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Sample records for background atp-binding cassette

  1. ATP-binding cassette transporters in liver.

    PubMed

    Wlcek, Katrin; Stieger, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The human ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily consists of 48 members with 14 of them identified in normal human liver at the protein level. Most of the ABC members act as ATP dependent efflux transport systems. In the liver, ABC transporters are involved in diverse physiological processes including export of cholesterol, bile salts, and metabolic endproducts. Consequently, impaired ABC transporter function is involved in inherited diseases like sitosterolemia, hyperbilirubinemia, or cholestasis. Furthermore, altered expression of some of the hepatic ABCs have been associated with primary liver tumors. This review gives a short overview about the function of hepatic ABCs. Special focus is addressed on the localization and ontogenesis of ABC transporters in the human liver. In addition, their expression pattern in primary liver tumors is discussed. PMID:24105869

  2. Two ATP Binding Cassette G Transporters, Rice ATP Binding Cassette G26 and ATP Binding Cassette G15, Collaboratively Regulate Rice Male Reproduction1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guochao; Shi, Jianxin; Liang, Wanqi; Xue, Feiyang; Luo, Qian; Zhu, Lu; Qu, Guorun; Chen, Mingjiao; Schreiber, Lukas; Zhang, Dabing

    2015-01-01

    Male reproduction in higher plants requires the support of various metabolites, including lipid molecules produced in the innermost anther wall layer (the tapetum), but how the molecules are allocated among different anther tissues remains largely unknown. Previously, rice (Oryza sativa) ATP binding cassette G15 (ABCG15) and its Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ortholog were shown to be required for pollen exine formation. Here, we report the significant role of OsABCG26 in regulating the development of anther cuticle and pollen exine together with OsABCG15 in rice. Cytological and chemical analyses indicate that osabcg26 shows reduced transport of lipidic molecules from tapetal cells for anther cuticle development. Supportively, the localization of OsABCG26 is on the plasma membrane of the anther wall layers. By contrast, OsABCG15 is polarly localized in tapetal plasma membrane facing anther locules. osabcg26 osabcg15 double mutant displays an almost complete absence of anther cuticle and pollen exine, similar to that of osabcg15 single mutant. Taken together, we propose that OsABCG26 and OsABCG15 collaboratively regulate rice male reproduction: OsABCG26 is mainly responsible for the transport of lipidic molecules from tapetal cells to anther wall layers, whereas OsABCG15 mainly is responsible for the export of lipidic molecules from the tapetal cells to anther locules for pollen exine development. PMID:26392263

  3. Two ATP Binding Cassette G Transporters, Rice ATP Binding Cassette G26 and ATP Binding Cassette G15, Collaboratively Regulate Rice Male Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guochao; Shi, Jianxin; Liang, Wanqi; Xue, Feiyang; Luo, Qian; Zhu, Lu; Qu, Guorun; Chen, Mingjiao; Schreiber, Lukas; Zhang, Dabing

    2015-11-01

    Male reproduction in higher plants requires the support of various metabolites, including lipid molecules produced in the innermost anther wall layer (the tapetum), but how the molecules are allocated among different anther tissues remains largely unknown. Previously, rice (Oryza sativa) ATP binding cassette G15 (ABCG15) and its Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ortholog were shown to be required for pollen exine formation. Here, we report the significant role of OsABCG26 in regulating the development of anther cuticle and pollen exine together with OsABCG15 in rice. Cytological and chemical analyses indicate that osabcg26 shows reduced transport of lipidic molecules from tapetal cells for anther cuticle development. Supportively, the localization of OsABCG26 is on the plasma membrane of the anther wall layers. By contrast, OsABCG15 is polarly localized in tapetal plasma membrane facing anther locules. osabcg26 osabcg15 double mutant displays an almost complete absence of anther cuticle and pollen exine, similar to that of osabcg15 single mutant. Taken together, we propose that OsABCG26 and OsABCG15 collaboratively regulate rice male reproduction: OsABCG26 is mainly responsible for the transport of lipidic molecules from tapetal cells to anther wall layers, whereas OsABCG15 mainly is responsible for the export of lipidic molecules from the tapetal cells to anther locules for pollen exine development. PMID:26392263

  4. The human ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily.

    PubMed

    Dean, M; Rzhetsky, A; Allikmets, R

    2001-07-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily contains membrane proteins that translocate a variety of substrates across extra- and intra-cellular membranes. Genetic variation in these genes is the cause of or contributor to a wide variety of human disorders with Mendelian and complex inheritance, including cystic fibrosis, neurological disease, retinal degeneration, cholesterol and bile transport defects, anemia, and drug response. Conservation of the ATP-binding domains of these genes has allowed the identification of new members of the superfamily based on nucleotide and protein sequence homology. Phylogenetic analysis is used to divide all 48 known ABC transporters into seven distinct subfamilies of proteins. For each gene, the precise map location on human chromosomes, expression data, and localization within the superfamily has been determined. These data allow predictions to be made as to potential functions or disease phenotypes associated with each protein. In this paper, we review the current state of knowledge on all human ABC genes in inherited disease and drug resistance. In addition, the availability of the complete Drosophila genome sequence allows the comparison of the known human ABC genes with those in the fly genome. The combined data enable an evolutionary analysis of the superfamily. Complete characterization of all ABC from the human genome and from model organisms will lead to important insights into the physiology and the molecular basis of many human disorders. PMID:11435397

  5. Structure and mechanism of ATP-binding cassette transporters

    PubMed Central

    Locher, Kaspar P.

    2008-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters constitute a large superfamily of integral membrane proteins that includes both importers and exporters. In recent years, several structures of complete ABC transporters have been determined by X-ray crystallography. These structures suggest a mechanism by which binding and hydrolysis of ATP by the cytoplasmic, nucleotide-binding domains control the conformation of the transmembrane domains and therefore which side of the membrane the translocation pathway is exposed to. A basic, conserved two-state mechanism can explain active transport of both ABC importers and ABC exporters, but various questions remain unresolved. In this article, I will review some of the crystal structures and the mechanistic insight gained from them. Future challenges for a better understanding of the mechanism of ABC transporters will be outlined. PMID:18957379

  6. ATP-Binding Cassette Efflux Transporters in Human Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Zhanglin; Mao, Qingcheng

    2010-01-01

    Pregnant women are often complicated with diseases including viral or bacterial infections, epilepsy, hypertension, or pregnancy-induced conditions such as depression and gestational diabetes that require treatment with medication. In addition, substance abuse during pregnancy remains a major public health problem. Many drugs used by pregnant women are off label without the necessary dose, efficacy, and safety data required for rational dosing regimens of these drugs. Thus, a major concern arising from the widespread use of drugs by pregnant women is the transfer of drugs across the placental barrier, leading to potential toxicity to the developing fetus. Knowledge regarding the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters, which play an important role in drug transfer across the placental barrier, is absolutely critical for optimizing the therapeutic strategy to treat the mother while protecting the fetus during pregnancy. Such transporters include P-glycoprotein (P-gp, gene symbol ABCB1), the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, gene symbol ABCG2), and the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs, gene symbol ABCCs). In this review, we summarize the current knowledge with respect to developmental expression and regulation, membrane localization, functional significance, and genetic polymorphisms of these ABC transporters in the placenta and their relevance to fetal drug exposure and toxicity. PMID:21118087

  7. PREDICTED ATP-BINDING CASSETTE SYSTEMS IN THE PHYTOPATHOGENIC MOLLICUTE SPIROPLASMA KUNKELII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spiroplasma kunkelii is a cell wall-free, helical, and motile mycoplasma-like organism that causes corn stunt disease in maize. The bacterium has a compact genome with a gene set approaching the minimal complement necessary for cellular life and pathogenesis. A set of 21 ATP-binding cassette (ABC)...

  8. Influence of ATP-binding cassette transporters in root exudation of phytoalexins, signals, and disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The roots of plants secrete compounds as a way to exchange information with organ-isms living in the soil. Here, we report the involvement of seven root-expressed ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters corresponding to both full and half-size molecules (Atabcg36, Atabcg37, Atabcc5, Atabcf1, Atabcf3...

  9. Functional analysis of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene family of Tribolium castaneum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters belong to a large superfamily of proteins that have important physiological functions in all living organisms. Most are integral membrane proteins that transport a broad spectrum of substrates across lipid membranes. In insects, ABC transporters are of special interest because of their role in insecticide resistance. Results We have identified 73 ABC transporter genes in the genome of T. castaneum, which group into eight subfamilies (ABCA-H). This coleopteran ABC family is significantly larger than those reported for insects in other taxonomic groups. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this increase is due to gene expansion within a single clade of subfamily ABCC. We performed an RNA interference (RNAi) screen to study the function of ABC transporters during development. In ten cases, injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into larvae caused developmental phenotypes, which included growth arrest and localized melanization, eye pigmentation defects, abnormal cuticle formation, egg-laying and egg-hatching defects, and mortality due to abortive molting and desiccation. Some of the ABC transporters we studied in closer detail to examine their role in lipid, ecdysteroid and eye pigment transport. Conclusions The results from our study provide new insights into the physiological function of ABC transporters in T. castaneum, and may help to establish new target sites for insect control. PMID:23324493

  10. Phylogenetic and functional classification of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) systems.

    PubMed

    Bouige, Philippe; Laurent, David; Piloyan, Linda; Dassa, Elie

    2002-10-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) systems constitute one of the most abundant superfamilies of proteins. They are involved in the transport of a wide variety of substances, but also in many cellular processes and in their regulation. In this paper, we made a comparative analysis of the properties of ABC systems and we provide a phylogenetic and functional classification. This analysis will be helpful to accurately annotate ABC systems discovered during the sequencing of the genome of living organisms and to identify the partners of the ABC ATPases. PMID:12370001

  11. Structure, Function, and Evolution of Bacterial ATP-Binding Cassette Systems

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Amy L.; Dassa, Elie; Orelle, Cedric; Chen, Jue

    2008-01-01

    Summary: ATP-binding cassette (ABC) systems are universally distributed among living organisms and function in many different aspects of bacterial physiology. ABC transporters are best known for their role in the import of essential nutrients and the export of toxic molecules, but they can also mediate the transport of many other physiological substrates. In a classical transport reaction, two highly conserved ATP-binding domains or subunits couple the binding/hydrolysis of ATP to the translocation of particular substrates across the membrane, through interactions with membrane-spanning domains of the transporter. Variations on this basic theme involve soluble ABC ATP-binding proteins that couple ATP hydrolysis to nontransport processes, such as DNA repair and gene expression regulation. Insights into the structure, function, and mechanism of action of bacterial ABC proteins are reported, based on phylogenetic comparisons as well as classic biochemical and genetic approaches. The availability of an increasing number of high-resolution structures has provided a valuable framework for interpretation of recent studies, and realistic models have been proposed to explain how these fascinating molecular machines use complex dynamic processes to fulfill their numerous biological functions. These advances are also important for elucidating the mechanism of action of eukaryotic ABC proteins, because functional defects in many of them are responsible for severe human inherited diseases. PMID:18535149

  12. ATP-Binding Cassette Proteins: Towards a Computational View of Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jielou

    2004-03-01

    Many large machine proteins can generate mechanical force and undergo large-scale conformational changes (LSCC) to perform varying biological tasks in living cells by utilizing ATP. Important examples include ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. They are membrane proteins that couple ATP binding and hydrolysis to the translocation of substrates across membranes [1]. To interpret how the mechanical force generated by ATP binding and hydrolysis is propagated, a coarse-grained ATP-dependent harmonic network model (HNM) [2,3] is applied to the ABC protein, BtuCD. This protein machine transports vitamin B12 across membranes. The analysis shows that subunits of the protein move against each other in a concerted manner. The lowest-frequency modes of the BtuCD protein are found to link the functionally critical domains, and are suggested to be responsible for large-scale ATP-coupled conformational changes. [1] K. P. Locher, A. T. Lee and D. C. Rees. Science 296, 1091-1098 (2002). [2] Atilgan, A. R., S. R. Durell, R. L. Jernigan, M. C. Demirel, O. Keskin, and I. Bahar. Biophys. J. 80, 505-515(2002); M. M Tirion, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 1905-1908 (1996). [3] J. -L. Liao and D. N. Beratan, 2003, to be published.

  13. Characterisation of single domain ATP-binding cassette protien homologues of Theileria parva.

    PubMed

    Kibe, M K; Macklin, M; Gobright, E; Bishop, R; Urakawa, T; ole-MoiYoi, O K

    2001-09-01

    Two distinct genes encoding single domain, ATP-binding cassette transport protein homologues of Theileria parva were cloned and sequenced. Neither of the genes is tandemly duplicated. One gene, TpABC1, encodes a predicted protein of 593 amino acids with an N-terminal hydrophobic domain containing six potential membrane-spanning segments. A single discontinuous ATP-binding element was located in the C-terminal region of TpABC1. The second gene, TpABC2, also contains a single C-terminal ATP-binding motif. Copies of TpABC2 were present at four loci in the T. parva genome on three different chromosomes. TpABC1 exhibited allelic polymorphism between stocks of the parasite. Comparison of cDNA and genomic sequences revealed that TpABC1 contained seven short introns, between 29 and 84 bp in length. The full-length TpABC1 protein was expressed in insect cells using the baculovirus system. Application of antibodies raised against the recombinant antigen to western blots of T. parva piroplasm lysates detected an 85 kDa protein in this life-cycle stage. PMID:11570560

  14. The Lipid Bilayer Modulates the Structure and Function of an ATP-binding Cassette Exporter.

    PubMed

    Zoghbi, Maria E; Cooper, Rebecca S; Altenberg, Guillermo A

    2016-02-26

    ATP-binding cassette exporters use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to transport substrates across membranes by switching between inward- and outward-facing conformations. Essentially all structural studies of these proteins have been performed with the proteins in detergent micelles, locked in specific conformations and/or at low temperature. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer spectroscopy to study the prototypical ATP-binding cassette exporter MsbA reconstituted in nanodiscs at 37 C while it performs ATP hydrolysis. We found major differences when comparing MsbA in these native-like conditions with double electron-electron resonance data and the crystal structure of MsbA in the open inward-facing conformation. The most striking differences include a significantly smaller separation between the nucleotide-binding domains and a larger fraction of molecules with associated nucleotide-binding domains in the nucleotide-free apo state. These studies stress the importance of studying membrane proteins in an environment that approaches physiological conditions. PMID:26725230

  15. Microarray study of single nucleotide polymorphisms and expression of ATP-binding cassette genes in breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, M. M.; Ibragimova, M. K.; Karabut, I. V.; Freydin, M. B.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Litvyakov, N. V.

    2015-11-01

    Our previous research establishes that changes of expression of the ATP-binding cassette genes family is connected with the neoadjuvant chemotherapy effect. However, the mechanism of regulation of resistance gene expression remains unclear. As many researchers believe, single nucleotide polymorphisms can be involved in this process. Thereupon, microarray analysis is used to study polymorphisms in ATP-binding cassette genes. It is thus found that MDR gene expression is connected with 5 polymorphisms, i.e. rs241432, rs241429, rs241430, rs3784867, rs59409230, which participate in the regulation of expression of own genes.

  16. Protection against chemotherapy-induced alopecia: targeting ATP-binding cassette transporters in the hair follicle?

    PubMed

    Haslam, Iain S; Pitre, Aaron; Schuetz, John D; Paus, Ralf

    2013-11-01

    Currently, efficacious treatments for chemotherapy-induced alopecia (hair loss) are lacking, and incidences of permanent hair loss following high-dose chemotherapy are on the increase. In this article, we describe mechanisms by which the pharmacological defense status of the hair follicle might be enhanced, thereby reducing the accumulation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and preventing or reducing hair loss and damage. We believe this could be achieved via the selective increase in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expression within the hair follicle epithelium, following application of topical agonists for regulatory nuclear receptors. Clinical application would require the development of hair follicle-targeted formulations, potentially utilizing nanoparticle technology. This novel approach has the potential to yield entirely new therapeutic options for the treatment and management of chemotherapy-induced alopecia, providing significant psychological and physical benefit to cancer patients. PMID:24100054

  17. Structural Features of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter ABCA3

    PubMed Central

    Paolini, Alessandro; Baldassarre, Antonella; Del Gaudio, Ilaria; Masotti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In this review we reported and discussed the structural features of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter ABCA3 and how the use of bioinformatics tools could help researchers to obtain a reliable structural model of this important transporter. In fact, a model of ABCA3 is still lacking and no crystallographic structures (of the transporter or of its orthologues) are available. With the advent of next generation sequencing, many disease-causing mutations have been discovered and many more will be found in the future. In the last few years, ABCA3 mutations have been reported to have important pediatric implications. Thus, clinicians need a reliable structure to locate relevant mutations of this transporter and make genotype/phenotype correlations of patients affected by ABCA3-related diseases. In conclusion, we strongly believe that the model preliminarily generated by these novel bioinformatics tools could be the starting point to obtain more refined models of the ABCA3 transporter. PMID:26295388

  18. Cell and molecular biology of ATP-binding cassette proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Kazufumi; Shitan, Nobukazu; Sugiyama, Akifumi; Takanashi, Kojiro

    2009-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins constitute a large and diverse superfamily of membrane-bound and soluble proteins, which are involved in a wide range of biological processes in all organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Genome analyses of model plants, for example, Arabidopsis and rice, have revealed that plants have more than double numbers of this family member in their genomes compared to animals and insects. In recent years, various biochemical and physiological functions of ABC proteins in plants have been reported. Some are relevant for the defense mechanisms to biotic and abiotic stresses, whereas others are involved in the basic functions necessary for maintaining the plant life. Here, we provide an updated inventory of plant ABC proteins and summarize their tissue specificities, membrane localizations, and physiological functions. PMID:19584015

  19. Role of family D ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABCD) in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hlav?, Viktor; Sou?ek, Pavel

    2015-10-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, belonging to the family D, are expressed in peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum or lysosomes. ABCD transporters play a role in transport of lipids, bile acids and vitamin B12 and associate with peroxisomal disorders. ABCD1 performs transport of coenzyme A esters of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) in peroxisomes and a number of mutations in ABCD1 gene were linked to an X-linked adrenoleucodystrophy (X-ALD). The role of ABCD transporters in tumour growth has not been studied in detail, but there is some evidence that ABCDs levels differ between undifferentiated stem or tumour cells and differentiated cells suggesting a possible link to tumorigenesis. In this mini-review, we discuss the available information about the role of ABCD transporters in cancer. PMID:26517907

  20. Transport in technicolor: Mapping ATP-binding cassette transporters in sea urchin embryos

    PubMed Central

    Gkirmak, Tufan; Shipp, Lauren E.; Campanale, Joseph P.; Nicklisch, Sascha C.T.; Hamdoun, Amro

    2014-01-01

    One quarter of eukaryotic genes encode membrane proteins. These include nearly 1000 transporters that translocate nutrients, signaling molecules, and xenobiotics across membranes. While it is well appreciated that membrane transport is critical for development, the specific roles of many transporters have remained cryptic, in part because of their abundance and the diversity of their substrates. Multi-drug resistance ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters are one example of cryptic membrane proteins. Although most organisms utilize these ABC transporters during embryonic development, many of these transporters have broad substrate specificity, and their developmental functions remain incompletely understood. Here, we review advances in our understanding of ABC transporters in sea urchin embryos, and methods developed to spatially and temporally map these proteins. These studies reveal that multifunctional transporters are required for signaling, homeostasis, and protection of the embryo, and shed light on how they are integrated into ancestral developmental pathways recapitulated in disease. PMID:25156004

  1. Transport in technicolor: mapping ATP-binding cassette transporters in sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed

    Gökirmak, Tufan; Shipp, Lauren E; Campanale, Joseph P; Nicklisch, Sascha C T; Hamdoun, Amro

    2014-09-01

    One quarter of eukaryotic genes encode membrane proteins. These include nearly 1,000 transporters that translocate nutrients, signaling molecules, and xenobiotics across membranes. While it is well appreciated that membrane transport is critical for development, the specific roles of many transporters have remained cryptic, in part because of their abundance and the diversity of their substrates. Multidrug resistance ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters are one example of cryptic membrane proteins. Although most organisms utilize these ABC transporters during embryonic development, many of these transporters have broad substrate specificity, and their developmental functions remain incompletely understood. Here, we review advances in our understanding of ABC transporters in sea urchin embryos, and methods developed to spatially and temporally map these proteins. These studies reveal that multifunctional transporters are required for signaling, homeostasis, and protection of the embryo, and shed light on how they are integrated into ancestral developmental pathways recapitulated in disease. PMID:25156004

  2. Structure-function analysis of peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporters using chimeric dimers.

    PubMed

    Geillon, Flore; Gondcaille, Catherine; Charbonnier, Soëli; Van Roermund, Carlo W; Lopez, Tatiana E; Dias, Alexandre M M; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Arnould, Christine; Wanders, Ronald J; Trompier, Doriane; Savary, Stéphane

    2014-08-29

    ABCD1 and ABCD2 are two closely related ATP-binding cassette half-transporters predicted to homodimerize and form peroxisomal importers for fatty acyl-CoAs. Available evidence has shown that ABCD1 and ABCD2 display a distinct but overlapping substrate specificity, although much remains to be learned in this respect as well as in their capability to form functional heterodimers. Using a cell model expressing an ABCD2-EGFP fusion protein, we first demonstrated by proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay that ABCD1 interacts with ABCD2. Next, we tested in the pxa1/pxa2Δ yeast mutant the functionality of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers by expressing chimeric proteins mimicking homo- or heterodimers. For further structure-function analysis of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers, we expressed chimeric dimers fused to enhanced GFP in human skin fibroblasts of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy patients. These cells are devoid of ABCD1 and accumulate very long-chain fatty acids (C26:0 and C26:1). We checked that the chimeric proteins were correctly expressed and targeted to the peroxisomes. Very long-chain fatty acid levels were partially restored in transfected X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy fibroblasts regardless of the chimeric construct used, thus demonstrating functionality of both homo- and heterodimers. Interestingly, the level of C24:6 n-3, the immediate precursor of docosahexaenoic acid, was decreased in cells expressing chimeric proteins containing at least one ABCD2 moiety. Our data demonstrate for the first time that both homo- and heterodimers of ABCD1 and ABCD2 are functionally active. Interestingly, the role of ABCD2 (in homo- and heterodimeric forms) in the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids is clearly evidenced, and the chimeric dimers provide a novel tool to study substrate specificity of peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporters. PMID:25043761

  3. Structure-Function Analysis of Peroxisomal ATP-binding Cassette Transporters Using Chimeric Dimers*

    PubMed Central

    Geillon, Flore; Gondcaille, Catherine; Charbonnier, Soli; Van Roermund, Carlo W.; Lopez, Tatiana E.; Dias, Alexandre M. M.; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Arnould, Christine; Wanders, Ronald J.; Trompier, Doriane; Savary, Stphane

    2014-01-01

    ABCD1 and ABCD2 are two closely related ATP-binding cassette half-transporters predicted to homodimerize and form peroxisomal importers for fatty acyl-CoAs. Available evidence has shown that ABCD1 and ABCD2 display a distinct but overlapping substrate specificity, although much remains to be learned in this respect as well as in their capability to form functional heterodimers. Using a cell model expressing an ABCD2-EGFP fusion protein, we first demonstrated by proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay that ABCD1 interacts with ABCD2. Next, we tested in the pxa1/pxa2? yeast mutant the functionality of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers by expressing chimeric proteins mimicking homo- or heterodimers. For further structure-function analysis of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers, we expressed chimeric dimers fused to enhanced GFP in human skin fibroblasts of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy patients. These cells are devoid of ABCD1 and accumulate very long-chain fatty acids (C26:0 and C26:1). We checked that the chimeric proteins were correctly expressed and targeted to the peroxisomes. Very long-chain fatty acid levels were partially restored in transfected X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy fibroblasts regardless of the chimeric construct used, thus demonstrating functionality of both homo- and heterodimers. Interestingly, the level of C24:6 n-3, the immediate precursor of docosahexaenoic acid, was decreased in cells expressing chimeric proteins containing at least one ABCD2 moiety. Our data demonstrate for the first time that both homo- and heterodimers of ABCD1 and ABCD2 are functionally active. Interestingly, the role of ABCD2 (in homo- and heterodimeric forms) in the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids is clearly evidenced, and the chimeric dimers provide a novel tool to study substrate specificity of peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporters. PMID:25043761

  4. ROLE OF ATP BINDING CASSETTE SUB-FAMILY MEMBER 2 (ABCG2) IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    ATP binding cassette sub-family member 2 (ABCG2), is a member of the ABC transporter superfamily and a principal xenobiotic transporter. ABCG2 is also highly expressed in certain stem cell populations where it is thought to be related to stem cell plasticity, although the role o...

  5. Transcriptional Regulation of ATP-binding Cassette Transporter A1 Expression by a Novel Signaling Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinping; Zhao, Yanfeng; Guo, Zhongmao; Zhou, Lichun; Okoro, Emmanuel U.; Yang, Hong

    2011-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) is a membrane-bound protein that regulates the efflux of cholesterol derived from internalized lipoproteins. Using a mouse macrophage cell line, this report studied the impact of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) on ABCA1 expression and the signaling pathway responsible for lipoprotein-induced ABCA1 expression. Our data demonstrated that treatment of macrophages with LDL increased ABCA1 mRNA and protein levels 4.3- and 3.5-fold, respectively. LDL also induced an ?2-fold increase in macrophage surface expression of ABCA1 and a 14-fold-increase in apolipoprotein AI-mediated cholesterol efflux. In addition, LDL significantly increased the level of phosphorylated specificity protein 1 (Sp1) and the amount of Sp1 bound to the ABCA1 promoter without alteration in total Sp1 protein level. Mutation of the Sp1 binding site in the ABCA1 promoter and inhibition of Sp1 DNA binding with mithramycin A suppressed the ABCA1 promoter activity and reduced the ABCA1 expression level induced by LDL. LDL treatment also elevated protein kinase C-? (PKC-?) phosphorylation and induced PKC-? binding with Sp1. Inhibition of PKC-? with kinase inhibitors or overexpression of kinase-dead PKC-? attenuated Sp1 phosphorylation and ABCA1 expression induced by LDL. These results demonstrate for the first time that activation of the PKC?-Sp1 signaling cascade is a mechanism for regulation of LDL-induced ABCA1 expression. PMID:21257755

  6. The Role of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters in Neuro-Inflammation: Relevance for Bioactive Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Kooij, Gijs; van Horssen, Jack; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Haughey, Norman J.; de Vries, Helga E.

    2012-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are highly expressed by brain endothelial cells that form the bloodbrain barrier (BBB). These efflux pumps play an important role in maintaining brain homeostasis as they actively hinder the entry of unwanted blood-derived compounds into the central nervous system (CNS). Consequently, their high activity at the BBB has been a major hurdle for the treatment of several brain diseases, as they prevent numerous drugs to reach their site of action within the brain. Importantly, recent data indicate that endogenous substrates for ABC transporters may include inflammatory mediators, such as prostaglandins, leukotrienes, cytokines, chemokines, and bioactive lipids, suggesting a potential role for ABC transporters in immunological responses, and more specifically in inflammatory brain disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). In this review, we will give a comprehensive overview of recent findings that illustrate this novel role for ABC transporters in neuro-inflammatory processes. Moreover, we will provide first insights into underlying mechanisms and focus on the importance for bioactive lipids, in particular platelet-activating factor, herein. A thorough understanding of these events may form the basis for the development for selective treatment modalities to dampen the neuro-inflammatory attack in MS and thereby reducing tissue damage. PMID:22557971

  7. The Yeast Plasma Membrane ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Aus1

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Magdalena; Milles, Sigrid; Schreiber, Gabriele; Daleke, David L.; Dittmar, Gunnar; Herrmann, Andreas; Mller, Peter; Pomorski, Thomas Gnther

    2011-01-01

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter Aus1 is expressed under anaerobic growth conditions at the plasma membrane of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is required for sterol uptake. These observations suggest that Aus1 promotes the translocation of sterols across membranes, but the precise transport mechanism has yet to be identified. In this study, an extraction and purification procedure was developed to characterize the Aus1 transporter. The detergent-solubilized protein was able to bind and hydrolyze ATP. Mutagenesis of the conserved lysine to methionine in the Walker A motif abolished ATP hydrolysis. Likewise, ATP hydrolysis was inhibited by classical inhibitors of ABC transporters. Upon reconstitution into proteoliposomes, the ATPase activity of Aus1 was specifically stimulated by phosphatidylserine (PS) in a stereoselective manner. We also found that Aus1-dependent sterol uptake, but not Aus1 expression and trafficking to the plasma membrane, was affected by changes in cellular PS levels. These results suggest a direct interaction between Aus1 and PS that is critical for the activity of the transporter. PMID:21521689

  8. Masitinib antagonizes ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2-mediated multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    KATHAWALA, RISHIL J.; CHEN, JUN-JIANG; ZHANG, YUN-KAI; WANG, YI-JUN; PATEL, ATISH; WANG, DE-SHEN; TALELE, TANAJI T.; ASHBY, CHARLES R.; CHEN, ZHE-SHENG

    2014-01-01

    In this in vitro study, we determined whether masitinib could reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) in cells overexpressing the ATP binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) transporter. Masitinib (1.25 and 2.5 ?M) significantly decreases the resistance to mitoxantrone (MX), SN38 and doxorubicin in HEK293 and H460 cells overexpressing the ABCG2 transporter. In addition, masitinib (2.5 ?M) significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of [3H]-MX, a substrate for ABCG2, by inhibiting the function of ABCG2 and significantly decreased the efflux of [3H]-MX. However, masitinib (2.5 ?M) did not significantly alter the expression of the ABCG2 protein. In addition, a docking model suggested that masitinib binds within the transmembrane region of a homology-modeled human ABCG2 transporter. Overall, our in vitro findings suggest that masitinib reverses MDR to various anti-neoplastic drugs in HEK293 and H460 cells overexpressing ABCG2 by inhibiting their transport activity as opposed to altering their levels of expression. PMID:24626598

  9. PGP4, an ATP binding cassette P-glycoprotein, catalyzes auxin transport in Arabidopsis thaliana roots.

    PubMed

    Terasaka, Kazuyoshi; Blakeslee, Joshua J; Titapiwatanakun, Boosaree; Peer, Wendy A; Bandyopadhyay, Anindita; Makam, Srinivas N; Lee, Ok Ran; Richards, Elizabeth L; Murphy, Angus S; Sato, Fumihiko; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2005-11-01

    Members of the ABC (for ATP binding cassette) superfamily of integral membrane transporters function in cellular detoxification, cell-to-cell signaling, and channel regulation. More recently, members of the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (MDR/PGP) subfamily of ABC transporters have been shown to function in the transport of the phytohormone auxin in both monocots and dicots. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis thaliana MDR/PGP PGP4 functions in the basipetal redirection of auxin from the root tip. Reporter gene studies showed that PGP4 was strongly expressed in root cap and epidermal cells. PGP4 exhibits apolar plasma membrane localization in the root cap and polar localization in tissues above. Root gravitropic bending and elongation as well as lateral root formation were reduced in pgp4 mutants compared with the wild type. pgp4 exhibited reduced basipetal auxin transport in roots and a small decrease in shoot-to-root transport consistent with a partial loss of the redirective auxin sink in the root. Seedlings overexpressing PGP4 exhibited increased shoot-to-root auxin transport. Heterologous expression of PGP4 in mammalian cells resulted in 1-N-naphthylthalamic acid-reversible net uptake of [3H]indole-3-acetic acid. These results indicate that PGP4 functions primarily in the uptake of redirected or newly synthesized auxin in epidermal root cells. PMID:16243904

  10. ATP-binding cassette transporters as pharmacogenetic biomarkers for kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shuker, Nauras; Bouamar, Rachida; Weimar, Willem; van Schaik, Ron H N; van Gelder, Teun; Hesselink, Dennis A

    2012-09-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs used in organ transplantation are highly effective in preventing acute rejection. However, the clinical use of these drugs is complicated by the fact that they display highly variable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics between individual patients. The influence of genetic variation on the interindividual variability in immunosuppressive drug disposition, efficacy, and toxicity has been explored in recent years. The polymorphically-expressed ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins, in particular ABCB1 and ABCC2, have been investigated extensively because they play an important role in the absorption, distribution and elimination of many immunosuppressive drugs in use today. From these studies it can be concluded that polymorphisms in ABCB1 and ABCC2 have no consistent effect on immunosuppressant pharmacokinetics and toxicity although polymorphisms in ABCB1 appear to be related to the risk of developing calcineurin inhibitor-related nephrotoxicity. However, the latter needs to be replicated before an individual's ABCB1 genotype can become a useful marker that is applied in clinical practice. Future studies evaluating the influence of ABC transporter gene polymorphisms should explore the relationship with intracellular rather than systemic drug concentrations further in well-designed clinical studies. Until then, single-nucleotide polymorphisms in ABC transporter genes are not suitable to act as biomarkers for solid organ transplantation. PMID:21996082

  11. Tracing the structural evolution of eukaryotic ATP binding cassette transporter superfamily.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jie; Feng, Jinmei; Yuan, Dongxia; Zhou, Jun; Miao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters superfamily is one of the largest classes of membrane proteins. The core of the ABC transporter protein is composed of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Eukaryotes ABC transporters are classified into seven main families (ABCA to ABCG) based on sequence similarity and domain organizations. With different domain number and domain organizations, eukaryote ABC transporters show diverse structures: the single structure (NBD or TMD), the ABC2 structure (NBD-NBD), the half structure (TMD-NBD or NBD-TMD) and the full structure (TMD-NBD-TMD-NBD or NBD-TMD-NBD-TMD). However, studies on how various ABC transporter gene structures evolved is still absent. Therefore, in this study, we comprehensively investigated the structural evolution of eukaryotic ABC transporters. The seven eukaryote ABC transporter families (A to G) fell into three groups: A&G group, B,C&D group and E&F group. There were at least four times the number of NBD and TMD fusion events in the origin of the half structure transporter. Two fusion modes were found in the full and ABC2 structure origination. Based on these findings, we present a putative structural evolutionary path of eukaryote ABC transporters that will increase our understanding on their origin, divergence and function. PMID:26577702

  12. Expression of ATP-binding cassette membrane transporters in a HIV-1 transgenic rat model.

    PubMed

    Robillard, Kevin R; Hoque, Md Tozammel; Bendayan, Reina

    2014-02-21

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp, product of Mdr1a and Mdr1b genes), multidrug resistance associated proteins (Mrps), and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), all members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) membrane-associated drug transporters superfamily, can significantly restrict the entry of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) into organs which exhibit a barrier function such as the central nervous system (CNS) and the male genital tract (MGT). In vitro, HIV-1 viral proteins such as glycoprotein-120 (gp120) and transcriptional transactivator (tat) have been shown to alter the expression of these transporters and ARVs permeability. The objective of this study was to compare mRNA expression of these transporters, in vivo, in several tissues obtained from HIV-1 transgenic rats (Tg-rat) (8 and 24 weeks) with those of age-matched wild-type rats. At 24 weeks, significant changes in several drug transporter mRNA expressions were observed, in particular, in brain, kidney, liver and testes. These findings suggest that HIV-1 viral proteins can alter the expression of ABC drug transporters, in vivo, in the context of HIV-1 and further regulate ARVs permeability in several organs including the CNS and MGT, two sites which have been reported to display very low ARVs permeability in the clinic. PMID:24472536

  13. A Plant Plasma Membrane ATP Binding CassetteType Transporter Is Involved in Antifungal Terpenoid Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Jasi?ski, Michal; Stukkens, Yvan; Degand, Herv; Purnelle, Bndicte; Marchand-Brynaert, Jacqueline; Boutry, Marc

    2001-01-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which are found in all species, are known mainly for their ability to confer drug resistance. To date, most of the ABC transporters characterized in plants have been localized in the vacuolar membrane and are considered to be involved in the intracellular sequestration of cytotoxins. Working on the assumption that certain ABC transporters might be involved in defense metabolite secretion and their expression might be regulated by the concentration of these metabolites, we treated a Nicotiana plumbaginifolia cell culture with sclareolide, a close analog of sclareol, an antifungal diterpene produced at the leaf surface of Nicotiana spp; this resulted in the appearance of a 160-kD plasma membrane protein, which was partially sequenced. The corresponding cDNA (NpABC1) was cloned and shown to encode an ABC transporter. In vitro and in situ immunodetection showed NpABC1 to be localized in the plasma membrane. Under normal conditions, expression was found in the leaf epidermis. In cell culture and in leaf tissues, NpABC1 expression was strongly enhanced by sclareolide and sclareol. In parallel with NpABC1 induction, cells acquired the ability to excrete a labeled synthetic sclareolide derivative. These data suggest that NpABC1 is involved in the secretion of a secondary metabolite that plays a role in plant defense. PMID:11340184

  14. Expression of the ATP-binding cassette transporter gene ABCG1 (ABC8) in Tangier disease.

    PubMed

    Lorkowski, S; Kratz, M; Wenner, C; Schmidt, R; Weitkamp, B; Fobker, M; Reinhardt, J; Rauterberg, J; Galinski, E A; Cullen, P

    2001-05-18

    Several members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family are involved in cholesterol efflux from cells. A defect in one member, ABCA1, results in Tangier disease, a condition characterized by cholesterol accumulation in macrophages and virtual absence of mature circulating high-density lipoproteins. Expression of a second member, ABCG1, is increased by cholesterol-loading in human macrophages. We now show that ABCG1, which we identified by differential display RT-PCR in foamy macrophages, is overexpressed in macrophages from patients with Tangier disease compared to control macrophages. On examination by confocal laser scanning microscopy, ABCG1 was present in perinuclear structures within the cell. In addition, a combination of in situ hybridization and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that ABCG1 is expressed in foamy macrophages within the atherosclerotic plaque. These data indicate that not only ABCA1 but also ABCG1 may play a role in the cholesterol metabolism of macrophages in vitro and in the atherosclerotic plaque. PMID:11350058

  15. Tracing the structural evolution of eukaryotic ATP binding cassette transporter superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Feng, Jinmei; Yuan, Dongxia; Zhou, Jun; Miao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters superfamily is one of the largest classes of membrane proteins. The core of the ABC transporter protein is composed of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Eukaryotes ABC transporters are classified into seven main families (ABCA to ABCG) based on sequence similarity and domain organizations. With different domain number and domain organizations, eukaryote ABC transporters show diverse structures: the single structure (NBD or TMD), the ABC2 structure (NBD-NBD), the half structure (TMD-NBD or NBD-TMD) and the full structure (TMD-NBD-TMD-NBD or NBD-TMD-NBD-TMD). However, studies on how various ABC transporter gene structures evolved is still absent. Therefore, in this study, we comprehensively investigated the structural evolution of eukaryotic ABC transporters. The seven eukaryote ABC transporter families (A to G) fell into three groups: A&G group, B,C&D group and E&F group. There were at least four times the number of NBD and TMD fusion events in the origin of the half structure transporter. Two fusion modes were found in the full and ABC2 structure origination. Based on these findings, we present a putative structural evolutionary path of eukaryote ABC transporters that will increase our understanding on their origin, divergence and function. PMID:26577702

  16. Multidrug ATP-binding cassette transporters are essential for hepatic development of Plasmodium sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Rijpma, Sanna R; van der Velden, Maarten; Gonzlez-Pons, Maria; Annoura, Takeshi; van Schaijk, Ben C L; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; van den Heuvel, Jeroen J M W; Ramesar, Jai; Chevalley-Maurel, Severine; Ploemen, Ivo H; Khan, Shahid M; Franetich, Jean-Francois; Mazier, Dominique; de Wilt, Johannes H W; Serrano, Adelfa E; Russel, Frans G M; Janse, Chris J; Sauerwein, Robert W; Koenderink, Jan B; Franke-Fayard, Blandine M

    2016-03-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) belong to the C-family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins and are known to transport a variety of physiologically important compounds and to be involved in the extrusion of pharmaceuticals. Rodent malaria parasites encode a single ABC transporter subfamily C protein, whereas human parasites encode two: MRP1 and MRP2. Although associated with drug resistance, their biological function and substrates remain unknown. To elucidate the role of MRP throughout the parasite life cycle, Plasmodium berghei and Plasmodium falciparum mutants lacking MRP expression were generated. P.?berghei mutants lacking expression of the single MRP as well as P.?falciparum mutants lacking MRP1, MRP2 or both proteins have similar blood stage growth kinetics and drug-sensitivity profiles as wild type parasites. We show that MRP1-deficient parasites readily invade primary human hepatocytes and develop into mature liver stages. In contrast, both P.?falciparum MRP2-deficient parasites and P.?berghei mutants lacking MRP protein expression abort in mid to late liver stage development, failing to produce mature liver stages. The combined P.?berghei and P.?falciparum data are the first demonstration of a critical role of an ABC transporter during Plasmodium liver stage development. PMID:26332724

  17. Molecular Characterization of LjABCG1, an ATP-Binding Cassette Protein in Lotus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Akifumi; Fukuda, Shoju; Takanashi, Kojiro; Yoshioka, Miki; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Narusaka, Yoshihiro; Narusaka, Mari; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Shitan, Nobukazu; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2015-01-01

    LjABCG1, a full-size ABCG subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins of a model legume, Lotus japonicus, was reported as a gene highly expressed during the early stages of nodulation, but have not been characterized in detail. In this study we showed that the induction of LjABCG1 expression was remarkable by methyl jasmonate treatment, and reporter gene experiments indicated that LjABCG1 was strongly expressed in the nodule parenchyma and cell layers adjacent to the root vascular tissue toward the nodule. LjABCG1 was suggested to be localized at the plasma membrane based on the fractionation of microsomal membranes as well as separation via aqueous two-phase partitioning. The physiological functions of LjABCG1 in symbiosis and pathogenesis were analyzed in homologous and heterologous systems. LjABCG1 knock-down L. japonicus plants did not show clear phenotypic differences in nodule formation, and not in defense against Pseudomonas syringae, either. In contrast, when LjABCG1 was expressed in the Arabidopsis pdr8-1 mutant, the penetration frequency of Phytophthora infestans, a potato late blight pathogen, was significantly reduced in LjABCG1/pdr8-1 than in pdr8-1 plants. This finding indicated that LjABCG1, at least partially, complemented the phenotype of pdr8 in Arabidopsis, suggesting the multiple roles of this protein in plant-microbe interactions. PMID:26418593

  18. Predicted ATP-binding cassette systems in the phytopathogenic mollicute Spiroplasma kunkelii.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Wang, H; Hammond, R W; Jomantiene, R; Liu, Q; Lin, S; Roe, B A; Davis, R E

    2004-04-01

    Spiroplasma kunkelii is a cell wall-free, helical, and motile mycoplasma-like organism that causes corn stunt disease in maize. The bacterium has a compact genome with a gene set approaching the minimal complement necessary for cellular life and pathogenesis. A set of 21 ATP-binding cassette (ABC) domains was identified during the annotation of a draft S. kunkelii genome sequence. These 21 ABC domains are present in 18 predicted proteins, and are components of 16 functional systems, which account for 5% of the protein coding capacity of the S. kunkelii genome. Of the 16 systems, 11 are membrane-bound transporters, and two are cytosolic systems involved in DNA repair and the oxidative stress response; the genes for the remaining three hypothetical systems harbor nonsense and/or frameshift mutations, so their functional status is doubtful. Assembly of the 11 multicomponent transporters, and comparisons with other known systems permitted functional predictions for the S. kunkelii ABC transporter systems. These transporters convey a wide variety of substrates, and are critical for nutrient uptake, multidrug resistance, and perhaps virulence. Our findings provide a framework for functional characterization of the ABC systems in S. kunkelii. PMID:15024644

  19. ATP-binding Cassette Transporters Are Required for Efficient RNA Interference in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Prema; Echalier, Benjamin; Han, Wang; Hull, Dawn

    2006-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a conserved gene-silencing phenomenon that can be triggered by delivery of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to cells and is a widely exploited technology in analyses of gene function. Although a number of proteins that facilitate RNAi have been identified, current descriptions of RNAi and interrelated mechanisms are far from complete. Here, we report that the Caenorhabditis elegans gene haf-6 is required for efficient RNAi. HAF-6 is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene superfamily. ABC transporters use ATP to translocate small molecule substrates across the membranes in which they reside, often against a steep concentration gradient. Collectively, ABC transporters are involved in a variety of activities, including protective or barrier mechanisms that export drugs or toxins from cells, organellar biogenesis, and mechanisms that protect against viral infection. HAF-6 is expressed predominantly in the intestine and germline and is localized to intracellular reticular organelles. We further demonstrate that eight additional ABC genes from diverse subfamilies are each required for efficient RNAi in C. elegans. Thus, the ability to mount a robust RNAi response to dsRNA depends upon the deployment of two ancient systems that respond to environmental assaults: RNAi mechanisms and membrane transport systems that use ABC proteins. PMID:16723499

  20. ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1: from metabolism to neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koldamova, Radosveta; Fitz, Nicholas F.; Lefterov, Iliya

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) mediates cholesterol efflux to lipid-free apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and apolipoprotein E (apoE). ABCA1 is an essential regulator of High Density Lipoproteins (HDL) and reverse cholesterol transport – a role that determines its importance for atherosclerosis. Over the last 10 years studies have provided convincing evidence that ABCA1, via its control of apoE lipidation, also has a role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A series of reports have revealed a significant impact of ABCA1 on Aβ deposition and clearance in AD model mice, as well as an association of common and rare ABCA1 gene variants with the risk for AD. Since APOE is the major genetic risk factor for late onset AD, the regulation of apoE level or its functionality by ABCA1 may prove significant for AD pathogenesis. ABCA1 is transcriptionally regulated by Liver X receptors (LXR) and Retinoic X Receptors (RXR) which provides a starting point for drug discovery and development of synthetic LXR and RXR agonists for treatment of metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders. This review summarizes the recent results of research on ABCA1, particularly relevant to atherosclerosis and AD. PMID:24844148

  1. Structure of an antibacterial peptide ATP-binding cassette transporter in a novel outward occluded state.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Hassanul G; Tong, Zhen; Mathavan, Indran; Li, Yanyan; Iwata, So; Zirah, Sverine; Rebuffat, Sylvie; van Veen, Hendrik W; Beis, Konstantinos

    2014-06-24

    Enterobacteriaceae produce antimicrobial peptides for survival under nutrient starvation. Microcin J25 (MccJ25) is an antimicrobial peptide with a unique lasso topology. It is secreted by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) exporter McjD, which ensures self-immunity of the producing strain through efficient export of the toxic mature peptide from the cell. Here we have determined the crystal structure of McjD from Escherichia coli at 2.7- resolution, which is to the authors' knowledge the first structure of an antibacterial peptide ABC transporter. Our functional and biochemical analyses demonstrate McjD-dependent immunity to MccJ25 through efflux of the peptide. McjD can directly bind MccJ25 and displays a basal ATPase activity that is stimulated by MccJ25 in both detergent solution and proteoliposomes. McjD adopts a new conformation, termed nucleotide-bound outward occluded. The new conformation defines a clear cavity; mutagenesis and ligand binding studies of the cavity have identified Phe86, Asn134, and Asn302 as important for recognition of MccJ25. Comparisons with the inward-open MsbA and outward-open Sav1866 structures show that McjD has structural similarities with both states without the intertwining of transmembrane (TM) helices. The occluded state is formed by rotation of TMs 1 and 2 toward the equivalent TMs of the opposite monomer, unlike Sav1866 where they intertwine with TMs 3-6 of the opposite monomer. Cysteine cross-linking studies on the McjD dimer in inside-out membrane vesicles of E. coli confirmed the presence of the occluded state. We therefore propose that the outward-occluded state represents a transition intermediate between the outward-open and inward-open conformation of ABC exporters. PMID:24920594

  2. A Novel Function of Apolipoprotein E: Upregulation of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hong; Zhou, Lichun; Okoro, Emmanuel U.; Guo, Zhongmao

    2011-01-01

    Despite the well known importance of apolipoprotein (Apo) E in cholesterol efflux, the effect of ApoE on the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) has never been investigated. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of ApoE on ApoB-carrying lipoprotein-induced expression of ABCA1, a protein that mediates cholesterol efflux. Our data demonstrate that ApoB-carrying lipoproteins obtained from both wild-type and ApoE knockout mice induced ApoAI-mediated cholesterol efflux in mouse macrophages, which was associated with an enhanced ABCA1 promoter activity, and an increased ABCA1 mRNA and protein expression. In addition, these lipoproteins increased the level of phosphorylated specificity protein 1 (Sp1) and the amount of Sp1 bound to the ABCA1 promoter. However, all these inductions were significantly diminished in cells treated with ApoE-free lipoproteins, when compared to those treated with wild-type lipoproteins. Enrichment with human ApoE3 reversed the reduced inducibility of ApoE-free lipoproteins. Moreover, we observed that inhibition of Sp1 DNA-binding by mithramycin A diminished ABCA1 expression and ApoAI-mediated cholesterol efflux induced by ApoB-carrying lipoproteins, and that mutation of the Sp1-binding motif in the ABCA1 promoter region diminished ApoB-carrying lipoprotein-induced ABCA1 promoter activity. Collectively, these data suggest that ApoE associated with ApoB-carrying lipoproteins has an upregulatory role on ABCA1 expression, and that induction of Sp1 phosphorylation is a mechanism by which ApoE upregulates ABCA1 expression. PMID:21779326

  3. An ATP-binding cassette transporter GhWBC1 from elongating cotton fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong-Qing; Xu, Ke-Xiang; Luo, Bin; Wang, Jia-Wei; Chen, Xiao-Ya

    2003-10-01

    We have isolated a cDNA (GhWBC1) from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) that encodes an ATP-binding cassette transporter of the WBC (white/brown complex) subfamily. Members of this subfamily are half-sized transporters and are reported to mediate lipid and drug excretion in human (Homo sapiens). GhWBC1 is highly expressed in developing fiber cells, but transcripts were also detectable in other tissues except roots. The transcript level peaked in rapidly expanding fibers from 5 to 9 DPA and then decreased. The GhWBC1 expression was weak in fiber cells of an li (ligon-lintless) mutant, which is defective in fiber cell elongation. These data indicate that GhWBC1 gene expression correlates with cotton fiber elongation. Transient expression of enhanced green fluorescence protein-GhWBC1 fusion protein in onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells revealed plasma membrane localization. The GhWBC1 cDNA driven by a constitutive 35S promoter was introduced into Arabidopsis. About 13% of the transformants produced short siliques (SSs), whereas others had normal siliques (long siliques [LSs]). In siliques of SS lines, most embryos were severely shriveled, and only several seeds per silique could be found at maturity. The transgene expression level was higher in SS lines than in LS lines. Expression of AtWBC11, the closest homolog of GhWBC1 in Arabidopsis, was not altered in either SS or LS transgenic plants examined. These data suggest that GhWBC1 interferes with substance translocation that is required for Arabidopsis seed and silique development. Characterization of Arabidopsis WBC members, particularly AtWBC11, will help to dissect the role of GhWBC1 in cotton fiber development and elongation. PMID:12972649

  4. ATP binding cassette modulators control abscisic acid-regulated slow anion channels in guard cells

    PubMed Central

    Leonhardt, N; Vavasseur, A; Forestier, C

    1999-01-01

    In animal cells, ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins are a large family of transporters that includes the sulfonylurea receptor and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). These two ABC proteins possess an ion channel activity and bind specific sulfonylureas, such as glibenclamide, but homologs have not been identified in plant cells. We recently have shown that there is an ABC protein in guard cells that is involved in the control of stomatal movements and guard cell outward K+ current. Because the CFTR, a chloride channel, is sensitive to glibenclamide and able to interact with K+ channels, we investigated its presence in guard cells. Potent CFTR inhibitors, such as glibenclamide and diphenylamine-2-carboxylic acid, triggered stomatal opening in darkness. The guard cell protoplast slow anion current that was recorded using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique was inhibited rapidly by glibenclamide in a dose-dependent manner; the concentration producing half-maximum inhibition was at 3 &mgr;M. Potassium channel openers, which bind to and act through the sulfonylurea receptor in animal cells, completely suppressed the stomatal opening induced by glibenclamide and recovered the glibenclamide-inhibited slow anion current. Abscisic acid is known to regulate slow anion channels and in our study was able to relieve glibenclamide inhibition of slow anion current. Moreover, in epidermal strip bioassays, the stomatal closure triggered by Ca2+ or abscisic acid was reversed by glibenclamide. These results suggest that the slow anion channel is an ABC protein or is tightly controlled by such a protein that interacts with the abscisic acid signal transduction pathway in guard cells. PMID:10368184

  5. ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 (ABCA7) loss of function alters Alzheimer amyloid processing.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kanayo; Abe-Dohmae, Sumiko; Yokoyama, Shinji; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Fraser, Paul E

    2015-10-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 (ABCA7) has been identified as a susceptibility factor of late onset Alzheimer disease in genome-wide association studies. ABCA7 has been shown to mediate phagocytosis and affect membrane trafficking. The current study examined the impact of ABCA7 loss of function on amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and generation of amyloid-β (Aβ). Suppression of endogenous ABCA7 in several different cell lines resulted in increased β-secretase cleavage and elevated Aβ. ABCA7 knock-out mice displayed an increased production of endogenous murine amyloid Aβ42 species. Crossing ABCA7-deficient animals to an APP transgenic model resulted in significant increases in the soluble Aβ as compared with mice expressing normal levels of ABCA7. Only modest changes in the amount of insoluble Aβ and amyloid plaque densities were observed once the amyloid pathology was well developed, whereas Aβ deposition was enhanced in younger animals. In vitro studies indicated a more rapid endocytosis of APP in ABCA7 knock-out cells that is mechanistically consistent with the increased Aβ production. These in vitro and in vivo findings indicate a direct role of ABCA7 in amyloid processing that may be associated with its primary biological function to regulate endocytic pathways. Several potential loss-of-function ABCA7 mutations and deletions linked to Alzheimer disease that in some instances have a greater impact than apoE allelic variants have recently been identified. A reduction in ABCA7 expression or loss of function would be predicted to increase amyloid production and that may be a contributing factor in the associated Alzheimer disease susceptibility. PMID:26260791

  6. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates Both Heme and Pesticide Detoxification in Tick Midgut Cells.

    PubMed

    Lara, Flavio Alves; Pohl, Paula C; Gandara, Ana Caroline; Ferreira, Jessica da Silva; Nascimento-Silva, Maria Clara; Bechara, Gervsio Henrique; Sorgine, Marcos H F; Almeida, Igor C; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Oliveira, Pedro L

    2015-01-01

    In ticks, the digestion of blood occurs intracellularly and proteolytic digestion of hemoglobin takes place in a dedicated type of lysosome, the digest vesicle, followed by transfer of the heme moiety of hemoglobin to a specialized organelle that accumulates large heme aggregates, called hemosomes. In the present work, we studied the uptake of fluorescent metalloporphyrins, used as heme analogs, and amitraz, one of the most regularly used acaricides to control cattle tick infestations, by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus midgut cells. Both compounds were taken up by midgut cells in vitro and accumulated inside the hemosomes. Transport of both molecules was sensitive to cyclosporine A (CsA), a well-known inhibitor of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Rhodamine 123, a fluorescent probe that is also a recognized ABC substrate, was similarly directed to the hemosome in a CsA-sensitive manner. Using an antibody against conserved domain of PgP-1-type ABC transporter, we were able to immunolocalize PgP-1 in the digest vesicle membranes. Comparison between two R. microplus strains that were resistant and susceptible to amitraz revealed that the resistant strain detoxified both amitraz and Sn-Pp IX more efficiently than the susceptible strain, a process that was also sensitive to CsA. A transcript containing an ABC transporter signature exhibited 2.5-fold increased expression in the amitraz-resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain. RNAi-induced down-regulation of this ABC transporter led to the accumulation of metalloporphyrin in the digestive vacuole, interrupting heme traffic to the hemosome. This evidence further confirms that this transcript codes for a heme transporter. This is the first report of heme transport in a blood-feeding organism. While the primary physiological function of the hemosome is to detoxify heme and attenuate its toxicity, we suggest that the use of this acaricide detoxification pathway by ticks may represent a new molecular mechanism of resistance to pesticides. PMID:26258982

  7. Detergent-free purification of ABC (ATP-binding-cassette) transporters.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Sonali; Jamshad, Mohammed; Knowles, Timothy J; Morrison, Kerrie A; Downing, Rebecca; Cant, Natasha; Collins, Richard; Koenderink, Jan B; Ford, Robert C; Overduin, Michael; Kerr, Ian D; Dafforn, Timothy R; Rothnie, Alice J

    2014-07-15

    ABC (ATP-binding-cassette) transporters carry out many vital functions and are involved in numerous diseases, but study of the structure and function of these proteins is often hampered by their large size and membrane location. Membrane protein purification usually utilizes detergents to solubilize the protein from the membrane, effectively removing it from its native lipid environment. Subsequently, lipids have to be added back and detergent removed to reconstitute the protein into a lipid bilayer. In the present study, we present the application of a new methodology for the extraction and purification of ABC transporters without the use of detergent, instead, using a copolymer, SMA (polystyrene-co-maleic acid). SMA inserts into a bilayer and assembles into discrete particles, essentially solubilizing the membrane into small discs of bilayer encircled by a polymer, termed SMALPs (SMA lipid particles). We show that this polymer can extract several eukaryotic ABC transporters, P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), MRP1 (multidrug-resistance protein 1; ABCC1), MRP4 (ABCC4), ABCG2 and CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator; ABCC7), from a range of different expression systems. The SMALP-encapsulated ABC transporters can be purified by affinity chromatography, and are able to bind ligands comparably with those in native membranes or detergent micelles. A greater degree of purity and enhanced stability is seen compared with detergent solubilization. The present study demonstrates that eukaryotic ABC transporters can be extracted and purified without ever being removed from their lipid bilayer environment, opening up a wide range of possibilities for the future study of their structure and function. PMID:24758594

  8. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates Both Heme and Pesticide Detoxification in Tick Midgut Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Flavio Alves; Pohl, Paula C.; Gandara, Ana Caroline; Ferreira, Jessica da Silva; Nascimento-Silva, Maria Clara; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Sorgine, Marcos H. F.; Almeida, Igor C.; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Oliveira, Pedro L.

    2015-01-01

    In ticks, the digestion of blood occurs intracellularly and proteolytic digestion of hemoglobin takes place in a dedicated type of lysosome, the digest vesicle, followed by transfer of the heme moiety of hemoglobin to a specialized organelle that accumulates large heme aggregates, called hemosomes. In the present work, we studied the uptake of fluorescent metalloporphyrins, used as heme analogs, and amitraz, one of the most regularly used acaricides to control cattle tick infestations, by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus midgut cells. Both compounds were taken up by midgut cells in vitro and accumulated inside the hemosomes. Transport of both molecules was sensitive to cyclosporine A (CsA), a well-known inhibitor of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Rhodamine 123, a fluorescent probe that is also a recognized ABC substrate, was similarly directed to the hemosome in a CsA-sensitive manner. Using an antibody against conserved domain of PgP-1-type ABC transporter, we were able to immunolocalize PgP-1 in the digest vesicle membranes. Comparison between two R. microplus strains that were resistant and susceptible to amitraz revealed that the resistant strain detoxified both amitraz and Sn-Pp IX more efficiently than the susceptible strain, a process that was also sensitive to CsA. A transcript containing an ABC transporter signature exhibited 2.5-fold increased expression in the amitraz-resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain. RNAi-induced down-regulation of this ABC transporter led to the accumulation of metalloporphyrin in the digestive vacuole, interrupting heme traffic to the hemosome. This evidence further confirms that this transcript codes for a heme transporter. This is the first report of heme transport in a blood-feeding organism. While the primary physiological function of the hemosome is to detoxify heme and attenuate its toxicity, we suggest that the use of this acaricide detoxification pathway by ticks may represent a new molecular mechanism of resistance to pesticides. PMID:26258982

  9. ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter 1 Attenuates Ovalbumin-Induced Neutrophilic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Cuilian; Yao, Xianglan; Vaisman, Boris; Brenner, Todd; Meyer, Katharine S.; Gao, Meixia; Keeran, Karen J.; Nugent, Gayle Z.; Qu, Xuan; Yu, Zu-Xi; Dagur, Pradeep K.; McCoy, J. Philip; Remaley, Alan T.

    2014-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) is an important component of high-density lipoprotein particles that mediates reverse cholesterol transport out of cells by interacting with the ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1). apoA-I has also been shown to attenuate neutrophilic airway inflammation in experimental ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma by reducing the expression of granulocyte colony–stimulating factor (G-CSF). Here, we hypothesized that overexpression of the ABCA1 transporter might similarly attenuate OVA-induced neutrophilic airway inflammation. Tie2–human ABCA1 (hABCA1) mice expressing human ABCA1 under the control of the Tie2 promoter, which is primarily expressed by vascular endothelial cells, but can also be expressed by macrophages, received daily intranasal OVA challenges, 5 d/wk for 5 weeks. OVA-challenged Tie2-hABCA1 mice had significant reductions in total bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cells that reflected a decrease in neutrophils, as well as reductions in peribronchial inflammation, OVA-specific IgE levels, and airway epithelial thickness. The reduced airway neutrophilia in OVA-challenged Tie2-hABCA1 mice was associated with significant decreases in G-CSF protein levels in pulmonary vascular endothelial cells, alveolar macrophages, and BALF. Intranasal administration of recombinant murine G-CSF to OVA-challenged Tie2-hABCA1 mice for 5 days increased BALF neutrophils to a level comparable to that of OVA-challenged wild-type mice. We conclude that ABCA1 suppresses OVA-induced airway neutrophilia by reducing G-CSF production by vascular endothelial cells and alveolar macrophages. These findings suggest that ABCA1 expressed by vascular endothelial cells and alveolar macrophages may play important roles in attenuating the severity of neutrophilic airway inflammation in asthma. PMID:24813055

  10. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in normal and pathological lung

    PubMed Central

    van der Deen, Margaretha; de Vries, Elisabeth GE; Timens, Wim; Scheper, Rik J; Timmer-Bosscha, Hetty; Postma, Dirkje S

    2005-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a family of transmembrane proteins that can transport a wide variety of substrates across biological membranes in an energy-dependent manner. Many ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) are highly expressed in bronchial epithelium. This review aims to give new insights in the possible functions of ABC molecules in the lung in view of their expression in different cell types. Furthermore, their role in protection against noxious compounds, e.g. air pollutants and cigarette smoke components, will be discussed as well as the (mal)function in normal and pathological lung. Several pulmonary drugs are substrates for ABC transporters and therefore, the delivery of these drugs to the site of action may be highly dependent on the presence and activity of many ABC transporters in several cell types. Three ABC transporters are known to play an important role in lung functioning. Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene can cause cystic fibrosis, and mutations in ABCA1 and ABCA3 are responsible for respectively Tangier disease and fatal surfactant deficiency. The role of altered function of ABC transporters in highly prevalent pulmonary diseases such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have hardly been investigated so far. We especially focused on polymorphisms, knock-out mice models and in vitro results of pulmonary research. Insight in the function of ABC transporters in the lung may open new ways to facilitate treatment of lung diseases. PMID:15967026

  11. A Novel Flow Cytometric HTS Assay Reveals Functional Modulators of ATP Binding Cassette Transporter ABCB6

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Hemantkumar; Young, Susan; Ma, Xiaochao; Waller, Anna; Garcia, Matthew; Perez, Dominique; Chavez, Stephanie; Strouse, Jacob J.; Haynes, Mark K.; Bologa, Cristian G.; Oprea, Tudor I.; Tegos, George P.; Sklar, Larry A.; Krishnamurthy, Partha

    2012-01-01

    ABCB6 is a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette family of transporter proteins that is increasingly recognized as a relevant physiological and therapeutic target. Evaluation of modulators of ABCB6 activity would pave the way toward a more complete understanding of the significance of this transport process in tumor cell growth, proliferation and therapy-related drug resistance. In addition, this effort would improve our understanding of the function of ABCB6 in normal physiology with respect to heme biosynthesis, and cellular adaptation to metabolic demand and stress responses. To search for modulators of ABCB6, we developed a novel cell-based approach that, in combination with flow cytometric high-throughput screening (HTS), can be used to identify functional modulators of ABCB6. Accumulation of protoporphyrin, a fluorescent molecule, in wild-type ABCB6 expressing K562 cells, forms the basis of the HTS assay. Screening the Prestwick Chemical Library employing the HTS assay identified four compounds, benzethonium chloride, verteporfin, tomatine hydrochloride and piperlongumine, that reduced ABCB6 mediated cellular porphyrin levels. Validation of the identified compounds employing the hemin-agarose affinity chromatography and mitochondrial transport assays demonstrated that three out of the four compounds were capable of inhibiting ABCB6 mediated hemin transport into isolated mitochondria. However, only verteporfin and tomatine hydrochloride inhibited ABCB6s ability to compete with hemin as an ABCB6 substrate. This assay is therefore sensitive, robust, and suitable for automation in a high-throughput environment as demonstrated by our identification of selective functional modulators of ABCB6. Application of this assay to other libraries of synthetic compounds and natural products is expected to identify novel modulators of ABCB6 activity. PMID:22808084

  12. Adipocyte ATP-binding cassette G1 promotes triglyceride storage, fat mass growth, and human obesity.

    PubMed

    Frisdal, Eric; Le Lay, Soazig; Hooton, Henri; Poupel, Lucie; Olivier, Maryline; Alili, Rohia; Plengpanich, Wanee; Villard, Elise F; Gilibert, Sophie; Lhomme, Marie; Superville, Alexandre; Miftah-Alkhair, Lobna; Chapman, M John; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M; Venteclef, Nicolas; Poitou, Christine; Tordjman, Joan; Lesnik, Philippe; Kontush, Anatol; Huby, Thierry; Dugail, Isabelle; Clement, Karine; Guerin, Maryse; Le Goff, Wilfried

    2015-03-01

    The role of the ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1) transporter in human pathophysiology is still largely unknown. Indeed, beyond its role in mediating free cholesterol efflux to HDL, the ABCG1 transporter equally promotes lipid accumulation in a triglyceride (TG)-rich environment through regulation of the bioavailability of lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Because both ABCG1 and LPL are expressed in adipose tissue, we hypothesized that ABCG1 is implicated in adipocyte TG storage and therefore could be a major actor in adipose tissue fat accumulation. Silencing of Abcg1 expression by RNA interference in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes compromised LPL-dependent TG accumulation during the initial phase of differentiation. Generation of stable Abcg1 knockdown 3T3-L1 adipocytes revealed that Abcg1 deficiency reduces TG storage and diminishes lipid droplet size through inhibition of Pparγ expression. Strikingly, local inhibition of adipocyte Abcg1 in adipose tissue from mice fed a high-fat diet led to a rapid decrease of adiposity and weight gain. Analysis of two frequent ABCG1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs1893590 [A/C] and rs1378577 [T/G]) in morbidly obese individuals indicated that elevated ABCG1 expression in adipose tissue was associated with increased PPARγ expression and adiposity concomitant to increased fat mass and BMI (haplotype AT>GC). The critical role of ABCG1 in obesity was further confirmed in independent populations of severe obese and diabetic obese individuals. This study identifies for the first time a major role of adipocyte ABCG1 in adiposity and fat mass growth and suggests that adipose ABCG1 might represent a potential therapeutic target in obesity. PMID:25249572

  13. Association of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 Gene Polymorphisms in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus among Malaysians

    PubMed Central

    Haghvirdizadeh, Polin; Ramachandran, Vasudevan; Etemad, Ali; Heidari, Farzad; Ghodsian, Nooshin; Bin Ismail, Norzian; Ismail, Patimah

    2015-01-01

    Background. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex polygenic disorder characterized by impaired insulin resistance, insulin secretion, and dysregulation of lipid and protein metabolism with environmental and genetic factors. ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) gene polymorphisms are reported as the one of the genetic risk factors for T2DM in various populations with conflicting results. This study was conducted based on PCR-HRM to determine the frequency of ABCA1 gene by rs2230806 (R219K), rs1800977 (C69T), and rs9282541 (R230C) polymorphisms Malaysian subjects. Methods. A total of 164 T2DM and 165 controls were recruited and their genotypes for ABCA1 gene polymorphisms were determined based on the real time high resolution melting analysis. Results. There was a significant difference between the subjects in terms of age, BMI, FPG, HbA1c, HDL, LDL, and TG (P < 0.05). There was a significant association between HOM of R219K (P = 0.005), among Malaysian subjects; moreover, allele frequency revealed the significant difference in A allele of R219K (P = 0.003). But, there was no significant difference in genotypic and allelic frequencies of C69T and R230C polymorphism. Conclusion. R219K polymorphism of ABCA1 gene can be considered as a genetic risk factor for T2DM subjects among Malaysians. PMID:26451383

  14. The saci_2123 gene of the hyperthermoacidophile Sulfolobus acidocaldarius encodes an ATP-binding cassette multidrug transporter.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nuan; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) transporters are capable of secreting structurally and functionally unrelated toxic compounds from the cell. Among this group are ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. These membrane proteins are typically arranged as either hetero- or homo-dimers of ABC half-transporters with each subunit consisting of a membrane domain fused at the C-terminus to an ATP-binding domain, or as full transporters in which the two subunits are fused into a single polypeptide. The saci_2123 gene of the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius is the only gene in the genome that encodes an ATP-binding cassette half-transporter, while a homologous gene is present in the genomes of S. solfataricus, S. tokodaii and S islandicus. Saci_2123 shares homology with well-characterized bacterial and mammalian MDR transporters. The saci_2132 gene is up-regulated when cells are exposed to drugs. A deletion mutant of saci_2132 was found to be more vulnerable to a set of toxic compounds, including detergents, antibiotics and uncouplers as compared to the wild-type strain, while the drug resistance could be restored through the plasmid-based expression of saci_2132. These data demonstrate that Saci_2132 is an archaeal ABC-MDR transporter and therefore it was termed Smr1 (Sulfolobus multidrug resistance transporter 1). PMID:25138279

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the bacterial ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) protein MalK.

    PubMed

    Schmees, G; Höner zu Bentrup, K; Schneider, E; Vinzenz, D; Ermler, U

    1999-01-01

    The ATP-binding protein, MalK, of the bacterial ABC (ATP-binding-cassette) transport complex MalFGK2 provides the energy for the translocation of maltose and maltodextrins across the cytoplasmic membrane. The MalK protein from Salmonella typhimurium was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized by the hanging-drop method using (NH4)2SO4as a precipitant. The crystals belong to space group P6x22 (most probably x = 1 or 5) with cell dimensions a = 181.8 and c = 182.5 A, corresponding to three or four molecules per asymmetric unit. They diffract to a resolution of about 3 A on a synchrotron X-ray source and are suitable for structure determination. PMID:10089426

  16. ATP hydrolysis is required to reset the ATP-binding cassette dimer into the resting-state conformation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; Westbrooks, James M; Davidson, Amy L; Chen, Jue

    2005-12-13

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters couple ATP binding and hydrolysis to the movement of substances across the membrane; conformational changes clearly play an important role in the transporter mechanism. Previously, we have shown that a dimer of MalK, the ATPase subunit of the maltose transporter from Escherichia coli, undergoes a tweezers-like motion in a transport cycle. The MalK monomer consists of an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain and a C-terminal regulatory domain. The two nucleotide-binding domains in a dimer are either open or closed, depending on whether ATP is present, while the regulatory domains maintain contacts to hold the dimer together. In this work, the structure of MalK in a posthydrolysis state is presented, obtained by cocrystallizing MalK with ATP-Mg(2+). ATP was hydrolyzed in the crystallization drop, and ADP-Mg(2+) was found in the resulting crystal structure. In contrast to the ATP-bound form where two ATP molecules are buried in a closed interface between the nucleotide-binding domains, the two nucleotide-binding domains of the ADP-bound form are open, indicating that ADP, unlike ATP, cannot stabilize the closed form. This conclusion is further supported by oligomerization studies of MalK in solution. At low protein concentrations, ATP promotes dimerization of MalK, whereas ADP does not. The structures of dimeric MalK in the nucleotide-free, ATP-bound, and ADP-bound forms provide a framework for understanding the nature of the conformational changes that occur in an ATP-binding cassette transporter hydrolysis cycle, as well as how conformational changes in MalK are coupled to solute transport. PMID:16326809

  17. Expression of ATP binding cassette-transporter ABCG1 prevents cell death by transporting cytotoxic 7beta-hydroxycholesterol.

    PubMed

    Engel, Thomas; Kannenberg, Frank; Fobker, Manfred; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch; Bode, Guenther; Lueken, Aloys; Assmann, Gerd; Seedorf, Udo

    2007-04-17

    Oxysterols result from cholesterol by enzymatic or oxidative processes. Some exert cytotoxic effects leading to necrosis or apoptosis. Detoxification of these compounds mainly occurs in the liver and requires transport from peripheral tissues towards it. Some ATP-binding cassette transporters are involved in export of cytotoxic compounds. In the current study, we investigated whether ABC transporter family member G1 (ABCG1) may be involved in oxysterol transport, since its gene expression is highly responsive to oxysterol loading. TetOff HeLa cells stably expressing ABCG1 showed decreased mass uptake of 7beta-hydroxycholesterol (7beta-HC) whereas that of other physiologically relevant oxysterols was unaffected. Application of 7beta-HC to ABCG1 expressing cells induced hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and production of reactive oxygen species, indicating energy consumption by the ATP-binding cassette transporter when it is activated by its correct substrate. Our study points to detoxification as one of potential cellular functions of ABCG1. We assume that ABCG1 protects against 7beta-HC-induced cell death, an important role in prevention of neurodegenerative and cardiovascular disease. PMID:17408620

  18. Allosteric transitions of ATP-binding cassette transporter MsbA studied by the adaptive anisotropic network model.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao Lu; Li, Chun Hua; Yang, Yong Xiao; Jin, Lu; Tan, Jian Jun; Zhang, Xiao Yi; Su, Ji Guo; Wang, Cun Xin

    2015-09-01

    The transporter MsbA is a kind of multidrug resistance ATP-binding cassette transporter that can transport lipid A, lipopolysaccharides, and some amphipathic drugs from the cytoplasmic to the periplasmic side of the inner membrane. In this work, we explored the allosteric pathway of MsbA from the inward- to outward-facing states during the substrate transport process with the adaptive anisotropic network model. The results suggest that the allosteric transitions proceed in a coupled way. The large-scale closing motions of the nucleotide-binding domains occur first, accompanied with a twisting motion at the same time, which becomes more obvious in middle and later stages, especially for the later. This twisting motion plays an important role for the rearrangement of transmembrane helices and the opening of transmembrane domains on the periplasmic side that mainly take place in middle and later stages respectively. The topological structure plays an important role in the motion correlations above. The conformational changes of nucleotide-binding domains are propagated to the transmembrane domains via the intracellular helices IH1 and IH2. Additionally, the movement of the transmembrane domains proceeds in a nonrigid body, and the two monomers move in a symmetrical way, which is consistent with the symmetrical structure of MsbA. These results are helpful for understanding the transport mechanism of the ATP-binding cassette exporters. PMID:26148303

  19. ATP-binding cassette-like transporters are involved in the transport of lignin precursors across plasma and vacuolar membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Y.C.; Liu, C.

    2010-12-28

    Lignin is a complex biopolymer derived primarily from the condensation of three monomeric precursors, the monolignols. The synthesis of monolignols occurs in the cytoplasm. To reach the cell wall where they are oxidized and polymerized, they must be transported across the cell membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the transport process are unclear. There are conflicting views about whether the transport of these precursors occurs by passive diffusion or is an energized active process; further, we know little about what chemical forms are required. Using isolated plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles prepared from Arabidopsis, together with applying different transporter inhibitors in the assays, we examined the uptake of monolignols and their derivatives by these native membrane vesicles. We demonstrate that the transport of lignin precursors across plasmalemma and their sequestration into vacuoles are ATP-dependent primary-transport processes, involving ATP-binding cassette-like transporters. Moreover, we show that both plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles selectively transport different forms of lignin precursors. In the presence of ATP, the inverted plasma membrane vesicles preferentially take up monolignol aglycones, whereas the vacuolar vesicles are more specific for glucoconjugates, suggesting that the different ATP-binding cassette-like transporters recognize different chemical forms in conveying them to distinct sites, and that glucosylation of monolignols is necessary for their vacuolar storage but not required for direct transport into the cell wall in Arabidopsis.

  20. Structure, function, and evolution of bacterial ATP-binding cassette systems

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, A.L.; Dassa, E.; Orelle, C.; Chen, J.

