Science.gov

Sample records for babcock and wilcox standard reactor

  1. Standard technical specifications: Babcock and Wilcox Plants. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for Babcock & Wilcox Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.9 of the improved STS.

  2. Babcock and Wilcox clean-coal program

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, J.B. ); Kulig, J.S. ); Rackley, J.M. )

    1989-01-01

    The issue of acid rain is being addressed on a world-wide basis. The major industrial nations are all implementing new laws that are directed at reducing the emissions of gases that are believed to contribute to acid rain. The United States has been a pioneer in this area with a major clean-air bill that became law in the early 1970s and amended in the late 1970s. In the mid-1980s, the U.S. embarked on a program to develop new clean-coal technologies, which would provide a cost-effective means of further reducing gaseous emissions from fossil-fired power facilities. The clean coal program at Babcock and Wilcox is presented.

  3. Shutdown decay heat removal analysis of a Babcock and Wilcox pressurized water reactor: Case study

    SciTech Connect

    Cramond, W.R.; Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Sanders, G.A.

    1987-03-01

    This is one of six case studies for USI A-45 Decay Heat Removal (DHR) Requirements. The purpose of this study is to identify any potential vulnerabilities in the DHR systems of a typical Babcock and Wilcox PWR, to suggest possible modifications to improve the DHR capability, and to assess the value and impact of the most promising alternatives to the existing DHR systems. The systems analysis considered small LOCAs and transient internal initiating events, and seismic, fire, extreme wind, internal and external flood, and lightning external events. A full-scale systems analysis was performed with detailed fault trees and event trees including support system dependencies. The system analysis results were extrapolated into release categories using applicable past PRA phenomenological results and improved containment failure mode probabilities. Public consequences were estimated using site specific CRAC2 calculations. The Value-Impact (VI) analysis of possible alternatives considered both onsite and offsite impacts arriving at several risk measures such as averted population dose out to a 50-mile radius and dollars per person rem averted. Uncertainties in the VI analysis are discussed and the issues of feed and bleed and secondary blowdown are analyzed.

  4. Standard technical specifications - Babcock and Wilcox Plants: Bases (Sections 2.0-3.3). Volume 2, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This NUREG contains the improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) plants. Revision 1 incorporates the cumulative changes to Revision 0, which was published in September 1992. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, specifically the B&W Owners Group (BWOG), NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993 (58 FR 39132). Licensees are encouraged to upgrade their technical specifications consistent with those criteria and conforming, to the extent practical and consistent with the licensing basis for the facility, to Revision 1 to the improved STS. The Commission continues to place the highest priority on requests for complete conversions to the improved STS. Licensees adopting portions of the improved STS to existing technical specifications should adopt all related requirements, as applicable, to achieve a high degree of standardization and consistency.

  5. Probability of pipe failure in the reactor coolant loops of Babcock and Wilcox PWR plants. Volume 1. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.

    1986-05-01

    As part of its reevaluation of the double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) of reactor coolant piping as a design basis event for nuclear power plants, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) contracted the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to estimate the probability of occurrence of a DEGB, and to assess the effect that earthquakes have on DEGB probability. This report describes an evaluation of reactor coolant loop piping in PWR plants having nuclear steam supply systems designed by Babcock and Wilcox. Two causes of pipe break were considered: pipe fracture due to the growth of cracks at welded joints (''direct'' DEGB), and pipe rupture indirectly caused by failure of heavy component supports due to an earthquake (''indirect'' DEGB). Unlike in earlier evaluations of Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering reactor coolant loop piping, in which the probability of direct DEGB had been explicitly estimated using a probabilistic fracture mechanics model, no detailed fracture mechanics calculations were performed. Instead, a comparison of relevant plant data, mainly reactor coolant loop stresses, for one representative B and W plant with equivalent information for Westinghouse and C-E systems inferred that the probability of direct DEGB should be similarly low (less than le-10 per reactor year). The probability of indirect DEGB, on the other hand, was explicitly estimated for two representative plants. The results of this study indicate that the probability of a DEGB form either cause is very low for reactor coolant loop piping in these specific plants and, because of similarity in design, infer that the probability of DEGB is generally very low in B and W reactor coolant loop piping. The NRC should therefore consider eliminating DEGB as a design basis event in favor of more realistic criteria. 13 refs., 9 tabs.

  6. APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT: BABCOCK AND WILCOX CYCLONE FURNACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is an evaluation of the performance of the Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Cyclone Furnace Vitrification Technology and its applicability as a treatment technique for soils contaminated with heavy metals, radionuclides, and organics. oth the technical and economic aspects of...

  7. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: BABCOCK AND WILCOX CYCLONE FURNACE VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Cyclone Furnace Vitrification Technology is a treatment process for contaminated soils. he process was evaluated to determine its ability to destroy semivolatile organics and to isolate metals and simulated radionuclides into a non-leachable slag materi...

  8. Babcock and Wilcox assessment of the Pratt and Whitney XNR2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westerman, Kurt O.; Scoles, Stephen W.; Jensen, R. R.; Rodes, J. R.; Ales, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    Babcock & Wilcox performed four subtasks related to the assessment of the Pratt & Whitney XNR2000 nuclear reactor as follows: (1) cermet fuel element fabricability assessment; (2) mechanical design review of the reactor system; (3) neutronic analysis review; and (4) safety assessment. The results of the mechanical and physics reviews have been integrated into the reactor design. The results of the fuel and safety assessments are presented.

  9. Babcock and Wilcox Barberton heating plant CWF conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Zahirsky, R.W.

    1985-08-01

    A Babcock and Wilcox representative describes the company's role in developing and commercializing coal-water fuel (CWF) in a joint venture with Slurrytech Inc. A demonstration production facility will produce enough fuel for a full-scale combustion demonstration for various industrial applications and generate technical and economic data for commercial sized CWF facilities. The company will also apply its combustion expertise in the development of an efficient CWF burner. The author provides specifications and a status report on each area of the project. 3 figures, 2 tables.

  10. Evaluation of operational safety at Babcock and Wilcox Plants: Volume 2, Thermal-hydraulic results

    SciTech Connect

    Wheatley, P.D.; Davis, C.B.; Callow, R.A.; Fletcher, C.D.; Dobbe, C.A.; Beelman, R.J.

    1987-11-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a research program to develop a methodology to assess the operational performance of Babcock and Wilcox plants and to apply this methodology on a trial basis. The methodology developed for analyzing Babcock and Wilcox plants integrated methods used in both thermal-hydraulics and human factors and compared results with information used in the assessment of risk. The integrated methodology involved an evaluation of a selected plant for each pressurized water reactor vendor during a limited number of transients. A plant was selected to represent each vendor, and three transients were identified for analysis. The plants were Oconee Unit 1 for Babcock and Wilcox, H.B. Robinson Unit 2 for Westinghouse, and Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 for Combustion Engineering. The three transients were a complete loss of all feedwater, a small-break loss-of-coolant accident, and a steam-generator overfill with auxiliary feedwater. Included in the integrated methodology was an assessment of the thermal-hydraulic behavior, including event timing, of the plants during the three transients. Thermal-hydraulic results are presented in this volume (Volume 2) of the report. 26 refs., 30 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Probability of pipe failure in the reactor coolant loops of Babcock and Wilcox PWR plants. Volume 2. Guillotine break indirectly induced by earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindra, M.K.; Campbell, R.D.; Kipp, T.R.; Sues, R.H.

    1985-07-01

    The requirements to design nuclear power plants for the effects of an instantaneous double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) of the reactor coolant loop (RCL) piping have led to excessive design costs, interference with normal plant operation and maintenance, and unnecessary radiation exposure of plant maintenance personnel. This report describes an aspect of the NRC/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory sponsored research program aimed at exploring whether the probability of DEGB in RCL Piping of nuclear power plants is acceptably small and the requirements to design for the DEGB effects (e.g., provision of pipe whip restraints) may be removed. This study estimates the probability of indirect DEGB in RCL piping as a consequence of seismic-induced structural failures within the containment of Babcock and Wilcox supplied pressurized water reactor nuclear power plants in the United States. The median probability of indirect DEGB was estimated to range between 6 x 10/sup -11/ and 1 x 10/sup -7/ per year. Using very conservative assumptions, the 90% subjective probability value (confidence) of P/sub DEGB/ was found to be less than 1 x 10/sup -5/ per year. 19 refs., 19 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Radioactive waste shipments to Hanford retrievable storage from Babcock and Wilcox, Leechburg, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, D.R.

    1994-02-14

    This report characterizes, as far as possible, the solid radioactive wastes generated by Babcock and Wilcox`s Park Township Plutonium Facility near Leechburg, Pennsylvania that were sent to retrievable storage at the Hanford Site. Solid waste as defined in this document is any containerized or self-contained material that has been declared waste. The objective is a description of characteristics of solid wastes that are or will be managed by the Restoration and Upgrades Program; gaseous or liquid effluents are discussed only at a summary level This characterization is of particular interest in the planning of transuranic (TRU) waste retrieval operations, including the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility, because Babcock and Wilcox generated greater than 2.5 percent of the total volume of TRU waste currently stored at the Hanford Site.

  13. TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION SUMMARY. BABCOCK AND WILCOX CYCLONE FURNACE VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY (EPA/540/SR-92/017)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Demonstration of the Babcock & Wilcox Cyclone Furnace Vitrification Technology was conducted in November 1991. This Demonstration occurred at the Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Alliance Research Center (ARC) in Alliance, OH. The B&W cyc...

  14. Babcock and Wilcox Owners' Group program: Trip reduction and transient response improvement

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, W.T.; Mercado, A.L.; Ganthner, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    In 1985, the average trip frequency for the industry was 4.3 trips per plant per year while Babcock Wilcox (B W)-designed plants had 4.5 trips. In early 1986, the B W Owners' Group (B WOG) established goals to reduce trip frequency and improve posttrip transient response. Through the recommendations of the B WOG Trip Reduction and Transient Response Improvement Program (TR/TRIP) and other utility initiatives, the trip frequency for the B WOG plants has been on a progressive downward trend and has been consistently below the industry average since 1986. The successful results in trip reduction for the B WOG plants are shown. The B WOG has implemented several programs that have resulted in fewer trips per plant. This success can be attributed to the following: (1) a comprehensive program to evaluate each trip and transient for root-cause determination, define corrective actions, share information, and peer reviews; (2) a broad program to review systems and components that contribute to trips and transients, identify specific recommendations to correct deficiencies, utility commitment to implementation, conduct internal monitoring and indirectly exert peer pressure; (3) an awareness of the goals at all levels in the organization coupled with strong executive-level involvement; and (4) timely implementation of recommendations.

  15. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: CYCLONE FURNACE SOIL VITRI- FICATION TECHNOLOGY - BABCOCK & WILCOX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Babcock and Wilcox's (B&W) cyclone furnace is an innovative thermal technology which may offer advantages in treating soils containing organics, heavy metals, and/or radionuclide contaminants. The furnace used in the SITE demonstration was a 4- to 6-million Btu/hr pilot system....

  16. BABCOCK & WILCOX CYCLONE VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Babcock & Wilcox 6 million Btu/hr pilot cyclone furnace was successfully used in a 2-yr Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Emerging Technology project to melt and vitrify an EPA Synthetic Soil Matrix (SSM) spiked with 7,000 ppm lead, 1,000 ppm cadmium, and 1,5...

  17. SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES PROJECT: BABCOCK & WILCOX CYCLONE VITRIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Babcock & Wilcox 6 million Btu/hr pilot cyclone furnace was successfully used in a 2-year SITE Emerging Technology project to melt and vitrify an EPA Synthetic Soil Matrix (SSM) spiked with 7,000 ppm lead, 1,000 ppm cadmium, and 1,500 ppm chromium. n advantage of vitrificatio...

  18. Modeling operator actions during a small break loss-of-coolant accident in a Babcock and Wilcox nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, L.S.; Ortiz, M.G.

    1991-12-31

    A small break loss-of-accident (SBLOCA) in a typical Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) nuclear power plant was modeled using RELAP5/MOD3. This work was performed as part of the United States Regulatory Commission`s (USNRC) Code, Scaling, Applicability and Uncertainty (CSAU) study. The break was initiated by severing one high pressure injection (HPI) line at the cold leg. Thus, the small break was further aggravated by reduced HPI flow. Comparisons between scoping runs with minimal operator action, and full operator action, clearly showed that the operator plays a key role in recovering the plant. Operator actions were modeled based on the emergency operating procedures (EOPs) and the Technical Bases Document for the EOPs. The sequence of operator actions modeled here is only one of several possibilities. Different sequences of operator actions are possible for a given accident because of the subjective decisions the operator must make when determining the status of the plant, hence, which branch of the EOP to follow. To assess the credibility of the modeled operator actions, these actions and results of the simulated accident scenario were presented to operator examiners who are familiar with B&W nuclear power plants. They agreed that, in general, the modeled operator actions conform to the requirements set forth in the EOPs and are therefore plausible. This paper presents the method for modeling the operator actions and discusses the simulated accident scenario from the viewpoint of operator actions.

  19. Compact Process Development at Babcock & Wilcox

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Shaber; Jeffrey Phillips

    2012-03-01

    Multiple process approaches have been used historically to manufacture cylindrical nuclear fuel compacts. Scale-up of fuel compacting was required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project to achieve an economically viable automated production process capable of providing a minimum of 10 compacts/minute with high production yields. In addition, the scale-up effort was required to achieve matrix density equivalent to baseline historical production processes, and allow compacting at fuel packing fractions up to 46% by volume. The scale-up approach of jet milling, fluid-bed overcoating, and hot-press compacting adopted in the U.S. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program involves significant paradigm shifts to capitalize on distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of mixed waste. A series of compaction trials have been completed to optimize compaction conditions of time, temperature, and forming pressure using natural uranium oxycarbide (NUCO) fuel at packing fractions exceeding 46% by volume. Results from these trials are included. The scale-up effort is nearing completion with the process installed and operable using nuclear fuel materials. Final process testing is in progress to certify the process for manufacture of qualification test fuel compacts in 2012.

  20. Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask

    SciTech Connect

    1990-02-01

    This Preliminary Design Report (PDR) provides a detailed description of the design, analyses, and testing programs for the BR-100 cask. The BR-100 is a Type B(U) cask designed for transport by rail or barge. This report presents the preliminary analyses and tests which have been performed for the BR-100 and outlines the confirmatory analyses and tests which will be performed.

  1. 75 FR 50009 - Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Operations Group, Inc.; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... Board Pursuant to delegation by the Commission dated December 29, 1972 (37 FR 28710), and the Commission...., on February 23, 2010. Pursuant to a Request for Hearing published in the Federal Register (74 FR 75... (72 FR 49139). Issued at Rockville, Maryland, this 6th day of August 2010. E. Roy Hawkens,...

  2. 10 MW(e) prototype testing of LIDS{trademark} as part of the Babcock and Wilcox low emission boiler system

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, D.A.; Musiol, W.F.

    1996-12-31

    Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) is currently developing the Limestone Injection and Dry Scrubbing (LIDS) system to be capable of reducing SO{sub x} and particulate emissions significantly below that allowed under the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) while addressing the concerns of solid waste generation and air toxics regulation. The work is being performed as an integral part of B and W`s development of an advanced low-emission boiler system in a project entitled, Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low Emission Boiler Systems (LEBS). The overall goal of the DOE`s program is to dramatically improve environmental performance and thermal efficiency of conventional, Rankine cycle, coal-fired power plants. The LIDS process is a limestone-based, furnace injection/dry scrubbing SO{sub 2} removal process. The process comprises the cost-effective integration of three commercially proven flue gas cleanup technologies: furnace limestone injection, dry scrubbing, and pulse-jet fabric filtration. This paper highlights the plans for 10 MW, LIDS testing to be performed in B and W`s world-class Clean Environment Development Facility to demonstrate the B and W LEBS project SO{sub 2} removal goal of 98% and particulate emissions goal of less than 0.005 lb/10{sup 6} Btu under cost-effective operating conditions. Air toxics control and solids by-product issues will be addressed. The paper also includes plans for LIDS in the Proof-of-Concept demonstration in Phase 4.

  3. STIRLING BOILER BY BABCOCK & WILCOX CO. (45,000 LB/HR CAPACITY), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STIRLING BOILER BY BABCOCK & WILCOX CO. (45,000 LB/HR CAPACITY), INSIDE BOILER HOUSE NO. 2. - Pittsburgh Steel Company, Monessen Works, Open Hearth Plant, Donner Avenue, Monessen, Westmoreland County, PA

  4. An aerial radiological survey of the Babcock and Wilcox Nuclear Facilities and surrounding area, Lynchburg, Virginia. Date of survey: July 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, P.P.

    1993-04-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted from July 18 through July 25, 1988, over a 41-square-kilometer (16-square-mile) area surrounding the Babcock and Wilcox nuclear facilities located near Lynchburg, Virginia. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 61 meters (200 feet) with line spacings of 91 meters (300 feet). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph. The terrestrial exposure rates varied from 8 to 12 microroentgens per hour ({mu}R/h). A search of the data for man-made radiation sources revealed the presence of three areas of high count rates in the survey area. Spectra accumulated over the main plant showed the presence of cobalt-60 ({sup 60}Co) and cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs). A second area near the main plant indicated the presence of uranium-235 ({sup 235}U). Protactinium-234m ({sup 234m}Pa) and {sup 60}Co were detected over a building to the east of the main plant. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries in support of the aerial data.

  5. Preliminary design report: Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask

    SciTech Connect

    1990-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information on burnup credit as applied to the preliminary design of the BR-100 shipping cask. There is a brief description of the preliminary basket design and the features used to maintain a critically safe system. Following the basket description is a discussion of various criticality analyses used to evaluate burnup credit. The results from these analyses are then reviewed in the perspective of fuel burnups expected to be shipped to either the final repository or a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The hurdles to employing burnup credit in the certification of any cask are then outlines and reviewed. the last section gives conclusions reached as to burnup credit for the BR-100 cask, based on our analyses and experience. All information in this study refers to the cask configured to transport PWR fuel. Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel satisfies the criticality requirements so that burnup credit is not needed. All calculations generated in the preparation of this report were based upon the preliminary design which will be optimized during the final design. 8 refs., 19 figs., 16 tabs.

  6. 75 FR 35846 - In the Matter of Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Operations Group, Inc., Lynchburg, VA; Order Imposing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... under 10 CFR 2.315(c), must be filed in accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139, August 28... Civil Monetary Penalty I Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Operations Group, Inc., (Licensee) is the holder of... Civil Penalty (Notice) was served upon the Licensee by letter dated February 23, 2010. The Notice...

  7. 77 FR 67688 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital I&C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital I&C... Instrumentation and Control of the Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) mPower reactor. The Subcommittee will hear presentations... participation in ACRS meetings were published in the Federal Register on October 18, 2012, (77 FR...

  8. 60. View from stock bin trestle looking northeast at Babcock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. View from stock bin trestle looking northeast at Babcock & Wilcox type boilers (manufactured by Casey-Hedges Co., Chattanooga, TN) where washed furnace gas is burned with natural gas and coal to generate heat for steam. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  9. Depositional sequences and hydrocarbon exploration in Wilcox Group, South Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.P.; Breyer, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Five unconformity-bounded depositional sequences are present in the lower and middle Wilcox in south Texas. The sequences are designated A through E, from uppermost to lowermost. Sequences A and B are in the middle Wilcox. Sequences C, D, and E are in the lower Wilcox. Thirty-three gas fields and three oil fields produce from the lower Wilcox in a 1,500 mi/sup 2/ area that includes most of DeWitt County and parts of Gonzales, Karnes, and Lavaca Counties. All but two of the fields are in the Wilcox growth-fault zone. Most of the fields occur in areas with less than 40% sand, downdip from a major sand accumulation. Prospective areas in the growth-fault zone include a strike-trending band across southern DeWitt County in sequence C, an area in central Karnes County and southwestern DeWitt County in sequence D, and a belt extending from Karnes County into DeWitt County in sequence E. Large areas in DeWitt County and Karnes County updip from the growth-fault zone remain undrilled even though 44 fields produce from the shallow Wilcox immediately along strike to the southwest. The shallow Wilcox trend should be explored in northern DeWitt County and northeastern Karnes county.

  10. Lithostratigraphic framework and production history of Wilcox in central Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Tye, R.S.; Wheeler, C.W.; Kimbrell, W.C.; Moslow, T.F.

    1988-02-01

    Complex fluvial, deltaic, and marine sedimentary processes active during deposition of the Wilcox Group in central Louisiana created multiple, discontinuous sandstones. Prolific hydrocarbon reservoirs developed in association with positive structural features or where sedimentary characteristics were favorable. Because the Wilcox Group contains numerous complex depocenters, it does not lend itself to easy regional correlation. Therefore, to better delineate the occurrence of hydrocarbon-bearing sediments and to promote further exploration, a five-fold lithostratigraphic framework is proposed for the Wilcox Group in Louisiana.

  11. Lithostratigraphic framework and production history of Wilcox in central Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Tye, R.S.; Wheeler, C.W.; Kimbrell, W.C.; Moslow, T.F.

    1988-01-01

    Complex fluvial, deltaic, and marine sedimentary processes active during deposition of the Wilcox Group in central Louisiana created multiple, discontinuous sandstones. Prolific hydrocarbon reservoirs developed in association with positive structural features or where sedimentary characteristics were favorable. Because the Wilcox Group contains numerous complex depocenters, it does not lend itself to easy regional correlation. Therefore, to better delineate the occurrence of hydrocarbon-bearing sediments and to promote further exploration, five-fold lithostratigraphic framework is proposed for the Wilcox Group in Louisiana. Five lithostratigraphic zones were defined on the basis of sedimentary processes and resistivity-log character. Their thickness and sand content were mapped within 21 parishes. These zones vary from 115 to 1,000 ft thick and the sand content in each ranges from 25 to 60%. All zones produce hydrocarbons, although production is geographically variable. Production in the updip Wilcox is by far the greatest in Zone III, whereas Zone I and Zone II are most productive in the downdip deep Wilcox shelf-margin trend, a paleo-shelf margin. Isopach and isolith maps indicate that the Wilcox was sourced from the northeast and northwest. All zoness display a strong north-south isopach grain in the northern two-thirds of the study area. East-west-oriented sand packages are presented southward along the paleo-shelf margin. Regional mapping facilitated the extension of presently existing production from fluvial/deltaic depocenters by following the sand packages to the west and southwest. Where these sandstones are associated with favorable structural/stratigraphic trapping conditions, new and lucrative Wilcox fields should be found.

  12. Advanced reactors transition FY 1997 multi-year work plan WBS 7.3

    SciTech Connect

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1996-09-27

    This document describes in detail the work to be accomplised in FY 1997 and the out-years for the Advanced Reactors Transition (WBS 7.3) under the management of the Babcock & Wilcox Hanford Company. This document also includes specific milestones and funding profiles. Based upon the Fiscal Year 1997 Multi-Year Work Plan, the Department of Energy will provide authorization to perform the work described.

  13. Sequence stratigraphy and sedimentology of a shelf-margin lowstand wedge in the deep Wilcox flexture trend of south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Snedden, J.W. ); Cooke, J.C. ); Johnson, R.K.; Conrad, K.T. )

    1991-03-01

    An integrated sedimentologic and biostratigraphic study of 15 wells and over 1400 ft (430 m) of core facilitated establishment of a sequence stratigraphic framework for the deep Wilcox Group of south Texas. This analysis also revealed the presence of a dip-restricted, sand-prone sediment wedge that produces hydrocarbons in growth-fault structures. A sequence stratigraphic framework for the Wilcox was constructed via the use of faunal-increase markers, thin intervals present in well cuttings characterized by rises in the relative abundance of planktonic foraminifera. These marine flooding horizons can be utilized to subdivide the Wilcox Group into four depositional sequences termed P(aleogene)-8, P-7, P-4, and P-3, in descending order. Identification of standard sequence-bounding unconformities is hampered by the poor seismic expression of the Wilcox and the structural complexity of the area.

  14. Deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy in Fandango field area, Zapata County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, D.M.

    1983-09-01

    The Fandango field in Zapata County, Texas, is a new deep Wilcox trend extension. The deep Wilcox sands are commonly found at depths of 15,000 to 20,000 ft (4,500 to 6,100 m). Enough well log and seismic control now exists to make an accurate integrated interpretation of regional deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy. Deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy are controlled by regionally extensive shale anticlines. These shale uplifts control deep Wilcox sand distribution, create large anticlines, and cause regional growth faults which commonly influence local structure. Each regional uplift presents a new exploration frontier holding the promise of vast reserves in the deep Wilcox. The history of Frio-Vicksburg exploration is an analogy to the deep Wilcox trend today. It took 40 years to expand Frio exploration from shallow stratigraphic tramps down into the enormous reserves in the Gulf of Mexico, because each new fault-block extension was considered to mark the downdip limit of Frio production. This was, of course, not true and is not true in the deep Wilcox today. The deep Wilcox trend remains virtually unexplored and it is the author's belief that continued work will prove the existence of much more deep Wilcox potential than is currently thought to exist.

  15. Deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy in Fandango field area, Zapata County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, D.M.

    1984-04-01

    The Fandango field in Zapata County, Texas, is a new deep Wilcox trend extension. The deep Wilcox sands are commonly found at depths of 15,000-20,000 ft (4500-6100 m). Enough well log and seismic control exists to make an accurate integrated interpretation of regional deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy. Deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy are controlled by regionally extensive shale anticlines. These shale uplifts control deep Wilcox sand distribution, create large anticlines, and cause regional growth faults which frequently influence local structure. Each regional uplift presents a new exploration frontier holding the promise of vast reserves in the deep Wilcox. The history of Frio-Vicksburg exploration is analogous to the deep Wilcox trend of today. It took 40 years to expand Frio exploration from shallow stratigraphic traps down into enormous reserves in the Gulf of Mexico, because each new fault block extension was considered to mark the downdip limit of Frio production. This assumption was not true, and is not true in the deep Wilcox today. The deep Wilcox trend remains virtually unexplored, and it is my belief that continued work will prove the existence of much more deep Wilcox potential than is currently thought to exist.

  16. Level 1 transient model for a molybdenum-99 producing aqueous homogeneous reactor and its applicability to the tracy reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nygaard, E. T.; Williams, M. M. R.; Angelo, P. L.

    2012-07-01

    Babcock and Wilcox Technical Services Group (B and W) has identified aqueous homogeneous reactors (AHRs) as a technology well suited to produce the medical isotope molybdenum 99 (Mo-99). AHRs have never been specifically designed or built for this specialized purpose. However, AHRs have a proven history of being safe research reactors. In fact, in 1958, AHRs had 'a longer history of operation than any other type of research reactor using enriched fuel' and had 'experimentally demonstrated to be among the safest of all various type of research reactor now in use [1].' A 'Level 1' model representing B and W's proposed Medical Isotope Production System (MIPS) reactor has been developed. The Level 1 model couples a series of differential equations representing neutronics, temperature, and voiding. Neutronics are represented by point reactor kinetics while temperature and voiding terms are axially varying (one-dimensional). While this model was developed specifically for the MIPS reactor, its applicability to the Japanese TRACY reactor was assessed. The results from the Level 1 model were in good agreement with TRACY experimental data and found to be conservative over most of the time domains considered. The Level 1 model was used to study the MIPS reactor. An analysis showed the Level 1 model agreed well with a more complex computational model of the MIPS reactor (a FETCH model). Finally, a significant reactivity insertion was simulated with the Level 1 model to study the MIPS reactor's time-dependent response. (authors)

  17. Fluid and thermal mixing in a model cold leg and downcomer with vent-valve flow. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, P.H.; Marscher, W.D.; Block, J.A.

