiers in lymphocytes has begun to shed light on this additional level of regulation. This review will discuss the recent advancements in understanding how humoral immune responses, in particular germinal centers and memory cells, are modulated by histone modifiers. PMID:25477884

  20. Nonrandon X chromosome inactivation in B cells from carriers of X chromosome-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, M.E.; Lavoie, A.; Briggs, C.; Brown, P.; Guerra, C.; Puck, J.M.

    1988-05-01

    X chromosome-linked sever combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is characterized by markedly reduced numbers of T cells, the absence of proliferative responses to mitogens, and hypogammaglobulinemia but normal or elevated number of B cells. To determine if the failure of the B cells to produce immunoglobulin might be due to expression of the XSCID gene defect in B-lineage cells as well as T cells, the authors analyzed patterns of X chromosome inactivation in B cells from nine obligate carriers of this disorder. A series of somatic cell hybrids that selectively retained the active X chromosome was produced from Epstein-Barr virus-stimulated B cells from each woman. To distinguish between the two X chromosome, the hybrids from each woman were analyzed using an X-linked restriction fragment length polymorphism for which the woman in question was heterozygous. In all obligate carriers of XSCID, the B-cell hybrids demonstrated preferential use of a single X chromosome, the nonmutant X, as the active X. To determine if the small number of B-cell hybrids that contained the mutant X were derived from an immature subset of B cells, lymphocytes from three carriers were separated into surface IgM positive and surface IgM negative B cells prior to exposure to Epstein-Barr virus and production of B-cell hybrids. The results demonstrated normal random X chromosome inactivation in B-cell hybrids derived from the less mature surface IgM positive B cells. These results suggest that the XSCID gene product has a direct effect on B cells as well as T cells and is required during B-cell maturation.

  1. Hyperactive mTOR pathway promotes lymphoproliferation and abnormal differentiation in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Völkl, Simon; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Allgäuer, Andrea; Schreiner, Elisabeth; Lorenz, Myriam Ricarda; Rohr, Jan; Klemann, Christian; Fuchs, Ilka; Schuster, Volker; von Bueren, André O; Naumann-Bartsch, Nora; Gambineri, Eleonora; Siepermann, Kathrin; Kobbe, Robin; Nathrath, Michaela; Arkwright, Peter D; Miano, Maurizio; Stachel, Klaus-Daniel; Metzler, Markus; Schwarz, Klaus; Kremer, Anita N; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-07-14

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a human disorder characterized by defective Fas signaling, resulting in chronic benign lymphoproliferation and accumulation of TCRαβ(+) CD4(-) CD8(-) double-negative T (DNT) cells. Although their phenotype resembles that of terminally differentiated or exhausted T cells, lack of KLRG1, high eomesodermin, and marginal T-bet expression point instead to a long-lived memory state with potent proliferative capacity. Here we show that despite their terminally differentiated phenotype, human ALPS DNT cells exhibit substantial mitotic activity in vivo. Notably, hyperproliferation of ALPS DNT cells is associated with increased basal and activation-induced phosphorylation of serine-threonine kinases Akt and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin abrogated survival and proliferation of ALPS DNT cells, but not of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells in vitro. In vivo, mTOR inhibition reduced proliferation and abnormal differentiation by DNT cells. Importantly, increased mitotic activity and hyperactive mTOR signaling was also observed in recently defined CD4(+) or CD8(+) precursor DNT cells, and mTOR inhibition specifically reduced these cells in vivo, indicating abnormal programming of Fas-deficient T cells before the DNT stage. Thus, our results identify the mTOR pathway as a major regulator of lymphoproliferation and aberrant differentiation in ALPS. PMID:27099149

  2. Treatment Response and Outcomes in Post-transplantation Lymphoproliferative Disease vs Lymphoma in Immunocompetent Patients.

    PubMed

    Trusson, R; Serre, J E; Szwarc, I; Brunot, V; Garrigue, V; Delmas, S; Kanouni, T; Cartron, G; Mourad, G

    2016-01-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) after solid organ transplantation may carry a poorer prognosis than lymphoma in immunocompetent individuals, but comparative data are lacking. In a retrospective, single-center, case-control study, 21 cases of PTLD were identified in patients undergoing kidney transplantation since 2000, and compared to 42 nontransplanted controls cared for in the same institution and matched for age, prognostic index, and cerebral localization. Two-year and 5-year overall survival was 57% and 44%, respectively, in PTLD patients and 71% and 58% in controls (log-rank test P = .20). On multivariable analysis, overall survival was similar for PTLD and control patients (hazard ratio 1.71, 95% confidence interval 0.81 to 3.61, P = .16). Response rate to first-line chemotherapy was similar between the 2 groups. Death was due to progression of the disease in 46% vs 94% of PTLD and control patients, respectively (P < .01), or sepsis in 31% vs 0% (P = .03). Treatment-related mortality was significantly higher in PTLD (19%) than in controls (0%, P = .03). In conclusion, response to first-line chemotherapy and overall survival are similar in PTLD and control patients, whereas causes of death were significantly different. Better prevention and management of infectious complications could improve the results in PTLD patients. PMID:27569924

