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Sample records for backfill materials investigated

  1. Creep consolidation of nuclear depository backfill materials

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, B.M.

    1980-10-01

    Evaluation of the effects of backfilling nuclear waste repository rooms is an important aspect of waste repository design. Consolidation of the porous backfill takes place as the room closes with time, causing the supporting stress exerted by the backfill against the intact rock to increase. Estimation of the rate of backfill consolidation is required for closure rate predictions and should be possible if the creep law for the solid constituent is known. A simple theory describing consolidation with a spherical void model is derived to illustrate this relationship. Although the present form of the theory assumes a homogeneous isotropic incompressible material atypical of most rocks, it may be applicable to rock salt, which exhibits considerable plasticity under confined pressure. Application of the theory is illustrated assuming a simple steady-state creep law, to show that the consolidation rate depends on the externally applied stress, temperature, and porosity.

  2. Modeling of sorption characteristics of backfill materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chitra, S.; Sasidhar, P.; Lal, K.B.; Ahmed, J.

    1998-06-01

    Sorption data analysis was carried out using the Freundlich, Langmuir, and Modified Freundlich isotherms for the uptake of sodium and potassium in an initial concentration range of 10--100 mg/L on backfill materials, viz., bentonite, vermiculite, and soil samples. The soil samples were collected from a shallow land disposal facility at Kalpakkam. The Freundlich isotherm equation is validated as a preferred general mathematical tool for representing the sorption of K{sup +} by all the selected backfill materials. The Modified Freundlich isotherm equation is validated as a preferred mathematical tool for representing the sorption of Na{sup +} by the soil samples. Since a negative sorption was observed for the uptake of Na{sup +} by commercial clay minerals (vermiculite and bentonite clay in the laboratory experiments), sorption analysis could not be carried out using the above-mentioned isotherm equations. Hill plots of the sorption data suggest that in the region of low saturation (10--40 mg/L), sorption of K{sup +} by vermiculite is impeded by interaction among sorption sites. In the region of higher saturation (60--100 mg/L), sorption of K{sup +} by all three backfill materials is enhanced by interaction among sorption sites. The Hill plot of the sorption data for Na{sup +} by soil suggests that irrespective of Na{sup +} concentration, sorption of Na{sup +} at one exchange size enhances sorption at other exchange sites.

  3. Some characteristics of potential backfill materials

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, D.R.

    1983-05-01

    A backfill material is one of the multiple barriers that may be involved in the disposal of nuclear waste. Such backfill should be a desiccant with the hydrous product having acceptable stability; it should sorb any released radioisotopes, and it should reseal any breached site. The backfill must also have acceptable thermal conductivity. This report presents data on the rate of hydration and the nature of the product of reaction of some candidate backfill materials with water and with brine. Thermal conductivity data is reported for both the reactants and the products. Granular MgO at 150/sup 0/C completely hydrates in less than 10 hours. At 60/sup 0/C and 20/sup 0/C, such extensive hydration requires about 100 and 1000 hours, respectively. The product of the reaction is stable to more than 300/sup 0/C. A doped discalcium silicate was less reactive and the product contains less water of crystallization than the MgO. The reaction product of dicalcium silicate is cementous, but it has low thermal stability. Bentonite readily reacts with water and expands. The reaction product has the properties of vermiculite, which indicates that magnesium ions have diffused into the bentonite structure and are not simply adsorbed on the surface. If bentonite is emplaced in a saline environment, the properties of vermiculite, the reaction product, should also be considered. The thermal conductivity of MgO, discalcium silicate, and bentonite is primarily dependent on the porosity of the sample. A slight increase in thermal conductivity was found with increased temperature, in contrast to most rocks. If the conductive data for the different materials is equated to the same porosity, MgO has the superior thermal conductivity compared to bentonite or discalcium silicate.

  4. TRIAXIAL AND SHEAR TESTING OF SELECTED BACKFILL MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    N. E. Kramer

    2000-08-07

    The Subsurface Performance Testing Section is performing tests in the Department of Energy's Atlas Facility to evaluate the performance of various backfill materials. Triaxial and shear tests were conducted on select backfill materials. The specific materials tested were: crushed tuff, overton sand, 4- 10 silica sand, 1/4'' dolostone/marble, and limestone. The objective of this report is to provide an estimated value for Poisson's ratio, determine internal friction angle, and stress-strain modulus of the backfill materials that were tested. These basic parameters are necessary for the selection of a backfill material to be included in the repository. This report transmits the results in both hardcopy and electronic formats plus describes the methodology and interpretation of the results. No conclusions will be drawn about the test results, as this will be the purview of other reports. The scope of this report is to use the triaxial and shear testing information and calculate, the internal friction angle, stress-strain modulus, and provide an estimate of Poisson's ratio (Sowers 1979, p. 199) of the selected backfill materials. Standard laboratory procedures, mentioned in Section 2 of this report, were used.

  5. Physical response of backfill materials to mineralogical changes in a basalt environment. [Sand-clay mixture containing 25% bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, R.A.; Seitz, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    Backfill materials surrounding waste canisters in a high-level nuclear waste repository are capable of ensuring very slow flow of groundwater past the canisters, and thereby increase the safety of the repository. However, in the design of a repository it will be necessary to allow for possible changes in the backfill. In this experimental program, changes in permeability, swelling behavior, and plastic behavior of the backfill at the temperatures, pressures, and radiation levels expected in a repository are investigated. The emphasis is on investigation of relevant phenomena and evaluation of experimental procedures for use in licensing procedures. The permeability of a slightly compacted sand-clay mixture containing 25% bentonite, with a dry bulk density of 1.59 g/cm/sup 3/, was determined to be 0.9 x 10/sup -18/ m/sup 2/ in liquid water at 25 and 200/sup 0/C, respectively. This is sufficiently low to demonstrate the potential effectiveness of proposed materials. In practice, fractures in the host rock may form short circuits around the backfill, so an even lower flow rate is probable. However, alteration by any of several mechanisms is expected to change the properties of the backfill. Crushed basalt plus bentonite is a leading candidate backfill for a basalt repository. Experiments show that basalt reacts with groundwater vapor or with liquid groundwater producing smectites, zeolites, silica, and other products that may be either beneficial or detrimental to the long-term performance of the backfill. Concentration of groundwater salts in the backfill by evaporation would cause immediate, but possibly reversible, reduction of the swelling abaility of bentonite. Moreover, under some circumstances, gamma radiolysis of moist air in the backfill could produce up to 0.5 mole of nitric acid or ammonia per liter of pore space. 27 references, 7 figures, 4 tables.

  6. Effects of rocks and backfill materials on waste glass leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiguro, K.; Sasaki, N.; Kashihara, H.; Yamamoto, M.

    1986-12-31

    Extensive studies have been made on the interactions between a waste glass and repository materials under static conditions. One of the PNC reference glasses was leached in the solution prepared from water in contact with crushed granite, tuff, diabase and backfill materials such as bentonite and zeolite. The leachant solutions except for some bentonite solutions reduced the glass leach rate compared with that measured in distilled water. The extent of the reduction was a function of silicon concentration in solution. The bentonite solutions enhanced the glass dissolution rate by a factor of 2 to 3 at low bentonite/water ratios but the effect was found to be less important at high bentonite/water ratios and in the long-term experiment. Addition of granite and zeolite to the bentonite solutions decreased the leach rate below the value measured in distilled water.

  7. Evaluation of the retention capability of backfill materials in the presence of cement waste form

    SciTech Connect

    Ghattas, N.K.; Adham, K.A.El; Eskander, S.; Mahmoud, N.S.

    1993-12-31

    The present study focused on the retention capability of the different local backfill materials and on horizontal and vertical radionuclide migration in simulated repository conditions of a saturated static humid environment, using single or combined components of the near-field. The results obtained from semi-field experiment show that no migration of cesium radionuclide was detected outside the backfill zone within the time interval of the experiment. This reflects the possibility efficiency, of the backfill materials used, for the confinement of radioactivity to the disposal site. On the other hand laboratory experiments show the effect of simulated repository condition on the sorption and desorption properties of backfill materials. It is clear from the results obtained that the presence of cement waste forms in equilibrium with underground water affect the retention capability of the backfill materials. The motivation of the work was a desire to provide a basis for minimizing radioactive waste processing by improving nonradioactive engineering barriers.

  8. Evaluation of in-situ cemented backfill performance. Rept. of Investigations/1991

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarik, D.R.; Vickery, J.D.; Seymour, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    As part of its research program to investigate ways of improving resource recovery and reducing subsidence, researchers from the U.S. Bureau of Mines placed instruments in the B-North ore body of the Cannon Mine, Wenatchee, WA, to monitor cemented backfill and rock deformation during mining. The vibrating-wire guages proved to be reliable and versatile, and approximately half of the instruments are providing data after 2 years of use. A two-dimensional, finite-element model was used to analyze the Cannon Mine's multilevel bench cut-and-fill mining method and predict rock and backfill displacements. The model accurately predicted rock displacements, but the predicted and measured displacements in cemented backfill had a correlation coefficient near zero, indicating that the model should only be used to predict rock displacements and not backfill displacements. A finite-difference model was also used to evaluate the stability of a cemented backfill pillar. Results can be used to conservatively predict backfill stresses, but on-site observations of pillar failures coupled with in situ measurements are needed to make more accurate predictions. An ongoing evaluation of the mining system has indicated that filling the primary stopes tight to the back with cemented backfill allowed these pillars to carry overburden loads soon after the cemented backfill was placed.

  9. Dessicant materials screening for backfill in a salt repository

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, D.R.

    1980-10-01

    Maintaining an anhydrous environment around nuclear waste stored in a salt repository is a concern which can be alleviated by using a desiccant material for backfilling. Such a desiccant should desiccate a brine yet be non deliquescent, the hydrated product should have moderate thermal stability, and the desiccant should have a high capacity and be readily available. From a literature search MgO and CaO were identified for detailed study. These oxides, and an intimate mixture of the two obtained by calcining dolomite, were used in experiments to further determine their suitability. They proved to be excellent desiccants with a high water capacity. The hydrates of both have moderate thermal stability and a high water content. Both MgO and CaO react in an alkaline chloride brine forming oxychloride compounds with different waters of crystallization. Some of these compounds are the Sorel Cements. CaO hydrates to Ca(OH)/sub 2/ which carbonates with CO/sub 2/ in air to form CaCO/sub 3/ and release the hydrated water. Thus the intimate mixture of CaO and MgO from calcined dolomite may serve as a desiccant and remove CO/sub 2/ from the repository atmosphere.

  10. Testing of candidate waste-package backfill and canister materials for basalt. [Cupronickel 90/10

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, M.I.; Anderson, W.J.; Aden, G.D.

    1982-09-01

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) is developing a multiple-barrier waste package to contain high-level nuclear waste as part of an overall system (e.g., waste package, repository sealing system, and host rock) designed to isolate the waste in a repository located in basalt beneath the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The three basic components of the waste package are the waste form, the canister, and the backfill. An extensive testing program is under way to determine the chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of potential canister and backfill materials. The data derived from this testing program will be used to recommend those materials that most adequately perform the functions assigned to the canister and backfill.

  11. Dielectric measurement method for real-time monitoring of initial hardening of backfill materials used for underground construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlovšek, Jurij; Schwing, Moritz; Chen, Zhen; Wagner, Norman; Williams, David J.; Scheuermann, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The broadband dielectric measurement method based on the vector network analysis technique, in combination with an open-ended coaxial probe, was applied to the determination of the dielectric relaxation behaviour of one- and two-component backfilling grout materials in the frequency range from 40 MHz to 2 GHz. The cement hydration process and the gelling of commercial grouts was monitored in real-time to investigate the application of non-destructive testing methods in the tunnelling industry. It was found that the time-dependent dielectric relaxation behaviour can accurately reveal the different stages of the hydration process and delineate the start of gel hardening. These measurement results demonstrate the practicability of the real-time dielectric measurement method to determine the broadband dielectric parameters of conventional backfill materials used in underground construction to determine construction integrity using non-destructive testing methods.

  12. Development of backfill material as an engineered barrier in the waste package system- Interim topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelwright, E.J.; Hodges, F.N.; Bray, L.A.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.; Lester, D.H.; Nakai, T.L.; Spaeth, M.E.; Stula, R.T.

    1981-09-01

    A backfill barrier, emplaced between the containerized waste and the host rock, can both protect the other engineered barriers and act as a primary barrier to the release of radionuclides from the waste package. Attributes that a backfill should provide in order to carry out its required function have been identified. Primary attributes are those that have a direct effect upon the release and transport of radionuclides from the waste package. Supportive attributes do not directly affect radionuclide release but are necessary to support the primary attributes. The primary attributes, in order of importance, are: minimize (retard or exclude) the migration of ground water between the host rock and the waste canister system; retard the migration of selected chemical species (corrosive species and radionuclides) in the ground water; control the Eh and pH of the ground water within the waste-package environment. The supportive attributes are: self-seal any cracks or discontinuities in the backfill or interfacing host geology; retain performance properties at all repository temperatures; retain peformance properties during and after receiving repository levels of gamma radiation; conduct heat from the canister system to the host geology; retain mechanical properties and provide resistance to applied mechanical forces; retain morphological stability and compatibility with structural barriers and with the host geology for required period of time. Screening and selection of candidate backfill materials has resulted in a preliminary list of materials for testing. Primary emphasis has been placed on sodium and calcium bentonites and zeolites used in conjunction with quartz sand or crushed host rock. Preliminary laboratory studies have concentrated on permeability, sorption, swelling pressure, and compaction properties of candidate backfill materials.

  13. Interactions of backfill materials with cesium in a bittern brine under repository conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Komarneni, S.; Roy, R.

    1982-03-01

    The following potential backfill materials have been studied: phillipsite, clinoptilolite, mordenite, montmorillonites, vermiculites, chlorite, kaolinite, labradorite, and shales. Each of these was hydrothermally reacted with Cs/sub 2/MoO/sub 4/, a possible cesium phase in spent fuel elements, in the presence of a bittern brine at 200/sup 0/C for two months under a confining pressure of 300 bars. Analyses of the product solutions indicated that montmorillonites, vermiculites, and zeolites fixed (as determined by resistance to K+ washing) the greatest fractions of the added cesium while other minerals, labradorite, and shales fixed only about 10% of the added cesium. For example, montmorillonite from Arizona and phillipsite from California fixed 47 and 50%, respectively, of the cesium added. X-ray diffraction analysis of the solid products revealed that cesium was fixed in the interlayers of montmorillonite as indicated by the collapse of the c-spacing from 15.5 to 12.1 A. Cesium interaction with clinoptilolite and mordenite zeolites did not result in their alteration or in any new cesium minerals as observed by x-ray diffraction. The cesium aluminosilicate mineral, pollucite, was detected only with phillipsite-cesium interactions in brine unlike in the hydrothermal interaction of these materials with Cs/sub 2/MoO/sub 4/ in deionized water where the presence of pollucite was found earlier to be pervasive. Powellite, CaMoO/sub 4/, was the only new phase found in all these interactions by x-ray diffraction which resulted from the combination of calcium from brine with molybdenum from Cs/sub 2/MoO/sub 4/. Montmorillonites among clay minerals and zeolites such as clinoptilolite and mordenite seem to be the best backfill materials in salt.

  14. Overview on backfill materials and permeable reactive barriers for nuclear waste disposal facilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Robert Charles; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Holt, Kathleen Caroline; Hasan, Mahmoud A. (Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, Egypt)

    2003-10-01

    A great deal of money and effort has been spent on environmental restoration during the past several decades. Significant progress has been made on improving air quality, cleaning up and preventing leaching from dumps and landfills, and improving surface water quality. However, significant challenges still exist in all of these areas. Among the more difficult and expensive environmental problems, and often the primary factor limiting closure of contaminated sites following surface restoration, is contamination of ground water. The most common technology used for remediating ground water is surface treatment where the water is pumped to the surface, treated and pumped back into the ground or released at a nearby river or lake. Although still useful for certain remediation scenarios, the limitations of pump-and-treat technologies have recently been recognized, along with the need for innovative solutions to ground-water contamination. Even with the current challenges we face there is a strong need to create geological repository systems for dispose of radioactive wastes containing long-lived radionuclides. The potential contamination of groundwater is a major factor in selection of a radioactive waste disposal site, design of the facility, future scenarios such as human intrusion into the repository and possible need for retrieving the radioactive material, and the use of backfills designed to keep the radionuclides immobile. One of the most promising technologies for remediation of contaminated sites and design of radioactive waste repositories is the use of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). PRBs are constructed of reactive material(s) to intercept and remove the radionuclides from the water and decontaminate the plumes in situ. The concept of PRBs is relatively simple. The reactive material(s) is placed in the subsurface between the waste or contaminated area and the groundwater. Reactive materials used thus far in practice and research include zero valent iron

  15. Effect of incinerator bottom-ash composition on the mechanical behavior of backfill material.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiou-Liang; Weng, Meng-Chia; Chang, Chih-Hung

    2012-12-30

    This study explores the influence of the chemical composition (SiO(2), CaO, Fe(2)O(3), and Al(2)O(3)) of incinerator bottom ash on its friction angle. Direct shear tests were performed to measure the strength of bottom ash with two distinctly different compositions. Then, an empirical equation was regressed to determine the correlation between each composition and the friction angle. The experimental results showed that the main constituent material of the incinerator bottom ash from general municipal wastes is SiO(2), and the friction angle is 48.04°-52.66°. The bottom ash from incineration plants treating both municipal wastes and general industrial wastes has a high content of iron-aluminum oxides, and its friction angle is 44.60°-52.52°. According to the multivariate regression analysis result, the friction angle of bottom ash of any composition is influenced mainly by the Fe(2)O(3) and Al(2)O(3) contents. This study used the friction angle of the bottom ash from four different incineration plants to validate the empirical equation, and found that the error between actual friction angles and the predicted values was -1.36% to 5.34%. Therefore, the regressed empirical equation in this study can be employed in engineering applications to preliminarily identify the backfill quality of incinerator bottom ash. PMID:23084273

  16. Borehole Heat Exchanger Systems: Hydraulic Conductivity and Frost-Resistance of Backfill Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbergen, Hauke; Sass, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems are economic solutions for both, domestic heating energy supply, as well as underground thermal energy storage (UTES). Over the past decades the technology developed to complex, advanced and highly efficient systems. For an efficient operation of the most common type of UTES, borehole heat exchanger (BHE) systems, it is necessary to design the system for a wide range of carrier fluid temperatures. During heat extraction, a cooled carrier fluid is heated up by geothermal energy. This collected thermal energy is energetically used by the heat pump. Thereby the carrier fluid temperature must have a lower temperature than the surrounding underground in order to collect heat energy. The steeper the thermal gradient, the more energy is transferred to the carrier fluid. The heat injection case works vice versa. For fast and sufficient heat extraction, even over long periods of heating (winter), it might become necessary to run the BHE with fluid temperatures below 0°C. As the heat pump runs periodically, a cyclic freezing of the pore water and corresponding ice-lens growth in the nearfield of the BHE pipes becomes possible. These so called freeze-thaw-cycles (FTC) are a critical state for the backfill material, as the sealing effect eventually decreases. From a hydrogeological point of view the vertical sealing of the BHE needs to be secured at any time (e.g. VDI 4640-2, Draft 2015). The vertical hydraulic conductivity of the BHE is influenced not only by the permeability of the grouting material itself, but by the contact area between BHE pipes and grout. In order to assess the sealing capacity of grouting materials a laboratory testing procedure was developed that measures the vertical hydraulic conductivity of the system BHE pipe and grout. The key features of the procedure are: • assessment of the systeḿs hydraulic conductivity • assessment of the systeḿs hydraulic conductivity after simulation of freeze-thaw-cycle

  17. Shredded tires and rubber-sand as lightweight backfill

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Salgado, R.; Lovell, C.W.; Bernal, A.

    1999-02-01

    The growing interest in utilizing waste materials in civil engineering applications has opened the possibility of constructing reinforced soil structures with unconventional backfills. Scrap tires are a high-profile waste material for which several uses have been studied, including the use of shredded tires as backfill. A triaxial testing program was conducted to investigate the stress-strain relationship and strength of tire chips and a mixture of sand and tire chips. The test results and additional information from the literature were used in the numerical modeling of wall backfills, both unreinforced and reinforced with geosynthetics. The numerical modeling results suggest tire shreds, particularly when mixed with sand, may be effectively used as a backfill.

  18. The evaluation of a metered mixer for RTV silicone for RSRM nozzle backfill operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardell, T. C.

    1989-01-01

    Metered mixing specifically for the RSRM backfill operation was investigated. Projected advantages were the elimination of waste RTV silicone produced in the operation and the elimination of entrapped air during the mix. Although metered mixing proved to be a viable method for mixing the Dow Corning DC 90-0006 rubber with its catalyst, applying the technology to the RSRM backfill operation has several disadvantages that are decisive. Use of a metered mixer would increase the amount of material that was being scraped for each backfill and increase the amount of time required to clean up the equipment after each operation. Therefore, use of metered static mixers is not recommended for use in the RSRM nozzle backfill operations. Because metered mixers proved to have significant disadvantages other methods of mixing and dispensing the RTV during the backfill operation are being investigated, and will be reported in a separate document.

  19. Research and Development of a New Silica-Alumina Based Cementitious Material Largely Using Coal Refuse for Mine Backfill, Mine Sealing and Waste Disposal Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Henghu Sun; Yuan Yao

    2012-06-29

    Coal refuse and coal combustion byproducts as industrial solid waste stockpiles have become great threats to the environment. To activate coal refuse is one practical solution to recycle this huge amount of solid waste as substitute for Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). The central goal of this project is to investigate and develop a new silica-alumina based cementitious material largely using coal refuse as a constituent that will be ideal for durable construction, mine backfill, mine sealing and waste disposal stabilization applications. This new material is an environment-friendly alternative to Ordinary Portland Cement. The main constituents of the new material are coal refuse and other coal wastes including coal sludge and coal combustion products (CCPs). Compared with conventional cement production, successful development of this new technology could potentially save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, recycle vast amount of coal wastes, and significantly reduce production cost. A systematic research has been conducted to seek for an optimal solution for enhancing pozzolanic reactivity of the relatively inert solid waste-coal refuse in order to improve the utilization efficiency and economic benefit as a construction and building material.

  20. Backfill barriers: the use of engineered barriers based on geologic materials to assure isolation of radioactive wastes in a repository. [Nickel-iron alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Apps, J.A.; Cook, N.G.W.

    1981-06-01

    A preliminary assessment is made to show that canisters fabricated of nickel-iron alloys, and surrounded by a suitable backfill, may produce an engineered barrier where the canister material is thermodynamically stable with respect to its environment. As similar conditions exist in nature, the performance of such systems as barriers to isolate radionuclides can be predicted over very long periods, of the order of 10/sup 6/ years.

  1. SEEPAGE/BACKFILL INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Mariner

    2000-04-14

    As directed by written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a sub-model of seepage/backfill interactions is developed and presented in this document to support the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Physical and Chemical Environment Model. The purpose of this analysis is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and the Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift. In this analysis, a conceptual model is developed to provide PAO a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). The development plan calls for a sub-model that evaluates the effect on water chemistry of chemical reactions between water that enters the drift and backfill materials in the drift. The development plan specifically requests an evaluation of the following important chemical reaction processes: dissolution-precipitation, aqueous complexation, and oxidation-reduction. The development plan also requests the evaluation of the effects of varying seepage and drainage fluxes, varying temperature, and varying evaporation and condensation fluxes. Many of these effects are evaluated in a separate Analysis/Model Report (AMR), ''Precipitates Salts Analysis AMR'' (CRWMS M&O 2000), so the results of that AMR are referenced throughout this AMR.

  2. Implementation of Paste Backfill Mining Technology in Chinese Coal Mines

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qingliang; Zhou, Huaqiang; Bai, Jianbiao

    2014-01-01

    Implementation of clean mining technology at coal mines is crucial to protect the environment and maintain balance among energy resources, consumption, and ecology. After reviewing present coal clean mining technology, we introduce the technology principles and technological process of paste backfill mining in coal mines and discuss the components and features of backfill materials, the constitution of the backfill system, and the backfill process. Specific implementation of this technology and its application are analyzed for paste backfill mining in Daizhuang Coal Mine; a practical implementation shows that paste backfill mining can improve the safety and excavation rate of coal mining, which can effectively resolve surface subsidence problems caused by underground mining activities, by utilizing solid waste such as coal gangues as a resource. Therefore, paste backfill mining is an effective clean coal mining technology, which has widespread application. PMID:25258737

  3. Implementation of paste backfill mining technology in Chinese coal mines.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qingliang; Chen, Jianhang; Zhou, Huaqiang; Bai, Jianbiao

    2014-01-01

    Implementation of clean mining technology at coal mines is crucial to protect the environment and maintain balance among energy resources, consumption, and ecology. After reviewing present coal clean mining technology, we introduce the technology principles and technological process of paste backfill mining in coal mines and discuss the components and features of backfill materials, the constitution of the backfill system, and the backfill process. Specific implementation of this technology and its application are analyzed for paste backfill mining in Daizhuang Coal Mine; a practical implementation shows that paste backfill mining can improve the safety and excavation rate of coal mining, which can effectively resolve surface subsidence problems caused by underground mining activities, by utilizing solid waste such as coal gangues as a resource. Therefore, paste backfill mining is an effective clean coal mining technology, which has widespread application. PMID:25258737

  4. Preparation for YMP backfill activities

    SciTech Connect

    Conca, J.

    1998-12-23

    Yucca Mountain activities for FY 1999 are anticipated to require specific information on the chemical and physical properties of the candidate getter materials and other backfill components necessary for defensible modeling of the source term, and possible controlling of the source term. There should be three tasks to this activity: at the end of this report is a draft test plan reflecting the present funding anticipated, the other tasks may be added as funding becomes available. (Task 1) The immobilization capacity of the getter materials for specific radionuclides. This task will primarily include column sorption tests of getter materials with solutions spiked with radionuclides. The getter materials will include Apatite II, MgO (with NaPO{sub 4} plus Ba,SrCO{sub 3} and soluble sulfate, with and without Apatite II), Gibbsite/Boehmite, and Hematite. Radionuclides will include Pu, U, Np, Am, Ra, Tc, and Th. Experiments will be performed under various anticipated repository conditions and with anticipated solution compositions. Occasional batch tests will be used to obtain specific K{sub d}s and other thermodynamic data. Solid and liquid analyses will be needed for characterization of the effluent concentrations from the columns to assess performance and for use in geochemical modeling. (Task 2) Intrinsic stability of the getter materials under repository conditions. The use of any candidate getter material will depend upon its anticipated lifetime in the backfill environment. Literature search for any existing data will be performed and augmented by solubility experiments on the getter materials. This is especially important for the reactive materials such as MgO and the soluble sulfates and phosphates that may be a limited lifetime in the backfill. It is also necessary to decide how much getter material to emplace. (Task 3) Diffusion of radionuclides across a Richards Barrier. The Richards Barrier, if emplaced, will act as a hydraulic diversion barrier for the

  5. Investigating Encrypted Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Niall; Gladyshev, Pavel; Kechadi, Tahar; Carthy, Joe

    When encrypted material is discovered during a digital investigation and the investigator cannot decrypt the material then s/he is faced with the problem of how to determine the evidential value of the material. This research is proposing a methodology of extracting probative value from the encrypted file of a hybrid cryptosystem. The methodology also incorporates a technique for locating the original plaintext file. Since child pornography (KP) images and terrorist related information (TI) are transmitted in encrypted format the digital investigator must ask the question Cui Bono? - who benefits or who is the recipient? By doing this the scope of the digital investigation can be extended to reveal the intended recipient.

  6. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... safety factor for the stability of the backfill of at least 1.3. (2) All spoil generated by the auger... nonacid-, nontoxic-forming material and the backfill graded to a slope which is compatible with the approved postmining land use and which provides adequate drainage and long-term stability. (4) Any...

  7. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... safety factor for the stability of the backfill of at least 1.3. (2) All spoil generated by the auger... nonacid-, nontoxic-forming material and the backfill graded to a slope which is compatible with the approved postmining land use and which provides adequate drainage and long-term stability. (4) Any...

  8. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... safety factor for the stability of the backfill of at least 1.3. (2) All spoil generated by the auger... nonacid-, nontoxic-forming material and the backfill graded to a slope which is compatible with the approved postmining land use and which provides adequate drainage and long-term stability. (4) Any...

  9. Reduce gas utility costs with improved backfill stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.R.; Baker, E.J.

    1983-12-01

    Backfilling and repaving over trenches and excavations for gas distribution piping leak repairs is a costly operation for gas utilities. The use of poor techniques or unsuitable material in the backfill operation may cause pavements to subside, resulting in hazardous potholes. In addition, some backfill materials may be corrosive to metal piping or hazardous for work crews to handle. There is a need to develop an improved material that can prevent excessive subsidence and reduce construction and maintenance costs. In 1981, the Gas Research Institute (GRI) initiated a project at Southwest Research Institute (SRI) to develop cost-effective methods for treating backfill in utility excavation operations. The results of the laboratory and field tests conducted during this project indicated that SRI has successfully developed a new soil stabilizer for use in backfilling excavations.

  10. A Historical Review of WIPP Backfill Development

    SciTech Connect

    Brush, L.H.; Krumhansl, J.L.; Molecke, M.A.; Papenguth, H.W.

    1999-07-15

    Backfills have been part of Sandia National Laboratories' [Sandia's] Waste Isolation Pilot Plant [WIPP] designs for over twenty years. Historically, backfill research at Sandia has depended heavily on the changing mission of the WIPP facility. Early testing considered heat producing, high level, wastes. Bentonite/sand/salt mixtures were evaluated and studies focused on developing materials that would retard brine ingress, sorb radionuclides, and withstand elevated temperatures. The present-day backfill consists of pure MgO [magnesium oxide] in a pelletized form and is directed at treating the relatively low contamination level, non-heat producing, wastes actually being disposed of in the WIPP. It's introduction was motivated by the need to scavenging CO{sub 2} [carbon dioxide] from decaying organic components in the waste. However, other benefits, such as a substantial desiccating capacity, are also being evaluated. The MgO backfill also fulfills a statutory requirement for assurance measures beyond those needed to demonstrate compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] regulatory release limits. However, even without a backfill, the WIPP repository design still operates within EPA regulatory release limits.

  11. Field demonstration of two pneumatic backfilling technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Dyni, R.C.; Burnett, M.; Philbin, D.

    1995-12-31

    This US Bureau of Mines (USBM) report summarizes a field demonstration of pneumatic backfilling technologies conducted at the abandoned Hillside Coal and Iron Slope in Vandling, PA. Researchers demonstrated two pneumatic backfilling technologies recently developed under the USBM`s Abandoned Mine Reclamation Research Program, the Pneumatic Pipefeeder and the High-Efficiency Ejector. Both systems had previously been evaluated at the USBM`s subsidence abatement investigation laboratory near Fairchance, PA. The objective of the demonstration was to fill 100% of the abandoned tunnel with backfill stone to prevent further subsidence. The pneumatic Pipefeeder was used for 21 days, at a rate of 63 to 124 t/d (69 to 136 st/d), to fill 88% of the tunnel. The High-Efficiency Ejector was used for 2 days, at a rate of 125 to 132 T/d (138 to 146 st/d) to fill the remaining 12% of the tunnel. The backfill placed by both systems was tightly compacted. The major problem encountered was wear on the polyethylene pipeline from the abrasion of the high-velocity backfill. The use of heavier steel pipe minimized the problem. A cost analysis for the entire project is given.

  12. Wormhole Formation in RSRM Nozzle Joint Backfill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, J.

    2000-01-01

    The RSRM nozzle uses a barrier of RTV rubber upstream of the nozzle O-ring seals. Post flight inspection of the RSRM nozzle continues to reveal occurrence of "wormholes" into the RTV backfill. The term "wormholes", sometimes called "gas paths", indicates a gas flow path not caused by pre-existing voids, but by a little-understood internal failure mode of the material during motor operation. Fundamental understanding of the mechanics of the RSRM nozzle joints during motor operation, nonlinear viscoelastic characterization of the RTV backfill material, identification of the conditions that predispose the RTV to form wormholes, and screening of candidate replacement materials is being pursued by a joint effort between Thiokol Propulsion, NASA, and the Army Propulsion & Structures Directorate at Redstone Arsenal. The performance of the RTV backfill in the joint is controlled by the joint environment. Joint movement, which applies a tension and shear load on the material, coupled with the introduction of high pressure gas in combination create an environment that exceeds the capability of the material to withstand the wormhole effect. Little data exists to evaluate why the material fails under the modeled joint conditions, so an effort to characterize and evaluate the material under these conditions was undertaken. Viscoelastic property data from characterization testing will anchor structural analysis models. Data over a range of temperatures, environmental pressures, and strain rates was used to develop a nonlinear viscoelastic model to predict material performance, develop criteria for replacement materials, and quantify material properties influencing wormhole growth. Three joint simulation analogs were developed to analyze and validate joint thermal barrier (backfill) material performance. Two exploratory tests focus on detection of wormhole failure under specific motor operating conditions. A "validation" test system provides data to "validate" computer models and

  13. Efficacy of backfilling and other engineered barriers in a radioactive waste repository in salt

    SciTech Connect

    Claiborne, H.C.

    1982-09-01

    In the United States, investigation of potential host geologic formations was expanded in 1975 to include hard rocks. Potential groundwater intrusion is leading to very conservative and expensive waste package designs. Recent studies have concluded that incentives for engineered barriers and 1000-year canisters probably do not exist for reasonable breach scenarios. The assumption that multibarriers will significantly increase the safety margin is also questioned. Use of a bentonite backfill for surrounding a canister of exotic materials was developed in Sweden and is being considered in the US. The expectation that bentonite will remain essentially unchanged for hundreds of years for US repository designs may be unrealistic. In addition, thick bentonite backfills will increase the canister surface temperature and add much more water around the canister. The use of desiccant materials, such as CaO or MgO, for backfilling seems to be a better method of protecting the canister. An argument can also be made for not using backfill material in salt repositories since the 30-cm-thick space will provide for hole closure for many years and will promote heat transfer via natural convection. It is concluded that expensive safety systems are being considered for repository designs that do not necessarily increase the safety margin. It is recommended that the safety systems for waste repositories in different geologic media be addressed individually and that cost-benefit analyses be performed.

  14. Investigations of lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, G. M.; Fvwaraye, A. O.; Fleischer, R. L.; Hart, H. R., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The investigations were directed at determining the radiation history and surface chronology of lunar materials using the etched particle track technique. The major lunar materials studied are the igneous rocks and double core from Apollo 12, the breccia and soil samples from Apollo 14, and the core samples from Luna 16. In the course of this work two new and potentially important observations were made: (1) Cosmic ray-induced spallation-recoil tracks were identified. The density of such tracks, when compared with the density of tracks induced by a known flux of accelerator protons, yields the time of exposure of a sample within the top meter or two of moon's surface. (2) Natural, fine scale plastic deformation was found to have fragmented pre-existing charged particle tracks, allowing the dating of the mechanical event causing the deformation.

  15. Centrifuge modeling of radioactive waste migration through backfill in a near surface disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gurumoorthy, C.; Kusakabe, O.

    2007-07-01

    Investigations on the performance of backfill barrier in Near Surface Disposal Facility (NSDF) for radioactive wastes are important to ensure the long term safety of such disposal option. Favorable condition to delay migration of radionuclides from disposed waste to far fields is diffusion process. However, advective dispersion/diffusion mechanism plays an important role due to changes in backfill over a period of time. In order to understand these mechanisms, detailed laboratory experiments are usually conducted for developing mathematical models to assess the behaviour of backfill. However, these experiments are time consuming and suffer with the limitations due to material complexity. Also, there are constraints associated with validation of theoretical predictions due to intricacy of boundary conditions as well as the time scale is quite different as compared to the time required for completion of the processes in the field. Keeping in view these aspects, centrifuge modeling technique has been adopted by various researchers to model and understand various geo-environment problems in order to provide a link between the real life situation termed as the 'Prototype' and its model, which is exposed to a higher gravitational field. An attempt has been made in this paper to investigate the feasibility of this technique to model advective dispersion/diffusion mechanism of radionuclides through saturated Bentonite-Sand (B:S) backfill. Various stages of centrifuge modeling are highlighted. Column tests were conducted in the centrifuge to evaluate the hydraulic conductivity of B:S mixture under prototype NSDF stress conditions. Results showed that steady state hydraulic conductivity under saturated conditions was 2.86 10{sup -11} m/sec. Studies indicate the feasibility of centrifuge modeling technique and usefulness to model advective diffusion of radionuclides through B:S backfill. (authors)

  16. Geochemical alteration of backfill FY98 status report

    SciTech Connect

    Buscheck, T; Knauss, K; Rosenberg, N; Viani, B

    1998-09-30

    The Yucca Mountain Project is considering some type of backfill, possibly emplaced as a capillary barrier, for inclusion in the Engineering Barrier System (EBS) at the potential Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository site. The performance of capillary barriers in isothermal, low- temperature, environments has been studied extensively (e.g., Ho and Webb, 1998; OZdenburg and Pruess, 1993; Ross, 1990). The performance of capillary barriers in an non-isothermal, high temperature environment, such as during the thermal pulse phase of a nuclear waste repository, has received much less attention. One concern is that the backfill materials may be altered from that of the as-placed material by the hydrothermal regime imposed by the emplacement of waste in the repository, changing hydrologic properties in a way that degrades the performance of the EBS system. This report is a status report on our efforts to address this concern. The work was initiated by SCR #98-76-041 and was authorized to begin at LLNL in summer 1998. This report is organized as follows. In the first part, we discuss our understanding of the relevant issues of backfill performance based on thermal hydrology. We focus here on changes to hydrologic properties, but we recognize that changes to thermal, mechanical and chemical (e.g., sorptive) properties are also important. Our primary interest is in addressing concerns over possible changes in the magnitude of key hydrologic properties (i.e., porosity, permeability, and moisture retention characteristics) that could significantly affect the design performance of backfill in the EBS. We report on what we know from previous work about geochemical alteration of backfill material, focusing primarily on crushed tuff. In the second part of this report, we present our progress on geochemical studies on backfill materials. These include sub-boiling, two-phase column experiments, batch experiments at above boiling temperatures and associated numerical modeling.

  17. A historical review of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant backfill development

    SciTech Connect

    KRUMHANSL,JAMES L.; MOLECKE,MARTIN A.; PAPENGUTH,HANS W.; BRUSH,LAURENCE H.

    2000-06-05

    Backfills have been part of Sandia National Laboratories' [Sandia's] Waste Isolation Pilot Plant [WIPP] designs for over twenty years. Historically, backfill research at Sandia has depended heavily on the changing mission of the WIPP facility. Early testing considered heat producing, high level, wastes. Bentonite/sand/salt mixtures were evaluated and studies focused on developing materials that would retard brine ingress, sorb radionuclides, and withstand elevated temperatures. The present-day backfill consists of pure MgO [magnesium oxide] in a pelletized form and is directed at treating the relatively low contamination level, non-heat producing, wastes actually being disposed of in the WIPP. Its introduction was motivated by the need to scavenging CO{sub 2} [carbon dioxide] from decaying organic components in the waste. However, other benefits, such as a substantial desiccating capacity, are also being evaluated. The MgO backfill also fulfills a statutory requirement for assurance measures beyond those needed to demonstrate compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] regulatory release limits. However, even without a backfill, the WIPP repository design still operates within EPA regulatory release limits.

  18. Backfilling canals to mitigate Wetland dredging in Louisiana coastal marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neill, Christopher; Turner, R. Eugene

    1987-11-01

    Returning canal spoil banks into canals, or backfilling, is used in Louisiana marshes to mitigate damage caused by dredging for oil and gas extraction. We evaluated 33 canals backfilled through July 1984 to assess the success of habitat restoration. We determined restoration success by examining canal depth, vegetation recolonization, and regraded spoil bank soils after backfilling. Restoration success depended on: marsh type, canal location, canal age, marsh soil characteristics, the presence or absence of a plug at the canal mouth, whether mitigation was on- or off-site, and dredge operator performance. Backfilling reduced median canal depth from 2.4 to 1.1 m, restored marsh vegetation on the backfilled spoil bank, but did not restore emergent marsh vegetation in the canal because of the lack of sufficient spoil material to fill the canal and time. Median percentage of cover of marsh vegetation on the canal spoil banks was 51.6%. Median percentage of cover in the canal was 0.7%. The organic matter and water content of spoil bank soils were restored to values intermediate between spoil bank levels and predredging marsh conditions. The average percentage of cover of marsh vegetation on backfilled spoil banks was highest in intermediate marshes (68.6%) and lowest in fresh (34.7%) and salt marshes (33.9%). Average canal depth was greatest in intermediate marshes (1.50 m) and least in fresh marshes (0.85 m). Canals backfilled in the Chenier Plain of western Louisiana were shallower (average depth = 0.61 m) than in the eastern Deltaic Plain (mean depth range = 1.08 to 1.30 m), probably because of differences in sediment type, lower subsidence rate, and lower tidal exchange in the Chenier Plain. Canals backfilled in marshes with more organic soils were deeper, probably as a result of greater loss of spoil volume caused by oxidation of soil organic matter. Canals ten or more years old at the time of backfilling had shallower depths after backfilling. Depths varied widely

  19. Investigation of Zerodur material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1993-07-01

    The Final Report of the Center for Applied Optics (CAO), of The University of Alabama (UAH) study entitled 'Investigation of Zerodur Material Processing' is presented. The objectives of the effort were to prepare glass samples by cutting, grinding, etching, and polishing block Zerodur to desired specifications using equipment located in the optical shop located in the Optical System Branch at NASA/MSFC; characterize samples for subsurface damage and surface roughness; utilize Zerodur samples for coating investigations; and perform investigations into enhanced optical fabrication and metrology techniques. The results of this investigation will be used to support the Advanced X Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) program as well as other NASA/MSFC research programs. The results of the technical effort are presented and discussed.

  20. Investigation of Zerodur material processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1993-01-01

    The Final Report of the Center for Applied Optics (CAO), of The University of Alabama (UAH) study entitled 'Investigation of Zerodur Material Processing' is presented. The objectives of the effort were to prepare glass samples by cutting, grinding, etching, and polishing block Zerodur to desired specifications using equipment located in the optical shop located in the Optical System Branch at NASA/MSFC; characterize samples for subsurface damage and surface roughness; utilize Zerodur samples for coating investigations; and perform investigations into enhanced optical fabrication and metrology techniques. The results of this investigation will be used to support the Advanced X Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) program as well as other NASA/MSFC research programs. The results of the technical effort are presented and discussed.

  1. Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to backfill, seal, and/or densify porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, Janda K.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Neiser, Richard A.; Moffatt, William C.

    1999-01-01

    Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to fill, seal, and/or density porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive substrates. Such coatings may be dielectrics, ceramics, or semiconductors and, by the present invention, may have deposited onto and into them sol-gel ceramic precursor compounds which are subsequently converted to sol-gel ceramics to yield composite materials with various tailored properties.

  2. Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to backfill, seal, and/or densify porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, J.K.; Reed, S.T.; Ashley, C.S.; Neiser, R.A.; Moffatt, W.C.

    1999-07-20

    Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to fill, seal, and/or density porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive substrates. Such coatings may be dielectrics, ceramics, or semiconductors and, by the present invention, may have deposited onto and into them sol-gel ceramic precursor compounds which are subsequently converted to sol-gel ceramics to yield composite materials with various tailored properties. 6 figs.

  3. Status of Research on Magnesium Oxide Backfill

    SciTech Connect

    PAPENGUTH,HANS W.; KRUMHANSL,JAMES L.; BYNUM,R. VANN; WANG,YIFENG; KELLY,JOHN W.; ANDERSON,HOWARD; NOWAK,E. JAMES

    2000-07-31

    For the WIPP, chemical and physical characteristics of MgO suggest it to be the most beneficial backfill choice, particularly because it has the ability to buffer the aqueous chemical conditions to control actinide volubility. In the current experimental program, the authors are developing a technical basis for taking credit for the complete set of attributes of MgO in geochemical, hydrogeological, and geomechanical technical areas, resulting in an improved conceptual model for the WIPP such as the following. Water uptake by MgO will delay the development of mobile actinides and gas generation by microbes and corrosion. Reduced gas generation will reduce or even eliminate spallings releases. As MgO hydrates, it swells, reducing porosity and permeability, which will inhibit gas flow in the repository, in turn reducing spallings releases. Hydration will also result in a self-sealing mechanism by which water uptake and swelling of MgO adjacent to a groundwater seep cuts off further seepage. Reaction with some groundwaters will produce cementitious materials, which will help to cement waste particles or produce a cohesive solid mass. Larger particles are less likely to be entrained in a spallings release. If sufficient water eventually accumulates in a repository to support microbial gas generation, magnesium carbonate cements will form; also producing good cohesion and strength.

  4. Aqueous diffusion in repository and backfill environments

    SciTech Connect

    Conca, J.L.; Apted, M.; Arthur, R.

    1993-12-31

    Aqueous diffusion coefficients have been experimentally determined in a variety of porous/fractured geologic and engineered media. For performance assessment applications, the purely diffusive flux must be separated from retardation effects. The simple diffusion coefficient, D, does not include any transient chemical effects, e.g., sorption, which lower the diffusion coefficient for some finite time period until equilibrium is reached. D is primarily a function of volumetric water content, {theta}, and not material characteristics. At high water contents, D gradually declines as water content decreases, from 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/sec at {theta} {approximately}0.5%. Although surface diffusion has a strong experimental basis in the transport of gases along metal surfaces experimental evidence for aqueous geologic/backfill/engineered systems strongly indicates that surface diffusion is not important, even in bentonite, because of the extremely poor connectivity among electric double-layers and the extremely low diffusivities and high {partial_derivative}C/{partial_derivative}x at small area/point contacts which more than negate the increased flux along intragrain surfaces.

  5. Backfilled, self-assembled monolayers and methods of making same

    DOEpatents

    Fryxell, Glen E.; Zemanian, Thomas S.; Addleman, R. Shane; Aardahl, Christopher L.; Zheng, Feng; Busche, Brad; Egorov, Oleg B.

    2009-06-30

    Backfilled, self-assembled monolayers and methods of making the same are disclosed. The self-assembled monolayer comprises at least one functional organosilane species and a substantially random dispersion of at least one backfilling organosilane species among the functional organosilane species, wherein the functional and backfilling organosilane species have been sequentially deposited on a substrate. The method comprises depositing sequentially a first organosilane species followed by a backfilling organosilane species, and employing a relaxation agent before or during deposition of the backfilling organosilane species, wherein the first and backfilling organosilane species are substantially randomly dispersed on a substrate.

  6. Backfilling with guarantees granted upon job submission.

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Vitus Joseph; Bunde, David P.; Lindsay, Alexander M.; Johnson, Christopher R.; Galloway-Carson, Maxwell

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present scheduling algorithms that simultaneously support guaranteed starting times and favor jobs with system desired traits. To achieve the first of these goals, our algorithms keep a profile with potential starting times for every unfinished job and never move these starting times later, just as in Conservative Backfilling. To achieve the second, they exploit previously unrecognized flexibility in the handling of holes opened in this profile when jobs finish early. We find that, with one choice of job selection function, our algorithms can consistently yield a lower average waiting time than Conservative Backfilling while still providing a guaranteed start time to each job as it arrives. In fact, in most cases, the algorithms give a lower average waiting time than the more aggressive EASY backfilling algorithm, which does not provide guaranteed start times. Alternately, with a different choice of job selection function, our algorithms can focus the benefit on the widest submitted jobs, the reason for the existence of parallel systems. In this case, these jobs experience significantly lower waiting time than Conservative Backfilling with minimal impact on other jobs.

  7. Radial diffusion of radiocaesium and radioiodide through cementitious backfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felipe-Sotelo, M.; Hinchliff, J.; Drury, D.; Evans, N. D. M.; Williams, S.; Read, D.

    The function of the backfill material in a geological disposal facility (GDF) is to chemically condition the environment of the near field and thereby chemically retard the transport of the radionuclides present in the waste. This function of the backfill material is usually referred to as chemical containment. Diffusion experiments are being carried out over periods up to four years to assess the diffusion of Cs, Ni, Eu, Th, U and I (as I-) through Nirex Reference Vault Backfill (NRVB). The method uses cylinders of NRVB (40 mm diameter, 40-45 mm height) which can be doped via a central well with the radionuclides of interest. Diffusion occurs radially into a surrounding solution already pre-equilibrated with the cement. This paper shows the results obtained during the first two years for experiments undertaken using 137Cs and 125I- tracers with and without carrier. Comparison is made to tritiated water under identical experimental conditions. Breakthrough of Cs and I- occurred within the first week of the experiments, reaching steady state in the surrounding solution after 20-50 days. The maximum concentrations expected from the original inventories based on a simple dilution calculation have not been reached, indicating that retention in the matrix has occurred; ranging from 10% to 40% for Cs, and up to 50% for I-. Corresponding experiments using a solution containing cellulose degradation products (CDP) showed an increased diffusion for both Cs and I. Migration profiles have been obtained and the relative retention of each radionuclide has been confirmed using digital autoradiography. The results indicate that, for both isotopes, migration occurs through the cement matrix rather than through microfissures. However, whereas Cs is homogeneously distributed within the blocks, there is evidence of zones of preferential I- accumulation even where concentrations in solution have reached steady state. Transport modelling using GoldSim has replicated experimental

  8. Radon emanation from backfilled mill tailings in underground uranium mine.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Patitapaban; Mishra, Devi Prasad; Panigrahi, Durga Charan; Jha, Vivekananda; Patnaik, R Lokeswara; Sethy, Narendra Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Coarser mill tailings used as backfill to stabilize the stoped out areas in underground uranium mines is a potential source of radon contamination. This paper presents the quantitative assessment of radon emanation from the backfilled tailings in Jaduguda mine, India using a cylindrical accumulator. Some of the important parameters such as (226)Ra activity concentration, bulk density, bulk porosity, moisture content and radon emanation factor of the tailings affecting radon emanation were determined in the laboratory. The study revealed that the radon emanation rate of the tailings varied in the range of 0.12-7.03 Bq m(-2) s(-1) with geometric mean of 1.01 Bq m(-2) s(-1) and geometric standard deviation of 3.39. An increase in radon emanation rate was noticed up to a moisture saturation of 0.09 in the tailings, after which the emanation rate gradually started declining with saturation due to low diffusion coefficient of radon in the saturated tailings. Radon emanation factor of the tailings varied in the range of 0.08-0.23 with the mean value of 0.21. The emanation factor of the tailings with moisture saturation level over 0.09 was found to be about three times higher than that of the absolutely dry tailings. The empirical relationship obtained between (222)Rn emanation rate and (226)Ra activity concentration of the tailings indicated a significant positive linear correlation (r = 0.95, p < 0.001). This relationship may be useful for quick prediction of radon emanation rate from the backfill material of similar nature. PMID:24412814

  9. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR BACKFILL EMPLACEMENT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    R. Garrett

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) backfill emplacement system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  10. Investigating Material Approximations in Spacecraft Radiation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Steven A.; Slaba, Tony C.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2011-01-01

    During the design process, the configuration of space vehicles and habitats changes frequently and the merits of design changes must be evaluated. Methods for rapidly assessing astronaut exposure are therefore required. Typically, approximations are made to simplify the geometry and speed up the evaluation of each design. In this work, the error associated with two common approximations used to simplify space radiation vehicle analyses, scaling into equivalent materials and material reordering, are investigated. Over thirty materials commonly found in spacesuits, vehicles, and human bodies are considered. Each material is placed in a material group (aluminum, polyethylene, or tissue), and the error associated with scaling and reordering was quantified for each material. Of the scaling methods investigated, range scaling is shown to be the superior method, especially for shields less than 30 g/cm2 exposed to a solar particle event. More complicated, realistic slabs are examined to quantify the separate and combined effects of using equivalent materials and reordering. The error associated with material reordering is shown to be at least comparable to, if not greater than, the error associated with range scaling. In general, scaling and reordering errors were found to grow with the difference between the average nuclear charge of the actual material and average nuclear charge of the equivalent material. Based on this result, a different set of equivalent materials (titanium, aluminum, and tissue) are substituted for the commonly used aluminum, polyethylene, and tissue. The realistic cases are scaled and reordered using the new equivalent materials, and the reduced error is shown.

  11. Glassy materials investigated for nuclear reactor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, E. D.

    1968-01-01

    Studies determine the feasibility of preparing fuel-bearing glasses and glasses bearing neutron-absorbing materials for use as crystalline fuel and control rods for reactors. Properties investigated were devitrification resistance, urania solubility, and density.

  12. Radiocolloid migration through backfill-surrounding porous media in semi-infinite cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B.S.; Lee, K.J.; Hwang, Y.S.

    1995-12-01

    Numerical simulation of radionuclide migration as a form of colloid in two dimentional cylindrical geometry were conducted. Due to the relatively strong filtration phenomena in backfill material of waste repository, colloid concentrations decay out very rapidly along the geosphere. Inside the backfill material, diffusional transport of radiocolloid is known to be relatively dominant than that of advection. The flow conditions of the waste repository groundwater can be represented with a dimensionless Peclet number. If the Peclet number is lower than 2, which means diffusion is dominant transport mechanism, general Finite Difference Method (FDM) cannot predict the migration behavior of the colloid exactly due to the numerical error. Instead, so called Central Difference Method (CDM) is applicable for the low Peclet number problems. outside the backfill media, where advection is the controlling transport process with Peclet number being greater than 2, the upwind numerical scheme would be a powerful tool. Most of the experiments simulating the radionuclide migration were conducted at high flow conditions, and the theoretical modelling about the experiments typically neglected the role of the diffusion in filtration mechanism. In this paper the two-dimensional CDM scheme and CDM-upwind scheme are developed to describe radio-colloid migration in two-dimensional porous media using potential flow theorem. Then the mass fluxes at a given position inside the backfill are predicted.

  13. Evacuate and backfill apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, D.J.; Groves, O.J.

    1984-06-27

    An apparatus and method as described for treatment of hollow articles by evacuating existing gas or gases therefrom and purging or backfilling the articles with a second gas such as helium. The apparatus includes a sealed enclosure having an article storage drum mounted therein. A multiplicity of such articles are fed singly into the enclosure and loaded into radial slots formed in the drum. The enclosure is successively evacuated and purged with helium to replace the existing gas in the articles with helium. The purged articles are then discharged singly from the drum and transported out of the enclosure.

  14. Evacuate and backfill apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, David J.; Groves, Oliver J.

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus and method for treatment of hollow articles by evacuating existing gas or gases therefrom and purging or backfilling the articles with a second gas such as helium. The apparatus includes a sealed enclosure having an article storage drum mounted therein. A multiplicity of such articles are fed singly into the enclosure and loaded into radial slots formed in the drum. The enclosure is successively evacuated and purged with helium to replace the existing gas in the articles with helium. The purged articles are then discharged singly from the drum and transported out of the enclosure.

  15. LDEF materials special investigation group's data bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strickland, John W.; Funk, Joan G.; Davis, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was composed of and contained a wide array of materials, representing the largest collection of materials flown for space exposure and returned for ground-based analyses to date. The results and implications of the data from these materials are the foundation on which future space missions will be built. The LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG) has been tasked with establishing and developing data bases to document these materials and their performance to assure not only that the data are archived for future generations but also that the data are available to the space user community in an easily accessed, user-friendly form. The format and content of the data bases developed or being developed to accomplish this task are discussed. The hardware and software requirements for each of the three data bases are discussed along with current availability of the data bases.

  16. Investigative study of holographic recording materials development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The potential of certain cis-trans isomers and doped LiNbO3 for the holographic read/write/erase memory application was investigated. The cis-trans work involved the photochemical investigation of a number of potential materials as well as specific molecular engineering efforts on alpha-methyl stilbene and its derivatives. These efforts resulted in an increase in the change in index of refraction, and thereby, in potential recording utility, of an order of magnitude. The work on LiNbO3 was directed toward a preliminary investigation of the dynamics of the writing process. Several samples and a variety of writing conditions were investigated. An unexpected and as yet unexplained improvement in material behavior with continued recycling was observed. In addition, some effort was devoted to an analysis of the physical conditions under which several current theories of the optical damage process are valid.

  17. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  18. 30 CFR 715.14 - Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Backfilling and grading. 715.14 Section 715.14 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INITIAL PROGRAM REGULATIONS GENERAL PERFORMANCE STANDARDS § 715.14 Backfilling and grading. In order to achieve the approximate orginal contour,...

  19. 30 CFR 715.14 - Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Backfilling and grading. 715.14 Section 715.14 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INITIAL PROGRAM REGULATIONS GENERAL PERFORMANCE STANDARDS § 715.14 Backfilling and grading. In order to achieve the approximate orginal contour,...

  20. Dedicated heterogeneous node scheduling including backfill scheduling

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Robert R.; Eckert, Philip D.; Hommes, Gregg

    2006-07-25

    A method and system for job backfill scheduling dedicated heterogeneous nodes in a multi-node computing environment. Heterogeneous nodes are grouped into homogeneous node sub-pools. For each sub-pool, a free node schedule (FNS) is created so that the number of to chart the free nodes over time. For each prioritized job, using the FNS of sub-pools having nodes useable by a particular job, to determine the earliest time range (ETR) capable of running the job. Once determined for a particular job, scheduling the job to run in that ETR. If the ETR determined for a lower priority job (LPJ) has a start time earlier than a higher priority job (HPJ), then the LPJ is scheduled in that ETR if it would not disturb the anticipated start times of any HPJ previously scheduled for a future time. Thus, efficient utilization and throughput of such computing environments may be increased by utilizing resources otherwise remaining idle.

  1. Hot Gas Testing Results of Stagnant Volume Filling Through a Back-Filled RSRM Nozzle Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Andrew S.

