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Sample records for bacillus cereus em

  1. Bacillus cereus endogenous panophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Bouza, E; Grant, S; Jordan, C; Yook, R H; Sulit, H L

    1979-03-01

    A case of severe suppurative endogenous panophthalmitis caused by Bacillus cereus resulted from intravenously administered medications. This is the first, to our knowledge, well-documented case of endogenous endophthalmitis associated with this organism. It is recommended that if on Gram's stain of the anterior chamber fluid, Gram-positive rods are seen, chloramphenicol should be administered in addition to penicillin because of the possibility of B cereus infection. PMID:105693

  2. Bacillus cereus and related species.

    PubMed Central

    Drobniewski, F A

    1993-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a gram-positive aerobic or facultatively anaerobic spore-forming rod. It is a cause of food poisoning, which is frequently associated with the consumption of rice-based dishes. The organism produces an emetic or diarrheal syndrome induced by an emetic toxin and enterotoxin, respectively. Other toxins are produced during growth, including phospholipases, proteases, and hemolysins, one of which, cereolysin, is a thiol-activated hemolysin. These toxins may contribute to the pathogenicity of B. cereus in nongastrointestinal disease. B. cereus isolated from clinical material other than feces or vomitus was commonly dismissed as a contaminant, but increasingly it is being recognized as a species with pathogenic potential. It is now recognized as an infrequent cause of serious nongastrointestinal infection, particularly in drug addicts, the immunosuppressed, neonates, and postsurgical patients, especially when prosthetic implants such as ventricular shunts are inserted. Ocular infections are the commonest types of severe infection, including endophthalmitis, panophthalmitis, and keratitis, usually with the characteristic formation of corneal ring abscesses. Even with prompt surgical and antimicrobial agent treatment, enucleation of the eye and blindness are common sequelae. Septicemia, meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections are other manifestations of severe disease. B. cereus produces beta-lactamases, unlike Bacillus anthracis, and so is resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics; it is usually susceptible to treatment with clindamycin, vancomycin, gentamicin, chloramphenicol, and erythromycin. Simultaneous therapy via multiple routes may be required. PMID:8269390

  3. Fatal outcome of Bacillus cereus septicaemia.

    PubMed

    Lede, I; Vlaar, A; Roosendaal, R; Geerlings, S; Spanjaard, L

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous environmental micro-organism which is often a contaminant of clinical cultures. Infections due to B. cereus are described, but mostly in immunocompromised patients. We report a fatal outcome of B. cereus septicaemia in an immunocompetent patient with a mechanical mitral valve. PMID:22173364

  4. Neonatal meningoencephalitis caused by Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Nisha; Knorr, Aimee; Muldrew, Kenneth L

    2008-09-01

    The classic organisms associated with central nervous system infection in the neonate are herpes simplex, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus agalactiae; we describe an unusual case of neonatal meningoencephalitis caused by Bacillus cereus. PMID:18679155

  5. Refractory Bacillus cereus infection in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Tuladhar, R; Patole, S K; Koh, T H; Norton, R; Whitehall, J S

    2000-06-01

    Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive aerobic or facultatively anaerobic spore-forming rod, which usually causes food poisoning. Its recognition as a pathogen in neonates has increased over the past two decades. The clinical course of a neonate (gestation 24 weeks) with B. cereus infection refractory to therapy is described. Death occurred after withdrawal of support following persistently positive blood and bone marrow cultures despite therapy with vancomycin, gentamicin, imipenum, clindamycin, ciprofloxacillin, immunoglobulin and granulocyte colony stimulating factor over a period of 49 days. No obvious focus of sepsis was identified. Contamination from the environment into the hospital and clinics occurs because of the ubiquitous presence of B. cereus. Combination therapy with vancomycin and gentamycin is appropriate for meningitis/severe systemic infections related to most bacillus species. The significance of repeated isolation of B. cereus in neonates with compromised host defences is emphasised. PMID:10954966

  6. Contamination of hospital linen by Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed Central

    Barrie, D.; Hoffman, P. N.; Wilson, J. A.; Kramer, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    An investigation into two cases of post-operative Bacillus cereus meningitis revealed that hospital linen laundered by a batch continuous washing machine was heavily contaminated by B. cereus spores. The washing machine, detergents, other chemical additives and the water supply were eliminated as the source of contamination. It was found that the linen introduced into the washing machine had a high B. cereus spore content and that this was still present after the wash process. The spores were not killed by either the heat disinfection stage of the wash or the addition of chemical disinfectants and were not removed by the dilution in the process. The multiplication of B. cereus was thought to have occurred on used, damp linen stored in plastic bags, particularly when ambient temperatures were high. An increase in the water flow through the washing machine was the only measure associated with a decrease in B. cereus on laundered linen. PMID:7925667

  7. Bacillus cereus Biofilms-Same, Only Different.

    PubMed

    Majed, Racha; Faille, Christine; Kallassy, Mireille; Gohar, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus displays a high diversity of lifestyles and ecological niches and include beneficial as well as pathogenic strains. These strains are widespread in the environment, are found on inert as well as on living surfaces and contaminate persistently the production lines of the food industry. Biofilms are suspected to play a key role in this ubiquitous distribution and in this persistency. Indeed, B. cereus produces a variety of biofilms which differ in their architecture and mechanism of formation, possibly reflecting an adaptation to various environments. Depending on the strain, B. cereus has the ability to grow as immersed or floating biofilms, and to secrete within the biofilm a vast array of metabolites, surfactants, bacteriocins, enzymes, and toxins, all compounds susceptible to act on the biofilm itself and/or on its environment. Within the biofilm, B. cereus exists in different physiological states and is able to generate highly resistant and adhesive spores, which themselves will increase the resistance of the bacterium to antimicrobials or to cleaning procedures. Current researches show that, despite similarities with the regulation processes and effector molecules involved in the initiation and maturation of the extensively studied Bacillus subtilis biofilm, important differences exists between the two species. The present review summarizes the up to date knowledge on biofilms produced by B. cereus and by two closely related pathogens, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus anthracis. Economic issues caused by B. cereus biofilms and management strategies implemented to control these biofilms are included in this review, which also discuss the ecological and functional roles of biofilms in the lifecycle of these bacterial species and explore future developments in this important research area. PMID:27458448

  8. Bacillus cereus Biofilms—Same, Only Different

    PubMed Central

    Majed, Racha; Faille, Christine; Kallassy, Mireille; Gohar, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus displays a high diversity of lifestyles and ecological niches and include beneficial as well as pathogenic strains. These strains are widespread in the environment, are found on inert as well as on living surfaces and contaminate persistently the production lines of the food industry. Biofilms are suspected to play a key role in this ubiquitous distribution and in this persistency. Indeed, B. cereus produces a variety of biofilms which differ in their architecture and mechanism of formation, possibly reflecting an adaptation to various environments. Depending on the strain, B. cereus has the ability to grow as immersed or floating biofilms, and to secrete within the biofilm a vast array of metabolites, surfactants, bacteriocins, enzymes, and toxins, all compounds susceptible to act on the biofilm itself and/or on its environment. Within the biofilm, B. cereus exists in different physiological states and is able to generate highly resistant and adhesive spores, which themselves will increase the resistance of the bacterium to antimicrobials or to cleaning procedures. Current researches show that, despite similarities with the regulation processes and effector molecules involved in the initiation and maturation of the extensively studied Bacillus subtilis biofilm, important differences exists between the two species. The present review summarizes the up to date knowledge on biofilms produced by B. cereus and by two closely related pathogens, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus anthracis. Economic issues caused by B. cereus biofilms and management strategies implemented to control these biofilms are included in this review, which also discuss the ecological and functional roles of biofilms in the lifecycle of these bacterial species and explore future developments in this important research area. PMID:27458448

  9. The Phylogeny of Bacillus cereus sensu lato.

    PubMed

    Okinaka, Richard T; Keim, Paul

    2016-02-01

    The three main species of the Bacillus cereus sensu lato, B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, and B. anthracis, were recognized and established by the early 1900 s because they each exhibited distinct phenotypic traits. B. thuringiensis isolates and their parasporal crystal proteins have long been established as a natural pesticide and insect pathogen. B. anthracis, the etiological agent for anthrax, was used by Robert Koch in the 19th century as a model to develop the germ theory of disease, and B. cereus, a common soil organism, is also an occasional opportunistic pathogen of humans. In addition to these three historical species designations, are three less-recognized and -understood species: B. mycoides, B. weihenstephanensis, and B. pseudomycoides. All of these "species" combined comprise the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group. Despite these apparently clear phenotypic definitions, early molecular approaches to separate the first three by various DNA hybridization and 16S/23S ribosomal sequence analyses led to some "confusion" because there were limited differences to differentiate between these species. These and other results have led to frequent suggestions that a taxonomic change was warranted to reclassify this group to a single species. But the pathogenic properties of B. anthracis and the biopesticide applications of B. thuringiensis appear to "have outweighed pure taxonomic considerations" and the separate species categories are still being maintained. B. cereus sensu lato represents a classic example of a now common bacterial species taxonomic quandary. PMID:26999390

  10. Bacillus cereus, a Volatile Human Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Bottone, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive aerobic or facultatively anaerobic, motile, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium that is widely distributed environmentally. While B. cereus is associated mainly with food poisoning, it is being increasingly reported to be a cause of serious and potentially fatal non-gastrointestinal-tract infections. The pathogenicity of B. cereus, whether intestinal or nonintestinal, is intimately associated with the production of tissue-destructive exoenzymes. Among these secreted toxins are four hemolysins, three distinct phospholipases, an emesis-inducing toxin, and proteases. The major hurdle in evaluating B. cereus when isolated from a clinical specimen is overcoming its stigma as an insignificant contaminant. Outside its notoriety in association with food poisoning and severe eye infections, this bacterium has been incriminated in a multitude of other clinical conditions such as anthrax-like progressive pneumonia, fulminant sepsis, and devastating central nervous system infections, particularly in immunosuppressed individuals, intravenous drug abusers, and neonates. Its role in nosocomial acquired bacteremia and wound infections in postsurgical patients has also been well defined, especially when intravascular devices such as catheters are inserted. Primary cutaneous infections mimicking clostridial gas gangrene induced subsequent to trauma have also been well documented. B. cereus produces a potent β-lactamase conferring marked resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. Antimicrobials noted to be effective in the empirical management of a B. cereus infection while awaiting antimicrobial susceptibility results for the isolate include ciprofloxacin and vancomycin. PMID:20375358

  11. Bacillus cereus, a volatile human pathogen.

    PubMed

    Bottone, Edward J

    2010-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive aerobic or facultatively anaerobic, motile, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium that is widely distributed environmentally. While B. cereus is associated mainly with food poisoning, it is being increasingly reported to be a cause of serious and potentially fatal non-gastrointestinal-tract infections. The pathogenicity of B. cereus, whether intestinal or nonintestinal, is intimately associated with the production of tissue-destructive exoenzymes. Among these secreted toxins are four hemolysins, three distinct phospholipases, an emesis-inducing toxin, and proteases. The major hurdle in evaluating B. cereus when isolated from a clinical specimen is overcoming its stigma as an insignificant contaminant. Outside its notoriety in association with food poisoning and severe eye infections, this bacterium has been incriminated in a multitude of other clinical conditions such as anthrax-like progressive pneumonia, fulminant sepsis, and devastating central nervous system infections, particularly in immunosuppressed individuals, intravenous drug abusers, and neonates. Its role in nosocomial acquired bacteremia and wound infections in postsurgical patients has also been well defined, especially when intravascular devices such as catheters are inserted. Primary cutaneous infections mimicking clostridial gas gangrene induced subsequent to trauma have also been well documented. B. cereus produces a potent beta-lactamase conferring marked resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. Antimicrobials noted to be effective in the empirical management of a B. cereus infection while awaiting antimicrobial susceptibility results for the isolate include ciprofloxacin and vancomycin. PMID:20375358

  12. Features of Bacillus cereus swarm cells.

    PubMed

    Senesi, Sonia; Salvetti, Sara; Celandroni, Francesco; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2010-11-01

    When propagated on solid surfaces, Bacillus cereus can produce differentiated swarm cells under a wide range of growth conditions. This behavioural versatility is ecologically relevant, since it allows this bacterium to adapt swarming to environmental changes. Swarming by B. cereus is medically important: swarm cells are more virulent and particularly prone to invade host tissues. Characterisation of swarming-deficient mutants highlights that flagellar genes as well as genes governing different metabolic pathways are involved in swarm-cell differentiation. In this review, the environmental and genetic requirements for swarming and the role played by swarm cells in the virulence this pathogen exerts will be outlined. PMID:21035546

  13. Bacillus cereus responses to acid stress.

    PubMed

    Mols, Maarten; Abee, Tjakko

    2011-11-01

    Coping with acid environments is one of the prerequisites for the soil saprophytic and human pathogenic lifestyle of Bacillus cereus. This minireview highlights novel insights in the responses displayed by vegetative cells and germinating spores of B. cereus upon exposure to low pH as well as organic acids, including acetic acid, lactic acid and sorbic acid. Insights regarding the possible acid-inflicted damage, physiological responses and protective mechanisms have been compiled based on single cell fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and transcriptome analyses. PMID:21554514

  14. Enumeration of Bacillus cereus in Foods

    PubMed Central

    Mossel, D. A. A.; Koopman, M. J.; Jongerius, E.

    1967-01-01

    For the enumeration of vegetative cells and spores of Bacillus cereus in foods, a mannitol-egg yolk-phenol red-agar has been developed which exploits the failure of B. cereus to dissimilate mannitol, and the ability of most strains to produce phospholipase C. When a high degree of selectivity was required, polymyxin B sulfate in a concentration of 10 ppm appeared to be the most effective selective additive. Useful characteristics for the identification of presumptive isolates of B. cereus were found to be: morphology, dissimilation of glucose mostly to acetyl methyl carbinol under anaerobic conditions, hydrolysis of starch and gelatin, reduction of nitrate, and growth on 0.25% chloral hydrate agar. PMID:4291956

  15. Bacillus cereus infection outbreak in captive psittacines.

    PubMed

    Godoy, S N; Matushima, E R; Chaves, J Q; Cavados, C F G; Rabinovitch, L; Teixeira, R H F; Nunes, A L V; Melville, P; Gattamorta, M A; Vivoni, A M

    2012-12-28

    This study reports an uncommon epizootic outbreak of Bacillus cereus that caused the sudden death of 12 psittacines belonging to the species Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus (1 individual), Diopsittaca nobilis (1 individual), Ara severa (1 individual) and Ara ararauna (9 individuals) in a Brazilian zoo. Post-mortem examination of the animals reveled extensive areas of lung hemorrhage, hepatic congestion, hemorrhagic enteritis and cardiac congestion. Histopathological examination of the organs showed the presence of multiple foci of vegetative cells of Gram-positive bacilli associated with discrete and moderate mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltrate. Seventeen B. cereus strains isolated from blood and sterile organs of nine A. ararauna were analyzed in order to investigate the genetic diversity (assessed by Rep-PCR) and toxigenic profiles (presence of hblA, hblC and hblD; nheA, nheB and nheC as well as cytK, ces and entFM genes) of such strains. Amplification of genomic DNA by Rep-PCR of B. cereus strains generated two closely related profiles (Rep-PCR types A and B) with three bands of difference. All strains were classified as belonging to the toxigenic profile I which contained HBL and NHE gene complexes, entFM and cytK genes. Altogether, microbiological and histopathological findings and the evidence provided by the success of the antibiotic prophylaxis, corroborate that B. cereus was the causative agent of the infection that killed the birds. PMID:22902190

  16. Pathogenomic Sequence Analysis of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis Isolates Closely Related to Bacillus anthracis†

    PubMed Central

    Han, Cliff S.; Xie, Gary; Challacombe, Jean F.; Altherr, Michael R.; Bhotika, Smriti S.; Bruce, David; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Chen, Jin; Chertkov, Olga; Cleland, Cathy; Dimitrijevic, Mira; Doggett, Norman A.; Fawcett, John J.; Glavina, Tijana; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Hill, Karen K.; Hitchcock, Penny; Jackson, Paul J.; Keim, Paul; Kewalramani, Avinash Ramesh; Longmire, Jon; Lucas, Susan; Malfatti, Stephanie; McMurry, Kim; Meincke, Linda J.; Misra, Monica; Moseman, Bernice L.; Mundt, Mark; Munk, A. Christine; Okinaka, Richard T.; Parson-Quintana, B.; Reilly, Lee Philip; Richardson, Paul; Robinson, Donna L.; Rubin, Eddy; Saunders, Elizabeth; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Ticknor, Lawrence O.; Wills, Patti L.; Brettin, Thomas S.; Gilna, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis are closely related gram-positive, spore-forming bacteria of the B. cereus sensu lato group. While independently derived strains of B. anthracis reveal conspicuous sequence homogeneity, environmental isolates of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis exhibit extensive genetic diversity. Here we report the sequencing and comparative analysis of the genomes of two members of the B. cereus group, B. thuringiensis 97-27 subsp. konkukian serotype H34, isolated from a necrotic human wound, and B. cereus E33L, which was isolated from a swab of a zebra carcass in Namibia. These two strains, when analyzed by amplified fragment length polymorphism within a collection of over 300 of B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, and B. anthracis isolates, appear closely related to B. anthracis. The B. cereus E33L isolate appears to be the nearest relative to B. anthracis identified thus far. Whole-genome sequencing of B. thuringiensis 97-27and B. cereus E33L was undertaken to identify shared and unique genes among these isolates in comparison to the genomes of pathogenic strains B. anthracis Ames and B. cereus G9241 and nonpathogenic strains B. cereus ATCC 10987 and B. cereus ATCC 14579. Comparison of these genomes revealed differences in terms of virulence, metabolic competence, structural components, and regulatory mechanisms. PMID:16621833

  17. Bacillus cereus necrotizing pneumonia in a patient with nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Jun; Tasaka, Sadatomo; Miyazaki, Masaki; Yoshida, Syuichi; Naoki, Katsuhiko; Sayama, Koichi; Asano, Koichiro; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Hasegawa, Naoki; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) is a Gram-positive rod that is widely distributed in the environment and can be a cause of food poisoning. We herein present a case of B. cereus necrotizing pneumonia in a patient with nephrotic syndrome under corticosteroid treatment after developing transient gastroenteritis symptoms. B. cereus was isolated from bronchial lavage fluid and transbronchial biopsy specimens. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction analysis of the toxin genes revealed a strain possessing enterotoxicity. The patient recovered after one week of intravenous meropenem followed by a combination of oral moxifloxacin and clindamycin. B. cereus is a pathogen that causes necrotizing pneumonia in immunocompromised hosts. PMID:23291682

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Biocontrol Agent Bacillus cereus UW85

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Gabriel L.; Holt, Jonathan; Rasko, David A.; Thomas, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus UW85 was isolated from a root of a field-grown alfalfa plant from Arlington, WI, and identified for its ability to suppress damping off, a disease caused by Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. medicaginis on alfalfa. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. cereus UW85, obtained by a combination of Sanger and Illumina sequencing. PMID:27587823

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Biocontrol Agent Bacillus cereus UW85.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Gabriel L; Holt, Jonathan; Ravel, Jacques; Rasko, David A; Thomas, Michael G; Handelsman, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus UW85 was isolated from a root of a field-grown alfalfa plant from Arlington, WI, and identified for its ability to suppress damping off, a disease caused by Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. medicaginis on alfalfa. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. cereus UW85, obtained by a combination of Sanger and Illumina sequencing. PMID:27587823

  20. Induction of natural competence in Bacillus cereus ATCC14579

    PubMed Central

    Mirończuk, Aleksandra M.; Kovács, Ákos T.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Natural competence is the ability of certain microbes to take up exogenous DNA from the environment and integrate it in their genome. Competence development has been described for a variety of bacteria, but has so far not been shown to occur in Bacillus cereus. However, orthologues of most proteins involved in natural DNA uptake in Bacillus subtiliscould be identified in B. cereus. Here, we report that B. cereus ATCC14579 can become naturally competent. When expressing the B. subtilis ComK protein using an IPTG‐inducible system in B. cereus ATCC14579, cells grown in minimal medium displayed natural competence, as either genomic DNA or plasmid DNA was shown to be taken up by the cells and integrated into the genome or stably maintained respectively. This work proves that a sufficient structural system for DNA uptake exists in B. cereus. Bacillus cereus can be employed as a model system to investigate the mechanism of DNA uptake in related bacteria such as Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis. Moreover, natural competence provides an important tool for biotechnology, as it will allow more efficient transformation of B. cereus and related organisms, e.g. to knockout genes in a high‐throughput way. PMID:21261842

  1. Susceptibilities of Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, and avirulent Bacillus anthracis spores to liquid biocides.

    PubMed

    Hilgren, J; Swanson, K M J; Diez-Gonzalez, F; Cords, B

    2009-02-01

    The susceptibility of spores of Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, and avirulent Bacillus anthracis to treatment with hydrogen peroxide, peroxyacetic acid, a peroxy-fatty acid mixture, sodium hypochlorite, and acidified sodium chlorite was investigated. Results indicated that B. cereus spores may be reasonable predictors of B. anthracis spore inactivation by peroxyacetic acid-based biocides. However, B. cereus was not a reliable predictor of B. anthracis inactivation by the other biocides. In studies comparing B. cereus and B. subtilis, B. cereus spores were more resistant (by 1.5 to 2.5 log CFU) than B. subtilis spores to peroxyacetic acid, the peroxy-fatty acid mixture, and acidified sodium chlorite. Conversely, B. subtilis spores were more resistant than B. cereus spores to hydrogen peroxide. These findings indicated the relevance of side-by-side testing of target organisms and potential surrogates against categories of biocides to determine whether both have similar properties and to validate the use of the surrogate microorganisms. PMID:19350981

  2. Phages Preying on Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis: Past, Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, Annika; Mahillon, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteriophages (phages) have been widely studied due to their major role in virulence evolution of bacterial pathogens. However, less attention has been paid to phages preying on bacteria from the Bacillus cereus group and their contribution to the bacterial genetic pool has been disregarded. Therefore, this review brings together the main information for the B. cereus group phages, from their discovery to their modern biotechnological applications. A special focus is given to phages infecting Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. These phages belong to the Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, Podoviridae and Tectiviridae families. For the sake of clarity, several phage categories have been made according to significant characteristics such as lifestyles and lysogenic states. The main categories comprise the transducing phages, phages with a chromosomal or plasmidial prophage state, γ-like phages and jumbo-phages. The current genomic characterization of some of these phages is also addressed throughout this work and some promising applications are discussed here. PMID:25010767

  3. Phages preying on Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Annika; Mahillon, Jacques

    2014-07-01

    Many bacteriophages (phages) have been widely studied due to their major role in virulence evolution of bacterial pathogens. However, less attention has been paid to phages preying on bacteria from the Bacillus cereus group and their contribution to the bacterial genetic pool has been disregarded. Therefore, this review brings together the main information for the B. cereus group phages, from their discovery to their modern biotechnological applications. A special focus is given to phages infecting Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. These phages belong to the Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, Podoviridae and Tectiviridae families. For the sake of clarity, several phage categories have been made according to significant characteristics such as lifestyles and lysogenic states. The main categories comprise the transducing phages, phages with a chromosomal or plasmidial prophage state, γ-like phages and jumbo-phages. The current genomic characterization of some of these phages is also addressed throughout this work and some promising applications are discussed here. PMID:25010767

  4. An Optical Biosensor for Bacillus Cereus Spore Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengquan; Tom, Harry W. K.

    2005-03-01

    We demonstrate a new transduction scheme for optical biosensing. Bacillus cereus is a pathogen that may be found in food and dairy products and is able to produce toxins and cause food poisoning. It is related to Bacillus anthracis (anthrax). A CCD array covered with micro-structured glass coverslip is used to detect the optical resonant shift due to the binding of the antigen (bacillus cereus spore) to the antibody (polyclonal antibody). This novel optical biosensor scheme has the potential for detecting 10˜100 bioagents in a single device as well as the potential to test for antigens with multiple antibody tests to avoid ``false positives.''

  5. Characteristics of some psychrotrophic Bacillus cereus isolates.

    PubMed

    Dufrenne, J; Bijwaard, M; te Giffel, M; Beumer, R; Notermans, S

    1995-10-01

    Twelve strains of Bacillus cereus isolated from different food products and foodborne disease outbreaks, and able to grow at temperatures < 7 degrees C, were characterised. Generation times at 7 degrees C varied from 9.4 h up to 75 h. Lag phase of the vegetative cells at 7 degrees C was strongly influenced by the previous temperature history of the cells. Preincubation at 37 degrees C increased the duration of the lag phase drastically. The heat resistance at 90 degrees C (D90 degrees C-values in min) for spores produced at 30 degrees C varied from 2.2 to 9.2 min for 11 strains. One strain, however, showed a D90 degrees C-value of > 100 min. Germination of spores in milk was delayed compared to those grown in brain heart infusion broth (BHI). All strains showed production of the diarrheal type enterotoxin in BHI. Addition of 50 IU of nisin to skim milk resulted in a decrease of numbers for 9 of the 12 strains tested. At a nisin concentration of 250 IU, a decrease in bacterial numbers was observed for all strains tested. PMID:8579988

  6. Bacillus cereus immune escape: a journey within macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tran, Seav-Ly; Ramarao, Nalini

    2013-10-01

    During bacterial infection, professional phagocytes are attracted to the site of infection, where they constitute a first line of host cell defense. Their function is to engulf and destroy the pathogens. Thus, bacteria must withstand the bactericidal activity of professional phagocytes, including macrophages to counteract the host immune system. Bacillus cereus infections are characterized by bacteremia despite the accumulation of inflammatory cells at the site of infection. This implies that the bacteria have developed means of resisting the host immune system. Bacillus cereus spores survive, germinate, and multiply in contact with macrophages, eventually producing toxins that kill these cells. However, the exact mechanism by which B. cereus evades immune attack remains unclear. This review addresses the interaction between B. cereus and macrophages, highlighting, in particular, the ways in which the bacteria escape the microbicidal activities of professional phagocytes. PMID:23827020

  7. Fulminating bacteremia and pneumonia due to Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J M; Hair, J G; Hebert, M; Hebert, L; Roberts, F J; Weyant, R S

    1997-01-01

    We present two cases of rapidly progressing, fatal pneumonia caused by Bacillus cereus. These cases are interesting in that B. cereus, even from blood or sputum specimens, may often be considered a contaminant and receive inadequate attention. Also of interest was the fact that the two patients resided in the same area of the state, were welders by trade, and became ill within a few days of each other, yet there was no epidemiologic link between them. PMID:9003628

  8. Production, secretion and biological activity of Bacillus cereus enterotoxins.

    PubMed

    Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2010-07-01

    Bacillus cereus behaves as an opportunistic pathogen frequently causing gastrointestinal diseases, and it is increasingly recognized to be responsible for severe local or systemic infections. Pathogenicity of B. cereus mainly relies on the secretion of a wide array of toxins and enzymes and also on the ability to undergo swarming differentiation in response to surface-sensing. In this report, the pathogenicity exerted by B. cereus toxins is described with particular attention to the regulatory mechanisms of production and secretion of HBL, Nhe and CytK enterotoxins. PMID:22069656

  9. Fluorescent Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Karen K.; Ticknor, Lawrence O.; Okinaka, Richard T.; Asay, Michelle; Blair, Heather; Bliss, Katherine A.; Laker, Mariam; Pardington, Paige E.; Richardson, Amber P.; Tonks, Melinda; Beecher, Douglas J.; Kemp, John D.; Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Wong, Amy C. Lee; Keim, Paul; Jackson, Paul J.

    2004-01-01

    DNA from over 300 Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus anthracis isolates was analyzed by fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). B. thuringiensis and B. cereus isolates were from diverse sources and locations, including soil, clinical isolates and food products causing diarrheal and emetic outbreaks, and type strains from the American Type Culture Collection, and over 200 B. thuringiensis isolates representing 36 serovars or subspecies were from the U.S. Department of Agriculture collection. Twenty-four diverse B. anthracis isolates were also included. Phylogenetic analysis of AFLP data revealed extensive diversity within B. thuringiensis and B. cereus compared to the monomorphic nature of B. anthracis. All of the B. anthracis strains were more closely related to each other than to any other Bacillus isolate, while B. cereus and B. thuringiensis strains populated the entire tree. Ten distinct branches were defined, with many branches containing both B. cereus and B. thuringiensis isolates. A single branch contained all the B. anthracis isolates plus an unusual B. thuringiensis isolate that is pathogenic in mice. In contrast, B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki (ATCC 33679) and other isolates used to prepare insecticides mapped distal to the B. anthracis isolates. The interspersion of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis isolates within the phylogenetic tree suggests that phenotypic traits used to distinguish between these two species do not reflect the genomic content of the different isolates and that horizontal gene transfer plays an important role in establishing the phenotype of each of these microbes. B. thuringiensis isolates of a particular subspecies tended to cluster together. PMID:14766590

  10. Efficient isolation and identification of Bacillus cereus group.

    PubMed

    Tallent, Sandra M; Kotewicz, Kristin M; Strain, Errol A; Bennett, Reginald W

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a group of ubiquitous facultative anaerobic sporeforming Gram-positive rods commonly found in soil. The spores frequently contaminate a variety of foods, including produce, meat, eggs, and dairy products. Foodborne illnesses associated with toxins produced by B. cereus can result in self-limiting diarrhea or vomiting. Plate enumeration methods recommended by recognized food authorities to detect the presence of B. cereus in potentially contaminated food products do not inhibit other Gram-positive competitive bacteria. This study evaluated the use of Bacara, a new chromogenic agar, as an efficient method to identify and enumerate B. cereus group from food matrixes, even in the presence of background flora. Inclusivity and exclusivity testing was performed using four different selective and differential media for B. cereus, including Mannitol Egg Yolk Polymyxin (MYP), Polymyxin Pyruvate Egg-Yolk Mannitol Bromothymol Blue Agar, Bacillus Chromogenic Media, Brilliance, and Bacara. MYP and Bacara were also used in plate enumeration studies to isolate B. cereus from artificially contaminated foods. PMID:22649932

  11. Enterotoxins and emetic toxins production by Bacillus cereus and other species of Bacillus isolated from Soumbala and Bikalga, African alkaline fermented food condiments.

    PubMed

    Ouoba, Labia Irene I; Thorsen, Line; Varnam, Alan H

    2008-06-10

    The ability of various species of Bacillus from fermented seeds of Parkia biglobosa known as African locust bean (Soumbala) and fermented seeds of Hibiscus sabdariffa (Bikalga) was investigated. The study included screening of the isolates by haemolysis on blood agar, detection of toxins in broth and during the fermentation of African locust bean using the Bacillus cereus Enterotoxin Reverse Passive Latex Agglutination test kit (BCET-RPLA) and the Bacillus Diarrhoeal Enterotoxin Visual Immunoassay (BDEVIA). Detection of genes encoding cytotoxin K (CytK), haemolysin BL (Hbl A, Hbl C, Hbl D), non-hemolytic enterotoxin (NheA, NheB, NheC) and EM1 specific of emetic toxin producers was also investigated using PCR with single pair and multiplex primers. Of 41 isolates, 29 Bacillus belonging to the species of B. cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus pumilus showed haemolysis on blood agar. Using RPLA, enterotoxin production was detected for three isolates of B. cereus in broth and all B. cereus (9) in fermented seeds. Using BDEVIA, enterotoxin production was detected in broth as well as in fermented seeds for all B. cereus isolates. None of the isolates belonging to the other Bacillus species was able to produce enterotoxins either by RPLA or BDEVIA. Nhe genes were detected in all B. cereus while Hbl and CytK genes were detected respectively in five and six B. cereus strains. A weak presence of Hbl (A, D) and CytK genes was detected in two isolates of B. subtilis and one of B. licheniformis but results were inconsistent, especially for Hbl genes. The emetic specific gene fragment EM1 was not detected in any of the isolates studied. PMID:18474404

  12. Complete Genome Sequences of Nine Bacillus cereus Group Phages

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    We report the sequences of nine novel Bacillus cereus group bacteriophages: DIGNKC, Juglone, Nemo, Nigalana, NotTheCreek, Phrodo, SageFayge, Vinny, and Zuko. These bacteriophages are double-stranded DNA-containing Myoviridae isolated from soil samples using B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki as the host bacterium. PMID:27417827

  13. Complete Genome Sequences of Nine Bacillus cereus Group Phages.

    PubMed

    Foltz, Samantha; Johnson, Allison A

    2016-01-01

    We report the sequences of nine novel Bacillus cereus group bacteriophages: DIGNKC, Juglone, Nemo, Nigalana, NotTheCreek, Phrodo, SageFayge, Vinny, and Zuko. These bacteriophages are double-stranded DNA-containing Myoviridae isolated from soil samples using B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki as the host bacterium. PMID:27417827

  14. Bacillus cereus food poisoning: international and Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Anita; Abdullah, Swaid

    2015-05-01

    Food borne illnesses result from eating food or drinking beverages that are contaminated with chemical matter, heavy metals, parasites, fungi, viruses and Bacteria. Bacillus cereus is one of the food-borne disease causing Bacteria. Species of Bacillus and related genera have long been troublesome to food producers on account of their resistant endospores. Their spores may be present on various types of raw and cooked foods, and their ability to survive high cooking temperatures requires that cooked foods be served hot or cooled rapidly to prevent the growth of this bacteria. Bacillus cereus is well known as a cause of food poisoning, and much more is now known about the toxins produced by various strains of this species, so that its significance in such episodes are clearer. However, it is still unclear why such cases are so rarely reported worldwide. PMID:25892750

  15. Comparison of hand hygiene procedures for removing Bacillus cereus spores.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Teppei; Hayashi, Shunji; Hosoda, Kouichi; Morisawa, Yuji; Hirai, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a spore-forming bacterium. B. cereus occasionally causes nosocomial infections, in which hand contamination with the spores plays an important role. Therefore, hand hygiene is the most important practice for controlling nosocomial B. cereus infections. This study aimed to determine the appropriate hand hygiene procedure for removing B. cereus spores. Thirty volunteers' hands were experimentally contaminated with B. cereus spores, after which they performed 6 different hand hygiene procedures. We compared the efficacy of the procedures in removing the spores from hands. The alcohol-based hand-rubbing procedures scarcely removed them. The soap washing procedures reduced the number of spores by more than 2 log10. Extending the washing time increased the spore-removing efficacy of the washing procedures. There was no significant difference in efficacy between the use of plain soap and antiseptic soap. Handwashing with soap is appropriate for removing B. cereus spores from hands. Alcohol-based hand-rubbing is not effective. PMID:25252644

  16. Linking Bacillus cereus Genotypes and Carbohydrate Utilization Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Warda, Alicja K.; Siezen, Roland J.; Boekhorst, Jos; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H. J.; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Nierop Groot, Masja N.; Abee, Tjakko

    2016-01-01

    We characterised carbohydrate utilisation of 20 newly sequenced Bacillus cereus strains isolated from food products and food processing environments and two laboratory strains, B. cereus ATCC 10987 and B. cereus ATCC 14579. Subsequently, genome sequences of these strains were analysed together with 11 additional B. cereus reference genomes to provide an overview of the different types of carbohydrate transporters and utilization systems found in B. cereus strains. The combined application of API tests, defined growth media experiments and comparative genomics enabled us to link the carbohydrate utilisation capacity of 22 B. cereus strains with their genome content and in some cases to the panC phylogenetic grouping. A core set of carbohydrates including glucose, fructose, maltose, trehalose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, and ribose could be used by all strains, whereas utilisation of other carbohydrates like xylose, galactose, and lactose, and typical host-derived carbohydrates such as fucose, mannose, N-acetyl-galactosamine and inositol is limited to a subset of strains. Finally, the roles of selected carbohydrate transporters and utilisation systems in specific niches such as soil, foods and the human host are discussed. PMID:27272929

  17. Linking Bacillus cereus Genotypes and Carbohydrate Utilization Capacity.

    PubMed

    Warda, Alicja K; Siezen, Roland J; Boekhorst, Jos; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Nierop Groot, Masja N; Abee, Tjakko

    2016-01-01

    We characterised carbohydrate utilisation of 20 newly sequenced Bacillus cereus strains isolated from food products and food processing environments and two laboratory strains, B. cereus ATCC 10987 and B. cereus ATCC 14579. Subsequently, genome sequences of these strains were analysed together with 11 additional B. cereus reference genomes to provide an overview of the different types of carbohydrate transporters and utilization systems found in B. cereus strains. The combined application of API tests, defined growth media experiments and comparative genomics enabled us to link the carbohydrate utilisation capacity of 22 B. cereus strains with their genome content and in some cases to the panC phylogenetic grouping. A core set of carbohydrates including glucose, fructose, maltose, trehalose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, and ribose could be used by all strains, whereas utilisation of other carbohydrates like xylose, galactose, and lactose, and typical host-derived carbohydrates such as fucose, mannose, N-acetyl-galactosamine and inositol is limited to a subset of strains. Finally, the roles of selected carbohydrate transporters and utilisation systems in specific niches such as soil, foods and the human host are discussed. PMID:27272929

  18. Next-Generation Whole-Genome Sequencing of Eight Strains of Bacillus cereus, Isolated from Food

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Antonina O.; de Jong, Anne; Eijlander, Robyn T.; Berendsen, Erwin M.; Holsappel, Siger; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus can contaminate food and cause emetic and diarrheal foodborne illness. Here, we report whole-genome sequences of eight strains of B. cereus, isolated from different food sources. PMID:26679589

  19. Invasive Bacillus cereus infection in a renal transplant patient: A case report and review.

    PubMed

    John, Susan; Neary, John; Lee, Christine H

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a common cause of gastrointestinal diseases. The majority of individuals with B cereus-related food poisoning recover without any specific treatment. It can, however, rarely cause invasive disease in immunocompromised patients. PMID:24294281

  20. Removal of hexavalent chromium in tannery wastewater by Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changqing; Yang, Qinhuan; Chen, Wuyong; Teng, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus cereus was used to remove chromium (Cr(VI)) from medium containing tannery wastewater under different conditions. The maximum rate of Cr(VI) removal was attained at a temperature of 37 °C, pH of 7.0-9.0, and biomass of 20 g/L when the initial Cr(VI) concentration was less than 50 mg/L. Under the optimum conditions, the Cr(VI) in tannery wastewater was treated with each cellular component of B. cereus to detect its ability to reduce Cr(VI). The results showed that the removal rate of Cr(VI) for the cell-free extracts could reach 92.70%, which was close to that of the whole cells (96.85%), indicating that the Cr(VI) reductase generated by B. cereus is primarily intracellular. Additionally, during continuous culture of the B. cereus, the strain showed good consecutive growth and removal ability. After treatment of 20 mg/L Cr(VI) for 48 h, the B. cereus was observed by SEM and TEM-EDX. SEM images showed that the B. cereus used to treat Cr(VI) grew well and had a uniform cellular size. TEM-EDX analysis revealed large quantities of chromium in the B. cereus cells used to treat Cr(VI). Overall, the results presented herein demonstrate that B. cereus can be used as a new biomaterial to remove Cr(VI) from tannery wastewater. PMID:22149215

  1. Comparative genome analysis of Bacillus cereus group genomes withBacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Sorokin, Alexei; Kapatral, Vinayak; Reznik, Gary; Bhattacharya, Anamitra; Mikhailova, Natalia; Burd, Henry; Joukov, Victor; Kaznadzey, Denis; Walunas, Theresa; D'Souza, Mark; Larsen, Niels; Pusch,Gordon; Liolios, Konstantinos; Grechkin, Yuri; Lapidus, Alla; Goltsman,Eugene; Chu, Lien; Fonstein, Michael; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Overbeek, Ross; Kyrpides, Nikos; Ivanova, Natalia

    2005-09-14

    Genome features of the Bacillus cereus group genomes (representative strains of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis sub spp israelensis) were analyzed and compared with the Bacillus subtilis genome. A core set of 1,381 protein families among the four Bacillus genomes, with an additional set of 933 families common to the B. cereus group, was identified. Differences in signal transduction pathways, membrane transporters, cell surface structures, cell wall, and S-layer proteins suggesting differences in their phenotype were identified. The B. cereus group has signal transduction systems including a tyrosine kinase related to two-component system histidine kinases from B. subtilis. A model for regulation of the stress responsive sigma factor sigmaB in the B. cereus group different from the well studied regulation in B. subtilis has been proposed. Despite a high degree of chromosomal synteny among these genomes, significant differences in cell wall and spore coat proteins that contribute to the survival and adaptation in specific hosts has been identified.

