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Sample records for b-l model naturally

  1. Dark matter indirect detection signals and the nature of neutrinos in the supersymmetric U(1)B-L extension of the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahverdi, Rouzbeh; Campbell, Sheldon S.; Dutta, Bhaskar; Gao, Yu

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we study the prospects for determining the nature of neutrinos in the context of a supersymmetric B-L extension of the standard model by using dark matter indirect detection signals and bounds on Neff from the cosmic microwave background data. The model contains two new dark matter candidates whose dominant annihilation channels produce more neutrinos than neutralino dark matter in the minimal supersymmetric standard model. The photon and neutrino counts may then be used to discriminate between the two models. If the dark matter comes from the B-L sector, its indirect signals and impact on the cosmic microwave background can shed light on the nature of the neutrinos. When the light neutrinos are of Majorana type, the indirect neutrino signal from the Sun and the Galactic center may show a prompt neutrino box feature, as well as an earlier cutoff in both neutrino and gamma-ray energy spectra. When the light neutrinos are of Dirac type, their contribution to the effective number of neutrinos Neff is at a detectable level.

  2. Scalar dark matter in the B-L model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodejohann, Werner; Yaguna, Carlos E.

    2015-12-01

    The U(1)B-L extension of the Standard Model requires the existence of right-handed neutrinos and naturally realizes the seesaw mechanism of neutrino mass generation. We study the possibility of explaining the dark matter in this model with an additional scalar field, phiDM, that is a singlet of the Standard Model but charged under U(1)B-L. An advantage of this scenario is that the stability of phiDM can be guaranteed by appropriately choosing its B-L charge, without the need of an extra ad hoc discrete symmetry. We investigate in detail the dark matter phenomenology of this model. We show that the observed dark matter density can be obtained via gauge or scalar interactions, and that semi-annihilations could play an important role in the latter case. The regions consistent with the dark matter density are determined in each instance and the prospects for detection in future experiments are analyzed. If dark matter annihilations are controlled by the B-L gauge interaction, the mass of the dark matter particle should lie below 5 TeV and its direct detection cross section can be easily probed by XENON1T; if instead they are controlled by scalar interactions, the dark matter mass can be much larger and the detection prospects are less certain. Finally, we show that this scenario can be readily extended to accommodate multiple dark matter particles.

  3. Dark matter in B-L extended MSSM models

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, S.; Okada, H.

    2009-04-15

    We analyze the dark matter problem in the context of the supersymmetric U(1){sub B-L} model. In this model, the lightest neutralino can be the B-L gaugino Z-tilde{sub B-L} or the extra Higgsinos {chi}-tilde{sub 1,2} dominated. We compute the thermal relic abundance of these particles and show that, unlike the lightest neutralino in the MSSM, they can account for the observed relic abundance with no conflict with other phenomenological constraints. The prospects for their direct detection, if they are part of our galactic halo, are also discussed.

  4. Classically conformal radiative neutrino model with gauged B - L symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Hiroshi; Orikasa, Yuta

    2016-09-01

    We propose a classically conformal model in a minimal radiative seesaw, in which we employ a gauged B - L symmetry in the standard model that is essential in order to work the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism well that induces the B - L symmetry breaking. As a result, nonzero Majorana mass term and electroweak symmetry breaking simultaneously occur. In this framework, we show a benchmark point to satisfy several theoretical and experimental constraints. Here theoretical constraints represent inert conditions and Coleman-Weinberg condition. Experimental bounds come from lepton flavor violations (especially μ → eγ), the current bound on the Z‧ mass at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, and neutrino oscillations.

  5. Baryogenesis via B- L violation in SO(10) unified models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccella, F.; Mangano, G.; Masiero, A.; Rosa, L.

    1994-01-01

    We discuss the problem of baryon number generation in the framework of a class of SO(10) grand unified models with an intermediate mass scale. In these theories the neutrino mass spectrum allows for the τ neutrino to be a good candidate for the hot component of the dark matter and, at the same time, an implementation of the MSW mechanism is possible. We show that an adequate matter-antimatter asymmetry is achievable through the interplay of B- L violating decays of scalar bosons into massive right-handed neutrinos with the anomalous B+ L violating processes mediated by sphalerons.

  6. Dark Matter in Supersymmetric U(1){sub B-L} Model

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, S.; Okada, H.

    2009-04-17

    We analyze the dark matter problem in the context of supersymmetric, U(1){sub B-L} model. In this model, the lightest neutalino can be B-L gaugino Z-tilde{sub B-L} or Higgsinos {chi}-tilde{sub 1,2} dominated. We examine the thermal relic abundance of these particles and discuss the prospects for their direct detection if they form part of our galactic halo.

  7. The minimal SUSY B - L model: simultaneous Wilson lines and string thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deen, Rehan; Ovrut, Burt A.; Purves, Austin

    2016-07-01

    In previous work, we presented a statistical scan over the soft supersymmetry breaking parameters of the minimal SUSY B - L model. For specificity of calculation, unification of the gauge parameters was enforced by allowing the two Z_3× Z_3 Wilson lines to have mass scales separated by approximately an order of magnitude. This introduced an additional "left-right" sector below the unification scale. In this paper, for three important reasons, we modify our previous analysis by demanding that the mass scales of the two Wilson lines be simultaneous and equal to an "average unification" mass < M U >. The present analysis is 1) more "natural" than the previous calculations, which were only valid in a very specific region of the Calabi-Yau moduli space, 2) the theory is conceptually simpler in that the left-right sector has been removed and 3) in the present analysis the lack of gauge unification is due to threshold effects — particularly heavy string thresholds, which we calculate statistically in detail. As in our previous work, the theory is renormalization group evolved from < M U > to the electroweak scale — being subjected, sequentially, to the requirement of radiative B - L and electroweak symmetry breaking, the present experimental lower bounds on the B - L vector boson and sparticle masses, as well as the lightest neutral Higgs mass of ˜125 GeV. The subspace of soft supersymmetry breaking masses that satisfies all such constraints is presented and shown to be substantial.

  8. Minimal gauged U(1) B-L model with spontaneous R parity violation.

    PubMed

    Barger, Vernon; Pérez, Pavel Fileviez; Spinner, Sogee

    2009-05-01

    We study the minimal gauged U(1) B-L supersymmetric model and show that it provides an attractive theory for spontaneous R-parity violation. Both U(1) B-L and R parity are broken by the vacuum expectation value of the right-handed sneutrino (proportional to the soft supersymmetry masses), thereby linking the B-L and soft SUSY scales. In this context we find a consistent mechanism for generating neutrino masses and a realistic mass spectrum, all without extending the Higgs sector of the minimal supersymmetry standard model. We discuss the most relevant collider signals and the connection between the Z' gauge boson and R-parity violation. PMID:19518859

  9. Resonant leptogenesis in the minimal B-L extended standard model at TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Iso, Satoshi; Orikasa, Yuta; Okada, Nobuchika

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the resonant leptogenesis scenario in the minimal B-L extended standard model with the B-L symmetry breaking at the TeV scale. Through detailed analysis of the Boltzmann equations, we show how much the resultant baryon asymmetry via leptogenesis is enhanced or suppressed, depending on the model parameters, in particular, the neutrino Dirac-Yukawa couplings and the TeV scale Majorana masses of heavy degenerate neutrinos. In order to consider a realistic case, we impose a simple ansatz for the model parameters and analyze the neutrino oscillation parameters and the baryon asymmetry via leptogenesis as a function of only a single CP phase. We find that for a fixed CP phase all neutrino oscillation data and the observed baryon asymmetry of the present Universe can be simultaneously reproduced.

  10. Constraining minimal U(1)B-L model from dark matter observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Tanushree; Mondal, Tanmoy

    2014-03-01

    We study the B-L gauge extension of the Standard Model which contains a singlet scalar and three right-handed neutrinos. The vacuum expectation value of the singlet scalar breaks the U(1)B-L symmetry. Here the third-generation right-handed neutrino is qualified as the dark matter candidate, as an artifact of Z2-charge assignment. Relic abundance of the dark matter is consistent with WMAP9 and PLANCK data, only near scalar resonances where dark matter mass is almost half of the scalar boson masses. Requiring correct relic abundance, we restrict the parameter space of the scalar mixing angle and mass of the heavy scalar boson of this model. Besides this, the maximum value of the spin-independent scattering cross section off nucleon is well below the Xenon100 and recent LUX exclusion limits and can be probed by future Xenon1T experiments. In addition, we compute the annihilation of the dark matter into a two-photon final state in detail and compare with the Fermi-LAT upper bound on ⟨σv⟩γγ for the NFW and Einasto profile.

  11. Higgs portal dark matter in the minimal gauged U(1){sub B-L} model

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Nobuchika; Seto, Osamu

    2010-07-15

    We propose a scenario of the right-handed neutrino dark matter in the context of the minimal gauged U(1){sub B-L} model by introducing an additional parity which ensures the stability of dark matter particle. The annihilation of this right-handed neutrino takes place dominantly through the s-channel Higgs boson exchange, so that this model can be called the Higgs portal dark matter model. We show that the thermal relic abundance of the right-handed neutrino dark matter with the help of Higgs resonance can match the observed dark matter abundance. In addition, we estimate the cross section with nucleon and show that the next generation direct dark matter search experiments can explore this model.

  12. Fermionic dark matter in radiative inverse seesaw model with U(1)B-L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Hiroshi; Toma, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    We construct a radiative inverse seesaw model with local B-L symmetry, and investigate the flavor structure of the lepton sector and the fermionic dark matter. Neutrino masses are radiatively generated through a kind of inverse seesaw framework. The Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata matrix is derived from each mixing matrix of the neutrino and charged lepton sector with a large Dirac CP phase. We show that the annihilation processes via the interactions with Higgses, which are independent on the lepton flavor violation, have to be dominant in order to satisfy the observed relic abundance by WMAP. The new interactions with Higgses allow us to be consistent with the direct detection result reported by XENON100, and it is possible to verify the model by the exposure of XENON100 (2012).

  13. LHC signals of a B -L supersymmetric standard model C P -even Higgs boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammad, A.; Khalil, S.; Moretti, S.

    2016-06-01

    We study the scope of the Large Hadron Collider in accessing a neutral Higgs boson of the B -L supersymmetric standard model. After assessing the surviving parameter space configurations following the Run 1 data taking, we investigate the possibilities of detecting this object during Run 2. For the model configurations in which the mixing between such a state and the discovered standard-model-like Higgs boson is non-negligible, there exist several channels enabling its discovery over a mass range spanning from ≈140 to ≈500 GeV . For a heavier Higgs state, with mass above 250 GeV (i.e., twice the mass of the Higgs state discovered in 2012), the hallmark signature is its decay in two such 125 GeV scalars, h'→h h , where h h →b b ¯ γ γ . For a lighter Higgs state, with mass of order 140 GeV, three channels are accessible: γ γ , Z γ , and Z Z , wherein the Z boson decays leptonically. In all such cases, significances above discovery can occur for already planned luminosities at the CERN machine.

  14. Mono-jet, -photon and - Z signals of a supersymmetric ( B - L) model at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, W.; Fiaschi, J.; Khalil, S.; Moretti, S.

    2016-02-01

    Search for invisible final states produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) by new physics scenarios are normally carried out resorting to a variety of probes emerging from the initial state, in the form of single-jet, -photon and - Z boson signatures. These are particularly effective for models of Supersymmetry (SUSY) in presence of R-parity conservation, owing to the presence in their spectra of a stable neutralino as a Dark Matter (DM) candidate. We assume here as theoretical framework the Supersymmetric version of the ( B - L) extension of the Standard Model (BLSSM), wherein a mediator for invisible decays can be the Z ' boson present in this scenario. The peculiarity of the signal is thus that the final state objects carry a very large (transverse) missing energy, since the Z ' is naturally massive and constrained by direct searches and Electro-Weak Precision Tests (EWPTs) to be at least in the TeV scale region. Under these circumstances the efficiency in accessing the invisible final state and rejecting the Standard Model (SM) background is very high. This somehow compensates the rather meagre production rates. Another special feature of this invisible BLSSM signal is its composition, which is often dominated by sneutrino decays (alongside the more traditional neutrino and neutralino modes). Sensitivity of the CERN machine to these two features can therefore help disentangling the BLSSM from more popular SUSY models. We assess in this analysis the scope of the LHC in establishing the aforementioned invisible signals through a sophisticated signal-to-background simulation carried out in presence of parton shower, hadronisation as well as detector effects. We find that significant sensitivity exists already after 300 fb-1 during Run 2. We find that mono-jet events can be readily accessible at the LHC, so as to enable one to claim a prompt discovery, while mono-photon and - Z signals can be used as diagnostic tools of the underlying scenario.

  15. Diphoton resonances in a U (1 )B -L extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarides, G.; Shafi, Q.

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by the 750 GeV diphoton state recently reported by ATLAS and CMS, we propose a U (1 )B-L extension of the MSSM which predicts the existence of four spin zero resonance states that are degenerate in mass in the supersymmetric limit. Vectorlike fields, a gauge singlet field, as well as the MSSM Higgsinos are prevented from acquiring arbitrary large masses by a U (1 ) R symmetry. Indeed, these masses can be considerably lighter than the Z' gauge boson mass. Depending on kinematics, the resonance states could decay into right-handed neutrinos and sneutrinos, and/or MSSM Higgs fields and Higgsinos with total decay widths in the multi-GeV range.

  16. Constraints on abelian extensions of the Standard Model from two-loop vacuum stability and U(1) B- L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corianò, Claudio; Rose, Luigi Delle; Marzo, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    We present a renormalization group study of the scalar potential in a minimal U(1) B- L extension of the Standard Model involving one extra heavier Higgs and three heavy right-handed neutrinos with family universal B-L charge assignments. We implement a type-I seesaw for the masses of the light neutrinos of the Standard Model. In particular, compared to a previous study, we perform a two-loop extension of the evolution, showing that two-loop effects are essential for the study of the stability of the scalar potential up to the Planck scale. The analysis includes the contribution of the kinetic mixing between the two abelian gauge groups, which is radiatively generated by the evolution, and the one-loop matching conditions at the electroweak scale. By requiring the stability of the potential up to the Planck mass, significant constraints on the masses of the heavy neutrinos, on the gauge couplings and the mixing in the Higgs sector are identified.

  17. Non-resonant leptogenesis in seesaw models with an almost conserved B - L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racker, J.

    2013-03-01

    We review the motivations and some results on leptogenesis in seesaw models with an almost conserved lepton number. The paper is based on a talk given at the 5th International Symposium on Symmetries in Subatomic Physics, SSP2012.

  18. A Model-Independent Search for the decay B->l nu gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /more authors..

    2012-10-09

    The authors present a search for the radiative leptonic decay B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{gamma}, where {ell} = e, {mu}, using a data sample of 465 million B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR experiment. In this analysis, they fully reconstruct the hadronic decay of one of the B mesons in {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{sup +}B{sup -} decays, then search for evidence of B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{gamma} in the rest of the event. They observe no significant evidence of signal decays and report model-independent branching fraction upper limits of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{gamma}) < 17 x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}}{gamma}) < 24 x 10{sup -6}, and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{gamma}) < 15.6 x 10{sup -6} ({ell} = e or {mu}), all at the 90% confidence level.

  19. 3.5 keV X-ray line signal from dark matter decay in local U(1) B- L extension of Zee-Babu model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seungwon

    2015-08-01

    We consider a local U(1) B- L extension of Zee-Babu model to explain the recently observed 3.5 keV X-ray line signal. The model has three Standard model (SM)-singlet Dirac fermions with different U(1) B- L charges. A complex scalar field charged under U(1) B- L is introduced to break the U(1) B- L symmetry. After U(1) B- L symmetry breaking a remnant discrete symmetry stabilizes the lightest state of the Dirac fermions, which can be a stable dark matter (DM). The second lightest state, if mass splitting with the stable DM is about 3.5 keV, decays dominantly to the stable DM and 3.5 keV photon through two-loop diagrams, explaining the X-ray line signal. Two-loop suppression of the decay amplitude makes its lifetime much longer than the age of the universe and it can be a decaying DM candidate in large parameter region. We also introduce a real scalar field which is singlet under both the SM and U(1) B- L and can explain the current relic abundance of the Dirac fermionic DMs. If the mixing with the SM Higgs boson is small, it does not contribute to DM direct detection. The main contribution to the scattering of DM off atomic nuclei comes from the exchange of U(1) B- L gauge boson, Z ', and is suppressed below current experimental bound when Z' mass is heavy (≳10 TeV). If the singlet scalar mass is about 0.1-10 MeV, DM self-interaction can be large enough to solve small scale structure problems in simulations with the cold DM, such as, the core-vs-cusp problem and too-big-to-fail problem.

  20. An analysis of B -L =-2 operators from matter-Higgs interactions in a class of supersymmetric SO(10 ) models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Pran; Syed, Raza M.

    2016-03-01

    Recently interest in grand unification scale baryogenesis has been resurrected due to the observation that B -violating dimension seven operators that arise in grand unified theories that also violate B -L produce baryon asymmetry that cannot be wiped out by sphaleron processes. While a general analysis of such higher dimensional operators from a bottom up approach exists in the literature, a full analysis of them derived from grand unification does not exist. In this paper we present a complete analysis of B -L =-2 operators within a realistic S O (10 ) grand unification where the doublet-triplet splitting is automatic via a missing partner mechanism. Specifically we compute all allowed dimension five, dimension seven and dimension nine operators arising from matter-Higgs interactions. The relative strength of all the allowed B -L =-2 operators is given. Such interactions are useful in the study of neutrino masses, baryogenesis, proton decay and n -n ¯ oscillations within a common realistic grand unification framework.

  1. Nonzero {theta}{sub 13} for neutrino mixing in a supersymmetric B-L gauge model with T{sub 7} lepton flavor symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Qinghong; Khalil, Shaaban; Ma, Ernest; Okada, Hiroshi

    2011-10-01

    We discuss how {theta}{sub 13}{ne}0 is accommodated in a recently proposed renormalizable model of neutrino mixing using the non-Abelian discrete symmetry T{sub 7} in the context of a supersymmetric extension of the standard model with gauged U(1){sub B-L}. We predict a correlation between {theta}{sub 13} and {theta}{sub 23}, as well as the effective neutrino mass m{sub ee} in neutrinoless double beta decay.

  2. New ways to leptogenesis with gauged B-L symmetry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Babu, K.S.; Meng, Yanzhi; Tavartkiladze, Zurab

    2009-10-01

    We show that in supersymmetric models with gauged B-L symmetry, there is a new source for cosmological lepton asymmetry. The Higgs bosons responsible for B-L gauge symmetry breaking decay dominantly into right-handed sneutrinos N~ and N~* producing an asymmetry in N~ over N~*. This can be fully converted into ordinary lepton asymmetry in the decays of N~. In simple models with gauged B-L symmetry we show that resonant/soft leptogenesis is naturally realized. Supersymmetry guarantees quasi-degenerate scalar states, while soft breaking of SUSY provides the needed CP violation. Acceptable values of baryon asymmetry are obtained without causing serious problems with gravitinomore » abundance.« less

  3. An SO(10) model with SU(3)⊗ SU(2) L ⊗ SU(2) R ⊗ U(1) B-L ⊗ D intermediate symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccella, F.; Rosa, L.

    1987-09-01

    We construct a SO(10) model with intermediate symmetry 10052_2005_Article_BF01573937_TeX2GIFE1.gif SU(3) ⊗ SU(2)_L ⊗ SU(2)_R ⊗ U(1)_{B - L} ⊗ D and baryon and lepton number conserved between the two highest scales. The experimental values of sin2θ w and α s are consistent with the lower bound on τ p→ e ++π0 and with a mass value for v τ around 1 eV.

  4. Dirac or inverse seesaw neutrino masses from gauged B-L symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ernest; Srivastava, Rahul

    2015-08-01

    The gauged B-L symmetry is one of the simplest and well-studied extension of Standard Model. In the conventional case, addition of three singlet right-handed neutrinos each transforming as - 1 under the B-L symmetry renders it anomaly-free. It is usually assumed that the B-L symmetry is spontaneously broken by a singlet scalar having two units of B-L charge, resulting in a natural implementation of Majorana seesaw mechanism for neutrinos. However, as we discuss here, there is another simple anomaly-free solution which leads to Dirac or inverse seesaw masses for neutrinos. These new possibilities are explored along with an application to neutrino mixing with S3 flavor symmetry.

  5. Dirac or Inverse Seesaw Neutrino Masses from Gauged B - L Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ernest; Srivastava, Rahul

    The gauged B - L symmetry is one of the simplest and well studied extension of standard model. In the conventional case, addition of three singlet right-handed neutrinos each transforming as -1 under the B - L symmetry renders it anomaly free. It is usually assumed that the B - L symmetry is spontaneously broken by a singlet scalar having two units of B - L charge, resulting in a natural implementation of Majorana seesaw mechanism for neutrinos. However, as we discuss in this proceeding, there is another simple anomaly free solution which leads to Dirac or inverse seesaw masses for neutrinos. These new possibilities are explored along with an application to neutrino mixing with S3 flavour symmetry.

  6. B-L mediated SUSY breaking with radiative B-L symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Tatsuru; Kubo, Takayuki

    2008-11-23

    We explore a mechanism of radiative B-L symmetry breaking in analogous to the radiative electroweak symmetry breaking. The breaking scale of B-L symmetry is related to the neutrino masses through the see-saw mechanism. Once we incorporate the U(1){sub B-L} gauge symmetry in SUSY models, the U(1){sub B-L} gaugino, Z-tilde{sub B-L} appears, and it can mediate the SUSY breaking (Z-prime mediated SUSY breaking) at around the scale of 10{sup 6} GeV. Then we find a links between the neutrino mass (more precisly the see-saw or B-L scale of order 10{sup 6} GeV) and the Z-prime mediated SUSY breaking scale. It is also very interesting that the gluino at the weak scale becomes relatively light, and almost compressed mass spectra for the gaugino sector can be realized in this scenario, which is very interesting in scope of the LHC.

  7. Sneutrino inflation in supersymmetric B - L with inverse seesaw

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Shaaban; Sil, Arunansu

    2012-07-27

    We have shown that inflation in the supersymmetric B - L extension of the Standard Model can be realized where one of the associated right-handed sneutrinos can provide a non-trivial inflationary trajectory at tree level (hence breaking B - L during inflation). As soon as the inflation ends, the right-handed sneutrino falls into the supersymmetric vacuum, with a vanishing vacuum expectation value, so that B - L symmetry is restored. The B - L gauge symmetry will be radiatively broken at a TeV scale and light neutrino masses are generated through the inverse seesaw mechanism.

  8. 750 GeV diphoton excess from gauged B - L symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modak, Tanmoy; Sadhukhan, Soumya; Srivastava, Rahul

    2016-05-01

    We show that the recently observed 750 GeV diphoton excess at LHC can be due to the decay of a SU (2)L singlet scalar particle having 3 units of charge under gauged B - L symmetry. Such a particle arises as an essential ingredient of recently studied gauged B - L extension of the Standard Model with unconventional charge assignment for right handed neutrinos. Apart from being one of the simplest extensions of the Standard Model, the model also contains a dark matter candidate and Dirac neutrinos with naturally small masses.

  9. Modeling Natural Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogiages, Christopher A.; Lotter, Christine

    2011-01-01

    In their research, scientists generate, test, and modify scientific models. These models can be shared with others and demonstrate a scientist's understanding of how the natural world works. Similarly, students can generate and modify models to gain a better understanding of the content, process, and nature of science (Kenyon, Schwarz, and Hug…

  10. B-L violating proton decay modes and new baryogenesis scenario in SO(10).

    PubMed

    Babu, K S; Mohapatra, R N

    2012-08-31

    We show that grand unified theories based on SO(10) generate quite naturally baryon number violating dimension seven operators that violate B-L, and lead to novel nucleon decay modes such as n→e(-)K(+), e(-)π(+) and p→νπ(+). We find that in two-step breaking schemes of nonsupersymmetric SO(10), the partial lifetimes for these modes can be within reach of experiments. The interactions responsible for these decay modes also provide a new way to understand the origin of matter in the Universe via the decays of grand unified theory (GUT) scale scalar bosons of SO(10). Their (B-L)-violating nature guarantees that the GUT scale induced baryon asymmetry is not washed out by the electroweak sphaleron interactions. In minimal SO(10) models this asymmetry is closely tied to the masses of quarks, leptons and the neutrinos. PMID:23002824

  11. The gravitational wave spectrum from cosmological B-L breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Buchmüller, W.; Domcke, V.; Kamada, K.; Schmitz, K. E-mail: valerie.domcke@desy.de E-mail: kai.schmitz@ipmu.jp

    2013-10-01

    Cosmological B-L breaking is a natural and testable mechanism to generate the initial conditions of the hot early universe. If B-L is broken at the grand unification scale, the false vacuum phase drives hybrid inflation, ending in tachyonic preheating. The decays of heavy B-L Higgs bosons and heavy neutrinos generate entropy, baryon asymmetry and dark matter and also control the reheating temperature. The different phases in the transition from inflation to the radiation dominated phase produce a characteristic spectrum of gravitational waves. We calculate the complete gravitational wave spectrum due to inflation, preheating and cosmic strings, which turns out to have several features. The production of gravitational waves from cosmic strings has large uncertainties, with lower and upper bounds provided by Abelian Higgs strings and Nambu-Goto strings, implying Ω{sub GW}h{sup 2} ∼ 10{sup −13}–10{sup −8}, much larger than the spectral amplitude predicted by inflation. Forthcoming gravitational wave detectors such as eLISA, advanced LIGO, ET, BBO and DECIGO will reach the sensitivity needed to test the predictions from cosmological B-L breaking.

  12. SU(5) without SU(5): why B-L is conserved and baryon number not in unified models of quarks and leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1980-09-01

    Quark-lepton unification is examined without assuming higher symmetries on more general gauge theories. In particular, properties are sought which are generally attributed to SU(5) models which are already present without the assumption of SU(5). (GHT)

  13. World Natural Gas Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-12-01

    RAMSGAS, the Research and Development Analysis Modeling System World Natural Gas Model, was developed to support planning of unconventional gaseoues fuels research and development. The model is a scenario analysis tool that can simulate the penetration of unconventional gas into world markets for oil and gas. Given a set of parameter values, the model estimates the natural gas supply and demand for the world for the period from 1980 to 2030. RAMSGAS is based onmore » a supply/demand framwork and also accounts for the non-renewable nature of gas resources. The model has three fundamental components: a demand module, a wellhead production cost module, and a supply/demand interface module. The demand for gas is a product of total demand for oil and gas in each of 9 demand regions and the gas share. Demand for oil and gas is forecast from the base year of 1980 through 2030 for each demand region, based on energy growth rates and price-induced conservation. For each of 11 conventional and 19 unconventional gas supply regions, wellhead production costs are calculated. To these are added transportation and distribution costs estimates associated with moving gas from the supply region to each of the demand regions and any economic rents. Based on a weighted average of these costs and the world price of oil, fuel shares for gas and oil are computed for each demand region. The gas demand is the gas fuel share multiplied by the total demand for oil plus gas. This demand is then met from the available supply regions in inverse proportion to the cost of gas from each region. The user has almost complete control over the cost estimates for each unconventional gas source in each year and thus can compare contributions from unconventional resources under different cost/price/demand scenarios.« less

  14. Chaotic hybrid inflation with a gauged B -L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Linda M.; Raby, Stuart

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we present a novel formulation of chaotic hybrid inflation in supergravity. The model includes a waterfall field which spontaneously breaks a gauged U1 (B- L) at a GUT scale. This allows for the possibility of future model building which includes the standard formulation of baryogenesis via leptogenesis with the waterfall field decaying into right-handed neutrinos. We have not considered the following issues in this short paper, i.e. supersymmetry breaking, dark matter or the gravitino or moduli problems. Our focus is on showing the compatibility of the present model with Planck, WMAP and Bicep2 data.

  15. TeV-scale gauged B-L symmetry with inverse seesaw mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Shaaban

    2010-10-01

    We propose a modified version of the TeV-scale B-L extension of the standard model, where neutrino masses are generated through the inverse seesaw mechanism. We show that heavy neutrinos in this model can be accessible via clean signals at the LHC. The search for the extra gauge boson Z{sub B-L}{sup '} through the decay into dileptons or two dileptons plus missing energy is studied. We also show that the B-L extra Higgs boson can be directly probed at the LHC via a clean dilepton and missing energy signal.

  16. Dark Matter and neutrino masses from global U(1) B - L symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Manfred; Schmidt, Daniel; Schwetz, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    We present a scenario where neutrino masses and Dark Matter are related due to a global U(1) B - L symmetry. Specifically we consider neutrino mass generation via the Zee-Babu two-loop mechanism, augmented by a scalar singlet whose VEV breaks the global U(1) B - L symmetry. In order to obtain a Dark Matter candidate we introduce two Standard Model singlet fermions. They form a Dirac particle and are stable because of a remnant Z2 symmetry. Hence, in this model the stability of Dark Matter follows from the global U(1) B - L symmetry. We discuss the Dark Matter phenomenology of the model, and compare it to similar models based on gauged U(1) B - L. We argue that in contrast to the gauged versions, the model based on the global symmetry does not suffer from severe constraints from Z‧ searches.

  17. Natural language modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, J.K.

    1997-11-01

    This seminar describes a process and methodology that uses structured natural language to enable the construction of precise information requirements directly from users, experts, and managers. The main focus of this natural language approach is to create the precise information requirements and to do it in such a way that the business and technical experts are fully accountable for the results. These requirements can then be implemented using appropriate tools and technology. This requirement set is also a universal learning tool because it has all of the knowledge that is needed to understand a particular process (e.g., expense vouchers, project management, budget reviews, tax, laws, machine function).

  18. Mass spectrum and Higgs profile in B -L symmetric SSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ün, Cem Salih; Özdal, Özer

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the predictions on the mass spectrum and Higgs boson decays in the supersymmetric standard model extended by U (1 )B-L symmetry (BLSSM). The model requires two singlet Higgs fields, which are responsible for the radiative breaking of U (1 )B-L symmetry. It predicts degenerate right-handed neutrino masses (1.7-2.2 TeV) as well as the right-handed sneutrinos of mass ≲4 TeV . The presence of right-handed neutrinos and sneutrinos triggers the baryon and lepton number violation processes, until they decouple from the standard model particles. Besides, the model predicts rather heavy colored particles; mt ˜ , mb ˜≳1.5 TeV , while mτ ˜≳100 GeV and mχ˜1±≳600 GeV . Even though the implications are similar to the minimal supersymmetric standard model, BLSSM can predict another Higgs boson lighter than 150 GeV. We find that the second Higgs boson can be degenerate with the lightest charge parity (C P )-even Higgs boson of mass about 125 GeV and contribute to the Higgs decay into two photons. In addition, it can provide an explanation for the excess in h →4 l at the mass scale ˜145 GeV .

  19. Natural Poincare gauge model

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrovandi, R.; Pereira, J.G.

    1986-05-15

    Because it acts on space-time and is not semisimple, the Poincare group cannot lead to a gauge theory of the usual kind. A candidate model is discussed which keeps itself as close as possible to the typical gauge scheme. Its field equations are the Yang-Mills equations for the Poincare group. It is shown that there exists no Lagrangian for these equations.

  20. Semishifted hybrid inflation with B-L cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarides, George; Peddie, Iain N. R.; Vamvasakis, Achilleas

    2008-08-15

    We discuss a new inflationary scenario that is realized within the extended supersymmetric Pati-Salam model which yields an acceptable b-quark mass for universal boundary conditions and {mu}>0 by modestly violating Yukawa unification and leads to new shifted, new smooth, or standard-smooth hybrid inflation. Inflation takes place along a ''semishifted'' classically flat direction on which the U(1){sub B-L} gauge group remains unbroken. After the end of inflation, U(1){sub B-L} breaks spontaneously and a network of local cosmic strings, which contribute a small amount to the curvature perturbation, is produced. We show that, in minimal supergravity, this semishifted inflationary scenario is compatible with a recent fit to data which uses field-theory simulations of a local string network. Taking into account the requirement of gauge unification, we find that, for spectral index n{sub s}=1, the predicted fractional contribution of strings to the temperature power spectrum at multipole l=10 is f{sub 10}{approx_equal}0.039. Also, for f{sub 10}=0.10, which is the best-fit value, we obtain n{sub s}{approx_equal}1.0254. Spectral indices lower than about 0.98 are excluded and blue spectra are slightly favored. Magnetic monopoles are not formed at the end of semishifted hybrid inflation.

  1. Modeling Natural Variation through Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrer, Richard; Schauble, Leona

    2004-01-01

    This design study tracks the development of student thinking about natural variation as late elementary grade students learned about distribution in the context of modeling plant growth at the population level. The data-modeling approach assisted children in coordinating their understanding of particular cases with an evolving notion of data as an…

  2. Sterile neutrino dark matter with gauged U(1){sub B-L} and a low reheating temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Shaaban; Seto, Osamu

    2009-04-17

    Sterile right-handed neutrinos can be naturally embedded in a low scale gauged U(1){sub B-L} extension of the standard model. We show that, within a low reheating scenario, such a neutrino can be produced via a novel manner, namely scattering through Z' gauge boson, and becomes an interesting dark matter candidate. In addition, we show that if the neutrino mass is of the order of MeV, then it accounts for the measured dark matter relic density and also accommodates the observed flux of 511 keV photons from the galactic bulge.

  3. The mass spectra, hierarchy and cosmology of B-L MSSM heterotic compactifications

    SciTech Connect

    Ambroso, Michael; Ovrut, Burt A.

    2011-04-10

    The matter spectrum of the MSSM, including three right-handed neutrino supermultiplets and one pair of Higgs-Higgs conjugate superfields, can be obtained by compactifying the E₈ x E₈ heterotic string and M-theory on Calabi-Yau manifolds with specific SU(4) vector bundles. These theories have the standard model gauge group augmented by an additional gauged U(1)B-L. Their minimal content requires that the B-L gauge symmetry be spontaneously broken by a vacuum expectation value of at least one right-handed neutrino. In previous papers, we presented the results of a quasi-analytic renormalization group analysis showing that B-L gauge symmetry is indeed radiatively broken with an appropriate B-L/electroweak hierarchy. In this paper, we extend these results by 1) enlarging the initial parameter space and 2) explicitly calculating all renormalization group equations numerically. The regions of the initial parameter space leading to realistic vacua are presented and the B-L/electroweak hierarchy computed over these regimes. At representative points, the mass spectrum for all particles and Higgs fields is calculated and shown to be consistent with present experimental bounds. Some fundamental phenomenological signatures of a non-zero right-handed neutrino expectation value are discussed, particularly the cosmology and proton lifetime arising from induced lepton and baryon number violating interactions.

  4. The mass spectra, hierarchy and cosmology of B-L MSSM heterotic compactifications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ambroso, Michael; Ovrut, Burt A.

    2011-04-10

    The matter spectrum of the MSSM, including three right-handed neutrino supermultiplets and one pair of Higgs-Higgs conjugate superfields, can be obtained by compactifying the E₈ x E₈ heterotic string and M-theory on Calabi-Yau manifolds with specific SU(4) vector bundles. These theories have the standard model gauge group augmented by an additional gauged U(1)B-L. Their minimal content requires that the B-L gauge symmetry be spontaneously broken by a vacuum expectation value of at least one right-handed neutrino. In previous papers, we presented the results of a quasi-analytic renormalization group analysis showing that B-L gauge symmetry is indeed radiatively broken with anmore » appropriate B-L/electroweak hierarchy. In this paper, we extend these results by 1) enlarging the initial parameter space and 2) explicitly calculating all renormalization group equations numerically. The regions of the initial parameter space leading to realistic vacua are presented and the B-L/electroweak hierarchy computed over these regimes. At representative points, the mass spectrum for all particles and Higgs fields is calculated and shown to be consistent with present experimental bounds. Some fundamental phenomenological signatures of a non-zero right-handed neutrino expectation value are discussed, particularly the cosmology and proton lifetime arising from induced lepton and baryon number violating interactions.« less

  5. U(1)B-L symmetry restoration and effective neutrino species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2014-06-01

    The U(1)B-L symmetry could be restored during inflation, since the BICEP2 results suggest a GUT-scale inflation with the Hubble parameter, Hinf≃1014 GeV, close to the U(1)B-L breaking scale. We consider a scenario in which the B-L Higgs field dominates the Universe after inflation, and mainly decays into the U(1)B-L gauge bosons, whose subsequent decays reheat the Universe. Interestingly, if one of the right-handed neutrinos is extremely light and behaves as dark radiation or hot dark matter, its abundance is determined by the B-L charge assignment and the relativistic degree of freedom in plasma. We find that ΔNeff takes discrete values between 0.188 and 0.220 in the standard model plus three right-handed neutrinos, depending on whether the decay into heavier right-handed neutrinos is kinematically accessible or not. In the fiveness U(1)5 case, we find that ΔNeff takes discrete values between 0.313 and 0.423. The tension between BICEP2 and Planck can be partially relaxed by dark radiation.

  6. Pure gravity mediation and spontaneous B-L breaking from strong dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, Kaladi S.; Schmitz, Kai; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2016-04-01

    In pure gravity mediation (PGM), the most minimal scheme for the mediation of supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking to the visible sector, soft masses for the standard model gauginos are generated at one loop rather than via direct couplings to the SUSY-breaking field. In any concrete implementation of PGM, the SUSY-breaking field is therefore required to carry nonzero charge under some global or local symmetry. As we point out in this note, a prime candidate for such a symmetry might be B- L, the Abelian gauge symmetry associated with the difference between baryon number B and lepton number L. The F-term of the SUSY-breaking field then not only breaks SUSY, but also B- L, which relates the respective spontaneous breaking of SUSY and B- L at a fundamental level. As a particularly interesting consequence, we find that the heavy Majorana neutrino mass scale ends up being tied to the gravitino mass, ΛN ∼m3/2. Assuming nonthermal leptogenesis to be responsible for the generation of the baryon asymmetry of the universe, this connection may then explain why SUSY necessarily needs to be broken at a rather high energy scale, so that m3/2 ≳ 1000 TeV in accord with the concept of PGM. We illustrate our idea by means of a minimal model of dynamical SUSY breaking, in which B- L is identified as a weakly gauged flavor symmetry. We also discuss the effect of the B- L gauge dynamics on the superparticle mass spectrum as well as the resulting constraints on the parameter space of our model. In particular, we comment on the role of the B- L D-term.

  7. Unification and mass spectrum in a B-L extended MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Pinto, R. J.; Perez-Lorenzana, A.

    2009-04-20

    The simplest B-L extension of the minimum supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) may change some of the conceptions about the path for gauge unification as well as to affect the predicted spectrum of the supersymmetric particles at low energy. We present our results for the running of gauge coupling constants and mass parameter in this context.

  8. PHOTOCHEMICAL MODELING APPLIED TO NATURAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study examines the application of modeling photochemical processes in natural water systems. For many photochemical reactions occurring in natural waters, a simple photochemical model describing reaction rate as a function of intensity, radiation attenuation, reactant absorpt...

  9. Chromo-natural model in anisotropic background

    SciTech Connect

    Maleknejad, Azadeh; Erfani, Encieh E-mail: eerfani@ipm.ir

    2014-03-01

    In this work we study the chromo-natural inflation model in the anisotropic setup. Initiating inflation from Bianchi type-I cosmology, we analyze the system thoroughly during the slow-roll inflation, from both analytical and numerical points of view. We show that the isotropic FRW inflation is an attractor of the system. In other words, anisotropies are damped within few e-folds and the chromo-natural model respects the cosmic no-hair conjecture. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in the slow-roll limit, the anisotropies in both chromo-natural and gauge-flation models share the same dynamics.

  10. Adapting overcomplete wavelet models to natural images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallee, Phil; Olshausen, Bruno A.

    2003-11-01

    Overcomplete wavelet representations have become increasingly popular for their ability to provide highly sparse and robust descriptions of natural signals. We describe a method for incorporating an overcomplete wavelet representation as part of a statistical model of images which includes a sparse prior distribution over the wavelet coefficients. The wavelet basis functions are parameterized by a small set of 2-D functions. These functions are adapted to maximize the average log-likelihood of the model for a large database of natural images. When adapted to natural images, these functions become selective to different spatial orientations, and they achieve a superior degree of sparsity on natural images as compared with traditional wavelet bases. The learned basis is similar to the Steerable Pyramid basis, and yields slightly higher SNR for the same number of active coefficients. Inference with the learned model is demonstrated for applications such as denoising, with results that compare favorably with other methods.

  11. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Natural Gas Model

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) Natural Gas Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  12. International Natural Gas Model 2011, Model Documentation Report

    EIA Publications

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the International Natural Gas Model (INGM). It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  13. Space Station Freedom natural environment design models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom program has established a series of natural environment models and databases for utilization in design and operations planning activities. The suite of models and databases that have either been selected from among internationally recognized standards or developed specifically for spacecraft design applications are presented. The models have been integrated with an orbit propagator and employed to compute environmental conditions for planned operations altitudes of Space Station Freedom.

  14. Mini force: The (B -L )+x Y gauge interaction with a light mediator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hye-Sung; Yun, Seokhoon

    2016-06-01

    The relevant phenomenology and the best search schemes of a subelectroweak-scale gauge boson can be vastly different depending on its coupling. For instance, the rare decay into a light gauge boson and the high precision parity test can be sensitive if it has an axial coupling. The minimal gauge extension of the standard model with the U (1 )B-L +x Y requires only three right-handed neutrinos, well suited to the current neutrino mass and mixing data, and no additional exotic matter fields. We study the light gauge boson of this symmetry in detail, including its axial coupling property from the hypercharge shift.

  15. Computational models of natural language processing

    SciTech Connect

    Bara, B.G.; Guida, G.

    1984-01-01

    The main concern in this work is the illustration of models for natural language processing, and the discussion of their role in the development of computational studies of language. Topics covered include the following: competence and performance in the design of natural language systems; planning and understanding speech acts by interpersonal games; a framework for integrating syntax and semantics; knowledge representation and natural language: extending the expressive power of proposition nodes; viewing parsing as word sense discrimination: a connectionist approach; a propositional language for text representation; from topic and focus of a sentence to linking in a text; language generation by computer; understanding the Chinese language; semantic primitives or meaning postulates: mental models of propositional representations; narrative complexity based on summarization algorithms; using focus to constrain language generation; and towards an integral model of language competence.

  16. Modelling natural wetlands from LGM to Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinen, T.; Brovkin, V.

    2014-12-01

    While natural wetlands are the largest natural source of methane, they also accumulate substantial amounts of carbon, with estimates of peat accumulated during the Holocene reaching 600 PgC. The consideration of natural wetlands in land surface models therefore is an important challenge for closing the GHG budgets on both short and long time scales. In order to mechanistically model glacial-interglacial carbon cycle dynamics, we have developed a dynamical model of wetland extent and wetland biogeochemistry, which we have integrated in the coupled climate carbon cycle model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER2-LPJ. This model consists of the climate model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER2, containing dynamic models of atmosphere and ocean, as well as sea ice and land surface modules. Its coarse spatial resolution leads to a high computational speed, which allows long-term transient integrations of the coupled model. Land carbon dynamics are computed using the dynamic global vegetation model LPJ, running at a high spatial resolution of 0.5° and coupled to CLIMBER2 using the climate anomalies approach. Changes in land carbon storage as a response to changes in climate or atmospheric CO2 are therefore taken into account interactively at high spatial resolution. Within this model, we have implemented a module that dynamically determines the extent of a grid cell that is inundated, based on the TOPMODEL approach, incorporating sub-grid scale information on hydrological properties of the land surface. Within the wetlands determined, decomposition of carbon is slowed under anaerobic conditions and methane is generated, which is emitted via the three pathways of diffusion, ebullition and plant mediated transport. In addition, the excess of biomass production over organic matter decomposition in permanent wetlands leads to accumulation of peat. We have performed model experiments covering the climatic range from the last glacial maximum to future climate states and will

  17. Higgs boson decays into γ γ and Z γ in the MSSM and the B -L supersymmetric SM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammad, A.; Khalil, S.; Moretti, S.

    2015-11-01

    We calculate Higgs decay rates into γ γ and Z γ in the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model and (B -L ) supersymmetric Standard Model by allowing for contributions from light staus (τ ˜ s ) and charginos (χ˜ ±s ). We show that sizable departures are possible from the Standard Model predictions for the 125 GeV state and that they are testable during Run 2 at the Large Hadron Collider. Furthermore, we illustrate how a second light scalar Higgs signal in either or both of these decay modes can be accessed at the CERN machine rather promptly within the (B -L ) supersymmetric Standard Model, a possibility instead precluded to the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model, owing to the much larger mass of its heavy scalar state.

  18. Modelling natural convection of fluid in cuvette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucher, D.; Manukhin, B.; Andreeva, O.; Chivilikhin, S.

    2014-09-01

    Convection is a process of transfer liquid from a hot region to a cool region. This phenomenon is involved in many physical processes. The main characteristic of convection is a temperature field. Modelling of convection allows to get the information about temperature field at any time of process. In this paper the results of modelling natural convection of fluid in cuvette are presented. All results are approved by experimental data. For modelling the process of natural convection Navier-Stokes equations under Boussinesq approximation were used. An experimental setup based on digital holographic interferometry was developedin order to make an experiment. The results for three stadiums of convection, such as: jet initiation, initial jet formation, jet development with formation of mushroom-shaped convective stream, are presented.

  19. Homophyly/Kinship Model: Naturally Evolving Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Angsheng; Li, Jiankou; Pan, Yicheng; Yin, Xianchen; Yong, Xi

    2015-10-01

    It has been a challenge to understand the formation and roles of social groups or natural communities in the evolution of species, societies and real world networks. Here, we propose the hypothesis that homophyly/kinship is the intrinsic mechanism of natural communities, introduce the notion of the affinity exponent and propose the homophyly/kinship model of networks. We demonstrate that the networks of our model satisfy a number of topological, probabilistic and combinatorial properties and, in particular, that the robustness and stability of natural communities increase as the affinity exponent increases and that the reciprocity of the networks in our model decreases as the affinity exponent increases. We show that both homophyly/kinship and reciprocity are essential to the emergence of cooperation in evolutionary games and that the homophyly/kinship and reciprocity determined by the appropriate affinity exponent guarantee the emergence of cooperation in evolutionary games, verifying Darwin’s proposal that kinship and reciprocity are the means of individual fitness. We propose the new principle of structure entropy minimisation for detecting natural communities of networks and verify the functional module property and characteristic properties by a healthy tissue cell network, a citation network, some metabolic networks and a protein interaction network.

  20. Homophyly/Kinship Model: Naturally Evolving Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Angsheng; Li, Jiankou; Pan, Yicheng; Yin, Xianchen; Yong, Xi

    2015-01-01

    It has been a challenge to understand the formation and roles of social groups or natural communities in the evolution of species, societies and real world networks. Here, we propose the hypothesis that homophyly/kinship is the intrinsic mechanism of natural communities, introduce the notion of the affinity exponent and propose the homophyly/kinship model of networks. We demonstrate that the networks of our model satisfy a number of topological, probabilistic and combinatorial properties and, in particular, that the robustness and stability of natural communities increase as the affinity exponent increases and that the reciprocity of the networks in our model decreases as the affinity exponent increases. We show that both homophyly/kinship and reciprocity are essential to the emergence of cooperation in evolutionary games and that the homophyly/kinship and reciprocity determined by the appropriate affinity exponent guarantee the emergence of cooperation in evolutionary games, verifying Darwin’s proposal that kinship and reciprocity are the means of individual fitness. We propose the new principle of structure entropy minimisation for detecting natural communities of networks and verify the functional module property and characteristic properties by a healthy tissue cell network, a citation network, some metabolic networks and a protein interaction network. PMID:26478264

  1. Homophyly/Kinship Model: Naturally Evolving Networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Angsheng; Li, Jiankou; Pan, Yicheng; Yin, Xianchen; Yong, Xi

    2015-01-01

    It has been a challenge to understand the formation and roles of social groups or natural communities in the evolution of species, societies and real world networks. Here, we propose the hypothesis that homophyly/kinship is the intrinsic mechanism of natural communities, introduce the notion of the affinity exponent and propose the homophyly/kinship model of networks. We demonstrate that the networks of our model satisfy a number of topological, probabilistic and combinatorial properties and, in particular, that the robustness and stability of natural communities increase as the affinity exponent increases and that the reciprocity of the networks in our model decreases as the affinity exponent increases. We show that both homophyly/kinship and reciprocity are essential to the emergence of cooperation in evolutionary games and that the homophyly/kinship and reciprocity determined by the appropriate affinity exponent guarantee the emergence of cooperation in evolutionary games, verifying Darwin's proposal that kinship and reciprocity are the means of individual fitness. We propose the new principle of structure entropy minimisation for detecting natural communities of networks and verify the functional module property and characteristic properties by a healthy tissue cell network, a citation network, some metabolic networks and a protein interaction network. PMID:26478264

  2. Modeling complexometric titrations of natural water samples.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Robert J M; Rue, Eden L; Bruland, Kenneth W

    2003-04-15

    Complexometric titrations are the primary source of metal speciation data for aquatic systems, yet their interpretation in waters containing humic and fulvic acids remains problematic. In particular, the accuracy of inferred ambient free metal ion concentrations and parameters quantifying metal complexation by natural ligands has been challenged because of the difficulties inherent in calibrating common analytical methods and in modeling the diverse array of ligands present. This work tests and applies a new method of modeling titration data that combines calibration of analytical sensitivity (S) and estimation of concentrations and stability constants for discrete natural ligand classes ([Li]T and Ki) into a single step using nonlinear regression and a new analytical solution to the one-metal/two-ligand equilibrium problem. When applied to jointly model data from multiple titrations conducted at different analytical windows, it yields accurate estimates of S, [Li]T, Ki, and [Cu2+] plus Monte Carlo-based estimates of the uncertainty in [Cu2+]. Jointly modeling titration data at low-and high-analytical windows leads to an efficient adaptation of the recently proposed "overload" approach to calibrating ACSV/CLE measurements. Application of the method to published data sets yields model results with greater accuracy and precision than originally obtained. The discrete ligand-class model is also re-parametrized, using humic and fulvic acids, L1 class (K1 = 10(13) M(-1)), and strong ligands (L(S)) with K(S) > K1 as "natural components". This approach suggests that Cu complexation in NW Mediterranean Sea water can be well represented as 0.8 +/- 0.3/0.2 mg humic equiv/L, 13 +/- 1 nM L1, and 2.5 +/- 0.1 nM L(S) with [CU]T = 3 nM. In coastal seawater from Narragansett Bay, RI, Cu speciation can be modeled as 0.6 +/- 0.1 mg humic equiv/L and 22 +/- 1 nM L1 or approximately 12 nM L1 and approximately 9 nM L(S), with [CU]T = 13 nM. In both waters, the large excess

  3. Teachers' views on the nature of models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justi, Rosária S.; Gilbert, John K.

    2003-11-01

    A semi-structured interview was used in Brazil to enquire into the 'notion of model' held by a total sample of 39 science teachers who were: employed in 'fundamental' (6-14 years) and 'medium' (15-17 years) schools; student science teachers currently doing their practicum; and university science teachers. Seven 'aspects' of their notions of a model were identified: the nature of a model, the use to which it can be put, the entities of which it consists, its relative uniqueness, the time span over which it is used, its status in the making of predictions, and the basis for the accreditation of its existence and use. Categories of meaning were identified for each of these aspects. The profiles of teachers' notions of 'model' in terms of the aspects and categories were complex, providing no support for the notion of 'Levels' in understanding. Teachers with degrees in chemistry or physics had different views about the notion of 'model' to those with degrees in biology or with teacher training certificates.

  4. The natural emissions model (NEMO): Description, application and model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liora, Natalia; Markakis, Konstantinos; Poupkou, Anastasia; Giannaros, Theodore M.; Melas, Dimitrios

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is the application and evaluation of a new computer model used for the quantification of emissions coming from natural sources. The Natural Emissions Model (NEMO) is driven by the meteorological data of the mesoscale numerical Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and it estimates particulate matter (PM) emissions from windblown dust, sea salt aerosols (SSA) and primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs). It also includes emissions from Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOCs) from vegetation; however, this study focuses only on particle emissions. An application and evaluation of NEMO at European scale are presented. NEMO and the modelling system consisted of WRF model and the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx) were applied in a 30 km European domain for the year 2009. The computed domain-wide annual PM10 emissions from windblown dust, sea salt and PBAPs were 0.57 Tg, 20 Tg and 0.12 Tg, respectively. PM2.5 represented 6% and 33% of emitted windblown dust and sea salt, respectively. Natural emissions are characterized by high geographical and seasonal variations; windblown dust emissions were the highest during summer in the southern Europe and SSA production was the highest in Atlantic Ocean during the cold season while in Mediterranean Sea the highest SSA emissions were found over the Aegean Sea during summer. Modelled concentrations were compared with surface station measurements and showed that the model captured fairly well the contribution of the natural sources to PM levels over Europe. Dust concentrations correlated better when dust transport events from Sahara desert were absent while the simulation of sea salt episodes led to an improvement of model performance during the cold season.

  5. Natural lightning flashes: from observation to modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defer, E.; Farges, T.; Barthe, C.; Bovalo, C.; Pinty, J.-P.; Chong, M.; Soula, S.; Ortéga, P.

    2011-12-01

    Different ground-based and space-based sensors are currently used to characterize and locate Earth lightning flashes like VHF mappers, VLF systems with short or long baseline, optical CCD camera and more recently microphone arrays. Concurrent observations with such equipments offer a unique description of the different processes occurring during the life of a lightning flash (triggering phase, leader development and junction phase). While the detection of lightning flashes becomes mature, more challenging investigations are still needed on i{)} Lightning Nitrogen Oxide (LINOx) production and on ii{)} the modeling of natural lightning discharges, even if ''engineer'' lightning schemes combined with electrification schemes are already implemented in numerical cloud resolving models. The PEACH project, the Atmospheric Electricity component of the upcoming field experiment HyMeX, will offer a unique opportunity for the European community to document and characterize the Mediterranean lightning activity with observations and modeling from the lightning scale to the regional scale and to gather the French community in preparation for the validation of future space-based missions like TARANIS and MTG-LI and for the interpretation of their lightning observations.

  6. Neurocysticercosis: A natural human model of epileptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nash, T.E.; Mahanty, S.; Loeb, J.A.; Theodore, W.H.; Friedman, A.; Sander, J.W.; Singh, E. G.; Cavalheiro, E.; Del Brutto, O.H.; Takayanagui, O.; Fleury, A.; Verastegui, M.; Preux, PM.; Montano, E.J.S.; Pretell, E.J.; White, A.C.; Gonzales, A. E.; Gilman, R.H.; Garcia, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop a better understanding on mechanisms of seizures and long-term epileptogenesis caused by neurocysticercosis. Methods A workshop was held bringing together experts in epilepsy and epileptogenesis and neurocysticercosis Results Human neurocysticercosis and parallel animal models offer a unique opportunity to understand basic mechanisms of seizures. Inflammatory responses to degenerating forms and in later stage calcified parasite granulomas are associated with seizures and epilepsy. Other mechanisms may also be involved in epileptogenesis as well. Conclusions Naturally occurring brain infections with neurocysticercosis offer a unique opportunity to develop treatments for one of the world’s most common causes of epilepsy and for the development of more general anti-epileptogenic treatments. Key advantages stem from the time course where an acute seizure heralds a start of the epileptogenic process and radiographic changes of calcification and perilesional edema provide biomarkers of a chronic epileptic state. PMID:25534640

  7. Modeling Recognition Memory Using the Similarity Structure of Natural Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacroix, Joyca P. W.; Murre, Jaap M. J.; Postma, Eric O.; van den Herik, H. Jaap

    2006-01-01

    The natural input memory (NAM) model is a new model for recognition memory that operates on natural visual input. A biologically informed perceptual preprocessing method takes local samples (eye fixations) from a natural image and translates these into a feature-vector representation. During recognition, the model compares incoming preprocessed…

  8. In the Footsteps of Nature: Nature Therapy as an Emerging Therapeutic-Educational Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Ronen

    2003-01-01

    Basic principles of the nature therapy model are described, integrating the author's personal journey and examples from fieldwork and theory. Four aspects are nature as "sacred space"; nature as therapeutic setting; healing potential of nature's physical and aesthetic elements and connections to "universal truths"; and development of a three-way…

  9. The Nature of Information Science: Changing Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Lyn; Karamuftuoglu, Murat

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: This paper considers the nature of information science as a discipline and profession. Method: It is based on conceptual analysis of the information science literature, and consideration of philosophical perspectives, particularly those of Kuhn and Peirce. Results: It is argued that information science may be understood as a field of…

  10. Molecular cloning of the Escherichia coli B L-fucose-D-arabinose gene cluster.

    PubMed Central

    Elsinghorst, E A; Mortlock, R P

    1994-01-01

    To metabolize the uncommon pentose D-arabinose, enteric bacteria often recruit the enzymes of the L-fucose pathway by a regulatory mutation. However, Escherichia coli B can grow on D-arabinose without the requirement of a mutation, using some of the L-fucose enzymes and a D-ribulokinase that is distinct from the L-fuculokinase of the L-fucose pathway. To study this naturally occurring D-arabinose pathway, we cloned and partially characterized the E. coli B L-fucose-D-arabinose gene cluster and compared it with the L-fucose gene cluster of E. coli K-12. The order of the fucA, -P, -I, and -K genes was the same in the two E. coli strains. However, the E. coli B gene cluster contained a 5.2-kb segment located between the fucA and fucP genes that was not present in E. coli K-12. This segment carried the darK gene, which encodes the D-ribulokinase needed for growth on D-arabinose by E. coli B. The darK gene was not homologous with any of the L-fucose genes or with chromosomal DNA from other D-arabinose-utilizing bacteria. D-Ribulokinase and L-fuculokinase were purified to apparent homogeneity and partially characterized. The molecular weights, substrate specificities, and kinetic parameters of these two enzymes were very dissimilar, which together with DNA hybridization analysis, suggested that these enzymes are not related. D-Arabinose metabolism by E. coli B appears to be the result of acquisitive evolution, but the source of the darK gene has not been determined. Images PMID:7961494

  11. Model documentation: Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-17

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The methodology employed allows the analysis of impacts of regional capacity constraints in the interstate natural gas pipeline network and the identification of pipeline capacity expansion requirements. There is an explicit representation of core and noncore markets for natural gas transmission and distribution services, and the key components of pipeline tariffs are represented in a pricing algorithm. Natural gas pricing and flow patterns are derived by obtaining a market equilibrium across the three main elements of the natural gas market: the supply element, the demand element, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. The NGTDM consists of four modules: the Annual Flow Module, the Capacity F-expansion Module, the Pipeline Tariff Module, and the Distributor Tariff Module. A model abstract is provided in Appendix A.

  12. Learning Phonics Naturally: A Model for Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Barbara; Lehnert, Linda

    1984-01-01

    Provides a look at primary grade children's abilities, inabilities, and requirements to use phonics as a beginning reading strategy and suggests a model that facilitates children's application of phonics while reading. (FL)

  13. Scattering measurements on natural and model trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James C.; Lee, Sung M.

    1990-01-01

    The acoustical back scattering from a simple scale model of a tree has been experimentally measured. The model consisted of a trunk and six limbs, each with 4 branches; no foliage or twigs were included. The data from the anechoic chamber measurements were then mathematically combined to construct the effective back scattering from groups of trees. Also, initial measurements have been conducted out-of-doors on a single tree in an open field in order to characterize its acoustic scattering as a function of azimuth angle. These measurements were performed in the spring, prior to leaf development. The data support a statistical model of forest scattering; the scattered signal spectrum is highly irregular but with a remarkable general resemblance to the incident signal spectrum. Also, the scattered signal's spectra showed little dependence upon scattering angle.

  14. Partially natural Two Higgs Doublet Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Patrick; Haber, Howard E.; Ruderman, Joshua T.

    2016-06-01

    It is possible that the electroweak scale is low due to the fine-tuning of microscopic parameters, which can result from selection effects. The experimental discovery of new light fundamental scalars other than the Standard Model Higgs boson would seem to disfavor this possibility, since generically such states imply parametrically worse fine-tuning with no compelling connection to selection effects. We discuss counterexamples where the Higgs boson is light because of fine-tuning, and a second scalar doublet is light because a discrete symmetry relates its mass to the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson. Our examples require new vectorlike fermions at the electroweak scale, and the models possess a rich electroweak vacuum structure. The mechanism that we discuss does not protect a small CP-odd Higgs mass in split or high-scale supersymmetry-breaking scenarios of the MSSM due to an incompatibility between the discrete symmetries and holomorphy.

  15. Quantifying the 'naturalness' of the curvaton model

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, Rose N.; Melville, Scott E-mail: scott.melville@queens.ox.ac.uk

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the probability of obtaining an observable curvature perturbation, using as an example the minimal curvaton-higgs (MCH) model. We determine ''probably observable'' and ''probably excluded'' regions of parameter space assuming generic initial conditions and applying a stochastic approach for the curvaton's evolution during inflation. Inflation is assumed to last longer than the N{sub obs} ≅ 55 observable e-folds, and the total number of e-folds of inflation determines the particular ranges of parameters that are probable. For the MCH model, these ''probably observable'' regions always lie within the range 8 × 10{sup 4} GeV ≤ m{sub σ} ≤ 2 × 10{sup 7} GeV, where m{sub σ} is the curvaton mass, and the Hubble scale at horizon exit is chosen as H{sub *} = 10{sup 10} GeV. Because the ''probably observable'' region depends on the total duration of inflation, information on parameters in the Lagrangian from particle physics and from precision CMB observations can therefore provide information about the total duration of inflation, not just the last N{sub obs} e-folds. This method could also be applied to any model that contains additional scalar fields to determine the probability that these scalar fields contribute to the curvature perturbation.

  16. The Effects of B/L-Dependent Heating on the Formation and Evolution of a Multi-Threaded Prominence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, Judith T.; Luna, M.; DeVore, C. R.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a comprehensive, multi-threaded, three-dimensional model of the plasma dynamics and energetics of a prominence and its overlying arcade (Luna et al. 2012). In this model, the basic magnetic structure is that of two interacting sheared arcades, while the cool condensations composing the prominence are formed by the well-studied thermal nonequilibrium mechanism. In a given filament-channel flux tube, the mass is evaporated from the chromosphere by heating localized near the footpoints, and condenses in the form of transient blobs or a persistent thread. Our previous studies of thermal nonequilibrium used steady or impulsive heating functions with no dependence on local physical. However, parametric active-region models with steady heating proportional to B/L, where B is the flux-tube magnetic field strength at each footpoint and L is the flux-tube length, yield the best agreement with observations (e.g., Schrijver et al. 2008). We have determined the effects of this active-region heating function on our model for the formation and evolution of prominence mass. We have also expanded the range of our computational domain to include more ofthe overlying arcade (the so-called "cavity") than in Luna et al. (2012), and have increased the number of selected flux tubes from 125 to 533. We will illustrate the time-dependent plasma behavior produced by the B/L heating function with synthetic images in several ALA passbands, and compare the resulting prominence properties with those predicted by our model with steady heating.

  17. Using STELLA Simulation Models to Teach Natural Resource Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dissanayake, Sahan T. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how graphical simulation models created using STELLA software can be used to present natural resource systems in an intuitive way in undergraduate natural resource economics classes based on his experiences at a leading research university, a state university, and a leading liberal arts college in the United…

  18. Fractal Modeling and Scaling in Natural Systems - Editorial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The special issue of Ecological complexity journal on Fractal Modeling and Scaling in Natural Systems contains representative examples of the status and evolution of data-driven research into fractals and scaling in complex natural systems. The editorial discusses contributions to understanding rela...

  19. A Working Model of Natural Selection Illustrated by Table Tennis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinc, Muhittin; Kilic, Selda; Aladag, Caner

    2013-01-01

    Natural selection is one of the most important topics in biology and it helps to clarify the variety and complexity of organisms. However, students in almost every stage of education find it difficult to understand the mechanism of natural selection and they can develop misconceptions about it. This article provides an active model of natural…

  20. Thermodynamic modeling of natural zeolite stability

    SciTech Connect

    Chipera, S.J.; Bish, D.L.

    1997-06-01

    Zeolites occur in a variety of geologic environments and are used in numerous agricultural, commercial, and environmental applications. It is desirable to understand their stability both to predict future stability and to evaluate the geochemical conditions resulting in their formation. The use of estimated thermodynamic data for measured zeolite compositions allows thermodynamic modeling of stability relationships among zeolites in different geologic environments (diagenetic, saline and alkaline lakes, acid rock hydrothermal, basic rock, deep sea sediments). This modeling shows that the relative cation abundances in both the aqueous and solid phases, the aqueous silica activity, and temperature are important factors in determining the stable zeolite species. Siliceous zeolites (e.g., clinoptilolite, mordenite, erionite) present in saline and alkaline lakes or diagenetic deposits formed at elevated silica activities. Aluminous zeolites (e.g., natrolite, mesolite/scolecite, thomsonite) formed in basic rocks in association with reduced silica activities. Likewise, phillipsite formation is favored by reduced aqueous silica activities. The presence of erionite, chabazite, and phillipsite are indicative of environments with elevated potassium concentrations. Elevated temperature, calcic water conditions, and reduced silica activity help to enhance the laumontite and wairakite stability fields. Analcime stability increases with increased temperature and aqueous Na concentration, and/or with decreased silica activity.

  1. Models for naturally fractured, carbonate reservoir simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncay, K.; Park, A.; Ozkan, G.; Zhan, X.; Ortoleva, P.; Hoak, T.; Sundberg, K.

    1998-12-31

    This report outlines the need for new tools for the simulation of fractured carbonate reservoirs. Several problems are identified that call for the development of new reservoir simulation physical models and numerical techniques. These include: karst and vuggy media wherein Darcy`s and traditional multi-phase flow laws do not apply; the need for predicting the preproduction state of fracturing and stress so that the later response of effective stress-dependent reservoirs can be predicted; and methods for predicting the fracturing and collapse of vuggy and karst reservoirs in response to draw-down pressure created during production. Specific research directions for addressing each problem are outlined and preliminary results are noted.

  2. [Ecotourism exploitation model in Bita Lake Natural Reserve of Yunnan].