    2010-07-27

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) systems constitute one of the largest superfamilies of paralogous sequences. All ABC systems share a highly conserved ATP-hydrolyzing domain or protein (the ABC; also referred to as a nucleotide-binding domain [NBD]) that is unequivocally characterized by three short sequence motifs (Fig. 1): these are the Walker A and Walker B motifs, indicative of the presence of a nucleotide-binding site, and the signature motif, unique to ABC proteins, located upstream of the Walker B motif (426). Other motifs diagnostic of ABC proteins are also indicated in Fig. 1. The biological significance of these motifs is discussed in Structure, Function, and Dynamics of the ABC. ABC systems are widespread among living organisms and have been detected in all genera of the three kingdoms of life, with remarkable conservation in the primary sequence of the cassette and in the organization of the constitutive domains or subunits (203, 420). ABC systems couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to an impressively large variety of essential biological phenomena, comprising not only transmembrane (TM) transport, for which they are best known, but also several non-transport-related processes, such as translation elongation (62) and DNA repair (174). Although ABC systems deserve much attention because they are involved in severe human inherited diseases (107), they were first discovered and characterized in detail in prokaryotes, as early as the 1970s (13, 148, 238, 468). The most extensively analyzed systems were the high-affinity histidine and maltose uptake systems of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli. Over 2 decades ago, after the completion of the nucleotide sequences encoding these transporters in the respective laboratories of Giovanna Ames and Maurice Hofnung, Hiroshi Nikaido and colleagues noticed that the two systems displayed a global similarity in the nature of their components and, moreover, that the primary sequences of MalK and HisP, the proteins suspected to energize these transporters, shared as much as 32% identity in amino acid residues when their sequences were aligned (171). Later, it was found that several bacterial proteins involved in uptake of nutrients, export of toxins, cell division, bacterial nodulation of plants, and DNA repair displayed the same similarity in their sequences (127, 196). This led to the notion that the conserved protein, which had been shown to bind ATP (198, 201), would probably energize the systems mentioned above by coupling the energy of ATP hydrolysis to transport. The latter was demonstrated with the maltose and histidine transporters by use of isolated membrane vesicles (105, 379) and purified transporters reconstituted into proteoliposomes (30, 98). The determination of the sequence of the first eukaryotic protein strongly similar to these bacterial transporters (the P-glycoprotein, involved in resistance of cancer cells to multiple drugs) (169, 179) demonstrated that these proteins were not restricted to prokaryotes. Two names, 'traffic ATPases' (15) and the more accepted name 'ABC transporters' (193, 218), were proposed for members of this new superfamily. ABC systems can be divided into three main functional categories, as follows. Importers mediate the uptake of nutrients in prokaryotes. The nature of the substrates that are transported is very wide, including mono- and oligosaccharides, organic and inorganic ions, amino acids, peptides, ironsiderophores, metals, polyamine cations, opines, and vitamins. Exporters are involved in the secretion of various molecules, such as peptides, lipids, hydrophobic drugs, polysaccharides, and proteins, including toxins such as hemolysin. The third category of systems is apparently not involved in transport, with some members being involved in translation of mRNA and in DNA repair. Despite the large, diverse population of substrates handled and the difference in the polarity of transport, importers and exporters share a common organization made of two hydrophobic membrane-spanning or integral membrane (IM) domains and two hydrophilic domains carrying the ABC peripherally associated with the IM domains on the cytosolic side of the membrane (26). In importers, these four domains are almost always independent polypeptide chains that come together to form a multimeric complex. In most exporters, including the E. coli hemolysin exporter HlyB, the N-terminal IM and the C-terminal ABC domains are fused as a single polypeptide chain (IM-ABC). An inverted organization in which the IM domain is C-terminal with respect to the ABC domain (ABC-IM) exists, such as in the MacB protein, involved in macrolide resistance in E. coli. No IM domain partners have been identified for ABC proteins falling into the third category, and these proteins consist of two ABCs fused together (ABC2).

  1. The allosteric regulatory mechanism of the Escherichia coli MetNI methionine ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter.

    PubMed

    Yang, Janet G; Rees, Douglas C

    2015-04-01

    The MetNI methionine importer of Escherichia coli, an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter, uses the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to catalyze the high affinity uptake of D- and L-methionine. Early in vivo studies showed that the uptake of external methionine is repressed by the level of the internal methionine pool, a phenomenon termed transinhibition. Our understanding of the MetNI mechanism has thus far been limited to a series of crystal structures in an inward-facing conformation. To understand the molecular mechanism of transinhibition, we studied the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis using detergent-solubilized MetNI. We find that transinhibition is due to noncompetitive inhibition by L-methionine, much like a negative feedback loop. Thermodynamic analyses revealed two allosteric methionine binding sites per transporter. This quantitative analysis of transinhibition, the first to our knowledge for a structurally defined transporter, builds upon the previously proposed structurally based model for regulation. This mechanism of regulation at the transporter activity level could be applicable to not only ABC transporters but other types of membrane transporters as well. PMID:25678706

  2. Cloning and Iron Transportation of Nucleotide Binding Domain of Cryptosporidium andersoni ATP-Binding Cassette (CaABC) Gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ju-Hua; Xue, Xiu-Heng; Zhou, Jie; Fan, Cai-Yun; Xie, Qian-Qian; Wang, Pan

    2015-06-01

    Cryptosporidium andersoni ATP-binding cassette (CaABC) is an important membrane protein involved in substrate transport across the membrane. In this research, the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of CaABC gene was amplified by PCR, and the eukaryotic expression vector of pEGFP-C1-CaNBD was reconstructed. Then, the recombinant plasmid of pEGFP-C1-CaNBD was transformed into the mouse intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) to study the iron transportation function of CaABC. The results indicated that NBD region of CaABC gene can significantly elevate the transport efficiency of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), K(+), and HCO3 (-) in IECs (P<0.05). The significance of this study is to find the ATPase inhibitors for NBD region of CaABC gene and to inhibit ATP binding and nutrient transport of CaABC transporter. Thus, C. andersoni will be killed by inhibition of nutrient uptake. This will open up a new way for treatment of cryptosporidiosis. PMID:26174828

  3. Cloning and Iron Transportation of Nucleotide Binding Domain of Cryptosporidium andersoni ATP-Binding Cassette (CaABC) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ju-Hua; Xue, Xiu-Heng; Zhou, Jie; Fan, Cai-Yun; Xie, Qian-Qian; Wang, Pan

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium andersoni ATP-binding cassette (CaABC) is an important membrane protein involved in substrate transport across the membrane. In this research, the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of CaABC gene was amplified by PCR, and the eukaryotic expression vector of pEGFP-C1-CaNBD was reconstructed. Then, the recombinant plasmid of pEGFP-C1-CaNBD was transformed into the mouse intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) to study the iron transportation function of CaABC. The results indicated that NBD region of CaABC gene can significantly elevate the transport efficiency of Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, and HCO3- in IECs (P<0.05). The significance of this study is to find the ATPase inhibitors for NBD region of CaABC gene and to inhibit ATP binding and nutrient transport of CaABC transporter. Thus, C. andersoni will be killed by inhibition of nutrient uptake. This will open up a new way for treatment of cryptosporidiosis. PMID:26174828

  4. ATP-binding cassette and multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporters in plants: a common theme among diverse detoxification mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Tsubasa

    2014-01-01

    Plants have developed elaborate detoxification mechanisms to cope with a large number of potentially toxic compounds, which include exogenous xenobiotics and endogenous metabolites, especially secondary metabolites. After enzymatic modification or synthesis, such compounds are transported and accumulated in apoplastic cell walls or central vacuoles in plant cells. Membrane transporters actively catalyze translocation of a diverse range of these compounds across various membranes within cells. Biochemical, molecular, and genetic studies have begun to reveal functions of a handful of ATP-binding cassette and multidrug and toxic compound extrusion family transporters engaged in transport of organic xenobiotics, heavy metals, metalloids, aluminum, alkaloids, flavonoids, terpenoids, terpenoid-derived phytohormones, cuticle lipids, and monolignols in plants. This detoxification versatility and metabolic diversity may underlie the functional diversification in plants of these families of transporters, which are largely involved in multidrug resistance in microorganisms and animals. PMID:24529726

  5. Evidence for a Molecular Diode-based Mechanism in a Multispecific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) Exporter

    PubMed Central

    Mehla, Jitender; Ernst, Robert; Moore, Rachel; Wakschlag, Adina; Marquis, Mary Kate; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Golin, John

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette multidrug efflux pumps transport a wide range of substrates. Current models suggest that a drug binds relatively tightly to a transport site in the transmembrane domains when the protein is in the closed inward facing conformation. Upon binding of ATP, the transporter can switch to an outward facing (drug off or drug releasing) structure of lower affinity. ATP hydrolysis is critically important for remodeling the drug-binding site to facilitate drug release and to reset the transporter for a new transport cycle. We characterized the novel phenotype of an S1368A mutant that lies in the putative drug-binding pocket of the yeast multidrug transporter Pdr5. This substitution created broad, severe drug hypersensitivity, although drug binding, ATP hydrolysis, and intradomain signaling were indistinguishable from the wild-type control. Several different rhodamine 6G efflux and accumulation assays yielded evidence consistent with the possibility that Ser-1368 prevents reentry of the excluded drug. PMID:25112867

  6. Mammalian drug efflux transporters of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) family in multidrug resistance: A review of the past decade.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaolin; Shi, Tianlu; Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Pengli; Deng, Mingying; Huang, Cheng; Hu, Tingting; Jiang, Ling; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a serious phenomenon employed by cancer cells which hampers the success of cancer pharmacotherapy. One of the common mechanisms of MDR is the overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters in cancer cells such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2/ABCC2), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) that limits the prolonged and effective use of chemotherapeutic drugs. Researchers have found that developing inhibitors of ABC efflux transporters as chemosensitizers could overcome MDR. But the clinical trials have shown that most of these chemosensitizers are merely toxic and only show limited or no benefits to cancer patients, thus new inhibitors are being explored. Recent findings also suggest that efflux pumps of the ABC transporter family are subject to epigenetic gene regulation. In this review, we summarize recent findings of the role of ABC efflux transporters in MDR. PMID:26499806

  7. Repositioning of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors as Antagonists of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters in Anticancer Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Kathawala, Rishil J.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR) has attenuated the efficacy of anticancer drugs and the possibility of successful cancer chemotherapy. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play an essential role in mediating MDR in cancer cells by increasing efflux of drugs from cancer cells, hence reducing the intracellular accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs. Interestingly, small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as AST1306, lapatinib, linsitinib, masitinib, motesanib, nilotinib, telatinib and WHI-P154, have been found to have the capability to overcome anticancer drug resistance by inhibiting ABC transporters in recent years. This review will focus on some of the latest and clinical developments with ABC transporters, TKIs and anticancer drug resistance. PMID:25268163

  8. In Vitro Reassembly of the Ribose ATP-binding Cassette Transporter Reveals a Distinct Set of Transport Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Matthew C.; Simon, Michael J.; Erramilli, Satchal K.; Zhang, Huide; Zaitseva, Jelena; Hermodson, Mark A.; Stauffacher, Cynthia V.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial ATP-binding cassette (ABC) importers are primary active transporters that are critical for nutrient uptake. Based on structural and functional studies, ABC importers can be divided into two distinct classes, type I and type II. Type I importers follow a strict alternating access mechanism that is driven by the presence of the substrate. Type II importers accept substrates in a nucleotide-free state, with hydrolysis driving an inward facing conformation. The ribose transporter in Escherichia coli is a tripartite complex consisting of a cytoplasmic ATP-binding cassette protein, RbsA, with fused nucleotide binding domains; a transmembrane domain homodimer, RbsC2; and a periplasmic substrate binding protein, RbsB. To investigate the transport mechanism of the complex RbsABC2, we probed intersubunit interactions by varying the presence of the substrate ribose and the hydrolysis cofactors, ATP/ADP and Mg2+. We were able to purify a full complex, RbsABC2, in the presence of stable, transition state mimics (ATP, Mg2+, and VO4); a RbsAC complex in the presence of ADP and Mg2+; and a heretofore unobserved RbsBC complex in the absence of cofactors. The presence of excess ribose also destabilized complex formation between RbsB and RbsC. These observations suggest that RbsABC2 shares functional traits with both type I and type II importers, as well as possessing unique features, and employs a distinct mechanism relative to other ABC transporters. PMID:25533465

  9. Association of ATP binding cassette transporter G8 rs4148217 SNP and serum lipid levels in Mulao and Han nationalities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The association of ATP binding cassette transporter G8 gene (ABCG8) rs4148217 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and serum lipid profiles is still controversial in diverse racial/ethnic groups. Mulao nationality is an isolated minority in China. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of ABCG8 rs4148217 SNP and several environmental factors with serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Mulao and Han populations. Methods A total of 634 subjects of Mulao nationality and 717 participants of Han nationality were randomly selected from our previous samples. Genotyping of the ABCG8 rs4148217 SNP was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with gel electrophoresis, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. Results The genotypic and allelic frequencies of ABCG8 rs4148217 SNP were different between the two nationalities (P?

  10. Regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters and cholesterol efflux by glucose in primary human monocytes and murine bone marrow-derived macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of developing atherosclerosis. This may be partially attributable to suppression of macrophage ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter mediated cholesterol efflux by sustained elevated blood glucose concentrations. Two models were used...

  11. Switching of the homooligomeric ATP-binding cassette transport complex MDL1 from post-translational mitochondrial import to endoplasmic reticulum insertion.

    PubMed

    Gompf, Simone; Zutz, Ariane; Hofacker, Matthias; Haase, Winfried; van der Does, Chris; Tamp, Robert

    2007-10-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter MDL1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been implicated in mitochondrial quality control, exporting degradation products of misassembled respiratory chain complexes. In the present study, we identified an unusually long leader sequence of 59 amino acids, which targets MDL1 to the inner mitochondrial membrane with its nucleotide-binding domain oriented to the matrix. By contrast, MDL1 lacking this leader sequence is directed into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane with the nucleotide-binding domain facing the cytosol. Remarkably, in both targeting routes, the ATP-binding cassette transporter maintains its intrinsic properties of membrane insertion and assembly, leading to homooligomeric complexes with similar activities in ATP hydrolysis. The physiological consequences of both targeting routes were elucidated in cells lacking the mitochondrial ATP-binding cassette transporter ATM1, which is essential for biogenesis of cytosolic iron-sulfur proteins. The mitochondrial MDL1 complex can complement ATM1 function, whereas the endoplasmic reticulum-targeted version, as well as MDL1 mutants deficient in ATP binding and hydrolysis, cannot overcome the Deltaatm1 growth phenotype. PMID:17892490

  12. Efficient Purification and Reconstitution of ATP Binding Cassette Transporter B6 (ABCB6) for Functional and Structural Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Hemantkumar; Taimur Khan, Mohiuddin Md.; Tegos, George; Krishnamurthy, Partha

    2013-01-01

    The mitochondrial ATP binding cassette transporter ABCB6 has been associated with a broad range of physiological functions, including growth and development, therapy-related drug resistance, and the new blood group system Langereis. ABCB6 has been proposed to regulate heme synthesis by shuttling coproporphyrinogen III from the cytoplasm into the mitochondria. However, direct functional information of the transport complex is not known. To understand the role of ABCB6 in mitochondrial transport, we developed an in vitro system with pure and active protein. ABCB6 overexpressed in HEK293 cells was solubilized from mitochondrial membranes and purified to homogeneity. Purified ABCB6 showed a high binding affinity for MgATP (Kd = 0.18 ?m) and an ATPase activity with a Km of 0.99 mm. Reconstitution of ABCB6 into liposomes allowed biochemical characterization of the ATPase including (i) substrate-stimulated ATPase activity, (ii) transport kinetics of its proposed endogenous substrate coproporphyrinogen III, and (iii) transport kinetics of substrates identified using a high throughput screening assay. Mutagenesis of the conserved lysine to alanine (K629A) in the Walker A motif abolished ATP hydrolysis and substrate transport. These results suggest a direct interaction between mitochondrial ABCB6 and its transport substrates that is critical for the activity of the transporter. Furthermore, the simple immunoaffinity purification of ABCB6 to near homogeneity and efficient reconstitution of ABCB6 into liposomes might provide the basis for future studies on the structure/function of ABCB6. PMID:23792964

  13. ATP-binding Cassette Subfamily C Member 5 (ABCC5) Functions as an Efflux Transporter of Glutamate Conjugates and Analogs.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Robert S; Mahakena, Sunny; de Haas, Marcel; Borst, Piet; van de Wetering, Koen

    2015-12-18

    The ubiquitous efflux transporter ABCC5 (ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 5) is present at high levels in the blood-brain barrier, neurons, and glia, but its in vivo substrates and function are not known. Using untargeted metabolomic screens, we show that Abcc5(-/-) mice accumulate endogenous glutamate conjugates in several tissues, but brain in particular. The abundant neurotransmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate was 2.4-fold higher in Abcc5(-/-) brain. The metabolites that accumulated in Abcc5(-/-) tissues were depleted in cultured cells that overexpressed human ABCC5. In a vesicular membrane transport assay, ABCC5 also transported exogenous glutamate analogs, like the classic excitotoxic neurotoxins kainic acid, domoic acid, and NMDA; the therapeutic glutamate analog ZJ43; and, as previously shown, the anti-cancer drug methotrexate. Glutamate conjugates and analogs are of physiological relevance because they can affect the function of glutamate, the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. After CO2 asphyxiation, several immediate early genes were expressed at lower levels in Abcc5(-/-) brains than in wild type brains, suggesting altered glutamate signaling. Our results show that ABCC5 is a general glutamate conjugate and analog transporter that affects the disposition of endogenous metabolites, toxins, and drugs. PMID:26515061

  14. Inventory and general analysis of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene superfamily in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Pang, Kaiyuan; Li, Yanjiao; Liu, Menghan; Meng, Zhaodong; Yu, Yanli

    2013-09-10

    The metabolic functions of ATP-binding cassette (or ABC) proteins, one of the largest families of proteins presented in all organisms, have been investigated in many protozoan, animal and plant species. To facilitate more systematic and complicated studies on maize ABC proteins in the future, we present the first complete inventory of these proteins, including 130 open reading frames (ORFs), and provide general descriptions of their classifications, basic structures, typical functions, evolution track analysis and expression profiles. The 130 ORFs were assigned to eight subfamilies based on their structures and homological features. Five of these subfamilies consist of 109 proteins, containing transmembrane domains (TM) performing as transporters. The rest three subfamilies contain 21 soluble proteins involved in various functions other than molecular transport. A comparison of ABC proteins among nine selected species revealed either convergence or divergence in each of the ABC subfamilies. Generally, plant genomes contain far more ABC genes than animal genomes. The expression profiles and evolution track of each maize ABC gene were further investigated, the results of which could provide clues for analyzing their functions. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction experiments (PCR) were conducted to detect induced expression in select ABC genes under several common stresses. This investigation provides valuable information for future research on stress tolerance in plants and potential strategies for enhancing maize production under stressful conditions. PMID:23747399

  15. Whole-genome survey of the putative ATP-binding cassette transporter family genes in Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Çakır, Birsen; Kılıçkaya, Ozan

    2013-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein superfamily constitutes one of the largest protein families known in plants. In this report, we performed a complete inventory of ABC protein genes in Vitis vinifera, the whole genome of which has been sequenced. By comparison with ABC protein members of Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified 135 putative ABC proteins with 1 or 2 NBDs in V. vinifera. Of these, 120 encode intrinsic membrane proteins, and 15 encode proteins missing TMDs. V. vinifera ABC proteins can be divided into 13 subfamilies with 79 "full-size," 41 "half-size," and 15 "soluble" putative ABC proteins. The main feature of the Vitis ABC superfamily is the presence of 2 large subfamilies, ABCG (pleiotropic drug resistance and white-brown complex homolog) and ABCC (multidrug resistance-associated protein). We identified orthologs of V. vinifera putative ABC transporters in different species. This work represents the first complete inventory of ABC transporters in V. vinifera. The identification of Vitis ABC transporters and their comparative analysis with the Arabidopsis counterparts revealed a strong conservation between the 2 species. This inventory could help elucidate the biological and physiological functions of these transporters in V. vinifera. PMID:24244377

  16. Characterization of Arabidopsis ABCG11/WBC11, an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter that is required for cuticular lipid secretion.

    PubMed

    Bird, David; Beisson, Fred; Brigham, Alexandra; Shin, John; Greer, Stephen; Jetter, Reinhard; Kunst, Ljerka; Wu, Xuemin; Yephremov, Alexander; Samuels, Lacey

    2007-11-01

    ABCG11/WBC11, an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana, is a key component of the export pathway for cuticular lipids. Arabidopsis wbc11 T-DNA insertional knock-out mutants exhibited lipidic inclusions inside epidermal cells similar to the previously characterized wax transporter mutant cer5, with a similar strong reduction in the alkanes of surface waxes. Moreover, the wbc11 knock-out mutants also showed defects not present in cer5, including post-genital organ fusions, stunted growth and a reduction in cutin load on the plant surface. A mutant line previously isolated in a forward genetics screen, called permeable leaves 1 (pel1), was identified as an allele of ABCG11/WBC11. The double knock-out wbc11 cer5 exhibited the same morphological and biochemical phenotypes as the wbc11 knock-out. A YFP-WBC11 fusion protein rescued a T-DNA knock-out mutant and was localized to the plasma membrane. These results show that WBC11 functions in secretion of surface waxes, possibly by interacting with CER5. However, unlike ABCG12/CER5, ABCG11/WBC11 is important to the normal process of cutin formation. PMID:17727615

  17. A Conserved Mitochondrial ATP-binding Cassette Transporter Exports Glutathione Polysulfide for Cytosolic Metal Cofactor Assembly*♦

    PubMed Central

    Schaedler, Theresia A.; Thornton, Jeremy D.; Kruse, Inga; Schwarzländer, Markus; Meyer, Andreas J.; van Veen, Hendrik W.; Balk, Janneke

    2014-01-01

    An ATP-binding cassette transporter located in the inner mitochondrial membrane is involved in iron-sulfur cluster and molybdenum cofactor assembly in the cytosol, but the transported substrate is unknown. ATM3 (ABCB25) from Arabidopsis thaliana and its functional orthologue Atm1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were expressed in Lactococcus lactis and studied in inside-out membrane vesicles and in purified form. Both proteins selectively transported glutathione disulfide (GSSG) but not reduced glutathione in agreement with a 3-fold stimulation of ATPase activity by GSSG. By contrast, Fe2+ alone or in combination with glutathione did not stimulate ATPase activity. Arabidopsis atm3 mutants were hypersensitive to an inhibitor of glutathione biosynthesis and accumulated GSSG in the mitochondria. The growth phenotype of atm3-1 was strongly enhanced by depletion of the mitochondrion-localized, GSH-dependent persulfide oxygenase ETHE1, suggesting that the physiological substrate of ATM3 contains persulfide in addition to glutathione. Consistent with this idea, a transportomics approach using mass spectrometry showed that glutathione trisulfide (GS-S-SG) was transported by Atm1. We propose that mitochondria export glutathione polysulfide, containing glutathione and persulfide, for iron-sulfur cluster assembly in the cytosol. PMID:25006243

  18. Molecular cloning and expression profile of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene from the hemipteran insect Nilaparvata lugens.

    PubMed

    Zha, W J; Li, S H; Zhou, L; Chen, Z J; Liu, K; Yang, G C; Hu, G; He, G C; You, A Q

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters belong to a large superfamily of proteins that have important physiological functions in all living organisms. In insects, ABC transporters have important functions in the transport of molecules, and are also involved in insecticide resistance, metabolism, and development. In this study, the Nilaparvata lugens Stal (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) ABCG (NlABCG) gene was identified and characterized. The complete mRNA sequence of NlABCG was 2608-bp long, with an open reading frame of 2064 bp encoding a protein comprised of 687 amino acids. The conserved regions include three N-glycosylation and 34 phosphorylation sites, as well as seven transmembrane domains. The amino acid identity with the closely related species Acyrthosiphon pisum was 42.8%. Developmental expression analysis using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR suggested that the NlABCG transcript was expressed at all developmental stages of N. lugens. The lowest expression of NlABCG was in the 1st instar, and levels increased with larval growth. The transcript profiles of NlABCG were analyzed in various tissues from a 5th instar nymph, and the highest expression was observed in the midgut. These results suggest that the sequence, characteristics, and expression of NlABCG are highly conserved, and basic information is provided for its functional analysis. PMID:25867414

  19. Significance of ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins in multidrug resistance of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    GUAN, GUO-FANG; ZHANG, DE-JUN; ZHENG, YING; WEN, LIAN-JI; YU, DUO-JIAO; LU, YAN-QING; ZHAO, YAN

    2015-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, a small subpopulation of cancer cells, known as cancer stem cells (CSCs), exist that are self-renewing and are involved in tumor invasion, metastasis and recurrence. A number of studies have reported that certain cancer cells are able to efflux the Hoechst 33342 dye. These cells are termed side population (SP) cells and share characteristic features of CSCs. The results of the present study revealed that 2.7% of primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells were SP cells. This was reduced to 0.7% following treatment with verapamil. The immunofluorescence and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that SP cells have an enhanced expression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein ABC subfamily G, member 2 (ABCG2), which has been identified to be actively involved in drug exclusion. Similarly, the mRNA level of the oncogene B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region-1 and the stem cell surface proteins nestin and octamer-binding transcription factor-4 were highly expressed in the SP cells compared with the non-SP cells. In addition, it was demonstrated that HNSCC SP cells exhibited increased proliferation and were highly resistant to multiple drugs. These findings suggest that the presence of CSCs, such as SP cells, may be responsible for chemotherapy failure and tumor relapse in patients with HNSCC. Therefore, the identification of a novel therapeutic drug that could effectively target CSCs may help to eradicate refractory tumors. PMID:26622545

  20. Influence of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters in Root Exudation of Phytoalexins, Signals, and in Disease Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Badri, Dayakar V.; Chaparro, Jacqueline M.; Manter, Daniel K.; Martinoia, Enrico; Vivanco, Jorge M.

    2012-01-01

    The roots of plants secrete compounds as a way to exchange information with organisms living in the soil. Here, we report the involvement of seven root-expressed ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters corresponding to both full and half-size molecules (Atabcg36, Atabcg37, Atabcc5, Atabcf1, Atabcf3, Atnap5, and Atath10) in root exudation processes using Arabidopsis thaliana. Root exuded phytochemicals were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and it was determined that some of the root exudates from the corresponding ABC transporter mutants were significantly different compared to the wild type. For example, Atabcg37 and Atabcc5 secreted higher levels of the phytoalexin camalexin, and Atabcg36 secreted higher levels of organic acids, specifically salicylic acid (SA). Furthermore, we analyzed the root tissue metabolites of these seven ABC transporter mutants and found that the levels of SA, quercetin, and kaempferol glucosides were higher in Atabcg36, which was correlated with higher expression levels of defense genes in the root tissues compared with the wild type. We did not observe significant changes in the root exudates of the half-size transporters except for Atabcf1 that showed lower levels of few organic acids. In summary, full-size transporters are involved in root secretion of phytochemicals. PMID:22783269

  1. Stickleback embryos use ATP-binding cassette transporters as a buffer against exposure to maternally derived cortisol.

    PubMed

    Paitz, Ryan T; Bukhari, Syed Abbas; Bell, Alison M

    2016-03-16

    Offspring from females that experience stressful conditions during reproduction often exhibit altered phenotypes and many of these effects are thought to arise owing to increased exposure to maternal glucocorticoids. While embryos of placental vertebrates are known to regulate exposure to maternal glucocorticoids via placental steroid metabolism, much less is known about how and whether egg-laying vertebrates can control their steroid environment during embryonic development. We tested the hypothesis that threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) embryos can regulate exposure to maternal steroids via active efflux of maternal steroids from the egg. Embryos rapidly (within 72 h) cleared intact steroids, but blocking ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters inhibited cortisol clearance. Remarkably, this efflux of cortisol was sufficient to prevent a transcriptional response of embryos to exogenous cortisol. Taken together, these findings suggest that, much like their placental counterparts, developing fish embryos can actively regulate their exposure to maternal cortisol. These findings highlight the fact that even in egg-laying vertebrates, the realized exposure to maternal steroids is mediated by both maternal and embryonic processes and this has important implications for understanding how maternal stress influences offspring development. PMID:26984623

  2. ABCC1, an ATP Binding Cassette Protein from Grape Berry, Transports Anthocyanidin 3-O-Glucosides[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Rita Maria; Regalado, Ana; Ageorges, Agns; Burla, Bo J.; Bassin, Barbara; Eisenach, Cornelia; Zarrouk, Olfa; Vialet, Sandrine; Marlin, Thrse; Chaves, Maria Manuela; Martinoia, Enrico; Nagy, Rka

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of anthocyanins in the exocarp of red grapevine (Vitis vinifera) cultivars is one of several events that characterize the onset of grape berry ripening (vraison). Despite our thorough understanding of anthocyanin biosynthesis and regulation, little is known about the molecular aspects of their transport. The participation of ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins in vacuolar anthocyanin transport has long been a matter of debate. Here, we present biochemical evidence that an ABC protein, ABCC1, localizes to the tonoplast and is involved in the transport of glucosylated anthocyanidins. ABCC1 is expressed in the exocarp throughout berry development and ripening, with a significant increase at vraison (i.e., the onset of ripening). Transport experiments using microsomes isolated from ABCC1-expressing yeast cells showed that ABCC1 transports malvidin 3-O-glucoside. The transport strictly depends on the presence of GSH, which is cotransported with the anthocyanins and is sensitive to inhibitors of ABC proteins. By exposing anthocyanin-producing grapevine root cultures to buthionine sulphoximine, which reduced GSH levels, a decrease in anthocyanin concentration is observed. In conclusion, we provide evidence that ABCC1 acts as an anthocyanin transporter that depends on GSH without the formation of an anthocyanin-GSH conjugate. PMID:23723325

  3. Conformational Changes of the Antibacterial Peptide ATP Binding Cassette Transporter McjD Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ruo-Xu; Corradi, Valentina; Singh, Gurpreet; Choudhury, Hassanul G; Beis, Konstantinos; Tieleman, D Peter

    2015-09-29

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters form one of the largest protein superfamilies. They use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to transport chemically diverse ligands across membranes. An alternating access mechanism in which the transporter switches between inward- and outward-facing conformations has been proposed to describe the translocation process. One of the main open questions in this process is the degree of opening of the transporter at different stages of the transport cycle, as crystal structures and biochemical data have suggested a wide range of distances between nucleotide binding domains. Recently, the crystal structure of McjD, an antibacterial peptide ABC transporter from Escherichia coli, revealed a new occluded intermediate state of the transport cycle. The transmembrane domain is closed on both sides of the membrane, forming a cavity that can accommodate its ligand, MccJ25, a lasso peptide of 21 amino acids. In this work, we investigate the degree of opening of the transmembrane cavity required for ligand translocation. By means of steered molecular dynamics simulations, the ligand was pulled from the internal cavity to the extracellular side. This resulted in an outward-facing state. Comparison with existing outward-facing crystal structures shows a smaller degree of opening in the simulations, suggesting that the large conformational changes in some crystal structures may not be necessary even for a large substrate like MccJ25. PMID:26334959

  4. In Vitro Folding and Assembly of the Escherichia coli ATP-binding Cassette Transporter, BtuCD*

    PubMed Central

    Di Bartolo, Natalie D.; Hvorup, Rikki N.; Locher, Kaspar P.; Booth, Paula J.

    2011-01-01

    Studies on membrane protein folding have focused on monomeric ?-helical proteins and a major challenge is to extend this work to larger oligomeric membrane proteins. Here, we study the Escherichia coli (E. coli) ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that imports vitamin B12 (the BtuCD protein) and use it as a model system for investigating the folding and assembly of a tetrameric membrane protein complex. Our work takes advantage of the modular organization of BtuCD, which consists of two transmembrane protein subunits, BtuC, and two cytoplasmically located nucleotide-binding protein subunits, BtuD. We show that the BtuCD transporter can be re-assembled from both prefolded and partly unfolded, urea denatured BtuC and BtuD subunits. The in vitro re-assembly leads to a BtuCD complex with the correct, native, BtuC and BtuD subunit stoichiometry. The highest rates of ATP hydrolysis were achieved for BtuCD re-assembled from partly unfolded subunits. This supports the idea of cooperative folding and assembly of the constituent protein subunits of the BtuCD transporter. BtuCD folding also provides an opportunity to investigate how a protein that contains both membrane-bound and aqueous subunits coordinates the folding requirements of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic subunits. PMID:21345797

  5. Transmembrane Gate Movements in the Type II ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Importer BtuCD-F during Nucleotide Cycle*

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Benesh; Jeschke, Gunnar; Goetz, Birke A.; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bordignon, Enrica

    2011-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are ubiquitous integral membrane proteins that translocate substrates across cell membranes. The alternating access of their transmembrane domains to opposite sides of the membrane powered by the closure and reopening of the nucleotide binding domains is proposed to drive the translocation events. Despite clear structural similarities, evidence for considerable mechanistic diversity starts to accumulate within the importers subfamily. We present here a detailed study of the gating mechanism of a type II ABC importer, the BtuCD-F vitamin B12 importer from Escherichia coli, elucidated by EPR spectroscopy. Distance changes at key positions in the translocation gates in the nucleotide-free, ATP- and ADP-bound conformations of the transporter were measured in detergent micelles and liposomes. The translocation gates of the BtuCD-F complex undergo conformational changes in line with a two-state alternating access model. We provide the first direct evidence that binding of ATP drives the gates to an inward-facing conformation, in contrast to type I importers specific for maltose, molybdate, or methionine. Following ATP hydrolysis, the translocation gates restore to an apo-like conformation. In the presence of ATP, an excess of vitamin B12 promotes the reopening of the gates toward the periplasm and the dislodgment of BtuF from the transporter. The EPR data allow a productive translocation cycle of the vitamin B12 transporter to be modeled. PMID:21953468

  6. AztD, a Periplasmic Zinc Metallochaperone to an ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter System in Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Handali, Melody; Roychowdhury, Hridindu; Neupane, Durga P; Yukl, Erik T

    2015-12-11

    Bacterial ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters of transition metals are essential for acquisition of necessary elements from the environment. A large number of Gram-negative bacteria, including human pathogens, have a fourth conserved gene of unknown function adjacent to the canonical permease, ATPase, and solute-binding protein (SBP) genes of the AztABC zinc transporter system. To assess the function of this putative accessory factor (AztD) from Paracoccus denitrificans, we have analyzed its transcriptional regulation, metal binding properties, and interaction with the SBP (AztC). Transcription of the aztD gene is significantly up-regulated under conditions of zinc starvation. Recombinantly expressed AztD purifies with slightly substoichiometric zinc from the periplasm of Escherichia coli and is capable of binding up to three zinc ions with high affinity. Size exclusion chromatography and a simple intrinsic fluorescence assay were used to determine that AztD as isolated is able to transfer bound zinc nearly quantitatively to apo-AztC. Transfer occurs through a direct, associative mechanism that prevents loss of metal to the solvent. These results indicate that AztD is a zinc chaperone to AztC and likely functions to maintain zinc homeostasis through interaction with the AztABC system. This work extends our understanding of periplasmic zinc trafficking and the function of chaperones in this process. PMID:26468286

  7. The ATP-binding cassette transporter-2 (ABCA2) regulates esterification of plasma membrane cholesterol by modulation of sphingolipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Davis, Warren

    2014-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporters are a large family (~48 genes divided into seven families A-G) of proteins that utilize the energy of ATP-hydrolysis to pump substrates across lipid bilayers against a concentration gradient. The ABC "A" subfamily is comprised of 13 members and transport sterols, phospholipids and bile acids. ABCA2 is the most abundant ABC transporter in human and rodent brain with highest expression in oligodendrocytes, although it is also expressed in neurons. Several groups have studied a possible connection between ABCA2 and Alzheimer's disease as well as early atherosclerosis. ABCA2 expression levels have been associated with changes in cholesterol and sphingolipid metabolism. In this paper, we hypothesized that ABCA2 expression level may regulate esterification of plasma membrane-derived cholesterol by modulation of sphingolipid metabolism. ABCA2 overexpression in N2a neuroblastoma cells was associated with an altered bilayer distribution of the sphingolipid ceramide that inhibited acylCoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity and cholesterol esterification. In contrast, depletion of endogenous ABCA2 in the rat schwannoma cell line D6P2T increased esterification of plasma membrane cholesterol following treatment with exogenous bacterial sphingomyelinase. These findings suggest that control of ABCA2 expression level may be a key locus of regulation for esterification of plasma membrane-derived cholesterol through modulation of sphingolipid metabolism. PMID:24201375

  8. Rice Stomatal Closure Requires Guard Cell Plasma Membrane ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter RCN1/OsABCG5.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shuichi; Takano, Sho; Sato, Moeko; Furukawa, Kaoru; Nagasawa, Hidetaka; Yoshikawa, Shoko; Kasuga, Jun; Tokuji, Yoshihiko; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Nakazono, Mikio; Takamure, Itsuro; Kato, Kiyoaki

    2016-03-01

    Water stress is one of the major environmental stresses that affect agricultural production worldwide. Water loss from plants occurs primarily through stomatal pores. Here, we report that an Oryza sativa half-size ATP-binding cassette (ABC) subfamily G protein, RCN1/OsABCG5, is involved in stomatal closure mediated by phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation in guard cells. We found that the GFP-RCN1/OsABCG5-fusion protein was localized at the plasma membrane in guard cells. The percentage of guard cell pairs containing both ABA and GFP-RCN1/OsABCG5 increased after exogenous ABA treatment, whereas they were co-localized in guard cell pairs regardless of whether exogenous ABA was applied. ABA application resulted in a smaller increase in the percentage of guard cell pairs containing ABA in rcn1 mutant (A684P) and RCN1-RNAi than in wild-type plants. Furthermore, polyethylene glycol (drought stress)-inducible ABA accumulation in guard cells did not occur in rcn1 mutants. Stomata closure mediated by exogenous ABA application was strongly reduced in rcn1 mutants. Finally, rcn1 mutant plants had more rapid water loss from detached leaves than the wild-type plants. These results indicate that in response to drought stress, RCN1/OsABCG5 is involved in accumulation of ABA in guard cells, which is indispensable for stomatal closure. PMID:26708605

  9. A selective ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 efflux inhibitor revealed via high-throughput flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Strouse, J Jacob; Ivnitski-Steele, Irena; Khawaja, Hadya M; Perez, Dominique; Ricci, Jerec; Yao, Tuanli; Weiner, Warren S; Schroeder, Chad E; Simpson, Denise S; Maki, Brooks E; Li, Kelin; Golden, Jennifer E; Foutz, Terry D; Waller, Anna; Evangelisti, Annette M; Young, Susan M; Chavez, Stephanie E; Garcia, Matthew J; Ursu, Oleg; Bologa, Cristian G; Carter, Mark B; Salas, Virginia M; Gouveia, Kristine; Tegos, George P; Oprea, Tudor I; Edwards, Bruce S; Aub, Jeffrey; Larson, Richard S; Sklar, Larry A

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapeutics tumor resistance is a principal reason for treatment failure, and clinical and experimental data indicate that multidrug transporters such as ATP-binding cassette (ABC) B1 and ABCG2 play a leading role by preventing cytotoxic intracellular drug concentrations. Functional efflux inhibition of existing chemotherapeutics by these pumps continues to present a promising approach for treatment. A contributing factor to the failure of existing inhibitors in clinical applications is limited understanding of specific substrate/inhibitor/pump interactions. We have identified selective efflux inhibitors by profiling multiple ABC transporters against a library of small molecules to find molecular probes to further explore such interactions. In our primary screening protocol using JC-1 as a dual-pump fluorescent reporter substrate, we identified a piperazine-substituted pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine substructure with promise for selective efflux inhibition. As a result of a focused structure-activity relationship (SAR)-driven chemistry effort, we describe compound 1 (CID44640177), an efflux inhibitor with selectivity toward ABCG2 over ABCB1. Compound 1 is also shown to potentiate the activity of mitoxantrone in vitro as well as preliminarily in vivo in an ABCG2-overexpressing tumor model. At least two analogues significantly reduce tumor size in combination with the chemotherapeutic topotecan. To our knowledge, low nanomolar chemoreversal activity coupled with direct evidence of efflux inhibition for ABCG2 is unprecedented. PMID:22923785

  10. Functional coupling of ATP-binding cassette transporter Abcb6 to cytochrome P450 expression and activity in liver.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Hemantkumar; Li, Feng; Tessman, Robert; Mickey, Kristen; Dorko, Kenneth; Schmitt, Timothy; Kumer, Sean; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Gaikwad, Nilesh; Krishnamurthy, Partha

    2015-03-20

    Although endogenous mechanisms that negatively regulate cytochrome P450 (P450) monooxygenases in response to physiological and pathophysiological signals are not well understood, they are thought to result from alterations in the level of endogenous metabolites, involved in maintaining homeostasis. Here we show that homeostatic changes in hepatic metabolite profile in Abcb6 (mitochondrial ATP-binding cassette transporter B6) deficiency results in suppression of a specific subset of hepatic P450 activity. Abcb6 null mice are more susceptible to pentobarbital-induced sleep and zoxazolamine-induced paralysis, secondary to decreased expression and activity of Cyp3a11 and Cyp2b10. The knock-out mice also show decrease in both basal and xeno-inducible expression and activity of a subset of hepatic P450s that appear to be related to changes in hepatic metabolite profile. These data, together with the observation that liver extracts from Abcb6-deficient mice suppress P450 expression in human primary hepatocytes, suggest that this mouse model may provide an opportunity to understand the physiological signals and the mechanisms involved in negative regulation of P450s. PMID:25623066

  11. ATP-binding cassette transporters protect sea urchin gametes and embryonic cells against the harmful effects of ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Leite, Jocelmo Cássio de Araujo; de Vasconcelos, Raianna Boni; da Silva, Suélenn Guedes; de Siqueira-Junior, José Pinto; Marques-Santos, Luis Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Embryos of marine organisms whose development occurs externally are particularly sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light (bands A and B, respectively, UVA and UVB). ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are the first line of cellular defense against chemical or physical stress. The present work investigated the involvement of ABC transporters on UVA or UVB effects on eggs, spermatozoa, and embryonic cells of the sea urchin Echinometra lucunter. Gametes or embryos were exposed to UVA (3.6-14.4 kJ m(-2)) or UVB (0.112-14.4 kJ m(-2)), and embryonic development was monitored by optical microscopy at different developmental stages in the presence or absence of the ABC-transporter blockers reversin205 (ABCB1 blocker) or MK571 (ABCC1 blocker). E. lucunter eggs, spermatozoa and embryos were resistant to UVA exposure. Resistance to the harmful effects of UVB was strongly associated to ABC transporter activity (embryos > eggs > spermatozoa). ABCB1 or ABCC1 blockage promoted the injurious effects of UVA on spermatozoa. ABCC1 transporter blockage increased UVB-dependent damage in eggs while ABCB1 transporter inhibition increased harmful effects of UVB in embryonic cells. ABC-transporter activity was not, however, affected by UVB exposure. In conclusion, the present study is the first report on the protective role of ABC transporters against harmful effects of UVA and UVB on sea urchin eggs and embryonic cells. PMID:24254332

  12. Getting in or out: early segregation between importers and exporters in the evolution of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters.

    PubMed

    Saurin, W; Hofnung, M; Dassa, E

    1999-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) systems, also called traffic ATPases, are found in eukaryotes and prokaryotes and almost all participate in the transport of a wide variety of molecules. ABC systems are characterized by a highly conserved ATPase module called here the ABC module, involved in coupling transport to ATP hydrolysis. We have used the sequence of one of the first representatives of bacterial ABC transporters, the MalK protein, to collect 250 closely related sequences from a nonredundant protein sequence database. The sequences collected by this objective method are all known or putative ABC transporters. After having eliminated short protein sequences and duplicates, the 197 remaining sequences were subjected to a phylogenetic analysis based on a mutational similarity matrix. An unrooted tree for these modules was found to display two major branches, one grouping all collected uptake systems and the other all collected export systems. This remarkable disposition strongly suggests that the divergence between these two functionally different types of ABC systems occurred once in the history of these systems and probably before the differentiation of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We discuss the implications of this finding and we propose a model accounting for the generation and the diversification of ABC systems. PMID:9873074

  13. HDAC inhibitor-induced drug resistance involving ATP-binding cassette transporters (Review)

    PubMed Central

    NI, XUAN; LI, LI; PAN, GUOYU

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are becoming a novel and promising class of antineoplastic agents that have been used for cancer therapy in the clinic. Two HDAC inhibitors, vorinostat and romidepsin, have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat T-cell lymphoma. Nevertheless, similar to common anticancer drugs, HDAC inhibitors have been found to induce multidrug resistance (MDR), which is an obstacle for the success of chemotherapy. The most common cause of MDR is considered to be the increased expression of adenosine triphosphate binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Numerous studies have identified that the upregulation of ABC transporters is often observed following treatment with HDAC inhibitors, particularly the increased expression of P-glycoprotein, which leads to drug efflux, reduces intracellular drug concentration and induces MDR. The present review summarizes the key ABC transporters involved in MDR following various HDAC inhibitor treatments in a range of cancer cell lines and also explored the potential mechanisms that result in MDR, including the effect of nuclear receptors, which are the upstream regulatory factors of ABC transporters. PMID:25624882

  14. Fructose Uptake in Sinorhizobium meliloti Is Mediated by a High-Affinity ATP-Binding Cassette Transport System

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Annie; sters, Magne; Mandon, Karine; Poggi, Marie-Christine; Le Rudulier, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    By transposon mutagenesis, we have isolated a mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti which is totally unable to grow on fructose as sole carbon source as a consequence of its inability to transport this sugar. The cloning and sequencing analysis of the chromosomal DNA region flanking the TnphoA insertion revealed the presence of six open reading frames (ORFs) organized in two loci, frcRS and frcBCAK, transcribed divergently. The frcBCA genes encode the characteristic components of an ATP-binding cassette transporter (FrcB, a periplasmic substrate binding protein, FrcC, an integral membrane permease, and FrcA, an ATP-binding cytoplasmic protein), which is the unique high-affinity (Km of 6 ?M) fructose uptake system in S. meliloti. The FrcK protein shows homology with some kinases, while FrcR is probably a transcriptional regulator of the repressor-ORF-kinase family. The expression of S. meliloti frcBCAK in Escherichia coli, which transports fructose only via the phosphotransferase system, resulted in the detection of a periplasmic fructose binding activity, demonstrating that FrcB is the binding protein of the Frc transporter. The analysis of substrate specificities revealed that the Frc system is also a high-affinity transporter for ribose and mannose, which are both fructose competitors for the binding to the periplasmic FrcB protein. However, the Frc mutant was still able to grow on these sugars as sole carbon source, demonstrating the presence of at least one other uptake system for mannose and ribose in S. meliloti. The expression of the frcBC genes as determined by measurements of alkaline phosphatase activity was shown to be induced by mannitol and fructose, but not by mannose, ribose, glucose, or succinate, suggesting that the Frc system is primarily targeted towards fructose. Neither Nod nor Fix phenotypes were impared in the TnphoA mutant, demonstrating that fructose uptake is not essential for nodulation and nitrogen fixation, although FrcB protein is expressed in bacteroids isolated from alfalfa nodulated by S. meliloti wild-type strains. PMID:11466273

  15. A Survey of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Gene Superfamily in the Salmon Louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis).

    PubMed

    Carmona-Antoñanzas, Greta; Carmichael, Stephen N; Heumann, Jan; Taggart, John B; Gharbi, Karim; Bron, James E; Bekaert, Michaël; Sturm, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Salmon lice, Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Krøyer, 1837), are fish ectoparasites causing significant economic damage in the mariculture of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar Linnaeus, 1758. The control of L. salmonis at fish farms relies to a large extent on treatment with anti-parasitic drugs. A problem related to chemical control is the potential for development of resistance, which in L. salmonis is documented for a number of drug classes including organophosphates, pyrethroids and avermectins. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene superfamily is found in all biota and includes a range of drug efflux transporters that can confer drug resistance to cancers and pathogens. Furthermore, some ABC transporters are recognised to be involved in conferral of insecticide resistance. While a number of studies have investigated ABC transporters in L. salmonis, no systematic analysis of the ABC gene family exists for this species. This study presents a genome-wide survey of ABC genes in L. salmonis for which, ABC superfamily members were identified through homology searching of the L. salmonis genome. In addition, ABC proteins were identified in a reference transcriptome of the parasite generated by high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of a multi-stage RNA library. Searches of both genome and transcriptome allowed the identification of a total of 33 genes / transcripts coding for ABC proteins, of which 3 were represented only in the genome and 4 only in the transcriptome. Eighteen sequences were assigned to ABC subfamilies known to contain drug transporters, i.e. subfamilies B (4 sequences), C (11) and G (2). The results suggest that the ABC gene family of L. salmonis possesses fewer members than recorded for other arthropods. The present survey of the L. salmonis ABC gene superfamily will provide the basis for further research into potential roles of ABC transporters in the toxicity of salmon delousing agents and as potential mechanisms of drug resistance. PMID:26418738

  16. Phosphorylation by protein kinase CK2 modulates the activity of the ATP binding cassette A1 transporter.

    PubMed

    Roosbeek, Stein; Peelman, Frank; Verhee, Annick; Labeur, Christine; Caster, Hans; Lensink, Marc F; Cirulli, Claudia; Grooten, Johan; Cochet, Claude; Vandekerckhove, Jol; Amoresano, Angela; Chimini, Giovanna; Tavernier, Jan; Rosseneu, Maryvonne

    2004-09-01

    In a previous characterization of the ABCA subfamily of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, we identified potential protein kinase 2 (CK2) phosphorylation sites, which are conserved in eukaryotic and prokaryotic members of the ABCA transporters. These phosphorylation residues are located in the conserved cytoplamic R1 and R2 domains, downstream of the nucleotide binding domains NBD1 and NBD2. To study the possible regulation of the ABCA1 transporter by CK2, we expressed the recombinant cytoplasmic domains of ABCA1, NBD1+R1 and NBD2+R2. We demonstrated that in vitro ABCA1 NBD1+R1, and not NBD2+R2, is phosphorylated by CK2, and we identified Thr-1242, Thr-1243, and Ser-1255 as the phosphorylated residues in the R1 domain by mass spectrometry. We further investigated the functional significance of the threonine and serine phosphorylation sites in NBD1 by site-directed mutagenesis of the entire ABCA1 followed by transfection into Hek-293 Tet-Off cells. The ABCA1 flippase activity, apolipoprotein AI and AII binding, and cellular phospholipid and cholesterol efflux were enhanced by mutations preventing CK2 phosphorylation of the threonine and serine residues. This was confirmed by the effect of specific protein kinase CK2 inhibitors upon the activity of wild type and mutant ABCA1 in transfected Hek-293 Tet-Off cells. The activities of the mutants mimicking threonine phosphorylation were close to that of wild type ABCA1. Our data, therefore, suggest that besides protein kinase A and C, protein kinase CK2 might play an important role in vivo in regulating the function and transport activity of ABCA1 and possibly of other members of the ABCA subfamily. PMID:15218032

  17. Localized induction of the ATP-binding cassette B19 auxin transporter enhances adventitious root formation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sukumar, Poornima; Maloney, Gregory S; Muday, Gloria K

    2013-07-01

    Adventitious roots emerge from aerial plant tissues, and the induction of these roots is essential for clonal propagation of agriculturally important plant species. This process has received extensive study in horticultural species but much less focus in genetically tractable model species. We have explored the role of auxin transport in this process in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings in which adventitious root initiation was induced by excising roots from low-light-grown hypocotyls. Inhibition of auxin transport from the shoot apex abolishes adventitious root formation under these conditions. Root excision was accompanied by a rapid increase in radioactive indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) transport and its accumulation in the hypocotyl above the point of excision where adventitious roots emerge. Local increases in auxin-responsive gene expression were also observed above the site of excision using three auxin-responsive reporters. These changes in auxin accumulation preceded cell division events, monitored by a cyclin B1 reporter (pCYCB1;1:GUS), and adventitious root initiation. We examined excision-induced adventitious root formation in auxin influx and efflux mutants, including auxin insensitive1, pin-formed1 (pin1), pin2, pin3, and pin7, with the most profound reductions observed in ATP-binding cassette B19 (ABCB19). An ABCB19 overexpression line forms more adventitious roots than the wild type in intact seedlings. Examination of transcriptional and translational fusions between ABCB19 and green fluorescent protein indicates that excision locally induced the accumulation of ABCB19 transcript and protein that is temporally and spatially linked to local IAA accumulation leading to adventitious root formation. These experiments are consistent with localized synthesis of ABCB19 protein after hypocotyl excision leads to enhanced IAA transport and local IAA accumulation driving adventitious root formation. PMID:23677937

  18. A Survey of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Gene Superfamily in the Salmon Louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis)

    PubMed Central

    Heumann, Jan; Taggart, John B.; Gharbi, Karim; Bron, James E.; Bekaert, Michaël; Sturm, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Salmon lice, Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Krøyer, 1837), are fish ectoparasites causing significant economic damage in the mariculture of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar Linnaeus, 1758. The control of L. salmonis at fish farms relies to a large extent on treatment with anti-parasitic drugs. A problem related to chemical control is the potential for development of resistance, which in L. salmonis is documented for a number of drug classes including organophosphates, pyrethroids and avermectins. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene superfamily is found in all biota and includes a range of drug efflux transporters that can confer drug resistance to cancers and pathogens. Furthermore, some ABC transporters are recognised to be involved in conferral of insecticide resistance. While a number of studies have investigated ABC transporters in L. salmonis, no systematic analysis of the ABC gene family exists for this species. This study presents a genome-wide survey of ABC genes in L. salmonis for which, ABC superfamily members were identified through homology searching of the L. salmonis genome. In addition, ABC proteins were identified in a reference transcriptome of the parasite generated by high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of a multi-stage RNA library. Searches of both genome and transcriptome allowed the identification of a total of 33 genes / transcripts coding for ABC proteins, of which 3 were represented only in the genome and 4 only in the transcriptome. Eighteen sequences were assigned to ABC subfamilies known to contain drug transporters, i.e. subfamilies B (4 sequences), C (11) and G (2). The results suggest that the ABC gene family of L. salmonis possesses fewer members than recorded for other arthropods. The present survey of the L. salmonis ABC gene superfamily will provide the basis for further research into potential roles of ABC transporters in the toxicity of salmon delousing agents and as potential mechanisms of drug resistance. PMID:26418738

  19. Insight into Pleiotropic Drug Resistance ATP-binding Cassette Pump Drug Transport through Mutagenesis of Cdr1p Transmembrane Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Khan, Mohammad Firoz; Kapoor, Khyati; Goyal, Neha; Sen, Sobhan; Saxena, Ajay Kumar; Lynn, Andrew M.; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; Monk, Brian C.; Cannon, Richard D.; Komath, Sneha Sudha; Prasad, Rajendra

    2013-01-01

    The fungal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter Cdr1 protein (Cdr1p), responsible for clinically significant drug resistance, is composed of two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). We have probed the nature of the drug binding pocket by performing systematic mutagenesis of the primary sequences of the 12 transmembrane segments (TMSs) found in the TMDs. All mutated proteins were expressed equally well and localized properly at the plasma membrane in the heterologous host Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but some variants differed significantly in efflux activity, substrate specificity, and coupled ATPase activity. Replacement of the majority of the amino acid residues with alanine or glycine yielded neutral mutations, but about 42% of the variants lost resistance to drug efflux substrates completely or selectively. A predicted three-dimensional homology model shows that all the TMSs, apart from TMS4 and TMS10, interact directly with the drug-binding cavity in both the open and closed Cdr1p conformations. However, TMS4 and TMS10 mutations can also induce total or selective drug susceptibility. Functional data and homology modeling assisted identification of critical amino acids within a drug-binding cavity that, upon mutation, abolished resistance to all drugs tested singly or in combinations. The open and closed Cdr1p models enabled the identification of amino acid residues that bordered a drug-binding cavity dominated by hydrophobic residues. The disposition of TMD residues with differential effects on drug binding and transport are consistent with a large polyspecific drug binding pocket in this yeast multidrug transporter. PMID:23824183

  20. ATP-binding cassette proteins BCRP, MRP1 and P-gp expression and localization in the human umbilical cord.

    PubMed

    Riches, Zoe; Walia, Gurinder; Berman, Jacob M; Wright, Tricia E; Collier, Abby C

    2016-06-01

    1. The umbilical cord is a direct conduit to the fetus hence transporters could have roles in partitioning substances between the maternal-placental-fetal units. Here we determined the expression and localization of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters BCRP (ABCG2), P-gp (ABCB1) and MRP1 (ABCC1) in human umbilical cords. 2. The mRNA for BCRP and MRP1 was detected in 25/25 samples, but P-gp was detected in only 5/25. ABC transporter mRNA expression relative to 18S was 25.6 ± 0.3, 26.5 ± 0.6 and 22.2 ± 0.2 cycles for BCRP, MRP1 and P-gp respectively. 3. Using a subset of 10 umbilical cords, BCRP protein was present in all samples (immunoblot) with positive correlation between mRNA and proteins (p = 0.07, r = 0.62) and between immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC) (p = 0.03, r = 0.67). P-gp protein was observed in 4/10 samples by both immunoblot and IHC, with no correlation between mRNA and protein (p = 0.45, r = 0.55) or immunoblotting and IHC (p = 0.2, r = 0.72), likely due to small sample size. MRP1 protein was not observed. 4. Localization of BCRP and P-gp proteins was to Wharton's jelly with no specific staining in arterial or venous endothelia. 5. Understanding ABC transporter expression in the umbilical cord may be useful for determining fetal exposures to xenobiotics if functional properties can be defined. PMID:26407213

  1. Up-regulation of the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 inhibits hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bocchetta, Simone; Maillard, Patrick; Yamamoto, Mami; Gondeau, Claire; Douam, Florian; Lebreton, Stphanie; Lagaye, Sylvie; Pol, Stanislas; Helle, Franois; Plengpanich, Wanee; Gurin, Maryse; Bourgine, Maryline; Michel, Marie Louise; Lavillette, Dimitri; Roingeard, Philippe; le Goff, Wilfried; Budkowska, Agata

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) establishes infection using host lipid metabolism pathways that are thus considered potential targets for indirect anti-HCV strategies. HCV enters the cell via clathrin-dependent endocytosis, interacting with several receptors, and virus-cell fusion, which depends on acidic pH and the integrity of cholesterol-rich domains of the hepatocyte membrane. The ATP-binding Cassette Transporter A1 (ABCA1) mediates cholesterol efflux from hepatocytes to extracellular Apolipoprotein A1 and moves cholesterol within cell membranes. Furthermore, it generates high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. HDL protects against arteriosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. We show that the up-regulation of ABCA1 gene expression and its cholesterol efflux function in Huh7.5 hepatoma cells, using the liver X receptor (LXR) agonist GW3965, impairs HCV infection and decreases levels of virus produced. ABCA1-stimulation inhibited HCV cell entry, acting on virus-host cell fusion, but had no impact on virus attachment, replication, or assembly/secretion. It did not affect infectivity or properties of virus particles produced. Silencing of the ABCA1 gene and reduction of the specific cholesterol efflux function counteracted the inhibitory effect of the GW3965 on HCV infection, providing evidence for a key role of ABCA1 in this process. Impaired virus-cell entry correlated with the reorganisation of cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains (lipid rafts). The inhibitory effect could be reversed by an exogenous cholesterol supply, indicating that restriction of HCV infection was induced by changes of cholesterol content/distribution in membrane regions essential for virus-cell fusion. Stimulation of ABCA1 expression by GW3965 inhibited HCV infection of both human primary hepatocytes and isolated human liver slices. This study reveals that pharmacological stimulation of the ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux pathway disrupts membrane cholesterol homeostasis, leading to the inhibition of virus-cell fusion and thus HCV cell entry. Therefore besides other beneficial roles, ABCA1 might represent a potential target for HCV therapy. PMID:24646941

  2. Up-Regulation of the ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gondeau, Claire; Douam, Florian; Lebreton, Stéphanie; Lagaye, Sylvie; Pol, Stanislas; Helle, François; Plengpanich, Wanee; Guérin, Maryse; Bourgine, Maryline; Michel, Marie Louise; Lavillette, Dimitri; Roingeard, Philippe; le Goff, Wilfried; Budkowska, Agata

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) establishes infection using host lipid metabolism pathways that are thus considered potential targets for indirect anti-HCV strategies. HCV enters the cell via clathrin-dependent endocytosis, interacting with several receptors, and virus-cell fusion, which depends on acidic pH and the integrity of cholesterol-rich domains of the hepatocyte membrane. The ATP-binding Cassette Transporter A1 (ABCA1) mediates cholesterol efflux from hepatocytes to extracellular Apolipoprotein A1 and moves cholesterol within cell membranes. Furthermore, it generates high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. HDL protects against arteriosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. We show that the up-regulation of ABCA1 gene expression and its cholesterol efflux function in Huh7.5 hepatoma cells, using the liver X receptor (LXR) agonist GW3965, impairs HCV infection and decreases levels of virus produced. ABCA1-stimulation inhibited HCV cell entry, acting on virus-host cell fusion, but had no impact on virus attachment, replication, or assembly/secretion. It did not affect infectivity or properties of virus particles produced. Silencing of the ABCA1 gene and reduction of the specific cholesterol efflux function counteracted the inhibitory effect of the GW3965 on HCV infection, providing evidence for a key role of ABCA1 in this process. Impaired virus-cell entry correlated with the reorganisation of cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains (lipid rafts). The inhibitory effect could be reversed by an exogenous cholesterol supply, indicating that restriction of HCV infection was induced by changes of cholesterol content/distribution in membrane regions essential for virus-cell fusion. Stimulation of ABCA1 expression by GW3965 inhibited HCV infection of both human primary hepatocytes and isolated human liver slices. This study reveals that pharmacological stimulation of the ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux pathway disrupts membrane cholesterol homeostasis, leading to the inhibition of virus–cell fusion and thus HCV cell entry. Therefore besides other beneficial roles, ABCA1 might represent a potential target for HCV therapy. PMID:24646941

  3. Functional analysis of an ATP-binding cassette transporter protein from Aspergillus fumigatus by heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sanjoy; Moye-Rowley, W Scott

    2013-08-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the major filamentous fungal pathogen in humans. Although A. fumigatus can be treated with many of the available antifungal drugs, including azole compounds, drug resistant isolates are being recovered at an increasing rate. In other fungal pathogens such as the Candida species, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins play important roles in development of clinically-significant azole resistance phenotypes. Central among these ABC transporter proteins are homologues of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pdr5 multidrug transporter. In this work, we test the two A. fumigatus genes encoding proteins sharing the highest degree of sequence similarity to S. cerevisiae Pdr5 for their ability to be function in a heterologous pdr5? strain of S. cerevisiae. Expression of full-length cDNAs for these two Afu proteins failed to suppress the drug sensitive phenotype of a pdr5? strain and no evidence could be obtained for their expression as green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions. To improve the expression of one of these Afu ABC transporters (XP_755847), we changed the sequence of the cDNA to use codons corresponding to the major tRNA species in S. cerevisiae. This codon-optimized (CO Afu abcA) cDNA was efficiently expressed in pdr5? cells and able to be detected as a GFP fusion protein. The CO Afu abcA did not correct the drug sensitivity of the pdr5? strain and exhibited a high degree of perinuclear fluorescence suggesting that this fusion protein was localized to the S. cerevisiae ER. Interestingly, when these experiments were repeated at 37 C, the CO Afu abcA was able to complement the drug sensitive phenotype of pdr5? cells and exhibited less intracellular fluorescence. Additionally, we found that the CO Afu abcA was able to reduce resistance to drugs like phytosphingosine that act via causing mislocalization of amino acid permeases in fungi. These data suggest that the Afu abcA protein can carry out two different functions of Pdr5: drug transport and regulation of protein internalization from the plasma membrane. PMID:23796749

  4. Evaluation of the role of ATP-binding cassette transporters as a defence mechanism against temephos in populations of Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Estelita Pereira; Goulart, Marília Oliveira Fonseca; Rolim, Modesto Leite

    2014-01-01

    The role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in the efflux of the insecticide, temephos, was assessed in the larvae of Aedes aegypti. Bioassays were conducted using mosquito populations that were either susceptible or resistant to temephos by exposure to insecticide alone or in combination with sublethal doses of the ABC transporter inhibitor, verapamil (30, 35 and 40 μM). The best result in the series was obtained with the addition of verapamil (40 μM), which led to a 2x increase in the toxicity of temephos, suggesting that ABC transporters may be partially involved in conferring resistance to the populations evaluated.

  5. Hydrolysis at One of the Two Nucleotide-binding Sites Drives the Dissociation of ATP-binding Cassette Nucleotide-binding Domain Dimers*

    PubMed Central

    Zoghbi, Maria E.; Altenberg, Guillermo A.

    2013-01-01

    The functional unit of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters consists of two transmembrane domains and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). ATP binding elicits association of the two NBDs, forming a dimer in a head-to-tail arrangement, with two nucleotides sandwiched at the dimer interface. Each of the two nucleotide-binding sites is formed by residues from the two NBDs. We recently found that the prototypical NBD MJ0796 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii dimerizes in response to ATP binding and dissociates completely following ATP hydrolysis. However, it is still unknown whether dissociation of NBD dimers follows ATP hydrolysis at one or both nucleotide-binding sites. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer to study heterodimers formed by one active (donor-labeled) and one catalytically defective (acceptor-labeled) NBD. Rapid mixing experiments in a stop-flow chamber showed that NBD heterodimers with one functional and one inactive site dissociated at a rate indistinguishable from that of dimers with two hydrolysis-competent sites. Comparison of the rates of NBD dimer dissociation and ATP hydrolysis indicated that dissociation followed hydrolysis of one ATP. We conclude that ATP hydrolysis at one nucleotide-binding site drives NBD dimer dissociation. PMID:24129575

  6. Structural characterization of an MJ1267 ATP-binding cassette crystal with a complex pattern of twinning caused by promiscuous fiber packing.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yu-Ren; Martsinkevich, Oskana; Hunt, John F

    2003-02-01

    ATP-binding cassettes represent the motor domains in ABC transporters, a superfamily of integral membrane-protein pumps that couple the hydrolysis of ATP to transmembrane solute translocation. A crystal of a Mg-ADP complex of the MJ1267 ATP-binding cassette was obtained that produced a diffraction pattern characterized by pathological streaking of the spots in the a* x b* plane. While the Laue symmetry of the diffraction pattern was P3;1m, the crystal was determined to be twinned based on intensity statistics, molecular-replacement analysis and difference Fourier analysis of an engineered single-site methylmercury derivative. The unit cell contains three similar 3(1) fibers, with two of them related by primarily translational non-crystallographic symmetry (NCS) and the third related to the first two by approximate twofold screw operations whose rotational components are very similar to the twinning operator. The promiscuous packing of these 3(1) fibers, which make both parallel and antiparallel interactions in the primary crystal lattice, can explain the twinning tendency based on the ability of the twin-related lattices to interact with one another while making only one slightly sub-optimal intermolecular contact per unit cell in the boundary region. The promiscuous fiber packing can also explain the streaking in the diffraction pattern based on the ability to form a variety of different lattices with similar inter-fiber packing interactions. The crystal structure was refined as a twin in space group P3(1) using the program CNS, yielding a free R factor of 28.9% at 2.6 A and a refined twin fraction of 0.50. The structure shows a rigid-body rotation of the ABC-transporter-specific alpha-helical subdomain (ABCalpha subdomain) in MJ1267 compared with the conformation observed for the same protein in a C2 crystal lattice; this observation suggests that the ABCalpha subdomain is flexibly attached to the F1-type ATP-binding core of the ATP-binding cassette when Mg-ADP is bound at the active site. PMID:12554933

  7. Drug Resistance Is Conferred on the Model Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Expression of Full-Length Melanoma-Associated Human ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter ABCB5

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABCB5, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, is highly expressed in melanoma cells, and may contribute to the extreme resistance of melanomas to chemotherapy by efflux of anti-cancer drugs. Our goal was to determine whether we could functionally express human ABCB5 in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in order to demonstrate an efflux function for ABCB5 in the absence of background pump activity from other human transporters. Heterologous expression would also facilitate drug discovery for this important target. DNAs encoding ABCB5 sequences were cloned into the chromosomal PDR5 locus of a S. cerevisiae strain in which seven endogenous ABC transporters have been deleted. Protein expression in the yeast cells was monitored by immunodetection using both a specific anti-ABCB5 antibody and a cross-reactive anti-ABCB1 antibody. ABCB5 function in recombinant yeast cells was measured by determining whether the cells possessed increased resistance to known pump substrates, compared to the host yeast strain, in assays of yeast growth. Three ABCB5 constructs were made in yeast. One was derived from the ABCB5-? mRNA, which is highly expressed in human tissues but is a truncation of a canonical full-size ABC transporter. Two constructs contained full-length ABCB5 sequences: either a native sequence from cDNA or a synthetic sequence codon-harmonized for S. cerevisiae. Expression of all three constructs in yeast was confirmed by immunodetection. Expression of the codon-harmonized full-length ABCB5 DNA conferred increased resistance, relative to the host yeast strain, to the putative substrates rhodamine 123, daunorubicin, tetramethylrhodamine, FK506, or clorgyline. We conclude that full-length ABCB5 can be functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae and confers drug resistance. PMID:25115303

  8. Mutational analysis of the yeast a-factor transporter STE6, a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) protein superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Berkower, C; Michaelis, S

    1991-01-01

    STE6, the yeast a-factor transporter, is a member of the ATP binding cassette protein superfamily, which also includes the mammalian multidrug resistance protein and the cystic fibrosis gene product. These proteins contain two homologous halves, each with six membrane spanning segments and a predicted ATP nucleotide binding domain. To assess the importance of the two halves of STE6, and to examine the functional significance of residues conserved among members of the ATP binding cassette superfamily, we introduced mutations into the nucleotide binding domains of STE6. Our analysis demonstrates that both halves of STE6 are critical for function and that some, but not all, mutations analogous to those known to result in cystic fibrosis impair STE6 activity. To examine further the functional contribution of each half of the STE6 protein, we severed the STE6 coding sequence and expressed the two halves of the transporter as separate polypeptides. Whereas 'half-molecules' are unable to provide transport function individually, co-expression of both half-molecules in the same cell leads to functional reconstitution of STE6-mediated a-factor transport. Images PMID:1935899

  9. NpPDR1, a Pleiotropic Drug Resistance-Type ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia, Plays a Major Role in Plant Pathogen Defense1

    PubMed Central

    Stukkens, Yvan; Bultreys, Alain; Grec, Sbastien; Trombik, Tomasz; Vanham, Delphine; Boutry, Marc

    2005-01-01

    Nicotiana plumbaginifolia NpPDR1, a plasma membrane pleiotropic drug resistance-type ATP-binding cassette transporter formerly named NpABC1, has been suggested to transport the diterpene sclareol, an antifungal compound. However, direct evidence for a role of pleiotropic drug resistance transporters in the plant defense is still lacking. In situ immunolocalization and histochemical analysis using the gusA reporter gene showed that NpPDR1 was constitutively expressed in the whole root, in the leaf glandular trichomes, and in the flower petals. However, NpPDR1 expression was induced in the whole leaf following infection with the fungus Botrytis cinerea, and the bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas marginalis pv marginalis, which do not induce a hypersensitive response in N. plumbaginifolia, whereas a weaker response was observed using P. syringae pv syringae, which does induce a hypersensitive response. Induced NpPDR1 expression was more associated with the jasmonic acid than the salicylic acid signaling pathway. These data suggest that NpPDR1 is involved in both constitutive and jasmonic acid-dependent induced defense. Transgenic plants in which NpPDR1 expression was prevented by RNA interference showed increased sensitivity to sclareol and reduced resistance to B. cinerea. These data show that NpPDR1 is involved in pathogen resistance and thus demonstrate a new role for the ATP-binding cassette transporter family. PMID:16126865

  10. Lapatinib (Tykerb, GW572016) Reverses Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Cells by Inhibiting the Activity of ATP-Binding Cassette Subfamily B Member 1 and G Member 2

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chun-ling; Tiwari, Amit K.; Wu, Chung-Pu; Su, Xiao-dong; Wang, Si-Rong; Liu, Dong-geng; Ashby, Charles R.; Huang, Yan; Robey, Robert W.; Liang, Yong-ju; Chen, Li-ming; Shi, Cheng-Jun; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Fu, Li-wu

    2009-01-01

    Lapatinib is active at the ATP-binding site of tyrosine kinases that are associated with the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, Her-1, or ErbB1) and Her-2. It is conceivable that lapatinib may inhibit the function of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters by binding to their ATP-binding sites. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of lapatinib to reverse tumor multidrug resistance (MDR) due to overexpression of ABCB1 and ABCG2 transporters. Our results showed that lapatinib significantly enhanced the sensitivity to ABCB1 or ABCG2 substrates in cells expressing these transporters although a small synergetic effect was observed in combining lapatinib and conventional chemotherapeutic agents in parental sensitive MCF-7 or S1 cells. Lapatinib alone, however, did not significantly alter the sensitivity of non-ABCB1 or non-ABCG2 substrates in sensitive and resistant cells. Additionally, lapatinib significantly increased the accumulation of doxorubicin or mitoxantrone in ABCB1 or ABCG2 overexpressing cells and inhibited the transport of methotrexate and E217?G by ABCG2. Furthermore, lapatinib stimulated the ATPase activity of both ABCB1 and ABCG2 and inhibited the photolabeling of ABCB1 or ABCG2 with [125I]Iodoarylazidoprazosin in a concentration-dependent manner. However, lapatinib did not affect the expression of these transporters at mRNA or protein levels. Importantly, lapatinib also strongly enhanced the effect of paclitaxel on the inhibition of growth of the ABCB1-overexpressing KBv200 cell xenografts in nude mice. Overall, we conclude that lapatinib reverses ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated MDR by directly inhibiting their transport function. These findings may be useful for cancer combinational therapy with lapatinib in the clinic. PMID:18829547

  11. Endogenous mutagenesis by an insertion sequence element identifies Aeromonas salmonicida AbcA as an ATP-binding cassette transport protein required for biogenesis of smooth lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, S; Noonan, B; Cavaignac, S; Trust, T J

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of an Aeromonas salmonicida A layer-deficient/O polysaccharide-deficient mutant carrying a Tn5 insertion in the structural gene for A protein (vapA) showed that the abcA gene immediately downstream of vapA had been interrupted by the endogenous insertion sequence element ISAS1. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that O polysaccharides did not accumulate at the inner membrane-cytoplasm interface of this mutant. abcA encodes an unusual protein; it carries both an amino-terminal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) domain showing high sequence similarity to ABC proteins implicated in the transport of certain capsular and O polysaccharides and a carboxyl-terminal potential DNA-binding domain, which distinguishes AbcA from other polysaccharide transport proteins in structural and evolutionary terms. The smooth lipopolysaccharide phenotype was restored by complementation with abcA but not by abcA carrying site-directed mutations in the sequence encoding the ATP-binding site of the protein. The genetic organization of the A. salmonicida ABC polysaccharide system differs from other bacteria. abcA also differs in apparently being required for both O-polysaccharide synthesis and in energizing the transport of O polysaccharides to the cell surface. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7777581

  12. High-speed screening and QSAR analysis of human ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCB11 (bile salt export pump) to predict drug-induced intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Hiroyuki; Kurata, Atsuo; Onishi, Yuko; Sakurai, Aki; Saito, Hikaru; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Nagakura, Makoto; Tarui, Shigeki; Kanamori, Yoichi; Kitajima, Masato; Ishikawa, Toshihisa

    2006-01-01

    Human ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCB11 (SPGP/BSEP) mediates the elimination of bile salts from liver cells and thereby plays a critical role in the generation of bile flow. In the present study, we have developed in vitro high-speed screening and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis methods to investigate the interaction of ABCB11 with a variety of drugs. Plasma membrane vesicles prepared from insect cells overexpressing human ABCB11 were used to measure the ATP-dependent transport of [14C]taurocholate. Over 40 different drugs and natural compounds were tested to evaluate their interaction with ABCB11-mediated taurocholate transport. On the basis of the extent of inhibition, we have analyzed the QSAR to identify one set of chemical fragmentation codes closely associated with the inhibition of ABCB11. This approach can be used to predict compounds with a potential risk of drug-induced intrahepatic cholestasis. PMID:16749857

  13. ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter B4 Anchors the Cell Adhesion Molecule DdCAD-1 to Cell Membrane in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunxia; Hou, Liansheng; Yang, Qixiu; Siu, Chi-Hung

    2013-12-01

    In Dictyostelium, soluble cell adhesion molecule, DdCAD-1, regulates cell-cell interaction through an unknown anchoring protein on the plasma membrane. Far western blot analysis using different probes revealed that the potential DdCAD-1 interacting protein was between 64 and 98kDa. To isolate and identify the anchoring protein, GST-DdCAD-1 and anchoring protein were cross-linked in vivo by chemical cross-linker and stable protein complex was isolated by co-immunoprecipitation assays. The protein cross-linked to DdCAD-1 was extracted from the gel slice and trypsinized. The peptides were subjected to analysis by mass spectrometry, which showed that the putative anchoring protein belongs to ATP-binding cassette transporter family. PMID:24426151

  14. Host response transcriptional profiling reveals extracellular components and ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters gene enrichment in typhoid fever-infected Nigerian children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) is a human-specific pathogen that causes typhoid fever, and remains a global health problem especially in developing countries. Its pathogenesis is complex and host response is poorly understood. In Africa, typhoid fever can be a major cause of morbidity in young infected children. The onset of the illness is insidious and clinical diagnosis is often unreliable. Gold standard blood culture diagnostic services are limited, thus rapid, sensitive, and affordable diagnostic test is essential in poor-resourced clinical settings. Routine typhoid fever vaccination is highly recommended but currently licensed vaccines provide only 55-75% protection. Recent epidemiological studies also show the rapid emergence of multi-drug resistant S. Typhi strains. High-throughput molecular technologies, such as microarrays, can dissect the molecular mechanisms of host responses which are S. Typhi-specific to provide a comprehensive genomic component of immunological responses and suggest new insights for diagnosis and treatment. Methods Global transcriptional profiles of S. Typhi-infected young Nigerian children were obtained from their peripheral blood and compared with that of other bacteremic infections using Agilent gene expression microarrays. The host-response profiles of the same patients in acute vs. convalescent phases were also determined. The top 96-100 differentially-expressed genes were identified and four genes were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. Gene clusters were obtained and functional pathways were predicted by DAVID (Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery). Results Transcriptional profiles from S. Typhi-infected children could be distinguished from those of other bacteremic infections. Enriched gene clusters included genes associated with extracellular peptides/components such as lipocalin (LCN2) and systemic immune response which is atypical in bacterial invasion. Distinct gene expression profiles can also be obtained from acute vs. convalescent phase during typhoid fever infection. We found novel down-regulation of ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters genes such as ABCA7, ABCC5, and ABCD4 and ATPase activity as the highest enriched pathway. Conclusions We identified unique extracellular components and ABC transporters gene enrichments in typhoid fever-infected Nigerian children, which have never been reported. These enriched gene clusters may represent novel targeted pathways to improve diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic and next-generation vaccine strategies for typhoid fever in Africa. PMID:21914192

  15. Afatinib reverses multidrug resistance in ovarian cancer via dually inhibiting ATP binding cassette subfamily B member 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng-qi; Liu, Shi-ting; Zhao, Bo-xin; Yang, Fu-heng; Wang, Ya-tian; Liang, Qian-ying; Sun, Ya-bin; Liu, Yuan; Song, Zhi-hua; Cai, Yun; Li, Guo-feng

    2015-01-01

    ABCB1-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major obstacle to successful chemotherapy in ovarian cancer. Herein, afatinib at nontoxic concentrations significantly reversed ABCB1-mediated MDR in ovarian cancer cells in vitro (p < 0.05). Combining paclitaxel and afatinib caused tumor regressions and tumor necrosis in A2780T xenografts in vivo. More interestingly, unlike reversible TKIs, afatinib had a distinctive dual-mode action. Afatinib not only inhibited the efflux function of ABCB1, but also attenuated its expression transcriptionally via down-regulation of PI3K/AKT and MAPK/p38-dependent activation of NF-?B. Furthermore, apart from a substrate binding domain, afatinib could also bind to an ATP binding domain of ABCB1 through forming hydrogen bonds with Gly533, Gly534, Lys536 and Ala560 sites. Importantly, mutations in these four binding sites of ABCB1 and the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR were not correlated with the reversal activity of afatinib on MDR. Given that afatinib is a clinically approved drug, our results suggest combining afatinib with chemotherapeutic drugs in ovarian cancer. This study can facilitate the rediscovery of superior MDR reversal agents from molecular targeted drugs to provide a more effective and safer way of resensitizing MDR. PMID:26317651

  16. Afatinib reverses multidrug resistance in ovarian cancer via dually inhibiting ATP binding cassette subfamily B member 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-qi; Liu, Shi-ting; Zhao, Bo-xin; Yang, Fu-heng; Wang, Ya-tian; Liang, Qian-Ying; Sun, Ya-bin; Liu, Yuan; Song, Zhi-hua; Cai, Yun; Li, Guo-feng

    2015-09-22

    ABCB1-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major obstacle to successful chemotherapy in ovarian cancer. Herein, afatinib at nontoxic concentrations significantly reversed ABCB1-mediated MDR in ovarian cancer cells in vitro (p < 0.05). Combining paclitaxel and afatinib caused tumor regressions and tumor necrosis in A2780T xenografts in vivo. More interestingly, unlike reversible TKIs, afatinib had a distinctive dual-mode action. Afatinib not only inhibited the efflux function of ABCB1, but also attenuated its expression transcriptionally via down-regulation of PI3K/AKT and MAPK/p38-dependent activation of NF-?B. Furthermore, apart from a substrate binding domain, afatinib could also bind to an ATP binding domain of ABCB1 through forming hydrogen bonds with Gly533, Gly534, Lys536 and Ala560 sites. Importantly, mutations in these four binding sites of ABCB1 and the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR were not correlated with the reversal activity of afatinib on MDR. Given that afatinib is a clinically approved drug, our results suggest combining afatinib with chemotherapeutic drugs in ovarian cancer. This study can facilitate the rediscovery of superior MDR reversal agents from molecular targeted drugs to provide a more effective and safer way of resensitizing MDR. PMID:26317651

  17. Analysis of the structural and functional roles of coupling helices in the ATP-binding cassette transporter MsbA through enzyme assays and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Tadaomi; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Kato, Hiroaki; Sakurai, Minoru

    2014-07-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are constructed from some common structural units: the highly conserved nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), which work as a nucleotide-dependent engine for driving substrate transport, the diverse transmembrane domains (TMDs), which create the translocation pathway, and the coupling helices (CHs), which are located at the NBD-TMD interface. Although the CHs are believed to be essential for NBD-TMD communication, their roles remain unclear. In this study, we performed enzyme assays and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the ABC transporter MsbA and two MsbA mutants in which the amino acid residues of one of the CHs were mutated to alanines: (i) wild type (Wt), (ii) CH1 mutant (Mt1), and (iii) CH2 mutant (Mt2). The experiments show that the CH2 mutation decreases the ATPase activity (kcat) compared with that of the Wt (a decrease of 32%), and a nearly equal degree of decrease in the ATP binding affinity (Km) was observed for both Mt1 and Mt2. The MD simulations successfully accounted for several structural and dynamical origins for these experimental observations. In addition, on the basis of collective motion and morphing analyses, we propose that the reverse-rotational motions and noddinglike motions between the NBDs and TMDs are indispensable for the conformational transition between the inward- and outward-facing conformations. In particular, CH2 is significantly important for the occurrence of the noddinglike motion. These findings provide important insights into the structure-function relationship of ABC transporters. PMID:24937232

  18. Knockout of a bacterial-type ATP-binding cassette transporter gene, AtSTAR1, results in increased aluminum sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao-Feng; Yamaji, Naoki; Ma, Jian Feng

    2010-08-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters represent a large family in plants, but the functions of most of these transporters are unknown. Here we report a gene, AtSTAR1, only encoding an ATP-binding domain of a bacterial-type ABC transporter in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). AtSTAR1 is an ortholog of rice (Oryza sativa) OsSTAR1, which has been implicated in aluminum (Al) tolerance. Knockout of AtSTAR1 resulted in increased sensitivity to Al and earlier flowering. Unlike OsSTAR1, AtSTAR1 was expressed in both the roots and shoots and its expression was not induced by Al or other stresses. Investigation of tissue-specific localization of AtSTAR1 through beta-glucuronidase fusion revealed that AtSTAR1 was predominantly expressed at outer cell layers of root tips and developing leaves, whose localization is also different from those of OsSTAR1. However, introduction of OsSTAR1 into atstar1 mutant rescued the sensitivity of atstar1 to Al, indicating that AtSTAR1 has a similar function as OsSTAR1. Furthermore, we found that AtSTAR1 may interact with ALS3, a transmembrane-binding domain in Arabidopsis to form a complex because introduction of OsSTAR1, a functional substitute of AtSTAR1, into als3 mutant resulted in the loss of OsSTAR1 protein. All these findings indicate that AtSTAR1 is involved in the basic detoxification of Al in Arabidopsis. PMID:20498340

  19. Suppression of c-Myc is involved in multi-walled carbon nanotubes' down-regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters in human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhaojing; Xu, Yonghong; Meng, Xiangning; Watari, Fumio; Liu, Hudan; Chen, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a large family of integral membrane proteins that decrease cellular drug uptake and accumulation by active extrusion, is one of the major causes of cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR) that frequently leads to failure of chemotherapy. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based drug delivery devices hold great promise in enhancing the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. However, CNTs' effects on the ABC transporters remain under-investigated. In this study, we found that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reduced transport activity and expression of ABC transporters including ABCB1/Pgp and ABCC4/MRP4 in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Proto-oncogene c-Myc, which directly regulates ABC gene expression, was concurrently decreased in MWCNT-treated cells and forced over-expression of c-Myc reversed MWCNTs' inhibitory effects on ABCB1 and ABCC4 expression. MWCNT-cell membrane interaction and cell membrane oxidative damage were observed. However, antioxidants such as vitamin C, β-mecaptoethanol and dimethylthiourea failed to antagonize MWCNTs' down-regulation of ABC transporters. These data suggest that MWCNTs may act on c-Myc, but not through oxidative stress, to down-regulate ABC transporter expression. Our findings thus shed light on CNTs' novel cellular effects that may be utilized to develop CNTs-based drug delivery devices to overcome ABC transporter-mediated cancer chemoresistance.