  2. Cyclic diguanylate regulation of Bacillus cereus group biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Fagerlund, Annette; Smith, Veronika; Røhr, Åsmund K; Lindbäck, Toril; Parmer, Marthe P; Andersson, K Kristoffer; Reubsaet, Leon; Økstad, Ole Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Biofilm formation can be considered a bacterial virulence mechanism. In a range of Gram-negatives, increased levels of the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) promotes biofilm formation and reduces motility. Other bacterial processes known to be regulated by c-di-GMP include cell division, differentiation and virulence. Among Gram-positive bacteria, where the function of c-di-GMP signalling is less well characterized, c-di-GMP was reported to regulate swarming motility in Bacillus subtilis while having very limited or no effect on biofilm formation. In contrast, we show that in the Bacillus cereus group c-di-GMP signalling is linked to biofilm formation, and to several other phenotypes important to the lifestyle of these bacteria. The Bacillus thuringiensis 407 genome encodes eleven predicted proteins containing domains (GGDEF/EAL) related to c-di-GMP synthesis or breakdown, ten of which are conserved through the majority of clades of the B. cereus group, including Bacillus anthracis. Several of the genes were shown to affect biofilm formation, motility, enterotoxin synthesis and/or sporulation. Among these, cdgF appeared to encode a master diguanylate cyclase essential for biofilm formation in an oxygenated environment. Only two cdg genes (cdgA, cdgJ) had orthologs in B. subtilis, highlighting differences in c-di-GMP signalling between B. subtilis and B. cereus group bacteria. PMID:27116468

  3. Weathering of phlogopite by Bacillus cereus and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Styriaková, Iveta; Bhatti, Tariq M; Bigham, Jerry M; Styriak, Igor; Vuorinen, Antti; Tuovinen, Olli H

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the weathering of finely ground phlogopite, a trioctahedral mica, by placing it in contact with heterotrophic (Bacillus cereus) and acidophilic (Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans) cultures. X-ray diffraction analyses of the phlogopite sample before and after 24 weeks of contact in B. cereus cultures revealed a decrease in the characteristic peak intensities of phlogopite, indicating destruction of individual structural planes of the mica. No new solid phase products or interlayer structures were detected in B. cereus cultures. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans cultures enhanced the chemical dissolution of the mineral and formed partially weathered interlayer structures, where interlayer K was expelled and coupled with the precipitation of K-jarosite [KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6]. PMID:15105888

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus cereus Group Phage TsarBomba

    PubMed Central

    Erill, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus group bacteriophage TsarBomba, a double-stranded DNA Myoviridae, was isolated from soil collected in Saratov, Russia. TsarBomba was found to be similar to Bacillus phages BCP78 and BCU4, and to have a wide host range among Bacillus cereus group species. PMID:26472830

  5. Bacillus cereus in personal care products: risk to consumers.

    PubMed

    Pitt, T L; McClure, J; Parker, M D; Amézquita, A; McClure, P J

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is ubiquitous in nature and thus occurs naturally in a wide range of raw materials and foodstuffs. B. cereus spores are resistant to desiccation and heat and able to survive dry storage and cooking. Vegetative cells produce several toxins which on ingestion in sufficient numbers can cause vomiting and/or diarrhoea depending on the toxins produced. Gastrointestinal disease is commonly associated with reheated or inadequately cooked foods. In addition to being a rare cause of several acute infections (e.g. pneumonia and septicaemia), B. cereus can also cause localized infection of post-surgical or trauma wounds and is a rare but significant pathogen of the eye where it may result in severe endophthalmitis often leading to loss of vision. Key risk factors in such cases are trauma to the eye and retained contaminated intraocular foreign bodies. In addition, rare cases of B. cereus-associated keratitis (inflammation of the cornea) have been linked to contact lens use. Bacillus cereus is therefore a microbial contaminant that could adversely affect product safety of cosmetic and facial toiletries and pose a threat to the user if other key risk factors are also present. The infective dose in the human eye is unknown, but as few as 100 cfu has been reported to initiate infection in a susceptible animal model. However, we are not aware of any reports in the literature of B. cereus infections in any body site linked with use of personal care products. Low levels of B. cereus spores may on occasion be present in near-eye cosmetics, and these products have been used by consumers for many years. In addition, exposure to B. cereus is more likely to occur through other routes (e.g. dustborne contamination) due to its ubiquity and resistance properties of spores. The organism has been recovered from the eyes of healthy individuals. Therefore, although there may be a perceived hazard, the risk of severe eye infections as a consequence of exposure through

  6. Effect of ultrasonic waves on the heat resistance of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus licheniformis spores.

    PubMed

    Burgos, J; Ordóñez, J A; Sala, F

    1972-09-01

    Heat resistance of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus licheniformis spores in quarter-strength Ringer solution decreases markedly after ultrasonic treatments which are unable to kill a significant proportion of the spore population. This effect does not seem to be caused by a loss of Ca(2+) or dipicolinic acid. The use of ultrasonics to eliminate vegetative cells or to break aggregates in Bacillus spore suspensions to be used subsequently in heat resistance experiments appears to be unadvisable. PMID:4627969

  7. Mycocerein, a novel antifungal peptide antibiotic produced by Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed Central

    Wakayama, S; Ishikawa, F; Oishi, K

    1984-01-01

    A peptide was obtained from culture filtrates of a bacterium which was newly isolated and tentatively named Bacillus cereus SW. The peptide was composed of Asx, Ser, Glx, Leu, Tyr, Pro, and an unknown amino acid in a ratio of 2:1:1:1:1:1:1, but, unless hydrolyzed with HCI, it was ninhydrin reaction negative. The peptide effectively inhibited the growth of all fungi and yeasts so far examined, whereas it inhibited none of the bacteria tested. PMID:6441513

  8. Proteomic Profiling and Identification of Immunodominant Spore Antigens of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis‡

    PubMed Central

    DelVecchio, Vito G.; Connolly, Joseph P.; Alefantis, Timothy G.; Walz, Alexander; Quan, Marian A.; Patra, Guy; Ashton, John M.; Whittington, Jessica T.; Chafin, Ryan D.; Liang, Xudong; Grewal, Paul; Khan, Akbar S.; Mujer, Cesar V.

    2006-01-01

    Differentially expressed and immunogenic spore proteins of the Bacillus cereus group of bacteria, which includes Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis, were identified. Comparative proteomic profiling of their spore proteins distinguished the three species from each other as well as the virulent from the avirulent strains. A total of 458 proteins encoded by 232 open reading frames were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis for all the species. A number of highly expressed proteins, including elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), elongation factor G, 60-kDa chaperonin, enolase, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, and others exist as charge variants on two-dimensional gels. These charge variants have similar masses but different isoelectric points. The majority of identified proteins have cellular roles associated with energy production, carbohydrate transport and metabolism, amino acid transport and metabolism, posttranslational modifications, and translation. Novel vaccine candidate proteins were identified using B. anthracis polyclonal antisera from humans postinfected with cutaneous anthrax. Fifteen immunoreactive proteins were identified in B. anthracis spores, whereas 7, 14, and 7 immunoreactive proteins were identified for B. cereus and in the virulent and avirulent strains of B. thuringiensis spores, respectively. Some of the immunodominant antigens include charge variants of EF-Tu, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase, Δ-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase, and a dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. Alanine racemase and neutral protease were uniquely immunogenic to B. anthracis. Comparative analysis of the spore immunome will be of significance for further nucleic acid- and immuno-based detection systems as well as next-generation vaccine development. PMID:16957262

  9. Genetic differentiation between sympatric populations of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Vilas-Boas, Gislayne; Sanchis, Vincent; Lereclus, Didier; Lemos, Manoel Victor F; Bourguet, Denis

    2002-03-01

    Little is known about genetic exchanges in natural populations of bacteria of the spore-forming Bacillus cereus group, because no population genetics studies have been performed with local sympatric populations. We isolated strains of Bacillus thuringiensis and B. cereus from small samples of soil collected at the same time from two separate geographical sites, one within the forest and the other at the edge of the forest. A total of 100 B. cereus and 98 B. thuringiensis strains were isolated and characterized by electrophoresis to determine allelic composition at nine enzymatic loci. We observed genetic differentiation between populations of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. Populations of a given Bacillus species--B. thuringiensis or B. cereus--were genetically more similar to each other than to populations of the other Bacillus species. Hemolytic activity provided further evidence of this genetic divergence, which remained evident even if putative clones were removed from the data set. Our results suggest that the rate of gene flow was higher between strains of the same species, but that exchanges between B. cereus and B. thuringiensis were nonetheless possible. Linkage disequilibrium analysis revealed sufficient recombination for B. cereus populations to be considered panmictic units. In B. thuringiensis, the balance between clonal proliferation and recombination seemed to depend on location. Overall, our data indicate that it is not important for risk assessment purposes to determine whether B. cereus and B. thuringiensis belong to a single or two species. Assessment of the biosafety of pest control based on B. thuringiensis requires evaluation of the extent of genetic exchange between strains in realistic natural conditions. PMID:11872495

  10. Occurrence of Toxigenic Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis in Doenjang, a Korean Fermented Soybean Paste.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Min; Kim, Hyun Jung; Jeong, Moon Cheol; Koo, Minseon

    2016-04-01

    This study determined the prevalence and toxin profile of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis in doenjang, a fermented soybean food, made using both traditional and commercial methods. The 51 doenjang samples tested were broadly contaminated with B. cereus; in contrast, only one sample was positive for B. thuringiensis. All B. cereus isolates from doenjang were positive for diarrheal toxin genes. The frequencies of nheABC and hblACD in traditional samples were 22.7 and 0%, respectively, whereas 5.1 and 5.1% of B. cereus isolates from commercial samples possessed nheABC and hblACD, respectively. The detection rate of ces gene was 10.8%. The predominant toxin profile among isolates from enterotoxigenic B. cereus in doenjang was profile 4 (entFM-bceT-cytK). The major enterotoxin genes in emetic B. cereus were cytK, entFM, and nheA genes. The B. thuringiensis isolate was of the diarrheagenic type. These results provide a better understanding of the epidemiology of the enterotoxigenic and emetic B. cereus groups in Korean fermented soybean products. PMID:27052865

  11. Food–bacteria interplay: pathometabolism of emetic Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Frenzel, Elrike; Gohar, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive endospore forming bacterium known for its wide spectrum of phenotypic traits, enabling it to occupy diverse ecological niches. Although the population structure of B. cereus is highly dynamic and rather panmictic, production of the emetic B. cereus toxin cereulide is restricted to strains with specific genotypic traits, associated with distinct environmental habitats. Cereulide is an ionophoric dodecadepsipeptide that is produced non-ribosomally by an enzyme complex with an unusual modular structure, named cereulide synthetase (Ces non-ribosomal peptide synthetase). The ces gene locus is encoded on a mega virulence plasmid related to the B. anthracis toxin plasmid pXO1. Cereulide, a highly thermo- and pH- resistant molecule, is preformed in food, evokes vomiting a few hours after ingestion, and was shown to be the direct cause of gastroenteritis symptoms; occasionally it is implicated in severe clinical manifestations including acute liver failures. Control of toxin gene expression in emetic B. cereus involves central transcriptional regulators, such as CodY and AbrB, thereby inextricably linking toxin gene expression to life cycle phases and specific conditions, such as the nutrient supply encountered in food matrices. While in recent years considerable progress has been made in the molecular and biochemical characterization of cereulide toxin synthesis, far less is known about the embedment of toxin synthesis in the life cycle of B. cereus. Information about signals acting on toxin production in the food environment is lacking. We summarize the data available on the complex regulatory network controlling cereulide toxin synthesis, discuss the role of intrinsic and extrinsic factors acting on toxin biosynthesis in emetic B. cereus and stress how unraveling these processes can lead to the development of novel effective strategies to prevent toxin synthesis in the food production and processing chain. PMID:26236290

  12. Food-bacteria interplay: pathometabolism of emetic Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Frenzel, Elrike; Gohar, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive endospore forming bacterium known for its wide spectrum of phenotypic traits, enabling it to occupy diverse ecological niches. Although the population structure of B. cereus is highly dynamic and rather panmictic, production of the emetic B. cereus toxin cereulide is restricted to strains with specific genotypic traits, associated with distinct environmental habitats. Cereulide is an ionophoric dodecadepsipeptide that is produced non-ribosomally by an enzyme complex with an unusual modular structure, named cereulide synthetase (Ces non-ribosomal peptide synthetase). The ces gene locus is encoded on a mega virulence plasmid related to the B. anthracis toxin plasmid pXO1. Cereulide, a highly thermo- and pH- resistant molecule, is preformed in food, evokes vomiting a few hours after ingestion, and was shown to be the direct cause of gastroenteritis symptoms; occasionally it is implicated in severe clinical manifestations including acute liver failures. Control of toxin gene expression in emetic B. cereus involves central transcriptional regulators, such as CodY and AbrB, thereby inextricably linking toxin gene expression to life cycle phases and specific conditions, such as the nutrient supply encountered in food matrices. While in recent years considerable progress has been made in the molecular and biochemical characterization of cereulide toxin synthesis, far less is known about the embedment of toxin synthesis in the life cycle of B. cereus. Information about signals acting on toxin production in the food environment is lacking. We summarize the data available on the complex regulatory network controlling cereulide toxin synthesis, discuss the role of intrinsic and extrinsic factors acting on toxin biosynthesis in emetic B. cereus and stress how unraveling these processes can lead to the development of novel effective strategies to prevent toxin synthesis in the food production and processing chain. PMID:26236290

  13. Genome Sequence of Bacillus cereus Phage vB_BceS-MY192

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Zhan, Li; Chen, Jiancai; Zhang, Yunyi; Sun, Yi; Yang, Zhangnv; Jiang, Liping; Zhu, Hanping; Zhang, Yanjun; Lu, Yiyu

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is an opportunistic foodborne pathogen. The phage vB_BceS-MY192 was isolated from B. cereus 192 in a cooked rice sample. The temperate phage belongs to the Siphoviridae family, Caudovirales order. Here we announce the phage genome sequence and its annotation, which may expand the understanding of B. cereus siphophages. PMID:27103733

  14. Genetic Differentiation between Sympatric Populations of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Vilas-Boas, Gislayne; Sanchis, Vincent; Lereclus, Didier; Lemos, Manoel Victor F.; Bourguet, Denis

    2002-01-01

    Little is known about genetic exchanges in natural populations of bacteria of the spore-forming Bacillus cereus group, because no population genetics studies have been performed with local sympatric populations. We isolated strains of Bacillus thuringiensis and B. cereus from small samples of soil collected at the same time from two separate geographical sites, one within the forest and the other at the edge of the forest. A total of 100 B. cereus and 98 B. thuringiensis strains were isolated and characterized by electrophoresis to determine allelic composition at nine enzymatic loci. We observed genetic differentiation between populations of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. Populations of a given Bacillus species—B. thuringiensis or B. cereus—were genetically more similar to each other than to populations of the other Bacillus species. Hemolytic activity provided further evidence of this genetic divergence, which remained evident even if putative clones were removed from the data set. Our results suggest that the rate of gene flow was higher between strains of the same species, but that exchanges between B. cereus and B. thuringiensis were nonetheless possible. Linkage disequilibrium analysis revealed sufficient recombination for B. cereus populations to be considered panmictic units. In B. thuringiensis, the balance between clonal proliferation and recombination seemed to depend on location. Overall, our data indicate that it is not important for risk assessment purposes to determine whether B. cereus and B. thuringiensis belong to a single or two species. Assessment of the biosafety of pest control based on B. thuringiensis requires evaluation of the extent of genetic exchange between strains in realistic natural conditions. PMID:11872495

  15. Evaluation of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus pumilus metabolites for anthelmintic activity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M. L. Vijaya; Thippeswamy, B.; Kuppust, I. L.; Naveenkumar, K. J.; Shivakumar, C. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the anthelmintic acivity of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus pumilus metabolites. Materials and Methods: The successive solvent extractions with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and methanol. The solvent extracts were tested for anthelmintic activity against Pheretima posthuma at 20 mg/ml concentration. The time of paralysis and time of death of the worms was determined for all the extracts. Albendazole was taken as a standard reference and sterile water as a control. Results: All the sample extracts showed significant anthelmintic activity in paralyzing the worms comparable with that of the standard drug. The time of death exhibited by BP metabolites was close to the time exhibited by standard. Conclusion: The study indicates both bacteria Bacillus cereus and Bacillus pumilus have anthelmintic activity indicating potential metabolites in them. PMID:25598639

  16. Laundry detergent compatibility of the alkaline protease from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Banik, Rathindra Mohan; Prakash, Monika

    2004-01-01

    The endogenous protease activity in various commercially available laundry detergents of international companies was studied. The maximum protease activity was found at 50 degrees C in pH range 10.5-11.0 in all the tested laundry detergents. The endogenous protease activity in the tested detergents retained up to 70% on incubation at 40 degrees C for 1 h, whereas less than 30% activity was only found on incubation at 50 degrees C for 1 h. The alkaline protease from an alkalophilic strain of Bacillus cereus was studied for its compatibility in commercial detergents. The cell free fermented broth from shake flask culture of the organism showed maximum activity at pH 10.5 and 50 degrees C. The protease from B. cereus showed much higher residual activity (more than 80%) on incubation with laundry detergents at 50 degrees C for 1 h or longer. The protease enzyme from B. cereus was found to be superior over the endogenous proteases present in the tested commercial laundry detergents in comparison to the enzyme stability during the washing at higher temperature, e.g., 40-50 degrees C. PMID:15293947

  17. Clostridium welchii and Bacillus cereus infection and intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Betty C.

    1974-01-01

    Clostridium welchii type A is a common agent of food poisoning when allowed to proliferate to large numbers in cooked foods, usually meat and poultry. The main factors of importance are survival of the spores, frequently found on raw products, through the cooking process, and possible contamination of cooked meats transferred to unclean containers; subsequent germination of spores and rapid multiplication of the vegetative cells during long slow cooling and non-refrigerated storage lead to heavy contamination. The toxin responsible is different from the soluble antigens, and its formation in the intestine is associated with sporulation. Large numbers of Cl. welchii of the same serological types in food and faeces is the main diagnostic factor. Important preventive measures are rapid cooling and cold storage to prevent growth. Bacillus cereus is an aerobic sporulating organism commonly found in cereals. Outbreaks described from Europe have a different aetiology with regard to food vehicles, incubation period and symptoms from those that have been reported recently in the U.K. from fried and boiled rice. The spores survive through cooking procedures and grow out to cells which sporulate readily in the cooked food and which are assumed to produce toxin in the food. Large numbers of B. cereus are found in foods causing illness and, as with Cl. welchii, the main preventive measure is inhibition of growth by quick cooling and cold storage of foods cooked ahead of requirements. A comparative table of the characteristics and clinical symptoms of Cl. welchii and B. cereus is given. PMID:4377580

  18. Chemodiversity of cereulide, the emetic toxin of Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Marxen, Sandra; Stark, Timo D; Frenzel, Elrike; Rütschle, Andrea; Lücking, Genia; Pürstinger, Gabriel; Pohl, Elena E; Scherer, Siegfried; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Hofmann, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Food-borne intoxications are increasingly caused by the dodecadepsipeptide cereulide, the emetic toxin produced by Bacillus cereus. As such intoxications pose a health risk to humans, a more detailed understanding on the chemodiversity of this toxin is mandatory for the reliable risk assessment of B. cereus toxins in foods. Mass spectrometric screening now shows a series of at least 18 cereulide variants, among which the previously unknown isocereulides A-G were determined for the first time by means of UPLC-TOF MS and ion-trap MS(n) sequencing, (13)C-labeling experiments, and post-hydrolytic dipeptide and enantioselective amino acid analysis. The data demonstrate a high microheterogeneity in cereulide and show evidence for a relaxed proof reading function of the non-ribosomal cereulide peptide synthetase complex giving rise to an enhanced cereulide chemodiversity. Most intriguingly, the isocereulides were found to differ widely in their cell toxicity correlating with their ionophoric properties (e.g., purified isocereulide A showed about 8-fold higher cytotoxicity than purified cereulide in the HEp-2 assay and induced an immediate breakdown of bilayer membranes). These findings provide a substantial contribution to the knowledge-based risk assessment of B. cereus toxins in foods, representing a still unsolved challenge in the field of food intoxications. PMID:25665710

  19. The pore-forming haemolysins of bacillus cereus: a review.

    PubMed

    Ramarao, Nalini; Sanchis, Vincent

    2013-06-01

    The Bacillus cereus sensu lato group contains diverse Gram-positive spore-forming bacteria that can cause gastrointestinal diseases and severe eye infections in humans. They have also been incriminated in a multitude of other severe, and frequently fatal, clinical infections, such as osteomyelitis, septicaemia, pneumonia, liver abscess and meningitis, particularly in immuno-compromised patients and preterm neonates. The pathogenic properties of this organism are mediated by the synergistic effects of a number of virulence products that promote intestinal cell destruction and/or resistance to the host immune system. This review focuses on the pore-forming haemolysins produced by B. cereus: haemolysin I (cereolysin O), haemolysin II, haemolysin III and haemolysin IV (CytK). Haemolysin I belongs to the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) family whose best known members are listeriolysin O and perfringolysin O, produced by L. monocytogenes and C. perfringens respectively. HlyII and CytK are oligomeric ß-barrel pore-forming toxins related to the α-toxin of S. aureus or the ß-toxin of C. perfringens. The structure of haemolysin III, the least characterized haemolytic toxin from the B. cereus, group has not yet been determined. PMID:23748204

  20. Architecture and High-Resolution Structure of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus Spore Coat Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Plomp, M; Leighton, T; Wheeler, K; Malkin, A

    2005-02-18

    We have utilized atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize the native surface topology and ultrastructure of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus spores in water and in air. AFM was able to resolve the nanostructure of the exosporium and three distinctive classes of appendages. Removal of the exosporium exposed either a hexagonal honeycomb layer (B. thuringiensis) or a rodlet outer spore coat layer (B. cereus). Removal of the rodlet structure from B. cereus spores revealed an underlying honeycomb layer similar to that observed with B. thuringiensis spores. The periodicity of the rodlet structure on the outer spore coat of B. cereus was {approx}8 nm, and the length of the rodlets was limited to the cross-patched domain structure of this layer to {approx}200 nm. The lattice constant of the honeycomb structures was {approx}9 nm for both B. cereus and B. thuringiensis spores. Both honeycomb structures were composed of multiple, disoriented domains with distinct boundaries. Our results demonstrate that variations in storage and preparation procedures result in architectural changes in individual spore surfaces, which establish AFM as a useful tool for evaluation of preparation and processing ''fingerprints'' of bacterial spores. These results establish that high-resolution AFM has the capacity to reveal species-specific assembly and nanometer scale structure of spore surfaces. These species-specific spore surface structural variations are correlated with sequence divergences in a spore core structural protein SspE.

  1. Detection of Bacillus cereus on selected retail chicken products.

    PubMed

    Smith, D P; Berrang, M E; Feldner, P W; Phillips, R W; Meinersmann, R J

    2004-08-01

    Samples from five chicken meat products, obtained at retail stores, were evaluated for the presence of Bacillus cereus. The products tested were as follows: breaded, fully cooked, frozen nuggets (NUGGETS); breaded, fully cooked, frozen tenders (TENDERS); fully cooked, frozen, white-meat fajita-style strips (STRIPS); raw, refrigerated, boneless, skinless, marinated breast fillets (FILLETS); and raw, refrigerated, cut-up, tray-pack bone-in parts (PARTS), either split breasts or thighs. Four packages of each item were obtained on three different days (n = 60). Frozen and refrigerated products were held overnight in their respective environments as appropriate; then packages were opened aseptically, and a total of 25 g of tissue was excised from multiple pieces within a package. The 25-g samples were enriched in 225 ml of Trypticase soy-polymixin broth for 18 to 24 h at 30 degrees C and then plated on mannitol-egg yolk-polymixin agar and incubated for 18 to 24 h at 30 degrees C. Colonies characteristic of B. cereus were chosen and replated for isolation on mannitol-egg yolk-polymixin agar. Suspect colonies were confirmed as Bacillus spp. by Gram stain, hemolysis on blood agar, and a biochemical test strip. Isolates were further confirmed as B. cereus using Bacteriological Analytical Manual procedures, including tests for motility, rhizoid growth, hemolysis, and protein toxin crystal production. B. cereus was detected in 27 of 60 total samples. By product, the prevalence levels were as follows: NUGGETS, 11 of 12 positive; TENDERS, 8 of 12 positive; STRIPS, 6 of 12 positive; FILLETS, 0 of 12 positive; and PARTS, 2 of 12 positive. Isolates were tested by PCR for presence of the toxin-encoding genes bceT, nheABC, hblACD, and cytK. Results indicate that B. cereus organisms were present on four of the five retail poultry products tested in this study, with the highest rates reported for the three fully cooked items, especially the two breaded products. All strains isolated

  2. The Arthromitus stage of Bacillus cereus: intestinal symbionts of animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Jorgensen, J. Z.; Dolan, S.; Kolchinsky, R.; Rainey, F. A.; Lo, S. C.

    1998-01-01

    In the guts of more than 25 species of arthropods we observed filaments containing refractile inclusions previously discovered and named "Arthromitus" in 1849 by Joseph Leidy [Leidy, J. (1849) Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia 4, 225-233]. We cultivated these microbes from boiled intestines of 10 different species of surface-cleaned soil insects and isopod crustaceans. Literature review and these observations lead us to conclude that Arthromitus are spore-forming, variably motile, cultivable bacilli. As long rod-shaped bacteria, they lose their flagella, attach by fibers or fuzz to the intestinal epithelium, grow filamentously, and sporulate from their distal ends. When these organisms are incubated in culture, their life history stages are accelerated by light and inhibited by anoxia. Characterization of new Arthromitus isolates from digestive tracts of common sow bugs (Porcellio scaber), roaches (Gromphodorhina portentosa, Blaberus giganteus) and termites (Cryptotermes brevis, Kalotermes flavicollis) identifies these flagellated, spore-forming symbionts as a Bacillus sp. Complete sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene from four isolates (two sow bug, one hissing roach, one death's head roach) confirms these as the low-G+C Gram-positive eubacterium Bacillus cereus. We suggest that B. cereus and its close relatives, easily isolated from soil and grown on nutrient agar, enjoy filamentous growth in moist nutrient-rich intestines of healthy arthropods and similar habitats.

  3. Transfer of Bacillus cereus spores from packaging paper into food.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Jaakko; Tsitko, Irina; Weber, Assi; Nielsen-LeRoux, Christina; Lereclus, Didier; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja

    2009-11-01

    Food packaging papers are not sterile, as the manufacturing is an open process, and the raw materials contain bacteria. We modeled the potential transfer of the Bacillus cereus spores from packaging paper to food by using a green fluorescent protein-expressing construct of Bacillus thuringiensis Bt 407Cry(-) [pHT315Omega(papha3-gfp)], abbreviated BT-1. Paper (260 g m(-2)) containing BT-1 was manufactured with equipment that allowed fiber formation similar to that of full-scale manufactured paper. BT-1 adhered to pulp during papermaking and survived similar to an authentic B. cereus. Rice and chocolate were exposed to the BT-1-containing paper for 10 or 30 days at 40 or 20 degrees C at relative air humidity of 10 to 60%. The majority of the spores remained immobilized inside the fiber web; only 0.001 to 0.03% transferred to the foods. This amount is low compared with the process hygiene criteria and densities commonly found in food, and it does not endanger food safety. To measure this, we introduced BT-1 spores into the paper in densities of 100 to 1,000 times higher than the amounts of the B. cereus group bacteria found in commercial paper. Of BT-1 spores, 0.03 to 0.1% transferred from the paper to fresh agar surface within 5 min of contact, which is more than to food during 10 to 30 days of exposure. The findings indicate that transfer from paper to dry food is restricted to those microbes that are exposed on the paper surface and readily detectable with a contact agar method. PMID:19903384

  4. Role of Acetate in Sporogenesis of Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, H. M.

    1966-01-01

    Nakata, H. M. (Washington State University, Pullman). Role of acetate in sporogenesis of Bacillus cereus. J. Bacteriol. 91:784–788. 1966.—The distribution of radioactivity associated initially with acetate-2-C14 was followed during sporogenesis of Bacillus cereus strain T. This was accomplished by replacing cells committed to sporulation into a chemically defined sporulation medium. It was observed that 65 to 70% of the initial radioactivity was incorporated into poly-β-hydroxybutyrate, whereas 20 to 25% was found in other cellular constituents. Virtually no radioactivity was lost as C14O2 during the first 5 to 6 hr after replacement. Then, a gradual evolution of C14O2 coincident with poly-β-hydroxybutyrate degradation, was observed until about the ninth hour. By this time, the polymer was essentially depleted, and the first spore structures were observed in stained preparations. The total amount of radioactivity lost as C14O2 was 20 to 25%. The major portion of products derived from poly-β-hydroxybutyrate was incorporated into the spores. As much as 17% of the radioactivity associated with the spores was found in dipicolinic acid. More than 50% was located in spore proteins, 20 to 25% in the hot 5% trichloroacetic acid-soluble fraction, 4 to 5% in the lipid fraction, and 15 to 20% in the cold 5% trichloroacetic acid-soluble fraction. These data, accounting for 70 to 75% of the initial radioactivity, confirmed the hypothesis that the major role of acetate, and subsequently of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate, in sporulation of B. cereus T is to provide carbon precursors and energy for sporogenesis. PMID:4956759

  5. Purification and characterization of two polyhydroxyalcanoates from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Zribi-Maaloul, Emna; Trabelsi, Imen; Elleuch, Lobna; Chouayekh, Hichem; Ben Salah, Riadh

    2013-10-01

    This work aimed to study the potential of 155 strains of Bacillus sp., isolated from a collection of Tunisian microorganisms, for polyhydroxyalcanoates production. The strains were submitted to a battery of standard tests commonly used for determining bioplastic properties. The findings revealed that two of the isolates, namely Bacillus US 163 and US 177, provided red excitations at a wavelength of approximately 543 nm. The polyhydroxyalcanoates produced by the two strains were purified. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS), Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) were used to characterize the two biopolymers. Bacillus US 163 was noted to produce a poly methyl-3-hydroxy tetradecanoic acid (P-3HTD) with an average molecular weight of 455 kDa, a completely amorphous homopolymer without crystallinity. The US 177 strain produced a homopolymer of methyl-3-hydroxy octadecanoic acid (P3-HOD) with an average molecular weight of 555 kDa. Exhibiting the highest performance, US 163 and US 177 were submitted to 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and the results revealed that they belonged to the Bacillus cereus species. Overall, the findings indicated that the Bacilli from petroleum soil have a number of promising properties that make them promising candidates for bioplastic production. PMID:23850680

  6. [Morphologic detection of Bacillus cereus in blank cartridges].

    PubMed

    Rothschild, M A; Mülling, C

    1998-01-01

    Wound infections after gunshot wounds from live ammunition can produce serious complications. It is well known that projectiles per se are neither sterile nor does their firing cause sterilization. The germs on the surface of a projectile enter the body together with the projectile and are thus introduced into the wound together with skin bacteria. However it is less known that wound infections can occur in wounds caused by the gas jet from blank ammunition (mainly from shots at very close range). In such ammunition without a projectile, the propellant particles are usually contaminated with bacteria which find their way into the wound together with skin germs. In previous investigations, we have microbiologically detected the species Bacillus cereus in the propellant of blank cartridges. In the present study, we have applied scanning electron microscopic methods to find out which areas of the blank cartridges are colonized by these bacteria. For this purpose 20 blank cartridges, each from 4 different manufacturers, were electronmicroscopically examined. B. cereus only found on the surface of intact nitrocellulose particles but not in the interior of broken prepared propellant particles. Bacterial structures were not morphologically identified on black powder particles. PMID:9701752

  7. [Analyze and compare metabolic pathways of Bacillus cereus group].

    PubMed

    Yu, Chan; Wang, Yan; Xu, Cheng-Chen; He, Jin; Zhang, Qing-Ye; Yu, Zi-Niu

    2011-10-01

    A large number of data and information was obtained from genome sequencing and high-throughput genomic studies, use of the information to study metabolic networks become a new hotspot in biological research. This article compared different methods to reconstruct metabolic networks and analyzed the advantages and disadvantages of each methods, and then introduced some researches about carbohydrate metabolism pathways, amino acid metabolic pathways, and energy metabolism pathways of 9 strains of Bacillus cereus, 6 strains of B. anthracis,,6 strain of B. thuringiensis, and finds out their similarities and characteristics. These three strains have some necessary metabolic pathways, such as glycolysis, tri-carboxylic acid cycle, alanine metabolism, histidine metabolism, and energy metabolism, but they may have some specific pathways. B cereus has higher efficiency in utilizing monosaccharide, B. anthracis is rich in degradation and transport pathways of amino acids. A glutamate metabolic bypass way exists in B. thuringiensis. Analysis of metabolic pathways provides a new way to study and use food toxin, anthrax toxin, and insecticidal toxin of these strains in future. PMID:21993280

  8. Recent research progress with phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Yan; Ye, Lidan; Xu, Jun; Yang, Xiaohong; Chen, Weiwei; Yu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phospholipids to produce phosphate monoesters and diacylglycerol. It has many applications in the enzymatic degumming of plant oils. PLC Bc , a bacterial PLC from Bacillus cereus, is an optimal choice for this activity in terms of its wide substrate spectrum, high activity, and approved safety. Unfortunately, its large-scale production and reliable high-throughput screening of PLC Bc remain challenging. Herein, we summarize the research progress regarding PLC Bc with emphasis on the screening methods, expression systems, catalytic mechanisms and inhibitor of PLC Bc . This review hopefully will inspire new achievements in related areas, to promote the sustainable development of PLC Bc and its application. PMID:26437973

  9. Single cell profiling of surface carbohydrates on Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congzhou; Ehrhardt, Christopher J; Yadavalli, Vamsi K

    2015-02-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates are important to various bacterial activities and functions. It is well known that different types of Bacillus display heterogeneity of surface carbohydrate compositions, but detection of their presence, quantitation and estimation of variation at the single cell level have not been previously solved. Here, using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based recognition force mapping coupled with lectin probes, the specific carbohydrate distributions of N-acetylglucosamine and mannose/glucose were detected, mapped and quantified on single B. cereus surfaces at the nanoscale across the entire cell. Further, the changes of the surface carbohydrate compositions from the vegetative cell to spore were shown. These results demonstrate AFM-based 'recognition force mapping' as a versatile platform to quantitatively detect and spatially map key bacterial surface biomarkers (such as carbohydrate compositions), and monitor in situ changes in surface biochemical properties during intracellular activities at the single cell level. PMID:25505137

  10. Single cell profiling of surface carbohydrates on Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congzhou; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Yadavalli, Vamsi K.

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates are important to various bacterial activities and functions. It is well known that different types of Bacillus display heterogeneity of surface carbohydrate compositions, but detection of their presence, quantitation and estimation of variation at the single cell level have not been previously solved. Here, using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based recognition force mapping coupled with lectin probes, the specific carbohydrate distributions of N-acetylglucosamine and mannose/glucose were detected, mapped and quantified on single B. cereus surfaces at the nanoscale across the entire cell. Further, the changes of the surface carbohydrate compositions from the vegetative cell to spore were shown. These results demonstrate AFM-based ‘recognition force mapping’ as a versatile platform to quantitatively detect and spatially map key bacterial surface biomarkers (such as carbohydrate compositions), and monitor in situ changes in surface biochemical properties during intracellular activities at the single cell level. PMID:25505137

  11. [Effect of Bacillus cereus hemolysin II on hepatocyte cells].