    PubMed

    Yang, G; Wang, Y; Zhong, L

    2000-12-01

    Bita lake provincial natural reserve is located in Shangri-La region of North-western Yunnan, and was set as a demonstrating area for ecotourism exploitation in 1998. After a year's exploitation construction and half a year's operation as a branch of the 99' Kunming International Horticulture Exposition to accept tourists, it was proved that the ecotourism demonstrating area attained four integrated functions of ecotourism, i.e., tourism, protection, poverty clearing and environment education. Five exploitation and management models including function zoned exploitation model, featured tourism communication model signs system designing model, local Tibetan family reception model and environmental monitoring model, were also successful, which were demonstrated and spreaded to the whole province. Bita lake provincial natural reserve could be a good sample for the ecotourism exploitation natural reserves of the whole country. PMID:11767581

  3. Model documentation Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-26

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) of the National Energy Modeling System is developed and maintained by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. This report documents the archived version of the NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1996, (DOE/EIA-0383(96)). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic approach, and provides detail on the methodology employed. Previously this report represented Volume I of a two-volume set. Volume II reported on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.

  4. Modeling natural gas market volatility using GARCH with different distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiaodong; Shan, Xian

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we model natural gas market volatility using GARCH-class models with long memory and fat-tail distributions. First, we forecast price volatilities of spot and futures prices. Our evidence shows that none of the models can consistently outperform others across different criteria of loss functions. We can obtain greater forecasting accuracy by taking the stylized fact of fat-tail distributions into account. Second, we forecast volatility of basis defined as the price differential between spot and futures. Our evidence shows that nonlinear GARCH-class models with asymmetric effects have the greatest forecasting accuracy. Finally, we investigate the source of forecasting loss of models. Our findings based on a detrending moving average indicate that GARCH models cannot capture multifractality in natural gas markets. This may be the plausible explanation for the source of model forecasting losses.

  5. ESTIMATING NATURAL EMISSIONS FOR EPA'S REGIONAL OXIDANT MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper documents the methodology used to estimate natural sources of nitrogen oxide (NOx) and nonmethane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions in the Regional Oxidant Model (ROM). The ROM is a three-dimensional photochemical grid model designed to simulate hourly concentrations of ozo...

  6. A forest-fire model with natural fire resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, M. R.; Turcotte, D. L.; Rundle, J. B.; Glasscoe, M. T.; Donnellan, A.

    2010-12-01

    It is widely believed that contemporary wildfire suppression practices in the United States have contributed to conditions that facilitate large, destructive fires. We introduce a forest-fire model with natural fire-resistance that supports this theory. The model yields power-law frequency-size distributions of model fires with scaling exponent values 1.2 ≤ b ≤ 1.75, consistent with distributions of wildfires observed in the United States. We show a direct relationship between a fire's intensity and its burn area, and we show that aggressive suppression of small early season fires can compromise a region's natural fire-resistance, increasing the rate of large fires.

  7. Modeling Natural Stream Nutrient Concentrations from Landscape Predictors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, J. R.; Hawkins, C. P.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding how much land use change has affected nutrient concentrations in aquatic ecosystems requires a way of estimating the nutrient concentrations that were present in these systems before they were altered. Pre-alteration data are generally not available, but models that associate natural landscape variation with stream nutrient concentrations can be used to predict natural nutrient concentrations. These models can also provide insight into which processes are primarily responsible for observed natural spatial and temporal variability in stream nutrient concentrations. We used data from 782 reference sites across the western USA to develop empirical models that predict natural, base-flow concentrations of total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN). Models were built using Random Forests, a nonparametric regression technique that accounts for both interactions between variables and non-linear relationships. We developed candidate predictor variables associated with nutrient sources, sinks, or other processes potentially affecting nutrient concentrations among sites. Factors associated with watershed geology and P availability were the most important predictors of TP. Climate and co-precipitates were less important predictors. TN concentrations were equally associated with climate, atmospheric deposition, and vegetation phenology. Both models were relatively accurate (Root Mean Squared Errors < 12% of the range of observations for independent validation sites) and made better predictions than previous models of natural nutrient concentrations. However, the models were not very precise (r2 = 0.46 for the TP model, and r2 = 0.23 for the TN model). An analysis of the sources of variation showed that our models accounted for a majority of the spatial variation in nutrient concentrations, and much of the imprecision was due to temporal or measurement variation in nutrient concentrations.

  8. Time-resolved resonance Raman characterization of the bL550 intermediate and the two dark-adapted bRDA/560 forms of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Terner, J; Hsieh, C L; El-Sayed, M A

    1979-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of the second intermediate in the bacteriorhodopsin cycle, bL550, is obtained by a simple flow technique. The Schiff base linkage in this intermediate appears to be protonated, contrary to previous suggestion. The fingerprint region of the spectrum of bL550 does not closely match those of any presently available model Schiff bases of retinal isomers, though some comparisons can be made. The resonance Raman spectrum of dark-adapted bacteriorhodopsin is obtained and decomposed by computer subtraction of the spectrum of bR570. The remaining spectrum does not match the spectra of any model compounds presently in the literature. The spectra of bL550 and dark-adapted bRDA/560 from purple membrane in H2O are compared to those in D2O. It is found that changes in the spectrum occur in the 1,600 - 1,650 cm-1 region as well as in the 800 - 1,000 cm-1 region, but apparently not in the fingerprint region (1,100 - 1,400 cm-1). The possibilities of conformational changes of the retinal chromophore in the light adaptation process as well as the photosynthetic cycle are discussed. PMID:262430

  9. Forest-fire model with natural fire resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Mark R.; Turcotte, Donald L.; Rundle, John B.

    2011-04-01

    Observations suggest that contemporary wildfire suppression practices in the United States have contributed to conditions that facilitate large, destructive fires. We introduce a forest-fire model with natural fire resistance that supports this theory. Fire resistance is defined with respect to the size and shape of clusters; the model yields power-law frequency-size distributions of model fires that are consistent with field observations in the United States, Canada, and Australia.

  10. Natural and synthetic podolactones with potential use as natural herbicide models.

    PubMed

    Macías, F A; Simonet, A M; Pacheco, P C; Barrero, A F; Cabrera, E; Jiménez-González, D

    2000-07-01

    A collection of 11 natural and synthetic podolactones have been tested as allelochemicals in a range between 10(-4) and 10(-9) M, and their potential use as natural herbicide models is discussed. Their effects on the germination and growth of the dicots Lactuca sativa (cv. Nigra and cv. Roman), Lepidium sativum, and Lycopersicon esculentum and the monocots Allium cepa, Hordeum vulgare, and Triticum aestivum as standard target species have been studied. An important inhibitory effect on the germination and growth of all tested species (average = 90%) was produced by compounds 9-11 at 10(-4) M. The specific structural requirements related to their activities are studied. On the basis of these results, their use as potential natural herbicide models is proposed. PMID:10898656

  11. Can Nature Protection be Unsustainable? Models Behind Nature Protection in New Zealands National Parks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauhs, Michael; Bogner, Christina

    2013-04-01

    Nature protection can be justified by intrinsic values of life. Western culture sees nature as an autonomous system. Thus, nature protection is often synonymous with refraining from human interference as much as possible. This, however, can pose at least technical problems. Indeed, historical human impacts such as introduced species are often irreversible. In such cases refraining from human interference to protect threatened species is not an adequate management response. Nature protection in New Zealand is a prominent example. Many introduced species make a non-interventionist attitude infeasible to protect endemic species such as kiwis. Actually, active human interference is necessary to attain this goal. Therefore, one may consider nature protection as another form of land use. As any other form of land use, it needs standards of proper management (i.e. explicit goals, assessment, intervention etc.). In other words, it has to be shown to be sustainable. However, sustainability may rigorously be defined as an attribute of past land use only. Instantaneous positive indicators of sustainability may be elusive. At best it can be decided by observation whether or not a land use has been (not) sustainable until now. Stakeholders of nature protection have often different (implicit) concepts or models of nature in mind. This can lead to conflicts when it comes to management decisions. For example, the methods by which conservationists in New Zealand seek to re-establish historical species assemblages (e.g. aerial drop of poison into national parks) have come under criticism of animal rights groups as non-humane. We propose to use abstract modelling language to classify these concepts of nature protection and related issues. We show that from modelling perspective these conflicts pose a basic science problem rather than an applied science problem. This makes the delegation into existing disciplines so hard. We discuss possible implications for nature protection

  12. a model based on crowsourcing for detecting natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, J.; Ma, C.; Zhang, J.; Liu, S.; Liu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Remote Sensing Technology provides a new method for the detecting,early warning,mitigation and relief of natural hazards. Given the suddenness and the unpredictability of the location of natural hazards as well as the actual demands for hazards work, this article proposes an evaluation model for remote sensing detecting of natural hazards based on crowdsourcing. Firstly, using crowdsourcing model and with the help of the Internet and the power of hundreds of millions of Internet users, this evaluation model provides visual interpretation of high-resolution remote sensing images of hazards area and collects massive valuable disaster data; secondly, this evaluation model adopts the strategy of dynamic voting consistency to evaluate the disaster data provided by the crowdsourcing workers; thirdly, this evaluation model pre-estimates the disaster severity with the disaster pre-evaluation model based on regional buffers; lastly, the evaluation model actuates the corresponding expert system work according to the forecast results. The idea of this model breaks the boundaries between geographic information professionals and the public, makes the public participation and the citizen science eventually be realized, and improves the accuracy and timeliness of hazards assessment results.

  13. Model documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System; Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-02-24

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is a component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. This report documents the archived version of NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts used in support of the Annual Energy Outlook 1994, DOE/EIA-0383(94). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. It is intended to fulfill the legal obligation of the EIA to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, Section 57.b.2). This report represents Volume 1 of a two-volume set. (Volume 2 will report on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.) Subsequent chapters of this report provide: (1) an overview of the NGTDM (Chapter 2); (2) a description of the interface between the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and the NGTDM (Chapter 3); (3) an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM (Chapter 4); (4) the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module (Chapter 5); (5) the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module (Chapter 6); (6) the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module (Chapter 7); (7) the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module (Chapter 8); and (8) a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs (Chapter 9).

  14. Numerical Modeling of Fracture Propagation in Naturally Fractured Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Prodanovic, M.; Olson, J. E.; Schultz, R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing consists of injecting fluid at high pressure and high flowrate to the wellbore for the purpose of enhancing production by generating a complex fracture network. Both tensile failure and shear failure occur during the hydraulic fracturing treatment. The shear event can be caused by slip on existing weak planes such as faults or natural fractures. From core observation, partially cemented and fully cemented opening mode natural fractures, often with considerable thickness are widely present. Hydraulic fractures can propagate either within the natural fracture (tensile failure) or along the interface between the natural fracture and the rock matrix (tensile/shear failure), depending on the relative strength of cement and rock matrix materials, the bonding strength of interface, as well as the presence of any heterogeneities. In this study, we evaluate the fracture propagation both experimentally and numerically. We embed one or multiple inclusions of different mechanical properties within synthetic hydrostone samples in order to mimic cemented natural fractures and rock. A semi-circular bending test is performed for each set of properties. A finite element model built with ABAQUS is used to mimic the semi-circular bending test and study the fracture propagation path, as well as the matrix-inclusion bonding interface status. Mechanical properties required for the numerical model are measured experimentally. The results indicate that the match between experiment and modeling fracture path are extremely sensitive to the chosen interface (bonding) model and related parameters. The semi-circular bending test is dry and easily conducted, providing a good platform for validating numerical approaches. A validated numerical model will enable us to add pressurized fluid within the crack and simulate hydraulic fracture-natural fracture interaction in the reservoir conditions, ultimately providing insights into the extent of the fracture network.

  15. Development of a natural Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Godec, M.; Haas, M.; Pepper, W.; Rose, J.

    1993-12-31

    Recent dramatic changes in natural gas markets have significant implications for the scope and direction of DOE`s upstream as well as downstream natural gas R&D. Open access transportation changes the way gas is bought and sold. The end of the gas deliverability surplus requires increased reserve development above recent levels. Increased gas demand for power generation and other new uses changes the overall demand picture in terms of volumes, locations and seasonality. DOE`s Natural Gas Strategic Plan requires that its R&D activities be evaluated for their ability to provide adequate supplies of reasonably priced gas. Potential R&D projects are to be evaluated using a full fuel cycle, benefit-cost approach to estimate likely market impact as well as technical success. To assure R&D projects are evaluated on a comparable basis, METC has undertaken the development of a comprehensive natural gas technology evaluation framework. Existing energy systems models lack the level of detail required to estimate the impact of specific upstream natural gas technologies across the known range of geological settings and likely market conditions. Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM) research during FY 1993 developed and implemented this comprehensive, consistent natural gas system evaluation framework. Rather than a isolated research activity, however, GSAM represents the integration of many prior and ongoing natural gas research efforts. When complete, it will incorporate the most current resource base description, reservoir modeling, technology characterization and other geologic and engineering aspects developed through recent METC and industry gas R&D programs.

  16. Measuring Anthropogenic Sky Glow Using a Natural Sky Brightness Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duriscoe, Dan M.

    2013-11-01

    Anthropogenic sky glow (a result of light pollution) combines with the natural background brightness of the night sky when viewed by an observer on the earth's surface. In order to measure the anthropogenic component accurately, the natural component must be identified and subtracted. A model of the moonless natural sky brightness in the V-band was constructed from existing data on the Zodiacal Light, an airglow model based on the van Rhijn function, and a model of integrated starlight (including diffuse galactic light) constructed from images made with the same equipment used for sky brightness observations. The model also incorporates effective extinction by the atmosphere and is improved at high zenith angles (>80°) by the addition of atmospheric diffuse light. The model may be projected onto local horizon coordinates for a given observation at a resolution of 0.05° over the hemisphere of the sky, allowing it to be accurately registered with data images obtained from any site. Zodiacal Light and integrated starlight models compare favorably with observations from remote dark sky sites, matching within ± 8 nL over 95% of the sky. The natural airglow may be only approximately modeled, errors of up to ± 25 nL are seen when the airglow is rapidly changing or has considerable character (banding); ± 8 nL precision may be expected under favorable conditions. When subtracted from all-sky brightness data images, the model significantly improves estimates of sky glow from anthropogenic sources, especially at sites that experience slight to moderate light pollution.

  17. A Simple Model for Human and Nature Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motesharrei, S.; Rivas, J.; Kalnay, E.

    2012-12-01

    There are widespread concerns that current trends in population and resource-use are unsustainable, but the possibilities of an overshoot and collapse remain unclear and controversial. Collapses of civilizations have occurred many times in the past 5000 years, often followed by centuries of economic, intellectual, and population decline. Many different natural and social phenomena have been invoked to explain specific collapses, but a general explanation remains elusive. Two important features seem to appear across societies that have collapsed: Ecological Strain and Economic Stratification. Our new model (Human And Nature DYnamics, HANDY) has just four equations that describe the evolution of Elites, Commoners, Nature, and Wealth. Mechanisms leading to collapse are discussed and the measure "Carrying Capacity" is developed and defined. The model shows that societal collapse can happen due to either one of two independent factors: (1) over-consumption of natural resources, and/or (2) deep inequity between Elites and Commoners. The model also portrays two distinct types of collapse: (i) collapse followed by recovery of nature, and (ii) full collapse. The model suggests that the estimation of Carrying Capacity is a practical means for early detection of a collapse. Collapse can be avoided, and population can reach a sustainable equilibrium, if the rate of depletion of nature is reduced to a sustainable level, and if resources are distributed in a reasonably equitable fashion.; A type-ii (full) collapse is shown in this figure. With high inequality and high depletion, societies are doomed to collapse. Wealth starts to decrease when population rises above the carrying capacity. The large gap between carrying capacity and its maximum is a result of depletion factor being much larger than the sustainable limit. ; It is possible to overshoot, oscillate, and eventually converge to an equilibrium, even in an inequitable society. However, it requires policies that control

  18. Nature of Science and Models: Comparing Portuguese Prospective Teachers' Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Joana; Vasconcelos, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Despite the relevance of nature of science and scientific models in science education, studies reveal that students do not possess adequate views regarding these topics. Bearing in mind that both teachers' views and knowledge strongly influence students' educational experiences, the main scope of this study was to evaluate Portuguese prospective…

  19. Data Modeling & the Infrastructural Nature of Conceptual Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesh, Richard; Caylor, Elizabeth; Gupta, Shweta

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to demonstrate the infrastructural nature of many modern conceptual technologies. The focus of this paper is on conceptual tools associated with elementary types of data modeling. We intend to show a variety of ways in which these conceptual tools not only express thinking, but also mold and shape thinking. And those ways…

  20. Building a Model Explaining the Social Nature of Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, I-Chun; Kim, Bosung; Liu, Pei-Ju; Goggins, Sean P.; Kumalasari, Christiana; Laffey, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Based on a framework emphasizing the social nature of learning, this research examines a model of how social constructs affect satisfaction within online learning using path analysis for students in higher education. The social constructs evaluated in this study include sense of community (SOC), social ability (SA), perceived ease of use (PEU) and…

  1. PREDETERMINATION OF NATURAL ILLUMINATION BY THE MODEL TESTING METHOD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PENA, WILLIAM A.

    NEW EDUCATIONAL SPECIFICATIONS HAVE CAUSED ARCHITECTS TO USE NEW FORMS WITH THEIR RESULTING NATURAL LIGHTING PROBLEMS. THE PROBLEM CAN BE ENGINEERED WITH THE USE OF MODELS. PREDICTION OF LIGHTING PERFORMANCE IN A BUILDING CAN BE MADE EARLY IN PLANNING. THIS METHOD PROVIDES FOR THE TESTING OF A VARIETY OF TRIAL SCHEMES ECONOMICALLY AND RAPIDLY.…

  2. Fishing for Nature's Hits: Establishment of the Zebrafish as a Model for Screening Antidiabetic Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Tabassum, Nadia; Tai, Hongmei; Jung, Da-Woon; Williams, Darren R.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects millions of people worldwide and significantly impacts their quality of life. Moreover, life threatening diseases, such as myocardial infarction, blindness, and renal disorders, increase the morbidity rate associated with diabetes. Various natural products from medicinal plants have shown potential as antidiabetes agents in cell-based screening systems. However, many of these potential “hits” fail in mammalian tests, due to issues such as poor pharmacokinetics and/or toxic side effects. To address this problem, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) model has been developed as a “bridge” to provide an experimentally convenient animal-based screening system to identify drug candidates that are active in vivo. In this review, we discuss the application of zebrafish to drug screening technologies for diabetes research. Specifically, the discovery of natural product-based antidiabetes compounds using zebrafish will be described. For example, it has recently been demonstrated that antidiabetic natural compounds can be identified in zebrafish using activity guided fractionation of crude plant extracts. Moreover, the development of fluorescent-tagged glucose bioprobes has allowed the screening of natural product-based modulators of glucose homeostasis in zebrafish. We hope that the discussion of these advances will illustrate the value and simplicity of establishing zebrafish-based assays for antidiabetic compounds in natural products-based laboratories. PMID:26681965

  3. Developing natural resource models using the object modeling system: feasibility and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, L. R.; Ascough, J. C., II; David, O.

    2005-08-01

    Current challenges in natural resource management have created demand for integrated, flexible, and easily parameterized hydrologic models. Most of these monolithic models are not modular, thus modifications (e.g., changes in process representation) require considerable time, effort, and expense. In this paper, the feasibility and challenges of using the Object Modeling System (OMS) for natural resource model development will be explored. The OMS is a Java-based modeling framework that facilitates simulation model development, evaluation, and deployment. In general, the OMS consists of a library of science, control, and database modules and a means to assemble the selected modules into an application-specific modeling package. The framework is supported by data dictionary, data retrieval, GIS, graphical visualization, and statistical analysis utility modules. Specific features of the OMS that will be discussed include: 1) how to reduce duplication of effort in natural resource modeling; 2) how to make natural resource models easier to build, apply, and evaluate; 3) how to facilitate long-term maintainability of existing and new natural resource models; and 4) how to improve the quality of natural resource model code and ensure credibility of model implementations. Examples of integrating a simple water balance model and a large monolithic model into the OMS will be presented.

  4. Measuring and Modeling Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material: Interpreting the Relationship Between the Natural Radionuclides Present

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, A.J.; Mucha, A.F.

    2008-07-01

    The regulatory release of sites and facilities (property) for restricted or unrestricted use has evolved beyond prescribed levels to model-derived dose and risk based limits. Dose models for deriving corresponding soil and structure radionuclide concentration guidelines are necessarily simplified representations of complex processes. A conceptual site model is often developed to present a reasonable and somewhat conservative representation of the physical and chemical properties of the impacted material. Dose modeling software is then used to estimate resulting dose and/or radionuclide specific acceptance criteria (activity concentrations). When the source term includes any or all of the uranium, thorium or actinium natural decay series radionuclides the interpretation of the relationship between the individual radionuclides of the series is critical to a technically correct and complete assessment of risk and/or derivation of radionuclide specific acceptance criteria. Unlike man-made radionuclides, modeling and measuring naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) and technologically enhanced NORM (TENORM) source terms involves the interpretation of the relationship between the radionuclide present, e.g., secular equilibrium, enrichment, depletion or transient equilibrium. Isotopes of uranium, radium, and thorium occur in all three natural decay series. Each of the three series also produces a radon gas isotope as one of its progeny. In nature, the radionuclides in the three natural decay series are in a state that is approaching or has achieved secular equilibrium, in which the activities of all radionuclides within each series are nearly equal. However, ores containing the three natural decay series may begin in approximate secular equilibrium, but after processing, equilibrium may be broken and certain elements (and the radioactive isotopes of that element) may be concentrated or removed. Where the original ore may have contained one long chain of natural

  5. Modeling Natural Anti-Inflammatory Compounds by Molecular Topology

    PubMed Central

    Galvez-Llompart, María; Zanni, Riccardo; García-Domenech, Ramón

    2011-01-01

    One of the main pharmacological problems today in the treatment of chronic inflammation diseases consists of the fact that anti-inflammatory drugs usually exhibit side effects. The natural products offer a great hope in the identification of bioactive lead compounds and their development into drugs for treating inflammatory diseases. Computer-aided drug design has proved to be a very useful tool for discovering new drugs and, specifically, Molecular Topology has become a good technique for such a goal. A topological-mathematical model, obtained by linear discriminant analysis, has been developed for the search of new anti-inflammatory natural compounds. An external validation obtained with the remaining compounds (those not used in building up the model), has been carried out. Finally, a virtual screening on natural products was performed and 74 compounds showed actual anti-inflammatory activity. From them, 54 had been previously described as anti-inflammatory in the literature. This can be seen as a plus in the model validation and as a reinforcement of the role of Molecular Topology as an efficient tool for the discovery of new anti-inflammatory natural compounds. PMID:22272145

  6. Genetic variants associated with neurodegenerative Alzheimer disease in natural models.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Claudia; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Ardiles, Álvaro O; Ewer, John; Palacios, Adrián G

    2016-01-01

    The use of transgenic models for the study of neurodegenerative diseases has made valuable contributions to the field. However, some important limitations, including protein overexpression and general systemic compensation for the missing genes, has caused researchers to seek natural models that show the main biomarkers of neurodegenerative diseases during aging. Here we review some of these models-most of them rodents, focusing especially on the genetic variations in biomarkers for Alzheimer diseases, in order to explain their relationships with variants associated with the occurrence of the disease in humans. PMID:26919851

  7. Image Discrimination Models Predict Object Detection in Natural Backgrounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Rohaly, A. M.; Watson, Andrew B.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Object detection involves looking for one of a large set of object sub-images in a large set of background images. Image discrimination models only predict the probability that an observer will detect a difference between two images. In a recent study based on only six different images, we found that discrimination models can predict the relative detectability of objects in those images, suggesting that these simpler models may be useful in some object detection applications. Here we replicate this result using a new, larger set of images. Fifteen images of a vehicle in an other-wise natural setting were altered to remove the vehicle and mixed with the original image in a proportion chosen to make the target neither perfectly recognizable nor unrecognizable. The target was also rotated about a vertical axis through its center and mixed with the background. Sixteen observers rated these 30 target images and the 15 background-only images for the presence of a vehicle. The likelihoods of the observer responses were computed from a Thurstone scaling model with the assumption that the detectabilities are proportional to the predictions of an image discrimination model. Three image discrimination models were used: a cortex transform model, a single channel model with a contrast sensitivity function filter, and the Root-Mean-Square (RMS) difference of the digital target and background-only images. As in the previous study, the cortex transform model performed best; the RMS difference predictor was second best; and last, but still a reasonable predictor, was the single channel model. Image discrimination models can predict the relative detectabilities of objects in natural backgrounds.

  8. Thermodynamic model of natural, medieval and nuclear waste glass durability

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    A thermodynamic model of glass durability based on hydration of structural units has been applied to natural glass, medieval window glasses, and glasses containing nuclear waste. The relative durability predicted from the calculated thermodynamics correlates directly with the experimentally observed release of structural silicon in the leaching solution in short-term laboratory tests. By choosing natural glasses and ancient glasses whose long-term performance is known, and which bracket the durability of waste glasses, the long-term stability of nuclear waste glasses can be interpolated among these materials. The current Savannah River defense waste glass formulation is as durable as natural basalt from the Hanford Reservation (10/sup 6/ years old). The thermodynamic hydration energy is shown to be related to the bond energetics of the glass. 69 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  9. Natural movement generation using hidden Markov models and principal components.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Junghyun; Park, Frank C

    2008-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that the perception of natural movements-in the sense of being "humanlike"-depends on both joint and task space characteristics of the movement. This paper proposes a movement generation framework that merges two established techniques from gesture recognition and motion generation-hidden Markov models (HMMs) and principal components-into an efficient and reliable means of generating natural movements, which uniformly considers joint and task space characteristics. Given human motion data that are classified into several movement categories, for each category, the principal components extracted from the joint trajectories are used as basis elements. An HMM is, in turn, designed and trained for each movement class using the human task space motion data. Natural movements are generated as the optimal linear combination of principal components, which yields the highest probability for the trained HMM. Experimental case studies with a prototype humanoid robot demonstrate the various advantages of our proposed framework. PMID:18784005

  10. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

  11. Model reduction for flexible spacecraft with clustered natural frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, T. W. C.; Gawronski, W. K.

    1989-01-01

    Two approaches to the problem of model reduction for flexible spacecraft that have proved very useful are balancing and model truncation. Furthermore, it is well known that a model representation of a lightly damped flexible structure with widely spaced natural frequencies is approximately balanced. Consequently, reduction in either coordinate system gives similar results for this case. It is important to note, however, that flexible space structures typically have clusters of closely spaced frequencies. In such cases, reduction in model coordinates can give large errors, while the error obtained using balancing is generally much smaller. A new reduction procedure which combines the best features of model and balanced reduction is therefore developed. It is more efficient than balanced reduction of the full system, as it only involves balancing those subsystems of close modes that are highly correlated, yet is shown to yield results which are essentially as good.

  12. Marine Natural Products as Models to Circumvent Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Long, Solida; Sousa, Emília; Kijjoa, Anake; Pinto, Madalena M M

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer drugs is a serious health problem that in many cases leads to cancer treatment failure. The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which leads to premature efflux of drugs from cancer cells, is often responsible for MDR. On the other hand, a strategy to search for modulators from natural products to overcome MDR had been in place during the last decades. However, Nature limits the amount of some natural products, which has led to the development of synthetic strategies to increase their availability. This review summarizes the research findings on marine natural products and derivatives, mainly alkaloids, polyoxygenated sterols, polyketides, terpenoids, diketopiperazines, and peptides, with P-gp inhibitory activity highlighting the established structure-activity relationships. The synthetic pathways for the total synthesis of the most promising members and analogs are also presented. It is expected that the data gathered during the last decades concerning their synthesis and MDR-inhibiting activities will help medicinal chemists develop potential drug candidates using marine natural products as models which can deliver new ABC transporter inhibitor scaffolds. PMID:27399665

  13. Modelling of compositional flow in naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhangxin; Douglas, J. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    A double porosity model of multidimensional, multicomponent, three-phase flow in naturally fractured reservoirs is derived first on the basis of physical intuition and then by the mathematical theory of homogenization. A fully compositional model is considered when there are N chemical components, each of which may exist in any or all of the three phases: gas, oil, and water. The equations of the interaction between matrix and fracture systems are obtained from the mass, momentum, and energy balance laws and the entropy condition, and a mechanical potential tensor is introduced to describe the matrix boundary condition. Various types of flow in naturally fractured reservoirs are treated as particular cases of the present techniques.

  14. Natural hazard resilient cities: the case of a SSMS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Reyes, Jaime

    2010-05-01

    Modern society is characterised by complexity; i.e. technical systems are highly complex and highly interdependent. The nature of the interdependence amongst these systems has become an issue on increasing importance in recent years. Moreover, these systems face a number threats ranging from technical, human and natural. For example, natural hazards (earthquakes, floods, heavy snow, etc) can cause significant problems and disruption to normal life. On the other hand, modern society depends on highly interdependent infrastructures such as transport (rail, road, air, etc), telecommunications, power and water supply, etc. Furthermore, in many cases there is no single owner, operator, and regulator of such systems. Any disruption in any of the interconnected systems may cause a domino-effect. The domino-effect may occur at local, regional or at national level; or, in some cases; it may be extended across international borders. Given the above, it may be argued that society is less resilient to such events and therefore there is a need to have a system in place able to maintain risk within an acceptable range, whatever that might be. This paper presents the modelling process of the interdependences amongst "critical infrastructures" (i.e. transport, telecommunications, power & water supply, etc) for a typical city. The approach has been the application of the developed Systemic Safety Management System (SSMS) model. The main conclusion is that the SSMS model has the potentiality to be used to model interdependencies amongst the so called "critical infrastructures". It is hoped that the approach presented in this paper may help to gain a better understanding of the interdependence amongst these systems and may contribute to a resilient society when disrupted by natural hazards.

  15. Thermohydraulic and nuclear modeling of natural fission reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viggato, Jason Charles

    Experimental verification of proposed nuclear waste storage schemes in geologic repositories is not possible, however, a natural analog exists in the form of ancient natural reactors that existed in uranium-rich ores. Two billion years ago, the enrichment of natural uranium was high enough to allow a sustained chain reaction in the presence of water as a moderator. Several natural reactors occurred in Gabon, Africa and were discovered in the early 1970's. These reactors operated at low power levels for hundreds of thousands of years. Heated water generated from the reactors also leached uranium from the surrounding rock strata and deposited it in the reactor cores. This increased the concentration of uranium in the core over time and served to "refuel" the reactor. This has strong implications in the design of modern geologic repositories for spent nuclear fuel. The possibility of accidental fission events in man-made repositories exists and the geologic evidence from Oklo suggests how those events may progress and enhance local concentrations of uranium. Based on a review of the literature, a comprehensive code was developed to model the thermohydraulic behavior and criticality conditions that may have existed in the Oklo reactor core. A two-dimensional numerical model that incorporates modeling of fluid flow, temperatures, and nuclear fission and subsequent heat generation was developed for the Oklo natural reactors. The operating temperatures ranged from about 456 K to about 721 K. Critical reactions were observed for a wide range of concentrations and porosity values (9 to 30 percent UO2 and 10 to 20 percent porosity). Periodic operation occurred in the computer model prediction with UO2 concentrations of 30 percent in the core and 5 percent in the surrounding material. For saturated conditions and 30 percent porosity, the model predicted temperature transients with a period of about 5 hours. Kuroda predicted 3 to 4 hour durations for temperature transients

  16. Ultravisible warped model from flavor triviality and improved naturalness

    SciTech Connect

    Delaunay, Cedric; Gedalia, Oram; Lee, Seung J.; Perez, Gilad; Ponton, Eduardo

    2011-06-01

    A warped extra-dimensional model, where the standard model Yukawa hierarchy is set by UV physics, is shown to have a sweet spot of parameters with improved experimental visibility and possibly naturalness. Upon marginalizing over all the model parameters, a Kaluza-Klein scale of 2.1 TeV can be obtained at 2{sigma} (95.4% C.L.) without conflicting with electroweak precision measurements. Fitting all relevant parameters simultaneously can relax this bound to 1.7 TeV. In this bulk version of the Rattazzi-Zaffaroni shining model, flavor violation is also highly suppressed, yielding a bound of 2.4 TeV. Nontrivial flavor physics at the LHC in the form of flavor gauge bosons is predicted. The model is also characterized by a depletion of the third-generation couplings--as predicted by the general minimal flavor violation framework--which can be tested via flavor precision measurements. In particular, sizable CP violation in {Delta}B=2 transitions can be obtained, and there is a natural region where B{sub s} mixing is predicted to be larger than B{sub d} mixing, as favored by recent Tevatron data. Unlike other proposals, the new contributions are not linked to Higgs or any scalar exchange processes.

  17. Naturalness of unknown physics: Theoretical models and experimental signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Can

    In the last few decades collider experiments have not only spectacularly confirmed the predictions of the Standard Model but also have not revealed any direct evidence for new physics beyond the SM, which has led theorists to devise numerous models where the new physics couples weakly to the SM or is simply beyond the reach of past experiments. While phenomenologically viable, many such models appear finely tuned, even contrived. This work illustrates three attempts at coming up with explanations to fine-tunings we observe in the world around us, such as the gauge hierarchy problem or the cosmological constant problem, emphasizing both the theoretical aspects of model building as well as possible experimental signatures. First we investigate the "Little Higgs" mechanism and work on a specifical model, the "Minimal Moose" to highlight its impact on precision observables in the SM, and illustrate that it does not require implausible fine-tuning. Next we build a supersymmetric model, the "Fat Higgs", with an extended gauge structure which becomes confining. This model, aside from naturally preserving the unification of the SM gauge couplings at high energies, also makes it possible to evade the bounds on the lightest Higgs boson mass which are quite restrictive in minimal SUSY scenarios. Lastly we take a look at a possible resolution of the cosmological constant problem through the mechanism of "Ghost Condensation" and dwell on astrophysical observables from the Lorentz Violating sector in this model. We use current experimental data to constrain the coupling of this sector to the SM.

  18. Modeling Natural Space Ionizing Radiation Effects on External Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alstatt, Richard L.; Edwards, David L.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Predicting the effective life of materials for space applications has become increasingly critical with the drive to reduce mission cost. Programs have considered many solutions to reduce launch costs including novel, low mass materials and thin thermal blankets to reduce spacecraft mass. Determining the long-term survivability of these materials before launch is critical for mission success. This presentation will describe an analysis performed on the outer layer of the passive thermal control blanket of the Hubble Space Telescope. This layer had degraded for unknown reasons during the mission, however ionizing radiation (IR) induced embrittlement was suspected. A methodology was developed which allowed direct comparison between the energy deposition of the natural environment and that of the laboratory generated environment. Commercial codes were used to predict the natural space IR environment model energy deposition in the material from both natural and laboratory IR sources, and design the most efficient test. Results were optimized for total and local energy deposition with an iterative spreadsheet. This method has been used successfully for several laboratory tests at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The study showed that the natural space IR environment, by itself, did not cause the premature degradation observed in the thermal blanket.

  19. Forecasting natural aquifer discharge using a numerical model and convolution.

    PubMed

    Boggs, Kevin G; Johnson, Gary S; Van Kirk, Rob; Fairley, Jerry P

    2014-01-01

    If the nature of groundwater sources and sinks can be determined or predicted, the data can be used to forecast natural aquifer discharge. We present a procedure to forecast the relative contribution of individual aquifer sources and sinks to natural aquifer discharge. Using these individual aquifer recharge components, along with observed aquifer heads for each January, we generate a 1-year, monthly spring discharge forecast for the upcoming year with an existing numerical model and convolution. The results indicate that a forecast of natural aquifer discharge can be developed using only the dominant aquifer recharge sources combined with the effects of aquifer heads (initial conditions) at the time the forecast is generated. We also estimate how our forecast will perform in the future using a jackknife procedure, which indicates that the future performance of the forecast is good (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency of 0.81). We develop a forecast and demonstrate important features of the procedure by presenting an application to the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer in southern Idaho. PMID:23914881

  20. THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    G. Saulnier and W. Statham

    2006-04-16

    The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following analogous characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site: (1) Analogous source--UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geology--(i.e. fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs); (3) Analogous climate--Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous setting--Volcanic tuffs overlie carbonate rocks; and (5) Analogous geochemistry--Oxidizing conditions Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table.

  1. THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Saulnier Jr; W. Statham

    2006-03-10

    The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site. (1) Analogous source: UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geologic setting: fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs overlying carbonate rocks; (3) Analogous climate: Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous geochemistry: Oxidizing conditions; and (5) Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table. The Nopal I deposit is approximately 8 {+-} 0.5 million years old and has been exposed to oxidizing conditions during the last 3.2 to 3.4 million years. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model considers that the uranium oxide and uranium silicates in the ore deposit were originally analogous to uranium-oxide spent nuclear fuel. The Pena Blanca site has been characterized using field and laboratory investigations of its fault and fracture distribution, mineralogy, fracture fillings, seepage into the mine adits, regional hydrology, and mineralization that shows the extent of radionuclide migration. Three boreholes were drilled at the Nopal I mine site in 2003 and these boreholes have provided samples for lithologic characterization, water-level measurements, and water samples for laboratory

  2. Peromyscus mice as a model for studying natural variation.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Nicole L; Hoekstra, Hopi E

    2015-01-01

    The deer mouse (genus Peromyscus) is the most abundant mammal in North America, and it occupies almost every type of terrestrial habitat. It is not surprising therefore that the natural history of Peromyscus is among the best studied of any small mammal. For decades, the deer mouse has contributed to our understanding of population genetics, disease ecology, longevity, endocrinology and behavior. Over a century's worth of detailed descriptive studies of Peromyscus in the wild, coupled with emerging genetic and genomic techniques, have now positioned these mice as model organisms for the study of natural variation and adaptation. Recent work, combining field observations and laboratory experiments, has lead to exciting advances in a number of fields-from evolution and genetics, to physiology and neurobiology. PMID:26083802

  3. Spatial Durbin model analysis macroeconomic loss due to natural disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusrini, D. E.; Mukhtasor

    2015-03-01

    Magnitude of the damage and losses caused by natural disasters is huge for Indonesia, therefore this study aimed to analyze the effects of natural disasters for macroeconomic losses that occurred in 115 cities/districts across Java during 2012. Based on the results of previous studies it is suspected that it contains effects of spatial dependencies in this case, so that the completion of this case is performed using a regression approach to the area, namely Analysis of Spatial Durbin Model (SDM). The obtained significant predictor variable is population, and predictor variable with a significant weighting is the number of occurrences of disasters, i.e., disasters in the region which have an impact on other neighboring regions. Moran's I index value using the weighted Queen Contiguity also showed significant results, meaning that the incidence of disasters in the region will decrease the value of GDP in other.

  4. Peromyscus mice as a model for studying natural variation

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Nicole L; Hoekstra, Hopi E

    2015-01-01

    The deer mouse (genus Peromyscus) is the most abundant mammal in North America, and it occupies almost every type of terrestrial habitat. It is not surprising therefore that the natural history of Peromyscus is among the best studied of any small mammal. For decades, the deer mouse has contributed to our understanding of population genetics, disease ecology, longevity, endocrinology and behavior. Over a century's worth of detailed descriptive studies of Peromyscus in the wild, coupled with emerging genetic and genomic techniques, have now positioned these mice as model organisms for the study of natural variation and adaptation. Recent work, combining field observations and laboratory experiments, has lead to exciting advances in a number of fields—from evolution and genetics, to physiology and neurobiology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06813.001 PMID:26083802

  5. Competition between B-Z and B-L transitions in a single DNA molecule: Computational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Ah-Young; Nam, Gi-Moon; Johner, Albert; Kim, Seyong; Hong, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Nam-Kyung

    2016-02-01

    Under negative torsion, DNA adopts left-handed helical forms, such as Z-DNA and L-DNA. Using the random copolymer model developed for a wormlike chain, we represent a single DNA molecule with structural heterogeneity as a helical chain consisting of monomers which can be characterized by different helical senses and pitches. By Monte Carlo simulation, where we take into account bending and twist fluctuations explicitly, we study sequence dependence of B-Z transitions under torsional stress and tension focusing on the interaction with B-L transitions. We consider core sequences, (GC) n repeats or (TG) n repeats, which can interconvert between the right-handed B form and the left-handed Z form, imbedded in a random sequence, which can convert to left-handed L form with different (tension dependent) helical pitch. We show that Z-DNA formation from the (GC) n sequence is always supported by unwinding torsional stress but Z-DNA formation from the (TG) n sequence, which are more costly to convert but numerous, can be strongly influenced by the quenched disorder in the surrounding random sequence.

  6. A box model of the Arctic natural variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Hsien-Wang

    2013-04-01

    We consider a box model of the Arctic system to examine its natural variability pertaining to the decadal Arctic Oscillation (AO) and the multidecadal Low-Frequency Oscillation (LFO). We distinguish the hierarchical order of the winter over the summer open-areas with only the former perturbing the sea-level pressure to effect coupled balances. From such balances, we discern two feedback loops on the winter open-area: a positive ice-flux feedback that elevates its overall variance and a negative buoyancy feedback that suppresses its low-frequency variance to render a decadal AO peak when subjected to white atmospheric noise. This negative buoyancy feedback may also reproduce observed phasing among LFO signals forced by the AMV (Atlantic Multidecadal Variability), thus resolving some outstanding questions. For the summer open-area, its variance is induced mainly by the winter forcings and insensitive to the base state. Its decadal signal merely reflects the preconditioning winter open-area, but its LFO variance is induced additionally and in comparable measure by the winter SAT (surface air temperature) through the latter's effect on the melt duration and the first-year ice thickness. As such, the summer open-area signal is dominantly multidecadal, which moreover is several times its winter counterpart, consistent with the observed disparity. Although the model is extremely crude, its explicit solution allows quantitative comparison with observations and the generally positive outcome suggests that the model has isolated the essential physics of the Arctic natural variability of our concern.

  7. Modeling anti-allergic natural compounds by molecular topology.

    PubMed

    García-Domenech, Ramón; Zanni, Riccardo; Galvez-Llompart, María; de Julián-Ortiz, J Vicente

    2013-09-01

    Molecular topology has been applied to the search of QSAR models able to identify the anti-allergic activity of a wide group of heterogeneous compounds. Through the linear discriminant analysis and artificial neural networks, correct classification percentages above 85% for both the training set and the test set have been obtained. After carrying out a virtual screening with a natural product library, about thirty compounds with theoretical anti-allergic activity have been selected. Among them, hesperidin, naringin, salinomycin, sorbitol, curcumol, myricitrin, diosmin and kinetin stand out. Some of these compounds have already been referenced as having anti-allergic activity. PMID:23597273

  8. Naturalness of CP Violation in the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, Gary W.; Gielen, Steffen; Pope, C. N.; Turok, Neil

    2009-03-27

    We construct a natural measure on the space of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrices in the standard model, assuming the fermion mass matrices are randomly selected from a distribution which incorporates the observed quark mass hierarchy. This measure allows us to assess the likelihood of Jarlskog's CP violation parameter J taking its observed value J{approx_equal}3x10{sup -5}. We find that the observed value, while well below the mathematically allowed maximum, is in fact typical once the observed quark masses are assumed.

  9. Climate and weather risk in natural resource models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Nathaniel Henry

    This work, consisting of three manuscripts, addresses natural resource management under risk due to variation in climate and weather. In three distinct but theoretically related applications, I quantify the role of natural resources in stabilizing economic outcomes. In Manuscript 1, we address policy designed to effect the risk of cyanobacteria blooms in a drinking water reservoir through watershed wide policy. Combining a hydrologic and economic model for a watershed in Rhode Island, we solve for the efficient allocation of best management practices (BMPs) on livestock pastures to meet a monthly risk-based as well as mean-based water quality objective. In order to solve for the efficient allocations of nutrient control effort, we optimize a probabilistically constrained integer-programming problem representing the choices made on each farm and the resultant conditions that support cyanobacteria blooms. In doing so, we employ a genetic algorithm (GA). We hypothesize that management based on controlling the upper tail of the probability distribution of phosphorus loading implies different efficient management actions as compared to controlling mean loading. We find a shift to more intense effort on fewer acres when a probabilistic objective is specified with cost savings of meeting risk levels of up to 25% over mean loading based policies. Additionally, we illustrate the relative cost effectiveness of various policies designed to meet this risk-based objective. Rainfall and the subsequent overland runoff is the source of transportation of nutrients to a receiving water body, with larger amounts of phosphorus moving in more intense rainfall events. We highlight the importance of this transportation mechanism by comparing policies under climate change scenarios, where the intensity of rainfall is projected to increase and the time series process of rainfall to change. In Manuscript 2, we introduce a new economic groundwater model that incorporates the gradual shift

  10. Comparison of measured and modeled BRDF of natural targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, Yannick; Cosnefroy, Helene; Petit, Alain D.; Serrot, Gerard; Briottet, Xavier

    1999-07-01

    The Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) plays a major role to evaluate or simulate the signatures of natural and artificial targets in the solar spectrum. A goniometer covering a large spectral and directional domain has been recently developed by the ONERA/DOTA. It was designed to allow both laboratory and outside measurements. The spectral domain ranges from 0.40 to 0.95 micrometer, with a resolution of 3 nm. The geometrical domain ranges 0 - 60 degrees for the zenith angle of the source and the sensor, and 0 - 180 degrees for the relative azimuth between the source and the sensor. The maximum target size for nadir measurements is 22 cm. The spatial target irradiance non-uniformity has been evaluated and then used to correct the raw measurements. BRDF measurements are calibrated thanks to a spectralon reference panel. Some BRDF measurements performed on sand and short grass and are presented here. Eight bidirectional models among the most popular models found in the literature have been tested on these measured data set. A code fitting the model parameters to the measured BRDF data has been developed. The comparative evaluation of the model performances is carried out, versus different criteria (root mean square error, root mean square relative error, correlation diagram . . .). The robustness of the models is evaluated with respect to the number of BRDF measurements, noise and interpolation.

  11. Bivariate statistical modeling of color and range in natural scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Che-Chun; Cormack, Lawrence K.; Bovik, Alan C.

    2014-02-01

    The statistical properties embedded in visual stimuli from the surrounding environment guide and affect the evolutionary processes of human vision systems. There are strong statistical relationships between co-located luminance/chrominance and disparity bandpass coefficients in natural scenes. However, these statistical rela- tionships have only been deeply developed to create point-wise statistical models, although there exist spatial dependencies between adjacent pixels in both 2D color images and range maps. Here we study the bivariate statistics of the joint and conditional distributions of spatially adjacent bandpass responses on both luminance/chrominance and range data of naturalistic scenes. We deploy bivariate generalized Gaussian distributions to model the underlying statistics. The analysis and modeling results show that there exist important and useful statistical properties of both joint and conditional distributions, which can be reliably described by the corresponding bivariate generalized Gaussian models. Furthermore, by utilizing these robust bivariate models, we are able to incorporate measurements of bivariate statistics between spatially adjacent luminance/chrominance and range information into various 3D image/video and computer vision applications, e.g., quality assessment, 2D-to-3D conversion, etc.

  12. Human task animation from performance models and natural language input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esakov, Jeffrey; Badler, Norman I.; Jung, Moon

    1989-01-01

    Graphical manipulation of human figures is essential for certain types of human factors analyses such as reach, clearance, fit, and view. In many situations, however, the animation of simulated people performing various tasks may be based on more complicated functions involving multiple simultaneous reaches, critical timing, resource availability, and human performance capabilities. One rather effective means for creating such a simulation is through a natural language description of the tasks to be carried out. Given an anthropometrically-sized figure and a geometric workplace environment, various simple actions such as reach, turn, and view can be effectively controlled from language commands or standard NASA checklist procedures. The commands may also be generated by external simulation tools. Task timing is determined from actual performance models, if available, such as strength models or Fitts' Law. The resulting action specification are animated on a Silicon Graphics Iris workstation in real-time.

  13. A global model of natural volatile organic compound emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Alex; Hewitt, C. Nicholas; Erickson, David; Fall, Ray; Geron, Chris; Graedel, Tom; Harley, Peter; Klinger, Lee; Lerdau, Manuel; McKay, W. A.; Pierce, Tom; Scholes, Bob; Steinbrecher, Rainer; Tallamraju, Raja; Taylor, John; Zimmerman, Pat

    1995-05-01

    Numerical assessments of global air quality and potential changes in atmospheric chemical constituents require estimates of the surface fluxes of a variety of trace gas species. We have developed a global model to estimate emissions of volatile organic compounds from natural sources (NVOC). Methane is not considered here and has been reviewed in detail elsewhere. The model has a highly resolved spatial grid (0.5°×0.5° latitude/longitude) and generates hourly average emission estimates. Chemical species are grouped into four categories: isoprene, monoterpenes, other reactive VOC (ORVOC), and other VOC (OVOC). NVOC emissions from oceans are estimated as a function of geophysical variables from a general circulation model and ocean color satellite data. Emissions from plant foliage are estimated from ecosystem specific biomass and emission factors and algorithms describing light and temperature dependence of NVOC emissions. Foliar density estimates are based on climatic variables and satellite data. Temporal variations in the model are driven by monthly estimates of biomass and temperature and hourly light estimates. The annual global VOC flux is estimated to be 1150 Tg C, composed of 44% isoprene, 11% monoterpenes, 22.5% other reactive VOC, and 22.5% other VOC. Large uncertainties exist for each of these estimates and particularly for compounds other than isoprene and monoterpenes. Tropical woodlands (rain forest, seasonal, drought-deciduous, and savanna) contribute about half of all global natural VOC emissions. Croplands, shrublands and other woodlands contribute 10-20% apiece. Isoprene emissions calculated for temperate regions are as much as a factor of 5 higher than previous estimates.

  14. The natural defense system and the normative self model.

    PubMed

    Kourilsky, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Infectious agents are not the only agressors, and the immune system is not the sole defender of the organism. In an enlarged perspective, the 'normative self model' postulates that a 'natural defense system' protects man and other complex organisms against the environmental and internal hazards of life, including infections and cancers. It involves multiple error detection and correction mechanisms that confer robustness to the body at all levels of its organization. According to the model, the self relies on a set of physiological norms, and NONself (meaning : Non Obedient to the Norms of the self) is anything 'off-norms'. The natural defense system comprises a set of 'civil defenses' (to which all cells in organs and tissues contribute), and a 'professional army ', made of a smaller set of mobile cells. Mobile and non mobile cells differ in their tuning abilities. Tuning extends the recognition capabilities of NONself by the mobile cells, which increase their defensive function. To prevent them to drift, which would compromise self/NONself discrimination, the more plastic mobile cells need to periodically refer to the more stable non mobile cells to keep within physiological standards. PMID:27303629

  15. Natural State Model of the Nesjavellir Geothermal Field, Iceland

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Stefansson, V.; Steingrimsson, B.; Bjornsson, S.; Gunnarsson, A.; Gunnlaugsson, E.

    1986-01-21

    The Nesjavellir geothermal system in southern Iceland is very complex from both a thermal and hydrologic point of view. There are large pressure and temperature gradients in the wellfield and zones with drastically different pressure potentials. Thus, natural fluid flow is substantial in the system and flow patterns are complex. We have developed a two-dimensional natural state model for the Nesjavellir system that matches reasonably well the observed pressure and temperature distributions. The match with field data has allowed determination of the energy recharge to the system and the permeability distribution. Fluids recharge the system at rate of 0.02 kg/s/m with an enthalpy of 1460 kJ/kg. The permeability in the main reservoir is estimated to be in the range of 1.5 to 2.0 md, which agrees well with injection test results from individual wells. Permeabilities in shallower reservoirs are about an order of magnitude higher. Most of the main reservoir is under twephase conditions, as are shallow aquifers in the southern part of the field. The model results also suggest that the low temperatures in the shallow part of the northern region of the field may be due to the young age of the system; i.e., the system is gradually heating up. If this is the case the estimated age of the system near the wellfield is on the order of a few thousand years.

  16. Integrated modeling of natural and human systems - problems and initiatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, H.; Giles, J.; Gunnink, J.; Hughes, A.; Moore, R. V.; Peach, D.

    2009-12-01

    Governments and their executive agencies across the world are facing increasing pressure to make decisions about the management of resources in light of population growth and environmental change. In the UK and the Netherlands, for example, groundwater is becoming a scarce resource for large parts of its most densely populated areas. At the same time river and groundwater flooding resulting from high rainfall events are increasing in scale and frequency and sea level rise is threatening the defences of coastal cities. There is also a need for affordable housing, improved transport infrastructure and waste disposal as well as sources of renewable energy and sustainable food production. These challenges can only be resolved if solutions are based on sound scientific evidence. Although we have knowledge and understanding of many individual processes in the natural sciences it is clear that a single science discipline is unable to answer the questions and their inter-relationships. Modern science increasingly employs computer models to simulate the natural, economic and human system. Management and planning requires scenario modelling, forecasts and “predictions”. Although the outputs are often impressive in terms of apparent accuracy and visualisation, they are inherently not suited to simulate the response to feedbacks from other models of the earth system, such as the impact of human actions. Geological Survey Organisations (GSO) are increasingly employing advances in Information Technology to visualise and improve their understanding of geological systems. Instead of 2 dimensional paper maps and reports many GSOs now produce 3 dimensional geological framework models and groundwater flow models as their standard output. Additionally the British Geological Survey and the Geological Survey of the Netherlands have developed standard routines to link geological data to groundwater models, but these models are only aimed at solving one specific part of the earth

  17. Climate and weather risk in natural resource models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Nathaniel Henry

    This work, consisting of three manuscripts, addresses natural resource management under risk due to variation in climate and weather. In three distinct but theoretically related applications, I quantify the role of natural resources in stabilizing economic outcomes. In Manuscript 1, we address policy designed to effect the risk of cyanobacteria blooms in a drinking water reservoir through watershed wide policy. Combining a hydrologic and economic model for a watershed in Rhode Island, we solve for the efficient allocation of best management practices (BMPs) on livestock pastures to meet a monthly risk-based as well as mean-based water quality objective. In order to solve for the efficient allocations of nutrient control effort, we optimize a probabilistically constrained integer-programming problem representing the choices made on each farm and the resultant conditions that support cyanobacteria blooms. In doing so, we employ a genetic algorithm (GA). We hypothesize that management based on controlling the upper tail of the probability distribution of phosphorus loading implies different efficient management actions as compared to controlling mean loading. We find a shift to more intense effort on fewer acres when a probabilistic objective is specified with cost savings of meeting risk levels of up to 25% over mean loading based policies. Additionally, we illustrate the relative cost effectiveness of various policies designed to meet this risk-based objective. Rainfall and the subsequent overland runoff is the source of transportation of nutrients to a receiving water body, with larger amounts of phosphorus moving in more intense rainfall events. We highlight the importance of this transportation mechanism by comparing policies under climate change scenarios, where the intensity of rainfall is projected to increase and the time series process of rainfall to change. In Manuscript 2, we introduce a new economic groundwater model that incorporates the gradual shift

  18. Using Digital Learning Objects to Introduce Students to the Nature of Models and the Nature of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Brenda; Mahaffy, Peter; Martin, Brian

    2011-01-01

    This article reports a subset of findings from a larger study centered on designing a series of six digital learning objects to help Grade 5 (age 10-12) students begin to consider the nature of models (understood as the physical or mental representation of objects, phenomena, or processes), the particle nature of matter, and the behavior of…

  19. The natural defense system and the normative self model

    PubMed Central

    Kourilsky, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Infectious agents are not the only agressors, and the immune system is not the sole defender of the organism. In an enlarged perspective, the ‘normative self model’ postulates that a ‘natural defense system’ protects man and other complex organisms against the environmental and internal hazards of life, including infections and cancers. It involves multiple error detection and correction mechanisms that confer robustness to the body at all levels of its organization. According to the model, the self relies on a set of physiological norms, and NONself (meaning : Non Obedient to the Norms of the self) is anything ‘off-norms’. The natural defense system comprises a set of ‘civil defenses’ (to which all cells in organs and tissues contribute), and a ‘professional army ‘, made of a smaller set of mobile cells. Mobile and non mobile cells differ in their tuning abilities. Tuning extends the recognition capabilities of NONself by the mobile cells, which increase their defensive function. To prevent them to drift, which would compromise self/NONself discrimination, the more plastic mobile cells need to periodically refer to the more stable non mobile cells to keep within physiological standards. PMID:27303629

  20. Tank bromeliad - a natural model ecosystem for methane cycling research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinson, Guntars; Brandt, Franziska; Conrad, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Tank bromeliads are common epiphytes throughout neotropical forest ecosystems. They are relatively small discrete habitats for terrestrial and aquatic macro- and microorganisms and naturally replicated. Their tanks effectively collect leaf litter and water and harbor a diverse microbial community. Up to several thousands of these tank bromeliads per hectare of tropical forest create a unique wetland ecosystem responsible for significant methane emissions. In a field study in tropical montane forests of southern Ecuador we sampled tank bromeliads of different species, size and canopy height and found that tank water availability controlled community composition of methanogenic archaea, determined by molecular analysis of the archaeal 16S rRNA genes. We set up a greenhouse experiment to investigate drying and re-wetting effects on microbial community composition and methanogenesis. Additionally, we conducted 13-CH-4 and 13-CO-2 labeling studies to investigate potential interaction of plant and microbial metabolism during methane cycling in tank bromeliads. Drying resulted in rapid change of the microbial community composition. The relative abundance of acetoclastic methanogens increased and that of hydrogenotrophic methanogens decreased with decreasing tank water availability confirming our field observations. Labeling studies showed that carbon was released from the plant into the tank supporting methanogenesis and that tank-produced methane was ventilated through the bromeliad leaf structure into the atmosphere which is analogous to the rhizosphere environment of wetland ecosystems. The bromeliad ecosystem may therefore provide a natural model to study how environmental changes and plant-microbe interactions drive methane cycling in aquatic-terrestrial ecosystems.

  1. Modeling of natural organic matter transport processes in groundwater.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, T C; Mas-Pla, J; McCarthy, J F; Williams, T M

    1995-01-01

    A forced-gradient tracer test was conducted at the Georgetown site to study the transport of natural organic matter (NOM) in groundwater. In particular, the goal of this experiment was to investigate the interactions between NOM and the aquifer matrix. A detailed three-dimensional characterization of the hydrologic conductivity heterogeneity of the site was obtained using slug tests. The transport of a conservative tracer (chloride) was successfully reproduced using these conductivity data. Despite the good simulation of the flow field, NOM breakthrough curves could not be reproduced using a two-site sorption model with spatially constant parameters. Preliminary results suggest that different mechanisms for the adsorption/desorption processes, as well as their spatial variability, may significantly affect the transport and fate of NOM. PMID:7621798

  2. New models for success emerge for US natural gas industry

    SciTech Connect

    Addy, W.M. ); Hutchinson, R.A. )

    1994-11-14

    Very few companies in the US natural gas industry are confident in their ability to compete effectively in the brave new world of deregulation. Boston Consulting Group recently conducted an internal study to help the industry think about its future and identify models for success in this new environment. The authors examined the historical performance of 800 companies using several shareholder-value indicators, including cash-flow returns on investment, a measure of cash returns on cash invested that correlates closely to share price. Based on that review and discussions with investment managers and industry analysts, the authors were able to focus on a handful of companies that actually have thrived and created value against the difficult landscape of the past decade. Interviews with their senior executives provided important strategic and operational insights.

  3. Modeling of information flows in natural gas storage facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbari, Leyla; Bahar, Arifah; Aziz, Zainal Abdul

    2013-09-01

    The paper considers the natural-gas storage valuation based on the information-based pricing framework of Brody-Hughston-Macrina (BHM). As opposed to many studies which the associated filtration is considered pre-specified, this work tries to construct the filtration in terms of the information provided to the market. The value of the storage is given by the sum of the discounted expectations of the cash flows under risk-neutral measure, conditional to the constructed filtration with the Brownian bridge noise term. In order to model the flow of information about the cash flows, we assume the existence of a fixed pricing kernel with liquid, homogenous and incomplete market without arbitrage.

  4. Aquabeads to model the geotechnical behavior of natural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabe, Kazunori

    Use of transparent synthetic soils to visualize flow and deformation problems has been recently developed. This study proposes a new water-based transparent aquabeads suitable for modeling the geotechnical properties of natural soils. A comprehensive study of the geotechnical properties of several types of Aquabeads, including permeability, compressibility, and yield stress were performed in order to understand the feasibility of deformation and flow modeling using transparent Aquabeads. The geotechnical properties of Aquabeads were similar to those of sands & silts in permeability, with hydraulic conductivity in the 10-2 to 10-5 cm/sec range, and very soft clay in compressibility and yield stress. Soil-structure interaction beneath a reinforced soil foundation was studied to illustrate the beneficial use of Aquabeads in research studies. The bearing capacity of a foundation on a model made of Aquabeads was observed to increases with the presence of geogrid. The results are similar to behavior observed for natural soils. There is an optimum number of the geogrid layers which is 3 for the bearing capacity improvement of Aquabeads. The optimal geogrid layer length for bearing capacity improvement was found to be form the width of the footing. The maximum benefit of geogrid-reinforcement was achievd when the geogrid depth is 0.75 of the footing width. The maximum benefit of geogrid-reinforcement was achieved when the geogrid vertical spacing is set to 0.7B. It is conducted that Aquabeads is suitable for simulating deformation problem in very weak soils. The feasibility of using Aquabeads to visualize geoenvironmental contamination problems was also investigated in this study. Surfactant flushing tests were conducted using a layered soil system and two contaminants, mineral oil and motor oil. Several surfactants were investigated using phase behavior tests, and Triton X-100 was selected. For Mineral oil, the optimal surfactant solution consisted of 0.025% Triton X-100

  5. Using natural laboratories and modeling to decipher lithospheric rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, Stephan

    2013-04-01

    Rheology is obviously important for geodynamic modeling but at the same time rheological parameters appear to be least constrained. Laboratory experiments give rather large ranges of rheological parameters and their scaling to nature is not entirely clear. Therefore finding rheological proxies in nature is very important. One way to do that is finding appropriate values of rheological parameter by fitting models to the lithospheric structure in the highly deformed regions where lithospheric structure and geologic evolution is well constrained. Here I will present two examples of such studies at plate boundaries. One case is the Dead Sea Transform (DST) that comprises a boundary between African and Arabian plates. During the last 15- 20 Myr more than 100 km of left lateral transform displacement has been accumulated on the DST and about 10 km thick Dead Sea Basin (DSB) was formed in the central part of the DST. Lithospheric structure and geological evolution of DST and DSB is rather well constrained by a number of interdisciplinary projects including DESERT and DESIRE projects leaded by the GFZ Potsdam. Detailed observations reveal apparently contradictory picture. From one hand widespread igneous activity, especially in the last 5 Myr, thin (60-80 km) lithosphere constrained from seismic data and absence of seismicity below the Moho, seem to be quite natural for this tectonically active plate boundary. However, surface heat flow of less than 50-60mW/m2 and deep seismicity in the lower crust ( deeper than 20 km) reported for this region are apparently inconsistent with the tectonic settings specific for an active continental plate boundary and with the crustal structure of the DSB. To address these inconsistencies which comprise what I call the "DST heat-flow paradox", a 3D numerical thermo-mechanical model was developed operating with non-linear elasto-visco-plastic rheology of the lithosphere. Results of the numerical experiments show that the entire set of

  6. Rill erosion in natural and disturbed forests: 2. Modeling Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenbrenner, J. W.; Robichaud, P. R.; Elliot, W. J.

    2010-10-01

    As forest management scenarios become more complex, the ability to more accurately predict erosion from those scenarios becomes more important. In this second part of a two-part study we report model parameters based on 66 simulated runoff experiments in two disturbed forests in the northwestern U.S. The 5 disturbance classes were natural, 10-month old and 2-week old low soil burn severity, high soil burn severity, and logging skid trails. In these environments the erosion rates were clearly detachment limited, and the rill erodibility parameters calculated from four hydraulic variables increased by orders of magnitude. The soil shear stress based erodibility parameter, Kr, was 1.5 × 10-6 s m-1in the natural plots, 2.0 × 10-4 s m-1 in the high soil burn severity plots, and 1.7 × 10-3 s m-1 in the skid trail plots; Kr values for the low soil burn severity plots had negative sign. The erodibility value for the skid trail plots fell within ranges reported for tilled agricultural fields and also for forest roads. The Kr values decreased as erosion occurred in the plots and therefore should not be a constant parameter. The stream power produced the largest R2 value (0.41) when hydraulic predictors and the sediment flux were log-transformed, but none of the four hydraulic variables (soil shear stress, stream power, unit stream power, and unit length shear force) explained much of the variability in sediment flux rates across the five levels of disturbance when evaluated in the linear form of the erosion models under consideration.

  7. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Frauk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2001-08-15

    Research continues on characterizing and modeling the behavior of naturally fractured reservoir systems. Work has progressed on developing techniques for estimating fracture properties from seismic and well log data, developing naturally fractured wellbore models, and developing a model to characterize the transfer of fluid from the matrix to the fracture system for use in the naturally fractured reservoir simulator.

  8. QSAR and pharmacophore modeling of natural and synthetic antimalarial prodiginines.

    PubMed

    Singh, Baljinder; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Bharate, Sandip B

    2013-09-01

    Prodiginines are a family of linear and cyclic oligopyrrole red-pigmented compounds possessing antibacterial, anticancer and immunosuppressive activities and are produced by actinomycetes and other eubacteria. Recently, prodiginines have been reported to possess potent in vitro as well as in vivo antimalarial activity against chloroquine sensitive D6 and multi-drug resistant Dd2 strains of Plasmodium falciparum. In the present paper, a QSAR and pharmacophore modeling for a series of natural and synthetic prodiginines was performed to find out structural features which are crucial for antimalarial activity against these D6 and Dd2 Plasmodium strains. The study indicated that inertia moment 2 length, Kier Chi6 (path) index, kappa 3 index and Wiener topological index plays important role in antimalarial activity against D6 strain whereas descriptors inertia moment 2 length, ADME H-bond donors, VAMP polarization XX component and VAMP quadpole XZ component play important role in antimalarial activity against Dd2 strain. Furthermore, a five-point pharmacophore (ADHRR) model with one H-bond acceptor (A), one H-bond donor (D), one hydrophobic group (H) and two aromatic rings (R) as pharmacophore features was developed for D6 strain by PHASE module of Schrodinger suite. Similarly a six-point pharmacophore AADDRR was developed for Dd2 strain activity. All developed QSAR models showed good correlation coefficient (r² > 0.7), higher F value (F >20) and excellent predictive power (Q² > 0.6). Developed models will be highly useful for predicting antimalarial activity of new compounds and could help in designing better molecules with enhanced antimalarial activity. Furthermore, calculated ADME properties indicated drug-likeness of prodiginines. PMID:24010933

  9. Pathogenesis of a Model Gammaherpesvirus in a Natural Host ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, David J.; Kipar, Anja; Sample, Jeffery T.; Stewart, James P.