    1999-01-01

    Silicone rubber is back-filled into RSW nozzle joints after assembly. A possible artifact of this process is the formation of small pathways through this filter leading to sensitive sealing materials within the joint. At motor ignition, hot gases fill the stagnant volumes within the joint through this path. A series of 14 test has been completed studying this scenario and providing anchoring data for thermal/flow models. Parameters such as gas path cross section, gas path length, gas path materials, fill volume size, and post path gas spreading prior to unpingement on seal material, have been investigated. Tests were accomplished using geometry similar to RSRM nozzle joint 4 with attached volumes replicating the free volume and flow friction in the actual hardware. The test hardware simulated 8 inches of the full-scale circumference. Testing has pointed to changes required in model boundary condition assumptions and gas dynamics corrections for gas paths of this size and geometry. Areas ,where this date has provided improvement in analysis models will be covered as well as model inadequacies that require separate specialized efforts. Questions remaining after this testing and a possible direction for future testing will be suggested.

  2. Investigations on Absorber Materials at Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Marhauser, Frank; Elliott, Thomas; Rimmer, Robert

    2009-05-01

    In the framework of the 12 GeV upgrade project for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) improvements are being made to refurbish cryomodules housing Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's (JLab) original 5-cell cavities. Recently we have started to look into a possible simplification of the existing Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorber design combined with the aim to find alternative material candidates. The absorbers are implemented in two HOM-waveguides immersed in the helium bath and operate at 2 K temperature. We have built a cryogenic setup to perform measurements on sample load materials to investigate their lossy characteristics and variations from room temperature down to 2 K. Initial results are presented in this paper.

  3. Raman microscopy investigation of beryllium materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardanaud, C.; Rusu, M. I.; Giacometti, G.; Martin, C.; Addab, Y.; Roubin, P.; Lungu, C. P.; Porosnicu, C.; Jepu, I.; Dinca, P.; Lungu, M.; Pompilian, O. G.; Mateus, R.; Alves, E.; Rubel, M.; contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    We report for the first time on the ability of Raman microscopy to give information on the structure and composition of Be related samples mimicking plasma facing materials that will be found in ITER. For that purpose, we investigate two types of material. First: Be, W, Be1W9, and Be5W5 deposits containing a few percents of D or N, and second: a Mo mirror exposed to plasma in the main JET chamber (in the framework of the first mirror test in JET with ITER-like wall). We performed atomic quantifications using ion beam analysis for the first samples. We also did atomic force microscopy. We found defect induced Raman bands in Be, Be1W9, and Be5W5 deposits. Molybdenum oxide has been identified showing an enhancement due to a resonance effect in the UV domain.

  4. Investigations into the formation of nanoporous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Matthew Graham

    The formation processes of a number of microporous materials have been investigated using a powerful combination of ex situ and in situ experimental techniques together with computational modelling. The materials investigated include both zeolites and their aluminophosphate counterparts, which have been previously synthesised and have shown some potential as industrial catalysts. Using an array of techniques has allowed different stages (such as nucleation or crystal growth) to be monitored as well as different aspects of the gel chemistry, such as the geometry of substituted metal ions and the location and conformation of organics within the framework. For MeAPO-34 and A1PO-5, quantum mechanical calculations have examined the early stages of A1PO formation and shown that, unlike silicates, chain growth seems to be preferred. Raman techniques have then identified metal-organic interactions and changes in organic conformation, key to the formation of a particular A1PO over another. For CoAPO-36, energy dispersive X-ray diffraction has been used to monitor crystal growth using three different organic species, and significant differences in the rate of formation have been identified. By combining these observations with crystallographic measurements and molecular mechanical modelling, it has shown that the rate of formation can be affected by both the size and shape of the organic used to form the crystal structure. Combined small angle/wide angle X-ray diffraction has also been used to follow the formation of zeolite-A throughout the nucleation and growth process and, it has been shown, that the insertion of the substituted metal germanium can alter the precise nature of the aggregation and dissolution processes occurring within this system. Finally, a synthesis project has been initiated to attempt to introduce mesopores into microporous A1PO materials. The synthesis of hierarchical microporous-mesoporous materials is of great interest as they offer advantages over

  5. Experimental investigation of new neutron moderator materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal; Daemen, Luke L; Hartl, Monika; Huegle, Thomas; Muhrer, Guenter

    2010-01-01

    In this study we present experimental investigation of thermal neutron energy spectra produced by lead and bismuth hydroxides (Pb(OH){sub 2}, and Bi(OH){sub 3}). The experimental energy spectra are compared with a thermal neutron energy spectrum of water measured in the same geometry. We present an MCNPX geometry model used to help with the experimental data interpretation. We demonstrate a very good reproduction of the experimental thermal neutron energy spectrum produced by the water moderator. We show a sensitivity study with the Pb(OH){sub 2}, and Bi(OH){sub 3} materials on different combinations of thermal neutron scattering kernels.

  6. State-of-the-art techniques for backfilling abandoned mine voids. Information circular/1993

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    Abandoned underground mine openings are susceptible to collapse because of the mining methods used, the character of the overburden, and the typically large wide entries with minimal roof support. The final effect of the collapse of the underground workings is surface subsidence. To reduce the probability of subsidence, methods to backfill the mine void with various types of materials have been developed. The paper describes the available technologies for subsidence abatement and discusses their operation and application.

  7. State-of-the-art techniques for backfilling abandoned mine voids

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Abandoned underground mine openings are susceptible to collapse because of the mining methods used, the character of the overburden, and the typically large, wide entries with minimal roof support. The final effect of the collapse of the underground workings is surface subsidence. To reduce the probability of subsidence, methods to backfill the mine void with various types of materials have been developed. This US Bureau of Mines report describes the available technologies for subsidence abatement and discusses their operation and application. The basis of these abatement methods is the replacement of the mined material with mine waste. Backfilling of mine voids is the most common method of stabilization used to abate subsidence and protect surface structures. Hydraulic flushing and grouting, using remote methods from single or multiple boreholes, are the most often-used methods for the placement of backfill material. Other subsidence abatement techniques are available and may be more appropriate under different conditions. These other techniques include pneumatic stowing, either by in-mine or remote methods, and various point support methods that do not completely fill the mine void and are used for the protection of small areas of the land surface and surface structures. 21 refs., 14 figs.

  8. Mechanic of Granular Materials (MGM) Investigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Key persornel in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment are Mark Lankton (Program Manager at University Colorado at Boulder), Susan Batiste (research assistance, UCB), and Stein Sture (principal investigator). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  9. A methodology to assess the radionuclide migration parameters through bentonite-sand backfill in a short experimental duration

    SciTech Connect

    Gurumoorthy, C.; Kusakabe, O.

    2007-07-01

    Bentonite-Sand Backfill is a part of Engineered Barrier System (EBS) widely used in a Near Surface Disposal Facility (NSDF) to delay migration of radionuclides from the disposed nuclear waste in a geo environment. Laboratory migration experiments have been conducted to understand the advection/diffusion mechanisms of various radionuclides through backfill and to evaluate their migration rates in order to assess the performance of EBS. Migration through backfill is an extremely slow process and the experiments are time consuming. Also, these experiments have limitations to simulate the field stress conditions. Various researchers have experienced the advantages of centrifuge modeling technique to model contaminant transport problems of geo-environment. However, no such studies have been carried out adopting this technique to model the behaviour of bentonite-sand mixture as backfill in NSDF. An attempt has been made in the present study to investigate the validity of this technique to carry out such studies. Significance of geotechnical centrifuge modeling to simulate the prototype radionuclide migration mechanisms through backfill is highlighted. This paper presents the dimensional analysis of various scale factors to construct a physical model for centrifuge tests to monitor online the migration phenomena of radionuclides through bentonite-sand mixture. Studies reveal the feasibility of the technique to evaluate the migration parameters in a short experimental duration. Such studies help in improving EBS design and assessing the long-term performance of EBS in NSDF. (authors)

  10. Combinatorial investigation of ferromagnetic shape memory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Famodu, Olugbenga O.

    2005-07-01

    Combinatorial synthesis is research methodology which allows one to systemically study a large number of compositionally varying samples simultaneously. We apply this technique to the investigation of multifunctional materials. Different designs of combinatorial libraries and various characterization tools are implemented in order to rapidly map composition-structure-property relationships in a variety of materials systems. In this thesis, I will discuss combinatorial investigation of various shape memory alloys. We have utilized the combinatorial magnetron co-sputtering deposition technique for fabricating composition spreads of ternary alloy systems containing ferromagnetic shape memory alloys (FSMAs) and thermoelastic shape memory alloys (SMAs). Magnetic properties of the composition spreads were rapidly characterized using a room temperature scanning semiconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope which provides mapping of the magnetic field emanating from different parts of the composition spreads. By applying the inversion technique to the mapping of the magnetic field distribution, we have mapped the magnetic phase diagram of the Ni-Mn-Ga and Ni-Mn-Al systems whose Heusler compositions Ni2MnGa and Ni2MnAl are well known ferromagnetic shape memory alloys (FSMAs). In addition, a rapid visual inspection technique was developed for detection of reversible martensites using arrays of micromachined cantilevers. A large, previously unexplored compositional region of FSMAs outside the Heusler composition was found. In search of novel FSMAs, we have also investigated a number of other ternary alloys systems. These systems included Ni-Mn-In, Gd-Ge-Si, Co-Mn-Ga, Ni-Fe-Al, and Co-Ni-Ga. A summary of the results from the investigation of these systems is presented. We have used the combinatorial technique to search for "ideal" SMAs with minimal hysteresis. For pursuing this, we had first set out to verify the geometric non-linear theory of martensites which

  11. Materials investigation of STS-3 parachute failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Main parachute, No. 2 of SRB A-12 on STS-3, sustained damage during deployment or initial inflation that resulted in its collapse and failure to sustain load. During an investigation of the materials from this parachute, optical and scanning electron microscope analyses were conducted. This examination identified stains and abrasions on vent lines that appear to have been a result of friction contact with its flotation bag lanyard. Mechanical testing of the vent band indicated a reduction in strength of 37 percent obviously due to structural overload, heat, and ocean water exposure. It is concluded from this and other available data that entanglement of parachutes No. 1 and No. 2 during deployment caused adequate structural damage to main parachute No. 2 to render it unable to carry load.

  12. Use of cemented paste backfill in arsenic-rich tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamberg, Roger; Maurice, Christian; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Gold is extracted by cyanide leaching from inclusions in arsenopyrite from a mine in the north of Sweden. The major ore mineral assemblage consists of pyrrhotite and arsenopyrite-loellingite. Effluents from the gold extraction were treated with Fe2(SO4)3, with the aim to form stable As-bearing Fe-precipitates (FEP). The use of the method called cemented paste backfill (CPB) is sometimes suggested for the management of tailings. In CPB, tailings are commonly mixed with low proportions (3 - 7 %) of cement and backfilled into underground excavated area. To reduce costs, amendments such as granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS), biofuel fly ash (BFA) and cement kiln dust (CKD) are used for partial replacement of cement in CPB due to their pozzolanic and alkaline properties. The objective for this study was to evaluate the leaching behaviour of As in CPB-mixtures with low proportions (1 - 3 %) of BFA and ordinary cement and unmodified tailings. The selection of CPB-recipies was made based on technical and economical criterias to adress the demands deriving from the mining operations. Speciation of the As in ore and tailings samples revealed that mining processes have dissolved the majority of the arsenopyrite in the ore, causing secondary As phases to co-precipitate with newly formed FEP:s. Tank leaching tests (TLT) and weathering cells (WCT) were used to compare leaching behaviour in a monolithic mass contra a crushed material. Quantification of the presumed benefit of CPB was made by calculation of the cumulative leaching of As. Results from the leaching tests (TLT and WCT) showed that the inclusion of As-rich tailings into a cementitious matrix increased leaching of As. This behaviour could partially be explained by an increase of pH. The addition of alkaline binder materials to tailings increased As leaching due to the relocation of desorbed As from FEPs into less acid-tolerant species such as Ca-arsenates and cementitious As-phases. Unmodified tailings generated an

  13. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Key persornel in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment at the University of Colorado at Boulder include Tawnya Ferbiak (software engineer), Susan Batiste (research assistant), and Christina Winkler (graduate research assistant). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  14. Machanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Investigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Key persornel in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment include Khalid Alshibli, project scientist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: MSFC).

  15. Investigation of daily covering material for biocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendere, R.; Smigins, R.; Medne, O.; Berzina-Cimdina, L.; Rugele, K.

    2014-02-01

    Bioreactor landfilling, with the acceptance of landfill Directive 1999/31/EC has lost its actuality in European Union; at the same time, this method can still be used for acceleration of biowaste degradation and biogas production. One of the possibilities to reduce the disposal of biowaste is to use biocells for its anaerobic pre-treatment before landfilling. The daily filling up of such a cell requires isolation of the main volume to limit gas emissions, reduce smells, etc. Bioprocesses that are of the utmost importance for biocell treatment are often not taken into account in selection of materials to be used as daily landfill covers. Based on physical, chemical and biological methods the investigations have been carried out into different covering materials offered in the market, with identification of parameters that are the most important for daily covering the biocells. It is found that the materials fitted best this purpose should be of biological origin and consist of small bio-particles with large surface, without the inhibitors of anaerobic processes such as sulphuric compounds. Bioreaktoru pielietošana atkritumu uzglabāšanas sfērā, sakarā ar Direktīvas 1999/31/EC pieņemšanu, ir zaudējusi savu aktualitāti, taču šī metode vēl joprojām var tikt izmantota bioatkritumu noārdīšanai un biogāzes ražošanai. Viena no iespējām kā samazināt bioatkritumu izvietošanu ir biošūnu izmantošana bioatkritumu anaerobai pirmsapstrādei pirms to noglabāšanas. Šūnas piepildīšana ikdienā prasa nepieciešamību izolēt lielāko tās daļu, lai samazinātu gāzes emisiju, smakas, utt. Materiāli, kas ikdienā tiek izmantoti atkritumu pārklāšanai, nepietiekami ietekmē bioprocesus, kas pamatā ir galvenais biošūnas izmantošanas mērķis. Šajā sakarā ir veikta dažādu tirdzniecībā pieejamu pārklājuma materiālu izpēte, pielietojot virkni fizikālo, ķīmisko un bioloģisko metožu, un nosakot svarīgākos parametrus, kas ir b

  16. Assessment of strength properties of cemented paste backfill by ultrasonic pulse velocity test.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Tekin; Ercikdi, Bayram; Karaman, Kadir; Külekçi, Gökhan

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) test is one of the most popular non-destructive techniques used in the assessment of the mechanical properties of concrete or rock materials. In this study, the effects of binder type/dosage, water to cement ratio (w/c) and fines content (<20 μm) of the tailings on ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) of cemented paste backfill (CPB) samples were investigated and correlated with the corresponding unconfined compressive strength (UCS) data. A total of 96 CPB samples prepared at different mixture properties were subjected to the UPV and UCS tests at 7, 14, 28 and 56-days of curing periods. UPV and UCS of CPB samples of ordinary Portland cement (CEM I 42.5 R) and sulphate resistant cement (SRC 32.5) initially increased rapidly, but, slowed down after 14 days. However, UPV and UCS of CPB samples of the blast furnace slag cement (CEM III/A 42.5 N) steadily increased between 7 and 56 days. Increasing binder dosage or reducing w/c ratio and fines content (<20 μm) increased the UCS and UPV of CPB samples. UPV was found to be particularly sensitive to fines content. UCS data were correlated with the corresponding UPV data. A linear relation appeared to exist between the UCS and UPV of CPB samples. These findings have demonstrated that the UPV test can be reliably used for the estimation of the strength of CPB samples. PMID:24602334

  17. Mechanical performance and ultrasonic properties of cemented gangue backfill with admixture of fly ash.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Zhang, Yongliang; Liu, Yucheng

    2016-01-01

    Cemented gangue backfill (CGB) is prepared by mixing cement, coal gangue and water. Fly ash from the combustion of coal is commonly utilized as admixture to improve the mechanical performance and fluidity of CGB, as well as to reduce cost of preparing CGB. Uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) is one of the most commonly used indicators for evaluating the mechanical performance of CGB. Ultrasonic testing, which is a non-destructive measurement, can also be applied to determine the mechanical properties of cementitious materials such as CGB. So this paper investigates the UCS and ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) of CGB prepared at different fly ash dosage (19, 20 and 21 wt.%) and solid content (76.5, 77.5 and 78.5 wt.%), versus curing periods of 3-28 days. The UCS and UPV values of CGB increase with increasing fly ash dosage and solid content. In order to find out the correlation between the UCS and UPV values of CGB, different types (linear, logarithmic, exponential and power) of curve fitting are conducted on the CGB samples made at different solid content. An exponential relationship with the correlation coefficient of 0.959 appears to exist between the UCS and UPV for CGB samples. This obtained exponential relationship is validated to be available by performing the t- and F- tests. The results acquired by this paper are capable of providing guidance for utilizing UPV test to estimate the strength of underground CGB structures. PMID:26320702

  18. Nuclear material investigations by advanced analytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, C.; Kuri, G.; Martin, M.; Froideval, A.; Cammelli, S.; Orlov, A.; Bertsch, J.; Pouchon, M. A.

    2010-10-01

    Advanced analytical techniques have been used to characterize nuclear materials at the Paul Scherrer Institute during the last decade. The analysed materials ranged from reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, Zircaloy claddings to fuel samples. The processes studied included copper cluster build up in RPV steels, corrosion, mechanical and irradiation damage behaviour of PWR and BWR cladding materials as well as fuel defect development. The used advanced techniques included muon spin resonance spectroscopy for zirconium alloy defect characterization while fuel element materials were analysed by techniques derived from neutron and X-ray scattering and absorption spectroscopy.

  19. Numerical Modelling of Soil Arching in a Shallow Backfill Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajna, Waldemar St.

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents the application of the finite element method into the modelling of soil arching. The phenomenon plays fundamental role in soil-shell flexible structures behaviour. To evaluate the influence of arching on a pressure reduction, a plain strain trapdoor under a shallow layer of backfill was simulated. The Coulomb-Mohr plasticity condition and the nonassociated flow rule were used for the soil model. The research examines the impact of the internal friction angle and the influence of the backfill layer thickness on the value of soil arching. The carried out analyses indicate that the reduction of pressures acting on a structure depends on the value of the internal friction angle, which confirms the earlier research. For a shallow backfill layer however, the reduction is only a local phenomenon and can influence only a part of the structure.

  20. Assessment of (222)Rn emanation from ore body and backfill tailings in low-grade underground uranium mine.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Devi Prasad; Sahu, Patitapaban; Panigrahi, Durga Charan; Jha, Vivekanand; Patnaik, R Lokeswara

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of (222)Rn emanation from the ore and backfill tailings in an underground uranium mine located at Jaduguda, India. The effects of surface area, porosity, (226)Ra and moisture contents on (222)Rn emanation rate were examined. The study revealed that the bulk porosity of backfill tailings is more than two orders of magnitude than that of the ore. The geometric mean radon emanation rates from the ore body and backfill tailings were found to be 10.01 × 10(-3) and 1.03 Bq m(-2) s(-1), respectively. Significant positive linear correlations between (222)Rn emanation rate and the (226)Ra content of ore and tailings were observed. For normalised (226)Ra content, the (222)Rn emanation rate from tailings was found to be 283 times higher than the ore due to higher bulk porosity and surface area. The relative radon emanation from the tailings with moisture fraction of 0.14 was found to be 2.4 times higher than the oven-dried tailings. The study suggested that the mill tailings used as a backfill material significantly contributes to radon emanation as compared to the ore body itself and the (226)Ra content and bulk porosity are the dominant factors for radon emanation into the mine atmosphere. PMID:24057960

  1. Backfill composition for secondary barriers in nuclear waste repositories

    DOEpatents

    Beall, G.W.; Allard, B.M.

    1980-05-30

    A backfill composition for sorbing and retaining hazardous elements of nuclear wastes comprises 50 to 70% by weight of quartz, 10 to 30% by weight of montmorillonite, 1 to 10% by weight of phosphate mineral, 1 to 10% by weight of ferrous mineral, 1 to 10% by weight of sulfate mineral and 1 to 10% by weight of attapulgite.

  2. 30 CFR 816.102 - Backfilling and grading: General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: General requirements. 816.102 Section 816.102 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.102...

  3. 30 CFR 816.102 - Backfilling and grading: General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: General requirements. 816.102 Section 816.102 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.102...

  4. 30 CFR 817.102 - Backfilling and grading: General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: General requirements. 817.102 Section 817.102 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES §...

  5. 30 CFR 817.102 - Backfilling and grading: General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: General requirements. 817.102 Section 817.102 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES §...

  6. Backfill composition for secondary barriers in nuclear waste repositories

    DOEpatents

    Beall, Gary W.; Allard, Bert M.

    1982-01-01

    A backfill composition for sorbing and retaining hazardous elements of nuclear wastes comprises 50-70% by weight of quartz, 10-30% by weight of montmorillonite, 1-10% by weight of phosphate mineral, 1-10% by weight of ferrous mineral, 1-10% by weight of sulfate mineral and 1-10% by weight of attapulgite.

  7. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... environment. (5) Spoil placed on the outslope during previous mining operations shall not be disturbed if such... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF...

  8. 30 CFR 817.102 - Backfilling and grading: General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: General requirements. 817.102 Section 817.102 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES §...

  9. 30 CFR 816.102 - Backfilling and grading: General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: General requirements. 816.102 Section 816.102 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.102...

  10. 30 CFR 817.102 - Backfilling and grading: General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: General requirements. 817.102 Section 817.102 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES §...

  11. 30 CFR 816.102 - Backfilling and grading: General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: General requirements. 816.102 Section 816.102 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.102...

  12. 30 CFR 816.107 - Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes. 816.107 Section 816.107 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SURFACE...

  13. 30 CFR 817.107 - Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes. 817.107 Section 817.107 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND...

  14. 30 CFR 816.104 - Backfilling and grading: Thin overburden.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: Thin overburden. 816.104 Section 816.104 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE...

  15. Spectroscopic Investigations of Amorphous Complex Dielectric Materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Muhammad

    1989-03-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. A discussion of general properties of three systems of dielectric films i.e. MoO_3 and the mixed oxide systems MoO_3/In _2O_3 and MoO_3/SiO is presented. Composition, film thickness, substrate deposition temperature and annealing, all have a substantial effect on the structure and various properties of the films. General properties of these three systems of dielectric films include analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, U.V/VIS and infra-red spectroscopy including the Fourier transform technique, electrical properties both D.C and A.C at both low and high fields, and electron paramagnetic resonance. A comprehensive comparison of all the results is carried out in a correlated manner and some new ideas are presented on an established semiconducting/dielectric material. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  16. Experiments investigating advanced materials under thermomechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.

    1988-01-01

    Many high temperature aircraft and rocket engine components experience large mechanical loads as well as severe thermal gradients and transients. These nonisothermal conditions are often large enough to cause inelastic deformations, which are the ultimate cause for failure in those parts. A way to alleviate this problem is through improved engine designs based on better predictions of thermomechanical material behavior. To address this concern, an experimental effort was recently initiated within the Hot Section Technology (HOST) program at Lewis. As part of this effort, two new test systems were added to the Fatigue and Structures Lab., which allowed thermomechanical tests to be conducted under closely controlled conditions. These systems are now being used for thermomechanical testing for the Space Station Receiver program, and will be used to support development of metal matrix composites.

  17. High-Throughput Investigation of Delafossite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haycock, Barry; Kylee Underwood, M.; Lekse, Jonathan; Matranga, Christopher; Lewis, James P.

    2013-03-01

    We present the application of high-throughput calculations to the intriguing problem of the forbidden optical transition in the CuGa1-xFexO2 delafossites, which is prototypical of many delafossite systems. When 5% or more of the Ga sites are replaced with Fe, there is a sudden shift to an optical band gap of 1.5eV from 2.5eV. Using high-throughput calculations and data mining techniques, we show the most likely positional configurations for x = 0.00 through x = 0.10 of the Fe atoms relative to one another. Implications of this result and applications of the techniques used are discussed, including the development of candidate materials via high-throughput analysis of constituent search-space. Funded by the National Science Foundation through NSF DMR 09-03225 and a subcontract from NETL (URS RES) for Work Activity 0004000.6.600.007.002.420.000.005 ARRA ICMI Project.

  18. Investigation of electrode materials for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arcand, G. M.

    1971-01-01

    A number of amalgam electrode systems were investigated for possible use as high rate anodes and cathodes. The systems examined include: lithium, sodium, and potassium in Group 1, magnesium, calcium, and barium in Group 2, aluminum in Group 3, lead in Group 4, copper in Group 1b, and zinc and cadmium in Group 2b. The K(Hg) and Na(Hg) anodes in 10 VF and 15 VF (an unambiguous expression of concentration that indicates the number of formula weights of solute dissolved in a liter of solution) hydroxide solutions have proven satisfactory; some of these have produced current densities of more than 8 A/sq cm. None of the amalgam cathodes have approached this performance although the TI(Hg) has delivered 1 A/sq cm. Se(Hg) and Te(Hg) cathodes have given very stable discharges. Zn(Hg) and Cd(Hg) electrodes did not show good high rate characteristics, 200 to 300 mA/sq cm being about the maximum current densities obtainable. Both anodes are charged through a two-step process in which M(Hg) is first formed electrochemically and subsequently reduces Zn(II or Cd(II) to form the corresponding amalgam. The second step is extremely rapid for zinc and very slow for cadmium.

  19. Initial investigation of cryogenic wind tunnel model filler materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, H. F.; Firth, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Various filler materials are being investigated for applicability to cryogenic wind tunnel models. The filler materials will be used to fill surface grooves, holes and flaws. The severe test environment of cryogenic models precludes usage of filler materials used on conventional wind tunnel models. Coefficients of thermal expansion, finishing characteristics, adhesion and stability of several candidate filler materials were examined. Promising filler materials are identified.

  20. Solubility constraints affecting the migration of selenium through the cementitious backfill of a geological disposal facility.

    PubMed

    Felipe-Sotelo, M; Hinchliff, J; Evans, N D M; Read, D

    2016-03-15

    This work presents the study of the solubility of selenium under cementitious conditions and its diffusion, as SeO3(2-), through monolithic cement samples. The solubility studies were carried out under alkaline conditions similar to those anticipated in the near-field of a cement-based repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste. Experiments were conducted in NaOH solution, 95%-saturated Ca(OH)2, water equilibrated with a potential backfill material (Nirex reference vault backfill, NRVB) and in solutions containing cellulose degradation products, with and without reducing agents. The highest selenium concentrations were found in NaOH solution. In the calcium-containing solutions, analysis of the precipitates suggests that the solubility controlling phase is Ca2SeO3(OH)2·2H2O, which appears as euhedral rhombic crystals. The presence of cellulose degradation products caused an increase in selenium concentration, possibly due to competitive complexation, thereby, limiting the amount of calcium available for precipitation. Iron coupons had a minor effect on selenium solubility in contrast to Na2S2O4, suggesting that effective reduction of Se(IV) occurs only at Eh values below -300mV. Radial through-diffusion experiments on NRVB and in a fly ash cement showed no evidence of selenium breakthrough after one year. However, autoradiography of the exposed surfaces indicated that some migration had occurred and that selenium was more mobile in the higher porosity backfill than in the fly ash cement. PMID:26642443

  1. Multicomponent Nanomaterials with Complex Networked Architectures from Orthogonal Degradation and Binary Metal Backfilling in ABC Triblock Terpolymers.

    PubMed

    Cowman, Christina D; Padgett, Elliot; Tan, Kwan Wee; Hovden, Robert; Gu, Yibei; Andrejevic, Nina; Muller, David; Coates, Geoffrey W; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2015-05-13

    Selective degradation of block copolymer templates and backfilling the open mesopores is an effective strategy for the synthesis of nanostructured hybrid and inorganic materials. Incorporation of more than one type of inorganic material in orthogonal ways enables the synthesis of multicomponent nanomaterials with complex yet well-controlled architectures; however, developments in this field have been limited by the availability of appropriate orthogonally degradable block copolymers for use as templates. We report the synthesis and self-assembly into cocontinuous network structures of polyisoprene-block-polystyrene-block-poly(propylene carbonate) where the polyisoprene and poly(propylene carbonate) blocks can be orthogonally removed from the polymer film. Through sequential block etching and backfilling the resulting mesopores with different metals, we demonstrate first steps toward the preparation of three-component polymer-inorganic hybrid materials with two distinct metal networks. Multiblock copolymers in which two blocks can be degraded and backfilled independently of each other, without interference from the other, may be used in a wide range of applications requiring periodically ordered complex multicomponent nanoarchitectures. PMID:25836760

  2. Multicomponent Nanomaterials with Complex Networked Architectures from Orthogonal Degradation and Binary Metal Backfilling in ABC Triblock Terpolymers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Selective degradation of block copolymer templates and backfilling the open mesopores is an effective strategy for the synthesis of nanostructured hybrid and inorganic materials. Incorporation of more than one type of inorganic material in orthogonal ways enables the synthesis of multicomponent nanomaterials with complex yet well-controlled architectures; however, developments in this field have been limited by the availability of appropriate orthogonally degradable block copolymers for use as templates. We report the synthesis and self-assembly into cocontinuous network structures of polyisoprene-block-polystyrene-block-poly(propylene carbonate) where the polyisoprene and poly(propylene carbonate) blocks can be orthogonally removed from the polymer film. Through sequential block etching and backfilling the resulting mesopores with different metals, we demonstrate first steps toward the preparation of three-component polymer–inorganic hybrid materials with two distinct metal networks. Multiblock copolymers in which two blocks can be degraded and backfilled independently of each other, without interference from the other, may be used in a wide range of applications requiring periodically ordered complex multicomponent nanoarchitectures. PMID:25836760

  3. Transport of soluble species in backfill and rock

    SciTech Connect

    Chambre, P.L.; Lee, W.W.L.; Light, W.B.; Pigford, T.H.

    1992-03-01

    In this report we study the release and transport of soluble species from spent nuclear fuel. By soluble species we mean a fraction of certain fission product species. Our previously developed methods for calculating release rates of solubility-limited species need to be revised for these soluble species. Here we provide methods of calculating release rates of soluble species directly into rock and into backfill and then into rock. Section 2 gives a brief discussion of the physics of fission products dissolution from U0{sub 2} spent fuel. Section 3 presents the mathematics for calculating release rates of soluble species into backfill and then into rock. The calculation of release rates directly into rock is a special case. Section 4 presents numerical illustrations of the analytic results.

  4. Initial Investigation of Cryogenic Wind Tunnel Model Filler Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firth, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Filler materials are used for surface flaws, instrumentation grooves, and fastener holes in wind tunnel models. More stringent surface quality requirements and the more demanding test environment encountered by cryogenic wind tunnels eliminate filler materials such as polyester resins, plaster, and waxes used on conventional wind tunnel models. To provide a material data base for cryogenic models, various filler materials are investigated. Surface quality requirements and test temperature extremes require matching of coefficients of thermal expansion or interfacing materials. Microstrain versus temperature curves are generated for several candidate filler materials for comparison with cryogenically acceptable materials. Matches have been achieved for aluminum alloys and austenitic steels. Simulated model surfaces are filled with candidate filler materials to determine finishing characteristics, adhesion and stability when subjected to cryogenic cycling. Filler material systems are identified which meet requirements for usage with aluminum model components.

  5. Backfill barrier as a component in a multiple barrier nuclear waste isolation system

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, E.J.

    1980-05-01

    Quantitative estimates of the potential effectiveness of backfill barriers based on a linear sorption model are presented. Using getters such as clays (known sorbents), a backfill approximately 1-foot-thick can delay by 10/sup 4/ to 10/sup 5/ years the breakthrough of transuranics. A delay of 10/sup 3/ years is possible for major cationic fission products. These delays can be achieved provided that (1) the distribution coefficient (K/sub d/, a measure of affinity for sorbed species) for the barrier material is equal to or greater than 2000 ml/g for transuranics and 200 ml/g for fission products; (2) the interstitial groundwater velocity through the barrier is limited to 1 ft/year or less; (3) the effective porosity of the barrier is equal to or less than 0.1; and (4) the physical integrity of the barrier is maintained (no channels or cracks). Mixtures containing expanding clays such as smectites and other getters are expected to satisfy these criteria.

  6. Experiments to investigate particulate materials in reduced gravity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, M.; Eden, H. F.; Felsenthal, P.; Glaser, P. E.; Wechsler, A. E.

    1967-01-01

    Study investigates agglomeration and macroscopic behavior in reduced gravity fields of particles of known properties by measuring and correlating thermal and acoustical properties of particulate materials. Experiment evaluations provide a basis for a particle behavior theory and measure bulk properties of particulate materials in reduced gravity.

  7. Geochemical processes and the effects of natural organic solutes on the solubility of selenium in coal-mine backfill samples from the Powder River basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    See, R.B.; Reddy, K.J.; Vance, G.F.; Fadlelmawla, A.A.; Blaylock, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    Geochemical processes and the effects of natural organic solutes on the solubility of selenium in coal-mine backfill aquifers were investigated. Backfill and ground-water samples were collected at coal mines in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Backfill was generally dominated by aluminum (14,400 to 49,000 mg/kg (milligrams per kilogram)), iron (3,330 to 23,200 mg/kg), and potassium (7,950 to 18,000 mg/kg). Backfill saturated-paste selenium concentrations ranged from 1 to 156 mg/kg (microsiemens per kilogram). Ground-water total selenium concentrations ranged from 3 to 125 mg/L. Dissolved organic carbon in all ground-water samples was dominated by hydrophobic and hydrophilic acids (38 to 84 percent). Selenite sorption/desorption experiments were conducted using background solutions of distilled-deionized water, 0.1 molar calcium chloride, and isolated hydrophobic and hydrophilic acids. Selenite sorption was larger when 0.1 molar calcium chloride was used. The addition of hydrophilic acid decreased selenite sorption more than the addition of hydrophobic acids. Geochemical modelling was used to predict the solid phases controlling dissolved selenium concentrations and to evaluate the effects of dissolved organic carbon on selenium solubility. Results suggested that 55 to 90 percent of selenium in backfill precipitation/dissolution extracts was dominated by magnesium selenate ion pairs. Dissolved organic carbon had little effect on selenium speciation. A redox chamber was constructed to control Eh and pH in water and backfill-core sample suspensions. The response of selenite and selenate in water samples to redox conditions did not follow thermodynamic predictions. Reduction of selenate in water samples did not occur at any of the redox levels tested.

  8. Investigation of Porosity Evolution and Orthotropic Axes on Anisotropic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Raheleh Mohammad

    Advancement of porosities that happens in shear deformation of anisotropic materials is investigated by Dr. Kweon. As the hydrostatic stress in shear deformation is zero, in the solid mechanics' researches it is proved several times that porosity will not be expanded in shear deformation. Dr. Kweon showed that this statement can be wrong in large deformation of simple shear. He proposed anisotropic ductile fracture model to show that hydrostatic stress becomes nonzero and porosities are increased in the simple shear deformation of anisotropic materials. This study investigates the effect of the evolution of anisotropy which means the rotation of the orthotropic axes onto the porosity changes. Hill coefficient shows that how orthotropic materials indicate different ductile fracture manners in shear deformation. Also the effect of void aspect ratio on change of porosity is investigated. It has been found that the interaction among porosity, the matrix anisotropy and void aspect ratio play a crucial role in the ductile damage of porous materials.

  9. High-pressure and temperature investigations of energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gump, J. C.

    2014-05-01

    Static high-pressure measurements are extremely useful for obtaining thermodynamic and phase stability information from a wide variety of materials. However, studying energetic materials can be challenging when extracting information from static high-pressure measurements. Energetic materials are traditionally C, H, N, O compounds with low crystalline symmetry, producing weak signal in commonly performed x-ray diffraction measurements. The small sample volume available in a static high-pressure cell exacerbates this issue. Additionally, typical hydrostatic compression media, such as methanol/ethanol, may react with many energetic materials. However, characterization of their thermodynamic parameters and phase stability is critical to understanding explosive performance and sensitivity. Crystalline properties, such as bulk modulus and thermal expansion, are necessary to accurately predict the behaviour of shocked solids using hydrodynamic codes. In order to obtain these values, equations of state of various energetic materials were investigated using synchrotron angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction experiments at static high-pressure and temperature. Intense synchrotron radiation overcomes the weak x-ray scattering of energetic materials in a pressure cell. The samples were hydrostatically compressed using a non-reactive hydrostatic medium and heated using a heated diamond anvil cell. Pressure - volume data for the materials were fit to the Birch-Murnaghan and Vinet formalisms to obtain bulk modulus and its first pressure derivative. Temperature - volume data at ambient pressure were fit to obtain the volume thermal expansion coefficient. Data from several energetic materials will be presented and compared.

  10. 30 CFR 816.101 - Backfilling and grading: Time and distance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements. 816.101 Section 816.101 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.101 Backfilling and grading: Time and distance requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, rough backfilling and grading for surface mining...

  11. 30 CFR 816.101 - Backfilling and grading: Time and distance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements. 816.101 Section 816.101 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.101 Backfilling and grading: Time and distance requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, rough backfilling and grading for surface mining...

  12. 30 CFR 816.101 - Backfilling and grading: Time and distance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements. 816.101 Section 816.101 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.101 Backfilling and grading: Time and distance requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, rough backfilling and grading for surface mining...

  13. 30 CFR 816.101 - Backfilling and grading: Time and distance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements. 816.101 Section 816.101 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.101 Backfilling and grading: Time and distance requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, rough backfilling and grading for surface mining...

  14. 30 CFR 816.101 - Backfilling and grading: Time and distance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements. 816.101 Section 816.101 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.101 Backfilling and grading: Time and distance requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, rough backfilling and grading for surface mining...

  15. Investigation of Shielding Material in Radioactive Waste Management - 13009

    SciTech Connect

    OSMANLIOGLU, Ahmet Erdal

    2013-07-01

    In this study, various waste packages have been prepared by using different materials. Experimental work has been performed on radiation shielding for gamma and neutron radiation. Various materials were evaluated (e.g. concrete, boron, etc.) related to different application areas in radioactive waste management. Effects of addition boric compound mixtures on shielding properties of concrete have been investigated for neutron radiation. The effect of the mixture addition on the shielding properties of concrete was investigated. The results show that negative effects of boric compounds on the strength of concrete decreasing by increasing boric amounts. Shielding efficiency of prepared mixture added concrete up to 80% better than ordinary concretes for neutron radiation. The attenuation was determined theoretically by calculation and practically by using neutron dose rate measurements. In addition of dose rate measurements, strength tests were applied on test shielding materials. (authors)

  16. Investigating accidents involving aircraft manufactured from polymer composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Leigh

    This study looks into the examination of polymer composite wreckage from the perspective of the aircraft accident investigator. It develops an understanding of the process of wreckage examination as well as identifying the potential for visual and macroscopic interpretation of polymer composite aircraft wreckage. The in-field examination of aircraft wreckage, and subsequent interpretations of material failures, can be a significant part of an aircraft accident investigation. As the use of composite materials in aircraft construction increases, the understanding of how macroscopic failure characteristics of composite materials may aid the field investigator is becoming of increasing importance.. The first phase of this research project was to explore how investigation practitioners conduct wreckage examinations. Four accident investigation case studies were examined. The analysis of the case studies provided a framework of the wreckage examination process. Subsequently, a literature survey was conducted to establish the current level of knowledge on the visual and macroscopic interpretation of polymer composite failures. Relevant literature was identified and a compendium of visual and macroscopic characteristics was created. Two full-scale polymer composite wing structures were loaded statically, in an upward bending direction, until each wing structure fractured and separated. The wing structures were subsequently examined for the existence of failure characteristics. The examination revealed that whilst characteristics were present, the fragmentation of the structure destroyed valuable evidence. A hypothetical accident scenario utilising the fractured wing structures was developed, which UK government accident investigators subsequently investigated. This provided refinement to the investigative framework and suggested further guidance on the interpretation of polymer composite failures by accident investigators..

  17. Chemical modeling of backfill composed of quartz sand, lime and an Fe-phase

    SciTech Connect

    Meike, A.; Glassley, W.E.

    1997-01-01

    The area adjacent to the waste package is an important component of the engineered barrier system in a high level radioactive waste repository. The combination of lime, quartz sand, and a phase containing reduced iron is investigated whether it can achieve reduction of oxygen in the waste emplacement drift (thereby reducin corrosion rates) and increase the pH. The simulations conducted to date have examined the following backfill options: Fe metal only, Fe metal and lime, and iron metal/lime/quartz sand in equal volume ratios. Each option was simulated under two environments: limited and unlimited air exchange with the atmosphere. Results suggest that the most important variable during the process of chemical conditioning is the amount of air exchange that occurs in the emplacement drift. The desired chemical conditioing (both oxidation potential and pH) will be far less effective in an emplacement that experiences an unlimited exchange of air with the atmosphere.

  18. Laboratory study on the use of tire shreds and rubber-sand in backfills and reinforced soil applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, A.; Lovell, C.W.; Salgado, R.

    1996-12-20

    Millions of scrap tires are discarded annually in the United States, the bulk of which are currently landfilled or stockpiled. This consumes valuable landfill space, or, if improperly disposed, creates a fire hazard and provides a prolific breeding ground for rates and mosquitoes. The use of tire shreds as lightweight fill material can sharply reduce the tire disposal problem. The present study, based on laboratory testing and numerical modeling, examines the feasibility of incorporating tire shreds and rubber-sand mixtures as lightweight geomaterial in embankments and backfills.

  19. Dealing with uncertainty in the chemical environment in bentonite backfill

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, R.C.; Apted, M.J.; Conca, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    Analytical and conceptual deficiencies in understanding compositional variability in the smectite clays are expected to generate uncertainty in models used to simulate the chemical environment in bentonite backfill. Equilibrium models accounting for nonstoichiometry in smectite can nevertheless bound ranges in aqueous solution compositions that are an explicit function of the uncertainty in smectite compositions. In one approach, we quantify uncertainty in terms of ranges in concentrations of octahedral and tetrahedral Al, and exchange-site cations and vacancies. Heterogeneous mass transfer in bentonite-water systems is modeled using conventional mass-action relations and standard Gibbs energies for stoichiometric minerals, and the site-occupancy constraints combined with site-mixing relations for smectite. The resultant bounding conditions in groundwater compositions may be large or small depending on which aqueous species are of interest in a given situation, but they are valid irrespective of whether equilibrium in smectite-water reaction is attained or is inhibited by slow intracrystalline reaction rates.

  20. Forensic DNA methylation profiling from evidence material for investigative leads.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwan Young; Lee, Soong Deok; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2016-07-01

    DNA methylation is emerging as an attractive marker providing investigative leads to solve crimes in forensic genetics. The identification of body fluids that utilizes tissue-specific DNA methylation can contribute to solving crimes by predicting activity related to the evidence material. The age estimation based on DNA methylation is expected to reduce the number of potential suspects, when the DNA profile from the evidence does not match with any known person, including those stored in the forensic database. Moreover, the variation in DNA implicates environmental exposure, such as cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption, thereby suggesting the possibility to be used as a marker for predicting the lifestyle of potential suspect. In this review, we describe recent advances in our understanding of DNA methylation variations and the utility of DNA methylation as a forensic marker for advanced investigative leads from evidence materials. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 359-369]. PMID:27099236

  1. Investigation of woven composites as potential cryogenic tank materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. S.; Melendez-Soto, E.; Castellanos, A. G.; Prabhakar, P.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, carbon fiber and Kevlar® fiber woven composites were investigated as potential cryogenic tank materials for storing liquid fuel in spacecraft or rocket. Towards that end, both carbon and Kevlar® fiber composites were manufactured and tested with and without cryogenic exposure. The focus was on the investigation of the influence of initial cryogenic exposure on the degradation of the composite. Tensile, flexural and inter laminar shear strength (ILSS) tests were conducted, which indicate that Kevlar® and carbon textile composites are potential candidates for use under cryogenic exposure.

  2. Investigation of graphene-based nanoscale radiation sensitive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Joshua A.; Wetherington, Maxwell; Hughes, Zachary; LaBella, Michael, III; Bresnehan, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Current state-of-the-art nanotechnology offers multiple benefits for radiation sensing applications. These include the ability to incorporate nano-sized radiation indicators into widely used materials such as paint, corrosion-resistant coatings, and ceramics to create nano-composite materials that can be widely used in everyday life. Additionally, nanotechnology may lead to the development of ultra-low power, flexible detection systems that can be embedded in clothing or other systems. Graphene, a single layer of graphite, exhibits exceptional electronic and structural properties, and is being investigated for high-frequency devices and sensors. Previous work indicates that graphene-oxide (GO) - a derivative of graphene - exhibits luminescent properties that can be tailored based on chemistry; however, exploration of graphene-oxide's ability to provide a sufficient change in luminescent properties when exposed to gamma or neutron radiation has not been carried out. We investigate the mechanisms of radiation-induced chemical modifications and radiation damage induced shifts in luminescence in graphene-oxide materials to provide a fundamental foundation for further development of radiation sensitive detection architectures. Additionally, we investigate the integration of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) with graphene-based devices to evaluate radiation induced conductivity in nanoscale devices. Importantly, we demonstrate the sensitivity of graphene transport properties to the presence of alpha particles, and discuss the successful integration of hBN with large area graphene electrodes as a means to provide the foundation for large-area nanoscale radiation sensors.

  3. Investigation of materials for inert electrodes in aluminum electrodeposition cells

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty, J. S.; Sadoway, D. R.

    1987-09-14

    Work was divided into major efforts. The first was the growth and characterization of specimens; the second was Hall cell performance testing. Cathode and anode materials were the subject of investigation. Preparation of specimens included growth of single crystals and synthesis of ultra high purity powders. Special attention was paid to ferrites as they were considered to be the most promising anode materials. Ferrite anode corrosion rates were studied and the electrical conductivities of a set of copper-manganese ferrites were measured. Float Zone, Pendant Drop Cryolite Experiments were undertaken because unsatisfactory choices of candidate materials were being made on the basis of a flawed set of selection criteria applied to an incomplete and sometimes inaccurate data base. This experiment was then constructed to determine whether the apparatus used for float zone crystal growth could be adapted to make a variety of important based melts and their interactions with candidate inert anode materials. The third major topic was Non Consumable Anode (Data Base, Candidate Compositions), driven by our perception that the basis for prior selection of candidate materials was inadequate. Results are presented. 162 refs., 39 figs., 18 tabs.

  4. Investigation of the monopole antenna performance on hybrid material substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kean, Ong Teik; Ahmad, Badrul Hisham; Aziz, Mohamad Zoinol Abidin Abd.; Fauzi, Noor Azamiah Md.; Ramli, Mohamad Hafize bin; Malek, Mohd. Fareq Abd.

    2015-05-01

    In the current telecommunication system, more applications such as GPS and video conferencing which need higher data rate has been discovered. In order to provide higher data rate, wider system bandwidth is needed for transferring data in a shorter time. Thus, an antenna which can provide wide bandwidth is significant to cover the desired system bandwidth. Recent researches also show that the using of hybrid substrate can improve the antenna performance. This paper investigates the monopole antenna performance on hybrid material substrate. The monopole antenna has been simulated in Computer Simulation Technology (CST) software in open space condition to investigate the antenna performance in resonant frequency, bandwidth, return loss, gain, directivity, and efficiency. Investigation shows that the increment of dielectric constant of hybrid material substrate, ɛr2 increases the return loss of frequency band from 2.9-6.6GHz without affecting the operating bandwidth. Notably, the increment of ɛr2 also brought to a forming of new frequency band at around 8.8GHz. Furthermore, increment on the thickness of hybrid material substrate will cause the return loss at first operating frequency band to be increased. However, the changes has lowered the frequency band and decreased the return loss until it formed a new broadband at 8GHz. The changes in position of second material substrate have also brought to a narrower bandwidth of the first operating frequency band for FR4-Copper-Hybrid Substrate (FCH) and FR4-Hybrid Substrate-Copper (FHC) configuration. Remarkably, Copper-FR4-Hybrid Substrate (CFH) configuration has maintained the bandwidth but increased the return loss of the first operating band.

  5. Laser vibrometry for investigation of tympanic membrane implant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnert, Thomas; Kuster, Manfred; Vogel, Uwe; Hofmann, Gert; Huettenbrink, Karl-Bernd

    1996-12-01

    The human tympanic membrane has reasonably good sound sensing properties. A destroyed tympanic membrane due to middle ear diseases or traumata may be repaired by different types of grafts. Middle ear surgery mostly uses autologous temporal fascia, cartilage, or cartilage perichondrium transplants. We have investigated the acoustical and mechanical properties of these materials and compared them with human tympanic membrane by constructing an ear canal model completed by an artificial tympanic membrane. Circular stretched human fascia, perichondrium, and cartilage preparations were exposed to static pressures up to 4 kPa and white noise sound pressure levels of 70 dB. The vibrational amplitudes and displacements due to static pressure of the graft material were measured by laser Doppler vibrometry and compared. The thin materials temporal fascia and perichondrium show similar amplitude frequency responses compared to the tympanic membrane for dynamic excitation. The displacement of these materials at static pressures above 4 kPA yields a higher compliance than tympanic membrane. The acoustical and mechanical properties of cartilage transplants change with the thickness of the slices. However, the thinner the cartilage slice combined with lower stability, the more similar is the frequency response with the intact tympanic membrane. The vibration amplitudes decrease more and more for layer thicknesses above 500 micrometers. Cartilage acts as an excellent transplant material which provides a better prognosis than different materials in cases of ventilation disorders with long-term middle ear pressure changes. Large cartilage slice transplants should not exceed layer thicknesses of 500 micrometer in order to prevent drawbacks to the transfer characteristics of the tympanic membrane.

  6. Investigation of the Environmental Durability of a Powder Metallurgy Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, LaNita D.

    2004-01-01

    PM304 is a NASA-developed composite powder metallurgy material that is being developed for high temperature applications such as bushings in high temperature industrial furnace conveyor systems. My goal this summer was to analyze and evaluate the effects that heat exposure had on the PM304 material at 500 C and 650 C. The material is composed of Ni-Cr, Ag, Cr2O3, and eutectic BaF2-CaF2. PM304 is designed to eliminate the need for oil based lubricants in high temperature applications, while reducing friction and wear. However, further investigation was needed to thoroughly examine the properties of PM304. The effects of heat exposure on PM304 bushings were investigated. This investigation was necessary due to the high temperatures that the material would be exposed to in a typical application. Each bushing was cut into eight sections. The specimens were heated to 500 C or 650 C for time intervals from 1 hr to 5,000 hrs. Control specimens were kept at room temperature. Weight and thickness measurements were taken before and after the bushing sections were exposed to heat. Then the heat treated specimens were mounted and polished side by side with the control specimens. This enabled optical examination of the material's microstructure using a metallograph. The specimens were also examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The microstructures were compared to observe the effects of the heat exposure. Chemical analysis was done to investigate the interactions between Ni-Cr and BaF2-CaF2 and between Cr2O3 and BaF2-CaF2 at high temperature. To observe this, the two compounds that were being analyzed were mixed in a crucible in varied weight percentages and heated to 1100 C in a furnace for approximately two hours. Then the product was allowed to cool and was then analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Interpretation of the results is in progress.

  7. Systematic investigation of silylation materials for recovery use of low-k material plasma damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Tadahiro; Nakata, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Shiro; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Nakamura, Tomoji

    2015-07-01

    We systematically investigated the recovery ability of some silylation materials for a plasma-damaged porous silica low-k material. In order to evaluate recovery ability, the permittivity and leakage current were measured. The recovery ability is listed in ascending order as ethoxy group, disilazane group, and dimethylamino group, and materials with SiH-(CH3)2 showed a better recovery ability than those with Si-(CH3)3. Recovery mechanisms were also analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermal desorption spectrometer (TDS). Clear differences in the silylation abilities were observed in the silylation rate as well as the amount of silylation. We focused on trimethylsilyldimethylamine (TMSDMA) and tetramethyldisilazane (TMDS) as the recovery material of vapor phase and both materials showed good recovery characteristics. TMSDMA showed rapid recovery because of its higher vapor pressure. TMDS effectively reduced the amount of absorbed water.

  8. Investigation of non-uniform materials under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchennikov, Vladimir; Korobeynikov, Igor; Morozova, Natalia; Shchennikov, Vsevolod, Jr.; Voronin, Vladimir; Berger, Ivan; Laboratory of electronic properties of matter at high pressures Team; Laboratory of neutron investigation of matter Team; Laboratory of micromechanics Team

    2013-06-01

    The approach is considered of the investigation of non-uniform (NU) materials at high pressure (P). Under P a material may become NU due to phase transition (PT). At topological insulators the properties may include the contributions both of the bulk states as well as of the surface ones as at NU material etc.. The approach is based on the model of multi-phase system with ordered phase inclusions of variably configuration (A) and concentration (C), and the experimental data are presented for: i) the substances near PT, ii) some ceramics, iii) the certain natural minerals. Si, ZnX, PbX, SmX (X - Te, Se, S), GaP, iron ores, and (WC)xCo1-x hard alloys etc. have been investigated under P up to 30 GPa. It was shown that the model allows to describe resistance (R) and thermoelectric power (S), etc. in the vicinity of PT. For hard alloys WC-Co the elastic modulus has been fitted using the model, and A has been estimated to be distinguished from the simple isotropic case. In the iron ores the A and the C of various components (Fe, FeyOx, MgO,Mg2SiO4, etc.) has been estimated due to the using of the new approach based on the different depth of penetration of X-ray and neutron radiation, and also on different dependences of S, R on C, A.

  9. Investigation of acoustically dead materials for resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, Jonathan; Maiorov, Boris; Ramshaw, Brad; Shehter, Arkady; Migliori, Albert

    2015-03-01

    Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy is used to excite mechanical resonances in solid samples. By precisely knowing the resonant frequency the complete elastic tensor of the sample can be calculated. In practice unwanted resonances are also created in the sample holder structure, these resonances are not related to the sample and can often confuse the measurement. To reduce this problem we have investigated the use of acoustically ``dead'' materials. We present data from various natural and synthetic materials. We also present RUS sample holder designs that can be used from <4K up to 700K and in magnet fields up to 45T. The elastic tensor of poly-crystal beryllium will be presented as a demonstration of the system performance.

  10. The solubility of nickel and its migration through the cementitious backfill of a geological disposal facility for nuclear waste.

    PubMed

    Felipe-Sotelo, M; Hinchliff, J; Field, L P; Milodowski, A E; Holt, J D; Taylor, S E; Read, D

    2016-08-15

    This work describes the solubility of nickel under the alkaline conditions anticipated in the near field of a cementitious repository for intermediate level nuclear waste. The measured solubility of Ni in 95%-saturated Ca(OH)2 solution is similar to values obtained in water equilibrated with a bespoke cementitious backfill material, on the order of 5×10(-7)M. Solubility in 0.02M NaOH is one order of magnitude lower. For all solutions, the solubility limiting phase is Ni(OH)2; powder X-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy indicate that differences in crystallinity are the likely cause of the lower solubility observed in NaOH. The presence of cellulose degradation products causes an increase in the solubility of Ni by approximately one order of magnitude. The organic compounds significantly increase the rate of Ni transport under advective conditions and show measurable diffusive transport through intact monoliths of the cementitious backfill material. PMID:27198634

  11. 30 CFR 816.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which is compatible with the approved postmining land use and which provides adequate drainage and long-term...

  12. 30 CFR 817.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which is compatible with the approved postmining land use and which provides adequate drainage and long-term...

  13. 30 CFR 817.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which is compatible with the approved postmining land use and which provides adequate drainage and long-term...

  14. 30 CFR 817.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which is compatible with the approved postmining land use and which provides adequate drainage and long-term...

  15. 30 CFR 816.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which is compatible with the approved postmining land use and which provides adequate drainage and long-term...

  16. 30 CFR 816.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which is compatible with the approved postmining land use and which provides adequate drainage and long-term...

  17. Investigation of microgravity effects on solidification phenomena of selected materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maag, Carl R.; Hansen, Patricia A.

    1992-01-01

    A Get Away Special (GAS) experiment payload to investigate microgravity effects on solidification phenomena of selected experimental samples has been designed for flight. It is intended that the first flight of the assembly will (1) study the p-n junction characteristics for advancing semiconductor device applications, (2) study the effects of gravity-driven convection on the growth of HgCd crystals, (3) compare the textures of the sample which crystallizes in microgravity with those found in chondrite meteorites, and (4) modify glass optical characteristics through divalent oxygen exchange. The space flight experiment consists of many small furnaces. While the experiment payload is in the low gravity environment of orbital flight, the payload controller will sequentially activate the furnaces to heat samples to their melt state and then allow cooling to resolidification in a controlled fashion. The materials processed in the microgravity environment of space will be compared to the same materials processed on earth in a one-gravity environment. This paper discusses the design of all subassemblies (furnance, electronics, and power systems) in the experiment. A complete description of the experimental materials is also presented.

  18. Investigation of select energetic materials by differential reflection spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Anna Marie

    The presence of explosive or energetic materials is prevalent in today's world. Terrorists continue to target buildings and mass transit systems with explosive devices. The detection of these energetic materials is necessary to insure national security and welfare. Detection techniques such as X-ray scanners, Raman spectroscopy, Terahertz spectroscopy and ion mobility spectrometry are in current use or development; however, none of these are appropriate for all necessary applications. These techniques include. The present document provides an overview of the current detection techniques and describes a new technique for detecting energetic materials called differential reflection spectrometry (DRS). DRS essentially measures the optical absorption of energetic materials. The use of DRS has led to the discovery of previously unreported optical characteristics for some energetic compounds that are unique to the individual material. These optical characteristics consist of absorption shoulders between 270 and 420 nm, e.g. near 420 nm for 2, 4, 6 trinitrotoluene (TNT). In the presented research, the origin of the differential reflection spectra obtained was investigated using several techniques including UV-Visible spectrophotometry (transmission and reflection) and computer molecular modeling. Experimental DRS spectra of TNT, hexahydro-1,3,5 trinitro-1,3,5 triazine (RDX), octahydro 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,6 tetrazocine (HMX), 18 pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and 2, 4, 6, n-tetranitro-n-methylaniline (Tetryl) were taken and analyzed. From the experimental results and verification by molecular modeling, it was found that the absorption features observed in the redder region of the UV range (270--420 nm) are due to molecular orbital transitions in the nitro (NO2) groups of the measured explosives. These transitions only occur in specific conditions, such as high concentration solutions and solids, where the normally forbidden transitions are allowed. The unique

  19. Experimental Investigation of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for spacecraft thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments. Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. This can result in a decreased turndown ratio for the radiator and a reduced system mass. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents an overview of the results of this investigation from the past three years.