  3. Spectrum of Radiological Manifestations in Lymphoproliferative Malignancies with Unusual Extra Nodal Soft Tissue Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Kahila; Upreti, Lalendra; Garga, Umesh Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative malignancies constitute a wide spectrum of haematological malignancies and their prevalence is widely increasing. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas and Hodgkin disease, frequently involve extranodal soft tissue structures in the head and neck, thorax and abdomen. These malignancies may involve virtually any type of soft tissues to any extent; hence many different imaging manifestations are possible which may mimic other disorders. The imaging characteristics of extranodal lymphomatous soft tissue involvement are described and classified here according to the site of involvement in 6 cases (primary diseases with orbital, muscle, extra testicular, scalp, sinonasal and pachymeningeal/dural involvement). In majority of these cases at presentation we found a predominantly homogeneous soft tissue mass with mildly high attenuation on CT and a T2 intermediate signal on MRI at these sites without any manifestation of disease elsewhere but on follow-up two out of these six cases developed systemic disease elsewhere. Few consistent patterns were noticed on CT and MRI which might help to include lymphomas as an important differential diagnosis of soft tissue masses. Though a definitive diagnosis requires a biopsy (bone marrow, lymph node, or mass), and other laboratory tests, imaging primarily aims at staging of the disease and identification of new or recurrent disease.

  4. A peptide-based inhibitor for prevention of B cell hyperproliferation induced by Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Knight, Jason S; Lan, Ke; Bajaj, Bharat; Sharma, Nikhil; Tsai, Donald E; Robertson, Erle S

    2006-10-10

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infects and transforms resting B lymphocytes in vitro. The virus can also cause B cell lymphomas in immunosuppressed humans. Indeed, EBV-mediated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease causes significant complications in transplant recipients, including loss of the transplanted organ and even death. The limited treatment options include, nonspecific targeting of B cell surface antigens with monoclonal antibodies or withdrawal of immunosuppression. These therapies fail in approximately 50% of patients. Clearly, treatments that specifically target EBV-infected cells are desirable. The EBV antigen EBNA3C regulates cell cycle by targeting critical cellular complexes such as cyclin A/cdk2, SCF(Skp2), and Rb. Here, we use a 20-amino-acid EBNA3C-derived peptide, fused to an HIV TAT tag for efficient delivery, to disrupt cell cycle regulation by EBNA3C. The peptide inhibited hyperproliferation of EBV-infected B cell lines and reduced in vitro immortalization of primary B lymphocytes by EBV. Importantly, the peptide inhibited lymphoblastoid outgrowth from the blood of an EBV-positive transplant patient in vitro. PMID:16876848

  5. B Cells and Humoral Immunity in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Diehl, Cody J.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Binder, Christoph J.

    2014-01-01

    Insights into the important contribution of inflammation and immune functions in the development and progression of atherosclerosis have greatly improved our understanding of this disease. Although the role of T cells has been extensively studied for decades, only recently has the role of B cells gained more attention. Recent studies have identified differential effects of different B-cell subsets and helped to clarify the still poorly understood mechanisms by which these act. B1 cells have been shown to prevent lesion formation, whereas B2 cells have been suggested to promote it. Natural IgM antibodies, mainly derived from B1 cells, have been shown to mediate atheroprotective effects, but the functional role of other immunoglobulin classes, particularly IgG, still remains elusive. In this review, we will focus on recent insights on the role of B cells and various immunoglobulin classes and how these may mediate their effects in atherosclerotic lesion formation. Moreover, we will highlight potential therapeutic approaches focusing on B-cell depletion that could be used to translate experimental evidence to human disease. PMID:24855199

  6. Altered BCR and TLR signals promote enhanced positive selection of autoreactive transitional B cells in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kolhatkar, Nikita S.; Brahmandam, Archana; Thouvenel, Christopher D.; Becker-Herman, Shirly; Jacobs, Holly M.; Schwartz, Marc A.; Allenspach, Eric J.; Khim, Socheath; Panigrahi, Anil K.; Luning Prak, Eline T.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Candotti, Fabio; Torgerson, Troy R.; Sanz, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked immunodeficiency disorder frequently associated with systemic autoimmunity, including autoantibody-mediated cytopenias. WAS protein (WASp)–deficient B cells have increased B cell receptor (BCR) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, suggesting that these pathways might impact establishment of the mature, naive BCR repertoire. To directly investigate this possibility, we evaluated naive B cell specificity and composition in WASp-deficient mice and WAS subjects (n = 12). High-throughput sequencing and single-cell cloning analysis of the BCR repertoire revealed altered heavy chain usage and enrichment for low-affinity self-reactive specificities in murine marginal zone and human naive B cells. Although negative selection mechanisms including deletion, anergy, and receptor editing were relatively unperturbed, WASp-deficient transitional B cells showed enhanced proliferation in vivo mediated by antigen- and Myd88-dependent signals. Finally, using both BCR sequencing and cell surface analysis with a monoclonal antibody recognizing an intrinsically autoreactive heavy chain, we show enrichment in self-reactive cells specifically at the transitional to naive mature B cell stage in WAS subjects. Our combined data support a model wherein modest alterations in B cell–intrinsic, BCR, and TLR signals in WAS, and likely other autoimmune disorders, are sufficient to alter B cell tolerance via positive selection of self-reactive transitional B cells. PMID:26371186

  7. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes B cells and B cell precursors in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Coffman, R.L.; Weissman, I.L.