    2010-01-01

    Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) infection of laboratory mice (Mus musculus) is an established model of gammaherpesvirus pathogenesis. The fact that M. musculus is not a host in the wild prompted us to reassess MHV-68 infection in wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus), a natural host. Here, we report significant differences in MHV-68 infection in the two species: (i) following intranasal inoculation, MHV-68 replicated in the lungs of wood mice to levels approximately 3 log units lower than in BALB/c mice; (ii) in BALB/c mice, virus replication in alveolar epithelial cells was accompanied by a diffuse, T-cell-dominated interstitial pneumonitis, whereas in wood mice it was restricted to focal granulomatous infiltrations; (iii) within wood mice, latently infected lymphocytes were abundant in inducible bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue that was not apparent in BALB/c mice; (iv) splenic latency was established in both species, but well-delineated secondary follicles with germinal centers were present in wood mice, while only poorly delineated follicles were seen in BALB/c mice; and, perhaps as a consequence, (v) production of neutralizing antibody was significantly higher in wood mice. These differences highlight the value of this animal model in the study of MHV-68 pathogenesis. PMID:20130062

  10. Pathogenesis of a model gammaherpesvirus in a natural host.

    PubMed

    Hughes, David J; Kipar, Anja; Sample, Jeffery T; Stewart, James P

    2010-04-01

    Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) infection of laboratory mice (Mus musculus) is an established model of gammaherpesvirus pathogenesis. The fact that M. musculus is not a host in the wild prompted us to reassess MHV-68 infection in wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus), a natural host. Here, we report significant differences in MHV-68 infection in the two species: (i) following intranasal inoculation, MHV-68 replicated in the lungs of wood mice to levels approximately 3 log units lower than in BALB/c mice; (ii) in BALB/c mice, virus replication in alveolar epithelial cells was accompanied by a diffuse, T-cell-dominated interstitial pneumonitis, whereas in wood mice it was restricted to focal granulomatous infiltrations; (iii) within wood mice, latently infected lymphocytes were abundant in inducible bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue that was not apparent in BALB/c mice; (iv) splenic latency was established in both species, but well-delineated secondary follicles with germinal centers were present in wood mice, while only poorly delineated follicles were seen in BALB/c mice; and, perhaps as a consequence, (v) production of neutralizing antibody was significantly higher in wood mice. These differences highlight the value of this animal model in the study of MHV-68 pathogenesis. PMID:20130062

  11. Models of natural fracture connectivity: Implication for reservoir permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Aydin, A.

    1992-03-01

    We have investigated common mechanisms responsible for fracture connectivity (or lack thereof) for single and multiple sets of fractures. The methods of study were based on detailed field mapping of fractures in layered sedimentary rocks, typical of producing oil and gas reservoirs and on numerical modeling of the concepts developed from the field observations. The crucial mechanisms important for connectivity have been deduced to be fracture propagation across layer interfaces with or without shearing in slightly deformed terrains in the Appalachians Plateau, central New York, and in highly deformed terrains in the Valley and Ridge province of the Appalachians in northeastern Tennessee, northwestern North Carolina and southwestern Maryland. Both of these mechanisms have been simulated by using numerical models which include fracture propagation across interfaces between dissimilar layers, and interactions between parallel faults of various scales. Fluid transport through a single fracture or a fracture network in rock depends strongly on the nature of connections between fracture segments and between the individual fractures. This study has shown that layer interfaces, particularly those with thin shale layers impede fluid flow along fractures in vertical direction, whereas additional fractures between low angle faults along the interfaces enhance it.

  12. Development of a natural gas systems analysis model (GSAM)

    SciTech Connect

    1999-10-01

    This report provides an overview of the activities to date and schedule for future testing, validation, and authorized enhancements of Natural Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). The goal of this report is to inform DOE managers of progress in model development and to provide a benchmark for ongoing and future research. Section II of the report provides a detailed discussion on the major GSAM development programs performed and completed during the period of performance, July 1, 1998 to September 30, 1999. Key improvements in the new GSAM version are summarized in Section III. Programmer's guides for GSAM main modules were produced to provide detailed descriptions of all major subroutines and main variables of the computer code. General logical flowcharts of the subroutines are also presented in the guides to provide overall picture of interactions between the subroutines. A standard structure of routine explanation is applied in every programmer's guide. The explanation is started with a brief description or main purpose of the routine, lists of input and output files read and created, and lists of invoked/child and calling/parent routines. In some of the guides, interactions between the routine itself and its parent and child routines are presented in the form of graphical flowchart. The explanation is then proceeded with step by step description of computer code in the subroutine where each step delegates a section of related code. Between steps, if a certain section of code needs further explanation, a Note is inserted with relevant explanation.

  13. System model of a natural circulation integral test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvin, Mark R.

    The Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics (NE/RHP) at Oregon State University (OSU) has been developing an innovative modular reactor plant concept since being initiated with a Department of Energy (DoE) grant in 1999. This concept, the Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR), is an integral pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant that utilizes natural circulation flow in the primary and employs advanced passive safety features. The OSU MASLWR test facility is an electrically heated integral effects facility, scaled from the MASLWR concept design, that has been previously used to assess the feasibility of the concept design safety approach. To assist in evaluating operational scenarios, a simulation tool that models the test facility and is based on both test facility experimental data and analytical methods has been developed. The tool models both the test facility electric core and a simulated nuclear core, allowing evaluation of a broad spectrum of operational scenarios to identify those scenarios that should be explored experimentally using the test facility or design-quality multi-physics tools. Using the simulation tool, the total cost of experimentation and analysis can be reduced by directing time and resources towards the operational scenarios of interest.

  14. Insights From Natural Host-Parasite Interactions: The Drosophila Model

    PubMed Central

    Keebaugh, Erin S.; Schlenke, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Immune responses against opportunistic pathogens have been extensively studied in Drosophila, leading to a detailed map of the genetics behind innate immunity networks including the Toll, Imd, Jak-Stat, and JNK pathways. However, immune mechanisms of other organisms, particularly plants, have primarily been investigated using natural pathogens. It was the use of natural pathogens in plant research that revealed the plant R/Avr system, a specialized immune response derived from antagonistic coevolution between plant immune proteins and their natural pathogens’ virulence proteins. Thus, we recommend that researchers begin to use natural Drosophila pathogens to identify novel immune mechanisms that may have arisen through antagonistic coevolution with common natural pathogens. In this review, we address the benefits of using natural pathogens in research, describe the known natural pathogens of Drosophila, and discuss exciting prospects for future research on select natural pathogens of Drosophila. PMID:23764256

  15. Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. From 1982 through 1993, the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) was used by the EIA for its analyses, and the Gas Analysis Modeling System (GAMS) was used within IFFS to represent natural gas markets. Prior to 1982, the Midterm Energy Forecasting System (MEFS), also referred to as the Project Independence Evaluation System (PIES), was employed. NEMS was developed to enhance and update EIA`s modeling capability by internally incorporating models of energy markets that had previously been analyzed off-line. In addition, greater structural detail in NEMS permits the analysis of a broader range of energy issues. The time horizon of NEMS is the midterm period (i.e., through 2015). In order to represent the regional differences in energy markets, the component models of NEMS function at regional levels appropriate for the markets represented, with subsequent aggregation/disaggregation to the Census Division level for reporting purposes.

  16. Thermal hydraulic modeling of a natural circulation loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, S. Y.; Wu, X. X.; Zhang, Y. J.; Jia, H. J.

    The experiment was carried out on the test loop HRTL-5, which simulates the geometry and system design of a 5MW nuclear heating reactor. The analysis was based on a one-dimensional two-phase flow drift model with conservation equations for mass, steam, energy and momentum. Clausius-Clapeyron equation was used for the calculation of flashing front in the riser. A set of ordinary equations, which describes the behavior of two-phase flow in the natural circulation system, was derived through integration of the above conservation equations for the subcooled boiling region, bulk boiling region in the heated section and for the riser. The method of time-domain was used for the calculation. Both static and dynamic results are presented. System pressure, inlet subcooling and heat flux are varied as input parameters. The results show that subcooled boiling in the heated section and void flashing in the riser have significant influence on the distribution of the void fraction, mass flow rate and flow instability of the system, especially at low pressure. The response of mass flow rate, after a small disturbance in the heat flux is shown, and based on it the instability map of the system is given through experiment and calculation. There exists three regions in the instability map of the investigated natural circulation system, namely, the stable two-phase flow region, the unstable bulk and subcooled boiling flow region and the stable subcooled boiling and single phase flow region. The mechanism of two-phase flow oscillation is interpreted.

  17. Natural gas production problems : solutions, methodologies, and modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Herrin, James M.; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Basinski, Paul M.; Olsson, William Arthur; Arnold, Bill Walter; Broadhead, Ronald F.; Knight, Connie D.; Keefe, Russell G.; McKinney, Curt; Holm, Gus; Holland, John F.; Larson, Rich; Engler, Thomas W.; Lorenz, John Clay

    2004-10-01

    Natural gas is a clean fuel that will be the most important domestic energy resource for the first half the 21st centtuy. Ensuring a stable supply is essential for our national energy security. The research we have undertaken will maximize the extractable volume of gas while minimizing the environmental impact of surface disturbances associated with drilling and production. This report describes a methodology for comprehensive evaluation and modeling of the total gas system within a basin focusing on problematic horizontal fluid flow variability. This has been accomplished through extensive use of geophysical, core (rock sample) and outcrop data to interpret and predict directional flow and production trends. Side benefits include reduced environmental impact of drilling due to reduced number of required wells for resource extraction. These results have been accomplished through a cooperative and integrated systems approach involving industry, government, academia and a multi-organizational team within Sandia National Laboratories. Industry has provided essential in-kind support to this project in the forms of extensive core data, production data, maps, seismic data, production analyses, engineering studies, plus equipment and staff for obtaining geophysical data. This approach provides innovative ideas and technologies to bring new resources to market and to reduce the overall environmental impact of drilling. More importantly, the products of this research are not be location specific but can be extended to other areas of gas production throughout the Rocky Mountain area. Thus this project is designed to solve problems associated with natural gas production at developing sites, or at old sites under redevelopment.

  18. Modeling Modern Methane Emissions from Natural Wetlands. 1; Model Description and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Bernadette P.; Heimann, Martin; Matthews, Elaine

    2001-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas which contributes about 22 percent to the present greenhouse effect. Natural wetlands currently constitute the biggest methane source and were the major source in preindustrial times. Wetland emissions depend highly on the climate, i.e., on soil temperature and water table. To investigate the response of methane emissions from natural wetlands to climate variations, a process-based model that derives methane emissions from natural wetlands as a function of soil temperature, water table, and net primary productivity is used. For its application on the global scale, global data sets for all model parameters are generated. In addition, a simple hydrologic model is developed in order to simulate the position of the water table in wetlands. The hydrologic model is tested against data from different wetland sites, and the sensitivity of the hydrologic model to changes in precipitation is examined. The global methane­ hydrology model constitutes a tool to study temporal and spatial variations in methane emissions from natural wetlands. The model is applied using high-frequency atmospheric forcing fields from European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) re-analyses of the period from 1982 to 1993. We calculate global annual methane emissions from wetlands to be 260 teragrams per year. Twenty-five percent of these methane emissions originate from wetlands north of 30 degrees North Latitude. Only 60 percent of the produced methane is emitted, while the rest is re-oxidized. A comparison of zonal integrals of simulated global wetland emissions and results obtained by an inverse modeling approach shows good agreement. In a test with data from two wetlands the seasonality of simulated and observed methane emissions agrees well.

  19. The tangled nature model as an evolving quasi-species model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avogadro di Collobiano, Simone; Christensen, Kim; Jeldtoft Jensen, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    We show that the tangled nature model can be interpreted as a general formulation of the quasi-species model by Eigen et al in a frequency-dependent fitness landscape. We present a detailed theoretical derivation of the mutation threshold, consistent with the simulation results, that provides a valuable insight into how the microscopic dynamics of the model determines the observed macroscopic phenomena published previously. The dynamics of the tangled nature model is defined on the microevolutionary time scale via reproduction, with heredity, variation and natural selection. Each organism reproduces at a rate that is linked to the individuals' genetic sequence and depends on the composition of the population in genotype space. Thus the microevolutionary dynamics of the fitness landscape is regulated by, and regulates, the evolution of the species by means of the mutual interactions. At low mutation rate, the macroevolutionary pattern mimics the fossil data: periods of stasis, where the population is concentrated in a network of coexisting species, are interrupted by bursts of activity. As the mutation rate increases, the duration and the frequency of bursts increase. Eventually, when the mutation rate reaches a certain threshold, the population is spread evenly throughout the genotype space showing that natural selection only leads to multiple distinct species if adaptation is allowed time to cause fixation.

  20. A robust and flexible Geospatial Modeling Interface (GMI) for deploying and evaluating natural resource models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geographical information systems (GIS) software packages have been used for nearly three decades as analytical tools in natural resource management for geospatial data assembly, processing, storage, and visualization of input data and model output. However, with increasing availability and use of fu...

  1. Adriatic indentation of the Eastern Alps - nature vs. analogue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favaro, S.; Scharf, A.; Schuster, R.; Handy, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    The Eastern Alps underwent late Oligocene-Miocene indentation by the Adriatic microplate, followed by rapid Miocene exhumation in the Tauern Window and orogen-parallel escape. Analogue models of indentation in the Eastern Alps indicate that exhumation of orogenic crust in front of the Adriatic indenter was coeval, with faults and post-nappe folds forming an asymmetrical conjugate pattern in front of the indenting block (Ratschbacher et al 1991, Rosenberg et al 2007). The amount and rate of exhumation is greatest at this location, but decrease laterally towards an unconfined boundary of the models that represents the retreating Carpathian subduction orogen. In nature, however, isotopic age patterns of deeply buried and exhumed basements rocks in the Tauern Window of the Eastern Alps indicate that cooling and possibly also exhumation were diachronous along strike of the orogen. In the westernmost Tauern Window, previous thermal modeling of fission-track ages (Fügenschuh et al 1997) revealed that rapid exhumation (≥ 1mm/a) lasted from 20-13 Ma and appears to have been triggered by sinistral transpression along the Guidicarie Belt beginning in Late Oligocene time. Rapid cooling (≥25°C/Ma) from 550 to 270°C lasted from 18-12 Ma (von Blanckenburg et al 1989; Fügenschuh et al 1997). In the easternmost part, however, rapid cooling from a similar peak temperature lasted from 23-20 Ma and ended no later than 17 Ma. Thus, rapid exhumation cannot have begun later than 23-21 Ma. Cooling patterns in the eastern central part of the Tauern Window are more complex and reflect the combined effects of doming and extensional exhumation. New Rb-Sr mica ages in post-nappe basement domes generally decrease from NW (muscovite: 26 Ma; biotite: 22 Ma) to SE (muscovite: 22 Ma; biotite: 18 Ma). We interpret these trends to show that doming began in the south-central part of the Tauern Window and then migrated to the SE while the entire basement nappe pile underwent orogen

  2. Towards a continuous population model for natural language vowel shift.

    PubMed

    Shipman, Patrick D; Faria, Sérgio H; Strickland, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    The Great English Vowel Shift of 16th-19th centuries and the current Northern Cities Vowel Shift are two examples of collective language processes characterized by regular phonetic changes, that is, gradual changes in vowel pronunciation over time. Here we develop a structured population approach to modeling such regular changes in the vowel systems of natural languages, taking into account learning patterns and effects such as social trends. We treat vowel pronunciation as a continuous variable in vowel space and allow for a continuous dependence of vowel pronunciation in time and age of the speaker. The theory of mixtures with continuous diversity provides a framework for the model, which extends the McKendrick-von Foerster equation to populations with age and phonetic structures. We develop the general balance equations for such populations and propose explicit expressions for the factors that impact the evolution of the vowel pronunciation distribution. For illustration, we present two examples of numerical simulations. In the first one we study a stationary solution corresponding to a state of phonetic equilibrium, in which speakers of all ages share a similar phonetic profile. We characterize the variance of the phonetic distribution in terms of a parameter measuring a ratio of phonetic attraction to dispersion. In the second example we show how vowel shift occurs upon starting with an initial condition consisting of a majority pronunciation that is affected by an immigrant minority with a different vowel pronunciation distribution. The approach developed here for vowel systems may be applied also to other learning situations and other time-dependent processes of cognition in self-interacting populations, like opinions or perceptions. PMID:23624180

  3. Modelling public risk evaluation of natural hazards: a conceptual approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plattner, Th.

    2005-04-01

    In recent years, the dealing with natural hazards in Switzerland has shifted away from being hazard-oriented towards a risk-based approach. Decreasing societal acceptance of risk, accompanied by increasing marginal costs of protective measures and decreasing financial resources cause an optimization problem. Therefore, the new focus lies on the mitigation of the hazard's risk in accordance with economical, ecological and social considerations. This modern proceeding requires an approach in which not only technological, engineering or scientific aspects of the definition of the hazard or the computation of the risk are considered, but also the public concerns about the acceptance of these risks. These aspects of a modern risk approach enable a comprehensive assessment of the (risk) situation and, thus, sound risk management decisions. In Switzerland, however, the competent authorities suffer from a lack of decision criteria, as they don't know what risk level the public is willing to accept. Consequently, there exists a need for the authorities to know what the society thinks about risks. A formalized model that allows at least a crude simulation of the public risk evaluation could therefore be a useful tool to support effective and efficient risk mitigation measures. This paper presents a conceptual approach of such an evaluation model using perception affecting factors PAF, evaluation criteria EC and several factors without any immediate relation to the risk itself, but to the evaluating person. Finally, the decision about the acceptance Acc of a certain risk i is made by a comparison of the perceived risk Ri,perc with the acceptable risk Ri,acc.

  4. Modeling the natural history of Pelizaeus–Merzbacher disease

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Joshua A.; Griffiths, Ian R.; Goldman, James E.; Smith, Chelsey M.; Cooksey, Elizabeth; Radcliff, Abigail B.; Duncan, Ian D.

    2015-01-01

    Major gaps in our understanding of the leukodystrophies result from their rarity and the lack of tissue for the interdisciplinary studies required to extend our knowledge of the pathophysiology of the diseases. This study details the natural evolution of changes in the CNS of the shaking pup (shp), a model of the classical form of the X-linked disorder Pelizaeus–Merzbacher disease, in particular in glia, myelin, and axons, which is likely representative of what occurs over time in the human disease. The mutation in the proteolipid protein gene, PLP1, leads to a delay in differentiation, increased cell death, and a marked distension of the rough endoplasmic reticulum in oligodendrocytes. However, over time, more oligodendrocytes differentiate and survive in the spinal cord leading to an almost total recovery of myelination, In contrast, the brain remains persistently hypomyelinated. These data suggest that shp oligodendrocytes may be more functional than previously realized and that their early recruitment could have therapeutic value. PMID:25562656

  5. Model operating permits for natural gas processing plants

    SciTech Connect

    Arend, C.

    1995-12-31

    Major sources as defined in Title V of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 that are required to submit an operating permit application will need to: Evaluate their compliance status; Determine a strategic method of presenting the general and specific conditions of their Model Operating Permit (MOP); Maintain compliance with air quality regulations. A MOP is prepared to assist permitting agencies and affected facilities in the development of operating permits for a specific source category. This paper includes a brief discussion of example permit conditions that may be applicable to various types of Title V sources. A MOP for a generic natural gas processing plant is provided as an example. The MOP should include a general description of the production process and identify emission sources. The two primary elements that comprise a MOP are: Provisions of all existing state and/or local air permits; Identification of general and specific conditions for the Title V permit. The general provisions will include overall compliance with all Clean Air Act Titles. The specific provisions include monitoring, record keeping, and reporting. Although Title V MOPs are prepared on a case-by-case basis, this paper will provide a general guideline of the requirements for preparation of a MOP. Regulatory agencies have indicated that a MOP included in the Title V application will assist in preparation of the final permit provisions, minimize delays in securing a permit, and provide support during the public notification process.

  6. Modelling the costs of natural hazards in games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostenaru-Dan, M.

    2012-04-01

    City are looked for today, including a development at the University of Torino called SimTorino, which simulates the development of the city in the next 20 years. The connection to another games genre as video games, the board games, will be investigated, since there are games on construction and reconstruction of a cathedral and its tower and a bridge in an urban environment of the middle ages based on the two novels of Ken Follett, "Pillars of the Earth" and "World Without End" and also more recent games, such as "Urban Sprawl" or the Romanian game "Habitat", dealing with the man-made hazard of demolition. A review of these games will be provided based on first hand playing experience. In games like "World without End" or "Pillars of the Earth", just like in the recently popular games of Zynga on social networks, construction management is done through providing "building" an item out of stylised materials, such as "stone", "sand" or more specific ones as "nail". Such approach could be used also for retrofitting buildings for earthquakes, in the series of "upgrade", not just for extension as it is currently in games, and this is what our research is about. "World without End" includes a natural disaster not so analysed today but which was judged by the author as the worst of manhood: the Black Death. The Black Death has effects and costs as well, not only modelled through action cards, but also on the built environment, by buildings remaining empty. On the other hand, games such as "Habitat" rely on role playing, which has been recently recognised as a way to bring games theory to decision making through the so-called contribution of drama, a way to solve conflicts through balancing instead of weighting, and thus related to Analytic Hierarchy Process. The presentation aims to also give hints on how to design a game for the problem of earthquake retrofit, translating the aims of the actors in such a process into role playing. Games are also employed in teaching of urban

  7. Synthesized performance model of thermal imaging systems based on natural background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Song-lin; Wang, Ji-hui; Wang, Xiao-wei; Jin, Wei-qi

    2013-09-01

    The impact of nature environment on the synthesized performance of thermal imaging systems was researched comparing with the targeting task performance (TTP) model. A nature background noise factor was presented and introduced into the minimum resolvable temperature difference channel width (MRTD-CW) model. The method for determining the nature background noise factor was given. A information quantity model based on MRTD-CW model was proposed to evaluate the impact of nature environment on the synthesized performance of thermal imaging systems. A normalized parameter was introduced into the information quantity model. Different background experiments were performed, and the results were analyzed and compared with those of TTP model.

  8. Towards a Curricular Model of the Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Keith S.

    2008-01-01

    The nature of science is a complex theme, and continues to be the subject of advanced and ongoing scholarship, drawing upon a range of disciplines. Therefore, whatever is presented in school science as being "the" nature of science must at best be a simplification, and so there is a need to form judgements about which simplifications are most…

  9. C P T , C P , and C transformations of fermions, and their consequences, in theories with B -L violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Susan; Yan, Xinshuai

    2016-05-01

    We consider the transformation properties of fermions under the discrete symmetries C P T , C P , and C in the presence of B -L violation. We thus generalize the analysis of the known properties of Majorana neutrinos, probed via neutrinoless double beta decay, to include the case of Dirac fermions with B -L violation, which can be probed via neutron-antineutron oscillations. We show that the resulting C P T phase has implications for the interplay of neutron-antineutron oscillations with external fields and sources and consider the differences in the Majorana dynamics of neutrinos and neutrons in the context of theories with self-conjugate isospin I =0 and I =1 /2 fields.

  10. Characterization of human papillomavirus 6b L1 virus-like particles isolated from silkworms using capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hahne, Thomas; Palaniyandi, Muthukutty; Kato, Tatsuya; Fleischmann, Peter; Wätzig, Hermann; Park, Enoch Y

    2014-09-01

    Human papillomavirus 6b L1 virus-like particles (VLPs) were successfully expressed using Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) bacmid expression system and rapidly purified using size exclusion chromatography after ultracentrifugation procedure and characterized by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). The average capillary electrophoresis migration time was 11 min with the relative standard deviation (RSD) of 0.3% of human papillomavirus 6b L1 VLPs. After this threefold fractionation, the CZE samples were still further investigated by dynamic light scattering and immuno blotting. The versatile technique, CZE not only proved to be a valuable tool for VLP characterization, but was also found to be reliable and precise. Thus CZE will also be an important option for the quality control of VLPs in pharmaceutical research level. PMID:24694399

  11. Modelling the costs of natural hazards in games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostenaru-Dan, M.

    2012-04-01

    City are looked for today, including a development at the University of Torino called SimTorino, which simulates the development of the city in the next 20 years. The connection to another games genre as video games, the board games, will be investigated, since there are games on construction and reconstruction of a cathedral and its tower and a bridge in an urban environment of the middle ages based on the two novels of Ken Follett, "Pillars of the Earth" and "World Without End" and also more recent games, such as "Urban Sprawl" or the Romanian game "Habitat", dealing with the man-made hazard of demolition. A review of these games will be provided based on first hand playing experience. In games like "World without End" or "Pillars of the Earth", just like in the recently popular games of Zynga on social networks, construction management is done through providing "building" an item out of stylised materials, such as "stone", "sand" or more specific ones as "nail". Such approach could be used also for retrofitting buildings for earthquakes, in the series of "upgrade", not just for extension as it is currently in games, and this is what our research is about. "World without End" includes a natural disaster not so analysed today but which was judged by the author as the worst of manhood: the Black Death. The Black Death has effects and costs as well, not only modelled through action cards, but also on the built environment, by buildings remaining empty. On the other hand, games such as "Habitat" rely on role playing, which has been recently recognised as a way to bring games theory to decision making through the so-called contribution of drama, a way to solve conflicts through balancing instead of weighting, and thus related to Analytic Hierarchy Process. The presentation aims to also give hints on how to design a game for the problem of earthquake retrofit, translating the aims of the actors in such

  12. Ten years of Nature Physics: Numerical models come of age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, E.; Millis, A. J.

    2015-10-01

    When Nature Physics celebrated 20 years of high-temperature superconductors, numerical approaches were on the periphery. Since then, new ideas implemented in new algorithms are leading to new insights.

  13. Biomimetics: using nature as an inspiring model for human innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of nature over 3.8 billion years led to the highly effective and power efficient biological mechanisms. Imitating these mechanisms offers enormous potentials for the improvement of our life and the tools we use.

  14. Natural language modeling for phoneme-to-text transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Derouault, A.M.; Merialdo, B.

    1986-11-01

    This paper relates different kinds of language modeling methods that can be applied to the linguistic decoding part of a speech recognition system with a very large vocabulary. These models are studied experimentally on a pseudophonetic input arising from French stenotypy. The authors propose a model which combines the advantages of a statistical modeling with information theoretic tools, and those of a grammatical approach.

  15. Conceptual geoinformation model of natural hazards risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulygin, Valerii

    2016-04-01

    Natural hazards are the major threat to safe interactions between nature and society. The assessment of the natural hazards impacts and their consequences is important in spatial planning and resource management. Today there is a challenge to advance our understanding of how socio-economical and climate changes will affect the frequency and magnitude of hydro-meteorological hazards and associated risks. However, the impacts from different types of natural hazards on various marine and coastal economic activities are not of the same type. In this study, the conceptual geomodel of risk assessment is presented to highlight the differentiation by the type of economic activities in extreme events risk assessment. The marine and coastal ecosystems are considered as the objects of management, on the one hand, and as the place of natural hazards' origin, on the other hand. One of the key elements in describing of such systems is the spatial characterization of their components. Assessment of ecosystem state is based on ecosystem indicators (indexes). They are used to identify the changes in time. The scenario approach is utilized to account for the spatio-temporal dynamics and uncertainty factors. Two types of scenarios are considered: scenarios of using ecosystem services by economic activities and scenarios of extreme events and related hazards. The reported study was funded by RFBR, according to the research project No. 16-35-60043 mol_a_dk.

  16. Electroweak stars: how nature may capitalize on the standard model's ultimate fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, De-Chang; Stojkovic, Dejan; Lue, Arthur; Starkman, Glenn E-mail: shinypup@gmail.com E-mail: ds77@buffalo.edu

    2010-12-01

    We study the possible existence of an electroweak star — a compact stellar-mass object whose central core temperature is higher than the electroweak symmetry restoration temperature. We found a solution to the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations describing such an object. The parameters of such a star are not substantially different from a neutron star — its mass is around 1.3 Solar masses while its radius is around 8km. What is different is the existence of a small electroweak core. The source of energy in the core that can at least temporarily balance gravity are standard-model non-perturbative baryon number (B) and lepton number (L) violating processes that allow the chemical potential of B+L to relax to zero. The energy released at the core is enormous, but gravitational redshift and the enhanced neutrino interaction cross section at these energies make the energy release rate moderate at the surface of the star. The lifetime of this new quasi-equilibrium can be more than ten million years. This is long enough to represent a new stage in the evolution of a star if stellar evolution can take it there.

  17. An Instructional Design Model to Teach Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koksal, Mustafa Serdar

    2009-01-01

    The "explicit-reflective-embedded" approach is an effective way of teaching nature of science (NOS). But, the studies have not provided a clear or explicit definition of the approach in terms of an instructional design framework. The approach has two sides including embedding into content knowledge and purposively teaching the NOS aspects as a…

  18. Natural Variation of Model Mutant Phenotypes in Ciona intestinalis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Euan R.; Leccia, Nicola I.; Squarzoni, Paola; Tarallo, Raffaella; Alfano, Christian; Caputi, Luigi; D'Ambrosio, Palmira; Daniele, Paola; D'Aniello, Enrico; D'Aniello, Salvatore; Maiella, Sylvie; Miraglia, Valentina; Russo, Monia Teresa; Sorrenti, Gerarda; Branno, Margherita; Cariello, Lucio; Cirino, Paola; Locascio, Annamaria; Spagnuolo, Antonietta; Zanetti, Laura; Ristoratore, Filomena

    2008-01-01

    Background The study of ascidians (Chordata, Tunicata) has made a considerable contribution to our understanding of the origin and evolution of basal chordates. To provide further information to support forward genetics in Ciona intestinalis, we used a combination of natural variation and neutral population genetics as an approach for the systematic identification of new mutations. In addition to the significance of developmental variation for phenotype-driven studies, this approach can encompass important implications in evolutionary and population biology. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we report a preliminary survey for naturally occurring mutations in three geographically interconnected populations of C. intestinalis. The influence of historical, geographical and environmental factors on the distribution of abnormal phenotypes was assessed by means of 12 microsatellites. We identified 37 possible mutant loci with stereotyped defects in embryonic development that segregate in a way typical of recessive alleles. Local populations were found to differ in genetic organization and frequency distribution of phenotypic classes. Conclusions/Significance Natural genetic polymorphism of C. intestinalis constitutes a valuable source of phenotypes for studying embryonic development in ascidians. Correlating genetic structure and the occurrence of abnormal phenotypes is a crucial focus for understanding the selective forces that shape natural finite populations, and may provide insights of great importance into the evolutionary mechanisms that generate animal diversity. PMID:18523552

  19. An Updated Natural History Model of Cervical Cancer: Derivation of Model Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Nicole G.; Burger, Emily A.; Sy, Stephen; Sharma, Monisha; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando; Kim, Jane J.

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models of cervical cancer have been widely used to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of preventive strategies. Major advances in the understanding of cervical carcinogenesis motivate the creation of a new disease paradigm in such models. To keep pace with the most recent evidence, we updated a previously developed microsimulation model of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cervical cancer to reflect 1) a shift towards health states based on HPV rather than poorly reproducible histological diagnoses and 2) HPV clearance and progression to precancer as a function of infection duration and genotype, as derived from the control arm of the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (2004–2010). The model was calibrated leveraging empirical data from the New Mexico Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Registry (1980–1999) and a state-of-the-art cervical cancer screening registry in New Mexico (2007–2009). The calibrated model had good correspondence with data on genotype- and age-specific HPV prevalence, genotype frequency in precancer and cancer, and age-specific cancer incidence. We present this model in response to a call for new natural history models of cervical cancer intended for decision analysis and economic evaluation at a time when global cervical cancer prevention policy continues to evolve and evidence of the long-term health effects of cervical interventions remains critical. PMID:25081182

  20. An updated natural history model of cervical cancer: derivation of model parameters.

    PubMed

    Campos, Nicole G; Burger, Emily A; Sy, Stephen; Sharma, Monisha; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando; Kim, Jane J

    2014-09-01

    Mathematical models of cervical cancer have been widely used to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of preventive strategies. Major advances in the understanding of cervical carcinogenesis motivate the creation of a new disease paradigm in such models. To keep pace with the most recent evidence, we updated a previously developed microsimulation model of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cervical cancer to reflect 1) a shift towards health states based on HPV rather than poorly reproducible histological diagnoses and 2) HPV clearance and progression to precancer as a function of infection duration and genotype, as derived from the control arm of the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (2004-2010). The model was calibrated leveraging empirical data from the New Mexico Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Registry (1980-1999) and a state-of-the-art cervical cancer screening registry in New Mexico (2007-2009). The calibrated model had good correspondence with data on genotype- and age-specific HPV prevalence, genotype frequency in precancer and cancer, and age-specific cancer incidence. We present this model in response to a call for new natural history models of cervical cancer intended for decision analysis and economic evaluation at a time when global cervical cancer prevention policy continues to evolve and evidence of the long-term health effects of cervical interventions remains critical. PMID:25081182

  1. Image Discrimination Models for Object Detection in Natural Backgrounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, A. J., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews work accomplished and in progress at NASA Ames relating to visual target detection. The focus is on image discrimination models, starting with Watson's pioneering development of a simple spatial model and progressing through this model's descendents and extensions. The application of image discrimination models to target detection will be described and results reviewed for Rohaly's vehicle target data and the Search 2 data. The paper concludes with a description of work we have done to model the process by which observers learn target templates and methods for elucidating those templates.

  2. Modelling methane emissions from natural wetlands by development and application of the TRIPLEX-GHG model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, Qing; Liu, Jinxun; Peng, C.; Chen, H.; Fang, X.; Jiang, H.; Yang, G.; Zhu, D.; Wang, W.; Zhou, X.

    2014-01-01

    A new process-based model TRIPLEX-GHG was developed based on the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS), coupled with a new methane (CH4) biogeochemistry module (incorporating CH4 production, oxidation, and transportation processes) and a water table module to investigate CH4 emission processes and dynamics that occur in natural wetlands. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the most sensitive parameters to evaluate CH4 emission processes from wetlands are r (defined as the CH4 to CO2 release ratio) and Q10 in the CH4 production process. These two parameters were subsequently calibrated to data obtained from 19 sites collected from approximately 35 studies across different wetlands globally. Being heterogeneously spatially distributed, r ranged from 0.1 to 0.7 with a mean value of 0.23, and the Q10 for CH4 production ranged from 1.6 to 4.5 with a mean value of 2.48. The model performed well when simulating magnitude and capturing temporal patterns in CH4 emissions from natural wetlands. Results suggest that the model is able to be applied to different wetlands under varying conditions and is also applicable for global-scale simulations.

  3. Modeling Functional Motions of Biological Systems by Customized Natural Moves.

    PubMed

    Demharter, Samuel; Knapp, Bernhard; Deane, Charlotte M; Minary, Peter

    2016-08-23

    Simulating the functional motions of biomolecular systems requires large computational resources. We introduce a computationally inexpensive protocol for the systematic testing of hypotheses regarding the dynamic behavior of proteins and nucleic acids. The protocol is based on natural move Monte Carlo, a highly efficient conformational sampling method with built-in customization capabilities that allows researchers to design and perform a large number of simulations to investigate functional motions in biological systems. We demonstrate the use of this protocol on both a protein and a DNA case study. Firstly, we investigate the plasticity of a class II major histocompatibility complex in the absence of a bound peptide. Secondly, we study the effects of the epigenetic mark 5-hydroxymethyl on cytosine on the structure of the Dickerson-Drew dodecamer. We show how our customized natural moves protocol can be used to investigate causal relationships of functional motions in biological systems. PMID:27558715

  4. Performance of five models to predict the naturalization of non-native woody plants in Iowa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of risk-assessment models that can predict the naturalization and invasion of non-native woody plants is a potentially beneficial approach for protecting human and natural environments. This study validates the power and accuracy of four risk-assessment models previously tested in Iowa, and exa...

  5. Potential model for single-sided naturally ventilated buildings in China

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Yin; Guo-qiang, Zhang; Jing, Liu; San-xian, Xia; Xiao, Wang

    2010-09-15

    The paper investigates a single-sided naturally ventilated buildings potential model considering number of factors in China. This model can be used to estimate potential of natural ventilation via local climate data and building parameters. The main goal of the model is to predict natural ventilation hours and hourly ventilation flow rate. In fluid model, formula of single-sided natural ventilation by coupling wind pressure and temperature difference was used to calculate air flow rate. Accordingly, the paper analyzed four typical cities in different climate region in China and calculated pressure difference Pascal hours (PDPH). The results show that single-sided ventilation has fewer adaptive comfort hours than two-sided ventilation and much less ventilation volume. This model provided quantitative information for early stage architectural natural ventilation design and building energy efficiency evaluation. (author)

  6. Widespread somatosensory sensitivity in naturally occurring canine model of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Knazovicky, David; Helgeson, Erika S; Case, Beth; Gruen, Margaret E; Maixner, William; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA)-associated pain is a leading cause of disability. Central sensitization (CS), as a result of OA, is recognized as an important facet of human patients' chronic pain and has been measured in people using quantitative sensory testing (QST) testing. The spontaneous canine OA model has been suggested as a good translational model, but CS has not been explored in this model. In this study, QST was performed on dogs with and without spontaneous hip or stifle OA to determine whether OA is associated with CS in this model. Mechanical (von Frey and blunt pressure) and thermal (hot and cold) sensory thresholds obtained in dogs with chronic OA-associated pain (n = 31) were compared with those of normal dogs (n = 23). Dogs were phenotyped and joint-pain scored, and testing was performed at the OA-affected joint, cranial tibial muscle, and dorsal metatarsal region. QST summary data were evaluated using mixed-effect models to understand the influence of OA status and covariates, and dogs with OA and control dogs were compared. The presence of OA was strongly associated with hyperalgesia across all QST modalities at the index joint, cranial tibial muscle, and metatarsal site. Mechanical QST scores were significantly moderately negatively correlated with total joint-pain scores. The spontaneous canine OA model is associated with somatosensory sensitivity, likely indicative of CS. These data further validate the canine spontaneous OA model as an appropriate model of the human OA pain condition. PMID:26901805

  7. Widespread somatosensory sensitivity in naturally occurring canine model of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Knazovicky, David; Helgeson, Erika S.; Case, Beth; Gruen, Margaret E.; Maixner, William; Lascelles, B. Duncan X.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA)-associated pain is a leading cause of disability. Central sensitization (CS), as a result of OA, is recognized as an important facet of human patients' chronic pain and has been measured in people using quantitative sensory testing (QST) testing. The spontaneous canine OA model has been suggested as a good translational model, but CS has not been explored in this model. In this study, QST was performed on dogs with and without spontaneous hip or stifle OA to determine whether OA is associated with CS in this model. Mechanical (von Frey and blunt pressure) and thermal (hot and cold) sensory thresholds obtained in dogs with chronic OA-associated pain (n = 31) were compared with those of normal dogs (n = 23). Dogs were phenotyped and joint-pain scored, and testing was performed at the OA-affected joint, cranial tibial muscle, and dorsal metatarsal region. QST summary data were evaluated using mixed-effect models to understand the influence of OA status and covariates, and dogs with OA and control dogs were compared. The presence of OA was strongly associated with hyperalgesia across all QST modalities at the index joint, cranial tibial muscle, and metatarsal site. Mechanical QST scores were significantly moderately negatively correlated with total joint-pain scores. The spontaneous canine OA model is associated with somatosensory sensitivity, likely indicative of CS. These data further validate the canine spontaneous OA model as an appropriate model of the human OA pain condition. PMID:26901805

  8. Generalized population models and the nature of genetic drift.

    PubMed

    Der, Ricky; Epstein, Charles L; Plotkin, Joshua B

    2011-09-01

    The Wright-Fisher model of allele dynamics forms the basis for most theoretical and applied research in population genetics. Our understanding of genetic drift, and its role in suppressing the deterministic forces of Darwinian selection has relied on the specific form of sampling inherent to the Wright-Fisher model and its diffusion limit. Here we introduce and analyze a broad class of forward-time population models that share the same mean and variance as the Wright-Fisher model, but may otherwise differ. The proposed class unifies and further generalizes a number of population-genetic processes of recent interest, including the Λ and Cannings processes. Even though these models all have the same variance effective population size, they encode a rich diversity of alternative forms of genetic drift, with significant consequences for allele dynamics. We characterize in detail the behavior of standard population-genetic quantities across this family of generalized models. Some quantities, such as heterozygosity, remain unchanged; but others, such as neutral absorption times and fixation probabilities under selection, deviate by orders of magnitude from the Wright-Fisher model. We show that generalized population models can produce startling phenomena that differ qualitatively from classical behavior - such as assured fixation of a new mutant despite the presence of genetic drift. We derive the forward-time continuum limits of the generalized processes, analogous to Kimura's diffusion limit of the Wright-Fisher process, and we discuss their relationships to the Kingman and non-Kingman coalescents. Finally, we demonstrate that some non-diffusive, generalized models are more likely, in certain respects, than the Wright-Fisher model itself, given empirical data from Drosophila populations. PMID:21718713

  9. On the nature of a supposed water model

    SciTech Connect

    Heckmann, Lotta Drossel, Barbara

    2014-08-15

    A cell model that has been proposed by Stanley and Franzese in 2002 for modeling water is based on Potts variables that represent the possible orientations of bonds between water molecules. We show that in the liquid phase, where all cells are occupied by a molecule, the Hamiltonian of the cell model can be rewritten as a Hamiltonian of a conventional Potts model, albeit with two types of coupling constants. We argue that such a model, while having a first-order phase transition, cannot display the critical end point that is postulated for the phase transition between a high- and low-density liquid. A closer look at the mean-field calculations that claim to find such an end point in the cell model reveals that the mean-field theory is constructed such that the symmetry constraints on the order parameter are violated. This is equivalent to introducing an external field. The introduction of such a field can be given a physical justification due to the fact that water does not have the type of long-range order occurring in the Potts model.

  10. Biomimetics - using nature as an inspiring model for innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2006-01-01

    In this presentation, various aspects of the field of biomimetics will be reviewed, examples of inspiring biological models and practical applications will be described, and challenges and potential direction of the field will be discussed.

  11. Natural vs. artificial groundwater recharge, quantification through inverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, H.; Berndtsson, R.; Kompani-Zare, M.; Persson, M.

    2012-08-01

    Estimating the change in groundwater recharge from an introduced artificial recharge system is important in order to evaluate future water availability. This paper presents an inverse modeling approach to quantify the recharge contribution from both an ephemeral river channel and an introduced artificial recharge system based on floodwater spreading in arid Iran. The study used the MODFLOW-2000 to estimate recharge for both steady and unsteady-state conditions. The model was calibrated and verified based on the observed hydraulic head in observation wells and model precision, uncertainty, and model sensitivity were analyzed in all modeling steps. The results showed that in a normal year without extreme events the floodwater spreading system is the main contributor to recharge with 80% and the ephemeral river channel with 20% of total recharge in the studied area. Uncertainty analysis revealed that the river channel recharge estimation represents relatively more uncertainty in comparison to the artificial recharge zones. The model is also less sensitive to the river channel. The results show that by expanding the artificial recharge system the recharge volume can be increased even for small flood events while the recharge through the river channel increases only for major flood events.

  12. Natural vs. artificial groundwater recharge, quantification through inverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, H.; Berndtsson, R.; Kompani-Zare, M.; Persson, M.

    2013-02-01

    Estimating the change in groundwater recharge from an introduced artificial recharge system is important in order to evaluate future water availability. This paper presents an inverse modeling approach to quantify the recharge contribution from both an ephemeral river channel and an introduced artificial recharge system based on floodwater spreading in arid Iran. The study used the MODFLOW-2000 to estimate recharge for both steady- and unsteady-state conditions. The model was calibrated and verified based on the observed hydraulic head in observation wells and model precision, uncertainty, and model sensitivity were analyzed in all modeling steps. The results showed that in a normal year without extreme events, the floodwater spreading system is the main contributor to recharge with 80% and the ephemeral river channel with 20% of total recharge in the studied area. Uncertainty analysis revealed that the river channel recharge estimation represents relatively more uncertainty in comparison to the artificial recharge zones. The model is also less sensitive to the river channel. The results show that by expanding the artificial recharge system, the recharge volume can be increased even for small flood events, while the recharge through the river channel increases only for major flood events.

  13. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, Michael L; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2002-10-08

    During this reporting period, research was continued on characterizing and modeling the behavior of naturally fractured reservoir systems. This report proposed a model to relate the seismic response to production data to determine crack spacing and aperture, provided details of tests of proposed models to obtain fracture properties from conventional well logs with actual field data, and verification of the naturally fractured reservoir simulator developed in this project.

  14. Stochastic Model for the Vocabulary Growth in Natural Languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Martin; Altmann, Eduardo G.

    2013-04-01

    We propose a stochastic model for the number of different words in a given database which incorporates the dependence on the database size and historical changes. The main feature of our model is the existence of two different classes of words: (i) a finite number of core words, which have higher frequency and do not affect the probability of a new word to be used, and (ii) the remaining virtually infinite number of noncore words, which have lower frequency and, once used, reduce the probability of a new word to be used in the future. Our model relies on a careful analysis of the Google Ngram database of books published in the last centuries, and its main consequence is the generalization of Zipf’s and Heaps’ law to two-scaling regimes. We confirm that these generalizations yield the best simple description of the data among generic descriptive models and that the two free parameters depend only on the language but not on the database. From the point of view of our model, the main change on historical time scales is the composition of the specific words included in the finite list of core words, which we observe to decay exponentially in time with a rate of approximately 30 words per year for English.

  15. Phonetic recognition of natural speech by nonstationary Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falaschi, Alessandro

    1988-04-01

    A speech recognition system based on statistical decision theory, viewing the problem as the classical design of a decoder in a communication system framework is outlined. Statistical properties of the language are used to characterize the allowable phonetic sequence inside the words, while trying to capture allophonic phoneme features into functional-dependent acoustical models with the aim of utilizing them as word segmentation cues. Experiments prove the utility of an explicit modeling of the intrinsic speech nonstationarity in a statistically based speech recognition system. The nonstationarity of phonetic chain statistics and acoustical transition probabilities can be easily taken into account, yielding recognition improvements. The use of inside syllable position dependent phonetic models does not improve recognition performance, and the iterative Viterbi training algorithm seems unable to adequately valorize this kind of acoustical modeling. As a direct consequence of the system design, the recognized phonetic sequence exhibits word boundary marks even in absence of pauses between words, thus giving anchor points to the higher level parsing algorithms needed in a complete recognition system.

  16. Thermal modeling of phase change solidification in thermal control devices including natural convection effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukanwa, A. O.; Stermole, F. J.; Golden, J. O.

    1972-01-01

    Natural convection effects in phase change thermal control devices were studied. A mathematical model was developed to evaluate natural convection effects in a phase change test cell undergoing solidification. Although natural convection effects are minimized in flight spacecraft, all phase change devices are ground tested. The mathematical approach to the problem was to first develop a transient two-dimensional conduction heat transfer model for the solidification of a normal paraffin of finite geometry. Next, a transient two-dimensional model was developed for the solidification of the same paraffin by a combined conduction-natural-convection heat transfer model. Throughout the study, n-hexadecane (n-C16H34) was used as the phase-change material in both the theoretical and the experimental work. The models were based on the transient two-dimensional finite difference solutions of the energy, continuity, and momentum equations.

  17. Modeling the Nature of Science with the Mystery Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Scott

    2014-12-01

    Oftentimes physics is portrayed as merely a list of facts that we know about the world around us, when in fact it is a way of knowing about that world. At times physics claims to understand the inner working of objects that cannot be directly observed, such as the core of the planets and Sun, or the structure of an atom. It is important for students to learn not only the facts of what we know about science, but also how we know what we know about science, even if we cannot directly observe it. This article describes a new take on a black box activity that has been around for years, the mystery tube.1 It is simple to construct but effective at demonstrating the nature of science (NOS). It illustrates the difference between observation and inference, and steps students through the scientific process. Beginning with a scientific question, students make observations, form a hypothesis, predict further observations, and test them before revising or strengthening their hypothesis. This activity provides a fantastic introduction to NOS, either as an alternative to other NOS activities2 or as a lead-in to a discussion of NOS.3 It can be used as an in-class activity, starting off a discussion of how scientists can claim to know what we know, or it can be used as an introductory lab, setting the foundation for how all subsequent activities should be conducted.

  18. Improvement of Endurance of DMD Animal Model Using Natural Polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    Sitzia, Clementina; Farini, Andrea; Fortunato, Francesco; Razini, Paola; Erratico, Silvia; Tavelli, Alessandro; Fabrizi, Francesco; Belicchi, Marzia; Torrente, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common form of muscular dystrophy, is characterized by muscular wasting caused by dystrophin deficiency that ultimately ends in force reduction and premature death. In addition to primary genetic defect, several mechanisms contribute to DMD pathogenesis. Recently, antioxidant supplementation was shown to be effective in the treatment of multiple diseases including muscular dystrophy. Different mechanisms were hypothesized such as reduced hydroxyl radicals, nuclear factor-κB deactivation, and NO protection from inactivation. Following these promising evidences, we investigated the effect of the administration of a mix of dietary natural polyphenols (ProAbe) on dystrophic mdx mice in terms of muscular architecture and functionality. We observed a reduction of muscle fibrosis deposition and myofiber necrosis together with an amelioration of vascularization. More importantly, the recovery of the morphological features of dystrophic muscle leads to an improvement of the endurance of treated dystrophic mice. Our data confirmed that ProAbe-based diet may represent a strategy to coadjuvate the treatment of DMD. PMID:25861640

  19. MSW to synthetic natural gas: System modeling and thermodynamics assessment.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Le; Fan, Junming; Jiang, Peng; Li, Luling

    2016-02-01

    To achieve environmental-friendly and energy-efficiency synthetic natural gas (SNG) production routing from municipal solid waste (MSW), a MSW-to-SNG process is unprecedentedly presented in this work, of which the designed configuration is developed and simulated with the aid of Aspen Plus. In addition, sensitivity analyses on major operation parameters, such as equivalence volume ratio (ER), steam-to-MSW mass ratio (S/M) and methanation pressure, are performed with the discussion of process efficiencies and SNG quality. In parallel, the comparison analysis is considered by adopting various MSW material. In this work, the composition of SNG mainly consists of 87.7% CH4, 2.9% CO2, 2.3% H2 and 7.1% N2. And lower heating value (LHV) together with Wobbe index of SNG are separately 31.66MJ/Nm(3) and 45.90MJ/Nm(3). Moreover, the wood-to-SNG, MSW-to-SNG and coal-to-SNG processes are carried out to demonstrate the superiority of the MSW-to-SNG process. The results reveal that the MSW-to-SNG process is a promising option to dispose MSW environmentally, meanwhile converting MSW to the valuable SNG. PMID:26525970

  20. The horse as a model of naturally occurring osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    McIlwraith, C. W.; Frisbie, D. D.; Kawcak, C. E.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is an important cause of pain, disability and economic loss in humans, and is similarly important in the horse. Recent knowledge on post-traumatic OA has suggested opportunities for early intervention, but it is difficult to identify the appropriate time of these interventions. The horse provides two useful mechanisms to answer these questions: 1) extensive experience with clinical OA in horses; and 2) use of a consistently predictable model of OA that can help study early pathobiological events, define targets for therapeutic intervention and then test these putative therapies. This paper summarises the syndromes of clinical OA in horses including pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment, and details controlled studies of various treatment options using an equine model of clinical OA. PMID:23610661

  1. A Theoretical Model for the Associative Nature of Conference Participation.

    PubMed

    Smiljanić, Jelena; Chatterjee, Arnab; Kauppinen, Tomi; Mitrović Dankulov, Marija

    2016-01-01

    Participation in conferences is an important part of every scientific career. Conferences provide an opportunity for a fast dissemination of latest results, discussion and exchange of ideas, and broadening of scientists' collaboration network. The decision to participate in a conference depends on several factors like the location, cost, popularity of keynote speakers, and the scientist's association with the community. Here we discuss and formulate the problem of discovering how a scientist's previous participation affects her/his future participations in the same conference series. We develop a stochastic model to examine scientists' participation patterns in conferences and compare our model with data from six conferences across various scientific fields and communities. Our model shows that the probability for a scientist to participate in a given conference series strongly depends on the balance between the number of participations and non-participations during his/her early connections with the community. An active participation in a conference series strengthens the scientist's association with that particular conference community and thus increases the probability of future participations. PMID:26859404

  2. Modeling the importance of faces in natural images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, B.; Yildirim, G.; Lau, C.; Shaji, A.; Ortiz Segovia, M.; Süsstrunk, S.

    2015-03-01

    In this work we study the varying importance of faces in images. Face importance is found to be affected by the size and number of faces present. We collected a dataset of 152 face images with faces in different size and number of faces. We conducted a crowdsourcing experiment where we asked people to label the important regions of the images. Analyzing the results from the experiment, we propose a simple face-importance model, which is a 2D Gaussian function, to quantitatively represent the influence of the size and number of faces on the perceived importance of faces. The face-importance model is then tested for the application of salient-object detection. For this application, we create a new salient-objects dataset, consisting of both face images and non-face images, and also through crowdsourcing we collect the ground truth. We demonstrate that our face-importance model helps us to better locate the important, thus salient, objects in the images and outperforms state-of-the-art salient-object detection algorithms.

  3. A Theoretical Model for the Associative Nature of Conference Participation

    PubMed Central

    Smiljanić, Jelena; Chatterjee, Arnab; Kauppinen, Tomi; Mitrović Dankulov, Marija

    2016-01-01

    Participation in conferences is an important part of every scientific career. Conferences provide an opportunity for a fast dissemination of latest results, discussion and exchange of ideas, and broadening of scientists’ collaboration network. The decision to participate in a conference depends on several factors like the location, cost, popularity of keynote speakers, and the scientist’s association with the community. Here we discuss and formulate the problem of discovering how a scientist’s previous participation affects her/his future participations in the same conference series. We develop a stochastic model to examine scientists’ participation patterns in conferences and compare our model with data from six conferences across various scientific fields and communities. Our model shows that the probability for a scientist to participate in a given conference series strongly depends on the balance between the number of participations and non-participations during his/her early connections with the community. An active participation in a conference series strengthens the scientist’s association with that particular conference community and thus increases the probability of future participations. PMID:26859404

  4. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Natural Gas Consumption and Prices

    EIA Publications

    2015-01-01

    The natural gas consumption and price modules of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model are designed to provide consumption and end-use retail price forecasts for the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors in the nine Census districts and natural gas working inventories in three regions. Natural gas consumption shares and prices in each Census district are used to calculate an average U.S. retail price for each end-use sector.

  5. A convenient model and program for the assessment of abiotic degradation of chemicals in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, R.; Kloepffer, W.

    1989-06-01

    A convenient model for the estimation and comparison of rates of various degradation processes of chemicals in natural waters is described. The estimates are determined by combining physicochemical properties of the chemicals with properties of natural waters and solar photon irradiancies.

  6. Natural variability of the climate as predicted by a simple ocean model with parameterized thermohaline circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, R.G.; Li, S.

    1995-12-31

    Variability of the Earth`s climate can take place on many time scales as a result of internal features. This natural variability is important to humans since it affects such important human enterprises as agriculture, floods, droughts, etc. The authors investigate natural variability within a simple ocean model.

  7. Teaching Concepts of Natural Sciences to Foreigners through Content-Based Instruction: The Adjunct Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satilmis, Yilmaz; Yakup, Doganay; Selim, Guvercin; Aybarsha, Islam

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates three models of content-based instruction in teaching concepts and terms of natural sciences in order to increase the efficiency of teaching these kinds of concepts in realization and to prove that the content-based instruction is a teaching strategy that helps students understand concepts of natural sciences. Content-based…

  8. The Communication Model and the Nature of Change in Terms of Deforestation in China since 1949

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tian, Dexin; Chao, Chin-Chung

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the communication model and nature of change in terms of deforestation in China since 1949. Through Lasswell's communication model and the theory of change and via historical analysis and extended literature review, we have discovered: First, Mao's government adopted an effective one-way top-down communication model with…

  9. Some insights in novel risk modeling of liquefied natural gas carrier maintenance operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwaoha, T. C.; John, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    This study discusses the analysis of various modeling approaches and maintenance techniques applicable to the Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) carrier operations in the maritime environment. Various novel modeling techniques are discussed; including genetic algorithms, fuzzy logic and evidential reasoning. We also identify the usefulness of these algorithms in the LNG carrier industry in the areas of risk assessment and maintenance modeling.

  10. Some insights in novel risk modeling of liquefied natural gas carrier maintenance operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwaoha, T. C.; John, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    This study discusses the analysis of various modeling approaches and maintenance techniques applicable to the Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) carrier operations in the maritime environment. Various novel modeling techniques are discussed; including genetic algorithms, fuzzy logic and evidential reasoning. We also identify the usefulness of these algorithms in the LNG carrier industry in the areas of risk assessment and maintenance modeling.

  11. Nature, theory and modelling of geophysical convective planetary boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical convective planetary boundary layers (CPBLs) are still poorly reproduced in oceanographic, hydrological and meteorological models. Besides the mean flow and usual shear-generated turbulence, CPBLs involve two types of motion disregarded in conventional theories: 'anarchy turbulence' comprised of the buoyancy-driven plumes, merging to form larger plumes instead of breaking down, as postulated in conventional theory (Zilitinkevich, 1973), large-scale organised structures fed by the potential energy of unstable stratification through inverse energy transfer in convective turbulence (and performing non-local transports irrespective of mean gradients of transporting properties). C-PBLs are strongly mixed and go on growing as long as the boundary layer remains unstable. Penetration of the mixed layer into the weakly turbulent, stably stratified free flow causes turbulent transports through the CPBL outer boundary. The proposed theory, taking into account the above listed features of CPBL, is based on the following recent developments: prognostic CPBL-depth equation in combination with diagnostic algorithm for turbulence fluxes at the CPBL inner and outer boundaries (Zilitinkevich, 1991, 2012, 2013; Zilitinkevich et al., 2006, 2012), deterministic model of self-organised convective structures combined with statistical turbulence-closure model of turbulence in the CPBL core (Zilitinkevich, 2013). It is demonstrated that the overall vertical transports are performed mostly by turbulence in the surface layer and entrainment layer (at the CPBL inner and outer boundaries) and mostly by organised structures in the CPBL core (Hellsten and Zilitinkevich, 2013). Principal difference between structural and turbulent mixing plays an important role in a number of practical problems: transport and dispersion of admixtures, microphysics of fogs and clouds, etc. The surface-layer turbulence in atmospheric and marine CPBLs is strongly enhanced by the velocity shears in

  12. A GIS-based Model for Natural Gas Data Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitik, E.; Seker, D. Z.; Denli, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    In Turkey gas utility sector has undergone major changes in terms of increased competition between gas providers, efforts in improving services, and applying new technological solutions. This paper discusses the challenges met by gas companies to switch from long workflows of gas distribution, sales and maintenance into IT driven efficient management of complex information both spatially and non-spatially. The aim of this study is migration of all gas data and information into a GIS environment in order to manage and operate all infrastructure investments with a Utility Management System. All data conversion model for migration was designed and tested during the study. A flowchart is formed to transfer the old data layers to the new structure based on geodatabase.

  13. Representing natural and manmade drainage systems in an earth system modeling framework

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongyi; Wu, Huan; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2012-08-27

    Drainage systems can be categorized into natural or geomorphological drainage systems, agricultural drainage systems and urban drainage systems. They interact closely among themselves and with climate and human society, particularly under extreme climate and hydrological events such as floods. This editorial articulates the need to holistically understand and model drainage systems in the context of climate change and human influence, and discusses the requirements and examples of feasible approaches to representing natural and manmade drainage systems in an earth system modeling framework.

  14. Integrating human and natural systems in community psychology: an ecological model of stewardship behavior.

    PubMed

    Moskell, Christine; Allred, Shorna Broussard

    2013-03-01

    Community psychology (CP) research on the natural environment lacks a theoretical framework for analyzing the complex relationship between human systems and the natural world. We introduce other academic fields concerned with the interactions between humans and the natural environment, including environmental sociology and coupled human and natural systems. To demonstrate how the natural environment can be included within CP's ecological framework, we propose an ecological model of urban forest stewardship action. Although ecological models of behavior in CP have previously modeled health behaviors, we argue that these frameworks are also applicable to actions that positively influence the natural environment. We chose the environmental action of urban forest stewardship because cities across the United States are planting millions of trees and increased citizen participation in urban tree planting and stewardship will be needed to sustain the benefits provided by urban trees. We used the framework of an ecological model of behavior to illustrate multiple levels of factors that may promote or hinder involvement in urban forest stewardship actions. The implications of our model for the development of multi-level ecological interventions to foster stewardship actions are discussed, as well as directions for future research to further test and refine the model. PMID:22722897

  15. Naturalism and the social model of disability: allied or antithetical?

    PubMed

    Sisti, Dominic A

    2015-07-01

    The question of how disability should be defined is fraught with political, ethical and philosophical complexities. The social model of disability, which posits that disability is socially and politically constructed and is characterised by systemic barriers, has enjoyed broad acceptance that is exemplified by the slow but steady progress in securing civil rights for persons with disabilities. Yet, there remains a palpable tension between disability studies scholars and activists and bioethicists. While philosophers and bioethicists should heed the theories developed from the standpoint of persons with disabilities, disability activists should acknowledge the possibility that philosophical theories about the basic reality of disease, illness, health, function and impairment offer a more steady foundation for social or political critiques of disability. I argue that naturalistic theories of function and dysfunction provide a valuable starting point to clarify questions about the broader concept of disability. A naturalist theory of function may serve as the core of the concept of disability and provide disability scholars and bioethicists alike a stronger set of arguments in analysing real or potential instances of disability. PMID:25341736

  16. The natural alternative: protozoa as cellular models for Legionella infection.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Christine; Harrison, Christopher F; Hilbi, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease occurs following infection by the Gram-negative bacterium Legionella pneumophila. Normally resident in fresh-water sources, Legionella are subject to predation by eukaryotic phagocytes such as amoeba and ciliates. To counter this, L. pneumophila has evolved a complex system of effector proteins which allow the bacteria to hijack the phagocytic vacuole, hiding and replicating within their erstwhile killers. These same mechanisms allow L. pneumophila to hijack another phagocyte, lung-based macrophages, which thus avoids a vital part of the immune system and leads to infection. The course of infection can be divided into five main categories: pathogen uptake, formation of the replication-permissive vacuole, intracellular replication, host cell response, and bacterial exit. L. pneumophila effector proteins target every stage of this process, interacting with secretory, endosomal, lysosomal, retrograde and autophagy pathways, as well as with mitochondria. Each of these steps can be studied in protozoa or mammalian cells, and the knowledge gained can be readily applied to human pathogenicity. Here we describe the manner whereby L. pneumophila infects host protozoa, the various techniques which are available to analyse these processes and the implications of this model for Legionella virulence and the pathogenesis of Legionnaires' disease. PMID:24168696

  17. Naturalism and the social model of disability: allied or antithetical?

    PubMed Central

    Sisti, Dominic A

    2015-01-01

    The question of how disability should be defined is fraught with political, ethical and philosophical complexities. The social model of disability, which posits that disability is socially and politically constructed and is characterised by systemic barriers, has enjoyed broad acceptance that is exemplified by the slow but steady progress in securing civil rights for persons with disabilities. Yet, there remains a palpable tension between disability studies scholars and activists and bioethicists. While philosophers and bioethicists should heed the theories developed from the standpoint of persons with disabilities, disability activists should acknowledge the possibility that philosophical theories about the basic reality of disease, illness, health, function and impairment offer a more steady foundation for social or political critiques of disability. I argue that naturalistic theories of function and dysfunction provide a valuable starting point to clarify questions about the broader concept of disability. A naturalist theory of function may serve as the core of the concept of disability and provide disability scholars and bioethicists alike a stronger set of arguments in analysing real or potential instances of disability. PMID:25341736

  18. A toy model for estimating N2O emissions from natural soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Inez

    1992-01-01

    A model of N2O emissions from natural soils, whose ultimate objective is to evaluate what contribution natural ecosystems make to the global N2O budget and how the contribution would change with global change, is presented. Topics covered include carbon and nitrogen available in the soil, delivery of nitrifiable N, soil water and oxygen status, soil water budget model, effects of drainage, nitrification and denitrification potentials, soil fertility, N2O production, and a model evaluation. A major implication of the toy model is that the tropics account for more than 80 percent of global emission.

  19. Concept of CFD model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyhlík, T.

    2014-03-01

    The article deals with the development of CFD model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow. The physical phenomena taking place within a natural draft wet cooling tower are described by the system of conservation law equations along with additional equations. The heat and mass transfer in the counterflow wet-cooling tower fill are described by model [1] which is based on the system of ordinary differential equations. Utilization of model [1] of the fill allows us to apply commonly measured fill characteristics as shown by [2].The boundary value problem resulting from the fill model is solved separately. The system of conservation law equations is interlinked with the system of ordinary differential equations describing the phenomena occurring in the counterflow wet-cooling tower fill via heat and mass sources and via boundary conditions. The concept of numerical solution is presented for the quasi one dimensional model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow. The simulation results are shown.

  20. A patch-based cross masking model for natural images with detail loss and additive defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yucheng; Allebach, Jan P.

    2015-03-01

    Visual masking is an effect that contents of the image reduce the detectability of a given target signal hidden in the image. The effect of visual masking has found its application in numerous image processing and vision tasks. In the past few decades, numerous research has been conducted on visual masking based on models optimized for artificial targets placed upon unnatural masks. Over the years, there is a tendency to apply masking model to predict natural image quality and detection threshold of distortion presented in natural images. However, to our knowledge few studies have been conducted to understand the generalizability of masking model to different types of distortion presented in natural images. In this work, we measure the ability of natural image patches in masking three different types of distortion, and analyse the performance of conventional gain control model in predicting the distortion detection threshold. We then propose a new masking model, where detail loss and additive defects are modeled in two parallel vision channels and interact with each other via a cross masking mechanism. We show that the proposed cross masking model has better adaptability to various image structures and distortions in natural scenes.