  20. Experimental Investigation of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2011-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for spacecraft thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments. Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. This can result in a decreased turndown ratio for the radiator and a reduced system mass. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents an overview of the results of this investigation from the past three years.

  1. Molecular-dynamics investigation of the desensitization of detonable material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Betsy M.; Mattson, William; Trevino, Samuel F.

    1998-05-01

    A molecular-dynamics investigation of the effects of a diluent on the detonation of a model crystalline explosive is presented. The diluent, a heavy material that cannot exothermally react with any species of the system, is inserted into the crystalline explosive in two ways. The first series of simulations investigates the attenuation of the energy of a detonation wave in a pure explosive after it encounters a small layer of crystalline diluent that has been inserted into the lattice of the pure explosive. After the shock wave has traversed the diluent layer, it reenters the pure explosive. Unsupported detonation is not reestablished unless the energy of the detonation wave exceeds a threshold value. The second series of simulations investigates detonation of solid solutions of different concentrations of the explosive and diluent. For both types of simulations, the key to reestablishing or reaching unsupported detonation is the attainment of a critical number density behind the shock front. Once this critical density is reached, the explosive molecules make a transition to an atomic phase. This is the first step in the reaction mechanism that leads to the heat release that sustains the detonation. The reactive fragments formed from the atomization of the heteronuclear reactants subsequently combine with new partners, with homonuclear product formation exothermally favored. The results of detonation of the explosive-diluent crystals are consistent with those presented in an earlier study on detonation of pure explosive [B. M. Rice, W. Mattson, J. Grosh, and S. F. Trevino, Phys. Rev. E 53, 611 (1996)].

  2. Investigation of composite materials using SLM-based phase retrieval.

    PubMed

    Agour, Mostafa; Falldorf, Claas; Bergmann, Ralf B

    2013-07-01

    We present a robust method to inspect a typical composite material constructed of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). It is based on optical surface contouring using the spatial light modulator (SLM)-based phase retrieval technique. The method utilizes multiple intensity observations of the wave field, diffracted by the investigated object, captured at different planes along the optical axis to recover the phase information across the object plane. The SLM-based system allows for the recording of the required consecutive intensity measurements in various propagation states across a common recording plane. This overcomes the mechanical shifting of a camera sensor required within the capturing process. In contrast to existing phase retrieval approaches, the measuring time is considerably reduced, since the switching time of the SLM is less than 50 ms. This enables nondestructive testing under thermal load. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the approach can be used to assess structural properties of technical components made from CFRP. PMID:23811877

  3. Isotopic, Chemical and Mineralogical Investigation's of Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugmair, G. W.

    2003-01-01

    During the grant period we have concentrated on the following main topics: 1. Enstatite meteorites and original heterogeneity of Mn-53 distribution in the solar nebula. We have completed our studies of the enstatite chondrites. 2. Processes of planetary differentiation. We have completed our study of silicate clasts from the mesosiderite Vaca Muerta and found that the global Mn/Cr fractionation event that established mantle source reservoirs on the parent body of the Vaca Muerta silicate clasts occurred approx. 2 Ma after a similar event on the howardite-eucrite-diogenite (HED) parent body. 3. Carbonaceous chondrites. Much effort has been devoted during the last three years to the investigation of this important class of meteorites. 4. Early solar system timescales. Based on the studies of the Mn-53 - Cr-53 isotope system in various meteorites and using results obtained with other isotope chronometers we constructed an absolute time-scale for events in the early solar system. 5.Unusual meteorites. We have studied the anomalous pallasite Eagle Station. 6. The chromium isotopic composition as a tracer for extraterrestrial material on Earth. Based on the observed difference in the Cr-53/Cr-52 ratios between Earth and the other solar system objects we developed a method for detecting cosmic materials on Earth using the Cr-53/Cr-52 ratio as a tracer.

  4. Investigating the Size Dependent Material Properties of Nanoceria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Bushra B.

    Nanoceria is widely being investigated for applications as support materials for fuel cell catalysts, free radical scavengers, and as chemical and mechanical abrasives due to its high antioxidant capacity and its oxygen buffering capacity. This antioxidant or oxygen buffering capacity has been reported to be highly size dependent and related to its redox properties. However, the quantification of this antioxidant capacity has not been well defined or understood and has been often been carried out using colorimetric assays which do not directly correlate to ceria nanoparticle properties. Fabrication rules for developing materials with optimal antioxidant/oxygen buffering capacities are not yet defined and one of the limitations has been the challenge of obtaining quantitative measurements of the antioxidant properties. In this work, we create our own library of ceria nanoparticles of various size distributions by two synthesis methods: sol-gel peroxo and thermal decomposition/calcination and annealing in open atmosphere at three different temperatures. The synthesis methods and conditions produce characteristic sizes and morphologies of ceria nanoparticles. Qualitative and quantitative approaches are used for characterization and to predict reactivity. Qualitative approaches include Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurements and Raman analysis while quantitative approaches include a combination of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) Rietveld analysis, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to measure crystallite sizes, lattice parameters, oxygen site occupancies, and the relative abundance of Ce(III) ions in a nanoceria sample. These methods are discussed in detail in addition to their limitations and challenges. These methods are used to predict nanocrystalline or bulk-like behavior of ceria nanoparticles. The investigation of the material properties is also extended to test the redox properties of ceria

  5. Nuclear waste package materials testing report: basaltic and tuffaceous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.J.; Coles, D.G.; Hodges, F.N.; McVay, G.L.; Westerman, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The disposal of high-level nuclear wastes in underground repositories in the continental United States requires the development of a waste package that will contain radionuclides for a time period commensurate with performance criteria, which may be up to 1000 years. This report addresses materials testing in support of a waste package for a basalt (Hanford, Washington) or a tuff (Nevada Test Site) repository. The materials investigated in this testing effort were: sodium and calcium bentonites and mixtures with sand or basalt as a backfill; iron and titanium-based alloys as structural barriers; and borosilicate waste glass PNL 76-68 as a waste form. The testing also incorporated site-specific rock media and ground waters: Reference Umtanum Entablature-1 basalt and reference basalt ground water, Bullfrog tuff and NTS J-13 well water. The results of the testing are discussed in four major categories: Backfill Materials: emphasizing water migration, radionuclide migration, physical property and long-term stability studies. Structural Barriers: emphasizing uniform corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical testing. Waste Form Release Characteristics: emphasizing ground water, sample surface area/solution volume ratio, and gamma radiolysis effects. Component Compatibility: emphasizing solution/rock, glass/rock, glass/structural barrier, and glass/backfill interaction tests. This area also includes sensitivity testing to determine primary parameters to be studied, and the results of systems tests where more than two waste package components were combined during a single test.

  6. FY:15 Transport Properties of Run-of-Mine Salt Backfill ? Unconsolidated to Consolidated.

    SciTech Connect

    Dewers, Thomas; Heath, Jason E.; Leigh, Christi D.

    2015-09-28

    The nature of geologic disposal of nuclear waste in salt formations requires validated and verified two-phase flow models of transport of brine and gas through intact, damaged, and consolidating crushed salt. Such models exist in other realms of subsurface engineering for other lithologic classes (oil and gas, carbon sequestration etc. for clastics and carbonates) but have never been experimentally validated and parameterized for salt repository scenarios or performance assessment. Models for waste release scenarios in salt back-fill require phenomenological expressions for capillary pressure and relative permeability that are expected to change with degree of consolidation, and require experimental measurement to parameterize and validate. This report describes a preliminary assessment of the influence of consolidation (i.e. volume strain or porosity) on capillary entry pressure in two phase systems using mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP). This is to both determine the potential usefulness of the mercury intrusion porosimetry method, but also to enable a better experimental design for these tests. Salt consolidation experiments are performed using novel titanium oedometers, or uniaxial compression cells often used in soil mechanics, using sieved run-of-mine salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as starting material. Twelve tests are performed with various starting amounts of brine pore saturation, with axial stresses up to 6.2 MPa (~900 psi) and temperatures to 90°C. This corresponds to UFD Work Package 15SN08180211 milestone “FY:15 Transport Properties of Run-of-Mine Salt Backfill – Unconsolidated to Consolidated”. Samples exposed to uniaxial compression undergo time-dependent consolidation, or creep, to various degrees. Creep volume strain-time relations obey simple log-time behavior through the range of porosities (~50 to 2% as measured); creep strain rate increases with temperature and applied stress as expected. Mercury porosimetry

  7. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of advanced energy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, George D.

    In order to better understand the physical electrochemical changes that take place in lithium ion batteries and asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been useful to probe and identify changes on the atomic and molecular level. NMR is used to characterize the local environment and investigate the dynamical properties of materials used in electrochemical storage devices (ESD). NMR investigations was used to better understand the chemical composition of the solid electrolyte interphase which form on the negative and positive electrodes of lithium batteries as well as identify the breakdown products that occur in the operation of the asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors. The use of nano-structured particles in the development of new materials causes changes in the electrical, structural and other material properties. NMR was used to investigate the affects of fluorinated and non fluorinated single wall nanotubes (SWNT). In this thesis three experiments were performed using solid state NMR samples to better characterize them. The electrochemical reactions of a lithium ion battery determine its operational profile. Numerous means have been employed to enhance battery cycle life and operating temperature range. One primary means is the choice and makeup of the electrolyte. This study focuses on the characteristics of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that is formed on the electrodes surface during the charge discharge cycle. The electrolyte in this study was altered with several additives in order to determine the influence of the additives on SEI formation as well as the intercalation and de-intercalation of lithium ions in the electrodes. 7Li NMR studies where used to characterize the SEI and its composition. Solid state NMR studies of the carbon enriched acetonitrile electrolyte in a nonaqueous asymmetric hybrid supercapacitor were performed. Magic angle spinning (MAS) coupled with cross polarization NMR

  8. Physical and Chemical Investigations of Selected Buckminsterfullerene-Based Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykes, John West

    Studies of materials based on the molecule C _{60} have been performed in three complementary areas; namely, the reaction and passivation of aluminum with C_{60}, nanometer-scale materials engineering utilizing C _{60}, and the critical magnetic fields of superconducting rm K_3C _{60}. The majority of the C _{60} powder used in the investigations was produced in-house. Steps of the process for generating C_{60} from graphitic carbon are given. Fullerene-containing soot was generated in a modified plasma-arc reactor. Fullerenes were separated from soot using Soxhlet extraction. Lastly, C _{60} was separated from the other fullerenes using liquid chromatography. Experiments on the reaction of C_ {60} with aluminum were done on aluminum foils in ultra-high vacuum using Auger spectroscopy, temperature -programmed desorption, photoluminescence, and soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Strong bonding between C _{60} and aluminum is reported. Results show that when multilayer C_{60} is evaporated onto clean aluminum, all molecules except the monolayer in contact with the aluminum desorb when the sample is heated to 578 K. Photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicate that electrons transfer from C _{60} to the aluminum at the interface. Additionally, the data may reveal that C_{60} molecules diffuse intact into the aluminum bulk when heating to the aluminum surface melting temperature occurs. The ease of preparing monolayer C_ {60} coverage on a surface by multilayer C_{60} evaporation followed by sublimation of all molecules but those in direct surface contact was examined for the preparation of multilayer and binding structures. The viability of the technique was not definitive. However, Fe/C_{60 }/Fe trilayers may show antiferromagnetic coupling and hence giant magnetoresistance at room temperature. Further, the use of C_{60} to bond metals to semiconductors is related. To resolve superconducting properties, an examination of rm K_3C_{60} was initiated. Most of

  9. MERCURY CONTAMINATED MATERIAL DECONTAMINATION METHODS: INVESTIGATION AND ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    Over the years mercury has been recognized as having serious impacts on human health and the environment. This recognition has led to numerous studies that deal with the properties of various mercury forms, the development of methods to quantify and speciate the forms, fate and transport, toxicology studies, and the development of site remediation and decontamination technologies. This report reviews several critical areas that will be used in developing technologies for cleaning mercury from mercury-contaminated surfaces of metals and porous materials found in many DOE facilities. The technologies used for decontamination of water and mixed wastes (solid) are specifically discussed. Many technologies that have recently appeared in the literature are included in the report. Current surface decontamination processes have been reviewed, and the limitations of these technologies for mercury decontamination are discussed. Based on the currently available technologies and the processes published recently in the literature, several processes, including strippable coatings, chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, chemisorbing surface wipes with forager sponge and grafted cotton, and surface/pore fixation through amalgamation or stabilization, have been identified as potential techniques for decontamination of mercury-contaminated metal and porous surfaces. Their potential merits and applicability are discussed. Finally, two processes, strippable coatings and chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, were experimentally investigated in Phase II of this project.

  10. An experimental investigation of wave propagation in fractured brittle material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Bibhuti Bhusan

    An experimental method for visualizing and analyzing the propagation of plate stress waves in a brittle plate is developed. A procedure has been developed to cast Break-Away glass (a low molecular weight polystyrene material) plate specimens in an open mold. The specimens are loaded with short duration (200 [...]s) stress pulses on one edge by an electromagnetic stress wave generator. The propagating stress waves generate out-of-plane deformations on the specimen surface, which are observed using Twyman-Green interferometry. The fringe patterns created by the propagating stress waves are captured using a high speed camera - pulsing laser combination at 4[...]s intervals.A generalized "Fringe Analysis Procedure" is developed to subtract the reference interferogram from the subsequent interferograms. The "Fringe Analysis Procedure" employs a fringe edge detection algorithm to obtain the sharp edge lines of the fringes in an interferogram. A digitizer is used to extract points on these edge lines and assign them fringe numbers. The "griddata" option in the commercial software "Matlab" is utilized to interpolate the deformation field on to the nodes of a uniform grid. The field values at these nodes in the reference image are then subtracted from corresponding values in the subsequent images to obtain the actual deformation patterns generated by the propagating stress waves. The "Fringe Analysis Procedure" has eliminated the subjective element introduced by human judgment in manual fringe tracing procedures.The developed experimental method and the image analysis technique is used to investigate the propagation of stress waves in Break-Away glass plate specimens.

  11. Assessing materials (''Getters'') to immobilize or retard the transport of technetium through the engineered barrier system at the potential Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, B E

    1999-03-15

    Current performance assessment calculations show that technetium (Tc) and neptunium (Np) will deliver the major fraction of the radiation dose to the accessible environment from the potential Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. Therefore, materials that can immobilize or delay the transport of Tc or Np (getters) are being considered for addition to either the waste-package or the backfill adjacent to the waste-package. Of the two radionuclides, Tc presents the greater challenge in identifying a suitable getter material. This report identifies several materials that warrant further consideration for immobilizing and/or sorbing Tc as additives to the backfill, and recommends active carbon and an inorganic oxide for initial testing. Other materials, such as zero valent iron, might be useful as getters if they were placed in the waste package itself, a subject that merits further investigation.

  12. An Investigation on Teaching Materials Used in Social Studies Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saglam, Halil Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the teaching materials employed during social studies lessons on the basis of certain variables. Specifically, the researcher tried to find out whether teachers' gender, service length, having a personal computer, receiving an in-service training regarding the use of teaching materials, having an interest on…

  13. 33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... applies to Corps of Engineers Divisions and Districts operating soils, concrete, water quality and... materials testing. 209.340 Section 209.340 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF... materials testing. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this section is to define and establish policies...

  14. 33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... applies to Corps of Engineers Divisions and Districts operating soils, concrete, water quality and... materials testing. 209.340 Section 209.340 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF... materials testing. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this section is to define and establish policies...

  15. Soil/backfill assessment: Y-12 Plant USTs 2334-U and 2335-U (ID 0-730168). Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, E.M.; Bohrman, D.E.

    1992-03-01

    The subject property, Martin Marietta Energy Systems (TSD), is located at Highway 58, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Martin Marietta Energy Systems contracted SPATCO Environmental Services to perform discrete soil sampling of backfill material exposed subsequent to the Underground Storage Tank (UST) product line replacement. SPATCO Environmental Services was retained to perform the following scope of work: (1) perform discrete soil sampling upon termination of the excavation immediately overlying 10,000 gallon, Diesel, UST and 6000 gallon, gasoline, UST; (2) submit soil samples for analysis of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) and Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Xylenes (BTEX) in accordance with State and Federal guidelines; and, (3) prepare a report documenting all work performed, provide analytical results of samples, and present conclusions and recommendations for further action based on field observations and laboratory analysis.

  16. Soil/backfill assessment: Y-12 Plant USTs 2334-U and 2335-U (ID 0-730168)

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, E.M.; Bohrman, D.E. )

    1992-03-01

    The subject property, Martin Marietta Energy Systems (TSD), is located at Highway 58, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Martin Marietta Energy Systems contracted SPATCO Environmental Services to perform discrete soil sampling of backfill material exposed subsequent to the Underground Storage Tank (UST) product line replacement. SPATCO Environmental Services was retained to perform the following scope of work: (1) perform discrete soil sampling upon termination of the excavation immediately overlying 10,000 gallon, Diesel, UST and 6000 gallon, gasoline, UST; (2) submit soil samples for analysis of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) and Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Xylenes (BTEX) in accordance with State and Federal guidelines; and, (3) prepare a report documenting all work performed, provide analytical results of samples, and present conclusions and recommendations for further action based on field observations and laboratory analysis.

  17. The advantages of a salt/bentonite backfill for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, B.M.; Novak, C.F. ); Jercinovic, M. )

    1991-04-01

    A 70/30 wt% salt/bentonite mixture is shown to be preferable to pure crushed salt as backfill for disposal rooms in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report discusses several selection criteria used to arrive at this conclusion: the need for low permeability and porosity after closure, chemical stability with the surroundings, adequate strength to avoid shear erosion from human intrusion, ease of emplacement, and sorption potential for brine and radionuclides. Both salt and salt/bentonite are expected to consolidate to a final state of impermeability (i.e., {le} 10{sup {minus}18}m{sup 2}) adequate for satisfying federal nuclear regulations. Any advantage of the salt/bentonite mixture is dependent upon bentonite's potential for sorbing brine and radionuclides. Estimates suggest that bentonite's sorption potential for water in brine is much less than for pure water. While no credit is presently taken for brine sorption in salt/bentonite backfill, the possibility that some amount of inflowing brine would be chemically bound is considered likely. Bentonite may also sorb much of the plutonium, americium, and neptunium within the disposal room inventory. Sorption would be effective only if a major portion of the backfill is in contact with radioactive brine. Brine flow from the waste out through highly localized channels in the backfill would negate sorption effectiveness. Although the sorption potentials of bentonite for both brine and radionuclides are not ideal, they are distinctly beneficial. Furthermore, no detrimental aspects of adding bentonite to the salt as a backfill have been identified. These two observations are the major reasons for selecting salt/bentonite as a backfill within the WIPP. 39 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Modeling coupled blast/structure interaction with Zapotec, benchmark calculations for the Conventional Weapon Effects Backfill (CONWEB) tests.

    SciTech Connect

    Bessette, Gregory Carl

    2004-09-01

    Modeling the response of buried reinforced concrete structures subjected to close-in detonations of conventional high explosives poses a challenge for a number of reasons. Foremost, there is the potential for coupled interaction between the blast and structure. Coupling enters the problem whenever the structure deformation affects the stress state in the neighboring soil, which in turn, affects the loading on the structure. Additional challenges for numerical modeling include handling disparate degrees of material deformation encountered in the structure and surrounding soil, modeling the structure details (e.g., modeling the concrete with embedded reinforcement, jointed connections, etc.), providing adequate mesh resolution, and characterizing the soil response under blast loading. There are numerous numerical approaches for modeling this class of problem (e.g., coupled finite element/smooth particle hydrodynamics, arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian methods, etc.). The focus of this work will be the use of a coupled Euler-Lagrange (CEL) solution approach. In particular, the development and application of a CEL capability within the Zapotec code is described. Zapotec links two production codes, CTH and Pronto3D. CTH, an Eulerian shock physics code, performs the Eulerian portion of the calculation, while Pronto3D, an explicit finite element code, performs the Lagrangian portion. The two codes are run concurrently with the appropriate portions of a problem solved on their respective computational domains. Zapotec handles the coupling between the two domains. The application of the CEL methodology within Zapotec for modeling coupled blast/structure interaction will be investigated by a series of benchmark calculations. These benchmarks rely on data from the Conventional Weapons Effects Backfill (CONWEB) test series. In these tests, a 15.4-lb pipe-encased C-4 charge was detonated in soil at a 5-foot standoff from a buried test structure. The test structure was composed of a

  19. 33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Laboratory investigations and... THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.340 Laboratory investigations and... procedures applicable to the performance of investigations and tests at Corps of Engineers...

  20. Investigations of mechanically alloyed nanocrystalline materials by microacoustic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubief, P.; Hunsinger, J. J.; Gaffet, E.

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine whether yes or no, there is a difference between the physico-chemical properties of the nanocrystalline and the microcrystalline materials. This paper deals with the acoustical behavior of nanocrystalline materials which were prepared by ball- milling and mechanical alloying. Based on two specific techniques (acoustic microinterferometry and acoustic microechography), some of the mechanical properties (elastic ones) may be determined, related to a materials volume of about a few micrometers 3 (for the high frequency 600 MHz apparatus). Thus the mechanically alloyed powders (typically 200 micrometers in diameter), behave as massive materials in this range of frequency. The measurements are directly obtained on the grains and do not take into account the voids induced by further sinthering process. The result of such a micromechanical approach will be given for pure ball-milled elements (Fe) and for the supersaturated solid phase Fe(Si) obtained by mechanical alloying.

  1. INVESTIGATION OF AGRICULTURAL FERTILIZERS AND RELATED MATERIALS FOR PERCHLORATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most comprehensive survey of fertilizers and other raw materials for perchlorate to date has been conducted to determine whether these could be significant contributors to environmental perchlorate contamination. Although the data span a large range of commercial products, th...

  2. Investigation of low cost material processes for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyentat, Thinh; Kawashige, Chester M.; Scala, James G.; Horn, Ronald M.

    1993-01-01

    The development of low cost material processes is essential to the achievement of economical liquid rocket propulsion systems in the next century. This paper will present the results of the evaluation of some promising material processes including powder metallurgy, vacuum plasma spray, metal spray forming, and bulge forming. The physical and mechanical test results from the samples and subscale hardware fabricated from high strength copper alloys and superalloys will be discussed.

  3. Investigation of low cost material processes for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyentat, Thinh; Kawashige, Chester M.; Scala, James G.; Horn, Ronald M.

    1993-06-01

    The development of low cost material processes is essential to the achievement of economical liquid rocket propulsion systems in the next century. This paper will present the results of the evaluation of some promising material processes including powder metallurgy, vacuum plasma spray, metal spray forming, and bulge forming. The physical and mechanical test results from the samples and subscale hardware fabricated from high strength copper alloys and superalloys will be discussed.

  4. Self diffraction holographic techniques for investigation of photosensitive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Luis F.; Nalin, Marcelo; Cescato, Lucila

    2013-05-01

    Holographic techniques are powerful tools to study photosensitive materials due to the high sensitivity of diffraction measurement and the ability to detect dynamic gratings. The self diffraction technique consists in to project an interference fringe pattern into the photosensitive material and to measure, in real time, the self-diffraction of the interfering beams, at the grating generated in the photosensitive material. Besides the higher sensitivity, such measurement allows to measure simultaneously and separately the phase and the amplitude grating contributions, as well as thin or thick gratings. In order to demonstrate potentiality of this technique we measured the kinetic constant of the photo-reaction in positive photoresists (AZ types) and negative SU-8 photoresist, as well as the maximum values of the refractive index and of the absorption coefficient modulations induced in these materials at different wavelengths of exposure. The same measurements were performed in SB based chalcogenide glasses in order to evaluate the potential of such materials to be used as optical data storage devices.

  5. Investigating materials formation with liquid-phase and cryogenic TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Yoreo, J. J.; N. A. J. M., Sommerdijk

    2016-08-01

    The recent advent of liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and advances in cryogenic TEM are transforming our understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms underlying the formation of materials in synthetic, biological and geochemical systems. These techniques have been applied to study the dynamic processes of nucleation, self-assembly, crystal growth and coarsening for metallic and semiconductor nanoparticles, (bio)minerals, electrochemical systems, macromolecular complexes, and organic and inorganic self-assembling systems. New instrumentation and methodologies that are currently on the horizon promise new opportunities for advancing the science of materials synthesis.

  6. Physics of Granular Materials: Investigations in Support of Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, John R.

    2002-01-01

    This publication list is submitted as a summary of the work conducted under Cooperative Agreement 1120. The goal of the 1120 research was to study granular materials within a planetary, astrophysical, and astrobiological context. This involved research on the physical, mechanical and electrostatic properties of granular systems, as well as the examination of these materials with atomic force microscopy and x-ray analysis. Instruments for analyzing said materials in planetary environments were developed, including the MECA (Mars Environment Compatibility Assessment) experiment for the MSP '01 lander, the ECHOS/MATADOR experiment for the MSP '03 lander, an ISRU experiment for the '03 lander, and MiniLEAP technology. Flight experiments for microgravity (Space Station and Shuttle) have also been developed for the study of granular materials. As expressed in the publications, work on 1120 encompassed laboratory research, theoretical modeling, field experiments, and flight experiments: a series of successful new models were developed for understanding the behavior of triboelectrostatically charged granular masses, and 4 separate instruments were selected for space flight. No inventions or patents were generated by the research under this Agreement.

  7. Financial Institutions Investigated. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Elaine

    This document provides teaching guidelines and student material for a unit intended for use in high school business, consumer, or home economics programs. Time allotment is from four to six hours of classroom time. The objective of this capsule is to help students understand the basic functions of and services provided by three types of financial…

  8. Investigating Your Environment: Teaching Materials for Environmental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Included in this set of environmental education materials for secondary school students are six lesson plans. Each lesson plan has six components: (1) suggestions for setting the stage; (2) individual or group activities; (3) task cards; (4) charts and tables to be used for data interpretation; (5) suggested questions, discussions, and summaries;…

  9. Looking at, Engaging More: Approaches for Investigating Material Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blandy, Doug; Bolin, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Objects of material culture are not always those items most commonly explored in the art classroom, and are, instead, the frequently overlooked things in people's everyday world. They are the items people collect in their homes, carry with them in backpacks, purses, and pockets, and stow on shelves in the back of closets--often the things they…

  10. Predicting the uniaxial compressive strength of cemented paste backfill from ultrasonic pulse velocity test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Tekin; Ercikdi, Bayram

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the predictability of the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) of cemented paste backfill (CPB) prepared from three different tailings (Tailings T1, Tailings T2 and Tailings T3) using ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) test. For this purpose, 180 CPB samples with diameter × height of 5 × 10 cm (similar to NX size) prepared at different binder dosages and consistencies were subjected to the UPV and UCS tests at 7-56 days of curing periods. The effects of binder dosage and consistency on the UPV and UCS properties of CPB samples were investigated and UCS values were correlated with the corresponding UPV data. Microstructural analyses were also performed on CPB samples in order to understand the effect of microstructure (i.e. total porosity) on the UPV data. The UPV and UCSs of CPB samples increased with increasing binder dosage and reducing the consistency irrespective of the tailings type and curing periods. Changes in the mixture properties observed to have a lesser extent on the UPV properties of CPB, while, their effect on the UCS of CPB was significant. Empirical equations were produced for each mixture in order to predict the UCSs of CPB through UPV. The validity of the equations was also checked by t- and F-test. The results showed that a linear relation appeared to exist between the UPV and UCS with high correlation coefficients (r ≥ 0.79) and all models were valid by statistical analysis. Mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses have revealed that the UPV properties of CPB samples were highly associated with their respective microstructural properties (i.e. total porosity). The major output of this study is that UPV test can be effectively used for a preliminary prediction of the strength of CPB.

  11. Ultrafast laser diagnostics to investigate initiation fundamentals in energetic materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Farrow, Darcie; Jilek, Brook Anton; Kohl, Ian Thomas; Kearney, Sean Patrick

    2013-08-01

    We present the results of a two year early career LDRD project, which has focused on the development of ultrafast diagnostics to measure temperature, pressure and chemical change during the shock initiation of energetic materials. We compare two single-shot versions of femtosecond rotational CARS to measure nitrogen temperature: chirped-probe-pulse and ps/fs hybrid CARS thermometry. The applicability of measurements to the combustion of energetic materials will be discussed. We have also demonstrated laser shock and particle velocity measurements in thin film explosives using stretched femtosecond laser pulses. We will discuss preliminary results from Al and PETN thin films. Agreement between our results and previous work will be discussed.

  12. Calculational investigation of impact cratering dynamics - Early time material motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, J. M.; Austin, M. G.; Ruhl, S. F.; Schultz, P. H.; Orphal, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Early time two-dimensional finite difference calculations of laboratory-scale hypervelocity (6 km/sec) impact of 0.3 g spherical 2024 aluminum projectiles into homogeneous plasticene clay targets were performed and the resulting material motions analyzed. Results show that the initial jetting of vaporized target material is qualitatively similar to experimental observation. The velocity flow field developed within the target is shown to have features quite similar to those found in calculations of near-surface explosion cratering. Specific application of Maxwell's analytic Z-Model (developed to interpret the flow fields of near-surface explosion cratering calculations), shows that this model can be used to describe the flow fields resulting from the impact cratering calculations, provided that the flow field center is located beneath the target surface, and that application of the model is made late enough in time that most of the projectile momentum has been dissipated.

  13. New polymeric materials for photonic applications: Preliminary investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldea, Anca; Albu, Ana-Maria; Rau, Ileana

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we propose two types of polymeric materials synthesized by us suitable to interact by assembling with DNA in order to obtain new NLO biomaterials. The first polymer is a methacrylic chromophore with azobenzene groups and carbazolyl sequences known for their carrying principles while the second one is a copolymer of the methacrylic chromophore with a N-substituted amide. The N-substituted amide is N-acryloyl morpholine already used in biological application and also because is compatible with DNA. Spectral characterization of these materials showed charge transfer interactions depending on the solvent. The results obtained indicate that these new polymeric/copolymeric chromophores could interact with DNA in order to obtain biomaterials for photonic applications.

  14. Investigation of composite materials property requirements for sonic fatigue research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, H. V. L.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental techniques for determining the extensional and bending stiffness characteristics for symmetric laminates are presented. Vibrational test techniques for determining the dynamic modulus and material damping are also discussed. Partial extensional stiffness results intially indicate that the laminate theory used for predicting stiffness is accurate. It is clearly shown that the laminate theory can only be as accurate as the physical characteristics describing the lamina, which may vary significantly. It is recommended that all of the stiffness characteristics in both extension and bending be experimentally determined to fully verify the laminate theory. Dynamic modulus should be experimentally evaluated to determine if static data adequately predicts dynamic behavior. Material damping should also be ascertained because laminate damping is an order of magnitude greater than found in common metals and can significantly effect the displacement response of composite panels.

  15. 30 CFR 817.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas. 817.106 Section 817.106 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE...

  16. 30 CFR 816.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas. 816.106 Section 816.106 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE...

  17. Experimental Investigation of Textile Composite Materials Using Moire Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifju, Peter G.

    1995-01-01

    The viability as an efficient aircraft material of advanced textile composites is currently being addressed in the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program. One of the expected milestones of the program is to develop standard test methods for these complex material systems. Current test methods for laminated composites may not be optimum for textile composites, since the architecture of the textile induces nonuniform deformation characteristics on the scale of the smallest repeating unit of the architecture. The smallest repeating unit, also called the unit cell, is often larger than the strain gages used for testing of tape composites. As a result, extending laminated composite test practices to textiles can often lead to pronounced scatter in material property measurements. It has been speculated that the fiber architectures produce significant surface strain nonuniformities, however, the magnitudes were not well understood. Moire interferometry, characterized by full-field information, high displacement sensitivity, and high spatial resolution, is well suited to document the surface strain on textile composites. Studies at the NASA Langley Research Center on a variety of textile architectures including 2-D braids and 3-D weaves, has evidenced the merits of using moire interferometry to guide in test method development for textile composites. Moire was used to support tensile testing by validating instrumentation practices and documenting damage mechanisms. It was used to validate shear test methods by mapping the full-field deformation of shear specimens. Moire was used to validate open hole tension experiments to determine the strain concentration and compare then to numeric predictions. It was used for through-the-thickness tensile strength test method development, to verify capabilities for testing of both 2-D and 3-D material systems. For all of these examples, moire interferometry provided vision so that test methods could be developed with less

  18. UNDERGROUNG PLACEMENT OF COAL PROCESSING WASTE AND COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS BASED PASTE BACKFILL FOR ENHANCED MINING ECONOMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Y.P. Chugh; D. Biswas; D. Deb

    2002-06-01

    This project has successfully demonstrated that the extraction ratio in a room-and-pillar panel at an Illinois mine can be increased from the current value of approximately 56% to about 64%, with backfilling done from the surface upon completion of all mining activities. This was achieved without significant ground control problems due to the increased extraction ratio. The mined-out areas were backfilled from the surface with gob, coal combustion by-products (CCBs), and fine coal processing waste (FCPW)-based paste backfill containing 65%-70% solids to minimize short-term and long-term surface deformations risk. This concept has the potential to increase mine productivity, reduce mining costs, manage large volumes of CCBs beneficially, and improve the miner's health, safety, and environment. Two injection holes were drilled over the demonstration panel to inject the paste backfill. Backfilling was started on August 11, 1999 through the first borehole. About 9,293 tons of paste backfill were injected through this borehole with a maximum flow distance of 300-ft underground. On September 27, 2000, backfilling operation was resumed through the second borehole with a mixture of F ash and FBC ash. A high-speed auger mixer (new technology) was used to mix solids with water. About 6,000 tons of paste backfill were injected underground through this hole. Underground backfilling using the ''Groutnet'' flow model was simulated. Studies indicate that grout flow over 300-foot distance is possible. Approximately 13,000 tons of grout may be pumped through a single hole. The effect of backfilling on the stability of the mine workings was analyzed using SIUPANEL.3D computer program and further verified using finite element analysis techniques. Stiffness of the backfill mix is most critical for enhancing the stability of mine workings. Mine openings do not have to be completely backfilled to enhance their stability. Backfill height of about 50% of the seam height is adequate to

  19. Infrared spectroscopic investigations of the compensatoin effect in ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vanina, E.A.; Kostyukov, N.S.

    1995-09-01

    The objective in this paper was to investigate by means of infrared spectroscopy samples of M-23 electrical porcelain ceramic after irradiation in a BOR-60 reactor with a neutron fluence of 6.5 x 10(exp 21)/square centimeter and isothermal annealing at 700 C and 1000 C for 10 hours. The work was performed on an IKS-29 spectrophotometer using samples in the form of a suspension in vasoline oil and pressed tablets with Potassium Bromide. The investigations were performed after the irradiated samples were allowed to stand for 7 years. It was found that partial amorphization of the quartz occurred.

  20. A Step Forward: Investigating Expertise in Materials Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Keith; Kim, Mija; Ya-Fang, Liu; Nava, Andrea; Perkins, Dawn; Smith, Anne Margaret; Soler-Canela, Oscar; Lu, Wang

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a study investigating the textbook evaluation techniques of novice and experienced teachers, which was conducted by the Language Teaching Expertise Research Group (or LATEX) within Lancaster University's Department of Linguistics and English Language. Three ELT teachers were chosen to evaluate the student and teacher…

  1. Investigation and development of new materials for electrochemical energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovskaya, Anna

    Performance of next generation electrochemical energy conversion devices relies on optimization of both ion selective membranes that retain conductivity at elevated temperatures, and electrode materials active and stable in corrosive environment. The work presented focuses on (1) improving energy conversion in fuel cells by designing novel ion conductive membrane materials optimized by an original optical high-throughput screening technique and (2) development of new stable mixed transition metal sulfide electrocatalysts for industrial bromine recovery. A functionalized fullerene derivative was used to fabricate mechanically strong, flexible organic-inorganic membranes via cooperative sol-gel synthesis. Amorphous materials with nanometer range wormlike structures were obtained. The dependence of conductivity on the concentration of triflic acid was quantitatively described by percolation theory. Fullerene derivatives with arbitrarily attached chains increased disorder of the structure, but before the wormlike network collapsed conductivity 40 times higher than that of the sample with no fullerenes was recorded. This enhancement was attributed to the additional inter-channel connections for proton transport facilitated by the fullerene derivatives. Optimization of the structure by an optical high-throughput screening made possible proton conductivity of 3.2x10-3 S/cm at 130°C and 5% humidity conditions. A series of doped Ru, Fe, Mo, W sulfide catalysts was synthesized, and their hydrogen evolution and oxygen reduction activity in HBr were studied as a function of dopant. RuS2 compounds showed the highest rates of hydrogen evolution and oxygen reduction reactions in HBr. Among all dopants, Co was the most active for hydrogen evolution reaction with overpotentials 100 mV lower than that of Pt at current density of 80 mA/cm2 in 0.5 M HBr. Oxygen reduction activity of RuS2 catalysts was found to change consistently as a function of periodic position of a dopant. Cr, Mn

  2. Microbeam Investigations of Presolar and Early Solar System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, Gary R.

    2005-01-01

    This grant provided three years of funding for my Cosmochemistry research program at Arizona State University. This research resulted in 11 peer-reviewed papers in six Journals and 35 abstracts to 11 Conferences and Workshops (see list below). My original proposal listed three main areas of research: 1) Studies of presolar grains; 2) Studies of short-lived radionuclides and; 3) Investigations of nebular processes and the origin of chondritic components.

  3. Investigation of Insulation Materials for Future Radioisotope Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornell, Peggy A.; Hurwitz, Frances I.; Ellis, David L.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Technology Advancement Project is developing next generation high-temperature insulation materials that directly benefit thermal management and improve performance of RPS for future science missions. Preliminary studies on the use of multilayer insulation (MLI) for Stirling convertors used on the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) have shown the potential benefits of MLI for space vacuum applications in reducing generator size and increasing specific power (W/kg) as compared to the baseline Microtherm HT (Microtherm, Inc.) insulation. Further studies are currently being conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center on candidate MLI foils and aerogel composite spacers. This paper presents the method of testing of foils and spacers and experimental results to date.

  4. Analysis of Images from Experiments Investigating Fragmentation of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, C; Hurricane, O

    2007-09-10

    Image processing techniques have been used extensively to identify objects of interest in image data and extract representative characteristics for these objects. However, this can be a challenge due to the presence of noise in the images and the variation across images in a dataset. When the number of images to be analyzed is large, the algorithms used must also be relatively insensitive to the choice of parameters and lend themselves to partial or full automation. This not only avoids manual analysis which can be time consuming and error-prone, but also makes the analysis reproducible, thus enabling comparisons between images which have been processed in an identical manner. In this paper, we describe our approach to extracting features for objects of interest in experimental images. Focusing on the specific problem of fragmentation of materials, we show how we can extract statistics for the fragments and the gaps between them.

  5. Investigation of Insulation Materials for Future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornell, Peggy A.; Hurwitz, Frances I.; Ellis, David L.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Radioisotope Power System (RPS) Technology Advancement Project is developing next generation high temperature insulation materials that directly benefit thermal management and improve performance of RPS for future science missions. Preliminary studies on the use of multilayer insulation (MLI) for Stirling convertors used on the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) have shown the potential benefits of MLI for space vacuum applications in reducing generator size and increasing specific power (W/kg) as compared to the baseline Microtherm HT (Microtherm, Inc.) insulation. Further studies are currently being conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) on candidate MLI foils and aerogel composite spacers. This paper presents the method of testing of foils and spacers and experimental results to date.

  6. Investigations of desorbed species from matrix materials used in MALDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, C. T. J.; Kosmidis, C.; Jia, W. J.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Singhal, R. P.

    1995-04-01

    Despite the widespread use of Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (MALDI), the processes involved in ion formation have yet to be satisfactorily explained. Protonation processes have been suggested as a possible method for the creation of the analyte ions. In this work, the existence of neutral hydrogen atoms in the ablation plume is investigated by using the postionization (PI) technique. Neutral atomic hydrogen is ionized through a (2+1) resonant excitation ionization scheme. The mass spectra at different delay times between the ablation and PI lasers have demonstrated the existence of hydrogen atoms with high velocities in the ablated plume.

  7. Microbeam Investigations of Presolar and Early Solar System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, Gary R.

    2003-01-01

    This grant provided three years of funding to initiate an independent research program in Cosmochemistry at Arizona State University. Because the new equipment that was installed at ASU took longer than expected to get running, the project was extended for a fourth year with no additional funding. By the time the funds were expended, we had set up an entirely new ion microprobe laboratory at ASU, and we have been fully operational for over two years. This laboratory was funded in almost equal parts by NASA, NSF, and ASU. Papers describing the first results from this new laboratory are being published now, and the results have been making an impact on the Cosmochemistry community. While this laboratory was being built, I continued my research program in collaboration with G. J. Wasserburg at Caltech. As equipment became available, I gradually shifted my research to ASU. Over the lifetime of this grant, my research program resulted in 12 papers and 13 abstracts on topics ranging from presolar grains (2 papers, 3 abstracts), short-lived radionuclides (6 papers, 6 abstracts), chemical compositions of chondritic materials (3 papers, 3 abstracts), silicon isotopic fractionation (1 abstract), and the oxygen composition of the Sun (1 paper). The most important results of this period were the discovery of presolar hibonite in a meteorite residue, the measurement of 26A1 in CAIs from enstatite chondrites, and the measurements of 10Be in type A CAIs from CV chondrites. All of these results have had a significant impact on research in Cosmochemstry.

  8. American Material Culture: Investigating a World War II Trash Dump

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Braun

    2005-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory: An Historical Trash Trove Historians and archaeologists love trash, the older the better. Sometimes these researchers find their passion in unexpected places. In this presentation, the treasures found in a large historic dump that lies relatively untouched in the middle of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will be described. The U.S. military used the central portion of the INL as one of only six naval proving grounds during World War II. They dumped trash in dry irrigation canals during and after their wartime activities and shortly before the federal government designated this arid and desolate place as the nation’s nuclear reactor testing station in 1949. When read critically and combined with memories and photographs, the 60-year old trash provides a glimpse into 1940s’ culture and the everyday lives of ordinary people who lived and worked during this time on Idaho’s desert. Thanks to priceless stories, hours of research, and the ability to read the language of historic artifacts, the dump was turned from just another trash heap into a treasure trove of 1940s memorabilia. Such studies of American material culture serve to fire our imaginations, enrich our understanding of past practices, and humanize history. Historical archaeology provides opportunities to integrate inanimate objects with animated narrative and, the more recent the artifacts, the more human the stories they can tell.

  9. Preliminary investigations into UHCRE thermal control materials (A0178)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levadou, Francois; Froggatt, Mike; Rott, Martin; Schneider, Eberhard

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the initial work that was done in the ESTEC Materials and Processes Division to evaluate the effect of space environment on the thermal blankets of the Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Ray Nuclei Experiments (UHCRE) is presented. The topics covered include: (1) a preliminary survey of the perforations of the two-thirds of the thermal blanket returned to ESTEC; (2) thermo-optical properties and thickness recessions of three samples cut from each of the third center parts of the 16 thermal blankets were measured and effects of environments (sun illumination and atomic oxygen fluences); (3) contamination was analyzed on trays, external blanket and internal aluminized Kapton foil by IR technique and scanning electron microscopy SEM/EDX examination; (4) the pattern of contamination on the Al Kapton foils was observed, sketched, and related to atomic oxygen flow; and (5) the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) yaw angle misorientation was evaluated from the contaminated areas visible on some of the trays. In addition, impacts of micrometeoroids and space debris were experimentally simulated on spare flight thermal blankets. Relations between penetration/perforation hole characteristics and projectile parameters were established.

  10. Investigation of the optical properties of ordered semiconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrae, Jack E., Jr.

    1997-11-01

    Optical Studies have been conducted upon CdGeAs2 and ZnGeP2, two of the most promising semiconductors being developed for mid-infrared non-linear optics applications. These experiments included photoluminescence (PL) studies of both compounds as well as photoreflectance (PR) measurements upon CdGeAs2. In addition, Hall effect measurements were carried out upon CdGeAs2, to aid in interpretation of the optical data. PL was measured as a function of laser power, sample temperature, and crystal orientation for CdGeAs2. One broad weak peak near 0.38 eV, and another somewhat narrower and often far brighter peak near 0.57 eV were found by low temperature (4 K) PL measurements. Strongly polarized PL was observed with the E field of the PL parallel to the material's c-axis. A polarization ratio as high as 6:1 was observed. PL on ZnGeP2 in the mid-IR revealed a previously unreported PL peak near 0.35 eV. PR measurements on CdCeAs2 allowed the estimation of the bandgap as a function of temperature. The low temperature bandgap proved to be lower than that reported for electroreflectance measurements on other samples of this compound. Hall effect measurements on CdGeAs2 reveals the dominant acceptor level lies about 120 meV above the valence band.

  11. Program to investigate advanced laser processing of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinan, E. M.; Snow, D. B.; Brown, C. O.

    1981-01-01

    This program included two major areas of research. In the processing area, a LAYERGLAZE (trade name) apparatus using a powder feed was developed and used to produce a 13.2 cm diameter by 3 cm thick cylindrical blank which was used as a preform for a scale model gas turbine disk. In addition to demonstrating that the process was capable of fabricating model size parts, mechanical testing and microstructural analysis of LAYERGLAZED material indicated that LAYERGLAZED parts exhibit good structural integrity and that the process produces no sizable or serious fabrication flaws provided that the alloy has adequate 'weldability' at high cooling rates. In a second major area, design of a LAYERGLAZE-processable superalloy was undertaken. With the system Ni-Al-Mo - X, numerous processable compositions were found, however, these compositions were characterized by embrittling phase transformations in the 600-800 deg temperature range. The research efforts in the alloy design area aimed at understanding and controlling this instability produced several alloys in the Ni-Al-Mo + X family which appeared to demonstrate the necessary characteristics of processability and phase stability. The mechanical properties of these alloys are being evaluated under an additional program. In addition to alloys from the above system, a number of additional alloys with high strength potentials have been developed based on other systems.

  12. Investigation of Microscopic Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Anlage, Steven

    2014-07-23

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities is often limited by breakdown events below the intrinsic limiting surface fields of Nb, and there is abundant evidence that these breakdown events are localized in space inside the cavity. Also, there is a lack of detailed understanding of the causal links between surface treatments and ultimate RF performance at low temperatures. An understanding of these links would provide a clear roadmap for improvement of SRF cavity performance, and establish a cause-and-effect ‘RF materials science’ of Nb. We propose two specific microscopic approaches to addressing these issues. First is a spatially-resolved local microwave-microscope probe that operates at SRF frequencies and temperatures to discover the microscopic origins of breakdown, and produce quantitative measurements of RF critical fields of coatings and films. Second, RF Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) has allowed visualization of RF current flow and sources of nonlinear RF response in superconducting devices with micro-meter spatial resolution. The LSM will be used in conjunction with surface preparation and characterization techniques to create definitive links between physical and chemical processing steps and ultimate cryogenic microwave performance. We propose to develop RF laser scanning microscopy of small-sample Nb pieces to establish surface-processing / RF performance relations through measurement of RF current distributions on micron-length scales and low temperatures.

  13. Investigation of polarization effects on new mask materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubke, Karsten; Teuber, Silvio; Hoellein, Ingo; Becker, Hans; Seitz, Holger; Buttgereit, Ute

    2005-05-01

    As microlithography moves to smaller critical dimensions, structures on reticles reach feature sizes comparable to the operating wavelength. Furthermore, with increasing NA the angle of incidence of light illuminating the mask steadily increases. In particular for immersion lithography this will have severe consequences on the printing behavior of reticles. Polarization effects arise which have an impact on, among other things, the contrast of the printed image. Angular effects have to be considered when aggressive off-axis illumination schemes are used. Whereas numerous articles have been published on those effects and the underlying theory seems to be understood, there is a strong need for experimental verification of properties of real masks at the actinic wavelength. This paper presents measurements of polarization effects on different mask blank types produced at Schott Lithotec including chrome and alternative absorber binary mask blanks, as well as phase shift mask blanks. Thickness and optical dispersion of all layers were determined using grazing incidence x-ray reflectometry (GIXR) and variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE). The set of mask blanks was patterned using a special design developed at the Advanced Mask Technology Center (AMTC) to allow measurements at different line width and pitch sizes. VUV Ellipsometry was then used to measure the properties of the structured materials, in particular the intensities in the 0th and 1st diffraction order for both polarization directions and varying angle of incidence. The degree of polarization of respective mask types is evaluated for dense lines with varying pitches and duty cycles. The results obtained experimentally are compared with simulations based on rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA).

  14. Investigation on low velocity impact resistance of SMA composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dianyin; Zhang, Long; Wang, Rongqiao; Zhang, Xiaoyong

    2016-04-01

    A method to improve low velocity impact resistance of aeroengine composite casing using shape memory alloy's properties of shape memory(SM) and super-elasticity(SE) is proposed in this study. Firstly, a numerical modeling of SMA reinforced composite laminate under low velocity impact load with impact velocity of 10 m/s is established based on its constitutive model implemented by the VUMAT subroutine of commercial software ABAQUS. Secondly, the responses of SMA composite laminate including stress and deflection distributions were achieved through transient analysis under low velocity impact load. Numerical results show that both peak stress and deflection values of SMA composite laminate are less than that without SMA, which proves that embedding SMA into the composite structure can effectively improve the low velocity impact performance of composite structure. Finally, the influence of SM and SE on low velocity impact resistance is quantitatively investigated. The values of peak stress and deflection of SMA composite based on SM property decrease by 18.28% and 9.43% respectively, compared with those without SMA, instead of 12.87% and 5.19% based on SE. In conclusion, this proposed model described the impact damage of SMA composite structure and turned to be a more beneficial method to enhance the impact resistance by utilizing SM effect.

  15. 40 CFR 1612.3 - Published reports and material contained in the public incident investigation dockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Published reports and material... Published reports and material contained in the public incident investigation dockets. (a) Demands for published investigation reports should be directed to the Office of Congressional and Public Affairs,...

  16. Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1998-01-01

    A method for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotopically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package.

  17. Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1998-11-03

    A method is described for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotopically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package. 6 figs.

  18. Magnetic responses to traffic related contamination recorded by backfills: A case study from Tongling City, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, M. M.; Hu, S. Y.; Lin, H.; Cao, L. W.; Wang, L. S.

    2014-08-01

    With the development of urbanization and industrialization, traffic is creating a serious contamination problem. Conventional methods for contamination testing are generally expensive and time-consuming, while magnetic methods have been suggested to be an economic and non-destructive alternative. In this study, we measured magnetic properties and heavy metal contents in backfills along an urban road side in China, in situ on surface and on samples in vertical sections. Magnetic results and SEM images show the dominance of coarse magnetite, supposed to origin from human activities. Furthermore, there is an obvious decreasing trend of magnetic susceptibility (χ) and several heavy metals (Cu, Mn, Zn, Pb) with increasing distance from the road edge, symmetrically at both road sides, indicating that this is a typical traffic-related contamination signal. The detailed distribution patterns of χ and heavy metals exhibit slight variations in the surface data, probably due to the local topography and surface runoff due to rainfall. In vertical soil cores magnetic parameters show significant positive relationships (r = 0.88-0.99) with concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Pb, Fe). Our results suggest that backfills unaffected by the traffic contamination signal and characterized by low χ value can be chosen for contamination monitoring. Despite the complex nature of backfills and the possibility of contamination prior to their transportation to the site, they are especially important for areas where undisturbed soil is not available.

  19. Development of a quantitative accelerated sulphate attack test for mine backfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shnorhokian, Shahe

    Mining operations produce large amounts of tailings that are either disposed of in surface impoundments or used in the production of backfill to be placed underground. Their mineralogy is determined by the local geology, and it is not uncommon to come across tailings with a relatively high sulphide mineral content, including pyrite and pyrrhotite. Sulphides oxidize in the presence of oxygen and water to produce sulphate and acidity. In the concrete industry, sulphate is known to produce detrimental effects by reacting with the cement paste to produce the minerals ettringite and gypsum. Because mine backfill uses tailings and binders---including cement---it is therefore prone to sulphate attack where the required conditions are met. Currently, laboratory tests on mine backfill mostly measure mechanical properties such as strength parameters, and the study of the chemical aspects is restricted to the impact of tailings on the environment. The potential of sulphate attack in mine backfill has not been studied at length, and no tests are conducted on binders used in backfill for their resistance to attack. Current ASTM guidelines for sulphate attack tests have been deemed inadequate by several authors due to their measurement of only expansion as an indicator of attack. Furthermore, the tests take too long to perform or are restricted to cement mortars only, and not to mixed binders that include pozzolans. Based on these, an accelerated test for sulphate attack was developed in this work through modifying and compiling procedures that had been suggested by different authors. Small cubes of two different binders were fully immersed in daily-monitored sodium sulphate and sulphuric acid solutions for a total of 28 days, after 7 days of accelerated curing at 50°C. In addition, four binders were partially immersed in the same solutions for 8 days for an accelerated attack process. The two procedures were conducted in tandem with leach tests using a mixed solution of

  20. The numerical investigation of the material behavior of high strength sheet materials in incremental forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badr, Ossama Mamdouh; Rolfe, Bernard; Hodgson, Peter; Weiss, Matthias

    2013-05-01

    Springback is an inevitable phenomenon in sheet metal forming and has been found to reduce with an increasing number of forming steps. In this study the effect of incremental forming on springback is analyzed for DP780 steel. The cyclic hardening characteristics of the DP780 steel are determined by fitting the experimental moment curvature data of a cyclic pure bending test using Abaqus Standard. The change in elastic modulus with pre-strain is also considered in the material model. Using the developed material model a V- die forming process is numerically analyzed for single and multiple-step forming, and the effect on springback determined. The numerical results show that there is a reduction in springback with an increasing number of forming steps, and that this may be due to the plastic strain accumulated in the blank during the sequential loading steps in the bending region. A very good agreement has been achieved between the simulation and the experimental results. The present study seems to offer an effective approach to increase the accuracy of the springback prediction and provide a greater insight into the nature of the springback in the incremental forming process.

  1. Investigation of the electrical properties of some dental composite restorative materials before and after laser exposure.

    PubMed

    ElKestawy, M A; Saafan, S A; Shehata, M M; Saafan, A M

    2006-10-01

    Some electrical properties, such as piezoelectricity, ac conductivity, dielectric constant and loss tangent of nine commercial types of dental composite restorative materials, have been investigated before and after laser exposure for 3s to study the effect of a probable laser exposure during some surgeries on the electrical properties of these materials. No piezoelectric effect has been found in these materials before and after laser exposure. The materials were found to be good insulators (very poorly conducting materials). The temperature and frequency dependence of ac conductivity, dielectric constant and loss tangent have not shown significant changes in values after laser exposure. PMID:16387356

  2. Vocabulary Recycling in Children's Authentic Reading Materials: A Corpus-Based Investigation of Narrow Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Dee

    2008-01-01

    Fourteen collections of children's reading materials were used to investigate the claim that collections of authentic texts with a common theme, or written by one author, afford readers with more repeated exposures to new words than unrelated materials. The collections, distinguished by relative thematic tightness, authorship (1 vs. 4 authors),…

  3. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1983-01-01

    Low cost encapsulation materials for the Flat Plate Solar Array Program (FSA) are investigated. The goal of the program is to identify, test, evaluate and recommend encapsulation materials and processes for the fabrication of cost effective and long life solar modules. Accelerated aging techniques for module component lifetime studies, investigation of candidate outer cover films and continued evaluation of soil repellant coatings are also included.

  4. An Investigation of the Behavior of Solvent based Polycaprolactone ink for Material Jetting

    PubMed Central

    He, Yinfeng; Wildman, Ricky D.; Tuck, Chris J.; Christie, Steven D. R.; Edmondson, Steven

    2016-01-01

    An initial study of processing bioresorbable polycaprolactone (PCL) through material jetting was conducted using a Fujifilm Dimatix DMP-2830 material printer. The aim of this work was to investigate a potential solvent based method of jetting polycaprolactone. Several solvents were used to prepare a PCL solvent based ink and 1, 4-dioxane was chosen with the consideration of both solubility and safety. The morphology of PCL formed under different substrate temperatures, droplet spacings were investigated. Multi-layer PCL structures were printed and characterized. This work shows that biodegradable polycaprolactone can be processed through material jetting. PMID:26868530

  5. An Investigation of the Behavior of Solvent based Polycaprolactone ink for Material Jetting.

    PubMed

    He, Yinfeng; Wildman, Ricky D; Tuck, Chris J; Christie, Steven D R; Edmondson, Steven

    2016-01-01

    An initial study of processing bioresorbable polycaprolactone (PCL) through material jetting was conducted using a Fujifilm Dimatix DMP-2830 material printer. The aim of this work was to investigate a potential solvent based method of jetting polycaprolactone. Several solvents were used to prepare a PCL solvent based ink and 1, 4-dioxane was chosen with the consideration of both solubility and safety. The morphology of PCL formed under different substrate temperatures, droplet spacings were investigated. Multi-layer PCL structures were printed and characterized. This work shows that biodegradable polycaprolactone can be processed through material jetting. PMID:26868530

  6. An Investigation of the Behavior of Solvent based Polycaprolactone ink for Material Jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yinfeng; Wildman, Ricky D.; Tuck, Chris J.; Christie, Steven D. R.; Edmondson, Steven

    2016-02-01

    An initial study of processing bioresorbable polycaprolactone (PCL) through material jetting was conducted using a Fujifilm Dimatix DMP-2830 material printer. The aim of this work was to investigate a potential solvent based method of jetting polycaprolactone. Several solvents were used to prepare a PCL solvent based ink and 1, 4-dioxane was chosen with the consideration of both solubility and safety. The morphology of PCL formed under different substrate temperatures, droplet spacings were investigated. Multi-layer PCL structures were printed and characterized. This work shows that biodegradable polycaprolactone can be processed through material jetting.

