Science.gov

Sample records for b1 periprosthetic fractures

  1. Periprosthetic Vancouver type B1 and C fractures treated by locking-plate osteosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Historically, the treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures (PFFs) has been associated with a high frequency of complications and reoperations. The preferred treatment is internal fixation, a revision of the femoral stem, or a combination of both. An improved understanding of plate use during internal fixation, and the introduction of locking-plate osteosynthesis may lead to improved outcome. We evaluated the outcome of Vancouver type B1 and C PFFs treated by locking-plate osteosynthesis, by assessing rates of fracture union and reoperations and by analyzing failure cases. Patients and methods From 2002 through 2011, 58 consecutive patients (60 fractures) with low-energy PFF around or below a stable femoral stem, i.e. Vancouver type B1 and C fractures, underwent osteosynthesis with a locking plate. All patients had a total hip replacement (THR). They were followed up clinically and radiographically, with 6 weeks between visits, until fracture union or until death. Fracture union was evaluated 6 months postoperatively. Results At a median follow-up time of 23 (0–121) months after PFF, 8 patients (8 fractures) had been reoperated due either to infection (n = 4), failure of fixation (n = 3), or loosening of the femoral stem (n = 1). All the patients who had been followed up for at least 6 months—and who did not undergo reoperation or die—went on to fracture union (n = 43). Interpretation Locking-plate osteosynthesis of periprosthetic Vancouver type B1 and C fractures gives good results regarding fracture union. It appears that spanning of the prosthesis to avoid stress-rising areas is important for successful treatment. Infection is the major cause of failure. PMID:23140109

  2. Periprosthetic femoral fracture--a biomechanical comparison between Vancouver type B1 and B2 fixation methods.

    PubMed

    Moazen, Mehran; Mak, Jonathan H; Etchels, Lee W; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth K; Jones, Alison C; Tsiridis, Eleftherios

    2014-03-01

    Current clinical data suggest a higher failure rate for internal fixation in Vancouver type B1 periprosthetic femoral fracture (PFF) fixations compared to long stem revision in B2 fractures. The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical performance of several fixations in the aforementioned fractures. Finite element models of B1 and B2 fixations, previously corroborated against in vitro experimental models, were compared. The results indicated that in treatment of B1 fractures, a single locking plate can be without complications provided partial weight bearing is followed. In case of B2 fractures, long stem revision and bypassing the fracture gap by two femoral diameters are recommended. Considering the risk of single plate failure, long stem revision could be considered in all comminuted B1 and B2 fractures. PMID:24035619

  3. Cement-in-cement revision for selected Vancouver Type B1 femoral periprosthetic fractures: a biomechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Brew, Christopher J; Wilson, Lance J; Whitehouse, Sarah L; Hubble, Matthew J W; Crawford, Ross W

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a biomechanical analysis of the cement-in-cement (c-in-c) technique for fixation of selected Vancouver Type B1 femoral periprosthetic fractures and to assess the degree of cement interposition at the fracture site. Six embalmed cadaveric femora were implanted with a cemented femoral stem. Vancouver Type B1 fractures were created by applying a combined axial and rotational load to failure. The femora were repaired using the c-in-c technique and reloaded to failure. The mean primary fracture torque was 117 Nm (SD 16.6, range 89-133). The mean revision fracture torque was 50 Nm (SD 16.6, range 29-74), which is above the torque previously observed for activities of daily living. Cement interposition at the fracture site was found to be minimal. PMID:23146585

  4. [Rehabilitation after periprosthetic fractures].

    PubMed

    Schmitt-Sody, M; Valle, C

    2016-03-01

    Periprosthetic fractures of the upper and lower extremities not only represent a challenge for surgeons but also for the rehabilitation team. The sometimes multimorbid patients have often undergone several surgical operations and need special planning and cooperation between an interdisciplinary team in order to achieve the best possible functional result and social reintegration. A structured rehabilitation planning after surgical treatment is a prerequisite for the patient to return to life as normal as possible. The aim is always rapid mobilization to achieve independence in activities of daily living. Special attention should be paid to postoperative immobilization and weight bearing. PMID:26923872

  5. Atypical periprosthetic femoral fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Woo, S B; Choi, S T; Chan, W L

    2016-08-01

    We report an 82-year-old woman who underwent fixation with a long-spanning cable-plate for a bisphosphonate-induced Vancouver B1 periprosthetic femoral fracture. Non-union and breakage of the plate occurred at 16 months and necessitated revision surgery using a long-stem femoral prosthesis augmented with a cable-plate construct. Bone union was achieved eventually after 10 months. PMID:27574277

  6. Periprosthetic fractures in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Van Flandern, Geoffrey J

    2005-09-01

    Periprosthetic fractures can be discussed in many formats. In this article, epidemiology, classification, and treatment are divided into the following three categories of periprosthetic fracture: intraoperative fractures detected at the time of surgery; intraoperative fractures undetected at the time of surgery, but detected postoperatively; and postoperative fractures occurring late after the arthroplasty procedure. PMID:16190043

  7. [Classification of periprosthetic shoulder fractures].

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, C; Kirchhoff, S; Biberthaler, P

    2016-04-01

    The key targets in the treatment of periprosthetic humeral fractures (PHF) are the preservation of bone, successful bony consolidation and provision of a stable anchoring of the prosthesis with the major goal of restoring the shoulder-arm function. A substantial problem of periprosthetic shoulder fractures is the fact that treatment is determined not only by the fracture itself but also by the implanted prosthesis and its function. Consequently, the exact preoperative shoulder function and, in the case of an implanted anatomical prosthesis, the status and function of the rotator cuff need to be assessed in order to clarify the possibility of a secondarily occurring malfunction. Of equal importance in this context is the type of implanted prosthesis. The existing classification systems of Wright and Cofield, Campbell et al., Groh et al. and Worland et al. have several drawbacks from a shoulder surgeon's point of view, such as a missing reference to the great variability of the available prostheses and the lack of an evaluation of rotator cuff function. The presented 6‑stage classification for the evaluation of periprosthetic fractures of the shoulder can be considered just as simple or complex to understand as the classification of the working group for osteosynthesis problems (AO, Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen), depending on the viewpoint. From our point of view the classification presented here encompasses the essential points of the existing classification systems and also covers the otherwise missing points, which should be considered in the assessment of such periprosthetic fractures. The classification presented here should provide helpful assistance in the daily routine to find the most convenient form of therapy. PMID:26992712

  8. Periprosthetic Fractures Following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Ki

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty may occur in any part of the femur, tibia and patella, and the most common pattern involves the supracondylar area of the distal femur. Supracondylar periprosthetic fractures frequently occur above a well-fixed prosthesis, and risk factors include anterior femoral cortical notching and use of the rotational constrained implant. Periprosthetic tibial fractures are frequently associated with loose components and malalignment or malposition of implants. Fractures of the patella are much less common and associated with rheumatoid arthritis, use of steroid, osteonecrosis and malalignment of implants. Most patients with periprosthetic fractures around the knee are the elderly with poor bone quality. There are many difficulties and increased risk of nonunion after treatment because reduction and internal fixation is interfered with by preexisting prosthesis and bone cement. Additionally, previous soft tissue injury is another disadvantageous condition for bone healing. Many authors reported good clinical outcomes after non-operative treatment of undisplaced or minimally displaced periprosthetic fractures; however, open reduction or revision arthroplasty was required in displaced fractures or fractures with unstable prosthesis. Periprosthetic fractures around the knee should be prevented by appropriate technique during total knee arthroplasty. Nevertheless, if a periprosthetic fracture occurs, an appropriate treatment method should be selected considering the stability of the prosthesis, displacement of fracture and bone quality. PMID:25750888

  9. Periprosthetic Femur Fracture Occuring after Contralateral Neglected Femoral Neck Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cankaya, Deniz; Toprak, Ali; IKilic, Enver; Bingol, Olgun; Tabak, Yalcin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Periprosthetic fractures of the femur are uncommon, but at times may lead to complications especially in elderly patients. As treatment of these fractures is difficult, prevention by identifying the risk factors is the best way to overcome these complex problems. Case Report: A periprosthetic right femur fracture associated with a neglected left femoral neck fracture in the contralateral femur in a 78-year-old elder woman patient is reported in the present article. We discuss the prevention of periprosthetic fractures after hip arthroplasty and address the risk factors associated with this complication. Conclusion: The present case emphasizes the importance of investigating and treating the cause of sudden onset of restriction on full weight-bearing in the contralateral limb, to prevent periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty in elderly patients. PMID:27299115

  10. Periprosthetic Femoral Fracture With Broken Implant Insitu: - A Treatment Prospect

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Chandra Prakash; Singh, Pulkesh; Kumar, Deepak; Singh, Arpit

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Fractures involving bones containing a component of a prosthetic joint are becoming more common. The causation is multifactorial but most of these injuries are associated with trivial trauma. The options available for operative management of these fractures include internal fixation of the fracture alone, fixation of the fracture with revision of the prosthesis, and reconstruction of proximal femur with either modified impaction bone grafting or proximal femoral replacement. Case Report: We present here a case of periprosthetic fracture Vancouver type B1 with a broken cemented bipolar prosthesis insitu, in which the broken implant was firmly fixed in the proximal fragment and could not be removed following which the whole of the proximal fragment along with the broken implant was removed and replaced by a customized steel long stem cemented mega prosthesis. Conclusion: This case is being presented on account of its unusual presentation and fracture pattern. A broken prosthesis along with a periprosthetic fracture is not a common incident. Thus the treatment had to be individualized. Since the prosthesis was well fixed, its broken stem could not be removed from the proximal fragment and so the whole of the proximal fragment along with stem was removed and replaced with a long stem custom made bipolar prosthesis. PMID:27298972

  11. Outcomes following surgical treatment of periprosthetic femur fractures: a single centre series

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Natasha; Papp, Steve; Gofton, Wade; Beaulé, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Periprosthetic femoral fracture after total hip arthroplasty (THA) is an increasing clinical problem and a challenging complication to treat surgically. The aim of this retrospective study was to review the treatment of periprosthetic fractures and the complication rate associated with treatment at our institution. Methods We reviewed the cases of patients with periprosthetic femoral fractures treated between January 2004 and June 2009. We used the Vancouver classification to assess fracture types, and we identified the surgical interventions used for these fracture types and the associated complications. Results We treated 45 patients with periprosthetic femoral fractures during the study period (15 men, 30 women, mean age 78 yr). Based on Vancouver classification, 2 patients had AL fractures, 9 had AG, 15 had B1, 24 had B2, 2 had B3 and 4 had C fractures. Overall, 82% of fractures united with a mean time to union of 15 (range 2–64) months. Fourteen patients (31%) had complications; 11 of them had a reoperation: 6 to treat an infection, 6 for nonunion and 2 for aseptic femoral component loosening. Conclusion Periprosthetic fractures are difficult to manage. Careful preoperative planning and appropriate intraoperative management in the hands of experienced surgeons may increase the chances of successful treatment. However, patients should be counselled on the high risk of complications when presenting with this problem. PMID:24869614

  12. Periprosthetic fracture fixation in osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Mark; Lehmann, Wolfgang; Wähnert, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    Fixation techniques of periprosthetic fractures are far from ideal although the number of this entity is rising. The presence of an intramedullary implant generates its own fracture characteristics since stiffness is altered along the bone shaft and certain implant combinations affect load resistance of the bone. Influencing factors are cement fixation of the implant, intramedullary locking and extramedullary or intramedullary localization of the implant and the cortical thickness of the surrounding bone. Cerclage wires are ideally suited to fix radially displaced fragments around an intramedullary implant but they are susceptible to axial and torsional load. Screws should be added if these forces have to be neutralized. Stability of the screw fixation itself can be enhanced by embracement configuration around the intramedullary implant. Poor bone stock quality, often being present in metaphyseal areas limits screw fixation. Cement augmentation is an attractive option in this field to enhance screw purchase. PMID:27338227

  13. A Review of Periprosthetic Femoral Fractures Associated With Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Marsland, Daniel; Mears, Simon C.

    2012-01-01

    Periprosthetic fractures of the femur in association with total hip arthroplasty are increasingly common and often difficult to treat. Patients with periprosthetic fractures are typically elderly and frail and have osteoporosis. No clear consensus exists regarding the optimal management strategy because there is limited high-quality research. The Vancouver classification facilitates treatment decisions. In the presence of a stable prosthesis (type-B1 and -C fractures), most authors recommend surgical stabilization of the fracture with plates, strut grafts, or a combination thereof. In up to 20% of apparent Vancouver type-B1 fractures, the femoral stem is loose, which may explain the high failure rates associated with open reduction and internal fixation. Some authors recommend routine opening and dislocation of the hip to perform an intraoperative stem stability test to rule out a loose component. Advances in plating techniques and technology are improving the outcomes for these fractures. For fractures around a loose femoral prosthesis (types B2 and 3), revision using an extensively porous-coated uncemented long stem, with or without additional fracture fixation, appears to offer the most reliable outcome. Cement-in-cement revision using a long-stem prosthesis is feasible in elderly patients with a well-fixed cement mantle. It is essential to treat the osteoporosis to help fracture healing and to prevent further fractures. We provide an overview of the causes, classification, and management of periprosthetic femoral fractures around a total hip arthroplasty based on the current best available evidence. PMID:23569704

  14. Periprosthetic Atypical Femoral Fracture-like Fracture after Hip Arthroplasty: A Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Jae; Min, Byung-Woo; Jang, Hyung-Kyu; Ye, Hee-Uk; Lim, Kyung-Hwan

    2015-09-01

    Atypical femoral fractures are stress or insufficient fractures induced by low energy trauma or no trauma and have specific X-ray findings. Although the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research has excluded periprosthetic fractures from the definition of an atypical femoral fracture in 2013, this is still a matter of controversy because some authors report periprosthetic fractures showing specific features of atypical fractures around a well-fixed femoral stem. We report 3 cases of periprosthetic femur fractures that had specific radiographic features of atypical femoral fractures in patients with a history of prolonged bisphosphonate use; we also review relevant literature. PMID:27536624

  15. Periprosthetic Atypical Femoral Fracture-like Fracture after Hip Arthroplasty: A Report of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Jae; Jang, Hyung-Kyu; Ye, Hee-Uk; Lim, Kyung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Atypical femoral fractures are stress or insufficient fractures induced by low energy trauma or no trauma and have specific X-ray findings. Although the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research has excluded periprosthetic fractures from the definition of an atypical femoral fracture in 2013, this is still a matter of controversy because some authors report periprosthetic fractures showing specific features of atypical fractures around a well-fixed femoral stem. We report 3 cases of periprosthetic femur fractures that had specific radiographic features of atypical femoral fractures in patients with a history of prolonged bisphosphonate use; we also review relevant literature.

  16. Revision Arthroplasty Using a MUTARS® Prosthesis in Comminuted Periprosthetic Fracture of the Distal Femur.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyung Suk; Nho, Jae Hwi; Kim, Chung Hyun; Kwon, Sai Won; Park, Jong Seok; Suh, You Sung

    2016-11-01

    Periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are gradually increasing, reflecting extended lifespan, osteoporosis, and the increasing proportion of the elderly during the past decade. Supracondylar periprosthetic femoral fracture is a potential complication after TKA. Generally, open reduction and internal fixation are the conventional option for periprosthetic fracture after TKA. However, the presence of severe comminution with component loosening can cause failure of internal fixation. Although the current concept for periprosthetic fracture is open reduction and internal fixation, we introduce an unusual case of revision arthroplasty using a MUTARS® prosthesis for a comminuted periprosthetic fracture in the distal femur after TKA, with technical tips. PMID:27593884

  17. Intraoperative Periprosthetic Femur Fracture: A Biomechanical Analysis of Cerclage Fixation.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Charters, Michael A; Sikora-Klak, Jakub; Banglmaier, Richard F; Oravec, Daniel J; Silverton, Craig D

    2015-08-01

    Intraoperative periprosthetic femur fracture is a known complication of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and a variety of cerclage systems are available to manage these fractures. The purpose of this study was to examine the in situ biomechanical response of cerclage systems for fixation of periprosthetic femur fractures that occur during cementless THA. We compared cobalt chrome (CoCr) cables, synthetic cables, monofilament wires and hose clamps under axial compressive and torsional loading. Metallic constructs with a positive locking system performed the best, supporting the highest loads with minimal implant subsidence (both axial and angular) after loading. Overall, the CoCr cable and hose clamp had the highest construct stiffness and least reduction in stiffness with increased loading. They were not demonstrably different from each other. PMID:25765131

  18. Distal Humeral Fixation of an Intramedullary Nail Periprosthetic Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Divecha, Hiren M.; Marynissen, Hans A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Distal humeral periprosthetic fractures below intramedullary nail devices are complex and challenging to treat, in particular due to the osteopenic/porotic nature of bone found in these patients. Fixation is often difficult to satisfactorily achieve around the intramedullary device, whilst minimising soft tissue disruption. Descriptions of such cases in the current literature are very rare. We present the case of a midshaft humeral fracture treated with a locking compression plate that developed a nonunion, in a 60-year old female. This went on to successful union after exchange for an intramedullary humeral nail. Unfortunately, the patient developed a distal 1/5th humeral periprosthetic fracture, which was then successfully addressed with a single-contoured, extra-articular, distal humeral locking compression plate (Synthes) with unicortical locking screws and cerclage cables proximally around the distal nail tip region. An excellent postoperative range of motion was achieved. PMID:23662231

  19. [Osteosynthesis after periprosthetic fractures of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    von Matthey, F; Ruchholtz, S; Biberthaler, P; Hanschen, M

    2016-04-01

    Periprosthetic fractures around the knee joint are of increasing relevance due to increasing numbers of total knee replacements and increasing life expectations. These fractures can be a real challenge due to an often limited patient compliance, reduced bone quality and impaired bone perfusion of potential intramedullary shafts resulting in poor healing and lack of fixation options for screws. These fractures necessitate special knowledge and approaches, which are systematically dealt with in this article, beginning with the correct diagnostics through to the most recent developments in the field of osteosynthetic techniques. The trends of minimally invasive techniques are presented and the options and limitations are described. PMID:26992714

  20. Outcomes of Surgical Treatment of Periprosthetic Femoral Fractures in Cementless Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Wook; Lee, Jung-Ho; Park, Ji-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to evaluate the results of surgical treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures in cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). Materials and Methods From June 2002 to May 2012, 40 patients who could be followed-up for more than 1 year after surgery were enrolled in this study. The mean duration of follow-up was 28.5 months (range, 15-97 months) and the average age at the time of surgery was 71.5 years (range, 38-89 years). The fracture types were determined by using the Vancouver classification. Among intraoperative fractures, there were type A in 3 hips, type B2 in 2 hips and type B3 in one. Among postoperative fractures, type AG was present in 5 hips, type AL in 2 hips, type B1 in 15 hips, type B2 in 6 hips, type B3 in 3 hips, and type C in 3 hips. Evaluation of the results was based on bony union, stability of the prosthesis, postoperative complications, and Harris hip score at the final follow-up. Results Bony union was achieved in all but one case and the average time for bony union was 21 weeks. The mean Harris hip score was 86 at the final follow-up. Clinical results were above good in 34 of 40 hips (85.0%). Stem loosening occurred in one patient with a type B1 fracture treated with open reduction and plate fixation. Nonunion was observed in 1 patient with an AG type fracture. Conclusion Open reduction and fixation using a plate with a screw and cerclage wiring provided good results for periprosthetic fractures in patients who had a stable femoral stem without bone defects. Revision surgery with a cementless long stem should be considered in patients with an unstable stem or suspected stability in B1 type of THA using a proximal fixation type. PMID:27536618

  1. Systematic review of periprosthetic tibia fracture after total knee arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Ebraheim, Nabil A; Ray, Joseph R; Wandtke, Meghan E; Buchanan, Grant S; Sanford, Chris G; Liu, Jiayong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the known incidences, treatment options, and related outcomes of periprosthetic tibia fractures after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A literature search was done to identify studies that fit the inclusion criteria. The database search yielded 185 results, which were further reduced by the exclusion criteria to 13 papers, totaling 157 patients that met these criteria. Incidence rates of the different types of periprosthetic tibia fractures were determined and their treatments were subsequently analyzed based on the fracture’s subclass, with patient outcomes being overall favorable. RESULTS: Of the 144 documented patients, 54 (37.5%) had a subclass C fracture, which are frequently seen in revision arthroplasties or when using cement intraoperatively. The fractures of subclasses A and B occur postoperatively. There were 90 subclass A and B fractures with incidences of 18.75% and 43.75% respectively. When broken down by type, 62 (55.36%) were type 1, 24 (21.4%) were type 2, 24 (21.4%) were type 3, and 2 (1.8%) were type 4. Furthermore, from the studies that included origin of injury, the types were further classified as having non-traumatic or traumatic origins. Type 1 had 78% (40/51) non-traumatic origin and 22% (11/51) traumatic origin. Fifteen fractures were type 2, but 5 were falls and 1 through a motor vehicle accident, giving a trauma causation of 40% (6/15). Of the 24 type 3 fractures, 12 were falls and 2 vehicular accidents, leading to a trauma causation of 58% (14/24). CONCLUSION: Type 1 fractures were the most common. Subclass A was treated with locking plates, B required a revision TKA, and C was treated intraoperatively or nonoperatively. PMID:26396942

  2. Enhancing fixation strength in periprosthetic femur fractures by orthogonal plating-A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Mark; Stoffel, Karl; Gueorguiev, Boyko; Klos, Kajetan; Kielstein, Heike; Hofmann, Gunther O

    2016-04-01

    Orthogonal plate osteosynthesis enhances fixation stability in periprosthetic femur fractures. Another option are locking attachment plates (LAP) allowing bicortical locking screw placement lateral to the prosthesis stem. Stability of lateral plate osteosynthesis with two LAP (2LAP) was compared to anterolateral orthogonal plate osteosynthesis (OP) with one LAP in a periprosthetic femur fracture model. In six pairs of fresh frozen human femora with cemented Charnley hip prosthesis, a transverse osteotomy was set distal to the tip of the prosthesis simulating a Vancouver type B1 fracture. Each pair was instrumented using a plate tensioner with either one lateral plate and two LAP, or two orthogonal anterolateral plates and one LAP. Stiffness was determined in a four-point-bending test prior to cyclic testing (2Hz) with physiologic profile and progressively increasing load up to catastrophic construct failure. Paired t-test and Wilcoxon-signed-rank test were used for statistical evaluation at a level of significance p = 0.05. The OP construct exhibited a significantly higher number of cycles and load to failure (39,627 cycles ± 4,056; 4,463 N ± 906) compared to the 2LAP construct (32,927 cycles ± 3,487; 3,793 N ± 849), p < 0.01. Mediolateral bending and torsional stiffness of the OP (1610 N/mm ± 249; 16.9 Nm/mm ± 6.3) were significantly higher compared to 2 LAP (1077 N/mm ± 189; 12.1 Nm/mm ± 3.9), p = 0.03 for both comparisons. Orthogonal plate osteosynthesis is a valuable option in periprosthetic fracture surgery, offering increased stability compared to a single lateral plate fixed with two LAP. PMID:26447634

  3. Peri-prosthetic fracture vibration testing

    SciTech Connect

    Cruce, Jesse R; Erwin, Jenny R; Remick, Kevin R; Cornwell, Phillip J; Menegini, R. Michael; Racanelli, Joe

    2011-01-28

    The purpose of this study is to establish a test setup and vibration analysis method to predict femoral stem seating and prevent bone fracture using accelerometer or force response data from an instrument stem and impactor. This study builds upon earlier studies to identify a means to supplement a surgeon's tactile and auditory senses by using damage identification techniques normally used for civil and mechanical structures. Testing will be conducted using foam cortical shell sawbones prepared for stems of different geometries. Each stem will be instrumented with an accelerometer. Two impactor designs will be compared: a monolithic impactor with an integrated load cell and accelerometer and a two piece impactor. Acceleration and force measurements will be taken in the direction of impaction. Signal processing techniques will be applied to the acceleration time histories to determine features that can be used to assess device seating and potential fracture. A consistent energy input will be applied using a drop tower. The effect of introducing compliance under the bone support vise will also be investigated. The ultimate goal of this study is to design an integrated portable data acquisition system capable of being used in future cadaveric testing. This paper will discuss the experimental set-up, the signal processing techniques used and the subsequent results.

  4. [Periprosthetic humeral fractures: Strategies and techniques for osteosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, C; Brunner, U; Biberthaler, P

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of periprosthetic humeral fractures (PHF) is currently low and accounts for 0.6-2.4%. Due to an increase in the rate of primary implantations a quantitative increase of PHF is to be expected in the near future. The majority of PHF occur intraoperatively during implantation with an increased risk for cementless stems and when performing total arthroplasty. Additional risk factors are in particular female gender and the severity of comorbidities. In contrast, postoperative PHF mostly due to low-energy falls, have a prevalence between 0.6% and 0.9% and are significantly less common. The prognosis and functional outcome following revision by open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) essentially depend on a thorough assessment of the indications for revision surgery, the operative treatment and the pretraumatic functional condition of the affected shoulder. In the armamentarium of periprosthetic ORIF of the humerus cerclage systems and locking implants as well as a combination of both play a central role. In comminuted fractures with extensive defect zones, severely thinned cortex or extensive osteolysis a biological augmentation of the ORIF should be considered. In this context when the indications are correctly interpreted, especially in the case of a stable anchored stem, various groups have reported that a high bony union rate can be achieved. As the treatment of PHF is complex it should be performed in dedicated centers in order to adequately address potential comorbidities, especially in the elderly population. PMID:27008215

  5. Peri-prosthetic fracture vibration testing

    SciTech Connect

    Cruce, Jesse R; Erwin, Jenny R; Remick, Kevin R; Cornwell, Phillip J; Menegini, R. Michael; Racanelli, Joe

    2010-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to establish a test setup and vibration analysis method to predict femoral stem seating and prevent bone fracture using accelerometer and force response data from an instrumented stem and impactor. This study builds upon earlier studies to identify a means to supplement a surgeon's tactile and auditory senses by using damage identification techniques normally used for civil and mechanical structures. Testing was conducted using foam cortical shell sawbones prepared for stems of different geometries. Each stem was instrumented with an accelerometer. Two impactor designs were compared: a monolithic impactor and a two-piece impactor, each with an integrated load cell and accelerometer. Acceleration and force measurements were taken in the direction of impaction. Comparisons between different methods of applying an impacting force were made, including a drop tower and a surgical hammer. The effect of varying compliance on the data was also investigated. The ultimate goal of this study was to assist in the design of an integrated portable data acquisition system capable of being used in future cadaveric testing. This paper will discuss the experimental setup and the subsequent results of the comparisons made between impactors, prosthetic geometries, compliances, and impact methods. The results of this study can be used for both future replicate testing as well as in a cadaveric environment.

  6. The biomechanical effect of bone quality and fracture topography on locking plate fixation in periprosthetic femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Leonidou, Andreas; Moazen, Mehran; Lepetsos, Panagiotis; Graham, Simon M; Macheras, George A; Tsiridis, Eleftherios

    2015-02-01

    Optimal management of periprosthetic femoral fractures (PFF) around a well fixed prosthesis (Vancouver B1) remains controversial as adequate fixation needs to be achieved without compromising the stability of the prosthesis. The aim of this study was to highlight the effect of bone quality i.e. canal thickness ratio (CTR), and fracture topography i.e. fracture angle and its position in relation to the stem, on the biomechanics of a locking plate for a Vancouver B1 fracture. A previously corroborated simplified finite element model of a femur with a cemented total hip replacement stem was used in this study. Canal thickness ratio (CTR) and fracture topography were altered in several models and the effect of these variations on the von Mises stress on the locking plate as well as the fracture displacement was studied. Increasing the CTR led to reduction of the von Mises stress on the locking plate as well as the fracture movement. In respect to the fracture angle with the medial cortex, it was shown that acute angles resulted in lower von Mises stress on the plate as opposed to obtuse angles. Furthermore, acute fracture angles resulted in lower fracture displacement compared to the other fractures considered here. Fractures around the tip of the stem had the same biomechanical effect on the locking plate. However, fractures more distal to the stem led to subsequent increase of stress, strain, and fracture displacement. Results highlight that in good bone quality and acute fracture angles, single locking plate fixation is perhaps an appropriate management method. On the contrary, for poor bone quality and obtuse fracture angles alternative management methods might be required as the fixation might be under higher risk of failure. Clinical studies for the management of PFF are required to further support our findings. PMID:25467710

  7. [Periprosthetic humeral fractures: Strategies and techniques of revision arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, C; Beirer, M; Brunner, U

    2016-04-01

    The primary aims when performing revision arthroplasty of periprosthetic humeral fractures (PHF) are preservation of bone stock, achieving fracture healing and preserving a stable prosthesis with the focus on regaining the preoperative shoulder-arm function. The indications for revision arthroplasty are given in PHF in combination with loosening of the stem. In addition, further factors must be independently clarified in the case of an anatomical arthroplasty. In this context secondary glenoid erosion as well as rotator cuff insufficiency are potential factors for an extended revision procedure. For the performance of revision surgery modular revision sets including long stems, revision glenoid and metaglene components as well as plate and cerclage systems are obligatory besides the explantation instrumentation. Despite a loosened prosthesis, a transhumeral removal of the stem along with a subpectoral fenestration are often required. Length as well as bracing of revision stems need to bridge the fracture by at least twice the humeral diameter. Moreover, in many cases a combined procedure using an additional distal open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) plus cable cerclages as well as biological augmentation might be needed. Assuming an adequate preparation, the experienced surgeon is able to achieve a high fracture union rate along with an acceptable or even good shoulder function and to avoid further complications. PMID:26992713

  8. Periprosthetic femoral fractures around well fixed implants: a simple method of fixation using LC-DCP with trochanteric purchase.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ramesh; Prasad, Prabhudev; Kumar, Senthil; Nagi, Onkarnath

    2007-04-01

    Periprosthetic fractures of the femur are among the most serious complications in hip surgery. Various classifications have been suggested. At present the Vancouver classification system probably comes closest to the ideal. Most authors recommend internal fixation of the fractures in well-fixed implants (Vancouver type B1). However as the fixation to the proximal fragment has always been a problem, many types of fixation devices have been used. This retrospective study was done to evaluate the efficacy of an LC-DCP with trochanteric purchase, in the fixation of Vancouver type B1 periprosthetic femoral fractures. Our study included 12 patients, 7 male and 5 female with a mean age of 73 years (range: 57 to 91). One patient died due to complications not related to surgery and in another patient the plate was found broken with a loose implant, which was revised. All cases were primary arthroplasties. A long broad LC-DCP was used for the fixation. Purchase in the proximal fragment was obtained with screws in the greater trochanter. Ten fractures united in an average period of 7 months. The mean duration of follow-up was 6.5 years. The final results were evaluated using the Harris hip score. The mean Harris hip score was 85 with a range of 75 to 94. PMID:17515232

  9. Prevalence and risk factors for periprosthetic fracture in older recipients of total hip replacement: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The growing utilization of total joint replacement will increase the frequency of its complications, including periprosthetic fracture. The prevalence and risk factors of periprosthetic fracture require further study, particularly over the course of long-term follow-up. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence and risk factors for periprosthetic fractures occurring in recipients of total hip replacement. Methods We identified Medicare beneficiaries who had elective primary total hip replacement (THR) for non-fracture diagnoses between July 1995 and June 1996. We followed them using Medicare Part A claims data through 2008. We used ICD-9 codes to identify periprosthetic femoral fractures occurring from 2006–2008. We used the incidence density method to calculate the annual incidence of these fractures and Cox proportional hazards models to identify risk factors for periprosthetic fracture. We also calculated the risk of hospitalization over the subsequent year. Results Of 58,521 Medicare beneficiaries who had elective primary THR between July 1995 and June 1996, 32,463 (55%) survived until January 2006. Of these, 215 (0.7%) developed a periprosthetic femoral fracture between 2006 and 2008. The annual incidence of periprosthetic fracture among these individuals was 26 per 10,000 person-years. In the Cox model, a greater risk of periprosthetic fracture was associated with having had a total knee replacement (HR 1.82, 95% CI 1.30, 2.55) or a revision total hip replacement (HR1.40, 95% CI 0.95, 2.07) between the primary THR and 2006. Compared to those without fractures, THR recipients who sustained periprosthetic femoral fracture had three-fold higher risk of hospitalization in the subsequent year (89% vs. 27%, p < 0.0001). Conclusion A decade after primary THR, periprosthetic fractures occur annually in 26 per 10,000 persons and are especially frequent in those with prior total knee or revision total hip replacements. PMID:24885707

  10. Distal humeral plating of an intramedullary nail periprosthetic fracture using a miss-a-nail technique: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ravi; Corbett, Steven A

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of distal humeral periprosthetic fractures is not widely described in the literature. We present a difficult clinical scenario of a 72-year-old man who sustained a displaced distal humeral periprosthetic fracture about a Polarus Plus intramedullary nail. In this case, stable fixation was achieved using bicondylar Acumed Mayo congruent Plates using a miss-a-nail technique. Four months following the post operative period, the patient regained satisfactory range of movement with full function and no further complications up to 18 months post fixation. Treatment of such complex periprosthetic fractures is technically achievable and with potentially good results. PMID:19829846

  11. Concepts and Potential Future Developments for Treatment of Periprosthetic Proximal Femoral Fractures.

    PubMed

    Brand, Stephan; Ettinger, Max; Omar, Mohamed; Hawi, Nael; Krettek, Christian; Petri, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic proximal femoral fractures are a major challenge for the orthopaedic surgeon, with a continuously increasing incidence due to aging populations and concordantly increasing numbers of total hip replacements. Surgical decision-making mainly depends on the stability of the arthroplasty, and the quality of bone stock. As patients final outcomes mainly depend on early mobilization, a high primary stability of the construct is of particular relevance. Osteosynthetic procedures are usually applied for fractures with a stable arthroplasty, while fractures with a loosened endoprosthesis commonly require revision arthroplasty. Osteoporotic bone with insufficient anchoring substance for screws poses one major concern for cases with well-fixed arthroplasties. Complication rates and perioperative mortality have remained unacceptably high, emphasizing the need for new innovations in the treatment of periprosthetic fractures. Transprosthetic drilling of screws through the hip stem as the most solid and reliable part in the patient might represent a promising future approach, with auspicious results in recent biomechanical studies. PMID:26401164

  12. Concepts and Potential Future Developments for Treatment of Periprosthetic Proximal Femoral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Stephan; Ettinger, Max; Omar, Mohamed; Hawi, Nael; Krettek, Christian; Petri, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic proximal femoral fractures are a major challenge for the orthopaedic surgeon, with a continuously increasing incidence due to aging populations and concordantly increasing numbers of total hip replacements. Surgical decision-making mainly depends on the stability of the arthroplasty, and the quality of bone stock. As patients final outcomes mainly depend on early mobilization, a high primary stability of the construct is of particular relevance. Osteosynthetic procedures are usually applied for fractures with a stable arthroplasty, while fractures with a loosened endoprosthesis commonly require revision arthroplasty. Osteoporotic bone with insufficient anchoring substance for screws poses one major concern for cases with well-fixed arthroplasties. Complication rates and perioperative mortality have remained unacceptably high, emphasizing the need for new innovations in the treatment of periprosthetic fractures. Transprosthetic drilling of screws through the hip stem as the most solid and reliable part in the patient might represent a promising future approach, with auspicious results in recent biomechanical studies. PMID:26401164

  13. TIBIAL PERIPROSTHETIC FRACTURE COMBINED WITH TIBIAL STEM STRESS FRACTURE FROM TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Fernando; Rebelo, Edgar; Completo, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty complications related to the prosthetic material are very rare, except for polyethylene wear. We report the case of a 58-year-old woman who came to the emergency service of our hospital with a periprosthetic tibial fracture (Mayo Clinic type I). Careful examination showed that this fracture was concomitantly associated with a tibial stem fatigue fracture. The prosthesis and the stem were sent to an independent biomechanics laboratory for evaluation. A finite-element CAD system was used to make a reconstruction, so as to ascertain whether there had been any manufacturing defect and what the causes of the event might have been. After evaluation of several hypotheses, it was concluded that the fracture in the prosthetic material had been caused by overloading at the plate/stem transition zone secondary to previous bone failure (fracture). From the evaluation of this case, the need to make appropriate assessment of bone mineralization can again be emphasized. In cases of doubt, a longer stem should be used. PMID:27047838

  14. TIBIAL PERIPROSTHETIC FRACTURE COMBINED WITH TIBIAL STEM STRESS FRACTURE FROM TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fernando; Rebelo, Edgar; Completo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty complications related to the prosthetic material are very rare, except for polyethylene wear. We report the case of a 58-year-old woman who came to the emergency service of our hospital with a periprosthetic tibial fracture (Mayo Clinic type I). Careful examination showed that this fracture was concomitantly associated with a tibial stem fatigue fracture. The prosthesis and the stem were sent to an independent biomechanics laboratory for evaluation. A finite-element CAD system was used to make a reconstruction, so as to ascertain whether there had been any manufacturing defect and what the causes of the event might have been. After evaluation of several hypotheses, it was concluded that the fracture in the prosthetic material had been caused by overloading at the plate/stem transition zone secondary to previous bone failure (fracture). From the evaluation of this case, the need to make appropriate assessment of bone mineralization can again be emphasized. In cases of doubt, a longer stem should be used. PMID:27047838

  15. Periprosthetic Insufficiency Fracture around Radiographically Loose Cemented Stem: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Young Soo; Lee, Jung Suk; Cho, Yoon Je

    2015-01-01

    As the osteoporotic patient population grows, various periprosthetic fractures that cannot be classified appropriately can occur around the femur after hip arthroplasty. We experienced two cases of periprosthetic insufficiency fractures at subtrochanteric area of the femurs around radiographically loose cemented femoral stems. The ages of the patients were 75 years and 83 years. Both patients could not recall any history of trauma before the onset of pain. Both were treated non-operatively. Both healed uneventfully and did not recur after two years of follow up. When the osteoporotic patient with cemented stem showed sudden hip or thigh pain without a history of trauma, great attention should be focused to find this lesion. PMID:27536623

  16. Spontaneous Acetabular Periprosthetic Fracture in a Patient Continuously Having Zoledronic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Tantavisut, Saran; Thanakit, Voranuch; Ngarmukos, Srihatach; Wilairatana, Vajara; Wangroongsub, Yongsak

    2014-01-01

    Zoledronic acid has been used for prevention of osteolytic and osteoblastic bone metastasis. This case report illustrates an undesirable consequence from prolonged usage of zoledronic acid in bone metastasis prevention. Periprosthetic acetabular fracture in a patient treated with zoledronic acid for 7 years was reported. The clinical presentation, radiographic and pathological results were described. This is a rare complication after total hip arthroplasty which should not be ignored especially in patients who received long term bisphosphonate. PMID:25177464

  17. Management of distal femoral periprosthetic fractures by distal femoral locking plate: A retrospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Thukral, Rajiv; Marya, SKS; Singh, Chandeep

    2015-01-01

    Background: Management of periprosthetic supracondylar femoral fractures is difficult. Osteoporosis, comminution and bone loss, compromise stability with delayed mobility and poor functional outcomes. Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) with anatomic distal femoral (DF) locking plate permits early mobilization. However, this usually necessitates bone grafting (BG). Biological fixation using minimally invasive techniques minimizes periosteal stripping and morbidity. Materials and Methods: 31 patients with comminuted periprosthetic DF fractures were reviewed retrospectively from October 2006 to September 2012. All patients underwent fixation using a DF locking compression plate (Synthes). 17 patients underwent ORIF with primary BG, whereas 14 were treated by closed reduction (CR) and internal fixation using biological minimally invasive techniques. Clinical and radiological followup were recorded for an average 36 months. Results: Mean time to union for the entire group was 5.6 months (range 3-9 months). Patients of ORIF group took longer (Mean 6.4 months, range 4.5-9 months) than the CR group (mean 4.6 months, range 3-7 months). Three patients of ORIF and one in CR group had poor results. Mean knee society scores were higher for CR group at 6 months, but nearly identical at 12 months, with similar eventual range of motion. Discussion: Locked plating of comminuted periprosthetic DF fractures permits stable rigid fixation and early mobilization. Fixation using minimally invasive biological techniques minimizes morbidity and may obviate the need for primary BG. PMID:26015610

  18. Periprosthetic fractures around the femoral stem: overcoming challenges and avoiding pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Antonia F.

    2015-01-01

    Management of periprosthetic fractures around the femoral stem after total hip arthroplasty (THA) represents a significant challenge and optimal treatment remains controversial. The most common treatment paradigm involves treating fractures around a well-fixed stem with osteosynthesis, whereas fractures around a loose stem require revision arthroplasty and those with poor bone require augmentation with bone graft. Paradoxically, the literature reports a higher rate of failure for osteosynthesis around prostheses considered to be well-fixed. Such a high rate of poor outcomes may result not only from difficult fracture fixation and compromised biologic healing, but also from unrecognized peri-implant pathology. Therefore, proper preoperative and intraoperative evaluation is key, and a subset of patients may benefit from alternative management. We review the appropriate methods for evaluation and treatment of Vancouver type B fractures with particular emphasis on avoiding missteps that can lead to failure. PMID:26539451

  19. Could Patient Undergwent Surgical Treatment for Periprosthetic Femoral Fracture after Hip Arthroplasty Return to Their Status before Trauma?

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Long; Lee, Woo-Yong; Kang, Chan; Noh, Chang-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare preoperative clinical outcomes before occurrence of periprosthetic femoral fracture (status before trauma) with postoperative clinical outcomes (status after operation) in patients with periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods A retrospective review was performed of all periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty treated surgically at our institution from January 2010 to January 2014. Among 29 patients who underwent surgical treatment for periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty, 3 patients excluded because of non-union of the fracture site. The clinical outcomes were determined by using visual analogue scale for pain (VAS), Harris hip score (HHS), and ambulatory ability using Koval classification. VAS, HHS and ambulatory ability was assessed for all the included patients at the last follow-up of status before trauma and after operation. Results The mean VAS, HHS and ambulatory ability at the last follow-up of status before trauma was 2.2 (range, 0-4), 78.9 (range, 48-92) and 1.9 (range, 1-5), respectively. The mean VAS, HHS and ambulatory ability at the last follow-up of status after operation was 3.1 (range, 1-5), 68.4 (range, 46-81) and 2.9 (range, 2-6), respectively. The clinical outcome of VAS, HHS and ambulatory ability were significantly worsened after surgical treatment for periprosthetic femoral fracture (P=0.010, P=0.001, and P=0.002, respectively). Conclusion Patients with periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty could not return to their status before trauma, although patients underwent appropriate surgical treatment and the fracture union achieved. PMID:27536650

  20. Periprosthetic humeral fracture after Copeland resurfacing and the role of revision arthroplasty: A report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Simon Bruce Murdoch; Mangat, Karanjit; Nandra, Rajpal; Kalogrianitis, Socrates

    2015-01-01

    Follow-up series of the Copeland resurfacing hemiarthroplasty have reported few postoperative fractures around the prosthesis. We report three cases of periprosthetic fracture around a Copeland resurfacing arthroplasty. Due to prosthetic loosening and tuberosity comminution, all cases were managed with revision shoulder arthroplasty. All patients had good functional outcome and range of movement on early follow-up. PMID:26622129

  1. A case report of periprosthetic fracture left proximal humerus with radial nerve palsy following pectoralis major repair

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jaydeep; Marson, Ben A

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Primary repair of pectoralis major tendon with bony tunnels and anchor sutures in the proximal humerus creates a potential weakness and stress riser leading to increased risk of periprosthetic fracture and nerve damage at the site of weakness with subsequent injury, if not allowed to heal satisfactorily with adequate period of rest. PMID:26185650

  2. Revision arthroplasty for periprosthetic femoral fracture using an uncemented modular tapered conical stem.

    PubMed

    da Assunção, R E; Pollard, T C B; Hrycaiczuk, A; Curry, J; Glyn-Jones, S; Taylor, A

    2015-08-01

    Periprosthetic femoral fracture (PFF) is a potentially devastating complication after total hip arthroplasty, with historically high rates of complication and failure because of the technical challenges of surgery, as well as the prevalence of advanced age and comorbidity in the patients at risk. This study describes the short-term outcome after revision arthroplasty using a modular, titanium, tapered, conical stem for PFF in a series of 38 fractures in 37 patients. The mean age of the cohort was 77 years (47 to 96). A total of 27 patients had an American Society of Anesthesiologists grade of at least 3. At a mean follow-up of 35 months (4 to 66) the mean Oxford Hip Score (OHS) was 35 (15 to 48) and comorbidity was significantly associated with a poorer OHS. All fractures united and no stem needed to be revised. Three hips in three patients required further surgery for infection, recurrent PFF and recurrent dislocation and three other patients required closed manipulation for a single dislocation. One stem subsided more than 5 mm but then stabilised and required no further intervention. In this series, a modular, tapered, conical stem provided a versatile reconstruction solution with a low rate of complications. PMID:26224817

  3. Impact of intraprosthetic drilling on the strength of the femoral stem in periprosthetic fractures: A finite element investigation.

    PubMed

    Brand, Stephan; Bauer, Michael; Petri, Maximilian; Schrader, Julian; Maier, Hans J; Krettek, Christian; Hassel, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of periprosthetic femur fractures after total hip arthroplasty remains a major challenge in orthopedic surgery. Recently, a novel surgical technique using intraprosthetic screw fixation has been suggested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of drilling the femoral hip stem on integrity and strength of the implant. The hypothesis was that intraprosthetic drilling and screw fixation would not cause the load limit of the prosthesis to be exceeded and that deformation would remain within the elastic limit. A sawbone model with a conventional straight hip stem was used and a Vancouver C periprosthetic fracture was created. The fracture was fixed with a nine-hole less invasive stabilization system plate with two screws drilled and inserted through the femoral hip stem. Three different finite element models were created using ANSYS software. The models increased in complexity including joint forces and stress risers from three different dimensions. A variation of drilling positions was analyzed. Due to the complexity of the physiological conditions in the human femur, the most complex finite element model provided the most realistic results. Overall, significant changes in the stresses to the prosthesis caused by the drilling procedure were observed. While the stresses at the site of the bore hole decreased, the load increased in the surrounding stem material. This effect is more pronounced and further the holes were apart, and it was found that increasing the number of holes could counteract this. The maximum load was still found to be in the area of the prosthesis neck. No stresses above the load limit of titanium alloy were detected. All deformations of the prosthesis stem remained in the elastic range. These results may indicate a potential role for intraprosthetic screw fixation in the future treatment of periprosthetic femur fractures. PMID:27272200

  4. Early Definitive Fixation of an Open Periprosthetic Femur Fracture in the Polytraumatized Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Aleem, Ilyas S; Bhandari, Mohit; Elizalde, Sebastian Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Periprosthetic fractures of the femur after total hip arthroplasty are increasing in frequency. In the polytraumatized patient with long-bone fracture, an ongoing debate exists regarding early definitive stabilization versus initial damage control orthopaedics, followed by delayed fixation. It remains to be seen whether this rationale applies to the polytraumatized patient with periprosthetic fracture. Case presentation: We present the case of a 73-years old Caucasian woman who sustained bilateral Gustillo-Anderson grade III open femur fractures; the fracture on the right was a Vancouver C open periprosthetic fracture after cemented total hip arthroplasty. After massive fluid resuscitation in the trauma bay she was taken to the intensive care unit in a hemodynamically unstable condition. She was subsequently operated and underwent early definitive fixation of both femurs with the rationale of potentially reducing pulmonary complications and promoting early mobilization. Conclusion: Early definitive stabilization versus delayed fixation in the polytraumatized patient with an open periprosthetic femur fracture is reviewed. Although several treatment algorithms based on fracture classification and implant stability exist, further study is required to delineate the preferred method and timeline of fixation for this growing cohort of patients. PMID:27299122

  5. Survival of ceramic bearings in total hip replacement after high-energy trauma and periprosthetic acetabular fracture.