  1. Modelling clustering of natural hazard phenomena and the effect on re/insurance loss perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, S.; Bonazzi, A.; Mitas, C.; Jewson, S.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present a conceptual framework for modelling clustered natural hazards that makes use of historical event data as a starting point. We review a methodology for modelling clustered natural hazard processes called Poisson mixtures. This methodology is suited to the application we have in mind as it naturally models processes that yield cross-event correlation (unlike homogeneous Poisson models), has a high degree of tunability to the problem at hand and is analytically tractable. Using European windstorm data as an example, we provide evidence that the historical data show strong evidence of clustering. We then develop Poisson and Clustered simulation models for the data, demonstrating clearly the superiority of the Clustered model which we have implemented using the Poisson mixture approach. We then discuss the implications of including clustering in models of prices of catXL contracts, one of the most commonly used mechanisms for transferring risk between primary insurers and reinsurers. This paper provides a number of unique insights into the impact clustering has on modelled catXL contract prices. The simple modelling example in this paper provides a clear and insightful starting point for practitioners tackling more complex natural hazard risk problems.

  2. Optimum timing for integrated pest management: modelling rates of pesticide application and natural enemy releases.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sanyi; Tang, Guangyao; Cheke, Robert A

    2010-05-21

    Many factors including pest natural enemy ratios, starting densities, timings of natural enemy releases, dosages and timings of insecticide applications and instantaneous killing rates of pesticides on both pests and natural enemies can affect the success of IPM control programmes. To address how such factors influence successful pest control, hybrid impulsive pest-natural enemy models with different frequencies of pesticide sprays and natural enemy releases were proposed and analyzed. With releasing both more or less frequent than the sprays, a stability threshold condition for a pest eradication periodic solution is provided. Moreover, the effects of times of spraying pesticides (or releasing natural enemies) and control tactics on the threshold condition were investigated with regard to the extent of depression or resurgence resulting from pulses of pesticide applications. Multiple attractors from which the pest population oscillates with different amplitudes can coexist for a wide range of parameters and the switch-like transitions among these attractors showed that varying dosages and frequencies of insecticide applications and the numbers of natural enemies released are crucial. To see how the pesticide applications could be reduced, we developed a model involving periodic releases of natural enemies with chemical control applied only when the densities of the pest reached the given Economic Threshold. The results indicate that the pest outbreak period or frequency largely depends on the initial densities and the control tactics. PMID:20219475

  3. A Structural Model of Prospective Science Teachers' Nature of Science Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mugaloglu, Ebru Z.; Bayram, Hale

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to establish a viable structural model of prospective science teachers' nature of science (NOS) views, which could be used as an analytical tool for understanding the complex relationships between prospective teachers' conceptions of NOS and factors possibly affecting their conceptions. In order to construct such a model, likely…

  4. A simple technique for obtaining future climate data inputs for natural resource models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Those conducting impact studies using natural resource models need to be able to quickly and easily obtain downscaled future climate data from multiple models, scenarios, and timescales for multiple locations. This paper describes a method of quickly obtaining future climate data over a wide range o...

  5. Derivation and Implementation of a Model Teaching the Nature of Science Using Informal Science Education Venues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, Barbara S.; Burkett, Ruth; Leard, Cyndy

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a model for using informal science education venues as contexts within which to teach the nature of science. The model was initially developed to enable university education students to teach science in elementary schools so as to be consistent with "National Science Education Standards" (NSES) (1996) and "A Framework for…

  6. Model for Naturally Ventilated Cavities on the Exteriors of Opaque Building Thermal Envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, B.

    2006-11-01

    This paper describes a model for naturally ventilated cavities on the exterior of opaque building thermal envelopes that are formed by the presence of a lightweight baffle. The model can be used for building components that are slightly detached from the main envelope (but do not connect to the interior).

  7. Three-dimensional numerical modeling of water quality and sediment-associated processes in natural lakes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter presents the development and application of a three-dimensional water quality model for predicting the distributions of nutrients, phytoplankton, dissolved oxygen, etc., in natural lakes. In this model, the computational domain was divided into two parts: the water column and the bed se...

  8. Estimating the distribution of harvested estuarine bivalves with natural-history-based habitat suitability models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Habitat suitability models are useful to forecast how environmental change may affect the abundance or distribution of species of concern. In the case of harvested bivalves, those models may be used to estimate the vulnerability of this valued ecosystem good to natural or human-...

  9. KEY CRITERIA AND SELECTION OF SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS METHODS APPLIED TO NATURAL RESOURCE MODELS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integrated natural resource models (e.g., APSIM)are typically large and complex, thus, it can be difficult to prioritize parameters that are most promising with respect to system management goals. It is important to evaluate how a model responds to changes in its inputs as part of the process of mo...

  10. Object detection in natural backgrounds predicted by discrimination performance and models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohaly, A. M.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    Many models of visual performance predict image discriminability, the visibility of the difference between a pair of images. We compared the ability of three image discrimination models to predict the detectability of objects embedded in natural backgrounds. The three models were: a multiple channel Cortex transform model with within-channel masking; a single channel contrast sensitivity filter model; and a digital image difference metric. Each model used a Minkowski distance metric (generalized vector magnitude) to summate absolute differences between the background and object plus background images. For each model, this summation was implemented with three different exponents: 2, 4 and infinity. In addition, each combination of model and summation exponent was implemented with and without a simple contrast gain factor. The model outputs were compared to measures of object detectability obtained from 19 observers. Among the models without the contrast gain factor, the multiple channel model with a summation exponent of 4 performed best, predicting the pattern of observer d's with an RMS error of 2.3 dB. The contrast gain factor improved the predictions of all three models for all three exponents. With the factor, the best exponent was 4 for all three models, and their prediction errors were near 1 dB. These results demonstrate that image discrimination models can predict the relative detectability of objects in natural scenes.

  11. Semiorganic nonlinear optical material: Crystal growth, structure and optical properties of NaB(L-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 5}){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hongwei; Yao, Wenjiao; He, Ying; Tian, Na; Chen, Chuangtian; Zhang, Yihe

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Semiorganic NLO material NaB(L-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 5}){sub 2} has been grown with sizes up to 8 × 5 × 2 mm{sup 3}. • It crystallizes in the noncentrosymmetric Monoclinic space group P2. • Thermal analysis demonstrated NaB(L-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 5}){sub 2} are thermally stable up to 280. • NaB(L-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 5}){sub 2} has an absorption edge about 220 nm in the UV region. • It exhibits a NLO efficiency of about two times that of KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) standard. - Abstract: Single crystal of the semiorganic NLO material NaB(L-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 5}){sub 2} has been grown with sizes up to 8 × 5 × 2 mm{sup 3} by the slow evaporation method. The crystal structure of this compound was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. It crystallizes in the Monoclinic space group P2 with lattice parameters a = 5.4045(11) Å, b = 11.692(2) Å, c = 9.4773(19) Å and Z = 2. Thermal analysis demonstrated NaB(L-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 5}){sub 2} are thermally stable up to 280 °C. NaB(L-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 5}){sub 2} exhibits an absorption edge about 220 nm in the UV region. The powder second-harmonic generation (SHG) measurement performed on the ground crystal indicates that it has a NLO efficiency of about 2 times that of KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) standard. In addition, the origin of stronger SHG effect was discussed.

  12. From Sequential Extraction to Transport Modeling, Monitored Natural Attenuation as a Remediation Approach for Inorganic Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    POWELL, KIMBERLYR.

    2004-05-25

    Implementation of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a remediation method requires a mechanistic understanding of the natural attenuation processes occurring at a given site. For inorganic contaminants, natural attenuation typically involves a decrease in metal toxicity and/or mobility. These natural processes include dilution, dispersion, sorption (including adsorption, absorption, and precipitation), and redox processes. In order to better quantify these processes in terms of metal availability, sequential extraction experiments were carried out on subsurface soil samples impacted by a low pH, high sulfate, metals (Be, Ni, U, As) plume associated with the long-term operation of a coal plant at the Savannah River Site. These laboratory scale studies provide mechanistic information regarding the solid phases in the soils associated with natural attenuation of the contaminant metals. This data provides input to be evaluated in the definition of the contaminant source term as well as transport of contaminants for site transport models.

  13. Models, Simulators, and Data-driven Resources for Oil and Natural Gas Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    NETL provides a number of analytical tools to assist in conducting oil and natural gas research. Software, developed under various DOE/NETL projects, includes numerical simulators, analytical models, databases, and documentation.[copied from http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/Software_main.html] Links lead users to methane hydrates models, preedictive models, simulators, databases, and other software tools or resources.

  14. Population-Dynamic Modeling of Bacterial Horizontal Gene Transfer by Natural Transformation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Junwen; Lu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Natural transformation is a major mechanism of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and plays an essential role in bacterial adaptation, evolution, and speciation. Although its molecular underpinnings have been increasingly revealed, natural transformation is not well characterized in terms of its quantitative ecological roles. Here, by using Neisseria gonorrhoeae as an example, we developed a population-dynamic model for natural transformation and analyzed its dynamic characteristics with nonlinear tools and simulations. Our study showed that bacteria capable of natural transformation can display distinct population behaviors ranging from extinction to coexistence and to bistability, depending on their HGT rate and selection coefficient. With the model, we also illustrated the roles of environmental DNA sources-active secretion and passive release-in impacting population dynamics. Additionally, by constructing and utilizing a stochastic version of the model, we examined how noise shapes the steady and dynamic behaviors of the system. Notably, we found that distinct waiting time statistics for HGT events, namely a power-law distribution, an exponential distribution, and a mix of the both, are associated with the dynamics in the regimes of extinction, coexistence, and bistability accordingly. This work offers a quantitative illustration of natural transformation by revealing its complex population dynamics and associated characteristics, therefore advancing our ecological understanding of natural transformation as well as HGT in general. PMID:26745428

  15. Pericellular mobilization of the tissue-destructive cysteine proteinases, cathepsins B, L, and S, by human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, V Y; Zhang, Q Y; Weiss, S J

    1995-01-01

    Human macrophages are believed to damage host tissues in chronic inflammatory disease states, but these cells have been reported to express only modest degradative activity in vitro. However, while examining the ability of human monocytes to degrade the extracellular matrix component elastin, we identified culture conditions under which the cells matured into a macrophage population that displayed a degradative phenotype hundreds of times more destructive than that previously ascribed to any other cell population. The monocyte-derived macrophages synthesized elastinolytic matrix metalloproteinases (i.e., gelatinase B and matrilysin) as well as cysteine proteinases (i.e., cathepsins B, L, and S), but only the cathepsins were detected in the extracellular milieu as fully processed, mature enzymes by either vital fluorescence or active-site labeling. Consistent with these observations, macrophage-mediated elastinolytic activity was not affected by matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors but could be almost completely abrogated by inhibiting cathepsins L and S. These data demonstrate that human macrophages mobilize cysteine proteinases to arm themselves with a powerful effector mechanism that can participate in the pathophysiologic remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7731994

  16. Predicting the natural flow regime: Models for assessing hydrological alteration in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlisle, D.M.; Falcone, J.; Wolock, D.M.; Meador, M.R.; Norris, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the extent to which natural streamflow characteristics have been altered is an important consideration for ecological assessments of streams. Assessing hydrologic condition requires that we quantify the attributes of the flow regime that would be expected in the absence of anthropogenic modifications. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether selected streamflow characteristics could be predicted at regional and national scales using geospatial data. Long-term, gaged river basins distributed throughout the contiguous US that had streamflow characteristics representing least disturbed or near pristine conditions were identified. Thirteen metrics of the magnitude, frequency, duration, timing and rate of change of streamflow were calculated using a 20-50 year period of record for each site. We used random forests (RF), a robust statistical modelling approach, to develop models that predicted the value for each streamflow metric using natural watershed characteristics. We compared the performance (i.e. bias and precision) of national- and regional-scale predictive models to that of models based on landscape classifications, including major river basins, ecoregions and hydrologic landscape regions (HLR). For all hydrologic metrics, landscape stratification models produced estimates that were less biased and more precise than a null model that accounted for no natural variability. Predictive models at the national and regional scale performed equally well, and substantially improved predictions of all hydrologic metrics relative to landscape stratification models. Prediction error rates ranged from 15 to 40%, but were 25% for most metrics. We selected three gaged, non-reference sites to illustrate how predictive models could be used to assess hydrologic condition. These examples show how the models accurately estimate predisturbance conditions and are sensitive to changes in streamflow variability associated with long-term land-use change. We also

  17. Estimating Risk of Natural Gas Portfolios by Using GARCH-EVT-Copula Model

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jiechen; Zhou, Chao; Yuan, Xinyu; Sriboonchitta, Songsak

    2015-01-01

    This paper concentrates on estimating the risk of Title Transfer Facility (TTF) Hub natural gas portfolios by using the GARCH-EVT-copula model. We first use the univariate ARMA-GARCH model to model each natural gas return series. Second, the extreme value distribution (EVT) is fitted to the tails of the residuals to model marginal residual distributions. Third, multivariate Gaussian copula and Student t-copula are employed to describe the natural gas portfolio risk dependence structure. Finally, we simulate N portfolios and estimate value at risk (VaR) and conditional value at risk (CVaR). Our empirical results show that, for an equally weighted portfolio of five natural gases, the VaR and CVaR values obtained from the Student t-copula are larger than those obtained from the Gaussian copula. Moreover, when minimizing the portfolio risk, the optimal natural gas portfolio weights are found to be similar across the multivariate Gaussian copula and Student t-copula and different confidence levels. PMID:26351652

  18. Estimating Risk of Natural Gas Portfolios by Using GARCH-EVT-Copula Model.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiechen; Zhou, Chao; Yuan, Xinyu; Sriboonchitta, Songsak

    2015-01-01

    This paper concentrates on estimating the risk of Title Transfer Facility (TTF) Hub natural gas portfolios by using the GARCH-EVT-copula model. We first use the univariate ARMA-GARCH model to model each natural gas return series. Second, the extreme value distribution (EVT) is fitted to the tails of the residuals to model marginal residual distributions. Third, multivariate Gaussian copula and Student t-copula are employed to describe the natural gas portfolio risk dependence structure. Finally, we simulate N portfolios and estimate value at risk (VaR) and conditional value at risk (CVaR). Our empirical results show that, for an equally weighted portfolio of five natural gases, the VaR and CVaR values obtained from the Student t-copula are larger than those obtained from the Gaussian copula. Moreover, when minimizing the portfolio risk, the optimal natural gas portfolio weights are found to be similar across the multivariate Gaussian copula and Student t-copula and different confidence levels. PMID:26351652

  19. Modeling Images of Natural 3D Surfaces: Overview and Potential Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalobeanu, Andre; Kuehnel, Frank; Stutz, John

    2004-01-01

    Generative models of natural images have long been used in computer vision. However, since they only describe the of 2D scenes, they fail to capture all the properties of the underlying 3D world. Even though such models are sufficient for many vision tasks a 3D scene model is when it comes to inferring a 3D object or its characteristics. In this paper, we present such a generative model, incorporating both a multiscale surface prior model for surface geometry and reflectance, and an image formation process model based on realistic rendering, the computation of the posterior model parameter densities, and on the critical aspects of the rendering. We also how to efficiently invert the model within a Bayesian framework. We present a few potential applications, such as asteroid modeling and Planetary topography recovery, illustrated by promising results on real images.

  20. Critical behavior of absorbing phase transitions for models in the Manna class with natural initial states.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Bub

    2014-06-01

    The critical behavior of absorbing phase transitions for two typical models in the Manna universality class, the conserved Manna model and the conserved lattice gas model, both on a square lattice, was investigated using the natural initial states. Various critical exponents were estimated using the static and dynamic simulations. The exponents characterizing dynamics of active particles differ considerably from the known exponents obtained using the random initial states, whereas those associated with the steady-state quantities remain the same. The critical exponents for both models were consistent with errors of less than 1% and satisfied the known scaling relations; thus, the known violation of scaling relations for models with a conserved field was resolved using the natural initial states. The results differed by 7%∼12% from the directed percolation values. PMID:25019750

  1. A Modeling Approach for Burn Scar Assessment Using Natural Features and Elastic Property

    SciTech Connect

    Tsap, L V; Zhang, Y; Goldgof, D B; Sarkar, S

    2004-04-02

    A modeling approach is presented for quantitative burn scar assessment. Emphases are given to: (1) constructing a finite element model from natural image features with an adaptive mesh, and (2) quantifying the Young's modulus of scars using the finite element model and the regularization method. A set of natural point features is extracted from the images of burn patients. A Delaunay triangle mesh is then generated that adapts to the point features. A 3D finite element model is built on top of the mesh with the aid of range images providing the depth information. The Young's modulus of scars is quantified with a simplified regularization functional, assuming that the knowledge of scar's geometry is available. The consistency between the Relative Elasticity Index and the physician's rating based on the Vancouver Scale (a relative scale used to rate burn scars) indicates that the proposed modeling approach has high potentials for image-based quantitative burn scar assessment.

  2. Generalized focus point and mass spectra comparison of highly natural SUGRA GUT models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Howard; Barger, Vernon; Savoy, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Supergravity grand unified models (SUGRA GUTs) are highly motivated and allow for a high degree of electroweak naturalness when the superpotential parameter μ ˜100 - 300 GeV (preferring values closer to 100 GeV). We first illustrate that models with radiatively driven naturalness enjoy a generalized focus-point behavior wherein all soft terms are correlated instead of just scalar masses. Next, we generate spectra from four SUGRA GUT archetypes: 1. S O (10 ) models where the Higgs doublets live in different ten-dimensional irreducible representations (irreps), 2. models based on S O (10 ) where the Higgs multiplets live in a single ten-dimensional irrep but with D -term scalar mass splitting, 3. models based on S U (5 ), and 4. a more general SUGRA model with 12 independent parameters. Electroweak naturalness implies for all models a spectrum of light Higgsinos with mW˜1,Z˜ 1 ,2≲300 GeV and gluinos with mg ˜≲ 2 - 4 TeV . However, masses and mixing in the third generation sfermion sector differ distinctly between the models. These latter differences would be most easily tested at a linear e+e- collider with √{s }˜ multi-TeV scale but measurements at a 50-100 TeV hadron collider are also possible.

  3. Physicochemical properties and theoretical modeling of actinide complexes with a para-tert-Butylcalix[6]arene bearing phosphinoyl pendants. Extraction capability of the calixarene toward f elements.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Flor de María; Varbanov, Sabi; Padilla, Juan; Bünzli, Jean-Claude G

    2008-09-01

    The coordination ability of the hexaphosphinoylated p-tert-butylcalix[6]arene B6bL6 toward actinides is established, as well as its good separation ability of the actinide ions UO2 2+ and Th(IV) over trivalent rare earths such as La(III), Eu(III), and Y(III). Spectrophotometric titration of uranyl with B6bL6 in CH 3CN yields log beta 11 = 7.1 and log beta 12 = 12.5 for the 1:1 and 1:2 (UO2 2+/B 6bL6) species, respectively. Actinide complexes with 1:1 and 1:2 (M/L) stoichiometries are isolated and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, and UV-vis. Compounds 1 and 3 fulfill their CN = 8 just with B 6bL (6), while compounds 2 and 4 require coordinated nitrates and/or water molecules. The luminescence spectra of the uranyl complexes and the parameters such as FWMH, vibronic spacing (upsilon sp), and the U-O bond length, as well as the luminescence lifetimes, permit the understanding of the coordination chemistry of these actinide calixarene complexes. Energy transfer from the B6bL6 ligand to the uranyl ion is demonstrated to be relevant in compound 1 with Q abs = 2.0%. The uranyl complex emission reveals a biexponential decay with tau s from 210 to 220 micros and tau L from 490 to 650 micros for compounds 1 and 3, respectively. The liquid-liquid extraction results demonstrate the good extraction capability of B 6bL (6) toward actinides but not for rare earths at room temperature. The extracted species keeps the 1(cation)/1(calixarene) ratio for the UO2 2+, Th 4+, and Eu 3+ ions. A good capacity of B6bL 6 toward Th4+ ions using aqueous phase 2 containing even up to 0.3 M thorium nitrate and an organic phase of 2.47 x 10 (-4) M B6bL6 in chloroform is found. The spectroscopic properties of the isolated uranyl complexes and the extraction studies reveal a uranophilic nature of B6bL6. The molecular modeling results are in good agreement with the experimental findings. PMID:18686994

  4. Modeling the acoustical and airflow performance of natural ventilation inlet and outlet units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, David J.; Kang, Jian; Brocklesby, Martin

    2005-04-01

    One aspect of the trend towards designing green buildings has been the increasing use of natural ventilation for buildings which otherwise might have required mechanical ventilation or even full air conditioning. However, the pressure differentials available to drive the natural ventilation process are small and hence relatively large inlets and outlets with low resistance to flow are required. These apertures constitute significant acoustic weak points on building facades and hence need to be treated to reduce noise ingress. Although there are a number of natural ventilation units available they have frequently been designed from the application of simple principles without any attempt to optimise both their airflow and acoustical performance. In this paper the results of a series of computer modeling exercises are described using acoustic FEM and BEM plus Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) which seeks to establish recommendations for the optimum design of natural ventilation inlet and outlet devices for both acoustical and airflow performance.

  5. Applying the Land Use Portfolio Model with Hazus to analyse risk from natural hazard events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinitz, Laura B.; Taketa, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes and demonstrates the integration of two geospatial decision-support systems for natural-hazard risk assessment and management. Hazus is a risk-assessment tool developed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency to identify risks and estimate the severity of risk from natural hazards. The Land Use Portfolio Model (LUPM) is a risk-management tool developed by the U.S. Geological Survey to evaluate plans or actions intended to reduce risk from natural hazards. We analysed three mitigation policies for one earthquake scenario in the San Francisco Bay area to demonstrate the added value of using Hazus and the LUPM together. The demonstration showed that Hazus loss estimates can be input to the LUPM to obtain estimates of losses avoided through mitigation, rates of return on mitigation investment, and measures of uncertainty. Together, they offer a more comprehensive approach to help with decisions for reducing risk from natural hazards.

  6. Thermodynamic nature of vitrification in a 1D model of a structural glass former

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. N.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a new spin-glass model with no positional quenched disorder which is regarded as a coarse-grained model of a structural glass-former. The model is analyzed in the 1D case when the number N of states of a primary cell is large. For N → ∞, the model exhibits a sharp freezing transition of the thermodynamic origin. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the glass transition is accompanied by a significant growth of a static length scale ξ pointing to the structural (equilibrium) nature of dynamical slowdown effects in supercooled liquids.

  7. Thermodynamic nature of vitrification in a 1D model of a structural glass former.

    PubMed

    Semenov, A N

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new spin-glass model with no positional quenched disorder which is regarded as a coarse-grained model of a structural glass-former. The model is analyzed in the 1D case when the number N of states of a primary cell is large. For N → ∞, the model exhibits a sharp freezing transition of the thermodynamic origin. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the glass transition is accompanied by a significant growth of a static length scale ξ pointing to the structural (equilibrium) nature of dynamical slowdown effects in supercooled liquids. PMID:26233148

  8. Comparison of reactive transport model predictions for natural attenuation processes occurring at chlorinated solvent contaminated site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, H. M.; Tsai, C. H.; Lai, K. H.; Chen, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Prediction of an analytical model and numerical model, namely BIOCLOR and HYDRODEOCHEM, for a test scenario involving the natural attenuations of dissolved solvent at chlorinated contaminated site are compared. Two models make same predictions for PCE, TCE and DCE and considerable different predictions for VC and ETH for the case of all species having identical retardation factors. Significant discrepancies between two models are observed for all species when retardation coefficients are considered to be different for all species. These differences can be attributed to the basic assumption that all the species have the same retardation factors embedded in BIOCHLOR.

  9. Thermodynamic nature of vitrification in a 1D model of a structural glass former

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, A. N.

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new spin-glass model with no positional quenched disorder which is regarded as a coarse-grained model of a structural glass-former. The model is analyzed in the 1D case when the number N of states of a primary cell is large. For N → ∞, the model exhibits a sharp freezing transition of the thermodynamic origin. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the glass transition is accompanied by a significant growth of a static length scale ξ pointing to the structural (equilibrium) nature of dynamical slowdown effects in supercooled liquids.

  10. A Transient Model of Induced Natural Circulation Thermal Cycling for Hydrogen Isotope Separation

    SciTech Connect

    SHADDAY, MARTIN

    2005-07-12

    The property of selective temperature dependence of adsorption and desorption of hydrogen isotopes by palladium is used for isotope separation. A proposal to use natural circulation of nitrogen to alternately heat and cool a packed bed of palladium coated beads is under active investigation, and a device consisting of two interlocking natural convection loops is being designed. A transient numerical model of the device has been developed to aid the design process. It is a one-dimensional finite-difference model, using the Boussinesq approximation. The thermal inertia of the pipe walls and other heat structures as well as the heater control logic is included in the model. Two system configurations were modeled and results are compared.

  11. A model of natural image edge co-occurrence in the rototranslation group.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Gonzalo; Citti, Giovanna; Sarti, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose to model the edge information contained in natural scenes as points in the 3D space of positions and orientations. This space is equipped with a strong geometrical structure and it is identified as the rototranslation group. In this space, we compute a histogram of co-occurrence of edges from a database of natural images and show that it can be interpreted as a probability density function, expressed by the fundamental solution of a suitable Fokker-Planck equation defined in the 3D structured space. Both estimated statistics and model predictions are reconsidered and compared with the partial gestalt association fields proposed by D. J. Field, A. Hayes, and R. F. Hess (1993). Finally, parametric identification allows to estimate the variance of the co-occurrence random process in natural images. PMID:21196513

  12. Clarifying differences in natural history between models of screening: The case of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Ballegooijen, Marjolein; Rutter, Carolyn M.; Knudsen, Amy B.; Zauber, Ann G.; Savarino, James; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Boer, Rob; Feuer, Eric J.; Habbema, J. Dik F.; Kuntz, Karen M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Microsimulation models are important decision support tools for screening. However, their complexity creates a barrier, making it difficult to understand models and, as a result, limiting realization of their full potential. Therefore, it is important to develop documentation that clarifies assumptions. We demonstrate this problem and explore a solution for the natural history, using three independently developed colorectal cancer screening models. Methods We begin by projecting the cost-effectiveness of colonoscopy screening for the three microsimulation models. Next, we provide a conventional presentation of each of them, including information that would usually be published with a decision analysis. Finally, for the three models, we provide the simulated reduction in clinical cancer incidence following a one-time complete removal of adenomas and preclinical cancers. We denote this measure as maximum clinical incidence reduction (MCLIR). Results There are considerable between-model differences in projected effectiveness. Conventional documentation describes model structure and associated parameter values. Given only this information, it is very difficult to compare models, largely because differences in structure make parameter values incomparable. In contrast, the MCLIR clearly shows the differences in assumptions on the key issue of the natural history: the dwell time of progressive preclinical disease, explaining between-model differences in projected effectiveness. Conclusions The simulated “maximum clinical incidence reduction” adds to the insight in dwell time, the critical characteristic of the natural history of disease, and how it differs between models. Inclusion of the MCLIR as a standard description would clarify the implications of assumptions for models applied to screening questions. PMID:21673187

  13. A Micro-Mechanically Based Continuum Model for Strain-Induced Crystallization in Natural Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, Sunny Jigger

    Recent experimental results show that strain-induced crystallization can substantially improve the crack growth resistance of natural rubber. While this might suggest superior designs of tires or other industrial applications where elastomers are used, a more thorough understanding of the underlying physics of strain-induced crystallization in natural rubber has to be developed before any design process can be started. The objective of this work is to develop a computationally-accessible micro-mechanically based continuum model, which is able to predict the macroscopic behavior of strain crystallizing natural rubber. While several researchers have developed micro-mechanical models of partially crystallized polymer chains, their results mainly give qualitative agreement with experimental data due to a lack of good micro-macro transition theories or the lack of computational power. However, recent developments in multiscale modeling in polymers provide new tools to continue this early work. In this thesis, a new model is proposed to model strain-induced crystallization in natural rubber. To this end, a micro-mechanical model of a constrained partially crystallized polymer chain with an extended-chain crystal is derived and connected to the macroscopic level using the non-affine micro-sphere model. On the macroscopic level, a thermodynamically consistent framework for strain-crystallizing materials is developed, and a description of the crystallization kinetics is introduced. For that matter, an evolution law for crystallization based on the gradient of the macroscopic Helmholtz free energy function (chemical potential) in combination with a simple threshold function is used. A numerical implementation of the model is proposed and its predictive performance assessed using published data.

  14. Bioactive diterpenes and sesquiterpenes from the rhizomes of wild ginger (Siphonochilus aethiopicus (Schweinf) B.L Burtt).

    PubMed

    Igoli, Ngozichukwuka Peace; Obanu, Zak Ahamefula; Gray, Alexander I; Clements, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Wild ginger (Siphonochilus aethiopicus (Schweinf) B.L Burtt) is used in traditional medicines in the West and South of Africa. In the present study, the crude hexane extract of wild ginger was evaluated for in vitro bioactivity. The components isolated from the plant for the first time are: epi-curzerenone, furanodienone (sesquiterpenes), 8(17),12E-labdadiene-15,16-dial, 15-hydroxy-8(17),12E-labdadiene-16-al and 16-oxo-8(17),12E-labdadiene-15-oic acid (labdanes). Cytotoxicity determinations using five cell lines: SH-SY5Y (human, Caucasian, bone marrow, neuroblastoma), Jurkat (human, peripheral blood, leukaemia T cell), L929 (mouse, CH3/connective tissue, areolar and adipose tumour cells), Hep G2 (human, Caucasian, hepatocellular carcinoma) and Hs 27 (normal, human, foreskin cells) were carried out. Anti-trypanosomal activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei (S427) blood stream forms and anti-bacterial activity against Mycobacterium aurum (CIP .104482) were also investigated. Activity against M. aurum was moderate and at 100µg/ml, the crude extract together with the labdanes showed specific cytotoxicity, indicating anti-cancer potency. Anti-trypanosomal activity was observed in the crude extract which increased with the pure components: 8(17),12E-labdadiene-15,16-dial (MIC = 5.3 µM) and the sesquiterpenoids (MIC = 6.9 µM) as compared to suramin activity (MIC = 10 µM). This anti-trypanosomal activity which is being reported for the first time indicates possible usage against sleeping sickness and nagana in cattle. PMID:23983325

  15. A Bending Willow Tree: A Japanese (Morita Therapy) Model of Human Nature and Client Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishiyama, F. Ishu

    2003-01-01

    Japanese Morita therapy is discussed to highlight its culturally and theoretically unique perspectives on human nature and client change. Key features of this theory are: theory of the nervous trait; multiple-dimensional model of causes and treatment of nervous neurosis; theory of mental attachment; reframing anxiety into constructive desires; and…

  16. Students' Evaluation of the Credibility of Scientific Models that Represent Natural Entities and Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore learners' evaluation of the credibility of scientific models that represent natural entities and phenomena. Participants were 845 students in grades 9-11 (aged 15-17 years) and 108 prospective science teachers in Oman, totaling 953 students. A survey called Epistemologies about the Credibility of…

  17. Scaling Analysis of Natural Fracture Systems in Support of Fluid Flow Modeling and Seismic Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Pointe, P. R.

    2001-12-01

    Many significant problems in rock engineering require consideration of fluid flow through natural fractures in rock or the mechanical response of a fractured rock mass. Accurate prediction of flow volumes, rates and mass transport through natural fracture systems, and their mechanical response, is critical for design and licensing of nuclear waste repositories, optimization of recovery from many petroleum reservoirs, and also in solution mining, groundwater resource development and protection, and hardrock civil engineering projects. Many of these projects require a large-scale, 3D numerical model for flow, transport or mechanical simulation or visualization. A fundamental problem in constructing these models is that fracture data from wells, boreholes, geophysical profiles or surface outcrops represents a small portion of the rock volume under consideration. Not only does the data represent a very small proportion of the reservoir or rock mass, it also represents fracturing in very restricted size scales. Thus scaling analysis is critical to accurately constructing a fracture model from the data. This paper describes, through two case examples, how scaling analysis techniques have been used to develop models of natural fracturing to support the design and licensing of a high level nuclear waste repository in Finland, and for optimization of a tertiary recovery project in an aging oil field in the US. A new technique for scaling fracture sizes is presented. Together, these two examples illustrate the importance of the scaling analyses, pitfalls in carrying out the analyses, and new methods to improve the 3D characterization of naturally fractured rock masses.

  18. Zebrafish Embryo Toxicity Microscale Model for Ichthyotoxicity Evaluation of Marine Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hong; Kong, Wen-Wen; Shao, Chang-Lun; Li, Yun; Liu, Yun-Zhang; Liu, Min; Guan, Fei-Fei; Wang, Chang-Yun

    2016-04-01

    Marine organisms often protect themselves against their predators by chemical defensive strategy. The second metabolites isolated from marine organisms and their symbiotic microbes have been proven to play a vital role in marine chemical ecology, such as ichthyotoxicity, allelopathy, and antifouling. It is well known that the microscale models for marine chemoecology assessment are urgently needed for trace quantity of marine natural products. Zebrafish model has been widely used as a microscale model in the fields of environment ecological evaluation and drug safety evaluation, but seldom reported for marine chemoecology assessment. In this work, zebrafish embryo toxicity microscale model was established for ichthyotoxicity evaluation of marine natural products by using 24-well microplate based on zebrafish embryo. Ichthyotoxicity was evaluated by observation of multiple toxicological endpoints, including coagulation egg, death, abnormal heartbeat, no spontaneous movement, delayed hatch, and malformation of the different organs during zebrafish embryogenesis periods at 24, 48, and 72 h post-fertilization (hpf). 3,4-Dichloroaniline was used as the positive control for method validation. Subsequently, the established model was applied to test the ichthyotoxic activity of the compounds isolated from corals and their symbiotic microbes and to isolate the bioactive secondary metabolites from the gorgonian Subergorgia mollis under bioassay guidance. It was suggested that zebrafish embryo toxicity microscale model is suitable for bioassay-guided isolation and preliminary bioactivity screening of marine natural products. PMID:26838966

  19. Integrated Spatial Modeling using Geoinformatics: A Prerequisite for Natural Resources Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katpatal, Y. B.

    2014-12-01

    Every natural system calls for complete visualization for its holistic and sustainable development. Many a times, especially in developing countries, the approaches deviate from this basic paradigm and results in ineffective management of the natural resources. This becomes more relevant in these countries which are witnessing heavy exodus of the rural population to urban areas increasing the pressures on the basic commodities. Spatial technologies which provide the opportunity to enhance the knowledge visualization of the policy makers and administrators which facilitates technical and scientific management of the resources. Increasing population has created negative impacts on the per capita availability of several resources, which has been well accepted in the statistical records of several developing countries. For instance, the per capita availability of water in India has decreased substantially in last decade and groundwater depletion is on the rise. There is hence a need of tool which helps in restoring the resource through visualization and evaluation temporally. Geological parameters play an important role in operation of several natural systems and earth sciences parameters may not be ignored. Spatial technologies enables application of 2D as well as 3D modeling taking into account variety of natural parameters related to diverse areas. The paper presents case studies where spatial technology has helped in not only understanding the natural systems but also providing solutions, especially in Indian context. The case studies relate to Groundwater Management, Watershed and Basin Management, Groundwater recharge, Environment sustainability using spatial technology. Key Words: Spatial model, Groundwater, Hydrogeology, Geoinformatics, Sustainable Development.

  20. Analogue modelling of inclined, brittle-ductile transpression: Testing analytical models through natural shear zones (external Betics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcos, L.; Díaz-Azpiroz, M.; Balanyá, J. C.; Expósito, I.; Jiménez-Bonilla, A.; Faccenna, C.

    2016-07-01

    The combination of analytical and analogue models gives new opportunities to better understand the kinematic parameters controlling the evolution of transpression zones. In this work, we carried out a set of analogue models using the kinematic parameters of transpressional deformation obtained by applying a general triclinic transpression analytical model to a tabular-shaped shear zone in the external Betic Chain (Torcal de Antequera massif). According to the results of the analytical model, we used two oblique convergence angles to reproduce the main structural and kinematic features of structural domains observed within the Torcal de Antequera massif (α = 15° for the outer domains and α = 30° for the inner domain). Two parallel inclined backstops (one fixed and the other mobile) reproduce the geometry of the shear zone walls of the natural case. Additionally, we applied digital particle image velocimetry (PIV) method to calculate the velocity field of the incremental deformation. Our results suggest that the spatial distribution of the main structures observed in the Torcal de Antequera massif reflects different modes of strain partitioning and strain localization between two domain types, which are related to the variation in the oblique convergence angle and the presence of steep planar velocity - and rheological - discontinuities (the shear zone walls in the natural case). In the 15° model, strain partitioning is simple and strain localization is high: a single narrow shear zone is developed close and parallel to the fixed backstop, bounded by strike-slip faults and internally deformed by R and P shears. In the 30° model, strain partitioning is strong, generating regularly spaced oblique-to-the backstops thrusts and strike-slip faults. At final stages of the 30° experiment, deformation affects the entire model box. Our results show that the application of analytical modelling to natural transpressive zones related to upper crustal deformation

  1. The association of HPV-16 seropositivity and natural immunity to reinfection: insights from compartmental models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Seroreactivity, processes of seroconversion and seroreversion, in the context of HPV infection has been investigated in numerous studies. However, the data resulting from these studies are usually not accounted for in mathematical transmission models of various HPV types due to gaps in our understanding of the nature of seroreactivity and its implications for HPV natural history. Methods In this study we selected a number of simple but plausible compartmental transmission models of HPV-16, differing in assumptions regarding the relation between seropositivity and immunity, and attempted to calibrate them to Australian HPV seroprevalence data for females and males, as well as DNA prevalence data for females, using a Bayesian model comparison procedure. We ranked the models according to both their simplicity and ability to be fitted to the data. Results Our results demonstrate that models with seroreversion where seropositivity indicates only a partial or very short-term full protection against re-infection generate age-specific HPV DNA prevalence most consistent with the observed data when compared with other models. Conclusions Models supporting the notion that seropositive individuals are fully immune to reinfection demonstrated consistently inferior fits to the data than other models making no such assumption. PMID:23402400

  2. Recent Progress in Understanding Natural-Hazards-Generated TEC Perturbations: Measurements and Modeling Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komjathy, A.; Yang, Y. M.; Meng, X.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Mannucci, A. J.; Langley, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Natural hazards, including earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunamis, have been significant threats to humans throughout recorded history. The Global Positioning System satellites have become primary sensors to measure signatures associated with such natural hazards. These signatures typically include GPS-derived seismic deformation measurements, co-seismic vertical displacements, and real-time GPS-derived ocean buoy positioning estimates. Another way to use GPS observables is to compute the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) to measure and monitor post-seismic ionospheric disturbances caused by earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunamis. Research at the University of New Brunswick (UNB) laid the foundations to model the three-dimensional ionosphere at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory by ingesting ground- and space-based GPS measurements into the state-of-the-art Global Assimilative Ionosphere Modeling (GAIM) software. As an outcome of the UNB and NASA research, new and innovative GPS applications have been invented including the use of ionospheric measurements to detect tiny fluctuations in the GPS signals between the spacecraft and GPS receivers caused by natural hazards occurring on or near the Earth's surface.We will show examples for early detection of natural hazards generated ionospheric signatures using ground-based and space-borne GPS receivers. We will also discuss recent results from the U.S. Real-time Earthquake Analysis for Disaster Mitigation Network (READI) exercises utilizing our algorithms. By studying the propagation properties of ionospheric perturbations generated by natural hazards along with applying sophisticated first-principles physics-based modeling, we are on track to develop new technologies that can potentially save human lives and minimize property damage. It is also expected that ionospheric monitoring of TEC perturbations might become an integral part of existing natural hazards warning systems.

  3. Kainic Acid-Induced Excitotoxicity Experimental Model: Protective Merits of Natural Products and Plant Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Sairazi, Nur Shafika; Sirajudeen, K. N. S.; Asari, Mohd Asnizam; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Mummedy, Swamy; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah

    2015-01-01

    Excitotoxicity is well recognized as a major pathological process of neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases involving the central nervous system (CNS). In the animal models of neurodegeneration, excitotoxicity is commonly induced experimentally by chemical convulsants, particularly kainic acid (KA). KA-induced excitotoxicity in rodent models has been shown to result in seizures, behavioral changes, oxidative stress, glial activation, inflammatory mediator production, endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and selective neurodegeneration in the brain upon KA administration. Recently, there is an emerging trend to search for natural sources to combat against excitotoxicity-associated neurodegenerative diseases. Natural products and plant extracts had attracted a considerable amount of attention because of their reported beneficial effects on the CNS, particularly their neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity. They provide significant reduction and/or protection against the development and progression of acute and chronic neurodegeneration. This indicates that natural products and plants extracts may be useful in protecting against excitotoxicity-associated neurodegeneration. Thus, targeting of multiple pathways simultaneously may be the strategy to maximize the neuroprotection effect. This review summarizes the mechanisms involved in KA-induced excitotoxicity and attempts to collate the various researches related to the protective effect of natural products and plant extracts in the KA model of neurodegeneration. PMID:26793262

  4. Inferring And Possibilities, Rather Than Natural Laws, In Robust Climate Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumble, K. C.

    2011-12-01

    One concern raised about sciences which rely upon simulation models (such as climatology) is that the nature of simulations calls into question the soundness of the inferences that can be drawn from them. I argue that this concern stems from a belief that simulation models must provide laws in order to count as rigorous science, when in actual practice simulation models can investigate a variety of types of possibility with differing inferential potential, and that these differing inferences are necessary parts of the experimental process. I appeal to philosophical work in epistemology to make the argument that simulation models in general - and climate models in particular - explore different kinds of possibility, from logical possibilities to physical possibilities. I then argue that not only is this plurality of inference compatible with robust modeling practices, but that it leads to stronger inferences for climatology.

  5. Anti-cancer glycosidase inhibitors from natural products: a computational and molecular modelling perspective.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashona; Mhlongo, Ndumiso; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of computational tools in pharmaceutics has proven an effectual strategy in creating harmony between the physical and chemical aspects of proteins and potential inhibitors. This is achieved by bringing to life the three dimensional retrospect of biological systems, which takes into consideration computational approaches such as quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics to facilitate drug design and discovery. In this work, we aim to provide a summary of the computational aspects of naturally derived anti-cancer inhibitors targeting the enzyme family of glycosidases. Our study offers insight into the evolution of drug discovery, molecular modelling and molecular binding modes of natural product inhibitors associated with glycosidase enzymes. PMID:25706917

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TECHNIQUES AND PRODUCTION MODELS FOR EXPLOITING NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Wiggins; Raymon L. Brown; Faruk Civan; Richard G. Hughes

    2002-12-31

    For many years, geoscientists and engineers have undertaken research to characterize naturally fractured reservoirs. Geoscientists have focused on understanding the process of fracturing and the subsequent measurement and description of fracture characteristics. Engineers have concentrated on the fluid flow behavior in the fracture-porous media system and the development of models to predict the hydrocarbon production from these complex systems. This research attempts to integrate these two complementary views to develop a quantitative reservoir characterization methodology and flow performance model for naturally fractured reservoirs. The research has focused on estimating naturally fractured reservoir properties from seismic data, predicting fracture characteristics from well logs, and developing a naturally fractured reservoir simulator. It is important to develop techniques that can be applied to estimate the important parameters in predicting the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. This project proposes a method to relate seismic properties to the elastic compliance and permeability of the reservoir based upon a sugar cube model. In addition, methods are presented to use conventional well logs to estimate localized fracture information for reservoir characterization purposes. The ability to estimate fracture information from conventional well logs is very important in older wells where data are often limited. Finally, a desktop naturally fractured reservoir simulator has been developed for the purpose of predicting the performance of these complex reservoirs. The simulator incorporates vertical and horizontal wellbore models, methods to handle matrix to fracture fluid transfer, and fracture permeability tensors. This research project has developed methods to characterize and study the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs that integrate geoscience and engineering data. This is an important step in developing exploitation strategies for

  7. Expanding metal mixture toxicity models to natural stream and lake invertebrate communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Mebane, Christopher A.; Schmidt, Travis S.; Keller, William (Bill)

    2015-01-01

    A modeling approach that was used to predict the toxicity of dissolved single and multiple metals to trout is extended to stream benthic macroinvertebrates, freshwater zooplankton, and Daphnia magna. The approach predicts the accumulation of toxicants (H, Al, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in organisms using 3 equilibrium accumulation models that define interactions between dissolved cations and biological receptors (biotic ligands). These models differ in the structure of the receptors and include a 2-site biotic ligand model, a bidentate biotic ligand or 2-pKa model, and a humic acid model. The predicted accumulation of toxicants is weighted using toxicant-specific coefficients and incorporated into a toxicity function called Tox, which is then related to observed mortality or invertebrate community richness using a logistic equation. All accumulation models provide reasonable fits to metal concentrations in tissue samples of stream invertebrates. Despite the good fits, distinct differences in the magnitude of toxicant accumulation and biotic ligand speciation exist among the models for a given solution composition. However, predicted biological responses are similar among the models because there are interdependencies among model parameters in the accumulation–Tox models. To illustrate potential applications of the approaches, the 3 accumulation–Tox models for natural stream invertebrates are used in Monte Carlo simulations to predict the probability of adverse impacts in catchments of differing geology in central Colorado (USA); to link geology, water chemistry, and biological response; and to demonstrate how this approach can be used to screen for potential risks associated with resource development.

  8. Modeling natural gas prices as a random walk: The advantages for generation planning

    SciTech Connect

    Felder, F.A.

    1995-11-01

    Random walk modeling allows decision makers to evaluate risk mitigation strategies. Easily constructed, the random walk provides probability information that long-term fuel forecasts do not. This is vital to meeting the ratepayers` need for low-cost power, the shareholders` financial objectives, and the regulators` desire for straightforward information. Power generation planning depends heavily on long-term fuel price forecasts. This is particularly true for natural gas-fired plants, because fuel expenses are a significant portion of busbar costs and are subject to considerable uncertainty. Accurate forecasts, then, are critical - especially if electric utilities are to take advantage of the current low cost of natural gas technologies and their relatively clean burning characteristics, without becoming overdependent on a fuel that might significantly increase in price. Moreover, the transition to a more competitive generation market requires a more market-driven planning process. Current planning techniques use several long-term fuel forecasts - one serving as an expected case and others for sensitivity analysis - as inputs for modeling production costs. These forecasts are deterministic: For every time interval there is one, and only one projected fuel price - a serious limitation. Further, past natural gas price predictions have been erroneous and may be susceptible to bias. Today, deregulation of the natural gas production industry allows for a new approach in long-term fuel forecasting. Using NYMEX information, a random walk model of natural gas prices can be constructed. A random walk assumes that prices move randomly, and in modeling prices in this context one would be sure to include this all-important price volatility.

  9. Simplifying and upscaling water resources systems models that combine natural and engineered components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, N.; Keir, G.

    2014-12-01

    Water supply systems typically encompass components of both natural systems (e.g. catchment runoff, aquifer interception) and engineered systems (e.g. process equipment, water storages and transfers). Many physical processes of varying spatial and temporal scales are contained within these hybrid systems models. The need to aggregate and simplify system components has been recognised for reasons of parsimony and comprehensibility; and the use of probabilistic methods for modelling water-related risks also prompts the need to seek computationally efficient up-scaled conceptualisations. How to manage the up-scaling errors in such hybrid systems models has not been well-explored, compared to research in the hydrological process domain. Particular challenges include the non-linearity introduced by decision thresholds and non-linear relations between water use, water quality, and discharge strategies. Using a case study of a mining region, we explore the nature of up-scaling errors in water use, water quality and discharge, and we illustrate an approach to identification of a scale-adjusted model including an error model. Ways forward for efficient modelling of such complex, hybrid systems are discussed, including interactions with human, energy and carbon systems models.

  10. A Posteriori Comparison of Natural and Surgical Destabilization Models of Canine Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; d'Anjou, Marc-André; Blond, Laurent; Pelletier, Johanne-Martel; del Castillo, Jérôme R. E.

    2013-01-01

    For many years Canis familiaris, the domestic dog, has drawn particular interest as a model of osteoarthritis (OA). Here, we optimized the dog model of experimental OA induced by cranial cruciate ligament sectioning. The usefulness of noninvasive complementary outcome measures, such as gait analysis for the limb function and magnetic resonance imaging for structural changes, was demonstrated in this model. Relationships were established between the functional impairment and the severity of structural changes including the measurement of cartilage thinning. In the dog model of naturally occurring OA, excellent test-retest reliability was denoted for the measurement of the limb function. A criterion to identify clinically meaningful responders to therapy was determined for privately owned dogs undergoing clinical trials. In addition, the recording of accelerometer-based duration of locomotor activity showed strong and complementary agreement with the biomechanical limb function. The translation potential of these models to the human OA condition is underlined. A preclinical testing protocol which combines the dog model of experimental OA induced by cranial cruciate ligament transection and the Dog model of naturally occurring OA offers the opportunity to further investigate the structural and functional benefits of disease-modifying strategies. Ultimately, a better prediction of outcomes for human clinical trials would be brought. PMID:24288664

  11. Fractal modeling of natural fracture networks. Final report, June 1994--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Ferer, M.V.; Dean, B.H.; Mick, C.

    1996-04-01

    Recovery from naturally fractured, tight-gas reservoirs is controlled by the fracture network. Reliable characterization of the actual fracture network in the reservoir is severely limited. The location and orientation of fractures intersecting the borehole can be determined, but the length of these fractures cannot be unambiguously determined. Fracture networks can be determined for outcrops, but there is little reason to believe that the network in the reservoir should be identical because of the differences in stresses and history. Because of the lack of detailed information about the actual fracture network, modeling methods must represent the porosity and permeability associated with the fracture network, as accurately as possible with very little apriori information. Three rather different types of approaches have been used: (1) dual porosity simulations; (2) `stochastic` modeling of fracture networks, and (3) fractal modeling of fracture networks. Stochastic models which assume a variety of probability distributions of fracture characteristics have been used with some success in modeling fracture networks. The advantage of these stochastic models over the dual porosity simulations is that real fracture heterogeneities are included in the modeling process. In the sections provided in this paper the authors will present fractal analysis of the MWX site, using the box-counting procedure; (2) review evidence testing the fractal nature of fracture distributions and discuss the advantages of using their fractal analysis over a stochastic analysis; (3) present an efficient algorithm for producing a self-similar fracture networks which mimic the real MWX outcrop fracture network.

  12. Application of surface complexation models to anion adsorption by natural materials.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Sabine

    2014-10-01

    Various chemical models of ion adsorption are presented and discussed. Chemical models, such as surface complexation models, provide a molecular description of anion adsorption reactions using an equilibrium approach. Two such models, the constant capacitance model and the triple layer model, are described in the present study. Characteristics common to all the surface complexation models are equilibrium constant expressions, mass and charge balances, and surface activity coefficient electrostatic potential terms. Methods for determining parameter values for surface site density, capacitances, and surface complexation constants also are discussed. Spectroscopic experimental methods of establishing ion adsorption mechanisms include vibrational spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron spin resonance spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity. Experimental determinations of point of zero charge shifts and ionic strength dependence of adsorption results and molecular modeling calculations also can be used to deduce adsorption mechanisms. Applications of the surface complexation models to heterogeneous natural materials, such as soils, using the component additivity and the generalized composite approaches are described. Emphasis is on the generalized composite approach for predicting anion adsorption by soils. Continuing research is needed to develop consistent and realistic protocols for describing ion adsorption reactions on soil minerals and soils. The availability of standardized model parameter databases for use in chemical speciation-transport models is critical. PMID:24619924

  13. Three-dimensional models of natural environments and the mapping of navigational information.

    PubMed

    Stürzl, Wolfgang; Grixa, Iris; Mair, Elmar; Narendra, Ajay; Zeil, Jochen

    2015-06-01

    Much evidence has accumulated in recent years, demonstrating that the degree to which navigating insects rely on path integration or landmark guidance when displaced depends on the navigational information content of their specific habitat. There is thus a need to quantify this information content. Here we present one way of achieving this by constructing 3D models of natural environments using a laser scanner and purely camera-based methods that allow us to render panoramic views at any location. We provide (1) ground-truthing of such reconstructed views against panoramic images recorded at the same locations; (2) evidence of their potential to map the navigational information content of natural habitats; (3) methods to register these models with GPS or with stereo camera recordings and (4) examples of their use in reconstructing the visual information available to walking and flying insects. We discuss the current limitations of 3D modelling, including the lack of spectral and polarisation information, but also the opportunities such models offer to map the navigational information content of natural habitats and to test visual navigation algorithms under 'real-life' conditions. PMID:25863682

  14. An analytical and experimental investigation of natural circulation transients in a model pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Massoud, M

    1987-01-01

    Natural Circulation phenomena in a simulated PWR was investigated experimentally and analytically. The experimental investigation included determination of system characteristics as well as system response to the imposed transient under symmetric and asymmetric operations. System characteristics were used to obtain correlation for heat transfer coefficient in heat exchangers, system flow resistance, and system buoyancy heat. Asymmetric transients were imposed to study flow oscillation and possible instability. The analytical investigation encompassed development of mathematical model for single-phase, steady-state and transient natural circulation as well as modification of existing model for two-phase flow analysis of phenomena such as small break LOCA, high pressure coolant injection and pump coast down. The developed mathematical model for single-phase analysis was computer coded to simulate the imposed transients. The computer program, entitled ''Symmetric and Asymmetric Analysis of Single-Phase Flow (SAS),'' were employed to simulate the imposed transients. It closely emulated the system behavior throughout the transient and subsequent steady-state. Modifications for two-phase flow analysis included addition of models for once-through steam generator and electric heater rods. Both programs are faster than real time. Off-line, they can be used for prediction and training applications while on-line they serve for simulation and signal validation. The programs can also be used to determine the sensitivity of natural circulation behavior to variation of inputs such as secondary distribution and power transients.

  15. Damage and the Gutenberg-Richter Law: from simple models to natural earthquake fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiampo, K. F.; Klein, W.; Rundle, J. B.; Dominguez, R.; Serino, C.

    2010-12-01

    Natural earthquake fault systems are highly nonhomogeneous in space, where these inhomogeneities occur because the earth is made of a variety of materials which hold and dissipate stress differently. One way that the inhomogeneous nature of fault systems manifests itself is in the spatial patterns which emerge in seismicity graphs (Tiampo et al., 2002, 2007). Despite their inhomogeneous nature, real faults are often modeled as spatially homogeneous systems. One argument for this approach is that earthquake faults experience long range stress transfer, and if this range is longer than the length scales associated with the inhomogeneities of the system, the dynamics of the system may be unaffected by their presence. However, it is not clear that this is the case. In this work we study the scaling of an earthquake model that is a variation of the Olami-Feder-Christensen (OFC) model, in order to explore the effect of spatial inhomogeneities on earthquake-like systems when interaction ranges are long, but not necessarily longer than the distances associated with those inhomogeneities (Rundle and Jackson, 1977; Olami et al., 1988). For long ranges and without inhomogeneities, such models have been found to produce scaling similar to GR scaling found in real earthquake systems (Rundle and Klein, 1993). In the earthquake models discussed here, damage is distributed inhomogeneously throughout and the interaction ranges, while long, are not longer than all of the damage length scales. We find that the scaling depends not only on the amount of damage, but also on the spatial distribution of that damage. In addition, we study the behaviour of particular natural earthquake faults and the spatial and temporal variation of GR scaling in those systems, in order to compare them with various damage cases from the simulations.

  16. Natural Non-Trasgenic Animal Models for Research in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarasa, Manuel; Pesini, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    The most common animal models currently used for Alzheimer disease (AD) research are transgenic mice that express a mutant form of human Aβ precursor protein (APP) and/or some of the enzymes implicated in their metabolic processing. However, these transgenic mice carry their own APP and APP-processing enzymes, which may interfere in the production of different amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides encoded by the human transgenes. Additionally, the genetic backgrounds of the different transgenic mice are a possible confounding factor with regard to crucial aspects of AD that they may (or may not) reproduce. Thus, although the usefulness of transgenic mice is undisputed, we hypothesized that additional relevant information on the physiopathology of AD could be obtained from other natural non-transgenic models. We have analyzed the chick embryo and the dog, which may be better experimental models because their enzymatic machinery for processing APP is almost identical to that of humans. The chick embryo is extremely easy to access and manipulate. It could be an advantageous natural model in which to study the cell biology and developmental function of APP and a potential assay system for drugs that regulate APP processing. The dog suffers from an age-related syndrome of cognitive dysfunction that naturally reproduces key aspects of AD including Aβ cortical pathology, neuronal degeneration and learning and memory disabilities. However, dense core neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles have not been consistently demonstrated in the dog. Thus, these species may be natural models with which to study the biology of AD, and could also serve as assay systems for Aβ-targeted drugs or new therapeutic strategies against this devastating disease. PMID:19355852

  17. Natural phenomena hazards modeling project: extreme wind/tornado hazard models for Department of Energy sites

    SciTech Connect

    Coats, D.W.

    1984-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed wind hazard models for the Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS), Department of Energy (DOE). The work is part of a three-phase effort aimed at establishing uniform building design criteria for seismic and wind hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. In Phase 1, LLNL gathered information on the sites and their critical facilities, including nuclear reactors, fuel-reprocessing plants, high-level waste storage and treatment facilities, and special nuclear material facilities. In Phase 2, development of seismic and wind hazard models, was initiated. These hazard models express the annual probability that the site will experience an earthquake or wind speed greater than some specified magnitude. This report summarizes the final wind/tornado hazard models recommended for each site and the methodology used to develop these models. 19 references, 29 figures, 9 tables.

  18. Phenylalanine ab initio models for the simulation of skin natural moisturizing factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, B. G.; Raniero, L. J.; Martin, A. A.; Favero, P. P.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated models that can be used to simulate amino acids in biological environments via density functional theory (DFT). The goal was to obtain realistic representations that combine computational economy and result quality when compared to experimental data. We increased the complexity of the models by using a model of an amino acid in a vacuum, followed by a water-solvated amino acid model. To consider pH variation, we simulated zwitterionic and nonionic amino acid configurations. The amino acid chosen for testing was phenylalanine, an aromatic amino acid present in high concentrations in the natural moisturizing factor of skin that plays a fundamental role in ultraviolet protection and vitiligo disease. To validate the models, vibrational modes and electronic properties were calculated and compared to experimental results.

  19. Comparison of Color Model in Cotton Image Under Conditions of Natural Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. H.; Kong, F. T.; Wu, J. Z.; Wang, S. W.; Liu, J. J.; Zhao, P.

    Although the color images contain a large amount of information reflecting the species characteristics, different color models also get different information. The selection of color models is the key to separating crops from background effectively and rapidly. Taking the cotton images collected under natural light as the object, we convert the color components of RGB color model, HSL color model and YIQ color model respectively. Then, we use subjective evaluation and objective evaluation methods, evaluating the 9 color components of conversion. It is concluded that the Q component of the soil, straw and plastic film region gray values remain the same without larger fluctuation when using subjective evaluation method. In the objective evaluation, we use the variance method, average gradient method, gray prediction objective evaluation error statistics method and information entropy method respectively to find the minimum numerical of Q color component suitable for background segmentation.

  20. Analysis on the similarity between steel ladles and hot-water models regarding natural convection phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liviu, Pascu; Adriana, Putan; Vasile, Putan; Alina, Lascutoni

    2012-09-01

    The similarity between steel ladles and hot water model regarding natural convection phenomena has been analyzed through examination of the numerical solutions of turbulent Navier-Stokes partial differential equations governing the phenomena in question. Key similarity criteria for non-isothermal physical modeling of steel ladles with hot-water models have been derived as Frm = Frp and (β∇T)m = (β∇T)p where the subscript m and p stand for the water model and the prototype steel ladle, respectively. Accordingly, appropriate conditions fulfilling the above criteria, such as model size, water temperature, time scale factor and the scale factor of boundary heat loss fluxes, have been proposed and discussed.

  1. The Ti environment in natural hibonite: XANES spectroscopy and computer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsova, Antonina N.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Walker, Andrew M.; Berry, Andrew J.

    2016-05-01

    The local atomic structure around Ti in Ti-bearing hibonite (CaAl12O19) was studied using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and computer modelling. Structural models of the direct substitution of Al by Ti3+, Al by Ti4+ charge balanced by the coupled substitution of Mg2+ for Al, and small Ti clusters were considered. The Ti K-XANES spectra of natural hibonite with different Ti concentration were recorded. Theoretical Ti K- XANES spectra for structural models of hibonite were calculated. It was shown that the theoretical Ti K-XANES spectra for a model with Ti at the five-coordinated M2 site are in agreement with the experimental XANES spectra of hibonite with low concentrations of Ti, while the theoretical spectra for a structural model of clustered Ti are in agreement with the experimental spectra of hibonite with higher Ti contents.

  2. Equinox. A Model for the Natural Science Education Curriculum for the Ninth Through Twelfth Grades in the Delaware Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Thomas M.; Reiher, John F.

    This publication represents a model for the Natural Science Education Curriculum for grades nine through twelve in Delaware's schools. This guide is meant to serve as a minimal standard for natural science education, but at the same time strives for maximum output of the natural science program. The guide is based on the processes of science…

  3. Equinox. A Model for the Natural Science Education Curriculum for Kindergarten and First Grade in Delaware's Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Thomas M.; Reiher, John F.

    This publication represents a model for the Natural Science Education Curriculum for kindergarten and grade one in Delaware's schools. This guide is meant to serve as a minimal standard for natural science education, but at the same time strives for maximum output of the natural science program. The guide is based on the processes of science…

  4. Equinox. A Model for the Natural Science Education Curriculum for the Second, Third, and Fourth Grades in the Delaware Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Thomas M.; Reiher, John F.

    This publication represents a model for the Natural Science Education Curriculum for grades two through four in Delaware's schools. This guide is meant to serve as a minimal standard for natural science education, but at the same time strives for maximum output of the natural science program. The guide is based on the processes of science…

  5. A regional GIS-based model for reconstructing natural monthly streamflow series at ungauged sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumo, Dario; Lo Conti, Francesco; Viola, Francesco; Noto, Leonardo V.

    2016-04-01

    Several hydrologic applications require reliable estimates of monthly runoff in river basins to face the widespread lack of data, both in time and in space. The main aim of this work is to propose a regional model for the estimation of monthly natural runoff series at ungauged sites, analyzing its applicability, reliability and limitations. A GIS (Geographic Information System) based model is here developed and applied to the entire region of Sicily (Italy). The core of this tool is a regional model for the estimation of monthly natural runoff series, based on a simple modelling structure, consisting of a regression based rainfall-runoff model with only four parameters. The monthly runoff is obtained as a function of precipitation and mean temperature at the same month and runoff at the previous month. For a given basin, the four model parameters are assessed by specific regional equations as a function of some easily measurable geomorphic and climate basins' descriptors. The model is calibrated by a "two-step" procedure applied to a number of gauged basins over the region. The first step is aimed at the identification of a set of parameters optimizing model performances at the level of single basin. Such "optimal" parameters sets, derived for each calibration basin, are successively used inside a regional regression analysis, performed at the second step, by which the regional equations for model parameters assessment are defined and calibrated. All the gauged watersheds across the Sicily have been analyzed, selecting 53 basins for model calibration and using other 6 basins exclusively for validation purposes. Model performances, quantitatively evaluated considering different statistical indexes, demonstrate a relevant model ability in capturing the observed hydrological response at both the monthly level and higher time scales (seasonal and annual). One of the key features related to the proposed methodology is its easy transferability to other arid and semiarid

  6. Natural addiction: a behavioral and circuit model based on sugar addiction in rats.

    PubMed

    Hoebel, Bartley G; Avena, Nicole M; Bocarsly, Miriam E; Rada, Pedro

    2009-03-01

    The distinction between natural addiction and drug addiction is interesting from many points of view, including scientific and medical perspectives. "Natural addictions" are those based on activation of a physiobehavioral system, such as the one that controls metabolism, foraging, and eating to achieve energy balance. "Drug addictions" activate many systems based on their pharmacology. This review discusses the following questions: (1) When does food produce a natural addiction? Sugar causes signs of addiction if the scheduling conditions are appropriate to cause binge eating. (2) Why does addictive-like behavior result? Bingeing on a 10% sucrose solution repeatedly releases dopamine in the nucleus accumbens, and it delays the release of acetylcholine, thereby postponing satiety. Opioid involvement is shown by withdrawal caused by naloxone or food deprivation. Bingeing, withdrawal, and abstinence-induced motivation are described as the basis for a vicious cycle leading to excessive eating. (3) Which foods can lead to natural addiction? A variety of sugars, saccharin, and sham feeding are compared with bingeing on high-fat diets, which seem to lack sugar's opioid-withdrawal characteristic. (4) How does natural food addiction relate to obesity? Low basal dopamine may be a common factor, leading to "eating for dopamine." (5) In a neural model, the accumbens is depicted as having separate GABA output pathways for approach and avoidance, both controlled by dopamine and acetylcholine. These outputs, in turn, control lateral hypothalamic glutamate release, which starts a meal, and GABA release, which stops it. PMID:21768998

  7. A model of primate visual cortex based on category-specific redundancies in natural images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmir, Mohsen; Shiry Ghidary, S.

    2010-12-01

    Neurophysiological and computational studies have proposed that properties of natural images have a prominent role in shaping selectivity of neurons in the visual cortex. An important property of natural images that has been studied extensively is the inherent redundancy in these images. In this paper, the concept of category-specific redundancies is introduced to describe the complex pattern of dependencies between responses of linear filters to natural images. It is proposed that structural similarities between images of different object categories result in dependencies between responses of linear filters in different spatial scales. It is also proposed that the brain gradually removes these dependencies in different areas of the ventral visual hierarchy to provide a more efficient representation of its sensory input. The authors proposed a model to remove these redundancies and trained it with a set of natural images using general learning rules that are developed to remove dependencies between responses of neighbouring neurons. Results of experiments demonstrate the close resemblance of neuronal selectivity between different layers of the model and their corresponding visual areas.

