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Sample records for background atp-binding cassette

  1. PATTERNS & PHENOTYPES ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter

    E-print Network

    a PATTERNS & PHENOTYPES ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Expression and Localization in Sea Urchin Development Lauren E. Shipp and Amro Hamdoun* Background: ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters of polarized cells. Accepted 26 March 2012 INTRODUCTION ATP-binding cassette (ABC) trans- porters

  2. Two ATP Binding Cassette G Transporters, Rice ATP Binding Cassette G26 and ATP Binding Cassette G15, Collaboratively Regulate Rice Male Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guochao; Shi, Jianxin; Liang, Wanqi; Xue, Feiyang; Luo, Qian; Zhu, Lu; Qu, Guorun; Chen, Mingjiao; Schreiber, Lukas; Zhang, Dabing

    2015-11-01

    Male reproduction in higher plants requires the support of various metabolites, including lipid molecules produced in the innermost anther wall layer (the tapetum), but how the molecules are allocated among different anther tissues remains largely unknown. Previously, rice (Oryza sativa) ATP binding cassette G15 (ABCG15) and its Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ortholog were shown to be required for pollen exine formation. Here, we report the significant role of OsABCG26 in regulating the development of anther cuticle and pollen exine together with OsABCG15 in rice. Cytological and chemical analyses indicate that osabcg26 shows reduced transport of lipidic molecules from tapetal cells for anther cuticle development. Supportively, the localization of OsABCG26 is on the plasma membrane of the anther wall layers. By contrast, OsABCG15 is polarly localized in tapetal plasma membrane facing anther locules. osabcg26 osabcg15 double mutant displays an almost complete absence of anther cuticle and pollen exine, similar to that of osabcg15 single mutant. Taken together, we propose that OsABCG26 and OsABCG15 collaboratively regulate rice male reproduction: OsABCG26 is mainly responsible for the transport of lipidic molecules from tapetal cells to anther wall layers, whereas OsABCG15 mainly is responsible for the export of lipidic molecules from the tapetal cells to anther locules for pollen exine development. PMID:26392263

  3. Two ATP Binding Cassette G Transporters, Rice ATP Binding Cassette G26 and ATP Binding Cassette G15, Collaboratively Regulate Rice Male Reproduction1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guochao; Shi, Jianxin; Liang, Wanqi; Xue, Feiyang; Luo, Qian; Zhu, Lu; Qu, Guorun; Chen, Mingjiao; Schreiber, Lukas; Zhang, Dabing

    2015-01-01

    Male reproduction in higher plants requires the support of various metabolites, including lipid molecules produced in the innermost anther wall layer (the tapetum), but how the molecules are allocated among different anther tissues remains largely unknown. Previously, rice (Oryza sativa) ATP binding cassette G15 (ABCG15) and its Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ortholog were shown to be required for pollen exine formation. Here, we report the significant role of OsABCG26 in regulating the development of anther cuticle and pollen exine together with OsABCG15 in rice. Cytological and chemical analyses indicate that osabcg26 shows reduced transport of lipidic molecules from tapetal cells for anther cuticle development. Supportively, the localization of OsABCG26 is on the plasma membrane of the anther wall layers. By contrast, OsABCG15 is polarly localized in tapetal plasma membrane facing anther locules. osabcg26 osabcg15 double mutant displays an almost complete absence of anther cuticle and pollen exine, similar to that of osabcg15 single mutant. Taken together, we propose that OsABCG26 and OsABCG15 collaboratively regulate rice male reproduction: OsABCG26 is mainly responsible for the transport of lipidic molecules from tapetal cells to anther wall layers, whereas OsABCG15 mainly is responsible for the export of lipidic molecules from the tapetal cells to anther locules for pollen exine development. PMID:26392263

  4. ATP-binding cassette transporters are required for efficient RNA interference in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Timmons, Lisa; Hull, Dawn; Han, Wang; Echalier, B.; Sundaram, P.

    2006-08-01

    that facilitate RNAi have been identified, current descriptions of RNAi and interrelated mechanisms are far from complete. Here, we report that the Caenorhabditis elegans gene haf-6 is required for efficient RNAi. HAF-6 is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC...

  5. PREDICTED ATP-BINDING CASSETTE SYSTEMS IN THE PHYTOPATHOGENIC MOLLICUTE SPIROPLASMA KUNKELII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spiroplasma kunkelii is a cell wall-free, helical, and motile mycoplasma-like organism that causes corn stunt disease in maize. The bacterium has a compact genome with a gene set approaching the minimal complement necessary for cellular life and pathogenesis. A set of 21 ATP-binding cassette (ABC)...

  6. Influence of ATP-binding cassette transporters in root exudation of phytoalexins, signals, and disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The roots of plants secrete compounds as a way to exchange information with organ-isms living in the soil. Here, we report the involvement of seven root-expressed ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters corresponding to both full and half-size molecules (Atabcg36, Atabcg37, Atabcc5, Atabcf1, Atabcf3...

  7. ATP-Binding Cassette Proteins: Towards a Computational View of Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jielou

    2004-03-01

    Many large machine proteins can generate mechanical force and undergo large-scale conformational changes (LSCC) to perform varying biological tasks in living cells by utilizing ATP. Important examples include ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. They are membrane proteins that couple ATP binding and hydrolysis to the translocation of substrates across membranes [1]. To interpret how the mechanical force generated by ATP binding and hydrolysis is propagated, a coarse-grained ATP-dependent harmonic network model (HNM) [2,3] is applied to the ABC protein, BtuCD. This protein machine transports vitamin B12 across membranes. The analysis shows that subunits of the protein move against each other in a concerted manner. The lowest-frequency modes of the BtuCD protein are found to link the functionally critical domains, and are suggested to be responsible for large-scale ATP-coupled conformational changes. [1] K. P. Locher, A. T. Lee and D. C. Rees. Science 296, 1091-1098 (2002). [2] Atilgan, A. R., S. R. Durell, R. L. Jernigan, M. C. Demirel, O. Keskin, and I. Bahar. Biophys. J. 80, 505-515(2002); M. M Tirion, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 1905-1908 (1996). [3] J. -L. Liao and D. N. Beratan, 2003, to be published.

  8. Microarray study of single nucleotide polymorphisms and expression of ATP-binding cassette genes in breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, M. M.; Ibragimova, M. K.; Karabut, I. V.; Freydin, M. B.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Litvyakov, N. V.

    2015-11-01

    Our previous research establishes that changes of expression of the ATP-binding cassette genes family is connected with the neoadjuvant chemotherapy effect. However, the mechanism of regulation of resistance gene expression remains unclear. As many researchers believe, single nucleotide polymorphisms can be involved in this process. Thereupon, microarray analysis is used to study polymorphisms in ATP-binding cassette genes. It is thus found that MDR gene expression is connected with 5 polymorphisms, i.e. rs241432, rs241429, rs241430, rs3784867, rs59409230, which participate in the regulation of expression of own genes.

  9. Transport in technicolor: Mapping ATP-binding cassette transporters in sea urchin embryos

    PubMed Central

    Gökirmak, Tufan; Shipp, Lauren E.; Campanale, Joseph P.; Nicklisch, Sascha C.T.; Hamdoun, Amro

    2014-01-01

    One quarter of eukaryotic genes encode membrane proteins. These include nearly 1000 transporters that translocate nutrients, signaling molecules, and xenobiotics across membranes. While it is well appreciated that membrane transport is critical for development, the specific roles of many transporters have remained cryptic, in part because of their abundance and the diversity of their substrates. Multi-drug resistance ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters are one example of cryptic membrane proteins. Although most organisms utilize these ABC transporters during embryonic development, many of these transporters have broad substrate specificity, and their developmental functions remain incompletely understood. Here, we review advances in our understanding of ABC transporters in sea urchin embryos, and methods developed to spatially and temporally map these proteins. These studies reveal that multifunctional transporters are required for signaling, homeostasis, and protection of the embryo, and shed light on how they are integrated into ancestral developmental pathways recapitulated in disease. PMID:25156004

  10. Structure and association of ATP-binding cassette transporter nucleotide-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Ian D

    2002-03-19

    ATP-binding cassette transporters are responsible for the uptake and efflux of a multitude of substances across both eukaryotic and prokaryotic membranes. Members of this family of proteins are involved in diverse physiological processes including antigen presentation, drug efflux from cancer cells, bacterial nutrient uptake and cystic fibrosis. In order to understand more completely the role of these multidomain transporters an integrated approach combining structural, pharmacological and biochemical methods is being adopted. Recent structural data have been obtained on the cytoplasmic, nucleotide-binding domains of prokaryotic ABC transporters. This review evaluates both these data and the conflicting implications they have for domain communication in ABC transporters. Areas of biochemical research that attempt to resolve these conflicts will be discussed. PMID:11988180

  11. Structural Features of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter ABCA3

    PubMed Central

    Paolini, Alessandro; Baldassarre, Antonella; Del Gaudio, Ilaria; Masotti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In this review we reported and discussed the structural features of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter ABCA3 and how the use of bioinformatics tools could help researchers to obtain a reliable structural model of this important transporter. In fact, a model of ABCA3 is still lacking and no crystallographic structures (of the transporter or of its orthologues) are available. With the advent of next generation sequencing, many disease-causing mutations have been discovered and many more will be found in the future. In the last few years, ABCA3 mutations have been reported to have important pediatric implications. Thus, clinicians need a reliable structure to locate relevant mutations of this transporter and make genotype/phenotype correlations of patients affected by ABCA3-related diseases. In conclusion, we strongly believe that the model preliminarily generated by these novel bioinformatics tools could be the starting point to obtain more refined models of the ABCA3 transporter. PMID:26295388

  12. Discovery of Regulatory Elements in Human ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters through Expression Quantitative Trait Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Matsson, Pär; Yee, Sook Wah; Markova, Svetlana; Morrissey, Kari; Jenkins, Gerard; Xuan, Jiekun; Jorgenson, Eric; Kroetz, Deanna L.; Giacomini, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) membrane transporters determine the disposition of many drugs, metabolites and endogenous compounds. Coding region variation in ABC transporters is the cause of many genetic disorders, but much less is known about the genetic basis and functional outcome of ABC transporter expression level variation. We used genotype and mRNA transcript level data from human lymphoblastoid cell lines to assess population and gender differences in ABC transporter expression, and to guide the discovery of genomic regions involved in transcriptional regulation. Nineteen of 49 ABC genes were differentially expressed between individuals of African, Asian and European descent suggesting an important influence of race on expression level of ABC transporters. Twenty-four significant associations were found between transporter transcript levels and proximally located genetic variants. Several of the associations were experimentally validated in reporter assays. Through influencing ABC expression levels, these SNPs may affect disease susceptibility and response to drugs. PMID:21383772

  13. Protection against chemotherapy-induced alopecia: targeting ATP-binding cassette transporters in the hair follicle?

    PubMed

    Haslam, Iain S; Pitre, Aaron; Schuetz, John D; Paus, Ralf

    2013-11-01

    Currently, efficacious treatments for chemotherapy-induced alopecia (hair loss) are lacking, and incidences of permanent hair loss following high-dose chemotherapy are on the increase. In this article, we describe mechanisms by which the pharmacological defense status of the hair follicle might be enhanced, thereby reducing the accumulation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and preventing or reducing hair loss and damage. We believe this could be achieved via the selective increase in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expression within the hair follicle epithelium, following application of topical agonists for regulatory nuclear receptors. Clinical application would require the development of hair follicle-targeted formulations, potentially utilizing nanoparticle technology. This novel approach has the potential to yield entirely new therapeutic options for the treatment and management of chemotherapy-induced alopecia, providing significant psychological and physical benefit to cancer patients. PMID:24100054

  14. Role of family D ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABCD) in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hlavá?, Viktor; Sou?ek, Pavel

    2015-10-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, belonging to the family D, are expressed in peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum or lysosomes. ABCD transporters play a role in transport of lipids, bile acids and vitamin B12 and associate with peroxisomal disorders. ABCD1 performs transport of coenzyme A esters of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) in peroxisomes and a number of mutations in ABCD1 gene were linked to an X-linked adrenoleucodystrophy (X-ALD). The role of ABCD transporters in tumour growth has not been studied in detail, but there is some evidence that ABCDs levels differ between undifferentiated stem or tumour cells and differentiated cells suggesting a possible link to tumorigenesis. In this mini-review, we discuss the available information about the role of ABCD transporters in cancer. PMID:26517907

  15. Structure-function analysis of peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporters using chimeric dimers.

    PubMed

    Geillon, Flore; Gondcaille, Catherine; Charbonnier, Soëli; Van Roermund, Carlo W; Lopez, Tatiana E; Dias, Alexandre M M; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Arnould, Christine; Wanders, Ronald J; Trompier, Doriane; Savary, Stéphane

    2014-08-29

    ABCD1 and ABCD2 are two closely related ATP-binding cassette half-transporters predicted to homodimerize and form peroxisomal importers for fatty acyl-CoAs. Available evidence has shown that ABCD1 and ABCD2 display a distinct but overlapping substrate specificity, although much remains to be learned in this respect as well as in their capability to form functional heterodimers. Using a cell model expressing an ABCD2-EGFP fusion protein, we first demonstrated by proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay that ABCD1 interacts with ABCD2. Next, we tested in the pxa1/pxa2? yeast mutant the functionality of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers by expressing chimeric proteins mimicking homo- or heterodimers. For further structure-function analysis of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers, we expressed chimeric dimers fused to enhanced GFP in human skin fibroblasts of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy patients. These cells are devoid of ABCD1 and accumulate very long-chain fatty acids (C26:0 and C26:1). We checked that the chimeric proteins were correctly expressed and targeted to the peroxisomes. Very long-chain fatty acid levels were partially restored in transfected X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy fibroblasts regardless of the chimeric construct used, thus demonstrating functionality of both homo- and heterodimers. Interestingly, the level of C24:6 n-3, the immediate precursor of docosahexaenoic acid, was decreased in cells expressing chimeric proteins containing at least one ABCD2 moiety. Our data demonstrate for the first time that both homo- and heterodimers of ABCD1 and ABCD2 are functionally active. Interestingly, the role of ABCD2 (in homo- and heterodimeric forms) in the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids is clearly evidenced, and the chimeric dimers provide a novel tool to study substrate specificity of peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporters. PMID:25043761

  16. Candida Drug Resistance Protein 1, a Major Multidrug ATP Binding Cassette Transporter of Candida albicans, Translocates Fluorescent Phospholipids in a

    E-print Network

    Menon, Anant K.

    Candida Drug Resistance Protein 1, a Major Multidrug ATP Binding Cassette Transporter of Candida ABSTRACT: Candida albicans drug resistance protein 1 (Cdr1p), an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump reconstituted purified Cdr1p into sealed membrane vesicles. Comparison of the ATPase activities of sealed

  17. Cyclic Nucleotide Compartmentalization: Contributions of Phosphodiesterases and ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Cheepala, Satish; Hulot, Jean-Sebastien; Morgan, Jessica A.; Sassi, Yassine; Zhang, Weiqiang; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; Schuetz, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotides [e.g., cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)] are ubiquitous second messengers that affect multiple cell functions from maturation of the egg to cell division, growth, differentiation, and death. The concentration of cAMP can be regulated by processes within membrane domains (local regulation) as well as throughout a cell (global regulation). The phosphodiesterases (PDEs) that degrade cAMP have well-known roles in both these processes. It has recently been discovered that ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters contribute to both local and global regulation of cAMP. This regulation may require the formation of macromolecular complexes. Some of these transporters are ubiquitously expressed, whereas others are more tissue restricted. Because some PDE inhibitors are also ABC transporter inhibitors, it is conceivable that the therapeutic benefits of their use result from the combined inhibition of both PDEs and ABC transporters. Deciphering the individual contributions of PDEs and ABC transporters to such drug effects may lead to improved therapeutic benefits. PMID:23072381

  18. The pharmacological impact of ATP-binding cassette drug transporters on vemurafenib-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chung-Pu; V. Ambudkar, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer and one of the most common cancers in the world. Advanced melanoma is often resistant to conventional therapies and has high potential for metastasis and low survival rates. Vemurafenib is a small molecule inhibitor of the BRAF serine-threonine kinase recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration to treat patients with metastatic and unresectable melanomas that carry an activating BRAF (V600E) mutation. Many clinical trials evaluating other therapeutic uses of vemurafenib are still ongoing. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are membrane proteins with important physiological and pharmacological roles. Collectively, they transport and regulate levels of physiological substrates such as lipids, porphyrins and sterols. Some of them also remove xenobiotics and limit the oral bioavailability and distribution of many chemotherapeutics. The overexpression of three major ABC drug transporters is the most common mechanism for acquired resistance to anticancer drugs. In this review, we highlight some of the recent findings related to the effect of ABC drug transporters such as ABCB1 and ABCG2 on the oral bioavailability of vemurafenib, problems associated with treating melanoma brain metastases and the development of acquired resistance to vemurafenib in cancers harboring the BRAF (V600E) mutation.

  19. Tracing the structural evolution of eukaryotic ATP binding cassette transporter superfamily.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jie; Feng, Jinmei; Yuan, Dongxia; Zhou, Jun; Miao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters superfamily is one of the largest classes of membrane proteins. The core of the ABC transporter protein is composed of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Eukaryotes ABC transporters are classified into seven main families (ABCA to ABCG) based on sequence similarity and domain organizations. With different domain number and domain organizations, eukaryote ABC transporters show diverse structures: the single structure (NBD or TMD), the ABC2 structure (NBD-NBD), the half structure (TMD-NBD or NBD-TMD) and the full structure (TMD-NBD-TMD-NBD or NBD-TMD-NBD-TMD). However, studies on how various ABC transporter gene structures evolved is still absent. Therefore, in this study, we comprehensively investigated the structural evolution of eukaryotic ABC transporters. The seven eukaryote ABC transporter families (A to G) fell into three groups: A&G group, B,C&D group and E&F group. There were at least four times the number of NBD and TMD fusion events in the origin of the half structure transporter. Two fusion modes were found in the full and ABC2 structure origination. Based on these findings, we present a putative structural evolutionary path of eukaryote ABC transporters that will increase our understanding on their origin, divergence and function. PMID:26577702

  20. The ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCB19 regulates postembryonic organ separation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongtao; Liu, Lei; Mo, Huixian; Qian, Litao; Cao, Ying; Cui, Sujuan; Li, Xia; Ma, Ligeng

    2013-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin plays a critical role in plant development, including embryogenesis, organogenesis, tropism, apical dominance and in cell growth, division, and expansion. In these processes, the concentration gradient of auxin, which is established by polar auxin transport mediated by PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins and several ATP-binding cassette/multi-drug resistance/P-glycoprotein (ABCB/MDR/PGP) transporters, is a crucial signal. Here, we characterized the function of ABCB19 in the control of Arabidopsis organ boundary development. We identified a new abcb19 allele, abcb19-5, which showed stem-cauline leaf and stem-pedicel fusion defects. By virtue of the DII-VENUS marker, the auxin level was found to be increased at the organ boundary region in the inflorescence apex. The expression of CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON2 (CUC2) was decreased, while no obvious change in the expression of CUC3 was observed, in abcb19. In addition, the fusion defects were greatly enhanced in cuc3 abcb19-5, which was reminiscent of cuc2 cuc3. We also found that some other organ boundary genes, such as LOF1/2 were down-regulated in abcb19. Together, these results reveal a new aspect of auxin transporter ABCB19 function, which is largely dependent on the positive regulation of organ boundary genes CUC2 and LOFs at the postembryonic organ boundary. PMID:23560110

  1. A Conserved Mitochondrial ATP-binding Cassette Transporter Exports Glutathione Polysulfide for Cytosolic Metal Cofactor Assembly*?

    PubMed Central

    Schaedler, Theresia A.; Thornton, Jeremy D.; Kruse, Inga; Schwarzländer, Markus; Meyer, Andreas J.; van Veen, Hendrik W.; Balk, Janneke

    2014-01-01

    An ATP-binding cassette transporter located in the inner mitochondrial membrane is involved in iron-sulfur cluster and molybdenum cofactor assembly in the cytosol, but the transported substrate is unknown. ATM3 (ABCB25) from Arabidopsis thaliana and its functional orthologue Atm1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were expressed in Lactococcus lactis and studied in inside-out membrane vesicles and in purified form. Both proteins selectively transported glutathione disulfide (GSSG) but not reduced glutathione in agreement with a 3-fold stimulation of ATPase activity by GSSG. By contrast, Fe2+ alone or in combination with glutathione did not stimulate ATPase activity. Arabidopsis atm3 mutants were hypersensitive to an inhibitor of glutathione biosynthesis and accumulated GSSG in the mitochondria. The growth phenotype of atm3-1 was strongly enhanced by depletion of the mitochondrion-localized, GSH-dependent persulfide oxygenase ETHE1, suggesting that the physiological substrate of ATM3 contains persulfide in addition to glutathione. Consistent with this idea, a transportomics approach using mass spectrometry showed that glutathione trisulfide (GS-S-SG) was transported by Atm1. We propose that mitochondria export glutathione polysulfide, containing glutathione and persulfide, for iron-sulfur cluster assembly in the cytosol. PMID:25006243

  2. Rice shoot branching requires an ATP-binding cassette subfamily G protein.

    PubMed

    Yasuno, Naoko; Takamure, Itsuro; Kidou, Shin-ichiro; Tokuji, Yoshihiko; Ureshi, An-na; Funabiki, Atsushi; Ashikaga, Kazunori; Yamanouchi, Utako; Yano, Masahiro; Kato, Kiyoaki

    2009-01-01

    * Shoot branching is important for the establishment of plant architecture and productivity. * Here, characterization of rice (Oryza sativa) reduced culm number 1 (rcn1) mutants revealed that Rcn1 positively controls shoot branching by promoting the outgrowth of lateral shoots. Molecular studies revealed that Rcn1 encodes a novel member of ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily G (ABCG subfamily), also known as the white-brown complex (WBC) subfamily, and is designated OsABCG5. * Rcn1 is expressed in leaf primordia of main and axillary shoots, and in the vascular cells and leaf epidermis of older leaves. In addition, Rcn1 is expressed in the crown root primordia, endodermis, pericycle and stele in the root. No effect on Rcn1 expression in shoots or roots was seen when the roots were treated with auxins. Phenotypic analyses of rcn1 and tillering dwarf 3 (d3) double mutants at the seedling stage clarified that Rcn1 works independently of D3 in the branching inhibitor pathway. * Rcn1 is the first functionally defined plant ABCG protein gene that controls shoot branching and could thus be significant in future breeding for high-yielding rice. PMID:19140940

  3. ABCC1, an ATP binding cassette protein from grape berry, transports anthocyanidin 3-O-Glucosides.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Rita Maria; Regalado, Ana; Ageorges, Agnès; Burla, Bo J; Bassin, Barbara; Eisenach, Cornelia; Zarrouk, Olfa; Vialet, Sandrine; Marlin, Thérèse; Chaves, Maria Manuela; Martinoia, Enrico; Nagy, Réka

    2013-05-01

    Accumulation of anthocyanins in the exocarp of red grapevine (Vitis vinifera) cultivars is one of several events that characterize the onset of grape berry ripening (véraison). Despite our thorough understanding of anthocyanin biosynthesis and regulation, little is known about the molecular aspects of their transport. The participation of ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins in vacuolar anthocyanin transport has long been a matter of debate. Here, we present biochemical evidence that an ABC protein, ABCC1, localizes to the tonoplast and is involved in the transport of glucosylated anthocyanidins. ABCC1 is expressed in the exocarp throughout berry development and ripening, with a significant increase at véraison (i.e., the onset of ripening). Transport experiments using microsomes isolated from ABCC1-expressing yeast cells showed that ABCC1 transports malvidin 3-O-glucoside. The transport strictly depends on the presence of GSH, which is cotransported with the anthocyanins and is sensitive to inhibitors of ABC proteins. By exposing anthocyanin-producing grapevine root cultures to buthionine sulphoximine, which reduced GSH levels, a decrease in anthocyanin concentration is observed. In conclusion, we provide evidence that ABCC1 acts as an anthocyanin transporter that depends on GSH without the formation of an anthocyanin-GSH conjugate. PMID:23723325

  4. Tracing the structural evolution of eukaryotic ATP binding cassette transporter superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Feng, Jinmei; Yuan, Dongxia; Zhou, Jun; Miao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters superfamily is one of the largest classes of membrane proteins. The core of the ABC transporter protein is composed of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Eukaryotes ABC transporters are classified into seven main families (ABCA to ABCG) based on sequence similarity and domain organizations. With different domain number and domain organizations, eukaryote ABC transporters show diverse structures: the single structure (NBD or TMD), the ABC2 structure (NBD-NBD), the half structure (TMD-NBD or NBD-TMD) and the full structure (TMD-NBD-TMD-NBD or NBD-TMD-NBD-TMD). However, studies on how various ABC transporter gene structures evolved is still absent. Therefore, in this study, we comprehensively investigated the structural evolution of eukaryotic ABC transporters. The seven eukaryote ABC transporter families (A to G) fell into three groups: A&G group, B,C&D group and E&F group. There were at least four times the number of NBD and TMD fusion events in the origin of the half structure transporter. Two fusion modes were found in the full and ABC2 structure origination. Based on these findings, we present a putative structural evolutionary path of eukaryote ABC transporters that will increase our understanding on their origin, divergence and function. PMID:26577702

  5. Molecular Characterization of LjABCG1, an ATP-Binding Cassette Protein in Lotus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Akifumi; Fukuda, Shoju; Takanashi, Kojiro; Yoshioka, Miki; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Narusaka, Yoshihiro; Narusaka, Mari; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Shitan, Nobukazu; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2015-01-01

    LjABCG1, a full-size ABCG subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins of a model legume, Lotus japonicus, was reported as a gene highly expressed during the early stages of nodulation, but have not been characterized in detail. In this study we showed that the induction of LjABCG1 expression was remarkable by methyl jasmonate treatment, and reporter gene experiments indicated that LjABCG1 was strongly expressed in the nodule parenchyma and cell layers adjacent to the root vascular tissue toward the nodule. LjABCG1 was suggested to be localized at the plasma membrane based on the fractionation of microsomal membranes as well as separation via aqueous two-phase partitioning. The physiological functions of LjABCG1 in symbiosis and pathogenesis were analyzed in homologous and heterologous systems. LjABCG1 knock-down L. japonicus plants did not show clear phenotypic differences in nodule formation, and not in defense against Pseudomonas syringae, either. In contrast, when LjABCG1 was expressed in the Arabidopsis pdr8-1 mutant, the penetration frequency of Phytophthora infestans, a potato late blight pathogen, was significantly reduced in LjABCG1/pdr8-1 than in pdr8-1 plants. This finding indicated that LjABCG1, at least partially, complemented the phenotype of pdr8 in Arabidopsis, suggesting the multiple roles of this protein in plant-microbe interactions. PMID:26418593

  6. The Role of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters in Neuro-Inflammation: Relevance for Bioactive Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Kooij, Gijs; van Horssen, Jack; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Haughey, Norman J.; de Vries, Helga E.

    2012-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are highly expressed by brain endothelial cells that form the blood–brain barrier (BBB). These efflux pumps play an important role in maintaining brain homeostasis as they actively hinder the entry of unwanted blood-derived compounds into the central nervous system (CNS). Consequently, their high activity at the BBB has been a major hurdle for the treatment of several brain diseases, as they prevent numerous drugs to reach their site of action within the brain. Importantly, recent data indicate that endogenous substrates for ABC transporters may include inflammatory mediators, such as prostaglandins, leukotrienes, cytokines, chemokines, and bioactive lipids, suggesting a potential role for ABC transporters in immunological responses, and more specifically in inflammatory brain disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). In this review, we will give a comprehensive overview of recent findings that illustrate this novel role for ABC transporters in neuro-inflammatory processes. Moreover, we will provide first insights into underlying mechanisms and focus on the importance for bioactive lipids, in particular platelet-activating factor, herein. A thorough understanding of these events may form the basis for the development for selective treatment modalities to dampen the neuro-inflammatory attack in MS and thereby reducing tissue damage. PMID:22557971

  7. ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter 1 Attenuates Ovalbumin-Induced Neutrophilic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Cuilian; Yao, Xianglan; Vaisman, Boris; Brenner, Todd; Meyer, Katharine S.; Gao, Meixia; Keeran, Karen J.; Nugent, Gayle Z.; Qu, Xuan; Yu, Zu-Xi; Dagur, Pradeep K.; McCoy, J. Philip; Remaley, Alan T.

    2014-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) is an important component of high-density lipoprotein particles that mediates reverse cholesterol transport out of cells by interacting with the ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1). apoA-I has also been shown to attenuate neutrophilic airway inflammation in experimental ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma by reducing the expression of granulocyte colony–stimulating factor (G-CSF). Here, we hypothesized that overexpression of the ABCA1 transporter might similarly attenuate OVA-induced neutrophilic airway inflammation. Tie2–human ABCA1 (hABCA1) mice expressing human ABCA1 under the control of the Tie2 promoter, which is primarily expressed by vascular endothelial cells, but can also be expressed by macrophages, received daily intranasal OVA challenges, 5 d/wk for 5 weeks. OVA-challenged Tie2-hABCA1 mice had significant reductions in total bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cells that reflected a decrease in neutrophils, as well as reductions in peribronchial inflammation, OVA-specific IgE levels, and airway epithelial thickness. The reduced airway neutrophilia in OVA-challenged Tie2-hABCA1 mice was associated with significant decreases in G-CSF protein levels in pulmonary vascular endothelial cells, alveolar macrophages, and BALF. Intranasal administration of recombinant murine G-CSF to OVA-challenged Tie2-hABCA1 mice for 5 days increased BALF neutrophils to a level comparable to that of OVA-challenged wild-type mice. We conclude that ABCA1 suppresses OVA-induced airway neutrophilia by reducing G-CSF production by vascular endothelial cells and alveolar macrophages. These findings suggest that ABCA1 expressed by vascular endothelial cells and alveolar macrophages may play important roles in attenuating the severity of neutrophilic airway inflammation in asthma. PMID:24813055

  8. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates Both Heme and Pesticide Detoxification in Tick Midgut Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Flavio Alves; Pohl, Paula C.; Gandara, Ana Caroline; Ferreira, Jessica da Silva; Nascimento-Silva, Maria Clara; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Sorgine, Marcos H. F.; Almeida, Igor C.; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Oliveira, Pedro L.

    2015-01-01

    In ticks, the digestion of blood occurs intracellularly and proteolytic digestion of hemoglobin takes place in a dedicated type of lysosome, the digest vesicle, followed by transfer of the heme moiety of hemoglobin to a specialized organelle that accumulates large heme aggregates, called hemosomes. In the present work, we studied the uptake of fluorescent metalloporphyrins, used as heme analogs, and amitraz, one of the most regularly used acaricides to control cattle tick infestations, by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus midgut cells. Both compounds were taken up by midgut cells in vitro and accumulated inside the hemosomes. Transport of both molecules was sensitive to cyclosporine A (CsA), a well-known inhibitor of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Rhodamine 123, a fluorescent probe that is also a recognized ABC substrate, was similarly directed to the hemosome in a CsA-sensitive manner. Using an antibody against conserved domain of PgP-1-type ABC transporter, we were able to immunolocalize PgP-1 in the digest vesicle membranes. Comparison between two R. microplus strains that were resistant and susceptible to amitraz revealed that the resistant strain detoxified both amitraz and Sn-Pp IX more efficiently than the susceptible strain, a process that was also sensitive to CsA. A transcript containing an ABC transporter signature exhibited 2.5-fold increased expression in the amitraz-resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain. RNAi-induced down-regulation of this ABC transporter led to the accumulation of metalloporphyrin in the digestive vacuole, interrupting heme traffic to the hemosome. This evidence further confirms that this transcript codes for a heme transporter. This is the first report of heme transport in a blood-feeding organism. While the primary physiological function of the hemosome is to detoxify heme and attenuate its toxicity, we suggest that the use of this acaricide detoxification pathway by ticks may represent a new molecular mechanism of resistance to pesticides. PMID:26258982

  9. Structure, function, and evolution of bacterial ATP-binding cassette systems

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, A.L.; Dassa, E.; Orelle, C.; Chen, J.