    PubMed

    Salih, S; Currall, V A; Ward, A J; Chesser, T J S

    2009-11-01

    Surgeons remain concerned that ceramic hip prostheses may fail catastrophically if either the head or the liner is fractured. We report two patients, each with a ceramic-on-ceramic total hip replacement who sustained high-energy trauma sufficient to cause a displaced periprosthetic acetabular fracture in whom the ceramic bearings survived intact. Simultaneous fixation of the acetabular fracture, revision of the cementless acetabular prosthesis and exchange of the ceramic bearings were performed successfully in both patients. Improved methods of manufacture of new types of alumina ceramic with a smaller grain size, and lower porosity, have produced much stronger bearings. Whether patients should be advised to restrict high-impact activities in order to protect these modern ceramic bearings from fracture remains controversial. PMID:19880903

  6. The effect of delay to surgery on morbidity, mortality and length of stay following periprosthetic fracture around the hip.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Lynn, Sarah; Ngu, Albert; Holland, Jim; Carluke, Ian; Fearon, Paul

    2016-03-01

    With the increasing prevalence of total hip arthroplasty and the increasing longevity of patients with implants in situ, periprosthetic fractures of the proximal femur are seen with greater frequency. They represent a challenging surgical problem, requiring combined arthroplasty and trauma skills in a potentially compromised surgical bed. We present data from the 82 consecutive patients with periprosthetic fractures around the hip presenting to two NHS Foundation Trusts in the period January 2009 to February 2014. Inpatient mortality across all sites was 11.0%. This increased to 17.1% at 1 year. There was no association between delay to surgery and either inpatient or 1 year mortality. Mean delay to surgery was 4.1 days in those without inpatient mortality, 5.2 days in those with (p=0.3075). Mean delay to surgery was 4.5 days in those with 1 year mortality, 4.16 days in those without (p=0.6203). The number of post-operative complications was not significantly positively correlated with increasing delay to surgery (Pearson correlation coefficient -0.04437). It would appear that a delay to order necessary equipment and obtain relevant surgical expertise for the treatment of these complex fractures is safe and not associated with increased mortality or post-operative complications. PMID:26653266

  7. Clinical characteristics and risk factors of periprosthetic femoral fractures associated with hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhendong; Zhuo, Qi; Chai, Wei; Ni, Ming; Li, Heng; Chen, Jiying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Periprosthetic femoral fracture (PFF) is a complicated complication of both primary and revision hip arthroplasty with an increasing incidence. The present study aimed to summarize the clinical characteristics and identify the risk factors for PFF which would be potentially helpful in the prevention and treatment of PFF. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 89 cases of PFF, and a case–control study was designed to identify the potential risk for intraoperative and postoperative PFF in both primary and revision hip arthroplasty. The overall incidence of PFF was 2.08% (intraoperative: 1.77%, postoperative: 0.30%, revision: 13.60%, and primary: 0.97%). The most commonly used treatment strategy was fixation with cerclage wire or band for intraoperative PFF, whereas long stem revision with plate or cortical allograft strut fixation was the main treatment strategy for postoperative PFF. The risk factors for intraoperative PFF in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) included the diagnosis of development dysplasia of the hip (DDH) (odds ratio [OR] = 5.01, 95%CI, 1.218–20.563, P=0.03) and CBR ≥ 0.49 (OR = 3.34, 95%CI, 1.138–9.784, P = 0.03). The increased age was associated with increased incidence of postoperative PFF in primary THA (OR = 1.09, 95%CI, 1.001–1.194, P = 0.04). As for the intraoperative PFF in revision THA, we found that receiving multiple operations before revision (OR = 2.45, 95%CI, 1.06–5.66, P = 0.04), revisions due to prosthetic joint infection (OR = 6.72, 95%CI, 1.007–44.832, P = 0.04), the presence of cementless implant before revision (OR = 13.54, 95%CI, 3.103–59.08, P = 0.001), and femoral deformity (OR = 8.03, 95%CI, 1.656–38.966, P = 0.01) were all risk factors. Screening for high-risk patients, preoperative templating, and detailed discharge instructions may be the potential strategies to reduce the incidence of PFF. The treatment of PFFs should take

  8. Clinical characteristics and risk factors of periprosthetic femoral fractures associated with hip arthroplasty: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhendong; Zhuo, Qi; Chai, Wei; Ni, Ming; Li, Heng; Chen, Jiying

    2016-08-01

    Periprosthetic femoral fracture (PFF) is a complicated complication of both primary and revision hip arthroplasty with an increasing incidence. The present study aimed to summarize the clinical characteristics and identify the risk factors for PFF which would be potentially helpful in the prevention and treatment of PFF.We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 89 cases of PFF, and a case-control study was designed to identify the potential risk for intraoperative and postoperative PFF in both primary and revision hip arthroplasty.The overall incidence of PFF was 2.08% (intraoperative: 1.77%, postoperative: 0.30%, revision: 13.60%, and primary: 0.97%). The most commonly used treatment strategy was fixation with cerclage wire or band for intraoperative PFF, whereas long stem revision with plate or cortical allograft strut fixation was the main treatment strategy for postoperative PFF. The risk factors for intraoperative PFF in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) included the diagnosis of development dysplasia of the hip (DDH) (odds ratio [OR] = 5.01, 95%CI, 1.218-20.563, P=0.03) and CBR ≥ 0.49 (OR = 3.34, 95%CI, 1.138-9.784, P = 0.03). The increased age was associated with increased incidence of postoperative PFF in primary THA (OR = 1.09, 95%CI, 1.001-1.194, P = 0.04). As for the intraoperative PFF in revision THA, we found that receiving multiple operations before revision (OR = 2.45, 95%CI, 1.06-5.66, P = 0.04), revisions due to prosthetic joint infection (OR = 6.72, 95%CI, 1.007-44.832, P = 0.04), the presence of cementless implant before revision (OR = 13.54, 95%CI, 3.103-59.08, P = 0.001), and femoral deformity (OR = 8.03, 95%CI, 1.656-38.966, P = 0.01) were all risk factors.Screening for high-risk patients, preoperative templating, and detailed discharge instructions may be the potential strategies to reduce the incidence of PFF. The treatment of PFFs should take into account Vancouver

  9. Use of Cemented Spacer with a Handmade Stem to Treat Acute Periprosthetic Tibial Fracture Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Font-Vizcarra, LluÍs; Izquierdo, Oscar; GarcÍa-NuÑo, Laura; GonzÁlez, Araceli; Diaz-Brito, VicenÇ; Castellanos, Juan

    2014-01-01

    We report an 85-year-old woman with dementia and dependent for normal life activities who was admitted due to a left periprosthetic tibial fracture. The tibial component was replaced by one with a long stem and she was discharged. Four weeks after the intervention the patient was re-admitted due to an acute prosthetic joint infection. All the components were removed and a bone-cement spacer with a handmade stem with a metal core was implanted. Radiological signs of fracture consolidation were observed after 3 months of follow-up. Due to the previous health status of the patient, it was decided to keep the spacer as a definitive treatment. After 24 months, the patient was able to sit without pain and to stand up with help using a knee brace. There were no radiological or clinical signs of infection. PMID:24551027

  10. Better Axial Stiffness of a Bicortical Screw Construct Compared to a Cable Construct for Comminuted Vancouver B1 Proximal Femoral Fractures.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Jamie T; Taheri, Arash; Day, Robert E; Yates, Piers J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to biomechanically evaluate the Locking attachment plate (LAP) construct in comparison to a Cable plate construct, for the fixation of periprosthetic femoral fractures after cemented total hip arthroplasty. Each construct incorporated a locking compression plate with bi-cortical locking screws for distal fixation. In the Cable construct, 2 cables and 2 uni-cortical locking screws were used for proximal fixation. In the LAP construct, the cables were replaced by a LAP with 4 bi-cortical locking screws. The LAP construct was significantly stiffer than the cable construct under axial load with a bone gap (P=0.01). The LAP construct offers better axial stiffness compared to the cable construct in the fixation of comminuted Vancouver B1 proximal femoral fractures. PMID:26239233

  11. Biomechanical evaluation of adjunctive cerclage wire fixation for the prevention of periprosthetic femur fractures using cementless press-fit total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Scott A; Kim, Stanley E; Roe, Simon; Pozzi, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Periprosthetic femoral fractures are a common complication associated with cementless press-fit total hip arthroplasty. The use of prophylactic cerclage wire fixation has been advocated to reduce this complication. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a double loop cerclage wire, used as adjunctive fixation, increased the peak torsional load to failure in femora implanted with press-fit cementless stems. Peak torsional load to failure was compared between femora without adjunctive fixation and femora receiving a 1 mm double loop cerclage wire placed proximally to the lesser trochanter. Femora treated with adjunctive cerclage wire fixation failed at 20% greater peak torque (P = 0.0001). In conclusion, a double loop cerclage wire may aid in the prevention of periprosthetic fractures associated with press-fit cementless femoral stems. PMID:27387718

  12. Retrograde Intramedullary Nailing with a Blocking Pin Technique for Reduction of Periprosthetic Supracondylar Femoral Fracture after Total Knee Arthroplasty: Technical Note with a Compatibility Chart of the Nail to Femoral Component

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Daisuke; Takasago, Tomoya; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Suzue, Naoto; Sairyo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) present a clear management challenge, and retrograde intramedullary nails have recently gained widespread acceptance in treatment of these fractures. In two cases, we found a blocking screw technique, first reported by Krettek et al., was useful in the reduction of the fractures. Both patients attained preinjury mobility after intramedullary nailing. Moreover, we present a chart summarizing the notch designs of various femoral components because some prosthetic knee designs are not amenable to retrograde nailing. We hope this will be helpful in determining indications for retrograde nailing in periprosthetic fractures after TKA. PMID:25574411

  13. Traumatic Periprosthetic Acetabular Fracture Treated with One-Stage Exchange and Bone Reconstruction Using a Synthetic Bone Graft Substitute

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A case of a traumatic periprosthetic acetabular fracture in an elderly patient, which was treated by one-stage hip exchange with implantation of an antiprotrusio cage and reconstruction of the acetabular bone loss with an injectable calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite bone graft substitute, is reported. The paste-like bone graft substitute was injected through the holes of the antiprotrusio cage. After a setting time of 15 minutes, a low-profile cup was cemented onto the cage using polymethylmethacrylate and a new stem was inserted. The patient was encouraged to ambulate three days postoperatively weight-bearing as tolerated. At the one-year follow-up visit the patient was ambulatory and full weight-bearing without any walking aids. The follow-up radiographs demonstrated stable position and articulation of the revision hip arthroplasty with no signs of loosening of the antiprotrusio cage. However, the most interesting finding was that the bone graft substitute had remodelled to a great extent into bone. This calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite composite shows high osteoconductive potential and can be used to regenerate bone stock in revision arthroplasty. PMID:27446621

  14. Traumatic Periprosthetic Acetabular Fracture Treated with One-Stage Exchange and Bone Reconstruction Using a Synthetic Bone Graft Substitute.

    PubMed

    Svacina, Jan

    2016-01-01

    A case of a traumatic periprosthetic acetabular fracture in an elderly patient, which was treated by one-stage hip exchange with implantation of an antiprotrusio cage and reconstruction of the acetabular bone loss with an injectable calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite bone graft substitute, is reported. The paste-like bone graft substitute was injected through the holes of the antiprotrusio cage. After a setting time of 15 minutes, a low-profile cup was cemented onto the cage using polymethylmethacrylate and a new stem was inserted. The patient was encouraged to ambulate three days postoperatively weight-bearing as tolerated. At the one-year follow-up visit the patient was ambulatory and full weight-bearing without any walking aids. The follow-up radiographs demonstrated stable position and articulation of the revision hip arthroplasty with no signs of loosening of the antiprotrusio cage. However, the most interesting finding was that the bone graft substitute had remodelled to a great extent into bone. This calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite composite shows high osteoconductive potential and can be used to regenerate bone stock in revision arthroplasty. PMID:27446621

  15. Substantially higher prevalence of postoperative peri-prosthetic fractures in octogenarians with hip fractures operated with a cemented, polished tapered stem rather than an anatomic stem.

    PubMed

    Mukka, Sebastian; Mellner, Carl; Knutsson, Björn; Sayed-Noor, Arkan; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Recent studies have demonstrated a high incidence of postoperative periprosthetic femoral fracture (PPF) in elderly patients treated with 2 commonly used cemented, polished tapered stems. We compared the prevalence and incidence rate of PPF in a consecutive cohort of octagenerians with femoral neck fractures (FNFs) treated with either a collarless, polished tapered (CPT) stem or an anatomic matte stem (Lubinus SP2). Patients and methods - In a multicenter, prospective cohort study, we included 979 hips in patients aged 80 years and above (72% females, median age 86 (80-102) years) with a femoral neck fracture as indication for surgery. 69% of the patients were classified as ASA class 3 or 4. Hip-related complications and repeat surgery were assessed at a median follow-up of 20 (0-24) months postoperatively. Results - 22 hips (2.2%) sustained a PPF at a median of 7 (0-22) months postoperatively; 14 (64%) were Vancouver B2 fractures. 7 of the 22 surgically treated fractures required revision surgery, mainly due to deep infection. The cumulative incidence of PPFs was 3.8% in the CPT group, as compared with 0.2% in the SP2 group (p < 0.001). The risk ratio (RR) was 16 (95% CI: 2-120) using the SP2 group as denominator. Interpretation - The CPT stem was associated with a higher risk of PPF than the SP2 stem. We suggest that the tapered CPT stem should not be used for the treatment of femoral neck fractures in patients over 80 years. PMID:27045318

  16. The economic impact of surgically treated peri-prosthetic hip fractures on a university teaching hospital in Wales 7.5-year study.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew R; Williams, Tim; Paringe, Vishal; White, Simon P

    2016-02-01

    The number of total hip replacements taking place across the UK continues to grow. In an ageing population, with people placing greater demands on their prostheses, the number of peri-prosthetic fractures is increasing. We studied the economic impact this has on a large teaching hospital. All patients with peri-prosthetic femoral fracture in a 7.5 year period were identified. Radiographic and case note analysis was performed. Costings from the finance departments were obtained. 90 cases were identified, 58 female and 32 male, with a mean age of 76 (range: 38-91). 89 of the cases were managed surgically, 66% undergoing revision and 33% receiving open reduction and internal fixation. According to the Vancouver Classification, 3% were Type A, 79% Type B and 18% Type C. The mean length of stay was 43 days. The mean cost of management was £31,370 (range: £6885-£112,327). Patients with type C fractures had the highest mean length of stay at 53 days and mean cost of £33,417. Including rehabilitation costs, our study illustrated a mean cost of £31,370, roughly four times the current basic NHS tariff of £8552. Although implant costs are greater, treatment with revision where appropriate allows earlier weight bearing, reduced length of stay and lower overall cost. PMID:26689495

  17. Salvage of an Infected Periprosthetic Failed Fracture Fixation in a Nonagenarian

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Jennifer; Chansky, Howard; Nork, Sean E.; Taitsman, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Infected nonunions resulting in segmental bone loss are a devastating complication for patients and a difficult problem for surgeons. Adequate soft tissue coverage, return of mobility, fracture stability, and long-term freedom from infection are all important goals of treatment. Although there are numerous published studies that provide some treatment guidelines, there are patients who require unique and individualized solutions. In this report, we present a case in which an antibiotic-impregnated cement spacer was used as a component of the definitive treatment in a geriatric patient with segmental bone loss of the femur secondary to severe infection as a salvage technique to avoid amputation. PMID:24093074

  18. Cigarette smoking decreases TGF-b1 serum concentrations after long bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, A; Weiss, S; Wölfl, C G; Schmeckenbecher, K; Wentzensen, A; Grützner, P A; Zimmermann, G

    2010-10-01

    TGF-b1 serum concentrations are considered to be one of the most promising markers of fracture healing. Previously, we demonstrated significant differences in the post-traumatic time courses of patients with timely and delayed fracture healing. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible differences in the serum concentrations of TGF-b1 in cigarette-smoking vs. non-smoking patients with timely and delayed fracture healing in order to understand pathophysiological pathways through which smoking impairs fracture healing.Serum samples were collected from 248 patients undergoing surgical treatment for long bone fractures within 1 year of surgery. Samples from 14 patients with atrophic-type delayed fracture healing were compared with 14 matched patients with normal bone healing. Each group included seven smokers and seven non-smokers. Post-operative serum concentrations were analysed at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks as well as 1 year after surgery. The patients were monitored both clinically and radiologically for the entire duration of the study.All patients increased TGF-b1 serum concentrations after surgery. In patients with normal fracture healing, significantly higher TGF-b1 levels were observed in non-smokers (70 ng/ml) than in smokers(50 ng/ml) at the 4th week after surgery (p = 0.007). Also at the 4th week, in patients with delayed healing, significantly lower TGF-b1 levels were observed in smokers than in non-smokers (38 ng/ml vs.47 ng/ml, p = 0.021). However, no significant differences between non-smokers with delayed healing and smokers with normal healing (p = 0.151) were observed at the 4th week after surgery. TGF-b1 serum concentrations reached a plateau in all groups from the 6th to the 12th week after surgery, with a slight decrease observed in the final measurement taken 1 year after surgery.This study demonstrates that, after fracture, TGF-b1 serum concentrations are reduced by smoking,and this reduction is statistically significant during the 4th week

  19. Field testing the Unified Classification System for periprosthetic fractures of the femur, tibia and patella in association with knee replacement: an international collaboration.

    PubMed

    Van der Merwe, J M; Haddad, F S; Duncan, C P

    2014-12-01

    The Unified Classification System (UCS) was introduced because of a growing need to have a standardised universal classification system of periprosthetic fractures. It combines and simplifies many existing classification systems, and can be applied to any fracture around any partial or total joint replacement occurring during or after operation. Our goal was to assess the inter- and intra-observer reliability of the UCS in association with knee replacement when classifying fractures affecting one or more of the femur, tibia or patella. We used an international panel of ten orthopaedic surgeons with subspecialty fellowship training and expertise in adult hip and knee reconstruction ('experts') and ten residents of orthopaedic surgery in the last two years of training ('pre-experts'). They each received 15 radiographs for evaluation. After six weeks they evaluated the same radiographs again but in a different order. The reliability was assessed using the Kappa and weighted Kappa values. The Kappa values for inter-observer reliability for the experts and the pre-experts were 0.741 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.707 to 0.774) and 0.765 (95% CI 0.733 to 0.797), respectively. The weighted Kappa values for intra-observer reliability for the experts and pre-experts were 0.898 (95% CI 0.846 to 0.950) and 0.878 (95% CI 0.815 to 0.942) respectively. The UCS has substantial inter-observer reliability and 'near perfect' intra-observer reliability when used for periprosthetic fractures in association with knee replacement in the hands of experienced and inexperienced users. PMID:25452371

  20. Periprosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Berg, Richard A; Daley, Jacqueline A; Fritz, Jan; Bhave, Anil; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-23

    Periprosthetic joint infections are a devastating complication after arthroplasty and are associated with substantial patient morbidity. More than 25% of revisions are attributed to these infections, which are expected to increase. The increased prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and other comorbidities are some of the reasons for this increase. Recognition of the challenge of surgical site infections in general, and periprosthetic joint infections particularly, has prompted implementation of enhanced prevention measures preoperatively (glycaemic control, skin decontamination, decolonisation, etc), intraoperatively (ultraclean operative environment, blood conservation, etc), and postoperatively (refined anticoagulation, improved wound dressings, etc). Additionally, indications for surgical management have been refined. In this Review, we assess risk factors, preventive measures, diagnoses, clinical features, and treatment options for prosthetic joint infection. An international consensus meeting about such infections identified the best practices and further research needs. Orthopaedics could benefit from enhanced preventive, diagnostic, and treatment methods. PMID:26135702

  1. [Diagnosis of periprosthetic hip infections].

    PubMed

    Lüdemann, C M; Schütze, N; Rudert, M

    2015-06-01

    The diagnosis of periprosthetic infection requires a clear definition itself and structured procedure concerning anamnesis, clinical examination, laboratory findings, puncture and imaging diagnostics. The clinical presentation may vary considerable due to the time of their occurrence as early, delayed, or late infection. Recognition of risk factors and knowledge of differential diagnoses facilitate and confirm the diagnosis. The synovial fluid is assessed with regard to leukocyte count, protein content, and glucose. Intraoperative tissue specimen sampling has to be performed correctly; the histopathological and microbiological studies must be assessed using specific criteria. The examination and classification of periprosthetic membranes make discrimination of the causal pathological mechanism possible, especially distinction between septic and aseptic loosening. In this manner statements with regard to etiology and prosthesis durability are possible. Different causative microorganisms appear postoperatively at specific times. Pathogens that grow as biofilms are of great significance, as they may compound diagnosis and therapy. Early infections are often caused by virulent microorganisms (S. aureus) with acute onset. Delayed (low grade) infections are usually caused by less virulent microorganisms, such as S. epidermidis or coagulase-negative staphylococci. Many diagnostic imaging methods have been used in the assessment of periprosthetic infection: plain radiographs, arthrography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Nuclear medicine with bone scintigraphy or positron-emission tomography enhance diagnostic capabilities. Cultures of samples obtained by sonication of prostheses are more sensitive than conventional periprosthetic tissue culture. Multiplex PCR of sonication fluid is a promising test for diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection. The promising diagnostic accuracy for interleukin-6 and procalcitonin has yet not been

  2. Prevention of Periprosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Alisina; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a calamitous complication with high morbidity and substantial cost. The reported incidence is low but it is probably underestimated due to the difficulty in diagnosis. PJI has challenged the orthopaedic community for several years and despite all the advances in this field, it is still a real concern with immense impact on patients, and the healthcare system. Eradication of infection can be very difficult. Therefore, prevention remains the ultimate goal. The medical community has executed many practices with the intention to prevent infection and treat it effectively when it encounters. Numerous factors can predispose patients to PJI. Identifying the host risk factors, patients’ health modification, proper wound care, and optimizing operative room environment remain some of the core fundamental steps that can help minimizing the overall incidence of infection. In this review we have summarized the effective prevention strategies along with the recommendations of a recent International Consensus Meeting on Surgical Site and Periprosthetic Joint Infection. PMID:26110171

  3. The Diagnosis of Periprosthetic Infection

    PubMed Central

    del Arco, Alfonso; Bertrand, María Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Periprosthetic infection (PJI) is the most serious joint replacement complication, occurring in 0.8-1.9% of knee arthroplasties and 0.3-1.7% of hip arthroplasties. A definition of PJI was proposed in the November 2011 issue of the journal Clinical Orthopedics and Related Research. The presence of a fistula or of local inflammatory signs is indicative of PJI, but in many cases local pain is the only symptom. In the absence of underlying inflammatory conditions, C-reactive protein measurement is the most useful preoperative blood test for detecting infection associated with a prosthetic joint. The most useful preoperative diagnostic test is the aspiration of synovial joint fluid to obtain a total and differential cell count and culture. Intraoperative frozen sections of periprosthetic tissues produce excellent accuracy in predicting a diagnosis of PJI but only moderate accuracy in ruling out the diagnosis. In this process, obtaining a quality sample is the first step, and determines the quality of microbiological results. Specimens for culture should be obtained prior to the initiation of antibiotic treatment. Sonication of a removed implant may increase the culture yield. Plain radiography has low sensitivity and low specificity for detecting infection associated with a prosthetic joint. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the evaluation of complex cases, but metal inserts interfere with these tests, and abnormalities may be non-specific. Labelled-leucocyte imaging (e.g., leucocytes labelled with indium-111) combined with bone marrow imaging with the use of technetium-99m–labelled sulphur colloid is considered the imaging test of choice when imaging is necessary. PMID:23898349

  4. Treatment of Periprosthetic Infections: An Economic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Vaquero, Daniel; Fernández-Fairen, Mariano; Torres, Ana; Menzie, Ann M.; Fernández-Carreira, José Manuel; Murcia-Mazon, Antonio; Merzthal, Luis

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes the existing economic literature, assesses the value of current data, and presents procedures that are the less costly and more effective options for the treatment of periprosthetic infections of knee and hip. Optimizing antibiotic use in the prevention and treatment of periprosthetic infection, combined with systemic and behavioral changes in the operating room, the detection and treatment of high-risk patient groups, as well as the rational management of the existing infection by using the different procedures according to each particular case, could allow for improved outcomes and lead to the highest quality of life for patients and the lowest economic impact. Nevertheless, the costeffectiveness of different interventions to treat periprosthetic infections remains unclear. PMID:23781163

  5. Periprosthetic Osteolysis after Total Wrist Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boeckstyns, Michel E. H.; Herzberg, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Background and Literature Review Periprosthetic osteolysis (PPO) after second- or third-generation total wrist arthroplasty (TWA), with or without evident loosening of the implant components, has previously been reported in the literature, but rarely in a systematic way. Purpose The purpose of this study was to analyze the prevalence, location, and natural history of PPO following a TWA and to determine whether this was associated with prosthetic loosening. Patients and Methods We analyzed 44 consecutive cases in which a RE-MOTION TWA (Small Bone Innovations Inc., Morrisville, PA, USA) had been done. Results We found significant periprosthetic radiolucency (more than 2 mm in width) at the radial component side in 16 of the cases and at the carpal component side in 7. It developed gradually juxta-articularly around the prosthetic components regardless of the primary diagnosis, and seemed to stabilize in most patients after 1–3 years. In a small percentage of the patients, the periprosthetic area of bone resorption was markedly larger. In general, radiolucency was not related to evident loosening of the implant components, and only five carpal components and one radial had subsided or tilted. Conclusion Periprosthetic loosening is frequent following a TWA. In our series it was not necessarily associated with implant loosening and seemed to stabilize within 3 years. Close and continued observation is, however, recommended. Level of Evidence Therapeutic IV PMID:25032076

  6. Reducing periprosthetic joint infection: what really counts?

    PubMed Central

    SOLARINO, GIUSEPPE; ABATE, ANTONELLA; VICENTI, GIOVANNI; SPINARELLI, ANTONIO; PIAZZOLLA, ANDREA; MORETTI, BIAGIO

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) remains one of the most challenging complications after joint arthroplasty. Despite improvements in surgical techniques and in the use of antibiotic prophylaxis, it remains a major cause of implant failure and need for revision. PJI is associated with both human host-related and bacterial agent-related factors that can interact in all the phases of the procedure (preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative). Prevention is the first strategy to implement in order to minimize this catastrophic complication. The present review focuses on the preoperative period, and on what to do once risk factors are fully understood and have been identified. PMID:26904527

  7. Periprosthetic bone loss: diagnostic and therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Cavalli, Loredana; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Total joint replacement surgery is being performed on an increasingly large part of the population. Clinical longevity of implants depends on their osseointegration, which is influenced by the load, the characteristics of the implant and the bone-implant interface, as well as by the quality and quantity of the surrounding bone. Aseptic loosening due to periprosthetic osteolysis is the most frequent known cause of implant failure. Wear of prosthetic materials results in the formation of numerous particles of debris that cause a complex biological response. Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) is regarded as an accurate method to evaluate Bone Mineral Density (BMD) around hip or knee prostheses. Further data may be provided by a new device, the Bone Microarchitecture Analysis (BMA), which combines bone microarchitecture quantification and ultra high resolution osteo-articular imaging. Pharmacological strategies have been developed to prevent bone mass loss and to extend implant survival. Numerous trials with bisphosphonates show a protective effect on periprosthetic bone mass, up to 72 months after arthroplasty. Strontium ranelate has been demonstrated to increase the osseointegration of titanium implants in treated animals with improvement of bone microarchitecture and bone biomaterial properties. PMID:25642325

  8. Engineered porous scaffolds for periprosthetic infection prevention.

    PubMed

    Iviglia, Giorgio; Cassinelli, Clara; Bollati, Daniele; Baino, Francesco; Torre, Elisa; Morra, Marco; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara

    2016-11-01

    Periprosthetic infection is a consequence of implant insertion procedures and strategies for its prevention involve either an increase in the rate of new bone formation or the release of antibiotics such as vancomycin. In this work we combined both strategies and developed a novel, multifunctional three-dimensional porous scaffold that was produced using hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), coupled with a pectin (PEC)-chitosan (CHIT) polyelectrolyte (PEI), and loaded with vancomycin (VCA). By this approach, a controlled vancomycin release was achieved and serial bacterial dilution test demonstrated that, after 1week, the engineered construct still inhibits the bacterial growth. Degradation tests show an excellent behavior in a physiological and acidic environment (<10% of mass loss). Furthermore, the PEI coating shows an anti-inflammatory response, and good cell proliferation and migration were demonstrated in vitro using osteoblast SAOS-2 cell line. This new engineered construct exhibits excellent properties both as an antibacterial material and as a stimulator of bone formation, which makes it a good candidate to contrast periprosthetic infection. PMID:27524071

  9. Numerical analysis of an osseointegrated prosthesis fixation with reduced bone failure risk and periprosthetic bone loss.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, P K; van Diest, M; Bulstra, S K; Verdonschot, N; Verkerke, G J

    2012-07-26

    Currently available implants for direct attachment of prosthesis to the skeletal system after transfemoral amputation (OPRA system, Integrum AB, Sweden and ISP Endo/Exo prosthesis, ESKA Implants AG, Germany) show many advantages over the conventional socket fixation. However, restraining biomechanical issues such as considerable bone loss around the stem and peri-prosthetic bone fractures are present. To overcome these limiting issues a new concept of the direct intramedullary fixation was developed. We hypothesize that the new design will reduce the peri-prosthetic bone failure risk and adverse bone remodeling by restoring the natural load transfer in the femur. Generic CT-based finite element models of an intact femur and amputated bones implanted with 3 analyzed implants were created and loaded with a normal walking and a forward fall load. The strain adaptive bone remodeling theory was used to predict long-term bone changes around the implants and the periprosthetic bone failure risk was evaluated by the von Mises stress criterion. The results show that the new design provides close to physiological distribution of stresses in the bone and lower bone failure risk for the normal walking as compared to the OPRA and the ISP implants. The bone remodeling simulations did not reveal any overall bone loss around the new design, as opposed to the OPRA and the ISP implants, which induce considerable bone loss in the distal end of the femur. This positive outcome shows that the presented concept has a potential to considerably improve safety of the rehabilitation with the direct fixation implants. PMID:22677337

  10. Role of polyethylene particles in peri-prosthetic osteolysis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Gerald J; Haynes, David R; Howie, Donald W; Findlay, David M

    2011-01-01

    There is convincing evidence that particles produced by the wear of joint prostheses are causal in the peri-prosthetic loss of bone, or osteolysis, which, if it progresses, leads to the phenomenon of aseptic loosening. It is important to fully understand the biology of this bone loss because it threatens prosthesis survival, and loosened implants can result in peri-prosthetic fracture, which is disastrous for the patient and presents a difficult surgical scenario. The focus of this review is the bioactivity of polyethylene (PE) particles, since there is evidence that these are major players in the development and progression of osteolysis around prostheses which use PE as the bearing surface. The review describes the biological consequences of interaction of PE particles with macrophages, osteoclasts and cells of the osteoblast lineage, including osteocytes. It explores the possible cellular mechanisms of action of PE and seeks to use the findings to date to propose potential non-surgical treatments for osteolysis. In particular, a non-surgical approach is likely to be applicable to implants containing newer, highly cross-linked PEs (HXLPEs), for which osteolysis seems to occur with much reduced PE wear compared with conventional PEs. The caveat here is that we know little as yet about the bioactivity of HXLPE particles and addressing this constitutes our next challenge. PMID:22474627

  11. Densitometric evaluation of periprosthetic bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Parchi, Paolo Domenico; Cervi, Valentina; Piolanti, Nicola; Ciapini, Gianluca; Andreani, Lorenzo; Castellini, Iacopo; Poggetti, Andrea; Lisanti, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Summary The application of Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in orthopaedic surgery gradually has been extended from the study of osteoporosis to different areas of interest like the study of the relation between bone and prosthetic implants. Aim of this review is to analyze changes that occur in periprosthetic bone after the implantation of a total hip arthroplasty (THA) or a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In THA the pattern of adaptive bone remodeling with different cementless femoral stems varies and it appears to be strictly related to the design and more specifically to where the femoral stem is fixed on bone. Short stems with metaphyseal fixation allow the maintenance of a more physiologic load transfer to the proximal femur decreasing the entity of bone loss. Femoral bone loss after TKA seems to be related to the stress shielding induced by the implants while tibial bone remodeling seems to be related to postoperative changes in knee alignment (varus/valgus) and consequently in tibial load transfer. After both THA and TKA stress shielding seems to be an inevitable phenomenon that occurs mainly in the first year after surgery. PMID:25568658

  12. Management of Periprosthetic Hip Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Dong; Prashant, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Total hip joint replacement offers dramatic improvement in the quality of life but periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is the most devastating complication of this procedure. The infection threatens the function of the joint, the preservation of the limb, and occasionally even the life of the patient due to long term hospitalization and high cost. For the surgeon it is a disastrous burden, which requires repeated, complicated procedures to eradicate infection and to provide a mobile joint without pain. Yet in the absence of a true gold standard, the diagnosis of PJI can be elusive. Synovial fluid aspiration, diagnostic imaging, traditional culture, peripheral serum inflammatory markers, and intraoperative frozen sections each have their limitations but continue to be the mainstay for diagnosis of PJI. Treatment options mainly include thorough irrigation and debridement with prosthesis retention, or a two-stage prosthesis exchange with intervening placement of an antibiotic-loaded spacer. Success in treating PJI depends on extensive surgical debridement and adequate and effective antibiotic therapy. Treatment in two stages using a spacer is recommended for most chronic PJI. Debridement, antibiotics and implant retention is the obvious choice for treatment of acute PJI, with good success rates in selected patients. This article presents an overview of recent management concepts for PJI of the hip emphasizing diagnosis and the clinical approach, and also share own experience at our institution.

  13. Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael C.

    1963-01-01

    Recent studies on the epidemiology and repair of fractures are reviewed. The type and severity of the fracture bears a relation to the age, sex and occupation of the patient. Bone tissue after fracture shows a process of inflammation and repair common to all members of the connective tissue family, but it repairs with specific tissue. Cartilage forms when the oxygen supply is outgrown. After a fracture, the vascular bed enlarges. The major blood supply to healing tissue is from medullary vessels and destruction of them will cause necrosis of the inner two-thirds of the cortex. Callus rapidly mineralizes, but full mineralization is achieved slowly; increased mineral metabolism lasts several years after fracture. PMID:13952119

  14. Economical Analysis on Prophylaxis, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Periprosthetic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Fairen, Mariano; Torres, Ana; Menzie, Ann; Hernandez-Vaquero, Daniel; Fernandez-Carreira, José Manuel; Murcia-Mazon, Antonio; Guerado, Enrique; Merzthal, Luis

    2013-01-01

    The economic burden of periprosthetic infections is enormous, but the number of economic studies dealing with this issue is very scarce. This review tries to know the economic literature existing, assess the value of current data, and recognize the less costly and more effective procedures for prevention, diagnosis and treatment of periprosthetic infections. Forty five studies meeting the inclusion criteria and adhering to the quality criteria used were carefully analyzed to extract the economic data of relevance in evaluating the magnitude of problem and the more cost-effective solutions. However, because the heterogeneity and the low-quality of most of these studies meta-analytical technique has not been possible. Instead, the studies have been reviewed descriptively. Optimizing the antibiotic use in the prevention and treatment of periprosthetic infection, combined with systemic and behavioral changes in the operating room; detecting and treating the high-risk groups; a quick, simple, reliable, safe, and cost-effective diagnosis, and the rationale management of the instituted infection, specifically using the different procedures according to each particular case, could allow to improve outcomes and produce the highest quality of life for patients and the lowest economic impact. Nevertheless, the cost effectiveness of different interventions to prevent and to treat the periprosthetic infection remains unclear. PMID:24082966

  15. Vitamin B1

    MedlinePlus

    ... Flash 6 » Sound: No High score: Yes Credits » Chicken Farm Game - Why do we need vitamin B1? - ... save lives. You have one minute to feed chickens suffering from beriberi with the correct food to ...

  16. Thiamine (Vitamin B1)

    MedlinePlus

    ... B1 (thiamine), vitamin B2 (riboflavin), vitamin B3 (niacin/niacinamide), vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid), vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), vitamin ... in appropriate amounts, although rare allergic reactions and skin irritation have occurred. It is also LIKELY SAFE ...

  17. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... commonly happen because of car accidents, falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the bones. Overuse can cause stress fractures, which are very small cracks in the ...

  18. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open ... falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the ...

  19. [Vitamin B1 (thiamine)].

    PubMed

    Guilland, Jean-Claude

    2013-10-01

    Vitamin B1 (or thiamine) plays a key role in energy production from glucose. Since the main fuel of the nervous system is glucose, thiamine deficiency causes severe neurological symptoms. The biological exploration of vitamin B1 status is based on the measurement of thiamine pyrophosphate concentration or of the activity of a thiamine-dependent enzyme, transketolase, in erythrocytes. Severe deficiency states can be observed in chronic alcoholics, after protracted vomiting during pregnancy and after bariatric surgery. Mild deficiencies are common in the general population, but their clinical consequences are still unclear. PMID:24298824

  20. B-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The B-1 test stand, the largest of three test stands used for Space Shuttle Main Engine testing at Stennis Space Center, is a dual position engine stand that was modified for single-engine tests. This structure stands 295 feet tall or 407 feet tall with the crane fully extended.

  1. Avermectin B1

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Avermectin B1 ; CASRN 65195 - 55 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  2. Proceedings of the International Consensus on Periprosthetic Joint Infection.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, J; Gehrke, T; Chen, A F

    2013-11-01

    Louis Pasteur once said that: "Fortune favours the prepared mind." As one of the great scientists who contributed to the fight against infection, he emphasised the importance of being prepared at all times to recognise infection and deal with it. Despite the many scientific discoveries and technological advances, such as the advent of antibiotics and the use of sterile techniques, infection continues to be a problem that haunts orthopaedic surgeons and inflicts suffering on patients. The medical community has implemented many practices with the intention of preventing infection and treating it effectively when it occurs. Although high-level evidence may support some of these practices, many are based on little to no scientific foundation. Thus, around the world, there is great variation in practices for the prevention and management of periprosthetic joint infection. This paper summaries the instigation, conduct and findings of a recent International Consensus Meeting on Surgical Site and Periprosthetic Joint Infection. PMID:24151261

  3. Boeing XF2B-1 (F2B-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Boeing XF2B-1 (F2B-1): Serving as the prototype for the F2B-1 shipboard fighter, the XF2B-1 differed visually in having a pointed spinner and an unbalanced rudder. Like many aircraft of its day, the Boeing model 69 was powered by a Pratt & Whitney Wasp radial engine.

  4. Comparison of bacterial growth in sonication fluid cultures with periprosthetic membranes and with cultures of biopsies for diagnosing periprosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Hischebeth, Gunnar T R; Randau, Thomas M; Molitor, Ernst; Wimmer, Matthias D; Hoerauf, Achim; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle; Gravius, Sascha

    2016-02-01

    Total joint arthroplasty is a common operation worldwide with infection rates between 1% and 3%. In cases of suspected periprosthetic joint infection, it is very challenging to rule out the causative microorganisms. In this study, we compared the appearance of periprosthetic membranes with the microbiological results obtained from cultures of sonication fluid and the correlation between classical microbiological cultures and cultures of sonication fluid. The results confirmed a strong correlation of bacterial growth in sonication fluid cultures with bacterial growth in classical microbiological cultures. Most importantly, however, our study documented a highly significant correlation of periprosthetic membranes typical for periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) with bacterial growth in sonication fluid. Sonication fluid cultures yielded a better sensitivity than tissue cultures (72.34-60.87%). These 3 methods are useful tools in diagnosing PJIs, and even more, sonication fluid cultures should be included in the diagnostic path of PJI. PMID:26584961

  5. B1 magnet harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P D

    2000-05-30

    During the B0 Overpass construction for the CDF detector at Fermilab, 33 B1 magnets were measured using a bucked tangential coil. Measurements were made on the midplane, at the centerline and at {+-} 1 inch horizontal displacement. Since the coil was only 62 inches long, measurements were made at four longitudinal positions. Because of the design of the Main Ring, it was sufficient to combine data from all positions and report the harmonic spectrum for the magnet as a whole. For modeling the Scrounge-atron, it is more useful to treat each measurement position separately. The author reports here an analysis of the harmonic spectra at each probe position, based on the original data.

  6. Periprosthetic tibial bone mineral density changes after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jaroma, Antti; Soininvaara, Tarja; Kröger, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may cause postoperative periprosthetic bone loss due to stress shielding. Bone also adapts to mechanical alterations such as correction of malalignment. We investigated medium-term changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in tibial periprosthetic bone after TKA. Patients and methods 86 TKA patients were prospectively measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the baseline measurement being within 1 week after TKA and the follow-up measurements being at 3 and 6 months, and at 1, 2, 4, and 7 years postoperatively. Long standing radiographs were taken and clinical evaluation was done with the American Knee Society (AKS) score. Results The baseline BMD of the medial tibial metaphyseal region of interest (ROI) was higher in the varus aligned knees (25%; p < 0.001). Medial metaphyseal BMD decreased in subjects with preoperatively varus aligned knees (13%, p < 0.001) and in those with preoperatively valgus aligned knees (12%, p = 0.02) between the baseline and 7-year measurements. No statistically significant changes in BMD were detected in lateral metaphyseal ROIs. No implant failures or revision surgery due to tibial problems occurred. Interpretation Tibial metaphyseal periprosthetic bone is remodeled after TKA due to mechanical axis correction, resulting in more balanced bone stock below the tibial tray. The diaphyseal BMD remains unchanged after the initial drop, within 3–6 months. This remodeling process was related to good component survival, as there were no implant failures or revision operations due to tibial problems in this medium-term follow-up. PMID:27120266

  7. Periprosthetic tibial bone mineral density changes after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jaroma, Antti; Soininvaara, Tarja; Kröger, Heikki

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may cause postoperative periprosthetic bone loss due to stress shielding. Bone also adapts to mechanical alterations such as correction of malalignment. We investigated medium-term changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in tibial periprosthetic bone after TKA. Patients and methods - 86 TKA patients were prospectively measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the baseline measurement being within 1 week after TKA and the follow-up measurements being at 3 and 6 months, and at 1, 2, 4, and 7 years postoperatively. Long standing radiographs were taken and clinical evaluation was done with the American Knee Society (AKS) score. Results - The baseline BMD of the medial tibial metaphyseal region of interest (ROI) was higher in the varus aligned knees (25%; p < 0.001). Medial metaphyseal BMD decreased in subjects with preoperatively varus aligned knees (13%, p < 0.001) and in those with preoperatively valgus aligned knees (12%, p = 0.02) between the baseline and 7-year measurements. No statistically significant changes in BMD were detected in lateral metaphyseal ROIs. No implant failures or revision surgery due to tibial problems occurred. Interpretation - Tibial metaphyseal periprosthetic bone is remodeled after TKA due to mechanical axis correction, resulting in more balanced bone stock below the tibial tray. The diaphyseal BMD remains unchanged after the initial drop, within 3-6 months. This remodeling process was related to good component survival, as there were no implant failures or revision operations due to tibial problems in this medium-term follow-up. PMID:27120266

  8. Diagnosis of Periprosthetic Joint Infection Following Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Javad; Fassihi, Safa Cyrus; Enayatollahi, Mohammad A

    2016-07-01

    The diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) following total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty has been one of the major challenges in orthopedic surgery. As there is no single absolute test for diagnosis of PJI, diagnostic criteria for PJI have been proposed that include using several diagnostic modalities. Focused history, physical examination, plain radiographs, and initial serologic tests should be followed by joint aspiration and synovial analysis. Newer diagnostic techniques, such as alpha-defensin and interleukin-6, hold great promise in the future diagnosis of equivocal infections. PMID:27241375

  9. Prevention of Periprosthetic Joint Infections of the Hip and Knee.

    PubMed

    Levy, David M; Wetters, Nathan G; Levine, Brett R

    2016-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a rare but devastating complication of arthroplasty. Research has been dedicated to minimizing the incidence of PJI, leading to the development of a comprehensive perioperative approach. Multiple preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors can increase patient risk. From medical management and skin sterilization to wound sterility and blood management, multiple issues must be considered in a well-rounded prevention protocol. In this literature review, we consolidate the current information that orthopedic surgeons can use to minimize PJI after total knee arthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27552468

  10. Aspiration of Periprosthetic Seromas Using the Blunt SeromaCath.

    PubMed

    Becker, Hilton; Klimczak, Jaclyn

    2016-02-01

    Postoperative swelling following prosthetic implant breast augmentation and reconstruction is not uncommon. Prompt diagnosis and targeted treatment are critical. Current treatment recommendations achieve a diagnosis using specialized equipment with needle-guided imaging and/or surgical modalities. These techniques are expensive and delay diagnosis and treatment. The authors use an in-office, nonimaging technique to drain periprosthetic fluid after unilateral breast swelling after breast reconstruction or augmentation. Their technique is effective in diagnosing and treating seroma fluid with minimal risk of implant damage or perforation. PMID:26818281

  11. Prevention of periprosthetic joint infection: what are the effective strategies?

    PubMed

    Alijanipour, Pouya; Heller, Snir; Parvizi, Javad

    2014-08-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) following total knee arthroplasty is a major burden for patients and health systems. Prevention of this challenging complication through implementation of effective strategies should be a priority. These strategies should encompass various levels of patient care. Multiple modifiable risk factors such as uncontrolled hyperglycemia, obesity, smoking, substance abuse, and nasal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus have been described for PJI. Preoperative recognition and mitigation of these risk factors along with optimization of nonmodifiable risk factors such as kidney, liver, or immune system insufficiency can considerably decrease the risk of PJI. A comprehensive perioperative protocol should involve optimization of the operative environment to reduce the number of bacteria and particulates in the air. Several surgical and nonsurgical details of intraoperative care such as maintenance of normothermia, skin preparation, surgical field irrigation, wound closure, and duration of surgical and anesthetic procedure can influence the occurrence of PJI. Prophylactic perioperative antibiotic administration is probably one of the most important strategies in preventing PJI. Implementation of surgical safety checklist can diminish the risk of perioperative complications, particularly surgical site infection. Controversy regarding efficacy, efficiency, and optimization of some preventive measures continues to exist due to inconsistency or inadequacy of available evidence. Novel research has focused on designing PJI-resistant implants and developing vaccines that target molecule components with major role in the process of bacterial adhesion to the implant or periprosthetic tissues. PMID:24792971

  12. Temporal radiographic texture analysis in the detection of periprosthetic osteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkie, Joel R.; Giger, Maryellen L.; Chinander, Michael R.; Engh, Charles A. Sr.; Hopper, Robert H. Jr.; Martell, John M.

    2008-01-15

    Periprosthetic osteolysis is one of the most serious long-term problems in total hip arthroplasty. It has been primarily attributed to the body's inflammatory response to submicron polyethylene particles worn from the hip implant, and it leads to bone loss and structural deterioration in the surrounding bone. It was previously demonstrated that radiographic texture analysis (RTA) has the ability to distinguish between osteolysis and normal cases at the time of clinical detection of the disease; however, that analysis did not take into account the changes in texture over time. The goal of this preliminary analysis, however, is to assess the ability of temporal radiographic texture analysis (tRTA) to distinguish between patients who develop osteolysis and normal cases. Two tRTA methods were used in the study: the RTA feature change from baseline at various follow-up intervals and the slope of the best-fit line to the RTA data series. These tRTA methods included Fourier-based and fractal-based features calculated from digitized images of 202 total hip replacement cases, including 70 that developed osteolysis. Results show that separation between the osteolysis and normal groups increased over time for the feature difference method, as the disease progressed, with area under the curve (AUC) values from receiver operating characteristic analysis of 0.65 to 0.72 at 15 years postsurgery. Separation for the slope method was also evident, with AUC values ranging from 0.65 to 0.76 for the task of distinguishing between osteolysis and normal cases. The results suggest that tRTA methods have the ability to measure changes in trabecular structure, and may be useful in the early detection of periprosthetic osteolysis.