  8. Development of Antiatherosclerotic Drugs on the basis of Natural Products Using Cell Model Approach

    PubMed Central

    Orekhov, Alexander N.; Sobenin, Igor A.; Revin, Victor V.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis including its subclinical form is one of the key medical and social problems. At present, there is no therapy available for widespread use against subclinical atherosclerosis. The use of synthetic drugs for the prevention of arteriosclerosis in its early stages is not sufficient because of the limited indications for severe side effects and high cost of treatment. Obviously, effective antiatherosclerotic drugs based on natural products would be a preferred alternative. Simple cell-based models for testing different natural products have been developed and the ability of natural products to prevent intracellular lipid accumulation in primary cell culture was evaluated. This approach utilizing cell models allowed to test effects of such direct antiatherosclerotic therapy, analyzing the effects mimicking those which can occur “at the level” of arterial wall via the inhibition of intracellular lipid deposition. The data from the carried out clinical trials support a point of view that the identification of antiatherosclerotic activity of natural products might offer a great opportunity for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerotic disease, reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26347804

  9. Study of natural circulation in a VHTR after a LOFA using different turbulence models

    SciTech Connect

    Yu-Hsin Tung; Yuh-Ming Ferng; Richard W. Johnson; Ching-Chang Chieng

    2013-10-01

    Natural convection currents in the core are anticipated in the event of the failure of the gas circulator in a prismatic gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR). The paths that the helium coolant takes in forming natural circulation loops and the effective heat transport are of interest. The heated flow in the reactor core is turbulent during normal operating conditions and at the beginning of the LOFA with forced convection, but the flow may significantly be slowed down after the event and laminarized with mixed convection. In the present study, the potential occurrence and effective heat transport of natural circulation are demonstrated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calculations with different turbulence models as well as laminar flow. Validations and recommendation on turbulence model selection are conducted. The study concludes that large loop natural convection is formed due to the enhanced turbulence levels by the buoyancy effect and the turbulent regime near the interface of upper plenum and flow channels increases the flow resistance for channel flows entering upper plenum and thus less heat can be removed from the core than the prediction by laminar flow assumption.

  10. Models of Drug-induced Liver Injury for Evaluation of Phytotherapeutics and Other Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Jaeschke, Hartmut; Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup

    2013-01-01

    Extracts from medicinal plants, many of which have been used for centuries, are increasingly tested in models of hepatotoxicity. One of the most popular models to evaluate the hepatoprotective potential of natural products is acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury, although other hepatotoxicity models such as carbon tetrachloride, thioacetamide, ethanol and endotoxin are occasionally used. APAP overdose is a clinically relevant model of drug-induced liver injury. Critical mechanisms and signaling pathways, which trigger necrotic cell death and sterile inflammation, are discussed. Although there is increasing understanding of the pathophysiology of APAP-induced liver injury, the mechanism is complex and prone to misinterpretation, especially when unknown chemicals such as plant extracts are tested. This review discusses the fundamental aspects that need to be considered when using this model, such as selection of the animal species or in vitro system, timing and dose-responses of signaling events, metabolic activation and protein adduct formation, the role of lipid peroxidation and apoptotic versus necrotic cell death, and the impact of the ensuing sterile inflammatory response. The goal is to enable researchers to select the appropriate model and experimental conditions for testing of natural products that will yield clinically relevant results and allow valid interpretations of the pharmacological mechanisms. PMID:23353004

  11. ENCODING AND DECODING V1 FMRI RESPONSES TO NATURAL IMAGES WITH SPARSE NONPARAMETRIC MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Vincent Q.; Ravikumar, Pradeep; Naselaris, Thomas; Kay, Kendrick N.; Gallant, Jack L.; Yu, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) has become the most common method for investigating the human brain. However, fMRI data present some complications for statistical analysis and modeling. One recently developed approach to these data focuses on estimation of computational encoding models that describe how stimuli are transformed into brain activity measured in individual voxels. Here we aim at building encoding models for fMRI signals recorded in the primary visual cortex of the human brain. We use residual analyses to reveal systematic nonlinearity across voxels not taken into account by previous models. We then show how a sparse nonparametric method [bJ. Roy. Statist. Soc. Ser. B 71 (2009b) 1009–1030] can be used together with correlation screening to estimate nonlinear encoding models effectively. Our approach produces encoding models that predict about 25% more accurately than models estimated using other methods [Nature 452 (2008a) 352–355]. The estimated nonlinearity impacts the inferred properties of individual voxels, and it has a plausible biological interpretation. One benefit of quantitative encoding models is that estimated models can be used to decode brain activity, in order to identify which specific image was seen by an observer. Encoding models estimated by our approach also improve such image identification by about 12% when the correct image is one of 11,500 possible images. PMID:22523529

  12. Understanding the nature of science through the historical development of conceptual models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, Donald J.

    Understanding the nature of science has been a common goal in science education for years and continues to hold a distinct place in the recently developed Pan-Canadian science framework. Although the nature of science is often prominent in the front end of such reform documents, the implementation of these goals is presumed to be taught implicitly with the delivery of knowledge outcomes. Research strongly indicates that most students have naive conceptions about the nature of science. Surprisingly, research also clearly shows that science teachers do not fare much better, and that when they do possess adequate understanding of the nature of science it does not significantly influence their behaviour in the classroom. Norm Lederman (1998), one of the leading scholars in this field, describes two approaches advocated by curriculum reform documents to address the nature of science outcomes. The first approach suggests that students can achieve nature of science outcomes by "doing science", the second suggests that history of science can enhance students' understanding of the nature of science. While Lederman advocates the use of the history of science, he argues that these approaches are not effective when used implicitly. He recommends that an explicit approach be used (planned for, taught, assessed), but so far there have been no studies which employ this technique beyond short lessons or limited case histories. This thesis advocates an explicit approach to teaching the nature of science using the historical development of conceptual models. The research study of this thesis integrated the historical development of conceptual models with the traditional content found in a typical grade ten chemistry curriculum. Participants in the research were 74 senior 2 (grade 10) science students from four different classes in three different schools in the province of Manitoba. Prior to, and after instruction, students wrote Lederman's VNOS nature of science test. The tests

  13. Climate change impacts utilizing regional models for agriculture, hydrology and natural ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafatos, M.; Asrar, G. R.; El-Askary, H. M.; Hatzopoulos, N.; Kim, J.; Kim, S.; Medvigy, D.; Prasad, A. K.; Smith, E.; Stack, D. H.; Tremback, C.; Walko, R. L.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change impacts the entire Earth but with crucial and often catastrophic impacts at local and regional levels. Extreme phenomena such as fires, dust storms, droughts and other natural hazards present immediate risks and challenges. Such phenomena will become more extreme as climate change and anthropogenic activities accelerate in the future. We describe a major project funded by NIFA (Grant # 2011-67004-30224), under the joint NSF-DOE-USDA Earth System Models (EaSM) program, to investigate the impacts of climate variability and change on the agricultural and natural (i.e. rangeland) ecosystems in the Southwest USA using a combination of historical and present observations together with climate, and ecosystem models, both in hind-cast and forecast modes. The applicability of the methodology to other regions is relevant (for similar geographic regions as well as other parts of the world with different agriculture and ecosystems) and should advance the state of knowledge for regional impacts of climate change. A combination of multi-model global climate projections from the decadal predictability simulations, to downscale dynamically these projections using three regional climate models, combined with remote sensing MODIS and other data, in order to obtain high-resolution climate data that can be used with hydrological and ecosystem models for impacts analysis, is described in this presentation. Such analysis is needed to assess the future risks and potential impacts of projected changes on these natural and managed ecosystems. The results from our analysis can be used by scientists to assist extended communities to determine agricultural coping strategies, and is, therefore, of interest to wide communities of stakeholders. In future work we will be including surface hydrologic modeling and water resources, extend modeling to higher resolutions and include significantly more crops and geographical regions with different weather and climate conditions

  14. Zebrafish as a Natural Host Model for Vibrio cholerae Colonization and Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Runft, Donna L.; Mitchell, Kristie C.; Abuaita, Basel H.; Allen, Jonathan P.; Bajer, Sarah; Ginsburg, Kevin; Neely, Melody N.

    2014-01-01

    The human diarrheal disease cholera is caused by the aquatic bacterium Vibrio cholerae. V. cholerae in the environment is associated with several varieties of aquatic life, including insect egg masses, shellfish, and vertebrate fish. Here we describe a novel animal model for V. cholerae, the zebrafish. Pandemic V. cholerae strains specifically colonize the zebrafish intestinal tract after exposure in water with no manipulation of the animal required. Colonization occurs in close contact with the intestinal epithelium and mimics colonization observed in mammals. Zebrafish that are colonized by V. cholerae transmit the bacteria to naive fish, which then become colonized. Striking differences in colonization between V. cholerae classical and El Tor biotypes were apparent. The zebrafish natural habitat in Asia heavily overlaps areas where cholera is endemic, suggesting that zebrafish and V. cholerae evolved in close contact with each other. Thus, the zebrafish provides a natural host model for the study of V. cholerae colonization, transmission, and environmental survival. PMID:24375135

  15. A simplified model of aerosol removal by natural processes in reactor containments

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, D.A.; Washington, K.E.; Sprung, J.L.; Burson, S.B.

    1996-07-01

    Simplified formulae are developed for estimating the aerosol decontamination that can be achieved by natural processes in the containments of pressurized water reactors and in the drywells of boiling water reactors under severe accident conditions. These simplified formulae were derived by correlation of results of Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses of detailed models of aerosol behavior under accident conditions. Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses of decontamination by natural aerosol processes are reported for 1,000, 2,000, 3,000, and 4,000 MW(th) pressurized water reactors and for 1,500, 2,500, and 3,500 MW(th) boiling water reactors. Uncertainty distributions for the decontamination factors and decontamination coefficients as functions of time were developed in the Monte Carlo analyses by considering uncertainties in aerosol processes, material properties, reactor geometry and severe accident progression. Phenomenological uncertainties examined in this work included uncertainties in aerosol coagulation by gravitational collision, Brownian diffusion, turbulent diffusion and turbulent inertia. Uncertainties in aerosol deposition by gravitational settling, thermophoresis, diffusiophoresis, and turbulent diffusion were examined. Electrostatic charging of aerosol particles in severe accidents is discussed. Such charging could affect both the coagulation and deposition of aerosol particles. Electrostatic effects are not considered in most available models of aerosol behavior during severe accidents and cause uncertainties in predicted natural decontamination processes that could not be taken in to account in this work. Median (50%), 90 and 10% values of the uncertainty distributions for effective decontamination coefficients were correlated with time and reactor thermal power. These correlations constitute a simplified model that can be used to estimate the decontamination by natural aerosol processes at 3 levels of conservatism. Applications of the model are described.

  16. Natural attenuation of BTEX compounds: model development and field-scale application.

    PubMed

    Lu, G; Clement, T P; Zheng, C; Wiedemeier, T H

    1999-01-01

    Benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene (BTEX) dissolved into ground water and migrated from a light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) source in a sandy aquifer near a petroleum, oil, and lubricants (POL) facility at Hill Air Force Base (AFB), Utah. Field observations indicated that microbially mediated BTEX degradation using multiple terminal electron-accepting processes including aerobic respiration, denitrification, Fe(III) reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis has occurred in the aquifer. To study the transport and transformation of dissolved BTEX compounds under natural conditions, a reactive flow and transport model incorporating biochemical multispecies interactions and BTEX was developed. The BTEX, oxygen, nitrate, Fe(II), sulfate, and methane plumes calculated by the model agree reasonably well with field observations. The first-order biodegradation rate constants, estimated based on model calibration are 0.051, 0.031, 0.005, 0.004, and 0.002 day(-1) for aerobic respiration, denitrification, Fe(III), sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis, respectively. The results of a sensitivity analysis show that the saturated aquifer thickness, hydraulic conductivity, and reaction rate constants are the most critical parameters controlling the natural attenuation of BTEX at this site. The hydraulic conductivity and aquifer thickness were found to be the key factors affecting the restoration of oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate after their interaction with the BTEX plume. The multispecies reactive transport modeling effort, describing BTEX degradation mediated by multiple electron-accepting processes, represents one of the few attempts to date to quantify a complete sequence of natural attenuation processes with a detailed field data set. Because the case study is representative of many petroleum-product contaminated sites, the results and insights obtained from this study are of general interest and relevance to other fuel-hydrocarbon natural attenuation sites

  17. Development of a natural Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    Lacking a detailed characterization of the resource base and a comprehensive borehole-to-burnertip evaluation model of the North American natural gas system, past R&D, tax and regulatory policies have been formulated without a full understanding of their likely direct and indirect impacts on future gas supply and demand. The recent disappearance of the deliverability surplus, pipeline deregulation, and current policy debates about regulatory initiatives in taxation, environmental compliance and leasing make the need for a comprehensive gas evaluation system critical. Traditional econometric or highly aggregated energy models are increasingly regarded as unable to incorporate available geologic detail and explicit technology performance and costing algorithms necessary to evaluate resource-technology-economic interactions in a market context. The objective of this research is to create a comprehensive, non-proprietary, microcomputer model of the North American natural gas system. GSAM explicitly evaluates the key components of the natural gas system, including resource base, exploration and development, extraction technology performance and costs, transportation and storage and end use. The primary focus is the detailed characterization of the resource base at the reservoir and sub-reservoir level and the impact of alternative extraction technologies on well productivity and economics. GSAM evaluates the complex interactions of current and alternative future technology and policy initiatives in the context of the evolving gas markets. Scheduled for completion in 1995, a prototype is planned for early 1994. ICF Resources reviewed relevant natural gas upstream, downstream and market models to identify appropriate analytic capabilities to incorporate into GSAM. We have reviewed extraction technologies to better characterize performance and costs in terms of GSAM parameters.

  18. Modeling Wettability Alteration using Chemical EOR Processes in Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Mojdeh Delshad; Gary A. Pope; Kamy Sepehrnoori

    2007-09-30

    The objective of our search is to develop a mechanistic simulation tool by adapting UTCHEM to model the wettability alteration in both conventional and naturally fractured reservoirs. This will be a unique simulator that can model surfactant floods in naturally fractured reservoir with coupling of wettability effects on relative permeabilities, capillary pressure, and capillary desaturation curves. The capability of wettability alteration will help us and others to better understand and predict the oil recovery mechanisms as a function of wettability in naturally fractured reservoirs. The lack of a reliable simulator for wettability alteration means that either the concept that has already been proven to be effective in the laboratory scale may never be applied commercially to increase oil production or the process must be tested in the field by trial and error and at large expense in time and money. The objective of Task 1 is to perform a literature survey to compile published data on relative permeability, capillary pressure, dispersion, interfacial tension, and capillary desaturation curve as a function of wettability to aid in the development of petrophysical property models as a function of wettability. The new models and correlations will be tested against published data. The models will then be implemented in the compositional chemical flooding reservoir simulator, UTCHEM. The objective of Task 2 is to understand the mechanisms and develop a correlation for the degree of wettability alteration based on published data. The objective of Task 3 is to validate the models and implementation against published data and to perform 3-D field-scale simulations to evaluate the impact of uncertainties in the fracture and matrix properties on surfactant alkaline and hot water floods.

  19. Statistics, models and learning in BCM theory of a natural visual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ann Be-Su

    Recently, there has been a great deal of interest in the statistics of natural images from both biological and computational perspectives. From the biological side, it is widely believed that our visual system is adapted to deal efficiently with natural stimuli. Part of this adaptation is experience-dependent and occurs due to some general mechanism in the brain for modifying the synapses of a neuron as a function of the inputs to the neuron. A better understanding of natural scene statistics may thus provide insight into the role of the environment in the development of the nervous system. Two basis properties of natural images are: (i) they are extremely non-Gaussian, with highly kurtotic distributions for almost any mean-0 filter response, and (ii) their statistics seem to be largely invariant to a change of scale or coarse-graining. A detailed study of small patches of natural images shows that the state space of such patches is very sparse and highly structured, with most of the high-contrast data concentrated in low-dimensional manifolds and clusters. An important question in vision is whether we can find stochastic models that capture the typical structures of natural images. We argue that many of the observed characteristics of natural images are, at least partly, due to the world being made up of objects in some generalized sense. We develop a simplified visual environment where an image is formed from a set of elementary shapes, whose locations and scale are sampled from a homogeneous Poisson process. These shapes partially occlude one another as they are laid down in layers. The image model, although very simple, seems to capture much of the low-level statistics of naturally occurring scenes. We finally test whether the BCM theory of synaptic plasticity and inputs from this artificial visual environment can account for the observed response properties of cortical cells in the primary visual cortex. The study is an attempt to better understand what

  20. An analytical model assessing the potential threat to natural habitats from insect resistance transgenes

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Colleen K; Bowler, Michael G; Breden, Felix; Fenner, Michael; Poppy, Guy M

    2005-01-01

    We examine the role of ecological interactions on effective gene flow from genetically manipulated plants to their wild relatives. We do so by constructing and applying to oilseed rape (OSR) an analytical model for interaction between plants with and without an insect resistance (IR) allele in natural communities, incorporating documented levels of herbivore variability. We find that with reasonable values of advantage to the IR allele, little concomitant disadvantage (physiological costs of the allele) restricts it to low proportions of the natural population for large numbers of generations. We conclude that OSR IR transgenes are unlikely to pose an immediate threat to natural communities. Our model identifies those factors best able to regulate particular transgenes at the population level, the most effective being impaired viability of seeds in the period between production and the following growing season, although other possibilities exist. Because solutions rely on ratios, limiting values of regulating factors are testable under controlled conditions, minimizing risk of release into the environment and offering significant advancement on existing testing programmes. Our model addresses folivory but is easily modified for herbivory damaging the seed or directly affecting seed production by infested plants, or for pathogens altering seed survival in the seedbank. PMID:16096086

  1. Validation of PARET for the modeling of heat transfer under natural convection core cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, J.K.; Kassim, M.S.; Mohammed, F.

    1995-12-31

    The PARET code is a one-dimensional, coupled thermal-hydraulic and point-kinetics code, which was originally developed for the analysis of SPERT-I transients and later adapted for the analysis of transient behavior in research reactors. Due to its ease of transportability and relative simplicity of input preparation, it is widely used internationally and is particularly attractive for research reactors with limited computational facilities. The thermal-hydraulic modeling of the current version of PARET accounts for buoyancy forces in the core and external pressure gradients that may arise from density differences between the core inlet and outlet. This feature of PARET makes it a useful tool for the analysis of research reactors cooled by natural convection as well as those cooled by forced convection. Since PARET has been applied to the analysis of the International Atomic Energy Agency 10-MW benchmark cores for protected and unprotected transients and also for the analysis of SPERT-I transients, its forced convection heat-removal model is reliable. However, there has been little experience with the capability of PARET to model heat removal in cores cooled by natural convection. This paper reports the results of some experiments performed at the Malaysian PUSPATI reactor to compare PARET predictions for power increases under natural convection core cooling to measured data.

  2. Modeling virtual organizations with Latent Dirichlet Allocation: a case for natural language processing.

    PubMed

    Gross, Alexander; Murthy, Dhiraj

    2014-10-01

    This paper explores a variety of methods for applying the Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) automated topic modeling algorithm to the modeling of the structure and behavior of virtual organizations found within modern social media and social networking environments. As the field of Big Data reveals, an increase in the scale of social data available presents new challenges which are not tackled by merely scaling up hardware and software. Rather, they necessitate new methods and, indeed, new areas of expertise. Natural language processing provides one such method. This paper applies LDA to the study of scientific virtual organizations whose members employ social technologies. Because of the vast data footprint in these virtual platforms, we found that natural language processing was needed to 'unlock' and render visible latent, previously unseen conversational connections across large textual corpora (spanning profiles, discussion threads, forums, and other social media incarnations). We introduce variants of LDA and ultimately make the argument that natural language processing is a critical interdisciplinary methodology to make better sense of social 'Big Data' and we were able to successfully model nested discussion topics from forums and blog posts using LDA. Importantly, we found that LDA can move us beyond the state-of-the-art in conventional Social Network Analysis techniques. PMID:24930023

  3. Applying the natural disasters vulnerability evaluation model to the March 2011 north-east Japan earthquake and tsunami.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Estrada, Mario Arturo; Yap, Su Fei; Park, Donghyun

    2014-07-01

    Natural hazards have a potentially large impact on economic growth, but measuring their economic impact is subject to a great deal of uncertainty. The central objective of this paper is to demonstrate a model--the natural disasters vulnerability evaluation (NDVE) model--that can be used to evaluate the impact of natural hazards on gross national product growth. The model is based on five basic indicators-natural hazards growth rates (αi), the national natural hazards vulnerability rate (ΩT), the natural disaster devastation magnitude rate (Π), the economic desgrowth rate (i.e. shrinkage of the economy) (δ), and the NHV surface. In addition, we apply the NDVE model to the north-east Japan earthquake and tsunami of March 2011 to evaluate its impact on the Japanese economy. PMID:24905816

  4. Testing the model of oblique transpression with oblique extrusion in two natural cases: Steps and consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Carlos; Czeck, Dyanna M.; Díaz-Azpiroz, Manuel

    2013-09-01

    Kinematic models of various types of transpression have been used to explain fabric features and strain in many natural deformation studies. Here, a mathematical model that encompasses all monoclinic and triclinic transpressional deformations including triclinic deformation with inclined simple shear (ϕ) and/or inclined extrusion orientations (υ) can be tested using a step-by-step approach with available field evidence. Two cases are presented. The first case from the Wabigoon-Quetico boundary in the Archean Superior Province utilizes both fabric orientation and quantified strain data. The best fit of the field evidence to the model indicates that deformation likely took place along subvertical shear zones via transpression with subhorizontal simple shear (ϕ = 0-20°) and variable inclined extrusion direction (extrusion can be either east or west and υ typically indicates extrusion orientations between 0 and 50° from vertical). The second case of the South Iberian shear zone has fabric orientation data, but no quantifiable strain possibilities. The best fit of the field evidence to the model indicates that deformation likely took place along a moderately inclined shear zone via transpression with subhorizontal simple shear (ϕ = 0-20°) and variable inclined extrusion direction (υ values between 0° and 80° from the true dip of the shear zone). Using this protocol in other examples of natural deformation will allow further constraints to be applied to kinematic models.

  5. Lagrangian Statistics and Modeling of Pore-Scale Dispersion in Heterogeneous Natural Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. W.; Bijeljic, B.; Blunt, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances made in the area of micro-CT scanning of natural pore-space geometries enable detailed investigations of flow and transport processes at the pore-scale, e.g., [Bijeljic et al., Phys. Rev. E, 87, 2013]. A study is reported of Lagrangian statistics of fluid-particle velocity and acceleration in natural porous media of different rock type. The underlying 3d pore-space geometries were obtained by means of micro-CT scans of a beadpack, Bentheimer sandstone, and Ketton and Estaillades carbonates. Based on these statistics, we introduce a new Lagrangian model for transport that reproduces the aforementioned statistics. Our model is based on a spatio-temporal Markov process of the Lagrangian velocity of fluid particles, where the model parametrization is related to the medium characteristics. Transport predictions are validated against flow and transport results from pore-scale direct numerical simulation. The new model enables the detailed investigation of the transition between non-Fickian and Fickian dispersion in real porous media. Moreover, the model sheds light on the connection between geometrical pore-space characteristics and transport behavior.

  6. Modelling nitrogen and carbon interactions in composting of animal manure in naturally aerated piles.

    PubMed

    Oudart, D; Robin, P; Paillat, J M; Paul, E

    2015-12-01

    Composting animal manure with natural aeration is a low-cost and low-energy process that can improve nitrogen recycling in millions of farms world-wide. Modelling can decrease the cost of choosing the best options for solid manure management in order to decrease the risk of loss of fertilizer value and ammonia emission. Semi-empirical models are suitable, considering the scarce data available in farm situations. Eleven static piles of pig or poultry manure were monitored to identify the main processes governing nitrogen transformations and losses. A new model was implemented to represent these processes in a pile considered as homogeneous. The model is based on four modules: biodegradation, nitrogen transformations and volatilization, thermal exchanges, and free air space evolution. When necessary, the parameters were calibrated with the data set. The results showed that microbial growth could reduce ammonia volatilization. Greatest nitrogen conservation is achieved when microbial growth was limited by nitrogen availability. PMID:26403389

  7. Development of a natural gas systems analysis model (GSAM). Annual report, July 1994--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    North American natural gas markets have changed dramatically over the past decade. A competitive, cost-conscious production, transportation, and distribution system has emerged from the highly regulated transportation wellhead pricing structure of the 1980`s. Technology advances have played an important role in the evolution of the gas industry, a role likely to expand substantially as alternative fuel price competition and a maturing natural gas resource base force operators to maximize efficiency. Finally, significant changes continue in regional gas demand patterns, industry practices, and infrastructure needs. As the complexity of the gas system grows so does the need to evaluate and plan for alternative future resource, technology, and market scenarios. Traditional gas modeling systems focused solely on the econometric aspects of gas marketing. These systems, developed to assess a regulated industry at a high level of aggregation, rely on simple representation of complex and evolving systems, thereby precluding insight into how the industry will change over time. Credible evaluations of specific policy initiatives and research activities require a different approach. Also, the mounting pressure on energy producers from environmental compliance activities requires development of analysis that incorporates relevant geologic, engineering, and project economic details. The objective of policy, research and development (R&D), and market analysis is to integrate fundamental understanding of natural gas resources, technology, and markets to fully describe the potential of the gas resource under alternative future scenarios. This report summarizes work over the past twelve months on DOE Contract DE-AC21-92MC28138, Development of a Natural Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). The products developed under this project directly support the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in carrying out its natural gas R&D mission.

  8. Can Geostatistical Models Represent Nature's Variability? An Analysis Using Flume Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidt, C.; Fernandes, A. M.; Paola, C.; Caers, J.

    2015-12-01

    The lack of understanding in the Earth's geological and physical processes governing sediment deposition render subsurface modeling subject to large uncertainty. Geostatistics is often used to model uncertainty because of its capability to stochastically generate spatially varying realizations of the subsurface. These methods can generate a range of realizations of a given pattern - but how representative are these of the full natural variability? And how can we identify the minimum set of images that represent this natural variability? Here we use this minimum set to define the geostatistical prior model: a set of training images that represent the range of patterns generated by autogenic variability in the sedimentary environment under study. The proper definition of the prior model is essential in capturing the variability of the depositional patterns. This work starts with a set of overhead images from an experimental basin that showed ongoing autogenic variability. We use the images to analyze the essential characteristics of this suite of patterns. In particular, our goal is to define a prior model (a minimal set of selected training images) such that geostatistical algorithms, when applied to this set, can reproduce the full measured variability. A necessary prerequisite is to define a measure of variability. In this study, we measure variability using a dissimilarity distance between the images. The distance indicates whether two snapshots contain similar depositional patterns. To reproduce the variability in the images, we apply an MPS algorithm to the set of selected snapshots of the sedimentary basin that serve as training images. The training images are chosen from among the initial set by using the distance measure to ensure that only dissimilar images are chosen. Preliminary investigations show that MPS can reproduce fairly accurately the natural variability of the experimental depositional system. Furthermore, the selected training images provide

  9. Bringing Chatbots into education: Towards Natural Language Negotiation of Open Learner Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerlyl, Alice; Hall, Phil; Bull, Susan

    There is an extensive body of work on Intelligent Tutoring Systems: computer environments for education, teaching and training that adapt to the needs of the individual learner. Work on personalisation and adaptivity has included research into allowing the student user to enhance the system's adaptivity by improving the accuracy of the underlying learner model. Open Learner Modelling, where the system's model of the user's knowledge is revealed to the user, has been proposed to support student reflection on their learning. Increased accuracy of the learner model can be obtained by the student and system jointly negotiating the learner model. We present the initial investigations into a system to allow people to negotiate the model of their understanding of a topic in natural language. This paper discusses the development and capabilities of both conversational agents (or chatbots) and Intelligent Tutoring Systems, in particular Open Learner Modelling. We describe a Wizard-of-Oz experiment to investigate the feasibility of using a chatbot to support negotiation, and conclude that a fusion of the two fields can lead to developing negotiation techniques for chatbots and the enhancement of the Open Learner Model. This technology, if successful, could have widespread application in schools, universities and other training scenarios.

  10. Integrated Modeling of the Human-Natural System to Improve Local Water Management and Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutowski, W. J., Jr.; Dziubanski, D.; Franz, K.; Goodwin, J.; Rehmann, C. R.; Simpkins, W. W.; Tesfastion, L.; Wanamaker, A. D.; Jie, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Communities across the world are experiencing the effects of unsustainable water management practices. Whether the problem is a lack of water, too much water, or water of degraded quality, finding acceptable solutions requires community-level efforts that integrate sound science with local needs and values. Our project develops both a software technology (agent-based hydrological modeling) and a social technology (a participatory approach to model development) that will allow communities to comprehensively address local water challenges. Using agent-based modeling (ABM), we are building a modeling system that includes a semi-distributed hydrologic process model coupled with agent (stakeholder) models. Information from the hydrologic model is conveyed to the agent models, which, along with economic information, determine appropriate agent actions that subsequently affect hydrology within the model. The iterative participatory modeling (IPM) process will assist with the continual development of the agent models. Further, IPM creates a learning environment in which all participants, including researchers, are co-exploring relevant data, possible scenarios and solutions, and viewpoints through continuous interactions. Our initial work focuses on the impact of flood mitigation and conservation efforts on reducing flooding in an urban area. We are applying all research elements above to the Squaw Creek watershed that flows through parts of four counties in central Iowa. The watershed offers many of the typical tensions encountered in Iowa, such as different perspectives on water management between upstream farmers and downstream urban areas, competition for various types of recreational services, and increasing absentee land ownership that may conflict with community values. Ultimately, climate change scenarios will be incorporated into the model to determine long term patterns that may develop within the social or natural system.

  11. Expanding metal mixture toxicity models to natural stream and lake invertebrate communities.

    PubMed

    Balistrieri, Laurie S; Mebane, Christopher A; Schmidt, Travis S; Keller, Wendel Bill

    2015-04-01

    A modeling approach that was used to predict the toxicity of dissolved single and multiple metals to trout is extended to stream benthic macroinvertebrates, freshwater zooplankton, and Daphnia magna. The approach predicts the accumulation of toxicants (H, Al, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in organisms using 3 equilibrium accumulation models that define interactions between dissolved cations and biological receptors (biotic ligands). These models differ in the structure of the receptors and include a 2-site biotic ligand model, a bidentate biotic ligand or 2-pKa model, and a humic acid model. The predicted accumulation of toxicants is weighted using toxicant-specific coefficients and incorporated into a toxicity function called Tox, which is then related to observed mortality or invertebrate community richness using a logistic equation. All accumulation models provide reasonable fits to metal concentrations in tissue samples of stream invertebrates. Despite the good fits, distinct differences in the magnitude of toxicant accumulation and biotic ligand speciation exist among the models for a given solution composition. However, predicted biological responses are similar among the models because there are interdependencies among model parameters in the accumulation-Tox models. To illustrate potential applications of the approaches, the 3 accumulation-Tox models for natural stream invertebrates are used in Monte Carlo simulations to predict the probability of adverse impacts in catchments of differing geology in central Colorado (USA); to link geology, water chemistry, and biological response; and to demonstrate how this approach can be used to screen for potential risks associated with resource development. PMID:25477294

  12. Constraining Methane Emissions from Natural Gas Production in Northeastern Pennsylvania Using Aircraft Observations and Mesoscale Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkley, Z.; Davis, K.; Lauvaux, T.; Miles, N.; Richardson, S.; Martins, D. K.; Deng, A.; Cao, Y.; Sweeney, C.; Karion, A.; Smith, M. L.; Kort, E. A.; Schwietzke, S.

    2015-12-01

    Leaks in natural gas infrastructure release methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas, into the atmosphere. The estimated fugitive emission rate associated with the production phase varies greatly between studies, hindering our understanding of the natural gas energy efficiency. This study presents a new application of inverse methodology for estimating regional fugitive emission rates from natural gas production. Methane observations across the Marcellus region in northeastern Pennsylvania were obtained during a three week flight campaign in May 2015 performed by a team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Global Monitoring Division and the University of Michigan. In addition to these data, CH4 observations were obtained from automobile campaigns during various periods from 2013-2015. An inventory of CH4 emissions was then created for various sources in Pennsylvania, including coalmines, enteric fermentation, industry, waste management, and unconventional and conventional wells. As a first-guess emission rate for natural gas activity, a leakage rate equal to 2% of the natural gas production was emitted at the locations of unconventional wells across PA. These emission rates were coupled to the Weather Research and Forecasting model with the chemistry module (WRF-Chem) and atmospheric CH4 concentration fields at 1km resolution were generated. Projected atmospheric enhancements from WRF-Chem were compared to observations, and the emission rate from unconventional wells was adjusted to minimize errors between observations and simulation. We show that the modeled CH4 plume structures match observed plumes downwind of unconventional wells, providing confidence in the methodology. In all cases, the fugitive emission rate was found to be lower than our first guess. In this initial emission configuration, each well has been assigned the same fugitive emission rate, which can potentially impair our ability to match the observed spatial variability

  13. Modeling the Long-Term Isolation Performance of Natural and Engineered Geologic CO2 Storage Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J W; Nitao, J J; Morris, J P

    2004-07-26

    Long-term cap rock integrity represents the single most important constraint on the long-term isolation performance of natural and engineered geologic CO{sub 2} storage sites. CO{sub 2} influx that forms natural accumulations and CO{sub 2} injection for EOR/sequestration or saline-aquifer disposal both lead to concomitant geochemical alteration and geomechanical deformation of the cap rock, enhancing or degrading its seal integrity depending on the relative effectiveness of these interdependent processes. This evolution of cap-rock permeability can be assessed through reactive transport modeling, an advanced computational method based on mathematical models of the coupled physical and chemical processes catalyzed by the influx event. Using our reactive transport simulator (NUFT), supporting geochemical databases and software (SUPCRT92), and distinct-element geomechanical model (LDEC), we have shown that influx-triggered mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions within typical shale cap rocks continuously reduce microfrac apertures, while pressure and effective-stress evolution first rapidly increase then slowly constrict them. For a given shale composition, the extent of geochemical enhancement is nearly independent of key reservoir properties (permeability and lateral continuity) that distinguish saline aquifer and EOR/sequestration settings and CO{sub 2} influx parameters (rate, focality, and duration) that distinguish engineered disposal sites and natural accumulations, because these characteristics and parameters have negligible impact on mineral reaction rates. In contrast, the extent of geomechanical degradation is highly dependent on these reservoir properties and influx parameters, because they effectively dictate magnitude of the pressure perturbation. Specifically, initial geomechanical degradation has been shown inversely proportional to reservoir permeability and lateral continuity and proportional to influx rate. As a result, while the extent of

  14. Engaging Students with the Nature of Science and the Nature of Technology by Modeling the Work of Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Jerrid W.; Wilcox, Jesse L.

    2013-01-01

    Just as science education is too often limited to the acquisition of facts, technology education is too often limited to proficient use of technology. Neither of these goals fully realize a robust definition of science and technology literacy. To achieve greater science and technology literacy, students must understand the natures of both science…

  15. A stochastic equilibrium model for the North American natural gas market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Jifang

    This dissertation is an endeavor in the field of energy modeling for the North American natural gas market using a mixed complementarity formulation combined with the stochastic programming. The genesis of the stochastic equilibrium model presented in this dissertation is the deterministic market equilibrium model developed in [Gabriel, Kiet and Zhuang, 2005]. Based on some improvements that we made to this model, including proving new existence and uniqueness results, we present a multistage stochastic equilibrium model with uncertain demand for the deregulated North American natural gas market using the recourse method of the stochastic programming. The market participants considered by the model are pipeline operators, producers, storage operators, peak gas operators, marketers and consumers. Pipeline operators are described with regulated tariffs but also involve "congestion pricing" as a mechanism to allocate scarce pipeline capacity. Marketers are modeled as Nash-Cournot players in sales to the residential and commercial sectors but price-takers in all other aspects. Consumers are represented by demand functions in the marketers' problem. Producers, storage operators and peak gas operators are price-takers consistent with perfect competition. Also, two types of the natural gas markets are included: the long-term and spot markets. Market participants make both high-level planning decisions (first-stage decisions) in the long-term market and daily operational decisions (recourse decisions) in the spot market subject to their engineering, resource and political constraints, resource constraints as well as market constraints on both the demand and the supply side, so as to simultaneously maximize their expected profits given others' decisions. The model is shown to be an instance of a mixed complementarity problem (MiCP) under minor conditions. The MiCP formulation is derived from applying the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker optimality conditions of the optimization problems

  16. Natural attenuation model and biodegradation for 1,1,1-trichloroethane contaminant in shallow groundwater.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiang; Zhu, Rui-Li; Yang, Jie; Li, Hui; Liu, Yong-Di; Lu, Shu-Guang; Luo, Qi-Shi; Lin, Kuang-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Natural attenuation is an effective and feasible technology for controlling groundwater contamination. This study investigated the potential effectiveness and mechanisms of natural attenuation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) contaminants in shallow groundwater in Shanghai by using a column simulation experiment, reactive transport model, and 16S rRNA gene clone library. The results indicated that the majority of the contaminant mass was present at 2-6 m in depth, the contaminated area was approximately 1000 m × 1000 m, and natural attenuation processes were occurring at the site. The effluent breakthrough curves from the column experiments demonstrated that the effectiveness of TCA natural attenuation in the groundwater accorded with the advection-dispersion-reaction equation. The kinetic parameter of adsorption and biotic dehydrochlorination of TCA was 0.068 m(3)/kg and 0.0045 d(-1). The contamination plume was predicted to diminish and the maximum concentration of TCA decreased to 280 μg/L. The bacterial community during TCA degradation in groundwater belonged to Trichococcus, Geobacteraceae, Geobacter, Mucilaginibacter, and Arthrobacter. PMID:26379629

  17. Nature of science in instruction materials of science through the model of educational reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizah, Nur; Mudzakir, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    The study was carried out to reconstruct the science teaching materials charged view of the nature of science (VNOS). This reconstruction process using the Model of Educational Reconstruction (MER), which is the framework for research and development of science education as well as a guide for planning the teaching of science in the schools is limited in two stages, namely: content structure analysis, and empirical studies of learners. The purpose of this study is to obtain a pre-conception of learners and prospective scientists to the topic of the nature of the material and utilization. The method used to descriptive with the instruments is guidelines for interviews for 15 students of class VIII, text analysis sheet, sheet analysis of the concept, and the validation sheet indicators and learning objectives NOS charged on cognitive and affective aspects. The results obtained in the form of pre-conceptions of learners who demonstrate almost 100% of students know the types of materials and some of its nature, the results of the scientist's perspective on the topic of the nature of the material and its use, as well as the results of the validation indicators and learning objectives charged NOS and competencies PISA 2015 cognitive and affective aspects with CVI value of 0.99 and 1.0 after being validated by five experts. This suggests that the indicators and the resulting learning objectives feasible and can proceed to the reconstruction of teaching materials on the topic of material properties and utilization.

  18. Natural attenuation model and biodegradation for 1,1,1-trichloroethane contaminant in shallow groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiang; Zhu, Rui-Li; Yang, Jie; Li, Hui; Liu, Yong-Di; Lu, Shu-Guang; Luo, Qi-Shi; Lin, Kuang-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Natural attenuation is an effective and feasible technology for controlling groundwater contamination. This study investigated the potential effectiveness and mechanisms of natural attenuation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) contaminants in shallow groundwater in Shanghai by using a column simulation experiment, reactive transport model, and 16S rRNA gene clone library. The results indicated that the majority of the contaminant mass was present at 2–6 m in depth, the contaminated area was approximately 1000 m × 1000 m, and natural attenuation processes were occurring at the site. The effluent breakthrough curves from the column experiments demonstrated that the effectiveness of TCA natural attenuation in the groundwater accorded with the advection-dispersion-reaction equation. The kinetic parameter of adsorption and biotic dehydrochlorination of TCA was 0.068 m3/kg and 0.0045 d–1. The contamination plume was predicted to diminish and the maximum concentration of TCA decreased to 280 μg/L. The bacterial community during TCA degradation in groundwater belonged to Trichococcus, Geobacteraceae, Geobacter, Mucilaginibacter, and Arthrobacter. PMID:26379629

  19. A high-dimensional joint model for longitudinal outcomes of different nature.

    PubMed

    Faes, Christel; Aerts, Marc; Molenberghs, Geert; Geys, Helena; Teuns, Greet; Bijnens, Luc

    2008-09-30

    In repeated dose-toxicity studies, many outcomes are repeatedly measured on the same animal to study the toxicity of a compound of interest. This is only one example in which one is confronted with the analysis of many outcomes, possibly of a different type. Probably the most common situation is that of an amalgamation of continuous and categorical outcomes. A possible approach towards the joint analysis of two longitudinal outcomes of a different nature is the use of random-effects models (Models for Discrete Longitudinal Data. Springer Series in Statistics. Springer: New York, 2005). Although a random-effects model can easily be extended to jointly model many outcomes of a different nature, computational problems arise as the number of outcomes increases. To avoid maximization of the full likelihood expression, Fieuws and Verbeke (Biometrics 2006; 62:424-431) proposed a pairwise modeling strategy in which all possible pairs are modeled separately, using a mixed model, yielding several different estimates for the same parameters. These latter estimates are then combined into a single set of estimates. Also inference, based on pseudo-likelihood principles, is indirectly derived from the separate analyses. In this paper, we extend the approach of Fieuws and Verbeke (Biometrics 2006; 62:424-431) in two ways: the method is applied to different types of outcomes and the full pseudo-likelihood expression is maximized at once, leading directly to unique estimates as well as direct application of pseudo-likelihood inference. This is very appealing when interested in hypothesis testing. The method is applied to data from a repeated dose-toxicity study designed for the evaluation of the neurofunctional effects of a psychotrophic drug. The relative merits of both methods are discussed. PMID:18551509

  20. Synchronized Chaos in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics and in the Predictive Modeling of Natural Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duane, Gregory S.

    2008-03-01

    The ubiquitous phenomenon of synchronization among regular oscillators in Nature has been shown, in the past two decades, to extend to chaotic systems. Despite sensitive dependence on initial conditions, two chaotic systems will commonly fall into synchronized motion along their strange attractors when only some of the many degrees of freedom of one system are coupled to corresponding variables in the other. In geophysical fluid models, synchronization can mediate scale interactions, so that coupling of degrees of freedom that describe medium-scale components of the flow can result in synchronization, or partial synchronization, at all scales. Chaos synchronization has been used to interpret non-local "teleconnection" patterns in the Earth's climate system and to predict new ones. In the realm of practical meteorology, the fact that two PDE systems, conceived as "truth" and "model", respectively, can be made to synchronize when coupled at only a discrete set of points, explains how observations at a discrete set of weather stations can be sufficient for weather prediction by a synchronously coupled model. Minimizing synchronization error leads to general recipes for assimilation of observed data into a running model that systematize the treatment of nonlinearities in the dynamical equations. Equations can generally be added to adapt parameters as well as states as the model is running, so that the model "learns". The synchronization view of predictive modelling extends to any translationally- any PDE with constant coefficients, the general form of physical theories. The reliance on synchronicity as an organizing principle in Nature, alternative to causality, has philosophical roots in the collaboration of Carl Jung and Wolfgang Pauli, on the one hand, and in traditions outside of European science, on the other.

  1. Semiparametric Modeling of Daily Ammonia Levels in Naturally Ventilated Caged-Egg Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Zapata, Diana María; Galeano-Vasco, Luis Fernando; Cerón-Muñoz, Mario Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia concentration (AMC) in poultry facilities varies depending on different environmental conditions and management; however, this is a relatively unexplored subject in Colombia (South America). The objective of this study was to model daily AMC variations in a naturally ventilated caged-egg facility using generalized additive models. Four sensor nodes were used to record AMC, temperature, relative humidity and wind speed on a daily basis, with 10 minute intervals for 12 weeks. The following variables were included in the model: Heat index, Wind, Hour, Location, Height of the sensor to the ground level, and Period of manure accumulation. All effects included in the model were highly significant (p<0.001). The AMC was higher during the night and early morning when the wind was not blowing (0.0 m/s) and the heat index was extreme. The average and maximum AMC were 5.94±3.83 and 31.70 ppm, respectively. Temperatures above 25°C and humidity greater than 80% increased AMC levels. In naturally ventilated caged-egg facilities the daily variations observed in AMC primarily depend on cyclic variations of the environmental conditions and are also affected by litter handling (i.e., removal of the bedding material). PMID:26812150

  2. Modeling study of the natural state of the Heber geothermal field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1983-06-01

    As a first step in simulating the behavior of the Heber field under exploitation, the system is modeled in its natural (pre-exploitation) state. Using Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's (LBL) computer code PT and a radially symmetric model, a reasonable match between published and calculated temperature and pressure distributions is obtained. The results of the study indicate that the Heber geothermal system is created by the upflow of hot water through a central zone of higher permeability. The model shows that in its natural state the system is recharged at depth by a 15 MW(thermal) convective heat source. The existence of a radially symmetric convection pattern, whose axis coincides with that of the Heber anomaly is suggested. At the lower part of the ascending hot water plume, the deep recharge water mixes with colder water moving laterally towards the axis of the system. On the upper part, the rising plume spreads radially outward before reaching the bottom of the caprock, at 550 m depth. The model results suggest that the caprock is quite permeable, with convection controlling the temperature distribution. The low permeability of the upper zones in the outer region of the system may be due to mineral precipitation.

  3. Technosocial Modeling for Determining the Status and Nature of a State’s Nuclear Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; Harvey, Julia B.

    2009-09-25

    The International Atomic Energy Agency State Evaluation Process: The Role of Information Analysis in Reaching Safeguards Conclusions (Mathews et al. 2008), several examples of nonproliferation models using analytical software were developed that may assist the IAEA with collecting, visualizing, analyzing, and reporting information in support of the State Evaluation Process. This paper focuses on one of the examples a set of models developed in the Proactive Scenario Production, Evidence Collection, and Testing (ProSPECT) software that evaluates the status and nature of a state’s nuclear activities. The models use three distinct subject areas to perform this assessment: the presence of nuclear activities, the consistency of those nuclear activities with national nuclear energy goals, and the geopolitical context in which those nuclear activities are taking place. As a proof-of-concept for the models, a crude case study was performed. The study, which attempted to evaluate the nuclear activities taking place in Syria prior to September 2007, yielded illustrative, yet inconclusive, results. Due to the inconclusive nature of the case study results, changes that may improve the model’s efficiency and accuracy are proposed.

  4. Semiparametric Modeling of Daily Ammonia Levels in Naturally Ventilated Caged-Egg Facilities.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Zapata, Diana María; Galeano-Vasco, Luis Fernando; Cerón-Muñoz, Mario Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia concentration (AMC) in poultry facilities varies depending on different environmental conditions and management; however, this is a relatively unexplored subject in Colombia (South America). The objective of this study was to model daily AMC variations in a naturally ventilated caged-egg facility using generalized additive models. Four sensor nodes were used to record AMC, temperature, relative humidity and wind speed on a daily basis, with 10 minute intervals for 12 weeks. The following variables were included in the model: Heat index, Wind, Hour, Location, Height of the sensor to the ground level, and Period of manure accumulation. All effects included in the model were highly significant (p<0.001). The AMC was higher during the night and early morning when the wind was not blowing (0.0 m/s) and the heat index was extreme. The average and maximum AMC were 5.94±3.83 and 31.70 ppm, respectively. Temperatures above 25°C and humidity greater than 80% increased AMC levels. In naturally ventilated caged-egg facilities the daily variations observed in AMC primarily depend on cyclic variations of the environmental conditions and are also affected by litter handling (i.e., removal of the bedding material). PMID:26812150

  5. Landslides! Engaging students in natural hazards and STEM principles through the exploration of landslide analog models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gochis, E. E.; Lechner, H. N.; Brill, K. A.; Lerner, G.; Ramos, E.

    2014-12-01

    Graduate students at Michigan Technological University developed the "Landslides!" activity to engage middle & high school students participating in summer engineering programs in a hands-on exploration of geologic engineering and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) principles. The inquiry-based lesson plan is aligned to Next Generation Science Standards and is appropriate for 6th-12th grade classrooms. During the activity students focus on the factors contributing to landslide development and engineering practices used to mitigate hazards of slope stability hazards. Students begin by comparing different soil types and by developing predictions of how sediment type may contribute to differences in slope stability. Working in groups, students then build tabletop hill-slope models from the various materials in order to engage in evidence-based reasoning and test their predictions by adding groundwater until each group's modeled slope fails. Lastly students elaborate on their understanding of landslides by designing 'engineering solutions' to mitigate the hazards observed in each model. Post-evaluations from students demonstrate that they enjoyed the hands-on nature of the activity and the application of engineering principles to mitigate a modeled natural hazard.

  6. Comparing Price Forecast Accuracy of Natural Gas Models andFutures Markets

    SciTech Connect

    Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

    2005-06-30

    The purpose of this article is to compare the accuracy of forecasts for natural gas prices as reported by the Energy Information Administration's Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) and the futures market for the period from 1998 to 2003. The analysis tabulates the existing data and develops a statistical comparison of the error between STEO and U.S. wellhead natural gas prices and between Henry Hub and U.S. wellhead spot prices. The results indicate that, on average, Henry Hub is a better predictor of natural gas prices with an average error of 0.23 and a standard deviation of 1.22 than STEO with an average error of -0.52 and a standard deviation of 1.36. This analysis suggests that as the futures market continues to report longer forward prices (currently out to five years), it may be of interest to economic modelers to compare the accuracy of their models to the futures market. The authors would especially like to thank Doug Hale of the Energy Information Administration for supporting and reviewing this work.

  7. Evaluating Engagement Models for a Citizen Science Project: Lessons Learned From Four Years of Nature's Notebook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crimmins, T. M.; Rosemartin, A.

    2012-12-01

    The success of citizen science programs hinges on their abilities to recruit and maintain active participants. The USA National Phenology Network's plant and animal phenology observation program, Nature's Notebook, has been active since 2009. This program engages thousands of citizen scientists in tracking plant and animal life cycle activity over the course of the year. We embarked on an evaluation of the various observer recruitment and retention tactics that we have employed over the ~4-year life of this program to better inform future outreach efforts specific to Nature's Notebook and for the broader citizen science community. Participants in Nature's Notebook may become engaged via one of three pathways: individuals may join Nature's Notebook directly, they may be invited to join through a USA-NPN partner organization, or they may engage through a group with local, site-based leadership. The level and type of recruitment tactics, training, and retention efforts that are employed varies markedly among these three models. In this evaluation, we compared the efficacy of these three engagement models using several metrics: number of individuals recruited, number of individuals that go on to submit at least one data point, retention rates over time, duration of activity, and quantity of data points submitted. We also qualitatively considered the differences in costs the three models require to support. In terms of recruitment, direct engagement yielded 20-100 times more registrants than other two models. In contrast, rates of participation were highest for site-based leadership (>35%, versus 20-30% for direct engagement; rates for partner organizations were highly variable due to small sample sizes). Individuals participating through partners with site-based leadership showed a much higher rate of retention (41% of participants remained active for two+ years) than those participating directly in Nature's Notebook (27% of participants remained active for two+ years

  8. New physics at the weak scale: axigluon models, scale invariance and naturalness, and interacting dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, Gustavo Marques

    The Standard Model of particle physics describes all known elementary particles and their interactions. Despite its great experimental success, we know that the Standard Model is not a complete description of Nature and therefore new phenomena should be observed at higher energies. In the coming years the Large Hadron Collider will test the Standard Model by colliding protons with center of mass energies of up to 14 TeV providing some of the most stringent tests on the Standard Model. Experimental searches for Dark Matter provide a complementary program to test physics at the weak scale. In the near future new experimental data coming from direct detection experiments, and from satellites and telescopes will drastically improve our sensitivity to weak scale dark matter. This could lead to the first direct observation of dark matter, and thus of physics beyond the Standard Model. In this thesis I propose different extensions of the Standard Model and discuss their experimental consequences. I first discuss models for Axigluons, which are spin one particles in the adjoint representation of the SU(3) color gauge group. These models were motivated by the measurement of higher than predicted forward-backward asymmetry in top quark pair production at the Tevatron. I study different scenarios for Axigluon models that can explain the Tevatron result and explore their signatures at the Large Hadron Collider. Second I discuss the implications of ultraviolet scale invariance for the Standard Model, which has been advocated as a solution to the hierarchy problem. I show that in order to solve the hierarchy problem with scale invariance, new physics is required not far from the weak scale. In the last part of this thesis I propose a new model for dark matter, in which dark matter is charged under a hidden non-Abelian gauge group. This leads to modifications in the sensitivity of the usual experimental searches for dark matter in addition to distinct signatures in the Cosmic

  9. Experimental and modeling analysis of coupled non-Fickian transport and sorption in natural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Shira; Dror, Ishai; Berkowitz, Brian

    2012-05-01

    We present experimental breakthrough curve (BTC) data and a modeling investigation of conservative and sorbing tracer transport in natural soils. By analyzing the data using the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model, we probe the traditional approach of using conservative tracer model parameters as a basis for quantifying the transport of sorbing solutes in the same domain when non-Fickian transport is present. Many known contaminants in groundwater are sorbed to the host solid porous medium, to varying extents, while being transported; this enhances the long tailing of BTCs which often already occurs because of the inherent non-Fickian nature of the transport. The CTRW framework has been shown to account very well for non-Fickian conservative (nonsorbing) transport. Here, we examine two BTC data sets in laboratory columns packed with natural soils; the first (previously analyzed by Mao and Ren (2004)) comprises transport of (conservative) bromide and (sorbing) atrazine tracers, while the second presents new data with bromide and tribromoneopentyl alcohol (TBNPA), a key flame retardant, as a sorbing solute. TBNPA has received little attention in the past, and is shown to be sorbed onto Bet Dagan soil in a nonlinear manner. We find that the transport behavior of bromide is non-Fickian in all cases, which is caused by the heterogeneity of the soil. Comparative model analysis of the non-Fickian BTCs of the conservative, and sorbing tracers and examination of the fitting parameters, exemplify the coupling between transport and adsorption/desorption processes. The difference in transport parameters used to match the conservative and sorbing data sets shows that conservative tracer parameters (average velocity and dispersion coefficient) are not valid for the transport of reactive tracers.

  10. Experimental and modeling analysis of coupled non-Fickian transport and sorption in natural soils.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Shira; Dror, Ishai; Berkowitz, Brian

    2012-05-01

    We present experimental breakthrough curve (BTC) data and a modeling investigation of conservative and sorbing tracer transport in natural soils. By analyzing the data using the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model, we probe the traditional approach of using conservative tracer model parameters as a basis for quantifying the transport of sorbing solutes in the same domain when non-Fickian transport is present. Many known contaminants in groundwater are sorbed to the host solid porous medium, to varying extents, while being transported; this enhances the long tailing of BTCs which often already occurs because of the inherent non-Fickian nature of the transport. The CTRW framework has been shown to account very well for non-Fickian conservative (nonsorbing) transport. Here, we examine two BTC data sets in laboratory columns packed with natural soils; the first (previously analyzed by Mao and Ren (2004)) comprises transport of (conservative) bromide and (sorbing) atrazine tracers, while the second presents new data with bromide and tribromoneopentyl alcohol (TBNPA), a key flame retardant, as a sorbing solute. TBNPA has received little attention in the past, and is shown to be sorbed onto Bet Dagan soil in a nonlinear manner. We find that the transport behavior of bromide is non-Fickian in all cases, which is caused by the heterogeneity of the soil. Comparative model analysis of the non-Fickian BTCs of the conservative, and sorbing tracers and examination of the fitting parameters, exemplify the coupling between transport and adsorption/desorption processes. The difference in transport parameters used to match the conservative and sorbing data sets shows that conservative tracer parameters (average velocity and dispersion coefficient) are not valid for the transport of reactive tracers. PMID:22445833

  11. Natural and orthogonal model for estimating gene-gene interactions applied to cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Feifei; Ma, Jianzhong; Cai, Guoshuai; Fang, Shenying; Lee, Jeffrey E; Wei, Qingyi; Amos, Christopher I

    2014-05-01

    Epistasis, or gene-gene interaction, results from joint effects of genes on a trait; thus, the same alleles of one gene may display different genetic effects in different genetic backgrounds. In this study, we generalized the coding technique of a natural and orthogonal interaction (NOIA) model for association studies along with gene-gene interactions for dichotomous traits and human complex diseases. The NOIA model which has non-correlated estimators for genetic effects is important for estimating influence from multiple loci. We conducted simulations and data analyses to evaluate the performance of the NOIA model. Both simulation and real data analyses revealed that the NOIA statistical model had higher power for detecting main genetic effects and usually had higher power for some interaction effects than the usual model. Although associated genes have been identified for predisposing people to melanoma risk: HERC2 at 15q13.1, MC1R at 16q24.3 and CDKN2A at 9p21.3, no gene-gene interaction study has been fully explored for melanoma. By applying the NOIA statistical model to a genome-wide melanoma dataset, we confirmed the previously identified significantly associated genes and found potential regions at chromosomes 5 and 4 that may interact with the HERC2 and MC1R genes, respectively. Our study not only generalized the orthogonal NOIA model but also provided useful insights for understanding the influence of interactions on melanoma risk. PMID:24241239

  12. Explaining the Timing of Natural Scene Understanding with a Computational Model of Perceptual Categorization

    PubMed Central

    Sofer, Imri; Crouzet, Sébastien M.; Serre, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Observers can rapidly perform a variety of visual tasks such as categorizing a scene as open, as outdoor, or as a beach. Although we know that different tasks are typically associated with systematic differences in behavioral responses, to date, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Here, we implemented a single integrated paradigm that links perceptual processes with categorization processes. Using a large image database of natural scenes, we trained machine-learning classifiers to derive quantitative measures of task-specific perceptual discriminability based on the distance between individual images and different categorization boundaries. We showed that the resulting discriminability measure accurately predicts variations in behavioral responses across categorization tasks and stimulus sets. We further used the model to design an experiment, which challenged previous interpretations of the so-called “superordinate advantage.” Overall, our study suggests that observed differences in behavioral responses across rapid categorization tasks reflect natural variations in perceptual discriminability. PMID:26335683

  13. Explaining the Timing of Natural Scene Understanding with a Computational Model of Perceptual Categorization.

    PubMed

    Sofer, Imri; Crouzet, Sébastien M; Serre, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Observers can rapidly perform a variety of visual tasks such as categorizing a scene as open, as outdoor, or as a beach. Although we know that different tasks are typically associated with systematic differences in behavioral responses, to date, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Here, we implemented a single integrated paradigm that links perceptual processes with categorization processes. Using a large image database of natural scenes, we trained machine-learning classifiers to derive quantitative measures of task-specific perceptual discriminability based on the distance between individual images and different categorization boundaries. We showed that the resulting discriminability measure accurately predicts variations in behavioral responses across categorization tasks and stimulus sets. We further used the model to design an experiment, which challenged previous interpretations of the so-called "superordinate advantage." Overall, our study suggests that observed differences in behavioral responses across rapid categorization tasks reflect natural variations in perceptual discriminability. PMID:26335683

  14. Two- and three-dimensional natural and mixed convection simulation using modular zonal models

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtz, E.; Nataf, J.M.; Winkelmann, F.

    1996-07-01

    We demonstrate the use of the zonal model approach, which is a simplified method for calculating natural and mixed convection in rooms. Zonal models use a coarse grid and use balance equations, state equations, hydrostatic pressure drop equations and power law equations of the form {ital m} = {ital C}{Delta}{sup {ital n}}. The advantage of the zonal approach and its modular implementation are discussed. The zonal model resolution of nonlinear equation systems is demonstrated for three cases: a 2-D room, a 3-D room and a pair of 3-D rooms separated by a partition with an opening. A sensitivity analysis with respect to physical parameters and grid coarseness is presented. Results are compared to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations and experimental data.

  15. Evolution and non-equilibrium physics: A study of the Tangled Nature Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Nikolaj; Sibani, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    We argue that the stochastic dynamics of interacting agents which replicate, mutate and die constitutes a non-equilibrium physical process akin to aging in complex materials. Specifically, our study uses extensive computer simulations of the Tangled Nature Model (TNM) of biological evolution to show that punctuated equilibria successively generated by the model's dynamics have increasing entropy and are separated by increasing entropic barriers. We further show that these states are organized in a hierarchy and that limiting the values of possible interactions to a finite interval leads to stationary fluctuations within a component of the latter. A coarse-grained description based on the temporal statistics of quakes, the events leading from one component of the hierarchy to the next, accounts for the logarithmic growth of the population and the decaying rate of change of macroscopic variables. Finally, we question the role of fitness in large-scale evolution models and speculate on the possible evolutionary role of rejuvenation and memory effects.

  16. Limit sets for natural extensions of Schelling’s segregation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Abhinav; Vainchtein, Dmitri; Weiss, Howard

    2011-07-01

    Thomas Schelling developed an influential demographic model that illustrated how, even with relatively mild assumptions on each individual's nearest neighbor preferences, an integrated city would likely unravel to a segregated city, even if all individuals prefer integration. Individuals in Schelling's model cities are divided into two groups of equal number and each individual is "happy" or "unhappy" when the number of similar neighbors cross a simple threshold. In this manuscript we consider natural extensions of Schelling's original model to allow the two groups have different sizes and to allow different notions of happiness of an individual. We observe that differences in aggregation patterns of majority and minority groups are highly sensitive to the happiness threshold; for low threshold, the differences are small, and when the threshold is raised, striking new patterns emerge. We also observe that when individuals strongly prefer to live in integrated neighborhoods, the final states exhibit a new tessellated-like structure.

  17. Natural convection flow in a square cavity revisited: Laminar and turbulent models with wall functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakos, G.; Mitsoulis, E.; Assimacopoulos, D.

    1994-04-01

    Numerical simulations have been undertaken for the benchmark problem of natural convection flow in a square cavity. The control volume method is used to solve the conservation equations for laminar and turbulent flows for a series of Rayleigh numbers (Ra) reaching values up to 10(exp 10). The k-epsilon model has been used for turbulence modelling with and without logarithmic wall functions. Uniform and non-uniform (stretched) grids have been employed with increasing density to guarantee accurate solutions, especially near the walls for high Ra-values. ADI and SIP solvers are implemented to accelerate convergence. Excellent agreement is obtained with previous numerical solutions, while some discrepancies with others for high Ra-values may be due to a possibly different implementation of the wall functions. Comparisons with experimental data for heat transfer (Nusselt number) clearly demonstrates the limitations of the standard k-epsilon model with logarithmic wall functions, which gives significant overpredictions.

  18. The geochemical behavior of natural radionuclides in coastal waters: A modeling study for the Huelva estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periáñez, Raúl; Hierro, Almudena; Bolívar, Juan Pedro; Vaca, Federico

    2013-10-01

    A numerical model to study the behavior and distribution of natural radionuclides in sediments of an estuary (Odiel and Tinto rivers, SW Spain) affected by acid mine drainage and industrial activities has been developed. The model solves water circulation due to tides and river stream flows. The dispersion model includes uptake/release reactions of radionuclides between the dissolved phase and bed sediments in a dynamic way, using kinetic transfer coefficients. Seasonal pH and chlorinity distributions are simulated, and a formulation has been developed to consider these seasonal variations on kinetic coefficients. Calculated concentrations of 226Ra and 238U in sediments have been compared with measurements from four seasonal sampling campaigns. Numerical experiments have been carried out to study the relative significance of the different radionuclides sources into the estuary as well as the effect of the two components of water circulation (tides are river flows) on radionuclide dispersion patterns.

  19. Stochastic model for simulating Souris River Basin precipitation, evapotranspiration, and natural streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolars, Kelsey A.; Vecchia, Aldo V.; Ryberg, Karen R.

    2016-01-01

    The Souris River Basin is a 61,000-square-kilometer basin in the Provinces of Saskatchewan and Manitoba and the State of North Dakota. In May and June of 2011, record-setting rains were seen in the headwater areas of the basin. Emergency spillways of major reservoirs were discharging at full or nearly full capacity, and extensive flooding was seen in numerous downstream communities. To determine the probability of future extreme floods and droughts, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the North Dakota State Water Commission, developed a stochastic model for simulating Souris River Basin precipitation, evapotranspiration, and natural (unregulated) streamflow. Simulations from the model can be used in future studies to simulate regulated streamflow, design levees, and other structures; and to complete economic cost/benefit analyses.Long-term climatic variability was analyzed using tree-ring chronologies to hindcast precipitation to the early 1700s and compare recent wet and dry conditions to earlier extreme conditions. The extended precipitation record was consistent with findings from the Devils Lake and Red River of the North Basins (southeast of the Souris River Basin), supporting the idea that regional climatic patterns for many centuries have consisted of alternating wet and dry climate states.A stochastic climate simulation model for precipitation, temperature, and potential evapotranspiration for the Souris River Basin was developed using recorded meteorological data and extended precipitation records provided through tree-ring analysis. A significant climate transition was seen around1970, with 1912–69 representing a dry climate state and 1970–2011 representing a wet climate state. Although there were some distinct subpatterns within the basin, the predominant differences between the two states were higher spring through early fall precipitation and higher spring potential evapotranspiration for the wet compared to the dry state.A water

  20. A kinetic model based on experimental study of structural evolution of natural carbonaceous material to graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Yoshino, T.; Satish-Kumar, M.

    2015-12-01

    We report here new experimental kinetic data on the structural evolution of carbonaceous materials (CM) to graphite in a wide range of temperature conditions (1000 and 1450 °C) and treatment time (10 min to 115 hrs) under a pressure condition of 1GPa. The morphologies and crystallinities of natural CM, extracted from sediments in the Shimanto accretionary complex and Hidaka metamorphic belt, transformed to fully ordered graphite with increasing temperature and annealing duration. The time-temperature relations of each crystal parameter obtained using XRD analysis and micro-Raman spectroscopy demonstrated sigmoidal transformations from amorphous to graphitic structure, suggesting the complexity of chemical reactions undergoing during graphitization. To assess these kinetic processes, the results were analyzed using a superposition method in which the crystal parameters were superposed to reference temperature with non-linear regression curves. The master curves fitted by sigmoidal and power functions exhibited very good correlation coefficients of 0.940 to 0.991, suggesting the Arrhenian relation between temperature and time. On the basis of master curves and shift values, we obtained the effective activation energies of 274 +/- 9 kJmol-1 and 339 +/- 6 kJmol-1 for two different natural CM. When compared with the previous studies, our data gave remarkably low activation energies for natural graphitization, which can be represented in a time-temperature relation. In addition, the sigmoidal functions obtained from time-temperature relations can be extrapolated for low temperature condition at 1GPa. Our kinetic model predicts that if the CM underwent metamorphism for about one million years, it begins to crystallize at ≈ 420 °C and transform to fully ordered graphite at over ≈ 510 °C. Thus, natural graphitization could be discussed by the laboratory experiments using natural precursor materials under realistic pressure condition and time span in the Earth's crust.