    PubMed

    Kholodkov, O A; Budarina, Zh; Kovalevskaya, J I; Si'unov, A V; Solonin, A

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of increasing the permeability (permeabilization) of cell membranes in primary liver cells by Bacillus cereus hemolysin II. An assessment of the degree of permeabilization was car ried out by measuring the fluorescence intensity of various low molecular weight dyes, which enter through pores into hepatocyte cells cultivated with hemolysin. We uncovered a high efficacy of hemolysin HlyII action on hepatocyte cell walls, which exceeded the effect of nonionic detergent, digitonin, which is commonly employed for pore formation in various cell membranes. Our results also point to the reversibility of membrane permeabilization in primary hepatocytes. The data obtained in this study can be utilized for assessments of pore-forming activity, in studies of hepatic mechanisms of action, and also the determination of the liver toxicity for different low molecular weight drugs. PMID:26027363

  12. Detection and expression of enterotoxin genes in plant-associated strains of Bacillus cereus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacillus cereus is an environmental microbe that commonly inhabits plants and soil. Twenty five plant-associated B. cereus isolates were obtained from apple, cacao, tomato, and potato. The isolates were screened for the presence and expression of enterotoxin B (BcET) components of the nonhemolytic e...

  13. Persistent Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in 3 Persons Who Inject Drugs, San Diego, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Gabrielle; Campbell, Wesley; Jenks, Jeffrey; Beesley, Cari; Katsivas, Theodoros; Hoffmaster, Alex; Mehta, Sanjay R; Reed, Sharon

    2016-09-01

    Bacillus cereus is typically considered a blood culture contaminant; however, its presence in blood cultures can indicate true bacteremia. We report 4 episodes of B. cereus bacteremia in 3 persons who inject drugs. Multilocus sequence typing showed that the temporally associated infections were caused by unrelated clones. PMID:27533890

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacteriophage Deep-Blue Infecting Emetic Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Hock, Louise; Gillis, Annika; Mahillon, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus emetic pathotype is responsible for important food-borne intoxications. Here, we describe the complete genome sequence of bacteriophage Deep-Blue, which is able to infect emetic strains of B. cereus Deep-Blue is a 159-kb myophage of the Bastille-like group within the Spounavirinae. PMID:27313285

  15. Sudden death of a young adult associated with Bacillus cereus food poisoning.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, María; Denayer, Sarah; Botteldoorn, Nadine; Delbrassinne, Laurence; Veys, Jean; Waegenaere, Jacques; Sirtaine, Nicolas; Driesen, Ronald B; Sipido, Karin R; Mahillon, Jacques; Dierick, Katelijne

    2011-12-01

    A lethal intoxication case, which occurred in Brussels, Belgium, is described. A 20-year-old man died following the ingestion of pasta contaminated with Bacillus cereus. Emetic strains of B. cereus were isolated, and high levels of cereulide (14.8 μg/g) were found in the spaghetti meal. PMID:22012017

  16. Plant compounds enhance assay sensitivity for detection of active bacillus cereus toxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacillus cereus is an important food pathogen, producing emetic and diarrheal syndromes, the latter mediated by enterotoxins. It has been estimated that there are 84,000 cases of B. cereus food poisoning in the US each year, with an annual cost of USD 36 million. The ability to sensitively trace and...

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacteriophage Deep-Blue Infecting Emetic Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Hock, Louise; Gillis, Annika

    2016-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus emetic pathotype is responsible for important food-borne intoxications. Here, we describe the complete genome sequence of bacteriophage Deep-Blue, which is able to infect emetic strains of B. cereus. Deep-Blue is a 159-kb myophage of the Bastille-like group within the Spounavirinae. PMID:27313285

  18. Persistent Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in 3 Persons Who Inject Drugs, San Diego, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Gabrielle; Campbell, Wesley; Jenks, Jeffrey; Beesley, Cari; Katsivas, Theodoros; Hoffmaster, Alex; Mehta, Sanjay R.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is typically considered a blood culture contaminant; however, its presence in blood cultures can indicate true bacteremia. We report 4 episodes of B. cereus bacteremia in 3 persons who inject drugs. Multilocus sequence typing showed that the temporally associated infections were caused by unrelated clones. PMID:27533890

  19. Cerecidins, Novel Lantibiotics from Bacillus cereus with Potent Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Li; Teng, Kunling; Sun, Shutao; Sun, Zhizeng

    2014-01-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified antimicrobial peptides that are widely produced by Gram-positive bacteria, including many species of the Bacillus group. In the present study, one novel gene cluster coding lantibiotic cerecidins was unveiled in Bacillus cereus strain As 1.1846 through genomic mining and PCR screening. The designated cer locus is different from that of conventional class II lantibiotics in that it included seven tandem precursor cerA genes, one modification gene (cerM), two processing genes (cerT and cerP), one orphan regulator gene (cerR), and two immunity genes (cerF and cerE). In addition, one unprecedented quorum sensing component, comQXPA, was inserted between cerM and cerR. The expression of cerecidins was not detected in this strain of B. cereus, which might be due to repressed transcription of cerM. We constitutively coexpressed cerA genes and cerM in Escherichia coli, and purified precerecidins were proteolytically processed with the endoproteinase GluC and a truncated version of putative serine protease CerP. Thus, two natural variants of cerecidins A1 and A7 were obtained which contained two terminal nonoverlapping thioether rings rarely found in lantibiotics. Both cerecidins A1 and A7 were active against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive bacteria. Cerecidin A7, especially its mutant Dhb13A, showed remarkable efficacy against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MDRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE), and even Streptomyces. PMID:24532070

  20. Differentiation of strains from the Bacillus cereus group by RFLP-PFGE genomic fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Otlewska, Anna; Oltuszak-Walczak, Elzbieta; Walczak, Piotr

    2013-11-01

    Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus pseudomycoides, Bacillus weihenstephanensis, Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus cereus belong to the B. cereus group. The last three species are characterized by different phenotype features and pathogenicity spectrum, but it has been shown that these species are genetically closely related. The macrorestriction analysis of the genomic DNA with the NotI enzyme was used to generate polymorphism of restriction profiles for 39 food-borne isolates (B. cereus, B. mycoides) and seven reference strains (B. mycoides, B. thuringiensis, B. weihenstephanensis, and B. cereus). The PFGE method was applied to differentiate the examined strains of the B. cereus group. On the basis of the unweighted pair group method with the arithmetic mean method and Dice coefficient, the strains were divided into five clusters (types A-E), and the most numerous group was group A (25 strains). A total of 21 distinct pulsotypes were observed. The RFLP-PFGE analysis was successfully used for the differentiation and characterization of B. cereus and B. mycoides strains isolated from different food products. PMID:23893780

  1. 40 CFR 180.1181 - Bacillus cereus strain BPO1; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus cereus strain BPO1; exemption... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1181 Bacillus cereus strain BPO1; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of the Bacillus...

  2. 40 CFR 180.1181 - Bacillus cereus strain BPO1; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bacillus cereus strain BPO1; exemption... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1181 Bacillus cereus strain BPO1; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of the Bacillus...

  3. Detection of Anthrax Simulants with Microcalorimetric Spectroscopy: Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus Spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Edward T.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Datskos, Panos G.

    2003-04-01

    Recent advances in the development of ultrasensitive micromechanical thermal detectors have led to the advent of novel subfemtojoule microcalorimetric spectroscopy (CalSpec). On the basis of principles of photothermal IR spectroscopy combined with efficient thermomechanical transduction, CalSpec provides acquisition of vibrational spectra of microscopic samples and absorbates. We use CalSpec as a method of identifying nanogram quantities of biological micro-organisms. Our studies focus on Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus spores as simulants for Bacillus anthracis spores. Using CalSpec, we measured IR spectra of B. subtilis and B. cereus spores present on surfaces in nanogram quantities (approximately 100 -1000 spores). The spectra acquired in the wavelength range of 690 -4000 cm-1 (2.5 -14.5 μm) contain information-rich vibrational signatures that reflect the different ratios of biochemical makeup of the micro-organisms. The distinctive features in the spectra obtained for the two types of micro-organism can be used to distinguish between the spores of the Bacillus family. As compared with conventional IR and Fourier-transform IR microscopic spectroscopy techniques, the advantages of the present technique include significantly improved sensitivity (at least a full order of magnitude), absence of expensive IR detectors, and excellent potential for miniaturization.

  4. Extended genetic analysis of Brazilian isolates of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Zahner, Viviane; Silva, Ana Carolina Telles de Carvalho e; de Moraes, Gabriela Pinhel; McIntosh, Douglas; de Filippis, Ivano

    2013-01-01

    Multiple locus sequence typing (MLST) was undertaken to extend the genetic characterization of 29 isolates of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis previously characterized in terms of presence/absence of sequences encoding virulence factors and via variable number tandem repeat (VNTR). Additional analysis involved polymerase chain reaction for the presence of sequences (be, cytK, inA, pag, lef, cya and cap), encoding putative virulence factors, not investigated in the earlier study. MLST analysis ascribed novel and unique sequence types to each of the isolates. A phylogenetic tree was constructed from a single sequence of 2,838 bp of concatenated loci sequences. The strains were not monophyletic by analysis of any specific housekeeping gene or virulence characteristic. No clear association in relation to source of isolation or to genotypic profile based on the presence or absence of putative virulence genes could be identified. Comparison of VNTR profiling with MLST data suggested a correlation between these two methods of genetic analysis. In common with the majority of previous studies, MLST was unable to provide clarification of the basis for pathogenicity among members of the B. cereus complex. Nevertheless, our application of MLST served to reinforce the notion that B. cereus and B. thuringiensis should be considered as the same species. PMID:23440117

  5. The Pathogenomic Sequence Analysis of B. cereus and B. Thuringiensis isolates closely related to Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Han, C S; Xie, G; Challacombe, J F; Altherr, M R; Bhotika, S S; Bruce, D; Campbell, C S; Campbell, M L; Chen, J; Chertkov, O; Cleland, C; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, M; Doggett, N A; Fawcett, J J; Glavina, T; Goodwin, L A; Hill, K K; Hitchcock, P; Jackson, P J; Keim, P; Kewalramani, A R; Longmire, J; Lucas, S; Malfatti, S; McMurry, K; Meincke, L J; Misra, M; Moseman, B L; Mundt, M; Munk, A C; Okinaka, R T; Parson-Quintana, B; Reilly, L P; Richardson, P; Robinson, D L; Rubin, E; Saunders, E; Tapia, R; Tesmer, J G; Thayer, N; Thompson, L S; Tice, H; Ticknor, L O; Wills, P L; Gilna, P; Brettin, T S

    2005-10-12

    The sequencing and analysis of two close relatives of Bacillus anthracis are reported. AFLP analysis of over 300 isolates of B. cereus, B. thuringiensis and B. anthracis identified two isolates as being very closely related to B. anthracis. One, a B. cereus, BcE33L, was isolated from a zebra carcass in Nambia; the second, a B. thuringiensis, 97-27, was isolated from a necrotic human wound. The B. cereus appears to be the closest anthracis relative sequenced to date. A core genome of over 3,900 genes was compiled for the Bacillus cereus group, including B anthracis. Comparative analysis of these two genomes with other members of the B. cereus group provides insight into the evolutionary relationships among these organisms. Evidence is presented that differential regulation modulates virulence, rather than simple acquisition of virulence factors. These genome sequences provide insight into the molecular mechanisms contributing to the host range and virulence of this group of organisms.

  6. Peptidoglycan N-acetylglucosamine deacetylases from Bacillus cereus, highly conserved proteins in Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Psylinakis, Emmanuel; Boneca, Ivo G; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Deli, Alexandra; Hayhurst, Emma; Foster, Simon J; Vårum, Kjell M; Bouriotis, Vassilis

    2005-09-01

    The genomes of Bacillus cereus and its closest relative Bacillus anthracis contain 10 polysaccharide deacetylase homologues. Six of these homologues have been proposed to be peptidoglycan N-acetylglucosamine deacetylases. Two of these genes, namely bc1960 and bc3618, have been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzymes have been purified to homogeneity and further characterized. Both enzymes were effective in deacetylating cell wall peptidoglycan from the Gram(+) Bacillus cereus and Bacillus subtilis and the Gram(-) Helicobacter pylori as well as soluble chitin substrates and N-acetylchitooligomers. However, the enzymes were not active on acetylated xylan. These results provide insight into the substrate specificity of carbohydrate esterase family 4 enzymes. It was revealed that both enzymes deacetylated only the GlcNAc residue of the synthetic muropeptide N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-(beta-1,4)-N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine-D-isoglutamine. Analysis of the constituent muropeptides of peptidoglycan from B. subtilis and H. pylori resulting from incubation of the enzymes BC1960 and BC3618 with these polymers and subsequent hydrolysis by Cellosyl and mutanolysin, respectively, similarly revealed that both enzymes deacetylate GlcNAc residues of peptidoglycan. Kinetic analysis toward GlcNAc(2-6) revealed that GlcNAc4 was the favorable substrate for both enzymes. Identification of the sequence of N-acetychitooligosaccharides (GlcNAc(2-4)) following enzymatic deacetylation by using 1H NMR revealed that both enzymes deacetylate all GlcNAc residues of the oligomers except the reducing end ones. Enzymatic deacetylation of chemically acetylated vegetative peptidoglycan from B. cereus by BC1960 and BC3618 resulted in increased resistance to lysozyme digestion. This is the first biochemical study of bacterial peptidoglycan N-acetylglucosamine deacetylases. PMID:15961396

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of Supercritical CO2-Tolerant Bacteria Bacillus subterraneus MITOT1 and Bacillus cereus MIT0214

    PubMed Central

    Peet, Kyle C.

    2015-01-01

    We report draft genome sequences of Bacillus subterraneus MITOT1 and Bacillus cereus MIT0214 isolated through enrichment of samples from geologic sequestration sites in pressurized bioreactors containing a supercritical (sc) CO2 headspace. Their genome sequences expand the phylogenetic range of sequenced bacilli and allow characterization of molecular mechanisms of scCO2 tolerance. PMID:25858826

  8. Bacteriophage PBC1 and its endolysin as an antimicrobial agent against Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Kong, Minsuk; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is an opportunistic human pathogen responsible for food poisoning and other, nongastrointestinal infections. Due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant B. cereus strains, the demand for alternative therapeutic options is increasing. To address these problems, we isolated and characterized a Siphoviridae virulent phage, PBC1, and its lytic enzymes. PBC1 showed a very narrow host range, infecting only 1 of 22 B. cereus strains. Phylogenetic analysis based on the major capsid protein revealed that PBC1 is more closely related to the Bacillus clarkii phage BCJA1c and phages of lactic acid bacteria than to the phages infecting B. cereus. Whole-genome comparison showed that the late-gene region, including the terminase gene, structural genes, and holin gene of PBC1, is similar to that from B. cereus temperate phage 250, whereas their endolysins are different. Compared to the extreme host specificity of PBC1, its endolysin, LysPBC1, showed a much broader lytic spectrum, albeit limited to the genus Bacillus. The catalytic domain of LysPBC1 when expressed alone also showed Bacillus-specific lytic activity, which was lower against the B. cereus group but higher against the Bacillus subtilis group than the full-length protein. Taken together, these results suggest that the virulent phage PBC1 is a useful component of a phage cocktail to control B. cereus, even with its exceptionally narrow host range, as it can kill a strain of B. cereus that is not killed by other phages, and that LysPBC1 is an alternative biocontrol agent against B. cereus. PMID:25595773

  9. A novel and highly specific phage endolysin cell wall binding domain for detection of Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Kong, Minsuk; Sim, Jieun; Kang, Taejoon; Nguyen, Hoang Hiep; Park, Hyun Kyu; Chung, Bong Hyun; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2015-09-01

    Rapid, specific and sensitive detection of pathogenic bacteria is crucial for public health and safety. Bacillus cereus is harmful as it causes foodborne illness and a number of systemic and local infections. We report a novel phage endolysin cell wall-binding domain (CBD) for B. cereus and the development of a highly specific and sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based B. cereus detection method using the CBD. The newly discovered CBD from endolysin of PBC1, a B. cereus-specific bacteriophage, provides high specificity and binding capacity to B. cereus. By using the CBD-modified SPR chips, B. cereus can be detected at the range of 10(5)-10(8) CFU/ml. More importantly, the detection limit can be improved to 10(2) CFU/ml by using a subtractive inhibition assay based on the pre-incubation of B. cereus and CBDs, removal of CBD-bound B. cereus, and SPR detection of the unbound CBDs. The present study suggests that the small and genetically engineered CBDs can be promising biological probes for B. cereus. We anticipate that the CBD-based SPR-sensing methods will be useful for the sensitive, selective, and rapid detection of B. cereus. PMID:26043681

  10. PCR detection of cytK gene in Bacillus cereus group strains isolated from food samples.

    PubMed

    Oltuszak-Walczak, Elzbieta; Walczak, Piotr

    2013-11-01

    A method for detection of the cytotoxin K cytK structural gene and its active promoter preceded by the PlcR-binding box, controlling the expression level of this enterotoxin, was developed. The method was applied for the purpose of the analysis of 47 bacterial strains belonging to the Bacillus cereus group isolated from different food products. It was found that the majority of the analyzed strains carried the fully functional cytK gene with its PlcR regulated promoter. The cytK gene was not detected in four emetic strains of Bacillus cereus carrying the cesB gene and potentially producing an emetic toxin - cereulide. The cytotoxin K gene was detected in 4 isolates classified as Bacillus mycoides and one reference strain B. mycoides PCM 2024. The promoter region and the N-terminal part of the cytK gene from two strains of B. mycoides (5D and 19E) showed similarities to the corresponding sequences of Bacillus cereus W23 and Bacillus thuringiensis HD-789, respectively. It was shown for the first time that the cytK gene promoter region from strains 5D and 19E of Bacillus mycoides had a similar arrangement to the corresponding sequence of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579. The presence of the cytK gene in Bacillus mycoides shows that this species, widely recognized as nonpathogenic, may pose potential biohazard to human beings. PMID:24060693

  11. Probiotic Bacillus cereus Strains, a Potential Risk for Public Health in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kui; Hölzel, Christina S.; Cui, Yifang; Mayer, Ricarda; Wang, Yang; Dietrich, Richard; Didier, Andrea; Bassitta, Rupert; Märtlbauer, Erwin; Ding, Shuangyang

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is an important cause of foodborne infectious disease and food poisoning. However, B. cereus has also been used as a probiotic in human medicine and livestock production, with low standards of safety assessment. In this study, we evaluated the safety of 15 commercial probiotic B. cereus preparations from China in terms of mislabeling, toxin production, and transferable antimicrobial resistance. Most preparations were incorrectly labeled, as they contained additional bacterial species; one product did not contain viable B. cereus at all. In total, 18 B. cereus group strains—specifically B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis—were isolated. Enterotoxin genes nhe, hbl, and cytK1, as well as the ces-gene were assessed by PCR. Enterotoxin production and cytotoxicity were confirmed by ELISA and cell culture assays, respectively. All isolated B. cereus group strains produced the enterotoxin Nhe; 15 strains additionally produced Hbl. Antimicrobial resistance was assessed by microdilution; resistance genes were detected by PCR and further characterized by sequencing, transformation and conjugation assays. Nearly half of the strains harbored the antimicrobial resistance gene tet(45). In one strain, tet(45) was situated on a mobile genetic element—encoding a site-specific recombination mechanism—and was transferable to Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis by electro-transformation. In view of the wide and uncontrolled use of these products, stricter regulations for safety assessment, including determination of virulence factors and transferable antimicrobial resistance genes, are urgently needed. PMID:27242738

  12. Vacuum distillation residue upgrading by an indigenous bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biological processing of heavy fractions of crude oils offers less severe process conditions and higher selectivity for refining. Biochemical Processes are expected to be low demand energy processes and certainly ecofriendly. Results A strain of biosurfactant producing bacterium was isolated from an oil contaminated soil at Tehran refinery distillation unit. Based on selected phenotypic and genotypic characteristic including morphology, biochemical proprety, and 16 SrRNA sequencing identified as a novel strain of Bacillus cereus (JQ178332). This bacterium endures a wide range of pH, salinity and temperature. This specific strain utilizes both paraffin and anthracene as samples of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The ability of this bacterium to acquire all its energy and chemical requirements from Vacuum Distillation Residue (VR), as a net sample of problematic hydrocarbons in refineries, was studied. SARA test ASTM D4124-01 revealed 65.5% decrease in asphaltenic, 22.1% in aliphatics and 30.3% in Aromatics content of the VR in MSM medium. Further results with 0.9% saline showed 55% decrease in asphaltene content and 2.1% Aromatics respectively. Conclusion Remarkable abilities of this microorganism propose its application in an ecofriendly technology to upgrade heavy crude oils. PMID:24499629

  13. Ecological consequences of ingestion of Bacillus cereus on Bacillus thuringiensis infections and on the gut flora of a lepidopteran host.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Ben; Lijek, Rebeccah S; Griffiths, Robert I; Bonsall, Michael B

    2008-09-01

    The Bacillus cereus group comprises a diverse array of non-pathogenic bacteria as well as pathogens such as Bacillus thuringiensis. Their spores are found together in soil and leaves and are therefore likely to commonly interact within hosts. Mixed infections of pathogenic B. thuringiensis and non-pathogenic strains have been little studied, despite their potential impact on biological control and the evolutionary ecology of virulence. Antibiotic secreting strains of B. cereus have been shown to be able to synergize B. thuringiensis (Bt) infections. We explored the ecology of these mixed infections more broadly in the diamondback moth (DBM). We tested whether antibiotic-expressing B. cereus can synergize Bt infections initiated with spores, investigated whether ingestion of antibiotic-expressing B. cereus had any consequences for the larval gut flora and whether synergistic interactions with B. cereus increase Bt reproduction. Ingestion of high-antibiotic secreting B. cereus synergized infections of B. thuringiensis in diamondback moth larvae, but at a lower level than previously reported. Coinfection also increased slightly the number of Bt spores found in cadavers. Culture independent analysis of gut homogenates indicated that ingestion of an antibiotic-expressing strain of B. cereus reduced the abundance of the gut flora and led to gut communities being dominated bacteria with DGGE profiles very similar to pure B. cereus cultures. Ingestion of B. cereus, regardless of genotype, reduced densities of an enteric isolate of Enterobacter sp. These findings support the hypothesis that antibiotic secretion in the gut synergizes B. thuringiensis infections by reducing the abundance of the commensal gut flora and facilitating invasion by bacteria in the B. cereus group. PMID:18533180

  14. The Water Cycle, a Potential Source of the Bacterial Pathogen Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Brillard, Julien; Dupont, Christian M. S.; Berge, Odile; Dargaignaratz, Claire; Oriol-Gagnier, Stéphanie; Doussan, Claude; Broussolle, Véronique; Gillon, Marina; Clavel, Thierry; Bérard, Annette

    2015-01-01

    The behaviour of the sporulating soil-dwelling Bacillus cereus sensu lato (B. cereus sl) which includes foodborne pathogenic strains has been extensively studied in relation to its various animal hosts. The aim of this environmental study was to investigate the water compartments (rain and soil water, as well as groundwater) closely linked to the primary B. cereus sl reservoir, for which available data are limited. B. cereus sl was present, primarily as spores, in all of the tested compartments of an agricultural site, including water from rain to groundwater through soil. During rain events, leachates collected after transfer through the soil eventually reached the groundwater and were loaded with B. cereus sl. In groundwater samples, newly introduced spores of a B. cereus model strain were able to germinate, and vegetative cells arising from this event were detected for up to 50 days. This first B. cereus sl investigation in the various types of interrelated environments suggests that the consideration of the aquatic compartment linked to soil and to climatic events should provide a better understanding of B. cereus sl ecology and thus be relevant for a more accurate risk assessment of food poisoning caused by B. cereus sl pathogenic strains. PMID:25918712

  15. Bacillus cereus bacteremia and multiple brain abscesses during acute lymphoblastic leukemia induction therapy.

    PubMed

    Hansford, Jordan R; Phillips, Marianne; Cole, Catherine; Francis, Joshua; Blyth, Christopher C; Gottardo, Nicholas G

    2014-04-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious infections in immunosuppressed patients. This population may be susceptible to B. cereus pneumonia, bacteremia, cellulitis, and rarely cerebral abscess. Here we report an 8-year-old boy undergoing induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed multifocal B. cereus cerebral abscesses, highlighting the propensity for B. cereus to develop cerebral abscesses. A review of the literature over the past 25 years identified another 11 cases (3 children and 8 adults) of B. cereus cerebral abscess in patients undergoing cancer therapy. B. cereus cerebral abscesses were associated with a high mortality rate (42%) and significant morbidity. Notably, B. cereus bacteremia with concomitant cerebral abscess was associated with induction chemotherapy for acute leukemia in both children and adults (10 of 12 case reports). Our case report and review of the literature highlights the propensity for B. cereus to develop cerebral abscess(es). Therefore, early consideration for neuroimaging should be given for any neutropenic cancer patient identified with B. cereus bacteremia, in particular those with acute leukemia during induction therapy. PMID:23619116

  16. Meningitis due to Bacillus cereus: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Michael P; Elam, Kara; Bearman, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is infrequently associated with invasive central nervous system (CNS) disease. Infection is associated with conditions that lead to reduced host immunity and provide direct access to the CNS, such as spinal anesthesia and ventricular tubes and shunts. A case of ventriculitis secondary to B cereus in a patient receiving intrathecal chemotherapy is reported, along with a review of the current literature. B cereus can colonize medical devices, thus posing a risk for invasive disease. Despite aggressive treatment with broad-spectrum anti-infectives, the mortality of CNS invasive B cereus is high. Clinicians should not dismiss Gram-positive rods resembling Bacillus species from normally sterile sites as contaminants in critically ill patients. Appropriate antibiotic therapy should be promptly initiated to limit morbidity and mortality. PMID:23449377

  17. Radiosensitization of Bacillus cereus spores in minced meat treated with cinnamaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayari, S.; Dussault, D.; Jerbi, T.; Hamdi, M.; Lacroix, M.

    2012-08-01

    Minced meat beef inoculated with Bacillus cereus spores was treated with four essential oil constituents. The active compounds were sprayed separately onto the meat in order to determine the concentration needed to reduce by 1 log the population of B. cereus spores. Cinnamaldehyde was the best antimicrobial compound selected. It was mixed with ascorbic acid and/or sodium pyrophosphate decahydrate and tested for its efficiency to increase the relative radiation sensitivity (RRS) of B. cereus spores in minced meat packed under air. Results demonstrated that the radiation treatment in presence of the cinnamaldehyde and sodium phosphate decahydrate increased the RRS of B. cereus spores by two fold. The study revealed also that the irradiation of raw beef meat pre-treated with cinnamaldehyde produced an inhibition of the growth of B. cereus count during refrigerated storage. This technology seems to be compatible with industrial meat processing.

  18. Antimicrobial Effect of Nisin against Bacillus cereus in Beef Jerky during Storage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Na-Kyoung; Kim, Hyoun Wook; Lee, Joo Yeon; Ahn, Dong Uk; Kim, Cheon-Jei; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The microbial distribution of raw materials and beef jerky, and the effect of nisin on the growth of Bacillus cereus inoculated in beef jerky during storage, were studied. Five strains of pathogenic B. cereus were detected in beef jerky, and identified with 99.8% agreement using API CHB 50 kit. To evaluate the effect of nisin, beef jerky was inoculated with approximately 3 Log CFU/g of B. cereus mixed culture and nisin (100 IU/g and 500 IU/g). During the storage of beef jerky without nisin, the number of mesophilic bacteria and B. cereus increased unlikely for beef jerky with nisin. B. cereus started to grow after 3 d in 100 IU nisin/g treatment, and after 21 d in 500 IU nisin/g treatment. The results suggest that nisin could be an effective approach to extend the shelf-life, and improve the microbial safety of beef jerky, during storage. PMID:26761838

  19. Inhibition of Bacillus cereus Growth and Toxin Production by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens RD7-7 in Fermented Soybean Products.

    PubMed

    Eom, Jeong Seon; Choi, Hye Sun

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a gram-positive, rod-shaped, spore-forming bacterium that has been isolated from contaminated fermented soybean food products and from the environment. B. cereus produces diarrheal and emetic toxins and has caused many outbreaks of foodborne diseases. In this study, we investigated whether B. amyloliquefaciens RD7-7, isolated from rice doenjang (Korean fermented soybean paste), a traditional Korean fermented soybean food, shows antimicrobial activity against B. cereus and regulates its toxin gene expression. B. amyloliquefaciens RD7-7 exhibited strong antibacterial activity against B. cereus and inhibited the expression of B. cereus toxin-related genes (groEL, nheA, nheC, and entFM). We also found that addition of water extracts of soybean and buckwheat soksungjang (Korean fermented soybean paste made in a short time) fermented with B. amyloliquefaciens RD7-7 significantly reduced the growth and toxin expression of B. cereus. These results indicate that B. amyloliquefaciens RD7-7 could be used to control B. cereus growth and toxin production in the fermented soybean food industry. Our findings also provide a basis for the development of candidate biological control agents against B. cereus to improve the safety of fermented soybean food products. PMID:26528531

  20. A cluster of Bacillus cereus bacteremia cases among injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Benusic, Michael A; Press, Natasha M; Hoang, Linda MN; Romney, Marc G

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous spore-forming organism that is infrequently implicated in extraintestinal infections. The authors report three cases of B cereus bacteremia among injection drug users presenting within one month to an urban tertiary care hospital. Treatment with intravenous vancomycin was successful in all three cases. While temporal association suggested an outbreak, molecular studies of patient isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis did not suggest a common source. A review of the association of B cereus infections with heroin use and treatment of this pathogen is provided. PMID:26015795

  1. A cluster of Bacillus cereus bacteremia cases among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Benusic, Michael A; Press, Natasha M; Hoang, Linda Mn; Romney, Marc G

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous spore-forming organism that is infrequently implicated in extraintestinal infections. The authors report three cases of B cereus bacteremia among injection drug users presenting within one month to an urban tertiary care hospital. Treatment with intravenous vancomycin was successful in all three cases. While temporal association suggested an outbreak, molecular studies of patient isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis did not suggest a common source. A review of the association of B cereus infections with heroin use and treatment of this pathogen is provided. PMID:26015795

  2. Disinfection of Preexisting Contamination of BACILLUS CEREUS on Stainless Steel when Using Glycoconjugate Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavan, Casey; Tarasenko, Olga

    2011-06-01

    Stainless steel is ubiquitous in our modern world, however it can become contaminated. This can endanger our health. The aim of our study is to disinfect stainless steel using Bacillus cereus as a model organism. Bacillus cereus is a microbe that is ubiquitous in nature, specifically soil. B. cereus is known to cause illness in humans. To prevent this, we propose to use a glycoconjugate solution (GS) for disinfection of stainless steel after it is contamination by B. cereus spores. In this study, two GS (9, 10) were tested for disinfection effectiveness on B. cereus spores on the surface of stainless steel foil (AISI-Series 200/300/400, THERMA-FOIL, Dayville, CT 0241). The disinfection rate of each GS was assessed by exposing the steel surface to B. cereus spores first and allowing them to settle for 24 hours. GS was used to treat the contaminated surface. The steel is washed and the resulting solution is plated on tryptic soy agar (TSA) plates. The GS with the fewest colony forming unit (CFU) formed on TSA is determined to be the most efficient during disinfection. Results show that both GS demonstrate a strong ability to disinfect B. cereus spores. Between the two, GS 9 shows the highest disinfection efficacy by killing approximately 99.5% of spores. This is a drastic improvement over the 0-20% disinfection of the control. Based on this we find that studied GS do have the capacity to act as a disinfectant on stainless steel.

  3. Disinfection of preexisting contamination of bacillus cereus on stainless steel when using glycoconjugate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Pavan, Casey; Tarasenko, Olga

    2011-06-10

    Stainless steel is ubiquitous in our modern world, however it can become contaminated. This can endanger our health. The aim of our study is to disinfect stainless steel using Bacillus cereus as a model organism. Bacillus cereus is a microbe that is ubiquitous in nature, specifically soil. B. cereus is known to cause illness in humans. To prevent this, we propose to use a glycoconjugate solution (GS) for disinfection of stainless steel after it is contamination by B. cereus spores. In this study, two GS (9, 10) were tested for disinfection effectiveness on B. cereus spores on the surface of stainless steel foil (AISI-Series 200/300/400, THERMA-FOIL, Dayville, CT 0241). The disinfection rate of each GS was assessed by exposing the steel surface to B. cereus spores first and allowing them to settle for 24 hours. GS was used to treat the contaminated surface. The steel is washed and the resulting solution is plated on tryptic soy agar (TSA) plates. The GS with the fewest colony forming unit (CFU) formed on TSA is determined to be the most efficient during disinfection. Results show that both GS demonstrate a strong ability to disinfect B. cereus spores. Between the two, GS 9 shows the highest disinfection efficacy by killing approximately 99.5% of spores. This is a drastic improvement over the 0-20% disinfection of the control. Based on this we find that studied GS do have the capacity to act as a disinfectant on stainless steel.

  4. Assessment of a new selective chromogenic Bacillus cereus group plating medium and use of enterobacterial autoinducer of growth for cultural identification of Bacillus species.

    PubMed

    Reissbrodt, R; Rassbach, A; Burghardt, B; Rienäcker, I; Mietke, H; Schleif, J; Tschäpe, H; Lyte, M; Williams, P H

    2004-08-01

    A new chromogenic Bacillus cereus group plating medium permits differentiation of pathogenic Bacillus species by colony morphology and color. Probiotic B. cereus mutants were distinguished from wild-type strains by their susceptibilities to penicillin G or cefazolin. The enterobacterial autoinducer increased the sensitivity and the speed of enrichment of B. cereus and B. anthracis spores in serum-supplemented minimal salts medium (based on the standard American Petroleum Institute medium) and buffered peptone water. PMID:15297532

  5. Cloning, Purification and Characterization of the Collagenase ColA Expressed by Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579.

    PubMed

    Abfalter, Carmen M; Schönauer, Esther; Ponnuraj, Karthe; Huemer, Markus; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Regl, Christof; Briza, Peter; Ferreira, Fatima; Huber, Christian G; Brandstetter, Hans; Posselt, Gernot; Wessler, Silja

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial collagenases differ considerably in their structure and functions. The collagenases ColH and ColG from Clostridium histolyticum and ColA expressed by Clostridium perfringens are well-characterized collagenases that cleave triple-helical collagen, which were therefore termed as ´true´ collagenases. ColA from Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) has been added to the collection of true collagenases. However, the molecular characteristics of B. cereus ColA are less understood. In this study, we identified ColA as a secreted true collagenase from B. cereus ATCC 14579, which is transcriptionally controlled by the regulon phospholipase C regulator (PlcR). B. cereus ATCC 14579 ColA was cloned to express recombinant wildtype ColA (ColAwt) and mutated to a proteolytically inactive (ColAE501A) version. Recombinant ColAwt was tested for gelatinolytic and collagenolytic activities and ColAE501A was used for the production of a polyclonal anti-ColA antibody. Comparison of ColAwt activity with homologous proteases in additional strains of B. cereus sensu lato (B. cereus s.l.) and related clostridial collagenases revealed that B. cereus ATCC 14579 ColA is a highly active peptidolytic and collagenolytic protease. These findings could lead to a deeper insight into the function and mechanism of bacterial collagenases which are used in medical and biotechnological applications. PMID:27588686

  6. Prevalence and genetic diversity of Bacillus cereus in dried red pepper in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choo, Euiyoung; Jang, Sung Sik; Kim, Kyumson; Lee, Kwang-Geun; Heu, Sunggi; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2007-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is a foodborne spore-forming bacterial pathogen that is ubiquitous in the natural environment. Infections with this pathogen manifest as diarrheal or emetic types of food poisoning. In this study, 140 samples of dried red pepper purchased in Korea were assayed for the presence of B. cereus according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration standard culture method. A multiplex PCR assay was developed for the rapid confirmation of B. cereus as an alternative to conventional biochemical confirmation tests. The genetic diversity of B. cereus isolates was investigated using a random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay. B. cereus was found in 84.3% of the dried red pepper samples, with an average concentration of 1.9 x 10(4) CFU/g. B. cereus could be detected and distinguished from B. thuringiensis in the multiplex PCR assay by using the BCFW1 plus BCrevnew and the K3 plus K5 primer sets designed to detect the gyrB gene of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis and the cry gene of B. thuringiensis. A RAPD assay using the OPG 16 and MUP 3 primers was used to successfully distinguish among isolates, thus elucidating the genetic diversity of B. cereus isolates. The discriminating ability of the OPG 16 primer (142 types) was about threefold higher than that of MUP 3 (52 types) in the RAPD assay. PMID:17477261

  7. Successful Treatment of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia.

    PubMed

    Aygun, Fatma Deniz; Aygun, Fatih; Cam, Halit

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious, life-threatening, systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. The ability of microorganism to form biofilm on biomedical devices can be responsible for catheter-related bloodstream infections. Other manifestations of severe disease are meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections. The most common feature in true bacteremia caused by Bacillus is the presence of an intravascular catheter. Herein, we report a case of catheter-related bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a patient with propionic acidemia. PMID:27195164

  8. Successful Treatment of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia

    PubMed Central

    Aygun, Fatih; Cam, Halit

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious, life-threatening, systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. The ability of microorganism to form biofilm on biomedical devices can be responsible for catheter-related bloodstream infections. Other manifestations of severe disease are meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections. The most common feature in true bacteremia caused by Bacillus is the presence of an intravascular catheter. Herein, we report a case of catheter-related bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a patient with propionic acidemia. PMID:27195164

  9. Phosphatidylcholine-Specific Phospholipase C and Sphingomyelinase Activities in Bacteria of the Bacillus cereus Group

    PubMed Central

    Pomerantsev, A. P.; Kalnin, K. V.; Osorio, M.; Leppla, S. H.

