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Sample records for b-type cyclin over-expression

  1. Specialization of B-Type Cyclins for Mitosis or Meiosis in S. Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Dahmann, C.; Futcher, B.

    1995-01-01

    The CLB1, CLB2, and CLB3 genes encode B-type cyclins important for mitosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, while a fourth B-type cyclin gene, CLB4, has no clear role. The effects of homozygous clb mutations on meiosis were examined. Mutants homozygous for clb1 clb3, or for clb1 clb4, gave high levels of sporulation, but produced mainly two-spored asci instead of four-spored asci. The cells had completed meiosis I but not meiosis II, producing viable diploid ascospores. CLB1 and CLB4 seem to be much more important for meiosis than for mitosis and may play some special role in meiosis II. In contrast, CLB2 is important for mitosis but not meiosis. The level of Cdc28-Clb activity may be important in determining whether meiosis II will occur. PMID:7672594

  2. Atypical Regulation of a Green Lineage-Specific B-Type Cyclin-Dependent Kinase1

    PubMed Central

    Corellou, Florence; Camasses, Alain; Ligat, Laetitia; Peaucellier, Gérard; Bouget, François-Yves

    2005-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are the main regulators of cell cycle progression in eukaryotes. The role and regulation of canonical CDKs, such as the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Cdc2 or plant CDKA, have been extensively characterized. However, the function of the plant-specific CDKB is not as well understood. Besides being involved in cell cycle control, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CDKB would integrate developmental processes to cell cycle progression. We investigated the role of CDKB in Ostreococcus (Ostreococcus tauri), a unicellular green algae with a minimal set of cell cycle genes. In this primitive alga, at the basis of the green lineage, CDKB has integrated two levels of regulations: It is regulated by Tyr phosphorylation like cdc2/CDKA and at the level of synthesis-like B-type CDKs. Furthermore, Ostreococcus CDKB/cyclin B accounts for the main peak of mitotic activity, and CDKB is able to rescue a yeast cdc28ts mutant. By contrast, Ostreococcus CDKA is not regulated by Tyr phosphorylation, and it exhibits a low and steady-state activity from DNA replication to exit of mitosis. This suggests that from a major role in the control of mitosis in green algae, CDKB has evolved in higher plants to assume other functions outside the cell cycle. PMID:15965018

  3. Two fission yeast B-type cyclins, cig2 and Cdc13, have different functions in mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, A; Russell, P

    1993-01-01

    Cyclin B interacts with Cdc2 kinase to induce cell cycle events, particularly those of mitosis. The existence of cyclin B subtypes in several species has been known for some time, leading to speculation that key events of mitosis may be carried out by distinct functional classes of Cdc2/cyclin B. We report the discovery of cig2, a third B-type cyclin gene in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Disruption of cig2 delays the onset of mitosis, to the degree that a cig2 null allele rescues mitotic catastrophe mutants, including those that are unable to carry out the inhibitory tyrosyl phosphorylation of Cdc2 kinase. Consistent with this, a cig2 null allele exhibits synthetic lethal interactions with cdc25ts and cdc2ts mutations. Mitotic phenotypes caused by disruption of cig2 are not reversed by increased production of Cdc13, the other fission yeast B-type cyclin that functions in mitosis. Likewise, a cdc13ts mutation is not rescued by increased gene dosage of cig2+. These data indicate that Cdc13 and Cig2 interact with Cdc2 to carry out different functions in mitosis. We suggest that some cyclin B subtypes found in other species, including humans, are also likely to have distinct, nonoverlapping functions in mitosis. Images PMID:8455610

  4. Identification of a mouse B-type cyclin which exhibits developmentally regulated expression in the germ line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, D. L.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    To begin to examine the function of cyclins in mammalian germ cells, we have screened an adult mouse testis cDNA library for the presence of B-type cyclins. We have isolated cDNAs that encode a murine B-type cyclin, which has been designated cycB1. cycB1 was shown to be expressed in several adult tissues and in the midgestation mouse embryo. In the adult tissues, the highest levels of cycB1 transcripts were seen in the testis and ovary, which contain germ cells at various stages of differentiation. The major transcripts corresponding to cycB1 are 1.7 and 2.5 kb, with the 1.7 kb species being the predominant testicular transcript and the 2.5 kb species more abundant in the ovary. Examination of cDNAs corresponding to the 2.5 kb and 1.7 kb mRNAs revealed that these transcripts encode identical proteins, differing only in the polyadenylation signal used and therefore in the length of their 3' untranslated regions. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses revealed that the predominant sites of cycB1 expression in the testis and ovary were in the germinal compartment, particularly in early round spermatids in the testis and growing oocytes in the ovary. Thus cycB1 is expressed in both meiotic and postmeiotic cells. This pattern of cycB1 expression further suggests that cycB1 may have different functions in the two cell types, only one of which correlates with progression of the cell cycle.

  5. The A- and B-type cyclin associated cdc2 kinases in Xenopus turn on and off at different times in the cell cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Minshull, J; Golsteyn, R; Hill, C S; Hunt, T

    1990-01-01

    Cyclins play a key role in the induction of mitosis. In this paper we report the isolation of a cyclin A cDNA clone from Xenopus eggs. Its cognate mRNA encodes a protein that shows characteristic accumulation and destruction during mitotic cell cycles. The cyclin A polypeptide is associated with a protein that cross-reacts with an antibody against the conserved 'PSTAIR' epitope of p34cdc2, and the cyclin A-cdc2 complex exhibits protein kinase activity that oscillates with the cell cycle. This kinase activity rises more smoothly than that of the cyclin B-cdc2 complexes and reaches a peak earlier in the cell cycle; indeed, cyclin A is destroyed before nuclear envelope breakdown. None of the cyclin-cdc2 complexes show simple relationships between the concentration of the cyclin moiety and the kinase activity. All three cyclin associated kinases (A, B1 and B2) phosphorylate identical sites on histones with the consensus XSPXK/R, although they show significant differences in their substrate preferences. We discuss possible models for the different roles of the A- and B-type cyclins in the control of cell division. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:2143983

  6. Cyclin Dl expression in B-cell non Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Aref, Salah; Mossad, Y; El-Khodary, T; Awad, M; El-Shahat, E

    2006-10-01

    Disorders of the cell cycle regulatory machinery play a key role in the pathogenesis of cancer. Over-expression of cyclin D1 protein has been reported in several solid tumors and certain lymphoid malignancies, but little is known about the effect of its expression on clinical behavior and outcome in B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In this study, we investigated the expression of cyclin Dl in group of patients with NHL and correlated the results with the clinical and laboratory data. The degree of expression of cyclin Dl protein was evaluated by flow cytometry in a group of NHL patients (n = 46) and in normal control group (n = 10). Cyclin Dl over expression was detected in 10 out of 46 (21.7%) patients; they were 5/5-mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) (100%) and 5/28 large B-cell lymphoma (17.8%). All other NHL subtypes showed normal cyclin D1 expression. The clinical signs (hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and B-symptoms, clinical staging) and laboratory data (hemoglobin, white cell count (WBCs), platelet count, and bone marrow infiltration) were not significantly different between NHL subgroup with cyclin Dl over expression and that with normal cyclin Dl expression. Serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels and lymphadenopathy were significantly higher in NHL group with cyclin D1 over expression as compared to those without. Also, cyclin D1 over expression is associated with poor outcome of NHL patients. Cyclin Dl over expression was evident among all cases of MCL and few cases of large B-cell lymphoma. Cyclin Dl over expression might be used as adjuvant tool for diagnosis of MCL; has role in NHL biology and is bad prognostic index in NHL. PMID:17607588

  7. AKAP95 promotes cell cycle progression via interactions with cyclin E and low molecular weight cyclin E

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiang-Yu; Zhang, Deng-Cheng; Zhuang, Wen-Xin; Hua, Su-Hang; Dai, Yue; Yuan, Yang-Yang; Feng, Li-Li; Huang, Qian; Teng, Bo-Gang; Yu, Xiu-Yi; Liu, Wen-Zhi; Zhang, Yong-Xing

    2016-01-01

    AKAP95 in lung cancer tissues showed higher expression than in paracancerous tissues. AKAP95 can bind with cyclin D and cyclin E during G1/S cell cycle transition, but its molecular mechanisms remain unclear. To identify the mechanism of AKAP95 in cell cycle progression, we performed AKAP95 transfection and silencing in A549 cells, examined AKAP95, cyclin E1 and cyclin E2 expression, and the interactions of AKAP95 with cyclins E1 and E2. Results showed that over-expression of AKAP95 promoted cell growth and AKAP95 bound cyclin E1 and E2, low molecular weight cyclin E1 (LWM-E1) and LWM-E2. Additionally AKAP95 bound cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 in the nucleus during G1/S transition, bound LMW-E1 during G1, S and G2/M, and bound cyclin E2 mainly on the nuclear membrane during interphase. Cyclin E2 and LMW-E2 were also detected. AKAP95 over-expression increased cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 expression but decreased cyclin E2 levels. Unlike cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 that were nuclear located during the G1, S and G1/S phases, cyclin E2 and LMW-E1 were expressed in all cell cycle phases, with cyclin E2 present in the cytoplasm and nuclear membrane, with traces in the nucleus. LMW-E1 was present in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. The 20 kDa form of LMW-E1 showed only cytoplasmic expression, while the 40 kDa form was nuclear expressed. The expression of AKAP95, cyclin E1, LMW-E1 and -E2, might be regulated by cAMP. We conclude that AKAP95 might promote cell cycle progression by interacting with cyclin E1 and LMW-E2. LMW-E2, but not cyclin E2, might be involved in G1/S transition. The binding of AKAP95 and LMW-E1 was found throughout cell cycle. PMID:27158371

  8. Plant cyclins: a unified nomenclature for plant A-, B- and D-type cyclins based on sequence organization.

    PubMed

    Renaudin, J P; Doonan, J H; Freeman, D; Hashimoto, J; Hirt, H; Inzé, D; Jacobs, T; Kouchi, H; Rouzé, P; Sauter, M; Savouré, A; Sorrell, D A; Sundaresan, V; Murray, J A

    1996-12-01

    The comparative analysis of a large number of plant cyclins of the A/B family has recently revealed that plants possess two distinct B-type groups and three distinct A-type groups of cyclins. Despite earlier uncertainties, this large-scale comparative analysis has allowed an unequivocal definition of plant cyclins into either A or B classes. We present here the most important results obtained in this study, and extend them to the case of plant D-type cyclins, in which three groups are identified. For each of the plant cyclin groups, consensus sequences have been established and a new, rational, plant-wide naming system is proposed in accordance with the guidelines of the Commission on Plant Gene Nomenclature. This nomenclature is based on the animal system indicating cyclin classes by an upper-case roman letter, and distinct groups within these classes by an arabic numeral suffix. The naming of plant cyclin classes is chosen to indicate homology to their closest animal class. The revised nomenclature of all described plant cyclins is presented, with their classification into groups CycA1, CycA2, CycA3, CycB1, CycB2, CycD1, CycD2 and CycD3. PMID:9002599

  9. BRCA1-IRIS regulates cyclin D1 expression in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakuci, Enkeleda; Mahner, Sven; DiRenzo, James; ElShamy, Wael M. . E-mail: wael_elshamy@dfci.harvard.edu

    2006-10-01

    The regulator of cell cycle progression, cyclin D1, is up-regulated in breast cancer cells; its expression is, in part, dependent on ER{alpha} signaling. However, many ER{alpha}-negative tumors and tumor cell lines (e.g., SKBR3) also show over-expression of cyclin D1. This suggests that, in addition to ER{alpha} signaling, cyclin D1 expression is under the control of other signaling pathways; these pathways may even be over-expressed in the ER{alpha}-negative cells. We previously noticed that both ER{alpha}-positive and -negative cell lines over-express BRCA1-IRIS mRNA and protein. Furthermore, the level of over-expression of BRCA1-IRIS in ER{alpha}-negative cell lines even exceeded its over-expression level in ER{alpha}-positive cell lines. In this study, we show that: (1) BRCA1-IRIS forms complex with two of the nuclear receptor co-activators, namely, SRC1 and SRC3 (AIB1) in an ER{alpha}-independent manner. (2) BRCA1-IRIS alone, or in connection with co-activators, is recruited to the cyclin D1 promoter through its binding to c-Jun/AP1 complex; this binding activates the cyclin D1 expression. (3) Over-expression of BRCA1-IRIS in breast cells over-activates JNK/c-Jun; this leads to the induction of cyclin D1 expression and cellular proliferation. (4) BRCA1-IRIS activation of JNK/c-Jun/AP1 appears to account for this, because in cells that were depleted from BRCA1-IRIS, JNK remained inactive. However, depletion of SRC1 or SRC3 instead reduced c-Jun expression. Our data suggest that this novel signaling pathway links BRCA1-IRIS to cellular proliferation through c-Jun/AP1 nuclear pathway; finally, this culminates in the increased expression of the cyclin D1 gene.

  10. Cyclin D1 and Ewing's sarcoma/PNET: A microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Fagone, Paolo; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Salvatorelli, Lucia; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Magro, Gaetano

    2015-10-01

    Recent immunohistochemical analyses have showed that cyclin D1 is expressed in soft tissue Ewing's sarcoma/peripheral neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) of childhood and adolescents, while it is undetectable in both embryonal and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. In the present paper, microarray analysis provided evidence of a significant upregulation of cyclin D1 in Ewing's sarcoma as compared to normal tissues. In addition, we confirmed our previous findings of a significant over-expression of cyclin D1 in Ewing sarcoma as compared to rhabdomyosarcoma. Bioinformatic analysis also allowed to identify some other genes, strongly correlated to cyclin D1, which, although not previously studied in pediatric tumors, could represent novel markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of Ewing's sarcoma/PNET. The data herein provided support not only the use of cyclin D1 as a diagnostic marker of Ewing sarcoma/PNET but also the possibility of using drugs targeting cyclin D1 as potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:26363896

  11. Drosophila Cyclin J is a mitotically stable Cdk1 partner without essential functions.

    PubMed

    Althoff, Friederike; Viktorinová, Ivana; Kastl, Johanna; Lehner, Christian F

    2009-09-15

    Cyclin J is a cyclin family member that appears to have evolved before the metazoan radiation. Its evolutionary conservation argues for an important role but functional characterizations of Cyclin J have remained very limited. In Drosophila, Cyclin J is expressed only in females. Using transgenic Drosophila lines expressing Cyclin J versions with N- or C-terminal GFP extensions, we demonstrate that it is expressed exclusively in the germline. After low level expression in all nuclei within the germarium, it gets highly enriched in the germinal vesicle within the oocyte until stage 12 of oogenesis, followed by disappearance after germinal vesicle breakdown before the first meiotic division. Surprisingly, Cyclin J is not required for female fertility. Chromosome segregation during female meiosis, as well as the rapid early embryonic cell cycles after fertilization, occurs normally in the complete absence of Cyclin J. Cyclin J with EGFP fused at either N- or C-terminus binds to Cdk1 and not to Cdk2. However, in contrast to the other known Cdk1 partners, the A- and B-type cyclins, Cyclin J is not degraded during mitosis. PMID:19591820

  12. Down-regulation of SOSTDC1 promotes thyroid cancer cell proliferation via regulating cyclin A2 and cyclin E2

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaoying; Ke, Weijian; Xu, Lijuan; Liu, Liehua; Xiao, Haipeng; Li, Yanbing

    2015-01-01

    Sclerostin domain containing protein 1 (SOSTDC1) is down-regulated and acts as a tumor suppressor in some kinds of cancers. However, the expression pattern and biological significance of SOSTDC1 in thyroid cancer are largely unknown. We demonstrated that SOSTDC1 was significantly down-regulated in thyroid cancer. Ectopic over-expression of SOSTDC1 inhibited proliferation and induced G1/S arrest in thyroid cancer cells. Moreover, SOSTDC1 over-expression suppressed the growth of tumor xenografts in nude mice. We also found that elevated SOSTDC1 led to inhibition of cyclin A2 and cyclin E2. Together, our results demonstrate that SOSTDC1 is down-regulated in thyroid cancer and might be a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of thyroid cancer. PMID:26378658

  13. Combinatorial control of cyclin B1 nuclear trafficking through phosphorylation at multiple sites.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Song, H; Walsh, S; Bardes, E S; Kornbluth, S

    2001-02-01

    Entry into mitosis is regulated by the Cdc2 kinase complexed to B-type cyclins. We and others recently reported that cyclin B1/Cdc2 complexes, which appear to be constitutively cytoplasmic during interphase, actually shuttle continually into and out of the nucleus, with the rate of nuclear export exceeding the import rate (). At the time of entry into mitosis, the import rate is increased, whereas the export rate is decreased, leading to rapid nuclear accumulation of Cdc2/cyclin B1. Although it has recently been reported that phosphorylation of 4 serines within cyclin B1 promotes the rapid nuclear translocation of Cdc2/cyclin B1 at G(2)/M, the role that individual phosphorylation sites play in this process has not been examined (, ). We report here that phosphorylation of a single serine residue (Ser(113) of Xenopus cyclin B1) abrogates nuclear export of cyclin B1. This serine lies directly within the cyclin B1 nuclear export sequence and, when phosphorylated, prevents binding of the nuclear export factor, CRM1. In contrast, analysis of phosphorylation site mutants suggests that coordinate phosphorylation of all 4 serines (94, 96, 101, and 113) is required for the accelerated nuclear import of cyclin B1/Cdc2 characteristic of G(2)/M. Additionally, binding of cyclin B1 to importin-beta, the factor known to be responsible for the slow interphase nuclear entry of cyclin B1, appears to be unaffected by the phosphorylation state of cyclin B. These data suggest that a distinct import factor must be recruited to enhance nuclear entry of Cdc2/cyclin B1 at the G(2)/M transition. PMID:11060306

  14. Closing the cell cycle circle in yeast: G2 cyclin proteolysis initiated at mitosis persists until the activation of G1 cyclins in the next cycle.

    PubMed

    Amon, A; Irniger, S; Nasmyth, K

    1994-07-01

    It is thought that DNA replication and mitosis in yeast are triggered by oscillations in the level of G1-specific (CLN1 and CLN2) and G2-specific (CLB1-CLB4) cyclins, which determine the substrate specificity of the CDC28 protein kinase. It is not understood how the time and order of appearance of different cyclin types are determined. We show here that CLB2 proteolysis, which is important for transition from mitosis to G1, is not confined to a narrow window at the end of mitosis as previously thought but continues until reactivation of CDC28 by CLN cyclins toward the end of the subsequent G1 period. Thus, cell cycle-regulated proteolysis prevents accumulation of G2-specific CLB cyclins during G1 and thereby ensures that the CLN-associated forms of the CDC28 kinase are activated without interference from CLB cyclins. Accumulation of CLN cyclins leads to inactivation of CLB cyclin proteolysis, which is a precondition for subsequent activation of G2-specific B-type cyclins. PMID:8020094

  15. A novel cyclin gene (CCNF) in the region of the polycystic kidney disease gene (PKD1)

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, B.; Pohlschmidt, M.; Leung, L.S.

    1994-11-01

    The major locus for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD1) is located in a gene-rich region on chromosome 16p13.3. Recently the identification of the gene responsible for PKD1 has been described. While searching for candidate genes in this region, the authors isolated a new member of the cyclin family. They have characterized the transcript by sequencing, determination of the exon intron boundaries, and Northern blot analysis. Cyclin F is related to A- and B-type cyclins by sequence, but its function is unknown.

  16. Cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are protein kinases characterized by needing a separate subunit - a cyclin - that provides domains essential for enzymatic activity. CDKs play important roles in the control of cell division and modulate transcription in response to several extra- and intracellular cues. The evolutionary expansion of the CDK family in mammals led to the division of CDKs into three cell-cycle-related subfamilies (Cdk1, Cdk4 and Cdk5) and five transcriptional subfamilies (Cdk7, Cdk8, Cdk9, Cdk11 and Cdk20). Unlike the prototypical Cdc28 kinase of budding yeast, most of these CDKs bind one or a few cyclins, consistent with functional specialization during evolution. This review summarizes how, although CDKs are traditionally separated into cell-cycle or transcriptional CDKs, these activities are frequently combined in many family members. Not surprisingly, deregulation of this family of proteins is a hallmark of several diseases, including cancer, and drug-targeted inhibition of specific members has generated very encouraging results in clinical trials. PMID:25180339

  17. The proteolysis of mitotic cyclins in mammalian cells persists from the end of mitosis until the onset of S phase.

    PubMed

    Brandeis, M; Hunt, T

    1996-10-01

    We have studied how the cell cycle-specific oscillations of mitotic B-type cyclins are generated in mouse fibroblasts. A reporter enzyme comprising the N-terminus of a B-type cyclin fused to bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) was degraded at the end of mitosis like endogenous cyclins. Point mutations in the destruction box of this construct completely abolished its mitotic instability. When the destructible reporter was driven by the cyclin B2 promoter, CAT activity mimicked the oscillations in the level of the endogenous cyclin B2. These oscillations were largely conserved when the reporter was transcribed constitutively from the SV40 promoter. Pulse-chase experiments or addition of the proteasome inhibitors lactacystin and ALLN showed that cyclin synthesis continued after the end of mitosis. The destruction box-specific degradation of cyclins normally ceases at the onset of S phase, and is active in fibroblasts arrested in G0 and in differentiated C2 myoblasts. We were able to reproduce this proteolysis in vitro in extracts of synchronized cells. Extracts of G1 cells degraded cyclin B1 whereas p27Kip1 was stable, in contrast, cyclin B1 remained stable and p27Kip1 was degraded in extracts of S phase cells. PMID:8895573

  18. Cyclin D1 amplification and expression in human breast carcinoma: correlation with histological prognostic markers and oestrogen receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Worsley, S D; Jennings, B A; Khalil, K H; Mole, M; Girling, A C

    1996-01-01

    Aims—To study the amplification of the Cyclin D1 gene (CCND1) in human breast carcinoma; to relate this to Cyclin D1 protein expression; to relate these parameters to recognised pathological prognostic factors, including oestrogen receptor (ER) status. Methods—DNA extracted from frozen sections of breast tumours (n = 36) was used for Southern blotting. Probes for CCND1, c-myc and the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus (IgH) were hybridised to tumour DNA. Immunocytochemical expression of Cyclin D1 protein and ER was studied in paraffin wax sections from the same tumours. Results—Amplification of CCND1 was observed in 11% (four of 36) of tumours studied. Over expression of Cyclin D1 protein was observed in 73% (30/41) of tumours. There was no correlation between recognised histological prognostic markers and either gene amplification or expression. However, a weak association was seen between Cyclin D1 expression and ER status. Conclusions—A disparity exists between locus amplification and over expression of Cyclin D1, suggesting the existence of another mechanism for raised protein expression. No significant correlation was detected between either Cyclin D1 amplification or over expression and established prognostic markers. Images PMID:16696045

  19. Physical and spectral characterization of the human cyclin A gene and its interactions with anthracycline anticancer drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Huixin; Wang, Xiaohui; Yu, Haijia; Fu, Manliang; Qu, Xiaogang; Zheng, Yongchen; Ren, Jinsong

    2007-02-01

    Over expression of cyclin A in human tumors has been linked to cancer by various experimental lines of evidence. However, physical and spectral characterization of the human cyclin A gene and its interactions with anticancer drugs have not been reported. Our gene sequence analysis, singular value decomposition method and melting studies in the presence of antitumor agents, daunomycin, doxorubicin and Hoechst 33258 showed that cyclin A gene had both AT-rich and GC-rich domains. For a ligand with unknown DNA binding specificity, this gene sequence can be used to differentiate its DNA binding preference.

  20. Redundant pathways for Cdc2 activation in Xenopus oocyte: either cyclin B or Mos synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Haccard, Olivier; Jessus, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Xenopus oocytes are arrested in meiotic prophase I. Progesterone induces the resumption of meiotic maturation, which requires continuous protein synthesis to bring about Cdc2 activation. The identification of the newly synthesized proteins has long been a goal. Two plausible candidates have received extensive study. The synthesis of cyclin B and of c-Mos, a kinase that activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in oocytes, is clearly upregulated by translational control in response to progesterone. Recent studies suggest that ablation of either c-Mos or cyclin B synthesis by antisense oligonucleotides does not block meiotic maturation. Here, however, we show that when both pathways are simultaneously inhibited, progesterone no longer triggers maturation; adding back either c-Mos or cyclin B restores meiotic maturation. We conclude that the specific synthesis of either B-type cyclins or c-Mos, induced by progesterone, is required to induce meiotic maturation. The two pathways seem to be functionally redundant. PMID:16374506

  1. B-type stars in eclipsing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, Milena; Pigulski, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    B-type stars in eclipsing binary systems are unique astrophysical tools to test several aspects of stellar evolution. Such objects can be used e.g. to determine the masses of Beta Cephei variable stars, as well as help to place tighter constraints on the value of the convective core overshooting parameter α. Both precise photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy with high SNR are required to achieve these goals, but since many of the targets are bright enough, the challenge is fair. Following this assumption, we shall explain how we plan to examine both the aforementioned aspects of stellar evolution using observations of B-type stars obtained with a wide range of spectrographs, as well as BRITE-Constellation satellites.

  2. Identification of the cyclin D1b mRNA variant in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jack; Wu, Si-hung; Bollig, Aliccia; Thakur, Archana

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin D1 plays a key regulatory role during the G1 phase of the cell cycle and its gene is amplified and over-expressed in many cancers. The cyclin D1b mRNA variant was established in human cells and recent functional analyses revealed that its protein product harbors unique activities in human cancer cells. By performing reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) experiments, we identified the cyclin D1b mRNA variant in mouse. Similar to its human counterpart, the mouse cyclin D1b transcript consists of exon 1, 2, 3, 4 and part of intron 4, and contains a long open reading frame (ORF). The predicted peptide from this ORF is 34-amino acid longer than the human cyclin D1b. The expression of this mouse mRNA variant was investigated. It appears to be expressed ubiquitously and differentially in various mouse cell lines and tissues and its level might be proportional to that of the canonical endogenous cyclin D1a mRNA. PMID:18446443

  3. Cyclin C is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Fassl, Anne; Chick, Joel; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Li, Xiaoyu; Mansour, Marc R.; Liu, Lijun; Wang, Haizhen; King, Bryan; Shaik, Shavali; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ordureau, Alban; Otto, Tobias; Kreslavsky, Taras; Baitsch, Lukas; Bury, Leah; Meyer, Clifford A.; Ke, Nan; Mulry, Kristin A.; Kluk, Michael J.; Roy, Moni; Kim, Sunkyu; Zhang, Xiaowu; Geng, Yan; Zagozdzon, Agnieszka; Jenkinson, Sarah; Gale, Rosemary E.; Linch, David C.; Zhao, Jean J.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Harper, J. Wade; Aster, Jon C.; Aifantis, Iannis; von Boehmer, Harald; Gygi, Steven P.; Wei, Wenyi; Look, A. Thomas; Sicinski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin C was cloned as a growth-promoting G1 cyclin, and was also shown to regulate gene transcription. Here we report that in vivo cyclin C acts as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor, by controlling Notch1 oncogene levels. Cyclin C activates an “orphan” CDK19 kinase, as well as CDK8 and CDK3. These cyclin C-CDK complexes phosphorylate Notch1 intracellular domain (ICN1) and promote ICN1 degradation. Genetic ablation of cyclin C blocks ICN1 phosphorylation in vivo, thereby elevating ICN1 levels in cyclin C-knockout mice. Cyclin C ablation or heterozygosity collaborate with other oncogenic lesions and accelerate development of T-cell-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Furthermore, the cyclin C gene is heterozygously deleted in a significant fraction of human T-ALL, and these tumors express reduced cyclin C levels. We also describe point mutations in human T-ALL that render cyclin C-CDK unable to phosphorylate ICN1. Hence, tumor cells may develop different strategies to evade cyclin C inhibitory function. PMID:25344755

  4. PTTG1 Over-expression in Adrenocortical Cancer is Associated with Poor Survival and Represents a Potential Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Demeure, Michael J.; Coan, Kathryn E.; Grant, Clive S.; Komorowski, Richard A.; Stephan, Elizabeth; Sinari, Shripad; Mount, David; Bussey, Kimberly J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is associated with poor survival rates. The objective of the study was to analyze ACC gene expression profiling data for prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Methods 44 ACC and 4 normal adrenals were profiled on Affymetrix U133 Plus 2 expression microarrays. Pathway and transcriptional enrichment analysis was performed. Protein levels were determined by western blot. Drug efficacy was assessed against ACC cell lines. Previously published expression datasets were analyzed for validation. Results Pathway enrichment analysis identified marked dysregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases and mitosis. Over-expression of PTTG1, which encodes securin, a negative regulator of p53, was identified as a marker of poor survival. Median survival for patients with tumors expressing high PTTG1 levels (log2 ratio of PTTG1 to average beta-actin <-3.04 ) was 1.8 years compared to 9.0 years if tumors expressed lower levels of PTTG1 (P<0.0001). Analysis of a previously published data set confirmed the association of high PTTG1 expression with a poor prognosis. Treatment of two ACC cell lines with vorinostat decreased securin levels and inhibited cell growth (IC50s of 1.69 uM and 0.891 uM, for SW-13 and H295R, respectively). Conclusion Over-expression of PTTG1 is correlated with poor survival in ACC. PTTG1/securin is a prognostic biomarker and warrants investigation as a therapeutic target. PMID:24238056

  5. Over-expression of secreted proteins from mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Annamarie C; Barton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Secreted mammalian proteins require the development of robust protein over-expression systems for crystallographic and biophysical studies of protein function. Due to complex disulfide bonds and distinct glycosylation patterns preventing folding and expression in prokaryotic expression hosts, many secreted proteins necessitate production in more complex eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we elaborate on the methods used to obtain high yields of purified secreted proteins from transiently or stably transfected mammalian cell lines. Among the issues discussed are the selection of appropriate expression vectors, choice of signal sequences for protein secretion, availability of fusion tags for enhancing protein stability and purification, choice of cell line, and the large-scale growth of cells in a variety of formats. PMID:24510886

  6. Over-Expression of Meteorin Drives Gliogenesis Following Striatal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jordan L.; Ermine, Charlotte M.; Jørgensen, Jesper R.; Parish, Clare L.; Thompson, Lachlan H.

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that damage to brain structures adjacent to neurogenic regions can result in migration of new neurons from neurogenic zones into the damaged tissue. The number of differentiated neurons that survive is low, however, and this has led to the idea that the introduction of extrinsic signaling factors, particularly neurotrophic proteins, may augment the neurogenic response to a level that would be therapeutically relevant. Here we report on the impact of the relatively newly described neurotrophic factor, Meteorin, when over-expressed in the striatum following excitotoxic injury. Birth-dating studies using bromo-deoxy-uridine (BrdU) showed that Meteorin did not enhance injury-induced striatal neurogenesis but significantly increased the proportion of new cells with astroglial and oligodendroglial features. As a basis for comparison we found under the same conditions, glial derived neurotrophic factor significantly enhanced neurogenesis but did not effect gliogenesis. The results highlight the specificity of action of different neurotrophic factors in modulating the proliferative response to injury. Meteorin may be an interesting candidate in pathological settings involving damage to white matter, for example after stroke or neonatal brain injury. PMID:27458346

  7. Lymphopoiesis in transgenic mice over-expressing Artemis.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Munoz, P; Abramowski, V; Jacquot, S; André, P; Charrier, S; Lipson-Ruffert, K; Fischer, A; Galy, A; Cavazzana, M; de Villartay, J-P

    2016-02-01

    Artemis is a factor of the non-homologous end joining pathway involved in DNA double-strand break repair that has a critical role in V(D)J recombination. Mutations in DCLRE1C/ARTEMIS gene result in radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency in humans owing to a lack of mature T and B cells. Given the known drawbacks of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), gene therapy appears as a promising alternative for these patients. However, the safety of an unregulated expression of Artemis has to be established. We developed a transgenic mouse model expressing human Artemis under the control of the strong CMV early enhancer/chicken beta actin promoter through knock-in at the ROSA26 locus to analyze this issue. Transgenic mice present a normal development, maturation and function of T and B cells with no signs of lymphopoietic malignancies for up to 15 months. These results suggest that the over-expression of Artemis in mice (up to 40 times) has no deleterious effects in early and mature lymphoid cells and support the safety of gene therapy as a possible curative treatment for Artemis-deficient patients. PMID:26361272

  8. Cyclin activation of p34cdc2.

    PubMed

    Solomon, M J; Glotzer, M; Lee, T H; Philippe, M; Kirschner, M W

    1990-11-30

    The gradual accumulation of cyclin in the frog egg induces an abrupt and concerted activation of p34cdc2 that initiates mitosis. Activation is delayed even after the accumulation of cyclin to a critical threshold concentration. We have reproduced these unusual kinetic properties of p34cdc2 activation in vitro using bacterially expressed cyclin proteins and extracts derived from Xenopus eggs. Abrupt activation follows a lag period, the length of which is independent of the concentration of cyclin. The threshold concentration of cyclin and the length of the lag period are regulated by INH, an inhibitor of MPF activation in oocytes recently identified as a type 2A protein phosphatase. Binding to cyclin induces both tyrosine and threonine phosphorylation of the previously unphosphorylated p34cdc2, rendering it inactivated. The concerted transition into mitosis involves both a reduction in the rate of p34cdc2 phosphorylation on tyrosine and an increase in its rate of dephosphorylation. PMID:2147872

  9. Cyclin A- and cyclin E-Cdk complexes shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Mark; Kubota, Yumiko; den Elzen, Nicole; Hagting, Anja; Pines, Jonathon

    2002-03-01

    Cyclins A and E and their partner cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are key regulators of DNA synthesis and of mitosis. Immunofluorescence studies have shown that both cyclins are nuclear and that a proportion of cyclin A is localized to sites of DNA replication. However, recently, both cyclin A and cyclin E have been implicated as regulators of centrosome replication, and it is unclear when and where these cyclin-Cdks can interact with cytoplasmic substrates. We have used live cell imaging to study the behavior of cyclin/Cdk complexes. We found that cyclin A and cyclin E are able to regulate both nuclear and cytoplasmic events because they both shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. However, we found that there are marked differences in their shuttling behavior, which raises the possibility that cyclin/Cdk function could be regulated at the level of nuclear import and export. In the course of these experiments, we have also found that, contrary to published results, mutations in the hydrophobic patch of cyclin A do affect Cdk binding and nuclear import. This has implications for the role of the hydrophobic patch as a substrate selection motif. PMID:11907280

  10. Positive expression of cyclin D1 is an indicator for the evaluation of the prognosis of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liying; Liu, Sha; Jakulin, Adina; Yilamu, Dilimina; Wang, Bowei; Yan, Jinghong

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The present study is to detect the expression of cyclin D1 in different clinical molecular subtypes in breast cancer, and to analyze its relationship to the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (Her-2), tumor size, clinical stages, histological grades, age of menarche, and prognosis. Methods: In the present study, we retrospectively reviewed the clinical information of 226 patients with breast cancer who were hospitalized at The First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University between January 2000 and December 2012. Immunohistochemical method was used to detect the expression of cyclin D1 in breast cancer tissues. Pearson’s Chi-square test was performed to compare the expression of cyclin D1 under different clinical indicators, and under different immune indexes and subtypes. Spearman rank correlation method was used to analyze the correlation between cyclin D1 expression and ER, PR, Her-2, tumor size, clinical stages, histological grades and age of menarche. Kaplan-Meier was employed to calculate the survival time of tumor-free survival time. Log-rank method was used to analyze the survival curves. Results: The expression of cyclin D1 was not significantly correlated to tumor size, clinical stages, histological grades, age of menarche, or PR, but was correlated to ER. Higher cyclin D1 positive rate corresponded to higher ER positive rate. The expression of cyclin D1 was negatively correlated to Her-2 expression (P < 0.05). Higher cyclin D1 positive rate corresponded to lower Her-2 positive rate. In cyclin D1 positive group, the percentage of Luminal A type was the highest. In cyclin D1 negative group, the percentage of Luminal B type was the highest. Higher cyclin D1 positive rate led to longer tumor-free survival time. Conclusions: The expression of cyclinD1 is significantly correlated to ER and Her-2. Positive expression of cyclin D1 suggests good prognosis, and can be used as

  11. Cyclin D1 expression in prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, R.A.; Ravinal, R.C.; Costa, R.S.; Lima, M.S.; Tucci, S.; Muglia, V.F.; Reis, R.B. Dos; Silva, G.E.B.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cyclin D1 expression and clinicopathological parameters in patients with prostate carcinoma. We assessed cyclin D1 expression by conventional immunohistochemistry in 85 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate carcinoma and 10 normal prostate tissue samples retrieved from autopsies. We measured nuclear immunostaining in the entire tumor area and based the results on the percentage of positive tumor cells. The preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 8.68±5.16 ng/mL (mean±SD). Cyclin D1 staining was positive (cyclin D1 expression in >5% of tumor cells) in 64 cases (75.4%) and negative (cyclin D1 expression in ≤5% of tumor cells) in 21 cases (including 15 cases with no immunostaining). Normal prostate tissues were negative for cyclin D1. Among patients with a high-grade Gleason score (≥7), 86% of patients demonstrated cyclin D1 immunostaining of >5% (P<0.05). In the crude analysis of cyclin D1 expression, the high-grade Gleason score group showed a mean expression of 39.6%, compared to 26.9% in the low-grade Gleason score group (P<0.05). Perineural invasion tended to be associated with cyclin D1 expression (P=0.07), whereas cyclin D1 expression was not associated with PSA levels or other parameters. Our results suggest that high cyclin D1 expression could be a potential marker for tumor aggressiveness. PMID:24820071

  12. Cyclin K and cyclin D1b are oncogenic in myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Aberrant expression of cyclin D1 is a common feature in multiple myeloma (MM) and always associated with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). CCND1 gene is alternatively spliced to produce two cyclin D1 mRNA isoforms which are translated in two proteins: cyclin D1a and cyclin D1b. Both isoforms are present in MM cell lines and primary cells but their relative role in the tumorigenic process is still elusive. Results To test the tumorigenic potential of cyclin D1b in vivo, we generated cell clones derived from the non-CCND1 expressing MM LP-1 cell line, synthesizing either cyclin D1b or cyclin K, a structural homolog and viral oncogenic form of cyclin D1a. Immunocompromised mice injected s.c. with LP-1K or LP-1D1b cells develop tumors at the site of injection. Genome-wide analysis of LP-1-derived cells indicated that several cellular processes were altered by cyclin D1b and/or cyclin K expression such as cell metabolism, signal transduction, regulation of transcription and translation. Importantly, cyclin K and cyclin D1b have no major action on cell cycle or apoptosis regulatory genes. Moreover, they impact differently cell functions. Cyclin K-expressing cells have lost their migration properties and display enhanced clonogenic capacities. Cyclin D1b promotes tumorigenesis through the stimulation of angiogenesis. Conclusions Our study indicates that cyclin D1b participates into MM pathogenesis via previously unrevealed actions. PMID:20459741

  13. Crystal structure of human cyclin K, a positive regulator of cyclin-dependent kinase 9.

    PubMed

    Baek, Kyuwon; Brown, Raymond S; Birrane, Gabriel; Ladias, John A A

    2007-02-16

    Cyclin K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, referred to collectively as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 A resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell-cycle inhibitor p27(Kip1). Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K structure as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high level of sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9-cyclin K and CDK9-cyclin T1 complexes. PMID:17169370

  14. Crystal Structure of Human Cyclin K, a Positive Regulator of Cyclin-dependent Kinase 9

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kyuwon; Brown, Raymond S.; Birrane, Gabriel; Ladias, John A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Cyclin K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, collectively referred to as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 Å resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1. Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9–cyclin K and CDK9–cyclin T1 complexes. PMID:17169370

  15. FEATURE B, TYPE 1 PILLBOX, SOUTH AND WEST SIDES, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE B, TYPE 1 PILLBOX, SOUTH AND WEST SIDES, VIEW FACING NORTH-NORTHEAST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Shore Pillbox Complex-Type 1 Pillbox, Along shoreline, seaward of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  16. The 19q12 bladder cancer GWAS signal: association with cyclin E function and aggressive disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yi-Ping; Kohaar, Indu; Moore, Lee E.; Lenz, Petra; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Tang, Wei; Porter-Gill, Patricia; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Scott-Johnson, Alexandra; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Muchmore, Brian; Baris, Dalsu; Paquin, Ashley; Ylaya, Kris; Schwenn, Molly; Apolo, Andrea B.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Tarway, McAnthony; Johnson, Alison; Mumy, Adam; Schned, Alan; Guedez, Liliana; Jones, Michael A.; Kida, Masatoshi; Monawar Hosain, GM; Malats, Nuria; Kogevinas, Manolis; Tardon, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Wu, Xifeng; Purdue, Mark; Andriole, Gerald L.; Grubb, Robert L.; Black, Amanda; Landi, Maria T.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Vineis, Paolo; Siddiq, Afshan; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ljungberg, Börje; Severi, Gianluca; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Krogh, Vittorio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Travis, Ruth C.; Tjønneland, Anne; Brennan, Paul; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Riboli, Elio; Prescott, Jennifer; Chen, Constance; De Vivo, Immaculata; Govannucci, Edward; Hunter, David; Kraft, Peter; Lindstrom, Sara; Gapstur, Susan M.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Albanes, Demetrius; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Kooperberg, Charles; Hohensee, Chancellor; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Conti, David V.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Stern, Mariana C.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Van Den Berg, David; Yuan, Jian-Min; Haiman, Christopher A.; Cussenot, Olivier; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Roupret, Morgan; Comperat, Eva; Porru, Stefano; Carta, Angela; Pavanello, Sofia; Arici, Cecilia; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Grossman, H. Barton; Wang, Zhaoming; Deng, Xiang; Chung, Charles C.; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Wheeler, William; Fraumeni, Joseph; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Silverman, Debra T.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of bladder cancer identified a genetic marker rs8102137 within the 19q12 region as a novel susceptibility variant. This marker is located upstream of the CCNE1 gene, which encodes cyclin E, a cell cycle protein. We performed genetic fine mapping analysis of the CCNE1 region using data from two bladder cancer GWAS (5,942 cases and 10,857 controls). We found that the original GWAS marker rs8102137 represents a group of 47 linked SNPs (with r2≥0.7) associated with increased bladder cancer risk. From this group we selected a functional promoter variant rs7257330, which showed strong allele-specific binding of nuclear proteins in several cell lines. In both GWAS, rs7257330 was associated only with aggressive bladder cancer, with a combined per-allele odds ratio (OR) =1.18 (95%CI=1.09-1.27, p=4.67×10−5 vs. OR =1.01 (95%CI=0.93-1.10, p=0.79) for non-aggressive disease, with p=0.0015 for case-only analysis. Cyclin E protein expression analyzed in 265 bladder tumors was increased in aggressive tumors (p=0.013) and, independently, with each rs7257330-A risk allele (ptrend=0.024). Over-expression of recombinant cyclin E in cell lines caused significant acceleration of cell cycle. In conclusion, we defined the 19q12 signal as the first GWAS signal specific for aggressive bladder cancer. Molecular mechanisms of this genetic association may be related to cyclin E over-expression and alteration of cell cycle in carriers of CCNE1 risk variants. In combination with established bladder cancer risk factors and other somatic and germline genetic markers, the CCNE1 variants could be useful for inclusion into bladder cancer risk prediction models. PMID:25320178

  17. Crystal Structure of Human Cyclin K, A Positive Regulator of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 9

    SciTech Connect

    Baek,K.; Brown, R.; Birrane, G.; Ladias, J.