  1. QSAR modeling and molecular interaction analysis of natural compounds as potent neuraminidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiaying; Mei, Hu

    2016-04-26

    Different QSAR models of 40 natural compounds as neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs) are developed to comprehend chemical-biological interactions and predict activities against neuraminidase (NA) from Clostridium perfringens. Based on the constitutional, topological and conformational descriptors, R(2) and Q(2) values of the obtained SRA model are 0.931 and 0.856. The R(2) and Q(2) values of the constructed HQSAR and almond models are 0.903 and 0.767, 0.904 and 0.511, respectively. Based on the pharmacophore alignment, R(2) and Q(2) values of the optimal CoMSIA model are 0.936 and 0.654. Moreover, Rtest(2) and Qext(2) of values of SRA, HQSAR, almond and CoMSIA models are 0.611 and 0.565, 0.753 and 0.750, 0.612 and 0.582, 0.582 and 0.571, respectively. So, QSAR models have good predictive capability. They can be further used to evaluate and screen new compounds. Moreover, hydrogen bonds and electrostatic factors have high contributions to activities. To understand molecular interactions between natural compounds and NA from Clostridium perfringens, molecular docking is investigated. The docking results elucidate that Arg266, Asp291, Asp328, Tyr485, Glu493, Arg555, Arg615 and Tyr655 are especially the key residues in the active site of 2bf6. Hydrogen bonds and electrostatics are key factors, which impact the interactions between NIs and NA. So, the influential factors of interactions between NIs and NA in the docking results are in agreement with the QSAR results. PMID:27008437

  2. Modeling of Immiscible, Two-Phase Flows in a Natural Rock Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H

    2009-01-01

    One potential method of geologically sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) is to inject the gas into brine-filled, subsurface formations. Within these low-permeability rocks, fractures exist that can act as natural fluid conduits. Understanding how a less viscous fluid moves when injected into an initially saturated rock fracture is important for the prediction of CO2 transport within fractured rocks. Our study examined experimentally and numerically the motion of immiscible fluids as they were transported through models of a fracture in Berea sandstone. The natural fracture geometry was initially scanned using micro-computerized tomography (CT) at a fine volume-pixel (voxel) resolution by Karpyn et al. [1]. This CT scanned fracture was converted into a numerical mesh for two-phase flow calculations using the finite-volume solver FLUENT® and the volume-of-fluid method. Additionally, a translucent experimental model was constructed using stereolithography. The numerical model was shown to agree well with experiments for the case of a constant rate injection of air into the initially water-saturated fracture. The invading air moved intermittently, quickly invading large-aperture regions of the fracture. Relative permeability curves were developed to describe the fluid motion. These permeability curves can be used in reservoir-scale discrete fracture models for predictions of fluid motion within fractured geological formations. The numerical model was then changed to better mimic the subsurface conditions at which CO2 will move into brine saturated fractures. The different fluid properties of the modeled subsurface fluids were shown to increase the amount of volume the less-viscous invading gas would occupy while traversing the fracture.

  3. Watershed Scale Monitoring and Modeling of Natural Organic Matter (NOM) Generation and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R.; Rees, P. L.; Reckhow, D. A.; Castellon, C. M.

    2006-05-01

    This study describes a coupled watershed scale monitoring campaign, laboratory study, and hydrological modeling study which has been focused on determining the sources and transport mechanisms for Natural Organic Matter (NOM), in a small, mostly forested New England watershed. For some time, the state conservation authorities and a large metropolitan water authority have been concerned that the level of naturally-occurring disinfection byproducts in drinking water supplied by a large surface water reservoir (Watchusett Reservoir, MA) have been increasing over time. The resulting study has attempted to investigate how these compounds, which are mostly formed by the chlorination process at the water treatment plant, are related to NOM precursor compounds which are generated from organic matter and transported by runoff processes in the watershed of the Watchusett Reservoir. The laboratory study measures disinfection byproduct formation potential (DBPFP) through chlorination of raw water samples obtained through field monitoring. Samples are analysed for trihalomethanes (THMs), and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Samples are also analysed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (UV254). The samples have been collected from as many components of the hydrological cycle as possible in one of the subcatchments of Watchusett Reservoir (Stillwater River). To date the samples include, stream runoff, water impounded naturally in small ponds by beaver dams, rainfall, snow, throughfall (drainage from tree canopies) and samples pumped from shallow suction lysimeters which were installed to monitor soil water in the riparian zone. The current monitoring program began in late-Summer 2005, however infrequent stream samples are available dating back to 2000 from an earlier research project and water quality monitoring by various regulatory authorities. The monitoring program has been designed to capture as much seasonal variation in water chemistry as

  4. Immersion freezing by natural dust based on a soccer ball model with the Community Atmospheric Model version 5: climate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a simplified version of the soccer ball model (SBM) developed by Niedermeier et al (2014 Geophys. Res. Lett. 41 736-741) into the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5). It is the first time that SBM is used in an atmospheric model to parameterize the heterogeneous ice nucleation. The SBM, which was simplified for its suitable application in atmospheric models, uses the classical nucleation theory to describe the immersion/condensation freezing by dust in the mixed-phase cloud regime. Uncertain parameters (mean contact angle, standard deviation of contact angle probability distribution, and number of surface sites) in the SBM are constrained by fitting them to recent natural dust (Saharan dust) datasets. With the SBM in CAM5, we investigate the sensitivity of modeled cloud properties to the SBM parameters, and find significant seasonal and regional differences in the sensitivity among the three SBM parameters. Changes of mean contact angle and the number of surface sites lead to changes of cloud properties in Arctic in spring, which could be attributed to the transport of dust ice nuclei to this region. In winter, significant changes of cloud properties induced by these two parameters mainly occur in northern hemispheric mid-latitudes (e.g., East Asia). In comparison, no obvious changes of cloud properties caused by changes of standard deviation can be found in all the seasons. These results are valuable for understanding the heterogeneous ice nucleation behavior, and useful for guiding the future model developments.

  5. Fractional brownian functions as mathematical models of natural rhythm in architecture.

    PubMed

    Cirovic, Ivana M

    2014-10-01

    Carl Bovill suggested and described a method of generating rhythm in architecture with the help of fractional Brownian functions, as they are mathematical models of natural rhythm. A relationship established in the stated procedure between fractional Brownian functions as models of rhythm, and the observed group of architectural elements, is recognized as an analogical relationship, and the procedure of generating rhythm as a process of analogical transfer from the natural domain to the architectural domain. Since analogical transfer implies relational similarity of two domains, and the establishment of one-to-one correspondence, this paper is trying to determine under which conditions such correspondence could be established. For example, if the values of the observed visual feature of architectural elements are not similar to each other in a way in which they can form a monotonically increasing, or a monotonically decreasing bounded sequence, then the structural alignment and the one-to-one correspondence with a single fractional Brownian function cannot be established, hence, this function is deemed inappropriate as a model for the architectural rhythm. In this case we propose overlapping of two or more functions, so that each of them is an analog for one subset of mutually similar values of the visual feature of architectural elements. PMID:25196709

  6. Models of natural fracture connectivity -- Implications for reservoir permeability. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, D.D.; Aydin, A.

    1994-11-14

    Fluid flow through fracture networks in a rock mass depends strongly on the nature of connections between fracture segments and between individual fractures. Therefore the objective of this research project is to develop three dimensional models for natural fracture connectivity using an integrated field, laboratory, and theoretical methodology. The geometric models the authors have developed are based on detailed field mapping and observations from outcrops of both massive and layered sedimentary rocks, typical of producing oil and gas reservoirs, or of aquifers. Furthermore, the have used computer simulations and laboratory experiments to investigate the physical mechanisms responsible for fracture connectivity (or lack thereof) as single and multiple sets of fractures evolve. The computer models are based on fracture mechanics principles and the laboratory experiments utilize layered composite materials analogous to sedimentary sequences. By identifying the physical mechanisms of connectivity they can relate the degree of connectivity to the geometry, state of stress, and material properties of the reservoir rocks and, in turn, be in a position to evaluate the influence of these factors on fracture permeability.

  7. Model assessment of the role of natural variability in recent global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stouffer, R. J.; Manabe, S.; Vinnikov, K. Ya.

    1994-02-01

    SINCE the late nineteenth century, the global mean surface air temperature has been increasing at the rate of about 0.5 °C per century1-3, but our poor understanding of low-frequency natural climate variability has made it very difficult to determine whether the observed warming trend is attributable to the enhanced green-house effect associated with increased atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases4,5. Here we evaluate the observed warming trend using a 1,000-year time series of global temperature obtained from a mathematical model of the coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system. We find that the model approximately reproduces the magnitude of the annual to interdecadal variation in global mean surface air temperature. But throughout the simulated time series no temperature change as large as 0.5 °C per century is sustained for more than a few decades. Assuming that the model is realistic, these results suggest that the observed trend is not a natural feature of the interaction between the atmosphere and oceans. Instead, it may have been induced by a sustained change in the thermal forcing, such as that resulting from changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations and aerosol loading.

  8. Naturalness in a type II seesaw model and implications for physical scalars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabab, M.; Peyranère, M. C.; Rahili, L.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we consider a minimal extension to the standard model by a scalar triplet field with hypercharge Y =2 . This model relies on the seesaw mechanism which provides a consistent explication of neutrino mass generation. We show from naturalness considerations that the Veltman condition is modified by virtue of the additional scalar charged states and that quadratic divergencies at one loop can be driven to zero within the allowed parameter space of the model; the latter is severely constrained by unitarity and boundedness from below, and it is consistent with the di-photon Higgs decay data of the LHC. Furthermore, we analyze the naturalness condition effects to the masses of heavy Higgs bosons H0, A0, H± and H±±, providing a drastic reduction of the ranges of variation of mH± and mH±± with an upper bounds at 288 and 351 GeV, respectively, while predicting almost a degeneracy for the other neutral Higgs bosons H0, A0 at about 207 GeV.

  9. Natural Organic Matter Transport Modeling with a Continuous Time Random Walk Approach

    PubMed Central

    McInnis, Daniel P.; Bolster, Diogo; Maurice, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In transport experiments through columns packed with naturally Fe/Al oxide-coated quartz sand, breakthrough curves (BTCs) of natural organic matter (NOM) displayed strong and persistent power law tailing that could not be described by the classical advection–dispersion equation. Tailing was not observed in BTCs for a nonreactive tracer (sulforhodamine B); therefore, the anomalous transport is attributed to diverse adsorptive behavior of the polydisperse NOM sample rather than to physical heterogeneity of the porous medium. NOM BTC tailing became more pronounced with decreases in pH and increases in ionic strength, conditions previously shown to be associated with enhanced preferential adsorption of intermediate to high molecular weight NOM components. Drawing from previous work on anomalous solute transport, we develop an approach to model NOM transport within the framework of a continuous time random walk (CTRW) and show that under all conditions examined, the CTRW model is able to capture tailing of NOM BTCs by accounting for differences in transport rates of NOM fractions through a distribution of effective retardation factors. These results demonstrate the importance of considering effects of adsorptive fractionation on NOM mobility, and illustrate the ability of the CTRW model to describe transport of a multicomponent solute. PMID:24596449

  10. The Behaviour of Naturally Debonded Composites Due to Bending Using a Meso-Level Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, C. E.; Rongong, J. A.; Hodzic, A.

    2012-06-01

    Numerical simulations and analytical models are increasingly being sought for the design and behaviour prediction of composite materials. The use of high-performance composite materials is growing in both civilian and defence related applications. With this growth comes the necessity to understand and predict how these new materials will behave under their exposed environments. In this study, the displacement behaviour of naturally debonded composites under out-of-plane bending conditions has been investigated. An analytical approach has been developed to predict the displacement response behaviour. The analytical model supports multi-layered composites with full and partial delaminations. The model can be used to extract bulk effective material properties in which can be represented, later, as an ESL (Equivalent Single Layer). The friction between each of the layers is included in the analytical model and is shown to have distinct behaviour for these types of composites. Acceptable agreement was observed between the model predictions, the ANSYS finite element model, and the experiments.

  11. Comparison and validation of point spread models for imaging in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Hou, Weilin; Gray, Deric J; Weidemann, Alan D; Arnone, Robert A

    2008-06-23

    It is known that scattering by particulates within natural waters is the main cause of the blur in underwater images. Underwater images can be better restored or enhanced with knowledge of the point spread function (PSF) of the water. This will extend the performance range as well as the information retrieval from underwater electro-optical systems, which is critical in many civilian and military applications, including target and especially mine detection, search and rescue, and diver visibility. A better understanding of the physical process involved also helps to predict system performance and simulate it accurately on demand. The presented effort first reviews several PSF models, including the introduction of a semi-analytical PSF given optical properties of the medium, including scattering albedo, mean scattering angles and the optical range. The models under comparison include the empirical model of Duntley, a modified PSF model by Dolin et al, as well as the numerical integration of analytical forms from Wells, as a benchmark of theoretical results. For experimental results, in addition to that of Duntley, we validate the above models with measured point spread functions by applying field measured scattering properties with Monte Carlo simulations. Results from these comparisons suggest it is sufficient but necessary to have the three parameters listed above to model PSFs. The simplified approach introduced also provides adequate accuracy and flexibility for imaging applications, as shown by examples of restored underwater images. PMID:18575566

  12. The Early Universe f2 FF Model of Primordial Magnetic Field at Natural Inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuhammad, Anwar; Lopez-Mobilia, Rafael

    2015-04-01

    We study the simple gauge invariant model f2 FF as a way to generate primordial magnetic fields (PMF) in Natural Inflation (NI). We compute both magnetic and electric spectra generated by the f2 FF model in NI for different values of model parameters and find that both de Sitter and power law expansion lead to the same results at sufficiently large number of e-foldings, as expected. We also find that the necessary scale invariance property of the PMF cannot be obtained in NI in first order of slow roll limits under the constraints derived from the recent BICEP2 results. Furthermore, if these constraints are relaxed to achieve scale invariance, then the model suffers from backreaction problems for almost all values of model parameters. We show that there is a narrow range of the height of the potential Λ around Λmin ~ 0 . 00460MPl and of the commoving wave number k around kmin ~ 5 . 5 ×10-4 , at which the problem of backreaction might be avoided. The value of Λmin lies within the range of Λ compatible with the BICEP2 results. However, the relatively short range of k presents a serious challenge to the viability of this model.

  13. New prognostic model for extranodal natural killer/T cell lymphoma, nasal type.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qingqing; Luo, Xiaolin; Zhang, Guanrong; Huang, Huiqiang; Huang, Hui; Lin, Tongyu; Jiang, Wenqi; Xia, Zhongjun; Young, Ken H

    2014-09-01

    Extranodal natural killer/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL) is an aggressive disease with a poor prognosis, requiring risk stratification in affected patients. We designed a new prognostic model specifically for ENKTL to identify high-risk patients who need more aggressive therapy. We retrospectively reviewed 158 patients who were newly diagnosed with ENKTL. The estimated 5-year overall survival rate was 39.4 %. Independent prognostic factors included total protein (TP) <60 g/L, fasting blood glucose (FBG) >100 mg/dL, and Korean Prognostic Index (KPI) score ≥2. We constructed a new prognostic model by combining these prognostic factors: group 1 (64 cases (41.0 %)), no adverse factors; group 2 (58 cases (37.2 %)), one adverse factor; and group 3 (34 cases (21.8 %)), two or three adverse factors. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates of these groups were 66.7, 23.0, and 5.9 %, respectively (p < 0.001). Our new prognostic model had a better prognostic value than did the KPI model alone (p < 0.001). Our proposed prognostic model for ENKTL, including the newly identified prognostic indicators, TP and FBG, demonstrated a balanced distribution of patients into different risk groups with better prognostic discrimination compared with the KPI model alone. PMID:24782120

  14. A dynamic process model of a natural gas combined cycle -- Model development with startup and shutdown simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Liese, Eric; Zitney, Stephen E.

    2013-01-01

    Research in dynamic process simulation for integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCC) with carbon capture has been ongoing at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), culminating in a full operator training simulator (OTS) and immersive training simulator (ITS) for use in both operator training and research. A derivative work of the IGCC dynamic simulator has been a modification of the combined cycle section to more closely represent a typical natural gas fired combined cycle (NGCC). This paper describes the NGCC dynamic process model and highlights some of the simulator’s current capabilities through a particular startup and shutdown scenario.

  15. Experimental and modeling analysis of coupled non-Fickian transport and sorption in natural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, S.; Berkowitz, B.

    2011-12-01

    We present experimental breakthrough curve (BTC) data and a modeling investigation of conservative and sorbing tracer transport in natural soils. By analyzing the data using the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model, we probe the traditional approach of using conservative tracer model parameters as a basis for quantifying the transport of sorbing solutes in the same domain. Many known contaminants in groundwater are sorbed to the host solid porous medium, to varying extents, while being transported; this enhances the long tailing of BTCs which already arise because of the inherent non-Fickian nature of the transport. The CTRW framework has been shown to account very well for non-Fickian conservative (nonsorbing) transport. Here, we examine two BTC data sets in laboratory columns packed with natural soils; the first (previously published) comprises transport of (conservative) bromide and (sorbing) atrazine tracers, while the second comprises new data with bromide and tribromoneopentyl alcohol (TBNPA), a common flame retardant, as a sorbing solute. We find that the transport behavior of bromide is non-Fickian in all cases, which is caused by the heterogeneity of the soil. Analysis of the relation between the non-Fickian transport of the conservative and sorbing tracers demonstrates the coupling between transport and adsorption/desorption, and the result that transport parameters (average velocity and dispersion coefficient) calibrated for the conservative tracer parameters are not applicable to the transport of reactive tracers. Our analyses further confirm the relevance and applicability of CTRW theory to the case of laboratory-scale observations of sorbing solutes.

  16. Towards modelling flood protection investment as a coupled human and natural system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, P. E.; O'Donnell, G.

    2013-06-01

    Due to a number of recent high profile flood events and the apparent threat from global warming, governments and their agencies are under pressure to make proactive investments to protect people living in floodplains. However, adopting a proactive approach as a universal strategy is not affordable. It has been argued that delaying expensive and essentially irreversible capital decisions could be a prudent strategy in situations with high future uncertainty. This paper firstly uses Monte Carlo simulation to explore the performance of proactive and reactive investment strategies using a rational cost-benefit approach in a natural system with varying levels of persistence/interannual variability in Annual Maximum Floods. It is found that, as persistence increases, there is a change in investment strategy optimality from proactive to reactive. This could have implications for investment strategies under the increasingly variable climate that is expected with global warming. As part of the emerging holistic approaches to flood risk management, there is increasing emphasis on stakeholder participation in determining where and when flood protection investments are made, and so flood risk management is becoming more people-centred. As a consequence, multiple actors are involved in the decision-making process, and the social sciences are assuming an increasingly important role in flood risk management. There is a need for modelling approaches which can couple the natural and human system elements. It is proposed that Coupled Human and Natural System (CHANS) modelling could play an important role in understanding the motivations, actions and influence of citizens and institutions and how these impact on the effective delivery of flood protection investment. A framework for using Agent Based Modelling of human activities leading to flood investments is outlined, and some of the challenges associated with implementation are discussed.

  17. Towards modelling flood protection investment as a coupled human and natural system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, P. E.; O'Donnell, G.

    2014-01-01

    Due to a number of recent high-profile flood events and the apparent threat from global warming, governments and their agencies are under pressure to make proactive investments to protect people living in floodplains. However, adopting a proactive approach as a universal strategy is not affordable. It has been argued that delaying expensive and essentially irreversible capital decisions could be a prudent strategy in situations with high future uncertainty. This paper firstly uses Monte Carlo simulation to explore the performance of proactive and reactive investment strategies using a rational cost-benefit approach in a natural system with varying levels of persistence/interannual variability in annual maximum floods. It is found that, as persistence increases, there is a change in investment strategy optimality from proactive to reactive. This could have implications for investment strategies under the increasingly variable climate that is expected with global warming. As part of the emerging holistic approaches to flood risk management, there is increasing emphasis on stakeholder participation in determining where and when flood protection investments are made, and so flood risk management is becoming more people-centred. As a consequence, multiple actors are involved in the decision-making process, and the social sciences are assuming an increasingly important role in flood risk management. There is a need for modelling approaches which can couple the natural and human system elements. It is proposed that coupled human and natural system (CHANS) modelling could play an important role in understanding the motivations, actions and influence of citizens and institutions and how these impact on the effective delivery of flood protection investment. A framework for using agent-based modelling of human activities leading to flood investments is outlined, and some of the challenges associated with implementation are discussed.

  18. Detailed lithologic log of the Dow Chemical #1 B.L. Garrigan Drill Hole, Mississippi County, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, Donley S.; Skipp, Gary L.

    1995-01-01

    The geology and tectonic setting of the New Madrid region in southeastern Missouri has received considerable attention because of the area's high seismic activity. The largest recorded earthquakes in this area occurred in the winter of 1811-1812. These earthquakes has estimated magnitudes as large as 8.0 on the Richter scale (Johnsonton and Kanter, 1990) and affected an area of about 1 million square miles (Fuller, 1912). Today, an area of continuously high seismic activity defines the New Madrid seismic zone, which extends from northeastern Arkansas into southeastern Missouri and northwestern Tennessee. Seismicity is locally concentrated along two subsurface archers--the Blytheville and Pascola (Hildenbrand and others, 1977; Crone and others, 1985; Hildenbrand, 1985; McKeown, 1988). The Padcola arch is not pertinent to this study and, therefore will not be discusses further. The Blytheville arch is located in and is subparallel to the axis of the northeast-southwest-trending Reelfoot structural basin, which formed during early Paleozoic rifting (Ervin and McGinnis, 1975; fig. 1). The Reelfoot basin is filled with Cambrian and Ordovician sedimentary rocks (Grohskopf, 1955; Howe, 1984; Houseknevht, 1989; Collins and others, 1992) that are uncomfortably overlain by Cretacaous and Tertiary sedimentary rocks and underlain by crystalline rocks of the eastern granite-rhyolite province (see Bickford and others, 1986). The presence of some Late Proterozoic sedimentary rocks in the Reelfoot basin currently cannot be ruled out. The Dow Chemical #1 B.L. Garrigan drill hole (hereafter, Garrigan) penetrated Paleozoic rocks on the Blytheville arch. The Garrigan is locted in the Reelfoot basin in the NW1/4, NW1/4 sec. 28, T. 15 N., R. 10 E., Mississippi County, Arkansas (fig. 1) and was completed to a total depth of 12,038 ft from a ground elevation of 239 ft on April 11, 1982 (Swolfs, 1991). The Garrigan is the only reported drill hole that penetrates the subsurface Blytheville

  19. Testing for ontological errors in probabilistic forecasting models of natural systems.

    PubMed

    Marzocchi, Warner; Jordan, Thomas H

    2014-08-19

    Probabilistic forecasting models describe the aleatory variability of natural systems as well as our epistemic uncertainty about how the systems work. Testing a model against observations exposes ontological errors in the representation of a system and its uncertainties. We clarify several conceptual issues regarding the testing of probabilistic forecasting models for ontological errors: the ambiguity of the aleatory/epistemic dichotomy, the quantification of uncertainties as degrees of belief, the interplay between Bayesian and frequentist methods, and the scientific pathway for capturing predictability. We show that testability of the ontological null hypothesis derives from an experimental concept, external to the model, that identifies collections of data, observed and not yet observed, that are judged to be exchangeable when conditioned on a set of explanatory variables. These conditional exchangeability judgments specify observations with well-defined frequencies. Any model predicting these behaviors can thus be tested for ontological error by frequentist methods; e.g., using P values. In the forecasting problem, prior predictive model checking, rather than posterior predictive checking, is desirable because it provides more severe tests. We illustrate experimental concepts using examples from probabilistic seismic hazard analysis. Severe testing of a model under an appropriate set of experimental concepts is the key to model validation, in which we seek to know whether a model replicates the data-generating process well enough to be sufficiently reliable for some useful purpose, such as long-term seismic forecasting. Pessimistic views of system predictability fail to recognize the power of this methodology in separating predictable behaviors from those that are not. PMID:25097265

  20. Improved Modeling of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs by Quantitatively Handling Flow Convergence into the Wellbore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadelman, M.; Crandall, D.; Sams, W. N.; Bromhal, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Complex fractured networks in the subsurface control the flow of fluids in many applications, and accurately modeling their interaction with wells is critical to understanding their behavior. For tight sand and shale formations, fluid flow is primarily restricted to fractures within each rock layer. NFFLOW was designed by the Department of Energy to model gas well production from naturally fractured reservoirs. NFFLOW is a discrete fracture simulator, with every fracture and rock matrix in the domain handled individually. One-dimensional models are used calculate the flow through connected fractures and flow from the surrounding rocks into fractures. Flow into wellbores are determined from the combined flux from connecting fractures and adjacent rock matrices. One-dimensional fluid flow equations are used because they are extremely fast to solve and represent a reasonable approximation of the physical behavior of fluids in most of the reservoir. However, near the wellbore those models become inaccurate due to gas flow convergence, which is a multidimensional situation. We present a method to correct the one-dimensional models, using data from two-dimensional fluid flow models, while maintaining the original simulator speed. By applying corrections from the two-dimensional model, the one-dimensional models can better account for gas flow convergence into the wellbore as well as the location of the wellbore within the rock strata. Corrections were successful in scaling the one-dimensional flow rates to match the two dimensional values over a wide range of parameters for both fracture flow and porous media flow into the wellbore. This is shown to increase the accuracy of history matching to production data for a wide range of wells, allowing for better modeling and prediction of future productivity. With an accurate history match established, NFFLOW can then be used to investigate issues such as the ability of the formation to sequester carbon dioxide or the effects

  1. Testing for ontological errors in probabilistic forecasting models of natural systems

    PubMed Central

    Marzocchi, Warner; Jordan, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    Probabilistic forecasting models describe the aleatory variability of natural systems as well as our epistemic uncertainty about how the systems work. Testing a model against observations exposes ontological errors in the representation of a system and its uncertainties. We clarify several conceptual issues regarding the testing of probabilistic forecasting models for ontological errors: the ambiguity of the aleatory/epistemic dichotomy, the quantification of uncertainties as degrees of belief, the interplay between Bayesian and frequentist methods, and the scientific pathway for capturing predictability. We show that testability of the ontological null hypothesis derives from an experimental concept, external to the model, that identifies collections of data, observed and not yet observed, that are judged to be exchangeable when conditioned on a set of explanatory variables. These conditional exchangeability judgments specify observations with well-defined frequencies. Any model predicting these behaviors can thus be tested for ontological error by frequentist methods; e.g., using P values. In the forecasting problem, prior predictive model checking, rather than posterior predictive checking, is desirable because it provides more severe tests. We illustrate experimental concepts using examples from probabilistic seismic hazard analysis. Severe testing of a model under an appropriate set of experimental concepts is the key to model validation, in which we seek to know whether a model replicates the data-generating process well enough to be sufficiently reliable for some useful purpose, such as long-term seismic forecasting. Pessimistic views of system predictability fail to recognize the power of this methodology in separating predictable behaviors from those that are not. PMID:25097265

  2. Slow-roll trajectories in chromo-natural and gauge-flation models: An exhaustive analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleknejad, Azadeh; Zarei, Moslem

    2013-08-01

    We present an exhaustive analysis on the background inflationary solutions of the chromo-natural model. We show that starting from an arbitrary axion field value χ0∈(0,fπ), it is possible to have slow-roll inflation with enough number of e-folds and determine the allowed region of the parameters corresponding to each χ0 value. Having the available parameter space, we then study the behavior of the solutions with respect to the initial value of the axion field.

  3. Numerical Modeling of Hydraulic Fractures Interaction in Complex Naturally Fractured Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresse, Olga; Weng, Xiaowei; Gu, Hongren; Wu, Ruiting

    2013-05-01

    A recently developed unconventional fracture model (UFM) is able to simulate complex fracture network propagation in a formation with pre-existing natural fractures. A method for computing the stress shadow from fracture branches in a complex hydraulic fracture network (HFN) based on an enhanced 2D displacement discontinuity method with correction for finite fracture height is implemented in UFM and is presented in detail including approach validation and examples. The influence of stress shadow effect from the HFN generated at previous treatment stage on the HFN propagation and shape at new stage is also discussed.

  4. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2003-02-11

    This research was directed toward developing a systematic reservoir characterization methodology which can be used by the petroleum industry to implement infill drilling programs and/or enhanced oil recovery projects in naturally fractured reservoir systems in an environmentally safe and cost effective manner. It was anticipated that the results of this research program will provide geoscientists and engineers with a systematic procedure for properly characterizing a fractured reservoir system and a reservoir/horizontal wellbore simulator model which can be used to select well locations and an effective EOR process to optimize the recovery of the oil and gas reserves from such complex reservoir systems.

  5. Incorporating Ecosystem Processes Controlling Carbon Balance Into Models of Coupled Human-Natural Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, W.; Brown, D. G.; Brunner, A.; Fouladbash, L.; Hadzick, Z.; Hutchins, M.; Kiger, S. E.; Makino, Y.; Nassauer, J. I.; Robinson, D. T.; Riolo, R. L.; Sun, S.

    2012-12-01

    A key element in the study of coupled human-natural systems is the interactions of human populations with vegetation and soils. In human-dominated landscapes, vegetation production and change results from a combination of ecological processes and human decision-making and behavior. Vegetation is often dramatically altered, whether to produce food for humans and livestock, to harvest fiber for construction and other materials, to harvest fuel wood or feedstock for biofuels, or simply for cultural preferences as in the case of residential lawns with sparse trees in the exurban landscape. This alteration of vegetation and its management has a substantial impact on the landscape carbon balance. Models can be used to simulate scenarios in human-natural systems and to examine the integration of processes that determine future trajectories of carbon balance. However, most models of human-natural systems include little integration of the human alteration of vegetation with the ecosystem processes that regulate carbon balance. Here we illustrate a few case studies of pilot-study models that strive for this integration from our research across various types of landscapes. We focus greater detail on a fully developed research model linked to a field study of vegetation and soils in the exurban residential landscape of Southeastern Michigan, USA. The field study characterized vegetation and soil carbon storage in 5 types of ecological zones. Field-observed carbon storage in the vegetation in these zones ranged widely, from 150 g C/m2 in turfgrass zones, to 6,000 g C/m2 in zones defined as turfgrass with sparse woody vegetation, to 16,000 g C/m2 in a zone defined as dense trees and shrubs. Use of these zones facilitated the scaling of carbon pools to the landscape, where the areal mixtures of zone types had a significant impact on landscape C storage. Use of these zones also facilitated the use of the ecosystem process model Biome-BGC to simulate C trajectories and also

  6. Constraints on the Amount of deeply subducted Water from numerical Models in comparison with natural Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad-Schmolke, M.; Halama, R.

    2014-12-01

    The subduction of hydrated slab mantle to beyond-arc depths is the most important and yet weakly constrained factor in the quantification of the Earth's deep geologic water cycle. During subduction of hydrated oceanic lithosphere, dehydration reactions in the downgoing plate lead to a partitioning of water between upper and lower plate. Water retained in the slab is recycled into the mantle where it controls its rheology and thus plate tectonic velocities. Hence, quantification of the water partitioning in subduction zones is crucial for the understanding of mass transfer between the Earth's surface and the mantle. Combined thermomechanical and thermodynamic models yield quantitative constraints on the water cycle in subduction zones, but unless model results can be linked to natural observations, the reliability of such models remains speculative. We present combined thermomechanical, thermodynamic and geochemical models of active and paleo-subduction zones, whose results can be tested with independent geochemical features in natural rocks. In active subduction zones, evidence for the validity of our model comes from the agreement between modeled and observed across-arc trends of boron concentrations and isotopic compositions in arc volcanic rocks. In the Kamchatkan subduction zone, for example, the model successfully predicts complex geochemical patterns and the spatial distribution of arc volcanoes. In paleo-subduction zones (e.g. Western Gneiss Region and Western Alps), constraints on the water budget and dehydration behavior of the subducting slab come from trace element zoning patterns in ultra-high pressure (UHP) garnets. Distinct enrichments of Cr, Ni and REE in the UHP zones of the garnets can be reconciled by our models that predict intense rehydration and trace element re-enrichment of the eclogites at UHP conditions by fluids released from the underlying slab mantle. Models of present-day subduction zones indicate the presence of 2.5-6 wt.% of water

  7. Triplet excitons in natural photosynthetic and artificial light harvesting systems: Measurement and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartzler, Daniel Allen

    Under full sunlight, unprotected (Bacterio)Chlorophyll ((B)Chl) molecules photodegrade in a matter of minutes. This is the result of the generation of highly reactive singlet oxygen (1O2) by energy transfer from the (B)Chl triplet state (3(B)Chl) to the oxygen ground state. Natural photosynthetic systems must protect themselves from 1O2, typically done by positioning carotenoids within a few angstroms of each (B)Chl molecule to quench 3(B)Chl states. Using phosphorescence spectroscopy and computational modeling, we investigated alternative, carotenoid independent, mechanisms which nature may employ to prevent 1O2 sensitization by lowering the energy of 3(B)Chl below that of 1O2. The two proposed triplet lowering mechanisms investigated were: triplet state lowering by strong pigment-pigment interactions (i.e. triplet exciton formation) and triplet state lowering by pigment-protein interactions. Possible natural examples employing these mechanisms are two structures found in green sulfur bacteria: the chlorosome (an antenna containing ~100000 coupled BChl c, d, or e molecules with unexpectedly high photostability) and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex (an auxiliary antenna containing eight seemingly unprotected BChl a molecules). Measurements performed on linear aggregates of the dye perylene diimide (PDI) show that triplet exciton formation does reduce the triplet state energy. However, direct measurement of triplet state energies for the chlorosome and FMO complex proved experimentally difficult, thus an alternative approach was used to calculate these energies using empirical and excitonic models. Since the use of excitonic modeling requires knowledge of both the pigment site energies and the pigment-pigment interactions (i.e. couplings), work was performed to catalog the monomeric singlet and triplet state energies of all known natural (B)Chl pigments by direct measurement or computational modeling and to characterize the triplet-triplet (T-T) coupling in

  8. Treatment of a multiple sclerosis animal model by a novel nanodrop formulation of a natural antioxidant

    PubMed Central

    Binyamin, Orli; Larush, Liraz; Frid, Kati; Keller, Guy; Friedman-Levi, Yael; Ovadia, Haim; Abramsky, Oded; Magdassi, Shlomo; Gabizon, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system and is associated with demyelination, neurodegeneration, and sensitivity to oxidative stress. In this work, we administered a nanodroplet formulation of pomegranate seed oil (PSO), denominated Nano-PSO, to mice induced for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an established model of MS. PSO comprises high levels of punicic acid, a unique polyunsaturated fatty acid considered as one of the strongest natural antioxidants. We show here that while EAE-induced mice treated with natural PSO presented some reduction in disease burden, this beneficial effect increased significantly when EAE mice were treated with Nano-PSO of specific size nanodroplets at much lower concentrations of the oil. Pathological examinations revealed that Nano-PSO administration dramatically reduced demyelination and oxidation of lipids in the brains of the affected animals, which are hallmarks of this severe neurological disease. We propose that novel formulations of natural antioxidants such as Nano-PSO may be considered for the treatment of patients suffering from demyelinating diseases. On the mechanistic side, our results demonstrate that lipid oxidation may be a seminal feature in both demyelination and neurodegeneration. PMID:26648720

  9. Segregation of Naturally Occurring Mitochondrial DNA Variants in a Mini-Pig Model.

    PubMed

    Cagnone, Gael; Tsai, Te-Sha; Srirattana, Kanokwan; Rossello, Fernando; Powell, David R; Rohrer, Gary; Cree, Lynsey; Trounce, Ian A; St John, Justin C

    2016-03-01

    The maternally inherited mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is present in multimeric form within cells and harbors sequence variants (heteroplasmy). While a single mtDNA variant at high load can cause disease, naturally occurring variants likely persist at low levels across generations of healthy populations. To determine how naturally occurring variants are segregated and transmitted, we generated a mini-pig model, which originates from the same maternal ancestor. Following next-generation sequencing, we identified a series of low-level mtDNA variants in blood samples from the female founder and her daughters. Four variants, ranging from 3% to 20%, were selected for validation by high-resolution melting analysis in 12 tissues from 31 animals across three generations. All four variants were maintained in the offspring, but variant load fluctuated significantly across the generations in several tissues, with sex-specific differences in heart and liver. Moreover, variant load was persistently reduced in high-respiratory organs (heart, brain, diaphragm, and muscle), which correlated significantly with higher mtDNA copy number. However, oocytes showed increased heterogeneity in variant load, which correlated with increased mtDNA copy number during in vitro maturation. Altogether, these outcomes show that naturally occurring mtDNA variants segregate and are maintained in a tissue-specific manner across generations. This segregation likely involves the maintenance of selective mtDNA variants during organogenesis, which can be differentially regulated in oocytes and preimplantation embryos during maturation. PMID:26819245

  10. Modeling the Interaction Between Hydraulic and Natural Fractures Using Dual-Lattice Discrete Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jing; Huang, Hai; Deo, Milind

    2015-10-01

    The interaction between hydraulic fractures (HF) and natural fractures (NF) will lead to complex fracture networks due to the branching and merging of natural and hydraulic fractures in unconventional reservoirs. In this paper, a newly developed hydraulic fracturing simulator based on discrete element method is used to predict the generation of complex fracture network in the presence of pre-existing natural fractures. By coupling geomechanics and reservoir flow within a dual lattice system, this simulator can effectively capture the poro-elastic effects and fluid leakoff into the formation. When HFs are intercepting single or multiple NFs, complex mechanisms such as direct crossing, arresting, dilating and branching can be simulated. Based on the model, the effects of injected fluid rate and viscosity, the orientation and permeability of NFs and stress anisotropy on the HF-NF interaction process are investigated. Combined impacts from multiple parameters are also examined in the paper. The numerical results show that large values of stress anisotropy, intercepting angle, injection rate and viscosity will impede the opening of NFs.

  11. Metabolic Network Modeling of Microbial Interactions in Natural and Engineered Environmental Systems.

    PubMed

    Perez-Garcia, Octavio; Lear, Gavin; Singhal, Naresh

    2016-01-01

    We review approaches to characterize metabolic interactions within microbial communities using Stoichiometric Metabolic Network (SMN) models for applications in environmental and industrial biotechnology. SMN models are computational tools used to evaluate the metabolic engineering potential of various organisms. They have successfully been applied to design and optimize the microbial production of antibiotics, alcohols and amino acids by single strains. To date however, such models have been rarely applied to analyze and control the metabolism of more complex microbial communities. This is largely attributed to the diversity of microbial community functions, metabolisms, and interactions. Here, we firstly review different types of microbial interaction and describe their relevance for natural and engineered environmental processes. Next, we provide a general description of the essential methods of the SMN modeling workflow including the steps of network reconstruction, simulation through Flux Balance Analysis (FBA), experimental data gathering, and model calibration. Then we broadly describe and compare four approaches to model microbial interactions using metabolic networks, i.e., (i) lumped networks, (ii) compartment per guild networks, (iii) bi-level optimization simulations, and (iv) dynamic-SMN methods. These approaches can be used to integrate and analyze diverse microbial physiology, ecology and molecular community data. All of them (except the lumped approach) are suitable for incorporating species abundance data but so far they have been used only to model simple communities of two to eight different species. Interactions based on substrate exchange and competition can be directly modeled using the above approaches. However, interactions based on metabolic feedbacks, such as product inhibition and synthropy require extensions to current models, incorporating gene regulation and compounding accumulation mechanisms. SMN models of microbial interactions can

  12. Metabolic Network Modeling of Microbial Interactions in Natural and Engineered Environmental Systems

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Garcia, Octavio; Lear, Gavin; Singhal, Naresh

    2016-01-01

    We review approaches to characterize metabolic interactions within microbial communities using Stoichiometric Metabolic Network (SMN) models for applications in environmental and industrial biotechnology. SMN models are computational tools used to evaluate the metabolic engineering potential of various organisms. They have successfully been applied to design and optimize the microbial production of antibiotics, alcohols and amino acids by single strains. To date however, such models have been rarely applied to analyze and control the metabolism of more complex microbial communities. This is largely attributed to the diversity of microbial community functions, metabolisms, and interactions. Here, we firstly review different types of microbial interaction and describe their relevance for natural and engineered environmental processes. Next, we provide a general description of the essential methods of the SMN modeling workflow including the steps of network reconstruction, simulation through Flux Balance Analysis (FBA), experimental data gathering, and model calibration. Then we broadly describe and compare four approaches to model microbial interactions using metabolic networks, i.e., (i) lumped networks, (ii) compartment per guild networks, (iii) bi-level optimization simulations, and (iv) dynamic-SMN methods. These approaches can be used to integrate and analyze diverse microbial physiology, ecology and molecular community data. All of them (except the lumped approach) are suitable for incorporating species abundance data but so far they have been used only to model simple communities of two to eight different species. Interactions based on substrate exchange and competition can be directly modeled using the above approaches. However, interactions based on metabolic feedbacks, such as product inhibition and synthropy require extensions to current models, incorporating gene regulation and compounding accumulation mechanisms. SMN models of microbial interactions can

  13. Aerodynamic analysis of natural flapping flight using a lift model based on spanwise flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Lionel D., Jr.

    This study successfully described the mechanics of flapping hovering flight within the framework of conventional aerodynamics. Additionally, the theory proposed and supported by this research provides an entirely new way of looking at animal flapping flight. The mechanisms of biological flight are not well understood, and researchers have not been able to describe them using conventional aerodynamic forces. This study proposed that natural flapping flight can be broken down into a simplest model, that this model can then be used to develop a mathematical representation of flapping hovering flight, and finally, that the model can be successfully refined and compared to biological flapping data. This paper proposed a unique theory that the lift of a flapping animal is primarily the result of velocity across the cambered span of the wing. A force analysis was developed using centripetal acceleration to define an acceleration profile that would lead to a spanwise velocity profile. The force produced by the spanwise velocity profile was determined using a computational fluid dynamics analysis of flow on the simplified wing model. The overall forces on the model were found to produce more than twice the lift required for hovering flight. In addition, spanwise lift was shown to generate induced drag on the wing. Induced drag increased both the model wing's lift and drag. The model allowed the development of a mathematical representation that could be refined to account for insect hovering characteristics and that could predict expected physical attributes of the fluid flow. This computational representation resulted in a profile of lift and drag production that corresponds to known force profiles for insect flight. The model of flapping flight was shown to produce results similar to biological observation and experiment, and these results can potentially be applied to the study of other flapping animals. This work provides a foundation on which to base further exploration

  14. Reactive Transport Modeling of Cap Rock Integrity During Natural and Engineered CO2 Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J W; Nitao, J J; Morris, J P

    2004-05-26

    Long-term cap rock integrity represents the single most important constraint on the long-term isolation performance of natural and engineered CO{sub 2} storage sites. CO{sub 2} influx that forms natural accumulations and CO{sub 2} injection for EOR/sequestration or saline-aquifer disposal both lead to concomitant geochemical alteration and geomechanical deformation of the cap rock, enhancing or degrading its seal integrity depending on the relative effectiveness of these interdependent processes. Using our reactive transport simulator (NUFT), supporting geochemical databases and software (GEMBOCHS, SUPCRT92), and distinct-element geomechanical model (LDEC), we have shown that influx-triggered mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions within typical shale cap rocks continuously reduce microfracture apertures, while pressure and effective-stress evolution first rapidly increase then slowly constrict them. For a given shale composition, the extent of geochemical enhancement is nearly independent of key reservoir properties (permeability and lateral continuity) that distinguish EOR/sequestration and saline-aquifer settings and CO{sub 2} influx parameters (rate, focality, and duration) that distinguish engineered disposal sites and natural accumulations, because these characteristics and parameters have negligible (indirect) impact on mineral dissolution/precipitation rates. In contrast, the extent of geomechanical degradation is highly dependent on these reservoir properties and influx parameters because they effectively dictate magnitude of the pressure perturbation; specifically, initial geomechanical degradation has been shown inversely proportional to reservoir permeability and lateral continuity and proportional to influx rate. Hence, while the extent of geochemical alteration is nearly independent of filling mode, that of geomechanical deformation is significantly more pronounced during engineered injection. This distinction limits the extent to which naturally

  15. Modeling of arsenic adsorption kinetics of synthetic and contaminated groundwater on natural laterite.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Abhijit; Sharma, Himanshu; Basu, Jayanta Kumar; De, Sirshendu

    2009-12-30

    A simple shrinking core model is applied to predict the adsorption kinetics of arsenite and arsenate species onto natural laterite (NL) in a stirred tank adsorber. The proposed model is a two-resistance model, in which two unknown parameters, external mass transfer coefficient (K(f)) and pore diffusion coefficient (D(e)) are estimated by comparing the simulation concentration profile with the experimental data using a nonlinear optimization technique. The model is applied under various operating conditions, e.g., initial arsenic concentration, NL dose, NL particle size, temperature, stirring speed, etc. Estimated values of D(e) and K(f) are found to be in the range of 2.2-2.6 x 10(-11)m(2)/s and 1.0-1.4 x 10(-6)m/s at 305K for different operating conditions, respectively. D(e) and K(f) values are found to be increasing with temperature and stirrer speed, respectively. Calculated values of Biot numbers indicate that both external mass transfer and pore diffusion are important during the adsorption. The model is also applied satisfactorily to predict the arsenic adsorption kinetics of arsenic contaminated groundwater-NL system and can be used to scale up. PMID:19717233

  16. Multiple equilibria, natural variability, and climate transitions in an idealized ocean-atmosphere model

    SciTech Connect

    Saravanan, R.; McWilliams, J.C.

    1995-10-01

    An idealized coupled ocean-atmosphere is constructed to study climatic equilibria and variability. The model focuses on the role of large-scale fluid motions in the climate system. The atmospheric component is an eddy-resolving two-level global primitive equation model with simplified physical parameterizations. The oceanic component is a zonally averaged sector model of the thermohaline circulation. The two components exchange heat and freshwater fluxes synchonously. Coupled integrations are carried out over periods of several centuries to identify the equilibrium states of the ocean-atmosphere system. It is shown that there exist at least three types of equilibria, which are distinguished by whether they have upwelling or downwelling in the polar regions. Each oceanic circulation in the coupled model exhibits natural variability on interdecadal and longer timescales. The dominant interdecadal mode of variability is associated with the advection of oceanic temperature anomalies in the sinking regions. The sensitivity of the coupled model to climatic perturbations is studied. A rapid increase in the greenhouse gas concentrations leads to a collapse of the meridional overtuning in the ocean. Introduction of a large positive surface freshwater anomaly in the high latitudes leads to a temporary suppression of the sinking motion, followed by a rapid recovery, due primarily to the high latitude cooling associated with the reduction of oceanic heat transport. In this evolution, the secondary roles played by the atmospheric heat transport and moisture transport in destablizing the thermohaline circulation are compared, and the former is found to be dominant.

  17. Numerical modeling of a lead melting front under the influence of natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulson, Ryan

    This work presents a study of the Effective Heat Capacity (EHC) method applied to the numerical simulation of the interface between a solid and a naturally convecting pool of liquid lead under pseudo-steady-state and transient conditions using COMSOL Multiphysics. The EHC method is implemented as a temperature dependent pseudo-material with discontinuities in the heat capacity, dynamic viscosity, and thermal conductivity to simulate the melting front. The approach is validated with experimental data for a vertical melting front between two walls. The hot wall heat flux and the cold wall temperature are adjusted until the numerical model that best matches the experimental data is found. The best case boundary conditions then serve as the control in subsequent studies of key modeling parameters, including the mesh refinement, the discontinuity width and location, the maximum allowable time step, and the jump in dynamic viscosity. An extra fine mesh with a maximum element size of 1.24 * 10--3 m2 results in the most accurate model. For pseudo-steady-state models the width and location of the discontinuity does not affect the results substantially but it does affect the settling times and transient behavior of the models. The maximum allowable time step is dependent on the mesh resolution. The behavior of the pseudo-solid transitions from solid to liquid when the dynamic viscosity is less then 1.0 * 104 Pa · s.

  18. Natural biogeochemical cycle of mercury in a global three-dimensional ocean tracer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanxu; Jaeglé, Lyatt; Thompson, LuAnne

    2014-05-01

    We implement mercury (Hg) biogeochemistry in the offline global 3-D ocean tracer model (OFFTRAC) to investigate the natural Hg cycle, prior to any anthropogenic input. The simulation includes three Hg tracers: dissolved elemental (Hg0aq), dissolved divalent (HgIIaq), and particle-bound mercury (HgPaq). Our Hg parameterization takes into account redox chemistry in ocean waters, air-sea exchange of Hg0, scavenging of HgIIaq onto sinking particles, and resupply of HgIIaq at depth by remineralization of sinking particles. Atmospheric boundary conditions are provided by a global simulation of the natural atmospheric Hg cycle in the GEOS-Chem model. In the surface ocean, the OFFTRAC model predicts global mean concentrations of 0.16 pM for total Hg, partitioned as 80% HgIIaq, 14% Hg0aq, and 6% HgPaq. Total Hg concentrations increase to 0.38 pM in the thermocline/intermediate waters (between the mixed layer and 1000 m depth) and 0.82 pM in deep waters (below 1000 m), reflecting removal of Hg from the surface to the subsurface ocean by particle sinking followed by remineralization at depth. Our model predicts that Hg concentrations in the deep North Pacific Ocean (>2000 m) are a factor of 2-3 higher than in the deep North Atlantic Ocean. This is the result of cumulative input of Hg from particle remineralization as deep waters transit from the North Atlantic to the North Pacific on their ~2000 year journey. The model is able to reproduce the relatively uniform concentrations of total Hg observed in the old deep waters of the North Pacific Ocean (observations: 1.2 ± 0.4 pM; model: 1.1 ± 0.04 pM) and Southern Ocean (observations: 1.1 ± 0.2 pM; model: 0.8 ± 0.02 pM). However, the modeled concentrations are factors of 5-6 too low compared to observed concentrations in the surface ocean and in the young water masses of the deep North Atlantic Ocean. This large underestimate for these regions implies a factor of 5-6 anthropogenic enhancement in Hg concentrations.

  19. Felid Herpesvirus Type 1 Infection in Cats: A Natural Host Model for Alphaherpesvirus Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Feline herpesvirus 1 (FeHV-1) is an alphaherpesvirus that causes feline viral rhinotracheitis, an important viral disease of cats on a worldwide basis. Acute FeHV-1 infection is associated with both upper respiratory and ocular signs. Following the acute phase of the disease lifelong latency is established, primarily in sensory neuronal cells. As is the case with human herpes simplex viruses, latency reactivation can result in recrudescence, which can manifest itself in the form of serious ocular lesions. FeHV-1 infection in cats is a natural host model that is useful for the identification of viral virulence genes that play a role in replication at the mucosal portals of entry or are mediators of the establishment, maintenance, or reactivation of latency. It is also a model system for defining innate and adaptive immunity mechanisms and for immunization strategies that can lead to better protection against this and other alphaherpesvirus infections. PMID:23762586

  20. Modelling in-situ matrix diffusion at Palmottu natural analogue study site in SW Finland

    SciTech Connect

    Rasilainen, K.; Suksi, J.

    1993-12-31

    Radioactive disequilibria, between U-238, U-234, and Th-230, in crystalline rock adjacent to a fracture, indicates mass transfer of U and Th between water in the fracture and the rock. The matrix diffusion theory was used to interpret the observed profiles of mobilized nuclides around the natural fracture. The interpretation of the profiles was based on the use of uranium series disequilibrium code, URSE, and migration code FTRANS. The model system was characterized using all available site-specific data, and the system evolution was outlined using the geology of the Palmottu site. The simulated concentration profiles, as a function of depth from the fracture surface, indicate that measured profiles can be modelled by matrix diffusion, assuming realistic initial and boundary conditions and diffusion times of 300,000 years.

  1. MODELING STRATEGIES TO COMPUTE NATURAL CIRCULATION USING CFD IN A VHTR AFTER A LOFA

    SciTech Connect

    Yu-Hsin Tung; Richard W. Johnson; Ching-Chang Chieng; Yuh-Ming Ferng

    2012-11-01

    A prismatic gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR) is being developed under the next generation nuclear plant program (NGNP) of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy. In the design of the prismatic VHTR, hexagonal shaped graphite blocks are drilled to allow insertion of fuel pins, made of compacted TRISO fuel particles, and coolant channels for the helium coolant. One of the concerns for the reactor design is the effects of a loss of flow accident (LOFA) where the coolant circulators are lost for some reason, causing a loss of forced coolant flow through the core. In such an event, it is desired to know what happens to the (reduced) heat still being generated in the core and if it represents a problem for the fuel compacts, the graphite core or the reactor vessel (RV) walls. One of the mechanisms for the transport of heat out of the core is by the natural circulation of the coolant, which is still present. That is, how much heat may be transported by natural circulation through the core and upwards to the top of the upper plenum? It is beyond current capability for a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis to perform a calculation on the whole RV with a sufficiently refined mesh to examine the full potential of natural circulation in the vessel. The present paper reports the investigation of several strategies to model the flow and heat transfer in the RV. It is found that it is necessary to employ representative geometries of the core to estimate the heat transfer. However, by taking advantage of global and local symmetries, a detailed estimate of the strength of the resulting natural circulation and the level of heat transfer to the top of the upper plenum is obtained.

  2. Socio-economic vulnerability to natural hazards - proposal for an indicator-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidsvig, U.; McLean, A.; Vangelsten, B. V.; Kalsnes, B.; Ciurean, R. L.; Argyroudis, S.; Winter, M.; Corominas, J.; Mavrouli, O. C.; Fotopoulou, S.; Pitilakis, K.; Baills, A.; Malet, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Vulnerability assessment, with respect to natural hazards, is a complex process that must consider multiple dimensions of vulnerability, including both physical and social factors. Physical vulnerability refers to conditions of physical assets, and may be modeled by the intensity and magnitude of the hazard, the degree of physical protection provided by the natural and built environment, and the physical robustness of the exposed elements. Social vulnerability refers to the underlying factors leading to the inability of people, organizations, and societies to withstand impacts from the natural hazards. Social vulnerability models can be used in combination with physical vulnerability models to estimate both direct losses, i.e. losses that occur during and immediately after the impact, as well as indirect losses, i.e. long-term effects of the event. Direct impact of a landslide typically includes casualties and damages to buildings and infrastructure while indirect losses may e.g. include business closures or limitations in public services. The direct losses are often assessed using physical vulnerability indicators (e.g. construction material, height of buildings), while indirect losses are mainly assessed using social indicators (e.g. economical resources, demographic conditions). Within the EC-FP7 SafeLand research project, an indicator-based method was proposed to assess relative socio-economic vulnerability to landslides. The indicators represent the underlying factors which influence a community's ability to prepare for, deal with, and recover from the damage associated with landslides. The proposed model includes indicators representing demographic, economic and social characteristics as well as indicators representing the degree of preparedness and recovery capacity. Although the model focuses primarily on the indirect losses, it could easily be extended to include more physical indicators which account for the direct losses. Each indicator is individually

  3. Multi-period natural gas market modeling Applications, stochastic extensions and solution approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egging, Rudolf Gerardus

    This dissertation develops deterministic and stochastic multi-period mixed complementarity problems (MCP) for the global natural gas market, as well as solution approaches for large-scale stochastic MCP. The deterministic model is unique in the combination of the level of detail of the actors in the natural gas markets and the transport options, the detailed regional and global coverage, the multi-period approach with endogenous capacity expansions for transportation and storage infrastructure, the seasonal variation in demand and the representation of market power according to Nash-Cournot theory. The model is applied to several scenarios for the natural gas market that cover the formation of a cartel by the members of the Gas Exporting Countries Forum, a low availability of unconventional gas in the United States, and cost reductions in long-distance gas transportation. 1 The results provide insights in how different regions are affected by various developments, in terms of production, consumption, traded volumes, prices and profits of market participants. The stochastic MCP is developed and applied to a global natural gas market problem with four scenarios for a time horizon until 2050 with nineteen regions and containing 78,768 variables. The scenarios vary in the possibility of a gas market cartel formation and varying depletion rates of gas reserves in the major gas importing regions. Outcomes for hedging decisions of market participants show some significant shifts in the timing and location of infrastructure investments, thereby affecting local market situations. A first application of Benders decomposition (BD) is presented to solve a large-scale stochastic MCP for the global gas market with many hundreds of first-stage capacity expansion variables and market players exerting various levels of market power. The largest problem solved successfully using BD contained 47,373 variables of which 763 first-stage variables, however using BD did not result in

  4. A planar anode-supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell model with internal reforming of natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinda, P.; Chanchaona, S.; Brault, P.; Wechsatol, W.

    2011-05-01

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are of great interest due to their high energy efficiency, low emission level, and multiple fuel utilization. SOFC can operate with various kinds of fuels such as natural gas, carbon monoxide, methanol, ethanol, and hydrocarbon compounds, and they are becoming one of the main competitors among environmentally friendly energy sources for the future. In this study, a mathematical model of a co-flow planar anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell with internal reforming of natural gas has been developed. The model simultaneously solves mass, energy transport equations, and chemical as well as electrochemical reactions. The model can effectively predict the compound species distributions as well as the cell performance under specific operating conditions. The main result is a rather small temperature gradient obtained at 800 °C with S/C = 1 in classical operating conditions. The cell performance is reported for several operating temperatures and pressures. The cell performance is specified in terms of cell voltage and power density at any specific current density. The influence of electrode microstructure on cell performance was investigated. The simulation results show that the steady state performance is almost insensitive to microstructure of cells such as porosity and tortuosity unlike the operating pressure and temperature. However, for SOFC power output enhancement, the power output could be maximized by adjusting the pore size to an optimal value, similarly to porosity and tortuosity. At standard operating pressure (1 atm) and 800 °C with 48% fuel utilization, when an output cell voltage was 0.73 V, a current density of 0.38 A cm-2 with a power density of 0.28 W cm-2 was predicted. The accuracy of the model was validated by comparing with existing experimental results from the available literature.

  5. Modeling relations in nature and eco-informatics: a practical application of rosennean complexity.

    PubMed

    Kineman, John J

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of eco-informatics is to communicate critical information about organisms and ecosystems. To accomplish this, it must reflect the complexity of natural systems. Present information systems are designed around mechanistic concepts that do not capture complexity. Robert Rosen's relational theory offers a way of representing complexity in terms of information entailments that are part of an ontologically implicit 'modeling relation'. This relation has corresponding epistemological components that can be captured empirically, the components being structure (associated with model encoding) and function (associated with model decoding). Relational complexity, thus, provides a long-awaited theoretical underpinning for these concepts that ecology has found indispensable. Structural information pertains to the material organization of a system, which can be represented by data. Functional information specifies potential change, which can be inferred from experiment and represented as models or descriptions of state transformations. Contextual dependency (of structure or function) implies meaning. Biological functions imply internalized or system-dependent laws. Complexity can be represented epistemologically by relating structure and function in two different ways. One expresses the phenomenal relation that exists in any present or past instance, and the other draws the ontology of a system into the empirical world in terms of multiple potentials subject to natural forms of selection and optimality. These act as system attractors. Implementing these components and their theoretical relations in an informatics system will provide more-complete ecological informatics than is possible from a strictly mechanistic point of view. This approach will enable many new possibilities for supporting science and decision making. PMID:17955469

  6. Capturing natural-colour 3D models of insects for species discovery and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Chuong V; Lovell, David R; Adcock, Matt; La Salle, John

    2014-01-01

    Collections of biological specimens are fundamental to scientific understanding and characterization of natural diversity-past, present and future. This paper presents a system for liberating useful information from physical collections by bringing specimens into the digital domain so they can be more readily shared, analyzed, annotated and compared. It focuses on insects and is strongly motivated by the desire to accelerate and augment current practices in insect taxonomy which predominantly use text, 2D diagrams and images to describe and characterize species. While these traditional kinds of descriptions are informative and useful, they cannot cover insect specimens "from all angles" and precious specimens are still exchanged between researchers and collections for this reason. Furthermore, insects can be complex in structure and pose many challenges to computer vision systems. We present a new prototype for a practical, cost-effective system of off-the-shelf components to acquire natural-colour 3D models of insects from around 3 mm to 30 mm in length. ("Natural-colour" is used to contrast with "false-colour", i.e., colour generated from, or applied to, gray-scale data post-acquisition.) Colour images are captured from different angles and focal depths using a digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera rig and two-axis turntable. These 2D images are processed into 3D reconstructions using software based on a visual hull algorithm. The resulting models are compact (around 10 megabytes), afford excellent optical resolution, and can be readily embedded into documents and web pages, as well as viewed on mobile devices. The system is portable, safe, relatively affordable, and complements the sort of volumetric data that can be acquired by computed tomography. This system provides a new way to augment the description and documentation of insect species holotypes, reducing the need to handle or ship specimens. It opens up new opportunities to collect data for research

  7. Capturing Natural-Colour 3D Models of Insects for Species Discovery and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Chuong V.; Lovell, David R.; Adcock, Matt; La Salle, John

    2014-01-01

    Collections of biological specimens are fundamental to scientific understanding and characterization of natural diversity—past, present and future. This paper presents a system for liberating useful information from physical collections by bringing specimens into the digital domain so they can be more readily shared, analyzed, annotated and compared. It focuses on insects and is strongly motivated by the desire to accelerate and augment current practices in insect taxonomy which predominantly use text, 2D diagrams and images to describe and characterize species. While these traditional kinds of descriptions are informative and useful, they cannot cover insect specimens “from all angles” and precious specimens are still exchanged between researchers and collections for this reason. Furthermore, insects can be complex in structure and pose many challenges to computer vision systems. We present a new prototype for a practical, cost-effective system of off-the-shelf components to acquire natural-colour 3D models of insects from around 3 mm to 30 mm in length. (“Natural-colour” is used to contrast with “false-colour”, i.e., colour generated from, or applied to, gray-scale data post-acquisition.) Colour images are captured from different angles and focal depths using a digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera rig and two-axis turntable. These 2D images are processed into 3D reconstructions using software based on a visual hull algorithm. The resulting models are compact (around 10 megabytes), afford excellent optical resolution, and can be readily embedded into documents and web pages, as well as viewed on mobile devices. The system is portable, safe, relatively affordable, and complements the sort of volumetric data that can be acquired by computed tomography. This system provides a new way to augment the description and documentation of insect species holotypes, reducing the need to handle or ship specimens. It opens up new opportunities to collect data

  8. Natural Transmission Model for Severe Fever With Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Bunyavirus in Villages of Hubei Province, China.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xuesen; Guan, Xuhua; Liu, Li; Zhan, Jianbo; Jiang, Hongbo; Liu, Li; Li, Guoming; Xiong, Jinfeng; Tan, Liangfei; Xu, Junqiang; Jiang, Yongzhong; Yao, Xuan; Zhan, Faxian; Nie, Shaofa

    2016-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS), an emerging high-fatality infectious disease, is caused by a novel bunyavirus. However, a clear natural transmission model has not yet been established. We conducted a cross-sectional study with in-depth investigation of villages to systematically understand the transmission and risk factors among humans, host animals, and vectors. Village residents were interviewed using standardized questionnaires, in which there were confirmed cases of new infections, between August 2012 and May 2013. Serum samples from all villagers and animals, as well as tick specimens, were collected for qRT-PCR and antibody testing. The seropositivity rate among villagers was 8.4% (35/419), which was lower than that among domesticated animals (54.0%, 27/50; χ(2)= 81.1, P < 0.05). SFTS viral RNA was most commonly detected among domesticated animals (14.0%), followed by ticks (3.1%) and humans (1.7%; χ(2) = 23.1, P < 0.05). The homology of the S gene fragment was 98%. Tick bites were significantly associated with SFTSV infection (Conditional Logistic Regression odds ratio [OR] = 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-6.6). We provided systematic evidence on a natural transmission model for SFTSV from reservoir hosts (domesticated animals) to vectors (Haemaphysalis longicornis) to humans, and close contact with SFTS confirmed patients was not found to be a risk factor for natural transmission. PMID:26825892

  9. Ocean Turbulence V: Mesoscale Modeling in Level Coordinates. The Effect of Random Nature of Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Dubovikov, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    The main result of this paper is the derivation of a new expression for the tracer subgrid term in level coordinates S(l) to be employed in O-GCM. The novel feature is the proper account of the random nature of the density field which strongly affects the transformation from isopycnal to level coordinates of the variables of interest, velocity and tracer fields, their correlation functions and ultimately the subgrid terms. In deriving our result we made use of measured properties of vertical ocean turbulence. The major new results are: 1) the new subgrid expression is different from that of the heuristic GM model, 2) u++(tracer)=1/2u+(thickness), where u++ and u+ are the tracer and thickness bolus velocities. In previous models, u++ = u+, 2) the subgrid for a tracer tau is not the same as that for the density rho even when one accounts for the obvious absence of a diffusion term in the latter. The difference stems from a new treatment of the stochastic nature of the density, 3) the mesoscale diffusivity enters both locally and non-locally, as the integral over all z's from the bottom of the ocean to the level z.

  10. AAV-Mediated Cone Rescue in a Naturally Occurring Mouse Model of CNGA3-Achromatopsia

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xufeng; Lei, Bo; Everhart, Drew; Umino, Yumiko; Li, Jie; Zhang, Keqing; Mao, Song; Boye, Sanford L.; Liu, Li; Chiodo, Vince A.; Liu, Xuan; Shi, Wei; Tao, Ye; Chang, Bo; Hauswirth, William W.