  7. Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear

    DOEpatents

    Westerfield, Curtis L.; Morris, John S.; Agnew, Stephen F.

    1997-01-01

    Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear. A cell is described which, in combination with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, permits the spectroscopic investigation of boundary layers under conditions of high temperature, high pressure and shear.

  8. Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear

    DOEpatents

    Westerfield, C.L.; Morris, J.S.; Agnew, S.F.

    1997-01-14

    Diamond anvil cell is described for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear. A cell is described which, in combination with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, permits the spectroscopic investigation of boundary layers under conditions of high temperature, high pressure and shear. 4 figs.

  9. 75 FR 15741 - Applied Materials; Boise, ID; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Applied Materials; Boise, ID; Notice of Termination of Investigation Pursuant to Section 221 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended, an investigation was initiated in response...

  10. Experimental investigations and numerical simulations of notch effect in cellular plastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsavina, L.; Linul, E.; Voiconi, T.; Negru, R.

    2016-04-01

    Cellular plastics are light weight structures with many applications in civil, aeronautical, automotive and mechanical engineering. Properties of cellular materials depend on the properties of the solid material, on the shape and dimensions of the cellular structure and on the relative density of the cellular material. Most of cellular plastic materials are crushing in compression and have a brittle behavior in tension. The effect of notches represents an important issue in such materials, taking into account that for packing applications for example, notches/holes should be introduced in the cellular material. This paper investigates the effect of notches in compression for three different densities 100, 145 and 300 kg/m3 polyurethane (PUR) foams. Experimental investigations were performed on rectangular blocks of 100×100×25 mm with 16, 28 and 40 mm central holes. The mechanism of damage was monitored with an IR camera FLIR A40M. Purpose of the numerical simulations was to calibrate a material model, based on compression test for un-notched specimens using the CRUSHABLE FOAM models implemented in ABAQUS SIMULIA. Then the material models were used to simulate the experimental tests on notched blocks. Good agreement was obtained for the load - displacement curves obtained experimentally and from simulation. Also the plastic deformation patterns observed experimentally by IR thermograpghy were obtained numerically using the CRUSHABLE FOAM material model.

  11. Experimental investigation on material migration phenomena in micro-EDM of reaction-bonded silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Pay Jun; Yan, Jiwang; Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto

    2013-07-01

    Material migration between tool electrode and workpiece material in micro electrical discharge machining of reaction-bonded silicon carbide was experimentally investigated. The microstructural changes of workpiece and tungsten tool electrode were examined using scanning electron microscopy, cross sectional transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray under various voltage, capacitance and carbon nanofibre concentration in the dielectric fluid. Results show that tungsten is deposited intensively inside the discharge-induced craters on the RB-SiC surface as amorphous structure forming micro particles, and on flat surface region as a thin interdiffusion layer of poly-crystalline structure. Deposition of carbon element on tool electrode was detected, indicating possible material migration to the tool electrode from workpiece material, carbon nanofibres and dielectric oil. Material deposition rate was found to be strongly affected by workpiece surface roughness, voltage and capacitance of the electrical discharge circuit. Carbon nanofibre addition in the dielectric at a suitable concentration significantly reduced the material deposition rate.

  12. Evaluation of Computational Method of High Reynolds Number Slurry Flow for Caverns Backfilling

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, Giorgia

    2015-05-01

    The abandonment of salt caverns used for brining or product storage poses a significant environmental and economic risk. Risk mitigation can in part be address ed by the process of backfilling which can improve the cavern geomechanical stability and reduce the risk o f fluid loss to the environment. This study evaluate s a currently available computational tool , Barracuda, to simulate such process es as slurry flow at high Reynolds number with high particle loading . Using Barracuda software, a parametric sequence of simu lations evaluated slurry flow at Re ynolds number up to 15000 and loading up to 25%. Li mitations come into the long time required to run these simulation s due in particular to the mesh size requirement at the jet nozzle. This study has found that slurry - jet width and centerline velocities are functions of Re ynold s number and volume fractio n The solid phase was found to spread less than the water - phase with a spreading rate smaller than 1 , dependent on the volume fraction. Particle size distribution does seem to have a large influence on the jet flow development. This study constitutes a first step to understand the behavior of highly loaded slurries and their ultimate application to cavern backfilling.

  13. Assessment of arsenic immobilization in synthetically prepared cemented paste backfill specimens.

    PubMed

    Coussy, Samuel; Benzaazoua, Mostafa; Blanc, Denise; Moszkowicz, Pierre; Bussière, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Mine tailings coming from the exploitation of sulphide and/or gold deposits can contain significant amounts of arsenic (As), highly soluble in conditions of weathering. Open mine voids backfilling techniques are now widely practiced by modern mining companies to manage the tailings. The most common one is called cemented paste backfill (CPB), and consists of tailings mixed with low amounts of hydraulic binders (3-5%) and a high proportion of water (typically 25%). The CPB is transported through a pipe network, to be placed in the mine openings. CPB provides storage benefits and underground support during mining operations. Moreover, this technique could also enhance contaminant stabilization, by fixing the contaminants in the binder matrix. CPB composites artificially spiked with As were synthesized in laboratory, using two types of hydraulic binders: a Portland cement, and a mix of fly ash and Portland cement. After curing duration of 66 days, the CPB samples were subjected to several leaching tests in various experimental conditions in order to better understand and then predict the As geochemical behaviour within CPBs. The assessment of the As release indicates that this element is better stabilized in Portland cement-based matrices rather than fly ash-based matrices. The As mobility differs in these two matrices, mainly because of the different As-bearing minerals formed during hydration processes. However, the total As depletion does not exceed 5% at the end of the most aggressive leaching test, indicating that As is well immobilized in the two types of CPB. PMID:22054566

  14. Investigation of polarized-proton target materials by differential calorimetry: preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.A.; Hill, J.J.

    1980-10-15

    A simple differential calorimeter was designed and operated for an investigation of the thermodynamic properties of polarized target materials. The calibration and use of the calorimeter are discussed, after a brief exposition of our motivation for this work. The results of a preliminary study of target materials is presented with emphasis on the relevance of the glass state to dynamic polarization in chemically-doped targets.

  15. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1983-01-01

    A study of potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials for the Flat-Plate Solar Array project is discussed. The goal is to identify, evaluate, test and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations included studies of aging and degradation of candidate encapsulation materials, continued identification of primers for durable bonding of module interfaces, continued evaluation of soil resistant treatments for the sunlit surface of the module and testing of corrosion protective coatings for use low cost mild steel substrates.

  16. [Investigation of superconductivity and magnetism in d and f-electron materials

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Emphasis has been on high {Tc} cuprate susperconductors, along with some experiments on heavy fermion materials. Approach involved the preparation of novel materials, including high {Tc} oxide and rare earth and uranium intermetallic compounds in polycrystals and single crystals, and the investigation of transport, thermal, and magnetic properties of these materials down to 50 mK, in magnetic fields up to 10 tesla, and pressures up to 160 kbar. Other measurements, such as neutron scattering, {mu}SR, and photoemission, are carried out at national facilities.

  17. Capacitance measurements to directly investigate exciton behaviors in organic photovoltaic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haomiao; Yi, Ruichen; Li, Wenbin; Zhang, Jiawei; He, Yun; Zeng, Qi; Hou, Xiaoyuan

    2015-11-01

    The major obstacle to directly determining exciton behaviors in common organic photovoltaic materials (e.g. fullerene) is the absence of room-temperature luminescence. Regarding this issue, the capacitance dependences on incident light intensity and electric field are investigated for several typical organic photovoltaic materials. Distinctive correlations between capacitance and light intensity/electric field are observed for different samples. Moreover, the exciton dissociation probability of fullerene and the charge density of pentacene are extracted from the capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics. All these results demonstrate a straight pathway to survey exciton behaviors in those materials with almost no luminescence at room temperature.

  18. Investigation of superconductivity and magnetism in d and f-electron materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emphasis has been on high (Tc) cuprate superconductors, along with some experiments on heavy fermion materials. Approach involved the preparation of novel materials, including high (Tc) oxide and rare earth and uranium intermetallic compounds in polycrystals and single crystals, and the investigation of transport, thermal, and magnetic properties of these materials down to 50 mK, in magnetic fields up to 10 tesla, and pressures up to 160 kbar. Other measurements, such as neutron scattering, micro-SR, and photoemission, are carried out at national facilities.

  19. Investigation of Lithium Metal Hydride Materials for Mitigation of Deep Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Atwell, William

    2016-01-01

    Radiation exposure to crew, electronics, and non-metallic materials is one of many concerns with long-term, deep space travel. Mitigating this exposure is approached via a multi-faceted methodology focusing on multi-functional materials, vehicle configuration, and operational or mission constraints. In this set of research, we are focusing on new multi-functional materials that may have advantages over traditional shielding materials, such as polyethylene. Metal hydride materials are of particular interest for deep space radiation shielding due to their ability to store hydrogen, a low-Z material known to be an excellent radiation mitigator and a potential fuel source. We have previously investigated 41 different metal hydrides for their radiation mitigation potential. Of these metal hydrides, we found a set of lithium hydrides to be of particular interest due to their excellent shielding of galactic cosmic radiation. Given these results, we will continue our investigation of lithium hydrides by expanding our data set to include dose equivalent and to further understand why these materials outperformed polyethylene in a heavy ion environment. For this study, we used HZETRN 2010, a one-dimensional transport code developed by NASA Langley Research Center, to simulate radiation transport through the lithium hydrides. We focused on the 1977 solar minimum Galactic Cosmic Radiation environment and thicknesses of 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50, and 100 g/cm2 to stay consistent with our previous studies. The details of this work and the subsequent results will be discussed in this paper.

  20. Investigations of the electrical breakdown properties of insulator materials used in high voltage vacuum diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Shurter, R.P.; Carlson, R.L.; Melton, J.G.

    1993-08-01

    The Injector for the proposed Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos utilizes a monolithic insulator deployed in a radial configuration. The 1.83-m-diam {times} 25.4-cm-thick insulator with embedded grading rings separates the output oil transmission line from the vacuum vessel that contains the re-entrant anode and cathode assemblies. Although much work has been done by the pulse power community in studying surface flash-over of insulating materials used in both axial and radial configurations, dendrite growth at the roots of grading rings embedded in materials suitable for very large insulators is less well characterized. Degradation of several acrylic insulators has been observed in the form of dendrites growing at the roots of the grading rings for large numbers (100`s) of pulses on the prototype DARHT Injector and other machines using similar radial geometries. In a few cases, these dendrites have led to catastrophic bulk breakdown of the acrylic between two grading rings making the insulator a costly loss. Insulating materials under investigation are acrylic (Lucite), epoxy (Furane), and cross-linked polystyrene (Rexolite); each of these materials has its own particular mechanical and electrical merits. All of these materials have been cast and machined into the required large size for the Injector. Test methods and the results of investigations into the breakdown strength of various interface geometries and the susceptibility of these materials to dendrite growth are reported.

  1. Investigating the Application of Needs Analysis on EAP Business Administration Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Saifalislam Abdalla Hajahmed

    2016-01-01

    This study is conducted to investigate the application of needs analysis in developing EAP materials for business administration students in two Sudanese universities. The subjects are 2 head departments of English language. To collect data, the researcher uses interview and content analysis. The study adopts the descriptive approach. The data of…

  2. Censorship of Written Curricular Materials in Public Schools: An Historical Investigation of Legal Parameters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Robert C.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and explain the censorship of written curricular and library materials in public schools over the past 20 years. Analysis of the 15 cases decided between 1972 and 1992, only one of which was decided by the Supreme Court, indicates that: (1) in every case except one, a school board or employees of the…

  3. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1981-01-01

    Encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules were investigated. The following areas were explored: (1) soil resistant surface treatment; (2) corrosion protecting coatings from mild steel substrates; (3) primers for bonding module interfaces; and (4) RS/4 accelerated aging of candidate encapsulation compounds

  4. Investigating Bandgap Energies, Materials, and Design of Light-Emitting Diodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Eugene P., II

    2016-01-01

    A student laboratory experiment to investigate the intrinsic and extrinsic bandgaps, dopant materials, and diode design in light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is presented. The LED intrinsic bandgap is determined by passing a small constant current through the diode and recording the junction voltage variation with temperature. A second visible…

  5. Development of Occupational Investigation Resource Materials. Final Report: Research Project in Occupational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    In response to a need for quality resource materials for the Occupational Investigation component of Occupational Orientation, a project developed guides that addressed the needs of the four program components: self-appraisal, economic and societal factors, occupational clusters, and educational planning. A teacher's handbook was developed to…

  6. The employment of a high density plasma jet for the investigation of thermal protection materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kezelis, R.; Grigaitiene, V.; Levinskas, R.; Brinkiene, K.

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes the results of tests of thermal protection materials (TPM) at conditions that simulate the atmospheric re-entry of space vehicles, tested by means of a high velocity and enthalpy air plasma jet generated with a dc plasma torch. Such a high velocity and enthalpy air plasma jet allows us to investigate TPM by simulating heat flux values varying with time in accordance with real re-entry altitudes and trajectories. The main research interests include the measurements of plasma flow temperature and heat flux for the testing of materials used for thermal protection systems of space vehicles. The test results of investigations of light composite thermal protective system material and graphite are presented.

  7. Preliminary Investigation of Zircaloy-4 as a Research Reactor Cladding Material

    SciTech Connect

    Brian K Castle

    2012-05-01

    As part of a scoping study for the ATR fuel conversion project, an initial comparison of the material properties of Zircaloy-4 and Aluminum-6061 (T6 and O-temper) is performed to provide a preliminary evaluation of Zircaloy-4 for possible inclusion as a candidate cladding material for ATR fuel elements. The current fuel design for the ATR uses Aluminum 6061 (T6 and O temper) as a cladding and structural material in the fuel element and to date, no fuel failures have been reported. Based on this successful and longstanding operating history, Zircaloy-4 properties will be evaluated against the material properties for aluminum-6061. The preliminary investigation will focus on a comparison of density, oxidation rates, water chemistry requirements, mechanical properties, thermal properties, and neutronic properties.

  8. Investigation of Kevlar fabric based materials for use with inflatable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niccum, R. J.; Munson, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    Design, manufacture and testing of laminated and coated composite materials incorporating a structural matrix of Kevlar are reported in detail. The practicality of using Kevlar in aerostat materials is demonstrated and data are provided on practical weaves, lamination and coating particulars, rigidity, strength, weight, elastic coefficients, abrasion resistance, crease effects, peel strength, blocking tendencies, helium permeability, and fabrication techniques. Properties of the Kevlar based materials are compared with conventional, Dacron reinforced counterparts. A comprehensive test and qualification program is discussed and quantitative biaxial tensile and shear test data are provided. The investigation shows that single ply laminates of Kevlar and plastic films offer significant strength to weight improvements, are less permeable than two ply coated materials, but have a lower flex life.

  9. Investigation on the Achievable Flow Length in Injection Moulding of Polymeric Materials with Dynamic Mould Tempering

    PubMed Central

    Drummer, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    A variety of parts in microsystems technology are manufactured by injection moulding of polymeric materials. In Particular the high cooling velocity affects negatively the process and the resulting part properties. The scope of this paper is to investigate the influence on the reachable flow length in injection moulding of different polymeric materials. The results indicate that the mould temperature has less impact on the achievable flow length of the polymer melt as the injection pressure. A higher mould temperature leads only to a slight increase in flow length. In addition, a transcending of the glass or the crystallization temperature of polymeric materials with the mould temperature shows no effect on the achievable flow length of the material. PMID:23970840

  10. 30 CFR 717.14 - Backfilling and grading of road cuts, mine entry area cuts, and other surface work areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Backfilling and grading of road cuts, mine entry area cuts, and other surface work areas. 717.14 Section 717.14 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INITIAL PROGRAM REGULATIONS UNDERGROUND MINING GENERAL PERFORMANCE STANDARDS §...

  11. 30 CFR 717.14 - Backfilling and grading of road cuts, mine entry area cuts, and other surface work areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Backfilling and grading of road cuts, mine entry area cuts, and other surface work areas. 717.14 Section 717.14 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INITIAL PROGRAM REGULATIONS UNDERGROUND MINING GENERAL PERFORMANCE STANDARDS §...

  12. 30 CFR 717.14 - Backfilling and grading of road cuts, mine entry area cuts, and other surface work areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Backfilling and grading of road cuts, mine entry area cuts, and other surface work areas. 717.14 Section 717.14 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INITIAL PROGRAM REGULATIONS UNDERGROUND MINING GENERAL PERFORMANCE STANDARDS §...

  13. Investigation of cell proliferative activity on the surface of the nanocomposite material produced by laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhurbina, N. N.; Kurilova, U. E.; Ickitidze, L. P.; Podgaetsky, V. M.; Selishchev, S. V.; Suetina, I. A.; Mezentseva, M. V.; Eganova, E. M.; Pavlov, A. A.; Gerasimenko, A. Y.

    2016-04-01

    A new method for the formation of composite nanomaterials based on multi-walled and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) on a silicon substrate has been developed. Formation is carried out by ultrasound coating of a silicon substrate by homogenous dispersion of CNTs in the albumin matrix and further irradiation with the continuous laser beam with a wavelength of 810 nm and power of 5.5 watts. The high electrical conductivity of CNTs provides its structuring under the influence of the laser radiation electric field. The result is a scaffold that provides high mechanical strength of nanocomposite material (250 MPa). For in vitro studies of materials biocompatibility a method of cell growth microscopic analysis was developed. Human embryonic fibroblasts (EPP) were used as biological cells. Investigation of the interaction between nanocomposite material and cells was carried out by optical and atomic force microscopy depending on the time of cells incubation. The study showed that after 3 hours incubation EPP were fixed on the substrate surface, avoiding the surface of the composite material. However, after 24 hours of incubation EPP fix on the sample surface and then begin to grow and divide. After 72 hours of incubation, the cells completely fill the sample surface of nanocomposite material. Thus, a nanocomposite material based on CNTs in albumin matrix does not inhibit cell growth on its surface, and favours their growth. The nanocomposite material can be used for creating soft tissue implants

  14. Investigation of Hygro-Thermal Aging on Carbon/Epoxy Materials for Jet Engine Fan Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, Lee W.; Roberts, Gary D.; Miller, Sandi G.; Pereira, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    This poster summarizes 2 years of aging on E862 epoxy and E862 epoxy with triaxial braided T700s carbon fiber composite. Several test methods were used to characterize chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of both the resin and composite materials. The aging cycle that was used included varying temperature and humidity exposure. The goal was to evaluate the environmental effects on a potential jet engine fan section material. Some changes were noted in the resin which resulted in increased brittleness, though this did not significantly affect the tensile and impact test results. A potential decrease in compression strength requires additional investigation.

  15. Cryostat system for investigation on new neutron moderator materials at reactor TRIGA PUSPATI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dris, Zakaria bin; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz bin; Hamid, Nasri A.; Azman, Azraf; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Yazid, Hafizal

    2016-01-01

    A simple continuous flow (SCF) cryostat was designed to investigate the neutron moderation of alumina in high temperature co-ceramic (HTCC) and polymeric materials such as Teflon under TRIGA neutron environment using a reflected neutron beam from a monochromator. Cooling of the cryostat will be carried out using liquid nitrogen. The cryostat will be built with an aluminum holder for moderator within stainless steel cylinder pipe. A copper thermocouple will be used as the temperature sensor to monitor the moderator temperature inside the cryostat holder. Initial measurements of neutron spectrum after neutron passing through the moderating materials have been carried out using a neutron spectrometer.

  16. Laboratory investigation into the contribution of contaminants to ground water from equipment materials used in sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Dresel, P. Evan; Sklarew, Deborah S.

    2004-07-31

    Benzene contamination was detected in water samples from the Ogallala aquifer beneath and adjacent to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. DOE assembled a Technical Assistance Team to evaluate the source of benzene. One of the team's recommendations was to assess whether the sampling equipment material could be a source of benzene and other volatile organic compounds. As part of this investigation, laboratory testing of the sample equipment material was conducted. Results from the laboratory tests indicated that the equipment material did, in fact, contribute volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds to the groundwater samples. Specifically, three materials were identified as contributing contaminants to water samples. The nylon-11 tubing used contributed benzene and the plasticizer N-butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBSA), the urethane-coated nylon well liner contributed toluene and trace amounts of NBSA, while the sampling port "spacer" material made of nylon/polypropylene/polyester-composite contributed trace amounts of toluene and NBSA. While the concentrations of benzene and toluene measured in the laboratory tests are below the concentrations measured in actual groundwater samples, the equipment material was found to contribute organics to the test water rendering the results reported for the groundwater samples highly suspect.

  17. An investigation on the effects of phase change material on material components used for high temperature thermal energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeil; Singh, Dileep; Zhao, Weihuan; Yua, Wenhua; France, David M.

    2016-05-01

    The latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems for concentrated solar power (CSP) plants with advanced power cycle require high temperature phase change materials (PCMs), Graphite foams with high thermal conductivity to enhance the poor thermal conductivity of PCMs. Brazing of the graphite foams to the structural metals of the LHTES system could be a method to assemble the system and a method to protect the structural metals from the molten salts. In the present study, the LHTES prototype capsules using MgCl2-graphite foam composites were assembled by brazing and welding, and tested to investigate the corrosion attack of the PCM salt on the BNi-4 braze. The microstructural analysis showed that the BNi-4 braze alloy can be used not only for the joining of structure alloy to graphite foams but also for the protecting of structure alloy from the corrosion by PCM.

  18. A finite element model investigation of ultrasonic array performance for inspecting polycrystalline materials

    SciTech Connect

    Van Pamel, A.; Huthwaite, P.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Brett, C. R.

    2015-03-31

    Microstructural noise has long hindered ultrasonic NDE of polycrystalline materials. In recent years however, arrays have enabled new possibilities to advance ultrasonic inspection of these materials. A Finite Element (FE) model is used to explore the different phenomena caused by grain scattering which may hinder detection of defects by an array. These include multiple scattering and beam deviation due to anisotropy; two aspects of the physics which are often required to be ignored in analytical models due to theoretical assumptions or computational limitations. We rely on a GPU based FE solver, Pogo, to provide fast computation and thereby enable parametric studies. The impact on array detection performance when varying center-frequency and aperture size is investigated. Preliminary results show that there exists an optimum for both the array aperture and frequency for inspection of these materials.

  19. Infrared microscopic investigation of skin biopsies after application of implant material for correction of aesthetic deficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, H. M.; Seifert, L.; Kuckuk, R.; Lenzen, C.

    2003-06-01

    Different implant materials are currently applied for correction of inborn and acquired aesthetic deficiencies of the human skin. Several commercial products are used as dermal fillers for aesthetic facial surgery, which contain bovine collagen and cross-linked substances, or hyaluronic acid derivatives, both also in combination with polymethylmethacrylate or co-polymerisates of methacrylate derivatives. Gels containing polylactate or dimethylpolysiloxane were also available. Infrared spectra of such products are presented after dry film preparation. Infrared microscopy using attenuated total reflection was employed to identify previously applied dermal filler products in excised tissue without embedding the sample in a matrix material such as paraffin as needed for microtoming. Several tissue spots guided by inspecting the different color grades were found with increased single implant component concentrations, as supported by the dominating spectral features and difference spectroscopy. The chemistry within dermal biopsies after material implantation can be uniquely investigated based on their infrared spectra.

  20. Investigation of Test Methods, Material Properties and Processes for Solar Cell Encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P.; Baum, B.

    1982-01-01

    The evaluation of potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials is discussed. The goal is to identify, evaluate, test and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants; the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatment, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. New compounds were evaluated for efficiency in curing both ethylene/vinyl acetate and ethylene/methyl acrylate pottants intended for vacuum bag lamination of solar cells. Two component aliphatic urethane casting syrups were evaluated for suitability as solar module pottants on the basis of optical, physical and fabrication characteristics.

  1. Investigation on Painting Materials in "Madonna col Bambino e S. Giovannino" by Botticelli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersani, D.; Lottici, P. P.; Casoli, A.; Ferrari, M.; Lottini, S.; Cauzzi, D.

    A study on the painting materials (pigments and binders) of the famous painting "Madonna col Bambino e S. Giovannino" by Sandro Botticelli, located in the Museo Civico of Piacenza (Italy), was performed before a recent restoration. The painting materials were investigated by the analysis of five millimetric samples taken in damaged regions. The pigments were determined using the micro-Raman spectroscopy, with the 632.8nm line of a He-Ne laser. Despite the strong fluorescence background, the nature of the ground layer (gypsum and anhydrite) and of most pigments (i.e. goethite, lapis lazuli, white lead) was determined. Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) was used to determine the organic binder media, and in particular proteinaceous and lipid materials. Egg and animal glue were found, while no siccative oils were detected.

  2. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, P.; Baum, B.

    1982-07-01

    The evaluation of potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials is discussed. The goal is to identify, evaluate, test and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants; the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatment, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. New compounds were evaluated for efficiency in curing both ethylene/vinyl acetate and ethylene/methyl acrylate pottants intended for vacuum bag lamination of solar cells. Two component aliphatic urethane casting syrups were evaluated for suitability as solar module pottants on the basis of optical, physical and fabrication characteristics.

  3. EBIC/TEM investigations of defects in solar silicon ribbon materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ast, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the defect structure of edge defined film growth (EFG) material, web dentritic ribbons (WEB), and ribbon to ribbon recrystallized material (RTR). The most common defects in all these materials are coherent first order twin boundaries. These coherent twins can be very thin, a few atomic layers. Bundles of the twins which contain odd numbers of twins will in optical images appear as a seemingly single first twin boundary. First-order coherent twin boundaries are not electrically active, except at locations where they contain intrinsic (grain boundary) dislocations. These dislocations take up small deviations from the ideal twin relation and play the same role in twin boundaries as conventional and play the some role in twin boundaries as conventional edge and screw dislocations in small angle tilt and twist boundaries.

  4. Investigation of corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in bolting materials on light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory experiments performed at BNL have shown that the concentration of boric acid to a moist paste at approximately the boiling point of water can produce corrosion rates of the order of several tenths of an inch per year on bolting and piping materials, which values are consistent with service experience. Other failure evaluation experience has shown that primary coolant/lubricant interaction may lead to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of steam generator manway studs. An investigation was also performed on eleven lubricants and their effects on A193 B7 and A540 B24 bolting materials. H/sub 2/S generation by the lubricants, coefficient of friction results and transgranular SCC of the bolting materials in steam are discussed. 13 refs.

  5. Parental separation and adult psychological distress: an investigation of material and relational mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An association between parental separation or divorce occurring in childhood and increased psychological distress in adulthood is well established. However relatively little is known about why this association exists and how the mechanisms might differ for men and women. We investigate why this association exists, focussing on material and relational mechanisms and in particular on the way in which these link across the life course. Methods This study used the 1970 British Cohort Study (n = 10,714) to investigate material (through adolescent and adult material disadvantage, and educational attainment) and relational (through parent–child relationship quality and adult partnership status) pathways between parental separation (0–16 years) and psychological distress (30 years). Psychological distress was measured using Rutter’s Malaise Inventory. The inter-linkages between these two broad mechanisms across the life course were also investigated. Missing data were multiply imputed by chained equations. Path analysis was used to explicitly model prospectively-collected measures across the life course, therefore methodologically extending previous work. Results Material and relational pathways partially explained the association between parental separation in childhood and adult psychological distress (indirect effect = 33.3% men; 60.0% women). The mechanisms were different for men and women, for instance adult partnership status was found to be more important for men. Material and relational factors were found to interlink across the life course. Mechanisms acting through educational attainment were found to be particularly important. Conclusions This study begins to disentangle the mechanisms between parental separation in childhood and adult psychological distress. Interventions which aim to support children through education, in particular, are likely to be particularly beneficial for later psychological health. PMID:24655926

  6. Investigations of chemical erosion of carbon materials in hydrogen and deuterium low pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starke, P.; Fantz, U.; Balden, M.

    2005-03-01

    Investigations on chemical erosion of pure and carbide-doped graphite materials were carried out in inductively coupled RF plasmas containing hydrogen, deuterium or a mixture of both in helium. For extrapolations of erosion yields to future fusion devices the relevant particle fluxes have to be known precisely. This was done by several diagnostic techniques. In particular the ion fluxes are determined by an energy mass analyzer. An isotope effect of the ion composition is measured resulting in an enhanced erosion of graphite in deuterium plasmas. Since in fusion plasmas a mixture of deuterium and tritium will interact with the surface, a mixture of hydrogen and deuterium on graphite was investigated as well. In order to reduce erosion yields doping of carbon is under discussion. Therefore, fluence dependent erosion yields of several W-, Ti-, V- and Zr-doped graphite materials are measured and compared with pure graphite.

  7. Calculational investigation of impact cratering dynamics - Material motions during the crater growth period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, M. G.; Thomsen, J. M.; Ruhl, S. F.; Orphal, D. L.; Schultz, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    The considered investigation was conducted in connection with studies which are to provide a better understanding of the detailed dynamics of impact cratering processes. Such an understanding is vital for a comprehension of planetary surfaces. The investigation is the continuation of a study of impact dynamics in a uniform, nongeologic material at impact velocities achievable in laboratory-scale experiments conducted by Thomsen et al. (1979). A calculation of a 6 km/sec impact of a 0.3 g spherical 2024 aluminum projectile into low strength (50 kPa) homogeneous plasticene clay has been continued from 18 microseconds to past 600 microseconds. The cratering flow field, defined as the material flow field in the target beyond the transient cavity but well behind the outgoing shock wave, has been analyzed in detail to see how applicable the Maxwell Z-Model, developed from analysis of near-surface explosion cratering calculations, is to impact cratering

  8. Experimental investigation of solid by-product as sensible heat storage material: Characterization and corrosion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Fernández, Iñigo; Faik, Abdessamad; Mani, Karthik; Rodriguez-Aseguinolaza, Javier; D'Aguanno, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    The experimental investigation of water cooled electrical arc furnace (EAF) slag used as filler material in the storage tank for sensible heat storage application was demonstrated in this study. The physicochemical and thermal properties of the tested slags were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microcopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and laser flash analysis, respectively. In addition, the chemical compatibility between slags and molten nitrate salt (60 wt. % NaNO3 and 40 wt. % KNO3) was investigated at 565 °C for 500 hrs. The obtained results were clearly demonstrated that the slags showed a good corrosion resistance in direct contact with molten salt at elevated temperature. The present study was clearly indicated that a low-cost filler material used in the storage tank can significantly reduce the overall required quantities of the relatively higher cost molten salt and consequently reduce the overall cost of the electricity production.

  9. An atomic force microscopy tip model for investigating the mechanical properties of materials at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Alderighi, Michele; Ierardi, Vincenzo; Allegrini, Maria; Fuso, Francesco; Solaro, Roberto

    2008-05-01

    Investigation of the mechanical properties of materials at the nanoscale is often performed by atomic force microscopy nanoindentation. However, substrates with large surface roughness and heterogeneity demand careful data analysis. This requirement is even more stringent when surface indentations with a typical depth of a few nanometers are produced to test material hardness. Accordingly, we developed a geometrical model of the nanoindenter, which was first validated by measurements on a reference gold sample. Then we used this technique to investigate the mechanical properties of a coating layer made of Balinit C, a commercially available alloy with superior anti-wear features deposited on steel. The reported results support the feasibility of reliable hardness measurements with truly nanosized indents. PMID:18572668

  10. Photothermal Investigation of Surface Defects of Pure Semiconducting A2B6 Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrzewski, J.; Maliński, M.; Strzałkowski, K.; Madaj, D.; Firszt, F.; Łęgowski, S.; Męczyńska, H.

    2012-04-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy is a sensitive and useful method to investigate the quality of semiconducting A2B6 crystals. An imperfection of surface quality can strongly influence photoacoustic spectra but it shows the different character for the different kinds of semiconducting materials. To properly interpret the amplitude and phase spectra, the temperature distribution and its modifications, due to the surface defects, are needed. The Blonskij model of the temperature distribution was used to investigate the influence of the defect on the amplitude and phase spectra.

  11. 1064 nm FT-Raman spectroscopy for investigations of plant cell walls and other biomass materials

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Umesh P.

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy with its various special techniques and methods has been applied to study plant biomass for about 30 years. Such investigations have been performed at both macro- and micro-levels. However, with the availability of the Near Infrared (NIR) (1064 nm) Fourier Transform (FT)-Raman instruments where, in most materials, successful fluorescence suppression can be achieved, the utility of the Raman investigations has increased significantly. Moreover, the development of several new capabilities such as estimation of cellulose-crystallinity, ability to analyze changes in cellulose conformation at the local and molecular level, and examination of water-cellulose interactions have made this technique essential for research in the field of plant science. The FT-Raman method has also been applied to research studies in the arenas of biofuels and nanocelluloses. Moreover, the ability to investigate plant lignins has been further refined with the availability of near-IR Raman. In this paper, we present 1064-nm FT-Raman spectroscopy methodology to investigate various compositional and structural properties of plant material. It is hoped that the described studies will motivate the research community in the plant biomass field to adapt this technique to investigate their specific research needs. PMID:25295049

  12. Alternative disposal for Investigation Derived Wastes (IDW) containing low activity source material

    SciTech Connect

    Downey, H.T.; Majer, T.

    2007-07-01

    As part of a Remedial Investigation (RI) at a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Site, approximately 77,111 kg (85 tons) I would use the actual tons of investigation derived wastes (IDW) were generated from exploratory soil borings and as part of removal activities at a former drum burial area. Characterization of these materials indicated elevated concentrations of metals including uranium and thorium (source material). Concentrations of uranium and thorium were at levels less than 0.05% by mass, which is the threshold for exempt source material under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. Disposal of this material was evaluated as low-level radioactive waste and as exempt radioactive waste. The NRC has established a process for evaluation and review of exempt source material transfer and direct disposal in a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) landfill. These requests are normally approved if the dose to a member of the general public is unlikely to exceed 0.25 mSv per year (25 milli-rem per year). The soil was evaluated for disposal as exempt radioactive waste at a RCRA landfill, which included dose modeling to workers during transportation and disposal as well as potential dose to members of the public after closure of the disposal facility. These evaluations determined that the potential dose was very small, and review by the agreement state regulatory agency indicated that this disposal process should not result in any undue hazard to public health and safety or property. The advantage of this approach is that disposal of 77,111 kg (85 tons) of IDW at a RCRA landfill is estimated to result in a savings of $80,000 as compared to disposal as low-level radioactive waste. Alternative waste disposal of exempt source material provides more disposal options and can lead to significant cost savings. (authors)

  13. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.; Schnitzer, H. S.

    1980-07-01

    The goal of this program is to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. Technical activities during the past year have covered a number of topics and have emphasized the development of solar module encapsulation technology that employs ethylene/vinyl acetate, copolymer (EVA) as the pottant. These activities have included: (1) continued production of encapsulation grade EVA in sheet form to meet the needs of the photovoltaic industry; (2) investigations of three non-blocking techniques for EVA sheet; (3) performed an economic analysis of the high volume production of each pottant in order to estimate the large volume selling price (EVA, EPDM, aliphatic urethane, PVC plastisol, and butyl acrylate); (4) initiated an experimental corrosion protection program to determine if metal components could be successfully protected by encapsulation; (5) began an investigation to determine the maximum temperature which can be tolerated by the candidate pottant material in the event of hot spot heating or other temperature override; (6) continuation of surveys of potentially useful outer cover materials; and (7) continued with the accelerated artificial weathering of candidate encapsulation materials. Study results are presented. (WHK)

  14. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar-cell encapsulants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1982-07-01

    Potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials are evaluated. The goal of the program is to identify, evaluate, test, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations have concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants, the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. Experiments are underway to assess the durability and cost effectiveness of coatings for protection of steel. Investigations are continuing with commercial maintenance coatings based on fluorocarbon and silicone-alkyd chemistries. Experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of occlusive coatings for wood products such as hard-board. An experimental program continued to determine the usefulness of soil resistant coatings. Primers were evaluated for effectiveness in bonding candidate pottants to outer covers, glass and substate materials. A program of accelerated aging and life predictive strategies is being conducted and data are reported for sunlamp exposure and thermal aging. Supporting activities are also discussed briefly. (LEW)

  15. Investigation of photon attenuation coefficient of some building materials used in Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, B.; Altinsoy, N.

    2015-03-30

    In this study, some building materials regularly used in Turkey, such as concrete, gas concrete, pumice and brick have been investigated in terms of mass attenuation coefficient at different gamma-ray energies. Measurements were carried out by gamma spectrometry containing NaI(Tl) detector. Narrow beam gamma-ray transmission geometry was used for the attenuation measurements. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation of XCOM code.

  16. Palynological Investigation of Post-Flight Solid Rocket Booster Foreign Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Linda; Jarzen, David

    2008-01-01

    Investigations of foreign material in a drain tube, from the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) of a recent Space Shuttle mission, was identified as pollen. The source of the pollen is from deposits made by bees, collecting pollen from plants found at the Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The pollen is determined to have been present in the frustum drain tubes before the shuttle flight. During the flight the pollen did not undergo thermal maturation.

  17. Investigation of photon attenuation coefficient of some building materials used in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, B.; Altinsoy, N.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, some building materials regularly used in Turkey, such as concrete, gas concrete, pumice and brick have been investigated in terms of mass attenuation coefficient at different gamma-ray energies. Measurements were carried out by gamma spectrometry containing NaI(Tl) detector. Narrow beam gamma-ray transmission geometry was used for the attenuation measurements. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation of XCOM code.

  18. Laser equipment for investigation of light distribution in dental tissues and restorative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisimov, Vladimir N.; Smirmov, Alexander V.; Stafeev, Sergey C.

    1997-04-01

    The description of experimental set-up for investigation of light scattering in dental tissue and dental restorative material is presented. The set-up includes the light source (He-Ne laser), beam shaping light polarization control unit and registration device. The latter represents the computer interfaced CCD-camera. The experimental results of side light scattering in enamel/dentin and in double-layer porcelain are represented. The results of this research may be useful for aesthetic dental restorations.

  19. Investigation of interlayer materials for the microwave joining of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Silberglitt, R.; Palaith, D. ); Black, W.M.; Sa'adaldin, H.S. ); Katz, J.D.; Blake, R.D. )

    1991-01-01

    Microwave joining of ceramics has the potential for increased speed and convenience. Joints have been made in alumina, mullite and silicon nitride with flexure strength approaching, and in some cases exceeding, that of the as received material in a fraction of the time that is customarily required with conventional techniques. This paper describes the initial results of investigations aimed at applying microwave joining to SiC and other carbide ceramics. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Active investigation of material damage under load using micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navalgund, Megha; Zunjarrao, Suraj; Mishra, Debasish; Manoharan, V.

    2015-03-01

    Due the growth of composite materials across multiple industries such as Aviation, Wind there is an increasing need to not just standardize and improve manufacturing processes but also to design these materials for the specific applications. One of the things that this translates to is understanding how failure initiates and grows in these materials and at what loads, especially around internal flaws such as voids or features such as ply drops. Traditional methods of investigating internal damage such as CT lack the resolution to resolve ply level damage in composites. Interrupted testing with layer removal can be used to investigate internal damage using microscopy; however this is a destructive method. Advanced techniques such as such as DIC are useful for in-situ damage detection, however are limited to surface information and would not enable interrogating the volume. Computed tomography has become a state of the art technique for metrology and complete volumetric investigation especially for metallic components. However, its application to the composite world is still nascent. This paper demonstrates micro-CT's capability as a gauge to quantitatively estimate the extent of damage & understand the propagation of damage in PMC composites while the component is under stress.

  1. Active investigation of material damage under load using micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Navalgund, Megha Mishra, Debasish; Manoharan, V.; Zunjarrao, Suraj

    2015-03-31

    Due the growth of composite materials across multiple industries such as Aviation, Wind there is an increasing need to not just standardize and improve manufacturing processes but also to design these materials for the specific applications. One of the things that this translates to is understanding how failure initiates and grows in these materials and at what loads, especially around internal flaws such as voids or features such as ply drops. Traditional methods of investigating internal damage such as CT lack the resolution to resolve ply level damage in composites. Interrupted testing with layer removal can be used to investigate internal damage using microscopy; however this is a destructive method. Advanced techniques such as such as DIC are useful for in-situ damage detection, however are limited to surface information and would not enable interrogating the volume. Computed tomography has become a state of the art technique for metrology and complete volumetric investigation especially for metallic components. However, its application to the composite world is still nascent. This paper demonstrates micro-CT’s capability as a gauge to quantitatively estimate the extent of damage and understand the propagation of damage in PMC composites while the component is under stress.

  2. Investigation of nanoscratch processes in semiconductor materials for application to maskless patterning.

    PubMed

    Richter, Asta; Kuswik, Piotr; Oszwaldowski, Maciej; Smith, Roger

    2008-06-01

    Features of nanoscratching processes with a diamond 90 degrees cube corner tip in semiconductor materials have been studied with different tip orientations and scratch procedures: constant and linearly increasing normal load during scratching, multi-scratching and the direct analysis of the generated scratch by re-scanning the scratch with a strongly reduced normal load. These scratch functions allowed a detailed investigation of the materials response due to the mechanical deformation process. Elastic material recovery, plastic deformation and material removal contribute to the generation of scratch groove profiles. For low applied normal loads mainly elastic deformation occurs whereas for larger normal loads stick-slip processes with periodic hillocks at the groove bottom and irregular pile-up along the scratch rim dominate the process. From the analysis of the scratch groove profile in Si(100), GaAs(100) and thin InSb films, quantitative values for the elastic deformation, the friction coefficient, stick-slip pattern, material removal and scratch depth as a function of the applied normal load are obtained. With multi-scratching a definite removal pattern with a reproducible scratch depth is obtained. These results can be used to optimise the scratch technique for application to maskless patterning. PMID:18681041

  3. Laboratory Investigation into the Contribution of Contaminants to Ground Water from Equipment Materials Used in Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Dresel, P Evan; Sklarew, Debbie S.

    2004-08-30

    Benzene contamination was detected in well water samples from the Ogallala Aquifer beneath and adjacent to the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. This study assessed whether or not the materials used in multilevel sampling equipment at this site could have contributed to the contaminants found in well water samples. As part of this investigation, laboratory testing of the sample equipment material was conducted. Results from the laboratory test indicated three different materials from two types of multilevel samplers did, in fact, contribute volatile and semivolatile organic compounds to the ground water samples from static leach tests that were conducted during an eight week period. The nylon-11 tubing contributed trace concentrations of benzene (1.37 ?g/L) and relatively high concentrations of the plasticizer N-butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBSA) (764 mg/L) to the water; a urethane-coated nylon well liner contributed relatively high concentrations of toluene (278 ?g/L) and trace amounts of NBSA; and a sampling port spacer material made of nylon/polypropylene/polyester-composite contributed trace amounts of toluene and NBSA. While the concentrations of benzene and toluene measured in the laboratory tests were below the concentrations measured in actual ground water samples, the concentrations of organics from these equipment materials were sufficient to render the results reported for the ground water samples suspect.

  4. Ground-based simulation of LEO environment: Investigations of a select LDEF material: FEP Teflon (trademark)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Jon B.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) has produced a wealth of data on materials degradation in the low earth orbit (LEO) space environment and has conclusively shown that surface chemistry (as opposed to surface physics-sputtering) is the key to understanding and predicting the degradation of materials in the LEO environment. It is also clear that materials degradation and spacecraft contamination are closely linked and that the fundamental mechanisms responsible for this linking are in general not well understood especially in the area of synergistic effects. The study of the fundamental mechanisms underlying materials degradation in LEO is hampered by the fact that the degradation process itself is not observed during the actual exposure to the environment. Rather the aftermath of the degradation process is studied, i.e., the material that remains after exposure is observed and mechanisms are proposed to explain the observed results. The EOIM-3 flight experiment is an attempt to bring sophisticated diagnostic equipment into the space environment and monitor the degradation process in real time through the use of mass spectrometry. More experiments of this nature which would include surface sensitive diagnostics (Auger and photoelectron spectroscopes) are needed to truly unravel the basic chemical mechanisms involved in the materials degradation process. Since these in-space capabilities will most likely not be available in the near future, ground-based LEO simulation facilities employing sophisticated diagnostics are needed to further advance the basic understanding of the materials degradation mechanisms. The LEO simulation facility developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been used to investigate the atomic oxygen/vacuum ultraviolet (AO/VUV) enhanced degradation of FEP Teflon. The results show that photo-ejection of polymer fragments occur at elevated temperature (200 C), that VUV synergistic rare gas sputtering of polymer fragments occur even at

  5. Investigation of the Higher Harmonic Lamb Wave Generation in Hyperelastic Isotropic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauter, Natalie; Lammering, Rolf

    Micro-structural damages, such as micro-cracks and voids, give locally rise to stresses and may initiate subsequent failure of structural components. Therefore, the development of methods for the detection of microstructural damage and the observation of their growth is an important and ongoing area of research, especially for thin-walled structures. The proposed method for the detection is based on the nonlinearity caused by the micro-structural damages. Lamb waves are generated which induce simultaneously higher harmonic modes due the inherent nonlinearity. For detailed investigations, numerical simulations are essential. In this work, the nonlinearity is modeled by the material law, which is based on the Neo- Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin material models. In contrast to previous studies, which used third order elastic coefficients, these hyperelastic material models are widely accepted, frequently used, and implemented in commonly available FEM software. In the numerical investigations, Lamb waves are generated in a thin-walled aluminum plate with windowed sine burst signals. Due to the nonlinearity in the material law, the waves are not only observed at the excitation frequency, but also at higher harmonic frequencies. Excitation at especially selected frequencies evoke the cumulative effect, and thus gives rise to the amplitudes of the higher harmonics. Comparing the S1-S2 and S2-S4 mode pairs clearly show the higher sensitivity of the latter to the material nonlinearity. This matches with previous published experimental results. Finally, it is shown that the results obtained agree qualitatively well with numerical analyses, in which the micro-structural damages are modeled directly by a respective finite element discretization.

  6. In vivo and in vitro investigations of a nanostructured coating material – a preclinical study

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Martin; Ganz, Cornelia; Xu, Weiguo; Sarajian, Hamid-Reza; Götz, Werner; Gerber, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Immediate loading of dental implants is only possible if a firm bone-implant anchorage at early stages is developed. This implies early and high bone apposition onto the implant surface. A nanostructured coating material based on an osseoinductive bone grafting is investigated in relation to the osseointegration at early stages. The goal is to transmit the structure (silica matrix with embedded hydroxyapatite) and the properties of the bone grafting into a coating material. The bone grafting substitute offers an osseoinductive potential caused by an exchange of the silica matrix in vivo accompanied by vascularization. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analysis show that the coating material consists of a high porous silica matrix with embedded nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite with the same morphology as human hydroxyapatite. An in vitro investigation shows the early interaction between coating and human blood. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis showed that the silica matrix was replaced by an organic matrix within a few minutes. Uncoated and coated titanium implants were inserted into the femora of New Zealand White rabbits. The bone-to-implant contact (BIC) was measured after 2, 4, and 6 weeks. The BIC of the coated implants was increased significantly at 2 and 4 weeks. After 6 weeks, the BIC was decreased to the level of the control group. A histological analysis revealed high bone apposition on the coated implant surface after 2 and 4 weeks. Osteoblastic and osteoclastic activities on the coating material indicated that the coating participates in the bone-remodeling process. The nanostructure of the coating material led to an exchange of the silica matrix by an autologous, organic matrix without delamination of the coating. This is the key issue in understanding initial bone formation on a coated surface. PMID:24627631

  7. A preliminary investigation of materialism and impulsiveness as predictors of technological addictions among young adults.

    PubMed

    Roberts, James A; Pirog, Stephen F

    2013-03-01

    Background and aims The primary objective of the present research is to investigate the drivers of technological addiction in college students - heavy users of Information and Communication Technology (ICT). The study places cell phone and instant messaging addiction in the broader context of consumption pathologies, investigating the influence of materialism and impulsiveness on these two technologies. Clearly, cell phones serve more than just a utilitarian purpose. Cell phones are used in public and play a vital role in the lives of young adults. The accessibility of new technologies, like cell phones, which have the advantages of portability and an ever increasing array of functions, makes their over-use increasingly likely. Methods College undergraduates (N = 191) from two U.S. universities completed a paper and pencil survey instrument during class. The questionnaire took approximately 15-20 minutes to complete and contained scales that measured materialism, impulsiveness, and mobile phone and instant messaging addiction. Results Factor analysis supported the discriminant validity of Ehrenberg, Juckes, White and Walsh's (2008) Mobile Phone and Instant Messaging Addictive Tendencies Scale. The path model indicates that both materialism and impulsiveness impact the two addictive tendencies, and that materialism's direct impact on these addictions has a noticeably larger effect on cell phone use than instant messaging. Conclusions The present study finds that materialism and impulsiveness drive both a dependence on cell phones and instant messaging. As Griffiths (2012) rightly warns, however, researchers must be aware that one's addiction may not simply be to the cell phone, but to a particular activity or function of the cell phone. The emergence of multi-function smart phones requires that research must dig beneath the technology being used to the activities that draw the user to the particular technology. PMID:26165772

  8. INVESTIGATION OF THE PRESENCE OF DRUGSTORE BEETLES WITHIN CELOTEX ASSEMBLIES IN RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Loftin, B; Glenn Abramczyk, G

    2008-06-04

    During normal operations at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Hanford, WA, drugstore beetles, (Stegobium paniceum (L.) Coleoptera: Anobiidae), were found within the fiberboard subassemblies of two 9975 Shipping Packages. Initial indications were that the beetles were feeding on the Celotex{trademark} assemblies within the package. Celotex{trademark} fiberboard is used in numerous radioactive material packages serving as both a thermal insulator and an impact absorber for both normal conditions of transport and hypothetical accident conditions. The Department of Energy's Packaging Certification Program (EM-63) directed a thorough investigation to determine if the drugstore beetles were causing damage that would be detrimental to the safety performance of the Celotex{trademark}. The Savannah River National Laboratory is conducting the investigation with entomological expertise provided by Clemson University. The two empty 9975 shipping packages were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory in the fall of 2007. This paper will provide details and results of the ongoing investigation.

  9. Numerical investigations on flow dynamics of prismatic granular materials using the discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, W.; Weatherley, D.; Wruck, B.; Chitombo, G. P.

    2012-04-01

    The flow dynamics of granular materials is of broad interest in both the geosciences (e.g. landslides, fault zone evolution, and brecchia pipe formation) and many engineering disciplines (e.g chemical engineering, food sciences, pharmaceuticals and materials science). At the interface between natural and human-induced granular media flow, current underground mass-mining methods are trending towards the induced failure and subsequent gravitational flow of large volumes of broken rock, a method known as cave mining. Cave mining relies upon the undercutting of a large ore body, inducement of fragmentation of the rock and subsequent extraction of ore from below, via hopper-like outlets. Design of such mines currently relies upon a simplified kinematic theory of granular flow in hoppers, known as the ellipsoid theory of mass movement. This theory assumes that the zone of moving material grows as an ellipsoid above the outlet of the silo. The boundary of the movement zone is a shear band and internal to the movement zone, the granular material is assumed to have a uniformly high bulk porosity compared with surrounding stagnant regions. There is however, increasing anecdotal evidence and field measurements suggesting this theory fails to capture the full complexity of granular material flow within cave mines. Given the practical challenges obstructing direct measurement of movement both in laboratory experiments and in-situ, the Discrete Element Method (DEM [1]) is a popular alternative to investigate granular media flow. Small-scale DEM studies (c.f. [3] and references therein) have confirmed that movement within DEM silo flow models matches that predicted by ellipsoid theory, at least for mono-disperse granular material freely outflowing at a constant rate. A major draw-back of these small-scale DEM studies is that the initial bulk porosity of the simulated granular material is significantly higher than that of broken, prismatic rock. In this investigation, more

  10. Investigation on the application of steel slag-fly ash-phosphogypsum solidified material as road base material.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weiguo; Zhou, Mingkai; Ma, Wei; Hu, Jinqiang; Cai, Zhi

    2009-05-15

    The aim of the present work is to prepare a new type of steel slag-fly ash-phosphogypsum solidified material totally composed with solid wastes to be utilized as road base material. The mix formula of this material was optimized, the solidified material with optimal mix formula (fly ash/steel slag=1:1, phosphogypsum dosage=2.5%) results in highest strength. The strength development, resilience modulus and splitting strength of this material were studied comparing with some typical road base materials, the 28- and 360-day strength of this material can reach 8MPa and 12MPa, respectively, its resilience modulus reaches 1987MPa and splitting strength reaches 0.82MPa, it has higher early strength than lime-fly ash and lime-soil road base material, its long-term strength is much higher than cement stabilized granular materials, the solidified material has best water stability among those road base materials, it can be engineered as road base material with competitive properties. The strength formation mechanism of this solidified material is discussed also. PMID:18801617

  11. Experimental investigation of Rayleigh Taylor instability in elastic-plastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haley, Aaron Alan; Banerjee, Arindam

    2010-11-01

    The interface of an elastic-plastic plate accelerated by a fluid of lower density is Rayleigh Taylor (RT) unstable, the growth being mitigated by the mechanical strength of the plate. The instability is observed when metal plates are accelerated by high explosives, in explosive welding, and in volcanic island formation due to the strength of the inner crust. In contrast to the classical case involving Newtonian fluids, RT instability in accelerated solids is not well understood. The difficulties for constructing a theory for the linear growth phase in solids is essentially due to the character of elastic-plastic constitutive properties which has a nonlinear dependence on the magnitude of the rate of deformation. Experimental investigation of the phenomena is difficult due to the exceedingly small time scales (in high energy density experiments) and large measurement uncertainties of material properties. We performed experiments on our Two-Wheel facility to study the linear stage of the incompressible RT instability in elastic-plastic materials (yogurt) whose properties were well characterized. Rotation of the wheels imparted a constant centrifugal acceleration on the material interface that was cut with a small sinusoidal ripple. The controlled initial conditions and precise acceleration amplitudes are levied to investigate transition from elastic to plastic deformation and allow accurate and detailed measurements of flow properties.

  12. Investigation of the Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) Electron Resist as Insulating Material in Phase Change Memory Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiao; Ji, Hongkai; Lan, Tian; Yan, Junbing; Zhou, Wenli; Miao, Xiangshui

    2015-01-01

    Phase change random access memory (PCRAM) affords many advantages over conventional solid-state memories due to its nonvolatility, high speed, and scalability. However, high programming current to amorphize the crystalline phase through the melt-quench process of PCRAM, known as the RESET current, poses a critical challenge and has become the most significant obstacle for its widespread commercialization. In this work, an excellent negative tone resist for high resolution electron beam lithography, hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ), has been investigated as the insulating material which locally blocks the contact between the bottom electrode and the phase change material in PCRAM devices. Fabrications of the highly scaled HSQ nanopore arrays (as small as 16 nm) are presented. The insulating properties of the HSQ material are studied, especially under e-beam exposure plus thermal curing. Some other critical issues about the thickness adjustment of HSQ films and the influence of the PCRAM electrode on electron scattering in e-beam lithography are discussed. In addition, the HSQ material was successfully integrated into the PCRAM devices, achieving ultra-low RESET current (sub-100 μA), outstanding on/off ratios (~50), and improved endurance at tens of nanometers.

  13. Investigation of the Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) Electron Resist as Insulating Material in Phase Change Memory Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiao; Ji, Hongkai; Lan, Tian; Yan, Junbing; Zhou, Wenli; Miao, Xiangshui

    2014-09-01

    Phase change random access memory (PCRAM) affords many advantages over conventional solid-state memories due to its nonvolatility, high speed, and scalability. However, high programming current to amorphize the crystalline phase through the melt-quench process of PCRAM, known as the RESET current, poses a critical challenge and has become the most significant obstacle for its widespread commercialization. In this work, an excellent negative tone resist for high resolution electron beam lithography, hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ), has been investigated as the insulating material which locally blocks the contact between the bottom electrode and the phase change material in PCRAM devices. Fabrications of the highly scaled HSQ nanopore arrays (as small as 16 nm) are presented. The insulating properties of the HSQ material are studied, especially under e-beam exposure plus thermal curing. Some other critical issues about the thickness adjustment of HSQ films and the influence of the PCRAM electrode on electron scattering in e-beam lithography are discussed. In addition, the HSQ material was successfully integrated into the PCRAM devices, achieving ultra-low RESET current (sub-100 μA), outstanding on/off ratios (~50), and improved endurance at tens of nanometers.

  14. Theoretical investigation of Chevrel phase materials for cathodes accommodating Ca2+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeu, Manuel; Hossain, Md Sazzad; Wang, Zi; Timoshevskii, Vladimir; Bevan, Kirk H.; Zaghib, Karim

    2016-02-01

    The Chevrel phase compounds Mo6X8 (X = S, Se, Te) are theoretically studied by ab initio methods as potential candidates for battery cathode materials. The voltage profiles are calculated for the cases of various alkaline earth metals (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) serving as guest intercalation ions. The Ca ions are shown to offer the practically significant voltage of ∼1.0-1.25 V, with S substitution giving the highest voltage over Se and Te. We further demonstrate that doubling the capacity of such a battery would also be possible by incorporating a second Ca ion near the Mo6X8 cluster. The electronic properties of this material are investigated, revealing that the entire Mo6 cluster behaves as a redox center. Finally, the ion diffusion barriers are calculated, showing comparable values to existing battery materials. This work demonstrates that the Chevrel phase may be useful as a cathode material for intercalating divalent ions, and also offers insights into possible tuning of cathode properties by judicious selection of the constituents.