    1982-03-01

    This report describes an experimental program of fluid mixing experiments performed at atmospheric pressure in a 1/5-scale transparent model of the cold leg and downcomer of typical Babcock and Wilcox pressurized water reactors with vent valves. The results include transient data from a grid of thermocouples and extensive flow visualization photographs. Substantial mixing of cold injected water with hot primary coolant occurred during many of the tests.

  18. ASTM Standards for Reactor Dosimetry and Pressure Vessel Surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    GRIFFIN, PATRICK J.

    1999-09-14

    The ASTM standards provide guidance and instruction on how to field and interpret reactor dosimetry. They provide a roadmap towards understanding the current ''state-of-the-art'' in reactor dosimetry, as reflected by the technical community. The consensus basis to the ASTM standards assures the user of an unbiased presentation of technical procedures and interpretations of the measurements. Some insight into the types of standards and the way in which they are organized can assist one in using them in an expeditious manner. Two example are presented to help orient new users to the breadth and interrelationship between the ASTM nuclear metrology standards. One example involves the testing of a new ''widget'' to verify the radiation hardness. The second example involves quantifying the radiation damage at a pressure vessel critical weld location through surveillance dosimetry and calculation.

  19. Sequence stratigraphy and hydrocarbon exploration: updip Wilcox trend in south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.M.; Breyer, J.A.

    1988-02-01

    Five unconformity-bounded depositional sequences occur in the sub-surface lower and middle Wilcox in south Texas. All of the sequences are oil and gas productive in the updip Wilcox trend. Forty-four class D and E oil and gas fields, with a combined cumulative production of over 40 million bbl of oil and 12,000 million ft/sup 3/ of gas, produce from the lower and middle Wilcox in a 4,000-mi/sup 2/ area in the northern part of the Rio Grande embayment. Much of the established production is from sands associated with the basal unconformity of each sequence. Twenty-four of the 38 fields producing from Sequence B produce from the basal sand in the sequence. Most of the fields occur in areas of relatively low sand percent. The low-sand areas occur in different places in different sequences because the locus of sand accumulation shifted during the deposition of the Wilcox Group. The potentially productive low-sand areas are not apparent on a sand percent map for the composite lower and middle Wilcox. The techniques they used to delineate potential productive areas in the updip Wilcox trend in south Texas can be applied throughout much of the Gulf Coast basin and in other petroleum provinces with terrigenous clastic depositional systems as well.

  20. Structural framework and sand genesis of Wilcox group, Travis Ward field, Jim Hogg County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Rolf, E.G.

    1987-09-01

    Since its discovery in 1983, there have been eight deep Wilcox and eight Queen City wells drilled in the Travis Ward field area. Of the eight Wilcox wells, four are producing gas from deep sands; three, that are capable of production, have been junked and abandoned, and one produces from the Hinnant sand at the top of the Wilcox. Only five of the eight Queen city wells have been completed; three are considered commercial. Wilcox gas reserve estimates range from 80 to 300 bcf. To date, Wilcox and Queen City production is related to normal faulting associated with a deep salt and/or shale ridge within the Rio Grande interior salt basin. Growth of the ridge has resulted in the Wilcox being as much as 2000 ft structurally higher than the areas immediately north and south of Travis Ward field. Knowledge of the ancestral development of ridge closure prior to faulting may be critical to successful completions at Travis Ward field. Ridge-associated sea floor topography, shelf currents, sediment source proximity, and rate of sedimentation have combined for local development of high quality clean reservoir sands.

  1. Reactor physics and standards in the framework of European collaborations

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, H. ); Rowlands, J.; Salvatores, M. ); Sowerby, M. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses some aspects of the standardization of data within European collaborations on reactors. It is not always possible to use identical standards because national projects often have excellent reasons for not changing, e.g., back compatibility. In such cases, intercomparisons are made. Most recommended standards are based on Joint Evaluated File (JEF) Project evaluations. Because of the key role of integral measurements in the validation of recommended data, intercomparison of integral measurement techniques has also been an important activity. The JEF Project is a collaboration between the member countries of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank. The main aim of the project is to provide neutron cross-section libraries for thermal and fast reactor calculations. It has been agreed that the standards for cross-section measurements will be the ENDF/B-VI standards internationally accepted by the Organization for European Cooperation and Development/NEA and the International Atomic Energy Agency nuclear data committees. There are close links with the European Fusion File Project.

  2. Foraminiferal biostratigraphy and paleoecology of Wilcox group (Paleocene-Eocene), central Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Nunn, L.L.

    1986-05-01

    The Wilcox Group in east-central and south-central Louisiana consists of 300-1200 m of mostly clastic marine and nonmarine deposits. Detailed micropaleontologic studies of the Wilcox Group in Louisiana are not available because the strata are generally unfossiliferous, especially in the northern, updip part of the study area. However, the present foraminiferal study, done in conjunction with a comprehensive regional investigation, has yielded significant biostratigraphic and paleoenvironmental information. Well cuttings and conventional cores from wells drilled by various oil companies into Wilcox units in Allen, Avoyelles, St. Landry, St. Martin, and Pointe Coupee parishes contain planktonic foraminifera that permit their assignment to established regional and worldwide zonation schemes. The section ranges from the Paleocene to the Eocene, and includes the Globorotalia angulata, G. pusilla, G. pseudomenardii, G. velascoensis, and G. subbotinae zones. Samples from conventional cores drilled through the Wilcox section throughout the study area yield benthic foraminiferal faunas that are dominated by agglutinated species and represent marine environments that range from the inner continental shelf to the continental slope. Core samples of glauconitic sandstones from the uppermost part of the section contain faunas that are dominated by Discocyclina sp. and other species of calcareous larger foraminifera. These faunas indicate shallow-water continental-shelf paleoenvironments. Many of the producing reservoir sandstones in the downdip part of the study area are stratigraphic traps of a marine depositional origin. This foraminiferal study, in conjunction with the ongoing regional Wilcox synthesis, will yield insight to similar producing trends in the downdip parts of the upper Wilcox.

  3. Magnetic flux transport and the sun's dipole moment - New twists to the Babcock-Leighton model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanisms that give rise to the sun's large-scale poloidal magnetic field are explored in the framework of the Babcock-Leighton (BL) model. It is shown that there are in general two quite distinct contributions to the generation of the 'alpha effect': the first is associated with the axial tilts of the bipolar magnetic regions as they erupt at the surface, while the second arises through the interaction between diffusion and flow as the magnetic flux is dispersed over the surface. The general relationship between flux transport and the BL dynamo is discussed.

  4. Depositional framework and genesis of Wilcox Submarine Canyon systems, Northwest Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, W.F.; Dinqus, W.F.; Paige, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    Wilcox (late Paleocene-early Eocene) slope systems of the Texas coastal plain contain two families of paleosubmarine canyons that exhibit distinctly different characteristics and stratigraphic settings: Yoakum and Lavaca type canyons occur as widely separated features within the generally retrogradational middle Wilcox interval. Four such canyons exhibit high length to width ratios, extend far updip of the contemporaneous shelf edge, were excavated deeply into paralic and coastal-plain deposits, and were filled primarily by mud. Fills consist of a lower onlapping unit and capping progradational deposits that are genetically related to deposition of the upper Wilcox fluvial-deltaic sequence. Significantly, the canyon fills correlate with widespread transgressive marine mudstones (the Yoakum shale-Sabinetown Formation and ''Big Shale''). In contrast, Lavaca-type canyons form a system of erosional features created along the rapidly prograding, unstable lower Wilcox continental margin. Comparative analysis of the two canyon system suggests a general process model for submarine canyon formation on prograding basin margins. Key elements are depositional loading of the continental margin creating instability, initiation of a large-scale slump, family of slumps, or listric bedding-plane fault creating a depression or indentation in the margin, and headward and lateral expansion of the depression by slumping and density-underflow erosion. Extent of canyon evolution varies according to time and submerged space available for maturation; short, broad canyons form on narrow shelves of actively prograding margins, and elongate mature canyons form in retrogradational or transgressive settings.

  5. WILCOX COUNTY, ALABAMA--A STUDY OF SOCIAL, ECONOMIC, AND EDUCATIONAL BANKRUPTCY. REPORT OF AN INVESTIGATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BROADUS, JAMES; AND OTHERS

    THE REQUEST FOR THIS INVESTIGATION BY THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE OF THE NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION COMMISSION ON PROFESSIONAL RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES RESULTED FROM THE FIRING OF NINE NEGRO TEACHERS IN WILCOX COUNTY. THE STUDY ITSELF IS MORE INCLUSIVE, INCORPORATING THE FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS OF SEPARATE STUDIES IN POVERTY, SCHOOL FINANCE,…

  6. Safety analysis of B and W Standard PWR using thorium-based fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Uotinen, V.O.; Carroll, W.P.; Jones, H.M.; Toops, E.C.

    1980-06-01

    A study was performed to assess the safety and licenseability of the Babcock and Wilcox standard 205-fuel assembly PWR when it is fueled with three types of thoria-based fuels denatured (/sup 233/U//sup 238/U-Th)O/sub 2/, denatured (/sup 235//U/sup 238/U-Th)O/sub 2/, and (Th-Pu)O/sub 2/. Selected transients were analyzed using typical PWR safety analysis calculational methods. The results support the conclusion that it is feasible from a safety standpoint to utilize either of the denatured urania-thoria fuels in the standard B and W plant. In addition, it appears that the use of thoria-plutonia fuels would probably also be feasible. These tentative conclusions depend on a data that is more limited than that available for UO/sub 2/ fuels.

  7. Carrizo-upper Wilcox depositional systems and their relation to updip oil production in South Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlin, H.S.

    1983-05-01

    In the Rio Grande embayment of S. Texas, the Carrizo-Upper Wilcox interval consists of 2 fluvial- coastal plain depositional systems that grade downdip into several deltaic complexes. The bedload channel system is dominated by laterally coalesced, stacked fluvial channel sandstones. Shales are minor and laterally discontinuous. The mixed alluvial system consists of a more typical suite of coastal plain facies. Channel sandstones tend to be isolated and surrounded by overbank shales. Total-interval isopach patterns, sandstone geometries, and facies distributions indicate that fluvial systems were converging upon the embayment from the west, northwest, and north. Petroleum production in the updip portion of the Carrizo-Upper Wilcox interval is influenced by the distribution of the depositional systems and their component facies. Although most of the traps are structural, the geometries and internal characteristics of the reservoir sandstones are facies-dependent and affect field size and quality.

  8. A case study of the Wilcox (Lobo) trend in Webb and Zapata counties, TX

    SciTech Connect

    Holditch, S.A.; Lee, W.J.

    1986-12-01

    The Wilcox (Lobo) trend of Webb and Zapata counties, TX, is a series of geopressured, low-permeability sands with average depth from 5,000 to 12,000 ft (1525 to 3660). More than 1,000 wells have been drilled in this prolific trend during the last 10 to 12 years. Although actively developed earlier, the trend became even more attractive after its classification by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) as a ''tight'' gas formation. Essentially, development of the Wilcox (Lobo) has been successful because of modern technological advances. This paper presents the results of several years of study involving the geologic history, completion methods, massive-hydraulic-fracture (HF) stimulation treatments, reservoir evaluation and numerical analysis of hydraulically fractured wells in this trend, all of which illustrate the application of this modern technology.

  9. A case study of the Wilcox (Lobo) trend in Webb and Zapata counties, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, B.M.; Holditch, S.A.; Lee, W.J.

    1983-03-01

    The Wilcox (Lobo) trend of Webb and Zapata Counties, Texas is a series of geopressured, low permeability sands in which the average depth ranges from 5,000 to 12,000 feet (1525 to 3660 m). Over 700 wells have been drilled in this prolific trend over the last 8 to 10 years. Although actively developed during this time period, this trend has become even more attractive due to its recent classification by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) as a ''tight'' gas formation. In essence, development of the Wilcox (Lobo) has been successful due to advances in modern technology. This paper presents the results of several years of study involving the geologic history, completion methods, massive hydraulic fracture stimulation treatments, reservoir evaluation, and numerical analysis of hydraulically fractured wells in this trend, all of which illustrate the application of this modern technology.

  10. Morphology and evolution of shale-filled paleochannel in Wilcox Group (Paleocene-Eocene), southeast Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, P.J.

    1987-09-01

    Local extensive paleochannels exist within the upper to lower Wilcox Group (Paleocene-Eocene) of the Gulf Coast of North America. Recent reports document the following paleochannels of the Wilcox Group: Bejuco-Lalaja, Chicontepec, DeSoto, Nautla, Ovejas, St. Landry, and Yoakum. An eighth, the Tyler (Hardin) channel, suggests that passive submarine erosional forces shaped the channels prior to any active erosional forces, such as those related to turbidity currents. The north-south-trending Tyler (Hardin) channel is 24 mi (40 km) long, 12 mi (20 km) wide, and displays over 1000 ft (300 m) of shale fill. The channel thalweg bifurcates updip into two meandering steep-walled channels that display numerous side gullies. The channel grew from the youthful to the mature stage through passive erosive mechanisms. During the mature stage, it may have been further enlarged by more active erosional agents, such as turbidity currents. Old age began with increased paralic sedimentation and infilling of the channel with deep-marine shale. Eventually, progradation and eustatic drop in sea level buried the channel, its younger fill, and older adjacent deposits. Paleochannels are salient economic features. The deep-marine shale infill of the channel acts as a source of oil and gas and a seal for adjacent reservoir rock. Upward migration of oil through fractures, faults, and sediments fills reservoirs in overlying structures formed in nearshore deposits of the upper Wilcox. Most of the major oil and gas fields of the Wilcox Group in Tyler and Hardin Counties are localized in structures overlying the channel fill.

  11. Thermal conductivity of Wilcox and Frio sandstones in South Texas (Gulf of Mexico basin)

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, T.E.; Sharp, J.M. Jr.; Lynch, F.L.

    1996-08-01

    Thermal conductivity and petrographic data are presented for verifying mechanistic models of sandstone thermal conductivity. We measured the thermal conductivity of 83 Wilcox and Frio sandstones from south Texas in the Gulf of Mexico sedimentary basin, and correlated conductivity to petrographic variables. Thermal conductivities of water-saturated sandstones at 20{degrees}C (68{degrees}F) and 3 MPa (435 psi) were measured on core plugs using a divided-bar apparatus. Thermal conductivity ranges from 2.06 to 5.73 W/m/K over a porosity range of 2.4 to 29.6%. Because of a higher quartz content, Wilcox sandstones at a given porosity are more conductive than Frio sandstones. A grain-matrix conductivity of 5.9 W/m/K is estimated for Wilcox sandstones; matrix conductivity is adequately described with an arithmetic mixing model. Thermal conductivities of clean (<25% clay) sandstones can be described by a multilinear function of decreasing thermal conductivity with increasing porosity and increasing thermal conductivity with quartz content. For clean, quartzose (>35% of the solids) sandstones, the dependence on quartz content can be dropped and thermal conductivities can be predicted with a linear decrease in conductivity with increasing porosity. These sandstones appear isotropic with respect to thermal conductivity.

  12. Conversion and standardization of US university reactor fuels using LEU, status 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.R.; Matos, J.E.; Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1989-01-01

    In 1986, the US Department of Energy initiated a program to change the fuel used in most of the US university research reactors using HEU (93%) to LEU({lt}20{percent}) in order to minimize the risk of theft or diversion of this weapons-useable material. An important consideration in the LEU conversion planning process has been the desire to standardize the fuels that are used and to enhance the performance and utilization of the reactors. This paper describes the current status of this conversion process and the plans and schedules to complete an orderly transition from HEU to LEU fuel in most of these reactors. To date, three university reactors have been converted to LEU fuel, completed safety documentation for three reactors is being evaluated by the USNRC, and work on the safety documentation for six reactors is in progress. 13 refs., 9 tabs.

  13. Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium: Plans and schedules

    SciTech Connect

    Young, H.H.; Brown, K.R.; Matos, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. To minimize this risk, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued its final rule on ''Limiting the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Domestically Licensed Research and Test Reactors,'' in February 1986. This paper describes the plans and schedules developed by the US Department of Energy to coordinate an orderly transition from HEU to LEU fuel in most of these reactors. An important element in the planning process has been the desire to standardize the LEU fuels used in US university reactors and to enhance the performance and utilization of a number of these reactors. The program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years.

  14. Structural styles of the Wilcox and Frio growth-fault trends in Texas: Constraints on geopressured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    In this report the wide variability in structural styles within the growth-faulted, geopressured trends of the Texas Gulf Coast is illustrated by detailed structural maps of Wilcox and Frio growth-fault trends and quantified by statistical analysis of fault compartment geometries. Within the Frio growth-fault trend the Sarita, Corpus Christi, and Port Arthur areas, together with the previously studied Blessing and Pleasant Bayou prospects, span nearly the entire range of Frio depositional systems. The Frio and Wilcox growth-fault trends show distinct differences. The author concludes that Wilcox sandstones tend to be dip-elongate, whereas fault compartments are highly strike-elongate; the probability of large reservoirs is consequently low. Frio sandstones are of mixed geometry, and fault compartments are larger and more equant, suggesting an increased chance of finding large reservoirs.

  15. Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium - options and costs

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.R.; Matos, J.E.; Young, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a policy statement expressing its concern and has published a proposed rule on limiting the use of HEU in NRC-licensed non-power reactors. The fuel options, functional impacts, licensing, and scheduling of conversion and standardization of these reactor fuels to use of low-enrichment uranium (LEU) have been assessed. The university reactors span a wide range in form and function, from medium-power intense neutron sources where HEU fuel may be required, to low-power training and research facilities where HEU fuel is unnecessary. Conversion provides an opportunity to standardize university reactor fuels and improve reactor utilization in some cases. The entire program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years. Planning for conversion and standardization is facilitated by the US Department of Energy. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Well log and 2D seismic data character of the Wilcox Group in south-central Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Enomoto, Catherine B.

    2014-01-01

    The Wilcox Group is productive in updip areas of Texas and Louisiana from fluvial, deltaic, and near-shore marine shelf sandstones. The reported presence of porous sandstones at 29,000 feet within the Wilcox Group containing about 200 feet of gas in the Davy Jones 1 discovery well in the offshore Louisiana South Marsh Island area illustrates a sand-rich system developed during the Paleocene and early Eocene. This study describes some of the well log and reflection seismic data characteristics of the slope and basin-floor reservoirs with gas-discovery potential that may be in the area between the producing trend onshore Louisiana and the offshore discovery.

  17. Assessement of Codes and Standards Applicable to a Hydrogen Production Plant Coupled to a Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Russell

    2006-06-01

    This is an assessment of codes and standards applicable to a hydrogen production plant to be coupled to a nuclear reactor. The result of the assessment is a list of codes and standards that are expected to be applicable to the plant during its design and construction.

  18. The advanced neutron source reactor: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) will be a new user facility for all kinds of neutron research, including neutron scattering, materials testing, materials analysis, isotope production and nuclear physics experiments. The centerpiece of the facility is to be the world's highest flux beam reactor. There will be beams of hot, cold and thermal neutrons for more than 40 simultaneous scattering and nuclear physics experiments. In addition, there will be irradiation positions and rabbit tubes for in-pile experiments, testing and isotopes production (including transuranium isotopes). To reduce technical risks and to minimize safety issues, the reactor design is based on technology already employed in existing research reactors. The fuel elements are annular assemblies of aluminum clad involute fuel plates, similar to the design of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge and the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) Reactor in Grenoble. As is common with many other research reactors, the core is cooled, moderated and reflected by heavy water. The preferred fuel is U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} - a high-density fuel form developed by Argonne National Laboratory and Babcock and Wilcox that has been extensively tested in reactors in the United States, Europe and Japan. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Biology and Genetics of the Strawberry Rootworm, Paria fragariae Wilcox

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The strawberry rootworm, Paria fragariae, is an emergent pest of ornamental nurseries in the southeastern US attacking a widening range of woody ornamentals. Conflicting observations regarding the biology and morphology of this insect have led us to believe that sub-species of Paria may exist in thi...

  20. Nuclear plant-aging research on reactor protection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the rsults of a review of the Reactor Trip System (RTS) and the Engineered Safety Feature Actuating System (ESFAS) operating experiences reported in Licensee Event Reports (LER)s, the Nuclear Power Experience data base, Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, and plant maintenance records. Our purpose is to evaluate the potential significance of aging, including cycling, trips, and testing as contributors to degradation of the RTS and ESFAS. Tables are presented that show the percentage of events for RTS and ESFAS classified by cause, components, and subcomponents for each of the Nuclear Steam Supply System vendors. A representative Babcock and Wilcox plant was selected for detailed study. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research guidelines were followed in performing the detailed study that identified materials susceptible to aging, stressors, environmental factors, and failure modes for the RTS and ESFAS as generic instrumentation and control systems. Functional indicators of degradation are listed, testing requirements evaluated, and regulatory issues discussed.

  1. High Temperature Gas Reactors: Assessment of Applicable Codes and Standards

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, Bruce K.; Nickolaus, James R.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Swearingen, Gary L.; Pugh, Ray

    2011-10-31

    Current interest expressed by industry in HTGR plants, particularly modular plants with power up to about 600 MW(e) per unit, has prompted NRC to task PNNL with assessing the currently available literature related to codes and standards applicable to HTGR plants, the operating history of past and present HTGR plants, and with evaluating the proposed designs of RPV and associated piping for future plants. Considering these topics in the order they are arranged in the text, first the operational histories of five shut-down and two currently operating HTGR plants are reviewed, leading the authors to conclude that while small, simple prototype HTGR plants operated reliably, some of the larger plants, particularly Fort St. Vrain, had poor availability. Safety and radiological performance of these plants has been considerably better than LWR plants. Petroleum processing plants provide some applicable experience with materials similar to those proposed for HTGR piping and vessels. At least one currently operating plant - HTR-10 - has performed and documented a leak before break analysis that appears to be applicable to proposed future US HTGR designs. Current codes and standards cover some HTGR materials, but not all materials are covered to the high temperatures envisioned for HTGR use. Codes and standards, particularly ASME Codes, are under development for proposed future US HTGR designs. A 'roadmap' document has been prepared for ASME Code development; a new subsection to section III of the ASME Code, ASME BPVC III-5, is scheduled to be published in October 2011. The question of terminology for the cross-duct structure between the RPV and power conversion vessel is discussed, considering the differences in regulatory requirements that apply depending on whether this structure is designated as a 'vessel' or as a 'pipe'. We conclude that designing this component as a 'pipe' is the more appropriate choice, but that the ASME BPVC allows the owner of the facility to select

  2. Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo: the role of downward pumping and the equatorward propagation of activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Cameron, Robert

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the role of downward magnetic pumping near the surface using a kinematic Babcock-Leighton model. We find that the pumping causes the poloidal field to become predominately radial in the near-surface shear layer. This allows the negative radial shear in the near-surface layer to effectively act on the radial field to produce a toroidal field. Consequently, we observe a clear equatorward migration of the toroidal field at low latitudes even when there is no meridional flow in the deep CZ. We show a case where the period of a dynamo wave solution is approximately 11 years. Flux transport models are also shown with periods close to 11 years. Both the dynamo wave and flux transport dynamo are thus able to reproduce some of the observed features of solar cycle. The main difference between the two types of dynamo is the value of $\\alpha$ required to produce dynamo action. In both types of dynamo, the surface meridional flow helps to advect and build the polar field in high latitudes, while in flux transport dynamo the equatorward flow near the bottom of CZ advects toroidal field to cause the equatorward migration in butterfly wings and this advection makes the dynamo easier by transporting strong toroidal field to low latitudes where $\\alpha$ effect works. Another conclusion of our study is that the magnetic pumping suppresses the diffusion of fields through the photospheric surface which helps to achieve the 11-year dynamo cycle at a moderately larger value of magnetic diffusivity than has previously been used.

  3. On the Meaning of Formative Measurement and How It Differs from Reflective Measurement: Comment on Howell, Breivik, and Wilcox (2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagozzi, Richard P.

    2007-01-01

    D. Howell, E. Breivik, and J. B. Wilcox (2007) have presented an important and interesting analysis of formative measurement and have recommended that researchers abandon such an approach in favor of reflective measurement. The author agrees with their recommendations but disagrees with some of the bases for their conclusions. He suggests that…

  4. Lignite occurrence in relation to depositional facies, Eocene Wilcox group, Sabine uplift area, east Texas - regional and local comparative studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, M.L.; Jackson, M.L.W.; Kaiser, W.R.; Fly, D.J.

    1984-04-01

    Lignite occurrence was related to sandbody geometry in two subsurface studies: a 12-county regional study and a local study of the Trawick gas field area, north-central Nacogdoches County. For both studies, the Wilcox Group was informally divided into lower progradational (deltaic) and upper aggradational (fluvial) units. The local study utilized closely spaced data to investigate a more detailed Wilcox stratigraphy. The most continuous lignite-bearing zone lies at the transition between lower and upper Wilcox strata. Mapping of lignite occurrence in both studies shows this zone to be coincident with distributary channels indicative of delta-plain settings. Lignites and laterally equivalent muds rest on platforms of sandy sediments. Initiation of peat accumulation in interdistributary basins, with upward and subsequent lateral development as blanket peat, is inferred from the local study. Thickness and most laterally extensive seams occur in Shelby and Panola Counties on the flanks of major delta lobes. Thick upper Wilcox lignites (> 5 ft, 1.5 m) occur regionally between major fluvial channel sand belts and cap 30 to 40-ft (9 to 12-m) upward-coarsening sequences (crevasse splays.). These lignites are surface-mined in Panola and Harrison Counties at Martin Lake and Darco. Westward, in northern Cherokee County, our drilling shows thick lignites (up to 11 ft, 3.4 m) have limited lateral extent in channel sand belt areas. Similarly, the local study lies within a major sand belt; small interchannel basins limit lateral continuity of lignites.

  5. Compiled reports on the applicability of selected codes and standards to advanced reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, E.L.; Hoopingarner, K.R.; Markowski, F.J.; Mitts, T.M.; Nickolaus, J.R.; Vo, T.V.

    1994-08-01

    The following papers were prepared for the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission under contract DE-AC06-76RLO-1830 NRC FIN L2207. This project, Applicability of Codes and Standards to Advance Reactors, reviewed selected mechanical and electrical codes and standards to determine their applicability to the construction, qualification, and testing of advanced reactors and to develop recommendations as to where it might be useful and practical to revise them to suit the (design certification) needs of the NRC.