    2010-07-27

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) systems constitute one of the largest superfamilies of paralogous sequences. All ABC systems share a highly conserved ATP-hydrolyzing domain or protein (the ABC; also referred to as a nucleotide-binding domain [NBD]) that is unequivocally characterized by three short sequence motifs (Fig. 1): these are the Walker A and Walker B motifs, indicative of the presence of a nucleotide-binding site, and the signature motif, unique to ABC proteins, located upstream of the Walker B motif (426). Other motifs diagnostic of ABC proteins are also indicated in Fig. 1. The biological significance of these motifs is discussed in Structure, Function, and Dynamics of the ABC. ABC systems are widespread among living organisms and have been detected in all genera of the three kingdoms of life, with remarkable conservation in the primary sequence of the cassette and in the organization of the constitutive domains or subunits (203, 420). ABC systems couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to an impressively large variety of essential biological phenomena, comprising not only transmembrane (TM) transport, for which they are best known, but also several non-transport-related processes, such as translation elongation (62) and DNA repair (174). Although ABC systems deserve much attention because they are involved in severe human inherited diseases (107), they were first discovered and characterized in detail in prokaryotes, as early as the 1970s (13, 148, 238, 468). The most extensively analyzed systems were the high-affinity histidine and maltose uptake systems of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli. Over 2 decades ago, after the completion of the nucleotide sequences encoding these transporters in the respective laboratories of Giovanna Ames and Maurice Hofnung, Hiroshi Nikaido and colleagues noticed that the two systems displayed a global similarity in the nature of their components and, moreover, that the primary sequences of MalK and HisP, the proteins suspected to energize these transporters, shared as much as 32% identity in amino acid residues when their sequences were aligned (171). Later, it was found that several bacterial proteins involved in uptake of nutrients, export of toxins, cell division, bacterial nodulation of plants, and DNA repair displayed the same similarity in their sequences (127, 196). This led to the notion that the conserved protein, which had been shown to bind ATP (198, 201), would probably energize the systems mentioned above by coupling the energy of ATP hydrolysis to transport. The latter was demonstrated with the maltose and histidine transporters by use of isolated membrane vesicles (105, 379) and purified transporters reconstituted into proteoliposomes (30, 98). The determination of the sequence of the first eukaryotic protein strongly similar to these bacterial transporters (the P-glycoprotein, involved in resistance of cancer cells to multiple drugs) (169, 179) demonstrated that these proteins were not restricted to prokaryotes. Two names, 'traffic ATPases' (15) and the more accepted name 'ABC transporters' (193, 218), were proposed for members of this new superfamily. ABC systems can be divided into three main functional categories, as follows. Importers mediate the uptake of nutrients in prokaryotes. The nature of the substrates that are transported is very wide, including mono- and oligosaccharides, organic and inorganic ions, amino acids, peptides, ironsiderophores, metals, polyamine cations, opines, and vitamins. Exporters are involved in the secretion of various molecules, such as peptides, lipids, hydrophobic drugs, polysaccharides, and proteins, including toxins such as hemolysin. The third category of systems is apparently not involved in transport, with some members being involved in translation of mRNA and in DNA repair. Despite the large, diverse population of substrates handled and the difference in the polarity of transport, importers and exporters share a common organization made of two hydrophobic membrane-spanning or integral membrane (IM)

  10. ATP-binding cassette-like transporters are involved in the transport of lignin precursors across plasma and vacuolar membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Y.C.; Liu, C.

    2010-12-28

    Lignin is a complex biopolymer derived primarily from the condensation of three monomeric precursors, the monolignols. The synthesis of monolignols occurs in the cytoplasm. To reach the cell wall where they are oxidized and polymerized, they must be transported across the cell membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the transport process are unclear. There are conflicting views about whether the transport of these precursors occurs by passive diffusion or is an energized active process; further, we know little about what chemical forms are required. Using isolated plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles prepared from Arabidopsis, together with applying different transporter inhibitors in the assays, we examined the uptake of monolignols and their derivatives by these native membrane vesicles. We demonstrate that the transport of lignin precursors across plasmalemma and their sequestration into vacuoles are ATP-dependent primary-transport processes, involving ATP-binding cassette-like transporters. Moreover, we show that both plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles selectively transport different forms of lignin precursors. In the presence of ATP, the inverted plasma membrane vesicles preferentially take up monolignol aglycones, whereas the vacuolar vesicles are more specific for glucoconjugates, suggesting that the different ATP-binding cassette-like transporters recognize different chemical forms in conveying them to distinct sites, and that glucosylation of monolignols is necessary for their vacuolar storage but not required for direct transport into the cell wall in Arabidopsis.

  11. Duplication of Genes in an ATP-binding Cassette Transport System Increases Dynamic Range While Maintaining Ligand Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire-Rijal, Sudipa; Lu, Xun; Myles, Dean A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria exist in a state of feast or famine where high nutrient availability leads to periods of growth followed by nutrient scarcity and growth stagnation. To adapt to the constantly changing nutrient flux, metabolite acquisition systems must be able to function over a broad range. This, however, creates difficulties as nutrient concentrations vary over many orders of magnitude, requiring metabolite acquisition systems to simultaneously balance ligand specificity and the dynamic range in which a response to a metabolite is elicited. Here we present how a gene duplication of a periplasmic binding protein in a mannose ATP-binding cassette transport system potentially resolves this dilemma through gene functionalization. Determination of ligand binding affinities and specificities of the gene duplicates with fluorescence and circular dichroism demonstrates that although the binding specificity is maintained the Kd values for the same ligand differ over three orders of magnitude. These results suggest that this metabolite acquisition system can transport ligand at both low and high environmental concentrations while preventing saturation with related and less preferentially metabolized compounds. The x-ray crystal structures of the ?-mannose-bound proteins help clarify the structural basis of gene functionalization and reveal that affinity and specificity are potentially encoded in different regions of the binding site. These studies suggest a possible functional role and adaptive advantage for the presence of two periplasmic-binding proteins in ATP-binding cassette transport systems and a way bacteria can adapt to varying nutrient flux through functionalization of gene duplicates. PMID:25210043

  12. ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter Structure Changes Detected by Intramolecular Fluorescence Energy Transfer for High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Iram, Surtaj H; Gruber, Simon J; Raguimova, Olga N; Thomas, David D; Robia, Seth L

    2015-07-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) actively transports a wide variety of drugs out of cells. To quantify MRP1 structural dynamics, we engineered a "two-color MRP1" construct by fusing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and TagRFP to MRP1 nucleotide-binding domains NBD1 and NBD2, respectively. The recombinant MRP1 protein expressed and trafficked normally to the plasma membrane. Two-color MRP1 transport activity was normal, as shown by vesicular transport of [(3)H]17?-estradiol-17-?-(D-glucuronide) and doxorubicin efflux in AAV-293 cells. We quantified fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from GFP to TagRFP as an index of NBD conformational changes. Our results show that ATP binding induces a large-amplitude conformational change that brings the NBDs into closer proximity. FRET was further increased by substrate in the presence of ATP but not by substrate alone. The data suggest that substrate binding is required to achieve a fully closed and compact structure. ATP analogs bind MRP1 with reduced apparent affinity, inducing a partially closed conformation. The results demonstrate the utility of the two-color MRP1 construct for investigating ATP-binding cassette transporter structural dynamics, and it holds great promise for high-throughput screening of chemical libraries for unknown activators, inhibitors, or transportable substrates of MRP1. PMID:25924616

  13. Cloning and Iron Transportation of Nucleotide Binding Domain of Cryptosporidium andersoni ATP-Binding Cassette (CaABC) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ju-Hua; Xue, Xiu-Heng; Zhou, Jie; Fan, Cai-Yun; Xie, Qian-Qian; Wang, Pan

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium andersoni ATP-binding cassette (CaABC) is an important membrane protein involved in substrate transport across the membrane. In this research, the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of CaABC gene was amplified by PCR, and the eukaryotic expression vector of pEGFP-C1-CaNBD was reconstructed. Then, the recombinant plasmid of pEGFP-C1-CaNBD was transformed into the mouse intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) to study the iron transportation function of CaABC. The results indicated that NBD region of CaABC gene can significantly elevate the transport efficiency of Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, and HCO3- in IECs (P<0.05). The significance of this study is to find the ATPase inhibitors for NBD region of CaABC gene and to inhibit ATP binding and nutrient transport of CaABC transporter. Thus, C. andersoni will be killed by inhibition of nutrient uptake. This will open up a new way for treatment of cryptosporidiosis. PMID:26174828

  14. Repositioning of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors as Antagonists of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters in Anticancer Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Kathawala, Rishil J.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR) has attenuated the efficacy of anticancer drugs and the possibility of successful cancer chemotherapy. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play an essential role in mediating MDR in cancer cells by increasing efflux of drugs from cancer cells, hence reducing the intracellular accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs. Interestingly, small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as AST1306, lapatinib, linsitinib, masitinib, motesanib, nilotinib, telatinib and WHI-P154, have been found to have the capability to overcome anticancer drug resistance by inhibiting ABC transporters in recent years. This review will focus on some of the latest and clinical developments with ABC transporters, TKIs and anticancer drug resistance. PMID:25268163

  15. Evidence for a Molecular Diode-based Mechanism in a Multispecific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) Exporter

    PubMed Central

    Mehla, Jitender; Ernst, Robert; Moore, Rachel; Wakschlag, Adina; Marquis, Mary Kate; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Golin, John

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette multidrug efflux pumps transport a wide range of substrates. Current models suggest that a drug binds relatively tightly to a transport site in the transmembrane domains when the protein is in the closed inward facing conformation. Upon binding of ATP, the transporter can switch to an outward facing (drug off or drug releasing) structure of lower affinity. ATP hydrolysis is critically important for remodeling the drug-binding site to facilitate drug release and to reset the transporter for a new transport cycle. We characterized the novel phenotype of an S1368A mutant that lies in the putative drug-binding pocket of the yeast multidrug transporter Pdr5. This substitution created broad, severe drug hypersensitivity, although drug binding, ATP hydrolysis, and intradomain signaling were indistinguishable from the wild-type control. Several different rhodamine 6G efflux and accumulation assays yielded evidence consistent with the possibility that Ser-1368 prevents reentry of the excluded drug. PMID:25112867

  16. Mammalian drug efflux transporters of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) family in multidrug resistance: A review of the past decade.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaolin; Shi, Tianlu; Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Pengli; Deng, Mingying; Huang, Cheng; Hu, Tingting; Jiang, Ling; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a serious phenomenon employed by cancer cells which hampers the success of cancer pharmacotherapy. One of the common mechanisms of MDR is the overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters in cancer cells such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2/ABCC2), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) that limits the prolonged and effective use of chemotherapeutic drugs. Researchers have found that developing inhibitors of ABC efflux transporters as chemosensitizers could overcome MDR. But the clinical trials have shown that most of these chemosensitizers are merely toxic and only show limited or no benefits to cancer patients, thus new inhibitors are being explored. Recent findings also suggest that efflux pumps of the ABC transporter family are subject to epigenetic gene regulation. In this review, we summarize recent findings of the role of ABC efflux transporters in MDR. PMID:26499806

  17. Regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters and cholesterol efflux by glucose in primary human monocytes and murine bone marrow-derived macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of developing atherosclerosis. This may be partially attributable to suppression of macrophage ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter mediated cholesterol efflux by sustained elevated blood glucose concentrations. Two models were used...

  18. ABCC1, an ATP Binding Cassette Protein from Grape Berry, Transports Anthocyanidin 3-O-Glucosides[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Rita Maria; Regalado, Ana; Ageorges, Agnès; Burla, Bo J.; Bassin, Barbara; Eisenach, Cornelia; Zarrouk, Olfa; Vialet, Sandrine; Marlin, Thérèse; Chaves, Maria Manuela; Martinoia, Enrico; Nagy, Réka

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of anthocyanins in the exocarp of red grapevine (Vitis vinifera) cultivars is one of several events that characterize the onset of grape berry ripening (véraison). Despite our thorough understanding of anthocyanin biosynthesis and regulation, little is known about the molecular aspects of their transport. The participation of ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins in vacuolar anthocyanin transport has long been a matter of debate. Here, we present biochemical evidence that an ABC protein, ABCC1, localizes to the tonoplast and is involved in the transport of glucosylated anthocyanidins. ABCC1 is expressed in the exocarp throughout berry development and ripening, with a significant increase at véraison (i.e., the onset of ripening). Transport experiments using microsomes isolated from ABCC1-expressing yeast cells showed that ABCC1 transports malvidin 3-O-glucoside. The transport strictly depends on the presence of GSH, which is cotransported with the anthocyanins and is sensitive to inhibitors of ABC proteins. By exposing anthocyanin-producing grapevine root cultures to buthionine sulphoximine, which reduced GSH levels, a decrease in anthocyanin concentration is observed. In conclusion, we provide evidence that ABCC1 acts as an anthocyanin transporter that depends on GSH without the formation of an anthocyanin-GSH conjugate. PMID:23723325

  19. Influence of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters in Root Exudation of Phytoalexins, Signals, and in Disease Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Badri, Dayakar V.; Chaparro, Jacqueline M.; Manter, Daniel K.; Martinoia, Enrico; Vivanco, Jorge M.

    2012-01-01

    The roots of plants secrete compounds as a way to exchange information with organisms living in the soil. Here, we report the involvement of seven root-expressed ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters corresponding to both full and half-size molecules (Atabcg36, Atabcg37, Atabcc5, Atabcf1, Atabcf3, Atnap5, and Atath10) in root exudation processes using Arabidopsis thaliana. Root exuded phytochemicals were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and it was determined that some of the root exudates from the corresponding ABC transporter mutants were significantly different compared to the wild type. For example, Atabcg37 and Atabcc5 secreted higher levels of the phytoalexin camalexin, and Atabcg36 secreted higher levels of organic acids, specifically salicylic acid (SA). Furthermore, we analyzed the root tissue metabolites of these seven ABC transporter mutants and found that the levels of SA, quercetin, and kaempferol glucosides were higher in Atabcg36, which was correlated with higher expression levels of defense genes in the root tissues compared with the wild type. We did not observe significant changes in the root exudates of the half-size transporters except for Atabcf1 that showed lower levels of few organic acids. In summary, full-size transporters are involved in root secretion of phytochemicals. PMID:22783269

  20. Efficient Purification and Reconstitution of ATP Binding Cassette Transporter B6 (ABCB6) for Functional and Structural Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Hemantkumar; Taimur Khan, Mohiuddin Md.; Tegos, George; Krishnamurthy, Partha

    2013-01-01

    The mitochondrial ATP binding cassette transporter ABCB6 has been associated with a broad range of physiological functions, including growth and development, therapy-related drug resistance, and the new blood group system Langereis. ABCB6 has been proposed to regulate heme synthesis by shuttling coproporphyrinogen III from the cytoplasm into the mitochondria. However, direct functional information of the transport complex is not known. To understand the role of ABCB6 in mitochondrial transport, we developed an in vitro system with pure and active protein. ABCB6 overexpressed in HEK293 cells was solubilized from mitochondrial membranes and purified to homogeneity. Purified ABCB6 showed a high binding affinity for MgATP (Kd = 0.18 ?m) and an ATPase activity with a Km of 0.99 mm. Reconstitution of ABCB6 into liposomes allowed biochemical characterization of the ATPase including (i) substrate-stimulated ATPase activity, (ii) transport kinetics of its proposed endogenous substrate coproporphyrinogen III, and (iii) transport kinetics of substrates identified using a high throughput screening assay. Mutagenesis of the conserved lysine to alanine (K629A) in the Walker A motif abolished ATP hydrolysis and substrate transport. These results suggest a direct interaction between mitochondrial ABCB6 and its transport substrates that is critical for the activity of the transporter. Furthermore, the simple immunoaffinity purification of ABCB6 to near homogeneity and efficient reconstitution of ABCB6 into liposomes might provide the basis for future studies on the structure/function of ABCB6. PMID:23792964

  1. Significance of ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins in multidrug resistance of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    GUAN, GUO-FANG; ZHANG, DE-JUN; ZHENG, YING; WEN, LIAN-JI; YU, DUO-JIAO; LU, YAN-QING; ZHAO, YAN

    2015-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, a small subpopulation of cancer cells, known as cancer stem cells (CSCs), exist that are self-renewing and are involved in tumor invasion, metastasis and recurrence. A number of studies have reported that certain cancer cells are able to efflux the Hoechst 33342 dye. These cells are termed side population (SP) cells and share characteristic features of CSCs. The results of the present study revealed that 2.7% of primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells were SP cells. This was reduced to 0.7% following treatment with verapamil. The immunofluorescence and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that SP cells have an enhanced expression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein ABC subfamily G, member 2 (ABCG2), which has been identified to be actively involved in drug exclusion. Similarly, the mRNA level of the oncogene B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region-1 and the stem cell surface proteins nestin and octamer-binding transcription factor-4 were highly expressed in the SP cells compared with the non-SP cells. In addition, it was demonstrated that HNSCC SP cells exhibited increased proliferation and were highly resistant to multiple drugs. These findings suggest that the presence of CSCs, such as SP cells, may be responsible for chemotherapy failure and tumor relapse in patients with HNSCC. Therefore, the identification of a novel therapeutic drug that could effectively target CSCs may help to eradicate refractory tumors. PMID:26622545

  2. Structures of ABCB10, a human ATP-binding cassette transporter in apo- and nucleotide-bound states

    PubMed Central

    Shintre, Chitra A.; Pike, Ashley C. W.; Kim, Jung-In; Barr, Alastair J.; Goubin, Solenne; Shrestha, Leela; Yang, Jing; Berridge, Georgina; Ross, Jonathan; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Edwards, Aled M.; Bountra, Chas; Marsden, Brian D.; von Delft, Frank; Bullock, Alex N.; Gileadi, Opher; Burgess-Brown, Nicola A.; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.

    2013-01-01

    ABCB10 is one of the three ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters found in the inner membrane of mitochondria. In mammals ABCB10 is essential for erythropoiesis, and for protection of mitochondria against oxidative stress. ABCB10 is therefore a potential therapeutic target for diseases in which increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and oxidative stress play a major role. The crystal structure of apo-ABCB10 shows a classic exporter fold ABC transporter structure, in an open-inwards conformation, ready to bind the substrate or nucleotide from the inner mitochondrial matrix or membrane. Unexpectedly, however, ABCB10 adopts an open-inwards conformation when complexed with nonhydrolysable ATP analogs, in contrast to other transporter structures which adopt an open-outwards conformation in complex with ATP. The three complexes of ABCB10/ATP analogs reported here showed varying degrees of opening of the transport substrate binding site, indicating that in this conformation there is some flexibility between the two halves of the protein. These structures suggest that the observed plasticity, together with a portal between two helices in the transmembrane region of ABCB10, assist transport substrate entry into the substrate binding cavity. These structures indicate that ABC transporters may exist in an open-inwards conformation when nucleotide is bound. We discuss ways in which this observation can be aligned with the current views on mechanisms of ABC transporters. PMID:23716676

  3. Conformational Changes of the Antibacterial Peptide ATP Binding Cassette Transporter McjD Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ruo-Xu; Corradi, Valentina; Singh, Gurpreet; Choudhury, Hassanul G; Beis, Konstantinos; Tieleman, D Peter

    2015-09-29

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters form one of the largest protein superfamilies. They use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to transport chemically diverse ligands across membranes. An alternating access mechanism in which the transporter switches between inward- and outward-facing conformations has been proposed to describe the translocation process. One of the main open questions in this process is the degree of opening of the transporter at different stages of the transport cycle, as crystal structures and biochemical data have suggested a wide range of distances between nucleotide binding domains. Recently, the crystal structure of McjD, an antibacterial peptide ABC transporter from Escherichia coli, revealed a new occluded intermediate state of the transport cycle. The transmembrane domain is closed on both sides of the membrane, forming a cavity that can accommodate its ligand, MccJ25, a lasso peptide of 21 amino acids. In this work, we investigate the degree of opening of the transmembrane cavity required for ligand translocation. By means of steered molecular dynamics simulations, the ligand was pulled from the internal cavity to the extracellular side. This resulted in an outward-facing state. Comparison with existing outward-facing crystal structures shows a smaller degree of opening in the simulations, suggesting that the large conformational changes in some crystal structures may not be necessary even for a large substrate like MccJ25. PMID:26334959

  4. AztD, a Periplasmic Zinc Metallochaperone to an ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter System in Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Handali, Melody; Roychowdhury, Hridindu; Neupane, Durga P; Yukl, Erik T

    2015-12-11

    Bacterial ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters of transition metals are essential for acquisition of necessary elements from the environment. A large number of Gram-negative bacteria, including human pathogens, have a fourth conserved gene of unknown function adjacent to the canonical permease, ATPase, and solute-binding protein (SBP) genes of the AztABC zinc transporter system. To assess the function of this putative accessory factor (AztD) from Paracoccus denitrificans, we have analyzed its transcriptional regulation, metal binding properties, and interaction with the SBP (AztC). Transcription of the aztD gene is significantly up-regulated under conditions of zinc starvation. Recombinantly expressed AztD purifies with slightly substoichiometric zinc from the periplasm of Escherichia coli and is capable of binding up to three zinc ions with high affinity. Size exclusion chromatography and a simple intrinsic fluorescence assay were used to determine that AztD as isolated is able to transfer bound zinc nearly quantitatively to apo-AztC. Transfer occurs through a direct, associative mechanism that prevents loss of metal to the solvent. These results indicate that AztD is a zinc chaperone to AztC and likely functions to maintain zinc homeostasis through interaction with the AztABC system. This work extends our understanding of periplasmic zinc trafficking and the function of chaperones in this process. PMID:26468286

  5. Molecular cloning and expression profile of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene from the hemipteran insect Nilaparvata lugens.

    PubMed

    Zha, W J; Li, S H; Zhou, L; Chen, Z J; Liu, K; Yang, G C; Hu, G; He, G C; You, A Q

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters belong to a large superfamily of proteins that have important physiological functions in all living organisms. In insects, ABC transporters have important functions in the transport of molecules, and are also involved in insecticide resistance, metabolism, and development. In this study, the Nilaparvata lugens Stal (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) ABCG (NlABCG) gene was identified and characterized. The complete mRNA sequence of NlABCG was 2608-bp long, with an open reading frame of 2064 bp encoding a protein comprised of 687 amino acids. The conserved regions include three N-glycosylation and 34 phosphorylation sites, as well as seven transmembrane domains. The amino acid identity with the closely related species Acyrthosiphon pisum was 42.8%. Developmental expression analysis using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR suggested that the NlABCG transcript was expressed at all developmental stages of N. lugens. The lowest expression of NlABCG was in the 1st instar, and levels increased with larval growth. The transcript profiles of NlABCG were analyzed in various tissues from a 5th instar nymph, and the highest expression was observed in the midgut. These results suggest that the sequence, characteristics, and expression of NlABCG are highly conserved, and basic information is provided for its functional analysis. PMID:25867414

  6. ATP-binding Cassette Subfamily C Member 5 (ABCC5) Functions as an Efflux Transporter of Glutamate Conjugates and Analogs.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Robert S; Mahakena, Sunny; de Haas, Marcel; Borst, Piet; van de Wetering, Koen

    2015-12-18

    The ubiquitous efflux transporter ABCC5 (ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 5) is present at high levels in the blood-brain barrier, neurons, and glia, but its in vivo substrates and function are not known. Using untargeted metabolomic screens, we show that Abcc5(-/-) mice accumulate endogenous glutamate conjugates in several tissues, but brain in particular. The abundant neurotransmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate was 2.4-fold higher in Abcc5(-/-) brain. The metabolites that accumulated in Abcc5(-/-) tissues were depleted in cultured cells that overexpressed human ABCC5. In a vesicular membrane transport assay, ABCC5 also transported exogenous glutamate analogs, like the classic excitotoxic neurotoxins kainic acid, domoic acid, and NMDA; the therapeutic glutamate analog ZJ43; and, as previously shown, the anti-cancer drug methotrexate. Glutamate conjugates and analogs are of physiological relevance because they can affect the function of glutamate, the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. After CO2 asphyxiation, several immediate early genes were expressed at lower levels in Abcc5(-/-) brains than in wild type brains, suggesting altered glutamate signaling. Our results show that ABCC5 is a general glutamate conjugate and analog transporter that affects the disposition of endogenous metabolites, toxins, and drugs. PMID:26515061

  7. Afatinib circumvents multidrug resistance via dually inhibiting ATP binding cassette subfamily G member 2 in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-kun; Kin Wah To, Kenneth; Huang, Li-yan; Xu, Jing-hong; Yang, Ke; Wang, Fang; Huang, Zhen-cong; Ye, Sheng; Fu, Li-wu

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapeutic drugs is a formidable barrier to the success of cancer chemotherapy. Expressions of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters contribute to clinical MDR phenotype. In this study, we found that afatinib, a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) targeting EGFR, HER-2 and HER-4, reversed the chemoresistance mediated by ABCG2 in vitro, but had no effect on that mediated by multidrug resistance protein ABCB1 and ABCC1. In addition, afatinib, in combination with topotecan, significantly inhibited the growth of ABCG2-overexpressing cell xenograft tumors in vivo. Mechanistic investigations exhibited that afatinib significantly inhibited ATPase activity of ABCG2 and downregulated expression level of ABCG2, which resulted in the suppression of efflux activity of ABCG2 in parallel to the increase of intracellular accumulation of ABCG2 substrate anticancer agents. Taken together, our findings may provide a new and useful combinational therapeutic strategy of afatinib with chemotherapeutical drug for the patients with ABCG2 overexpressing cancer cells. PMID:25436978

  8. The ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter ABCB6 Is Induced by Arsenic and Protects against Arsenic Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Hemantkumar; Oruganti, Mahitha; Krishnamurthy, Partha

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic, an environmental carcinogen, remains a major public health problem. Arsenic damages biological systems through multiple mechanisms, including the generation of reactive oxygen species. ABCB6 is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that is highly expressed in cells resistant to arsenic. We have recently demonstrated that ABCB6 expression protects against cellular stressors. In the present study, we evaluated the significance of ABCB6 expression to arsenic toxicity both in mice and in cell culture. We show that sodium arsenite induces ABCB6 expression in a dose-dependent manner both in mice fed sodium arsenite in drinking water and in cells exposed to sodium arsenite in vitro. Arsenite-induced ABCB6 expression was transcriptionally regulated, but this induction was not mediated by the redox-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2–related factor 2 (Nrf2). We demonstrate that, in HepG2 and Hep3B cells, knockdown of ABCB6 expression using ABCB6-specific small interfering RNA sensitized the cells to arsenite toxicity. In contrast, stable overexpression of ABCB6 conferred a strong survival advantage toward arsenite-induced oxidative stress. Collectively, these results, obtained by both loss of function and gain of function analysis, suggest that ABCB6 expression in response to sodium arsenite might be an endogenous protective mechanism activated to protect cells against arsenite-induced oxidative stress. PMID:21266531

  9. ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters and HDL Suppress Hematopoietic Stem Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Yvan-Charvet, Laurent; Pagler, Tamara; Gautier, Emmanuel L.; Avagyan, Serine; Siry, Read L.; Han, Seongah; Welch, Carrie L.; Wang, Nan; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Snoeck, Hans W.; Tall, Alan R.

    2011-01-01

    Elevated leukocyte cell numbers (leukocytosis), and monocytes in particular, promote atherosclerosis; however, how they become increased is poorly understood. Mice deficient in the adenosine triphosphate–binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1, which promote cholesterol efflux from macrophages and suppress atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice, displayed leukocytosis, a transplantable myeloproliferative disorder, and a dramatic expansion of the stem and progenitor cell population containing Lin? Sca-1+Kit+ (LSK) in the bone marrow. Transplantation of Abca1?/? Abcg1?/? bone marrow into apolipoprotein A-1 transgenic mice with elevated levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) suppressed the LSK population, reduced leukocytosis, reversed the myeloproliferative disorder, and accelerated atherosclerosis. The findings indicate that ABCA1, ABCG1, and HDL inhibit the proliferation of hematopoietic stem and multipotential progenitor cells and connect expansion of these populations with leukocytosis and accelerated atherosclerosis. PMID:20488992

  10. ATP-binding cassette transporters and HDL suppress hematopoietic stem cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yvan-Charvet, Laurent; Pagler, Tamara; Gautier, Emmanuel L; Avagyan, Serine; Siry, Read L; Han, Seongah; Welch, Carrie L; Wang, Nan; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Snoeck, Hans W; Tall, Alan R

    2010-06-25

    Elevated leukocyte cell numbers (leukocytosis), and monocytes in particular, promote atherosclerosis; however, how they become increased is poorly understood. Mice deficient in the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1, which promote cholesterol efflux from macrophages and suppress atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice, displayed leukocytosis, a transplantable myeloproliferative disorder, and a dramatic expansion of the stem and progenitor cell population containing Lin(-)Sca-1(+)Kit+ (LSK) in the bone marrow. Transplantation of Abca1(-/-) Abcg1(-/-) bone marrow into apolipoprotein A-1 transgenic mice with elevated levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) suppressed the LSK population, reduced leukocytosis, reversed the myeloproliferative disorder, and accelerated atherosclerosis. The findings indicate that ABCA1, ABCG1, and HDL inhibit the proliferation of hematopoietic stem and multipotential progenitor cells and connect expansion of these populations with leukocytosis and accelerated atherosclerosis. PMID:20488992

  11. [Study on the relationship between the resistance to MTX and the transport protein superfamily of ATP-binding cassette that induces multiple drug resistance].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Yu; Feng, Yuan-Xi; Li, Pu; Fu, Song-Bin

    2006-10-01

    A major problem, especially the multidrug resistance, in chemotherapy was the resistance to the chemotherapeutic agents. ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily that mediated the efflux of drugs was involved in multidrug resistance. In order to understand the relationship between the resistance to MTX and the transport protein superfamily of ATP-binding cassette, and to investigate the mechanism of resistance to MTX, the study detected the expressions of mdr1, mrp1, mrp2, mrp3, mrp5, mrp6 and abcg2 that encoded the transport proteins by SuperArray analysis and the expressions of MRP1and MRP5 proteins by Western blot analysis. The results showed that the multidrug resistance proteins were the chief member of ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily related to resistance to MTX. And the high expression levels of mrp1 and mrp5 were detected. Moreover, it revealed by SuperArray analysis that expression of mrp5 in MTX-resistant cells was significantly higher than that in normal mouse cells. Besides, corresponding excessive expression of MRP5 protein in MTX-resistant cells was also confirmed by Western blot. So, MRP5 could play important roles in the resistance to MTX and would be a new potential drug target. PMID:17035174

  12. A Survey of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Gene Superfamily in the Salmon Louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis)

    PubMed Central

    Heumann, Jan; Taggart, John B.; Gharbi, Karim; Bron, James E.; Bekaert, Michaël; Sturm, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Salmon lice, Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Krøyer, 1837), are fish ectoparasites causing significant economic damage in the mariculture of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar Linnaeus, 1758. The control of L. salmonis at fish farms relies to a large extent on treatment with anti-parasitic drugs. A problem related to chemical control is the potential for development of resistance, which in L. salmonis is documented for a number of drug classes including organophosphates, pyrethroids and avermectins. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene superfamily is found in all biota and includes a range of drug efflux transporters that can confer drug resistance to cancers and pathogens. Furthermore, some ABC transporters are recognised to be involved in conferral of insecticide resistance. While a number of studies have investigated ABC transporters in L. salmonis, no systematic analysis of the ABC gene family exists for this species. This study presents a genome-wide survey of ABC genes in L. salmonis for which, ABC superfamily members were identified through homology searching of the L. salmonis genome. In addition, ABC proteins were identified in a reference transcriptome of the parasite generated by high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of a multi-stage RNA library. Searches of both genome and transcriptome allowed the identification of a total of 33 genes / transcripts coding for ABC proteins, of which 3 were represented only in the genome and 4 only in the transcriptome. Eighteen sequences were assigned to ABC subfamilies known to contain drug transporters, i.e. subfamilies B (4 sequences), C (11) and G (2). The results suggest that the ABC gene family of L. salmonis possesses fewer members than recorded for other arthropods. The present survey of the L. salmonis ABC gene superfamily will provide the basis for further research into potential roles of ABC transporters in the toxicity of salmon delousing agents and as potential mechanisms of drug resistance. PMID:26418738

  13. Phosphorylation by protein kinase CK2 modulates the activity of the ATP binding cassette A1 transporter.

    PubMed

    Roosbeek, Stein; Peelman, Frank; Verhee, Annick; Labeur, Christine; Caster, Hans; Lensink, Marc F; Cirulli, Claudia; Grooten, Johan; Cochet, Claude; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Amoresano, Angela; Chimini, Giovanna; Tavernier, Jan; Rosseneu, Maryvonne

    2004-09-01

    In a previous characterization of the ABCA subfamily of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, we identified potential protein kinase 2 (CK2) phosphorylation sites, which are conserved in eukaryotic and prokaryotic members of the ABCA transporters. These phosphorylation residues are located in the conserved cytoplamic R1 and R2 domains, downstream of the nucleotide binding domains NBD1 and NBD2. To study the possible regulation of the ABCA1 transporter by CK2, we expressed the recombinant cytoplasmic domains of ABCA1, NBD1+R1 and NBD2+R2. We demonstrated that in vitro ABCA1 NBD1+R1, and not NBD2+R2, is phosphorylated by CK2, and we identified Thr-1242, Thr-1243, and Ser-1255 as the phosphorylated residues in the R1 domain by mass spectrometry. We further investigated the functional significance of the threonine and serine phosphorylation sites in NBD1 by site-directed mutagenesis of the entire ABCA1 followed by transfection into Hek-293 Tet-Off cells. The ABCA1 flippase activity, apolipoprotein AI and AII binding, and cellular phospholipid and cholesterol efflux were enhanced by mutations preventing CK2 phosphorylation of the threonine and serine residues. This was confirmed by the effect of specific protein kinase CK2 inhibitors upon the activity of wild type and mutant ABCA1 in transfected Hek-293 Tet-Off cells. The activities of the mutants mimicking threonine phosphorylation were close to that of wild type ABCA1. Our data, therefore, suggest that besides protein kinase A and C, protein kinase CK2 might play an important role in vivo in regulating the function and transport activity of ABCA1 and possibly of other members of the ABCA subfamily. PMID:15218032

  14. Neratinib Reverses ATP-Binding Cassette B1-Mediated Chemotherapeutic Drug Resistance In Vitro, In Vivo, and Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao-qin; Xie, Jing-dun; Chen, Xing-gui; Sim, Hong May; Zhang, Xu; Liang, Yong-ju; Singh, Satyakam; Talele, Tanaji T.; Sun, Yueli; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Neratinib, an irreversible inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor and human epidermal receptor 2, is in phase III clinical trials for patients with human epidermal receptor 2-positive, locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. The objective of this study was to explore the ability of neratinib to reverse tumor multidrug resistance attributable to overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Our results showed that neratinib remarkably enhanced the sensitivity of ABCB1-overexpressing cells to ABCB1 substrates. It is noteworthy that neratinib augmented the effect of chemotherapeutic agents in inhibiting the growth of ABCB1-overexpressing primary leukemia blasts and KBv200 cell xenografts in nude mice. Furthermore, neratinib increased doxorubicin accumulation in ABCB1-overexpressing cell lines and Rhodamine 123 accumulation in ABCB1-overexpressing cell lines and primary leukemia blasts. Neratinib stimulated the ATPase activity of ABCB1 at low concentrations but inhibited it at high concentrations. Likewise, neratinib inhibited the photolabeling of ABCB1 with [125I]iodoarylazidoprazosin in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 = 0.24 ?M). Neither the expression of ABCB1 at the mRNA and protein levels nor the phosphorylation of Akt was affected by neratinib at reversal concentrations. Docking simulation results were consistent with the binding conformation of neratinib within the large cavity of the transmembrane region of ABCB1, which provides computational support for the cross-reactivity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors with human ABCB1. In conclusion, neratinib can reverse ABCB1-mediated multidrug resistance in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo by inhibiting its transport function. PMID:22491935

  15. A Survey of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Gene Superfamily in the Salmon Louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis).