    2007-01-01

    K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, referred to collectively as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell-cycle inhibitor p27{sup Kip1}. Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K structure as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high level of sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9-cyclin K and CDK9-cyclin T1 complexes.

  18. Near Infrared Spectroscopy of B-type Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Jewitt, D.

    2009-09-01

    Most small bodies in the Solar system possess optical colors that are either redder than, or comparable to, the Solar colors in the wavelength region from 0.4 to 0.9 µm. However, a small fraction, about 1 out of every 23 asteroids, is found to be bluer than the Sun. These rare, blue asteroids, of which 2 Pallas is the largest and most famous example, are classified as B-types in the Bus spectral taxonomy. The paucity of B-types already makes these objects interesting. Moreover, several meteor shower-associated asteroids (e.g. 3200 Phaethon, 2005 UD) are found to be blue in the optical. Furthermore, the available optical spectra of the main belt comets 133P and 176P are similar to those of the B-type asteroids. However, B-type asteroids remain largely unexamined as a group and our knowledge of their properties is correspondingly limited. For this reason, we undertook a focused, spectroscopic study of 20 B-type asteroids using the 3-meter IRTF telescope atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The spectra show that optically similar B-type asteroids are spectrally diverse in the near infrared. We find that the negative optical spectral slope is due to the presence of a broad absorption band centered near 1.0 µm. Amongst the meteorites, the best spectral analogs are found in the unusual CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites. The 1.0 µm absorption feature in several objects is very well matched by the reflection spectrum of magnetite. We will present our observations of the 20 B-type asteroids and discuss the possible aqueous alteration history of these objects.

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF MAGNETITE IN B-TYPE ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Bin; Jewitt, David E-mail: jewitt@ucla.ed

    2010-09-15

    Spectrally blue (B-type) asteroids are rare, with the second discovered asteroid, Pallas, being the largest and most famous example. We conducted a focused, infrared spectroscopic survey of B-type asteroids to search for water-related features in these objects. Our results show that the negative optical spectral slope of some B-type asteroids is due to the presence of a broad absorption band centered near 1.0 {mu}m. The 1 {mu}m band can be matched in position and shape using magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), which is an important indicator of past aqueous alteration in the parent body. Furthermore, our observations of B-type asteroid (335) Roberta in the 3 {mu}m region reveal an absorption feature centered at 2.9 {mu}m, which is consistent with the absorption due to phyllosilicates (another hydration product) observed in CI chondrites. The new observations suggest that at least some B-type asteroids are likely to have incorporated significant amounts of water ice and to have experienced intensive aqueous alteration.

  20. B-type Olivine Fabric induced by Grain Boundary Sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Précigout, Jacques; Hirth, Greg

    2013-04-01

    Olivine fabric, or Lattice Preferred Orientation (LPO), in naturally deformed peridotite largely contributes to the seismic anisotropy of the upper mantle. LPO usually results from motion of intra-crystalline dislocations during dislocation creep. In this case, experimental and numerical data indicate that the degree of mineral alignment (fabric strength) increases with increasing finite strain. Here, we show an opposite trend suggesting that olivine fabric can also result from a different deformation mechanism. Based on documentation of olivine LPOs in peridotites of a kilometer-scale mantle shear zone in the Ronda massif (Spain), we highlight a transition from a flow-parallel [a]- axis LPO (A-type fabric) to a flow-normal [a]-axis LPO (B-type fabric). While dislocation sub-structures indicate that A-type fabric results from dislocation motion, we conclude that the B-type fabric does not originate from dislocation creep, but instead from grain boundary sliding (GBS) because: (1) dislocation sub-structures remain consistent with the A-type slip system in all samples; (2) the fabric transition from A-type to B-type correlates with decreasing fabric strength despite increasing finite strain; and (3) our observations are supported by experiments that document B-type fabric in olivine aggregates where deformation involves a component of GBS. The B-type olivine fabric has a specific signature in term of seismic anisotropy, and hence, our results may have important implications for interpreting upper mantle structures and deformation processes via seismic observations.

  1. Over-expression of Multi-heme C-type Cytochromes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Lin, Chiann Tso; Markillie, Lye Meng; Squier, Thomas C.; Hooker, Brian S.

    2005-02-01

    ABSTRACT-Because they contain covalently attached hemes, c-type cytochromes, especially those with multi-heme, are difficult to over-express. The gram negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has been successfully used for over-expression of multi-heme c-type cytochromes...

  2. Cerebellar Cortical Lamination and Foliation Require Cyclin A2

    PubMed Central

    Otero, José Javier; Kalaszczynska, Ilona; Michowski, Wojciech; Wong, Michael; Gygli, Patrick Edwin; Gokozan, Hamza Numan; Griveau, Amélie; Odajima, Junko; Czeisler, Catherine; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Murnen, Alice; Schüler, Ulrich; Sicinski, Piotr; Rowitch, David

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian genome encodes two A-type cyclins, which are considered potentially redundant yet essential regulators of the cell cycle. Here, we tested requirements for cyclin A1 and cyclin A2 function in cerebellar development. Compound conditional loss of cyclin A1/A2 in neural progenitors resulted in severe cerebellar hypoplasia, decreased proliferation of cerebellar granule neuron progenitors (CGNP), and Purkinje (PC) neuron dyslamination. Deletion of cyclin A2 alone showed an identical phenotype, demonstrating that cyclin A1 does not compensate for cyclin A2 loss in neural progenitors. Cyclin A2 loss lead to increased apoptosis at early embryonic time points but not at post-natal time points. In contrast, neural progenitors of the VZ/SVZ did not undergo increased apoptosis, indicating that VZ/SVZ-derived and rhombic lip-derived progenitor cells show differential requirements to cyclin A2. Conditional knockout of cyclin A2 or the SHH proliferative target Nmyc in CGNP also resulted in PC neuron dyslamination. Although cyclin E1 has been reported to compensate for cyclin A2 function in fibroblasts and is upregulated in cyclin A2 null cerebella, cyclin E1 expression was unable to compensate for loss-of cyclin A2 function. PMID:24184637

  3. Cytoplasmic Cyclin E and Phospho-Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 Are Biomarkers of Aggressive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Karakas, Cansu; Biernacka, Anna; Bui, Tuyen; Sahin, Aysegul A; Yi, Min; Akli, Said; Schafer, Jolie; Alexander, Angela; Adjapong, Opoku; Hunt, Kelly K; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2016-07-01

    Cyclin E and its co-activator, phospho-cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (p-CDK2), regulate G1 to S phase transition and their deregulation induces oncogenesis. Immunohistochemical assessments of these proteins in cancer have been reported but were based only on their nuclear expression. However, the oncogenic forms of cyclin E (low molecular weight cyclin E or LMW-E) in complex with CDK2 are preferentially mislocalized to the cytoplasm. Here, we used separate nuclear and cytoplasmic scoring systems for both cyclin E and p-CDK2 expression to demonstrate altered cellular accumulation of these proteins using immunohistochemical analysis. We examined the specificity of different cyclin E antibodies and evaluated their concordance between immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses in a panel of 14 breast cell lines. Nuclear versus cytoplasmic staining of cyclin E readily differentiated full-length from LMW-E, respectively. We also evaluated the expression of cyclin E and p-CDK2 in 1676 breast carcinoma patients by immunohistochemistry. Cytoplasmic cyclin E correlated strongly with cytoplasmic p-CDK2 (P < 0.0001), high tumor grade, negative estrogen/progesterone receptor status, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positivity (all P < 0.0001). In multivariable analysis, cytoplasmic cyclin E plus phosphorylated CDK2 (as one variable) predicted breast cancer recurrence-free and overall survival. These results suggest that cytoplasmic cyclin E and p-CDK2 can be readily detected with immunohistochemistry and used as clinical biomarkers for aggressive breast cancer. PMID:27182644

  4. B-type lamins in health and disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    For over two decades, B-type lamins were thought to have roles in fundamental processes including correct assembly of nuclear envelopes, DNA replication, transcription and cell survival. Recent studies have questioned these roles and have instead emphasised the role of these proteins in tissue building and tissue integrity, particularly in tissues devoid of A-type lamins. Other studies have suggested that the expression of B-type lamins in somatic cells influences the rate of entry into states of cellular senescence. In humans duplication of the LMNB1 gene (encoding lamin B1) causes an adult onset neurodegenerative disorder, termed autosomal dominant leukodystrophy, whilst very recently, LMNB1 has been implicated as a susceptibility gene in neural tube defects. This is consistent with studies in mice that reveal a critical role for B-type lamins in neuronal migration and brain development. In this review, I will consider how different model systems have contributed to our understanding of the functions of B-type lamins and which of those functions are critical for human health and disease. PMID:24380701

  5. Hyposmotic stress induces cell growth arrest via proteasome activation and cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase degradation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Guo-Zhong; Rott, Lusijah S; Lowe, Anson W; Omary, M Bishr

    2002-05-31

    Ordered cell cycle progression requires the expression and activation of several cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). Hyperosmotic stress causes growth arrest possibly via proteasome-mediated degradation of cyclin D1. We studied the effect of hyposmotic conditions on three colonic (Caco2, HRT18, HT29) and two pancreatic (AsPC-1 and PaCa-2) cell lines. Hyposmosis caused reversible cell growth arrest of the five cell lines in a cell cycle-independent fashion, although some cell lines accumulated at the G(1)/S interface. Growth arrest was followed by apoptosis or by formation of multinucleated giant cells, which is consistent with cell cycle catastrophe. Hyposmosis dramatically decreased Cdc2, Cdk2, Cdk4, cyclin B1, and cyclin D3 expression in a time-dependent fashion, in association with an overall decrease in cellular protein synthesis. However, some protein levels remained unaltered, including cyclin E and keratin 8. Selective proteasome inhibition prevented Cdk and cyclin degradation and reversed hyposmotic stress-induced growth arrest, whereas calpain and lysosome enzyme inhibitors had no measurable effect on cell cycle protein degradation. Therefore, hyposmotic stress inhibits cell growth and, depending on the cell type, causes cell cycle catastrophe with or without apoptosis. The growth arrest is due to decreased protein synthesis and proteasome activation, with subsequent degradation of several cyclins and Cdks. PMID:11897780

  6. Cyclin A is redundant in fibroblasts but essential in hematopoietic and embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kalaszczynska, Ilona; Geng, Yan; Iino, Tadafumi; Mizuno, Shin-ichi; Choi, Yoon; Kondratiuk, Ilona; Silver, Daniel P; Wolgemuth, Debra J; Akashi, Koichi; Sicinski, Piotr

    2009-07-23

    Cyclins are regulatory subunits of cyclin-dependent kinases. Cyclin A, the first cyclin ever cloned, is thought to be an essential component of the cell-cycle engine. Mammalian cells encode two A-type cyclins, testis-specific cyclin A1 and ubiquitously expressed cyclin A2. Here, we tested the requirement for cyclin A function using conditional knockout mice lacking both A-type cyclins. We found that acute ablation of cyclin A in fibroblasts did not affect cell proliferation, but led to prolonged expression of another cyclin, cyclin E, across the cell cycle. However, combined ablation of all A- and E-type cyclins extinguished cell division. In contrast, cyclin A function was essential for cell-cycle progression of hematopoietic and embryonic stem cells. Expression of cyclin A is particularly high in these compartments, which might render stem cells dependent on cyclin A, whereas in fibroblasts cyclins A and E play redundant roles in cell proliferation. PMID:19592082

  7. Transcriptional regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21) gene by NFI in proliferating human cells

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Stéphane; Vigneault, François; Lessard, Maryse; Leclerc, Steeve; Drouin, Régen; Guérin, Sylvain L.

    2006-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A), also known as p21 (WAF1/CIP1) modulates cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and differentiation via specific protein–protein interactions with the cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk), and many others. Expression of the p21 gene is mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. By conducting both ligation-mediated PCR (LMPCR) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in vivo, we identified a functional target site for the transcription factor, nuclear factor I (NFI), in the basal promoter from the p21 gene. Transfection of recombinant constructs bearing mutations in the p21 NFI site demonstrated that NFI acts as a repressor of p21 gene expression in various types of cultured cells. Inhibition of NFI in human skin fibroblasts through RNAi considerably increased p21 promoter activity suggesting that NFI is a key repressor of p21 transcription. Over-expression of each of the four NFI isoforms in HCT116 cells established that each of them contribute to various extend to the repression of the p21 gene. Most of all, over-expression of NFI-B in doxorubicin, growth-arrested HCT116 increased the proportion of cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle whereas NFI-A and NFI-X reduced it, thereby establishing a role for NFI in the cell cycle dependent expression of p21. PMID:17130157

  8. B-type olivine fabric induced by grain boundary sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Précigout, Jacques; Hirth, Greg

    2014-06-01

    Mineral Lattice Preferred Orientation (LPO) in naturally deformed peridotite is typically interpreted to result from the motion of intra-crystalline dislocations during dislocation creep. The degree of mineral alignment (fabric strength) is often assumed to increase with increasing finite strain. Here, we document olivine LPOs in peridotites in a kilometer-scale mantle shear zone in the Ronda massif (Spain) that demonstrate a transition from a flow-parallel [100]-axis LPO (A-type fabric) to a flow-normal [100]-axis LPO (B-type fabric). We conclude that the B-type fabric in the Ronda peridotite results from the enhancement of grain boundary sliding (GBS) with decreasing grain size, rather than a change in the dominant dislocation slip system because: (1) dislocation sub-structures remain consistent with the A-type slip system in all samples; (2) the fabric transition correlates with decreasing fabric strength despite increasing finite strain; (3) the analysis of deformation conditions in Ronda is inconsistent with the experimental conditions, including water content, inferred to promote the dominance of (010)[001] slip in laboratory samples, and (4) our observations are supported by experiments that document B-type fabric in olivine aggregates where deformation involves a component of GBS. Our results have important implications for interpreting the rheological properties of shear zones and upper mantle structures via micro-structural and seismic observations.

  9. CSF1 over-expression has pleiotropic effects on microglia in vivo

    PubMed Central

    De, Ishani; Nikodemova, Maria; Steffen, Megan D.; Sokn, Emily; Maklakova, Vilena I.; Watters, Jyoti J.; Collier, Lara S.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage colony stimulating factor (CSF1) is a cytokine that is upregulated in several diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). To examine the effects of CSF1 over-expression on microglia, transgenic mice that over-express CSF1 in the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) compartment were generated. CSF1 over-expressing mice have increased microglial proliferation and increased microglial numbers compared to controls. Treatment with PLX3397, a small molecule inhibitor of the CSF1 receptor CSF1R and related kinases, decreases microglial numbers by promoting microglial apoptosis in both CSF1 over-expressing and control mice. Microglia in CSF1 over-expressing mice exhibit gene expression profiles indicating that they are not basally M1 or M2 polarized, but they do have defects in inducing expression of certain genes in response to the inflammatory stimulus lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These results indicate that the CSF1 over-expression observed in CNS pathologies likely has pleiotropic influences on microglia. Furthermore, small molecule inhibition of CSF1R has the potential to reverse CSF1-driven microglial accumulation that is frequently observed in CNS pathologies, but can also promote apoptosis of normal microglia. PMID:25042473

  10. The Requirement for Cyclin D Function in Tumor Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jong; Li, Xiaoyu; Hydbring, Per; Sanda, Takaomi; Stefano, Joanna; Christie, Amanda L.; Signoretti, Sabina; Look, A. Thomas; Kung, Andrew L.; von Boehmer, Harald; Sicinski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY D-cyclins represent components of cell cycle machinery. To test the efficacy of targeting D-cyclins in cancer treatment, we engineered mouse strains which allow acute and global ablation of individual D-cyclins in a living animal. Ubiquitous shutdown of cyclin D1 or inhibition of cyclin D-associated kinase activity in mice bearing ErbB2-driven mammary carcinomas triggered tumor cell senescence, without compromising the animals’ health. Ablation of cyclin D3 in mice bearing Notch1-driven T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALL) triggered tumor cell apoptosis. Such selective killing of leukemic cells can also be achieved by inhibiting cyclin D-associated kinase activity in mouse and human T-ALL models. Inhibition of cyclin D-kinase activity represents a highly-selective anti-cancer strategy that specifically targets cancer cells without significantly affecting normal tissues. PMID:23079655

  11. The p-ERK–p-c-Jun–cyclinD1 pathway is involved in proliferation of smooth muscle cells after exposure to cigarette smoke extract

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tianjia; Song, Ting; Ni, Leng; Yang, Genhuan; Song, Xitao; Wu, Lifei; Liu, Bao; Liu, Changwei

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Smooth muscle cells proliferated after exposure to cigarette smoke extract. • The p-ERK, p-c-Jun, and cyclinD1 expressions increased in the process. • The p-ERK inhibitor, U0126, can reverse these effects. • The p-ERK → p-c-Jun → cyclinD1 pathway is involved in the process. - Abstract: An epidemiological survey has shown that smoking is closely related to atherosclerosis, in which excessive proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) plays a key role. To investigate the mechanism underlying this unusual smoking-induced proliferation, cigarette smoke extract (CSE), prepared as smoke-bubbled phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), was used to induce effects mimicking those exerted by smoking on SMCs. As assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 detection (an improved MTT assay), SMC viability increased significantly after exposure to CSE. Western blot analysis demonstrated that p-ERK, p-c-Jun, and cyclinD1 expression increased. When p-ERK was inhibited using U0126 (inhibitor of p-ERK), cell viability decreased and the expression of p-c-Jun and cyclinD1 was reduced accordingly, suggesting that p-ERK functions upstream of p-c-Jun and cyclinD1. When a c-Jun over-expression plasmid was transfected into SMCs, the level of cyclinD1 in these cells increased. Moreover, when c-Jun was knocked down by siRNA, cyclinD1 levels decreased. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the p-ERK–p-c-Jun–cyclinD1 pathway is involved in the excessive proliferation of SMCs exposed to CSE.

  12. Retroviral Cyclin Controls Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 8-Mediated Transcription Elongation and Reinitiation

    PubMed Central

    Birkenheuer, Claire H.; Brewster, Connie D.; Quackenbush, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Walleye dermal sarcoma virus (WDSV) infection is associated with the seasonal development and regression of walleye dermal sarcoma. Previous work showed that the retroviral cyclin (RV-cyclin), encoded by WDSV, has separable cyclin box and transcription activation domains. It binds to cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and enhances its kinase activity. CDK8 is evolutionarily conserved and is frequently overexpressed in human cancers. It is normally activated by cyclin C and is required for transcription elongation of the serum response genes (immediate early genes [IEGs]) FOS, EGR1, and cJUN. The IEGs drive cell proliferation, and their expression is brief and highly regulated. Here we show that constitutive expression of RV-cyclin in the HCT116 colon cancer cell line significantly increases the level of IEG expression in response to serum stimulation. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and nuclear run-on assays provide evidence that RV-cyclin does not alter the initiation of IEG transcription but does enhance the overall rate of transcription elongation and maintains transcription reinitiation. RV-cyclin does not increase activating phosphorylation events in the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and does not inhibit decay of IEG mRNAs. At the EGR1 gene locus, RV-cyclin increases and maintains RNA polymerase II (Pol II) occupancy after serum stimulation, in conjunction with increased and extended EGR1 gene expression. The RV-cyclin increases CDK8 occupancy at the EGR1 gene locus before and after serum stimulation. Both of RV-cyclin's functional domains, i.e., the cyclin box and the activation domain, are necessary for the overall enhancement of IEG expression. RV-cyclin presents a novel and ancient mechanism of retrovirus-induced oncogenesis. IMPORTANCE The data reported here are important to both virology and cancer biology. The novel mechanism pinpoints CDK8 in the development of walleye dermal sarcoma and sheds light on CDK8's role in

  13. Proteomic Interaction Patterns between Human Cyclins, the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 and Additional Cytomegalovirus Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Steingruber, Mirjam; Kraut, Alexandra; Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich; Reichel, Anna; Stamminger, Thomas; Amin, Bushra; Couté, Yohann; Hutterer, Corina; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) ortholog pUL97 associates with human cyclin B1 and other types of cyclins. Here, the question was addressed whether cyclin interaction of pUL97 and additional viral proteins is detectable by mass spectrometry-based approaches. Proteomic data were validated by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP), Western blot, in vitro kinase and bioinformatic analyses. Our findings suggest that: (i) pUL97 shows differential affinities to human cyclins; (ii) pUL97 inhibitor maribavir (MBV) disrupts the interaction with cyclin B1, but not with other cyclin types; (iii) cyclin H is identified as a new high-affinity interactor of pUL97 in HCMV-infected cells; (iv) even more viral phosphoproteins, including all known substrates of pUL97, are detectable in the cyclin-associated complexes; and (v) a first functional validation of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction, analyzed by in vitro kinase assay, points to a cyclin-mediated modulation of pUL97 substrate preference. In addition, our bioinformatic analyses suggest individual, cyclin-specific binding interfaces for pUL97-cyclin interaction, which could explain the different strengths of interactions and the selective inhibitory effect of MBV on pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction. Combined, the detection of cyclin-associated proteins in HCMV-infected cells suggests a complex pattern of substrate phosphorylation and a role of cyclins in the fine-modulation of pUL97 activities. PMID:27548200

  14. Proteomic Interaction Patterns between Human Cyclins, the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 and Additional Cytomegalovirus Proteins.

    PubMed

    Steingruber, Mirjam; Kraut, Alexandra; Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich; Reichel, Anna; Stamminger, Thomas; Amin, Bushra; Couté, Yohann; Hutterer, Corina; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) ortholog pUL97 associates with human cyclin B1 and other types of cyclins. Here, the question was addressed whether cyclin interaction of pUL97 and additional viral proteins is detectable by mass spectrometry-based approaches. Proteomic data were validated by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP), Western blot, in vitro kinase and bioinformatic analyses. Our findings suggest that: (i) pUL97 shows differential affinities to human cyclins; (ii) pUL97 inhibitor maribavir (MBV) disrupts the interaction with cyclin B1, but not with other cyclin types; (iii) cyclin H is identified as a new high-affinity interactor of pUL97 in HCMV-infected cells; (iv) even more viral phosphoproteins, including all known substrates of pUL97, are detectable in the cyclin-associated complexes; and (v) a first functional validation of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction, analyzed by in vitro kinase assay, points to a cyclin-mediated modulation of pUL97 substrate preference. In addition, our bioinformatic analyses suggest individual, cyclin-specific binding interfaces for pUL97-cyclin interaction, which could explain the different strengths of interactions and the selective inhibitory effect of MBV on pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction. Combined, the detection of cyclin-associated proteins in HCMV-infected cells suggests a complex pattern of substrate phosphorylation and a role of cyclins in the fine-modulation of pUL97 activities. PMID:27548200

  15. PPARgamma ligands suppress the feedback loop between E2F2 and cyclin-E1.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Yoko; Ito, Ichiaki; Wayama, Mitsutoshi; Fujimura, Akiko; Akaogi, Kensuke; Machida, Hikaru; Nakajima, Yuka; Kuroda, Takao; Ohmori, Kazuji; Murayama, Akiko; Kimura, Keiji; Yanagisawa, Junn

    2008-05-23

    PPARgamma is a nuclear hormone receptor that plays a key role in the induction of peroxisome proliferation. A number of studies showed that PPARgamma ligands suppress cell cycle progression; however, the mechanism remains to be determined. Here, we showed that PPARgamma ligand troglitazone inhibited G1/S transition in colon cancer cells, LS174T. Troglitazone did not affect on either expression of CDK inhibitor (p18) or Wnt signaling pathway, indicating that these pathways were not involved in the troglitazone-dependent cell cycle arrest. GeneChip and RT-PCR analyses revealed that troglitazone decreased mRNA levels of cell cycle regulatory factors E2F2 and cyclin-E1 whose expression is activated by E2F2. Down-regulation of E2F2 by troglitazone results in decrease of cyclin-E1 transcription, which could inhibit phosphorylation of Rb protein, and consequently evoke the suppression of E2F2 transcriptional activity. Thus, we propose that troglitazone suppresses the feedback loop containing E2F2, cyclin-E1, and Rb protein. PMID:18355447

  16. Impact of mitochondrial telomerase over-expression on drug resistance of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing; Zhou, Yuan; Chen, Daixing; Li, Lili; Yang, Xin; You, Yang; Ling, Xianlong

    2015-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of chemotherapy in patients with hepatocellular carcinomas still poor due to multidrug resistance. This study aimed to investigate the impact of the over-expressed mitochondrial human telomerase reverse transcriptase on multidrug resistance of hepatocellular carcinomas. Methods: HepG2 and SK-Hep1 cell lines were used. And sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs was detected. Results: Mitochondrial human telomerase reverse transcriptase over-expression in hepatocellular carcinomas cells could significantly reduce its sensitivity to multiple chemotherapeutic drugs in vitro and in vivo. Hepatocellular carcinomas cells over-expressing mitochondrial human telomerase reverse transcriptase showed a significantly higher mitochondrial membrane potential, a markedly lower activated caspase-3 after drug treatment, and an increased mtDNA copy number, which explained the drastically decreased drug-induced apoptosis of hepatocellular carcinomas cells with mitochondrial human telomerase reverse transcriptase over-expression. Conclusion: Over-expressed mitochondrial human telomerase reverse transcriptase may increase the mtDNA copy number and inhibit the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway to contribute to the multidrug resistance of hepatocellular carcinomas cells. PMID:25755831

  17. HER3 over-expression and overall survival in gastrointestinal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yadong; Yang, Haiyan; Duan, Guangcai

    2015-01-01

    Published studies on the association between human epidermal factor receptor 3 (HER3) expression and overall survival (OS) in gastrointestinal cancers have yielded conflicting results. The aim of this study was to explore the association of HER3 over-expression with OS in gastrointestinal cancers. A systematic search was performed through Medline/PubMed, Embase, Science Direct and Elsevier. The summary odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated to estimate the strength of the association. Overall, we observed that HER3 over-expression was associated with worse OS at five years (OR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.04–1.82); however, HER3 over-expression was not associated with worse OS at three years (OR = 1.33, 95% CI: 0.97–1.84). The cumulative meta-analysis showed similar results. In subgroup analyses by tumor type, HER3 over-expression in gastric cancers was associated with worse OS at both three years (OR = 1.69, 95% CI: 1.28–2.25) and five years (OR = 1.74, 95% CI: 1.26–2.41). In conclusion, our results suggest that HER3 over-expression may be associated with worse overall survival in gastric cancers. Well-designed studies with a large sample size are required to further confirm our findings. PMID:26517355

  18. Investigations of the Magnetic a and B Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Gregg Allan

    In an effort to explore further the mechanisms responsible for magnetism and chemical peculiarity in the early-type stars, I have constructed models of the magnetic fields of individual A and B type stars, studied the evolutionary dependence of magnetism in the Ap/Bp stars, undertaken the first systematic study of linear polarisation in the spectral lines of magnetic A and B type stars, and searched for magnetic fields in the photospheres of canonically non-magnetic upper-main sequence stars. I present detailed studies of 8 magnetic Ap, Bp and He-strong stars. For 7 of these objects (84 UMa, iota Cas, HD 115708, HD 184927, HD 200311, HD 81009, and HD 192678) new models of the surface magnetic field structure have been developed using longitudinal field, field modulus, and broadband linear polarisation measurements. These models represent a substantial contribution to the accumulated data regarding the surface magnetic fields of upper-main sequence stars. One object (HD 59435) is in fact a spectroscopic binary (SB2), the secondary component of which is a magnetic Ap star. A detailed study of the evolutionary state of the components and the mean magnetic field modulus variation of the secondary is presented. The results of this analysis are consistent with the suggestion by Hubrig & Mathys (1994) that magnetism (and perhaps chemical peculiarity) arise late in the evolution of A and B type stars. In order to test further this possibility, a more extensive study of the evolutionary states and magnetic fields of 10 magnetic Ap stars was undertaken. This study indicates that the magnetic stars are distributed across the entire width of the main sequence, a result inconsistent with the hypothesis of Hubrig & Mathys. I furthermore present investigations of the Zeeman circular and linear polarisation measured within stellar spectral lines. The MuSiCoS spectropolarimeter was used to conduct the first systematic, high signal-to-noise ratio observations of Zeeman linear

  19. Neuroglobin Over Expressing Mice: Expression Pattern and Effect on Brain Ischemic Infarct Size

    PubMed Central

    Raida, Zindy; Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Nyengaard, Jens R.; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Background Stroke is a major cause of death and severe disability, but effective treatments are limited. Neuroglobin, a neuronal heme-globin, has been advocated as a novel pharmacological target in combating stroke and neurodegenerative disorders based on cytoprotective properties. Using thoroughly validated antibodies and oligos, we give a detailed brain anatomical characterization of transgenic mice over expressing Neuroglobin. Moreover, using permanent middle artery occlusion the effect of elevated levels of Neuroglobin on ischemic damage was studied. Lastly, the impact of mouse strain genetic background on ischemic damage was investigated. Principal Findings A four to five fold increase in Neuroglobin mRNA and protein expression was seen in the brain of transgenic mice. A β-actin promoter was used to drive Neuroglobin over expression, but immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization showed over expression to be confined to primarily the cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and only in neurons. The level and expression pattern of endogenous Neuroglobin was unaffected by insertion of the over expressing Ngb transgene. Neuroglobin over expression resulted in a significant reduction in infarct volume 24 hours after ischemia. Immunohistochemistry showed no selective sparing of Neuroglobin expressing cells in the ischemic core or penumbra. A significant difference in infarct volume was found between mice of the same strain, but from different colonies. Significance In contrast to some previous reports, Neuroglobin over expression is not global but confined to a few well-defined brain regions, and only in neurons. This study confirms previous reports showing a correlation between reduced infarct volume and elevated Neuroglobin levels, but underlines the need to study the likely contribution from compensatory mechanisms to the phenotype following a genetic perturbation. We also stress, that care should be taken when comparing results where different mouse strains and

  20. Enhancing Indigo Production by Over-Expression of the Styrene Monooxygenase in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Yin, Sheng; Chen, Min; Sun, Baoguo; Hao, Shuai; Wang, Chengtao

    2016-08-01

    As an important traditional blue dye, indigo has been used in food and textile industry for centuries, which can be produced via the styrene oxygenation pathway in Pseudomonas putida. Hence, the styrene monooxygenase gene styAB and oxide isomerase gene styC are over-expressed in P. putida to investigate their roles in indigo biosynthesis. RT-qPCR analysis indicated that transcriptions of styA and styB were increased by 2500- and 750-folds in the styAB over-expressed strain B4-01, compared with the wild-type strain B4, consequently significantly enhancing the indole monooxygenase activity. Transcription of styC was also increased by 100-folds in the styC over-expressed strain B4-02. Besides, styAB over-expression slightly up-regulated the transcription of styC in B4-01, while styC over-expression hardly exerted an effect on the transcriptional levels of styA and styB and indole monooxygenase activity in B4-02. Furthermore, shaking flask experiments showed that indigo production in B4-01 reached 52.13 mg L(-1) after 24 h, which was sevenfold higher than that in B4. But no obvious increase in indigo yield was observed in B4-02. Over-expression of styAB significantly enhanced the indigo production, revealing that the monooxygenase STYAB rather than oxide isomerase STYC probably acted as the key rate-limiting enzyme in the indigo biosynthesis pathway in P. putida. This work provided a new strategy for enhancing indigo production in Pseudomonas. PMID:27154464

  1. Cyclin D1 promotes BRCA2-Rad51 interaction by restricting cyclin A/B-dependent BRCA2 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chalermrujinanant, C; Michowski, W; Sittithumcharee, G; Esashi, F; Jirawatnotai, S

    2016-06-01

    BRCA2 has an important role in the maintenance of genome stability by interacting with RAD51 recombinase through its C-terminal domain. This interaction is abrogated by cyclin A-CDK2-mediated phosphorylation of BRCA2 at serine 3291 (Ser3291). Recently, we showed that cyclin D1 facilitates RAD51 recruitment to BRCA2-containing DNA repair foci, and that downregulation of cyclin D1 leads to inefficient homologous-mediated DNA repair. Here, we demonstrate that cyclin D1, via amino acids 20-90, interacts with the C-terminal domain of BRCA2, and that this interaction is increased in response to DNA damage. Interestingly, CDK4-cyclin D1 does not phosphorylate Ser3291. Instead, cyclin D1 bars cyclin A from the C-terminus of BRCA2, prevents cyclin A-CDK2-dependent Ser3291 phosphorylation and facilitates RAD51 binding to the C-terminal domain of BRCA2. These findings indicate that the interplay between cyclin D1 and other cyclins such as cyclin A regulates DNA integrity through RAD51 interaction with the BRCA2 C-terminal domain. PMID:26387543

  2. Identification of cyclins A1, E1 and vimentin as downstream targets of heme oxygenase-1 in vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Andrea; Mylroie, Hayley; Thornton, C. Clare; Calay, Damien; Birdsey, Graeme M.; Kiprianos, Allan P.; Wilson, Garrick K.; Soares, Miguel P.; Yin, Xiaoke; Mayr, Manuel; Randi, Anna M.; Mason, Justin C.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential physiological process and an important factor in disease pathogenesis. However, its exploitation as a clinical target has achieved limited success and novel molecular targets are required. Although heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) acts downstream of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to modulate angiogenesis, knowledge of the mechanisms involved remains limited. We set out identify novel HO-1 targets involved in angiogenesis. HO-1 depletion attenuated VEGF-induced human endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and tube formation. The latter response suggested a role for HO-1 in EC migration, and indeed HO-1 siRNA negatively affected directional migration of EC towards VEGF; a phenotype reversed by HO-1 over-expression. EC from Hmox1−/− mice behaved similarly. Microarray analysis of HO-1-depleted and control EC exposed to VEGF identified cyclins A1 and E1 as HO-1 targets. Migrating HO-1-deficient EC showed increased p27, reduced cyclin A1 and attenuated cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity. In vivo, cyclin A1 siRNA inhibited VEGF-driven angiogenesis, a response reversed by Ad-HO-1. Proteomics identified structural protein vimentin as an additional VEGF-HO-1 target. HO-1 depletion inhibited VEGF-induced calpain activity and vimentin cleavage, while vimentin silencing attenuated HO-1-driven proliferation. Thus, vimentin and cyclins A1 and E1 represent VEGF-activated HO-1-dependent targets important for VEGF-driven angiogenesis. PMID:27388959

  3. Boron Abundances in A and B-type Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, David L.

    1997-01-01

    Boron abundances in A- and B-type stars may be a successful way to track evolutionary effects in these hot stars. The light elements - Li, Be, and B - are tracers of exposure to temperatures more moderate than those in which the H-burning CN-cycle operates. Thus, any exposure of surface stellar layers to deeper layers will affect these light element abundances. Li and Be are used in this role in investigations of evolutionary processes in cool stars, but are not observable in hotter stars. An investigation of boron, however, is possible through the B II 1362 A resonance line. We have gathered high resolution spectra from the IUE database of A- and B-type stars near 10 solar mass for which nitrogen abundances have been determined. The B II 1362 A line is blended throughout; the temperature range of this program, requiring spectrum syntheses to recover the boron abundances. For no star could we synthesize the 1362 A region using the meteoritic/solar boron abundance of log e (B) = 2.88; a lower boron abundance was necessary which may reflect evolutionary effects (e.g., mass loss or mixing near the main-sequence), the natal composition of the star forming regions, or a systematic error in the analyses (e.g., non-LTE effects). Regardless of the initial boron abundance, and despite the possibility of non-LTE effects, it seems clear that boron is severely depleted in some stars. It may be that the nitrogen and boron abundances are anticorrelated, as would be expected from mixing between the H-burning and outer stellar layers. If, as we suspect, a residue of boron is present in the A-type supergiants, we may exclude a scenario in which mixing occurs continuously between the surface and the deep layers operating the CN-cycle. Further exploitation of the B II 1362 A line as an indicator of the evolutionary status of A- and B-type stars will require a larger stellar sample to be observed with higher signal-to-noise as attainable with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  4. Correlation between B type natriuretic peptide and metabolic risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wen-Hua; Chen, Li-Ying; Dai, Hong-Lei; Chen, Jian-Hua; Chen, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It has been shown that B type natriuretic peptide (BNP) level can indicate cardiovascular disease. However, the association between BNP and metabolic risk factors is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and metabolic risk factors. Material and methods A total of 11,508 subjects were selected from those who underwent health examinations in our hospital. NT-proBNP, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose and lipid profile were measured. The level of NT-proBNP was measured and classified into four stratifications (BNP ≥ 20 pg/ml, ≥ 40 pg/ml, ≥ 60 pg/ml, and ≥ 80 pg/ml) to analyze the relationship between BNP and metabolic risk factors. Results B type natriuretic peptide increased gradually with increasing age (p < 0.001). The BNP levels were significantly higher in women than in men (p < 0.001). Multivariate regression analysis showed a positive association between NT-proBNP levels and systolic blood pressure (p < 0.001), fasting plasma glucose (p < 0.05), and total cholesterol (p < 0.001 in women). The NT-proBNP levels were inversely associated with diastolic blood pressure, waist circumference, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein, and LDL cholesterol. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated a close relationship between NT-proBNP and systolic blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and total cholesterol. In the BNP ≥ 60 pg/ml group, odds ratio (OR) values were 1.80, 1.56 and 1.54 (female) and 3.74, 1.59 and 1.51 (male), respectively. In the BNP ≥ 80 pg/ml group, OR values were 2.45, 1.65 and 1.84 (female) and 4.61, 1.66 and 1.75 (male), respectively. Conclusions NT-proBNP was independently associated with the main metabolic risk factors (systolic blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and total cholesterol). These findings suggest that the combined determination of NT-proBNP and the main metabolic risk factors could be

  5. b-Type Cytochromes in Higher Plant Plasma Membranes 1

    PubMed Central

    Asard, Han; Venken, Mireille; Caubergs, Roland; Reijnders, Willem; Oltmann, Fred L.; De Greef, Jan A.