  6. Interpretational Confounding Is Due to Misspecification, Not to Type of Indicator: Comment on Howell, Breivik, and Wilcox (2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollen, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    R. D. Howell, E. Breivik, and J. B. Wilcox (2007) have argued that causal (formative) indicators are inherently subject to interpretational confounding. That is, they have argued that using causal (formative) indicators leads the empirical meaning of a latent variable to be other than that assigned to it by a researcher. Their critique of causal…

  7. Geopressured Geothermal Resource and Recoverable Energy Estimate for the Wilcox and Frio Formations, Texas (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, A.; Augustine, C.

    2011-10-01

    An estimate of the total and recoverable geopressured geothermal resource of the fairways in the Wilcox and Frio formations is made using the current data available. The flow rate of water and methane for wells located in the geopressured geothermal fairways is simulated over a 20-year period utilizing the TOUGH2 Reservoir Simulator and research data. The model incorporates relative permeability, capillary pressure, rock compressibility, and leakage from the bounding shale layers. The simulations show that permeability, porosity, pressure, sandstone thickness, well spacing, and gas saturation in the sandstone have a significant impact on the percent of energy recovered. The results also predict lower average well production flow rates and a significantly higher production of natural gas relative to water than in previous studies done from 1975 to 1980. Previous studies underestimate the amount of methane produced with hot brine. Based on the work completed in this study, multiphase flow processes and reservoir boundary conditions greatly influence the total quantity of the fluid produced as well as the ratio of gas and water in the produced fluid.

  8. Structural styles of the Wilcox and Frio growth-fault trends in Texas: Constraints on geopressured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    The wide variability in structural styles within the growth-faulted, geopressured trends of the Texas Gulf Coast is illustrated by detailed structural maps of selected areas of the Wilcox and Frio growth-fault trends and quantified by statistical analysis of fault compartment geometries. Structural variability is a key determinant of the size of geopressured aquifers in the deep subsurface. Two major structural styles exist in the Wilcox trend. (1) In southeast and Central Texas, the trend consists of continuous, closely spaced faults that have little associated rollover despite moderate expansion of section; the fault plane flattens little with depth. (2) By contrast, in South Texas a narrow band of growth faults having high expansion and moderate rollover lies above and downdip of a ridge of deformed, overpressured shale but updip of a deep basin formed by withdrawal of overpressured shale. Frio fault systems generally display greater rollover and wider spacing than do Wilcox fault systems; however, the Frio trend displays distinctive features in each study area. Most of the Frio growth faults, however, have a similar geometry, showing substantial rollover, expansion of section, and a moderate flattening of the fault zone with depth, possibly related to a deep decollement surface. The local variability in style is related to the magnitude of Frio sedimentation and progradation and to the presence of thick salt or shale. Finding and developing a large geopressured aquifer require recognition of a favorable combination of sand-body geometry, reservoir quality, and fault compartment size and shape.

  9. Organic petrology and coalbed gas content, Wilcox Group (Paleocene-Eocene), northern Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, P.C.; Warwick, P.D.; Breland, F.C., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Wilcox Group (Paleocene-Eocene) coal and carbonaceous shale samples collected from four coalbed methane test wells in northern Louisiana were characterized through an integrated analytical program. Organic petrographic analyses, gas desorption and adsorption isotherm measurements, and proximate-ultimate analyses were conducted to provide insight into conditions of peat deposition and the relationships between coal composition, rank, and coalbed gas storage characteristics. The results of petrographic analyses indicate that woody precursor materials were more abundant in stratigraphically higher coal zones in one of the CBM wells, consistent with progradation of a deltaic depositional system (Holly Springs delta complex) into the Gulf of Mexico during the Paleocene-Eocene. Comparison of petrographic analyses with gas desorption measurements suggests that there is not a direct relationship between coal type (sensu maceral composition) and coalbed gas storage. Moisture, as a function of coal rank (lignite-subbituminous A), exhibits an inverse relationship with measured gas content. This result may be due to higher moisture content competing for adsorption space with coalbed gas in shallower, lower rank samples. Shallower ( 600??m) coal samples containing less moisture range from under- to oversaturated with respect to their CH4 adsorption capacity.

  10. Reservoir characterization and preliminary modeling of deltaic facies, lower Wilcox, Concordia Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Schenewerk, P.; Goddard, D.; Echols, J.

    1994-12-31

    The decline in production in several fields in Concordia Parish, Louisiana, has created interest in the economic feasibility of producing the remaining bypassed oil in the lower Wilcox Group. One of these fields, Bee Brake, has been one of the more prolific oil-producing fields in east-central Louisiana. The producing interval, the Minter sandstones, at a depth of about 6,775 ft typically consists of an upper Bee Brake sandstone and a lower Angelina sandstone. A detailed study of a conventional core in the center of the field reveals a 15-ft-thick Minter interval bounded above and below by sealing shales and lignites of lower delta plain marsh facies. The upper 4-ft-thick Bee Brake is a very fine silty sandstone with characteristics of a small overbank or crevasse splay deposit. The lower 3-ft-thick oil-producing Angelina sandstone consists of very fine and fine sandstone of probable overbank or crevasse facies. Cumulative production from the Angelina is about 1.8 million stock-tank barrels of oil. Special core analysis data (capillary pressure, relative permeability, and waterflood recovery) have been used to develop a simulation model of the two reservoirs in the Minter. This model incorporates the geologic and engineering complexities noted during evaluation of the field area. Operators can use the model results in this field to design an optimal development plan for enhanced recovery.

  11. Obituary: Horace Welcome Babcock, 1912-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Arthur Harris

    2003-12-01

    sunspot cycles. Until about 1957 this work had been done at the Hale Solar Laboratory on Holladay Road in Pasadena. Improved models of the magnetograph developed by Robert F. Howard, in collaboration with Horace, went into operation in the 150-foot solar tower telescope at Mount Wilson in 1959 and later, and similar instruments are now employed at many other solar observatories. In 1961 Horace proposed an explanation of the Sun's 22-year magnetic cycle that contained many of the features still embodied in contemporary theoretical models of the phenomenon. The advance in our understanding of solar and stellar magnetism brought forth by Horace Babcock is a worthy sequel to the pioneering efforts initiated by George E. Hale early in the twentieth century. Faced with the growing obsolescence of the Carnegie Institution of Washington's facilities at Mount Wilson along with the competition from Caltech's 200-inch telescope, the Carnegie Trustees in 1963 adopted the idea of founding a major observatory in the Southern Hemisphere as its master plan for modernizing the astronomical facilities of the Institution. Upon becoming Director of the Mount Wilson and Palomar Observatories in 1964, Horace Babcock embraced the job of carrying out this plan, although it meant giving up his own science. Beginning in 1963, and with his usual ingenuity, Horace developed apparatus for measuring astronomical ``seeing." In collaboration with John Irwin and others, he carried out site surveys in Chile, Australia and New Zealand with the aim of selecting the best available location for the anticipated array of large telescopes. Some five years of exploration led, in 1968, to the selection and purchase of a 276 square-kilometer tract on Cerro Las Campanas in north central Chile as the site for the new observatory. Babcock and Irwin had first climbed to its summit, on foot, in October 1966. The team Horace assembled to build the observatory and its infrastructure proved equal to the high standards he

  12. The LaSalle Arch and its effect on Wilcox sequence stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Lawless P.N.; Hart, G.F. )

    1990-09-01

    The LaSalle Arch is a southerly trending anticline separating the Louisiana and Mississippi interior salt basins. The structural trend of the Arch is suspended along basement paleo-highs. The paleo-high beneath the Nebo-Hemphill field, as seen on reflection seismic data, is the nose of an Ouachitan thrust fault that was partially rifted during the opening of the Gulf of Mexico. The western limb of the Arch formed owing to differential subsidence expanding the stratigraphic section toward the southwest. The eastern limb of the Arch formed because of regional tilting to the east after deposition of the Claibornian Sparta Formation. Uplift of the LaSalle Arch occurred during the Late Cretaceous Period and is seen as a truncational unconformity within the Tayloran Demopolis Formation. The Wilcox and Midway groups of central Louisiana have been subdivided into three genetic sequences. They are T{sub 1} (the Midway.), T{sub 2} (the Holly Springs), and T{sub 3} (the Carrizo). A genetic sequence is bounded above and below by condensed sections and represents a progradation into the basin followed by transgression. Each sequence represents a potential major migration route for the crude oil. The high stand systems tract of T{sub 1} and T{sub 3} were deposited during falling sea level resulting in similar homogenous sheetlike sand bodies. The paleo-highs subtly controlled the location of depositional environments, but did not prevent progradation to the southwest. The highstand systems tract of T{sub 2} was deposited during rising sea level resulting in heterogenous sediment dominated deltaic deposits that are very different from T{sub 1} and T{sub 3}. Although the stratigraphic section expands to the southwest, giving the impression that the interval thins over the Arch, the LaSalle Arch did not control the location of depositional environments within T{sub 2}.

  13. The simulation of thermohydraulic phenomena in a pressurized water reactor primary loop

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, M

    1987-01-01

    Several important fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena essential to nuclear power reactor safety were investigated. Scaling and modeling laws for pressurized water reactors are reviewed and a new scaling approach focusing on the overall loop behavior is presented. Scaling criteria for one- and two-phase natural circulation are developed, as well as a simplified model describing the first phase of a small break loss of coolant accident. Reactor vessel vent valve effects are included in the analysis of steady one-phase natural circulation flow. Two new dimensionless numbers, which uniquely describe one-phase flow in natural circulation loops, were deduced and are discussed. A scaled model of the primary loop of a typical Babcock and Wilcox reactor was designed, built, and tested. The particular prototype modeled was the TMI unit 2 reactor. The electrically heated, stainless steel model operates at a maximum pressure of 300 psig and has a maximum heat input of 188 kW. The model is about 4 times smaller in height than the prototype reactor, with a nominal volume scale of 1:500. Experiments were conducted establishing subcooled natural circulation in the model loop. Both steady flow and power transients were investigated.

  14. Maturation of organic matter in Paleocene-Eocene Wilcox group south Texas: relationship to clay diagenesis and sandstone cementation

    SciTech Connect

    Jenden, P.D.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1984-04-01

    Thirty-three mudstone core and cuttings samples ranging in depth of 1.6-4.7 km (5200-15,400 ft) and in temperature from 80/sup 0/ to 210/sup 0/C (175-410/sup 0/F) were obtained from wells in south Texas. The results of closed-system pyrolyses and bitumen and kerogen analyses are related to available data on clay mineralogy and sandstone cement. This study examines the diagenesis of Wilcox organic matter, the migration of hydrocarbons, and the importance of organically derived CO/sub 2/ in sandstone cementation. The samples average 1% TOC, contain type 111 kerogen, and generally show bitumen contents less than or equal to about 150 mg/gC. Modeling indicates that primary migration of methane and light hydrocarbons in aqueous solution is capable of producing giant (greater than or equal to 1 tcf) gas and condensate fields. Because hydrocarbon generation does not occur until after the main stage of illitization, smectite accounts for less than 25% of the total water involved. Pyrolysis experiments indicate that as much as 150 mg/gC CO/sub 2/ may be liberated by Wilcox organic matter during diagenesis to present-day temperatures of 100/sup 0/C (212/sup 0/F). The main zone of oil generation occurs at subsurface temperatures of 95..pi..-125/sup 0/C (203/sup 0/-257/sup 0/F). The timing of these processes suggest that CO/sub 2/ could lay an important role in creating secondary sandstones porosity for hydrocarbon migration. The delta/sup 13/C values indicate that 25% of the carbonate cement present in Wilcox sandstones may originate from decomposition and diagenesis of organic matter.

  15. Potentiometric surface, 2013, and water-level differences, 1991-2013, of the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer in northwest Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fendick, Robert B., Jr.; Carter, Kayla

    2015-01-01

    This report presents data and maps that illustrate the potentiometric surface of the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer during March–May 2013 and water-level differences from 1991 to 2013. The potentiometric surface map can be used for determining the direction of groundwater flow, hydraulic gradients, and effects of withdrawals on the groundwater resource. The rate of groundwater movement also can be estimated from the gradient when the hydraulic conductivity is applied. Water-level data collected for this study are stored in the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS) (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) and are on file at the USGS office in Baton Rouge, La.

  16. Steps towards verification and validation of the Fetch code for Level 2 analysis, design, and optimization of aqueous homogeneous reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Nygaard, E. T.; Pain, C. C.; Eaton, M. D.; Gomes, J. L. M. A.; Goddard, A. J. H.; Gorman, G.; Tollit, B.; Buchan, A. G.; Cooling, C. M.; Angelo, P. L.

    2012-07-01

    Babcock and Wilcox Technical Services Group (B and W) has identified aqueous homogeneous reactors (AHRs) as a technology well suited to produce the medical isotope molybdenum 99 (Mo-99). AHRs have never been specifically designed or built for this specialized purpose. However, AHRs have a proven history of being safe research reactors. In fact, in 1958, AHRs had 'a longer history of operation than any other type of research reactor using enriched fuel' and had 'experimentally demonstrated to be among the safest of all various type of research reactor now in use [1].' While AHRs have been modeled effectively using simplified 'Level 1' tools, the complex interactions between fluids, neutronics, and solid structures are important (but not necessarily safety significant). These interactions require a 'Level 2' modeling tool. Imperial College London (ICL) has developed such a tool: Finite Element Transient Criticality (FETCH). FETCH couples the radiation transport code EVENT with the computational fluid dynamics code (Fluidity), the result is a code capable of modeling sub-critical, critical, and super-critical solutions in both two-and three-dimensions. Using FETCH, ICL researchers and B and W engineers have studied many fissioning solution systems include the Tokaimura criticality accident, the Y12 accident, SILENE, TRACY, and SUPO. These modeling efforts will ultimately be incorporated into FETCH'S extensive automated verification and validation (V and V) test suite expanding FETCH'S area of applicability to include all relevant physics associated with AHRs. These efforts parallel B and W's engineering effort to design and optimize an AHR to produce Mo99. (authors)

  17. An extended conventional fuel cycle for the B and W mPower{sup TM} small modular nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Scarangella, M. J.

    2012-07-01

    The B and W mPower{sup TM} reactor is a small pressurized water reactor (PWR) with an integral once-through steam generator and a thermal output of about 500 MW; it is intended to replace aging fossil power plants of similar output. The core is composed of 69 reduced-height PWR assemblies with the familiar 17 x 17 fuel rod array. The Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W) is offering a core loading and cycle management plan for a four-year cycle based on its presumed attractiveness to potential customers. This option is a once-through fuel cycle in which the entire core is discharged and replaced after four years. In addition, a conventional fuel utilization strategy, employing a periodic partial reload and shuffle, was developed as an alternative to the four-year once-through fuel cycle. This study, which was performed using the Studsvik core design code suite, is a typical multi-cycle projection analysis of the type performed by most fuel management organizations such as fuel vendors and utilities. In the industry, the results of such projections are used by the financial arms of these organizations to assist in making long-term decisions. In the case of the B and W mPower reactor, this analysis demonstrates flexibility for customers who consider the once-through fuel cycle unacceptable from a fuel utilization standpoint. As expected, when compared to the once-through concept, reloads of the B and W mPower reactor will achieve higher batch average discharge exposure, will have adequate shut-down margin, and will have a relatively flat hot excess reactivity trend at the expense of slightly increased peaking. (authors)

  18. Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data annual report, FY 95: Technical training. Volume 9, Number 3

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    The Technical Training Center provides initial and continuing technical training for NRC staff and contractors to satisfy training needs defined by formal NRC staff qualification and training programs. Technical training includes reactor technology programs and specialized technical programs. Reactor technology programs include a spectrum of courses, including classroom and simulator instruction, in each of the four Nuclear Steam Supply System vendor designs--General Electric (GE), Westinghouse, Combustion Engineering (CE), and Babcock and Wilcox (B and W). Specialized technical training includes courses in engineering support, probabilistic risk assessment, radiation protection, fuel cycle technology, safeguards, and regulatory skills. The report presents the activities of the Technical Training Center in FY95 in support of the NRC`s mission.

  19. Coal gasification systems engineering and analysis. Appendix G: Commercial design and technology evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A technology evaluation of five coal gasifier systems (Koppers-Totzek, Texaco, Babcock and Wilcox, Lurgi and BGC/Lurgi) and procedures and criteria for evaluating competitive commercial coal gasification designs is presented. The technology evaluation is based upon the plant designs and cost estimates developed by the BDM-Mittelhauser team.

  20. The development and application of k0-standardization method of neutron activation analysis at Es-Salam research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alghem, L.; Ramdhane, M.; Khaled, S.; Akhal, T.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years the k0-NAA method has been applied and developed at the 15 MW Es-Salam research reactor, which includes: (1) the detection efficiency calibration of γ-spectrometer used in k0-NAA, (2) the determination of reactor neutron spectrum parameters such as α and f factors in the irradiation channel, and (3) the validation of the developed k0-NAA procedure by analysing SRM, namely AIEA-Soil7 and CRM, namely IGGE-GSV4. The analysis results obtained by k0-NAA with 27 elements of Soil-7 standard and 14 elements of GSV-4 standard were compared with certified values. The analysis results showed that the deviations between experimental and certified values were mostly less than 10%. The k0-NAA procedure established at Es-Salam research reactor has been regarded as a reliable standardization method of NAA and as available for practical applications.

  1. 78 FR 73898 - Operator Licensing Examination Standards for Power Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... COMMISSION Operator Licensing Examination Standards for Power Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Standards for Power Reactors.'' DATES: Submit comments by February 7, 2014. Comments received after this..., and grading of examinations used for licensing operators at nuclear power plants pursuant to...

  2. Properties and chemical constituents in ground water from the middle Wilcox aquifer, south-central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pettijohn, Robert A.; Busby, John F.; Beckman, Jeffery D.

    1993-01-01

    The Gulf Coast Regional Aquifer-System Analysis is a study of regional aquifers composed of sediments of mostly Cenozoic age that underlie about 230,000 sq mi of the Gulf Coastal Plain. These regional aquifers are part of three aquifer systems: (1) the Mississippi Embayment Aquifer System, (2) the Texas Coastal Uplands Aquifer System, and (3) the Coastal Lowlands Aquifer System. The water chemistry of the Middle Wilcox Aquifer, which is part of the Mississippi Embayment Aquifer System and the Texas Coastal Uplands Aquifer System is presented by a series of maps. These maps show the area1 distribution of (1) the concentration of dissolved solids and temperature, (2) the primary water types and pH, (3) the concentration of major ions and silica, and (4) the milliequivalent ratios of selected ions. Dissolved constituents, pH, temperature, and ratios are based on the median values of all samples in each 100-sq-mi area. The concentration of dissolved solids in water from the Middle Wilcox Aquifer ranges from 26 mg/L in the northern part of the Mississippi Embayment Aquifer System to 125,500 mg/L in a down-dip area in southeastern Texas. The primary water types, which are based on the most frequently observed type in each 100-sq-mi area, are calcium bicarbonate in the outcrop in Missouri, Kentucky, Mississippi, and southern Texas; sodium bicarbonate in the remaining outcrop areas and all areas from outcrop to mid-dip; and sodium chloride in all down-dip areas. The concentrations of major ions in water from the Middle Wilcox Aquifer generally increase from the outcrop area to the down-dip limit of the data. The milliequivalent ratio of magnesium plus calcium to bicarbonate ranges from less than 0.01 to 158 and generally decreases from outcrop to mid-dip and increases from mid-dip to the down-dip limit of the data. From the Sabine Uplift eastward to southwestern Alabama the ratio of bicarbonate to chloride generally decreases from outcrop to down-dip in the area west of

  3. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 4. For G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii for June, July, and August 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during June, July, and August 1982 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weater are provided.

  4. Interview with Professor Mark Wilcox.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Mark Wilcox speaks to Georgia Patey, Commissioning Editor: Professor Mark Wilcox is a Consultant Microbiologist and Head of Microbiology at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals (Leeds, UK), the Professor of Medical Microbiology at the University of Leeds (Leeds, UK), and is the Lead on Clostridium difficile and the Head of the UK C. difficile Reference Laboratory for Public Health England (PHE). He was the Director of Infection Prevention (4 years), Infection Control Doctor (8 years) and Clinical Director of Pathology (6 years) at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals. He is Chair of PHE's Rapid Review Panel (reviews utility of infection prevention and control products for National Health Service), Deputy Chair of the UK Department of Health's Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare Associated Infection Committee and a member of PHE's HCAI/AR Programme Board. He is a member of UK/European/US working groups on C. difficile infection. He has provided clinical advice as part of the FDA/EMA submissions for the approval of multiple novel antimicrobial agents. He heads a healthcare-associated infection research team at University of Leeds, comprising approximately 30 doctors, scientists and nurses; projects include multiple aspects of C. difficile infection, diagnostics, antimicrobial resistance and the clinical development of new antimicrobial agents. He has authored more than 400 publications, and is the coeditor of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (5th/6th/7th Editions, 15 December 2007). PMID:27494150

  5. Peter Wilcox: A new purple-skin, yellow flesh fresh market potato cultivar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peter Wilcox is a new, medium-maturing, purple-skin, yellow-flesh potato cultivar for fresh market. Peter Wilcox also produces light-colored chips, although it is being released primarily as a fresh market potato because of its skin and flesh colors. Tubers of Peter Wilcox are attractive, smooth, wi...

  6. Numerical simulation of PWR response to a small break LOCA (loss-of-coolant accident) with reactor coolant pumps operating

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.P.; Dobbe, C.A.; Bayless, P.D.

    1986-01-01

    Calculations have been made of the response of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) during a small-break, loss-of-coolant accident with the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) operating. This study was conducted, as part of a comprehensive project, to assess the relationship between measurable RCP parameters, such as motor power or current, and fluid density, both local (at the RCP inlet) and global (average reactor coolant system). Additionally, the efficacy of using these RCP parameters, together with fluid temperature, to identify an off-nominal transient as either a LOCA, a heatup transient, or a cooldown transient and to follow recovery from the transient was assessed. The RELAP4 and RELAP5 computer codes were used with three independent sets of RCP, two-phase degradation multipliers. These multipliers were based on data obtained in two-phase flow conditions for the Semiscale, LOFT, and Creare/Combustion Engineering (CE)/Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) pumps, respectively. Two reference PWRs were used in this study: Zion, a four-loop, 1100-MWe, Westinghouse plant operated by Commonwealth Edison Co. in Zion, Illinois and Bellefonte, a two-by-four loop, 1213 MWe, Babcock and Wilcox designed plant being built by the Tennessee Valley Authority in Scottsboro, Alabama. The results from this study showed that RCP operation resulted in an approximately homogeneous reactor coolant system and that this result was independent of reference plant, computer code, or two-phase RCP head degradation multiplier used in the calculation.

  7. Altitude of the water table in the alluvial and Wilcox aquifers in the vicinity of Richland and Tehuacana creeks and the Trinity River, Texas, December 1979

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garza, Sergio

    1980-01-01

    This map shows the altitude of the water table in the alluvial and Wilcox aquifers in the vicinity of Richland and Tehuacana Creeks and the Trinity River, Tex., in December 1979. The water-table contours were constructed on the basis of water-level control derived from an inventory of shallow wells in the area, topographic maps, and field locations of numerous small springs and seeps. (USGS)

  8. The Advanced Candu reactor annunciation system - Compliance with IEC standard and US NRC guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Leger, R.; Malcolm, S.; Davey, E.

    2006-07-01

    Annunciation is a key plant information system that alerts Operations staff to important changes in plant processes and systems. Operational experience at nuclear stations worldwide has shown that many annunciation implementations do not provide the support needed by Operations staff in all plant situations. To address utility needs for annunciation improvement in Candu plants, AECL in partnership with Canadian Candu utilities, undertook an annunciation improvement program in the early nineties. The outcome of the research and engineering development program was the development and simulator validation of alarm processing, display, and information presentation techniques that provide practical and effective solutions to key operational deficiencies with earlier annunciation implementations. The improved annunciation capabilities consist of a series of detection, information processing and presentation functions called the Candu Annunciation Message List System (CAMLS). The CAMLS concepts embody alarm processing, presentation and interaction techniques, and strategies and methods for annunciation system configuration to ensure improved annunciation support for all plant situations, especially in upset situations where the alarm generation rate is high. The Advanced Candu Reactor (ACR) project will employ the CAMLS annunciation concepts as the basis for primary annunciation implementations. The primary annunciation systems will be implemented from CAMLS applications hosted on AECL Advanced Control Centre Information System (ACCIS) computing technology. The ACR project has also chosen to implement main control room annunciation aspects in conformance with the following international standard and regulatory review guide for control room annunciation practice: International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 62241 - Main Control Room, Alarm Function and Presentation (International standard) US NRC NUREG-0700 - Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines, Section 4

  9. 3D Babcock-Leighton Solar Dynamo Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Hazra, Gopal; Karak, Bidya Binay; Teweldebirhan, Kinfe; Upton, Lisa

    2016-05-01

    We present results from the new STABLE (Surface flux Transport and Babcock Leighton) Dynamo Model. STABLE is a 3D Babcock-Leighton/Flux Transport dynamo model in which the source of poloidal field is the explicit emergence, distortion, and dispersal of bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs). In this talk I will discuss initial results with axisymmetric flow fields, focusing on the operation of the model, the general features of the cyclic solutions, and the challenge of achieving supercritical dynamo solutions using only the Babcock-Leighton source term. Then I will present dynamo simulations that include 3D convective flow fields based on the observed velocity power spectrum inferred from photospheric Dopplergrams. I'll use these simulations to assess how the explicit transport and amplification of fields by surface convection influences the operation of the dynamo. I will also discuss the role of surface magnetic fields in regulating the subsurface toroidal flux budget.

  10. Development and testing of a diagnostic system for intelligen distributed control at EBR-2

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.M.; Ruhl, D.W.; Klevans, E.H.; Robinson, G.E.

    1990-01-01

    A diagnostic system is under development for demonstration of Intelligent Distributed Control at the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR--II). In the first phase of the project a diagnostic system is being developed for the EBR-II steam plant based on the DISYS expert systems approach. Current testing uses recorded plant data and data from simulated plant faults. The dynamical simulation of the EBR-II steam plant uses the Babcock and Wilcox (B W) Modular Modeling System (MMS). At EBR-II the diagnostic system operates in the UNIX workstation and receives live plant data from the plant Data Acquisition System (DAS). Future work will seek implementation of the steam plant diagnostic in a distributed manner using UNIX based computers and Bailey microprocessor-based control system. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Study of Channel Morphology and Infill Lithology in the Wilcox Group Central Louisiana Using Seismic Attribute Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng

    The fluvial and deltaic Wilcox Group is a major target for hydrocarbon and coal exploration in northern and central Louisiana. However, the characterization and delineation of fluvial systems is a difficult task due to the variability and complexity of fluvial systems and their internal heterogeneities. Seismic geomorphology is studied by recognizing paleogeographic features in seismic stratal slices, which are seismic images of paleo-depositional surfaces. Seismic attributes, which are extracted along seismic stratal slices, can reveal information that is not readily apparent in raw seismic data. The existence and distribution of fluvial channels are recognized by the channel geomorphology in seismic attributes displayed on stratal slices. The lithologies in the channels are indicated by those seismic attributes that are directly related to the physical properties of rocks. Selected attributes utilized herein include similarity, spectral decomposition, sweetness, relative acoustic impedance, root mean square (RMS) amplitude, and curvature. Co-rendering and Red/Green/Blue (RGB) display techniques are also included to better illuminate the channel geometry and lithology distribution. Hydrocarbons may exist in the channel sand-bodies, but are not explicitly identified herein. Future drilling plans for oil and gas exploration may benefit from the identification of the channels and the lithologies that fill them.