    2003-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is nonhemolytic, even though it is closely related to the highly hemolytic Bacillus cereus. Hemolysis by B. cereus results largely from the action of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) and sphingomyelinase (SPH), encoded by the plc and sph genes, respectively. In B. cereus, these genes are organized in an operon regulated by the global regulator PlcR. B. anthracis contains a highly similar cereolysin operon, but it is transcriptionally silent because the B. anthracis PlcR is truncated at the C terminus. Here we report the cloning, expression, purification, and enzymatic characterization of PC-PLC and SPH from B. cereus and B. anthracis. We also investigated the effects of expressing PlcR on the expression of plc and sph. In B. cereus, PlcR was found to be a positive regulator of plc but a negative regulator of sph. Replacement of the B. cereus plcR gene by its truncated orthologue from B. anthracis eliminated the activities of both PC-PLC and SPH, whereas introduction into B. anthracis of the B. cereus plcR gene with its own promoter did not activate cereolysin expression. Hemolytic activity was detected in B. anthracis strains containing the B. cereus plcR gene on a multicopy plasmid under control of the strong B. anthracis protective antigen gene promoter or in a strain carrying a multicopy plasmid containing the entire B. cereus plc-sph operon. Slight hemolysis and PC-PLC activation were found when PlcR-producing B. anthracis strains were grown under anaerobic-plus-CO2 or especially under aerobic-plus-CO2 conditions. Unmodified parental B. anthracis strains did not demonstrate obvious hemolysis under the same conditions. PMID:14573681

  10. Localization of new peptidoglycan at poles in Bacillus mycoides, a member of the Bacillus cereus group.

    PubMed

    Turchi, Luana; Santini, Tiziana; Beccari, Elena; Di Franco, Carmen

    2012-10-01

    Bacillus mycoides is a sporogenic Gram-positive soil bacillus of the B. cereus group. This bacillus, which forms hyphal colonies, is composed of cells connected in filaments that make up bundles and turn clock- or counterclockwise depending on the strain. A thick peptidoglycan wall gives the rod cells of these bacilli strength and shape. One approach used to study peptidoglycan neoformation in Gram positives exploits the binding properties of antibiotics such as vancomycin and ramoplanin to nascent peptidoglycan, whose localization in the cell is monitored by means of a fluorescent tag. When we treated B. mycoides strains with BODIPY-vancomycin, we found the expected accumulation of fluorescence at the midcell septa and localization along the cell sidewall in small foci distributed quite uniformly. Intense fluorescence was also observed at the poles of many cells, more clearly visible at the outer edges of the cell chains. The unusual abundance of peptidoglycan intermediates at the cell poles after cell separation suggests that the construction process of this structure is different from that of B. subtilis, in which the free poles are rarely reactive to vancomycin. PMID:22773111

  11. Glycosylation of BclA Glycoprotein from Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis Exosporium Is Domain-specific.

    PubMed

    Maes, Emmanuel; Krzewinski, Frederic; Garenaux, Estelle; Lequette, Yannick; Coddeville, Bernadette; Trivelli, Xavier; Ronse, Annette; Faille, Christine; Guerardel, Yann

    2016-04-29

    The spores of the Bacillus cereus group (B. cereus, Bacillus anthracis, and Bacillus thuringiensis) are surrounded by a paracrystalline flexible yet resistant layer called exosporium that plays a major role in spore adhesion and virulence. The major constituent of its hairlike surface, the trimerized glycoprotein BclA, is attached to the basal layer through an N-terminal domain. It is then followed by a repetitive collagen-like neck bearing a globular head (C-terminal domain) that promotes glycoprotein trimerization. The collagen-like region of B. anthracis is known to be densely substituted by unusual O-glycans that may be used for developing species-specific diagnostics of B. anthracis spores and thus targeted therapeutic interventions. In the present study, we have explored the species and domain specificity of BclA glycosylation within the B. cereus group. First, we have established that the collagen-like regions of both B. anthracis and B. cereus are similarly substituted by short O-glycans that bear the species-specific deoxyhexose residues anthrose and the newly observed cereose, respectively. Second we have discovered that the C-terminal globular domains of BclA from both species are substituted by polysaccharide-like O-linked glycans whose structures are also species-specific. The presence of large carbohydrate polymers covering the surface of Bacillus spores may have a profound impact on the way that spores regulate their interactions with biotic and abiotic surfaces and represents potential new diagnostic targets. PMID:26921321

  12. Relapsing peritonitis with Bacillus cereus in a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Eyð Tausen; Vang, Amanda Gratton; Á Steig, Torkil; Gaini, Shahin

    2016-01-01

    We present a case where Bacillus cereus was determined to be the causative agent of relapsing peritonitis in a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The patient, a 70-year-old man from the Faroe Islands, was admitted with relapsing peritonitis four times over a 3-month period. Peritoneal cultures were positive for growth of B. cereus, a rare bacterial cause of peritonitis. The cultures demonstrated susceptibility to vancomycin, and therefore the patient was treated with intraperitoneal vancomycin, intraperitoneal gentamycin and oral ciprofloxacin. As a result of the relapsing B. cereus peritonitis diagnosis and a CT scan showing contraction of the peritoneum after longstanding inflammation, the peritoneal catheter was removed and the patient converted to haemodialysis. To date, the patient has not been readmitted due to peritonitis. A lack of proper hygiene when changing the dialysis bag was the suspected source of infection with B. cereus. PMID:27118739

  13. Antimicrobial activities of tea catechins and theaflavins and tea extracts against Bacillus cereus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the antimicrobial activities of seven green tea catechins and four black tea theaflavins, generally referred to as flavonoids, as well as the aqueous extracts (infusions) of 36 commercial black, green, oolong, white, and herbal teas against Bacillus cereus (strain RM3190) incubated at 2...

  14. Genome Sequence of Bacillus cereus Strain A1, an Efficient Starch-Utilizing Producer of Hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Bao, Meidan; Wang, Yu; Su, Haijia; Tan, Tianwei

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus cereus strain A1 is a newly isolated hydrogen producer capable of utilizing bioresources and biowaste, such as starch and starch wastewater. Here, we present a 5.67-Mb assembly of the genome sequence of strain A1, which may provide insights into the molecular mechanism of hydrogen production from bioresources and biowaste. PMID:24874679

  15. Genome Sequence of Bacillus cereus Phage vB_BceS-MY192.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Zhan, Li; Chen, Jiancai; Zhang, Yunyi; Sun, Yi; Yang, Zhangnv; Jiang, Liping; Zhu, Hanping; Zhang, Yanjun; Lu, Yiyu; Mei, Lingling

    2016-01-01

    ITALIC! Bacillus cereusis an opportunistic foodborne pathogen. The phage vB_BceS-MY192 was isolated from ITALIC! B. cereus192 in a cooked rice sample. The temperate phage belongs to the ITALIC! Siphoviridaefamily, ITALIC! Caudoviralesorder. Here we announce the phage genome sequence and its annotation, which may expand the understanding of ITALIC! B. cereussiphophages. PMID:27103733

  16. Genome Sequence of a Chromium-Reducing Strain, Bacillus cereus S612

    PubMed Central

    Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Doug S.; Reimus, Paul W.; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Johnson, Shannon L.; Li, Po-E

    2015-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of an effective chromium-reducing bacterium, Bacillus cereus strain S612. The size of the draft genome sequence is approximately 5.4 Mb, with a G+C content of 35%, and it is predicted to contain 5,450 protein-coding genes. PMID:26659672

  17. The effect of selected factors on the survival of Bacillus cereus in the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Berthold-Pluta, Anna; Pluta, Antoni; Garbowska, Monika

    2015-05-01

    Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive bacterium widely distributed in soil and vegetation. This bacterial species can also contaminate raw or processed foods. Pathogenic B. cereus strains can cause a range of infections in humans, as well as food poisoning of an emetic (intoxication) or diarrheal type (toxico-infection). Toxico-infections are due to the action of the Hbl toxin, Nhe toxin, and cytotoxin K produced by the microorganism in the gastrointestinal tract. This occurs once the spores or vegetative B. cereus cells survive the pH barrier of the stomach and reach the small intestine where they produce toxins in sufficient amounts. This article discusses the effect of various factors on the survival of B. cereus in the gastrointestinal tract, including low pH and the presence of digestive enzymes in the stomach, bile salts in the small intestine, and indigenous microflora in the lower parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Additional aspects also reported to affect B. cereus survival and virulence in the gastrointestinal tract include the interaction of the spores and vegetative cells with enterocytes. In vitro studies revealed that both vegetative B. cereus and spores can survive in the gastrointestinal tract suggesting that the biological form of the microorganism may have less influence on the occurrence of the symptoms of infection than was once believed. It is most likely the interaction between the pathogen and enterocytes that is necessary for the diarrheal form of B. cereus food poisoning to develop. The adhesion of B. cereus to the intestinal epithelium allows the bacterium to grow and produce enterotoxins in the proximity of the epithelium. Recent studies suggest that the human intestinal microbiota inhibits the growth of vegetative B. cereus cells considerably. PMID:25794697

  18. Characterization and comparative genomic analysis of bacteriophages infecting members of the Bacillus cereus group.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Hoon; Shin, Hakdong; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2014-05-01

    The Bacillus cereus group phages infecting B. cereus, B. anthracis, and B. thuringiensis (Bt) have been studied at the molecular level and, recently, at the genomic level to control the pathogens B. cereus and B. anthracis and to prevent phage contamination of the natural insect pesticide Bt. A comparative phylogenetic analysis has revealed three different major phage groups with different morphologies (Myoviridae for group I, Siphoviridae for group II, and Tectiviridae for group III), genome size (group I > group II > group III), and lifestyle (virulent for group I and temperate for group II and III). A subsequent phage genome comparison using a dot plot analysis showed that phages in each group are highly homologous, substantiating the grouping of B. cereus phages. Endolysin is a host lysis protein that contains two conserved domains: a cell-wall-binding domain (CBD) and an enzymatic activity domain (EAD). In B. cereus sensu lato phage group I, four different endolysin groups have been detected, according to combinations of two types of CBD and four types of EAD. Group I phages have two copies of tail lysins and one copy of endolysin, but the functions of the tail lysins are still unknown. In the B. cereus sensu lato phage group II, the B. anthracis phages have been studied and applied for typing and rapid detection of pathogenic host strains. In the B. cereus sensu lato phage group III, the B. thuringiensis phages Bam35 and GIL01 have been studied to understand phage entry and lytic switch regulation mechanisms. In this review, we suggest that further study of the B. cereus group phages would be useful for various phage applications, such as biocontrol, typing, and rapid detection of the pathogens B. cereus and B. anthracis and for the prevention of phage contamination of the natural insect pesticide Bt. PMID:24264384

  19. MALDI-TOF MS portrait of emetic and non-emetic Bacillus cereus group members.

    PubMed

    Fiedoruk, Krzysztof; Daniluk, Tamara; Fiodor, Angelika; Drewicka, Ewa; Buczynska, Katarzyna; Leszczynska, Katarzyna; Bideshi, Dennis Ken; Swiecicka, Izabela

    2016-08-01

    The number of foodborne intoxications caused by emetic Bacillus cereus isolates has increased significantly. As such, rapid and reliable methods to identify emetic strains appear to be clinically relevant. In this study, intact cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was used to differentiate emetic and non-emetic bacilli. The phyloproteomic clustering of 34 B. cereus emetic and 88 non-emetic isolates classified as B. cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus weihenstephanensis, and Bacillus mycoides, showed (i) a clear separation of both groups at a similarity level of 43%, and (ii) a high relatedness among the emetic isolates (similarity of 78%). Specifically, 83 mass peak classes were recognized in the spectral window range between m/z 4000 and 12 000 that were tentatively assigned to 41 protein variants based on a bioinformatic approach. Mass variation between the emetic and the non-emetic subsets was recorded for 27 of them, including ten ribosomal subunit proteins, for which inter-strain polymorphism was confirmed by gene sequencing. Additional peaks were assigned to other proteins such as small acid soluble proteins, cold shock proteins and hypothetical proteins, e.g., carbohydrate kinase. Moreover, the results were supported by in silico analysis of the biomarkers in 259 members of B. cereus group, including Bacillus anthracis, based on their whole-genome sequences. In conclusion, the proteomic profiling by MALDI-TOF MS is a promising and rapid method for pre-screening B. cereus to identify medically relevant isolates and for epidemiologic purposes. PMID:27196540

  20. Development of a double-antibody sandwich ELISA for rapid detection of Bacillus Cereus in food.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Longjiao; He, Jing; Cao, Xiaohan; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo; Xu, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is increasingly recognized as one of the major causes of food poisoning in the industrialized world. In this paper, we describe a sensitive double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that was developed for rapid detection of B. cereus in food to minimize the risk of contamination. The polyclonal antibody (pAb) and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific to B. cereus were generated from rabbit antiserum and mouse ascites, respectively, using the octanoic acid/saturated ammonium sulfate precipitation method and protein A-sepharose columns. IgG-isotype mAbs were specially developed to undergo a novel peripheral multiple sites immunization for rapid gain of hybridomas and a subtractive screen was used to eliminate cross reactivity with closely related species such as Bacillus thuringiensis, B. subtilis, B. licheniformis and B. perfringens. The linear detection range of the method was approximately 1 × 10(4)-2.8 × 10(6) cells/mL with a detection limit (LOD) of 0.9 × 10(3) cells/mL. The assay was able to detect B. cereus when the samples were prepared in meat with various pathogens. The newly developed analytical method provides a rapid method to sensitively detect B. cereus in food specimens. PMID:26976753

  1. Development of a double-antibody sandwich ELISA for rapid detection of Bacillus Cereus in food

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Longjiao; He, Jing; Cao, Xiaohan; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo; Xu, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is increasingly recognized as one of the major causes of food poisoning in the industrialized world. In this paper, we describe a sensitive double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that was developed for rapid detection of B. cereus in food to minimize the risk of contamination. The polyclonal antibody (pAb) and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific to B. cereus were generated from rabbit antiserum and mouse ascites, respectively, using the octanoic acid/saturated ammonium sulfate precipitation method and protein A-sepharose columns. IgG-isotype mAbs were specially developed to undergo a novel peripheral multiple sites immunization for rapid gain of hybridomas and a subtractive screen was used to eliminate cross reactivity with closely related species such as Bacillus thuringiensis, B. subtilis, B. licheniformis and B. perfringens. The linear detection range of the method was approximately 1 × 104–2.8 × 106 cells/mL with a detection limit (LOD) of 0.9 × 103 cells/mL. The assay was able to detect B. cereus when the samples were prepared in meat with various pathogens. The newly developed analytical method provides a rapid method to sensitively detect B. cereus in food specimens. PMID:26976753

  2. Characterization of Bacillus cereus isolates from local dairy farms in China.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yifang; Liu, Xiaoye; Dietrich, Richard; Märtlbauer, Erwin; Cao, Jie; Ding, Shuangyang; Zhu, Kui

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus cereus is an important opportunistic foodborne pathogen. In the present work, a total of 306 milk and environmental samples were collected from 10 local dairy farms in Beijing, China. Of the 92 B. cereus-like isolates, 88 and 4 belonged to B. cereus and B. thuringiensis, respectively. The prevalence of B. cereus isolates in bedding, feces, feed, liquid manure and raw milk was 93.3%, 78.9%, 41.2%, 100.0% and 9.8%, respectively. Three main toxin genes nhe, hbl and ces were detected with rates of 100.0%, 78.3% and 1.1%, but no strain harbored cytK1 The production of Nhe, Hbl and cereulide could be confirmed by specific monoclonal antibodies-based enzyme immunoassays in 94.6%, 70.7% and 1.1% of all isolates, respectively. Cytotoxicity tests were used to further corroborate the results of genetic and protein-based assays; 91.3% of the isolates showed cytotoxicity to Vero cells. All isolates were tested for antimicrobial resistance against 17 antibiotics. All isolates were resistant to lincomycin, retapamulin, tiamulin and valnemulin, while two strains were susceptible to ampicillin and ceftiofur. A total of 16 isolated strains were resistant to tetracycline. Since spores of B. cereus are not inactivated during manufacturing of most milk products, contamination of milk with B. cereus on the farm level may represent a potential hazard, particularly with respect to emetic toxin-producing strains. PMID:27190168

  3. Bacillus cereus strain S2 shows high nematicidal activity against Meloidogyne incognita by producing sphingosine

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Huijuan; Qi, Gaofu; Yin, Rong; Zhang, Hongchun; Li, Chenggang; Zhao, Xiuyun

    2016-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes cause serious crop losses worldwidely. This study intended to discover the antagonistic mechanism of Bacillus cereus strain S2 against Meloidogyne incognita. Treatment with B. cereus strain S2 resulted in a mortality of 77.89% to Caenorhabditis elegans (a model organism) and 90.96% to M. incognita. In pot experiment, control efficiency of B. cereus S2 culture or supernatants were 81.36% and 67.42% towards M. incognita, respectively. In field experiment, control efficiency was 58.97% towards M. incognita. Nematicidal substances were isolated from culture supernatant of B. cereus S2 by polarity gradient extraction, silica gel column chromatography and HPLC. Two nematicidal compounds were identified as C16 sphingosine and phytosphingosine by LC-MS. The median lethal concentration of sphingosine was determined as 0.64 μg/ml. Sphingosine could obviously inhibit reproduction of C. elegans, with an inhibition rate of 42.72% for 24 h. After treatment with sphingosine, ROS was induced in intestinal tract, and genital area disappeared in nematode. Furthermore, B. cereus S2 could induce systemic resistance in tomato, and enhance activity of defense-related enzymes for biocontrol of M. incognita. This study demonstrates the nematicidal activity of B. cereus and its product sphingosine, as well provides a possibility for biocontrol of M. incognita. PMID:27338781

  4. Bacillus cereus strain S2 shows high nematicidal activity against Meloidogyne incognita by producing sphingosine.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huijuan; Qi, Gaofu; Yin, Rong; Zhang, Hongchun; Li, Chenggang; Zhao, Xiuyun

    2016-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes cause serious crop losses worldwidely. This study intended to discover the antagonistic mechanism of Bacillus cereus strain S2 against Meloidogyne incognita. Treatment with B. cereus strain S2 resulted in a mortality of 77.89% to Caenorhabditis elegans (a model organism) and 90.96% to M. incognita. In pot experiment, control efficiency of B. cereus S2 culture or supernatants were 81.36% and 67.42% towards M. incognita, respectively. In field experiment, control efficiency was 58.97% towards M. incognita. Nematicidal substances were isolated from culture supernatant of B. cereus S2 by polarity gradient extraction, silica gel column chromatography and HPLC. Two nematicidal compounds were identified as C16 sphingosine and phytosphingosine by LC-MS. The median lethal concentration of sphingosine was determined as 0.64 μg/ml. Sphingosine could obviously inhibit reproduction of C. elegans, with an inhibition rate of 42.72% for 24 h. After treatment with sphingosine, ROS was induced in intestinal tract, and genital area disappeared in nematode. Furthermore, B. cereus S2 could induce systemic resistance in tomato, and enhance activity of defense-related enzymes for biocontrol of M. incognita. This study demonstrates the nematicidal activity of B. cereus and its product sphingosine, as well provides a possibility for biocontrol of M. incognita. PMID:27338781

  5. Assessment of hydrophobicity and roughness of stainless steel adhered by an isolate of Bacillus cereus from a dairy plant

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, Patrícia Campos; de Andrade, Nélio José; Ferreira, Sukarno Olavo; de Sá, João Paulo Natalino; Araújo, Emiliane Andrade; Delatorre, Deyse Maria Zanom; Luiz, Lívia Maria Pinheiro

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between the surface of stainless steel and Bacillus cereus was studied in terms of the characteristics of interfacial interaction determined from the measurement of the contact angle of the surface of B. cereus and stainless steel in the presence or absence of B. cereus adherence. The microtopographies and the roughness of the surface of stainless steel and stainless steel adhered by B. cereus were evaluated with the help of atomic force microscopy and perfilometry. The strain of B. cereus studied was considered hydrophilic, whereas the stainless steel was considered hydrophobic. The adhesion was not thermodynamically favorable (ΔGadhesion > 0) between the stainless steel and the strain of B. cereus studied. Thus, the interaction between them was not favored by the thermodynamic aspect of adhesion. There was no difference (p > 0.05) in the roughness of the surfaces of stainless steel adhered by B. cereus when analyzed by atomic force microscope and perfilometry. PMID:24031578

  6. [Bacillus cereus septicemia and necrotizing fasciitis in a patient with liver cirrhosis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shogo; Kirishima, Toshihiko; Okamoto, Naoki; Hisano, Yasuko; Takai, Koji; Motoyoshi, Takayuki; Nishikata, Makoto; Yamashita, Yasuhide; Yoshinami, Naomi; Shintani, Hiroyuki

    2014-10-01

    A 54-year-old woman with hematemesis was referred to our hospital. She had a history of liver cirrhosis and diabetes mellitus. After inserting a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube, we performed endoscopic variceal ligation for ruptured esophageal varices. On the third day of admission, she developed septicemia and necrotizing fasciitis caused by Bacillus cereus. She was successfully treated with early debridement of both lower extremities and intravenous treatment with vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, and clindamycin. Although B. cereus is an attenuate bacterium, it can occasionally cause fatal infection in immuno-compromised individuals, such as those with liver cirrhosis. PMID:25283231

  7. Isolation and characterisation of Bacillus cereus from pasteurised milk in household refrigerators in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Te Giffel, M C; Beumer, R R; Granum, P E; Rombouts, F M

    1997-03-01

    The incidence and some characteristics (carbohydrate metabolism, growth profiles, haemolysin production and enterotoxin production) of Bacillus cereus, in pasteurised, low-fat (1.5%) milk, in household refrigerators in the Netherlands was investigated. In 247 (74%) of the 334 milk samples analyzed, the mesophilic aerobic counts were between 50 and 5000 per millilitre. B. cereus could be isolated from 133 (40%) of the samples. In general the B. cereus counts were low; numbers of less than five per millilitre were observed in 258 (77%) of the samples. As expected, both the mesophilic aerobic counts and levels of B. cereus increased with increasing storage temperatures in the refrigerator and prolonged storage times. In total, 143 presumptive B. cereus colonies were isolated. According to the ISO confirmation tests and the carbohydrate patterns (API 50 CHB) 134 (94%) of these isolates were confirmed to be B. cereus. Of these 134 isolates 20% fermented lactose and 53% of the 106 strains tested were able to grow at 7 degrees C. These percentages are much higher than expected for strains isolated from non-dairy products, suggesting that strains can adapt to environmental conditions in milk. All 106 strains tested, produced haemolysin, 27% showed the discontinuous haemolytic pattern characteristic for haemolysin BL, possibly a virulence factor. Of the 37 B. cereus isolates tested for enterotoxin production 27 (73%), 28 (76%) and 26 (70%) were found to be enterotoxigenic (as determined by the Western immunoblot technique, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Vero cell assays, respectively). Isolates unable to ferment lactose, produced less enterotoxin in comparison with those able to utilize lactose. Although only a few outbreaks of food poisoning caused by B. cereus in milk (products) have been reported, most strains isolated from these products are able to produce enterotoxins and may represent a health hazard. PMID:9039575

  8. A Novel Sensitive Bioassay for Detection of Bacillus cereus Emetic Toxin and Related Depsipeptide Ionophores

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, M. A.; Mikkola, R.; Helin, J.; Andersson, M. C.; Salkinoja-Salonen, M.

    1998-01-01

    Of the toxins produced by Bacillus cereus, the emetic toxin is likely the most dangerous but, due to the lack of a suitable assay, the least well known. In this paper, a new, sensitive, inexpensive, and rapid bioassay for detection of the emetic toxin of B. cereus is described. The assay is based on the loss of motility of boar spermatozoa upon 24 h of exposure to extracts of emetic B. cereus strains or contaminated food. The paralyzed spermatozoa exhibited swollen mitochondria, but no depletion of cellular ATP or damage to plasma membrane integrity was observed. Analysis of the purified toxin by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry showed that it was a dodecadepsipeptide with a mass fragmentation pattern similar to that described for cereulide. The 50% effective concentration of the purified toxin to boar spermatozoa was 0.5 ng of purified toxin ml of extended boar semen−1. This amount corresponds to 104 to 105 CFU of B. cereus cells. No toxicity was detected for 27 other B. cereus strains up to 108 CFU ml−1. The detection limit for food was 3 g of rice containing 106 to 107 CFU of emetic B. cereus per gram. Effects similar to those provoked by emetic B. cereus toxin were also induced in boar spermatozoa by valinomycin and gramicidin at 2 and 3 ng ml of extended boar semen−1, respectively. The symptoms provoked by the toxin in spermatozoa indicated that B. cereus emetic toxin was acting as a membrane channel-forming ionophore, damaging mitochondria and blocking the oxidative phosphorylation required for the motility of boar spermatozoa. PMID:9546170

  9. Environmental and Biofilm-dependent Changes in a Bacillus cereus Secondary Cell Wall Polysaccharide*

    PubMed Central

    Candela, Thomas; Maes, Emmanuel; Garénaux, Estelle; Rombouts, Yoann; Krzewinski, Frédéric; Gohar, Michel; Guérardel, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial species from the Bacillus genus, including Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis, synthesize secondary cell wall polymers (SCWP) covalently associated to the peptidoglycan through a phospho-diester linkage. Although such components were observed in a wide panel of B. cereus and B. anthracis strains, the effect of culture conditions or of bacterial growth state on their synthesis has never been addressed. Herein we show that B. cereus ATCC 14579 can synthesize not only one, as previously reported, but two structurally unrelated secondary cell wall polymers (SCWP) polysaccharides. The first of these SCWP, →4)[GlcNAc(β1–3)]GlcNAc(β1–6)[Glc(β1-3)][ManNAc(α1–4)]GalNAc(α1–4)ManNAc(β1→, although presenting an original sequence, fits to the already described the canonical sequence motif of SCWP. In contrast, the second polysaccharide was made up by a totally original sequence, →6)Gal(α1–2)(2-R-hydroxyglutar-5-ylamido)Fuc2NAc4N(α1-6)GlcNAc(β1→, which no equivalent has ever been identified in the Bacillus genus. In addition, we established that the syntheses of these two polysaccharides were differently regulated. The first one is constantly expressed at the surface of the bacteria, whereas the expression of the second is tightly regulated by culture conditions and growth states, planktonic, or biofilm. PMID:21784857

  10. Bacteriostatic Mode of Action of Trypsin-Hydrolyzed Palm Kernel Expeller Peptide Against Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yen Nee; Matthews, Karl R; Di, Rong; Ayob, Mohd Khan

    2012-03-01

    Palm kernel expeller (PKE), the by-product derived from the palm kernel oil milling industry, is commonly added to ruminant feed as a source of protein. Recent research has demonstrated that the enzymatically hydrolyzed protein is inhibitory to spore-forming bacteria including Bacillus cereus. The trypsin-hydrolyzed PKE peptide appears to disrupt the membrane integrity and inhibit the intracellular macromolecule metabolism of B. cereus. The addition of the PKE peptide (350 and 700 μg/ml) to B. cereus cultures triggered the efflux of K(+) and caused the depletion of the intracellular ATP. However, no proportional increase in cell's extracellular ATP was observed. Analysis of the biosynthesis of macromolecules demonstrated that RNA was affected by the PKE peptide. Results of this study suggest that the PKE peptide is bacteriostatic interfering with membrane integrity and forming membrane pores permitting the efflux of K(+) and interferes with intracellular biopolymer synthesis. PMID:26781737

  11. Endotrophic Calcium, Strontium, and Barium Spores of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus cereus1

    PubMed Central

    Foerster, Harold F.; Foster, J. W.

    1966-01-01

    Foerster, Harold F. (The University of Texas, Austin), and J. W. Foster. Endotrophic calcium, strontium, and barium spores of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus cereus. J. Bacteriol. 91:1333–1345. 1966.—Spores were produced by washed vegetative cells suspended in deionized water supplemented with CaCl2, SrCl2, or BaCl2. Normal, refractile spores were produced in each case; a portion of the barium spores lost refractility and darkened. Thin-section electron micrographs revealed no apparent anatomical differences among the three types of spores. Analyses revealed that the different spore types were enriched specifically in the metal to which they were exposed during sporogenesis. The calcium content of the strontium and the barium spores was very small. From binary equimolar mixtures of the metal salts, endotrophic spores accumulated both metals to nearly the same extent. Viability of the barium spores was considerably less than that of the other two types. Strontium and barium spores were heat-resistant; however, calcium was essential for maximal heat resistance. Significant differences existed in the rates of germination; calcium spores germinated fastest, strontium spores were slower, and barium spores were slowest. Calcium-barium and calcium-strontium spores germinated readily. Endotrophic calcium and strontium spores germinated without the prior heat activation essential for growth spores. Chemical germination of the different metal-type spores with n-dodecylamine took place at the same relative rates as physiological germination. Heat-induced release of dipicolinic acid occurred much faster with barium and strontium spores than with calcium spores. The washed “coat fraction” from disrupted spores contained little of the spore calcium but most of the spore barium. The metal in this fraction was released by dilute acid. The demineralized coats reabsorbed calcium and barium at neutral pH. Images PMID:4956334

  12. Inhibition of Bacillus cereus growth by bacteriocin producing Bacillus subtilis isolated from fermented baobab seeds (maari) is substrate dependent.

    PubMed

    Kaboré, Donatien; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Sawadogo-Lingani, Hagrétou; Diawara, Bréhima; Dicko, Mamoudou Hama; Jakobsen, Mogens; Thorsen, Line

    2013-03-01

    Maari is a spontaneously alkaline fermented food condiment made from baobab tree seeds. Due to the spontaneous nature of maari fermentations growth of the opportunistic human pathogen Bacillus cereus is occasionally observed. Bacillus subtilis strains are important for alkaline seed fermentations because of their enzymatic activities contributing to desirable texture, flavor and pH development. Some B. subtilis strains have antimicrobial properties against B. cereus. In the present work, three bacteriocin producing B. subtilis strains (B3, B122 and B222) isolated from maari were tested. The production of antimicrobial activity by the three strains was found to be greatly influenced by the substrate. All three B. subtilis strains produced antimicrobial activity against B. cereus NVH391-98 in BHI broth as determined by the agar well diffusion assay, whereas no antimicrobial activity was detected in whole cooked baobab seeds and in 10% (w/v) grinded baobab seeds. Incorporation of BHI with up to 5% (w/w) grinded baobab seeds enhanced the antimicrobial activity of B. subtilis compared with pure BHI in a strain dependent manner. Incorporation of BHI with 50% (w/w) baobab grinded seeds decreased the antimicrobial activity. Addition of the inorganic salts FeCl₃, MgSO₄ and MnSO₄ has previously been reported to increase bacteriocin production of B. subtilis, but the addition of these salts to 10% (w/v) grinded baobab seed broth did not cause antimicrobial activity. Survival of B. cereus NVH391-98 in co-culture with B. subtilis was tested in BHI broth, 10% (w/v) grinded baobab seed based broth and during baobab seed fermentation to produce maari. B. cereus NVH391-98 grew well in all three substrates in mono-culture. All the 3 B. subtilis strains were able to decrease B. cereus NVH391-98 to levels below the detection limit (<10 CFU/ml) in BHI, but not in baobab seed based substrates, even though the outgrowth of B. cereus NVH391-98 was delayed by up to 40 h. In

  13. Anthrax Toxin-Expressing Bacillus cereus Isolated from an Anthrax-Like Eschar.

    PubMed

    Marston, Chung K; Ibrahim, Hisham; Lee, Philip; Churchwell, George; Gumke, Megan; Stanek, Danielle; Gee, Jay E; Boyer, Anne E; Gallegos-Candela, Maribel; Barr, John R; Li, Han; Boulay, Darbi; Cronin, Li; Quinn, Conrad P; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus isolates have been described harboring Bacillus anthracis toxin genes, most notably B. cereus G9241, and capable of causing severe and fatal pneumonias. This report describes the characterization of a B. cereus isolate, BcFL2013, associated with a naturally occurring cutaneous lesion resembling an anthrax eschar. Similar to G9241, BcFL2013 is positive for the B. anthracis pXO1 toxin genes, has a multi-locus sequence type of 78, and a pagA sequence type of 9. Whole genome sequencing confirms the similarity to G9241. In addition to the chromosome having an average nucleotide identity of 99.98% when compared to G9241, BcFL2013 harbors three plasmids with varying homology to the G9241 plasmids (pBCXO1, pBC210 and pBFH_1). This is also the first report to include serologic testing of patient specimens associated with this type of B. cereus infection which resulted in the detection of anthrax lethal factor toxemia, a quantifiable serum antibody response to protective antigen (PA), and lethal toxin neutralization activity. PMID:27257909

  14. Anthrax Toxin-Expressing Bacillus cereus Isolated from an Anthrax-Like Eschar

    PubMed Central

    Marston, Chung K.; Ibrahim, Hisham; Lee, Philip; Churchwell, George; Gumke, Megan; Stanek, Danielle; Gee, Jay E.; Boyer, Anne E.; Gallegos-Candela, Maribel; Barr, John R.; Li, Han; Boulay, Darbi; Cronin, Li; Quinn, Conrad P.; Hoffmaster, Alex R.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus isolates have been described harboring Bacillus anthracis toxin genes, most notably B. cereus G9241, and capable of causing severe and fatal pneumonias. This report describes the characterization of a B. cereus isolate, BcFL2013, associated with a naturally occurring cutaneous lesion resembling an anthrax eschar. Similar to G9241, BcFL2013 is positive for the B. anthracis pXO1 toxin genes, has a multi-locus sequence type of 78, and a pagA sequence type of 9. Whole genome sequencing confirms the similarity to G9241. In addition to the chromosome having an average nucleotide identity of 99.98% when compared to G9241, BcFL2013 harbors three plasmids with varying homology to the G9241 plasmids (pBCXO1, pBC210 and pBFH_1). This is also the first report to include serologic testing of patient specimens associated with this type of B. cereus infection which resulted in the detection of anthrax lethal factor toxemia, a quantifiable serum antibody response to protective antigen (PA), and lethal toxin neutralization activity. PMID:27257909

  15. The Pathogenomic Sequence Analysis of B. cereus and B.thuringiensis Isolates Closely Related to Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Cliff S.; Xie, Gary; Challacombe, Jean F.; Altherr, MichaelR.; Smriti, B.; Bruce, David; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Chen, Jin; Chertkov, Olga; Cleland, Cathy; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, M.; Doggett, Norman A.; Fawcett, John J.; Glavina, Tijana; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Hill, Karen K.; Hitchcock, Penny; Jackson, Paul J.; Keim, Paul; Kewalramani, Avinash Ramesh; Longmire, Jon; Lucas, Susan; Malfatti,Stephanie; McMurry, Kim; Meincke, Linda J.; Misra, Monica; Moseman,Bernice L.; Mundt, Mark; Munk, A. Christine; Okinaka, Richard T.; Parson-Quintana, B.; Reilly, Lee P.; Richardson, Paul; Robinson, DonnaL.; Rubin, Eddy; Saunders, Elizabeth; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Ticknor, Lawrence O.; Wills, Patti L.; Gilna, Payl; Brettin, Thomas S.

    2005-08-18

    The sequencing and analysis of two close relatives of Bacillus anthracis are reported. AFLP analysis of over 300 isolates of B.cereus, B. thuringiensis and B. anthracis identified two isolates as being very closely related to B. anthracis. One, a B. cereus, BcE33L, was isolated from a zebra carcass in Nambia; the second, a B. thuringiensis, 97-27, was isolated from a necrotic human wound. The B. cereus appears to be the closest anthracis relative sequenced to date. A core genome of over 3,900 genes was compiled for the Bacillus cereus group, including Banthracis. Comparative analysis of these two genomes with other members of the B. cereus group provides insight into the evolutionary relationships among these organisms. Evidence is presented that differential regulation modulates virulence, rather than simple acquisition of virulence factors. These genome sequences provide insight into the molecular mechanisms contributing to the host range and virulence of this group of organisms.