    1989-01-01

    The composition and characteristics of b-type cytochromes from higher plant plasma membranes, purified using aqueous two-phase partitioning, were investigated. At least three different cytochromes were identified by their wavelength maxima and redox midpoint potentials (E0′). Cytochrome b-560.7 (E0′ from + 110 to + 160 millivolts) was present in zucchini (Cucurbita pepo) hypocotyls and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) hooks, although in different concentrations. The main component in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L.) inflorescences (cytochrome b-558.8) is probably functionally similar to this cytochrome. The plasma membrane generally contains two to three cytochrome species. However, the occurrence and concentrations were species dependent. The high potential cytochrome can be reduced by ascorbate but not NADH, and may be involved in blue light perception. PMID:16666854

  6. Over-expression in Escherichia coli and characterization of two recombinant isoforms of human FAD synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Brizio, Carmen; Galluccio, Michele; Wait, Robin; Torchetti, Enza Maria; Bafunno, Valeria; Accardi, Rosita; Gianazza, Elisabetta; Indiveri, Cesare; Barile, Maria . E-mail: m.barile@biologia.uniba.it

    2006-06-09

    FAD synthetase (FADS) (EC 2.7.7.2) is a key enzyme in the metabolic pathway that converts riboflavin into the redox cofactor FAD. Two hypothetical human FADSs, which are the products of FLAD1 gene, were over-expressed in Escherichia coli and identified by ESI-MS/MS. Isoform 1 was over-expressed as a T7-tagged protein which had a molecular mass of 63 kDa on SDS-PAGE. Isoform 2 was over-expressed as a 6-His-tagged fusion protein, carrying an extra 84 amino acids at the N-terminal with an apparent molecular mass of 60 kDa on SDS-PAGE. It was purified near to homogeneity from the soluble cell fraction by one-step affinity chromatography. Both isoforms possessed FADS activity and had a strict requirement for MgCl{sub 2}, as demonstrated using both spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods. The purified recombinant isoform 2 showed a specific activity of 6.8 {+-} 1.3 nmol of FAD synthesized/min/mg protein and exhibited a K {sub M} value for FMN of 1.5 {+-} 0.3 {mu}M. This is First report on characterization of human FADS, and First cloning and over-expression of FADS from an organism higher than yeast.

  7. relA over-expression reduces tumorigenicity and activates apoptosis in human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ricca, A; Biroccio, A; Trisciuoglio, D; Cippitelli, M; Zupi, G; Bufalo, D Del

    2001-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that bcl-2 over-expression increases the malignant behaviour of the MCF7 ADR human breast cancer cell line and enhances nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-k B) transcriptional activity. Here, we investigated the direct effect of increased NF-k B activity on the tumorigenicity of MCF7 ADR cells by over-expressing the NF-k B subunit relA/p65. Surprisingly, our results demonstrated that over-expression of relA determines a considerable reduction of the tumorigenic ability in nude mice as indicated by the tumour take and the median time of tumour appearance. In vitro studies also evidenced a reduced cell proliferation and the activation of the apoptotic programme after relA over-expression. Apoptosis was associated with the production of reactive oxygen species, and the cleavage of the specific substrate Poly-ADP-ribose-polymerrase. Our data indicate that there is no general role for NF-k B in the regulation of apoptosis and tumorigenicity. In fact, even though inhibiting NF-k B activity has been reported to be lethal to tumour cells, our findings clearly suggest that an over-induction of nuclear NF-k B activity may produce the same effect. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11747334

  8. Rhomboid-7 over-expression results in Opa1-like processing and malfunctioning mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mokhlasur; Kylsten, Per

    2011-10-22

    Rhomboid-7 (rho-7) is a mitochondrial-specific intramembranous protease. The loss-of-function mutation rho-7 results in semi-lethality, while escapers have a reduced lifespan with several neurological disorders [1]. Here we show that general, or CNS-specific expression of rho-7 can rescue the lethality of rho-7. General, or CNS-specific over-expression of rho-7 in otherwise wild-type animals caused semi-lethality, with approximately 50% of the animals escaping this lethality, developing into adults displaying a shortened life span with larval locomotory problem. On a cellular level, over-expression resulted in severe depression of ATP levels and cytochrome c oxidase subunit II mRNA levels, a lowered number of mitochondria in neurons and aggregation of mitochondria in the brain indicating mitochondrial malfunction. Over-expression of rho-7 in developing eye discs resulted in an elevated apoptotic index. In the CNS, elevated levels of rho-7 were accompanied by both isoforms of Opa1-like, a dynamin-like GTPase, a mitochondrial component involved in regulating mitochondrial dynamics and function, including apoptosis. Most, but not all, of rho-7 over-expression phenotypes were suppressed by introducing a heterozygous mutation for Opa1-like. Our results suggest that rho-7 and Opa1-like function in a common molecular pathway affecting mitochondrial function and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:21945938

  9. Over-expression of Topoisomerase II Enhances Salt Stress Tolerance in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    John, Riffat; Ganeshan, Uma; Singh, Badri N.; Kaul, Tanushri; Reddy, Malireddy K.; Sopory, Sudhir K.; Rajam, Manchikatla V.

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerases are unique enzymes having an ability to remove or add DNA supercoils and untangle the snarled DNA. They can cut, shuffle, and religate DNA strands and remove the torsional stress during DNA replication, transcription or recombination events. In the present study, we over-expressed topoisomerase II (TopoII) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabaccum) and examined its role in growth and development as well as salt (NaCl) stress tolerance. Several putative transgenic plants were generated and the transgene integration and expression was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analyses, and RT-PCR analysis respectively. Percent seed germination, shoot growth, and chlorophyll content revealed that transgenic lines over-expressing the NtTopoIIα-1 gene exhibited enhanced tolerance to salt (150 and 200 mM NaCl) stress. Moreover, over-expression of TopoII lead to the elevation in proline and glycine betaine levels in response to both concentrations of NaCl as compared to wild-type. In response to NaCl stress, TopoII over-expressing lines showed reduced lipid peroxidation derived malondialdehyde (MDA) generation. These results suggest that TopoII plays a pivotal role in salt stress tolerance in plants.

  10. Generation of a cre recombinase-conditional Nos1ap over-expression transgenic mouse

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Dallas R.; Sysa-Shah, Polina; Bedja, Djahida; Simmers, Jessica L.; Pak, Evgenia; Dutra, Amalia; Cohn, Ronald; Gabrielson, Kathleen L.

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphic non-coding variants at the NOS1AP locus have been associated with the common cardiac, metabolic and neurological traits and diseases. Although, in vitro gene targeting-based cellular and biochemical studies have shed some light on NOS1AP function in cardiac and neuronal tissue, to enhance our understanding of NOS1AP function in mammalian physiology and disease, we report the generation of cre recombinase-conditional Nos1ap over-expression transgenic mice (Nos1apTg). Conditional transgenic mice were generated by the pronuclear injection method and three independent, single-site, multiple copies integration event-based founder lines were selected. For heart-restricted over-expression, Nos1apTg mice were crossed with Mlc2v-cre and Nos1ap transcript over-expression was observed in left ventricles from Nos1apTg; Mlc2v-cre F1 mice. We believe that with the potential of conditional over-expression, Nos1apTg mice will be a useful resource in studying NOS1AP function in various tissues under physiological and disease states. PMID:24563304

  11. Cyclin Y regulates the proliferation, migration, and invasion of ovarian cancer cells via Wnt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyuan; Shi, Honghui; Fan, Qingbo; Sun, Xiangxiu

    2016-08-01

    This study is designated to investigate the roles of cyclin Y (CCNY) and Wnt signaling pathway in regulating ovarian cancer (OC) cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), Western blot, MTT assay, cell scratch, and transwell test were used in our study, and transplanted tumor model was constructed on nude mice. C-Myc, cyclin D1, PFTK1, ki67, OGT, and β-catenin protein expressions in tumor tissues were detected. CCNY was significantly upregulated in OC cell lines and tissues (both P < 0.05); significant association was observed between CCNY expression and clinicopathological stage, lymph node metastasis (LNM) (P < 0.05); and the CCNY expression in stages III to IV was higher than that in stages I to II, and patients with LNM had higher CCNY expression when compared with those in patients without LNM (P < 0.05); expressions of c-Myc, cyclin D, PFTK1, ki67, and OGT were upregulated in OC tissues compared with ovarian benign tissues, suggesting that these expressions were significantly different between the two groups (P < 0.05); CCNY significantly exacerbated proliferation, migration, and invasion of A2780 cells; c-Myc and cyclin D1 protein expressions increased as the expression of CCNY increased (P < 0.001); β-catenin expressions in A2780 cells with over-expression of CCNY were significantly increased in the nucleus, but significantly decreased in the cytoplasm (both P < 0.05); high expressions of CCNY exacerbated the proliferation of A2780 cells in nude mice and significantly increased c-Myc, cyclin D1, PFTK1, ki67, and OGT protein expressions in tumor tissues which were transplanted into nude mice (P < 0.01). CCNY might exacerbate the proliferation, migration, and invasion of OC cells via activating the Wnt signaling pathway. Thus, this study provides a theoretical foundation for the development of therapeutic drugs that are able to cure OC by targeting CCNY. PMID:26831658

  12. Specific Inhibition of Cyclin-dependent Kinase 5 Activity Induces Motor Neuron Development in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kanungo, Jyotshnabala; Zheng, Ya-Li; Amin, Niranjana D.; Kaur, Sukhbir; Ramchandran, Ramani; Pant, Harish C.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5) is a ubiquitous protein activated by specific activators, p35 and p39. Cdk5 regulates neuronal migration, differentiation, axonogenesis, synaptic transmission and apoptosis. However, its role in motor neuron development remains unexplored. Here, using gain and loss-of-function analyses in developing zebrafish embryos, we report that cdk5 plays a critical role in spinal and cranial motor neuron development. Cdk5 knockdown results in supernumerary spinal and cranial motor neurons. While a dominant negative, kinase-dead cdk5 promotes the generation of supernumerary motor neurons; over-expression of cdk5 suppresses motor neuron development. Thus, modulating cdk5 activity seems promising in inducing motor neuron development in vivo. PMID:19523926

  13. Cyclin A- and cyclin B-dependent protein kinases are regulated by different mechanisms in Xenopus egg extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, P R; Leiss, D; Pagano, M; Karsenti, E

    1992-01-01

    Cyclins are proteins which are synthesized and degraded in a cell cycle-dependent fashion and form integral regulatory subunits of protein kinase complexes involved in the regulation of the cell cycle. The best known catalytic subunit of a cyclin-dependent protein kinase complex is p34cdc2. In the cell, cyclins A and B are synthesized at different stages of the cell cycle and induce protein kinase activation with different kinetics. The kinetics of activation can be reproduced and studied in extracts of Xenopus eggs to which bacterially produced cyclins are added. In this paper we report that in egg extracts, both cyclin A and cyclin B associate with and activate the same catalytic subunit, p34cdc2. In addition, cyclin A binds a less abundant p33 protein kinase related to p34cdc2, the product of the cdk2/Eg1 gene. When complexed to cyclin B, p34cdc2 is subject to transient inhibition by tyrosine phosphorylation, producing a lag between the addition of cyclin and kinase activation. In contrast, p34cdc2 is only weakly tyrosine phosphorylated when bound to cyclin A and activates rapidly. This finding shows that a given kinase catalytic subunit can be regulated in a different manner depending on the nature of the regulatory subunit to which it binds. Tyrosine phosphorylation of p34cdc2 when complexed to cyclin B provides an inhibitory check on the activation of the M phase inducing protein kinase, allowing the coupling of processes such as DNA replication to the onset of metaphase. Our results suggest that, at least in the early Xenopus embryo, cyclin A-dependent protein kinases may not be subject to this checkpoint and are regulated primarily at the level of cyclin translation. Images PMID:1316271

  14. Participation of cyclin A in Myc-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, A T; Cohen, K J; Barrett, J F; Bergstrom, D A; Dang, C V

    1994-01-01

    The involvement of c-Myc in cellular proliferation or apoptosis has been linked to differential cyclin gene expression. We observed that in both proliferating cells and cells undergoing apoptosis, cyclin A (but not B, C, D1, and E) mRNA level was elevated in unsynchronized Myc-overexpressing cells when compared with parental Rat1a fibroblasts. We further demonstrated that Zn(2+)-inducible cyclin A expression was sufficient to cause apoptosis. When Myc-induced apoptosis was blocked by coexpression of Bcl-2, the levels of cyclin C, D1, and E mRNAs were also elevated. Thus, while apoptosis induced by c-Myc is associated with an elevated cyclin A mRNA level, protection from apoptosis by coexpressed Bcl-2 is associated with a complementary increase in cyclin C, D1, and E mRNAs. Images PMID:8041712

  15. Carbides with Filled Re 3B-Type Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, Anne M.; Jeitschko, Wolfgang

    1994-10-01

    The new compounds AFe2SiC (A = Y, Sm, Gd, Tb, Ho, Er, Tm, Lu, Th, U) were prepared by arc-melting cold-pressed pellets of the elemental components. They are isotypic with the orthorhombic DyFe2SiC-type structure, which was refined from single-crystal X-ray data of ThFe2SiC: Cmcm, a = 386.32(6) pm, b = 1080.6(1) pm, c = 695.0(1) pm, Z = 4, R = 0.020 for 559 structure factors and 17 variable parameters. The polyanionic iron-silicon-carbon network is three-dimensionally infinite. The carbon atoms are situated in octahedral voids formed by four thorium and two iron atoms. The hydrolysis of ErFe2SiC with diluted hydrochloric acid yields mainly methane besides C2 and C3 hydro-carbons. A large number of compounds can be classified to crystallize with a filled-up version of the Re3B-type structure. They are isotypic with V3AsC, where the positions of the vanadium and arsenic atoms correspond to the atomic positions of Re3B and the carbon atoms fill octahedral voids formed by the vanadium atoms. The DyFe2SiC-type structure also can be described as a filled-up Re3B structure; however, the carbon atoms of DyFe2SiC occupy different octahedral voids.

  16. Pleiotrophin over-expression provides trophic support to dopaminergic neurons in parkinsonian rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pleiotrophin is known to promote the survival and differentiation of dopaminergic neurons in vitro and is up-regulated in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease patients. To establish whether pleiotrophin has a trophic effect on nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in vivo, we injected a recombinant adenovirus expressing pleiotrophin in the substantia nigra of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats. Results The viral vector induced pleiotrophin over-expression by astrocytes in the substantia nigra pars compacta, without modifying endogenous neuronal expression. The percentage of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive cells as well as the area of their projections in the lesioned striatum was higher in pleiotrophin-treated animals than in controls. Conclusions These results indicate that pleiotrophin over-expression partially rescues tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive cell bodies and terminals of dopaminergic neurons undergoing 6-hydroxydopamine-induced degeneration. PMID:21649894

  17. Over-Expression of the LH Receptor Increases Distant Metastases in an Endometrial Cancer Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Pillozzi, Serena; Fortunato, Angelo; De Lorenzo, Emanuele; Borrani, Elena; Giachi, Massimo; Scarselli, Gianfranco; Arcangeli, Annarosa; Noci, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to define the role of luteinizing hormone receptor (LH-R) expression in endometrial cancer (EC), using preclinical mouse models, to further transfer these data to the clinical setting. Materials and Methods: The role of LH-R over-expression was studied using EC cells (Hec1A, e.g., cells with low endogenous LH-R expression) transfected with the LH-R (Hec1A-LH-R). In vitro cell proliferation was measured through the WST-1 assay, whereas cell invasion was measured trough the matrigel assay. The effects of LH-R over-expression in vivo were analyzed in an appropriately developed preclinical mouse model of EC, which mimicked postmenopausal conditions. The model consisted in an orthotopic xenograft of Hec1A cells into immunodeficient mice treated daily with recombinant LH, to assure high levels of LH. Results: In vitro data indicated that LH-R over-expression increased Hec1A invasiveness. In vivo results showed that tumors arising from Hec1A-LH-R cells injection displayed a higher local invasion and a higher number of distant metastases, mainly in the lung, compared to tumors obtained from the injection of Hec1A cells. LH withdrawal strongly inhibited local and distant metastatic spread of tumors, especially those arising from Hec1A-LH-R cells. Conclusion: The over-expression of the LH-R increases the ability of EC cells to undergo local invasion and metastatic spread. This occurs in the presence of high LH serum concentrations. PMID:24312898

  18. Anosmin-1 over-expression regulates oligodendrocyte precursor cell proliferation, migration and myelin sheath thickness.

    PubMed

    Murcia-Belmonte, Verónica; Esteban, Pedro F; Martínez-Hernández, José; Gruart, Agnès; Luján, Rafael; Delgado-García, José María; de Castro, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    During development of the central nervous system, anosmin-1 (A1) works as a chemotropic cue contributing to axonal outgrowth and collateralization, as well as modulating the migration of different cell types, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) being the main receptor involved in all these events. To further understand the role of A1 during development, we have analysed the over-expression of human A1 in a transgenic mouse line. Compared with control mice during development and in early adulthood, A1 over-expressing transgenic mice showed an enhanced oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) proliferation and a higher number of OPCs in the subventricular zone and in the corpus callosum (CC). The migratory capacity of OPCs from the transgenic mice is increased in vitro due to a higher basal activation of ERK1/2 mediated through FGFR1 and they also produced more myelin basic protein (MBP). In vivo, the over-expression of A1 resulted in an elevated number of mature oligodendrocytes with higher levels of MBP mRNA and protein, as well as increased levels of activation of the ERK1/2 proteins, while electron microscopy revealed thicker myelin sheaths around the axons of the CC in adulthood. Also in the mature CC, the nodes of Ranvier were significantly longer and the conduction velocity of the nerve impulse in vivo was significantly increased in the CC of A1 over-expressing transgenic mice. Altogether, these data confirmed the involvement of A1 in oligodendrogliogenesis and its relevance for myelination. PMID:25662897

  19. Microarray dataset of Jurkat cells following miR-93 over-expression.

    PubMed

    Gioiosa, Silvia; Verduci, Lorena; Azzalin, Gianluca; Carissimi, Claudia; Fulci, Valerio; Macino, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    The dataset presented here represents a microarray experiment of Jurkat cell line over-expressing miR-93 after lentiviral transgenic construct transduction. Three biological replicates have been performed. We further provide normalized and processed data, log2 Fold Change based ranked list and GOterms resulting table. The raw microarray data are available in the ArrayExpress database (www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress) under accession number ArrayExpress: E-MTAB-4588. PMID:27408928

  20. FOXP3 over-expression inhibits melanoma tumorigenesis via effects on proliferation and apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, BeeShin; Anaka, Matthew; Deb, Siddhartha; Freyer, Claudia; Ebert, Lisa M.; Chueh, Anderly C.; Al-Obaidi, Sheren; Behren, Andreas; Jayachandran, Aparna; Cebon, Jonathan; Chen, Weisan; Mariadason, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The Forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) transcription factor is the key driver of regulatory T cell (Treg cells) differentiation and immunosuppressive function. In addition, FOXP3 has been reported to be expressed in many tumors, including melanoma. However, its role in tumorigenesis is conficting, with both tumor suppressive and tumor promoting functions described. The aim of the current study was to characterize the expression and function of FOXP3 in melanoma. FOXP3 expression was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 12% (18/146) of stage III and IV melanomas. However expression was confined to fewer than 1% of cells in these tumors. Stable over-expression of FOXP3 in the SK-MEL-28 melanoma cell line reduced cell proliferation and clonogenicity in vitro, and reduced xenograft growth in vivo. FOXP3 over-expression also increased pigmentation and the rate of apoptosis of SK-MEL-28 cells. Based on its infrequent expression in human melanoma, and its growth inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effect in over-expressing melanoma cells, we conclude that FOXP3 is not likely to be a key tumor suppressor or promoter in melanoma. PMID:24406338

  1. Regulation of cyclin E stability in Xenopus laevis embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt-(Webb), Yekaterina

    Cyclin-Cdk complexes positively regulate cell cycle progression. Cyclins are regulatory subunits that bind to and activate cyclin-dependent kinases or Cdks. Cyclin E associates with Cdk2 to mediate G1/S phase transition of the cell cycle. Cyclin E is overexpressed in breast, lung, skin, gastrointestinal, cervical, and ovarian cancers. Its overexpression correlates with poor patient prognosis and is involved in the etiology of breast cancer. We have been studying how this protein is downregulated during development in order to determine if these mechanisms are disrupted during tumorigenesis, leading to its overexpression. Using Xenopus laevis embryos as a model, we have shown previously that during the first 12 embryonic cell cycles Cyclin E levels remain constant yet Cdk2 activity oscillates twice per cell cycle. Cyclin E is abruptly destabilized by an undefined mechanism after the 12th cell cycle, which corresponds to the midblastula transition (MBT). Based on work our work and work by others, we have hypothesized that differential phosphorylation and a change in localization result in Cyclin E degradation by the 26S proteasome at the MBT. To test this, we generated a series of point mutations in conserved threonine/serine residues implicated in degradation of human Cyclin E. Using Western blot analysis, we show that similarly to human Cyclin E, mutation of these residues to unphosphorylatable alanine stabilizes Cyclin E past the MBT when they are expressed in vivo. Cyclin E localization was studied by immunofluorescence analysis of endogenous and exogenous protein in pre-MBT, MBT, and post-MBT embryos. In addition, we developed a novel method of conjugating recombinant His6-tagged Cyclin E to fluorescent (CdSe)ZnS nanoparticles (quantum dots) capped with dihydrolipoic acid. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize His6Cyclin E-quantum dot complexes inside embryo cells in real time. We found that re-localization at the MBT from the cytoplasm to the nucleus

  2. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition by the KLF6 tumor suppressor protein through interaction with cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Benzeno, Sharon; Narla, Goutham; Allina, Jorge; Cheng, George Z; Reeves, Helen L; Banck, Michaela S; Odin, Joseph A; Diehl, J Alan; Germain, Doris; Friedman, Scott L

    2004-06-01

    Kruppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is a tumor suppressor gene inactivated in prostate and colon cancers, as well as in astrocytic gliomas. Here, we establish that KLF6 mediates growth inhibition through an interaction with cyclin D1, leading to reduced phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) at Ser(795). Furthermore, introduction of KLF6 disrupts cyclin D1-cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) 4 complexes and forces the redistribution of p21(Cip/Kip) onto cdk2, which promotes G(1) cell cycle arrest. Our data suggest that KLF6 converges with the Rb pathway to inhibit cyclin D1/cdk4 activity, resulting in growth suppression. PMID:15172998

  3. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of cyclin D1 nuclear export and cyclin D1–dependent cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Alt, Jodi R.; Cleveland, John L.; Hannink, Mark; Diehl, J. Alan

    2000-01-01

    GSK-3β-dependent phosphorylation of cyclin D1 at Thr-286 promotes the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic redistribution of cyclin D1 during S phase of the cell cycle, but how phosphorylation regulates redistribution has not been resolved. For example, phosphorylation of nuclear cyclin D1 could increase its rate of nuclear export relative to nuclear import; alternatively, phosphorylation of cytoplasmic cyclin D1 by GSK-3β could inhibit nuclear import. Here, we report that GSK-3β-dependent phosphorylation promotes cyclin D1 nuclear export by facilitating the association of cyclin D1 with the nuclear exportin CRM1. D1-T286A, a cyclin D1 mutant that cannot be phosphorylated by GSK-3β, remains nuclear throughout the cell cycle, a consequence of its reduced binding to CRM1. Constitutive overexpression of the nuclear cyclin D1-T286A in murine fibroblasts results in cellular transformation and promotes tumor growth in immune compromised mice. Thus, removal of cyclin D1 from the nucleus during S phase appears essential for regulated cell division. PMID:11124803

  4. Fundamental properties of nearby single early B-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieva, María-Fernanda; Przybilla, Norbert

    2014-06-01

    Aims: Fundamental parameters of a sample of 26 apparently slowly-rotating single early B-type stars in OB associations and in the field within a distance of ≲400 pc from the Sun are presented and compared to high-precision data from detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs). Together with surface abundances for light elements the data are used to discuss the evolutionary status of the stars in context of the most recent Geneva grid of models for core hydrogen-burning stars in the mass-range ~6 to 18 M⊙ at metallicity Z = 0.014. Methods: The fundamental parameters are derived on the basis of accurate and precise atmospheric parameters determined earlier by us from non-LTE analyses of high-quality spectra of the sample stars, utilising the new Geneva stellar evolution models. Results: Evolutionary masses plus radii and luminosities are determined to better than typically 5%, 10%, and 20% uncertainty, respectively, facilitating the mass-radius and mass-luminosity relationships to be recovered for single core hydrogen-burning objects with a similar precision as derived from DEBs. Good agreement between evolutionary and spectroscopic masses is found. Absolute visual and bolometric magnitudes are derived to typically ~0.15-0.20 mag uncertainty. Metallicities are constrained to better than 15-20% uncertainty and tight constraints on evolutionary ages of the stars are provided. Overall, the spectroscopic distances and ages of individual sample stars agree with independently derived values for the host OB associations. Signatures of mixing with CN-cycled material are found in 1/3 of the sample stars. Typically, these are consistent with the amount predicted by the new Geneva models with rotation. The presence of magnetic fields appears to augment the mixing efficiency. In addition, a few objects are possibly the product of binary evolution. In particular, the unusual characteristics of τ Sco point to a blue straggler nature, due to a binary merger. Conclusions: The accuracy

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of CDK and cyclin proteins in premetazoan lineages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The molecular history of animal evolution from single-celled ancestors remains a major question in biology, and little is known regarding the evolution of cell cycle regulation during animal emergence. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive evolutionary analysis of CDK and cyclin proteins in metazoans and their unicellular relatives. Results Our analysis divided the CDK family into eight subfamilies. Seven subfamilies (CDK1/2/3, CDK5, CDK7, CDK 20, CDK8/19, CDK9, and CDK10/11) are conserved in metazoans and fungi, with the remaining subfamily, CDK4/6, found only in eumetazoans. With respect to cyclins, cyclin C, H, L, Y subfamilies, and cyclin K and T as a whole subfamily, are generally conserved in animal, fungi, and amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. In contrast, cyclin subfamilies B, A, E, and D, which are cell cycle-related, have distinct evolutionary histories. The cyclin B subfamily is generally conserved in D. discoideum, fungi, and animals, whereas cyclin A and E subfamilies are both present in animals and their unicellular relatives such as choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis and filasterean Capsaspora owczarzaki, but are absent in fungi and D. discoideum. Although absent in fungi and D. discoideum, cyclin D subfamily orthologs can be found in the early-emerging, non-opisthokont apusozoan Thecamonas trahens. Within opisthokonta, the cyclin D subfamily is conserved only in eumetazoans, and is absent in fungi, choanoflagellates, and the basal metazoan Amphimedon queenslandica. Conclusions Our data indicate that the CDK4/6 subfamily and eumetazoans emerged simultaneously, with the evolutionary conservation of the cyclin D subfamily also tightly linked with eumetazoan appearance. Establishment of the CDK4/6-cyclin D complex may have been the key step in the evolution of cell cycle control during eumetazoan emergence. PMID:24433236

  6. Clinical implications of defective B-type natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Menon, Santosh G; Mills, Roger M; Schellenberger, Ute; Saqhir, Syed; Protter, Andrew A

    2009-12-01

    Our understanding of the natriuretic peptide system continues to evolve rapidly. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), originally thought to be a simple volume-regulating hormone that is produced in response to cardiac stretch, has been shown to also play important roles in modulating bronchodilation, endothelial function, and cardiac remodeling. Recent data demonstrate that elevated levels of BNP in patients with heart failure do not represent a simple ratcheting up of normal production in response to increased stimulus. Instead, we now know that chronic stimulation of BNP synthesis induces a reversion to fetal gene expression, resulting in production of high molecular weight forms of BNP that are functionally deficient. Standard point-of-care BNP assays are immunoassays that will detect any molecule containing the target epitopes. Consequently, these assays cannot distinguish between defective, high molecular weight forms of BNP and normal, physiologically active BNP. In 2 separate evaluations, mass spectroscopy detected little, if any, normal BNP in patients with heart failure, despite the appearance of high circulating levels of immunoreactive BNP (iBNP) using commercial assays. Therefore, these commercial assays should be considered to be only an indication of myocardial stress. They do not measure physiologic BNP activity. This accounts for the "BNP paradox," namely, that administration of exogenous recombinant human BNP (rhBNP, nesiritide) has substantial clinical and hemodynamic impact in the presence of high levels of circulating iBNP using commercial assays. In addition to its short-term hemodynamic impact, rhBNP may have other important effects in this setting, and further investigation is warranted. PMID:20014209

  7. Cyclin C mediates stress-induced mitochondrial fission and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Yan, Ruilan; Cooper, Katrina F.; Strich, Randy

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo constant fission and fusion cycles. In response to cellular damage, this balance is shifted dramatically toward fission. Cyclin C–Cdk8 kinase regulates transcription of diverse gene sets. Using knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), we demonstrate that cyclin C directs the extensive mitochondrial scission induced by the anticancer drug cisplatin or oxidative stress. This activity is independent of transcriptional regulation, as Cdk8 is not required for this activity. Furthermore, adding purified cyclin C to unstressed permeabilized MEF cultures induced complete mitochondrial fragmentation that was dependent on the fission factors Drp1 and Mff. To regulate fission, a portion of cyclin C translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it associates with Drp1 and is required for its enhanced mitochondrial activity in oxidatively stressed cells. In addition, although HeLa cells regulate cyclin C in a manner similar to MEF cells, U2OS osteosarcoma cultures display constitutively cytoplasmic cyclin C and semifragmented mitochondria. Finally, cyclin C, but not Cdk8, is required for loss of mitochondrial outer membrane permeability and apoptosis in cells treated with cisplatin. In conclusion, this study suggests that cyclin C connects stress-induced mitochondrial hyperfission and programmed cell death in mammalian cells. PMID:25609094

  8. Paradoxical roles of cyclin D1 in DNA stability.

    PubMed

    Jirawatnotai, Siwanon; Sittithumcharee, Gunya

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of DNA integrity is vital for all of the living organisms. Consequence of DNA damaging ranges from, introducing harmless synonymous mutations, to causing disease-associated mutations, genome instability, and cell death. A cell cycle protein cyclin D1 is an established cancer-driving protein. However, contribution of cyclin D1 to cancer formation and cancer survival is not entirely known. In cancer tissues, overexpression of cyclin D1 is associated with both cancer genome instability, and resistance to DNA-damaging cancer drugs. Emerging evidence indicated that cyclin D1 may play novel direct roles in regulating DNA repair. Here we provide an insight how cyclin D1 expression may contribute to DNA repair and chromosome instability, and how these functions may facilitate cancer formation, and drug resistance. PMID:27155130

  9. Cyclin D type does not influence cell cycle response to DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation in multiple myeloma tumours.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean; Mann, David; Yong, Kwee

    2016-06-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by over-expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1) or D2 (CCND2), which control G1 phase cell-cycle progression. Proteolytic degradation of CCND1 (but not CCND2), resulting in G1 arrest, is reported in non-MM cells post-DNA damage, affecting DNA repair and survival. We examined the effect of ionizing radiation (IR) on D-cyclin levels and cell-cycle kinetics of MM cells, exploring differences based on D-cyclin expression. We showed that CCND1 is downregulated, whereas CCND2 is not, following IR. This did not lead to hypo-phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein or G1 arrest. Both CCND1- and CCND2-expressing MM cells arrested in S/G2/M, and did not differ in other cell-cycle proteins or sensitivity to IR. When treated with a CDK4/6 inhibitor, both CCND1 and CCND2 MM cells arrested in G1 and therefore are subject to physiological regulation at this checkpoint. Immunoprecipitation showed that, despite CCND1 degradation following IR, sufficient protein remains bound to CDK4/6 to prevent G1 arrest. Aberrant expression of CCND1 driven from the IGH promoter in t(11;14) MM cells maintains progression through G1 to arrest in S/G2/M. Differential expression of D-cyclin does not appear to affect cell-cycle response to IR, and is unlikely to underlie differential sensitivity to DNA damage. PMID:27146121

  10. Over-expression of heme oxygenase-1 promotes oxidative mitochondrial damage in rat astroglia.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Su, Haixiang; Song, Sisi; Paudel, Hemant K; Schipper, Hyman M

    2006-03-01

    Glial heme oxygenase-1 is over-expressed in the CNS of subjects with Alzheimer disease (AD), Parkinson disease (PD) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Up-regulation of HO-1 in rat astroglia has been shown to facilitate iron sequestration by the mitochondrial compartment. To determine whether HO-1 induction promotes mitochondrial oxidative stress, assays for 8-epiPGF(2alpha) (ELISA), protein carbonyls (ELISA) and 8-OHdG (HPLC-EC) were used to quantify oxidative damage to lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, respectively, in mitochondrial fractions and whole-cell compartments derived from cultured rat astroglia engineered to over-express human (h) HO-1 by transient transfection. Cell viability was assessed by trypan blue exclusion and the MTT assay, and cell proliferation was determined by [3H] thymidine incorporation and total cell counts. In rat astrocytes, hHO-1 over-expression (x 3 days) resulted in significant oxidative damage to mitochondrial lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, partial growth arrest, and increased cell death. These effects were attenuated by incubation with 1 microM tin mesoporphyrin, a competitive HO inhibitor, or the iron chelator, deferoxamine. Up-regulation of HO-1 engenders oxidative mitochondrial injury in cultured rat astroglia. Heme-derived ferrous iron and carbon monoxide (CO) may mediate the oxidative modification of mitochondrial lipids, proteins and nucleic acids in these cells. Glial HO-1 hyperactivity may contribute to cellular oxidative stress, pathological iron deposition, and bioenergetic failure characteristic of degenerating and inflamed neural tissues and may constitute a rational target for therapeutic intervention in these conditions. PMID:16222706

  11. Transcriptomic profiling comparison of YAP over-expression and conditional knockout mouse tooth germs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming; Wang, Xiu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    To identify the downstream target genes of YAP, we used RNA-Seq technology to compare the transcriptomic profilings of Yap conditional knockout (Yap CKO) and YAP over-expression mouse tooth germs. Our results showed that some Hox, Wnt and Laminin family genes had concurrent changes with YAP transcripts, indicating that the expression of these genes may be regulated by YAP. Here, we provide the detailed experimental procedure for the transcriptomic profiling results (NCBI GEO accession number GSE65524). The associated study on the regulation of Hoxa1 and Hoxc13 genes by YAP was published in Molecular Cellular Biology in 2015 [Liu et al., 2015]. PMID:26484260

  12. Sequence analysis, cloning and over-expression of an endoxylanase from the alkaliphilic Bacillus halodurans.

    PubMed

    Martínez, M Alejandra; Delgado, Osvaldo D; Baigorí, Mario D; Siñeriz, Faustino

    2005-04-01

    The BhMIR32 xyn11A gene, encoding an extracellular endoxylanase of potential interest in bio-bleaching applications, was amplified from Bacillus halodurans MIR32 genomic DNA. The protein encoded is an endo-1,4-beta-xylanase belonging to family 11 of glycosyl hydrolases. Its nucleotide sequence was analysed and the mature peptide was subcloned into pET22b(+) expression vector. The enzyme was over-expressed in a high density Escherichia coli culture as a soluble and active protein, and purified in a single step by immobilised metal ion affinity chromatography with a specific activity of 3073 IU mg-1. PMID:15973487

  13. Pharmacological inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Knockaert, Marie; Greengard, Paul; Meijer, Laurent

    2002-09-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) regulate the cell division cycle, apoptosis, transcription and differentiation in addition to functions in the nervous system. Deregulation of CDKs in various diseases has stimulated an intensive search for selective pharmacological inhibitors of these kinases. More than 50 inhibitors have been identified, among which >20 have been co-crystallized with CDK2. These inhibitors all target the ATP-binding pocket of the catalytic site of the kinase. The actual selectivity of most known CDK inhibitors, and thus the underlying mechanism of their cellular effects, is poorly known. Pharmacological inhibitors of CDKs are currently being evaluated for therapeutic use against cancer, alopecia, neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and stroke), cardiovascular disorders (e.g. atherosclerosis and restenosis), glomerulonephritis, viral infections (e.g. HCMV, HIV and HSV) and parasitic protozoa (Plasmodium sp. and Leishmania sp.). PMID:12237154

  14. Parkin deletion causes cerebral and systemic amyloidosis in human mutated tau over-expressing mice.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Jose A; Gómez, Ana; Rodal, Izaskun; Perucho, Juan; Martinez, Armando; Furió, Vicente; Ampuero, Israel; Casarejos, María J; Solano, Rosa M; de Yébenes, Justo García; Mena, Maria A

    2008-10-15

    Deposition of proteins leading to amyloid takes place in some neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Mutations of tau and parkin proteins produce neurofibrillary abnormalities without deposition of amyloid. Here we report that mature, parkin null, over-expressing human mutated tau (PK(-/-)/Tau(VLW)) mice have altered behaviour and dopamine neurotransmission, tau pathology in brain and amyloid deposition in brain and peripheral organs. PK(-/-)/Tau(VLW) mice have abnormal behaviour and severe drop out of dopamine neurons in the ventral midbrain, up to 70%, at 12 months and abundant phosphorylated tau positive neuritic plaques, neuro-fibrillary tangles, astrogliosis, microgliosis and plaques of murine beta-amyloid in the hippocampus. PK(-/-)/Tau(VLW) mice have organomegaly of the liver, spleen and kidneys. The electron microscopy of the liver confirmed the presence of a fibrillary protein deposits with amyloid characteristics. There is also accumulation of mouse tau in hepatocytes. These mice have lower levels of CHIP-HSP70, involved in the proteosomal degradation of tau, increased oxidative stress, measured as depletion of glutathione which, added to lack of parkin, could trigger tau accumulation and amyloidogenesis. This model is the first that demonstrates beta-amyloid deposits caused by over-expression of tau and without modification of the amyloid precursor protein, presenilins or secretases. PK(-/-)/Tau(VLW) mice provide a link between the two proteins more important for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. PMID:18640988

  15. VCC-1 over-expression inhibits cisplatin-induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhitao; Lu, Xiao; Zhu, Ping; Zhu, Wei; Mu, Xia; Qu, Rongmei; Li, Ming

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VCC-1 is hypothesized to be associated with carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Levels of VCC-1 are increased significantly in HCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of VCC-1 could promotes cellular proliferation rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of VCC-1 inhibit the cisplatin-provoked apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VCC-1 plays an important role in control the tumor growth and apoptosis. -- Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor-correlated chemokine 1 (VCC-1), a recently described chemokine, is hypothesized to be associated with carcinogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms by which aberrant VCC-1 expression determines poor outcomes of cancers are unknown. In this study, we found that VCC-1 was highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissue. It was also associated with proliferation of HepG2 cells, and inhibition of cisplatin-induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells. Conversely, down-regulation of VCC-1 in HepG2 cells increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells. In summary, these results suggest that VCC-1 is involved in cisplatin-induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells, and also provides some evidence for VCC-1 as a potential cellular target for chemotherapy.

  16. Over-Expressing Mitofusin-2 in Healthy Mature Mammalian Skeletal Muscle Does Not Alter Mitochondrial Bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Lally, James S. V.; Herbst, Eric A. F.; Matravadia, Sarthak; Maher, Amy C.; Perry, Christopher G. R.; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Holloway, Graham P.