    PubMed

    Carmona-Antoñanzas, Greta; Carmichael, Stephen N; Heumann, Jan; Taggart, John B; Gharbi, Karim; Bron, James E; Bekaert, Michaël; Sturm, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Salmon lice, Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Krøyer, 1837), are fish ectoparasites causing significant economic damage in the mariculture of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar Linnaeus, 1758. The control of L. salmonis at fish farms relies to a large extent on treatment with anti-parasitic drugs. A problem related to chemical control is the potential for development of resistance, which in L. salmonis is documented for a number of drug classes including organophosphates, pyrethroids and avermectins. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene superfamily is found in all biota and includes a range of drug efflux transporters that can confer drug resistance to cancers and pathogens. Furthermore, some ABC transporters are recognised to be involved in conferral of insecticide resistance. While a number of studies have investigated ABC transporters in L. salmonis, no systematic analysis of the ABC gene family exists for this species. This study presents a genome-wide survey of ABC genes in L. salmonis for which, ABC superfamily members were identified through homology searching of the L. salmonis genome. In addition, ABC proteins were identified in a reference transcriptome of the parasite generated by high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of a multi-stage RNA library. Searches of both genome and transcriptome allowed the identification of a total of 33 genes / transcripts coding for ABC proteins, of which 3 were represented only in the genome and 4 only in the transcriptome. Eighteen sequences were assigned to ABC subfamilies known to contain drug transporters, i.e. subfamilies B (4 sequences), C (11) and G (2). The results suggest that the ABC gene family of L. salmonis possesses fewer members than recorded for other arthropods. The present survey of the L. salmonis ABC gene superfamily will provide the basis for further research into potential roles of ABC transporters in the toxicity of salmon delousing agents and as potential mechanisms of drug resistance. PMID:26418738

  16. Insight into Pleiotropic Drug Resistance ATP-binding Cassette Pump Drug Transport through Mutagenesis of Cdr1p Transmembrane Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Khan, Mohammad Firoz; Kapoor, Khyati; Goyal, Neha; Sen, Sobhan; Saxena, Ajay Kumar; Lynn, Andrew M.; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; Monk, Brian C.; Cannon, Richard D.; Komath, Sneha Sudha; Prasad, Rajendra

    2013-01-01

    The fungal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter Cdr1 protein (Cdr1p), responsible for clinically significant drug resistance, is composed of two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). We have probed the nature of the drug binding pocket by performing systematic mutagenesis of the primary sequences of the 12 transmembrane segments (TMSs) found in the TMDs. All mutated proteins were expressed equally well and localized properly at the plasma membrane in the heterologous host Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but some variants differed significantly in efflux activity, substrate specificity, and coupled ATPase activity. Replacement of the majority of the amino acid residues with alanine or glycine yielded neutral mutations, but about 42% of the variants lost resistance to drug efflux substrates completely or selectively. A predicted three-dimensional homology model shows that all the TMSs, apart from TMS4 and TMS10, interact directly with the drug-binding cavity in both the open and closed Cdr1p conformations. However, TMS4 and TMS10 mutations can also induce total or selective drug susceptibility. Functional data and homology modeling assisted identification of critical amino acids within a drug-binding cavity that, upon mutation, abolished resistance to all drugs tested singly or in combinations. The open and closed Cdr1p models enabled the identification of amino acid residues that bordered a drug-binding cavity dominated by hydrophobic residues. The disposition of TMD residues with differential effects on drug binding and transport are consistent with a large polyspecific drug binding pocket in this yeast multidrug transporter. PMID:23824183

  17. Linoleic acid suppresses cholesterol efflux and ATP-binding cassette transporters in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Spartano, Nicole L.; Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Matthan, Nirupa R.; Obin, Martin S.; Greenberg, Andrew S.; Lichtenstein, Alice H.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), possibly associated with elevated plasma free fatty acid concentrations. Paradoxically, evidence suggests that unsaturated, compared to saturated fatty acids, suppress macrophage cholesterol efflux, favoring cholesterol accumulation in the artery wall. Murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were used to further explore the relationship between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and cholesterol efflux mediated by ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABCA1 and ABCG1) through transcription factors liver-x-receptor-alpha (LXR-?) and sterol receptor element binding protein (SREBP)-1. BMDM isolated from C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 100 uM linoleic acid (18:2) or palmitic acid (16:0) for 16 hr, and 25 ug/mL oxidized low density lipoprotein for an additional 24 hr. ABCA1 and ABCG1 mRNA expression was suppressed to a greater extent by 18:2 (60% and 54 %, respectively) than 16:0 (30% and 29%, respectively) relative to control (all p<0.01). 18:2 decreased ABCA1 protein levels by 94% and high density lipoprotein (HDL) mediated cholesterol efflux by 53% (both p<0.05), and had no significant effect on ABCG1, LXR-? or SREBP-1 protein levels. 16:0 had no effect on ABCA1, ABCG1, LXR-? or SREBP-1 protein expression or HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux. These results suggest that 18:2, relative to 16:0, attenuated macrophage HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux through down regulation of ABCA1 mRNA and protein levels but not through changes in LXR-? or SREBP-1 expression. The effect of 18:2 relative to 16:0 on macrophages cholesterol homeostasis may exacerbate the predisposition of individuals with T2DM to increased CVD risk. PMID:24595513

  18. HIV-1 Protein Nef Inhibits Activity of ATP-binding Cassette Transporter A1 by Targeting Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Calnexin*

    PubMed Central

    Jennelle, Lucas; Hunegnaw, Ruth; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Fitzgerald, Michael L.; Sviridov, Dmitri; Popratiloff, Anastas; Brichacek, Beda; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    HIV-infected patients are at increased risk of developing atherosclerosis, in part due to an altered high density lipoprotein profile exacerbated by down-modulation and impairment of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) activity by the HIV-1 protein Nef. However, the mechanisms of this Nef effect remain unknown. Here, we show that Nef interacts with an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone calnexin, which regulates folding and maturation of glycosylated proteins. Nef disrupted interaction between calnexin and ABCA1 but increased affinity and enhanced interaction of calnexin with HIV-1 gp160. The Nef mutant that did not bind to calnexin did not affect the calnexin-ABCA1 interaction. Interaction with calnexin was essential for functionality of ABCA1, as knockdown of calnexin blocked the ABCA1 exit from the endoplasmic reticulum, reduced ABCA1 abundance, and inhibited cholesterol efflux; the same effects were observed after Nef overexpression. However, the effects of calnexin knockdown and Nef on cholesterol efflux were not additive; in fact, the combined effect of these two factors together did not differ significantly from the effect of calnexin knockdown alone. Interestingly, gp160 and ABCA1 interacted with calnexin differently; although gp160 binding to calnexin was dependent on glycosylation, glycosylation was of little importance for the interaction between ABCA1 and calnexin. Thus, Nef regulates the activity of calnexin to stimulate its interaction with gp160 at the expense of ABCA1. This study identifies a mechanism for Nef-dependent inactivation of ABCA1 and dysregulation of cholesterol metabolism. PMID:25170080

  19. Evaluation of the role of ATP-binding cassette transporters as a defence mechanism against temephos in populations of Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Lima, Estelita Pereira; Goulart, Marília Oliveira Fonseca; Rolim Neto, Modesto Leite

    2014-11-01

    The role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in the efflux of the insecticide, temephos, was assessed in the larvae of Aedes aegypti. Bioassays were conducted using mosquito populations that were either susceptible or resistant to temephos by exposure to insecticide alone or in combination with sublethal doses of the ABC transporter inhibitor, verapamil (30, 35 and 40 ?M). The best result in the series was obtained with the addition of verapamil (40 ?M), which led to a 2x increase in the toxicity of temephos, suggesting that ABC transporters may be partially involved in conferring resistance to the populations evaluated. PMID:25411004

  20. NpPDR1, a Pleiotropic Drug Resistance-Type ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia, Plays a Major Role in Plant Pathogen Defense1

    PubMed Central

    Stukkens, Yvan; Bultreys, Alain; Grec, Sébastien; Trombik, Tomasz; Vanham, Delphine; Boutry, Marc

    2005-01-01

    Nicotiana plumbaginifolia NpPDR1, a plasma membrane pleiotropic drug resistance-type ATP-binding cassette transporter formerly named NpABC1, has been suggested to transport the diterpene sclareol, an antifungal compound. However, direct evidence for a role of pleiotropic drug resistance transporters in the plant defense is still lacking. In situ immunolocalization and histochemical analysis using the gusA reporter gene showed that NpPDR1 was constitutively expressed in the whole root, in the leaf glandular trichomes, and in the flower petals. However, NpPDR1 expression was induced in the whole leaf following infection with the fungus Botrytis cinerea, and the bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas marginalis pv marginalis, which do not induce a hypersensitive response in N. plumbaginifolia, whereas a weaker response was observed using P. syringae pv syringae, which does induce a hypersensitive response. Induced NpPDR1 expression was more associated with the jasmonic acid than the salicylic acid signaling pathway. These data suggest that NpPDR1 is involved in both constitutive and jasmonic acid-dependent induced defense. Transgenic plants in which NpPDR1 expression was prevented by RNA interference showed increased sensitivity to sclareol and reduced resistance to B. cinerea. These data show that NpPDR1 is involved in pathogen resistance and thus demonstrate a new role for the ATP-binding cassette transporter family. PMID:16126865

  1. Endogenous mutagenesis by an insertion sequence element identifies Aeromonas salmonicida AbcA as an ATP-binding cassette transport protein required for biogenesis of smooth lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, S; Noonan, B; Cavaignac, S; Trust, T J

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of an Aeromonas salmonicida A layer-deficient/O polysaccharide-deficient mutant carrying a Tn5 insertion in the structural gene for A protein (vapA) showed that the abcA gene immediately downstream of vapA had been interrupted by the endogenous insertion sequence element ISAS1. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that O polysaccharides did not accumulate at the inner membrane-cytoplasm interface of this mutant. abcA encodes an unusual protein; it carries both an amino-terminal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) domain showing high sequence similarity to ABC proteins implicated in the transport of certain capsular and O polysaccharides and a carboxyl-terminal potential DNA-binding domain, which distinguishes AbcA from other polysaccharide transport proteins in structural and evolutionary terms. The smooth lipopolysaccharide phenotype was restored by complementation with abcA but not by abcA carrying site-directed mutations in the sequence encoding the ATP-binding site of the protein. The genetic organization of the A. salmonicida ABC polysaccharide system differs from other bacteria. abcA also differs in apparently being required for both O-polysaccharide synthesis and in energizing the transport of O polysaccharides to the cell surface. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7777581

  2. Conformational changes of the bacterial type I ATP-binding cassette importer HisQMP2 at distinct steps of the catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Heuveling, Johanna; Frochaux, Violette; Ziomkowska, Joanna; Wawrzinek, Robert; Wessig, Pablo; Herrmann, Andreas; Schneider, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Prokaryotic solute binding protein-dependent ATP-binding cassette import systems are divided into type I and type II and mechanistic differences in the transport process going along with this classification are under intensive investigation. Little is known about the conformational dynamics during the catalytic cycle especially concerning the transmembrane domains. The type I transporter for positively charged amino acids from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (LAO-HisQMP2) was studied by limited proteolysis in detergent solution in the absence and presence of co-factors including ATP, ADP, LAO/arginine, and Mg(2+) ions. Stable peptide fragments could be obtained and differentially susceptible cleavage sites were determined by mass spectrometry as Lys-258 in the nucleotide-binding subunit, HisP, and Arg-217/Arg-218 in the transmembrane subunit, HisQ. In contrast, transmembrane subunit HisM was gradually degraded but no stable fragment could be detected. HisP and HisQ were equally resistant under pre- and post-hydrolysis conditions in the presence of arginine-loaded solute-binding protein LAO and ATP/ADP. Some protection was also observed with LAO/arginine alone, thus reflecting binding to the transporter in the apo-state and transmembrane signaling. Comparable digestion patterns were obtained with the transporter reconstituted into proteoliposomes and nanodiscs. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy confirmed the change of HisQ(R218) to a more apolar microenvironment upon ATP binding and hydrolysis. Limited proteolysis was subsequently used as a tool to study the consequences of mutations on the transport cycle. Together, our data suggest similar conformational changes during the transport cycle as described for the maltose ABC transporter of Escherichia coli, despite distinct structural differences between both systems. PMID:24021237

  3. An ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Is Required for Cuticular Wax Deposition and Desiccation Tolerance in the Moss Physcomitrella patens[W

    PubMed Central

    Buda, Gregory J.; Barnes, William J.; Fich, Eric A.; Park, Sungjin; Yeats, Trevor H.; Zhao, Lingxia; Domozych, David S.; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.

    2013-01-01

    The plant cuticle is thought to be a critical evolutionary adaptation that allowed the first plants to colonize land, because of its key roles in regulating plant water status and providing protection from biotic and abiotic stresses. Much has been learned about cuticle composition and structure through genetic and biochemical studies of angiosperms, as well as underlying genetic pathways, but little is known about the cuticles of early diverging plant lineages. Here, we demonstrate that the moss Physcomitrella patens, an extant relative of the earliest terrestrial plants, has a cuticle that is analogous in both structure and chemical composition to those of angiosperms. To test whether the underlying cuticle biosynthetic pathways were also shared among distant plant lineages, we generated a genetic knockout of the moss ATP binding cassette subfamily G (ABCG) transporter Pp-ABCG7, a putative ortholog of Arabidopsis thaliana ABCG transporters involved in cuticle precursor trafficking. We show that this mutant is severely deficient in cuticular wax accumulation and has a reduced tolerance of desiccation stress compared with the wild type. This work provides evidence that the cuticle was an adaptive feature present in the first terrestrial plants and that the genes involved in their formation have been functionally conserved for over 450 million years. PMID:24163310

  4. Rescuing Trafficking Mutants of the ATP-binding Cassette Protein, ABCA4, with Small Molecule Correctors as a Treatment for Stargardt Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Sabirzhanova, Inna; Lopes Pacheco, Miquéias; Rapino, Daniele; Grover, Rahul; Handa, James T; Guggino, William B; Cebotaru, Liudmila

    2015-08-01

    Stargardt disease is the most common form of early onset macular degeneration. Mutations in ABCA4, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family, are associated with Stargardt disease. Here, we have examined two disease-causing mutations in the NBD1 region of ABCA4, R1108C, and R1129C, which occur within regions of high similarity with CFTR, another ABC transporter gene, which is associated with cystic fibrosis. We show that R1108C and R1129C are both temperature-sensitive processing mutants that engage the cellular quality control mechanism and show a strong interaction with the chaperone Hsp 27. Both mutant proteins also interact with HDCAC6 and are degraded in the aggresome. We also demonstrate that novel corrector compounds that are being tested as treatment for cystic fibrosis, such as VX-809, can rescue the processing of the ABCA4 mutants, particularly their expression at the cell surface, and can reduce their binding to HDAC6. Thus, our data suggest that VX-809 can potentially be developed as a new therapy for Stargardt disease, for which there is currently no treatment. PMID:26092729

  5. Structural and Functional Characterization of an Orphan ATP-Binding Cassette ATPase Involved in Manganese Utilization and Tolerance in Leptospira spp.

    PubMed Central

    Saul, Frederick; Bellalou, Jacques; Miras, Isabelle; Weber, Patrick; Bondet, Vincent; Murray, Gerald L.; Adler, Ben; Ristow, Paula; Louvel, Hélène; Haouz, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira species are the etiological agents of the widespread zoonotic disease leptospirosis. Most organisms, including Leptospira, require divalent cations for proper growth, but because of their high reactivity, these metals are toxic at high concentrations. Therefore, bacteria have acquired strategies to maintain metal homeostasis, such as metal import and efflux. By screening Leptospira biflexa transposon mutants for their ability to use Mn2+, we have identified a gene encoding a putative orphan ATP-binding cassette (ABC) ATPase of unknown function. Inactivation of this gene in both L. biflexa and L. interrogans strains led to mutants unable to grow in medium in which iron was replaced by Mn2+, suggesting an involvement of this ABC ATPase in divalent cation uptake. A mutation in this ATPase-coding gene increased susceptibility to Mn2+ toxicity. Recombinant ABC ATPase of the pathogen L. interrogans exhibited Mg2+-dependent ATPase activity involving a P-loop motif. The structure of this ATPase was solved from a crystal containing two monomers in the asymmetric unit. Each monomer adopted a canonical two-subdomain organization of the ABC ATPase fold with an ?/? subdomain containing the Walker motifs and an ? subdomain containing the ABC signature motif (LSSGE). The two monomers were arranged in a head-to-tail orientation, forming a V-shaped particle with all the conserved ABC motifs at the dimer interface, similar to functional ABC ATPases. These results provide the first structural and functional characterization of a leptospiral ABC ATPase. PMID:24123817

  6. An ATP-binding cassette pleiotropic drug transporter protein is required for xenobiotic tolerance and antagonism in the fungal biocontrol agent Clonostachys rosea.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Mukesh K; Jensen, Dan Funck; Karlsson, Magnus

    2014-07-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters mediate active efflux of natural and synthetic toxicants and are considered to be important for drug tolerance in microorganisms. In biological control agents (BCA), ABC transporters can play important roles in antagonism by providing protection against toxins derived from the fungal prey and by mediating the secretion of endogenous toxins. In the present study, we generated deletion and complementation strains of the ABC transporter abcG5 in the fungal BCA Clonostachys rosea to study its role in xenobiotic tolerance and antagonism. Gene expression analysis shows induced expression of abcG5 in the presence of the Fusarium mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEA), secreted metabolites of F. graminearum, and different classes of fungicides. Phenotypic analysis of abcG5 deletion and complementation strains showed that the deletion strains were more sensitive towards F. graminearum culture filtrates, ZEA, and iprodione- and mefenoxam-based fungicides, thus suggesting the involvement of abcG5 in cell protection. The ?abcG5 strains displayed reduced antagonism towards F. graminearum in a plate confrontation assay. Furthermore, the ?abcG5 strains failed to protect barley seedlings from F. graminearium foot rot disease. These data show that the abcG5 ABC transporter is important for xenobiotic tolerance and biocontrol traits in C. rosea. PMID:24654977

  7. Role of NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic motif in the subcellular localization of ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily D: Common features in eukaryotic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Asaka; Asahina, Kota; Okamoto, Takumi; Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Kostsin, Dzmitry G.; Kashiwayama, Yoshinori; Takanashi, Kojiro; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Imanaka, Tsuneo; Morita, Masashi

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • ABCD proteins classifies based on with or without NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment. • The ABCD proteins with the segment are targeted peroxisomes. • The ABCD proteins without the segment are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum. • The role of the segment in organelle targeting is conserved in eukaryotic organisms. - Abstract: In mammals, four ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins belonging to subfamily D have been identified. ABCD1–3 possesses the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic region and are targeted to peroxisomes, while ABCD4 lacking the region is targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Based on hydropathy plot analysis, we found that several eukaryotes have ABCD protein homologs lacking the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment (H0 motif). To investigate whether the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in subcellular localization is conserved across species, we expressed ABCD proteins from several species (metazoan, plant and fungi) in fusion with GFP in CHO cells and examined their subcellular localization. ABCD proteins possessing the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif were localized to peroxisomes, while ABCD proteins lacking this region lost this capacity. In addition, the deletion of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif of ABCD protein resulted in their localization to the ER. These results suggest that the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in organelle targeting is widely conserved in living organisms.

  8. Vascular and extravascular distribution of the ATP-binding cassette transporters ABCB1 and ABCC1 in aged human brain and pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Hölzl, Gloria; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Hildebrandt, Jens; Trübner, Kurt; Krohn, Markus; Bogerts, Bernhard; Pahnke, Jens

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play an increasing role in the understanding of pathologic peptide deposition in neurodegenerative diseases (NDs), such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. To describe the location of the most important ABC transporters for NDs in human brain tissue, we investigated ABCB1 and ABCC1 immunohistologically in the adult human brain and pituitary. Both transporters have similar but not identical expression patterns. In brain regions with an established blood-brain barrier (BBB), ABCB1 and ABCC1 were ubiquitously expressed in endothelial cells of the microvasculature and in a subset of larger blood vessels (mostly venules). Remarkably, both transporters were also found in fenestrated capillaries in circumventricular organs where the BBB is absent. Moreover, ABCB1 and ABCC1 were also expressed in various non-endothelia cells such as pericytes, astrocytes, choroid plexus epithelia, ventricle ependymal cells, and neurons. With regard to their neuronal expression it was shown that both transporters are located in specific nerve cell populations, which are also immunopositive for three putative cell markers of purinergic cell signalling, namely 5´-nucleotidase, adenosine deaminase and nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-2. Therefore, we speculate that neuronal expression of ABCB1 and ABCC1 might be linked to adenosinergic/purinergic neuromodulation. Lastly, both transporters were observed in multiple adenohypophyseal cells. PMID:25218792

  9. Whole-Transcriptome Survey of the Putative ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Family Genes in the Latex-Producing Laticifers of Hevea brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhiyi, Nie; Guijuan, Kang; Yu, Li; Longjun, Dai; Rizhong, Zeng

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins or transporters constitute a large protein family in plants and are involved in many different cellular functions and processes, including solute transportation, channel regulation and molecular switches, etc. Through transcriptome sequencing, a transcriptome-wide survey and expression analysis of the ABC protein genes were carried out using the laticiferous latex from Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree). A total of 46 putative ABC family proteins were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex. These consisted of 12 ‘full-size’, 21 ‘half-size’ and 13 other putative ABC proteins, and all of them showed strong conservation with their Arabidopsis thaliana counterparts. This study indicated that all eight plant ABC protein paralog subfamilies were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex, of which ABCB, ABCG and ABCI were the most abundant. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays demonstrated that gene expression of several latex ABC proteins was regulated by ethylene, jasmonic acid or bark tapping (a wound stress) stimulation, and that HbABCB15, HbABCB19, HbABCD1 and HbABCG21 responded most significantly of all to the abiotic stresses. The identification and expression analysis of the latex ABC family proteins could facilitate further investigation into their physiological involvement in latex metabolism and rubber biosynthesis by H. brasiliensis. PMID:25615936

  10. Intrinsic acyl-CoA thioesterase activity of a peroxisomal ATP binding cassette transporter is required for transport and metabolism of fatty acids.

    PubMed

    De Marcos Lousa, Carine; van Roermund, Carlo W T; Postis, Vincent L G; Dietrich, Daniela; Kerr, Ian D; Wanders, Ronald J A; Baldwin, Stephen A; Baker, Alison; Theodoulou, Frederica L

    2013-01-22

    Peroxisomes are organelles that perform diverse metabolic functions in different organisms, but a common function is ?-oxidation of a variety of long chain aliphatic, branched, and aromatic carboxylic acids. Import of substrates into peroxisomes for ?-oxidation is mediated by ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins of subfamily D, which includes the human adrenoleukodystropy protein (ALDP) defective in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). Whether substrates are transported as CoA esters or free acids has been a matter of debate. Using COMATOSE (CTS), a plant representative of the ABCD family, we demonstrate that there is a functional and physical interaction between the ABC transporter and the peroxisomal long chain acyl-CoA synthetases (LACS)6 and -7. We expressed recombinant CTS in insect cells and showed that membranes from infected cells possess fatty acyl-CoA thioesterase activity, which is stimulated by ATP. A mutant, in which Serine 810 is replaced by asparagine (S810N) is defective in fatty acid degradation in vivo, retains ATPase activity but has strongly reduced thioesterase activity, providing strong evidence for the biological relevance of this activity. Thus, CTS, and most likely the other ABCD family members, represent rare examples of polytopic membrane proteins with an intrinsic additional enzymatic function that may regulate the entry of substrates into the ?-oxidation pathway. The cleavage of CoA raises questions about the side of the membrane where this occurs and this is discussed in the context of the peroxisomal coenzyme A (CoA) budget. PMID:23288899

  11. Cooperative transcriptional activation of ATP-binding cassette sterol transporters ABCG5 and ABCG8 genes by nuclear receptors including Liver-X-Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Back, Su Sun; Kim, Jinsu; Choi, Daehyung; Lee, Eui Sup; Choi, Soo Young; Han, Kyuhyung

    2013-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporters ABCG5 and ABCG8 form heterodimers that limit absorption of dietary sterols in the intestine and promote cholesterol elimination from the body through hepatobiliary secretion. To identify cis-regulatory elements of the two genes, we have cloned and analyzed twenty-three evolutionary conserved region (ECR) fragments using the CMV-luciferase reporter system in HepG2 cells. Two ECRs were found to be responsive to the Liver-X-Receptor (LXR). Through elaborate deletion studies, regions containing putative LXREs were identified and the binding of LXR? was demonstrated by EMSA and ChIP assay. When the LXREs were inserted upstream of the intergenic promoter, synergistic activation by LXR?/RXR? in combination with GATA4, HNF4?, and LRH-1, which had been shown to bind to the intergenic region, was observed. In conclusion, we have identified two LXREs in ABCG5/ABCG8 genes for the first time and propose that these LXREs, especially in the ECR20, play major roles in regulating these genes. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(6): 322-327] PMID:23790976

  12. Residues of a proposed gate region in type I ATP-binding cassette import systems are crucial for function as revealed by mutational analysis.

    PubMed

    Weidlich, Daniela; Wiesemann, Nicole; Heuveling, Johanna; Wardelmann, Kristina; Landmesser, Heidi; Sani, Katayoun Behnam; Worth, Catherine L; Preissner, Robert; Schneider, Erwin

    2013-09-01

    The type I ATP-binding cassette (ABC) importer for positively charged amino acids of the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus consists of the extracellular solute binding protein, ArtJ, and a homodimer each of the transmembrane subunit, ArtM, and the nucleotide-binding and -hydrolyzing subunit, ArtP. We have investigated the functional consequences of mutations affecting conserved residues from two peptide regions in ArtM, recently proposed to form a 'gate' by which access of a substrate to the translocation path is controlled (Hollenstein et al., 2007 [14]). Transporter variants were reconstituted into proteoliposomes and assayed for ArtJ/arginine-stimulated ATPase activity. Replacement of residues from region 1 (Arg-63, Pro-66) caused no or only moderate reduction in ATPase activity. In contrast, mutating residues from gate region 2 (Lys-159, Leu-163) resulted in a substantial increase in ATPase activity which, however, as demonstrated for variants ArtM(K159I) and ArtM(K159E), is not coupled to transport. Replacing homologous residues in the closely related histidine transporter of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (HisJ-QMP2) caused different phenotypes. Mutation to isoleucine of HisQ(K163) or HisM(H172), both homologous to ArtM(K159), abolished ATPase activity. The mutations most likely caused a structural change as revealed by limited proteolysis. In contrast, substantial, albeit reduced, enzymatic activity was observed with variants of HisQ(L167?G) or HisM(L176?G), both homologous to ArtM(L163). Our study provides the first experimental evidence in favor of a crucial role of residues from the proposed gate region in type I ABC importer function. PMID:23747295

  13. ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter G26 Is Required for Male Fertility and Pollen Exine Formation in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Quilichini, Teagen D.; Friedmann, Michael C.; Samuels, A. Lacey; Douglas, Carl J.

    2010-01-01

    The highly resistant biopolymer, sporopollenin, gives the outer wall (exine) of spores and pollen grains their unparalleled strength, shielding these structures from terrestrial stresses. Despite a limited understanding of the composition of sporopollenin, it appears that the synthesis of sporopollenin occurs in the tapetum and requires the transport of one or more sporopollenin constituents to the surface of developing microspores. Here, we describe ABCG26, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily, which is required for pollen exine formation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). abcg26 mutants are severely reduced in fertility, with most siliques failing to produce seeds by self-fertilization and mature anthers failing to release pollen. Transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed an absence of an exine wall on abcg26-1 mutant microspores. Phenotypic abnormalities in pollen wall formation were first apparent in early uninucleate microspores as a lack of exine formation and sporopollenin deposition. Additionally, the highest levels of ABCG26 mRNA were in the tapetum, during early pollen wall formation, sporopollenin biosynthesis, and sporopollenin deposition. Accumulations resembling the trilamellar lipidic coils in the abcg11 and abcg12 mutants defective in cuticular wax export were observed in the anther locules of abcg26 mutants. A yellow fluorescent protein-ABCG26 protein was localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane. Our results show that ABCG26 plays a critical role in exine formation and pollen development and are consistent with a model by which ABCG26 transports sporopollenin precursors across the tapetum plasma membrane into the locule for polymerization on developing microspore walls. PMID:20732973

  14. Ethnic differences in ATP-binding cassette transporter, sub-family G, member 2 (ABCG2/BCRP): genotype combinations and estimated functions.

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Masayuki; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Takada, Yuzo; Nakamura, Takahiro; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Takada, Tappei; Kitajiri, Shin-Ichiro; Wakai, Kenji; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter, sub-family G, member 2 (ABCG2/BCRP) is a xenobiotic transporter and also regulates serum uric acid levels as a urate transporter. We have shown that the severity of ABCG2 dysfunction can be estimated by simple genotyping of two dysfunctional variants, Q126X (rs72552713) and Q141K (rs2231142). This genotyping method is widely accepted for the risk analysis of hyperuricemia/gout, but there is no report on ethnic differences in ABCG2 dysfunctions. Here, we estimated ABCG2 dysfunctions by its genotype combination (Q126X and Q141K) and compared them in three different ethnic groups (500 Japanese, 200 Caucasians and 100 African-Americans). The minor allele frequencies of Q126X and Q141K in Japanese (0.025 and 0.275, respectively) were significantly higher than those in Caucasians (0.005 and 0.085, respectively) and African-Americans (0 and 0.090, respectively). Additionally, the rates of mild, moderate and severe ABCG2 dysfunctions in Japanese (35.4%, 12.4% and 1.6%, respectively) were higher than those in Caucasians (14.0%, 2.5% and 0%, respectively) and African-Americans (14.0%, 2.0% and 0%, respectively). Because ABCG2 dysfunctional diplotypes were commonly observed in both Caucasians (16.5%) and African-Americans (16.0%), the genotyping of the two ABCG2 dysfunctional variants is useful for evaluating individual differences in the ABCG2 dysfunction which affect the pharmacokinetics of substrate drugs and hyperuricemia risk in all three ethnic groups. PMID:24869748

  15. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Inhibitors Interact with ATP Binding Cassette Transporter 4/Multidrug Resistance Protein 4: A Basis for Unanticipated Enhanced Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Yu; Takenaka, Kazumasa; Sparreboom, Alex; Cheepala, Satish B.; Wu, Chung-Pu; Ekins, Sean; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pharmacotherapy, by combining different drug classes such as nucleoside analogs and HIV protease inhibitors (PIs), has increased HIV-patient life expectancy. Consequently, among these patients, an increase in non-HIV–associated cancers has produced a patient cohort requiring both HIV and cancer chemotherapy. We hypothesized that multidrug resistance protein 4/ATP binding cassette transporter 4 (MRP4/ABCC4), a widely expressed transporter of nucleoside-based antiviral medications as well as cancer therapeutics might interact with PIs. Among the PIs evaluated (nelfinavir, ritonavir, amprenavir, saquinavir, and indinavir), only nelfinavir both effectively stimulated MRP4 ATPase activity and inhibited substrate-stimulated ATPase activity. Saos2 and human embryonic kidney 293 cells engineered to overexpress MRP4 were then used to assess transport and cytotoxicity. MRP4 expression reduced intracellular accumulation of nelfinavir and consequently conferred survival advantage to nelfinavir cytotoxicity. Nelfinavir blocked Mrp4-mediated export, which is consistent with its ability to increase the sensitivity of MRP4-expressing cells to methotrexate. In contrast, targeted inactivation of Abcc4/Mrp4 in mouse cells specifically enhanced nelfinavir and 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl) adenine cytotoxicity. These results suggest that nelfinavir is both an inhibitor and substrate of MRP4. Because nelfinavir is a new MRP4/ABCC4 substrate, we developed a MRP4/ABCC4 pharmacophore model, which showed that the nelfinavir binding site is shared with chemotherapeutic substrates such as adefovir and methotrexate. Our studies reveal, for the first time, that nelfinavir, a potent and cytotoxic PI, is both a substrate and inhibitor of MRP4. These findings suggest that HIV-infected cancer patients receiving nelfinavir might experience both enhanced antitumor efficacy and unexpected adverse toxicity given the role of MRP4/ABCC4 in exporting nucleoside-based antiretroviral medications and cancer chemotherapeutics. PMID:23775562

  16. ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transport System Solute-binding Protein-guided Identification of Novel d-Altritol and Galactitol Catabolic Pathways in Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58.