  13. Boeing F3B-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Boeing F3B-1: While most Boeing F3B-1s served aboard the U. S. Navy aircraft carriers Lexington and Saratoga, this example flew in NACA hands at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in the late 1920's. Also known as the Boeing Model 77, the aircraft was powered by a Pratt & Whitney Wasp radial engine.

  14. Modulation and predictors of periprosthetic bone mineral density following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mau-Moeller, Anett; Behrens, Martin; Felser, Sabine; Bruhn, Sven; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer; Skripitz, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) leads to a loss of periprosthetic bone mineral density (BMD). Great importance is attached to the prevention of periprosthetic bone loss with a view to ensuring a long service life of the prosthesis. In order to provide appropriate recommendations for preventive movement therapy measures to combat peri-implant bone loss, it is necessary to know the predictors of periprosthetic BMD. The aim of this study was (1) to determine the change of periprosthetic BMD of the femur and tibia and (2) to analyse the effects of different predictors on periprosthetic BMD. Twenty-three patients with primary TKA were evaluated 10 days and 3 months postoperatively. The data analysis comprised (1) the change in periprosthetic BMD from pretest to posttest and (2) the correlations between BMD and the variables isometric maximum voluntary force, lean mass, physical activity (step count), and BMI using multiple linear regression and structural equation modelling (SEM). BMD of the distal femur was significantly reduced by 19.7% (P = 0.008) 3 months after surgery, while no changes were found in BMD of the tibia. The results of SEM demonstrate that 55% of the BMD variance was explained by the model (χ(2) = 0.002; df = 1; P = 0.96; χ(2)/df = 0.002; RMSEA < 0.01; TLI = 1.5; CFI = 1.0). A significant direct effect was only evidenced by the variable lean mass (β = 0.38; b = 0.15; SE = 0.07; C.R. = 2.0; P = 0.046). It can be assumed that a large muscle mass with accompanying distribution of high mechanical load in the bones can contribute to local changes of periprosthetic BMD. Concrete recommendations for preventing peri-implant bone loss therefore include exercises which have the aim of maintaining or building up muscle mass. PMID:25793194

  15. Modulation and Predictors of Periprosthetic Bone Mineral Density following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Felser, Sabine; Skripitz, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) leads to a loss of periprosthetic bone mineral density (BMD). Great importance is attached to the prevention of periprosthetic bone loss with a view to ensuring a long service life of the prosthesis. In order to provide appropriate recommendations for preventive movement therapy measures to combat peri-implant bone loss, it is necessary to know the predictors of periprosthetic BMD. The aim of this study was (1) to determine the change of periprosthetic BMD of the femur and tibia and (2) to analyse the effects of different predictors on periprosthetic BMD. Twenty-three patients with primary TKA were evaluated 10 days and 3 months postoperatively. The data analysis comprised (1) the change in periprosthetic BMD from pretest to posttest and (2) the correlations between BMD and the variables isometric maximum voluntary force, lean mass, physical activity (step count), and BMI using multiple linear regression and structural equation modelling (SEM). BMD of the distal femur was significantly reduced by 19.7% (P = 0.008) 3 months after surgery, while no changes were found in BMD of the tibia. The results of SEM demonstrate that 55% of the BMD variance was explained by the model (χ2 = 0.002; df = 1; P = 0.96; χ2/df = 0.002; RMSEA < 0.01; TLI = 1.5; CFI = 1.0). A significant direct effect was only evidenced by the variable lean mass (β = 0.38; b = 0.15; SE = 0.07; C.R. = 2.0; P = 0.046). It can be assumed that a large muscle mass with accompanying distribution of high mechanical load in the bones can contribute to local changes of periprosthetic BMD. Concrete recommendations for preventing peri-implant bone loss therefore include exercises which have the aim of maintaining or building up muscle mass. PMID:25793194

  16. Detection of bacteria with molecular methods in prosthetic joint infection: sonication fluid better than periprosthetic tissue.

    PubMed

    Rak, Mitja; KavčIč, Martina; Trebše, Rihard; CőR, Andrej

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - The correct diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) can be difficult because bacteria form a biofilm on the surface of the implant. The sensitivity of culture from sonication fluid is better than that from periprosthetic tissue, but no comparison studies using molecular methods on a large scale have been performed. We assessed whether periprosthetic tissue or sonication fluid should be used for molecular analysis. Patients and methods - Implant and tissue samples were retrieved from 87 patients who underwent revision operation of total knee or total hip arthroplasty. Both sample types were analyzed using broad-range (BR-) PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene. The results were evaluated based on the definition of periprosthetic joint infection from the Workgroup of the Musculoskeletal Infection Society. Results - PJI was diagnosed in 29 patients, whereas aseptic failure was diagnosed in 58 patients. Analysis of sonication fluid using BR-PCR detected bacteria in 27 patients, whereas analysis of periprosthetic tissue by BR-PCR detected bacteria in 22 patients. In 6 of 7 patients in whom BR-PCR analysis of periprosthetic tissue was negative, low-virulence bacteria were present. The sensitivity and specificity values for periprosthetic tissue were 76% and 93%, respectively, and the sensitivity and specificity values for sonication fluid were 95% and 97%. Interpretation - Our results suggest that sonication fluid may be a more appropriate sample than periprosthetic tissue for BR-PCR analysis in patients with PJI. However, further investigation is required to improve detection of bacteria in patients with so-called aseptic failure. PMID:27123818

  17. Retrieval analysis of motion preserving spinal devices and periprosthetic tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Steven M.; Steinbeck, Marla; Ianuzzi, Allyson; van Ooij, André; Punt, Ilona M.; Isaza, Jorge; Ross, E.R.S.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews certain practical aspects of retrieval analysis for motion preserving spinal implants and periprosthetic tissues as an essential component of the overall revision strategy for these implants. At our institution, we established an international repository for motion-preserving spine implants in 2004. Our repository is currently open to all spine surgeons, and is intended to be inclusive of all cervical and lumbar implant designs such as artificial discs and posterior dynamic stabilization devices. Although a wide range of alternative materials is being investigated for nonfusion spine implants, many of the examples in this review are drawn from our existing repository of metal-on-polyethylene, metal-on-metal lumbar total disc replacements (TDRs), and polyurethane-based dynamic motion preservation devices. These devices are already approved or nearing approval for use in the United States, and hence are the most clinically relevant at the present time. This article summarizes the current literature on the retrieval analysis of these implants and concludes with recommendations for the development of new test methods that are based on the current state of knowledge of in vivo wear and damage mechanisms. Furthermore, the relevance and need to evaluate the surrounding tissue to obtain a complete understanding of the biological reaction to implant component corrosion and wear is reviewed. PMID:25802641

  18. Special Issues Involving Periprosthetic Infection in Immunodeficiency Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tornero, Eduard; Riba, Josep; Garcia-Ramiro, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Chronic systemic illnesses such as diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease (CKD), liver cirrhosis, neoplasia, etc. have been clearly associated with high rates of SWI. However, the exact mechanisms underlying these observations are still under investigation. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing problem in our society. Many of these patients will require an arthroplasty and it appears that the prosthetic infection risk for these types of patients is much higher than in the normal population. The risk of complications due to infection seems to be lower in patients with kidney transplants than in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Both prophylaxis and treatment of infection in patients with CKD should be carried out with a strict monitoring of potentially nephrotoxic antibiotics. The literature on the prognosis and risk of infection in patients with haematopoietic stem cell transplant is scarce and occasionally contradictory. The optimal time for the surgery should be determined by taking into account the immunological state of the patient and should be avoided, as much as possible, during the first year after the HSCT. Child’s classification system is the most widely used method of stratifying the surgical risk for patients with cirrhosis; the infection appeared to be associated in a statistically significant way with advanced age and a Child B pre-operative classification. The prevention of prosthetic joint infections in HIV-infected patients should not be significantly different from the prevention for any other patient. Those patients that receive adequate antiretroviral treatment and periodic laboratory control show infection rates and periprosthetic complications that are similar to those for patients not affected by HIV. Therefore, the patient’s level of immunodeficiency is the most important prognostic factor for prosthetic infection. The particular immunological condition of these patients can lead to infections due to particular microorganisms

  19. Intermittent negative pressure wound therapy with instillation for the treatment of persistent periprosthetic hip infections: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Söylemez, Mehmet Salih; Özkan, Korhan; Kılıç, Bülent; Erinç, Samet

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWTi) is starting to be used successfully to treat early periprosthetic infections of endoprostheses. However, few articles have reported the outcome of treatment with intermittent NPWTi for late persistent periprosthetic infections of the hip. In this study, we report two cases who underwent several rounds of radical wound debridement for the treatment of a late persistent periprosthetic infection of the hip. Intermittent NPWTi was used in both cases. Patients were treated successfully and there was no recurrence after 3 and 1 years of follow-up, respectively. PMID:26929628

  20. Intermittent negative pressure wound therapy with instillation for the treatment of persistent periprosthetic hip infections: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Söylemez, Mehmet Salih; Özkan, Korhan; Kılıç, Bülent; Erinç, Samet

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWTi) is starting to be used successfully to treat early periprosthetic infections of endoprostheses. However, few articles have reported the outcome of treatment with intermittent NPWTi for late persistent periprosthetic infections of the hip. In this study, we report two cases who underwent several rounds of radical wound debridement for the treatment of a late persistent periprosthetic infection of the hip. Intermittent NPWTi was used in both cases. Patients were treated successfully and there was no recurrence after 3 and 1 years of follow-up, respectively. PMID:26929628

  1. Metallic debris from metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty regulates periprosthetic tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lohmann, Christoph H; Singh, Gurpal; Willert, Hans-Georg; Buchhorn, Gottfried H

    2014-01-01

    The era of metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty has left the orthopaedic community with valuable insights and lessons on periprosthetic tissue reactions to metallic debris. Various terms have been used to describe the tissue reactions. Sometimes the nomenclature can be confusing. We present a review of the concepts introduced by Willert and Semlitsch in 1977, along with further developments made in the understanding of periprosthetic tissue reactions to metallic debris. We propose that periprosthetic tissue reactions be thought of as (1) gross (metallosis, necrosis, cyst formation and pseudotumour); (2) histological (macrophage-dominated, lymphocyte-dominated or mixed); and (3) molecular (expression of inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha). Taper corrosion and modularity are discussed, along with future research directions to elucidate the antigen-presenting pathways and material-specific biomarkers which may allow early detection and intervention in a patient with adverse periprosthetic tissue reactions to metal wear debris. PMID:25405095

  2. Biomechanical optimization of subject-specific implant positioning for femoral head resurfacing to reduce fracture risk.

    PubMed

    Miles, Brad; Kolos, Elizabeth; Appleyard, Richard; Theodore, Willy; Zheng, Keke; Li, Qing; Ruys, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    Peri-prosthetic femoral neck fracture after femoral head resurfacing can be either patient-related or surgical technique-related. The study aimed to develop a patient-specific finite element modelling technique that can reliably predict an optimal implant position and give minimal strain in the peri-prosthetic bone tissue, thereby reducing the risk of peri-prosthetic femoral neck fracture. The subject-specific finite element modelling was integrated with optimization techniques including design of experiments to best possibly position the implant for achieving minimal strain for femoral head resurfacing. Sample space was defined by varying the floating point to find the extremes at which the cylindrical reaming operation actually cuts into the femoral neck causing a notch during hip resurfacing surgery. The study showed that the location of the maximum strain, for all non-notching positions, was on the superior femoral neck, in the peri-prosthetic bone tissue. It demonstrated that varus positioning resulted in a higher strain, while valgus positioning reduced the strain, and further that neutral version had a lower strain. PMID:27098752

  3. 8 CFR 343b.1 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the form designated by USCIS with the fee specified in 8 CFR 103.7(b)(1) and in accordance with the... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Application. 343b.1 Section 343b.1 Aliens... NATURALIZATION FOR RECOGNITION BY A FOREIGN STATE § 343b.1 Application. A naturalized citizen who desires...

  4. Enhancement of Periprosthetic Bone Quality with Topical Hydroxyapatite-Bisphosphonate Composite

    PubMed Central

    Suratwala, Sanjeev J.; Cho, Samuel K.; van Raalte, Jonathan J.; Park, Sang Hyun; Seo, Sung Wook; Chang, Seong-Sil; Gardner, Thomas R.; Lee, Francis Young-In

    2008-01-01

    Background: Implant loosening is associated with inflammatory bone loss induced by ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear debris. We hypothesized that a hydroxyapatite-bisphosphonate composite improves periprosthetic bone quality and osseous integration of an intramedullary implant even in the presence of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene particles in an experimental rat femur model. Methods: A preliminary in vitro study determined the optimal concentration of zoledronate (50 μM) that would maximally decrease osteoclasts without harming osteoblasts. Hydroxyapatite-coated intramedullary nails were implanted bilaterally in the femora of sixteen rats (the control group), and hydroxyapatite-zoledronate-coated nails were implanted bilaterally in the femora of sixteen rats (the experimental group). Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene particles were introduced into the femoral canal before implantation. Eight rats from each group were killed at six weeks, and the remaining rats were killed at six months. Periprosthetic bone mass was analyzed by dual x-ray absorptiometry and microcomputed tomography. Osseous integration was examined by biomechanical testing of pullout strength. Results: The mean bone area (and standard deviation) in the periprosthetic bone region was significantly greater (p < 0.0001) in the hydroxyapatite-zoledronate group (2.388 ± 0.960 mm2) than in the control group (0.933 ± 0.571 mm2). This difference was larger in the six-week group than in the six-month group (p = 0.03). The average peak pullout force for the treated femora (241.0 ± 95.1 N) was significantly greater (p < 0.0001) than that for the controls (55.6 ± 49.0 N). This difference was similar in the six-week and six-month groups. The energy required for nail pullout was significantly greater (p < 0.0001) for the treated femora (521.6 ± 293.8 N-mm) than for the controls (142.2 ± 152.1 N-mm). This difference in energy to pullout was similar in the six-week and six

  5. Altered load transfer in the pelvis in the presence of periprosthetic osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Munro, Jacob T; Fernandez, Justin W; Millar, James S; Walker, Cameron G; Howie, Donald W; Shim, Vickie B

    2014-11-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis in the retroacetabular region with cancellous bone loss is a recognized phenomenon in the long-term follow-up of total hip replacement. The effects on load transfer in the presence of defects are less well known. A validated, patient-specific, 3D finite element (FE) model of the pelvis was used to assess changes in load transfer associated with periprosthetic osteolysis adjacent to a cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) component. The presence of a cancellous defect significantly increased (p < 0.05) von Mises stress in the cortical bone of the pelvis during walking and a fall onto the side. At loads consistent with single leg stance, this was still less than the predicted yield stress for cortical bone. During higher loads associated with a fall onto the side, highest stress concentrations occurred in the superior and inferior pubic rami and in the anterior column of the acetabulum with larger cancellous defects. PMID:25203813

  6. Improved Diagnosis of Prosthetic Joint Infection by Culturing Periprosthetic Tissue Specimens in Blood Culture Bottles

    PubMed Central

    Peel, Trisha N.; Dylla, Brenda L.; Hughes, John G.; Lynch, David T.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Cheng, Allen C.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite known low sensitivity, culture of periprosthetic tissue specimens on agars and in broths is routine. Culture of periprosthetic tissue samples in blood culture bottles (BCBs) is potentially more convenient, but it has been evaluated in a limited way and has not been widely adopted. The aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of inoculation of periprosthetic tissue specimens into blood culture bottles with standard agar and thioglycolate broth culture, applying Bayesian latent class modeling (LCM) in addition to applying the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) criteria for prosthetic joint infection. This prospective cohort study was conducted over a 9-month period (August 2013 to April 2014) at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, and included all consecutive patients undergoing revision arthroplasty. Overall, 369 subjects were studied; 117 (32%) met IDSA criteria for prosthetic joint infection, and 82% had late chronic infection. Applying LCM, inoculation of tissues into BCBs was associated with a 47% improvement in sensitivity compared to the sensitivity of conventional agar and broth cultures (92.1 versus 62.6%, respectively); this magnitude of change was similar when IDSA criteria were applied (60.7 versus 44.4%, respectively; P = 0.003). The time to microorganism detection was shorter with BCBs than with standard media (P < 0.0001), with aerobic and anaerobic BCBs yielding positive results within a median of 21 and 23 h, respectively. Results of our study demonstrate that the semiautomated method of periprosthetic tissue culture in blood culture bottles is more sensitive than and as specific as agar and thioglycolate broth cultures and yields results faster. PMID:26733067

  7. Intermittent PTH administration and mechanical loading are anabolic for periprosthetic cancellous bone

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, Matthew J.; Courtland, Hayden-William; Yang, Xu; Sutherland, James P.; Stoner, Kirsten; Nguyen, Joseph; Fahlgren, Anna; Ross, F. Patrick; van der Meulen, Marjolein C. H.; Bostrom, Mathias P.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the individual and combined effects on periprosthetic cancellous bone of intermittent PTH (iPTH) and mechanical loading at the cellular, molecular, and tissue levels. Porous titanium implants were inserted bilaterally on the cancellous bone of adult rabbits beneath a loading device attached to the distal lateral femur. The left femur received a sham loading device. The right femur was loaded daily, and half of the rabbits received daily PTH. Periprosthetic bone was evaluated up to 28 days for gene expression, histology, and µCT analysis. Loading and iPTH increased bone mass by a combination of two mechanisms: 1) altering cell populations in a pro-osteoblastic/anti-adipocytic direction, and 2) controlling bone turnover by modulating the RANKL-OPG ratio. At the tissue level, BV/TV increased with both loading (+53%, p<0.05) and iPTH (+54%, p<0.05). Combined treatment showed only small additional effects at the cellular and molecular levels that corresponded to a small additive effect on bone volume (+13% compared to iPTH alone, p>0.05). This study suggests that iPTH and loading are potential therapies for enhancing periprosthetic bone formation. The elucidation of the cellular and molecular response may help further enhance the combined therapy and related targeted treatment strategies. PMID:25408434

  8. Nose fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It ... with other fractures of the face. Sometimes a blunt injury can ...

  9. Outcomes of Geriatric Hip Fractures Treated with AFFIXUS Hip Fracture Nail

    PubMed Central

    Mabrouk, Ahmed; Madhusudan, Mysore; Waseem, Mohammed; Kershaw, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Geriatric hip fractures are one of the commonest fractures worldwide. The purpose of this study was to report the outcomes of a series of unstable geriatric hip fractures treated with AFFIXUS hip fracture nail. A retrospective study of 100 unstable geriatric hip fractures treated with AFFIXUS hip fracture nail is presented. The mean follow-up duration was 8 months (range 3–32). Of the patients 83% were female. The average age was 85 years. The fracture was treated by closed reduction and intramedullary fixation. The mean acute hospital stay was 17.6 days. Systemic complications occurred in 29 patients (29%) and local complications in 3 patients (3%) including lag screw cutout in one patient (1%), lag screw backout in one patient (1%), and deep infection in one patient (1%). Mechanical failures and periprosthetic fractures were not observed in our series. Fractures united in all patients. Preinjury activity level was recovered in 78% of the patients. The results of AFFIXUS hip fracture nail were satisfactory in most elderly patients. The unique design of the lag screw and its thread spacing had effectively reduced cut-out rate. PMID:25580303

  10. 18 CFR 1b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions. 1b.1 Section 1b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.1 Definitions. For purposes of this part—...

  11. 34 CFR 5b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Definitions. 5b.1 Section 5b.1 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 5b.1 Definitions. As used in this part: (a... Education. (c) Department means the Department of Education. (d) Disclosure means the availability...

  12. 34 CFR 5b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definitions. 5b.1 Section 5b.1 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 5b.1 Definitions. As used in this part: (a... Education. (c) Department means the Department of Education. (d) Disclosure means the availability...

  13. 8 CFR 343b.1 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application. 343b.1 Section 343b.1 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY NATIONALITY REGULATIONS SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF NATURALIZATION FOR RECOGNITION BY A FOREIGN STATE § 343b.1 Application. A naturalized citizen who desires...

  14. 32 CFR 242b.1 - Regents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regents. 242b.1 Section 242b.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS GENERAL PROCEDURES AND DELEGATIONS OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIFORMED SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF THE HEALTH SCIENCES § 242b.1 Regents. (a) History...

  15. 32 CFR 242b.1 - Regents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regents. 242b.1 Section 242b.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS GENERAL PROCEDURES AND DELEGATIONS OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIFORMED SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF THE HEALTH SCIENCES § 242b.1 Regents. (a) History...

  16. Periprosthetic DXA after total hip arthroplasty with short vs. ultra-short custom-made femoral stems

    PubMed Central

    Santori, Francesco S; Pavan, Laura; Learmonth, Ian D; Passariello, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) analysis of the 7 periprosthetic Gruen zones is the most commonly used protocol to evaluate bone remodeling after the implantation of conventional femoral stems. We assessed the value of DXA after cementless primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) by comparing the effect of progressive shortening of the stem of two femoral implants on periprosthetic bone remodeling using a specifically developed protocol of analysis with 5 periprosthetic regions of interest (ROIs). Patients and methods Bone mineral density (BMD) was evaluated in 37 patients in the plateau stage, 3 years after THA. Two femoral implants featuring conceptually new designs and surgical technique were tested: types 1 and 2, characterized by extremely short stem and virtual absence of distal stem, respectively. Results We found that progressive shortening of the femoral stem produces more proximal loading, which effectively preserves metaphyseal bone stock and increases periprosthetic BMD in the medial ROIs over time. In the type 2 group, higher absolute BMD values were observed in medial ROIs 4 and 5. No differences were found in ROIs 1, 2, and 3. Interpretation This study shows the flexibility of DXA in adapting the protocol of periprosthetic analysis to the specific requirements of new implant designs, and it shows its high sensitivity in evaluation of the biological response of bone to changes in implant shape. PMID:19562565

  17. Nose fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It usually occurs after an injury and often occurs with ...

  18. Skull fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Basilar skull fracture; Depressed skull fracture; Linear skull fracture ... Skull fractures may occur with head injuries . The skull provides good protection for the brain. However, a severe impact ...

  19. No effect of risedronate on femoral periprosthetic bone loss following total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Muren, Olle; Akbarian, Ehsan; Salemyr, Mats; Bodén, Henrik; Eisler, Thomas; Stark, André

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose We have previously shown that during the first 2 years after total hip arthroplasty (THA), periprosthetic bone resorption can be prevented by 6 months of risedronate therapy. This follow-up study investigated this effect at 4 years. Patients and methods A single-center, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial was carried out from 2006 to 2010 in 73 patients with osteoarthritis of the hip who were scheduled to undergo THA. The patients were randomly assigned to receive either 35 mg risedronate or placebo orally, once a week, for 6 months postoperatively. The primary outcome was the percentage change in bone mineral density (BMD) in Gruen zones 1 and 7 in the proximal part of the femur at follow-up. Secondary outcomes included migration of the femoral stem and clinical outcome scores. Results 61 of the 73 patients participated in this 4-year (3.9- to 4.1-year) follow-up study. BMD was similar in the risedronate group (n = 30) and the placebo group (n = 31). The mean difference was −1.8% in zone 1 and 0.5% in zone 7. Migration of the femoral stem, the clinical outcome, and the frequency of adverse events were similar in the 2 groups. Interpretation Although risedronate prevents periprosthetic bone loss postoperatively, a decrease in periprosthetic BMD accelerates when therapy is discontinued, and no effect is seen at 4 years. We do not recommend the use of risedronate following THA for osteoarthritis of the hip. PMID:25885280

  20. 18 CFR 3b.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 3b.1 Section 3b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES COLLECTION, MAINTENANCE, USE, AND DISSEMINATION OF RECORDS OF IDENTIFIABLE...

  1. Human B-1 cells take the stage

    PubMed Central

    Rothstein, Thomas L.; Griffin, Daniel O.; Holodick, Nichol E.; Quach, Tam D.; Kaku, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    B-1cells play critical roles in defending against microbial invasion and in housekeeping removal of cellular debris. B-1cells secrete natural antibody and manifest functions that influence T cell expansion and differentiation and in these and other ways differ from conventional B-2 cells. B-1-cells were originally studied in mice where they are easily distinguished from B-2cells, but their identity in the human system remained poorly defined for many years. Recently, functional criteria for human B-1cells were established on the basis of murine findings, and reverse engineering resulted in identification of the phenotypic profile, CD20+CD27+CD43+CD70−, for B-1cells found in both umbilical cord blood and adult peripheral blood. Human B-1cells may contribute to multiple disease states through production of autoantibody and stimulation/modulation of T cell activity. Human B-1cells could be a rich source of antibodies useful in treating diseases present in elderly populations where natural antibody protection may have eroded. Manipulation of human B-1cell numbers and/or activity may be a new avenue for altering T cell function and treating immune dyscrasias. PMID:23692567

  2. Particle Disease: A Current Review of the Biological Mechanisms in Periprosthetic Osteolysis After Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sukur, Erhan; Akman, Yunus Emre; Ozturkmen, Yusuf; Kucukdurmaz, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory responses to wear debris cause osteolysis that leads to aseptic prosthesis loosening and hip arthroplasty failure. Although osteolysis is usually associated with aseptic loosening, it is rarely seen around stable implants. Aseptic implant loosening is a simple radiologic phenomenon, but a complex immunological process. Particulate debris produced by implants most commonly causes osteolysis, and this is called particle-associated periprosthetic osteolysis (PPO). Objective: The objective of this review is to outline the features of particle-associated periprosthetic osteolysis to allow the physician to recognise this condition and commence early treatment, thereby optimizing patient outcome. Methods: A thorough literature search was performed using available databases, including Pubmed, to cover important research published covering particle-associated PPO. Results: Although osteolysis causes bone resorption, clinical, animal, and in vitro studies of particle bioreactivity suggest that particle-associated PPO represents the culmination of several biological reactions of many cell types, rather than being caused solely by the osteoclasts. The biological activity is highly dependent on the characteristics and quantity of the wear particles. Conclusion: Despite advances in total hip arthroplasty (THA), particle-associated PPO and aseptic loosening continue to be major factors that affect prosthetic joint longevity. Biomarkers could be exploited as easy and objective diagnostic and prognostic targets that would enable testing for osteolysis after THA. Further research is needed to identify new biomarkers in PPO. A comprehensive understanding of the underlying biological mechanisms is crucial for developing new therapeutic interventions to reverse or suppress biological responses to wear particles. PMID:27499822

  3. Chronic inflammation in biomaterial induced periprosthetic osteolysis: NF-κB as a therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu-hua; Tamaki, Yasunobu; Pajarinen, Jukka; Waters, Heather A.; Woo, Deanna K.; Yao, Zhenyu; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterial-induced tissue responses in patients with total joint replacement are associated with the generation of wear particles, which may lead to chronic inflammation and local bone destruction (periprosthetic osteolysis). Inflammatory reactions associated with wear particles are mediated by several important signaling pathways, the most important of which involves the transcription factor NF-κB. NF-κB activation is essential for macrophage recruitment and maturation, as well as the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, MCP1, etc. In addition, NF-κB activation contributes to osteoclast differentiation and maturation via RANK/RANKL signaling, which increases bone destruction and reduces bone formation. Targeting individual downstream cytokines directly (such as TNF-α or IL-1β) may not effectively prevent wear particle induced osteolysis. A more logical upstream therapeutic approach may be provided by direct modulation of the core IκB/IKKα/β/NF-κB signaling pathway in the local environment, however, the timing, dose, and strategy for administration should be considered. Suppression of chronic inflammation via inhibition of NF-κB activity in patients with malfunctioning joint replacements may be an effective strategy to mitigate wear particle induced periprosthetic osteolysis. PMID:24090989

  4. Unyvero i60 implant and tissue infection (ITI) multiplex PCR system in diagnosing periprosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Hischebeth, Gunnar T R; Randau, Thomas M; Buhr, Johanna K; Wimmer, Matthias D; Hoerauf, Achim; Molitor, Ernst; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle; Gravius, Sascha

    2016-02-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the most challenging complications in orthopedic surgery. In cases of suspected periprosthetic joint infection several diagnostic methods are available. In this study we investigated the performance of the newly available Unyvero i60 implant and tissue infection (ITI) multiplex PCR System. 62 specimens from 31 patients with suspected PJI or aseptic loosening of a painful joint arthoplasty were included in this study. Besides the established diagnostic procedures we included a commercial multiplex PCR detection system for diagnosis of PJI. The PCR results obtained from analysis of sonication and synovial fluids (62 specimens) showed a sensitivity of 66.7%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 100% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 68.4% when compared to cultural methods. Notably, cultures from sonication fluid displayed a sensitivity of 88.9%, a specificity of 61.5%, a PPV of 76.2% and a NPV of 80.0% when compared to tissue cultures. In conclusion, multiplex PCR is an additional - rapid - method for diagnosing PJI. Positive results with the PCR assay used in this study were always confirmed by subsequent matching culture positivity. However, apart from the time saved the nucleic acid amplification technique did not yield additional information than that obtained from microbiological cultures. PMID:26689142

  5. Observation of B Meson decays to b1pi and b1K.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Pegna, D Lopes; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Vazquez, W Panduro; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2007-12-14

    We present the results of searches for decays of B mesons to final states with a b1 meson and a charged pion or kaon. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 382x10(6) BB[over ] pairs produced in e+e- annihilation. The results for the branching fractions are, in units of 10(-6), B(B+-->b1(0)pi+)=6.7+/-1.7+/-1.0, B(B+-->b1(0)K+)=9.1+/-1.7+/-1.0, B(B0-->b1(-/+)pi(+/-))=10.9+/-1.2+/-0.9, and B(B0-->b1(-)K+)=7.4+/-1.0+/-1.0, with the assumption that B(b1-->omega pi)=1. We also measure charge and flavor asymmetries A(ch)(B+-->b1(0)pi+)=0.05+/-0.16+/-0.02, Ach(B+-->b1(0)K+)=-0.46+/-0.20+/-0.02, A(ch)(B0-->b1(-/+)pi(+/-))=-0.05+/-0.10+/-0.02, C(B0-->b1(-/+)pi(+/-))=-0.22+/-0.23+/-0.05, DeltaC(B0-->b1(-/+)pi(+/-))=-1.04+/-0.23+/-0.08, and A(ch)(B0-->b1(-)K+)=-0.07+/-0.12+/-0.02. The first error quoted is statistical, and the second systematic. PMID:18233439

  6. Large dynamic range relative B1+ mapping

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Aaron T.; Aljabar, Paul; Malik, Shaihan J.; Jezzard, Peter; Robson, Matthew D.; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Koopmans, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Parallel transmission (PTx) requires knowledge of the B1+ produced by each element. However, B1+ mapping can be challenging when transmit fields exhibit large dynamic range. This study presents a method to produce high quality relative B1+ maps when this is the case. Theory and Methods The proposed technique involves the acquisition of spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) images at multiple radiofrequency drive levels for each transmitter. The images are combined using knowledge of the SPGR signal equation using maximum likelihood estimation, yielding an image for each channel whose signal is proportional to the B1+ field strength. Relative B1+ maps are then obtained by taking image ratios. The method was tested using numerical simulations, phantom imaging, and through in vivo experiments. Results The numerical simulations demonstrated that the proposed method can reconstruct relative transmit sensitivities over a wide range of B1+ amplitudes and at several SNR levels. The method was validated at 3 Tesla (T) by comparing it with an alternative B1+ mapping method, and demonstrated in vivo at 7T. Conclusion Relative B1+ mapping in the presence of large dynamic range has been demonstrated through numerical simulations, phantom imaging at 3T and experimentally at 7T. The method will enable PTx to be applied in challenging imaging scenarios at ultrahigh field. Magn Reson Med 76:490–499, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26308375

  7. B-1a Lymphocytes Attenuate Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Lei; Chng, MH; Alonso, Michael N.; Yuan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Obesity-associated insulin resistance, a common precursor of type 2 diabetes, is characterized by chronic inflammation of tissues, including visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Here we show that B-1a cells, a subpopulation of B lymphocytes, are novel and important regulators of this process. B-1a cells are reduced in frequency in obese high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice, and EGFP interleukin-10 (IL-10) reporter mice show marked reductions in anti-inflammatory IL-10 production by B cells in vivo during obesity. In VAT, B-1a cells are the dominant producers of B cell–derived IL-10, contributing nearly half of the expressed IL-10 in vivo. Adoptive transfer of B-1a cells into HFD-fed B cell–deficient mice rapidly improves insulin resistance and glucose tolerance through IL-10 and polyclonal IgM-dependent mechanisms, whereas transfer of B-2 cells worsens metabolic disease. Genetic knockdown of B cell–activating factor (BAFF) in HFD-fed mice or treatment with a B-2 cell–depleting, B-1a cell–sparing anti-BAFF antibody attenuates insulin resistance. These findings establish B-1a cells as a new class of immune regulators that maintain metabolic homeostasis and suggest manipulation of these cells as a potential therapy for insulin resistance. PMID:25249575

  8. Patient-related medical risk factors for periprosthetic joint infection of the hip and knee

    PubMed Central

    Eka, Aleeson

    2015-01-01

    Despite advancements and improvements in methods for preventing infection, periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a significant complication following total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Prevention is the most important strategy to deal with this disabling complication, and prevention should begin with identifying patient-related risk factors. Medical risk factors, such as morbid obesity, malnutrition, hyperglycemia, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), preoperative anemia, cardiovascular disorders, chronic renal failure, smoking, alcohol abuse and depression, should be evaluated and optimized prior to surgery. Treating patients to get laboratory values under a specified threshold or cessation of certain modifiable risk factors can decrease the risk of PJI. Although significant advances have been made in past decades to identify these risk factors, there remains some uncertainty regarding the risk factors predisposing TJA patients to PJI. Through a review of the current literature, this paper aims to comprehensively evaluate and provide a better understanding of known medical risk factors for PJI after TJA. PMID:26539450

  9. Periprosthetic joint infection treated via bone cement and without the removal of hardware

    PubMed Central

    Göçer, Hasan; Dabak, Nevzat

    2016-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a challenging complication with a frequency of 0.5–3%. The patient's age, recurrent surgeries, and comorbid systemic diseases increase the risk of infection. Although the current approach in the treatment of PJI is a two-stage revision; sometimes, removing all the implants can lead to more serious complications. PJI's complications are increase in the time of surgery, loss of blood volume, and increase in the amount of bone loss. Infected soft tissue and dead bone tissue debridement must be made in all cases. One of our cases had bone defects due to recurrent hip arthroplasty revisions. Our case that was given PJI treatment by covering the well-fixed components with bone cement and removing only the mobile parts was discussed in line with the literature.

  10. Fungal degradation of aflatoxin B1.

    PubMed

    Shantha, T

    1999-01-01

    A number of fungal cultures were screened to select an organism suitable to be used in the detoxification of aflatoxin B1. They were co-cultured in Czapek-Dox-Casamino acid medium with aflatoxin B1 producing Aspergillus flavus. Several fungal cultures were found to prevent synthesis of aflatoxin B1 in liquid culture medium. Among these Phoma sp., Mucor sp., Trichoderma harzianum, Trichoderma sp. 639, Rhizopus sp. 663, Rhizopus sp. 710, Rhizopus sp. 668, Alternaria sp. and some strains belonging to the Sporotrichum group (ADA IV B14(a), ADA SF VI BF (9), strain 720) could inhibit aflatoxin synthesis by > or =90%. A few fungi, namely ADA IV B1, ADA F1, ADA F8, also belonging to the Sporotrichum group, were less efficient than the Phoma sp. The Cladosporium sp. and A. terreus sp. were by far the least efficient, registering <10% inhibition. The cultures which prevent aflatoxin biosynthesis are also capable of degrading the preformed toxin. Among these, Phoma sp. was the most efficient destroying about 99% of aflatoxin B1. The cell free extract of Phoma sp. destroyed nearly 50 microg aflatoxin B1 100 ml(-1) culture medium (90% of the added toxin), and this was more effective than its own culture filtrate over 5 days incubation at 28+/-2 degrees C. The degradation was gradual: 35% at 24 h, 58% at 48 h, 65% at 72 h, 85% at 96 h and 90% at 120 h. The possibility of a heat stable enzymatic activity in the cell free extract of Phoma is proposed. PMID:10945479

  11. Imputation methods for temporal radiographic texture analysis in the detection of periprosthetic osteolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkie, Joel R.; Giger, Maryellen L.; Pesce, Lorenzo L.; Engh, Charles A., Sr.; Hopper, Robert H., Jr.; Martell, John M.

    2007-03-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis is a disease triggered by the body's response to tiny wear fragments from total hip replacements (THR), which leads to localized bone loss and disappearance of the trabecular bone texture. We have been investigating methods of temporal radiographic texture analysis (tRTA) to help detect periprosthetic osteolysis. One method involves merging feature measurements at multiple time points using an LDA or BANN. The major drawback of this method is that several cases do not meet the inclusion criteria because of missing data, i.e., missing image data at the necessary time intervals. In this research, we investigated imputation methods to fill in missing data points using feature averaging, linear interpolation, and first and second order polynomial fitting. The database consisted of 101 THR cases with full data available from four follow-up intervals. For 200 iterations, missing data were randomly created to simulate a typical THR database, and the missing points were then filled in using the imputation methods. ROC analysis was used to assess the performance of tRTA in distinguishing between osteolysis and normal cases for the full database and each simulated database. The calculated values from the 200 iterations showed that the imputation methods produced negligible bias, and substantially decreased the variance of the AUC estimator, relative to excluding incomplete cases. The best performing imputation methods were those that heavily weighted the data points closest to the missing data. The results suggest that these imputation methods appear to be acceptable means to include cases with missing data for tRTA.

  12. 45 CFR 5b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 5b.1 Definitions. As... the Department of Health and Human Services. (c) Department means the Department of Health and Human... records when used in connection with the term “system of records.” (g) Notification means communication...

  13. B1 bradykinin receptors and sensory neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, C. L.; Naeem, S.; Phagoo, S. B.; Campbell, E. A.; Urban, L.; Burgess, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    1. The location of the B1 bradykinin receptors involved in inflammatory hyperalgesia was investigated. 2. No specific binding of the B1 bradykinin receptor ligand [3H]-des-Arg10-kallidin was detected in primary cultures of rat dorsal root ganglion neurones, even after treatment with interleukin-1 beta (100 iu ml-1). 3. In dorsal root ganglion neurones, activation of B2 bradykinin receptors stimulated polyphosphoinositidase C. In contrast, B1 bradykinin receptor agonists (des-Arg9-bradykinin up to 10 microM and des-Arg10-kallidin up to 1 microM) failed to activate polyphosphoinositidase C, even in neurones that had been treated with interleukin-1 beta (100 iu ml-1), prostaglandin E2 (1 microM) or prostaglandin I2 (1 microM). 4. Dorsal root ganglion neurones removed from rats (both neonatal and 14 days old) that had been pretreated with inflammatory mediators (Freund's complete adjuvant, or carrageenan) failed to respond to B1 bradykinin receptor selective agonists (des-Arg9-bradykinin up to 10 microM and des-Arg10-kallidin up to 1 microM). 5. Bradykinin (25 nM to 300 nM) evoked ventral root responses when applied to peripheral receptive fields or central terminals of primary afferents in the neonatal rat spinal cord and tail preparation. In contrast, des-Arg9-bradykinin (50 nM to 500 nM) failed to evoke ventral root depolarizations in either control rats or in animals that developed inflammation following ultraviolet irradiation of the tail skin. 6. The results of the present study imply that the B1 bradykinin receptors that contribute to hypersensitivity in models of persistent inflammatory hyperalgesia are located on cells other than sensory neurones where they may be responsible for releasing mediators that sensitize or activate the nociceptors. PMID:8832074

  14. Intermittent Administration of Parathyroid Hormone [1–34] Prevents Particle-Induced Periprosthetic Osteolysis in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Fanggang; Shi, Zhongli; Zhou, Chenhe; Liu, An; Shen, Yue; Yan, Shigui

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone [1–34] (PTH[1–34]; 60 μg/kg/day) can prevent the negative effects of titanium (Ti) particles on implant fixation and periprosthetic osteolysis in a rat model. Eighteen adult male rats (12 weeks old, bones still growing) received intramedullary Ti implants in their bilateral femurs; 6 rats from the blank group received vehicle injections, and 12 rats from the control group and PTH treatment group received Ti particle injections at the time of operation and intra-articular injections 2 and 4 weeks postoperatively. Six of the rats that received Ti particles from the PTH group also received PTH[1–34] treatment. Six weeks postoperatively, all specimens were collected for assessment by X-ray, micro-CT, biomechanical, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and dynamic histomorphometry. A lower BMD, BV/TV, Tb.N, maximal fixation strength, and mineral apposition rate were observed in the control group compared to the blank group, demonstrating that a periprosthetic osteolysis model had been successfully established. Administration of PTH[1–34] significantly increased the bone mineral density of the distal femur, BV/TV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, Tb.Sp, Con.D, SMI, and maximal fixation strength in the PTH group compared to that in the control group. SEM revealed higher bone–implant contact, thicker lamellar bone, and larger trabecular bone area in the PTH group than in the control group. A higher mineral apposition rate was observed in the PTH group compared to both the blank and control groups. These findings imply that intermittent administration of PTH[1–34] prevents periprosthetic osteolysis by promoting bone formation. The effects of PTH[1–34] were evaluated at a suprapharmacological dosage to the human equivalent in rats; therefore, additional studies are required to demonstrate its therapeutic potential in periprosthetic osteolysis. PMID:26441073

  15. Intermittent Administration of Parathyroid Hormone [1-34] Prevents Particle-Induced Periprosthetic Osteolysis in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Bi, Fanggang; Shi, Zhongli; Zhou, Chenhe; Liu, An; Shen, Yue; Yan, Shigui

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone [1-34] (PTH[1-34]; 60 μg/kg/day) can prevent the negative effects of titanium (Ti) particles on implant fixation and periprosthetic osteolysis in a rat model. Eighteen adult male rats (12 weeks old, bones still growing) received intramedullary Ti implants in their bilateral femurs; 6 rats from the blank group received vehicle injections, and 12 rats from the control group and PTH treatment group received Ti particle injections at the time of operation and intra-articular injections 2 and 4 weeks postoperatively. Six of the rats that received Ti particles from the PTH group also received PTH[1-34] treatment. Six weeks postoperatively, all specimens were collected for assessment by X-ray, micro-CT, biomechanical, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and dynamic histomorphometry. A lower BMD, BV/TV, Tb.N, maximal fixation strength, and mineral apposition rate were observed in the control group compared to the blank group, demonstrating that a periprosthetic osteolysis model had been successfully established. Administration of PTH[1-34] significantly increased the bone mineral density of the distal femur, BV/TV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, Tb.Sp, Con.D, SMI, and maximal fixation strength in the PTH group compared to that in the control group. SEM revealed higher bone-implant contact, thicker lamellar bone, and larger trabecular bone area in the PTH group than in the control group. A higher mineral apposition rate was observed in the PTH group compared to both the blank and control groups. These findings imply that intermittent administration of PTH[1-34] prevents periprosthetic osteolysis by promoting bone formation. The effects of PTH[1-34] were evaluated at a suprapharmacological dosage to the human equivalent in rats; therefore, additional studies are required to demonstrate its therapeutic potential in periprosthetic osteolysis. PMID:26441073

  16. Structural and mechanical characterisation of the peri-prosthetic tissue surrounding loosened hip prostheses. An explorative study.

    PubMed

    Moerman, Astrid; Zadpoor, Amir A; Oostlander, Angela; Schoeman, Monique; Rahnamay Moshtagh, Parisa; Pouran, Behdad; Valstar, Edward

    2016-09-01

    Very little is known about the structure and properties of peri-prosthetic fibrous tissue that is found around loose orthopaedic implants. We describe a method for characterizing the structural organisation (histology, confocal microscopy) as well as the nano- and micro-scale mechanical behaviour (atomic force microscopy, nanoindentation) of peri-prosthetic fibrous tissue. The tissue was collected from 11 patients undergoing revision surgery due to aseptic loosening. Sirius Red and Movat histological staining procedures indicated that the tissue mainly consists of collagen fibres and ground substance. However, large inter- and intra-patient variations in the relative proportions of these tissue components were found, as well as in collagen fibre orientation and possibly also maturation. The nano-scale Young׳s moduli ranged from 0-950kPa, but showed large inter-patient variability. When the results per sample were presented in a probability density function, we could roughly discriminate one peak in the 0-100kPa range and/or one peak in the 100-500Pa range. These nano-scale moduli seem to respectively present the mechanical properties of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen molecules. The majority of the micro-scale Young׳s moduli ranged between 0.5 and 2.0kPa for all samples. This explorative study provides new insights in (the variations of) structural organisation and mechanical properties of peri-prosthetic tissue. PMID:27281163

  17. B-1 Cell Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Randall S

    2015-01-01

    Coelomic cavity–derived B-1 and splenic marginal zone (MZ) B lymphocytes play principal roles in frontline host protection at homeostasis and during primary humoral immune responses. Although they share many features that enable rapid and broad-based defense against pathogens, these innate-like subsets have disparate B cell receptor (BCR) signaling features. Members of the Fc receptor–like (FCRL) family are preferentially expressed by B cells and possess tyrosine-based immunoregulatory function. An unusual characteristic of many of these cell surface proteins is the presence of both inhibitory (ITIM) and activating (ITAM-like) motifs in their cytoplasmic tails. In mice, FCRL5 is a discrete marker of splenic MZ and peritoneal B-1 B cells and has both ITIM and ITAM-like sequences. Recent work explored its signaling properties and identified that FCRL5 differentially influences innate-like BCR function. Closer scrutiny of these differences disclosed the ability of FCRL5 to counter-regulate BCR activation by recruiting SHP-1 and Lyn to its cytoplasmic motifs. Furthermore, the disparity in FCRL5 regulation between MZ and B-1 B cells correlated with relative intracellular concentrations of SHP-1. These findings validate and extend our understanding of the unique signaling features in innate-like B cells and provide new insight into the complexity of FCRL modulation. PMID:25964091

  18. Autoclaved metal-on-cement spacer versus static spacer in two-stage revision in periprosthetic knee infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Pin; Wu, Cheng-Chun; Ho, Wei-Pin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic knee infection is troublesome for Orthopedic surgeons and a catastrophy for patients. Reported rates of periprosthetic joint infection following primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are 0.39–2%. Two stage revision arthroplasty, which has success rates exceeding 90%, has been the gold standard for treating subacute and chronic periprosthetic infection following TKA. Antibiotic spacers, a well established means of delivering local antibiotic therapy, maintain soft tissue tension during two stage revision arthroplasty. However, controversy remains around whether static or mobile antibiotic impregnated spacers are superior for treating infection following TKA. Various mobile spacers are available, including cement-on-cement, cement-on-polyethylene and metal-on-polyethylene. In this study, the efficacy of the modified metal-on-cement spacer, consisting of reinsertion of the autoclaved femoral component and implantation of antibiotic-loaded cement in the proximal tibia, is assessed. Materials and Methods: Records of 19 patients diagnosed as periprosthetic knee infection were reviewed in this retrospective study. Among these patients, 10 patients received first stage debridement with the autoclaved metal-on-cement spacer and 8 patients with the static spacer, who eventually underwent two-stage re-implantation, were listed in the final comparison. Patient demographics, infection eradication rates, average range of motion (ROM), surgical time and blood loss during the second-stage of the surgery, and Knee Society (KS) knee scores at last followup after revision total knee replacement were clinically evaluated. Results: At a minimum of 2-year followup after re-implantation, infection eradication rates, surgical times, blood loss during the second-stage of the surgery, and KS knee score after re-implantation were similar for the two groups. Patients receiving autoclaved metal-on-cement spacers had superior ROM after re-implantation compared to

  19. Usefulness of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scan in the assessment of periprosthetic collections: report of 2 cases with opposite management.