  16. Bacillus cereus Induces Permeability of the Blood Ocular Barrier During Experimental Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, A. L.; Ramadan, R. T.; Novosad, B.; Astley, R.; Callegan, M. C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent blood retina barrier (BRB) permeability occurred during experimental Bacillus cereus endophthalmitis and whether tight junction alterations were involved in permeability. Methods Mice were intravitreally injected with 100 CFU B. cereus and eyes were analyzed at specific times postinfection for permeability to fibrin and albumin, quantitation of intraocular plasma constituent leakage, production of inflammatory cytokines, and alterations in tight junction protein localization and expression at the level of the RPE. Results B. cereus-induced leakage of albumin and fibrin into the aqueous and vitreous humor by 8 h postinfection. BRB permeability occurred as early as 4 h and increased 13.30-fold compared to uninfected controls by 8 h. Production of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, MIP-1α, IL-1β, and KC increased over the course of infection. In the retina, ZO-1 disruption begins by 4 h, followed by decreasing occludin and ZO-1 expression at 4 and 8 h, respectively. Tubulin condensation and RPE65 degradation occurred by 12 h. A quorum sensing mutant B. cereus strain caused BRB permeability comparable to that of wild-type B. cereus. Both wild-type and mutant B. cereus sterile supernatants induced blood ocular barrier permeability similarly to that of wild-type infection. Conclusions These results indicate that BRB permeability occurs during the early stages of experimental B. cereus endophthalmitis, beginning as early as 4 h postinfection. Disruption of tight junctions at the level of the RPE may contribute to barrier breakdown. Quorum-sensing dependent factors may not significantly contribute to BRB permeability. PMID:19264886

  17. Association of Genotyping of Bacillus cereus with Clinical Features of Post-Traumatic Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Meng; Wang, Qian; Tang, Zhide; Wang, Youpei; Gu, Yunfeng; Lou, Yongliang; Zheng, Meiqin

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is the second most frequent cause of post-traumatic bacterial endophthalmitis. Although genotyping of B. cereus associated with gastrointestinal infections has been reported, little is known about the B. cereus clinical isolates associated with post-traumatic endophthalmitis. This is largely due to the limited number of clinical strains available isolated from infected tissues of patients with post-traumatic endophthalmitis. In this study, we report successful isolation of twenty-four B. cereus strains from individual patients with different disease severity of post-traumatic endophthalmitis. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all strains could be categorized into three genotypes (GTI, GTII and GTIII) and the clinical score showed significant differences among these groups. We then further performed genotyping using the vrrA gene, and evaluated possible correlation of genotype with the clinical features of B. cereus–caused post-traumatic endophthalmitis, and with the prognosis of infection by conducting follow-up with patients for up to 2 months. We found that the disease of onset and final vision acuity were significantly different among the three groups. These results suggested that the vrrA gene may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of endophthalmitis, and genotyping of B. cereus has the potential for predicting clinical manifestation and prognosis of endophthalmitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation of large numbers of clinical isolates of B. cereus from patients with endophthalmitis. This work sets the foundation for future investigation of the pathogenesis endophthalmitis caused by B. cereus infection. PMID:26886446

  18. Elucidation of enterotoxigenic Bacillus cereus outbreaks in Austria by complementary epidemiological and microbiological investigations, 2013.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Daniela; Rademacher, Corinna; Kanitz, Elisabeth Eva; Frenzel, Elrike; Simons, Erica; Allerberger, Franz; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2016-09-01

    Identifying Bacillus cereus as the causative agent of a foodborne outbreak still poses a challenge. We report on the epidemiological and microbiological investigation of three outbreaks of food poisoning (A, B, and C) in Austria in 2013. A total of 44% among 32 hotel guests (A), 22% among 63 employees (B) and 29% among 362 residents of a rehab clinic (C) fell sick immediately after meal consumption. B. cereus isolated from left overs or retained samples from related foods were characterized by toxin gene profiling, and molecular typing using panC sequencing and M13-PCR typing (in outbreak A and C). We identified two B. cereus strains in outbreak A, and six B. cereus strains, each in outbreak B and C; we also found Staphylococcus aureus and staphylococcal enterotoxins in outbreak A. The panC sequence based phylogenetic affiliation of the B. cereus strains, together with findings of the retrospective cohort analyses, helped determining their etiological role. Consumption of a mashed potatoes dish in outbreak A (RR: ∞), a pancake strips soup in outbreak B (RR 13.0; 95% CI 1.8-93.0) and for outbreak C of a fruit salad (RR 1.50; 95% CI 1.09-2.00), deer ragout (RR: 1.99; 95% CI 1.23-3.22) and a cranberry/pear (RR 2.46; 95% CI 1.50-4.03)were associated with increased risk of falling sick. An enterotoxigenic strain affiliated to the phylogenetic group with the highest risk of food poisoning was isolated from the crème spinach and the strawberry buttermilk, and also from the stool samples of the one B. cereus positive outbreak case-patient, who ate both. Our investigation of three food poisoning outbreaks illustrates the added value of a combined approach by using epidemiological, microbiological and genotyping methods in identifying the likely outbreak sources and the etiological B. cereus strains. PMID:27257745

  19. Infective endocarditis due to Bacillus cereus in a pregnant female: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mahek; Patnaik, Soumya; Wongrakpanich, Supakanya; Alhamshari, Yaser; Alnabelsi, Talal

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of infective endocarditis during pregnancy is around 0.006% with high maternal and fetal mortality. Bacillus cereus is an extremely rare cause for endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers (IVDA) or those with valvular disease or devices such as pacemakers. We report a case of B. cereus endocarditis, which, to the best of our knowledge, has never been reported in pregnancy. A 30-year-old, 25-week pregnant female presented with right shoulder pain, swelling and erythema on the lateral aspect of deltoid muscle from large abscess over her deltoid muscle. She was found to have a vegetation on the native tricuspid valve. Cultures from abscess fluid and blood cultures grew B. cereus, she was appropriately treated with antimicrobials and had favorable outcomes. There are <20 cases of B. cereus endocarditis reported but none during pregnancy. When cultures grow unusual organisms the case must be thoroughly investigated. This case illustrates a rare situation (endocarditis in pregnancy) with an unusual outcome (B. cereus) on an uncommon valve (tricuspid valve). PMID:26793477

  20. Air-Liquid Interface Biofilms of Bacillus cereus: Formation, Sporulation, and Dispersion▿

    PubMed Central

    Wijman, Janneke G. E.; de Leeuw, Patrick P. L. A.; Moezelaar, Roy; Zwietering, Marcel H.; Abee, Tjakko

    2007-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Bacillus cereus was assessed using 56 strains of B. cereus, including the two sequenced strains, ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10987. Biofilm production in microtiter plates was found to be strongly dependent on incubation time, temperature, and medium, as well as the strain used, with some strains showing biofilm formation within 24 h and subsequent dispersion within the next 24 h. A selection of strains was used for quantitative analysis of biofilm formation on stainless steel coupons. Thick biofilms of B. cereus developed at the air-liquid interface, while the amount of biofilm formed was much lower in submerged systems. This suggests that B. cereus biofilms may develop particularly in industrial storage and piping systems that are partly filled during operation or where residual liquid has remained after a production cycle. Moreover, depending on the strain and culture conditions, spores constituted up to 90% of the total biofilm counts. This indicates that B. cereus biofilms can act as a nidus for spore formation and subsequently can release their spores into food production environments. PMID:17209076

  1. Comparative proteomic analysis of experimental evolution of the Bacillus cereus-Ketogulonicigenium vulgare co-culture.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qian; Zou, Yang; Lv, Yajin; Song, Hao; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2014-01-01

    The microbial co-culture system composing of Ketogulonicigenium vulgare and Bacillus cereus was widely adopted in industry for the production of 2-keto-gulonic acid (2-KGA), the precursor of vitamin C. We found serial subcultivation of the co-culture could enhance the yield of 2-KGA by 16% in comparison to that of the ancestral co-culture. To elucidate the evolutionary dynamics and interaction mechanisms of the two microbes, we performed iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analyses of the pure cultures of K. vulgare, B. cereus and their co-culture during serial subcultivation. Hierarchy cluster analyses of the proteomic data showed that the expression level of a number of crucial proteins associated with sorbose conversion and oligopeptide transport was significantly enhanced by the experimental evolution. In particular, the expression level of sorbose/sorbosone dehydrogenase was enhanced in the evolved K. vulgare, while the expression level of InhA and the transport efficiency of oligopeptides were increased in the evolved B. cereus. The decreased sporulating protein expression and increased peptide transporter expression observed in evolved B. cereus, together with the increased amino acids synthesis in evolved K. vulgare suggested that serial subcultivation result in enhanced synergistic cooperation between K. vulgare and B. cereus, enabling an increased production of 2-KGA. PMID:24619085

  2. Proteome data to explore the impact of pBClin15 on Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Jean-Paul; Alpha-Bazin, Béatrice; Armengaud, Jean; Omer, Hélène; Duport, Catherine

    2016-09-01

    This data article reports changes in the cellular and exoproteome of B. cereus cured from pBClin15.Time-course changes of proteins were assessed by high-throughput nanoLC-MS/MS. We report all the peptides and proteins identified and quantified in B. cereus with and without pBClin15. Proteins were classified into functional groups using the information available in the KEGG classification and we reported their abundance in term of normalized spectral abundance factor. The repertoire of experimentally confirmed proteins of B. cereus presented here is the largest ever reported, and provides new insights into the interplay between pBClin15 and its host B. cereus ATCC 14579. The data reported here is related to a published shotgun proteomics analysis regarding the role of pBClin15, "Deciphering the interactions between the Bacillus cereus linear plasmid, pBClin15, and its host by high-throughput comparative proteomics" Madeira et al. [1]. All the associated mass spectrometry data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org) via the PRIDE partner repository (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/), with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD001568, PRIDE: PXD002788 and PRIDE: PXD002789. PMID:27547804

  3. Bacillus cereus Response to a Proanthocyanidin Trimer, a Transcriptional and Functional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Tomoko; Ozawa, Megumi; Tanaka, Naoto; Arai, Soichi; Mura, Kiyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Proanthocyanidins are abundant in peanut skin, and in this study, the antibacterial effects of a peanut skin extract (PSE) against food-borne bacteria were investigated to find its minimum inhibitory concentration. Food-borne gram-positive bacteria, and in particular Bacillus cereus, was more sensitive to PSE. In particular, the inhibitory activity of epicatechin-(4β → 6)-epicatechin-(2β → O→7, 4β → 8)-catechin (EEC), a proanthocyanidin trimer from peanut skin, against B. cereus was stronger than that of procyanidin A1, a proanthocyanidin dimer. DNA microarray analysis of B. cereus treated with EEC was carried out, with a finding that 597 genes were significantly up-regulated. Analysis of the up-regulated genes suggested that EEC disrupted the normal condition of the cell membrane and wall of B. cereus and alter its usual nutritional metabolism. Moreover, treatment of B. cereus with EEC inhibited glucose uptake, suggesting that EEC affects the cell-surface adsorption. PMID:27061585

  4. Infective endocarditis due to Bacillus cereus in a pregnant female: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mahek; Patnaik, Soumya; Wongrakpanich, Supakanya; Alhamshari, Yaser; Alnabelsi, Talal

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of infective endocarditis during pregnancy is around 0.006% with high maternal and fetal mortality. Bacillus cereus is an extremely rare cause for endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers (IVDA) or those with valvular disease or devices such as pacemakers. We report a case of B. cereus endocarditis, which, to the best of our knowledge, has never been reported in pregnancy. A 30-year-old, 25-week pregnant female presented with right shoulder pain, swelling and erythema on the lateral aspect of deltoid muscle from large abscess over her deltoid muscle. She was found to have a vegetation on the native tricuspid valve. Cultures from abscess fluid and blood cultures grew B. cereus, she was appropriately treated with antimicrobials and had favorable outcomes. There are <20 cases of B. cereus endocarditis reported but none during pregnancy. When cultures grow unusual organisms the case must be thoroughly investigated. This case illustrates a rare situation (endocarditis in pregnancy) with an unusual outcome (B. cereus) on an uncommon valve (tricuspid valve). PMID:26793477

  5. Genome Sequence of a Chromium-Reducing Strain, Bacillus cereus S612

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dongping; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Doug S.; Reimus, Paul W.; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Johnson, Shannon L.; Li, Po-E

    2015-12-10

    We report here the genome sequence of an effective chromium-reducing bacterium,Bacillus cereusstrain S612. We found that the size of the draft genome sequence is approximately 5.4 Mb, with a G+C content of 35%, and it is predicted to contain 5,450 protein-coding genes.

  6. Continuous Cultivation for Apparent Optimization of Defined Media for Cellulomonas sp. and Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Summers, R. J.; Boudreaux, D. P.; Srinivasan, V. R.

    1979-01-01

    Steady-state continuous culture was used to optimize lean chemically defined media for a Cellulomonas sp. and Bacillus cereus strain T. Both organisms were extremely sensitive to variations in trace-metal concentrations. However, medium optimization by this technique proved rapid, and multifactor screening was easily conducted by using a minimum of instrumentation. The optimized media supported critical dilution rates of 0.571 and 0.467 h−1 for Cellulomonas and Bacillus, respectively. These values approximated maximum growth rate values observed in batch culture. PMID:16345417

  7. Alternative modes of biofilm formation by plant-associated Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Tantan; Foulston, Lucy; Chai, Yunrong; Wang, Qi; Losick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The ability to form multicellular communities known as biofilms is a widespread adaptive behavior of bacteria. Members of the Bacillus group of bacteria have been found to form biofilms on plant roots, where they protect against pathogens and promote growth. In the case of the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis the genetic pathway controlling biofilm formation and the production of an extracellular matrix is relatively well understood. However, it is unclear whether other members of this genus utilize similar mechanisms. We determined that a plant-associated strain of Bacillus cereus (905) can form biofilms by two seemingly independent pathways. In one mode involving the formation of floating biofilms (pellicles) B. cereus 905 appears to rely on orthologs of many of the genes known to be important for B. subtilis biofilm formation. We report that B. cereus 905 also forms submerged, surface-associated biofilms and in a manner that resembles biofilm formation by the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. This alternative mode, which does not rely on B. subtilis-like genes for pellicle formation, takes place under conditions of glucose fermentation and depends on a drop in the pH of the medium. PMID:25828975

  8. Levels and toxigenicity of Bacillus cereus and Clostridium perfringens from retail seafood.

    PubMed

    Rahmati, T; Labbe, R

    2008-06-01

    For the period 1990 through 2003, seafood was the most commonly identified food linked to foodborne outbreaks in the United States. Fish as a commodity has rarely been examined for the presence of Bacillus cereus in particular. For the present study, 347 fresh and processed retail seafood samples were examined for the presence of Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium perfringens, and B. cereus. The presence of C. botulinum was not confirmed in any of the isolates, but C. perfringens was confirmed in 17 samples. One of the C. perfringens isolates possessed the enterotoxin gene, as determined by PCR. In contrast, 62 confirmed B. cereus isolates were obtained from separate samples at levels ranging from 3.6 to > 1,100 CFU/g. Thirty (48%) of 62 isolates produced both the hemolysin BL (HBL) and nonhemolytic (NHE) enterotoxins, and 58 (94%) and 31 (50%) produced NHE or HBL toxins, respectively. The presence of at least one of the three genes of the NHE complex was detected in 99% of the isolates; 69% of the isolates possessed all three genes. In contrast, 71% of the isolates possessed at least one of the three genes of the HBL complex, and 37% possessed all three HBL gene components. Fifty of the 62 B. cereus isolates were from imported seafood, and 19 (38%) of these samples were at levels > 100 CFU/g. Twelve of the 14 highest enterotoxin assay results were from isolates from imported food. Only one B. cereus isolate possessed the cereulide synthetase gene, ces; this isolate also possessed the genes for the three-component HBL and NHE complexes. A majority of enterotoxin-producing isolates were resistant to 2 of 10 antibiotics tested, ceftriaxone and clindamycin. Our results demonstrate the potential of seafood as a vehicle for foodborne illness caused by B. cereus, in particular the enterotoxin-producing genotype. PMID:18592743

  9. Toxin producing Bacillus cereus persist in ready-to-reheat spaghetti Bolognese mainly in vegetative state.

    PubMed

    Rajkovic, Andreja; Kljajic, Milica; Smigic, Nada; Devlieghere, Frank; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2013-10-15

    The potential of Bacillus cereus to cause a diarrheal toxico-infection is related to its ability to perform de novo enterotoxin production in the small intestine. A prerequisite for this is presence of sufficient numbers of B. cereus that have survived gastro-intestinal passage. It is known that the percentage of survival is much smaller for vegetative cells in comparison to spores and it is therefore important to know the state in which B. cereus is ingested. The results of the current study performed on twelve B. cereus strains, comprising both diarrheal and emetic type, indicate that exposure via contaminated foods mainly concerns vegetative cells. Inoculated vegetative cells grew to high counts, with the growth dynamic depending on the storage temperature. At 28 °C growth to high counts resulted in spore formation, in general, after 1 day of storage. One strain was an exception, producing spores only after 16 days. At 12 °C obtained high counts did not result in spore formation for 11 of 12 tested strains after two weeks of storage. The highest counts and time to sporulation were different between strains, but no difference was observed on the group level of diarrheal and emetic strains. The spore counts were always lower than vegetative cell counts and occurred only when food was obviously sensory spoiled (visual and odor evaluation). Similar observations were made with food inoculated with B. cereus spores instead of vegetative cells. Although the prospect of consuming spores was found very weak, the numbers of vegetative B. cereus cells were high enough, without obvious sensory deviation, to survive in sufficient level to cause diarrheal toxico-infection. PMID:24129156

  10. Role of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) 2 in Experimental Bacillus cereus Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Novosad, Billy D.; Astley, Roger A.; Callegan, Michelle C.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus cereus causes a uniquely rapid and blinding intraocular infection, endophthalmitis. B. cereus replicates in the eye, synthesizes numerous toxins, and incites explosive intraocular inflammation. The mechanisms involved in the rapid and explosive intraocular immune response have not been addressed. Because Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are integral to the initial recognition of organisms during infection, we hypothesized that the uniquely explosive immune response observed during B. cereus endophthalmitis is directly influenced by the presence of TLR2, a known Gram-positive pathogen recognition receptor. To address this hypothesis, we compared the courses of experimental B. cereus endophthalmitis in wild type C57BL/6J mice to that of age-matched homozygous TLR2-/- mice. Output parameters included analysis of bacterial growth, inflammatory cell (PMN) infiltration, cytokine/chemokine kinetics, retinal function testing, and histology, with N≥4 eyes/assay/time point/mouse strain. B. cereus grew at similar rates to108 CFU/eye by 12 h, regardless of the mouse strain. Retinal function was preserved to a greater degree in infected TLR2-/- eyes compared to that of infected wild type eyes, but infected eyes of both mouse strains lost significant function. Retinal architecture was preserved in infected TLR2-/- eyes, with limited retinal and vitreal cellular infiltration compared to that of infected wild type eyes. Ocular myeloperoxidase activities corroborated these results. In general, TNFα, IFNγ, IL6, and KC were detected in greater concentrations in infected wild type eyes than in infected TLR2-/- eyes. The absence of TLR2 resulted in decreased intraocular proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine levels and altered recruitment of inflammatory cells into the eye, resulting in less intraocular inflammation and preservation of retinal architecture, and a slightly greater degree of retinal function. These results demonstrate TLR2 is an important component of the initial

  11. A genomic region involved in the formation of adhesin fibers in Bacillus cereus biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Caro-Astorga, Joaquín; Pérez-García, Alejandro; de Vicente, Antonio; Romero, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a bacterial pathogen that is responsible for many recurrent disease outbreaks due to food contamination. Spores and biofilms are considered the most important reservoirs of B. cereus in contaminated fresh vegetables and fruits. Biofilms are bacterial communities that are difficult to eradicate from biotic and abiotic surfaces because of their stable and extremely strong extracellular matrix. These extracellular matrixes contain exopolysaccharides, proteins, extracellular DNA, and other minor components. Although B. cereus can form biofilms, the bacterial features governing assembly of the protective extracellular matrix are not known. Using the well-studied bacterium B. subtilis as a model, we identified two genomic loci in B. cereus, which encodes two orthologs of the amyloid-like protein TasA of B. subtilis and a SipW signal peptidase. Deletion of this genomic region in B. cereus inhibited biofilm assembly; notably, mutation of the putative signal peptidase SipW caused the same phenotype. However, mutations in tasA or calY did not completely prevent biofilm formation; strains that were mutated for either of these genes formed phenotypically different surface attached biofilms. Electron microscopy studies revealed that TasA polymerizes to form long and abundant fibers on cell surfaces, whereas CalY does not aggregate similarly. Heterologous expression of this amyloid-like cassette in a B. subtilis strain lacking the factors required for the assembly of TasA amyloid-like fibers revealed (i) the involvement of this B. cereus genomic region in formation of the air-liquid interphase pellicles and (ii) the intrinsic ability of TasA to form fibers similar to the amyloid-like fibers produced by its B. subtilis ortholog. PMID:25628606

  12. Plant compounds enhance the assay sensitivity for detection of active Bacillus cereus toxin.

    PubMed

    Rasooly, Reuven; Hernlem, Bradley; He, Xiaohua; Friedman, Mendel

    2015-03-01

    Bacillus cereus is an important food pathogen, producing emetic and diarrheal syndromes, the latter mediated by enterotoxins. The ability to sensitively trace and identify this active toxin is important for food safety. This study evaluated a nonradioactive, sensitive, in vitro cell-based assay, based on B. cereus toxin inhibition of green fluorescent protein (GFP) synthesis in transduced monkey kidney Vero cells, combined with plant extracts or plant compounds that reduce viable count of B. cereus in food. The assay exhibited a dose dependent GFP inhibition response with ~25% inhibition at 50 ng/mL toxin evaluated in culture media or soy milk, rice milk or infant formula, products associated with food poisonings outbreak. The plant extracts of green tea or bitter almond and the plant compounds epicatechin or carvacrol were found to amplify the assay response to ~90% inhibition at the 50 ng/mL toxin concentration greatly increasing the sensitivity of this assay. Additional studies showed that the test formulations also inhibited the growth of the B. cereus bacteria, likely through cell membrane disruption. The results suggest that the improved highly sensitive assay for the toxin and the rapid inactivation of the pathogen producing the toxin have the potential to enhance food safety. PMID:25767986

  13. Incidence and characterization of diarrheal enterotoxins of fecal Bacillus cereus isolates associated with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Al-Khatib, Mariam Saleh; Khyami-Horani, Hala; Badran, Eman; Shehabi, Asem A

    2007-12-01

    A total of 490 stool specimens were collected from patients with diarrhea and healthy controls without diarrhea to investigate the incidence of Bacillus cereus and its enterotoxins. B. cereus was found more significant in stools of persons with diarrhea than without diarrhea (9.5% versus 1.8%, P < 0.05), and was also detected more frequent but not significant in individuals aged > or =1 year and in adults than in children aged <1 year (11% and 8% versus 7.8%, P > 0.05). The hemolytic enterotoxin HBL genes of B. cereus isolates (hblA, hblC, hblD) were detected in 58%, 58%, and 68%, respectively, whereas the nonhemolytic enterotoxin NHE genes (nheA, nheB, nheC) were detected more frequent in 71.%, 84%, and 90% of the isolates, respectively. This study suggests that B. cereus isolates harboring 1 or more enterotoxin gene(s) can be a potential cause of diarrhea in Jordanian population. PMID:17878069

  14. Detection of toxigenic Bacillus cereus strains isolated from vegetables in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Flores-Urbán, Karen A; Natividad-Bonifacio, Iván; Vázquez-Quiñones, Carlos R; Vázquez-Salinas, Carlos; Quiñones-Ramírez, Elsa Irma

    2014-12-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause diarrhea and emetic syndromes after ingestion of food contaminated with it. This ability is due to the production of enterotoxins by this microorganism, these being the hemolysin BL complex, which is involved in the diarrheal syndrome, and cereulide, which is responsible for the emetic syndrome. The detection of genes associated with the production of these toxins can predict the virulence of strains isolated from contaminated food. In this paper, we analyzed 100 samples of vegetables, 25 of each kind (broccoli, coriander, carrot, and lettuce) obtained from different markets in Mexico City and its metropolitan area. B. cereus was isolated in 32, 44, 84, and 68% of the samples of broccoli, carrot, lettuce, and coriander, respectively. The hblA gene (encoding one of the three subunits of hemolysin BL) was amplified in 100% of the B. cereus isolates, and the ces gene (encoding the cereulide) could not be amplified from any of them. This is the first report of B. cereus isolation from the vegetables analyzed in this work and, also, the first report in Mexico of the isolation from vegetables of strains with potential virulence. The results should serve as evidence of the potential risk of consuming these foods without proper treatment. PMID:25474064

  15. Occurrence and behavior of Bacillus cereus in naturally contaminated ricotta salata cheese during refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    Spanu, Carlo; Scarano, Christian; Spanu, Vincenzo; Pala, Carlo; Casti, Daniele; Lamon, Sonia; Cossu, Francesca; Ibba, Michela; Nieddu, Gavino; De Santis, Enrico P L

    2016-09-01

    The present study shows the fate of Bacillus cereus in refrigerated ricotta salata cheese during shelf-life. 144 ricotta salata cheese belonging to nine naturally contaminated batches were stored refrigerated and analyzed at 24 h, 30, 60 and 90 days of storage. Total bacterial count, B. cereus spores and vegetative forms, intrinsic properties and composition were determined. The presence of spores was sporadic while the prevalence and the level of B. cereus vegetative cells decreased respectively from 83.3 % to 4.65 ± 0.74 cfu g(-1) at the beginning of the observation period to 33.3 % and 1.99 ± 0.55 cfu g(-1) after 90 days. No information is currently available on the fate of B. cereus in ricotta salata. The production process of ricotta salata includes steps such as whey heating followed by slow cooling of clots, which expose to the risk of spore germination and successive growth to levels compatible with toxins production. The prolonged refrigerated storage was not favorable to sporulation, explaining the successive death of vegetative cells. The present study demonstrate the potential risk of food poisoning as consequence of pre-formed emetic toxins in ricotta salata. Food safety of ricotta salata relies on the rapid refrigeration of the product during critical phases for cereulide production. PMID:27217369

  16. Plant Compounds Enhance the Assay Sensitivity for Detection of Active Bacillus cereus Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Rasooly, Reuven; Hernlem, Bradley; He, Xiaohua; Friedman, Mendel

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is an important food pathogen, producing emetic and diarrheal syndromes, the latter mediated by enterotoxins. The ability to sensitively trace and identify this active toxin is important for food safety. This study evaluated a nonradioactive, sensitive, in vitro cell-based assay, based on B. cereus toxin inhibition of green fluorescent protein (GFP) synthesis in transduced monkey kidney Vero cells, combined with plant extracts or plant compounds that reduce viable count of B. cereus in food. The assay exhibited a dose dependent GFP inhibition response with ~25% inhibition at 50 ng/mL toxin evaluated in culture media or soy milk, rice milk or infant formula, products associated with food poisonings outbreak. The plant extracts of green tea or bitter almond and the plant compounds epicatechin or carvacrol were found to amplify the assay response to ~90% inhibition at the 50 ng/mL toxin concentration greatly increasing the sensitivity of this assay. Additional studies showed that the test formulations also inhibited the growth of the B. cereus bacteria, likely through cell membrane disruption. The results suggest that the improved highly sensitive assay for the toxin and the rapid inactivation of the pathogen producing the toxin have the potential to enhance food safety. PMID:25767986

  17. From genome to toxicity: a combinatory approach highlights the complexity of enterotoxin production in Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Jeßberger, Nadja; Krey, Viktoria M.; Rademacher, Corinna; Böhm, Maria-Elisabeth; Mohr, Ann-Katrin; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Scherer, Siegfried; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years Bacillus cereus has gained increasing importance as a food poisoning pathogen. It is the eponymous member of the B. cereus sensu lato group that consists of eight closely related species showing impressive diversity of their pathogenicity. The high variability of cytotoxicity and the complex regulatory network of enterotoxin expression have complicated efforts to predict the toxic potential of new B. cereus isolates. In this study, comprehensive analyses of enterotoxin gene sequences, transcription, toxin secretion and cytotoxicity were performed. For the first time, these parameters were compared in a whole set of B. cereus strains representing isolates of different origin (food or food poisoning outbreaks) and of different toxic potential (enteropathogenic and apathogenic) to elucidate potential starting points of strain-specific differential toxicity. While toxin gene sequences were highly conserved and did not allow for differentiation between high and low toxicity strains, comparison of nheB and hblD enterotoxin gene transcription and Nhe and Hbl protein titers revealed not only strain-specific differences but also incongruence between toxin gene transcripts and toxin protein levels. With one exception all strains showed comparable capability of protein secretion and so far, no secretion patterns specific for high and low toxicity strains were identified. These results indicate that enterotoxin expression is more complex than expected, possibly involving the orchestrated interplay of different transcriptional regulator proteins, as well as posttranscriptional and posttranslational regulatory mechanisms plus additional influences of environmental conditions. PMID:26113843

  18. Phenotypic, genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic changes in Bacillus cereus after a short-term space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Longxiang; Zhou, Lisha; Liu, Jinwen; Cen, Zhong; Wu, Chunyan; Wang, Tong; Zhou, Tao; Chang, De; Guo, Yinghua; Fang, Xiangqun; Wang, Junfeng; Li, Tianzhi; Yin, Sanjun; Dai, Wenkui; Zhou, Yuping; Zhao, Jiao; Fang, Chengxiang; Yang, Ruifu; Liu, Changting

    2014-01-01

    The environment in space could affect microorganisms by changing a variety of features, including proliferation rate, cell physiology, cell metabolism, biofilm production, virulence, and drug resistance. However, the relevant mechanisms remain unclear. To explore the effect of a space environment on Bacillus cereus, a strain of B. cereus was sent to space for 398 h by ShenZhou VIII from November 1, 2011 to November 17, 2011. A ground simulation with similar temperature conditions was simultaneously performed as a control. After the flight, the flight and control strains were further analyzed using phenotypic, genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic techniques to explore the divergence of B. cereus in a space environment. The flight strains exhibited a significantly slower growth rate, a significantly higher amikacin resistance level, and changes in metabolism relative to the ground control strain. After the space flight, three polymorphic loci were found in the flight strains LCT-BC25 and LCT-BC235. A combined transcriptome and proteome analysis was performed, and this analysis revealed that the flight strains had changes in genes/proteins relevant to metabolism. In addition, certain genes/proteins that are relevant to structural function, gene expression modification and translation, and virulence were also altered. Our study represents the first documented analysis of the phenotypic, genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic changes that occur in B. cereus during space flight, and our results could be beneficial to the field of space microbiology.

  19. Antibacterial Effects of Cissus welwitschii and Triumfetta welwitschii Extracts against Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has increased sharply, while the pace for the development of new antimicrobials has slowed down. Plants provide an alternative source for new drugs. This study aimed to screen extracts from Cissus welwitschii and Triumfetta welwitschii for antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus. The tests conducted included a susceptibility determination test, analysis of the effect of T. welwitschii on cell wall integrity, and transport across the membrane. It was found that the T. welwitschii methanol extracts were more effective than the water extracts and had the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration at 0.125 mg/mL and 0.5 mg/mL, respectively, against E. coli and B. cereus. The C. welwitschii extract caused the most drug accumulation in E. coli. In B. cereus, no significant drug accumulation was observed. Nucleic acid leakage in B. cereus and E. coli and protein leakage in E. coli were observed after exposure to the T. welwitschii extract. The extracts from T. welwitschii had greater antibacterial activity than the extracts from C. welwitschii. T. welwitschii may be a potential source of lead compounds for that could be developed into antibacterial agents. PMID:26904744

  20. The potential of flow cytometry in the study of Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Cronin, U P; Wilkinson, M G

    2010-01-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) is a rapid method allowing the acquisition of multiparametric data from thousands of individual cells within a sample. As well as measuring the intrinsic light scattering properties of cells, a plethora of fluorescent dyes may be employed to yield information on macromolecule content, surface antigens present or physiological status. Despite FCM's indispensability within other fields e.g. immunology, it is underutilized within microbiological research. In this review, a strong case is presented for the potential of FCM in the study of Gram-positive spore-former, Bacillus cereus. Previous reports where FCM was successfully used in the study of B. cereus are reviewed along with relevant studies involving other members of the genus. Under headings reflecting common research themes associated with B. cereus, specific instances where FCM has generated novel data, providing a unique insight into the organism, are discussed. Further applications are posited, based on the authors' own research with FCM and B. cereus and work extant in the broader field of microbial cytometry. The authors conclude that, while the expense of equipment and reagents is an undeniable disadvantage, FCM is a technique capable of generating significantly novel data and allows the design and execution of experiments that are not possible with any other technique. PMID:19486207

  1. Detection of enterotoxic Bacillus cereus producing hemolytic and non hemolytic enterotoxins by PCR test.

    PubMed

    Ołtuszak-Walczak, Elzbieta; Walczak, Piotr; Modrak, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Nine strains belonging to Bacillus cereus group has been isolated from food and environmental samples. Their taxonomic position was confirmed by RFLP analysis of 16S rRNA gene digested with TaqI. The detection of DNA sequences encoding the hemolysin BL complex and enterotoxin NHE, was studied in Bacillus sp. isolates. Set of primers was used to amplify fragment of hblD gene by PCR. For the detection of nheB gene a new primer set was developed which allowed to amplify 273 bp fragment from wide number of strains belonging to B. cereus group. The hblD gene was present in 7 out of 9 isolates whereas nheB gene occurred in all of them. Reference strains of B. cereus LOCK 0807, and B. thuringiensis NCAIM 01262 contained both genes. Strains of B. subtilis ATCC 6633 and B. pumilus LOCK 0814 do not contain both genes. Obtained results showed that B. thuringiensis NCAIM 01262 contains both genes and therefore may be harmful for human beings. PMID:17419288

  2. Crystalliferous Bacillus cereus group bacteria from a Maryland hardwood forest are dominated by psychrotolerant strains.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Michael B; Martin, Phyllis A W; Kuhar, Daniel; Farrar, Robert R; Gundersen-Rindal, Dawn E

    2014-08-01

    Crystal-forming bacteria of the Bacillus cereus group were isolated from soil samples collected at different elevations within a mixed hardwood forest in central Maryland, and their phylogenetic relationships determined by multilocus sequence analysis. The vast majority of isolates obtained were associated with two phylogenetic groups known to be psychrotolerant, with very few isolates representing phylogenetic groups more typically associated with Bacillus thuringiensis. Isolates from the psychrotolerant groups were found to grow on solid media at 7 °C. Isolates of 11 highly related, novel sequence types (STs) from the psychrotolerant group that includes Bacillus weihenstephanensis were generally found at higher elevations, and were not associated with soils near streams. Isolates of two related STs from the second psychrotolerant group were nearly always found at the bottoms of ravines near streams, in areas abundant in earthworm castings. PMID:24985699

  3. BC4707 Is a Major Facilitator Superfamily Multidrug Resistance Transport Protein from Bacillus cereus Implicated in Fluoroquinolone Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Simm, Roger; Vörös, Aniko; Ekman, Jaakko V.; Sødring, Marianne; Nes, Ingerid; Kroeger, Jasmin K.; Saidijam, Massoud; Bettaney, Kim E.; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling highlighted a subset of genes encoding putative multidrug transporters in the pathogen Bacillus cereus that were up-regulated during stress produced by bile salts. One of these multidrug transporters (BC4707) was selected for investigation. Functional characterization of the BC4707 protein in Escherichia coli revealed a role in the energized efflux of xenobiotics. Phenotypic analyses after inactivation of the gene bc4707 in Bacillus cereus ATCC14579 suggested a more specific, but modest role in the efflux of norfloxacin. In addition to this, transcriptional analyses showed that BC4707 is also expressed during growth of B. cereus under non-stressful conditions where it may have a role in the normal physiology of the bacteria. Altogether, the results indicate that bc4707, which is part of the core genome of the B. cereus group of bacteria, encodes a multidrug resistance efflux protein that is likely involved in maintaining intracellular homeostasis during growth of the bacteria. PMID:22615800

  4. Prevalence and toxigenic profiles of Bacillus cereus isolated from dried red peppers, rice, and Sunsik in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Ki; Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Jang, Sung Sik; Shin, Eun Mi; Kim, Min-Jeong; Oh, Sangsuk; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2009-03-01

    Bacillus cereus is a spore-forming foodborne pathogen responsible for diarrheal and emetic types of food poisoning. Intoxication is caused by various enterotoxins or by emetic toxin. Because of its widespread presence and the ability to form heat-stable endospores in a relatively short time, B. cereus has been difficult to control. In this study, 21 rice and 36 Sunsik (a mixture of powdered raw grains) samples were examined for the prevalence of B. cereus. A multiplex PCR assay was used to evaluate the distribution of 10 different toxigenicity-related genes among 1,082 B. cereus strains isolated from dried red peppers (919 isolates), rice (98 isolates), and Sunsik (65 isolates). The results suggest that (i) the examined foods were free of the emetic toxin but not free of enterotoxins and (ii) the distribution of enterotoxigenic genes was significantly different among the B. cereus isolates from various sources. PMID:19343947

  5. High-level production of Bacillus cereus phospholipase C in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Ravasi, Pablo; Braia, Mauricio; Eberhardt, Florencia; Elena, Claudia; Cerminati, Sebastián; Peirú, Salvador; Castelli, Maria Eugenia; Menzella, Hugo G

    2015-12-20

    Enzymatic oil degumming (removal of phospholipids) using phospholipase C (PLC) is a well-established and environmentally friendly process for vegetable oil refining. In this work, we report the production of recombinant Bacillus cereus PLC in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13869 in a high cell density fermentation process and its performance in soybean oil degumming. A final concentration of 5.5g/L of the recombinant enzyme was achieved when the respective gene was expressed from the tac promoter in a semi-defined medium. After treatment with trypsin to cleave the propeptide, the mature enzyme completely hydrolyzed phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, which represent 70% of the phospholipids present in soybean oil. The results presented here show the feasibility of using B. cereus PLC for oil degumming and provide a manufacturing process for the cost effective production of this enzyme. PMID:26519562

  6. Zwittermicin A-producing strains of Bacillus cereus from diverse soils.

    PubMed Central

    Stabb, E V; Jacobson, L M; Handelsman, J

    1994-01-01

    Bacillus cereus UW85 produces a novel aminopolyol antibiotic, zwittermicin A, that contributes to the ability of UW85 to suppress damping-off of alfalfa caused by Phytophthora medicaginis. UW85 produces a second antibiotic, provisionally designated antibiotic B, which also contributes to suppression of damping-off but has not been structurally defined yet and is less potent than zwittermicin A. The purpose of this study was to isolate genetically diverse strains of B. cereus that produce zwittermicin A and suppress disease. We found that most isolates of B. cereus that were sensitive to phage P7 or inhibited the growth of Erwinia herbicola produced zwittermicin A; therefore, phage typing and E. herbicola inhibition provided indirect, but rapid screening tests for identification of zwittermicin A-producing isolates. We used these tests to screen a collection of 4,307 B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis isolates obtained from bacterial stock collections and from diverse soils collected in Honduras, Panama, Australia, The Netherlands, and the United States. A subset of the isolates screened by the P7 sensitivity and E. herbicola inhibition tests were assayed directly for production of zwittermicin A, leading to the identification of 57 isolates that produced zwittermicin A; 41 of these isolates also produced antibiotic B. Eight isolates produced antibiotic B but not zwittermicin A. The assay for phage P7 sensitivity was particularly useful because of its simplicity and rapidity and because 22 of the 23 P7-sensitive isolates tested produced zwittermicin A. However, not all zwittermicin A-producing isolates were sensitive to P7, and the more labor-intensive E. herbicola inhibition assay identified a larger proportion of the zwittermicin A producers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7811080

  7. Inactivation of Enterobacter sakazakii, Bacillus cereus, and Salmonella typhimurium in powdered weaning food by electron-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yun-Hee; Park, Ji-Yong; Park, Jong-Hyun; Chung, Myong-Soo; Kwon, Ki-Sung; Chung, Kyungsook; Won, Misun; Song, Kyung-Bin

    2008-09-01

    Inactivation of Enterobacter sakazakii, Bacillus cereus, and Salmonella typhimurium were evaluated in powdered weaning food using electron-beam irradiation. E. sakazakii, B. cereus, and S. typhimurium were eliminated by irradiation at 16, 8, and 8 kGy, respectively. The D10-vlaues of E. sakazakii, B. cereus, and S. typhimurium inoculated on powdered weaning food were 4.83, 1.22, and 0.98 kGy, respectively. The results suggest that electron-beam irradiation should inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria on baby food without impairing qualities.