    PubMed

    Wichelecki, Daniel J; Vetting, Matthew W; Chou, Liyushang; Al-Obaidi, Nawar; Bouvier, Jason T; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A

    2015-11-27

    Innovations in the discovery of the functions of uncharacterized proteins/enzymes have become increasingly important as advances in sequencing technology flood protein databases with an exponentially growing number of open reading frames. This study documents one such innovation developed by the Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI; U54GM093342), the use of solute-binding proteins for transport systems to identify novel metabolic pathways. In a previous study, this strategy was applied to the tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporters. Here, we apply this strategy to the ATP-binding cassette transporters and report the discovery of novel catabolic pathways for d-altritol and galactitol in Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58. These efforts resulted in the description of three novel enzymatic reactions as follows: 1) oxidation of d-altritol to d-tagatose via a dehydrogenase in Pfam family PF00107, a previously unknown reaction; 2) phosphorylation of d-tagatose to d-tagatose 6-phosphate via a kinase in Pfam family PF00294, a previously orphan EC number; and 3) epimerization of d-tagatose 6-phosphate C-4 to d-fructose 6-phosphate via a member of Pfam family PF08013, another previously unknown reaction. The epimerization reaction catalyzed by a member of PF08013 is especially noteworthy, because the functions of members of PF08013 have been unknown. These discoveries were assisted by the following two synergistic bioinformatics web tools made available by the Enzyme Function Initiative: the EFI-Enzyme Similarity Tool and the EFI-Genome Neighborhood Tool. PMID:26472925

  17. New High-Throughput Screening Assay To Reveal Similarities and Differences in Inhibitory Sensitivities of Multidrug ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters?

    PubMed Central

    Kolaczkowski, Marcin; Kolaczkowska, Anna; Motohashi, Noboru; Michalak, Krystyna

    2009-01-01

    Cdr1p is the major ATP-binding cassette multidrug transporter conferring resistance to azoles and other antifungals in Candida albicans. In this study, the identification of new Cdr1p inhibitors by use of a newly developed high-throughput fluorescence-based assay is reported. The assay also allowed monitoring of the activity and inhibition of the related transporters Pdr5p and Snq2p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which made it possible to compare its performance with those of previously established procedures. A high sensitivity, resulting from a wide dynamic range, was achieved upon high-level expression of the Cdr1p, Pdr5p, and Snq2p transporters in an S. cerevisiae strain in which the endogenous interfering activities were further reduced by genetic manipulation. An analysis of a set of therapeutically used and newly synthesized phenothiazine derivatives revealed different pharmacological profiles for Cdr1p, Pdr5p, and Snq2p. All transporters showed similar sensitivities to M961 inhibition. In contrast, Cdr1p was less sensitive to inhibition by fluphenazine, whereas phenothiazine selectively inhibited Snq2p. The inhibition potencies measured by the new assay reflected the ability of the compounds to potentiate the antifungal effect of ketoconazole (KTC), which was detoxified by the overproduced transporters. They also correlated with the 50% inhibitory concentration for inhibition of Pdr5p-mediated transport of rhodamine 6G in isolated plasma membranes. The most active derivative, M961, potentiated the activity of KTC against an azole-resistant CDR1-overexpressing C. albicans isolate. PMID:19188399

  18. Correlation between the promoter methylation status of ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 and drug sensitivity in colorectal cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyun-Hye; Kim, Sung-Hee; Ku, Ja-Lok

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapeutic agents has been considered as a major reason for the high incidence rate of recurrence and metastasis suffered by colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. ATP?binding cassette sub?family G member 2 (ABCG2) is involved in drug resistance. DNA methylation of the ABCG2 promoter site has a significant influence on the regulation of epigenetic gene expression. In the present study, we investigated whether the methylation status of the ABCG2 promoter is related to drug sensitivity in CRC cell lines. In order to examine the ABCG2 expression level and identify the methylation status, RT?PCR, qRT?PCR analysis, MS?PCR and bisulfite sequencing were conducted on 32 CRC cell lines. SNU?C4, LS174T and NCI?H716 were selected as low ABCG2?expressing and high promoter methylated cell lines. The cell proliferation assay for 5?fluorouracil, oxaliplatin and irinotecan was performed after 5?aza?2'?deoxycytidine (5?aza) treatment in these cell lines. In the 32 CRC cell lines, 25% of the cell lines expressed low or no ABCG2 expression. Of these cell lines, SNU?C4, LS174T and NCI?H716 were hypermethylated at the promoter region, ~20%. Demethylation of ABCG2 was induced by 5?aza, which enhanced the ABCG2 expression level and influenced the cell proliferation similar to treatment with the anticancer agents. Our data suggest that the ABCG2 expression level regulated by methylation is related to anticancer drug sensitivity. Based on these results, it can be applied to predict the anticancer drug response. PMID:26497773

  19. Functional and Structural Characterization of Polysaccharide Co-polymerase Proteins Required for Polymer Export in ATP-binding Cassette Transporter-dependent Capsule Biosynthesis Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Larue, Kane; Ford, Robert C.; Willis, Lisa M.; Whitfield, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B and Escherichia coli K1 bacteria produce a capsular polysaccharide (CPS) that is composed of ?2,8-linked polysialic acid (PSA). Biosynthesis of PSA in these bacteria occurs via an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter-dependent pathway. In N. meningitidis, export of PSA to the surface of the bacterium requires two proteins that form an ABC transporter (CtrC and CtrD) and two additional proteins, CtrA and CtrB, that are proposed to form a cell envelope-spanning export complex. CtrA is a member of the outer membrane polysaccharide export (OPX) family of proteins, which are proposed to form a pore to mediate export of CPSs across the outer membrane. CtrB is an inner membrane protein belonging to the polysaccharide co-polymerase (PCP) family. PCP proteins involved in other bacterial polysaccharide assembly systems form structures that extend into the periplasm from the inner membrane. There is currently no structural information available for PCP or OPX proteins involved in an ABC transporter-dependent CPS biosynthesis pathway to support their proposed roles in polysaccharide export. Here, we report cryo-EM images of purified CtrB reconstituted into lipid bilayers. These images contained molecular top and side views of CtrB and showed that it formed a conical oligomer that extended ?125 Å from the membrane. This structure is consistent with CtrB functioning as a component of an envelope-spanning complex. Cross-complementation of CtrA and CtrB in E. coli mutants with defects in genes encoding the corresponding PCP and OPX proteins show that PCP-OPX pairs require interactions with their cognate partners to export polysaccharide. These experiments add further support for the model of an ABC transporter-PCP-OPX multiprotein complex that functions to export CPS across the cell envelope. PMID:21454677

  20. Regulation of ATP-binding Cassette Transporters and Cholesterol Efflux by Glucose in Primary Human Monocytes and Murine Bone Marrow-derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Spartano, N. L.; Lamon-Fava, S.; Matthan, N. R.; Ronxhi, J.; Greenberg, A. S.; Obin, M. S.; Lichtenstein, A. H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of developing atherosclerosis. This may be partially attributable to suppression of macrophage ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter mediated cholesterol efflux by sustained elevated blood glucose concentrations. 2 models were used to assess this potential relationship: human monocytes/leukocytes and murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM). Methods 10 subjects (4 F/6 M, 50–85 years, BMI 25–35 kg/m2) underwent an oral glucose challenge. Baseline and 1- and 2-h post-challenge ABC-transporter mRNA expression was determined in monocytes, leukocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In a separate study, murine-BMDM were exposed to 5 mmol/L D-glucose (control) or additional 20 mmol/L D-or L-glucose and 25 ug/mL oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL). High density lipoprotein (HDL)-mediated cholesterol efflux and ABC-transporter (ABCA1 and ABCG1) expression were determined. Results Baseline ABCA1and ABCG1 expression was lower (> 50 %) in human monocytes and PBMC than leukocytes (p < 0.05). 1 h post-challenge leukocyte ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression increased by 37 % and 30 %, respectively (p < 0.05), and began to return to baseline thereafter. There was no significant change in monocyte ABC-transporter expression. In murine BMDM, higher glucose concentrations suppressed HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux (10 %; p < 0.01) without significantly affecting ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. Data demonstrate that leukocytes are not a reliable indicator of monocyte ABC-transporter expression. Conclusions Human monocyte ABC-transporter gene expression was unresponsive to a glucose challenge. Correspondingly, in BMDM, hyperglycemia attenuated macrophage cholesterol efflux in the absence of altered ABC-transporter expression, suggesting that hyperglycemia, per se, suppresses cholesterol transporter activity. This glucose-related impairment in cholesterol efflux may potentially contribute to diabetes-associated atherosclerosis. PMID:24838154

  1. Molecular phylogenetic study and expression analysis of ATP-binding cassette transporter gene family in Oryza sativa in response to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Saha, Jayita; Sengupta, Atreyee; Gupta, Kamala; Gupta, Bhaskar

    2015-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter is a large gene superfamily that utilizes the energy released from ATP hydrolysis for transporting myriad of substrates across the biological membranes. Although many investigations have been done on the structural and functional analysis of the ABC transporters in Oryza sativa, much less is known about molecular phylogenetic and global expression pattern of the complete ABC family in rice. In this study, we have carried out a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis constructing neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood trees based on various statistical methods of different ABC protein subfamily of five plant lineages including Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (green algae), Physcomitrella patens (moss), Selaginella moellendorffii (lycophyte), Arabidopsis thaliana (dicot) and O. sativa (monocot) to explore the origin and evolutionary patterns of these ABC genes. We have identified several conserved motifs in nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of ABC proteins among all plant lineages during evolution. Amongst the different ABC protein subfamilies, 'ABCE' has not yet been identified in lower plant genomes (algae, moss and lycophytes). The result indicated that gene duplication and diversification process acted upon these genes as a major operative force creating new groups and subgroups and functional divergence during evolution. We have demonstrated that rice ABCI subfamily consists of only half size transporters that represented highly dynamic members showing maximum sequence variations among the other rice ABC subfamilies. The evolutionary and the expression analysis contribute to a deep insight into the evolution and diversity of rice ABC proteins and their roles in response to salt stress that facilitate our further understanding on rice ABC transporters. PMID:25531538

  2. A mutation within the extended X loop abolished substrate-induced ATPase activity of the human liver ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter MDR3.

    PubMed

    Kluth, Marianne; Stindt, Jan; Dröge, Carola; Linnemann, Doris; Kubitz, Ralf; Schmitt, Lutz

    2015-02-20

    The human multidrug resistance protein 3 (MDR3/ABCB4) belongs to the ubiquitous family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and is located in the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. There it flops the phospholipids of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) family from the inner to the outer leaflet. Here, we report the characterization of wild type MDR3 and the Q1174E mutant, which was identified previously in a patient with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3 (PFIC-3). We expressed different variants of MDR3 in the yeast Pichia pastoris, purified the proteins via tandem affinity chromatography, and determined MDR3-specific ATPase activity in the presence or absence of phospholipids. The ATPase activity of wild type MDR3 was stimulated 2-fold by liver PC or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine lipids. Furthermore, the cross-linking of MDR3 with a thiol-reactive fluorophore blocked ATP hydrolysis and exhibited no PC stimulation. Similarly, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and sphingomyelin lipids did not induce an increase of wild type MDR3 ATPase activity. The phosphate analogues beryllium fluoride and aluminum fluoride led to complete inhibition of ATPase activity, whereas orthovanadate inhibited exclusively the PC-stimulated ATPase activity of MDR3. The Q1174E mutation is located in the nucleotide-binding domain in direct proximity of the leucine of the ABC signature motif and extended the X loop, which is found in ABC exporters. Our data on the Q1174E mutant demonstrated basal ATPase activity, but PC lipids were incapable of stimulating ATPase activity highlighting the role of the extended X loop in the cross-talk of the nucleotide-binding domain and the transmembrane domain. PMID:25533467

  3. Disruption of N-linked glycosylation enhances ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation of the human ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Wakabayashi-Nakao, Kanako; Tamura, Ai; Toyoda, Yu; Koshiba, Shoko; Ishikawa, Toshihisa

    2009-12-01

    The human ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, ABCG2 (BCRP/MXR/ABCP), is a plasma membrane protein containing intramolecular and intermolecular disulfide bonds and an N-linked glycan at Asn596. We have recently reported that the intramolecular disulfide bond is a critical checkpoint for determining the degradation fates of ABCG2. In the present study, we aimed to analyze quantitatively the impact of the N-linked glycan on the protein stability of ABCG2. For this purpose, we incorporated one single copy of ABCG2 cDNA into a designated site of genomic DNA in Flp-In-293 cells to stably express ABCG2 or its variant proteins. When ABCG2 wild type-expressing cells were incubated with various N-linked glycosylation inhibitors, tunicamycin profoundly suppressed the protein expression level of ABCG2 and, accordingly, reduced the ABCG2-mediated cellular resistance to the cancer chemotherapeutic SN-38. When Asn596 was converted to Gln596, the resulting variant protein was not glycosylated, and its protein level was about one-third of the wild type level in Flp-In-293 cells. Treatment with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, increased the level of the variant protein. Immunoblotting with anti-ubiquitin IgG1k after immunoprecipitation of ABCG2 revealed that the N596Q protein was ubiquitinated at levels that were significantly enhanced by treatment with MG132. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that treatment with MG132 increased the level of ABCG2 N596Q protein both in intracellular compartments and in the plasma membrane. In conclusion, we propose that the N-linked glycan at Asn596 is important for stabilizing de novo-synthesized ABCG2 and that disruption of this linkage results in protein destabilization and enhanced ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. PMID:19909340

  4. Bacteriophage-mediated Glucosylation Can Modify Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigens Synthesized by an ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter-dependent Assembly Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mann, Evan; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; King, Jerry D; Whitfield, Chris

    2015-10-16

    Lysogenic bacteriophages may encode enzymes that modify the structures of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen glycans, altering the structure of the bacteriophage receptor and resulting in serotype conversion. This can enhance virulence and has implications for antigenic diversity and vaccine development. Side chain glucosylation is a common modification strategy found in a number of bacterial species. To date, glucosylation has only been observed in O-antigens synthesized by Wzy-dependent pathways, one of the two most prevalent O-antigen synthesis systems. Here we exploited a heterologous system to study the glucosylation potential of a model O-antigen produced in an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-dependent system. Although O-antigen production is cryptic in Escherichia coli K-12, because of a mutation in the synthesis genes, it possesses a prophage glucosylation cluster, which modifies the GlcNAc residue in an ?-l-Rha-(1?3)-d-GlcNAc motif found in the original O16 antigen. Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257 produces an O-antigen possessing the same disaccharide motif, but its assembly uses an ABC transporter-dependent system. E. coli harboring the R. terrigena O-antigen biosynthesis genes produced an O-antigen displaying reduced reactivity toward antisera raised against the native R. terrigena repeat structure, indicative of an altered chemical structure. Structural determination using NMR revealed the addition of glucose side chains to the repeat units. O-antigen modification was dependent on a functional ABC transporter, consistent with modification in the periplasm, and was eliminated by deletion of the glucosylation genes from the E. coli chromosome, restoring native level antisera sensitivity and structure. There are therefore no intrinsic mechanistic barriers for bacteriophage-mediated O-antigen glucosylation in ABC transporter-dependent pathways. PMID:26330553

  5. Mycophenolic acid induces ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) expression through the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yanni; Lai, Fangfang; Xu, Yang; Wu, Yexiang; Liu, Qi; Li, Ni; Wei, Yuzhen; Feng, Tingting; Zheng, Zhihui; Jiang, Wei; Yu, Liyan; Hong, Bin; Si, Shuyi

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using an ABCA1p-LUC HepG2 cell line, we found that MPA upregulated ABCA1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MPA induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 markedly inhibited MPA-induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of MPA upregulating ABCA1 was due mainly to activation of the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 pathway. -- Abstract: ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) promotes cholesterol and phospholipid efflux from cells to lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I and plays an important role in atherosclerosis. In a previous study, we developed a high-throughput screening method using an ABCA1p-LUC HepG2 cell line to find upregulators of ABCA1. Using this method in the present study, we found that mycophenolic acid (MPA) upregulated ABCA1 expression (EC50 = 0.09 {mu}M). MPA upregulation of ABCA1 expression was confirmed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis in HepG2 cells. Previous work has indicated that MPA is a potent agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}; EC50 = 5.2-9.3 {mu}M). Liver X receptor {alpha} (LXR{alpha}) is a target gene of PPAR{gamma} and may directly regulate ABCA1 expression. Western blot analysis showed that MPA induced LXR{alpha} protein expression in HepG2 cells. Addition of PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 markedly inhibited MPA-induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression. These data suggest that MPA increased ABCA1 expression mainly through activation of PPAR{gamma}. Thus, the effects of MPA on upregulation of ABCA1 expression were due mainly to activation of the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 signaling pathway. This is the first report that the antiatherosclerosis activity of MPA is due to this mechanism.

  6. Time-resolved Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy of the Nucleotide-binding Domain from the ATP-binding

    E-print Network

    Gerwert, Klaus

    Time-resolved Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy of the Nucleotide-binding Domain from the ATP-binding Cassette Transporter MsbA ATP HYDROLYSIS IS THE RATE-LIMITING STEP IN THE CATALYTIC CYCLE*S Received, D-44780 Bochum, Germany Background: The dynamics of coupling of ATP hydrolysis with transport in ATP

  7. Genetic variant of V825I in the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 gene and serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several genetic variants in the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) gene have associated with modifications of serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and the susceptibility for coronary heart disease, but the findings are still controversial in diverse racial/ethnic groups. Bai Ku Yao is an isolated subgroup of the Yao minority in southern China. The present study was undertaken to detect the possible association of V825I (rs2066715) polymorphism in the ABCA1 gene and several environmental factors with serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations. Methods A total of 677 subjects of Bai Ku Yao and 646 participants of Han Chinese were randomly selected from our previous stratified randomized cluster samples. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism assay combined with gel electrophoresis were performed for the genotyping of V825I variant, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. Results The levels of serum total cholesterol (TC), HDL-C, apolipoprotein (Apo) AI and ApoB were lower in Bai Ku Yao than in Han (P < 0.01 for all). The frequency of G and A alleles was 57.4% and 42.6% in Bai Ku Yao, and 57.7% and 42.3% in Han (P > 0.05); respectively. The frequency of GG, GA and AA genotypes was 33.7%, 47.4% and 18.9% in Bai Ku Yao, and 33.4%, 48.6% and 18.0% in Han (P > 0.05); respectively. There was no difference in the genotypic and allelic frequencies between males and females in the both ethnic groups. The subjects with AA genotype in Bai Ku Yao had higher serum TC levels than the subjects with GG and GA genotypes (P < 0.05). The participants with AA genotype in Han had lower serum HDL-C and ApoAI levels than the participants with GG and GA genotypes (P < 0.05 for each), but these results were found in males but not in females. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that the levels of TC in Bai Ku Yao and HDL-C and ApoAI in male Han were correlated with genotypes (P < 0.05 for all). Serum lipid parameters were also correlated with sex, age, body mass index, alcohol consumption, and blood pressure in both ethnic groups (P < 0.05-0.001). Conclusion The present study suggests that the V825I polymorphism in the ABCA1 gene is associated with male serum HDL-C and ApoAI levels in the Han, and serum TC levels in the Bai Ku Yao populations. The difference in the association of V825I polymorphism and serum lipid levels between the two ethnic groups might partly result from different ABCA1 gene-enviromental interactions. PMID:21247457

  8. Pathogen-Responsive Expression of a Putative ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter Gene Conferring Resistance to the Diterpenoid Sclareol Is Regulated by Multiple Defense Signaling Pathways in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Emma J.; Schenk, Peer M.; Kazan, Kemal; Penninckx, Iris A.M.A.; Anderson, Jonathan P.; Maclean, Don J.; Cammue, Bruno P.A.; Ebert, Paul R.; Manners, John M.

    2003-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are encoded by large gene families in plants. Although these proteins are potentially involved in a number of diverse plant processes, currently, very little is known about their actual functions. In this paper, through a cDNA microarray screening of anonymous cDNA clones from a subtractive library, we identified an Arabidopsis gene (AtPDR12) putatively encoding a member of the pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) subfamily of ABC transporters. AtPDR12 displayed distinct induction profiles after inoculation of plants with compatible and incompatible fungal pathogens and treatments with salicylic acid, ethylene, or methyl jasmonate. Analysis of AtPDR12 expression in a number of Arabidopsis defense signaling mutants further revealed that salicylic acid accumulation, NPR1 function, and sensitivity to jasmonates and ethylene were all required for pathogen-responsive expression of AtPDR12. Germination assays using seeds from an AtPDR12 insertion line in the presence of sclareol resulted in lower germination rates and much stronger inhibition of root elongation in the AtPDR12 insertion line than in wild-type plants. These results suggest that AtPDR12 may be functionally related to the previously identified ABC transporters SpTUR2 and NpABC1, which transport sclareol. Our data also point to a potential role for terpenoids in the Arabidopsis defensive armory. PMID:14526118

  9. Functional Dynamics Revealed by the Structure of the SufBCD Complex, a Novel ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Protein That Serves as a Scaffold for Iron-Sulfur Cluster Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Kei; Yuda, Eiki; Tanaka, Naoyuki; Katayama, Sumie; Iwasaki, Kenji; Matsumoto, Takashi; Kurisu, Genji; Outten, F Wayne; Fukuyama, Keiichi; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Wada, Kei

    2015-12-11

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type ATPases are chemomechanical engines involved in diverse biological pathways. Recent genomic information reveals that ABC ATPase domains/subunits act not only in ABC transporters and structural maintenance of chromosome proteins, but also in iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis. A novel type of ABC protein, the SufBCD complex, functions in the biosynthesis of nascent Fe-S clusters in almost all Eubacteria and Archaea, as well as eukaryotic chloroplasts. In this study, we determined the first crystal structure of the Escherichia coli SufBCD complex, which exhibits the common architecture of ABC proteins: two ABC ATPase components (SufC) with function-specific components (SufB-SufD protomers). Biochemical and physiological analyses based on this structure provided critical insights into Fe-S cluster assembly and revealed a dynamic conformational change driven by ABC ATPase activity. We propose a molecular mechanism for the biogenesis of the Fe-S cluster in the SufBCD complex. PMID:26472926

  10. Change in ATP-binding cassette B1/19, glutamine synthetase and alcohol dehydrogenase gene expression during root elongation in Betula pendula Roth and Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn in response to leachate and leonardite humic substances.

    PubMed

    Tahiri, Abdelghani; Delporte, Fabienne; Muhovski, Yordan; Ongena, Marc; Thonart, Philippe; Druart, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) are complex and heterogeneous compounds of humified organic matter resulting from the chemical and microbiological decomposition of organic residues. HS have a positive effect on plant growth and development by improving soil structure and fertility. They have long been recognized as plant growth-promoting substances, particularly with regard to influencing nutrient uptake, root growth and architecture. The biochemical and molecular mechanisms through which HS influence plant physiology are not well understood. This study evaluated the bioactivity of landfill leachate and leonardite HS on alder (Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn) and birch (Betula pendula Roth) during root elongation in vitro. Changes in root development were studied in relation to auxin, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms, as well as to the stress adaptive response. The cDNA fragments of putative genes encoding two ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters (ABCB1 and ABCB19) belonging to the B subfamily of plant ABC auxin transporters were cloned and sequenced. Molecular data indicate that HS and their humic acid (HA) fractions induce root growth by influencing polar auxin transport (PAT), as illustrated by the modulation of the ABCB transporter transcript levels (ABCB1 and ABCB19). There were also changes in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) gene transcript levels in response to HS exposure. These findings confirmed that humic matter affects plant growth and development through various metabolic pathways, including hormonal, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms and stress response or signalization. PMID:26595095

  11. The Arabidopsis ATP-binding cassette protein AtMRP5/AtABCC5 is a high affinity inositol hexakisphosphate transporter involved in guard cell signaling and phytate storage.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Réka; Grob, Hanne; Weder, Barbara; Green, Porntip; Klein, Markus; Frelet-Barrand, Annie; Schjoerring, Jan K; Brearley, Charles; Martinoia, Enrico

    2009-11-27

    Arabidopsis possesses a superfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Among these, the multidrug resistance-associated protein AtMRP5/AtABCC5 regulates stomatal aperture and controls plasma membrane anion channels of guard cells. Remarkably, despite the prominent role of AtMRP5 in conferring partial drought insensitivity upon Arabidopsis, we know little of the biochemical function of AtMRP5. Our phylogenetic analysis showed that AtMRP5 is closely related to maize MRP4, mutation of which confers a low inositol hexakisphosphate kernel phenotype. We now show that insertion mutants of AtMRP5 display a low inositol hexakisphosphate phenotype in seed tissue and that this phenotype is associated with alterations of mineral cation and phosphate status. By heterologous expression in yeast, we demonstrate that AtMRP5 encodes a specific and high affinity ATP-dependent inositol hexakisphosphate transporter that is sensitive to inhibitors of ABC transporters. Moreover, complementation of the mrp5-1 insertion mutants of Arabidopsis with the AtMRP5 cDNA driven from a guard cell-specific promoter restores the sensitivity of the mutant to abscisic acid-mediated inhibition of stomatal opening. Additionally, we show that mutation of residues of the Walker B motif prevents restoring the multiple phenotypes associated with mrp5-1. Our findings highlight a novel function of plant ABC transporters that may be relevant to other kingdoms. They also extend the signaling repertoire of this ubiquitous inositol polyphosphate signaling molecule. PMID:19797057

  12. The glycine residues G551 and G1349 within the ATP-binding cassette signature motifs play critical roles in the activation and inhibition of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channels by phloxine B.

    PubMed

    Melin, Patricia; Norez, Caroline; Callebaut, Isabelle; Becq, Frédéric

    2005-12-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein contains a canonical ATP-binding cassette (ABC) signature motif, LSGGQ, in nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1) and a degenerate LSHGH in NBD2. Here, we studied the contribution of the conserved residues G551 and G1349 to the pharmacological modulation of CFTR chloride channels by phloxine B using iodide efflux and whole-cell patch clamp experiments performed on the following green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged CFTR: wild-type, delF508, G551D, G1349D, and G551D/G1349D double mutant. We found that phloxine B stimulates and inhibits channel activity of wild-type CFTR (Ks = 3.2 +/- 1.6 microM: , Ki = 38 +/- 1.4 microM: ) and delF508 CFTR (Ks = 3 +/- 1.8 microM: , Ki = 33 +/- 1 microM: ). However, CFTR channels with the LSGDQ mutated motif (mutation G551D) are activated (Ks = 2 +/- 1.13 microM: ) but not inhibited by phloxine B. Conversely, CFTR channels with the LSHDH mutated motif (mutation G1349D) are inhibited (Ki = 40 +/- 1.01 microM: ) but not activated by phloxine B. Finally, the double mutant G551D/G1349D CFTR failed to respond not only to phloxine B stimulation but also to phloxine B inhibition, confirming the importance of both amino acid locations. Similar results were obtained with genistein, and kinetic parameters were determined to compare the pharmacological effects of both agents. These data show that G551 and G1349 control the inhibition and activation of CFTR by these agents, suggesting functional nonequivalence of the signature motifs of NBD in the ABC transporter CFTR. PMID:16604470

  13. The PnrA (Tp0319; TmpC) lipoprotein represents a new family of bacterial purine nucleoside receptor encoded within an ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-like operon in Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Deka, Ranjit K; Brautigam, Chad A; Yang, Xiaofeng F; Blevins, Jon S; Machius, Mischa; Tomchick, Diana R; Norgard, Michael V

    2006-03-24

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterial agent of syphilis, cannot be cultivated in vitro. This constraint has severely impeded the study of the membrane biology of this complex human pathogen. A structure-to-function approach thus was adopted as a means of discerning the likely function of Tp0319, a 35-kDa cytoplasmic membrane-associated lipoprotein of T. pallidum formerly designated as TmpC. A 1.7-A crystal structure showed that recombinant Tp0319 (rTp0319) consists of two alpha/beta domains, linked by three crossovers, with a deep cleft between them akin to ATP-binding cassette (ABC) receptors. In the cleft, a molecule of inosine was bound. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that rTp0319 specifically binds purine nucleosides (dissociation constant (Kd) approximately 10(-7) M). This predilection for purine nucleosides by rTp0319 is consistent with its likely role as a receptor component of a cytoplasmic membrane-associated transporter system. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis of RNA isolated from rabbit tissue-extracted T. pallidum additionally showed that tp0319 is transcriptionally linked to four other downstream open reading frames, thereby supporting the existence of an ABC-like operon (tp0319-0323). We herein thus re-name tp0319 as purine nucleoside receptor A (pnrA), with its operonic partners tp0320-0323 designated as pnrB-E, respectively. Our study not only infers that PnrA transports purine nucleosides essential for the survival of T. pallidum within its obligate human host, but to our knowledge, this is the first description of an ABC-type nucleoside transport system in any bacterium. PnrA has been grouped with a functionally uncharacterized protein family (HBG016869), thereby implying that other members of the family may have similar nucleoside-binding function(s). PMID:16418175

  14. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Shah, Viral S.; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Welsh, Michael J.; Randak, Christoph O.

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ? 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P1,P5-di(adenosine-5?) pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5?-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5?-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl? channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia. PMID:25887396

  15. Functional hot spots in human ATP-binding cassette transporter

    E-print Network

    Sali, Andrej

    intrahepatic cholestasis type 2; CBAVD, congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens; CF, cystic fibrosis; CFTR, cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator; CMD1O, cardiomyopathy dilated type 1O; CORD3, cone; Grant sponsor: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFTR2). Libusha Kelly and Hisayo Fukushima contributed

  16. Role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in assembly of MacAB-TolC macrolide transporter.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuo; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2012-12-01

    MacB is a founding member of the Macrolide Exporter family of transporters belonging to the ATP-Binding Cassette superfamily. These proteins are broadly represented in genomes of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and are implicated in virulence and protection against antibiotics and peptide toxins. MacB transporter functions together with MacA, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, which stimulates MacB ATPase. In Gram-negative bacteria, MacA is believed to couple ATP hydrolysis to transport of substrates across the outer membrane through a TolC-like channel. In this study, we report a real-time analysis of concurrent ATP hydrolysis and assembly of MacAB-TolC complex. MacB binds nucleotides with a low millimolar affinity and fast on- and off-rates. In contrast, MacA-MacB complex is formed with a nanomolar affinity, which further increases in the presence of ATP. Our results strongly suggest that association between MacA and MacB is stimulated by ATP binding to MacB but remains unchanged during ATP hydrolysis cycle. We also found that the large periplasmic loop of MacB plays the major role in coupling reactions separated in two different membranes. This loop is required for MacA-dependent stimulation of MacB ATPase and at the same time, contributes to recruitment of TolC into a trans-envelope complex. PMID:23057817

  17. Multidrug Resistance Protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1), a “Multitasking” ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Susan P. C.