    2012-01-01

    Achromatopsia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder which shows color blindness, severely impaired visual acuity, and extreme sensitivity to bright light. Mutations in the alpha subunits of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGA3) are responsible for about 1/4 of achromatopsia in the U.S. and Europe. Here, we test whether gene replacement therapy using an AAV5 vector could restore cone-mediated function and arrest cone degeneration in the cpfl5 mouse, a naturally occurring mouse model of achromatopsia with a CNGA3 mutation. We show that gene therapy leads to significant rescue of cone-mediated ERGs, normal visual acuities and contrast sensitivities. Normal expression and outer segment localization of both M- and S-opsins were maintained in treated retinas. The therapeutic effect of treatment lasted for at least 5 months post-injection. This study is the first demonstration of substantial, relatively long-term restoration of cone-mediated light responsiveness and visual behavior in a naturally occurring mouse model of CNGA3 achromatopsia. The results provide the foundation for development of an AAV5-based gene therapy trial for human CNGA3 achromatopsia. PMID:22509403

  11. Stabilization of natural colors and nutraceuticals: Inhibition of anthocyanin degradation in model beverages using polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Chung, Cheryl; Rojanasasithara, Thananunt; Mutilangi, William; McClements, David Julian

    2016-12-01

    Anthocyanins are widely used as natural colorants in foods, but they are highly susceptible to chemical degradation during storage leading to color fading. This study examined the potential of natural quillaja saponin and polyphenols (vanillin, epigallocatechin gallate, green tea extract, and protocatechualdehyde) at inhibiting color fading of anthocyanins in model beverages. The purple carrot anthocyanin (0.025%) in model beverages (citric acid, pH 3.0) containing l-ascorbic acid (0.050%) degraded with a first-order reaction rate during storage (40°C/7days in light). The addition of polyphenols (0.2%) delayed color fading, with the most notable improvement observed with green tea extract addition. The half-life for anthocyanin color fading increased from 2.9 to 6.7days with green tea extract. Fluorescence quenching measurements showed that the green tea extract contained components that interacted with anthocyanins probably through hydrophobic interactions. Overall, this study provides valuable information about enhancing the stability of anthocyanins in beverage systems using polyphenols. PMID:27374573

  12. Integrating remote sensing and GIS data for the Natural Systems Boundary (NSB) model

    SciTech Connect

    Leary, T.J.; Flamm, R.O.; Haddad, K.D.

    1997-06-01

    Significant alterations in hydrology, water quality, and land use have put the entire south Florida ecosystem on the brink of collapse. Considerable federal, state, and local efforts have focused on this region to develop and implement management options for environmental and economic restoration and sustainability. The Governor`s Commission for a Sustainable South Florida was created to represent a broad array of interests in the region and is charged with setting the state is vision, direction, and management options for an environmentally and economically sustainable south Florida ecosystem. The Commission`s Science Research Advisory Committee (SRAC) was given the responsibility of delineating and evaluating alternative natural system boundaries. To meet the Commission`s recommendations, the SRAC empowered the Florida Marine Research Institute (FMR1) to develop a GIS-based modeling application. The resulting ARCVIEW application allows managers and scientists to delineate alternative Natural Systems Boundaries (NSBs) by varying the selection and weight (relative importance) of management criteria such as hydrology, habitat, wildlife, and water quality. Repetitive model runs with modifications to the user-defined inputs afford managers the opportunity to better understand the complexity of the data and their relationship to management objectives.

  13. Mobility of Four Common Mercury Species in Model and Natural Unsaturated Soils.

    PubMed

    Gai, Ke; Hoelen, Thomas P; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Lowry, Gregory V

    2016-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) occurs as a myriad of species in environmental media, each with different physicochemical properties. The influence of Hg speciation on its transport in unsaturated soils is not well studied. Transport of four Hg species (dissolved inorganic Hg (II) species, a prepared Hg(II) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) complex, Hg(0), and HgS nanoparticles) was measured in sand and soil packed columns with partial water saturation under simulated rainfall (low ionic strength solution without DOM) and landfill leachate (high DOM content and high ionic strength) influent conditions. The Hg(II)-DOM species had the highest mobility among the four Hg species evaluated, and HgS particles (∼230 nm hydrodynamic diameter) had the poorest mobility, for all soil and influent conditions tested. The addition of 2 wt % clay particles to sand greatly retarded the transport of all Hg species, especially under simulated rainfall. DOM in the column influent facilitated the transport of all four Hg species in model and natural soils. For simulated rainfall, the transport trends observed in model sands were consistent with those measured in a sandy soil, except that the mobility of dissolved inorganic Hg(II) species was significantly lower in natural soils. For simulated rainfall, Hg transport was negligible in a high organic content (∼3.72 wt %) soil for all species except Hg-DOM. This work suggests that the Hg-DOM species presents the greatest potential for vertical migration to groundwater, especially with DOM in the influent solution. PMID:26949999

  14. Remediation of a historically Pb contaminated soil using a model natural Mn oxide waste.

    PubMed

    McCann, Clare M; Gray, Neil D; Tourney, Janette; Davenport, Russell J; Wade, Matthew; Finlay, Nina; Hudson-Edwards, Karen A; Johnson, Karen L

    2015-11-01

    A natural Mn oxide (NMO) waste was assessed as an in situ remediation amendment for Pb contaminated sites. The viability of this was investigated using a 10 month lysimeter trial, wherein a historically Pb contaminated soil was amended with a 10% by weight model NMO. The model NMO was found to have a large Pb adsorption capacity (qmax 346±14 mg g(-1)). However, due to the heterogeneous nature of the Pb contamination in the soils (3650.54-9299.79 mg kg(-1)), no treatment related difference in Pb via geochemistry could be detected. To overcome difficulties in traditional geochemical techniques due to pollutant heterogeneity we present a new method for unequivocally proving metal sorption to in situ remediation amendments. The method combines two spectroscopic techniques; namely electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Using this we showed Pb immobilisation on NMO, which were Pb free prior to their addition to the soils. Amendment of the soil with exogenous Mn oxide had no effect on microbial functioning, nor did it perturb the composition of the dominant phyla. We conclude that NMOs show excellent potential as remediation amendments. PMID:26073590

  15. SPAM Detection Server Model Inspired by the Dionaea Muscipula Closure Mechanism: An Alternative Approach for Natural Computing Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza Pereira Lopes, Rodrigo Arthur; Carrari R. Lopes, Lia; Mustaro, Pollyana Notargiacomo

    Natural computing has been an increasingly evolving field in the last few years. Focusing on the interesting behaviours offered by nature and biological processes, this work intends to apply the metaphor of the carnivorous plant "Dionaea muscipula" as a complementary defence system against a recurring problem regarding internet and e-mails: spam. The metaphor model presents relevant aspects for further implementation and debate.

  16. TH-A-9A-06: Inverse Planning of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Using Natural Physical Models

    SciTech Connect

    Riofrio, D; Ma, L; Zhou, J; Luan, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Treatment-planning systems rely on computer intensive optimization algorithms in order to provide radiation dose localization. We are investigating a new optimization paradigm based on natural physical modeling and simulations, which tend to evolve in time and find the minimum energy state. In our research, we aim to match physical models with radiation therapy inverse planning problems, where the minimum energy state coincides with the optimal solution. As a prototype study, we have modeled the inverse planning of Gamma Knife radiosurgery using the dynamic interactions between charged particles and demonstrate the potential of the paradigm. Methods: For inverse planning of Gamma Knife radiosurgery: (1) positive charges are uniformly placed on the surface of tumors and critical structures. (2) The Gamma Knife dose kernels of 4mm, 8mm and 16mm radii are modeled as geometric objects with variable charges. (3) The number of shots per each kernel radii is obtained by solving a constrained integer-linear problem. (4) The shots are placed into the tumor volume and move under electrostatic forces. The simulation is performed until internal forces are zero or maximum iterations are reached. (5) Finally, non-negative least squares (NNLS) is used to calculate the beam-on times for each shot. Results: A 3D C-shaped tumor surrounding a spherical critical structure was used for testing the new optimization paradigm. These tests showed that charges spread out evenly covering the tumor while keeping distance from the critical structure, resulting in a high quality plan. Conclusion: We have developed a new paradigm for dose optimization based on the simulation of physical models. As prototype studies, we applied electrostatic models to Gamma Knife radiosurgery and demonstrated the potential of the new paradigm. Further research and fine-tuning of the model are underway. NSF CBET-0853157.

  17. Modeling natural wetlands: A new global framework built on wetland observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, E.; Romanski, J.; Olefeldt, D.

    2015-12-01

    Natural wetlands are the world's largest methane (CH4) source, and their distribution and CH4 fluxes are sensitive to interannual and longer-term climate variations. Wetland distributions used in wetland-CH4 models diverge widely, and these geographic differences contribute substantially to large variations in magnitude, seasonality and distribution of modeled methane fluxes. Modeling wetland type and distribution—closely tied to simulating CH4 emissions—is a high priority, particularly for studies of wetlands and CH4 dynamics under past and future climates. Methane-wetland models either prescribe or simulate methane-producing areas (aka wetlands) and both approaches result in predictable over- and under-estimates. 1) Monthly satellite-derived inundation data include flooded areas that are not wetlands (e.g., lakes, reservoirs, and rivers), and do not identify non-flooded wetlands. 2) Models simulating methane-producing areas overwhelmingly rely on modeled soil moisture, systematically over-estimating total global area, with regional over- and under-estimates, while schemes to model soil-moisture typically cannot account for positive water tables (i.e., flooding). Interestingly, while these distinct hydrological approaches to identify wetlands are complementary, merging them does not provide critical data needed to model wetlands for methane studies. We present a new integrated framework for modeling wetlands, and ultimately their methane emissions, that exploits the extensive body of data and information on wetlands. The foundation of the approach is an existing global gridded data set comprising all and only wetlands, including vegetation information. This data set is augmented with data inter alia on climate, inundation dynamics, soil type and soil carbon, permafrost, active-layer depth, growth form, and species composition. We investigate this enhanced wetland data set to identify which variables best explain occurrence and characteristics of observed

  18. An assessment of the bidirectional reflectance models basing on laboratory experiment of natural particulate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhongqiu; Lv, Yunfeng; Lu, Shan

    2015-09-01

    The bidirectional reflectance model is commonly used to study surface structure and composition of atmosphereless celestial bodies basing on photometric measurements. We conducted a test of two bidirectional reflectance models, which are theoretically similar but with different form, to assess their ability for calculating the bidirectional reflectance of particulate surfaces and if the parameters could be confidently linked to the surface's property. Two types of natural particulate surfaces with controlled particle sizes vary from 300 μm to 900 μm have been measured in the visible and near-infrared wavelength with the NENULGS (Northeast Normal University Laboratory Goniospectrometer System), we only used these measurement results at 560 nm and 670 nm which are regarded to the evaluation standard of models. In this range of particle size, the bidirectional reflectance models were well match to the experimental data as the results shown in previous publications. Although some parameters of the models can be used to simulate the reflectance of particulate surface, they contain no reliable information on the physical property of our samples. Furthermore, the influence of the number of viewing angles on the precision of modeling results has been tested in this paper. It is clear that an increase of the number of viewing angles and the range of azimuth angles could allow us to improve precision on the estimation of parameters. Comparing with the best fitted model reflectance, we also found that if we used the parameters, which derived from measurements in the principal plane for individual incident zenith angle, to model the bidirectional reflectance may overestimate the computed results in the backward scattering direction and underestimate the computed results in the forward scattering direction. The difference between modeled results and measurements can reach up to 20% in the backward direction when using the parameters inverted in the principal plane. However

  19. Nature of stress accommodation in sheared granular material: Insights from 3D numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, Karen; Hazzard, James F.

    2007-07-01

    Active faults often contain distinct accumulations of granular wear material. During shear, this granular material accommodates stress and strain in a heterogeneous manner that may influence fault stability. We present new work to visualize the nature of contact force distributions during 3D granular shear. Our 3D discrete numerical models consist of granular layers subjected to normal loading and direct shear, where gouge particles are simulated by individual spheres interacting at points of contact according to simple laws. During shear, we observe the transient microscopic processes and resulting macroscopic mechanical behavior that emerge from interactions of thousands of particles. We track particle translations and contact forces to determine the nature of internal stress accommodation with accumulated slip for different initial configurations. We view model outputs using novel 3D visualization techniques. Our results highlight the prevalence of transient directed contact force networks that preferentially transmit enhanced stresses across our granular layers. We demonstrate that particle size distribution (psd) controls the nature of the force networks. Models having a narrow (i.e. relatively uniform) psd exhibit discrete pipe-like force clusters with a dominant and focussed orientation oblique to but in the plane of shear. Wider psd models (e.g. power law size distributions D = 2.6) also show a directed contact force network oblique to shear but enjoy a wider range of orientations and show more out-of-plane linkages perpendicular to shear. Macroscopic friction level, is insensitive to these distinct force network morphologies, however, force network evolution appears to be linked to fluctuations in macroscopic friction. Our results are consistent with predictions, based on recent laboratory observations, that force network morphologies are sensitive to grain characteristics such as particle size distribution of a sheared granular layer. Our numerical

  20. Modelling of plant-soil carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycling in semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Jessica; Quinton, John; Rowe, Ed; Tipping, Ed

    2013-04-01

    In recent centuries pools and fluxes of C, N and P in natural and semi-natural UK ecosystems have been transformed by atmospheric pollution leading to: acidification; eutrophication of surface waters; loss of biodiversity; and increased greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, climate change now threatens to perturb these systems further. Understanding in this field is vital in determining the consequences of artificial nutrient enrichment and land use and climate change, and mitigating against their effects. The N14CP model has been recently developed to assess the temporal responses of soil C, N and P pools to nutrient enrichment in semi-natural ecosystems, and explore the connections between these nutrients. It is a dynamic, mechanistic model, driven by: climate; CO2, N (fixation and pollutant deposition), and P (weathering and atmospheric deposition) inputs; and plant cover type. It explicitly links C, N, and P in both plants and soils, using plant element stoichiometry as the primary constraint. Net primary production, and plant/soil element pools, are calculated over time, and output fluxes of dissolved organic and inorganic, and gaseous, forms of C, N, and P produced. Radiocarbon data are used to constrain Soil Organic Matter (SOM) turnover. The SOM is represented as three pools, undergoing first-order decomposition reactions with turn-over rates ranging from 2 to 1000 years. The N14CP modelling methodology is discussed and its calibration and verification using observations from 200 northern European sites presented. Whilst the primary period of interest with respect to nutrient enrichment is from the industrial revolution onwards, plant-soil C, N and P are simulated at these sites for a period spanning from the start of the Holocene (to provide a spin-up period) to the present day. Clearly, during this time span land cover and usage will have changed at these sites, and histories of these changes are used as an input to the model. The influence of these land

  1. Climatology and natural variability of the global hydrologic cycle in the GLA atmospheric general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K.-M.; Mehta, V. M.; Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.

    1994-01-01

    Time average climatology and low-frequency variabilities of the global hydrologic cycle (GHC) in the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) general circulation model (GCM) were investigated in the present work. A 730-day experiment was conducted with the GLA GCM forced by insolation, sea surface temperature, and ice-snow undergoing climatological annual cycles. Ifluences of interactive soil moisture on time average climatology and natural variability of the GHC were also investigated by conducting 365-day experiments with and without interactive soil moisture. Insolation, sea surface temperature, and ice-snow were fixed at their July levels in the latter two experiments. Results show that the model's time average hydrologic cycle variables for July in all three experiments agree reasonably well with observations. Except in the case of precipitable water, the zonal average climates of the annual cycle experiment and the two perpetual July experiments are alike, i.e., their differences are within limits of the natural variability of the model's climate. Statistics of various components of the GHC, i.e., water vapor, evaporation, and precipitation, are significantly affected by the presence of interactive soil moisture. A long-term trend is found in the principal empirical modes of variability of ground wetness, evaporation, and sensible heat. Dominant modes of variability of these quantities over land are physically consistent with one another and with land surface energy balance requirements. The dominant mode of precipitation variability is found to be closely related to organized convection over the tropical western Pacific Ocean. The precipitation variability has timescales in the range of 2 to 3 months and can be identified with the stationary component of the Madden-Julian Oscillation. The precipitation mode is not sensitive to the presence of interactive soil moisture but is closely linked to both the rotational and divergent components of atmospheric

  2. Using a Global Vegetation Model to Plan Local Natural Resource Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symstad, A.; King, D. A.; Bachelet, D. M.; Burkhart, B.; Roddy, D.; Schroeder, G.; Swanson, D.

    2012-12-01

    Like politics, all ecology is local. Vegetation structure, composition, and production are strongly affected by local soils, topography, climate, and management. Local effects can be particularly strong in vegetation transition zones, areas that are often especially sensitive to climate variability, and in national parks or reserves, where management often differs substantially from surrounding areas. Natural resource management planning for future climate conditions in the latter is complicated by government-mandated or publically expected management priorities, such as maintaining a viable population of individual species of interest or the character of a landscape. Wind Cave National Park (WCNP), a 13,000-ha natural area in the Black Hills of South Dakota, lies on a prairie-forest transition where grass production controls the population viability of important wildlife and fire strongly influences the extent and character of the forest within the park. Both of these processes are quite climate-sensitive and park managers have been looking for ways to prepare for the challenges of climate change. The dynamic global vegetation model MC1 incorporates ecosystem science (C, water and N cycling; wildfire; CO2 effects), climate (temperature, precipitation, humidity), and natural resource management practices (fire suppression, prescribed fire, grazing) to simulate vegetation dynamics, thereby providing a means for natural resource managers to anticipate the effects of climate change, their management actions, and the interactions of the two on critical resources at the park scale. We parameterized MC1 to approximate the historical balance between forest and grasslands at WCNP, then ran 100-year-long simulations into the future using three fire and grazing scenarios and statistically downscaled climate projections from three general circulation models (GCMs). Under all fire/climate scenario combinations some forest remains in the park, but with lower biomass due to

  3. IRON PRECIPITATION AND ARSENIC ATTENUATION - ASSESSMENT OF ARSENIC NATURAL ATTENUATION OF THE SUBSURFACE USING A GEOCHEMICAL MODEL (PHREEQC): ABSTRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-ADA-01310 Chen, J., Lin, Z, and Azadpour-Keeley**, A. "Iron Precipitation and Arsenic Attenuation - Assessment of Arsenic Natural Attenuation of the Subsurface Using a Geochemical Model (PHRE...

  4. The Changing Nature of Adult Education in the Age of Transnational Migration: Toward a Model of Recognitive Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Shibao

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines the changing nature of adult education in the age of transnational migration and proposes recognitive adult education as an inclusive model that acknowledges and affirms cultural difference and diversity as positive and desirable assets.

  5. Effects of structure on the interactions between five natural antimicrobial compounds and phospholipids of bacterial cell membrane on model monolayers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monolayers composed of bacterial phospholipids were used as model membranes to study interactions of naturally occurring phenolic compounds 2,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, 2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzaldehyde and the plant essential oil compounds carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and geraniol, previously found to be...

  6. Semi-Supervised Learning of Statistical Models for Natural Language Understanding

    PubMed Central

    He, Yulan

    2014-01-01

    Natural language understanding is to specify a computational model that maps sentences to their semantic mean representation. In this paper, we propose a novel framework to train the statistical models without using expensive fully annotated data. In particular, the input of our framework is a set of sentences labeled with abstract semantic annotations. These annotations encode the underlying embedded semantic structural relations without explicit word/semantic tag alignment. The proposed framework can automatically induce derivation rules that map sentences to their semantic meaning representations. The learning framework is applied on two statistical models, the conditional random fields (CRFs) and the hidden Markov support vector machines (HM-SVMs). Our experimental results on the DARPA communicator data show that both CRFs and HM-SVMs outperform the baseline approach, previously proposed hidden vector state (HVS) model which is also trained on abstract semantic annotations. In addition, the proposed framework shows superior performance than two other baseline approaches, a hybrid framework combining HVS and HM-SVMs and discriminative training of HVS, with a relative error reduction rate of about 25% and 15% being achieved in F-measure. PMID:25152899

  7. Nature of phase transitions in Axelrod-like coupled Potts models in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandica, Yerali; Chiacchiera, Silvia

    2016-03-01

    We study F coupled q -state Potts models in a two-dimensional square lattice. The interaction between the different layers is attractive to favor a simultaneous alignment in all of them, and its strength is fixed. The nature of the phase transition for zero field is numerically determined for F =2 ,3 . Using the Lee-Kosterlitz method, we find that it is continuous for F =2 and q =2 , whereas it is abrupt for higher values of q and/or F . When a continuous or a weakly first-order phase transition takes place, we also analyze the properties of the geometrical clusters. This allows us to determine the fractal dimension D of the incipient infinite cluster and to examine the finite-size scaling of the cluster number density via data collapse. A mean-field approximation of the model, from which some general trends can be determined, is presented too. Finally, since this lattice model has been recently considered as a thermodynamic counterpart of the Axelrod model of social dynamics, we discuss our results in connection with this one.

  8. From Multi-Porosity to Multiple-Scale Permeability Models of Natural Fractured Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Dreuzy, J. R.; Davy, P.; Meheust, Y.; Bour, O.

    2014-12-01

    Classical dual-porosity models and homogenization approaches fail to represent the permeability scaling, the high flow channeling and the broad variability observed in natural fractured media. More critically, most modeling frameworks cannot restitute simultaneously the permeability increase with scale and the persistence of channeling. In fact, channeling enhances the impact of bottlenecks, reduces permeability, and increases permeability variability with scale. It is the case of percolation theory but also of more advanced large-range correlated theories including power-law scaling of some of the fracture properties including their length or their mutual distances. More generally, we show with extensive numerical studies on 3D Discrete Fracture Networks (DFNs) that hydraulic behaviors come from a number of local and global fracture characteristics. The concept of effective properties like effective permeability itself appears quite weak and should be replaced by new modeling frameworks. We propose three alternative approaches combining the specificies of fracture flow and transport of DFNs and the simplicity of continuum approaches: 1- Discrete dual porosity media for high flow localization in a subset of the fracture network. 2- Structured Interacting Continua for highly organized diffusive processes in poorly connected fracture structures. 3- Multiple-scale permeability models for hierarchically structured fractured media with 3D concurrent fracture percolating networks. These different approaches can be combined and specified with a limited number of parameters. They are also efficient in representing the potentially large hydraulic impact of minor modification of the fracture network geometry and local connectivity.

  9. Numerical Modeling of the Nonlinear Evolution of Permeability in Naturally Fractured Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelletto, N.; Garipov, T.; Tchelepi, H.

    2014-12-01

    The hydromechanical coupling between fluid flow and geomechanical response plays a key role whenever significant volumes of fluid are injected into the subsurface. An emerging engineering application of this class of problem is represented by CO2 sequestration in deep geological formations. We present a modeling approach to tackle coupled fluid flow and geomechanics in naturally fractured reservoir. The system of partial differential equations is solved using a combination of finite-volume and finite-element discretization schemes, respectively, for the flow and mechanics problems. The model accounts for flow along fractures and can predict fracture reactivation by accurately simulating normal and shear stresses acting on the fracture surfaces. The focus is on the effects induced by changes in the stress field in fracture permeability. The fracture permeability evolution is described by a constitutive model that depends on the tangential displacement that develops between the two contact surfaces defining a fracture, and the effective normal traction, giving rise to a highly non-linear problem. The proposed model is verified against both simple single-fracture test cases and more complex fracture network configurations.

  10. Comparing Models of Nature of Science Dimensionality Based on the Next Generation Science Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, George M.; Seraphin, Kanesa Duncan; Philippoff, Joanna; Vallin, Lisa M.; Brandon, Paul R.

    2015-05-01

    Instruments measuring understanding of the nature of science (NOS) are required if educational institutions intend to use benchmarks or examine the effects of interventions targeting students' NOS development. Compared to other constructs, NOS understanding is complex, having been the subject of debate among scholars in both its substance and its dimensionality. This complexity invites challenges in defining what is to be measured. Drawing from the perspective that policy reform documents provide pragmatic consensus-based definitions of NOS, this study investigated how well the dimensionality described in the NOS component of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) framework matched the empirical structure of data collected from a set of secondary-school students' responses to an NOS instrument comprising multiple-choice and Likert-scale items. Using multidimensional item response modeling to compare structures of NOS dimensionality, we found that treating NOS as comprising multiple dimensions-as defined by the themes in the NGSS NOS framework-resulted in a better fitting model than when treating NOS as a single dimension. The multidimensional model also had fewer poorly functioning items and revealed NOS profiles that otherwise would have been masked in a model treating NOS as a single dimension. These results provide support for the NOS NGSS framework and contribute to the ongoing discussion about the dimensionality of NOS.

  11. Characterization of Ring Wave Spectra for Natural Rain: Measurements and Model for Remote Sensing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliven, L.; Sobieski, P.; Craeye, C.

    1998-01-01

    Ring waves generated by natural rains from 1 to 100 mm/hr were measured in a small tank located in a field. Time series were obtained: (a) from a wire capacitance probe that measured surface elevation, (b) from an optical gauge that measured rain rates R, (c) from an anemometer that measured wind speeds and (d) from a 13.5 GHz scatterometer (w polarization, and 30 degree incidence angle). Ring wave frequency spectra are computed from the surface elevation data for each minute of rain. All the spectra have a similar shape, with a maximum near 5 Hz, and with a more rapid decay towards higher frequencies than towards lower frequencies. A log-Gaussian spectral model provides a useful representation of these data and analysis of the model coefficients shows that the peak frequency and bandwidth are approximately constant, but the magnitude increases as R increases, Additionally, the normalized radar cross section from the scatterometer varies approximately linearly with the spectral line corresponding to the Bragg-wavelength, so together the log-Gaussian ring wave model and the Bragg scattering theory should be useful for a broad range of applications. These findings can be used to help interpret remote sensing data during rain events and to guide model development for radar scattering from rain roughened seas.

  12. Final Report: Natural State Models of The Geysers Geothermal System, Sonoma County, California

    SciTech Connect

    T. H. Brikowski; D. L. Norton; D. D. Blackwell

    2001-12-31

    Final project report of natural state modeling effort for The Geysers geothermal field, California. Initial models examined the liquid-dominated state of the system, based on geologic constraints and calibrated to match observed whole rock delta-O18 isotope alteration. These models demonstrated that the early system was of generally low permeability (around 10{sup -12} m{sup 2}), with good hydraulic connectivity at depth (along the intrusive contact) and an intact caprock. Later effort in the project was directed at development of a two-phase, supercritical flow simulation package (EOS1sc) to accompany the Tough2 flow simulator. Geysers models made using this package show that ''simmering'', or the transient migration of vapor bubbles through the hydrothermal system, is the dominant transition state as the system progresses to vapor-dominated. Such a system is highly variable in space and time, making the rock record more difficult to interpret, since pressure-temperature indicators likely reflect only local, short duration conditions.

  13. Modeling the evolution of natural cliffs subject to weathering: 1. Limit analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utili, S.; Crosta, G. B.

    2011-03-01

    Retrogressive landsliding evolution of natural slopes subjected to weathering has been modeled by assuming Mohr-Coulomb material behavior and by using an analytical method. The case of weathering-limited slope conditions, with complete erosion of the accumulated debris, has been modeled. The limit analysis upper-bound method is used to study slope instability induced by a homogeneous decrease of material strength in space and time. The only assumption required in the model concerns the degree of weathering within the slope, and for this we assumed and tested different weathering laws. By means of this method, the evolution of cliffs subject to strong weathering conditions (weathering-limited conditions) was predicted. The discrete succession of failures taking place was modeled taking into account the geometry assumed by slopes as a consequence of previous mass movements. The results have been compared with published data from long-term slope monitoring and show a good match between experimental observations and analytical predictions. The retrogressive evolution of the slope occurs with decreasing size of the unstable blocks, following a logarithmic volume-frequency relationship. A nonlinear relationship is found between mass flux and average slope gradient. A set of normalized solutions is presented both by nomograms and tables for different values of slope angle, cohesion, and internal friction angle.

  14. Object Detection in Natural Backgrounds Predicted by Discrimination Performance and Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, A. J., Jr.; Watson, A. B.; Rohaly, A. M.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    In object detection, an observer looks for an object class member in a set of backgrounds. In discrimination, an observer tries to distinguish two images. Discrimination models predict the probability that an observer detects a difference between two images. We compare object detection and image discrimination with the same stimuli by: (1) making stimulus pairs of the same background with and without the target object and (2) either giving many consecutive trials with the same background (discrimination) or intermixing the stimuli (object detection). Six images of a vehicle in a natural setting were altered to remove the vehicle and mixed with the original image in various proportions. Detection observers rated the images for vehicle presence. Discrimination observers rated the images for any difference from the background image. Estimated detectabilities of the vehicles were found by maximizing the likelihood of a Thurstone category scaling model. The pattern of estimated detectabilities is similar for discrimination and object detection, and is accurately predicted by a Cortex Transform discrimination model. Predictions of a Contrast- Sensitivity- Function filter model and a Root-Mean-Square difference metric based on the digital image values are less accurate. The discrimination detectabilities averaged about twice those of object detection.

  15. Development of a natural gas systems analysis model (GSAM). Annual report, January 1994--January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1994-07-01

    The objective of GSAM development is to create a comprehensive, non-proprietary, microcomputer model of the North American natural gas system. GSAM explicitly evaluates the key components of the system, including the resource base, exploration and development practices, extraction technology performance and costs, project economics, transportation costs and restrictions, storage, and end-use. The primary focus is the detailed characterization of the resource base at the reservoir and sub-reservoir level. This disaggregation allows direct evaluation of alternative extraction technologies based on discretely estimated, individual well productivity, required investments, and associated operating costs. GSAM`s design allows users to evaluate complex interactions of current and alternative future technology and policy initiatives as they directly impact the gas market. Key activities completed during the past year include: conducted a comparative analysis of commercial reservoir databases; licensed and screened NRG Associates Significant Oil and Gas Fields of the US reservoir database; developed and tested reduced form reservoir model production type curves; fully developed database structures for use in GSAM and linkage to other systems; developed a methodology for the exploration module; collected and updated upstream capital and operating cost parameters; completed initial integration of downstream/demand models; presented research results at METC Contractor Review Meeting; conducted other briefings for METC managers, including initiation of the GSAM Environmental Module; and delivered draft topical reports on technology review, model review, and GSAM methodology.

  16. Semi-supervised learning of statistical models for natural language understanding.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Deyu; He, Yulan

    2014-01-01

    Natural language understanding is to specify a computational model that maps sentences to their semantic mean representation. In this paper, we propose a novel framework to train the statistical models without using expensive fully annotated data. In particular, the input of our framework is a set of sentences labeled with abstract semantic annotations. These annotations encode the underlying embedded semantic structural relations without explicit word/semantic tag alignment. The proposed framework can automatically induce derivation rules that map sentences to their semantic meaning representations. The learning framework is applied on two statistical models, the conditional random fields (CRFs) and the hidden Markov support vector machines (HM-SVMs). Our experimental results on the DARPA communicator data show that both CRFs and HM-SVMs outperform the baseline approach, previously proposed hidden vector state (HVS) model which is also trained on abstract semantic annotations. In addition, the proposed framework shows superior performance than two other baseline approaches, a hybrid framework combining HVS and HM-SVMs and discriminative training of HVS, with a relative error reduction rate of about 25% and 15% being achieved in F-measure. PMID:25152899

  17. Analysis of Water Conflicts across Natural and Societal Boundaries: Integration of Quantitative Modeling and Qualitative Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Balaram, P.; Islam, S.

    2009-12-01

    Water issues and problems have bewildered humankind for a long time yet a systematic approach for understanding such issues remain elusive. This is partly because many water-related problems are framed from a contested terrain in which many actors (individuals, communities, businesses, NGOs, states, and countries) compete to protect their own and often conflicting interests. We argue that origin of many water problems may be understood as a dynamic consequence of competition, interconnections, and feedback among variables in the Natural and Societal Systems (NSSs). Within the natural system, we recognize that triple constraints on water- water quantity (Q), water quality (P), and ecosystem (E)- and their interdependencies and feedback may lead to conflicts. Such inherent and multifaceted constraints of the natural water system are exacerbated often at the societal boundaries. Within the societal system, interdependencies and feedback among values and norms (V), economy (C), and governance (G) interact in various ways to create intractable contextual differences. The observation that natural and societal systems are linked is not novel. Our argument here, however, is that rigid disciplinary boundaries between these two domains will not produce solutions to the water problems we are facing today. The knowledge needed to address water problems need to go beyond scientific assessment in which societal variables (C, G, and V) are treated as exogenous or largely ignored, and policy research that does not consider the impact of natural variables (E, P, and Q) and that coupling among them. Consequently, traditional quantitative methods alone are not appropriate to address the dynamics of water conflicts, because we cannot quantify the societal variables and the exact mathematical relationships among the variables are not fully known. On the other hand, conventional qualitative study in societal domain has mainly been in the form of individual case studies and therefore

  18. Modelling natural grass production and its spatio-temporal variations in a semiarid Mediterranean watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, Susanne; Lozano-Parra, Javier; Maneta-López, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Natural grasses are found in semiarid rangelands with disperse tree cover of part of the Iberian Peninsula and constitute a resource with high ecologic and economic value worth, being an important source of food for livestock, playing a significant role in the hydrologic cycle, controlling the soil thermal regime, and are a key factor in reducing soil erosion and degradation. However, increasing pressure on the resources, changes in land use as well as possible climate variations threaten the sustainability of natural grasses. Despite of their importance, the spatio-temporal variations of pasture production over whole watersheds are poorly known. In this sense, previous studies by other authors have indicated its dependence on a balance of positive and negative effects brought about by the main limiting factors: water, light, nutrients and space. Nevertheless, the specific weight of each factor is not clear because they are highly variable due to climate characteristics and the structure of these agroforestry systems. We have used a physical spatially-distributed ecohydrologic model to investigate the specific weight of factors that contribute to pasture production in a semiarid watershed of 99.5 ha in western Spain. This model couples a two layer (canopy and understory) vertical local closure energy balance scheme, a hydrologic model and a carbon uptake and vegetation growth component, and it was run using a synthetic daily climate dataset generated by a stochastic weather generator, which reproduced the range of climatic variations observed under mediterranean current climate. The modelling results reproduced satisfactorily the seasonality effects of climate as precipitation and temperatures, as well as annual and inter-annual variations of pasture production. Spatial variations of pasture production were largely controlled by topographic and tree effects, showing medium-low values depending of considered areas. These low values require introduction of feed to

  19. Model Constrained by Visual Hierarchy Improves Prediction of Neural Responses to Natural Scenes

    PubMed Central

    Antolík, Ján; Hofer, Sonja B.; Bednar, James A.; Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of neuronal receptive fields is essential for understanding sensory processing in the early visual system. Yet a full characterization of receptive fields is still incomplete, especially with regard to natural visual stimuli and in complete populations of cortical neurons. While previous work has incorporated known structural properties of the early visual system, such as lateral connectivity, or imposing simple-cell-like receptive field structure, no study has exploited the fact that nearby V1 neurons share common feed-forward input from thalamus and other upstream cortical neurons. We introduce a new method for estimating receptive fields simultaneously for a population of V1 neurons, using a model-based analysis incorporating knowledge of the feed-forward visual hierarchy. We assume that a population of V1 neurons shares a common pool of thalamic inputs, and consists of two layers of simple and complex-like V1 neurons. When fit to recordings of a local population of mouse layer 2/3 V1 neurons, our model offers an accurate description of their response to natural images and significant improvement of prediction power over the current state-of-the-art methods. We show that the responses of a large local population of V1 neurons with locally diverse receptive fields can be described with surprisingly limited number of thalamic inputs, consistent with recent experimental findings. Our structural model not only offers an improved functional characterization of V1 neurons, but also provides a framework for studying the relationship between connectivity and function in visual cortical areas. PMID:27348548

  20. Reactive transport modeling of the clogging process at Maqarin natural analogue site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Haibing; Kosakowski, Georg; Berner, Urs; Kulik, Dmitrii A.; Mäder, Urs; Kolditz, Olaf

    The Maqarin site in Jordan has been investigated for three decades as a natural analogue for the long term changes of materials in contact with hyper-alkaline solutions. Similar processes are expected in radioactive waste disposal sites, where cement based materials are in contact with natural rocks or other e.g. clay based materials. In this context, a numerical reactive transport model was used to study local geochemical alterations and induced porosity changes for the Maqarin marl rock in contact with the hyper-alkaline solution. The geochemical setup for the rock mineralogy and the pore water was calibrated to match measurements from the Maqarin site. The setup includes several clay and zeolite minerals, considers cation exchange processes, and a state-of-the-art model for cement phases. Similar to earlier calculations by Steefel and Lichtner (1998) who used a much simpler geochemical model, the pore clogging occurred after several hundred years at a distance of 5-10 mm from the contact to the hyper-alkaline solution. In our calculations, this was caused by a massive precipitation of ettringite and C-S-H minerals. We performed a sensitivity study by varying the intrinsic diffusion coefficient, the Archie's law exponential factor, and the mineral surface area available for dissolution and precipitation. We found that the dissolution of clay minerals controls the availability of Al, which is needed for ettringite and C-S-H phase precipitation. Thus, the amount and kinetically controlled dissolution of clay minerals controls the spatial and temporal evolution of porosity changes. The simulations reveal that neither cation exchange processes nor the formation of zeolite minerals strongly influence the geochemical evolution of the system.

  1. Instrumental record of debris flow initiation during natural rainfall: Implications for modeling slope stability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, D.R.; Schmidt, K.M.; Dietrich, W.E.; McKean, J.

    2009-01-01

    The middle of a hillslope hollow in the Oregon Coast Range failed and mobilized as a debris flow during heavy rainfall in November 1996. Automated pressure transducers recorded high spatial variability of pore water pressure within the area that mobilized as a debris flow, which initiated where local upward flow from bedrock developed into overlying colluvium. Postfailure observations of the bedrock surface exposed in the debris flow scar reveal a strong spatial correspondence between elevated piezometric response and water discharging from bedrock fractures. Measurements of apparent root cohesion on the basal (Cb) and lateral (Cl) scarp demonstrate substantial local variability, with areally weighted values of Cb = 0.1 and Cl = 4.6 kPa. Using measured soil properties and basal root strength, the widely used infinite slope model, employed assuming slope parallel groundwater flow, provides a poor prediction of hydrologie conditions at failure. In contrast, a model including lateral root strength (but neglecting lateral frictional strength) gave a predicted critical value of relative soil saturation that fell within the range defined by the arithmetic and geometric mean values at the time of failure. The 3-D slope stability model CLARA-W, used with locally observed pore water pressure, predicted small areas with lower factors of safety within the overall slide mass at sites consistent with field observations of where the failure initiated. This highly variable and localized nature of small areas of high pore pressure that can trigger slope failure means, however, that substantial uncertainty appears inevitable for estimating hydrologie conditions within incipient debris flows under natural conditions. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Model Constrained by Visual Hierarchy Improves Prediction of Neural Responses to Natural Scenes.

    PubMed

    Antolík, Ján; Hofer, Sonja B; Bednar, James A; Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas D

    2016-06-01

    Accurate estimation of neuronal receptive fields is essential for understanding sensory processing in the early visual system. Yet a full characterization of receptive fields is still incomplete, especially with regard to natural visual stimuli and in complete populations of cortical neurons. While previous work has incorporated known structural properties of the early visual system, such as lateral connectivity, or imposing simple-cell-like receptive field structure, no study has exploited the fact that nearby V1 neurons share common feed-forward input from thalamus and other upstream cortical neurons. We introduce a new method for estimating receptive fields simultaneously for a population of V1 neurons, using a model-based analysis incorporating knowledge of the feed-forward visual hierarchy. We assume that a population of V1 neurons shares a common pool of thalamic inputs, and consists of two layers of simple and complex-like V1 neurons. When fit to recordings of a local population of mouse layer 2/3 V1 neurons, our model offers an accurate description of their response to natural images and significant improvement of prediction power over the current state-of-the-art methods. We show that the responses of a large local population of V1 neurons with locally diverse receptive fields can be described with surprisingly limited number of thalamic inputs, consistent with recent experimental findings. Our structural model not only offers an improved functional characterization of V1 neurons, but also provides a framework for studying the relationship between connectivity and function in visual cortical areas. PMID:27348548

  3. Modeling the Natural Biogeochemical Cycle of Mercury in the Global Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Jaegle, L.; Thompson, L.; Emerson, S. R.; Deutsch, C. A.; Trossman, D. S.; Shao, A.

    2012-12-01

    The ocean plays an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of mercury (Hg) because of its large reservoir mass and re-emission flux via evasion. The currently available Hg models, including 2D slab, 1D column and 0D box model cannot fully resolve the marine Hg cycle because of the lack of the proper spatial resolution. In this work, we have implemented Hg biogeochemistry in a state-of-the-art 3D offline ocean tracer model (OFFTRAC). OFFTRAC simulates the evolution of three Hg species (Hg0aq, HgIIaq and HgPaq), which are diffused and advected in the ocean. Hg0aq and HgII aq are interconverted in the surface ocean via parameterized photochemical and biological redox processes. The partitioning between HgIIaq and HgPaq depends on the local levels of particulate organic carbon (POC). The sinking of HgPaq is parameterized by coupling with the nutrient phosphorous cycle simulated in OFFTRAC. The reduction of HgIIaq to Hg0aq in the anaerobic subsurface water is proportional to the remineralizaiton of POC. OFFTRAC is coupled to a global simulation of the natural atmospheric Hg cycle in the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. The GEOS-Chem simulation includes a geogenic source and provides the atmospheric deposition flux of HgII to the ocean and atmospheric Hg0 concentrations. The riverine input of Hg is calculated based on the climatological monthly mean fresh water discharge from continental to ocean and the average soil concentrations near the river mouth. The results show that the riverine input enhances Hg concentrations at surface by a factor of 2-3 near large river mouths and nearby coastal regions. The riverine input approximately doubles surface Hg concentration over the Arctic because of the small basin volume. In the deep ocean, which is not influenced by anthropogenic emissions, the model results (1.1±0.3 pM) generally agree with the observed present-day total Hg concentration profiles (1.4±0.9 pM). In the surface ocean, observations show average total Hg

  4. Modeling study of natural emissions, source apportionment, and emission control of atmospheric mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Suraj K.

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic pollutant and is important to understand its cycling in the environment. In this dissertation, a number of modeling investigations were conducted to better understand the emission from natural surfaces, the source-receptor relationship of the emissions, and emission reduction of atmospheric mercury. The first part of this work estimates mercury emissions from vegetation, soil and water surfaces using a number of natural emission processors and detailed (LAI) Leaf Area Index data from GIS (Geographic Information System) satellite products. East Asian domain was chosen as it contributes nearly 50% of the global anthropogenic mercury emissions into the atmosphere. The estimated annual natural mercury emissions (gaseous elemental mercury) in the domain are 834 Mg yr-1 with 462 Mg yr-1 contributing from China. Compared to anthropogenic sources, natural sources show greater seasonal variability (highest in simmer). The emissions are significant, sometimes dominant, contributors to total mercury emission in the regions. The estimates provide possible explanation for the gaps between the anthropogenic emission estimates based on activity data and the emission inferred from field observations in the regions. To understand the contribution of domestic emissions to mercury deposition in the United States, the second part of the work applies the mercury model of Community Multi-scale Air Quality Modeling system (CMAQ-Hg v4.6) to apportion the various emission sources attributing to the mercury wet and dry deposition in the 6 United States receptor regions. Contributions to mercury deposition from electric generating units (EGU), iron and steel industry (IRST), industrial point sources excluding EGU and IRST (OIPM), the remaining anthropogenic sources (RA), natural processes (NAT), and out-of-boundary transport (BC) in domain was estimated. The model results for 2005 compared reasonably well to field observations made by MDN (Mercury Deposition Network

  5. System Dynamics Model to develop resilience management strategies for lifelines exposed to natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Alessandro; Pluchinotta, Irene; Giordano, Raffaele; Vurro, Michele

    2016-04-01

    . Moving in such direction, System Dynamics Modeling (SDM) is a suitable operative approach. The SDM allows taking into account all resilience dimensions in an integrated and dynamic way. Furthermore, it allows to combine predictive and learning functionality through feedback mechanisms, and to foster active involvement of stakeholders in the modelling process. The present paper show some results of ongoing research activities. The main aim of the work is to describe using SDM, the relationships and interdependencies between drinking water supply infrastructures and societies in building the resilience of urban communities in case of natural disasters. Reflections are carried out on the comparison between two major earthquakes in Italy: L'Aquila in 2009 and Emilia Romagna in 2012. The model aims at defining a quantitative tool to assess the evolution of resilience of drinking water supply system. Specifically, it has been used to evaluate the impact of actions and strategies for resilience improvement on the dynamic evolution of the system, thus suggesting the most suitable ones.

  6. Learning Natural Selection in 4th Grade with Multi-Agent-Based Computational Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickes, Amanda Catherine; Sengupta, Pratim

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate how elementary school students develop multi-level explanations of population dynamics in a simple predator-prey ecosystem, through scaffolded interactions with a multi-agent-based computational model (MABM). The term "agent" in an MABM indicates individual computational objects or actors (e.g., cars), and these agents obey simple rules assigned or manipulated by the user (e.g., speeding up, slowing down, etc.). It is the interactions between these agents, based on the rules assigned by the user, that give rise to emergent, aggregate-level behavior (e.g., formation and movement of the traffic jam). Natural selection is such an emergent phenomenon, which has been shown to be challenging for novices (K16 students) to understand. Whereas prior research on learning evolutionary phenomena with MABMs has typically focused on high school students and beyond, we investigate how elementary students (4th graders) develop multi-level explanations of some introductory aspects of natural selection—species differentiation and population change—through scaffolded interactions with an MABM that simulates predator-prey dynamics in a simple birds-butterflies ecosystem. We conducted a semi-clinical interview based study with ten participants, in which we focused on the following: a) identifying the nature of learners' initial interpretations of salient events or elements of the represented phenomena, b) identifying the roles these interpretations play in the development of their multi-level explanations, and c) how attending to different levels of the relevant phenomena can make explicit different mechanisms to the learners. In addition, our analysis also shows that although there were differences between high- and low-performing students (in terms of being able to explain population-level behaviors) in the pre-test, these differences disappeared in the post-test.

  7. Modeling the temperature dependence of N-methylpyrrolidone permeation through butyl- and natural-rubber gloves.

    PubMed

    Zellers, E T; Sulewski, R

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes the temperature dependence of N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) permeation through gloves used in microelectronics fabrication facilities. One type of butyl-rubber glove (North B161), two types of natural-rubber gloves (Edmont Puretek and Ansell Pacific White), and a natural rubber/nitrile/neoprene-blend glove (Pioneer Trionic) were tested at four temperatures from 25-50 degrees C using the ASTM F739-85 permeation test method. The butyl-rubber glove showed no breakthrough after four hours of exposure at any temperature. The variations with temperature of measured breakthrough times (BT) and steady-state permeation rates (SSPR) for the other gloves were described well by Arrhenius relationships, with BT values decreasing by factors of 7-10 and SSPR values increasing by factors of 4-6 over the temperature range studied. Extrapolation to 70 and 93 degrees C, the temperatures at which degreasing is often performed, yielded BT values of < 2 min and < 0.5 min, respectively, in all cases. With the exception of the butyl-rubber glove, following an initial exposure at 25 degrees C and air drying overnight, low levels of NMP vapor were detected off-gassing from the inner surfaces of the gloves. Experimental results were then compared to those expected from several permeation models. Estimates of the equilibrium solvent solubility, S, were calculated using a model based on three-dimensional solubility parameters. Estimates of the solvent diffusion coefficient, D, were obtained from correlations with either the solvent kinematic viscosity or the product of the Flory interaction parameter, chi, and the solvent molar volume. Combining these values of D and S in Fickian diffusion equations gave modeled BT estimates that were within 23% of experimental values over the temperature range examined. Modeled SSPR values were within 50% (typically within 25%) of experimental values. Another model based on a generalized Arrhenius relationship also provided useful but

  8. From Sequential Extraction to Transport Modeling: Monitored Natural Attenuation as a Remediation Approach for Inorganic Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Crapse, Kimberly P.; Serkiz, Steven M.; Pishko, Adrian L.; Kaplan, Daniel L.; Lee, Cindy M.; Schank, Anja

    2005-08-18

    To quantify metal natural attenuation processes in terms of environmental availability, sequential extraction experiments were carried out on subsurface soil samples impacted by a low pH, high sulfate, metals (Be, Ni, U, As) plume associated with the long-term operation of a coal plant at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Despite significant heterogeneity resulting both from natural and anthropogenic factors, sequential extraction results demonstrate that pH is a controlling factor in the prediction of the distribution of metal contaminants within the solid phases in soils at the site as well as the contaminant partitioning between the soil and the soil solution. Results for beryllium, the most mobile metal evaluated, exhibit increasing attenuation along the plume flow path which corresponds to an increasing plume pH. These laboratory- and field-scale studies provide mechanistic information regarding partitioning of metals to soils at the site (one of the major attenuation mechanisms for the metals at the field site). Subsequently, these data have been used in the definition of the contaminant source terms and contaminant transport factors in risk modeling for the site.

  9. Colloid release and transport processes in natural and model porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S.B.; Dzombak, D.A.

    1995-12-01

    Colloidal particles present in porous media may be released and transported over significant distances when contacted with water at low ionic strength. An understanding of this process is of environmental interest because suspended colloidal particles in groundwater may enhance the subsurface transport of contaminants that are sorbed on their surfaces. This research focused on the processes of colloid release and transport in natural porous media of interest in contaminant transport, i.e., high permeability materials with low fines contents. Our objective in this study was to examine the mechanisms of colloid release and transport in a natural sand, and two model systems: latex particles attached on glass beads, and kaolinite particles attached on glass beads. For the appropriate electrolyte conditions, the release of attached colloids from all three porous media was found to be substantial. The total amount of colloids released depended upon the electrolyte composition and concentration. Column effluent data could be described with an advective-dispersive transport equation for colloidal particles with first-order terms for colloid release and deposition rates, by changing the mass of colloids available for release at each electrolyte concentrations.

  10. Evolution of natural gas composition: Predictive multi-phase reaction-transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ortoleva, P.J.; Chang, K.A.; Maxwell, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    A computational modeling approach is used to investigate reaction and transport processes affecting natural gas composition over geological time. Three basic stages are integrated -- gas generation from organic solids or liquids, interactions during source rock expulsion to the reservoir and reactions within the reservoir. Multi-phase dynamics is handled by solving the fully coupled problem of phase-to-phase transfer, intra-phase organic and inorganic reactions and redox and other reactions between fluid phase molecules and minerals. Effects of capillarity and relative permeability are accounted for. Correlations will be determined between gas composition, temperature history, the mineralogy of rocks with which the gas was in contact and the composition of source organic phases. Questions of H{sub 2}S scavenging by oxidizing minerals and the production or removal of CO{sub 2} are focused upon. Our three spatial dimensional, reaction-transport simulation approach has great promise for testing general concepts and as a practical tool for the exploration and production of natural gas.

  11. A Focus on Natural Variation for Abiotic Constraints Response in the Model Species Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Valérie; Kiani, Seifollah Poormohammad; Durand-Tardif, Mylène

    2009-01-01

    Plants are particularly subject to environmental stress, as they cannot move from unfavourable surroundings. As a consequence they have to react in situ. In any case, plants have to sense the stress, then the signal has to be transduced to engage the appropriate response. Stress response is effected by regulating genes, by turning on molecular mechanisms to protect the whole organism and its components and/or to repair damage. Reactions vary depending on the type of stress and its intensity, but some are commonly turned on because some responses to different abiotic stresses are shared. In addition, there are multiple ways for plants to respond to environmental stress, depending on the species and life strategy, but also multiple ways within a species depending on plant variety or ecotype. It is regularly accepted that populations of a single species originating from diverse geographic origins and/or that have been subjected to different selective pressure, have evolved retaining the best alleles for completing their life cycle. Therefore, the study of natural variation in response to abiotic stress, can help unravel key genes and alleles for plants to cope with their unfavourable physical and chemical surroundings. This review is focusing on Arabidopsis thaliana which has been largely adopted by the global scientific community as a model organism. Also, tools and data that facilitate investigation of natural variation and abiotic stress encountered in the wild are set out. Characterization of accessions, QTLs detection and cloning of alleles responsible for variation are presented. PMID:20111677

  12. Directed natural product biosynthesis gene cluster capture and expression in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxin; Li, Zhongrui; Yamanaka, Kazuya; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Weipeng; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto; Moore, Bradley S.; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-03-01

    Bacilli are ubiquitous low G+C environmental Gram-positive bacteria that produce a wide assortment of specialized small molecules. Although their natural product biosynthetic potential is high, robust molecular tools to support the heterologous expression of large biosynthetic gene clusters in Bacillus hosts are rare. Herein we adapt transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in yeast to design a single genomic capture and expression vector for antibiotic production in Bacillus subtilis. After validating this direct cloning ``plug-and-play'' approach with surfactin, we genetically interrogated amicoumacin biosynthetic gene cluster from the marine isolate Bacillus subtilis 1779. Its heterologous expression allowed us to explore an unusual maturation process involving the N-acyl-asparagine pro-drug intermediates preamicoumacins, which are hydrolyzed by the asparagine-specific peptidase into the active component amicoumacin A. This work represents the first direct cloning based heterologous expression of natural products in the model organism B. subtilis and paves the way to the development of future genome mining efforts in this genus.

  13. Directed natural product biosynthesis gene cluster capture and expression in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongxin; Li, Zhongrui; Yamanaka, Kazuya; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Weipeng; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto; Moore, Bradley S.; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Bacilli are ubiquitous low G+C environmental Gram-positive bacteria that produce a wide assortment of specialized small molecules. Although their natural product biosynthetic potential is high, robust molecular tools to support the heterologous expression of large biosynthetic gene clusters in Bacillus hosts are rare. Herein we adapt transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in yeast to design a single genomic capture and expression vector for antibiotic production in Bacillus subtilis. After validating this direct cloning “plug-and-play” approach with surfactin, we genetically interrogated amicoumacin biosynthetic gene cluster from the marine isolate Bacillus subtilis 1779. Its heterologous expression allowed us to explore an unusual maturation process involving the N-acyl-asparagine pro-drug intermediates preamicoumacins, which are hydrolyzed by the asparagine-specific peptidase into the active component amicoumacin A. This work represents the first direct cloning based heterologous expression of natural products in the model organism B. subtilis and paves the way to the development of future genome mining efforts in this genus. PMID:25807046

  14. Heat Transfer Measurements on Surfaces with Natural Ice Castings and Modeled Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breuer, Kenneth S.; Torres, Benjamin E.; Orr, D. J.; Hansman, R. John

    1997-01-01

    An experimental method is described to measure and compare the convective heat transfer coefficient of natural and simulated ice accretion roughness and to provide a rational means for determining accretion-related enhanced heat transfer coefficients. The natural ice accretion roughness was a sample casting made from accretions at the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). One of these castings was modeled using a Spectral Estimation Technique (SET) to produce three roughness elements patterns that simulate the actual accretion. All four samples were tested in a flat-plate boundary layer at angle of attack in a "dry" wind tunnel test. The convective heat transfer coefficient was measured using infrared thermography. It is shown that, dispite some problems in the current data set, the method does show considerable promise in determining roughness-induced heat transfer coefficients, and that, in addition to the roughness height and spacing in the flow direction, the concentration and spacing of elements in the spanwise direction are important parameters.

  15. Directed natural product biosynthesis gene cluster capture and expression in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongxin; Li, Zhongrui; Yamanaka, Kazuya; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Weipeng; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto; Moore, Bradley S; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Bacilli are ubiquitous low G+C environmental Gram-positive bacteria that produce a wide assortment of specialized small molecules. Although their natural product biosynthetic potential is high, robust molecular tools to support the heterologous expression of large biosynthetic gene clusters in Bacillus hosts are rare. Herein we adapt transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in yeast to design a single genomic capture and expression vector for antibiotic production in Bacillus subtilis. After validating this direct cloning "plug-and-play" approach with surfactin, we genetically interrogated amicoumacin biosynthetic gene cluster from the marine isolate Bacillus subtilis 1779. Its heterologous expression allowed us to explore an unusual maturation process involving the N-acyl-asparagine pro-drug intermediates preamicoumacins, which are hydrolyzed by the asparagine-specific peptidase into the active component amicoumacin A. This work represents the first direct cloning based heterologous expression of natural products in the model organism B. subtilis and paves the way to the development of future genome mining efforts in this genus. PMID:25807046

  16. Studying human respiratory disease in animals--role of induced and naturally occurring models.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kurt; Roman, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory disorders like asthma, emphysema, and pulmonary fibrosis affect millions of Americans and many more worldwide. Despite advancements in medical research that have led to improved understanding of the pathophysiology of these conditions and sometimes to new therapeutic interventions, these disorders are for the most part chronic and progressive; current interventions are not curative and do not halt disease progression. A major obstacle to further advancements relates to the absence of animal models that exactly resemble the human condition, which delays the elucidation of relevant mechanisms of action, the unveiling of biomarkers of disease progression, and identification of new targets for intervention in patients. There are currently many induced animal models of human respiratory disease available for study, and even though they mimic features of human disease, discoveries in these models have not always translated into safe and effective treatments in humans. A major obstacle relates to the genetic, anatomical, and functional variations amongst species, which represents the major challenge to overcome when searching for appropriate models of respiratory disease. Nevertheless, rodents, in particular mice, have become the most common species used for experimentation, due to their relatively low cost, size, and adequate understanding of murine genetics, among other advantages. Less well known is the fact that domestic animals also suffer from respiratory illnesses similar to those found in humans. Asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia, and pulmonary fibrosis are among the many disorders occurring naturally in dogs, cats, and horses, among other species. These models might better resemble the human condition and are emphasized here, but further investigations are needed to determine their relevance. PMID:26467890

  17. Modeling Potential Distribution and Carbon Dynamics of Natural Terrestrial Ecosystems: A Case Study of Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Evrendilek, Fatih; Berberoglu, Suha; Gulbeyaz, Onder; Ertekin, Can

    2007-01-01

    We derived a simple model that relates the classification of biogeoclimate zones, (co)existence and fractional coverage of plant functional types (PFTs), and patterns of ecosystem carbon (C) stocks to long-term average values of biogeoclimatic indices in a time- and space-varying fashion from climate–vegetation equilibrium models. Proposed Dynamic Ecosystem Classification and Productivity (DECP) model is based on the spatial interpolation of annual biogeoclimatic variables through multiple linear regression (MLR) models and inverse distance weighting (IDW) and was applied to the entire Turkey of 780,595 km2 on a 500 m × 500 m grid resolution. Estimated total net primary production (TNPP) values of mutually exclusive PFTs ranged from 108 ± 26 to 891 ± 207 Tg C yr-1 under the optimal conditions and from 16 ± 7 to 58 ± 23 Tg C yr-1 under the growth-limiting conditions for all the natural ecosystems in Turkey. Total NPP values of coexisting PFTs ranged from 178 ± 36 to 1231 ± 253 Tg C yr-1 under the optimal conditions and from 23 ± 8 to 92 ± 31 Tg C yr-1 under the growth-limiting conditions. The national steady state soil organic carbon (SOC) storage in the surface one meter of soil was estimated to range from 7.5 ± 1.8 to 36.7 ± 7.8 Pg C yr-1 under the optimal conditions and from 1.3 ± 0.7 to 5.8 ± 2.6 Pg C yr-1 under the limiting conditions, with the national range of 1.3 to 36.7 Pg C elucidating 0.1% and 2.8% of the global SOC value (1272.4 Pg C), respectively. Our comparisons with literature compilations indicate that estimated patterns of biogeoclimate zones, PFTs, TNPP and SOC storage by the DECP model agree reasonably well with measurements from field and remotely sensed data.

  18. Non-stationary rainfall and natural flows modeling at the watershed scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egüen, M.; Aguilar, C.; Solari, S.; Losada, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    In areas in which natural water resources are variable over time, tools that determine the probability distribution of hydrological variables are required to evaluate various management alternatives. In this article, a stochastic simulation framework of hydrological variables through atmospheric pressure modeling is proposed. This methodology employs the mean value of the atmospheric pressure in the winter to differentiate the wet, medium and dry years in terms of rainfall and flow at different temporal scales. Monthly mean and daily maximum rainfall and flow data series are stochastically replicated. To achieve this replication, a non-stationary parametric mixture distribution model that combines a Weibull and a Normal distribution is fitted to the univariate distribution of the atmospheric pressure. This model includes interannual variability through two covariables: extraterrestrial solar radiation and the NAO index. This model is applied to the Guadalete River Basin in southern Spain, in which the river flow regime is influenced by the highly seasonal precipitation regime typically found in the Mediterranean area. The non-stationary parametric mixture distribution model with the two covariables showed a good fit to the observed sea level pressure, displaying an important reduction on the BIC. A good correlation was obtained between the average sea level pressure in winter and the accumulated precipitation and flow (r = -0.8 for monthly values and -0.6 for maximum daily values). The statistical similarity indicated that the synthetic series of precipitation and flow preserved the distribution trends in the observed data. The identical methodology can be applied in other watersheds once the direct relationship between the mean atmospheric pressure and the hydrology of the area is known.

  19. A Globally Consistent Methodology for an Exposure Model for Natural Catastrophe Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunasekera, Rashmin; Ishizawa, Oscar; Pandey, Bishwa; Saito, Keiko

    2013-04-01

    There is a high demand for the development of a globally consistent and robust exposure data model employing a top down approach, to be used in national level catastrophic risk profiling for the public sector liability. To this effect, there are currently several initiatives such as UN-ISDR Global Assessment Report (GAR) and Global Exposure Database for Global Earthquake Model (GED4GEM). However, the consistency and granularity differs from region to region, a problem that is overcome in this proposed approach using national datasets for example in Latin America and the Caribbean Region (LCR). The methodology proposed in this paper aim to produce a global open exposure dataset based upon population, country specific building type distribution and other global/economic indicators such as World Bank indices that are suitable for natural catastrophe risk modelling purposes. The output would be a GIS raster grid at approximately 1 km spatial resolution which would highlight urbaness (building typology distribution, occupancy and use) for each cell at sub national level and compatible with other global initiatives and datasets. It would make use of datasets on population, census, demographic, building data and land use/land cover which are largely available in the public domain. The resultant exposure dataset could be used in conjunction with hazard and vulnerability components to create views of risk for multiple hazards that include earthquake, flood and windstorms. The model we hope would also assist in steps towards future initiatives for open, interchangeable and compatible databases for catastrophe risk modelling. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this paper are entirely those of the authors. They do not necessarily represent the views of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/World Bank and its affiliated organizations, or those of the Executive Directors of the World Bank or the governments they represent.

  20. Modelling human decision-making in coupled human and natural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feola, G.

    2012-12-01

    A solid understanding of human decision-making is essential to analyze the complexity of coupled human and natural systems (CHANS) and inform policies to promote resilience in the face of environmental change. Human decisions drive and/or mediate the interactions and feedbacks, and contribute to the heterogeneity and non-linearity that characterize CHANS. However, human decision-making is usually over-simplistically modeled, whereby human agents are represented deterministically either as dumb or clairvoyant decision-makers. Decision-making models fall short in the integration of both environmental and human behavioral drivers, and concerning the latter, tend to focus on only one category, e.g. economic, cultural, or psychological. Furthermore, these models render a linear decision-making process and therefore fail to account for the recursive co-evolutionary dynamics in CHANS. As a result, these models constitute only a weak basis for policy-making. There is therefore scope and an urgent need for better approaches to human decision-making, to produce the knowledge that can inform vulnerability reduction policies in the face of environmental change. This presentation synthesizes the current state-of-the-art of modelling human decision-making in CHANS, with particular reference to agricultural systems, and delineates how the above mentioned shortcomings can be overcome. Through examples from research on pesticide use and adaptation to climate change, both based on the integrative agent-centered framework (Feola and Binder, 2010), the approach for an improved understanding of human agents in CHANS are illustrated. This entails: integrative approach, focus on behavioral dynamics more than states, feedbacks between individual and system levels, and openness to heterogeneity.

  1. A molecular informed poroelastic model for organic-rich, naturally occurring porous geocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfared, Siavash; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2016-03-01

    Molecular simulation results on organic maturity (mature and immature kerogen as the two asymptotic cases) are introduced into a continuum micromechanics based model for organic-rich shales. Through a fundamental functional relationship that constrains microporous kerogen density and elasticity variable spaces and within the framework of effective media theory; the model bridges the gap between asymptotic cases of organic maturity with texture as the overriding theme, specifically a matrix/inclusion (Mori-Tanaka) texture for immature systems and a granular (self-consistent) texture for mature ones. The utility of the molecular results merged into a continuum framework is demonstrated by estimating kerogen's microporosity (< 2 nm) from nanoindentation measurements. The effect of burial and diagenetic processes on the effective poroelasticity of these porous, naturally occurring geocomposites are captured by introduction of imperfect interfaces. Finally, the performance of the model is fully characterized by ranking the normalized contribution of uncertainty of input to the overall behavior and parameters of interest to geophysicists and geomechanicians such as degree of anisotropy and in situ stresses.

  2. Measurement and modeling of CO₂ solubility in natural and synthetic formation brines for CO₂ sequestration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haining; Dilmore, Robert; Allen, Douglas E; Hedges, Sheila W; Soong, Yee; Lvov, Serguei N

    2015-02-01

    CO2 solubility data in the natural formation brine, synthetic formation brine, and synthetic NaCl+CaCl2 brine were collected at the pressures from 100 to 200 bar, temperatures from 323 to 423 K. Experimental results demonstrate that the CO2 solubility in the synthetic formation brines can be reliably represented by that in the synthetic NaCl+CaCl2 brines. We extended our previously developed model (PSUCO2) to calculate CO2 solubility in aqueous mixed-salt solution by using the additivity rule of the Setschenow coefficients of the individual ions (Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), K(+), Cl(-), and SO4(2-)). Comparisons with previously published models against the experimental data reveal a clear improvement of the proposed PSUCO2 model. Additionally, the path of the maximum gradient of the CO2 solubility contours divides the P-T diagram into two distinct regions: in Region I, the CO2 solubility in the aqueous phase decreases monotonically in response to increased temperature; in region II, the behavior of the CO2 solubility is the opposite of that in Region I as the temperature increases. PMID:25558883

  3. Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted from Natural Gas Cooking Burners

    SciTech Connect

    Lobscheid, Agnes; Singer, Brett C.; Klepeis, Neil E.