  8. Bacillus cereus septicemia in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ya-Ling; Cheng, Shin-Nan; Hsieh, Kao-Hsian; Wang, Chih-Chien; Chen, Shyi-Jou; Lo, Wen-Tsung

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus cereus is an aerobic Gram-positive, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium that is responsible for foodborne illnesses. We report on a 15-year-old girl with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who fell into a somnolent state after presenting with a 12-hour history of fever, muscle soreness, myalgia in both calves, sore throat, and vomiting. Fulminant septicemic syndrome caused by B. cereus was finally identified. The aim of this work is the introduction of B. cereus as a differential diagnosis of sepsis in patients with acute leukemia in induction chemotherapy, to prevent delayed treatment. PMID:23927823

  9. Bacillus cereus cell response upon exposure to acid environment: toward the identification of potential biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Desriac, Noémie; Broussolle, Véronique; Postollec, Florence; Mathot, Anne-Gabrielle; Sohier, Danièle; Coroller, Louis; Leguerinel, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are able to adapt to different environments and evolve rapidly, allowing them to cope with their new environments. Such adaptive response and associated protections toward other lethal stresses, is a crucial survival strategy for a wide spectrum of microorganisms, including food spoilage bacteria, pathogens, and organisms used in functional food applications. The growing demand for minimal processed food yields to an increasing use of combination of hurdles or mild preservation factors in the food industry. A commonly used hurdle is low pH which allows the decrease in bacterial growth rate but also the inactivation of pathogens or spoilage microorganisms. Bacillus cereus is a well-known food-borne pathogen leading to economical and safety issues in food industry. Because survival mechanisms implemented will allow bacteria to cope with environmental changes, it is important to provide understanding of B. cereus stress response. Thus this review deals with the adaptive traits of B. cereus cells facing to acid stress conditions. The acid stress response of B. cereus could be divided into four groups (i) general stress response (ii) pH homeostasis, (iii) metabolic modifications and alkali production and (iv) secondary oxidative stress response. This current knowledge may be useful to understand how B. cereus cells may cope to acid environment such as encountered in food products and thus to find some molecular biomarkers of the bacterial behavior. These biomarkers could be furthermore used to develop new microbial behavior prediction tools which can provide insights into underlying molecular physiological states which govern the behavior of microorganisms and thus opening the avenue toward the detection of stress adaptive behavior at an early stage and the control of stress-induced resistance throughout the food chain. PMID:24106490

  10. Bacillus cereus cell response upon exposure to acid environment: toward the identification of potential biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Desriac, Noémie; Broussolle, Véronique; Postollec, Florence; Mathot, Anne-Gabrielle; Sohier, Danièle; Coroller, Louis; Leguerinel, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are able to adapt to different environments and evolve rapidly, allowing them to cope with their new environments. Such adaptive response and associated protections toward other lethal stresses, is a crucial survival strategy for a wide spectrum of microorganisms, including food spoilage bacteria, pathogens, and organisms used in functional food applications. The growing demand for minimal processed food yields to an increasing use of combination of hurdles or mild preservation factors in the food industry. A commonly used hurdle is low pH which allows the decrease in bacterial growth rate but also the inactivation of pathogens or spoilage microorganisms. Bacillus cereus is a well-known food-borne pathogen leading to economical and safety issues in food industry. Because survival mechanisms implemented will allow bacteria to cope with environmental changes, it is important to provide understanding of B. cereus stress response. Thus this review deals with the adaptive traits of B. cereus cells facing to acid stress conditions. The acid stress response of B. cereus could be divided into four groups (i) general stress response (ii) pH homeostasis, (iii) metabolic modifications and alkali production and (iv) secondary oxidative stress response. This current knowledge may be useful to understand how B. cereus cells may cope to acid environment such as encountered in food products and thus to find some molecular biomarkers of the bacterial behavior. These biomarkers could be furthermore used to develop new microbial behavior prediction tools which can provide insights into underlying molecular physiological states which govern the behavior of microorganisms and thus opening the avenue toward the detection of stress adaptive behavior at an early stage and the control of stress-induced resistance throughout the food chain. PMID:24106490

  11. Germination and outgrowth of spores of Bacillus cereus group members: diversity and role of germinant receptors.

    PubMed

    Abee, Tjakko; Groot, Masja Nierop; Tempelaars, Marcel; Zwietering, Marcel; Moezelaar, Roy; van der Voort, Menno

    2011-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is a gram-positive, facultative anaerobic, endospore-forming toxicogenic human pathogen. Endospores are highly specialized, metabolically dormant cell types that are resistant to extreme environmental conditions, including heat, dehydration and other physical stresses. B. cereus can enter a range of environments, and can in its spore form, survive harsh conditions. If these conditions become favorable, spores can germinate and grow out and reach considerable numbers in a range of environments including processed foods. Certainly the last decade, when consumer preferences have shifted to mildly processed food, new opportunities arose for spore-forming spoilage and pathogenic organisms. Only rigorous methods have been shown to be capable of destroying all spores present in food, thus a shift toward e.g., milder heat preservation strategies, may result in low but significant amounts of viable spores in food products. Hence, the need for a mild spore destruction strategy is eminent including control of spore outgrowth. Consequently, there is a large interest in triggering spore germination in foodstuffs, since germinated spores have lost the extreme resistance of dormant spores and are relatively easy to kill. Another option could be to prevent germination so that no dangerous levels can be reached. This contribution will focus on germination and outgrowth characteristics of B. cereus and other members of the B. cereus group, providing an overview of the niches these spore-formers can occupy, the signals that trigger germination, and how B. cereus copes with these wake-up calls in different environments including foods, during food processing and upon interaction with the human host. PMID:21315974

  12. Bacillus cereus G9241 S-Layer Assembly Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Anthrax-Like Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Ting; Oh, So-Young; Hendrickx, Antoni P. A.; Lunderberg, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus cereus G9241, the causative agent of anthrax-like disease, harbors virulence plasmids encoding anthrax toxins as well as hyaluronic acid (HA) and B. cereus exopolysaccharide (BPS) capsules. B. cereus G9241 also harbors S-layer genes, including homologs of Bacillus anthracis surface array protein (Sap), extractable antigen 1 (EA1), and the S-layer-associated proteins (BSLs). In B. anthracis, S-layer proteins and BSLs attach via their S-layer homology domains (SLH) to the secondary cell wall polysaccharide (SCWP) in a manner requiring csaB, a predicted ketalpyruvate transferase. Here we used a genetic approach to analyze B. cereus G9241 S-layer assembly and function. Variants lacking the csaB gene synthesized SCWP but failed to retain Sap, EA1, and BSLs in the bacterial envelope. The B. cereus G9241 csaB mutant assembled capsular polysaccharides but displayed an increase in chain length relative to the wild-type strain. This phenotype is likely due to its inability to deposit BslO murein hydrolase at divisional septa. During growth under capsule-inducing conditions, B. cereus G9241 assembled BSLs (BslA and BslO) and the Sap S-layer protein, but not EA1, in the envelope. Finally, csaB-mediated assembly of S-layer proteins and BSLs in B. cereus G9241 contributes to the pathogenesis of anthrax-like disease in mice. PMID:23204457

  13. Characteristics and phylogeny of Bacillus cereus strains isolated from Maari, a traditional West African food condiment.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Line; Kando, Christine Kere; Sawadogo, Hagrétou; Larsen, Nadja; Diawara, Bréhima; Ouédraogo, Georges Anicet; Hendriksen, Niels Bohse; Jespersen, Lene

    2015-03-01

    Maari is a spontaneously fermented food condiment made from baobab tree seeds in West African countries. This type of product is considered to be safe, being consumed by millions of people on a daily basis. However, due to the spontaneous nature of the fermentation the human pathogen Bacillus cereus occasionally occurs in Maari. This study characterizes succession patterns and pathogenic potential of B. cereus isolated from the raw materials (ash, water from a drilled well (DW) and potash), seed mash throughout fermentation (0-96h), after steam cooking and sun drying (final product) from two production sites of Maari. Aerobic mesophilic bacterial (AMB) counts in raw materials were of 10(5)cfu/ml in DW, and ranged between 6.5×10(3) and 1.2×10(4)cfu/g in potash, 10(9)-10(10)cfu/g in seed mash during fermentation and 10(7) - 10(9) after sun drying. Fifty three out of total 290 AMB isolates were identified as B. cereus sensu lato by use of ITS-PCR and grouped into 3 groups using PCR fingerprinting based on Escherichia coli phage-M13 primer (M13-PCR). As determined by panC gene sequencing, the isolates of B. cereus belonged to PanC types III and IV with potential for high cytotoxicity. Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated sequences of glpF, gmk, ilvD, pta, pur, pycA and tpi revealed that the M13-PCR group 1 isolates were related to B. cereus biovar anthracis CI, while the M13-PCR group 2 isolates were identical to cereulide (emetic toxin) producing B. cereus strains. The M13-PCR group 1 isolates harboured poly-γ-D-glutamic acid capsule biosynthesis genes capA, capB and capC showing 99-100% identity with the environmental B. cereus isolate 03BB108. Presence of cesB of the cereulide synthetase gene cluster was confirmed by PCR in M13-PCR group 2 isolates. The B. cereus harbouring the cap genes were found in potash, DW, cooking water and at 8h fermentation. The "emetic" type B. cereus were present in DW, the seed mash at 48-72h of fermentation and in the final product

  14. A quantitative microbiological exposure assessment model for Bacillus cereus in REPFEDs.

    PubMed

    Daelman, Jeff; Membré, Jeanne-Marie; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Vermeulen, An; Devlieghere, Frank; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2013-09-16

    One of the pathogens of concern in refrigerated and processed foods of extended durability (REPFED) is psychrotrophic Bacillus cereus, because of its ability to survive pasteurisation and grow at low temperatures. In this study a quantitative microbiological exposure assessment (QMEA) of psychrotrophic B. cereus in REPFEDs is presented. The goal is to quantify (i) the prevalence and concentration of B. cereus during production and shelf life, (ii) the number of packages with potential emetic toxin formation and (iii) the impact of different processing steps and consumer behaviour on the exposure to B. cereus from REPFEDs. The QMEA comprises the entire production and distribution process, from raw materials over pasteurisation and up to the moment it is consumed or discarded. To model this process the modular process risk model (MPRM) was used (Nauta, 2002). The product life was divided into nine modules, each module corresponding to a basic process: (1) raw material contamination, (2) cross contamination during handling, (3) inactivation during preparation, (4) growth during intermediate storage, (5) partitioning of batches in portions, (6) mixing portions to create the product, (7) recontamination during assembly and packaging, (8) inactivation during pasteurisation and (9) growth during shelf life. Each of the modules was modelled and built using a combination of newly gathered and literature data, predictive models and expert opinions. Units (batch/portion/package) with a B. cereus concentration of 10(5)CFU/g or more were considered 'risky' units. Results show that the main drivers of variability and uncertainty are consumer behaviour, strain variability and modelling error. The prevalence of B. cereus in the final products is estimated at 48.6% (±0.01%) and the number of packs with too high B. cereus counts at the moment of consumption is estimated at 4750 packs per million (0.48%). Cold storage at retail and consumer level is vital in limiting the exposure

  15. Toxigenic genes, spoilage potential, and antimicrobial resistance of Bacillus cereus group strains from ice cream.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Seza; Eyi, Ayla; Küçüksarı, Rümeysa

    2014-02-01

    Bacillus spp. can be recovered from almost every environment. It is also found readily in foods, where it may cause food spoilage and/or food poisoning due to its toxigenic and pathogenic nature, and extracellular enzymes. In this study, 29 Bacillus cereus group strains from ice cream were examined for the presence of following virulence genes hblC, nheA, cytK and ces genes, and tested for a range of the extracellular enzymes, and antimicrobial susceptibility. The strains were found to produce extracellular enzymes: proteolytic and lipolytic activity, gelatin hydrolysis and lecithinase production (100%), DNase production (93.1%) and amylase activity (93.1%). Of 29 strains examined, 24 (82.8%) showed hemolytic activity on blood agar. Beta-lactamase enzyme was only produced by 20.7% of B. cereus group. Among 29 B. cereus group from ice cream, nheA was the most common virulence gene detected in 44.8% of the strains, followed by hblC gene with 17.2%. Four (13.8%) of the 29 strains were positive for both hblC gene and nheA gene. Contrarily, cytK and ces genes were not detected in any of the strains. Antimicrobial susceptibility of ice cream isolates was tested to 14 different antimicrobial agents using the disc diffusion method. We detected resistance to penicillin and ampicillin with the same rate of 89.7%. Thirty-one percent of the strains were multiresistant to three or more antibiotics. This study emphasizes that the presence of natural isolates of Bacillus spp. harboring one or more enterotoxin genes, producing extracellular enzymes which may cause spoilage and acquiring antibiotic resistance might hold crucial importance in the food safety and quality. PMID:24309214

  16. Distinct Mutations in PlcR Explain Why Some Strains of the Bacillus cereus Group Are Nonhemolytic

    PubMed Central

    Slamti, Leyla; Perchat, Stéphane; Gominet, Myriam; Vilas-Bôas, Gislayne; Fouet, Agnès; Mock, Michèle; Sanchis, Vincent; Chaufaux, Josette; Gohar, Michel; Lereclus, Didier

    2004-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus anthracis are closely related species belonging to the Bacillus cereus group. B. thuringiensis and B. cereus generally produce extracellular proteins, including phospholipases and hemolysins. Transcription of the genes encoding these factors is controlled by the pleiotropic regulator PlcR. Disruption of plcR in B. cereus and B. thuringiensis drastically reduces the hemolytic, lecithinase, and cytotoxic properties of these organisms. B. anthracis does not produce these proteins due to a nonsense mutation in the plcR gene. We screened 400 B. thuringiensis and B. cereus strains for their hemolytic and lecithinase properties. Eight Hly− Lec− strains were selected and analyzed to determine whether this unusual phenotype was due to a mutation similar to that found in B. anthracis. Sequence analysis of the DNA region including the plcR and papR genes of these strains and genetic complementation of the strains with functional copies of plcR and papR indicated that different types of mutations were responsible for these phenotypes. We also found that the plcR genes of three B. anthracis strains belonging to different phylogenetic groups contained the same nonsense mutation, suggesting that this mutation is a distinctive trait of this species. PMID:15150241

  17. Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis (SBP) caused by Bacillus Cereus in an Alcoholic Patient: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sayan; Ansari, Mohammad Aftab Alam; Sarfraz, Asim; Jaiswal, Nitesh; Singh, Siddharth

    2015-02-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is infection of peritoneal covering of the abdomen caused by bacteria, without any known etiology. Common known predisposing factors are cirrhosis of liver and old age among others. Bacillus cereus is an uncommon cause of SBP and often wrongly interpreted as a contaminant. We hereby report a case of peritonitis in chronic alcoholic, elderly male patient presenting in the outpatient department. Bacillus cereus is often regarded as contaminant but must be carefully identified and correlated clinically in case of isolation from peritoneal fluid. PMID:25859458

  18. A Novel Multiplex PCR Discriminates Bacillus anthracis and Its Genetically Related Strains from Other Bacillus cereus Group Species

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Hirohito; Fujikura, Daisuke; Ohnuma, Miyuki; Ohnishi, Naomi; Hang'ombe, Bernard M.; Mimuro, Hitomi; Ezaki, Takayuki; Mweene, Aaron S.; Higashi, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax is an important zoonotic disease worldwide that is caused by Bacillus anthracis, a spore-forming pathogenic bacterium. A rapid and sensitive method to detect B. anthracis is important for anthrax risk management and control in animal cases to address public health issues. However, it has recently become difficult to identify B. anthracis by using previously reported molecular-based methods because of the emergence of B. cereus, which causes severe extra-intestinal infection, as well as the human pathogenic B. thuringiensis, both of which are genetically related to B. anthracis. The close genetic relation of chromosomal backgrounds has led to complexity of molecular-based diagnosis. In this study, we established a B. anthracis multiplex PCR that can screen for the presence of B. anthracis virulent plasmids and differentiate B. anthracis and its genetically related strains from other B. cereus group species. Six sets of primers targeting a chromosome of B. anthracis and B. anthracis-like strains, two virulent plasmids, pXO1 and pXO2, a bacterial gene, 16S rRNA gene, and a mammalian gene, actin-beta gene, were designed. The multiplex PCR detected approximately 3.0 CFU of B. anthracis DNA per PCR reaction and was sensitive to B. anthracis. The internal control primers also detected all bacterial and mammalian DNAs examined, indicating the practical applicability of this assay as it enables monitoring of appropriate amplification. The assay was also applied for detection of clinical strains genetically related to B. anthracis, which were B. cereus strains isolated from outbreaks of hospital infections in Japan, and field strains isolated in Zambia, and the assay differentiated B. anthracis and its genetically related strains from other B. cereus group strains. Taken together, the results indicate that the newly developed multiplex PCR is a sensitive and practical method for detecting B. anthracis. PMID:25774512

  19. Bacterial succession and metabolite changes during flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) retting with Bacillus cereus HDYM-02.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dan; Liu, Pengfei; Pan, Chao; Du, Renpeng; Ping, Wenxiang; Ge, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing and GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) were jointly used to reveal the bacterial succession and metabolite changes during flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) retting. The inoculation of Bacillus cereus HDYM-02 decreased bacterial richness and diversity. This inoculum led to the replacement of Enterobacteriaceae by Bacillaceae. The level of aerobic Pseudomonadaceae (mainly Azotobacter) and anaerobic Clostridiaceae_1 gradually increased and decreased, respectively. Following the addition of B. cereus HDYM-02, the dominant groups were all degumming enzyme producers or have been proven to be involved in microbial retting throughout the entire retting period. These results could be verified by the metabolite changes, either degumming enzymes or their catalytic products galacturonic acid and reducing sugars. The GC-MS data showed a clear separation between flax retting with and without B. cereus HDYM-02, particularly within the first 72 h. These findings reveal the important bacterial groups that are involved in fiber retting and will facilitate improvements in the retting process. PMID:27585559

  20. Detection and quantification of Bacillus cereus group in milk by droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Porcellato, Davide; Narvhus, Judith; Skeie, Siv Borghild

    2016-08-01

    Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) is one of the newest and most promising methods for the detection and quantification of molecular targets by PCR. Here, we optimized and used a new ddPCR assay for the detection and quantification of the Bacillus cereus group in milk. We also compared the ddPCR to a standard qPCR assay. The new ddPCR assay showed a similar coefficient of determination and a better limit of detection compared to the qPCR assay during quantification of the target molecules in the samples. However, the ddPCR assay has a limitation during quantification of a high number of target molecules. This new assay was then tested for the quantification of the B. cereus group in 90 milk samples obtained over three months from two different dairies and the milk was stored at different temperatures before sampling. The ddPCR assay showed good agreement with the qPCR assay for the quantification of the B. cereus group in milk, and due to its lower detection limit more samples were detected as positive. The new ddPCR assay is a promising method for the quantification of target bacteria in low concentration in milk. PMID:27211508

  1. Global transcriptome analysis of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 in response to silver nitrate stress

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized using Bacillus cereus strains. Earlier, we had synthesized monodispersive crystalline silver nanoparticles using B. cereus PGN1 and ATCC14579 strains. These strains have showed high level of resistance to silver nitrate (1 mM) but their global transcriptomic response has not been studied earlier. In this study, we investigated the cellular and metabolic response of B. cereus ATCC14579 treated with 1 mM silver nitrate for 30 & 60 min. Global expression profiling using genomic DNA microarray indicated that 10% (n = 524) of the total genes (n = 5234) represented on the microarray were up-regulated in the cells treated with silver nitrate. The majority of genes encoding for chaperones (GroEL), nutrient transporters, DNA replication, membrane proteins, etc. were up-regulated. A substantial number of the genes encoding chemotaxis and flagellar proteins were observed to be down-regulated. Motility assay of the silver nitrate treated cells revealed reduction in their chemotactic activity compared to the control cells. In addition, 14 distinct transcripts overexpressed from the 'empty' intergenic regions were also identified and proposed as stress-responsive non-coding small RNAs. PMID:22071005

  2. Bactericidal thurincin H causes unique morphological changes in Bacillus cereus F4552 without affecting membrane permeability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaoyan; Feng, Guoping; Snyder, Abigail B; Manns, David C; Churey, John J; Worobo, Randy W

    2014-08-01

    Thurincin H is an antilisterial bacteriocin produced by Bacillus thuringiensis SF361. It exhibits inhibitory activity against a wide range of Gram-positive foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria including Listeria monocytogenes, B. cereus, and B. subtilis. This hydrophobic, anionic bacteriocin folds into a hairpin structure maintained by four pairs of unique sulfur to α-carbon thioether bonds. As its hydrophobicity and structure are quite different from most archived bacteriocins, this study aimed to elucidate its mode of action and compare it with the mechanisms of other well-characterized bacteriocins. The results indicated that, although bactericidal to B. cereus F4552, thurincin H did not lead to optical density reduction or detectable changes in cell membrane permeability. B. cereus F4552 imaged by scanning electron microscopy after treatment with thurincin H at 32 × MIC showed regular rod-shaped cells, while only cells treated with thurincin H at the elevated levels of 256 × MIC showed loss of cell integrity and rigidity. Both concentrations caused greater than 99% of cell viability reduction. In contrast, nisin caused significant cell membrane permeability at concentration as low as 2 × MIC. These results indicated a difference in the mode of action for thurincin H compared with the generalized pore-forming mechanism of many lantibiotics, such as nisin. PMID:24891232

  3. Antibacterial activity of 11 essential oils against Bacillus cereus in tyndallized carrot broth.

    PubMed

    Valero, M; Salmerón, M C

    2003-08-15

    The antibacterial activity of 11 essential oils from aromatic plants against the strain INRA L2104 of the foodborne pathogen Bacillus cereus grown in carrot broth at 16 degrees C was studied. The quantity needed by the essential oils of nutmeg, mint, clove, oregano, cinnamon, sassafras, sage, thyme or rosemary to produce 14-1110% relative extension of the lag phase was determined. Total growth inhibition of bacterial spores was observed for some of the antimicrobial agents assayed. The addition of 5 microl cinnamon essential oil per 100 ml of broth in combination with refrigeration temperatures of cereus for at least 60 days in a model, refrigerated minimally processed food product, made with carrots and tyndallized. This is especially important considering that the psychrotrophic enterotoxigenic strain of B. cereus INRA TZ415 was able to grow in this substrate at low temperatures in the absence of any essential oil. Furthermore, the study of the sensory characteristics of the final product suggests that the use of cinnamon essential oil can be considered as an alternative to "traditional food preservatives". PMID:12810272

  4. Bacterial succession and metabolite changes during flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) retting with Bacillus cereus HDYM-02

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dan; Liu, Pengfei; Pan, Chao; Du, Renpeng; Ping, Wenxiang; Ge, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing and GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) were jointly used to reveal the bacterial succession and metabolite changes during flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) retting. The inoculation of Bacillus cereus HDYM-02 decreased bacterial richness and diversity. This inoculum led to the replacement of Enterobacteriaceae by Bacillaceae. The level of aerobic Pseudomonadaceae (mainly Azotobacter) and anaerobic Clostridiaceae_1 gradually increased and decreased, respectively. Following the addition of B. cereus HDYM-02, the dominant groups were all degumming enzyme producers or have been proven to be involved in microbial retting throughout the entire retting period. These results could be verified by the metabolite changes, either degumming enzymes or their catalytic products galacturonic acid and reducing sugars. The GC-MS data showed a clear separation between flax retting with and without B. cereus HDYM-02, particularly within the first 72 h. These findings reveal the important bacterial groups that are involved in fiber retting and will facilitate improvements in the retting process. PMID:27585559

  5. Effect of inhibitors of trypsin-like proteolytic enzymes Bacillus cereus T spore germination.

    PubMed Central

    Boschwitz, H; Milner, Y; Keynan, A; Halvorson, H O; Troll, W

    1983-01-01

    The germination of Bacillus cereus T spore suspensions is partially prevented by several inhibitors of trypsin-like enzymes. Leupeptin, antipain, and tosyl-lysine-chloromethyl ketone are effective inhibitors, whereas chymostatin, elastatinal, and pepstatin are inactive. A synthetic substrate of trypsin, tosyl-arginine-methyl ester, also inhibits germination. Its inhibitory effect decreases as a function of incubation time in the presence of spores and is abolished by previous hydrolysis with trypsin. Germinating, but not dormant, spore suspensions hydrolyze tosyl-arginine-methyl ester; its hydrolysis is insensitive to chloramphenicol, sulfhydryl reagents, and EDTA. A crude extract of germinated B. cereus spores contains a trypsin-like enzyme whose activity, as measured by hydrolysis of benzoyl-arginine p-nitroanilide, is sensitive to germination-inhibitory compounds such as leupeptin, tosyl-arginine-methyl ester, and tosyl-lysine-chloromethyl ketone. Spore suspensions exposed to the above inhibitors under germination conditions lose only part of their heat resistance and some 10 to 30% of their dipicolinic acid content. Part of the germinating spore population becomes "phase grey" under phase optics. Based on a study of the inhibition of germination by protease inhibitors and the activity of a protease in germination spores and spore extracts, it is suggested that the activity of a trypsin-like enzyme may be involved in the mechanism of the breaking of dormancy in spores of B. cereus T. PMID:6401704

  6. Antimicrobial potential of flavoring ingredients against Bacillus cereus in a milk-based beverage.

    PubMed

    Pina-Pérez, Maria C; Rodrigo, Dolores; Martínez-López, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    Natural ingredients--cinnamon, cocoa, vanilla, and anise--were assessed based on Bacillus cereus vegetative cell growth inhibition in a mixed liquid whole egg and skim milk beverage (LWE-SM), under different conditions: ingredient concentration (1, 2.5, and 5% [wt/vol]) and incubation temperature (5, 10, and 22 °C). According to the results obtained, ingredients significantly (p<0.05) reduced bacterial growth when supplementing the LWE-SM beverage. B. cereus behavior was mathematically described for each substrate by means of a modified Gompertz equation. Kinetic parameters, lag time, and maximum specific growth rate were obtained. Cinnamon was the most bacteriostatic ingredient and cocoa the most bactericidal one when they were added at 5% (wt/vol) and beverages were incubated at 5 °C. The bactericidal effect of cocoa 5% (wt/vol) reduced final B. cereus log10 counts (log Nf, log10 (colony-forming units/mL)) by 4.10 ± 0.21 log10 cycles at 5 °C. PMID:23909775

  7. Arsenic release by indigenous bacteria Bacillus cereus from aquifer sediments at Datong Basin, northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zuoming; Wang, Yanxin; Duan, Mengyu; Xie, Xianjun; Su, Chunli

    2011-03-01

    Endemic arsenic poisoning due to long-term drinking of high arsenic groundwater has been reported in Datong Basin, northern China. To investigate the effects of microbial activities on arsenic mobilization in contaminated aquifers, Bacillus cereus ( B. cereus) isolated from high arsenic aquifer sediments of the basin was used in our microcosm experiments. The arsenic concentration in the treatment with both bacteria and sodium citrate or glucose had a rapid increase in the first 18 d, and then, it declined. Supplemented with bacteria only, the concentration could increase on the second day. By contrast, the arsenic concentration in the treatment supplemented with sodium citrate or glucose was kept very low. These results indicate that bacterial activities promoted the release of arsenic in the sediments. Bacterial activities also influenced other geochemical parameters of the aqueous phase, such as pH, Eh, and the concentrations of dissolved Fe, Mn, and Al that are important controls on arsenic release. The removal of Fe, Mn, and Al from sediment samples was observed with the presence of B. cereus. The effects of microbial activities on Fe, Mn, and Al release were nearly the same as those on As mobilization. The pH values of the treatments inoculated with bacteria were lower than those without bacteria, still at alkaline levels. With the decrease of Eh values in treatments inoculated with bacteria, the microcosms became more reducing and are thus favorable for arsenic release.

  8. Complete genome sequence of the cold-active bacteriophage VMY22 from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Qin, Kunhao; Cheng, Benxu; Zhang, Shengting; Wang, Nan; Fang, Yuan; Zhang, Qi; Kuang, Anxiu; Lin, Lianbing; Ji, Xiuling; Wei, Yunlin

    2016-06-01

    The cold-active bacteriophage VMY22, belonging to the Podoviridae family, was isolated from Mingyong Glacier in China. Sequence analysis revealed that the genome is 18,609 bp long, with an overall G + C content of 36.4 mol%, and 25 open reading frames (ORFs). The sequence contains 46 potential promoters, 6 transcription terminators, and no tRNAs. Most of the ORFs show a high degree of similarity to B103 (NC_004165). Two noteworthy findings were made. First, one of the predicted proteins, ORF 19, shows high sequence similarity to the bacteriocin biosynthesis protein from Bacillus cereus. From this information, we propose that the VMY22 phage is at an intermediate phase in its coevolution with its bacterial host. Second, seven of the hypothetical proteins appear to be unique to this cold-active B. cereus phage (i.e., not found in temperate-active B. cereus phages). These observations add to our current knowledge about the coevolution of bacteriophages and their hosts. The identification of a novel group of gene and protein structures and functions will lead to a better understanding of cold-adaptation mechanisms in bacteria and their bacteriophages. PMID:26941234

  9. Antimicrobial resistance among Pseudomonas spp. and the Bacillus cereus group isolated from Danish agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L B; Baloda, S; Boye, M; Aarestrup, F M

    2001-06-01

    From four Danish pig farms, bacteria of Pseudomonas spp. and the Bacillus cereus group were isolated from soil and susceptibility towards selected antimicrobials was tested. From each farm, soil samples representing soil just before and after spread of animal waste and undisturbed agricultural soil, when possible, were collected. Soil from a well-characterized Danish farm soil (Højbakkegaard) was collected for comparison. The Pseudomonas spp. and B. cereus were chosen as representative for Gram-negative and Gram-positive indigenous soil bacteria to test the effect of spread of animal waste on selection of resistance among soil bacteria. No variations in resistance levels were observed between farms; but when the four differently treated soils were compared, resistance was seen for carbadox, chloramphenicol, nalidixan (nalidixic acid), nitrofurantoin, streptomycin and tetracycline for Pseudomonas spp., and for bacitracin, erythromycin, penicillin and streptomycin for the B. cereus group. Variations in resistance levels were observed when soil before and after spread of animal waste was compared, indicating an effect from spread of animal waste. PMID:11485227

  10. Isolation and characterization of flagellar filaments from Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Yuichi

    2014-12-01

    Isolated flagellar filaments from the type strain of Bacillus cereus, ATCC 14579, were shown to consist of 34, 32 and 31 kDa proteins in similar proportions as judged by band intensities on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of these three proteins of strain ATCC 14579 were identical with the deduced sequences of three flagellin genes BC1657, BC1658 and BC1659 in the whole genome sequence. Strain ATCC 14579 was classified into serotype T2 by a flagellar serotyping scheme for B. cereus strains that are untypeable into known flagellar serotypes H1 to H23. Flagellar filaments from a reference strain of serotype T2 contained two protein bands at 34 and 32 kDa, but a single protein band at 39 kDa was detected in flagellar filaments of a reference strain of serotype H1. Two murine monoclonal antibodies, 1A5 and 2A5, which recognize both the 34 and 32 kDa flagellins and a single flagellin of 32 kDa, respectively, were specifically reactive with B. cereus strains ATCC 14579 and serotype T2 in whole-cell ELISA and bacterial motility inhibition tests. In immunoelectron microscopy with monoclonal antibodies 1A5 and 2A5, colloidal gold spheres were shown to localize almost evenly over the entire part of flagellar filaments. Since strain ATCC 14579, and presumably strain serotype T2, are unusual among B. cereus strains in possessing multiple genes that encode flagellin subunits, a possible unique mechanism may contribute to assembly of multiple flagellin subunits into the filament over its entire length. PMID:25227778

  11. Reduction of Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus in Milk by Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Mirhosseini, Mahboubeh; Barzegari Firouzabadi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background & Objectives: Direct addition of antimicrobial materials to food during food processing is an effective method for controlling microbial contaminants of food and extending the shelf- life of food products. Objective of this research was to study the antimicrobial effect of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle and potential applications of ZnO nanoparticles in terms of controling two food-borne pathogens in milk. Methods: Toxicity of different concentration (0, 0.5, 2, 5, and 10 mM) of ZnO nanoparticles on Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus was studied in culture media and milk. Results: Among the mentiond concentrations, treatment of 10 mM of ZnO nanoparticle was the most effective one for L. monocytogenes and B. cereus inhibition, which completely inhibited the growth of L. monocytogenes and B. cereus in 24h. These data revealed concentration-dependency of the antibacterial activity of ZnO. Therefore, 5 mM and 10 mM ZnO were selected for further studies, which were performed in milk, since they demonstrated significant growth inhibition. ZnO NPs were more capable in terms of reducing the initial growth counts of all the above-stated strains in milk. Conclusion: ZnO nanoparticles had an antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes and B. cereus in milk and the media. This work was a preliminary study that provided a starting point for determining whether the use of ZnO nanoparticles had the potential for being applied in food preservation or not. PMID:26351469

  12. Inhibition of Bacillus cereus Strains by Antimicrobial Metabolites from Lactobacillus johnsonii CRL1647 and Enterococcus faecium SM21.

    PubMed

    Soria, M Cecilia; Audisio, M Carina

    2014-12-01

    Bacillus cereus is an endospore-forming, Gram-positive bacterium able to cause foodborne diseases. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are known for their ability to synthesize organic acids and bacteriocins, but the potential of these compounds against B. cereus has been scarcely documented in food models. The present study has examined the effect of the metabolites produced by Lactobacillus johnsonii CRL1647 and Enterococcus faecium SM21 on the viability of select B. cereus strains. Furthermore, the effect of E. faecium SM21 metabolites against B. cereus strains has also been investigated on a rice food model. L. johnsonii CRL1647 produced 128 mmol/L of lactic acid, 38 mmol/L of acetic acid and 0.3 mmol/L of phenyl-lactic acid. These organic acids reduced the number of vegetative cells and spores of the B. cereus strains tested. However, the antagonistic effect disappeared at pH 6.5. On the other hand, E. faecium SM21 produced only lactic and acetic acid (24.5 and 12.2 mmol/L, respectively) and was able to inhibit both vegetative cells and spores of the B. cereus strains, at a final fermentation pH of 5.0 and at pH 6.5. This would indicate the action of other metabolites, different from organic acids, present in the cell-free supernatant. On cooked rice grains, the E. faecium SM21 bacteriocin(s) were tested against two B. cereus strains. Both of them were significantly affected within the first 4 h of contact; whereas B. cereus BAC1 cells recovered after 24 h, the effect on B. cereus 1 remained up to the end of the assay. The LAB studied may thus be considered to define future strategies for biological control of B. cereus. PMID:25305011

  13. The Arthromitus stage of Bacillus cereus: Intestinal symbionts of animals

    PubMed Central

    Margulis, Lynn; Jorgensen, Jeremy Z.; Dolan, Sona; Kolchinsky, Rita; Rainey, Frederick A.; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    1998-01-01

    In the guts of more than 25 species of arthropods we observed filaments containing refractile inclusions previously discovered and named “Arthromitus” in 1849 by Joseph Leidy [Leidy, J. (1849) Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia 4, 225–233]. We cultivated these microbes from boiled intestines of 10 different species of surface-cleaned soil insects and isopod crustaceans. Literature review and these observations lead us to conclude that Arthromitus are spore-forming, variably motile, cultivable bacilli. As long rod-shaped bacteria, they lose their flagella, attach by fibers or fuzz to the intestinal epithelium, grow filamentously, and sporulate from their distal ends. When these organisms are incubated in culture, their life history stages are accelerated by light and inhibited by anoxia. Characterization of new Arthromitus isolates from digestive tracts of common sow bugs (Porcellio scaber), roaches (Gromphodorhina portentosa, Blaberus giganteus) and termites (Cryptotermes brevis, Kalotermes flavicollis) identifies these flagellated, spore-forming symbionts as a Bacillus sp. Complete sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene from four isolates (two sow bug, one hissing roach, one death’s head roach) confirms these as the low-G+C Gram-positive eubacterium Bacillus cereus. We suggest that B. cereus and its close relatives, easily isolated from soil and grown on nutrient agar, enjoy filamentous growth in moist nutrient-rich intestines of healthy arthropods and similar habitats. PMID:9448315

  14. Biogenesis of antibacterial silver nanoparticles using the endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus isolated from Garcinia xanthochymus

    PubMed Central

    Sunkar, Swetha; Nachiyar, C Valli

    2012-01-01

    Objective To synthesize the ecofriendly nanoparticles, which is viewed as an alternative to the chemical method which initiated the use of microbes like bacteria and fungi in their synthesis. Methods The current study uses the endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus isolated from the Garcinia xanthochymus to synthesize the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The AgNPs were synthesized by reduction of silver nitrate solution by the endophytic bacterium after incubation for 3-5 d at room temperature. The synthesis was initially observed by colour change from pale white to brown which was confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The AgNPs were further characterized using FTIR, SEM-EDX and TEM analyses. Results The synthesized nanoparticles were found to be spherical with the size in the range of 20-40 nm which showed a slight aggregation. The energy-dispersive spectra of the nanoparticle dispersion confirmed the presence of elemental silver. The AgNPs were found to have antibacterial activity against a few pathogenic bacteria like Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Conclusions The endophytic bacteria identified as Bacillus cereus was able to synthesize silver nanoparticles with potential antibacterial activity. PMID:23593575

  15. Production and characterization of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate from Bacillus cereus PS 10.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Priyanka; Bajaj, Bijender Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Usage of renewable raw materials for production of fully degradable bioplastics (bacterial poly-3-hydroxybutyrate, PHB) has gained immense research impetus considering recalcitrant nature of petroleum based plastics, dwindling fossil fuel feed stocks, and associated green house gas emissions. However, high production cost of PHB is the major bottleneck for its wide range industrial applications. In current study, Bacillus cereus PS 10, a recent isolate, efficiently utilized molasses, an abundantly available by-product from sugar industries as sole carbon source for growth and PHB production. Most influential bioprocess variables i.e. molasses, pH and NH4Cl were identified based on Plackett-Burman-designed experiments. Design of experiment approach (response surface methodology) was further employed for optimization of these bioprocess variables, and an enhanced PHB yield (57.5%) was obtained. PHB produced by Bacillus cereus PS 10 was investigated using various physico-chemical approaches viz. thermogravimetric analysis, proton and carbon NMR ((1)H and (13)C) spectroscopy, melting point, elemental analysis and polarimetry for its detail characterization, and assessment for industrial application potential. PMID:26257381

  16. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) production by Bacillus cereus SPV using sugarcane molasses as the main carbon source.