    2014-01-01

    The multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) encoded by ABCC1 was originally discovered as a cause of multidrug resistance in tumor cells. However, it is now clear that MRP1 serves a broader role than simply mediating the ATP-dependent efflux of drugs from cells. The antioxidant GSH and the pro-inflammatory cysteinyl leukotriene C4 have been identified as key physiological organic anions effluxed by MRP1, and an ever growing body of evidence indicates that additional lipid-derived mediators are also substrates of this transporter. As such, MRP1 is a multitasking transporter that likely influences the etiology and progression of a host of human diseases. PMID:25281745

  18. The ABCC6 transporter: what lessons can be learnt from other ATP-binding cassette transporters?

    PubMed Central

    Vanakker, Olivier M.; Hosen, Mohammad J.; Paepe, Anne De

    2013-01-01

    ABC transporters represent a large family of ATP-driven transmembrane transporters involved in uni- or bidirectional transfer of a large variety of substrates. Divided in seven families, they represent 48 transporter proteins, several of which have been associated with human disease. Among the latter is ABCC6, a unidirectional exporter protein primarily expressed in liver and kidney. ABCC6 deficiency has been shown to cause the ectopic mineralization disorder pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), characterized by calcification and fragmentation of elastic fibers, resulting in oculocutaneous and cardiovascular symptoms. Unique in the group of connective tissue disorders, the pathophysiological relation between the ABCC6 transporter and ectopic mineralization in PXE remains enigmatic, not in the least because of lack of knowledge on the substrate(s) of ABCC6 and its unusual expression pattern. Because many features, including structure and transport mechanism, are shared by many ABC transporters, it is worthwhile to evaluate if and to what extent the knowledge on the physiology and pathophysiology of these other transporters may provide useful clues toward understanding the (patho)physiological role of ABCC6 and how its deficiency may be dealt with. PMID:24137173

  19. ATP-binding cassette protein E is involved in gene transcription and translation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Baillie, David

    and are involved in the transport of various molecules across plasma membranes and intracellular membranes and nucleus, and possibly as a nucleocytoplasmic transporter. In addition, RNAi data suggest that ABCE and NHR Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Keywords: ABC transporter; ABCE; RNase L inhibitor; Caenorhabditis

  20. Functional Rescue of a Misfolded Eukaryotic ATP-binding Cassette Transporter by Domain Replacement*S

    E-print Network

    Miller, Liz

    proper transport to the plasma membrane. Functionality of Yor1p- F was restored upon co type ABC transporter that localizes to the plasma membrane and clears the cytosol of a variety substrates across lipid barriers. Although the substrates of ABC transporters are extremely diverse (peptides

  1. Marine medaka ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily and new insight into teleost Abch nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Chang-Bum; Kim, Bo-Mi; Kang, Hye-Min; Choi, Ik-Young; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The ABC gene family is recognized as one of the largest gene families in all kingdoms of life. Although many genes involved in the ABC superfamily have been annotated from several fish species, information on large sets of the ABC superfamily and their evolutionary characterization are still unclear. In the marine medaka Oryzias melastigma, 50 ABC transporters were identified with bioinformatics-aided in silico analyses, and their full-length cDNA sequences were characterized. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that they could be classified into the eight subfamilies (A–H) that include all members of all ABC subfamilies. Interestingly, several teleosts’ Abcg members were closely clustered with Abch members in a distinctive clade. The abch gene was also observed in the coelacanth and the spotted gar, suggesting that this gene was retained from a bilaterian ancestor and that a gene loss event recently occurred in the tetrapod lineage. In teleosts, the nomenclature of previously annotated abcg genes should be considered carefully, as they form a distinctive clade with the marine medaka abch subfamily and other teleost abch genes, but not with the members of the Abcg subfamily. PMID:26472499

  2. ATP-binding cassette transporter controls leaf surface secretion of anticancer drug components in Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fang; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    The Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) is highly specialized for the biosynthesis of many different monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs), many of which have powerful biological activities. Such MIAs include the commercially important chemotherapy drugs vinblastine, vincristine, and other synthetic derivatives that are derived from the coupling of catharanthine and vindoline. However, previous studies have shown that biosynthesis of these MIAs involves extensive movement of metabolites between specialized internal leaf cells and the leaf epidermis that require the involvement of unknown secretory processes for mobilizing catharanthine to the leaf surface and vindoline to internal leaf cells. Spatial separation of vindoline and catharanthine provides a clear explanation for the low levels of dimers that accumulate in intact plants. The present work describes the molecular cloning and functional identification of a unique catharanthine transporter (CrTPT2) that is expressed predominantly in the epidermis of young leaves. CrTPT2 gene expression is activated by treatment with catharanthine, and its in planta silencing redistributes catharanthine to increase the levels of catharanthine–vindoline drug dimers in the leaves. Phylogenetic analysis shows that CrTPT2 is closely related to a key transporter involved in cuticle assembly in plants and that may be unique to MIA-producing plant species, where it mediates secretion of alkaloids to the plant surface. PMID:24019465

  3. ATP-binding cassette transporter enhances tolerance to DDT in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Ning, YingZhi; Dang, Huai; Liu, GuangLong; Xiong, Jie; Yuan, DongXia; Feng, LiFang; Miao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    The reuse of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) as an indoor residual spray was permitted by the World Health Organization in 2007, and approximately 14 countries still use DDT to control disease vectors. The extensive exposure of insects to DDT has resulted in the emergence of DDT resistance, especially in mosquitoes, and the mechanism for this resistance in mosquitoes has been widely reported. Spraying can also introduce DDT directly into surface water, and DDT can subsequently accumulate in microorganisms, but the mechanism for the resistance to DDT degradation in microorganisms is unclear. Using whole-genome microarray analysis, we detected an abcb15 gene that was up-regulated in a specific manner by DDT treatment in T. thermophile. The deduced ABCB15 peptide sequence had two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) to form the structure TMD-NBD-TMD-NBD, and each NBD contained three conserved motifs: Walker-A, C-loop, and Walker-B, which indicated the T. thermophila abcb15 was a typical ABC transporter gene. The expression of ABCB15 fused with a C-terminal green fluorescent protein was found to be on the periphery of the cell, suggesting that ABCB15 was a membrane pump protein. In addition, cells with abcb15 partially knocked down (abcb15-KD) grew slower than wild-type cells in the presence of 256 mg L(-1) DDT, indicating the tolerance of abcb15-KD strain to DDT exposure was decreased. Thus, we suggest that in Tetrahymena, the membrane pump protein encoded by ABCT gene abcb15 can enhance the tolerance to DDT and protect cells from this exogenous toxin by efficiently pumping it to the extracellular space. PMID:25260902

  4. A Two-site Kinetic Mechanism for ATP Binding and Hydrolysis by E. coli Rep Helicase Dimer Bound to a

    E-print Network

    Lohman, Timothy M.

    A Two-site Kinetic Mechanism for ATP Binding and Hydrolysis by E. coli Rep Helicase Dimer Bound that are coupled to ATP binding and hydrolysis. We have investi- gated the kinetic mechanism of ATP binding and hydrolysis by a proposed intermediate in Rep-catalyzed DNA unwinding, the Rep ``P2S'' dimer (formed

  5. ATP Binding Turns Plant Cryptochrome Into an Efficient Natural Photoswitch

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Pavel; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Hitomi, Kenichi; Balland, Véronique; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.; Ritz, Thorsten; Brettel, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Cryptochromes are flavoproteins that drive diverse developmental light-responses in plants and participate in the circadian clock in animals. Plant cryptochromes have found application as photoswitches in optogenetics. We have studied effects of pH and ATP on the functionally relevant photoreduction of the oxidized FAD cofactor to the semi-reduced FADH· radical in isolated Arabidopsis cryptochrome 1 by transient absorption spectroscopy on nanosecond to millisecond timescales. In the absence of ATP, the yield of light-induced radicals strongly decreased with increasing pH from 6.5 to 8.5. With ATP present, these yields were significantly higher and virtually pH-independent up to pH 9. Analysis of our data in light of the crystallographic structure suggests that ATP-binding shifts the pKa of aspartic acid D396, the putative proton donor to FAD·?, from ~7.4 to >9, and favours a reaction pathway yielding long-lived aspartate D396?. Its negative charge could trigger conformational changes necessary for signal transduction. PMID:24898692

  6. ATP binding turns plant cryptochrome into an efficient natural photoswitch.

    PubMed

    Müller, Pavel; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Hitomi, Kenichi; Balland, Véronique; Getzoff, Elizabeth D; Ritz, Thorsten; Brettel, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Cryptochromes are flavoproteins that drive diverse developmental light-responses in plants and participate in the circadian clock in animals. Plant cryptochromes have found application as photoswitches in optogenetics. We have studied effects of pH and ATP on the functionally relevant photoreduction of the oxidized FAD cofactor to the semi-reduced FADH(·) radical in isolated Arabidopsis cryptochrome 1 by transient absorption spectroscopy on nanosecond to millisecond timescales. In the absence of ATP, the yield of light-induced radicals strongly decreased with increasing pH from 6.5 to 8.5. With ATP present, these yields were significantly higher and virtually pH-independent up to pH 9. Analysis of our data in light of the crystallographic structure suggests that ATP-binding shifts the pKa of aspartic acid D396, the putative proton donor to FAD·(-), from ~7.4 to >9, and favours a reaction pathway yielding long-lived aspartate D396(-). Its negative charge could trigger conformational changes necessary for signal transduction. PMID:24898692

  7. ATP Binding Turns Plant Cryptochrome Into an Efficient Natural Photoswitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Pavel; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Hitomi, Kenichi; Balland, Véronique; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.; Ritz, Thorsten; Brettel, Klaus

    2014-06-01

    Cryptochromes are flavoproteins that drive diverse developmental light-responses in plants and participate in the circadian clock in animals. Plant cryptochromes have found application as photoswitches in optogenetics. We have studied effects of pH and ATP on the functionally relevant photoreduction of the oxidized FAD cofactor to the semi-reduced FADH. radical in isolated Arabidopsis cryptochrome 1 by transient absorption spectroscopy on nanosecond to millisecond timescales. In the absence of ATP, the yield of light-induced radicals strongly decreased with increasing pH from 6.5 to 8.5. With ATP present, these yields were significantly higher and virtually pH-independent up to pH 9. Analysis of our data in light of the crystallographic structure suggests that ATP-binding shifts the pKa of aspartic acid D396, the putative proton donor to FAD.-, from ~7.4 to >9, and favours a reaction pathway yielding long-lived aspartate D396-. Its negative charge could trigger conformational changes necessary for signal transduction.

  8. ATP binding to the pseudokinase domain of JAK2 is critical for pathogenic activation

    PubMed Central

    Ungureanu, Daniela; Grisouard, Jean; Skoda, Radek C.; Hubbard, Stevan R.; Silvennoinen, Olli

    2015-01-01

    Pseudokinases lack conserved motifs typically required for kinase activity. Nearly half of pseudokinases bind ATP, but only few retain phosphotransfer activity, leaving the functional role of nucleotide binding in most cases unknown. Janus kinases (JAKs) are nonreceptor tyrosine kinases with a tandem pseudokinase–kinase domain configuration, where the pseudokinase domain (JAK homology 2, JH2) has important regulatory functions and harbors mutations underlying hematological and immunological diseases. JH2 of JAK1, JAK2, and TYK2 all bind ATP, but the significance of this is unclear. We characterize the role of nucleotide binding in normal and pathogenic JAK signaling using comprehensive structure-based mutagenesis. Disruption of JH2 ATP binding in wild-type JAK2 has only minor effects, and in the presence of type I cytokine receptors, the mutations do not affect JAK2 activation. However, JH2 mutants devoid of ATP binding ameliorate the hyperactivation of JAK2 V617F. Disrupting ATP binding in JH2 also inhibits the hyperactivity of other pathogenic JAK2 mutants, as well as of JAK1 V658F, and prevents induction of erythrocytosis in a JAK2 V617F myeloproliferative neoplasm mouse model. Molecular dynamic simulations and thermal-shift analysis indicate that ATP binding stabilizes JH2, with a pronounced effect on the C helix region, which plays a critical role in pathogenic activation of JAK2. Taken together, our results suggest that ATP binding to JH2 serves a structural role in JAKs, which is required for aberrant activity of pathogenic JAK mutants. The inhibitory effect of abrogating JH2 ATP binding in pathogenic JAK mutants may warrant novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25825724

  9. Molecular mechanism of ATP binding and ion channel activation in P2X receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-10-24

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-activated ion channels permeable to Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. The seven P2X receptor subtypes are implicated in physiological processes that include modulation of synaptic transmission, contraction of smooth muscle, secretion of chemical transmitters and regulation of immune responses. Despite the importance of P2X receptors in cellular physiology, the three-dimensional composition of the ATP-binding site, the structural mechanism of ATP-dependent ion channel gating and the architecture of the open ion channel pore are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4 receptor in complex with ATP and a new structure of the apo receptor. The agonist-bound structure reveals a previously unseen ATP-binding motif and an open ion channel pore. ATP binding induces cleft closure of the nucleotide-binding pocket, flexing of the lower body {beta}-sheet and a radial expansion of the extracellular vestibule. The structural widening of the extracellular vestibule is directly coupled to the opening of the ion channel pore by way of an iris-like expansion of the transmembrane helices. The structural delineation of the ATP-binding site and the ion channel pore, together with the conformational changes associated with ion channel gating, will stimulate development of new pharmacological agents.

  10. Characterization of the ATP-Binding Domain of the Sarco(endo)plasmic Reticulum -ATPase: Probing Nucleotide Binding by Multidimensional NMR

    E-print Network

    Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    Characterization of the ATP-Binding Domain of the Sarco(endo)plasmic Reticulum Ca2+ -ATPase cycle catalyzed by SERCA1a, we have studied the ATP-binding domain of SERCA1a in both nucleotide containing the nucleotide-binding domain of SERCA1a spanning residues Thr357-Leu600. ATP binding activity

  11. Sm-like protein Hfq: Location of the ATP-binding site and the effect of ATP on HfqRNA complexes

    E-print Network

    Mura, Cameron

    Sm-like protein Hfq: Location of the ATP-binding site and the effect of ATP on Hfq­RNA complexes the first evidence indicating that Hfq is an ATP-binding protein. Using a combination of biochemical and genetic techniques, we have now determined a plausible ATP-binding site in Hfq and tested Hfq's ATP

  12. Inactivation of multiple bacterial histidine kinases by targeting the ATP-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Kaelyn E; Francis, Samson; Carlson, Erin E

    2015-01-16

    Antibacterial agents that exploit new targets will be required to combat the perpetual rise of bacterial resistance to current antibiotics. We are exploring the inhibition of histidine kinases, constituents of two-component systems. Two-component systems are the primary signaling pathways that bacteria utilize to respond to their environment. They are ubiquitous in bacteria and trigger various pathogenic mechanisms. To attenuate these signaling pathways, we sought to broadly target the histidine kinase family by focusing on their highly conserved ATP-binding domain. Development of a fluorescence polarization displacement assay facilitated high-throughput screening of ?53?000 diverse small molecules for binding to the ATP-binding pocket. Of these compounds, nine inhibited the catalytic activity of two or more histidine kinases. These scaffolds could provide valuable starting points for the design of broadly effective HK inhibitors, global reduction of bacterial signaling, and ultimately, a class of antibiotics that function by a new mechanism of action. PMID:25531939

  13. Unique Functional and Structural Properties of the LRRK2 Protein ATP-binding Pocket*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiyong; Galemmo, Robert A.; Fraser, Kyle B.; Moehle, Mark S.; Sen, Saurabh; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura A.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Ross, Larry J.; Valiyaveettil, Jacob; Moukha-Chafiq, Omar; Pathak, Ashish K.; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Kezar, Hollis; White, E. Lucile; Gupta, Vandana; Maddry, Joseph A.; Suto, Mark J.; West, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in the LRRK2 gene can cause late-onset Parkinson disease. The most common mutation, G2019S, resides in the kinase domain and enhances activity. LRRK2 possesses the unique property of cis-autophosphorylation of its own GTPase domain. Because high-resolution structures of the human LRRK2 kinase domain are not available, we used novel high-throughput assays that measured both cis-autophosphorylation and trans-peptide phosphorylation to probe the ATP-binding pocket. We disclose hundreds of commercially available activity-selective LRRK2 kinase inhibitors. Some compounds inhibit cis-autophosphorylation more strongly than trans-peptide phosphorylation, and other compounds inhibit G2019S-LRRK2 more strongly than WT-LRRK2. Through exploitation of structure-activity relationships revealed through high-throughput analyses, we identified a useful probe inhibitor, SRI-29132 (11). SRI-29132 is exquisitely selective for LRRK2 kinase activity and is effective in attenuating proinflammatory responses in macrophages and rescuing neurite retraction phenotypes in neurons. Furthermore, the compound demonstrates excellent potency, is highly blood-brain barrier-permeant, but suffers from rapid first-pass metabolism. Despite the observed selectivity of SRI-29132, docking models highlighted critical interactions with residues conserved in many protein kinases, implying a unique structural configuration for the LRRK2 ATP-binding pocket. Although the human LRRK2 kinase domain is unstable and insoluble, we demonstrate that the LRRK2 homolog from ameba can be mutated to approximate some aspects of the human LRRK2 ATP-binding pocket. Our results provide a rich resource for LRRK2 small molecule inhibitor development. More broadly, our results provide a precedent for the functional interrogation of ATP-binding pockets when traditional approaches to ascertain structure prove difficult. PMID:25228699

  14. Unique functional and structural properties of the LRRK2 protein ATP-binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiyong; Galemmo, Robert A; Fraser, Kyle B; Moehle, Mark S; Sen, Saurabh; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura A; DeLucas, Lawrence J; Ross, Larry J; Valiyaveettil, Jacob; Moukha-Chafiq, Omar; Pathak, Ashish K; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Kezar, Hollis; White, E Lucile; Gupta, Vandana; Maddry, Joseph A; Suto, Mark J; West, Andrew B

    2014-11-21

    Pathogenic mutations in the LRRK2 gene can cause late-onset Parkinson disease. The most common mutation, G2019S, resides in the kinase domain and enhances activity. LRRK2 possesses the unique property of cis-autophosphorylation of its own GTPase domain. Because high-resolution structures of the human LRRK2 kinase domain are not available, we used novel high-throughput assays that measured both cis-autophosphorylation and trans-peptide phosphorylation to probe the ATP-binding pocket. We disclose hundreds of commercially available activity-selective LRRK2 kinase inhibitors. Some compounds inhibit cis-autophosphorylation more strongly than trans-peptide phosphorylation, and other compounds inhibit G2019S-LRRK2 more strongly than WT-LRRK2. Through exploitation of structure-activity relationships revealed through high-throughput analyses, we identified a useful probe inhibitor, SRI-29132 (11). SRI-29132 is exquisitely selective for LRRK2 kinase activity and is effective in attenuating proinflammatory responses in macrophages and rescuing neurite retraction phenotypes in neurons. Furthermore, the compound demonstrates excellent potency, is highly blood-brain barrier-permeant, but suffers from rapid first-pass metabolism. Despite the observed selectivity of SRI-29132, docking models highlighted critical interactions with residues conserved in many protein kinases, implying a unique structural configuration for the LRRK2 ATP-binding pocket. Although the human LRRK2 kinase domain is unstable and insoluble, we demonstrate that the LRRK2 homolog from ameba can be mutated to approximate some aspects of the human LRRK2 ATP-binding pocket. Our results provide a rich resource for LRRK2 small molecule inhibitor development. More broadly, our results provide a precedent for the functional interrogation of ATP-binding pockets when traditional approaches to ascertain structure prove difficult. PMID:25228699

  15. ATP binding to neighbouring subunits and intersubunit allosteric coupling underlie proteasomal ATPase function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Chan; Snoberger, Aaron; Schupp, Jane; Smith, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The primary functions of the proteasome are driven by a highly allosteric ATPase complex. ATP binding to only two subunits in this hexameric complex triggers substrate binding, ATPase–20S association and 20S gate opening. However, it is unclear how ATP binding and hydrolysis spatially and temporally coordinates these allosteric effects to drive substrate translocation into the 20S. Here, we use FRET to show that the proteasomal ATPases from eukaryotes (RPTs) and archaea (PAN) bind ATP with high affinity at neighbouring subunits, which complements the well-established spiral-staircase topology of the 26S ATPases. We further show that two conserved arginine fingers in PAN located at the subunit interface work together as a single allosteric unit to mediate the allosteric effects of ATP binding, without altering the nucleotide-binding pattern. Rapid kinetics analysis also shows that ring resetting of a sequential hydrolysis mechanism can be explained by thermodynamic equilibrium binding of ATP. These data support a model whereby these two functionally distinct allosteric networks cooperate to translocate polypeptides into the 20S for degradation. PMID:26465836

  16. Multidrug resistance protein 4/ ATP binding cassette transporter 4: a new potential therapeutic target for acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Copsel, Sabrina; Bruzzone, Ariana; May, Maria; Beyrath, Julien; Wargon, Victoria; Cany, Jeannette; Frans, G.M. Russel; Shayo, Carina; Davio, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Less than a third of adults patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are cured by current treatments, emphasizing the need for new approaches to therapy. We previously demonstrated that besides playing a role in drug-resistant leukemia cell lines, multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4/ABCC4) regulates leukemia cell proliferation and differentiation through the endogenous MRP4/ABCC4 substrate, cAMP. Here, we studied the role of MRP4/ABCC4 in tumor progression in a mouse xenograft model and in leukemic stem cells (LSCs) differentiation. We found a decrease in the mitotic index and an increase in the apoptotic index associated with the inhibition of tumor growth when mice were treated with rolipram (PDE4 inhibitor) and/or probenecid (MRPs inhibitor). Genetic silencing and pharmacologic inhibition of MRP4 reduced tumor growth. Furthermore, MRP4 knockdown induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vivo. Interestingly, when LSC population was isolated, we observed that increased cAMP levels and MRP4/ABCC4 blockade resulted in LSCs differentiation. Taken together, our findings show that MRP4/ABCC4 has a relevant role in tumor growth and apoptosis and in the eradication of LSCs, providing the basis for a novel promising target in AML therapy. PMID:25301721

  17. Association of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 gene polymorphisms with plasma lipid variability and coronary heart disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuping; Liu, Yawen; Li, Yong; Zhang, Huiping; Yu, Mingxi; Kanu, Joseph Sam; Qiao, Yichun; Tang, Yuan; Zhen, Qing; Cheng, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our study aimed to investigate the association of ABCA1 polymorphisms with plasma lipid variability and CHD risk in the Chinese Han population. Methods: 754 CHD patients and 760 controls were included in this case-control study. Three SNPs (rs363717, rs4149339, and rs4149338) in ABCA1 3’UTR and one nonsynonymous SNP (rs2230808) in ABCA1 exon 35 were selected and genotyped. The analysis of genetic data was performed using the SNPstats program and the SPSS17.0 software. Results: Significant associations were observed between SNP rs363717 and CHD risk under different genetic models before or after Bonferroni corrections (codominant model: OR = 0.70, P = 0.003 for AG vs. AA; dominant model: OR = 0.71, P = 0.003 for GG + AG vs. AA). The nonsynonymous SNP rs2230808 was associated with higher total cholesterol levels (P = 0.047). The GCC haplotype (consisting of alleles of SNPs rs363717, rs4149339, and rs4149338) was associated with a decreased risk of CHD (OR = 0.8, P = 0.027). Three ABCA1 SNPs interacted with high triglyceride levels to increase CHD risk (P values of interactions were 0.010 for rs363717, 0.010 for rs4149339, and 0.020 for rs4149338, respectively). Conclusions: Our results suggest that ABCA1 polymorphisms influence plasma lipid variability and CHD risk. ABCA1 polymorphisms could also modify the effects of plasma lipids on CHD risk. PMID:26722555

  18. Gene Expression Profiling of Transporters in the Solute Carrier and ATP-Binding Cassette Superfamilies in Human Eye Substructures

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Amber; Geier, Ethan; Stocker, Sophie L.; Cropp, Cheryl D.; Grigorenko, Elena; Bloomer, Michele; Siegenthaler, Julie; Xu, Lu; Basile, Anthony S.; Tang-Liu, Diane D-S.; Giacomini, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    The barrier epithelia of the cornea and retina control drug and nutrient access to various compartments of the human eye. While ocular transporters are likely to play a critical role in homeostasis and drug delivery, little is known about their expression, localization and function. In this study, the mRNA expression levels of 445 transporters, metabolic enzymes, transcription factors and nuclear receptors were profiled in five regions of the human eye: cornea, iris, ciliary body, choroid and retina. Through RNA expression profiling and immunohistochemistry, several transporters were identified as putative targets for drug transport in ocular tissues. Our analysis identified SLC22A7 (OAT2), a carrier for the anti-viral drug, acyclovir, in the corneal epithelium, in addition to ABCG2 (BCRP), an important xenobiotic efflux pump, in retinal nerve fibers and the retinal pigment epithelium. Collectively, our results provide an understanding of the transporters that serve to maintain ocular homeostasis and which may be potential targets for drug delivery to deep compartments of the eye. PMID:23268600

  19. N-desmethyl-Loperamide Is Selective for P-Glycoprotein among Three ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters at the

    E-print Network

    Pike, Victor W.

    ). In the periphery as well as in the brain, overexpression of P-gp in cancer cells is one cause of multidrug.H.); and Laboratory of Cell Biology, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (K]N-desmethyl-Loperamide ([11 C]dLop) is used in positron emission tomography (PET) to measure the in vivo activity of efflux

  20. Do ATP-binding cassette transporters cause pharmacoresistance in epilepsy? Problems and approaches in determining which antiepileptic drugs are affected.

    PubMed

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Luna-Tortós, Carlos; Römermann, Kerstin; Fedrowitz, Maren

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to multiple antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a common problem in epilepsy, affecting at least 30% of patients. One prominent hypothesis to explain this resistance suggests an inadequate penetration or excess efflux of AEDs across the blood - brain barrier (BBB) as a result of overexpressed efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp), the encoded product of the multidrug resistance- 1 (MDR1, ABCB1) gene. Pgp and MDR1 are markedly increased in epileptogenic brain tissue of patients with AED-resistant partial epilepsy and following seizures in rodent models of partial epilepsy. In rodent models, AED-resistant rats exhibit higher Pgp levels than responsive animals; increased Pgp expression is associated with lower brain levels of AEDs; and, most importantly, co-administration of Pgp inhibitors reverses AED resistance. Thus, it is reasonable to conclude that Pgp plays a significant role in mediating resistance to AEDs in rodent models of epilepsy - however, whether this phenomenon extends to at least some human refractory epilepsy remains unclear, particularly because it is still a matter of debate which AEDs, if any, are transported by human Pgp. The difficulty in determining which AEDs are substrates of human Pgp is mainly a consequence of the fact that AEDs are highly permeable compounds, which are not easily identified as Pgp substrates in in vitro models of the BBB, such as monolayer (Transwell(®)) efflux assays. By using a modified assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA), which minimizes the influence of high transcellular permeability, two groups have recently demonstrated that several major AEDs are transported by human Pgp. Importantly, it was demonstrated in these studies that Pgp-mediated transport highly depends on the AED concentration and may not be identified if concentrations below or above the therapeutic range are used. In addition to the efflux transporters, seizure-induced alterations in BBB integrity and activity of drug metabolizing enzymes (CYPs) affect the brain uptake of AEDs. For translating these findings to the clinical arena, in vivo imaging studies using positron emission tomography (PET) with (11)C-labelled AEDs in epileptic patients are under way. PMID:21827408

  1. Linoleic acid suppresses cholesterol efflux and ATP-binding cassette transporters in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), possibly associated with elevated plasma free fatty acid concentrations. Paradoxically, evidence suggests that unsaturated, compared to saturated fatty acids, suppress macrophage chole...

  2. Heterocyclic cyclohexanone monocarbonyl analogs of curcumin can inhibit the activity of ATP-binding cassette transporters in cancer multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Revalde, Jezrael L; Li, Yan; Hawkins, Bill C; Rosengren, Rhonda J; Paxton, James W

    2015-02-01

    Curcumin (CUR) is a phytochemical that inhibits the xenobiotic ABC efflux transporters implicated in cancer multidrug resistance (MDR), such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins 1 and 5 (MRP1 and MRP5). The use of CUR in the clinic however, is complicated by its instability and poor pharmacokinetic profile. Monocarbonyl analogs of CUR (MACs) are compounds without CUR's unstable ?-diketone moiety and were reported to have improved stability and in vivo disposition. Whether the MACs can be used as MDR reversal agents is less clear, as the absence of a ?-diketone may negatively impact transporter inhibition. In this study, we investigated 23 heterocyclic cyclohexanone MACs for inhibitory effects against P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP5. Using flow cytometry and resistance reversal assays, we found that many of these compounds inhibited the transport activity of the ABC transporters investigated, often with much greater potency than CUR. Overall the analogs were most effective at inhibiting BCRP and we identified three compounds, A12 (2,6-bis((E)-2,5-dimethoxy-benzylidene)cyclohexanone), A13 (2,6-bis((E)-4-hydroxyl-3-methoxybenzylidene)-cyclohexanone) and B11 (3,5-bis((E)-2-fluoro-4,5-dimethoxybenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidin-4-one), as the most promising BCRP inhibitors. These compounds inhibited BCRP activity in a non-cell line, non-substrate-specific manner. Their inhibition occurred by direct transporter interaction rather than modulating protein or cell surface expression. From these results, we concluded that MACs, such as the heterocyclic cyclohexanone analogs in this study, also have potential as MDR reversal agents and may be superior alternatives to the unstable parent compound, CUR. PMID:25543853

  3. XENOBIOTIC REGULATION OF THE ATP BINDING CASSETTE TRANSPORTER ABCB6 AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE TO HEPATIC HEME HOMEOSTASIS

    E-print Network

    Chavan, Hemantkumar Dilip

    2013-12-31

    in heme demand to compensate for the increased expression of the heme-dependent cytochrome P450s (P450s) detoxifying enzymes. Cells respond to this increasing heme demand by increasing heme synthesis. Thus, exposure to environmental contaminants serves...

  4. Cassette Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped.

    This catalog lists cassette books produced by the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped during 1989. Books are listed alphabetically within subject categories under nonfiction and fiction headings. Nonfiction categories include: animals and wildlife, the arts, bestsellers, biography, blindness and physical handicaps,…

  5. Critical role of ?-phosphate in structural transition of Na,K-ATPase upon ATP binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrushanko, Irina Yu.; Mitkevich, Vladimir A.; Anashkina, Anastasia A.; Klimanova, Elizaveta A.; Dergousova, Elena A.; Lopina, Olga D.; Makarov, Alexander A.

    2014-06-01

    Active transport of sodium and potassium ions by Na,K-ATPase is accompanied by the enzyme conformational transition between E1 and E2 states. ATP and ADP bind to Na,K-ATPase in the E1 conformation with similar affinity but the properties of enzyme in complexes with these nucleotides are different. We have studied thermodynamics of Na,K-ATPase binding with adenine nucleotides at different temperatures using isothermal titration calorimetry. Our data indicate that ?-phosphate is involved in complex formation by increasing the affinity of adenine nucleotides to Na,K-ATPase by an order of magnitude, while ?-phosphate does not affect it. ATP binding to Na,K-ATPase in contrast to ADP binding generates a structural transition in the enzyme, which is consistent with the movement of a significant portion of the surface area to a solvent-protected state. We propose that ATP binding leads to convergence of the nucleotide-binding and phosphorylation domains transferring the enzyme from the ``E1-open'' to ``E1-closed'' conformation ready for phosphorylation.