  12. Obituary: Horace Welcome Babcock, 1912-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Arthur Harris

    2003-12-01

    Horace Welcome Babcock died in Santa Barbara, California on 29 August 2003, fifteen days short of his ninety-first birthday. An acclaimed authority on solar and stellar magnetism and the originator of ingenious advances in astronomical instrumentation in his earlier career, he served as Director of Mount Wilson and Palomar (later Hale) Observatories from 1964 until his retirement in 1978. The founding of the Carnegie Institution of Washington's Las Campanas Observatory in Chile was the culmination of his directorship. Horace was born in Pasadena California on 13 September 1912, the only child of Harold Delos Babcock and Mary G. Henderson. His father, an electrical engineer and physicist by training, had been hired by George Ellery Hale to work at the recently founded Mount Wilson Solar Observatory beginning in 1909. Thus Horace spent much of his boyhood on Mount Wilson in the company of astronomers. Horace developed an early interest in astronomy, worked as a volunteer solar observer at Mount Wilson and published his first paper in 1932, with his father. He was fascinated by fine mechanisms and by optical and electrical instruments. After graduating from Caltech with a degree in structural engineering in 1934, he earned his PhD in astronomy at Lick Observatory in 1938. His dissertation provided the first measurement of the rotational velocity curve and a derivation of the mass-to-luminosity ratio for M31; this work is still cited in reviews of the study of ``dark matter." Horace served as a research assistant at Lick Observatory (1938 39) and an Instructor at the University of Chicago's McDonald and Yerkes Observatories (1939--41) under Otto Struve. He undertook radar-related wartime electronics work at the MIT Radiation Laboratory (1941 42) and then worked on aircraft rocket launchers as part of the Caltech Rocket Project (1942 45). This project brought him into contact with Ira S. Bowen, head of the project's Photographic Division. Impressed with his knowledge of

  13. Trap types vs productivity of significant Wilcox gas fields in the south Texas, listric growth fault trend, and the divergent origin of its two largest producers

    SciTech Connect

    Stricklin, F.L. Jr.

    1996-09-01

    Detailed mapping and analysis of 23 Wilcox fields in the subject trend indicates that gas production is related to trap type. Of total cumulative production of 3.4 TCFG, 65% is from upthrown fault blocks implying very effective fault seals due to differential pressure and/or shale smears. NE Thompsonville and Bob West fields have produced 650 and 200 BCFG, respectively, with 400 BCFG remaining reserves in the latter. The field structures are not attributed to listric growth faulting, as is suggested by their trend location. NE Thompsonville is a 9-mile-long turtle structure that originated through depositional loading of an upper slope basin, followed by tilting, and then eventual collapse of a sediment squeeze-up mound due to gravitational instability. These events provide an excellent example of basin evolution through sediment loading accompanied by withdrawal of a salt-shale substrate; the basin flanks are defined by basin-dipping listric faulting that accommodated subsidence and merge beneath its floor. Bob West Field lies along the edge of the Laramide fold belt. The 1-1/2 x 4 mile field anticline adjoins a deep-seated fault that slices over and across a buried structural ridge of probable Cretaceous age. Uplift of the latter, immediately following deposition of 20+ stacked, shelf-bar producing sands, upwarped the fault and resulted in rollover growth of the Wilcox anticline. The fault shows no downward decrease in dip typical of listric faults. NE Thompsonville and Bob West fields both produce upthrown along crestal faults. This analysis indicates that {open_quotes}high-side{close_quotes} closures, irrespective of diverse origins, have achieved head-of-the-class stature as Wilcox gas producers.

  14. FABRICATION PROCESS AND PRODUCT QUALITY IMPROVEMENTS IN ADVANCED GAS REACTOR UCO KERNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Charles M Barnes

    2008-09-01

    A major element of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program is developing fuel fabrication processes to produce high quality uranium-containing kernels, TRISO-coated particles and fuel compacts needed for planned irradiation tests. The goals of the AGR program also include developing the fabrication technology to mass produce this fuel at low cost. Kernels for the first AGR test (“AGR-1) consisted of uranium oxycarbide (UCO) microspheres that werre produced by an internal gelation process followed by high temperature steps tot convert the UO3 + C “green” microspheres to first UO2 + C and then UO2 + UCx. The high temperature steps also densified the kernels. Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) fabricated UCO kernels for the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, which went into the Advance Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory in December 2006. An evaluation of the kernel process following AGR-1 kernel production led to several recommendations to improve the fabrication process. These recommendations included testing alternative methods of dispersing carbon during broth preparation, evaluating the method of broth mixing, optimizing the broth chemistry, optimizing sintering conditions, and demonstrating fabrication of larger diameter UCO kernels needed for the second AGR irradiation test. Based on these recommendations and requirements, a test program was defined and performed. Certain portions of the test program were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), while tests at larger scale were performed by B&W. The tests at B&W have demonstrated improvements in both kernel properties and process operation. Changes in the form of carbon black used and the method of mixing the carbon prior to forming kernels led to improvements in the phase distribution in the sintered kernels, greater consistency in kernel properties, a reduction in forming run time, and simplifications to the forming process. Process parameter variation tests in both forming and sintering steps led

  15. A proposed standard on medical isotope production in fission reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Schenter, R. E.; Brown, G. J.; Holden, C. S.

    2006-07-01

    Authors Robert E. Sehenter, Garry Brown and Charles S. Holden argue that a Standard for 'Medical Isotope Production' is needed. Medical isotopes are becoming major components of application for the diagnosis and treatment of all the major diseases including all forms of cancer, heart disease, arthritis, Alzheimer's, among others. Current nuclear data to perform calculations is incomplete, dated or imprecise or otherwise flawed for many isotopes that could have significant applications in medicine. Improved data files will assist computational analyses to design means and methods for improved isotope production techniques in the fission reactor systems. Initial focus of the Standard is expected to be on neutron cross section and branching data for both fast and thermal reactor systems. Evaluated and reviewed tables giving thermal capture cross sections and resonance integrals for the major target and product medical isotopes would be the expected 'first start' for the 'Standard Working Group'. (authors)

  16. A Numerical Model of Deuterium and Oxygen-18 Diffusion in the Confined Lower Wilcox Aquifer of the Lower Mississippi Valley (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currens, B. J.; Sawyer, A. H.; Fryar, A. E.; Parris, T. M.; Zhu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Deuterium and oxygen-18 are routinely used with noble gases and radioisotopes (e.g., 2H, 14C, 36Cl) to infer climate during groundwater recharge. However, diffusion of 2H and 18O between a confined aquifer and bounding aquitards could alter total isotope concentrations and the inferred temperature during recharge if groundwater flow is sufficiently slow. Hendry and Schwartz (WRR 24(10), 1988) explained anomalous 2H and 18O enrichment in the Milk River aquifer of Alberta by analytically modeling isotope diffusion between the lower bounding aquitard and the aquifer. Haile (PhD dissertation, U. Kentucky, 2011) inferred the same mechanism to explain 2H and 18O enrichment along a flowpath in the confined Lower Wilcox aquifer of the northern Gulf Coastal Plain in Missouri and Arkansas. Based on the geologic and hydraulic properties of the Lower Wilcox aquifer, a numerical model has been constructed to determine how diffusion may influence 2H and 18O concentrations in regional aquifers with residence times on the order of 104 to 105 years. The model combines solutions for a 1D forward-in-time, finite-difference groundwater flow equation with an explicit-implicit Crank-Nicholson algorithm for advection and diffusion to solve for flow velocity and isotope concentration. Initial results are consistent with the analytical solution of Hendry and Schwartz (1988), indicating diffusion as a means of isotopic enrichment along regional groundwater flowpaths.

  17. Reservoir characteristics of Lower Wilcox Sandstones, Lobo Trend, Webb and Zapata Counties, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Henke, K.A.

    1985-02-01

    To date, over 340 bcf of gas have been produced from the Lobo sandstones in the Laredo field area at depths of less than 10,000 ft (3050 m). Gas accumulation is controlled by faulting and erosional truncation. The resulting structural complexity has made accurate prediction of reservoir sandstones difficult. Cored sections display repetitive ordered sequences of sedimentary structures and textural and compositional gradations indicative of turbidity-current deposits. The reservoir sandstones were deposited as constructional channels having vertical and lateral variation from channel-fill to channel-margin to overbank deposits. Channel-fill units are 2-10 ft (0.61-3.05 m) thick and composed of AB, AE, and ABE bedsets. Channel-margin units are 1-3 ft (0.31-0.92 m) thick and contain thinner, more complete ABC, ABE and ABCE sequences. Overbank deposits consist of highly bioturbated, thinly interbedded sandstones and shales. Sandstones are feldspathic litharenites that have 15% matrix and 15% calcite cement. Porosities average 16% and permeabilities range from 0.54 to 12 md, decreasing with increased matrix, cement, and bioturbation. The channel-fill sandstones are linear, dip-trending bodies less than 3000 ft (915 m) wide, which bifurcate downdip into distributary channels. High-intensity, small-scale, soft-sediment deformation indicates the sandstones were deposited in an unstable outer-shelf to upper-slope environment. A slumped, dip-trending channel-fill interpretation for the Lobo sandstones provides a mechanism for sediment transport beyond the present downdip limits of the trend.

  18. Dipmeter helps in siting successful Wilcox offsets

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    Practically used, dipmeter logs or dip logs can be used to more accurately map subsurface stratigraphic traps. After drilling into a seismically defined target in far southwestern Mississippi, R.E. Williams Oil and Gas Co. geologists and their logging advisors were able to site and drill six successful offset locations to a 1984 discovery in a Wilcox point bar sandstone by applying a stratigraphic dipmeter tool. Interpretation steps leaching up to the drilling of each of these wells are reviewed in the following text.

  19. Buoyancy-induced time delays in Babcock-Leighton flux-transport dynamo models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouve, L.; Proctor, M. R. E.; Lesur, G.

    2010-09-01

    Context. The Sun is a magnetic star whose cyclic activity is thought to be linked to internal dynamo mechanisms. A combination of numerical modelling with various levels of complexity is an efficient and accurate tool to investigate such intricate dynamical processes. Aims: We investigate the role of the magnetic buoyancy process in 2D Babcock-Leighton dynamo models, by modelling more accurately the surface source term for poloidal field. Methods: To do so, we reintroduce in mean-field models the results of full 3D MHD calculations of the non-linear evolution of a rising flux tube in a convective shell. More specifically, the Babcock-Leighton source term is modified to take into account the delay introduced by the rise time of the toroidal structures from the base of the convection zone to the solar surface. Results: We find that the time delays introduced in the equations produce large temporal modulation of the cycle amplitude even when strong and thus rapidly rising flux tubes are considered. Aperiodic modulations of the solar cycle appear after a sequence of period doubling bifurcations typical of non-linear systems. The strong effects introduced even by small delays is found to be due to the dependence of the delays on the magnetic field strength at the base of the convection zone, the modulation being much less when time delays remain constant. We do not find any significant influence on the cycle period except when the delays are made artificially strong. Conclusions: A possible new origin of the solar cycle variability is here revealed. This modulated activity and the resulting butterfly diagram are then more compatible with observations than what the standard Babcock-Leighton model produces.

  20. Coal gasification systems engineering and analysis. Appendix D: Cost and economic studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The detailed cost estimate documentation for the designs prepared in this study are presented. The include: (1) Koppers-Totzek, (2) Texaco (3) Babcock and Wilcox, (4) BGC-Lurgi, and (5) Lurgi. The alternate product cost estimates include: (1) Koppers-Totzek and Texaco single product facilities (methane, methanol, gasoline, hydrogen), (2) Kopers-Totzek SNG and MBG, (3) Kopers-Totzek and Texaco SNG and MBG, and (4) Lurgi-methane and Lurgi-methane and methanol.

  1. Properties and chemical constituents in ground water from the lower Wilcox Aquifer, Mississippi Embayment Aquifer System, south-central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pettijohn, Robert A.; Busby, John F.; Beckman, Jeffery D.

    1993-01-01

    The Gulf Coast Regional Aquifer-System Analysis is a study of regional aquifers composed of sediments of mostly Cenozoic age that underlie about 230,000 sq mi of the Gulf Coastal Plain. These regional aquifers are part of three aquifer systems: (1) the Mississippi Embayment Aquifer System, (2) the Texas Coastal Uplands Aquifer System, and (3) the Coastal Lowlands Aquifer System. The water chemistry of the Lower Wilcox Aquifer, which is part of the Mississippi Embayment Aquifer System is presented by a series of maps. These maps show the areal distribution of (1) the concentration of dissolved solids and temperature, (2) the primary water types and pH, (3) the concentration of major ions and silica, and (4) the milliequivalent ratios of selected ions. Dissolved constituents, pH, temperature, and ratios are based on the median values of all samples in each 100-sq-mi area. The concentration of dissolved solids in water from the Lower Wilcox Aquifer ranges from 18 mg/L near the outcrop in western Tennessee to 122,000 mg/L in a down-dip area in southern Mississippi. The primary water type is calcium bicarbonate in the outcrop area and sodium bicarbonate in all other areas of the aquifer within the limits of available data. The concentrations of major ions generally increase from the outcrop area to the down-dip limit of the data in the southern part of the aquifer area east of the Mississippi River. The milliequivalent ratio maps of selected ions in water from the Lower Wilcox Aquifer indicate some trends. The milliequivalent ratio of magnesium plus calcium to bicarbonate ranges from less than 0.1 to 40.4 and generally decreases from outcrop to down-dip limit of the data in the southern part of the aquifer area east of the Mississippi River. The milliequivalent ratio of bicarbonate to chloride ranges from 0.01 in southern Mississippi to 52.3 in northwestern Mississippi. This ratio increases from the outcrop toward the Mississippi River and from north to south in the

  2. CONVECTIVE BABCOCK-LEIGHTON DYNAMO MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Miesch, Mark S.; Brown, Benjamin P.

    2012-02-20

    We present the first global, three-dimensional simulations of solar/stellar convection that take into account the influence of magnetic flux emergence by means of the Babcock-Leighton (BL) mechanism. We have shown that the inclusion of a BL poloidal source term in a convection simulation can promote cyclic activity in an otherwise steady dynamo. Some cycle properties are reminiscent of solar observations, such as the equatorward propagation of toroidal flux near the base of the convection zone. However, the cycle period in this young sun (rotating three times faster than the solar rate) is very short ({approx}6 months) and it is unclear whether much longer cycles may be achieved within this modeling framework, given the high efficiency of field generation and transport by the convection. Even so, the incorporation of mean-field parameterizations in three-dimensional convection simulations to account for elusive processes such as flux emergence may well prove useful in the future modeling of solar and stellar activity cycles.

  3. Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, these standards will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience.

  4. Azalea's Worst Nightmare: The Strawberry Rootworm, Paria fargariae Wilcox

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The strawberry rootworm (SRW), Paria fargariae Wilcox, is an emergent pest of azaleas in commercial production nurseries in the southeastern US. Larvae feed on roots but do minimal damage. Adults feed at night and make small holes in the foliage. Severe damage has been reported in many nurseries, es...

  5. Ethology of Omniablautus nigronotum (Wilcox) (Diptera: Asilidae) in Wyoming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In southwest Wyoming, Omniablautus nigronotum (Wilcox), hunted primarily from the surface of the sandy substrate in a greasewood community. Prey, captured in flight, represented four insect orders with Diptera and Hymenoptera predominating. Courtship consisted of the male approaching the female from...

  6. 78 FR 59981 - Proposed Revision to Physical Security-Standard Design Certification and Operating Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ....regulations.gov and search for Docket ID NRC-2013-0225. Address questions about NRC dockets to Carol Gallagher; telephone: 301-287- 3442; email: Carol.Gallagher@nrc.gov . For technical questions, contact the...

  7. Development of ground water from the Carrizo sand and Wilcox group in Dimmit, Zavala, Maverick, Frio, Atacosa, Median, Bexar, Live Oak, McMullen, La Salle, and Webb Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moulder, E.A.

    1957-01-01

    The development of ground water for irrigation from the Carrizo sand south and southwest of San Antonio, Tex., has increased rapidly during the past few years. Declining pumping water levels in irrigation wells, caused by increased withdrawals, have caused considerable concern among the residents of the area. In response, the Nueces River Conservation and Reclamation District entered into a cooperative agreement with the Texas Board of Water Engineers and the United States Geological Survey to determine the extent of development and the rate of withdrawal that has cause the decline. All wells that discharged more than 150 gallons per minute for extended periods of time in 1955 from either the Carrizo sand or sands of the Wilcox group were studied and are shown on [late 1. Estimates were made of the total withdrawals by county and are given in table 2. Similar estimates of withdrawals in some of the counties for the irrigation years 1929-30, 1938-39, 1944-45, and 1947-48 are presented for comparison in table 3. Although the Carrizo sand is the principal source of ground water pumped in the area, estimate of withdrawals of water from the Wilcox were included in this inventory because (1) the formation appears to be hydraulically connected to the Carrizo sand, (2) the quality of water generally is good in the outcrop area of the Wilcox, and (3) appreciable withdrawals are being made from the Wilcox for irrigation in a few areas. The investigation covered an area of about 7,500 square miles and included all or parts of the following counties: Dimmit, Zavala, Maverick, Frio, Atascosa, Medina, Bexar, Live Oak, McMullen, La Salle, and Webb (fig. 1).

  8. Validation of standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation/TRITON two-dimensional and three-dimensional models for light water reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S. M.; Gill, D. F.

    2006-07-01

    The isotopic depletion capabilities of the new Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation control module TRITON, coupled with ORIGEN-S, were evaluated using spent fuel assays from several commercial light water reactors with both standard and mixed-oxide fuel assemblies. Calculations were performed using the functional modules NEWT and KENO-VI. NEWT is a two-dimensional, arbitrary-geometry, discrete-ordinates transport code, and KENO-VI is a three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport code capable of handling complex three-dimensional geometries. To validate the codes and data used in depletion calculations, numerical predictions were compared with experimental measurements for a total of 29 samples taken from the Calvert Cliffs, Obrigheim, and San Onofre pressurized water reactors and the Gundremmingen boiling water reactor. Similar comparisons have previously been performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the one-dimensional SAS2H control module. The SAS2H, TRITON/KENO-VI, and TRITON/NEWT results were compared for corresponding samples. All analyses showed that TRITON/KENO-VI and TRITON/NEWT produced typically similar or better results than SAS2H. The calculations performed in this validation study demonstrate that the depletion capabilities of TRITON accurately model spent fuel depletion and decay. (authors)

  9. Geologic history indicated by the fossiliferous deposits of the Wilcox group (Eocene) at Meridian, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berry, Edward Wilber

    1917-01-01

    The presence of erosion intervals at several horizons in the Eocene of the Gulf States has been pointed out in a recent paper, and the evidence of an erosion interval between the period of deposition of the sediments of the Wilcox group (lower Eocene) and that of the Claiborne group (middle Eocene) was reviewed in some detail in a general discussion of the extensive flora of the Wilcox group of that region.

  10. Additions to the flora of the Wilcox group

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berry, Edward Wilber

    1923-01-01

    A rather full account of the extensive flora contained in the lower Eocene strata of the Mississippi embayment which are referred to the Wilcox group was published in 1916. At that time it was not possible to obtain sections of the numerous specimens of petrified wood that had been collected from these beds. These woods have since been sectioned and studied, and it seems eminently desirable to place the results of this study on record, for although much of the material had suffered greatly from decay before silicification, some of it is fairly well preserved and shows, among other results, that conifers were individually much more plentiful during Wilcox time than would be inferred from the almost total absence of their foliage in the very large collections of remains of this class that have been studied.

  11. Seismic stratigraphy of Winedale prospect: updip Wilcox trend, onshore Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Huckabay, A.

    1984-04-01

    In the central Texas Gulf Coast, the Eocene lower Wilcox Formation consists predominantly of massive sands updip of the Lower Cretaceous shelf margin. In northeast Fayette County, near the town of Winedale, and inflection point was found at the Lower Cretaceous Edwards and Sligo levels on reconnaissance seismic data. There was a corresponding ''wipeout'' of reflectors within the lower Wilcox section above. Prospect-detailing seismic data indicated that the infection point had localized lateral continuity. A flat spot was mapped at lower Wilcox, Edwards, and Sligo levels. A well drilled to test the lower Wilcox ''wipeout'' zone resulted in a lower Wilcox discovery with initial potential of 2.5 MMCFGD and 50 BCPD. Two delineation wells were dry. The producing sand is near, but not in, the seismic ''wipeout'' zone. Genetically indistinguishable from the other lower Wilcox sands, it has a blocky, massive character, decreasing-upward grain size, and is bounded by thin coals. It pinches out updip and is not in the two later wells. An upper delta-plain point-bar depositional model is proposed.

  12. Hydrogeology of the middle Wilcox aquifer system in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.E.; Arthur, J.K. )

    1992-01-01

    A study has been performed to provide water resource planners and managers with hydrogeologic data on the predominantly undeveloped middle Wilcox aquifer system in Mississippi, and to describe its potential as an alternative source of water. The principal source of recharge to the middle Wilcox aquifer system is from precipitation in the outcrop area, a crescent-shaped belt extending from north to east, and dipping west to southwest. Most of the water that percolates into the ground is lost by evapotranspiration or groundwater discharge to local streams. Locally, the rate and direction of groundwater movement is controlled by the hydraulic conductivity of the sand bed and by withdrawal from wells. The potentiometric surface of the aquifer was mapped to represent the approximate altitude of water levels in wells screened in the middle Wilcox aquifer system in 1983. Near some pumping centers in and near the recharge area, water-level declines in recent years have been in the range of about 0.5 to 1.0 ft/yr. The aquifer system is capable of yielding 100-500 gpm from large wells; however, the availability of freshwater at shallower depths has limited the development of this aquifer system farther downdip, and results of aquifer tests are sparse. Groundwater in the outcrop area of the aquifer system generally is of a mixed, calcium-sodium bicarbonate type. There is a general trend of increasing pH values and concentrations of dissolved sodium, bicarbonate, nitrate, and iron with increasing depth. Typically, water in the middle Wilcox aquifer system has concentrations much smaller than the recommended limits for drinking water for nitrate, sulfate, and fluoride. Water from this aquifer system is generally suitable for most uses.

  13. Bob West field: Extending upper Wilcox production in south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, S.L.

    1997-05-01

    Discovered in 1990 near the southern limit of the upper Wilcox gas-producing trend in south Texas, Bob West field is the largest pool to date in this trend, with probable reserves of up to 1 Tcf. The field produces from seven major sandstone {open_quotes}packages,{close_quotes} comprising 27 individual reservoirs and distributed over 3500 productive acres. The sandstones represent either fluvial/deltaic deposits or delta-margin barrier bar and strand-plain sediments. Porosities range up to 20%, but permeabilities are low, commonly less than 1.5 md. Artificial stimulation is therefore required to establish commercial rates of production. Bob West lies on a faulted anticline between two major growth-fault structures, with several stages of structural development evident. Such development has directly affected sandstone thickness. Rates of production are higher at Bob West than at other upper Wilcox fields due to commingling of zones, large-scale fracture treatments, and directional drilling. Discovery at Bob West has significant implications for renewed exploration in this part of the upper Wilcox gas trend.

  14. Voices: A Conversation with Allen J. Wilcox.

    PubMed

    Jukic, Anne Marie Z

    2016-09-01

    Allen James Wilcox was born on 30 September 1946 in Columbus, OH. He studied medicine at the University of Michigan, graduated in 1973, and after a rotating internship, he completed a master's degree in maternal and child health (1976) and a PhD in epidemiology (1979) at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. After graduation, he went to work at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS, one of the US National Institutes of Health) in Durham, NC, where he has spent his career. He developed a research program in reproductive and perinatal epidemiology, a relatively unexplored area at the time. His studies include the early pregnancy study, which documented the extent of subclinical pregnancy loss in humans and established the fertile days of a woman's menstrual cycle. He served as the Chief of the Epidemiology Branch from 1991 to 2001, and as Editor-in-Chief of the journal EPIDEMIOLOGY from 2001 to 2014. His textbook, Fertility and Pregnancy-An Epidemiologic Perspective, was published by Oxford University Press in 2010. He was elected to the American Epidemiological Society in 1989, and served as its president in 2003. He also served as president of the Society of Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiological Research (1996) and the president of the Society of Epidemiological Research (1998). He holds adjunct teaching appointments at the University of North Carolina, Harvard University, and the University of Bergen (Norway), which awarded him an honorary doctoral degree in 2008. PMID:27482869

  15. Diagenetic resetting of Sm-Nd isotope systematics in Wilcox Group sandstones and shales, San Marcos Arch, south-central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Awwiller, D.N.; Mack, L.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Preliminary Sm-Nd analyses of sandstones and shales from the Wilcox Group (upper Paleocene-lower Eocene) suggest that the whole-rock Sm-Nd signature is changed by diagenesis. Samples are obtained from the San Marcos arch, south-central Texas, at depths ranging from outcrop to 15,000 ft. Samples from above the depth of intense illitization and feldspar reactions (about 10,000 ft) have whole-rock Nd model ages of about 1,500-1,400 Ma, whereas samples buried deeper than 13,000 ft have Nd model ages of about 1,700-1,500 Ma. The similar depositional age of all samples makes change in provenance an unlikely cause of the variation. Diagenetic modification is the only reasonable explanation for the observed differences. Sm and Nd reservoirs within the shale change considerably with progressive diagenesis. Outcrop samples contain subequal concentrations of Sm and Nd in the acid-soluble and silicate fractions. The acid-soluble reservoir in deeper samples contains progressively less Sm and Nd and higher Sm/Nd ratios. In all samples, the acid-soluble Nd is more radiogenic than the Nd in the corresponding silicate fraction; the difference between the two reservoirs increases with depth. Preferential loss of Nd relative to Sm in the silicate reservoir during diagenetic crystallization of illite and albite is the most likely explanation for the observed trend in Nd model age. These data imply that the earlier assumption that no fractionation takes place in the Sm-Nd system during diagenesis is incorrect.