    PubMed

    Akaraonye, Everest; Moreno, Catalina; Knowles, Jonathan C; Keshavarz, Tajalli; Roy, Ipsita

    2012-02-01

    The main hindrance in the use of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) as a replacement for existing petroleum-based plastics is their high production cost. The carbon source accounts for 50% of the cost for PHA production. Thus, increasing the yield and productivity of PHAs on cheap substrates is an important challenge for biotechnologists to support the commercialization and further applications of these polymers. In this study, we have investigated the use of an agricultural raw material, sugarcane molasses, as the main carbon source for poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (P(3HB)) production by Bacillus cereus SPV. These studies were carried out in both shaken flasks and 2 L bioreactors. Various conditions were evaluated for their effects on biomass and P(3HB) accumulation. A high polymer yield was obtained, 61.07% dry cell weight (DCW) in a 1 L shaken flask study and 51.37% DCW in a 2 L fermenter study. These yields are 50% higher than previously observed with Bacillus cereus SPV. Hence, the results are encouraging and show that sugarcane molasses are a promising carbon source for an economical and commercially viable production of P(3HB). PMID:22147642

  17. Structural and catalytic properties of L-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Porumb, H; Vancea, D; Mureşan, L; Presecan, E; Lascu, I; Petrescu, I; Porumb, T; Pop, R; Bârzu, O

    1987-04-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus, a non-allosteric enzyme composed of six identical subunits, was purified to homogeneity by chromatography on blue-Sepharose and Sepharose 6B-CL. Like other pyridine-linked dehydrogenases, alanine dehydrogenase is inhibited by Cibacron blue, competitively with respect to NADH and noncompetitively with respect to pyruvate. The enzyme was inactivated by 0.1 M glycine/HCl (pH 2) and reactivated by 0.1 M phosphate (pH 8) supplemented with NAD+ or NADH. The reactivation was characterized by sigmoidal kinetics indicating a complex mechanism involving rate-limiting folding and association steps. Cibacron blue interfered with renaturation, presumably by competition with NADH. Chromatography on Sepharose 6B-CL of the partially renatured alanine dehydrogenase led to the separation of several intermediates, but only the hexamer was characterized by enzymatic activity. By immobilization on Sepharose 4B, alanine dehydrogenase from B. cereus retained 66% of the specific activity of the soluble enzyme. After denaturation of immobilized alanine dehydrogenase with 7 M urea, 37% of the initial protein was still bound to Sepharose, indicating that on the average the hexamer was attached to the matrix via, at most, two subunits. The ability of the denatured, immobilized subunits to pick up subunits from solution shows their capacity to fold back to the native conformation after urea treatment. The formation of "hybrids" between subunits of enzyme from B. cereus and Bacillus subtilis demonstrates the close resemblance of the tertiary and quaternary structures of alanine dehydrogenases from these species. PMID:3104322

  18. IlsA, A Unique Surface Protein of Bacillus cereus Required for Iron Acquisition from Heme, Hemoglobin and Ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Nadine; Buisson, Christophe; Gohar, Michel; Vidic, Jasmina; Bierne, Hélène; Kallassy, Mireille; Lereclus, Didier; Nielsen-LeRoux, Christina

    2009-01-01

    The human opportunistic pathogen Bacillus cereus belongs to the B. cereus group that includes bacteria with a broad host spectrum. The ability of these bacteria to colonize diverse hosts is reliant on the presence of adaptation factors. Previously, an IVET strategy led to the identification of a novel B. cereus protein (IlsA, Iron-regulated leucine rich surface protein), which is specifically expressed in the insect host or under iron restrictive conditions in vitro. Here, we show that IlsA is localized on the surface of B. cereus and hence has the potential to interact with host proteins. We report that B. cereus uses hemoglobin, heme and ferritin, but not transferrin and lactoferrin. In addition, affinity tests revealed that IlsA interacts with both hemoglobin and ferritin. Furthermore, IlsA directly binds heme probably through the NEAT domain. Inactivation of ilsA drastically decreases the ability of B. cereus to grow in the presence of hemoglobin, heme and ferritin, indicating that IlsA is essential for iron acquisition from these iron sources. In addition, the ilsA mutant displays a reduction in growth and virulence in an insect model. Hence, our results indicate that IlsA is a key factor within a new iron acquisition system, playing an important role in the general virulence strategy adapted by B. cereus to colonize susceptible hosts. PMID:19956654

  19. Recipes for Antimicrobial Wine Marinades against Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella enterica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated bactericidal activities of several antimicrobial wine recipes consisting of red and white wine extracts of oregano leaves with added garlic juice and oregano oil against Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella enterica. Dose-response plots were...

  20. A probability model for enterotoxin production of Bacillus cereus as a function of pH and temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacillus cereus is frequently isolated from a variety of foods including vegetables, dairy products, meat, and other raw and processed foods. The bacterium is capable of producing enterotoxin and emetic toxin that can cause severe nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. The objectives of this study were to a...

  1. Finished Genome Sequence of Bacillus cereus Strain 03BB87, a Clinical Isolate with B. anthracis Virulence Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Shannon L.; Minogue, Timothy D.; Teshima, Hazuki; Davenport, Karen W.; Shea, April A.; Miner, Haven L.; Wolcott, Mark J.; Chain, Patrick S.G.

    2015-01-15

    Bacillus cereus strain 03BB87, a blood culture isolate, originated in a 56-year-old male muller operator with a fatal case of pneumonia in 2003. Here we present the finished genome sequence of that pathogen, including a 5.46-Mb chromosome and two plasmids (209 and 52 Kb, respectively).

  2. Degradation of N-Acyl-l-Homoserine Lactones by Bacillus cereus in Culture Media and Pork Extract▿

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Martínez, Maria Stella; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Rajkovic, Andreja; Nadal, Pol; Debevere, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Degradation of the quorum-sensing signal molecule N-acyl-l-homoserine lactone (AHL) in cocultures was verified with Bacillus cereus and Yersinia enterocolitica in culture medium and in pork extract. Results showed evidence of microbial interaction when the AHL-degrading bacterium and AHL-producing bacterium were cocultured in a food-simulating condition. PMID:17293532

  3. Characterization and genomic analysis of chromate resistant and reducing Bacillus cereus strain SJ1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chromium is a toxic heavy metal, which primarily exists in two inorganic forms, Cr(VI) and Cr(III). Chromate [Cr(VI)] is carcinogenic, mutational, and teratogenic due to its strong oxidizing nature. Biotransformation of Cr(VI) to less-toxic Cr(III) by chromate-resistant and reducing bacteria has offered an ecological and economical option for chromate detoxification and bioremediation. However, knowledge of the genetic determinants for chromate resistance and reduction has been limited so far. Our main aim was to investigate chromate resistance and reduction by Bacillus cereus SJ1, and to further study the underlying mechanisms at the molecular level using the obtained genome sequence. Results Bacillus cereus SJ1 isolated from chromium-contaminated wastewater of a metal electroplating factory displayed high Cr(VI) resistance with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 30 mM when induced with Cr(VI). A complete bacterial reduction of 1 mM Cr(VI) was achieved within 57 h. By genome sequence analysis, a putative chromate transport operon, chrIA1, and two additional chrA genes encoding putative chromate transporters that likely confer chromate resistance were identified. Furthermore, we also found an azoreductase gene azoR and four nitroreductase genes nitR possibly involved in chromate reduction. Using reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) technology, it was shown that expression of adjacent genes chrA1 and chrI was induced in response to Cr(VI) but expression of the other two chromate transporter genes chrA2 and chrA3 was constitutive. In contrast, chromate reduction was constitutive in both phenotypic and gene expression analyses. The presence of a resolvase gene upstream of chrIA1, an arsenic resistance operon and a gene encoding Tn7-like transposition proteins ABBCCCD downstream of chrIA1 in B. cereus SJ1 implied the possibility of recent horizontal gene transfer. Conclusion Our results indicate that expression of the chromate transporter gene chrA1

  4. Characterization of boron resistant and accumulating bacteria Lysinibacillus fusiformis M1, Bacillus cereus M2, Bacillus cereus M3, Bacillus pumilus M4 isolated from former mining site, Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Raja, Chellaiah Edward; Omine, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Boron is known to be widespread environmental contaminant that is relatively mobile in soil when compared to other metal contaminants. The present study made an attempt to isolate and characterize the boron resistant and accumulating bacteria from former mining site at Hokkaido, Japan. Four potential strains M1, M2, M3 and M4 were selected based on high degree of boron and heavy metal resistances. The morphological, biochemical and 16S rDNA sequencing analysis of mining bacteria revealed that the isolates were highly homology to Lysinibacillus fusiformis M1 (99 %), Bacillus cereus M2 (99 %), Bacillus cereus M3 (99 %) and Bacillus pumilus M4 (99 %) respectively. The strains M1, M2, M3 and M4 showed resistance to several heavy metals such as As (III), As (V) and Cr (VI), Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. The selected strains were found to be arsenic oxidizing bacteria confirmed by Silver nitrate test. The resting and growing cells of mining bacteria were used for boron accumulation analysis. Selected strains were found to be efficiently accumulating boron concentration ranging from 0.1-2.3 mg L (-1) and 1.5-4.7 mg L (-1) at 24 h and 168 h, respectively. The following results conclude that the mining bacteria act as potent bioaccumulator of boron and its resistant, removal characteristic can be valuable in boron bioremediation. PMID:22571522

  5. Bacillus cereus Biovar Anthracis Causing Anthrax in Sub-Saharan Africa-Chromosomal Monophyly and Broad Geographic Distribution.

    PubMed

    Antonation, Kym S; Grützmacher, Kim; Dupke, Susann; Mabon, Philip; Zimmermann, Fee; Lankester, Felix; Peller, Tianna; Feistner, Anna; Todd, Angelique; Herbinger, Ilka; de Nys, Hélène M; Muyembe-Tamfun, Jean-Jacques; Karhemere, Stomy; Wittig, Roman M; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Grunow, Roland; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien; Corbett, Cindi R; Klee, Silke R; Leendertz, Fabian H

    2016-09-01

    Through full genome analyses of four atypical Bacillus cereus isolates, designated B. cereus biovar anthracis, we describe a distinct clade within the B. cereus group that presents with anthrax-like disease, carrying virulence plasmids similar to those of classic Bacillus anthracis. We have isolated members of this clade from different mammals (wild chimpanzees, gorillas, an elephant and goats) in West and Central Africa (Côte d'Ivoire, Cameroon, Central African Republic and Democratic Republic of Congo). The isolates shared several phenotypic features of both B. anthracis and B. cereus, but differed amongst each other in motility and their resistance or sensitivity to penicillin. They all possessed the same mutation in the regulator gene plcR, different from the one found in B. anthracis, and in addition, carry genes which enable them to produce a second capsule composed of hyaluronic acid. Our findings show the existence of a discrete clade of the B. cereus group capable of causing anthrax-like disease, found in areas of high biodiversity, which are possibly also the origin of the worldwide distributed B. anthracis. Establishing the impact of these pathogenic bacteria on threatened wildlife species will require systematic investigation. Furthermore, the consumption of wildlife found dead by the local population and presence in a domestic animal reveal potential sources of exposure to humans. PMID:27607836

  6. Detection of Bacillus cereus with enteropathogenic potential by multiplex real-time PCR based on SYBR Green I.

    PubMed

    Wehrle, Esther; Didier, Andrea; Moravek, Maximilian; Dietrich, Richard; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2010-06-01

    In order to meet the growing demand for fast and reliable detection of potentially toxinogenic Bacillus cereus, we developed a multiplex real-time PCR assay based on SYBR Green I with subsequent melting curve analysis. We designed and selected primers specific for genes of toxins responsible for diarrhoea (nheA, hblD and cytK1) and emesis (ces). A panel of 337 Bacillus strains was applied to the novel method on Light Cycler 2.0 with average melting temperature (T(m)) values of 73.85 degrees C (nheA), 87.01 degrees C (hblD), 78.66 degrees C (ces) and 82.19 degrees C (cytK1). An adapted version of the assay was also successfully run on Light Cycler 480 using one third (113 strains) of the total test panel. Verification of PCR results by conventional PCR as well as immunoassays and cytotoxicity tests gave an overall excellent correlation. Distinct melting peaks were only observed in B. cereus and B. cereus group strains but not in other Bacilli and Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria. Artificial contamination of three different food matrices with distinct bacterial counts revealed a detection limit of 10(1) CFU/g B. cereus cells after overnight enrichment. Thus, the novel multiplex real-time PCR turned out to be a reliable method for identification of B. cereus with enteropathogenic potential. PMID:19944752

  7. Diversity of Bacillus cereus group strains is reflected in their broad range of pathogenicity and diverse ecological lifestyles.

    PubMed

    Ceuppens, Siele; Boon, Nico; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2013-06-01

    Bacillus cereus comprises a highly versatile group of bacteria, which are of particular interest because of their capacity to cause disease. Emetic food poisoning is caused by the toxin cereulide produced during the growth of emetic B. cereus in food, while diarrhoeal food poisoning is the result of enterotoxin production by viable vegetative B. cereus cells in the small intestine, probably in the mucus layer and/or attached to the host's intestinal epithelium. The numbers of B. cereus causing disease are highly variable, depending on diverse factors linked to the host (age, diet, physiology and immunology), bacteria (cellular form, toxin genes and expression) and food (nutritional composition and meal characteristics). Bacillus cereus group strains show impressive ecological diversity, ranging from their saprophytic life cycle in soil to symbiotic (commensal and mutualistic) lifestyles near plant roots and in guts of insects and mammals to various pathogenic ones in diverse insect and mammalian hosts. During all these different ecological lifestyles, their toxins play important roles ranging from providing competitive advantages within microbial communities to inhibition of specific pathogenic organisms for their host and accomplishment of infections by damaging their host's tissues. PMID:23488744

  8. Conducting polymer based DNA biosensor for the detection of the Bacillus cereus group species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velusamy, Vijayalakshmi; Arshak, Khalil; Korostynska, Olga; Oliwa, Kamila; Adley, Catherine

    2009-05-01

    Biosensor designs are emerging at a significant rate and play an increasingly important role in foodborne pathogen detection. Conducting polymers are excellent tools for the fabrication of biosensors and polypyrrole has been used in the detection of biomolecules due to its unique properties. The prime intention of this paper was to pioneer the design and fabrication of a single-strand (ss) DNA biosensor for the detection of the Bacillus cereus (B.cereus) group species. Growth of B. cereus, results in production of several highly active toxins. Therefore, consumption of food containing >106 bacteria/gm may results in emetic and diarrhoeal syndromes. The most common source of this bacterium is found in liquid food products, milk powder, mixed food products and is of particular concern in the baby formula industry. The electrochemical deposition technique, such as cyclic voltammetry, was used to develop and test a model DNA-based biosensor on a gold electrode electropolymerized with polypyrrole. The electrically conducting polymer, polypyrrole is used as a platform for immobilizing DNA (1μg) on the gold electrode surface, since it can be more easily deposited from neutral pH aqueous solutions of pyrrolemonomers. The average current peak during the electrodeposition event is 288μA. There is a clear change in the current after hybridization of the complementary oligonucleotide (6.35μA) and for the noncomplementary oligonucleotide (5.77μA). The drop in current after each event was clearly noticeable and it proved to be effective.

  9. Bacillus cereus spores during housing of dairy cows: factors affecting contamination of raw milk.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, M; Christiansson, A; Svensson, B

    2007-06-01

    The contamination of raw milk with Bacillus cereus spores was studied during the indoor confinement of dairy cattle. The occurrence of spores in fresh and used bedding material, air samples, feed, feces, and the rinse water from milking equipment was compared with the spore level in bulk tank milk on 2 farms, one of which had 2 different housing systems. A less extensive study was carried out on an additional 5 farms. High spore concentrations of >100 spores/L in the raw milk were found on 4 of the farms. The number of spores found in the feed, feces, and air was too small to be of importance for milk contamination. Elevated spore contents in the rinse water from the milking equipment (up to 322 spores/L) were observed and large numbers of spores were found in the used bedding material, especially in free stalls with >5 cm deep sawdust beds. At most, 87,000 spores/g were found in used sawdust bedding. A positive correlation was found between the spore content in used bedding material and milk (r = 0.72). Comparison of the genetic fingerprints obtained by the random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR of isolates of B. cereus from the different sources indicated that used bedding material was the major source of contamination. A separate feeding experiment in which cows were experimentally fed B. cereus spores showed a positive relationship between the number of spores in the feed and feces and in the feces and milk (r = 0.78). The results showed that contaminated feed could be a significant source of spore contamination of raw milk if the number of spores excreted in the feces exceeded 100,000/g. PMID:17517714

  10. Characterization of LysPBC4, a novel Bacillus cereus-specific endolysin of bacteriophage PBC4.

    PubMed

    Na, Hongjun; Kong, Minsuk; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus cereus is a spore-forming, Gram-positive bacterium and is a major food-borne pathogen. A B. cereus-specific bacteriophage PBC4 was isolated from the soil of a stock farm, and its genome was analyzed. PBC4 belongs to the Siphoviridae family and has a genome consisting of 80 647-bp-long double-stranded DNA, including 123 genes and two tRNAs. LysPBC4, the endolysin of PBC4, has an enzymatically active domain (EAD) on its N-terminal region and a putative cell wall-binding domain (CBD) on its C-terminal region, respectively. Although the phage PBC4 showed a very limited host range, LysPBC4 could lyse all of the B. cereus strains tested. However, LysPBC4 did not kill other bacteria such as B. subtilis or Listeria, indicating that the endolysin has specific lytic activity against the B. cereus group species. Furthermore, LysPBC4_CBD fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) could decorate limited strains of B. cereus group, suggesting that the LysPBC4_CBD may be a promising material for specific detection of B. cereus. PMID:27190165

  11. Root Exudate-Induced Alterations in Bacillus cereus Cell Wall Contribute to Root Colonization and Plant Growth Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Swarnalee; Rani, T. Swaroopa; Podile, Appa Rao

    2013-01-01

    The outcome of an interaction between plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and plants may depend on the chemical composition of root exudates (REs). We report the colonization of tobacco, and not groundnut, roots by a non-rhizospheric Bacillus cereus (MTCC 430). There was a differential alteration in the cell wall components of B. cereus in response to the REs from tobacco and groundnut. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy revealed a split in amide I region of B. cereus cells exposed to tobacco-root exudates (TRE), compared to those exposed to groundnut-root exudates (GRE). In addition, changes in exopolysaccharides and lipid-packing were observed in B. cereus grown in TRE-amended minimal media that were not detectable in GRE-amended media. Cell-wall proteome analyses revealed upregulation of oxidative stress-related alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, and DNA-protecting protein chain (Dlp-2), in response to GRE and TRE, respectively. Metabolism-related enzymes like 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase and 2-methylcitrate dehydratase and a 60 kDa chaperonin were up-regulated in response to TRE and GRE. In response to B. cereus, the plant roots altered their exudate-chemodiversity with respect to carbohydrates, organic acids, alkanes, and polyols. TRE-induced changes in surface components of B. cereus may contribute to successful root colonization and subsequent plant growth promotion. PMID:24205213

  12. gyrB as a phylogenetic discriminator for members of the Bacillus anthracis-cereus-thuringiensis group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    La Duc, Myron T.; Satomi, Masataka; Agata, Norio; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2004-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of the human disease anthrax, Bacillus cereus, a food-borne pathogen capable of causing human illness, and Bacillus thuringiensis, a well-characterized insecticidal toxin producer, all cluster together within a very tight clade (B. cereus group) phylogenetically and are indistinguishable from one another via 16S rDNA sequence analysis. As new pathogens are continually emerging, it is imperative to devise a system capable of rapidly and accurately differentiating closely related, yet phenotypically distinct species. Although the gyrB gene has proven useful in discriminating closely related species, its sequence analysis has not yet been validated by DNA:DNA hybridization, the taxonomically accepted "gold standard". We phylogenetically characterized the gyrB sequences of various species and serotypes encompassed in the "B. cereus group," including lab strains and environmental isolates. Results were compared to those obtained from analyses of phenotypic characteristics, 16S rDNA sequence, DNA:DNA hybridization, and virulence factors. The gyrB gene proved more highly differential than 16S, while, at the same time, as analytical as costly and laborious DNA:DNA hybridization techniques in differentiating species within the B. cereus group.

  13. Genomic insights into the taxonomic status of the Bacillus cereus group

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Lai, Qiliang; Göker, Markus; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Wang, Meng; Sun, Yamin; Wang, Lei; Shao, Zongze

    2015-01-01

    The identification and phylogenetic relationships of bacteria within the Bacillus cereus group are controversial. This study aimed at determining the taxonomic affiliations of these strains using the whole-genome sequence-based Genome BLAST Distance Phylogeny (GBDP) approach. The GBDP analysis clearly separated 224 strains into 30 clusters, representing eleven known, partially merged species and accordingly 19–20 putative novel species. Additionally, 16S rRNA gene analysis, a novel variant of multi-locus sequence analysis (nMLSA) and screening of virulence genes were performed. The 16S rRNA gene sequence was not sufficient to differentiate the bacteria within this group due to its high conservation. The nMLSA results were consistent with GBDP. Moreover, a fast typing method was proposed using the pycA gene, and where necessary, the ccpA gene. The pXO plasmids and cry genes were widely distributed, suggesting little correlation with the phylogenetic positions of the host bacteria. This might explain why classifications based on virulence characteristics proved unsatisfactory in the past. In summary, this is the first large-scale and systematic study of the taxonomic status of the bacteria within the B. cereus group using whole-genome sequences, and is likely to contribute to further insights into their pathogenicity, phylogeny and adaptation to diverse environments. PMID:26373441

  14. The Bacillus cereus Group Is an Excellent Reservoir of Novel Lanthipeptides

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Bingyue; Zheng, Jinshui; Xu, Ziya; Song, Xiaoling; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai

    2014-01-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized peptides that contain multiple posttranslational modifications. Research on lantibiotics has increased recently, mainly due to their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, especially against some clinical Gram-positive pathogens. Many reports about various bacteriocins in the Bacillus cereus group have been published, but few were about lantibiotics. In this study, we identified 101 putative lanthipeptide gene clusters from 77 out of 223 strains of this group, and these gene clusters were further classified into 20 types according to their gene organization and the homologies of their functional genes. Among them, 18 types were novel and have not yet been experimentally verified. Two novel lantibiotics (thuricin 4A-4 and its derivative, thuricin 4A-4D) were identified in the type I-1 lanthipeptide gene cluster and showed activity against all tested Gram-positive bacteria. The mode of action of thuricin 4A-4 was studied, and we found that it acted as a bactericidal compound. The transcriptional analysis of four structural genes (thiA1, thiA2, thiA3, and thiA4) in the thuricin 4A gene cluster showed that only one structural gene, thiA4, showed efficient transcription in the exponential growth phase; the other three structural genes did not. In addition, the putative transmembrane protein ThiI was responsible for thuricin 4A-4 immunity. Genome analysis and functional verification illustrated that B. cereus group strains were a prolific source of novel lantibiotics. PMID:25548056

  15. Comparative transcriptomic and phenotypic analysis of the responses of Bacillus cereus to various disinfectant treatments.

    PubMed

    Ceragioli, Mara; Mols, Maarten; Moezelaar, Roy; Ghelardi, Emilia; Senesi, Sonia; Abee, Tjakko

    2010-05-01

    Antimicrobial chemicals are widely applied to clean and disinfect food-contacting surfaces. However, the cellular response of bacteria to various disinfectants is unclear. In this study, the physiological and genome-wide transcriptional responses of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 exposed to four different disinfectants (benzalkonium chloride, sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, and peracetic acid) were analyzed. For each disinfectant, concentrations leading to the attenuation of growth, growth arrest, and cell death were determined. The transcriptome analysis revealed that B. cereus, upon exposure to the selected concentrations of disinfectants, induced common and specific responses. Notably, the common response included genes involved in the general and oxidative stress responses. Exposure to benzalkonium chloride, a disinfectant known to induce membrane damage, specifically induced genes involved in fatty acid metabolism. Membrane damage induced by benzalkonium chloride was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy, and fatty acid analysis revealed modulation of the fatty acid composition of the cell membrane. Exposure to sodium hypochlorite induced genes involved in metabolism of sulfur and sulfur-containing amino acids, which correlated with the excessive oxidation of sulfhydryl groups observed in sodium hypochlorite-stressed cells. Exposures to hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid induced highly similar responses, including the upregulation of genes involved in DNA damage repair and SOS response. Notably, hydrogen peroxide- and peracetic acid-treated cells exhibited high mutation rates correlating with the induced SOS response. PMID:20348290

  16. Infrared decontamination of oregano: effects on Bacillus cereus spores, water activity, color, and volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, Lovisa; Libander, Patrik; Lövenklev, Maria; Isaksson, Sven; Ahrné, Lilia

    2014-12-01

    Infrared (IR) heating, a novel technology for decontaminating oregano, was evaluated by investigating the reduction of inoculated Bacillus cereus spores and the effect on water activity (a(w)), color, and headspace volatile compounds after exposure to IR treatment. Conditioned oregano (a(w) 0.88) was IR-treated in a closed heating unit at 90 and 100 °C for holding times of 2 and 10 min, respectively. The most successful reduction in B. cereus spore numbers (5.6 log units) was achieved after a holding time of 10 min at 90 °C, while treatment at 100 °C for the same time resulted in a lower reduction efficiency (4.7 log units). The lower reduction at 100 °C was probably due to a reduced aw (aw 0.76) during IR treatment or possibly to the alteration or loss of volatile compounds possessing antimicrobial properties. The green color of oregano was only slightly affected, while the composition of volatile compounds was clearly altered by IR heating. However, two of the key aroma compounds, carvacrol and thymol, were only slightly affected, compared to the effect on the other studied compounds, indicating that the typical oregano aroma can likely be preserved. In conclusion, IR heating shows potential for the successful decontamination of oregano without severe alteration of its color or the key aroma compounds, carvacrol and thymol. PMID:25393824

  17. Depsipeptide Intermediates Interrogate Proposed Biosynthesis of Cereulide, the Emetic Toxin of Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Marxen, Sandra; Stark, Timo D.; Rütschle, Andrea; Lücking, Genia; Frenzel, Elrike; Scherer, Siegfried; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Hofmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cereulide and isocereulides A-G are biosynthesized as emetic toxins by Bacillus cereus via a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) called Ces. Although a thiotemplate mechanisms involving cyclo-trimerization of ready-made D-O-Leu-D-Ala-L-O-Val-L-Val via a thioesterase (TE) domain is proposed for cereulide biosynthesis, the exact mechanism is far from being understood. UPLC-TOF MS analysis of B. cereus strains in combination with 13C-labeling experiments now revealed tetra-, octa-, and dodecapeptides of a different sequence, namely (L-O-Val-L-Val-D-O-Leu-D-Ala)1-3, as intermediates of cereulide biosynthesis. Surprisingly, also di-, hexa-, and decadepsipeptides were identified which, together with the structures of the previously reported isocereulides E, F, and G, do not correlate to the currently proposed mechanism for cereulide biosynthesis and violate the canonical NRPS biosynthetic logic. UPLC-TOF MS metabolite analysis and bioinformatic gene cluster analysis highlighted dipeptides rather than single amino or hydroxy acids as the basic modules in tetradepsipeptide assembly and proposed the CesA C-terminal C* domain and the CesB C-terminal TE domain to function as a cooperative esterification and depsipeptide elongation center repeatedly recruiting the action of the C* domain to oligomerize tetradepsipeptides prior to the release of cereulide from the TE domain by macrocyclization. PMID:26013201

  18. Depsipeptide Intermediates Interrogate Proposed Biosynthesis of Cereulide, the Emetic Toxin of Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Marxen, Sandra; Stark, Timo D; Rütschle, Andrea; Lücking, Genia; Frenzel, Elrike; Scherer, Siegfried; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Hofmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cereulide and isocereulides A-G are biosynthesized as emetic toxins by Bacillus cereus via a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) called Ces. Although a thiotemplate mechanisms involving cyclo-trimerization of ready-made D-O-Leu-D-Ala-L-O-Val-L-Val via a thioesterase (TE) domain is proposed for cereulide biosynthesis, the exact mechanism is far from being understood. UPLC-TOF MS analysis of B. cereus strains in combination with (13)C-labeling experiments now revealed tetra-, octa-, and dodecapeptides of a different sequence, namely (L-O-Val-L-Val-D-O-Leu-D-Ala)1-3, as intermediates of cereulide biosynthesis. Surprisingly, also di-, hexa-, and decadepsipeptides were identified which, together with the structures of the previously reported isocereulides E, F, and G, do not correlate to the currently proposed mechanism for cereulide biosynthesis and violate the canonical NRPS biosynthetic logic. UPLC-TOF MS metabolite analysis and bioinformatic gene cluster analysis highlighted dipeptides rather than single amino or hydroxy acids as the basic modules in tetradepsipeptide assembly and proposed the CesA C-terminal C* domain and the CesB C-terminal TE domain to function as a cooperative esterification and depsipeptide elongation center repeatedly recruiting the action of the C* domain to oligomerize tetradepsipeptides prior to the release of cereulide from the TE domain by macrocyclization. PMID:26013201

  19. Surface architecture of endospores of the Bacillus cereus/anthracis/thuringiensis family at the subnanometer scale

    PubMed Central

    Kailas, Lekshmi; Terry, Cassandra; Abbott, Nicholas; Taylor, Robert; Mullin, Nic; Tzokov, Svetomir B.; Todd, Sarah J.; Wallace, B. A.; Hobbs, Jamie K.; Moir, Anne; Bullough, Per A.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria of the Bacillus cereus family form highly resistant spores, which in the case of the pathogen B. anthracis act as the agents of infection. The outermost layer, the exosporium, enveloping spores of the B. cereus family as well as a number of Clostridia, plays roles in spore adhesion, dissemination, targeting, and germination control. We have analyzed two naturally crystalline layers associated with the exosporium, one representing the “basal” layer to which the outermost spore layer (“hairy nap”) is attached, and the other likely representing a subsurface (“parasporal”) layer. We have used electron cryomicroscopy at a resolution of 0.8–0.6 nm and circular dichroism spectroscopic measurements to reveal a highly α-helical structure for both layers. The helices are assembled into 2D arrays of “cups” or “crowns.” High-resolution atomic force microscopy of the outermost layer showed that the open ends of these cups face the external environment and the highly immunogenic collagen-like fibrils of the hairy nap (BclA) are attached to this surface. Based on our findings, we present a molecular model for the spore surface and propose how this surface can act as a semipermeable barrier and a matrix for binding of molecules involved in defense, germination control, and other interactions of the spore with the environment. PMID:21896762

  20. Iron Regulates Expression of Bacillus cereus Hemolysin II via Global Regulator Fur

    PubMed Central

    Shadrin, Andrey; Rodikova, Ekaterina A.; Andreeva-Kovalevskaya, Zhanna I.; Protsenko, Alexey S.; Mayorov, Sergey G.; Galaktionova, Darya Yu; Magelky, Erica

    2012-01-01

    The capacity of pathogens to respond to environmental signals, such as iron concentration, is key to bacterial survival and establishment of a successful infection. Bacillus cereus is a widely distributed bacterium with distinct pathogenic properties. Hemolysin II (HlyII) is one of its pore-forming cytotoxins and has been shown to be involved in bacterial pathogenicity in a number of cell and animal models. Unlike many other B. cereus pathogenicity factors, HlyII is not regulated by pleiotropic transcriptional regulator PlcR but is controlled by its own regulator, HlyIIR. Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro techniques, we show that hlyII expression is also negatively regulated by iron by the global regulator Fur via direct interaction with the hlyII promoter. DNase I footprinting and in vitro transcription experiments indicate that Fur prevents RNA polymerase binding to the hlyII promoter. HlyII expression profiles demonstrate that both HlyIIR and Fur regulate HlyII expression in a concerted fashion, with the effect of Fur being maximal in the early stages of bacterial growth. In sum, these results show that Fur serves as a transcriptional repressor for hlyII expression. PMID:22522892

  1. The Genetically Remote Pathogenic Strain NVH391-98 of the Bacillus cereus Group Represents the Cluster of Thermophilic Strains

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, Sandrine; Galleron, Nathalie; Bidnenko, Elena; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Lapidus, Alla; Sorokin, Alexei

    2007-10-02

    Bacteria of the Bacillus cereus group are known to cause food poisoning. A rare phylogenetically remote strain, NVH391-98, was recently characterized to encode a particularly efficient cytotoxin K presumably responsible for food poisoning. This pathogenic strain and its close relatives can be phenotypically distinguished from other strains of the B. cereus group by the inability to grow at temperatures below 17 degrees C and by the ability to grow at temperatures from 48 to 53 degrees C. A temperate phage, phBC391A2, residing in the genome of NVH391-98 allows us to distinguish the three known members of this thermophilic strain cluster.

  2. Growth of Bacillus cereus on solid media as affected by agar, sodium chloride, and potassium sorbate.

    PubMed

    Stecchini, M L; Del Torre, M; Donda, S; Maltini, E

    2000-07-01

    The effect of two independent variables: microstructure, as modified by the agar content (1.0, 4.0, 7.0%), and water activity (a(w)), as modified by the NaCl content (0.5, 2.5, 4.5%), in the absence or in the presence of potassium sorbate (0.0; 2,000 ppm) on Bacillus cereus growth on solid media was studied. The time to visible growth (TVG) and the radial growth rate (RGR) of colonies were evaluated. TVG was not affected by microstructure and K-sorbate, although when a(w) was reduced, TVG tended to increase. RGR depended on linear effects of microstructure and a(w) variables and their interaction. When K-sorbate was added to cultural media, RGR was reduced significantly. However, in the presence of K-sorbate, RGR was found to change only when a(w) vas varied. PMID:10914662

  3. Mutation effect of MeV protons on bioflocculant bacteria Bacillus cereus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. N.; Ren, N.; Xue, J. M.; Yang, J.; Rong, B. L.

    2007-09-01

    A 3.2 MeV proton beam was used to irradiate bioflocculant bacteria (Bacillus cereus) to achieve mutation. The ion fluence ranged from 1011 to 1014/cm2. Most of the bacteria were killed when the ion fluence reached 1012 ions/cm2. The survival ratio drops in an exponential way on further increasing the ion fluence. The flocculating activity of 7 samples out of 51 showed a positive change, and a perfect mutant C7-23 with a stable high capacity of bioflocculant production was found. RAPD measurements showed that a new lane appears in this sample. The flocculating activity of the C7-23 bacteria increased by factors of 22%, 54% and 217% under pH values of 4, 7 or 10, respectively.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a phosphopentomutase from Bacillus cereus

    SciTech Connect

    Panosian, Timothy D.; Nannemann, David P.; Bachmann, Brian O.; Iverson, T.M.

    2013-09-18

    Phosphopentomutases (PPMs) interconvert D-ribose 5-phosphate and {alpha}-D-ribose 1-phosphate to link glucose and nucleotide metabolism. PPM from Bacillus cereus was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity and crystallized. Bacterial PPMs are predicted to contain a di-metal reaction center, but the catalytically relevant metal has not previously been identified. Sparse-matrix crystallization screening was performed in the presence or absence of 50 mM MnCl{sub 2}. This strategy resulted in the formation of two crystal forms from two chemically distinct conditions. The crystals that formed with 50 mM MnCl{sub 2} were more easily manipulated and diffracted to higher resolution. These results suggest that even if the catalytically relevant metal is not known, the crystallization of putative metalloproteins may still benefit from supplementation of the crystallization screens with potential catalytic metals.