  15. Project of electro-cyclotron resonance ion source test-bench for material investigation.

    PubMed

    Kulevoy, T V; Chalykh, B B; Kuibeda, R P; Kropachev, G N; Ziiatdinova, A V

    2014-02-01

    Development of new materials for future energy facilities with higher operating efficiency is a challenging and crucial task. However, full-scale testing of radiation hardness for reactor materials is quite sophisticated and difficult as it requires long session of reactor irradiation; moreover, induced radioactivity considerably complicates further investigation. Ion beam irradiation does not have such a drawback; on the contrary, it has certain advantages. One of them is high speed of defect formation. Therefore, it provides a useful tool for modeling of different radiation damages. Improved understanding of material behavior under high dose irradiation will probably allow to simulate reactor irradiation close to real conditions and to make an adequate estimation of material radiation hardness. Since 2008 in Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, the ion beam irradiation experiments are under development at the heavy ion radio frequency quadrupole linac and very important results are obtained already [T. V. Kulevoy et al., in Proceedings of the International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Research Applications and Utilization of Accelerators, IAEA Vienna, Austria, 2009, http://www.pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/P1433_CD/darasets/papers/ap_p5_07.pdf]. Nevertheless, the new test bench based on electro-cyclotron resonance ion source and high voltage platform is developed. The project of the test bench is presented and discussed. PMID:24593489

  16. Project of electro-cyclotron resonance ion source test-bench for material investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulevoy, T. V.; Chalykh, B. B.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Kropachev, G. N.; Ziiatdinova, A. V.

    2014-02-01

    Development of new materials for future energy facilities with higher operating efficiency is a challenging and crucial task. However, full-scale testing of radiation hardness for reactor materials is quite sophisticated and difficult as it requires long session of reactor irradiation; moreover, induced radioactivity considerably complicates further investigation. Ion beam irradiation does not have such a drawback; on the contrary, it has certain advantages. One of them is high speed of defect formation. Therefore, it provides a useful tool for modeling of different radiation damages. Improved understanding of material behavior under high dose irradiation will probably allow to simulate reactor irradiation close to real conditions and to make an adequate estimation of material radiation hardness. Since 2008 in Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, the ion beam irradiation experiments are under development at the heavy ion radio frequency quadrupole linac and very important results are obtained already [T. V. Kulevoy et al., in Proceedings of the International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Research Applications and Utilization of Accelerators, IAEA Vienna, Austria, 2009, http://www.pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/P1433_CD/darasets/papers/ap_p5_07.pdf]. Nevertheless, the new test bench based on electro-cyclotron resonance ion source and high voltage platform is developed. The project of the test bench is presented and discussed.

  17. Recent results on materials aspects of the investigation of new topological states of matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cava, Robert

    Investigation of the electronic states of matter that are determined by topological physics has exploded in recent years through parallel progress in theory, experimental characterization, device fabrication and new materials development. In our group working in this area, the speaker has been responsible for the development of new materials to allow the experimentalists to probe the emergence of new topological properties, and to help embody the concepts of our theorists in real materials. The field is fast-moving, with particular thrusts at the present time toward Weyl and Dirac semimetals, and in this talk I will describe the materials aspects of our work in the past year in these areas, specifically as they are related to our strong collaborations with the groups of N.P. Ong, A. Yazdani, and B.A. Bernevig at Princeton, T. Valla and J. Tao at Brookhaven, and A. Vishwanath at Berkeley. The support of our work in this area by the NSF through its MRSEC program, Grant DMR 1420541, and the ARO through its MURI on topological insulators, Grant W911NF-12-1-0461, is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Investigation of metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials for engineered barrier applications in nuclear-waste packages

    SciTech Connect

    Westerman, R.E.

    1980-10-01

    An effort to develop licensable engineered barrier systems for the long-term (about 1000 yr) containment of nuclear wastes under conditions of deep continental geologic disposal has been underway at Pacific Northwest Laboratory since January 1979, under the auspices of the High-Level Waste Immobilization Program. In the present work, the barrier system comprises the hard or structural elements of the package: the canister, the overpack(s), and the hole sleeve. A number of candidate metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials were put through mechanical, corrosion, and leaching screening tests to determine their potential usefulness in barrier-system applications. Materials demonstrating adequate properties in the screening tests will be subjected to more detailed property tests, and, eventually, cost/benefit analyses, to determine their ultimate applicability to barrier-system design concepts. The following materials were investigated: two titanium alloys of Grade 2 and Grade 12; 300 and 400 series stainless steels, Inconels, Hastelloy C-276, titanium, Zircoloy, copper-nickel alloys and cast irons; total of 14 ceramic materials, including two grades of alumina, plus graphite and basalt; and polymers such as polyamide-imide, polyarylene, polyimide, polyolefin, polyphenylene sulfide, polysulfone, fluoropolymer, epoxy, furan, silicone, and ethylene-propylene terpolymer (EPDM) rubber. The most promising candidates for further study and potential use in engineered barrier systems were found to be rubber, filled polyphenylene sulfide, fluoropolymer, and furan derivatives.

  19. Validation of reference materials for uranium radiochronometry in the frame of nuclear forensic investigations.

    PubMed

    Varga, Z; Mayer, K; Bonamici, C E; Hubert, A; Hutcheon, I; Kinman, W; Kristo, M; Pointurier, F; Spencer, K; Stanley, F; Steiner, R; Tandon, L; Williams, R

    2015-08-01

    The results of a joint effort by expert nuclear forensic laboratories in the area of age dating of uranium, i.e. the elapsed time since the last chemical purification of the material are presented and discussed. Completely separated uranium materials of known production date were distributed among the laboratories, and the samples were dated according to routine laboratory procedures by the measurement of the (230)Th/(234)U ratio. The measurement results were in good agreement with the known production date showing that the concept for preparing uranium age dating reference material based on complete separation is valid. Detailed knowledge of the laboratory procedures used for uranium age dating allows the identification of possible improvements in the current protocols and the development of improved practice in the future. The availability of age dating reference materials as well as the evolvement of the age dating best-practice protocol will increase the relevance and applicability of age dating as part of the tool-kit available for nuclear forensic investigations. PMID:26043276

  20. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of the program is to identify, test, evaluate and recommend encapsulation materials and processes for the fabrication of cost-effective and long life solar modules. Of the $18 (1948 $) per square meter allocated for the encapsulation components approximately 50% of the cost ($9/sq m) may be taken by the load bearing component. Due to the proportionally high cost of this element, lower costing materials were investigated. Wood based products were found to be the lowest costing structural materials for module construction, however, they require protection from rainwater and humidity in order to acquire dimensional stability. The cost of a wood product based substrate must, therefore, include raw material costs plus the cost of additional processing to impart hygroscopic inertness. This protection is provided by a two step, or split process in which a flexible laminate containing the cell string is prepared, first in a vacuum process and then adhesively attached with a back cover film to the hardboard in a subsequent step.

  1. Direct investigation of (sub-) surface preparation artifacts in GaAs based materials by FIB sectioning.

    PubMed

    Belz, Jürgen; Beyer, Andreas; Torunski, Torsten; Stolz, Wolfgang; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-04-01

    The introduction of preparation artifacts is almost inevitable when producing samples for (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM). These artifacts can be divided in extrinsic artifacts like damage processes and intrinsic artifacts caused by the deviations from the volume strain state in thin elastically strained material systems. The reduction and estimation of those effects is of great importance for the quantitative analysis of (S)TEM images. Thus, optimized ion beam preparation conditions are investigated for high quality samples. Therefore, the surface topology is investigated directly with atomic force microscopy (AFM) on the actual TEM samples. Additionally, the sectioning of those samples by a focused ion beam (FIB) is used to investigate the damage depth profile directly in the TEM. The AFM measurements show good quantitative agreement of sample height modulation due to strain relaxation to finite elements simulations. Strong indications of (sub-) surface damage by ion beams are observed. Their influence on high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging is estimated with focus on thickness determination by absolute intensity methods. Data consolidation of AFM and TEM measurements reveals a 3.5nm surface amorphization, negligible surface roughness on the scale of angstroms and a sub-surface damage profile in the range of up to 8.0nm in crystalline gallium arsenide (GaAs) and GaAs-based ternary alloys. A correction scheme for thickness evaluation of absolute HAADF intensities is proposed and applied for GaAs based materials. PMID:26855206

  2. Preliminary investigation of cement materials in the Taif area, Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Conrad

    1970-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of possible sources of cement rock in the Taft area was made during the latter part of August 1968. Adequate deposits of limestone, clay, quartz conglomerate and sandstone, and pisolitic iron ore, yet no gypsum, were located to support a Cement plant should it prove feasible to establish one in this area. These materials, made up mostly of Tertiary and later sediments, crop out in isolated, inconspicuous low hills in a north- trending belt, 10 to 15 kilometers wide, lying about 90 kilometers to-the east of At Taft. The belt extends for more than 90 kilometers from the vicinity of Jabal 'An in the south to the crushed rock pits at Radwan and beyond in the north. The area is readily accessible either from the Talf-Riyadh highway or from the Taif-Bishah road presently under construction. The limestone, which is quite pure and dense in some localities but dolomitic, argillaceous, and cherty in others, occurs in a variety of colors and would make suitable decorative building stone. The volcanic rocks of the Harrat Hadan, lying directly to the east of the limestone belt, include volcanic ash beds some of which may have been altered to bentonitlc clays. Others may have been lithified and might be suitable for light-weight aggregate. These possibilities remain to be investigated. Precambrian metamorphic rocks lying directly to the south and southeast of Taif were also investigated as possible cement rock sources, but no suitable material was found here.

  3. Forensic DNA Phenotyping: Predicting human appearance from crime scene material for investigative purposes.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    Forensic DNA Phenotyping refers to the prediction of appearance traits of unknown sample donors, or unknown deceased (missing) persons, directly from biological materials found at the scene. "Biological witness" outcomes of Forensic DNA Phenotyping can provide investigative leads to trace unknown persons, who are unidentifiable with current comparative DNA profiling. This intelligence application of DNA marks a substantially different forensic use of genetic material rather than that of current DNA profiling presented in the courtroom. Currently, group-specific pigmentation traits are already predictable from DNA with reasonably high accuracies, while several other externally visible characteristics are under genetic investigation. Until individual-specific appearance becomes accurately predictable from DNA, conventional DNA profiling needs to be performed subsequent to appearance DNA prediction. Notably, and where Forensic DNA Phenotyping shows great promise, this is on a (much) smaller group of potential suspects, who match the appearance characteristics DNA-predicted from the crime scene stain or from the deceased person's remains. Provided sufficient funding being made available, future research to better understand the genetic basis of human appearance will expectedly lead to a substantially more detailed description of an unknown person's appearance from DNA, delivering increased value for police investigations in criminal and missing person cases involving unknowns. PMID:25716572

  4. Experimental investigation of micromechanical behavior of advanced materials by moiré interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Xinlin; Qin, Yuwen; Dai, Fulong

    1996-09-01

    Several typical instances show that moiré interferometry is an effective experimental method for micromechanics study of advanced materials. By using moiré interferometry, stress-induced martensitic transformation plastic zone in ceria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline ceramics (Ce-TZP) is studied. The experimental results show that the stress-induced transformation at room temperature is not uniform within the transformation zone and the phenomenon of microscopic plastic flow localization for transformation is revealed. Meanwhile, the experimental investigation of the pseudoelasticity behavior of Cu-Zn-Al polycrystalline shape memory alloy and bending behavior of carbon-fiber aluminium laminates (CALL) are reported. The experiments reveal some important features of the deformation processes of the materials. Finally, the measuring ability of moiré interferometry for micromechanics study is discussed.

  5. Radiative property investigation. [digital computer programs for determining bidirectional reflectance of spacecraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. L., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed formulation of radiative heat transfer problems involving the use of bidirectional reflectance is discussed. Except for very simple systems this formulation is very intricate. For this reason and the fact that bidirectional data are scarce, such a formulation is not in common use. However, with the development of the digital computer there have been numerical methods developed for detailed radiative investigations using the bidirectional reflectance. Since computations using bidirectional reflectance are coming into use for spacecraft radiative studies, it is necessary to have reflectance data on the materials involved. Materials that are frequently studied are coatings which are used in controlling the thermal environment of spacecrafts. This study is primarily concerned with the bidirectional reflectance of zinc oxide which is one constituent commonly used for coatings.

  6. Experimental and analytical investigations of granular materials: Shear flow and convective heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Hojin

    1989-12-01

    Granular materials flowing down an inclined chute were studied experimentally and analytically. Characteristics of convective heat transfer to granular flows were also investigated experimentally and numerically. Experiments on continuous, steady flows of granular materials in an inclined chute were conducted with the objectives of understanding the characteristics of chute flows and of acquiring information on the rheological behavior of granular material flow. Existing constitutive equations and governing equations were used to solve for fully developed chute flows of granular materials, and thus the boundary value problem was formulated with two parameters (the coefficient of restitution between particles, and the chute inclination) and three boundary values at the chute base wall (the values of solid fraction, granular temperature, and mean velocity at the wall). The boundary value problem was numerically solved by the shooting method. These analytical results were also compared with the present experimental values and with the computer simulations by other investigators in their literature. Experiments on heat transfer to granular flows over a flat heating plate were conducted with three sizes of glass beads, polystyrene beads, and mustard seeds. A modification on the existing model for the convective heat transfer was made using the effective Nusselt number and the effective Peclet number, which include the effects of solid fraction variations. The slightly modified model could describe the heat transfer characteristics of both fast and slow flows (supercritical and subcritical). A numerical analysis of the transfer to granular flows was also performed. The results were compared with the present experimental data, and reasonable agreement was found in the comparison.

  7. Synthesis and investigation of novel cathode materials for sodium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicki, Monica

    Environmental pollution and eventual depletion of fossil fuels and lithium has increased the need for research towards alternative electrical energy storage systems. In this context, research in sodium ion batteries (NIBs) has become more prevalent since the price in lithium has increased due to its demand and reserve location. Sodium is an abundant resource that is low cost, and safe; plus its chemical properties are similar to that of Li which makes the transition into using Na chemistry for ion battery systems feasible. In this study, we report the effects of processing conditions on the electrochemical properties of Na-ion batteries made of the NaCrO2 cathode. NaCrO2 is synthesized via solid state reactions. The as-synthesized powder is then subjected to high-energy ball milling under different conditions which reduces particle size drastically and causes significant degradation of the specific capacity for NaCrO2. X-ray diffraction reveals that lattice distortion has taken place during high-energy ball milling and in turn affects the electrochemical performance of the cathode material. This study shows that a balance between reducing particle size and maintaining the layered structure is essential to obtain high specific capacity for the NaCrO2 cathode. In light of the requirements for grid scale energy storage: ultra-long cycle life (> 20,000 cycles and calendar life of 15 to 20 years), high round trip efficiency (> 90%), low cost, sufficient power capability, and safety; the need for a suitable cathode materials with excellent capacity retention such as Na2MnFe(CN)6 and K2MnFe(CN)6 will be investigated. Prussian blue (A[FeIIIFeII (CN)6]•xH2O, A=Na+ or K+ ) and its analogues have been investigated as an alkali ion host for use as a cathode material. Their structure (FCC) provides large ionic channels along the direction enabling facile insertion and extraction of alkali ions. This material is also capable of more than one Na ion insertion per unit formula

  8. Mars: electric properties of clay materials in martian-like conditions to refine radar investigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colantuono, Luca; Baliva, Antonio; Lauro, Sebastian; Mattei, Elisabetta; Marinangeli, Lucia; Pettinelli, Elena; Seu, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    The orbital radar instruments are giving new opportunities for planetary geological investigation regarding subsurface layering and geometry. Sedimentary deposits of paleolacustrine environments on Mars have shown the presence of various clay minerals . These clay deposits are very important in planetary exploration because they are strictly linked to the presence of water and to the capability of the analyzed environment to develop life and, as a consequence, to preserve fossilized life marker. The subsurface stratigraphy and geometry of sedimentary deposits on Mars are investigated by two orbiting radar instruments (SHARAD and MARSIS) and in the next future another radar instrument, a landing one, will be send on Mars (WISDOM). For small grain size sediments, like clay minerals, the dielectric properties have a strong impact on the penetration depth of the radar signal. We studied the correct evaluation of these properties and their correlation with chemical and mineralogical phases. The focus of this research is on the dielectric properties of natural clayey materials at different frequencies and temperature, evaluating the correlation among water content , temperature and electric properties. Several natural clayey material samples, considered as analogues to the Martian ones, have been collected from different geological settings in Italy and we analyzed their water content, mineralogical assemblage and chemical content and the correlation with the permittivity at different frequencies and temperatures using the Network Analyzer technique. We also changed the water content of the samples, and using the SHARAD, MARSIS and WISDOM operating frequencies, we measured the variation of permittivity and electric properties in the thermal range of 180 K to 298 K. The goal of the study is to refine the sounding depths of the radar investigation on Mars, exploring the possibility to identify clayey sedimentary layers analyzing the differences between the electric

  9. Experimental Investigation of Material Flows Within FSWs Using 3D Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Charles R. Tolle; Timothy A. White; Karen S. Miller; Denis E. Clark; Herschel B. Smartt

    2008-06-01

    There exists significant prior work using tracers or pre-placed hardened markers within friction stir welding (FSWing) to experimentally explore material flow within the FSW process. Our experiments replaced markers with a thin sheet of copper foil placed between the 6061 aluminum lap and butt joints that were then welded. The absorption characteristics of x-rays for copper and aluminum are significantly different allowing for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods such as x-ray computed tomography (CT) to be used to demonstrate the material movement within the weldment on a much larger scale than previously shown. 3D CT reconstruction of the copper components of the weldment allows for a unique view into the final turbulent state of the welding process as process parameters are varied. The x-ray CT data of a section of the weld region was collected using a cone-beam x-ray imaging system developed at the INL. Six-hundred projections were collected over 360-degrees using a 160-kVp Bremsstrahlung x-ray generator (25-micrometer focal spot) and amorphoussilicon x-ray detector. The region of the object that was imaged was about 3cm tall and 1.5cm x 1cm in cross section, and was imaged at a magnification of about 3.6x. The data were reconstructed on a 0.5x0.5x0.5 mm3 voxel grid. After reconstruction, the aluminum and copper could be easily discriminated using a gray level threshold allowing visualization of the copper components. Fractal analysis of the tomographic reconstructed material topology is investigated as a means to quantify macro level material flow based on process parameters. The results of multi-pass FSWs show increased refinement of the copper trace material. Implications of these techniques for quantifying process flow are discussed.

  10. Pseudo-Glassification Material for G-Demption

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, Andrew M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Gates, Robert O.; Riley, Brian J.

    2014-09-30

    G-Demption, LLC has requested that PPNL provide design input for a “pseudo-glassification” process associated with their proposed technology for generating gamma irradiation stations from used nuclear fuel. The irradiation design currently consists of an aluminum enclosure designed to allow for proper encapsulation of and heat flow from a used fuel rod while minimally impacting the streaming of gamma rays from the fuel. In order to make their design more robust, G-Demption is investigating the benefits of backfilling this aluminum enclosure with a setting material once the used fuel rod is properly placed. This process has been initially referred to as “pseudo-glassification”, and strives not to impact heat transport or gamma streaming from the used fuel rod while providing increased fuel rod protection and fission gas retention. PNNL has compiled an internal material evaluation and discussion for the “pseudo-glassification” process in this report.

  11. Time resolved optical methods for investigation of phase transformations in materials exposed to nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martan, J.; Semmar, N.; Cibulka, O.

    2011-06-01

    Infrared (IR) radiometry and time resolved reflectivity (TRR) methods can be used for investigation of laser pulse effects on materials in nanosecond time scale. The methods in combination are capable to quantify object temperature and detect phase transformations in the solid state, melting and plasma formation from vapour. Measurements with different laser pulse energy densities provide threshold of the transformation. The melt duration can be also determined. The experimental system is described. It contains KrF excimer laser with homogenizer and variable attenuator, fast IR detector for radiometry, continuous probing laser with Si photodiode for reflectivity measurement and UV detector for pump laser pulse reflection measurement. The system was applied to investigation of responses to laser light of silicon and different pure metals and alloys. The range of energy densities used was 1-5500 mJ.cm-2 and measurements were done with temporal resolution of 6 ns for radiometry and 1 ns for reflectivity.

  12. Investigation and characterization of constraint effects on flaw growth during fatigue loading of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinchcomb, W. W.; Reifsnider, K. L.; Yeung, P.; Gibbins, M. N.

    1979-01-01

    An investigative program is presented in an attempt to add to the current understanding of constraint effects on the response of composite materials under cyclic loading. The objectives were: (1) to use existing data and to develop additional data in order to establish an understanding and quantitative description of flaw growth in unidirectional lamina under cyclic loading at different load direction to fiber direction angles; (2) to establish a similar understanding and description of flaw growth in lamina which are embedded in laminates between other unflawed lamina; (3) to determine the nature of the influence of constraint on flaw growth by quantitatively comparing the results of the tests; and (4) to develop a model and philosophy of constraints effects based on our investigative results.

  13. Experimental investigation of various vegetable fibers as sorbent materials for oil spills.

    PubMed

    Annunciado, T R; Sydenstricker, T H D; Amico, S C

    2005-11-01

    Oil spills are a global concern due to their environmental and economical impact. Various commercial systems have been developed to control these spills, including the use of fibers as sorbents. This research investigates the use of various vegetable fibers, namely mixed leaves residues, mixed sawdust, sisal (Agave sisalana), coir fiber (Cocos nucifera), sponge-gourd (Luffa cylindrica) and silk-floss as sorbent materials of crude oil. Sorption tests with crude oil were conducted in deionized and marine water media, with and without agitation. Water uptake by the fibers was investigated by tests in dry conditions and distillation of the impregnated sorbent. The silk-floss fiber showed a very high degree of hydrophobicity and oil sorption capacity of approximately 85goil/g sorbent (in 24hours). Specific gravity measurements and buoyancy tests were also used to evaluate the suitability of these fibers for the intended application. PMID:15946707

  14. Investigating the frequency spectrum of mechanical quality factor for piezoelectric materials based on phenomenological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Weijia; Zhao, Hui; Ma, Jie; Yao, Yu; Uchino, Kenji

    2015-10-01

    Heat generation due to losses restricts piezoelectric materials from maintaining a high power density, which will further limit the miniaturization of piezoelectric devices. As an evaluation index of the loss level, the mechanical quality factor shows an opposite tendency with losses. The mechanical quality factor should therefore be evaluated. By new methods to determine the mechanical quality factor, the highest mechanical quality factor has been discovered within the working bandwidth other than the resonance and antiresonance frequencies, which is almost double the value at the resonance. In this study, the prime determinant of the maximum value has been experimentally investigated on the basis of the phenomenological model of the admittance phase. The investigation experimentally infers that the change in the tendency of the phase leads to the appearance of the maximum value. Thus, the new phenomenon is experimentally explained for the first time.

  15. Ferricyanide-backfilled cylindrical carbon fiber microelectrodes for in vivo analysis with high stability and low polarized potential.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Peipei; Yu, Ping; Wang, Kai; Hao, Jie; Fei, Junjie; Mao, Lanqun

    2015-11-01

    The development of stable and reproducible methods for in vivo electrochemical monitoring of neurochemicals is of great physiological importance. In this study, we demonstrate ferricyanide-filled cylindrical carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFEs) of high stability and low polarized potential for in vivo electrochemical analysis. We first studied the voltammetric behavior of cylindrical CFEs by using a model system consisting of two separated cells each containing potassium ferricyanide (K3Fe(CN)6) or potassium ferrocyanide (K4Fe(CN)6). We observed that E1/2 values of the system were dependent on the ratio of the lengths of the cylindrical CFEs and of the concentrations of the redox species on both poles. Based on this property, we prepared the ferricyanide-backfilled cylindrical CFEs, and found that this kind of electrode exhibits a more stable current response and a lower polarized potential than the CFEs backfilled with KCl or Ru(NH3)6Cl3. Animal experiments with the ferricyanide-backfilled cylindrical CFEs demonstrate that this kind of electrode could be used for in vivo monitoring of neurochemical release with a high stability under some physiological conditions. PMID:26378690

  16. Methods for an investigation of the effect of material components on the mechanical characteristics of glass-fiber-reinforced plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willax, H. O.

    1980-01-01

    The materials used in the production of glass reinforced plastics are discussed. Specific emphasis is given to matrix polyester materials, the reinforcing glass materials, and aspects of specimen preparation. Various methods of investigation are described, giving attention to optical impregnation and wetting measurements and the gravimetric determination of the angle of contact. Deformation measurements and approaches utilizing a piezoelectric device are also considered.

  17. Utilization of water-reducing admixtures in cemented paste backfill of sulphide-rich mill tailings.

    PubMed

    Ercikdi, Bayram; Cihangir, Ferdi; Kesimal, Ayhan; Deveci, Haci; Alp, Ibrahim

    2010-07-15

    This study presents the effect of three different water-reducing admixtures (WRAs) on the rheological and mechanical properties of cemented paste backfill (CPB) samples. A 28-day strength of > or = 0.7 MPa and the maintenance of the stability (i.e. > or = 0.7 MPa) over 360 days of curing were desired as the design criteria. Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and Portland composite cement (PCC) were used as binders at 5 wt.% dose. WRAs were initially tested to determine the dosage of a WRA for a required consistency of 7'' for CPB mixtures. A total of 192 CPB samples were then prepared using WRAs. The utilization of WRAs enhanced the flow characteristics of the CPB mixture and allowed to achieve the same consistency at a lower water-to-cement ratio. For OPC, the addition of WRAs appeared to improve the both short- and long-term performance of CPB samples. However, only polycarboxylate-based superplasticiser produced the desired 28-day strength of > or = 0.7 MPa when PCC was used as the binder. These findings suggest that WRAs can be suitably exploited for CPB of sulphide-rich tailings to improve the strength and stability in short and long terms allowing to reduce binder costs in a CPB plant. PMID:20382473

  18. 12 CFR 1080.14 - Confidential treatment of demand material and non-public nature of investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Confidential treatment of demand material and non-public nature of investigations. 1080.14 Section 1080.14 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER... and non-public nature of investigations. (a) Documentary materials, written reports, answers...

  19. 12 CFR 1080.14 - Confidential treatment of demand material and non-public nature of investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Confidential treatment of demand material and non-public nature of investigations. 1080.14 Section 1080.14 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER... and non-public nature of investigations. (a) Documentary materials and tangible things the...

  20. 12 CFR 1080.14 - Confidential treatment of demand material and non-public nature of investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Confidential treatment of demand material and non-public nature of investigations. 1080.14 Section 1080.14 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER... and non-public nature of investigations. (a) Documentary materials, written reports, answers...

  1. Theoretical and experimental investigation of acoustic streaming in a porous material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poesio, Pietro; Ooms, Gijs; Schraven, Arthur; van der Bas, Fred

    2002-07-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the influence of high-frequency acoustic waves on the flow of a liquid through a porous material has been made. Particular attention was paid to the phenomenon of acoustic streaming of the liquid in the porous material due to the damping of the acoustic waves. The experiments were performed on Berea sandstone cores. Two acoustic horns were used with frequencies of 20 and 40 kHz, and with maximum power output of 2 and 0.7 kW, respectively. A high external pressure was applied in order to avoid cavitation. A microphone was used to measure the damping of the waves in the porous material and also temperature and pressure measurements in the flowing liquid inside the cores were carried out. To model the acoustic streaming effect Darcy's law was extended with a source term representing the momentum transfer from the acoustic waves to the liquid. The model predictions for the pressure distribution inside the core under acoustic streaming conditions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Investigation of new material combinations for hard x-ray telescope designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, C. P.; Madsen, K. K.; Christensen, F. E.

    2006-06-01

    The materials chosen for depth graded multilayer designs for hard x-ray telescopes (10 keV to 80 keV) have until now been focusing on W/Si, W/SiC, Pt/C, and Pt/SiC. These material combinations have been chosen because of good stability over time and low interface roughness, However both W and Pt have absorption edges in the interesting energy range from 70 - 80 keV. If looking at the optical constants Cu and Ni would be good alternative high-Z candidates since the k-absorption edges in Cu and Ni is below 10 keV. We have investigated both of these materials as the reflecting layer in combination with SiC as the spacer layer and give the performance in terms of roughness, minimum obtainable d-spacing and stability over time as deposited in our planar magnetron sputtering facility. Likewise we review the same properties of WC/SiC coatings which we have previously developed and which allow for very small d-spacings. The combination of WC/SiC or the well established W/SiC with the above mentioned Cu and Ni-containing multilayers in the same stack allows for novel telescope designs operating up to and above 100 keV without the absorption edge structure.

  3. Dielectric engineered symmetric underlap double gate tunnel FET (DGTFET): An investigation towards variation of dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallikarjunarao; Ranjan, Rajeev; Pradhan, K. P.; Sahu, P. K.

    2016-08-01

    In this article, an underlap silicon n-channel Tunnel Field Effect Transistor (n-TFET) i.e., symmetric single-k spacer (SSS) Double Gate N-TFET (DGTFET) is proposed to improve the performance of the device by using different spacer materials. A detailed investigation has been made on the proposed device characteristics with the help of extensive 2-D TCAD simulations. It is demonstrated that an optimized underlap length is chosen for a significant on-state current (Ion) without deteriorating the off-state current (Ioff) and sub-threshold swing (SS). The proposed model with different spacer materials has been extensively analyzed by using transfer characteristics, output characteristics, and analog/RF characteristics. The structure is optimized based on the comparison among various performance metrics like Ion, Ioff, SS, on-off ratio (Ion/Ioff), threshold (or) cut-off frequency (fT), and intrinsic delay with considering different spacer materials like SiO2 (k = 3.9), Si3N4 (k = 7.5), and HfO2 (k = 25).

  4. Numerical investigation of the thermal behavior of heated natural composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasim, S. M.; Mohammed, F. Abbas; Hashim, R.

    2015-11-01

    In the present work numerical investigation was carried out for laminar natural convection heat transfer from natural composite material (NCM). Three types of natural materials such as seed dates, egg shells, and feathers are mixed separately with polyester resin. Natural materials are added with different volume fraction (10%, 20%, and 30%) are heated with different heat flux (1078W/m2, 928W/m2, 750W/m2, 608W/m2, and 457W/m2) at (vertical, inclined, and horizontal) position. Continuity and Navier-Stocks equations are solved numerically in three dimensions using ANSYS FLUENT package 12.1 software commercial program. Numerical results showed the temperature distribution was affected for all types at volume fraction 30% and heat flux is 1078 W/m2, for different position. So, shows that the plumes and temperature behavior are affected by the air and the distance from heat source. Numerical results showed acceptable agreement with the experimental previous results.

  5. Theoretical and experimental investigation of acoustic streaming in a porous material.

    PubMed

    Poesio, Pietro; Ooms, Gijs; Schraven, Arthur; van der Bas, Fred

    2002-07-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the influence of high-frequency acoustic waves on the flow of a liquid through a porous material has been made. Particular attention was paid to the phenomenon of acoustic streaming of the liquid in the porous material due to the damping of the acoustic waves. The experiments were performed on Berea sandstone cores. Two acoustic horns were used with frequencies of 20 and 40 kHz, and with maximum power output of 2 and 0.7 kW, respectively. A high external pressure was applied in order to avoid cavitation. A microphone was used to measure the damping of the waves in the porous material and also temperature and pressure measurements in the flowing liquid inside the cores were carried out. To model the acoustic streaming effect Darcy's law was extended with a source term representing the momentum transfer from the acoustic waves to the liquid. The model predictions for the pressure distribution inside the core under acoustic streaming conditions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. PMID:12241483

  6. Experimental investigation on materials and lubricants for sliding-vane air compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, Stefano; Valenti, Gianluca; Contaldi, Giulio; Valenti, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    Positive-displacement compressors and, among them, sliding-vane rotary machines are widely used in the compressed air sector. As in many other industrial fields, the efficient utilization of energy has become a major goal also in this sector. The aim of the present activity is the experimental investigation on the influence of two vanes materials (cast iron and aluminium with anodized surface) and of four commercial lubricants (characterized by different formulations and additives concentrations) on the performance of a mid-capacity sliding-vane rotary compressor in a number of operating pressures. The performance is identified by both the volume flow rate and the absorbed mechanical power, evaluated according to the international standard ISO 5167 and ISO 1217. The campaign indicates that the considered lubricants do not affect appreciably the volumetric flow rate. On the other hand, the specific lubricants determine a variation of about 1% of the mechanical power for both materials, while the specific material a variation between 0.9% and 2.6%. The best performance is achieved by aluminium vanes and a synthetic poly-α-olefin lubricant.

  7. Investigation of dental alginate and agar impression materials as a brain simulant for ballistic testing.

    PubMed

    Falland-Cheung, Lisa; Piccione, Neil; Zhao, Tianqi; Lazarjan, Milad Soltanipour; Hanlin, Suzanne; Jermy, Mark; Waddell, J Neil

    2016-06-01

    Routine forensic research into in vitro skin/skull/brain ballistic blood backspatter behavior has traditionally used gelatin at a 1:10 Water:Powder (W:P) ratio by volume as a brain simulant. A limitation of gelatin is its high elasticity compared to brain tissue. Therefore this study investigated the use of dental alginate and agar impression materials as a brain simulant for ballistic testing. Fresh deer brain, alginate (W:P ratio 91.5:8.5) and agar (W:P ratio 81:19) specimens (n=10) (11×22×33mm) were placed in transparent Perspex boxes of the same internal dimensions prior to shooting with a 0.22inch caliber high velocity air gun. Quantitative analysis to establish kinetic energy loss, vertical displacement elastic behavior and qualitative analysis to establish elasticity behavior was done via high-speed camera footage (SA5, Photron, Japan) using Photron Fastcam Viewer software (Version 3.5.1, Photron, Japan) and visual observation. Damage mechanisms and behavior were qualitatively established by observation of the materials during and after shooting. The qualitative analysis found that of the two simulant materials tested, agar behaved more like brain in terms of damage and showed similar mechanical response to brain during the passage of the projectile, in terms of energy absorption and vertical velocity displacement. In conclusion agar showed a mechanical and subsequent damage response that was similar to brain compared to alginate. PMID:27131216

  8. Investigation of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Metal Matrix Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    2002-01-01

    The improvement in weld quality by the friction stir welding (FSW) process invented by TWI of Cambridge, England, patented in 1991, has prompted investigation of this process for advanced structural materials including Al metal matrix composite (Al-MMC) materials. Such materials can have high specific stiffness and other potential beneficial properties for the extreme environments in space. Developments of discontinuous reinforced Al-MMCs have found potential space applications and the future for such applications is quite promising. The space industry has recognized advantages of the FSW process over conventional welding processes such as the absence of a melt zone, reduced distortion, elimination of the need for shielding gases, and ease of automation. The process has been well proven for aluminum alloys, and work is being carried out for ferrous materials, magnesium alloys and copper alloys. Development work in the FSW welding process for joining of Al-MMCs is relatively recent and some of this and related work can be found in referenced research publications. NASA engineers have undertaken to spear head this research development work for FSW process investigation of Al-MMCs. Some of the reported related work has pointed out the difficulty in fusion welding of particulate reinforced MMCs where liquid Al will react with SiC to precipitate aluminum carbide (Al4C3). Advantages of no such reaction and no need for joint preparation for the FSW process is anticipated in the welding of Al-MMCs. The FSW process has been best described as a combination of extrusion and forging of metals. This is carried out as the pin tool rotates and is slowly plunged into the bond line of the joint as the pin tool's shoulder is in intimate contact with the work piece. The material is friction-stirred into a quality weld. Al-MMCs, 4 in. x 12 in. plates of 0.25 in. (6.35mm) thickness, procured from MMCC, Inc. were butt welded using FSW process at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using

  9. A unique in vivo approach for investigating antimicrobial materials utilizing fistulated animals

    PubMed Central

    Berean, Kyle J.; Adetutu, Eric M.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Nour, Majid; Nguyen, Emily P.; Paull, David; Mcleod, Jess; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Bansal, Vipul; Latham, Kay; Bishop-Hurley, Greg J.; McSweeney, Chris; Ball, Andrew S.; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2015-01-01

    Unique in vivo tests were conducted through the use of a fistulated ruminant, providing an ideal environment with a diverse and vibrant microbial community. Utilizing such a procedure can be especially invaluable for investigating the performance of antimicrobial materials related to human and animal related infections. In this pilot study, it is shown that the rumen of a fistulated animal provides an excellent live laboratory for assessing the properties of antimicrobial materials. We investigate microbial colonization onto model nanocomposites based on silver (Ag) nanoparticles at different concentrations into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). With implantable devices posing a major risk for hospital-acquired infections, the present study provides a viable solution to understand microbial colonization with the potential to reduce the incidence of infection through the introduction of Ag nanoparticles at the optimum concentrations. In vitro measurements were also conducted to show the validity of the approach. An optimal loading of 0.25 wt% Ag is found to show the greatest antimicrobial activity and observed through the in vivo tests to reduce the microbial diversity colonizing the surface. PMID:26098413

  10. A unique in vivo approach for investigating antimicrobial materials utilizing fistulated animals.

    PubMed

    Berean, Kyle J; Adetutu, Eric M; Zhen Ou, Jian; Nour, Majid; Nguyen, Emily P; Paull, David; Mcleod, Jess; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Bansal, Vipul; Latham, Kay; Bishop-Hurley, Greg J; McSweeney, Chris; Ball, Andrew S; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2015-01-01

    Unique in vivo tests were conducted through the use of a fistulated ruminant, providing an ideal environment with a diverse and vibrant microbial community. Utilizing such a procedure can be especially invaluable for investigating the performance of antimicrobial materials related to human and animal related infections. In this pilot study, it is shown that the rumen of a fistulated animal provides an excellent live laboratory for assessing the properties of antimicrobial materials. We investigate microbial colonization onto model nanocomposites based on silver (Ag) nanoparticles at different concentrations into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). With implantable devices posing a major risk for hospital-acquired infections, the present study provides a viable solution to understand microbial colonization with the potential to reduce the incidence of infection through the introduction of Ag nanoparticles at the optimum concentrations. In vitro measurements were also conducted to show the validity of the approach. An optimal loading of 0.25 wt% Ag is found to show the greatest antimicrobial activity and observed through the in vivo tests to reduce the microbial diversity colonizing the surface. PMID:26098413

  11. A unique in vivo approach for investigating antimicrobial materials utilizing fistulated animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berean, Kyle J.; Adetutu, Eric M.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Nour, Majid; Nguyen, Emily P.; Paull, David; McLeod, Jess; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Bansal, Vipul; Latham, Kay; Bishop-Hurley, Greg J.; McSweeney, Chris; Ball, Andrew S.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2015-06-01

    Unique in vivo tests were conducted through the use of a fistulated ruminant, providing an ideal environment with a diverse and vibrant microbial community. Utilizing such a procedure can be especially invaluable for investigating the performance of antimicrobial materials related to human and animal related infections. In this pilot study, it is shown that the rumen of a fistulated animal provides an excellent live laboratory for assessing the properties of antimicrobial materials. We investigate microbial colonization onto model nanocomposites based on silver (Ag) nanoparticles at different concentrations into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). With implantable devices posing a major risk for hospital-acquired infections, the present study provides a viable solution to understand microbial colonization with the potential to reduce the incidence of infection through the introduction of Ag nanoparticles at the optimum concentrations. In vitro measurements were also conducted to show the validity of the approach. An optimal loading of 0.25 wt% Ag is found to show the greatest antimicrobial activity and observed through the in vivo tests to reduce the microbial diversity colonizing the surface.

  12. The stabilization of the rock mass of the wieliczka salt mine through the backfilling of the witos chamber with the use of injection methods / Stabilizacji górotworu kopalni soli "wieliczka" poprzez likwidację komór "witos" z zastosowaniem metod iniekcji

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Obyrn, Kajetan

    2012-10-01

    The Wieliczka Salt Mine is the most famous and the most visited mining industry monument in the world and it requires modern methods to ensure rock mass stability and tourists' security. Both for conservation and tourism organization reasons, the group of Warszawa-Wisla-Budryk-Lebzeltern-Upper Witos Chambers (Photo. 1, 2. 3) located the Kazanów mid-level at a depth of 117 m underground is extremely important. Discontinuous deformation occurring in this Chamber complex was eliminated by comprehensive securing work with anchor housing, but their final securing and stability is conditioned by further backfilling and sealing the Witos Chambers situated directly beneath. In the 1940s and 1950s, the Witos Chamber was backfilled with slag from the mine boilerhouse. However, slags with 80% compressibility are not backfilling material which would ensure the stability of the rock mass. The chambers were exploited in the early nineteenth century in the Spizit salts of the central part of the layered deposit. The condition of the Upper Witos, Wisla, Warszawa, Budryk, and Lebzeltern Chambers is generally good. The western part if the Lebzeltern Chamber (Fig. 1), which was threatened with collapse, was backfilled with sand. In all the chambers of the Witos complex, local deformation of ceiling rock of varying intensity is observed as well as significant destruction of the side walls of pillars between chambers. No hydrogeological phenomena are observed in the chambers. It has been attempted to solve the problem of stability of the rock mass in this region of the mine by extracting the slag and backfilling with sand, erecting concrete supporting pillars, backfilling the voids with sand, anchoring the ceiling and the side walls, the use of the pillar housing. The methods have either not been applied or have been proved insufficient to properly protect the excavation situated above. In order to select the optimal securing method, a geomechanical analysis was conducted in order to

  13. The high throughput investigation of polyphenolic couplers in biodegradable packaging materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochhead, Robert Y.; Haynes, Camille T.; Jones, Stephen R.; Smith, Virginia

    2006-01-01

    Our goal is to select and develop stimuli-responsive interfacial coupling materials for nanocomposites that will enhance substrate mechanical properties during use but cause triggered disintegration when exposed to the appropriate aqueous environment. The study could potentially provide the scientific underpinning for the development of an interfacially interacting nanocomposite alloy capable of enhanced biodegradation in the aqueous environment. In the first stage of this study it was shown that quaternary ammonium polymers adsorbed on the faces of the montmorillonite platelets, non-ionic polyacrylamides adsorbed on the faces and edges by hydrogen bonding, and anionic polyelectrolytes, carboxylates and sulfonates, did not adsorb at all on the montmorillonite [R.Y. Lochhead, C.L. McConnell-Boykin, An investigative study of polymer adsorption to smectite clay: polyelectrolytes and sodium montmorillonite, in: R. Krishnamoorti, R. Vaia (Eds.), Polymer Nanocomposites, American Chemical Society, 2002; R.Y. Lochhead, C.L. McConnell-Boykin, C. Haynes, Interaction of hydrophilic polymers with smectite clays, Polymer Materials Science and Engineering, vol. 85, American Chemical Society, 2001, p. 419]. The objective of the second part of the study was to examine model polymers in order to guide research aimed at designing coupling polymers that would cause exfoliation of the clay. Based upon the earlier study, polyvinylamine was chosen as the model on the basis that it is a simple polymer with primary amine groups and the polymer charge density could be modified by simply changing the system pH. The aim of this research was to determine the conditions under which polyvinylamine, and selected derivatives of this polymer, would penetrate the galleries of the stacked montmorillonite platelets. The knowledge gained could be applied to predict systems that would facilitate intercalation or exfoliation of sodium montmorillonite. The investigative approach of the third stage was to

  14. Investigating the role of educative curriculum materials in supporting teacher enactment of a field-based urban ecology investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houle, Meredith

    2008-10-01

    This multiple case study examined how three urban science teachers used curriculum materials designed educatively. Educative curriculum materials have been suggested as one way to support science teacher learning, particularly around new innovations and new pedagogies and to support teachers in evaluating and modifying materials to meet the needs of their students (Davis & Krajcik, 2005). While not a substitute for professional development, educative curriculum materials may provide an opportunity to support teachers' enactment and learning in the classroom context (Davis & Krajcik, 2005; Remillard, 2005; Schneider & Krajcik, 2002). However, little work has examined how science teachers interact with written curriculum materials to design classroom instruction. Grounded in sociocultural analysis, this study takes the theoretical stance that teachers and curriculum materials are engaged in a dynamic and participatory relationship from which the planned and enacted curriculum emerges (Remillard, 2005). Teaching is therefore a design activity where teachers rely on their personal resources and the curricular resources to construct and shape their students' learning experiences (Brown, 2002). Specifically this study examines how teacher beliefs influence their reading and use of curriculum and how educative features in the written curriculum inform teachers' pedagogical decisions. Data sources included classroom observation and video, teacher interviews, and classroom artifacts. To make sense how teachers' make curricular decisions, video were analyzed using Brown's (2002) Pedagogical Design for Enactment Framework. These coded units were examined in light of the teacher interviews, classroom notes and artifacts to examine how teachers' beliefs influenced these decisions. Data sources were then reexamined for evidence of teachers' use of specific educative features. My analyses revealed that teachers' beliefs about curriculum influenced the degree to which teachers

  15. Permittivity Investigations of the Road Construction Raw Materials for Purposes of GPR Data Interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krysiński, Lech

    2014-05-01

    Permittivity is the major material property governing the formation of GPR response signal in diagnostic measurements. Every quantitative interpretation refers explicitly or implicitly to discussion of permittivity values. Thus, the recognition of permittivity for materials typical of the given technological area is necessary to make use of diagnostic measurements. Collection of several tens of stone cores representing different outcrops was investigated in order to obtain cross-sectional view of permittivity for stone materials being in use in Polish road construction industry as components of stone-asphalt mixtures. The main task was to estimate the typical permittivity values for stone materials treated as representation of several major petrological types. The capacimetry (at 50 MHz) was used as major and very efficient method of permittivity assessment and formation of the samples was subordinated to demands of this method. This method allows for determination of permittivity variability on the lateral surface of the cylindrical sample, giving the insight into the major features of the permittivity spatial distribution characteristic for the given rock. For the most homogeneous samples (in terms of permittivity distribution) the permittivity was measured also on the core top at frequency 2 GHz using impulse GPR reflectometry. No clear proofs for considerable permittivity frequency dependence were found (in the frame of the two methods precision) for these rocks. This conclusion can be related generally to major rock-forming minerals at least in dry igneous rocks. Only solid rocks obtained from regular massive outcrops were included to this first cross-sectional sampling, while artificial synthetic materials and natural gravels of postglacial origin were omitted since additional problems occur in these cases. This first experience allowed to recognize practical problems related to the sampling procedure. The collected data allow for provisional identification

  16. Structural and multi-scale rheophysical investigation of diphasic magneto-sensitive materials based on biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Roger, Stéphane; Sang, Yan Yip Cheung; Bee, Agnès; Perzynski, Régine; Di Meglio, Jean Marc; Ponton, Alain

    2015-08-01

    We present a structural and a multi-scale rheophysical investigation of magneto-sensitive materials based on biopolymers, namely aqueous solutions of sodium alginate incorporating magnetic maghemite nanoparticles, functionalized with adsorbed negative citrate ions. The large alginate ionic strength impacts the structure and the rheology of these nanocomposites in zero magnetic field. In given physico-chemical conditions, the system is fluid and homogeneous on macroscopic scales while it is diphasic on microscopic ones, containing micro-droplets coming from the demixion of the system. These micro-droplets are liquid and deformable under magnetic field. Their under-field elongation and their zero-field relaxation are directly observed by optical microscopy to determine their interfacial tension, their magnetic susceptibility and their internal viscosity. A structural analysis of the solutions of alginate chains and of the phase-separated mixtures of alginate and nanoparticles by Small Angle Scattering completes the local description of the system. PMID:26264396

  17. Preliminary Investigation of Candidate Materials for Use in Accident Resistant Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Lessing; Blair H. Park; Jakeob Maupin

    2013-09-01

    As part of a Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with industry, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is investigating several options for accident resistant uranium compounds including silicides, and nitrides for use in future light water reactor (LWR) fuels. This work is part of a larger effort to create accident tolerant fuel forms where changes to the fuel pellets, cladding, and cladding treatment are considered. The goal fuel form should have a resistance to water corrosion comparable to UO2, have an equal to or larger thermal conductivity than uranium dioxide, a melting temperature that allows the material to stay solid under power reactor conditions, and a uranium loading that maintains or improves current LWR power densities. During the course of this research, fuel fabricated at INL will be characterized, irradiated at the INL Advanced Test Reactor, and examined after irradiation at INL facilities to help inform industrial partners on candidate technologies.

  18. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Positron annihilation spectroscopy in materials structure studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafutin, Viktor I.; Prokop'ev, Evgenii P.

    2002-01-01

    A relatively new method of materials structure analysis — positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) — is reviewed. Measurements of positron lifetimes, the determination of positron 3γ- and 2γ-annihilation probabilities, and an investigation of the effects of different external factors on the fundamental characteristics of annihilation constitute the basis for this promising method. The ways in which the positron annihilation process operates in ionic crystals, semiconductors, metals and some condensed matter systems are analyzed. The scope of PAS is described and its prospects for the study of the electronic and defect structures are discussed. The applications of positron annihilation spectroscopy in radiation physics and chemistry of various substances as well as in physics and chemistry of solutions are exemplified.

  19. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Modification of material properties and coating deposition using plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnyak, Alexander D.; Tyurin, Yu N.

    2005-05-01

    The review is concerned with the current status of research on the use of plasma jets for the modification of surface properties of metalware, as well as of investigations of doping and mass transfer of elements. The effect of thermal plasma parameters on the efficiency of surface processing of metal materials is discussed. The structure and properties of protective coatings produced by exposure to pulsed plasmas are analyzed. A new direction for the production of combined coatings is considered. Their structure and properties were studied by the example of Fe, Cu, steels, and alloys, including titanium alloys; the modification process was shown to be controllable by the action of pulsed plasma jets. The physical factors that affect the modification process and the coating deposition, and their effect on the structure and properties of metallic, ceramic - metal, and ceramic coatings were analyzed.

  20. Investigation of a Cermet Gas-turbine-blade Material of Titanium Carbide Infiltrated with Hastalloy C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Charles A

    1955-01-01

    A cermet composition was investigated as a potential material for gas-turbine blades. Blades of HS-21 alloy were also operated in the engine simultaneously to provide a basis of comparison. The cermet blades survived as long as approximately 312-1/2 hours at about 1500 degrees F with an average midspan centrifugal stress of approximately 11,500 psi. The alloy blade midspan stress was about 15,300 psi. Because of extensive damage to both types of blade due to external causes, a reliable comparison of operating lives could not be made. The cermet blades tended to fail in the airfoil rather than in the base, although the base was the usual location of failure in a prior study of cold-pressed and sintered cermets of other compositions with the same blade shape.

  1. Reference waste forms and packing material for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project

    SciTech Connect

    Oversby, V.M.

    1984-03-30

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, Calif., has been given the task of designing and verifying the performance of waste packages for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. NNWSI is studying the suitability of the tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site, for the potential construction of a high-level nuclear waste repository. This report gives a summary description of the three waste forms for which LLNL is designing waste packages: spent fuel, either as intact assemblies or as consolidated fuel pins, reprocessed commercial high-level waste in the form of borosilicate glass, and reprocessed defense high-level waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility in Aiken, S.C. Reference packing material for use with the alternative waste package design for spent fuel is also described. 14 references, 8 figures, 20 tables.

  2. Hot carrier solar cell absorbers: investigation of carrier cooling properties of candidate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conibeer, G.; Shrestha, Santosh; Huang, Shujuan; Patterson, Robert; Xia, Hongze; Feng, Yu; Zhang, Pengfei; Gupta, Neeti; Smyth, Suntrana; Liao, Yuanxun; Lin, Shu; Wang, Pei; Dai, Xi; Chung, Simon; Yang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yi

    2015-09-01

    The hot carrier cell aims to extract the electrical energy from photo-generated carriers before they thermalize to the band edges. Hence it can potentially achieve a high current and a high voltage and hence very high efficiencies up to 65% under 1 sun and 86% under maximum concentration. To slow the rate of carrier thermalisation is very challenging, but modification of the phonon energies and the use of nanostructures are both promising ways to achieve some of the required slowing of carrier cooling. A number of materials and structures are being investigated with these properties and test structures are being fabricated. Initial measurements indicate slowed carrier cooling in III-Vs with large phonon band gaps and in multiple quantum wells. It is expected that soon proof of concept of hot carrier devices will pave the way for their development to fully functioning high efficiency solar cells.

  3. Recovery of high-grade barite from waste pond materials. Report of investigations/1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lamont, W.E.; Sullivan, G.V.

    1982-06-01

    The Bureau of Mines studied the potential for recovering marketable barite concentrates that meet oil well drilling-mud specifications from barite waste pond materials. The samples, which were obtained from Georgia, Nevada, Missouri, and Illinois, varied widely in character, particle size, and barite content. The samples were treated with sodium silicate and sodium cetyl-stearyl sulfate and then floated. The flotation flow sheet was modified to reject barren coarse and/or slime fractions from some of the samples, and one feed sample had to be scrubbed prior to flotation to remove residual flotation reagents. The cleaned concentrates had BaSO4 contents ranging from 95.0 to 96.9 percent, while recovering 81.2 to 95.9 percent of the barite in the feed. The specific gravity of each concentrate exceeded the specification of 4.2. The removal of the flotation reagents from the flotation concentrate was not investigated.

  4. Investigation of Electron Transfer-Based Photonic and Electro-Optic Materials and Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Bromenshenk, Jerry J; Abbott, Edwin H; Dickensheets, David; Donovan, Richard P; Hobbs, J D; Spangler, Lee; McGuirl, Michele A; Spangler, Charles; Rebane, Aleksander; Rosenburg, Edward; Schmidt, V H; Singel, David J

    2008-03-28

    Montana's state program began its sixth year in 2006. The project's research cluster focused on physical, chemical, and biological materials that exhibit unique electron-transfer properties. Our investigators have filed several patents and have also have established five spin-off businesses (3 MSU, 2 UM) and a research center (MT Tech). In addition, this project involved faculty and students at three campuses (MSU, UM, MT Tech) and has a number of under-represented students, including 10 women and 5 Native Americans. In 2006, there was an added emphasis on exporting seminars and speakers via the Internet from UM to Chief Dull Knife Community College, as well as work with the MT Department of Commerce to better educate our faculty regarding establishing small businesses, licensing and patent issues, and SBIR program opportunities.

  5. Investigating Students' Ideas About X-rays While Developing Teaching Materials for a Medical Physics Course

    SciTech Connect

    Kalita, Spartak; Zollman, Dean

    2007-01-30

    The goal of the Modern Miracle Medical Machines project is to promote pre-med students' interest in physics by using the context of contemporary medical imaging. The X-ray medical imaging learning module will be a central part of this effort. To investigate students' transfer of learning in this context we have conducted a series of clinical and teaching interviews. In the latter interview, some of the proposed learning materials were used. The students brought to our discussion pieces of knowledge transferred from very different sources such as their own X-ray experiences, previous learning and the mass media. This transfer seems to result in more or less firm mental models which often are not always internally consistent or coherent.

  6. Investigation of thermal distortion and control of spacecraft based on shape memory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongwei; Du, Xingwen; Tan, Huifeng

    2009-07-01

    Gossamer space structures are relatively large, flimsy, and lightweight. As a result, they are more easily affected or distortion by space thermal environments compared to other space structures. This study examines the structural integrity of a Five-Meter Ka-Band Inflatable/Self-Rigidizable Reflect Antenna under space thermal environments. To maintain the required accuracy of the reflector under orbital temperature changes, the Gossamer space structures will utilize an active control system, consisting of boundary control actuators and an electrostatic figure control system with a real time closed loop feedback. An experimental system is established to verify the control mechanism with photogrammetric measurement technique and Bragg fiber grating (FBG) sensor technique. The shape control experiments are finished by measuring and analyzing small amplitude distortion of Five-Meter Ka-Band Inflatable/Self-Rigidizable Reflect Antenna based on the active components made of shape memory alloy (SMA) and shape memory polymer composite (SMPC) material. Then, simulations are finished by NASTRAN finite element software with active effect which is considered to be deformation applied on the analytical model. The amplitude of distortion is obtained by the simulations. Both the experimental and numerical solution show that the amplitude of accuracy are developed which proves the feasibility of shape control using shape memory materials and this investigation explores the feasibility of utilizing an active cable based control system of shape memory materials to reduce global distortion due to thermal loading. It is found that through proper assemble of cable lengths and attachment points, significant thermal distortion reduction is achieved. Specifically, radial distortion due to on-orbit thermal loading .

  7. Investigation of engineered bacterial adhesins for opportunity to interface cells with abiotic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrell, Jessica L.; Dong, Hong; Holthoff, Ellen L.; Small, Meagan C.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2016-05-01

    The convenience of cellular genetic engineering has afforded the power to build `smart' synthetic biological tools with novel applications. Here, we have explored opportunities to hybridize engineered cells with inorganic materials toward the development of 'living' device-compatible systems. Cellular structural biology is engineerable based on the ability to rewrite genetic code to generate recombinant, foreign, or even unnatural proteins. With this capability on the biological end, it should be possible to achieve superior abio-compatibility with the inorganic materials that compose current microfabricated technology. This work investigated the hair-like appendages of Escherichia coli known as Type 1 fimbriae that enable natural adhesion to glycosylated substrates. Sequence alterations within the fimbrial gene cluster were found to be well-tolerated, evidenced by tagging the fimbriae with peptide-based probes. As a further development, fimbriae tips could be reconfigured to, in turn, alter cell binding. In particular, the fimbriae were fused with a genetically optimized peptide-for-inorganics to enable metal binding. This work established methodologies to systematically survey cell adhesion properties across a suite of fimbriae-modified cell types as well as to direct patterned cell adhesion. Cell types were further customized for added complexity including turning on secondary gene expression and binding to gold surfaces. The former demonstrates potential for programmable gene switches and the latter for interfacing biology with inorganic materials. In general, the incorporation of 'programmed' cells into devices can be used to provide the feature of dynamic and automated cell response. The outcomes of this study are foundational toward the critical feature of deliberate positioning of cells as configurable biocomponentry. Overall, cellular integration into bioMEMs will yield advanced sensing and actuation.