    2013-01-01

    The role of mitofusin-2 (MFN-2) in regulating mitochondrial dynamics has been well-characterized in lower order eukaryotic cell lines through the complete ablation of MFN-2 protein. However, to support the contractile function of mature skeletal muscle, the subcellular architecture and constituent proteins of this tissue differ substantially from simpler cellular organisms. Such differences may also impact the role of MFN-2 in mature mammalian muscle, and it is unclear if minor fluctuations in MFN-2, as observed in response to physiological perturbations, has a functional consequence. Therefore, we have transiently transfected MFN-2 cDNA into rat tibialis anterior muscle to determine the effect of physiolgically relevant increases in MFN-2 protein on mitochondrial bioenergetics. Permeabilized muscle fibres generated from muscle following MFN-2-transfection were used for functional assessments of mitochondrial bioenergetics. In addition, we have further established a novel method for selecting fibre bundles that are positively transfected, and using this approach transient transfection increased MFN-2 protein ∼2.3 fold in selected muscle fibres. However, this did not alter maximal rates of oxygen consumption or the sensitivity for ADP-stimulated respiration. In addition, MFN-2 over-expression did not alter rates of H2O2 emission. Altogether, and contrary to evidence from lower order cell lines, our results indicate that over-expressing MFN-2 in healthy muscle does not influence mitochondrial bioenergetics in mature mammalian skeletal muscle. PMID:23383258

  17. Over-expression of cytosolic glutamine synthetase increases photosynthesis and growth at low nitrogen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, S I; Allen, D J; Ortiz-Lopez, A; Hernández, G

    2001-05-01

    Nitrogen, which is a major limiting nutrient for plant growth, is assimilated as ammonium by the concerted action of glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT). GS catalyses the critical incorporation of inorganic ammonium into the amino acid glutamine. Two types of GS isozymes, located in the cytosol (GS1) and in the chloroplast (GS2) have been identified in plants. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) transformants, over-expressing GS1 driven by the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter were analysed. GS in leaves of GS-5 and GS-8 plants was up-regulated, at the level of RNA and proteins. These transgenic plants had six times higher leaf GS activity than controls. Under optimum nitrogen fertilization conditions there was no effect of GS over-expression on photosynthesis or growth. However, under nitrogen starvation the GS transgenics had c. 70% higher shoot and c. 100% greater root dry weight as well as 50% more leaf area than low nitrogen controls. This was achieved by the maintenance of photosynthesis at rates indistinguishable from plants under high nitrogen, while photosynthesis in control plants was inhibited by 40-50% by nitrogen deprivation. It was demonstrated that manipulation of GS activity has the potential to maintain crop photosynthetic productivity while reducing nitrogen fertilization and the concomitant pollution. PMID:11432923

  18. Transgenic mice over-expressing carbonic anhydrase I showed aggravated joint inflammation and tissue destruction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies have demonstrated that carbonic anhydrase I (CA1) stimulates calcium salt precipitation and cell calcification, which is an essential step in new bone formation. Our study had reported that CA1 encoding gene has a strong association with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS), two rheumatic diseases with abnormal new bone formation and bone resorption in joints. This study investigated the effect of CA1 on joint inflammation and tissue destruction in transgenic mice that over-express CA1 (CA1-Tg). Methods CA1-Tg was generated with C57BL/6J mice by conventional methods. CA1-Tg was treated with collagen-II to induce arthritis (CIA). Wild-type mice, CA1-Tg treated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and transgenic mice over-expressing PADI4 (PADI4-Tg), a gene known to be involved in rheumatoid arthritis, were used as controls. Histochemistry and X-ray radiographic assay were used to examine joint destruction. Western blotting and real time-PCR were used to examine CA1 expression. Results CIA was observed in 60% of CA1-Tg, 20% of PADI4-Tg and 20% of wild-type mice after collagen injections. No CIA was found in CA1-Tg mice that received injections of BSA. The arthritic score was 5.5 ± 0.84 in the CA1-Tgs but the score was less than 2 in the injected wild-type mice and the PADI4-Tgs. The thickness of the hind paws in the CA1-Tgs was 3.46 ± 0.11 mm, which was thicker than that of PADI4-Tgs (2.23 ± 0.08 mm), wild-type mice (2.08 ± 0.06 mm) and BSA-treated CA1-Tgs (2.04 ± 0.07 mm). Histochemistry showed obvious inflammation, synovial hyperplasia and bone destruction in the joints of CA1-Tg that was not detected in PADI4-Tgs or wild-type mice. X-ray assays showed bone fusion in the paws and spines of CA1-Tg mice. Conclusion Over-expression of CA1 may aggravate joint inflammation and tissue destruction in the transgenic mice. PMID:23256642

  19. Striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions in rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Chiodi, Valentina; Ferrante, Antonella; Ferraro, Luca; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Armida, Monica; Beggiato, Sarah; Pèzzola, Antonella; Bader, Michael; Fuxe, Kjell; Popoli, Patrizia; Domenici, Maria Rosaria

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2 A Rs) and cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1 Rs) are highly expressed in the striatum, where they functionally interact and form A2A /CB1 heteroreceptor complexes. We investigated the effects of CB1 R stimulation in a transgenic rat strain over-expressing A2 A Rs under the control of the neural-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A rats) and in age-matched wild-type (WT) animals. The effects of the CB1 R agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) were significantly lower in NSEA2A rats than in WT animals, as demonstrated by i) electrophysiological recordings of synaptic transmission in corticostriatal slices; ii) the measurement of glutamate outflow from striatal synaptosomes and iii) in vivo experiments on locomotor activity. Moreover, while the effects of WIN were modulated by both A2 A R agonist (CGS 21680) and antagonists (ZM 241385, KW-6002 and SCH-442416) in WT animals, the A2 A R antagonists failed to influence WIN-mediated effects in NSEA2A rats. The present results demonstrate that in rats with genetic neuronal over-expression of A2 A Rs, the effects mediated by CB1 R activation in the striatum are significantly reduced, suggesting a change in the stoichiometry of A2A and CB1 receptors and providing a strategy to dissect the involvement of A2 A R forming or not forming heteromers in the modulation of striatal functions. These findings add additional evidence for the existence of an interaction between striatal A2 A Rs and CB1 Rs, playing a fundamental role in the regulation of striatal functions. We studied A2A -CB1 receptor interaction in transgenic rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A ). In these rats, we demonstrated a reduced effect of the CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 in the modulation of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and locomotor activity, while CB1 receptor expression level did not change with respect to WT rats. A reduction in the expression of A2A -CB1

  20. Over-expression of AtEXLA2 alters etiolated arabidopsis hypocotyl growth

    PubMed Central

    Boron, Agnieszka Karolina; Van Loock, Bram; Suslov, Dmitry; Markakis, Marios Nektarios; Verbelen, Jean-Pierre; Vissenberg, Kris

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Plant stature and shape are largely determined by cell elongation, a process that is strongly controlled at the level of the cell wall. This is associated with the presence of many cell wall proteins implicated in the elongation process. Several proteins and enzyme families have been suggested to be involved in the controlled weakening of the cell wall, and these include xyloglucan endotransglucosylases/hydrolases (XTHs), yieldins, lipid transfer proteins and expansins. Although expansins have been the subject of much research, the role and involvement of expansin-like genes/proteins remain mostly unclear. This study investigates the expression and function of AtEXLA2 (At4g38400), a member of the expansin-like A (EXLA) family in arabidposis, and considers its possible role in cell wall metabolism and growth. Methods Transgenic plants of Arabidopsis thaliana were grown, and lines over-expressing AtEXLA2 were identified. Plants were grown in the dark, on media containing growth hormones or precursors, or were gravistimulated. Hypocotyls were studied using transmission electron microscopy and extensiometry. Histochemical GUS (β-glucuronidase) stainings were performed. Key Results AtEXLA2 is one of the three EXLA members in arabidopsis. The protein lacks the typical domain responsible for expansin activity, but contains a presumed cellulose-interacting domain. Using promoter::GUS lines, the expression of AtEXLA2 was seen in germinating seedlings, hypocotyls, lateral root cap cells, columella cells and the central cylinder basally to the elongation zone of the root, and during different stages of lateral root development. Furthermore, promoter activity was detected in petioles, veins of leaves and filaments, and also in the peduncle of the flowers and in a zone just beneath the papillae. Over-expression of AtEXLA2 resulted in an increase of >10 % in the length of dark-grown hypocotyls and in slightly thicker walls in non-rapidly elongating etiolated

  1. Properties of astrocytes cultured from GFAP over-expressing and GFAP mutant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Woosung; Messing, Albee

    2009-04-15

    Alexander disease is a fatal leukoencephalopathy caused by dominantly-acting coding mutations in GFAP. Previous work has also implicated elevations in absolute levels of GFAP as central to the pathogenesis of the disease. However, identification of the critical astrocyte functions that are compromised by mis-expression of GFAP has not yet been possible. To provide new tools for investigating the nature of astrocyte dysfunction in Alexander disease, we have established primary astrocyte cultures from two mouse models of Alexander disease, a transgenic that over-expresses wild type human GFAP, and a knock-in at the endogenous mouse locus that mimics a common Alexander disease mutation. We find that mutant GFAP, as well as excess wild type GFAP, promotes formation of cytoplasmic inclusions, disrupts the cytoskeleton, decreases cell proliferation, increases cell death, reduces proteasomal function, and compromises astrocyte resistance to stress.

  2. Over-expression of tetraspanin 8 in malignant glioma regulates tumor cell progression

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Si-Jian; Wu, Yue-Bing; Cai, Shang; Pan, Yi-Xin; Liu, Wei; Bian, Liu-Guan; Sun, Bomin; Sun, Qing-Fang

    2015-03-13

    Tumor cell invasion and proliferation remain the overwhelming causes of death for malignant glioma patients. To establish effective therapeutic methods, new targets implied in these processes have to be identified. Tetraspanin 8 (Tspn8) forms complexes with a large variety of trans-membrane and/or cytosolic proteins to regulate several important cellular functions. In the current study, we found that Tspn8 was over-expressed in multiple clinical malignant glioma tissues, and its expression level correlated with the grade of tumors. Tspn8 expression in malignant glioma cells (U251MG and U87MG lines) is important for cell proliferation and migration. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Tspn8 markedly reduced in vitro proliferation and migration of U251MG and U87MG cells. Meanwhile, Tspn8 silencing also increased the sensitivity of temozolomide (TMZ), and significantly increased U251MG or U87MG cell death and apoptosis by TMZ were achieved with Tspn8 knockdown. We observed that Tspn8 formed a complex with activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in both human malignant glioma tissues and in above glioma cells. This complexation appeared required for FAK activation, since Tspn8 knockdown inhibited FAK activation in U251MG and U87MG cells. These results provide evidence that Tspn8 contributes to the pathogenesis of glioblastoma probably by promoting proliferation, migration and TMZ-resistance of glioma cells. Therefore, targeting Tspn8 may provide a potential therapeutic intervention for malignant glioma. - Highlights: • Tspn8 is over-expressed in multiple clinical malignant glioma tissues. • Tspn8 expression is correlated with the grade of malignant gliomas. • Tspn8 knockdown suppresses U251MG/U87MG proliferation and in vitro migration. • Tspn8 knockdown significantly increases TMZ sensitivity in U251MG/U87MG cells. • Tspn8 forms a complex with FAK, required for FAK activation.

  3. The over-expression of cell migratory genes in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma could contribute to metastatic spread.

    PubMed

    Rapa, Elizabeth; Hill, Sophie K; Morten, Karl J; Potter, Michelle; Mitchell, Chris

    2012-06-01

    Alveolar (ARMS) and Embryonal (ERMS) rhabdomyosarcoma differ in their response to current treatments. The ARMS subtype has a less favourable prognosis and often presents with widespread metastases, while the less metastatic ERMS has a 5 year survival rate of more than 80 %. In this study we investigate gene expression differences that could contribute to the high frequency of metastasis in ARMS. Microarray analysis identified significant differences in DNA repair, cell cycle and cell migration between the two RMS subtypes. Two genes up regulated in ARMS and involved in cell migration; the engulfment and cell motility gene 1 (ELMO1) and NEL-like 1 gene (NELL1) were selected for further investigation. Over-expression of ELMO1 significantly increased cell invasion from 24.70 ± 7% to 93 ± 5.4% in primary myoblasts and from 29.43 ± 2.1% to 87.33 ± 4.1% in the ERMS cell line RD. siRNA knockout of ELMO1 in the ARMS cell line RH30 significantly reduced cell invasion from 88.2 ± 3.8% to 35.2 ± 2.5%. Over-expression of NELL1 significantly increased myoblast invasion from 23.6 ± 6.9% to 100 ± 0.1%, but had no effect on invasion of the ERMS cell line RD. These findings suggest that ELMO1 may play a key role in ARMS metastasis. NELL1 increased invasion in primary myoblasts, but other factors required for it to enhance motility were not present in the RD ERMS cell line. Impairing ELMO1 function by pharmacological or siRNA knockdown could be a highly effective approach to reduce the metastatic spread of RMS. PMID:22415709

  4. Severe hypoxia induces chemo-resistance in clinical cervical tumors through MVP over-expression

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Pedro C; Lloret, Marta; Clavo, Bernardino; Apolinario, Rosa M; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Bordón, Elisa; Fontes, Fausto; Rey, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen molecule modulates tumour response to radiotherapy. Higher radiation doses are required under hypoxic conditions to induce cell death. Hypoxia may inhibit the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair through down regulating Ku70/80 expression. Hypoxia induces drug resistance in clinical tumours, although the mechanism is not clearly elucidated. Vaults are ribonucleoprotein particles with a hollow barrel-like structure composed of three proteins: major vault protein (MVP), vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and telomerase associated protein-1 and small untranslated RNA. Over-expression of MVP has been associated with chemotherapy resistance. Also, it has been related to poor outcome in patients treated with radiotherapy alone. The aim of the present study was to assess the relation of Major Vault Protein expression and tumor hypoxia in clinical cervical tumors. MVP, p53 and angiogenesis, together with tumor oxygenation, were determined in forty-three consecutive patients suffering from localized cervix carcinoma. High MVP expression was related to severe hypoxia compared to low MVP expressing tumors (p = 0.022). Tumors over-expressing MVP also showed increased angiogenesis (p = 0.003). Besides it, in this study we show for the first time that severe tumor hypoxia is associated with high MVP expression in clinical cervical tumors. Up-regulation of MVP by hypoxia is of critical relevance as chemotherapy is currently a standard treatment for those patients. From our results it could be suggested that hypoxia not only induces increased genetic instability, oncogenic properties and metastatization, but through the correlation observed with MVP expression, another pathway of chemo and radiation resistance could be developed. PMID:19660100

  5. Impact of cyclooxygenase-2 over-expression on the prognosis of breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Sertaç Ata; Uğurlu, Mustafa Ümit; Kaya, Handan; Şen, Semiha; Nazlı, Yasemin; Güllüoğlu, Bahadır M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this present study was to assess the impact of COX-2 over-expression on breast cancer survival. Material and Methods: Non-metastatic invasive breast cancer patients who received adequate loco-regional and systemic treatments were evaluated. Patients’ demographic, clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related and survival data were retrieved from their hospital files. COX-2, estrogen/progesterone receptor (ER/PR), HER-2/neu expression and Ki67 index of the tumors were determined immunohistochemically. As the primary objective, COX-2 positive and negative patients were compared in terms of overall (OS), disease-free (DFS) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS). Secondary objectives were to assess the independent prognostic factors for survival. In addition, the correlation of COX-2 expression with conventional prognostic and predictive factors of breast cancer was assessed. Results: Two hundred and seventeen patients who underwent adequate breast cancer treatment between November 2004 and December 2013 were included in the study. The median follow-up was 37 months (range: 5–107). Eighty-one (37%) patients were COX-2 positive. OS, DFS, and BCSS were similar in COX-2 positive and negative patients. Ki67 index and age were significantly correlated with COX-2 expression (r=−0.116; p=0.02; r=0.159; p=0.02). PR expression was found to be the only independent factor for predicting OS, tumor size and molecular subtype classification were found to be the only independent factors for predicting DFS, and PR expression was found to be the only independent factor for predicting BCSS. Conclusion: Among the independent predictive and prognostic factors of breast cancer, COX-2 over-expression was only correlated with Ki67 index and age. PMID:27436928

  6. MiR-506 Over-Expression Inhibits Proliferation and Metastasis of Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fei; Lv, Mingli; Li, Dan; Cai, Haidong; Ma, Lishui; Luo, Qiong; Yuan, Xueyu; Lv, Zhongwei

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the relationship between miR-506 and proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Material/Methods MiR-506 mimics, inhibitor, and negative control (NC) were transfected into MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Cell proliferation, cell counting, colony formation assay, and Transwell assay were applied to evaluate the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Data are shown as mean ± standard deviation and the experiment was performed 3 times. Statistical analyses were performed with SPSS version 10.0. Results At 1 day after transfection, cell proliferation detected by CCK-8 assay was significantly promoted in miR-506 inhibitor when compared with the miR-506 mimics group and the NC group (P<0.05). At 3 days or 5 days after transfection, cell proliferation was markedly inhibited in the miR-506 mimics group, and miR-506 inhibitor was still significantly promoted. Cell counting with a hemocytometer showed similar results to cell proliferation. Colony formation assay showed that the number of colonies in the miR-506 mimics group was significantly smaller than that in the miR-506 inhibitor group and NC group. Transwell assay revealed that the number of migrated cells in miR-506 mimics was markedly smaller than that in the miR-506 inhibitor group and NC group. Conclusions MiR-506 over-expression significantly inhibits the proliferation, colony formation, and migration of breast cancer cells. miR-506 over-expression may thus be able to improve the malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells. PMID:26059632

  7. Severe hypoxia induces chemo-resistance in clinical cervical tumors through MVP over-expression.

    PubMed

    Lara, Pedro C; Lloret, Marta; Clavo, Bernardino; Apolinario, Rosa M; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Bordón, Elisa; Fontes, Fausto; Rey, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen molecule modulates tumour response to radiotherapy. Higher radiation doses are required under hypoxic conditions to induce cell death. Hypoxia may inhibit the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair through down regulating Ku70/80 expression. Hypoxia induces drug resistance in clinical tumours, although the mechanism is not clearly elucidated. Vaults are ribonucleoprotein particles with a hollow barrel-like structure composed of three proteins: major vault protein (MVP), vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and telomerase associated protein-1 and small untranslated RNA. Over-expression of MVP has been associated with chemotherapy resistance. Also, it has been related to poor outcome in patients treated with radiotherapy alone. The aim of the present study was to assess the relation of Major Vault Protein expression and tumor hypoxia in clinical cervical tumors. MVP, p53 and angiogenesis, together with tumor oxygenation, were determined in forty-three consecutive patients suffering from localized cervix carcinoma. High MVP expression was related to severe hypoxia compared to low MVP expressing tumors (p = 0.022). Tumors over-expressing MVP also showed increased angiogenesis (p = 0.003). Besides it, in this study we show for the first time that severe tumor hypoxia is associated with high MVP expression in clinical cervical tumors. Up-regulation of MVP by hypoxia is of critical relevance as chemotherapy is currently a standard treatment for those patients. From our results it could be suggested that hypoxia not only induces increased genetic instability, oncogenic properties and metastatization, but through the correlation observed with MVP expression, another pathway of chemo and radiation resistance could be developed. PMID:19660100

  8. Meiotic induction by Xenopus cyclin B is accelerated by coexpression with mosXe.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, R S; Ballantyne, S M; Donoghue, D J

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the relationship between Xenopus laevis c-mos (mosXe) and the cyclin B component of maturation-promoting factor. Microinjection of Xenopus oocytes with in vitro-synthesized RNAs encoding Xenopus cyclin B1 or cyclin B2 induces the progression of meiosis, characterized by germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD). By preinjecting oocytes with a mosXe-specific antisense oligonucleotide, we show that GVBD induced by cyclin B does not require expression of the mosXe protein. GVBD induced by cyclin B proceeds significantly faster than GVBD induced by progesterone or MosXe. However, coinjection of RNAs encoding cyclin B1 or cyclin B2 with mosXe RNA results in a 2.5- to 3-fold acceleration in GVBD relative to that induced by cyclin B alone. This acceleration of GVBD does not correlate with changes in the level of cyclin B1 and cyclin B2 phosphorylation. Images PMID:1825350

  9. CyclinA2-Cyclin-dependent Kinase Regulates SAMHD1 Protein Phosphohydrolase Domain.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junpeng; Hao, Caili; DeLucia, Maria; Swanson, Selene; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Ahn, Jinwoo; Skowronski, Jacek

    2015-05-22

    SAMHD1 is a nuclear deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate triphosphohydrolase that contributes to the control of cellular deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pool sizes through dNTP hydrolysis and modulates the innate immune response to viruses. CyclinA2-CDK1/2 phosphorylates SAMHD1 at Thr-592, but how this modification controls SAMHD1 functions in proliferating cells is not known. Here, we show that SAMHD1 levels remain relatively unchanged during the cell division cycle in primary human T lymphocytes and in monocytic cell lines. Inactivation of the bipartite cyclinA2-CDK-binding site in the SAMHD1 C terminus described herein abolished SAMHD1 phosphorylation on Thr-592 during S and G2 phases thus interfering with DNA replication and progression of cells through S phase. The effects exerted by Thr-592 phosphorylation-defective SAMHD1 mutants were associated with activation of DNA damage checkpoint and depletion of dNTP concentrations to levels lower than those seen upon expression of wild type SAMHD1 protein. These disruptive effects were relieved by either mutation of the catalytic residues of the SAMHD1 phosphohydrolase domain or by a Thr-592 phosphomimetic mutation, thus linking the Thr-592 phosphorylation state to the control of SAMHD1 dNTPase activity. Our findings support a model in which phosphorylation of Thr-592 by cyclinA2-CDK down-modulates, but does not inactivate, SAMHD1 dNTPase in S phase, thereby fine-tuning SAMHD1 control of dNTP levels during DNA replication. PMID:25847232

  10. CyclinA2-Cyclin-dependent Kinase Regulates SAMHD1 Protein Phosphohydrolase Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Junpeng; Hao, Caili; DeLucia, Maria; Swanson, Selene; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Skowronski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    SAMHD1 is a nuclear deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate triphosphohydrolase that contributes to the control of cellular deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pool sizes through dNTP hydrolysis and modulates the innate immune response to viruses. CyclinA2-CDK1/2 phosphorylates SAMHD1 at Thr-592, but how this modification controls SAMHD1 functions in proliferating cells is not known. Here, we show that SAMHD1 levels remain relatively unchanged during the cell division cycle in primary human T lymphocytes and in monocytic cell lines. Inactivation of the bipartite cyclinA2-CDK-binding site in the SAMHD1 C terminus described herein abolished SAMHD1 phosphorylation on Thr-592 during S and G2 phases thus interfering with DNA replication and progression of cells through S phase. The effects exerted by Thr-592 phosphorylation-defective SAMHD1 mutants were associated with activation of DNA damage checkpoint and depletion of dNTP concentrations to levels lower than those seen upon expression of wild type SAMHD1 protein. These disruptive effects were relieved by either mutation of the catalytic residues of the SAMHD1 phosphohydrolase domain or by a Thr-592 phosphomimetic mutation, thus linking the Thr-592 phosphorylation state to the control of SAMHD1 dNTPase activity. Our findings support a model in which phosphorylation of Thr-592 by cyclinA2-CDK down-modulates, but does not inactivate, SAMHD1 dNTPase in S phase, thereby fine-tuning SAMHD1 control of dNTP levels during DNA replication. PMID:25847232

  11. Mechanisms and regulation of the degradation of cyclin B.

    PubMed Central

    Hershko, A

    1999-01-01

    The degradation of the cyclin B subunit of protein kinase Cdk1/cyclin B is required for inactivation of the kinase and exit from mitosis. Cyclin B is degraded by the ubiquitin pathway, a system involved in most selective protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. In this pathway, proteins are targeted for degradation by ligation to ubiquitin, a process carried out by the sequential action of three enzymes: the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1, a ubiquitin-carrier protein E2 and a ubiquitin-protein ligase E3. In the system responsible for cyclin B degradation, the E3-like function is carried out by a large complex called cyclosome or anaphase-promoting complex (APC). In the early embryonic cell cycles, the cyclosome is inactive in the interphase, but becomes active at the end of mitosis. Activation requires phosphorylation of the cyclosome/APC by protein kinase Cdk1/cyclin B. The lag kinetics of cyclosome activation may be explained by Suc1-assisted multiple phosphorylations of partly phosphorylated complex. The presence of a Fizzy/Cdc20-like protein is necessary for maximal activity of the mitotic form of cyclosome/APC in cyclin-ubiquitin ligation. PMID:10582242

  12. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Cyclin Gene Family in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tingyan; Wang, Xin; Lu, Yongen; Cai, Xiaofeng; Ye, Zhibiao; Zhang, Junhong

    2014-01-01

    Cyclins play important roles in cell division and cell expansion. They also interact with cyclin-dependent kinases to control cell cycle progression in plants. Our genome-wide analysis identified 52 expressed cyclin genes in tomato. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino sequences of tomato and Arabidopsis cyclin genes divided them into 10 types, A-, B-, C-, D-, H-, L-, T-, U-, SDS- and J18. Pfam analysis indicated that most tomato cyclins contain a cyclin-N domain. C-, H- and J18 types only contain a cyclin-C domain, and U-type cyclins contain another potential cyclin domain. All of the cyclin genes are distributed throughout the tomato genome except for chromosome 8, and 30 of them were found to be segmentally duplicated; they are found on the duplicate segments of chromosome 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 11 and 12, suggesting that tomato cyclin genes experienced a mass of segmental duplication. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis indicates that the expression patterns of tomato cyclin genes were significantly different in vegetative and reproductive stages. Transcription of most cyclin genes can be enhanced or repressed by exogenous application of gibberellin, which implies that gibberellin maybe a direct regulator of cyclin genes. The study presented here may be useful as a guide for further functional research on tomato cyclins. PMID:24366066

  13. Preparation, structure, and digestibility of crystalline A- and B-type aggregates from debranched waxy starches.

    PubMed

    Cai, Liming; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2014-05-25

    Highly crystalline A- and B-type aggregates were prepared from short linear α-1,4 glucans generated from completely debranched waxy maize and waxy potato starches by manipulating the chain length and crystallization conditions including starch solids concentration and crystallization temperature. The A-type crystalline products were more resistant to enzyme digestion than the B-type crystalline products, and the digestibility of the A- and B-type allomorphs was not correlated with the size of the aggregates formed. Annealing increased the peak melting temperature of the B-type crystallites, making it similar to that of the A-type crystallites, but did not improve the enzyme resistance of the B-type crystalline products. The possible reason for these results was due to the compact morphology as well as the denser packing pattern of double helices in A-type crystallites. Our observations counter the fact that most B-type native starches are more enzyme-resistant than A-type native starches. Crystalline type per se does not seem to be the key factor that controls the digestibility of native starch granules; the resistance of native starches with a B-type X-ray diffraction pattern is probably attributed to the other structural features in starch granules. PMID:24708989

  14. A Simple Method for Assessment of MDR Bacteria for Over-Expressed Efflux Pumps.

    PubMed

    Martins, Marta; McCusker, Matthew P; Viveiros, Miguel; Couto, Isabel; Fanning, Séamus; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Amaral, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    It is known that bacteria showing a multi-drug resistance phenotype use several mechanisms to overcome the action of antibiotics. As a result, this phenotype can be a result of several mechanisms or a combination of thereof. The main mechanisms of antibiotic resistance are: mutations in target genes (such as DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV); over-expression of efflux pumps; changes in the cell envelope; down regulation of membrane porins, and modified lipopolysaccharide component of the outer cell membrane (in the case of Gram-negative bacteria). In addition, adaptation to the environment, such as quorum sensing and biofilm formation can also contribute to bacterial persistence. Due to the rapid emergence and spread of bacterial isolates showing resistance to several classes of antibiotics, methods that can rapidly and efficiently identify isolates whose resistance is due to active efflux have been developed. However, there is still a need for faster and more accurate methodologies. Conventional methods that evaluate bacterial efflux pump activity in liquid systems are available. However, these methods usually use common efflux pump substrates, such as ethidium bromide or radioactive antibiotics and therefore, require specialized instrumentation, which is not available in all laboratories. In this review, we will report the results obtained with the Ethidium Bromide-agar Cartwheel method. This is an easy, instrument-free, agar based method that has been modified to afford the simultaneous evaluation of as many as twelve bacterial strains. Due to its simplicity it can be applied to large collections of bacteria to rapidly screen for multi-drug resistant isolates that show an over-expression of their efflux systems. The principle of the method is simple and relies on the ability of the bacteria to expel a fluorescent molecule that is substrate for most efflux pumps, ethidium bromide. In this approach, the higher the concentration of ethidium bromide required to

  15. Over-expression of COQ10 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae inhibits mitochondrial respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Zampol, Mariana A.; Busso, Cleverson; Gomes, Fernando; Ferreira-Junior, Jose Ribamar; Tzagoloff, Alexander; Barros, Mario H.

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} COQ10 deletion elicits a defect in mitochondrial respiration correctable by addition of coenzyme Q{sub 2}, a synthetic diffusible ubiquinone. {yields} The significance that purified Coq10p contains bound Q{sub 6} was examined by testing over-expression of Coq10p on respiration. {yields} Inhibition of CoQ function due to Coq10p excess strength our hypothesis of Coq10p function in CoQ delivery. {yields} Respiratory deficiency caused by more Coq10p was specific and restored by Q{sub 2} in mitochondria or by Coq8p in cells. {yields} Coq8p over-production on other coq mutants revealed a surprisingly higher stability of other Coq proteins. -- Abstract: COQ10 deletion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae elicits a defect in mitochondrial respiration correctable by addition of coenzyme Q{sub 2}. Rescue of respiration by Q{sub 2} is a characteristic of mutants blocked in coenzyme Q{sub 6} synthesis. Unlike Q{sub 6} deficient mutants, mitochondria of the coq10 null mutant have wild-type concentrations of Q{sub 6}. The physiological significance of earlier observations that purified Coq10p contains bound Q{sub 6} was examined in the present study by testing the in vivo effect of over-expression of Coq10p on respiration. Mitochondria with elevated levels of Coq10p display reduced respiration in the bc1 span of the electron transport chain, which can be restored with exogenous Q{sub 2}. This suggests that in vivo binding of Q{sub 6} by excess Coq10p reduces the pool of this redox carrier available for its normal function in providing electrons to the bc1 complex. This is confirmed by observing that extra Coq8p relieves the inhibitory effect of excess Coq10p. Coq8p is a putative kinase, and a high-copy suppressor of the coq10 null mutant. As shown here, when over-produced in coq mutants, Coq8p counteracts turnover of Coq3p and Coq4p subunits of the Q-biosynthetic complex. This can account for the observed rescue by COQ8 of the respiratory defect in strains

  16. Marked over expression of uncoupling protein-2 in beta cells exerts minor effects on mitochondrial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Hals, Ingrid K.; Ogata, Hirotaka; Pettersen, Elin; Ma, Zuheng; Bjoerklund, Anneli; Skorpen, Frank; Egeberg, Kjartan Wollo; Grill, Valdemar

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The impact of UCP-2 over expression on mitochondrial function is controversial. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested mitochondrial functions at defined levels of overexpression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find minor increases of fatty acid oxidation and uncoupling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects were seen only at high level (fourfold) of over expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hence it is doubtful whether these effects are of importance in diabetes. -- Abstract: Evidence is conflicting as to the impact of elevated levels of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2) on insulin-producing beta cells. Here we investigated effects of a fourfold induction of UCP-2 protein primarily on mitochondrial parameters and tested for replication of positive findings at a lower level of induction. We transfected INS-1 cells to obtain a tet-on inducible cell line. A 48 h exposure to 1 {mu}g/ml of doxycycline (dox) induced UCP-2 fourfold (424 {+-} 113%, mean {+-} SEM) and 0.1 {mu}g/ml twofold (178 {+-} 29%, n = 3). Fourfold induced cells displayed normal viability (MTT, apoptosis), normal cellular insulin contents and, glucose-induced insulin secretion (+27 {+-} 11%) as well as D-[U-{sup 14}C]-glucose oxidation (+5 {+-} 9% at 11 mM glucose). Oxidation of [1-{sup 14}C]-oleate was increased from 4088 to 5797 fmol/{mu}g prot/2 h at 3.3 mM glucose, p < 0.03. Oxidation of L-[{sup 14}C(U)]-glutamine was unaffected. Induction of UCP-2 did not significantly affect measures of mitochondrial membrane potential (Rhodamine 123) or mitochondrial mass (Mitotracker Green) and did not affect ATP levels. Oligomycin-inhibited oxygen consumption (a measure of mitochondrial uncoupling) was marginally increased, the effect being significant in comparison with dox-only treated cells, p < 0.05. Oxygen radicals, assessed by dichlorofluorescin diacetate, were decreased by 30%, p < 0.025. Testing for the lower level of UCP-2 induction did not reproduce any of the

  17. The chromatin-remodeling protein Osa interacts with CyclinE in Drosophila eye imaginal discs.

    PubMed

    Baig, Jawaid; Chanut, Francoise; Kornberg, Thomas B; Klebes, Ansgar

    2010-03-01

    Coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation is essential during organogenesis. In Drosophila, the photoreceptor, pigment, and support cells of the eye are specified in an orchestrated wave as the morphogenetic furrow passes across the eye imaginal disc. Cells anterior of the furrow are not yet differentiated and remain mitotically active, while most cells in the furrow arrest at G(1) and adopt specific ommatidial fates. We used microarray expression analysis to monitor changes in transcription at the furrow and identified genes whose expression correlates with either proliferation or fate specification. Some of these are members of the Polycomb and Trithorax families that encode epigenetic regulators. Osa is one; it associates with components of the Drosophila SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. Our studies of this Trithorax factor in eye development implicate Osa as a regulator of the cell cycle: Osa overexpression caused a small-eye phenotype, a reduced number of M- and S-phase cells in eye imaginal discs, and a delay in morphogenetic furrow progression. In addition, we present evidence that Osa interacts genetically and biochemically with CyclinE. Our results suggest a dual mechanism of Osa function in transcriptional regulation and cell cycle control. PMID:20008573

  18. Assessment of the Selenoprotein M (SELM) Over-Expression on Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Tissues by Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, E.; Accardo, M.; Capone, F.; Colonna, G.; Castello, G.; Costantini, S.

    2014-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace mineral of fundamental importance to human healthy and exerts its biological function through selenoproteins. In particular, Selenoprotein M (SELM) is located in the endoplasmic reticulum and contains the common redox motif of cysteine-X-X-selenocysteine type. It attracts great attention due to its high expression in brain and its potential roles as antioxidant, neuroprotective, and cytosolic calcium regulator. Recently, our group found SELM over-expression in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines. In this report some paraffin-embedded tissues from liver biopsy of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cirrhosis and HCC were immunohistochemically stained and SELM expression scoring was evaluated. Our results evidence for the first time an increase of SELM expression in HCC liver tissues, and its gradual expression raise associated with an increased malignancy grade. Therefore, we propose to use i) SELM as putative marker for HCC as well as ii) simple immunohistochemistry technique to distinguish between the different grades of malignancy. PMID:25578973

  19. Enhancing Corynebacterium glutamicum robustness by over-expressing a gene, mshA, for mycothiol glycosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying-Bao; Chen, Can; Chaudhry, Muhammad Tausif; Si, Mei-Ru; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yao; Shen, Xi-Hui

    2014-07-01

    Over-expression of the gene, mshA, coding for mycothiol glycosyl transferase improved the robustness of Corynebacterium glutamicum to various stresses. Intracellular mycothiol (MSH) content was increased by 114 % in WT(pXMJ19-mshA) compared to WT(pXMJ19). Survival rates increased by 44, 39, 90, 77, 131, 87, 52, 47, 57, 85 and 33 % as compared to WT(pXMJ19) under stress by H2O2 (40 mM), methylglyoxal (5.8 mM), erythromycin (0.08 mg ml(-1)), streptomycin (0.005 mg ml(-1)), Cd(2+) (0.01 mM), Mn(2+) (2 mM), formic acid (0.05 %), acetic acid (0.15 %), levulinic acid (0.25 %), furfural (7.2 mM), and ethanol (10 % v/v), respectively. Increased MSH content also decreased the concentration of reactive oxygen species in the presence of the above stresses. Our results may open a new avenue for enhancing robustness of industrial bacteria for production of commodity chemicals. PMID:24737070

  20. Apoptotic effect of tannic acid on fatty acid synthase over-expressed human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nie, Fangyuan; Liang, Yan; Jiang, Bing; Li, Xiabing; Xun, Hang; He, Wei; Lau, Hay Tong; Ma, Xiaofeng

    2016-02-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers and is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide. Novel therapies and chemo-therapeutic drugs are urgently needed to be developed for the treatment of breast cancer. Increasing evidence suggests that fatty acid synthase (FAS) plays an important role in breast cancer, for the expression of FAS is significantly higher in human breast cancer cells than in normal cells. Tannic acid (TA), a natural polyphenol, possesses significant biological functions, including bacteriostasis, hemostasis, and anti-oxidant. Our previous studies demonstrated that TA is a natural FAS inhibitor whose inhibitory activity is stronger than that of classical FAS inhibitors, such as C75 and cerulenin. This study further assessed the effect and therapeutic potential of TA on FAS over-expressed breast cancer cells, and as a result, TA had been proven to possess the functions of inhibiting intracellular FAS activity, down-regulating FAS expression in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells, and inducing cancer cell apoptosis. Since high-expressed FAS is recognized as a molecular marker for breast cancer and plays an important role in cancer prognosis, these findings suggest that TA is a potential drug candidate for treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26349913

  1. Over-expression of poplar transcription factor ERF76 gene confers salt tolerance in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wenjing; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Boru; Wang, Shengji; Li, Renhua; Jiang, Tingbo

    2016-07-01

    Ethylene response factors (ERFs) belong to a large plant-specific transcription factor family, which play a significant role in plant development and stress responses. Poplar ERF76 gene, a member of ERF TF family, can be up-regulated in response to salt stress, osmotic stress, and ABA treatment. The ERF76 protein was confirmed to be targeted preferentially in the nucleus of onion cell by particle bombardment. In order to understand the functions of ERF76 gene in salt stress response, we conducted temporal and spatial expression analysis of ERF76 gene in poplar. Then the ERF76 cDNA fragment containing an ORF was cloned from di-haploid Populus simonii×P. nigra and transferred into tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum) genome by Agrobacterium-mediated leaf disc method. Under salt stress, transgenic tobacco over-expressing ERF76 gene showed a significant increase in seed germination rate, plant height, root length, and fresh weight, as well as in relative water content (RWC), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, peroxidase (POD) activity, and proline content, compared to control tobacco lines. In contrast, transgenic tobacco lines displayed a decrease in malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation, relative electrical conductivity (REC) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in response to salt stress, compared to control tobacco lines. Over all, the results indicated that ERF76 gene plays a critical role in salt tolerance in transgenic tobacco. PMID:27123829

  2. Over-expression, purification, and confirmation of Bacillus anthracis transcriptional regulator NprR.

    PubMed

    Rice, Amy J; Woo, Jerry K; Khan, Attiya; Szypulinski, Michael Z; Johnson, Michael E; Lee, Hyunwoo; Lee, Hyun

    2016-09-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) has been recognized as an important biological phenomenon in which bacterial cells communicate and coordinate their gene expression and cellular processes with respect to population density. Bacillus anthracis is the etiological agent of fatal pulmonary anthrax infections, and the NprR/NprX QS system may be involved in its pathogenesis. NprR, renamed as aqsR for anthrax quorum sensing Regulator, is a transcriptional regulator that may control the expression of genes required for proliferation and survival. Currently, there is no protocol reported to over-express and purify B. anthracis AqsR. In this study, we describe cloning, purification, and confirmation of functional full-length B. anthracis AqsR protein. The AqsR gene was cloned into the pQE-30 vector with an HRV 3C protease recognition site between AqsR and the N-terminal His6-tag in order to yield near native AqsR after the His-tag cleavage, leaving only two additional amino acid residues at the N-terminus. PMID:26344899

  3. A viral over-expression system for the major malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yasutsugu; Niu, Guodong; Hughes, Grant L.; Rasgon, Jason L.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding pathogen/mosquito interactions is essential for developing novel strategies to control mosquito-borne diseases. Technical advances in reverse-genetics, such as RNA interference (RNAi), have facilitated elucidation of components of the mosquito immune system that are antagonistic to pathogen development, and host proteins essential for parasite development. Forward genetic approaches, however, are limited to generation of transgenic insects, and while powerful, mosquito transgenesis is a resource- and time-intensive technique that is not broadly available to most laboratories. The ability to easily “over-express” genes would enhance molecular studies in vector biology and expedite elucidation of pathogen-refractory genes without the need to make transgenic insects. We developed and characterized an efficient Anopheles gambiae densovirus (AgDNV) over-expression system for the major malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. High-levels of gene expression were detected at 3 days post-infection and increased over time, suggesting this is an effective system for gene induction. Strong expression was observed in the fat body and ovaries. We validated multiple short promoters for gene induction studies. Finally, we developed a polycistronic system to simultaneously express multiple genes of interest. This AgDNV-based toolset allows for consistent transduction of genes of interest and will be a powerful molecular tool for research in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes. PMID:24875042

  4. GPX4 and GPX7 Over-Expression in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, E.; Capone, F.; Accardo, M.; Sorice, A.; Costantini, M.; Colonna, G.; Castello, G.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer and is still one of the most fatal cancers. Hence, it needs to identify always new putative markers to improve its diagnosis and prognosis. The selenium is an essential trace mineral implicated as a key factor in the early stage of cancer and exerts its biological function through the selenoproteins. In the last years our group has been studying the involvement of some selenoproteins in HCC. However, no many data are reported in literature about the correlation between HCC and the glutathione peroxidases (GPXs), both selenium and non selenium-containing GPXs. In this paper we have evaluated the GPX4 and GPX7 expression in some paraffin-embedded tissues from liver biopsy of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cirrhosis and HCC by immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR analysis. Our results evidenced that i) GPX4 and GPX7 had a statistically significant over-expression in HCC tissues compared to cirrhotic counterparts used as non tumor tissues, and ii) their expression was higher in grade III HCC tissues with respect to grade I-II samples. Therefore, we propose to use GPX4 and GPX7 as possible markers for improving HCC diagnosis/prognosis. PMID:26708178

  5. Enhanced water stress tolerance of transgenic maize plants over-expressing LEA Rab28 gene.

    PubMed

    Amara, Imen; Capellades, Montserrat; Ludevid, M Dolors; Pagès, Montserrat; Goday, Adela

    2013-06-15

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins participate in plant stress responses and contribute to the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. In this report Rab28 LEA gene has been over-expressed in maize plants under a constitutive maize promoter. The expression of Rab28 transcripts led to the accumulation and stability of Rab28 protein in the transgenic plants. Native Rab28 protein is localized to nucleoli in wild type maize embryo cells; here we find by whole-mount immunocytochemistry that in root cells of Rab28 transgenic and wild-type plants the protein is also associated to nucleolar structures. Transgenic plants were tested for stress tolerance and resulted in sustained growth under polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-mediated dehydration compared to wild-type controls. Under osmotic stress transgenic seedlings showed increased leaf and root areas, higher relative water content (RWC), reduced chlorophyll loss and lower Malondialdehyde (MDA) production in relation to wild-type plants. Moreover, transgenic seeds exhibited higher germination rates than wild-type seeds under water deficit. Overall, our results highlight the presence of transgenic Rab28 protein in nucleolar structures and point to the potential of group 5 LEA Rab28 gene as candidate to enhance stress tolerance in maize plants. PMID:23384757