  16. SPACE-R Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System: Design and Technology Demonstration Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-05-01

    This semiannual technical progress report summarizes the technical progress and accomplishments for the Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System (TI-SNPS) Design and Technology Demonstration Program of the prime contractor, Space Power Incorporated (SPI), its subcontractors, and supporting national laboratories during the first half of the government fiscal year (GFY) 1993. SPI's subcontractors and supporting national laboratories include: Babcock & Wilcox for the reactor core and externals; Space Systems/Loral for the spacecraft integration; Thermocore for the radiator heat pipes and the heat exchanger; INERTEK of CIS for the TFE, core elements, and nuclear tests; Argonne National Laboratories for nuclear safety, physics, and control verification; and Oak Ridge National laboratories for materials testing. Parametric trade studies are near completion. However, technical input from INERTEK has yet to be provided to determine some of the baseline design configurations. The INERTEK subcontract is expected to be initiated soon. The point design task has been initiated. The thermionic fuel element (TFE) is undergoing several design iterations. The reactor core vessel analysis and design has also been started.

  17. Characteristics of spent fuel, high-level waste, and other radioactive wastes which may require long-term isolation: Appendix 2A, Physical descriptions of LWR (Light-Water Reactor) fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This appendix includes a four-page Physical Description report for each assembly type identified from the current data. Where available, a drawing of an assembly follows the appropriate Physical Description report. If no drawing is available for an assembly, a cross-reference to a similar assembly is provided if possible. For Advanced Nuclear Fuels, Babcock and Wilcox, Combustion Engineering, and Westinghouse assemblies, information was obtained via subcontracts with these fuel vendors. Data for some assembly types are not available. For such assemblies, the information shown in this report was obtained from the open literature and by inference from reload fuels made by other vendors. Efforts to obtain additional information are continuing. Individual Physical Description reports can be generated interactively through the menu-driven LWR Assemblies Data Base system. These reports can be viewed on the screen or directed to a printer. Special reports and compilations of specific data items can be produced on request.

  18. SPACE-R Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System: Design and Technology Demonstration Program. Semiannual technical progress report for period ending March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This Semiannual Technical Progress Report summarizes the technical progress and accomplishments for the Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System (TI-SNPS) Design and Technology Demonstration Program of the Prime Contractor, Space Power Incorporated (SPI), its subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories during the first half of the Government Fiscal Year (GFY) 1993. SPI`s subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories include: Babcock & Wilcox for the reactor core and externals; Space Systems/Loral for the spacecraft integration; Thermocore for the radiator heat pipes and the heat exchanger; INERTEK of CIS for the TFE, core elements and nuclear tests; Argonne National Laboratories for nuclear safety, physics and control verification; and Oak Ridge National laboratories for materials testing. Parametric trade studies are near completion. However, technical input from INERTEK has yet to be provided to determine some of the baseline design configurations. The INERTEK subcontract is expected to be initiated soon. The Point Design task has been initiated. The thermionic fuel element (TFE) is undergoing several design iterations. The reactor core vessel analysis and design has also been started.

  19. Rolling Process Modeling Report. Finite-Element Model Validation and Parametric Study on various Rolling Process parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Soulami, Ayoub; Lavender, Curt A.; Paxton, Dean M.; Burkes, Douglas

    2015-06-15

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been investigating manufacturing processes for the uranium-10% molybdenum alloy plate-type fuel for high-performance research reactors in the United States. This work supports the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Material Management and Minimization Reactor Conversion Program. This report documents modeling results of PNNL’s efforts to perform finite-element simulations to predict roll-separating forces for various rolling mill geometries for PNNL, Babcock & Wilcox Co., Y-12 National Security Complex, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Idaho National Laboratory. The model developed and presented in a previous report has been subjected to further validation study using new sets of experimental data generated from a rolling mill at PNNL. Simulation results of both hot rolling and cold rolling of uranium-10% molybdenum coupons have been compared with experimental results. The model was used to predict roll-separating forces at different temperatures and reductions for five rolling mills within the National Nuclear Security Administration Fuel Fabrication Capability project. This report also presents initial results of a finite-element model microstructure-based approach to study the surface roughness at the interface between zirconium and uranium-10% molybdenum.

  20. Revisiting the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock Studies of an Aging Pressurized Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bryson, J.W.; Dickson, T.L.; Malik, S.N.M.; Simonen, F.A.

    1999-08-01

    The Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) studies were a series of studies performed in the early-mid 1980s as part of an NRC-organized comprehensive research project to confirm the technical bases for the pressurized thermal shock (PTS) rule, and to aid in the development of guidance for licensee plant-specific analyses. The research project consisted of PTS pilot analyses for three PWRs: Oconee Unit 1, designed by Babcock and Wilcox; Calvert Cliffs Unit 1, designed by Combustion Engineering; and H.B. Robinson Unit 2, designed by Westinghouse. The primary objectives of the IPTS studies were (1) to provide for each of the three plants an estimate of the probability of a crack propagating through the wall of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) due to PTS; (2) to determine the dominant overcooling sequences, plant features, and operator actions and the uncertainty in the plant risk due to PTS; and (3) to evaluate the effectiveness of potential corrective actions. The NRC is currently evaluating the possibility of revising current PTS regulatory guidance. Technical bases must be developed to support any revisions. In the years since the results of IPTS studies were published, the fracture mechanics model, the embrittlement database, embrittlement correlation, inputs for flaw distributions, and the probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) computer code have been refined. An ongoing effort is underway to determine the impact of these fracture-technology refinements on the conditional probabilities of vessel failure calculated in the IPTS Studies. This paper discusses the results of these analyses performed for one of these plants.

  1. Bob West and Lopeno Fields: Structure and stratigraphy of two significant Upper Wilcox gas fields in South Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Debus, R.W.

    1996-09-01

    Determining pore size and pore geometry relationships in carbonate rocks and relating both to permeability is difficult using traditional logging methods. This problem is further complicated by the presence of abundant microporosity (pore size less than 62 microns) in the Edwards Limestone. The use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMR) allows for an alternative approach to evaluating the pore types present by examining the response of hydrogen nuclei contained within the free fluid pore space. By testing the hypothesis that larger pore types exhibit an NMR signal decay much slower than smaller pore types, an estimate of the pore type present, (i.e.) vuggy, interparticle, or micropores, can be inferred. Calibration of the NMR decay curve to known samples with measured petrophysical properties allows for improved predictability of pore types and permeability. The next stage of the analysis involves the application of the calibration technique to the borehole environment using an NMR logging tool to more accurately predict production performance.

  2. Improving CRDCS through digital technology for pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Liddle, P.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes increased Control Rod Drive Control System (CRDCS) reliability through the use of digital technology. A CRDCS is a non-safety plant system used to control rod motion into and out of the reactor core, which in turn controls the reactivity in the core. The CRDCS also provides the operator with information on the status of the control rods and the components within the system. The Digital CRDCS (DCRDCS) is an upgrade for the Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) pressurized water reactor control rod drive control system. The existing CRDCS was designed using relays, various electromechanical devices, and discrete solid-state components. The DCRDCS provides higher reliability, simplified maintenance, and streamlined system configuration through the use of Triple Modular Redundant (TMR) Controllers that implement the logic and control functions, as well as other design enhancements. A particularly important feature of the DCRDCS is the system's redundancy. With this configuration, no single failure of any DCRDCS component can cause an uncontrolled reaction. Such uncontrolled reactions might include withdrawal of the control rods, causing unwanted, or preventing, reactor trip, the loss of either or both the Absolute Position Indication (API) or Relative Position Indication (RPI), or inhibited rod movement. The DCRDCS is made up of two primary sections: the System Logic Equipment (SLE) and the Motor Control Equipment (MCE). The SLE is the primary component of the system. Signals transmitted to this equipment are processed by its logic, producing output signals that control the rod positions and provide system status information. The MCE receives command signals from the SLE to energize the Control Rod Drive Mechanism motors, producing the actual control rod motions. The DCRDCS is designed as a direct, state-of-the-art replacement for the existing CRDCS. Functionally, the DCRDCS will fulfill, and in some areas, exceed the functionality of the existing

  3. RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas W. Marshall

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a twoinch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

  4. RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH-DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Charles M Barnes

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a two inch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

  5. Fate of injected CO2 in the Wilcox Group, Louisiana, Gulf Coast Basin: Chemical and isotopic tracers of microbial-brine-rock-CO2 interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, Jenna L.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Warwick, Peter D.; Lee Zhi Yi, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    The “2800’ sandstone” of the Olla oil field is an oil and gas-producing reservoir in a coal-bearing interval of the Paleocene–Eocene Wilcox Group in north-central Louisiana, USA. In the 1980s, this producing unit was flooded with CO2 in an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project, leaving ∼30% of the injected CO2 in the 2800’ sandstone post-injection. This study utilizes isotopic and geochemical tracers from co-produced natural gas, oil and brine to determine the fate of the injected CO2, including the possibility of enhanced microbial conversion of CO2 to CH4 via methanogenesis. Stable carbon isotopes of CO2, CH4 and DIC, together with mol% CO2 show that 4 out of 17 wells sampled in the 2800’ sandstone are still producing injected CO2. The dominant fate of the injected CO2appears to be dissolution in formation fluids and gas-phase trapping. There is some isotopic and geochemical evidence for enhanced microbial methanogenesis in 2 samples; however, the CO2 spread unevenly throughout the reservoir, and thus cannot explain the elevated indicators for methanogenesis observed across the entire field. Vertical migration out of the target 2800’ sandstone reservoir is also apparent in 3 samples located stratigraphically above the target sand. Reservoirs comparable to the 2800’ sandstone, located along a 90-km transect, were also sampled to investigate regional trends in gas composition, brine chemistry and microbial activity. Microbial methane, likely sourced from biodegradation of organic substrates within the formation, was found in all oil fields sampled, while indicators of methanogenesis (e.g. high alkalinity, δ13C-CO2 and δ13C-DIC values) and oxidation of propane were greatest in the Olla Field, likely due to its more ideal environmental conditions (i.e. suitable range of pH, temperature, salinity, sulfate and iron concentrations).

  6. Correction to Wilcox et al. (2016).

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Reports an error in "How being busy can increase motivation and reduce task completion time" by Keith Wilcox, Juliano Laran, Andrew T. Stephen and Peter P. Zubcsek (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2016[Mar], Vol 110[3], 371-384). In the article, the affiliation of the author Andrew T. Stephen was incorrectly listed in the byline and the author note. The author is affiliated with the University of Oxford. The author note paragraph "Andrew T. Stephen is now at the University of Oxford" should have been omitted. All versions of this article have been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2016-11945-002.) This research tests the hypothesis that being busy increases motivation and reduces the time it takes to complete tasks for which people miss a deadline. This effect occurs because busy people tend to perceive that they are using their time effectively, which mitigates the sense of failure people have when they miss a task deadline. Studies 1 and 2 show that when people are busy, they are more motivated to complete a task after missing a deadline than those who are not busy, and that the perception that one is using time effectively mediates this effect. Studies 3 and 4 show that this process makes busy people more likely to complete real tasks than people who are not busy. Study 5 uses data from over half a million tasks submitted by thousands of users of a task management software application to show that busy people take less time to complete a task after they miss a deadline for completing it. The findings delineate the conditions under which being busy can mitigate the negative effects of missing a deadline and reduce the time it takes to complete tasks. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27176772

  7. Organic geochemistry and petrology of subsurface Paleocene-Eocene Wilcox and Claiborne Group coal beds, Zavala County, Maverick Basin, Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Paul C.; Warwick, Peter; Hook, Robert W.; Alimi, Hossein; Mastalerz, Maria; Swanson, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    Coal samples from a coalbed methane exploration well in northern Zavala County, Maverick Basin, Texas, were characterized through an integrated analytical program. The well was drilled in February, 2006 and shut in after coal core desorption indicated negligible gas content. Cuttings samples from two levels in the Eocene Claiborne Group were evaluated by way of petrographic techniques and Rock–Eval pyrolysis. Core samples from the Paleocene–Eocene Indio Formation (Wilcox Group) were characterized via proximate–ultimate analysis in addition to petrography and pyrolysis. Two Indio Formation coal samples were selected for detailed evaluation via gas chromatography, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. Samples are subbituminous rank as determined from multiple thermal maturity parameters. Elevated rank (relative to similar age coal beds elsewhere in the Gulf Coast Basin) in the study area is interpreted to be a result of stratigraphic and/or structural thickening related to Laramide compression and construction of the Sierra Madre Oriental to the southwest. Vitrinite reflectance data, along with extant data, suggest the presence of an erosional unconformity or change in regional heat flow between the Cretaceous and Tertiary sections and erosion of up to >5 km over the Cretaceous. The presence of liptinite-rich coals in the Claiborne at the well site may indicate moderately persistent or recurring coal-forming paleoenvironments, interpreted as perennially submerged peat in shallow ephemeral lakes with herbaceous and/or flotant vegetation. However, significant continuity of individual Eocene coal beds in the subsurface is not suggested. Indio Formation coal samples contain abundant telovitrinite interpreted to be preserved from arborescent, above-ground woody vegetation that developed during the middle portion of mire development in forested swamps. Other petrographic criteria suggest enhanced biological, chemical and physical

  8. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report for G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii, for November 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The data accumulated during November 1982 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii, are presented. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  9. Three-dimensional analysis of thermal and fluid mixing in cold leg and downcomer of PWR geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Lyczkowski, R.W.; Miao, C.C.; Domanus, H.M.; Hull, J.R.; Sha, W.T.; Schmitt, R.C.

    1983-12-01

    This report describes the three-dimensional transient and steady-state computations using the COMMIX-1A computer code for the analysis of six (6) 1/5-scale thermal and fluid mixing experiments conducted at Creare, Inc. under EPRI sponsorship. The tests chosen for analyses emphasized the effects of vent valve flow, cold leg and high pressure injection (HPI) coolant flow rates, and HPI location and geometry. The COMMIX-1A computations will provide fluid temperatures and velocities in the belt-line region of the downcomer for assessment of boundary conditions for thermal stress analysis in the vessel walls. A realistic prediction for thermal and fluid mixing significantly helps establish what overcooling transients can lead to in pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events. Sample three-dimensional steady-state computations are presented for three (3) generic full-scale pressurized water reactors (PWR's) typical of Westinghouse (W), Combustion Engineering (CE), and Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) configurations as part of the code assessment.

  10. Converting the Audience: A Conversation with Agnes Wilcox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Becky

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a conversation with Agnes Wilcox, Executive Director of Prison Performing Arts in St. Louis, Missouri, about Prison Performing Arts. Although the average person might balk at the notion of interacting with prison inmates, finding it intimidating, worrisome, or self-sacrificial, for Wilcox, Prison Performing Arts is a…

  11. 75 FR 68009 - Office of New Reactors; Notice of Availability of the Final Staff Guidance Standard Review Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... COMMISSION Office of New Reactors; Notice of Availability of the Final Staff Guidance Standard Review Plan, Section 13.6.1, Revision 1 on Physical Security--Combined License and Operating Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). ACTION: Notice of Availability. SUMMARY: The NRC is issuing its Final Revision...

  12. Neutron behavior, reactor control, and reactor heat transfer. Volume four

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Volume four covers neutron behavior (neutron absorption, how big are nuclei, neutron slowing down, neutron losses, the self-sustaining reactor), reactor control (what is controlled in a reactor, controlling neutron population, is it easy to control a reactor, range of reactor control, what happens when the fuel burns up, controlling a PWR, controlling a BWR, inherent safety of reactors), and reactor heat transfer (heat generation in a nuclear reactor, how is heat removed from a reactor core, heat transfer rate, heat transfer properties of the reactor coolant).

  13. A THREE-DIMENSIONAL BABCOCK-LEIGHTON SOLAR DYNAMO MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Miesch, Mark S.; Dikpati, Mausumi

    2014-04-10

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) kinematic solar dynamo model in which poloidal field is generated by the emergence and dispersal of tilted sunspot pairs (more generally bipolar magnetic regions, or BMRs). The axisymmetric component of this model functions similarly to previous 2.5 dimensional (2.5D, axisymmetric) Babcock-Leighton (BL) dynamo models that employ a double-ring prescription for poloidal field generation but we generalize this prescription into a 3D flux emergence algorithm that places BMRs on the surface in response to the dynamo-generated toroidal field. In this way, the model can be regarded as a unification of BL dynamo models (2.5D in radius/latitude) and surface flux transport models (2.5D in latitude/longitude) into a more self-consistent framework that builds on the successes of each while capturing the full 3D structure of the evolving magnetic field. The model reproduces some basic features of the solar cycle including an 11 yr periodicity, equatorward migration of toroidal flux in the deep convection zone, and poleward propagation of poloidal flux at the surface. The poleward-propagating surface flux originates as trailing flux in BMRs, migrates poleward in multiple non-axisymmetric streams (made axisymmetric by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion), and eventually reverses the polar field, thus sustaining the dynamo. In this Letter we briefly describe the model, initial results, and future plans.

  14. Guidelines for preparing and reviewing applications for the licensing of non-power reactors: Standard review plan and acceptance criteria. NUREG - 1537, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    NUREG - 1537, Part 2 gives guidance on the conduct of licensing action reviews to NRC staff who review non-power reactor licensing applications. These licensing actions include construction permits and initial operating licenses, license renewals, amendments, conversions from highly enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium, decommissioning, and license termination.

  15. CFB boiler for Southern Illinois University: Planning and design

    SciTech Connect

    Silvey, M.; Roth, N.; Haake, A.

    1995-12-31

    Southern Illinois University (SIU) is in the process of installing a Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) coal fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler at its Carbondale, Illinois campus. The CFB boiler will be used for cogeneration. Funding for this project was made possible by the State of Illinois Capital Development Board. Illinois coal will be fired in this CFB boiler. This paper provides a description of the planning process and design of the CFB boiler and related equipment with specific emphasis on particulate removal and recirculation. The startup of this new installation is scheduled for the summer of 1996, with commercial operation by fall of 1996.

  16. The neutron standard fields at the BR1 reactor at SCK.CEN

    SciTech Connect

    Wagemans, J.; Malambu, E.; Borms, L.

    2011-07-01

    The BR1 research reactor at SCK-CEN is characterized by a wide variety of irradiation possibilities, a large reactor core, and strong flexibility in its operation. A full MCNP model of BR1 has been recently developed in order to complement the results that can be obtained from activation dosimetry. After a general presentation of the reactor, this paper pays particular attention to its standard {sup 235}U(n,f) fast neutron field MARK III. This irradiation field is a useful tool for integral measurements and for detector calibrations. With the support of MCNP calculations, irradiations in MARK III can be directly referred to the pure {sup 235}U(n,f) fast neutron spectrum. (authors)

  17. Comment on a Wilcox Test Statistic for Comparing Means When Variances Are Unequal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiung, Tung-Hsing; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The alternative proposed by Wilcox (1989) to the James second-order statistic for comparing population means when variances are heterogeneous can sometimes be invalid. The degree to which the procedure is invalid depends on differences in sample size, the expected values of the observations, and population variances. (SLD)

  18. Growing Readers: Wendy Wilcox--West Bloomfield Township Public Library, MI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In 2001 youth services librarian Wendy Wilcox begged her boss for the chance to make West Bloomfield Township Public Library (WBTPL) one of 20 demonstration sites for the Public Library Association (PLA)/Association for Library Service to Children initiative Every Child Ready To Read. While all participating libraries teach parents and caregivers…

  19. Shifts of neutrino oscillation parameters in reactor antineutrino experiments with non-standard interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Feng; Zhou, Ye-Ling

    2014-11-01

    We discuss reactor antineutrino oscillations with non-standard interactions (NSIs) at the neutrino production and detection processes. The neutrino oscillation probability is calculated with a parametrization of the NSI parameters by splitting them into the averages and differences of the production and detection processes respectively. The average parts induce constant shifts of the neutrino mixing angles from their true values, and the difference parts can generate the energy (and baseline) dependent corrections to the initial mass-squared differences. We stress that only the shifts of mass-squared differences are measurable in reactor antineutrino experiments. Taking Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) as an example, we analyze how NSIs influence the standard neutrino measurements and to what extent we can constrain the NSI parameters. Long baseline reactor antineutrino experiments, such as KamLAND [10,11]. The aim of these experiments is to observe the slow oscillation with Δ21 and measure the corresponding oscillation parameters Δm212 and θ12. Short baseline reactor antineutrino experiments, such as Daya Bay [1-3], Double CHOOZ [4], RENO [5]. They are designed to observe the fast oscillation with Δ31 and Δ32 (or equivalently, Δee[3]) and measure the corresponding oscillation parameters Δmee2, θ13. Medium baseline reactor antineutrino experiments. They stand for the next generation experiments of reactor antineutrinos, with typical representatives of Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) [12] and RENO-50 [13]. They can determine the neutrino mass ordering (m1and slow oscillations and become a bridge between short baseline and long baseline reactor antineutrino experiments. High-dimensional operators originating from new physics can contribute to the neutrino oscillation in the form of non-standard interactions (NSIs) [14

  20. Tdp studies and tests for C. A. Energia Electrica de Venezuela (enelven) at planta ramon laguna, units RL-17 and RL-10. Volume 2. Unit RL-10 boiler condition assessment report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-28

    The study, conducted by Babcock and Wilcox, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development agency on behalf of Enelven. In order to maximize generated power output and minimize operating costs at Planta Ramon Laguna, tests were done to evaluate the condition of equipment at the plant. In order to identify any damage and determine the operating output of each unit, assessments were done of the furnaces, boilers, generators and boiler feed pumps being used in the plant. The report presents the results of these tests. This is the second of three volumes and it includes the following section: (1) Condition Assessment of Unit RL-10 Boiler.

  1. GPU v. B and W lawsuit review and its effect on TMI-1 (Docket 50-289)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    This report documents a review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff of the General Public Utilities Corporation, et al. v. the Babcock and Wilcox Company, et al. (GPU v. B and W) lawsuit record to assess whether any of the staff's previous conclusions or their principal bases presented at the Three Mile Island Unit 1 (TMI-1) restart hearing, supporting restart of TMI-1, should be amended in light of the information contained in the lawsuit record. Details of the lawsuit record are provided in the appendices contained in Volume II of this report.

  2. 75 FR 29588 - Office of New Reactors: Proposed NUREG-0800; Standard Review Plan Section 13.6.6, Draft Revision...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... COMMISSION Office of New Reactors: Proposed NUREG-0800; Standard Review Plan Section 13.6.6, Draft Revision 0... comment. SUMMARY: The NRC staff is soliciting public comment on NUREG-0800, ``Standard Review Plan for the... guidance into the next revision of NUREG-0800, SRP Section 13.6.6 and Regulatory Guide 1.206,...

  3. 76 FR 31381 - Office Of New Reactors; Proposed Revision 4 to Standard Review Plan; Section 8.1 on Electric...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... Position (BTP) 8-8 on ``Onsite (Emergency Diesel Generators) and Offsite Power Sources Allowed Outage Time... COMMISSION Office Of New Reactors; Proposed Revision 4 to Standard Review Plan; Section 8.1 on Electric Power... Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants,'' on a proposed Revision 4 to Standard Review Plan...

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION

    DOEpatents

    West, J.M.; Weills, J.T.

    1960-03-15

    A method is given for operating a nuclear reactor having a negative coefficient of reactivity to compensate for the change in reactor reactivity due to the burn-up of the xenon peak following start-up of the reactor. When it is desired to start up the reactor within less than 72 hours after shutdown, the temperature of the reactor is lowered prior to start-up, and then gradually raised after start-up.

  5. REACTOR AND NOVEL METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Young, G.J.; Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-06-24

    A nuclear reactor of the type which uses a liquid fuel and a method of controlling such a reactor are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of a tank for containing the liquid fuel such as a slurry of discrete particles of fissionnble material suspended in a heavy water moderator, and a control means in the form of a disc of neutron absorbirg material disposed below the top surface of the slurry and parallel thereto. The diameter of the disc is slightly smaller than the diameter of the tank and the disc is perforated to permit a flow of the slurry therethrough. The function of the disc is to divide the body of slurry into two separate portions, the lower portion being of a critical size to sustain a nuclear chain reaction and the upper portion between the top surface of the slurry and the top surface of the disc being of a non-critical size. The method of operation is to raise the disc in the reactor until the lower portion of the slurry has reached a critical size when it is desired to initiate the reaction, and to lower the disc in the reactor to reduce the size of the lower active portion the slurry to below criticality when it is desired to stop the reaction.

  6. The worldwide applicability of B and W`s advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler system

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D.K.; Madden, D.A.; Sivy, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Babcock and Wilcox, under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE), has been developing an advanced generating plant design in DOE`s Combustion 2000 program entitled, Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low Emission Boiler System. The objective of the LEBS program is to develop an advanced pulverized coal (PC) fired power generation system for commercial application by the year 2000. Since concerns over acid rain, air toxics, global climate changes, ozone depletion and solid waste disposal are expected to further tighten regulations for new coal-fired plants, the system must achieve very low emissions and high cycle efficiency at a life cycle cost equivalent to a conventional PC plant meeting New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). B and W has coupled advanced environmental control technologies capable of achieving emissions or NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulate far below current NSPS with an advanced boiler equipped with improved combustion and heat transfer subsystems to meet this objective. The B and W LEBS plant uses conventional state-of-the-art equipment along with developing new technologies to meet the program goals. This combustion of new and proven technologies allows B and W to meet the current demands in the marketplace. This paper describes B and W`s advanced generating plant design and its relevance to both the foreign and domestic markets.

  7. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 8. For G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii for December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-03-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during December 1982 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphiclaly. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  8. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report for G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii for October 1982. Volume VI

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during October 1982 at the intermediate project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  9. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 5. For G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii for September 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during September 1982 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  10. A critical assembly designed to measure neutronic benchmarks in support of the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parma, E. J.; Ball, R. M.; Hoovler, G. S.; Selcow, E. C.; Cerbone, R. J.

    1992-10-01

    A reactor designed to perform criticality experiments in support of the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion program is currently in operation at the Sandia National Laboratories' reactor facility. The reactor is a small, water-moderated system that uses highly enriched uranium particle fuel in a 19-element configuration. Its purpose is to obtain neutronic measurements under a variety of experimental conditions that are subsequently used to benchmark reactor-design computer codes. Brookhaven National Laboratory, Babcock & Wilcox, and Sandia National Laboratories participated in determining the reactor's performance requirements, design, follow on experimentation, and in obtaining the licensing approvals. Brookhaven National Laboratory is primarily responsible for the analytical support, Babcock & Wilcox the hardware design, and Sandia National Laboratories the operational safety. All of the team members participate in determining the experimentation requirements, performance, and data reduction. Initial criticality was achieved in October 1989. An over-all description of the reactor is presented along with key design features and safety-related aspects.