  8. An investigation of the influence of acoustic waves on the liquid flow through a porous material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poesio, Pietro; Ooms, Gijs; Barake, Sander; van der Bas, Fred

    2002-05-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation has been made of the influence of high-frequency acoustic waves on the flow of a liquid through a porous material. The experiments have been performed on Berea sandstone cores. Two acoustic horns were used with frequencies of 20 and 40 kHz, and with maximum power output of 2 and 0.7 kW, respectively. Also, a temperature measurement of the flowing liquid inside the core was made. A high external pressure was applied in order to avoid cavitation. The acoustic waves were found to produce a significant effect on the pressure gradient at constant liquid flow rate through the core samples. During the application of acoustic waves the pressure gradient inside the core decreases. This effect turned out to be due to the decrease of the liquid viscosity caused by an increase in liquid temperature as a result of the acoustic energy dissipation inside the porous material. Also, a theoretical model has been developed to calculate the dissipation effect on the viscosity and on the pressure gradient. The model predictions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  9. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1982-04-01

    Technical investigations concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants; the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. New compounds were evaluated for efficiency in curing both ethylene/vinyl acetate and ethylene/methyl acrylate pottants intended for vacuum bag lamination of solar cells. One compound in particular, designated Lupersol - TBEC (Lucidol Division of Pennwalt Corp.) was found to be unusually effective in promoting the rapid cure of both these materials. Formulation of these resins with TBEC resulted in compositions of very high gel content, lower temperatures of activation, and much lower cure times, even in the ethylene/methyl acrylate polymer that is more difficult to cure. It is expected that TBEC modified pottant formulations may permit the lamination/encapsulation step to be operated at lower temperatures, higher speed, higher throughput and a much wider tolerance for intentional or accidental variations in the cure schedule. An experimental program continued to determine the effectiveness of soil resistant coatings.

  10. Investigation of Thunniform Swimming Using Material Testing, Biomimetic Robotics and Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruijie; Saraiya, Vishaal; Zhu, Jianzhong; Lewis, Gregory; Bart-Smith, Hilary

    2015-11-01

    Thunniform swimming is well recognized as an efficient method for high-speed long-distance underwater travelers such as tuna. Previous research has shown that tuna relies on contraction and relaxation of red muscle to generate angular motion of its large, crescent-shaped caudal fin through its peduncle. However, few researchers conduct deep investigation of material properties of tuna caudal fin and peduncle. This research project is composed of two parts, first of which is determining mechanical properties of components such as spine joints, tendons, fin rays and cartilage, from which the biomechanics of tuna tail can be better understood. The second part is building a robotic system mimicking a real tuna tail based on previously retrieved information, and testing the system inside a flow tank. With the help of PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry), fluid-structure interaction of the biomimetic fin is visualized and data such as swimming speed and power consumption are retrieved through the robotic system. The final outcome should explain how the material properties of tuna tail affect fluid dynamics of thunniform swimming. This project is supported by Office of Naval Research (ONRBAA13-022).

  11. Dynamic acousto-elastic test using continuous probe wave and transient vibration to investigate material nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Eiras, J N; Vu, Q A; Lott, M; Payá, J; Garnier, V; Payan, C

    2016-07-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of the dynamic acousto-elastic effect of a continuous high frequency wave for investigating the material nonlinearity upon transient vibration. The approach is demonstrated on a concrete sample measuring 15×15×60cm(3). Two ultrasonic transducers (emitter and receiver) are placed at its middle span. A continuous high frequency wave of 500kHz propagates through the material and is modulated with a hammer blow. The position of the hammer blow on the sample is configured to promote the first bending mode of vibration. The use of a continuous wave allows discrete time extraction of the nonlinear behavior by a short-time Fourier transform approach, through the simultaneous comparison of a reference non-modulated signal and an impact-modulated signal. The hammer blow results in phase shifts and variations of signal amplitude between reference and perturbed signals, which are driven by the resonant frequency of the sample. Finally, a comprehensive analysis of the relaxation mechanisms (modulus and attenuation recovery) is conducted to untangle the coupled fast and slow hysteretic effects. PMID:27018754

  12. An investigation of the influence of acoustic waves on the liquid flow through a porous material.

    PubMed

    Poesio, Pietro; Ooms, Gijs; Barake, Sander; van der Bas, Fred

    2002-05-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation has been made of the influence of high-frequency acoustic waves on the flow of a liquid through a porous material. The experiments have been performed on Berea sandstone cores. Two acoustic horns were used with frequencies of 20 and 40 kHz, and with maximum power output of 2 and 0.7 kW, respectively. Also, a temperature measurement of the flowing liquid inside the core was made. A high external pressure was applied in order to avoid cavitation. The acoustic waves were found to produce a significant effect on the pressure gradient at constant liquid flow rate through the core samples. During the application of acoustic waves the pressure gradient inside the core decreases. This effect turned out to be due to the decrease of the liquid viscosity caused by an increase in liquid temperature as a result of the acoustic energy dissipation inside the porous material. Also, a theoretical model has been developed to calculate the dissipation effect on the viscosity and on the pressure gradient. The model predictions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. PMID:12051421

  13. Investigation of oxidation resistance of carbon based first-wall liner materials of fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moormann, R.; Hinssen, H. K.; Krüssenberg, A.-K.; Stauch, B.; Wu, C. H.

    1994-09-01

    One important aspect in selection of carbon based first-wall liner materials in fusion reactors is a sufficient oxidation resistance against steam and oxygen; this is because during accidents like loss of coolant into vacuum or loss of vacuum these oxidizing media can enter the vacuum vessel and may cause some corrosion of carbon followed by release of adsorbed tritium; in addition other consequences of oxidation like formation of burnable gases and their explosions have to be examined. Based on extensive experience on nuclear graphite oxidation in HTRs KFA has started in cooperation with NET some experimental investigations on oxidation of fusion reactor carbons. Results of first experiments on CFCs, Ti- and Si-doped carbons and graphites in steam (1273-1423 K) and oxygen (973 K) are reported. It was found that most materials have a similar reactivity as HTR nuclear graphites (which is much smaller than those of usual technical carbons); Si-doped CFCs however have a remarkably better oxidation resistance than those, which is probably due to the formation of a protecting layer of SiO 2. The measured kinetic data will be used in safety analyses for above mentioned accidents.

  14. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1982-01-01

    Technical investigations concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants; the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. New compounds were evaluated for efficiency in curing both ethylene/vinyl acetate and ethylene/methyl acrylate pottants intended for vacuum bag lamination of solar cells. One compound in particular, designated Lupersol - TBEC (Lucidol Division of Pennwalt Corp.) was found to be unusually effective in promoting the rapid cure of both these materials. Formulation of these resins with TBEC resulted in compositions of very high gel content, lower temperatures of activation, and much lower cure times, even in the ethylene/methyl acrylate polymer that is more difficult to cure. It is expected that TBEC modified pottant formulations may permit the lamination/encapsulation step to be operated at lower temperatures, higher speed, higher throughput and a much wider tolerance for intentional or accidental variations in the cure schedule. An experimental program continued to determine the effectiveness of soil resistant coatings.

  15. Investigation of Sintering Temperature on Attrition Resistance of Highly Porous Diatomite Based Material

    SciTech Connect

    Garderen, Noemie van; Clemens, Frank J.; Scharf, Dagobert; Graule, Thomas

    2010-05-30

    Highly porous diatomite based granulates with a diameter of 500 mum have been produced by an extrusion method. In order to investigate the relation between microstructure, phase composition and attrition resistance of the final product, the granulates were sintered between 800 and 1300 deg. C. Mean pore size of the granulates was evaluated by Hg-porosimetry. An increase of the pore size is observed in the range of 3.6 nm to 40 mum with increasing sintering temperature. Higher mean pore radii of 1.6 mum and 5.7 mum obtained by sintering at 800 and 1300 deg. C respectively. X-ray diffraction shows that mullite phase appears at 1100 deg. C due to the presence of clay. At 1100 deg. C diatomite (amorphous silicate) started to transform into alpha-cristobalite. Attrition resistance was determined by evaluating the amount of ground material passed through a sieve with a predefined mesh size. It was observed that a material sintered at high temperature leads to an increase of attrition resistance due to the decrease of total porosities and phase transformation. Due to the reason that attrition resistance significantly increased by sintering the granulates at higher temperature, a so called attrition resistance index was determined in order to compare all the different attrition resistance values. This attrition resistance index was determined by using the exponential component of the equation obtained from attrition resistance curves. It permits comparison of the attrition behaviour without a time influence.

  16. Material specific lateralization of medial temporal lobe function: An fMRI investigation.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Marshall A; Hornberger, Michael; Piguet, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    The theory of material specific lateralization of memory function posits that left and right MTL regions are asymmetrically involved in mnemonic processing of verbal and nonverbal material respectively. Lesion and functional imaging (fMRI) studies provide robust evidence for a left MTL asymmetry in the verbal memory domain. Evidence for a right MTL/nonverbal asymmetry is not as robust. A handful of fMRI studies have investigated this issue but have generally utilised nonverbal stimuli which are amenable to semantic elaboration. This fMRI study aimed to investigate the neural correlates of recognition memory processing in 20 healthy young adults (mean age = 26 years) for verbal stimuli and nonverbal stimuli that were specifically designed to minimize verbalisation. Analyses revealed that the neural correlates of recognition memory processing for verbal and nonverbal stimuli were differentiable and asymmetrically recruited the left and right MTL respectively. The right perirhinal cortex and hippocampus were preferentially involved in successful recognition memory of items devoid of semantic information. In contrast, the left anterior hippocampus was preferentially involved in successful recognition memory of stimuli which contained semantic meaning. These results suggest that the left MTL is preferentially involved in mnemonic processing of verbal/semantic information. In contrast, the right MTL is preferentially involved in visual/non-semantic mnemonic processing. We propose that during development, the left MTL becomes specialised for verbal mnemonic processing due to its proximity with left lateralised cortical language processing areas while visual/non-semantic mnemonic processing gets 'crowded out' to become predominantly, but not completely, the domain of the right MTL. PMID:26700110

  17. Investigation of X-Ray Optical Anisotropy of Materials by means of X-Ray Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mkrtchyan, Vahram P.; Gasparyan, Laura G.; Balyan, Minas K.

    2010-04-06

    A novel approach is proposed in the present work for investigation of X-ray optical anisotropy of materials, that is based on X-ray interferometric method of measurements. Unlike the existing methods, where the specimen to be tested is placed in the path of one of interfering beams, in the proposed approach the specimens under investigation are placed directly in the paths of both the interfering beams, owing to which the impact of other factors on the shift of interference Moire fringes is eliminated. In this way the Moire fringes simultaneously appear during the same exposure both in the absence and presence of specimens with different orientations of optical axes. Due to the fact that the relative displacement of Moire fringes is observed in three different columns of the same beam, it becomes possible to simultaneously observe and immediately identify the presence of X-ray optical anisotropy, as well as to measure the values of refractive indices n{sub o} and n{sub e} for specimens under study. By means of proposed method the X-ray optical anisotropy of cellophane film was registered and values of refractive indices n{sub o} and n{sub e} for cellophane were measured. It was established that cellophane is X-ray optically positive anisotropic medium.

  18. Investigation of X-Ray Optical Anisotropy of Materials by means of X-Ray Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkrtchyan, Vahram P.; Gasparyan, Laura G.; Balyan, Minas K.

    2010-04-01

    A novel approach is proposed in the present work for investigation of X-ray optical anisotropy of materials, that is based on X-ray interferometric method of measurements. Unlike the existing methods, where the specimen to be tested is placed in the path of one of interfering beams, in the proposed approach the specimens under investigation are placed directly in the paths of both the interfering beams, owing to which the impact of other factors on the shift of interference Moire fringes is eliminated. In this way the Moire fringes simultaneously appear during the same exposure both in the absence and presence of specimens with different orientations of optical axes. Due to the fact that the relative displacement of Moire fringes is observed in three different columns of the same beam, it becomes possible to simultaneously observe and immediately identify the presence of X-ray optical anisotropy, as well as to measure the values of refractive indices no and ne for specimens under study. By means of proposed method the X-ray optical anisotropy of cellophane film was registered and values of refractive indices no and ne for cellophane were measured. It was established that cellophane is X-ray optically positive anisotropic medium.

  19. Investigation of the Crystal Growth of Dielectric Materials by the Bridgman Technique Using Vibrational Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.; Zharikov, Evgenii

    2002-01-01

    The principal goal of this ground-based program, which started on February 1, 1998 and concluded on April 30, 2002, was to investigate the influence of low frequency vibrations on the fluid flow and quality of dielectric oxide crystals grown by the vertical Bridgman method. This experimental program was a collaborative effort between Stanford University and the General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow, and included a strong emphasis on both physical modeling and the growth of some technologically important materials. Additionally it was carried out initially in collaboration with the theoretical and numerical investigations of A.Fedoseyev and I.Alexander (ongoing in another NASA sponsored program). This latter program involved a study of vibro-convective buoyancy-driven flows in cylindrical configurations with the expectation of being able to use vibrational flows to control buoyancy driven fluid transport to off-set the effect of "g-jitter" during microgravity Bridgman crystal growth. These two programs taken together, were designed to lead to a new parametric control variable which can be used to either suppress or control convection, and thereby heat and mass transport during Bridgman crystal growth. It was expected to be effective in either a terrestrial or space environment.

  20. Investigations on modern carbon materials in the Boris Kidrič Institute, Vinča

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinković, Slobodan

    1980-03-01

    Modern carbon materials which have been objects of research at the Boris Kidrič Institute, Vinča involve high-performance carbon fibres from PAN precursor, carbon-fibre-reinforced phenolic and epoxy resins, carbon-carbon composites, pyrolytic carbons deposited at 1500-2450 K both pure and containing small amounts of B, Si, P or U, and carbon felt from viscose rayon precursor. Investigations relevant to carbon fibres comprise a study of processes during air oxidation of PAN fibres and an extensive research of low-temperature SO 2-treatment of PAN fibres, which has resulted in a model of the structure stabilization and shows that this stabilization can be successfully applied for the preparation of high-performance carbon fibres. Extensive investigations of codeposition of carbon and small amounts of B, Si, P and U suggest that B, Si and P enter the pyrocarbon lattice substitutionally and produce important changes in properties of the product. B, Si and U act as graphitizing catalysts, the effect being most pronounced for Si. The fabrication technology of the carbon fibres, carbon-fibre-reinforced-plastics and of pyrolytic carbon has been developed on a laboratory scale.

  1. An investigation of the influence of the core material properties on the compression and properties of dry-coated tablets.

    PubMed

    Thomas, W I; Rowley, G; Doveston, G

    1998-10-01

    The effect of core material properties on the process of compression and physical properties of compression-coated tablets were investigated using microcrystalline cellulose as the coating material (mantle). Three model core materials: borosilicate glass, silicone rubber, and steel, each of different Young's modulus, were selected to give a range of core mechanical properties. Coated tablets were prepared using a single-punch press, with facilities for monitoring the compression cycle and analysis of data using the Heckel (1) equation. This analysis showed a considerable effect of different core materials on the compression process, (i) as an unanchored core, and (ii) due to core material type with differing Young's modulus. PMID:9876552

  2. Material Modeling of Space Shuttle Leading Edge and External Tank Materials For Use in the Columbia Accident Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Kelly; Melis, Matthew; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Gabrys, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Upon the commencement of the analytical effort to characterize the impact dynamics and damage of the Space Shuttle Columbia leading edge due to External Tank insulating foam, the necessity of creating analytical descriptions of these materials became evident. To that end, material models were developed of the leading edge thermal protection system, Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC), and a low density polyurethane foam, BX-250. Challenges in modeling the RCC include its extreme brittleness, the differing behavior in compression and tension, and the anisotropic fabric layup. These effects were successfully included in LS-DYNA Material Model 58, *MAT_LAMINATED_ COMPOSITE_ FABRIC. The differing compression and tension behavior was modeled using the available damage parameters. Each fabric layer was given an integration point in the shell element, and was allowed to fail independently. Comparisons were made to static test data and coupon ballistic impact tests before being utilized in the full scale analysis. The foam's properties were typical of elastic automotive foams; and LS-DYNA Material Model 83, *MAT_FU_CHANG_FOAM, was successfully used to model its behavior. Material parameters defined included strain rate dependent stress-strain curves for both loading and un-loading, and for both compression and tension. This model was formulated with static test data and strain rate dependent test data, and was compared to ballistic impact tests on load-cell instrumented aluminum plates. These models were subsequently utilized in analysis of the Shuttle leading edge full scale ballistic impact tests, and are currently being used in the Return to Flight Space Shuttle re-certification effort.

  3. Experimental investigation on the flexural fatigue behavior of pultruded composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Sabry Taha

    1997-10-01

    Flexural fatigue analysis is important for design applications of composite materials subject to fluctuating stress or strain conditions. The effects of fatigue parameters including mean stress (sigmasb{m}), stress ratio (R), and number of cycles (N) were investigated for aspultruded composite materials. Shell EPON 9310 epoxy and Alpha Owens Corning AOC E606-6-polyester pultruded composites reinforced with unidirectional E-glass fiber were produced using a commercial pultrusion machine. Specimens of these materials were initially subjected to static three-point displacement control, 16 - 1 and 32 - 1 span-to-depth ratio flexural testing, to determine the static behavior; these data were used to establish the base-line ultimate mechanical properties. Three-point flexural tests were performed according to ASTM D790-92 standard test method using a MTS universal servo-hydraulic testing machine. The flexural fatigue performance of the composites was determined under load control using similar flexural test methods as in static testing. Specimens considered for fatigue testing were subjected to five different values of mean stress level lbracksigmasb{m} = (0.5, 0.45, 0.4, 0.35 and 0.3) sigmasb{u}rbrack and four different stress ratios (R = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4). From the dynamic load-displacement response, fatigue data were monitored for damage measurements including loss factor and damage index. Also, a parametric study was conducted to investigate the correlation between static flexural and flexural fatigue behavior in addition to constructing S-N curves of these pultruded composite materials. Results from three-point, displacement control static mechanical tests indicated initial failure on the tensile side without any evidence of fiber breakage until maximum peak load followed by a small number of delaminations before final specimen breakage. The strain in the outermost fibers did not vary greatly depending on the flexural test method, but for the apoxy based system

  4. Experimental investigation of pressure responsive 'smart' materials found in the natural world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, George W.

    The unique ability to sense environmental stimuli and respond appropriately in a controlled and reversible fashion is a distinguishing characteristic of a novel class of materials collectively known as 'smart,' 'adaptive,' or 'responsive' materials. This seemingly 'smart' behavior is, thus, controlled by internal 'feedback loops' generated by the interconnectivity of various system elements which enables them to operate cooperatively and exhibit more complex behaviors as a collective. This thesis investigates, experimentally, three natural systems found in both the biological and non-biological domains which exhibit responsive or adaptive behaviors in the presence of external mechanical pressures by exploiting uniquely different chemical and physical principles. The first system focuses on articular cartilage, an example of an adaptive material which utilizes its distinctive hierachical, multi-scale structure in order to adjust and change its physical and lubricating properties to suit the specific needs under a broad range of normal and shear stresses. A compression cell designed to fit inside an NMR spectrometer was used to investigate the in situ mechanical strain response, structural changes to the internal pore structure, and the diffusion and flow of interstitial water in full thickness cartilage samples as it was deforming dynamically under a constant compressive load (pressure). We distinguish between the hydrostatic pressure acting on the interstitial fluid and the pore pressure acting on the cartilage fibril network. Our results show that properties related to the pore matrix microstructure such as diffusion and hydraulic conductivity are strongly influenced by the hydrostatic pressure in the interstitial fluid of the dynamically deforming cartilage which differ significantly from the properties measured under static i.e. equilibrium loading conditions (when the hydrostatic pressure has relaxed back to zero). The magnitude of the hydrostatic fluid

  5. Computational and experimental investigations of carbon-ceramic composite materials thermochemical resistance in combustion products of liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, V. V.; Volkov, N. N.; Volkova, L. I.; Kondratenko, V. I.; Popov, V. A.; Tsatsuev, S. M.

    2009-09-01

    Computational and experimental investigations of thermochemical resistance of carbon-ceramic composites in the combustion products of liquid rocket engine (LRE) are presented. The tests with model extensions made of the composite material (CM) were performed. The test time was about 200 s. The maximal temperature of the material fire surface was 1600 K. Physical and numerical model of silicon carbide destruction was developed.

  6. Effects of Material Degradation on the Structural Integrity of Composite Materials: Experimental Investigation and Modeling of High Temperature Degradation Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Ronan A.; McManus, Hugh L.

    1996-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that simple coupled reaction-diffusion models can approximate the aging behavior of PMR-15 resin subjected to different oxidative environments. Based on empirically observed phenomena, a model coupling chemical reactions, both thermal and oxidative, with diffusion of oxygen into the material bulk should allow simulation of the aging process. Through preliminary modeling techniques such as this it has become apparent that accurate analytical models cannot be created until the phenomena which cause the aging of these materials are quantified. An experimental program is currently underway to quantify all of the reaction/diffusion related mechanisms involved. The following contains a summary of the experimental data which has been collected through thermogravimetric analyses of neat PMR-15 resin, along with analytical predictions from models based on the empirical data. Thermogravimetric analyses were carried out in a number of different environments - nitrogen, air and oxygen. The nitrogen provides data for the purely thermal degradation mechanisms while those in air provide data for the coupled oxidative-thermal process. The intent here is to effectively subtract the nitrogen atmosphere data (assumed to represent only thermal reactions) from the air and oxygen atmosphere data to back-figure the purely oxidative reactions. Once purely oxidative (concentration dependent) reactions have been quantified it should then be possible to quantify the diffusion of oxygen into the material bulk.

  7. An investigation of oxide composite anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo

    This thesis is aimed to develop high-capacity, inexpensive, long cycle life and environmentally benign anode for lithium-ion batteries. With those goals in mind, a novel oxide alloy composite materials MO-Sn xCoyCz (MO=GeO2, SnO2, SiO and SiO2) have been proposed and investigated. Mechanical alloying method has been used to synthesize oxide alloy composite anode material. The MO-SnxCo yCz composite has the potential to combine the advantageous properties of both Sn-Co-C (long cycle life) and MO (high capacity) and, thereby, improve the overall electrochemical performance. The as-milled materials were studied by BET, laser particle analyzer, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), pair distribution function (PDF), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Evaluating from electrochemical performance, tap density, and cost, GeO2 and SiO are the most promising candidates alloyed with Sn-Co-C system. The GeO 2 composite anode shows a reversible capacity over 800 mAh/g with good capacity retention. Furthermore, the 1st cycle coulombic efficiency has been improved up to 80%. Compared with GeO2, SiO has an advantage on the price. A series of composite anode materials of xSiO * (1-x)SnxCoyC z were studied by electrochemical method. The composition of 50 wt.%SiO-50 wt.%Sn30Co30C40 shows the best electrochemical performance. Two different milling methods (ultra high-energy milling and SPEX milling) were employed to prepare the samples. Ultra high-energy milling sample exhibited superior electrochemical performance. Stabilized lithium metallic powder technique is employed on this anode to improve the first cycle coulombic efficiency. Full-cell configuration (Li1.2Ni 0.15Co0.10Mn0.55O2 vs. 50 wt.%SiO-50 wt.% Sn30Co30C40) has been cycled over 200 cycles successfully. The SiO-SnxFeyC z (x : y: z molar ratio) composite has been milled in different compositions. Metallic iron was employed instead of cobalt, which cuts the cost significantly but does not

  8. The investigation of molecular mixing and segregation in opv materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochester, Christopher W.

    With the growing energy demand and the threat of global warming caused by our excessive use of fossil fuels, it is imperative that we search for and develop alternative ways to generate energy. Using photovoltaic technologies to produce energy is a good way to supplement our current energy supplies. The problem with conventional PV technology is that it is too expensive to compete with cheap fossil fuels. Polymer solar cells have the potential to be a much cheaper alternative to conventional PV technology, as they can easily be manufactured using simple roll-to-roll printing methods, are light-weight, and are flexible. Polymer solar cells consist of layered organic materials that are deposited using solution deposition methods. The organic layers often consist of mixtures of organic molecules, that may be composed of polymer and small molecules. The behavior of these organic materials are not always predictable as they have been found to often diffuse, causing material segregation and mixing within layers and at interfaces. These processes are measured and observed using a combination of experimental techniques. P3HT/PCBM bilayer samples were fabricated by spin coating PCBM dissolved in CH2Cl 2 onto P3HT films. We show using steady-state spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and current-voltage measurements that substantial mixing occurs between the P3HT and PCBM during the PCBM deposition. We conclude that the PCBM mixes with amorphous P3HT and does not disrupt the existing crystalline domains. A PCBM loading of 25-30 wt% into the P3HT layer was determined, which explains why reported photovoltaic performances of these solution processed bilayer structures are comparable to that of bulk-heterojunctions. The use of F4-TCNQ as a molecular dopant for the polymeric hole transport layer, S-P3MEET, for use in organic photovoltaic devices was investigated. It is shown that F4-TCNQ effectively oxidized the S-P3MEET polymer, and that even for low doping concentrations

  9. Optoacoustic Microscopy for Investigation of Material Nanostructures-Embracing the Ultrasmall, Ultrafast, and the Invisible

    SciTech Connect

    Nurmikko, Arto; Humphrey, Maris

    2014-07-10

    The goal of this grant was the development of a new type of scanning acoustic microscope for nanometer resolution ultrasound imaging, based on ultrafast optoacoustics (>GHz). In the microscope, subpicosecond laser pulses was used to generate and detect very high frequency ultrasound with nanometer wavelengths. We report here on the outcome of the 3-year DOE/BES grant which involved the design, multifaceted construction, and proof-of-concept demonstration of an instrument that can be used for quantitative imaging of nanoscale material features – including features that may be buried so as to be inaccessible to conventional lightwave or electron microscopies. The research program has produced a prototype scanning optoacoustic microscope which, in combination with advanced computational modeling, is a system-level new technology (two patents issues) which offer novel means for precision metrology of material nanostructures, particularly those that are of contemporary interest to the frontline micro- and optoelectronics device industry. For accomplishing the ambitious technical goals, the research roadmap was designed and implemented in two phases. In Phase I, we constructed a “non-focusing” optoacoustic microscope instrument (“POAM”), with nanometer vertical (z-) resolution, while limited to approximately 10 micrometer scale lateral recolution. The Phase I version of the instrument which was guided by extensive acoustic and optical numerical modeling of the basic underlying acoustic and optical physics, featured nanometer scale close loop positioning between the optoacoustic transducer element and a nanostructured material sample under investigation. In phase II, we implemented and demonstrated a scanning version of the instrument (“SOAM”) where incident acoustic energy is focused, and scanned on lateral (x-y) spatial scale in the 100 nm range as per the goals of the project. In so doing we developed advanced numerical simulations to provide

  10. Investigating the stability of cathode materials for rechargeable lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yiqing

    Lithium ion batteries are widely used in portable electronic devices and electric vehicles. However, safety is one of the most important issues for the Li-ion batteries' use. Some cathode materials, such as LiCoO 2, are thermally unstable in the charged state. Upon decomposition these cathode materials release O2, which could react with organic electrolyte, leading to a thermal runaway. Thus understanding the stability of the cathode materials is critical to the safety of lithium ion batteries. Olivine-type LiMnPO4 is a promising cathode material for lithium ion batteries because of its high energy density. We have revealed the critical role of carbon in the stability and thermal behaviour of olivine MnPO 4 obtained by chemical delithiation of LiMnPO4. (Li)MnPO 4 samples with various particle sizes and carbon contents were studied. Carbon-free LiMnPO4 obtained by solid state synthesis in O 2 becomes amorphous upon delithiation. Small amounts of carbon (0.3 wt.%) help to stabilize the olivine structure, so that completely delithiated crystalline olivine MnPO4 can be obtained. Larger amount of carbon (2 wt.%) prevents full delithiation. Heating in air, O2, or N 2 results in structural disorder (< 300 °C), formation of an intermediate sarcopside Mn3(PO4)2 phase (350 -- 450 °C), and complete decomposition to Mn2P2O 7 on extended heating at 400 °C. Carbon protects MnPO4 from reacting with environmental water, which is detrimental to its structural stability. We not only studied the crystalline olivine MnPO4, but also investigated the amorphous products obtained from carbon-free LiMnPO 4. We have revealed the Mn dissolution phenomenon during chemical delithiation of LiMnPO4, which causes the amorphization of olivine MnPO 4. Properties of crystalline-MnPO4 obtained from carbon-coated LiMnPO4 and of amorphous product resulting from the delithiation of pure LiMnPO4 were studied and compared. The P-rich amorphous phases in the latter are considered to be MnHP2O7 and MnH2P

  11. Optimizing the formula of rare earth-bearing materials: A computational chemistry investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolus, Marjorie; Defranceschi, Mireille

    We present a computational investigation into the nature of bonds formed by rare earth elements (REE) in materials. This study focuses on the incorporation of neodymium in minerals called apatites, which are derived from fluorapatite: Ca10(PO4)6F2. These minerals, which allow many substitutions on all three Ca, P, and F sites, are considered as potential host phases for radioactive elements separated from nuclear waste. Nd and trivalent actinides have very similar physical and chemical properties, and Nd is not radioactive and much more easily handled. It is therefore very often used as a surrogate for actinides with oxidation degree three in experimental studies. Several formulas can be considered to substitute Nd3+ to Ca2+ and maintain charge balance of the apatite. Existing experimental and theoretical studies, however, mostly concern the Ca9Nd(PO4)5SiO4F2 formula, where the Nd incorporation is compensated by the replacement of one PO43- by a SiO44- group. Moreover, only the cation position has been studied, whereas the silicate position and its influence on stability are unknown. We present a more general investigation of possible charge compensations on the one hand, and of the various resulting configurations on the other. All possible configurations of the two formulas Ca9Nd(PO4)5 SiO4F2 and Ca8NdNa(PO4)6F2 have been considered. Calculations have been performed within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). A computation scheme that permits good accuracy in these systems within reasonable computation times is determined. The results obtained for cohesion energies, geometries, and electronic densities are discussed. As for the formulation, it is shown that the Ca8NdNa(PO4)6F2 formula is less stable than the fluorapatite, while Ca9Nd(PO4)5 SiO4F2 is more stable. For the structures, it is found that Nd substitutes preferably in the second cationic site. Moreover, the most stable structures exhibit the shortest Na-Nd or Nd-Si distances. Local charge

  12. Investigating the Structure-Property Relationships of Aqueous Self-Assembled Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogstad, Daniel Vincent

    The components of all living organisms are formed through aqueous self-assembly of organic and inorganic materials through physical interactions including hydrophobic, electrostatic, and hydrogen bonding. In this dissertation, these physical interactions were exploited to develop nanostructured materials for a range of applications. Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) self-assemble into varying structures depending on the physical interactions of the peptides and tails. PA aggregation was investigated by cryo-TEM to provide insight on the effects of varying parameters, including the number and length of the lipid tails as well as the number, length, charge, hydrophobicity, and the hydrogen bonding ability of the peptides. It was determined that cylindrical micelles are most commonly formed, and that specific criteria must be met in order to form spherical micelles, nanoribbons, vesicles or less ordered aggregates. Controlling the aggregated structure is necessary for many applications---particularly in therapeutics. Additionally, two-headed PAs were designed to act as a catalyst and template for biomimetic mineralization to control the formation of inorganic nanomaterials. Finally, injectable hydrogels made from ABA triblock copolymers were synthesized with the A blocks being functionalized with either guanidinium or sulfonate groups. These oppositely charged polyelectrolyte endblocks formed complex coacervate domains, which served as physical crosslinks in the hydrogel network. The mechanical properties, the network structure, the nature of the coacervate domain and the kinetics of hydrogel formation were investigated as a function of polymer concentration, salt concentration, pH and stoichiometry with rheometry, SAXS and SANS. It was shown that the mechanical properties of the hydrogels was highly dependent on the structural organization of the coacervate domains and that the properties could be tuned with polymer and salt concentration. Polymer and salt concentration were

  13. Experimental studies of seal materials for potential use in a Los Medanos-type bedded salt repository

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeley, L.D.; Roy, D.M.; Grutzeck, M.W.

    1981-09-01

    This investigation is composed of the following three tasks: (1) materials selection and factors affecting longevity of seal materials; (2) experimental seal materials for shaft, tunnel, and room backfill incorporating rock from the Los Medanos area; and (3) effects of the curing environment on properties of seal materials. Cement-based materials have been studied as candidates for backfilling and sealing boreholes, shafts, tunnels, and rooms in potential repository environments, particularly in bedded salt. In these studies, potential seal materials were selected and subjected to preliminary tests. Then, geochemical factors which control longevity of repository-sealing materials were investigated. The subjects of investigations included: factors controlling the attainment of equilibrium, with time, of the plug components; and the rate of approach of the plug-component subsystem to a state of equilibrium within the total system. The effect of these factors upon changes in physical, mechanical and thermal properties of a seal system, and the consequent effectiveness of the seal in preventing transport of radwaste species are being determined. High values were obtained for compressive strengths of some concretes (> 35 MPa); these samples also had very low permeabilities to brine (10/sup -7/ or 10/sup -8/ darcy). Highest strengths were obtained from samples cast with dolostone and anhydrite aggregate. Apparently, a strong bond generally was formed between the grout and the various rocks, evidenced by breakage through aggregate particles in tests of compressive strength. An expansive grout mixture containing salt was evaluated in five curing conditions, including: solutions saturated with CaSO/sub 4/, and Ca(OH)/sub 2/; deionized water; naturally occurring brine; and humid air, all at 38/sup 0/C. Expansion due to extensive growth of ettringite occurred in the first three of these five environments.

  14. Investigating Your Environment: Teaching Materials for Environmental Education. October 1978 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Included are seven lesson plans for secondary school students: (1) soil investigations; (2) water investigations; (3) forest investigations; (4) investigating some animals and their environment; (5) a land use simulation; (6) investigating the human community; and (7) developing environmental investigations. Each lesson plan has seven components:…

  15. Ultrastructural Heterogeneity of Carbonaceous Material in Ancient Cherts: Investigating Biosignature Origin and Preservation.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yuangao; Engdahl, Anders; Zhu, Shixing; Vajda, Vivi; McLoughlin, Nicola

    2015-10-01

    Opaline silica deposits on Mars may be good target sites where organic biosignatures could be preserved. Potential analogues on Earth are provided by ancient cherts containing carbonaceous material (CM) permineralized by silica. In this study, we investigated the ultrastructure and chemical characteristics of CM in the Rhynie chert (c. 410 Ma, UK), Bitter Springs Formation (c. 820 Ma, Australia), and Wumishan Formation (c. 1485 Ma, China). Raman spectroscopy indicates that the CM has experienced advanced diagenesis or low-grade metamorphism at peak metamorphic temperatures of 150-350°C. Raman mapping and micro-Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectroscopy were used to document subcellular-scale variation in the CM of fossilized plants, fungi, prokaryotes, and carbonaceous stromatolites. In the Rhynie chert, ultrastructural variation in the CM was found within individual fossils, while in coccoidal and filamentous microfossils of the Bitter Springs and formless CM of the Wumishan stromatolites ultrastructural variation was found between, not within, different microfossils. This heterogeneity cannot be explained by secondary geological processes but supports diverse carbonaceous precursors that experienced differential graphitization. Micro-FTIR analysis found that CM with lower structural order contains more straight carbon chains (has a lower R3/2 branching index) and that the structural order of eukaryotic CM is more heterogeneous than prokaryotic CM. This study demonstrates how Raman spectroscopy combined with micro-FTIR can be used to investigate the origin and preservation of silica-permineralized organics. This approach has good capability for furthering our understanding of CM preserved in Precambrian cherts, and potential biosignatures in siliceous deposits on Mars. PMID:26496525

  16. INVESTIGATION OF CONTACT VACUUMING FOR REMEDIATION OF FUNGALLY CONTAMINATED DUCT MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental fungi become a potential Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) problem when adequate moisture and nutrients are present in building materials. Because of their potential to rapidly spread contamination throughout a building, ventilation system materials are of particular signifi...

  17. A test and instrumentation system for the investigation of degradation of electrical insulating materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The basic test methods of aging and deterioration mechanisms of electrical insulating materials are discussed. A comprehensive test system developed to study the degradation process is described. This system is completely checked, and calibrated with a few insulating material samples.

  18. Electrochemical investigations of advanced materials for microelectronic and energy storage devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goonetilleke, Pubudu Chaminda

    A broad range of electrochemical techniques are employed in this work to study a selected set of advanced materials for applications in microelectronics and energy storage devices. The primary motivation of this study has been to explore the capabilities of certain modern electrochemical techniques in a number of emerging areas of material processing and characterization. The work includes both aqueous and non-aqueous systems, with applications in two rather general areas of technology, namely microelectronics and energy storage. The sub-systems selected for investigation are: (i) Electrochemical mechanical and chemical mechanical planarization (ECMP and CMP, respectively), (ii) Carbon nanotubes in combination with room temperature ionic liquids (ILs), and (iii) Cathode materials for high-performance Li ion batteries. The first group of systems represents an important building block in the fabrication of microelectronic devices. The second and third groups of systems are relevant for new energy storage technologies, and have generated immense interests in recent years. A common feature of these different systems is that they all are associated with complex surface reactions that dictate the performance of the devices based on them. Fundamental understanding of these reactions is crucial to further development and expansion of their associated technologies. It is the complex mechanistic details of these surface reactions that we address using a judicious combination of a number of state of the art electrochemical techniques. The main electrochemical techniques used in this work include: (i) Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and slow scan cyclic voltammetry (SSCV, a special case of CV); (ii) Galvanostatic (or current-controlled) measurements; (iii) Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), based on two different methodologies, namely, Fourier transform EIS (FT-EIS, capable of studying fast reaction kinetics in a time-resolved mode), and EIS using frequency response

  19. Investigation on Rubber-Modified Polybenzoxazine Composites for Lubricating Material Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jubsilp, Chanchira; Taewattana, Rapiphan; Takeichi, Tsutomu; Rimdusit, Sarawut

    2015-10-01

    Effects of liquid amine-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile (ATBN) on the properties of bisphenol-A/aniline-based polybenzoxazine (PBA-a) composites were investigated. Liquid ATBN decreased gel time and lowered curing temperature of the benzoxazine resin (BA-a). The PBA-a/ATBN-based self-lubricating composites resulted in substantial enhancement regarding their tribological, mechanical, and thermal properties. The inclusion of the ATBN at 5% by weight was found decreasing the friction coefficient and improved wear resistance of the PBA-a/ATBN composites. Flexural modulus and glass transition temperature of the PBA-a composite samples added the ATBN was constant within the range of 1-5% by weight. A plausible wear mechanism of the composites is proposed based on their worn surface morphologies. Based on the findings in this work, it seems that the obtained PBA-a/ATBN self-lubricating composites would have high potential to be used for bearing materials where low friction coefficient, high wear resistance, and modulus with good thermal property are required.

  20. Investigation of Methods for Selectively Reinforcing Aluminum and Aluminum-Lithium Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, R. Keith; Alexa, Joel A.; Messick, Peter L.; Domack, Marcia S.; Wagner, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that selective reinforcement offers the potential to significantly improve the performance of metallic structures for aerospace applications. Applying high-strength, high-stiffness fibers to the high-stress regions of aluminum-based structures can increase the structural load-carrying capability and inhibit fatigue crack initiation and growth. This paper discusses an investigation into potential methods for applying reinforcing fibers onto the surface of aluminum and aluminum-lithium plate. Commercially-available alumina-fiber reinforced aluminum alloy tapes were used as the reinforcing material. Vacuum hot pressing was used to bond the reinforcing tape to aluminum alloy 2219 and aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 base plates. Static and cyclic three-point bend testing and metallurgical analysis were used to evaluate the enhancement of mechanical performance and the integrity of the bond between the tape and the base plate. The tests demonstrated an increase in specific bending stiffness. In addition, no issues with debonding of the reinforcing tape from the base plate during bend testing were observed. The increase in specific stiffness indicates that selectively-reinforced structures could be designed with the same performance capabilities as a conventional unreinforced structure but with lower mass.

  1. Investigation of the irradiation effects on laser-removal and surface morphology of mixed material sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubkowska, M.; Gąsior, P.; Kowalska-Strzęciwilk, E.; Fortuna-Zalesna, E.; Grzonka, J.; Ciupinski, L.

    2013-07-01

    Paper presents experimental results of laser-removal of deposits from mixed materials sample (mixes of C, W and Al on aluminum substrate) and investigation of the effects on morphology and microstructure of deposits and substrates. Two kinds of laser were applied - high power density Nd:YAG laser and high average power, but lower power density Yb:fiber laser. A constant repetition rate of 100 kHz fiber laser was used with variable pulse energy (0.5-1 mJ) to examine the phenomena in dependence of power density. To verify differences in the removal process, pulses of energy of 500 mJ in 3.5 ns of the Nd:YAG laser were used. The surface of examined sample was characterized by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) in order to monitor substrate/deposit morphology changes introduced by both lasers. In contrary to the Nd:YAG, the Yb:fiber laser does not cause substrate damages unless it operates at the power density above 106 W/cm2 and does not produce macroscopic dust.

  2. Resonance Counters as the Best Tool for the Investigations in Material Science

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, A. A.; Irkaev, S. M.; Panchuck, V. V.; Semenov, V. G.; Volodin, V. S.

    2008-10-28

    Sensitivity and resolution play a crucial role when Moessbauer spectroscopy is used in the materials science. Application of resonance counters in Moessbauer spectrometers allows us to increase the parameters mentioned above, and also signal-to-noise ratio considerably. The last one provides diminishing the time needed for obtaining given statistical accuracy. We carried out investigations of development of optimal counters for following isotopes: {sup 57}Fe, {sup 119}Sn, and {sup 151}Eu. Influence of different parameters of resonant radiation converters on experimental results was considered theoretically. Optimization of design has been performed using mathematical modeling based on Monte-Carlo method. Comparison of different types of counters used for resonant detecting was carried out. Results of experimental works on selection of efficient radiation converters are given. Comparison of scintillation and gas resonance counters was carried out. FeAl and FeGe{sub 2} alloys and K{sub 2}MgFe(CN){sub 6} have been used as converters for experiments with {sup 57}Fe-isotope, CaSnO{sub 3} has been used for {sup 119}Sn and Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} and EuF{sub 3}--for {sup 151}Eu isotope. Gamma-optical scheme for versatile spectrometer, which expands the range of application of resonant detection for other Moessbauer isotopes, was suggested.

  3. Investigation of the composition of arterial plaques based on arterial waveforms and material properties.

    PubMed

    Feng, J; Rajeswaran, T; He, S; Wilkinson, F L; Serracino-Inglott, F; Azzawi, M; Parikh, V; Miraftab, M; Alexander, M Y

    2015-08-01

    Stroke is mainly caused by a narrowing of the carotid artery from a build-up of plaque. The risk of plaque rupture and subsequent stroke is dependent on plaque composition. Advances in imaging modalities offer a non-invasive means to assess the health of blood vessels and detect damage. However, the current diagnosis fails to identify patients with soft lipid plaque that are more susceptible to fissure, resulting in stroke. The aim of this study was to use waveform analysis to identify plaque composition and the risk of rupture. We have investigated pressure and flow by combining an artificial blood flow circuit with tubing containing different materials, to simulate plaques in a blood vessel. We used fat and bone to model lipid and calcification respectively to determine if the composition of plaques can be identified by arterial waveforms. We demonstrate that the arterial plaque models with different percentages of calcification and fat, results in significantly different arterial waveforms. These findings imply that arterial waveform analysis has the potential for further development to identify the vulnerable plaques prone to rupture. These findings could have implications for improved patient prognosis by speed of detection and a more appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26736431

  4. Investigation on slot-die coating of hybrid material structure for OLED lightings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kwang-Jun; Lee, Jin-Young; Shin, Dong-Kyun; Park, Jongwoon

    2016-08-01

    With an attempt to fabricate large-area OLED lighting panels, we investigate slot-die coating of a small molecule (SM) hole transport layer (HTL). It is observed that SM HTL films formed by spin coating exhibit pinhole-like surface, whereas the films by slot-die coating show micro-sized hillocks due to agglomeration. As the plate temperature of the slot coater is increased, smaller hillocks appear more densely. To tackle it, a small amount of a polymer HTL is added into the SM HTL (Hybrid HTL). By the aid of entangled polymer chains, small molecules are prohibited from migrating and thus agglomerations disappear. The peak-to-peak roughness of the slot-coated hybrid HTL films is measured to be about 11.5 nm, which is slightly higher than that (~7 nm) of the polymer HTL film, but much lower than that (~1071 nm) of the SM HTL film. Similar results are also observed in spin-coated films. It is also addressed that OLED with the hybrid HTL shows higher luminous efficacy, compared to OLED with the SM HTL or the polymer HTL. We have further demonstrated that the dissolution problem occurring between two stacked layers with different solvents during slot-die coating can be suppressed to a great extent using such a combination of materials in hybrid structure.

  5. Investigation of bubble dynamics and heating during focused ultrasound insonation in tissue-mimicking materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xinmai

    2003-10-01

    The deposition of ultrasonic energy in tissue can cause tissue damage due to local heating. For pressures above a critical threshold, cavitation will occur in tissue and bubbles will be created. These oscillating bubbles can induce a much larger thermal energy deposition in the local region. The present work is an attempt to control and utilize this bubble-enhanced heating. First, by applying appropriate bubble dynamic models, limits on the asymptotic bubble size distribution are obtained for different driving pressures at 1 MHz. The size distributions are bounded by two thresholds: the bubble shape instability threshold and the rectified diffusion threshold. The growth rate of bubbles in this region is also given, and the resulting time evolution of the heating in a given insonation scenario is modeled. Experimental results have been obtained to investigate the bubble-enhanced heating in an agar and graphite based tissue-mimicking material. By fitting appropriate bubble densities in the ultrasound field, the peak temperature changes observed in experiments are simulated. Finally, a simple bubbly liquid model is presented to estimate shielding effects which may be important even for low void fraction during high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. Thesis advisor: R. Glynn Holt Copies of this thesis may be obtained by contacting the advisor, Glynn Holt, Dept. of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, 110 Cummington St., Boston, MA 02215. E-mail address: rgholt@bu.edu

  6. Investigation of epitaxial silicon layers as a material for radiation hardened silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Eremin, V.; Ilyashenko, I.; Ivanov, A.; Verbitskaya, E.; CERN RD-48 ROSE Collaboration

    1997-12-01

    Epitaxial grown thick layers ({ge} 100 micrometers) of high resistivity silicon (Epi-Si) have been investigated as a possible candidate of radiation hardened material for detectors for high-energy physics. As grown Epi-Si layers contain high concentration (up to 2 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}) of deep levels compared with that in standard high resistivity bulk Si. After irradiation of test diodes by protons (E{sub p} = 24 GeV) with a fluence of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}2}, no additional radiation induced deep traps have been detected. A reasonable explanation is that there is a sink of primary radiation induced defects (interstitial and vacancies), possibly by as-grown defects, in epitaxial layers. The ``sinking`` process, however, becomes non-effective at high radiation fluences (10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2}) due to saturation of epitaxial defects by high concentration of radiation induced ones. As a result, at neutron fluence of 1 {times} 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2} the deep level spectrum corresponds to well-known spectrum of radiation induced defects in high resistivity bulk Si. The net effective concentration in the space charge region equals to 3 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} after 3 months of room temperature storage and reveals similar annealing behavior for epitaxial as compared to bulk silicon.

  7. Investigation of epitaxial silicon layers as a material for radiation hardened silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Eremin, V.; Ilyashenko, I.; Ivanov, A.

    1997-11-01

    Epitaxial grown thick layers (>100 {mu}m) of high resistivity silicon (Epi-Si) have been investigated as a possible candidate of radiation hardened material for detectors for high-energy physics. As grown Epi-Si layers contain high concentration (up to 2{center_dot}10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}) of deep levels compared with that in standard high resistivity bulk Si. After irradiation of test diodes by protons (E{sub p} = 24 GeV) with a fluence of 1.5{center_dot}10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}2}, no additional radiation induced deep traps have been detected. A reasonable explanation is that there is a sink of primary radiation induced defects, in epitaxial layers. The {open_quotes}sinking{close_quotes} process, however, becomes non-effective at high radiation fluences (10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2}) due to saturation of epitaxial defects by high concentration of radiation induced ones. As a result, at neutron fluence of 1{center_dot}10{sup 14}cm{sup {minus}2} the deep level spectrum corresponds to well-known spectrum of radiation induced defects in high resistivity bulk Si. The net effective concentration in the space charge region equals to 3{center_dot}10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} after 3 months of room temperature storage and reveals similar annealing behavior for epitaxial as compared to bulk silicon.

  8. An Investigation of North Dakota's Special Education Commerical Curriculum Material: No. 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Drew; Hartman, Donna

    Questionnaires completed by 126 instructors of handicapped students in North Dakota were analyzed to examine the use of curriculum materials in special education. Teachers were asked to list at least 10 curriculum materials presently used by the students. Of the 536 materials named, 255 were classified through the use of the Annehurst Curriculum…

  9. Thermionic emission investigation of materials for directly heated cathodes of electron tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellert, Bernd; Rohrbach, W.

    1994-05-01

    Thermionic emission of new material compositions are studied. Combinations of rare earth materials and tungsten offer great potential as thermal electron emitter into vacuum. The thermal emission properties of these materials are studied and compared to thoriated tungsten as a well-known thermal emitter. The corresponding work functions and Richardson Dushman constants are evaluated. The chemistry involved and the emission mechanism are discussed.

  10. Pressurized grout remote backfilling at AML sites near Beulah and Zap, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, E.J.; Dodd, W.E.

    1999-07-01

    The Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) Division of the North Dakota Public Service Commission (PSC) is charged with the reclamation of hazardous abandoned mine sites in North Dakota. Several underground lignite coalmines were operated near the cities of Beulah and Zap, North Dakota, from the early 1900's until about 1955. Coal seams in this area were relatively thick and the overburden generally shallow. As these mines have deteriorated with time, deep collapse features, or sinkholes, have surfaced in many areas. These features are very dangerous, especially when they occur at or near residential and commercial areas and public roads. In the past five years, sinkholes have surfaced beneath a commercial building (boat dealership, lounge, and gas station) and beneath a nearby occupied mobile home north of Beulah. sinkholes have also surfaced near KHOL Radio Station in Beulah and in the right of way of a public road south of Zap. The AML Division has conducted several emergency sinkhole-filling projects in these areas. In 1995--97, the AML Division conducted exploratory drilling which confirmed the presence of collapsing underground mines at these sites. The remediation of these sites around Beulah/Zap will take place over several years and involve three or more separate contracts due to budget considerations. In 1997, the AML Division began reclamation at these sties utilizing pressurized grout remote backfilling. In this technique, a cementitious grout is pumped through cased drill holes directly into the mine cavities to fill them and thereby stabilize the surface from collapse. The successful contractor for Phase One of the project was The Concrete Doctor, Inc. (TCDI). This paper will concentrate on Phase One of this work performed from June through September 1997. This project is especially interesting because grout was pumped through holes drilled inside the occupied commercial building. Grout was also pumped through angled holes that intercepted mined workings directly

  11. Microfluidic encapsulation for self-healing material and investigation of its impacts on composite performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmens, Ryan J.

    controllable fabrication of uniform diameters with CV in the range 6-10 and the solution processing allows for control of catalyst content. The microfibers exhibit several advantageous characteristics such as uniform catalyst loading, sub-micron catalyst particle size, and amorphous catalyst structure. As a result, the fibers enable faster gelation times during polymerization of dicyclopentadiene. The microfluidic solution spinning process enables dramatically improved catalyst utilization in self-healing epoxy composites. As compared with their traditionally spherical analogue, the microfibers speed the rate of healing by 25% and increase the overall healed strength by 75%. The impacts of particle size distribution on healing performance and the use of fibrous particles are then investigated theoretically through development of two separate analytical models. Both models relate known composite design parameters such as the weight fraction and dimensions of the particles to the respective healing agent delivery modes for solid and liquid phase healing agent. These are the number of particles exposed on a crack surface and the mass of healing agent released into the damage volume. These models provide a theoretical frame work for the controlled design and optimization of composite healing performance through development of novel encapsulation processes. Throughout this work, evaluation of composite properties and healing performance was experimentally performed using a tapered double cantilever beam specimen. Quantification of such composite performance metrics requires careful calibration of this fracture specimen to determine geometry dependent parameters used for calculations. A method is developed here, for this purpose, using finite element analysis of 3D specimen models and through experimental calibration. The development of this method helps to elucidate the influence of side grooving on the parameters and to align the method of evaluating self-healing material

  12. Investigations of the effects of photocatalysis on the molecular assembly behavior of titanium alkoxide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musgraves, Jonathan David

    The present work focuses on the use of engineered, photoactive metal alkoxide precursors in the sol-gel processing of metal-oxide materials. The strategy under investigation seeks to integrate photoinduced structural modification with conventional sol-gel chemical preparations to enable the selective photo-activation of reaction points about the metal center during material formation. The approach thus has the potential to influence the development of intermolecular bonding geometry and to provide an opportunity to enforce or bias longer range structural development processes and resulting network topology. This ability to bias the long range structural development has been shown to provide opportunities both for photoinduced material formation and the potential to control multi-length scale structural characteristics of these materials. The response of a mononuclear, heteroleptic titanium alkoxide (OPy) 2Ti(4MP)2 [where OPy = pyridine carbinoxide and 4MP = 4-mercaptophenoxide] to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in dilute solution and in solid-state samples has been measured. Vibrational spectroscopy (FTIR absorption and Raman scattering) was used to monitor changes in molecular structure upon exposure to 337.1 and 365 nm light. Assignment of spectral features to vibrational modes of the molecule was aided by a normal-mode analysis of the energy-minimized molecular structure within a density functional theory (DFT) framework. Photoinduced decreases in peak areas were observed in both FTIR spectra of the precursor solutions and Raman data collected from solution-cast films of the precursor material. These changes were associated with vibrational modes localized at the 4MP ligands. Conversely, no significant modification of vibrational structure associated with the OPy moiety was observed under the excitation conditions examined. Excitation, with 248 nm light, of a solution of (OPy)2Ti(TAP) 2 [where OPy = pyridine carbinoxide and TAP = 2,4,6 tris

  13. High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines - Phase I: Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This project proposes to use pneumatically or hydraulically emplaced dry-flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products to backfill the adits left by highwall mining. Backfilling highwall mine adits with dry-FGD materials is technically attractive. The use of an active highwall mine would allow the dry-FGD material to be brought in using the same transportation network used to move the coal out, eliminating the need to recreated the transportation infrastructure, thereby saving costs. Activities during the period included the negotiations leading to the final cooperative agreement for the project and the implementation of the necessary instruments at the University of Kentucky to administer the project. Early in the negotiations, a final agreement on a task structure was reached and a milestone plan was filed. A review was initiated of the original laboratory plan as presented in the proposal, and tentative modifications were developed. Selection of a mine site was made early; the Pleasant Valley mine in Greenup County was chosen. Several visits were made to the mine site to begin work on the hydrologic monitoring plan. The investigation of the types of permits needed to conduct the project was initiated. Considerations concerning the acceptance and implementation of technologies led to the choice of circulating fluidized bed ash as the primary material for the study. Finally, the membership of a Technical Advisory Committee for the study was assembled.

  14. 49 CFR 837.3 - Published reports, material contained in the public accident investigation dockets, and accident...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... For information regarding the types of documents routinely issued by the Board, see 49 CFR part 801... public accident investigation dockets, and accident database data. 837.3 Section 837.3 Transportation... investigation dockets, and accident database data. (a) Demands for material contained in the NTSB's...

  15. 49 CFR 837.3 - Published reports, material contained in the public accident investigation dockets, and accident...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... For information regarding the types of documents routinely issued by the Board, see 49 CFR part 801... public accident investigation dockets, and accident database data. 837.3 Section 837.3 Transportation... investigation dockets, and accident database data. (a) Demands for material contained in the NTSB's...

  16. 49 CFR 837.3 - Published reports, material contained in the public accident investigation dockets, and accident...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... For information regarding the types of documents routinely issued by the Board, see 49 CFR part 801... public accident investigation dockets, and accident database data. 837.3 Section 837.3 Transportation... investigation dockets, and accident database data. (a) Demands for material contained in the NTSB's...

  17. 49 CFR 837.3 - Published reports, material contained in the public accident investigation dockets, and accident...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... For information regarding the types of documents routinely issued by the Board, see 49 CFR part 801... public accident investigation dockets, and accident database data. 837.3 Section 837.3 Transportation... investigation dockets, and accident database data. (a) Demands for material contained in the NTSB's...

  18. 49 CFR 837.3 - Published reports, material contained in the public accident investigation dockets, and accident...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... For information regarding the types of documents routinely issued by the Board, see 49 CFR part 801... public accident investigation dockets, and accident database data. 837.3 Section 837.3 Transportation... investigation dockets, and accident database data. (a) Demands for material contained in the NTSB's...

  19. An international multi-laboratory investigation of carbon-based hydrogen sorbent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Katherine E.; Parilla, Philip A.; O'Neill, Kevin J.; Gennett, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    New materials are needed to achieve the hydrogen storage targets set out by the US Department of Energy for fuel cell vehicular applications. In order to enable the pathway toward this discovery, precise and accurate characterization of the hydrogen storage performance of these materials is needed. Determining the precise and accurate hydrogen storage capacity of materials requires rigorous attention to detailed experimental parameters and methodology. Slight errors in even small experimental details can result in a large deviation in the determination of the material's true characteristics. Here, we compare measurements of the gravimetric excess hydrogen uptake capacities for two different carbon sorbent materials measured by different laboratories at ambient and liquid N2 temperatures. The participants for this study consist of research laboratories led by experienced scientists in the hydrogen storage field. This collaborative evaluation of standard sorbents illustrated considerable reproducibility over a broad range of materials' hydrogen sorption gravimetric capacities.