  6. Conserved mechanisms of microtubule-stimulated ADP release, ATP binding, and force generation in transport kinesins

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, Joseph; Farabella, Irene; Yu, I-Mei; Rosenfeld, Steven S; Houdusse, Anne; Topf, Maya; Moores, Carolyn A

    2014-01-01

    Kinesins are a superfamily of microtubule-based ATP-powered motors, important for multiple, essential cellular functions. How microtubule binding stimulates their ATPase and controls force generation is not understood. To address this fundamental question, we visualized microtubule-bound kinesin-1 and kinesin-3 motor domains at multiple steps in their ATPase cycles—including their nucleotide-free states—at ?7 Å resolution using cryo-electron microscopy. In both motors, microtubule binding promotes ordered conformations of conserved loops that stimulate ADP release, enhance microtubule affinity and prime the catalytic site for ATP binding. ATP binding causes only small shifts of these nucleotide-coordinating loops but induces large conformational changes elsewhere that allow force generation and neck linker docking towards the microtubule plus end. Family-specific differences across the kinesin–microtubule interface account for the distinctive properties of each motor. Our data thus provide evidence for a conserved ATP-driven mechanism for kinesins and reveal the critical mechanistic contribution of the microtubule interface. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03680.001 PMID:25209998

  7. Origin Licensing Requires ATP Binding and Hydrolysis by the MCM Replicative Helicase

    PubMed Central

    Coster, Gideon; Frigola, Jordi; Beuron, Fabienne; Morris, Edward P.; Diffley, John F.X.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Loading of the six related Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM) proteins as head-to-head double hexamers during DNA replication origin licensing is crucial for ensuring once-per-cell-cycle DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. Assembly of these prereplicative complexes (pre-RCs) requires the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC), Cdc6, and Cdt1. ORC, Cdc6, and MCM are members of the AAA+ family of ATPases, and pre-RC assembly requires ATP hydrolysis. Here we show that ORC and Cdc6 mutants defective in ATP hydrolysis are competent for origin licensing. However, ATP hydrolysis by Cdc6 is required to release nonproductive licensing intermediates. We show that ATP binding stabilizes the wild-type MCM hexamer. Moreover, by analyzing MCM containing mutant subunits, we show that ATP binding and hydrolysis by MCM are required for Cdt1 release and double hexamer formation. This work alters our view of how ATP is used by licensing factors to assemble pre-RCs. PMID:25087873

  8. Effect of ATP Binding and Hydrolysis on Dynamics of Canine Parvovirus NS1? †

    PubMed Central

    Niskanen, Einari A.; Ihalainen, Teemu O.; Kalliolinna, Olli; Häkkinen, Milla M.; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija

    2010-01-01

    The replication protein NS1 is essential for genome replication and protein production in parvoviral infection. Many of its functions, including recognition and site-specific nicking of the viral genome, helicase activity, and transactivation of the viral capsid promoter, are dependent on ATP. An ATP-binding pocket resides in the middle of the modular NS1 protein in a superfamily 3 helicase domain. Here we have identified key ATP-binding amino acid residues in canine parvovirus (CPV) NS1 protein and mutated amino acids from the conserved A motif (K406), B motif (E444 and E445), and positively charged region (R508 and R510). All mutations prevented the formation of infectious viruses. When provided in trans, all except the R508A mutation reduced infectivity in a dominant-negative manner, possibly by hindering genome replication. These results suggest that the conserved R510 residue, but not R508, is the arginine finger sensory element of CPV NS1. Moreover, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), complemented by computer simulations, was used to assess the binding properties of mutated fluorescent fusion proteins. These experiments identified ATP-dependent and -independent binding modes for NS1 in living cells. Only the K406M mutant had a single binding site, which was concluded to indicate ATP-independent binding. Furthermore, our data suggest that DNA binding of NS1 is dependent on its ability to both bind and hydrolyze ATP. PMID:20219935

  9. A stable ATP binding to the nucleotide binding domain is important for reliable gating cycle in an ABC transporter CFTR.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Yu, Ying-Chun; Kono, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yasui, Masato; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sohma, Yoshiro

    2010-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel, a member of ABC transporter superfamily, gates following ATP-dependent conformational changes of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Reflecting the hundreds of milliseconds duration of the channel open state corresponding to the dimerization of two NBDs, macroscopic WT-CFTR currents usually showed a fast, single exponential relaxation upon removal of cytoplasmic ATP. Mutations of tyrosine1219, a residue critical for ATP binding in second NBD (NBD2), induced a significant slow phase in the current relaxation, suggesting that weakening ATP binding affinity at NBD2 increases the probability of the stable open state. The slow phase was effectively diminished by a higher affinity ATP analogue. These data suggest that a stable binding of ATP to NBD2 is required for normal CFTR gating cycle, andthat the instability of ATP binding frequently halts the gating cycle in the open state presumably through a failure of ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. PMID:20628841

  10. Complexed Structures of Formylglycinamide Ribonucleotide Amidotransferase from Thermotoga maritima Describe a Novel ATP Binding Protein Superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Morar, Mariya; Anand, Ruchi; Hoskins, Aaron A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-09-11

    Formylglycinamide ribonucleotide amidotransferase (FGAR-AT) catalyzes the ATP-dependent synthesis of formylglycinamidine ribonucleotide (FGAM) from formylglycinamide ribonucleotide (FGAR) and glutamine in the fourth step of the purine biosynthetic pathway. FGAR-AT is encoded by the purL gene. Two types of PurL have been detected. The first type, found in eukaryotes and Gram-negative bacteria, consists of a single 140 kDa polypeptide chain and is designated large PurL (lgPurL). The second type, small PurL (smPurL), is found in archaea and Gram-positive bacteria and consists of an 80 kDa polypeptide chain. SmPurL requires two additional gene products, PurQ and PurS, for activity. PurL is a member of a protein superfamily that contains a novel ATP-binding domain. Structures of several members of this superfamily are available in the unliganded form. We determined five different structures of FGAR-AT from Thermotoga maritima in the presence of substrates, a substrate analogue, and a product. These complexes have allowed a detailed description of the novel ATP-binding motif. The availability of a ternary complex enabled mapping of the active site, thus identifying potential residues involved in catalysis. The complexes show a conformational change in the active site compared to the unliganded structure. Surprising discoveries, an ATP molecule in an auxiliary site of the protein and the conformational changes associated with its binding, provoke speculation about the regulatory role of the auxiliary site in formation of the PurLSQ complex as well as the evolutionary relationship of PurLs from different organisms.

  11. ATP Utilization by Yeast Replication Factor C III. THE ATP-BINDING DOMAINS OF Rfc2, Rfc3, AND Rfc4 ARE ESSENTIAL FOR DNA RECOGNITION AND

    E-print Network

    Burgers, Peter M.

    ATP Utilization by Yeast Replication Factor C III. THE ATP-BINDING DOMAINS OF Rfc2, Rfc3, AND Rfc4 lysine in the Walker A motif of the ATP- binding domain encoded by the yeast RFC1, RFC2, RFC3, and RFC4 loading activity. In addition to their defects in ATP hydrolysis, these complexes were defective for DNA

  12. Mapping of Interdomain Interfaces Required for the Functional Architecture of Yor1p, a Eukaryotic ATP-binding

    E-print Network

    Miller, Liz

    super- family of proteins that mediate substrate translocation across biological membranes. Our goal ABC transporter, Yor1p, which functions as a pleiotropic drug pump at the plasma mem- brane. We have that translocate substrates across biological membranes using a mechanism that couples ATP binding/hy- drolysis

  13. ATP binding to the ? subunit of thermophilic ATP synthase is crucial for efficient coupling of ATPase and H+ pump activities.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Fumitaka; Kato, Shigeyuki; Watanabe, Kei; Kato-Yamada, Yasuyuki

    2011-07-01

    ATP binding to the ? subunit of F1-ATPase, a soluble subcomplex of TFoF1 (FoF1-ATPase synthase from the thermophilic Bacillus strain PS3), affects the regulation of F1-ATPase activity by stabilizing the compact, ATPase-active, form of the ? subunit [Kato, S., Yoshida, M. and Kato-Yamada, Y. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 37618-37623]. In the present study, we report how ATP binding to the ? subunit affects ATPase and H+ pumping activities in the holoenzyme TFoF1. Wild-type TFoF1 showed significant H+ pumping activity when ATP was used as the substrate. However, GTP, which bound poorly to the ? subunit, did not support efficient H+ pumping. Addition of small amounts of ATP to the GTP substrate restored coupling between GTPase and H+ pumping activities. Similar uncoupling was observed when TFoF1 contained an ATP-binding-deficient ? subunit, even with ATP as a substrate. Further analysis suggested that the compact conformation of the ? subunit induced by ATP binding was required to couple ATPase and H+ pumping activities in TFoF1 unless the ? subunit was in its extended-state conformation. The present study reveals a novel role of the ? subunit as an ATP-sensitive regulator of the coupling of ATPase and H+ pumping activities of TFoF1. PMID:21510843

  14. ATP Utilization by Yeast Replication Factor C II. MULTIPLE STEPWISE ATP BINDING EVENTS ARE REQUIRED TO LOAD PROLIFERATING CELL

    E-print Network

    Burgers, Peter M.

    ATP Utilization by Yeast Replication Factor C II. MULTIPLE STEPWISE ATP BINDING EVENTS ARE REQUIRED of adenosine (3-thiotriphosphate) (ATP S), a nonhydrolyzable analog of ATP, to replication factor C with a N-terminal truncation ( 2­273) of the Rfc1 sub- unit (RFC) was studied by filter binding. RFC alone bound 1.8 ATP

  15. CELL REGULATION, Vol. 2, 851-859, October 1991 An ATP-binding membrane protein is required for

    E-print Network

    Walter, Peter

    , ATP is required for protein import into chloroplasts (Grossman et aL, 1980; Flugge and Hinz, 1986CELL REGULATION, Vol. 2, 851-859, October 1991 An ATP-binding membrane protein is required microsomal vesicles with a photoactivatable ana- logue of ATP, 8-N2ATP. This treatment resufted

  16. ATP binding by NLRP7 is required for inflammasome activation in response to bacterial lipopeptides.

    PubMed

    Radian, Alexander D; Khare, Sonal; Chu, Lan H; Dorfleutner, Andrea; Stehlik, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligimerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) are pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) involved in innate immune responses. NLRs encode a central nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) consisting of the NAIP, CIITA, HET-E and TP1 (NACHT) domain and the NACHT associated domain (NAD), which facilitates receptor oligomerization and downstream inflammasome signaling. The NBD contains highly conserved regions, known as Walker motifs, that are required for nucleotide binding and hydrolysis. The NLR containing a PYRIN domain (PYD) 7 (NLRP7) has been recently shown to assemble an ASC and caspase-1-containing high molecular weight inflammasome complex in response to microbial acylated lipopeptides and Staphylococcus aureus infection. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for NLRP7 inflammasome activation is still elusive. Here we demonstrate that the NBD of NLRP7 is an ATP binding domain and has ATPase activity. We further show that an intact nucleotide-binding Walker A motif is required for NBD-mediated nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, oligomerization, and NLRP7 inflammasome formation and activity. Accordingly, THP-1 cells expressing a mutated Walker A motif display defective NLRP7 inflammasome activation, interleukin (IL)-1? release and pyroptosis in response to acylated lipopeptides and S. aureus infection. Taken together, our results provide novel insights into the mechanism of NLRP7 inflammasome assembly. PMID:26143398

  17. Three-Dimensional Structures Reveal Multiple ADP/ATP Binding Modes

    SciTech Connect

    C Simmons; C Magee; D Smith; L Lauman; J Chaput; J Allen

    2011-12-31

    The creation of synthetic enzymes with predefined functions represents a major challenge in future synthetic biology applications. Here, we describe six structures of de novo proteins that have been determined using protein crystallography to address how simple enzymes perform catalysis. Three structures are of a protein, DX, selected for its stability and ability to tightly bind ATP. Despite the addition of ATP to the crystallization conditions, the presence of a bound but distorted ATP was found only under excess ATP conditions, with ADP being present under equimolar conditions or when crystallized for a prolonged period of time. A bound ADP cofactor was evident when Asp was substituted for Val at residue 65, but ATP in a linear configuration is present when Phe was substituted for Tyr at residue 43. These new structures complement previously determined structures of DX and the protein with the Phe 43 to Tyr substitution [Simmons, C. R., et al. (2009) ACS Chem. Biol. 4, 649-658] and together demonstrate the multiple ADP/ATP binding modes from which a model emerges in which the DX protein binds ATP in a configuration that represents a transitional state for the catalysis of ATP to ADP through a slow, metal-free reaction capable of multiple turnovers. This unusual observation suggests that design-free methods can be used to generate novel protein scaffolds that are tailor-made for catalysis.

  18. Exhaustive de novo design of low-molecular-weight fragments against the ATP-binding site of DNA-gyrase.

    PubMed

    Firth-Clark, Stuart; Todorov, Nikolay P; Alberts, Ian L; Williams, Anthony; James, Timothy; Dean, Philip M

    2006-01-01

    We present a de novo design approach to generating small fragments in the DNA-gyrase ATP-binding site using the computational drug design platform SkelGen. We have generated an exhaustive number of structural possibilities, which were subsequently filtered for site complementarity and synthetic tractability. A number of known active fragments are found, but most of the species created are potentially novel and could be valuable for further elaboration and development into lead-like structures. PMID:16711736

  19. NEM modication prevents high-anity ATP binding to the rst nucleotide binding fold of the sulphonylurea receptor, SUR1

    E-print Network

    Tucker, Stephen J.

    NEM modi¢cation prevents high-a¤nity ATP binding to the ¢rst nucleotide binding fold, UK Received 7 July 1999; received in revised form 11 August 1999 Abstract Pancreatic LL-cell ATP WWM 8-azido- [KK-32 P]ATP or 8-azido-[QQ-32 P]ATP was inhibited by NEM with Ki of 1.8 WWM and 2.4 WWM

  20. Differential Cellular Effects of Plk1 Inhibitors Targeting the ATP-binding Domain or Polo-box Domain.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sol-Bi; Woo, Sang-Uk; Yim, Hyungshin

    2015-12-01

    The expression of polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) correlates with malignancy and is thus recognized as a target for cancer therapy. In addition to the development of ATP-competitive Plk1 inhibitors, the polo-box domain (PBD), a unique functional domain of PLKs, is being targeted to develop Plk1-specific inhibitors. However, the action mechanisms of these two classes of Plk1 inhibitors have not been thoroughly evaluated. Here, we evaluate the differences in cellular effects of ATP-binding domain inhibitors (BI 2536, GSK 461364) and PBD inhibitors (poloxin, thymoquinone) to determine their mechanisms of Plk1 inhibition. Our data show that BI 2536 and GSK461364 increased the population of cells in the G2/M phase compared with controls, while treatment with poloxin and thymoquinone increased cell population in the S phase as well as in G2/M, in a p53-independent manner. The population of cells staining positively for p-Histone H3 and MPM2, mitotic index, was increased by treatment with BI 2536 or GSK461364, but not by treatment with poloxin or thymoquinone. Furthermore, treatment with BI 2536 or GSK461364 resulted in activation of the BubR1 spindle checkpoint kinase, suggesting that treatment with ATP-binding domain inhibitors induces metaphase arrest. However, the administration of poloxin and thymoquinone resulted in an increase in p21(WAF1) and S arrest, indicating that PBD inhibitors also affected interphase before mitotic entry. Taken together, these data suggest that the PDB of Plk1 plays a role in S phase progression through interaction with other proteins, while its ATP-binding domain is important for regulating mitotic progression mediated by its catalytic activity involving consumption of ATP. PMID:25975351

  1. An Inhibitor’s-Eye View of the ATP-Binding Site of CDKs in Different Regulatory States

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have used a chemically diverse panel of kinase inhibitors to assess the chemical similarity of the ATP-binding sites of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) subfamily members in a range of activation states. Using this approach, we find that different activation states of a particular CDK may differ from each other as much as different CDKs in the same activation state. We also find that inhibitors discriminate more effectively among CDK family members in their monomeric state than in their cyclin-bound state, providing direct evidence for the belief that selective binding to inactive kinase states might be more readily achieved than selective binding to active states. PMID:24669831

  2. An inhibitor's-eye view of the ATP-binding site of CDKs in different regulatory states.

    PubMed

    Echalier, Aude; Hole, Alison J; Lolli, Graziano; Endicott, Jane A; Noble, Martin E M

    2014-06-20

    We have used a chemically diverse panel of kinase inhibitors to assess the chemical similarity of the ATP-binding sites of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) subfamily members in a range of activation states. Using this approach, we find that different activation states of a particular CDK may differ from each other as much as different CDKs in the same activation state. We also find that inhibitors discriminate more effectively among CDK family members in their monomeric state than in their cyclin-bound state, providing direct evidence for the belief that selective binding to inactive kinase states might be more readily achieved than selective binding to active states. PMID:24669831

  3. The tomato R gene products I-2 and MI-1 are functional ATP binding proteins with ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Tameling, Wladimir I L; Elzinga, Sandra D J; Darmin, Patricia S; Vossen, Jack H; Takken, Frank L W; Haring, Michel A; Cornelissen, Ben J C

    2002-11-01

    Most plant disease resistance (R) genes known today encode proteins with a central nucleotide binding site (NBS) and a C-terminal Leu-rich repeat (LRR) domain. The NBS contains three ATP/GTP binding motifs known as the kinase-1a or P-loop, kinase-2, and kinase-3a motifs. In this article, we show that the NBS of R proteins forms a functional nucleotide binding pocket. The N-terminal halves of two tomato R proteins, I-2 conferring resistance to Fusarium oxysporum and Mi-1 conferring resistance to root-knot nematodes and potato aphids, were produced as glutathione S-transferase fusions in Escherichia coli. In a filter binding assay, purified I-2 was found to bind ATP rather than other nucleoside triphosphates. ATP binding appeared to be fully dependent on the presence of a divalent cation. A mutant I-2 protein containing a mutation in the P-loop showed a strongly reduced ATP binding capacity. Thin layer chromatography revealed that both I-2 and Mi-1 exerted ATPase activity. Based on the strong conservation of NBS domains in R proteins of the NBS-LRR class, we propose that they all are capable of binding and hydrolyzing ATP. PMID:12417711

  4. ATP-Binding Pocket-Targeted Suppression of Src and Syk by Luteolin Contributes to Its Anti-Inflammatory Action

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Oog; Jeong, Deok; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-01-01

    Luteolin is a flavonoid identified as a major anti-inflammatory component of Artemisia asiatica. Numerous reports have demonstrated the ability of luteolin to suppress inflammation in a variety of inflammatory conditions. However, its exact anti-inflammatory mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory mode of action in activated macrophages of luteolin from Artemisia asiatica was examined by employing immunoblotting analysis, a luciferase reporter gene assay, enzyme assays, and an overexpression strategy. Luteolin dose-dependently inhibited the secretion of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and diminished the levels of mRNA transcripts of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) ?, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) and pam3CSK-treated macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells without displaying cytotoxicity. Luteolin displayed potent NO-inhibitory activity and also suppressed the nuclear translocation of NF-?B (p65 and p50) via blockade of Src and Syk, but not other mitogen-activated kinases. Overexpression of wild type Src and point mutants thereof, and molecular modelling studies, suggest that the ATP-binding pocket may be the luteolin-binding site in Src. These results strongly suggest that luteolin may exert its anti-inflammatory action by suppressing the NF-?B signaling cascade via blockade of ATP binding in Src and Syk. PMID:26236111

  5. ATP-Binding site of annexin VI characterized by photochemical release of nucleotide and infrared difference spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bandorowicz-Piku?a, J; Wrzosek, A; Danieluk, M; Pikula, S; Buchet, R

    1999-10-01

    Structural changes induced by nucleotide binding to porcine liver annexin VI (AnxVI) were probed by reaction-induced difference spectroscopy (RIDS). Photorelease of the nucleotide from ATP[Et(PhNO2)] produced RIDS of AnxVI characterized by reproducible changes in the amide I region. The magnitude of the infrared change was comparable to RIDS of other ATP-binding proteins, such as Ca(2+)-ATPase and creatine and arginine kinases. Analysis of RIDS revealed the existence of ATP-binding site(s) (K(d) < 1 microM) within the AnxVI molecule, comprising five to six amino acid residues located in the C-terminal portion of the protein molecule. The binding stoichiometry of ATP:AnxVI was determined as 1:1 (mol/mol). ATP, in the presence of Ca2+, induced changes in protein secondary structure reflected by a 5% decrease in alpha-helix content of the protein in favor of unordered structure. Such changes may influence the affinity of AnxVI for Ca2+ and modulate its interaction with membranes. PMID:10512756

  6. Encapsulated Brucella ovis Lacking a Putative ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter (?abcBA) Protects against Wild Type Brucella ovis in Rams

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ana Patrícia C.; Macêdo, Auricélio A.; Costa, Luciana F.; Rocha, Cláudia E.; Garcia, Luize N. N.; Farias, Jade R. D.; Gomes, Priscilla P. R.; Teixeira, Gustavo C.; Fonseca, Kessler W. J.; Maia, Andréa R. F.; Neves, Gabriela G.; Romão, Everton L.; Silva, Teane M. A.; Mol, Juliana P. S.; Oliveira, Renata M.; Araújo, Márcio S. S.; Nascimento, Ernane F.; Martins-Filho, Olindo A.; Brandão, Humberto M.; Paixão, Tatiane A.; Santos, Renato L.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate protection induced by the vaccine candidate B. ovis ?abcBA against experimental challenge with wild type B. ovis in rams. Rams were subcutaneously immunized with B. ovis ?abcBA encapsulated with sterile alginate or with the non encapsulated vaccine strain. Serum, urine, and semen samples were collected during two months after immunization. The rams were then challenged with wild type B. ovis (ATCC25840), and the results were compared to non immunized and experimentally challenged rams. Immunization, particularly with encapsulated B. ovis ?abcBA, prevented infection, secretion of wild type B. ovis in the semen and urine, shedding of neutrophils in the semen, and the development of clinical changes, gross and microscopic lesions induced by the wild type B. ovis reference strain. Collectively, our data indicates that the B. ovis ?abcBA strain is an exceptionally good vaccine strain for preventing brucellosis caused by B. ovis infection in rams. PMID:26317399

  7. Polymorphisms of ATP binding cassette G5 and G8 transporters: their effect on cholesterol metabolism after moderate weight loss in overweight and obese hyperlipidemic women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the effect of polymorphisms ABCG5 and ABCG8 transporters on changes in lipid levels, cholesterol absorption rate (ABS), fractional synthesis rate (FSR), and turnover (TO) after moderate weight loss (WtL) in women. Cholesterol metabolism was measured pre and post WtL in 35 hyperlipidemic...

  8. Variants in the ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter (ABCA7), Apolipoprotein E ?4, and the Risk of Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Christiane; Jun, Gyungah; Naj, Adam; Rajbhandary, Ruchita; Vardarajan, Badri Narayan; Wang, Li-San; Valladares, Otto; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Larson, Eric B.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Evans, Denis; De Jager, Philip L.; Crane, Paul K.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Murrell, Jill R.; Raj, Towfique; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Logue, Mark; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Green, Robert C.; Barnes, Lisa L.; Cantwell, Laura B.; Fallin, M. Daniele; Go, Rodney C. P.; Griffith, Patrick; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Manly, Jennifer J.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Lopez, Oscar L.; Bennett, David A.; Hendrie, Hugh; Hall, Kathleen S.; Goate, Alison M.; Byrd, Goldie S.; Kukull, Walter A.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Mayeux, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Importance Genetic variants associated with susceptibility to late-onset Alzheimer disease are known for individuals of European ancestry, but whether the same or different variants account for the genetic risk of Alzheimer disease in African American individuals is unknown. Identification of disease-associated variants helps identify targets for genetic testing, prevention, and treatment. Objective To identify genetic loci associated with late-onset Alzheimer disease in African Americans. Design, Setting, and Participants The Alzheimer Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC) assembled multiple data sets representing a total of 5896 African Americans (1968 case participants, 3928 control participants) 60 years or older that were collected between 1989 and 2011 at multiple sites. The association of Alzheimer disease with genotyped and imputed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was assessed in case-control and in family-based data sets. Results from individual data sets were combined to perform an inverse variance–weighted meta-analysis, first with genome-wide analyses and subsequently with gene-based tests for previously reported loci. Main Outcomes and Measures Presence of Alzheimer disease according to standardized criteria. Results Genome-wide significance in fully adjusted models (sex, age, APOE genotype, population stratification) was observed for a SNP in ABCA7 (rs115550680, allele = G; frequency, 0.09 cases and 0.06 controls; odds ratio [OR], 1.79 [95% CI, 1.47-2.12]; P = 2.2 × 10–9), which is in linkage disequilibrium with SNPs previously associated with Alzheimer disease in Europeans (0.8

  9. Construction of Listeria monocytogenes mutants with in-frame deletions in putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and analysis of their growth under stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that is difficult to eliminate since it can survive under multiple stress conditions such as low pH and low temperature. Understanding its survival under stress conditions is important to control this pathogen in food. ABC transporters have been shown...

  10. Specific mutation of a regulatory site within the ATP-binding region of simian virus 40 large T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, B M; Bradley, M K

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to distinguish simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (T) binding to ATP from hydrolysis, specific mutations were made in the ATP-binding site of T according to our model for the site (M. K. Bradley, T. F. Smith, R. H. Lathrop, D. M. Livingston, and T. A. Webster, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:4026-4030, 1987). Two acidic residues predicted to make contact with the magnesium phosphate were changed to alanines. The mutated T gene was completely defective for viral DNA synthesis and for virion production, and it was dominant defective for viral DNA replication. The defective T gene encoded a stable product (2905T) that oncogenically transformed mouse cell lines. 2905T, immunoprecipitated from transformed-cell extracts, bound SV40 origin DNA specifically and, surprisingly, it was active as an ATPase. A recombinant baculovirus was constructed for the production and purification of the mutant protein for detailed biochemical analyses. 2905T had only 10% of the ATPase and helicase of wild-type T. The Km of 2905T for ATP in ATPase assays was the same as the Km of wild-type T. ATP activated the ATPase activity of wild-type T, but not of 2905T. As tested by gel bandshift assay, 2905T bound to SV40 origin DNA and to individual sites I and II with affinities similar to that of the wild type. However, ATP did not modulate the DNA-binding activity of mutant T to site II. Therefore, this mutation in the ATP-binding site in T resulted in defects in the interaction between the protein and ATP that appeared to be responsible for the determination of the active state of T for DNA binding versus ATPase. Images PMID:1651416

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Universal Stress Protein Rv2623 Regulates Bacillary Growth by ATP Binding: Requirement for Establishing Chronic Persistent Infection

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, J.; Mi, K; Bilder, P; Sun, M; Lim, J; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H; Basaraba, R; So, M; Zhu, G; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculous latency and reactivation play a significant role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, yet the mechanisms that regulate these processes remain unclear. The Mycobacterium tuberculosisuniversal stress protein (USP) homolog, rv2623, is among the most highly induced genes when the tubercle bacillus is subjected to hypoxia and nitrosative stress, conditions thought to promote latency. Induction of rv2623 also occurs when M. tuberculosis encounters conditions associated with growth arrest, such as the intracellular milieu of macrophages and in the lungs of mice with chronic tuberculosis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Rv2623 regulates tuberculosis latency. We observed that an Rv2623-deficient mutant fails to establish chronic tuberculous infection in guinea pigs and mice, exhibiting a hypervirulence phenotype associated with increased bacterial burden and mortality. Consistent with this in vivo growth-regulatory role, constitutive overexpression of rv2623 attenuates mycobacterial growth in vitro. Biochemical analysis of purified Rv2623 suggested that this mycobacterial USP binds ATP, and the 2.9-A-resolution crystal structure revealed that Rv2623 engages ATP in a novel nucleotide-binding pocket. Structure-guided mutagenesis yielded Rv2623 mutants with reduced ATP-binding capacity. Analysis of mycobacteria overexpressing these mutants revealed that the in vitro growth-inhibitory property of Rv2623 correlates with its ability to bind ATP. Together, the results indicate that i M. tuberculosis Rv2623 regulates mycobacterial growth in vitro and in vivo, and ii Rv2623 is required for the entry of the tubercle bacillus into the chronic phase of infection in the host; in addition, iii Rv2623 binds ATP; and iv the growth-regulatory attribute of this USP is dependent on its ATP-binding activity. We propose that Rv2623 may function as an ATP-dependent signaling intermediate in a pathway that promotes persistent infection.

  12. The Q Motif Is Involved in DNA Binding but Not ATP Binding in ChlR1 Helicase

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hao; Guo, Manhong; Vidhyasagar, Venkatasubramanian; Talwar, Tanu; Wu, Yuliang

    2015-01-01

    Helicases are molecular motors that couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to the unwinding of structured DNA or RNA and chromatin remodeling. The conversion of energy derived from ATP hydrolysis into unwinding and remodeling is coordinated by seven sequence motifs (I, Ia, II, III, IV, V, and VI). The Q motif, consisting of nine amino acids (GFXXPXPIQ) with an invariant glutamine (Q) residue, has been identified in some, but not all helicases. Compared to the seven well-recognized conserved helicase motifs, the role of the Q motif is less acknowledged. Mutations in the human ChlR1 (DDX11) gene are associated with a unique genetic disorder known as Warsaw Breakage Syndrome, which is characterized by cellular defects in genome maintenance. To examine the roles of the Q motif in ChlR1 helicase, we performed site directed mutagenesis of glutamine to alanine at residue 23 in the Q motif of ChlR1. ChlR1 recombinant protein was overexpressed and purified from HEK293T cells. ChlR1-Q23A mutant abolished the helicase activity of ChlR1 and displayed reduced DNA binding ability. The mutant showed impaired ATPase activity but normal ATP binding. A thermal shift assay revealed that ChlR1-Q23A has a melting point value similar to ChlR1-WT. Partial proteolysis mapping demonstrated that ChlR1-WT and Q23A have a similar globular structure, although some subtle conformational differences in these two proteins are evident. Finally, we found ChlR1 exists and functions as a monomer in solution, which is different from FANCJ, in which the Q motif is involved in protein dimerization. Taken together, our results suggest that the Q motif is involved in DNA binding but not ATP binding in ChlR1 helicase. PMID:26474416

  13. Automatic cassette to cassette radiant impulse processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheets, Ronald E.

    1985-01-01

    Single wafer rapid annealing using high temperature isothermal processing has become increasingly popular in recent years. In addition to annealing, this process is also being investigated for suicide formation, passivation, glass reflow and alloying. Regardless of the application, there is a strong necessity to automate in order to maintain process control, repeatability, cleanliness and throughput. These requirements have been carefully addressed during the design and development of the Model 180 Radiant Impulse Processor which is a totally automatic cassette to cassette wafer processing system. Process control and repeatability are maintained by a closed loop optical pyrometer system which maintains the wafer at the programmed temperature-time conditions. Programmed recipes containing up to 10 steps may be easily entered on the computer keyboard or loaded in from a recipe library stored on a standard 5 {1}/{4?} floppy disk. Cold wall heating chamber construction, controlled environment (N 2, A, forming gas) and quartz wafer carriers prevent contamination of the wafer during high temperature processing. Throughputs of 150-240 wafers per hour are achieved by quickly heating the wafer to temperature (450-1400°C) in 3-6 s with a high intensity, uniform (± 1%) radiant flux of 100 {W}/{cm 2}, parallel wafer handling system and a wafer cool down stage.

  14. Automated cassette-to-cassette substrate handling system

    DOEpatents

    Kraus, Joseph Arthur; Boyer, Jeremy James; Mack, Joseph; DeChellis, Michael; Koo, Michael

    2014-03-18

    An automated cassette-to-cassette substrate handling system includes a cassette storage module for storing a plurality of substrates in cassettes before and after processing. A substrate carrier storage module stores a plurality of substrate carriers. A substrate carrier loading/unloading module loads substrates from the cassette storage module onto the plurality of substrate carriers and unloads substrates from the plurality of substrate carriers to the cassette storage module. A transport mechanism transports the plurality of substrates between the cassette storage module and the plurality of substrate carriers and transports the plurality of substrate carriers between the substrate carrier loading/unloading module and a processing chamber. A vision system recognizes recesses in the plurality of substrate carriers corresponding to empty substrate positions in the substrate carrier. A processor receives data from the vision system and instructs the transport mechanism to transport substrates to positions on the substrate carrier in response to the received data.

  15. Identification of mutations in regions corresponding to the two putative nucleotide (ATP)-binding folds of the cystic fibrosis gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kerem, B.; Zielenski, J.; Markiewicz, D.; Bozon, D.; Kennedy, D.; Rommens, J.M. ); Gazit, E. ); Yahav, J. ); Riordan, J.R. ); Collins, F.S. ); Tsui, Lapchee Univ. of Toronto, Ontario )

    1990-11-01

    Additional mutations in the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene were identified in the regions corresponding to the two putative nucleotide (ATP)-binding folds (NBFs) of the predicted polypeptide. The patient cohort included 46 Canadian CF families with well-characterized DNA marker haplotypes spanning the disease locus and several other families from Israel. Eleven mutations were found in the first NBF, 2 were found in the second NBF, but none was found in the R-domain. Seven of the mutations were of the missense type affecting some of the highly conserved amino acid residues in the first NBF; 3 were nonsense mutations; 2 would probably affect mRNA splicing; 2 corresponded to small deletions, including another 3-base-pair deletion different from the major mutation ({delta}F508), which could account for 70% of the CF chromosomes in the population. Nine of these mutations accounted for 12 of the 31 non-{delta}F508 CF chromosomes in the Canadian families. The highly heterogeneous nature of the remaining CF mutations provides important insights into the structure and function of the protein, but it also suggests that DNA-based genetic screening for CF carrier status will not be straightforward.

  16. The effects of ABCG5/G8 polymorphisms on HDL-cholesterol concentrations depend on ABCA1 genetic variants in the Boston Puerto Rican health study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and aims: ATP-binding cassette transporters G5/G8 (ABCG5/G8) are associated with HDL-C concentrations. To assess whether the effect of ABCG5/G8 genetic variants on HDL-C concentrations is dependent on ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 (ABCA1), we studied potential interactions between ...