  6. Cytochrome P450 CYP1B1 over-expression in primary and metastatic ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    McFadyen, M C E; Cruickshank, M E; Miller, I D; McLeod, H L; Melvin, W T; Haites, N E; Parkin, D; Murray, G I

    2001-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most frequent cause of death from gynaecological malignancies world wide. Little improvement has been made in the long-term outcome of this disease, with the 5-year survival of patients only 30%. This poor prognosis is due to the late presentation of the disease and to the unpredictable response of ovarian cancer to chemotherapy. The cytochrome P450 enzymes are a superfamily of haemoproteins, known to be involved in the metabolic activation and/or detoxification of a number of anti-cancer drugs. CYP1B1 is a tumour-related form of cytochrome P450 which is over expressed in a wide variety of primary tumours of different histological type. The presence of CYP1B1 may be of importance in the modulation of these tumours to anti-cancer drugs. We have conducted a comprehensive immunohistochemical investigation, into the presence of cytochrome P450 CYP1B1 in primary and metastatic ovarian cancer. The key findings of this study are the increased expression of CYP1B1 in the majority of ovarian cancers investigated (92%), with a strong correlation demonstrated between CYP1B1 expression in both primary and metastatic ovarian cancer (P= 0.005 Spearman's rank correlation test). In contrast no detectable CYP1B1 was found in normal ovary. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11461084

  7. Induced over-expression of AtDREB2A CA improves drought tolerance in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Reis, Rafaela Ribeiro; da Cunha, Bárbara Andrade Dias Brito; Martins, Polyana Kelly; Martins, Maria Thereza Bazzo; Alekcevetch, Jean Carlos; Chalfun, Antônio; Andrade, Alan Carvalho; Ribeiro, Ana Paula; Qin, Feng; Mizoi, Junya; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Nakashima, Kazuo; Carvalho, Josirley de Fátima Corrêa; de Sousa, Carlos Antônio Ferreira; Nepomuceno, Alexandre Lima; Kobayashi, Adilson Kenji; Molinari, Hugo Bruno Correa

    2014-05-01

    Drought is one of the most challenging agricultural issues limiting sustainable sugarcane production and, in some cases, yield losses caused by drought are nearly 50%. DREB proteins play vital regulatory roles in abiotic stress responses in plants. The transcription factor DREB2A interacts with a cis-acting DRE sequence to activate the expression of downstream genes that are involved in drought-, salt- and heat-stress response in Arabidopsis thaliana. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of stress-inducible over-expression of AtDREB2A CA on gene expression, leaf water potential (ΨL), relative water content (RWC), sucrose content and gas exchanges of sugarcane plants submitted to a four-days water deficit treatment in a rhizotron-grown root system. The plants were also phenotyped by scanning the roots and measuring morphological parameters of the shoot. The stress-inducible expression of AtDREB2A CA in transgenic sugarcane led to the up-regulation of genes involved in plant response to drought stress. The transgenic plants maintained higher RWC and ΨL over 4 days after withholding water and had higher photosynthetic rates until the 3rd day of water-deficit. Induced expression of AtDREB2A CA in sugarcane increased sucrose levels and improved bud sprouting of the transgenic plants. Our results indicate that induced expression of AtDREB2A CA in sugarcane enhanced its drought tolerance without biomass penalty. PMID:24656336

  8. BDNF over-expression increases olfactory bulb granule cell dendritic spine density in vivo.

    PubMed

    McDole, B; Isgor, C; Pare, C; Guthrie, K

    2015-09-24

    Olfactory bulb granule cells (GCs) are axon-less, inhibitory interneurons that regulate the activity of the excitatory output neurons, the mitral and tufted cells, through reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses located on GC spines. These contacts are established in the distal apical dendritic compartment, while GC basal dendrites and more proximal apical segments bear spines that receive glutamatergic inputs from the olfactory cortices. This synaptic connectivity is vital to olfactory circuit function and is remodeled during development, and in response to changes in sensory activity and lifelong GC neurogenesis. Manipulations that alter levels of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in vivo have significant effects on dendritic spine morphology, maintenance and activity-dependent plasticity for a variety of CNS neurons, yet little is known regarding BDNF effects on bulb GC spine maturation or maintenance. Here we show that, in vivo, sustained bulbar over-expression of BDNF in transgenic mice produces a marked increase in GC spine density that includes an increase in mature spines on their apical dendrites. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that changes in spine density were most notable in the distal and proximal apical domains, indicating that multiple excitatory inputs are potentially modified by BDNF. Our results indicate that increased levels of endogenous BDNF can promote the maturation and/or maintenance of dendritic spines on GCs, suggesting a role for this factor in modulating GC functional connectivity within adult olfactory circuitry. PMID:26211445

  9. Improving xylitol production at elevated temperature with engineered Kluyveromyces marxianus through over-expressing transporters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Dongmei; Gao, Xiaolian; Hong, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Three transporter genes including Kluyveromyces marxianus aquaglyceroporin gene (KmFPS1), Candida intermedia glucose/xylose facilitator gene (CiGXF1) or glucose/xylose symporter gene (CiGXS1) were over-expressed in K. marxianus YZJ017 to improve xylitol production at elevated temperatures. The xylitol production of YZJ074 that harbored CiGXF1 was improved to 147.62g/L in Erlenmeyer flask at 42°C. In fermenter, 99.29 and 149.60g/L xylitol were produced from 99.55 and 151.91g/L xylose with productivity of 4.14 and 3.40g/L/h respectively at 42°C. Even at 45°C, YZJ074 could produce 101.30g/L xylitol from 101.41g/L xylose with productivity of 2.81g/L/h. Using fed-batch fermentation through repeatedly adding non-sterilized substrate directly, YZJ074 could produce 312.05g/L xylitol which is the highest yield reported to date. The engineered strains YZJ074 which can produce xylitol at elevated temperatures is an excellent foundation for xylitol bioconversion. PMID:25465792

  10. Enhancement of Larval RNAi Efficiency by Over-expressing Argonaute2 in Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiqian; Zeng, Baosheng; Ling, Lin; Xu, Jun; You, Lang; Aslam, Abu F.M.; Tan, Anjiang; Huang, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference has been described as a powerful genetic tool for gene functional analysis and a promising approach for pest management. However, RNAi efficiency varies significantly among insect species due to distinct RNAi machineries. Lepidopteran insects include a large number of pests as well as model insects, such as the silkworm, Bombyx mori. However, only limited success of in vivo RNAi has been reported in lepidoptera, particularly during the larval stages when the worms feed the most and do the most harm to the host plant. Enhancing the efficiency of larval RNAi in lepidoptera is urgently needed to develop RNAi-based pest management strategies. In the present study, we investigate the function of the conserved RNAi core factor, Argonaute2 (Ago2), in mediating B. mori RNAi efficiency. We demonstrate that introducing BmAgo2 dsRNA inhibits the RNAi response in both BmN cells and embryos. Furthermore, we establish several transgenic silkworm lines to assess the roles of BmAgo2 in larval RNAi. Over-expressing BmAgo2 significantly facilitated both dsRNA-mediated larval RNAi when targeting DsRed using dsRNA injection and shRNA-mediated larval RNAi when targeting BmBlos2 using transgenic shRNA expression. Our results show that BmAgo2 is involved in RNAi in B. mori and provides a promising approach for improving larval RNAi efficiency in B. mori and in lepidopteran insects in general. PMID:25561900

  11. Differences between the Pallas collisional family and similarly sized B-type asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alí-Lagoa, V.; Licandro, J.; Gil-Hutton, R.; Cañada-Assandri, M.; Delbo', M.; de León, J.; Campins, H.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Kelley, M. S. P.; Hanuš, J.

    2016-06-01

    Context. B-type asteroids constitute a peculiar spectral class within the C-complex. Previous work has pointed out the difference between the visible geometric albedos of B-types and those of the Pallas collisional family (PCF), whose few members with observed spectra are B-types (one exception out of eight objects). This has been interpreted as being due to compositional differences. However, the PCF members are typically smaller than the spectroscopically classified B-types, and the following possibilities have not been ruled out: the albedo differences might be related to a size-albedo dependence and/or to the generally larger errors of the WISE data and best-fitting values of the derived parameters expected for smaller objects. Aims: We compare albedos and beaming parameters of PCF members and B-types of similar sizes and re-examine our conclusion on the different composition of the PCF. Methods: By modelling their WISE/NEOWISE data, we derived sizes and albedos of all objects whose Sloan Digital Sky Survey reflectances are similar to the typical B-type reflectance spectra. In particular, we derived the so-called infrared beaming parameters (η), effective diameters (D), and corresponding visible geometric albedos (pV), and studied their value distributions. Results: We obtained the effective diameter and geometric visible albedo for ~600 B-type asteroids whose sizes range between 2 and 100 km, approximately half of which have fitted η-values that are inversely correlated to size. We found that the albedo distributions of the PCF is significantly different from that of other B-types in the same size range (2-20 km), and we rule out any size-albedo dependency or biases related to the lower quality of the pV-values of smaller objects. In addition, we also found differences between the η-value distribution of the PCF and the other similarly-sized B-types. Conclusions: The differences in the visible albedos of PCF members and the other B-types of similar sizes is

  12. Cloning and sequence analysis of two cDNAs encoding cyclin A and cyclin B in the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Lamers, A E; Heiney, J P; Ram, J L

    1999-01-11

    Cyclins are key components in the progression of both mitotic and meiotic cell cycle control. Full-length cDNA clones encoding cyclin A and cyclin B were isolated from a zebra mussel testis cDNA library. The clones contained open reading frames of 419 and 434 amino acids, had similarity to cyclins A and B from other species, but also some unique features in their sequences. Cyclin A and B mRNA was expressed in testis, ovary, gill, mantle, muscle, and eggs, as shown by specific polymerase chain reaction. PMID:9990304

  13. Enhanced expression of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases in aniline-induced cell proliferation in rat spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianling; Wang Gangduo; Ma Huaxian; Khan, M. Firoze

    2011-01-15

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen leading to splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis and a variety of sarcomas of the spleen on chronic exposure. In earlier studies, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload, oxidative stress and activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors, which could regulate various genes leading to a tumorigenic response in the spleen. However, molecular mechanisms leading to aniline-induced cellular proliferation in the spleen remain largely unknown. This study was, therefore, undertaken on the regulation of G1 phase cell cycle proteins (cyclins), expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and cell proliferation in the spleen, in an experimental condition preceding a tumorigenic response. Male SD rats were treated with aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water) for 30 days (controls received drinking water only), and splenocyte proliferation, protein expression of G1 phase cyclins, CDKs and pRB were measured. Aniline treatment resulted in significant increases in splenocyte proliferation, based on cell counts, cell proliferation markers including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), nuclear Ki67 protein (Ki67) and minichromosome maintenance (MCM), MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blot analysis of splenocyte proteins from aniline-treated rats showed significantly increased expression of cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E, as compared to the controls. Similarly, real-time PCR analysis showed significantly increased mRNA expression for cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E in the spleens of aniline-treated rats. The overexpression of these cyclins was associated with increases in the expression of CDK4, CDK6, CDK2 as well as phosphorylation of pRB protein. Our data suggest that increased expression of cyclins, CDKs and phosphorylation of pRB protein could be critical in cell proliferation, and may contribute to aniline-induced tumorigenic response in

  14. PAR1 is selectively over expressed in high grade breast cancer patients: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Norma A; Correa, Elma; Avila, Esther P; Vela, Teresa A; Pérez, Víctor M

    2009-01-01

    Background The protease-activated receptor (PAR1) expression is correlated with the degree of invasiveness in cell lines. Nevertheless it has never been directed involved in breast cancer patients progression. The aim of this study was to determine whether PAR1 expression could be used as predictor of metastases and mortality. Methods In a cohort of patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma studied longitudinally since 1996 and until 2007, PAR1 over-expression was assessed by immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, and flow citometry. Chi-square and log rank tests were used to determine whether there was a statistical association between PAR1 overexpression and metastases, mortality, and survival. Multivariate analysis was performed including HER1, stage, ER and nodes status to evaluate PAR1 as an independent prognostic factor. Results Follow up was 95 months (range: 2–130 months). We assayed PAR1 in a cohort of patients composed of 136 patients; we found PAR1 expression assayed by immunoblotting was selectively associated with high grade patients (50 cases of the study cohort; P = 0.001). Twenty-nine of 50 (58%) patients overexpressed PAR1, and 23 of these (46%) developed metastases. HER1, stage, ER and PAR1 overexpression were robustly correlated (Cox regression, P = 0.002, P = 0.024 and P = 0.002 respectively). Twenty-one of the 50 patients (42%) expressed both receptors (PAR1 and HER1 P = 0.0004). We also found a statistically significant correlation between PAR1 overexpression and increased mortality (P = 0.0001) and development of metastases (P = 0.0009). Conclusion Our data suggest PAR1 overexpression may be involved in the development of metastases in breast cancer patient and is associated with undifferentiated cellular progression of the tumor. Further studies are needed to understand PAR1 mechanism of action and in a near future assay its potential use as risk factor for metastasis development in high grade breast cancer patients. PMID:19538737

  15. Enhancing lignan biosynthesis by over-expressing pinoresinol lariciresinol reductase in transgenic wheat.

    PubMed

    Ayella, Allan K; Trick, Harold N; Wang, Weiqun

    2007-12-01

    Lignans are phenylpropane dimers that are biosynthesized via the phenylpropanoid pathway, in which pinoresinol lariciresinol reductase (PLR) catalyzes the last steps of lignan production. Our previous studies demonstrated that the contents of lignans in various wheat cultivars were significantly associated with anti-tumor activities in APC(Min) mice. To enhance lignan biosynthesis, this study was conducted to transform wheat cultivars ('Bobwhite', 'Madison', and 'Fielder', respectively) with the Forsythia intermedia PLR gene under the regulatory control of maize ubiquitin promoter. Of 24 putative transgenic wheat lines, we successfully obtained 3 transformants with the inserted ubiquitin-PLR gene as screened by PCR. Southern blot analysis further demonstrated that different copies of the PLR gene up to 5 were carried out in their genomes. Furthermore, a real-time PCR indicated approximately 17% increase of PLR gene expression over the control in 2 of the 3 positive transformants at T(0) generation. The levels of secoisolariciresinol diglucoside, a prominent lignan in wheat as determined by HPLC-MS, were found to be 2.2-times higher in one of the three positive transgenic sub-lines at T(2 )than that in the wild-type (117.9 +/- 4.5 vs. 52.9 +/- 19.8 mug/g, p <0.005). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that elevated lignan levels in a transgenic wheat line has been successfully achieved through genetic engineering of over-expressed PLR gene. Although future studies are needed for a stably expression and more efficient transformants, the new wheat line with significantly higher SDG contents obtained from this study may have potential application in providing additive health benefits for cancer prevention. PMID:18030664

  16. Over-Expression of CD200 Protects Mice from Dextran Sodium Sulfate Induced Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhiqi; Yu, Kai; Zhu, Fang; Gorczynski, Reginald

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim CD200:CD200 receptor (CD200R) interactions lead to potent immunosuppression and inhibition of autoimmune inflammation. We investigated the effect of "knockout"of CD200 or CD200R, or over-expression of CD200, on susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)—induced colitis, a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods Acute or chronic colitis was induced by administration of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in four groups of age-matched C57BL/6 female mice: (1) CD200-transgenic mice (CD200tg); (2) wild-type (WT) mice; (3) CD200 receptor 1-deficient (CD200R1KO) mice; and (4) CD200-deficient (CD200KO) mice. The extent of colitis was determined using a histological scoring system. Colon tissues were collected for quantitative RT-PCR and Immunohistochemical staining. Supernatants from colonic explant cultures and mononuclear cells isolated from colonic tissue were used for ELISA. Results CD200KO and CD200R1KO mice showed greater sensitivity to acute colitis than WT mice, with accelerated loss of body weight, significantly higher histological scores, more severe infiltration of macrophages, neutrophils and CD3+ cells, and greater expression of macrophage-derived inflammatory cytokines, whose production was inhibited in vitro (in WT/CD200KO mouse cells) by CD200. In contrast, CD200tg mice showed less sensitivity to DSS compared with WT mice, with attenuation of all of the features seen in other groups. In a chronic colitis model, greater infiltration of Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells was seen in the colon of CD200tg mice compared to WT mice, and anti-CD25 mAb given to these mice attenuated protection. Conclusions The CD200:CD200R axis plays an immunoregulatory role in control of DSS induced colitis in mice. PMID:26841120

  17. Improving starch yield in cereals by over-expression of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase: expectations and unanticipated outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, Aytug; Okita, Thomas W

    2013-10-01

    Significant improvements in crop productivity are required to meet the nutritional requirements of a growing world population. This challenge is magnified by an increased demand for bioenergy as a means to mitigate carbon inputs into the environment. Starch is a major component of the harvestable organs of many crop plants, and various endeavors have been taken to improve the yields of starchy organs through the manipulation of starch synthesis. Substantial efforts have centered on the starch regulatory enzyme ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) due to its pivotal role in starch biosynthesis. These efforts include over-expression of this enzyme in cereal plants such as maize, rice and wheat as well as potato and cassava, as they supply the bulk of the staple food worldwide. In this perspective, we describe efforts to increase starch yields in cereal grains by first providing an introduction about the importance of source-sink relationship and the motives behind the efforts to alter starch biosynthesis and turnover in leaves. We then discuss the catalytic and regulatory properties of AGPase and the molecular approaches used to enhance starch synthesis by manipulation of this process during grain filling using seed-specific promoters. Several studies have demonstrated increases in starch content per seed using endosperm-specific promoters, but other studies have demonstrated an increase in seed number with only marginal impact on seed weight. Potential mechanisms that may be responsible for this paradoxical increase in seed number will also be discussed. Finally, we describe current efforts and future prospects to improve starch yield in cereals. These efforts include further enhancement of starch yield in rice by augmenting the process of ADPglucose transport into amyloplast as well as other enzymes involved in photoassimilate partitioning in seeds. PMID:23987811

  18. [Effects of ggpS over-expression on glycosylglycerol and glycerol biosynthesis of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803].

    PubMed

    Ma, Peizhen; Tan, Xiaoming; Lü, Xuefeng; Tian, Jiyuan

    2016-03-01

    To study the roles of glucosylglycerol phosphate synthase (Ggps) in glucosylglycerol (GG) and glycerol biosynthesis, we over-expressed Ggps from either Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 or Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 in a Synechocystis strain with a high GG titer, and determined the GG and glycerol accumulation in the resultant mutants grown under different NaCl-stress conditions. Ion chromatography results revealed that GG yield was not improved, but glycerol production was significantly enhanced by over-expression of Ggps from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (6803ggpS). In addition, increasing the NaCl concentration of medium from 600 to 900 mmol/L led to a further 75% increase of glycerol accumulation in the mutant strain with 6803ggpS over-expression. These findings show the role of ggpS in driving the carbon flux to the glycerol biosynthesis pathway, and will be helpful for further improvement of GG and glycerol production in Synechocystis. PMID:27349117

  19. Both SCF(Cdc4alpha) and SCF(Cdc4gamma) are required for cyclin E turnover in cell lines that do not overexpress cyclin E.

    PubMed

    Sangfelt, Olle; Cepeda, Diana; Malyukova, Alena; van Drogen, Frank; Reed, Steven I

    2008-04-15

    The ubiquitin-mediated turnover of cyclin E is regulated by phosphorylation and the activity of the ubiquitin ligase SCF(Cdc4) (also known as SCF(Fbw7)). In 293A cells, SCF complexes containing two different Cdc4 isoforms, alpha and gamma, are required for efficient cyclin E ubiquitylation. Whereas SCF(Cdc4gamma) ubiquitylates cyclin E directly, SCF(Cdc4alpha) serves as a cofactor for Pin1-mediated prolyl isomerization of the cyclin E phosphodegron, essential to potentiate ubiquitylation. In the current study, we show that the requirement for both Cdc4alpha and gamma is general, except in cell lines where cyclin E is expressed at an elevated level. Under these circumstances, Cdc4alpha is sufficient for cyclin E turnover. Furthermore, the requirement for Cdc4gamma can be bypassed by ectopic overexpression of cyclin E. PMID:18414042

  20. Interactions between human cyclin T, Tat, and the transactivation response element (TAR) are disrupted by a cysteine to tyrosine substitution found in mouse cyclin T

    PubMed Central

    Fujinaga, Koh; Taube, Ran; Wimmer, Jörg; Cujec, Thomas P.; Peterlin, B. Matija

    1999-01-01

    The transcriptional transactivator Tat from HIV binds to the transactivation response element (TAR) RNA to increase rates of elongation of viral transcription. Human cyclin T supports these interactions between Tat and TAR. In this study, we report the sequence of mouse cyclin T and identify the residues from positions 1 to 281 in human cyclin T that bind to Tat and TAR. Mouse cyclin T binds to Tat weakly and is unable to facilitate interactions between Tat and TAR. Reciprocal exchanges of the cysteine and tyrosine at position 261 in human and mouse cyclin T proteins also render human cyclin T inactive and mouse cyclin T active. These findings reveal the molecular basis for the restriction of Tat transactivation in rodent cells. PMID:9990016

  1. Dehydration breakdown of antigorite and the formation of B-type olivine CPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaya, Takayoshi; Wallis, Simon R.; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Seto, Yusuke; Miyake, Akira; Matsumoto, Megumi

    2014-02-01

    Peridotite formed by contact metamorphism and dehydration breakdown of an antigorite schist from the Happo area, central Japan shows a strong olivine crystallographic preferred orientation (Ol CPO). The lack of mesoscale deformation structures associated with the intrusion and the lack of microstructural evidence for plastic deformation of neoblastic grains suggest that olivine CPO in this area did not form as a result of solid-state deformation. Instead, the good correspondence between the original antigorite orientation and the orientation of the newly formed olivine implies the CPO formed by topotactic growth of the olivine after antigorite. Ol CPO is likely to develop by a similar process in subduction zone environments where foliated serpentinite is dragged down to depths where antigorite is no longer stable. The Happo Ol CPO has a strong a-axis concentration perpendicular to the lineation and within the foliation-commonly referred to as B-type Ol CPO. Seismic fast directions parallel to the ocean trench are observed in many convergent margins and are consistent with the presence of B-type Ol CPO in the mantle wedge of these regions. Experimental work has shown that B-type CPO can form by dislocation creep under hydrous conditions at relatively high stresses. There are, however, several discrepancies between the characteristics of natural and laboratory samples with B-type Ol CPO. (1) The formation conditions (stress and temperature) of some natural examples with B-type CPO fall outside those predicted by experiments. (2) In deformation experiments, slip in the crystallographic c-axis direction is important but has not been observed in natural examples of B-type CPO. (3) Experimental work suggests the presence of H2O and either high shear stress or relatively low temperatures are essential for the formation of B-type CPO. These conditions are most likely to be achieved close to subduction boundaries, but these regions are also associated with serpentinization

  2. The yeast carboxyl-terminal repeat domain kinase CTDK-I is a divergent cyclin-cyclin-dependent kinase complex.

    PubMed Central

    Sterner, D E; Lee, J M; Hardin, S E; Greenleaf, A L

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae CTDK-I is a protein kinase complex that specifically and efficiently hyperphosphorylates the carboxyl-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II and is composed of three subunits of 58, 38, and 32 kDa. The kinase is essential in vivo for normal phosphorylation of the CTD and for normal growth and differentiation. We have now cloned the genes for the two smaller kinase subunits, CTK2 and CTK3, and found that they form a unique, divergent cyclin-cyclin-dependent kinase complex with the previously characterized largest subunit protein CTK1, a cyclin-dependent kinase homolog. The CTK2 gene encodes a cyclin-related protein with limited homology to cyclin C, while CTK3 shows no similarity to other known proteins. Copurification of the three gene products with each other and CTDK-I activity by means of conventional chromatography and antibody affinity columns has verified their participation in the complex in vitro. In addition, null mutations of each of the genes and all combinations thereof conferred very similar growth-impaired, cold-sensitive phenotypes, consistent with their involvement in the same function in vivo. These characterizations and the availability of all of the genes encoding CTDK-I and reagents derivable from them will facilitate investigations into CTD phosphorylation and its functional consequences both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:7565723

  3. E2-C, a cyclin-selective ubiquitin carrier protein required for the destruction of mitotic cyclins.

    PubMed Central

    Aristarkhov, A; Eytan, E; Moghe, A; Admon, A; Hershko, A; Ruderman, J V

    1996-01-01

    Ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of the mitotic cyclins A and B is required for the completion of mitosis and entry into the next cell cycle. This process is catalyzed by the cyclosome, an approximately 22S particle that contains a cyclin-selective ubiquitin ligase activity, E3-C, that requires a cyclin-selective ubiquitin carrier protein (UBC) E2-C. Here we report the purification and cloning of E2-C from clam oocytes. The deduced amino acid sequence of E2-C indicates that it is a new UBC family member. Bacterially expressed recombinant E2-C is active in in vitro cyclin ubiquitination assays, where it exhibits the same substrate specificities seen with native E2-C. These results demonstrate that E2-C is not a homolog of UBC4 or UBC9, proteins previously suggested to be involved in cyclin ubiquitination, but is a new UBC family member with unique properties. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8633058

  4. Consequence of the tumor-associated conversion to cyclin D1b

    PubMed Central

    Augello, Michael A; Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Carr, Richard; Yoshida, Akihiro; Dean, Jeffry L; Schiewer, Matthew J; Feng, Felix Y; Tomlins, Scott A; Gao, Erhe; Koch, Walter J; Benovic, Jeffrey L; Diehl, John Alan; Knudsen, Karen E

    2015-01-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that cyclin D1b, a variant of cyclin D1, is associated with tumor progression and poor outcome. However, the underlying molecular basis was unknown. Here, novel models were created to generate a genetic switch from cyclin D1 to cyclin D1b. Extensive analyses uncovered overlapping but non-redundant functions of cyclin D1b compared to cyclin D1 on developmental phenotypes, and illustrated the importance of the transcriptional regulatory functions of cyclin D1b in vivo. Data obtained identify cyclin D1b as an oncogene, wherein cyclin D1b expression under the endogenous promoter induced cellular transformation and further cooperated with known oncogenes to promote tumor growth in vivo. Further molecular interrogation uncovered unexpected links between cyclin D1b and the DNA damage/PARP1 regulatory networks, which could be exploited to suppress cyclin D1b-driven tumors. Collectively, these data are the first to define the consequence of cyclin D1b expression on normal cellular function, present evidence for cyclin D1b as an oncogene, and provide pre-clinical evidence of effective methods to thwart growth of cells dependent upon this oncogenic variant. PMID:25787974

  5. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases by p21.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, J W; Elledge, S J; Keyomarsi, K; Dynlacht, B; Tsai, L H; Zhang, P; Dobrowolski, S; Bai, C; Connell-Crowley, L; Swindell, E

    1995-01-01

    p21Cip1 is a cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor that is transcriptionally activated by p53 in response to DNA damage. We have explored the interaction of p21 with the currently known Cdks. p21 effectively inhibits Cdk2, Cdk3, Cdk4, and Cdk6 kinases (Ki 0.5-15 nM) but is much less effective toward Cdc2/cyclin B (Ki approximately 400 nM) and Cdk5/p35 (Ki > 2 microM), and does not associate with Cdk7/cyclin H. Overexpression of P21 arrests cells in G1. Thus, p21 is not a universal inhibitor of Cdks but displays selectivity for G1/S Cdk/cyclin complexes. Association of p21 with Cdks is greatly enhanced by cyclin binding. This property is shared by the structurally related inhibitor p27, suggesting a common biochemical mechanism for inhibition. With respect to Cdk2 and Cdk4 complexes, p27 shares the inhibitory potency of p21 but has slightly different kinase specificities. In normal diploid fibroblasts, the vast majority of active Cdk2 is associated with p21, but this active kinase can be fully inhibited by addition of exogenous p21. Reconstruction experiments using purified components indicate that multiple molecules of p21 can associate with Cdk/cyclin complexes and inactive complexes contain more than one molecule of p21. Together, these data suggest a model whereby p21 functions as an inhibitory buffer whose levels determine the threshold kinase activity required for cell cycle progression. Images PMID:7626805

  6. Matrix Metalloproteinase-20 Over-Expression Is Detrimental to Enamel Development: A Mus musculus Model

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Masashi; Hu, Yuanyuan; Tye, Coralee E.; Guan, Xiaomu; Deagle, Craig C.; Antone, Jerry V.; Smith, Charles E.; Simmer, James P.; Bartlett, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinase-20 (Mmp20) ablated mice have enamel that is thin and soft with an abnormal rod pattern that abrades from the underlying dentin. We asked if introduction of transgenes expressing Mmp20 would revert this Mmp20 null phenotype back to normal. Unexpectedly, for transgenes expressing medium or high levels of Mmp20, we found opposite enamel phenotypes depending on the genetic background (Mmp20−/− or Mmp20+/+) in which the transgenes were expressed. Methodology/Principal Findings Amelx-promoter-Mmp20 transgenic founder mouse lines were assessed for transgene expression and those expressing low, medium or high levels of Mmp20 were selected for breeding into the Mmp20 null background. Regardless of expression level, each transgene brought the null enamel back to full thickness. However, the high and medium expressing Mmp20 transgenes in the Mmp20 null background had significantly harder more mineralized enamel than did the low transgene expresser. Strikingly, when the high and medium expressing Mmp20 transgenes were present in the wild-type background, the enamel was significantly less well mineralized than normal. Protein gel analysis of enamel matrix proteins from the high and medium expressing transgenes present in the wild-type background demonstrated that greater than normal amounts of cleavage products and smaller quantities of higher molecular weight proteins were present within their enamel matrices. Conclusions/Significance Mmp20 expression levels must be within a specific range for normal enamel development to occur. Creation of a normally thick enamel layer may occur over a wider range of Mmp20 expression levels, but acquisition of normal enamel hardness has a narrower range. Since over-expression of Mmp20 results in decreased enamel hardness, this suggests that a balance exists between cleaved and full-length enamel matrix proteins that are essential for formation of a properly hardened enamel layer. It also suggests that

  7. Over-expression of prothymosin-α antagonizes TGFβ signalling to promote the development of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Su, Bing-Hua; Tseng, Yau-Lin; Shieh, Gia-Shing; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Wu, Pensee; Shiau, Ai-Li; Wu, Chao-Liang

    2016-02-01

    Emphysema, a major consequence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), is characterized by the permanent airflow restriction resulting from enlargement of alveolar airspace and loss of lung elasticity. Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) signalling regulates the balance of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)/tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP) to control matrix homeostasis. Patients with COPD have dysregulated TGFβ signalling and reduced histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity through epigenetic up-regulation of histone acetylation in the promoters of pro-inflammatory genes. However, the potential link between decreased HDAC activity and dysregulated TGFβ signalling in emphysema pathogenesis remains to be determined. Prothymosin α (ProT), a highly conserved acidic nuclear protein, plays a role in the acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that ProT inhibits TGFβ-Smad signalling through Smad7, thereby contributing to emphysema pathogenesis. We show that ProT enhances Smad7 acetylation by decreasing its association with HDAC and thereby down-regulates TGFβ-Smad signalling. ProT caused an imbalance between MMP and TIMP through acetylated Smad7 in favour of MMP expression. In addition to interfering with R-Smad activation and targeting receptors for degradation in the cytoplasm, acetylated Smad7 potentiated by ProT competitively antagonized binding of the pSmad2/3-Smad4 complex to the TIMP-3 promoter, resulting in reduced TIMP-3 expression. These effects were detected in ProT-over-expressing cells, lungs of ProT transgenic mice displaying an emphysema phenotype and in emphysema patients. Importantly, increased Smad7 and reduced TIMP-3 were found in the lungs of emphysema patients and mice with cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced emphysema. Such effects could be abrogated by silencing endogenous ProT expression. Collectively, our results uncover acetylated Smad7 regulated by ProT as an

  8. Cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors as anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, Concepción; Gelbert, Lawrence M; Lallena, María José; de Dios, Alfonso

    2015-09-01

    Sustained proliferative capacity is a hallmark of cancer. In mammalian cells proliferation is controlled by the cell cycle, where cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) regulate critical checkpoints. CDK4 and CDK6 are considered highly validated anticancer drug targets due to their essential role regulating cell cycle progression at the G1 restriction point. This review provides an overview of recent advances on cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors in general with special emphasis on CDK4 and CDK6 inhibitors and compounds under clinical evaluation. Chemical structures, structure activity relationships, and relevant preclinical properties will be described. PMID:26115571

  9. Identification of E2F-1/Cyclin A antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S K; Ramsey, T M; Chen, Y N; Chen, W; Martin, M S; Clune, K; Sabio, M; Bair, K W

    2001-09-17

    A simple method for the synthesis of a rationally designed (S,S)-[Pro-Leu]-spirolactam scaffold is described. This was expanded to a small biased library of compounds mimicking the 'ZRXL' motif in order to identify E2F-1/Cyclin A antagonists. The synthesized compounds were evaluated in an E2F-1/Cyclin A binding assay and moderately active analogues were identified. In addition, the critical roles of Phe, Leu, Lys, and Arg residues of the identified motif were determined. PMID:11549444

  10. Over-expression of putative transcriptional coactivator KELP interferes with Tomato mosaic virus cell-to-cell movement.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Nobumitsu; Ogata, Takuya; Deguchi, Masakazu; Nagai, Shoko; Tamai, Atsushi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Kawakami, Shigeki; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Matsushita, Yasuhiko; Nyunoya, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) encodes a movement protein (MP) that is necessary for virus cell-to-cell movement. We have demonstrated previously that KELP, a putative transcriptional coactivator of Arabidopsis thaliana, and its orthologue from Brassica campestris can bind to ToMV MP in vitro. In this study, we examined the effects of the transient over-expression of KELP on ToMV infection and the intracellular localization of MP in Nicotiana benthamiana, an experimental host of the virus. In co-bombardment experiments, the over-expression of KELP inhibited virus cell-to-cell movement. The N-terminal half of KELP (KELPdC), which had been shown to bind to MP, was sufficient for inhibition. Furthermore, the over-expression of KELP and KELPdC, both of which were co-localized with ToMV MP, led to a reduction in the plasmodesmal association of MP. In the absence of MP expression, KELP was localized in the nucleus and the cytoplasm by the localization signal in its N-terminal half. It was also shown that ToMV amplified normally in protoplasts prepared from leaf tissue that expressed KELP transiently. These results indicate that over-expressed KELP interacts with MP in vivo and exerts an inhibitory effect on MP function for virus cell-to-cell movement, but not on virus amplification in individual cells. PMID:19236566

  11. Behavioral and Histopathological Consequences of Paraquat Intoxication in Mice: Effects of α-Synuclein Over-Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fernagut, P.O.; Hutson, C.B.; Fleming, S.M.; Tetreaut, N.A.; Salcedo, J.; Masliah, E.; Chesselet, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic variability in the α-synuclein gene and long-term exposure to the pesticide paraquat constitute possible risk factors for sporadic Parkinson’s disease. The goal of the present study was to further characterize the effects of paraquat in mice as a model of Parkinson’s disease and to determine whether it acted synergistically with α-synuclein over-expression to cause nigrostriatal cell death or dysfunction. Paraquat (10 mg/kg i.p.) was administered once a week for 3 weeks to mice over-expressing human α-synuclein under the Thy1 promoter and their wild-type littermates. The effect of paraquat on catecholaminergic neurons was reminiscent of that of Parkinson’s disease, with preferential loss of dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tier of the substantia nigra pars compacta and loss of tyrosine hydroxylase staining in the locus coeruleus. α-Synuclein over-expression did not increase paraquat-induced cell loss, and paraquat did not worsen the behavioral deficits observed in the transgenic mice. However, paraquat markedly increased proteinase-K-resistant α-synuclein aggregates in substantia nigra of the transgenic mice. The data further validate the use of paraquat to model Parkinson’s disease in mice and show that although paraquat and α-synuclein over-expression act synergistically to increase protein aggregation in vivo, this interaction does not result in short-term neuroprotection or increased vulnerability of nigrostriatal neurons. PMID:17879265

  12. EFFECTS OF OVER-EXPRESSION OF HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT GLUTENIN SUBUNIT 1Dy10 ON WHEAT TORTILLA PROPERTIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) flour properties necessary for optimal tortilla production have not been identified. Transgenic wheats (Triticum aestivum L.) over-expressing high molecular weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) 1Dy10 were used to produce tortillas and their quality evaluated. The level of HM...

  13. Over-expression of hedgehog signaling is associated with epidermal tumor formation in vitamin D receptor null mice

    PubMed Central

    Teichert, Arnaud; Elalieh, Hashem; Elias, Peter; Welsh, JoEllen; Bikle, Daniel D.

    2011-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) ligand, 1,25(OH)2D3, reduces proliferation and enhances differentiation and thus has been investigated for a role in preventing or treating cancer. Mice deficient for the VDR display a hyperproliferative response in the hair follicle and epidermis and decreased epidermal differentiation. Unlike their wild type littermates, when treated with 7,12 dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) or UVB, they develop skin tumors, including some characteristic of over-expression of the hedgehog (Hh) pathway. Both the epidermis and utricles of the VDR null animals over-express elements of the Hh pathway [Sonic Hedgehog (Shh, 2.02 fold), Patched1 1.58 fold, Smoothened 3.54 fold, Gli1 1.17 fold, and Gli2 1.66 fold]. This over-expression occurs at an age (11 weeks) where epidermal hyperproliferation is most visible and is spatially controlled in the epidermis. DMBA or UVB induced tumors in the VDR null mice also over-express elements of this pathway. Moreover, 1,25(OH)2D3 down-regulates the expression of some members of the Hh pathway in an epidermal explants culture system, suggesting a direct regulation by 1,25(OH)2D3. Our results suggest that increased expression of Shh in the keratinocytes of the VDR null animal activates the Hh pathway, predisposing the skin to the development of both malignant and benign epidermal neoplasms. PMID:21814234

  14. Measurement of tomato plant gene expression on a genomic scale for tomato plants that over express peroxidase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the gene expression of transgenic tomato plants that over-express the plant defense peroxidase in comparison to the control tomato plants with normal levels of peroxidase. In general, jasmonate-related plant defenses such as putative protease inhibitors were suppressed in peroxidase-rel...

  15. Over-Expression of SlSHN1 Gene Improves Drought Tolerance by Increasing Cuticular Wax Accumulation in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abdallat, Ayed M.; Al-Debei, Hmoud S.; Ayad, Jamal Y.; Hasan, Shireen

    2014-01-01

    Increasing cuticular wax accumulation in plants has been associated with improving drought tolerance in plants. In this study, a cDNA clone encoding the SlSHN1 transcription factor, the closest ortholog to WIN/SHN1 gene in Arabidopsis, was isolated from tomato plant. Expression analysis of SlSHN1 indicated that it is induced in response to drought conditions. The over-expression of SlSHN1 in tomato under the control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter produced plants that showed mild growth retardation phenotype with shiny and dark green leaves. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the over-expression of SlSHN1 in tomato resulted in higher cuticular wax deposition on leaf epidermial tissue when compared to non-transformed plants. Expression analysis in transgenic lines over-expressing SlSHN1 indicated that several wax-related synthesis genes were induced. Transgenic tomato plants over-expressing SlSHN1 showed higher drought tolerance when compared with wild type plants; this was reflected in delayed wilting of transgenic lines, improved water status and reduced water loss rate when compared with wild type plants. In conclusion, the SlSHN1 gene can modulate wax accumulation and could be utilized to enhance drought tolerance in tomato plant. PMID:25350113

  16. Lentiviral vector-mediated over-expression of Sox9 protected chondrocytes from IL-1β induced degeneration and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Huading; Zeng, Chun; Chen, Mingwei; Lian, Liyi; Dai, Yuhu; Zhao, Huiqing

    2015-01-01

    To explore whether the over-expression of Sry-related HMG box (Sox9) in degenerative chondrocytes is able to improve cell regeneration and protects cells from inflammation induced apoptosis, we generated a Sox9 over-expressing vector delivery system in which the Sox9 gene was inserted into a lentiviral vector. After infecting mouse chondrocytes with the Sox9-encoding vector, we observed a high level of gene transduction efficiency and achieved a high level of Sox9 expression in the infected chondrocytes. To explore whether over-expression of Sox9 is able to induce cell regeneration and improve cell survival, we induced Sox9 over-expression by lentiviral vector infection 48 hours before IL-1β treatment. The cells were infected with the reporter gene GFP-encoded lentiviral vector as a negative control or left uninfected. 48-hours after IL-1β treatment, the chrondrocytes treated with IL-1β alone, underwent a degenerative process, with elevated expression of MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-5 and ALP, but the cell specific anabolic proteins collagen II and aggrecan were significantly suppressed. The cells infected with the GFP reporter vector had no increased regeneration after IL-1β treatment. The results indicated that Sox9 is an important chondrocyte transcription factor, promoting chondrocyte regeneration and cell survival, which were mediated through affecting multiple cell differentiation as well as anti-apoptotic signaling pathways. PMID:26617711

  17. Over-expression of TSPO in the hippocampal CA1 area alleviates cognitive dysfunction caused by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Ma, Li; Yin, Yan-Ling; Dong, Lian-Qiang; Cheng, Gang-Ge; Ma, Ya-Qun; Li, Yun-Feng; Xu, Bai-Nan

    2016-09-01

    The translocator protein 18kDa (TSPO) is closely related to regulation of immune/inflammatory response. However, the putative role and signaling mechanisms of TSPO in regulation of neuroinflammation remain unclear. GV287 lentiviral vectors mediating TSPO over-expression were injected into bilateral hippocampal CA1 areas to test whether TSPO over-expression was neuroprotective in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mice model. Finasteride, a blocker of allopregnanolone production, was used to test whether the protective effects were related to steroideogenesis. The results demonstrated that TSPO over-expression increased progesterone and allopregnanolone synthesis. TSPO over-expression in CA1 area improved LPS-induced cognitive deficiency in mice and this cognitive improvement was reversed by finasteride administration. These data suggest that up-regulation of TSPO level during neuroinflammation may be an adaptive response mechanism, a way to provide more neurosteroids. We confer that TSPO could be an attractive drug target for controlling neuroinflammation in the future. PMID:27265418

  18. Metabolic profiling of transgenic wheat over-expressing the high-molecular weight Dx5 glutenin subunit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary aim of this work was to evaluate potential changes in the metabolic network of transgenic wheat grain due to over-expression of the gene encoding the high-molecular-weight (HMW) glutenin Dx5-subunit. We used GC-MS and multivariate analyses to compare the metabolite profiles of developing...