  11. Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  12. Use of ionic concentrations in mapping ground-water flow: Wilcox-Carrizo aquifer system (paleogene), east Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, M.L.; Kaiser, W.R.; Fogg, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Ground water in the Wilcox-Carrizo aquifer system of East Texas interacts with the rock matrix an devolves along the flow path from a Ca-HCO/sub 3/ to a Na-HCO/sub 3/ type. Ionic concentrations were mapped to identify possible regional groundwater flow components and to provide a baseline for evaluating impacts of lignite mining in the Wilcox Group. Hydrochemical mapping complements hydraulic head mapping and helps define recharge and discharge areas. Because the concentrations of major ions are distributed log-normally, log-transformed molar concentrations were mapped, allowing the regional trends to be readily identified.

  13. Tide-dominated delta model for coal-bearing Wilcox strata in south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Breyer, J.A.

    1984-04-01

    Coal-bearing Wilcox strata near Uvalde in south Texas are the deposits of a tide-dominated delta. The delta of the Klang and Langat Rivers, Malaysia, provides a modern analog for these strata. Five facies have been identified from a study of core and well logs: lignite; underclay; interbedded sand and mud with lenticular, wavy, and flaser bedding; ripple-laminated or cross-bedded sand; and greenish, very strongly bioturbated sand. On the Klang-Langat delta, the modern equivalents of these facies are peat formed in fresh water swamps; root horizons developed beneath the peat; interbedded sand and mud deposited on tidal flats; channel sands; and shallow marine sand and mud. Tidal flat deposits are the most abundant type of sediment on the Klang-Langat delta and in the coal-bearing Wilcox strata. The tidal flats of the modern delta are crossed by small tidal creeks and by larger tidal streams. The tidal channels are cut into tidal flat sediments and separate peat-forming areas. Channel sands in the Wilcox are cut into tidal flat deposits and form washouts in the lignite. Two types of channel-fill sand are present in the Wilcox, sands 5-15 ft (1.5-4.5 m) thick and sands more than 30 ft (9m) thick. The thinner sands, deposits of small tidal creeks, have sharp, erosive bases, fine upward and pass into interbedded sand and mud. The thicker sands have sharp tops as well as sharp bases and show no grain-size trends; they are fills of larger tidal streams.

  14. Shelf-margin sedimentation in Wilcox group, south-central Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, P.; Lemoine, R.C.; Moslow, T.F.

    1986-09-01

    Two well-defined trends of Wilcox oil and gas production occur in Louisiana: an updip dip-oriented trend and a downdip strike-oriented trend. The downdip trend delineates an uppermost Wilcox shelf margin and includes recent discoveries at Lockhart Crossing field and the long-established Fordoche field. This Wilcox shelf margin is adjacent to carbonate reef trends that formed a stable shelf margin throughout central Louisiana during the early Cretaceous. Shelf-margin locations remained essentially unchanged at least through the late Paleocene, by which time Wilcox clastics began to prograde out to and beyond the established margin. The depositional features of this progradational episode reflect the unstable nature of the shelf margin and a high wave-energy environment. Shelf-margin processes were responsible for the formation of a regional syndepositional normal fault system, the incision and subsequent infilling of a major submarine canyon system, and the development of stacked paralic sequences. The submarine canyon system is manifest as a mudstone-filled channel in St. Landry Parish where it reaches a maximum thickness of 1000 ft and is up to 12 mi wide. Lower to middle shoreface facies of the stacked paralic sequences constitute the primary reservoir sandstones for both Lockhart Crossing and Fordoche fields. The major producing intervals of both fields belong to two discrete sandstone bodies that are at least 30-40 mi long, 6-7 mi wide, and 30-40 ft thick, and are analogous to late Quaternary Gulf Coast shelf-margin deltas. The co-occurrence of these laterally continuous thick sandstones, favorable structural trapping mechanisms, and previous performance suggest a high potential for future exploration along this and other Gulf Coast Tertiary shelf-margin trends.

  15. Fluvial depositional systems of Carrizo-Upper Wilcox in south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlin, H.S.

    1983-09-01

    In the Rio Grande embayment of south Texas, the Carrizo-upper Wilcox interval (Eocene) consists of two sand-rich coastal plain fluvial depositional systems that grade basinward into several deltaic complexes. The bedload channel system is dominated by multi-story, multi-lateral, fluvial, channel-fill sandstones. This system is typically > 90% sandstone. Shales are thin and laterally discontinuous, the remnants of abandoned channel fills. Bedload channel sandstones dominate the major fluvial axes and form the depositional framework of the interval. The mixed alluvial system consists of a more typical suite of coastal plain facies. Mixed-load channel-fill sandstones tend to be isolated and surrounded by overbank shales and thin sandstones. Crevasse splay and lacustrine facies occur in the flood-plain area. Total-interval isopach patterns, sandstone geometries, and depositional systems distributions indicate that fluvial sediment input was converging upon the embayment from the west, northwest, and north. Economically, the Carrizo-upper Wilcox of south Texas has a three-fold significance. The updip Carrizo sandstone is a major source of fresh groundwater, includes several large oil fields, and also contains deposits of uranium minerals. The downdip upper Wilcox trend is an area of active hydrocarbon exploration.

  16. Overview and status of first 25 MW(e) IR-CFB boiler in India

    SciTech Connect

    Kavidass, S.; Bakshi, V.K.; Diwakar, K.K.

    1997-12-31

    The Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) internal recirculation CFB (IR-CFB) boiler is unique in design. Worldwide, B and W offers IR-CFB boilers up to 150 MW(e) both reheat and non-reheat, and is pursuing units up to 300 MW(e). This paper discusses an overview and status of the construction, commissioning, initial start-up operation and milestones of the ongoing 25 MW(e) IR-CFB boiler project at Kanoria Chemicals and Industries Ltd., Renukoot, India. This IR-CFB boiler is designed, supplied and installed by Thermax Babcock and Wilcox Ltd. (TBW), a joint venture company of the B and W and Thermax in India. The boiler parameters are, steam flow of 29.2 kg/s (23,420 lbs/hr), 6.4 MPa (925 psig), and 485 C (905 F) with feedwater temperature of 180 C (356 F). The boiler will utilize high-ash content (> 45%), subbituminous coal with a heating value of 3,500 KCal/kg (6,300 Btu/lb). This paper also discusses the various aspects of the boiler design, performance, auxiliary equipment, advantages and initial start-up operating performance.

  17. 76 FR 23630 - Office of New Reactors; Proposed Revision 2 to Standard Review Plan, Section 1.0 on Introduction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... COMMISSION Office of New Reactors; Proposed Revision 2 to Standard Review Plan, Section 1.0 on Introduction...), Section 1.0, ``Introduction and Interfaces'' (Agencywide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS...: Cindy Bladey, Chief, Rules, Announcements, and Directives Branch (RADB), Office of Administration,...

  18. Nuclear Reactor Kinetics and Control.

    SciTech Connect

    JEFFERY,; LEWINS, D.

    2009-07-27

    Version 00 Dr. J.D. Lewins has now released the following legacy book for free distribution: Nuclear Reactor Kinetics and Control, Pergamon Press, London, 275 pages, 1978. 1. Introductory Review 2. Neutron and Precursor Equations 3. Elementary Solutions of the Kinetics Equations at Low Power 4. Linear Reactor Process Dynamics with Feedback 5. Power Reactor Control Systems 6. Fluctuations and Reactor Noise 7. Safety and Reliability 8. Non Linear Systems; Stability and Control 9. Analogue Computing Addendum: Jay Basken and Jeffery D. Lewins: Power Series Solution of the Reactor Kinetics Equations, Nuclear Science and Engineering: 122, 407-436 (1996) (authorized for distribution with the book: courtesy of the American Nuclear Society)

  19. Comparison of Standard Light Water Reactor Cross-Section Libraries using the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Pressurized Water Reactor Standard Core Loading Benchmark Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzu Alpan, F.; Kulesza, Joel A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper compares contemporary and historical light water reactor shielding and pressure vessel dosimetry cross-section libraries for a pressurized water reactor calculational benchmark problem with a standard out-in core loading. The calculational benchmark problem was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the request of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and used the Oak Ridge National Laboratory two-dimensional discrete ordinates code DORT and the BUGLE-93 cross-section library for the calculations. In this paper, a Westinghouse three-dimensional discrete ordinates code with parallel processing, the RAPTOR-M3G code was used. A variety of cross section libraries were used with RAPTOR-M3G including the BUGLE-93, BUGLE-96, and BUGLE-B7 cross-section libraries developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the broad-group ALPAN-VII.0 cross-section library developed at Westinghouse. In comparing the calculation-to-calculation reaction rates using the BUGLE-93 cross-section library at the thermal shield, pressure vessel, and cavity capsules, for eleven dosimetry reaction rates, a maximum relative difference of 5% was observed, with the exception of 65Cu(n,2n) in the pressure vessel capsule that had a 90% relative difference with respect to the reference results. It is thought that the 65Cu(n,2n) reaction rate reported in the reference for the pressure vessel capsule is not correct. In considering the libraries developed after BUGLE-93, a maximum relative difference of 12% was observed in reaction rates, with respect to the reference results, for 237Np(n,f) in the cavity capsule using BUGLE-B7.

  20. New CEM systems measure up to the job

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, R.K.

    1996-11-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require utilities to face the problem of providing power while ensuring their plants comply with clean air standards. This paper describes a Clean Environment Development Facility (CEM) constructed by Babcock and Wilcox research. The facility is dedicated to finding cleaner and more efficient means of producing power and has incorporated advanced continuous emissions monitoring systems.

  1. TRAC-PF1/MOD1 calculations and data comparisons for MIST (Multi-Loop Integral System Test) small-break loss-of-coolant accidents with scaled 10 cm/sup 2/ and 50 cm/sup 2/ breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, J.L.; Siebe, D.A.; Boyack, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a participant in the Integral System Test (IST) program initiated in June 1983 for the purpose of providing integral system test data on specific issues/phenomena relevant to post-small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs), loss of feedwater and other transients in Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) plant designs. The Multi-Loop Integral System Test (MIST) facility is the largest single component in the IST program. MIST is a 2 x 4 (2 hot legs and steam generators, 4 cold legs and reactor-coolant pumps) representation of lowered-loop reactor systems of the B and W design. It is a full-height, full-pressure facility with 1/817 power and volume scaling. Two other experimental facilities are included in the IST program: test loops at the University of Maryland, College Park, and at Stanford Research Institute. The objective of the IST tests is to generate high-quality experimental data to be used for assessing thermal-hydraulic safety computer codes. Efforts are underway at Los Alamos to assess TRAC-PF1/MOD1 against data from each of the IST facilities. Calculations and data comparisons for TRAC-PF1/MOD1 assessment have been completed for two transients run in the MIST facility. These are the MIST nominal test. Test 3109AA, a scaled 10 cm/sup 2/ SBLOCA and Test 320201, a scaled 50 cm/sup 2/ SBLOCA. Only MIST assessment results are presented in this paper.

  2. Compaction of Wilcox sandstones to 14,500 feet

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, E.F.; Wilson, J.C.; Diggs, T.N.

    1989-03-01

    Changes in packing and porosity resulting from compaction were studied in 38 Wilcox sandstones from 12 cores. Burial depths, adjusted for erosion in updip areas, range from 1100 to 14,500 ft. Neither quartz (/anti x/ = 5.6%) nor carbonate cement (/anti x/ = 2.9%) were introduced shallow enough or in sufficient abundance in the sandstones to significantly retard compaction. As a result, compaction continued to maximum burial depth and was the main cause of porosity decrease with depth (r = 0.82). As measured by increases in packing indices, sands compacted rapidly to depths of 2500 to 4000 ft (where intergranular volume averages approximately 30%) and more slowly and variably at greater depths. At all depths the amount of porosity lost by grain rearrangement was about twice the porosity lost by ductile grain deformation or by pressure solution. Ductile grain deformation was identified as shallow as 1100 ft (the shallowest sample) and pressure solution as shallow as 1915 ft. At shallow depths, only clay rip-up clasts deformed ductility; at greater depths micaceous rock fragments, micas, and glauconite deformed also. Surprisingly, porosity loss by ductile deformation has only a poor correlation (r = 0.62) with total amount of ductile grains. Quartz is the main mineral that undergoes pressure solution, although feldspar and volcanic rock fragments locally pressolve also.

  3. Looking Southwest at Reactor Box Furnaces With Reactor Boxes and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking Southwest at Reactor Box Furnaces With Reactor Boxes and Repossessed Uranium in Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  4. The origin and distribution of HAPs elements in relation to maceral composition of the A1 lignite bed (Paleocene, Calvert Bluff Formation, Wilcox Group), Calvert mine area, east-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, S.S.; Warwick, P.D.; Ruppert, L.F.; Pontolillo, J.

    1997-01-01

    The origin and distribution of twelve potentially Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs; As, Be, Cd, Cr, Co, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb Sb, Se, and U) identified in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments were examined in relation to the maceral composition of the A1 bed (Paleocene, Calvert Bluff Formation, Wilcox Group) of the Calvert mine in east-central Texas. The 3.2 m-thick A1 bed was divided into nine incremental channel samples (7 lignite samples and 2 shaley coal samples) on the basis of megascopic characteristics. Results indicate that As, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Sb, and U are strongly correlated with ash yield and are enriched in the shaley coal samples. We infer that these elements are associated with inorganic constituents in the coal bed and may be derived from a penecontemporaneous stream channel located several kilometers southeast of the mining block. Of the HAPs elements studied, Mn and Hg are the most poorly correlated to ash yield. We infer an organic association for Mn; Hg may be associated with pyrite. The rest of the trace elements (Be, Co, and Se) are weakly correlated with ash yield. Further analytical work is necessary to determine the mode of occurrence for these elements. Overall, concentrations of the HAPs elements are generally similar to or less than those reported in previous studies of lignites of the Wilcox Group, east-central region, Texas. Petrographic analysis indicates the following ranges in composition for the seven lignite samples: liptinites (5-8%), huminites (88-95%), and inertinites (trace amounts to 7%). Samples from the middle portion of the A1 bed contain abundant crypto-eugelinite compared to the rest of the samples; this relationship suggests that the degradation of plant material was an important process during the development of the peat mire. With the exception of Hg and Mn, relatively low levels of the HAPs elements studied are found in the samples containing abundant crypto-eugelinite. We infer that the peat-forming environment for this portion

  5. Lockhart Crossing field: new Wilcox trend in southeastern Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Self, G.A.; Breard, S.Q.; Rael, H.P.; Stein, J.A.; Thayer, P.A.; Traugott, M.O.; Eason, W.D.

    1986-05-01

    In 1982, a significant onshore oil discovery in the lower Eocene Wilcox was made at Lockhart Crossing field, illuminating a new oil trend in southeast Louisiana. Twenty-eight producers and nine dry holes were drilled, resulting in development of 3400 productive acres with estimated recoverable reserves of 21 million bbl of oil after secondary recovery. The main field reservoir is a 40 to 80-ft (12 to 24-m) marine sandstone. The dominant facies is an upward-coarsening sequence of very fine to fine-grained glauconitic sandstone deposited as a nearshore marine bar. The associated facies is a younger, upward-fining, channelized sequence of medium to very fine-grained sandstone. Faulting initiated channeling and erosion into the existing nearshore bar facies with subsequent deposition of channel fill. Together these two facies constitute one reservoir. The primary trapping mechanism is structural, in the form of a rollover anticline. This solution gas drive reservoir is normally pressured and displays a concave-downward producing water level that initially masked the true productive limits of the field. 14 figures, 3 tables.

  6. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 2 for G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, HI

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during April and May 1982 at this intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  7. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 1. For G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during January, February, and March 1982 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  8. The IRIS network site at the Wilcox Solar Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.; Scherrer, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    The site for the International Research on the Interior of the Sun (IRIS) instrument housed at the Wilcox Solar Observatory at Stanford University (near San Francisco, USA) is described together with the instrument operation procedure. The IRIS instrument, which measures global oscillations of the sun, operates continuously every clear day since it was installed in August 1987.

  9. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report, for G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Vol. 9

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    This report presents the data accumulated during January 1983 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  10. Occurrence of Pseudophragmina sp. as a possible indication of carbonate bank deposition in Upper Wilcox (Paleocene-Eocene), Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Nunn, L.L.; Lemoine, R.C.

    1987-05-01

    Paleontologic and sedimentologic analysis of whole-diameter cores from two upper Wilcox sandstones in south-central Louisiana suggests the presence of carbonate bank deposition during the late Wilcox. The larger foraminifera Pseudophragmina sp. occurs in two stratigraphically unrelated sandstones from the upper Wilcox (Paleocene-Eocene) in Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana. In Bayou Fordoche field, Pseudophragmina sp. is dispersed throughout an uppermost Wilcox sandstone, which is a 6-m thick unit found 82-m below the top of the Wilcox. In Fordoche field, which is south and down dip of Bayou Fordoche field, numerous individuals of Pseudophragmina sp. are concentrated in two distinct zones within the W-12 sandstone, a relatively thicker (33 m) sandstone that occurs 320 m below the top of the Wilcox. The down dip W-12 sandstone is stratigraphically unrelated to the updip sandstone; however, the two sandstones are lithologically and faunally similar. The updip sandstone and the Pseudophragmina sp. bearing intervals in the down dip W-12 sandstone are quartzose and glauconitic. In addition to numerous Pseudophragmina sp., they contain globorotalid and globigerinid planktonic foraminifera and smaller benthic foraminifera from such groups as miliolids, lagenids, and nodosarids. Echinoids and mollusks are also present. These fossils are dispersed throughout the updip sandstone and are concentrated in two separate zones within the down dip W-12 sandstone. This Pseudophragmina facies in the upper Wilcox is faunally and lithologically similar to facies that are related to modern submarine carbonate banks in the Gulf of Mexico and to reef facies reported for subsurface Tertiary units in the Gulf Coast.

  11. 76 FR 14437 - Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Standard Design: GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Issuance of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Standard Design: GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Issuance of Final Design Approval The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a final design approval (FDA) to GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy (GEH) for...

  12. Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Drilling and Testing Activity (Frio, Wilcox, and Tuscaloosa Formations, Texas and Louisiana)

    SciTech Connect

    1981-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program to evaluate the feasibility of developing the geothermal-geopressured energy resources of the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. As part of this effort, DOE is contracting for the drilling of design wells to define the nature and extent of the geopressure resource. At each of several sites, one deep well (4000-6400 m) will be drilled and flow tested. One or more shallow wells will also be drilled to dispose of geopressured brines. Each site will require about 2 ha (5 acres) of land. Construction and initial flow testing will take approximately one year. If initial flow testing is successful, a continuous one-year duration flow test will take place at a rate of up to 6400 m{sup 3} (40,000 bbl) per day. Extensive tests will be conducted on the physical and chemical composition of the fluids, on their temperature and flow rate, on fluid disposal techniques, and on the reliability and performance of equipment. Each project will require a maximum of three years to complete drilling, testing, and site restoration.

  13. NTRE extended life feasibility assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Results of a feasibility analysis of a long life, reusable nuclear thermal rocket engine are presented in text and graph form. Two engine/reactor concepts are addressed: the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) design and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) concept. Engine design, integration, reliability, and safety are addressed by various members of the NTRE team from Aerojet Propulsion Division, Energopool (Russia), and Babcock & Wilcox.

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CHARGING AND DISCHARGING

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.

    1959-07-14

    A method and arrangement is presented for removing a fuel element from a neutronic reactor tube through which a liquid coolant is being circulaled. The fuel element is moved into a section of the tube beyond the reactor proper, and then the coolant in the tube between the fuel element and the reactor proper is frozen, so that the fuel element may be removed from the tube without loss of the coolant therein. The method is particularly useful in the case of a liquid metal- cooled reactor.

  15. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.

    1998-05-12

    A fast quench reactor includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This ``freezes`` the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage. 7 figs.

  16. Alternative approaches to fusion. [reactor design and reactor physics for Tokamak fusion reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The limitations of the Tokamak fusion reactor concept are discussed and various other fusion reactor concepts are considered that employ the containment of thermonuclear plasmas by magnetic fields (i.e., stellarators). Progress made in the containment of plasmas in toroidal devices is reported. Reactor design concepts are illustrated. The possibility of using fusion reactors as a power source in interplanetary space travel and electric power plants is briefly examined.

  17. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.

    1963-09-10

    A breeder reactor is described, including a mass of fissionable material that is less than critical with respect to unmoderated neutrons and greater than critical with respect to neutrons of average energies substantially greater than thermal, a coolant selected from sodium or sodium--potassium alloys, a control liquid selected from lead or lead--bismuth alloys, and means for varying the quantity of control liquid in the reactor. (AEC)

  18. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1961-07-25

    A means is described for co-relating the essential physical requirements of a fission chain reaction in order that practical, compact, and easily controllable reactors can be built. These objects are obtained by employing a composition of fissionsble isotope and moderator in fluid form in which the amount of fissionsble isotcpe present governs the reaction. The size of the reactor is no longer a critical factor, the new criterion being the concentration of the fissionable isotope.

  19. Wilcox sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy. Report of Investigations No. 117

    SciTech Connect

    Debout, D.G.; Weise, B.R.; Gregory, A.R.; Edwards, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    Regional studies of the lower Eocene Wilcox Group in Texas were conducted to assess the potential for producing heat energy and solution methane from geopressured fluids in the deep-subsurface growth-faulted zone. However, in addition to assembling the necessary data for the geopressured geothermal project, this study has provided regional information of significance to exploration for other resources such as lignite, uranium, oil, and gas. Because the focus of this study was on the geopressured section, emphasis was placed on correlating and mapping those sandstones and shales occurring deeper than about 10,000 ft. The Wilcox and Midway Groups comprise the oldest thick sandstone/shale sequence of the Tertiary of the Gulf Coast. The Wilcox crops out in a band 10 to 20 mi wide located 100 to 200 mi inland from the present-day coastline. The Wilcox sandstones and shales in the outcrop and updip shallow subsurface were deposited primarily in fluvial environments; downdip in the deep subsurface, on the other hand, the Wilcox sediments were deposited in large deltaic systems, some of which were reworked into barrier-bar and strandplain systems. Growth faults developed within the deltaic systems, where they prograded basinward beyond the older, stable Lower Cretaceous shelf margin onto the less stable basinal muds. Continued displacement along these faults during burial resulted in: (1) entrapment of pore fluids within isolated sandstone and shale sequences, and (2) buildup of pore pressure greater than hydrostatic pressure and development of geopressure.

  20. Plane-polar Fresnel and far-field computations using the Fresnel-Wilcox and Jacobi-Bessel expansions. [for large aperture antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Galindo-Israel, V.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that the computation of the Fresnel fields for large aperture antennas is significant for many applications. The present investigation is concerned with an approach for the effective utilization of the coefficients of the Jacobi-Bessel series for the far-field to obtain an analytically continuous representation of the antenna field which is valid from the Fresnel region into the far field. Attention is given to exact formulations and closed form solutions, Fresnel and Fresnel small angle approximations, aspects of field expansion, the accuracy of the Fresnel and Fresnel small angle approximations, and the Jacobi-Bessel expansion applied to the Fresnel small angle approximation.

  1. Nuclear Reactor Kinetics and Control.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-07-27

    Version 00 Dr. J.D. Lewins has now released the following legacy book for free distribution: Nuclear Reactor Kinetics and Control, Pergamon Press, London, 275 pages, 1978. 1. Introductory Review 2. Neutron and Precursor Equations 3. Elementary Solutions of the Kinetics Equations at Low Power 4. Linear Reactor Process Dynamics with Feedback 5. Power Reactor Control Systems 6. Fluctuations and Reactor Noise 7. Safety and Reliability 8. Non Linear Systems; Stability and Control 9. Analogue Computingmore » Addendum: Jay Basken and Jeffery D. Lewins: Power Series Solution of the Reactor Kinetics Equations, Nuclear Science and Engineering: 122, 407-436 (1996) (authorized for distribution with the book: courtesy of the American Nuclear Society)« less

  2. Fast reactors and nuclear nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Avrorin, E.N.; Rachkov, V.I.; Chebeskov, A.N.

    2013-07-01

    Problems are discussed with regard to nuclear fuel cycle resistance in fast reactors to nuclear proliferation risk due to the potential for use in military programs of the knowledge, technologies and materials gained from peaceful nuclear power applications. Advantages are addressed for fast reactors in the creation of a more reliable mode of nonproliferation in the closed nuclear fuel cycle in comparison with the existing fully open and partially closed fuel cycles of thermal reactors. Advantages and shortcomings are also discussed from the point of view of nonproliferation from the start with fast reactors using plutonium of thermal reactor spent fuel and enriched uranium fuel to the gradual transition using their own plutonium as fuel. (authors)

  3. Standards and Certification. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on standards and certification in human resource development (HRD). "Implementing Management Standards in the UK" (Jonathan Winterton, Ruth Winterton) reports on a study that explored the implementation of management standards in 16 organizations and identified 36 key themes and strategic issues…

  4. REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT NUCLEAR RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR SNM ATTRIBUTION AND NUCLEAR FORENSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Sternat, M.; Beals, D.; Webb, R.; Nichols, T.

    2010-06-09

    Nuclear research reactors are the least safeguarded type of reactor; in some cases this may be attributed to low risk and in most cases it is due to difficulty from dynamic operation. Research reactors vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power and burnup providing a significant challenge to any standardized safeguard system. If a whole fuel assembly was interdicted, based on geometry and other traditional forensics work, one could identify the material's origin fairly accurately. If the material has been dispersed or reprocessed, in-depth reactor physics models may be used to help with the identification. Should there be a need to attribute research reactor fuel material, the Savannah River National Laboratory would perform radiochemical analysis of samples of the material as well as other non-destructive measurements. In depth reactor physics modeling would then be performed to compare to these measured results in an attempt to associate the measured results with various reactor parameters. Several reactor physics codes are being used and considered for this purpose, including: MONTEBURNS/ORIGEN/MCNP5, CINDER/MCNPX and WIMS. In attempt to identify reactor characteristics, such as time since shutdown, burnup, or power, various isotopes are used. Complexities arise when the inherent assumptions embedded in different reactor physics codes handle the isotopes differently and may quantify them to different levels of accuracy. A technical approach to modeling spent research reactor fuel begins at the assembly level upon acquiring detailed information of the reactor to be modeled. A single assembly is run using periodic boundary conditions to simulate an infinite lattice which may be repeatedly burned to produce input fuel isotopic vectors of various burnups for a core level model. A core level model will then be constructed using the assembly level results as inputs for the specific fuel shuffling pattern in an attempt to establish an equilibrium cycle. The

  5. Studies on coal devolatilization and char reactivity under PFBC conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    A fundamental combustion study was performed at Babcock and Wilcox's Alliance Research Center to characterize the combustion properties of Pittsburgh No. 8 and Texas lignite coals under conditions simulating pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) using a bench-scale reactor. Over 400 combustion tests were performed at temperatures ranging from 1425{degree} to 1,725{degree}F, a maximum pressure of 280 psig, maximum superficial gas velocities of approximately 5 ft/sec to 20 ft/sec, and several oxygen concentrations using six coal particle sizes. A database of combustion profiles at PFBC conditions was obtained. A fundamental model of the chemical kinetics of the coal combustion at elevated pressures was developed based on this database. The kinetic models were used to derive the rate constants and activation energies of coal combustion for the two coals. For coal devolatilization, the effects of each test variable on the rate of reaction, the volatile yield, and the reaction order were evaluated. The apparent orders of coal devolatilization for Pittsburgh No. 8 and Texas lignite coals were determined to be less than one and vary with coal properties and test conditions. For char oxidation, the rates were reported as apparent kinetic rates and were derived based on the information which was obtained at the early stage of char oxidation. The kinetic rate constant of Pittsburgh No. 8 coal was found to be insensitive to the tested particle sizes. Increasing temperature, pressure, and superficial gas velocity increased the kinetic rate constant. The kinetic rate constant of Texas lignite coal was found to be approximately 2.5 times that of Pittsburgh No. 8 coal. The kinetic data obtained from this study in the low-temperature range was comparable to those reported by others in the literature. 40 refs., 37 figs., 15 tabs.