  17. Hedyotis diffusa Willd overcomes 5-fluorouracil resistance in human colorectal cancer HCT-8/5-FU cells by downregulating the expression of P-glycoprotein and ATP-binding casette subfamily G member 2

    PubMed Central

    LI, QIONGYU; WANG, XIANGFENG; SHEN, ALING; ZHANG, YUCHEN; CHEN, YOUQIN; SFERRA, THOMAS J.; LIN, JIUMAO; PENG, JUN

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Hedyotis diffusa Willd (HDW), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, exhibits potent anticancer activity in models of colorectal cancer (CRC). Aggressive forms of CRC exhibit resistance to widely used chemotherapeutic drugs, including the antimetabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); however, less is known with regard to the activity of HDW against 5-FU-resistant cancer. In the present study, the mechanism of action and the potency of ethanol extracts of HDW (EEHDW) were investigated on a multidrug-resistant CRC HCT-8/5-FU cell line. Using an MTT cell proliferation assay, EEHDW treatment was shown to significantly reduce the cell viability of HCT-8/5-FU cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, EEHDW significantly increased the retention of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter substrate, rhodamine-123, as compared with the untreated controls. To further investigate the molecular mechanisms targeted by EEHDW in the resistant cells, the expression levels of the ABC drug transporter protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and ABC subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2), were analyzed using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The mRNA and protein expression levels of P-gp and ABCG2 were reduced in the HCT-8/5-FU cells following EEHDW treatment, indicating that EEHDW inhibits ABCG2-mediated drug resistance by downregulating the expression of ABCG2 and P-gp. Therefore, the potential application of EEHDW as a chemotherapeutic adjuvant represents a promising alternative approach to the treatment of drug-resistant CRC.

  18. Intrasteric Inhibition of ATP Binding Is Not Required To Prevent Unregulated Autophosphorylation or Signaling by the Insulin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Mark; Ablooglu, Ararat J.; Leone, Joseph W.; Rusinova, Elena; Ross, J. B. Alexander; Heinrikson, Robert L.; Kohanski, Ronald A.

    2001-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases may use intrasteric inhibition to suppress autophosphorylation prior to growth factor stimulation. To test this hypothesis we made an Asp1161Ala mutant in the activation loop that relieved intrasteric inhibition of the unphosphorylated insulin receptor (IR) and its recombinant cytoplasmic kinase domain (IRKD) without affecting the activated state. Solution studies with the unphosphorylated mutant IRKD demonstrated conformational changes and greater catalytic efficiency from a 10-fold increase in kcat and a 15-fold-lower Km ATP although Km peptide was unchanged. Kinetic parameters of the autophosphorylated mutant and wild-type kinase domains were virtually identical. The Asp1161Ala mutation increased the rate of in vitro autophosphorylation of the IRKD or IR at low ATP concentrations and in the absence of insulin. However, saturation with ATP (for the IRKD) or the presence of insulin (for the IR) yielded equivalent rates of autophosphorylation for mutant versus wild-type kinases. Despite a biochemically more active kinase domain, the mutant IR expressed in C2C12 myoblasts was not constitutively autophosphorylated. However, it displayed a 2.5-fold-lower 50% effective concentration for insulin stimulation of autophosphorylation and was dephosphorylated more slowly following withdrawal of insulin than wild-type IR. In tests of the regulation of the unphosphorylated basal state, these results demonstrate that neither intrasteric inhibition against ATP binding nor suppression of kinase activity is required to prevent premature autophosphorylation of the IR. Finally, the lower rate of dephosphorylation suggests invariant residues of the activation loop such as Asp1161 may function at multiple junctures in cellular regulation of receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:11390649

  19. Unique ATPase site architecture triggers cis-mediated synchronized ATP binding in heptameric AAA+-ATPase domain of flagellar regulatory protein FlrC.

    PubMed

    Dey, Sanjay; Biswas, Maitree; Sen, Udayaditya; Dasgupta, Jhimli

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial enhancer-binding proteins (bEBPs) oligomerize through AAA(+) domains and use ATP hydrolysis-driven energy to isomerize the RNA polymerase-?(54) complex during transcriptional initiation. Here, we describe the first structure of the central AAA(+) domain of the flagellar regulatory protein FlrC (FlrC(C)), a bEBP that controls flagellar synthesis in Vibrio cholerae. Our results showed that FlrC(C) forms heptamer both in nucleotide (Nt)-free and -bound states without ATP-dependent subunit remodeling. Unlike the bEBPs such as NtrC1 or PspF, a novel cis-mediated "all or none" ATP binding occurs in the heptameric FlrC(C), because constriction at the ATPase site, caused by loop L3 and helix ?7, restricts the proximity of the trans-protomer required for Nt binding. A unique "closed to open" movement of Walker A, assisted by trans-acting "Glu switch" Glu-286, facilitates ATP binding and hydrolysis. Fluorescence quenching and ATPase assays on FlrC(C) and mutants revealed that although Arg-349 of sensor II, positioned by trans-acting Glu-286 and Tyr-290, acts as a key residue to bind and hydrolyze ATP, Arg-319 of ?7 anchors ribose and controls the rate of ATP hydrolysis by retarding the expulsion of ADP. Heptameric state of FlrC(C) is restored in solution even with the transition state mimicking ADP·AlF3. Structural results and pulldown assays indicated that L3 renders an in-built geometry to L1 and L2 causing ?(54)-FlrC(C) interaction independent of Nt binding. Collectively, our results underscore a novel mechanism of ATP binding and ?(54) interaction that strives to understand the transcriptional mechanism of the bEBPs, which probably interact directly with the RNA polymerase-?(54) complex without DNA looping. PMID:25688103

  20. Structural Models of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) NOD1 and NOD2 NACHT Domains Suggest Differential ATP Binding Orientations: Insights from Computational Modeling, Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Maharana, Jitendra; Sahoo, Bikash Ranjan; Bej, Aritra; Sahoo, Jyoti Ranjan; Dehury, Budheswar; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Martha, Sushma Rani; Balabantray, Sucharita; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar; Behera, Bijay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1) and NOD2 are cytosolic pattern recognition receptors playing pivotal roles in innate immune signaling. NOD1 and NOD2 recognize bacterial peptidoglycan derivatives iE-DAP and MDP, respectively and undergoes conformational alternation and ATP-dependent self-oligomerization of NACHT domain followed by downstream signaling. Lack of structural adequacy of NACHT domain confines our understanding about the NOD-mediated signaling mechanism. Here, we predicted the structure of NACHT domain of both NOD1 and NOD2 from model organism zebrafish (Danio rerio) using computational methods. Our study highlighted the differential ATP binding modes in NOD1 and NOD2. In NOD1, ?-phosphate of ATP faced toward the central nucleotide binding cavity like NLRC4, whereas in NOD2 the cavity was occupied by adenine moiety. The conserved ‘Lysine’ at Walker A formed hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) and Aspartic acid (Walker B) formed electrostatic interaction with ATP. At Sensor 1, Arg328 of NOD1 exhibited an H-bond with ATP, whereas corresponding Arg404 of NOD2 did not. ‘Proline’ of GxP motif (Pro386 of NOD1 and Pro464 of NOD2) interacted with adenine moiety and His511 at Sensor 2 of NOD1 interacted with ?-phosphate group of ATP. In contrast, His579 of NOD2 interacted with the adenine moiety having a relatively inverted orientation. Our findings are well supplemented with the molecular interaction of ATP with NLRC4, and consistent with mutagenesis data reported for human, which indicates evolutionary shared NOD signaling mechanism. Together, this study provides novel insights into ATP binding mechanism, and highlights the differential ATP binding modes in zebrafish NOD1 and NOD2. PMID:25811192

  1. Conservation of an ATP-binding domain among recA proteins from Proteus vulgaris, erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli K-12 and B/r

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, K.L.; Hess, R.M.; McEntee, K.

    1988-06-01

    The purified RecA proteins encoded by the cloned genes from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r were compared with the RecA protein from E. coli K-12. Each of the proteins hydrolyzed ATP in the presence of single-stranded DNA, and each was covalently modified with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8N/sub 3/ATP). Two-dimensional tryptic maps of the four heterologous RecA proteins demonstrated considerable structural conservation among these bacterial genera. Moreover, when the (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/ATP-modified proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, a single peak of radioactivity was detected in each of the digests and these peptides eluted identically with the tryptic peptide T/sub 31/ of the E. coli K-12 RecA protein, which was the unique site of 8N/sub 3/ATP photolabeling. Each of the heterologous recA genes hybridized to oligonucleotide probes derived from the ATP-binding domain sequence of the E. coli K-12 gene. These last results demonstrate that the ATP-binding domain of the RecA protein has been strongly conserved for greater than 10/sup 7/ years.

  2. The histone H4 tail regulates the conformation of the ATP-binding pocket in the SNF2h chromatin remodeling enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Racki, Lisa R.; Naber, Nariman; Pate, Ed; Leonard, John; Cooke, Roger; Narlikar, Geeta J.

    2014-01-01

    The chromatin remodeling complex ACF helps establish the appropriate nucleosome spacing for generating repressed chromatin states. ACF activity is stimulated by two defining features of the nucleosomal substrate: a basic patch on the histone H4 N-terminal tail and the specific length of flanking DNA. Yet the mechanisms by which these two substrate cues function in the ACF remodeling reaction is not well understood. Using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with spin-labeled ATP analogs to probe the structure of the ATP active site under physiological solution conditions, we identify a closed state of the ATP-binding pocket that correlates with ATPase activity. We find that the H4 tail promotes pocket closure. We further show that ATPase stimulation by the H4 tail does not require a specific structure connecting the H4 tail and the globular domain. In the case of many DNA helicases, closure of the ATP- binding pocket is regulated by specific DNA substrates. Pocket closure by the H4 tail may analogously provide a mechanism to directly couple substrate recognition to activity. Surprisingly, the flanking DNA, which also stimulates ATP hydrolysis, does not promote pocket closure, suggesting that the H4 tail and flanking DNA may be recognized in different reaction steps. PMID:24607692

  3. Identification of the ATP binding sites of the carbamyl phosphate synthetase domain of the Syrian hamster multifunctional protein CAD by affinity labeling with 5 prime -(p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl)adenosine

    SciTech Connect

    Hyesook Kim; Evans, D.R. ); Lee, L. )

    1991-10-22

    The ATP analogue 5{prime}-(p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl)adenosine (FSBA) was used to chemically modify the ATP binding sites of the carbamyl phosphate synthetase domain of CAD, the multifunctional protein that catalyzes the first steps in mammalian pyrimidine biosynthesis. Reaction of CAD with FSBA resulted in the inactivation of the ammonia- and glutamine-dependent CPSase activities but had no effect on its glutaminase, aspartate transcarbamylase, or dihydroortase activities. ATP protected CAD against inactivation by FSBA whereas the presence of the allosteric effectors UTP and PRPP afforded little protection, which suggests that the ATP binding sites were specifically labeled. The inactivation exhibited saturation behavior with respect to FSBA with a K{sub I} of 0.93 mM. The stoichiometry of ({sup 14}C)FSBA labeling showed that only 0.4-0.5 mol of FSBA/mol of protein was required for complete inactivation. Incorporation of radiolabeled FSBA into CAD and subsequent proteolysis, gel electrophoresis, and fluorography demonstrated that only the carbamyl phosphate synthetase domain of CAD is labeled. Amino acid sequencing of the principal peaks resulting from tryptic digests of FSBA-modified CAD located the sites of FSBA modification in regions that exhibit high homology to ATP binding sites of other known proteins. Thus CAD has two ATP binding sites, one in each of the two highly homologous halves of the carbamyl phosphate domain which catalyze distinct ATP-dependent partial reactions in carbamyl phosphate synthesis.

  4. Counseling: Discipline, Tape Cassettes, Occupations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation's Schools and Colleges, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Special instructional centers in Dade County, Florida, provide tutoring and remedial instruction to suspended students; at the University of Wisconsin (Madison) 225 dial access tape cassettes offer information and advice; and a computer program at Willowbrook High School in Villa Park, Illinois, helps students choose careers. (MLF)

  5. ATP binding to the C terminus of the Arabidopsis thaliana nitrate/proton antiporter, AtCLCa, regulates nitrate transport into plant vacuoles.

    PubMed

    De Angeli, Alexis; Moran, Oscar; Wege, Stefanie; Filleur, Sophie; Ephritikhine, Geneviève; Thomine, Sébastien; Barbier-Brygoo, Hélène; Gambale, Franco

    2009-09-25

    Nitrate, one of the major nitrogen sources for plants, is stored in the vacuole. Nitrate accumulation within the vacuole is primarily mediated by the NO(3)(-)/H(+) exchanger AtCLCa, which belongs to the chloride channel (CLC) family. Crystallography analysis of hCLC5 suggested that the C-terminal domain, composed by two cystathionine beta-synthetase motifs in all eukaryotic members of the CLC family is able to interact with ATP. However, interaction of nucleotides with a functional CLC protein has not been unambiguously demonstrated. Here we show that ATP reversibly inhibits AtCLCa by interacting with the C-terminal domain. Applying the patch clamp technique to isolated Arabidopsis thaliana vacuoles, we demonstrate that ATP reduces AtCLCa activity with a maximum inhibition of 60%. ATP inhibition of nitrate influx into the vacuole at cytosolic physiological nitrate concentrations suggests that ATP modulation is physiologically relevant. ADP and AMP do not decrease the AtCLCa transport activity; nonetheless, AMP (but not ADP) competes with ATP, preventing inhibition. A molecular model of the C terminus of AtCLCa was built by homology to hCLC5 C terminus. The model predicted the effects of mutations of the ATP binding site on the interaction energy between ATP and AtCLCa that were further confirmed by functional expression of site-directed mutated AtCLCa. PMID:19636075

  6. Structures of the CDK12/CycK complex with AMP-PNP reveal a flexible C-terminal kinase extension important for ATP binding

    PubMed Central

    Dixon-Clarke, Sarah E.; Elkins, Jonathan M.; Cheng, S.-W. Grace; Morin, Gregg B.; Bullock, Alex N.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 12 (CDK12) promotes transcriptional elongation by phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD). Structure-function studies show that this activity is dependent on a C-terminal kinase extension, as well as the binding of cyclin K (CycK). To better define these interactions we determined the crystal structure of the human CDK12/CycK complex with and without the kinase extension in the presence of AMP-PNP. The structures revealed novel features for a CDK, including a large ?4-?5 loop insertion that contributes to the N-lobe interaction with the cyclin. We also observed two different conformations of the C-terminal kinase extension that effectively open and close the ATP pocket. Most notably, bound AMP-PNP was only observed when trapped in the closed state. Truncation of this C-terminal structure also diminished AMP-PNP binding, as well as the catalytic activity of the CDK12/CycK complex. Further kinetic measurements showed that the full length CDK12/CycK complex was significantly more active than the two crystallised constructs suggesting a critical role for additional domains. Overall, these results demonstrate the intrinsic flexibility of the C-terminal extension in CDK12 and highlight its importance for both ATP binding and kinase activity. PMID:26597175

  7. A Previously Unknown Unique Challenge for Inhibitors of SYK ATP-Binding Site: Role of SYK as A Cell Cycle Checkpoint Regulator?

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, Fatih M.; Ma, Hong; Ozer, Zahide; Goodman, Patricia; Zhang, Jian; Qazi, Sanjive

    2014-01-01

    The identification of SYK as a molecular target in B-lineage leukemia/lymphoma cells prompted the development of SYK inhibitors as a new class of anti-cancer drug candidates. Here we report that induction of the SYK gene expression in human cells causes a significant down-regulation of evolutionarily conserved genes associated with mitosis and cell cycle progression providing unprecedented evidence that SYK is a master regulator of cell cycle regulatory checkpoint genes in human cells. We further show that SYK regulates the G2 checkpoint by physically associating with and inhibiting the dual-specificity phosphatase CDC25C via phosphorylation of its S216 residue. SYK depletion by RNA interference or treatment with the chemical SYK inhibitor prevented nocodazole-treated human cell lines from activating the G2 checkpoint via CDC25C S216-phosphorylation and resulted in polyploidy. Our study provides genetic and biochemical evidence that spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) has a unique role in the activation of the G2 checkpoint in both non-lymphohematopoietic and B-lineage lymphoid cells. This previously unknown role of SYK as a cell cycle checkpoint regulator represents an unforeseen and significant challenge for inhibitors of SYK ATP binding site. PMID:25506060

  8. Structures of the CDK12/CycK complex with AMP-PNP reveal a flexible C-terminal kinase extension important for ATP binding.

    PubMed

    Dixon-Clarke, Sarah E; Elkins, Jonathan M; Cheng, S-W Grace; Morin, Gregg B; Bullock, Alex N

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 12 (CDK12) promotes transcriptional elongation by phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD). Structure-function studies show that this activity is dependent on a C-terminal kinase extension, as well as the binding of cyclin K (CycK). To better define these interactions we determined the crystal structure of the human CDK12/CycK complex with and without the kinase extension in the presence of AMP-PNP. The structures revealed novel features for a CDK, including a large ?4-?5 loop insertion that contributes to the N-lobe interaction with the cyclin. We also observed two different conformations of the C-terminal kinase extension that effectively open and close the ATP pocket. Most notably, bound AMP-PNP was only observed when trapped in the closed state. Truncation of this C-terminal structure also diminished AMP-PNP binding, as well as the catalytic activity of the CDK12/CycK complex. Further kinetic measurements showed that the full length CDK12/CycK complex was significantly more active than the two crystallised constructs suggesting a critical role for additional domains. Overall, these results demonstrate the intrinsic flexibility of the C-terminal extension in CDK12 and highlight its importance for both ATP binding and kinase activity. PMID:26597175

  9. New crystal structures of HSC-70 ATP binding domain confirm the role of individual binding pockets and suggest a new method of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziming; Cellitti, Jason; Teriete, Peter; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Stec, Boguslaw

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the chaperone HSC-70 has become a target for drug design with a strong focus in anticancer therapies. In our study of possible inhibitors of HSC-70 enzymatic activity we screened compounds by NMR as well as X-ray crystallography. As part of our screening efforts we crystallized the human HSC-70 ATP binding domain and obtained novel crystal forms in addition to known structures. The new crystal structures highlight the mobility of the entire domain previously described by NMR, which was linked to its chaperone activity but not yet demonstrated by X-ray crystallography. Conformational changes across the entire molecule have been elucidated in response to the binding of small molecule ligands and show a pattern of mobility consistent with postulated signal transduction modes between the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) and the substrate binding domain (SBD). In addition, two crystal structures contained glycerol bound at a new site. Binding studies performed with glycerol analogs proved inhibitory properties of the site, which were further characterized by isothermal calorimetry and in silico docking studies. The presence of two binding pockets enabled us to explore a novel method of inhibition by compounds that bridge the adjacent phosphate and glycerol binding sites. Finally, an example of such a bridged inhibitor is proposed. PMID:25433210

  10. The Second Extracellular Loop of Pore-Forming Subunits of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters for Basic Amino Acids Plays a Crucial Role in Interaction with the Cognate Solute Binding Protein(s)?

    PubMed Central

    Eckey, Viola; Weidlich, Daniela; Landmesser, Heidi; Bergmann, Ulf; Schneider, Erwin

    2010-01-01

    In the thermophile Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the uptake of basic amino acids is mediated by an ABC transporter composed of the substrate binding protein (receptor) ArtJ and a homodimer each of the pore-forming subunit, ArtM, and the nucleotide-binding subunit, ArtP. We recently identified two putative binding sites in ArtJ that might interact with the Art(MP)2 complex, thereby initiating the transport cycle (A. Vahedi-Faridi et al., J. Mol. Biol. 375:448-459, 2008). Here we investigated the contribution of charged amino acid residues in the second extracellular loop of ArtM to contact with ArtJ. Our results demonstrate a crucial role for residues K177, R185, and E188, since mutations to oppositely charged amino acids or glutamine led to a complete loss of ArtJ-stimulated ATPase activity of the complex variants in proteoliposomes. The defects could not be suppressed by ArtJ variants carrying mutations in site I (K39E and K152E) or II (E163K and D170K), suggesting a more complex interplay than that by a single salt bridge. These findings were supported by cross-linking assays demonstrating physical proximity between ArtJ(N166C) and ArtM(E182C). The importance of positively charged residues for receptor-transporter interaction was underscored by mutational analysis of the closely related transporter HisJ/LAO-HisQMP2 of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. While transporter variants with mutated positively charged residues in HisQ displayed residual ATPase activities, corresponding mutants of HisM could no longer be stimulated by HisJ/LAO. Interestingly, the ATPase activity of the HisQM(K187E)P2 variant was inhibited by l- and d-histidine in detergent, suggesting a role of the residue in preventing free histidine from gaining access to the substrate binding site within HisQM. PMID:20154136

  11. The second extracellular loop of pore-forming subunits of ATP-binding cassette transporters for basic amino acids plays a crucial role in interaction with the cognate solute binding protein(s).

    PubMed

    Eckey, Viola; Weidlich, Daniela; Landmesser, Heidi; Bergmann, Ulf; Schneider, Erwin

    2010-04-01

    In the thermophile Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the uptake of basic amino acids is mediated by an ABC transporter composed of the substrate binding protein (receptor) ArtJ and a homodimer each of the pore-forming subunit, ArtM, and the nucleotide-binding subunit, ArtP. We recently identified two putative binding sites in ArtJ that might interact with the Art(MP)(2) complex, thereby initiating the transport cycle (A. Vahedi-Faridi et al., J. Mol. Biol. 375:448-459, 2008). Here we investigated the contribution of charged amino acid residues in the second extracellular loop of ArtM to contact with ArtJ. Our results demonstrate a crucial role for residues K177, R185, and E188, since mutations to oppositely charged amino acids or glutamine led to a complete loss of ArtJ-stimulated ATPase activity of the complex variants in proteoliposomes. The defects could not be suppressed by ArtJ variants carrying mutations in site I (K39E and K152E) or II (E163K and D170K), suggesting a more complex interplay than that by a single salt bridge. These findings were supported by cross-linking assays demonstrating physical proximity between ArtJ(N166C) and ArtM(E182C). The importance of positively charged residues for receptor-transporter interaction was underscored by mutational analysis of the closely related transporter HisJ/LAO-HisQMP(2) of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. While transporter variants with mutated positively charged residues in HisQ displayed residual ATPase activities, corresponding mutants of HisM could no longer be stimulated by HisJ/LAO. Interestingly, the ATPase activity of the HisQM(K187E)P(2) variant was inhibited by l- and d-histidine in detergent, suggesting a role of the residue in preventing free histidine from gaining access to the substrate binding site within HisQM. PMID:20154136

  12. Sensitivity of a renal K+ channel (ROMK2) to the inhibitory sulfonylurea compound glibenclamide is enhanced by coexpression with the ATP-binding cassette transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator.

    PubMed Central

    McNicholas, C M; Guggino, W B; Schwiebert, E M; Hebert, S C; Giebisch, G; Egan, M E

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrate here that coexpression of ROMK2, an inwardly rectifying ATP-sensitive renal K+ channel (IKATP) with cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) significantly enhances the sensitivity of ROMK2 to the sulfonylurea compound glibenclamide. When expressed alone, ROMK2 is relatively insensitive to glibenclamide. The interaction between ROMK2, CFTR, and glibenclamide is modulated by altering the phosphorylation state of either ROMK2, CFTR, or an associated protein, as exogenous MgATP and the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A significantly attenuate the inhibitory effect of glibenclamide on ROMK2. Thus CFTR, which has been demonstrated to interact with both Na+ and Cl- channels in airway epithelium, modulates the function of renal ROMK2 K+ channels. PMID:8755607

  13. Temperature Variations around Medication Cassette and Carry Bag in Routine Use of Epoprostenol Administration in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Yuichi; Nakajima, Yasuo; Ozeki, Yasushi; Ono, Tomohiko; Takei, Makoto; Yamamoto, Tsunehisa; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    Background According to several treatment guidelines, epoprostenol is an important treatment option for pulmonary arterial hypertension. However, the pharmacokinetic characteristics and poor stability of epoprostenol at room temperature make its administration challenging. We therefore studied temperature fluctuations between the drug administration cassette and atmosphere to promote the safe use of epoprostenol. Methods and Findings Five healthy volunteers carried a portable intravenous infusion pump attached to a medication cassette containing saline in a bag during their ordinary activities over 16 days during which the mean atmospheric temperature was 29.6±1.5°C. The temperature around the medication cassette was not less than 25°C on any occasion, and the mean period over 24 h during which the temperature around the cassette exceeded 35°C and 40°C was 96.9±156.4 min and 24.4±77.3 min, respectively. Significant correlations were observed between the temperatures outside the bag and around the cassette, as well as between temperatures around the cassette and of the saline solution in the cassette (r?=?0.9258 and 0.8276, respectively). There were no differences in the temperatures outside the bag or around the cassette with respect to the bag material. Conclusions Temperatures around a medication cassette and outside the bag containing the medication increase with sunlight exposure. The temperature around cassettes used for administering epoprostenol must therefore be kept low for as long as possible during hot summer conditions to maintain the drug stability. PMID:23300618

  14. The three-dimensional structure of MAP kinase p38[beta]: different features of the ATP-binding site in p38[beta] compared with p38[alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Sangita B.; Cameron, Patricia M.; O'Keefe, Stephen J.; Frantz-Wattley, Betsy; Thompson, Jed; O'Neill, Edward A.; Tennis, Trevor; Liu, Luping; Becker, Joseph W.; Scapin, Giovanna; Merck

    2010-10-18

    The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases are activated in response to environmental stress and cytokines and play a significant role in transcriptional regulation and inflammatory responses. Of the four p38 isoforms known to date, two (p38{alpha} and p38{beta}) have been identified as targets for cytokine-suppressive anti-inflammatory drugs. Recently, it was reported that specific inhibition of the p38{alpha} isoform is necessary and sufficient for anti-inflammatory efficacy in vivo, while further inhibition of p38{beta} may not provide any additional benefit. In order to aid the development of p38{alpha}-selective compounds, the three-dimensional structure of p38{beta} was determined. To do so, the C162S and C119S,C162S mutants of human MAP kinase p38{beta} were cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Initial screening hits in crystallization trials in the presence of an inhibitor led upon optimization to crystals that diffracted to 2.05 {angstrom} resolution and allowed structure determination (PDB codes 3gc8 and 3gc9 for the single and double mutant, respectively). The structure of the p38{alpha} C162S mutant in complex with the same inhibitor is also reported (PDB code 3gc7). A comparison between the structures of the two kinases showed that they are highly similar overall but that there are differences in the relative orientation of the N- and C-terminal domains that causes a reduction in the size of the ATP-binding pocket in p38{beta}. This difference in size between the two pockets could be exploited in order to achieve selectivity.

  15. Synthesis and Evaluation of a Novel Deguelin Derivative, L80, which Disrupts ATP Binding to the C-terminal Domain of Heat Shock Protein 90.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Chan; Min, Hye-Young; Choi, Hoon; Kim, Ho Shin; Kim, Kyong-Cheol; Park, So-Jung; Seong, Myeong A; Seo, Ji Hae; Park, Hyun-Ju; Suh, Young-Ger; Kim, Kyu-Won; Hong, Hyun-Seok; Kim, Hee; Lee, Min-Young; Lee, Jeewoo; Lee, Ho-Young

    2015-08-01

    The clinical benefit of current anticancer regimens for lung cancer therapy is still limited due to moderate efficacy, drug resistance, and recurrence. Therefore, the development of effective anticancer drugs for first-line therapy and for optimal second-line treatment is necessary. Because the 90-kDa molecular chaperone heat shock protein (Hsp90) contributes to the maturation of numerous mutated or overexpressed oncogenic proteins, targeting Hsp90 may offer an effective anticancer therapy. Here, we investigated antitumor activities and toxicity of a novel deguelin-derived C-terminal Hsp90 inhibitor, designated L80. L80 displayed significant inhibitory effects on the viability, colony formation, angiogenesis-stimulating activity, migration, and invasion of a panel of non-small cell lung cancer cell lines and their sublines with acquired resistance to paclitaxel with minimal toxicity to normal lung epithelial cells, hippocampal cells, vascular endothelial cells, and ocular cells. Biochemical analyses and molecular docking simulation revealed that L80 disrupted Hsp90 function by binding to the C-terminal ATP-binding pocket of Hsp90, leading to the disruption of the interaction between hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1? and Hsp90, downregulation of HIF-1? and its target genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2), and decreased the expression of various Hsp90 client proteins. Consistent with these in vitro findings, L80 exhibited significant antitumor and antiangiogenic activities in H1299 xenograft tumors. These results suggest that L80 represents a novel C-terminal Hsp90 inhibitor with effective anticancer activities with minimal toxicities. PMID:25976766

  16. Worksheets simplify use of Wisconsin Test Cassette.

    PubMed

    David, G

    1991-01-01

    The Wisconsin Test Cassette, long the standard for non-invasive evaluation of kilovoltage, isn't known for its simplicity or convenience during use. The author presents a computer-generated worksheet that simplifies kilovoltage accuracy checks and customizes cassettes according to calibration curve data. PMID:1767021

  17. Solution structure of the 45-residue MgATP-binding peptide of adenylate kinase as examined by 2-D NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fry, D C; Byler, D M; Susi, H; Brown, E M; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1988-05-17

    The structure of a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 1-45 of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been studied in aqueous solution by two-dimensional NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy. This peptide, which binds MgATP and is believed to represent most of the MgATP-binding site of the enzyme [Fry, D.C., Kuby, S.A., & Mildvan, A.S. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4680-4694], appears to maintain a conformation similar to that of residues 1-45 in the X-ray structure of intact porcine adenylate kinase [Sachsenheimer, W., & Schulz, G.E. (1977) J. Mol. Biol. 114, 23-26], with 42% of the residues of the peptide showing NOEs indicative of phi and psi angles corresponding to those found in the protein. The NMR studies suggest that the peptide is composed of two helical regions of residues 4-7 and 23-29, and three stretches of beta-strand at residues 8-15, 30-32, and 35-40, yielding an overall secondary structure consisting of 24% alpha-helix, 38% beta-structure, and 38% aperiodic. Although the resolution-enhanced amide I band of the peptide FTIR spectrum is broad and rather featureless, possibly due to disorder, it can be fit by using methods developed on well-characterized globular proteins. On this basis, the peptide consists of 35 +/- 10% beta-structure, 60 +/- 12% turns and aperiodic structure, and not more than 10% alpha-helix. The CD spectrum is best fit by assuming the presence of at most 13% alpha-helix in the peptide, 24 +/- 2% beta-structure, and 66 +/- 4% aperiodic. The inability of the high-frequency FTIR and CD methods to detect helices in the amount found by NMR may result from the short helical lengths as well as from static and dynamic disorder in the peptide. Upon binding of MgATP, numerous conformational changes in the backbone of the peptide are detected by NMR, with smaller alterations in the overall secondary structure as assessed by CD. Detailed assignments of resonances in the peptide spectrum and intermolecular NOEs between protons of bound MgATP and those of the peptide, as well as chemical shifts of peptide resonances induced by the binding of MgATP, are consistent with the previously proposed binding site for MgATP on adenylate kinase. PMID:2841970

  18. Targeted deletion of the ATP binding domain of left-right dynein confirms its role in specifying development of left-right asymmetries

    PubMed Central

    Supp, Dorothy M.; Brueckner, Martina; Kuehn, Michael R.; Witte, David P.; Lowe, Linda A.; McGrath, James; Corrales, JoMichelle; Potter, S. Steven

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Vertebrates develop distinct asymmetries along the left-right axis, which are consistently aligned with the anteroposterior and dorsoventral axes. The mechanisms that direct this handed development of left-right asymmetries have been elusive, but recent studies of mutations that affect left-right development have shed light on the molecules involved. One molecule implicated in left-right specification is left-right dynein (LRD), a microtubule-based motor protein. In the LRD protein of the inversus viscerum (iv) mouse, there is a single amino acid difference at a conserved position, and the lrd gene is one of many genes deleted in the legless (lgl) mutation. Both iv and lgl mice display randomized left-right development. Here we extend the analysis of the lrd gene at the levels of sequence, expression and function. The complete coding sequence of the lrd gene confirms its classification as an axonemal, or ciliary, dynein. Expression of lrd in the node at embryonic day 7.5 is shown to be symmetric. At embryonic day 8.0, however, a striking asymmetric expression pattern is observed in all three germ layers of the developing headfold, suggesting roles in both the establishment and maintenance of left-right asymmetries. At later times, expression of lrd is also observed in the developing floorplate, gut and limbs. These results suggest function for LRD protein in both cilitated and non-ciliated cells, despite its sequence classification as axonemal. In addition, a targeted mutation of lrd was generated that deletes the part of the protein required for ATP binding, and hence motor function. The resulting left-right phenotype, randomization of laterality, is identical to that of iv and lgl mutants. Gross defects in ciliary structure were not observed in lrd/lrd mutants. Strikingly, however, the monocilia on mutant embryonic node cells were immotile. These results prove the identity of the iv and lrd genes. Further, they argue that LRD motor function, and resulting nodal monocilia movement, are required for normal left-right development. PMID:10556073

  19. Cassette for handling banknotes or the like

    DOEpatents

    Lundblad, Leif (Haradsvagen 102, S-141 41 Huddinge, SE)

    1981-08-11

    A cassette for banknotes and like valuable articles is provided with a displaceable lid (6) and locking means (10) for latching the lid of the cassette when the cassette is located outside a housing (25) in which it is intended to be placed. An operating means (8) is arranged to co-act with the locking means and with a latching element (15). The latching element is arranged to be released in dependence upon a pre-set program. A signal circuit is arranged to send a code signal to a detector circuit (23) when electrical contact elements on the cassette and the housing co-act with one another, which detector circuit, when the signal coincides with the signal program in the detector circuit, causes a signal to be sent for moving the latching means to a non-latching position.