  19. PROFILES OF GENE EXPRESSION ASSOCIATED WITH TETRACYCLINE OVER EXPRESSION OF HSP70 IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Profiles of gene expression associated with tetracycline over expression of HSP70 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) protect cells from damage through their function as molecular chaperones. Some cancers reveal high levels of HSP70 expression in asso...

  20. Cyclin D2 Overexpression in Transgenic Mice Induces Thymic and Epidermal Hyperplasia whereas Cyclin D3 Expression Results Only in Epidermal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.; LaCava, Margaret; Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; Jorcano, Jose L.; Richie, Ellen R.; Conti, Claudio J.

    2000-01-01

    In a previous report, we described the effects of cyclin D1 expression in epithelial tissues of transgenic mice. To study the involvement of D-type cyclins (D1, D2, and D3) in epithelial growth and differentiation and their putative role as oncogenes in skin, transgenic mice were developed which carry cyclin D2 or D3 genes driven by a keratin 5 promoter. As expected, both transgenic lines showed expression of these proteins in most of the squamous tissues analyzed. Epidermal proliferation increased in transgenic animals and basal cell hyperplasia was observed. All of the animals also had a minor thickening of the epidermis. The pattern of expression of keratin 1 and keratin 5 indicated that epidermal differentiation was not affected. Transgenic K5D2 mice developed mild thymic hyperplasia that reversed at 4 months of age. On the other hand, high expression of cyclin D3 in the thymus did not produce hyperplasia. This model provides in vivo evidence of the action of cyclin D2 and cyclin D3 as mediators of proliferation in squamous epithelial cells. A direct comparison among the three D-type cyclin transgenic mice suggests that cyclin D1 and cyclin D2 have similar roles in epithelial thymus cells. However, overexpression of each D-type cyclin produces a distinct phenotype in thymic epithelial cells. PMID:10980142

  1. Sequences within the conserved cyclin box of human cyclin A are sufficient for binding to and activation of cdc2 kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Lees, E M; Harlow, E

    1993-01-01

    Cyclins are pivotal in the coordinate regulation of the cell cycle. By physical association, they are able to activate at least one of the cyclin-dependent kinases, cdc2. How this association between the catalytic moiety and cyclins leads to subsequent activation of the kinase remains unclear. In this report, we describe experiments to investigate this event at a physical level. Our approach was to map the regions required on the cyclin A molecule for interaction with cdc2. We have mapped the contact regions to two small noncontiguous stretches of amino acids, residues 189 to 241 and 275 to 320, both located within the conserved cyclin box domain of the protein. We have further shown that this region not only represents a contact site for cdc2 but apparently represents an intact functional domain with respect to cdc2 activation. This region alone is sufficient to stimulate maturation when injected into immature Xenopus laevis oocytes. This observation implies that events leading to the activation of cdc2 kinase can be mediated through small regions of the cyclin molecule that are located in the cyclin box. These regions contain some of the most highly conserved residues found between all the cyclin members so far identified. This suggests that the cyclin family members may have conserved a similar mechanism to bind and activate cyclin-dependent kinases. Images PMID:8423786

  2. Cigarette smoke extract alters the cell cycle via the phospholipid transfer protein/transforming growth factor-β1/CyclinD1/CDK4 pathway.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xue-Min; Li, You-Lun; Chen, Hong; Guo, Shu-Liang; Shui, Li-Li; Chen, Ya-Juan

    2016-09-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) on cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced alteration of the cell cycle and the possible mechanism. Male Wistar rats and the rat alveolar epithelial cell line (RLE-6TN) were exposed to normal air or different concentrations of CSE. Then PLTP siRNA was transfected into cells and an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) was administered prior to CSE exposure. Histological changes and cell cycle stage were recorded, as were the expression levels of PLTP, TGF-β1, CyclinD1 and CDK4. Resulting morphological changes included diffuse interstitial substance incrassation and elevated alveolar rupturing. Flow cytometry analysis revealed an increase in the number of cells in the G1 phase in a time- and dose-related manner. Both PLTP and TGF-β1 were up-regulated at protein and mRNA levels, whereas CyclinD1 and CDK4 expression was down-regulated after CSE exposure. Furthermore, PLTP siRNA significantly suppressed CSE-induced TGF-β1 expression, resulting in up-regulation of CyclinD1 and CDK4, but the TGF-β1 inhibitor was not able to abrogate CSE-induced PLTP over-expression. In conclusion, PLTP may operate upstream of the TGF-β1/CyclinD1/CDK4 pathway and may mediate the CSE-induced G1 arrest in RLE-6TN cells. Our work provides some new insight into the relation between PLTP and cell cycle progression. PMID:27260126

  3. Expression of δ-cyclins of Brassica rapa L. embryos by clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, O. A.

    Cyclins is one of the important regulators of cell cycle. There are several types of cyclins exists. They are responding for different phases of cycle and have high homology in plant's and mammalian's cells. δ -cyclins are specific for plants and controlling the presynthetic phase events. These cyclins likes to mammalian D-cyclins and have similar functions. This class consist three types of cyclins -- δ 1, δ 2 and δ 3. Cyclin δ 1 is responding for events in cell, which take place before exiting from stage of quiet (G0). Cyclin δ 1 is responding for entering and outputting from G0, and cyclin δ 3 -- for events, which happen in cell after stage of quiet, by entering to S-phase (phase of DNA's synthesis). In present research was used δ 1- and δ 3-cyclins. For determination of δ -cyclins gene's expression level was excreted RNA from embryos: 3-days (spherical stage), 6-days (heart-shaped stage) and 9-days (generated stage) seedlings of Brassica rapa L. in control and under clinorotation. For definition the cyclins gene's expression level applied Northern Blot Analysis. Obtained data testify about difference in level of gene's expression of cyclin δ 1 between control and clinorotation variants. After three days by pollination the expression of this gene in embryos was observed in control only. By clinorotation the gene's expression was detected on 6 days later, but it level was lower than in control variant. On 9 days it was gently expressed by clinorotation, where as by control it was not detected absolutely. Cyclin δ 3 gene's expression was observed during all time of the experiment. These data also confirm known one about expression δ 1- cyclin, which expressed on beginning of cell cycle only. And δ 3 --cyclin that express during whole presinthetic phase of cell cycle (Sony et al., 1995, Murray, 1994, Inze et al, 1999, Umeda, 2000).

  4. ATM is required for rapid degradation of cyclin D1 in response to {gamma}-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, Dong Wan; Baek, Hye Jung; Motoyama, Noboru; Cho, Kwan Ho; Kim, Hye Sun; Kim, Sang Soo

    2009-01-23

    The cellular response to DNA damage induced by {gamma}-irradiation activates cell-cycle arrest to permit DNA repair and to prevent replication. Cyclin D1 is the key molecule for transition between the G1 and S phases of the cell-cycle, and amplification or overexpression of cyclin D1 plays pivotal roles in the development of several human cancers. To study the regulation of cyclin D1 in the DNA-damaged condition, we analyzed the proteolytic regulation of cyclin D1 expression upon {gamma}-irradiation. Upon {gamma}-irradiation, a rapid reduction in cyclin D1 levels was observed prior to p53 stabilization, indicating that the stability of cyclin D1 is controlled in a p53-independent manner. Further analysis revealed that irradiation facilitated ubiquitination of cyclin D1 and that a proteasome inhibitor blocked cyclin D1 degradation under the same conditions. Interestingly, after mutation of threonine residue 286 of cyclin D1, which is reported to be the GSK-3{beta} phosphorylation site, the mutant protein showed resistance to irradiation-induced proteolysis although inhibitors of GSK-3{beta} failed to prevent cyclin D1 degradation. Rather, ATM inhibition markedly prevented cyclin D1 degradation induced by {gamma}-irradiation. Our data indicate that communication between ATM and cyclin D1 may be required for maintenance of genomic integrity achieved by rapid arrest of the cell-cycle, and that disruption of this crosstalk may increase susceptibility to cancer.

  5. A luminescence study of B-type Eu2O3 under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Stump, N. A.; Haire, R. G.; Burns, J. B.; Peterson, J. R.

    1994-07-01

    Luminescence spectra from Eu3+ ion in B-type (monoclinic) Eu2O3 powder have been recorded at room temperature as a function of pressure using a diamond anvil cell. Changes in the spectral pattern of the Eu3+ ion emission at about 4 GPa indicated that a phase transition to the A-type (hexagonal) structure had taken place. Upon release of the applied pressure, the B-type structure was regained with hysteresis. The spectral shifts with pressure have been used to study the effect of pressure on the spin-orbit interaction of the 4f electrons in the Eu3+ ion.

  6. The kinetics of G2 and M transitions regulated by B cyclins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yehong; Sramkoski, R Michael; Jacobberger, James W

    2013-01-01

    B cyclins regulate G2-M transition. Because human somatic cells continue to cycle after reduction of cyclin B1 (cycB1) or cyclin B2 (cycB2) by RNA interference (RNAi), and because cycB2 knockout mice are viable, the existence of two genes should be an optimization. To explore this idea, we generated HeLa BD™ Tet-Off cell lines with inducible cyclin B1- or B2-EGFP that were RNAi resistant. Cultures were treated with RNAi and/or doxycycline (Dox) and bromodeoxyuridine. We measured G2 and M transit times and 4C cell accumulation. In the absence of ectopic B cyclin expression, knockdown (kd) of either cyclin increased G2 transit. M transit was increased by cycB1 kd but decreased by cycB2 depletion. This novel difference was further supported by time-lapse microscopy. This suggests that cycB2 tunes mitotic timing, and we speculate that this is through regulation of a Golgi checkpoint. In the presence of endogenous cyclins, expression of active B cyclin-EGFPs did not affect G2 or M phase times. As previously shown, B cyclin co-depletion induced G2 arrest. Expression of either B cyclin-EGFP completely rescued knockdown of the respective endogenous cyclin in single kd experiments, and either cyclin-EGFP completely rescued endogenous cyclin co-depletion. Most of the rescue occurred at relatively low levels of exogenous cyclin expression. Therefore, cycB1 and cycB2 are interchangeable for ability to promote G2 and M transition in this experimental setting. Cyclin B1 is thought to be required for the mammalian somatic cell cycle, while cyclin B2 is thought to be dispensable. However, residual levels of cyclin B1 or cyclin B2 in double knockdown experiments are not sufficient to promote successful mitosis, yet residual levels are sufficient to promote mitosis in the presence of the dispensible cyclin B2. We discuss a simple model that would explain most data if cyclin B1 is necessary. PMID:24324638

  7. The cyclosome, a large complex containing cyclin-selective ubiquitin ligase activity, targets cyclins for destruction at the end of mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sudakin, V; Ganoth, D; Dahan, A; Heller, H; Hershko, J; Luca, F C; Ruderman, J V; Hershko, A

    1995-01-01

    The ubiquitin-mediated degradation of mitotic cyclins is required for cells to exit from mitosis. Previous work with cell-free systems has revealed four components required for cyclin-ubiquitin ligation and proteolysis: a nonspecific ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1, a soluble fraction containing a ubiquitin carrier protein activity called E2-C, a crude particulate fraction containing a ubiquitin ligase (E3) activity that is activated during M-phase, and a constitutively active 26S proteasome that degrades ubiquitinated proteins. Here, we identify a novel approximately 1500-kDa complex, termed the cyclosome, which contains a cyclin-selective ubiquitin ligase activity, E3-C. E3-C is present but inactive during interphase; it can be activated in vitro by the addition of cdc2, enabling the transfer of ubiquitin from E2-C to cyclin. The kinetics of E3-C activation suggest the existence of one or more intermediates between cdc2 and E3-C. Cyclosome-associated E3-C acts on both cyclin A and B, and requires the presence of wild-type N-terminal destruction box motifs in each cyclin. Ubiquitinated cyclins are then rapidly recognized and degraded by the proteasome. These results identify the cyclosome-associated E3-C as the component of the cyclin destruction machinery whose activity is ultimately regulated by cdc2 and, as such, the element directly responsible for setting mitotic cyclin levels during early embryonic cell cycles. Images PMID:7787245

  8. Stimulation of hERG1 channel activity promotes a calcium-dependent degradation of cyclin E2, but not cyclin E1, in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Neut, Mathew; Shum, Andrew; Cuevas, Bruce D.; Miller, Richard; Gentile, Saverio

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin E2 gene amplification, but not cyclin E1, has been recently defined as marker for poor prognosis in breast cancer, and appears to play a major role in proliferation and therapeutic resistance in several breast cancer cells. Our laboratory has previously reported that stimulation of the hERG1 potassium channel with selective activators led to down-regulation of cyclin E2 in breast cancer cells. In this work, we demonstrate that stimulation of hERG1 promotes an ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent degradation of cyclin E2 in multiple breast cancer cell lines representing Luminal A, HER2+ and Trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer cells. In addition we have also reveal that hERG1 stimulation induces an increase in intracellular calcium that is required for cyclin E2 degradation. This novel function for hERG1 activity was specific for cyclin E2, as cyclins A, B, D E1 were unaltered by the treatment. Our results reveal a novel mechanism by which hERG1 activation impacts the tumor marker cyclin E2 that is independent of cyclin E1, and suggest a potential therapeutic use for hERG1 channel activators. PMID:25596745

  9. Stimulation of hERG1 channel activity promotes a calcium-dependent degradation of cyclin E2, but not cyclin E1, in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Perez-Neut, Mathew; Shum, Andrew; Cuevas, Bruce D; Miller, Richard; Gentile, Saverio

    2015-01-30

    Cyclin E2 gene amplification, but not cyclin E1, has been recently defined as marker for poor prognosis in breast cancer, and appears to play a major role in proliferation and therapeutic resistance in several breast cancer cells. Our laboratory has previously reported that stimulation of the hERG1 potassium channel with selective activators led to down-regulation of cyclin E2 in breast cancer cells. In this work, we demonstrate that stimulation of hERG1 promotes an ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent degradation of cyclin E2 in multiple breast cancer cell lines representing Luminal A, HER2+ and Trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer cells. In addition we have also reveal that hERG1 stimulation induces an increase in intracellular calcium that is required for cyclin E2 degradation. This novel function for hERG1 activity was specific for cyclin E2, as cyclins A, B, D E1 were unaltered by the treatment. Our results reveal a novel mechanism by which hERG1 activation impacts the tumor marker cyclin E2 that is independent of cyclin E1, and suggest a potential therapeutic use for hERG1 channel activators. PMID:25596745

  10. Strategies used for genetically modifying bacterial genome: ite-directed mutagenesis, gene inactivation, and gene over-expression*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian-zhong; Zhang, Wei-guo

    2016-01-01

    With the availability of the whole genome sequence of Escherichia coli or Corynebacterium glutamicum, strategies for directed DNA manipulation have developed rapidly. DNA manipulation plays an important role in understanding the function of genes and in constructing novel engineering bacteria according to requirement. DNA manipulation involves modifying the autologous genes and expressing the heterogenous genes. Two alternative approaches, using electroporation linear DNA or recombinant suicide plasmid, allow a wide variety of DNA manipulation. However, the over-expression of the desired gene is generally executed via plasmid-mediation. The current review summarizes the common strategies used for genetically modifying E. coli and C. glutamicum genomes, and discusses the technical problem of multi-layered DNA manipulation. Strategies for gene over-expression via integrating into genome are proposed. This review is intended to be an accessible introduction to DNA manipulation within the bacterial genome for novices and a source of the latest experimental information for experienced investigators. PMID:26834010

  11. Strategies used for genetically modifying bacterial genome: site-directed mutagenesis, gene inactivation, and gene over-expression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian-zhong; Zhang, Wei-guo

    2016-02-01

    With the availability of the whole genome sequence of Escherichia coli or Corynebacterium glutamicum, strategies for directed DNA manipulation have developed rapidly. DNA manipulation plays an important role in understanding the function of genes and in constructing novel engineering bacteria according to requirement. DNA manipulation involves modifying the autologous genes and expressing the heterogenous genes. Two alternative approaches, using electroporation linear DNA or recombinant suicide plasmid, allow a wide variety of DNA manipulation. However, the over-expression of the desired gene is generally executed via plasmid-mediation. The current review summarizes the common strategies used for genetically modifying E. coli and C. glutamicum genomes, and discusses the technical problem of multi-layered DNA manipulation. Strategies for gene over-expression via integrating into genome are proposed. This review is intended to be an accessible introduction to DNA manipulation within the bacterial genome for novices and a source of the latest experimental information for experienced investigators. PMID:26834010

  12. Functional over-expression of the Stm1 protein, a G-protein-coupled receptor, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyung-Sook; Kim, Dong-Uk; Ryoo, Sung-Woo; Kang, Eun-Jung; Won, Misun; Kim, Lila; Jang, Young-Joo; Maeng, Pil-Jae; Kim, Sei-Chang; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Hoe, Kwang-Lae

    2003-02-01

    We report here the first functional over-expression of the Stm1 protein, a G-protein-coupled receptor with seven-trans-membrane spanning regions, in a homologous expression system without internal modification of the open reading frame of Stm1. The entire coding sequence, except for the termination codon followed by a C-terminal His6 tag, has been cloned into the pREP1 vector. The functionally active Stm1-His6 was over-expressed in Schizosaccharomyces pombe under the control of the nmt1 (no message in thiamine) promoter. The expression after induction was 120 times as much as that of control before induction and it gave approximately 500 ng protein/2 x 10(7) cells. PMID:12882583

  13. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  18. A Cadmium-transporting P1B-type ATPase in Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Adle, David J.; Sinani, Devis; Kim, Heejeong; Lee, Jaekwon

    2014-01-01

    Detoxification and homeostatic acquisition of metal ions are vital for all living organisms. We have identified PCA1 in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an overexpression suppressor of copper toxicity. PCA1 possesses signatures of a P1B-type heavy metal-transporting ATPase that is widely distributed from bacteria to humans. Copper resistance conferred by PCA1 is not dependent on catalytic activity, but it appears that a cysteine-rich region located in the N terminus sequesters copper. Unexpectedly, when compared with two independent natural isolates and an industrial S. cerevisiae strain, the PCA1 allele of the common laboratory strains we have examined possesses a missense mutation in a predicted ATP-binding residue conserved in P1B-type ATPases. Consistent with a previous report that identifies an equivalent mutation in a copper-transporting P1B-type ATPase of a Wilson disease patient, the PCA1 allele found in laboratory yeast strains is nonfunctional. Overexpression or deletion of the functional allele in yeast demonstrates that PCA1 is a cadmium efflux pump. Cadmium as well as copper and silver, but not other metals examined, dramatically increase PCA1 protein expression through post-transcriptional regulation and promote subcellular localization to the plasma membrane. Our study has revealed a novel metal detoxification mechanism in yeast mediated by a P1B-type ATPase that is unique in structure, substrate specificity, and mode of regulation. PMID:17107946

  19. Physical properties of small B-type asteroids from SDSS and WISE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Lagoa, V.; Licandro, J.; Delbo, M.; Gil-Hutton, R.; Cañada-Assandri, M.; de Leon, J.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Campins, H.

    2014-07-01

    In this work, we study the physical properties from WISE data (Wright et al. 2010, Mainzer et al. 2011, Masiero et al. 2011) of a list of asteroids whose Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data are compatible with those of B types in terms of their negative visible slopes (see, for example, de Leon et al. 2012). This allows us to extend to smaller-sized objects the study of spectroscopic B-types carried out by Ali-Lagoa et al. (2013), where we concluded that the members of the Pallas collisional family (PCF) have significantly different geometric albedos than the rest of the B types. Grav et al. (2012) pointed out that, even though the small-end members of the Jupiter Trojans appear to have higher geometric visible albedos than their larger counterparts (see their Figure 3), this is actually an artifact caused by the natural spread of the errors of the smaller objects and that there is no strong trend between size and albedo for the Jupiter Trojans. This motivates us to examine --- in a different context, since we are not proposing an albedo-size dependency --- the possibility that the abovementioned difference between the PCF and the rest of spectroscopic B types may also be caused by the former being smaller than the latter, which would introduce potential biases and/or result from larger relative errors in the values of the geometric albedo, since it is derived from poorer-quality asteroid absolute magnitudes and best-fit radiometric diameters.

  20. Finite Strain in the Forearc Mantle: Testing the B-type Fabric Anisotropy Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneller, E. A.; van Keken, P.; Karato, S.; Park, J.

    2005-12-01

    Seismic observations from many subduction zones show that the seismically fast direction is perpendicular to the direction of convergence. This is opposite of what is expected from models that assume flow is parallel to plate motion and the seismically fast axis of olivine [100] aligns sub-parallel to the shear direction (A-type fabric). Recent deformation experiments on olivine aggregates show that under low-temperature and high-stress conditions, the fast axis of olivine aligns sub-perpendicular to the shear direction (B-type fabric)(Jung and Karato, 2001; Katayama et al., 2004). B-type fabric has potential to explain convergence-perpendicular anisotropy in subduction zones with flow parallel to plate motion. Kneller et al. (2005) used combined data from deformation experiments on olivine aggregates and dynamical models of subduction zones to predict the distribution of B-type fabric in the mantle wedge. This study predicted that the forearc mantle has suitable thermal and stress conditions for B-type fabric and a rapid transition toward the backarc to conditions more suitable for other olivine fabrics. A vertical projection of the volcanic arc into the mantle wedge is predicted to mark the fabric transition between B-type and A-, E-, or C-type fabrics depending on water content. An important aspect not thoroughly investigated by our previous research is finite strain accumulation across the predicted fabric transition. In this study we present finite strain calculation for non-Newtonian subduction zone models with composite water-dependent rheology. This composite rheology includes experimentally based Peierls, dislocation, and diffusion creep. We predict greater than 100 % strain accumulation across 75 km for material traveling into the forearc mantle. This strain accumulation may be sufficient to produce a well developed B-type fabric. Furthermore, material enters the forearc mantle from a low-strain-rate thermal boundary layer at the base of the overriding

  1. EGFR over-expression and activation in high HER2, ER negative breast cancer cell line induces trastuzumab resistance.

    PubMed

    Dua, Rajiv; Zhang, Jianhuan; Nhonthachit, Phets; Penuel, Elicia; Petropoulos, Chris; Parry, Gordon

    2010-08-01

    HER2 is gene amplified or over-expressed in 20-25% of breast cancers resulting in elevated HER2 activation. Trastuzumab (Herceptin), a humanized monoclonal antibody, targets activated HER2 and is clinically effective in HER2-over-expressing breast cancers. However, despite prolonged survival, treated breast cancer patients develop resistance. Resistance to trastuzumab occurs upon inactivation of HER2 regulatory proteins or upon up-regulation of alternative receptors. In particular, elevated levels of EGFR, present in estrogen receptor (ER) positive, trastuzumab-resistant BT-474 xenografts caused, a trastuzumab-resistant phenotype (Ritter et al. Clin Cancer Res 13:4909-4919, 2007). However, the role of EGFR in acquired trastuzumab resistance in ER negative cell models is not well defined. In this study, SKBR3 cell line clones expressing EGFR were generated to examine the role of EGFR over-expression on trastuzumab sensitivity in an, ER-negative breast carcinoma cell line. A stable clone, SKBR3/EGFR (clone 4) expressing moderate levels of EGFR remained sensitive to trastuzumab, whereas a stable clone, SKBR3/EGFR (clone 5) expressing high levels of EGFR, became resistant to trastuzumab. Depletion of EGFR by EGFR small-interfering RNAs in the SKBR3/EGFR (clone 5) reversed trastuzumab resistance. However, the SKBR3/EGFR (clone 5) cell line remained sensitive to lapatinib, an EGFR/HER2 inhibitor. Biochemical analysis using co-immunoprecipitation and proximity-based quantitative VeraTag assays demonstrated that high levels of EGFR phosphorylation, EGFR/EGFR homo-dimerization, and EGFR/HER2 hetero-dimerization were present in the trastuzumab-resistant cells. We conclude that EGFR over-expression can mediate trastuzumab resistance in both ER positive and ER negative cells and hypothesize that a threshold level of EGFR, in the absence of autocrine ligand production, is required to induce the resistant phenotype. PMID:19859802

  2. Functional response to SDF1α through over-expression of CXCR4 on adult subventricular zone progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xian Shuang; Chopp, Michael; Santra, Manoranjan; Hozeska-Solgot, Ann; Zhang, Rui Lan; Wang, Lei; Teng, Hua; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2008-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand, stromal cell derived factor-1α (SDF1α) regulate neuroblast migration towards the ischemic boundary after stroke. Using loss-and gain-function, we investigated the biological effect of CXCR4/SDF1α on neural progenitor cells. Neural progenitor cells, from the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the adult rat, were transfected with rat CXCR4-pLEGFP-C1 and pSIREN-RetroQ-CXCR4-siRNA retroviral vectors. Migration assay analysis showed that inhibition of CXCR4 by siRNA significantly reduced cell migration compared to the empty vector, indicating that CXCR4 mediated neural progenitor cell motility. When neural progenitor cells were cultured in growth medium containing bFGF (20 ng/ml), over-expression of CXCR4 significantly reduced the cell proliferation as measured by the number of bromodeoxyuridine+ (BrdU+) cells (26.4%) compared with the number in the control group (54.0%). Addition of a high concentration of SDF1α (500 ng/ml) into the progenitor cells with over-expression of CXCR4 reversed the cell proliferation back to the control levels (57.6%). Immunostaining analysis showed that neither over-expression nor inhibition of CXCR4 altered the population of neurons and astrocytes, when neural progenitor cells were cultured in differentiation medium. These in vitro results suggest that CXCR4/SDF1α primarily regulates adult neural progenitor cell motility but not differentiation, while over-expression of CXCR4 in the absence of SDF1α decreases neural progenitor cell proliferation. PMID:18598677

  3. Regulation of cell growth and apoptosis through lactate dehydrogenase C over-expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tuo; Zhang, Cunchao; Jing, Yu; Jiang, Cheng; Li, Zhenhua; Wang, Shengyu; Ma, Kai; Zhang, Dapeng; Hou, Sheng; Dai, Jianxin; Kou, Geng; Wang, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Lactate has long been credited as a by-product, which jeopardizes cell growth and productivity when accumulated over a certain concentration during the manufacturing process of therapeutic recombinant proteins by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. A number of efforts to decrease the lactate concentration have been developed; however, the accumulation of lactate is still a critical issue by the late stage of fed-batch culture. Therefore, a lactate-tolerant cell line was developed through over-expression of lactate dehydrogenase C (LDH-C). In fed-batch culture, sodium lactate or sodium pyruvate was supplemented into the culture medium to simulate the environment of lactate accumulation, and LDH-C over-expression increased the highest viable cell density by over 30 and 50 %, respectively, on day 5, meanwhile the viability was also improved significantly since day 5 compared with that of the control. The percentages of cells suffering early and late apoptosis decreased by 3.2 to 12.5 and 2.0 to 4.3 %, respectively, from day 6 onwards in the fed-batch culture when 40 mM sodium pyruvate was added compared to the control. The results were confirmed by mitochondrial membrane potential assay. In addition, the expression of cleaved caspases 3 and 7 decreased in cells over-expressing LDH-C, suggesting the mitochondrial pathway was involved in the LDH-C regulated anti-apoptosis. In conclusion, a novel cell line with higher lactate tolerance, lowered lactate production, and alleviated apoptosis response was developed by over-expression of LDH-C, which may potentially represent an efficient and labor-saving approach in generating recombinant proteins. PMID:26841889

  4. Responses of hybrid aspen over-expressing a PIP2;5 aquaporin to low root temperature.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Kapilan; El Kayal, Walid; Cooke, Janice E K; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2016-03-15

    Aquaporins mediate the movement of water across cell membranes. Plasma membrane intrinsic protein 2;5 from Populus trichocarpa×deltoides (PtdPIP2;5) was previously demonstrated to be a functionally important water conducting aquaporin. To study the relevance of aquaporin-mediated root water transport at low temperatures, we generated transgenic Populus tremula×alba over-expressing PtdPIP2;5 under control of the maize ubiquitin promoter, and compared the physiological responses and water transport properties of the PtdPIP2;5 over-expressing lines (PtdPIP2;5ox) with wild-type plants. We hypothesized that over-expression of PtdPIP2;5 would reduce temperature sensitivity of root water transport and gas exchange. Decreasing root temperatures to 10 and 5°C significantly decreased hydraulic conductivities (Lp) in wild-type plants, but had no significant effect on Lp in PtdPIP2;5ox plants. Recovery of Lp in the transgenic lines returned to 20°C from 5°C was faster than in the wild-type plants. Low root temperature did not induce major changes in transcript levels for other PIPs. When roots were exposed to 5°C in solution culture and shoots were exposed to 20°C, wild-type plants had significantly lower net photosynthetic and transpiration rates compared to PtdPIP2;5ox plants. Taken together, our results demonstrate that over-expression of PtdPIP2;5 in P. tremula×alba was effective in alleviating the effects of low root temperature on Lp and gas exchange. PMID:26895330

  5. Heterogeneity of microRNAs expression in cervical cancer cells: over-expression of miR-196a

    PubMed Central

    Villegas-Ruiz, Vanessa; Juárez-Méndez, Sergio; Pérez-González, Oscar A; Arreola, Hugo; Paniagua-García, Lucero; Parra-Melquiadez, Miriam; Peralta-Rodríguez, Raúl; López-Romero, Ricardo; Monroy-García, Alberto; Mantilla-Morales, Alejandra; Gómez-Gutiérrez, Guillermo; Román-Bassaure, Edgar; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the study of microRNAs associated with neoplastic processes has increased. Patterns of microRNA expression in different cell lines and different kinds of tumors have been identified; however, little is known about the alterations in regulatory pathways and genes involved in aberrant set of microRNAs. The identification of these altered microRNAs in several cervical cancer cells and potentially deregulated pathways involved constitute the principal goals of the present study. In the present work, the expression profiles of cellular microRNAs in Cervical Cancer tissues and cell lines were explored using microRNA microarray, Affymetrix. The most over-expressed was miR-196a, which was evaluated by real time PCR, and HOXC8 protein as potential target by immunohistochemistry assay. One hundred and twenty three human microRNAs differentially expressed in the cell tumor, 64 (52%) over-expressed and 59 (48%) under-expressed were observed. Among the microRNAs over-expressed, we focused on miR-196a; at present this microRNA is poorly studied in CC. The expression of this microRNA was evaluated by qRT-PCR, and HOXC8 by immunohistochemistry assay. There is not a specific microRNA expression profile in the CC cells, neither a microRNA related to HPV presence. Furthermore, the miR-196a was over-expressed, while an absence of HOXC8 expression was observed. We suggest that miR-196a could be played as oncomiR in CC. PMID:24817935

  6. Functional consequences of the over-expression of TRPC6 channels in HEK cells: impact on the homeostasis of zinc.

    PubMed

    Chevallet, Mireille; Jarvis, Louis; Harel, Amélie; Luche, Sylvie; Degot, Sébastien; Chapuis, Violaine; Boulay, Guylain; Rabilloud, Thierry; Bouron, Alexandre

    2014-07-01

    The canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6) protein is a non-selective cation channel able to transport essential trace elements like iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) through the plasma membrane. Its over-expression in HEK-293 cells causes an intracellular accumulation of Zn, indicating that it could be involved in Zn transport. This finding prompted us to better understand the role played by TRPC6 in Zn homeostasis. Experiments done using the fluorescent probe FluoZin-3 showed that HEK cells possess an intracellular pool of mobilisable Zn present in compartments sensitive to the vesicular proton pump inhibitor Baf-A, which affects endo/lysosomes. TRPC6 over-expression facilitates the basal uptake of Zn and enhances the size of the pool of Zn sensitive to Baf-A. Quantitative RT-PCR experiments showed that TRPC6 over-expression does not affect the mRNA expression of Zn transporters (ZnT-1, ZnT-5, ZnT-6, ZnT-7, ZnT-9, Zip1, Zip6, Zip7, and Zip14); however it up-regulates the mRNA expression of metallothionein-I and -II. This alters the Zn buffering capacities of the cells as illustrated by the experiments done using the Zn ionophore Na pyrithione. In addition, HEK cells over-expressing TRPC6 grow slower than their parental HEK cells. This feature can be mimicked by growing HEK cells in a culture medium supplemented with 5 μM of Zn acetate. Finally, a proteomic analysis revealed that TRPC6 up-regulates the expression of the actin-associated proteins ezrin and cofilin-1, and changes the organisation of the actin cytoskeleton without changing the cellular actin content. Altogether, these data indicate that TRPC6 is participating in the transport of Zn and influences the Zn storage and buffering capacities of the cells. PMID:24733507

  7. Integrin signaling at the M/G1 transition induces expression of cyclin E.

    PubMed

    Hulleman, E; Bijvelt, J J; Verkleij, A J; Verrips, C T; Boonstra, J

    1999-12-15

    The activities of the mammalian G1 cyclins, cyclin D and cyclin E, during cell cycle progression (G1/S) are believed to be regulated by cell attachment and the presence of growth factors. In order to study the importance of cell attachment and concomitant integrin signaling on the expression of G1 cyclins during the natural adhesion process from mitosis to interphase, protein expression was monitored in cells that were synchronized by mitotic shake off. Here we show that in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and neuroblastoma (N2A) cells, expression of cyclin E at the M/G1 transition is regulated by both growth factors and cell attachment, while expression of cyclin D seems to be entirely dependent on the presence of serum. Expression of cyclin E appears to be correlated with the phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein, suggesting a link with the activity of the cyclin D/cdk4 complex. Expression of the cdk inhibitors p21(cip1/Waf1) and p27(Kip1) is not changed upon serum depletion or detachment of cells during early G1, suggesting no direct role for these CKIs in the regulation of cyclin activity. Although inhibition of cyclin E/cdk2 kinase activity has been reported previously, this is the first time that cyclin E expression is shown to be dependent on cell attachment. PMID:10585265

  8. A novel partner for D-type cyclins: protein kinase A-anchoring protein AKAP95.

    PubMed Central

    Arsenijevic, Tatjana; Degraef, Chantal; Dumont, Jacques E; Roger, Pierre P; Pirson, Isabelle

    2004-01-01

    Using a yeast interaction screen to search for proteins that interact with cyclin D3 in thyroid gland, we identified the cAMP-dependent AKAP95 (protein kinase A-anchoring protein 95). AKAP95 is a scaffolding protein that primarily co-fractionates with the nuclear matrix, whereas a minor fraction associates with chromatin in interphase cells. In co-transfected Chinese-hamster ovary cells, AKAP95 strongly interacted with the three D-type cyclins, but not with CDK4 (cyclin-dependent kinase 4) or with p27kip1. CDK4 displaced the interaction between cyclin D3 and AKAP95, suggesting that AKAP95 could not be the elusive bridging adaptor between D-type cyclins and CDK4 or play a role in the regulation of cyclin D3-CDK4 activity. Interaction between endogenous AKAP95 and cyclin D3 or cyclin D1 was detected in canine thyrocytes, human fibroblasts and NIH-3T3 cells. As both AKAP95 and cyclins D were recently reported to associate with minichromosome maintenance proteins [Eide, Tasken, Carlson, Williams, Jahnsen, Tasken and Collas (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 26750-26756; Gladden and Diehl (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 9754-9760], we hypothesize that the interaction between AKAP95 and D-type cyclins might serve to facilitate the emerging regulatory role of cyclin D-CDK4 in the formation of the prereplication complex at the DNA replication origins. PMID:14641107

  9. Enhancing cytochrome P450-mediated conversions in P. pastoris through RAD52 over-expression and optimizing the cultivation conditions.