    2011-06-01

    We developed a physics-based data-supported model to investigate indoor pollutant exposure distributions resulting from use of natural gas cooking appliances across households in California. The model was applied to calculate time-resolved indoor concentrations of CO, NO2 and formaldehyde resulting from cooking burners and entry with outdoor air. Exposure metrics include 1-week average concentrations and frequency of exceeding ambient air quality standards. We present model results for Southern California (SoCal) using two air-exchange scenarios in winter: (1) infiltration-only, and (2) air exchange rate (AER) sampled from lognormal distributions derived from measurements. In roughly 40percent of homes in the SoCal cohort (N=6634) the 1-hour USEPA NO2 standard (190 ?g/m3) was exceeded at least once. The frequency of exceeding this standard was largely independent of AER assumption, and related primarily to building volume, emission rate and amount of burner use. As expected, AER had a more substantial impact on one-week average concentrations.

  4. Understanding Methane Emission from Natural Gas Activities Using Inverse Modeling Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdioskouei, M.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Natural gas (NG) has been promoted as a bridge fuel that can smooth the transition from fossil fuels to zero carbon energy sources by having lower carbon dioxide emission and lower global warming impacts in comparison to other fossil fuels. However, the uncertainty around the estimations of methane emissions from NG systems can lead to underestimation of climate and environmental impacts of using NG as a replacement for coal. Accurate estimates of methane emissions from NG operations is crucial for evaluation of environmental impacts of NG extraction and at larger scale, adoption of NG as transitional fuel. However there is a great inconsistency within the current estimates. Forward simulation of methane from oil and gas operation sites for the US is carried out based on NEI-2011 using the WRF-Chem model. Simulated values are compared against measurements of observations from different platforms such as airborne (FRAPPÉ field campaign) and ground-based measurements (NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory). A novel inverse modeling technique is used in this work to improve the model fit to the observation values and to constrain methane emission from oil and gas extraction sites.

  5. Comparative Burkholderia pseudomallei natural history virulence studies using an aerosol murine model of infection

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Shane; Yeager, Linsey A.; Blumentritt, Carla A.; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Sbrana, Elena; Peterson, Johnny W.; Brasel, Trevor; LeDuc, James W.; Endsley, Janice J.; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2014-01-01

    Melioidosis is an endemic disease caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Concerns exist regarding B. pseudomallei use as a potential bio-threat agent causing persistent infections and typically manifesting as severe pneumonia capable of causing fatal bacteremia. Development of suitable therapeutics against melioidosis is complicated due to high degree of genetic and phenotypic variability among B. pseudomallei isolates and lack of data establishing commonly accepted strains for comparative studies. Further, the impact of strain variation on virulence, disease presentation, and mortality is not well understood. Therefore, this study evaluate and compare the virulence and disease progression of B. pseudomallei strains K96243 and HBPUB10303a, following aerosol challenge in a standardized BALB/c mouse model of infection. The natural history analysis of disease progression monitored conditions such as weight, body temperature, appearance, activity, bacteremia, organ and tissue colonization (pathological and histological analysis) and immunological responses. This study provides a detailed, direct comparison of infection with different B. pseudomallei strains and set up the basis for a standardized model useful to test different medical countermeasures against Burkholderia species. Further, this protocol serves as a guideline to standardize other bacterial aerosol models of infection or to define biomarkers of infectious processes caused by other intracellular pathogens. PMID:24603493

  6. Unveiling the mode of action of antibacterial labdane diterpenes from Alpinia nigra (Gaertn.) B. L. Burtt seeds.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sudipta; Indukuri, Kiran; Bondalapati, Somasekhar; Saikia, Anil K; Rangan, Latha

    2013-08-01

    The labdane diterpene, (E)-labda-8(17), 12-diene-15, 16-dial (compound A) and its epoxide analogue, (E)-8β, 17-Epoxylabd-12-ene-15, 16-dial (compound B) were isolated from the seeds of Alpinia nigra for the first time. The antibacterial activities of both compounds were evaluated against three Gram-positive and four Gram-negative bacteria, and flow cytometric analysis revealed that these compounds caused significant damage to the bacterial cell membranes. Further, field emission scanning electron microscope imaging and cell leakage analysis confirmed that the labdane diterpenes were responsible for bacterial cell membrane damage and disintegration. Our findings provide new insight into the broad-spectrum effects of two natural labdane diterpenes that may be useful in the future development of herbal antibiotic products. PMID:23792320

  7. Competitive effects of natural organic matter: parametrization and verification of the three-component adsorption model COMPSORB.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Mariñas, Benito J; Schideman, Lance C; Snoeyink, Vernon L; Li, Qilin

    2006-01-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) hinders adsorption of trace organic compounds on powdered activated carbon (PAC) via two dominant mechanisms: direct site competition and pore blockage. COMPSORB, a three-component model that incorporates these two competitive mechanisms, was developed in a previous study to describe the removal of trace contaminants in continuous-flow hybrid PAC adsorption/membrane filtration systems. Synthetic solutions containing two model compounds as surrogates for NOM were used in the original study to elucidate competitive effects and to verify the model. In the present study, a quantitative method to characterize the components of NOM that are responsible for competitive adsorption effects in natural water was developed to extend the application of COMPSORB to natural water systems. Using batch adsorption data, NOM was differentiated into two fictive fractions, representing the strongly competing and pore blocking components, and each was treated as a single compound. The equilibrium and kinetic parameters for these fictive compounds were calculated using simplified adsorption models. This parametrization procedure was carried out on two different natural waters, and the model was verified with experimental data obtained for atrazine removal from natural water in a PAC/membrane system. The model predicted the system performance reasonably well and highlighted the importance of considering both direct site competition and pore blockage effects of NOM in modeling these systems. PMID:16433371

  8. Use of characterisation leaching tests and associated modelling tools in assessing the hazardous nature of wastes.

    PubMed

    van der Sloot, H A; Kosson, D S

    2012-03-15

    The evaluation of the hazardous nature of a waste is frequently based on total composition in many jurisdictions, while for most cases the chemical form of the constituents and the release pathways that may result in exposure of man and organisms under conditions of handling, transport, disposal or beneficial use are the most important factors controlling potential environmental impact. Thus, leaching assessment related to possible management scenarios rather than total content can provide a much more robust basis for evaluating health risks and environmental risks for waterborne pathways. Standardized characterisation leaching tests based on intrinsic characteristics of a material provide a new foundation for needed decisions. Chemical speciation modelling using characterisation testing results provides a means to identify mechanisms controlling constituent release, including mineral or sorptive phases, and thus insights into the long-term release behaviour of the material and approaches to reducing potential impacts. PMID:21531504

  9. Development of a natural gas systems analysis model (GSAM). Annual report, July 1996--July 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The objective of GSAM development is to create a comprehensive, non-proprietary, microcomputer model of the North American natural gas system. GSAM explicitly evaluates the key components of the system, including the resource base, exploration and development practices, extraction technology performance and costs, project economics, transportation costs and restrictions, storage, and end-use. The primary focus is the detailed characterization of the resource base at the reservoir and subreservoir level. This disaggregation allows direct evaluation of alternative extraction technologies based on discretely estimated, individual well productivity, required investments, and associated operating costs. GSAM`s design allows users to evaluate complex interactions of current and alternative future technology and policy initiatives as they directly impact the gas market. GSAM development has been ongoing for the past five years. Key activities completed during the past year are described.

  10. Harnessing the natural Drosophila-parasitoid model for integrating insect immunity with functional venomics

    PubMed Central

    Heavner, Mary E.; Hudgins, Adam D.; Rajwani, Roma; Morales, Jorge; Govind, Shubha

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila species lack most hallmarks of adaptive immunity yet are highly successful against an array of natural microbial pathogens and metazoan enemies. When attacked by figitid parasitoid wasps, fruit flies deploy robust, multi-faceted innate immune responses and overcome many attackers. In turn, parasitoids have evolved immunosuppressive strategies to match, and more frequently to overcome, their hosts. We present methods to examine the evolutionary dynamics underlying anti-parasitoid host defense by teasing apart the specialized immune-modulating venoms of figitid parasitoids and, in turn, possibly delineating the roles of individual venom molecules. This combination of genetic, phylogenomic, and "functional venomics" methods in the Drosophila-parasitoid model should allow entomologists and immunologists to tackle important outstanding questions with implications across disciplines and to pioneer translational applications in agriculture and medicine. PMID:25642411

  11. Acoustic studies of ternary mixture phenanthrene toluene heptane as a model of natural flocculating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucek, M.; Marczak, W.

    2008-02-01

    Complexity of natural systems causes that results of experimental studies are often ambiguous and extremely unrewarding in interpretation. To overcome this difficulty, relative simple model systems may be investigated in order to provide physical grounds for further discussion. This study deals with adiabatic compressibility of liquid ternary system consisting of phenanthrene, toluene and heptane. Increase of heptane concentration in the mixture changes considerably the partial compressibility of phenanthrene, from common positive value in pure toluene up to clearly negative ones. This is most probably because of self-association of phenanthrene due to strong London forces. Heptane seems to promote the self-association. These feature of the investigated system suggests its usefulness in studies of flocculation of asphaltenes from crude oils.

  12. Change-Point Detection of Natural Frequency Using Dynamic Model Selection and Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Kodai; Kaito, Kiyoyuki; Sogabe, Masamichi

    In order to apply structural monitoring into practice, it is indispensable to develop a method for change-point detection of bridge vibrational properties. In this study, the authors have developed a methodology using sequential prediction, dynamic model selection, and clustering, with the purpose of evaluating vibrational properties and its change timings. In order to examine the validity, the time series that had the change in frequency was calculated, and proposal method was applied. As a results, it was found that the natural frequency is detected. As for change timings, these were evaluated as change intervals. On the other hand, when the proposed method was applied to the acceleration response of a bridge when a train passes, it was found that bridge frequency can be extracted stably, and it is difficult to detect change timings when the change is small. Based on these results, factors were studied, and some solutions to the problems were proposed.

  13. A modeling and numerical algorithm for thermoporomechanics in multiple porosity media for naturally fractured reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Sonnenthal, E. L.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-12-01

    Rigorous modeling of coupling between fluid, heat, and geomechanics (thermo-poro-mechanics), in fractured porous media is one of the important and difficult topics in geothermal reservoir simulation, because the physics are highly nonlinear and strongly coupled. Coupled fluid/heat flow and geomechanics are investigated using the multiple interacting continua (MINC) method as applied to naturally fractured media. In this study, we generalize constitutive relations for the isothermal elastic dual porosity model proposed by Berryman (2002) to those for the non-isothermal elastic/elastoplastic multiple porosity model, and derive the coupling coefficients of coupled fluid/heat flow and geomechanics and constraints of the coefficients. When the off-diagonal terms of the total compressibility matrix for the flow problem are zero, the upscaled drained bulk modulus for geomechanics becomes the harmonic average of drained bulk moduli of the multiple continua. In this case, the drained elastic/elastoplastic moduli for mechanics are determined by a combination of the drained moduli and volume fractions in multiple porosity materials. We also determine a relation between local strains of all multiple porosity materials in a gridblock and the global strain of the gridblock, from which we can track local and global elastic/plastic variables. For elastoplasticity, the return mapping is performed for all multiple porosity materials in the gridblock. For numerical implementation, we employ and extend the fixed-stress sequential method of the single porosity model to coupled fluid/heat flow and geomechanics in multiple porosity systems, because it provides numerical stability and high accuracy. This sequential scheme can be easily implemented by using a porosity function and its corresponding porosity correction, making use of the existing robust flow and geomechanics simulators. We implemented the proposed modeling and numerical algorithm to the reaction transport simulator

  14. A spatio-temporel optimization model for the evacuation of the population exposed to natural disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaeddine, H.; Serrhini, K.; Maïzia, M.; Néron, E.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of managing the crisis caused by natural disasters, and especially by flood, requires the development of an effective evacuation systems. An effective evacuation system must take into account certain constraints, including those related to network traffic, accessibility, human resources and material equipment (vehicles, collecting points, etc.). The main objective of this work is to provide assistance to technical services and rescue forces in terms of accessibility by offering itineraries relating to rescue and evacuation of people and property. We consider in this paper the evacuation of an urban area of medium size exposed to the hazard of flood. In case of inundation, most people will be evacuated using their own vehicles. Two evacuation types are addressed in this paper, (1) a preventive evacuation based on a flood forecasting system and (2) an evacuation during the disaster based on flooding scenarios. The two study sites on which the evacuation model developed is applied are the valley of Tours (Fr, 37) which is protected by a set of dikes (preventive evacuation) and the valley of Gien (Fr, 45) which benefits of a low rate of flooding (evacuation before and during the disaster). Our goal is to construct, for each of these two sites, a chronological evacuation plan i.e. computing for each individual the departure date and the path to reach the assembly point (also called shelter) associated according to a priorities list established for this purpose. Evacuation plan must avoid the congestion on the road network. Here we present a Spatio-Temporal Optimization Model (STOM) dedicated to the evacuation of the population exposed to natural disasters and more specifically to flood risk.

  15. Modelling natural electromagnetic interference in man-made conductors for space weather applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichtchenko, Larisa

    2016-04-01

    Power transmission lines above the ground, cables and pipelines in the ground and under the sea, and in general all man-made long grounded conductors are exposed to the variations of the natural electromagnetic field. The resulting currents in the networks (commonly named geomagnetically induced currents, GIC), are produced by the conductive and/or inductive coupling and can compromise or even disrupt system operations and, in extreme cases, cause power blackouts, railway signalling mis-operation, or interfere with pipeline corrosion protection systems. To properly model the GIC in order to mitigate their impacts it is necessary to know the frequency dependence of the response of these systems to the geomagnetic variations which naturally span a wide frequency range. For that, the general equations of the electromagnetic induction in a multi-layered infinitely long cylinder (representing cable, power line wire, rail or pipeline) embedded in uniform media have been solved utilising methods widely used in geophysics. The derived electromagnetic fields and currents include the effects of the electromagnetic properties of each layer and of the different types of the surrounding media. This exact solution then has been used to examine the electromagnetic response of particular samples of long conducting structures to the external electromagnetic wave for a wide range of frequencies. Because the exact solution has a rather complicated structure, simple approximate analytical formulas have been proposed, analysed and compared with the results from the exact model. These approximate formulas show good coincidence in the frequency range spanning from geomagnetic storms (less than mHz) to pulsations (mHz to Hz) to atmospherics (kHz) and above, and can be recommended for use in space weather applications.

  16. Modeling spatial patterns in soil arsenic to estimate natural baseline concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Venteris, Erik R.; Basta, Nicolas T.; Bigham, Jerry M.; Rea, Ron

    2014-05-09

    ABSTRACT Arsenic in soil is an important public health concern. Toxicity guidelines and models based on laboratory studies (i.e., U.S. EPA’s Integrated Risk Information System) should consider natural soil As concentrations to avoid unnecessary remediation burdens on society. We used soil and stream sediment samples from the USGS National Geochemical Survey database to assess the spatial distribution of natural As in a 1.16E+5 km2 area. Samples were collected at 348 soil and 144 stream locations, providing approximately one sample for every 290 km2. Sample sites were selected to minimize the potential influence of anthropogenic inputs. Samples were processed using acid digestion of whole samples (concentrated HCl and ascorbic acid) and concentrations were measured using hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Soil As ranged from 2.0 to 45.6 mg kg-1. Geostatistical techniques were used to model and map the spatial variability of As. The mean and variance at unsampled locations were estimated using sequential Gaussian simulation. Five areas of elevated concentration (> the median of 10 mg kg-1) were identified and the relationships to geologic parent materials, glacial sedimentation patterns, and soil conditions interpreted. Our results showed As concentrations >10 mg kg-1 were common, and >20 mg kg-1 were not unusual for the central and west central portions of Ohio (USA). In contrast, concentrations <4 mg kg-1 were rare. Measured concentrations typically exceeded the soil As human generic screening levels of 0.39 mg/kg (1); the calculated value that corresponds to a cancer risk level of 1 in 1,000,000 for soil ingestion. Because the As content of Ohio soils is similar to many world soils, the USEPA generic soil screening level of 0.39 mg/kg is of little utility. A more useful and practical approach would be the uses of natural background levels. Regional soil As patterns based on geology and biogeochemistry and not political boundaries should be used

  17. Mathematical Decision Models Applied for Qualifying and Planning Areas Considering Natural Hazards and Human Dealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, Jose M.; Grau, Juan B.; Tarquis, Ana M.; Sanchez, Elena; Andina, Diego

    2014-05-01

    The authors were involved in the use of some Mathematical Decision Models, MDM, to improve knowledge and planning about some large natural or administrative areas for which natural soils, climate, and agro and forest uses where main factors, but human resources and results were important, natural hazards being relevant. In one line they have contributed about qualification of lands of the Community of Madrid, CM, administrative area in centre of Spain containing at North a band of mountains, in centre part of Iberian plateau and river terraces, and also Madrid metropolis, from an official study of UPM for CM qualifying lands using a FAO model from requiring minimums of a whole set of Soil Science criteria. The authors set first from these criteria a complementary additive qualification, and tried later an intermediate qualification from both using fuzzy logic. The authors were also involved, together with colleagues from Argentina et al. that are in relation with local planners, for the consideration of regions and of election of management entities for them. At these general levels they have adopted multi-criteria MDM, used a weighted PROMETHEE, and also an ELECTRE-I with the same elicited weights for the criteria and data, and at side AHP using Expert Choice from parallel comparisons among similar criteria structured in two levels. The alternatives depend on the case study, and these areas with monsoon climates have natural hazards that are decisive for their election and qualification with an initial matrix used for ELECTRE and PROMETHEE. For the natural area of Arroyos Menores at South of Rio Cuarto town, with at North the subarea of La Colacha, the loess lands are rich but suffer now from water erosions forming regressive ditches that are spoiling them, and use of soils alternatives must consider Soil Conservation and Hydraulic Management actions. The use of soils may be in diverse non compatible ways, as autochthonous forest, high value forest, traditional

  18. Geodynamic models of the deep structure of the natural disaster regions of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodnikov, A. G.; Sergeyeva, N. A.; Zabarinskaya, L. P.

    2012-04-01

    Investigation of the deep structure and creation of geodynamic models of natural disaster regions are important for understanding of the nature of such phenomena as earthquakes, eruptions of volcanoes, tsunami and others. Carrying out of such researches is necessary for definition of areas of potential risk, forecasting and the prevention of negative consequences of acts of nature. Research region is active continental margins of the Sea of Okhotsk, and especially the area of Neftegorsk earthquake which has occurred on May, 28th 1995 in the North Sakhalin and caused many victims and destructions. The geodynamic model of the lithosphere in the region of Neftegorsk earthquake has been constructed along the profile crossing the North Sakhalin Basin, Deryugin Basin and ophiolite complex between them. The Deryugin Basin was formed at the site of an ancient deep trench after the subduction of the Okhotsk Sea Plate under Sakhalin. The basin is located above a hot plume in the mantle at a depth of 25 km. The ophiolite belt of ultramafic magmatic rocks is an ancient (K2-Pg) paleosubduction zone separating the Deryugin basin from the North Sakhalin Basin. The thickness of the ancient seismic focal zone is 80 km. It is probably that the structures of the North Sakhalin have been formed in the following way. In the Late Cretaceous the oceanic Okhotsk Sea Plate subducted under Sakhalin, the eastern part of which was an andesite island arc. Approximately in Miocene the subduction of the plate apparently ceased. In that time the Tatar Rift Strait was formed. Ophiolite rocks of the subduction zones as a result of compression have been squeezed out on a surface. The ophiolite complex combined by the ultrabasic rocks, fixes position of ancient subduction zone. It is probable that the manifestation of the Neftegorsk earthquake was a result of activization of this ancient subduction zone. On a surface the subduction zone manifests itself as deep faults running along Sakhalin. The

  19. Initial evaluation of nighttime restlessness in a naturally occurring canine model of osteoarthritis pain

    PubMed Central

    Knazovicky, David; Tomas, Andrea; Motsinger-Reif, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain due to osteoarthritis (OA) can lead to significant disruption of sleep and increased restlessness. Our objective was to assess whether naturally occurring canine OA is associated with nighttime restlessness and so has potential as a model of OA-associated sleep disturbance. The study was designed as a two-part prospective masked, placebo-controlled study using client-owned dogs (Part A n = 60; Part B n = 19). Inclusion criteria consisted of OA-associated joint pain and mobility impairment. The primary outcome measure for both parts was nighttime accelerometry. In Part B, quality of sleep was assessed using a clinical metrology instrument (Sleep and Night Time Restlessness Evaluation Score, SNoRE). Part A included dogs receiving two weeks of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) preceded with two weeks of no treatment. Part B was a crossover study, with NSAID/placebo administered for two weeks followed by a washout period of one week and another two weeks of NSAID/placebo. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to assess differences between baseline and treatment. There were no significant changes in accelerometry-measured nighttime activity as a result of NSAID administration. SNoRE measures indicated significant improvements in aspects of the quality of nighttime sleep that did not involve obvious movement. These results reflect the few similar studies in human OA patients. Although accelerometry does not appear to be useful, this model has potential to model the human pain-related nighttime sleep disturbance, and other outcome measures should be explored in this model. PMID:25722957

  20. Mechanistic Model of Natural Killer Cell Proliferative Response to IL-15 Receptor Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun M.; French, Anthony R.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that provide early host defense against intracellular pathogens, such as viruses. Although NK cell development, homeostasis, and proliferation are regulated by IL-15, the influence of IL-15 receptor (IL-15R)-mediated signaling at the cellular level has not been quantitatively characterized. We developed a mathematical model to analyze the kinetic interactions that control the formation and localization of IL-15/IL-15R complexes. Our computational results demonstrated that IL-15/IL-15R complexes on the cell surface were a key determinant of the magnitude of the IL-15 proliferative signal and that IL-15R occupancy functioned as an effective surrogate measure of receptor signaling. Ligand binding and receptor internalization modulated IL-15R occupancy. Our work supports the hypothesis that the total number and duration of IL-15/IL-15R complexes on the cell surface crosses a quantitative threshold prior to the initiation of NK cell division. Furthermore, our model predicted that the upregulation of IL-15Rα on NK cells substantially increased IL-15R complex formation and accelerated the expansion of dividing NK cells with the greatest impact at low IL-15 concentrations. Model predictions of the threshold requirement for NK cell recruitment to the cell cycle and the subsequent exponential proliferation correlated well with experimental data. In summary, our modeling analysis provides quantitative insight into the regulation of NK cell proliferation at the receptor level and provides a framework for the development of IL-15 based immunotherapies to modulate NK cell proliferation. PMID:24068905

  1. Phytochemical investigation and in vitro antioxidant activity of an indigenous medicinal plant Alpinia nigra B.L. Burtt

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Suprava; Ghosh, Goutam; Das, Debajyoti; Nayak, Sanghamitra

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate antioxidant potential of methanol extract of Alpinia nigra leaves. Methods The study was done by using various in vitro methods such as 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide radical scavenging assays. Phytochemical constituents, total phenolic content and total flavonoid content of the extract at different concentrations (10-500 µg/mL) were determined. Results Alpinia nigra leaves showed high free radical scavenging activity as evidenced by the low IC50 values in DPPH (64.51 µg/mL), in ABTS (28.32 µg/mL), in nitric oxide (80.02 µg/mL) and in H2O2 (77.45 µg/mL) scavenging assays. Furthermore the TPC and TFC of the extract were found to be 69.25 mg gallic acid equivalent per gram of extract and 78.84 mg quercetin equivalent per gram of extract respectively. Conclusions The results of present comprehensive analysis demonstrated that Alpinia nigra leaves possess high phenolic, flavonoid contents and potential antioxidant activity, and could be used as a viable source of natural antioxidants and might be exploited for functional foods and neutraceutical applications.

  2. MODELING CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST INACTIVATION AND BROMATE IN A FLOW-THROUGH OZONE CONTACTOR TREATING NATURAL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A reactive transport model was developed to simultaneously predict Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst inactivation and bromate formation during ozonation of natural water. A mechanistic model previously established to predict bromate formation in organic-free synthetic waters w...

  3. A Study of the Nature of Students' Models of Microscopic Processes in the Context of Modern Physics Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thacker, Beth Ann

    2003-01-01

    Interviews university students in modern physics about their understanding of three fundamental experiments. Explores their development of models of microscopic processes. Uses interactive demonstrations to probe student understanding of modern physics experiments in two high school physics classes. Analyzes the nature of students' models and the…

  4. Numerical modeling of crystal growth on a centrifuge for unstable natural convection configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Downey, J. P.; Curreri, P. A.; Jones, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    The fluid mechanics associated with crystal growth processes on centrifuges is modeled using 2D and 3D models. Two-dimensional calculations show that flow bifurcations exist in such crystal growth configurations where the ampoule is oriented in the same direction as the resultant gravity vector and a temperature gradient is imposed on the melt. A scaling analysis is formulated to predict the flow transition point from the natural convection dominated regime to the Coriolis force dominated regime. Results of 3D calculations are presented for two thermal configurations of the crystal growth cell: top heated and bottom heated with respect to the centrifugal acceleration. In the top heated configuration, a substantial reduction in the convection intensity within the melt can be attained by centrifuge operations, and close to steady diffusion-limited thermal conditions can be achieved over a narrow range of the imposed microgravity level. In the bottom heated configuration the Coriolis force has a stabilizing effect on fluid motion by delaying the onset of unsteady convection.

  5. [Spatial distribution of soil total nitrogen in Liangshui National Nature Reserve based on local model].

    PubMed

    Zhen, Zhen; Guo, Zhi-ying; Zhao, Ying-hui; Li, Feng-ri; Wei, Qing-bin

    2016-02-01

    Based on LiDAR data of Liangshui National Nature Reserve, digital elevation model (DEM) was constructed and both primary terrain attributes (slope, aspect, profile curvature, etc.) and secondary terrain attributes (wetness index, sediment transport index, relative stream power index, etc.) were extracted. According to the theory of soil formation, geographically weighted regression (GWR) was applied to predict soil total nitrogen (TN) of the area, and the predicted results were compared with those of three traditional interpolation methods including inverse distance weighting (IDW), ordinary Kriging (OK) and universal Kriging (UK). Results showed that the prediction accuracy of GWR (77.4%) was higher than that of other three interpolation methods and the accuracy of IDW (69.4%) was higher than that of OK (63.5%) and UK (60.6%). The average of TN predicted by GWR reached 4.82 g . kg-1 in the study area and TN tended to be higher in the region with higher elevation, bigger wetness index and stronger relative stream power index than in other areas. Further, TN also varied partly with various aspects and slopes. Thus, local model using terrain attributes as independent variables was effective in predicting soil attribute distribution. PMID:27396130

  6. Genetic basis of hindlimb loss in a naturally occurring vertebrate model

    PubMed Central

    Don, Emily K.; de Jong-Curtain, Tanya A.; Doggett, Karen; Hall, Thomas E.; Heng, Benjamin; Badrock, Andrew P.; Winnick, Claire; Nicholson, Garth A.; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Currie, Peter D.; Hesselson, Daniel; Heath, Joan K.; Cole, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here we genetically characterise pelvic finless, a naturally occurring model of hindlimb loss in zebrafish that lacks pelvic fin structures, which are homologous to tetrapod hindlimbs, but displays no other abnormalities. Using a hybrid positional cloning and next generation sequencing approach, we identified mutations in the nuclear localisation signal (NLS) of T-box transcription factor 4 (Tbx4) that impair nuclear localisation of the protein, resulting in altered gene expression patterns during pelvic fin development and the failure of pelvic fin development. Using a TALEN-induced tbx4 knockout allele we confirm that mutations within the Tbx4 NLS (A78V; G79A) are sufficient to disrupt pelvic fin development. By combining histological, genetic, and cellular approaches we show that the hindlimb initiation gene tbx4 has an evolutionarily conserved, essential role in pelvic fin development. In addition, our novel viable model of hindlimb deficiency is likely to facilitate the elucidation of the detailed molecular mechanisms through which Tbx4 functions during pelvic fin and hindlimb development. PMID:26892237

  7. Genetic basis of hindlimb loss in a naturally occurring vertebrate model.

    PubMed

    Don, Emily K; de Jong-Curtain, Tanya A; Doggett, Karen; Hall, Thomas E; Heng, Benjamin; Badrock, Andrew P; Winnick, Claire; Nicholson, Garth A; Guillemin, Gilles J; Currie, Peter D; Hesselson, Daniel; Heath, Joan K; Cole, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    Here we genetically characterise pelvic finless, a naturally occurring model of hindlimb loss in zebrafish that lacks pelvic fin structures, which are homologous to tetrapod hindlimbs, but displays no other abnormalities. Using a hybrid positional cloning and next generation sequencing approach, we identified mutations in the nuclear localisation signal (NLS) of T-box transcription factor 4 (Tbx4) that impair nuclear localisation of the protein, resulting in altered gene expression patterns during pelvic fin development and the failure of pelvic fin development. Using a TALEN-induced tbx4 knockout allele we confirm that mutations within the Tbx4 NLS (A78V; G79A) are sufficient to disrupt pelvic fin development. By combining histological, genetic, and cellular approaches we show that the hindlimb initiation gene tbx4 has an evolutionarily conserved, essential role in pelvic fin development. In addition, our novel viable model of hindlimb deficiency is likely to facilitate the elucidation of the detailed molecular mechanisms through which Tbx4 functions during pelvic fin and hindlimb development. PMID:26892237

  8. Fabricating authenticity: modeling a whale at the American Museum of Natural History, 1906-1974.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Historians of science have in recent years become increasingly attentive to the ways in which issues of process, matter, meaning, and value combine in the fabrication of scientific objects. This essay examines the techniques that went into the construction--and authentication--of one such scientific object: a model of a blue, or "sulfur-bottom," whale manufactured at the American Museum of Natural History in 1907. In producing their model, exhibitors at the American Museum employed a patchwork of overlapping discursive, procedural, and material techniques to argue that their fabrication was as authentic--as truthful, accurate, authoritative, and morally and aesthetically worthy of display--as an exhibit containing a real, preserved cetacean. Through an examination of the archival and published traces left by these exhibitors as they built their whale, I argue that the scientific meanings of authenticity at the American Museum were neither static nor timeless, but rather were subject to constant negotiation, examination, re-evaluation, and upkeep. PMID:20718275

  9. Examination of cocaine dose in a preclinical model of natural reward devaluation by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Green, Jennifer L; Dykstra, Linda A; Carelli, Regina M

    2015-06-01

    In a preclinical model of natural reward devaluation by cocaine, taste cues elicit aversive taste reactivity when they predict impending but delayed cocaine self-administration. Here, we investigated this negative affective state as a function of cocaine dose. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats were given 45 brief intraoral infusions of a 0.15% saccharin solution before 2 h cocaine self-administration for 14 days. Rats were video recorded; taste reactivity and patterns of self-administration were quantified on the first and last days. On day 14, a significant decrease in appetitive taste reactivity and increase in aversive taste reactivity was observed (compared with day 1) that did not vary as a function of cocaine dose. In contrast, patterns of cocaine self-administration (i.e. the total number of lever presses and load-up behavior) varied as a function of dose across days. Further, load-up behavior was positively correlated with aversive taste reactivity (i.e. gapes) on day 14 across all doses tested. Collectively, these findings indicate that the emergence of negative affect in this preclinical model is not dependent on cocaine dose. PMID:25738759

  10. A non Standard Model Higgs at the LHC as a sign of naturalness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Villadoro, Giovanni

    2012-02-01

    Light states associated with the hierarchy problem affect the Higgs LHC production and decays. We illustrate this within the MSSM and two simple extensions applying the latest bounds from LHC Higgs searches. Large deviations in the Higgs properties are expected in a natural SUSY spectrum. The discovery of a non-Standard-Model Higgs may signal the presence of light stops accessible at the LHC. Conversely, the more the Higgs is Standard-Model-like, the more tuned the theory becomes. Taking the ratio of different Higgs decay channels at the LHC cancels the leading QCD uncertainties and potentially improves the accuracy in Higgs coupling measurements to the percent level. This may lead to the possibility of doing precision Higgs physics at the LHC. Finally, we entertain the possibility that the ATLAS excess around 125 GeV persists with a Higgs production cross-section that is enhanced compared to the SM. This increase can only be accommodated in extensions of the MSSM and it may suggest that stops lie below 400 GeV, likely within reach of next year's LHC run.

  11. Hydrodynamic Models of the Dynamics of Methane Release by Natural Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimova, T.; Lyubimov, D.; Ivantsov, A.; Tsiberkin, K.; Zikanov, O.

    2011-12-01

    We present results of a broad study of the dynamics of natural deposits of methane hydrates in response to global warming. Particular attention is given to the hydrodynamic aspects of the process associated with instability and deformation of boundaries and filtration of released methane to the surface. The study is computational and is based on a novel physical model that fully takes into account the nonlinear three-dimensional dynamics of the processes of heat and mass transfer that control the dissociation of natural hydrates. This particular presentation is focused on two phenomena. One is the possibility of development and growth of chimney-like vertical hydrate-free channels within the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) that provide paths of relatively unimpeded escape of methane to the surface. According to our analysis, such channels can develop and grow under geologically plausible conditions, the main of which is relatively high (above approximately 10-12 m2)permeability of deposits. The key mechanism that determines the growth is the convection heat transfer by upward filtration of methane gas from the underlying gas-saturated layer. Simulations of the system consisting of several channels located close to each other demonstrate faster growth and merging. We also consider the dynamics of a compact hydrate-free inclusion (a bubble) within the HSZ. The goal of this investigation is to evaluate the ability of such bubbles to migrate to the surface. As a model, an isolated bubble in a boundless hydrate zone is considered. Considering the evolution of a purely spherical bubble, we find that its lifetime can be estimated as t ˜ R2δ -σ , where R is the bubble radius, δ is a parameter evaluating the closeness of surrounding hydrates to dissociation, and 0<σ <1 is function of R. The more advanced model that takes into account the flow of methane gas and buoyancy force shows significant deformation and even disintegration of the bubble at high permeability of

  12. Crystal chemistry of natural and synthetic trioctahedral micas: Exploring the limits of geometric crystal chemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Patrick H. J.

    Seventy-five synthetic powder trioctahedral mica samples (between Mg, Co, Ni, and Fe end members, with different degrees of oxidation, vacancy and Al/Si contents, and including an OH/F substitution series) were studied by room-temperature powder X-ray diffraction. The iron-bearing samples were studied by 57Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy. Subsets of the samples were also characterized by scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, and gas chromatography. Lattice parameters (refined under the 1M stacking polytype, space group C2/m) were determined for all powder samples and iron site populations ([4]Fe 3+, [6]Fe2+, and [6]Fe 2+) were obtained from Mossbauer spectroscopy. The relation (c/a)cosbeta* = 113 was found to hold exactly (within experimental error) for all synthetic powders whereas it does not hold in general for synthetic and natural 1M single-crystals. The above relation is predicted to hold for geometric home-octahedral sheets (having equal M1 and M2 site bond lengths) and not to hold for geometric meso-octahedral sheets (having unequal M1 and M2 site bond lengths). The counter-rotation of the M2 site of 1M single-crystals exactly (within experimental error) follows the geometric meso-octahedral sheet model, which, assuming a uniform octahedral sheet height and site-specific M1 and M2 bond lengths, predicts site-specific flattening angles and a counter-rotation angle for the M2 site which is uniquely determined by the bond length difference between the M1 and M2 sites. A geometric meso-octahedral 2:1 layer silicate was shown to require corrugated tetrahedral sheets composed of bond-distorted tetrahedra. Key geometric meso-octahedral distortions in 1M single-crystals were identified and elucidated: (i) intra-layer top-bottom displacements within a TOT layer; and (ii) a tetrahedral bending angle between the apical bond and the pyramidal base formed by the three basal bonds. Plots

  13. Common data model for natural language processing based on two existing standard information models: CDA+GrAF.

    PubMed

    Meystre, Stéphane M; Lee, Sanghoon; Jung, Chai Young; Chevrier, Raphaël D

    2012-08-01

    An increasing need for collaboration and resources sharing in the Natural Language Processing (NLP) research and development community motivates efforts to create and share a common data model and a common terminology for all information annotated and extracted from clinical text. We have combined two existing standards: the HL7 Clinical Document Architecture (CDA), and the ISO Graph Annotation Format (GrAF; in development), to develop such a data model entitled "CDA+GrAF". We experimented with several methods to combine these existing standards, and eventually selected a method wrapping separate CDA and GrAF parts in a common standoff annotation (i.e., separate from the annotated text) XML document. Two use cases, clinical document sections, and the 2010 i2b2/VA NLP Challenge (i.e., problems, tests, and treatments, with their assertions and relations), were used to create examples of such standoff annotation documents, and were successfully validated with the XML schemata provided with both standards. We developed a tool to automatically translate annotation documents from the 2010 i2b2/VA NLP Challenge format to GrAF, and automatically generated 50 annotation documents using this tool, all successfully validated. Finally, we adapted the XSL stylesheet provided with HL7 CDA to allow viewing annotation XML documents in a web browser, and plan to adapt existing tools for translating annotation documents between CDA+GrAF and the UIMA and GATE frameworks. This common data model may ease directly comparing NLP tools and applications, combining their output, transforming and "translating" annotations between different NLP applications, and eventually "plug-and-play" of different modules in NLP applications. PMID:22197801

  14. Using the Activity Model of Inquiry to Enhance General Chemistry Students' Understanding of Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchlewicz, Sara C.; Wink, Donald J.

    2011-01-01

    Nature of science refers to the processes of scientific activity and the social and cultural premises involved in the creation of scientific knowledge. Having an informed view of nature of science is important in the development of scientifically literate citizens. However, students often come to the classroom with misconceptions about nature of…

  15. Modeling of natural risks in GIS, decision support in the Civil Protection and Emergency Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M.; Martins, L.; Moreira, S.; Costa, A.; Matos, F.; Teixeira, M.; Bateira, C.

    2012-04-01

    The assessment of natural hazards in Civil Protection is essential in the prevention and mitigation of emergency situations. This paper presents the results of the development of mapping susceptibility to landslides, floods, forest fires and soil erosion, using GIS (Geographic Information System) tools in two municipalities - Santo Tirso and Trofa - in the district of Oporto, in the northwest of Portugal. The mapping of natural hazards fits in the legislative plan of the Municipal Civil Protection (Law No. 65/2007 of 12 November) and it provides the key elements to planning and preparing an appropriate response in case some of the processes / phenomena occur, thus optimizing the procedures for protection and relief provided by the Municipal Civil Protection Service. Susceptibility mapping to landslides, floods, forest fires and soil erosion was performed with GIS tools resources. The methodology used to compile the mapping of landslides, forest fires and soil erosion was based on the modeling of different conditioning factors and validated with field work and event log. The mapping of susceptibility to floods and flooding was developed through mathematical parameters (statistical, hydrologic and hydraulic), supported by field work and the recognition of individual characteristics of each sector analysis and subsequently analyzed in a GIS environment The mapping proposal was made in 1:5000 scale which allows not only the identification of large sets affected by the spatial dynamics of the processes / phenomena, but also a more detailed analysis, especially when combined with geographic information systems (GIS) thus allowing to study more specific situations that require a quick response. The maps developed in this study are fundamental to the understanding, prediction and prevention of susceptibility and risks present in the municipalities, being a valuable tool in the process of Emergency Planning, since it identifies priority areas of intervention for farther

  16. A signal integration model of thymic selection and natural regulatory T cell commitment.

    PubMed

    Khailaie, Sahamoddin; Robert, Philippe A; Toker, Aras; Huehn, Jochen; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2014-12-15

    The extent of TCR self-reactivity is the basis for selection of a functional and self-tolerant T cell repertoire and is quantified by repeated engagement of TCRs with a diverse pool of self-peptides complexed with self-MHC molecules. The strength of a TCR signal depends on the binding properties of a TCR to the peptide and the MHC, but it is not clear how the specificity to both components drives fate decisions. In this study, we propose a TCR signal-integration model of thymic selection that describes how thymocytes decide among distinct fates, not only based on a single TCR-ligand interaction, but taking into account the TCR stimulation history. These fates are separated based on sustained accumulated signals for positive selection and transient peak signals for negative selection. This spans up the cells into a two-dimensional space where they are either neglected, positively selected, negatively selected, or selected as natural regulatory T cells (nTregs). We show that the dynamics of the integrated signal can serve as a successful basis for extracting specificity of thymocytes to MHC and detecting the existence of cognate self-peptide-MHC. It allows to select a self-MHC-biased and self-peptide-tolerant T cell repertoire. Furthermore, nTregs in the model are enriched with MHC-specific TCRs. This allows nTregs to be more sensitive to activation and more cross-reactive than conventional T cells. This study provides a mechanistic model showing that time integration of TCR-mediated signals, as opposed to single-cell interaction events, is needed to gain a full view on the properties emerging from thymic selection. PMID:25392533

  17. Cadmium sorption onto Natural Red Earth - An assessment using batch experiments and surface complexation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahatantila, K.; Minoru, O.; Seike, Y.; Vithanage, M. S.

    2010-12-01

    Natural red earth (NRE), an iron coated sand found in north western part of Sri Lanka was used to examine its retention behavior of cadmium, a heavy metal postulated as a factor of chronic kidney disease in Sri Lanka. Adsorption studies were examined in batch experiments as a function of pH, ionic strength and initial cadmium loading. Proton binding sites on NRE were characterized by potentiometric titration yielding a pHzpc around 6.6. The cadmium adsorption increased from 6% to 99% along with a pH increase from 4 to 8.5. In addition, the maximum adsorption was observed when pH is greater than 7.5. Ionic strength dependency of cadmium adsorption for 100 fold variation of NaNO3 evidences the dominance of an inner-sphere bonding mechanism for 10 fold variation of initial cadmium loadings (4.44 and 44.4 µmol/L). Adsorption edges were quantified with a 2pK generalized diffuse double layer model considering two site types, >FeOH and >AlOH, for Cd2+ binding. From modeling, we introduced a monodentate chemical bonding mechanism for cadmium binding on to NRE and this finding was further verified with FTIR spectroscopy. Intrinsic constants determined were log KFeOCd = 8.543 and log KAlOCd = 13.917. Isotherm data implies the heterogeneity of NRE surface and the sorption maximum of 9.418 x10-6 mol/g and 1.3x10-4 mol/g for Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The study suggested the potential of NRE as a material in decontaminating environmental water polluted with cadmium.

  18. Nature and velocity of pyroclastic density currents inferred from models of entrainment of substrate lithic clasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Olivier

    2015-05-01

    Deposits of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) often contain accidental lithic clasts of typical size of 0.1-1 m captured from an underlying substrate by the parent flows at distances up to several tens of kilometers from the eruptive vent. In order to gain insights into the nature of PDCs, this study investigates the conditions required for entrainment of particles from a granular substrate by a gas-particle density current, with special emphasis to ignimbrite-forming currents whose dynamics are controversial. The two types of physics of emplacement of PDCs proposed in literature are considered. The first model deals with a hydraulically rough, dilute turbulent PDC of bulk density of ∼1-10 kg/m3 and considers that entrainment through both traction and saltation is controlled by a Shield criterion at high (>104) particle Reynolds number. The second model considers entrainment by a PDC consisting of a dense basal flow of bulk density of the order of 103 kg /m3 and with high interstitial gas pore pressure. This model involves uplift of substrate particles, caused by an upward pressure gradient at the flow-substrate interface, and then transport and deposition on the aggrading basal deposit of the flow as demonstrated by recent laboratory experiments. Results show that a dilute PDC can entrain blocks of maximum size of ∼10-15 cm (for a block density of 2000-3000 kg/m3) if maximum current velocities up to ∼100 m/s are taken into account. This, in turn, suggests that larger (heavier) blocks found in deposits were captured by PDCs if these had a dense basal flow. The dense flow model predicts that PDCs have the potential to entrain metric blocks, whose maximum size (up to ∼2-5 m) decreases with decreasing atmospheric pressure (i.e. increasing altitude). Application of the model considering published data on the characteristics of accidental blocks in several well-studied ignimbrites indicates that the velocity of the parent dense PDCs was up to ∼25-30 m/s.

  19. Incorporating grazing into an eco-hydrologic model: Simulating coupled human and natural systems in rangelands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, J. J.; Liu, M.; Tague, C.; Choate, J. S.; Evans, R. D.; Johnson, K. A.; Adam, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Rangelands provide an opportunity to investigate the coupled feedbacks between human activities and natural ecosystems. These areas comprise at least one-third of the Earth's surface and provide ecological support for birds, insects, wildlife and agricultural animals including grazing lands for livestock. Capturing the interactions among water, carbon, and nitrogen cycles within the context of regional scale patterns of climate and management is important to understand interactions, responses, and feedbacks between rangeland systems and humans, as well as provide relevant information to stakeholders and policymakers. The overarching objective of this research is to understand the full consequences, intended and unintended, of human activities and climate over time in rangelands by incorporating dynamics related to rangeland management into an eco-hydrologic model that also incorporates biogeochemical and soil processes. Here we evaluate our model over ungrazed and grazed sites for different rangeland ecosystems. The Regional Hydro-ecologic Simulation System (RHESSys) is a process-based, watershed-scale model that couples water with carbon and nitrogen cycles. Climate, soil, vegetation, and management effects within the watershed are represented in a nested landscape hierarchy to account for heterogeneity and the lateral movement of water and nutrients. We incorporated a daily time-series of plant biomass loss from rangeland to represent grazing. The TRY Plant Trait Database was used to parameterize genera of shrubs and grasses in different rangeland types, such as tallgrass prairie, Intermountain West cold desert, and shortgrass steppe. In addition, other model parameters captured the reallocation of carbon and nutrients after grass defoliation. Initial simulations were conducted at the Curlew Valley site in northern Utah, a former International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme Desert Biome site. We found that grasses were most sensitive to model parameters affecting

  20. The Nature of Global Large-scale Sea Level Variability in Relation to Atmospheric Forcing: A Modeling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukumori, I.; Raghunath, R.; Fu, L. L.

    1996-01-01

    The relation between large-scale sea level variability and ocean circulation is studied using a numerical model. A global primitive equaiton model of the ocean is forced by daily winds and climatological heat fluxes corresponding to the period from January 1992 to February 1996. The physical nature of the temporal variability from periods of days to a year, are examined based on spectral analyses of model results and comparisons with satellite altimetry and tide gauge measurements.

  1. Interinstrument reliability of the Jamar electronic dynamometer and pinch gauge compared with the Jamar hydraulic dynamometer and B&L Engineering mechanical pinch gauge.

    PubMed

    King, Theodore I

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study sought to determine interinstrument reliability of the Jamar electronic dynamometer and pinch gauge compared with the commonly used Jamar hydraulic dynamometer and B&L Engineering mechanical pinch gauge. METHOD. Twenty men and 20 women were tested for grip strength with the two different dynamometers, and 17 men and 25 women were tested for lateral pinch strength with the two different pinch gauges. RESULTS. Grip strength measurements were approximately 10% higher with the hydraulic dynamometer, and lateral pinch strength measurements were approximately 18% higher with the mechanical pinch gauge. Paired t tests and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used for statistical analyses. The two-tailed p value was <.0001, and the ICC indicated poor to moderate reliability. CONCLUSION. When retesting patients, it is recommended that occupational therapists use the same instrument to measure hand strength because interinstrument reliability may be lacking. PMID:23791323

  2. Magnetic Interactions Sense Changes in Distance between Heme bL and the Iron−Sulfur Cluster in Cytochrome bc1†

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    During the operation of cytochrome bc1, a key enzyme of biological energy conversion, the iron−sulfur head domain of one of the subunits of the catalytic core undergoes a large-scale movement from the catalytic quinone oxidation Qo site to cytochrome c1. This changes a distance between the two iron−two sulfur (FeS) cluster and other cofactors of the redox chains. Although the role and the mechanism of this movement have been intensely studied, they both remain poorly understood, partly because the movement itself is not easily traceable experimentally. Here, we take advantage of magnetic interactions between the reduced FeS cluster and oxidized heme bL to use dipolar enhancement of phase relaxation of the FeS cluster as a spectroscopic parameter which with a unique clarity and specificity senses changes in the distance between those two cofactors. The dipolar relaxation curves measured by EPR at Q-band in a glass state of frozen solution (i.e., under the conditions trapping a dynamic distribution of FeS positions that existed in a liquid phase) of isolated cytochrome bc1 were compared with the curves calculated for the FeS cluster occupying distinct positions in various crystals of cytochrome bc1. This comparison revealed the existence of a broad distribution of the FeS positions in noninhibited cytochrome bc1 and demonstrated that the average equilibrium position is modifiable by inhibitors or mutations. To explain the results, we assume that changes in the equilibrium distribution of the FeS positions are the result of modifications of the orienting potential gradient in which the diffusion of the FeS head domain takes place. The measured changes in the phase relaxation enhancement provide the first direct experimental description of changes in the strength of dipolar coupling between the FeS cluster and heme bL. PMID:19415898

  3. Model estimate of mercury emission from natural sources in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Suraj K.; Lin, Che-Jen; Streets, David G.; Jang, Carey

    East Asia is one of the largest source regions that release mercury into the atmosphere. Although extensive studies have been devoted to estimating the anthropogenic mercury emission, little is known about mercury emission from natural sources in the region. In this study, we adapt the algorithms developed previously, coupled with detailed GIS data and satellite LAI products, to estimate mercury emission from natural sources including vegetation, soil, and water surfaces in an East Asian domain containing 164 × 97 grid cells at a spatial resolution of 36 km. Seasonal simulations were performed to project the annual emission quantity. The simulated emission shows strong diurnal and seasonal variations due to meteorology and vegetation coverage. The annual emission in the form of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) from the domain in 2001 is estimated to be 834 Mg, with 462 Mg contributed from China. The estimated GEM emission is comparable to the reported anthropogenic emission of 575 ± 261 Mg (56% GEM, 32% reactive gaseous mercury, 12% particulate mercury; Wu, Y., Wang, S., Streets, D.G., Hao, J., Chan, M., Jiang, J., 2006. Trends in anthropogenic mercury emissions in China from 1995 to 2003. Environmental Science & Technology 40, 5312-5318) in China for the year 2001, and dominates the anthropogenic emission during the warm season. Combining the anthropogenic and natural emission estimates, the total mercury emission from China is 776-1298 Mg, with GEM being in the range of 660-1000 Mg. The latter is similar to the GEM emission quantity inferred from aircraft measurement (765 Mg; Friedli, H.R., Radke, L.F., Prescott, R., Li, P., Woo, J.-H., Carmichael, G.R., 2004. Mercury in the atmosphere around Japan, Korea and China as observed during the 2001 ACE Asia field campaign: measurements, distributions, sources, and implications. Journal of Geophysical Research 109, D19 S25) and modeling estimate (1140 Mg; Pan, L., Chai, T., Carmichael, G.R., Tang, Y., Streets, G

  4. Scientific Modeling for Inquiring Teachers Network (SMIT'N): The Influence on Elementary Teachers' Views of Nature of Science, Inquiry, and Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akerson, Valarie L.; Townsend, J. Scott; Donnelly, Lisa A.; Hanson, Deborah L.; Tira, Praweena; White, Orvil

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the findings from a K-6 professional development program that emphasized scientific inquiry and nature of science within the theme of scientific modeling. During the 2-week summer workshop and follow up school year workshops, the instruction modeled a 5-E learning cycle approach. Pre and posttesting measured teachers' views…

  5. Cathepsins B, L and D in inflammatory bowel disease macrophages and potential therapeutic effects of cathepsin inhibition in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, K; Hausmann, M; Obermeier, F; Schreiter, K; Dunger, N; Bataille, F; Falk, W; Scholmerich, J; Herfarth, H; Rogler, G

    2006-01-01

    The cathepsins D (CTSD), B (CTSB) and L (CTSL) are important for the intracellular degradation of proteins. Increased cathepsin expression is associated with inflammatory diseases. We have shown previously an induction of CTSD expression in intestinal macrophages (IMAC) in inflamed mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Here we investigated the regulation of CTSB and CTSL in IMAC during IBD and effects of CTSD and CTSB/CTSL inhibition in vivo. Human IMAC were isolated from normal and inflamed mucosa. Reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) was performed for CTSB and CTSL mRNA. Immunostaining was used to confirm PCR results. Cathepsin inhibition was investigated in the dextran–sulphate–sodium (DSS) colitis model in mice with application of pepstatin A (CTSD inhibitor), CA-074 (CTSB inhibitor) and Z-Phe-Tyr-aldehyde (CTSL inhibitor). CTSL mRNA was significantly up-regulated in IMAC isolated from IBD mucosa. Up-regulated protein expression was found mainly in areas of mucosal damage by immunostaining. Inhibition of CTSD in mouse DSS colitis was followed by an amelioration of the disease. Inhibitor-treated mice showed a significant lower histological score (HS) and less colon reduction in comparison to controls. Similarly, simultaneous inhibition of CTSB/CTSL was followed by a significant amelioration of colitis. Expression of tissue-degrading cathepsins is increased in IMAC in IBD. Inhibition of CTSD as well as CTSB/CTSL is followed by an amelioration of experimental colitis. The prevention of mucosal damage by cathepsin inhibition could represent a new approach for the therapy of IBD. PMID:16968411

  6. Use of multiple regression models in the study of sandhopper orientation under natural conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Giovanni M.; Scapini, Felicita

    2003-10-01

    In sandhoppers (Amphipoda; Talitridae), typical dwellers of the supralittoral zone of sandy beaches, orientation with respect to the sun and landscape vision is adapted to the local direction of the shoreline. Variation of this behavioural adaptation can be related to the characteristics of the beach. Measures of orientation with respect to the shoreline direction can thus be made as a tool to assess beach stability versus changeability, once the sources of variation are correctly interpreted. Orientation of animals can be studied by statistical analysis of directions taken after release in nature. In this paper some new tools for exploring directional data are reviewed, with special emphasis on non-parametric smoothers and regression models. Results from a large study concerning one species of sandhoppers, Talitrus saltator (Montagu), from an exposed sandy beach in northeastern Tunisia are presented. Seasonal differences in orientation behaviour were shown with a higher scatter in autumn with respect to spring. The higher scatter shown in autumn depended both on intrinsic (sex) and external (climatic conditions and landscape visibility) factors and was related to the tendency of this species to migrate towards the dune anticipating winter conditions.

  7. Tangled nature model of evolutionary dynamics reconsidered: Structural and dynamical effects of trait inheritance.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Christian Walther; Sibani, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Based on the stochastic dynamics of interacting agents which reproduce, mutate, and die, the tangled nature model (TNM) describes key emergent features of biological and cultural ecosystems' evolution. While trait inheritance is not included in many applications, i.e., the interactions of an agent and those of its mutated offspring are taken to be uncorrelated, in the family of TNMs introduced in this work correlations of varying strength are parametrized by a positive integer K. We first show that the interactions generated by our rule are nearly independent of K. Consequently, the structural and dynamical effects of trait inheritance can be studied independently of effects related to the form of the interactions. We then show that changing K strengthens the core structure of the ecology, leads to population abundance distributions better approximated by log-normal probability densities, and increases the probability that a species extant at time t_{w} also survives at t>t_{w}. Finally, survival probabilities of species are shown to decay as powers of the ratio t/t_{w}, a so-called pure aging behavior usually seen in glassy systems of physical origin. We find a quantitative dynamical effect of trait inheritance, namely, that increasing the value of K numerically decreases the decay exponent of the species survival probability. PMID:27300927

  8. The importance of transport parameter cross correlations in natural systems radioactive transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, Paul W

    2011-01-03

    Transport parameter cross correlations are rarely considered in models used to predict radionuclide transport in natural systems. In this paper, it is shown that parameter cross correlations could have a significant impact on radionuclide transport predictions in saturated media. In fractured rock, the positive correlation between fracture apertures and groundwater residence times is shown to result in significantly less retardation due to matrix diffusion than is predicted without the correlation. The suppression of matrix diffusion is further amplified by a tendency toward larger apertures, smaller matrix diffusion coefficients, and less sorption capacity in rocks of lower matrix porosity. In a hypothetical example, strong cross correlations between these parameters result in a decrease in predicted radionuclide travel times of an order of magnitude or more relative to travel times calculated with uncorrelated parameters. In porous media, expected correlations between permeability, porosity, and sorption capacity also result in shorter predicted travel times than when the parameters are assumed to be uncorrelated. Individual parameter standard deviations can also have a significant influence on predicted radionuclide travel times, particularly when cross correlations are considered.

  9. Glycosphingolipid analysis in a naturally occurring ovine model of acute neuronopathic Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Karageorgos, Litsa; Hein, Leanne; Rozaklis, Tina; Adams, Melissa; Duplock, Stephen; Snel, Marten; Hemsley, Kim; Kuchel, Tim; Smith, Nicholas; Hopwood, John J

    2016-07-01

    Gaucher disease arises from mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene which encodes an enzyme required for the lysosomal catabolism of glucosylceramide. We have identified a naturally occurring mutation in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene in sheep that leads to Gaucher disease with acute neurological symptoms. Here we have examined the clinical phenotype at birth and subsequently quantified lipids in Gaucher lamb brain, in order to characterise the disorder. Enzyme activity assessments showed that a reduction in β-glucocerebrosidase activity to 1-5% of wild-type occurs consistently across newborn Gaucher lamb brain regions. We analyzed glucosylceramide, glucosylsphingosine, bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and ganglioside profiles in brain, liver, and spleen, and observed 30- to 130-fold higher glucosylceramide, and 500- to 2000-fold higher glucosylsphingosine concentrations in Gaucher diseased lambs compared to wild-type. Significant increases of bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and gangliosides [GM1, GM2, GM3] concentrations were also detected in the brain. As these glycosphingolipids are involved in many cellular events, an imbalance or disruption of the cell membrane lipid homeostasis would be expected to impair normal neuronal function. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed analysis of glycosphingolipids in various brain regions in a large animal model of neuronal disease, which permits the mechanistic investigation of lipid deregulation and their contribution to neurodegenerative process. PMID:26976737

  10. The Regional Nature of Global Challenges. A Need and Strategy for Integrated Regional Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Janetos, Anthony C.

    2013-01-31

    In this paper, we explore the regional nature of global environmental challenges. We take a broad approach by examining the scientific foundation that is needed to support policy and decision making and identifying some of the most important barriers to progress that are truly scale-dependent. In so doing, we hope to show that understanding global environmental changes requires understanding a number of intrinsically regional phenomena, and that successful decision making likewise requires an integrated approach that accounts for a variety of regional Earth system processes—which we define to include both human activities and environmental systems that operate or interact primarily at sub-continental scales. Understanding regional processes and phenomena, including regional decision-making processes and information needs, should thus be an integral part of the global change research agenda. To address some of the key issues and challenges, we propose an integrated regional modeling approach that accounts for the dynamic interactions among physical, ecological, biogeochemical, and human processes and provides relevant information to regional decision makers and stakeholders.

  11. Natural and forced asymmetries in flow through a vocal fold model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drain, Bethany; Lambert, Lori; Krane, Michael; Wei, Timothy

    2012-11-01

    Much of the complexity and richness of voice production stems from asymmetries in flow through the vocal folds. There are naturally occurring asymmetries, such as the Coanda effect (i . e . deviation of the glottal jet from the centerline as air passes through the nominally symmetric vocal folds). There are also asymmetries which arise from disease or dysfunction of the vocal folds. This study uses DPIV measurements in a dynamically scaled-up human vocal fold model to compare the flow characteristics between symmetric versus asymmetric oscillations. For this study, asymmetries were introduced by running one vocal fold out of phase with the other. Three phase lags, 0 18 and 36, were examined over a range of frequencies corresponding to the physiological frequencies of 50-200 Hz. Control volume analysis was applied and time traces of terms from the conservation of linear momentum equation were generated. This allowed analysis of how differences in the glottal jet flow manifest themselves in the fluid pressure field. In addition, further examination of the Coanda effect in the context of fluid pressure will be discussed. Supported by NIH.

  12. Modeling of babesipain-1 and identification of natural and synthetic leads for bovine babesiosis drug development.

    PubMed

    Meetei, Potshangbam Angamba; Rathore, R S; Prabhu, N Prakash; Vindal, Vaibhav

    2016-04-01

    Babesiosis is a tick-borne, zoonotic disease caused by species of the intraerythrocytic protozoan Babesia. It is distributed all around the world and affects various domestic and wild animals, mainly cattle. Recently, the cysteine protease enzyme, babesipain-1 from Babesia bigemina has been identified as a potential target for designing new anti-babesiosis drugs. In the present study, a three-dimensional structural model of babesipain-1 was developed. An active site with three pockets (S1, S2, and S3), which is congruent with its homolog, falcipain-3, was also identified. Moreover, the conservation of active site residues was consistent with the cysteine protease family. In order to identify potential inhibitors, a virtual screening workflow was employed with a chemical library containing natural and synthetic compounds. Potential inhibitors interacting with all the three subsites were identified. Further, molecular dynamic simulations were carried out to assess the interactions and stability of the inhibitors. The informatics approach, and the findings presented in this study will assist researchers in further development of potential anti-babesiosis molecules. PMID:26969677

  13. Interaction of KRAS G-quadruplex with natural polyphenols: A spectroscopic analysis with molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, Rudradip; Basak, Pijush; Sen, Srikanta; Bhattacharyya, Maitree

    2016-08-01

    Researchers are endeavoring to find out new therapeutics for curing cancer and G-quadruplex DNA has already been identified as a prospective one in this venture. Stabilizing G-quadruplex structures of telomere has emerged to be an important strategy in this context. Mutation in KRAS is mostly responsible for pancreatic, lung and colon cancer. In this present study we explored binding and conformational behaviour of G-quadruplex with different ligands by utilizing several biophysical techniques. Natural polyphenols like Curcumin and Ellagic acid were observed to bind with the G-quadruplex and enhance the melting temperature significantly indicating higher stability. UV-vis spectroscopy confirms formation of G quadruplex-ligand complex for both the compounds with specific binding affinity. Fluorimetric studies revealed that Ellagic acid had stronger binding affinity, 1.10×10(5)M(-1) compared to Curcumin, 1.6×10(4)M(-1) towards G-quadruplex. Interestingly, Curcumin provides greater stability by stacking on the top of the quadruplex structure with the help of the loops compared to Ellagic acid as is evident by docking studies. The keto form of curcumin showed stronger affinity than the enol form. We have developed a general model to estimate the influence of the ligands towards stabilizing the G-quadruplex subsequently characterizing the binding profile to enlighten prospective therapeutics. PMID:27130653

  14. Experiments on water/melt explosions, nature of products, and models of dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, M. F.; Wohletz, K. H.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in a steel pressure device using controlled amounts of water and thermite melt to examine the mechanical energy released on explosive mixing following the initial contact of the two materials. An experimental design was used to allow the direct calculation of the mechanical energy by the dynamic lift of the device as recorded both optically and physically. A large number of experiments were run to accurately determine the optimum mixture of water and melt for the conversion of thermal to mechanical energy. The maximum efficiency observed was about 12% at a water/thermite mass ratio of 0.50. These experiments are the basis for the development of models of hydroexplosions and melt fragmentation. Particles collected from the experimental products are similar in size and shape to pyroclasts produced by much larger hydrovolcanic explosions. Melt rupture at optimum ratios produces very fine particles whereas rupture at high or low water/melt ratios produces large melt fragments. Grain surface textures in the experimental products are also related to the water/melt ratio and the mechanism of explosive mixing. It is thus possible to have qualitative information about the nature of the explosion from the sizes and shapes of the fragments produced.

  15. Natural abundance 17O nuclear magnetic resonance and computational modeling studies of lithium based liquid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xuchu; Hu, Mary Y.; Wei, Xiaoliang; Wang, Wei; Chen, Zhong; Liu, Jun; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2015-07-01

    Natural abundance 17O NMR measurements were conducted on electrolyte solutions consisting of Li[CF3SO2NSO2CF3] (LiTFSI) dissolved in the solvents of ethylene carbonate (EC), propylene carbonate (PC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and their mixtures at various concentrations. It was observed that 17O chemical shifts of solvent molecules change with the concentration of LiTFSI. The chemical shift displacements of carbonyl oxygen are evidently greater than those of ethereal oxygen, strongly indicating that Li+ ion is coordinated with carbonyl oxygen rather than ethereal oxygen. To understand the detailed molecular interaction, computational modeling of 17O chemical shifts was carried out on proposed solvation structures. By comparing the predicted chemical shifts with the experimental values, it is found that a Li+ ion is coordinated with four double bond oxygen atoms from EC, PC, EMC and TFSI- anion. In the case of excessive amount of solvents of EC, PC and EMC the Li+ coordinated solvent molecules are undergoing quick exchange with bulk solvent molecules, resulting in average 17O chemical shifts. Several kinds of solvation structures are identified, where the proportion of each structure in the liquid electrolytes investigated depends on the concentration of LiTFSI.

  16. Regional modeling of natural dust in the United State: Source emission, transport, and photochemical impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, D. Q.; Mathur, R.; Mobley, D.; Wong, D.; Yu, S.

    2008-12-01

    We developed a dust emission module to estimate the wind-blown dust emissions from dessert and agricultural land using local wind speed, threshold wind speed to initiate erosion, soil texture and moisture, land use type, and vegetation coverage. The estimated dust is then partitioned to create a fraction of the total sediment mobilized by the wind for vertical transport and subsequent regional circulation. This dust module also included detailed chemical speciation and size distribution, and a geographic filter to eliminate unrealistic emission sources (e.g., mountain peaks with dry soil and strong winds). We then couple the dust module with a regional air quality model CMAQ to: (1) study if the WRF-CMAQ national air quality forecasting system can accurately predict major dust storms occurring in the United States; 2) estimate the annual budget of natural dust emissions from agricultural and dessert lands and their relative importance for total PM2.5 over different U.S. regions; and 3) examine the effects of dust emissions on photolysis rates and consequently on levels of tropospheric O3 and atmospheric oxidants.

  17. Model of a Generic Natural Uranium Conversion Plant ? Suggested Measures to Strengthen International Safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Raffo-Caiado, Ana Claudia; Begovich, John M; Ferrada, Juan J

    2009-11-01

    This is the final report that closed a joint collaboration effort between DOE and the National Nuclear Energy Commission of Brazil (CNEN). In 2005, DOE and CNEN started a collaborative effort to evaluate measures that can strengthen the effectiveness of international safeguards at a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP). The work was performed by DOE s Oak Ridge National Laboratory and CNEN. A generic model of a NUCP was developed and typical processing steps were defined. Advanced instrumentation and techniques for verification purposes were identified and investigated. The scope of the work was triggered by the International Atomic Energy Agency s 2003 revised policy concerning the starting point of