  20. Inherited surfactant deficiency due to uniparental disomy of rare mutations in the surfactant protein-B and ATP binding cassette, subfamily A, member 3 genes

    PubMed Central

    Hamvas, Aaron; Nogee, Lawrence M.; Wegner, Daniel J.; DePass, Kelcey; Christodoulou, John; Bennetts, Bruce; McQuade, Leon R.; Gray, Peter H.; Deterding, Robin R.; Carroll, Travis R.; Kammesheidt, Anja; Kasch, Laura M.; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Cole, F. Sessions

    2009-01-01

    Objective To characterize inheritance of homozygous, rare, recessive loss-of-function mutations in the surfactant protein-B (SFTPB) or ATP binding cassette, subfamily A, member 3 (ABCA3) genes in newborns with lethal respiratory failure. Study design We resequenced parents whose infants were homozygous for mutations in SFTPB or ABCA3. For infants with only one heterozygous parent, we performed microsatellite analysis for chromosomes 2 (SFTPB) and 16 (ABCA3). Results We identified one infant homozygous for the c.1549C>GAA mutation (121ins2) in SFTPB for whom only the mother was heterozygous and 3 infants homozygous for mutations in ABCA3 (p.K914R, p.P147L, and c.806_7insGCT) for whom only the fathers were heterozygous. For the SP-B deficient infant, microsatellite markers confirmed maternal heterodisomy with segmental isodisomy. Microsatellite analysis confirmed paternal isodisomy for the three ABCA3 deficient infants. Two ABCA3 deficient infants underwent lung transplantation at 3 and 5 months of age, respectively, and two infants died. None exhibited any non-pulmonary phenotype. Conclusions Uniparental disomy should be suspected in infants with rare homozygous mutations in SFTPB or ABCA3. Confirmation of parental carrier status is important to provide recurrence risk and to monitor expression of other phenotypes that may emerge through reduction to homozygosity of recessive alleles. PMID:19647838

  1. Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone (CRH) Promotes Macrophage Foam Cell Formation via Reduced Expression of ATP Binding Cassette Transporter-1 (ABCA1).

    PubMed

    Cho, Wonkyoung; Kang, Jihee Lee; Park, Young Mi

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the major pathology of cardiovascular disease, is caused by multiple factors involving psychological stress. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which is released by neurosecretory cells in the hypothalamus, peripheral nerve terminals and epithelial cells, regulates various stress-related responses. Our current study aimed to verify the role of CRH in macrophage foam cell formation, the initial critical stage of atherosclerosis. Our quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR), semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR, and Western blot results indicate that CRH down-regulates ATP-binding cassette transporter-1 (ABCA1) and liver X receptor (LXR)-?, a transcription factor for ABCA1, in murine peritoneal macrophages and human monocyte-derived macrophages. Oil-red O (ORO) staining and intracellular cholesterol measurement of macrophages treated with or without oxidized LDL (oxLDL) and with or without CRH (10 nM) in the presence of apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) revealed that CRH treatment promotes macrophage foam cell formation. The boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-conjugated cholesterol efflux assay showed that CRH treatment reduces macrophage cholesterol efflux. Western blot analysis showed that CRH-induced down-regulation of ABCA1 is dependent on phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473) induced by interaction between CRH and CRH receptor 1(CRHR1). We conclude that activation of this pathway by CRH accelerates macrophage foam cell formation and may promote stress-related atherosclerosis. PMID:26110874

  2. The Role of Arabidopsis ABCG9 and ABCG31 ATP Binding Cassette Transporters in Pollen Fitness and the Deposition of Steryl Glycosides on the Pollen Coat[W

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyunju; Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Kim, Yu-Young; Jin, Jun-Young; Lee, Saet Buyl; Yamaoka, Yasuyo; Muranaka, Toshiya; Suh, Mi Chung; Fujioka, Shozo; Lee, Youngsook

    2014-01-01

    The pollen coat protects pollen grains from harmful environmental stresses such as drought and cold. Many compounds in the pollen coat are synthesized in the tapetum. However, the pathway by which they are transferred to the pollen surface remains obscure. We found that two Arabidopsis thaliana ATP binding cassette transporters, ABCG9 and ABCG31, were highly expressed in the tapetum and are involved in pollen coat deposition. Upon exposure to dry air, many abcg9 abcg31 pollen grains shriveled up and collapsed, and this phenotype was restored by complementation with ABCG9pro:GFP:ABCG9. GFP-tagged ABCG9 or ABCG31 localized to the plasma membrane. Electron microscopy revealed that the mutant pollen coat resembled the immature coat of the wild type, which contained many electron-lucent structures. Steryl glycosides were reduced to about half of wild-type levels in the abcg9 abcg31 pollen, but no differences in free sterols or steryl esters were observed. A mutant deficient in steryl glycoside biosynthesis, ugt80A2 ugt80B1, exhibited a similar phenotype. Together, these results indicate that steryl glycosides are critical for pollen fitness, by supporting pollen coat maturation, and that ABCG9 and ABCG31 contribute to the accumulation of this sterol on the surface of pollen. PMID:24474628

  3. Whole-transcriptome survey of the putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family genes in the latex-producing laticifers of Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Zhiyi, Nie; Guijuan, Kang; Yu, Li; Longjun, Dai; Rizhong, Zeng

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins or transporters constitute a large protein family in plants and are involved in many different cellular functions and processes, including solute transportation, channel regulation and molecular switches, etc. Through transcriptome sequencing, a transcriptome-wide survey and expression analysis of the ABC protein genes were carried out using the laticiferous latex from Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree). A total of 46 putative ABC family proteins were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex. These consisted of 12 'full-size', 21 'half-size' and 13 other putative ABC proteins, and all of them showed strong conservation with their Arabidopsis thaliana counterparts. This study indicated that all eight plant ABC protein paralog subfamilies were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex, of which ABCB, ABCG and ABCI were the most abundant. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays demonstrated that gene expression of several latex ABC proteins was regulated by ethylene, jasmonic acid or bark tapping (a wound stress) stimulation, and that HbABCB15, HbABCB19, HbABCD1 and HbABCG21 responded most significantly of all to the abiotic stresses. The identification and expression analysis of the latex ABC family proteins could facilitate further investigation into their physiological involvement in latex metabolism and rubber biosynthesis by H. brasiliensis. PMID:25615936

  4. Pathogen-responsive expression of a putative ATP-binding cassette transporter gene conferring resistance to the diterpenoid sclareol is regulated by multiple defense signaling pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Emma J; Schenk, Peer M; Kazan, Kemal; Penninckx, Iris A M A; Anderson, Jonathan P; Maclean, Don J; Cammue, Bruno P A; Ebert, Paul R; Manners, John M

    2003-11-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are encoded by large gene families in plants. Although these proteins are potentially involved in a number of diverse plant processes, currently, very little is known about their actual functions. In this paper, through a cDNA microarray screening of anonymous cDNA clones from a subtractive library, we identified an Arabidopsis gene (AtPDR12) putatively encoding a member of the pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) subfamily of ABC transporters. AtPDR12 displayed distinct induction profiles after inoculation of plants with compatible and incompatible fungal pathogens and treatments with salicylic acid, ethylene, or methyl jasmonate. Analysis of AtPDR12 expression in a number of Arabidopsis defense signaling mutants further revealed that salicylic acid accumulation, NPR1 function, and sensitivity to jasmonates and ethylene were all required for pathogen-responsive expression of AtPDR12. Germination assays using seeds from an AtPDR12 insertion line in the presence of sclareol resulted in lower germination rates and much stronger inhibition of root elongation in the AtPDR12 insertion line than in wild-type plants. These results suggest that AtPDR12 may be functionally related to the previously identified ABC transporters SpTUR2 and NpABC1, which transport sclareol. Our data also point to a potential role for terpenoids in the Arabidopsis defensive armory. PMID:14526118

  5. Genome-wide analysis of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins in a model legume plant, Lotus japonicus: comparison with Arabidopsis ABC protein family.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Akifumi; Shitan, Nobukazu; Sato, Shusei; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Tabata, Satoshi; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2006-10-31

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins constitute a large family in plants with more than 120 members each in Arabidopsis and rice, and have various functions including the transport of auxin and alkaloid, as well as the regulation of stomata movement. In this report, we carried out genome-wide analysis of ABC protein genes in a model legume plant, Lotus japonicus. For analysis of the Lotus genome sequence, we devised a new method 'domain-based clustering analysis', where domain structures like the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) and transmembrane domain (TMD), instead of full-length amino acid sequences, are used to compare phylogenetically each other. This method enabled us to characterize fragments of ABC proteins, which frequently appear in a draft sequence of the Lotus genome. We identified 91 putative ABC proteins in L. japonicus, i.e. 43 'full-size', 40 'half-size' and 18 'soluble' putative ABC proteins. The characteristic feature of the composition is that Lotus has extraordinarily many paralogs similar to AtMRP14 and AtPDR12, which are at least six and five members, respectively. Expression analysis of the latter genes performed with real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR revealed their putative involvement in the nodulation process. PMID:17164256

  6. The E23 early gene of Drosophila encodes an ecdysone-inducible ATP-binding cassette transporter capable of repressing ecdysone-mediated gene activation.

    PubMed

    Hock, T; Cottrill, T; Keegan, J; Garza, D

    2000-08-15

    At the onset of Drosophila metamorphosis, the steroid hormone 20-OH ecdysone directly induces a small number of early puffs in the polytene chromosomes of the larval salivary gland. Proteins encoded by the early genes corresponding to these transcriptional puffs then regulate the activity of both the early puffs themselves and a much larger set of late puffs. Three of these early genes encode transcription factors that play critical regulatory roles during metamorphosis. Here we report the cloning, DNA sequence, genomic structure, ecdysone inducibility, and temporal expression of an early gene residing in the 23E early puff and denoted E23 (Early gene at 23). In contrast to other early genes, E23 encodes a protein with similarity to ATP-binding cassette transporters. Using heat shock-inducible transgenes, we found that E23 overexpression not only produces phenotypic abnormalities and lethality, but also interferes with ecdysone-mediated gene activation, demonstrating that E23 is capable of modulating the ecdysone response. Our results suggest the existence of a previously unrecognized regulatory mechanism for modulating steroid hormone signaling in Drosophila. PMID:10931948

  7. Human ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter ABCB1 Confers Resistance to Volasertib (BI 6727), a Selective Inhibitor of Polo-like Kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chung-Pu; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Hsiao, Sung-Han; Luo, Shi-Yu; Su, Ching-Ya; Li, Yan-Qing; Huang, Yang-Hui; Huang, Chiun-Wei; Hsu, Sheng-Chieh

    2015-11-01

    The overexpression of the serine/threonine specific polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is associated with poor prognosis in many types of cancer. Consequently, Plk1 has emerged as a valid therapeutic target for anticancer drug design. Volasertib is a potent inhibitor of Plk1 that inhibits the proliferation of multiple human cancer cell lines by promoting cell cycle arrest at nanomolar concentrations. However, the risk of developing drug resistance, which is often associated with the overexpression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein), can present a therapeutic challenge for volasertib and many other therapeutic drugs. Although volasertib is highly effective against the proliferation of numerous cancer cell lines, we found that the overexpression of ABCB1 in cancer cells leads to cellular resistance to volasertib and reduces the level of volasertib-stimulated G2/M cell cycle arrest and subsequent onset of apoptosis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that volasertib competitively inhibits the function of ABCB1 and stimulates the basal ATPase activity of ABCB1 in a concentration-dependent manner, which is consistent with substrate transport by ABCB1. More importantly, we discovered that the coadministration of an inhibitor or drug substrate of ABCB1 restored the anticancer activity of volasertib in ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells. In conclusion, the results of our study reveal that ABCB1 negatively affects the efficacy of volasertib and supports its combination with a modulator of ABCB1 to improve clinical responses. PMID:26412161

  8. Involvement of CjMDR1, a plant multidrug-resistance-type ATP-binding cassette protein, in alkaloid transport in Coptis japonica

    PubMed Central

    Shitan, Nobukazu; Bazin, Ingrid; Dan, Kazuyuki; Obata, Kazuaki; Kigawa, Koji; Ueda, Kazumitsu; Sato, Fumihiko; Forestier, Cyrille; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2003-01-01

    Alkaloids comprise one of the largest groups of plant secondary metabolites. Berberine, a benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, is preferentially accumulated in the rhizome of Coptis japonica, a ranunculaceous plant, whereas gene expression for berberine biosynthetic enzymes has been observed specifically in root tissues, which suggests that berberine synthesized in the root is transported to the rhizome, where there is high accumulation. We recently isolated a cDNA encoding a multidrug-resistance protein (MDR)-type ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter (Cjmdr1) from berberine-producing cultured C. japonica cells, which is highly expressed in the rhizome. Functional analysis of Cjmdr1 by using a Xenopus oocyte expression system showed that CjMDR1 transported berberine in an inward direction, resulting in a higher accumulation of berberine in Cjmdr1-injected oocytes than in the control. Typical inhibitors of ABC proteins, such as vanadate, nifedipine, and glibenclamide, as well as ATP depletion, clearly inhibited this CjMDR1-dependent berberine uptake, suggesting that CjMDR1 functioned as an ABC transporter. Conventional membrane separation methods showed that CjMDR1 was localized in the plasma membrane of C. japonica cells. In situ hybridization indicated that Cjmdr1 mRNA was expressed preferentially in xylem tissues of the rhizome. These findings strongly suggest that CjMDR1 is involved in the translocation of berberine from the root to the rhizome. PMID:12524452

  9. Role of NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic motif in the subcellular localization of ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily D: Common features in eukaryotic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Asaka; Asahina, Kota; Okamoto, Takumi; Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Kostsin, Dzmitry G.; Kashiwayama, Yoshinori; Takanashi, Kojiro; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Imanaka, Tsuneo; Morita, Masashi

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • ABCD proteins classifies based on with or without NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment. • The ABCD proteins with the segment are targeted peroxisomes. • The ABCD proteins without the segment are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum. • The role of the segment in organelle targeting is conserved in eukaryotic organisms. - Abstract: In mammals, four ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins belonging to subfamily D have been identified. ABCD1–3 possesses the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic region and are targeted to peroxisomes, while ABCD4 lacking the region is targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Based on hydropathy plot analysis, we found that several eukaryotes have ABCD protein homologs lacking the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment (H0 motif). To investigate whether the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in subcellular localization is conserved across species, we expressed ABCD proteins from several species (metazoan, plant and fungi) in fusion with GFP in CHO cells and examined their subcellular localization. ABCD proteins possessing the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif were localized to peroxisomes, while ABCD proteins lacking this region lost this capacity. In addition, the deletion of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif of ABCD protein resulted in their localization to the ER. These results suggest that the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in organelle targeting is widely conserved in living organisms.

  10. Structural and Functional Characterization of an Orphan ATP-Binding Cassette ATPase Involved in Manganese Utilization and Tolerance in Leptospira spp.

    PubMed Central

    Saul, Frederick; Bellalou, Jacques; Miras, Isabelle; Weber, Patrick; Bondet, Vincent; Murray, Gerald L.; Adler, Ben; Ristow, Paula; Louvel, Hélène; Haouz, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira species are the etiological agents of the widespread zoonotic disease leptospirosis. Most organisms, including Leptospira, require divalent cations for proper growth, but because of their high reactivity, these metals are toxic at high concentrations. Therefore, bacteria have acquired strategies to maintain metal homeostasis, such as metal import and efflux. By screening Leptospira biflexa transposon mutants for their ability to use Mn2+, we have identified a gene encoding a putative orphan ATP-binding cassette (ABC) ATPase of unknown function. Inactivation of this gene in both L. biflexa and L. interrogans strains led to mutants unable to grow in medium in which iron was replaced by Mn2+, suggesting an involvement of this ABC ATPase in divalent cation uptake. A mutation in this ATPase-coding gene increased susceptibility to Mn2+ toxicity. Recombinant ABC ATPase of the pathogen L. interrogans exhibited Mg2+-dependent ATPase activity involving a P-loop motif. The structure of this ATPase was solved from a crystal containing two monomers in the asymmetric unit. Each monomer adopted a canonical two-subdomain organization of the ABC ATPase fold with an α/β subdomain containing the Walker motifs and an α subdomain containing the ABC signature motif (LSSGE). The two monomers were arranged in a head-to-tail orientation, forming a V-shaped particle with all the conserved ABC motifs at the dimer interface, similar to functional ABC ATPases. These results provide the first structural and functional characterization of a leptospiral ABC ATPase. PMID:24123817

  11. Whole-Transcriptome Survey of the Putative ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Family Genes in the Latex-Producing Laticifers of Hevea brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhiyi, Nie; Guijuan, Kang; Yu, Li; Longjun, Dai; Rizhong, Zeng

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins or transporters constitute a large protein family in plants and are involved in many different cellular functions and processes, including solute transportation, channel regulation and molecular switches, etc. Through transcriptome sequencing, a transcriptome-wide survey and expression analysis of the ABC protein genes were carried out using the laticiferous latex from Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree). A total of 46 putative ABC family proteins were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex. These consisted of 12 ‘full-size’, 21 ‘half-size’ and 13 other putative ABC proteins, and all of them showed strong conservation with their Arabidopsis thaliana counterparts. This study indicated that all eight plant ABC protein paralog subfamilies were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex, of which ABCB, ABCG and ABCI were the most abundant. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays demonstrated that gene expression of several latex ABC proteins was regulated by ethylene, jasmonic acid or bark tapping (a wound stress) stimulation, and that HbABCB15, HbABCB19, HbABCD1 and HbABCG21 responded most significantly of all to the abiotic stresses. The identification and expression analysis of the latex ABC family proteins could facilitate further investigation into their physiological involvement in latex metabolism and rubber biosynthesis by H. brasiliensis. PMID:25615936

  12. Copy number variation in the ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCC6 gene and ABCC6 pseudogenes in patients with pseudoxanthoma elasticum

    PubMed Central

    Kringen, Marianne K; Stormo, Camilla; Berg, Jens Petter; Terry, Sharon F; Vocke, Christine M; Rizvi, Samar; Hendig, Doris; Piehler, Armin P

    2015-01-01

    Single mutations in the ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCC6) gene (OMIM 603234) are known to cause the rare autosomal recessive disease pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE). Recently, we have found that copy number variations (CNVs) in pseudogenes of the ABCC6 gene are quite common. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and possible contribution of CNV in ABCC6 and its pseudogenes in PXE. Genomic DNA from 212 PXE individuals were examined for copy number by pyrosequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and compared with healthy individuals. The frequency of PXE individuals with any CNV was higher than in healthy individuals. The majority of variation comprised known and possibly new deletions in the ABCC6 gene and duplications of the ABCC6P1 and ABCC6P2 genes. ABCC6 deletions and ABCC6P2 duplications were not observed in 142 healthy individuals. In conclusion, by pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR, we were able to detect known and possibly new deletions in the ABCC6 gene that may have caused the PXE phenotype. Pyrosequencing may be used in PXE patients who have obtained incomplete genotype from conventional techniques. The frequency of ABCC6P2 pseudogene duplication was more common in PXE patients than healthy individuals and may affect the PXE phenotype. PMID:26029710

  13. Ethanolic extract of propolis promotes reverse cholesterol transport and the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 and G1 in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Si, Yanhong; Song, Guohua; Luo, Tian; Wang, Jiafu; Qin, Shucun

    2011-09-01

    The ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP) is beneficial in increasing high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C) and diminishing risks of atherosclerosis. In this study, we examined the effects of EEP on reverse cholesterol transport in mice. (3)H -cholesterol laden macrophage was injected intraperitoneally into mice fed by gastric gavage with EEP. Plasma lipid level was determined and (3)H-cholesterol was traced in plasma, liver and feces. The effects of EEP on ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 and G1 (ABCA1 and ABCG1) and scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) in mice liver and in cultured cells were also investigated. EEP administration led to a significant increase in HDL-C and peritoneal macrophage-original (3)H-cholesterol in plasma, liver and feces. Liver protein expressions of ABCA1 and ABCG1 were increased but SR-B1 was not. In vitro experiments with HepG2 and Raw264.7 cell lines confirmed the above results. The finding of these studies shows that EEP-enhanced reverse cholesterol transport may have resulted from EEP stimulated plasma HDL level and hepatic ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. PMID:21638064

  14. The homodimeric ATP-binding cassette transporter LmrA mediates multidrug transport by an alternating two-site (two-cylinder engine) mechanism

    PubMed Central

    van Veen, Hendrik W.; Margolles, Abelardo; Mller, Michael; Higgins, Christopher F.; Konings, Wil N.

    2000-01-01

    The bacterial LmrA protein and the mammalian multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein are closely related ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that confer multidrug resistance on cells by mediating the extrusion of drugs at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. The mechanisms by which transport is mediated, and by which ATP hydrolysis is coupled to drug transport, are not known. Based on equilibrium binding experiments, photoaffinity labeling and drug transport assays, we conclude that homodimeric LmrA mediates drug transport by an alternating two-site transport (two-cylinder engine) mechanism. The transporter possesses two drug-binding sites: a transport-competent site on the inner membrane surface and a drug-release site on the outer membrane surface. The interconversion of these two sites, driven by the hydrolysis of ATP, occurs via a catalytic transition state intermediate in which the drug transport site is occluded. The mechanism proposed for LmrA may also be relevant for P-glycoprotein and other ABC transporters. PMID:10835349

  15. Rescuing Trafficking Mutants of the ATP-binding Cassette Protein, ABCA4, with Small Molecule Correctors as a Treatment for Stargardt Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Sabirzhanova, Inna; Lopes Pacheco, Miquias; Rapino, Daniele; Grover, Rahul; Handa, James T; Guggino, William B; Cebotaru, Liudmila

    2015-08-01

    Stargardt disease is the most common form of early onset macular degeneration. Mutations in ABCA4, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family, are associated with Stargardt disease. Here, we have examined two disease-causing mutations in the NBD1 region of ABCA4, R1108C, and R1129C, which occur within regions of high similarity with CFTR, another ABC transporter gene, which is associated with cystic fibrosis. We show that R1108C and R1129C are both temperature-sensitive processing mutants that engage the cellular quality control mechanism and show a strong interaction with the chaperone Hsp 27. Both mutant proteins also interact with HDCAC6 and are degraded in the aggresome. We also demonstrate that novel corrector compounds that are being tested as treatment for cystic fibrosis, such as VX-809, can rescue the processing of the ABCA4 mutants, particularly their expression at the cell surface, and can reduce their binding to HDAC6. Thus, our data suggest that VX-809 can potentially be developed as a new therapy for Stargardt disease, for which there is currently no treatment. PMID:26092729

  16. A Selective ATP-binding Cassette Sub-family G Member 2 Efflux Inhibitor Revealed Via High-Throughput Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Strouse, J. Jacob; Ivnitski-Steele, Irena; Khawaja, Hadya M.; Perez, Dominique; Ricci, Jerec; Yao, Tuanli; Weiner, Warren S.; Schroeder, Chad E.; Simpson, Denise S.; Maki, Brooks E.; Li, Kelin; Golden, Jennifer E.; Foutz, Terry D.; Waller, Anna; Evangelisti, Annette M.; Young, Susan M.; Chavez, Stephanie E.; Garcia, Matthew J.; Ursu, Oleg; Bologa, Cristian G.; Carter, Mark B.; Salas, Virginia M.; Gouveia, Kristine; Tegos, George P.; Oprea, Tudor I.; Edwards, Bruce S.; Aub, Jeffrey; Larson, Richard S.; Sklar, Larry A.

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapeutics tumor resistance is a principal reason for treatment failure and clinical and experimental data indicate that multidrug transporters such as ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) B1 and ABCG2 play a leading role by preventing cytotoxic intracellular drug concentrations. Functional efflux inhibition of existing chemotherapeutics by these pumps continues to present a promising approach for treatment. A contributing factor to the failure of existing inhibitors in clinical applications is limited understanding of specific substrate/inhibitor/pump interactions. We have identified selective efflux inhibitors by profiling multiple ABC transporters against a library of small molecules to find molecular probes to further explore such interactions. In our primary screening protocol using JC-1 as a dual-pump fluorescent reporter substrate we identified a piperazine substituted pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine substructure with promise for selective efflux inhibition. As a result of a focused SAR-driven chemistry effort we describe compound 1 (CID44640177), an efflux inhibitor with selectivity toward ABCG2 over ABCB1. Compound 1 is also shown to potentiate the activity of mitoxantrone in vitro as well as preliminarily in vivo in an ABCG2 over-expressing tumor model. At least two analogs significantly reduce tumor size in combination with the chemotherapeutic topotecan. To our knowledge, low nanomolar chemoreversal activity coupled with direct evidence of efflux inhibition for ABCG2 is unprecedented. PMID:22923785

  17. Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone (CRH) Promotes Macrophage Foam Cell Formation via Reduced Expression of ATP Binding Cassette Transporter-1 (ABCA1)

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Wonkyoung; Kang, Jihee Lee; Park, Young Mi

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the major pathology of cardiovascular disease, is caused by multiple factors involving psychological stress. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which is released by neurosecretory cells in the hypothalamus, peripheral nerve terminals and epithelial cells, regulates various stress-related responses. Our current study aimed to verify the role of CRH in macrophage foam cell formation, the initial critical stage of atherosclerosis. Our quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR), semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR, and Western blot results indicate that CRH down-regulates ATP-binding cassette transporter-1 (ABCA1) and liver X receptor (LXR)-?, a transcription factor for ABCA1, in murine peritoneal macrophages and human monocyte-derived macrophages. Oil-red O (ORO) staining and intracellular cholesterol measurement of macrophages treated with or without oxidized LDL (oxLDL) and with or without CRH (10 nM) in the presence of apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) revealed that CRH treatment promotes macrophage foam cell formation. The boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-conjugated cholesterol efflux assay showed that CRH treatment reduces macrophage cholesterol efflux. Western blot analysis showed that CRH-induced down-regulation of ABCA1 is dependent on phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473) induced by interaction between CRH and CRH receptor 1(CRHR1). We conclude that activation of this pathway by CRH accelerates macrophage foam cell formation and may promote stress-related atherosclerosis. PMID:26110874

  18. Arabidopsis PEN3/PDR8, an ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Contributes to Nonhost Resistance to Inappropriate Pathogens That Enter by Direct Penetration[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Mnica; Dittgen, Jan; Snchez-Rodrguez, Clara; Hou, Bi-Huei; Molina, Antonio; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Lipka, Volker; Somerville, Shauna

    2006-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is a host to the powdery mildew Erysiphe cichoracearum and nonhost to Blumeria graminis f. sp hordei, the powdery mildew pathogenic on barley (Hordeum vulgare). Screening for Arabidopsis mutants deficient in resistance to barley powdery mildew identified PENETRATION3 (PEN3). pen3 plants permitted both increased invasion into epidermal cells and initiation of hyphae by B. g. hordei, suggesting that PEN3 contributes to defenses at the cell wall and intracellularly. pen3 mutants were compromised in resistance to the necrotroph Plectosphaerella cucumerina and to two additional inappropriate biotrophs, pea powdery mildew (Erysiphe pisi) and potato late blight (Phytophthora infestans). Unexpectedly, pen3 mutants were resistant to E. cichoracearum. This resistance was salicylic aciddependent and correlated with chlorotic patches. Consistent with this observation, salicylic acid pathway genes were hyperinduced in pen3 relative to the wild type. The phenotypes conferred by pen3 result from the loss of function of PLEIOTROPIC DRUG RESISTANCE8 (PDR8), a highly expressed putative ATP binding cassette transporter. PEN3/PDR8 tagged with green fluorescent protein localized to the plasma membrane in uninfected cells. In infected leaves, the protein concentrated at infection sites. PEN3/PDR8 may be involved in exporting toxic materials to attempted invasion sites, and intracellular accumulation of these toxins in pen3 may secondarily activate the salicylic acid pathway. PMID:16473969

  19. Interaction of extracellular domain 2 of the human retina-specific ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCA4) with all-trans-retinal.

    PubMed

    Biswas-Fiss, Esther E; Kurpad, Deepa S; Joshi, Kinjalben; Biswas, Subhasis B

    2010-06-18

    The retina-specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, ABCA4, is essential for transport of all-trans-retinal from the rod outer segment discs in the retina and is associated with a broad range of inherited retinal diseases, including Stargardt disease, autosomal recessive cone rod dystrophy, and fundus flavimaculatus. A unique feature of the ABCA subfamily of ABC transporters is the presence of highly conserved, long extracellular loops or domains (ECDs) with unknown function. The high degree of sequence conservation and mapped disease-associated mutations in these domains suggests an important physiological significance. Conformational analysis using CD spectroscopy of purified, recombinant ECD2 protein demonstrated that it has an ordered and stable structure composed of 27 +/- 3% alpha-helix, 20 +/- 3% beta-pleated sheet, and 53 +/- 3% coil. Significant conformational changes were observed in disease-associated mutant proteins. Using intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum of ECD2 polypeptide and fluorescence anisotropy, we have demonstrated that this domain specifically interacts with all-trans-retinal. Furthermore, the retinal interaction appeared preferential for the all-trans-isomer and was directly measurable through fluorescence anisotropy analysis. Our results demonstrate that the three macular degeneration-associated mutations lead to significant changes in the secondary structure of the ECD2 domain of ABCA4, as well as in its interaction with all-trans-retinal. PMID:20404325

  20. Expression of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters B1 and C1 after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Humans.

    PubMed

    Willyerd, F Anthony; Empey, Philip E; Philbrick, Ashley; Ikonomovic, Milos D; Puccio, Ava M; Kochanek, Patrick M; Okonkwo, David O; Clark, Robert S B

    2016-01-15

    Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins ABCC1 and ABCB1 (also known as multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 and p-glycoprotein, respectively), are key membrane efflux transporters of drugs and endogenous substrates, including in the brain. The impact of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on ABCC1 and ABCB1 expression in humans is unknown. We hypothesized that ABCC1 and ABCB1 expression would be altered in brain tissue from patients acutely after severe TBI. Archived TBI samples (n=10) from our Brain Trauma Research Center and control samples (n=7) from our Alzheimer Disease Research Center were obtained under Institutional Review Board approval. Protein was extracted from fresh frozen cortical brain tissue for Western blot analysis and sections were obtained from fixed cortical tissue for immunohistochemistry. Relative abundance of ABCC1 was increased in samples from TBI versus controls (2.82.5 fold; p=0.005). ABCC1 immunohistochemistry was consistent with Western blot data, with increased immunoreactivity in cerebral blood vessel walls, as well as cells with the morphological appearance of neurons and glia in TBI versus controls. Relative abundance of ABCB1 was similar between TBI and controls (p=0.76), and ABCB1 immunoreactivity was primarily associated with cerebral blood vessels in both groups. These human data show that TBI increases ABCC1 expression in the brain, consistent with possible implications for both patients receiving pharmacological inhibitors and/or substrates of ABCC1 after TBI. PMID:25891836

  1. Up-regulation of ATP Binding Cassette Transporter A1 Expression by Very Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor and Apolipoprotein E Receptor 2*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinping; Guo, Zhongmao; Okoro, Emmanuel U.; Zhang, Hongfeng; Zhou, LiChun; Lin, Xinhua; Rollins, Allman T.; Yang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Activation of very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) and apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (apoER2) results in either pro- or anti-atherogenic effects depending on the ligand. Using reelin and apoE as ligands, we studied the impact of VLDLR- and apoER2-mediated signaling on the expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and cholesterol efflux using RAW264.7 cells. Treatment of these mouse macrophages with reelin or human apoE3 significantly increased ABCA1 mRNA and protein levels, and apoAI-mediated cholesterol efflux. In addition, both reelin and apoE3 significantly increased phosphorylated disabled-1 (Dab1), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase C? (PKC?), and specificity protein 1 (Sp1). This reelin- or apoER2-mediated up-regulation of ABCA1 expression was suppressed by 1) knockdown of Dab1, VLDLR, and apoER2 with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), 2) inhibition of PI3K and PKC with kinase inhibitors, 3) overexpression of kinase-dead PKC?, and 4) inhibition of Sp1 DNA binding with mithramycin A. Activation of the Dab1-PI3K signaling pathway has been implicated in VLDLR- and apoER2-mediated cellular functions, whereas the PI3K-PKC?-Sp1 signaling cascade has been implicated in the regulation of ABCA1 expression induced by apoE/apoB-carrying lipoproteins. Taken together, these data support a model in which activation of VLDLR and apoER2 by reelin and apoE induces ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux via a Dab1-PI3K-PKC?-Sp1 signaling cascade. PMID:22170052

  2. Intrinsic acyl-CoA thioesterase activity of a peroxisomal ATP binding cassette transporter is required for transport and metabolism of fatty acids.

    PubMed

    De Marcos Lousa, Carine; van Roermund, Carlo W T; Postis, Vincent L G; Dietrich, Daniela; Kerr, Ian D; Wanders, Ronald J A; Baldwin, Stephen A; Baker, Alison; Theodoulou, Frederica L

    2013-01-22

    Peroxisomes are organelles that perform diverse metabolic functions in different organisms, but a common function is β-oxidation of a variety of long chain aliphatic, branched, and aromatic carboxylic acids. Import of substrates into peroxisomes for β-oxidation is mediated by ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins of subfamily D, which includes the human adrenoleukodystropy protein (ALDP) defective in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). Whether substrates are transported as CoA esters or free acids has been a matter of debate. Using COMATOSE (CTS), a plant representative of the ABCD family, we demonstrate that there is a functional and physical interaction between the ABC transporter and the peroxisomal long chain acyl-CoA synthetases (LACS)6 and -7. We expressed recombinant CTS in insect cells and showed that membranes from infected cells possess fatty acyl-CoA thioesterase activity, which is stimulated by ATP. A mutant, in which Serine 810 is replaced by asparagine (S810N) is defective in fatty acid degradation in vivo, retains ATPase activity but has strongly reduced thioesterase activity, providing strong evidence for the biological relevance of this activity. Thus, CTS, and most likely the other ABCD family members, represent rare examples of polytopic membrane proteins with an intrinsic additional enzymatic function that may regulate the entry of substrates into the β-oxidation pathway. The cleavage of CoA raises questions about the side of the membrane where this occurs and this is discussed in the context of the peroxisomal coenzyme A (CoA) budget. PMID:23288899

  3. Remote Communication through Solute Carriers and ATP Binding Cassette Drug Transporter Pathways: An Update on the Remote Sensing and Signaling Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Dnyanmote, Ankur V.

    2011-01-01

    Recent data from knockouts, human disease, and transport studies suggest that solute carrier (SLC) and ATP binding cassette (ABC) multispecific drug transporters maintain effective organ and body fluid concentrations of key nutrients, signaling molecules, and antioxidants. These processes involve transcellular movement of solutes across epithelial barriers and fluid compartments (e.g., blood, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, bile) via matching or homologous sets of SLC (e.g., SLC21, SLC22, SLC47) and ABC transporters. As described in the Remote Sensing and Signaling Hypothesis (Biochem Biophys Res Commun 323:429436, 2004; Biochem Biophys Res Commun 351:872876, 2006; J Biol Chem 282:2384123853, 2007; Nat Clin Pract Nephrol 3:443448, 2007; Mol Pharmacol 76:481490, 2009), highly regulated transporter networks with overlapping substrate preferences are involved in sensing and signaling to maintain homeostasis in response to environmental changes (e.g., substrate imbalance and injury). They function in parallel with (and interact with) the endocrine and autonomic systems. Uric acid (urate), carnitine, prostaglandins, conjugated sex steroids, cGMP, odorants, and enterobiome metabolites are discussed here as examples. Xenobiotics hitchhike on endogenous carrier systems, sometimes leading to toxicity and side effects. By regulation of the expression and/or function of various remote organ multispecific transporters after injury, the overall transport capacity of the remote organ to handle endogenous toxins, metabolites, and signaling molecules may change, aiding in recovery. Moreover, these transporters may play a role in communication between organisms. The specific cellular components involved in sensing and altering transporter abundance or functionality depend upon the metabolite in question and probably involve different types of sensors as well as epigenetic regulation. PMID:21325265

  4. ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter G2 Activity in the Bovine Spermatozoa Is Modulated Along the Epididymal Duct and at Ejaculation1

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Julieta; Frenette, Gilles; D'Amours, Olivier; Dufour, Maurice; Oko, Richard; Sullivan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    During their epididymal maturation, stabilizing factors such as cholesterol sulfate are associated with the sperm plasma membrane. Cholesterol is sulfated in epididymal spermatozoa by the enzyme estrogen sulfotransferase. Because of its role in the efflux of sulfate conjugates formed intracellularly by sulfotransferases, the ATP-binding cassette membrane transporter G2 (ABCG2) might have a role in the translocation of this compound across the plasma membrane. In the present study we showed that ABCG2 is present in the plasma membrane overlaying the acrosomal region of spermatozoa recovered from testis, epididymis, and after ejaculation. Although ABCG2 is also present in epididymosomes, the transporter is not transferred to spermatozoa via this mechanism. Furthermore, although epididymal sperm ABCG2 was shown to be functional, as determined by its ability to extrude Hoechst 33342 in the presence of the specific inhibitor Fumitremorgin C, ABCG2 present in ejaculated sperm was found to be nonfunctional. Additional experiments demonstrated that phosphorylation of ABCG2 tyrosyl residues, but not its localization in lipid rafts, is the mechanism responsible for its functionality. Dephosphorylation of ABCG2 in ejaculated spermatozoa is proposed to cause a partial protein relocalization to other intracellular compartments. Prostasomes are proposed to have a role in this process because incubation with this fraction of seminal plasma induces a decrease in the amount of ABCG2 in the associated sperm membrane fraction. These results demonstrate that ABCG2 plays a role in epididymal sperm maturation, but not after ejaculation. The loss of ABCG2 function after ejaculation is proposed to be regulated by prostasomes. PMID:22441796

  5. Molecular phylogenetic study and expression analysis of ATP-binding cassette transporter gene family in Oryza sativa in response to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Saha, Jayita; Sengupta, Atreyee; Gupta, Kamala; Gupta, Bhaskar

    2015-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter is a large gene superfamily that utilizes the energy released from ATP hydrolysis for transporting myriad of substrates across the biological membranes. Although many investigations have been done on the structural and functional analysis of the ABC transporters in Oryza sativa, much less is known about molecular phylogenetic and global expression pattern of the complete ABC family in rice. In this study, we have carried out a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis constructing neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood trees based on various statistical methods of different ABC protein subfamily of five plant lineages including Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (green algae), Physcomitrella patens (moss), Selaginella moellendorffii (lycophyte), Arabidopsis thaliana (dicot) and O. sativa (monocot) to explore the origin and evolutionary patterns of these ABC genes. We have identified several conserved motifs in nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of ABC proteins among all plant lineages during evolution. Amongst the different ABC protein subfamilies, 'ABCE' has not yet been identified in lower plant genomes (algae, moss and lycophytes). The result indicated that gene duplication and diversification process acted upon these genes as a major operative force creating new groups and subgroups and functional divergence during evolution. We have demonstrated that rice ABCI subfamily consists of only half size transporters that represented highly dynamic members showing maximum sequence variations among the other rice ABC subfamilies. The evolutionary and the expression analysis contribute to a deep insight into the evolution and diversity of rice ABC proteins and their roles in response to salt stress that facilitate our further understanding on rice ABC transporters. PMID:25531538

  6. A mutation within the extended X loop abolished substrate-induced ATPase activity of the human liver ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter MDR3.

    PubMed

    Kluth, Marianne; Stindt, Jan; Dröge, Carola; Linnemann, Doris; Kubitz, Ralf; Schmitt, Lutz

    2015-02-20

    The human multidrug resistance protein 3 (MDR3/ABCB4) belongs to the ubiquitous family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and is located in the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. There it flops the phospholipids of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) family from the inner to the outer leaflet. Here, we report the characterization of wild type MDR3 and the Q1174E mutant, which was identified previously in a patient with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3 (PFIC-3). We expressed different variants of MDR3 in the yeast Pichia pastoris, purified the proteins via tandem affinity chromatography, and determined MDR3-specific ATPase activity in the presence or absence of phospholipids. The ATPase activity of wild type MDR3 was stimulated 2-fold by liver PC or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine lipids. Furthermore, the cross-linking of MDR3 with a thiol-reactive fluorophore blocked ATP hydrolysis and exhibited no PC stimulation. Similarly, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and sphingomyelin lipids did not induce an increase of wild type MDR3 ATPase activity. The phosphate analogues beryllium fluoride and aluminum fluoride led to complete inhibition of ATPase activity, whereas orthovanadate inhibited exclusively the PC-stimulated ATPase activity of MDR3. The Q1174E mutation is located in the nucleotide-binding domain in direct proximity of the leucine of the ABC signature motif and extended the X loop, which is found in ABC exporters. Our data on the Q1174E mutant demonstrated basal ATPase activity, but PC lipids were incapable of stimulating ATPase activity highlighting the role of the extended X loop in the cross-talk of the nucleotide-binding domain and the transmembrane domain. PMID:25533467

  7. Acyl-CoA synthetase 1 is required for oleate and linoleate mediated inhibition of cholesterol efflux through ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kanter, Jenny E.; Tang, Chongren; Oram, John F.; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes and insulin resistance increase the risk of cardiovascular disease caused by atherosclerosis through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Lipid-loaded macrophages are key contributors to all stages of atherosclerosis. We have recently shown that diabetes associated with increased plasma lipids reduces cholesterol efflux and levels of the reverse cholesterol exporter ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1) in mouse macrophages, which likely contributes to macrophage lipid accumulation in diabetes. Furthermore, we and others have shown that unsaturated fatty acids reduce ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux, and that this effect is mediated by the acyl-CoA derivatives of the fatty acids. We therefore investigated whether acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1), a key enzyme mediating acyl-CoA synthesis in macrophages, could directly influence ABCA1 levels and cholesterol efflux in these cells. Mouse macrophages deficient in ACSL1 exhibited reduced sensitivity to oleate- and linoleate-mediated ABCA1 degradation, which resulted in increased ABCA1 levels and increased apolipoprotein A-I-dependent cholesterol efflux in the presence of these fatty acids, as compared with wildtype mouse macrophages. Conversely, overexpression of ACSL1 resulted in reduced ABCA1 levels and reduced cholesterol efflux in the presence of unsaturated fatty acids. Thus, the reduced ABCA1 and cholesterol efflux in macrophages subjected to conditions of diabetes and elevated fatty load may, at least in part, be mediated by ACSL1. These observations raise the possibility that ABCA1 levels could be increased by inhibition of acyl-CoA synthetase activity in vivo. PMID:22020260

  8. Endocrine disruptors differentially target ATP-binding cassette transporters in the blood-testis barrier and affect Leydig cell testosterone secretion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dankers, Anita C A; Roelofs, Maarke J E; Piersma, Aldert H; Sweep, Fred C G J; Russel, Frans G M; van den Berg, Martin; van Duursen, Majorie B M; Masereeuw, Rosalinde

    2013-12-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are considered to cause testicular toxicity primarily via interference with steroid hormone function. Alternatively, EDCs could possibly exert their effects by interaction with ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that are expressed in the blood-testis barrier. In this study, we investigated the effects of bisphenol A (BPA), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) on breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), multidrug resistance proteins 1 and 4 (MRP1 and MRP4), and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) using membrane vesicles overexpressing these transporters. BPA solely inhibited BCRP activity, whereas TBBPA, PFOA, and PFOS inhibited all transporters tested. No effect was observed for the phthalates. Using transporter-overexpressing Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, we show that BPA and PFOA, but not TBBPA, are transported by BCRP, whereas none of the compounds were transported by P-gp. To investigate the toxicological implications of these findings, testosterone secretion and expression of steroidogenic genes were determined in murine Leydig (MA-10) cells upon exposure to the selected EDCs. Only BPA and TBBPA concentration dependently increased testosterone secretion by MA-10 cells to 6- and 46-fold of control levels, respectively. Inhibition of the Mrp's by MK-571 completely blocked testosterone secretion elicited by TBBPA, which could not be explained by coinciding changes in expression of steroidogenic genes. Therefore, we hypothesize that transporter-mediated efflux of testosterone precursors out of MA-10 cells is inhibited by TBBPA resulting in higher availability for testosterone production. Our data show the toxicological and clinical relevance of ABC transporters in EDC risk assessment related to testicular toxicity. PMID:24014645

  9. Human ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter ABCG2 Confers Resistance to CUDC-907, a Dual Inhibitor of Histone Deacetylase and Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chung-Pu; Hsieh, Ya-Ju; Hsiao, Sung-Han; Su, Ching-Ya; Li, Yan-Qing; Huang, Yang-Hui; Huang, Chiun-Wei; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Yu, Jau-Song; Wu, Yu-Shan

    2016-03-01

    CUDC-907 is a novel, dual-acting small molecule compound designed to simultaneously inhibit the activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Treatment with CUDC-907 led to sustained inhibition of HDAC and PI3K activity, inhibition of RAF-MEK-MAPK signaling pathway, and inhibition of cancer cell growth. CUDC-907 is currently under evaluation in phase I clinical trials in patients with lymphoma or multiple myeloma, and in patients with advanced solid tumors. However, the risk of developing acquired resistance to CUDC-907 can present a significant therapeutic challenge to clinicians in the future and should be investigated. The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter ABCB1, ABCC1, or ABCG2 is one of the most common mechanisms of developing multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancers and a major obstacle in chemotherapy. In this study, we reveal that ABCG2 reduces the intracellular accumulation of CUDC-907 and confers significant resistance to CUDC-907, which leads to reduced activity of CUDC-907 to inhibit HDAC and PI3K in human cancer cells. Moreover, although CUDC-907 affects the transport function of ABCG2, it was not potent enough to reverse drug resistance mediated by ABCG2 or affect the expression level of ABCG2 in human cancer cells. Taken together, our findings indicate that ABCG2-mediated CUDC-907 resistance can have serious clinical implications and should be further investigated. More importantly, we demonstrate that the activity of CUDC-907 in ABCG2-overexpressing cancer cells can be restored by inhibiting the function of ABCG2, which provides support for the rationale of combining CUDC-907 with modulators of ABCG2 to improve the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of CUDC-907 in future treatment trials. PMID:26796063

  10. Functional and Structural Characterization of Polysaccharide Co-polymerase Proteins Required for Polymer Export in ATP-binding Cassette Transporter-dependent Capsule Biosynthesis Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Larue, Kane; Ford, Robert C.; Willis, Lisa M.; Whitfield, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B and Escherichia coli K1 bacteria produce a capsular polysaccharide (CPS) that is composed of ?2,8-linked polysialic acid (PSA). Biosynthesis of PSA in these bacteria occurs via an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter-dependent pathway. In N. meningitidis, export of PSA to the surface of the bacterium requires two proteins that form an ABC transporter (CtrC and CtrD) and two additional proteins, CtrA and CtrB, that are proposed to form a cell envelope-spanning export complex. CtrA is a member of the outer membrane polysaccharide export (OPX) family of proteins, which are proposed to form a pore to mediate export of CPSs across the outer membrane. CtrB is an inner membrane protein belonging to the polysaccharide co-polymerase (PCP) family. PCP proteins involved in other bacterial polysaccharide assembly systems form structures that extend into the periplasm from the inner membrane. There is currently no structural information available for PCP or OPX proteins involved in an ABC transporter-dependent CPS biosynthesis pathway to support their proposed roles in polysaccharide export. Here, we report cryo-EM images of purified CtrB reconstituted into lipid bilayers. These images contained molecular top and side views of CtrB and showed that it formed a conical oligomer that extended ?125 from the membrane. This structure is consistent with CtrB functioning as a component of an envelope-spanning complex. Cross-complementation of CtrA and CtrB in E. coli mutants with defects in genes encoding the corresponding PCP and OPX proteins show that PCP-OPX pairs require interactions with their cognate partners to export polysaccharide. These experiments add further support for the model of an ABC transporter-PCP-OPX multiprotein complex that functions to export CPS across the cell envelope. PMID:21454677

  11. The novel BCR-ABL and FLT3 inhibitor ponatinib is a potent inhibitor of the multidrug resistance-associated ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Rupashree; Natarajan, Karthika; Bhullar, Jasjeet; Shukla, Suneet; Fang, Hong-Bin; Cai, Ling; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Baer, Maria R.

    2012-01-01

    Ponatinib is a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent activity against BCR-ABL with mutations including T315I, and also against fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3). We tested interactions between ponatinib at pharmacologically relevant concentrations of 50 to 200 nM and the multidrug resistance-associated ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins ABCB1, ABCC1 and ABCG2. Ponatinib enhanced uptake of substrates of ABCG2 and ABCB1, but not ABCC1, in cells overexpressing these proteins, with a greater effect on ABCG2 than on ABCB1. Ponatinib potently inhibited [125I]-IAAP binding to ABCG2 and ABCB1, indicating binding to their drug substrate sites, with IC50s of 0.04 ?M and 0.63 ?M, respectively. Ponatinib stimulated ABCG2 ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner and stimulated ABCB1 ATPase activity at low concentrations, consistent with it being a substrate of both proteins at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. The ponatinib IC50s of BCR-ABL-expressing K562 cells transfected with ABCB1 and ABCG2 were approximately the same as and 2-fold higher than that of K562, respectively, consistent with ponatinib being a substrate of both proteins, but inhibiting its own transport, and resistance was also attenuated to a small degree by ponatinib-induced downregulation of ABCB1 and ABCG2 cell surface expression on resistant K562 cells. Ponatinib at pharmacologically relevant concentrations produced synergistic cytotoxicity with ABCB1 and ABCG2 substrate chemotherapy drugs and enhanced apoptosis induced by these drugs, including daunorubicin, mitoxantrone, topotecan and flavopiridol, in cells overexpressing these transport proteins. Combinations of ponatinib and chemotherapy drugs warrant further testing. PMID:22778153

  12. Ethnic differences in ATP-binding cassette transporter, sub-family G, member 2 (ABCG2/BCRP): genotype combinations and estimated functions.

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Masayuki; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Takada, Yuzo; Nakamura, Takahiro; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Takada, Tappei; Kitajiri, Shin-Ichiro; Wakai, Kenji; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter, sub-family G, member 2 (ABCG2/BCRP) is a xenobiotic transporter and also regulates serum uric acid levels as a urate transporter. We have shown that the severity of ABCG2 dysfunction can be estimated by simple genotyping of two dysfunctional variants, Q126X (rs72552713) and Q141K (rs2231142). This genotyping method is widely accepted for the risk analysis of hyperuricemia/gout, but there is no report on ethnic differences in ABCG2 dysfunctions. Here, we estimated ABCG2 dysfunctions by its genotype combination (Q126X and Q141K) and compared them in three different ethnic groups (500 Japanese, 200 Caucasians and 100 African-Americans). The minor allele frequencies of Q126X and Q141K in Japanese (0.025 and 0.275, respectively) were significantly higher than those in Caucasians (0.005 and 0.085, respectively) and African-Americans (0 and 0.090, respectively). Additionally, the rates of mild, moderate and severe ABCG2 dysfunctions in Japanese (35.4%, 12.4% and 1.6%, respectively) were higher than those in Caucasians (14.0%, 2.5% and 0%, respectively) and African-Americans (14.0%, 2.0% and 0%, respectively). Because ABCG2 dysfunctional diplotypes were commonly observed in both Caucasians (16.5%) and African-Americans (16.0%), the genotyping of the two ABCG2 dysfunctional variants is useful for evaluating individual differences in the ABCG2 dysfunction which affect the pharmacokinetics of substrate drugs and hyperuricemia risk in all three ethnic groups. PMID:24869748

  13. Time-resolved Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy of the Nucleotide-binding Domain from the ATP-binding Cassette Transporter MsbA

    PubMed Central

    Syberg, Falk; Suveyzdis, Yan; Ktting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus; Hofmann, Eckhard

    2012-01-01

    MsbA is an essential Escherichia coli ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter involved in the flipping of lipid A across the cytoplasmic membrane. It is a close homologue of human P-glycoprotein involved in multidrug resistance, and it similarly accepts a variety of small hydrophobic xenobiotics as transport substrates. X-ray structures of three full-length ABC multidrug exporters (including MsbA) have been published recently and reveal large conformational changes during the transport cycle. However, how ATP hydrolysis couples to these conformational changes and finally the transport is still an open question. We employed time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy, a powerful method to elucidate molecular reaction mechanisms of soluble and membrane proteins, to address this question with high spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we monitored the hydrolysis reaction in the nucleotide-binding domain of MsbA at the atomic level. The isolated MsbA nucleotide-binding domain hydrolyzed ATP with Vmax = 45 nmol mg?1 min?1, similar to the full-length transporter. A Hill coefficient of 1.49 demonstrates positive cooperativity between the two catalytic sites formed upon dimerization. Global fit analysis of time-resolved FTIR data revealed two apparent rate constants of ?1 and 0.01 s?1, which were assigned to formation of the catalytic site and hydrolysis, respectively. Using isotopically labeled ATP, we identified specific marker bands for protein-bound ATP (1245 cm?1), ADP (1101 and 1205 cm?1), and free phosphate (1078 cm?1). Cleavage of the ?-phosphate?-phosphate bond was found to be the rate-limiting step; no protein-bound phosphate intermediate was resolved. PMID:22593573

  14. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Inhibitors Interact with ATP Binding Cassette Transporter 4/Multidrug Resistance Protein 4: A Basis for Unanticipated Enhanced Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Yu; Takenaka, Kazumasa; Sparreboom, Alex; Cheepala, Satish B.; Wu, Chung-Pu; Ekins, Sean; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pharmacotherapy, by combining different drug classes such as nucleoside analogs and HIV protease inhibitors (PIs), has increased HIV-patient life expectancy. Consequently, among these patients, an increase in non-HIV–associated cancers has produced a patient cohort requiring both HIV and cancer chemotherapy. We hypothesized that multidrug resistance protein 4/ATP binding cassette transporter 4 (MRP4/ABCC4), a widely expressed transporter of nucleoside-based antiviral medications as well as cancer therapeutics might interact with PIs. Among the PIs evaluated (nelfinavir, ritonavir, amprenavir, saquinavir, and indinavir), only nelfinavir both effectively stimulated MRP4 ATPase activity and inhibited substrate-stimulated ATPase activity. Saos2 and human embryonic kidney 293 cells engineered to overexpress MRP4 were then used to assess transport and cytotoxicity. MRP4 expression reduced intracellular accumulation of nelfinavir and consequently conferred survival advantage to nelfinavir cytotoxicity. Nelfinavir blocked Mrp4-mediated export, which is consistent with its ability to increase the sensitivity of MRP4-expressing cells to methotrexate. In contrast, targeted inactivation of Abcc4/Mrp4 in mouse cells specifically enhanced nelfinavir and 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl) adenine cytotoxicity. These results suggest that nelfinavir is both an inhibitor and substrate of MRP4. Because nelfinavir is a new MRP4/ABCC4 substrate, we developed a MRP4/ABCC4 pharmacophore model, which showed that the nelfinavir binding site is shared with chemotherapeutic substrates such as adefovir and methotrexate. Our studies reveal, for the first time, that nelfinavir, a potent and cytotoxic PI, is both a substrate and inhibitor of MRP4. These findings suggest that HIV-infected cancer patients receiving nelfinavir might experience both enhanced antitumor efficacy and unexpected adverse toxicity given the role of MRP4/ABCC4 in exporting nucleoside-based antiretroviral medications and cancer chemotherapeutics. PMID:23775562

  15. ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA4 and chemical isomerization protect photoreceptor cells from the toxic accumulation of excess 11-cis-retinal.

    PubMed

    Quazi, Faraz; Molday, Robert S

    2014-04-01

    The visual cycle is a series of enzyme-catalyzed reactions which converts all-trans-retinal to 11-cis-retinal for the regeneration of visual pigments in rod and cone photoreceptor cells. Although essential for vision, 11-cis-retinal like all-trans-retinal is highly toxic due to its highly reactive aldehyde group and has to be detoxified by either reduction to retinol or sequestration within retinal-binding proteins. Previous studies have focused on the role of the ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA4 associated with Stargardt macular degeneration and retinol dehydrogenases (RDH) in the clearance of all-trans-retinal from photoreceptors following photoexcitation. How rod and cone cells prevent the accumulation of 11-cis-retinal in photoreceptor disk membranes in excess of what is required for visual pigment regeneration is not known. Here we show that ABCA4 can transport N-11-cis-retinylidene-phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), the Schiff-base conjugate of 11-cis-retinal and PE, from the lumen to the cytoplasmic leaflet of disk membranes. This transport function together with chemical isomerization to its all-trans isomer and reduction to all-trans-retinol by RDH can prevent the accumulation of excess 11-cis-retinal and its Schiff-base conjugate and the formation of toxic bisretinoid compounds as found in ABCA4-deficient mice and individuals with Stargardt macular degeneration. This segment of the visual cycle in which excess 11-cis-retinal is converted to all-trans-retinol provides a rationale for the unusually high content of PE and its long-chain unsaturated docosahexaenoyl group in photoreceptor membranes and adds insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for Stargardt macular degeneration. PMID:24707049

  16. Correlation between the promoter methylation status of ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 and drug sensitivity in colorectal cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyun-Hye; Kim, Sung-Hee; Ku, Ja-Lok

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapeutic agents has been considered as a major reason for the high incidence rate of recurrence and metastasis suffered by colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. ATP?binding cassette sub?familyG member2 (ABCG2) is involved in drug resistance. DNA methylation of the ABCG2promoter site has a significant influence on the regulation of epigenetic gene expression. In the present study, we investigated whether the methylation status of the ABCG2 promoter is related to drug sensitivity in CRC cell lines. In order to examine the ABCG2 expression level and identify the methylation status, RT?PCR, qRT?PCR analysis, MS?PCR and bisulfite sequencing were conducted on 32CRC cell lines. SNU?C4, LS174T and NCI?H716 were selected as low ABCG2?expressing and high promoter methylated cell lines. The cell proliferation assay for 5?fluorouracil, oxaliplatin and irinotecan was performed after 5?aza?2'?deoxycytidine (5?aza) treatment in these cell lines. In the 32CRC cell lines, 25%of the cell lines expressed low or no ABCG2 expression. Of these cell lines, SNU?C4, LS174T and NCI?H716 were hypermethylated at the promoter region, ~20%. Demethylation of ABCG2 was induced by 5?aza, which enhanced the ABCG2expression level and influenced the cell proliferation similar to treatment with the anticancer agents. Our data suggest that the ABCG2expression level regulated by methylation is related to anticancer drug sensitivity. Based on these results, it can be applied to predict the anticancer drug response. PMID:26497773

  17. The Myxococcus xanthus rfbABC operon encodes an ATP-binding cassette transporter homolog required for O-antigen biosynthesis and multicellular development.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, D; Bowden, M G; Pershad, R; Kaplan, H B

    1996-01-01

    A wild-type sasA locus is critical for Myxococcus xanthus multicellular development. Mutations in the sasA locus cause defective fruiting body formation, reduce sporulation, and restore developmental expression of the early A-signal-dependent gene 4521 in the absence of A signal. The wild-type sasA locus has been located on a 14-kb cloned fragment of the M. xanthus chromosome. The nucleotide sequence of a 7-kb region containing the complete sasA locus was determined. Three open reading frames encoded by the genes, designated rfbA, B and C were identified. The deduced amino acid sequences of rfbA and rfbB show identity to the integral membrane domains and ATPase domains, respectively, of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. The highest identities are to a set of predicted ABC transporters required for the biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen in certain gram-negative bacteria. The rfbC gene encodes a predicted protein of 1,276 amino acids. This predicted protein contains a region of 358 amino acids that is 33.8% identical to the Yersinia enterocolitica O3 rfbH gene product, which is also required for O-antigen biosynthesis. Immunoblot analysis revealed that the sasA1 mutant, which was found to encode a nonsense codon in the beginning of rfbA, produced less O-antigen than sasA+ strains. These data indicate that the sasA locus is required for the biosynthesis of O-antigen and, when mutated, results in A-signal-independent expression of 4521. PMID:8626291

  18. Mutant Allele-Specific Uncoupling of PENETRATION3 Functions Reveals Engagement of the ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter in Distinct Tryptophan Metabolic Pathways1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xunli; Dittgen, Jan; Piślewska-Bednarek, Mariola; Molina, Antonio; Schneider, Bernd; Doubský, Jan; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PENETRATION (PEN) genes quantitatively contribute to the execution of different forms of plant immunity upon challenge with diverse leaf pathogens. PEN3 encodes a plasma membrane-resident pleiotropic drug resistance-type ATP-binding cassette transporter and is thought to act in a pathogen-inducible and PEN2 myrosinase-dependent metabolic pathway in extracellular defense. This metabolic pathway directs the intracellular biosynthesis and activation of tryptophan-derived indole glucosinolates for subsequent PEN3-mediated efflux across the plasma membrane at pathogen contact sites. However, PEN3 also functions in abiotic stress responses to cadmium and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA)-mediated auxin homeostasis in roots, raising the possibility that PEN3 exports multiple functionally unrelated substrates. Here, we describe the isolation of a pen3 allele, designated pen3-5, that encodes a dysfunctional protein that accumulates in planta like wild-type PEN3. The specific mutation in pen3-5 uncouples PEN3 functions in IBA-stimulated root growth modulation, callose deposition induced with a conserved peptide epitope of bacterial flagellin (flg22), and pathogen-inducible salicylic acid accumulation from PEN3 activity in extracellular defense, indicating the engagement of multiple PEN3 substrates in different PEN3-dependent biological processes. We identified 4-O-β-d-glucosyl-indol-3-yl formamide (4OGlcI3F) as a pathogen-inducible, tryptophan-derived compound that overaccumulates in pen3 leaf tissue and has biosynthesis that is dependent on an intact PEN2 metabolic pathway. We propose that a precursor of 4OGlcI3F is the PEN3 substrate in extracellular pathogen defense. These precursors, the shared indole core present in IBA and 4OGlcI3F, and allele-specific uncoupling of a subset of PEN3 functions suggest that PEN3 transports distinct indole-type metabolites in distinct biological processes. PMID:26023163

  19. ATP-binding cassette transporter G2 activity in the bovine spermatozoa is modulated along the epididymal duct and at ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Julieta; Frenette, Gilles; D'Amours, Olivier; Dufour, Maurice; Oko, Richard; Sullivan, Robert

    2012-06-01

    During their epididymal maturation, stabilizing factors such as cholesterol sulfate are associated with the sperm plasma membrane. Cholesterol is sulfated in epididymal spermatozoa by the enzyme estrogen sulfotransferase. Because of its role in the efflux of sulfate conjugates formed intracellularly by sulfotransferases, the ATP-binding cassette membrane transporter G2 (ABCG2) might have a role in the translocation of this compound across the plasma membrane. In the present study we showed that ABCG2 is present in the plasma membrane overlaying the acrosomal region of spermatozoa recovered from testis, epididymis, and after ejaculation. Although ABCG2 is also present in epididymosomes, the transporter is not transferred to spermatozoa via this mechanism. Furthermore, although epididymal sperm ABCG2 was shown to be functional, as determined by its ability to extrude Hoechst 33342 in the presence of the specific inhibitor Fumitremorgin C, ABCG2 present in ejaculated sperm was found to be nonfunctional. Additional experiments demonstrated that phosphorylation of ABCG2 tyrosyl residues, but not its localization in lipid rafts, is the mechanism responsible for its functionality. Dephosphorylation of ABCG2 in ejaculated spermatozoa is proposed to cause a partial protein relocalization to other intracellular compartments. Prostasomes are proposed to have a role in this process because incubation with this fraction of seminal plasma induces a decrease in the amount of ABCG2 in the associated sperm membrane fraction. These results demonstrate that ABCG2 plays a role in epididymal sperm maturation, but not after ejaculation. The loss of ABCG2 function after ejaculation is proposed to be regulated by prostasomes. PMID:22441796

  20. A new strategy of high-speed screening and quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis to evaluate human ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hikaru; Hirano, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Fukami, Takeaki; Oosumi, Keisuke; Murakami, Kaori; Kimura, Hiroko; Kouchi, Takayuki; Konomi, Mami; Tao, Eriko; Tsujikawa, Noboru; Tarui, Shigeki; Nagakura, Makoto; Osumi, Masako; Ishikawa, Toshihisa

    2006-06-01

    The human ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter ABCG2 (BCRP/MXR1/ABCP) plays a critical role in cellular protection against xenobiotics as well as pharmacokinetics of drugs in our body. In the present study, we aimed to analyze the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) latently residing in ABCG2-drug interactions. We first established standard methods for expression of human ABCG2 in insect cells, quality control of plasma membrane samples by using electron microscopy techniques, and high-speed screening of ABCG2 inhibition with test compounds. Plasma membrane vesicles prepared from ABCG2-expressing Sf9 cells were used as a model system to measure the ATP-dependent transport of [3H]methotrexate (MTX). Forty-nine different therapeutic drugs and natural compounds were tested for their ability to inhibit ABCG2-mediated MTX transport. Based on their inhibition profiles, we performed QSAR analysis using chemical fragmentation codes deduced from the structures of test compounds. Multiple linear regression analysis delineated a relationship between the structural components and the extent of ABCG2 inhibition, allowing us to identify one set of structure-specific chemical fragmentation codes that are closely correlated with the inhibition of ABCG2 transport activity. Based on the QSAR analysis data, we predicted the potency of gefitinib to inhibit ABCG2. The validity of our QSAR-based prediction for gefitinib was examined by actual experiments. Our kinetic analysis experiments suggest that the ABCG2-ATP complex binds gefitinib. The present study provides a new strategy for analyzing ABCG2-drug interactions. This strategy is considered to be practical and useful for the molecular designing of new ABCG2 modulators. PMID:16489126

  1. SALL4, a Stem Cell Factor, Affects the Side Population by Regulation of the ATP-Binding Cassette Drug Transport Genes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Youyang; Lu, Jiayun; He, Jie; Li, Ailing; Song, David; Guo, Ye; Liu, Bee H.; Chai, Li

    2011-01-01

    Our previous work shows that the stem cell factor SALL4 plays a central role in embryonic and leukemic stem cells. In this study, we report that SALL4 expression was higher in drug resistant primary acute myeloid leukemic patients than those from drug-responsive cases. In addition, while overexpression of SALL4 led to drug resistance in cell lines, cells with decreased SALL4 expression were more sensitive to drug treatments than the parental cells. This led to our investigation of the implication of SALL4 in drug resistance and its role in side population (SP) cancer stem cells. SALL4 expression was higher in SP cells compared to non-SP cells by 24 fold in various malignant hematopoietic cell lines. Knocking down of SALL4 in isolated SP cells resulted in a reduction of SP cells, indicating that SALL4 is required for their self-renewal. The SP phenotype is known to be mediated by members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transport protein family, such as ABCG2 and ABCA3. Using chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP), quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay(EMSA), we demonstrated that SALL4 was able to bind to the promoter region of ABCA3 and activate its expression while regulating the expression of ABCG2 indirectly. Furthermore, SALL4 expression was positively correlated to those of ABCG2 and ABCA3 in primary leukemic patient samples. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for SALL4 in drug sensitivity, at least in part through the maintenance of SP cells, and therefore may be responsible for drug-resistance in leukemia. We are the first to demonstrate a direct link between stem cell factor SALL4, SP and drug resistance in leukemia. PMID:21526180

  2. Bacteriophage-mediated Glucosylation Can Modify Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigens Synthesized by an ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter-dependent Assembly Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mann, Evan; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; King, Jerry D; Whitfield, Chris

    2015-10-16

    Lysogenic bacteriophages may encode enzymes that modify the structures of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen glycans, altering the structure of the bacteriophage receptor and resulting in serotype conversion. This can enhance virulence and has implications for antigenic diversity and vaccine development. Side chain glucosylation is a common modification strategy found in a number of bacterial species. To date, glucosylation has only been observed in O-antigens synthesized by Wzy-dependent pathways, one of the two most prevalent O-antigen synthesis systems. Here we exploited a heterologous system to study the glucosylation potential of a model O-antigen produced in an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-dependent system. Although O-antigen production is cryptic in Escherichia coli K-12, because of a mutation in the synthesis genes, it possesses a prophage glucosylation cluster, which modifies the GlcNAc residue in an α-l-Rha-(1→3)-d-GlcNAc motif found in the original O16 antigen. Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257 produces an O-antigen possessing the same disaccharide motif, but its assembly uses an ABC transporter-dependent system. E. coli harboring the R. terrigena O-antigen biosynthesis genes produced an O-antigen displaying reduced reactivity toward antisera raised against the native R. terrigena repeat structure, indicative of an altered chemical structure. Structural determination using NMR revealed the addition of glucose side chains to the repeat units. O-antigen modification was dependent on a functional ABC transporter, consistent with modification in the periplasm, and was eliminated by deletion of the glucosylation genes from the E. coli chromosome, restoring native level antisera sensitivity and structure. There are therefore no intrinsic mechanistic barriers for bacteriophage-mediated O-antigen glucosylation in ABC transporter-dependent pathways. PMID:26330553

  3. ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transport System Solute-binding Protein-guided Identification of Novel d-Altritol and Galactitol Catabolic Pathways in Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58.