  20. Investigation on thermo-mechanical instability of porous low dielectric constant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zin, Emil Hyunbae

    This study investigates the structural stability of porous low dielectric constant materials (PLK) under thermal and mechanical load and the influence of contributing factors including porosity as intrinsic factor and plasma damage and moisture absorption as extrinsic factors on thermo-mechanical instability of PLK in advanced Cu/PLK interconnects. For this purpose, a ball indentation creep test technique was developed to examine the thermal and mechanical instability of PLK at relevant load and temperature conditions in the interconnect structure. Our exploration with the ball indentation creep test found that PLK films plastically deforms with time, indicating that viscoplastic deformation does occur under relevant conditions of PLK processing. On the basis of the results that the increase of the indentation depth with time shows more noticeable difference in PLK films with higher porosity, plasma exposure, and moisture absorption, it is our belief that PLK stability is greatly affected by porosity, plasma damage and moisture. Viscous flow was found to be mechanism for the viscoplastic deformation at the temperature and load of real PLK integration processing. This finding was obtained from the facts that the kinetics of the indentation creep fit very well with the viscous flow model and the extracted stress exponent is close to unity. Based on the results of temperature dependence in all PLK films, the activation energy(~1.5eV) of the viscosity back calculated from the experimental value of the kinetics was found to be much small than that of a pure glass (> 4eV). This suggests that the viscous flow of PLK is controlled by chemical reaction happening in PLK matrix. The FT-IR measurement for the examination of chemical bond reconfiguration shows that the intensity of Si-OH bonds increases with the flow while that of Si-O-Si, -CHX and Si-CH 3 bonds decreases, indicating that chemical reactions are involved in the deformation process. From these findings, it is

  1. Investigation of Clad Metals for Use as Bipolar Plate Material in PEM Fuel Cell Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, John S.; Meier, Alan M.; Kim, Jin Yong; Xia, Guanguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Weil, K. Scott

    2006-07-21

    Although metal interconnects offer many advantages over their carbon-based counterparts, they suffer from surface corrosion which leads to a release of metal ions that can contaminate the electrolyte membrane and poison the electrode catalysts. In addition, the formation of a passivating oxide or oxyhydroxide layer on the surface of the metal will increase the contact resistance between the bipolar plate and the graphite electrode backing. The approach currently under development employs an inexpensive clad metal laminate as the primary material for the bipolar plate. The key in making this work is in identifying an appropriate surface passivation layer that mitigates corrosion while at the same time allows for good electronic conduction. The current study investigated the kinetics of nitride formation on Nb and Ti foils as a function of time, temperature, atmosphere (N2-H2 gas composition), and the corrosion behavior. These two metals are being considered for use as a thin external cladding layer over an inexpensive steel core layer. As the nitride layer formation temperature was increased, the surface morphologies for both niobium and titanium substrates became coarser and more pitted, the nitride thicknesses of both increased non-linearly, and in the titanium system an oxide layer product layer on the outer surface grew as well. As the isothermal hold time was increased, the surface morphologies of both niobium and titanium reaction product layers did not change noticeably, and the thicknesses of the nitride layers increased. As the amount of hydrogen in the atmosphere was increased the surface morphologies for both the niobium and titanium did not change detectably, the thicknesses of the nitride layers increased, and titanium thicknesses of the oxide layers decreased. The nitrided niobium exhibited much better corrosion behavior than the nitrided titanium but no improvement was obtained relative to the pure Nb corrosion rates.

  2. A Numerical Investigation of CFRP-Steel Interfacial Failure with Material Point Method

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Luming; Faleh, Haydar; Al-Mahaidi, Riadh

    2010-05-21

    The success of retrofitting steel structures by using the Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) significantly depends on the performance and integrity of CFRP-steel joint and the effectiveness of the adhesive used. Many of the previous numerical studies focused on the design and structural performance of the CFRP-steel system and neglected the mechanical responses of adhesive layer, which results in the lack of understanding in how the adhesive layer between the CFRP and steel performs during the loading and failure stages. Based on the recent observation on the failure of CFRP-steel bond in the double lap shear tests, a numerical approach is proposed in this study to simulate the delamination process of CFRP sheet from steel plate using the Material Point Method (MPM). In the proposed approach, an elastoplasticity model with a linear hardening and softening law is used to model the epoxy layer. The MPM, which does not employ fixed mesh-connectivity, is employed as a robust spatial discretization method to accommodate the multi-scale discontinuities involved in the CFRP-steel bond failure process. To demonstrate the potential of the proposed approach, a parametric study is conducted to investigate the effects of bond length and loading rates on the capacity and failure modes of CFRP-steel system. The evolution of the CFRP-steel bond failure and the distribution of stress and strain along bond length direction will be presented. The simulation results not only well match the available experimental data but also provide a better understanding on the physics behind the CFRP sheet delamination process.

  3. A Numerical Investigation of CFRP-Steel Interfacial Failure with Material Point Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Luming; Faleh, Haydar; Al-Mahaidi, Riadh

    2010-05-01

    The success of retrofitting steel structures by using the Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) significantly depends on the performance and integrity of CFRP-steel joint and the effectiveness of the adhesive used. Many of the previous numerical studies focused on the design and structural performance of the CFRP-steel system and neglected the mechanical responses of adhesive layer, which results in the lack of understanding in how the adhesive layer between the CFRP and steel performs during the loading and failure stages. Based on the recent observation on the failure of CFRP-steel bond in the double lap shear tests [1], a numerical approach is proposed in this study to simulate the delamination process of CFRP sheet from steel plate using the Material Point Method (MPM). In the proposed approach, an elastoplasticity model with a linear hardening and softening law is used to model the epoxy layer. The MPM [2], which does not employ fixed mesh-connectivity, is employed as a robust spatial discretization method to accommodate the multi-scale discontinuities involved in the CFRP-steel bond failure process. To demonstrate the potential of the proposed approach, a parametric study is conducted to investigate the effects of bond length and loading rates on the capacity and failure modes of CFRP-steel system. The evolution of the CFRP-steel bond failure and the distribution of stress and strain along bond length direction will be presented. The simulation results not only well match the available experimental data but also provide a better understanding on the physics behind the CFRP sheet delamination process.

  4. Sheetflow Effects and Canal Backfilling on Sediment Source and Transport in Everglades Freshwater Marshes: Analysis of Molecular Organic Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regier, P.; He, D.; Saunders, C.; Coronado-Molina, C.; Jara, B.; Jaffe, R.

    2014-12-01

    Historic freshwater sheetflow in the Florida Everglades distributed sediment to form a ridge-and-slough landscape. However, drainage along with reduction and obstruction of flow has resulted in degradation of this ridged topography. The DECOMP Physical Model is a landscape-scale project aiming to reestablish natural sheetflow to the central and southern Everglades by redesigning barriers to flow. To validate proof of concept that increased flow will rebuild ridge-slough microtopography, biomarker proxies were established for ridge and slough organic matter sources. In addition, partial and complete canal backfill options were assessed via sediment trap accumulation in each backfill treatment area. Flocculent matter (floc) and sediment samples were collected, solvent extracted, chromatographically separated, and analyzed on a GC/MS using internal standard for quantification. Four molecular organic biomarkers were evaluated: the aquatic proxy (Paq), highly-branched isoprenoids (C20 HBI), kaurenes and botyrococcenes. Paq, an aquatic proxy of mid to long-chain n-alkanes, was shown to clearly differentiate between ridge-derived and slough-derived organic matter with Paq values increasing along ridge-to-slough transects. Kaurenes indicated presence of ridge-derived organic matter while C20 HBI and botyrococcenes were indicative of periphyton-derived organic matter which is commonly more abundant in sloughs. Biomarker distributions during both low (present day) and high (managed) water flow through the DECOMP experimental parcel were determined and discussed comparatively.

  5. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.A.; Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

  6. ASSESSMENT OF RADIONUCLIDE RELEASE FROM INTACT STRUCTURES BACKFILLED WITH CONTAMINATED CONCRETE AT THE YANKEE NUCLEAR POWER STATION.

    SciTech Connect

    SULLIVAN, T.

    2004-09-30

    This calculation determines the release of residual radioactivity (including H-3, C-14, Co-60, Ni-63, Sr-90, and Cs-137), from subsurface structures filled with concrete debris at the Yankee Nuclear Power Station. Analyses were performed to assess the rate of release from the source of contamination and the resulting dose in the groundwater pathway. Two mechanisms were considered, diffusive release from the concrete structures (walls and floors) that remain intact and sorption onto concrete backfill placed within these structures. RESRAD was used to calculate the predicted maximum dose assuming a unit loading of 1 pCi/g on the intact structures. To the extent possible, the same assumptions in the soil DCGL calculations performed for Yankee Atomic were used in the calculation. However, modifications to some input parameter values were needed to represent the geometry of the subsurface facilities, flow through these facilities, and releases from the backfill and intact structures. Input parameters specific to these calculations included the leach rate, disposal geometry, pumping rate, porosity and bulk density. The dose results for a unit loading of 1 pCi/g on intact structures showed that Sr-90 had the highest dose (3.67E-02 mrem/yr).

  7. Investigation of Aging Processes of Ti-6Al-4 V Powder Material in Laser Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyda, V.; Kaufmann, N.; Emmelmann, C.

    Laser melting of titanium material, e.g. Ti-6Al-4 V, offers great potential in manufacturing automotive components, lightweight structures and medical implants. In order to achieve required mechanical properties of laser melted components quality of powder materials is essential. Unmelted powder is recycled and reused in a subsequent process. Due to repeated recycling it is suggested that powder material changes. In this paper aging processes of Ti-6Al-4 V powder are studied. It was observed that powder particles coarsen and flowability increases. Comparing examined powder characteristics to bulk material properties it was noticed that there are significant effects of aged powder on laser melted components.

  8. Modeling of chemical interactions of fuel rod materials at high temperatures II. Investigation of downward relocation of molten materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veshchunov, M. S.; Palagin, A. V.

    1998-01-01

    In Part II of the modeling of chemical interactions of fuel rod materials at high temperatures, qualitative results on the nature of Zr-rich melt oxidation and interactions with fuel rods allow further interpretation of the post-test examinations of structures (debris) formed in the CORA tests under more complicated conditions, namely during downward relocation of the melt. In this situation, the molten mass extensively oxidizes and simultaneously dissolves UO 2 pellets and ZrO 2 scales of the cladding. The analysis of these simultaneous physico-chemical processes on the basis of the kinetic oxidation/dissolution model developed in Part I of the paper, allows a new interpretation and explanation of the CORA tests results concerning relocation dynamics of the major part of the melt (slow relocation of melt in the form of massive slug rather than quick relocations of droplets and rivulets), formation of local blockages (debris) in the interrod space and accumulation of the melt in the core region in the form of molten pool.

  9. Investigation of cross-linking characteristics of novel hole-transporting materials for solution-processed phosphorescent OLEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaemin; Ameen, Shahid; Lee, Changjin

    2016-04-01

    After the success of commercialization of the vacuum-evaporated organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), solutionprocessing or printing of OLEDs are currently attracting much research interests. However, contrary to various kinds of readily available vacuum-evaporable OLED materials, the solution-processable OLED materials are still relatively rare. Hole-transporting layer (HTL) materials for solution-processed OLEDs are especially limited, because they need additional characteristics such as cross-linking to realize multilayer structures in solution-processed OLEDs, as well as their own electrically hole-transporting characteristics. The presence of such cross-linking characteristics of solutionprocessable HTL materials therefore makes them more challenging in the development stage, and also makes them essence of solution-processable OLED materials. In this work, the structure-property relationships of thermally crosslinkable HTL materials were systematically investigated by changing styrene-based cross-linking functionalities and modifying the carbazole-based hole-transporting core structures. The temperature dependency of the cross-linking characteristics of the HTL materials was systematically investigated by the UV-vis. absorption spectroscopy. The new HTL materials were also applied to green phosphorescent OLEDs, and their device characteristics were also investigated based on the chemical structures of the HTL materials. The device configuration was [ITO / PEDOT:PSS / HTL / EML / ETL / CsF / Al]. We found out that the chemical structures of the cross-linking functionalities greatly affect not only the cross-linking characteristics of the resultant HTL materials, but also the resultant OLED device characteristics. The increase of the maximum luminance and efficiency of OLEDs was evident as the cross-linking temperature decreases from higher than 200°C to at around 150°C.

  10. Pit and backfill: Getty's plan for a diatomite zone in an oil patch. [Dravo Process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    Getty Oil Co. is investigating the recovery of oil from a diatomite deposit in California's McKittrick oil field, using a pair of newly built pilot plants - one a Dravo solvent extraction train and the other a Lurgi-Ruhrgas retort-condenser system. Both are sized to process approximately 240 short tons/day of mined feed, and each will be separately campaigned for a year during the evaluation program. The diatomite project has a number of advantages as a mine and materials-handling project compared to oil shale and tar sands. The deposit is soft, and in-transit handling will probably perform much of the necessary crushing for the plant. The material is light, approximately 100 lb/cu ft in place and 90 lb/cu ft broken. The near-surface location contrasts to the more deeply buried oil shale deposits in other areas of the nation. At the same time, the traction surface and structural bearing strength for heavy earth movers should be somewhat better in diatomite.

  11. Investigating the Factors That Influence Chemistry Teachers' Use of Curriculum Materials: The Case of China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, B.; Wei, B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper aimed to explore the factors that influenced teachers' adaptations of the curriculum materials of the new senior secondary chemistry curriculum, a standards-based science curriculum, in China. This study was based on the premise that the interaction of the teacher with curriculum materials in a given social context determined what…

  12. Adaptation Criteria for the Personalised Delivery of Learning Materials: A Multi-Stage Empirical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thalmann, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Personalised e-Learning represents a major step-change from the one-size-fits-all approach of traditional learning platforms to a more customised and interactive provision of learning materials. Adaptive learning can support the learning process by tailoring learning materials to individual needs. However, this requires the initial preparation of…

  13. The Development of Environmental Education Materials for Investigating Fire-Environment-Man Relationships: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanselman, David L.; Reider, David A.

    This publication details the development and use of environmental education materials based on the United States Forest Service "Process Approach." This publication focuses on materials that teach the ecology and management of natural and man-made forest and brush fires. The main body of the contents develop and document a rationale for…

  14. Crystallographic approaches for the investigation of molecular materials: structure property relationships and reverse crystal engineering.

    PubMed

    Macchi, Piero

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the connection between crystallography and material science. It sheds light on some of the research opportunities that are currently available and it critically reviews the directions taken by the scientific community in the field of crystal engineering. The focus is on materials formed by the assembly of organic and organometallic molecular building blocks. PMID:24801694

  15. Investigating Velocity Spectra at the Hugoniot State of Shock Loaded Heterogeneous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajeunesse, Jeff; Borg, John; Stewart, Sarah; Thadhani, Naresh

    2015-06-01

    Hugoniot states achieved in heterogeneous materials have shown oscillations in particle velocity about an averaged state for both experimental and simulated data. These oscillations arise from the scattering of the transmitted shock wave due to the presence of internal interfaces within heterogeneous materials. The goal of this work is to determine if the spectra of oscillatory behavior can be associated to characteristic length scales of the corresponding un-shocked heterogeneous material. Similarities between different types of shock-loaded materials are compared such as sand, concrete, aluminum foam, and layered composites. I would like to acknowledge the AFOSR under grant: FA9550-12-1-0128, ``Dynamic High-Pressure Behavior of Hierarchical Heterogenous Geological Granular Materials'' and the D.o.D. Supercomputing Resource Center.

  16. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1977-01-01

    The potentially useful encapsulating materials for Task 3 of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array project were studied to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. Materials for study were chosen on the basis of existing knowledge of generic chemical types having high resistance to environmental weathering. The materials varied from rubbers to thermoplastics and presented a broad range of mechanical properties and processing requirements. Basic physical and optical properties were measured on the polymers and were redetermined after exposure to indoor artificial accelerated aging conditions covering four time periods. Strengths and weaknesses of the various materials were revealed and data was accumulated for the development of predictive methodologies. To date, silicone rubbers, fluorocarbons, and acrylic polymers appear to have the most promising combination of characteristics. The fluorocarbons may be used only as films, however, because of their high cost.

  17. ARTEMIS Program : Investigation of MCCI by Means of Simulating Material Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Veteau, J.M.

    2006-07-01

    rod periodically investigates the temperature and the position of the interface between corium and solid. At last, measurements of the corium composition during the test as well as post-mortem analysis are implemented. In this paper, similarity criteria for phase diagram and thermal-hydraulics to select adequate simulating material are first described. Then the most salient results obtained during the 6 tests performed are given and according to these results, a classification in 3 categories is proposed. It is concluded that for tests submitted to conditions prevailing in the reactor the experimental results agree satisfactorily with the essential features of the so-called 'phase segregation model' envisaged in the TOLBIAC-ICB MCCI code. (author)

  18. Synthesis and Investigation of the V-shaped Tröger's Base Derivatives as Hole-transporting Materials.

    PubMed

    Braukyla, Titas; Sakai, Nobuya; Daskeviciene, Maryte; Jankauskas, Vygintas; Kamarauskas, Egidijus; Malinauskas, Tadas; Snaith, Henry J; Getautis, Vytautas

    2016-07-20

    V-shaped Tröger's base core has been investigated as a central linking unit in the synthesis of new charge-transporting materials for optoelectronic applications. The studied molecules have been synthesized in two steps from relatively inexpensive starting materials, and demonstrate high glass transition temperatures, good stability of the amorphous state, and comparatively high hole drift mobility (up to 0.011 cm(2)  V(-1)  s(-1) ). PMID:27245871

  19. Investigation of Wear and Friction Properties Under Sliding Conditions of Some Materials Suitable for Cages of Rolling-Contact Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Robert L; Swikert, Max A; Bisson, Edmond E

    1952-01-01

    An investigation of wear and friction properties of a number of materials sliding against SAE 52100 steel was conducted. These materials included brass, bronze, beryllium copper, monel, nichrome v, 24s-t aluminum, nodular iron, and gray cast iron. The metals investigated may be useful as possible cage (separator or retainer) materials for rolling-contact bearings of high-speed turbine engines. The ability of materials to form surface films that prevent welding is a most important factor in both dry friction and boundary lubrication. On the basis of wear and resistance to welding only, the cast irons were the most promising materials investigated; they showed the least wear and the least tendency to surface failure when run dry, and when boundary lubricated they showed the highest load capacity. On the basis of mechanical properties, nodular iron is superior to gray cast iron. Bronze had the lowest friction coefficient under dry sliding conditions. The results with brass, beryllium copper, and aluminum were poor and these materials do not appear, with regard to friction and wear, to be suitable for cages.

  20. Investigation of IAQ-Relevant Surface Chemistry and Emissions on HVAC Filter Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Destaillats, Hugo; Fisk, William J.

    2010-02-01

    Chemical reactions involving ozone of outdoor origin and indoor materials are known to be significant sources of formaldehyde and other irritant gas-phase oxidation products in the indoor environment. HVAC filters are exposed to particularly high ozone concentrations--close to outdoor levels. In this study, we investigated chemical processes taking place on the surface of filters that included fiberglass, polyester, cotton/polyester blend and synthetic (e.g., polyolefin) filter media. Ozone reactions were studied on unused filter media, and on filters that were deployed for 3 months in two different locations: at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at the Port of Oakland. Specimens from each filter were exposed to ozone under controlled conditions in a laboratory flow tube at a constant flow of dry or humidified air (50percent relative humidity). Ozone was generated with a UV source upstream of the flow tube, and monitored using a photometric detector. Ozone breakthrough curves were recorded for each sample exposed to ~;;150 ppbv O3 for periods of ~;;1000 min, from which we estimated their uptake rate. Most experiments were performed at 1.3 L/min (corresponding to a face velocity of 0.013 m/s), except for a few tests performed at a higher airflow rate, to obtain a face velocity of 0.093 m/s, slightly closer to HVAC operation conditions. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two oxidation byproducts, were collected downstream of the filter and quantified. Emissions of these volatile aldehydes were consistently higher under humidified air than under dry conditions, at which levels were near the limit of detection. Our results confirm that there are significant reactions of ozone as air containing ozone flows through HVAC filters, particularly when the filters are loaded with particles and the air is humidified. The amount of ozone reacted was not clearly related to the types of filter media, e.g., fiberglass versus synthetic. Specific fiberglass filters that were

  1. X-ray diffraction from shocked materials: investigating solid-solid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, Justin

    2008-04-01

    X-ray diffraction on nanosecond and sub-nanosecond time-scales has proven to be a useful tool in investigating the transient response of shocked crystals. Perhaps the most notable success in this area has been the direct observation of the α- ɛ transition in laser-shocked single crystals of [001] iron. [1,2] The information extracted from the diffraction patterns has been shown to be in remarkable agreement with multi-million atom molecular dynamics calculations. [3] Having successfully observed the transition in single crystals shocked along the principal axis, several further challenges remain. Amongst these are the exploration of the response of single crystals to shocks propagating along other crystallographic directions (where significantly different response is predicted [4]) the role of pre-existing defects in the time-scale of the elastic/plastic response of the material, and any differences that may occur in polycrystalline compared with single crystal samples.[5] A further challenge will be the development of rapid compression techniques that take samples to off-Hugoniot states (for example so-called quasi-isentropic compression). If such states can be produced in a controlled way, much could potentially be learnt about the state of certain planetary cores, including our own. [1] D.H. Kalantar, J.F. Belak, G.W. Collins, J.D. Colvin, H.M. Davies, J.H. Eggert, T.C. Germann, J. Hawreliak, B.L. Holian, K. Kadau, P.S. Lomdahl, H.E. Lorenzana, M.A. Meyers, K. Rosolankova, M.S. Schneider, J. Sheppard, J.S. Stolken and J.S. Wark, Phys. Rev. Lett., 95 075502, 2005 [2] J. Hawreliak, J.D. Colvin, J.H.Eggert, D. Kalantar, H.E. Lorenzana, J.S. Stölken, H.M. Davies, T.C. Germann, B.L. Holian, K. Kadau, P.S. Lomdahl, A. Higginbotham, K. Rosolankova, J. Sheppard, and J.S. Wark, Phys. Rev. B, 74, 184107, 2006 [3] K. Kadau, Timothy C. Germann, Peter S. Lomdahl, and Brad Lee Holian, Science, 296, 1681, 2002 [4] Kai Kadau, Timothy C. Germann, Peter S. Lomdahl, and Brad

  2. Investigation of Kevlar fabric-based materials for use with inflatable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niccum, R. J.; Munson, J. B.; Rueter, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    Design, manufacture and testing of laminated and coated composite materials incorporating a structural matrix of Kevlar are reported. The practicality of using Kevlar in aerostat materials is demonstrated, and data are provided on practical weaves, lamination and coating particulars, rigidity, strength, weight, elastic coefficients, abrasion resistance, crease effects, peel strength, blocking tendencies, helium permeability, and fabrication techniques. Properties of the Kevlar-based materials are compared with conventional Dacron-reinforced counterparts. A comprehensive test and qualification program is discussed, and considerable quantitative biaxial tensile and shear test data are provided.

  3. Spectroscopic Investigation of the Effects of Environment on Newly Developed Emissive Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Louis E.; Hammer, Nathan I.; Rathnayake, Hemali; Hollis, Kieth; Delcamp, Jared

    2014-06-01

    A comprehensive spectroscopic analysis of recently synthesized novel emissive materials, such as perylene diimide nanostructures, pincer complexes, and newly developed dyes, provides insight into how to modify these materials to be better suited for applications in photovoltaics and photodiodes. Properties of interest in this study include fluorescence emission, fluorescence lifetime, and quantum yield. Tracking how the photophysics of a compound change as different environments are introduced to the system helps to develop a better understanding of the fundamental photophysical properties of the material. Both solid phase and samples in solution are examined on the bulk and single molecule level.

  4. Investigation of the reactivity of carbonaceous materials in liquid and gaseous oxidizing media

    SciTech Connect

    Cherednik, E.M.; Butyrin, G.M.; Chirkina, A.P.; Mashkovich, L.A.; Kuteinikov, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    Constructional materials based on carbon are being used even more widely in various sectors of science and technology where they are subjected to the action of high temperatures, and also to aggressive liquid and gaseous media. The tendency of carbonaceous materials, especially synthetic graphites, to undergo oxidation frequently determines the possibility of their employment under concrete conditions of use. In the reported study, a comparative analysis has been made of experimental results on the liquid- and gas-phase oxidation of a wide range of carbon-containing materials with different porosities and chemical structures. Some general laws of the oxidation of carbon by various oxidizing agents have been deduced. 17 refs.

  5. Investigation of possibility of creation of radiation resistance sensors for physical information based on fiber materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskov, P. B.; Chebyshov, S. B.; Kadilin, V. V.; Sakharov, V. V.; Mosyagina, I. V.

    2016-02-01

    The results of physical and material science and technological development of new materials of radiation photonics - nano- and microstructure of radiation-sensitive and radiation- resistant optical glass and fibers based on quartz are presented in the report. The possibility of their application in neutron diagnostics devices of nuclear power objects are considered. Component and construction options for the radiation-sensitive fiber and glass materials (with isotopes 10B, 6Li, Gd, ions of Nd3+, Ce3+ etc.), in which radiation resistance is achieved through the organization of areas of "drain" and annihilation of radiation-induced defects are considered.

  6. Air-coupled ultrasonic investigation of multi-layered composite materials.

    PubMed

    Kazys, R; Demcenko, A; Zukauskas, E; Mazeika, L

    2006-12-22

    Air-coupled ultrasonics is fine alternative for the immersion testing technique. Usually a through transmission and a pitch-catch arrangement of ultrasonic transducers are used. The pitch-catch arrangement is very attractive for non-destructive testing and evaluation of materials, because it allows one-side access to the object. However, this technique has several disadvantages. It is sensitive to specularly reflected and edge waves. A spatial resolution depends on a distance between the transducers. A new method for detection and visualisation of inhomogeneities in composite materials using one-side access air-coupled ultrasonic measurement technique is described. Numerical predictions of Lamb wave interaction with a defect in a composite material are carried out and the interaction mechanism is explained. Experimental measurements are carried out with different arrangements of the transducers. The proposed method enables detect delamination and impact type defects in honeycomb materials. PMID:16797664

  7. An Investigation of Ferrite and Nanocrystalline Core Materials for Medium-Frequency Power Transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Selami; Sefa, Ibrahim; Altin, Necmi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, two transformers are designed using the ferrite N87 and the nanocrystalline core materials for the same power level and operating frequency. The operating frequency is defined as 10 kHz, which is suitable for both materials. Modeling and simulation studies have been performed with the same finite element analysis software and the obtained results have been reported. The nanocrystalline and the ferrite N87 core materials have been compared according to both electrical and mechanical parameters. In these comparisons, many features such as core and winding losses, flux distributions, leakage flux, efficiency, and both electrical and mechanical performance have been reported comparatively in the case of rectangular waveform excitation of the transformer. Obtained results show that the weight and the volume of the transformer are reduced and more compact transformer is designed by using the nanocrystalline core material. In addition, besides the core loss, winding losses are also reduced in this design.

  8. Investigations of Zeolitic Materials at the NIST Center for Neutron Research

    PubMed Central

    Toby, B. H.

    2001-01-01

    Crystallographic studies of four zeolitic materials using neutron powder diffraction data are presented. In most cases, these projects benefited from the combined use of neutron and x-ray measurements.

  9. An Investigation of Ferrite and Nanocrystalline Core Materials for Medium-Frequency Power Transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Selami; Sefa, Ibrahim; Altin, Necmi

    2016-05-01

    In this study, two transformers are designed using the ferrite N87 and the nanocrystalline core materials for the same power level and operating frequency. The operating frequency is defined as 10 kHz, which is suitable␣for both materials. Modeling and simulation studies have been performed with the same finite element analysis software and the obtained results have been reported. The nanocrystalline and the ferrite N87 core materials have been compared according to both electrical and mechanical parameters. In these comparisons, many features such as core and winding losses, flux distributions, leakage flux, efficiency, and both electrical and mechanical performance have been reported comparatively in the case of rectangular waveform excitation of the transformer. Obtained results show that the weight and the volume of the transformer are reduced and more compact transformer is designed by using the nanocrystalline core material. In addition, besides the core loss, winding losses are also reduced in this design.

  10. Hierarchical fiber bundle model to investigate the complex architectures of biological materials.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Nicola M; Bosia, Federico; Abdalrahman, Tamer

    2012-01-01

    The mechanics of fiber bundles has been widely studied in the literature, and fiber bundle models in particular have provided a wealth of useful analytical and numerical results for modeling ordinary materials. These models, however, are inadequate to treat bioinspired nanostructured materials, where hierarchy, multiscale, and complex properties play a decisive role in determining the overall mechanical characteristics. Here, we develop an ad hoc hierarchical theory designed to tackle these complex architectures, thus allowing the determination of the strength of macroscopic hierarchical materials from the properties of their constituents at the nanoscale. The roles of finite size, twisting angle, and friction are also included. Size effects on the statistical distribution of fiber strengths naturally emerge without invoking best-fit or unknown parameters. A comparison between the developed theory and various experimental results on synthetic and natural materials yields considerable agreement. PMID:22400587

  11. Investigation of the electromagnetic behavior of AA/PVA based photopolymer material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haoyu; Qi, Yue; Guo, Jinxin; Gleeson, Michael R.; Sheridan, John T.

    2013-05-01

    The photopolymer materials in Holographic Data Storage (HDS) have been increasingly studied due to their growing interest in applications. In this article we make use of the time varying parameters to study the behaviors of the photopolymer materials during exposure time. The nonlocal photo-polymerization driven diffusion (NPDD) model and electromagnetic theories of Maxell equations are combined in our model development. Moreover in this model, the theories of the material molecule polarization and the excited photosensitizer conductivity production are also introduced. The numerical simulation results in both cases of transmittance and diffraction efficiency are all analyzed. Several physical parameters and photochemical rate constant values are estimated by fitting the model predictions to the experimental results of AA/PVA material.

  12. Structural investigation and thermal stability of new extruded wheat flour based polymeric materials.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Nathalie; Saiah, Redouan; Beucher, Eric; Gattin, Richard; Castandet, Michel; Saiter, Jean-Marc

    2008-09-01

    In this study, we compare physical properties of wheat starch and wheat-flour based materials. The comparison has been done using thermogravimetric, calorimetric, X-ray diffraction, mechanic and morphologic experiments conducted on a series of wheat-flour extruded materials. The wheat flour used here can be understood as a by-product of the farm-produce wheat flour. All data obtained by means of these experimental methods allow us to conclude that, basically no significant difference exists between our wheat-flour based and wheat-starch based materials. Only one clear difference occurs for the strain to break value which decreases by about 30% for wheat-flour based materials. PMID:26048220

  13. Recent progress in theoretical and computational investigations of Li-ion battery materials and electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Mahesh Datt; O'Dwyer, Colm

    2015-02-21

    There is an increasing worldwide demand for high energy density batteries. In recent years, rechargeable Li-ion batteries have become important power sources, and their performance gains are driving the adoption of electrical vehicles (EV) as viable alternatives to combustion engines. The exploration of new Li-ion battery materials is an important focus of materials scientists and computational physicists and chemists throughout the world. The practical applications of Li-ion batteries and emerging alternatives may not be limited to portable electronic devices and circumventing hurdles that include range anxiety and safety among others, to their widespread adoption in EV applications in the future requires new electrode materials and a fuller understanding of how the materials and the electrolyte chemistries behave. Since this field is advancing rapidly and attracting an increasing number of researchers, it is crucial to summarise the current progress and the key scientific challenges related to Li-ion batteries from theoretical point of view. Computational prediction of ideal compounds is the focus of several large consortia, and a leading methodology in designing materials and electrolytes optimized for function, including those for Li-ion batteries. In this Perspective, we review the key aspects of Li-ion batteries from theoretical perspectives: the working principles of Li-ion batteries, the cathodes, anodes, and electrolyte solutions that are the current state of the art, and future research directions for advanced Li-ion batteries based on computational materials and electrolyte design. PMID:25613366

  14. Investigation of Materials for Boundary Layer Control in a Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braafladt, Alexander; Lucero, John M.; Hirt, Stefanie M.

    2013-01-01

    During operation of the NASA Glenn Research Center 15- by 15-Centimeter Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT), a significant, undesirable corner flow separation is created by the three-dimensional interaction of the wall and floor boundary layers in the tunnel corners following an oblique-shock/ boundary-layer interaction. A method to minimize this effect was conceived by connecting the wall and floor boundary layers with a radius of curvature in the corners. The results and observations of a trade study to determine the effectiveness of candidate materials for creating the radius of curvature in the SWT are presented. The experiments in the study focus on the formation of corner fillets of four different radii of curvature, 6.35 mm (0.25 in.), 9.525 mm (0.375 in.), 12.7 mm (0.5 in.), and 15.875 mm (0.625 in.), based on the observed boundary layer thickness of 11.43 mm (0.45 in.). Tests were performed on ten candidate materials to determine shrinkage, surface roughness, cure time, ease of application and removal, adhesion, eccentricity, formability, and repeatability. Of the ten materials, the four materials which exhibited characteristics most promising for effective use were the heavy body and regular type dental impression materials, the basic sculpting epoxy, and the polyurethane sealant. Of these, the particular material which was most effective, the heavy body dental impression material, was tested in the SWT in Mach 2 flow, and was observed to satisfy all requirements for use in creating the corner fillets in the upcoming experiments on shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction.

  15. Investigation on Effect of Material Hardness in High Speed CNC End Milling Process

    PubMed Central

    Dhandapani, N. V.; Thangarasu, V. S.; Sureshkannan, G.

    2015-01-01

    This research paper analyzes the effects of material properties on surface roughness, material removal rate, and tool wear on high speed CNC end milling process with various ferrous and nonferrous materials. The challenge of material specific decision on the process parameters of spindle speed, feed rate, depth of cut, coolant flow rate, cutting tool material, and type of coating for the cutting tool for required quality and quantity of production is addressed. Generally, decision made by the operator on floor is based on suggested values of the tool manufacturer or by trial and error method. This paper describes effect of various parameters on the surface roughness characteristics of the precision machining part. The prediction method suggested is based on various experimental analysis of parameters in different compositions of input conditions which would benefit the industry on standardization of high speed CNC end milling processes. The results show a basis for selection of parameters to get better results of surface roughness values as predicted by the case study results. PMID:26881267

  16. Preliminary Results of a Microgravity Investigation to Measure Net Charge on Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert D.; Myers, Jerry G.; Hansen, Bonnie L.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate characterization of the electrostatic charge on granular materials has typically been limited to materials with diameters on the order of 10 microns and below due to high settling velocities of larger particles. High settling velocities limit both the time and the acceptable uncertainty with which a measurement can be made. A prototype device has been developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to measure coulombic charge on individual particles of granular materials that are 50 to 500 microns in diameter. This device, a novel extension of Millikan's classic oil drop experiment, utilizes the NASA GRC 2.2 second drop tower to extend the range of electrostatic charge measurements to accommodate moderate size granular materials. A dielectric material with a nominal grain diameter between 1.06 and 250 microns was tribocharged using a dry gas jet, suspended in a 5x10x10 cm enclosure during a 2.2 second period of microgravity and exposed to a known electric field. The response was recorded on video and post processed to allow tracking of individual particles. By determining the particle trajectory and velocity, estimates of the coulombic charge were made. Over 30 drops were performed using this technique and the analysis showed that first order approximations of coulombic charge could successfully be obtained, with the mean charge of 3.4E-14 coulombs measured for F-75 Ottawa quartz sand. Additionally, the measured charge showed a near-Gaussian distribution, with a standard deviation of 2.14E -14 coulombs.

  17. Investigation of potential waste material insulating properties at different temperature for thermal storage application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, T. Z. S.; Rosli, A. B.; Gan, L. M.; Billy, A. S.; Farid, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Thermal energy storage system (TES) is developed to extend the operation of power generation. TES system is a key component in a solar energy power generation plant, but the main issue in designing the TES system is its thermal capacity of storage materials, e.g. insulator. This study is focusing on the potential waste material acts as an insulator for thermal energy storage applications. As the insulator is used to absorb heat, it is needed to find suitable material for energy conversion and at the same time reduce the waste generation. Thus, a small-scale experimental testing of natural cooling process of an insulated tank within a confined room is conducted. The experiment is repeated by changing the insulator from the potential waste material and also by changing the heat transfer fluid (HTF). The analysis presented the relationship between heat loss and the reserved period by the insulator. The results show the percentage of period of the insulated tank withstands compared to tank insulated by foam, e.g. newspaper reserved the period of 84.6% as much as foam insulated tank to withstand the heat transfer of cooking oil to the surrounding. The paper finally justifies the most potential waste material as an insulator for different temperature range of heat transfer fluid.

  18. Investigation on Effect of Material Hardness in High Speed CNC End Milling Process.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, N V; Thangarasu, V S; Sureshkannan, G

    2015-01-01

    This research paper analyzes the effects of material properties on surface roughness, material removal rate, and tool wear on high speed CNC end milling process with various ferrous and nonferrous materials. The challenge of material specific decision on the process parameters of spindle speed, feed rate, depth of cut, coolant flow rate, cutting tool material, and type of coating for the cutting tool for required quality and quantity of production is addressed. Generally, decision made by the operator on floor is based on suggested values of the tool manufacturer or by trial and error method. This paper describes effect of various parameters on the surface roughness characteristics of the precision machining part. The prediction method suggested is based on various experimental analysis of parameters in different compositions of input conditions which would benefit the industry on standardization of high speed CNC end milling processes. The results show a basis for selection of parameters to get better results of surface roughness values as predicted by the case study results. PMID:26881267

  19. Surficial materials investigation at the Weldon Spring Training Area St. Charles County, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Rueff, M.L. )

    1993-03-01

    The Weldon Spring Training Area at Weldon Spring, St. Charles County, Missouri, is a portion of the former Weldon Spring Ordnance Works (WSOW) where trinitrotoluene (TNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) were manufactured during World War II. Nitroaromatic contaminants remain on the Weldon Spring Training Area (WSTA) despite several attempts to decontaminate the property since closure of the ordnance works in 1945. Much of the former WSOW property has been added to the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List of Superfund sites. As a result, the US Army Corps of Engineers has initiated further efforts to decontaminate and remediate the property. One of the initial steps of an environmental remediation action is characterization of the geologic setting at the site. Characterization and detailed mapping of surficial material units define the soil types and their origin. This information is critical to decision-making during the clean-up, and assists in defining potential contaminant migration pathways. In 1991, the US Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas city District requested the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geology and Land Survey (MDNR-DGLS) to identify the surficial material units in the approximately 1,700-acre WSTA site and to define their engineering properties. The 12-month study included exploratory trenching and soil borings to characterize the surficial material units, laboratory testing to determine engineering properties of each surficial material unit, and detailed mapping and cross sections of the surficial material units utilizing the MDNR-DGLS Geographic Information System (GIS).

  20. Straintronics-based magnetic tunneling junction: Dynamic and static behavior analysis and material investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barangi, Mahmood; Mazumder, Pinaki

    2014-04-01

    We theoretically study the dynamic and static effects of mechanical stress on a straintronics device that includes a piezoelectric film combined with a magnetic tunneling junction. The inverse magnetostriction effect is studied in detail by realizing the varying magnetic susceptibility of the nanomagnet under stress. A dynamic model is developed based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation, which provides a platform to simulate the magnetization vector's behavior, critical flipping voltage, and delay properties. Furthermore, by converting the LLG equation into a 2nd order damping differential equation, we develop a proximate approach. This approach predicts the dynamic behavior of the magnetization vector and its dependency on material properties and applied voltage across the device without using sophisticated numerical calculations of the LLG model. Different dynamic and static material properties are observed by simulating five common magnetostrictive materials, including a newly discovered alloy, Galfenol.

  1. An optical coherence tomography investigation of materials defects in ceramic fixed partial dental prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Todea, Carmen; Rominu, Mihai; Laissue, Philippe L.; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2008-04-01

    Metal ceramic and integral ceramic fixed partial prostheses are mainly used in the frontal part of the dental arch because for esthetics reasons. The masticatory stress may induce fractures of the bridges. There are several factors that are associated with the stress state created in ceramic restorations, including: thickness of ceramic layers, mechanical properties of the materials, elastic modulus of the supporting substrate material, direction, magnitude and frequency of applied load, size and location of occlusal contact areas, residual stresses induced by processing or pores, restoration-cement interfacial defects and environmental defects. The fractures of these bridges lead to functional, esthetic and phonetic disturbances which finally render the prosthetic treatment inefficient. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the capability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in detection and analysis of possible material defects in metal-ceramic and integral ceramic fixed partial dentures.

  2. An Investigation Into The Viability Of Nanocrystalline Cellulose As A Packaging Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, John

    The focus of this proposal is to identify unexplored areas of research in the field of packaging science, specifically related to the incorporation of Nanocrystalline Cellulose (NCC) as a functional material in fiber based packaging, as well as to highlight some of potential risks and unknowns in the product lifecycle. This research hypothesizes that incorporating NCC into wood fiber-based c-flute corrugated packaging medium will show a sufficient performance improvement to justify additional research. Nanomaterials, as a whole, are still being understood, including those using naturally occurring bases such as NCC. Further incremental testing with NCC will help provide a performance and safety baseline for the necessary future research prior to mass production. NCC holds great promise for the future: a commonly available, naturally occurring material that's easily recyclable and biodegradable, yet has the strength of steel. Due diligence is required for this material to come to market in a safe and sustainable manner.

  3. A photoelastic investigation of asymmetric four point bend shear test for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakaran, R.; Sawyer, W.

    1986-01-01

    The shear stress fringe value of orthotropic birefringent model materials is presently used in an asymmetric four-point bend test that employs a notched specimen and is a modification of the Iosipescu test (1967). While in the case of a unidirectionally reinforced glass-polyester model material, shear stress fringe values obtained from 90- and 120-deg (sharp and radiused) notches are reasonably close to the values obtained for an off-axis tensile specimen, no conclusions can be drawn on the influence of the notch parameters, due to the peculiarities of the photoelastic response of the inhomogeneous orthotropic model material. The failure modes nevertheless indicate that a notch radius, and the 120-deg notch angle, reduce the stress concentration. Comparisons are made with finite element results.

  4. Investigation of nonlinear optical properties of various organic materials by the Z-scan method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeev, R. A.; Boltaev, G. S.; Tugushev, R. I.; Usmanov, T.

    2012-06-01

    We have studied the nonlinear optical properties of various organic materials (vegetable oil, juice, wine, cognac, Coca-Cola and Fanta drinks, Nescafé coffee, tea, gasoline, clock oil, glycerol, and polyphenyl ether) that are used in everyday life. Their nonlinearities have been studied by the Z-scan method in the near-IR and visible spectral ranges. We have shown that the majority of samples possess a nonlinear absorption; however, some of the studied materials show a strong saturated absorption and nonlinear refraction. Red wine and glycerol proved to be the most interesting materials. For these samples, we have observed a change in the sign of the nonlinear absorption with increasing laser intensity, which was attributed to the competition between two-photon absorption and saturated absorption.

  5. Investigation of Ti6Al4V Orthogonal Cutting Numerical Simulations using Different Material Models

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Roberto

    2010-06-15

    Titanium alloys are materials considered as extremely difficult to cut and titanium alloy Ti6Al4V is a reference in machining of titanium. The segmented (saw toothed) chip morphology has attracted great interest in researchers because the understanding of the saw-toothed chip morphology helps to understand the chip formation mechanisms. In this study, the effect of different constitutive models on the saw-toothed chip morphology is examined in machining Ti6Al4V. The paper presents the influence of eight material constitutive modelling in the simulation of segmented chip formation. A critical comparison of outstanding process outputs as cutting force, temperature and measurable parameters for segmented chips is carried out to compare and discuss the performance of the eight different material models to each other and with experimental data.

  6. Nanoscale Techniques for Investigating Material Issues in Quantum Dot Based Nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Ganapathi Prabhu Sai

    The current scaling of feature size of complementary metal oxide semiconductor transistors has been predicted to reach its limits by around the end of this decade. Therefore, several competing strategies for the post-CMOS era are under investigation. The focus of this dissertation in on two key materials issues pertaining to semiconductor nanostructures, more specifically Ge-Si quantum dot based nano-electronics. A key issue here is the understanding of local chemistry of these nano-structures because the local chemistry affects the positions of the electronic band edges of these structures relative to that of the surrounding matrix, which in-turn affects the carrier localization properties. While the nano-scale chemistry of the QDs is relatively well understood, the chemistry of QDMs is not as well understood. Therefore, focus of this dissertation is the understanding of detailed nano-scale chemistry of QDMs. Another key issue arises from the use of the focused ion beam (FIB) for controlled delivery of dopant ions into the QDs and the QDMs for creating controlled dopant profiles at the nanoscale, and for templating the growth of these structures. The materials issue associated with this application of the FIB is the damage recovery of ion implanted (FIB) regions. Although ion implantation damage and recovery of Si implanted using commercial broad area implantation implanters is well understood, the FIB implantation damage and recovery of Si is not as well understood. The focus of this research is thus to understand the effect of high ion implantation current density in the FIB, and the effect of FIB ion species (Si, Ge and Ga) on the damage recovery of Si. With regards to the first body of research Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) was used for mapping the chemistry of QDMs in the epitaxy of Si 0.7Ge0.3 on Si(100). The AES study shows that the pit bases of QDMs are richest in Ge, which is consistent with one existing paper on composition distribution within these

  7. XPS investigation of surface reactivity of electrode materials: effect of the transition metal.

    PubMed

    Andreu, N; Flahaut, D; Dedryvère, R; Minvielle, M; Martinez, H; Gonbeau, D

    2015-04-01

    The role of the transition metal nature and Al2O3 coating on the surface reactivity of LiCoO2 and LiNi(1/3)Mn(1/3)Co(1/3)O2 (NMC) materials were studied by coupling chemisorption of gaseous probes molecules and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy. The XPS analyses have put in evidence the low reactivity of the LiMO2 materials toward basic gaseous probe (NH3). The reactivity toward SO2 gaseous probe is much larger (roughly more than 10 times) and strongly influenced by the nature of metal. Only one adsorption mode (redox process producing adsorbed sulfate species) was observed at the LiCoO2 surface, while NMC materials exhibit sulfate and sulfite species at the surface. On the basis of XPS analysis of bare materials and previous theoretical work, we propose that the acid-base adsorption mode involving the Ni(2+) cation is responsible for the sulfite species on the NMC surface. After Al2O3 coating, the surface reactivity was clearly decreasing for both LiCoO2 and NMC materials. In addition, for LiCoO2, the coating modifies the surface reactivity with the identification of both sulfate and sulfite species. This result is in line with a change in the adsorption mode from redox toward acid-base after Al/Co substitution. In the case of NMC materials, the coating induced a decrease of the sulfite species content at the surface. This phenomenon can be related to the cation mixing effect in the NMC. PMID:25751495

  8. Investigation and Characterization of Conductive DEAP Polymer Materials with Nickel Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrisley, Seaver

    Dielectric ElectroActive Polymers, or DEAPs, are devices with coupled electrical and mechanical responses that resemble stretchable parallel plate capacitors, that can act as actuators, sensors, or electrical generators. Currently, the electrode layers on the top and bottom are generally conductive carbon grease, which is dirty and also causes curing issues for certain polymers. This thesis explores several polymers and conductive fillers to identify a conductive nanocomposite material, to replace the grease electrode with a solid material and eliminate issues associated with grease electrodes. It then characterizes the mechanical and electric properties and how they change during cyclic loading, while augmenting an equibiaxial tensile testing machine and advancing the knowledge of equibiaxial characterization. The most promising polymer/filler combination was found to be EcoFlex30, a platinum cure silicone rubber, containing seven volume percent of nickel nanostrands and three volume percent of 0.1 mm length nickel-coated carbon fiber. Using two conductive fillers of different sizes resulted in much higher conductivity than a single filler alone, and an enormous piezoresistive effect. This material gave weak conductivity at no load, increasing several orders of magnitude as strained and well surpassing the benchmark of 1.2 S/m set by conductive carbon grease. Elastomer materials were found to have conductivities as high as 275 S/m under peak strain, and changing the nickel-coated carbon fiber length allowed for strains over 120%. Equibiaxial stress-strain curves were also analyzed for energy lost through hysteresis, in order to compare to published results for DEAPs used as Dielectric Energy Generators. Results and recommendations are presented for using and further improving the materials for applications of DEAPs used as energy harvesters and capacitive sensors, using the material alone as a piezoresistive sensor, and improving the equibiaxial characterization

  9. Fundamental investigation of ultraviolet radiation effects in polymeric film-forming materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giori, C.; Yamauchi, T.; Llewellen, P.; Gilligan, J.

    1974-01-01

    A literature search from 1958 to present was conducted on the effect of ultraviolet radiation on polymeric materials, with particular emphasis on vacuum photolysis, mechanisms of degradation, and energy transfer phenomena. The literature from 1958 to 1968 was searched manually, while the literature from 1968 to present was searched by using a computerized keyword system. The primary objective was to provide the necessary background information for the design of new or modified materials with improved stability to the vacuum-radiation environment of space.

  10. Investigation of Test Methods, Material Properties, and Processes for Solar Cell Encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    During this quarter the technical activities were directed toward the reformulation of ethylene/vinyl acetate copolymer for use as a compound in solar cell module fabrication. Successful formulations were devised that lowered the temperature required for cure and raised the gel content. A major volatile component was also eliminated (acrylate crosslinking agent) which should aid in the production of bubble free laminates. Adhesive strengths and primers for the bonding of ethylene/vinyl acetate to supersyrate and substrate materials was assessed with encouraging results. The incorporation of silane compounds gave high bond strengths. A survey of scrim materials was also conducted.

  11. Investigation of the adsorption of blood plasma proteins by activated carbon fiber material

    SciTech Connect

    Eretskaya, E.V.; Nikolaev, V.G.; Sergeev, V.P.; Stefanov, A.V.; Vovyanko, S.I.

    1987-01-01

    The authors study the adsorption of fibrinogen, albumin, and gamma globulin by carbon fibrous materials by physical immobilization of protein ligands on their surface. The adsorption of proteins from model solutions under standard conditions was studied by an indirect method according to the decrease in the concentration of the adsorbate in solution, determining the protein content. The adsorption of the same proteins from the plasma and their desorption from activated carbon fibrous materials were estimated by a direct radiometric method using /sup 125/I-labeled proteins.

  12. Collaborative investigations of in-service irradiated material from the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.; Broadhead, B.L.; Suzuki, M.; Kohsaka, A.

    1997-02-01

    There is a need to validate the results of irradiation effects research by the examination of material taken directly from the wall of a pressure vessel that has been irradiated during normal service. Just such an evaluation is currently being conducted on material from the wall of the pressure vessel from the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR). The research is being jointly performed at the Tokai Research Establishment of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-funded Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  13. Investigating Learning Achievements of Thai High School Students in a Sequences and Series Lesson Delivered on CAI-Based Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chundang, Ungsana; Singhaprink, Wipawaan; Pongpullponsak, Adisak; Tantipisalkul, Tasanee; Praekhaow, Puchong

    2012-01-01

    The current experimental research aims to investigate students' learning outcomes in classes in which the interactive CAI (computer-assisted instruction)-based materials were implemented. It also aims to compare the learning outcomes of the students based on regions in which their school is located. The participants were 326 Matthayom-4 students…

  14. Investigation of metal hydride materials as hydrogen reservoirs for metal-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONISCHAK

    1976-01-01

    The performance and suitability of various metal hydride materials were examined for use as possible hydrogen storage reservoirs for secondary metal-hydrogen batteries. Lanthanum pentanickel hydride appears as a probable candidate in terms of stable hydrogen supply under feasible thermal conditions. A kinetic model describing the decomposition rate data of the hydride has been developed.

  15. The Investigation of the Degree of Difficulty in the Learning Materials by the Recursive Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Wu, Shing-Ling

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify the difficulty of learning materials in the network by using learner's portfolio in the asynchronous learning system. Asynchronous learning takes the advantage of information technology that records the learning portfolio of the learner. The data of the learning portfolio reflects the characteristics of…

  16. Investigation of Barrier-Layer Materials for Mg2Si/Ni Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Taguchi, Yutaka; Kutsuwa, Takeshi; Ichimi, Kiyohide; Kasatani, Shinichi; Inada, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    The durability of Ni electrodes, which are often used for Mg2Si thermoelectric chips, is poor at high working temperatures because of deposition of Mg at the Mg2Si/Ni interface and on the surface. Hence, a "Mg2Si/barrier material/Ni" structure was adopted instead of direct adhesion of Ni to Mg2Si. Ti, TiSi2, and TiN were selected as candidate materials for the barrier layer between Mg2Si and Ni, and the barrier effect, adhesion, and contact resistance of each of these materials were evaluated. After the samples had been annealed at 873 K for 1 h, Mg appeared on the Ti surface and TiSi2 deposited on Mg2Si; however, no Mg was detected on the surface of TiN or in the inner part of the Ni electrode. Continuous, low contact resistance was also observed for Mg2Si/TiN/Ni samples. TiN does not adhere strongly to Mg2Si but is a promising barrier material for Mg2Si/Ni interfaces.

  17. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Exploratory Shaft Facility fluids and materials evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    West, K.A.

    1988-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if any fluids or materials used in the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) of Yucca Mountain will make the mountain unsuitable for future construction of a nuclear waste repository. Yucca Mountain, an area on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada, USA, is a candidate site for permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste from commercial nuclear power and defense nuclear activities. To properly characterize Yucca Mountain, it will be necessary to construct an underground test facility, in which in situ site characterization tests can be conducted. The candidate repository horizon at Yucca Mountain, however, could potentially be compromised by fluids and materials used in the site characterization tests. To minimize this possibility, Los Alamos National Laboratory was directed to evaluate the kinds of fluids and materials that will be used and their potential impacts on the site. A secondary objective was to identify fluids and materials, if any, that should be prohibited from, or controlled in, the underground. 56 refs., 19 figs., 11 tabs.

  18. Investigating iron material strength during phase transitions using Rayleigh-Taylor growth measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, C. M.; Belof, J. L.; Blobaum, K. J. M.; Cavallo, R. M.; Kostinski, N.; Maddox, B. R.; May, M. J.; Plechaty, C.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Remington, B. A.; Rudd, R. E.; Swift, D. W.; Wallace, R. J.; Wilson, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    A solid-solid phase transition between the bcc (α) and hcp (ɛ) lattice structures in iron is known to occur as the material is compressed. When kept below its melting point, an effective increase in the macroscopic strength of the material accompanies this phase transition. Understanding the strength of iron throughout the deformation process is important for improving models of planetary structure, including interpretation of seismic measurements on Earth. To explore iron strength at high pressures and strain rates, we have performed experiments at the OMEGA laser. The laser drive produces a pressure near 1 Mbar on a thin Fe disk with a sinusoidal ripple pattern imposed on its face. The ripples seed the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability, the growth of which is suppressed by the material strength of the sample. The ripple amplitude is diagnosed with x-ray radiography, and their growth is compared to values from simulations using different material strength models. This work will be compared to previous, similar experiments at 0.1 - 0.3 Mbar pressures. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore Na- tional Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Investigation of Friction Stir Welding of Al Metal Matrix Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    2003-01-01

    The innovative process of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has generated tremendous interest since its inception about a decade or so ago since the first patent in 1991 by TWI of Cambridge, England. This interest has been seen in many recent international conferences and publications on the subject and relevant published literature. Still the process needs both intensive basic study of deformation mechanisms during this FSW process and analysis and feasibility study to evaluate production methods that will yield high quality strong welds from the stirring action of the appropriate pin tool into the weld plate materials. Development of production processes is a complex task that involves effects of material thickness, materials weldability, pin tool design, pin height, and pin shoulder diameter and related control conditions. The frictional heating with rotational speeds of the pin tool as it plunges into the material and the ensuing plastic flow arising during the traverse of the welding faying surfaces provide the known special advantages of the FSW process in the area of this new advanced joining technology.

  20. Organic Materials in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Microscale Synthesis and Investigation of a Donor-Acceptor Molecule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappenfus, Ted M.; Schliep, Karl B.; Dissanayake, Anudaththa; Ludden, Trevor; Nieto-Ortega, Belen; Lopez Navarrete, Juan T.; Ruiz Delgado, M. Carmen; Casado, Juan

    2012-01-01

    A series of experiments for undergraduate courses (e.g., organic, physical) have been developed in the area of small molecule organic materials. These experiments focus on understanding the electronic and redox properties of a donor-acceptor molecule that is prepared in a convenient one-step microscale reaction. The resulting intensely colored…

  1. Materials investigation and tests for the development of space compatible electrical connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomeroy, C.; Mccabe, T.

    1971-01-01

    A molding study of compounds based on copolymers of highly fluorinated olefins and of flame retardant silicone is reported. Both single cavity and four cavity molds having size 22 and 24 holes with three webs in each hole were used. Also covered are dielectric strength, arc resistance, Bashore rebound, and maintenance aging tests on the various materials that have been successfully molded.

  2. Irradiation facility at the IBR-2 reactor for investigation of material radiation hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulavin, M.; Cheplakov, A.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulagin, E.; Kulikov, S.; Shabalin, E.; Verkhoglyadov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Description of the irradiation facility and available parameters of the neutron and gamma exposures including the maximal integrated doses are presented in the paper. The research capabilities for radiation hardness tests of materials in high intensity beam of fast neutrons at the IBR-2 reactor of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna (Russia) are outlined.