    PubMed

    Wriessnegger, Tamara; Moser, Sandra; Emmerstorfer-Augustin, Anita; Leitner, Erich; Müller, Monika; Kaluzna, Iwona; Schürmann, Martin; Mink, Daniel; Pichler, Harald

    2016-04-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) play an essential role in the biosynthesis of various natural compounds by catalyzing regio- and stereospecific hydroxylation reactions. Thus, CYP activities are of great interest in the production of fine chemicals, pharmaceutical compounds or flavors and fragrances. Industrial applicability of CYPs has driven extensive research efforts aimed at improving the performance of these enzymes to generate robust biocatalysts. Recently, our group has identified CYP-mediated hydroxylation of (+)-valencene as a major bottleneck in the biosynthesis of trans-nootkatol and (+)-nootkatone in Pichia pastoris. In the current study, we aimed at enhancing CYP-mediated (+)-valencene hydroxylation by over-expressing target genes identified through transcriptome analysis in P. pastoris. Strikingly, over-expression of the DNA repair and recombination gene RAD52 had a distinctly positive effect on trans-nootkatol formation. Combining RAD52 over-expression with optimization of whole-cell biotransformation conditions, i.e. optimized media composition and cultivation at higher pH value, enhanced trans-nootkatol production 5-fold compared to the initial strain and condition. These engineering approaches appear to be generally applicable for enhanced hydroxylation of hydrophobic compounds in P. pastoris as confirmed here for two additional membrane-attached CYPs, namely the limonene-3-hydroxylase from Mentha piperita and the human CYP2D6. PMID:26898115

  10. Over-expression of platelet-derived growth factor-D promotes tumor growth and invasion in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Qiu, Haifeng; Hu, Weixu; Li, Shaoru; Yu, Jinjin

    2014-01-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor-D (PDGF-D) was demonstrated to be able to promote tumor growth and invasion in human malignancies. However, little is known about its roles in endometrial cancer. In the present study, we investigated the expression and functions of PDGF-D in human endometrial cancer. Alterations of PDGF-D mRNA and protein were determined by real time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical staining. Up-regulation of PDGF-D was achieved by stably transfecting the pcDNA3-PDGF-D plasmids into ECC-1 cells; and knockdown of PDGF-D was achieved by transient transfection with siRNA-PDGF-D into Ishikawa cells. The MTT assay, colony formation assay and Transwell assay were used to detect the effects of PDGF-D on cellular proliferation and invasion. The xenograft assay was used to investigate the functions of PDGF-D in vivo. Compared to normal endometrium, more than 50% cancer samples showed over-expression of PDGF-D (p < 0.001), and high level of PDGF-D was correlated with late stage (p = 0.003), deep myometrium invasion (p < 0.001) and lympha vascular space invasion (p = 0.006). In vitro, over-expressing PDGF-D in ECC-1 cells significantly accelerated tumor growth and promoted cellular invasion by increasing the level of MMP2 and MMP9; while silencing PDGF-D in Ishikawa cells impaired cell proliferation and inhibited the invasion, through suppressing the expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Moreover, we also demonstrated that over-expressed PDGF-D could induce EMT and knockdown of PDGF-D blocked the EMT transition. Consistently, in xenografts assay, PDGF-D over-expression significantly promoted tumor growth and tumor weights. We demonstrated that PDGF-D was commonly over-expressed in endometrial cancer, which was associated with late stage deep myometrium invasion and lympha vascular space invasion. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments showed PDGF-D could promote tumor growth and invasion through up-regulating MMP2/9 and inducing EMT. Thus, we propose

  11. A dominant-negative cyclin D1 mutant prevents nuclear import of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and its phosphorylation by CDK-activating kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, J A; Sherr, C J

    1997-01-01

    Cyclins contain two characteristic cyclin folds, each consisting of five alpha-helical bundles, which are connected to one another by a short linker peptide. The first repeat makes direct contact with cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) subunits in assembled holoenzyme complexes, whereas the second does not contribute directly to the CDK interface. Although threonine 156 in mouse cyclin D1 is predicted to lie at the carboxyl terminus of the linker peptide that separates the two cyclin folds and is buried within the cyclin subunit, mutation of this residue to alanine has profound effects on the behavior of the derived cyclin D1-CDK4 complexes. CDK4 in complexes with mutant cyclin D1 (T156A or T156E but not T156S) is not phosphorylated by recombinant CDK-activating kinase (CAK) in vitro, fails to undergo activating T-loop phosphorylation in vivo, and remains catalytically inactive and unable to phosphorylate the retinoblastoma protein. Moreover, when it is ectopically overexpressed in mammalian cells, cyclin D1 (T156A) assembles with CDK4 in the cytoplasm but is not imported into the cell nucleus. CAK phosphorylation is not required for nuclear transport of cyclin D1-CDK4 complexes, because complexes containing wild-type cyclin D1 and a CDK4 (T172A) mutant lacking the CAK phosphorylation site are efficiently imported. In contrast, enforced overexpression of the CDK inhibitor p21Cip1 together with mutant cyclin D1 (T156A)-CDK4 complexes enhanced their nuclear localization. These results suggest that cyclin D1 (T156A or T156E) forms abortive complexes with CDK4 that prevent recognition by CAK and by other cellular factors that are required for their nuclear localization. These properties enable ectopically overexpressed cyclin D1 (T156A), or a more stable T156A/T286A double mutant that is resistant to ubiquitination, to compete with endogenous cyclin D1 in mammalian cells, thereby mobilizing CDK4 into cytoplasmic, catalytically inactive complexes and dominantly inhibiting

  12. Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Stabilizes Cyclin D1 and Increases Cyclin D1 Nuclear Accumulation through ERK-Mediated Inactivation of GSK-3β.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangmei; Zhang, Ling; Zheng, Sujun; Zhang, Ting; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiaolei; Zeng, Zhenzhen; McCrae, Malcolm A; Zhao, Jingmin; Zhuang, Hui; Lu, Fengmin

    2015-05-01

    The Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) contributes centrally to the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It has been suggested that the transcriptional activation of cyclin D1 by HBx is implicated in the development of HCC. However, numerous studies have shown that overexpression of cyclin D1 alone is not sufficient to drive oncogenic transformation. Herein, we investigated whether HBx can stabilize cyclin D1 and induce cyclin D1 protein nuclear accumulation, and thereby accelerate hepatocarcinogenesis. The effects of HBx on cyclin D1 stabilization were assessed in cell-based transfection, Western blot, immunoprecipitation, immunocytofluorescence staining, and flow-cytometric assays. The results demonstrated that ectopic expression of HBx in HCC cells could extend the half-life of cyclin D1 protein from 40-60 minutes to 80-110 minutes. HBx stabilized cyclin D1 primarily in the S phase of the cell cycle, in a manner dependent on the inactivation of GSK-3β, which was mediated by ERK activation. HBx also prompted the nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1, and cotransfection of the constitutively active mutant of GSK-3β along with HBx could reverse the nuclear accumulation and subsequent cell proliferation induced by HBx. Further, a positive correlation between HBx and nuclear cyclin D1 level was established in HCC specimens detected by an immunohistochemical assay. Taken together, our results indicated that HBx could stabilize and increase cyclin D1 nuclear accumulation through ERK-mediated inactivation of GSK-3β. This HBx-induced cyclin D1 upregulation might play an important role in HCC development and progression. PMID:25712050

  13. The regulation of cyclin D1 degradation: roles in cancer development and the potential for therapeutic invention

    PubMed Central

    Alao, John P

    2007-01-01

    Cyclin D1 is an important regulator of cell cycle progression and can function as a transcriptionl co-regulator. The overexpression of cyclin D1 has been linked to the development and progression of cancer. Deregulated cyclin D1 degradation appears to be responsible for the increased levels of cyclin D1 in several cancers. Recent findings have identified novel mechanisms involved in the regulation of cyclin D1 stability. A number of therapeutic agents have been shown to induce cyclin D1 degradation. The therapeutic ablation of cyclin D1 may be useful for the prevention and treatment of cancer. In this review, current knowledge on the regulation of cyclin D1 degradation is discussed. Novel insights into cyclin D1 degradation are also discussed in the context of ablative therapy. A number of unresolved questions regarding the regulation of cellular cyclin D1 levels are also addressed. PMID:17407548

  14. Pharmacological cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors: Implications for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Archana; Vyas, Arpita; Deshpande, Kaivalya; Vyas, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer accounts for a significant proportion of cancer deaths worldwide. The need to develop more chemotherapeutic agents to combat this disease is critical. Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs), along with its binding partner cyclins, serve to control the growth of cells through the cell cycle. A new class of drugs, termed CDK inhibitors, has been studied in preclinical and now clinical trials. These inhibitors are believed to act as an anti-cancer drug by blocking CDKs to block the uncontrolled cellular proliferation that is hallmark of cancers like colorectal cancer. CDK article provides overview of the emerging drug class of CDK inhibitors and provides a list of ones that are currently in clinical trials. PMID:26900281

  15. Interactions between Equine Cyclin T1, Tat, and TAR Are Disrupted by a Leucine-to-Valine Substitution Found in Human Cyclin T1

    PubMed Central

    Taube, Ran; Fujinaga, Koh; Irwin, Dan; Wimmer, Jörg; Geyer, Matthias; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2000-01-01

    Transcriptional transactivators (Tat) from human immunodeficiency and equine infectious anemia viruses (HIV and EIAV) interact with their transactivation response elements (TAR) to increase the rates of viral transcription. Whereas the human cyclin T1 is required for the binding of Tat to TAR from HIV, it is unknown how Tat from EIAV interacts with its TAR. Furthermore, Tat from EIAV functions in equine and canine cells but not in human cells. In this study, we present sequences of cyclins T1 from horse and dog and demonstrate that their N-terminal 300 residues rescue the transactivation of Tat from EIAV in human cells. Although human and equine cyclins T1 bind to this Tat, only the equine cyclin T1 supports the binding of Tat to TAR from EIAV. Finally, a reciprocal exchange of the valine for the leucine at position 29 in human and equine cyclins T1, respectively, renders the human cyclin T1 active and the equine cyclin T1 inactive for Tat transactivation from EIAV. Thus, the collaboration between a specific cyclin T1 and Tat for their high-affinity interaction with TAR is a common theme of lentiviral transactivation. PMID:10623752

  16. Diffraction in resonant electron scattering from helical macromolecules: A- and B-type DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Caron, Laurent; Sanche, Leon

    2004-09-01

    We elaborate our theoretical framework to treat low-energy electron scattering from helical macromolecules. A model of simple scatterers organized into a helical structure is proposed with application to base-pair arrangements in DNA. We extend our analysis to A-type DNA as well as nonperiodic arrangements in B-type DNA. Diffraction patterns due to base-pair spacing are observed under all conditions. We discuss the role of electron diffraction in electron attachment to the bases leading to the formation of shape and core-excited resonances. The decay of such transient anions into dissociative-state channels producing DNA strand breaks is also described. We find A-type DNA to be much more sensitive to low-energy electrons than B type.

  17. D-type cyclins and G1 progression during liver development in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Boylan, Joan M. . E-mail: Joan_Boylan@brown.edu; Gruppuso, Philip A. . E-mail: Philip_Gruppuso@brown.edu

    2005-05-13

    Initiation and progression through G1 requires the activity of signaling complexes containing cyclins (D- or E-type) and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4/6 and CDK2, respectively). We set out to identify the G1-phase cyclins and CDKs that are operative during late gestation liver development in the rat. This is a period during which hepatocytes show a high rate of proliferation that is, at least in part, independent of the mitogenic signaling pathways that are functional in mature hepatocytes. RNase protection assay and Western immunoblotting indicated that cyclin D1 is expressed at similar levels in fetal and adult liver. When cyclin D1 was induced after partial hepatectomy, its predominant CDK-binding partner was CDK4. In contrast, cyclins D2 and D3 predominated in fetal liver and were complexed with both CDK4 and CDK6. Little CDK6 protein was expressed in quiescent or regenerating adult liver. Cyclins E1 and E2 were both transcriptionally up-regulated in fetal liver. Activity of complexes containing cyclins E1 and E2 was higher in fetal liver, as was content of the cell cycle regulator, Rb. In fetal liver, Rb was highly phosphorylated at both cyclin D- and cyclin E-dependent sites. In conclusion, liver development is associated with a switch from cyclin D2/D3-containing complexes to cyclin D1:CDK4 complexes. We speculate that the switch in D-type cyclins may be associated with the dependence on mitogenic signaling that develops as hepatocytes mature.

  18. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. XXII. Multiplicity properties of the B-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunstall, P. R.; Dufton, P. L.; Sana, H.; Evans, C. J.; Howarth, I. D.; Simón-Díaz, S.; de Mink, S. E.; Langer, N.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Taylor, W. D.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the multiplicity properties of 408 B-type stars observed in the 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud with multi-epoch spectroscopy from the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey (VFTS). We use a cross-correlation method to estimate relative radial velocities from the helium and metal absorption lines for each of our targets. Objects with significant radial-velocity variations (and with an amplitude larger than 16 km s-1) are classified as spectroscopic binaries. We find an observed spectroscopic binary fraction (defined by periods of <103.5 d and mass ratios >0.1) for the B-type stars, fB(obs) = 0.25 ± 0.02, which appears constant across the field of view, except for the two older clusters (Hodge 301 and SL 639). These two clusters have significantly lower binary fractions of 0.08 ± 0.08 and 0.10 ± 0.09, respectively. Using synthetic populations and a model of our observed epochs and their potential biases, we constrain the intrinsic multiplicity properties of the dwarf and giant (i.e. relatively unevolved) B-type stars in 30 Dor. We obtain a present-day binary fraction fB(true) = 0.58 ± 0.11, with a flat period distribution. Within the uncertainties, the multiplicity properties of the B-type stars agree with those for the O stars in 30 Dor from the VFTS. Appendices A, B are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgFull Tables 2 and 3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/580/A93

  19. Over-expression of XIST, the Master Gene for X Chromosome Inactivation, in Females With Major Affective Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Baohu; Higa, Kerin K.; Kelsoe, John R.; Zhou, Xianjin

    2015-01-01

    Background Psychiatric disorders are common mental disorders without a pathological biomarker. Classic genetic studies found that an extra X chromosome frequently causes psychiatric symptoms in patients with either Klinefelter syndrome (XXY) or Triple X syndrome (XXX). Over-dosage of some X-linked escapee genes was suggested to cause psychiatric disorders. However, relevance of these rare genetic diseases to the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders in the general population of psychiatric patients is unknown. Methods XIST and several X-linked genes were studied in 36 lymphoblastoid cell lines from healthy females and 60 lymphoblastoid cell lines from female patients with either bipolar disorder or recurrent major depression. XIST and KDM5C expression was also quantified in 48 RNA samples from postmortem human brains of healthy female controls and female psychiatric patients. Findings We found that the XIST gene, a master in control of X chromosome inactivation (XCI), is significantly over-expressed (p = 1 × 10− 7, corrected after multiple comparisons) in the lymphoblastoid cells of female patients with either bipolar disorder or major depression. The X-linked escapee gene KDM5C also displays significant up-regulation (p = 5.3 × 10− 7, corrected after multiple comparisons) in the patients' cells. Expression of XIST and KDM5C is highly correlated (Pearson's coefficient, r = 0.78, p = 1.3 × 10− 13). Studies on human postmortem brains supported over-expression of the XIST gene in female psychiatric patients. Interpretations We propose that over-expression of XIST may cause or result from subtle alteration of XCI, which up-regulates the expression of some X-linked escapee genes including KDM5C. Over-expression of X-linked genes could be a common mechanism for the development of psychiatric disorders between patients with those rare genetic diseases and the general population of female psychiatric patients with XIST over-expression. Our studies

  20. Ribosome clearance by FusB-type proteins mediates resistance to the antibiotic fusidic acid

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Georgina; Thompson, Gary S.; Jenkins, Huw T.; Peske, Frank; Savelsbergh, Andreas; Rodnina, Marina V.; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Homans, Steve W.; Edwards, Thomas A.; O'Neill, Alexander J.

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to the antibiotic fusidic acid (FA) in the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus usually results from expression of FusB-type proteins (FusB or FusC). These proteins bind to elongation factor G (EF-G), the target of FA, and rescue translation from FA-mediated inhibition by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that the FusB family are two-domain metalloproteins, the C-terminal domain of which contains a four-cysteine zinc finger with a unique structural fold. This domain mediates a high-affinity interaction with the C-terminal domains of EF-G. By binding to EF-G on the ribosome, FusB-type proteins promote the dissociation of stalled ribosome⋅EF-G⋅GDP complexes that form in the presence of FA, thereby allowing the ribosomes to resume translation. Ribosome clearance by these proteins represents a highly unusual antibiotic resistance mechanism, which appears to be fine-tuned by the relative abundance of FusB-type protein, ribosomes, and EF-G. PMID:22308410

  1. Ribosome clearance by FusB-type proteins mediates resistance to the antibiotic fusidic acid.

    PubMed

    Cox, Georgina; Thompson, Gary S; Jenkins, Huw T; Peske, Frank; Savelsbergh, Andreas; Rodnina, Marina V; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Homans, Steve W; Edwards, Thomas A; O'Neill, Alexander J

    2012-02-01

    Resistance to the antibiotic fusidic acid (FA) in the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus usually results from expression of FusB-type proteins (FusB or FusC). These proteins bind to elongation factor G (EF-G), the target of FA, and rescue translation from FA-mediated inhibition by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that the FusB family are two-domain metalloproteins, the C-terminal domain of which contains a four-cysteine zinc finger with a unique structural fold. This domain mediates a high-affinity interaction with the C-terminal domains of EF-G. By binding to EF-G on the ribosome, FusB-type proteins promote the dissociation of stalled ribosome⋅EF-G⋅GDP complexes that form in the presence of FA, thereby allowing the ribosomes to resume translation. Ribosome clearance by these proteins represents a highly unusual antibiotic resistance mechanism, which appears to be fine-tuned by the relative abundance of FusB-type protein, ribosomes, and EF-G. PMID:22308410

  2. An Einstein Observatory SAO-based catalog of B-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grillo, F.; Sciortino, S.; Micela, G.; Vaiana, G. S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    About 4000 X-ray images obtained with the Einstein Observatory are used to measure the 0.16-4.0 keV emission from 1545 B-type SAO stars falling in the about 10 percent of the sky surveyed with the IPC. Seventy-four detected X-ray sources with B-type stars are identified, and it is estimated that no more than 15 can be misidentified. Upper limits to the X-ray emission of the remaining stars are presented. In addition to summarizing the X-ray measurements and giving other relevant optical data, the present extensive catalog discusses the reduction process and analyzes selection effects associated with both SAO catalog completeness and IPC target selection procedures. It is concluded that X-ray emission, at the level of Lx not less than 10 exp 30 ergs/s, is quite common in B stars of early spectral types (B0-B3), regardless of luminosity class, but that emission, at the same level, becomes less common, or nonexistent, in later B-type stars.

  3. A screen of apoptosis and senescence regulatory genes for life span effects when over-expressed in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Curtis, Christina; Tavaré, Simon; Tower, John

    2009-01-01

    Conditional expression of transgenes in Drosophila was produced using the Geneswitch system, wherein feeding the drug RU486/Mifepristone activates the artificial transcription factor Geneswitch. Geneswitch was expressed using the Actin5C promoter and this was found to yield conditional, tissue-general expression of a target transgene (UAS-GFP) in both larvae and adult flies. Nervous system-specific (Elav-GS) and fat body-specific Geneswitch drivers were also characterized using UAS-GFP. Fourteen genes implicated in growth, apoptosis and senescence regulatory pathways were over-expressed in adult flies or during larval development, and assayed for effects on adult fly life span. Over-expression of a dominant p53 allele (p53-259H) in adult flies using the ubiquitous driver produced increased life span in females but not males, consistent with previous studies. Both wingless and Ras activated form transgenes were lethal when expressed in larvae, and reduced life span when expressed in adults, consistent with results from other model systems indicating that the wingless and Ras pathways can promote senescence. Over-expression of the caspase inhibitor baculovirus p35 during larval development reduced the mean life span of male and female adults, and also produced a subset of females with increased life span. These experiments suggest that baculovirus p35 and the wingless and Ras pathways can have sex-specific and developmental stage-specific effects on adult Drosophila life span, and these reagents should be useful for the further analysis of the role of these conserved pathways in aging. PMID:20157509

  4. Transgenic mice over-expressing ET-1 in the endothelial cells develop systemic hypertension with altered vascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    Leung, Justin Wai-Chung; Wong, Wing Tak; Koon, Hon Wai; Mo, Fong Ming; Tam, Sidney; Huang, Yu; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Chung, Stephen Sum Man; Chung, Sookja Kim

    2011-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent vasoconstrictor involved in the regulation of vascular tone and implicated in hypertension. However, the role of small blood vessels endothelial ET-1 in hypertension remains unclear. The present study investigated the effect of chronic over-expression of endothelial ET-1 on arterial blood pressure and vascular reactivity using transgenic mice approach. Transgenic mice (TET-1) with endothelial ET-1 over-expression showed increased in ET-1 level in the endothelial cells of small pulmonary blood vessels. Although TET-1 mice appeared normal, they developed mild hypertension which was normalized by the ET(A) receptor (BQ123) but not by ET(B) receptor (BQ788) antagonist. Tail-cuff measurements showed a significant elevation of systolic and mean blood pressure in conscious TET-1 mice. The mice also exhibited left ventricular hypertrophy and left axis deviation in electrocardiogram, suggesting an increased peripheral resistance. The ionic concentrations in the urine and serum were normal in 8-week old TET-1 mice, indicating that the systemic hypertension was independent of renal function, although, higher serum urea levels suggested the occurrence of kidney dysfunction. The vascular reactivity of the aorta and the mesenteric artery was altered in the TET-1 mice indicating that chronic endothelial ET-1 up-regulation leads to vascular tone imbalance in both conduit and resistance arteries. These findings provide evidence for the role of spatial expression of ET-1 in the endothelium contributing to mild hypertension was mediated by ET(A) receptors. The results also suggest that chronic endothelial ET-1 over-expression affects both cardiac and vascular functions, which, at least in part, causes blood pressure elevation. PMID:22096514

  5. Altered Fruit and Seed Development of Transgenic Rapeseed (Brassica napus) Over-Expressing MicroRNA394.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian Bo; Shu, Xia Xia; Shen, Qi; Li, Bo Wen; Song, Jun; Yang, Zhi Min

    2015-01-01

    Fruit and seed development in plants is a complex biological process mainly involved in input and biosynthesis of many storage compounds such as proteins and oils. Although the basic biochemical pathways for production of the storage metabolites in plants are well characterized, their regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we functionally identified rapeseed (Brassica napus) miR394 with its target gene Brassica napus leaf curling responsiveness (BnLCR) to dissect a role of miR394 during the fruit and seed development. Transgenic rapeseed plants over-expressing miR394 under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter were generated. miR394 over-expression plants exhibited a delayed flowering time and enlarged size of plants, leaf blade, pods and seed body, but developed seeds with higher contents of protein and glucosinolates (GLS) and lower levels of oil accumulation as compared to wild-type. Over-expression of miR394 altered the fatty acid (FA) composition by increasing several FA species such as C16:0 and C18:0 and unsaturated species of C20:1 and C22:1 but lowering C18:3. This change was accompanied by induction of genes coding for transcription factors of FA synthesis including leafy cotyledon1 (BnLEC1), BnLEC2, and FUSCA3 (FUS3). Because the phytohormone auxin plays a crucial role in fruit development and seed patterning, the DR5-GUS reporter was used for monitoring the auxin response in Arabidopsis siliques and demonstrated that the DR5 gene was strongly expressed. These results suggest that BnmiR394 is involved in rapeseed fruit and seed development. PMID:25978066

  6. Over-expression of miR375 reduces glucose-induced insulin secretion in Nit-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hua-Qiang; Pan, Yi; Peng, Ju; Lu, Guang-Xiu

    2011-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 19- to 25-nt fragments cleaved from 70- to 100-nt hairpin precursors. These molecules participate in essential biological processes. It was estimated that 30% of all protein-coding genes are miRNA targets. Thousands of miRNAs have already been identified in plants and animals, but little is known about their biological roles. MicroRNA375 (miR375) is highly expressed in pancreatic islets of humans and mice and regulates insulin secretion in isolated pancreatic cells. To improve our understanding of the biological roles of miR375, we constructed the plasmid pAAV-miR375 and transfected it into mouse Nit-1 cells. Real-time PCR and Northern blot analysis showed that the Nit-1 cells transfected with pAAV-miR375 over-expressed the mature miR375 compared with Nit-1 cells transfected with control plasmid or untransfected cells. The expression of myotrophin (Mtpn) decreased and insulin secretion was reduced in Nit-1 cells transfected with pAAV-miR375. In this study, we successfully established an over-expression system for miR375 and a technique to study the biological function of miRNAs by over-expression. We verified that miR375 reduced glucose-induced insulin secretion by down-regulating the expression of Mtpn in Nit-1 cells in vitro, suggesting that miR375 has potential therapeutic applications in type II diabetes. PMID:20221699

  7. Over-expression of Plk4 induces centrosome amplification, loss of primary cilia and associated tissue hyperplasia in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Paula A; Bury, Leah; Shahbazi, Marta N; Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Tate, Peri H; Wormald, Sam; Hindley, Christopher J; Huch, Meritxell; Archer, Joy; Skarnes, William C; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Glover, David M

    2015-12-01

    To address the long-known relationship between supernumerary centrosomes and cancer, we have generated a transgenic mouse that permits inducible expression of the master regulator of centriole duplication, Polo-like-kinase-4 (Plk4). Over-expression of Plk4 from this transgene advances the onset of tumour formation that occurs in the absence of the tumour suppressor p53. Plk4 over-expression also leads to hyperproliferation of cells in the pancreas and skin that is enhanced in a p53 null background. Pancreatic islets become enlarged following Plk4 over-expression as a result of equal expansion of α- and β-cells, which exhibit centrosome amplification. Mice overexpressing Plk4 develop grey hair due to a loss of differentiated melanocytes and bald patches of skin associated with a thickening of the epidermis. This reflects an increase in proliferating cells expressing keratin 5 in the basal epidermal layer and the expansion of these cells into suprabasal layers. Such cells also express keratin 6, a marker for hyperplasia. This is paralleled by a decreased expression of later differentiation markers, involucrin, filaggrin and loricrin. Proliferating cells showed an increase in centrosome number and a loss of primary cilia, events that were mirrored in primary cultures of keratinocytes established from these animals. We discuss how repeated duplication of centrioles appears to prevent the formation of basal bodies leading to loss of primary cilia, disruption of signalling and thereby aberrant differentiation of cells within the epidermis. The absence of p53 permits cells with increased centrosomes to continue dividing, thus setting up a neoplastic state of error prone mitoses, a prerequisite for cancer development. PMID:26701933

  8. Altered Fruit and Seed Development of Transgenic Rapeseed (Brassica napus) Over-Expressing MicroRNA394

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jian Bo; Shu, Xia Xia; Shen, Qi; Li, Bo Wen; Song, Jun; Yang, Zhi Min

    2015-01-01

    Fruit and seed development in plants is a complex biological process mainly involved in input and biosynthesis of many storage compounds such as proteins and oils. Although the basic biochemical pathways for production of the storage metabolites in plants are well characterized, their regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we functionally identified rapeseed (Brassica napus) miR394 with its target gene Brassica napus LEAF CURLING RESPONSIVENESS (BnLCR) to dissect a role of miR394 during the fruit and seed development. Transgenic rapeseed plants over-expressing miR394 under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter were generated. miR394 over-expression plants exhibited a delayed flowering time and enlarged size of plants, leaf blade, pods and seed body, but developed seeds with higher contents of protein and glucosinolates (GLS) and lower levels of oil accumulation as compared to wild-type. Over-expression of miR394 altered the fatty acid (FA) composition by increasing several FA species such as C16:0 and C18:0 and unsaturated species of C20:1 and C22:1 but lowering C18:3. This change was accompanied by induction of genes coding for transcription factors of FA synthesis including LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (BnLEC1), BnLEC2, and FUSCA3 (FUS3). Because the phytohormone auxin plays a crucial role in fruit development and seed patterning, the DR5-GUS reporter was used for monitoring the auxin response in Arabidopsis siliques and demonstrated that the DR5 gene was strongly expressed. These results suggest that BnmiR394 is involved in rapeseed fruit and seed development. PMID:25978066

  9. Over-expression of Plk4 induces centrosome amplification, loss of primary cilia and associated tissue hyperplasia in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Paula A.; Bury, Leah; Shahbazi, Marta N.; Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Tate, Peri H.; Wormald, Sam; Hindley, Christopher J.; Huch, Meritxell; Archer, Joy; Skarnes, William C.; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Glover, David M.

    2015-01-01

    To address the long-known relationship between supernumerary centrosomes and cancer, we have generated a transgenic mouse that permits inducible expression of the master regulator of centriole duplication, Polo-like-kinase-4 (Plk4). Over-expression of Plk4 from this transgene advances the onset of tumour formation that occurs in the absence of the tumour suppressor p53. Plk4 over-expression also leads to hyperproliferation of cells in the pancreas and skin that is enhanced in a p53 null background. Pancreatic islets become enlarged following Plk4 over-expression as a result of equal expansion of α- and β-cells, which exhibit centrosome amplification. Mice overexpressing Plk4 develop grey hair due to a loss of differentiated melanocytes and bald patches of skin associated with a thickening of the epidermis. This reflects an increase in proliferating cells expressing keratin 5 in the basal epidermal layer and the expansion of these cells into suprabasal layers. Such cells also express keratin 6, a marker for hyperplasia. This is paralleled by a decreased expression of later differentiation markers, involucrin, filaggrin and loricrin. Proliferating cells showed an increase in centrosome number and a loss of primary cilia, events that were mirrored in primary cultures of keratinocytes established from these animals. We discuss how repeated duplication of centrioles appears to prevent the formation of basal bodies leading to loss of primary cilia, disruption of signalling and thereby aberrant differentiation of cells within the epidermis. The absence of p53 permits cells with increased centrosomes to continue dividing, thus setting up a neoplastic state of error prone mitoses, a prerequisite for cancer development. PMID:26701933

  10. miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation by suppressing CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuesong; Gong, Xuhai; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Jinghui; Sun, Jiahang; Guo, Mian

    2015-05-08

    Glioblastoma development is often associated with alteration in the activity and expression of cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin-dependent kinases (CKDs) and cyclins, resulting in aberrant cell proliferation. Recent studies have highlighted the pivotal roles of miRNAs in controlling the development and growth of glioblastoma. Here, we provide evidence for a function of miR-340 in the inhibition of glioblastoma cell proliferation. We found that miR-340 is downregulated in human glioblastoma tissue samples and several established glioblastoma cell lines. Proliferation and neurosphere formation assays revealed that miR-340 plays an oncosuppressive role in glioblastoma, and that its ectopic expression causes significant defect in glioblastoma cell growth. Further, using bioinformatics, luciferase assay and western blot, we found that miR-340 specifically targets the 3′UTRs of CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2, leading to the arrest of glioblastoma cells in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase. Confirming these results, we found that re-introducing CDK6, cyclin-D1 or cyclin-D2 expression partially, but significantly, rescues cells from the suppression of cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest mediated by miR-340. Collectively, our results demonstrate that miR-340 plays a tumor-suppressive role in glioblastoma and may be useful as a diagnostic biomarker and/or a therapeutic avenue for glioblastoma. - Highlights: • miR-340 is downregulated in glioblastoma samples and cell lines. • miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation. • miR-340 directly targets CDK6, cyclin-D1, and cyclin-D2. • miR-340 regulates glioblastoma cell proliferation via CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2.

  11. Comprehensive RNA dataset of AGO2 associated RNAs in Jurkat cells following miR-21 over-expression.

    PubMed

    Carissimi, Claudia; Colombo, Teresa; Azzalin, Gianluca; Cipolletta, Emanuela; Laudadio, Ilaria; Macino, Giuseppe; Fulci, Valerio

    2016-06-01

    We set out to identify miR-21 targets in Jurkat cells using a high-throughput biochemical approach (10.1016/j.biochi.2014.09.021[1]). Using a specific monoclonal antibody raised against AGO2, RISC complexes were immunopurified in Jurkat cells over-expressing miR-21 following lentiviral trasduction as well as in Jurkat control cells lines. A parallel immunoprecipitation using isotype-matched rat IgG was performed as a control. AGO2 associated mRNAs were profiled by microarray (GEO: GSE37212). AGO2 bound miRNAs were profiled by RNA-seq. PMID:27054165

  12. Over-Expression of Cysteine Leucine Rich Protein Is Related to SAG Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sanchita; Shah, Priyanka; Tandon, Rati; Yadav, Narendra Kumar; Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh A.; Sundar, Shyam; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Dube, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    Background Resistance emergence against antileishmanial drugs, particularly Sodium Antimony Gluconate (SAG) has severely hampered the therapeutic strategy against visceral leishmaniasis, the mechanism of resistance being indistinguishable. Cysteine leucine rich protein (CLrP), was recognized as one of the overexpressed proteins in resistant isolates, as observed in differential proteomics between sensitive and resistant isolates of L. donovani. The present study deals with the characterization of CLrP and for its possible connection with SAG resistance. Methodology and Principal Findings In pursuance of deciphering the role of CLrP in SAG resistance, gene was cloned, over-expressed in E. coli system and thereafter antibody was raised. The expression profile of CLrP and was found to be over-expressed in SAG resistant clinical isolates of L. donovani as compared to SAG sensitive ones when investigated by real-time PCR and western blotting. CLrP has been characterized through bioinformatics, immunoblotting and immunolocalization analysis, which reveals its post-translational modification along with its dual existence in the nucleus as well as in the membrane of the parasite. Further investigation using a ChIP assay confirmed its DNA binding potential. Over-expression of CLrP in sensitive isolate of L. donovani significantly decreased its responsiveness to SAG (SbV and SbIII) and a shift towards the resistant mode was observed. Further, a significant increase in its infectivity in murine macrophages has been observed. Conclusion/Significance The study reports the differential expression of CLrP in SAG sensitive and resistant isolates of L. donovani. Functional intricacy of CLrP increases with dual localization, glycosylation and DNA binding potential of the protein. Further over-expressing CLrP in sensitive isolate of L. donovani shows significantly decreased sensitivity towards SAG and increased infectivity as well, thus assisting the parasite in securing a safe niche

  13. Cyclin D1 stimulation of estrogen receptor transcriptional activity independent of cdk4.

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, E; Ladha, M H; Lin, N; Upton, T M; Miller, S J; DiRenzo, J; Pestell, R G; Hinds, P W; Dowdy, S F; Brown, M; Ewen, M E

    1997-01-01

    Cyclin D1 plays an important role in the development of breast cancer and is required for normal breast cell proliferation and differentiation associated with pregnancy. We show that ectopic expression of cyclin D1 can stimulate the transcriptional activity of the estrogen receptor in the absence of estradiol and that this activity can be inhibited by 4-hydroxytamoxifen and ICI 182,780. Cyclin D1 can form a specific complex with the estrogen receptor. Stimulation of the estrogen receptor by cyclin D1 is independent of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 activation. Cyclin D1 may manifest its oncogenic potential in breast cancer in part through binding to the estrogen receptor and activation of the transcriptional activity of the receptor. PMID:9271411

  14. Cyclin B in Xenopus oocytes: implications for the mechanism of pre-MPF activation.

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, J; Maller, J L

    1991-01-01

    Using a polyclonal antibody raised against B2 cyclin from Xenopus laevis, we show that prophase-arrested Xenopus oocytes contain a stockpile of cyclin B2 protein. During progesterone-induced maturation, an increase in the synthesis of cyclin B2 is observed, although Western blotting experiments show that this new synthesis does not significantly increase the mass of cyclin over the maternal stockpile. In the oocyte cyclin B2 is already present in two forms which differ in the extent of phosphorylation, but the phosphorylated form becomes predominant as oocytes progress towards germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), coincident with cdc2 protein kinase activation. These two events do not depend upon formation of a new complex between cyclin and cdc2 protein kinase, since these two proteins are already found associated in resting oocytes, prior to activation of the kinase. Images PMID:1824935

  15. Foci of cyclin A2 interact with actin and RhoA in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Loukil, Abdelhalim; Izard, Fanny; Georgieva, Mariya; Mashayekhan, Shaereh; Blanchard, Jean-Marie; Parmeggiani, Andrea; Peter, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin A2 is a key player in the regulation of the cell cycle. Its degradation in mid-mitosis depends primarily on the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), while autophagy also contributes. However, a fraction of cyclin A2 persists beyond metaphase. In this work, we focus on cyclin A2-rich foci detected in mitosis by high resolution imaging and analyse their movements. We demonstrate that cyclin A2 interacts with actin and RhoA during mitosis, and that cyclin A2 depletion induces a dramatic decrease in active RhoA in mitosis. Our data suggest cyclin A2 participation in RhoA activation in late mitosis. PMID:27279564

  16. Immunohistological recognition of cyclin D1 expression by non-lymphoid cells among lymphoid neoplastic cells.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, Zainalabideen; Turley, Helen; Gatter, Kevin; Pezzella, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    Cyclin D1 immunostaining of non-neoplastic cells has been a source of diagnostic confusion especially in lymphoproliferative lesions. This study has reviewed these in two hundred and thirty-one haematopathological samples stained for cyclin D1. Most cases were formalin-fixed except for a few bone marrow trephines, which were B-5 fixed, and EDTA decalcified. Overall, 94% (216/231) of cases showed one or more types of non-neoplastic cells expressing Cyclin D1 of variable intensity. Endothelial cells and histiocytes were the most commonly identified Cyclin D1 positive cells being positive in 92% (214/231) of cases. Other normal cell types identified included fat cells, stromal fibroblasts, glial cells, spermatocytes, smooth muscle cells, osteoblasts and where present epithelial cells. Many normal cell types can express cyclinD1. Knowledge of these is useful to prevent misinterpretation of cyclin D1 positive tumours. PMID:23758159

  17. Over-expression of histone H3K4 demethylase gene JMJ15 enhances salt tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yuan; Conde e Silva, Natalia; Audonnet, Laure; Servet, Caroline; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Dao-Xiu

    2014-01-01

    Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) has been shown to be involved in stress-responsive gene expression and gene priming in plants. However, the role of H3K4me3 resetting in the processes is not clear. In this work we studied the expression and function of Arabidopsis H3K4 demethylase gene JMJ15. We show that the expression of JMJ15 was relatively low and was limited to a number of tissues during vegetative growth but was higher in young floral organs. Over-expression of the gene in gain-of-function mutants reduced the plant height with accumulation of lignin in stems, while the loss-of-function mutation did not produce any visible phenotype. The gain-of-function mutants showed enhanced salt tolerance, whereas the loss-of-function mutant was more sensitive to salt compared to the wild type. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that over-expression of JMJ15 down-regulated many genes which are preferentially marked by H3K4me3 and H3K4me2. Many of the down-regulated genes encode transcription regulators involved in stress responses. The data suggest that increased JMJ15 levels may regulate the gene expression program that enhances stress tolerance. PMID:25009544

  18. The anti-inflammatory target A(3) adenosine receptor is over-expressed in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ochaion, A; Bar-Yehuda, S; Cohen, S; Barer, F; Patoka, R; Amital, H; Reitblat, T; Reitblat, A; Ophir, J; Konfino, I; Chowers, Y; Ben-Horin, S; Fishman, P

    2009-01-01

    The Gi protein associated A(3) adenosine receptor (A(3)AR) was recently defined as a novel anti-inflammatory target. The aim of this study was to look at A(3)AR expression levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with autoimmune inflammatory diseases and to explore transcription factors involved receptor expression. Over-expression of A(3)AR was found in PBMCs derived from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis and Crohn's disease compared with PBMCs from healthy subjects. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated the presence of DNA binding sites for nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) in the A(3)AR gene promoter. Up-regulation of NF-kappaB and CREB was found in the PBMCs from patients with RA, psoriasis and Crohn's disease. The PI3K-PKB/Akt signaling pathway, known to regulate both the NF-kappaB and CREB, was also up-regulated in the patients' PBMCs. Taken together, NF-kappaB and CREB are involved with the over-expression of A(3)AR in patients with autoimmune inflammatory diseases. The receptor may be considered as a specific target to combat inflammation. PMID:19426966

  19. Anosmin-1 over-expression increases adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone and neuroblast migration to the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    García-González, Diego; Murcia-Belmonte, Verónica; Esteban, Pedro F; Ortega, Felipe; Díaz, David; Sánchez-Vera, Irene; Lebrón-Galán, Rafael; Escobar-Castañondo, Laura; Martínez-Millán, Luis; Weruaga, Eduardo; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Berninger, Benedikt; de Castro, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    New subventricular zone (SVZ)-derived neuroblasts that migrate via the rostral migratory stream are continuously added to the olfactory bulb (OB) of the adult rodent brain. Anosmin-1 (A1) is an extracellular matrix protein that binds to FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1) to exert its biological effects. When mutated as in Kallmann syndrome patients, A1 is associated with severe OB morphogenesis defects leading to anosmia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Here, we show that A1 over-expression in adult mice strongly increases proliferation in the SVZ, mainly with symmetrical divisions, and produces substantial morphological changes in the normal SVZ architecture, where we also report the presence of FGFR1 in almost all SVZ cells. Interestingly, for the first time we show FGFR1 expression in the basal body of primary cilia in neural progenitor cells. Additionally, we have found that A1 over-expression also enhances neuroblast motility, mainly through FGFR1 activity. Together, these changes lead to a selective increase in several GABAergic interneuron populations in different OB layers. These specific alterations in the OB would be sufficient to disrupt the normal processing of sensory information and consequently alter olfactory memory. In summary, this work shows that FGFR1-mediated A1 activity plays a crucial role in the continuous remodelling of the adult OB. PMID:25300351

  20. Bcl-2 over-expression promotes genomic instability by inhibiting apoptosis of cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Cox, Andrew G; Hampton, Mark B

    2007-10-01

    The anti-apoptotic oncogene bcl-2 is hypothesized to increase the antioxidant status of cells, thereby protecting them from oxidative stress. In this study, we examined hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-mediated oxidative stress in Jurkat T lymphoma cells. Over-expression of Bcl-2 did not inhibit cytotoxicity at doses of H2O2 that caused necrosis (>200 microM), but it did block cell death at apoptotic doses (<200 microM). However, these cells exhibited the same initial level of protein and lipid oxidation following exposure to H2O2 as the parental cells, indicating that the anti-apoptotic activity is not associated with general antioxidant properties. Bcl-2 expression was able to protect against secondary protein carbonyl formation, which was linked to lysosome stabilization. Assessment of micronuclei formation in cells over-expressing Bcl-2 showed evidence of increased genomic instability, consistent with the impairment of apoptosis in damaged cells. We conclude that while Bcl-2 can block cytotoxicity associated with apoptosis-inducing levels of oxidative stress, it does not protect the cells from the stress itself. Bcl-2 may promote tumourigenesis by preventing the removal of oxidatively damaged cells. PMID:17434928

  1. Single living cell detection of telomerase over-expression for cancer detection by an optical fiber nanobiosensor.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xin Ting; Li, Chang Ming

    2010-02-15

    An optical fiber nanobiosensor was constructed to successfully detect a general cancer biomarker, telomerase at single cell level with its nanoscale tip. The nanotip immobilized with a specific antibody was inserted into a MCF-7 breast cancer cell nucleus to capture telomerases directly, after which an in vitro enzymatic sandwich immunoassay was performed to achieve sensitive single living cell detection. The nanotip inserted into MCF-7 cell nucleus provides significantly higher average (F-F(0))/F(0) ratio than that of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) nucleus, demonstrating the successful detection of the telomerase over-expression in cancer cells as compared to normal cells. The detection in the cytoplasm shows much smaller average ratio than that in the nucleus of MCF-7 cells while clearly verifies the nuclear localization of telomerase. The successful detection of telomerase over-expression in a single living cell for the first time may provide a potential method for cancer detection, and also demonstrate a universal approach that can be used to detect other low expression proteins in a single living cell. PMID:19963365

  2. Over-expression of the cucumber expansin gene (Cs-EXPA1) in transgenic maize seed for cellulose deconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sangwoong; Devaiah, Shivakumar P; Choi, Seo-Eun; Bray, Jeff; Love, Robert; Lane, Jeffrey; Drees, Carol; Howard, John H; Hood, Elizabeth E

    2016-04-01

    Plant cell wall degradation into fermentable sugars by cellulases is one of the greatest barriers to biofuel production. Expansin protein loosens the plant cell wall by opening up the complex of cellulose microfibrils and polysaccharide matrix components thereby increasing its accessibility to cellulases. We over-expressed cucumber expansin in maize kernels to produce enough protein to assess its potential to serve as an industrial enzyme for applications particularly in biomass conversion. We used the globulin-1 embryo-preferred promoter to express the cucumber expansin gene in maize seed. Expansin protein was targeted to one of three sub-cellular locations: the cell wall, the vacuole, or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To assess the level of expansin accumulation in seeds of transgenic kernels, a high throughput expansin assay was developed. The highest expressing plants were chosen and enriched crude expansin extract from those plants was tested for synergistic effects with cellulase on several lignocellulosic substrates. Activity of recombinant cucumber expansin from transgenic kernels was confirmed on these pretreated substrates. The best transgenic lines (ER-targeted) can now be used for breeding to increase expansin expression for use in the biomass conversion industry. Results of these experiments show the success of expansin over-expression and accumulation in transgenic maize seed without negative impact on growth and development and confirm its synergistic effect with cellulase on deconstruction of complex cell wall substrates. PMID:26712321