    PubMed

    Choufani, Camille; Pierret, Charles; Gontier, Eric; Mlynski, Amélie; de Kerangal, Xavier; Chapuis, Olivier

    2014-04-01

    Vascular prosthetic infection is a rare but serious complication of vascular surgery that requires rapid diagnosis and treatment. It is associated with high rates of amputation and death. The diagnosis is difficult when faced with a chronic nonspecific clinical presentation. We report 2 cases showing the diagnostic usefulness of positron emission tomography (PET). In 1 case, PET excluded with certainty the septic character of a periprosthetic collection fistulized with the skin by showing a periprosthetic fixation insufficient to diagnose an infection. In the other case, it confirmed the prosthetic infection in association with an evocative clinical picture by revealing a pathologic periprosthetic hyperfixation. PET scan therefore drew aside the diagnosis of prosthetic infection faced with a mild clinical and paraclinical presentation in the first case, and made it possible to pose it with certainty in the second case. This examination made it possible to save valuable time in 1 case and to elucidate the periprosthetic collection in the other case. Therefore, the rule of surgical explantation of any prosthesis with flow or periprosthetic collection is no more univocal. PMID:24211410

  20. B-1B excels in conventional role

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.B.

    1992-07-01

    A report is presented of an observational flight performed in a USAF B-1B to better understand the operational aspects of the aircraft's new conventional bombing mission as an integral element of a multiaircraft tactical strike package. The basic flight plan consisted of a standard takeoff and climb, cruising to the training area at 22,000 ft, descending for a 400 ft low-level run, making two simulated bomb drops, and climbing back to 25,000 ft for the return to base. Attention is given the new/enhanced avionics, the ALQ-161 defensive electronic warfare system and ripple-release Mk. 82 bombing procedures.

  1. What role do periodontal pathogens play in osteoarthritis and periprosthetic joint infections of the knee?

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Garth D; Hu, Fen Z; Sotereanos, Nicholas; Sewicke, Jeffrey; Parvizi, Javad; Nara, Peter L; Arciola, Carla Renata

    2014-01-01

    Through the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-electron spray ionization (ESI)-time of flight (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS), we identified multiple periodontal pathogens within joint tissues of individuals undergoing replacement arthroplasties of the knee. The most prevalent of the periodontal pathogens were Treponema denticola and Enterococcus faecalis, the latter of which is commonly associated with apical periodontitis. These findings were unique to periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) of the knee and were never observed for PJIs of other lower extremity joints (hip and ankle) or upper extremity joints (shoulder and elbow). These data were confirmed by multiple independent methodologies including fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) which showed the bacteria deeply penetrated inside the diseased tissues, and 454-based deep 16S rDNA sequencing. The site-specificity, the tissue investment, and the identical findings by multiple nucleic-acid-based techniques strongly suggests the presence of infecting bacteria within these diseased anatomic sites. Subsequently, as part of a control program using PCR-ESI-TOF-MS, we again detected these same periodontal pathogens in aspirates from patients with osteoarthritis who were undergoing primary arthroplasty of the knee and thus who had no history of orthopedic implants. This latter finding raises the question of whether hematogenic spread of periodontal pathogens to the knee play a primary or secondary-exacerbatory role in osteoarthritis. PMID:24921460

  2. Fungal Periprosthetic Joint Infection in Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Jakobs, Oliver; Schoof, Benjamin; Klatte, Till Orla; Schmidl, Stefan; Fensky, Florian; Guenther, Daniel; Frommelt, Lars; Gehrke, Thorsten; Gebauer, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Fungal periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a rare but devastating complication following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A standardized procedure regarding an accurate treatment of this serious complication of knee arthroplasty is lacking. In this systematic review, we collected data from 36 studies with a total of 45 reported cases of a TKA complicated by a fungal PJI. Subsequently, an analysis focusing on diagnostic, medicaments and surgical procedures in the pre-, intra- and postoperative period was performed. Candida spp. accounts for about 80% (36 out of 45 cases) of fungal PJIs and is therefore the most frequently reported pathogen. A systemic antifungal therapy was administered in all but one patient whereas a local antifungal therapy, e.g. the use of an impregnated spacer, is of inferior relevance. Resection arthroplasty with delayed re-implantation (two-stage revision) was the surgical treatment of choice. However, in 50% of all reported cases the surgical therapy was heterogeneous. The outcome under a combined therapy was moderate with recurrent fungal PJI in 11 patients and subsequent bacterial PJI as a main complication in 5 patients. In summary, this systematic review integrates data from up to date 45 reported cases of a fungal PJI of a TKA. On the basis of the current literature strategies for the treatment of this devastating complication after TKA are discussed. PMID:25874061

  3. Therapy of periprosthetical leakage with tissue augmentation using Bioplastique around the implanted voice prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Lorincz, B B; Lichtenberger, G; Bihari, A; Falvai, J

    2005-01-01

    Having a voice prosthesis provides a good possibility for speech rehabilitation after total laryngectomy has been performed, especially if common complications such as leakage around the valve can be reduced effectively. The early applications of a voice prosthesis-which was originally invented and applied by Mozolewski in 1972, was further developed by Blom and Singer and became an internationally available implantable instrument by 1980- already made clear not only the typical benefits, but also the complications, such as possible leakage around the implanted valve. Remacle proposed the injection of collagen into the surrounding tissues in order to stop leakage. Knowing that collagen is usually resorbed as time goes by, new substances that can be tolerated by human tissues must be found. This article reports the experiences of the authors in the search for such an injectable material that cannot be resorbed and does not migrate. In order to solve the above-mentioned problem, Lichtenberger introduced the injection of Bioplastique into the perivalvular tissues. This delivered the best results ever achieved in this field at our department. During the past 2 years, Bioplastique augmentation was performed for seven laryngectomized and speech-rehabilitated patients in order to reduce periprosthetical leakage. All procedures were successful in terms of either eliminating or reducing the leakage, and also the non-resorbable property of Bioplastique has been proven. PMID:14986020

  4. The potential role of the osteoblast in the development of periprosthetic osteolysis: review of in vitro osteoblast responses to wear debris, corrosion products, and cytokines and growth factors.

    PubMed

    Vermes, C; Glant, T T; Hallab, N J; Fritz, E A; Roebuck, K A; Jacobs, J J

    2001-12-01

    Limited information is available on the responses of osteoblasts to wear debris, corrosion products, and cytokines and on the roles of altered osteoblast functions in the development of periprosthetic bone loss. Wear debris-challenged osteoblasts exhibit altered functions resulting in the loss of their capacity to produce bone matrix and to replace the resorbed bone. Also, osteoblasts may secrete cytokines, which act in a paracrine fashion to recruit inflammatory cells into the periprosthetic space and to stimulate osteoclastic bone resorption. These effects may be mediated in part by ionic metal dissolution products. We review the mechanisms by which altered osteoblast functions, in response to particulate wear debris, corrosion products, and cytokines and growth factors, may contribute to the development and the progression of periprosthetic osteolysis. PMID:11742458

  5. 26 CFR 301.7701(b)-1 - Resident alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resident alien. 301.7701(b)-1 Section 301.7701(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Definitions § 301.7701(b)-1 Resident alien. (a) Scope. Section 301.7701(b)-1(b) provides rules...

  6. Phylogeography of E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup and analysis of its subclades in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Reguig, Ahmed; Harich, Nourdin; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Rouba, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    In this study we analyzed 295 unrelated Berber-speaking men from northern, central, and southern Morocco to characterize frequency of the E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup and to refine the phylogeny of its subclades: E1b1b1b1-M107, E1b1b1b2-M183, and E1b1b1b2a-M165. For this purpose, we typed four biallelic polymorphisms: M81, M107, M183, and M165. A large majority of the Berber-speaking male lineages belonged to the Y-chromosomal E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup. The frequency ranged from 79.1% to 98.5% in all localities sampled. E1b1b1b2-M183 was the most dominant subclade in our samples, ranging from 65.1% to 83.1%. In contrast, the E1b1b1b1-M107 and E1b1b1b2a-M165 subclades were not found in our samples. Our results suggest a predominance of the E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup among Moroccan Berber-speaking males with a decreasing gradient from south to north. The most prevalent subclade in this haplogroup was E1b1b1b2-M183, for which diffferences among these three groups were statistically significant between central and southern groups. PMID:25397701

  7. Lower periprosthetic bone loss and good fixation of an ultra-short stem compared to a conventional stem in uncemented total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Salemyr, Mats; Muren, Olle; Ahl, Torbjörn; Bodén, Henrik; Eisler, Thomas; Stark, André; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — We hypothesized that an ultra-short stem would load the proximal femur in a more physiological way and could therefore reduce the adaptive periprosthetic bone loss known as stress shielding. Patients and methods — 51 patients with primary hip osteoarthritis were randomized to total hip arthroplasty (THA) with either an ultra-short stem or a conventional tapered stem. The primary endpoint was change in periprosthetic bone mineral density (BMD), measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), in Gruen zones 1 and 7, two years after surgery. Secondary endpoints were change in periprosthetic BMD in the entire periprosthetic region, i.e. Gruen zones 1 through 7, stem migration measured with radiostereometric analysis (RSA), and function measured with self-administered functional scores. Results — The periprosthetic decrease in BMD was statistically significantly lower with the ultra-short stem. In Gruen zone 1, the mean difference was 18% (95% CI: −27% to −10%). In zone 7, the difference was 5% (CI: −12% to −3%) and for Gruen zones 1–7 the difference was also 5% (CI: −9% to −2%). During the first 6 weeks postoperatively, the ultra-short stems migrated 0.77 mm more on average than the conventional stems. 3 months after surgery, no further migration was seen. The functional scores improved during the study and were similar in the 2 groups. Interpretation — Up to 2 years after total hip arthroplasty, compared to the conventional tapered stem the ultra-short uncemented anatomical stem induced lower periprosthetic bone loss and had equally excellent stem fixation and clinical outcome. PMID:26134386

  8. 118-B-1 excavation treatability test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Hanford 118-B-1 Burial Ground Treatability Study has been required by milestone change request {number_sign}M-15-93-04, dated September 30, 1993. The change request requires that a treatability test be conducted at the 100-B Area to obtain additional engineering information for remedial design of burial grounds receiving waste from 100 Area removal actions. This treatability study has two purposes: (1) to support development of the Proposed Plan (PP) and Record of Decision (ROD), which will identify the approach to be used for burial ground remediation, and (2) to provide specific engineering information for receiving waste generated from the 100 Area removal actions. Data generated from this test also will provide critical performance and cost information necessary for remedy evaluation in the detailed analysis of alternatives during preparation of the focused feasibility study (FFS). This treatability testing supports the following 100 Area alternatives: (1) excavation and disposal, and (2) excavation, sorting, (treatment), and disposal.

  9. 118-B-1 excavation treatability test procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Frain, J.M.

    1994-08-01

    This treatability study has two purposes: to support development of the approach to be used for burial ground remediation, and to provide specific engineering information for the design of burial grounds receiving waste generated from the 100 Area removal actions. Data generated from this test will also provide performance and cost information necessary for detailed analysis of alternatives for burial ground remediation. Further details on the test requirements, milestones and data quality objectives are described in detail in the 118-B-1 Excavation Treatability Test Plan (DOE/RL-94-43). These working procedures are intended for use by field personnel to implement the requirements of the milestone. A copy of the detailed Test Plan will be kept on file at the on-site field support trailer, and will be available for review by field personnel.

  10. In vivo Metabolism of Hydrolyzed Fumonisin B1 and Fumonisin B1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is the most prevalent fumonisin mycotoxin found in corn and corn-based foods. It inhibits ceramide synthase, disrupts sphingolipid metabolism and function, is toxic to animals, causes cancer in rodents, and induces neural tube defects in some mouse strains. Its human health effect...

  11. Investigation of temporal radiographic texture analysis for the detection of periprosthetic osteolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkie, Joel R.; Giger, Maryellen L.; Engh, Charles A., Sr.; Martell, John M.

    2006-03-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis is a disease caused by the body's response to submicron polyethylene debris particles from the hip implant in total hip replacement (THR) patients. It leads to resorption of bone surrounding the implant and deterioration of the bone's trabecular texture, but this is difficult to detect until the later stages of disease progression. Radiographic texture analysis methods have shown promise in detecting this disease at an earlier stage; however, changes in texture over time may be more important than absolute texture measures. In this research, we investigated temporal radiographic texture analysis (tRTA) methods as possible aids in the detection of osteolysis. A database of 48 THR cases with images available from four different follow-up time intervals was used. ROIs were selected within the osteolytic region of the most recent follow-up image (or comparable region for normal cases) and visually matched on all previous images. Texture features were calculated from the ROIs and then trend analysis was performed using a simple linear regression method, an LDA method and a BANN method. The performance of these three methods was evaluated by ROC analysis. Maximum AUC values of 0.68, 0.78, and 0.88 for the task of distinguishing between osteolysis and normal cases were achieved for the respective tRTA features. These performances were superior to those of our prior stationary, non-temporal texture analysis. The results suggest that tRTA may have the potential to help detect osteolysis at an earlier, more treatable stage.

  12. Molecular epidemiology of coxsackievirus type B1.

    PubMed

    Abdelkhalek, Ichrak; Seghier, Mohamed; Yahia, Ahlem Ben; Touzi, Henda; Meddeb, Zina; Triki, Henda; Rezig, Dorra

    2015-11-01

    Coxsackievirus type B1 (CVB1) has emerged globally as the predominant enterovirus serotype and is associated with epidemics of meningitis and chronic diseases. In this report, the phylogeny of CVB1 was studied based on the VP1 sequences of 11 North African isolates and 81 published sequences. All CVB1 isolates segregated into four distinct genogroups and 10 genotypes. Most of the identified genotypes of circulating CVB1 strains appear to have a strict geographical specificity. The North African strains were of a single genotype and probably evolved distinctly. Using a relaxed molecular clock model and three different population models (constant population, exponential growth and Bayesian skyline demographic models) in coalescent analysis using the BEAST program, the substitution rate in CVB1 varied between 6.95 × 10(-3) and 7.37 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year in the VP1 region. This study permits better identification of circulating CVB1, which has become one of the most predominant enterovirus serotypes in humans. PMID:26243282

  13. Vitamin B1 (thiamine) and dementia.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Gary E; Hirsch, Joseph A; Fonzetti, Pasquale; Jordan, Barry D; Cirio, Rosanna T; Elder, Jessica

    2016-03-01

    The earliest and perhaps best example of an interaction between nutrition and dementia is related to thiamine (vitamin B1). Throughout the last century, research showed that thiamine deficiency is associated with neurological problems, including cognitive deficits and encephalopathy. Multiple similarities exist between classical thiamine deficiency and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in that both are associated with cognitive deficits and reductions in brain glucose metabolism. Thiamine-dependent enzymes are critical components of glucose metabolism that are reduced in the brains of AD patients and by thiamine decline, and a decrease in their levels could account for the reduction in glucose metabolism. In preclinical models, reduced thiamine can drive AD-like abnormalities, including memory deficits, neuritic plaques, and hyperphosphorylation of tau. Furthermore, excess thiamine diminishes AD-like pathologies. In addition to dietary deficits, drugs or other manipulations that interfere with thiamine absorption can cause thiamine deficiency. Elucidating the reasons why the brains of AD patients are functionally thiamine deficient and determining the effects of thiamine restoration may provide critical information to help treat patients with AD. PMID:26971083

  14. A New Case of Fracture of a Modular Femoral Neck Device After a Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Trieb, Klemens; Stadler, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    This report addresses a new case of a modular femoral neck fracture after total hip arthroplasty. A now seventy-three-year- old overweight female underwent total hip replacement of the right hip because of osteoarthritis in the year 2002. Then, years later, the head and the polyethylene were changed due to wear. In October 2014, the patient was transferred from the trauma department of her hometown to our department after she had slipped and fallen directly on her right hip. The x-rays done at the trauma department have shown no periprosthetic fracture but a fracture of the modular neck. Therefore, the patient was transferred to our department in order to undergo a revision arthroplasty with change of the stem and head after splitting the femur. PMID:26157528

  15. Atypical Presentation of Tuberculosis of Elbow Joint in Operated Case of Distal Humerus Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Yogesh; Khadilkar, Madhav; Ranade, Ashish S.; Vartak, Devendra N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A typical presentations of tuberculosis are not uncommon. Periprosthetic infection with tuberculosis after total joint replacement has well published. Tuberculosis of the elbow following open reduction internal fixation of a distal humerus fraeture is extremely rare. Case Report: We report case of a healthy, immunocompetenet 49-year-old male who underwent open reduction and internal fixation with bicolumnar plating for distal humerus fracture and presented after 18 month with cystic swelling over medial aspect of operated site. There was no wound dehiscence and the underlying fracture was healed well without any signs of implant loosening or bony involvement. Cystic swelling was excised and histopathology provided the diagnosis of tuberculosis. Patient was treated with anti tubercular chemotherapy and patient made uneventful recovery. Conclusion: Although synovial tuberculosis after fracture fixation is a rare entity, tuberculosis should be kept as a differential diagnosis. Surgeons should have high index of suspicion to diagnose atypical presentations of tuberculosis. PMID:27299044

  16. Bone density and anisotropy affect periprosthetic cement and bone stresses after anatomical glenoid replacement: A micro finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Yan; Santos, Inês; Müller, Peter E; Pietschmann, Matthias F

    2016-06-14

    Glenoid loosening is still a main complication for shoulder arthroplasty. We hypothesize that cement and bone stresses potentially leading to fixation failure are related not only to glenohumeral conformity, fixation design or eccentric loading, but also to bone volume fraction, cortical thickness and degree of anisotropy in the glenoid. In this study, periprosthetic bone and cement stresses were computed with micro finite element models of the replaced glenoid depicting realistic bone microstructure. These models were used to quantify potential effects of bone microstructural parameters under loading conditions simulating different levels of glenohumeral conformity and eccentric loading simulating glenohumeral instability. Results show that peak cement stresses were achieved near the cement-bone interface in all loading schemes. Higher stresses within trabecular bone tissue and cement mantle were obtained within specimens of lower bone volume fraction and in regions of low anisotropy, increasing with decreasing glenohumeral conformity and reaching their maxima below the keeled design when the load is shifted superiorly. Our analyses confirm the combined influences of eccentric load shifts with reduced bone volume fraction and anisotropy on increasing periprosthetic stresses. They finally suggest that improving fixation of glenoid replacements must reduce internal cement and bone tissue stresses, in particular in glenoids of low bone density and heterogeneity. PMID:27087675

  17. Saponins, Esculeosides B-1 and B-2, in Tomato Juice and Sapogenol, Esculeogenin B1.

    PubMed

    Nohara, Toshihiro; Fujiwara, Yukio; Zhou, Jian-Rong; Urata, Jun; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Murakami, Kotaro; El-Aasr, Mona; Ono, Masateru

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that commercial tomato juice packaged in 900 g plastic bottles contains rare, naturally occurring steroidal solanocapsine-type tomato glycosides in which the saponins consist of esculeosides B-1 (2) and B-2 (3) in 0.041% as major components lacking esculeoside A. We suggest that these saponins are derived from esculeoside A (1) when the juice in plastic bottles is prepared by treatment with boiling water, similar to the process used in preparing canned tomatoes. Herein, the obtained tomato saponins (2) and (3) provided sapogenols esculeogenin B1 (4) and B2 (5), respectively, by acid hydrolysis. The former was identical to esculeogenin B previously reported, and the latter was a new sapogenol characterized to be (5α,22S,23S,25S)-22,26-epimino-16β,23-epoxy-3β,23,27-trihydroxycholestane. PMID:26423043

  18. Chemical and biochemical composition of late periprosthetic fluids from women after explantation of ruptured Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) breast prostheses.

    PubMed

    Beretta, Giangiacomo; Richards, Adrian; Malacco, Matteo

    2013-10-01

    In this study we have analysed the chemical composition of the silicone extracted from two explanted intact PIP breast prostheses and of breast late periprosthetic fluid (LPF) samples from n=4 patients with ruptured PIP implants. The results obtained by ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy, GC-MS, reverse phase HPLC-UV/DAD, SEC-UV/DAD and contrast phase microscopy demonstrated for the first time that the cloudy, viscous LPF found in the breast of women carriers of PIP implants is a multiphasic amphiphilic silicone/serum microemulsion that can migrate through the body (via lymphatic system) to accumulate first in the lymph nodes. The GC-MS and ATR-FT-IR data indicate that low and high molecular weight silicones (chemical markers: D4-D9, L8) can penetrate the elastomeric shell and periprosthetic capsule and enter the breast tissue via the periprosthetic fluid. Also serum influx from breast tissue into via periprosthetic fluid through the capsule and shell into implant filler silicone (chemical markers: cholesterol by GC-MS, and uric acid, globulins and albumin by HPLC-DAD). To the best of our knowledge, the profile of the major constituents in PIP-induced LPF have been unequivocally characterised for the first time in this work. Further studies will be needed to evaluate the biological consequences of the current results. The potential toxicological implications of the results are discussed in the light of the current literature on the health effects of PIP implants. PMID:23835059

  19. A numerical investigation into the influence of the properties of cobalt chrome cellular structures on the load transfer to the periprosthetic femur following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hazlehurst, Kevin Brian; Wang, Chang Jiang; Stanford, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Stress shielding of the periprosthetic femur following total hip arthroplasty is a problem that can promote the premature loosening of femoral stems. In order to reduce the need for revision surgery it is thought that more flexible implant designs need to be considered. In this work, the mechanical properties of laser melted square pore cobalt chrome molybdenum cellular structures have been incorporated into the design of a traditional monoblock femoral stem. The influence of incorporating the properties of cellular structures on the load transfer to the periprosthetic femur was investigated using a three dimensional finite element model. Eleven different stiffness configurations were investigated by using fully porous and functionally graded approaches. This investigation confirms that the periprosthetic stress values depend on the stiffness configuration of the stem. The numerical results showed that stress shielding is reduced in the periprosthetic Gruen zones when the mechanical properties of cobalt chrome molybdenum cellular structures are used. This work identifies that monoblock femoral stems manufactured using a laser melting process, which are designed for reduced stiffness, have the potential to contribute towards reducing stress shielding. PMID:24613500

  20. 26 CFR 1.7702B-1 - Consumer protection provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Consumer protection provisions. 1.7702B-1 Section 1.7702B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) General Actuarial Valuations § 1.7702B-1 Consumer protection provisions. (a) In general. Under...

  1. 49 CFR 178.33b-1 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance. 178.33b-1 Section 178.33b-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Specifications for Inside Containers, and Linings § 178.33b-1 Compliance. (a) Required in all details. (b)...

  2. 32 CFR 806b.1 - Summary of revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Summary of revisions. 806b.1 Section 806b.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Overview of the Privacy Act Program § 806b.1 Summary of revisions. This part moves...

  3. 26 CFR 1.367(b)-1 - Other transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Other transfers. 1.367(b)-1 Section 1.367(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Effects on Corporation § 1.367(b)-1 Other transfers. (a) Scope. The regulations promulgated under section 367(b) (the section...

  4. 26 CFR 1.267(b)-1 - Relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Relationships. 1.267(b)-1 Section 1.267(b)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.267(b)-1 Relationships. (a) In general. (1) The persons... partnership separately. Therefore, if the other person and a partner are within any one of the...

  5. 26 CFR 1.267(b)-1 - Relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Relationships. 1.267(b)-1 Section 1.267(b)-1...) INCOME TAXES Items Not Deductible § 1.267(b)-1 Relationships. (a) In general. (1) The persons referred to... partnership separately. Therefore, if the other person and a partner are within any one of the...

  6. 26 CFR 1.7702B-1 - Consumer protection provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Consumer protection provisions. 1.7702B-1 Section 1.7702B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) General Actuarial Valuations § 1.7702B-1 Consumer...

  7. 26 CFR 1.168(b)-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions. 1.168(b)-1 Section 1.168(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.168(b)-1 Definitions. (a) Definitions. For purposes of section...

  8. 49 CFR 178.33b-1 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compliance. 178.33b-1 Section 178.33b-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Containers, and Linings § 178.33b-1 Compliance. (a) Required in all details. (b)...

  9. 49 CFR 178.33b-1 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compliance. 178.33b-1 Section 178.33b-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Containers, and Linings § 178.33b-1 Compliance. (a) Required in all details. (b)...

  10. 49 CFR 178.33b-1 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compliance. 178.33b-1 Section 178.33b-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Containers, and Linings § 178.33b-1 Compliance. (a) Required in all details. (b)...

  11. 49 CFR 178.33b-1 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compliance. 178.33b-1 Section 178.33b-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Containers, and Linings § 178.33b-1 Compliance. (a) Required in all details. (b)...

  12. 76 FR 60471 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section... Proposed Issuance of Letter of Offer Pursuant to Section 36(b)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act,...

  13. 78 FR 26324 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of... No. 13-20 Notice of Proposed Issuance of Letter of Offer Pursuant to Section 36(b)(1) of the...

  14. 77 FR 42709 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section... Proposed Issuance of Letter of Offer Pursuant to Section 36(b)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act,...

  15. 76 FR 60455 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section... Proposed Issuance of Letter of Offer Pursuant to Section 36(b)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act,...

  16. 12 CFR 261b.1 - Basis and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Basis and scope. 261b.1 Section 261b.1 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM RULES REGARDING PUBLIC OBSERVATION OF MEETINGS § 261b.1 Basis and scope. This part is issued by the Board...

  17. 26 CFR 53.4942(b)-1 - Operating foundations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Operating foundations. 53.4942(b)-1 Section 53.4942(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Taxes on Failure To Distribute Income § 53.4942(b)-1 Operating foundations....

  18. 26 CFR 53.4942(b)-1 - Operating foundations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Operating foundations. 53.4942(b)-1 Section 53.4942(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Taxes on Failure To Distribute Income § 53.4942(b)-1 Operating foundations....

  19. 26 CFR 31.6302(b)-1 - Method of collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Method of collection. 31.6302(b)-1 Section 31.6302(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT... Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.6302(b)-1 Method of collection. For provisions relating to collection by...

  20. 26 CFR 54.4980B-1 - COBRA in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false COBRA in general. 54.4980B-1 Section 54.4980B-1... TAXES (CONTINUED) PENSION EXCISE TAXES § 54.4980B-1 COBRA in general. The COBRA continuation coverage... requirements were added to section 162 by the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985...

  1. 26 CFR 54.4980B-1 - COBRA in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false COBRA in general. 54.4980B-1 Section 54.4980B-1... TAXES (CONTINUED) PENSION EXCISE TAXES § 54.4980B-1 COBRA in general. The COBRA continuation coverage... requirements were added to section 162 by the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985...

  2. 26 CFR 54.4980B-1 - COBRA in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false COBRA in general. 54.4980B-1 Section 54.4980B-1... TAXES (CONTINUED) PENSION EXCISE TAXES § 54.4980B-1 COBRA in general. The COBRA continuation coverage... requirements were added to section 162 by the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985...

  3. 26 CFR 1.1314(b)-1 - Method of adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Method of adjustment. 1.1314(b)-1 Section 1.1314(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Readjustment of Tax Between Years and Special Limitations § 1.1314(b)-1 Method...

  4. Elbow Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... and held together with pins and wires or plates and screws. Fractures of the distal humerus (see ... doctor. These fractures usually require surgical repair with plates and/or screw, unless they are stable. SIGNS ...

  5. Olecranon Fractures.

    PubMed

    Brolin, Tyler J; Throckmorton, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Olecranon fractures are common upper extremity injuries, with all but nondisplaced fractures treated surgically. There has been a recent shift in the surgical management of these fractures from tension band wiring to locking plate fixation and intramedullary nailing; however, this comes with increased implant cost. Although most patients can expect good outcomes after these various techniques, there is little information to guide a surgeon's treatment plan. This article reviews the epidemiology, classification, treatment, and outcomes of olecranon fractures. PMID:26498547

  6. Topical Tranexamic Acid Use in Knee Periprosthetic Joint Infection Is Safe and Effective.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Bradford S; Zahoor, Talal; Meyer, Mark; Ochsner, Lock; Chimento, George

    2016-07-01

    Tranexamic acid (TXA) has been shown to decrease hemoglobin loss and reduce the need for transfusions in primary hip and knee arthroplasty. Our study evaluated the safety and efficacy of topical TXA in revision TKA for periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). We performed a retrospective review of patients who underwent removal of hardware with antibiotic spacer placement (stage 1) and/or revision TKA (stage 2) for PJI at our institution between September 2007 and July 2013. During that time, 49 patients underwent stage-1 procedures (20 knees with TXA, 29 without TXA) and 47 patients underwent stage-2 revisions (28 with TXA, 19 without TXA). We evaluated hemoglobin loss, need for transfusion, reinfection rate, length of stay (LOS), complications, and mortality with and without the use of TXA in these patients. All data sets were analyzed with a two-sample t-test. Average follow-up was 3.15 years (range, 1-7 years). TXA use led to a significantly lower percentage drop in the postoperative lowest hemoglobin compared with the preoperative hemoglobin in stage-1 surgeries (19.8 vs. 30.05%, p = 0.0004) and stage-2 revisions (24.5 vs 32.01%, p = 0.01). In both groups, TXA use was associated with a significant reduction in transfusion rates (stage-1, 25 vs 51.7%, p = 0.04; stage-2, 25 vs. 52.6%, p = 0.05). There was a nonstatistical decreased LOS in both groups in which TXA was used (stage 1, 5.15 vs. 6.72 days, p = 0.055; stage 2, 5.21 vs. 6.84 days, p = 0.09). There was no difference in the reinfection rate (4 vs. 4, p = 0.56) or mortality rate between groups (0 vs. 2 non-TXA group). A single upper extremity deep vein thrombosis occurred in a stage-1 patient who received TXA, and no pulmonary embolism occurred. We show that topical TXA is safe and effective for use in both stages of revision TKA for PJI. Previous studies have shown TXA to aggravate a staphylococcal infection in mice; however, topical TXA doesn't appear to negatively effect on the

  7. Sports fractures.

    PubMed Central

    DeCoster, T. A.; Stevens, M. A.; Albright, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    Fractures occur in athletes and dramatically influence performance during competitive and recreational activities. Fractures occur in athletes as the result of repetitive stress, acute sports-related trauma and trauma outside of athletics. The literature provides general guidelines for treatment as well as a variety of statistics on the epidemiology of fractures by sport and level of participation. Athletes are healthy and motivated patients, and have high expectations regarding their level of function. These qualities make them good surgical candidates. Although closed treatment methods are appropriate for most sports fractures, an aggressive approach to more complicated fractures employing current techniques may optimize their subsequent performance. PMID:7719781

  8. Periprosthetic bone loss in total hip arthroplasty. Polyethylene wear debris and the concept of the effective joint space.

    PubMed

    Schmalzried, T P; Jasty, M; Harris, W H

    1992-07-01

    Thirty-four hips in which there had been prosthetic replacement were selected for study because of the presence of linear (diffuse) or lytic (localized) areas of periprosthetic bone loss. In all hips, there was careful documentation of the anatomical location of the material that had been obtained for histological analysis, and the specific purpose of the removal of the tissue was for examination to determine the cause of the resorption of bone. Specimens from twenty-three hips were retrieved during an operation and from eleven hips, at autopsy. The area of bone loss was linear only in sixteen hips, lytic only in thirteen, and both linear and lytic in five. In all thirty-four hips, intracellular particulate debris was found in the macrophages that were present in the area of bone resorption. All thirty-four had intracellular particles of polyethylene, many of which were less than one micrometer in size. Thirty-one hips had extracellular particles of polyethylene as well. Twenty-two of the thirty-four hips had intracellular metallic debris; in ten, metallic debris was found extracellularly as well. Ten of the sixteen cemented specimens had intracellular and extracellular polymethylmethacrylate debris. In the mechanically stable prostheses--cemented and uncemented--polyethylene wear debris was identified in areas of bone resorption far from the articular surfaces. The number of macrophages in a microscopic field was directly related to the amount of particulate polyethylene debris that was visible by light microscopy. Although the gross radiographic appearances of linear bone loss and lytic bone loss were different, the histological appearance of the regions in which there was active bone resorption was similar. Regardless of the radiographic appearance and anatomical origin of the specimen, bone resorption was found to occur in association with macrophages that were laden with polyethylene debris. In general, the number of macrophages present had a direct

  9. Risk factors for intraoperative calcar fracture in cementless total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Simo S A; Mäkinen, Tatu J; Kostensalo, Inari; Mäkelä, Keijo; Huhtala, Heini; Kettunen, Jukka S; Remes, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Intraoperative periprosthetic femoral fracture is a known complication of cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). We determined the incidence of—and risk factors for—intraoperative calcar fracture, and assessed its influence on the risk of revision. Patients and methods — This retrospective analysis included 3,207 cementless THAs (in 2,913 patients). 118 intraoperative calcar fractures were observed in these hips (3.7%). A control group of 118 patients/hips without calcar fractures was randomly selected. The mean follow-up was 4.2 (1.8–8.0) years. Demographic data, surgical data, type of implant, and proximal femur morphology were evaluated to determine risk factors for intraoperative calcar fracture. Results — The revision rates in the calcar fracture group and the control group were 10% (95% CI: 5.9–17) and 3.4% (CI: 1.3–8.4), respectively. The revision rate directly related to intraoperative calcar fracture was 7.6%. The Hardinge approach and lower age were risk factors for calcar fracture. In the fracture group, 55 of 118 patients (47%) had at least one risk factor, while only 23 of118 patients in the control group (20%) had a risk factor (p = 0.001). Radiological analysis showed that in the calcar fracture group, there were more deviated femoral anatomies and proximal femur bone cortices were thinner. Interpretation — Intraoperative calcar fracture increased the risk of revision. The Hardinge approach and lower age were risk factors for intraoperative calcar fracture. To avoid intraoperative fractures, special attention should be paid when cementless stems are used with deviant-shaped proximal femurs and with thin cortices. PMID:26541230

  10. Effects of Aflatoxin B1 and Fumonisin B1 on Blood Biochemical Parameters in Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Tessari, Eliana N. C.; Kobashigawa, Estela; Cardoso, Ana Lúcia S. P.; Ledoux, David R.; Rottinghaus, George E.; Oliveira, Carlos A. F.

    2010-01-01

    The individual and combined effects of dietary aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and fumonisin B1 (FB1) on liver pathology, serum levels of aspartate amino-transferase (AST) and plasma total protein (TP) of broilers were evaluated from 8 to 41 days of age. Dietary treatments included a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement with three levels of AFB1 (0, 50 and 200 μg AFB1/kg), and three levels of FB1 (0, 50 and 200 mg FB1/kg). At 33 days post feeding, with the exception of birds fed 50 mg FB1 only, concentrations of AST were higher (p < 0.05) in all other treatment groups when compared with controls. Plasma TP was lower (p < 0.05) at six days post feeding in groups fed 200 μg AFB1/kg alone or in combination with FB1. At day 33 days post feeding, with the exception of birds fed the highest combination of AFB1 and FB1 which had higher plasma TP than control birds, plasma TP of birds fed other dietary treatments were similar to controls. Broilers receiving the highest levels of AFB1 and FB1 had bile duct proliferation and trabecular disorder in liver samples. AFB1 singly or in combination with FB at the levels studied, caused liver damage and an increase in serum levels of AST. PMID:22069595

  11. Effects of aflatoxin B(1) and fumonisin B(1) on blood biochemical parameters in broilers.

    PubMed

    Tessari, Eliana N C; Kobashigawa, Estela; Cardoso, Ana Lúcia S P; Ledoux, David R; Rottinghaus, George E; Oliveira, Carlos A F

    2010-04-01

    The individual and combined effects of dietary aflatoxin B(1 )(AFB(1)) and fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) on liver pathology, serum levels of aspartate amino-transferase (AST) and plasma total protein (TP) of broilers were evaluated from 8 to 41 days of age. Dietary treatments included a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement with three levels of AFB(1 )(0, 50 and 200 μg AFB(1)/kg), and three levels of FB(1 )(0, 50 and 200 mg FB(1)/kg). At 33 days post feeding, with the exception of birds fed 50 mg FB(1 )only, concentrations of AST were higher (p < 0.05) in all other treatment groups when compared with controls. Plasma TP was lower (p < 0.05) at six days post feeding in groups fed 200 μg AFB(1)/kg alone or in combination with FB(1). At day 33 days post feeding, with the exception of birds fed the highest combination of AFB(1 )and FB(1 )which had higher plasma TP than control birds(, )plasma TP of birds fed other dietary treatments were similar to controls. Broilers receiving the highest levels of AFB(1) and FB(1) had bile duct proliferation and trabecular disorder in liver samples. AFB(1) singly or in combination with FB at the levels studied, caused liver damage and an increase in serum levels of AST. PMID:22069595

  12. B-1-cell subpopulations contribute differently to gut immunity.

    PubMed

    Roy, Bishnudeo; Agarwal, Shiwani; Brennecke, Anne-Margarete; Krey, Martina; Pabst, Oliver; Düber, Sandra; Weiss, Siegfried

    2013-08-01

    In mice, B-1 (B1a/B1b) cells are mainly located in the peritoneal cavity. B-1 cells are well known for their role in the early stages of Ab-mediated immune responses against pathogenic invasion as well as for the production of natural IgM antibodies. Although such B cells have been claimed to give rise to intestinal plasma cells producing IgA, a clear role of B-1 cells in IgA production in the gut-associated tissues is still not defined. Here, we employed the transgenic L2 mouse model characterized by the lack of B-2 cells and presence of B-1 cells as major B-cell subpopulation. The oligoclonality of the Ab repertoire in this mouse allowed us to take typical B1a cell VH sequences as indicators of the presence of IgM-producing B-1a cells in Peyer's patches as well as in lamina propria. However, amongst the IgAVH sequences recovered from the same tissues, none of the sequences showed B1a-cell specificity. Interestingly, all IgAVH sequences derived from the lamina propria of L2 mice displayed extensive numbers of nucleotide exchanges, indicating somatic hypermutation, and affinity maturation. This suggests that the contribution of natural unmutated IgA by B-1a cells to intestinal immunity is negligible. PMID:23677546

  13. [The interactions between natural products and OATP1B1].

    PubMed

    Shi, Mei-zhi; Liu, Yu; Bian, Jia-lin; Jin, Meng; Gui, Chun-shan

    2015-07-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) is an important liver-specific uptake transporter, which mediates transport of numerous endogenous substances and drugs from blood into hepatocytes. To identify and investigate potential modulators of OATP1B1 from natural products, the effect of 21 frequently used natural compounds and extracts on OATP1B1-mediated fluorescein methotrexate transport was studied by using Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing OATP1B1 (CHO-OATP1B1) in 96-well plates. This method could be used for the screening of large compound libraries. Our studies showed that some flavonoids (e.g., quercetin, quercitrin, rutin, chrysanthemum flavonoids and mulberrin) and triterpenoids (e.g., glycyrrhetinic acid and glycyrrhizic acid) were inhibitors of OATP1B1 with IC50 values less than 16 µmol · L(-1). The IC50 value of glycyrrhetinic acid on OATP1B1 was comparable to its blood concentration in clinics, indicating an OATPlB1-mediated drug-drug interaction could occur. Structure-activity relationship analysis showed that flavonoids had much higher inhibitory activity than their glycosides. Furthermore, the type and length of saccharides had a significant effect on their activity. In addition, we used OATP1B1 substrates fluvastatin and rosuvastatin as probe drugs to investigate the substrate-dependent effect of several natural compounds on the function of OATP1B1 in vitro. Our results demonstrated that the effect of these natural products on the function of OATPlB1 was substrate-dependent. In summary, this study would be conducive to predicting and avoiding potential OATP1B1-mediated drug-drug and drug-food interactions and thus provide the experimental basis and guidance for rational drug use. PMID:26552146

  14. Management of periprosthetic joint infection after total hip arthroplasty using a custom made articulating spacer (CUMARS); the Exeter experience.

    PubMed

    Tsung, Jason D; Rohrsheim, James A L; Whitehouse, Sarah L; Wilson, Matthew J; Howell, Jonathan R

    2014-09-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after THA is a major complication with an incidence of 1%-3%. We report our experiences with a technique using a custom-made articulating spacer (CUMARS) at the first of two-stage treatment for PJI. This technique uses widely available all-polyethylene acetabular components and the Exeter Universal stem, fixed using antibiotic loaded acrylic cement. Seventy-six hips were treated for PJI using this technique. Performed as the first of a two-stage procedure, good functional results were commonly seen, leading to postponing second stage indefinitely with retention of the CUMARS prosthesis in 34 patients. The CUMARS technique presents an alternative to conventional spacers, using readily available components that are well tolerated, allowing weight bearing and mobility, and achieving comparable eradication rates. PMID:24851790

  15. 38 CFR 18b.1 - Scope of rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Scope of rules. 18b.1 Section 18b.1 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE UNDER TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 AND PART 18 OF THIS CHAPTER General Rules § 18b.1 Scope of rules. The rules...

  16. 26 CFR 301.6226(b)-1 - 5-percent group.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... beginning prior to October 4, 2001, see § 301.6226(b)-1T contained in 26 CFR part 1, revised April 1, 2001. ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false 5-percent group. 301.6226(b)-1 Section 301.6226... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Assessment In General § 301.6226(b)-1 5-percent group. (a) In...

  17. 26 CFR 301.6223(b)-1 - Notice group.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... October 4, 2001. For years beginning prior to October 4, 2001, see § 301.6223(b)-1T contained in 26 CFR... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Notice group. 301.6223(b)-1 Section 301.6223(b... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Assessment In General § 301.6223(b)-1 Notice group. (a) In...

  18. 26 CFR 301.6223(b)-1 - Notice group.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... October 4, 2001. For years beginning prior to October 4, 2001, see § 301.6223(b)-1T contained in 26 CFR... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice group. 301.6223(b)-1 Section 301.6223(b... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Assessment In General § 301.6223(b)-1 Notice group. (a) In...

  19. 26 CFR 301.6226(b)-1 - 5-percent group.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... beginning prior to October 4, 2001, see § 301.6226(b)-1T contained in 26 CFR part 1, revised April 1, 2001. ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false 5-percent group. 301.6226(b)-1 Section 301.6226... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Assessment In General § 301.6226(b)-1 5-percent group. (a) In...

  20. New insights into heterogeneity of peritoneal B-1a cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongsheng; Lin, Jian-xin; Li, Peng; Skinner, Jeff; Leonard, Warren J; Morse, Herbert C

    2015-12-01

    Peritoneal B-1a cells are characterized by their expression of CD5 and enrichment for germline-encoded IgM B cell receptors. Early studies showing expression of a diverse array of VDJ sequences among purified B-1a cells provided a molecular basis for understanding the heterogeneity of the B-1a cell repertoire. Antigen-driven positive selection and the identification of B-1a specific progenitors suggest multiple origins of B-1a cells. The introduction of new markers such as PD-L2, CD25, CD73, and PC1 (plasma cell alloantigen 1, also known as ectonucleotide phosphodiesterase/pyrophosphatase 1) further helped to identify phenotypically and functionally distinct B-1a subsets. Among many B-1a subsets defined by these new markers, PC1 is unique in that it subdivides B-1a cells into PC1(hi) and PC1(lo) subpopulations with distinct functions, such as production of natural IgM and gut IgA, response to the pneumococcal antigen PPS-3, secretion of interleukin-10, and support for T helper 1 (TH 1) cell differentiation. RNA sequencing of these subsets revealed differential expression of genes involved in cellular movement and immune cell trafficking. We will discuss these new insights underlying the heterogeneous nature of the B-1a cell repertoire. PMID:25988856

  1. MAN1B1 Deficiency: An Unexpected CDG-II

    PubMed Central

    Millón, María B.; Race, Valérie; Sturiale, Luisa; Garozzo, Domenico; Mills, Philippa; Clayton, Peter; Asteggiano, Carla G.; Quelhas, Dulce; Cansu, Ali; Martins, Esmeralda; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Gonçalves-Rocha, Miguel; Topaloglu, Haluk; Jaeken, Jaak; Foulquier, François; Matthijs, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a group of rare metabolic diseases, due to impaired protein and lipid glycosylation. In the present study, exome sequencing was used to identify MAN1B1 as the culprit gene in an unsolved CDG-II patient. Subsequently, 6 additional cases with MAN1B1-CDG were found. All individuals presented slight facial dysmorphism, psychomotor retardation and truncal obesity. Generally, MAN1B1 is believed to be an ER resident alpha-1,2-mannosidase acting as a key factor in glycoprotein quality control by targeting misfolded proteins for ER-associated degradation (ERAD). However, recent studies indicated a Golgi localization of the endogenous MAN1B1, suggesting a more complex role for MAN1B1 in quality control. We were able to confirm that MAN1B1 is indeed localized to the Golgi complex instead of the ER. Furthermore, we observed an altered Golgi morphology in all patients' cells, with marked dilatation and fragmentation. We hypothesize that part of the phenotype is associated to this Golgi disruption. In conclusion, we linked mutations in MAN1B1 to a Golgi glycosylation disorder. Additionally, our results support the recent findings on MAN1B1 localization. However, more work is needed to pinpoint the exact function of MAN1B1 in glycoprotein quality control, and to understand the pathophysiology of its deficiency. PMID:24348268

  2. Hip fracture - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Inter-trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Subtrochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Femoral neck fracture repair - discharge; Trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Hip pinning surgery - discharge

  3. Loss of endophilin-B1 exacerbates Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Wang, David B; Kinoshita, Yoshito; Kinoshita, Chizuru; Uo, Takuma; Sopher, Bryce L; Cudaback, Eiron; Keene, C Dirk; Bilousova, Tina; Gylys, Karen; Case, Amanda; Jayadev, Suman; Wang, Hong-Gang; Garden, Gwenn A; Morrison, Richard S

    2015-07-01

    Endophilin-B1, also known as Bax-interacting factor 1 (Bif-1, and encoded by SH3GLB1), is a multifunctional protein involved in apoptosis, autophagy and mitochondrial function. We recently described a unique neuroprotective role for neuron-specific alternatively spliced isoforms of endophilin-B1. To examine whether endophilin-B1-mediated neuroprotection could be a novel therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease we used a double mutant amyloid precursor protein and presenilin 1 (APPswe/PSEN1dE9) mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and observed that expression of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms declined with disease progression. To determine if this reduction in endophilin-B1 has a functional role in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, we crossed endophilin-B1(-/-) mice with APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. Deletion of endophilin-B1 accelerated disease onset and progression in 6-month-old APPswe/PSEN1dE9/endophilin-B1(-/-) mice, which showed more plaques, astrogliosis, synaptic degeneration, cognitive impairment and mortality than APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. In mouse primary cortical neuron cultures, overexpression of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms protected against amyloid-β-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, protein and mRNA levels of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms were also selectively decreased in the cerebral cortex and in the synaptic compartment of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Flow sorting of synaptosomes from patients with Alzheimer's disease demonstrated a negative correlation between amyloid-β and endophilin-B1 levels. The importance of endophilin-B1 in neuronal function was further underscored by the development of synaptic degeneration and cognitive and motor impairment in endophilin-B1(-/-) mice by 12 months. Our findings suggest that endophilin-B1 is a key mediator of a feed-forward mechanism of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis where amyloid-β reduces neuron-specific endophilin-B1, which in turn enhances amyloid

  4. 26 CFR 1.280B-1 - Demolition of structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Demolition of structures. 1.280B-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.280B-1 Demolition of structures. (a) In general. Section 280B provides that, in the case of the demolition of any structure, no deduction...

  5. 76 FR 43659 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  6. 26 CFR 1.643(b)-1 - Definition of income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of income. 1.643(b)-1 Section 1.643(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX... of subparts A through D, part I, subchapter J, chapter 1 of the Internal Revenue Code, “income,”...

  7. 38 CFR 18b.1 - Scope of rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope of rules. 18b.1 Section 18b.1 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE UNDER TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 AND PART 18 OF THIS CHAPTER General...

  8. 26 CFR 1.665(b)-1A - Accumulation distributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Accumulation distributions. 1.665(b)-1A Section... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Treatment of Excess Distributions of Trusts Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning on Or After January 1, 1969 § 1.665(b)-1A Accumulation distributions. (a) In general. (1) For...