    PubMed

    Wichelecki, Daniel J; Vetting, Matthew W; Chou, Liyushang; Al-Obaidi, Nawar; Bouvier, Jason T; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A

    2015-11-27

    Innovations in the discovery of the functions of uncharacterized proteins/enzymes have become increasingly important as advances in sequencing technology flood protein databases with an exponentially growing number of open reading frames. This study documents one such innovation developed by the Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI; U54GM093342), the use of solute-binding proteins for transport systems to identify novel metabolic pathways. In a previous study, this strategy was applied to the tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporters. Here, we apply this strategy to the ATP-binding cassette transporters and report the discovery of novel catabolic pathways for d-altritol and galactitol in Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58. These efforts resulted in the description of three novel enzymatic reactions as follows: 1) oxidation of d-altritol to d-tagatose via a dehydrogenase in Pfam family PF00107, a previously unknown reaction; 2) phosphorylation of d-tagatose to d-tagatose 6-phosphate via a kinase in Pfam family PF00294, a previously orphan EC number; and 3) epimerization of d-tagatose 6-phosphate C-4 to d-fructose 6-phosphate via a member of Pfam family PF08013, another previously unknown reaction. The epimerization reaction catalyzed by a member of PF08013 is especially noteworthy, because the functions of members of PF08013 have been unknown. These discoveries were assisted by the following two synergistic bioinformatics web tools made available by the Enzyme Function Initiative: the EFI-Enzyme Similarity Tool and the EFI-Genome Neighborhood Tool. PMID:26472925

  4. ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter G26 Is Required for Male Fertility and Pollen Exine Formation in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Quilichini, Teagen D.; Friedmann, Michael C.; Samuels, A. Lacey; Douglas, Carl J.

    2010-01-01

    The highly resistant biopolymer, sporopollenin, gives the outer wall (exine) of spores and pollen grains their unparalleled strength, shielding these structures from terrestrial stresses. Despite a limited understanding of the composition of sporopollenin, it appears that the synthesis of sporopollenin occurs in the tapetum and requires the transport of one or more sporopollenin constituents to the surface of developing microspores. Here, we describe ABCG26, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily, which is required for pollen exine formation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). abcg26 mutants are severely reduced in fertility, with most siliques failing to produce seeds by self-fertilization and mature anthers failing to release pollen. Transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed an absence of an exine wall on abcg26-1 mutant microspores. Phenotypic abnormalities in pollen wall formation were first apparent in early uninucleate microspores as a lack of exine formation and sporopollenin deposition. Additionally, the highest levels of ABCG26 mRNA were in the tapetum, during early pollen wall formation, sporopollenin biosynthesis, and sporopollenin deposition. Accumulations resembling the trilamellar lipidic coils in the abcg11 and abcg12 mutants defective in cuticular wax export were observed in the anther locules of abcg26 mutants. A yellow fluorescent protein-ABCG26 protein was localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane. Our results show that ABCG26 plays a critical role in exine formation and pollen development and are consistent with a model by which ABCG26 transports sporopollenin precursors across the tapetum plasma membrane into the locule for polymerization on developing microspore walls. PMID:20732973

  5. Fasting Induces Nuclear Factor E2-Related Factor 2 and ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters via Protein Kinase A and Sirtuin-1 in Mouse and Human

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Supriya R.; Donepudi, Ajay C.; Xu, Jialin; Wei, Wei; Cheng, Qiuqiong C.; Driscoll, Maureen V.; Johnson, Delinda A.; Johnson, Jeffrey A.; Li, Xiaoling

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine whether 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) and Sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) dependent mechanisms modulate ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) transport protein expression. ABC transport proteins (ABCC2–4) are essential for chemical elimination from hepatocytes and biliary excretion. Nuclear factor-E2 related-factor 2 (NRF2) is a transcription factor that mediates ABCC induction in response to chemical inducers and liver injury. However, a role for NRF2 in the regulation of transporter expression in nonchemical models of liver perturbation is largely undescribed. Results: Here we show that fasting increased NRF2 target gene expression through NRF2- and SIRT1–dependent mechanisms. In intact mouse liver, fasting induces NRF2 target gene expression by at least 1.5 to 5-fold. In mouse and human hepatocytes, treatment with 8-Bromoadenosine-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, increased NRF2 target gene expression and antioxidant response element activity, which was decreased by the PKA inhibitor, H-89. Moreover, fasting induced NRF2 target gene expression was decreased in liver and hepatocytes of SIRT1 liver-specific null mice and NRF2-null mice. Lastly, NRF2 and SIRT1 were recruited to MAREs and Antioxidant Response Elements (AREs) in the human ABCC2 promoter. Innovation: Oxidative stress mediated NRF2 activation is well described, yet the influence of basic metabolic processes on NRF2 activation is just emerging. Conclusion: The current data point toward a novel role of nutrient status in regulation of NRF2 activity and the antioxidant response, and indicates that cAMP/PKA and SIRT1 are upstream regulators for fasting-induced activation of the NRF2-ARE pathway. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 15–30. PMID:23725046

  6. SALL4, a stem cell factor, affects the side population by regulation of the ATP-binding cassette drug transport genes.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ha-Won; Cui, Wei; Yang, Youyang; Lu, Jiayun; He, Jie; Li, Ailing; Song, David; Guo, Ye; Liu, Bee H; Chai, Li

    2011-01-01

    Our previous work shows that the stem cell factor SALL4 plays a central role in embryonic and leukemic stem cells. In this study, we report that SALL4 expression was higher in drug resistant primary acute myeloid leukemic patients than those from drug-responsive cases. In addition, while overexpression of SALL4 led to drug resistance in cell lines, cells with decreased SALL4 expression were more sensitive to drug treatments than the parental cells. This led to our investigation of the implication of SALL4 in drug resistance and its role in side population (SP) cancer stem cells. SALL4 expression was higher in SP cells compared to non-SP cells by 2-4 fold in various malignant hematopoietic cell lines. Knocking down of SALL4 in isolated SP cells resulted in a reduction of SP cells, indicating that SALL4 is required for their self-renewal. The SP phenotype is known to be mediated by members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transport protein family, such as ABCG2 and ABCA3. Using chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP), quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay(EMSA), we demonstrated that SALL4 was able to bind to the promoter region of ABCA3 and activate its expression while regulating the expression of ABCG2 indirectly. Furthermore, SALL4 expression was positively correlated to those of ABCG2 and ABCA3 in primary leukemic patient samples. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for SALL4 in drug sensitivity, at least in part through the maintenance of SP cells, and therefore may be responsible for drug-resistance in leukemia. We are the first to demonstrate a direct link between stem cell factor SALL4, SP and drug resistance in leukemia. PMID:21526180

  7. AtMRP2, an Arabidopsis ATP binding cassette transporter able to transport glutathione S-conjugates and chlorophyll catabolites: functional comparisons with Atmrp1.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y P; Li, Z S; Drozdowicz, Y M; Hortensteiner, S; Martinoia, E; Rea, P A

    1998-01-01

    Three ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter-like activities directed toward large amphipathic organic anions have recently been identified on the vacuolar membrane of plant cells. These are the Mg-ATP-energized, vanadate-inhibitable vacuolar accumulation of glutathione S-conjugates (GS conjugates), chlorophyll catabolites, and bile acids, respectively. Although each of these activities previously had been assigned to distinct pumps in native plant membranes, we describe here the molecular cloning, physical mapping, and heterologous expression of a gene, AtMRP2, from Arabidopsis thaliana that encodes a multispecific ABC transporter competent in the transport of both GS conjugates and chlorophyll catabolites. Unlike its isoform, AtMRP1, which transports the model Brassica napus chlorophyll catabolite transporter substrate Bn-NCC-1 at low efficiency, heterologously expressed AtMRP2 has the facility for simultaneous high-efficiency parallel transport of GS conjugates and Bn-NCC-1. The properties of AtMRP2 therefore establish a basis for the manipulation of two previously identified plant ABC transporter activities and provide an explanation for how the comparable transporter in native plant membranes would be systematically mistaken for two distinct transporters. These findings are discussed with respect to the functional organization of AtMRP2, the inability of AtMRP2 and AtMRP1 to transport the model bile acid transporter substrate taurocholate (despite the pronounced sensitivity of both to direct inhibition by this agent), the differential patterns of expression of their genes in the intact plant, and the high capacity of AtMRP2 for the transport of glutathionated herbicides and anthocyanins. PMID:9490749

  8. Mutant Allele-Specific Uncoupling of PENETRATION3 Functions Reveals Engagement of the ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter in Distinct Tryptophan Metabolic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xunli; Dittgen, Jan; Pi?lewska-Bednarek, Mariola; Molina, Antonio; Schneider, Bernd; Svato, Ale; Doubsk, Jan; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Weigel, Detlef; Bednarek, Pawe?; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) penetration (PEN) genes quantitatively contribute to the execution of different forms of plant immunity upon challenge with diverse leaf pathogens. PEN3 encodes a plasma membrane-resident pleiotropic drug resistance-type ATP-binding cassette transporter and is thought to act in a pathogen-inducible and PEN2 myrosinase-dependent metabolic pathway in extracellular defense. This metabolic pathway directs the intracellular biosynthesis and activation of tryptophan-derived indole glucosinolates for subsequent PEN3-mediated efflux across the plasma membrane at pathogen contact sites. However, PEN3 also functions in abiotic stress responses to cadmium and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA)-mediated auxin homeostasis in roots, raising the possibility that PEN3 exports multiple functionally unrelated substrates. Here, we describe the isolation of a pen3 allele, designated pen3-5, that encodes a dysfunctional protein that accumulates in planta like wild-type PEN3. The specific mutation in pen3-5 uncouples PEN3 functions in IBA-stimulated root growth modulation, callose deposition induced with a conserved peptide epitope of bacterial flagellin (flg22), and pathogen-inducible salicylic acid accumulation from PEN3 activity in extracellular defense, indicating the engagement of multiple PEN3 substrates in different PEN3-dependent biological processes. We identified 4-O-?-D-glucosyl-indol-3-yl formamide (4OGlcI3F) as a pathogen-inducible, tryptophan-derived compound that overaccumulates in pen3 leaf tissue and has biosynthesis that is dependent on an intact PEN2 metabolic pathway. We propose that a precursor of 4OGlcI3F is the PEN3 substrate in extracellular pathogen defense. These precursors, the shared indole core present in IBA and 4OGlcI3F, and allele-specific uncoupling of a subset of PEN3 functions suggest that PEN3 transports distinct indole-type metabolites in distinct biological processes. PMID:26023163

  9. Retinoic Acid Isomers Up-Regulate ATP Binding Cassette A1 and G1 and Cholesterol Efflux in Rat Astrocytes: Implications for Their Therapeutic and Teratogenic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Costa, Lucio G.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that retinoids may be effective in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, although exposure to an excess of retinoids during gestation causes teratogenesis. Cholesterol is essential for brain development, but high levels of cholesterol have been associated with Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that retinoic acid may affect cholesterol homeostasis in rat astrocytes, which regulate cholesterol distribution in the brain, through the up-regulation of cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette (Abc)a1 and Abcg1. Tretinoin, 13-cis retinoic acid (13-cis-RA), 9-cis-RA, and the selective retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonist methoprene significantly increased cholesterol efflux induced by cholesterol acceptors and protein levels of Abca1 by 2.3- (±0.25), 3.6- (±0.42), 4.1- (±0.5), and 1.75- (±0.43) fold, respectively, and Abcg1 by 2.1- (±0.26), 2.2- (±0.33), 2.5- (±0.23), and 2.2- (±0.21) fold, respectively. 13-cis-RA and 9-cis-RA also significantly increased mRNA levels of Abca1 (maximal induction 7.3 ± 0.42 and 2.7 ± 0.17, respectively) and Abcg1 (maximal induction 2.0 ± 0.18 and 1.8 ± 0.09, respectively), and the levels of membrane-bound Abca1 (2.5 ± 0.3 and 2.5 ± 0.40-fold increase, respectively), whereas they significantly decreased intracellular cholesterol content without affecting cholesterol synthesis. The effect of 9-cis-RA on cholesterol homeostasis in astrocytes can be ascribed to the activation of RXR, whereas the effects of 13-cis-RA and tretinoin were independent of either RXRs or retinoic acid receptors. These findings suggest that retinoids affect cholesterol homeostasis in astrocytes and that this effect may be involved in both their therapeutic and teratogenic actions. PMID:21628419

  10. ATP-binding cassette ABCC1 is involved in the release of sphingosine 1-phosphate from rat uterine leiomyoma ELT3 cells and late pregnant rat myometrium.

    PubMed

    Tanfin, Zahra; Serrano-Sanchez, Martin; Leiber, Denis

    2011-12-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid generated by sphingosine kinases (SphK1/2), initiates different signalling pathways involved in physiological and pathological processes. We previously demonstrated that in rat myometrium at late (day 19) gestation, SphK1 increases the expression of COX2 via S1P generation and release. In rat uterine leiomyoma cells (ELT3), SphK1/S1P axis controls survival and proliferation. In the present study we demonstrate that PDBu activates SphK1 but not SphK2. SphK1 activation requires PKC and MAPK ERK1/2. S1P produced by PDBu is released in the medium. PDBu-induced S1P export is abolished by Ro-318220 and BIM (PKC inhibitors), by U0126 and PD98059 (MEK inhibitors), SKI-II (SphKI/2 inhibitor) and SphK1-siRNA, suggesting the involvement of PKC, ERK and SphK1 respectively. The release of S1P is insensitive to inhibitors of ATP Binding Cassette (ABC)A1 and ABCB1 transporters, but is abolished when ABCC1 transporters are inhibited by MK571 or down-regulated by ABCC1-siRNA. PDBu increases COX2 expression that is blocked by the inhibition of PKC, ERK1/2, SphK1, and when cells are treated with MK571 or transfected with ABCC1-siRNA. The induction of COX2 by the S1P release due to PDBu or by exogenous S1P involves S1P2 receptors coupled to Gi. In myometrium from rat at late gestation, the release of S1P is also strongly reduced when SphK and ABCC1 are inhibited. The data reveal that in rat leiomyoma cells and late pregnant rat myometrium, the release of S1P involves a similar signalling pathway and occurs through ABCC1. PMID:21803151

  11. Mycophenolic acid induces ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) expression through the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yanni; Lai, Fangfang; Xu, Yang; Wu, Yexiang; Liu, Qi; Li, Ni; Wei, Yuzhen; Feng, Tingting; Zheng, Zhihui; Jiang, Wei; Yu, Liyan; Hong, Bin; Si, Shuyi

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using an ABCA1p-LUC HepG2 cell line, we found that MPA upregulated ABCA1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MPA induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 markedly inhibited MPA-induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of MPA upregulating ABCA1 was due mainly to activation of the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 pathway. -- Abstract: ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) promotes cholesterol and phospholipid efflux from cells to lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I and plays an important role in atherosclerosis. In a previous study, we developed a high-throughput screening method using an ABCA1p-LUC HepG2 cell line to find upregulators of ABCA1. Using this method in the present study, we found that mycophenolic acid (MPA) upregulated ABCA1 expression (EC50 = 0.09 {mu}M). MPA upregulation of ABCA1 expression was confirmed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis in HepG2 cells. Previous work has indicated that MPA is a potent agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}; EC50 = 5.2-9.3 {mu}M). Liver X receptor {alpha} (LXR{alpha}) is a target gene of PPAR{gamma} and may directly regulate ABCA1 expression. Western blot analysis showed that MPA induced LXR{alpha} protein expression in HepG2 cells. Addition of PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 markedly inhibited MPA-induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression. These data suggest that MPA increased ABCA1 expression mainly through activation of PPAR{gamma}. Thus, the effects of MPA on upregulation of ABCA1 expression were due mainly to activation of the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 signaling pathway. This is the first report that the antiatherosclerosis activity of MPA is due to this mechanism.

  12. Seminal Plasma Characteristics and Expression of ATP-binding Cassette Transporter A1 (ABCA1) in Canine Spermatozoa from Ejaculates with Good and Bad Freezability.

    PubMed

    Schäfer-Somi, S; Palme, N

    2016-04-01

    The composition of seminal plasma and the localization of the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) in spermatozoa from good and bad freezers were compared to frozen-thawed spermatozoa from the same dog. Ejaculates were obtained from 31 stud dogs, and the sperm-rich fraction (SRF) was kept for analysis. One aliquot was used for the analysis of concentration, progressive motility (P; CASA), viability (V; CASA) and leucocyte count, and the analysis was performed by flow cytometry (FITC-PNA/PI), SCSA and HOST. In seminal plasma, concentration of albumin, cholesterol, calcium, inorganic phosphate, sodium, potassium, zinc and copper was measured. Semen smears were prepared and evaluated for the expression of ABCA1. The remainder of each ejaculate was frozen. After thawing, the quality assessment was repeated and further smears were prepared. According to post-thaw semen quality, dogs were assigned to good freezers (n = 20) or bad freezers (n = 11), the latter were defined as < 50% progressive motility and/or > 40% morphologically abnormal sperm and/or < 50% viability. Bad freezers were older than good freezers (5.3 vs 3.4 years, p < 0.05). In bad freezers, the percentage of sperm with ABCA1 signal in the acrosome was lower (26.3% vs 35.7%, p < 0.01) and the percentage of sperm with complete loss of ABCA1 signal higher (46.7% vs 30%, p < 0.01); the percentage of dead spermatozoa was higher (36.1% vs 25.5%, p < 0.05), and the concentration of cholesterol and sodium in seminal plasma was lower than in good freezers (p < 0.05). We conclude that in thawed bad freezer sperm, an increase in acrosome damages coincided with an increased loss of cholesterol transporters and cell death, and a lower cholesterol concentration in seminal plasma. Follow-up studies revealed whether a relation exists between these findings. PMID:26848092

  13. A role for calcium in the regulation of ATP-binding cassette, sub-family C, member 3 (ABCC3) gene expression in a model of epidermal growth factor-mediated breast cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Teneale A; Azimi, Iman; Thompson, Erik W; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2015-03-13

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process implicated in cancer metastasis, is associated with the transcriptional regulation of members of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily of efflux pumps, and drug resistance in breast cancer cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced EMT in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells is calcium signal dependent. In this study induction of EMT was shown to result in the transcriptional up-regulation of ATP-binding cassette, subfamily C, member 3 (ABCC3), a member of the ABC transporter superfamily, which has a recognized role in multidrug resistance. Buffering of cytosolic free calcium inhibited EGF-mediated ABCC3 increases, indicating a calcium-dependent mode of regulation. Silencing of TRPM7 (an ion channel involved in EMT associated vimentin induction) did not inhibit ABCC3 up-regulation. Silencing of the store operated calcium entry (SOCE) pathway components ORAI1 and STIM1 also did not alter ABCC3 induction by EGF. However, the calcium permeable ion channel transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C, member 1 (TRPC1) appears to contribute to the regulation of both basal and EGF-induced ABCC3 mRNA. Improved understanding of the relationship between calcium signaling, EMT and the regulation of genes important in therapeutic resistance may help identify novel therapeutic targets for breast cancer. PMID:25666946

  14. The hypocholesterolemic activity of aa (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) is mediated by the enhanced expression of the ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G transporters 5 and 8 and low-density lipoprotein receptor genes in the rat.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Melina Oliveira; Souza E Silva, Lorena; de Brito Magalhes, Cntia Lopes; de Figueiredo, Bianca Barros; Costa, Daniela Caldeira; Silva, Marcelo Eustquio; Pedrosa, Maria Lcia

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the ingestion of aa pulp can improve serum lipid profile in various animal models; therefore, we hypothesized that aa pulp (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) may modulate the expression of the genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis in the liver and increase fecal excretion, thus reducing serum cholesterol. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the expression of 7?-hydroxylase and ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G transporters (ABCG5 and ABCG8), which are genes involved with the secretion of cholesterol in the rat. We also evaluated the expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase, low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R), and apolipoprotein B100, which are involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Female Fischer rats were divided into 4 groups: the C group, which was fed a standard AIN-93 M diet; the CA group, which was fed a standard diet supplemented with 2% aa pulp; the H group, which was fed a hypercholesterolemic diet (25% soy oil and 1% cholesterol); and the HA group, which was fed a hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with 2% aa pulp. At the end of the experimental period, the rats were euthanized, and their blood and livers were collected. The HA group exhibited a significant decrease in serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and atherogenic index and also had increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and cholesterol excretion in feces compared with the H group. In addition, the expression of the LDL-R, ABCG5, and ABCG8 genes was significantly increased by the presence of aa pulp. These results suggest that aa pulp promotes a hypocholesterolemic effect in a rat model of dietary-induced hypercholesterolemia through an increase in the expression of ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G transporters, and LDL-R genes. PMID:23244543

  15. Genetic variant of V825I in the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 gene and serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several genetic variants in the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) gene have associated with modifications of serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and the susceptibility for coronary heart disease, but the findings are still controversial in diverse racial/ethnic groups. Bai Ku Yao is an isolated subgroup of the Yao minority in southern China. The present study was undertaken to detect the possible association of V825I (rs2066715) polymorphism in the ABCA1 gene and several environmental factors with serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations. Methods A total of 677 subjects of Bai Ku Yao and 646 participants of Han Chinese were randomly selected from our previous stratified randomized cluster samples. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism assay combined with gel electrophoresis were performed for the genotyping of V825I variant, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. Results The levels of serum total cholesterol (TC), HDL-C, apolipoprotein (Apo) AI and ApoB were lower in Bai Ku Yao than in Han (P < 0.01 for all). The frequency of G and A alleles was 57.4% and 42.6% in Bai Ku Yao, and 57.7% and 42.3% in Han (P > 0.05); respectively. The frequency of GG, GA and AA genotypes was 33.7%, 47.4% and 18.9% in Bai Ku Yao, and 33.4%, 48.6% and 18.0% in Han (P > 0.05); respectively. There was no difference in the genotypic and allelic frequencies between males and females in the both ethnic groups. The subjects with AA genotype in Bai Ku Yao had higher serum TC levels than the subjects with GG and GA genotypes (P < 0.05). The participants with AA genotype in Han had lower serum HDL-C and ApoAI levels than the participants with GG and GA genotypes (P < 0.05 for each), but these results were found in males but not in females. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that the levels of TC in Bai Ku Yao and HDL-C and ApoAI in male Han were correlated with genotypes (P < 0.05 for all). Serum lipid parameters were also correlated with sex, age, body mass index, alcohol consumption, and blood pressure in both ethnic groups (P < 0.05-0.001). Conclusion The present study suggests that the V825I polymorphism in the ABCA1 gene is associated with male serum HDL-C and ApoAI levels in the Han, and serum TC levels in the Bai Ku Yao populations. The difference in the association of V825I polymorphism and serum lipid levels between the two ethnic groups might partly result from different ABCA1 gene-enviromental interactions. PMID:21247457

  16. Macrophage-activating lipopeptide-2 downregulates the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 by activating the TLR2/NF-кB/ZNF202 pathway in THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liangjie; Zhang, Zizhen; Zhang, Min; Yu, Xiaohua; Yao, Feng; Tan, Yulin; Liu, Dan; Gong, Duo; Chong, Huang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zheng, Xilong; Tian, Guoping; Tang, Chaoke

    2016-04-01

    Macrophage-activating lipopeptide-2 (MALP-2) has been shown to promote the development of atherosclerosis. ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), a transmembrane protein, plays a critical role in mediating cholesterol export from macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I). However, whether MALP-2 can regulate the expression of ABCA1 is still largely unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of MALP-2 on ABCA1 expression in THP-1 macrophages and the underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that the treatment of cells with MALP-2 decreased ABCA1 level and suppressed cholesterol efflux in both concentration- and time-dependent manners. The contents of intracellular cholesterol were significantly increased in the presence of MALP-2. Moreover, MALP-2-mediated inhibition of ABCA1 expression was abolished by siRNA of either Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) or nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). A similar effect was produced by treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate. In addition, MALP-2-induced activation of NF-κB markedly increased zinc finger protein 202 (ZNF202) level, and ZNF202 siRNA impaired the effects of MALP-2 on ABCA1 expression. Taken together, these results suggest that MALP-2 can decrease ABCA1 expression and subsequent cholesterol efflux through activation of the TLR2/NF-κB/ZNF202 signaling pathway in THP-1 macrophages. PMID:26922321

  17. Block of ATP-Binding Cassette B19 Ion Channel Activity by 5-Nitro-2-(3-Phenylpropylamino)-Benzoic Acid Impairs Polar Auxin Transport and Root Gravitropism1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Misuk; Henry, Elizabeth M.; Lewis, Daniel R.; Wu, Guosheng; Muday, Gloria K.

    2014-01-01

    Polar transport of the hormone auxin through tissues and organs depends on membrane proteins, including some B-subgroup members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. The messenger RNA level of at least one B-subgroup ABCB gene in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), ABCB19, increases upon treatment with the anion channel blocker 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (NPPB), possibly to compensate for an inhibitory effect of the drug on ABCB19 activity. Consistent with this hypothesis, NPPB blocked ion channel activity associated with ABCB19 expressed in human embryonic kidney cells as measured by patch-clamp electrophysiology. NPPB inhibited polar auxin transport through Arabidopsis seedling roots similarly to abcb19 mutations. NPPB also inhibited shootward auxin transport, which depends on the related ABCB4 protein. NPPB substantially decreased ABCB4 and ABCB19 protein levels when cycloheximide concomitantly inhibited new protein synthesis, indicating that blockage by NPPB enhances the degradation of ABCB transporters. Impairing the principal auxin transport streams in roots with NPPB caused aberrant patterns of auxin signaling reporters in root apices. Formation of the auxin-signaling gradient across the tips of gravity-stimulated roots, and its developmental consequence (gravitropism), were inhibited by micromolar concentrations of NPPB that did not affect growth rate. These results identify ion channel activity of ABCB19 that is blocked by NPPB, a compound that can now be considered an inhibitor of polar auxin transport with a defined molecular target. PMID:25324509

  18. ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter G1 and High-Density Lipoprotein Promote Endothelial NO Synthesis Through a Decrease in the Interaction of Caveolin-1 and Endothelial NO Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Terasaka, Naoki; Westerterp, Marit; Koetsveld, Joris; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos; Yvan-Charvet, Laurent; Wang, Nan; Sessa, William C.; Tall, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether cholesterol efflux to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) via ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) modulates the interaction of caveolin (Cav) 1 and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Methods and Results ABCG1 promotes cholesterol and 7-oxysterol efflux from endothelial cells (ECs) to HDL. It was previously reported that ABCG1 protects against dietary cholesterol-induced endothelial dysfunction by promoting the efflux of 7-oxysterols to HDL. Increased cholesterol loading in ECs is known to cause an inhibitory interaction between Cav-1 and eNOS and impaired NO release. In human aortic ECs, free cholesterol loading promoted the interaction of Cav-1 with eNOS, reducing eNOS activity. These effects of cholesterol loading were reversed by HDL in an ABCG1-dependent manner. HDL also reversed the inhibition of eNOS by cholesterol loading in murine lung ECs, but this effect of HDL was abolished in Cav-1–deficient murine lung ECs. Increased interaction of Cav-1 with eNOS was also detected in aortic homogenates of high-cholesterol diet–fed Abcg1−/− mice, paralleling a decrease in eNOS activity and impaired endothelial function. Conclusion The promotion of cholesterol efflux via ABCG1 results in a reduced inhibitory interaction of eNOS with Cav-1. PMID:20798376

  19. Change in ATP-binding cassette B1/19, glutamine synthetase and alcohol dehydrogenase gene expression during root elongation in Betula pendula Roth and Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn in response to leachate and leonardite humic substances.

    PubMed

    Tahiri, Abdelghani; Delporte, Fabienne; Muhovski, Yordan; Ongena, Marc; Thonart, Philippe; Druart, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) are complex and heterogeneous compounds of humified organic matter resulting from the chemical and microbiological decomposition of organic residues. HS have a positive effect on plant growth and development by improving soil structure and fertility. They have long been recognized as plant growth-promoting substances, particularly with regard to influencing nutrient uptake, root growth and architecture. The biochemical and molecular mechanisms through which HS influence plant physiology are not well understood. This study evaluated the bioactivity of landfill leachate and leonardite HS on alder (Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn) and birch (Betula pendula Roth) during root elongation in vitro. Changes in root development were studied in relation to auxin, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms, as well as to the stress adaptive response. The cDNA fragments of putative genes encoding two ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters (ABCB1 and ABCB19) belonging to the B subfamily of plant ABC auxin transporters were cloned and sequenced. Molecular data indicate that HS and their humic acid (HA) fractions induce root growth by influencing polar auxin transport (PAT), as illustrated by the modulation of the ABCB transporter transcript levels (ABCB1 and ABCB19). There were also changes in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) gene transcript levels in response to HS exposure. These findings confirmed that humic matter affects plant growth and development through various metabolic pathways, including hormonal, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms and stress response or signalization. PMID:26595095

  20. Crystal structures and mutational analysis of the arginine-, lysine-, histidine-binding protein ArtJ from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. Implications for interactions of ArtJ with its cognate ATP-binding cassette transporter, Art(MP)2.

    PubMed

    Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Eckey, Viola; Scheffel, Frank; Alings, Claudia; Landmesser, Heidi; Schneider, Erwin; Saenger, Wolfram

    2008-01-11

    ArtJ is the substrate-binding component (receptor) of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport system ArtJ-(MP)(2) from the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus that is specific for arginine, lysine, and histidine. The highest affinity is found for arginine (K(d)=0.039(+/-0.014) microM), while the affinities for lysine and histidine are about tenfold lower. We have determined the X-ray structures of ArtJ liganded with each of these substrates at resolutions of 1.79 A (arginine), 1.79 A (lysine), and 2.35 A (histidine), respectively. As found for other solute receptors, the polypeptide chain is folded into two distinct domains (lobes) connected by a hinge. The interface between the lobes forms the substrate-binding pocket whose geometry is well preserved in all three ArtJ/amino acid complexes. Structure-derived mutational analyses indicated the crucial role of a region in the carboxy-terminal lobe of ArtJ in contacting the transport pore Art(MP)(2) and revealed the functional importance of Gln132 and Trp68. While variant Gln132Leu exhibited lower binding affinity for arginine but no binding of lysine and histidine, the variant Trp68Leu had lost binding activity for all three substrates. The results are discussed in comparison with known structures of homologous proteins from mesophilic bacteria. PMID:18022195

  1. Functional Dynamics Revealed by the Structure of the SufBCD Complex, a Novel ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Protein That Serves as a Scaffold for Iron-Sulfur Cluster Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Kei; Yuda, Eiki; Tanaka, Naoyuki; Katayama, Sumie; Iwasaki, Kenji; Matsumoto, Takashi; Kurisu, Genji; Outten, F Wayne; Fukuyama, Keiichi; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Wada, Kei

    2015-12-11

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type ATPases are chemomechanical engines involved in diverse biological pathways. Recent genomic information reveals that ABC ATPase domains/subunits act not only in ABC transporters and structural maintenance of chromosome proteins, but also in iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis. A novel type of ABC protein, the SufBCD complex, functions in the biosynthesis of nascent Fe-S clusters in almost all Eubacteria and Archaea, as well as eukaryotic chloroplasts. In this study, we determined the first crystal structure of the Escherichia coli SufBCD complex, which exhibits the common architecture of ABC proteins: two ABC ATPase components (SufC) with function-specific components (SufB-SufD protomers). Biochemical and physiological analyses based on this structure provided critical insights into Fe-S cluster assembly and revealed a dynamic conformational change driven by ABC ATPase activity. We propose a molecular mechanism for the biogenesis of the Fe-S cluster in the SufBCD complex. PMID:26472926

  2. The bovine ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 Tyr581Ser single-nucleotide polymorphism increases milk secretion of the fluoroquinolone danofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Otero, Jon A; Real, Rebeca; de la Fuente, lvaro; Prieto, Julio G; Marqus, Margarita; lvarez, Ana I; Merino, Gracia

    2013-03-01

    The bovine adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein) polymorphism Tyr581Ser (Y581S) has recently been shown to increase in vitro transepithelial transport of antibiotics. Since this transporter has been extensively related to the active secretion of drugs into milk, the potential in vivo effect of this polymorphism on secretion of xenobiotics in livestock could have striking consequences for milk production, the dairy industry, and public health. Our purpose was to study the in vivo effect of this polymorphism on the secretion of danofloxacin, a widely used veterinary antibiotic, into milk. Danofloxacin (1.25 mg/kg) was administered to six Y/Y 581 homozygous and six Y/S 581 heterozygous lactating cows, and plasma and milk samples were collected and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. No differences were found in the pharmacokinetic parameters of danofloxacin in plasma between the two groups of animals. In contrast, Y/S heterozygous cows showed a 2-fold increase in danofloxacin levels in milk. In addition, the pharmacokinetic elimination parameters, mean residence time and elimination half-life, were significantly lower in the milk of the animals carrying the Y/S polymorphism. These in vivo results are in agreement with our previously published in vitro data, which showed a greater capacity of the S581 variant in accumulation assays, and demonstrate, for the first time, an important effect of the Y581S single-nucleotide polymorphism on antibiotic secretion into cow milk. These findings could be extended to other ABCG2 substrates, and may be relevant for the treatment of mastitis and for the design of accurate and novel strategies to handle milk residues. PMID:23230133

  3. ATP-binding cassette sub-family C member 4 (ABCC4) is overexpressed in human NK/T-cell lymphoma and regulates chemotherapy sensitivity: Potential as a functional therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xudong; Zhao, Lu; Li, Xin; Wang, Xinhua; Li, Ling; Fu, Xiaorui; Sun, Zhenchang; Li, Zhaoming; Nan, Feifei; Chang, Yu; Zhang, Mingzhi

    2015-12-01

    Nasal-type natural killer/T-cell (NK/T-cell) lymphomas are subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), which are typically more clinically aggressive. There is, however relatively little understanding of nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma molecular pathogenesis. Thus, in this study we applied RNA sequencing to systematically screen for altered gene expression in human NK/T-cell lymphoma cell lines YTS and SNK-6 versus normal NK cells. We found that ATP-binding cassette sub-family C Member 4 (ABCC4) levels were significantly upregulated both in human NK/T-cell lymphoma YTS and SNK-6 cells, as compared with normal NK cells. These expression levels were further confirmed by real-time PCR. Protein levels of ABCC4 were also significantly higher in YTS and SNK-6 cells as compared with normal NK cells. Clinically relevant, ABCC4 expression levels were significantly higher in human NK/T-cell lymphoma tissues as compared with control nasal mucosa tissues, confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. In addition, we explored the biological function of such ABCC4 upregulation. Overexpression of ABCC4 by lentivirus transfection induced chemotherapy resistance to epirubicin (EPI) and cisplatin (DDP) in YTS cells. In contrast, knockdown of ABCC4 expression by shRNA contributed to chemotherapy sensitivity by both EPI and DDP. Furthermore, overexpression of ABCC4 inhibited, while downregulation of ABCC4 increased, YTS cell apoptosis following treatment by EPI or DDP. Therefore, the present study identified ABCC4 to be overexpressed in human NK/T-cell lymphoma cells, to regulate chemotherapy sensitivity to EPI and DDP, and possibly to be a functional therapeutic target. These findings may provide a basic rationale for new approaches in the effort to develop anti-tumor therapeutics for NK/T-cell lymphoma. PMID:26499190

  4. The Arabidopsis ATP-binding cassette protein AtMRP5/AtABCC5 is a high affinity inositol hexakisphosphate transporter involved in guard cell signaling and phytate storage.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Rka; Grob, Hanne; Weder, Barbara; Green, Porntip; Klein, Markus; Frelet-Barrand, Annie; Schjoerring, Jan K; Brearley, Charles; Martinoia, Enrico

    2009-11-27

    Arabidopsis possesses a superfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Among these, the multidrug resistance-associated protein AtMRP5/AtABCC5 regulates stomatal aperture and controls plasma membrane anion channels of guard cells. Remarkably, despite the prominent role of AtMRP5 in conferring partial drought insensitivity upon Arabidopsis, we know little of the biochemical function of AtMRP5. Our phylogenetic analysis showed that AtMRP5 is closely related to maize MRP4, mutation of which confers a low inositol hexakisphosphate kernel phenotype. We now show that insertion mutants of AtMRP5 display a low inositol hexakisphosphate phenotype in seed tissue and that this phenotype is associated with alterations of mineral cation and phosphate status. By heterologous expression in yeast, we demonstrate that AtMRP5 encodes a specific and high affinity ATP-dependent inositol hexakisphosphate transporter that is sensitive to inhibitors of ABC transporters. Moreover, complementation of the mrp5-1 insertion mutants of Arabidopsis with the AtMRP5 cDNA driven from a guard cell-specific promoter restores the sensitivity of the mutant to abscisic acid-mediated inhibition of stomatal opening. Additionally, we show that mutation of residues of the Walker B motif prevents restoring the multiple phenotypes associated with mrp5-1. Our findings highlight a novel function of plant ABC transporters that may be relevant to other kingdoms. They also extend the signaling repertoire of this ubiquitous inositol polyphosphate signaling molecule. PMID:19797057

  5. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Shah, Viral S.; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Welsh, Michael J.; Randak, Christoph O.

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ? 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P1,P5-di(adenosine-5?) pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5?-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5?-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl? channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia. PMID:25887396

  6. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase Erk1/2 promotes protein degradation of ATP binding cassette transporters A1 and G1 in CHO and HuH7 cells.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Vishwaroop; Wood, Peta; Manetsch, Melanie; Darabi, Masoud; Cairns, Rose; Hoque, Monira; Chan, Karen Cecilia; Reverter, Meritxell; Alvarez-Guaita, Anna; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Rentero, Carles; Heeren, Joerg; Enrich, Carlos; Grewal, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Signal transduction modulates expression and activity of cholesterol transporters. We recently demonstrated that the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade regulates protein stability of Scavenger Receptor BI (SR-BI) through Proliferator Activator Receptor (PPARα) -dependent degradation pathways. In addition, MAPK (Mek/Erk 1/2) inhibition has been shown to influence liver X receptor (LXR) -inducible ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter ABCA1 expression in macrophages. Here we investigated if Ras/MAPK signaling could alter expression and activity of ABCA1 and ABCG1 in steroidogenic and hepatic cell lines. We demonstrate that in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and human hepatic HuH7 cells, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) inhibition reduces PPARα-inducible ABCA1 protein levels, while ectopic expression of constitutively active H-Ras, K-Ras and MAPK/Erk kinase 1 (Mek1) increases ABCA1 protein expression, respectively. Furthermore, Mek1/2 inhibitors reduce ABCG1 protein levels in ABCG1 overexpressing CHO cells (CHO-ABCG1) and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells treated with LXR agonist. This correlates with Mek1/2 inhibition reducing ABCG1 cell surface expression and decreasing cholesterol efflux onto High Density Lipoproteins (HDL). Real Time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and protein turnover studies reveal that Mek1/2 inhibitors do not target transcriptional regulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1, but promote ABCA1 and ABCG1 protein degradation in HuH7 and CHO cells, respectively. In line with published data from mouse macrophages, blocking Mek1/2 activity upregulates ABCA1 and ABCG1 protein levels in human THP1 macrophages, indicating opposite roles for the Ras/MAPK pathway in the regulation of ABC transporter activity in macrophages compared to steroidogenic and hepatic cell types. In summary, this study suggests that Ras/MAPK signaling modulates PPARα- and LXR-dependent protein degradation pathways in a cell-specific manner to regulate the expression levels of ABCA1 and ABCG1 transporters. PMID:23634230

  7. Phytosterols reduce cholesterol absorption by inhibition of 27-hydroxycholesterol generation, liver X receptor α activation, and expression of the basolateral sterol exporter ATP-binding cassette A1 in Caco-2 enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Reinhard; Johannes, Christian; Ploessl, Florian; Bracher, Franz; Lorenz, Reinhard L

    2012-06-01

    Phytosterol-enriched foods are increasingly marketed to lower cholesterol levels and atherosclerosis in the general population. Phytosterols reduce cholesterol absorption, but the molecular mechanism is controversial. We therefore investigated the phytosterol effects on cholesterol metabolism in human enterocyte, hepatocyte, and macrophage models relevant for sterol absorption, reverse transport, and excretion. Isomolar sitosterol (50 μmol/L) was less effectively taken up by enterocytes than cholesterol but suppressed apical cholesterol uptake by 50% (P < 0.01) and basolateral secretion by two-thirds (P < 0.01) whether added in micelles or ethanol or complexed to cyclodextrin. In contrast, enterocytes handled nanomolar (3)H-sitosterol similarly to cholesterol. Enterocytes selectively oxidized all sterols to 27-hydroxy- and 27-carboxy-sterols. Conversion rates were much lower for sitosterol (0.05 ± 0.02 nmol/mg protein) and campesterol (0.48 ± 0.10) compared with cholesterol (3.73 ± 0.60) (P < 0.001). 27-Hydroxycholesterol (27OH-C) activated liver-X-receptor alpha (LXRα) (P < 0.01) and stimulated ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC) A1 expression (P < 0.001) and basolateral systemic cholesterol secretion from enterocytes (P < 0.05). In co-incubations, phytosterols inhibited 27OH-C generation by sterol 27-hydroxylase (P < 0.001) and reduced LXRα-mediated ABCA1 expression (P < 0.01) and basolateral systemic cholesterol secretion. In contrast, ABCG8 transcription and apical sterol resecretion was unchanged by LXRα activation in human enterocytes. Exogenous LXRα agonists reverted sterol selectivity and phytosterol cholesterol interaction. Due to constitutive apical expression of ABCG5/G8 and LXRα-enhanced basolateral expression of ABCA1 in enterocytes, interference of phytosterols with the generation of the dominating LXRα-agonist 27OH-C blocks the self-priming component of cholesterol absorption. This local LXRα antagonism of dietary phytosterols contributes to sterol selectivity and reduces fractional cholesterol absorption and preloading of nascent HDL with dietary cholesterol. PMID:22535758

  8. Hospicells promote upregulation of the ATP-binding cassette genes by insulin-like growth factor-I via the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway in an ovarian cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    BENABBOU, NADIA; MIRSHAHI, PEZHMAN; CADILLON, MLODIE; SORIA, JEANNETTE; THERWATH, AMU; MIRSHAHI, MASSOUD

    2013-01-01

    Interaction between tumor cells and their microenvironment has a crucial role in the development, progression and drug resistance of cancer. Our objective was to confirm the role of Hospicells, which are stromal cells from the cancer microenvironment, in drug resistance and tumor cell growth. We demonstrated that soluble factors secreted by Hospicells activate several genes and upregulate the JAK/STAT signaling pathway in ovarian cancer cell lines. Hospicells express all insulin-like growth factor (IGF) family as detected by gene array, RT-PCR, protein array and immunocytochemistry. While focusing attention on the microenvironment, we considered the role of IGF-I in proliferation and survival of ovarian cancer cells. Indeed, IGF-I is a major regulator of different stages of cancer development. We studied the effect of exogenously added IGF-I on the regulation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) genes (MDR1, MRP1, MRP2, MRP3, MRP5 and BCRP) in the ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR3 and validated the results obtained using the IGF-IR antagonist picropodophyllin. IGF-I regulates the expression of ABC genes in OVCAR3 cells via the PI3-kinase, MEK and JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathways. The OVCAR3 cell line when co-cultured with Hospicells showed a marked degree of drug resistance. The drug resistance observed could be amplified with exogenous IGF-I. Addition of IGF-IR inhibitor, however, reduced the degree of resistance in these exposed cells. Cells that were treated with anticancer drugs and then exposed to IGF-I showed an increase in drug resistance and, thereby, an increase in cell survival. This observation indicates that drug resistance of OVCAR3 cells increases when there is synergy between OVCAR3 cells and Hospicells and it is amplified when IGF-I was exogenously added. In conclusion, inhibition of IGF-IR and targeting of the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway can be a target for ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:23857432

  9. ATP Binding and Hydrolysis Properties of ABCB10 and Their Regulation by Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wei; Liesa, Marc; Carpenter, Elizabeth P.; Shirihai, Orian S.

    2015-01-01

    ABCB10 (ATP binding cassette sub-family B10) is a mitochondrial inner-membrane ABC transporter. ABCB10 has been shown to protect the heart from the impact of ROS during ischemia-reperfusion and to allow for proper hemoglobin synthesis during erythroid development. ABC transporters are proteins that increase ATP binding and hydrolysis activity in the presence of the transported substrate. However, molecular entities transported by ABCB10 and its regulatory mechanisms are currently unknown. Here we characterized ATP binding and hydrolysis properties of ABCB10 by using the 8-azido-ATP photolabeling technique. This technique can identify potential ABCB10 regulators, transported substrates and amino-acidic residues required for ATP binding and hydrolysis. We confirmed that Gly497 and Lys498 in the Walker A motif, Glu624 in the Walker B motif and Gly602 in the C-Loop motif of ABCB10 are required for proper ATP binding and hydrolysis activity, as their mutation changed ABCB10 8-Azido-ATP photo-labeling. In addition, we show that the potential ABCB10 transported entity and heme precursor delta-aminolevulinic acid (dALA) does not alter 8-azido-ATP photo-labeling. In contrast, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) stimulates ATP hydrolysis without affecting ATP binding, whereas reduced glutathione (GSH) inhibits ATP binding and hydrolysis. Indeed, we detectABCB10 glutathionylation in Cys547 and show that it is one of the exposed cysteine residues within ABCB10 structure. In all, we characterize essential residues for ABCB10 ATPase activity and we provide evidence that supports the exclusion of dALA as a potential substrate directly transported by ABCB10. Last, we show the first molecular mechanism by which mitochondrial oxidative status, through GSH/GSSG, can regulate ABCB10. PMID:26053025

  10. Role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in assembly of MacAB-TolC macrolide transporter.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuo; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2012-12-01

    MacB is a founding member of the Macrolide Exporter family of transporters belonging to the ATP-Binding Cassette superfamily. These proteins are broadly represented in genomes of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and are implicated in virulence and protection against antibiotics and peptide toxins. MacB transporter functions together with MacA, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, which stimulates MacB ATPase. In Gram-negative bacteria, MacA is believed to couple ATP hydrolysis to transport of substrates across the outer membrane through a TolC-like channel. In this study, we report a real-time analysis of concurrent ATP hydrolysis and assembly of MacAB-TolC complex. MacB binds nucleotides with a low millimolar affinity and fast on- and off-rates. In contrast, MacA-MacB complex is formed with a nanomolar affinity, which further increases in the presence of ATP. Our results strongly suggest that association between MacA and MacB is stimulated by ATP binding to MacB but remains unchanged during ATP hydrolysis cycle. We also found that the large periplasmic loop of MacB plays the major role in coupling reactions separated in two different membranes. This loop is required for MacA-dependent stimulation of MacB ATPase and at the same time, contributes to recruitment of TolC into a trans-envelope complex. PMID:23057817

  11. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the ATP-binding subunit of an ABC transporter from Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    PubMed

    Manjula, Mallappa; Pampa, Kudigana J; Madan Kumar, Shankar; Kunishima, Naoki; Lokanath, Neratur K

    2012-11-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, also known as traffic ATPases, form a large family of integral membrane proteins responsible for the translocation of a variety of chemically diverse substrates across the lipid bilayers of cellular membranes of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes by the hydrolysis of ATP. The ATP-binding subunit of an ABC transporter from Geobacillus kaustophilus, a homodimeric enzyme, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Crystals were obtained using the microbatch-under-oil method at 291 K. X-ray diffraction data to 1.6 Å resolution were collected on SPring-8 beamline BL26B1. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a=54.94, b=78.63, c=112.96 Å. Assuming the presence of a dimer in the asymmetric unit gave a crystal volume per protein weight (VM) of 2.32 Å3 Da(-1) and a solvent content of 47%; this was consistent with the results of a dynamic light-scattering experiment, which showed a dimeric state of the protein in solution. Molecular-replacement trials using the crystal structure of HisP from the Salmonella typhimurium ATP-binding subunit of an ABC transporter as a search model did not provide a satisfactory solution, indicating that the two ATP-binding subunits of ABC transporters have substantially different structures. PMID:23143260

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the putative ABC transporter ATP-binding protein from Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Ethayathulla, Abdul S; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Shinkai, Akeo; Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Singh, Tej P; Kaur, Punit; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2008-06-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette transporters (ABC transporters) are ATP hydrolysis-dependent transmembrane transporters. Here, the overproduction, purification and crystallization of the putative ABC transporter ATP-binding protein TM0222 from Thermotoga maritima are reported. The protein was crystallized in the hexagonal space group P6(4)22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 148.49, c = 106.96 A, gamma = 120.0 degrees . Assuming the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit, the calculated V(M) is 2.84 A(3) Da(-1), which corresponds to a solvent content of 56.6%. A three-wavelength MAD data set was collected to 2.3 A resolution from SeMet-substituted TM0222 crystals. Data sets were collected on the BL38B1 beamline at SPring-8, Japan. PMID:18540059

  13. ATP-binding cassette transporter controls leaf surface secretion of anticancer drug components in Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fang; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    The Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) is highly specialized for the biosynthesis of many different monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs), many of which have powerful biological activities. Such MIAs include the commercially important chemotherapy drugs vinblastine, vincristine, and other synthetic derivatives that are derived from the coupling of catharanthine and vindoline. However, previous studies have shown that biosynthesis of these MIAs involves extensive movement of metabolites between specialized internal leaf cells and the leaf epidermis that require the involvement of unknown secretory processes for mobilizing catharanthine to the leaf surface and vindoline to internal leaf cells. Spatial separation of vindoline and catharanthine provides a clear explanation for the low levels of dimers that accumulate in intact plants. The present work describes the molecular cloning and functional identification of a unique catharanthine transporter (CrTPT2) that is expressed predominantly in the epidermis of young leaves. CrTPT2 gene expression is activated by treatment with catharanthine, and its in planta silencing redistributes catharanthine to increase the levels of catharanthine–vindoline drug dimers in the leaves. Phylogenetic analysis shows that CrTPT2 is closely related to a key transporter involved in cuticle assembly in plants and that may be unique to MIA-producing plant species, where it mediates secretion of alkaloids to the plant surface. PMID:24019465

  14. Marine medaka ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily and new insight into teleost Abch nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chang-Bum; Kim, Bo-Mi; Kang, Hye-Min; Choi, Ik-Young; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The ABC gene family is recognized as one of the largest gene families in all kingdoms of life. Although many genes involved in the ABC superfamily have been annotated from several fish species, information on large sets of the ABC superfamily and their evolutionary characterization are still unclear. In the marine medaka Oryzias melastigma, 50 ABC transporters were identified with bioinformatics-aided in silico analyses, and their full-length cDNA sequences were characterized. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that they could be classified into the eight subfamilies (A-H) that include all members of all ABC subfamilies. Interestingly, several teleosts' Abcg members were closely clustered with Abch members in a distinctive clade. The abch gene was also observed in the coelacanth and the spotted gar, suggesting that this gene was retained from a bilaterian ancestor and that a gene loss event recently occurred in the tetrapod lineage. In teleosts, the nomenclature of previously annotated abcg genes should be considered carefully, as they form a distinctive clade with the marine medaka abch subfamily and other teleost abch genes, but not with the members of the Abcg subfamily. PMID:26472499

  15. ROLE OF PLACENTAL ATP-BINDING CASSETTE (ABC) TRANSPORTERS IN ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY DURING PREGNANCY

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Abhishek; Gerk, Phillip M.

    2010-01-01

    Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART) is used to treat HIV-infected patients and involves administration of multiple antiretroviral drugs acting at different steps of the HIV life cycle. In treating HIV-infected pregnant patients, the aim of therapy is not only to treat the mother but also to prevent the transmission of the virus to the fetus. Among the antiretroviral drugs used, there are differences in the extent of transfer of these drugs across the placenta; HIV protease inhibitors are particularly poorly transferred. Activities of ABC transporters expressed in the human placenta as well as differences in plasma protein binding may account for the poor transplacental transfer of certain drugs. This review discusses factors affecting the extent of placental transfer of antiretroviral drugs during pregnancy. These issues may also apply to drugs in other therapeutic categories. PMID:19067393

  16. Marine medaka ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily and new insight into teleost Abch nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Chang-Bum; Kim, Bo-Mi; Kang, Hye-Min; Choi, Ik-Young; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The ABC gene family is recognized as one of the largest gene families in all kingdoms of life. Although many genes involved in the ABC superfamily have been annotated from several fish species, information on large sets of the ABC superfamily and their evolutionary characterization are still unclear. In the marine medaka Oryzias melastigma, 50 ABC transporters were identified with bioinformatics-aided in silico analyses, and their full-length cDNA sequences were characterized. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that they could be classified into the eight subfamilies (A–H) that include all members of all ABC subfamilies. Interestingly, several teleosts’ Abcg members were closely clustered with Abch members in a distinctive clade. The abch gene was also observed in the coelacanth and the spotted gar, suggesting that this gene was retained from a bilaterian ancestor and that a gene loss event recently occurred in the tetrapod lineage. In teleosts, the nomenclature of previously annotated abcg genes should be considered carefully, as they form a distinctive clade with the marine medaka abch subfamily and other teleost abch genes, but not with the members of the Abcg subfamily. PMID:26472499

  17. ATP-binding cassette transporter enhances tolerance to DDT in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Ning, YingZhi; Dang, Huai; Liu, GuangLong; Xiong, Jie; Yuan, DongXia; Feng, LiFang; Miao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    The reuse of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) as an indoor residual spray was permitted by the World Health Organization in 2007, and approximately 14 countries still use DDT to control disease vectors. The extensive exposure of insects to DDT has resulted in the emergence of DDT resistance, especially in mosquitoes, and the mechanism for this resistance in mosquitoes has been widely reported. Spraying can also introduce DDT directly into surface water, and DDT can subsequently accumulate in microorganisms, but the mechanism for the resistance to DDT degradation in microorganisms is unclear. Using whole-genome microarray analysis, we detected an abcb15 gene that was up-regulated in a specific manner by DDT treatment in T. thermophile. The deduced ABCB15 peptide sequence had two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) to form the structure TMD-NBD-TMD-NBD, and each NBD contained three conserved motifs: Walker-A, C-loop, and Walker-B, which indicated the T. thermophila abcb15 was a typical ABC transporter gene. The expression of ABCB15 fused with a C-terminal green fluorescent protein was found to be on the periphery of the cell, suggesting that ABCB15 was a membrane pump protein. In addition, cells with abcb15 partially knocked down (abcb15-KD) grew slower than wild-type cells in the presence of 256 mg L(-1) DDT, indicating the tolerance of abcb15-KD strain to DDT exposure was decreased. Thus, we suggest that in Tetrahymena, the membrane pump protein encoded by ABCT gene abcb15 can enhance the tolerance to DDT and protect cells from this exogenous toxin by efficiently pumping it to the extracellular space. PMID:25260902

  18. Putative ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter Is Essential for Brucella ovis Pathogenesis in Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Teane M. A.; Paixão, Tatiane A.; Costa, Érica A.; Xavier, Mariana N.; Sá, Joicy Cortez; Moustacas, Valéria S.; den Hartigh, Andreas B.; Carvalho Neta, Alcina V.; Oliveira, Sérgio C.; Tsolis, Renée; Santos, Renato L.

    2011-01-01

    Brucella ovis is a major cause of reproductive failure in sheep, which is associated with epididymitis and infertility in rams. Importantly, B. ovis is one of the few Brucella species that is not zoonotic. Due to the scarcity of studies on B. ovis infection, a murine model of infection was developed. The roles of B. ovis genes encoding a putative hemagglutinin and an ABC transporter were investigated in the mouse model. The kinetics of B. ovis infection were similar in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, and both strains of mice developed multifocal microgranulomas in the liver and spleen, but only minimal colonization and histopathological changes were observed in the genital tract. Therefore, the mouse was considered a suitable infection model for B. ovis but not for B. ovis-induced genital disease. Two mutant strains were generated in this study (the ΔabcAB and Δhmg strains). The B. ovis ΔabcAB strain was attenuated in the spleens and livers of BALB/c mice compared to the wild-type (WT) strain (P < 0.001). Conversely, the Δhmg strain infected mice at the same level as WT B. ovis, suggesting that a putative hemagglutinin is not required for B. ovis pathogenesis. Additionally, the ΔabcAB strain did not survive in peritoneal macrophages, extracellularly in the peritoneal cavity, or in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Moreover, infection with the ΔabcAB strain was not lethal for male regulatory factor 1-knockout mice, whereas infection with the B. ovis WT strain was 100% lethal within 14 days postinfection. These results confirm that the predicted ABC transporter is required for the full virulence and survival of B. ovis in vivo. PMID:21300772

  19. Equilibrated Atomic Models of Outward-Facing P-glycoprotein and Effect of ATP Binding on Structural Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Lurong; Aller, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that alternates between inward- and outward-facing conformations to capture and force substrates out of cells like a peristaltic pump. The high degree of similarity in outward-facing structures across evolution of ABC transporters allowed construction of a high-confidence outward-facing Pgp atomic model based on crystal structures of outward-facing Sav1866 and inward-facing Pgp. The model adhered to previous experimentally determined secondary- and tertiary- configurations during all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in the presence or absence of MgATP. Three long lasting (>100 ns) meta-stable states were apparent in the presence of MgATP revealing new insights into alternating access. The two ATP-binding pockets are highly asymmetric resulting in differential control of overall structural dynamics and allosteric regulation of the drug-binding pocket. Equilibrated Pgp has a considerably different electrostatic profile compared to Sav1866 that implicates significant kinetic and thermodynamic differences in transport mechanisms. PMID:25600711

  20. ATP binding turns plant cryptochrome into an efficient natural photoswitch.

    PubMed

    Mller, Pavel; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Hitomi, Kenichi; Balland, Vronique; Getzoff, Elizabeth D; Ritz, Thorsten; Brettel, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Cryptochromes are flavoproteins that drive diverse developmental light-responses in plants and participate in the circadian clock in animals. Plant cryptochromes have found application as photoswitches in optogenetics. We have studied effects of pH and ATP on the functionally relevant photoreduction of the oxidized FAD cofactor to the semi-reduced FADH() radical in isolated Arabidopsis cryptochrome 1 by transient absorption spectroscopy on nanosecond to millisecond timescales. In the absence of ATP, the yield of light-induced radicals strongly decreased with increasing pH from 6.5 to 8.5. With ATP present, these yields were significantly higher and virtually pH-independent up to pH 9. Analysis of our data in light of the crystallographic structure suggests that ATP-binding shifts the pKa of aspartic acid D396, the putative proton donor to FAD(-), from ~7.4 to >9, and favours a reaction pathway yielding long-lived aspartate D396(-). Its negative charge could trigger conformational changes necessary for signal transduction. PMID:24898692

  1. ATP Binding Turns Plant Cryptochrome Into an Efficient Natural Photoswitch

    PubMed Central

    Mller, Pavel; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Hitomi, Kenichi; Balland, Vronique; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.; Ritz, Thorsten; Brettel, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Cryptochromes are flavoproteins that drive diverse developmental light-responses in plants and participate in the circadian clock in animals. Plant cryptochromes have found application as photoswitches in optogenetics. We have studied effects of pH and ATP on the functionally relevant photoreduction of the oxidized FAD cofactor to the semi-reduced FADH radical in isolated Arabidopsis cryptochrome 1 by transient absorption spectroscopy on nanosecond to millisecond timescales. In the absence of ATP, the yield of light-induced radicals strongly decreased with increasing pH from 6.5 to 8.5. With ATP present, these yields were significantly higher and virtually pH-independent up to pH 9. Analysis of our data in light of the crystallographic structure suggests that ATP-binding shifts the pKa of aspartic acid D396, the putative proton donor to FAD?, from ~7.4 to >9, and favours a reaction pathway yielding long-lived aspartate D396?. Its negative charge could trigger conformational changes necessary for signal transduction. PMID:24898692

  2. ATP Binding Turns Plant Cryptochrome Into an Efficient Natural Photoswitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Pavel; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Hitomi, Kenichi; Balland, Véronique; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.; Ritz, Thorsten; Brettel, Klaus

    2014-06-01

    Cryptochromes are flavoproteins that drive diverse developmental light-responses in plants and participate in the circadian clock in animals. Plant cryptochromes have found application as photoswitches in optogenetics. We have studied effects of pH and ATP on the functionally relevant photoreduction of the oxidized FAD cofactor to the semi-reduced FADH. radical in isolated Arabidopsis cryptochrome 1 by transient absorption spectroscopy on nanosecond to millisecond timescales. In the absence of ATP, the yield of light-induced radicals strongly decreased with increasing pH from 6.5 to 8.5. With ATP present, these yields were significantly higher and virtually pH-independent up to pH 9. Analysis of our data in light of the crystallographic structure suggests that ATP-binding shifts the pKa of aspartic acid D396, the putative proton donor to FAD.-, from ~7.4 to >9, and favours a reaction pathway yielding long-lived aspartate D396-. Its negative charge could trigger conformational changes necessary for signal transduction.

  3. Molecular mechanism of ATP binding and ion channel activation in P2X receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-10-24

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-activated ion channels permeable to Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. The seven P2X receptor subtypes are implicated in physiological processes that include modulation of synaptic transmission, contraction of smooth muscle, secretion of chemical transmitters and regulation of immune responses. Despite the importance of P2X receptors in cellular physiology, the three-dimensional composition of the ATP-binding site, the structural mechanism of ATP-dependent ion channel gating and the architecture of the open ion channel pore are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4 receptor in complex with ATP and a new structure of the apo receptor. The agonist-bound structure reveals a previously unseen ATP-binding motif and an open ion channel pore. ATP binding induces cleft closure of the nucleotide-binding pocket, flexing of the lower body {beta}-sheet and a radial expansion of the extracellular vestibule. The structural widening of the extracellular vestibule is directly coupled to the opening of the ion channel pore by way of an iris-like expansion of the transmembrane helices. The structural delineation of the ATP-binding site and the ion channel pore, together with the conformational changes associated with ion channel gating, will stimulate development of new pharmacological agents.

  4. Bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate accumulation in macrophages induces intracellular cholesterol redistribution, attenuates liver-X receptor/ATP-Binding cassette transporter A1/ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 pathway, and impairs cholesterol efflux

    PubMed Central

    Luquain-Costaz, Cline; Lefai, Etienne; Arnal-Levron, Maud; Markina, Daria; Saka, Shota; Euthine, Vanessa; Makino, Asami; Guichardant, Michel; Yamashita, Shizuya; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Lagarde, Michel; Moulin, Philippe; Delton-Vandenbroucke, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Objective Endosomal signature phospholipid bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) has been involved in the regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis. Accumulation of BMP is a hallmark of lipid storage disorders and was recently reported as a noticeable feature of oxidized LDL-laden macrophages. This study was designed to delineate the consequences of macrophage BMP accumulation on intracellular cholesterol distribution, metabolism and efflux and to unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms. Methods and results We have developed an experimental design to specifically increase BMP content in RAW macrophages. Following BMP accumulation, cell cholesterol distribution was markedly altered despite no change in LDL uptake and hydrolysis, cholesterol esterification, or total cell cholesterol content. The expression of cholesterol regulated genes SREBP2 and HMGCoAR was decreased by 40%, indicative of an increase of endoplasmic reticulum associated-cholesterol. Cholesterol delivery to plasma membrane was reduced as evidenced by the 20% decrease of efflux by cyclodextrin. Functionally, BMP accumulation reduced cholesterol efflux to both apoA1 and HDL by 40%, correlated with a 40% decrease in mRNA contents of ABCA1 and ABCG1 transporters and LXR ? and ?. Foam cell formation induced by oxidized LDL exposure was exacerbated in BMP enriched cells. Conclusion The present work shows for the first time a strong functional link between BMP and cholesterol regulating genes involved in both intracellular metabolism and efflux. We propose that accumulation of cellular BMP might contribute to the deregulation of cholesterol homeostasis in atheromatous macrophages. PMID:23788762

  5. Multidrug resistance protein 4/ ATP binding cassette transporter 4: a new potential therapeutic target for acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Copsel, Sabrina; Bruzzone, Ariana; May, Maria; Beyrath, Julien; Wargon, Victoria; Cany, Jeannette; Frans, G.M. Russel; Shayo, Carina; Davio, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Less than a third of adults patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are cured by current treatments, emphasizing the need for new approaches to therapy. We previously demonstrated that besides playing a role in drug-resistant leukemia cell lines, multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4/ABCC4) regulates leukemia cell proliferation and differentiation through the endogenous MRP4/ABCC4 substrate, cAMP. Here, we studied the role of MRP4/ABCC4 in tumor progression in a mouse xenograft model and in leukemic stem cells (LSCs) differentiation. We found a decrease in the mitotic index and an increase in the apoptotic index associated with the inhibition of tumor growth when mice were treated with rolipram (PDE4 inhibitor) and/or probenecid (MRPs inhibitor). Genetic silencing and pharmacologic inhibition of MRP4 reduced tumor growth. Furthermore, MRP4 knockdown induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vivo. Interestingly, when LSC population was isolated, we observed that increased cAMP levels and MRP4/ABCC4 blockade resulted in LSCs differentiation. Taken together, our findings show that MRP4/ABCC4 has a relevant role in tumor growth and apoptosis and in the eradication of LSCs, providing the basis for a novel promising target in AML therapy. PMID:25301721

  6. Linoleic acid suppresses cholesterol efflux and ATP-binding cassette transporters in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), possibly associated with elevated plasma free fatty acid concentrations. Paradoxically, evidence suggests that unsaturated, compared to saturated fatty acids, suppress macrophage chole...

  7. The multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP/ABCC) subfamily of ATP-binding cassette transporters in plants.

    PubMed

    Klein, Markus; Burla, Bo; Martinoia, Enrico

    2006-02-13

    In many different plant species, genes belonging to the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP, ABCC) subfamily of ABC transporters have been identified. Following the discovery of vacuolar transport systems for xenobiotic or plant-produced conjugated organic anions, plant MRPs were originally proposed to be primarily involved in the vacuolar sequestration of potentially toxic metabolites. Indeed, heterologous expression of different Arabidopsis MRPs in yeast demonstrates their activity as ATP-driven pumps for structurally diverse substrates. Recent analysis of protein-protein interactions and the characterization of knockout mutants in Arabidopsis suggests that apart from transport functions plant MRPs play additional roles including the control of plant transpiration through the stomata. Here, we review and discuss the diverse functions of plant MRP-type ABC transporters and present an organ-related and developmental analysis of the expression of Arabidopsis MRPs using the publicly available full-genome chip data. PMID:16375897

  8. Association of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 gene polymorphisms with plasma lipid variability and coronary heart disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuping; Liu, Yawen; Li, Yong; Zhang, Huiping; Yu, Mingxi; Kanu, Joseph Sam; Qiao, Yichun; Tang, Yuan; Zhen, Qing; Cheng, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our study aimed to investigate the association of ABCA1 polymorphisms with plasma lipid variability and CHD risk in the Chinese Han population. Methods: 754 CHD patients and 760 controls were included in this case-control study. Three SNPs (rs363717, rs4149339, and rs4149338) in ABCA1 3UTR and one nonsynonymous SNP (rs2230808) in ABCA1 exon 35 were selected and genotyped. The analysis of genetic data was performed using the SNPstats program and the SPSS17.0 software. Results: Significant associations were observed between SNP rs363717 and CHD risk under different genetic models before or after Bonferroni corrections (codominant model: OR = 0.70, P = 0.003 for AG vs. AA; dominant model: OR = 0.71, P = 0.003 for GG + AG vs. AA). The nonsynonymous SNP rs2230808 was associated with higher total cholesterol levels (P = 0.047). The GCC haplotype (consisting of alleles of SNPs rs363717, rs4149339, and rs4149338) was associated with a decreased risk of CHD (OR = 0.8, P = 0.027). Three ABCA1 SNPs interacted with high triglyceride levels to increase CHD risk (P values of interactions were 0.010 for rs363717, 0.010 for rs4149339, and 0.020 for rs4149338, respectively). Conclusions: Our results suggest that ABCA1 polymorphisms influence plasma lipid variability and CHD risk. ABCA1 polymorphisms could also modify the effects of plasma lipids on CHD risk. PMID:26722555

  9. Regulation and expression of the ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Raji; Chen, Kevin G; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Handley, Misty; Mallon, Barbara S; Hamilton, Rebecca S; Park, Kyeyoon; Varma, Sudhir; Mehaffey, Michele G; Robey, Pamela G; McKay, Ronald D G; Gottesman, Michael M

    2012-10-01

    The expression and function of several multidrug transporters (including ABCB1 and ABCG2) have been studied in human cancer cells and in mouse and human adult stem cells. However, the expression of ABCG2 in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) remains unclear. Limited and contradictory results in the literature from two research groups have raised questions regarding its expression and function. In this study, we used quantitative real-time PCR, Northern blots, whole genome RNA sequencing, Western blots, and immunofluorescence microscopy to study ABCG2 expression in hESCs. We found that full-length ABCG2 mRNA transcripts are expressed in undifferentiated hESC lines. However, ABCG2 protein was undetectable even under embryoid body differentiation or cytotoxic drug induction. Moreover, surface ABCG2 protein was coexpressed with the differentiation marker stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 of hESCs, following constant BMP-4 signaling at days 4 and 6. This expression was tightly correlated with the downregulation of two microRNAs (miRNAs) (i.e., hsa-miR-519c and hsa-miR-520h). Transfection of miRNA mimics and inhibitors of these two miRNAs confirmed their direct involvement in the regulation ABCG2 translation. Our findings clarify the controversy regarding the expression of the ABCG2 gene and also provide new insights into translational control of the expression of membrane transporter mRNAs by miRNAs in hESCs. PMID:22887864

  10. Functional ATP-binding cassette drug efflux transporters in isolated human and rat hepatocytes significantly affect assessment of drug disposition.

    PubMed

    Lundquist, Patrik; Englund, Gunilla; Skogastierna, Cristine; Lööf, Johan; Johansson, Jenny; Hoogstraate, Janet; Afzelius, Lovisa; Andersson, Tommy B

    2014-03-01

    Freshly isolated hepatocytes are considered the gold standard for in vitro studies of hepatic drug disposition. To ensure a reliable supply of cells, cryopreserved human hepatocytes are often used. ABC-superfamily drug efflux transporters are key elements in hepatic drug disposition. These transporters are often considered lost after isolation of hepatocytes. In the present study, the expression and activity of ABC transporters BCRP, BSEP, P-gp, MRP2, MRP3, and MRP4 in human and rat cryopreserved hepatocytes were investigated. In commercially available human cryopreserved hepatocytes, all drug efflux transporters except human BCRP (hBCRP) exhibited similar expression levels as in fresh liver biopsies. Expression levels of hBCRP were 60% lower in cryopreserved human hepatocytes than in liver tissue, which could lead to, at most, a 2.5-fold reduction in hBCRP-mediated efflux. Fresh rat hepatocytes showed significantly lower levels of rat BCRP compared with liver expression levels; expression levels of other ABC transporters were unchanged. ABC transporters in human cryopreserved cells were localized to the plasma membrane. Functional studies could demonstrate P-gp and BCRP activity in both human cryopreserved and fresh rat hepatocytes. Inhibiting P-gp-mediated efflux by elacridar in in vitro experiments significantly decreased fexofenadine efflux from hepatocytes, resulting in an increase in apparent fexofenadine uptake. The results from the present study clearly indicate that ABC transporter-mediated efflux in freshly isolated as well as cryopreserved rat and human hepatocytes should be taken into account in in vitro experiments used for modeling of drug metabolism and disposition. PMID:24396144

  11. Molecular cloning and expression of a cyclic AMP-activated chloride conductance regulator: a novel ATP-binding cassette transporter.

    PubMed Central

    van Kuijck, M A; van Aubel, R A; Busch, A E; Lang, F; Russel, F G; Bindels, R J; van Os, C H; Deen, P M

    1996-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ATP-regulated, cAMP-activated chloride channel located in the apical membrane of many epithelial secretory cells. Here we report cloning of a cAMP-activated epithelial basolateral chloride conductance regulator (EBCR) that appears to be a basolateral CFTR counterpart. This novel chloride channel or regulator shows 49% identity with multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and 29% identity with CFTR. On expression in Xenopus oocytes, EBCR confers a cAMP-activated chloride conductance that is inhibited by the chloride channel blockers niflumic acid, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamine)benzoic acid, and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid. Northern blot analysis reveals high expression in small intestine, kidney, and liver. In kidney, immunohistochemistry shows a conspicuous basolateral localization mainly in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop, distal convoluted tubules and to a lesser extent connecting tubules. These data suggest that in the kidney EBCR is involved in hormone-regulated chloride reabsorption. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8643587

  12. Do ATP-binding cassette transporters cause pharmacoresistance in epilepsy? Problems and approaches in determining which antiepileptic drugs are affected.