  6. Reactor and method of operation

    DOEpatents

    Wheeler, John A.

    1976-08-10

    A nuclear reactor having a flattened reactor activity curve across the reactor includes fuel extending over a lesser portion of the fuel channels in the central portion of the reactor than in the remainder of the reactor.

  7. Results and Analysis of the Infrastructure Request for Information (DE-SOL-0008318)

    SciTech Connect

    Heidrich, Brenden John

    2015-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) released a request for information (RFI) (DE-SOL-0008318) for “University, National Laboratory, Industry and International Input on Potential Office of Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Investments” on April 13, 2015. DOE-NE solicited information on five specific types of capabilities as well as any others suggested by the community. The RFI proposal period closed on June 19, 2015. From the 26 responses, 34 individual proposals were extracted. Eighteen were associated with a DOE national laboratory, including Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was referenced in a proposal as a proposed capability location, although the proposal did not originate with ORNL. Five US universities submitted proposals (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Pennsylvania State University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, University of Houston and the University of Michigan). Three industrial/commercial institutions submitted proposals (AREVA NP, Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)). Eight major themes emerged from the submissions as areas needing additional capability or support for existing capabilities. Two submissions supported multiple areas. The major themes are: Advanced Manufacturing (AM), High Performance Computing (HPC), Ion Irradiation with X-Ray Diagnostics (IIX), Ion Irradiation with TEM Visualization (IIT), Radiochemistry Laboratories (RCL), Test Reactors, Neutron Sources and Critical Facilities (RX) , Sample Preparation and Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE) and Thermal-Hydraulics Test Facilities (THF).

  8. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Roman, W.G.

    1961-06-27

    A pressurized water reactor in which automatic control is achieved by varying the average density of the liquid moderator-cooiant is patented. Density is controlled by the temperature and power level of the reactor ftself. This control can be effected by the use of either plate, pellet, or tubular fuel elements. The fuel elements are disposed between upper and lower coolant plenum chambers and are designed to permit unrestricted coolant flow. The control chamber has an inlet opening communicating with the lower coolant plenum chamber and a restricted vapor vent communicating with the upper coolant plenum chamber. Thus, a variation in temperature of the fuel elements will cause a variation in the average moderator density in the chamber which directly affects the power level of the reactor.

  9. Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wigeland; J. Cahalan

    2009-09-01

    Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance R. Wigeland , Idaho National Laboratory J. Cahalan, Argonne National Laboratory The sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor is currently being evaluated for the efficient transmutation of the highly-hazardous, long-lived, transuranic elements that are present in spent nuclear fuel. One of the fundamental choices that will be made is the selection of the fuel type for the fast reactor, whether oxide, metal, carbide, nitride, etc. It is likely that a decision on the fuel type will need to be made before many of the related technologies and facilities can be selected, from fuel fabrication to spent fuel reprocessing. A decision on fuel type should consider all impacts on the fast reactor system, including safety. Past work has demonstrated that the choice of fuel type may have a significant impact on the severity of consequences arising from accidents, especially for severe accidents of low probability. In this paper, the response of sodium-cooled fast reactors is discussed for both oxide and metal fuel types, highlighting the similarities and differences in reactor response and accident consequences. Any fast reactor facility must be designed to be able to successfully prevent, mitigate, or accommodate all consequences of potential events, including accidents. This is typically accomplished by using multiple barriers to the release of radiation, including the cladding on the fuel, the intact primary cooling system, and most visibly the reactor containment building. More recently, this has also included the use of ‘inherent safety’ concepts to reduce or eliminate the potential for serious damage in some cases. Past experience with oxide and metal fuel has demonstrated that both fuel types are suitable for use as fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. However, safety analyses for these two fuel types have also shown that there can be substantial differences in accident consequences due to the neutronic and

  10. REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Spitzer, L. Jr.

    1961-10-01

    Thermonuclear reactors, methods, and apparatus are described for controlling and confining high temperature plasma. Main axial confining coils in combination with helical windings provide a rotational transform that avoids the necessity of a figure-eight shaped reactor tube. The helical windings provide a multipolar helical magnetic field transverse to the axis of the main axial confining coils so as to improve the effectiveness of the confining field by counteracting the tendency of the more central lines of force in the stellarator tube to exchange positions with the magnetic lines of force nearer the walls of the tube. (AEC)

  11. Nuclear Reactors and Technology; (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

  12. Louisiana ground-water map no. 8; potentiometric surface, 1991, of the Carrizo-Wilcox Aquifer in northwestern Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seanor, Ronald C.; Smoot, Charles W.

    1995-01-01

    In northwestern Louisiana, the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer is the primary source of ground water within six parishes (Bossier, Caddo, De Soto, Natchitoches, Red River, and Sabine) and the secondary source in parts of three other parishes (Bienville, Claiborne, and Webster). Withdrawals from the aquifer increased from 4.7 Mgal/d (million gallons per day) in 1965 to 13.3 Mgal/d in 1990. A map of the potentiometric surface indicates that the altitudes of water levels in the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer ranged from less than 100 feet to 300 feet above sea level in November and December 1991. The direction of ground-water flow within the aquifer generally is to the southeast and east or west to the Red River Valley.

  13. 75 FR 6413 - Office of New Reactors; Proposed Revision to Standard Review Plan, Section 14.3.12 on Physical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... Regulations, Part 73, Power Reactor Security Rule (published in the Federal Register (FR) on March 27, 2009 (74 FR 13926)). The previous version of this SRP section was published in March 2007 as an initial... COMMISSION Office of New Reactors; Proposed Revision to Standard Review Plan, Section 14.3.12 on...

  14. Thermal Reactor Code System for Reactor Design and Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    SUZUKI, TADAKAZU

    2003-04-21

    Version: 00 SRAC95 is a general purpose neutronics code system applicable to core analyses of various types of reactors, including cell calculation with burn up, core calculation for any type of thermal reactor; where core burn up calculation and fuel management were done by an auxiliary code. Since the publication of JAERI-1302 for the revised SRAC in 1986, a number of additions and modifications were made for nuclear data libraries and programs. In this version, many new functions and data are implemented to support nuclear design studies of advanced reactors. SRAC95 can be used for burnup credit analysis within the ORIGEN2 and SWAT (CCC-714) code system.

  15. Fast quench reactor and method

    SciTech Connect

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    2002-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  16. Fast quench reactor and method

    SciTech Connect

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    1998-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  17. Fast quench reactor and method

    SciTech Connect

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    2002-09-24

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  18. Shale-filled channel system in Wilcox Group (Paleocene-Eocene), north-central south Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloh, R.P.; Eversull, L.G.

    1986-09-01

    Anomalously thick shale intervals of limited extent within normally sandy facies of the Wilcox are evident on published regional electric log structure sections through south Louisiana. These intervals were investigated with a series of subregional stratigraphic electric log sections and by mapping. The stratigraphic sections show that in places the shale cuts out nearly 1000 ft (300 m) of adjacent interstratified sandstone and shale section and has lenticular, channel-like, cross-sectional geometry. The sections also indicate that the uppermost parts of the thick shale intervals are stratigraphically equivalent to, or at least contiguous with, a persistent subregional shale marker bed known informally as the Big Shale, but are distinguishable from it in places by more uniform log character. A map of the anomalously thick and uniform shale indicates a south-trending, relatively straight channel with a single bifurcation in southern Avoyelles Parish. The branches probably continue downdip, although they cannot be traced with confidence south of central St. Landry Parish because of the overall shalier Wilcox section and scarcity of adequately deep control wells. The channel shale is analogous to other early Cenozoic subsurface truncational shale masses that have been mostly interpreted as submarine canyon-channel fills. Stratigraphic trapping possibilities are evident from the truncation of bounding permeable units, but the possible continuation of the branches downdip suggests the potential for deep sandy equivalents and deep gas.

  19. Standards and Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, S. P.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of water quality standards and administration, covering publications of 1976-77. Consideration is given to municipal facilities, National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems, regional and international water quality management, and effluent standards. A list of 99 references is also presented. (HM)

  20. State Standards and Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Randy

    2004-01-01

    Throughout the United States various individuals and groups have tried to subvert science education by removing or weakening the treatment of evolution in state science-education standards. Most states' science-education standards support the teaching of evolution, but many in the general public and some policymakers want science classrooms to…

  1. 75 FR 33362 - Notice of Opportunity To Request a Hearing and Provide Written Comments on Order Approving...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... general requirements in Subpart C of 10 CFR Part 2, as amended on January 14, 2004 (69 FR 2182), any... NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139, August 28, 2007). The E-Filing process requires participants to submit... licensee, Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Operations Group, Inc. (B&W NOG), pertaining to a proposed...

  2. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Spitzer, L. Jr.

    1962-01-01

    The system conteraplates ohmically heating a gas to high temperatures such as are useful in thermonuclear reactors of the stellarator class. To this end the gas is ionized and an electric current is applied to the ionized gas ohmically to heat the gas while the ionized gas is confined to a central portion of a reaction chamber. Additionally, means are provided for pumping impurities from the gas and for further heating the gas. (AEC)

  3. Coal geology of the Paleocene-Eocene Calvert Bluff Formation (Wilcox Group) and the Eocene Manning Formation (Jackson Group) in east-central Texas; field trip guidebook for the Society for Organic Petrology, Twelfth Annual Meeting, The Woodlands, Texas, August 30, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warwick, Peter D.; Crowley, Sharon S.

    1995-01-01

    The Jackson and Wilcox Groups of eastern Texas (fig. 1) are the major lignite producing intervals in the Gulf Region. Within these groups, the major lignite-producing formations are the Paleocene-Eocene Calvert Bluff Formation (Wilcox) and the Eocene Manning Formation (Jackson). According to the Keystone Coal Industry Manual (Maclean Hunter Publishing Company, 1994), the Gulf Coast basin produces about 57 million short tons of lignite annually. The state of Texas ranks number 6 in coal production in the United States. Most of the lignite is used for electric power generation in mine-mouth power plant facilities. In recent years, particular interest has been given to lignite quality and the distribution and concentration of about a dozen trace elements that have been identified as potential hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. As pointed out by Oman and Finkelman (1994), Gulf Coast lignite deposits have elevated concentrations of many of the HAPs elements (Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Mn, Se, U) on a as-received gm/mmBtu basis when compared to other United States coal deposits used for fuel in thermo-electric power plants. Although regulations have not yet been established for acceptable emissions of the HAPs elements during coal burning, considerable research effort has been given to the characterization of these elements in coal feed stocks. The general purpose of the present field trip and of the accompanying collection of papers is to investigate how various aspects of east Texas lignite geology might collectively influence the quality of the lignite fuel. We hope that this collection of papers will help future researchers understand the complex, multifaceted interrelations of coal geology, petrology, palynology and coal quality, and that this introduction to the geology of the lignite deposits of east Texas might serve as a stimulus for new ideas to be applied to other coal basins in the U.S. and abroad.

  4. A comparison of three self-tuning control algorithms developed for the Bristol-Babcock controller

    SciTech Connect

    Tapp, P.A.

    1992-04-01

    A brief overview of adaptive control methods relating to the design of self-tuning proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers is given. The methods discussed include gain scheduling, self-tuning, auto-tuning, and model-reference adaptive control systems. Several process identification and parameter adjustment methods are discussed. Characteristics of the two most common types of self-tuning controllers implemented by industry (i.e., pattern recognition and process identification) are summarized. The substance of the work is a comparison of three self-tuning proportional-plus-integral (STPI) control algorithms developed to work in conjunction with the Bristol-Babcock PID control module. The STPI control algorithms are based on closed-loop cycling theory, pattern recognition theory, and model-based theory. A brief theory of operation of these three STPI control algorithms is given. Details of the process simulations developed to test the STPI algorithms are given, including an integrating process, a first-order system, a second-order system, a system with initial inverse response, and a system with variable time constant and delay. The STPI algorithms' performance with regard to both setpoint changes and load disturbances is evaluated, and their robustness is compared. The dynamic effects of process deadtime and noise are also considered. Finally, the limitations of each of the STPI algorithms is discussed, some conclusions are drawn from the performance comparisons, and a few recommendations are made. 6 refs.

  5. A comparison of three self-tuning control algorithms developed for the Bristol-Babcock controller

    SciTech Connect

    Tapp, P.A.

    1992-04-01

    A brief overview of adaptive control methods relating to the design of self-tuning proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers is given. The methods discussed include gain scheduling, self-tuning, auto-tuning, and model-reference adaptive control systems. Several process identification and parameter adjustment methods are discussed. Characteristics of the two most common types of self-tuning controllers implemented by industry (i.e., pattern recognition and process identification) are summarized. The substance of the work is a comparison of three self-tuning proportional-plus-integral (STPI) control algorithms developed to work in conjunction with the Bristol-Babcock PID control module. The STPI control algorithms are based on closed-loop cycling theory, pattern recognition theory, and model-based theory. A brief theory of operation of these three STPI control algorithms is given. Details of the process simulations developed to test the STPI algorithms are given, including an integrating process, a first-order system, a second-order system, a system with initial inverse response, and a system with variable time constant and delay. The STPI algorithms` performance with regard to both setpoint changes and load disturbances is evaluated, and their robustness is compared. The dynamic effects of process deadtime and noise are also considered. Finally, the limitations of each of the STPI algorithms is discussed, some conclusions are drawn from the performance comparisons, and a few recommendations are made. 6 refs.

  6. Standard model and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    The ''standard'' SU(3)/sub C/ x SU(2)/sub L/ x U(1) model of strong and electroweak interactions elegantly incorporates all the proven symmetries and successes of the quark model, quantum electrodynamics, and the Four-Fermi theory. It correctly predicted weak neutral currents as well as the existence and properties of W/sup + -/, Z and gluons. ''Only'' the predicted Higgs scalar boson remains undiscovered. At this time there are no solid experimental results that cannot be accommodated by the standard model (at the 1 or 2 sigma level). Nevertheless, we do anticipate the emergence of new physics, beyond standard model expectations, which will hopefully provide guidance for theoretical advancement. Indeed, hints of some new phenomena may already be starting to appear in the CERN anti pp collider data. Details are discussed. 65 refs.

  7. Thermal Reactor Code System for Reactor Design and Analysis.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-04-21

    Version: 00 SRAC95 is a general purpose neutronics code system applicable to core analyses of various types of reactors, including cell calculation with burn up, core calculation for any type of thermal reactor; where core burn up calculation and fuel management were done by an auxiliary code. Since the publication of JAERI-1302 for the revised SRAC in 1986, a number of additions and modifications were made for nuclear data libraries and programs. In this version,more » many new functions and data are implemented to support nuclear design studies of advanced reactors. SRAC95 can be used for burnup credit analysis within the ORIGEN2 and SWAT (CCC-714) code system.« less

  8. Integrated reformer and shift reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Dorson, Matthew H.

    2006-06-27

    A hydrocarbon fuel reformer for producing diatomic hydrogen gas is disclosed. The reformer includes a first reaction vessel, a shift reactor vessel annularly disposed about the first reaction vessel, including a first shift reactor zone, and a first helical tube disposed within the first shift reactor zone having an inlet end communicating with a water supply source. The water supply source is preferably adapted to supply liquid-phase water to the first helical tube at flow conditions sufficient to ensure discharge of liquid-phase and steam-phase water from an outlet end of the first helical tube. The reformer may further include a first catalyst bed disposed in the first shift reactor zone, having a low-temperature shift catalyst in contact with the first helical tube. The catalyst bed includes a plurality of coil sections disposed in coaxial relation to other coil sections and to the central longitudinal axis of the reformer, each coil section extending between the first and second ends, and each coil section being in direct fluid communication with at least one other coil section.

  9. Component development in support of B and W`s advanced coal-fired low-emissions boiler system

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D.K.; Madden, D.A.; Rodgers, L.W.; Sivy, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    Shortly after the year 2000 it is expected that new generating plants will be needed in North America to meet the growing demand for electricity and to replace the aging plants that are nearing the end of their useful service life. If coal is to remain the fuel of choice for this new and replacement power generation, the plants of the future will need to be extremely clean, highly efficient and economical. Continuing concerns over acid rain, air toxics, global climate changes, ozone depletion and solid waste disposal are expected to further tighten regulations for new coal-fired plants. To address the design issues facing new and replacement coal-fired power plants, Babcock and Wilcox (B and W), under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE), with subcontracts to Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) and Raytheon Engineers and Constructors (RE and C), has been developing an advanced generating plant design in DOE`s Combustion 2000 program entitled, ``Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emission Boiler System`` (LEBS). The project objective is to design a new boiler equipped with improved combustion and heat transfer subsystems and advanced environmental control technologies capable of achieving emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and particulates far below current New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). In Phase 1, completed in 1994, a thorough review and assessment of potential advanced technologies and techniques for the control of emissions, and a review of boiler design options were performed. In phases 2 and 3 currently underway, research and development continues to resolve design uncertainties at the pilot and subsystem scale. A preliminary design for a Proof-Of-Concept (POC) Demonstration Facility has also been completed. Results of these activities will be presented in this paper.

  10. An example of Ensemble Kalman Filter data assimilation in a Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikpati, Mausumi; Anderson, Jeffrey L.

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric and oceanic prediction models have been greatly advanced over the past 40 years by using modern data assimilation techniques. Application of similar techniques in solar models started about 7 years ago. However, acceptance of such techniques by the solar community has been slow to develop. In order to make accurate predictions of solar activity as well as reconstruction of certain model parameters that cannot be directly measured, it will be essential to implement sophisticated data assimilation techniques as used by atmospheric and oceanic models. We will present here an example of parameter reconstruction, namely the time variation in meridional flow-speed, done by assimilating data into a Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model in the framework of NCAR's Data Assimilation Research Testbed (NCAR-DART). By performing many 'Observing System Simulation Experiments' (OSSEs) we find that an optimally good reconstruction in time series of meridional circulation can be obtained by using 16 ensemble members and assimilating one magnetic observation with less than 40 percent observational error. However, the RMS error in reconstruction reduces with increase in ensemble size, increase in number of observations and decrease in observational error. We also find that assimilation of magnetic field observations taken from low-to-mid latitudes at the surface compared to any other locations produces the best reconstruction. We will close by showing that assimilation cycle of 15 days is optimal; generally a longer assimilation cycle deteriorates the results, but the Dynamo DART system needs a minimum time to develop the dynamics.

  11. A novel sorbent for transport reactors and fluidized bed reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, R.; Cesario, M.; Gershanovich, Y.; Sibold, J.; Windecker, B.

    1998-12-31

    Coal Fired Gasifier Combined Cycles (GCC) have both high efficiency and very low emissions. GCCs critically need a method of removing the H{sub 2}S produced from the sulfur in the coal from the hot gases. There has been extensive research on hot gas cleanup systems, focused on the use of a zinc oxide based sorbent (e.g., zinc titanate). TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) is developing a novel sorbent with improved attrition resistance for transport reactors and fluidized bed reactors. The authors are testing sorbents at conditions simulating the operating conditions of the Pinon Pine clean coal technology plant. TDA sulfided several different formulations at 538 C and found several that have high sulfur capacity when tested in a fluidized bed reactor. TDA initiated sorbent regeneration at 538 C. The sorbents retained chemical activity with multiple cycles. Additional tests will be conducted to evaluate the best sorbent formulation.

  12. Telemetry and command standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, Adrian J.; Macmedan, Mervyn L.; Lenhart, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    The first phase of the international Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) efforts toward the definition of standards for space telemetry, spacecraft tracking, and command functions has established a set of standard space communications techniques capable of satisfying almost the entire spectrum of space mission user requirements. This was achieved by focusing on the distinctive problems associated with the space/ground data link, and developing the infrastructural system designated the 'Open Systems Interconnection'. The intrinsically international coordination by CCSDS of development efforts ensures highly flexible mutual support activities by the various national space agencies.

  13. Preservice and Professional Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelfelt, Roy

    This paper, prepared for the September 5, 1968, National Education Association (NEA) Staff Conference, presents the NEA position, program, and strategy with regard to preservice and inservice teacher education and professional standards. Introductory remarks include a list of seven priorities which form the "framework of context of the NEA…

  14. The nuclear reactor strategy between fast breeder reactors and advanced pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Seifritz, W.

    1983-11-01

    A nuclear reactor strategy between fast breeder reactors (FBRs) and advanced pressurized water reactors (APWRs) is being studied. The principal idea of this strategy is that the discharged plutonium from light water reactors (LWRs) provides the inventories of the FBRs and the high-converter APWRs, whereby the LWRs are installed according to the derivative of a logistical S curve. Special emphasis is given to the dynamics of reaching an asymptotic symbiosis between FBRs and APWRs. The main conclusion is that if a symbiotic APWR-FBR family with an asymptotic total power level in the terawatt range is to exist in about half a century from now, we need a large number of FBRs already in an early phase.

  15. Productive lower Wilcox distributary channel sands of Hallettsville embayment, Lavaca County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Chuber, S.; Howell, H.H.

    1986-09-01

    Whole-core petrographic and micropaleontological analyses from four wells and subsurface studies in three new fields of the Hallettsville area define a heretofore unsuspected deltaic suite of facies in the lower Wilcox. Massive distributary channel sands up to 250 ft thick are interbedded with overbank silts and shales as well as marsh, crevasse-splay, and natural levee sediments. Sparse microfauna indicate a restricted marine, shallow neritic, or nonmarine facies with reworked Cretaceous forms. Three channels have been productive to date: the Renger and Golsch (gas bearing) and the Hathaway (oil bearing). Even with dipmeter, whole-core, and abundant seismic data available, the narrow, sinuous channel sands are difficult to locate. Once penetrated, however, the sands produce either oil or condensate-rich gas in copious amounts.

  16. Status of phase II subsystem testing in support of B and W`s advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler system

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D.K.; DeVault, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    In late 1990, the anticipated need for new generating capacity shortly after the year 2000 and the belief that coal will remain the fuel of choice for much of the domestic power industry motivated the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to begin a two-stage research initiative named Combustion 2000. The nearest term Low-Emission Boiler System (LEBS) program was intended to support development of an advanced pulverized coal (PC)-fired power generation system for commercial application by the year 2000 and the High Performance Power System (HIPPS) program was designed to address technologies which will require more time to be commercially ready. Since 1992, Babcock and Wilcox, under contract to the DOE, with a subcontract to Raytheon Engineers and Constructors (RE and C), has been developing an advanced generating plant design under the LEBS program. Driven by concerns over SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, particulate and air toxics emissions as well as solid waste disposal for coal-fired plants, very low emissions and high cycle efficiency goals were established and subsequently tightened as the project progressed. Meanwhile, the life cycle cost target remains at the cost of a conventional PC plant meeting New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). B and W has coupled advanced environmental control technologies, capable of achieving emissions of SO{sub x}, NO{sub x} and particulate far below current NSPS, with an advanced boiler, equipped with improved combustion and heat transfer subsystems, to meet this objective. This paper describes the status of and recent results from the subsystem testing presently in progress at B and W`s Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) located at the Alliance Research Center, development of the Commercial Generating Unit design, and provides insight into future plans.

  17. Computerized quantitative petrographic image analysis of Wilcox sandstone, Louisiana Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, J.R. Jr.; Gerard, R.E.; Manni, F.M.

    1987-05-01

    Computerized quantitative petrographic image analysis measures first-order parameters such as the abundance, cross-sectional area, length, width, diameter, and perimeter of a pore feature very rapidly and with great accuracy and precision. From these first-order parameters, second-order parameters such as shape factors, aspect ratios, specific surfaces, and pore size and roughness distributions can be calculated. These parameters can then be used to calculate even higher order parameters such as porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure curves. Analyses were performed on 350 samples from nine wells from the Wilcox Formation in southern Louisiana to characterize the two-dimensional rock pore complex of this Gulf Coast reservoir rock. Empirical equations were derived that describe relationships between first- and second-order image analysis parameters and conventional laboratory porosity and permeability measurements from core plugs. Because image analysis represents only a two-dimensional section of the power complex, these equations provide only an index of porosity and permeability which is restricted by the limited relationship of the two-dimensional section to the three-dimensional core plug. Both indices were derived from simplified equations, using parameters such as pore cross-sectional area, pore shape, and pore size. The permeability and porosity indices were correlated to the conventional laboratory permeability and porosity data (r = 0.855 and r = 0.804, respectively). First- and second-order image analysis parameters were also used to calculate mercury injection capillary pressure curves. Such curves were calculated from image analysis data from nine Wilcox samples and were scaled based on their correlation with actual measured brine capillary pressure curves.

  18. Coal gasification systems engineering and analysis. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Feasibility analyses and systems engineering studies for a 20,000 tons per day medium Btu (MBG) coal gasification plant to be built by TVA in Northern Alabama were conducted. Major objectives were as follows: (1) provide design and cost data to support the selection of a gasifier technology and other major plant design parameters, (2) provide design and cost data to support alternate product evaluation, (3) prepare a technology development plan to address areas of high technical risk, and (4) develop schedules, PERT charts, and a work breakdown structure to aid in preliminary project planning. Volume one contains a summary of gasification system characterizations. Five gasification technologies were selected for evaluation: Koppers-Totzek, Texaco, Lurgi Dry Ash, Slagging Lurgi, and Babcock and Wilcox. A summary of the trade studies and cost sensitivity analysis is included.

  19. Reactor neutrino experiments: θ13 and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xin; Wang, Wei

    2014-05-01

    We review the current-generation short-baseline reactor neutrino experiments that have firmly established the third neutrino mixing angle θ13 to be nonzero. The relative large value of θ13 (around 9°) has opened many new and exciting opportunities for future neutrino experiments. Daya Bay experiment with the first measurement of Δ m2ee is aiming for a precision measurement of this atmospheric mass-squared splitting with a comparable precision as Δ m2μ μ from accelerator muon neutrino experiments. JUNO, a next-generation reactor neutrino experiment, is targeting to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy (MH) with medium baselines ( 50 km). Beside these opportunities enabled by the large θ13, the current-generation (Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO) and the next-generation (JUNO, RENO-50, and PROSPECT) reactor experiments, with their unprecedented statistics, are also leading the precision era of the three-flavor neutrino oscillation physics as well as constraining new physics beyond the neutrino Standard Model.