  9. 26 CFR 1.665(b)-1A - Accumulation distributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Accumulation distributions. 1.665(b)-1A Section... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Treatment of Excess Distributions of Trusts Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning on Or After January 1, 1969 § 1.665(b)-1A Accumulation distributions. (a)...

  10. 26 CFR 301.269B-1 - Stapled foreign corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stapled foreign corporations. 301.269B-1....269B-1 Stapled foreign corporations. In accordance with section 269B(a)(1), a stapled foreign... Revenue Code. For provisions concerning taxes other than income for which the stapled foreign...

  11. 26 CFR 1.280B-1 - Demolition of structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Demolition of structures. 1.280B-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.280B-1 Demolition of structures. (a) In general. Section 280B provides that, in the case of the demolition of any structure, no deduction...

  12. 26 CFR 1.7702B-1 - Consumer protection provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Consumer protection provisions. 1.7702B-1 Section 1.7702B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME... policies, unintentional lapse, disclosure, prohibitions against post-claims underwriting, minimum...

  13. 26 CFR 1.468B-1 - Qualified settlement funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-1 Relation-Back Election”, at the top of the first page; (B) Each transferor's name, address, and... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Qualified settlement funds. 1.468B-1 Section 1.468B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME...

  14. 26 CFR 1.468B-1 - Qualified settlement funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-1 Relation-Back Election”, at the top of the first page; (B) Each transferor's name, address, and... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Qualified settlement funds. 1.468B-1 Section 1.468B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME...

  15. 26 CFR 1.468B-1 - Qualified settlement funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-1 Relation-Back Election”, at the top of the first page; (B) Each transferor's name, address, and... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Qualified settlement funds. 1.468B-1 Section 1.468B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME...

  16. 75 FR 48646 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD... 36(b)(1) arms sales notifications to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law...

  17. 75 FR 74014 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  18. 76 FR 37075 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  19. 75 FR 20571 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD...(b)(1) arms sales notifications to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law...

  20. 75 FR 81993 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  1. 76 FR 29212 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements...

  2. 76 FR 37071 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  3. 76 FR 37078 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  4. 76 FR 28956 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  5. 75 FR 60424 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD...(b)(1) arms sales notifications to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law...

  6. 75 FR 74011 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  7. 76 FR 26707 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements...

  8. 76 FR 38371 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  9. 26 CFR 1.280B-1 - Demolition of structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Demolition of structures. 1.280B-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.280B-1 Demolition of structures. (a) In general. Section 280B provides that, in the case of the demolition of any structure, no deduction...

  10. ALDH1B1 links alcohol consumption and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra; Chen, Ying; Matsumoto, Akiko; Orlicky, David J; Dong, Hongbin; Thompson, David C; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2015-08-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1B1 (ALDH1B1) is a mitochondrial enzyme sharing 65% and 72% sequence identity with ALDH1A1 and ALDH2 proteins, respectively. Compared to the latter two ALDH isozymes, little is known about the physiological functions of ALDH1B1. Studies in humans indicate that ALDH1B1 may be associated with alcohol sensitivity and stem cells. Our recent in vitro studies using human ALDH1B1 showed that it metabolizes acetaldehyde and retinaldehyde. To investigate the in vivo role of ALDH1B1, we generated and characterized a global Aldh1b1 knockout mouse line. These knockout (KO) mice are fertile and show overtly good health. However, ethanol pharmacokinetic analysis revealed ∼40% increase in blood acetaldehyde levels in KO mice. Interestingly, the KO mice exhibited higher fasting blood glucose levels. Collectively, we show for the first time the functional in vivo role of ALDH1B1 in acetaldehyde metabolism and in maintaining glucose homeostasis. This mouse model is a valuable tool to investigate the mechanism by which alcohol may promote the development of diabetes. PMID:26086111

  11. 75 FR 107 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD...(b)(1) arms sales notifications to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated 21 July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English, DSCA/DBO/CFM, (703)...

  12. 77 FR 74832 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  13. 76 FR 40703 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  14. 75 FR 47275 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD...(b)(1) arms sales notifications to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164, dated 21 July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English, DSCA/DBO/CFM, (703)...

  15. 75 FR 42708 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD... 36(b)(1) arms sales notifications to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164, dated 21 July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English, DSCA/DBO/CFM, (703)...

  16. 76 FR 35188 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  17. 17 CFR 260.10b-1 - Calculation of percentages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calculation of percentages. 260.10b-1 Section 260.10b-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... Calculation of percentages. The percentages of voting securities and other securities specified in section...

  18. 26 CFR 48.4061(b)-1 - Imposition of tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Imposition of tax. 48.4061(b)-1 Section 48.4061(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS EXCISE TAXES Motor Vehicles, Tires, Tubes, Tread Rubber,...

  19. 75 FR 69926 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements...

  20. 75 FR 69938 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements...

  1. 75 FR 69957 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  2. 75 FR 69931 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements...

  3. 75 FR 69947 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements...

  4. 75 FR 69953 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  5. 75 FR 69971 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  6. 75 FR 69922 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements...

  7. 75 FR 69960 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  8. 26 CFR 1.280B-1 - Demolition of structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Demolition of structures. 1.280B-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Items Not Deductible § 1.280B-1 Demolition of structures. (a) In general. Section 280B provides that, in the case of the demolition of any structure, no deduction otherwise...

  9. 26 CFR 31.3401(b)-1 - Payroll period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Payroll period. 31.3401(b)-1 Section 31.3401(b... Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3401(b)-1 Payroll period. (a) The term payroll period means the... elapsed and receives the remainder at the end of the week, the payroll period is still the calendar...

  10. 26 CFR 31.6011(b)-1 - Employers' identification numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Employers' identification numbers. 31.6011(b)-1... Subtitle F, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.6011(b)-1 Employers' identification numbers. (a... Insurance Contributions Act, but who prior to such day neither has been assigned an identification...

  11. 26 CFR 1.1314(b)-1 - Method of adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Method of adjustment. 1.1314(b)-1 Section 1.1314(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Readjustment of Tax Between Years and Special Limitations §...

  12. Effects of prolonged oral administration of aflatoxin B1 and fumonisin B1 in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Del Bianchi, M; Oliveira, C A F; Albuquerque, R; Guerra, J L; Correa, B

    2005-12-01

    The effects of prolonged oral administration of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and fumonisin B1 (FB1) mycotoxins were evaluated in broiler chickens from 21 to 42 d of age. A total of 192 birds were housed in experimental batteries and assigned to 32 cages, 6 birds per cage. The following treatments were applied: 1) 0 mycotoxins (control), 2) 10 mg of FB1, 3) 50 microg of AFB1, 4) 50 microg of AFB1 + 10 mg of FB1, 5) 350 microg of AFB1, 6) 350 microg of AFB1 + 10 mg of FB1, 7) 2,450 microg of AFB1, 8) 2,450 microg of AFB1 + 10 mg of FB1/kg of feed. Each treatment consisted of 4 replicates of 6 birds each. At the end of the trial, blood samples from 12 birds per treatment were collected, and the birds were necropsied. Compared with controls, the percentage of heterophils was lower (P < 0.05) in birds from groups receiving 50 microg of AFB1/kg + 10 mg of FB1/ kg and 2450 microg of AFB1/kg alone or in combination with FB1. A higher percentage of lymphocytes (P < 0.05) was observed in birds fed 50 microg of AFB1/kg + 10 mg of FB1/ kg, 350 microg of AFB1/kg, and 2,450 microg of AFB1/kg. A decrease in plasma albumin was observed only in birds fed 2,450 microg of AFB1/kg + 10 mg of FB1/kg. The liver of AFB1-treated birds had focal areas of necrosis and inflammatory infiltrates. In birds fed rations containing only 10 mg of FB1/kg, bile duct hyperplasia with fibrosis and a mononuclear infiltrate accompanied by trabecular derangement were observed. In contrast, in treatments in which FB1 was administered in combination, hepatic vacuolar degeneration was observed, and renal tissue presented corpuscles with increased cellular agglomeration, characterizing glomerulonephritis, and a clearly visible tubular epithelium with areas of degeneration and necrosis. The FB1 residues were detected in liver and in excreta of all FB1-treated groups, at levels that ranged from 0.013 to 0.051 mg/kg and from 1.19 to 2.79 mg/kg, respectively. Results indicated that FB1 and AFB1, singly or in combination

  13. Are periprosthetic tissue reactions observed after revision of total disc replacement comparable to the reactions observed after total hip or knee revision surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Punt, Ilona M.; Austen, Shennah; Cleutjens, Jack P.M.; Kurtz, Steven M.; ten Broeke, René H.M.; van Rhijn, Lodewijk W.; Willems, Paul C.; van Ooij, André

    2011-01-01

    Study design Comparative study. Objective To compare periprosthetic tissue reactions observed after total disc replacement (TDR), total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) revision surgery. Summary of background data Prosthetic wear debris leading to particle disease, followed by osteolysis, is often observed after THA and TKA. Although the presence of polyethylene (PE) particles and periprosthetic inflammation after TDR has been proven recently, osteolysis is rarely observed. The clinical relevance of PE wear debris in the spine remains poorly understood. Methods Number, size and shape of PE particles, as well as quantity and type of inflammatory cells in periprosthetic tissue retrieved during Charité TDR (n=22), THA (n=10) and TKA (n=4) revision surgery were compared. Tissue samples were stained with hematoxylin/eosin and examined by using light microscopy with bright field and polarized light. Results After THA, large numbers of PE particles <6 µm were observed, which were mainly phagocytosed by macrophages. The TKA group had a broad size range with many larger PE particles and more giant cells. In TDR, the size range was similar to that observed in TKA. However, the smallest particles were the most prevalent with 75% of the particles being <6 µm, as seen in revision THA. In TDR, both macrophages and giant cells were present with a higher number of macrophages. Conclusions Both small and large PE particles are present after TDR revision surgery compatible with both THA and TKA wear patterns. The similarities between periprosthetic tissue reactions in the different groups may give more insight in the clinical relevance of PE particles and inflammatory cells in the lumbar spine. The current findings may help to improve TDR design as applied from technologies previously developed in THA and TKA with the goal of a longer survival of TDR. PMID:21336235

  14. Patients with Intolerance Reactions to Total Knee Replacement: Combined Assessment of Allergy Diagnostics, Periprosthetic Histology, and Peri-implant Cytokine Expression Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Peter; von der Helm, Christine; Schopf, Christoph; Mazoochian, Farhad; Frommelt, Lars; Gollwitzer, Hans; Schneider, Josef; Flaig, Michael; Krenn, Veit; Thomas, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    We performed a combined approach to identify suspected allergy to knee arthroplasty (TKR): patch test (PT), lymphocyte transformation test (LTT), histopathology (overall grading; T- and B-lymphocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils), and semiquantitative Real-time-PCR-based periprosthetic inflammatory mediator analysis (IFNγ, TNFα, IL1-β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL17, and TGFβ). We analyzed 25 TKR patients with yet unexplained complications like pain, effusion, and reduced range of motion. They consisted of 20 patients with proven metal sensitization (11 with PT reactions; 9 with only LTT reactivity). Control specimens were from 5 complicated TKR patients without metal sensitization, 12 OA patients before arthroplasty, and 8 PT patients without arthroplasty. Lymphocytic infiltrates were seen and fibrotic (Type IV membrane) tissue response was most frequent in the metal sensitive patients, for example, in 81% of the PT positive patients. The latter also had marked periprosthetic IFNγ expression. 8/9 patients with revision surgery using Ti-coated/oxinium based implants reported symptom relief. Our findings demonstrate that combining allergy diagnostics with histopathology and periprosthetic cytokine assessment could allow us to design better diagnostic strategies. PMID:25866822

  15. Ibandronate and cementless total hip arthroplasty: densitometric measurement of periprosthetic bone mass and new therapeutic approach to the prevention of aseptic loosening

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Maurizio; Quarta, Eugenio; Quarta, Laura; Calcagnile, Fabio; Grimaldi, Antonella; Orgiani, M. Antonio; Marsilio, Antonio; Rollo, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Summary Studies of the mechanisms of periprosthetic bone loss have led to the development of pharmacologic strategies intended to enhance bone mass recovery after surgery and consequently prevent aseptic loosening and prolong the implant survival. Bisphosphonates, potent anti-resorptive drugs widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis and other disorders of bone metabolism, were shown to be particularly effective in reducing periprosthetic bone resorption in the first year after hip and knee arthroplasty, both cemented and cementless. Based on these results, we investigated the inhibitory effects of ibandronate on periprosthetic bone loss in a 2-year study of postmenopausal women that underwent cementless total hip arthroplasty. In the first 6 months both groups (A, treated with ibandronate 3 mg i.v. within five days after surgery and then with oral ibandronate 150 mg/month, plus calcium and vitamin D supplementation; and B, treated with calcium and vitamin D supplementation only) experienced bone loss, though to a lesser extent in group A. After 12 months, group A showed a remarkable BMD recovery, that was statistically significant versus baseline values (about +1, 74% of global BMD) and most evident in region R1 (+3, 81%) and R2 (+4, 12%); in group B, on the contrary, BMD values were unchanged compared with those at 6 months post-surgery. Quality of life scores also showed a greater improvement in group A, both at 6 and 12 months after surgery, likely because of the pain-reducing effects of ibandronate treatment. PMID:22783337

  16. CYP1B1: a unique gene with unique characteristics.

    PubMed

    Faiq, Muneeb A; Dada, Rima; Sharma, Reetika; Saluja, Daman; Dada, Tanuj

    2014-01-01

    CYP1B1, a recently described dioxin inducible oxidoreductase, is a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily involved in the metabolism of estradiol, retinol, benzo[a]pyrene, tamoxifen, melatonin, sterols etc. It plays important roles in numerous physiological processes and is expressed at mRNA level in many tissues and anatomical compartments. CYP1B1 has been implicated in scores of disorders. Analyses of the recent studies suggest that CYP1B1 can serve as a universal/ideal cancer marker and a candidate gene for predictive diagnosis. There is plethora of literature available about certain aspects of CYP1B1 that have not been interpreted, discussed and philosophized upon. The present analysis examines CYP1B1 as a peculiar gene with certain distinctive characteristics like the uniqueness in its chromosomal location, gene structure and organization, involvement in developmentally important disorders, tissue specific, not only expression, but splicing, potential as a universal cancer marker due to its involvement in key aspects of cellular metabolism, use in diagnosis and predictive diagnosis of various diseases and the importance and function of CYP1B1 mRNA in addition to the regular translation. Also CYP1B1 is very difficult to express in heterologous expression systems, thereby, halting its functional studies. Here we review and analyze these exceptional and startling characteristics of CYP1B1 with inputs from our own experiences in order to get a better insight into its molecular biology in health and disease. This may help to further understand the etiopathomechanistic aspects of CYP1B1 mediated diseases paving way for better research strategies and improved clinical management. PMID:25658124

  17. Proangiogenic role of ephrinB1/EphB1 in basic fibroblast growth factor-induced corneal angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Takashi; Chang, Jin-Hong; Azar, Dimitri T

    2007-02-01

    Corneal neovascularization is a vision-threatening condition caused by various ocular pathological conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the function of the ephrin ligands and Eph receptors in vitro and in vivo in corneal angiogenesis in a mouse model. The Eph tyrosine kinase receptors and their ligands, ephrins, are expressed on the cell surface. The functions of Eph and ephrins have been shown to regulate axonal guidance, segmentation, cell migration, and angiogenesis. Understanding the roles of Eph and ephrin in corneal angiogenesis may provide a therapeutic intervention for the treatment of angiogenesis-related disorders. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that ephrinB1 and EphB1 were expressed in basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced vascularized corneas. EphB1 was specifically colocalized with vascular endothelial marker CD31 surrounded by type IV collagen. EphrinB1 was expressed in corneal-resident keratocytes and neutrophils. Recombinant ephrinB1-Fc, which induces EphB receptor activation, enhanced bFGF-induced tube formation in an in vitro aortic ring assay and promoted bFGF-induced corneal angiogenesis in vivo in a corneal pocket assay. Synergistically enhanced and sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase was noted in vascular endothelial cell lines after stimulation with ephrin B1 and bFGF combinations. These results suggest that ephrinB1 plays a synergistic role in corneal neovascularization. PMID:17255342

  18. MISR Level 1B1 Radiance Data (MI1B1_V2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David J. (Principal Investigator)

    summary, the Level 1B1 Product contains the Data Numbers (DNs) radiometrically-scaled to radiances with no geometric resampling. [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=2000-02-24; Stop_Date=] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180] [Data_Resolution: Latitude_Resolution=1.1 km; Longitude_Resolution=1.1 km; Temporal_Resolution=about 15 orbits/day; Temporal_Resolution_Range=about 15 orbits/day].

  19. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Aflatoxin B 1 from Soil

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research describes the development of a Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) method to recover aflatoxin B1 from fortified soil. The effects of temperature, pressure, modifier (identity and percentage), and extraction type were assessed. Using the optimized SFE conditions, ...

  20. 76 FR 46754 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ...The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21,...

  1. 78 FR 78939 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ...The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21,...

  2. Properties of L=1 B(1) and B(2)* mesons.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, C; Clément, B; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; de Jong, P; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Martins, C De Oliveira; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Williams, M R J; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yu, C; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-10-26

    This Letter presents the first strong evidence for the resolution of the excited B mesons B(1) and B(2)* as two separate states in fully reconstructed decays to B(+)(*)pi(-). The mass of B(1) is measured to be 5720.6+/-2.4+/-1.4 MeV/c(2) and the mass difference DeltaM between B(2)* and B(1) is 26.2+/-3.1+/-0.9 MeV/c;{2}, giving the mass of the B(2)* as 5746.8+/-2.4+/-1.7 MeV/c(2). The production rate for B(1) and B(2)* mesons is determined to be a fraction (13.9+/-1.9+/-3.2)% of the production rate of the B+ meson. PMID:17995320

  3. 77 FR 42711 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ...The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21,...

  4. 76 FR 72686 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-25

    ...The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21,...

  5. 76 FR 56181 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ...The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21,...

  6. ACTH Regulation of Adrenal SR-B1

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wen-Jun; Azhar, Salman; Kraemer, Fredric B.

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal gland is one of the prominent sites for steroid hormone synthesis. Lipoprotein-derived cholesterol esters (CEs) delivered via SR-B1 constitute the dominant source of cholesterol for steroidogenesis, particularly in rodents. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulates steroidogenesis through downstream actions on multiple components involved in steroidogenesis. Both acute and chronic ACTH treatments can modulate SR-B1 function, including its transcription, posttranscriptional stability, phosphorylation and dimerization status, as well as the interaction with other protein partners, all of which result in changes in the ability of SR-B1 to mediate HDL-CE uptake and the supply of cholesterol for conversion to steroids. Here, we provide a review of the recent findings on the regulation of adrenal SR-B1 function by ACTH. PMID:27242666

  7. 78 FR 36536 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ...The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21,...

  8. UNC93B1 mediates differential trafficking of endosomal TLRs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bettina L; Moon, Joanne E; Shu, Jeffrey H; Yuan, Lin; Newman, Zachary R; Schekman, Randy; Barton, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    UNC93B1, a multipass transmembrane protein required for TLR3, TLR7, TLR9, TLR11, TLR12, and TLR13 function, controls trafficking of TLRs from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to endolysosomes. The mechanisms by which UNC93B1 mediates these regulatory effects remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that UNC93B1 enters the secretory pathway and directly controls the packaging of TLRs into COPII vesicles that bud from the ER. Unlike other COPII loading factors, UNC93B1 remains associated with the TLRs through post-Golgi sorting steps. Unexpectedly, these steps are different among endosomal TLRs. TLR9 requires UNC93B1-mediated recruitment of adaptor protein complex 2 (AP-2) for delivery to endolysosomes while TLR7, TLR11, TLR12, and TLR13 utilize alternative trafficking pathways. Thus, our study describes a mechanism for differential sorting of endosomal TLRs by UNC93B1, which may explain the distinct roles played by these receptors in certain autoimmune diseases.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00291.001. PMID:23426999

  9. Regulation of EphB1 expression by dopamine signaling.

    PubMed

    Halladay, A K; Yue, Y; Michna, L; Widmer, D A; Wagner, G C; Zhou, R

    2000-12-28

    The Eph family tyrosine kinase receptors and their ligands have been implicated in axon guidance and neuronal migration during development of the nervous system. In the current study, we aim to characterize the nature of changes in EphB1 receptor expression following increases or decreases in dopamine activity. Neonatal mice (P3) were injected with 6-hydroxydopamine and allowed 13 days to recover. These animals show a profound depletion of dopamine in all areas assayed, with a corresponding dose-dependent decrease in EphB1 expression. Day 3 pups were also injected either chronically (P3-P16) or acutely (P3 only) with cocaine to determine how enhancing dopamine signaling would affect EphB1 signal density. It was found that both treatments significantly increased expression of EphB1 in the cortex, striatum and substantia nigra. Finally, animals were treated prenatally (E15-E17) with cocaine and sacrificed on P7. These animals also showed an increase in EphB1 signal density, but only in the dopaminergic terminal areas in the cortex and striatum. These studies indicate that dopamine activity regulates developmental expression of the tyrosine kinase receptor EphB1. PMID:11146119

  10. UNC93B1 mediates differential trafficking of endosomal TLRs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bettina L; Moon, Joanne E; Shu, Jeffrey H; Yuan, Lin; Newman, Zachary R; Schekman, Randy; Barton, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    UNC93B1, a multipass transmembrane protein required for TLR3, TLR7, TLR9, TLR11, TLR12, and TLR13 function, controls trafficking of TLRs from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to endolysosomes. The mechanisms by which UNC93B1 mediates these regulatory effects remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that UNC93B1 enters the secretory pathway and directly controls the packaging of TLRs into COPII vesicles that bud from the ER. Unlike other COPII loading factors, UNC93B1 remains associated with the TLRs through post-Golgi sorting steps. Unexpectedly, these steps are different among endosomal TLRs. TLR9 requires UNC93B1-mediated recruitment of adaptor protein complex 2 (AP-2) for delivery to endolysosomes while TLR7, TLR11, TLR12, and TLR13 utilize alternative trafficking pathways. Thus, our study describes a mechanism for differential sorting of endosomal TLRs by UNC93B1, which may explain the distinct roles played by these receptors in certain autoimmune diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00291.001 PMID:23426999

  11. Fracture Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... to hold the fracture in the correct position. • Fiberglass casting is lighter and stronger and the exterior ... with your physician if this occurs. • When a fiberglass cast is used in conjunction with a GORE- ...

  12. Evidence for the eta_b(1S) in the Decay Upsilon(2S)-> gamma eta_b(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-12-14

    We have performed a search for the {eta}{sub b}(1S) meson in the radiative decay of the {Upsilon}(2S) resonance using a sample of 91.6 million {Upsilon}(2S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe a peak in the photon energy spectrum at E{sub {gamma}} = 610.5{sub -4.3}{sup +4.5}(stat) {+-} 1.8(syst) MeV, corresponding to an {eta}{sub b}(1S) mass of 9392.9{sub -4.8}{sup +4.6}(stat) {+-} 1.9(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. The branching fraction for the decay {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S) is determined to be (4.2{sub -1.0}{sup +1.1}(stat) {+-} 0.9(syst)) x 10{sup -4}. The ratio {Beta}({Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S))/{Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S)) = 0.89{sub -0.23}{sup +0.25}(stat){sub -0.16}{sup +0.12}(syst) is consistent with the ratio expected for magnetic dipole transitions to the {eta}{sub b}(1S) meson.

  13. The 1990 vertical distribution of two important halons (F-12B1 and F-13B1) in the tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, O. N.; Borchers, R.; Lal, Shyam; Subbarya, B. H.; Krueger, Bernd C.; Fabian, Peter

    1994-01-01

    The first vertical profiles of F-12B1 and F-13B1 had been obtained in the tropical troposphere and stratosphere by us in 1987. The measurement of these substances responsible for almost the entire anthropogenic contribution to the stratospheric BrO(x) budget is important in the tropics, as tropical upwelling provides their injection along with that of other pollutants, into the stratosphere. To ascertain the trends of these distributions and foster the data, the 1987 experiment was repeated in April 1990. Like 1987, the MPAE cryogenic whole air sampler was launched on a balloon from Hyderabad, India (17.5 deg N), and 14 samples were collected between 10 and 35 km altitude. The results obtained by means of GC and GC-MS analyses showed that the atmospheric abundance of both F-12B1 and F-13B1 is increasing at a fast rate, respectively by about 15 percent and 10 percent per year. From 1987 to 1990, F-12B1 and F-13B1 tropospheric mixing ratios have been growing from 1.2 and 1.3 ppt to 1.8 and 1.7 ppt, respectively. The vertical profiles will be discussed.

  14. Molecular Diagnosis of Periprosthetic Joint Infection by Quantitative RT-PCR of Bacterial 16S Ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mel S.; Chang, Wen-Hsin; Chen, Su-Chin; Hsieh, Pang-Hsin; Shih, Hsin-Nung; Ueng, Steve W. N.; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection is sometimes straightforward with purulent discharge from the fistula tract communicating to the joint prosthesis. However it is often difficult to differentiate septic from aseptic loosening of prosthesis because of the high culture-negative rates in conventional microbiologic culture. This study used quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) to amplify bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA in vitro and in 11 clinical samples. The in vitro analysis demonstrated that the RT-qPCR method was highly sensitive with the detection limit of bacterial 16S rRNA being 0.148 pg/μl. Clinical specimens were analyzed using the same protocol. The RT-qPCR was positive for bacterial detection in 8 culture-positive cases (including aerobic, anaerobic, and mycobacteria) and 2 culture-negative cases. It was negative in one case that the final diagnosis was confirmed without infection. The molecular diagnosis of bacterial infection using RT-qPCR to detect bacterial 16S rRNA around a prosthesis correlated well with the clinical findings. Based on the promising clinical results, we were attempting to differentiate bacterial species or drug-resistant strains by using species-specific primers and to detect the persistence of bacteria during the interim period before the second stage reimplantation in a larger scale of clinical subjects. PMID:24453929

  15. Is two-stage reimplantation effective for virulent pathogenic infection in a periprosthetic hip? A retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yong-Cheol; Lakhotia, Devendra; Oh, Jong-Keon; Moon, Jun Gyu; Prashant, Kumar; Shon, Won Yong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effectiveness of two-stage reimplantation using antibiotic-loaded bone cement (ALBC) and the risk factors associated with failure to control periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 38 consecutive hips managed using two-stage reimplantation with ALBC. The mean follow-up period was 5.4 years (range: 2.5-9 years). RESULTS: The causative pathogens were isolated from 29 patients (76%), 26 of whom were infected with highly virulent organisms. Sixteen patients (42%) underwent at least two first-stage debridements. An increased debridement frequency correlated significantly with high comorbidity (P < 0.001), a lower preoperative Harris hip score (HHS; P < 0.001), antimicrobial resistance, and gram-negative and polymicrobial infection (P = 0.002). Of the 35 patients who underwent two-stage reimplantation, 34 showed no signs of recurrence of infection. The mean HHS improved from 46 ± 12.64 to 78 ± 10.55 points, with 7 (20%), 12 (34%), 11 (32%) and 5 (14%) patients receiving excellent, good, fair and poor ratings, respectively. CONCLUSION: The current study demonstrated that two-stage reimplantation could successfully treat PJI after hip arthroplasty. However, the ability of ALBC to eradicate infection was limited because frequent debridement was required in high-risk patients (i.e., patients who are either in poor general health due to associated comorbidities or harbor infections due to highly virulent, difficult-to-treat organisms). Level of evidence: Level IV. PMID:26495248

  16. Numerical investigations on the strain-adaptive bone remodelling in the periprosthetic femur: Influence of the boundary conditions

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Bernd-Arno; Nolte, Ingo; Wefstaedt, Patrick; Stukenborg-Colsman, Christina; Bouguecha, Anas

    2009-01-01

    Background There are several numerical investigations on bone remodelling after total hip arthroplasty (THA) on the basis of the finite element analysis (FEA). For such computations certain boundary conditions have to be defined. The authors chose a maximum of three static load situations, usually taken from the gait cycle because this is the most frequent dynamic activity of a patient after THA. Materials and methods The numerical study presented here investigates whether it is useful to consider only one static load situation of the gait cycle in the FE calculation of the bone remodelling. For this purpose, 5 different loading cases were examined in order to determine their influence on the change in the physiological load distribution within the femur and on the resulting strain-adaptive bone remodelling. First, four different static loading cases at 25%, 45%, 65% and 85% of the gait cycle, respectively, and then the whole gait cycle in a loading regime were examined in order to regard all the different loadings of the cycle in the simulation. Results The computed evolution of the apparent bone density (ABD) and the calculated mass losses in the periprosthetic femur show that the simulation results are highly dependent on the chosen boundary conditions. Conclusion These numerical investigations prove that a static load situation is insufficient for representing the whole gait cycle. This causes severe deviations in the FE calculation of the bone remodelling. However, accompanying clinical examinations are necessary to calibrate the bone adaptation law and thus to validate the FE calculations. PMID:19371424

  17. Risk factors for periprosthetic joint infection after total joint arthroplasty: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Zhang, F; Chen, W; Liu, S; Zhang, Q; Zhang, Y

    2015-02-01

    Many of the mooted risk factors associated with periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) remain controversial and are not well characterized. Online and manual searches were performed using Medline, Embase, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure and the Cochrane Central Database from January 1980 to March 2014). For inclusion, studies had to meet the quality assessment criteria of the CONSORT statement, and be concerned with evaluation of risk factors for PJI after TJA. Two reviewers extracted the relevant data independently and any disagreements were resolved by consensus. Fourteen studies were included in this meta-analysis. The following significant risk factors for PJI were identified: body mass index (both continuous and dichotomous variables); diabetes mellitus; corticosteroid therapy; hypoalbuminaemia; history of rheumatoid arthritis; blood transfusion; presence of a wound drain; wound dehiscence; superficial surgical site infection; coagulopathy; malignancy, immunodepression; National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance Score ≥2; other nosocomial infection; prolonged operative time; and previous surgery. Factors that were not significantly associated with PJI were: cirrhosis; hypothyroidism; urinary tract infection; illicit drug abuse; alcohol abuse; hypercholesterolaemia; hypertension, ischaemic heart disease; peptic ulcer disease; hemiplegia or paraplegia; dementia; and operation performed by a staff surgeon (vs a trainee). Strategies to prevent PJI after TJA should focus, in particular, on those patients at greatest risk of infection according to their individual risk factors. PMID:25575769

  18. Hepatitis B Virus Infection Is a Risk Factor for Periprosthetic Joint Infection Among Males After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Shu-Jui; Huang, Po-Hua; Chang, Chien-Chun; Kuo, Feng-Chih; Wu, Cheng-Ta; Hsu, Horng-Chaung; Lin, Che-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a grave complication that can affect patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In this study, we aim to determine whether hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a risk factor for PJIs. All patients (1184 males, 3435 females) undergoing primary TKA in Taiwan from 2001 to 2010 were recruited for analysis. The incidence of PJI was 523 among the males with HBV infection and 110 among the males without HBV (per 10,000 person-years, P < 0.001). The males with HBV infection had a 4.32-fold risk of PJI compared with the males without HBV. HBV infection and diabetes were the risk factors for PJI among males. The incidence of PJI was 58.8 among the females with HBV infection and 75.2 among the females without HBV (per 10,000 person-years, P = 0.67). The risk of PJI was higher for the males with HBV infection than for the males without 0.5 to 1 year after TKA (hazard ratio [HR] = 18.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.90–184) and >1 year after TKA (HR = 4.80, 95% CI = 1.57–14.7). HBV infection is a risk factor for PJI after TKA among males. PMID:27258517

  19. Association of Endophilin B1 with Cytoplasmic Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhui; Barylko, Barbara; Eichorst, John P; Mueller, Joachim D; Albanesi, Joseph P; Chen, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Endophilins are SH3- and BAR domain-containing proteins implicated in membrane remodeling and vesicle formation. Endophilins A1 and A2 promote the budding of endocytic vesicles from the plasma membrane, whereas endophilin B1 has been implicated in vesicle budding from intracellular organelles, including the trans-Golgi network and late endosomes. We previously reported that endophilins A1 and A2 exist almost exclusively as soluble dimers in the cytosol. Here, we present results of fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy analyses indicating that, in contrast, the majority of endophilin B1 is present in multiple copies on small, highly mobile cytoplasmic vesicles. Formation of these vesicles was enhanced by overexpression of wild-type dynamin 2, but suppressed by expression of a catalytically inactive dynamin 2 mutant. Using dual-color heterospecies partition analysis, we identified the epidermal growth factor receptor on endophilin B1 vesicles. Moreover, a proportion of endophilin B1 vesicles also contained caveolin, whereas clathrin was almost undetectable on those vesicles. These results raise the possibility that endophilin B1 participates in dynamin 2-dependent formation of a population of transport vesicles distinct from those generated by A-type endophilins. PMID:27508440

  20. Occurrence of aflatoxin B1 in natural products.

    PubMed

    Prado, Guilherme; Altoé, Aline F; Gomes, Tatiana C B; Leal, Alexandre S; Morais, Vanessa A D; Oliveira, Marize S; Ferreira, Marli B; Gomes, Mateus B; Paschoal, Fabiano N; von S Souza, Rafael; Silva, Daniela A; Cruz Madeira, Jovita E G

    2012-10-01

    The media claims for the consumption of natural resource-based food have gradually increased in both developing and developed countries. The interest in the safety of these products is partially due to the possible presence of toxigenic fungi acting as mycotoxin producers, such as aflatoxins produced during the secondary metabolism of Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus and A. nomius. Aflatoxins, mainly aflatoxin B1, are directly associated with liver cancer in human beings. This paper is aimed at evaluating the presence of aflatoxin B1 in a few vegetable drugs, dried plant extracts and industrialized products traded in 2010 in the city of Belo Horizonte, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The method used for the quantification of aflatoxin B1 was based on extraction through acetone:water (85:15), immunoaffinity column purification followed by separation and detection in high efficiency liquid chromatography. Under the conditions of analysis, the Limits of Detection and Quantification were 0.6 µg kg(-1) and 1.0 µg kg(-1) respectively. The complete sets of analyses were carried out in duplicate. Aflatoxin B1 was noticed in a single sample (< 1.0 µg kg(-1)). The results revealed low aflatoxin B1 contamination in the products under analysis. However, it is required to establish a broad monitoring program in order to obtain additional data and check up on the actual extension of contamination. PMID:24031973

  1. Occurrence of aflatoxin B1 in natural products

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Guilherme; Altoé, Aline F.; Gomes, Tatiana C. B.; Leal, Alexandre S.; Morais, Vanessa A. D.; Oliveira, Marize S.; Ferreira, Marli B.; Gomes, Mateus B.; Paschoal, Fabiano N.; von S. Souza, Rafael; Silva, Daniela A.; Cruz Madeira, Jovita E. G.

    2012-01-01

    The media claims for the consumption of natural resource-based food have gradually increased in both developing and developed countries. The interest in the safety of these products is partially due to the possible presence of toxigenic fungi acting as mycotoxin producers, such as aflatoxins produced during the secondary metabolism of Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus and A. nomius. Aflatoxins, mainly aflatoxin B1, are directly associated with liver cancer in human beings. This paper is aimed at evaluating the presence of aflatoxin B1 in a few vegetable drugs, dried plant extracts and industrialized products traded in 2010 in the city of Belo Horizonte, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The method used for the quantification of aflatoxin B1 was based on extraction through acetone:water (85:15), immunoaffinity column purification followed by separation and detection in high efficiency liquid chromatography. Under the conditions of analysis, the Limits of Detection and Quantification were 0.6 µg kg-1 and 1.0 µg kg-1 respectively. The complete sets of analyses were carried out in duplicate. Aflatoxin B1 was noticed in a single sample (< 1.0 µg kg-1). The results revealed low aflatoxin B1 contamination in the products under analysis. However, it is required to establish a broad monitoring program in order to obtain additional data and check up on the actual extension of contamination. PMID:24031973

  2. Metabolism of hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride in Pseudomonas strain B1.

    PubMed Central

    van Ginkel, C G; van Dijk, J B; Kroon, A G

    1992-01-01

    A bacterium (strain B1) utilizing hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride as a carbon and energy source was isolated from activated sludge and tentatively identified as a Pseudomonas sp. This bacterium only grew on alkyltrimethylammonium salts (C12 to C22) and possible intermediates of hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride breakdown such as hexadecanoate and acetate. Pseudomonas strain B1 did not grow on amines. Simultaneous adaptation studies suggested that the bacterium oxidized only the alkyl chain of hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride. This was confirmed by the stoichiometric formation of trimethylamine from hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride. The initial hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride oxygenase activity, measured by its ability to form trimethylamine, was NAD(P)H and O2 dependent. Finally, assays of aldehyde dehydrogenase, hexadecanoyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, and isocitrate lyase in cell extracts revealed the potential of Pseudomonas strain B1 to metabolize the alkyl chain via beta-oxidation. PMID:1444422

  3. Transmission and Demographic Dynamics of Coxsackievirus B1.

    PubMed

    Chu, Pei-Yu; Tyan, Yu-Chang; Chen, Yao-Shen; Chen, Hsiu-Lin; Lu, Po-Liang; Chen, Yu-Hsien; Chen, Bao-Chen; Huang, Tsi-Shu; Wang, Chu-Feng; Su, Hui-Ju; Shi, Yong-Ying; Sanno-Duanda, Bintou; Lin, Kuei-Hsiang; Motomura, Kazushi

    2015-01-01

    The infectious activity of coxsackievirus B1 (CV-B1) in Taiwan was high from 2008 to 2010, following an alarming increase in severe neonate disease in the United States (US). To examine the relationship between CV-B1 strains isolated in Taiwan and those from other parts of the world, we performed a phylodynamic study using VP1 and partial 3Dpol (414 nt) sequences from 22 strains of CV-B1 isolated in Taiwan (1989-2010) and compared them to sequences from strains isolated worldwide. Phylogenetic trees were constructed by neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain methods. Four genotypes (GI-IV) in the VP1 region of CV-B1 and three genotypes (GA-C) in the 3Dpol region of enterovirus B were identified and had high support values. The phylogenetic analysis indicates that the GI and GIII strains in VP1 were geographically distributed in Taiwan (1993-1994) and in India (2007-2009). On the other hand, the GII and GIV strains appear to have a wider spatiotemporal distribution and ladder-like topology A stair-like phylogeny was observed in the VP1 region indicating that the phylogeny of the virus may be affected by different selection pressures in the specified regions. Further, most of the GI and GII strains in the VP1 tree were clustered together in GA in the 3D tree, while the GIV strains diverged into GB and GC. Taken together, these data provide important insights into the population dynamics of CV-B1 and indicate that incongruencies in specific gene regions may contribute to spatiotemporal patterns of epidemicity for this virus. PMID:26053872

  4. Base substitution mutations induced by metabolically activated aflatoxin B1.

    PubMed

    Foster, P L; Eisenstadt, E; Miller, J H

    1983-05-01

    We have determined the base substitutions generated by metabolically activated aflatoxin B1 in the lacI gene of a uvrB- strain of Escherichia coli. By monitoring over 70 different nonsense mutation sites, we show that activated aflatoxin B1 specifically induced GxC leads to TxA transversions. One possible pathway leading to this base change involves depurination at guanine residues. We consider this mechanism of mutagenesis in the light of our other findings that the carcinogens benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide and N-acetoxyacetylaminofluorene also specifically induce GxC leads to TxA transversions. PMID:6405385

  5. Removal torque of nail interlocking screws is related to screw proximity to the fracture and screw breakage.

    PubMed

    White, Alexander A; Kubacki, Meghan R; Samona, Jason; Telehowski, Paul; Atkinson, Patrick J

    2016-06-01

    Studies have shown that titanium implants can be challenging to explant due to the material's excellent biocompatibility and resulting osseointegration. Clinically, titanium alloy nail interlocking screws may require removal to dynamize a construct or revise the nail due to nonunion, infection, pain, or periprosthetic fracture. This study was designed to determine what variables influence the removal torque for titanium alloy interlocking screws. An intramedullary nail with four interlocking screws was used to stabilize a 1-cm segmental femoral defect in a canine model for 16 weeks. The animals were observed to be active following a several-day recovery after surgery. In six animals, the femora and implanted nail/screws were first tested to failure in torsion to simulate periprosthetic fracture of an implant after which the screws were then removed. In four additional animals, the screws were removed without mechanical testing. Both intraoperative insertional and extraction torques were recorded for all screws. Mechanical testing to failure broke 10/24 screws. On average, the intact screws required 70% of the insertional torque during removal while broken screws only required 16% of the insertional torque (p < 0.001). In addition, intact screws closer to the fracture required 2.8 times more removal torque than the outboard distal screw (p < 0.005). On average, the angle of rotation to peak torque was ∼80°. The peak axial load did not significantly correlate with the torque required to remove the screws. On average, the removal torque was lower than at the time of insertion, and less torque was required to remove broken screws and screws remote to the fracture. However, broken screws will require additional time to retrieve the remaining screw fragment. This study suggests that broken screws and screws in prematurely active patients will require less torque to remove. PMID:27129382

  6. Pediatric Thighbone (Femur) Fracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... fractures in infants under 1 year old is child abuse. Child abuse is also a leading cause of thighbone fracture ... contact sports • Being in a motor vehicle accident • Child abuse Types of Femur Fractures (Classification) Femur fractures vary ...

  7. Hydraulic fracturing-1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book contains papers on hydraulic fracturing. Topics covered include: An overview of recent advances in hydraulic fracturing technology; Containment of massive hydraulic fracture; and Fracturing with a high-strength proppant.

  8. 75 FR 114 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of six section...

  9. 75 FR 5971 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of six section...

  10. 75 FR 51445 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b... July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English, DSCA/DBO/CFM, (703) 601-3740....

  11. 75 FR 30787 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b... July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English, DSCA/DBO/CFM, (703) 601-3740. The...

  12. 26 CFR 54.4980B-1 - COBRA in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... for topics not addressed in §§ 54.4980B-1 through 54.4980B-10? A-2: For purposes of section 4980B, for topics relating to the COBRA continuation coverage requirements of section 4980B that are not...

  13. In vivo formation of N-acyl-fumonisin B1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisins are fungal toxins found in corn and in corn-based foods. Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is the most common and is toxic to animals, causes cancer in rodents, and is a suspected risk factor for cancer and birth defects in humans. The hydrolyzed form of FB1 (HFB1) also occurs in foods and is metabolize...

  14. 78 FR 62597 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  15. 78 FR 62600 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  16. 77 FR 75617 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  17. 78 FR 62588 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  18. 77 FR 42704 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  19. 78 FR 15004 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  20. 78 FR 62590 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text...

  1. 78 FR 62592 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  2. 77 FR 51780 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text...

  3. 78 FR 72066 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text...

  4. 78 FR 62594 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  5. 26 CFR 31.3231(b)-1 - Who are employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Railroad Retirement Tax Act (Chapter 22, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) General Provisions § 31.3231(b)-1... he was employed or its corporate or operating successor, but (1) solely by reason of his physical...

  6. 75 FR 9182 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD...)(1) arms sales notification to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated...

  7. 76 FR 18731 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD...)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of...

  8. 76 FR 8716 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD...)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of...

  9. 76 FR 18726 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD...)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of...

  10. 75 FR 11865 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD...)(1) arms sales notification to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated...

  11. Determination of aflatoxin B1 in pistachio kernels and shells.

    PubMed

    Scholten, J M; Spanjer, M C

    1996-01-01

    A method was developed for accurate measurement of aflatoxin B1 in the edible portion of pistachio nuts. Twenty-nine samples of kernels with and without their shells were slurried with a Mega Ultra Turrax. A subsample of the homogenate was extracted with water-methanol, defatted with petroleum ether, purified with a silica solid-phase extraction column, and redissolved in methanol. After separation on an octadecyl column and postcolumn reaction with on-line electrochemically generated bromine, the aflatoxin B1 derivative was detected fluorometrically. The shells contained less than 1% of the aflatoxin B1 found in the edible kernel, and they accounted for 41.7-46.8% of the weight of the whole pistachio. These observations indicate it is possible to analyze an entire sample, up to 25 kg, as a whole and still be able to judge whether it meets the legal tolerance limit of 5 micrograms aflatoxin B1/kg edible part, as set by the Dutch Food Act. PMID:8946714

  12. Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin B1 in flour production.

    PubMed

    Halt, M

    1994-10-01

    This paper discusses the results of investigations of contamination with aflatoxin-producing fungi and aflatoxin B1 affecting 545 samples of wheat grains, 475 samples of intermediate products of wheat grain being milled to flour (like middlings) and 238 samples of flour. A significant contamination with moulds was detected in analyzed samples. Although Aspergillus (34.87%) and Penicillium (32.37%) dominated, other types were also present, e.g., Cladosporium, Fusarium, Mucor, Alternaria, Rhizopus, Absidia and Trichoderma (listed in order of frequency). The presence of Aspergillus flavus, the known aflatoxin producer, was detected in 9.94% of analyzed samples. Isolates of A. Flavus were capable of producing aflatoxin B1 under favourable conditions. Aflatoxin B1 was found in 76.8% of samples contaminated with A. flavus. The highest contamination with aflatoxin B1 was detected in wheat grain samples (mean value of 16.3 micrograms/kg) and in intermediate products of wheat grain being milled to flour (mean value of 11.13 micrograms/kg). Contamination was lower in flour samples (mean value of 4.13 micrograms/kg). With regard to proposed standards given by the FAO and WHO, under which the content of aflatoxin should not exceed 30 micrograms/kg in food products, only two of 96 samples did not meet these criteria. PMID:7859854

  13. 32 CFR 806b.1 - Summary of revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... systems subject to the Privacy Act, includes guidance on sending personal information via e-mail; adds procedures on complaints; and provides guidance on recall rosters; social rosters; consent statements... PROGRAM Overview of the Privacy Act Program § 806b.1 Summary of revisions. This part moves...

  14. 76 FR 66044 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... support. (iv) Military Department: Navy (LHG). (v) Prior Related Cases: Multiple cases dating back to...

  15. 76 FR 72184 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... Related Cases, if any: numerous cases dating back to 1995. (vi) Sales Commission, Fee, etc., Paid,...

  16. 77 FR 60387 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office.... ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of...

  17. 77 FR 60384 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office.... ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of...

  18. 77 FR 60391 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office.... ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of...

  19. Cathodic voltage-controlled electrical stimulation of titanium implants as treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus periprosthetic infections.

    PubMed

    Ehrensberger, Mark T; Tobias, Menachem E; Nodzo, Scott R; Hansen, Lisa A; Luke-Marshall, Nicole R; Cole, Ross F; Wild, Linda M; Campagnari, Anthony A

    2015-02-01

    Effective treatment options are often limited for implant-associated orthopedic infections. In this study we evaluated the antimicrobial effects of applying cathodic voltage-controlled electrical stimulation (CVCES) of -1.8 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) to commercially pure titanium (cpTi) substrates with preformed biofilm-like structures of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The in vitro studies showed that as compared to the open circuit potential (OCP) conditions, CVCES of -1.8 V for 1 h significantly reduced the colony-forming units (CFU) of MRSA enumerated from the cpTi by 97% (1.89 × 106 vs 6.45 × 104 CFU/ml) and from the surrounding solution by 92% (6.63 × 105 vs. 5.15 × 104 CFU/ml). The in vivo studies, utilizing a rodent periprosthetic infection model, showed that as compared to the OCP conditions, CVCES at -1.8 V for 1 h significantly reduced MRSA CFUs in the bone tissue by 87% (1.15 × 105 vs. 1.48 × 104 CFU/ml) and reduced CFU on the cpTi implant by 98% (5.48 × 104 vs 1.16 × 103 CFU/ml). The stimulation was not associated with histological changes in the host tissue surrounding the implant. As compared to the OCP conditions, the -1.8 V stimulation significantly increased the interfacial capacitance (18.93 vs. 98.25 μF/cm(2)) and decreased polarization resistance (868,250 vs. 108 Ω-cm(2)) of the cpTi. The antimicrobial effects are thought to be associated with these voltage-dependent electrochemical surface properties of the cpTi. PMID:25522969

  20. 26 CFR 31.3306(b)-1 - Wages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... provisions of law and of 26 CFR (1939) Part 403 (Regulations 107). (3) Remuneration paid in 1939. Whether... accordance with the applicable provisions of law and of 26 CFR (1939) Part 400 (Regulations 90). (b) The term... §§ 31.3306(b)(1)-1 to 31.3306(b)(10)-1, inclusive) or paragraph (j) of this section. (c) The name...