    PubMed

    Lscher, Wolfgang; Luna-Torts, Carlos; Rmermann, Kerstin; Fedrowitz, Maren

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to multiple antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a common problem in epilepsy, affecting at least 30% of patients. One prominent hypothesis to explain this resistance suggests an inadequate penetration or excess efflux of AEDs across the blood - brain barrier (BBB) as a result of overexpressed efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp), the encoded product of the multidrug resistance- 1 (MDR1, ABCB1) gene. Pgp and MDR1 are markedly increased in epileptogenic brain tissue of patients with AED-resistant partial epilepsy and following seizures in rodent models of partial epilepsy. In rodent models, AED-resistant rats exhibit higher Pgp levels than responsive animals; increased Pgp expression is associated with lower brain levels of AEDs; and, most importantly, co-administration of Pgp inhibitors reverses AED resistance. Thus, it is reasonable to conclude that Pgp plays a significant role in mediating resistance to AEDs in rodent models of epilepsy - however, whether this phenomenon extends to at least some human refractory epilepsy remains unclear, particularly because it is still a matter of debate which AEDs, if any, are transported by human Pgp. The difficulty in determining which AEDs are substrates of human Pgp is mainly a consequence of the fact that AEDs are highly permeable compounds, which are not easily identified as Pgp substrates in in vitro models of the BBB, such as monolayer (Transwell()) efflux assays. By using a modified assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA), which minimizes the influence of high transcellular permeability, two groups have recently demonstrated that several major AEDs are transported by human Pgp. Importantly, it was demonstrated in these studies that Pgp-mediated transport highly depends on the AED concentration and may not be identified if concentrations below or above the therapeutic range are used. In addition to the efflux transporters, seizure-induced alterations in BBB integrity and activity of drug metabolizing enzymes (CYPs) affect the brain uptake of AEDs. For translating these findings to the clinical arena, in vivo imaging studies using positron emission tomography (PET) with (11)C-labelled AEDs in epileptic patients are under way. PMID:21827408

  13. Gene Expression Profiling of Transporters in the Solute Carrier and ATP-Binding Cassette Superfamilies in Human Eye Substructures

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Amber; Geier, Ethan; Stocker, Sophie L.; Cropp, Cheryl D.; Grigorenko, Elena; Bloomer, Michele; Siegenthaler, Julie; Xu, Lu; Basile, Anthony S.; Tang-Liu, Diane D-S.; Giacomini, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    The barrier epithelia of the cornea and retina control drug and nutrient access to various compartments of the human eye. While ocular transporters are likely to play a critical role in homeostasis and drug delivery, little is known about their expression, localization and function. In this study, the mRNA expression levels of 445 transporters, metabolic enzymes, transcription factors and nuclear receptors were profiled in five regions of the human eye: cornea, iris, ciliary body, choroid and retina. Through RNA expression profiling and immunohistochemistry, several transporters were identified as putative targets for drug transport in ocular tissues. Our analysis identified SLC22A7 (OAT2), a carrier for the anti-viral drug, acyclovir, in the corneal epithelium, in addition to ABCG2 (BCRP), an important xenobiotic efflux pump, in retinal nerve fibers and the retinal pigment epithelium. Collectively, our results provide an understanding of the transporters that serve to maintain ocular homeostasis and which may be potential targets for drug delivery to deep compartments of the eye. PMID:23268600

  14. Unique functional and structural properties of the LRRK2 protein ATP-binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiyong; Galemmo, Robert A; Fraser, Kyle B; Moehle, Mark S; Sen, Saurabh; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura A; DeLucas, Lawrence J; Ross, Larry J; Valiyaveettil, Jacob; Moukha-Chafiq, Omar; Pathak, Ashish K; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Kezar, Hollis; White, E Lucile; Gupta, Vandana; Maddry, Joseph A; Suto, Mark J; West, Andrew B

    2014-11-21

    Pathogenic mutations in the LRRK2 gene can cause late-onset Parkinson disease. The most common mutation, G2019S, resides in the kinase domain and enhances activity. LRRK2 possesses the unique property of cis-autophosphorylation of its own GTPase domain. Because high-resolution structures of the human LRRK2 kinase domain are not available, we used novel high-throughput assays that measured both cis-autophosphorylation and trans-peptide phosphorylation to probe the ATP-binding pocket. We disclose hundreds of commercially available activity-selective LRRK2 kinase inhibitors. Some compounds inhibit cis-autophosphorylation more strongly than trans-peptide phosphorylation, and other compounds inhibit G2019S-LRRK2 more strongly than WT-LRRK2. Through exploitation of structure-activity relationships revealed through high-throughput analyses, we identified a useful probe inhibitor, SRI-29132 (11). SRI-29132 is exquisitely selective for LRRK2 kinase activity and is effective in attenuating proinflammatory responses in macrophages and rescuing neurite retraction phenotypes in neurons. Furthermore, the compound demonstrates excellent potency, is highly blood-brain barrier-permeant, but suffers from rapid first-pass metabolism. Despite the observed selectivity of SRI-29132, docking models highlighted critical interactions with residues conserved in many protein kinases, implying a unique structural configuration for the LRRK2 ATP-binding pocket. Although the human LRRK2 kinase domain is unstable and insoluble, we demonstrate that the LRRK2 homolog from ameba can be mutated to approximate some aspects of the human LRRK2 ATP-binding pocket. Our results provide a rich resource for LRRK2 small molecule inhibitor development. More broadly, our results provide a precedent for the functional interrogation of ATP-binding pockets when traditional approaches to ascertain structure prove difficult. PMID:25228699

  15. Unique Functional and Structural Properties of the LRRK2 Protein ATP-binding Pocket*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiyong; Galemmo, Robert A.; Fraser, Kyle B.; Moehle, Mark S.; Sen, Saurabh; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura A.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Ross, Larry J.; Valiyaveettil, Jacob; Moukha-Chafiq, Omar; Pathak, Ashish K.; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Kezar, Hollis; White, E. Lucile; Gupta, Vandana; Maddry, Joseph A.; Suto, Mark J.; West, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in the LRRK2 gene can cause late-onset Parkinson disease. The most common mutation, G2019S, resides in the kinase domain and enhances activity. LRRK2 possesses the unique property of cis-autophosphorylation of its own GTPase domain. Because high-resolution structures of the human LRRK2 kinase domain are not available, we used novel high-throughput assays that measured both cis-autophosphorylation and trans-peptide phosphorylation to probe the ATP-binding pocket. We disclose hundreds of commercially available activity-selective LRRK2 kinase inhibitors. Some compounds inhibit cis-autophosphorylation more strongly than trans-peptide phosphorylation, and other compounds inhibit G2019S-LRRK2 more strongly than WT-LRRK2. Through exploitation of structure-activity relationships revealed through high-throughput analyses, we identified a useful probe inhibitor, SRI-29132 (11). SRI-29132 is exquisitely selective for LRRK2 kinase activity and is effective in attenuating proinflammatory responses in macrophages and rescuing neurite retraction phenotypes in neurons. Furthermore, the compound demonstrates excellent potency, is highly blood-brain barrier-permeant, but suffers from rapid first-pass metabolism. Despite the observed selectivity of SRI-29132, docking models highlighted critical interactions with residues conserved in many protein kinases, implying a unique structural configuration for the LRRK2 ATP-binding pocket. Although the human LRRK2 kinase domain is unstable and insoluble, we demonstrate that the LRRK2 homolog from ameba can be mutated to approximate some aspects of the human LRRK2 ATP-binding pocket. Our results provide a rich resource for LRRK2 small molecule inhibitor development. More broadly, our results provide a precedent for the functional interrogation of ATP-binding pockets when traditional approaches to ascertain structure prove difficult. PMID:25228699

  16. On the ATP binding site of the ε subunit from bacterial F-type ATP synthases.

    PubMed

    Krah, Alexander; Takada, Shoji

    2016-04-01

    F-type ATP synthases are reversible machinery that not only synthesize adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using an electrochemical gradient across the membrane, but also can hydrolyze ATP to pump ions under certain conditions. To prevent wasteful ATP hydrolysis, subunit ε in bacterial ATP synthases changes its conformation from the non-inhibitory down- to the inhibitory up-state at a low cellular ATP concentration. Recently, a crystal structure of the ε subunit in complex with ATP was solved in a non-biologically relevant dimeric form. Here, to derive the functional ATP binding site motif, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. Our results suggest that the ATP binding site markedly differs from the experimental resolved one; we observe a reorientation of several residues, which bind to ATP in the crystal structure. In addition we find that an Mg(2+) ion is coordinated by ATP, replacing interactions of the second chain in the crystal structure. Thus we demonstrate more generally the influence of crystallization effects on ligand binding sites and their respective binding modes. Furthermore, we propose a role for two highly conserved residues to control the ATP binding/unbinding event, which have not been considered before. Additionally our results provide the basis for the rational development of new biosensors based on subunit ε, as shown previously for novel sensors measuring the ATP concentration in cells. PMID:26780667

  17. ATP binding to neighbouring subunits and intersubunit allosteric coupling underlie proteasomal ATPase function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Chan; Snoberger, Aaron; Schupp, Jane; Smith, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The primary functions of the proteasome are driven by a highly allosteric ATPase complex. ATP binding to only two subunits in this hexameric complex triggers substrate binding, ATPase–20S association and 20S gate opening. However, it is unclear how ATP binding and hydrolysis spatially and temporally coordinates these allosteric effects to drive substrate translocation into the 20S. Here, we use FRET to show that the proteasomal ATPases from eukaryotes (RPTs) and archaea (PAN) bind ATP with high affinity at neighbouring subunits, which complements the well-established spiral-staircase topology of the 26S ATPases. We further show that two conserved arginine fingers in PAN located at the subunit interface work together as a single allosteric unit to mediate the allosteric effects of ATP binding, without altering the nucleotide-binding pattern. Rapid kinetics analysis also shows that ring resetting of a sequential hydrolysis mechanism can be explained by thermodynamic equilibrium binding of ATP. These data support a model whereby these two functionally distinct allosteric networks cooperate to translocate polypeptides into the 20S for degradation. PMID:26465836

  18. Cassette Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped.

    This catalog lists cassette books produced by the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped during 1989. Books are listed alphabetically within subject categories under nonfiction and fiction headings. Nonfiction categories include: animals and wildlife, the arts, bestsellers, biography, blindness and physical handicaps,…

  19. Structural and Enzymatic Insights into the ATP Binding and Autophosphorylation Mechanism of a Sensor Histidine Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Trajtenberg, Felipe; Graa, Martin; Rutalo, Natalia; Botti, Horacio; Buschiazzo, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    DesK is a sensor histidine kinase (HK) that allows Bacillus subtilis to respond to cold shock, triggering the adaptation of membrane fluidity via transcriptional control of a fatty acid desaturase. It belongs to the HK family HPK7, which includes the nitrogen metabolism regulators NarX/Q and the antibiotic sensor LiaS among other important sensor kinases. Structural information on different HK families is still scarce and several questions remain, particularly concerning the molecular features that determine HK specificity during its catalytic autophosphorylation and subsequent response-regulator phosphotransfer reactions. To analyze the ATP-binding features of HPK7 HKs and dissect their mechanism of autophosphorylation at the molecular level, we have studied DesK in complex with ATP using high resolution structural approaches in combination with biochemical studies. We report the first crystal structure of an HK in complex with its natural nucleotidic substrate. The general fold of the ATP-binding domain of DesK is conserved, compared with well studied members of other families. Yet, DesK displays a far more compact structure at the ATP-binding pocket: the ATP lid loop is much shorter with no secondary structural organization and becomes ordered upon ATP loading. Sequence conservation mapping onto the molecular surface, semi-flexible protein-protein docking simulations, and structure-based point mutagenesis allow us to propose a specific domain-domain geometry during autophosphorylation catalysis. Supporting our hypotheses, we have been able to trap an autophosphorylating intermediate state, by protein engineering at the predicted domain-domain interaction surface. PMID:20507988

  20. Functional role of ATP binding to synapsin I in synaptic vesicle trafficking and release dynamics.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Marta; Lignani, Gabriele; Maragliano, Luca; Fassio, Anna; Onofri, Franco; Baldelli, Pietro; Gioved, Silvia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2014-10-29

    Synapsins (Syns) are synaptic vesicle (SV)-associated proteins involved in the regulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity, which display a highly conserved ATP binding site in the central C-domain, whose functional role is unknown. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrated that ATP binding to SynI is mediated by a conformational transition of a flexible loop that opens to make the binding site accessible; such transition, prevented in the K269Q mutant, is not significantly affected in the absence of Ca(2+) or by the E373K mutation that abolishes Ca(2+)-binding. Indeed, the ATP binding to SynI also occurred under Ca(2+)-free conditions and increased its association with purified rat SVs regardless of the presence of Ca(2+) and promoted SynI oligomerization. However, although under Ca(2+)-free conditions, SynI dimerization and SV clustering were enhanced, Ca(2+) favored the formation of tetramers at the expense of dimers and did not affect SV clustering, indicating a role of Ca(2+)-dependent dimer/tetramer transitions in the regulation of ATP-dependent SV clustering. To elucidate the role of ATP/SynI binding in synaptic physiology, mouse SynI knock-out hippocampal neurons were transduced with either wild-type or K269Q mutant SynI and inhibitory transmission was studied by patch-clamp and electron microscopy. K269Q-SynI expressing inhibitory synapses showed increased synaptic strength due to an increase in the release probability, an increased vulnerability to synaptic depression and a dysregulation of SV trafficking, when compared with wild-type SynI-expressing terminals. The results suggest that the ATP-SynI binding plays predocking and postdocking roles in the modulation of SV clustering and plasticity of inhibitory synapses. PMID:25355227

  1. Intracellular ATP binding is required to activate the slowly activating K+ channel I(Ks).

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Gao, Junyuan; Lu, Zhongju; McFarland, Kelli; Shi, Jingyi; Bock, Kevin; Cohen, Ira S; Cui, Jianmin

    2013-11-19

    Gating of ion channels by ligands is fundamental to cellular function, and ATP serves as both an energy source and a signaling molecule that modulates ion channel and transporter functions. The slowly activating K(+) channel I(Ks) in cardiac myocytes is formed by KCNQ1 and KCNE1 subunits that conduct K(+) to repolarize the action potential. Here we show that intracellular ATP activates heterologously coexpressed KCNQ1 and KCNE1 as well as I(Ks) in cardiac myocytes by directly binding to the C terminus of KCNQ1 to allow the pore to open. The channel is most sensitive to ATP near its physiological concentration, and lowering ATP concentration in cardiac myocytes results in I(Ks) reduction and action potential prolongation. Multiple mutations that suppress I(Ks) by decreasing the ATP sensitivity of the channel are associated with the long QT (interval between the Q and T waves in electrocardiogram) syndrome that predisposes afflicted individuals to cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death. A cluster of basic and aromatic residues that may form a unique ATP binding site are identified; ATP activation of the wild-type channel and the effects of the mutations on ATP sensitivity are consistent with an allosteric mechanism. These results demonstrate the activation of an ion channel by intracellular ATP binding, and ATP-dependent gating allows I(Ks) to couple myocyte energy state to its electrophysiology in physiologic and pathologic conditions. PMID:24190995

  2. Effect of ATP Binding and Hydrolysis on Dynamics of Canine Parvovirus NS1?

    PubMed Central

    Niskanen, Einari A.; Ihalainen, Teemu O.; Kalliolinna, Olli; Hkkinen, Milla M.; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija

    2010-01-01

    The replication protein NS1 is essential for genome replication and protein production in parvoviral infection. Many of its functions, including recognition and site-specific nicking of the viral genome, helicase activity, and transactivation of the viral capsid promoter, are dependent on ATP. An ATP-binding pocket resides in the middle of the modular NS1 protein in a superfamily 3 helicase domain. Here we have identified key ATP-binding amino acid residues in canine parvovirus (CPV) NS1 protein and mutated amino acids from the conserved A motif (K406), B motif (E444 and E445), and positively charged region (R508 and R510). All mutations prevented the formation of infectious viruses. When provided in trans, all except the R508A mutation reduced infectivity in a dominant-negative manner, possibly by hindering genome replication. These results suggest that the conserved R510 residue, but not R508, is the arginine finger sensory element of CPV NS1. Moreover, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), complemented by computer simulations, was used to assess the binding properties of mutated fluorescent fusion proteins. These experiments identified ATP-dependent and -independent binding modes for NS1 in living cells. Only the K406M mutant had a single binding site, which was concluded to indicate ATP-independent binding. Furthermore, our data suggest that DNA binding of NS1 is dependent on its ability to both bind and hydrolyze ATP. PMID:20219935

  3. Origin Licensing Requires ATP Binding and Hydrolysis by the MCM Replicative Helicase

    PubMed Central

    Coster, Gideon; Frigola, Jordi; Beuron, Fabienne; Morris, EdwardP.; Diffley, JohnF.X.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Loading of the six related Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM) proteins as head-to-head double hexamers during DNA replication origin licensing is crucial for ensuring once-per-cell-cycle DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. Assembly of these prereplicative complexes (pre-RCs) requires the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC), Cdc6, and Cdt1. ORC, Cdc6, and MCM are members of the AAA+ family of ATPases, and pre-RC assembly requires ATP hydrolysis. Here we show that ORC and Cdc6 mutants defective in ATP hydrolysis are competent for origin licensing. However, ATP hydrolysis by Cdc6 is required to release nonproductive licensing intermediates. We show that ATP binding stabilizes the wild-type MCM hexamer. Moreover, by analyzing MCM containing mutant subunits, we show that ATP binding and hydrolysis by MCM are required for Cdt1 release and double hexamer formation. This work alters our view of how ATP is used by licensing factors to assemble pre-RCs. PMID:25087873

  4. Origin licensing requires ATP binding and hydrolysis by the MCM replicative helicase.

    PubMed

    Coster, Gideon; Frigola, Jordi; Beuron, Fabienne; Morris, Edward P; Diffley, John F X

    2014-09-01

    Loading of the six related Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM) proteins as head-to-head double hexamers during DNA replication origin licensing is crucial for ensuring once-per-cell-cycle DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. Assembly of these prereplicative complexes (pre-RCs) requires the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC), Cdc6, and Cdt1. ORC, Cdc6, and MCM are members of the AAA+ family of ATPases, and pre-RC assembly requires ATP hydrolysis. Here we show that ORC and Cdc6 mutants defective in ATP hydrolysis are competent for origin licensing. However, ATP hydrolysis by Cdc6 is required to release nonproductive licensing intermediates. We show that ATP binding stabilizes the wild-type MCM hexamer. Moreover, by analyzing MCM containing mutant subunits, we show that ATP binding and hydrolysis by MCM are required for Cdt1 release and double hexamer formation. This work alters our view of how ATP is used by licensing factors to assemble pre-RCs. PMID:25087873

  5. A stable ATP binding to the nucleotide binding domain is important for reliable gating cycle in an ABC transporter CFTR.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Yu, Ying-Chun; Kono, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yasui, Masato; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sohma, Yoshiro

    2010-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel, a member of ABC transporter superfamily, gates following ATP-dependent conformational changes of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Reflecting the hundreds of milliseconds duration of the channel open state corresponding to the dimerization of two NBDs, macroscopic WT-CFTR currents usually showed a fast, single exponential relaxation upon removal of cytoplasmic ATP. Mutations of tyrosine1219, a residue critical for ATP binding in second NBD (NBD2), induced a significant slow phase in the current relaxation, suggesting that weakening ATP binding affinity at NBD2 increases the probability of the stable open state. The slow phase was effectively diminished by a higher affinity ATP analogue. These data suggest that a stable binding of ATP to NBD2 is required for normal CFTR gating cycle, andthat the instability of ATP binding frequently halts the gating cycle in the open state presumably through a failure of ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. PMID:20628841

  6. Critical roles of interdomain interactions for modulatory ATP binding to sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Johannes D; Holdensen, Anne Nyholm; Andersen, Jens Peter

    2014-10-17

    ATP has dual roles in the reaction cycle of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase. Upon binding to the Ca2E1 state, ATP phosphorylates the enzyme, and by binding to other conformational states in a non-phosphorylating modulatory mode ATP stimulates the dephosphorylation and other partial reaction steps of the cycle, thereby ensuring a high rate of Ca(2+) transport under physiological conditions. The present study elucidates the mechanism underlying the modulatory effect on dephosphorylation. In the intermediate states of dephosphorylation the A-domain residues Ser(186) and Asp(203) interact with Glu(439) (N-domain) and Arg(678) (P-domain), respectively. Single mutations to these residues abolish the stimulation of dephosphorylation by ATP. The double mutation swapping Asp(203) and Arg(678) rescues ATP stimulation, whereas this is not the case for the double mutation swapping Ser(186) and Glu(439). By taking advantage of the ability of wild type and mutant Ca(2+)-ATPases to form stable complexes with aluminum fluoride (E2·AlF) and beryllium fluoride (E2·BeF) as analogs of the E2·P phosphoryl transition state and E2P ground state, respectively, of the dephosphorylation reaction, the mutational effects on ATP binding to these intermediates are demonstrated. In the wild type Ca(2+)-ATPase, the ATP affinity of the E2·P phosphoryl transition state is higher than that of the E2P ground state, thus explaining the stimulation of dephosphorylation by nucleotide-induced transition state stabilization. We find that the Asp(203)-Arg(678) and Ser(186)-Glu(439) interdomain bonds are critical, because they tighten the interaction with ATP in the E2·P phosphoryl transition state. Moreover, ATP binding and the Ser(186)-Glu(439) bond are mutually exclusive in the E2P ground state. PMID:25193668

  7. A Chemical Proteomics Approach to Profiling the ATP-binding Proteome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis *

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Lisa M.; Veeraraghavan, Usha; Idicula-Thomas, Susan; Schrer, Stephan; Wennerberg, Krister; Reynolds, Robert; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Dobos, Karen M.

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, remains one of the leading causes of death worldwide despite extensive research, directly observed therapy using multidrug regimens, and the widespread use of a vaccine. The majority of patients harbor the bacterium in a state of metabolic dormancy. New drugs with novel modes of action are needed to target essential metabolic pathways in M. tuberculosis; ATP-competitive enzyme inhibitors are one such class. Previous screening efforts for ATP-competitive enzyme inhibitors identified several classes of lead compounds that demonstrated potent anti-mycobacterial efficacy as well as tolerable levels of toxicity in cell culture. In this report, a probe-based chemoproteomic approach was used to selectively profile the M. tuberculosis ATP-binding proteome in normally growing and hypoxic M. tuberculosis. From these studies, 122 ATP-binding proteins were identified in either metabolic state, and roughly 60% of these are reported to be essential for survival in vitro. These data are available through ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000141. Protein families vital to the survival of the tubercle bacillus during hypoxia emerged from our studies. Specifically, along with members of the DosR regulon, several proteins involved in energy metabolism (Icl/Rv0468 and Mdh/Rv1240) and lipid biosynthesis (UmaA/Rv0469, DesA1/Rv0824c, and DesA2/Rv1094) were found to be differentially abundant in hypoxic versus normal growing cultures. These pathways represent a subset of proteins that may be relevant therapeutic targets for development of novel ATP-competitive antibiotics. PMID:23462205

  8. In Vivo Function of Hsp90 Is Dependent on ATP Binding and ATP Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Obermann, Wolfgang M.J.; Sondermann, Holger; Russo, Alicia A.; Pavletich, Nikola P.; Hartl, F. Ulrich

    1998-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), an abundant molecular chaperone in the eukaryotic cytosol, is involved in the folding of a set of cell regulatory proteins and in the re-folding of stress-denatured polypeptides. The basic mechanism of action of Hsp90 is not yet understood. In particular, it has been debated whether Hsp90 function is ATP dependent. A recent crystal structure of the NH2-terminal domain of yeast Hsp90 established the presence of a conserved nucleotide binding site that is identical with the binding site of geldanamycin, a specific inhibitor of Hsp90. The functional significance of nucleotide binding by Hsp90 has remained unclear. Here we present evidence for a slow but clearly detectable ATPase activity in purified Hsp90. Based on a new crystal structure of the NH2-terminal domain of human Hsp90 with bound ADP-Mg and on the structural homology of this domain with the ATPase domain of Escherichia coli DNA gyrase, the residues of Hsp90 critical in ATP binding (D93) and ATP hydrolysis (E47) were identified. The corresponding mutations were made in the yeast Hsp90 homologue, Hsp82, and tested for their ability to functionally replace wild-type Hsp82. Our results show that both ATP binding and hydrolysis are required for Hsp82 function in vivo. The mutant Hsp90 proteins tested are defective in the binding and ATP hydrolysisdependent cycling of the co-chaperone p23, which is thought to regulate the binding and release of substrate polypeptide from Hsp90. Remarkably, the complete Hsp90 protein is required for ATPase activity and for the interaction with p23, suggesting an intricate allosteric communication between the domains of the Hsp90 dimer. Our results establish Hsp90 as an ATP-dependent chaperone. PMID:9817749

  9. Complexed Structures of Formylglycinamide Ribonucleotide Amidotransferase from Thermotoga maritima Describe a Novel ATP Binding Protein Superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Morar, Mariya; Anand, Ruchi; Hoskins, Aaron A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-09-11

    Formylglycinamide ribonucleotide amidotransferase (FGAR-AT) catalyzes the ATP-dependent synthesis of formylglycinamidine ribonucleotide (FGAM) from formylglycinamide ribonucleotide (FGAR) and glutamine in the fourth step of the purine biosynthetic pathway. FGAR-AT is encoded by the purL gene. Two types of PurL have been detected. The first type, found in eukaryotes and Gram-negative bacteria, consists of a single 140 kDa polypeptide chain and is designated large PurL (lgPurL). The second type, small PurL (smPurL), is found in archaea and Gram-positive bacteria and consists of an 80 kDa polypeptide chain. SmPurL requires two additional gene products, PurQ and PurS, for activity. PurL is a member of a protein superfamily that contains a novel ATP-binding domain. Structures of several members of this superfamily are available in the unliganded form. We determined five different structures of FGAR-AT from Thermotoga maritima in the presence of substrates, a substrate analogue, and a product. These complexes have allowed a detailed description of the novel ATP-binding motif. The availability of a ternary complex enabled mapping of the active site, thus identifying potential residues involved in catalysis. The complexes show a conformational change in the active site compared to the unliganded structure. Surprising discoveries, an ATP molecule in an auxiliary site of the protein and the conformational changes associated with its binding, provoke speculation about the regulatory role of the auxiliary site in formation of the PurLSQ complex as well as the evolutionary relationship of PurLs from different organisms.

  10. ATP binding to the ? subunit of thermophilic ATP synthase is crucial for efficient coupling of ATPase and H+ pump activities.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Fumitaka; Kato, Shigeyuki; Watanabe, Kei; Kato-Yamada, Yasuyuki

    2011-07-01

    ATP binding to the ? subunit of F1-ATPase, a soluble subcomplex of TFoF1 (FoF1-ATPase synthase from the thermophilic Bacillus strain PS3), affects the regulation of F1-ATPase activity by stabilizing the compact, ATPase-active, form of the ? subunit [Kato, S., Yoshida, M. and Kato-Yamada, Y. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 37618-37623]. In the present study, we report how ATP binding to the ? subunit affects ATPase and H+ pumping activities in the holoenzyme TFoF1. Wild-type TFoF1 showed significant H+ pumping activity when ATP was used as the substrate. However, GTP, which bound poorly to the ? subunit, did not support efficient H+ pumping. Addition of small amounts of ATP to the GTP substrate restored coupling between GTPase and H+ pumping activities. Similar uncoupling was observed when TFoF1 contained an ATP-binding-deficient ? subunit, even with ATP as a substrate. Further analysis suggested that the compact conformation of the ? subunit induced by ATP binding was required to couple ATPase and H+ pumping activities in TFoF1 unless the ? subunit was in its extended-state conformation. The present study reveals a novel role of the ? subunit as an ATP-sensitive regulator of the coupling of ATPase and H+ pumping activities of TFoF1. PMID:21510843

  11. Structure-guided Development of Specific Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Inhibitors Targeting the ATP-binding Pocket*

    PubMed Central

    Tso, Shih-Chia; Qi, Xiangbing; Gui, Wen-Jun; Wu, Cheng-Yang; Chuang, Jacinta L.; Wernstedt-Asterholm, Ingrid; Morlock, Lorraine K.; Owens, Kyle R.; Scherer, Philipp E.; Williams, Noelle S.; Tambar, Uttam K.; Wynn, R. Max; Chuang, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoforms (PDKs 14) negatively regulate activity of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by reversible phosphorylation. PDK isoforms are up-regulated in obesity, diabetes, heart failure, and cancer and are potential therapeutic targets for these important human diseases. Here, we employed a structure-guided design to convert a known Hsp90 inhibitor to a series of highly specific PDK inhibitors, based on structural conservation in the ATP-binding pocket. The key step involved the substitution of a carbonyl group in the parent compound with a sulfonyl in the PDK inhibitors. The final compound of this series, 2-[(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)sulfonyl]isoindoline-4,6-diol, designated PS10, inhibits all four PDK isoforms with IC50 = 0.8 ?m for PDK2. The administration of PS10 (70 mg/kg) to diet-induced obese mice significantly augments pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity with reduced phosphorylation in different tissues. Prolonged PS10 treatments result in improved glucose tolerance and notably lessened hepatic steatosis in the mouse model. The results support the pharmacological approach of targeting PDK to control both glucose and fat levels in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24356970

  12. Three-Dimensional Structures Reveal Multiple ADP/ATP Binding Modes

    SciTech Connect

    C Simmons; C Magee; D Smith; L Lauman; J Chaput; J Allen

    2011-12-31

    The creation of synthetic enzymes with predefined functions represents a major challenge in future synthetic biology applications. Here, we describe six structures of de novo proteins that have been determined using protein crystallography to address how simple enzymes perform catalysis. Three structures are of a protein, DX, selected for its stability and ability to tightly bind ATP. Despite the addition of ATP to the crystallization conditions, the presence of a bound but distorted ATP was found only under excess ATP conditions, with ADP being present under equimolar conditions or when crystallized for a prolonged period of time. A bound ADP cofactor was evident when Asp was substituted for Val at residue 65, but ATP in a linear configuration is present when Phe was substituted for Tyr at residue 43. These new structures complement previously determined structures of DX and the protein with the Phe 43 to Tyr substitution [Simmons, C. R., et al. (2009) ACS Chem. Biol. 4, 649-658] and together demonstrate the multiple ADP/ATP binding modes from which a model emerges in which the DX protein binds ATP in a configuration that represents a transitional state for the catalysis of ATP to ADP through a slow, metal-free reaction capable of multiple turnovers. This unusual observation suggests that design-free methods can be used to generate novel protein scaffolds that are tailor-made for catalysis.

  13. ATP Binding by Monarch-1/NLRP12 Is Critical for Its Inhibitory Function▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhengmao; Lich, John D.; Moore, Chris B.; Duncan, Joseph A.; Williams, Kristi L.; Ting, Jenny P.-Y.

    2008-01-01

    The recently discovered nucleotide binding domain-leucine rich repeat (NLR) gene family is conserved from plants to mammals, and several members are associated with human autoinflammatory or immunodeficiency disorders. This family is defined by a central nucleotide binding domain that contains the highly conserved Walker A and Walker B motifs. Although the nucleotide binding domain is a defining feature of this family, it has not been extensively studied in its purified form. In this report, we show that purified Monarch-1/NLRP12, an NLR protein that negatively regulates NF-κB signaling, specifically binds ATP and exhibits ATP hydrolysis activity. Intact Walker A/B motifs are required for this activity. These motifs are also required for Monarch-1 to undergo self-oligomerization, Toll-like receptor- or CD40L-activated association with NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK-1), degradation of NIK, and inhibition of IRAK-1 phosphorylation. The stable expression of a Walker A/B mutant in THP-1 monocytes results in increased production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines to an extent comparable to that in cells in which Monarch-1 is silenced via short hairpin RNA. The results of this study are consistent with a model wherein ATP binding regulates the anti-inflammatory activity of Monarch-1. PMID:18160710

  14. ATP binding by monarch-1/NLRP12 is critical for its inhibitory function.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhengmao; Lich, John D; Moore, Chris B; Duncan, Joseph A; Williams, Kristi L; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2008-03-01

    The recently discovered nucleotide binding domain-leucine rich repeat (NLR) gene family is conserved from plants to mammals, and several members are associated with human autoinflammatory or immunodeficiency disorders. This family is defined by a central nucleotide binding domain that contains the highly conserved Walker A and Walker B motifs. Although the nucleotide binding domain is a defining feature of this family, it has not been extensively studied in its purified form. In this report, we show that purified Monarch-1/NLRP12, an NLR protein that negatively regulates NF-kappaB signaling, specifically binds ATP and exhibits ATP hydrolysis activity. Intact Walker A/B motifs are required for this activity. These motifs are also required for Monarch-1 to undergo self-oligomerization, Toll-like receptor- or CD40L-activated association with NF-kappaB-inducing kinase (NIK) and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK-1), degradation of NIK, and inhibition of IRAK-1 phosphorylation. The stable expression of a Walker A/B mutant in THP-1 monocytes results in increased production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines to an extent comparable to that in cells in which Monarch-1 is silenced via short hairpin RNA. The results of this study are consistent with a model wherein ATP binding regulates the anti-inflammatory activity of Monarch-1. PMID:18160710

  15. ATP binding by NLRP7 is required for inflammasome activation in response to bacterial lipopeptides.

    PubMed

    Radian, Alexander D; Khare, Sonal; Chu, Lan H; Dorfleutner, Andrea; Stehlik, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligimerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) are pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) involved in innate immune responses. NLRs encode a central nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) consisting of the NAIP, CIITA, HET-E and TP1 (NACHT) domain and the NACHT associated domain (NAD), which facilitates receptor oligomerization and downstream inflammasome signaling. The NBD contains highly conserved regions, known as Walker motifs, that are required for nucleotide binding and hydrolysis. The NLR containing a PYRIN domain (PYD) 7 (NLRP7) has been recently shown to assemble an ASC and caspase-1-containing high molecular weight inflammasome complex in response to microbial acylated lipopeptides and Staphylococcus aureus infection. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for NLRP7 inflammasome activation is still elusive. Here we demonstrate that the NBD of NLRP7 is an ATP binding domain and has ATPase activity. We further show that an intact nucleotide-binding Walker A motif is required for NBD-mediated nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, oligomerization, and NLRP7 inflammasome formation and activity. Accordingly, THP-1 cells expressing a mutated Walker A motif display defective NLRP7 inflammasome activation, interleukin (IL)-1β release and pyroptosis in response to acylated lipopeptides and S. aureus infection. Taken together, our results provide novel insights into the mechanism of NLRP7 inflammasome assembly. PMID:26143398

  16. Sequence-based predictor of ATP-binding residues using random forest and mRMR-IFS feature selection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin; Sun, Xiao

    2014-11-01

    We develop a computational and statistical approach (ATPBR) for predicting ATP-binding residues in proteins from amino acid sequences by using random forests with a novel hybrid feature. The hybrid feature incorporates a new feature called PSSMPP, the predicted secondary structure and orthogonal binary vectors. The mRMR-IFS feature selection method is utilized to construct the best prediction model. At last, ATPBR achieves significantly improved performance over existing methods, with 87.53% accuracy and a Matthew׳s correlation coefficient of 0.554. In addition, our further analysis demonstrates that PSSMPP distinguishes more effectively between ATP-binding and non-binding residues. Besides, the optimal features selected by the mRMR-IFS method improve the prediction performance and may provide useful insights for revealing the mechanisms of ATP and proteins interactions. PMID:25014477

  17. Exhaustive de novo design of low-molecular-weight fragments against the ATP-binding site of DNA-gyrase.

    PubMed

    Firth-Clark, Stuart; Todorov, Nikolay P; Alberts, Ian L; Williams, Anthony; James, Timothy; Dean, Philip M

    2006-01-01

    We present a de novo design approach to generating small fragments in the DNA-gyrase ATP-binding site using the computational drug design platform SkelGen. We have generated an exhaustive number of structural possibilities, which were subsequently filtered for site complementarity and synthetic tractability. A number of known active fragments are found, but most of the species created are potentially novel and could be valuable for further elaboration and development into lead-like structures. PMID:16711736

  18. Evaluation of Cassette Braille.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VSE Corp., Alexandria, VA.

    A study conducted to determine user acceptability of cassette braille systems addressed three concerns: (1) user reaction to the basic concept of cassette braille, (2) the determination of the strong and weak features of the cassette braille machines currently available, and (3) the determination of those features of braille machines which would

  19. Mapping the ATP binding site in the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Sampedro, Jos G; Njera, Hugo; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Ruiz-Granados, Yadira G

    2014-11-01

    The plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase from Kluyveromyces lactis contains 14 tryptophan residues. Binding a nucleotide or unfolding with Gnd-HCl quenched intrinsic fluorescence by??60% suggesting that in the H(+)-ATPase-Nucleotide complex there is solvent-mediated collisional quenching of W505 fluorescence. N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) treatment of H(+)-ATPase modified a single W residue in both native and Gnd-HCl-unfolded H(+)-ATPase. Denaturing the H(+)-ATPase with 1% SDS led to expose six tryptophan residues while requiring 17 NBS/H(+)-ATPase. The remaining eight tryptophan residues kept buried indicating a highly stable TM domain. Acrylamide generated static quenching of fluorescence; partial in the native enzyme (V?=?0.43 M(-1)) and complete in the Gnd-HCl-unfolded H(+)-ATPase (V?=?0.81 M(-1)). Collisional quenching (K sv) increased from 3.12 to 7.45 M(-1) upon H(+)-ATPase unfolding. W505 fluorescence titration with NBS yielded a molar ratio of 6 NBS/H(+)-ATPase and quenched???60% fluorescence. In the recombinant N-domain, the distance between W505 and MantATP was estimated to be 21 by FRET. The amino acid residues involved in nucleotide binding were identified by N-domain molecular modelling and docking with ATP. In the N-domain/ATP complex model, the distance between W505 and ATP was 20.5 . ATP binding leads to a conformational change in the N-domain of H(+)-ATPase that exposes W505 to the environment. PMID:25345860

  20. Data for proteomic analysis of ATP-binding proteins and kinase inhibitor target proteins using an ATP probe

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Jun; Kishida, Marina; Watanabe, Shio; Hashimoto, Yuuki; Fukamizu, Kazuna; Tomonaga, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between ATP and ATP-binding proteins (ATPome) are common and are required for most cellular processes. Thus, it is clearly important to identify and quantify these interactions for understanding basic cellular mechanisms and the pathogenesis of various diseases. We used an ATP competition assay (competition between ATP and acyl-ATP probes) that enabled us to distinguish specific ATP-binding proteins from non-specific proteins (Adachi et al., 2014) [1]. As a result, we identified 539 proteins, including 178 novel ATP-binding protein candidates. We also established an ATPome selectivity profiling method for kinase inhibitors using our cataloged ATPome list. Normally only kinome selectivity is profiled in selectivity profiling of kinase inhibitors. In this data, we expand the profiled targets from the kinome to the ATPome through performance of ATPome selectivity profiling and obtained target profiles of staurosporine and (S)-crizotinib. The data accompanying the manuscript on this approach(Adachi et al., 2014) [1] have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001200. PMID:26693503

  1. Differential Cellular Effects of Plk1 Inhibitors Targeting the ATP-binding Domain or Polo-box Domain.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sol-Bi; Woo, Sang-Uk; Yim, Hyungshin

    2015-12-01

    The expression of polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) correlates with malignancy and is thus recognized as a target for cancer therapy. In addition to the development of ATP-competitive Plk1 inhibitors, the polo-box domain (PBD), a unique functional domain of PLKs, is being targeted to develop Plk1-specific inhibitors. However, the action mechanisms of these two classes of Plk1 inhibitors have not been thoroughly evaluated. Here, we evaluate the differences in cellular effects of ATP-binding domain inhibitors (BI 2536, GSK 461364) and PBD inhibitors (poloxin, thymoquinone) to determine their mechanisms of Plk1 inhibition. Our data show that BI 2536 and GSK461364 increased the population of cells in the G2/M phase compared with controls, while treatment with poloxin and thymoquinone increased cell population in the S phase as well as in G2/M, in a p53-independent manner. The population of cells staining positively for p-Histone H3 and MPM2, mitotic index, was increased by treatment with BI 2536 or GSK461364, but not by treatment with poloxin or thymoquinone. Furthermore, treatment with BI 2536 or GSK461364 resulted in activation of the BubR1 spindle checkpoint kinase, suggesting that treatment with ATP-binding domain inhibitors induces metaphase arrest. However, the administration of poloxin and thymoquinone resulted in an increase in p21(WAF1) and S arrest, indicating that PBD inhibitors also affected interphase before mitotic entry. Taken together, these data suggest that the PDB of Plk1 plays a role in S phase progression through interaction with other proteins, while its ATP-binding domain is important for regulating mitotic progression mediated by its catalytic activity involving consumption of ATP. PMID:25975351

  2. Cardiac myosin isoforms exhibit differential rates of MgADP release and MgATP binding detected by myocardial viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Tanner, Bertrand C W; Lombardo, Andrew T; Tremble, Sarah M; Maughan, David W; Vanburen, Peter; Lewinter, Martin M; Robbins, Jeffrey; Palmer, Bradley M

    2013-01-01

    We measured myosin crossbridge detachment rate and the rates of MgADP release and MgATP binding in mouse and rat myocardial strips bearing one of the two cardiac myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms. Mice and rats were fed an iodine-deficient, propylthiouracil diet resulting in ~100% expression of ?-MyHC in the ventricles. Ventricles of control animals expressed ~100% ?-MyHC. Chemically-skinned myocardial strips prepared from papillary muscle were subjected to sinusoidal length perturbation analysis at maximum calcium activation pCa 4.8 and 17C. Frequency characteristics of myocardial viscoelasticity were used to calculate crossbridge detachment rate over 0.01 to 5mM [MgATP]. The rate of MgADP release, equivalent to the asymptotic value of crossbridge detachment rate at high MgATP, was highest in mouse ?-MyHC (111.46.2s(-1)) followed by rat ?-MyHC (65.07.3s(-1)), mouse ?-MyHC (24.31.8s(-1)) and rat ?-MyHC (15.50.8s(-1)). The rate of MgATP binding was highest in mouse ?-MyHC (32532 mM(-1) s(-1)) then mouse ?-MyHC (15223 mM(-1) s(-1)), rat ?-MyHC (10810 mM(-1) s(-1)) and rat ?-MyHC (556 mM(-1) s(-1)). Because the events of MgADP release and MgATP binding occur in a post power-stroke state of the myosin crossbridge, we infer that MgATP release and MgATP binding must be regulated by isoform- and species-specific structural differences located outside the nucleotide binding pocket, which is identical in sequence for these four myosins. We postulate that differences in the stiffness profile of the entire myosin molecule, including the thick filament and the myosin-actin interface, are primarily responsible for determining the strain on the nucleotide binding pocket and the subsequent differences in the rates of nucleotide release and binding observed among the four myosins examined here. PMID:23123290

  3. The Tomato R Gene Products I-2 and Mi-1 Are Functional ATP Binding Proteins with ATPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tameling, Wladimir I. L.; Elzinga, Sandra D. J.; Darmin, Patricia S.; Vossen, Jack H.; Takken, Frank L. W.; Haring, Michel A.; Cornelissen, Ben J. C.

    2002-01-01

    Most plant disease resistance (R) genes known today encode proteins with a central nucleotide binding site (NBS) and a C-terminal Leu-rich repeat (LRR) domain. The NBS contains three ATP/GTP binding motifs known as the kinase-1a or P-loop, kinase-2, and kinase-3a motifs. In this article, we show that the NBS of R proteins forms a functional nucleotide binding pocket. The N-terminal halves of two tomato R proteins, I-2 conferring resistance to Fusarium oxysporum and Mi-1 conferring resistance to root-knot nematodes and potato aphids, were produced as glutathione S-transferase fusions in Escherichia coli. In a filter binding assay, purified I-2 was found to bind ATP rather than other nucleoside triphosphates. ATP binding appeared to be fully dependent on the presence of a divalent cation. A mutant I-2 protein containing a mutation in the P-loop showed a strongly reduced ATP binding capacity. Thin layer chromatography revealed that both I-2 and Mi-1 exerted ATPase activity. Based on the strong conservation of NBS domains in R proteins of the NBS-LRR class, we propose that they all are capable of binding and hydrolyzing ATP. PMID:12417711

  4. ATP-Binding Pocket-Targeted Suppression of Src and Syk by Luteolin Contributes to Its Anti-Inflammatory Action

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Oog; Jeong, Deok; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-01-01

    Luteolin is a flavonoid identified as a major anti-inflammatory component of Artemisia asiatica. Numerous reports have demonstrated the ability of luteolin to suppress inflammation in a variety of inflammatory conditions. However, its exact anti-inflammatory mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory mode of action in activated macrophages of luteolin from Artemisia asiatica was examined by employing immunoblotting analysis, a luciferase reporter gene assay, enzyme assays, and an overexpression strategy. Luteolin dose-dependently inhibited the secretion of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and diminished the levels of mRNA transcripts of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) ?, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) and pam3CSK-treated macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells without displaying cytotoxicity. Luteolin displayed potent NO-inhibitory activity and also suppressed the nuclear translocation of NF-?B (p65 and p50) via blockade of Src and Syk, but not other mitogen-activated kinases. Overexpression of wild type Src and point mutants thereof, and molecular modelling studies, suggest that the ATP-binding pocket may be the luteolin-binding site in Src. These results strongly suggest that luteolin may exert its anti-inflammatory action by suppressing the NF-?B signaling cascade via blockade of ATP binding in Src and Syk. PMID:26236111

  5. Characteristics of the Plasmodium falciparum PK5 ATP-binding site: implications for the design of novel antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Susan M; Welsh, William J

    2004-01-01

    Increasing worldwide resistance of Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) to traditional chemotherapy strategies such as chloroquine and mefloquine demonstrates the urgent need for the discovery of novel chemotherapeutic agents in the fight against malaria. The recent discovery of P. falciparum Protein Kinase 5 (PfPK5) invites the possibility of selectively targeting the life cycle of P. falciparum in order to prevent cerebral malaria. PfPK5 bears a high degree of sequence identity (>58%) to a structurally conserved family of mammalian kinases known as the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The CDKs are the key regulatory elements governing the ordered progression of the mammalian cell cycle. With numerous X-ray crystal structures of CDK2 to provide a structural template, here we present a three-dimensional structural model of PfPK5 constructed using computer-based homology modeling techniques. Our model was used to compare the ATP binding site of PfPK5 with that of the mammalian kinase CDK2. Furthermore, kinase-ligand interactions of PfPK5 with known inhibitors were investigated and compared to available crystal structures of CDK2 with inhibitors bound. The focus of the study is to identify similarities and differences between the ATP binding sites of the two kinases that can be exploited for future rational drug design. PMID:14629982

  6. Critical role of γ-phosphate in structural transition of Na,K-ATPase upon ATP binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrushanko, Irina Yu.; Mitkevich, Vladimir A.; Anashkina, Anastasia A.; Klimanova, Elizaveta A.; Dergousova, Elena A.; Lopina, Olga D.; Makarov, Alexander A.

    2014-06-01

    Active transport of sodium and potassium ions by Na,K-ATPase is accompanied by the enzyme conformational transition between E1 and E2 states. ATP and ADP bind to Na,K-ATPase in the E1 conformation with similar affinity but the properties of enzyme in complexes with these nucleotides are different. We have studied thermodynamics of Na,K-ATPase binding with adenine nucleotides at different temperatures using isothermal titration calorimetry. Our data indicate that β-phosphate is involved in complex formation by increasing the affinity of adenine nucleotides to Na,K-ATPase by an order of magnitude, while γ-phosphate does not affect it. ATP binding to Na,K-ATPase in contrast to ADP binding generates a structural transition in the enzyme, which is consistent with the movement of a significant portion of the surface area to a solvent-protected state. We propose that ATP binding leads to convergence of the nucleotide-binding and phosphorylation domains transferring the enzyme from the ``E1-open'' to ``E1-closed'' conformation ready for phosphorylation.

  7. Construction of Listeria monocytogenes mutants with in-frame deletions in putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and analysis of their growth under stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that is difficult to eliminate since it can survive under multiple stress conditions such as low pH and low temperature. Understanding its survival under stress conditions is important to control this pathogen in food. ABC transporters have been shown...

  8. Steroid and bile acid conjugates are substrates of human multidrug-resistance protein (MRP) 4 (ATP-binding cassette C4).

    PubMed Central

    Zelcer, Noam; Reid, Glen; Wielinga, Peter; Kuil, Annemieke; van der Heijden, Ingrid; Schuetz, John D; Borst, Piet

    2003-01-01

    Human multidrug-resistance protein (MRP) 4 transports cyclic nucleotides and when overproduced in mammalian cells mediates resistance to some nucleoside analogues. Recently, it has been shown that Mrp4 is induced in the livers of Fxr ((-/-)) mice, which have increased levels of serum bile acids. Since MRP4, like MRP1-3, also mediates transport of a model steroid conjugate substrate, oestradiol 17-beta-D-glucuronide (E(2)17betaG), we tested whether MRP4 may be involved in the transport of steroid and bile acid conjugates. Bile salts, especially sulphated derivatives, and cholestatic oestrogens inhibited the MRP4-mediated transport of E(2)17betaG. Inhibition by oestradiol 3,17-disulphate and taurolithocholate 3-sulphate was competitive, suggesting that these compounds are MRP4 substrates. Furthermore, we found that MRP4 transports dehydroepiandrosterone 3-sulphate (DHEAS), the most abundant circulating steroid in humans, which is made in the adrenal gland. The ATP-dependent transport of DHEAS by MRP4 showed saturable kinetics with K (m) and V (max) values of 2 microM and 45 pmol/mg per min, respectively (at 27 degrees C). We further studied the possible involvement of other members of the MRP family of transporters in the transport of DHEAS. We found that MRP1 transports DHEAS in a glutathione-dependent manner and exhibits K (m) and V (max) values of 5 microM and 73 pmol/mg per min, respectively (at 27 degrees C). No transport of DHEAS was observed in membrane vesicles containing MRP2 or MRP3. Our findings suggest a physiological role for MRP1 and MRP4 in DHEAS transport and an involvement of MRP4 in transport of conjugated steroids and bile acids. PMID:12523936

  9. Polymorphisms of ATP binding cassette G5 and G8 transporters: their effect on cholesterol metabolism after moderate weight loss in overweight and obese hyperlipidemic women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the effect of polymorphisms ABCG5 and ABCG8 transporters on changes in lipid levels, cholesterol absorption rate (ABS), fractional synthesis rate (FSR), and turnover (TO) after moderate weight loss (WtL) in women. Cholesterol metabolism was measured pre and post WtL in 35 hyperlipidemic...

  10. Conserved glycolipid termini in capsular polysaccharides synthesized by ATP-binding cassette transporter-dependent pathways in Gram-negative pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Lisa M.; Stupak, Jacek; Richards, Michele R.; Lowary, Todd L.; Li, Jianjun; Whitfield, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial capsules are surface layers made of long-chain polysaccharides. They are anchored to the outer membrane of many Gram-negative bacteria, including pathogens such as Escherichia coli, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Pasteurella multocida. Capsules protect pathogens from host defenses including complement-mediated killing and phagocytosis and therefore represent a major virulence factor. Capsular polysaccharides are synthesized by enzymes located in the inner (cytoplasmic) membrane and are then translocated to the cell surface. Whereas the enzymes that synthesize the polysaccharides have been studied in detail, the structure and biosynthesis of the anchoring elements have not been definitively resolved. Here we determine the structure of the glycolipid attached to the reducing terminus of the polysialic acid capsular polysaccharides from E. coli K1 and N. meningitidis group B and the heparosan-like capsular polysaccharide from E. coli K5. All possess the same unique glycolipid terminus consisting of a lyso-phosphatidylglycerol moiety with a ?-linked poly-(3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid) (poly-Kdo) linker attached to the reducing terminus of the capsular polysaccharide. PMID:23610430

  11. The mitochondrial ATP-binding cassette transporter Abcb7 is essential in mice and participates in cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pondarr, Corinne; Antiochos, Brendan B; Campagna, Dean R; Clarke, Stephen L; Greer, Eric L; Deck, Kathryn M; McDonald, Alice; Han, An-Ping; Medlock, Amy; Kutok, Jeffery L; Anderson, Sheila A; Eisenstein, Richard S; Fleming, Mark D

    2006-03-15

    Proteins with iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters participate in multiple metabolic pathways throughout the cell. The mitochondrial ABC half-transporter Abcb7, which is mutated in X-linked sideroblastic anemia with ataxia in humans, is a functional ortholog of yeast Atm1p and is predicted to export a mitochondrially derived metabolite required for cytosolic Fe-S cluster assembly. Using an inducible Cre/loxP system to delete exons 9 and 10 of the Abcb7 gene, we examined the phenotype of mice deficient in Abcb7. We found that Abcb7 was essential in extra-embryonic tissues early in gestation and that the mutant allele exhibits an X-linked parent-of-origin lethality effect. Furthermore, using X-chromosome inactivation assays and tissue-specific deletions, Abcb7 was found to be essential for the development and function of numerous other cell types and tissues. A notable exception to this was liver, where loss of Abcb7 impaired cytosolic Fe-S cluster assembly but was not lethal. In this situation, control of iron regulatory protein 1, a key cytosolic modulator of iron metabolism, which is responsive to the availability of cytosolic Fe-S clusters, was impaired and contributed to the dysregulation of hepatocyte iron metabolism. Altogether, these studies demonstrate the essential nature of Abcb7 in mammals and further substantiate a central role for mitochondria in the biogenesis of cytosolic Fe-S proteins. PMID:16467350

  12. Variants in the ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter (ABCA7), Apolipoprotein E ?4, and the Risk of Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Christiane; Jun, Gyungah; Naj, Adam; Rajbhandary, Ruchita; Vardarajan, Badri Narayan; Wang, Li-San; Valladares, Otto; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Larson, Eric B.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Evans, Denis; De Jager, Philip L.; Crane, Paul K.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Murrell, Jill R.; Raj, Towfique; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Logue, Mark; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Green, Robert C.; Barnes, Lisa L.; Cantwell, Laura B.; Fallin, M. Daniele; Go, Rodney C. P.; Griffith, Patrick; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Manly, Jennifer J.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Lopez, Oscar L.; Bennett, David A.; Hendrie, Hugh; Hall, Kathleen S.; Goate, Alison M.; Byrd, Goldie S.; Kukull, Walter A.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Mayeux, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Importance Genetic variants associated with susceptibility to late-onset Alzheimer disease are known for individuals of European ancestry, but whether the same or different variants account for the genetic risk of Alzheimer disease in African American individuals is unknown. Identification of disease-associated variants helps identify targets for genetic testing, prevention, and treatment. Objective To identify genetic loci associated with late-onset Alzheimer disease in African Americans. Design, Setting, and Participants The Alzheimer Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC) assembled multiple data sets representing a total of 5896 African Americans (1968 case participants, 3928 control participants) 60 years or older that were collected between 1989 and 2011 at multiple sites. The association of Alzheimer disease with genotyped and imputed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was assessed in case-control and in family-based data sets. Results from individual data sets were combined to perform an inverse varianceweighted meta-analysis, first with genome-wide analyses and subsequently with gene-based tests for previously reported loci. Main Outcomes and Measures Presence of Alzheimer disease according to standardized criteria. Results Genome-wide significance in fully adjusted models (sex, age, APOE genotype, population stratification) was observed for a SNP in ABCA7 (rs115550680, allele = G; frequency, 0.09 cases and 0.06 controls; odds ratio [OR], 1.79 [95% CI, 1.47-2.12]; P = 2.2 109), which is in linkage disequilibrium with SNPs previously associated with Alzheimer disease in Europeans (0.8

  13. Thiorhodamines Containing Amide and Thioamide Functionality as Inhibitors of the ATP-Binding Cassette Drug Transporter P-glycoprotein (ABCB1)

    PubMed Central

    Orchard, Alexandra; Schamerhorn, Gregory A.; Calitree, Brandon D.; Sawada, Geri A.; Loo, Tip W.; Bartlett, M. Claire; Clarke, David M.; Dettya, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Twelve thiorhodamine derivatives have been examined for their ability to stimulate the ATPase activity of purified human P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-His10, to promote uptake of calcein AM and vinblastine into multidrug-resistant, P-gp-overexpressing MDCKII-MDR1 cells, and for their rates of transport in monolayers of multidrug-resistant, P-gp-overexpressing MDCKII-MDR1 cells. The thiorhodamine derivatives have structural diversity from amide and thioamide functionality (N,N-diethyl and N-piperidyl) at the 5-position of a 2-thienyl substituent on the thiorhodamine core and from diversity at the 3-amino substituent with N,N-dimethylamino, fused azadecalin (julolidyl), and fused N-methylcyclohexylamine (half-julolidyl) substituents. The julolidyl and half-julolidyl derivatives were more effective inhibitors of P-gp than the dimethylamino analogues. Amide-containing derivatives were transported much more rapidly than thioamide-containing derivatives. PMID:22727780

  14. The C421A (Q141K) polymorphism enhances the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR)-dependent regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Ripperger, Anne; Benndorf, Ralf A

    2016-03-15

    The impact of the gout-causing C421A (Q141K) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on ABC transporter ABCG2 expression and function has been extensively characterized. However, the influence of the C421A SNP on 3'-UTR-dependent ABCG2 regulation has not been analysed so far. To elucidate this matter, we generated vectors for expression of either the ABCG2 coding sequence (ORF) or the ABCG2 ORF fused to its 3'-UTR, inserted the C421A mutation via site-directed mutagenesis and expressed wild-type and C421A-mutated ABCG2 transcripts in HEK293-Tet-On cells. As shown previously, the C421A SNP significantly reduced ABCG2 protein levels in ABCG2 ORF-transfected HEK293-Tet-On cells. Interestingly, the presence of the 3'-UTR in the ABCG2 transcript dramatically reduced ABCG2 protein content in cells transfected with the C421A variant but not significantly in those transfected with ABCG2 wild-type sequence, whereas ABCG2 mRNA levels were similar. siRNA-mediated DICER1 knockdown to reduce cellular microRNA biogenesis and selective mutation of putative microRNA binding sites within the ABCG2 3'-UTR partially antagonized C421A-associated reduction of ABCG2 protein content but did not significantly affect wild-type ABCG2 protein levels. In addition, antagomir-mediated inhibition of two microRNAs (hsa-miR-519c and hsa-miR-328) again partially reversed C421A-associated ABCG2 translational repression, thereby indicating that the C421A SNP may facilitate microRNA-dependent repression of ABCG2 protein translation. We conclude from our results that the C421A SNP may lead to reduced ABCG2 protein levels not only by affecting cellular protein stability but also via enhanced microRNA-dependent ABCG2 repression. Moreover, tissue-specific variation in ABCG2 3'-UTR processing may profoundly affect ABCG2 expression levels in individuals carrying the C421A mutation. PMID:26903388

  15. Cystathionine ?-Synthase (CBS) Domains 1 and 2 Fulfill Different Roles in Ionic Strength Sensing of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter OpuA*

    PubMed Central

    Karasawa, Akira; Erkens, Guus B.; Berntsson, Ronnie P.-A.; Otten, Renee; Schuurman-Wolters, Gea K.; Mulder, Frans A. A.; Poolman, Bert

    2011-01-01

    The cystathionine ?-synthase module of OpuA in conjunction with an anionic membrane surface acts as a sensor of internal ionic strength, which allows the protein to respond to osmotic stress. We now show by chemical modification and cross-linking studies that CBS2-CBS2 interface residues are critical for transport activity and/or ionic regulation of transport, whereas CBS1 serves no functional role. We establish that Cys residues in CBS1, CBS2, and the nucleotide-binding domain are more accessible for cross-linking at high than low ionic strength, indicating that these domains undergo conformational changes when transiting between the active and inactive state. Structural analyses suggest that the cystathionine ?-synthase module is largely unstructured. Moreover, we could substitute CBS1 by a linker and preserve ionic regulation of transport. These data suggest that CBS1 serves as a linker and the structured CBS2-CBS2 interface forms a hinge point for ionic strength-dependent rearrangements that are transmitted to the nucleotide-binding domain and thereby affect translocation activity. PMID:21878634

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of AlgS, a bacterial ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein specific to macromolecule import.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Y; Momma, K; Hashimoto, W; Mikami, B; Murata, K

    2001-06-01

    Sphingomonas sp. A1 possesses a macromolecule (alginate; average molecular size 25 700 Da) uptake system mediated by a novel pit-dependent ABC transporter. In this system, AlgS (363 amino-acid residues; 40 kDa) functions as an ATPase and provides energy for the translocation of high molecular-weight alginate across the cytoplasmic membrane. Hexahistidine-tagged AlgS of Sphingomonas sp. A1 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized by means of the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with ammonium dihydrogen monophosphate as the precipitant. Preliminary X-ray analysis of the resultant crystals was performed; they belonged to the monoclinic space group P2(1) and had unit-cell parameters a = 57.4, b = 92.7, c = 65.8 A, beta = 102.3 degrees. X-ray diffraction data to 3.2 A have been collected from the native crystal. PMID:11375517

  17. Encapsulated Brucella ovis Lacking a Putative ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter (ΔabcBA) Protects against Wild Type Brucella ovis in Rams.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Patrícia C; Macêdo, Auricélio A; Costa, Luciana F; Rocha, Cláudia E; Garcia, Luize N N; Farias, Jade R D; Gomes, Priscilla P R; Teixeira, Gustavo C; Fonseca, Kessler W J; Maia, Andréa R F; Neves, Gabriela G; Romão, Everton L; Silva, Teane M A; Mol, Juliana P S; Oliveira, Renata M; Araújo, Márcio S S; Nascimento, Ernane F; Martins-Filho, Olindo A; Brandão, Humberto M; Paixão, Tatiane A; Santos, Renato L

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate protection induced by the vaccine candidate B. ovis ΔabcBA against experimental challenge with wild type B. ovis in rams. Rams were subcutaneously immunized with B. ovis ΔabcBA encapsulated with sterile alginate or with the non encapsulated vaccine strain. Serum, urine, and semen samples were collected during two months after immunization. The rams were then challenged with wild type B. ovis (ATCC25840), and the results were compared to non immunized and experimentally challenged rams. Immunization, particularly with encapsulated B. ovis ΔabcBA, prevented infection, secretion of wild type B. ovis in the semen and urine, shedding of neutrophils in the semen, and the development of clinical changes, gross and microscopic lesions induced by the wild type B. ovis reference strain. Collectively, our data indicates that the B. ovis ΔabcBA strain is an exceptionally good vaccine strain for preventing brucellosis caused by B. ovis infection in rams. PMID:26317399

  18. Encapsulated Brucella ovis Lacking a Putative ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter (ΔabcBA) Protects against Wild Type Brucella ovis in Rams

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ana Patrícia C.; Macêdo, Auricélio A.; Costa, Luciana F.; Rocha, Cláudia E.; Garcia, Luize N. N.; Farias, Jade R. D.; Gomes, Priscilla P. R.; Teixeira, Gustavo C.; Fonseca, Kessler W. J.; Maia, Andréa R. F.; Neves, Gabriela G.; Romão, Everton L.; Silva, Teane M. A.; Mol, Juliana P. S.; Oliveira, Renata M.; Araújo, Márcio S. S.; Nascimento, Ernane F.; Martins-Filho, Olindo A.; Brandão, Humberto M.; Paixão, Tatiane A.; Santos, Renato L.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate protection induced by the vaccine candidate B. ovis ΔabcBA against experimental challenge with wild type B. ovis in rams. Rams were subcutaneously immunized with B. ovis ΔabcBA encapsulated with sterile alginate or with the non encapsulated vaccine strain. Serum, urine, and semen samples were collected during two months after immunization. The rams were then challenged with wild type B. ovis (ATCC25840), and the results were compared to non immunized and experimentally challenged rams. Immunization, particularly with encapsulated B. ovis ΔabcBA, prevented infection, secretion of wild type B. ovis in the semen and urine, shedding of neutrophils in the semen, and the development of clinical changes, gross and microscopic lesions induced by the wild type B. ovis reference strain. Collectively, our data indicates that the B. ovis ΔabcBA strain is an exceptionally good vaccine strain for preventing brucellosis caused by B. ovis infection in rams. PMID:26317399

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Universal Stress Protein Rv2623 Regulates Bacillary Growth by ATP-Binding: Requirement for Establishing Chronic Persistent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bilder, Patrick; Sun, Meihao; Lim, Jihyeon; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Basaraba, Randall; So, Melvin; Zhu, Guofeng; Tufariello, JoAnn M.; Izzo, Angelo A.; Orme, Ian M.; Almo, Steve C.; Leyh, Thomas S.; Chan, John

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculous latency and reactivation play a significant role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, yet the mechanisms that regulate these processes remain unclear. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis universal stress protein (USP) homolog, rv2623, is among the most highly induced genes when the tubercle bacillus is subjected to hypoxia and nitrosative stress, conditions thought to promote latency. Induction of rv2623 also occurs when M. tuberculosis encounters conditions associated with growth arrest, such as the intracellular milieu of macrophages and in the lungs of mice with chronic tuberculosis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Rv2623 regulates tuberculosis latency. We observed that an Rv2623-deficient mutant fails to establish chronic tuberculous infection in guinea pigs and mice, exhibiting a hypervirulence phenotype associated with increased bacterial burden and mortality. Consistent with this in vivo growth-regulatory role, constitutive overexpression of rv2623 attenuates mycobacterial growth in vitro. Biochemical analysis of purified Rv2623 suggested that this mycobacterial USP binds ATP, and the 2.9--resolution crystal structure revealed that Rv2623 engages ATP in a novel nucleotide-binding pocket. Structure-guided mutagenesis yielded Rv2623 mutants with reduced ATP-binding capacity. Analysis of mycobacteria overexpressing these mutants revealed that the in vitro growth-inhibitory property of Rv2623 correlates with its ability to bind ATP. Together, the results indicate that i) M. tuberculosis Rv2623 regulates mycobacterial growth in vitro and in vivo, and ii) Rv2623 is required for the entry of the tubercle bacillus into the chronic phase of infection in the host; in addition, iii) Rv2623 binds ATP; and iv) the growth-regulatory attribute of this USP is dependent on its ATP-binding activity. We propose that Rv2623 may function as an ATP-dependent signaling intermediate in a pathway that promotes persistent infection. PMID:19478878

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Universal Stress Protein Rv2623 Regulates Bacillary Growth by ATP Binding: Requirement for Establishing Chronic Persistent Infection

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, J.; Mi, K; Bilder, P; Sun, M; Lim, J; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H; Basaraba, R; So, M; Zhu, G; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculous latency and reactivation play a significant role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, yet the mechanisms that regulate these processes remain unclear. The Mycobacterium tuberculosisuniversal stress protein (USP) homolog, rv2623, is among the most highly induced genes when the tubercle bacillus is subjected to hypoxia and nitrosative stress, conditions thought to promote latency. Induction of rv2623 also occurs when M. tuberculosis encounters conditions associated with growth arrest, such as the intracellular milieu of macrophages and in the lungs of mice with chronic tuberculosis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Rv2623 regulates tuberculosis latency. We observed that an Rv2623-deficient mutant fails to establish chronic tuberculous infection in guinea pigs and mice, exhibiting a hypervirulence phenotype associated with increased bacterial burden and mortality. Consistent with this in vivo growth-regulatory role, constitutive overexpression of rv2623 attenuates mycobacterial growth in vitro. Biochemical analysis of purified Rv2623 suggested that this mycobacterial USP binds ATP, and the 2.9-A-resolution crystal structure revealed that Rv2623 engages ATP in a novel nucleotide-binding pocket. Structure-guided mutagenesis yielded Rv2623 mutants with reduced ATP-binding capacity. Analysis of mycobacteria overexpressing these mutants revealed that the in vitro growth-inhibitory property of Rv2623 correlates with its ability to bind ATP. Together, the results indicate that i M. tuberculosis Rv2623 regulates mycobacterial growth in vitro and in vivo, and ii Rv2623 is required for the entry of the tubercle bacillus into the chronic phase of infection in the host; in addition, iii Rv2623 binds ATP; and iv the growth-regulatory attribute of this USP is dependent on its ATP-binding activity. We propose that Rv2623 may function as an ATP-dependent signaling intermediate in a pathway that promotes persistent infection.

  1. The Q Motif Is Involved in DNA Binding but Not ATP Binding in ChlR1 Helicase

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hao; Guo, Manhong; Vidhyasagar, Venkatasubramanian; Talwar, Tanu; Wu, Yuliang

    2015-01-01

    Helicases are molecular motors that couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to the unwinding of structured DNA or RNA and chromatin remodeling. The conversion of energy derived from ATP hydrolysis into unwinding and remodeling is coordinated by seven sequence motifs (I, Ia, II, III, IV, V, and VI). The Q motif, consisting of nine amino acids (GFXXPXPIQ) with an invariant glutamine (Q) residue, has been identified in some, but not all helicases. Compared to the seven well-recognized conserved helicase motifs, the role of the Q motif is less acknowledged. Mutations in the human ChlR1 (DDX11) gene are associated with a unique genetic disorder known as Warsaw Breakage Syndrome, which is characterized by cellular defects in genome maintenance. To examine the roles of the Q motif in ChlR1 helicase, we performed site directed mutagenesis of glutamine to alanine at residue 23 in the Q motif of ChlR1. ChlR1 recombinant protein was overexpressed and purified from HEK293T cells. ChlR1-Q23A mutant abolished the helicase activity of ChlR1 and displayed reduced DNA binding ability. The mutant showed impaired ATPase activity but normal ATP binding. A thermal shift assay revealed that ChlR1-Q23A has a melting point value similar to ChlR1-WT. Partial proteolysis mapping demonstrated that ChlR1-WT and Q23A have a similar globular structure, although some subtle conformational differences in these two proteins are evident. Finally, we found ChlR1 exists and functions as a monomer in solution, which is different from FANCJ, in which the Q motif is involved in protein dimerization. Taken together, our results suggest that the Q motif is involved in DNA binding but not ATP binding in ChlR1 helicase. PMID:26474416

  2. Specific mutation of a regulatory site within the ATP-binding region of simian virus 40 large T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, B M; Bradley, M K

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to distinguish simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (T) binding to ATP from hydrolysis, specific mutations were made in the ATP-binding site of T according to our model for the site (M. K. Bradley, T. F. Smith, R. H. Lathrop, D. M. Livingston, and T. A. Webster, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:4026-4030, 1987). Two acidic residues predicted to make contact with the magnesium phosphate were changed to alanines. The mutated T gene was completely defective for viral DNA synthesis and for virion production, and it was dominant defective for viral DNA replication. The defective T gene encoded a stable product (2905T) that oncogenically transformed mouse cell lines. 2905T, immunoprecipitated from transformed-cell extracts, bound SV40 origin DNA specifically and, surprisingly, it was active as an ATPase. A recombinant baculovirus was constructed for the production and purification of the mutant protein for detailed biochemical analyses. 2905T had only 10% of the ATPase and helicase of wild-type T. The Km of 2905T for ATP in ATPase assays was the same as the Km of wild-type T. ATP activated the ATPase activity of wild-type T, but not of 2905T. As tested by gel bandshift assay, 2905T bound to SV40 origin DNA and to individual sites I and II with affinities similar to that of the wild type. However, ATP did not modulate the DNA-binding activity of mutant T to site II. Therefore, this mutation in the ATP-binding site in T resulted in defects in the interaction between the protein and ATP that appeared to be responsible for the determination of the active state of T for DNA binding versus ATPase. Images PMID:1651416

  3. ATP-binding motifs play key roles in Krp1p, kinesin-related protein 1, function for bi-polar growth control in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, Dong Keun; Cho, Bon A; Kim, Hyong Bai . E-mail: hbkim5212@hotmail.com

    2005-06-03

    Kinesin is a microtubule-based motor protein with various functions related to the cell growth and division. It has been reported that Krp1p, kinesin-related protein 1, which belongs to the kinesin heavy chain superfamily, localizes on microtubules and may play an important role in cytokinesis. However, the function of Krp1p has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we overexpressed an intact form and three different mutant forms of Krp1p in fission yeast constructed by site-directed mutagenesis in two ATP-binding motifs or by truncation of the leucine zipper-like motif (LZiP). We observed hyper-extended microtubules and the aberrant nuclear shape in Krp1p-overexpressed fission yeast. As a functional consequence, a point mutation of ATP-binding domain 1 (G89E) in Krp1p reversed the effect of Krp1p overexpression in fission yeast, whereas the specific mutation in ATP-binding domain 2 (G238E) resulted in the altered cell polarity. Additionally, truncation of the leucine zipper-like domain (LZiP) at the C-terminal of Krp1p showed a normal nuclear division. Taken together, we suggest that krp1p is involved in regulation of cell-polarized growth through ATP-binding motifs in fission yeast.

  4. Automatic cassette to cassette radiant impulse processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheets, Ronald E.

    1985-01-01

    Single wafer rapid annealing using high temperature isothermal processing has become increasingly popular in recent years. In addition to annealing, this process is also being investigated for suicide formation, passivation, glass reflow and alloying. Regardless of the application, there is a strong necessity to automate in order to maintain process control, repeatability, cleanliness and throughput. These requirements have been carefully addressed during the design and development of the Model 180 Radiant Impulse Processor which is a totally automatic cassette to cassette wafer processing system. Process control and repeatability are maintained by a closed loop optical pyrometer system which maintains the wafer at the programmed temperature-time conditions. Programmed recipes containing up to 10 steps may be easily entered on the computer keyboard or loaded in from a recipe library stored on a standard 5 {1}/{4?} floppy disk. Cold wall heating chamber construction, controlled environment (N 2, A, forming gas) and quartz wafer carriers prevent contamination of the wafer during high temperature processing. Throughputs of 150-240 wafers per hour are achieved by quickly heating the wafer to temperature (450-1400C) in 3-6 s with a high intensity, uniform ( 1%) radiant flux of 100 {W}/{cm 2}, parallel wafer handling system and a wafer cool down stage.

  5. Identification of mutations in regions corresponding to the two putative nucleotide (ATP)-binding folds of the cystic fibrosis gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kerem, B.; Zielenski, J.; Markiewicz, D.; Bozon, D.; Kennedy, D.; Rommens, J.M. ); Gazit, E. ); Yahav, J. ); Riordan, J.R. ); Collins, F.S. ); Tsui, Lapchee Univ. of Toronto, Ontario )

    1990-11-01

    Additional mutations in the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene were identified in the regions corresponding to the two putative nucleotide (ATP)-binding folds (NBFs) of the predicted polypeptide. The patient cohort included 46 Canadian CF families with well-characterized DNA marker haplotypes spanning the disease locus and several other families from Israel. Eleven mutations were found in the first NBF, 2 were found in the second NBF, but none was found in the R-domain. Seven of the mutations were of the missense type affecting some of the highly conserved amino acid residues in the first NBF; 3 were nonsense mutations; 2 would probably affect mRNA splicing; 2 corresponded to small deletions, including another 3-base-pair deletion different from the major mutation ({delta}F508), which could account for 70% of the CF chromosomes in the population. Nine of these mutations accounted for 12 of the 31 non-{delta}F508 CF chromosomes in the Canadian families. The highly heterogeneous nature of the remaining CF mutations provides important insights into the structure and function of the protein, but it also suggests that DNA-based genetic screening for CF carrier status will not be straightforward.

  6. ATP protects against FITC labeling of Solanum lycopersicon and Arabidopsis thaliana Ca2+-ATPase ATP binding domains.

    PubMed

    Galva, Charitha; Virgin, Gail K; Helms, Jeff B; Gatto, Craig

    2013-10-01

    Ca(2+)-ATPases are integral membrane proteins that actively transport Ca(2+) against substantial concentration gradients in eukaryotic cells. This active transport is energized by coupling ion translocation with ATP hydrolysis. In order to better understand this coupling mechanism, we studied the nucleotide specificities of isolated ATP binding domains (ABDs) of Solanum lycopersicon Ca(2+)-ATPase (LCA), a type IIA non-calmodulin regulated P-type pump found in tomato plants that is very similar to mammalian sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA), and Arabidopsis Ca(2+)-ATPase, isoform 2 (ACA2), a type IIB calmodulin regulated P-type ATPase found in the endoplasmic reticulum of Arabidopsis cells. We used nucleotide protection against FITC labeling as a measure of binding since both LCA and ACA contained the KGAP(S,V,F)E motif, which has been shown to be modified by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) in P-type pumps from animal cells. We demonstrated that the heterologously expressed GST-tagged ABDs from both LCA and ACA2 were modified by FITC and that ATP protects against this modification. Moreover, GTP was able to reduce, but not eliminate, the level of FITC labeling in both ABD constructs, suggesting that these plant pumps may also bind GTP with low affinity, which is in contrast to mammalian SERCA and PMCA type pumps which do not bind GTP. PMID:23974359

  7. ATP protects against FITC labeling of Solanum lycopersicon and Arabidopsis thaliana Ca2+ -ATPase ATP binding domains

    PubMed Central

    Galva, Charitha; Virgin, Gail K.; Helms, Jeff B.; Gatto, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Ca2+-ATPases are integral membrane proteins that actively transport Ca2+ against substantial concentration gradients in eukaryotic cells. This active transport is energized by coupling ion translocation with ATP hydrolysis. In order to better understand this coupling mechanism, we studied the nucleotide specificities of isolated ATP binding domains (ABDs) of Solanum lycopersicon Ca2+-ATPase (LCA), a type IIA non-calmodulin regulated P-type pump found in tomato plants that is very similar to mammalian sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA), and Arabidopsis Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 2 (ACA2), a type IIB calmodulin regulated P-type ATPase found in the endoplasmic reticulum of Arabidopsis cells. We used nucleotide protection against FITC labeling as a measure of binding since both LCA and ACA contained the KGAP(S,V,F)E motif, which has been shown to be modified by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) in P-type pumps from animal cells. We demonstrated that the heterologously expressed GST-tagged ABDs from both LCA and ACA2 were modified by FITC and that ATP protects against this modification. Moreover, GTP was able to reduce, but not eliminate, the level of FITC labeling in both ABD constructs, suggesting that these plant pumps may also bind GTP with low affinity, which is in contrast to mammalian SERCA and PMCA type pumps which do not bind GTP. PMID:23974359

  8. Automated cassette-to-cassette substrate handling system

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Joseph Arthur; Boyer, Jeremy James; Mack, Joseph; DeChellis, Michael; Koo, Michael

    2014-03-18

    An automated cassette-to-cassette substrate handling system includes a cassette storage module for storing a plurality of substrates in cassettes before and after processing. A substrate carrier storage module stores a plurality of substrate carriers. A substrate carrier loading/unloading module loads substrates from the cassette storage module onto the plurality of substrate carriers and unloads substrates from the plurality of substrate carriers to the cassette storage module. A transport mechanism transports the plurality of substrates between the cassette storage module and the plurality of substrate carriers and transports the plurality of substrate carriers between the substrate carrier loading/unloading module and a processing chamber. A vision system recognizes recesses in the plurality of substrate carriers corresponding to empty substrate positions in the substrate carrier. A processor receives data from the vision system and instructs the transport mechanism to transport substrates to positions on the substrate carrier in response to the received data.