  3. Irradiation facility at the IBR-2 reactor for investigating material radiation hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulavin, M. V.; Verkhoglyadov, A. E.; Kulikov, S. A.; Kulagin, E. N.; Kukhtin, V. V.; Cheplakov, A. P.; Shabalin, E. P.

    2015-03-01

    A description of the irradiation facility and available parameters of neutron and gamma exposures, including the maximum integrated doses, are presented in the paper. The research capabilities for radiation hardness tests of materials in a high-intensity beam of fast neutrons at the IBR-2 reactor of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna (Russia) are outlined.

  4. Cytogenetic genotoxic investigation in peripheral blood lymphocytes of subjects with dental composite restorative filling materials.

    PubMed

    Pettini, F; Savino, M; Corsalini, M; Cantore, S; Ballini, A

    2015-01-01

    Dental composite resins are biomaterials commonly used to aesthetically restore the structure and function of teeth impaired by caries, erosion, or fracture. Residual monomers released from resin restorations as a result of incomplete polymerization processes interact with living oral tissues. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of a common dental composite material (Enamel Plus-HFO), in subjects with average 13 filled teeth with the same material, compared to a control group (subjects having neither amalgam nor composite resin fillings). Genotoxicity assessment of composite materials was carried out in vitro in human peripheral blood leukocytes using sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) cytogenetic tests. The results of correlation and multiple regression analyses confirmed the absence of a relationship between SCE/cell, high frequency of SCE(HFC) or CA frequencies and exposure to dental composite materials. These results indicate that composite resins used for dental restorations differ extensively in vivo in their cytotoxic and genotoxic potential and in their ability to affect chromosomal integrity, cell-cycle progression, DNA replication and repair. PMID:25864763

  5. The Usability of a Commercial Game Physics Engine to Develop Physics Educational Materials: An Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Colin B.

    2008-01-01

    Commercial computer games contain "physics engine" components, responsible for providing realistic interactions among game objects. The question naturally arises of whether these engines can be used to develop educational materials for high school and university physics education. To answer this question, the author's group recently conducted a…

  6. The investigation of the light radiation caused polyethylene based materials deterioration by means of atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, A.; Grabarek, A.; Moroń, L.; Wałecki, M.; Kryla, P.

    2016-02-01

    The impact of the environmental conditions on the materials used in various devices and constructions, in particular in electrotechnical applications, has an critical impact in terms of their reliability and utilization range in specific climatic conditions. Due to increasing utilitarian requirements, technological processes complexity and introducing new materials (for instance nanomaterials), advanced diagnostic techniques are desired. One of such techniques is atomic force microscopy (AFM), which allows to study the changes of the roughness and mechanical properties of the surface at the submicrometer scale, enabling the investigation of the degradation processes. In this work the deterioration of selected group of polyethylene based materials have been measured by means of AFM, as the samples were exposed to the simulated solar light and UV-C radiation. Such an analysis of the environmental conditions impact on the deterioration process using AFM methods for various versions of specific material was not presented before.

  7. An investigation of manganese based electrode materials for use in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Surajit

    Lithium-based batteries are potential candidates to provide maximum volumetric and gravimetric energy density. One of the most attractive candidates as a cathode material for secondary lithium ion battery systems is the spinel LiMn 2O4 because it is environmentally friendly, less expensive and is capable of providing high energy density as compared to other cathode materials that are currently available. One problem associated with the spinel structure is capacity fading during multiple cycles of charge and discharge operations. This behaviour is due in part to the structural distortion during deep charge and discharge where nearly 100% of the lithium is extracted and inserted inside the spinel structure. Capacity fading can also be caused by dissolution of manganese ions in the electrolyte phase. A solution based method has been adapted for the synthesis of lithium manganese oxide, and chromium and cobalt doped mixed oxide materials using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a chelating agent. It has been found from TGA/DSC analysis that at around 220°C the synthesis reaction is completed. The precursor powders obtained were annealed at different temperatures and times in the range of 250°C to 600°C and from 2 to 8 hours respectively to obtain pure spinel oxides. From X-ray analysis it has been observed that the crystallite size can be controlled in the range of approximately 6 nm to 32 nm depending on the annealing time and the temperature. The morphology of the synthesized materials consisted of submicron sized particles agglomerated with micropores inside the network structure. To observe the effect of physical properties on battery performance cyclic chronopotentiometric evaluation was conducted. It has been found with these synthesized materials that there is an increase in the 1st discharge capacity with an increase in the annealing time and the temperature at both 1C and C/5 rates. This increase is more significant when the annealing temperature is 600°C as

  8. Investigating the suitability of GaAs:Cr material for high flux X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veale, M. C.; Bell, S. J.; Duarte, D. D.; French, M. J.; Hart, M.; Schneider, A.; Seller, P.; Wilson, M. D.; Kachkanov, V.; Lozinskaya, A. D.; Novikov, V. A.; Tolbanov, O. P.; Tyazhev, A.; Zarubin, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    Semi-insulating wafers of GaAs material with a thickness of 500μm have been compensated with chromium by Tomsk State University. Initial measurements have shown the material to have high resistivity (3 × 109Ωcm) and tests with pixel detectors on a 250 μm pitch produced uniform spectroscopic performance across an 80 × 80 pixel array. At present, there is a lack of detectors that are capable of operating at high X-ray fluxes (> 108 photons s-1 mm-2) in the energy range 5-50 keV. Under these conditions, the poor stopping power of silicon, as well as issues with radiation hardness, severely degrade the performance of traditional detectors. While high-Z materials such as CdTe and CdZnTe may have much greater stopping power, the formation of space charge within these detectors degrades detector performance. Initial measurements made with GaAs:Cr detectors suggest that many of its material properties make it suitable for these challenging conditions. In this paper the radiation hardness of the GaAs:Cr material has been measured on the B16 beam line at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron. Small pixel detectors were bonded to the STFC Hexitec ASIC and were irradiated with 3 × 108 photons s-1 mm-2 monochromatic 12 keV X-rays up to a maximum dose of 0.6 MGy. Measurements of the spectroscopic performance before and after irradiation have been used to assess the extent of the radiation damage.

  9. Investigating the formation mechanism of soot-like materials present in blast furnace coke samples

    SciTech Connect

    S. Dong; P. A'lvarez; N. Paterson; D.R. Dugwell; R. Kandiyoti

    2008-09-15

    An attempt to gain an understanding of the formation mechanism of these 'soot-like' materials has been made by means of tracing the changes in the molecular-mass distribution and molecular structure of the NMP-extractable materials from an injectant coal as well as its partially gasified chars and its pyrolytic tars. Variations in the SEC chromatograms provide clues about changes in the apparent molecular-mass distributions of these NMP extracts. Results suggest that the build-up of 'soot-like' materials follows from the secondary reactions of tars evolved from the injectant coal. The likely secondary-reaction pathways have been probed by collating structural information on these NMP extracts. The time-resolved 13-16 and 22-25 min elution fractions from the SEC column have been characterized using UV fluorescence (UV F) spectroscopy. Greater concentrations of larger aromatic ring systems are found present in samples formed under conditions appearing more prone for soot formation. The 11-16 min (large apparent molecular mass) effluent from SEC has been examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results from FTIR spectroscopy are consistent with the UV F data, showing more significant extents of dehydrogenation under conditions more prone to form soot. Similarly, TEM results show that larger amount of graphene layers exist in samples exposed to more soot-prone conditions. The emerging picture for the formation of 'soot-like' materials involves a well-defined sequence. Tars evolved from the injectant coal undergo secondary dehydrogenation, condensation, and repolymerization reactions, which eventually lead to the formation of the NMP-extractable 'soot-like' materials of large apparent molecular mass. 44 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. An Experimental Investigation of Damage Resistances and Damage Tolerance of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakaran, R.

    2003-01-01

    The project included three lines of investigation, aimed at a better understanding of the damage resistance and damage tolerance of pultruded composites. The three lines of investigation were: (i) measurement of permanent dent depth after transverse indentation at different load levels, and correlation with other damage parameters such as damage area (from x-radiography) and back surface crack length, (ii) estimation of point stress and average stress characteristic dimensions corresponding to measured damage parameters, and (iii) an attempt to measure the damage area by a reflection photoelastic technique. All the three lines of investigation were pursued.

  11. Effect of desliming of sulphide-rich mill tailings on the long-term strength of cemented paste backfill.

    PubMed

    Ercikdi, Bayram; Baki, Hakan; İzki, Muhammet

    2013-01-30

    This paper presents the effect of desliming on the short- and long-term strength, stability and rheological properties of cemented paste backfill (CPB) produced from two different mill tailings. A 28-day unconfined compressive strength (UCS) of ≥1.0 MPa and the maintenance of stability over 224 days of curing were selected as the design criteria for the evaluation of paste backfill performance. Desliming induced some changes in the physical, chemical, mineralogical and rheological properties of the tailings. CPB mixture of the deslimed tailings achieved the required consistency at a lower water to cement ratio. The short-term UCSs of CPB samples of the deslimed tailings were found to be 30-100% higher than those samples of the reference tailings at all the binder dosages and curing times. CPB samples of the deslimed tailings achieved the long-term stability at relatively low binder dosages (e.g. 5 wt% c.f. ≥6.1% for the reference tailings). It was also estimated that desliming could allow a 13.4-23.1% reduction in the binder consumption depending apparently on the inherent characteristics of the tailings. Over the curing period, generation of sulphate and acid by the oxidation of pyrite present in the tailings was also monitored to correlate with the strength losses observed in the long term. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry (MIP) analyses provided an insight into the microstructure of CPB and the formation of secondary mineral phases (i.e. gypsum) confirming the beneficial effect of desliming. These findings suggest that desliming can be suitably exploited for CPB of sulphide-rich mill tailings to improve the strength and stability particularly in the long term and to reduce binder consumption. PMID:23220652

  12. Observations regarding the stability of bentonite backfill in a high-level waste (HLW) repository in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Krumhansl, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Consideration of bentonite as a component of the engineered barrier system surrounding high-level nuclear waste (HLW) canisters in rock salt raised several questions regarding the stability of this clay. Dehydration studies pertinent to the period immediately following waste emplacement showed a partial loss in swelling ability, the extent of which depended on the composition of the rehydrating brine and increased with temperature from 150/sup 0/ to 320/sup 0/C. At a later date, hydrothermal reactions between brine and bentonite may occur as pressure in the repository rises and the backfill saturates with brine. In pure sodium chloride brines little change in the bentonite was observed after two months at 250/sup 0/C. In the same amount of time, brines rich in potassium formed mixed-layer, illite-smectite clays. Adding magnesium to the brine arrested mixed-layer clay formation; instead, a magnesium-enriched montmorillonite formed and the brine pH dropped. Radiation stability studies to 10/sup 10/ rads were conducted in both wet and dry environments, but caused no detectable alteration of the clay. In contrast, fluid-phase compositions changed significantly. Gamma irradiation of dry bentonite produced an oxygen-depleted atmosphere which was enriched in both hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Mixed bentonite-brine slurries produced copious amounts of both hydrogen and oxygen gas when irradiated. These irradiated slurries generally had posttest pH values between 4 and 6. Solutions made by exposing preirradiated salt and bentonite to unirradiated water, or brine, had pH values between 6 and 8.5 and, in the case of salt solutions, were highly oxidizing. Although more research is needed for a complete performance assessment, it appears that such backfills may prove useful in a variety of rock-salt environments.

  13. Materialism.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26301463

  14. Investigation of alternative materials for impregnation of Nb3Sn accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Deepak Reddy Chichili, Jay Hoffman and Alexander Zlobin

    2003-11-17

    Insulation is one of the most important elements of magnet design, which determines the electrical, mechanical, and thermal performance as well as lifetime of the magnet. The exposure to high radiation loads especially for the proposed LHC second-generation interaction region Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupoles further limits the choices of the insulation materials. Traditionally Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets were impregnated with epoxy to improve both the mechanical and electrical properties. However, the acceptable radiation limit for epoxy is low which reduces the lifetime of the magnet. The paper presents the results of the feasibility study to replace epoxy with high radiation-resistant material during vacuum impregnation. The mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of samples impregnated with Matrimid were measured and compared with epoxy-impregnated samples.

  15. A computational investigation on radiation damage and activation of structural material for C-ADS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Tairan; Shen, Fei; Yin, Wen; Yu, Quanzhi; Liang, Tianjiao

    2015-11-01

    The C-ADS (China Accelerator-Driven Subcritical System) project, which aims at transmuting high-level radiotoxic waste (HLW) and power generation, is now in the research and development stage. In this paper, a simplified ADS model is set up based on the IAEA Th-ADS benchmark calculation model, then the radiation damage as well as the residual radioactivity of the structural material are estimated using the Monte Carlo simulation method. The peak displacement production rate, gas productions, activity and residual dose rate of the structural components like beam window and outer casing of subcritical reactor core are calculated. The calculation methods and the corresponding results provide the basic reference for making reasonable predictions for the lifetime and maintenance operations of the structural material of C-ADS.

  16. X-ray tomography system to investigate granular materials during mechanical loading

    SciTech Connect

    Athanassiadis, Athanasios G.; La Rivière, Patrick J.; Sidky, Emil; Pan, Xiaochuan; Pelizzari, Charles; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2014-08-15

    We integrate a small and portable medical x-ray device with mechanical testing equipment to enable in situ, non-invasive measurements of a granular material's response to mechanical loading. We employ an orthopedic C-arm as the x-ray source and detector to image samples mounted in the materials tester. We discuss the design of a custom rotation stage, which allows for sample rotation and tomographic reconstruction under applied compressive stress. We then discuss the calibration of the system for 3D computed tomography, as well as the subsequent image reconstruction process. Using this system to reconstruct packings of 3D-printed particles, we resolve packing features with 0.52 mm resolution in a (60 mm){sup 3} field of view. By analyzing the performance bounds of the system, we demonstrate that the reconstructions exhibit only moderate noise.

  17. X-ray tomography system to investigate granular materials during mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassiadis, Athanasios G.; La Rivière, Patrick J.; Sidky, Emil; Pelizzari, Charles; Pan, Xiaochuan; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2014-08-01

    We integrate a small and portable medical x-ray device with mechanical testing equipment to enable in situ, non-invasive measurements of a granular material's response to mechanical loading. We employ an orthopedic C-arm as the x-ray source and detector to image samples mounted in the materials tester. We discuss the design of a custom rotation stage, which allows for sample rotation and tomographic reconstruction under applied compressive stress. We then discuss the calibration of the system for 3D computed tomography, as well as the subsequent image reconstruction process. Using this system to reconstruct packings of 3D-printed particles, we resolve packing features with 0.52 mm resolution in a (60 mm)3 field of view. By analyzing the performance bounds of the system, we demonstrate that the reconstructions exhibit only moderate noise.

  18. Experimental and theoretical investigations of functionalized boron nitride as electrode materials for Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Nemeth, Karoly; Bareño, Javier; Dogan, Fulya; Bloom, Ira D.; Shaw, Leon L.

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of synthesizing functionalized h-BN (FBN) via the reaction between molten LiOH and solid h-BN is studied for the first time and its first ever application as an electrode material in Li-ion batteries is evaluated. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to provide mechanistic understanding of the possible electrochemical reactions derived from the FBN. Various materials characterizations reveal that the melt-solid reaction can lead to exfoliation and functionalization of h-BN simultaneously, while electrochemical analysis proves that the FBN can reversibly store charges through surface redox reactions with good cycle stability and coulombic efficiency. DFT calculations have provided physical insights into the observed electrochemical properties derived from the FBN.

  19. Investigation of thermal fatigue in fiber composite materials. [(thermal cycling tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahmy, A. A.; Cunningham, T. G.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite-epoxy laminates were thermally cycled to determine the effects of thermal cycles on tensile properties and thermal expansion coefficients of the laminates. Three 12-ply laminate configurations were subjected to up to 5,000 thermal cycles. The cumulative effect of the thermal cycles was determined by destructive inspection (electron micrographs and tensile tests) of samples after progressively larger numbers of cycles. After thermal cycling, the materials' tensile strengths, moduli, and thermal expansion coefficients were significantly lower than for the materials as fabricated. Most of the degradation of properties occurred after only a few cycles. The property degradation was attributed primarily to the progressive development of matrix cracks whose locations depended upon the layup orientation of the laminate.

  20. X-ray tomography system to investigate granular materials during mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Athanassiadis, Athanasios G; La Rivière, Patrick J; Sidky, Emil; Pelizzari, Charles; Pan, Xiaochuan; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2014-08-01

    We integrate a small and portable medical x-ray device with mechanical testing equipment to enable in situ, non-invasive measurements of a granular material's response to mechanical loading. We employ an orthopedic C-arm as the x-ray source and detector to image samples mounted in the materials tester. We discuss the design of a custom rotation stage, which allows for sample rotation and tomographic reconstruction under applied compressive stress. We then discuss the calibration of the system for 3D computed tomography, as well as the subsequent image reconstruction process. Using this system to reconstruct packings of 3D-printed particles, we resolve packing features with 0.52 mm resolution in a (60 mm)(3) field of view. By analyzing the performance bounds of the system, we demonstrate that the reconstructions exhibit only moderate noise. PMID:25173277

  1. Investigation of Liquid Metal Embrittlement of Materials for use in Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Daniel; Jaworski, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Liquid metals can provide a continually replenished material for the first wall and extraction blankets of fusion reactors. However, research has shown that solid metal surfaces will experience embrittlement when exposed to liquid metals under stress. Therefore, it is important to understand the changes in structural strength of the solid metal materials and test different surface treatments that can limit embrittlement. Research was conducted to design and build an apparatus for exposing solid metal samples to liquid metal under high stress and temperature. The apparatus design, results of tensile testing, and surface imaging of fractured samples will be presented. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  2. Mössbauer spectroscopy in the investigation of new mineral-related materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Frank J.; de Laune, Benjamin P.; Greaves, Colin; Whitaker, Mariana J.; Thomas, Michael F.; Marco, José F.

    2014-04-01

    New materials based on the composition of the mineral schafarzikite, FeSb, have been synthesised. Fe- and Sb- Mössbauer spectroscopy shows that iron is present as Fe and that antimony is present as Sb. The presence of Pb on the antimony sites in materials of composition FeSbPb induces partial oxidation of Feto Fe. The quasi-one-dimensional magnetic structure of schafarzikite is retained in FeSbPb and gives rise to weakly coupled non-magnetic Fe ions coexisting with Fe ions in a magnetically ordered state. A similar model can be applied to account for the spectra recorded from the compound CoFeSbPb.

  3. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Seventh annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P.B.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of the program is to identify and evaluate encapsulation materials and processes for the protection of silicon solar cells for service in a terrestrial environment. Aging and degradation studies were performed including: thermal aging, sunlamp exposures, aging in controlled environment reactors and outdoor photothermal aging devices, and metal catalyzed degradation. Other tests addressed water absorption, primers and adhesives, soiling experiments, and corrosion protection. (LEW)

  4. Emission Spectroscopic Boundary Layer Investigation during Ablative Material Testing in Plasmatron

    PubMed Central

    Helber, Bernd; Chazot, Olivier; Hubin, Annick; Magin, Thierry E.

    2016-01-01

    Ablative Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) allowed the first humans to safely return to Earth from the moon and are still considered as the only solution for future high-speed reentry missions. But despite the advancements made since Apollo, heat flux prediction remains an imperfect science and engineers resort to safety factors to determine the TPS thickness. This goes at the expense of embarked payload, hampering, for example, sample return missions. Ground testing in plasma wind-tunnels is currently the only affordable possibility for both material qualification and validation of material response codes. The subsonic 1.2MW Inductively Coupled Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics is able to reproduce a wide range of reentry environments. This protocol describes a procedure for the study of the gas/surface interaction on ablative materials in high enthalpy flows and presents sample results of a non-pyrolyzing, ablating carbon fiber precursor. With this publication, the authors envisage the definition of a standard procedure, facilitating comparison with other laboratories and contributing to ongoing efforts to improve heat shield reliability and reduce design uncertainties. The described core techniques are non-intrusive methods to track the material recession with a high-speed camera along with the chemistry in the reactive boundary layer, probed by emission spectroscopy. Although optical emission spectroscopy is limited to line-of-sight measurements and is further constrained to electronically excited atoms and molecules, its simplicity and broad applicability still make it the technique of choice for analysis of the reactive boundary layer. Recession of the ablating sample further requires that the distance of the measurement location with respect to the surface is known at all times during the experiment. Calibration of the optical system of the applied three spectrometers allowed quantitative comparison. At the fiber scale

  5. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Invisible cloaking of material bodies using the wave flow method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinov, Alexander E.; Mytareva, Lyubov'A.

    2010-08-01

    The current knowledge of the physics of electromagnetic cloaking of material objects by the wave flow method is reviewed. Experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this cloaking method are described. Some aspects of calculating cloak profiles are examined, and achievements and unsolved problems in the theory of the interaction of electromagnetic waves with shells are considered. Prospects for developing the cloaking method for waves of other physical nature (acoustic and probability density waves) are discussed.

  6. Investigation of thiol-ene and thiol-ene-methacrylate based resins as dental restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Neil B.; Couch, Charles L.; Schreck, Kathleen M.; Carioscia, Jacquelyn A.; Boulden, Jordan E.; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this work was to evaluate thiol-norbornene and thiol-ene-methacrylate systems as the resin phase of dental restorative materials and demonstrate their superior performance as compared to dimethacrylate materials. Methods Polymerization kinetics and overall functional group conversions were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Flexural strength and modulus were determined with a 3-point flexural test. Polymerization-induced shrinkage stress was measured with a tensometer. Results Thiol-ene polymer systems were demonstrated to exhibit advantageous properties for dental restorative materials in regards to rapid curing kinetics, high conversion, and low shrinkage and stress. However, both the thiol-norbornene and thiol-allyl ether systems studied here exhibit significant reductions in flexural strength and modulus relative to BisGMA/TEGDMA. By utilizing the thiol-ene component as the reactive diluent in dimethacrylate systems, high flexural modulus and strength are achieved while dramatically reducing the polymerization shrinkage stress. The methacrylate-thiol-allyl ether and methacrylate-thiol-norbornene systems both exhibited equivalent flexural modulus (2.1 ± 0.1 GPa) and slightly reduced flexural strength (95 ± 1 and 101 ± 3 MPa, respectively) relative to BisGMA/TEGDMA (flexural modulus; 2.2 + 0.1 GPa and flexural strength; 112 ± 3 MPa). Both the methacrylate-thiol-allyl ether and methacrylate-thiol-norbornene systems exhibited dramatic reductions in shrinkage stress (1.1 ± 0.1 and 1.1 ± 0.2 MPa, respectively) relative to BisGMA/TEGDMA (2.6 ± 0.2 MPa). Significance The improved polymerization kinetics and overall functional group conversion, coupled with reductions in shrinkage stress while maintaining equivalent flexural modulus, result in a superior overall dental restorative material as compared to traditional bulk dimethacrylate resins. PMID:19781757

  7. Investigation of the effect of resin material on impact damage to graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental program are described which establishes the feasibility and guide lines for resin development. The objective was to identify the basic epoxy neat resin properties that improve low velocity impact resistance and toughness to graphite-epoxy laminates and at the same time maintain useful structural laminate mechanical properties. Materials tests from twenty-three toughened epoxy resin matrix systems are included.

  8. Emission Spectroscopic Boundary Layer Investigation during Ablative Material Testing in Plasmatron.

    PubMed

    Helber, Bernd; Chazot, Olivier; Hubin, Annick; Magin, Thierry E

    2016-01-01

    Ablative Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) allowed the first humans to safely return to Earth from the moon and are still considered as the only solution for future high-speed reentry missions. But despite the advancements made since Apollo, heat flux prediction remains an imperfect science and engineers resort to safety factors to determine the TPS thickness. This goes at the expense of embarked payload, hampering, for example, sample return missions. Ground testing in plasma wind-tunnels is currently the only affordable possibility for both material qualification and validation of material response codes. The subsonic 1.2MW Inductively Coupled Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics is able to reproduce a wide range of reentry environments. This protocol describes a procedure for the study of the gas/surface interaction on ablative materials in high enthalpy flows and presents sample results of a non-pyrolyzing, ablating carbon fiber precursor. With this publication, the authors envisage the definition of a standard procedure, facilitating comparison with other laboratories and contributing to ongoing efforts to improve heat shield reliability and reduce design uncertainties. The described core techniques are non-intrusive methods to track the material recession with a high-speed camera along with the chemistry in the reactive boundary layer, probed by emission spectroscopy. Although optical emission spectroscopy is limited to line-of-sight measurements and is further constrained to electronically excited atoms and molecules, its simplicity and broad applicability still make it the technique of choice for analysis of the reactive boundary layer. Recession of the ablating sample further requires that the distance of the measurement location with respect to the surface is known at all times during the experiment. Calibration of the optical system of the applied three spectrometers allowed quantitative comparison. At the fiber scale

  9. Investigating compression failure mechanisms in composite laminates with a transparent fiberglass-epoxy birefringent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.; Williams, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The response and failure of a + or - 45s class laminate was studied by transparent fiberglass epoxy composite birefringent material. The birefringency property allows the laminate stress distribution to be observed during the test and also after the test if permanent residual stresses occur. The location of initial laminate failure and of the subsequent failure propagation are observed through its transparency characteristics. Experimental results are presented.

  10. Analysis of cured carbon-phenolic decomposition products to investigate the thermal decomposition of nozzle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, James M.; Daniel, Janice D.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a mass spectrometer/thermal analyzer/computer (MS/TA/Computer) system capable of providing simultaneous thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA), derivative thermogravimetry (DTG) and evolved gas detection and analysis (EGD and EGA) under both atmospheric and high pressure conditions is described. The combined system was used to study the thermal decomposition of the nozzle material that constitutes the throat of the solid rocket boosters (SRB).

  11. Computational Investigations of a Possible New Class of Materials: A Superatom Ionic Solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohlberg, Karl; Nasto, Violeta

    2013-03-01

    A ``superatom'' is a cluster of atoms that shows high stability. High stability can arise from the geometric arrangement of the atoms in the cluster. For example, when atoms are close packed, clusters containing an integer number of closed shells of atoms, (i.e. 13, 55, 137... atoms) exhibit enhanced stability and are termed ``magic clusters.'' High stability can also arise from the electronic structure. High symmetry metal clusters that have exactly 8, 20, 40..., valence electrons show enhanced stability. Superatoms can act chemically like a single atom of a different element. We have used electronic structure calculations to test the idea that a new class of materials may be formed based on the periodic arrangement of superatom ions, instead of the typical atomic or polyatomic ions of a conventional ionic solid. A solid is formed based on crystalline packing of anionic (Al@Cu54-)and cationic (Ce@C60+),nearly spherical superatom species that show exceptional stability. According to radius-ratio rules, these ions will favor a CsCl crystal structure with a body-centered (bcc) type of unit cell. Calculations on this material suggest that it is stable, semiconducting and less dense than common metal oxides, but that the metal anion clusters deform within the material.

  12. An investigation of anode and cathode materials in photomicrobial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Kenneth; Thorne, Rebecca J; Cameron, Petra J

    2016-02-28

    Photomicrobial fuel cells (p-MFCs) are devices that use photosynthetic organisms (such as cyanobacteria or algae) to turn light energy into electrical energy. In a p-MFC, the anode accepts electrons from microorganisms that are either growing directly on the anode surface (biofilm) or are free floating in solution (planktonic). The nature of both the anode and cathode material is critical for device efficiency. An ideal anode is biocompatible and facilitates direct electron transfer from the microorganisms, with no need for an electron mediator. For a p-MFC, there is the additional requirement that the anode should not prevent light from perfusing through the photosynthetic cells. The cathode should facilitate the rapid reaction of protons and oxygen to form water so as not to rate limit the device. In this paper, we first review the range of anode and cathode materials currently used in p-MFCs. We then present our own data comparing cathode materials in a p-MFC and our first results using porous ceramic anodes in a mediator-free p-MFC. PMID:26755764

  13. Investigating materials for breast nodules simulation by using segmentation and similarity analysis of digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Paula N.; Marcomini, Karem D.; Sousa, Maria A. Z.; Schiabel, Homero

    2015-03-01

    The task of identifying the malignancy of nodular lesions on mammograms becomes quite complex due to overlapped structures or even to the granular fibrous tissue which can cause confusion in classifying masses shape, leading to unnecessary biopsies. Efforts to develop methods for automatic masses detection in CADe (Computer Aided Detection) schemes have been made with the aim of assisting radiologists and working as a second opinion. The validation of these methods may be accomplished for instance by using databases with clinical images or acquired through breast phantoms. With this aim, some types of materials were tested in order to produce radiographic phantom images which could characterize a good enough approach to the typical mammograms corresponding to actual breast nodules. Therefore different nodules patterns were physically produced and used on a previous developed breast phantom. Their characteristics were tested according to the digital images obtained from phantom exposures at a LORAD M-IV mammography unit. Two analysis were realized the first one by the segmentation of regions of interest containing the simulated nodules by an automated segmentation technique as well as by an experienced radiologist who has delineated the contour of each nodule by means of a graphic display digitizer. Both results were compared by using evaluation metrics. The second one used measure of quality Structural Similarity (SSIM) to generate quantitative data related to the texture produced by each material. Although all the tested materials proved to be suitable for the study, the PVC film yielded the best results.

  14. Investigation of Effects of Material Architecture on the Elastic Response of a Woven Ceramic Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Bonacuse, Peter J.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2012-01-01

    To develop methods for quantifying the effects of the microstructural variations of woven ceramic matrix composites on the effective properties and response of the material, a research program has been undertaken which is described in this paper. In order to characterize and quantify the variations in the microstructure of a five harness satin weave, CVI SiC/SiC, composite material, specimens were serially sectioned and polished to capture images that detailed the fiber tows, matrix, and porosity. Open source quantitative image analysis tools were then used to isolate the constituents and collect relevant statistics such as within ply tow spacing. This information was then used to build two dimensional finite element models that approximated the observed section geometry. With the aid of geometrical models generated by the microstructural characterization process, finite element models were generated and analyses were performed to quantify the effects of the microstructure and its variation on the effective stiffness and areas of stress concentration of the material. The results indicated that the geometry and distribution of the porosity appear to have significant effects on the through-thickness modulus. Similarly, stress concentrations on the outer surface of the composite appear to correlate to regions where the transverse tows are separated by a critical amount.

  15. Computational investigation of noble gas adsorption and separation by nanoporous materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Sanders, Joseph C.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    2008-10-01

    Molecular simulations are used to assess the ability of metal-organic framework (MOF) materials to store and separate noble gases. Specifically, grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation techniques are used to predict noble gas adsorption isotherms at room temperature. Experimental trends of noble gas inflation curves of a Zn-based material (IRMOF-1) are matched by the simulation results. The simulations also predict that IRMOF-1 selectively adsorbs Xe atoms in Xe/Kr and Xe/Ar mixtures at total feed gas pressures of 1 bar (14.7 psia) and 10 bar (147 psia). Finally, simulations of a copper-based MOF (Cu-BTC) predict this material's ability to selectively adsorb Xe and Kr atoms when present in trace amounts in atmospheric air samples. These preliminary results suggest that Cu-BTC may be an ideal candidate for the pre-concentration of noble gases from air samples. Additional simulations and experiments are needed to determine the saturation limit of Cu-BTC for xenon, and whether any krypton atoms would remain in the Cu-BTC pores upon saturation.

  16. "Rinse and trickle": a protocol for TEM preparation and investigation of inorganic fibers from biological material.

    PubMed

    Vigliaturo, Ruggero; Capella, Silvana; Rinaudo, Caterina; Belluso, Elena

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to define a sample preparation protocol that allows inorganic fibers and particulate matter extracted from different biological samples to be characterized morphologically, crystallographically and chemically by transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (TEM-EDS). The method does not damage or create artifacts through chemical attacks of the target material. A fairly rapid specimen preparation is applied with the aim of performing as few steps as possible to transfer the withdrawn inorganic matter onto the TEM grid. The biological sample is previously digested chemically by NaClO. The salt is then removed through a series of centrifugation and rinse cycles in deionized water, thus drastically reducing the digestive power of the NaClO and concentrating the fibers for TEM analysis. The concept of equivalent hydrodynamic diameter is introduced to calculate the settling velocity during the centrifugation cycles. This technique is applicable to lung tissues and can be extended to a wide range of organic materials. The procedure does not appear to cause morphological damage to the fibers or modify their chemistry or degree of crystallinity. The extrapolated data can be used in interdisciplinary studies to understand the pathological effects caused by inorganic materials. PMID:27151190

  17. Investigation of negative coercivity in one layer formation of soft and hard magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tho, Luu Van; Kim, Cheol Gi; Kim, Chong Oh

    2008-04-01

    A single layer consists of CoFe soft and LaCoFeO hard magnetic materials was deposited using the cosputtering method. Microstructure analysis of the layer demonstrated that CoFe particles were surrounded by a LaCoFeO shell and the ratio of the thicknesses was dependent on the amount of La and on the O2/(Ar+O2) gas flow ratio used during sputtering. When the O2/(Ar+O2) gas flow ratio was increased from 7% to 13%, coercivity (Hc) along the hard axis decreased from 11.3Oe at 7% to -9.1Oe at 11%. At a gas flow ratio of 13%, the coercivity increased to 11.7Oe. The results of the present study show that negative coercivity Hc<0 is caused by interactions between two single domains of soft and hard magnetic materials. This interaction was modeled and described in detail using an extension of Heisenberg's model to the case of two domains. The results of the present study, demonstrating the conditions required to obtain negative Hc, can be applied to other pairs of soft-hard magnetic materials.

  18. Refinement of digital image correlation technique to investigate the fracture behaviour of refractory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belrhiti, Y.; Pop, O.; Germaneau, A.; Doumalin, P.; Dupré, J. C.; Huger, M.; Chotard, T.

    2016-03-01

    Refractory materials exhibit a heterogeneous microstructure consisting in coarse aggregates surrounded by fine grains that form an aggregate/matrix composite. This heterogeneous microstructure often leads to a complex mechanical behaviour during loading. This paper is devoted to the study, thanks to an optical method, Digital Image Correlation (DIC), of the fracture behaviour of two industrial refractory materials in relation with their microstructure resulting from both the chosen constituents and the sintering process. The aim is here, specifically, to highlight and to characterize the evolution of kinematic fields (displacement and strain) observed at the surface of sample during a wedge splitting test typically used to quantify the work of fracture. DIC is indeed a helpful and effective tool, in the topic of experimental mechanics, for the measurement of deformation in a planar sample surface. This non-contact optical method directly provides full-field displacements by comparing the digital images of the sample surface obtained before and during loading. In the present study, DIC has been improved to take into account the occurrence of cracks and performed so as to better identify the early stage of the cracking behaviour. The material transformation, usually assumed homogeneous inside each DIC subset, is thus more complex and a discontinuity of displacement should be taken into account. Then each subset which crosses a crack can be cut in two parts with different kinematics. By this way, it is possible to automatically find the fracture paths and follow the crack geometries (length, opening).

  19. Investigation of local losses as a function of material removal in a large-grain superconducting niobium cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel

    2006-08-02

    The performance of a superconducting radio-frequency (RF) cavity made of residual resistivity ratio (RRR) > 200 large-grain niobium has been investigated as a function of material removal, between 70 and 240 ?m, by buffered chemical polishing (BCP). Temperature maps of the cavity surface at 1.7 and 2.0 K were taken for each step of chemical etching and revealed localized losses (''hot-spots''), which contribute to the degradation of the cavity quality factor as a function of the RF surface field. It was found that the number of ''hot-spots'' decreased for larger material removal. Interestingly, the losses at the ''hot-spots'' at different locations evolved differently for successive material removal. The cavity achieved peak surface magnetic fields of about of 130 mT and was limited mostly by thermal quench. By measuring the temperature dependence of the surface resistance (Rs) at low field between 4.2 K and 1.7 K, the variation of material parameters such as the energy gap at 0 K, the residual resistance and the mean free path as a function of material removal could also be investigated. This contribution presents the results of the RF tests along with the temperature maps and the analysis of the losses caused by the ''hot-spots''.

  20. Investigation of local losses as a function of material removal in a large-grain superconducting niobium cavity

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati, P. Kneisel

    2008-01-02

    The performance of a superconducting radio-frequency (RF) cavity made of residual resistivity ratio (RRR) > 200 large-grain niobium has been investigated as a function of material removal, between 70 and 240 mu-m, by buffered chemical polishing (BCP). Temperature maps of the cavity surface at 1.7 and 2 K were taken for each step of chemical etching and revealed localized losses (hot-spots), which contribute to the degradation of the cavity quality factor as a function of the RF surface field. It was found that the number of hot-spots decreased for larger material removal. Interestingly, the losses at the hot-spots at different locations evolved differently for successive material removal. The cavity achieved peak surface magnetic fields of about of 130 mT and was limited mostly by thermal quench. By measuring the temperature dependence of the surface resistance (Rs) at low field between 4.2 K and 1.7 K, the variation of material parameters such as the energy gap at 0 K, the residual resistance and the mean free path as a function of material removal could also be investigated. This contribution shows the results of the RF tests along with the temperature maps and the analysis of the losses caused by the "hot-spots."

  1. Holographic investigations of azobenzene-containing low-molecular-weight compounds in pure materials and binary blends with polystyrene.

    PubMed

    Audorff, Hubert; Walker, Roland; Kador, Lothar; Schmidt, Hans-Werner

    2011-11-01

    This paper reports on the synthesis and the thermal and optical properties of photochromic low-molecular-weight compounds, especially with respect to the formation of holographic volume gratings in the pure materials and in binary blends with polystyrene. Its aim is to provide a basic understanding of the holographic response with regard to the molecular structure, and thus to show a way to obtain suitable rewritable materials with high sensitivity for holographic data storage. The photoactive low-molecular-weight compounds consist of a central core with three or four azobenzene-based arms attached through esterification. Four different cores were investigated that influence the glass transition temperature and the glass-forming properties. Additional structural variations were introduced by the polar terminal substituent at the azobenzene chromophore to fine-tune the optical properties and the holographic response. Films of the neat compounds were investigated in holographic experiments, especially with regard to the material sensitivity. In binary blends of the low-molecular-weight compounds with polystyrene, the influence of a polymer matrix on the behavior in holographic experiments was studied. The most promising material combination was also investigated at elevated temperatures, at which the holographic recording sensitivity is even higher. PMID:21956207

  2. Investigation into the effects of high-Z nano materials in proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, R.; Royle, G.; Lourenço, A.; Schwarz, M.; Fracchiolla, F.; Ricketts, K.

    2016-06-01

    High-Z nano materials have been previously shown to increase the amount of dose deposition within the tumour due to an increase in secondary electrons. This study evaluates the effects of high-Z nano materials in combination with protons, and the impact of proton energy, nanoparticle material and concentration. These effects were studied in silico through Monte Carlo simulation and experimentally through a phantom study, with particular attention to macroscale changes to the Bragg peak in the presence of nanoparticles. Three nanoparticle materials were simulated (gold, silver and platinum) at three concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 6.5 mg ml‑1) at two clinical proton energies (60 and 226 MeV). Simulations were verified experimentally using Gafchromic film measurements of gold nanoparticles suspended in water at two available high concentrations (5.5 mg ml‑1 and 1.1 mg ml‑1). A significant change to Bragg peak features was evident, where at 226 MeV and 6.5 mg ml‑1, simulations of gold showed a 4.7 mm longitudinal shift of the distal edge and experimentally at 5.5 mg ml‑1, a shift of 2.2 mm. Simulations showed this effect to be material dependent, where platinum having the highest physical density caused the greatest shift with increasing concentration. A dose enhancement of 6%  ±  0.05 and 5%  ±  0.15 (60 MeV and 226 MeV, respectively) was evident with gold at 6.5 mg ml‑1 to water alone, compared to the 21%  ±  0.53 observed experimentally as dose to film with 5.5 mg ml‑1 of gold nanoparticles suspended in water at 226 MeV. The introduction of nanoparticles has strong potential to enhance dose in proton therapy, however the changes to the Bragg peak distribution that occur with high concentrations need to be accounted for to ensure tumour coverage.

  3. Investigation into the effects of high-Z nano materials in proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, R; Royle, G; Lourenço, A; Schwarz, M; Fracchiolla, F; Ricketts, K

    2016-06-21

    High-Z nano materials have been previously shown to increase the amount of dose deposition within the tumour due to an increase in secondary electrons. This study evaluates the effects of high-Z nano materials in combination with protons, and the impact of proton energy, nanoparticle material and concentration. These effects were studied in silico through Monte Carlo simulation and experimentally through a phantom study, with particular attention to macroscale changes to the Bragg peak in the presence of nanoparticles. Three nanoparticle materials were simulated (gold, silver and platinum) at three concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 6.5 mg ml(-1)) at two clinical proton energies (60 and 226 MeV). Simulations were verified experimentally using Gafchromic film measurements of gold nanoparticles suspended in water at two available high concentrations (5.5 mg ml(-1) and 1.1 mg ml(-1)). A significant change to Bragg peak features was evident, where at 226 MeV and 6.5 mg ml(-1), simulations of gold showed a 4.7 mm longitudinal shift of the distal edge and experimentally at 5.5 mg ml(-1), a shift of 2.2 mm. Simulations showed this effect to be material dependent, where platinum having the highest physical density caused the greatest shift with increasing concentration. A dose enhancement of 6%  ±  0.05 and 5%  ±  0.15 (60 MeV and 226 MeV, respectively) was evident with gold at 6.5 mg ml(-1) to water alone, compared to the 21%  ±  0.53 observed experimentally as dose to film with 5.5 mg ml(-1) of gold nanoparticles suspended in water at 226 MeV. The introduction of nanoparticles has strong potential to enhance dose in proton therapy, however the changes to the Bragg peak distribution that occur with high concentrations need to be accounted for to ensure tumour coverage. PMID:27224304

  4. Summary and review of Materials Special Investigation Group evaluations of hardware from the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann F.; Funk, Joan; Pippin, H. Gary; Dursch, Harry

    1995-01-01

    Major materials findings obtained during LDEF post-flight investigations over the past three and one-half years are reported. The summary of findings to date includes results for thermal control coatings, thin polymeric films, composites, metals, adhesives, contamination, and environments definitions. Reaction rates of selected materials exposed to atomic oxygen are presented. Results useful for model verification and comparison with ground based facility data are specifically highlighted. Potential areas for future work are described. In conclusion, a rationale for a second long term flight experiment is presented.

  5. Spectroscopic investigation of materials for frequency-agile laser systems. Final report, 15 January 1982-14 January 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    This research involves the use of laser-spectroscopy techniques such as four-wave mixing, multiphoton absorption, time-resolved site-selection spectroscopy, and holography to characterize dynamical optical processes such as energy transfer, exciton migration, radiation-less relaxation, and the photorefractive effect. In addition, a significant effort was spent in the synthesis and characterization of new types of materials for tunable laser applications. The materials investigated include alexandrite, titanium-doped sapphire, lithium niobate, neodymium pentaphosphate, rhodium-doped rubidium calcium fluoride, manganese silicate, and neodymium-doped garnet crystals and glasses.

  6. Investigation of lightweight designs and materials for LO2 and LH2 propellant tanks for space vehicles, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Design, analysis, and fabrication studies were performed on nonintegral (suspended) tanks using a representative space tug design. The LH2 and LO2 tank concept selection was developed. Tank geometries and support relationships were investigated using tug design propellant inertias and ullage pressures, then compared based on total tug systems effects. The tank combinations which resulted in the maximum payload were selected. Tests were conducted on samples of membrane material which was processed in a manner simulating production tank fabrication operations to determine fabrication effects on the fracture toughness of the tank material. Fracture mechanics analyses were also performed to establish a preliminary set of allowables for initial defects.

  7. Experimental and theoretical investigation of a mesoporous KxWO3 material having superior mechanical strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sonal; Anderson, Sean T.; Mayanovic, Robert A.; Sakidja, Ridwan; Landskron, Kai; Kokoszka, Berenika; Mandal, Manik; Wang, Zhongwu

    2016-01-01

    Mesoporous materials with tailored properties hold great promise for energy harvesting and industrial applications. We have synthesized a novel tungsten bronze mesoporous material (KxWO3; x ~ 0.07) having inverse FDU-12 type pore symmetry and a crystalline framework. In situ small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements of the mesoporous K0.07WO3 show persistence of a highly ordered meso-scale pore structure to high pressure conditions (~18.5 GPa) and a material with remarkable mechanical strength despite having ~35% porosity. Pressure dependent in situ SAXS measurements reveal a bulk modulus κ = 44 +/- 4 GPa for the mesoporous KxWO3 which is comparable to the corresponding value for the bulk monoclinic WO3 (γ-WO3). Evidence from middle angle (MAXS) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and Raman spectroscopy shows that the presence of potassium leads to the formation of a K-bearing orthorhombic tungsten bronze (OTB) phase within a monoclinic WO3 host structure. Our ab initio molecular dynamics calculations show that the formation of the OTB phase provides superior strength to the mesoporous K0.07WO3.Mesoporous materials with tailored properties hold great promise for energy harvesting and industrial applications. We have synthesized a novel tungsten bronze mesoporous material (KxWO3; x ~ 0.07) having inverse FDU-12 type pore symmetry and a crystalline framework. In situ small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements of the mesoporous K0.07WO3 show persistence of a highly ordered meso-scale pore structure to high pressure conditions (~18.5 GPa) and a material with remarkable mechanical strength despite having ~35% porosity. Pressure dependent in situ SAXS measurements reveal a bulk modulus κ = 44 +/- 4 GPa for the mesoporous KxWO3 which is comparable to the corresponding value for the bulk monoclinic WO3 (γ-WO3). Evidence from middle angle (MAXS) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), high

  8. Rapid prototyping for in vitro knee rig investigations of prosthetized knee biomechanics: comparison with cobalt-chromium alloy implant material.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Christian; Steinbrück, Arnd; Müller, Tatjana; Woiczinski, Matthias; Chevalier, Yan; Weber, Patrick; Müller, Peter E; Jansson, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Retropatellar complications after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) such as anterior knee pain and subluxations might be related to altered patellofemoral biomechanics, in particular to trochlear design and femorotibial joint positioning. A method was developed to test femorotibial and patellofemoral joint modifications separately with 3D-rapid prototyped components for in vitro tests, but material differences may further influence results. This pilot study aims at validating the use of prostheses made of photopolymerized rapid prototype material (RPM) by measuring the sliding friction with a ring-on-disc setup as well as knee kinematics and retropatellar pressure on a knee rig. Cobalt-chromium alloy (standard prosthesis material, SPM) prostheses served as validation standard. Friction coefficients between these materials and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were additionally tested as this latter material is commonly used to protect pressure sensors in experiments. No statistical differences were found between friction coefficients of both materials to PTFE. UHMWPE shows higher friction coefficient at low axial loads for RPM, a difference that disappears at higher load. No measurable statistical differences were found in knee kinematics and retropatellar pressure distribution. This suggests that using polymer prototypes may be a valid alternative to original components for in vitro TKA studies and future investigations on knee biomechanics. PMID:25879019

  9. Rapid Prototyping for In Vitro Knee Rig Investigations of Prosthetized Knee Biomechanics: Comparison with Cobalt-Chromium Alloy Implant Material

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Christian; Steinbrück, Arnd; Müller, Tatjana; Woiczinski, Matthias; Chevalier, Yan; Müller, Peter E.; Jansson, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Retropatellar complications after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) such as anterior knee pain and subluxations might be related to altered patellofemoral biomechanics, in particular to trochlear design and femorotibial joint positioning. A method was developed to test femorotibial and patellofemoral joint modifications separately with 3D-rapid prototyped components for in vitro tests, but material differences may further influence results. This pilot study aims at validating the use of prostheses made of photopolymerized rapid prototype material (RPM) by measuring the sliding friction with a ring-on-disc setup as well as knee kinematics and retropatellar pressure on a knee rig. Cobalt-chromium alloy (standard prosthesis material, SPM) prostheses served as validation standard. Friction coefficients between these materials and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were additionally tested as this latter material is commonly used to protect pressure sensors in experiments. No statistical differences were found between friction coefficients of both materials to PTFE. UHMWPE shows higher friction coefficient at low axial loads for RPM, a difference that disappears at higher load. No measurable statistical differences were found in knee kinematics and retropatellar pressure distribution. This suggests that using polymer prototypes may be a valid alternative to original components for in vitro TKA studies and future investigations on knee biomechanics. PMID:25879019

  10. Investigation of the removing process of cathode material in micro-EDM using an atomistic-continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianwen; Zhang, Guojun; Huang, Yu; Ming, Wuyi; Liu, Min; Huang, Hao

    2014-10-01

    In micro-electrical discharge machining (micro-EDM), the discharge duration is ultra-short, and both the electric action and the thermal action by the discharge channel play important roles in the removing process of cathode material. However, in most researches on the machining mechanism of micro-EDM, only the thermal action is concerned. In this article, a combined atomistic-continuum modeling method in which the two-temperature model and the molecular dynamics simulation model are integrated is used to construct the simulation model for cathode in single-discharge micro-EDM process. With this simulation model, removing processes of Cu cathode material in micro-EDM under pure thermal action, pure electric action and the combination of them are investigated in a simulative way. By analyzing evolutions of temperature, stress and micro-structure of material as well as the dynamical behaviors of material in the removing process, mechanisms of the cathode material removal and crater formation are revealed. In addition, the removing process of cathode material under the combination of pure thermal action and pure electric action is compared with those under the two pure actions respectively to analyze the interactive effect between the thermal action and the electric action.

  11. Investigations on the impact of material-integrated sensors with the help of FEM-based modeling.

    PubMed

    Lang, Gerrit Dumstorff andWalter

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the impact of material-integrated sensors with the help of finite element-based modeling. A sensor (inlay) integrated with a material (matrix) is always a foreign body in the material, which can lead to a "wound effect", that is degradation of the macroscopic behavior of a material. By analyzing the inlay's impact on the material in terms of mechanical load, heat conduction, stress during integration and other impacts of integration, this wound effect is analyzed. For the mechanical load, we found out that the inlay has to be at least as stretchable and bendable as the matrix. If there is a high thermal load during integration, the coefficients of the thermal expansion of the inlay have to be matched to the matrix. In the case of a high thermal load during operation, the inlay has to be as thin as possible or its thermal conductivity has to be adapted to the thermal conductivity of the matrix. To have a general view of things, the results are dimensionless and independent of the geometry. In each section, the results are illustrated by examples. Based on all of the results, we present our idea for the fabrication of future material-integrated sensors. PMID:25621607

  12. Experimental Investigation of Three-Dimensional (3-D) Material Flow Pattern in Thick Dissimilar 2050 Friction-Stir Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avettand-Fènoël, Marie-Noëlle; Taillard, Roland; Laye, Julien; Odièvre, Thierry

    2014-02-01

    The current microstructural investigation performed at various scales deals with the three-dimensional (3-D) material flow in thick dissimilar Airware™ 2050 friction-stir butt welds (Airware, Newport Beach, CA) because of the scarcity of the results obtained with thicker than 8 mm joints and the lack of detailed interpretation of features in the longitudinal direction. An additional originality consists in the study of material flow under the probe tip. In the current case of thick plates, the variation of local temperature along the weld depth is of key importance for the material flow. Indeed, it governs the slight difference of local mechanical behavior between both materials and therefore the shift of the interface, which was clearly put into evidence by means of a difference of Mn content as small as 0.3 pct between both alloys. This importance of temperature for the malleability also entails the pear shape of the nugget as well as a change of grains orientation along the depth in the thermomechanically affected zone. Due to the modification of tool-material adhesion with temperature, a new phenomenological model of material flow for thick friction-stir welds is proposed. In accordance with their difference of origin, the coexistence of onion rings and serrated interface is also highlighted.

  13. Investigations on the Impact of Material-Integrated Sensors with the Help of FEM-Based Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Dumstorff, Gerrit; Lang, Walter

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the impact of material-integrated sensors with the help of finite element-based modeling. A sensor (inlay) integrated with a material (matrix) is always a foreign body in the material, which can lead to a “wound effect”, that is degradation of the macroscopic behavior of a material. By analyzing the inlay's impact on the material in terms of mechanical load, heat conduction, stress during integration and other impacts of integration, this wound effect is analyzed. For the mechanical load, we found out that the inlay has to be at least as stretchable and bendable as the matrix. If there is a high thermal load during integration, the coefficients of the thermal expansion of the inlay have to be matched to the matrix. In the case of a high thermal load during operation, the inlay has to be as thin as possible or its thermal conductivity has to be adapted to the thermal conductivity of the matrix. To have a general view of things, the results are dimensionless and independent of the geometry. In each section, the results are illustrated by examples. Based on all of the results, we present our idea for the fabrication of future material-integrated sensors. PMID:25621607

  14. Structure-function Investigation of Operando Nanostructured Materials Using Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvestad, Andrew

    Nanostructured devices promise to help solve grand challenges of our time, including renewable energy generation, storage, and mitigating climate change. Their power lies in the particular influence of the surface on the total free energy when dimensions approach the nanoscale and it is well known that different sizes, shapes, and defects can drastically alter material properties. However, this strength represents a considerable challenge for imaging techniques that can be limited in terms of sample environments, average over large ensembles of particles, and/or lack adequate spatiotemporal resolution for studying the relevant physical processes. The focus of this thesis is the development of in situ coherent X-ray diffractive imaging (CXDI) and its application in imaging strain evolution in battery cathode nanoparticles. Using in situ CXDI, the compressive/tensile strain field in the pristine state is revealed, and found to be linked to a particular concentration of strain inducing Jahn-Teller ions. The evolution of strain during the first charge/discharge cycle shows that the cathode nanoparticle exhibits phase separation. Using the 3D strain field, the strain field energy is calculated and shows interesting hysteresis between charge and discharge. Strain evolution during a disconnection event, in which the cathode nanoparticle is no longer able to exchange electrons and ions with its environment, reveals the formation of a poorly conducting interphase layer. Finally, strain fields were used to study dislocation dynamics in battery nanoparticles. Using the full 3D information, the dislocation line structure is mapped and shown to move in response to charge transfer. The dislocation is used as a way to probe the local material properties and it is discovered that the material enters an ``auxetic", or negative Poisson's ratio, regime.

  15. Reference earth orbital research and applications investigations (blue book). Volume 6: Materials sciences and manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The development of commercial manufacturing and research activities in space is discussed. The capability is to be installed in space stations in order to exploit the extended free fall which makes many novel manipulations of materials possible and alters the behavior of certain chemical and physical processes. The broad objectives are: (1) to develop technical basis required for commercial use of manned space facilities, (2) to provide indirect economic benefits by exploiting advantages of space laboratory facilities to solve critical experimental problems, and (3) to initiate manufacturing operations in space by private enterprise for commercial purposes and by agencies of the Government for public purposes.

  16. Investigation of the properties of Sb doping on tin oxide SNO2 materials for technological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachoun, Z.; Ouerdane, A.; Bouslama, M.; Ghaffour, M.; Abdellaoui, A.; Caudano, Y.; benamara, A. Ali

    2016-04-01

    The conductivities of the oxide SnO2 is dependent on the nature of the surrounding gas. This property stems from the adsorption or desorption on the surface of oxide grains. These phenomena are usually accompanied by electronic transfer between the adsorbed molecule and the semiconductor material, changing its conductivity. Tin oxidation and Sb doping were realized without and with heating process. The XPS technique and the TEM microscopy showed the synthesized nanocrystals. Simulated Monte Carlo program Casino is used for a scanning its profile. The surface characteristics are highlighted in the aim to be used as spatial gas sensors.

  17. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1985-01-01

    The historical development of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) is presented, including the functional requirements, polymer selection, curing, stabilization, production and module processing. The construction and use of a new method for the accelerated aging of polymers is detailed. The method more closely resembles the conditions that may be encountered in actual module field exposure and additionally may permit service life to be predicted accurately. The use of hardboard as a low cost candidate substrate material is studied. The performance of surface antisoiling treatments useful for imparting a self cleaning property to modules is updated.

  18. Review of some results of the author's fatigue investigations with applications in engineering and material science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, A.

    1994-04-01

    This document deals with research results mainly connected with the problem of fatigue calculations and various aspects of fatigue. It contains the following topics: Correlation between fatigue limits and ultimate tensile strength, Fatigue properties of pure metals, Analytical approach to notch-size effects in fatigue of aircraft sheet materials, Torsional fatigue life of axle shafts under program loading, Fatigue properties of aircraft lugs with interference fit, Comparison of various aircraft loading test results with the aid of Relative-Miner-Rule, The Relative Method in the case of Local-Strain-Approach, and Prediction of fatigue life.

  19. Investigative Photography, 16-1. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This military-developed text consists of nine lessons dealing with investigative photography. Covered in the individual lessons are the following topics: light (light as the basis of photography, the behavior of light, the composition of white light, light transmission, reflection and absorption, illumination, and pinholes and light); camera…

  20. The Role of Materials Degradation and Analysis in the Space Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDanels, Steven J.

    2006-01-01

    The efforts following the loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia included debris recovery, reconstruction, and analysis. The debris was subjected to myriad quantitative and semiquantitative chemical analysis techniques, ranging from examination via the scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) to X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA). The results from the work with the debris helped the investigators determine the location where a breach likely occurred in the leading edge of the left wing during lift off of the Orbiter from the Kennedy Space Center. Likewise, the information evidenced by the debris was also crucial in ascertaining the path of impinging plasma flow once it had breached the wing. After the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) issued its findings, the major portion of the investigation was concluded. However, additional work remained to be done on many pieces of debris from portions of the Orbiter which were not directly related to the initial impact during ascent. This subsequent work was not only performed in the laboratory, but was also performed with portable equipment, including examination via portable X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Likewise, acetate and silicon-rubber replicas of various fracture surfaces were obtained for later macroscopic and fractographic examination. This paper will detail the efforts and findings from the initial investigation, as well as present results obtained by the later examination and analysis of debris from the Orbiter including its windows, bulkhead structures, and other components which had not been examined during the primary investigation.