  1. Improving MRI surface coil decoupling to reduce B1 distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Christian

    As clinical MRI systems continue to advance, larger focus is being given to image uniformity. Good image uniformity begins with generating uniform magnetic fields, which are easily distorted by induced currents on receive-only surface coils. It has become an industry standard to combat these induced currents by placing RF blocking networks on surface coils. This paper explores the effect of blocking network impedance of phased array surface coils on B1 distortion. It has been found and verified, that traditional approaches for blocking network design in complex phased arrays can leave undesirable B1 distortions at 3 Tesla. The traditional approach of LC tank blocking is explored, but shifts from the idea that higher impedance equals better B1 distortion at 3T. The result is a new design principle for a tank with a finite inductive reactance at the Larmor Frequency. The solution is demonstrated via simulation using a simple, single, large tuning loop. The same loop, along with a smaller loop, is used to derive the new design principle, which is then applied to a complex phased array structure.

  2. Presence of corrosion products and hypersensitivity-associated reactions in periprosthetic tissue after aseptic loosening of total hip replacements with metal bearing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Huber, Monika; Reinisch, Georg; Trettenhahn, Günter; Zweymüller, Karl; Lintner, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Aseptic loosening of articular implants is frequently associated with tissue reactions to wear particles. Some patients, who had received metal-on-metal articulations, present early symptoms including persistent pain and implant failure. These symptoms raise the suspicion about the development of an immunological response. Furthermore, the generation of rare corrosion products in association with metallic implants has been observed. Corrosion products are known to enhance third-body wear and contribute to the loss of the implant. The purpose of this study was to investigate periprosthetic tissue containing solid corrosion products after aseptic loosening of second-generation metal-on-metal total hip replacements made of low-carbon cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy for the presence of immunologically determined tissue changes. Periprosthetic tissue of 11 cases containing uncommon solid deposits was investigated by light microscopy. In order to confirm the presence of corrosion products, additional methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR) analysis were used. All investigated cases revealed solid chromium orthophosphate corrosion products as well as metallic wear particles to a various extent. Moreover, various intense tissue reactions characteristic of immune response were observed in all cases. The simultaneous presence of corrosion products and hypersensitivity-associated tissue reaction indicates that a relationship between corrosion development and implant-related hypersensitivity may exist. PMID:18725188

  3. The inhibition of staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation by vancomycin-modified titanium alloy and implications for the treatment of periprosthetic infection

    PubMed Central

    Antoci, Valentin; Adams, Christopher S.; Parvizi, Javad; Davidson, Helen M.; Composto, Russell J.; Freeman, Theresa A.; Wickstrom, Eric; Ducheyne, Paul; Jungkind, Donald; Shapiro, Irving M.; Hickok, Noreen J.

    2008-01-01

    Peri-prosthetic infections are notoriously difficult to treat as the biomaterial implant is ideal for bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation, resulting in decreased antibiotic sensitivity. Previously, we reported that vancomycin covalently attached to a Ti alloy surface (Vanc-Ti) could prevent bacterial colonization. Herein we examine the effect of this Vanc-Ti surface on Staphylococci epidermidis, a Gram-positive organism prevalent in orthopaedic infections. By direct colony counting and fluorescent visualization of live bacteria, S. epidermidis colonization was significantly inhibited on Vanc-Ti implants. In contrast, the gram negative organism Escherichia coli readily colonized the Vanc-Ti rod, suggesting retention of antibiotic specificity. By histochemical and SEM analysis, Vanc-Ti prevented S. epidermidis biofilm formation, even in the presence of serum. Furthermore, when challenged multiple times with S. epidermidis, Vanc-Ti rods resisted bacterial colonization. Finally, when S. epidermidis was continuously cultured in the presence of Vanc-Ti, the bacteria maintained a Vanc sensitivity equivalent to the parent strain. These findings indicate that antibiotic derivatization of implants can result in a surface that can resist bacterial colonization. This technology holds great promises for the prevention and treatment of periprosthetic infections. PMID:18814909

  4. Substantially higher prevalence of postoperative peri­prosthetic fractures in octogenarians with hip fractures operated with a cemented, polished tapered stem rather than an anatomic stem

    PubMed Central

    Mukka, Sebastian; Mellner, Carl; Knutsson, Björn; Sayed-Noor, Arkan; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Recent studies have demonstrated a high incidence of postoperative periprosthetic femoral fracture (PPF) in elderly patients treated with 2 commonly used cemented, polished tapered stems. We compared the prevalence and incidence rate of PPF in a consecutive cohort of octagenerians with femoral neck fractures (FNFs) treated with either a collarless, polished tapered (CPT) stem or an anatomic matte stem (Lubinus SP2). Patients and methods In a multicenter, prospective cohort study, we included 979 hips in patients aged 80 years and above (72% females, median age 86 (80–102) years) with a femoral neck fracture as indication for surgery. 69% of the patients were classified as ASA class 3 or 4. Hip-related complications and repeat surgery were assessed at a median follow-up of 20 (0–24) months postoperatively. Results 22 hips (2.2%) sustained a PPF at a median of 7 (0–22) months postoperatively; 14 (64%) were Vancouver B2 fractures. 7 of the 22 surgically treated fractures required revision surgery, mainly due to deep infection. The cumulative incidence of PPFs was 3.8% in the CPT group, as compared with 0.2% in the SP2 group (p < 0.001). The risk ratio (RR) was 16 (95% CI: 2–120) using the SP2 group as denominator. Interpretation The CPT stem was associated with a higher risk of PPF than the SP2 stem. We suggest that the tapered CPT stem should not be used for the treatment of femoral neck fractures in patients over 80 years. PMID:27045318

  5. 26 CFR 48.6416(b)(1)-1 - Price readjustments causing overpayments of manufacturers tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... manufacturers tax. 48.6416(b)(1)-1 Section 48.6416(b)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... § 48.6416(b)(1)-1 Price readjustments causing overpayments of manufacturers tax. In the case of any... within the meaning of section 6416(b)(1) and § 48.6416(b)(1)-2 or § 48.6416(b)(1)-3, the person who...

  6. Patient-Related Risk Factors for Periprosthetic Joint Infection after Total Joint Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kunutsor, Setor K.; Whitehouse, Michael R.; Blom, Ashley W.; Beswick, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are dreaded complications of total joint arthroplasties. The risk of developing PJIs is likely to be influenced by several patient factors such as sociodemographic characteristics, body mass index (BMI), and medical and surgical histories. However, the nature and magnitude of the long-term longitudinal associations between these patient-related factors and risk of developing PJIs are uncertain. Objective To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the associations between several patient-related factors and PJI. Data Sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and reference lists of relevant studies from inception to September 2015. Study Selection Longitudinal studies with at least one-year of follow-up for PJIs after total joint arthroplasty. Data Extraction and Synthesis Two investigators extracted data on study characteristics, methods, and outcomes. A consensus was reached with involvement of a third. The relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals was used as the summary measure of association across studies. Study-specific RRs with 95% confidence intervals were meta-analysed using random effect models and were grouped by study-level characteristics. Results Sixty-six observational (23 prospective cohort and 43 retrospective cohort or case-control) studies with data on 512,508 participants were included. Comparing males to females and smokers to non-smokers, the pooled RRs for PJI were 1.36 (1.18–1.57) and 1.83 (1.24–2.70) respectively. There was no evidence of any significant associations of PJI with age and high alcohol intake. Comparing BMI ≥ 30 versus < 30 kg/m2; ≥ 35 versus < 35 kg/m2; and ≥ 40 versus < 40 kg/m2; the pooled RRs were 1.60 (1.29–1.99); 1.53 (1.22–1.92); and 3.68 (2.25–6.01) respectively. Histories of diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, depression, steroid use, and previous joint surgery were also associated with increased risk of PJI. The

  7. Ceramic femoral component fracture in total knee arthroplasty: an analysis using fractography, fourier-transform infrared microscopy, contact radiography and histology.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Alexander P; Singh, Gurpal; Beil, Frank Timo; Feuerstein, Bernd; Ruether, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Christoph H

    2014-05-01

    Ceramic components in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are evolving. We analyze the first case of BIOLOX delta ceramic femoral component fracture. A longitudinal midline fracture in the patellar groove was present, with an intact cement mantle and no bony defects. Fractographic analysis with laser scanning microscopy and white light interferometry showed no evidence of arrest lines, hackles, wake hackles, material flaws, fatigue or crack propagation. Analysis of periprosthetic tissues with Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) microscopy, contact radiography, histology, and subsequent digestion and high-speed centrifugation did not show ceramic debris. A macrophage-dominated response was present around polyethylene debris. We conclude that ceramic femoral component failure in this case was related to a traumatic event. Further research is needed to determine the suitability of ceramic components in TKA. PMID:24360338

  8. Supercritical fluid extraction of aflatoxin B(1) from soil.

    PubMed

    Starr, James M; Selim, Mustafa I

    2008-10-31

    This research describes the development of a supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) method to recover aflatoxin B(1) from fortified soil. The effects of temperature, pressure, modifier (identity and percentage), and extraction type were assessed. Using the optimized SFE conditions, the mean recovery from air dried soil was 72%. The variables associated with changes in recovery of aflatoxin were co-solvents, static extraction, and temperature. Acetonitrile-2% acetic acid, used both in-cell and on-line, provided the most efficient recovery. The results indicate that desorption from the soil was the limiting factor in recovery and that the static phase was more important than the dynamic. PMID:18814879

  9. Human placental cathepsin B1. Isolation and some physical properties

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Arnold A.; Martin, Bill J.; Spicer, Sam S.

    1974-01-01

    A reproducible procedure for the isolation, from human placenta, of a cathepsin B1 in a homogeneous state, demonstrated by electrophoretic, ultracentrifugal and enzymic criteria, was carried out. The pH optimum was near pH5.5. The placental enzyme catalysed the release of acid-soluble u.v.-dense products from haemoglobin and myoglobin. It was inhibited by heavy metals and several compounds which react with the thiol groups. The optimum temperature was between 37° and 42°C. The molecular weight of the enzyme was calculated to be 24250. ImagesPLATE 1Fig. 5. PMID:4824207

  10. Clinical Instability of the Knee and Functional Differences Following Tibial Plateau Fractures Versus Distal Femoral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hosein; Birjandinejad, Ali; Moradi, Ali; Fathi Choghadeh, Maysam; Rezazadeh, Jafar; Omidi-Kashani, Farzad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fractures of the knee account for about 6% of all trauma admissions. While its management is mostly focused on fracture treatment, it is not the only factor that defines the final outcome. Objectives: This study aimed to study objective and subjective outcomes after proximal tibial versus distal femoral fractures in terms of knee instability and health-related quality of life. Patients and Methods: This retrospective, cross-sectional, cohort study was carried out on 80 patients with either isolated proximal tibial (n = 42) or distal femoral (n = 38) fractures, who underwent open reduction and internal fixation. All the fractures were classified based on the Schatzker and AO classification for tibial plateau and distal femoral fractures, respectively. The patients were followed and examined by an orthopedic knee surgeon for clinical assessment of knee instability. In their last follow-up visit, these patients completed a Lysholm knee score and the short-form (SF) 36 health survey. Results: Among the 42 tibial plateau fractures, 25% were classified as Schatzker type 2. Of the 38 distal femoral fractures, we did not find any type B1 or B3 fractures. The overall prevalence of anterior and posterior instability was 42% and 20%, respectively. Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) and Lateral Collateral Ligament (LCL) injuries were detected clinically in 50% and 28%, respectively. The incidence rates of ligament injuries in tibial plateau fractures were as follows: Anterior Collateral Ligament (ACL) 26%, Posterior Collateral Ligament (PCL) 7%, MCL 24%, and LCL 14%. Medial collateral ligament injury was the most common in the Schatzker type 2 (50% of the injuries). Distal femoral fractures were associated with ACL injury in 16%, PCL in 13%, MCL in 26% and LCL in 14%. However, final knee range of motion (ROM) and function (Lysholm score) were not associated with fracture location. No statistically significant difference was observed between the two groups, except for

  11. Does the lateral plate need to overlap the stem to mitigate stress concentration when treating Vancouver C periprosthetic supracondylar femur fracture?

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Erik N; Haller, Justin M; Kemper, Dan D; Presson, Angela P; Higgins, Thomas F; Horwitz, Daniel S

    2015-01-01

    The effect of construct length on cortical strain and load to failure between locked compression plating and cemented femoral stem in a fall model was analyzed. Eight Sawbone femurs with cemented stems were instrumented with increasing fixation lengths starting 8cm distal to stem tip and progressing proximally to overlapping constructs. Uniaxial strain gauges measured cortical strain. Load to failure was performed with 8cm gap between implants, 2cm gap, and proximally overlapping configurations. Strain was significantly reduced as the 8cm gap transitioned to an overlapped construct with most comparisons. Load to failure in the overlapped construct was 273% greater compared to 2cm gap construct. Overlapping the stem with a locking compression plate resulted in reduced strain and increased load to failure. PMID:25443562

  12. Non-uniformity correction of human brain imaging at high field by RF field mapping of B1+ and B1-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hidehiro; Takaya, Nobuhiro; Mitsumori, Fumiyuki

    2011-10-01

    A new method of non-uniform image correction is proposed. Image non-uniformity is originated from the spatial distribution of RF transmission and reception fields, represented as B1+ and B1-, respectively. In our method, B1+ mapping was performed invivo by a phase method. In B1- mapping, images with multiple TEs were acquired with a multi-echo adiabatic spin echo (MASE) sequence which enables homogeneous excitation. By T2 fitting of these images an M0 map ( M0MASE) was obtained, in which signal intensity was expressed as the product of B1- and M0(1-e). The ratio of this M0MASE map to the B1+ map showed a similar spatial pattern in different human brains. These ratios of M0MASE to B1+ in 24 subjects were averaged and then fitted with a spatially polynomial function to obtain a ratio map of B1-/B1+(α). Uniform image was achieved in spin echo (SE), MASE and inversion recovery turboFLASH (IRTF) images using measured B1+ and calculated B1- by αB1+. Water fractions in gray and white matters obtained from the M0 images corrected by this method were in good agreement with previously reported values. From these experimental results, the proposed method of non-uniformity correction is validated at 4.7 T imaging.

  13. Rapid immunoenzyme assay of aflatoxin B1 using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Urusov, Alexandr E; Petrakova, Alina V; Vozniak, Maxim V; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Dzantiev, Boris B

    2014-01-01

    The main limitations of microplate-based enzyme immunoassays are the prolonged incubations necessary to facilitate heterogeneous interactions, the complex matrix and poorly soluble antigens, and the significant sample dilutions often required because of the presence of organic extractants. This study presents the use of antibody immobilization on the surface of magnetic particles to overcome these limitations in the detection of the mycotoxin, aflatoxin B1. Features of the proposed system are a high degree of nanoparticle dispersion and methodologically simple immobilization of the antibodies by adsorption. Reactions between the immobilized antibodies with native and labeled antigens are conducted in solution, thereby reducing the interaction period to 5 min without impairing the analytical outcome. Adsorption of immunoglobulins on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles increases their stability in aqueous-organic media, thus minimizing the degree of sample dilution required. Testing barley and maize extracts demonstrated a limit of aflatoxin B1 detection equal to 20 pg/mL and total assay duration of 20 min. Using this method, only the 3-fold dilution of the initial methanol/water (60/40) extraction mixture in the microplate wells is necessary. The proposed pseudo-homogeneous approach could be applied toward immunodetection of a wide range of compounds. PMID:25412219

  14. (HFR-B1 experiment reporting and capsule disassembly)

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, B.F.

    1991-02-22

    The traveler visited the Joint Research Centre (JRC), Petten, The Netherlands, the Forschungszentrum GmbH (KFA), Juelich, Germany; and the Zentralinstitut fuer Kernforschung (ZfK), Rossendorf, Germany, during the period January 28 through February 9. At JRC, the analysis of the experiment HFR-B1 was discussed; a new schedule for issuance of the final data report was established. Other discussions at JRC concerned the capabilities of Petten to conduct two reactor experiments being proposed under the US/FRG cooperative program and the initial results of a proof test of Germany fuel spheres. At KFA, the main emphasis was on the disassembly of capsules 2 and 3 of the HFR-B1 experiment and agreement on the examinations and tests to be conducted with the disassembled components. The disassembly of capsule 3 was observed. Extensive discussions were conducted on the work, both experimental and analytical, being conducted in the Institut fuer Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktor Technologie. A major portion of the experimental work is being conducted at ZfK and a visit to this laboratory, sponosored by the KFA, was made on February 6 and 7. Cooperation with the US on the experimental and analytical work in the safety area was strongly emphasized. 1 tab.

  15. Regulation of the Extrarenal CYP27B1-Hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    Adams, John S.; Rafison, Brandon; Witzel, Sten; Reyes, Rachel E.; Shieh, Albert; Chun, Rene; Zavala, Kathryn; Hewison, Martin; Liu, Philip T.

    2014-01-01

    Provided here is a collective review of research on the extrarenal CYP27B1-hydroxylase that shapes our current and expanding vision of the role this enzyme plays in the intracrinonology and paracrinology, as opposed to the traditional endocrinology, of vitamin D to regulate the innate and adaptive immune response, particularly in human granuloma-forming diseases like tuberculosis. Special emphasis is placed on soluble factors (i.e., cytokines) in the local microenvironment of these human diseases that coordinate amplification and feedback inhibition of the macrophage CYP27B1-hydroxylase. Principal among these factors are Type I and Type II interferons (IFNs); the Type II IFN, IFN-γ, stimulates the production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) from 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) by the granuloma-forming disease-activated macrophage, while the Type I IFNs, IFN-α and IFN-ß, block the hydroxylation reaction. The type I IFN response is associated with more aggressive disease, while the Type II IFN response, the one that promotes 1,25(OH)2D production by the macrophage, is associated with more confined disease. Tilting the balance in the human immune response toward a type II IFN, confined disease phenotype in enabled by the presence of extracellular 25OHD levels that are sufficient to enable the type II IFNγ-promoted, substrate 25OHD-driven intracellular synthesis of 1,25(OH)2D. PMID:24388948

  16. (Fission product transport experiments (HFR-B1))

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, B.F.

    1989-12-05

    Travel to the JRC Petten was for the purpose of discussing the HFR-B1 experiment and post irradiation activities. Technical assessment of the experiment strongly supports the concept of enhanced fission gas release at temperatures above 1100{degree}C, the extensive release of stored fission gas at water vapor levels postulated in accident scenarios, an increase in the steady-state fission gas release under hydrolyzing conditions, and an increase in gas release during thermal cycling. Schedules were established for completion of the work and issuance of reports by September 1990. At the KFA Juelich agreement was reached on the PIE activities for HFR-B1 and a schedule established. The final PIE report is due June 1991. Choices of accident condition tests in the PIE have yet to be made by the US participants. A proposal for the establishment of a new cooperative effort on model and code development was presented at the Institut fuer Nukleare Sicherheitsforschung of KFA. The proposal was considered premature; discussions dealing with general principles, basic aims, and organization were requested; particular concerns about free exchange of information, overlap with the existing safety subprogram, and exclusive cooperation with ORNL were raised. A strong desire for cooperation and the opinion that the raised problems could be resolved were expressed. Technical discussions at the KFA were beneficial.

  17. The CHESS survey of the L1157-B1 shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busquet, G.; Lefloch, B.; Benedettini, M.; Codella, C.; Cabrit, S.; Ceccarelli, C.; Vasta, M.; Viti, S.; Giannini, T.; Nisini, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Lorenzani, A.

    2012-03-01

    Outflows generated by protostars heavily affect the kinematics and chemistry of the hosting molecular cloud due to strong shocks. These shocks heats and compress the ambient dense gas switching on a complex chemistry that leads to an enhancement of the abundance of several species, as reported in ``chemically active'' outflows, whose archetype is the outflow of the low-mass Class 0 protostar L1157. We present the results of the spectral survey of the shock region L1157-B1 carried out with PACS, SPIRE and HIFI instruments in the framework of the Herschel key program CHESS. The high spectral resolution data from HIFI show that different excitation conditions coexist in the B1 shock while the high PACS spatial resolution data shows a different spatial distribution of the the detected specie. We will discuss the properties of the different gas components and present the physical conditions derived from different species. We will present a first comparison with shock models highlighting the complex structure of this shocked region.

  18. Radial head fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Elbow fracture - radial head - aftercare ... the radius bone, just below your elbow. A fracture is a break in your bone. The most common cause of a radial head fracture is falling with an outstretched arm.

  19. Hand fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000552.htm Hand fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... need to be repaired with surgery. Types of hand fractures Your fracture may be in one of ...

  20. Fractured Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03084 Fractured Surface

    These fractures and graben are part of Gordii Fossae, a large region that has undergone stresses which have cracked the surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16.6S, Longitude 234.3E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. 16 CFR Appendix B1 to Part 305 - Upright Freezers With Manual Defrost

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Upright Freezers With Manual Defrost B1 Appendix B1 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF...) Pt. 305, App. B1 Appendix B1 to Part 305—Upright Freezers With Manual Defrost Range...

  2. Generation and Characterization of a Cyp4b1 Null Mouse and the Role of CYP4B1 in the Activation and Toxicity of Ipomeanol

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    4-Ipomeanol (IPO) is a prototypical pulmonary toxin that requires P450-mediated metabolic activation to reactive intermediates in order to elicit its toxic effects. CYP4B1 is a pulmonary enzyme that has been shown, in vitro, to have a high capacity for bioactivating IPO. In order to determine, unambiguously, the role of CYP4B1 in IPO bioactivation in vivo, we generated Cyp4b1 null mice following targeted disruption of the gene downstream of exon 1. Cyp4b1 −/− mice are viable and healthy, with no overt phenotype, and no evidence of compensatory upregulation of other P450 isoforms in any of the tissues examined. Pulmonary and renal microsomes prepared from male Cyp4b1 −/− mice exhibited no detectable expression of the protein and catalyzed the in vitro bioactivation of IPO at < 10% of the rates observed in tissue microsomes from Cyp4b1 +/+ animals. Administration of IPO (20mg/kg) to Cyp4b1 +/+ mice resulted in characteristic lesions in the lung, and to a lesser extent in the kidney, which were completely absent in Cyp4b1 −/− mice. We conclude that CYP4B1 is a critical enzyme for the bioactivation of IPO in vivo and that the Cyp4b1 −/− mouse is a useful model for studying CYP4B1-dependent metabolism and toxicity. PMID:23748241

  3. RNA interference of IL-10 in leukemic B-1 cells.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Brian A; Mansour, Amal; Lin, Yi-Chu; Kotenko, Sergei; Raveche, Elizabeth

    2004-07-23

    RNA interference, or RNAi, is designed to work by Watson-Crick base pairing and to result in a posttranscriptional block in protein synthesis. Antiapoptotic proteins are a major focus of cancer therapy and make attractive targets for RNAi. An IL-10 RNAi sequence was designed in accordance with Tuschl rules and was modeled to a hairpin configuration. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the most common leukemia in the Western world, the failure to undergo apoptosis may be responsible for the accumulation of malignant B-1 cells. Interleukin-10, despite controversy, has been shown to have antiapoptotic properties, and increased endogenous IL-10 production has been found in CLL by several labs. A malignant B-1 cell line, LNC, derived from an NZB mouse (a murine model for CLL) was utilized as a target for IL-10 RNAi. Our earlier studies of antisense IL-10 resulted in antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects. The cytotoxic effects of IL-10 RNAi were dose- and time-dependent, with an optimal dose 10-fold lower than that of antisense IL-10. IL-10 RNAi lowered IL-10 protein as measured by ELISA. 2 micro M IL-10 RNAi initiated a G2/M block and a decrease in the message for cdc25C, the M-phase inducer phosphatase. IL-10 RNAi efficiently induced apoptosis. Bcl7C, a member of the antiapoptotic Bcl family, was significantly down-regulated. IL-10 modulating Bcl7C expression represents a novel mechanism in the evasion of apoptosis. This approach, by itself or in conjunction with current therapies, merits consideration in similar B-cell malignancies. PMID:15270555

  4. Is Xpert MRSA/SA SSTI real-time PCR a reliable tool for fast detection of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci in periprosthetic joint infections?

    PubMed

    Lourtet-Hascoëtt, J; Bicart-See, A; Félicé, M P; Giordano, G; Bonnet, E

    2015-09-01

    Periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are frequently caused by methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). Cultures remain the gold standard but often require a few days. Thus, a rapid test could be interesting to guide antibiotic strategy earlier. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performances of RT-PCR Xpert® MRSA/SA technique for the detection of methicillin-resistant CoNS (MRCoNS) from deep samples in patients with PJIs. RT-PCR was tested on 72 samples. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of RT-PCR method were 0.36, 0.98, 0.90, and 0.74, respectively. Although RT-PCR may allow early microbial diagnosis of PJI due to Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA), the low sensitivity and the high cost of this method to detect MRCoNS could limit its use in this field. PMID:26052062

  5. Synovial Fluid C-reactive Protein as a Diagnostic Marker for Periprosthetic Joint Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi; Wang, Qi; Li, Rui; Duan, Jin-Yan; Wang, Cheng-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is the main cause of failure following total joint arthroplasty. Until now, the diagnosis of PJI is still confronted with technical limitations, and the question of whether synovial fluid biomarker, C-reactive protein (CRP), can provide high value in the diagnosis of PJI remains unanswered and, therefore, was the aim of the study. Methods: First, we conducted a systematic review on CRP in the diagnosis of PJI by searching online databases using keywords such as “periprosthetic joint infection”, “synovial fluid”, and “C-reactive protein”. Eligible studies providing sufficient data to construct 2 × 2 contingency tables were then selected based on the list of criteria and the quality of included studies was assessed subsequently. Finally, the reported sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve, and the area under the SROC (AUSROC) were pooled together and used to evaluate overall diagnostic performance. Results: Seven studies were included in our review, six of which comprising a total of 456 participants were further investigated in our meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and DOR were 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.86–0.96), 0.90 (95% CI: 0.87–0.93), and 101.40 (95% CI: 48.07–213.93), respectively. The AUSROC was 0.9663 (standard error, 0.0113). Conclusions: Synovial fluid CRP is a good biomarker for the diagnosis of PJI with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27503025

  6. Femoral midshaft fractures: expandable versus locked nailing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen-Tao; Song, Yu-Chen; Zhou, Xiao-Zhong; Zhou, Hai-Bin; Luo, Zong-Ping; Dong, Qi-Rong

    2015-04-01

    Femoral midshaft fracture is one of the most common clinical injuries and is often caused by high-energy traffic accidents. Intramedullary nailings, plates, and external fixators are all used as treatment alternatives for a variety of patients depending on fracture location, displacement, comminution, soft tissue condition, and local tradition. Locked intramedullary nailing is currently the preferred treatment method for most diaphyseal fractures and has good clinical results. The goal of this study was to compare expandable and locked intramedullary nailing for the treatment of AO type 32A and 32B1 femoral midshaft fractures. The authors performed a retrospective analysis of 46 patients (33 men and 13 women; mean age, 32.3 years; range, 22-52 years) with femoral midshaft fractures who were divided into 2 groups-one treated with an expandable intramedullary nailing method and the other with a conventional locked intramedullary nailing. The 2 groups were compared with respect to operation time, fluoroscopic time, amount of estimated blood loss, hospitalization time, healing time, and complications. Patients were followed for at least 1 year. The results of this study showed that all of the patients achieved bone union within 12 to 24 months. Expandable nailing performed better than locked nailing in operation time, fluoroscopic time, amount of estimated blood loss, and healing time (P<.001). There was no difference in hospitalization time and no visible shortening or severe complications were observed in either group. Based on the results of this study, the expandable intramedullary nailing is an easy and effective treatment for AO type 32A and 32B1 diaphyseal femoral fractures. PMID:25901625

  7. Structure and expression of the gene (HNRPA2B1) encoding the human hnRNP protein A2/B1

    SciTech Connect

    Kozu, Tomoko; Henrich, B.; Schaefer, K.P.

    1995-01-20

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A2 is a major nuclear protein and one of the major components of the hnRNP core complex in mammalian cells. We first determined the complete sequence of the human gene for hnRNP protein A2 (HNRPA2B1). The human HNRPA2B1 gene exists in a single copy over 9 kb in length. The gene was split into 12 exons, including a 36-nucleotide mini-exon, which was specific to the hnRNP protein B1, providing genetic evidence that the B1 mRNA was generated from the primary HNRPA2B1 transcript by alternative splicing. The 5{prime} region of HNRPA2B1 was GC-rich and contained several DNA motifs for the binding of several transcription factors, which included 2 CCAAT boxes and no TATA sequences. The 5{prime} ends of the mRNA were mapped to multiple positions. These structural features are characteristic of promoter regions of housekeeping genes. Northern blot and RT-PCR analyses of the HNRPA2B1 transcripts revealed levels of B1 mRNA from 2 to 5% of total A2/B1 transcripts and showed that both A2 and B1 mRNAs were transcribed in all human cell lines and mouse tissues studied. The structural and evolutionary characteristics of the A2 and A1 proteins as they relate to each other are discussed. 38 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Fumonisin B1 and the kidney: modes of action for renal tumor formation by fumonisin B1 in rodents.

    PubMed

    Müller, Stephanie; Dekant, Wolfgang; Mally, Angela

    2012-10-01

    The mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1) is an important contaminant of maize and maize-based products. In rodent toxicity studies, FB1 was shown to be hepato- and nephrotoxic, and to induce renal tumors in rats when administered via the diet. Of particular note are the aggressive growth characteristics of FB1-induced tumors with a high potential to metastasize. While genotoxicity does not appear to contribute to FB1 carcinogenicity, it is well established that FB1-mediated disruption of sphingolipid metabolism plays a key role in FB1 toxicity. This review provides an overview on human dietary exposure to FB1, FB1 toxicity and carcinogenicity, and potential mechanisms involved in FB1-mediated tumor formation, with a particular focus on cellular functions of sphingolipids and biological consequences of FB1-mediated perturbation of sphingolipid metabolism. PMID:22771819

  9. Fracture channel waves

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.; Yi, W.; Myer, L.R.; Cook, N.G.; Schoenberg, M.

    1999-03-01

    The properties of guided waves which propagate between two parallel fractures are examined. Plane wave analysis is used to obtain a dispersion equation for the velocities of fracture channel waves. Analysis of this equation demonstrates that parallel fractures form an elastic waveguide that supports two symmetric and two antisymmetric dispersive Rayleigh channel waves, each with particle motions and velocities that are sensitive to the normal and tangential stiffnesses of the fractures. These fracture channel waves degenerate to shear waves when the fracture stiffnesses are large, to Rayleigh waves and Rayleigh-Lamb plate waves when the fracture stiffnesses are low, and to fracture interface waves when the fractures are either very closely spaced or widely separated. For intermediate fracture stiffnesses typical of fractured rock masses, fracture channel waves are dispersive and exhibit moderate to strong localization of guided wave energy between the fractures. The existence of these waves is examined using laboratory acoustic measurements on a fractured marble plate. This experiment confirms the distinct particle motion of the fundamental antisymmetric fracture channel wave (A{sub 0} mode) and demonstrates the ease with which a fracture channel wave can be generated and detected. {copyright} 1999 American Geophysical Union

  10. Effects of aflatoxin B1 and fumonisin B1 on body weight, antibody titres and histology of broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Tessari, E N C; Oliveira, C A F; Cardoso, A L S P; Ledoux, D R; Rottinghaus, G E

    2006-06-01

    1. Our objective was to evaluate the toxic effects of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and fumonisin B1 (FB1), administered singly or in combination to broilers. 2. Feeds were prepared with concentrations equal to 0, 50 and 200 microg AFB1/kg, and/or 0, 50 and 200 mg FB1/kg, and offered to broiler chicks from 8 to 41 d of age. The experimental design was totally randomised, in a 3 x 3 factorial arrangement with 9 treatments and 12 birds per treatment. Animals were vaccinated against Newcastle disease on d 14 of life and killed at 41 d. 3. Compared with controls, all mycotoxin-treated groups at 41 d had lower body weight and weight gain, and higher relative heart weight. The relative weight of the liver increased only in birds fed diets containing 200 mg FB1, singly or in combination with AFB1. 4. At 35 d, all groups receiving mycotoxin-treated rations had reduced geometrical mean antibody titres, with birds from groups fed combinations of AFB1 and FB1/kg having even lower values, when compared to the other groups. 5. Histological changes were observed only in liver from birds fed mycotoxin-contaminated rations, and in kidneys of birds fed the diet containing 200 microg AFB1 and 200 mg FB1/kg. Main alterations included vacuolar degeneration and cell proliferation of bile ducts in the liver, and hydropic degeneration in renal tubules in the kidneys. 6. We concluded that AFB1 and FB1 in combination have primarily additive effects on body weight, liver structure and immunological response of broilers at the concentrations used. PMID:16787861

  11. Poroelastic Response of Orthotropic Fractured Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, James G.

    2011-12-16

    An algorithm is presented for inverting either laboratory or field poroelastic data for all the drained constants of an anisotropic (specifically orthotropic) fractured poroelastic system. While fractures normally weaken the system by increasing the mechanical compliance, any liquids present in these fractures are expected to increase the stiffness somewhat, thus negating to some extent the mechanical weakening influence of the fractures themselves. The analysis presented quantifies these effects and shows that the key physical variable needed to account for the pore-fluid effects is a factor of (1 - B), where B is Skempton's second coe fficient and satisfies 0 {<=} B < 1. This scalar factor uniformly reduces the increase in compliance due to the presence of communicating fractures, thereby stiffening the fractured composite medium by a predictable amount. One further goal of the discussion is to determine how many of the poroelastic constants need to be known by other means in order to determine the rest from remote measurements, such as seismic wave propagation data in the field. Quantitative examples arising in the analysis show that, if the fracture aspect ratio a{sub f} ~ 0.1 and the pore fluid is liquid water, then for several cases considered Skempton's B ~ 0:9, so the stiffening effect of the pore-liquid reduces the change in compliance due to the fractures by a factor 1-B ~ 0.1, in these examples. The results do however depend on the actual moduli of the unfractured elastic material, as well as on the pore-liquid bulk modulus, so these quantitative predictions are just examples, and should not be treated as universal results. Attention is also given to two previously unremarked poroelastic identities, both being useful variants of Gassmann's equations for homogeneous -- but anisotropic -- poroelasticity. Relationships to Skempton's analysis of saturated soils are also noted. The paper concludes with a discussion of alternative methods of analyzing and

  12. The toxicity of purified fumonisin B1 in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Henry, M H; Wyatt, R D; Fletchert, O J

    2000-10-01

    An investigation of the toxicity of fumonisin B1 (FB1), a toxic metabolite of Fusarium moniliforme, in broiler chicks was conducted. Purified FB1 (98.1% pure) was incorporated into the diets of broiler chicks at 0, 20, 40, and 80 mg/kg, and fed to chicks from 0 to 21 d of age. Dietary FB1, at concentrations of 80 mg/kg or less, did not adversely affect body weight, feed efficiency, or water consumption of broiler chicks. The relative weights of the liver, spleen, kidney, proventriculus, and bursa of Fabricius were also unaffected (P < 0.05) by any dietary concentration of FB1 compared with the control (0 mg/kg) group. Total liver lipids of chicks fed 40 or 80 mg FB1/kg were significantly lower than those of the chicks fed either 0 or 20 mg FB1/kg of feed. Liver sphinganine concentration and the sphinganine:sphingosine ratio were increased significantly in all treated groups. Chicks fed dietary FB1 at 80 mg/kg had significantly higher serum glutamate oxaloacetate aminotransaminase:aspartate aminotransferase ratios and levels of free sphinganine in the serum. The results of this investigation agree with the results previously described, in which FB1 was supplied to diets from the use of F. moniliforme-contaminated grain; therefore, the use of such material as the source of the mycotoxin in animal feeding studies is appropriate. PMID:11055840

  13. Transonic aeroelastic analysis of the B-1 wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, G. P.; Goorjian, P. M.; Ide, H.; Miller, G. D.

    1986-01-01

    The flow over the B-1 wing is studied computationally, including the aeroelastic response of the wing. Computed results are compared with results from wind tunnel and flight tests for both low- and high-sweep cases, at 25.0 and 67.5 deg, respectively, for selected transonic Mach numbers. The aerodynamic and aeroelastic computations are made by using the transonic unsteady code ATRAN3S. Steady aerodynamic computations compare well with wind tunnel results for the 25.0 deg sweep case and also for small angles of attack at 67.5 deg sweep case. The aeroelastic response results show that the wing is stable at the low-sweep angle for the calculation at the Mach number at which there is a shock wave. In the higher-sweep case, for the higher angle of attack at which oscillations were observed in the flight and wind tunnel tests, the calculations do not show any shock waves. Their absence lends support to the hypothesis that the observed oscillations are due to the presence of leading-edge separation vortices and not to shock wave motion, as was previously proposed.

  14. Carcinogenic effects of aflatoxin B1 among wheat handlers

    PubMed Central

    Saad-Hussein, Amal; Taha, Mona M; Beshir, Safia; Shahy, Eman M; Shaheen, Weam; Elhamshary, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that serum aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a hepatocarcinogenic mycotoxin and contributor to the high rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The prevalence of liver cancer in Egypt is particularly worrisome. In a registry-based analysis of occupational risk for HCC, significant excesses were observed especially for grain mill workers. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the hepatic carcinogenicity of AFB1 in wheat handlers. Methods: Serum AFB1/albumin (AFB1/Alb), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), alpha-l-fucosidase (AFU), and arginase were estimated in exposed wheat handlers including millers and bakers. The control group was composed of non-occupationally exposed workers. Results: AFB1/Alb and AFU were significantly higher among workers employed as bakers compared to mill workers and controls. Mill workers had higher levels of AFB1/Alb than the controls. AFB1/Alb, AFP, and AFU were all significantly higher and arginase was significantly lower among HCC cases compared to the other groups. There was a significant correlation between AFU and AFB1/Alb in bakers and between AFP and AFB1/Alb in HCC cases. Arginase was inversely correlated with AFB1/Alb in HCC cases. AFB1/Alb was significantly correlated with the duration of exposure in bakers. Conclusion: Wheat handlers exposed to Aspergillus flavus have a high risk of elevated serum AFB1/Alb levels and AFU. PMID:25000109

  15. PHOSPHORUS CHEMISTRY IN THE SHOCKED REGION L1157 B1

    SciTech Connect

    Aota, T.; Aikawa, Y.

    2012-12-10

    We study the evolution of phosphorus-bearing species in one-dimensional C-shock models. We find that the abundances of P-bearing species depend sensitively on the elemental abundance of P in the gas phase and on the abundance of N atoms in the pre-shock gas. The observed abundance of PN and the non-detection of PO toward L1157 B1 are reproduced in C-shock models with shock velocity v = 20 km s{sup -1} and pre-shock density n(H{sub 2}) 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}, if the elemental abundance of P in the gas phase is {approx}10{sup -9} and the N-atom abundance is n(N)/n{sub H} {approx}10{sup -5} in the pre-shock gas. We also find that P-chemistry is sensitive to O- and N-chemistry because N atoms are destroyed mainly by OH and NO. We identify the reactions of O-bearing and N-bearing species that significantly affect P-chemistry.

  16. The body vitamin B1 levels of rats fed a diet containing the minimum requirement of vitamin B1 is reduced by exercise.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Katsumi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    It is thought that increasing energy expenditure increases consumption of vitamin B1, leading to an increase in the requirement of vitamin B1. However, evidence supporting this hypothesis is lacking. To examine the hypothesis, initially, we determined the minimum requirement of vitamin B1 for weaning rats. We found that the minimum requirement of vitamin B1 for optimum growth of weaning rats was around 0.786 mg thiamin/kg diet. Next, rats fed a diet containing the minimum requirement of vitamin B1 were forced to swim until exhaustion. Concentrations of vitamin B1 in the blood and liver as well as urinary excretion of swimming rats decreased significantly compared with those of non-swimming rats (p<0.05), while in rats fed the diet containing a sufficient amount of vitamin B1 (4.720 mg thiamin/kg diet), vitamin B1 amounts in the blood, liver and urine were not affected by swimming. We clearly and firstly showed the reduction of body vitamin B1 following increases in energy expenditure. PMID:23727637

  17. The PGE2/IL-10 Axis Determines Susceptibility of B-1 Cell-Derived Phagocytes (B-1CDP) to Leishmania major Infection.

    PubMed

    Arcanjo, Angélica F; LaRocque-de-Freitas, Isabel F; Rocha, Juliana Dutra B; Zamith, Daniel; Costa-da-Silva, Ana Caroline; Nunes, Marise Pinheiro; Mesquita-Santos, Fabio P; Morrot, Alexandre; Filardy, Alessandra A; Mariano, Mario; Bandeira-Melo, Christianne; DosReis, George A; Decote-Ricardo, Debora; Freire-de-Lima, Célio Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    B-1 cells can be differentiated from B-2 cells because they are predominantly located in the peritoneal and pleural cavities and have distinct phenotypic patterns and activation properties. A mononuclear phagocyte derived from B-1 cells (B-1CDP) has been described. As the B-1CDP cells migrate to inflammatory/infectious sites and exhibit phagocytic capacity, the microbicidal ability of these cells was investigated using the Leishmania major infection model in vitro. The data obtained in this study demonstrate that B-1CDP cells are more susceptible to infection than peritoneal macrophages, since B-1CDP cells have a higher number of intracellular amastigotes forms and consequently release a larger number of promastigotes. Exacerbated infection by L. major required lipid bodies/PGE2 and IL-10 by B-1CDP cells. Both infection and the production of IL-10 were decreased when PGE2 production was blocked by NSAIDs. The involvement of IL-10 in this mechanism was confirmed, since B-1CDP cells from IL-10 KO mice are more competent to control L. major infection than cells from wild type mice. These findings further characterize the B-1CDP cells as an important mononuclear phagocyte that plays a previously unrecognized role in host responses to L. major infection, most likely via PGE2-driven production of IL-10. PMID:25933287

  18. The PGE2/IL-10 Axis Determines Susceptibility of B-1 Cell-Derived Phagocytes (B-1CDP) to Leishmania major Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zamith, Daniel; Costa-da-Silva, Ana Caroline; Nunes, Marise Pinheiro; Mesquita-Santos, Fabio P.; Morrot, Alexandre; Filardy, Alessandra A.; Mariano, Mario; Bandeira-Melo, Christianne; DosReis, George A.; Decote-Ricardo, Debora; Freire-de-Lima, Célio Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    B-1 cells can be differentiated from B-2 cells because they are predominantly located in the peritoneal and pleural cavities and have distinct phenotypic patterns and activation properties. A mononuclear phagocyte derived from B-1 cells (B-1CDP) has been described. As the B-1CDP cells migrate to inflammatory/infectious sites and exhibit phagocytic capacity, the microbicidal ability of these cells was investigated using the Leishmania major infection model in vitro. The data obtained in this study demonstrate that B-1CDP cells are more susceptible to infection than peritoneal macrophages, since B-1CDP cells have a higher number of intracellular amastigotes forms and consequently release a larger number of promastigotes. Exacerbated infection by L. major required lipid bodies/PGE2 and IL-10 by B-1CDP cells. Both infection and the production of IL-10 were decreased when PGE2 production was blocked by NSAIDs. The involvement of IL-10 in this mechanism was confirmed, since B-1CDP cells from IL-10 KO mice are more competent to control L. major infection than cells from wild type mice. These findings further characterize the B-1CDP cells as an important mononuclear phagocyte that plays a previously unrecognized role in host responses to L. major infection, most likely via PGE2-driven production of IL-10. PMID:25933287

  19. Primary Cementless Hip Arthroplasty in Unstable Intertrochanteric Femur Fracture in Elderlys: Short-term Results

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyung Lae; Cho, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was aimed to explore and report the short term results of primary cementless hip arthroplasty in treatment of unstable intertrochanteric femur fracture in elderlys. Materials and Methods Between March 2009 and Feburary 2012, 35 arthroplasty cases performed by single surgeon and followed up for more than one year were evaluated. They were 21 females and 14 males with mean age of 78 years (range, 71-92 years). Preoperative evaluation was performed by American Society of Anesthesia score. Retrospective evaluation was performed by operative time, transfusion amount, time to operation days, hospital stay and time to full weight bearing. Clinically, ambulatory ability was checked by Parker and Palmer (P&P) score and function of hip was appraised by Harris hip score (HSS). Radiologically, bone healing of fractured trochanteric fragment and presence of subsidence, stress shielding or osteolysis were checked. Results Fracture type was 11 cases of A2.2, 18 cases of A2.3 and 6 cases of A3.3. Femoral stems used were 8 cases of rectangular tapered wedge type and 27 cases of fluted modular distal fixation type. P&P score improved from mean preinjury score of 7.1 to mean postoperative last follow-up score of 6.5. Median HHS at last follow-up was 75. Mean time to full weight bearing was 47 days (24-79 days). Postoperative complications were one case of linear periprosthetic femoral fracture and one case of postoperative dislocation. Conclusion Cementless hip replacement arthroplasty could be a good option for unstable intertrochanteric femoral fracture in elderlys.

  20. Cyp1b1 Mediates Periostin Regulation of Trabecular Meshwork Development by Suppression of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun; Wang, Shoujian; Sorenson, Christine M.; Teixeira, Leandro; Dubielzig, Richard R.; Peters, Donna M.; Conway, Simon J.; Jefcoate, Colin R.

    2013-01-01

    Mutation in CYP1B1 has been reported for patients with congenital glaucoma. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show increased diurnal intraocular pressure (IOP) in Cyp1b1-deficient (Cyp1b1−/−) mice. Cyp1b1−/− mice presented ultrastructural irregular collagen distribution in their trabecular meshwork (TM) tissue along with increased oxidative stress and decreased levels of periostin (Postn). Increased levels of oxidative stress and decreased levels of Postn were also detected in human glaucomatous TM tissues. Furthermore, Postn-deficient mice exhibited TM tissue ultrastructural abnormalities similar to those of Cyp1b1−/− mice. Administration of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) restored structural abnormality of TM tissue in Cyp1b1−/− mice. In addition, TM cells prepared from Cyp1b1−/− mice exhibited increased oxidative stress, altered adhesion, and decreased levels of Postn. These aberrant cellular responses were reversed in the presence of NAC or by restoration of Cyp1b1 expression. Cyp1b1 knockdown or inhibition of CYP1B1 activity in Cyp1b1+/+ TM cells resulted in a Cyp1b1−/− phenotype. Thus, metabolic activity of CYP1B1 contributes to oxidative homeostasis and ultrastructural organization and function of TM tissue through modulation of Postn expression. PMID:23979599

  1. Paratrooper's Ankle Fracture: Posterior Malleolar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki Won; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Seuk; Cho, Hun Ki; Lee, Kyung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the frequency and types of ankle fractures that frequently occur during parachute landings of special operation unit personnel and analyzed the causes. Methods Fifty-six members of the special force brigade of the military who had sustained ankle fractures during parachute landings between January 2005 and April 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The injury sites and fracture sites were identified and the fracture types were categorized by the Lauge-Hansen and Weber classifications. Follow-up surveys were performed with respect to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, patient satisfaction, and return to preinjury activity. Results The patients were all males with a mean age of 23.6 years. There were 28 right and 28 left ankle fractures. Twenty-two patients had simple fractures and 34 patients had comminuted fractures. The average number of injury and fractures sites per person was 2.07 (116 injuries including a syndesmosis injury and a deltoid injury) and 1.75 (98 fracture sites), respectively. Twenty-three cases (41.07%) were accompanied by posterior malleolar fractures. Fifty-five patients underwent surgery; of these, 30 had plate internal fixations. Weber type A, B, and C fractures were found in 4, 38, and 14 cases, respectively. Based on the Lauge-Hansen classification, supination-external rotation injuries were found in 20 cases, supination-adduction injuries in 22 cases, pronation-external rotation injuries in 11 cases, tibiofibular fractures in 2 cases, and simple medial malleolar fractures in 2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 23.8 months, and the average follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was 85.42. Forty-five patients (80.36%) reported excellent or good satisfaction with the outcome. Conclusions Posterior malleolar fractures occurred in 41.07% of ankle fractures sustained in parachute landings. Because most of the ankle fractures in parachute injuries were

  2. Molecular ions in the protostellar shock L1157-B1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podio, L.; Lefloch, B.; Ceccarelli, C.; Codella, C.; Bachiller, R.