    1981-02-01

    The monoclonal antibody, RA3-2C2, appears to be specific for cells within the B cell lineage. This antibody does not recognize thymocytes, peripheral T cells, or nonlymphoid hematopoietic cells in the spleen or bone marrow. Nor does it recognize the pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells, the spleen colony-forming unit, All sIg+ B cells and most plasma cells are RA3-2C2+. In addition, approximately 20% of nucleated bone marrow cells are RA3-2C2+ but sIg-. This population contains B cell precursors that can give rise to sIg+ cells within 2 d in vitro.

  8. Rituximab does not reset defective early B cell tolerance checkpoints

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Nicolas; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Cantaert, Tineke; Herold, Kevan C.; Meffre, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients show abnormalities in early B cell tolerance checkpoints, resulting in the accumulation of large numbers of autoreactive B cells in their blood. Treatment with rituximab, an anti-CD20 mAb that depletes B cells, has been shown to preserve β cell function in T1D patients and improve other autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. However, it remains largely unknown how anti–B cell therapy thwarts autoimmunity in these pathologies. Here, we analyzed the reactivity of Abs expressed by single, mature naive B cells from 4 patients with T1D before and 52 weeks after treatment to determine whether rituximab resets early B cell tolerance checkpoints. We found that anti–B cell therapy did not alter the frequencies of autoreactive and polyreactive B cells, which remained elevated in the blood of all patients after rituximab treatment. Moreover, the limited proliferative history of autoreactive B cells after treatment revealed that these clones were newly generated B cells and not self-reactive B cells that had escaped depletion and repopulated the periphery through homeostatic expansion. We conclude that anti–B cell therapy may provide a temporary dampening of autoimmune processes through B cell depletion. However, repletion with autoreactive B cells may explain the relapse that occurs in many autoimmune patients after anti–B cell therapy. PMID:26642366

  9. Switched-memory B cells remodel B cell receptors within secondary germinal centers

    PubMed Central

    Okitsu, Shinji L.; McHeyzer-Williams, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Effective vaccines induce high-affinity memory B cells and durable antibody responses through accelerated mechanisms of natural selection. Secondary changes in antibody repertoires after vaccine boosts suggest progressive B cell receptor (BCR) re-diversification, but underlying mechanisms remain unresolved. Here integrated specificity and function of individual memory B cell progeny reveal ongoing evolution of polyclonal antibody specificities through germinal center (GC) specific transcriptional activity. At the clonal and sub-clonal levels, single cell expression of Cd83 and Pol□ segregates the secondary GC transcriptional program into 4 stages that regulate divergent mechanisms of memory BCR evolution. These studies demonstrate that vaccine boosts re-activate a cyclic program of GC function in switched-memory B cells to remodel existing antibody specificities and enhance durable immune protection. PMID:25642821

  10. Cyclin Dl expression in B-cell non Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Aref, Salah; Mossad, Y; El-Khodary, T; Awad, M; El-Shahat, E

    2006-10-01

    Disorders of the cell cycle regulatory machinery play a key role in the pathogenesis of cancer. Over-expression of cyclin D1 protein has been reported in several solid tumors and certain lymphoid malignancies, but little is known about the effect of its expression on clinical behavior and outcome in B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In this study, we investigated the expression of cyclin Dl in group of patients with NHL and correlated the results with the clinical and laboratory data. The degree of expression of cyclin Dl protein was evaluated by flow cytometry in a group of NHL patients (n = 46) and in normal control group (n = 10). Cyclin Dl over expression was detected in 10 out of 46 (21.7%) patients; they were 5/5-mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) (100%) and 5/28 large B-cell lymphoma (17.8%). All other NHL subtypes showed normal cyclin D1 expression. The clinical signs (hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and B-symptoms, clinical staging) and laboratory data (hemoglobin, white cell count (WBCs), platelet count, and bone marrow infiltration) were not significantly different between NHL subgroup with cyclin Dl over expression and that with normal cyclin Dl expression. Serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels and lymphadenopathy were significantly higher in NHL group with cyclin D1 over expression as compared to those without. Also, cyclin D1 over expression is associated with poor outcome of NHL patients. Cyclin Dl over expression was evident among all cases of MCL and few cases of large B-cell lymphoma. Cyclin Dl over expression might be used as adjuvant tool for diagnosis of MCL; has role in NHL biology and is bad prognostic index in NHL. PMID:17607588