  3. Cadmium tolerance and phytochelatin content of Arabidopsis seedlings over-expressing the phytochelatin synthase gene AtPCS1

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, Patrizia; Zanella, Letizia; Proia, Alessandra; De Paolis, Angelo; Falasca, Giuseppina; Altamura, Maria Maddalena; Sanità di Toppi, Luigi; Costantino, Paolo; Cardarelli, Maura

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that expression of the Arabidopsis phytochelatin (PC) biosynthetic gene AtPCS1 in Nicotiana tabacum plants increases the Cd tolerance in the presence of exogenous glutathione (GSH). In this paper, the Cd tolerance of Arabidopsis plants over-expressing AtPCS1 (AtPCSox lines) has been analysed and the differences between Arabidopsis and tobacco are shown. Based on the analysis of seedling fresh weight, primary root length, and alterations in root anatomy, evidence is provided that, at relatively low Cd concentrations, the Cd tolerance of AtPCSox lines is lower than the wild type, while AtPCS1 over-expressing tobacco is more tolerant to Cd than the wild type. At higher Cd concentrations, Arabidopsis AtPCSox seedlings are more tolerant to Cd than the wild type, while tobacco AtPCS1 seedlings are as sensitive as the wild type. Exogenous GSH, in contrast to what was observed in tobacco, did not increase the Cd tolerance of AtPCSox lines. The PC content in wild-type Arabidopsis at low Cd concentrations is more than three times higher than in tobacco and substantial differences were also found in the PC chain lengths. These data indicate that the differences in Cd tolerance and in its dependence on exogenous GSH between Arabidopsis and tobacco are due to species-specific differences in the endogenous content of PCs and GSH and may be in the relative abundance of PCs of different length. PMID:21841172

  4. Cadmium tolerance and phytochelatin content of Arabidopsis seedlings over-expressing the phytochelatin synthase gene AtPCS1.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Patrizia; Zanella, Letizia; Proia, Alessandra; De Paolis, Angelo; Falasca, Giuseppina; Altamura, Maria Maddalena; Sanità di Toppi, Luigi; Costantino, Paolo; Cardarelli, Maura

    2011-11-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that expression of the Arabidopsis phytochelatin (PC) biosynthetic gene AtPCS1 in Nicotiana tabacum plants increases the Cd tolerance in the presence of exogenous glutathione (GSH). In this paper, the Cd tolerance of Arabidopsis plants over-expressing AtPCS1 (AtPCSox lines) has been analysed and the differences between Arabidopsis and tobacco are shown. Based on the analysis of seedling fresh weight, primary root length, and alterations in root anatomy, evidence is provided that, at relatively low Cd concentrations, the Cd tolerance of AtPCSox lines is lower than the wild type, while AtPCS1 over-expressing tobacco is more tolerant to Cd than the wild type. At higher Cd concentrations, Arabidopsis AtPCSox seedlings are more tolerant to Cd than the wild type, while tobacco AtPCS1 seedlings are as sensitive as the wild type. Exogenous GSH, in contrast to what was observed in tobacco, did not increase the Cd tolerance of AtPCSox lines. The PC content in wild-type Arabidopsis at low Cd concentrations is more than three times higher than in tobacco and substantial differences were also found in the PC chain lengths. These data indicate that the differences in Cd tolerance and in its dependence on exogenous GSH between Arabidopsis and tobacco are due to species-specific differences in the endogenous content of PCs and GSH and may be in the relative abundance of PCs of different length. PMID:21841172

  5. Schizophrenia susceptibility gene product dysbindin-1 regulates the homeostasis of cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hidenori; Morishita, Rika; Nagata, Koh-Ichi

    2016-08-01

    Dysbindin-1 (dystrobrevin binding protein-1, DTNBP1) is now widely accepted as a potential schizophrenia susceptibility gene and accumulating evidence indicates its functions in the neural development. In this study, we tried to identify new binding partners for dysbindin-1 to clarify the novel function of this molecule. When consulted with BioGRID protein interaction database, cyclin D3 was found to be a possible binding partner for dysbindin-1. We then examined the interaction between various dysbindin-1 isoforms (dysbindin-1A, -1B and -1C) and all three D-type cyclins (cyclin D1, D2, and D3) by immunoprecipitation with the COS7 cell expression system, and found that dysbindin-1A preferentially interacts with cyclin D1. The mode of interaction between these molecules was considered as direct binding since recombinant dysbindin-1A and cyclin D1 formed a complex in vitro. Mapping analyses revealed that the C-terminal region of dysbindin-1A binds to the C-terminal of cyclin D1. Consistent with the results of the biochemical analyses, endogenous dysbindin-1was partially colocalized with cyclin D1 in NIH3T3 fibroblast cells and in neuronal stem and/or progenitor cells in embryonic mouse brain. While co-expression of dysbindin-1A with cyclin D1 changed the localization of the latter from the nucleus to cytosol, cyclin D1-binding partner CDK4 inhibited the dysbindin-cyclin D1 interaction. Meanwhile, depletion of endogenous dysbindin-1A increased cyclin D1 expression. These results indicate that dysbindin-1A may control the cyclin D1 function spatiotemporally and might contribute to better understanding of the pathophysiology of dysbindin-1-associated disorders. PMID:27130439

  6. Positive cyclin T expression as a favorable prognostic factor in treating gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    LIN, LIEN-FU; JIN, JONG-SHIAW; CHEN, JUI-CHANG; HUANG, CHIA-CHI; SHEU, JENG-HORNG; CHEN, WENLUNG; TSAO, TANG-YI; HSU, CHIH-WEI

    2016-01-01

    Positive transcriptional elongation factor b (P-TEFb) contains the catalytic subunit cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (Cdk9) and the regulatory subunit cyclin T. Cyclin T1 and Cdk9 are the key factors of the PTEFb pathways and are overexpressed in the human head and neck carcinoma cell line. However, there have been limited studies regarding the role of cyclin T1 and Cdk9 in gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). The aim of the present study was to assess the association between cyclin T1 and Cdk9 and their clinical significance in gastric GISTs. A total of 30 gastric GIST patients who underwent either laparoscopic or laparotomic partial gastrectomy were enrolled in the study. The surgical tissue slides were stained with Cdk9 and cyclin T1 antibodies, and the immunohistochemistry scores and disease-free survival (DFS) were analyzed. Ten patients were cyclin T1-positive, and 20 were negative. All 11 patients with recurrent tumors or distant metastases were cyclin T1-negative patients. Old age, large tumor size, a high Ki67 IHC staining score, high mitotic count and negative cyclin T1 staining revealed a worse clinical outcome in univariate analysis. By contrast, the Cdk9 score was not associated with clinical parameters. The Kaplan-Meier survival curve illustrated that the DFS rate of the patients with negative cyclin T1 staining was significantly lower than that of the patients with positive cyclin T1 staining. Positive expression of cyclin T1 was a good prognostic factor in patients with gastric GISTs. PMID:27284431

  7. [Pronostic value of the immunohistochemical expression of cyclin D1 (DCS6) in epidermoid larynx carcinoma].

    PubMed

    García Lozano, M C; Orradre Romero, J L; Sánchez Carrión, S; Caro Garcia, M; Lasso Luis, O; Piris Pinilla, M A

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we carried out an immunohistochemical study of cyclin D1 (DCS6 ) expression in a series of 195 patients with laryngeal carcinoma that were diagnosticated, treated and followed at the Department of Otolaryngology at "Virgen de la Salud" Hospital (Toledo, Spain) for a time of 5 years. In the cases with lymph node metastasis we also studied cyclin D1 expression at this level. Furthermore we have analysed the value of cyclin D1 expression as a prognostic factor (tumor recurrence, deads due to cancer and survival) and we evaluate the relationship between cyclin D1 expression and other clinic and pathologic parameters. PMID:16881553

  8. Cytoplasmic sequestration of cyclin D1 associated with cell cycle withdrawal of neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sumrejkanchanakij, Piyamas; Eto, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Masa-Aki . E-mail: mikeda.emb@tmd.ac.jp

    2006-02-03

    The regulation of D-type cyclin-dependent kinase activity is critical for neuronal differentiation and apoptosis. We recently showed that cyclin D1 is sequestered in the cytoplasm and that its nuclear localization induces apoptosis in postmitotic primary neurons. Here, we further investigated the role of the subcellular localization of cyclin D1 in cell cycle withdrawal during the differentiation of N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells. We show that cyclin D1 became predominantly cytoplasmic after differentiation. Targeting cyclin D1 expression to the nucleus induced phosphorylation of Rb and cdk2 kinase activity. Furthermore, cyclin D1 nuclear localization promoted differentiated N1E-115 cells to reenter the cell cycle, a process that was inhibited by p16{sup INK4a}, a specific inhibitor of D-type cyclin activity. These results indicate that cytoplasmic sequestration of cyclin D1 plays a role in neuronal cell cycle withdrawal, and suggests that the abrogation of machinery involved in monitoring aberrant nuclear cyclin D1 activity contributes to neuronal tumorigenesis.

  9. Cyclin E Is Stabilized in Response to Replication Fork Barriers Leading to Prolonged S Phase Arrest*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Jia; Legerski, Randy J.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin E is a regulator of cyclin-dependent protein kinases (Cdks) and is involved in mediating the cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase. Here, we describe a novel function for cyclin E in the long term maintenance of checkpoint arrest in response to replication barriers. Exposure of cells to mitomycin C or UV irradiation, but not ionizing radiation, induces stabilization of cyclin E. Stabilization of cyclin E reduces the activity of Cdk2-cyclin A, resulting in a slowing of S phase progression and arrest. In addition, cyclin E is shown to be required for stabilization of Cdc6, which is required for activation of Chk1 and the replication checkpoint pathway. Furthermore, the stabilization of cyclin E in response to replication fork barriers depends on ATR, but not Nbs1 or Chk1. These results indicate that in addition to its well studied role in promoting cell cycle progression, cyclin E also has a role in regulating cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage. PMID:19812034

  10. A novel function for Cyclin A2: Control of cell invasion via RhoA signaling

    PubMed Central

    Arsic, Nikola; Bendris, Nawal; Peter, Marion; Begon-Pescia, Christina; Rebouissou, Cosette; Gadéa, Gilles; Bouquier, Nathalie; Bibeau, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Cyclin A2 plays a key role in cell cycle regulation. It is essential in embryonic cells and in the hematopoietic lineage yet dispensable in fibroblasts. In this paper, we demonstrate that Cyclin A2–depleted cells display a cortical distribution of actin filaments and increased migration. These defects are rescued by restoration of wild-type Cyclin A2, which directly interacts with RhoA, or by a Cyclin A2 mutant unable to associate with Cdk. In vitro, Cyclin A2 potentiates the exchange activity of a RhoA-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor. Consistent with this, Cyclin A2 depletion enhances migration of fibroblasts and invasiveness of transformed cells via down-regulation of RhoA activity. Moreover, Cyclin A2 expression is lower in metastases relative to primary colon adenocarcinoma in matched human tumors. All together, these data show that Cyclin A2 negatively controls cell motility by promoting RhoA activation, thus demonstrating a novel Cyclin A2 function in cytoskeletal rearrangements and cell migration. PMID:22232705

  11. Binding of HTm4 to cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-associated phosphatase (KAP).Cdk2.cyclin A complex enhances the phosphatase activity of KAP, dissociates cyclin A, and facilitates KAP dephosphorylation of Cdk2.

    PubMed

    Chinami, Masanobu; Yano, Yoshihiko; Yang, Xing; Salahuddin, Saira; Moriyama, Kosei; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Turner, Helen; Shirakawa, Taro; Adra, Chaker N

    2005-04-29

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk2) activation requires phosphorylation of Thr160 and dissociation from cyclin A. The T-loop of cdk2 contains a regulatory phosphorylation site at Thr160. An interaction between cdc-associated phosphatase (KAP) and cdk2 compromises the interaction between cdk2 and cyclin A, which permits access of KAP, a Thr160-directed phosphatase, to its substrate, cdk2. We have reported that KAP is bound and activated by a nuclear membrane protein, HTm4. Here, we present in vitro data showing the direct interaction between the HTm4 C terminus and KAP Tyr141. We show that this interaction not only facilitates access of KAP to Thr160 and accelerates KAP kinetics, but also forces exclusion of cyclin A from the KAP.cdk2 complex. PMID:15671017

  12. Suppression of Parkin enhances nigrostriatal and motor neuron lesion in mice over-expressing human-mutated tau protein.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, J; Rodríguez-Navarro, J A; Solano, R M; Casarejos, M J; Rodal, I; Guerrero, R; Sánchez, M P; Avila, J; Mena, M A; de Yébenes, J G

    2006-07-01

    Abnormal deposition of protein tau takes place in the brain of patients with several neurodegenerative diseases. Few of these patients present frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism and amyotrophy (FTDPA-17), an autosomal dominant tauopathy related to mutations of the gene that codes for protein tau, localized in chromosome 17. The great majority of patients with tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease, sporadic frontotemporal dementia or progressive supranuclear palsy do not show a Mendelian pattern of inheritance. We have occasionally seen tauopathies in patients with parkin mutations and, therefore, hypothesized that the protein tau interacts with parkin. We have tested that hypothesis in mice with combined genetic modifications of tau (over-expression of human tau with three mutations known to produce FTDPA-17) and parkin (deleted) proteins. Homozygote parkin null or over-expressing mutated-human tau mice have subtle behavioral and molecular abnormalities but do not express a clinical phenotype of neurodegenerative disease. Mice with combined homozygous mutations of these two genes show progressively abnormal walking already noticeable at 3 months of age, loss of dopamine and dopamine markers in striatum, nuclear tau immunoreactive deposits in motor neurons of the spinal cord, abnormal expression of glial markers and enhanced levels of pro-apoptotic proteins; findings that were absent or less pronounced in homozygote animals with deletions of parkin or over-expression of tau. The double transgenic mice do not express normal mechanisms of adaptation to stress such as increased levels of GSH and Hsp-70. In addition, they have reduced levels of CHIP-Hsc70, a complex known to attenuate aggregation of tau and to enhance ubiquitination of phosphorylated tau. We have found high levels of phosphorylated tau in parkin-/-+tau(VLW) mice and a relative decrease of the inactivated pSer9 to total GSK-3 levels. Our data reveal that there are interactions between tau and

  13. Over-expression of human endosulfatase-1 exacerbates cadmium-induced injury to transformed human lung cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Huiying; Newman, Donna R.; Bonner, James C.; Sannes, Philip L.

    2012-11-15

    Environmental exposure to cadmium is known to cause damage to alveolar epithelial cells of the lung, impair their capacity to repair, and result in permanent structural alterations. Cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) can modulate cell responses to injury through their interactions with soluble effector molecules. These interactions are often sulfate specific, and the removal of sulfate groups from HS side chains could be expected to influence cellular injury, such as that caused by exposure to cadmium. The goal of this study was to define the role 6-O-sulfate plays in cellular responses to cadmium exposure in two pulmonary epithelial cancer cell lines (H292 and A549) and in normal human primary alveolar type II (hAT2) cells. Sulfate levels were modified by transduced transient over-expression of 6-O-endosulfatase (HSulf-1), a membrane-bound enzyme which specifically removes 6-O-sulfate groups from HSPG side chains. Results showed that cadmium decreased cell viability and activated apoptosis pathways at low concentrations in hAT2 cells but not in the cancer cells. HSulf-1 over-expression, on the contrary, decreased cell viability and activated apoptosis pathways in H292 and A549 cells but not in hAT2 cells. When combined with cadmium, HSulf-1 over-expression further decreased cell viability and exacerbated the activation of apoptosis pathways in the transformed cells but did not add to the toxicity in hAT2 cells. The finding that HSulf-1 sensitizes these cancer cells and intensifies the injury induced by cadmium suggests that 6-O-sulfate groups on HSPGs may play important roles in protection against certain environmental toxicants, such as heavy metals. -- Highlights: ► Primary human lung alveolar type 2 (hAT2) cells and H292 and A549 cells were used. ► Cadmium induced apoptosis in hAT2 cells but not in H292 or A549 cells. ► HSulf-1exacerbates apoptosis induced by cadmium in H292 and A549 but not hAT2 cells.

  14. MASS AND DENSITY OF THE B-TYPE ASTEROID (702) ALAUDA

    SciTech Connect

    Rojo, P.; Margot, J. L. E-mail: jlm@astro.ucla.edu

    2011-02-01

    Observations with the adaptive optics system on the Very Large Telescope reveal that the outer main belt asteroid (702) Alauda has a small satellite with primary to secondary diameter ratio of {approx}56. The secondary revolves around the primary in 4.9143 {+-} 0.007 days at a distance of 1227 {+-} 24 km, yielding a total system mass of (6.057 {+-} 0.36) x 10{sup 18} kg. Combined with an IRAS size measurement, our data yield a bulk density of 1570 {+-} 500 kg m{sup -3} for this B-type asteroid.

  15. Clinical implications of B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro--B-type natriuretic peptide in the care of the vascular surgery patient.

    PubMed

    Wayne Causey, Marlin; Singh, Niten

    2014-12-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (also known as brain natriuretic peptide or BNP) is a physiologic marker that is often used to assess a patient's global cardiovascular health. BNP is secreted from the ventricular cardiac myocytes in response to stretch that occurs due to increased intravascular volume. PreproBNP is cleaved into BNP and N-terminal proBNP (NT proBNP) to cause diuresis, natriuresis, and vasodilation, and can be measured with a blood laboratory assay test or point-of-care testing. BNP/NT proBNP has been most extensively studied in the diagnosis and management of heart failure, but within the past 5 years, interest has carried over to vascular surgery patients. Studies have demonstrated that elevated levels of BNP/NT-proBNP (typically >100 pg/mL/>300 pg/mL) are associated with major adverse cardiac events at 30 and 180 days. Additional analysis of BNP/NT-proBNP has demonstrated that patients can be classified as very low risk (<19 pg/mL), low risk (<100 pg/mL), intermediate risk (100 to 400 pg/mL), or high risk (>400 pg/mL). BNP/NT-proBNP in the low- and very-low-risk groups suggests patients are unlikely to have a major adverse cardiac event. An elevated BNP/NT-proBNP, excluding those with reasons for abnormal values, suggests the need for additional risk stratification and medical risk factor optimization. A preoperative measure of BNP or NT-proBNP affords an easy and rapid opportunity to individually and objectively quantify perioperative cardiovascular risk. Recent studies have also identified other biomarkers, none superior to BNP or NT-proBNP, but that, when used concomitantly, aid in further stratifying perioperative risk and will likely be the focus of future investigations. PMID:26073822

  16. Small-Scale Screening to Large-Scale Over-Expression of Human Membrane Proteins for Structural Studies.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Sarika; Saha, Sukanya; Thamminana, Sobrahani; Stroud, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Membrane protein structural studies are frequently hampered by poor expression. The low natural abundance of these proteins implies a need for utilizing different heterologous expression systems. E. coli and yeast are commonly used expression systems due to rapid cell growth at high cell density, economical production, and ease of manipulation. Here we report a simplified, systematically developed robust strategy from small-scale screening to large-scale over-expression of human integral membrane proteins in the mammalian expression system for structural studies. This methodology streamlines small-scale screening of several different constructs utilizing fluorescence size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC) towards optimization of buffer, additives, and detergents for achieving stability and homogeneity. This is followed by the generation of stable clonal cell lines expressing desired constructs, and lastly large-scale expression for crystallization. These techniques are designed to rapidly advance the structural studies of eukaryotic integral membrane proteins including that of human membrane proteins. PMID:27485338

  17. Tumor-Specific Proteolytic Processing of Cyclin E Generates Hyperactive Lower-Molecular-Weight Forms

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Donald C.; Zhang, Ning; Danes, Christopher; McGahren, Mollianne J.; Harwell, Richard M.; Faruki, Shamsa; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2001-01-01

    Cyclin E is a G1 cyclin essential for S-phase entry and has a profound role in oncogenesis. Previously this laboratory found that cyclin E is overexpressed and present in lower-molecular-weight (LMW) isoforms in breast cancer cells and tumor tissues compared to normal cells and tissues. Such alteration of cyclin E is linked to poor patient outcome. Here we report that the LMW forms of cyclin E are hyperactive biochemically and they can more readily induce G1-to-S progression in transfected normal cells than the full-length form of the protein can. Through biochemical and mutational analyses we have identified two proteolytically sensitive sites in the amino terminus of human cyclin E that are cleaved to generate the LMW isoforms found in tumor cells. Not only are the LMW forms of cyclin E functional, as they phosphorylate substrates such as histone H1 and GST-Rb, but also their activities are higher than the full-length cyclin E. These nuclear localized LMW forms of cyclin E are also biologically functional, as their overexpression in normal cells increases the ability of these cells to enter S and G2/M. Lastly, we show that cyclin E is selectively cleaved in vitro by the elastase class of serine proteases to generate LMW forms similar to those observed in tumor cells. These studies suggest that the defective entry into and exit from S phase by tumor cells is in part due to the proteolytic processing of cyclin E, which generates hyperactive LMW isoforms whose activities have been modified from that of the full-length protein. PMID:11509668

  18. Over-expression of miR-10b in NPC patients: correlation with LMP1 and Twist1.

    PubMed

    Allaya, Nesrine; Khabir, Abdelmajid; Sallemi-Boudawara, Tahia; Sellami, Noura; Daoud, Jamel; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Frikha, Mounir; Gargouri, Ali; Mokdad-Gargouri, Raja; Ayadi, Wajdi

    2015-05-01

    Aberrant expression of miR-10b has been described in many cancers but remains unexplored in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Therefore, we aimed to study the miR-10b expression level in 43 NPC biopsies collected from Tunisian patients and three NPC xenografts. Then, we investigated the correlation between miR-10b expression and its upstream regulators LMP1/Twist1 as well as its adjacent gene HoxD4. We showed that miR-10b was significantly up-regulated in NPC biopsies compared to non-tumor nasopharyngeal tissues (fold change 153; p = 0.004) and associated with advanced clinical stage and young age at diagnosis (p = 0.005 and p = 0.011, respectively). In addition, over-expression of miR-10b was positively associated with the transcription factor Twist1 as well as the EBV oncoprotein LMP1 (fold change 6.32; p = 0.014, fold change 6.58; p = 0.01 respectively). Furthermore, higher level of miR-10b was observed in tumors with simultaneous expression of LMP1 and Twist1, compared to those expressing only Twist1 (fold change 2.49; p = 0.033). Meanwhile, the analysis of the link between miR-10b and its neighbor gene HoxD4 did not show any significant correlation (Fisher test p = 0.205; Mann-Whitney test p = 0.676). This study reports the first evidence of miR-10b over-expression in NPC patients. Furthermore, our findings can support hsa-miR-10b gene regulation through LMP1/Twist1 in NPC malignancy. PMID:25597482

  19. Heat shock protein 90-β over-expression is associated with poor survival in stage I lung adenocarcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongkai; Huang, Bo; Liu, Qian; Liu, Yongyu

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90-beta (Hsp90-β) is associated with cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis and has been investigated as a prognostic factor in many cancers. However, Hsp90-β protein expression in lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) has not been thoroughly elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between Hsp90-β expression, clinicopathological parameters and prognosis in lung adenocarcinomas. Seventy-five surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas and matched normal lung tissue samples were obtained to construct a tissue microarray (TMA), including 44 stage IA-IB cases. Then, Hsp90-β protein expression level in lung tissue was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with a Log-rank significance test was used to estimate the survival differences among subgroups according to Hsp90-β expression in lung ADC tissues using SigmaPlot/SigmaStat v10 and 3.5, respectively. Hsp90-β protein expression was significantly upregulated in lung ADC tissues compared to that in the matched normal alveoli (P<0.001) and was associated with tumor differentiation (P<0.001). Furthermore, Hsp90-β over-expression was correlated with poor survival in stage I patients (P=0.026). Increased Hsp90-β expression was associated with reduced overall survival (HR, 2.440; 95% confidence interval, 1.076-5.530; P=0.033). To conclude, our data demonstrated that Hsp90-β protein was over-expressed in lung ADC tumor tissues and was associated with poor outcomes in early stage ADC patients and low pathological grade tumors. These data suggest that Hsp90-β could be a clinically useful biomarker for the prognosis of ADC and an effective anticancer target. PMID:26339394

  20. Over-expression of GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 feedback regulatory protein attenuates LPS and cytokine-stimulated nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Manasi; Kelly, Peter; Vallance, Patrick; Leiper, James

    2008-02-01

    GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 (GTP-CH1) catalyses the first and rate-limiting step for the de novo production of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)), an essential cofactor for nitric oxide synthase (NOS). The GTP-CH1-BH(4) pathway is emerging as an important regulator in a number of pathologies associated with over-production of nitric oxide (NO) and hence a more detailed understanding of this pathway may lead to novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of certain vascular diseases. GTP-CH1 activity can be inhibited by BH(4) through its protein-protein interactions with GTP-CH1 regulatory protein (GFRP), and transcriptional and post-translational modification of both GTP-CH1 and GFRP have been reported in response to proinflammatory stimuli. However, the functional significance of GFRP/GTP-CH1 interactions on NO pathways has not yet been demonstrated. We aimed to investigate whether over-expression of GFRP could affect NO production in living cells. Over-expression of N-terminally Myc-tagged recombinant human GFRP in the murine endothelial cell line sEnd 1 resulted in no significant effect on basal BH(4) nor NO levels but significantly attenuated the rise in BH(4) and NO observed following lipopolysaccharide and cytokine stimulation of cells. This study demonstrates that GFRP can play a direct regulatory role in iNOS-mediated NO synthesis and suggests that the allosteric regulation of GTP-CH1 activity by GFRP may be an important mechanism regulating BH(4) and NO levels in vivo. PMID:18372436

  1. Reduced sensitivity to both positive and negative reinforcement in mice over-expressing the 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Line, Samantha J; Barkus, Chris; Rawlings, Nancy; Jennings, Katie; McHugh, Stephen; Sharp, Trevor; Bannerman, David M

    2014-12-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) transporter (5-HTT) is believed to play a key role in both normal and pathological psychological states. Much previous data suggest that the s allele of the polymorphic regulatory region of the 5-HTT gene promoter is associated with reduced 5-HTT expression and vulnerability to psychiatric disorders, including anxiety and depression. In comparison, the l allele, which increases 5-HTT expression, is generally considered protective. However, recent data link this allele to both abnormal 5-HT signalling and psychopathic traits. Here, we studied the processing of aversive and rewarding cues in transgenic mice that over-express the 5-HTT (5-HTTOE mice). Compared with wild-type mice, 5-HTTOE mice froze less in response to both a tone that had previously been paired with footshock, and the conditioning context. In addition, on a decision-making T-maze task, 5-HTTOE mice displayed reduced preference for a larger, delayed reward and increased preference for a smaller, immediate reward, suggesting increased impulsiveness compared with wild-type mice. However, further inspection of the data revealed that 5-HTTOE mice displayed a relative insensitivity to reward magnitude, irrespective of delay. In contrast, 5-HTTOE mice appeared normal on tests of spatial working and reference memory, which required an absolute choice between options associated with either reward or no reward. Overall, the present findings suggest that 5-HTT over-expression results in a reduced sensitivity to both positive and negative reinforcers. Thus, these data show that increased 5-HTT expression has some maladaptive effects, supporting recent suggestions that l allele homozygosity may be a potential risk factor for disabling psychiatric traits. PMID:25283165

  2. Identification of New SRF Binding Sites in Genes Modulated by SRF Over-Expression in Mouse Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Azhar, Gohar; Helms, Scott; Burton, Brian; Huang, Chris; Zhong, Ying; Gu, Xuesong; Fang, Hong; Tong, Weida; Wei, Jeanne Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background: To identify in vivo new cardiac binding sites of serum response factor (SRF) in genes and to study the response of these genes to mild over-expression of SRF, we employed a cardiac-specific, transgenic mouse model, with mild over-expression of SRF (Mild-O SRF Tg). Methodology: Microarray experiments were performed on hearts of Mild-O-SRF Tg at 6 months of age. We identified 207 genes that are important for cardiac function that were differentially expressed in vivo. Among them the promoter region of 192 genes had SRF binding motifs, the classic CArG or CArG-like (CArG-L) elements. Fifty-one of the 56 genes with classic SRF binding sites had not been previously reported. These SRF-modulated genes were grouped into 12 categories based on their function. It was observed that genes associated with cardiac energy metabolism shifted toward that of carbohydrate metabolism and away from that of fatty acid metabolism. The expression of genes that are involved in transcription and ion regulation were decreased, but expression of cytoskeletal genes was significantly increased. Using public databases of mouse models of hemodynamic stress (GEO database), we also found that similar altered expression of the SRF-modulated genes occurred in these hearts with cardiac ischemia or aortic constriction as well. Conclusion and significance: SRF-modulated genes are actively regulated under various physiological and pathological conditions. We have discovered that a large number of cardiac genes have classic SRF binding sites and were significantly modulated in the Mild-O-SRF Tg mouse hearts. Hence, the mild elevation of SRF protein in the heart that is observed during typical adult aging may have a major impact on many SRF-modulated genes, thereby affecting cardiac structure and performance. The results from our study could help to enhance our understanding of SRF regulation of cellular processes in the aged heart. PMID:21792293

  3. Over-Expression of Rice CBS Domain Containing Protein, OsCBSX3, Confers Rice Resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Shaoliang; Shi, Lanping; Lin, Wei; Liu, Yanyan; Shen, Lei; Guan, Deyi; He, Shuilin

    2015-01-01

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) domain containing proteins (CDCPs) constitute a big family in plants and some members in this family have been implicated in a variety of biological processes, but the precise functions and the underlying mechanism of the majority of this family in plant immunity remain to be elucidated. In the present study, a CBS domain containing protein gene, OsCBSX3, is functionally characterized in rice resistance against Magnaporthe oryzae (M. oryzae). By quantitative real-time PCR, transcripts of OsCBSX3 are up-regulated significantly by inoculation of M. oryzae and the exogenously applied salicylic acid (SA) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA). OsCBSX3 is exclusively localized to the plasma membrane by transient expression of OsCBSX3 fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) through approach of Agrobacterium infiltration in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. The plants of homozygous T3 transgenic rice lines of over-expressing OsCBSX3 exhibit significant enhanced resistance to M. oryzae inoculation, manifested by decreased disease symptoms, and inhibition of pathogen growth detected in DNA. Consistently, the over-expression of OsCBSX3 enhances the transcript levels of immunity associated marker genes including PR1a, PR1b, PR5, AOS2, PAL, NH1, and OsWRKY13 in plants inoculated with M. oryzae. These results suggest that OsCBSX3 acts as a positive regulator in resistance of rice to M. oryzae regulated by SA and JA-mediated signaling pathways synergistically. PMID:26184180

  4. Over-Expression of Rice CBS Domain Containing Protein, OsCBSX3, Confers Rice Resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae Inoculation.

    PubMed

    Mou, Shaoliang; Shi, Lanping; Lin, Wei; Liu, Yanyan; Shen, Lei; Guan, Deyi; He, Shuilin

    2015-01-01

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) domain containing proteins (CDCPs) constitute a big family in plants and some members in this family have been implicated in a variety of biological processes, but the precise functions and the underlying mechanism of the majority of this family in plant immunity remain to be elucidated. In the present study, a CBS domain containing protein gene, OsCBSX3, is functionally characterized in rice resistance against Magnaporthe oryzae (M. oryzae). By quantitative real-time PCR, transcripts of OsCBSX3 are up-regulated significantly by inoculation of M. oryzae and the exogenously applied salicylic acid (SA) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA). OsCBSX3 is exclusively localized to the plasma membrane by transient expression of OsCBSX3 fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) through approach of Agrobacterium infiltration in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. The plants of homozygous T3 transgenic rice lines of over-expressing OsCBSX3 exhibit significant enhanced resistance to M. oryzae inoculation, manifested by decreased disease symptoms, and inhibition of pathogen growth detected in DNA. Consistently, the over-expression of OsCBSX3 enhances the transcript levels of immunity associated marker genes including PR1a, PR1b, PR5, AOS2, PAL, NH1, and OsWRKY13 in plants inoculated with M. oryzae. These results suggest that OsCBSX3 acts as a positive regulator in resistance of rice to M. oryzae regulated by SA and JA-mediated signaling pathways synergistically. PMID:26184180

  5. Establishment of type II 5alpha-reductase over-expressing cell line as an inhibitor screening model.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sunhyae; Lee, Young; Hwang, Seong-Lok; Lee, Min-Ho; Park, Su Jin; Lee, In Ho; Kang, Sangjin; Roh, Seok-Seon; Seo, Young-Joon; Park, Jang-Kyu; Lee, Jeung-Hoon; Kim, Chang Deok

    2007-01-01

    Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is the most potent male hormone that causes androgenetic alopecia. The type II 5alpha-reductase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of testosterone (T) to DHT, therefore it can be expected that specific inhibitors for type II 5alpha-reductase may improve the pathophysiologic status of androgenetic alopecia. In this study, we attempted to establish the reliable and convenient screening model for type II 5alpha-reductase inhibitors. After transfection of human cDNA for type II 5alpha-reductase into HEK293 cells, the type II 5alpha-reductase over-expressing stable cells were selected by G418 treatment. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses confirmed that type II 5alpha-reductase gene was expressed in the stable cells. In in vitro enzymatic assay, 10 microg of stable cell extract completely converted 1 microCi (approximately 0.015 nmol) of T into DHT. The type II 5alpha-reductase activity was inhibited by finasteride in a dose-dependent manner, confirming the reliability of screening system. In cell culture condition, 2 x 10(5) of stable cells completely converted all the input T (approximately 0.03 nmol) into DHT by 4h incubation, demonstrating that the stable cell line can be used as a cell-based assay system. Using this system, we selected the extracts of Curcumae longae rhizoma and Mori ramulus as the potential inhibitors for type II 5alpha-reductase. These results demonstrate that the type II 5alpha-reductase over-expressing stable cell line is a convenient and reliable model for screening and evaluation of inhibitors. PMID:17646096

  6. Molecular dynamic behavior and binding affinity of flavonoid analogues to the cyclin dependent kinase 6/cyclin D complex.

    PubMed

    Khuntawee, Wasinee; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Hannongbua, Supot

    2012-01-23

    The cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs), each with their respective regulatory partner cyclin that are involved in the regulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and transcription, are potentially interesting targets for cancer therapy. The CDK6 complex with cyclin D (CDK6/cycD) drives cellular proliferation by phosphorylation of specific key target proteins. To understand the flavonoids that inhibit the CDK6/cycD functions, molecular dynamics simulations (MDSs) were performed on three inhibitors, fisetin (FST), apigenin (AGN), and chrysin (CHS), complexed with CDK6/cycD, including the two different binding orientations of CHS: FST-like (CHS_A) and deschloro-flavopiridol-like (CHS_B). For all three inhibitors, including both CHS orientations, the conserved interaction between the 4-keto group of the flavonoid and the backbone V101 nitrogen of CDK6 was strongly detected. The 3'- and 4'-OH groups on the flavonoid phenyl ring and the 3-OH group on the benzopyranone ring of inhibitor were found to significantly increase the binding and inhibitory efficiency. Besides the electrostatic interactions, especially through hydrogen bond formation, the van der Waals (vdW) interactions with the I19, V27, F98, H100, and L152 residues of CDK6 are also important factors in the binding efficiency of flavonoids against the CDK6/cycD complex. On the basis of the docking calculation and MM-PBSA method, the order of the predicted inhibitory affinities of these three inhibitors toward the CDK6/cycD was FST > AGN > CHS, which is in good agreement with the experimental data. In addition, CHS preferentially binds to the active CDK6 in a different orientation to FST and AGN but similar to its related analog, deschloro-flavopiridol. The obtained results are useful as the basic information for the further design of potent anticancer drugs specifically targeting the CDK6 enzyme. PMID:22172011

  7. Identification of a major QTL controlling the content of B-type starch granules in Aegilops

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Thomas; Rejab, Nur Ardiyana; Griffiths, Simon; Leigh, Fiona; Leverington-Waite, Michelle; Simmonds, James; Uauy, Cristobal; Trafford, Kay

    2011-01-01

    Starch within the endosperm of most species of the Triticeae has a unique bimodal granule morphology comprising large lenticular A-type granules and smaller near-spherical B-type granules. However, a few wild wheat species (Aegilops) are known to lack B-granules. Ae. peregrina and a synthetic tetraploid Aegilops with the same genome composition (SU) were found to differ in B-granule number. The synthetic tetraploid had normal A- and B-type starch granules whilst Ae. peregrina had only A-granules because the B-granules failed to initiate. A population segregating for B-granule number was generated by crossing these two accessions and was used to study the genetic basis of B-granule initiation. A combination of Bulked Segregant Analysis and QTL mapping identified a major QTL located on the short arm of chromosome 4S that accounted for 44.4% of the phenotypic variation. The lack of B-granules in polyploid Aegilops with diverse genomes suggests that the B-granule locus has been lost several times independently during the evolution of the Triticeae. It is proposed that the B-granule locus is susceptible to silencing during polyploidization and a model is presented to explain the observed data based on the assumption that the initiation of B-granules is controlled by a single major locus per haploid genome. PMID:21227932

  8. Formation of Nonclassical Ordered Phases of A B -Type Multiarm Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ya; Deng, Hanlin; Li, Weihua; Qiu, Feng; Shi, An-Chang

    2016-02-01

    The formation of ordered phases from block copolymers is driven by a delicate balance between the monomer-monomer interaction and chain configurational entropy. The configurational entropy can be regulated by designed chain architecture, resulting in a new entropy-driven mechanism to control the self-assembly of ordered phases from block copolymers. An effective routine to regulate the configurational entropy is to utilize multiarm architecture, in which the entropic contribution to the free energy could be qualitatively controlled by the fraction of bridging configurations. As an illustration of this mechanism, the phase behavior of two A B -type multiarm block copolymers, B0-(Bi-Ai) m and (B1-Ai-B2) m where the minority A blocks form cylindrical or spherical domains, are examined using the self-consistent field theory (SCFT). The SCFT results demonstrate that the packing symmetry of the cylinders or spheres can be controlled by the length of the bridging B blocks. Several nonclassical ordered phases, including a novel square array cylinder with p 4 m m symmetry, are predicted to form from the A B -type multiarm block copolymers.

  9. The precursor to B-type natriuretic peptide is an O-linked glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, Ute; O'Rear, Jessica; Guzzetta, Andrew; Jue, Rodney A; Protter, Andrew A; Pollitt, N Stephen

    2006-07-15

    Human pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (proBNP), the precursor for B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) and compared by Western blot analysis to BNP cross-reacting material immunoprecipitated from the plasma of heart failure patients. Both recombinant and native forms co-migrated as a diffuse band centered around 25 kDa and were reduced to a 12 kDa species by treatment with a mixture of O-link deglycosylation enzymes. The 108-amino acid CHO-expressed protein was examined by tryptic mapping and LC-MS and found to be an O-linked glycoprotein. Determination of the sites of O-glycosyl addition by blank cycle sequencing of tryptic and Glu-C (Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease) peptides showed that there are seven sites of glycosylation confined to a 36-amino acid residue stretch within the center of the propeptide region. This data is consistent with previous observations of higher molecular weight isoforms of BNP. PMID:16750161

  10. Activity of cyclin B1 in HL-60 cells treated with etoposide.

    PubMed

    Żuryń, Agnieszka; Krajewski, Adrian; Szulc, Dawid; Litwiniec, Anna; Grzanka, Alina

    2016-06-01

    Cyclin B1 triggers G2/M phase transition phosphorylating with its catalytical partner - Cdc2 many of the molecular targets essential for cell cycle progression. Human leukemia cell line HL-60 were treated with increasing doses of etoposide (ETP) (0.5; 0.75; 1μM) to investigate how the drug affects cell morphology, viability, cell cycle distribution and expression of cyclin B1. To achieve this aim we applied light and transmission electron microscopy to observe morphological and ultra structural changes, image-based cytometry for apoptosis evaluation and cell cycle analysis, and then we conducted immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence staining to visualize cyclin localization and expression. Quantitive data about cyclin B1 expression were obtained from flow cytometry. Etoposide caused decrease in cell viability, induced apoptosis and G2/M arrest accompanied by enhanced expression of cyclin B1. Changes in expression and localization of cyclin B1 may constitute a part of the mechanism responsible for resistance of HL-60 cells to etoposide. Our results may reflect involvement of cyclin B1 in opposite processes - apoptosis induction and maintenance of cell viability in leukemia cells. We hypothesized possible roles and pathways by which cyclin B1 takes part in drug treatment response and chemosensitivity. PMID:27297620