  9. Hedyotis diffusa Willd overcomes 5-fluorouracil resistance in human colorectal cancer HCT-8/5-FU cells by downregulating the expression of P-glycoprotein and ATP-binding casette subfamily G member 2

    PubMed Central

    LI, QIONGYU; WANG, XIANGFENG; SHEN, ALING; ZHANG, YUCHEN; CHEN, YOUQIN; SFERRA, THOMAS J.; LIN, JIUMAO; PENG, JUN

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Hedyotis diffusa Willd (HDW), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, exhibits potent anticancer activity in models of colorectal cancer (CRC). Aggressive forms of CRC exhibit resistance to widely used chemotherapeutic drugs, including the antimetabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); however, less is known with regard to the activity of HDW against 5-FU-resistant cancer. In the present study, the mechanism of action and the potency of ethanol extracts of HDW (EEHDW) were investigated on a multidrug-resistant CRC HCT-8/5-FU cell line. Using an MTT cell proliferation assay, EEHDW treatment was shown to significantly reduce the cell viability of HCT-8/5-FU cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, EEHDW significantly increased the retention of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter substrate, rhodamine-123, as compared with the untreated controls. To further investigate the molecular mechanisms targeted by EEHDW in the resistant cells, the expression levels of the ABC drug transporter protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and ABC subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2), were analyzed using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The mRNA and protein expression levels of P-gp and ABCG2 were reduced in the HCT-8/5-FU cells following EEHDW treatment, indicating that EEHDW inhibits ABCG2-mediated drug resistance by downregulating the expression of ABCG2 and P-gp. Therefore, the potential application of EEHDW as a chemotherapeutic adjuvant represents a promising alternative approach to the treatment of drug-resistant CRC. PMID:26640560

  10. Biophysical changes of ATP binding pocket may explain loss of kinase activity in mutant DAPK3 in cancer: A molecular dynamic simulation analysis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Tarun; Annamalai, Nithyanan; Maiti, Tapas Kumar; Arsad, Hasni

    2016-04-10

    DAPK3 belongs to family of DAPK (death-associated protein kinases) and is involved in the regulation of progression of the cell cycle, cell proliferation, apoptosis and autophagy. It is considered as a tumor suppressor kinase, suggesting the loss of its function in case of certain specific mutations. The T112M, D161N and P216S mutations in DAPK3 have been observed in cancer patients. These DAPK3 mutants have been associated with very low kinase activity, which results in the cellular progression towards cancer. However, a clear understanding of the structural and biophysical variations that occur in DAPK3 with these mutations, resulting in the decreased kinase activity has yet not been deciphered. We performed a molecular dynamic simulation study to investigate such structural variations. Our results revealed that mutations caused a significant structural variation in DAPK3, majorly concentrated in the flexible loops that form part of the ATP binding pocket. Interestingly, D161N and P216S mutations collapsed the ATP binding pocket through flexible loops invasion, hindering ATP binding which resulted in very low kinase activity. On the contrary, T112M mutant DAPK3 reduces ATP binding potential through outward distortion of flexible loops. In addition, the mutant lacked characteristic features of the active protein kinase including proper interaction between HR/FD and DFG motifs, well structured hydrophobic spine and Lys42-Glu64 salt bridge interaction. These observations could possibly explain the underlying mechanism associated with the loss of kinase activity with T112M, D161N and P216S mutation in DAPK3. PMID:26748242

  11. ATP sequestration by a synthetic ATP-binding protein leads to novel phenotypic changes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Korch, Shaleen B; Stomel, Joshua M; Len, Megan A; Hamada, Matt A; Stevenson, Christine R; Simpson, Brent W; Gujulla, Sunil K; Chaput, John C

    2013-02-15

    Artificial proteins that bind key metabolites with high affinity and specificity hold great promise as new tools in synthetic biology, but little has been done to create such molecules and examine their effects on living cells. Experiments of this kind have the potential to expand our understanding of cellular systems, as certain phenotypes may be physically realistic but not yet observed in nature. Here, we examine the physiology and morphology of a population of Escherichia coli as they respond to a genetically encoded, non-biological ATP-binding protein. Unlike natural ATP-dependent proteins, which transiently bind ATP during metabolic transformations, the synthetic protein DX depletes the concentration of intracellular ATP and ADP by a mechanism of protein-mediated ligand sequestration. The resulting ATP/ADP imbalance leads to an adaptive response in which a large population of bacilli cells transition to a filamentous state with dense lipid structures that segregate the cells into compartmentalized units. A wide range of biochemical and microscopy techniques extensively characterized these novel lipid structures, which we have termed endoliposomes. We show that endoliposomes adopt well-defined box-like structures that span the full width of the cell but exclude the synthetic protein DX. We further show that prolonged DX exposure causes a large fraction of the population to enter a viable-but-non-culturable state that is not easily reversed. Both phenotypes correlate with strong intracellular changes in ATP and ADP concentration. We suggest that artificial proteins, such as DX, could be used to control and regulate specific targets in metabolic pathways. PMID:23181457

  12. Long-range coupling between the extracellular gates and the intracellular ATP binding domains of multidrug resistance protein pumps and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channels.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Icyuz, Mert; Chauvet, Sylvain; Tao, Binli; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2016-03-01

    The ABCC transporter subfamily includes pumps, the long and short multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs), and an ATP-gated anion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We show that despite their thermodynamic differences, these ABCC transporter subtypes use broadly similar mechanisms to couple their extracellular gates to the ATP occupancies of their cytosolic nucleotide binding domains. A conserved extracellular phenylalanine at this gate was a prime location for producing gain of function (GOF) mutants of a long MRP in yeast (Ycf1p cadmium transporter), a short yeast MRP (Yor1p oligomycin exporter), and human CFTR channels. Extracellular gate mutations rescued ATP binding mutants of the yeast MRPs and CFTR by increasing ATP sensitivity. Control ATPase-defective MRP mutants could not be rescued by this mechanism. A CFTR double mutant with an extracellular gate mutation plus a cytosolic GOF mutation was highly active (single-channel open probability >0.3) in the absence of ATP and protein kinase A, each normally required for CFTR activity. We conclude that all 3 ABCC transporter subtypes use similar mechanisms to couple their extracellular gates to ATP occupancy, and highly active CFTR channels that bypass defects in ATP binding or phosphorylation can be produced.-Wei, S., Roessler, B. C., Icyuz, M., Chauvet, S., Tao, B., Hartman IV, J. L., Kirk, K. L. Long-range coupling between the extracellular gates and the intracellular ATP binding domains of multidrug resistance protein pumps and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channels. PMID:26606940

  13. The Deviant ATP-binding Site of the Multidrug Efflux Pump Pdr5 Plays an Active Role in the Transport Cycle*

    PubMed Central

    Furman, Christopher; Mehla, Jitender; Ananthaswamy, Neeti; Arya, Nidhi; Kulesh, Bridget; Kovach, Ildiko; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Golin, John

    2013-01-01

    Pdr5 is the founding member of a large subfamily of evolutionarily distinct, clinically important fungal ABC transporters containing a characteristic, deviant ATP-binding site with altered Walker A, Walker B, Signature (C-loop), and Q-loop residues. In contrast to these motifs, the D-loops of the two ATP-binding sites have similar sequences, including a completely conserved aspartate residue. Alanine substitution mutants in the deviant Walker A and Signature motifs retain significant, albeit reduced, ATPase activity and drug resistance. The D-loop residue mutants D340A and D1042A showed a striking reduction in plasma membrane transporter levels. The D1042N mutation localized properly had nearly WT ATPase activity but was defective in transport and was profoundly hypersensitive to Pdr5 substrates. Therefore, there was a strong uncoupling of ATPase activity and drug efflux. Taken together, the properties of the mutants suggest an additional, critical intradomain signaling role for deviant ATP-binding sites. PMID:24019526

  14. A thermosensitive defect in the ATP binding pocket of FtsA can be suppressed by allosteric changes in the dimer interface

    PubMed Central

    Herricks, Jennifer R.; Nguyen, Diep; Margolin, William

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In Escherichia coli, initial assembly of the Z ring for cell division requires FtsZ plus the essential Z ring-associated proteins FtsA and ZipA. Thermosensitive mutations in ftsA, such as ftsA27, map in or near its ATP binding pocket and result in cell division arrest at nonpermissive temperatures. We found that purified wild-type FtsA bound and hydrolyzed ATP, whereas FtsA27 was defective in both activities. FtsA27 was also less able to localize to the Z ring in vivo. To investigate the role of ATP transactions in FtsA function in vivo, we isolated intragenic suppressors of ftsA27. Suppressor lesions in the ATP site restored the ability of FtsA27 to compete with ZipA at the Z ring, and enhanced ATP binding and hydrolysis in vitro. Notably, suppressors outside of the ATP binding site, including some mapping to the FtsA-FtsA subunit interface, also enhanced ATP transactions and exhibited gain of function phenotypes in vivo. These results suggest that allosteric effects, including changes in oligomeric state, may influence the ability of FtsA to bind and/or hydrolyze ATP. PMID:25213228

  15. Cys(577) is a conformationally mobile residue in the ATP-binding domain of the Na,K-ATPase alpha-subunit.

    PubMed

    Gatto, C; Thornewell, S J; Holden, J P; Kaplan, J H

    1999-08-27

    2-[4'-Maleimidylanilino]naphthalene 6-sulfonic acid (MIANS) irreversibly inactivates Na,K-ATPase in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Inactivation is prevented by 3 mM ATP or low K(+) (<1 mM); the protective effect K(+) is reversed at higher concentrations. This biphasic effect was also observed with K(+) congeners. In contrast, Na(+) ions did not protect. MIANS inactivation disrupted high affinity ATP binding. Tryptic fragments of MIANS-labeled protein were analyzed by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography. ATP clearly protected one major labeled peptide peak. This observation was confirmed by separation of tryptic peptides in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealing a single fluorescently-labeled peptide of approximately 5 kDa. N-terminal amino acid sequencing identified the peptide (V(545)LGFCH...). This hydrophobic peptide contains only two Cys residues in all sodium pump alpha-subunit sequences and is found in the major cytoplasmic loop between M4 and M5, a region previously associated with ATP binding. Subsequent digestion of the tryptic peptide with V8 protease and N-terminal amino acid sequencing identified the modified residue as Cys(577). The cation-dependent change in reactivity of Cys(577) implies structural alterations in the ATP-binding domain following cation binding and occlusion in the intramembrane domain of Na,K-ATPase and expands our knowledge of the extent to which cation binding and occlusion are sensed in the ATP hydrolysis domain. PMID:10455178

  16. The effects of ABCG5/G8 polymorphisms on HDL-cholesterol concentrations depend on ABCA1 genetic variants in the Boston Puerto Rican health study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and aims: ATP-binding cassette transporters G5/G8 (ABCG5/G8) are associated with HDL-C concentrations. To assess whether the effect of ABCG5/G8 genetic variants on HDL-C concentrations is dependent on ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 (ABCA1), we studied potential interactions between ...

  17. Structural Models of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) NOD1 and NOD2 NACHT Domains Suggest Differential ATP Binding Orientations: Insights from Computational Modeling, Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Maharana, Jitendra; Sahoo, Bikash Ranjan; Bej, Aritra; Sahoo, Jyoti Ranjan; Dehury, Budheswar; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Martha, Sushma Rani; Balabantray, Sucharita; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar; Behera, Bijay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1) and NOD2 are cytosolic pattern recognition receptors playing pivotal roles in innate immune signaling. NOD1 and NOD2 recognize bacterial peptidoglycan derivatives iE-DAP and MDP, respectively and undergoes conformational alternation and ATP-dependent self-oligomerization of NACHT domain followed by downstream signaling. Lack of structural adequacy of NACHT domain confines our understanding about the NOD-mediated signaling mechanism. Here, we predicted the structure of NACHT domain of both NOD1 and NOD2 from model organism zebrafish (Danio rerio) using computational methods. Our study highlighted the differential ATP binding modes in NOD1 and NOD2. In NOD1, ?-phosphate of ATP faced toward the central nucleotide binding cavity like NLRC4, whereas in NOD2 the cavity was occupied by adenine moiety. The conserved Lysine at Walker A formed hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) and Aspartic acid (Walker B) formed electrostatic interaction with ATP. At Sensor 1, Arg328 of NOD1 exhibited an H-bond with ATP, whereas corresponding Arg404 of NOD2 did not. Proline of GxP motif (Pro386 of NOD1 and Pro464 of NOD2) interacted with adenine moiety and His511 at Sensor 2 of NOD1 interacted with ?-phosphate group of ATP. In contrast, His579 of NOD2 interacted with the adenine moiety having a relatively inverted orientation. Our findings are well supplemented with the molecular interaction of ATP with NLRC4, and consistent with mutagenesis data reported for human, which indicates evolutionary shared NOD signaling mechanism. Together, this study provides novel insights into ATP binding mechanism, and highlights the differential ATP binding modes in zebrafish NOD1 and NOD2. PMID:25811192

  18. The rem Mutations in the ATP-Binding Groove of the Rad3/XPD Helicase Lead to Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne Syndrome-Like Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Montelone, Beth A.; Aguilera, Andrs

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic TFIIH complex is involved in Nucleotide Excision Repair and transcription initiation. We analyzed three yeast mutations of the Rad3/XPD helicase of TFIIH known as rem (recombination and mutation phenotypes). We found that, in these mutants, incomplete NER reactions lead to replication fork breaking and the subsequent engagement of the homologous recombination machinery to restore them. Nevertheless, the penetrance varies among mutants, giving rise to a phenotype gradient. Interestingly, the mutations analyzed reside at the ATP-binding groove of Rad3 and in vivo experiments reveal a gain of DNA affinity upon damage of the mutant Rad3 proteins. Since mutations at the ATP-binding groove of XPD in humans are present in the Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne Syndrome (XP-CS), we recreated rem mutations in human cells, and found that these are XP-CS-like. We propose that the balance between the loss of helicase activity and the gain of DNA affinity controls the capacity of TFIIH to open DNA during NER, and its persistence at both DNA lesions and promoters. This conditions NER efficiency and transcription resumption after damage, which in human cells would explain the XP-CS phenotype, opening new perspectives to understand the molecular basis of the role of XPD in human disease. PMID:25500814

  19. Mutations in the consensus ATP-binding sites of XcpR and PilB eliminate extracellular protein secretion and pilus biogenesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, L R; Lara, J C; Nunn, D N; Lory, S

    1993-01-01

    The process of extracellular secretion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa requires specialized machinery which is widely distributed among bacteria that actively secrete proteins to the extracellular medium. One of the components of this machinery is the product of the xcpR gene, which is homologous to pilB, a gene encoding a protein essential for the biogenesis of type IV pili. Both XcpR and PilB are characterized by the presence of a conserved ATP-binding motif (Walker sequence). The codons of highly conserved glycine residues within the Walker sequences of xcpR and pilB were altered to encode a serine, and the effects of these substitutions were examined. Bacteria expressing mutant XcpR or PilB were unable to secrete exotoxin A or assemble pili, respectively. In addition, high-level expression of mutant XcpR in wild-type P. aeruginosa led to a pleiotropic extracellular secretion defect, resulting in the periplasmic accumulation of enzymes that are normally secreted from the cell. These studies show that the putative ATP-binding sites of XcpR and PilB are essential for their functions in protein secretion and assembly of pili, respectively. Moreover, the observed dominant negative phenotype of mutant XcpR suggests that this protein functions as a multimer or, alternatively, interacts with another essential component of the extracellular protein secretion machinery. Images PMID:8102361

  20. The rem mutations in the ATP-binding groove of the Rad3/XPD helicase lead to Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome-like phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Moyano, Emilia; Moriel-Carretero, Mara; Montelone, Beth A; Aguilera, Andrs

    2014-12-01

    The eukaryotic TFIIH complex is involved in Nucleotide Excision Repair and transcription initiation. We analyzed three yeast mutations of the Rad3/XPD helicase of TFIIH known as rem (recombination and mutation phenotypes). We found that, in these mutants, incomplete NER reactions lead to replication fork breaking and the subsequent engagement of the homologous recombination machinery to restore them. Nevertheless, the penetrance varies among mutants, giving rise to a phenotype gradient. Interestingly, the mutations analyzed reside at the ATP-binding groove of Rad3 and in vivo experiments reveal a gain of DNA affinity upon damage of the mutant Rad3 proteins. Since mutations at the ATP-binding groove of XPD in humans are present in the Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne Syndrome (XP-CS), we recreated rem mutations in human cells, and found that these are XP-CS-like. We propose that the balance between the loss of helicase activity and the gain of DNA affinity controls the capacity of TFIIH to open DNA during NER, and its persistence at both DNA lesions and promoters. This conditions NER efficiency and transcription resumption after damage, which in human cells would explain the XP-CS phenotype, opening new perspectives to understand the molecular basis of the role of XPD in human disease. PMID:25500814

  1. Conservation of an ATP-binding domain among recA proteins from Proteus vulgaris, erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli K-12 and B/r

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, K.L.; Hess, R.M.; McEntee, K.

    1988-06-01

    The purified RecA proteins encoded by the cloned genes from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r were compared with the RecA protein from E. coli K-12. Each of the proteins hydrolyzed ATP in the presence of single-stranded DNA, and each was covalently modified with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8N/sub 3/ATP). Two-dimensional tryptic maps of the four heterologous RecA proteins demonstrated considerable structural conservation among these bacterial genera. Moreover, when the (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/ATP-modified proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, a single peak of radioactivity was detected in each of the digests and these peptides eluted identically with the tryptic peptide T/sub 31/ of the E. coli K-12 RecA protein, which was the unique site of 8N/sub 3/ATP photolabeling. Each of the heterologous recA genes hybridized to oligonucleotide probes derived from the ATP-binding domain sequence of the E. coli K-12 gene. These last results demonstrate that the ATP-binding domain of the RecA protein has been strongly conserved for greater than 10/sup 7/ years.

  2. RAC: Repository of Antibiotic resistance Cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Tsafnat, Guy; Copty, Joseph; Partridge, Sally R.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria is often due to acquisition of resistance genes associated with different mobile genetic elements. In Gram-negative bacteria, many resistance genes are found as part of small mobile genetic elements called gene cassettes, generally found integrated into larger elements called integrons. Integrons carrying antibiotic resistance gene cassettes are often associated with mobile elements and here are designated ‘mobile resistance integrons’ (MRIs). More than one cassette can be inserted in the same integron to create arrays that contribute to the spread of multi-resistance. In many sequences in databases such as GenBank, only the genes within cassettes, rather than whole cassettes, are annotated and the same gene/cassette may be given different names in different entries, hampering analysis. We have developed the Repository of Antibiotic resistance Cassettes (RAC) website to provide an archive of gene cassettes that includes alternative gene names from multiple nomenclature systems and allows the community to contribute new cassettes. RAC also offers an additional function that allows users to submit sequences containing cassettes or arrays for annotation using the automatic annotation system Attacca. Attacca recognizes features (gene cassettes, integron regions) and identifies cassette arrays as patterns of features and can also distinguish minor cassette variants that may encode different resistance phenotypes (aacA4 cassettes and bla cassettes-encoding β-lactamases). Gaps in annotations are manually reviewed and those found to correspond to novel cassettes are assigned unique names. While there are other websites dedicated to integrons or antibiotic resistance genes, none includes a complete list of antibiotic resistance gene cassettes in MRI or offers consistent annotation and appropriate naming of all of these cassettes in submitted sequences. RAC thus provides a unique resource for researchers, which should reduce confusion and improve the quality of annotations of gene cassettes in integrons associated with antibiotic resistance. Database URL: http://www2.chi.unsw.edu.au/rac. PMID:22140215

  3. Replacement of lysine residue 1030 in the putative ATP-binding region of the insulin receptor abolishes insulin- and antibody-stimulated glucose uptake and receptor kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Ebina, Y; Araki, E; Taira, M; Shimada, F; Mori, M; Craik, C S; Siddle, K; Pierce, S B; Roth, R A; Rutter, W J

    1987-01-01

    To test whether the tyrosine kinase activity of the insulin receptor is crucial for insulin action, we have constructed mutations of the human insulin receptor at Lys-1030, which is in the presumed ATP-binding region. By using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis, this lysine residue was replaced with either methionine, arginine, or alanine. Chinese hamster ovary cells were transfected by mutant cDNAs and the expressed insulin receptors were characterized. We show here that none of these mutants exhibited insulin-activated autophosphorylation and kinase activity in vitro. They also do not mediate insulin- and antibody-stimulated uptake of 2-deoxyglucose. The tyrosine kinase activity is thus required for a key physiological response of insulin. Images PMID:3101064

  4. Replacement of lysine residue 1030 in the putative ATP-binding region of the insulin receptor abolishes insulin- and antibody-stimulated glucose uptake and receptor kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ebina, Y.; Araki, E.; Taira, M.; Shimada, F.; Mori, M.; Craik, C.S.; Siddle, K.; Pierce, S.B.; Roth, R.A.; Rutter, W.J.

    1987-02-01

    To test whether the tyrosine kinase activity of the insulin receptor is crucial for insulin action, the authors have constructed mutations of the human insulin receptor at Lys-1030, which is in the presumed ATP-binding region. By using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis, this lysine residue was replaced with either methionine, arginine, or alanine. Chinese hamster ovary cells were transfected by mutant cDNAs and the expressed insulin receptors were characterized. They show here that none of these mutants exhibited insulin-activated autophosphorylation and kinase activity in vitro. They also do not mediate insulin- and antibody-stimulated uptake of 2-deoxyglucose. The tyrosine kinase activity is thus required for a key physiological response of insulin.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the ATP-binding domain of the ABC transporter haemolysin B from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kránitz, László; Benabdelhak, Houssain; Horn, Carsten; Blight, Mark A; Holland, I Barry; Schmitt, Lutz

    2002-03-01

    Haemolysin B (HlyB) is a transmembrane protein which belongs to the superfamily of ABC transporters. In vivo, it mediates the non-classical translocation of the 107 kDa toxin HlyA across both membranes of Escherichia coli together with haemolysin D and the outer membrane protein TolC. The cytosolic ATP-binding domain of HlyB has been overexpressed and purified as an N-terminal His-tag fusion protein. Here, the crystallization of the ATPase domain of HlyB in the presence of ATP is described. A native data set has been obtained at a resolution of 2.8 A. Crystals belong to the primitive tetragonal space group P4(x)2(1)2, where x is very likely to be 1 or 3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 104.6, c = 125.8 A, alpha = beta = gamma = 90 degrees. PMID:11856849

  6. Effects on maribavir susceptibility of cytomegalovirus UL97 kinase ATP binding region mutations detected after drug exposure in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chou, Sunwen; Hakki, Morgan; Villano, Stephen

    2012-08-01

    Resistance to the experimental human cytomegalovirus (CMV) UL97 kinase inhibitor maribavir has been mapped to UL97 mutations at codons 353, 397, 409 and 411, in the kinase ATP-binding region, and to mutations in the UL27 gene. We studied the maribavir susceptibility phenotypes of additional UL97 mutations observed in vitro and in clinical trials, and the effect of simultaneous mutation in both UL97 and UL27. In vitro selection under maribavir identified a new locus of UL97 mutation within the conserved kinase p-loop (L337M), which conferred low grade maribavir resistance (3.5-fold increased EC50) without ganciclovir cross-resistance. During maribavir Phase III CMV prevention clinical trials, three previously unknown UL97 sequence variants were detected in plasma samples after 27-98 days of drug exposure (I324V, S334G and S386L). These variants did not confer any drug resistance despite proximity to mutations that confer maribavir resistance. The UL27 resistance mutation R233S, when added to strains containing UL97 mutations L337M or V353A, doubled their maribavir EC50s. These results expand the range of UL97 maribavir-resistance mutations into another part of the kinase ATP-binding region, but offer no genotypic evidence that development of drug resistance affected the outcomes of Phase III maribavir clinical trials after drug exposure of up to 14 weeks. There is a potential for increased maribavir resistance in UL27-UL97 double mutants. PMID:22664236

  7. Effect of N-Terminal Extension of Cardiac Troponin I on the Ca(2+) Regulation of ATP Binding and ADP Dissociation of Myosin II in Native Cardiac Myofibrils.

    PubMed

    Gunther, Laura K; Feng, Han-Zhong; Wei, Hongguang; Raupp, Justin; Jin, Jian-Ping; Sakamoto, Takeshi

    2016-03-29

    Cardiac troponin I (cTnI) has a unique N-terminal extension that plays a role in modifying the calcium regulation of cardiac muscle contraction. Restrictive cleavage of the N-terminal extension of cTnI occurs under stress conditions as a physiological adaptation. Recent studies have shown that in comparison with controls, transgenic mouse cardiac myofibrils containing cTnI lacking the N-terminal extension (cTnI-ND) had a lower sensitivity to calcium activation of ATPase, resulting in enhanced ventricular relaxation and cardiac function. To investigate which step(s) of the ATPase cycle is regulated by the N-terminal extension of cTnI, here we studied the calcium dependence of cardiac myosin II ATPase kinetics in isolated cardiac myofibrils. ATP binding and ADP dissociation rates were measured by using stopped-flow spectrofluorimetry with mant-dATP and mant-dADP, respectively. We found that the second-order mant-dATP binding rate of cTnI-ND mouse cardiac myofibrils was 3-fold faster than that of wild-type myofibrils at low Ca(2+) concentrations. The ADP dissociation rate of cTnI-ND myofibrils was positively dependent on calcium concentration, while the wild-type controls were not significantly affected. These data from experiments using native cardiac myofibrils under physiological conditions indicate that modification of the N-terminal extension of cTnI plays a role in the calcium regulation of the kinetics of actomyosin ATPase. PMID:26862665

  8. Identification of the ATP binding sites of the carbamyl phosphate synthetase domain of the Syrian hamster multifunctional protein CAD by affinity labeling with 5 prime -(p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl)adenosine

    SciTech Connect

    Hyesook Kim; Evans, D.R. ); Lee, L. )

    1991-10-22

    The ATP analogue 5{prime}-(p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl)adenosine (FSBA) was used to chemically modify the ATP binding sites of the carbamyl phosphate synthetase domain of CAD, the multifunctional protein that catalyzes the first steps in mammalian pyrimidine biosynthesis. Reaction of CAD with FSBA resulted in the inactivation of the ammonia- and glutamine-dependent CPSase activities but had no effect on its glutaminase, aspartate transcarbamylase, or dihydroortase activities. ATP protected CAD against inactivation by FSBA whereas the presence of the allosteric effectors UTP and PRPP afforded little protection, which suggests that the ATP binding sites were specifically labeled. The inactivation exhibited saturation behavior with respect to FSBA with a K{sub I} of 0.93 mM. The stoichiometry of ({sup 14}C)FSBA labeling showed that only 0.4-0.5 mol of FSBA/mol of protein was required for complete inactivation. Incorporation of radiolabeled FSBA into CAD and subsequent proteolysis, gel electrophoresis, and fluorography demonstrated that only the carbamyl phosphate synthetase domain of CAD is labeled. Amino acid sequencing of the principal peaks resulting from tryptic digests of FSBA-modified CAD located the sites of FSBA modification in regions that exhibit high homology to ATP binding sites of other known proteins. Thus CAD has two ATP binding sites, one in each of the two highly homologous halves of the carbamyl phosphate domain which catalyze distinct ATP-dependent partial reactions in carbamyl phosphate synthesis.

  9. Mutations in the Yeast Pdr3, Pdr4, Pdr7 and Pdr9 Pleiotropic (Multiple) Drug Resistance Loci Affect the Transcript Level of an Atp Binding Cassette Transporter Encoding Gene, Pdr5

    PubMed Central

    Dexter, D.; Moye-Rowley, W. S.; Wu, A. L.; Golin, J.

    1994-01-01

    The yeast pleiotropic (multiple drug) resistance gene PDR5 encodes a product with homology to a large number of membrane transport proteins including the mammalian multiple drug resistance family. In this study, we identified four genes on chromosome II that affect the steady-state level of PDR5 transcript in addition to a previously identified positive regulator, PDR1. The genes in question are PDR3, PDR4, PDR7 and PDR9. We also analyzed the interaction between PDR5 and YAP1. YAP1 encodes a positive regulator with a leucine zipper motif that causes pleiotropic drug resistance when overproduced. YAP1-mediated pleiotropic drug resistance is not dependent on the presence of PDR5 and must act through other genes. PMID:8150279

  10. ATP Regulation of Type-1 Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor Activity Does Not Require Walker A-type ATP-binding Motifs*

    PubMed Central

    Betzenhauser, Matthew J.; Wagner, Larry E.; Park, Hyung Seo; Yule, David I.

    2009-01-01

    ATP is known to increase the activity of the type-1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R1). This effect is attributed to the binding of ATP to glycine rich Walker A-type motifs present in the regulatory domain of the receptor. Only two such motifs are present in neuronal S2+ splice variant of InsP3R1 and are designated the ATPA and ATPB sites. The ATPA site is unique to InsP3R1, and the ATPB site is conserved among all three InsP3R isoforms. Despite the fact that both the ATPA and ATPB sites are known to bind ATP, the relative contribution of these two sites to the enhancing effects of ATP on InsP3R1 function is not known. We report here a mutational analysis of the ATPA and ATPB sites and conclude neither of these sites is required for ATP modulation of InsP3R1. ATP augmented InsP3-induced Ca2+ release from permeabilized cells expressing wild type and ATP-binding site-deficient InsP3R1. Similarly, ATP increased the single channel open probability of the mutated InsP3R1 to the same extent as wild type. ATP likely exerts its effects on InsP3R1 channel function via a novel and as yet unidentified mechanism. PMID:19386591

  11. The ATP binding site of the chromatin remodeling homolog Lsh is required for nucleosome density and de novo DNA methylation at repeat sequences

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jianke; Briones, Victorino; Barbour, Samantha; Yu, Weishi; Han, Yixing; Terashima, Minoru; Muegge, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Lsh, a chromatin remodeling protein of the SNF2 family, is critical for normal heterochromatin structure. In particular, DNA methylation at repeat elements, a hallmark of heterochromatin, is greatly reduced in Lsh−/− (KO) cells. Here, we examined the presumed nucleosome remodeling activity of Lsh on chromatin in the context of DNA methylation. We found that dynamic CG methylation was dependent on Lsh in embryonic stem cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that ATP function is critical for de novo methylation at repeat sequences. The ATP binding site of Lsh is in part required to promote stable association of the DNA methyltransferase 3b with the repeat locus. By performing nucleosome occupancy assays, we found distinct nucleosome occupancy in KO ES cells compared to WT ES cells after differentiation. Nucleosome density was restored to wild-type level by re-expressing wild-type Lsh but not the ATP mutant in KO ES cells. Our results suggest that ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling is the primary molecular function of Lsh, which may promote de novo methylation in differentiating ES cells. PMID:25578963

  12. A Previously Unknown Unique Challenge for Inhibitors of SYK ATP-Binding Site: Role of SYK as A Cell Cycle Checkpoint Regulator☆

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, Fatih M.; Ma, Hong; Ozer, Zahide; Goodman, Patricia; Zhang, Jian; Qazi, Sanjive

    2014-01-01

    The identification of SYK as a molecular target in B-lineage leukemia/lymphoma cells prompted the development of SYK inhibitors as a new class of anti-cancer drug candidates. Here we report that induction of the SYK gene expression in human cells causes a significant down-regulation of evolutionarily conserved genes associated with mitosis and cell cycle progression providing unprecedented evidence that SYK is a master regulator of cell cycle regulatory checkpoint genes in human cells. We further show that SYK regulates the G2 checkpoint by physically associating with and inhibiting the dual-specificity phosphatase CDC25C via phosphorylation of its S216 residue. SYK depletion by RNA interference or treatment with the chemical SYK inhibitor prevented nocodazole-treated human cell lines from activating the G2 checkpoint via CDC25C S216-phosphorylation and resulted in polyploidy. Our study provides genetic and biochemical evidence that spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) has a unique role in the activation of the G2 checkpoint in both non-lymphohematopoietic and B-lineage lymphoid cells. This previously unknown role of SYK as a cell cycle checkpoint regulator represents an unforeseen and significant challenge for inhibitors of SYK ATP binding site. PMID:25506060

  13. Structures of the CDK12/CycK complex with AMP-PNP reveal a flexible C-terminal kinase extension important for ATP binding

    PubMed Central

    Dixon-Clarke, Sarah E.; Elkins, Jonathan M.; Cheng, S.-W. Grace; Morin, Gregg B.; Bullock, Alex N.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 12 (CDK12) promotes transcriptional elongation by phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD). Structure-function studies show that this activity is dependent on a C-terminal kinase extension, as well as the binding of cyclin K (CycK). To better define these interactions we determined the crystal structure of the human CDK12/CycK complex with and without the kinase extension in the presence of AMP-PNP. The structures revealed novel features for a CDK, including a large β4-β5 loop insertion that contributes to the N-lobe interaction with the cyclin. We also observed two different conformations of the C-terminal kinase extension that effectively open and close the ATP pocket. Most notably, bound AMP-PNP was only observed when trapped in the closed state. Truncation of this C-terminal structure also diminished AMP-PNP binding, as well as the catalytic activity of the CDK12/CycK complex. Further kinetic measurements showed that the full length CDK12/CycK complex was significantly more active than the two crystallised constructs suggesting a critical role for additional domains. Overall, these results demonstrate the intrinsic flexibility of the C-terminal extension in CDK12 and highlight its importance for both ATP binding and kinase activity. PMID:26597175

  14. Recovery and evolutionary analysis of complete integron gene cassette arrays from Vibrio

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Yan; Nesb, Camilla L; Joss, Michael J; Robinson, Andrew; Mabbutt, Bridget C; Gillings, Michael R; Doolittle, W Ford; Stokes, HW

    2006-01-01

    Background Integrons are genetic elements capable of the acquisition, rearrangement and expression of genes contained in gene cassettes. Gene cassettes generally consist of a promoterless gene associated with a recombination site known as a 59-base element (59-be). Multiple insertion events can lead to the assembly of large integron-associated cassette arrays. The most striking examples are found in Vibrio, where such cassette arrays are widespread and can range from 30 kb to 150 kb. Besides those found in completely sequenced genomes, no such array has yet been recovered in its entirety. We describe an approach to systematically isolate, sequence and annotate large integron gene cassette arrays from bacterial strains. Results The complete Vibrio sp. DAT722 integron cassette array was determined through the streamlined approach described here. To place it in an evolutionary context, we compare the DAT722 array to known vibrio arrays and performed phylogenetic analyses for all of its components (integrase, 59-be sites, gene cassette encoded genes). It differs extensively in terms of genomic context as well as gene cassette content and organization. The phylogenetic tree of the 59-be sites collectively found in the Vibrio gene cassette pool suggests frequent transfer of cassettes within and between Vibrio species, with slower transfer rates between more phylogenetically distant relatives. We also identify multiple cases where non-integron chromosomal genes seem to have been assembled into gene cassettes and others where cassettes have been inserted into chromosomal locations outside integrons. Conclusion Our systematic approach greatly facilitates the isolation and annotation of large integrons gene cassette arrays. Comparative analysis of the Vibrio sp. DAT722 integron obtained through this approach to those found in other vibrios confirms the role of this genetic element in promoting lateral gene transfer and suggests a high rate of gene gain/loss relative to most other loci on vibrio chromosomes. We identify a relationship between the phylogenetic distance separating two species and the rate at which they exchange gene cassettes, interactions between the non-mobile portion of bacterial genomes and the vibrio gene cassette pool as well as intragenomic translocation events of integrons in vibrios. PMID:16417647

  15. Stable and strictly controlled expression of LTR-flanked autoregulated expression cassettes upon adenoviral transfer.

    PubMed

    Unsinger, Jacqueline; Lindenmaier, Werner; May, Tobias; Hauser, Hansjrg; Wirth, Dagmar

    2004-07-01

    An autoregulatory bidirectional expression cassette encoding all components necessary for regulated gene expression in a one-step gene transfer was evaluated for use in adenoviral vectors. Adenoviral vectors transducing this cassette provide about 1000-fold regulation. Regulation could be further improved by integrating the cassette as a retroviral vector into the adenoviral backbone. Moreover, with these adeno/retroviral hybrid vectors, the frequency of chromosomal integration is enhanced and about 1% of infected cells show stable chromosomal integration of the autoregulated cassette. In these stably transduced cells high regulation capacity is maintained. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this unexpected observation we investigated the regulation capacity of these cassettes in a viral and non-viral vector background after stable integration into the host's DNA. While naked cassettes show regulated expression that is strongly influenced by the chromosomal surrounding sequences the regulatory capacity of LTR flanked cassettes is highly comparable amongst different cell clones. This strict regulation with little influence from the flanking sequences is obtained when LTR-flanked cassettes are transduced as DNA, by retroviral or by adenoviral infection. PMID:15184065

  16. Temperature Variations around Medication Cassette and Carry Bag in Routine Use of Epoprostenol Administration in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Yuichi; Nakajima, Yasuo; Ozeki, Yasushi; Ono, Tomohiko; Takei, Makoto; Yamamoto, Tsunehisa; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    Background According to several treatment guidelines, epoprostenol is an important treatment option for pulmonary arterial hypertension. However, the pharmacokinetic characteristics and poor stability of epoprostenol at room temperature make its administration challenging. We therefore studied temperature fluctuations between the drug administration cassette and atmosphere to promote the safe use of epoprostenol. Methods and Findings Five healthy volunteers carried a portable intravenous infusion pump attached to a medication cassette containing saline in a bag during their ordinary activities over 16 days during which the mean atmospheric temperature was 29.61.5C. The temperature around the medication cassette was not less than 25C on any occasion, and the mean period over 24 h during which the temperature around the cassette exceeded 35C and 40C was 96.9156.4 min and 24.477.3 min, respectively. Significant correlations were observed between the temperatures outside the bag and around the cassette, as well as between temperatures around the cassette and of the saline solution in the cassette (r?=?0.9258 and 0.8276, respectively). There were no differences in the temperatures outside the bag or around the cassette with respect to the bag material. Conclusions Temperatures around a medication cassette and outside the bag containing the medication increase with sunlight exposure. The temperature around cassettes used for administering epoprostenol must therefore be kept low for as long as possible during hot summer conditions to maintain the drug stability. PMID:23300618

  17. The three-dimensional structure of MAP kinase p38[beta]: different features of the ATP-binding site in p38[beta] compared with p38[alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Sangita B.; Cameron, Patricia M.; O'Keefe, Stephen J.; Frantz-Wattley, Betsy; Thompson, Jed; O'Neill, Edward A.; Tennis, Trevor; Liu, Luping; Becker, Joseph W.; Scapin, Giovanna; Merck

    2010-10-18

    The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases are activated in response to environmental stress and cytokines and play a significant role in transcriptional regulation and inflammatory responses. Of the four p38 isoforms known to date, two (p38{alpha} and p38{beta}) have been identified as targets for cytokine-suppressive anti-inflammatory drugs. Recently, it was reported that specific inhibition of the p38{alpha} isoform is necessary and sufficient for anti-inflammatory efficacy in vivo, while further inhibition of p38{beta} may not provide any additional benefit. In order to aid the development of p38{alpha}-selective compounds, the three-dimensional structure of p38{beta} was determined. To do so, the C162S and C119S,C162S mutants of human MAP kinase p38{beta} were cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Initial screening hits in crystallization trials in the presence of an inhibitor led upon optimization to crystals that diffracted to 2.05 {angstrom} resolution and allowed structure determination (PDB codes 3gc8 and 3gc9 for the single and double mutant, respectively). The structure of the p38{alpha} C162S mutant in complex with the same inhibitor is also reported (PDB code 3gc7). A comparison between the structures of the two kinases showed that they are highly similar overall but that there are differences in the relative orientation of the N- and C-terminal domains that causes a reduction in the size of the ATP-binding pocket in p38{beta}. This difference in size between the two pockets could be exploited in order to achieve selectivity.

  18. Modulatory ATP binding to the E2 state of maize plasma membrane H+-ATPase indicated by the kinetics of vanadate inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaozhi; Qian, Xiaoqing; Stumpf, Beate; Fatima, Ammara; Feng, Ke; Schubert, Sven; Hanstein, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    P-type ATPases, as major consumers of cellular ATP in eukaryotic cells, are characterized by the formation of a phosphorylated enzyme intermediate (E2P), a process that is allosterically coupled to translocation of cations against an electrochemical gradient. The catalytic cycle comprises binding of Mg-ATP at the nucleotide-binding domain, phosphorylation of the E1 state (E1), conformational transition to the E2P state, and dephosphorylation through the actuator domain and re-establishment of the E1 state. Recently, it has been suggested that, for several P-type ATPases, Mg-ATP binds to the phosphorylated enzyme, thereby accelerating the transition to the E1 state, before then becoming the enzyme's catalytic substrate. Here, we provide evidence supporting this viewpoint. We employed kinetic models based on steady-state kinetics in the presence and absence of the reversible inhibitor orthovanadate. Vanadate is generally considered to be a conformational probe that specifically binds to the E2 state, arresting the enzyme in a state analogous to the E2P state. Hydrolytic H(+) -ATPase activities were measured in inside-out plasma membrane vesicles isolated from roots and shoots of maize plants. For root enzymes, kinetic models of vanadate inhibition that allow simultaneous binding of Mg-ATP and vanadate to the same enzyme state were most plausible. For shoot enzymes, application of the competitive inhibitor Mg-free ATP attenuated vanadate inhibition, which is consistent with a model in which either Mg-free ATP or Mg-ATP is bound to the enzyme when vanadate binds. Therefore, data from roots and shoots indicate that binding of ATP species before transition to the E1 state plays an important role in the catalytic cycle of plant plasma membrane H(+) -ATPase. PMID:23879673

  19. Synthesis and Evaluation of a Novel Deguelin Derivative, L80, which Disrupts ATP Binding to the C-terminal Domain of Heat Shock Protein 90.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Chan; Min, Hye-Young; Choi, Hoon; Kim, Ho Shin; Kim, Kyong-Cheol; Park, So-Jung; Seong, Myeong A; Seo, Ji Hae; Park, Hyun-Ju; Suh, Young-Ger; Kim, Kyu-Won; Hong, Hyun-Seok; Kim, Hee; Lee, Min-Young; Lee, Jeewoo; Lee, Ho-Young

    2015-08-01

    The clinical benefit of current anticancer regimens for lung cancer therapy is still limited due to moderate efficacy, drug resistance, and recurrence. Therefore, the development of effective anticancer drugs for first-line therapy and for optimal second-line treatment is necessary. Because the 90-kDa molecular chaperone heat shock protein (Hsp90) contributes to the maturation of numerous mutated or overexpressed oncogenic proteins, targeting Hsp90 may offer an effective anticancer therapy. Here, we investigated antitumor activities and toxicity of a novel deguelin-derived C-terminal Hsp90 inhibitor, designated L80. L80 displayed significant inhibitory effects on the viability, colony formation, angiogenesis-stimulating activity, migration, and invasion of a panel of non-small cell lung cancer cell lines and their sublines with acquired resistance to paclitaxel with minimal toxicity to normal lung epithelial cells, hippocampal cells, vascular endothelial cells, and ocular cells. Biochemical analyses and molecular docking simulation revealed that L80 disrupted Hsp90 function by binding to the C-terminal ATP-binding pocket of Hsp90, leading to the disruption of the interaction between hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1? and Hsp90, downregulation of HIF-1? and its target genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2), and decreased the expression of various Hsp90 client proteins. Consistent with these in vitro findings, L80 exhibited significant antitumor and antiangiogenic activities in H1299 xenograft tumors. These results suggest that L80 represents a novel C-terminal Hsp90 inhibitor with effective anticancer activities with minimal toxicities. PMID:25976766

  20. ATP binding by the P-loop NTPase OsYchF1 (an unconventional G protein) contributes to biotic but not abiotic stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ming-Yan; Li, Xiaorong; Miao, Rui; Fong, Yu-Hang; Li, Kwan-Pok; Yung, Yuk-Lin; Yu, Mei-Hui; Wong, Kam-Bo; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2016-01-01

    G proteins are involved in almost all aspects of the cellular regulatory pathways through their ability to bind and hydrolyze GTP. The YchF subfamily, interestingly, possesses the unique ability to bind both ATP and GTP, and is possibly an ancestral form of G proteins based on phylogenetic studies and is present in all kingdoms of life. However, the biological significance of such a relaxed ligand specificity has long eluded researchers. Here, we have elucidated the different conformational changes caused by the binding of a YchF homolog in rice (OsYchF1) to ATP versus GTP by X-ray crystallography. Furthermore, by comparing the 3D relationships of the ligand position and the various amino acid residues at the binding sites in the crystal structures of the apo-bound and ligand-bound versions, a mechanism for the protein’s ability to bind both ligands is revealed. Mutation of the noncanonical G4 motif of the OsYchF1 to the canonical sequence for GTP specificity precludes the binding/hydrolysis of ATP and prevents OsYchF1 from functioning as a negative regulator of plant-defense responses, while retaining its ability to bind/hydrolyze GTP and its function as a negative regulator of abiotic stress responses, demonstrating the specific role of ATP-binding/hydrolysis in disease resistance. This discovery will have a significant impact on our understanding of the structure–function relationships of the YchF subfamily of G proteins in all kingdoms of life. PMID:26912459

  1. Metal Switch-controlled Myosin II from Dictyostelium discoideum Supports Closure of Nucleotide Pocket during ATP Binding Coupled to Detachment from Actin Filaments*

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, Jared C.; Thompson, Morgan E.; Kull, F. Jon

    2013-01-01

    G-proteins, kinesins, and myosins are hydrolases that utilize a common protein fold and divalent metal cofactor (typically Mg2+) to coordinate purine nucleotide hydrolysis. The nucleoside triphosphorylase activities of these enzymes are activated through allosteric communication between the nucleotide-binding site and the activator/effector/polymer interface to convert the free energy of nucleotide hydrolysis into molecular switching (G-proteins) or force generation (kinesins and myosin). We have investigated the ATPase mechanisms of wild-type and the S237C mutant of non-muscle myosin II motor from Dictyostelium discoideum. The S237C substitution occurs in the conserved metal-interacting switch-1, and we show that this substitution modulates the actomyosin interaction based on the divalent metal present in solution. Surprisingly, S237C shows rapid basal steady-state Mg2+- or Mn2+-ATPase kinetics, but upon binding actin, its MgATPase is inhibited. This actin inhibition is relieved by Mn2+, providing a direct and experimentally reversible linkage of switch-1 and the actin-binding cleft through the swapping of divalent metals in the reaction. Using pyrenyl-labeled F-actin, we demonstrate that actoS237C undergoes slow and weak MgATP binding, which limits the rate of steady-state catalysis. Mn2+ rescues this effect to near wild-type activity. 2?(3?)-O-(N-Methylanthraniloyl)-ADP release experiments show the need for switch-1 interaction with the metal cofactor for tight ADP binding. Our results are consistent with strong reciprocal coupling of nucleoside triphosphate and F-actin binding and provide additional evidence for the allosteric communication pathway between the nucleotide-binding site and the filament-binding region. PMID:23960071

  2. Metal switch-controlled myosin II from Dictyostelium discoideum supports closure of nucleotide pocket during ATP binding coupled to detachment from actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Jared C; Thompson, Morgan E; Kull, F Jon

    2013-09-27

    G-proteins, kinesins, and myosins are hydrolases that utilize a common protein fold and divalent metal cofactor (typically Mg(2+)) to coordinate purine nucleotide hydrolysis. The nucleoside triphosphorylase activities of these enzymes are activated through allosteric communication between the nucleotide-binding site and the activator/effector/polymer interface to convert the free energy of nucleotide hydrolysis into molecular switching (G-proteins) or force generation (kinesins and myosin). We have investigated the ATPase mechanisms of wild-type and the S237C mutant of non-muscle myosin II motor from Dictyostelium discoideum. The S237C substitution occurs in the conserved metal-interacting switch-1, and we show that this substitution modulates the actomyosin interaction based on the divalent metal present in solution. Surprisingly, S237C shows rapid basal steady-state Mg(2+)- or Mn(2+)-ATPase kinetics, but upon binding actin, its MgATPase is inhibited. This actin inhibition is relieved by Mn(2+), providing a direct and experimentally reversible linkage of switch-1 and the actin-binding cleft through the swapping of divalent metals in the reaction. Using pyrenyl-labeled F-actin, we demonstrate that actoS237C undergoes slow and weak MgATP binding, which limits the rate of steady-state catalysis. Mn(2+) rescues this effect to near wild-type activity. 2'(3')-O-(N-Methylanthraniloyl)-ADP release experiments show the need for switch-1 interaction with the metal cofactor for tight ADP binding. Our results are consistent with strong reciprocal coupling of nucleoside triphosphate and F-actin binding and provide additional evidence for the allosteric communication pathway between the nucleotide-binding site and the filament-binding region. PMID:23960071

  3. 4-Hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (4-HNE) induces neuronal SH-SY5Y cell death via hampering ATP binding at kinase domain of Akt1.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Mahendra P; Singh, Abhishek K; Yadav, Dharmendra K; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Srivastava, Ritesh K; Chaturvedi, Vishal; Rai, Navneet

    2015-02-01

    Inhibition mechanism(s) of protein kinase B/Akt1 and its consequences on related cell signaling were investigated in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells exposed to 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (4-HNE), one of the most reactive aldehyde by-products of lipid peroxidation. In silico data indicate that 4-HNE interacts with kinase domain of Akt1 with the total docking score of 6.0577 and also forms H-bond to Glu234 residue similar to highly potent Akt1 inhibitor imidazopiperidine analog 8b, in which the protonated imidazole nitrogen involves in two hydrogen bonds between Glu234 and Asp292. The strong hydrogen bonding with Glu234 and hydrophobic interactions with several residues, namely Leu156, Gly157, Val164, Ala177, Tyr229, Ala230, Met281 and Thr291, at the vicinity which is normally occupied by the ribose of ATP, appear to be the main causes of Akt1 inhibition and lead to the significant conformational change on this region of protein. Results of mutational docking prove that Glu234 plays a major role in 4-HNE-mediated Akt1 inhibition. In silico data on Akt inhibition were further validated by observing the down-regulated levels of phosphorylated (Thr308/Ser493) Akt1 as well as the altered levels of the downstream targets of pAkt, namely downregulated levels of pGSK3? (Ser9), ?-catenin, Bcl2 and upregulated levels of pro-apoptotic markers, namely Bad, Bax, P(53) and caspase-9/3. The cellular fate of such pAkt inhibition was evidenced by increased reactive oxygen species, degraded nuclei, transferase dUTP nick end labeling positive cells and upregulated levels of pJNK1/2. We identified that 4-HNE-mediated Akt1 inhibition was due to the competitive inhibition of ATP by 4-HNE at the kinase domain of ATP binding sites. PMID:24825450

  4. Worksheets simplify use of Wisconsin Test Cassette.

    PubMed

    David, G

    1991-01-01

    The Wisconsin Test Cassette, long the standard for non-invasive evaluation of kilovoltage, isn't known for its simplicity or convenience during use. The author presents a computer-generated worksheet that simplifies kilovoltage accuracy checks and customizes cassettes according to calibration curve data. PMID:1767021

  5. Identification of differentially expressed proteins by treatment with PUGNAc in 3T3-L1 adipocytes through analysis of ATP-binding proteome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Park, Ja-Hye; Moon, Pyong-Gon; Baek, Moon-Chang

    2013-10-01

    O-GlcNAc (2-acetamino-2-deoxy-β-D-glucopyranose), an important modification for cellular processes, is catalyzed by O-GlcNAc transferase and O-GlcNAcase. O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucopyranosylidene) amino-N-phenylcarbamate (PUGNAc) is a nonselective inhibitor of O-GlcNAcase, which increases the level of protein O-GlcNAcylation and is known to induce insulin-resistance in adipose cells due to uncharacterized targets of this inhibitor. In this study, using ATP affinity chromatography, we applied a targeted proteomic approach for identification of proteins induced by treatment with PUGNAc. For optimization of proteomic methods using ATP affinity chromatography, comparison of two cell lines (3T3-L1 adipocytes and C2C12 myotubes) and two different digestion steps was performed using four different structures of immobilized ATP-bound resins. Using this approach, based on DNA sequence homologies, we found that the identified proteins covered almost half of ATP-binding protein families classified by PROSITE. The optimized ATP affinity chromatography approach was applied for identification of proteins that were differentially expressed in 3T3-L1 adipocytes following treatment with PUGNAc. For label-free quantitation, a gel-assisted method was used for digestion of the eluted proteins, and analysis was performed using two different MS modes, data-independent (671 proteins identified) and data-dependent (533 proteins identified) analyses. Among identified proteins, 261 proteins belong to nucleotide-binding proteins and we focused on some nucleotide-binding proteins, ubiquitin-activation enzyme 1 (E1), Hsp70, vasolin-containing protein (Vcp), and Hsp90, involved in ubiquitin-proteasome degradation and insulin signaling pathways. In addition, we found that treatment with PUGNAc resulted in increased ubiquitination of proteins in a time-dependent manner, and a decrease in both the amount of Akt and the level of phosphorylation of Akt, a key component in insulin signaling, through downregulation of Hsp90. In this study, based on a targeted proteomic approach using ATP affinity chromatography, we found four proteins related to ubiquitination and insulin signaling pathways that were induced by treatment with PUGNAc. This result would provide insight into understanding functions of PUGNAc in 3T3-L1 cells. PMID:23946262

  6. Cassette for handling banknotes or the like

    DOEpatents

    Lundblad, Leif

    1981-08-11

    A cassette for banknotes and like valuable articles is provided with a displaceable lid (6) and locking means (10) for latching the lid of the cassette when the cassette is located outside a housing (25) in which it is intended to be placed. An operating means (8) is arranged to co-act with the locking means and with a latching element (15). The latching element is arranged to be released in dependence upon a pre-set program. A signal circuit is arranged to send a code signal to a detector circuit (23) when electrical contact elements on the cassette and the housing co-act with one another, which detector circuit, when the signal coincides with the signal program in the detector circuit, causes a signal to be sent for moving the latching means to a non-latching position.

  7. Cassette Kinematics. A Reel-World Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbondanzio, Richard

    1990-01-01

    Described is an activity in which students calculate constant velocity using a tape cassette player. The objectives, procedures, graphing directions, and formulas and values needed for the calculations are included. (KR)

  8. Position of the ATP-binding site of the Fe-protein relative to the iron-sulfur clusters 4Fe-4S and the iron-molybdenum-containing cofactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kondrat'eva, T.A.; Gvozdev, R.I.; Mitsova, I.Z.

    1986-06-10

    Nitrogenase was affinity labeled with epsilon-ATP at the ATP-binding sites and separated into protein components by ion exchange chromatography. In spectrofluorometric titration of the labeled Fe-protein with the native MoFe-protein from the wild strain of Azotobacter and the MoFe-protein not containing iron-sulfur clusters 4Fe-4S, a 4-6-fold quenching of the fluorescence of immobilized epsilon-ATP was observed. When the labeled Fe-protein was titrated with MoFe-protein from the Azotobacter mutant UW-45, on the contrary, there was a four-fold increase in the fluorescence of immobilized epsilon-ATP. Since the MoFe-protein of the Azotobacter mutant UW-45 differs from the MoFe-protein from the wild strain of Azotobacter only by the absence of an iron-molybdenum-containing cofactor (Fe-Mo-cofactor), it is suggested that the ATP-binding site of the Fe-protein is situated next to the FeMo-cofactor and at a distance from the iron-sulfur clusters 4Fe-4S when a complex is formed with the MoFe-protein. The formation of a complex is accompanied by a change in the conformation of the Fe-protein.

  9. CryoEM and Molecular Dynamics of the Circadian KaiB-KaiC Complex Indicates That KaiB Monomers Interact with KaiC and Block ATP Binding Clefts

    SciTech Connect

    Villarreal, Seth A.; Pattanayek, Rekha; Williams, Dewight R.; Mori, Tetsuya; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl H.; Egli, Martin; Stewart, Phoebe L.

    2014-10-02

    The circadian control of cellular processes in cyanobacteria is regulated by a posttranslational oscillator formed by three Kai proteins. During the oscillator cycle, KaiA serves to promote autophosphorylation of KaiC while KaiB counteracts this effect. Here, we present a crystallographic structure of the wild-type Synechococcus elongatus KaiB and a cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) structure of a KaiBC complex. The crystal structure shows the expected dimer core structure and significant conformational variations of the KaiB C-terminal region, which is functionally important in maintaining rhythmicity. The KaiBC sample was formed with a C-terminally truncated form of KaiC, KaiC-Δ489, which is persistently phosphorylated. The KaiB–KaiC-Δ489 structure reveals that the KaiC hexamer can bind six monomers of KaiB, which form a continuous ring of density in the KaiBC complex. We performed cryoEM-guided molecular dynamics flexible fitting simulations with crystal structures of KaiB and KaiC to probe the KaiBC protein–protein interface. This analysis indicated a favorable binding mode for the KaiB monomer on the CII end of KaiC, involving two adjacent KaiC subunits and spanning an ATP binding cleft. A KaiC mutation, R468C, which has been shown to affect the affinity of KaiB for KaiC and lengthen the period in a bioluminescence rhythm assay, is found within the middle of the predicted KaiBC interface. The proposed KaiB binding mode blocks access to the ATP binding cleft in the CII ring of KaiC, which provides insight into how KaiB might influence the phosphorylation status of KaiC.

  10. Checklist for Cassette Recorders Connected to CRTs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Lawrence A.

    1981-01-01

    Provides a prescriptive checklist describing necessary or desirable features for a typical application for use in choosing among 150 available data cassette recorders as an effective low-cost method for collecting data in machine-readable form from display terminals. Included are environmental considerations and purchasing information. (RAA)

  11. Cross-reactivity of Antibodies Directed to the Gram-Negative Bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae With Heat Shock Protein 60 and ATP-Binding Protein Correlates to Reduced Mitochondrial Activity in HIBCPP Choroid Plexus Papilloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Reuss, B; Schroten, H; Ishikawa, H; Asif, A R

    2015-09-01

    Antibacterial antibodies can cause neurologic side-effects by cross-reactivity with cellular antigens. Here we investigated interactions of antibodies to Neisseria gonorrhoeae (α-NG) - maternal infections by which increases the offspring's risk for later psychosis-with HIBCPP cells, a cell culture model of choroid plexus epithelium. Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting with α-NG, revealed organelle-like intracellular staining in HIBCPP cells, and labelling of several immunoreactive bands in cellular protein. Two-dimensional Western blotting revealed several immunopositive spots, most prominent of which were identified by mass spectrometry as mitochondrially localized proteins heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60) and ATP-binding protein β-subunit (ATPB). Similarly α-NG interacted with commercial samples of these proteins as revealed by Western blotting. Three alternative methods (JC-1, Janus green and MTT staining) revealed α-NG to cause in HIBCPP cells a significant decrease in mitochondrial activity, which could be reverted by neuroleptic drugs. Immunoreactivity of α-NG with choroid plexus epithelium in human post mortem samples suggests in vivo relevance of these findings. Finally, distinctly different staining patterns of antibodies against Neisseria meningitidis (α-NM), confirmed antibody specificity. To our knowledge this is the first report that α-NG cross-reactivity with Hsp60 and ATPB impairs mitochondrial activity in choroid plexus epithelial cells, pathogenetic relevance of which needs further clarification. PMID:26080747

  12. A Cassette Based System for Hydrogen Storage and Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Britton Wayne E.

    2006-11-29

    A hydrogen storage system is described and evaluated. This is based upon a cassette, that is a container for managing hydrogen storage materials. The container is designed to be safe, modular, adaptable to different chemistries, inexpensive, and transportable. A second module receives the cassette and provides the necessary infrastructure to deliver hydrogen from the cassette according to enduser requirements. The modular concept has a number of advantages over approaches that are all in one stand alone systems. The advantages of a cassette based system are discussed, along with results from model and laboratory testing.

  13. Finger-actuated, self-contained immunoassay cassettes.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xianbo; Thompson, Jason A; Chen, Zongyuan; Liu, Changchun; Chen, Dafeng; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Mauk, Michael G; Ongagna, Serge; Barber, Cheryl; Abrams, William R; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L A M; Bau, Haim H

    2009-12-01

    The building blocks for an inexpensive, disposable, luminescence-based microfluidic immunoassay cassette are described, and their integration in a point-of-care diagnostic system is demonstrated. Fluid motion in the cassette is driven by depressing finger-actuated pouches. All reagents needed for the immunoassay can be stored in the cassette in liquid form. Prior to use, the cassette consists of two separate parts. A top storage component contains pouches, sealed storage chambers, a metering chamber, and needle seats. The bottom processing component contains connection needles, a mixing chamber, and a detection chamber with immobilized proteins. Subsequent to sample introduction, the storage and processing components are mated. The needles form hydraulic connections between the two parts and, in some cases, close valves. The pouches are then actuated sequentially to induce flow of various reagents and facilitate process operations. The cassette is compatible with different detection modalities. Both a cassette with immunochromatographic-based detection and a cassette with microbead-based detection were constructed and evaluated. The immunochromatographic cassette was used to detect antibodies to HIV in saliva samples. The bead-based cassette was used to detect the proinflammatory chemokine IL-8. The experimental data demonstrates good repeatability and reasonable sensitivity. PMID:19597994

  14. Finger-Actuated, Self-Contained Immunoassay Cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xianbo; Thompson, Jason A.; Chen, Zongyuan; Liu, Changchun; Chen, Dafeng; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Mauk, Michael G.; Ongagna, Serge; Barber, Cheryl; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L.A.M.; Bau, Haim H.

    2010-01-01

    The building blocks for an inexpensive, disposable, luminescence-based microfluidic immunoassay cassette are described, and their integration in a point-of-care diagnostic system is demonstrated. Fluid motion in the cassette is driven by depressing finger-actuated pouches. All reagents needed for the immunoassay can be stored in the cassette in liquid form. Prior to use, the cassette consists of two separate parts. A top storage component contains pouches, sealed storage chambers, a metering chamber, and needle seats. The bottom processing component contains connection needles, a mixing chamber, and a detection chamber with immobilized proteins. Subsequent to sample introduction, the storage and processing components are mated. The needles form hydraulic connections between the two parts and, in some cases, close valves. The pouches are then actuated sequentially to induce flow of various reagents and facilitate process operations. The cassette is compatible with different detection modalities. Both a cassette with immunochromatographic-based detection and a cassette with microbead-based detection were constructed and evaluated. The immunochromatographic cassette was used to detect antibodies to HIV in saliva samples. The bead-based cassette was used to detect the proinflammatory chemokine IL-8. The experimental data demonstrates good repeatability and reasonable sensitivity. PMID:19597994

  15. Characterization of a multiple endogenously expressed Adenosine triphosphate-Binding Cassette transporters using nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns

    PubMed Central

    Khadeer, M.A.; Shimmo, R.; Wainer, I.W.; Moaddel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive form of human astrocytoma, with poor prognosis due to multi-drug resistance to a number of anticancer drugs. The observed multi-drug resistance is primarily due to the efflux activity of ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP. The expression of these transporters has been demonstrated in nuclear and cellular membranes of the LN-229 human glioblastoma cell line. Nuclear membrane and cellular membrane fragments from LN229 cells were immobilized on the IAM stationary phase to create nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns, (NMAC(LN229)) and (CMAC(LN229)), respectively. Pgp, MRP1and BCRP transporters co-immobilized on both columns was characterized and compared by establishing the binding affinities for estrone-3-sulfate (3.8 vs 3.7μM), verapamil (0.6 vs 0.7μM) and prazosin (0.099 vs 0.033μM) on each column and no significant differences were observed. Since the marker ligands had overlapping selectivities, the selective characterization of each transporter was carried out by saturation of the binding sites of the non-targeted transporters. The addition of verapamil (Pgp and MRP1 substrate) to the mobile phase allowed the comparative screening of 8 compounds at the nuclear and cellular BCRP using etoposide as the marker ligand. AZT increased the retention of etoposide (+15%), a positive allosteric interaction, on the CMAC(LN229) column and decreased it (−5%) on the NMAC(LN229), while the opposite effect was produced by rhodamine. The results indicate that there are differences between the cellular and nuclear membrane expressed BCRP and that NMAC and CMAC columns can be used to probe these differences. PMID:24642394

  16. Characterization of a multiple endogenously expressed adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters using nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns.

    PubMed

    Habicht, K-L; Singh, N S; Khadeer, M A; Shimmo, R; Wainer, I W; Moaddel, R

    2014-04-25

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive form of human astrocytoma, with poor prognosis due to multi-drug resistance to a number of anticancer drugs. The observed multi-drug resistance is primarily due to the efflux activity of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP. The expression of these transporters has been demonstrated in nuclear and cellular membranes of the LN-229 human glioblastoma cell line. Nuclear membrane and cellular membrane fragments from LN-229 cells were immobilized on the IAM stationary phase to create nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns, (NMAC(LN-229)) and (CMAC(LN-229)), respectively. Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP transporters co-immobilized on both columns were characterized and compared by establishing the binding affinities for estrone-3-sulfate (3.8 vs. 3.7μM), verapamil (0.6 vs. 0.7μM) and prazosin (0.099 vs. 0.033μM) on each column and no significant differences were observed. Since the marker ligands had overlapping selectivities, the selective characterization of each transporter was carried out by saturation of the binding sites of the non-targeted transporters. The addition of verapamil (Pgp and MRP1 substrate) to the mobile phase allowed the comparative screening of eight compounds at the nuclear and cellular BCRP using etoposide as the marker ligand. AZT increased the retention of etoposide (+15%), a positive allosteric interaction, on the CMAC(LN-229) column and decreased it (-5%) on the NMAC(LN-229), while the opposite effect was produced by rhodamine. The results indicate that there are differences between the cellular and nuclear membrane expressed BCRP and that NMAC and CMAC columns can be used to probe these differences. PMID:24642394

  17. 21 CFR 892.1850 - Radiographic film cassette.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiographic film cassette. 892.1850 Section 892.1850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1850 Radiographic film cassette....

  18. Clinton Pilot Cassette Center Project Director's Report 1970-1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flugaur, George; And Others

    The Clinton Cassette Project was begun during 1969-70 to find out if children with reading problems could learn their lessons by listening to them on cassette tapes. This project was the first to include setups for individual and group listening in every classroom in an elementary school. Many tapes were produced and duplicated at Clinton School,

  19. Polycistronic transcription of fused cassettes and identification of translation initiation signals in an unusual gene cassette array from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, rica L.; Vicente, Ana Carolina Paulo

    2015-01-01

    The gene cassettes found in class 1 integrons are generally promoterless units composed by an open reading frame (ORF), a short 5 untranslated region (UTR) and a 3 recombination site ( attC). Fused gene cassettes are generated by partial or total loss of the attC from the first cassette in an array, creating, in some cases, a fusion with the ORF from the next cassette. These structures are rare and little is known about their mechanisms of mobilization and expression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dynamic of mobilization and transcription of the gcu14-bla GES-1 /aacA4 gene cassette array, which harbours a fused gene cassette represented by bla GES-1 /aacA4. The cassette array was analyzed by Northern blot and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in order to assess the transcription mechanism of bla GES-1 /aacA4 fused cassette. Also, inverse polymerase chain reactions (PCR) were performed to detect the free circular forms of gcu14, bla GES-1 and aacA4. The Northern blot and real time RT-PCR revealed a polycistronic transcription, in which the fused cassette bla GES-1 /aacA4 is transcribed as a unique gene, while gcu14 (with a canonical attC recombination site) has a monocistronic transcription. The gcu14 cassette, closer to the weak configuration of cassette promoter (PcW), had a higher transcription level than bla GES-1/ aacA4, indicating that the cassette position affects the transcript amounts. The presence of ORF-11 at attI1, immediately preceding gcu14, and of a Shine-Dalgarno sequence upstream bla GES-1/ aacA4 composes a scenario for the occurrence of array translation. Inverse PCR generated amplicons corresponding to gcu14, gcu14-aacA4 and gcu14-bla GES-1/ aacA4 free circular forms, but not to bla GES-1 and aacA4 alone, indicating that the GES-1 truncated attC is not substrate of integrase activity and that these genes are mobilized together as a unique cassette. This study was original in showing the transcription of fused cassettes and in correlating cassette position with transcription. PMID:26674490

  20. Apparatus and method for loading and unloading multiple digital tape cassettes utilizing a removable magazine

    DOEpatents

    Lindenmeyer, Carl W. (St. Charles, IL)

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus and method to automate the handling of multiple digital tape cassettes for processing by commercially available cassette tape readers and recorders. A removable magazine rack stores a plurality of tape cassettes, and cooperates with a shuttle device that automatically inserts and removes cassettes from the magazine to the reader and vice-versa. Photocells are used to identify and index to the desired tape cassette. The apparatus allows digital information stored on multiple cassettes to be processed without significant operator intervention.

  1. Apparatus and method for loading and unloading multiple digital tape cassettes utilizing a removable magazine

    DOEpatents

    Lindenmeyer, C.W.

    1993-01-26

    An apparatus and method to automate the handling of multiple digital tape cassettes for processing by commercially available cassette tape readers and recorders. A removable magazine rack stores a plurality of tape cassettes, and cooperates with a shuttle device that automatically inserts and removes cassettes from the magazine to the reader and vice-versa. Photocells are used to identify and index to the desired tape cassette. The apparatus allows digital information stored on multiple cassettes to be processed without significant operator intervention.

  2. 21 CFR 892.1850 - Radiographic film cassette.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identification. A radiographic film cassette is a device intended for use during diagnostic x-ray procedures to hold a radiographic film in close contact with an x-ray intensifying screen and to provide a...

  3. 21 CFR 892.1850 - Radiographic film cassette.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. A radiographic film cassette is a device intended for use during diagnostic x-ray procedures to hold a radiographic film in close contact with an x-ray intensifying screen and to provide a...

  4. 21 CFR 892.1850 - Radiographic film cassette.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A radiographic film cassette is a device intended for use during diagnostic x-ray procedures to hold a radiographic film in close contact with an x-ray intensifying screen and to provide a...

  5. 21 CFR 892.1850 - Radiographic film cassette.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. A radiographic film cassette is a device intended for use during diagnostic x-ray procedures to hold a radiographic film in close contact with an x-ray intensifying screen and to provide a...

  6. Audio and Video Cassettes; Friend or Foe of the Librarian?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulos, Arthur

    1972-01-01

    Audio and video tape cassettes pose some special problems for the librarian. A better understanding of what these products can -- and cannot -- do will help the librarian make optimum use of the new formats. (Author/NH)

  7. Mini-TV: The Case for Cassettes -- The Far North.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porcaro, Michael

    1977-01-01

    Describes a television system proposed for rural Alaska employing a core of locally selected programs transmitted via satellite plus a cassette machine for program substitutions as a way to maximize local participation. (JMF)

  8. Sampling results of the improved SKC diesel particulate matter cassette.

    PubMed

    Noll, James D; Timko, Robert J; McWilliams, Linda; Hall, Peter; Haney, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Diesel particulate matter (DPM) samples from underground metal/nonmetal mines are collected on quartz fiber filters and measured for carbon content using National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Method 5040. If size-selective samplers are not used to collect DPM in the presence of carbonaceous ore dust, both the ore dust and DPM will collect on the quartz filters, causing the carbon attributed to DPM to be artificially high. Because the DPM particle size is much smaller than that of mechanically generated mine dust aerosols, it can be separated from the larger mine dust aerosol by a single-stage impactor. The SKC DPM cassette is a single-stage impactor designed to collect only DPM aerosols in the presence of carbonaceous mine ore aerosols, which are commonly found in underground nonmetal mines. However, there is limited data on how efficiently the SKC DPM cassette can collect DPM in the presence of ore dust. In this study we investigated the ability of the SKC DPM cassette to collect DPM while segregating ore dust from the sample. We found that the SKC DPM cassette accurately collected DPM. In the presence of carbon-based ore aerosols having an average concentration of 8 mg/m3, no ore dust was detected on SKC DPM cassette filters. We did discover a problem: the surface areas of the DPM deposits on SKC DPM cassettes, manufactured prior to August 2002 were inconsistent. To correct this problem, SKC modified the cassette. The new cassette produced, with 99% confidence, a range of DPM deposit areas between 8.05 and 8.28 cm2, a difference of less than 3%. PMID:15764521

  9. Self-illuminative cascade-reaction-driven anticancer therapeutic cassettes made of cooperatively interactive nanocomplexes.

    PubMed

    Song, Woo Chul; Shin, Seung Won; Park, Kyung Soo; Jang, Min Su; Choi, Jin-Ha; Oh, Byung-Keun; Um, Soong Ho

    2015-02-01

    Therapeutic options based on near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths have attracted attention owing to in vivo lowest-background interventions and the development of several nano-architectures with localized surface plasmon resonance. Because of their limited tissue penetration, the clinical use of NIR light-driven treatments is not widespread; this technology is inapplicable to infection sites in the deeper areas of internal tissues. In this study, we demonstrate a self-illuminative therapeutic cassette able to exert anticancer effects via a series of enzymatic, chemical, and optical cooperative cascade reactions. It consists of (1) NIR-illuminative nanocomplexes and (2) NIR-sensitive therapeutic cassettes, which demonstrate a 60% chemically-induced killing effect in a prostate cancer model without external NIR irradiation. This technology can also be actively exploited as an imaging agent due to adaptation of a self-illuminating nanocomplex. Consequently, these novel therapeutic cassettes, which work not only as a powerful internal NIR stimulant, but also as a biological imaging platform, provide a new rational design concept for biomedical use. PMID:25537832

  10. Characteristic alatoid 'cineole cassette' monoterpene synthase present in Nicotiana noctiflora.

    PubMed

    Fhnrich, Anke; Neumann, Madeleine; Piechulla, Birgit

    2014-05-01

    Nicotiana species of the section Alatae emit a characteristic floral scent comprising the' cineole cassette' monoterpenes 1,8-cineole, limonene, myrcene, ?-pinene, ?-pinene, sabinene and ?-terpineol. All previously isolated 'cineole cassette'-monoterpene synthase genes are multi product enzymes that synthesize the seven compounds of the 'cineole cassette'. Interestingly, so far this 'alatoid' trait was only shared with the eponymous species Nicotiana suaveolens of the sister section Suaveolentes. To determine the origin of the 'cineole cassette' monoterpene phenotype other potential parent species of section Noctiflorae or Petunoides as well as of the distantly related section Trigonophyllae were analysed. A monoterpene synthase producing the set of 'cineole cassette' compounds was isolated from N. noctiflorae. N. obtusifolia emitted solely 1,8-cineole and no monoterpenes were found in floral scents of N. petunoides and N. palmeri. Interestingly, the phylogenetic analysis clustered the new gene of N. noctiflora closely to the terpineol synthase genes of e.g. N. alata rather than to cineole synthase genes of e.g. N. forgetiana. PMID:24493662

  11. A Portable Analyzer for Pouch-Actuated, Immunoassay Cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xianbo; Liu, Changchun; Mauk, Michael G.; Hart, Robert W.; Chen, Dafeng; Qiu, Jing; Kientz, Terry; Fiene, Jonathan; Bau, Haim H.

    2011-01-01

    A portable, small footprint, light, general purpose analyzer (processor) to control the flow in immunoassay cassettes and to facilitate the detection of test results is described. The durable analyzer accepts disposable cassettes that contain pouches and reaction chambers for various unit operations such as hydration of dry reagents, stirring, and incubation. The analyzer includes individually controlled, linear actuators to compress the pouches in the cassette, which facilitates the pumping and mixing of sample and reagents, and to close diaphragm-based valves for flow control. The same types of actuators are used to compress pouches and actuate valves. The analyzer also houses a compact OEM scanner/reader to excite fluorescence and detect emission from labels. The analyzer is hydraulically isolated from the cassette, reducing the possibility of cross-contamination. The analyzer facilitates programmable, automated execution of a sequence of operations such as pumping and valving in a timely fashion, reducing the level of expertise required from the operator and the possibility for errors. The analyzer’s design is modular and expandable to accommodate cassettes of various complexities and additional functionalities. In this paper, the utility of the analyzer has been demonstrated with the execution of a simple, consecutive, lateral flow assay of a model biological system and the test results were detected with up converting phosphor labels that are excited at infrared frequencies and emit in the visible spectrum. PMID:22125359

  12. Inhibition of cholesterol absorption associated with a PPAR alpha-dependent increase in ABC binding cassette transporter A1 in mice.

    PubMed

    Knight, Brian L; Patel, Dilip D; Humphreys, Sandy M; Wiggins, David; Gibbons, Geoffrey F

    2003-11-01

    Dietary supplementation with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR alpha) ligand WY 14,643 gave rise to a 4- to 5-fold increase in the expression of mRNA for the ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) in the intestine of normal mice. There was no effect in the intestine of PPAR alpha-null mice. Consumption of a high-cholesterol diet also increased intestinal ABCA1 expression. The effects of WY 14,643 and the high-cholesterol diet were not additive. WY 14,643 feeding reduced intestinal absorption of cholesterol in the normal mice, irrespective of the dietary cholesterol concentration, and this resulted in lower diet-derived cholesterol and cholesteryl ester concentrations in plasma and liver. At each concentration of dietary cholesterol, there was a similar significant inverse correlation between intestinal ABCA1 mRNA content and the amount of cholesterol absorbed. The fibrate-induced changes in the intestines of the normal mice were accompanied by an increased concentration of the mRNA encoding the sterol-regulatory element binding protein-1c gene (SREBP-1c), a known target gene for the oxysterol receptor liver X receptor alpha (LXR alpha). There was a correlation between intestinal ABCA1 mRNA and SREBP-1c mRNA contents, but not between SREBP-1c mRNA content and cholesterol absorption. These results suggest that PPAR alpha influences cholesterol absorption through modulating ABCA1 activity in the intestine by a mechanism involving LXR alpha. PMID:12897186

  13. The effect of ABCG5/G8 polymorphisms on plasma HDL cholesterol levels depends on the ABCA1 gene variation in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: ATP-binding cassette transporters G5/G8 have shown an association with HDL-C. One of the most likely mechanisms to explain those associations is through ABCA1. Objective: To assess whether the effect of ABCG5/G8 polymorphisms on HDL-C is dependent on ABCA1, we studied potential interacti...

  14. 21 CFR 892.1860 - Radiographic film/cassette changer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiographic film/cassette changer. 892.1860 Section 892.1860 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1860 Radiographic...

  15. 21 CFR 892.1860 - Radiographic film/cassette changer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiographic film/cassette changer. 892.1860 Section 892.1860 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1860 Radiographic...

  16. 21 CFR 892.1860 - Radiographic film/cassette changer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiographic film/cassette changer. 892.1860 Section 892.1860 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1860 Radiographic...

  17. 21 CFR 892.1860 - Radiographic film/cassette changer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiographic film/cassette changer. 892.1860 Section 892.1860 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1860 Radiographic...

  18. 21 CFR 892.1860 - Radiographic film/cassette changer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiographic film/cassette changer. 892.1860 Section 892.1860 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1860 Radiographic...