  5. Penicillin and Cell Wall Synthesis: A Study of Bacillus cereus by Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Highton, Peter J.; Hobbs, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    The changes in wall structure of a penicillinase micro-constitutive strain of Bacillus cereus (569/H/24), on exposure to penicillin, and after its removal by addition of penicillinase, have suggested the following model for the growth of the walls of these cylindrical cells. Longitudinal extension is by addition of material to a large and continuously increasing number of growing points uniformly distributed over the cylindrical surface. Addition is only in the longitudinal direction so that the cell diameter remains constant. Cross walls grow by addition to their inner edge, and on completion the two new rounded ends of the daughter cells are formed by splitting at the outer edge and continued addition at the center. The ends are conserved. Images PMID:4110923

  6. Effects of Aronia melanocarpa constituents on biofilm formation of Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Bräunlich, Marie; Økstad, Ole A; Slimestad, Rune; Wangensteen, Helle; Malterud, Karl E; Barsett, Hilde

    2013-01-01

    Many bacteria growing on surfaces form biofilms. Adaptive and genetic changes of the microorganisms in this structure make them resistant to antimicrobial agents. Biofilm-forming organisms on medical devices can pose serious threats to human health. Thus, there is a need for novel prevention and treatment strategies. This study aimed to evaluate the ability of Aronia melanocarpa extracts, subfractions and compounds to prevent biofilm formation and to inhibit bacterial growth of Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus in vitro. It was found that several aronia substances possessed anti-biofilm activity, however, they were not toxic to the species screened. This non-toxic inhibition may confer a lower potential for resistance development compared to conventional antimicrobials. PMID:24317526

  7. Direct recovery of cyclodextringlycosyltransferase from Bacillus cereus using aqueous two-phase flotation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu Kiat; Show, Pau Loke; Yap, Yee Jiun; Tan, Chin Ping; Ng, Eng-Poh; Ariff, Arbakariya B; Mohamad Annuar, Mohamad Suffian B; Ling, Tau Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Purification of cyclodextrin glycosyl transferase (CGTase) from Bacillus cereus using polyethylene glycol (PEG)-potassium phosphates aqueous two-phase flotation (ATPF) system was studied in this paper. The effects of varying PEG molecular weight, tie-line length (TLL) value, volume ratio (VR), pH value, crude concentration and gas nitrogen flotation time were investigated. The optimal condition for purification of CGTase was attained at 18.0% (w/w) PEG 8000, 7.0% (w/w) potassium phosphates, VR of 3.0, 20% (w/w) crude load at pH 7, and 80 min nitrogen flotation time at a flow rate of 5 L/min. With this optimal condition, purification factor (PFT) of 21.8 and a yield (YT) of 97.1% were attained. CGTase was successfully purified in a single downstream processing step using the ATPF. PMID:26111602

  8. Detection of Multiple Resistances, Biofilm Formation and Conjugative Transfer of Bacillus cereus from Contaminated Soils.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Reshma; Krakat, Niclas

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect microbial resistances to a set of antibiotics/pesticides (multi-resistance) within pesticide and antibiotic-contaminated alluvial soils and to identify the corresponding antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). To assess whether identified multi-resistant isolates are able to construct biofilms, several biofilm formation and conjugation experiments were conducted. Out of 35 isolates, six strains were used for filter mating experiments. Nine strains were identified by 16S rDNA gene sequence analyses and those were closely related to Pseudomonas sp., Citrobacter sp., Acinetobacter sp., Enterobacter sp., and in addition, Bacillus cereus was chosen for multi-resistant and pesticide-tolerant studies. Antibiotic-resistant and pesticide-tolerant bacterial strains were tested for the presence of ARGs. All nine strains were containing multiple ARGs (ampC, ermB, ermD, ermG, mecA, tetM) in different combinations. Interestingly, only strain WR34 (strongly related to Bacillus cereus) exhibited a high biofilm forming capacity on glass beads. Results obtained by filter mating experiments demonstrated gene transfer frequencies from 10(-5) to 10(-8). This study provides evidence that alluvial soils are hot spots for the accumulation of antibiotics, pesticides and biofilm formation. Particularly high resistances to tetracycline, ampicillin, amoxicillin and methicillin were proved. Apparently, isolate WR34 strongly correlated to a pathogenic organism had high potential to deploy biofilms in alluvial soils. Thus, we assume that loosened and unconsolidated soils investigated pose a high risk of an enhanced ARG prevalence. PMID:26650381

  9. Effect of endophytic Bacillus cereus ERBP inoculation into non-native host: Potentials and challenges for airborne formaldehyde removal.

    PubMed

    Khaksar, Gholamreza; Treesubsuntorn, Chairat; Thiravetyan, Paitip

    2016-10-01

    Phytoremediation could be a cost-effective, environmentally friendly approach for the treatment of indoor air. However, some drawbacks still dispute the expediency of phytotechnology. Our objectives were to investigate the competency of plant growth-promoting (PGP) endophytic Bacillus cereus ERBP (endophyte root blue pea), isolated from the root of Clitoria ternatea, to colonize and stabilize within Zamioculcas zamiifolia and Euphorbia milii as non-native hosts without causing any disease or stress symptoms. Moreover, the impact of B. cereus ERBP on the natural shoot endophytic community and for the airborne formaldehyde removal capability of non-native hosts was assessed. Non-native Z. zamiifolia was effectively inoculated with B. cereus ERBP through soil as the most efficient method of endophyte inoculation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiling of the shoot endophytic community verified the colonization and stability of B. cereus ERBP within its non-native host during a 20-d fumigation period without interfering with the natural shoot endophytic diversity of Z. zamiifolia. B. cereus ERBP conferred full protection to its non-native host against formaldehyde phytotoxicity and enhanced airborne formaldehyde removal of Z. zamiifolia whereas non-inoculated plants suffered from formaldehyde phytotoxicity because their natural shoot endophytic community was detrimentally affected by formaldehyde. In contrast, B. cereus ERBP inoculation into non-native E. milii deteriorated airborne formaldehyde removal of the non-native host (compared to a non-inoculated one) as B. cereus ERBP interfered with natural shoot endophytic community of E. milii, which caused stress symptoms and stimulated ethylene biosynthesis. Non-native host inoculation with PGP B. cereus ERBP could bear potentials and challenges for airborne formaldehyde removal. PMID:27362296

  10. Characterization of Bacillus cereus isolates associated with fatal pneumonias: strains are closely related to Bacillus anthracis and harbor B. anthracis virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Hoffmaster, Alex R; Hill, Karen K; Gee, Jay E; Marston, Chung K; De, Barun K; Popovic, Tanja; Sue, David; Wilkins, Patricia P; Avashia, Swati B; Drumgoole, Rahsaan; Helma, Charles H; Ticknor, Lawrence O; Okinaka, Richard T; Jackson, Paul J

    2006-09-01

    Bacillus cereus is ubiquitous in nature, and while most isolates appear to be harmless, some are associated with food-borne illnesses, periodontal diseases, and other more serious infections. In one such infection, B. cereus G9241 was identified as the causative agent of a severe pneumonia in a Louisiana welder in 1994. This isolate was found to harbor most of the B. anthracis virulence plasmid pXO1 (13). Here we report the characterization of two clinical and one environmental B. cereus isolate collected during an investigation of two fatal pneumonia cases in Texas metal workers. Molecular subtyping revealed that the two cases were not caused by the same strain. However, one of the three isolates was indistinguishable from B. cereus G9241. PCR analysis demonstrated that both clinical isolates contained B. anthracis pXO1 toxin genes. One clinical isolate and the environmental isolate collected from that victim's worksite contained the cap A, B, and C genes required for capsule biosynthesis in B. anthracis. Both clinical isolates expressed a capsule; however, neither was composed of poly-D-glutamic acid. Although most B. cereus isolates are not opportunistic pathogens and only a limited number cause food-borne illnesses, these results demonstrate that some B. cereus strains can cause severe and even fatal infections in patients who appear to be otherwise healthy. PMID:16954272

  11. Unusual chromatographic behaviour and one-step purification of a novel membrane proteinase from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Fricke, B; Buchmann, T; Friebe, S

    1995-11-01

    Cell envelopes of Bacillus cereus contain a casein-cleaving membrane proteinase (CCMP) and an insulin-cleaving membrane proteinase (ICMP), which differ in their substrate and inhibitor specificity from all Bacillus proteinases described previously. They remained localized in the cytoplasmic membrane after treatment with lysozyme and mutanolysin and they are strongly attached to the membrane compared with other known membrane proteinases. Only high a concentration of the Zwitterionic detergent sulfobetain SB-12 enabled an effective solubilization of both membrane proteinases. The usual conventional purification methods, such as chromatofocusing, ion-exchange chromatography and hydrophobic interaction chromatography in the presence of detergent concentrations beyond their critical micelle concentration, could not be applied to the purification, because the solubilized membrane proteinases bound strongly and irreversibly to the chromatographic matrix. In the search for other purification methods, we used a tentacle ion-exchanger (EMD trimethylaminoethyl-Fractogel) to reduce the hydrophobic interactions between the proteinases and the matrix. All contaminating proteins could be removed by a first gradient of sodium chloride without elution of CCMP; a second gradient with isopropanol and a decreasing salt concentration resulted in an efficiently purified CCMP. The ICMP was irreversibly denaturated. Purified CCMP is a member of the metalloproteinase family with a pH optimum in the neutral range and a temperature optimum of 40 degrees C, whose properties differ from the serine-type membrane proteinase of Bacillus subtilis described by Shimizu et al. [Agric. Biol. Chem., 47 (1983) 1775]. It consists of two subunits in sodiumdodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) under reducing conditions (Mr 53,000 and 65,000); however, the molecular mass of the purified enzyme could not be determined by size exclusion or SDS-PAGE, because the purified enzyme

  12. Tetracycline and oxytetracycline resistance determinants detected in Bacillus cereus strains isolated from honey samples.

    PubMed

    López, A C; de Ortúzar, R V M; Alippi, A M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of tetracycline and oxytetracycline resistance determinants in Bacillus cereus strains isolated from honey samples. Of a total of 77 isolates analyzed, 30 (39%) exhibited resistance to tetracyclines according to the results of a disk diffusion method. Resistant strains (n=30) were screened by PCR for the presence of the resistant determinants tetK, tetL, tetM, tetO, tetW, otrA and otrB and their MIC values for tetracycline, oxytetracycline and minocycline were assessed. According to the PCR results, 23 isolates (77%) presented at least one tetracycline or oxytetracycline resistance determinant. The tetK genotype was present in 10 isolates while the tetL, tetM, and otrA genotypes were present in 3, 2, and 5 isolates, respectively. In addition, 2 isolates of the tetK plus tetM genotype, 1 of the tetK plus tetL genotype, and 1 of the tetK plus otrA genotype were found. All isolates were tetW, tetO and otrB negatives. On the other hand, 7 isolates (23%) showed a tetracycline-resistant and/or minocycline-resistant phenotype (MIC) but did not carry any of the tet or otr determinants investigated in this study. This research has shown that B. cereus isolates from honey samples contain a variety of tetracycline and oxytetracycline resistance genes, including the tetK and tetL determinants which encode for efflux proteins, and tetM and otrA, which encode for ribosomal protection proteins. These findings indicate that strains isolated from honeys could represent a reservoir for tetracycline resistance genes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of tetracycline-resistant and oxytetracycline-resistant B. cereus strains carrying the tetK determinant, and also the first report of oxytetracycline-resistant and tetracycline-resistant Bacillus species carrying the otrA determinant. PMID:19213248

  13. Identification, genetic diversity and cereulide producing ability of Bacillus cereus group strains isolated from Beninese traditional fermented food condiments.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Line; Azokpota, Paulin; Hansen, Bjarne Munk; Hounhouigan, D Joseph; Jakobsen, Mogens

    2010-08-15

    Bacillus cereus sensu lato is often detected in spontaneously fermented African foods but is rarely identified to species level. Only some of the B. cereus group species are reported to be pathogenic to humans and identification to species level is necessary to estimate the safety of these products. In the present study, a total of 19 Bacillus cereus group spp. isolated from afitin, iru and sonru, three spontaneously fermented African locust (Parkia biglobosa) bean based condiments produced in Benin, were investigated. The strains were isolated at 6, 12, 18, 24 and 48 h fermentation time. By using phenotypic and genotypic methods all of the isolates could be identified as B. cereus sensu stricto. The isolates were grouped according to their PM13 PCR (random amplification of polymorphic DNA PCR) fingerprint and formed two major clusters, one of which contained eight strains isolated from afitin (cluster 1). Highly similar PM13 profiles were obtained for seven of the isolates, one from afitin, one from iru and five from sonru (cluster 2). Four of the isolates, one from afitin and three from sonru, did not form any particular cluster. The PM13 profiles of cluster 2 isolates were identical to those which are specific to emetic toxin producers. Cereulide production of these isolates was confirmed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. This is the first report on cereulide producing B. cereus in African fermented foods. Occurrence of the opportunistic human pathogen B. cereus, which is able to produce emetic toxin in afitin, iru and sonru, could impose a health hazard. Interestingly, no reports on food poisoning from the consumption of the fermented condiments exist. PMID:20599285

  14. Identification and Classification of bcl Genes and Proteins of Bacillus cereus Group Organisms and Their Application in Bacillus anthracis Detection and Fingerprinting▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Leski, Tomasz A.; Caswell, Clayton C.; Pawlowski, Marcin; Klinke, David J.; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Hart, Sean J.; Lukomski, Slawomir

    2009-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus group includes three closely related species, B. anthracis, B. cereus, and B. thuringiensis, which form a highly homogeneous subdivision of the genus Bacillus. One of these species, B. anthracis, has been identified as one of the most probable bacterial biowarfare agents. Here, we evaluate the sequence and length polymorphisms of the Bacillus collagen-like protein bcl genes as a basis for B. anthracis detection and fingerprinting. Five genes, designated bclA to bclE, are present in B. anthracis strains. Examination of bclABCDE sequences identified polymorphisms in bclB alleles of the B. cereus group organisms. These sequence polymorphisms allowed specific detection of B. anthracis strains by PCR using both genomic DNA and purified Bacillus spores in reactions. By exploiting the length variation of the bcl alleles it was demonstrated that the combined bclABCDE PCR products generate markedly different fingerprints for the B. anthracis Ames and Sterne strains. Moreover, we predict that bclABCDE length polymorphism creates unique signatures for B. anthracis strains, which facilitates identification of strains with specificity and confidence. Thus, we present a new diagnostic concept for B. anthracis detection and fingerprinting, which can be used alone or in combination with previously established typing platforms. PMID:19767469

  15. Characterization and Exposure Assessment of Emetic Bacillus cereus and Cereulide Production in Food Products on the Dutch Market.

    PubMed

    Biesta-Peters, Elisabeth G; Dissel, Serge; Reij, Martine W; Zwietering, Marcel H; in't Veld, Paul H

    2016-02-01

    The emetic toxin cereulide, which can be produced by Bacillus cereus, can be the cause of food poisoning upon ingestion by the consumer. The toxin causes vomiting and is mainly produced in farinaceous food products. This article includes the prevalence of B. cereus and of cereulide in food products in The Netherlands, a characterization of B. cereus isolates obtained, cereulide production conditions, and a comparison of consumer exposure estimates with those of a previous exposure assessment. Food samples (n = 1,489) were tested for the presence of B. cereus; 5.4% of the samples contained detectable levels (>10(2) CFU/g), and 0.7% contained levels above 10(5) CFU/g. Samples (n = 3,008) also were tested for the presence of cereulide. Two samples (0.067%) contained detectable levels of cereulide at 3.2 and 5.4 μg/kg of food product. Of the 481 tested isolates, 81 produced cereulide and/or contained the ces gene. None of the starch-positive and hbl-containing isolates possessed the ces gene, whereas all strains contained the nhe genes. Culture of emetic B. cereus under nonoptimal conditions revealed a delay in onset of cereulide production compared with culture under optimal conditions, and cereulide was produced in all cases when B. cereus cells had been in the stationary phase for some time. The prevalence of cereulide-contaminated food approached the prevalence of contaminated products estimated in an exposure assessment. The main food safety focus associated with this pathogen should be to prevent germination and growth of any B. cereus present in food products and thus prevent cereulide production in foods. PMID:26818983

  16. Epidemiologic Investigation of a Cluster of Neuroinvasive Bacillus cereus Infections in 5 Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Chanu; Klompas, Michael; Tamburini, Fiona B.; Fremin, Brayon J.; Chea, Nora; Epstein, Lauren; Halpin, Alison Laufer; Guh, Alice; Gallen, Rachel; Coulliette, Angela; Gee, Jay; Hsieh, Candace; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Pedamullu, Chandra Sekhar; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Manzo, Veronica E.; Folkerth, Rebecca Dunn; Milner, Danny A.; Pecora, Nicole; Osborne, Matthew; Chalifoux-Judge, Diane; Bhatt, Ami S.; Yokoe, Deborah S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Five neuroinvasive Bacillus cereus infections (4 fatal) occurred in hospitalized patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) during a 9-month period, prompting an investigation by infection control and public health officials. Methods. Medical records of case-patients were reviewed and a matched case-control study was performed. Infection control practices were observed. Multiple environmental, food, and medication samples common to AML patients were cultured. Multilocus sequence typing was performed for case and environmental B cereus isolates. Results. All 5 case-patients received chemotherapy and had early-onset neutropenic fevers that resolved with empiric antibiotics. Fever recurred at a median of 17 days (range, 9–20) with headaches and abrupt neurological deterioration. Case-patients had B cereus identified in central nervous system (CNS) samples by (1) polymerase chain reaction or culture or (2) bacilli seen on CNS pathology stains with high-grade B cereus bacteremia. Two case-patients also had colonic ulcers with abundant bacilli on autopsy. No infection control breaches were observed. On case-control analysis, bananas were the only significant exposure shared by all 5 case-patients (odds ratio, 9.3; P = .04). Five environmental or food isolates tested positive for B cereus, including a homogenized banana peel isolate and the shelf of a kitchen cart where bananas were stored. Multilocus sequence typing confirmed that all case and environmental strains were genetically distinct. Multilocus sequence typing-based phylogenetic analysis revealed that the organisms clustered in 2 separate clades. Conclusions. The investigation of this neuroinvasive B cereus cluster did not identify a single point source but was suggestive of a possible dietary exposure. Our experience underscores the potential virulence of B cereus in immunocompromised hosts. PMID:26269794

  17. Epidemiologic Investigation of a Cluster of Neuroinvasive Bacillus cereus Infections in 5 Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Chanu; Klompas, Michael; Tamburini, Fiona B; Fremin, Brayon J; Chea, Nora; Epstein, Lauren; Halpin, Alison Laufer; Guh, Alice; Gallen, Rachel; Coulliette, Angela; Gee, Jay; Hsieh, Candace; Desjardins, Christopher A; Pedamullu, Chandra Sekhar; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Manzo, Veronica E; Folkerth, Rebecca Dunn; Milner, Danny A; Pecora, Nicole; Osborne, Matthew; Chalifoux-Judge, Diane; Bhatt, Ami S; Yokoe, Deborah S

    2015-09-01

    Background.  Five neuroinvasive Bacillus cereus infections (4 fatal) occurred in hospitalized patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) during a 9-month period, prompting an investigation by infection control and public health officials. Methods.  Medical records of case-patients were reviewed and a matched case-control study was performed. Infection control practices were observed. Multiple environmental, food, and medication samples common to AML patients were cultured. Multilocus sequence typing was performed for case and environmental B cereus isolates. Results.  All 5 case-patients received chemotherapy and had early-onset neutropenic fevers that resolved with empiric antibiotics. Fever recurred at a median of 17 days (range, 9-20) with headaches and abrupt neurological deterioration. Case-patients had B cereus identified in central nervous system (CNS) samples by (1) polymerase chain reaction or culture or (2) bacilli seen on CNS pathology stains with high-grade B cereus bacteremia. Two case-patients also had colonic ulcers with abundant bacilli on autopsy. No infection control breaches were observed. On case-control analysis, bananas were the only significant exposure shared by all 5 case-patients (odds ratio, 9.3; P = .04). Five environmental or food isolates tested positive for B cereus, including a homogenized banana peel isolate and the shelf of a kitchen cart where bananas were stored. Multilocus sequence typing confirmed that all case and environmental strains were genetically distinct. Multilocus sequence typing-based phylogenetic analysis revealed that the organisms clustered in 2 separate clades. Conclusions.  The investigation of this neuroinvasive B cereus cluster did not identify a single point source but was suggestive of a possible dietary exposure. Our experience underscores the potential virulence of B cereus in immunocompromised hosts. PMID:26269794

  18. Fabrication of an electrochemical DNA-based biosensor for Bacillus cereus detection in milk and infant formula.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Zahra; Sheikh-Zeinoddin, Mahmoud; Ensafi, Ali A; Soleimanian-Zad, Sabihe

    2016-06-15

    This paper describes fabrication of a DNA-based Au-nanoparticle modified pencil graphite electrode (PGE) biosensor for detection of Bacillus cereus, causative agent of two types of food-borne disease, i.e., emetic and diarrheal syndrome. The sensing element of the biosensor was comprised of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) self-assembled with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) of nheA gene immobilized with thiol linker on the GNPs modified PGE. The size, shape and dispersion of the GNPs were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). Detection of B. cereus was carried out based on an increase in the charge transfer resistance (Rct) of the biosensor due to hybridization of the ss-DNA with target DNA. An Atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to confirm the hybridization. The biosensor sensitivity in pure cultures of B. cereus was found to be 10(0) colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) with a detection limit of 9.4 × 10(-12) mol L(-1). The biosensor could distinguish complementary from mismatch DNA sequence. The proposed biosensor exhibited a rapid detection, low cost, high sensitivity to bacterial contamination and could exclusively and specifically detect the target DNA sequence of B. cereus from other bacteria that can be found in dairy products. Moreover, the DNA biosensor exhibited high reproducibility and stability, thus it may be used as a suitable biosensor to detect B. cereus and to become a portable system for food quality control. PMID:26896793

  19. A procedure for estimating Bacillus cereus spores in soil and stream-sediment samples - A potential exploration technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watterson, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of bacterial spores of the Bacillus cereus group in soils and stream sediments appears to be a sensitive indicator of several types of concealed mineral deposits, including vein-type gold deposits. The B. cereus assay is rapid, inexpensive, and inherently reproducible. The test, currently under investigation for its potential in mineral exploration, is recommended for use on a research basis. Among the aerobic spore-forming bacilli, only B. cereus and closely related strains produce an opaque zone in egg-yolk emulsion agar. This characteristic, also known as the Nagler of lecitho-vitellin reaction, has long been used to rapidly indentify and estimate presumptive B. cereus. The test is here adapted to permit rapid estimation of B. cereus spores in soil and stream-sediment samples. Relative standard deviation was 10.3% on counts obtained from two 40-replicate pour-plate determinations. As many as 40 samples per day can be processed. Enough procedural detail is included to permit investigation of the test in conventional geochemical laboratories using standard microbiological safety precautions. ?? 1985.

  20. Evaluation of the Toxicity and Toxicokinetics of Cereulide from an Emetic Bacillus cereus Strain of Milk Origin

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yifang; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Xiaoye; Xia, Xi; Ding, Shuangyang; Zhu, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is an opportunistic foodborne agent causing food poisoning and many infectious diseases. The heat-stable emetic toxin cereulide is one of the most prevalent toxins produced by pathogenic B. cereus, resulting in symptoms such as emesis and liver failure. In the present work, the toxicity and toxicokinetics of cereulide from an emetic B. cereus isolate (CAU45) of raw milk were evaluated. The production of cereulide was tested by a cytotoxicity test and enzyme immunoassay, and confirmed by the presence of the ces (cereulide synthetase) gene and the ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method. All results showed that the amount and toxicity of cereulide produced by CAU45 was 7 to 15.3 folds higher than the reference emetic B. cereus DSMZ 4312. Cereulide in plasma was collected at different time points after a single intravenous injection to evaluate its toxicokinetics in rabbits. The maximum concentration of cereulide was achieved in 2.6 ± 3.4 h after administration, with the elimination half-life of 10.8 ± 9.1 h, which expands our understanding of the toxic effects of cereulide. Together, it suggests that urgent sanitary practices are needed to eliminate emetic toxins and emetic B. cereus in raw milk. PMID:27275834

  1. Cloning and sequencing of the metallothioprotein beta-lactamase II gene of Bacillus cereus 569/H in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M; Carlino, A; Madonna, M J; Lampen, J O

    1985-01-01

    The structural gene for beta-lactamase II (EC 3.5.2.6), a metallothioenzyme, from Bacillus cereus 569/H (constitutive for high production of the enzyme) was cloned in Escherichia coli, and the nucleotide sequence was determined. This is the first class B beta-lactamase whose primary structure has been reported. The amino acid sequence of the exoenzyme form, deduced from the DNA, indicates that beta-lactamase II, like other secreted proteins, is synthesized as a precursor with a 30-amino acid N-terminal signal peptide. The pre-beta-lactamase II (Mr, 28,060) is processed in E. coli and in B. cereus to a single mature protein (Mr, 24,932) which is totally secreted by B. cereus but in E. coli remains intracellular, probably in the periplasm. The expression of the gene in E. coli RR1 on the multicopy plasmid pRWHO12 was comparable to that in B. cereus, where it is presumably present as a single copy. The three histidine residues that are involved (along with the sole cysteine of the mature protein) in Zn(II) binding and hence in enzymatic activity against beta-lactams were identified. These findings will help to define the secondary structure, mechanism of action, and evolutionary lineage of B. cereus beta-lactamase II and other class B beta-lactamases. Images PMID:3930467

  2. Disassembly of F-Actin Cytoskeleton after Interaction of Bacillus cereus with Fully Differentiated Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Minnaard, Jessica; Lievin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Coconnier, Marie-Helene; Servin, Alain L.; Pérez, Pablo F.

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, the role of direct procaryote-eucaryote interactions in the virulence of Bacillus cereus was investigated. As a model of human enterocytes, differentiated Caco-2 cells were used. Infection of fully differentiated Caco-2 cells with B. cereus in the exponential phase of growth, in order to minimize the concentration of spores or sporulating microorganisms, shows that a strain-dependent cytopathic effect develops. Interestingly, addition of 3-h-old cultures of some strains resulted in complete detachment of the cultured cells after a 3-h infection whereas no such effect was found after a 3-h infection with 16-h-old cultures. Infection of enterocyte-like cells with B. cereus leads to disruption of the F-actin network and necrosis. Even though the effect of secreted factors cannot be ruled out, direct eucaryote-procaryote interaction seems to be necessary. In addition, we observed that some B. cereus strains were able to be internalized in Caco-2 cells. Our findings add a new insight into the mechanisms of virulence of B. cereus in the context of intestinal infection. PMID:15155611

  3. Evaluation of the Toxicity and Toxicokinetics of Cereulide from an Emetic Bacillus cereus Strain of Milk Origin.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yifang; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Xiaoye; Xia, Xi; Ding, Shuangyang; Zhu, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is an opportunistic foodborne agent causing food poisoning and many infectious diseases. The heat-stable emetic toxin cereulide is one of the most prevalent toxins produced by pathogenic B. cereus, resulting in symptoms such as emesis and liver failure. In the present work, the toxicity and toxicokinetics of cereulide from an emetic B. cereus isolate (CAU45) of raw milk were evaluated. The production of cereulide was tested by a cytotoxicity test and enzyme immunoassay, and confirmed by the presence of the ces (cereulide synthetase) gene and the ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method. All results showed that the amount and toxicity of cereulide produced by CAU45 was 7 to 15.3 folds higher than the reference emetic B. cereus DSMZ 4312. Cereulide in plasma was collected at different time points after a single intravenous injection to evaluate its toxicokinetics in rabbits. The maximum concentration of cereulide was achieved in 2.6 ± 3.4 h after administration, with the elimination half-life of 10.8 ± 9.1 h, which expands our understanding of the toxic effects of cereulide. Together, it suggests that urgent sanitary practices are needed to eliminate emetic toxins and emetic B. cereus in raw milk. PMID:27275834

  4. Bacillus cereus food poisoning associated with fried rice at two child day care centers--Virginia, 1993.

    PubMed

    1994-03-18

    Bacillus cereus, an infectious cause of foodborne illness, accounted for 2% of outbreaks with confirmed etiology that were reported to CDC during 1973-1987 (1). On July 21, 1993, the Lord Fairfax (Virginia) Health District received reports of acute gastrointestinal illness that occurred among children and staff at two jointly owned child day care centers following a catered lunch. This report summarizes the investigation of this outbreak. PMID:8121375

  5. Identification and Characterization of Bacillus cereus SW7-1 in Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guan-Nan; Xia, Xue-Juan; Zhao, Huan-Huan; Sendegeya, Parfait; Zhu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial diseases of silkworms cause significant reductions in sericulture and result in huge economic loss. This study aimed to identify and characterize a pathogen from diseased silkworm. SW7-1, a pathogenic bacterial strain, was isolated from the diseased silkworm. The strain was identified on the basis of its bacteriological properties and 16S rRNA gene sequence. The colony was round, slightly convex, opaque, dry, and milky on a nutrient agar medium, the colony also exhibited jagged edges. SW7-1 was Gram-positive, without parasporal crystal, and 0.8–1.2 by 2.6–3.4 µm in length, resembling long rods with rounded ends. The strain was positive to most of the physiological biochemical tests used in this study. The strain could utilize glucose, sucrose, and maltose. The results of its 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that SW7-1 shared the highest sequence identity (>99%) with Bacillus cereus strain 14. The bacterial strain was highly susceptible to gentamycin, streptomycin, erythromycin, norfloxacin, and ofloxacin and moderately susceptible to tetracycline and rifampicin. It exhibited resistance to other antibiotics. SW7-1 had hemolytic activity and could produce extracellular casease, lipase, and amylase. SW7-1 could reproduce septicemia-like symptoms with high mortality rate when re-fed to healthy silkworm. .The median lethal concentration (LC50) was 5.45 × 104 cfu/ml. Thus, SW7-1 was identified as B. cereus, which is a pathogen for silkworm and human infections are possible. PMID:26411789

  6. Identification of novel nitroreductases from Bacillus cereus and their interaction with the CB1954 prodrug.

    PubMed

    Gwenin, Vanessa V; Poornima, Paramasivan; Halliwell, Jennifer; Ball, Patrick; Robinson, George; Gwenin, Chris D

    2015-12-01

    Directed enzyme prodrug therapy is a form of cancer chemotherapy in which bacterial prodrug-activating enzymes, or their encoding genes, are directed to the tumour before administration of a prodrug. The prodrug can then be activated into a toxic drug at the tumour site, reducing off-target effects. The bacterial nitroreductases are a class of enzymes used in this therapeutic approach and although very promising, the low turnover rate of prodrug by the most studied nitroreductase enzyme, NfnB from Escherichia coli (NfnB_Ec), is a major limit to this technology. There is a continual search for enzymes with greater efficiency, and as part of the search for more efficient bacterial nitroreductase enzymes, two novel enzymes from Bacillus cereus (strain ATCC 14579) have been identified and shown to reduce the CB1954 (5-(aziridin-1-yl)-2,4-dinitrobenzamide) prodrug to its respective 2'-and 4'-hydroxylamine products. Both enzymes shared features characteristic of the nitro-FMN-reductase superfamily including non-covalently associated FMN, requirement for the NAD(P)H cofactor, homodimeric, could be inhibited by Dicoumarol (3,3'-methylenebis(4-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one)), and displayed ping pong bi bi kinetics. Based on the biochemical characteristics and nucleotide alignment with other nitroreductase enzymes, one enzyme was named YdgI_Bc and the other YfkO_Bc. Both B. cereus enzymes had greater turnover for the CB1954 prodrug compared with NfnB_Ec, and in the presence of added NADPH cofactor, YfkO_Bc had superior cell killing ability, and produced mainly the 4'-hydroxylamine product at low prodrug concentration. The YfkO_Bc was identified as a promising candidate for future enzyme prodrug therapy. PMID:26415543

  7. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Dessanti, Paola; Zhang, Yang; Allegrini, Simone; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Sgarrella, Francesco; Ealick, Steven E.

    2012-03-01

    Adenosine phosphorylase from B. cereus shows a strong preference for adenosine over other 6-oxopurine nucleosides. Mutation of Asp204 to asparagine reduces the efficiency of adenosine cleavage but does not affect inosine cleavage, effectively reversing the substrate specificity. The structures of D204N complexes explain these observations. Purine nucleoside phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of the glycosidic bond of purine (2′-deoxy)nucleosides, generating the corresponding free base and (2′-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Two classes of PNPs have been identified: homotrimers specific for 6-oxopurines and homohexamers that accept both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines. Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase (AdoP) is a hexameric PNP; however, it is highly specific for 6-aminopurines. To investigate the structural basis for the unique substrate specificity of AdoP, the active-site mutant D204N was prepared and kinetically characterized and the structures of the wild-type protein and the D204N mutant complexed with adenosine and sulfate or with inosine and sulfate were determined at high resolution (1.2–1.4 Å). AdoP interacts directly with the preferred substrate through a hydrogen-bond donation from the catalytically important residue Asp204 to N7 of the purine base. Comparison with Escherichia coli PNP revealed a more optimal orientation of Asp204 towards N7 of adenosine and a more closed active site. When inosine is bound, two water molecules are interposed between Asp204 and the N7 and O6 atoms of the nucleoside, thus allowing the enzyme to find alternative but less efficient ways to stabilize the transition state. The mutation of Asp204 to asparagine led to a significant decrease in catalytic efficiency for adenosine without affecting the efficiency of inosine cleavage.

  8. Potato Crop as a Source of Emetic Bacillus cereus and Cereulide-Induced Mammalian Cell Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Hoornstra, Douwe; Andersson, Maria A.; Teplova, Vera V.; Mikkola, Raimo; Uotila, Liisa M.; Andersson, Leif C.; Roivainen, Merja; Gahmberg, Carl G.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus cereus, aseptically isolated from potato tubers, were screened for cereulide production and for toxicity on human and other mammalian cells. The cereulide-producing isolates grew slowly, the colonies remained small (∼1 mm), tested negative for starch hydrolysis, and varied in productivity from 1 to 100 ng of cereulide mg (wet weight)−1 (∼0.01 to 1 ng per 105 CFU). By DNA-fingerprint analysis, the isolates matched B. cereus F5881/94, connected to human food-borne illness, but were distinct from cereulide-producing endophytes of spruce tree (Picea abies). Exposure to cell extracts (1 to 10 μg of bacterial biomass ml−1) and to purified cereulide (0.4 to 7 ng ml−1) from the potato isolates caused mitochondrial depolarization (loss of ΔΨm) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and keratinocytes (HaCaT), porcine spermatozoa and kidney tubular epithelial cells (PK-15), murine fibroblasts (L-929), and pancreatic insulin-producing cells (MIN-6). Cereulide (10 to 20 ng ml−1) exposed pancreatic islets (MIN-6) disintegrated into small pyknotic cells, followed by necrotic death. Necrotic death in other test cells was observed only after a 2-log-higher exposure. Exposure to 30 to 60 ng of cereulide ml−1 induced K+ translocation in intact, live PBMC, keratinocytes, and sperm cells within seconds of exposure, depleting 2 to 10% of the cellular K+ stores within 10 min. The ability of cereulide to transfer K+ ions across biological membranes may benefit the producer bacterium in K+-deficient environments such as extracellular spaces inside plant tissue but is a pathogenic trait when in contact with mammalian cells. PMID:23524678

  9. Isolation and characterization of a furfural-degrading bacterium Bacillus cereus sp. strain DS1.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dan; Bao, Jianguo; Lu, Jueming; Gao, Chunlei

    2015-02-01

    Furfural was found to be the main organic pollutant in the wastewater coming from the Diosgenin factory. This substance is derived from acidic pentosan in Dioscorea zingiberensis and is also found in a variety of agricultural byproducts, including corncobs, oat, wheat bran, and sawdust. It is regarded as a toxicant and an inhibitor to the growth of microorganism in both sewage disposal and biological fermentation. A furfural-degrading strain (DS1) was isolated from activated sludge of wastewater treatment plant in a diosgenin factory by continuous enrichment culture. The strain was identified as Bacillus cereus based on morphological, physiological tests, as well as on 16S rDNA sequence and Biolog analyses. The capacity of this strain to grow on a mineral salt medium, utilizing furfural as the sole carbon and energy source to degrade furfural, was investigated in this study. Under the condition of pH 9.0, temperature 35 °C, with rotating speed of 150 rpm, and an inoculum of 6 %, the strain showed that the furfural degradation capacity reaches 35 % in 7 days, as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The addition of inorganic carbon sources could bring down the biodegradation efficiency of the furfural. The strain DS1 showed better furfural removal capacity, as compared to other inorganic carbon sources in the media. Furthermore, a furfural concentration of as high as 4,000 mg L(-1) was tolerated by the culture. The capacity to degrade furfural was demonstrated for the first time by using the genus B. cereus. This study suggests the possible application in biodegradation strategies. PMID:25274411

  10. Identification and Characterization of Bacillus cereus SW7-1 in Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae).

    PubMed

    Li, Guan-Nan; Xia, Xue-Juan; Zhao, Huan-Huan; Sendegeya, Parfait; Zhu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial diseases of silkworms cause significant reductions in sericulture and result in huge economic loss. This study aimed to identify and characterize a pathogen from diseased silkworm. SW7-1, a pathogenic bacterial strain, was isolated from the diseased silkworm. The strain was identified on the basis of its bacteriological properties and 16S rRNA gene sequence. The colony was round, slightly convex, opaque, dry, and milky on a nutrient agar medium, the colony also exhibited jagged edges. SW7-1 was Gram-positive, without parasporal crystal, and 0.8-1.2 by 2.6-3.4 µm in length, resembling long rods with rounded ends. The strain was positive to most of the physiological biochemical tests used in this study. The strain could utilize glucose, sucrose, and maltose. The results of its 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that SW7-1 shared the highest sequence identity (>99%) with Bacillus cereus strain 14. The bacterial strain was highly susceptible to gentamycin, streptomycin, erythromycin, norfloxacin, and ofloxacin and moderately susceptible to tetracycline and rifampicin. It exhibited resistance to other antibiotics. SW7-1 had hemolytic activity and could produce extracellular casease, lipase, and amylase. SW7-1 could reproduce septicemia-like symptoms with high mortality rate when re-fed to healthy silkworm. .The median lethal concentration (LC50) was 5.45 × 10(4) cfu/ml. Thus, SW7-1 was identified as B. cereus, which is a pathogen for silkworm and human infections are possible. PMID:26411789