  20. Environment of deposition of downdip Lower Wilcox sandstones, Provident City field, Lavaca County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Vest, S.W.

    1990-09-01

    The Lower Wilcox section at Provident City field produces dry gas from thin-bedded, silty sandstones, at depths of 12,500 to 14,100 ft (3,810 to 4,298 m). Cores show that sandstone cosets range 0.1 to 2.7 ft (0.03 to 0.82 m) and average 0.5 8 ft (0. 18 m) in thickness. Sedimentary structures within the cosets range upward from a massive unit (A) to a planar-laminated unit (B) to a ripple-laminated unit (C). The cosets have an average composition of lithic arkose and show textural grading indicative of deposition from turbidity flows. The sandstones lie within the Wilcox fault zone, downdip of the Colorado and Guadalupe deltas of the Rockdale Delta System. Regional stratigraphy and structural trends indicate that the sandstones were deposited in a deep marine environment. A growth fault, having approximately 1000 ft (3048 m) of throw at a depth of 12,300 ft (3750 m), bounds the field to the northwest and largely controls the distribution of lithofacies. Stacked, AB-type, turbidite cosets indicate channel facies. The M Sandstone was deposited as a constructional channel, with abrupt lateral grading to overbank facies, where turbidites of the BC- and C-type are dominant. The S Sandstone was deposited as a series of thin, constructional channels, mostly with turbidites of the AB- and ABC-type that are generally stacked, causing superimposed, dip-trending lobes on an otherwise strike-trending sandstone.

  1. Effect of aging upon CE and B and W control rod drives

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, E.; Gunther, W.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of aging upon the Babcock Wilcox (B W) and Combustion Engineering (CE) Control Rod Drive (CRD) systems has been evaluated as part of the US NRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. Operating experience data for the 1980--1990 time period was reviewed to identify predominant failure modes, causes, and effects. These results, in conjunction with an assessment of component materials and operating environment, conclude that both systems are susceptible to age degradation. System failures have resulted in significant plant effects, including power reductions, plant shutdowns, scrams, and Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) actuation. Current industry inspection and maintenance practices were assessed. Some of these practices effectively address aging, while others do not.

  2. Effect of aging upon CE and B and W control rod drives

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, E.; Gunther, W.

    1992-05-01

    The effect of aging upon the Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) and Combustion Engineering (CE) Control Rod Drive (CRD) systems has been evaluated as part of the US NRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. Operating experience data for the 1980--1990 time period was reviewed to identify predominant failure modes, causes, and effects. These results, in conjunction with an assessment of component materials and operating environment, conclude that both systems are susceptible to age degradation. System failures have resulted in significant plant effects, including power reductions, plant shutdowns, scrams, and Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) actuation. Current industry inspection and maintenance practices were assessed. Some of these practices effectively address aging, while others do not.

  3. Upper Wilcox Rosita delta system of south Texas: growth-faulted shelf-edge deltas

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M.B.

    1981-01-01

    The Rosita delta system, a heretofore unrecognized, major depositional system preserved in the deep upper Wilcox of south Texas, was delineated by detailed correlation of approximately 500 well logs. The Rosita delta system comprises at least three delta complexes, each of which can be traced up to tens of miles along strike and up to approximately 15 mi (24 km) downdip. Basinward, across the growth-fault zone, each delta complex thickens from about 600 ft (180 m) to more than 3000 ft (900 m). The growth faults were activated by progradation of deltas over unstable prodelta-slope muds at the contemporary shelf margin. The three upper Wilcox delta complexes studied in detail are, from oldest to youngest, the Duval, Zapata, and Live Oak deltas, named for the counties in which they are centered. Each complex consists of several lobes, some of which can be traced across the deep zones where the thickness increases by as much as tenfold owing to progradation over active growth faults. Characteristic coarsening-upward progradational units are interpreted from electric log patterns to include prodelta shales, delta-front sandstones, distributary channel and channel-mouth bar sandstones, and interdistributary shales and sandstones. Appreciable variability in sandstone distribution in the deltas may reflect changing importance of fluvial versus marine currents in distributing sediment along the delta front. However, all of the deltas prograded abruptly toward the shelf margin. The gulfward extent of these delta complexes is unknown, and it is concluded that appreciable quantities of sandstone remain to be explored in the deep subsurface of the trend.

  4. USA B and W`s IR-CFB coal-fired boiler operating experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Kavidass, S.; Maryamchik, M.; Kanoria, M.; Price, C.S.

    1998-12-31

    This paper updates operating experience of two Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) coal-fired, internal recirculation circulating fluidized-bed (IR-CFB) boilers. The first boiler is located at Southern Illinois University (SIU) in Carbondale, Illinois and is designed for 35 MWt output for cogeneration application, utilizing high sulfur, low ash Illinois coal. The second boiler is located at Kanoria Chemicals and Industries Ltd. (KCIL) in Renukoot, India and is designed for 81 MWt output for captive power requirements, firing high ash, low sulfur coal. This boiler was supplied by Thermax B and W (TBW) Ltd., a joint venture company of B and W and Thermax in India. The CFB technology is selected for these two units based on the fuel and environmental considerations. This paper discusses the various aspects of the two IR-CFB boilers` design features, performance, and operating experience including emissions.

  5. The IAEA international conference on fast reactors and related fuel cycles: highlights and main outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Monti, S.; Toti, A.

    2013-07-01

    The 'International Conference on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycles', which is regularly held every four years, represents the main international event dealing with fast reactors technology and related fuel cycles options. Main topics of the conference were new fast reactor concepts, design and simulation capabilities, safety of fast reactors, fast reactor fuels and innovative fuel cycles, analysis of past experience, fast reactor knowledge management. Particular emphasis was put on safety aspects, considering the current need of developing and harmonizing safety standards for fast reactors at the international level, taking also into account the lessons learned from the accident occurred at the Fukushima- Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011. Main advances in the several key areas of technological development were presented through 208 oral presentations during 41 technical sessions which shows the importance taken by fast reactors in the future of nuclear energy.

  6. Tdp studies and tests for C. A. Energia Electrica de Venezuela (enelven) at planta ramon laguna, units RL-17 and RL-10. Volume 1. Executive summary, RL-17 test report, and gas conversion proposals. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-28

    The study, conducted by Babcock and Wilcox, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development agency on behalf of Enelven. In order to maximize generated power output and minimize operating costs at Planta Ramon Laguna, tests were done to evaluate the condition of equipment at the plant. In order to identify any damage and determine the operating output of each unit, assessments were done of the furnaces, boilers, generators and boiler feed pumps being used in the plant. The report presents the results of these tests. This is the first of three volumes and it is divided into the following sections: (1) Executive Summary; (2) Hydrogen Damage Assessment; (3) RL-17 Gas Conversion Proposal; (4) RL-10 and RL-11 Gas Conversion Proposals.

  7. Frequency Standards and Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Lute

    2009-04-01

    Preface / Lute Maleki -- Symposium history / Jacques Vanier -- Symposium photos -- pt. I. Fundamental physics. Variation of fundamental constants from the big bang to atomic clocks: theory and observations (Invited) / V. V. Flambaum and J. C. Berengut. Alpha-dot or not: comparison of two single atom optical clocks (Invited) / T. Rosenband ... [et al.]. Variation of the fine-structure constant and laser cooling of atomic dysprosium (Invited) / N. A. Leefer ... [et al.]. Measurement of short range forces using cold atoms (Invited) / F. Pereira Dos Santos ... [et al.]. Atom interferometry experiments in fundamental physics (Invited) / S. W. Chiow ... [et al.]. Space science applications of frequency standards and metrology (Invited) / M. Tinto -- pt. II. Frequency & metrology. Quantum metrology with lattice-confined ultracold Sr atoms (Invited) / A. D. Ludlow ... [et al.]. LNE-SYRTE clock ensemble: new [symbol]Rb hyperfine frequency measurement - spectroscopy of [symbol]Hg optical clock transition (Invited) / M. Petersen ... [et al.]. Precise measurements of S-wave scattering phase shifts with a juggling atomic clock (Invited) / S. Gensemer ... [et al.]. Absolute frequency measurement of the [symbol] clock transition (Invited) / M. Chwalla ... [et al.]. The semiclassical stochastic-field/atom interaction problem (Invited) / J. Camparo. Phase and frequency noise metrology (Invited) / E. Rubiola ... [et al.]. Optical spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen for an improved determination of the Rydberg constant / J. L. Flowers ... [et al.] -- pt. III. Clock applications in space. Recent progress on the ACES mission (Invited) / L. Cacciapuoti and C. Salomon. The SAGAS mission (Invited) / P. Wolf. Small mercury microwave ion clock for navigation and radioScience (Invited) / J. D. Prestage ... [et al.]. Astro-comb: revolutionizing precision spectroscopy in astrophysics (Invited) / C. E. Kramer ... [et al.]. High frequency very long baseline interferometry: frequency standards and

  8. Microcomputer Acquisition Standards and Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wold, Geoffrey H.

    1987-01-01

    Increased use of microcomputers in schools can be implemented more effectively when management develops acquisitions standards and controls. Technical standards as well as operational and documentation standards are outlined. (MLF)

  9. Tdp studies and tests for C. A. Energia Electrica de Venezuela (enelven) at planta ramon laguna, units RL-17 and RL-10. Volume 3. Unit RL-10 turbine generator condition assessment report and units RL-10 and RL-11 boiler feed pump conditon assessment report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-28

    The study, conducted by Babcock and Wilcox, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development agency on behalf of Enelven. In order to maximize generated power output and minimize operating costs at Planta Ramon Laguna, tests were done to evaluate the condition of equipment at the plant. In order to identify any damage and determine the operating output of each unit, assessments were done of the furnaces, boilers, generators and boiler feed pumps being used in the plant. The report presents the results of these tests. This is the last of three volumes and it is divided into the following sections: (1) Condition Assessment of Unit RL-10 Turbine-Generator; (2) Condition Assessment of Unit RL-10 and RL-11 Boiler Feed Pumps.

  10. Reactor monitoring and safeguards using antineutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, N. S.

    2008-11-01

    Nuclear reactors have served as the antineutrino source for many fundamental physics experiments. The techniques developed by these experiments make it possible to use these very weakly interacting particles for a practical purpose. The large flux of antineutrinos that leaves a reactor carries information about two quantities of interest for safeguards: the reactor power and fissile inventory. Measurements made with antineutrino detectors could therefore orer an alternative means for verifying the power history and fissile inventory of a reactors, as part of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and other reactor safeguards regimes. Several erorts to develop this monitoring technique are underway across the globe.

  11. Reactor

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Robert M.

    1976-10-05

    1. A neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch.

  12. Frequency Standards and Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Lute

    2009-04-01

    Preface / Lute Maleki -- Symposium history / Jacques Vanier -- Symposium photos -- pt. I. Fundamental physics. Variation of fundamental constants from the big bang to atomic clocks: theory and observations (Invited) / V. V. Flambaum and J. C. Berengut. Alpha-dot or not: comparison of two single atom optical clocks (Invited) / T. Rosenband ... [et al.]. Variation of the fine-structure constant and laser cooling of atomic dysprosium (Invited) / N. A. Leefer ... [et al.]. Measurement of short range forces using cold atoms (Invited) / F. Pereira Dos Santos ... [et al.]. Atom interferometry experiments in fundamental physics (Invited) / S. W. Chiow ... [et al.]. Space science applications of frequency standards and metrology (Invited) / M. Tinto -- pt. II. Frequency & metrology. Quantum metrology with lattice-confined ultracold Sr atoms (Invited) / A. D. Ludlow ... [et al.]. LNE-SYRTE clock ensemble: new [symbol]Rb hyperfine frequency measurement - spectroscopy of [symbol]Hg optical clock transition (Invited) / M. Petersen ... [et al.]. Precise measurements of S-wave scattering phase shifts with a juggling atomic clock (Invited) / S. Gensemer ... [et al.]. Absolute frequency measurement of the [symbol] clock transition (Invited) / M. Chwalla ... [et al.]. The semiclassical stochastic-field/atom interaction problem (Invited) / J. Camparo. Phase and frequency noise metrology (Invited) / E. Rubiola ... [et al.]. Optical spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen for an improved determination of the Rydberg constant / J. L. Flowers ... [et al.] -- pt. III. Clock applications in space. Recent progress on the ACES mission (Invited) / L. Cacciapuoti and C. Salomon. The SAGAS mission (Invited) / P. Wolf. Small mercury microwave ion clock for navigation and radioScience (Invited) / J. D. Prestage ... [et al.]. Astro-comb: revolutionizing precision spectroscopy in astrophysics (Invited) / C. E. Kramer ... [et al.]. High frequency very long baseline interferometry: frequency standards and

  13. Intermediate leak protection/automatic shutdown for B and W helical coil steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The report summarizes a follow-on study to the multi-tiered Intermediate Leak/Automatic Shutdown System report. It makes the automatic shutdown system specific to the Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) helical coil steam generator and to the Large Development LMFBR Plant. Threshold leak criteria specific to this steam generator design are developed, and performance predictions are presented for a multi-tier intermediate leak, automatic shutdown system applied to this unit. Preliminary performance predictions for application to the helical coil steam generator were given in the referenced report; for the most part, these predictions have been confirmed. The importance of including a cover gas hydrogen meter in this unit is demonstrated by calculation of a response time one-fifth that of an in-sodium meter at hot standby and refueling conditions.

  14. Standards for discharge measurement with standardized nozzles and orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1940-01-01

    The following standards give the standardized forms for two throttling devices, standard nozzles and standard orifices, and enable them to be used in circular pipes without calibration. The definition of the standards are applicable in principle to the calibration and use of nonstandardized throttling devices, such as the venturi tube. The standards are valid, likewise, as a basis for discharge measurements in the German acceptance standards.

  15. AGR-5/6/7 LEUCO Kernel Fabrication Readiness Review

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Douglas W.; Bailey, Kirk W.

    2015-02-01

    In preparation for forming low-enriched uranium carbide/oxide (LEUCO) fuel kernels for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel development and qualification program, Idaho National Laboratory conducted an operational readiness review of the Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Operations Group – Lynchburg (B&W NOG-L) procedures, processes, and equipment from January 14 – January 16, 2015. The readiness review focused on requirements taken from the American Society Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Nuclear Quality Assurance Standard (NQA-1-2008, 1a-2009), a recent occurrence at the B&W NOG-L facility related to preparation of acid-deficient uranyl nitrate solution (ADUN), and a relook at concerns noted in a previous review. Topic areas open for the review were communicated to B&W NOG-L in advance of the on-site visit to facilitate the collection of objective evidences attesting to the state of readiness.

  16. Process regime variability across growth faults in the Paleogene Lower Wilcox Guadalupe Delta, South Texas Gulf Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olariu, Mariana I.; Ambrose, William A.

    2016-07-01

    The Wilcox Group in Texas is a 3000 m thick unit of clastic sediments deposited along the Gulf of Mexico coast during early Paleogene. This study integrates core facies analysis with subsurface well-log correlation to document the sedimentology and stratigraphy of the Lower Wilcox Guadalupe Delta. Core descriptions indicate a transition from wave- and tidally-influenced to wave-dominated deposition. Upward-coarsening facies successions contain current ripples, organic matter, low trace fossil abundance and low diversity, which suggest deposition in a fluvial prodelta to delta front environment. Heterolithic stratification with lenticular, wavy and flaser bedding indicate tidal influence. Pervasively bioturbated sandy mudstones and muddy sandstones with Cruziana ichnofacies and structureless sandstones with Ophiomorpha record deposition in wave-influenced deltas. Tidal channels truncate delta front deposits and display gradational upward-fining facies successions with basal lags and sandy tabular cross-beds passing into heterolithic tidal flats and biologically homogenized mudstones. Growth faults within the lower Wilcox control expanded thickness of sedimentary units (up to 4 times) on the downdip sides of faults. Increased local accommodation due to fault subsidence favors a stronger wave regime on the outer shelf due to unrestricted fetch and water depth. As the shoreline advances during deltaic progradation, successively more sediment is deposited in the downthrown depocenters and reworked along shore by wave processes, resulting in a thick sedimentary unit characterized by repeated stacking of shoreface sequences. Thick and laterally continuous clean sandstone successions in the downthrown compartments represent attractive hydrocarbon reservoirs. As a consequence of the wave dominance and increased accommodation, thick (tens of meters) sandstone-bodies with increased homogeneity and vertical permeability within the stacked shoreface successions are created.

  17. Multiloop integral system test (MIST): Test Group 35, Noncondensibles and venting

    SciTech Connect

    Gloudemans, J.R. . Nuclear Power Div.)

    1989-07-01

    The multiloop integral system test (MIST) was a scaled 2-by-4 (2 hot legs and 4 cold legs) physical model of a Babcock Wilcox (B W), lowered-loop, nuclear steam supply system (NSSS). MIST was designed to operate at typical plant pressures and temperatures. Experimental data obtained from this facility during post-small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) testing are used for computer code benchmarking. The MIST interactions are of intrinsic interest because they may provide insight into expected plant behavior. MIST was necessarily atypical of a plant in certain important respects, however. The MIST interactions therefore are not to be applied directly to a plant. 5 refs., 239 figs., 11 tabs.

  18. Standards and Bibliographic Data Representation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannehill, Robert S. Jr.; Husbands, Charles W.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews use of codes and standards for bibliographic data elements, focusing on efforts of American National Standards Institute and International Organization for Standardization. Identifiers of bibliographic entities; codes for geographic, political, and corporate entities; binary codes; script conversion; and standardization are covered.…

  19. Yuzhno-sakhalin TET`s-1 modernization study. Volume 1. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This study, conducted by Babcock and Wilcox, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report shows the results of a feasibility study conducted to assess the rehabilitation of the Sakhalin TETs-1 thermal power station. The study includes the complete plant equipment and operations, and recommendation and budgetary pricing to upgrade to present standards. This is Volume 1 of the report and it contains the following sections: (A) Abstract; (B) Technical.

  20. Emergency Management Standards and Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication discusses emergency management standards for school use and lists standards recommended by FEMA's National Incident Management System (NIMS). Schools are encouraged to review these standards carefully and to adopt, where applicable, those that meet their needs. The lists of standards, resources, and references contained herein…

  1. Request for Naval Reactors Comment on Proposed Prometheus Space Flight Nuclear Reactor High Tier Reactor Safety Requirements and for Naval Reactors Approval to Transmit These Requirements to JPL

    SciTech Connect

    D. Kokkinos

    2005-04-28

    The purpose of this letter is to request Naval Reactors comments on the nuclear reactor high tier requirements for the PROMETHEUS space flight reactor design, pre-launch operations, launch, ascent, operation, and disposal, and to request Naval Reactors approval to transmit these requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory to ensure consistency between the reactor safety requirements and the spacecraft safety requirements. The proposed PROMETHEUS nuclear reactor high tier safety requirements are consistent with the long standing safety culture of the Naval Reactors Program and its commitment to protecting the health and safety of the public and the environment. In addition, the philosophy on which these requirements are based is consistent with the Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group recommendations on space nuclear propulsion safety (Reference 1), DOE Nuclear Safety Criteria and Specifications for Space Nuclear Reactors (Reference 2), the Nuclear Space Power Safety and Facility Guidelines Study of the Applied Physics Laboratory.

  2. Flux and spectrum of reactor antineutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, V. I.

    2012-02-01

    In order to perform reactor experiments aimed at studying the nature of the neutrino and measurements in the realms of geo- and astrophysical neutrinos and to meet practical requirements in this field, it is highly desirable to obtain deeper insight into the operation of nuclear reactors as a source of antineutrinos. The fluxes and spectra of neutrinos from a reactor in the on and off modes and from a reservoir intended for storing a spent reactor fuel and situated near the reactor being considered are calculated. Features that are peculiar to the flux and spectrum of reactor antineutrinos and which are of importance for implementing and interpreting experiments, but which were disregarded previously, are analyzed here.

  3. I and C modernization for VVER reactors. [Eastern bloc pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gangloff, W.C.; Werner, C.L. )

    1993-08-01

    Many countries of the former Eastern Bloc are now looking westward for the introduction, absorption, and widespread application of modern technology in many areas. One such area is the nuclear power industry, where an infusion of western technology is desired to improve both plant production economics and long term plant safety. Modern digital I and C systems are sought for upgrading the existing Soviet designed reactor plants to levels of safety and reliability consistent with western standards. This paper describes the functional and physical design of the distributed microprocessor based protection, control and plant information systems to be used in Czechoslovakia for the modernization of the Temelin units (VVER-1,000). The modernization incorporates not only new hardware, but also a new functional design based on a safety analysis performed to western standards. The new systems will reduce the maintenance requirements and costs and provide such enhancements as online testability and automated surveillance testing. The technology is directly applicable to both new reactor designs under construction and to retrofits for the older reactors. It is expected to find many applications in eastern and central Europe as well as in the former Soviet Union for improving the safety and reliability of their vital nuclear power stations.

  4. TRAC PF1/MOD1 calculations and data comparisons for mist feed and bleed and steam generator tube rupture experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Siebe, D.A.; Boyack, B.E.; Steiner, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a participant in the Integral System Test (IST) program initiated in June 1983 for the purpose of providing integral system test data on specific issues/phenomena relevant to post-small-break loss-of-coolant accidents, loss of feedwater and other transients in Babcock and Wilcox (BandW) plant designs. The Multi-Loop Integral System Test (MIST) facility is the largest single component in the IST program. MIST is a 2 /times/ 4 (two hot legs and steam generators (SGs), four cold legs and reactor coolant pumps) representation of lowered-loop reactor system of the BandW design. It is a full-height, full-pressure facility with 1/817 power and volume scaling. Two other integral experimental facilities are included in the IST program: test loops at the University of Maryland, College Park, and at SRI International (SRI-2). The objective of the IST tests is to generate high-quality experimental data to be used for assessing thermal-hydraulic safety computer codes. Efforts are under way at Los Alamos to assess TRAC-PF1/MOD1 against data from each of the IST facilities. Calculations and data comparisons for TRAC-PF1/MOD1 assessment are presented for two transients run in the MIST facility. These are MIST Test 330302, a feed and bleed test with delayed high-pressure injection; and Test 3404AA, an SG tube-rupture test with the affected SG isolated. Only MIST assessment results are presented in this paper. The TRAC-PF1/MOD1 calculations completed to date for MIST tests are in reasonable agreement with the data from these tests. Reasonable agreement is defined as meaning that major trends are predicted correctly, although TRAC values are frequently outside the range of data uncertainty. We believe that correct conclusions will be reached if the code is used in similar applications despite minor code/model deficiencies. 7 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Tyrosinase immobilized enzyme reactor: development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Karina Bora; Mischiatti, Keylla Lençone; Fontana, José Domingos; de Oliveira, Brás Heleno

    2014-01-15

    Immobilized enzyme reactors of tyrosinase (tyr-IMERs) for use on-line in HPLC system were prepared by different procedures and then compared. The enzyme, obtained from Agaricus bisporus, was immobilized on epoxy-silica which was prepared using different conditions. Enzyme immobilization was conducted by both in situ and in batch techniques. The different procedures were compared in terms of protein and activity retention, IMERs activity, kinetics and stability. The influence of immobilization procedure on enzyme activity and the behavior of the IMERs against a standard inhibitor were also investigated. In situ immobilization on epoxy-silica, synthesized using microwave assistance, provided the best conditions to prepare tyrosinase IMERs. The tyr-IMERs were successfully tested with known and potential inhibitors of tyrosinase, and the results showed that they can be used for the screening of inhibitors of that enzyme. PMID:24317418

  6. Plant maintenance and advanced reactors, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2006-09-15

    The focus of the September-October issue is on plant maintenance and advanced reactors. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Advanced plants to meet rising expectations, by John Cleveland, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna; A flexible and economic small reactor, by Mario D. Carelli and Bojan Petrovic, Westinghouse Electric Company; A simple and passively safe reactor, by Yury N. Kuznetsov, Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (NIKIET), Russia; Gas-cooled reactors, by Jeffrey S. Merrifield, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; ISI project managment in the PRC, by Chen Chanbing, RINPO, China; and, Fort Calhoun refurbishment, by Sudesh Cambhir, Omaha Public Power District.

  7. OTSG modeling for the analysis of the TMI incident

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.J.; Shier, W.G.; Levine, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    The IRT code is a reactor plant systems code for the analysis of pressurized water reactor (PWR) transients that is being modified by Brookhaven National Laboratory for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. A significant modification that has recently been implemented is a model for a once-through steam generator (OTSG) to enable simulation of Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) reactor transients. This paper describes the new OTSG modeling and presents the results of an analysis of the initial phase of the TMI incident using this model.

  8. BOILING SLURRY REACTOR AND METHOD FO CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Petrick, M.; Marchaterre, J.F.

    1963-05-01

    The control of a boiling slurry nuclear reactor is described. The reactor consists of a vertical tube having an enlarged portion, a steam drum at the top of the vertical tube, and at least one downcomer connecting the steam drum and the bottom of the vertical tube, the reactor being filled with a slurry of fissionabie material in water of such concentration that the enlarged portion of the vertical tube contains a critical mass. The slurry boils in the vertical tube and circulates upwardly therein and downwardly in the downcomer. To control the reactor by controlling the circulation of the slurry, a gas is introduced into the downcomer. (AEC)

  9. Design and analysis of a nuclear reactor core for innovative small light water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, Alexey I.

    In order to address the energy needs of developing countries and remote communities, Oregon State University has proposed the Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) design. In order to achieve five years of operation without refueling, use of 8% enriched fuel is necessary. This dissertation is focused on core design issues related with increased fuel enrichment (8.0%) and specific MASLWR operational conditions (such as lower operational pressure and temperature, and increased leakage due to small core). Neutron physics calculations are performed with the commercial nuclear industry tools CASMO-4 and SIMULATE-3, developed by Studsvik Scandpower Inc. The first set of results are generated from infinite lattice level calculations with CASMO-4, and focus on evaluation of the principal differences between standard PWR fuel and MASLWR fuel. Chapter 4-1 covers aspects of fuel isotopic composition changes with burnup, evaluation of kinetic parameters and reactivity coefficients. Chapter 4-2 discusses gadolinium self-shielding and shadowing effects, and subsequent impacts on power generation peaking and Reactor Control System shadowing. The second aspect of the research is dedicated to core design issues, such as reflector design (chapter 4-3), burnable absorber distribution and programmed fuel burnup and fuel use strategy (chapter 4-4). This section also includes discussion of the parameters important for safety and evaluation of Reactor Control System options for the proposed core design. An evaluation of the sensitivity of the proposed design to uncertainty in calculated parameters is presented in chapter 4-5. The results presented in this dissertation cover a new area of reactor design and operational parameters, and may be applicable to other small and large pressurized water reactor designs.

  10. Standardization from below: Science and Technology Standards and Educational Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleischmann, Kenneth R.

    2007-01-01

    Education in the United States is becoming increasingly standardized, with the standards being initiated at the national level and then trickling down to the state level and finally the local level. Yet, this top-down approach to educational standards carries with it significant limitations, such as loss of local autonomy and restrictions on the…