  19. Cassette Reading Method: A Superior Method of Teaching Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Buford Charles

    In the cassette reading method, based on Guthrie's theory of learning (1952), which states that two stimuli occurring at the same time will be learned together, children follow the written text (using a bookmark) as they listen to the same words being spoken on tape. This booklet briefly outlines the method, which works well with children in the

  20. Directory of Spoken-Voice Audio-Cassettes, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Gerald, Ed.

    Most listings in this catalog, which draws on many sources of production and is not a guide to one company's output, are for programs of college or adult level interest, with the exception of the "Careers" listings, geared toward high school students. The catalog also has lists of producers of children's cassettes and those designed for school…

  1. Evaluation of an Audio Cassette Tape Lecture Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Jerome W.

    1975-01-01

    An audio-cassette continuing education course (Selected Topics in Pharmacology) from Extension Services in Pharmacy at the University of Wisconsin was offered to a selected test market of pharmacists and evaluated using a pre-, post-test design. Results showed significant increase in cognitive knowledge and strong approval of students. (JT)

  2. The Real World French Cassette Program. Script Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternburg, Sheldon G.; Sammarco, Anthony M., Jr.

    This dual cassette package, accompanied by a script book, is designed to give students listening practice in French, particularly for regional differences of pronunciation and for variety in idiomatic constructions. The program may be integrated with texts used in intermediate and advanced levels of instruction. The announcements, jingles, and

  3. The Real World Spanish Cassette Program. Script Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternburg, Sheldon G.

    This dual cassette program, accompanied by a script book, is designed to give students listening practice in Spanish, particularly for regional differences of pronunciation and for variety in idiomatic construction. The program may be integrated with texts used in intermediate and advanced levels of instruction. The announcements, jingles, and…

  4. The Real World French Cassette Program. Script Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternburg, Sheldon G.; Sammarco, Anthony M., Jr.

    This dual cassette package, accompanied by a script book, is designed to give students listening practice in French, particularly for regional differences of pronunciation and for variety in idiomatic constructions. The program may be integrated with texts used in intermediate and advanced levels of instruction. The announcements, jingles, and…

  5. Classroom Cassette Recorders: Low and Moderate Cost. An in Depth Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Product Report, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Contains guidelines for selecting an audio cassette recorder, one school district's report of cassette testing for high-speed duplication, data from a survey of users and technicians in several school districts, individual laboratory analyses of 15 machines and recommendations, and comparative descriptions of 74 cassette recorders (information

  6. Patterns of Availability and Use of Audiotape Cassettes in Special Libraries. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, J. M., II

    1975-01-01

    The availability and use of audiotape cassettes is studied in terms of user requirements. The following factors were examined: how special libraries utilize audiotape cassettes; who the users of the medium are; how the libraries acquire and maintain their collection; and opinions of librarians as to the value of the audiotape cassette as a medium for dissemination of information.

  7. Diversity of Class 1 Integron Gene Cassette Rearrangements Selected under Antibiotic Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Barraud, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Integrons are bacterial genetic elements able to capture and express genes contained within mobile gene cassettes. Gene cassettes are expressed via a Pc promoter and can be excised from or integrated into the integron by integrase IntI. Although the mechanisms of gene cassette integration and excision are well known, the kinetics and modes of gene cassette shuffling leading to new gene cassette arrays remain puzzling. It has been proposed that under antibiotic selective pressure, IntI-mediated rearrangements can generate integron variants in which a weakly expressed gene cassette moves closer to Pc, thus leading to higher-level resistance. To test this hypothesis, we used an integron with four gene cassettes, intI1-aac(6′)-Ib-dfrA15-aadA1-catB9, and applied selective pressure with chloramphenicol, resistance to which is encoded by catB9. Experiments were performed with three different Pc variants corresponding to three IntI1 variants. All three integrases, even when not overexpressed, were able to bring catB9 closer to Pc via excision of the dfrA15 and aadA1 gene cassettes, allowing their host bacteria to adapt to antibiotic pressure and to grow at high chloramphenicol concentrations. Integrase IntI1R32_H39, reported to have the highest recombination activity, was able, when overexpressed, to trigger multiple gene cassette rearrangements. Although we observed a wide variety of rearrangements with catB9 moving closer to Pc and leading to higher chloramphenicol resistance, “cut-and-paste” relocalization of catB9 to the first position was not detected. Our results suggest that gene cassette rearrangements via excision are probably less cost-effective than excision and integration of a distal gene cassette closer to Pc. IMPORTANCE Integrons are bacterial genetic elements able to capture and express gene cassettes. Gene cassettes are expressed via a Pc promoter; the closer they are to Pc, the more strongly they are expressed. Gene cassettes can be excised from or integrated into the integron by integrase IntI. The kinetics and modes of gene cassette shuffling, leading to new gene cassette arrays remain puzzling. We used an integron with 4 antibiotic resistance gene cassettes and applied selective pressure with the antibiotic for which resistance was encoded by cassette 4. All IntI variants were able to bring cassette 4 closer to Pc. Rearrangements occur via excision of the previous gene cassettes instead of cut-and-paste relocalization of the fourth gene cassette. PMID:25897031

  8. THE REAL ISSUE WITH WALL DEPOSITS IN CLOSED FILTER CASSETTES - WHAT'S THE SAMPLE?

    SciTech Connect

    Brisson, M.

    2009-09-12

    The measurement of aerosol dusts has long been utilized to assess the exposure of workers to metals. Tools used to sample and measure aerosol dusts have gone through many transitions over the past century. In particular, there have been several different techniques used to sample for beryllium, not all of which might be expected to produce the same result. Today, beryllium samples are generally collected using filters housed in holders of several different designs, some of which are expected to produce a sample that mimics the human capacity for dust inhalation. The presence of dust on the interior walls of cassettes used to hold filters during metals sampling has been discussed in the literature for a number of metals, including beryllium, with widely varying data. It appears that even in the best designs, particulates can enter the sampling cassette and deposit on the interior walls rather than on the sampling medium. The causes are not well understood but are believed to include particle bounce, electrostatic forces, particle size, particle density, and airflow turbulence. Historically, the filter catch has been considered to be the sample, but the presence of wall deposits, and the potential that the filter catch is not representative of the exposure to the worker, puts that historical position into question. This leads to a fundamental question: What is the sample? This article reviews the background behind the issue, poses the above-mentioned question, and discusses options and a possible path forward for addressing that question.

  9. Cassette less SOFC stack and method of assembly

    DOEpatents

    Meinhardt, Kerry D

    2014-11-18

    A cassette less SOFC assembly and a method for creating such an assembly. The SOFC stack is characterized by an electrically isolated stack current path which allows welded interconnection between frame portions of the stack. In one embodiment electrically isolating a current path comprises the step of sealing a interconnect plate to a interconnect plate frame with an insulating seal. This enables the current path portion to be isolated from the structural frame an enables the cell frame to be welded together.

  10. Optimization of transplastomic production of hemicellulases in tobacco: effects of expression cassette configuration and tobacco cultivar used as production platform on recombinant protein yields

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chloroplast transformation in tobacco has been used extensively to produce recombinant proteins and enzymes. Chloroplast expression cassettes can be designed with different configurations of the cis-acting elements that govern foreign gene expression. With the aim to optimize production of recombinant hemicellulases in transplastomic tobacco, we developed a set of cassettes that incorporate elements known to facilitate protein expression in chloroplasts and examined expression and accumulation of a bacterial xylanase XynA. Biomass production is another important factor in achieving sustainable and high-volume production of cellulolytic enzymes. Therefore, we compared productivity of two tobacco cultivars – a low-alkaloid and a high-biomass - as transplastomic expression platforms. Results Four different cassettes expressing XynA produced various mutant phenotypes of the transplastomic plants, affected their growth rate and resulted in different accumulation levels of the XynA enzyme. The most productive cassette was identified and used further to express XynA and two additional fungal xylanases, Xyn10A and Xyn11B, in a high-biomass tobacco cultivar. The high biomass cultivar allowed for a 60% increase in XynA production per plant. Accumulation of the fungal enzymes reached more than 10-fold higher levels than the bacterial enzyme, constituting up to 6% of the total soluble protein in the leaf tissue. Use of a well-characterized translational enhancer with the selected expression cassette revealed inconsistent effects on accumulation of the recombinant xylanases. Additionally, differences in the enzymatic activity of crude plant extracts measured in leaves of different age suggest presence of a specific xylanase inhibitor in the green leaf tissue. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the pivotal importance of the expression cassette design and appropriate tobacco cultivar for high-level transplastomic production of recombinant proteins. PMID:23642171

  11. Cassettes for solid-oxide fuel cell stacks and methods of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Weil, K. Scott; Meinhardt, Kerry D; Sprenkle, Vincent L

    2012-10-23

    Solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack assembly designs are consistently investigated to develop an assembly that provides optimal performance, and durability, within desired cost parameters. A new design includes a repeat unit having a SOFC cassette and being characterized by a three-component construct. The three components include an oxidation-resistant, metal window frame hermetically joined to an electrolyte layer of a multi-layer, anode-supported ceramic cell and a pre-cassette including a separator plate having a plurality of vias that provide electrical contact between an anode-side collector within the pre-cassette and a cathode-side current collector of an adjacent cell. The third component is a cathode-side seal, which includes a standoff that supports a cathode channel spacing between each of the cassettes in a stack. Cassettes are formed by joining the pre-cassette and the window frame.

  12. Cassette labeling for facile construction of energy transfer fluorescent primers.

    PubMed Central

    Ju, J; Glazer, A N; Mathies, R A

    1996-01-01

    DNA primer sets, labeled with two fluorescent dyes to exploit fluorescence energy transfer (ET), can be efficiently excited with a single laser line and emit strong fluorescence at distinctive wavelengths. Such ET primers are superior to single fluorophore-labeled primers for DNA sequencing and other multiple color-based analyses [J. Ju, C. Ruan, C. W. Fuller, A. N. Glazer and R. A. Mathies (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 4347-4351]. We describe here a novel method of constructing fluorescent primers using a universal ET cassette that can be incorporated by conventional synthesis at the 5'-end of an oligonucleotide primer of any sequence. In this cassette, the donor and acceptor fluorophores are separated by a polymer spacer (S6) formed by six 1',2'-dideoxyribose phosphate monomers (S). The donor is attached to the 5' side of the ribose spacer and the acceptor to a modified thymidine attached to the 3' end of the ribose spacer in the ET cassette. The resulting primers, labeled with 6-carboxy-fluorescein as the donor and other fluorescein and rhodamine dyes as acceptors, display well-separated acceptor emission spectra with 2-12-fold enhanced fluorescence intensity relative to that of the corresponding single dye-labeled primers. With single- stranded M13mp18DNA as the template, a typical run with these ET primers on a capillary sequencer provides DNA sequences with 99% accuracy in the first 550 bases using the same amount of DNA template as that typically required using a four-color slab gel automated sequencer. PMID:8604350

  13. Balloon-borne video cassette recorders for digital data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althouse, W. E.; Cook, W. R.

    A high-speed, high-capacity digital data storage system has been developed for a new balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope. The system incorporates sophisticated, yet easy to use and economical consumer products: the portable video cassette recorder (VCR) and a relatively newer item - the digital audio processor. The in-flight recording system employs eight VCRs and will provide a continuous data storage rate of 1.4 megabits/sec throughout a 40 hour balloon flight. Data storage capacity is 25 gigabytes and power consumption is only 10 watts.

  14. Balloon-borne video cassette recorders for digital data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althouse, W. E.; Cook, W. R.

    1985-08-01

    A high speed, high capacity digital data storage system was developed for a new balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope. The system incorporates economical consumer products: the portable video cassette recorder (VCR) and a relatively newer item - the digital audio processor. The in-flight recording system employs eight VCRs and will provide a continuous data storage rate of 1.4 megabits/sec throughout a 40 hour balloon flight. Data storage capacity is 25 gigabytes and power consumption is only 10 watts.

  15. Is this charred material from a VHS video cassette?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruchtenicht, Tara; Blackledge, Robert D.; Williams, Teresa R.

    2010-06-01

    At his residence, a victim in a double homicide had installed a home-built video surveillance system. The suspects either knew of or discovered this system and removed it. In a backyard at a location associated with the suspects was a barrel used for burning trash. Could charred debris recovered from a metal bowl found among the contents of the barrel be the remains of a VHS video cassette? A positive answer to the question was obtained through a combination of optical microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS).

  16. Balloon-borne video cassette recorders for digital data storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Althouse, W. E.; Cook, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    A high speed, high capacity digital data storage system was developed for a new balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope. The system incorporates economical consumer products: the portable video cassette recorder (VCR) and a relatively newer item - the digital audio processor. The in-flight recording system employs eight VCRs and will provide a continuous data storage rate of 1.4 megabits/sec throughout a 40 hour balloon flight. Data storage capacity is 25 gigabytes and power consumption is only 10 watts.

  17. Balloon-borne video cassette recorders for digital data storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Althouse, W. E.; Cook, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    A high-speed, high-capacity digital data storage system has been developed for a new balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope. The system incorporates sophisticated, yet easy to use and economical consumer products: the portable video cassette recorder (VCR) and a relatively newer item - the digital audio processor. The in-flight recording system employs eight VCRs and will provide a continuous data storage rate of 1.4 megabits/sec throughout a 40 hour balloon flight. Data storage capacity is 25 gigabytes and power consumption is only 10 watts.

  18. Evaluation of Salmonella live vaccines with chromosomal expression cassettes for translocated fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Husseiny, Mohamed I; Hensel, Michael

    2009-06-01

    Salmonella enterica is a versatile live carrier for the presentation of recombinant vaccine antigens. Fusion proteins of a type III secretion system effector and heterologous vaccine antigens can be translocated by live attenuated Salmonella strains and mediate protective immunity against infections. Here we investigated the use expression cassettes for translocated fusion protein consisting of effector SseF and antigens of Listeria monocytogenes after stable integration into the Salmonella chromosome. The efficacy of chromosomal expression cassettes was compared to plasmid-based expression cassettes. Our data indicate that live Salmonella vaccines with chromosomal expression cassettes for translocated fusion proteins, although only present in single copy, efficiently stimulate immune responses. PMID:19464562

  19. Gene disruption in Escherichia coli: TcR and KmR cassettes with the option of Flp-catalyzed excision of the antibiotic-resistance determinant.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Cherepanov PP; Wackernagel W

    1995-05-26

    Two cassettes with tetracycline-resistance (TcR) and kanamycin-resistance (KmR) determinants have been developed for the construction of insertion and deletion mutants of cloned genes in Escherichia coli. In both cassettes, the resistance determinants are flanked by the short direct repeats (FRT sites) required for site-specific recombination mediated by the yeast Flp recombinase. In addition, a plasmid with temperature-sensitive replication for temporal production of the Flp enzyme in E. coli has been constructed. After a gene disruption or deletion mutation is constructed in vitro by insertion of one of the cassettes into a given gene, the mutated gene is transferred to the E. coli chromosome by homologous recombination and selection for the antibiotic resistance provided by the cassette. If desired, the resistance determinant can subsequently be removed from the chromosome in vivo by Flp action, leaving behind a short nucleotide sequence with one FRT site and with no polar effect on downstream genes. This system was applied in the construction of an E. coli endA deletion mutation which can be transduced by P1 to the genetic background of interest using TcR as a marker. The transductant can then be freed of the TcR if required.

  20. Gene disruption in Escherichia coli: TcR and KmR cassettes with the option of Flp-catalyzed excision of the antibiotic-resistance determinant.

    PubMed

    Cherepanov, P P; Wackernagel, W

    1995-05-26

    Two cassettes with tetracycline-resistance (TcR) and kanamycin-resistance (KmR) determinants have been developed for the construction of insertion and deletion mutants of cloned genes in Escherichia coli. In both cassettes, the resistance determinants are flanked by the short direct repeats (FRT sites) required for site-specific recombination mediated by the yeast Flp recombinase. In addition, a plasmid with temperature-sensitive replication for temporal production of the Flp enzyme in E. coli has been constructed. After a gene disruption or deletion mutation is constructed in vitro by insertion of one of the cassettes into a given gene, the mutated gene is transferred to the E. coli chromosome by homologous recombination and selection for the antibiotic resistance provided by the cassette. If desired, the resistance determinant can subsequently be removed from the chromosome in vivo by Flp action, leaving behind a short nucleotide sequence with one FRT site and with no polar effect on downstream genes. This system was applied in the construction of an E. coli endA deletion mutation which can be transduced by P1 to the genetic background of interest using TcR as a marker. The transductant can then be freed of the TcR if required. PMID:7789817

  1. AC Electrokinetics Facilitated Biosensor Cassette for Rapid Pathogen Identification

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Mengxing; Mohan, Ruchika; Lu, Yi; Liu, Tingting; Mach, Kathleen E.; Sin, Mandy L. Y.; McComb, Mason; Joshi, Janhvi; Gau, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    To develop a portable point-of-care system based on biosensors for common infectious diseases such as urinary tract infection, the sensing process needs to be implemented within an enclosed fluidic system. On chip sample preparation of clinical samples remains a significant obstacle to achieve robust sensor performance. Herein AC electrokinetics is applied in an electrochemical biosensor cassette to enhance molecular convection and hybridization efficiency though electrokinetic induced fluid motion and Joule heating induced temperature elevation. Using E. coli as an exemplary pathogen, we determined the optimal electrokinetic parameters for detecting bacterial 16S rRNA in the biosensor cassette based on the current output, signal-to-noise ratio, and limit of detection. In addition, a panel of six probe sets targeting common uropathogenic bacteria was demonstrated. The optimized parameters were also validated using patient-derived clinical urine samples. The effectiveness of electrokinetic for on chip sample preparation will facilitate the implementation of point-of-care diagnosis of urinary tract infection in the future. PMID:23626988

  2. Regional Dissemination of a Trimethoprim-Resistance Gene Cassette via a Successful Transposable Element

    PubMed Central

    Opintan, Japheth A.; Bishar, Rima A.; Aboderin, A. Oladipo; Newman, Mercy J.; Lamikanra, Adebayo; Okeke, Iruka N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial resistance is a growing international problem. We observed a 50% increase in the prevalence of trimethoprim resistance among fecal Escherichia coli from healthy Nigerian students between 1998 and 2005, a trend to increase that continued in 2009. Methods and Findings A PCR-based screen revealed that 131 (43.1%) of isolates obtained in Nigeria in 2005 and 2009 carried integron-borne dfrA cassettes. In the case of 67 (51.1%) of these isolates, the cassette was a class 1-integron-borne dfrA7 gene, which has been reported at high prevalence from E. coli isolates from other parts of Africa. Complete sequencing of a 27 Kb dfrA7-bearing plasmid from one isolate located the dfrA7 gene within a Tn21-type transposon. The transposon also contained an IS26-derived bla/sul/str element, encoding resistance to ?-lactams, sulphonamides and streptomycin, and mercury resistance genes. Although the plasmid backbone was only found in 12 (5.8%) of trimethoprim-resistant isolates, dfrA7 and other transposon-borne genes were detected in 14 (16.3%) and 32 (26.3%) of trimethoprim resistant isolates collected in Nigeria in 2005 and 2009, respectively. Additionally, 37 (19.3%) of trimethoprim-resistant E. coli isolates collected between 2006 and 2008 from Ghana were positive for the dfrA7 and a transposon marker, but only 4 (2.1%) harbored the plasmid backbone. Conclusions Our data point to transposition as a principal mechanism for disseminating dfrA7 among E. coli from Nigeria and Ghana. On-going intensive use of the affordable broad-spectrum antibacterials is likely to promote selective success of a highly prevalent transposable element in West Africa. PMID:22666464

  3. Cassette Sound Filmstrip Viewers -- Evaluations of Nine Machines. An In Depth Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Product Report, 1974

    1974-01-01

    In evaluating cassette sound filmstrip viewers, many criteria are the same as those applied to cassette recorders in Educational Product Report; v7 n5 Nov '73 and silent filmstrip viewers in Educational Product Report; v6 n5 Feb '73. These criteria cover output power; frequency response; tape speed accuracy including drift, wow, and flutter; and

  4. Motion Pictures and Video Cassettes 1971. AV-USA Supplement 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hope, Thomas W.

    The financial status of the motion picture and of the video cassette industry in 1970 are reviewed. Based on production rates and income of these industries, trends are discovered. Figures on local origination of television programing and commercials are also included. The section on video cassettes includes the following information: the current

  5. Clinton Pilot Cassette Center Project Director's Report and Evaluation Addendum 1969-1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flugaur, George J.; Schouweiler, Mary P.

    The goal of the cassette pilot center at Clinton Elementary School, Minneapolis, Minn., is to develop a tape library that will improve instruction for children who learn better by simultaneous listening and viewing than by reading. To assess effects of the cassette program, two classes at Clinton which received considerable assistance with

  6. Motion Pictures and Video Cassettes 1971. AV-USA Supplement 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hope, Thomas W.

    The financial status of the motion picture and of the video cassette industry in 1970 are reviewed. Based on production rates and income of these industries, trends are discovered. Figures on local origination of television programing and commercials are also included. The section on video cassettes includes the following information: the current…

  7. Natural transformation with synthetic gene cassettes: new tools for integron research and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Gestal, Alicia M; Liew, Elissa F; Coleman, Nicholas V

    2011-12-01

    Integrons are genetic elements that can capture and express genes packaged as gene cassettes. Here we report new methods that allow integrons to be studied and manipulated in their native bacterial hosts. Synthetic gene cassettes encoding gentamicin resistance (aadB) and green fluorescence (gfp), or lactose metabolism (lacZY), were made by PCR and self-ligation, converted to large tandem arrays by multiple displacement amplification, and introduced into Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas stutzeri strains via electroporation or natural transformation. Recombinants (Gm(R) or Lac(+)) were obtained at frequencies ranging from 10(1) to 10(6) c.f.u. (g DNA)(-1). Cassettes were integrated by site-specific recombination at the integron attI site in nearly all cases examined (370/384), including both promoterless and promoter-containing cassettes. Fluorometric analysis of gfp-containing recombinants revealed that expression levels from the integron-associated promoter P(C) were five- to 10-fold higher in the plasmid-borne integron In3 compared with the P. stutzeri chromosomal integrons. Integration of lacZY cassettes into P. stutzeri integrons allowed the bacteria to grow on lactose, and the lacZY gene cassette was stably maintained in the absence of selection. This study is believed to be the first to show natural transformation by gene cassettes, and integron-mediated capture of catabolic gene cassettes. PMID:21948046

  8. Development of a versatile cassette for directional genome walking using cassette ligation-mediated PCR and its application in the cloning of complete lipolytic genes from Bacillus species.

    PubMed

    Nthangeni, Mulalo B; Ramagoma, Faranani; Tlou, Matsobane G; Litthauer, Derek

    2005-05-01

    Since the invention of the PCR technology, adaptation techniques to clone DNA fragments flanking the known sequence continue to be developed. We describe a perfectly annealed cassette available in almost unlimited quantities with variable sticky-and blunt-end restriction enzyme recognition sites for efficient restriction and ligation with the restricted target genomic DNA. The cassette provides a 200-bp sequence, which is used to design a variety of cassette-specific primers. The dephosphorylation prevents cassette self-ligation and creates a nick at the cassette: target genome DNA ligation site suppressing unspecific PCR amplifications. We introduce the single-strand amplification PCR (SSA-PCR) technique where a lone known locus-specific primer is firstly used to enrich the targeted template DNA strand resulting in significant PCR product specificity during the second round conventional nested PCR. The distance between the known locus-specific primer and the nearest location of the restriction enzyme used determined the length of the obtained PCR product. We used this technique to walk downstream into the isochorismatase and upstream into the hypothetical conserved genes flanking the mature extracellular lipase gene from Bacillus licheniformis. We further demonstrated the potential of the technique as a cost-effective method during PCR-based prospecting for novel genes by designing "universal" degenerate primers that detected homologues of Family VII bacterial lipolytic genes in Bacillus species. The cassette ligation-mediated PCR was used to clone complete nucleotide sequences encoding functional lipolytic genes from B. licheniformis and Bacillus pumilus. PMID:15722149

  9. Hausaufgaben mit Kassettenrekorder und Plattenspieler - eine Hilfe fuer den Fremdsprachenunterricht? Ein Bericht aus der Praxis (Homework Assignments with Cassette Recorder and Record-player - An Aid for Foreign Language Teaching? A Report from Actual Practice)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiefer, Bruno

    1974-01-01

    Describes an experiment carried out with 360 pupils with different social backgrounds from 11 classes in 4 Realschulen. The investigation was concerned with the possibility of introducing cassette recorders and record-players into the home assignments. On the whole, the results were assessed as positive. (Text is in German.) (IFS/WGA)

  10. Inducible and Reversible Lentiviral and Recombination Mediated Cassette Exchange (RMCE) Systems for Controlling Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bersten, David C.; Sullivan, Adrienne E.; Li, Dian; Bhakti, Veronica; Bent, Stephen J.; Whitelaw, Murray L.

    2015-01-01

    Manipulation of gene expression to invoke loss of function (LoF) or gain of function (GoF) phenotypes is important for interrogating complex biological questions both in vitro and in vivo. Doxycycline (Dox)-inducible gene expression systems are commonly used although success is often limited by high background and insufficient sensitivity to Dox. Here we develop broadly applicable platforms for reliable, tightly controlled and reversible Dox-inducible systems for lentiviral mediated generation of cell lines or FLP Recombination-Mediated Cassette Exchange (RMCE) into the Collagen 1a1 (Col1a1) locus (FLP-In Col1a1) in mouse embryonic stem cells. We significantly improve the flexibility, usefulness and robustness of the Dox-inducible system by using Tetracycline (Tet) activator (Tet-On) variants which are more sensitive to Dox, have no background activity and are expressed from single Gateway-compatible constructs. We demonstrate the usefulness of these platforms in ectopic gene expression or gene knockdown in multiple cell lines, primary neurons and in FLP-In Col1a1 mouse embryonic stem cells. We also improve the flexibility of RMCE Dox-inducible systems by generating constructs that allow for tissue or cell type-specific Dox-inducible expression and generate a shRNA selection algorithm that can effectively predict potent shRNA sequences able to knockdown gene expression from single integrant constructs. These platforms provide flexible, reliable and broadly applicable inducible expression systems for studying gene function. PMID:25768837

  11. Crystal Structure of an Integron Gene Cassette-Associated Protein from Vibrio cholerae Identifies a Cationic Drug-Binding Module

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Boucher, Yan; Hassan, Karl A.; Leo, Rosa Di; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Savchenko, Alexei; Chang, Changsoo; Labbate, Maurizio; Paulsen, Ian T.; Stokes, H. W.; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Mabbutt, Bridget C.

    2011-01-01

    Background The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes. Methodology/Principal Findings We report the 1.8 crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators. Conclusions/Significance Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds. PMID:21390267

  12. Radiation exposure reduction by use of Kevlar cassettes in the neonatal nursery.

    PubMed

    Herman, M W; Mak, H K; Lachman, R S

    1987-05-01

    A study was performed to determine whether the use of Kevlar cassettes in the neonatal intensive care nursery would reduce radiation exposure to patients. The radiation dose to the neonates was measured by using thermoluminescent dosimeters. In addition, the attenuation of the Kevlar cassettes and the sensitivity of the film-screen combination were compared with the previously used system. The greatest radiation reduction using a mobile X-ray unit was 27%; based on sensitivity measurements, the theoretical reduction averaged 38%. The reduction in radiation exposure resulted from reduced attenuation by the Kevlar cassette. PMID:3495126

  13. Radiation exposure reduction by use of Kevlar cassettes in the neonatal nursery

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, M.W.; Mak, H.K.; Lachman, R.S.

    1987-05-01

    A study was performed to determine whether the use of Kevlar cassettes in the neonatal intensive care nursery would reduce radiation exposure to patients. The radiation dose to the neonates was measured by using thermoluminescent dosimeters. In addition, the attenuation of the Kevlar cassettes and the sensitivity of the film-screen combination were compared with the previously used system. The greatest radiation reduction using a mobile X-ray unit was 27%; based on sensitivity measurements, the theoretical reduction averaged 38%. The reduction in radiation exposure resulted from reduced attenuation by the Kevlar cassette.

  14. Statistical Mechanics Analysis of ATP Binding to a Multisubunit Enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun-Xin

    2014-10-01

    Due to inter-subunit communication, multisubunit enzymes usually hydrolyze ATP in a concerted fashion. However, so far the principle of this process remains poorly understood. In this study, from the viewpoint of statistical mechanics, a simple model is presented. In this model, we assume that the binding of ATP will change the potential of the corresponding enzyme subunit, and the degree of this change depends on the state of its adjacent subunits. The probability of enzyme in a given state satisfies the Boltzmann's distribution. Although it looks much simple, this model can fit the recent experimental data of chaperonin TRiC/CCT well. From this model, the dominant state of TRiC/CCT can be obtained. This study provide a new way to understand biophysical processe by statistical mechanics analysis.

  15. A modified Janus cassette (Sweet Janus) to improve allelic replacement efficiency by high-stringency negative selection in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Thompson, Claudette M; Lipsitch, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The Janus cassette permits marker-free allelic replacement or knockout in streptomycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) through sequential positive and negative selection. Spontaneous revertants of Janus can lead to high level of false-positives during negative selection, which necessitate a time-consuming post-selection screening process. We hypothesized that an additional counter-selectable marker in Janus would decrease the revertant frequency and reduce false-positives, since simultaneous reversion of both counter-selectable makers is much less likely. Here we report a modified cassette, Sweet Janus (SJ), in which the sacB gene from Bacillus subtilis conferring sucrose sensitivity is added to Janus. By using streptomycin and sucrose simultaneously as selective agents, the frequency of SJ double revertants was about 105-fold lower than the frequency of Janus revertants. Accordingly, the frequency of false-positives in the SJ-mediated negative selection was about 100-fold lower than what was seen for Janus. Thus, SJ enhances negative selection stringency and can accelerate allelic replacement in pneumococcus, especially when transformation frequency is low due to strain background or suboptimal transformation conditions. Results also suggested the sacB gene alone can function as a counter-selectable marker in the Gram-positive pneumococcus, which will have the advantage of not requiring a streptomycin-resistant strain for allelic replacement. PMID:24959661

  16. Identification of tumor-associated cassette exons in human cancer through EST-based computational prediction and experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many evidences report that alternative splicing, the mechanism which produces mRNAs and proteins with different structures and functions from the same gene, is altered in cancer cells. Thus, the identification and characterization of cancer-specific splice variants may give large impulse to the discovery of novel diagnostic and prognostic tumour biomarkers, as well as of new targets for more selective and effective therapies. Results We present here a genome-wide analysis of the alternative splicing pattern of human genes through a computational analysis of normal and cancer-specific ESTs from seventeen anatomical groups, using data available in AspicDB, a database resource for the analysis of alternative splicing in human. By using a statistical methodology, normal and cancer-specific genes, splice sites and cassette exons were predicted in silico. The condition association of some of the novel normal/tumoral cassette exons was experimentally verified by RT-qPCR assays in the same anatomical system where they were predicted. Remarkably, the presence in vivo of the predicted alternative transcripts, specific for the nervous system, was confirmed in patients affected by glioblastoma. Conclusion This study presents a novel computational methodology for the identification of tumor-associated transcript variants to be used as cancer molecular biomarkers, provides its experimental validation, and reports specific biomarkers for glioblastoma. PMID:20813049

  17. Streamlined Genome Engineering with a Self-Excising Drug Selection Cassette.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Daniel J; Pani, Ariel M; Heppert, Jennifer K; Higgins, Christopher D; Goldstein, Bob

    2015-08-01

    A central goal in the development of genome engineering technology is to reduce the time and labor required to produce custom genome modifications. Here we describe a new selection strategy for producing fluorescent protein (FP) knock-ins using CRISPR/Cas9-triggered homologous recombination. We have tested our approach in Caenorhabditis elegans. This approach has been designed to minimize hands-on labor at each step of the procedure. Central to our strategy is a newly developed self-excising cassette (SEC) for drug selection. SEC consists of three parts: a drug-resistance gene, a visible phenotypic marker, and an inducible Cre recombinase. SEC is flanked by LoxP sites and placed within a synthetic intron of a fluorescent protein tag, resulting in an FP-SEC module that can be inserted into any C. elegans gene. Upon heat shock, SEC excises itself from the genome, leaving no exogenous sequences outside the fluorescent protein tag. With our approach, one can generate knock-in alleles in any genetic background, with no PCR screening required and without the need for a second injection step to remove the selectable marker. Moreover, this strategy makes it possible to produce a fluorescent protein fusion, a transcriptional reporter and a strong loss-of-function allele for any gene of interest in a single injection step. PMID:26044593

  18. COLLECTION EFFICIENCY OF FIELD SAMPLING CASSETTES: INTERAGENCY ENERGY/ENVIRONMENT R AND D PROGRAM REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Industrial hygiene particulate samples are often collected under anisokinetic sampling conditions and in crosswinds. Experiments were conducted to quantitate errors associated with sampling under these non-ideal conditions. Three types of field sampling cassetts were tested to de...

  19. How To Choose Audio and Video Tape and Cassettes That Best Fit Your Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Judson

    1978-01-01

    An audiovisual consultant presents a guide to selecting suitable and cost effective tape and cassettes. He describes and illustrates physical properties of tapes and includes a list of manufacturers and suppliers. (MF)

  20. Improving yeast strains using recyclable integration cassettes, for the production of plant terpenoids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Terpenoids constitute a large family of natural products, attracting commercial interest for a variety of uses as flavours, fragrances, drugs and alternative fuels. Saccharomyces cerevisiae offers a versatile cell factory, as the precursors of terpenoid biosynthesis are naturally synthesized by the sterol biosynthetic pathway. Results S. cerevisiae wild type yeast cells, selected for their capacity to produce high sterol levels were targeted for improvement aiming to increase production. Recyclable integration cassettes were developed which enable the unlimited sequential integration of desirable genetic elements (promoters, genes, termination sequence) at any desired locus in the yeast genome. The approach was applied on the yeast sterol biosynthetic pathway genes HMG2, ERG20 and IDI1 resulting in several-fold increase in plant monoterpene and sesquiterpene production. The improved strains were robust and could sustain high terpenoid production levels for an extended period. Simultaneous plasmid-driven co-expression of IDI1 and the HMG2 (K6R) variant, in the improved strain background, maximized monoterpene production levels. Expression of two terpene synthase enzymes from the sage species Salvia fruticosa and S. pomifera (SfCinS1, SpP330) in the modified yeast cells identified a range of terpenoids which are also present in the plant essential oils. Co-expression of the putative interacting protein HSP90 with cineole synthase 1 (SfCinS1) also improved production levels, pointing to an additional means to improve production. Conclusions Using the developed molecular tools, new yeast strains were generated with increased capacity to produce plant terpenoids. The approach taken and the durability of the strains allow successive rounds of improvement to maximize yields. PMID:21276210

  1. Storing self-contained gel capillary cassettes for POC medical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Manage, Dammika P; Lauzon, Jana; Zahariadis, George; Pilarski, Linda M

    2013-10-21

    For effective clinical uptake of the lab on a chip/point of care technology (LOC-POC), in addition to cost advantages LOC-POC devices should offer multiple patient screening panels for related diseases as well as cold-chain transportation and storage abilities. We recently described a device that performs polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to simultaneously screen raw clinical samples from up to 16 patients for multiple infectious agents (Manage et al., Lab Chip, 2013, 13, 2576-2584). This cassette contains glass capillaries with desiccated semi-solid acrylamide gels that include all the reagents except for the sample, with integrated quality control. Here we report the development of protocols to store assembled PCR cassettes at room temperature, 4 C or -20 C as well as at +40 C. We show that our cassettes are stable, with no loss of activity for at least 3 months at RT and at least 7 months at 4 C and -20 C. However, the activity of desiccated cassettes degrades when stored for more than 2 weeks at 40 C, insufficient time for post-manufacture delivery and use of cassette PCR. To address this, we have evaluated two stage storage protocols. PCR cassettes can initially be stored at 4 C and -20 C for prolonged periods of time and removed for shorter term storage at RT, retaining activity for at least a month, which would facilitate transport to remote areas for testing. Effective use of cassette PCR in high temperature regions of the world, for experimental purposes defined here as 40 C, appears to be feasible only after a first stage storage in the cold, followed by no more than 1 week at 40 C. This should allow sufficient time for delivery by the manufacturer to a central area well served by power and refrigeration, for later ambient temperature transport and use in under-resourced areas that lack refrigeration. PMID:23966212

  2. A comparison of the closed-face cassette at different orientations while measuring total particles.

    PubMed

    Cook, David M; Sleeth, Darrah K; Thiese, Matthew S; Larson, Rodney R

    2015-01-01

    The current method for sampling aerosols using the 37-mm closed-face cassette (CFC) sampler is based on the orientation of the cassette at ?45 from horizontal. There is some concern as to whether this method is appropriate and may be underestimating exposures. An alternative orientation at ?0 (horizontal) has been discussed. This research compared the CFC's orientation at 45 from horizontal to the proposed orientation at horizontal, 0 in a controlled laboratory setting. The particles used in this study were fused alumina oxide in four sizes, approximately 9.5 ?m, 12.8 ?m, 18 ?m, and 44.3 ?m in aerodynamic diameter. For each test, one aerosol was dispersed in a wind tunnel operating at 0.2 m/s with samplers mounted in the breathing zone of a rotating mannequin. A sampling event consisted of four pairs of samplers, placed side by side (one pair at 45 and another at 0 cassette orientation), and exposed for a period of 45 minutes. A total of 12 sampling events, 3 sample events per particle size, were conducted with a total of 94 samples collected. Mass concentration measurements were compared to assess the relationship between the sampler orientations of the cassettes. In addition, the relationship between the mass collected on the cassette filter and on the interior walls of the cassette was also assessed. The results indicated that there was no significant difference between the measured concentrations based on the orientation of the CFCs. The amount of mass collected on the interior walls of the cassettes was relatively low (<5%) compared to expected (up to 100%) wall losses for both orientations. PMID:25337937

  3. Characterization of the phd-doc and ccd toxin-antitoxin cassettes from Vibrio superintegrons.

    PubMed

    Gurout, Anne-Marie; Iqbal, Naeem; Mine, Natacha; Ducos-Galand, Magaly; Van Melderen, Laurence; Mazel, Didier

    2013-05-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems have been reported in the genomes of most bacterial species, and their role when located on the chromosome is still debated. TA systems are particularly abundant in the massive cassette arrays associated with chromosomal superintegrons (SI). Here, we describe the characterization of two superintegron cassettes encoding putative TA systems. The first is the phd-doc(SI) system identified in Vibrio cholerae N16961. We determined its distribution in 36 V. cholerae strains and among five V. metschnikovii strains. We show that this cassette, which is in position 72 of the V. cholerae N16961 cassette array, is functional, carries its own promoter, and is expressed from this location. Interestingly, the phd-doc(SI) system is unable to control its own expression, most likely due to the absence of any DNA-binding domain on the antitoxin. In addition, this SI system is able to cross talk with the canonical P1 phage system. The second cassette that we characterized is the ccd(Vfi) cassette found in the V. fischeri superintegron. We demonstrate that CcdB(Vfi) targets DNA-gyrase, as the canonical CcB(F) toxin, and that ccd(Vfi) regulates its expression in a fashion similar to the ccd(F) operon of the conjugative plasmid F. We also establish that this cassette is functional and expressed in its chromosomal context in V. fischeri CIP 103206T. We tested its functional interactions with the ccdAB(F) system and found that CcdA(Vfi) is specific for its associated CcdB(Vfi) and cannot prevent CcdB(F) toxicity. Based on these results, we discuss the possible biological functions of these TA systems in superintegrons. PMID:23475970

  4. Characterization of the phd-doc and ccd Toxin-Antitoxin Cassettes from Vibrio Superintegrons

    PubMed Central

    Gurout, Anne-Marie; Iqbal, Naeem; Mine, Natacha; Ducos-Galand, Magaly; Van Melderen, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems have been reported in the genomes of most bacterial species, and their role when located on the chromosome is still debated. TA systems are particularly abundant in the massive cassette arrays associated with chromosomal superintegrons (SI). Here, we describe the characterization of two superintegron cassettes encoding putative TA systems. The first is the phd-docSI system identified in Vibrio cholerae N16961. We determined its distribution in 36 V. cholerae strains and among five V. metschnikovii strains. We show that this cassette, which is in position 72 of the V. cholerae N16961 cassette array, is functional, carries its own promoter, and is expressed from this location. Interestingly, the phd-docSI system is unable to control its own expression, most likely due to the absence of any DNA-binding domain on the antitoxin. In addition, this SI system is able to cross talk with the canonical P1 phage system. The second cassette that we characterized is the ccdVfi cassette found in the V. fischeri superintegron. We demonstrate that CcdBVfi targets DNA-gyrase, as the canonical CcBF toxin, and that ccdVfi regulates its expression in a fashion similar to the ccdF operon of the conjugative plasmid F. We also establish that this cassette is functional and expressed in its chromosomal context in V. fischeri CIP 103206T. We tested its functional interactions with the ccdABF system and found that CcdAVfi is specific for its associated CcdBVfi and cannot prevent CcdBF toxicity. Based on these results, we discuss the possible biological functions of these TA systems in superintegrons. PMID:23475970

  5. Erythromycin esterase gene ere(A) is located in a functional gene cassette in an unusual class 2 integron.

    PubMed

    Biskri, Latefa; Mazel, Didier

    2003-10-01

    The gene ere(A) of the plasmid pIP1100 is larger than originally reported and is organized as an integron gene cassette. The ere(A) gene cassette carries its own promoter and is propagated by a class 2 integron with an insertion sequence element, IS1, inserted upstream of the intI2 gene. The mobility of the ere(A) cassette has been demonstrated. PMID:14506050

  6. Erythromycin Esterase Gene ere(A) Is Located in a Functional Gene Cassette in an Unusual Class 2 Integron

    PubMed Central

    Biskri, Latefa; Mazel, Didier

    2003-01-01

    The gene ere(A) of the plasmid pIP1100 is larger than originally reported and is organized as an integron gene cassette. The ere(A) gene cassette carries its own promoter and is propagated by a class 2 integron with an insertion sequence element, IS1, inserted upstream of the intI2 gene. The mobility of the ere(A) cassette has been demonstrated. PMID:14506050

  7. A prototype stable RNA identification cassette for monitoring plasmids of genetically engineered microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedenstierna, K. O.; Lee, Y. H.; Yang, Y.; Fox, G. E.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype stable RNA identification cassette for monitoring genetically engineered plasmids carried by strains of Escherichia coli has been developed. The cassette consists of a Vibrio proteolyticus 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene surrounded by promoters and terminators from the rrnB operon of Escherischia coli. The identifier RNA is expressed and successfully processed so that approximately 30% of the 5S rRNA isolated from either whole cells or 70S ribosomes is of the V. proteolyticus type. Cells carrying the identifier are readily detectable by hybridization. Accurate measurements show that the identification cassette has little effect on fitness compared to a strain containing an analogous plasmid carrying wild type E. coli 5S rRNA, and the V. proteolyticus 5S rRNA gene is not inactivated after prolonged growth. These results demonstrate the feasibility of developing small standardized identification cassettes that can utilize already existing highly sensitive rRNA detection methods. Cassettes of this type could in principle be incorporated into either the engineered regions of recombinant plasmids or their hosts.

  8. Development of a full-size divertor cassette prototype for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Vieider, G.; Pacher, H.D.

    1996-10-01

    Production of a full-size divertor cassette involves eight major components. All of the components are mounted on the cassette body. Inner divertor channel components for the vertical target design are being provided by the Japan Home Team. Outer divertor channel components for the vertical target design are being provided by the European and United States Home Teams. Gas box liners are being provided by the Russian Home Team. The full-size components manufactured by the four parties will be shipped to the US Home Team for assembly into a full size divertor cassette. The techniques for assembly and maintenance of the cassette will be demonstrated during this process. The assembled cassette will be tested for proper flow distribution and proof of the filling and draining procedures. The testing will include vacuum leak tightness at full temperature and pressure, cyclic heating to 150 {degrees}C, verification of dimensional accuracy of the assembled components, and application of thermal gradients to measure dimensional stability. The development of the divertor for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) depends on successful R&D efforts on materials, joining, and plasma materials interactions. Results of the development program are presented. The scale-up of the processes developed in the basic research and development tasks is accomplished by producing and high-heat-flux testing medium and full-scale mock- ups. The design of the mock-ups is discussed.

  9. Analysis of the effect of the bovine adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter G2 single nucleotide polymorphism Y581S on transcellular transport of veterinary drugs using new cell culture models.

    PubMed

    Real, R; González-Lobato, L; Baro, M F; Valbuena, S; de la Fuente, A; Prieto, J G; Alvarez, A I; Marques, M M; Merino, G

    2011-12-01

    In commercial dairy production, the risk of drug residues and environmental pollutants in milk from ruminants has become an outstanding problem. One of the main determinants of active drug secretion into milk is the ATP-binding cassette transporter G2/breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2/BCRP). It is located in several organs associated with drug absorption, metabolism, and excretion, and its expression is highly induced during lactation in the mammary gland of ruminants, mice, and humans. As a consequence, potential contamination of milk could expose suckling infants to xenotoxins. In cows, a SNP for this protein affecting quality and quantity of milk production has been described previously (Y581S). In this study, our main purpose was to determine whether this polymorphism has an effect on transcellular transport of veterinary drugs because this could alter substrate pharmacokinetics and milk residues. We stably expressed the wild-type bovine ABCG2 and the Y581S variant in Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells (MDCKII) and MEF3.8 cell lines generating cell models in which the functionality of the bovine transporter could be addressed. Functional studies confirmed the greater functional activity in mitoxantrone accumulation assays for the Y581S variant with a greater relative V(MAX) value (P = 0.040) and showed for the first time that the Y581S variant presents greater transcellular transport of the model ABCG2 substrate nitrofurantoin (P = 0.024) and of 3 veterinary antibiotics, the fluoroquinolone agents enrofloxacin (P = 0.035), danofloxacin (P = 0.001), and difloxacin (P = 0.008), identified as new substrates of the bovine ABCG2. In addition, the inhibitory effect of the macrocyclic lactone ivermectin on the activity of wild-type bovine ABCG2 and the Y581S variant was also confirmed, showing a greater inhibitory potency on the wild-type protein at all the concentrations tested (5 μM, P = 0.017; 10 μM, P = 0.001; 25 μM, P = 0.008; and 50 μM, P = 0.003). Differential transport activity depending on the genotype together with the differential inhibition pattern might have clinical consequences, including changes in substrate pharmacokinetics (and subsequently pharmacodynamics) and more specifically, changes in secretion of ABCG2 substrates into milk, potentially implying important consequences to veterinary therapeutics. PMID:21821808

  10. Diverse Gene Cassettes in Class 1 Integrons of Facultative Oligotrophic Bacteria of River Mahananda, West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Ranadhir; Kumar, Arvind; Bhowal, Suparna Saha; Mandal, Amit Kumar; Tiwary, Bipransh Kumar; Mukherjee, Shriparna

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study a large random collection (n?=?2188) of facultative oligotrophic bacteria, from 90 water samples gathered in three consecutive years (20072009) from three different sampling sites of River Mahananda in Siliguri, West Bengal, India, were investigated for the presence of class 1 integrons and sequences of the amplification products. Methodology/Principal Findings Replica plating method was employed for determining the antibiotic resistance profile of the randomly assorted facultative oligotrophic isolates. Genomic DNA from each isolate was analyzed by PCR for the presence of class 1 integron. Amplicons were cloned and sequenced. Numerical taxonomy and 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses were done to ascertain putative genera of the class 1 integron bearing isolates. Out of 2188 isolates, 1667 (76.19%) were antibiotic-resistant comprising of both single-antibiotic resistance (SAR) and multiple-antibiotic resistant (MAR), and 521 (23.81%) were sensitive to all twelve different antibiotics used in this study. Ninety out of 2188 isolates produced amplicon(s) of varying sizes from 0.15 to 3.45 KB. Chi-square (?2) test revealed that the possession of class 1 integron in sensitive, SAR and MAR is not equally probable at the 1% level of significance. Diverse antibiotic-resistance gene cassettes, aadA1, aadA2, aadA4, aadA5, dfrA1, dfrA5, dfrA7, dfrA12, dfrA16, dfrA17, dfrA28, dfrA30, dfr-IIe, blaIMP-9, aacA4, Ac-6?-Ib, oxa1, oxa10 and arr2 were detected in 64 isolates. The novel cassettes encoding proteins unrelated to any known antibiotic resistance gene function were identified in 26 isolates. Antibiotic-sensitive isolates have a greater propensity to carry gene cassettes unrelated to known antibiotic-resistance genes. The integron-positive isolates under the class Betaproteobacteria comprised of only two genera, Comamonas and Acidovorax of family Comamonadaceae, while isolates under class Gammaproteobacteria fell under the families, Moraxellaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Aeromonadaceae and Enterobacteriaceae. Conclusions Oligotrophic bacteria are good sources of novel genes as well as potential reservoirs of antibiotic resistance gene casettes. PMID:23951238

  11. The Evolution of the Bacterial Luciferase Gene Cassette (lux) as a Real-Time Bioreporter

    PubMed Central

    Close, Dan; Xu, Tingting; Smartt, Abby; Rogers, Alexandra; Crossley, Robert; Price, Sarah; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux) is unique among bioluminescent bioreporter systems due to its ability to synthesize and/or scavenge all of the substrate compounds required for its production of light. As a result, the lux system has the unique ability to autonomously produce a luminescent signal, either continuously or in response to the presence of a specific trigger, across a wide array of organismal hosts. While originally employed extensively as a bacterial bioreporter system for the detection of specific chemical signals in environmental samples, the use of lux as a bioreporter technology has continuously expanded over the last 30 years to include expression in eukaryotic cells such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and even human cell lines as well. Under these conditions, the lux system has been developed for use as a biomedical detection tool for toxicity screening and visualization of tumors in small animal models. As the technologies for lux signal detection continue to improve, it is poised to become one of the first fully implantable detection systems for intra-organismal optical detection through direct marriage to an implantable photon-detecting digital chip. This review presents the basic biochemical background that allows the lux system to continuously autobioluminesce and highlights the important milestones in the use of lux-based bioreporters as they have evolved from chemical detection platforms in prokaryotic bacteria to rodent-based tumorigenesis study targets. In addition, the future of lux imaging using integrated circuit microluminometry to image directly within a living host in real-time will be introduced and its role in the development of dose/response therapeutic systems will be highlighted. PMID:22368493

  12. Cloning-free CRISPR/Cas system facilitates functional cassette knock-in in mice.

    PubMed

    Aida, Tomomi; Chiyo, Keiho; Usami, Takako; Ishikubo, Harumi; Imahashi, Risa; Wada, Yusaku; Tanaka, Kenji F; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Tanaka, Kohichi

    2015-01-01

    Although the CRISPR/Cas system has enabled one-step generation of knockout mice, low success rates of cassette knock-in limit its application range. Here we show that cloning-free, direct nuclear delivery of Cas9 protein complex with chemically synthesized dual RNAs enables highly efficient target digestion, leading to generation of knock-in mice carrying a functional cassette with up to 50% efficiency, compared with just 10% by a commonly used method consisting of Cas9 mRNA and single guide RNA. Our cloning-free CRISPR/Cas system facilitates rapid one-step generation of cassette knock-in mice, accelerating functional genomic research by providing various in vivo genetic tools. PMID:25924609

  13. A self-excising beta-recombinase/six cassette for repetitive gene deletion and homokaryon purification in Neurospora crassa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a previous study we developed a cassette employing a bacterial beta-recombinase acting on six recognition sequences (beta-rec/six), which allowed repetitive site-specific gene deletion and marker recycling in Neurospora crassa. However, only one positive selection marker was used in the cassette...

  14. Video Cassettes: The Systems, the Market, the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Martin

    In its survey of the videocassette field, this book details the background, current status, problems, and potentials of the various systems designed to record and reproduce films and other audiovisual material through a conventional television set. The systems used by CBS (a miniaturized film format), Avco, Sony, Ampex (all magnetic tape formats),

  15. STS-29 MS Bagian juggles audio cassettes on Discovery's, OV-103's, middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    On aft middeck, STS-29 Mission Specialist (MS) James P. Bagian juggles TEAC audio cassettes freefloating above foam insert as he attempts to organize them. In front of Bagian are aft middeck lockers and part of the open airlock hatch. Behind him are the starboard wall-mounted sleep restraints.

  16. 21 CFR 892.1870 - Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer. 892.1870 Section 892.1870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1870 Radiographic...

  17. 21 CFR 892.1880 - Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder. 892.1880 Section 892.1880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1880...

  18. 21 CFR 892.1880 - Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder. 892.1880 Section 892.1880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1880...

  19. 21 CFR 892.1870 - Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer. 892.1870 Section 892.1870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1870 Radiographic...

  20. 21 CFR 892.1870 - Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer. 892.1870 Section 892.1870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1870 Radiographic...

  1. 21 CFR 892.1880 - Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder. 892.1880 Section 892.1880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1880...

  2. 21 CFR 892.1870 - Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer. 892.1870 Section 892.1870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1870 Radiographic...

  3. 21 CFR 892.1880 - Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder. 892.1880 Section 892.1880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1880...

  4. 21 CFR 892.1880 - Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder. 892.1880 Section 892.1880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1880...

  5. 21 CFR 892.1870 - Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer. 892.1870 Section 892.1870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1870 Radiographic...

  6. A test cassette for x-ray-exposure experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K. B.; Celeste, J.; Rekow, V.; Bopp, D. R.; May, M. J.; Fisher, J. H.; Horton, R.; Newlander, C. D.; Jenkins, P.; Trautz, K.

    2010-07-15

    We present the design and operation of a test cassette for exposure of samples to radiation environments at the National Ignition Facility. The cassette provides options for square and round samples and exposure areas; the cassette provides for multiple levels of filtration on a single sample, which allows dynamic range in experiments. The samples had normal lines of sight to the x-ray source in order to have uniform x-ray illumination. The incident x-radiation onto the samples was determined by the choice of filter thicknesses and materials. The samples were held at precise locations, accurate to within a few hundred microns, in the target chamber in order to have a known fluence incident. In the cassette, the samples were held in place in such a way that a minimal ''line contact'' allows them to have the maximal mechanical response to the x-ray load. We present postshot images of the debris found on films used for filters, and pre- and postexposure specimens.

  7. Construction of heterologous gene expression cassettes for the development of recombinant Clostridium beijerinckii.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Hoon; Eom, Gyeong Tae; Kang, Kyoung Hee; Joo, Jeong Chan; Jang, Young-Ah; Choi, Jae Woo; Song, Bong Keun; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Si Jae

    2016-04-01

    Gene-expression cassettes for the construction of recombinant Clostridium beijerinckii were developed as potential tools for metabolic engineering of C. beijerinckii. Gene expression cassettes containing ColE1 origin and pAMB origin along with the erythromycin resistance gene were constructed, in which promoters from Escherichia coli, Lactococcus lactis, Ralstonia eutropha, C. acetobutylicum, and C. beijerinckii are examined as potential promoters in C. beijerinckii. Zymogram analysis of the cell extracts and comparison of lipase activities of the recombinant C. beijerinckii strains expressing Pseudomonas fluorescens tliA gene suggested that the tliA gene was functionally expressed by all the examined promoters with different expression level. Also, recombinant C. beijerinckii expressing C. beijerinckii secondary alcohol dehydrogenase by the constructed expression cassettes successfully produced 2-propanol from glucose. The best promoter for TliA expression was the R. eutropha phaP promoter while that for 2-propanol production was the putative C. beijerinckii pta promoter. Gene expression cassettes developed in this study may be useful tools for the construction of recombinant C. beijerinckii strains as host strains for the valuable chemicals and fuels from renewable resources. PMID:26780375

  8. STS-37 crewmembers watch Pilot Cameron juggle cassettes on OV-104's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-37 crewmembers watch Pilot Kenneth D. Cameron juggle cassette tapes on the middeck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Laughing at Cameron's stunt are Mission Specialist (MS) Linda M. Godwin (foreground), Commander Steven R. Nagel (behind Cameron), and MS Jerry L. Ross (at floor level). Ross snacks on chocolate candy during the performance.

  9. ATimer-Actuated, Immunoassay Cassette for Detecting Molecular Markers in Oral Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changchun; Qiu, Xianbo; Ongagna, Serge; Chen, Dafeng; Chen, Zongyuan; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L.A.M.; Bau, Haim H.

    2009-01-01

    An inexpensive, hand-held, point-of-care, disposable, self-contained, immunoassay cassette comprised of air pouches for pumping, a metering chamber, reagents storage chambers, a mixer, and a lateral flow strip was designed, constructed, and tested. The assay was carried out in a consecutive flow format. The detection was facilitated with up-converting, phosphor (UCP) reporter particles. The automated, timely pumping of the various reagents was driven by a spring-loaded timer. The utility of the cassette was demonstrated by detecting antibodies to HIV in saliva samples and further evaluated with a non-contagious, haptenized DNA assay. The cassette has several advantages over dip sticks such as sample preprocessing, integrated storage of reagents, and automated operation that reduces operator errors and training. The cassette and actuator described herein can readily be extended to detect biomarkers of other diseases in body fluids and other fluids at the point of care. The system is particularly suitable for resource poor countries, where funds and trained personnel are in short supply. PMID:19255658

  10. A timer-actuated immunoassay cassette for detecting molecular markers in oral fluids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changchun; Qiu, Xianbo; Ongagna, Serge; Chen, Dafeng; Chen, Zongyuan; Abrams, William R; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L A M; Bau, Haim H

    2009-03-21

    An inexpensive, hand-held, point-of-care, disposable, self-contained immunoassay cassette comprised of air pouches for pumping, a metering chamber, reagents storage chambers, a mixer, and a lateral flow strip was designed, constructed, and tested. The assay was carried out in a consecutive flow format. The detection was facilitated with up-converting phosphor (UCP) reporter particles. The automated, timely pumping of the various reagents was driven by a spring-loaded timer. The utility of the cassette was demonstrated by detecting antibodies to HIV in saliva samples and further evaluated with a non-contagious, haptenized DNA assay. The cassette has several advantages over dip sticks such as sample preprocessing, integrated storage of reagents, and automated operation that reduces operator errors and training. The cassette and actuator described herein can readily be extended to detect biomarkers of other diseases in body fluids and other fluids at the point of care. The system is particularly suitable for resource-poor countries, where funds and trained personnel are in short supply. PMID:19255658

  11. Evaluation of the SKC DPM cassette for monitoring diesel particulate matter in coal mines.

    PubMed

    Noll, James D; Birch, Eileen

    2004-12-01

    In a previous study, the efficacy of commercial and prototype impactors for sampling diesel particulate matter (DPM) in coal mines was investigated. Laboratory and field samples were collected on quartz-fiber filters and analyzed for organic and elemental carbon. Coal dust contributed a minimal amount of elemental carbon when commercial cascade impactors and prototype impactors, designed by the University of Minnesota (UMN) and the US Bureau of Mines (BOM), were used to collect submicrometer dust fractions. Other impactors were not as effective at excluding coal dust. The impactors evaluated in that study were either not commercially available or were multi-stage, expensive, and difficult to use for personal measurements. A commercial version of the BOM impactor, called the DPM Cassette, was recently introduced by SKC. Tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of the DPM Cassette for measuring diesel-source elemental carbon in the presence of coal dust. Bituminous coals from three mines in two different coal provinces were examined. The dust particle diameters were small and the coal dust contained a high percentage of carbon, thereby giving a worst-case condition for non-anthracite coal mines. Results for the DPM Cassette were essentially identical to those obtained by the BOM impactors in a previous study. At a respirable coal dust concentration of 5.46 mg m(-3), which is 3.8 times the regulatory limit, the DPM Cassette collected only 34 microg m(-3) of coal-source elemental carbon. PMID:15568046

  12. Positive selection, cloning vectors for gram-positive bacteria based on a restriction endonuclease cassette.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, G M; Klaenhammer, T R

    1996-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis contains numerous restriction and modification (R/M) systems of different specificities. A novel IIS type R/M system encoded by the LlaI operon has previously been characterized from the L. lactis conjugative plasmid pTR2030. The LlaI operon is composed of six genes: First, a small regulatory gene llaIC precedes the methylase gene llaIM. The following three genes, llaI.1, llaI.2, llaI.3, are all essential for restriction endonuclease activity and are designed as the restriction cassette llaIR. The forth open reading frame of unknown function follows the llaIR gene cassette. We have successfully subcloned the three llaIR genes, llaI.1, llaI.2, and llaI.3, without llaIM, as a suicide cassette into the three shuttle vectors pTRKL2, pTRKH2, and pBV5030. A promoter (P6) from Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC4356, which is functional in E. coli, lactococci, and lactobacilli (Djordjevic and Topisirovic, unpublished) was cloned upstream of the three gene cassette. Restriction activity was evaluated in Escherichia coli and several gram-positive bacteria. The llaIR restriction cassette was not functional in E. coli, but its presence was lethal to L. lactis, Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus johnsonii, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Carnobacterium pisicola, Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis, and Leuconostoc gelidum. Several novel, positive selection cloning vectors were developed that can exploit unique cloning sites within the llaIR cassette. Insertions in llaI.1 resulted in complete inactivation of restriction activity and provided unconditional selection for recombinant plasmids in surviving transformants. These positive selection cloning vectors are the first for gram-positive bacteria that are based on a restriction endonuclease cassette. Functional activity of the llaIR genes in various gram-positive bacteria would also enable use of these cloning vectors for positive selection of promoters, terminators, and regulatory sequences across these genera. PMID:8693025

  13. Utilizing ARC EMCS Seedling Cassettes as Highly Versatile Miniature Growth Chambers for Model Organism Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, John L.; Steele, Marianne K.; Sun, Gwo-Shing; Heathcote, David; Reinsch, S.; DeSimone, Julia C.; Myers, Zachary A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our ground testing was to demonstrate the capability of safely putting specific model organisms into dehydrated stasis, and to later rehydrate and successfully grow them inside flight proven ARC EMCS seedling cassettes. The ARC EMCS seedling cassettes were originally developed to support seedling growth during space flight. The seeds are attached to a solid substrate, launched dry, and then rehydrated in a small volume of media on orbit to initiate the experiment. We hypothesized that the same seedling cassettes should be capable of acting as culture chambers for a wide range of organisms with minimal or no modification. The ability to safely preserve live organisms in a dehydrated state allows for on orbit experiments to be conducted at the best time for crew operations and more importantly provides a tightly controlled physiologically relevant growth experiment with specific environmental parameters. Thus, we performed a series of ground tests that involved growing the organisms, preparing them for dehydration on gridded Polyether Sulfone (PES) membranes, dry storage at ambient temperatures for varying periods of time, followed by rehydration. Inside the culture cassettes, the PES membranes were mounted above blotters containing dehydrated growth media. These were mounted on stainless steel bases and sealed with plastic covers that have permeable membrane covered ports for gas exchange. The results showed we were able to demonstrate acceptable normal growth of C.elegans (nematodes), E.coli (bacteria), S.cerevisiae (yeast), Polytrichum (moss) spores and protonemata, C.thalictroides (fern), D.discoideum (amoeba), and H.dujardini (tardigrades). All organisms showed acceptable growth and rehydration in both petri dishes and culture cassettes initially, and after various time lengths of dehydration. At the end of on orbit ISS European Modular Cultivation System experiments the cassettes could be frozen at ultra-low temperatures, refrigerated, or chemically preserved before being returned to Earth for analyses. Our results suggest that with protocol modifications and future verification testing we can utilize the versatile EMCS to conduct tightly controlled experiments inside our culture cassettes for a wide variety of organisms. These physiological experiments would be designed to answer questions at the molecular level about the specific stress responses of space flight.

  14. Evaluating the accuracy of technicians and pharmacists in checking unit dose medication cassettes.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Peter J; Saya, Frank G; Lovett, Larry T; Tan, Sandy; Adams, Dale W; Shane, Rita

    2002-06-15

    The accuracy rates of board-registered pharmacy technicians and pharmacists in checking unit dose medication cassettes in the inpatient setting at two separate institutions were examined. Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, both in Los Angeles county, petitioned the California State Board of Pharmacy to approve a waiver of the California Code of Regulations to conduct an experimental program to compare the accuracy of unit dose medication cassettes checked by pharmacists with that of cassettes checked by trained, certified pharmacy technicians. The study consisted of three parts: assessing pharmacist baseline checking accuracy (Phase I), developing a technician-training program and certifying technicians who completed the didactic and practical training (Phase II), and evaluating the accuracy of certified technicians checking unit dose medication cassettes as a daily function (Phase III). Twenty-nine pharmacists and 41 technicians (3 of whom were pharmacy interns) participated in the study. Of the technicians, all 41 successfully completed the didactic and practical training, 39 successfully completed the audits and became certified checkers, and 2 (including 1 of the interns) did not complete the certification audits because they were reassigned to another work area or had resigned. In Phase II, the observed accuracy rate and its lower confidence limit exceeded the predetermined minimum requirement of 99.8% for a certified checker. The mean accuracy rates for technicians were identical at the two institutions (p = 1.0). The difference in mean accuracy rates between pharmacists (99.52%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 99.44-99.58%) and technicians, (99.89%; 95% CI 99.87-99.90%) was significant (p < 0.0001). Inpatient technicians who had been trained and certified in a closely supervised program that incorporated quality assurance mechanisms could safely and accurately check unit dose medication cassettes filled by other technicians. PMID:12073859

  15. An integrated, self-contained microfluidic cassette for isolation, amplification, and detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dafeng; Mauk, Michael; Qiu, Xianbo; Liu, Changchun; Kim, Jitae; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Ongagna, Serge; Abrams, William R; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L A M; Bau, Haim H

    2010-08-01

    A self-contained, integrated, disposable, sample-to-answer, polycarbonate microfluidic cassette for nucleic acid-based detection of pathogens at the point of care was designed, constructed, and tested. The cassette comprises on-chip sample lysis, nucleic acid isolation, enzymatic amplification (polymerase chain reaction and, when needed, reverse transcription), amplicon labeling, and detection. On-chip pouches and valves facilitate fluid flow control. All the liquids and dry reagents needed for the various reactions are pre-stored in the cassette. The liquid reagents are stored in flexible pouches formed on the chip surface. Dry (RT-)PCR reagents are pre-stored in the thermal cycling, reaction chamber. The process operations include sample introduction; lysis of cells and viruses; solid-phase extraction, concentration, and purification of nucleic acids from the lysate; elution of the nucleic acids into a thermal cycling chamber and mixing with pre-stored (RT-)PCR dry reagents; thermal cycling; and detection. The PCR amplicons are labeled with digoxigenin and biotin and transmitted onto a lateral flow strip, where the target analytes bind to a test line consisting of immobilized avidin-D. The immobilized nucleic acids are labeled with up-converting phosphor (UCP) reporter particles. The operation of the cassette is automatically controlled by an analyzer that provides pouch and valve actuation with electrical motors and heating for the thermal cycling. The functionality of the device is demonstrated by detecting the presence of bacterial B.Cereus, viral armored RNA HIV, and HIV I virus in saliva samples. The cassette and actuator described here can be used to detect other diseases as well as the presence of bacterial and viral pathogens in the water supply and other fluids. PMID:20401537

  16. Ground Testing of the EMCS Seed Cassette for Biocompatibility with the Cellular Slime Mold, Dictyostelium Discoideum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanely, Julia C.; Reinsch, Sigrid; Myers, Zachary A.; Freeman, John; Steele, Marianne K.; Sun, Gwo-Shing; Heathcote, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The European Modular Cultivation System, EMCS, was developed by ESA for plant experiments. To expand the use of flight verified hardware for various model organisms, we performed ground experiments to determine whether ARC EMCS Seed Cassettes could be adapted for use with cellular slime mold for future space flight experiments. Dictyostelium is a cellular slime mold that can exist both as a single-celled independent organism and as a part of a multicellular colony which functions as a unit (pseudoplasmodium). Under certain stress conditions, individual amoebae will aggregate to form multicellular structures. Developmental pathways are very similar to those found in Eukaryotic organisms, making this a uniquely interesting organism for use in genetic studies. Dictyostelium has been used as a genetic model organism for prior space flight experiments. Due to the formation of spores that are resistant to unfavorable conditions such as desiccation, Dictyostelium is also a good candidate for use in the EMCS Seed Cassettes. The growth substratum in the cassettes is a gridded polyether sulfone (PES) membrane. A blotter beneath the PES membranes contains dried growth medium. The goals of this study were to (1) verify that Dictyostelium are capable of normal growth and development on PES membranes, (2) develop a method for dehydration of Dictyostelium spores with successful recovery and development after rehydration, and (3) successful mock rehydration experiments in cassettes. Our results show normal developmental progression in two strains of Dictyostelium discoideum on PES membranes with a bacterial food source. We have successfully performed a mock rehydration of spores with developmental progression from aggregation to slug formation, and production of morphologically normal spores within 9 days of rehydration. Our results indicate that experiments on the ISS using the slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum could potentially be performed in the flight verified hardware of the EMCS ARC Seed Cassettes.

  17. Use of cassette dosing to enhance the throughput of rat brain microdialysis studies.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Gauri; Sun, Kefeng; Liederer, Bianca M; Ding, Xiao; Liu, Xingrong

    2015-07-01

    This study was designed to increase the throughput of rat brain microdialysis studies by administration of compounds as a cassette as opposed to discrete study. Eight compounds (carbamazepine, citalopram, desmethylclozapine, diphenhydramine, gabapentin, metoclopramide, naltrexone, and stavudine) were selected and administered as an intravenous bolus dose at 0.5-3.3 mg/kg each followed by an intravenous infusion at 1 mg/kg per hour for 6 hours in rats in a cassette or discrete dosing. The dialysate, plasma, brain, and cerebrospinal fluid were collected and analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The microdialysis probe recovery was determined by an in vitro gain method. The recovery between the cassette and discrete dosing was similar, with an average of 1.0 ± 0.10-fold difference. The stavudine interstitial fluid (ISF) concentration, as measured by brain microdialysis, was below the low limit of quantitation and was excluded from the analyses. The ratios of ISF concentration to unbound plasma concentration were within 2-fold for six of the remaining seven compounds, with an average of 0.92 ± 0.51-fold difference between the cassette and discrete methods. The ratios of ISF concentration to unbound brain concentration, as measured by the brain homogenate method, were also similar, with a 1.1 ± 0.7-fold difference. In addition, the ratios of ISF to cerebrospinal fluid concentrations were similar, with a 1.5 ± 0.6-fold difference. The results from this study support the use of a cassette dosing approach to enhance the throughput of rat brain microdialysis studies in drug discovery. PMID:25943358

  18. An integrated, self-contained microfluidic cassette for isolation, amplification, and detection of nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dafeng; Mauk, Michael; Qiu, Xianbo; Liu, Changchun; Kim, Jitae; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Ongagna, Serge; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L. A. M.

    2010-01-01

    A self-contained, integrated, disposable, sample-to-answer, polycarbonate microfluidic cassette for nucleic acid—based detection of pathogens at the point of care was designed, constructed, and tested. The cassette comprises on-chip sample lysis, nucleic acid isolation, enzymatic amplification (polymerase chain reaction and, when needed, reverse transcription), amplicon labeling, and detection. On-chip pouches and valves facilitate fluid flow control. All the liquids and dry reagents needed for the various reactions are pre-stored in the cassette. The liquid reagents are stored in flexible pouches formed on the chip surface. Dry (RT-)PCR reagents are pre-stored in the thermal cycling, reaction chamber. The process operations include sample introduction; lysis of cells and viruses; solid-phase extraction, concentration, and purification of nucleic acids from the lysate; elution of the nucleic acids into a thermal cycling chamber and mixing with pre-stored (RT-)PCR dry reagents; thermal cycling; and detection. The PCR amplicons are labeled with digoxigenin and biotin and transmitted onto a lateral flow strip, where the target analytes bind to a test line consisting of immobilized avidin-D. The immobilized nucleic acids are labeled with up-converting phosphor (UCP) reporter particles. The operation of the cassette is automatically controlled by an analyzer that provides pouch and valve actuation with electrical motors and heating for the thermal cycling. The functionality of the device is demonstrated by detecting the presence of bacterial B.Cereus, viral armored RNA HIV, and HIV I virus in saliva samples. The cassette and actuator described here can be used to detect other diseases as well as the presence of bacterial and viral pathogens in the water supply and other fluids. PMID:20401537

  19. Optimized human factor IX expression cassettes for hepatic-directed gene therapy of hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ru; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Saijuan

    2015-03-01

    Gene therapy provides a potential cure for hemophilia B, and significant progress has been achieved in liver-directed gene transfer mediated by adeno-associated viral vectors. Recent clinical trials involving the use of a self-complementary adeno-associated virus serotype 8-human codon-optimized factor IX (AAV8-hFIXco) vector demonstrated encouraging efficacy with hFIX expression stabilized at 1% to 6% of normal level in patients, but safety concerns related to high vector doses are still present. Thus, further improvement of AAV vectors and hFIX expression cassette may positively contribute to the ultimate success of hemophilia B gene therapy. In this study, to obtain a higher expression level of hFIX that potentiates the coagulant capacity of recipients, human FIX expression vector was optimized by upgrading the codon adaption index and adjusting the GC content, inserting a Kozak sequence (GCCACC), and introducing a gain-of-function mutation, R338L (FIX Padua). The efficiency of the published and the presently constructed cassettes was compared through in vivo screening. In addition, the regulatory elements that control the FIX gene expression in these cassettes were screened for liver-specific effectiveness. Among all the constructed cassettes, scAAV-Pre-hFIXco-SIH-R338L, which was the construct under the control of the prothrombin enhancer and prealbumin promoter, resulted in the highest level of coagulant activity, and the expression levels of two constructed cassettes (scAAV-Chi-hFIXco-SIH-R338L and scAAV-Pre-hFIXco-SIH-R338L) were also higher than that of the published cassette (scAAV-LP1-hFIXco-SJ). In summary, our strategies led to a substantial increase in hFIX expression at the protein level or a remarkably elevated coagulant activity. Thus, these reconstructs of hFIX with AAV vector may potentially contribute to the creation of an efficacious gene therapy of hemophilia B. PMID:25663062

  20. Light without substrate amendment: the bacterial luciferase gene cassette as a mammalian bioreporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Dan M.; Xu, Tingting; Smartt, Abby E.; Jegier, Pat; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-06-01

    Bioluminescent production represents a facile method for bioreporter detection in mammalian tissues. The lack of endogenous bioluminescent reactions in these tissues allows for high signal to noise ratios even at low signal strength compared to fluorescent signal detection. While the luciferase enzymes commonly employed for bioluminescent detection are those from class Insecta (firefly and click beetle luciferases), these are handicapped in that they require concurrent administration of a luciferin compound to elicit a bioluminescent signal. The bacterial luciferase (lux) gene cassette offers the advantages common to other bioluminescent proteins, but is simultaneously capable of synthesizing its own luciferin substrates using endogenously available cellular compounds. The longstanding shortcoming of the lux cassette has been its recalcitrance to function in the mammalian cellular environment. This paper will present an overview of the work completed to date to overcome this limitation and provide examples of mammalian lux-based bioreporter technologies that could provide the framework for advanced, biomedically relevant real-time sensor development.