    2014-05-01

    Aims: We perform a complete census of molecular ions with an abundance greater than ~10-10 in the protostellar shock L1157-B1. This allows us to study the ionisation structure and chemistry of the shock. Methods: An unbiased high-sensitivity survey of L1157-B1 performed with the IRAM-30 m and Herschel/HIFI as part of the CHESS and ASAI large programmes allows searching for molecular ions emission. Then, by means of a radiative transfer code in the large velocity gradient approximation, the gas physical conditions and fractional abundances of molecular ions are derived. The latter are compared with estimates of steady-state abundances in the cloud and their evolution in the shock calculated with the chemical model Astrochem. Results: We detect emission from HCO+, H13CO+, N2H+, HCS+, and for the first time in a shock, from HOCO+ and SO+. The bulk of the emission peaks at blue-shifted velocity, ~0.5-3 km s -1 with respect to systemic, has a width of ~3-7 km s-1 and is associated with the outflow cavities (Tkin ~ 20-70 K, nH2 ~ 105 cm-3). A high-velocity component up to -40 km s-1, associated with the primary jet, is detected in the HCO+ 1-0 line. Observed HCO+ and N2H+ abundances (XHCO+ ~ 0.7-3 × 10-8, XN2H+ ~ 0.4-8 × 10-9) agree with steady-state abundances in the cloud and with their evolution in the compressed and heated gas in the shock for cosmic rays ionisation rate ζ = 3 × 10-16 s-1. HOCO+, SO+, and HCS+ observed abundances (XHOCO+ ~ 10-9, XSO+ ~ 8 × 10-10, XHCS+ ~ 3-7 × 10-10), instead, are 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than predicted in the cloud; on the other hand, they are strongly enhanced on timescales shorter than the shock age (~2000 years) if CO2, S or H2S, and OCS are sputtered off the dust grains in the shock. Conclusions: The performed analysis indicates that HCO+ and N2H+ are a fossil record of pre-shock gas in the outflow cavity, whilst HOCO+, SO+, and HCS+ are effective shock tracers that can be used to infer the amount of CO2 and sulphur

  3. Fumonisin B1 facilitates seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol in mice.

    PubMed

    Poersch, Alice Bertotto; Trombetta, Francielle; Souto, Naiéli Schiefelbein; de Oliveira Lima, Camilla; Braga, Ana Cláudia Monteiro; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Ribeiro, Leandro Rodrigo; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes; Fighera, Michele Rechia; Royes, Luiz Fernando Freire; Oliveira, Mauro Schneider; Furian, Ana Flávia

    2015-01-01

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a Fusarium spp. mycotoxin which constitutes a major public health issue because of its worldwide distribution and diversity of toxic effects.While the liver and kidney are considered the major target organs of FB1 toxicity in several species, evidence indicates that FB1 may be toxic to the brain. To further investigate the effects of FB1 on the central nervous system the present study aimed to test the hypothesis that acute FB1 exposure causes brain hyperexcitability and the potential underlying mechanisms. For these purposes, adult male C57BL/6 mice were injected with FB1 (8 mg/kg, i.p.) or its vehicle and 30 min thereafter received with a low dose of the classical convulsant pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, 30 mg/kg, i.p.) or its vehicle. After behavioral evaluation the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus were collected for analysis of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and mitochondrial complex I and II activities. We found that FB1 reduced the latency for PTZ-induced myoclonic jerks and increased the number of these events. After exposure to FB1 total and α1 Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activities increased in cerebral cortex, whereas the same enzyme activities decreased in the hippocampus. Although no changes in mitochondrial complex I and II activities were found, acute exposure to FB1 increased ΔΨm in the cerebral cortex. Altogether, present results indicate that FB1 causes brain hyperexcitability in vivo, and that mitochondrial dysfunction may represent a potential underlying mechanism. PMID:26342287

  4. Aflatoxin B1 is toxic to porcine oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Wang, Qiao-Chu; Han, Jun; Xiong, Bo; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2015-07-01

    As a toxic secondary metabolite of Aspergillus species, Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a major food and feed contaminant in tropical and sub-tropical regions with high temperature and humidity. It has been reported to be toxic to the female reproductive system in laboratory and domestic animals. In the present study, the influence of acute exposure to AFB1 (10 and 50 μM, 44h) on porcine oocyte maturation and its possible mechanism were investigated. The maturation rates of oocytes decreased significantly in the presence of 50 μM of AFB1. Cell cycle analysis showed that most oocytes were arrested at germinal vesicle breakdown or meosis I stage. However, actin assembly, spindle structure and chromosome alignment were not disrupted after exposure to 50 μM AFB1. Further study showed that DNA methylation levels increased in treated oocytes (50 μM). Histone methylation levels were also analysed after treatment (50 μM): H3K27me3 and H3K4me2 levels decreased, whereas H3K9me3 level increased, indicating that epigenetic modification was affected. AFB1 treatment (50 μM) also induced oxidative stress and further led to autophagy, as shown by accumulation of reactive oxygen species, up-regulated LC3 protein expression and increased mRNA levels of ATG3, ATG5 and ATG7. Annexin V-FITC staining assay revealed that AFB1 treatment (50 μM) resulted in oocyte early apoptosis, which was confirmed by increased Bak, Bax, Bcl-xl mRNA levels. Collectively, our results suggest that AFB1 disrupts porcine oocyte maturation through changing epigenetic modifications as well as inducing oxidative stress, excessive autophagy and apoptosis. PMID:25778688

  5. EphB1 Suppression in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: Regulating the DNA Damage Control System

    PubMed Central

    Kampen, K.R.; Scherpen, F.J.G.; Garcia-Manero, G.; Yang, H.; Kaspers, G.J.L.; Cloos, J.; Zwaan, C.M.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M.M.; Kornblau, S.M.; De Bont, E.S.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Loss of ephrin receptor (EphB1) expression may associate with aggressive cancer phenotypes; however, the mechanism of action remains unclear. To gain detailed insight into EphB1 function in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), comprehensive analysis of EphB1 transcriptional regulation was conducted. In AML cells, EphB1 transcript was inversely correlated with EphB1 promoter methylation. The presence of EphB1 allowed EfnB1 ligand–mediated p53 DNA binding, leading to restoration of the DNA damage response (DDR) cascade by the activation of ATR, Chk1, p53, p21, p38, CDK1tyr15, and Bax, and downregulation of HSP27 and Bcl2. Comparatively, reintroduction of EphB1 expression in EphB1-methylated AML cells enhanced the same cascade of ATR, Chk1, p21, and CDK1tyr15, which consequently enforced programmed cell death. Interestingly, in pediatric AML samples, EphB1 peptide phosphorylation and mRNA expression were actively suppressed as compared with normal bone marrow, and a significant percentage of the primary AML specimens had EphB1 promoter hyper-methylation. Finally, EphB1 repression associated with a poor overall survival in pediatric AML. Combined, the contribution of EphB1 to the DDR system reveals a tumor-suppressor function for EphB1 in pediatric AML. Implications The tumor-suppressor function of EphB1 is clinically relevant across many malignancies, suggesting that EphB1 is an important regulator of common cancer cell trans forming pathways. PMID:25944917

  6. Purified form of cytochrome P-450 from rainbow trout with high activity toward conversion of aflatoxin B1 to aflatoxin B1-2,3-epoxide.

    PubMed

    Williams, D E; Buhler, D R

    1983-10-01

    Aflatoxin B1, the most potent hepatic chemical carcinogen known, is activated to the putative product aflatoxin B1-2,3-epoxide via a cytochrome P-450-dependent reaction. Mt. Shasta rainbow trout is the most sensitive species known to the hepatocarcinogenic effects of aflatoxin B1. We have previously isolated and purified a minor form of cytochrome P-450 from this strain of rainbow trout, with a lambda max in the carbon monoxide-reduced difference spectrum of 449.5 nm and a molecular weight of 54,000. In this study, we have compared in a reconstituted system this trout P-450 to trout cytochrome P-448 and rat cytochrome P-450 and P-448 for metabolism and activation of aflatoxin B1. Trout cytochrome P-450 had much higher activity towards aflatoxin B1 and a greater degree of regioselectivity in the formation of aflatoxin B1-2,3-dihydroxy-2,3-dihydrodiol and was much more efficient in producing aflatoxin B1 covalent adducts with DNA. The existence of such a form of cytochrome P-450 in Mt. Shasta rainbow trout may be responsible for the acute sensitivity of this strain to the carcinogenic effects of aflatoxin B1. PMID:6411332

  7. Epidemiology of fragility fractures.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Susan M; Mendelson, Daniel Ari

    2014-05-01

    As the world population of older adults-in particular those over age 85-increases, the incidence of fragility fractures will also increase. It is predicted that the worldwide incidence of hip fractures will grow to 6.3 million yearly by 2050. Fractures result in significant financial and personal costs. Older adults who sustain fractures are at risk for functional decline and mortality, both as a function of fractures and their complications and of the frailty of the patients who sustain fractures. Identifying individuals at high risk provides an opportunity for both primary and secondary prevention. PMID:24721358

  8. 26 CFR 301.6230(b)-1 - Request that correction not be made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... October 4, 2001. For years beginning prior to October 4, 2001, see § 301.6230(b)-1T contained in 26 CFR... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Request that correction not be made. 301.6230(b)-1 Section 301.6230(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  9. 26 CFR 301.6230(b)-1 - Request that correction not be made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... October 4, 2001. For years beginning prior to October 4, 2001, see § 301.6230(b)-1T contained in 26 CFR... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Request that correction not be made. 301.6230(b)-1 Section 301.6230(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  10. 26 CFR 1.263(b)-1 - Expenditures for advertising or promotion of good will.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... good will. 1.263(b)-1 Section 1.263(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Items Not Deductible § 1.263(b)-1 Expenditures for... section 733 or section 451 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1939, in computing its excess profits...

  11. 22 CFR 9b.1 - Press access to the Department of State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Press access to the Department of State. 9b.1 Section 9b.1 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL REGULATIONS GOVERNING DEPARTMENT OF STATE PRESS BUILDING PASSES § 9b.1 Press access to the Department of State. (a) Media correspondents without valid Department of State press building...

  12. 17 CFR 270.57b-1 - Exemption for downstream affiliates of business development companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exemption for downstream affiliates of business development companies. 270.57b-1 Section 270.57b-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....57b-1 Exemption for downstream affiliates of business development companies....

  13. 26 CFR 53.4941(b)-1 - Imposition of additional taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Imposition of additional taxes. 53.4941(b)-1...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Taxes on Self-Dealing § 53.4941(b)-1 Imposition of additional taxes. (a) Tax on self-dealer. Section 4941(b)(1) of the Code imposes an excise...

  14. 26 CFR 1.414(b)-1 - Controlled group of corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Controlled group of corporations. 1.414(b)-1 Section 1.414(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.414(b)-1 Controlled group of corporations....

  15. 26 CFR 1.6045B-1 - Returns relating to actions affecting basis of securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Returns relating to actions affecting basis of securities. 1.6045B-1 Section 1.6045B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Information Returns § 1.6045B-1 Returns relating to actions affecting basis...

  16. 26 CFR 1.927(b)-1T - Temporary regulations; Definition of gross receipts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Temporary regulations; Definition of gross receipts. 1.927(b)-1T Section 1.927(b)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Earned Income of Citizens of United States § 1.927(b)-1T Temporary...

  17. 26 CFR 1.927(b)-1T - Temporary regulations; Definition of gross receipts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Temporary regulations; Definition of gross receipts. 1.927(b)-1T Section 1.927(b)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Earned Income of Citizens of United States § 1.927(b)-1T Temporary...

  18. 26 CFR 1.927(b)-1T - Temporary regulations; Definition of gross receipts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Temporary regulations; Definition of gross receipts. 1.927(b)-1T Section 1.927(b)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Earned Income of Citizens of United States § 1.927(b)-1T Temporary...

  19. 26 CFR 1.927(b)-1T - Temporary regulations; Definition of gross receipts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Temporary regulations; Definition of gross receipts. 1.927(b)-1T Section 1.927(b)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Earned Income of Citizens of United States § 1.927(b)-1T Temporary...

  20. 26 CFR 11.401(b)-1 - Certain retroactive changes in plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Certain retroactive changes in plan. 11.401(b)-1 Section 11.401(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 § 11.401(b)-1...

  1. 26 CFR 1.6045B-1 - Returns relating to actions affecting basis of securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Returns relating to actions affecting basis of securities. 1.6045B-1 Section 1.6045B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Information Returns § 1.6045B-1 Returns relating to actions affecting basis...

  2. 26 CFR 11.401(b)-1 - Certain retroactive changes in plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Certain retroactive changes in plan. 11.401(b)-1 Section 11.401(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 § 11.401(b)-1...

  3. 26 CFR 1.666(b)-1 - Total taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Total taxes deemed distributed. 1.666(b)-1 Section 1.666(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(b)-1 Total taxes deemed distributed. (a) If...

  4. 26 CFR 1.666(b)-1A - Total taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Total taxes deemed distributed. 1.666(b)-1A Section 1.666(b)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(b)-1A Total taxes deemed distributed. (a) If...

  5. 22 CFR 9b.1 - Press access to the Department of State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Press access to the Department of State. 9b.1 Section 9b.1 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL REGULATIONS GOVERNING DEPARTMENT OF STATE PRESS BUILDING PASSES § 9b.1 Press access to the Department of State. (a) Media correspondents without valid Department of State press building...

  6. 26 CFR 1.6050B-1 - Information returns by person making unemployment compensation payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... unemployment compensation payments. 1.6050B-1 Section 1.6050B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... § 1.6050B-1 Information returns by person making unemployment compensation payments. For taxable years beginning after December 31, 1978, every person who makes payments of unemployment compensation (as...

  7. 26 CFR 1.6050B-1 - Information returns by person making unemployment compensation payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... unemployment compensation payments. 1.6050B-1 Section 1.6050B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... § 1.6050B-1 Information returns by person making unemployment compensation payments. For taxable years beginning after December 31, 1978, every person who makes payments of unemployment compensation (as...

  8. 26 CFR 1.6050B-1 - Information returns by person making unemployment compensation payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... unemployment compensation payments. 1.6050B-1 Section 1.6050B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... § 1.6050B-1 Information returns by person making unemployment compensation payments. For taxable years beginning after December 31, 1978, every person who makes payments of unemployment compensation (as...

  9. 42 CFR 52b.1 - To what programs do these regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false To what programs do these regulations apply? 52b.1 Section 52b.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.1 To what programs do these regulations apply? (a)...

  10. 42 CFR 52b.1 - To what programs do these regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false To what programs do these regulations apply? 52b.1 Section 52b.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.1 To what programs do these regulations apply? (a)...

  11. 42 CFR 52b.1 - To what programs do these regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false To what programs do these regulations apply? 52b.1 Section 52b.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.1 To what programs do these regulations apply? (a)...

  12. 42 CFR 52b.1 - To what programs do these regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false To what programs do these regulations apply? 52b.1 Section 52b.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.1 To what programs do these regulations apply? (a)...

  13. 42 CFR 52b.1 - To what programs do these regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false To what programs do these regulations apply? 52b.1 Section 52b.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.1 To what programs do these regulations apply? (a)...

  14. 26 CFR 1.415(b)-1 - Limitations for defined benefit plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations for defined benefit plans. 1.415(b)-1 Section 1.415(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY.... § 1.415(b)-1 Limitations for defined benefit plans. (a) General rules—(1) Maximum limitations....

  15. 26 CFR 1.666(b)-1 - Total taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Total taxes deemed distributed. 1.666(b)-1 Section 1.666(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(b)-1 Total taxes deemed distributed. (a) If...

  16. 26 CFR 1.666(b)-1A - Total taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Total taxes deemed distributed. 1.666(b)-1A Section 1.666(b)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(b)-1A Total taxes deemed distributed. (a) If...

  17. 26 CFR 1.666(b)-1 - Total taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Total taxes deemed distributed. 1.666(b)-1 Section 1.666(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(b)-1 Total taxes deemed distributed. (a) If...

  18. 26 CFR 1.666(b)-1A - Total taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Total taxes deemed distributed. 1.666(b)-1A Section 1.666(b)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(b)-1A Total taxes deemed distributed. (a) If...

  19. 26 CFR 1.666(b)-1 - Total taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Total taxes deemed distributed. 1.666(b)-1 Section 1.666(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(b)-1 Total taxes deemed distributed. (a) If...

  20. 26 CFR 1.666(b)-1A - Total taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Total taxes deemed distributed. 1.666(b)-1A Section 1.666(b)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(b)-1A Total taxes deemed distributed. (a) If...

  1. 26 CFR 1.666(b)-1 - Total taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Total taxes deemed distributed. 1.666(b)-1 Section 1.666(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(b)-1 Total taxes deemed distributed. (a) If...

  2. 26 CFR 1.666(b)-1A - Total taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Total taxes deemed distributed. 1.666(b)-1A Section 1.666(b)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(b)-1A Total taxes deemed distributed. (a) If...

  3. 26 CFR 1.925(b)-1T - Temporary regulations; marginal costing rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Temporary regulations; marginal costing rules. 1.925(b)-1T Section 1.925(b)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Earned Income of Citizens of United States § 1.925(b)-1T Temporary regulations; marginal...

  4. 22 CFR 9b.1 - Press access to the Department of State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Press access to the Department of State. 9b.1 Section 9b.1 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL REGULATIONS GOVERNING DEPARTMENT OF STATE PRESS BUILDING PASSES § 9b.1 Press access to the Department of State. (a) Media correspondents without valid Department of State press building...

  5. 26 CFR 301.6323(b)-1 - Protection for certain interests even though notice filed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Protection for certain interests even though notice filed. 301.6323(b)-1 Section 301.6323(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Collection General Provisions § 301.6323(b)-1 Protection...

  6. 26 CFR 1.6050B-1 - Information returns by person making unemployment compensation payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... unemployment compensation payments. 1.6050B-1 Section 1.6050B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... § 1.6050B-1 Information returns by person making unemployment compensation payments. For taxable years beginning after December 31, 1978, every person who makes payments of unemployment compensation (as...

  7. 26 CFR 31.3306(b)(1)-1 - $3,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false $3,000 limitation. 31.3306(b)(1)-1 Section 31.3306(b)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3306(b)(1)-1...

  8. 26 CFR 1.6038B-1T - Reporting of certain transactions to foreign corporations (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reporting of certain transactions to foreign corporations (temporary). 1.6038B-1T Section 1.6038B-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Information Returns § 1.6038B-1T Reporting of certain...

  9. 26 CFR 1.6038B-1T - Reporting of certain transactions to foreign corporations (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reporting of certain transactions to foreign corporations (temporary). 1.6038B-1T Section 1.6038B-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Information Returns § 1.6038B-1T Reporting of certain transactions to...

  10. 26 CFR 1.6038B-1T - Reporting of certain transactions to foreign corporations (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reporting of certain transactions to foreign corporations (temporary). 1.6038B-1T Section 1.6038B-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Information Returns § 1.6038B-1T Reporting of certain...

  11. 26 CFR 49.5000B-1T - Indoor tanning services (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indoor tanning services (temporary). 49.5000B-1T Section 49.5000B-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Cosmetic Services § 49.5000B-1T Indoor tanning services (temporary). (a)...

  12. 26 CFR 11.401(b)-1 - Certain retroactive changes in plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certain retroactive changes in plan. 11.401(b)-1 Section 11.401(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... SECURITY ACT OF 1974 § 11.401(b)-1 Certain retroactive changes in plan. (a) General rule. (1) Under...

  13. 26 CFR 11.401(b)-1 - Certain retroactive changes in plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Certain retroactive changes in plan. 11.401(b)-1 Section 11.401(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... OF 1974 § 11.401(b)-1 Certain retroactive changes in plan. (a) General rule. (1) Under section...

  14. 26 CFR 1.1311(b)-1 - Maintenance of an inconsistent position.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...(b)-1 Section 1.1311(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY....1311(b)-1 Maintenance of an inconsistent position. (a) In general. Under the circumstances stated in... computation of the tax for the closed taxable year. Adjustments under the circumstances stated in paragraph...

  15. 26 CFR 1.1311(b)-1 - Maintenance of an inconsistent position.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...(b)-1 Section 1.1311(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Limitations § 1.1311(b)-1 Maintenance of an inconsistent position. (a) In general. Under the circumstances... stated in paragraph (b) of § 1.1312-3 and in § 1.1312-4 are made without regard to the maintenance of...

  16. Observations and Light Curve Solutions of the Eclipsing Binaries USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 and USNO-B1.0 1395-0370731

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, D.; Popov, V. A.; Vasileva, D.; Petrov, N.

    2016-07-01

    We present follow-up photometric observations in Sloan filters g', i' of the newly discovered eclipsing stars USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 and USNO-B1.0 1395-0370731. Our data revealed that their orbital periods are considerably bigger than the previous values. This result changed the classification of USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 from ultrashort-period binary (P=0.197 d) to short-period system (P=0.251 d). The light curve solutions of our observations revealed that USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 and USNO-B1.0 1395-0370731 are overcontact binaries in which components are K dwarfs, close in masses and radii. The light curve distortions were reproduced by cool spots with angular radius of around 20°.

  17. B1b cells recognize protective antigens after natural infection and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Adam F; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Bobat, Saeeda; Dominguez Medina, Carmen C; Cook, Charlotte N L; Ross, Ewan A; Lopez-Macias, Constantino; Henderson, Ian R

    2014-01-01

    There are multiple, distinct B-cell populations in human beings and other animals such as mice. In the latter species, there is a well-characterized subset of B-cells known as B1 cells, which are enriched in peripheral sites such as the peritoneal cavity but are rare in the blood. B1 cells can be further subdivided into B1a and B1b subsets. There may be additional B1 subsets, though it is unclear if these are distinct populations or stages in the developmental process to become mature B1a and B1b cells. A limitation in understanding B1 subsets is the relative paucity of specific surface markers. In contrast to mice, the existence of B1 cells in human beings is controversial and more studies are needed to investigate the nature of these enigmatic cells. Examples of B1b antigens include pneumococcal polysaccharide and the Vi antigen from Salmonella Typhi, both used routinely as vaccines in human beings and experimental antigens such as haptenated-Ficoll. In addition to inducing classical T-dependent responses some proteins are B1b antigens and can induce T-independent (TI) immunity, examples include factor H binding protein from Borrelia hermsii and porins from Salmonella. Therefore, B1b antigens can be proteinaceous or non-proteinaceous, induce TI responses, memory, and immunity, they exist in a diverse range of pathogenic bacteria, and a single species can contain multiple B1b antigens. An unexpected benefit to studying B1b cells is that they appear to have a propensity to recognize protective antigens in bacteria. This suggests that studying B1b cells may be rewarding for vaccine design as immunoprophylactic and immunotherapeutic interventions become more important due to the decreasing efficacy of small molecule antimicrobials. PMID:25400633

  18. B1b Cells Recognize Protective Antigens after Natural Infection and Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Adam F.; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Bobat, Saeeda; Dominguez Medina, Carmen C.; Cook, Charlotte N. L.; Ross, Ewan A.; Lopez-Macias, Constantino; Henderson, Ian R.

    2014-01-01

    There are multiple, distinct B-cell populations in human beings and other animals such as mice. In the latter species, there is a well-characterized subset of B-cells known as B1 cells, which are enriched in peripheral sites such as the peritoneal cavity but are rare in the blood. B1 cells can be further subdivided into B1a and B1b subsets. There may be additional B1 subsets, though it is unclear if these are distinct populations or stages in the developmental process to become mature B1a and B1b cells. A limitation in understanding B1 subsets is the relative paucity of specific surface markers. In contrast to mice, the existence of B1 cells in human beings is controversial and more studies are needed to investigate the nature of these enigmatic cells. Examples of B1b antigens include pneumococcal polysaccharide and the Vi antigen from Salmonella Typhi, both used routinely as vaccines in human beings and experimental antigens such as haptenated-Ficoll. In addition to inducing classical T-dependent responses some proteins are B1b antigens and can induce T-independent (TI) immunity, examples include factor H binding protein from Borrelia hermsii and porins from Salmonella. Therefore, B1b antigens can be proteinaceous or non-proteinaceous, induce TI responses, memory, and immunity, they exist in a diverse range of pathogenic bacteria, and a single species can contain multiple B1b antigens. An unexpected benefit to studying B1b cells is that they appear to have a propensity to recognize protective antigens in bacteria. This suggests that studying B1b cells may be rewarding for vaccine design as immunoprophylactic and immunotherapeutic interventions become more important due to the decreasing efficacy of small molecule antimicrobials. PMID:25400633

  19. Kinin B1 receptor homo-oligomerization is required for receptor trafficking to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Sandén, Caroline; Leeb-Lundberg, L M Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    The kinin B1 receptor (B1R) is a G protein-coupled receptor with pro-inflammatory activity that is latent in healthy tissues but induced by tissue insult. Here, we investigated if B1R homo-oligomerization is a possible mechanism regulating the presentation of this receptor at the level of maturation and trafficking to the cell surface. To this end, we used HEK293 cells stably expressing N-terminal FLAG and HA epitope-tagged wild-type human B1R and an N-terminal receptor fragment, B1stop135, which terminates at the C-terminal end of the third transmembrane domain and has previously been shown to oligomerize with B1R. Receptors were monitored by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation, receptor function by agonist binding and agonist-promoted phosphoinositide hydrolysis, and receptor trafficking by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. When expressed alone, B1R is core N-glycosylated and forms oligomers localized intracellularly and on the cell surface. B1stop135 also exists as core N-glycosylated oligomers but is localized exclusively intracellularly. When co-expressed, B1stop135 prevents specifically B1R homo-oligomerization by forming nonfunctional B1R-B1stop135 hetero-oligomers, retains B1R intracellularly at least in part in the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER), increases calnexin binding to the receptor, and increases receptor degradation. We conclude that B1R homo-oligomerization is necessary for B1R maturation and trafficking to the cell surface. Modulating this mechanism may be a novel therapeutic avenue in inflammatory disease. PMID:23201435

  20. Increased infection risk after hip hemiarthroplasty in institutionalized patients with proximal femur fracture.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Calero, Irene; Larrainzar-Coghen, Thais; Rodriguez-Pardo, Dolors; Pigrau, Carles; Sánchez-Raya, Judith; Amat, Carles; Lung, Maily; Carrera, Luis; Corona, Pablo S

    2016-04-01

    In patients undergoing hip hemiarthroplasty (HHA) secondary to proximal femur fracture, acute periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the most important complications. We have detected an increased risk of PJI in chronic institutionalized patients (CIPs), and a higher number of early postoperative infections are caused by Gram-negative bacteria (GNB), not covered by the current prophylaxis (cefazolin in noninstitutionalized patients (NIPs) and cotrimoxazole in CIPs). We sought to compare infection characteristics between NIPs and CIPs, analyzing predisposing factors, causative pathogens, and antibiotic prophylaxis-related microbiological characteristics. We performed a retrospective review of our prospective institutional database to identify all patients consecutively admitted for HHA to treat proximal femur fracture at our centre between 2011 and 2013. PJI was diagnosed in 21 of 381 (5.51%) patients, with 10 of 105 (9.52%) in the CIP group and 11 of 276 (3.99%) in the NIP group, and statistical significance was achieved. GNB accounted for PJI in 14 (66.67%) patients. We detected a single case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in the NIP group. We confirm a higher risk of acute PJI among institutionalized patients, commonly caused by Gram-negative microorganisms, which are not covered by the current prophylaxis. New prophylactic strategies should be investigated in order to reduce this problem. PMID:26857632

  1. CYP1B1 expression, a potential risk factor for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Goth-Goldstein, Regine; Erdmann, Christine A.; Russell, Marion

    2001-05-31

    CYP1B1 expression in non-tumor breast tissue from breast cancer patients and cancer-free individuals was determined to test the hypothesis that high CYP1B1 expression is a risk factor for breast cancer. Large interindividual variations in CYP1B1 expression were found with CYP1B1 levels notably higher in breast cancer patients than cancer-free individuals. The results indicate that CYP1B1 might play a role in breast cancer either through increased PAH activation or through metabolism of endogenous estrogen to a carcinogenic derivative.

  2. Infant skull fracture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Skull fractures may occur with head injuries. Although the skull is both tough and resilient and provides excellent ... or blow can result in fracture of the skull and may be accompanied by injury to the ...

  3. Fractures in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Siyi

    Rocks may be composed of layers and contain fracture sets that cause the hydraulic, mechanical and seismic properties of a rock to be anisotropic. Coexisting fractures and layers in rock give rise to competing mechanisms of anisotropy. For example: (1) at low fracture stiffness, apparent shear-wave anisotropy induced by matrix layering can be masked or enhanced by the presence of a fracture, depending on the fracture orientation with respect to layering, and (2) compressional-wave guided modes generated by parallel fractures can also mask the presence of matrix layerings for particular fracture orientations and fracture specific stiffness. This report focuses on two anisotropic sources that are widely encountered in rock engineering: fractures (mechanical discontinuity) and matrix layering (impedance discontinuity), by investigating: (1) matrix property characterization, i.e., to determine elastic constants in anisotropic solids, (2) interface wave behavior in single-fractured anisotropic media, (3) compressional wave guided modes in parallel-fractured anisotropic media (single fracture orientation) and (4) the elastic response of orthogonal fracture networks. Elastic constants of a medium are required to understand and quantify wave propagation in anisotropic media but are affected by fractures and matrix properties. Experimental observations and analytical analysis demonstrate that behaviors of both fracture interface waves and compressional-wave guided modes for fractures in anisotropic media, are affected by fracture specific stiffness (controlled by external stresses), signal frequency and relative orientation between layerings in the matrix and fractures. A fractured layered medium exhibits: (1) fracture-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are weakly coupled; (2) isotropic behavior when fractures delay waves that are usually fast in a layered medium; and (3) matrix-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are closed and no longer delay the signal. The

  4. Bone fracture repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100077.htm Bone fracture repair - series To use the sharing features on ... to slide 4 out of 4 Indications Overview Fractures of the bones are classified in a number ...

  5. Forearm Fractures in Children

    MedlinePlus

    .org Forearm Fractures in Children The forearm is the part of the arm between the wrist and the elbow. It is ... two bones: the radius and the ulna. Forearm fractures are common in childhood, accounting for more than ...

  6. Nasal fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000554.htm Nasal fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on this ... that gives your nose its shape. A nasal fracture occurs when the bony part of your nose ...

  7. Nasal fracture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A nasal fracture is a break in the bone over the ridge of the nose. It usually results from a blunt ... and is one of the most common facial fracture. Symptoms of a broken nose include pain, blood ...

  8. Hip fracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... neck fracture repair; Trochanteric fracture repair; Hip pinning surgery; Osteoarthritis-hip ... You may receive general anesthesia before this surgery. This means ... spinal anesthesia. With this kind of anesthesia, medicine is ...

  9. Compendium of fracture mechanics problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallworth, R.; Wilson, C.; Meyers, C.

    1990-01-01

    Fracture mechanics analysis results are presented from the following structures/components analyzed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) between 1982 and 1989: space shuttle main engine (SSME), Hubble Space Telescope (HST), external tank attach ring, B-1 stand LOX inner tank, and solid rocket booster (SRB). Results from the SSME high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) second stage blade parametric analysis determine a critical flaw size for a wide variety of stress intensity values. The engine 0212 failure analysis was a time dependent fracture life assessment. Results indicated that the disk ruptured due to an overspeed condition. Results also indicated that very small flaws in the curvic coupling area could propagate and lead to failure under normal operating conditions. It was strongly recommended that a nondestructive evaluation inspection schedule be implemented. The main ring of the HST, scheduled to launch in 1990, was analyzed by safe-life and fail-safe analyses. First safe-life inspection criteria curves for the ring inner and outer skins and the fore and aft channels were derived. Afterwards the skins and channels were determined to be fail-safe by analysis. A conservative safe-life analysis was done on the 270 redesign external tank attach ring. Results from the analysis were used to determine the nondestructive evaluation technique required.

  10. The Formation of Boundary Clinopyroxenes and Associated Glass Veins in Type B1 CAIs

    SciTech Connect

    Paque, J M; Beckett, J R; Ishii, H A; Toppani, A; Burnett, D S; Teslich, N; Dai, Z R; Bradley, J P

    2008-05-18

    We used focused ion beam thin section preparation and scanning transmission electron microscopy (FIB/STEM) to examine the interfacial region between spinel and host melilite for three spinel grains, two from the mantle and one from the core of an Allende type B1 inclusion, and a second pair of spinel grains from a type B1 inclusion from the Leoville carbonaceous chondrite. The compositions of boundary clinopyroxenes decorating spinel surfaces are generally consistent with those of coarser clinopyroxenes from the same region of the inclusion, suggesting little movement of spinels between mantle and core regions after the formation of boundary clinopyroxenes. The host melilite displays no anomalous compositions near the interface, and anorthite or other late-stage minerals are not observed, suggesting that crystallization of residual liquid was not responsible for the formation of boundary clinopyroxenes. Allende spinels display either direct spinel-melilite contact or an intervening boundary clinopyroxene between the two phases. In the core, boundary clinopyroxene is mantled by a thin (1-2 {micro}m thick) layer of normally zoned (X{sub Ak} increasing away from the melilite-clinopyroxene contact) melilite with X{sub Ak} matching that of the host melilite at the melilite-melilite contact. In the mantle, X{sub Ak} near boundary spinels is constant. Spinels in a Leoville type B1 inclusion are more complex with boundary clinopyroxene, as observed in Allende, but also variable amounts of glass ({approx}1 {micro}m width), secondary calcite, perovskite, and an unknown Mg-, Al-, OH-rich and Ca-, Si-poor crystalline phase that may be a layered double hydrate. Glass compositions are consistent to first order with a precursor consisting mostly of Mg-carpholite or sudoite with some aluminous diopside. One possible scenario of formation for the glass veins is that open system alteration of melilite produced a porous, hydrated aggregate of Mg-carpholite or sudoite + aluminous

  11. Cancer-associated SF3B1 mutations affect alternative splicing by promoting alternative branchpoint usage

    PubMed Central

    Alsafadi, Samar; Houy, Alexandre; Battistella, Aude; Popova, Tatiana; Wassef, Michel; Henry, Emilie; Tirode, Franck; Constantinou, Angelos; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Dutertre, Martin; Stern, Marc-Henri

    2016-01-01

    Hotspot mutations in the spliceosome gene SF3B1 are reported in ∼20% of uveal melanomas. SF3B1 is involved in 3′-splice site (3′ss) recognition during RNA splicing; however, the molecular mechanisms of its mutation have remained unclear. Here we show, using RNA-Seq analyses of uveal melanoma, that the SF3B1R625/K666 mutation results in deregulated splicing at a subset of junctions, mostly by the use of alternative 3′ss. Modelling the differential junctions in SF3B1WT and SF3B1R625/K666 cell lines demonstrates that the deregulated splice pattern strictly depends on SF3B1 status and on the 3'ss-sequence context. SF3B1WT knockdown or overexpression do not reproduce the SF3B1R625/K666 splice pattern, qualifying SF3B1R625/K666 as change-of-function mutants. Mutagenesis of predicted branchpoints reveals that the SF3B1R625/K666-promoted splice pattern is a direct result of alternative branchpoint usage. Altogether, this study provides a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying splicing alterations induced by mutant SF3B1 in cancer, and reveals a role for alternative branchpoints in disease. PMID:26842708

  12. Dual role for B-1a cells in immunity to influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youn Soo; Baumgarth, Nicole

    2008-12-22

    B-1 cells are known to contribute most of the "natural antibodies" that are secreted in the steady state, antibodies which are crucial for protection against many pathogens including influenza virus. Whether the CD5(+) B-1a subset plays a role during an active immune response is incompletely understood. In contrast to recent data suggesting a passive role for B-1a cells, data provided here show strong highly localized activation of B-1 cells in the draining lymph nodes of the respiratory tract after influenza infection. B-1 cells are identified as a major source for both steady state and infection-induced local virus-neutralizing IgM. The CD5(+) B-1a subset is the main B-1 cell subset generating this response. B-1a cell responses are generated by their increased local accumulation rather than by antigen-specific expansion. Our study reveals that during infection with influenza, CD5-expressing B-1a cells respond to and contribute to protection, presumably without the need for B cell receptor-mediated antigen-specific signals, which are known to induce the death of B-1a cells rather than activation. With that, our data reveal fundamental differences in the response regulation of B-1 and B-2 cells during an infection. PMID:19075288

  13. Decreased expression of receptor tyrosine kinase of EphB1 protein in renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuigen; Wang, Longxin; Li, Guimei; Zhang, Zhengyu; Wang, Jiandong

    2014-01-01

    Receptors tyrosine kinase of Eph superfamily plays an important role in human cancers. We previously found that EphB1 subtype is down-regulated in gastric cancer, colorectal cancer and ovary serous carcinoma. Fore the more, the decreased expression of EphB1 is related to invasion and metastasis in cancers. Although EphB1 has been revealed as an important receptor in cancers, our understanding of its roles in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is limited. In the present study, using specific anit-EphB1 polyclonal antibody and immunohistochemistry, we evaluated EphB1 protein expression levels in RCC specimens surgically resected from 82 patients (including 62 conventional clear-cell RCC, 10 papillary, and 10 chromophobic RCC cases). We found EphB1 protein is positively expressed in the epithelium of renal tubules. Decreased expression of EphB1 was found in all RCC carcinomas compared with expression in the normal epithelium of renal tubules. EphB1 protein moderately expressed in chromophobic RCC, weakly expressed in clear-cell RCC and negatively expressed in papillary RCC. Our results indicate that EphB1 may be involved in carcinogenesis of RCC, the molecular mechanisms of down-regulation of EphB1 including genetic and epigenetic alterations and the dedicated roles of EphB1 in occurrence and progress of RCC need to be explicated in next step. PMID:25120806

  14. Pediatric Open Fractures.

    PubMed

    Trionfo, Arianna; Cavanaugh, Priscilla K; Herman, Martin J

    2016-07-01

    Open fractures in children are rare and are typically associated with better prognoses compared with their adult equivalents. Regardless, open fractures pose a challenge because of the risk of healing complications and infection, leading to significant morbidity even in the pediatric population. Therefore, the management of pediatric open fractures requires special consideration. This article comprehensively reviews the initial evaluation, classification, treatment, outcomes, and controversies of open fractures in children. PMID:27241379

  15. Effect of vitamin B1 and mixtures of B1 with other vitamins on cytostatic efficiency of sanazole under irradiation. A study in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Edith; Getoff, Nikola

    2003-06-01

    Experiments in vitro, using bacteria Escherichia coli (AB 1157) as a biological model, showed that the cytostatic efficiency of sanazole (AK-2123, a nitrotriazole-type radiosensitizer) in radiation treatment can be strongly influenced by the presence of various vitamins. In airfree media the sanazole action is increased by a factor of 2.5 in the presence of vitamin (vit.) B1, vit. C E-acetate and β-carotene, whereas vit. B1 used individually possesses a 2.7-times higher cytostatic activity than sanazole itself. In media containing air the highest increase of sanazole action is observed in the presence of vit. B1 and C, whereas the individual use of vit. B1 shows a radiation protection effect. In media saturated with N 2O the addition of the vit. B1 and C causes a 1.8-times larger sanazole activity, but the application of vit. B1 alone brings about a very high radiation protection. From studies of vit. B1-radiolysis it can be concluded that OH radicals are the major primary transients leading to substrate degradation. The results are of interest for the radiation therapy of cancer.

  16. Short versus long intramedullary nails for the treatment of intertrochanteric hip fractures in patients older than 65 years

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Liu, Yueju; Liang, Yi; Zhao, Changping; Zhang, Yingze

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare failure rates between short and long intramedullary nails used for the treatment of intertrochanteric hip fractures in patients over 65 years of age. Methods: A retrospective review of 156 patients aged more than 65 years with femoral intertrochanteric fractures from December 2010 to December 2012 was performed. The patients were allocated to two groups: those treated with long nail (n=59) and short nail (n=97). Relevant patient variables and medical comorbidities were collected. Medical comorbidities were evaluated according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists classification and medical records were also reviewed for age, sex, intraoperative blood loss, operative time, length of stay, time to fracture union, hip pain, Harris Hip Score 1 year postoperatively, and failure rates. The failure rate was defined as periprosthetic fracture or reoperation requiring removal or revision of nail. Variables were statistically compared between the two groups, with statistical significance at P<0.05. Results: Patients treat with long nails and short nails were comparable for all assessed clinical variables (P>0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between these groups in intraoperative blood loss, time to fracture union and Harris Hip Score at 1 year postoperatively (P>0.05). The long nail group had significantly less failure rate (0/59) and hip pain rate (3/59) than those with short nail (3/97 and 13/97, respectively) (P < 0.05), but the operative time was significantly longer in the former (60.60 ± 11.43 minutes) than the latter (53.10 ± 8.51 minutes) group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Both the long and short intramedullary nails are the optional internal fixation choices for femoral intertrochanteric fracture in the aged patients older than 65 years. But the long nail could avoid the refracture of femur and reduced postoperative hip pain. PMID:26131244

  17. Outcome of intertrochanteric fractures treated by intramedullary nail with two integrated lag screws: A study in Asian population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Won; Kim, Tae-Young; Ha, Yong-Chan; Lee, Young-Kyun; Koo, Kyung-Hoi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The incidence of intertrochanteric fracture has increased during recent years as life expectancy has also increased. Currently, orthopedic surgeons use various fixation methods for intertrochanteric fractures like, intramedullary (IM) nailing or dynamic hip screws and plates. The intramedullary (IM) nail with two integrated lag screws has been used recently in intertrochanteric fractures to overcome Z-affect phenomenon. However, no study is available in an Asian population. This prospective study was undertaken to document the clinical and radiologic outcomes of the IM nail with two integrated lag screws and its limitations in Asian patients. Materials and Methods: Osteosynthesis was performed using InterTAN nail in 100 patients with an intertrochanteric fractures followed up for at least 1 year after surgery. We evaluated the recovery rates to prefracture status, time to bony union and the incidence of complications. Results: Seventy four patients were available for at least 1 year followup examinations. Forty-five patients (60.8%) recovered prefracture status. Mean time to bony union was 18.3 ± 8.6 weeks. Intraoperative technical problems related to an unavoidable superior positioning of the lag screw occurred in five cases. Postoperative complications requiring reoperation occurred in three patients; two cases of varus collapse with cut out and one case of periprosthetic fracture. Conclusions: The IM nail with two integrated lag screws showed favorable outcomes in Asian patients with an intertrochanteric fracture even though several complications that were not previously reported with this nail were found. The proper selection of patients and careful insertion of two lag screws should be mandatory in Asian patients. PMID:26229165

  18. Waterflood-induced fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Dikken, B.J.; Niko, H.

    1987-01-01

    Fracturing occurs quite often in water injection wells, with sometimes unforeseen consequences on waterflood sweep efficiency. One of the causes of fracturing is often the cooling of hot formations by cold injection water. A special version of a thermal reservoir simulator for prototype applications has thus been constructed that is capable of dealing with propagating waterflood-induces hydraulic fractures. With this simulator, fracture propagation and the effect of growing fractures on the sweep efficiency are studied. Infinite fracture conductivity is assumed. The limitation to a very high leak-off fractures justifies disregarding the changes in fracture volume. Fracture growth is calculated using the concept of a critical stress intensity factor. Both poro- and thermo-elastic changes in the horizontal stresses are calculated numerically and their influence on the fracture initiation/propagation is continuously taken into account. In addition, a model of fracture wall impairment because of filter-cake build-up due to poor quality injection water is included. Results are presented for both thermal and isothermal situations. It is observed in isothermal cases that the voidage replacement ratio (volume balance during injection) determined to a great extent the length to which the fracture eventually may grow.

  19. Fractured tooth (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A tooth can be chipped or fractured during an accident or a bad fall. A tooth that is chipped or not badly fractured can usually be handled on a nonemergency basis. A tooth that is badly fractured may have exposed nerve ...

  20. Talus fractures: surgical principles.

    PubMed

    Rush, Shannon M; Jennings, Meagan; Hamilton, Graham A

    2009-01-01

    Surgical treatment of talus fractures can challenge even the most skilled foot and ankle surgeon. Complicated fracture patterns combined with joint dislocation of variable degrees require accurate assessment, sound understanding of principles of fracture care, and broad command of internal fixation techniques needed for successful surgical care. Elimination of unnecessary soft tissue dissection, a low threshold for surgical reduction, liberal use of malleolar osteotomy to expose body fracture, and detailed attention to fracture reduction and joint alignment are critical to the success of treatment. Even with the best surgical care complications are common and seem to correlate with injury severity and open injuries. PMID:19121756

  1. Heat Shock Protein B1-Deficient Mice Display Impaired Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    McNamee, Kay; Przybycien, Paulina M.; Lu, Xin; Williams, Richard O.; Bou-Gharios, George; Saklatvala, Jeremy; Dean, Jonathan L. E.

    2013-01-01

    There is large literature describing in vitro experiments on heat shock protein (hsp)B1 but understanding of its function in vivo is limited to studies in mice overexpressing human hspB1 protein. Experiments in cells have shown that hspB1 has chaperone activity, a cytoprotective role, regulates inflammatory gene expression, and drives cell proliferation. To investigate the function of the protein in vivo we generated hspB1-deficient mice. HspB1-deficient fibroblasts display increased expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6, compared to wild-type cells, but reduced proliferation. HspB1-deficient fibroblasts exhibit reduced entry into S phase and increased expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p27kip1 and p21waf1. The expression of hspB1 protein and mRNA is also controlled by the cell cycle. To investigate the physiological function of hspB1 in regulating inflammation and cell proliferation we used an excisional cutaneous wound healing model. There was a significant impairment in the rate of healing of wounds in hspB1-deficient mice, characterised by reduced re-epithelialisation and collagen deposition but also increased inflammation. HspB1 deficiency augments neutrophil infiltration in wounds, driven by increased chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 expression. This appears to be a general mechanism as similar results were obtained in the air-pouch and peritonitis models of acute inflammation. PMID:24143227

  2. Defining the membrane disruption mechanism of kalata B1 via coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Nawae, Wanapinun; Hannongbua, Supa; Ruengjitchatchawalya, Marasri

    2014-01-01

    Kalata B1 has been demonstrated to have bioactivity relating to membrane disruption. In this study, we conducted coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to gain further insight into kB1 bioactivity. The simulations were performed at various concentrations of kB1 to capture the overall progression of its activity. Two configurations of kB1 oligomers, termed tower-like and wall-like clusters, were detected. The conjugation between the wall-like oligomers resulted in the formation of a ring-like hollow in the kB1 cluster on the membrane surface. Our results indicated that the molecules of kB1 were trapped at the membrane-water interface. The interfacial membrane binding of kB1 induced a positive membrane curvature, and the lipids were eventually extracted from the membrane through the kB1 ring-like hollow into the space inside the kB1 cluster. These findings provide an alternative view of the mechanism of kB1 bioactivity that corresponds with the concept of an interfacial bioactivity model. PMID:24492660

  3. Cytochrome P450 1B1: An Unexpected Modulator of Liver Fatty Acid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Michele Campaigne; Bushkofsky, Justin R.; Gorman, Tyler; Adhami, Vaqar; Mukhtar, Hasan; Wang, Suqing; Reeder, Scott B.; Sheibani, Nader; Jefcoate, Colin R.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 1b1 (Cyp1b1) expression is absent in mouse hepatocytes, but present in liver endothelia and activated stellate cells. Increased expression during adipogenesis suggests a role of Cyp1b1 metabolism in fatty acid homeostasis. Wild-type C57BL/6j (WT) and Cyp1b1-null (Cyp1b1-ko) mice were provided low or high fat diets (LFD and HFD, respectively). Cyp1b1-deletion suppressed HFD-induced obesity, improved glucose tolerance and prevented liver steatosis. Suppression of lipid droplets in sinusoidal hepatocytes, concomitant with enhanced glycogen granules, was a consistent feature of Cyp1b1-ko mice. Cyp1b1 deletion altered the in vivo expression of 560 liver genes, including suppression of PPARγ, stearoyl CoA desaturase 1 (Scd1) and many genes stimulated by PPARα, each consistent with this switch in energy storage mechanism. Ligand activation of PPARα in Cyp1b1-ko mice by WY-14643 was, nevertheless, effective. Seventeen gene changes in Cyp1b1-ko mice correspond to mouse transgenic expression that attenuated diet-induced diabetes. The absence of Cyp1b1 in mouse hepatocytes indicates participation in energy homeostasis through extra-hepatocyte signaling. Extensive sexual dimorphism in hepatic gene expression suggests a developmental impact of estrogen metabolism by Cyp1b1. Suppression of Scd1 and increased leptin turnover support enhanced leptin participation from the hypothalamus. Cyp1b1-mediated effects on vascular cells may underlie these changes. PMID:25703193

  4. Detection of Bacteria Bearing Resistant Biofilm Forms, by Using the Universal and Specific PCR is Still Unhelpful in the Diagnosis of Periprosthetic Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Zegaer, Batool H.; Ioannidis, Anastasios; Babis, George C.; Ioannidou, Vassiliki; Kossyvakis, Athanassios; Bersimis, Sotiris; Papaparaskevas, Joseph; Petinaki, Efthimia; Pliatsika, Paraskevi; Chatzipanagiotou, Stylianos

    2014-01-01

    Intraoperative conventional bacteriological cultures were compared with different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods in patients with total joint arthroplasties. The isolated bacteria were investigated for biofilm formation, and the biofilm forming strains, in their planktonic and biofilm forms, were further tested for their antimicrobial resistance against several clinically important antimicrobials. Forty four bone and joint samples were included and classified as infected or non-infected according to standard criteria for periprosthetic hip and knee infections. For the bacteriological diagnosis, conventional culture, two types of universal PCR and species specific PCR for three selected pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were applied. Biofilm formation determination was performed by the tissue culture plate method. Antimicrobial susceptibility of the planktonic bacteria was performed by the minimal inhibitory concentration determination and, of the biofilm forms, by the minimal inhibitory concentration for bacterial regrowth from the biofilm. Twenty samples were culture positive, with S. epidermidis, S. aureus, or P. aeruginosa. All PCR methods were very ineffective in detecting only one pathogen. All isolates were biofilm positive and their biofilm forms, were highly resistant. In this study, compared to PCR, culture remains the “gold standard.” The biofilm formation by the causative bacteria and the concomitant manifold increased antimicrobial resistance may explain the clinical failure of treatment in some cases and should be considered in the future for therapeutic planning. PMID:25593905

  5. The development and treatment of periprosthetic leakage after prosthetic voice restoration: a literature review and personal experience. Part II: conservative and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Kai J

    2015-03-01

    In the past 30 years, the use of voice prostheses has become the gold standard for voice rehabilitation after total laryngectomy. The placement of a voice prosthesis is a simple procedure that is associated with only a minor increase in operating time and a low rate of complications. Most problems with voice prostheses are minor and can be easily managed. Enlargement of the tracheo-oesophageal fistula, however, can be a severe complication. Approximately 25 % of all patients with voice prostheses develop periprosthetic leakage with aspiration within 1-4 years after the placement of a voice prosthesis. Depending on the severity of fistula enlargement, treatment ranges from conservative approaches to maximally invasive procedures. In some cases, however, these measures prove unsuccessful. The causes of treatment failure and fistula enlargement are not yet fully understood. Apart from a discussion of treatment options, an algorithm for the management of this complication is presented on the basis of the literature and the experience that we have accumulated at our institution during the past 20 years in the treatment of 232 laryngectomised patients. PMID:25404115

  6. Imaging of the B1 distribution and background signal in a MAS NMR probehead using inhomogeneous B0 and B1 fields.

    PubMed

    Odedra, Smita; Wimperis, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    Several widely used methods for suppressing the "background" signal in (1)H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy are based on the assumption of a significant difference between the B1 radiofrequency field experienced by the sample (within the MAS rotor) and that felt by static components of the probehead (where the background signal is believed to originate). In this work, a two-dimensional correlation experiment employing inhomogeneous B0 and B1 fields is used to image the B1 distribution in a MAS NMR probehead. The experiment, which can be performed on any spectrometer, allows the distribution of the B1 field to be measured and also correlated with the spatial location of the NMR signal within the probehead. The method can also readily be combined with various "depth pulse" techniques for background suppression, allowing their performances to be more rigorously evaluated. PMID:23644349

  7. Epidemiology of clavicle fractures.

    PubMed

    Postacchini, Franco; Gumina, Stefano; De Santis, Pierfrancesco; Albo, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    An epidemiologic study of 535 isolated clavicle fractures treated in a hospital of a large metropolis during an 11-year period was performed. Data regarding patient's age and sex, side involved, mechanism of injury, and season in which the fracture occurred were obtained from the clinical records. Radiographic classification was performed with the Allman system. Clavicle fractures represented 2.6% of all fractures and 44% of those in the shoulder girdle. Most patients were men (68%), and the left side was involved in 61% of cases. Fractures of the middle third of the clavicle, which were the most common (81%), were displaced in 48% of cases and comminuted in 19%. Fractures of the medial third were the least common (2%). The prevalence of midclavicular fractures was found to decrease progressively with age, starting from the first decade of life when they represented 88.2% of all clavicle fractures and were undisplaced in 55.5% of cases. In adults, the incidence of displaced fractures, independent of location, was higher than that of undisplaced fractures. Traffic accidents were the most common cause of the injury. In the period under study, the incidence of fractures showed no significant change over time and no seasonal variation. PMID:12378163

  8. Mechanics of Hydraulic Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detournay, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic fractures represent a particular class of tensile fractures that propagate in solid media under pre-existing compressive stresses as a result of internal pressurization by an injected viscous fluid. The main application of engineered hydraulic fractures is the stimulation of oil and gas wells to increase production. Several physical processes affect the propagation of these fractures, including the flow of viscous fluid, creation of solid surfaces, and leak-off of fracturing fluid. The interplay and the competition between these processes lead to multiple length scales and timescales in the system, which reveal the shifting influence of the far-field stress, viscous dissipation, fracture energy, and leak-off as the fracture propagates.

  9. Montelukast Disposition: No Indication of Transporter-Mediated Uptake in OATP2B1 and OATP1B1 Expressing HEK293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brännström, Marie; Nordell, Pär; Bonn, Britta; Davis, Andrew M.; Palmgren, Anna-Pia; Hilgendorf, Constanze; Rubin, Katarina; Grime, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies with montelukast show variability in effect and polymorphic OATP2B1-dependent absorption has previously been implicated as a possible cause. This claim has been challenged with conflicting data and here we used OATP2B1-transfected HEK293 cells to clarify the mechanisms involved. For montelukast, no significant difference in cell uptake between HEK-OATP2B1 and empty vector cell lines was observed at pH 6.5 or pH 7.4, and no concentration-dependent uptake was detected. Montelukast is a carboxylic acid, a relatively potent inhibitor of OATP1B1, OATP1B3, and OATP2B1, and has previously been postulated to be actively transported into human hepatocytes. Using OATP1B1-transfected HEK293 cells and primary human hepatocytes in the presence of OATP inhibitors we demonstrate for the first time that active OATP-dependent transport is unlikely to play a significant role in the human disposition of montelukast. PMID:26694455

  10. Montelukast Disposition: No Indication of Transporter-Mediated Uptake in OATP2B1 and OATP1B1 Expressing HEK293 Cells.

    PubMed

    Brännström, Marie; Nordell, Pär; Bonn, Britta; Davis, Andrew M; Palmgren, Anna-Pia; Hilgendorf, Constanze; Rubin, Katarina; Grime, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies with montelukast show variability in effect and polymorphic OATP2B1-dependent absorption has previously been implicated as a possible cause. This claim has been challenged with conflicting data and here we used OATP2B1-transfected HEK293 cells to clarify the mechanisms involved. For montelukast, no significant difference in cell uptake between HEK-OATP2B1 and empty vector cell lines was observed at pH 6.5 or pH 7.4, and no concentration-dependent uptake was detected. Montelukast is a carboxylic acid, a relatively potent inhibitor of OATP1B1, OATP1B3, and OATP2B1, and has previously been postulated to be actively transported into human hepatocytes. Using OATP1B1-transfected HEK293 cells and primary human hepatocytes in the presence of OATP inhibitors we demonstrate for the first time that active OATP-dependent transport is unlikely to play a significant role in the human disposition of montelukast. PMID:26694455

  11. Flavonoids exhibit diverse effects on CYP11B1 expression and cortisol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Li-Chuan; Li, Lih-Ann

    2012-02-01

    CYP11B1 catalyzes the final step of cortisol biosynthesis. The effects of flavonoids on transcriptional expression and enzyme activity of CYP11B1 were investigated using the human adrenocortical H295R cell model. All tested nonhydroxylated flavones including 3′,4′-dimethoxyflavone, α-naphthoflavone, and β-naphthoflavone upregulated CYP11B1 expression and cortisol production, whereas apigenin and quercetin exhibited potent cytotoxicity and CYP11B1 repression at high concentrations. Nonhydroxylated flavones stimulated CYP11B1-catalyzed cortisol formation at transcriptional level. Resveratrol increased endogenous and substrate-supported cortisol production like nonhydroxylated flavones tested, but it had no effect on CYP11B1 gene expression and enzyme activity. Resveratrol appeared to alter cortisol biosynthesis at an earlier step. The Ad5 element situated in the − 121/− 106 region was required for basal and flavone-induced CYP11B1 expression. Overexpression of COUP-TFI did not improve the responsiveness of Ad5 to nonhydroxylated flavones. Although COUP-TFI overexpression increased CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 promoter activation, its effect was not mediated through the common Ad5 element. Treating cells with PD98059 (a flavone-type MEK1 inhibitor) increased CYP11B1 promoter activity, but not involving ERK signaling because phosphorylation of ERK1/2 remained unvarying throughout the course of treatment. Likewise, AhR was not responsible for the CYP11B1-modulating effects of flavonoids because inconsistency with their effects on AhR activation. 3′,4′-dimethoxyflavone and 8-Br-cAMP additively activated CYP11B1 promoter activity. H-89 reduced 3′,4′-dimethoxyflavone-induced CYP11B1 promoter activation but to a lesser extent as compared to its inhibition on cAMP-induced transactivation. Our data suggest that constant exposure to nonhydroxylated flavones raises a potential risk of high basal and cAMP-induced cortisol synthesis in consequence of increased CYP11B1

  12. Modeling of Interaction of Hydraulic Fractures in Complex Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresse, O. 2; Wu, R.; Weng, X.; Gu, H.; Cohen, C.

    2011-12-01

    A recently developed unconventional fracture model (UFM) is able to simulate complex fracture network propagation in a formation with pre-existing natural fractures. Multiple fracture branches can propagate at the same time and intersect/cross each other. Each open fracture exerts additional stresses on the surrounding rock and adjacent fractures, which is often referred to as "stress shadow" effect. The stress shadow can cause significant restriction of fracture width, leading to greater risk of proppant screenout. It can also alter the fracture propagation path and drastically affect fracture network patterns. It is hence critical to properly model the fracture interaction in a complex fracture model. A method for computing the stress shadow in a complex hydraulic fracture network is presented. The method is based on an enhanced 2D Displacement Discontinuity Method (DDM) with correction for finite fracture height. The computed stress field is compared to 3D numerical simulation in a few simple examples and shows the method provides a good approximation for the 3D fracture problem. This stress shadow calculation is incorporated in the UFM. The results for simple cases of two fractures are presented that show the fractures can either attract or expel each other depending on their initial relative positions, and compares favorably with an independent 2D non-planar hydraulic fracture model. Additional examples of both planar and complex fractures propagating from multiple perforation clusters are presented, showing that fracture interaction controls the fracture dimension and propagation pattern. In a formation with no or small stress anisotropy, fracture interaction can lead to dramatic divergence of the fractures as they tend to repel each other. However, when stress anisotropy is large, the fracture propagation direction is dominated by the stress field and fracture turning due to fracture interaction is limited. However, stress shadowing still has a strong effect

  13. Modeling SF3B1 Mutations in Cancer: Advances, Challenges, and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daichi; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2016-09-12

    In this issue of Cancer Cell, Obeng et al. identify the consequences of expressing the most common mutation in the spliceosomal gene SF3B1 on hematopoiesis. The knockin mouse model described represents a valuable tool to dissect the effects of SF3B1 mutations on transformation, splicing, and less well-characterized functions of SF3B1. PMID:27622329

  14. HUMAN CYTOSOLIC SULFOTRANSFERASE 2B1: ISOFORM EXPRESSION, TISSUE SPECIFICITY AND SUBCELLULAR LOCALIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Falany, C.N.; He, D.; Dumas, N.; Frost, A.R.; Falany, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Sulfation is an important Phase II conjugation reaction involved in the synthesis and metabolism of steroids in humans. Two different isoforms (2B1a and 2B1b) are encoded by the sulfotransferase (SULT) 2B1 gene utilizing different start sites of transcription resulting in the incorporation of different first exons. SULT2B1a and SULT2B1b are 350 and 365 amino acids in length, respectively, and the last 342 aa are identical. Message for both SULT2B1 isoforms is present in human tissues although SULT2B1b message is generally more abundant. However, to date only SULT2B1b protein has been detected in human tissues or cell lines. SULT2B1b is localized in the cytosol and/or nuclei of human cells. A unique 3′-extension of SULT2B1b is required for nuclear localization in human BeWo placental choriocarcinoma cells. Nuclear localization is stimulated by forskolin treatment in BeWo cells and serine phosphorylation has been identified in the 3′-extension. SULT2B1b is selective for the sulfation of 3β-hydroxysteroids such as dehydroepiandrosterone and pregnenolone, and may also have a role in cholesterol sulfation in human skin. The substrate specificity, nuclear localization, and tissue localization of SULT2B1b suggest a role in regulating the responsiveness of cells to adrenal androgens via their direct inactivation or by preventing their conversion to more potent androgens and estrogens. PMID:17055258

  15. Fracture corridors in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelée, Sébastien; Lamarche, Juliette; Gauthier, Bertrand D. M.

    2015-04-01

    Among fractures, Fracture Corridors (FC) are anomalous structures made of highly persistent fracture clusters having a strong effect on multi-phase fluid flow in the subsurface. While mechanical and geological conditions for diffuse fracture systems are well constrained, FC genetic conditions remain a matter of questioning. FC can be localized in larger structures such as folds and fault zones but recent studies suggest that a large amount of fractures and FC also arise as distributed in the host rock and formed in tabular layers during burial with early rock mechanical differentiation. In addition, while the mechanical stratigraphy is of prime importance for fracture stratigraphy, it is still unknown which factor prevails on FC genesis among the local versus regional stress-state, the host rock mechanical stratigraphy or the sedimentary facies. We present a study of fractures in a 400×300 m wide quarry (Calvisson, SE France) dug in homogeneous marly limestones of Hauterivian age. The quarry exhibits diffuse fractures as well as 16 FC. The aim of this study is to reveal the genetics factor for FC development, their global geometry and internal morphologic variations, but also to clear the impact of fracture corridors on diffuse fracture. For that, we measured >2500 fractures (strike, dip, spacing, filling, aperture, etc.) and studied microstructures in 80 thin sections. We calculated fracture density and acquired LiDAR data with >90 million points with a resolution of 4 to 15mm. Diffuse fractures are organized as two perpendicular sets, a main set NE-SW-trending and minor set NW-SE-trending. The FC have the same trend, but the NW-SE trend prevail on the NE-SW one. The LiDAR acquisition allows to visualize the 3D lateral continuity with corridors with a minimal extension of 30m. We distinguish 4 internal morphologic types in FC, depending on fracture morphology, occurrence of breccia and number of zones. The types may occur in a single FC with a lateral transition

  16. Downregulation of kinin B1 receptor function by B2 receptor heterodimerization and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianming; Brovkovych, Viktor; Zhang, Yongkang; Tan, Fulong; Skidgel, Randal A.

    2014-01-01

    Signaling through the G protein-coupled kinin receptors B1 (kB1R) and B2 (kB2R) plays a critical role in inflammatory responses mediated by activation of the kallikrein-kinin system. The kB2R is constitutively expressed and rapidly desensitized in response to agonist whereas kB1R expression is upregulated by inflammatory stimuli and it is resistant to internalization and desensitization. Here we show that the kB1R heterodimerizes with kB2Rs in co-transfected HEK293 cells and natively expressing endothelial cells, resulting in significant internalization and desensitization of the kB1R response in cells pre-treated with kB2R agonist. However, pre-treatment of cells with kB1R agonist did not affect subsequent kB2R responses. Agonists of other G protein-coupled receptors (thrombin, lysophosphatidic acid) had no effect on a subsequent kB1R response. The loss of kB1R response after pretreatment with kB2R agonist was partially reversed with kB2R mutant Y129S, which blocks kB2R signaling without affecting endocytosis, or T342A, which signals like wild type but is not endocytosed. Co-endocytosis of the kB1R with kB2R was dependent on β-arrestin and clathrin-coated pits but not caveolae. The sorting pathway of kB1R and kB2R after endocytosis differed as recycling of kB1R to the cell surface was much slower than that of kB2R. In cytokine-treated human lung microvascular endothelial cells, pre-treatment with kB2R agonist inhibited kB1R-mediated increase in transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) caused by kB1R stimulation (to generate nitric oxide) and blocked the profound drop in TER caused by kB1R activation in the presence of pyrogallol (a superoxide generator). Thus, kB1R function can be downregulated by kB2R co-endocytosis and signaling, suggesting new approaches to control kB1R signaling in pathological conditions. PMID:25289859

  17. B1 mapping with a pure phase encode approach: Quantitative density profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashaee, S.; Newling, B.; MacMillan, B.; Balcom, B. J.

    2013-07-01

    In MRI, it is frequently observed that naturally uniform samples do not have uniform image intensities. In many cases this non-uniform image intensity is due to an inhomogeneous B1 field. The ‘principle of reciprocity' states that the received signal is proportional to the local magnitude of the applied B1 field per unit current. Inhomogeneity in the B1 field results in signal intensity variations that limit the ability of MRI to yield quantitative information. In this paper a novel method is described for mapping B1 inhomogeneities based on measurement of the B1 field employing centric-scan pure phase encode MRI measurements. The resultant B1 map may be employed to correct related non-uniformities in MR images. The new method is based on acquiring successive images with systematically incremented low flip angle excitation pulses. The local image intensity variation is proportional to B12, which ensures high sensitivity to B1 field variations. Pure phase encoding ensures the resultant B1 field maps are free from distortions caused by susceptibility variation, chemical shift and paramagnetic impurities. Hence, the method works well in regions of space that are not accessible to other methods such as in the vicinity of conductive metallic structures, such as the RF probe itself. Quantitative density images result when the centric scan pure phase encode measurement is corrected with a relative or absolute B1 field map. The new technique is simple, reliable and robust.

  18. Stress fractures in athletes.

    PubMed

    Hulkko, A; Orava, S

    1987-06-01

    During the 14-year period of 1971-1985, 368 stress fractures in 324 athletes were treated. The series contained 268 fractures in males and 100 fractures in females; 32 fractures occurred in children (less than 16 years), 117 in adolescents (16-19 years), and 219 in adults. Forty-six fractures were incurred by athletes at an international level, 274 by athletes at a national or district level and 48 by recreational athletes. Of the total cases, 72% occurred to runners and a further 12% to athletes in other sports after running exercises. The distribution of the stress fractures by site was: tibia 182, metatarsal bones 73, fibula 44, big toe sesamoid bones 15, femoral shaft 14, femoral neck 9, tarsal navicular 9, pelvis 7, olecranon 5 and other bones 10. Of the total fractures, 342 were treated conservatively and 26 fractures required surgical treatment. The operative indication was dislocation in 5 cases and delayed union/nonunion in 21 cases. The sites most often affected by delayed union were: anterior midtibia, sesamoid bones of the big toe, base of the fifth metatarsal, olecranon, and tarsal navicular. The athletes at an international level experienced the greatest risk of multiple separate fractures, protracted healing, or fractures requiring surgery. PMID:3623785

  19. Similar incidence of periprosthetic fluid collections after ceramic-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasties and metal-on-metal resurfacing arthroplasties: results of a screening metal artefact reduction sequence-MRI study.

    PubMed

    Bisseling, P; de Wit, B W K; Hol, A M; van Gorp, M J; van Kampen, A; van Susante, J L C

    2015-09-01

    Patients from a randomised trial on resurfacing hip arthroplasty (RHA) (n = 36, 19 males; median age 57 years, 24 to 65) comparing a conventional 28 mm metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (MoM THA) (n = 28, 17 males; median age 59 years, 37 to 65) and a matched control group of asymptomatic patients with a 32 mm ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP) THA (n = 33, 18 males; median age 63 years, 38 to 71) were cross-sectionally screened with metal artefact reducing sequence-MRI (MARS-MRI) for pseudotumour formation at a median of 55 months (23 to 72) post-operatively. MRIs were scored by consensus according to three different classification systems for pseudotumour formation. Clinical scores were available for all patients and metal ion levels for MoM bearing patients. Periprosthetic lesions with a median volume of 16 mL (1.5 to 35.9) were diagnosed in six patients in the RHA group (17%), one in the MoM THA group (4%) and six in the CoP group (18%). The classification systems revealed no clear differences between the groups. Solid lesions (n = 3) were exclusively encountered in the RHA group. Two patients in the RHA group and one in the MoM THA group underwent a revision for pseudotumour formation. There was no statistically significant relationship between clinical scoring, metal ion levels and periprosthetic lesions in any of the groups. Periprosthetic fluid collections are seen on MARS-MRI after conventional CoP THA and RHA and may reflect a soft-tissue collection or effusion. Currently available MRI classification systems seem to score these collections as pseudotumours, causing an-overestimatation of the incidence of pseudotumours. PMID:26330582

  20. [Trochanteric femoral fractures].

    PubMed

    Douša, P; Čech, O; Weissinger, M; Džupa, V

    2013-01-01

    At the present time proximal femoral fractures account for 30% of all fractures referred to hospitals for treatment. Our population is ageing, the proportion of patients with post-menopausal or senile osteoporosis is increasing and therefore the number of proximal femoral fractures requiring urgent treatment is growing too. In the age category of 50 years and older, the incidence of these fractures has increased exponentially. Our department serves as a trauma centre for half of Prague and part of the Central Bohemia Region with a population of 1 150 000. Prague in particular has a high number of elderly citizens. Our experience is based on extensive clinical data obtained from the Register of Proximal Femoral Fractures established in 1997. During 14 years, 4280 patients, 3112 women and 1168 men, were admitted to our department for treatment of proximal femoral fractures. All patients were followed up until healing or development of complications. In the group under study, 82% were patients older than 70 years; 72% of those requiring surgery were in their seventies and eighties. Men were significantly younger than women (p<0.001) and represented 30% of the group. The fractures were 2.3-times more frequent in women than in men. In the category under 60 years, men significantly outnumbered women (p<0.001). The patients with pertrochanteric fractures were, on the average, eight years older than the patients with intertrochanteric fractures, which is a significant difference (p<0.001). The mortality rate within a year of injury was about 30%. Trochanteric fractures accounted for 54.7% and femoral neck fractures for 45.3% of all fractures. The inter-annual increase was 5.9%, with more trochanteric than femoral neck fractures. There was a non-significant decrease in intertrochanteric (AO 31-A3) fractures. On the other hand, the number of pertrochanteric (AO 31-A1+2) fractures increased significantly (p<0.001). A total of 1 394 fractures were treated with a proximal

  1. Growth, children, and fractures.

    PubMed

    Jones, Graeme

    2004-09-01

    Fractures in childhood have long been considered an unavoidable consequence of growth. Studies in recent years have documented the epidemiology of these very common fractures and have also documented considerable variation by fracture type and from country to country. There have also been a number of studies aimed at identifying risk factors particularly for the most common distal forearm fracture. These studies have consistently associated bone mineral density with these fractures. Other possible risk factors include obesity, physical inactivity, sports, cola beverages, calcium intake, risk taking, and coordination. While prospective studies are required to confirm these risk factors, accumulating evidence now suggests that a substantial proportion of fractures in children are preventable. PMID:16036086

  2. Radiation-resistant B-1 cells: A possible initiating cells of neoplastic transformation.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Cunha, Caroline Ferreira; Alvares-Saraiva, Anuska Marcelino; de Souza Apostolico, Juliana; Popi, Ana Flavia

    2016-07-01

    The role of B-1 cells in the hyperproliferative hematologic disease has been described. Several reports bring evidences that B-1 cells are the main cell population in the chronic lymphatic leukemia. It is also described that these cells have an important involvement in the lupus erythematous systemic. The murine model used to investigate both disease models is NZB/NZW. Data from literature point that mutation in micro-RNA 15a and 16 are the responsible for the B-1 hyperplasia in these mice. Interestingly, it was demonstrated that NZB/NZW B-1 cells are radioresistant, contrariwise to observe in other mouse lineage derived B-1 cells and B-2 cells. However, some reports bring evidences that a small percentage of B-1 cells in healthy mice are also able to survive to irradiation. Herein, we aim to investigate the malignant potential of ionizing-radiation resistant B-1 cells in vitro. Our main goal is to establish a model that mimics the neoplastic transformation originate to a damage exposure of DNA, and not only related to intrinsic mutations. Data shown here demonstrated that radiation-resistant B-1 cells were able to survive long periods in culture. Further, these cells show proliferation index increase in relation to non-irradiated B-1 cells. In addition, radiation resistant B-1 cells showed hyperploid, morphologic alterations, increased induction of apoptosis after anti-IgM stimulation. Based on these results, we could suggest that radiation resistant B-1 cells showed some modifications in that could be related to induction of malignant potential. PMID:26898918

  3. Distension of the uterus induces HspB1 expression in rat uterine smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    White, B G; MacPhee, D J

    2011-11-01

    The uterine musculature, or myometrium, demonstrates tremendous plasticity during pregnancy under the influences of the endocrine environment and mechanical stresses. Expression of the small stress protein heat shock protein B1 (HspB1) has been reported to increase dramatically during late pregnancy, a period marked by myometrial hypertrophy caused by fetal growth-induced uterine distension. Thus, using unilaterally pregnant rat models and ovariectomized nonpregnant rats with uteri containing laminaria tents to induce uterine distension, we examined the effect of uterine distension on myometrial HspB1 expression. In unilaterally pregnant rats, HspB1 mRNA and Ser(15)-phosphorylated HspB1 (pSer(15) HspB1) protein expression were significantly elevated in distended gravid uterine horns at days 19 and 23 (labor) of gestation compared with nongravid horns. Similarly, pSer(15) HspB1 protein in situ was only readily detectable in the distended horns compared with the nongravid horns at days 19 and 23; however, pSer(15) HspB1 was primarily detectable in situ at day 19 in membrane-associated regions, while it had primarily a cytoplasmic localization in myometrial cells at day 23. HspB1 mRNA and pSer(15) HspB1 protein expression were also markedly increased in ovariectomized nonpregnant rat myometrium distended for 24 h with laminaria tents compared with empty horns. Therefore, uterine distension plays a major role in the stimulation of myometrial HspB1 expression, and increased expression of this small stress protein could be a mechanoadaptive response to the increasing uterine distension that occurs during pregnancy. PMID:21900647

  4. Combinatorial control of cyclin B1 nuclear trafficking through phosphorylation at multiple sites.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Song, H; Walsh, S; Bardes, E S; Kornbluth, S

    2001-02-01

    Entry into mitosis is regulated by the Cdc2 kinase complexed to B-type cyclins. We and others recently reported that cyclin B1/Cdc2 complexes, which appear to be constitutively cytoplasmic during interphase, actually shuttle continually into and out of the nucleus, with the rate of nuclear export exceeding the import rate (). At the time of entry into mitosis, the import rate is increased, whereas the export rate is decreased, leading to rapid nuclear accumulation of Cdc2/cyclin B1. Although it has recently been reported that phosphorylation of 4 serines within cyclin B1 promotes the rapid nuclear translocation of Cdc2/cyclin B1 at G(2)/M, the role that individual phosphorylation sites play in this process has not been examined (, ). We report here that phosphorylation of a single serine residue (Ser(113) of Xenopus cyclin B1) abrogates nuclear export of cyclin B1. This serine lies directly within the cyclin B1 nuclear export sequence and, when phosphorylated, prevents binding of the nuclear export factor, CRM1. In contrast, analysis of phosphorylation site mutants suggests that coordinate phosphorylation of all 4 serines (94, 96, 101, and 113) is required for the accelerated nuclear import of cyclin B1/Cdc2 characteristic of G(2)/M. Additionally, binding of cyclin B1 to importin-beta, the factor known to be responsible for the slow interphase nuclear entry of cyclin B1, appears to be unaffected by the phosphorylation state of cyclin B. These data suggest that a distinct import factor must be recruited to enhance nuclear entry of Cdc2/cyclin B1 at the G(2)/M transition. PMID:11060306

  5. Observation of B+→b1+K0 and search for B-meson decays to b10K0 and b1π0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Cahn, R. N.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Ronan, M. T.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wang, L.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Clifton, Z. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Nash, J. A.; Vazquez, W. Panduro; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; da Costa, J. Firmino; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Lepeltier, V.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; George, K. A.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Alwyn, K. E.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Li, X.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Koeneke, K.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; McLachlin, S. E.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Biesiada, J.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Gioi, L. Li; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Roethel, W.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Escalier, M.; Esteve, L.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Benitez, J. F.; Cenci, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Gabareen, A. M.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; West, C. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Miyashita, T. S.; Petersen, B. A.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2008-07-01

    We present the results of searches for decays of B mesons to final states with a b1 meson and a neutral pion or kaon. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 465×106 B Bmacr pairs produced in e+e- annihilation. The results for the branching fractions are, in units of 10-6, B(B+→b1+K0)=9.6±1.7±0.9, B(B0→b10K0)=5.1±1.8±0.5 (<7.8), B(B+→b1+π0)=1.8±0.9±0.2 (<3.3), and B(B0→b10π0)=0.4±0.8±0.2 (<1.9), with the assumption that B(b1→ωπ)=1. We also measure the charge asymmetry Ach(B+→b1+K0)=-0.03±0.15±0.02. The first error quoted is statistical, the second systematic, and the upper limits in parentheses indicate the 90% confidence level.

  6. Measuring electron-impact cross sections of water: elastic scattering and electronic excitation of the ã3B1 and Ã1B1 states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Midori; Hoshino, Masamitsu; Kato, Hidetoshi; Ferreira da Silva, Fillipe; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Here, we report elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron scattering from water in the incident energy range of 2-100 eV. Furthermore, we present a complete study on the electronic excitation of the ã3B1 and Ã1B1 states at electron impact energies of 15, 20, and 30 eV and in the scattering angle range of 10° - 130°. Integral cross sections (ICSs) are determined from the DCSs. Measuring elastic DCSs in various experimental conditions confirmed the reproducibility of the data. The present results agree with the data previously obtained from a conventional collimating tube gas source. Ambiguities associated with the unfolding procedure of the electron energy loss (EEL) spectra for the electronic excitations have been reduced by comparison against the EEL spectrum at high electron impact energy and for small scattering angle. The reliability of the extracted DCSs is improved significantly for optically forbidden contributions from the overlap of the ã3B1 and Ã1B1 electronic states. The BEf-scaling model is also confirmed to produce the integral cross section for the optical allowed transition of the Ã1B1 state in the intermediate electron energy region above 15 eV.

  7. Fracture tooth fragment reattachment

    PubMed Central

    Maitin, Nitin; Maitin, Shipra Nangalia; Rastogi, Khushboo; Bhushan, Rajarshi

    2013-01-01

    Coronal fractures of the anterior teeth are a common form of dental trauma and its sequelae may impair the establishment and accomplishment of an adequate treatment plan. Among the various treatment options, reattachment of a crown fragment is a conservative treatment that should be considered for crown fractures of anterior teeth. This clinical case reports the management of two coronal tooth fracture cases that were successfully treated using tooth fragment reattachment using glass-fibre-reinforced composite post. PMID:23853012

  8. Pathological fractures in children

    PubMed Central

    De Mattos, C. B. R.; Binitie, O.; Dormans, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Pathological fractures in children can occur as a result of a variety of conditions, ranging from metabolic diseases and infection to tumours. Fractures through benign and malignant bone tumours should be recognised and managed appropriately by the treating orthopaedic surgeon. The most common benign bone tumours that cause pathological fractures in children are unicameral bone cysts, aneurysmal bone cysts, non-ossifying fibromas and fibrous dysplasia. Although pathological fractures through a primary bone malignancy are rare, these should be recognised quickly in order to achieve better outcomes. A thorough history, physical examination and review of plain radiographs are crucial to determine the cause and guide treatment. In most benign cases the fracture will heal and the lesion can be addressed at the time of the fracture, or after the fracture is healed. A step-wise and multidisciplinary approach is necessary in caring for paediatric patients with malignancies. Pathological fractures do not have to be treated by amputation; these fractures can heal and limb salvage can be performed when indicated. PMID:23610658

  9. Fracture detection logging tool

    DOEpatents

    Benzing, William M.

    1992-06-09

    A method and apparatus by which fractured rock formations are identified and their orientation may be determined includes two orthogonal motion sensors which are used in conjunction with a downhole orbital vibrator. The downhole vibrator includes a device for orienting the sensors. The output of the sensors is displayed as a lissajou figure. The shape of the figure changes when a subsurface fracture is encountered in the borehole. The apparatus and method identifies fractures rock formations and enables the azimuthal orientation of the fractures to be determined.

  10. Capitellar and Trochlear Fractures.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Michael J; Athwal, George S; King, Graham J W; Faber, Kenneth J

    2015-11-01

    Fractures of the capitellum and trochlea account for a small proportion of elbow trauma. Clinicians need to be vigilant in their assessment as they are commonly associated with other injuries about the elbow. To optimize outcomes, the goals of management include a stable, anatomic reduction and early range of motion. Closed reduction of noncomminuted fractures may be successful but requires close follow-up. Open reduction and internal fixation is the preferred management of displaced capitellum-trochlear fractures. Elbow stiffness is the most commonly reported complication in operatively treated fractures. Arthroscopic-assisted reduction and internal fixation and arthroplasty are evolving management options. PMID:26498550

  11. Pterygoid Plate Fractures: Not Limited to Le Fort Fractures.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravi K; Alsheik, Nila H; Afifi, Ahmed M; Gentry, Lindell R

    2015-09-01

    Pterygoid plate fractures are often described in the setting of Le Fort fractures. The goal of this study was to define other craniofacial fracture patterns causing injury to the pterygoid plates. A retrospective review of computed tomography (CT) scans obtained on craniofacial trauma patients over a 5-year period revealed 209 patients with pterygoid plate fractures. Pterygoid plate fractures in 78 patients (37.3%) were unrelated to Le Fort fractures. Common causes included sphenotemporal buttress fractures in 26 patients (33.3%), temporal bone fractures in 18 patients (23.1%), zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures in 17 patients (21.8%), and displaced mandible fractures in 14 patients (17.9%). These findings indicate that approximately one third of pterygoid plate fractures do not result from Le Fort pattern injuries and that the craniofacial surgeon should have a broad differential for causes of pterygoid plate fractures when reviewing trauma imaging. PMID:26147022

  12. 26 CFR 301.6514(b)-1 - Credit against barred liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Credit against barred liability. 301.6514(b)-1... Collection § 301.6514(b)-1 Credit against barred liability. Any credit against a liability in respect of any... of limitations at the time such credit is made. Mitigation of Effect of Period of Limitations...

  13. 26 CFR 301.6514(b)-1 - Credit against barred liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Credit against barred liability. 301.6514(b)-1... Collection § 301.6514(b)-1 Credit against barred liability. Any credit against a liability in respect of any... of limitations at the time such credit is made. Mitigation of Effect of Period of Limitations...

  14. 26 CFR 301.6514(b)-1 - Credit against barred liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Credit against barred liability. 301.6514(b)-1... Collection § 301.6514(b)-1 Credit against barred liability. Any credit against a liability in respect of any... of limitations at the time such credit is made. Mitigation of Effect of Period of Limitations...

  15. 26 CFR 1.514(b)-1 - Definition of debt-financed property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Definition of debt-financed property. 1.514(b)-1... Organizations § 1.514(b)-1 Definition of debt-financed property. (a) In general. For purposes of section 514 and the regulations thereunder, the term debt-financed property means any property which is held...

  16. 26 CFR 1.514(b)-1 - Definition of debt-financed property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Definition of debt-financed property. 1.514(b)-1... Organizations § 1.514(b)-1 Definition of debt-financed property. (a) In general. For purposes of section 514 and the regulations thereunder, the term debt-financed property means any property which is held...

  17. 26 CFR 1.514(b)-1 - Definition of debt-financed property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Definition of debt-financed property. 1.514(b)-1... Organizations § 1.514(b)-1 Definition of debt-financed property. (a) In general. For purposes of section 514 and the regulations thereunder, the term debt-financed property means any property which is held...

  18. 26 CFR 1.514(b)-1 - Definition of debt-financed property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Definition of debt-financed property. 1.514(b)-1... Organizations § 1.514(b)-1 Definition of debt-financed property. (a) In general. For purposes of section 514 and the regulations thereunder, the term debt-financed property means any property which is held...

  19. 26 CFR 1.678(b)-1 - If grantor is treated as the owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false If grantor is treated as the owner. 1.678(b)-1...(b)-1 If grantor is treated as the owner. Section 678(a) does not apply with respect to a power over income, as originally granted or thereafter modified, if the grantor of the trust is treated as the...

  20. 17 CFR 270.19b-1 - Frequency of distribution of capital gains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... securities (as defined in Rule 14a-3(b) (17 CFR 270.14a-3(b)) under this Act); Provided, That: (1) The... capital gains. 270.19b-1 Section 270.19b-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE... distribution of capital gains. (a) No registered investment company which is a “regulated investment...

  1. 26 CFR 31.3302(b)-1 - Additional credit against tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Additional credit against tax. 31.3302(b)-1...) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3302(b)-1...

  2. 26 CFR 301.6323(b)-1 - Protection for certain interests even though notice filed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Protection for certain interests even though notice filed. 301.6323(b)-1 Section 301.6323(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...) hinder, evade, or defeat the collection of any tax imposed by the Internal Revenue Code of 1954....

  3. 26 CFR 1.669(b)-1A - Tax on distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax on distribution. 1.669(b)-1A Section 1.669(b... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Treatment of Excess Distributions of Trusts Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.669(b)-1A Tax on distribution. (a) In general. The partial tax imposed on...

  4. 26 CFR 1.669(b)-1A - Tax on distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tax on distribution. 1.669(b)-1A Section 1.669(b... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Treatment of Excess Distributions of Trusts Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.669(b)-1A Tax on distribution. (a) In general. The partial tax...

  5. 26 CFR 1.414(b)-1 - Controlled group of corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Controlled group of corporations. 1.414(b)-1...(b)-1 Controlled group of corporations. (a) Defintion of controlled group of corporations. For purposes of this section, the term “controlled group of corporations” has the same meaning as is...

  6. 26 CFR 1.414(b)-1 - Controlled group of corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Controlled group of corporations. 1.414(b)-1...(b)-1 Controlled group of corporations. (a) Defintion of controlled group of corporations. For purposes of this section, the term “controlled group of corporations” has the same meaning as is...

  7. 26 CFR 1.414(b)-1 - Controlled group of corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Controlled group of corporations. 1.414(b)-1...(b)-1 Controlled group of corporations. (a) Defintion of controlled group of corporations. For purposes of this section, the term “controlled group of corporations” has the same meaning as is...

  8. 26 CFR 1.263(b)-1 - Expenditures for advertising or promotion of good will.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... good will. 1.263(b)-1 Section 1.263(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Expenditures for advertising or promotion of good will. See § 1.162-14 for the rules applicable to a corporation which has elected to capitalize expenditures for advertising or the promotion of good will...

  9. Natural and induced B-1 cell immunity to infections raises questions of nature versus nurture.

    PubMed

    Baumgarth, Nicole; Waffarn, Elizabeth E; Nguyen, Trang T T

    2015-12-01

    Mouse B-1 cells are not only major producers of steady-state natural antibodies but also rapid responders to infections and inflammation. These discrete functions may be the outcomes of distinct environmental or developmental triggers that drive B-1 cells toward IgM production or an effector cell fate. Alternatively, distinct B-1 cell subsets may exist, which differ in their functional plasticity. In this paper, we summarize existing data suggesting that B-1 cells form a heterogeneous group of cells with distinct developmental requirements and nonoverlapping functions. Most spleen B-1 cells differ in development from that of bone marrow and peritoneal cavity B-1 cells, in that they develop in the absence of natural IgM. Functional heterogeneity is revealed by findings that B-1 cells in the bone marrow and spleen, but not the peritoneal cavity, generate natural serum IgM, while the latter are rapid responders to inflammatory and infectious insults, resulting in their relocation to secondary lymphoid tissues. A clearer understanding of the developmental and functional differences within the B-1 cell pool may reveal how they might be harnessed for prophylaxis or therapy. PMID:26060895

  10. 26 CFR 1.381(b)-1 - Operating rules applicable to carryovers in certain corporate acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... as contained in 26 CFR part 1 in effect on April 1, 2006. ... certain corporate acquisitions. 1.381(b)-1 Section 1.381(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Insolvency Reorganizations §...

  11. 26 CFR 1.381(b)-1 - Operating rules applicable to carryovers in certain corporate acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... as contained in 26 CFR part 1 in effect on April 1, 2006. ... certain corporate acquisitions. 1.381(b)-1 Section 1.381(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Insolvency Reorganizations §...

  12. EphrinB1 interacts with the transcriptional co-repressor Groucho/xTLE4.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Teddy; Bong, Yong-Sik; Mood, Kathleen; Park, Mae Ja; Nishanian, Tagvor G; Lee, Hyun-Shik

    2011-03-01

    Ephrin signaling is involved in various morphogenetic events, such as axon guidance, hindbrain segmentation, and angiogenesis. We conducted a yeast two-hybrid screen using the intracellular domain (ICD) of EphrinB1 to gain biochemical insightinto the function of the EphrinB1 ICD. We identified the transcriptional co-repressor xTLE1/Groucho as an EphrinB1 interacting protein. Whole-mount in situ hybridization of Xenopus embryos confirmed the co-localization of EphrinB1 and a Xenopus counterpart to TLE1, xTLE4, during various stages of development. The EphrinB1/xTLE4 interaction was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Further characterization of the interaction revealed that the carboxy-terminal PDZ binding motif of EphrinB1 and the SP domain of xTLE4 are required for binding. Additionally, phosphorylation of EphrinB1 by a constitutively activated fibroblast growth factor receptor resulted in loss of the interaction, suggesting that the interaction is modulated by tyrosine phosphorylation of the EphrinB1 ICD. PMID:21429299

  13. Scavenger receptor B1, the HDL receptor, is expressed abundantly in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Latha P.; Mates, Jessica M.; Cheplowitz, Alana M.; Avila, Christina L.; Zimmerer, Jason M.; Yao, Zhili; Maiseyeu, Andrei; Rajaram, Murugesan V. S.; Robinson, John M.; Anderson, Clark L.

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol from peripheral tissue, carried by HDL, is metabolized in the liver after uptake by the HDL receptor, SR-B1. Hepatocytes have long been considered the only liver cells expressing SR-B1; however, in this study we describe two disparate immunofluorescence (IF) experiments that suggest otherwise. Using high-resolution confocal microscopy employing ultrathin (120 nm) sections of mouse liver, improving z-axis resolution, we identified the liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC), marked by FcγRIIb, as the cell within the liver expressing abundant SR-B1. In contrast, the hepatocyte, identified with β-catenin, expressed considerably weaker levels, although optical resolution of SR-B1 was inadequate. Thus, we moved to a different IF strategy, first separating dissociated liver cells by gradient centrifugation into two portions, hepatocytes (parenchymal cells) and LSEC (non-parenchymal cells). Characterizing both portions for the cellular expression of SR-B1 by flow cytometry, we found that LSEC expressed considerable amounts of SR-B1 while in hepatocytes SR-B1 expression was barely perceptible. Assessing mRNA of SR-B1 by real time PCR we found messenger expression in LSEC to be about 5 times higher than in hepatocytes. PMID:26865459

  14. 16 CFR Appendix B1 to Part 305 - Upright Freezers With Manual Defrost

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Upright Freezers With Manual Defrost B1 Appendix B1 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING DISCLOSURES REGARDING ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND WATER USE OF CERTAIN HOME...

  15. 26 CFR 48.4216(b)-1 - Constructive sale price; scope and application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Constructive sale price; scope and application. 48.4216(b)-1 Section 48.4216(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS EXCISE TAXES Special Provisions Applicable to Manufacturers Taxes §...

  16. 26 CFR 1.678(b)-1 - If grantor is treated as the owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false If grantor is treated as the owner. 1.678(b)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.678(b)-1 If grantor is treated as the owner. Section 678(a) does not apply with respect to a power over income,...

  17. 26 CFR 48.4222(b)-1 - Exceptions to the requirement for registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the purchaser are registered under the provisions of § 48.4222(a)-1. The article also may, on or after.... 48.4222(b)-1 Section 48.4222(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... governments. The Internal Revenue Service will not register State or local governments under section 4222....

  18. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Biocontrol Strain Pantoea sp. OXWO6B1

    PubMed Central

    Town, Jennifer; Audy, Patrice; Boyetchko, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Pantoea sp. strain OXWO6B1 inhibits the growth of the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans. We determined the 5.2-Mbp genome sequence of this strain, which featured at least 3 confirmed plasmids of up to 250 kbp. The genome sequence of OXWO6B1 is different from that of all previously sequenced strains of Pantoea. PMID:27340064

  19. B1a cells play a pathogenic role in the development of autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jun; Wang, Xiaohui; Chen, Qian; Sun, Xiaoxuan; Xiao, Fan; Ko, King-Hung; Zhang, Miaojia; Lu, Liwei

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulated functions of B1 cells have been implicated in the disease progression of various autoimmune disorders, but it remains largely unclear whether B1 cells are involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis. In this study, we found that peritoneal B1a cells underwent proliferation and migrated to the inflamed joint tissue with upregulated RANKL expression during collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) development in mice. Adoptive transfer of B1a cells exacerbated arthritic severity and joint damage while intraperitoneal depletion of B1 cells ameliorated both arthritic symptoms and joint pathology in CIA mice. In culture, RANKL-expressing B1a cells significantly promoted the expansion of osteoclasts derived from bone marrow cells, which were in accord with the in vivo findings of increased osteoclastogenesis in CIA mice transferred with B1a cells. Together, these results have demonstrated a pathogenic role of B1a cells in the development of autoimmune arthritis through RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis. PMID:27014914

  20. 26 CFR 1.6050B-1 - Information returns by person making unemployment compensation payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... unemployment compensation payments. 1.6050B-1 Section 1.6050B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Information returns by person making unemployment compensation payments. For taxable years beginning after December 31, 1978, every person who makes payments of unemployment compensation (as defined in section...