  1. A new efficient gene disruption cassette for repeated use in budding yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Gldener, U; Heck, S; Fielder, T; Beinhauer, J; Hegemann, J H

    1996-01-01

    The dominant kanr marker gene plays an important role in gene disruption experiments in budding yeast, as this marker can be used in a variety of yeast strains lacking the conventional yeast markers. We have developed a loxP-kanMX-loxP gene disruption cassette, which combines the advantages of the heterologous kanr marker with those from the Cre-lox P recombination system. This disruption cassette integrates with high efficiency via homologous integration at the correct genomic locus (routinely 70%). Upon expression of the Cre recombinase the kanMX module is excised by an efficient recombination between the loxP sites, leaving behind a single loxP site at the chromosomal locus. This system allows repeated use of the kanr marker gene and will be of great advantage for the functional analysis of gene families. PMID:8692690

  2. Analysis of Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec in BD GeneOhm MRSA Assay-Negative Strains

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Li, Shanshuang; Misawa, Shigeki; Kondo, Shigemi; Miida, Takashi; Ohsaka, Akimichi; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    The BD GeneOhm MRSA assay could identify methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains at a high ratio (97.8%). Analysis of 11 assay-negative MRSA strains suggested that insertion of non-mec staphylococcal cassette chromosome elements (SCCs) downstream of orfX, and carriage of SCCmecs with a left extremity that cannot be detected by the kit, might lead to their being given an incorrect negative status. PMID:23571551

  3. Development of a low-resource RNA extraction cassette based on surface tension valves.

    PubMed

    Bordelon, Hali; Adams, Nicholas M; Klemm, Amy S; Russ, Patricia K; Williams, John V; Talbot, H Keipp; Wright, David W; Haselton, Frederick R

    2011-06-01

    Nucleic acid-based diagnostics are highly sensitive and specific, but are easily disrupted by the presence of interferents in biological samples. In a laboratory or hospital setting, the influence of these interferents can be minimized using an RNA or DNA extraction procedure prior to analysis. However, in low-resource settings, limited access to specialized instrumentation and trained personnel presents challenges that impede sample preparation. We have developed a self-contained nucleic acid extraction cassette suitable for operation in a low-resource setting. This simple design contains processing solutions preloaded within a continuous length of 1.6 mm inner diameter Tygon tubing. Processing solutions are separated by air gaps and held in place during processing by the surface tension forces at the liquid-air interface, viz. surface tension valves. Nucleic acids preferentially adsorbed to silica-coated magnetic particles are separated from sample interferents using an external magnet to transfer the nucleic acid biomarker through successive solutions to precipitate, wash and elute in the final cassette solution. The efficiency of the extraction cassette was evaluated using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) following extraction of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) RNA. RNA was recovered from TE buffer or from lysates of RSV infected HEp-2 cells with 55 and 33% efficiency, respectively, of the Qiagen RNeasy kit. Recovery of RSV RNA from RSV infected HEp-2 cells was similar at 30% of the RNeasy kit. An overall limit of detection after extraction was determined to be nearly identical (97.5%) to a laboratory-based commercially available kit. These results indicate that this extraction cassette design has the potential to be an effective sample preparation device suitable for use in a low-resource setting. PMID:21604768

  4. Checking of unit dose cassettes by pharmacy technicians at three Minnesota hospitals.

    PubMed

    Woller, T W; Stuart, J; Vrabel, R; Senst, B

    1991-09-01

    A pilot project in which pharmacy technicians were trained to check unit dose cassettes filled by other technicians is described. With the approval of the state board of pharmacy, the Minnesota Society of Hospital Pharmacists (MSHP) conducted the nine-month project in three hospitals with different types of unit dose drug distribution systems. Twenty-seven technicians underwent didactic and practical training and were then validated as checkers if they scored 99.8% accuracy in checking carts into which errors had been deliberately introduced by the pharmacist auditor. The performance of validated technicians was audited monthly, and failed audits had to be repeated. Participating technicians did not check the preparation of first doses or extemporaneously prepared doses. In 100,000 doses audited, 60 errors by the validated checkers were identified. Of six technicians who failed a monthly audit, five passed a repeat audit. Pharmacists at the participating hospitals documented time they spent on clinical activities that would have been spent checking cassettes. In December 1990 a one-year extension of the project, expanded to 10 hospitals, began. With strict quality control measures, specially selected and trained pharmacy technicians performed unit dose cassette checking with an accuracy of at least 99.94%. PMID:1928139

  5. Site-specific recombination in the chicken genome using Flipase recombinase-mediated cassette exchange.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Jo; Lee, Hyung Chul; Kim, Young Min; Hwang, Young Sun; Park, Young Hyun; Park, Tae Sub; Han, Jae Yong

    2016-02-01

    Targeted genome recombination has been applied in diverse research fields and has a wide range of possible applications. In particular, the discovery of specific loci in the genome that support robust and ubiquitous expression of integrated genes and the development of genome-editing technology have facilitated rapid advances in various scientific areas. In this study, we produced transgenic (TG) chickens that can induce recombinase-mediated gene cassette exchange (RMCE), one of the site-specific recombination technologies, and confirmed RMCE in TG chicken-derived cells. As a result, we established TG chicken lines that have, Flipase (Flp) recognition target (FRT) pairs in the chicken genome, mediated by piggyBac transposition. The transgene integration patterns were diverse in each TG chicken line, and the integration diversity resulted in diverse levels of expression of exogenous genes in each tissue of the TG chickens. In addition, the replaced gene cassette was expressed successfully and maintained by RMCE in the FRT predominant loci of TG chicken-derived cells. These results indicate that targeted genome recombination technology with RMCE could be adaptable to TG chicken models and that the technology would be applicable to specific gene regulation by cis-element insertion and customized expression of functional proteins at predicted levels without epigenetic influence.-Lee, H. J., Lee, H. C., Kim, Y. M., Hwang, Y. S., Park, Y. H., Park, T. S., Han, J. Y. Site-specific recombination in the chicken genome using Flipase recombinase-mediated cassette exchange. PMID:26443821

  6. Modulation of Gene Expression by Polymer Nanocapsule Delivery of DNA Cassettes Encoding Small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming; Wen, Jing; Liang, Min; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2015-01-01

    Small RNAs, including siRNAs, gRNAs and miRNAs, modulate gene expression and serve as potential therapies for human diseases. Delivery to target cells remains the fundamental limitation for use of these RNAs in humans. To address this challenge, we have developed a nanocapsule delivery technology that encapsulates small DNA molecules encoding RNAs into a small (30 nm) polymer nanocapsule. For proof of concept, we transduced DNA expression cassettes for three small RNAs. In one application, the DNA cassette encodes an shRNA transcriptional unit that downregulates CCR5 and protects from HIV-1 infection. The DNA cassette nanocapsules were further engineered for timed release of the DNA cargo for prolonged knockdown of CCR5. Secondly, the nanocapsules provide an efficient means for delivery of gRNAs in the CRISPR/Cas9 system to mutate integrated HIV-1. Finally, delivery of microRNA-125b to mobilized human CD34+ cells enhances survival and expansion of the CD34+ cells in culture. PMID:26035832

  7. Genomic donor cassette sharing during VLRA and VLRC assembly in jawless vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Das, Sabyasachi; Li, Jianxu; Holland, Stephen J; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Hirano, Masayuki; Schorpp, Michael; Aravind, L; Cooper, Max D; Boehm, Thomas

    2014-10-14

    Lampreys possess two T-like lymphocyte lineages that express either variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) A or VLRC antigen receptors. VLRA(+) and VLRC(+) lymphocytes share many similarities with the two principal T-cell lineages of jawed vertebrates expressing the ?? and ?? T-cell receptors (TCRs). During the assembly of VLR genes, several types of genomic cassettes are inserted, in step-wise fashion, into incomplete germ-line genes to generate the mature forms of antigen receptor genes. Unexpectedly, the structurally variable components of VLRA and VLRC receptors often possess partially identical sequences; this phenomenon of module sharing between these two VLR isotypes occurs in both lampreys and hagfishes. By contrast, VLRA and VLRC molecules typically do not share their building blocks with the structurally analogous VLRB receptors that are expressed by B-like lymphocytes. Our studies reveal that VLRA and VLRC germ-line genes are situated in close proximity to each other in the lamprey genome and indicate the interspersed arrangement of isotype-specific and shared genomic donor cassettes; these features may facilitate the shared cassette use. The genomic structure of the VLRA/VLRC locus in lampreys is reminiscent of the interspersed nature of the TCRA/TCRD locus in jawed vertebrates that also allows the sharing of some variable gene segments during the recombinatorial assembly of TCR genes. PMID:25228758

  8. Conceptual Design Studies of the KSTAR Bay-Nm Cassette and Thomson Scattering Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Feder, R.; Ellis, R.; Johnson, D.; Park, H.; Lee, H. G.

    2005-09-26

    A Multi-Channel Thomson Scattering System viewing the edge and core of the KSTAR plasma will be installed at the mid-plane port Bay-N. An engineering design study was undertaken at PPPL in collaboration with the Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI) to determine the optimal optics and cassette design. Design criteria included environmental, mechanical and optical factors. All of the optical design options have common design features; the Thomson Scattering laser, an in-vacuum shutter, a quartz heat shield and primary vacuum window, a set of optical elements and a fiber optic bundle. Neutron radiation damage was a major factor in the choice of competing lens-based and mirror-based optical designs. Both the mirror based design and the lens design are constrained by physical limits of the Bay-N cassette and interference with the Bay-N micro-wave launcher. The cassette will contain the optics and a rail system for maintenance of the optics.

  9. Linear friction weld process monitoring of fixture cassette deformations using empirical mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, O. J.; Gibson, C.; Wilson, P.; Lohse, N.; Popov, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Due to its inherent advantages, linear friction welding is a solid-state joining process of increasing importance to the aerospace, automotive, medical and power generation equipment industries. Tangential oscillations and forge stroke during the burn-off phase of the joining process introduce essential dynamic forces, which can also be detrimental to the welding process. Since burn-off is a critical phase in the manufacturing stage, process monitoring is fundamental for quality and stability control purposes. This study aims to improve workholding stability through the analysis of fixture cassette deformations. Methods and procedures for process monitoring are developed and implemented in a fail-or-pass assessment system for fixture cassette deformations during the burn-off phase. Additionally, the de-noised signals are compared to results from previous production runs. The observed deformations as a consequence of the forces acting on the fixture cassette are measured directly during the welding process. Data on the linear friction-welding machine are acquired and de-noised using empirical mode decomposition, before the burn-off phase is extracted. This approach enables a direct, objective comparison of the signal features with trends from previous successful welds. The capacity of the whole process monitoring system is validated and demonstrated through the analysis of a large number of signals obtained from welding experiments.

  10. Highly efficient integration and expression of piggyBac-derived cassettes in the honeybee (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Christina; Theilenberg, Eva; Müller-Borg, Marion; Gempe, Tanja; Beye, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Honeybees (Apis mellifera), which are important pollinators of plants, display remarkable individual behaviors that collectively contribute to the organization of a complex society. Advances in dissecting the complex processes of honeybee behavior have been limited in the recent past due to a lack of genetic manipulation tools. These tools are difficult to apply in honeybees because the unit of reproduction is the colony, and many interesting phenotypes are developmentally specified at later stages. Here, we report highly efficient integration and expression of piggyBac-derived cassettes in the honeybee. We demonstrate that 27 and 20% of queens stably transmitted two different expression cassettes to their offspring, which is a 6- to 30-fold increase in efficiency compared with those generally reported in other insect species. This high efficiency implies that an average beekeeping facility with a limited number of colonies can apply this tool. We demonstrated that the cassette stably and efficiently expressed marker genes in progeny under either an artificial or an endogenous promoter. This evidence of efficient expression encourages the use of this system to inhibit gene functions through RNAi in specific tissues and developmental stages by using various promoters. We also showed that the transgenic marker could be used to select transgenic offspring to be employed to facilitate the building of transgenic colonies via the haploid males. We present here the first to our knowledge genetic engineering tool that will efficiently allow for the systematic detection and better understanding of processes underlying the biology of honeybees. PMID:24821811

  11. Product variability of the 'cineole cassette' monoterpene synthases of related Nicotiana species.

    PubMed

    Fhnrich, Anke; Krause, Katrin; Piechulla, Birgit

    2011-11-01

    Nicotiana species of the section Alatae characteristically emit the floral scent compounds of the 'cineole cassette' comprising 1,8-cineole, limonene, myrcene, ?-pinene, ?-pinene, sabinene, and ?-terpineol. We successfully isolated genes of Nicotiana alata and Nicotiana langsdorfii that encoded enzymes, which produced the characteristic monoterpenes of this 'cineole cassette' with ?-terpineol being most abundant in the volatile spectra. The amino acid sequences of both terpineol synthases were 99% identical. The enzymes cluster in a monophyletic branch together with the closely related cineole synthase of Nicotiana suaveolens and monoterpene synthase 1 of Solanum lycopersicum. The cyclization reactions (?-terpineol to 1,8-cineole) of the terpineol synthases of N. alata and N. langsdorfii were less efficient compared to the 'cineole cassette' monoterpene synthases of Arabidopsis thaliana, N. suaveolens, Salvia fruticosa, Salvia officinalis, and Citrus unshiu. The terpineol synthases of N. alata and N. langsdorfii were localized in pistils and in the adaxial and abaxial epidermis of the petals. The enzyme activities reached their maxima at the second day after anthesis when flowers were fully opened and the enzyme activity in N. alata was highest at the transition from day to night (diurnal rhythm). PMID:21527560

  12. Highly efficient integration and expression of piggyBac-derived cassettes in the honeybee (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Schulte, Christina; Theilenberg, Eva; Mller-Borg, Marion; Gempe, Tanja; Beye, Martin

    2014-06-17

    Honeybees (Apis mellifera), which are important pollinators of plants, display remarkable individual behaviors that collectively contribute to the organization of a complex society. Advances in dissecting the complex processes of honeybee behavior have been limited in the recent past due to a lack of genetic manipulation tools. These tools are difficult to apply in honeybees because the unit of reproduction is the colony, and many interesting phenotypes are developmentally specified at later stages. Here, we report highly efficient integration and expression of piggyBac-derived cassettes in the honeybee. We demonstrate that 27 and 20% of queens stably transmitted two different expression cassettes to their offspring, which is a 6- to 30-fold increase in efficiency compared with those generally reported in other insect species. This high efficiency implies that an average beekeeping facility with a limited number of colonies can apply this tool. We demonstrated that the cassette stably and efficiently expressed marker genes in progeny under either an artificial or an endogenous promoter. This evidence of efficient expression encourages the use of this system to inhibit gene functions through RNAi in specific tissues and developmental stages by using various promoters. We also showed that the transgenic marker could be used to select transgenic offspring to be employed to facilitate the building of transgenic colonies via the haploid males. We present here the first to our knowledge genetic engineering tool that will efficiently allow for the systematic detection and better understanding of processes underlying the biology of honeybees. PMID:24821811

  13. Modulation of Gene Expression by Polymer Nanocapsule Delivery of DNA Cassettes Encoding Small RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Min; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Small RNAs, including siRNAs, gRNAs and miRNAs, modulate gene expression and serve as potential therapies for human diseases. Delivery to target cells remains the fundamental limitation for use of these RNAs in humans. To address this challenge, we have developed a nanocapsule delivery technology that encapsulates small DNA molecules encoding RNAs into a small (30nm) polymer nanocapsule. For proof of concept, we transduced DNA expression cassettes for three small RNAs. In one application, the DNA cassette encodes an shRNA transcriptional unit that downregulates CCR5 and protects from HIV-1 infection. The DNA cassette nanocapsules were further engineered for timed release of the DNA cargo for prolonged knockdown of CCR5. Secondly, the nanocapsules provide an efficient means for delivery of gRNAs in the CRISPR/Cas9 system to mutate integrated HIV-1. Finally, delivery of microRNA-125b to mobilized human CD34+ cells enhances survival and expansion of the CD34+ cells in culture. PMID:26035832

  14. Viral Expression Cassette Elements to Enhance Transgene Target Specificity and Expression in Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Sara Kathleen; Rivera-Soto, Ricardo; Gray, Steven James

    2015-01-01

    Over the last five years, the number of clinical trials involving AAV (adeno-associated virus) and lentiviral vectors continue to increase by about 150 trials each year. For continued success, AAV and lentiviral expression cassettes need to be designed to meet each disease's specific needs. This review discusses how viral vector expression cassettes can be engineered with elements to enhance target specificity and increase transgene expression. The key differences relating to target specificity between ubiquitous and tissue-specific promoters are discussed, as well as how endogenous miRNAs and their target sequences have been used to restrict transgene expression. Specifically, relevant studies indicating how cis-acting elements such as introns, WPRE, polyadenylation signals, and the CMV enhancer are highlighted to show their utility for enhancing transgene expression in gene therapy applications. All discussion bears in mind that expression cassettes have space constraints. In conclusion, this review can serve as a menu of vector genome design elements and their cost in terms of space to thoughtfully engineer viral vectors for gene therapy. PMID:25636961

  15. Ubiquitin promoter-terminator cassette promotes genetically stable expression of the taste-modifying protein miraculin in transgenic lettuce.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Tadayoshi; Shohael, Abdullah Mohammad; Kim, You-Wang; Yano, Megumu; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    Lettuce is a commercially important leafy vegetable that is cultivated worldwide, and it is also a target crop for plant factories. In this study, lettuce was selected as an alternative platform for recombinant miraculin production because of its fast growth, agronomic value, and wide availability. The taste-modifying protein miraculin is a glycoprotein extracted from the red berries of the West African native shrub Richadella dulcifica. Because of its limited natural availability, many attempts have been made to produce this protein in suitable alternative hosts. We produced transgenic lettuce with miraculin gene driven either by the ubiquitin promoter/terminator cassette from lettuce or a 35S promoter/nos terminator cassette. Miraculin gene expression and miraculin accumulation in both cassettes were compared by quantitative real-time PCR analysis, Western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression level of the miraculin gene and protein in transgenic lettuce was higher and more genetically stable in the ubiquitin promoter/terminator cassette than in the 35S promoter/nos terminator cassette. These results demonstrated that the ubiquitin promoter/terminator cassette is an efficient platform for the genetically stable expression of the miraculin protein in lettuce and hence this platform is of benefit for recombinant miraculin production on a commercial scale. PMID:21830129

  16. Evidence for dynamic exchange of qac gene cassettes between class 1 integrons and other integrons in freshwater biofilms.

    PubMed

    Gillings, Michael R; Holley, Marita P; Stokes, H W

    2009-06-01

    Class 1 integrons carried by pathogens have acquired over 100 different gene cassettes encoding resistance to antimicrobial compounds, helping to generate a crisis in the management of infectious disease. It is presumed that these cassettes originated from environmental bacteria, but exchange of gene cassettes has surprisingly never been demonstrated outside laboratory or clinical contexts. We aimed to identify a natural environment where such exchanges might occur, and determine the phylogenetic range of participating integrons. Here we examine freshwater biofilms and show that families of cassettes conferring resistance to quaternary ammonium compounds (qac) are found on class 1 integrons identical to those from clinical contexts, on sequence variants of class 1 integrons only known from natural environments, and on other diverse classes of integrons only known from the chromosomes of soil and freshwater Proteobacteria. We conclude that gene cassettes might be readily shared between different integron classes found in environmental, commensal and pathogenic bacteria. This suggests that class 1 integrons in pathogens have access to a vast pool of gene cassettes, any of which could confer a phenotype of clinical relevance. Exploration of this resource might allow identification of resistance or virulence genes before they become part of multi-drug-resistant human pathogens. PMID:19459951

  17. Use of the cassette-dosing approach to assess brain penetration in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingrong; Ding, Xiao; Deshmukh, Gauri; Liederer, Bianca M; Hop, Cornelis E C A

    2012-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the cassette dosing method in determination of brain-to-plasma concentration ratio (area under the concentration-time profiles for plasma/area under the concentration-time profiles for brain, K(p)). Eleven model compounds, amprenavir, citalopram, digoxin, elacridar, imatinib, (3S,6S,12aS)-1,2,3,4,6,7,12,12a-octahydro-9-methoxy-6-(2-methylpropyl)-1,4-dioxopyrazino[1',2':1,6]pyrido[3,4-b]indole-3-propanoic acid 1,1-dimethylethyl ester (Ko143), loperamide, prazosin, quinidine, sulfasalazine, and verapamil, were selected to compare their K(p) determined from discrete dosing in wild-type mice and their K(p) from cassette dosing in wild-type, Mdr1a/1b(-/-), Bcrp1(-/-), and Mdr1a/1b(-/-)/Bcrp1(-/-) mice at 1 to 3 mg/kg. The mice brain and plasma were collected at 0.25, 1, and 3 h and were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods. The K(p) determined from discrete dosing versus cassette dosing in the wild-type mice were within 2-fold for all the compounds except sulfasalazine and Ko143. The brain concentrations of sulfasalazine and Ko143 and the plasma concentrations of Ko143 were below the lower limit of quantitation. In addition, the K(p) values estimated by mass spectrometry responses, namely the ratio of compound peak area to internal standard peak area, were within 2-fold of the K(p) observed from the actual concentrations. Furthermore, the ratios of K(p) in Mdr1a/1b(-/-), Bcrp1(-/-), and Mdr1a/1b(-/-)/Bcrp1(-/-) mice versus the K(p) in the wild-type mice from cassette dosing were consistent with the ones reported in the literature where the compounds were dosed discretely. These results demonstrate that drug-drug interactions at the blood-brain barrier are unlikely at a subcutaneous dose of 1 to 3 mg/kg and support the use of the cassette dosing approach to assess brain penetration in drug discovery. PMID:22328585

  18. Enhanced performance of methamphetamine lateral flow cassettes using an electronic lateral flow reader.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jerome P; Sammons, Deborah L; Robertson, Shirley A; Snawder, John E

    2015-01-01

    Surface contamination from methamphetamine in meth labs continues to be a problem. We had previously developed a lateral flow assay cassette for field detection of methamphetamine contamination that is commercially available and has been used by a number of groups to assess contamination. This cassette uses the complete disappearance of the test line as an end point for detection of 50 ng/100 cm2 of methamphetamine contamination for surface sampling with cotton swabs. In the present study, we further evaluate the response of the cassettes using an electronic lateral flow reader to measure the intensities of the test and control lines. The cassettes were capable of detecting 0.25 ng/ml for calibration solutions. For 100 cm2 ceramic tiles that were spiked with methamphetamine and wiped with cotton-tipped wooden swabs wetted in assay/sampling buffer, 1 ng/tile was detected using the reader. Semi-quantitative results can be produced over the range 0-10 ng/ml for calibration solutions and 0-25 ng/tile for spiked tiles using either a 4-parameter logistic fit of test line intensity versus concentration or spiked mass or the ratio of the control line to the test line intensity fit to concentration or spiked mass. Recovery from the tiles was determined to be about 30% using the fitted curves. Comparison of the control line to the test line was also examined as a possible visual detection end point and it was found that the control line became more intense than the test line at 0.5 to 1 ng/ml for calibration solutions or 1 to 2 ng/tile for spiked tiles. Thus the lateral flow cassettes for methamphetamine have the potential to produce more sensitive semi-quantitative results if an electronic lateral flow reader is used and can be more sensitive for detection if the comparison of the control line to the test line is used as the visual end point. PMID:25379615

  19. Characterization of integrons and their cassettes in Escherichia coli and Salmonella isolates from poultry in Korea.

    PubMed

    Dessie, Hirut Kidie; Bae, Dong Hwa; Lee, Young Ju

    2013-11-01

    Ninety-nine Escherichia coli and 33 Salmonella isolates were assessed for antimicrobial susceptibility (disc diffusion test). Sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes were identified through PCR, and class 1 and class 2 integrons with resistance gene cassettes were identified with PCR followed by sequencing. Salmonella (63.6%) and E. coli (85.8%) isolates were multidrug resistant (resistance to 3 or more antimicrobials), and the highest incidences of resistance were observed for tetracycline, nalidixic acid, and sulfamethoxazole. The sul1, sul2, tetA, and tetB resistance determinant genes were predominant in E. coli, whereas only sul2 and tetA were identified in Salmonella isolates. In the E. coli isolates, 54 (54.5%) class 1 integrons, 6 (6.1%) class 2 integrons, and 5 (5.1%) class 1 and class 2 integrons together were detected, whereas only 3 (9.1%) integrons were found in the Salmonella serovars. Around 87% of the integrons in E. coli harbored resistance gene cassettes conferring resistance to streptomycin/spectinomycin (aadA, aminoglycoside resistance gene), trimethoprim (dfrA, dihydrofolate reductase gene), streptothricin [sat1 and sat2 (streptothricin acetyltransferase), and estX (putative esterases)]. The most common gene cassettes were aadA1+dfrA1 and dfrA1+sat2+aadA1 in class 1 and class 2 integrons, respectively. Other cassettes including aadA5+dfrA7, dfrA12+aadA2, aadA2+aadA1+dfrA12, and aadA5+aadA2/dfrA7 were also identified. Among the Salmonella serovars, Salmonella Malmoe harbored aadA1+dfrA1 and dfrA12+sat2+aadA1 genes. The aadA1, aadA2, sat2, and dfrA1 had wide variation in similarity among themselves and from previously reported genes worldwide. The diverse gene cassettes could be responsible for the prominent resistance profiles observed and a potential source for dissemination of antimicrobial resistance determinants to other bacteria. PMID:24135609

  20. Enhanced performance of methamphetamine lateral flow cassettes using an electronic lateral flow reader

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jerome P.; Sammons, Deborah L.; Robertson, Shirley A.; Snawder, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Surface contamination from methamphetamine in meth labs continues to be a problem. We had previously developed a lateral flow assay cassette for field detection of methamphetamine contamination that is commercially available and has been used by a number of groups to assess contamination. This cassette uses the complete disappearance of the test line as an end point for detection of 50 ng/100 cm2 of methamphetamine contamination for surface sampling with cotton swabs. In the present study, we further evaluate the response of the cassettes using an electronic lateral flow reader to measure the intensities of the test and control lines. The cassettes were capable of detecting 0.25 ng/ml for calibration solutions. For 100 cm2 ceramic tiles that were spiked with methamphetamine and wiped with cotton tipped wooden swabs wetted in assay/sampling buffer, 1 ng/tile was detected using the reader. Semi-quantitative results can be produced over the range 010 ng/ml for calibration solutions and 025 ng/tile for spiked tiles using either a 4-parameter logistic fit of test line intensity versus concentration or spiked mass or the ratio of the control line to the test line intensity fit to concentration or spiked mass. Recovery from the tiles was determined to be about 30% using the fitted curves. Comparison of the control line to the test line was also examined as a possible visual detection end point and it was found that the control line became more intense than the test line at 0.5 to 1 ng/ml for calibration solutions or 1 to 2 ng/tile for spiked tiles. Thus the lateral flow cassettes for methamphetamine have the potential to produce more sensitive semi-quantitative results if an electronic lateral flow reader is used and can be more sensitive for detection if the comparison of the control line to the test line is used as the visual end point. PMID:25379615

  1. Development of an efficient cis-trans-cis ribozyme cassette to inactivate plant genes.

    PubMed

    Bussire, Frdric; Led, Sylvain; Girard, Marianne; Hroux, Maryse; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Matton, Daniel P

    2003-11-01

    Inactivation of a targeted gene is one of the main strategies used to understand their precise cellular role. In plants, apart from chemical or physical mutagenesis and random insertions of DNA elements followed by screening for a desired phenotype, the most common strategy to inhibit the expression of a given gene involves RNA silencing. This can be achieved either through antisense suppression, sense over-expression leading to co-suppression, or expression of double-stranded DNA constructs (dsRNA). The use of ribozymes to inhibit gene product accumulation has only been occasionally attempted, mainly because of the more complex genetic engineering procedure involved, although the specificity of ribozymes can be an important factor when targeting close members of a gene family. We report here the development of a new cis-acting ribozyme cassette for the production of RNAs with desired termini. Attention to many details has been brought in order to provide a powerful procedure for plant application. For example, ultrastable GNRA tetraloops were substituted for both loops II and III of cis-acting hammerhead sequences, thereby favouring folding into the catalytically active structure that results in the self-cleavage of all transcripts. We demonstrate the usefulness of this cassette by producing a ribozyme that cleaves in trans, originally embedded in the cis-acting self-cleaving cassette. The activity of the cis-trans-cis construct, was demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, in transgenic plants with the specific cleavage of an mRNA encoding a 2-oxo-glutarate-dependant dioxygenase predominantly expressed in pistils tissues and in leaves, from the wild potato Solanum chacoense. PMID:17134401

  2. New cassettes for single-step drug resistance and prototrophic marker switching in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Construction of multiply mutated strains for genetic interaction analysis and of strains carrying different epitope tags at multiple open reading frames for testing protein localization, abundance and protein-protein interactions is hampered by the availability of a sufficient number of different selectable markers. Moreover, strains with single gene deletions or tags often already exist in strain collections; for historical reasons these will mostly carry the ura4(+) gene or the G418-resistance kanMX as marker. Because it is rather cumbersome to produce multiply deleted or tagged strains using the same marker, or to completely reconstruct a particular strain with a different marker, single-step exchange protocols of markers are a time-saving alternative. In recent years, dominant drug resistance markers (DDRMs) against clonNAT, hygromycin B and bleomycin have been adapted and successfully used in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The corresponding DDRM cassettes, natMX, hphMX and bleMX, carry the TEF promotor and terminator sequences from Ashbya gossypii as kanMX; this provides flanking homologies to enable single-step marker swapping by homologous gene targeting. To expand this very useful toolset for single-step marker exchange, I constructed MX cassettes containing the nutritional markers arg3(+) , his3(+) , leu1(+) and ura4(+) . Furthermore, a set of constructs was created to enable single-step exchange of ura4(+) to kanMX6, natMX4 and hphMX4. The functionality of the cassettes is demonstrated by successful single-step marker swapping at several loci. These constructs allow straightforward and rapid remarking of existing ura4(+) - and MX-deleted and -tagged strains. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26305038

  3. Hygromycin B and apramycin antibiotic resistance cassettes for use in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Andrew; Gaynor, Erin C

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni genetic manipulation is restricted by the limited number of antibiotic resistance cassettes available for use in this diarrheal pathogen. In this study, two antibiotic resistance cassettes were developed, encoding for hygromycin B and apramycin resistance, for use in mutagenesis or for selection of gene expression and complementation constructs in C. jejuni. First, the marker genes were successfully modified to allow for insertional mutagenesis or deletion of a gene-of-interest, and were bracketed with restriction sites for the facilitation of site-specific cloning. These hygromycin B and apramycin markers are encoded by plasmids pAC1H and pAC1A, respectively. We also modified an insertional gene-delivery vector to create pRRH and pRRA, containing the hygromycin B and apramycin resistance genes, and 3 unique restriction sites for the directional introduction of genes into the conserved multi-copy rRNA gene clusters of the C. jejuni chromosome. We determined the effective antibiotic concentrations required for selection, and established that no harmful effects or fitness costs were associated with carrying hygromycin B or apramycin resistance under standard C. jejuni laboratory conditions. Using these markers, the arylsulfatase reporter gene astA was deleted, and the ability to genetically complement the astA deletion using pRRH and pRRA for astA gene insertion was demonstrated. Furthermore, the relative levels of expression from the endogenous astA promoter were compared to that of polycistronic mRNA expression from the constitutive promoter upstream of the resistance gene. The development of additional antibiotic resistance cassettes for use in Campylobacter will enable multiple gene deletion and expression combinations as well as more in-depth study of multi-gene systems important for the survival and pathogenesis of this important bacterium. PMID:24751825

  4. Coupling recombinase-mediated cassette exchange with somatic hypermutation for antibody affinity maturation in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuan; Li, Nan; Zhao, Yun; Hang, Haiying

    2016-01-01

    Heterologous expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) can induce somatic hypermutation (SHM) for genes of interest in various cells, and several research groups (including ours) have successfully improved antibody affinity in mammalian or chicken cells using AID-induced SHM. These affinity maturation systems are time-consuming and inefficient. In this study, we developed an antibody affinity maturation platform in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by coupling recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) with SHM. Stable CHO cell clones containing a single copy puromycin resistance gene (PuroR) expression cassette flanked by recombination target sequences (FRT and loxP) being able to highly express a gene of interest placed in the cassette were developed. The PuroR gene was replaced with an antibody gene by RMCE, and the antibody was displayed on the cell surface. Cells displaying antibodies on their membrane were transfected with the AID gene, and mutations of the antibody gene were accumulated by AID-mediated hypermutation during cell proliferation followed by flow cytometric cell sorting for cells bearing antibody mutants with improved affinity. Affinity improvements were detected after only one round of cell sorting and proliferation, mutant clones with 15-fold affinity improvement were isolated within five rounds of maturation (within 2 months). CHO cells are fast growing, stress-resistant and produce antibody with glycosylations suitable for therapy. Our antibody-evolution platform based on CHO cells makes antibody-affinity maturation more efficient and is especially convenient for therapeutic antibody affinity improvement. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 39-51. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26235363

  5. Natural Transformation Facilitates Transfer of Transposons, Integrons and Gene Cassettes between Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Sara; Harms, Klaus; Fricke, W. Florian; Johnsen, Pål J.; da Silva, Gabriela J.; Nielsen, Kaare Magne

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated to what extent natural transformation acting on free DNA substrates can facilitate transfer of mobile elements including transposons, integrons and/or gene cassettes between bacterial species. Naturally transformable cells of Acinetobacter baylyi were exposed to DNA from integron-carrying strains of the genera Acinetobacter, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, and Salmonella to determine the nature and frequency of transfer. Exposure to the various DNA sources resulted in acquisition of antibiotic resistance traits as well as entire integrons and transposons, over a 24 h exposure period. DNA incorporation was not solely dependent on integrase functions or the genetic relatedness between species. DNA sequence analyses revealed that several mechanisms facilitated stable integration in the recipient genome depending on the nature of the donor DNA; homologous or heterologous recombination and various types of transposition (Tn21-like and IS26-like). Both donor strains and transformed isolates were extensively characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, integron- and cassette-specific PCRs, DNA sequencing, pulsed field gel electrophoreses (PFGE), Southern blot hybridizations, and by re-transformation assays. Two transformant strains were also genome-sequenced. Our data demonstrate that natural transformation facilitates interspecies transfer of genetic elements, suggesting that the transient presence of DNA in the cytoplasm may be sufficient for genomic integration to occur. Our study provides a plausible explanation for why sequence-conserved transposons, IS elements and integrons can be found disseminated among bacterial species. Moreover, natural transformation of integron harboring populations of competent bacteria revealed that interspecies exchange of gene cassettes can be highly efficient, and independent on genetic relatedness between donor and recipient. In conclusion, natural transformation provides a much broader capacity for horizontal acquisitions of genetic elements and hence, resistance traits from divergent species than previously assumed. PMID:22876180

  6. Marine integrons containing novel integrase genes, attachment sites, attI, and associated gene cassettes in polluted sediments from Suez and Tokyo Bays

    PubMed Central

    Elsaied, Hosam; Stokes, Hatch W; Kitamura, Keiko; Kurusu, Yasurou; Kamagata, Yoichi; Maruyama, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand the structure and biological significance of integrons and associated gene cassettes in marine polluted sediments, metagenomic DNAs were extracted from sites at Suez and Tokyo Bays. PCR amplicons containing new integrase genes, intI, linked with novel gene cassettes, were recovered and had sizes from 1.8 to 2.5 kb. This approach uncovered, for the first time, the structure and diversity of both marine integron attachment site, attI, and the first gene cassette, the most efficiently expressed integron-associated gene cassette. The recovered 13 and 20 intI phylotypes, from Suez and Tokyo Bay samples, respectively, showed a highly divergence, suggesting a difference in integron composition between the sampling sites. Some intI phylotypes showed similarity with that from Geobacter metallireducens, belonging to Deltaproteobacteria, the dominant class in both sampling sites, as determined by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Thirty distinct families of putative attI site, as determined by the presence of an attI-like simple site, were recovered. A total of 146 and 68 gene cassettes represented Suez and Tokyo Bay unsaturated cassette pools, respectively. Gene cassettes, including a first cassette, from both sampling sites encoded two novel families of glyoxalase/bleomycin antibiotic-resistance protein. Gene cassettes from Suez Bay encoded proteins similar to haloacid dehalogenases, protein disulfide isomerases and death-on-curing and plasmid maintenance system killer proteins. First gene cassettes from Tokyo Bay encoded a xenobiotic-degrading protein, cardiolipin synthetase, esterase and WD40-like β propeller protein. Many of the first gene cassettes encoded proteins with no ascribable function but some of them were duplicated and possessed signal functional sites, suggesting efficient adaptive functions to their bacterial sources. Thus, each sampling site had a specific profile of integrons and cassette types consistent with the hypothesis that the environment shapes the genome. PMID:21248857

  7. Marine integrons containing novel integrase genes, attachment sites, attI, and associated gene cassettes in polluted sediments from Suez and Tokyo Bays.

    PubMed

    Elsaied, Hosam; Stokes, Hatch W; Kitamura, Keiko; Kurusu, Yasurou; Kamagata, Yoichi; Maruyama, Akihiko

    2011-07-01

    In order to understand the structure and biological significance of integrons and associated gene cassettes in marine polluted sediments, metagenomic DNAs were extracted from sites at Suez and Tokyo Bays. PCR amplicons containing new integrase genes, intI, linked with novel gene cassettes, were recovered and had sizes from 1.8 to 2.5 kb. This approach uncovered, for the first time, the structure and diversity of both marine integron attachment site, attI, and the first gene cassette, the most efficiently expressed integron-associated gene cassette. The recovered 13 and 20 intI phylotypes, from Suez and Tokyo Bay samples, respectively, showed a highly divergence, suggesting a difference in integron composition between the sampling sites. Some intI phylotypes showed similarity with that from Geobacter metallireducens, belonging to Deltaproteobacteria, the dominant class in both sampling sites, as determined by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Thirty distinct families of putative attI site, as determined by the presence of an attI-like simple site, were recovered. A total of 146 and 68 gene cassettes represented Suez and Tokyo Bay unsaturated cassette pools, respectively. Gene cassettes, including a first cassette, from both sampling sites encoded two novel families of glyoxalase/bleomycin antibiotic-resistance protein. Gene cassettes from Suez Bay encoded proteins similar to haloacid dehalogenases, protein disulfide isomerases and death-on-curing and plasmid maintenance system killer proteins. First gene cassettes from Tokyo Bay encoded a xenobiotic-degrading protein, cardiolipin synthetase, esterase and WD40-like β propeller protein. Many of the first gene cassettes encoded proteins with no ascribable function but some of them were duplicated and possessed signal functional sites, suggesting efficient adaptive functions to their bacterial sources. Thus, each sampling site had a specific profile of integrons and cassette types consistent with the hypothesis that the environment shapes the genome. PMID:21248857

  8. Building Background Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Susan B.; Kaefer, Tanya; Pinkham, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    This article make a case for the importance of background knowledge in children's comprehension. It suggests that differences in background knowledge may account for differences in understanding text for low- and middle-income children. It then describes strategies for building background knowledge in the age of common core standards.

  9. United States Geological Survey (USGS) FM cassette seismic-refraction recording system

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.M.

    1988-12-31

    In this two chapter report, instrumentation used to collect seismic data is described. This data acquisition system has two parts: (1) portable anolog seismic recorders and related ``hand-held-testers`` (HHT) and (2) portable digitizing units. During the anolog recording process, ground motion is sensed by a 2-Hz vertical-component seismometer. The voltage output from the seismometer is split without amplification and sent to three parallel amplifier circuit boards. Each circuit board amplifiers the seismic signal in three stages and then frequency modulates the signal. Amplification at the last two stages can be set by the user. An internal precision clock signal is also frequency modulated. The three data carrier frequencies, the clock carrier frequency, and a tape-speed compensation carrier frequency are summed and recorded on a recorded on a cassette tape. During the digitizing process, the cassette tapes are played back and the signals are demultiplexed and demodulated. An anolog-to-digital converter converts the signals to digital data which are stored on 8-inch floppy disks. 7 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Recombination-Induced Tag Exchange (RITE) Cassette Series to Monitor Protein Dynamics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Terweij, Marit; van Welsem, Tibor; van Deventer, Sjoerd; Verzijlbergen, Kitty F.; Menendez-Benito, Victoria; Ontoso, David; San-Segundo, Pedro; Neefjes, Jacques; van Leeuwen, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are not static entities. They are highly mobile, and their steady-state levels are achieved by a balance between ongoing synthesis and degradation. The dynamic properties of a protein can have important consequences for its function. For example, when a protein is degraded and replaced by a newly synthesized one, posttranslational modifications are lost and need to be reincorporated in the new molecules. Protein stability and mobility are also relevant for the duplication of macromolecular structures or organelles, which involves coordination of protein inheritance with the synthesis and assembly of newly synthesized proteins. To measure protein dynamics, we recently developed a genetic pulse-chase assay called recombination-induced tag exchange (RITE). RITE has been successfully used in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to measure turnover and inheritance of histone proteins, to study changes in posttranslational modifications on aging proteins, and to visualize the spatiotemporal inheritance of protein complexes and organelles in dividing cells. Here we describe a series of successful RITE cassettes that are designed for biochemical analyses, genomics studies, as well as single cell fluorescence applications. Importantly, the genetic nature and the stability of the tag switch offer the unique possibility to combine RITE with high-throughput screening for protein dynamics mutants and mechanisms. The RITE cassettes are widely applicable, modular by design, and can therefore be easily adapted for use in other cell types or organisms. PMID:23708297

  11. Recommended Method for Chromosome Exploitation: RMCE-based Cassette-exchange Systems in Animal Cell Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Oumard, Andr; Qiao, Junhua; Jostock, Thomas; Li, Jiandong; Bode, Juergen

    2006-03-01

    The availability of site-specific recombinases has revolutionized the rational construction of cell lines with predictable properties. Early efforts were directed to providing pre-characterized genomic loci with a single recombinase target site that served as an address for the integration of vectors carrying a compatible tag. Efficient procedures of this type had to await recombinases like PhiC31, which recombine attP and attB target sites in a one-way reaction - at least in the cellular environment of the higher eukaryotic cell. Still these procedures lead to the co-introduction of prokaryotic vector sequences that are known to cause epigenetic silencing. This review illuminates the actual status of the more advanced recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) techniques that have been developed for the major members of site-specific recombinases (SR), Flp, Cre and PhiC31. In RMCE the genomic address consists of a set of heterospecific recombinase target (RT-) sites permitting the exchange of the intervening sequence for the gene of interest (GOI), as part of a similar cassette. This process locks the GOI in place and it is 'clean' in the sense that it does not co-introduce prokaryotic vector parts nor does it leave behind a selection marker. PMID:19003073

  12. Plug-and-play genetic access to drosophila cell types using exchangeable exon cassettes.

    PubMed

    Diao, Fengqiu; Ironfield, Holly; Luan, Haojiang; Diao, Feici; Shropshire, William C; Ewer, John; Marr, Elizabeth; Potter, Christopher J; Landgraf, Matthias; White, Benjamin H

    2015-03-01

    Genetically encoded effectors are important tools for probing cellular function in living animals, but improved methods for directing their expression to specific cell types are required. Here, we introduce a simple, versatile method for achieving cell-type-specific expression of transgenes that leverages the untapped potential of "coding introns" (i.e., introns between coding exons). Our method couples the expression of a transgene to that of a native gene expressed in the cells of interest using intronically inserted "plug-and-play" cassettes (called "Trojan exons") that carry a splice acceptor site followed by the coding sequences of T2A peptide and an effector transgene. We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach in Drosophila using lines containing suitable MiMIC (Minos-mediated integration cassette) transposons and a palette of Trojan exons capable of expressing a range of commonly used transcription factors. We also introduce an exchangeable, MiMIC-like Trojan exon construct that can be targeted to coding introns using the Crispr/Cas system. PMID:25732830

  13. Changes in total CO2 measurement according to reagent cassette rotation in chemistry autoanalyzers.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hee-Jung; Lee, Woochang; Chun, Sail; Kang, So Young; Lee, Woo In; Park, Hae-Il; Min, Won-Ki

    2009-01-01

    The quality control (QC) failure rate in the serum total carbon dioxide (TCO(2)) test increases at a higher rate than in other tests over time after calibration. The causes of the increased QC failure rate in the TCO(2) test were examined. Using a TBA200RF analyzer (Toshiba Medical Systems), the TCO(2) of the QC material was measured at 2-hr intervals and was found to decrease by up to 16.5% at 10 hr after calibration. In contrast, using the P-module and D-module analyzers (Roche Diagnostics), the TCO(2) of the QC material did not change significantly during 10 hr after calibration. When the TCO(2) level of the QC material was measured hourly over 5 hr with the TBA200FR analyzer while the reagent bottle was rotated at 0, 80, 120, 160, or 200 rpm, the rate of decline of TCO(2), increased over time after calibration and with increasing reagent cassette rotation. Therefore, in a clinical laboratory using an automated analyzer with a rotating reagent cassette, it is necessary to set a limit to the calibration time interval in order to satisfy the QC goal. PMID:19429801

  14. Lab 3 Cryogenic System 4 Cassette VLPC Test Cryostat I/O & Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, D.; /Fermilab

    1998-01-12

    Dzero is using LAB3 as a test facility for the VCLPC (Visible Light Photon Counter) Cassettes and Cryostats. This installation will use liquid Helium from a vendor provided Dewar trailer for the cryostat refrigeration. The gas Helium will then be recovered and pumped into high pressure trailers and be sent back to the vender. Most of this system was installed at LAB6 and was operated in 1995 and 1996. The previous control system was a hardwired type system with 2 MOORE 352 controllers performing loop controls with some limited logic control. The installation at LAB3 will replace this control system with a commercial Programmable Logic Controller, a TI545. The TI545 will allow centralized loop and logic control. The VLPC cassette temperature monitoring and control will also be performed by this PLC. The entire LAB3 system will be on the sitewide FIX32 operator interface. This note describes the specifications and configuration of the physical Input/Output devices and instrumentation of the LAB3 Control System. Lab3 also has an oven used to bake Carbon fiber cylinders. The TI545 will monitor these temperatures using 'T' Thermocouples installed in a remote base.

  15. Use of cassette-electrode microbial fuel cell for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Morio; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2013-02-01

    Cassette-electrode microbial fuel cells (CE-MFCs) have been developed for the conversion of biomass wastes into electric energy. The present study modified CE-MFC for its application to wastewater treatment and examined its utility in a long-term (240 days) experiment to treat a synthetic wastewater, containing starch, yeast extract, peptone, plant oil, and a detergent (approximately 500mg of total chemical oxygen demand [COD] per liter). A test MFC reactor (1l in capacity) was equipped with 10 cassette electrodes with total anode and cathode projection areas of 1440cm(2), and the operation was initiated by inoculating with rice paddy-field soil. It was demonstrated that CE-MFC achieved COD removal rates of 80% at hydraulic-retention times of 6h or greater, and electricity was generated at a maximum power density of 150mWm(-2) and Coulombic efficiency of 20%. Microbial communities established on anodes of CEs were analyzed by pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, showing that Geobacter, Clostridium, and Geothrix were abundantly detected in anode biofilms. These results demonstrate the utility of CE-MFC for wastewater treatment, in which Geobacter and Geothrix would be involved in the electricity generation. PMID:23041137

  16. Broad 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibitor herbicide tolerance in soybean with an optimized enzyme and expression cassette.

    PubMed

    Siehl, Daniel L; Tao, Yumin; Albert, Henrik; Dong, Yuxia; Heckert, Matthew; Madrigal, Alfredo; Lincoln-Cabatu, Brishette; Lu, Jian; Fenwick, Tamara; Bermudez, Ericka; Sandoval, Marian; Horn, Caroline; Green, Jerry M; Hale, Theresa; Pagano, Peggy; Clark, Jenna; Udranszky, Ingrid A; Rizzo, Nancy; Bourett, Timothy; Howard, Richard J; Johnson, David H; Vogt, Mark; Akinsola, Goke; Castle, Linda A

    2014-11-01

    With an optimized expression cassette consisting of the soybean (Glycine max) native promoter modified for enhanced expression driving a chimeric gene coding for the soybean native amino-terminal 86 amino acids fused to an insensitive shuffled variant of maize (Zea mays) 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD), we achieved field tolerance in transgenic soybean plants to the HPPD-inhibiting herbicides mesotrione, isoxaflutole, and tembotrione. Directed evolution of maize HPPD was accomplished by progressively incorporating amino acids from naturally occurring diversity and novel substitutions identified by saturation mutagenesis, combined at random through shuffling. Localization of heterologously expressed HPPD mimicked that of the native enzyme, which was shown to be dually targeted to chloroplasts and the cytosol. Analysis of the native soybean HPPD gene revealed two transcription start sites, leading to transcripts encoding two HPPD polypeptides. The N-terminal region of the longer encoded peptide directs proteins to the chloroplast, while the short form remains in the cytosol. In contrast, maize HPPD was found almost exclusively in chloroplasts. Evolved HPPD enzymes showed insensitivity to five inhibitor herbicides. In 2013 field trials, transgenic soybean events made with optimized promoter and HPPD variant expression cassettes were tested with three herbicides and showed tolerance to four times the labeled rates of mesotrione and isoxaflutole and two times the labeled rates of tembotrione. PMID:25192697

  17. The use of personal cassette players among youths and its effects on hearing.

    PubMed

    Wong, T W; Van Hasselt, C A; Tang, L S; Yiu, P C

    1990-09-01

    To assess the prevalence of use of Personal Cassette Players (PCP) among youths in a residential community in Hong Kong, we interviewed 487 youths aged 15-24 years who attended various activities in eight Youth Centres in Shatin, Hong Kong. 394 (81%) reported using the Personal Cassette Player regularly. The mean duration of PCP use was 2.8 years with a median of 2 years. The mean time of listening to PCP was 4.5 hours per week. We further examined 124 subjects by otoscopy and of the 103 otoscopically normal individuals, audiometric tests were performed. Among the 78 PCP users and 25 non-users, no significant difference in the mean hearing threshold was observed for the frequencies tested. The mean ear canal sound level was 70.4 dBA. Four subjects were habitually exposed to sound levels higher than 85 dBA. One was exposed to 116 dBA and was found to have a 4000 Hz dip on his audiogram, suggestive of noise-induced hearing loss. In general, despite the high prevalence of PCP use, most youths used their PCP at relatively safe sound levels with low risk of hearing loss. However, education directed towards the youth with respect to the potential hazard on hearing due to improper and prolonged use of PCP is still warranted. PMID:2247585

  18. [Testing the characteristics of X-ray apparatuses by using test cassette].

    PubMed

    Shengeliia, N A

    2001-01-01

    An X-ray TKP-1 M test cassette has been designed for effective testing of the basic operational parameters of X-ray diagnostic apparatuses that most frequently require inspection and adjustment during their use. The use of the cassette makes it possible to check the values of anode voltage on the basis of the improved double exposure method that simultaneously exposes two comparable parts of an X-ray film. Equivalent filtration is accomplished by a rotary shutter having sector slots, whose total angle is 30 degrees, which ensures 12-fold reduction in X-ray radiation at the site of disk rotation. A diaphragm and a step circular copper attenuating wedge are located in alignment with the shutter, each step ensures 12-fold reduction in radiation of certain power (at 40, 44, 48, 52, 57 kV, etc.). The pattern and pulsation of anode voltage and the duration of exposure are assessed by the pattern of an image of the small-diameter hole in the shutter. The perpendicularity of a radiation beam and alignment of an indicator are estimated by the shape of an image of the central vertical longitudinal hole. PMID:11837196

  19. Using phage integrases in a site-specific dual integrase cassette exchange strategy.

    PubMed

    Geisinger, Jonathan M; Calos, Michele P

    2015-01-01

    ?C31 integrase, a site-specific large serine recombinase, is a useful tool for genome engineering in a variety of eukaryotic species and cell types. ?C31 integrase performs efficient recombination between its attB site and either its own placed attP site or a partially mismatched genomic pseudo attP site. Bxb1 integrase, another large serine recombinase, has a similar level of recombinational activity, but recognizes only its own attB and attP sites. Previously, we have used these integrases sequentially to integrate plasmid DNA into the genome. This approach relied on placing a landing pad attP for Bxb1 integrase in the genome by using phiC31 integrase-mediated recombination at a genomic pseudo attP site. In this chapter, we present a protocol for using these integrases simultaneously to facilitate cassette exchange at a predefined location. This approach permits greater control and accuracy over integration. We also present a general method for using polymerase chain reaction assays to verify that the desired cassette exchange occurred successfully. PMID:25408400

  20. Fully Automated Data Collection Using PAM and the Development of PAM/SPACE Reversible Cassettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraki, Masahiko; Watanabe, Shokei; Chavas, Leonard M. G.; Yamada, Yusuke; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Fujihashi, Masahiro; Miki, Kunio; Baba, Seiki; Ueno, Go; Yamamoto, Masaki; Suzuki, Mamoru; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Tanaka, Isao

    2010-06-01

    To remotely control and automatically collect data in high-throughput X-ray data collection experiments, the Structural Biology Research Center at the Photon Factory (PF) developed and installed sample exchange robots PAM (PF Automated Mounting system) at PF macromolecular crystallography beamlines; BL-5A, BL-17A, AR-NW12A and AR-NE3A. We developed and installed software that manages the flow of the automated X-ray experiments; sample exchanges, loop-centering and X-ray diffraction data collection. The fully automated data collection function has been available since February 2009. To identify sample cassettes, PAM employs a two-dimensional bar code reader. New beamlines, BL-1A at the Photon Factory and BL32XU at SPring-8, are currently under construction as part of Targeted Proteins Research Program (TPRP) by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. However, different robots, PAM and SPACE (SPring-8 Precise Automatic Cryo-sample Exchanger), will be installed at BL-1A and BL32XU, respectively. For the convenience of the users of both facilities, pins and cassettes for PAM and SPACE are developed as part of the TPRP.

  1. A comparison of aerosol sampling techniques: "open" versus "closed-face" filter cassettes.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, H J; Fidino, A V; Arlington, K L; Buchan, R M

    1980-10-01

    Accepted practice by most professional industrial hygienists in government and industry is to use "closed-face" filter cassette techniques as standard sampling procedures for the majority of aerosols. A two-phase, field study was conducted to determine whether a gravimetric bias exists between "open" and "closed-face" sampling methods. Phase I involved an in-depth analysis of the potential gravimetric viability as it applies to an industrial paint spray mist, and Phase II was a series of pilot studies, of small sample base, to determine if this phenomena exists over a range of aerosol types. Dusts of wood, grain, cellulose, Portland cement and perlite, welding fumes, and chromic acid mist were sampled in Phase II. Paired breathing zone samples, "open" and "closed-face", 37 mm, 3-piece filter cassettes were utilized in both phases of the study. In both phases of the study, "open-face" concentrations were consistently higher than "closed-face" concentrations, with the exception of cellulose dust. Based on the concentration for both sampling techniques, the data suggests that "closed-face" sampling techniques (4.0 mm inlet diameter) might be size selective against large particles. This could lead to an underestimation of a worker's total aerosol exposure. PMID:7435380

  2. VLPC Single Cassette Cryostat Christmas Tree Temperature as Related to Annulus Flow and LHe Level

    SciTech Connect

    Olis, D.; /Fermilab

    1993-04-23

    Data taken from tests of annulus shield flow versus Christmas tree temperature show that the temperature of the tree is controlled by the annulus flow and the LHe level in the reservoir. Graphs indicating this are shown in Figures 1 and 2. An equation determined from the data taken on 4/19 to model the flow and LHe level dependence of tree temperature is as follows: T = AL + BF + C; T = tree temperature (K); A = -0.0055 (K/%); L = LHe Level (%) - 10% (0.6-inch) < L < 65% (3.9-inch); B = -1.166 (K/scfh air); F = annulus flow (scfh air) - 0.5 < F < 1.0 scfh; and C = 7.889 (K). From the above equation it is evident that shield flow has a significant effect on tree temperature while the percent of LHe in the reservoir is much less significant. The following illustrates the temperature's relative sensitivity to the two variables: {Delta}flow = 0.5 scfh gives {Delta}T = 0.58 K and {Delta}level = 40% LHe gives {Delta}T = 0.22 K. A graph of Temperature Calculated vs. Temperature Measured in Figure 3 shows the degree to which the equation conforms to the data taken on 4/19. This test data is included in the appendix. The measured temperature, calculated temperature, and the percent of error between the two is shown among the data. Figure 3 and the 'Temp.%Error' column in the data indicate the degree of the equation's accuracy. When determining the value of the above equation it is important to consider Figure 4. The graph shows Temperature vs. Annulus Flow data collected on a number of different days. Note that data collected from day to day have similar slopes yet different y-intercepts. This means that the degree to which flow effects temperature remained relatively constant from day to day, yet some unknown variable in temperature control remains. Initially it seems possible that variations in cryostat pressure might be the third variable. But the maximum possible pressure change of 4 psig within the cryostat only accounts for a 0.24 K temperature difference. One other theory is that the GHe used to apply positve pressure to the cassette space is leaking out the cassette top and is causing the change in y-intercepts. A leak in the cassette top would allow warm GHe to enter the cassette volume. Further tests will be done to see if this cassette leak is in fact the problem. The above equation cannot be applied at some instant to determine the annulus flow required at some LHe level to produce a desired tree temperature. Rather its value is that it shows the relative contribution of the two variables to the temperature and the temperature's sensitivity to them. It seems regulation of the tree temperature would best be achieved by providing a feedback loop between temperature and shield flow while maintaining a relatively steady ({+-}5%) LHe level. As one last note, I found that regulating the LHe level with the inlet valve caused disturbances in the cryostat that resulted in temperature drops as great as 0.2 K. To prevent this, when LHe levels fell too low, I would remove the boil-off hose from the regulator for a few minutes until the LHe level was back to a satisfactory level. From this it seems that the LHe level can be controlled by the boil-off regulator with less upset than by adjusting the LHe inlet valve.

  3. Evaluation of D-1 tape and cassette characteristics: Moisture content of Sony and Ampex D-1 tapes when delivered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashton, Gary

    1993-01-01

    Commercial D-1 cassette tapes and their associated recorders were designed to operate in broadcast studios and record in accordance with the International Radio Consultative Committee (CCIR) 607 digital video standards. The D-1 recorder resulted in the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) standards 224 to 228 and is the first digital video recorder to be standardized for the broadcast industry. The D-1 cassette and associated media are currently marketed for broadcast use. The recorder was redesigned for data applications and is in the early stages of being evaluated. The digital data formats used are specified in MIL-STD-2179 and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) X3.175-190 standard. In early 1990, the National Media Laboratory (NML) was asked to study the effects of time, temperature, and relative humidity on commercial D-1 cassettes. The environmental range to be studied was the one selected for the Advanced Tactical Air Reconnaissance System (ATARS) program. Several discussions between NML personnel, ATARS representatives, recorder contractors, and other interested parties were held to decide upon the experimental plan to be implemented. Review meetings were held periodically during the course of the experiment. The experiments were designed to determine the dimensional stability of the media and cassette since this is one of the major limiting factors of helical recorders when the media or recorders are subjected to non-broadcasting environments. Measurements were also made to characterize each sample of cassettes to give preliminary information on which purchase specifications could be developed. The actual tests performed on the cassettes and media before and after aging fall into the general categories listed.

  4. Evaluation of D-1 tape and cassette characteristics: Moisture content of Sony and Ampex D-1 tapes when delivered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, Gary

    Commercial D-1 cassette tapes and their associated recorders were designed to operate in broadcast studios and record in accordance with the International Radio Consultative Committee (CCIR) 607 digital video standards. The D-1 recorder resulted in the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) standards 224 to 228 and is the first digital video recorder to be standardized for the broadcast industry. The D-1 cassette and associated media are currently marketed for broadcast use. The recorder was redesigned for data applications and is in the early stages of being evaluated. The digital data formats used are specified in MIL-STD-2179 and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) X3.175-190 standard. In early 1990, the National Media Laboratory (NML) was asked to study the effects of time, temperature, and relative humidity on commercial D-1 cassettes. The environmental range to be studied was the one selected for the Advanced Tactical Air Reconnaissance System (ATARS) program. Several discussions between NML personnel, ATARS representatives, recorder contractors, and other interested parties were held to decide upon the experimental plan to be implemented. Review meetings were held periodically during the course of the experiment. The experiments were designed to determine the dimensional stability of the media and cassette since this is one of the major limiting factors of helical recorders when the media or recorders are subjected to non-broadcasting environments. Measurements were also made to characterize each sample of cassettes to give preliminary information on which purchase specifications could be developed. The actual tests performed on the cassettes and media before and after aging fall into the general categories listed.

  5. CFTR structure and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cant, Natasha; Pollock, Naomi; Ford, Robert C

    2014-07-01

    CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette family of membrane proteins. Although almost all members of this family are transporters, CFTR functions as a channel with specificity for anions, in particular chloride and bicarbonate. In this review we look at what is known about CFTR structure and function within the context of the ATP-binding cassette family. We also review current strategies aimed at obtaining the high resolution structure of the protein. PMID:24534272

  6. The Cosmic Background Explorer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulkis, Samuel; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Outlines the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission to measure celestial radiation. Describes the instruments used and experiments involving differential microwave radiometers, and a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer. (YP)

  7. The chromosome 3q26 OncCassette: A multigenic driver of human cancer.

    PubMed

    Fields, Alan P; Justilien, Verline; Murray, Nicole R

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent copy number variations (CNVs) are genetic alterations commonly observed in human tumors. One of the most frequent CNVs in human tumors involves copy number gains (CNGs) at chromosome 3q26, which is estimated to occur in >20% of human tumors. The high prevalence and frequent occurrence of 3q26 CNG suggest that it drives the biology of tumors harboring this genetic alteration. The chromosomal region subject to CNG (the 3q26 amplicon) spans from chromosome 3q26 to q29, a region containing ∼200 protein-encoding genes. The large number of genes within the amplicon makes it difficult to identify relevant oncogenic target(s). Whereas a number of genes in this region have been linked to the transformed phenotype, recent studies indicate a high level of cooperativity among a subset of frequently amplified 3q26 genes. Here we use a novel bioinformatics approach to identify potential driver genes within the recurrent 3q26 amplicon in lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC). Our analysis reveals a set of 35 3q26 amplicon genes that are coordinately amplified and overexpressed in human LSCC tumors, and that also map to a major LSCC susceptibility locus identified on mouse chromosome 3 that is syntenic with human chromosome 3q26. Pathway analysis reveals that 21 of these genes exist within a single predicted network module. Four 3q26 genes, SOX2, ECT2, PRKCI and PI3KCA occupy the hub of this network module and serve as nodal genes around which the network is organized. Integration of available genetic, genomic, biochemical and functional data demonstrates that SOX2, ECT2, PRKCI and PIK3CA are cooperating oncogenes that function within an integrated cell signaling network that drives a highly aggressive, stem-like phenotype in LSCC tumors harboring 3q26 amplification. Based on the high level of genomic, genetic, biochemical and functional integration amongst these 4 3q26 nodal genes, we propose that they are the key oncogenic targets of the 3q26 amplicon and together define a "3q26 OncCassette" that mediates 3q26 CNG-driven tumorigenesis. Genomic analysis indicates that the 3q26 OncCassette also operates in other major tumor types that exhibit frequent 3q26 CNGs, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), ovarian serous cancer and cervical cancer. Finally, we discuss how the 3q26 OncCassette represents a tractable target for development of novel therapeutic intervention strategies that hold promise for improving treatment of 3q26-driven cancers. PMID:26754874

  8. Correlators in nontrivial backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Stephanou, Michael

    2009-01-15

    Operators in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory with an R-charge of O(N{sup 2}) are dual to backgrounds which are asymtotically AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. In this article we develop efficient techniques that allow the computation of correlation functions in these backgrounds. We find that (i) contractions between fields in the string words and fields in the operator creating the background are the field theory accounting of the new geometry, (ii) correlation functions of probes in these backgrounds are given by the free field theory contractions but with rescaled propagators and (iii) in these backgrounds there are no open string excitations with their special end point interactions; we have only closed string excitations.

  9. The Athena Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Luigi; Lotti, Simone; Macculi, Claudio; Molendi, Silvano; Eraerds, Tanja; Laurent, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Estimating, reducing and controlling the residual particle background is fundamental for achieving the objectives of several science topics of Athena, in particular those connected with background dominated observations of faint and/or diffuse sources. This requires assessing the particle environment in L2, propagating the various particle components throughout the mirror, spacecraft, and instruments via proper modelling and simulations of various physical processes, implementing design and h/w measures at instrument and mission level to reduce the un-rejected background and identifying proper calibration methods to control the background variations. Likewise, an adequate knowledge of the XRB, made of components that may vary spatially or temporally, is required as well. Here we will review the present status of the background knowledge, and summarize the activities on-going within Athena at various levels.

  10. Recognition of alternatively spliced cassette exons based on a hybrid model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaokang; Peng, Qinke; Li, Liang; Li, Xintong

    2016-03-11

    Alternative splicing (AS) is an important mechanism of gene regulation that contributes to protein diversity. It is of great significance to recognize different kinds of AS accurately so as to understand the mechanism of gene regulation. Many in silico methods have been applied to detecting AS with vast features, but the result is far from satisfactory. In this paper, we used the features proven to be useful in recognizing AS in previous literature and proposed a hybrid method combining Gene Expression Programming (GEP) and Random Forests (RF) to classify the constitutive exons and cassette exons which is the most common AS phenomenon. GEP will firstly make prediction to the samples of strong signal, and the other samples of weak signal will be distinguished with a more complex classifier based on RF. The experiment result indicates that this method can highly improve the recognition level in this issue. PMID:26869516

  11. Cassette based digital X-ray systems: evaluating the Konica Minolta Xpress CR.

    PubMed

    2005-11-01

    Cassette-based digital x-ray systems--also called computed radiography (CR) systems--are flexible and affordable, qualities that have secured their continued use in clinical settings. In this follow-up to our August 2001 Evaluation of CR systems, we examine the Konica Minolta Xpress CR. Our testing examines the ability of the Xpress CR to provide at least the same amount of diagnostic information as screen-film systems, while significantly increasing the overall efficiency of a radiology department. This article also includes updated information on the new products now offered by the suppliers whose CR systems we examined in August 2001. In addition, it describes the general developments that have occurred in CR technology. These developments include the use of new phosphor types to increase image quality and the wider implementation of wall-mounted touchscreens to improve workflow. PMID:16454117

  12. Herpesviruses carrying a Brainbow cassette reveal replication and expression of limited numbers of incoming genomes.

    PubMed

    Kobiler, Oren; Lipman, Yaron; Therkelsen, Kate; Daubechies, Ingrid; Enquist, Lynn W

    2010-01-01

    Whether all the infectious herpesvirus particles entering a cell are able to replicate and/or express their genomes is not known. Here, we developed a general method to determine the number of viral genomes expressed in an infected cell. We constructed and analysed fluorophore expression from a recombinant pseudorabies virus (PRV263) carrying a Brainbow cassette (Cre-conditional expression of different fluorophores). Using three isogenic strains derived from PRV263, each expressing a single fluorophore, we analysed the colour composition of cells infected with these three viruses at different multiplicities. We estimate that fewer than seven incoming genomes are expressed per cell. In addition, those templates that are expressed are the genomes selected for replication and packaging into virions. This finite limit on the number of viral genomes that can be expressed is an intrinsic property of the infected cell and may be influenced by viral and cellular factors. PMID:21266996

  13. Rapid genetic modification of mouse embryonic stem cells by inducible cassette exchange recombination

    PubMed Central

    Iacovino, Michelina; Roth, Megan E.; Kyba, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Summary Embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation is a useful tool by which to develop large quantities of cells in vitro representing early stages of embryonic development. A conditional gene expression system allows interrogation of factors at specific time points in the differentiation of ES cells to defined cell types. We have developed a method for rapidly generating conditional inducible murine ES cells by targeting genes into an Inducible Cassette Exchange (ICE) locus. The ICE locus encodes a doxycycline-inducible floxed Cre, which replaces itself with an incoming floxed gene of interest. The derivative cell lines, selected in G418, thus bear doxycycline-inducible transgenes. We provide detailed methods for performing ICE recombination and generating derivative doxycycline-inducible cell lines. PMID:24233789

  14. ?C31 integrase mediates efficient cassette exchange in the zebrafish germline.

    PubMed

    Hu, Gui; Goll, Mary G; Fisher, Shannon

    2011-09-01

    Site-specific recombinases (SSRs) are powerful tools for genome manipulation, used in diverse organisms including Drosophila melanogaster, mouse, Arabidopsis, zebrafish, and human cultured cells. The integrase from the bacteriophage ?C31 belongs to the large serine family of integrases, and in contrast to other widely used SSRs such as Cre and Flp, recombination is directional and therefore irreversible. We have developed a vector system for recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) in the zebrafish, allowing swapping of the coding sequence in an integrated transgene. Utilizing codon-optimized ?C31 integrase RNA bearing the 3'UTR from the nanos1 gene, we replaced the egfp coding sequence of an integrated reporter transgene with mCherry coding sequence. Recombination was achieved at high efficiency in both somatic cells and in the germline. We demonstrate an effective approach to RMCE, increasing the repertoire of tools available to manipulate the zebrafish genome. PMID:21805532

  15. Site-Specific Cassette Exchange Systems in the Aedes aegypti Mosquito and the Plutella xylostella Moth

    PubMed Central

    Haghighat-Khah, Roya Elaine; Scaife, Sarah; Martins, Sara; St John, Oliver; Matzen, Kelly Jean; Morrison, Neil; Alphey, Luke

    2015-01-01

    Genetically engineered insects are being evaluated as potential tools to decrease the economic and public health burden of mosquitoes and agricultural pest insects. Here we describe a new tool for the reliable and targeted genome manipulation of pest insects for research and field release using recombinase mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) mechanisms. We successfully demonstrated the established ?C31-RMCE method in the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, which is the first report of RMCE in mosquitoes. A new variant of this RMCE system, called iRMCE, combines the ?C31-att integration system and Cre or FLP-mediated excision to remove extraneous sequences introduced as part of the site-specific integration process. Complete iRMCE was achieved in two important insect pests, Aedes aegypti and the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, demonstrating the transferability of the system across a wide phylogenetic range of insect pests. PMID:25830287

  16. Adaptive background model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaochun; Xiao, Yijun; Chai, Zhi; Wang, Bangping

    2007-11-01

    An adaptive background model aiming at outdoor vehicle detection is presented in this paper. This model is an improved model of PICA (pixel intensity classification algorithm), it classifies pixels into K-distributions by color similarity, and then a hypothesis that the background pixel color appears in image sequence with a high frequency is used to evaluate all the distributions to determine which presents the current background color. As experiments show, the model presented in this paper is a robust, adaptive and flexible model, which can deal with situations like camera motions, lighting changes and so on.

  17. The cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dar, Arnon

    1991-01-01

    The cosmic neutrino background is expected to consist of relic neutrinos from the big bang, of neutrinos produced during nuclear burning in stars, of neutrinos released by gravitational stellar collapse, and of neutrinos produced by cosmic ray interactions with matter and radiation in the interstellar and intergalactic medium. Formation of baryonic dark matter in the early universe, matter-antimatter annihilation in a baryonic symmetric universe, and dark matter annihilation could have also contributed significantly to the cosmic neutrino background. The purpose of this paper is to review the properties of these cosmic neutrino backgrounds, the indirect evidence for their existence, and the prospects for their detection.

  18. Background Underground at WIPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esch, Ernst-Ingo; Hime, A.; Bowles, T. J.

    2001-04-01

    Recent interest to establish a dedicated underground laboratory in the United States prompted an experimental program at to quantify the enviromental backgrounds underground at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. An outline of this program is provided along with recent experimental data on the cosmic ray muon flux at the 650 meter level of WIPP. The implications of the cosmic ray muon and fast neutron background at WIPP will be discussed in the context of new generation, low background experiments envisioned in the future.

  19. Detection of E. coli O157:H7 with a reporter phage containing the luxCDABE cassette

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteriophage and reporter phage are used for typing and/or detection of pathogens. The temperate tailed phage fV10 has been utilized for phage-typing E. coli O157:H7. By modifying fV10 to transduce kanamycin resistance and the a luxCDABE cassette, we developed a reporter bacteriophage (fV10-lux) p...

  20. Consumer Education Resources Catalog: 16mm Films, Multi Media Kits, Video Cassettes, Simulations & Games, Printed Materials. 1978 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sandra; Neal, Kathy

    This consumer education resources catalog provides an annotated guide to 16mm films, multi-media kits, video cassettes, simulations and games, and printed materials related to consumer education available from Michigan Department of Education's Regional Education Media Centers. The first major section lists available media by specific subject…

  1. Consumer Education Resources Catalog. 1980 Supplement. 16mm Films, Multi Media Kits, Video Cassettes, Simulations & Games, Printed Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sandra

    This supplement to the Consumer Education Resources Catalog (see note) lists teaching-learning resources available for preview at the Michigan Consumer Education Center. A subject index to multi-media identifies titles of films, video cassettes, multi-media kits, and games under seven specific subjects. These are (1) Factors Affecting Consumer…

  2. An Evaluative Directory to Producers and Distributors of Unabridged Books on Cassette Tape. Occasional Papers Number 184.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Preston Jones

    A study gathered information about producers and distributors of unabridged books on cassette tape for the use of librarians engaged in collection development. Questionnaires were distributed to 48 public libraries and 45 producers/distributors. This report includes an introduction covering the history of this medium and a rationale for collecting

  3. Identification of antibiotic resistance cassettes in class 1 integrons in Aeromonas spp. strains isolated from fresh fish (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Sarria-Guzmán, Yohanna; López-Ramírez, María Patricia; Chávez-Romero, Yosef; Ruiz-Romero, Erick; Dendooven, Luc; Bello-López, Juan Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Forty-six Aeromonas spp. strains were isolated from fresh fish and investigated for their antimicrobial susceptibility, detection of Class 1 integrons by PCR, and arrangement of gene cassettes. Selected isolates were further characterized by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR. Twenty isolates were found to carry Class 1 integrons. Amplification of the variable regions of the integrons revealed diverse bands ranging in size from 150 to 1,958 pb. Sequence analysis of the variable regions revealed the presence of several gene cassettes, such as adenylyl transferases (aadA2 and aadA5), dihydrofolate reductases (dfrA17 and dfrA1), chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (catB3), β-lactamase (oxa2), lincosamide nucleotidil transferase (linF), aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (apha15), and oxacillinase (bla OXA-10). Two open reading frames with an unknown function were identified as orfC and orfD. The aadA2 cassette was the most common integron found in this study. Interestingly, five integrons were detected in the plasmids that might be involved in the transfer of resistance genes to other bacteria. This is a first report of cassette encoding for lincosamides (linF) resistance in Aeromonas spp. Implications on the incidence of integrons in isolates of Aeromonas spp. from fresh fish for human consumption, and its possible consequences to human health are discussed. PMID:24370627

  4. Integron Gene Cassettes and Degradation of Compounds Associated with Industrial Waste: The Case of the Sydney Tar Ponds

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Jeremy E.; Sharp, Christine; Dlutek, Marlena; Curtis, Bruce; Joss, Michael; Boucher, Yan; Doolittle, W. Ford

    2009-01-01

    Integrons are genetic platforms that accelerate lateral gene transfer (LGT) among bacteria. They were first detected on plasmids bearing single and multiple drug resistance determinants in human pathogens, and it is abundantly clear that integrons have played a major role in the evolution of this public health menace. Similar genetic elements can be found in nonpathogenic environmental bacteria and in metagenomic environmental DNA samples, and it is reasonable to suppose that integrons have facilitated microbial adaptation through LGT in niches outside infectious disease wards. Here we show that a heavily impacted estuary, exposed for almost a century to products of coal and steel industries, has developed a rich and unique cassette metagenome, containing genes likely to aid in the catabolism of compounds associated with industrial waste found there. In addition, we report that the most abundant cassette recovered in this study is one that encodes a putative LysR protein. This autoregulatory transcriptional regulator is known to activate transcription of linked target genes or unlinked regulons encoding diverse functions including chlorocatechol and dichlorophenol catabolism. Finally, only class 1 integrase genes were amplified in this study despite using different primer sets, and it may be that the cassettes present in the Tar Ponds will prove to be associated with class 1 integrase genes. Nevertheless, our cassette library provides a snapshot of a complex evolutionary process involving integron-meditated LGT likely to be important in natural bioremediation. PMID:19390587

  5. Endotoxin deposits on the inner surfaces of closed-face cassettes during bioaerosol sampling: a field investigation at composting facilities.

    PubMed

    Duquenne, Philippe; Simon, Xavier; Demange, Valrie; Harper, Martin; Wild, Pascal

    2015-05-01

    A set of 270 bioaerosol samples was taken from 15 composting facilities using polystyrene closed-face filter cassettes (CFCs). The objective was to measure the quantity of endotoxin deposits on the inner surfaces of the cassettes (sometimes referred to as 'wall deposits'). The results show that endotoxins are deposited on the inner surfaces of the CFCs through sampling and/or handling of samples. The quantity of endotoxins measured on inner surfaces range between 0.05 (the limit of detection of the method) and 3100 endotoxin units per cassette. The deposits can represent a large and variable percentage of the endotoxins sampled. More than a third of the samples presented a percentage of inner surface deposits >40% of the total quantity of endotoxins collected (filter + inner surfaces). Omitting these inner surface deposits in the analytical process lead to measurement errors relative to sampling all particles entering the CFC sampler, corresponding to a developing consensus on matching the inhalable particulate sampling convention. The result would be underestimated exposures and could affect the decision as to whether or not a result is acceptable in comparison to airborne concentration limits defined in terms of the inhalability convention. The results of this study suggest including the endotoxins deposited on the inner surfaces of CFCs during analysis. Further researches are necessary to investigate endotoxin deposits on the inner cassette surfaces in other working sectors. PMID:25535181

  6. Lactobacillus hilgardii plasmid pLAB1000 consists of two functional cassettes commonly found in other gram-positive organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Josson, K; Soetaert, P; Michiels, F; Joos, H; Mahillon, J

    1990-01-01

    A Lactobacillus hilgardii plasmid, pLAB1000, was studied to understand the organization of autonomous replicons from lactobacilli. Two cassettes could be identified. First, the replication region consisted of a sequence coding for a replication protein (Rep) and its corresponding target site, similar to those from plasmids pUB110, pC194 (Staphylococcus aureus), pFTB14, pBAA1 (Bacillus sp.), and pLP1 (Lactobacillus sp.). Sequence analysis indicated the possible synthesis of an antisense RNA that might regulate Rep production. The results also suggested that pLAB1000 replicates via a single-stranded DNA intermediate, and a putative lagging-strand initiation site was found that had similarities to those of alpha 3, St-1, and G4 isometric bacteriophages. The second cassette of pLAB1000 consisted of a sequence coding for a putative mobilization protein (Mob) and its corresponding RSA site. This cassette was similar to those found in pT181, pUB110, pE194 (S. aureus), and pG12 (Bacillus sp.), and it was found to be conserved among different Lactobacillus plasmid replicons. The origin and evolution of these functional cassettes are also discussed. Images PMID:2188951

  7. Bacterial resistance evolution by recruitment of super-integron gene cassettes.

    PubMed

    Rowe-Magnus, Dean A; Guerout, Anne-Marie; Mazel, Didier

    2002-03-01

    The capture and spread of antibiotic resistance determinants by integrons underlies the rapid evolution of multiple antibiotic resistance among diverse Gram-negative clinical isolates. The association of multiple resistance integrons (MRIs) with mobile DNA elements facilitates their transit across phylogenetic boundaries and augments the potential impact of integrons on bacterial evolution. Recently, ancestral chromosomal versions, the super-integrons (SIs), were found to be genuine components of the genomes of diverse bacterial species. SIs possess evolutionary characteristics and stockpiles of adaptive f