  20. Cassette Kinematics. A Reel-World Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbondanzio, Richard

    1990-01-01

    Described is an activity in which students calculate constant velocity using a tape cassette player. The objectives, procedures, graphing directions, and formulas and values needed for the calculations are included. (KR)

  1. Position of the ATP-binding site of the Fe-protein relative to the iron-sulfur clusters 4Fe-4S and the iron-molybdenum-containing cofactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kondrat'eva, T.A.; Gvozdev, R.I.; Mitsova, I.Z.

    1986-06-10

    Nitrogenase was affinity labeled with epsilon-ATP at the ATP-binding sites and separated into protein components by ion exchange chromatography. In spectrofluorometric titration of the labeled Fe-protein with the native MoFe-protein from the wild strain of Azotobacter and the MoFe-protein not containing iron-sulfur clusters 4Fe-4S, a 4-6-fold quenching of the fluorescence of immobilized epsilon-ATP was observed. When the labeled Fe-protein was titrated with MoFe-protein from the Azotobacter mutant UW-45, on the contrary, there was a four-fold increase in the fluorescence of immobilized epsilon-ATP. Since the MoFe-protein of the Azotobacter mutant UW-45 differs from the MoFe-protein from the wild strain of Azotobacter only by the absence of an iron-molybdenum-containing cofactor (Fe-Mo-cofactor), it is suggested that the ATP-binding site of the Fe-protein is situated next to the FeMo-cofactor and at a distance from the iron-sulfur clusters 4Fe-4S when a complex is formed with the MoFe-protein. The formation of a complex is accompanied by a change in the conformation of the Fe-protein.

  2. CryoEM and Molecular Dynamics of the Circadian KaiB–KaiC Complex Indicates KaiB Monomers Interact with KaiC and Block ATP Binding Clefts

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Seth A.; Pattanayek, Rekha; Williams, Dewight R.; Mori, Tetsuya; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl H.; Egli, Martin; Stewart, Phoebe L.

    2013-01-01

    The circadian control of cellular processes in cyanobacteria is regulated by a posttranslational oscillator formed by three Kai proteins. During the oscillator cycle KaiA serves to promote autophosphorylation of KaiC while KaiB counteracts this effect. Here we present a crystallographic structure of the wild-type Synechococcus elongatus KaiB and a cryoEM structure of a KaiBC complex. The crystal structure shows the expected dimer core structure and significant conformational variations of the KaiB C-terminal region, which is functionally important in maintaining rhythmicity. The KaiBC sample was formed with a C-terminally truncated form of KaiC, KaiC-?489, which is persistently phosphorylated. The KaiB-KaiC-?489 structure reveals that the KaiC hexamer can bind six monomers of KaiB, which form a continuous ring of density in the KaiBC complex. We performed cryoEM guided molecular dynamics flexible fitting simulations with crystal structures of KaiB and KaiC to probe the KaiBC protein-protein interface. This analysis indicated a favorable binding mode for the KaiB monomer on the CII end of KaiC, involving two adjacent KaiC subunits and spanning an ATP binding cleft. A KaiC mutation, R468C, which has been shown to affect the affinity of KaiB for KaiC and lengthen the period in a bioluminescence rhythm assay, is found within the middle of the predicted KaiBC interface. The proposed KaiB binding mode blocks access to the ATP binding cleft in the CII ring of KaiC, which provides insight into how KaiB might influence the phosphorylation status of KaiC. PMID:23796516

  3. 21 CFR 892.1860 - Radiographic film/cassette changer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiographic film/cassette changer. 892.1860... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1860 Radiographic film/cassette changer. (a) Identification. A radiographic film/cassette changer is a device intended to be used during...

  4. 21 CFR 892.1860 - Radiographic film/cassette changer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiographic film/cassette changer. 892.1860... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1860 Radiographic film/cassette changer. (a) Identification. A radiographic film/cassette changer is a device intended to be used during...

  5. 21 CFR 892.1850 - Radiographic film cassette.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiographic film cassette. 892.1850 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1850 Radiographic film cassette. (a) Identification. A radiographic film cassette is a device intended for use during diagnostic x-ray procedures...

  6. 21 CFR 892.1860 - Radiographic film/cassette changer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiographic film/cassette changer. 892.1860... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1860 Radiographic film/cassette changer. (a) Identification. A radiographic film/cassette changer is a device intended to be used during...

  7. 21 CFR 892.1860 - Radiographic film/cassette changer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiographic film/cassette changer. 892.1860... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1860 Radiographic film/cassette changer. (a) Identification. A radiographic film/cassette changer is a device intended to be used during...

  8. 21 CFR 892.1860 - Radiographic film/cassette changer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiographic film/cassette changer. 892.1860... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1860 Radiographic film/cassette changer. (a) Identification. A radiographic film/cassette changer is a device intended to be used during...

  9. Cross-reactivity of Antibodies Directed to the Gram-Negative Bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae With Heat Shock Protein 60 and ATP-Binding Protein Correlates to Reduced Mitochondrial Activity in HIBCPP Choroid Plexus Papilloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Reuss, B; Schroten, H; Ishikawa, H; Asif, A R

    2015-09-01

    Antibacterial antibodies can cause neurologic side-effects by cross-reactivity with cellular antigens. Here we investigated interactions of antibodies to Neisseria gonorrhoeae (?-NG) - maternal infections by which increases the offspring's risk for later psychosis-with HIBCPP cells, a cell culture model of choroid plexus epithelium. Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting with ?-NG, revealed organelle-like intracellular staining in HIBCPP cells, and labelling of several immunoreactive bands in cellular protein. Two-dimensional Western blotting revealed several immunopositive spots, most prominent of which were identified by mass spectrometry as mitochondrially localized proteins heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60) and ATP-binding protein ?-subunit (ATPB). Similarly ?-NG interacted with commercial samples of these proteins as revealed by Western blotting. Three alternative methods (JC-1, Janus green and MTT staining) revealed ?-NG to cause in HIBCPP cells a significant decrease in mitochondrial activity, which could be reverted by neuroleptic drugs. Immunoreactivity of ?-NG with choroid plexus epithelium in human post mortem samples suggests in vivo relevance of these findings. Finally, distinctly different staining patterns of antibodies against Neisseria meningitidis (?-NM), confirmed antibody specificity. To our knowledge this is the first report that ?-NG cross-reactivity with Hsp60 and ATPB impairs mitochondrial activity in choroid plexus epithelial cells, pathogenetic relevance of which needs further clarification. PMID:26080747

  10. A Cassette Based System for Hydrogen Storage and Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Britton Wayne E.

    2006-11-29

    A hydrogen storage system is described and evaluated. This is based upon a cassette, that is a container for managing hydrogen storage materials. The container is designed to be safe, modular, adaptable to different chemistries, inexpensive, and transportable. A second module receives the cassette and provides the necessary infrastructure to deliver hydrogen from the cassette according to enduser requirements. The modular concept has a number of advantages over approaches that are all in one stand alone systems. The advantages of a cassette based system are discussed, along with results from model and laboratory testing.

  11. Finger-Actuated, Self-Contained Immunoassay Cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xianbo; Thompson, Jason A.; Chen, Zongyuan; Liu, Changchun; Chen, Dafeng; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Mauk, Michael G.; Ongagna, Serge; Barber, Cheryl; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L.A.M.; Bau, Haim H.

    2010-01-01

    The building blocks for an inexpensive, disposable, luminescence-based microfluidic immunoassay cassette are described, and their integration in a point-of-care diagnostic system is demonstrated. Fluid motion in the cassette is driven by depressing finger-actuated pouches. All reagents needed for the immunoassay can be stored in the cassette in liquid form. Prior to use, the cassette consists of two separate parts. A top storage component contains pouches, sealed storage chambers, a metering chamber, and needle seats. The bottom processing component contains connection needles, a mixing chamber, and a detection chamber with immobilized proteins. Subsequent to sample introduction, the storage and processing components are mated. The needles form hydraulic connections between the two parts and, in some cases, close valves. The pouches are then actuated sequentially to induce flow of various reagents and facilitate process operations. The cassette is compatible with different detection modalities. Both a cassette with immunochromatographic-based detection and a cassette with microbead-based detection were constructed and evaluated. The immunochromatographic cassette was used to detect antibodies to HIV in saliva samples. The bead-based cassette was used to detect the proinflammatory chemokine IL-8. The experimental data demonstrates good repeatability and reasonable sensitivity. PMID:19597994

  12. Polycistronic transcription of fused cassettes and identification of translation initiation signals in an unusual gene cassette array from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Érica L.; Vicente, Ana Carolina Paulo

    2015-01-01

    The gene cassettes found in class 1 integrons are generally promoterless units composed by an open reading frame (ORF), a short 5’ untranslated region (UTR) and a 3’ recombination site ( attC). Fused gene cassettes are generated by partial or total loss of the attC from the first cassette in an array, creating, in some cases, a fusion with the ORF from the next cassette. These structures are rare and little is known about their mechanisms of mobilization and expression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dynamic of mobilization and transcription of the gcu14-bla GES-1 /aacA4 gene cassette array, which harbours a fused gene cassette represented by bla GES-1 /aacA4. The cassette array was analyzed by Northern blot and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in order to assess the transcription mechanism of bla GES-1 /aacA4 fused cassette. Also, inverse polymerase chain reactions (PCR) were performed to detect the free circular forms of gcu14, bla GES-1 and aacA4. The Northern blot and real time RT-PCR revealed a polycistronic transcription, in which the fused cassette bla GES-1 /aacA4 is transcribed as a unique gene, while gcu14 (with a canonical attC recombination site) has a monocistronic transcription. The gcu14 cassette, closer to the weak configuration of cassette promoter (PcW), had a higher transcription level than bla GES-1/ aacA4, indicating that the cassette position affects the transcript amounts. The presence of ORF-11 at attI1, immediately preceding gcu14, and of a Shine-Dalgarno sequence upstream bla GES-1/ aacA4 composes a scenario for the occurrence of array translation. Inverse PCR generated amplicons corresponding to gcu14, gcu14-aacA4 and gcu14-bla GES-1/ aacA4 free circular forms, but not to bla GES-1 and aacA4 alone, indicating that the GES-1 truncated attC is not substrate of integrase activity and that these genes are mobilized together as a unique cassette. This study was original in showing the transcription of fused cassettes and in correlating cassette position with transcription. PMID:26674490

  13. Apparatus and method for loading and unloading multiple digital tape cassettes utilizing a removable magazine

    DOEpatents

    Lindenmeyer, C.W.

    1993-01-26

    An apparatus and method to automate the handling of multiple digital tape cassettes for processing by commercially available cassette tape readers and recorders. A removable magazine rack stores a plurality of tape cassettes, and cooperates with a shuttle device that automatically inserts and removes cassettes from the magazine to the reader and vice-versa. Photocells are used to identify and index to the desired tape cassette. The apparatus allows digital information stored on multiple cassettes to be processed without significant operator intervention.

  14. The effect of ABCG5/G8 polymorphisms on plasma HDL cholesterol levels depends on the ABCA1 gene variation in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: ATP-binding cassette transporters G5/G8 have shown an association with HDL-C. One of the most likely mechanisms to explain those associations is through ABCA1. Objective: To assess whether the effect of ABCG5/G8 polymorphisms on HDL-C is dependent on ABCA1, we studied potential interacti...

  15. 21 CFR 892.1850 - Radiographic film cassette.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1850 Radiographic film cassette. (a) Identification. A...

  16. 21 CFR 892.1860 - Radiographic film/cassette changer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1860 Radiographic film/cassette changer. (a) Identification. A...

  17. 21 CFR 892.1850 - Radiographic film cassette.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. A radiographic film cassette is a device intended for use during diagnostic x-ray procedures to hold a radiographic film in close contact with an x-ray intensifying screen and to provide a...

  18. 21 CFR 892.1850 - Radiographic film cassette.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. A radiographic film cassette is a device intended for use during diagnostic x-ray procedures to hold a radiographic film in close contact with an x-ray intensifying screen and to provide a...

  19. 21 CFR 892.1850 - Radiographic film cassette.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identification. A radiographic film cassette is a device intended for use during diagnostic x-ray procedures to hold a radiographic film in close contact with an x-ray intensifying screen and to provide a...

  20. 21 CFR 892.1850 - Radiographic film cassette.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A radiographic film cassette is a device intended for use during diagnostic x-ray procedures to hold a radiographic film in close contact with an x-ray intensifying screen and to provide a...

  1. A Portable Analyzer for Pouch-Actuated, Immunoassay Cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xianbo; Liu, Changchun; Mauk, Michael G.; Hart, Robert W.; Chen, Dafeng; Qiu, Jing; Kientz, Terry; Fiene, Jonathan; Bau, Haim H.

    2011-01-01

    A portable, small footprint, light, general purpose analyzer (processor) to control the flow in immunoassay cassettes and to facilitate the detection of test results is described. The durable analyzer accepts disposable cassettes that contain pouches and reaction chambers for various unit operations such as hydration of dry reagents, stirring, and incubation. The analyzer includes individually controlled, linear actuators to compress the pouches in the cassette, which facilitates the pumping and mixing of sample and reagents, and to close diaphragm-based valves for flow control. The same types of actuators are used to compress pouches and actuate valves. The analyzer also houses a compact OEM scanner/reader to excite fluorescence and detect emission from labels. The analyzer is hydraulically isolated from the cassette, reducing the possibility of cross-contamination. The analyzer facilitates programmable, automated execution of a sequence of operations such as pumping and valving in a timely fashion, reducing the level of expertise required from the operator and the possibility for errors. The analyzer’s design is modular and expandable to accommodate cassettes of various complexities and additional functionalities. In this paper, the utility of the analyzer has been demonstrated with the execution of a simple, consecutive, lateral flow assay of a model biological system and the test results were detected with up converting phosphor labels that are excited at infrared frequencies and emit in the visible spectrum. PMID:22125359

  2. Cassette Reading Method: A Superior Method of Teaching Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Buford Charles

    In the cassette reading method, based on Guthrie's theory of learning (1952), which states that two stimuli occurring at the same time will be learned together, children follow the written text (using a bookmark) as they listen to the same words being spoken on tape. This booklet briefly outlines the method, which works well with children in the…

  3. Business Information Audio Cassettes: Their Care and Feeding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Valerie

    1973-01-01

    Audio cassettes raise new types of problems for special librarians. Confronted with sparse information about the media, the author, through trial and error, eventually produced basic guidelines and criteria for bibliographic control, storage, circulation, and material sources. These are described and workable solutions are presented. (5…

  4. 21 CFR 892.1870 - Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer. 892... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1870 Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer. (a) Identification. A radiographic film/cassette changer programmer is...

  5. 21 CFR 892.1870 - Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer. 892... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1870 Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer. (a) Identification. A radiographic film/cassette changer programmer is...

  6. 21 CFR 892.1870 - Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer. 892... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1870 Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer. (a) Identification. A radiographic film/cassette changer programmer is...

  7. 21 CFR 892.1870 - Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer. 892... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1870 Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer. (a) Identification. A radiographic film/cassette changer programmer is...

  8. 21 CFR 892.1870 - Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer. 892... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1870 Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer. (a) Identification. A radiographic film/cassette changer programmer is...

  9. Patterns of Availability and Use of Audiotape Cassettes in Special Libraries. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, J. M., II

    1975-01-01

    The availability and use of audiotape cassettes is studied in terms of user requirements. The following factors were examined: how special libraries utilize audiotape cassettes; who the users of the medium are; how the libraries acquire and maintain their collection; and opinions of librarians as to the value of the audiotape cassette as a medium for dissemination of information.

  10. THE REAL ISSUE WITH WALL DEPOSITS IN CLOSED FILTER CASSETTES - WHAT'S THE SAMPLE?

    SciTech Connect

    Brisson, M.

    2009-09-12

    The measurement of aerosol dusts has long been utilized to assess the exposure of workers to metals. Tools used to sample and measure aerosol dusts have gone through many transitions over the past century. In particular, there have been several different techniques used to sample for beryllium, not all of which might be expected to produce the same result. Today, beryllium samples are generally collected using filters housed in holders of several different designs, some of which are expected to produce a sample that mimics the human capacity for dust inhalation. The presence of dust on the interior walls of cassettes used to hold filters during metals sampling has been discussed in the literature for a number of metals, including beryllium, with widely varying data. It appears that even in the best designs, particulates can enter the sampling cassette and deposit on the interior walls rather than on the sampling medium. The causes are not well understood but are believed to include particle bounce, electrostatic forces, particle size, particle density, and airflow turbulence. Historically, the filter catch has been considered to be the sample, but the presence of wall deposits, and the potential that the filter catch is not representative of the exposure to the worker, puts that historical position into question. This leads to a fundamental question: What is the sample? This article reviews the background behind the issue, poses the above-mentioned question, and discusses options and a possible path forward for addressing that question.

  11. Available methods for assembling expression cassettes for synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianwen; Ma, Xingyuan; Zhu, Hu; Li, Aitao; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2012-03-01

    Studies in the structural biology of the multicomponent protein complex, metabolic engineering, and synthetic biology frequently rely on the efficient over-expression of these subunits or enzymes in the same cell. As a first step, constructing the multiple expression cassettes will be a complicated and time-consuming job if the classic and conventional digestion and ligation based cloning method is used. Some more efficient methods have been developed, including (1) the employment of a multiple compatible plasmid expression system, (2) the rare-cutter-based design of vectors, (3) in vitro recombination (sequence and ligation independent cloning, the isothermally enzymatic assembly of DNA molecules in a single reaction), and (4) in vivo recombination using recombination-efficient yeast (in vivo assembly of overlapping fragments, reiterative recombination for the chromosome integration of foreign expression cassettes). In this review, we systematically introduce these available methods. PMID:22311648

  12. Cassette less SOFC stack and method of assembly

    DOEpatents

    Meinhardt, Kerry D

    2014-11-18

    A cassette less SOFC assembly and a method for creating such an assembly. The SOFC stack is characterized by an electrically isolated stack current path which allows welded interconnection between frame portions of the stack. In one embodiment electrically isolating a current path comprises the step of sealing a interconnect plate to a interconnect plate frame with an insulating seal. This enables the current path portion to be isolated from the structural frame an enables the cell frame to be welded together.

  13. Cassettes for solid-oxide fuel cell stacks and methods of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Weil, K. Scott; Meinhardt, Kerry D; Sprenkle, Vincent L

    2012-10-23

    Solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack assembly designs are consistently investigated to develop an assembly that provides optimal performance, and durability, within desired cost parameters. A new design includes a repeat unit having a SOFC cassette and being characterized by a three-component construct. The three components include an oxidation-resistant, metal window frame hermetically joined to an electrolyte layer of a multi-layer, anode-supported ceramic cell and a pre-cassette including a separator plate having a plurality of vias that provide electrical contact between an anode-side collector within the pre-cassette and a cathode-side current collector of an adjacent cell. The third component is a cathode-side seal, which includes a standoff that supports a cathode channel spacing between each of the cassettes in a stack. Cassettes are formed by joining the pre-cassette and the window frame.

  14. On wiping the interior walls of 37-mm closed-face cassettes: an OSHA perspective.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Warren; Stones, Fern; Lillquist, Dean

    2009-12-01

    As early as 1976, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) methods for analyzing metal samples collected using 37-mm polystyrene closed-face cassettes specified that any loose dust be transferred from the cassette to the digestion vessel, that the cassette be rinsed, and that, if necessary, the cassette be wiped out to help ensure that all particles that enter the cassette are included along with the filter as part of the sample for analysis. OSHA analytical methods for metal analysis were recently revised to explicitly require cassette wiping for all metal samples. This change was based on policy that any material entering the collection device constitutes part of the sample and on OSHA Salt Lake Technical Center research showing that invisible residue on the cassette walls can significantly contribute to the total sample results reported. OSHA procedures are consistent with guidance given in the NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods. This guidance concludes that internal deposits in sampling cassettes should be included in the analysis and that one way to accomplish this would be to wipe or wash the internal surfaces of the cassette and include the material along with the filter for analysis. PMID:19894173

  15. Versatile co-expression of graft-protective proteins using 2A-linked cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Fisicaro, Nella; Londrigan, Sarah L.; Brady, Jamie L.; Salvaris, Evelyn; Nottle, Mark B.; O’Connell, Philip J.; Robson, Simon C.; d’Apice, Anthony J. F.; Lew, Andrew M.; Cowan, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Expression of multiple graft-protective proteins targeted to different locations (i.e., intracellular, cell surface, and secreted) has become an increasingly important goal in xenotransplantation. The 2A “ribosome skip” signal is used as a linker to enable transgene co-expression, but some studies have shown that post-translational modification and trafficking of 2A-linked proteins may be adversely affected depending on their position relative to 2A. We tested whether several relevant proteins, subject to a range of processing and localization mechanisms, could be efficiently co-expressed using the 2A system. Methods Six expression cassettes were constructed, each containing up to four 2A-linked open reading frames, encoding combinations of human CD55, thrombomodulin (TBM), CD39, CTLA4-Ig and hygromycin resistance. Each linker incorporated a furin cleavage site to remove the carboxy-terminal extension that remains on upstream proteins after 2A processing. The cassettes were used to produce vectors for transfection, adenoviral transduction and transgenesis. Expression was detected by flow cytometry and/or Western blotting. Results All proteins were expressed in the appropriate location following transient transfection of COS-7 cells, irrespective of the number of linked genes. The percentage of stable transfectants expressing a linked gene was increased 10-fold (from 4–5% to 58–67%) by incorporating the hygromycin resistance gene into the cassette. Stable transfection of transgenic GalT KO pig fibroblasts with a hygromycin- TBM-CD39 construct resulted in surface expression of both TBM and CD39 by the majority of hygromycin-resistant cells. Expression was maintained after flow cytometric sorting and expansion. Adenoviral transduction of NIT-1 mouse insulinoma cells with a TBM-CD39 construct resulted in strong expression of both genes on the cell surface. Mice transgenic for 3-gene (CD55- TBM-CD39) or 4-gene (CD55- TBM-CTLA4Ig-CD39) constructs expressed all genes except CD55. Conclusions These results confirm the versatility of the 2A system, and demonstrate that careful construct design can minimize potential problems with post-translational modification and trafficking. In addition, incorporation of a selection marker into the 2A-linked chain can dramatically increase the proportion of stable transfectants expressing proteins of interest. This provides a powerful method for the rapid modification of existing genetically modified pigs. PMID:21496119

  16. Detection of oral Helicobacter Pylori infection using saliva test cassette

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Min; Zhang, Xue-Yan; Yu, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the incidence of oral infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and identify related epidemiological factors among freshmen of four colleges in Yancheng. Methods: The data, scored positive or negative, were collected on 160 individuals who had been diagnosed by H. pylori Saliva Test Cassette (HPS) during October 2013 to October 2014. H. pylori Saliva Test Cassette (HPS) is to use colloidal gold technique to specifically identify urease in saliva. A standard questionnaire, with variables including sex, educational degree of parents etc., was used in the subjects. Statistical data of diagnostic test were analyzed by SPSS17.0 software. Results: Out of 160, 82 subjects were detected positive and 78 were negative. In univariate analysis, dental plaque, family history of stomach diseases, habit of washing hands before meals and habit of brushing teeth twice daily were associated negatively with H. pylori infection. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that dental plaque and family history of stomach diseases were the risk factors which may be associated with H. pylori infection. Conclusions: Dental plaque and family history of gastric diseases were risk factors of oral H. pylori infection. It is vital for the prevention of H. pylori infection to focus on health education and oral hygiene, and avoid transmission by oral-oral route as well.

  17. Screening Foodstuffs for Class 1 Integrons and Gene Cassettes.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Liette S; Gillings, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is one of the greatest threats to health in the 21st century. Acquisition of resistance genes via lateral gene transfer is a major factor in the spread of diverse resistance mechanisms. Amongst the DNA elements facilitating lateral transfer, the class 1 integrons have largely been responsible for spreading antibiotic resistance determinants amongst Gram negative pathogens. In total, these integrons have acquired and disseminated over 130 different antibiotic resistance genes. With continued antibiotic use, class 1 integrons have become ubiquitous in commensals and pathogens of humans and their domesticated animals. As a consequence, they can now be found in all human waste streams, where they continue to acquire new genes, and have the potential to cycle back into humans via the food chain. This protocol details a streamlined approach for detecting class 1 integrons and their associated resistance gene cassettes in foodstuffs, using culturing and PCR. Using this protocol, researchers should be able to: collect and prepare samples to make enriched cultures and screen for class 1 integrons; isolate single bacterial colonies to identify integron-positive isolates; identify bacterial species that contain class 1 integrons; and characterize these integrons and their associated gene cassettes. PMID:26132232

  18. Spiranic BODIPYs: a ground-breaking design to improve the energy transfer in molecular cassettes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Carnerero, Esther M; Gartzia-Rivero, Leire; Moreno, Florencio; Maroto, Beatriz L; Agarrabeitia, Antonia R; Ortiz, María J; Bañuelos, Jorge; López-Arbeloa, Íñigo; de la Moya, Santiago

    2014-10-28

    Boosted excitation energy transfer in spiranic O-BODIPY/polyarene cassettes, when compared with the parent non-spiranic (flexible) system, is highlighted as a proof for the ability of a new structural design to improve the energy transfer in molecular cassettes. PMID:25207836

  19. Structural basis for functional cooperation between tandem helicase cassettes in Brr2-mediated

    E-print Network

    Munk, Axel

    Structural basis for functional cooperation between tandem helicase cassettes in Brr2-mediated, two ring-like helicase cassettes intimately interact and functionally cooperate and how retinitis, and U6 in the major spliceosome) or its plethora of non-snRNP factors bear a preformed active center

  20. Novel Type XII Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Harboring a New Cassette Chromosome Recombinase, CcrC2.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhaowei; Li, Fan; Liu, Dongliang; Xue, Huping; Zhao, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Excision and integration of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) are mediated by cassette chromosome recombinases (Ccr), which play a crucial role in the worldwide spread of methicillin resistance in staphylococci. We report a novel ccr gene, ccrC2, in the SCCmec of a Staphylococcus aureus isolate, BA01611, which showed 62.6% to 69.4% sequence identities to all published ccrC1 sequences. A further survey found that the ccrC2 gene was mainly located among coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) and could be found in staphylococcal isolates from China, the United States, France, and Germany. The ccr gene complex harboring the ccrC2 gene was designated a type 9 complex, and the SCCmec of BA01611 was considered a novel type and was designated type XII (9C2). This novel SCCmec element in BA01611 was flanked by a pseudo-SCC element (?SCCBA01611) carrying a truncated ccrA1 gene. Both individual SCC elements and a composite SCC were excised from the chromosome based on detection of extrachromosomal circular intermediates. We advocate inclusion of the ccrC2 gene and type 9 ccr gene complex during revision of the SCCmec typing method. PMID:26416872

  1. Engineered nanostructured ?-sheet peptides protect membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Tao, Houchao; Lee, Sung Chang; Moeller, Arne; Roy, Rituparna Sinha; Siu, Fai Yiu; Zimmermann, Jörg; Stevens, Raymond C; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Zhang, Qinghai

    2013-08-01

    We designed ?-strand peptides that stabilize integral membrane proteins (IMPs). ?-strand peptides self-assemble in solution as filaments and become restructured upon association with IMPs; resulting IMP-?-strand peptide complexes resisted aggregation when diluted in detergent-free buffer and were visible as stable, single particles with low detergent background in electron micrographs. ?-strand peptides enabled clear visualization of flexible conformations in the highly dynamic ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter MsbA. PMID:23817067

  2. Inducible and reversible lentiviral and Recombination Mediated Cassette Exchange (RMCE) systems for controlling gene expression.

    PubMed

    Bersten, David C; Sullivan, Adrienne E; Li, Dian; Bhakti, Veronica; Bent, Stephen J; Whitelaw, Murray L

    2015-01-01

    Manipulation of gene expression to invoke loss of function (LoF) or gain of function (GoF) phenotypes is important for interrogating complex biological questions both in vitro and in vivo. Doxycycline (Dox)-inducible gene expression systems are commonly used although success is often limited by high background and insufficient sensitivity to Dox. Here we develop broadly applicable platforms for reliable, tightly controlled and reversible Dox-inducible systems for lentiviral mediated generation of cell lines or FLP Recombination-Mediated Cassette Exchange (RMCE) into the Collagen 1a1 (Col1a1) locus (FLP-In Col1a1) in mouse embryonic stem cells. We significantly improve the flexibility, usefulness and robustness of the Dox-inducible system by using Tetracycline (Tet) activator (Tet-On) variants which are more sensitive to Dox, have no background activity and are expressed from single Gateway-compatible constructs. We demonstrate the usefulness of these platforms in ectopic gene expression or gene knockdown in multiple cell lines, primary neurons and in FLP-In Col1a1 mouse embryonic stem cells. We also improve the flexibility of RMCE Dox-inducible systems by generating constructs that allow for tissue or cell type-specific Dox-inducible expression and generate a shRNA selection algorithm that can effectively predict potent shRNA sequences able to knockdown gene expression from single integrant constructs. These platforms provide flexible, reliable and broadly applicable inducible expression systems for studying gene function. PMID:25768837

  3. Transcriptional regulation of the ABCC6 gene and the background of impaired function of missense disease-causing mutations

    PubMed Central

    Arányi, Tamás; Bacquet, Caroline; de Boussac, Hugues; Ratajewski, Marcin; Pomozi, Viola; Fülöp, Krisztina; Brampton, Christopher N.; Pulaski, Lukasz; Saux, Olivier Le; Váradi, András

    2013-01-01

    The human ATP-binding cassette family C member 6 (ABCC6) gene encodes an ABC transporter protein expressed primarily in the liver and to a lesser extent in the kidneys and the intestines. We review here the mechanisms of this restricted tissue-specific expression and the role of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4? which is responsible for the expression pattern. Detailed analyses uncovered further regulators of the expression of the gene pointing to an intronic primate-specific regulator region, an activator of the expression of the gene by binding CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta, which interacts with other proteins acting in the proximal promoter. This regulatory network is affected by various environmental stimuli including oxidative stress and the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 pathway. We also review here the structural and functional consequences of disease-causing missense mutations of ABCC6. A significant clustering of the missense disease-causing mutations was found at the domain–domain interfaces. This clustering means that the domain contacts are much less permissive to amino acid replacements than the rest of the protein. We summarize the experimental methods resulting in the identification of mutants with preserved transport activity but failure in intracellular targeting. These mutants are candidates for functional rescue by chemical chaperons. The results of such research can provide the basis of future allele-specific therapy of ABCC6-mediated disorders like pseudoxanthoma elasticum or the generalized arterial calcification in infancy. PMID:23483032

  4. Radiation exposure reduction by use of Kevlar cassettes in the neonatal nursery.

    PubMed

    Herman, M W; Mak, H K; Lachman, R S

    1987-05-01

    A study was performed to determine whether the use of Kevlar cassettes in the neonatal intensive care nursery would reduce radiation exposure to patients. The radiation dose to the neonates was measured by using thermoluminescent dosimeters. In addition, the attenuation of the Kevlar cassettes and the sensitivity of the film-screen combination were compared with the previously used system. The greatest radiation reduction using a mobile X-ray unit was 27%; based on sensitivity measurements, the theoretical reduction averaged 38%. The reduction in radiation exposure resulted from reduced attenuation by the Kevlar cassette. PMID:3495126

  5. A clinical trial of a rare earth screen/film system in a periapical cassette

    SciTech Connect

    Kogon, S.L.; Stephens, R.G.; Reid, J.A.; Lubus, N.J.

    1984-04-01

    In a clinical trial, a slow rare earth screen/film system (Siemens Titan 2D/Kodak XG) was used to obtain intraoral radiographs at conventional monitoring stages in endodontic treatment. The screen film image proved to be an effective substitute for the direct-exposure Ultraspeed periapical film. The intraoral cassettes, designed and fabricated for the study, were an adaptation of the flexible, vacuum-sealed cassettes used in mammography. It is believed that when a practicable periapical cassette is manufactured, many additional indications for the system are probable. Major reductions in patient exposure of at least 85% to 90% per periapical film would be effected.

  6. Radiation exposure reduction by use of Kevlar cassettes in the neonatal nursery

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, M.W.; Mak, H.K.; Lachman, R.S.

    1987-05-01

    A study was performed to determine whether the use of Kevlar cassettes in the neonatal intensive care nursery would reduce radiation exposure to patients. The radiation dose to the neonates was measured by using thermoluminescent dosimeters. In addition, the attenuation of the Kevlar cassettes and the sensitivity of the film-screen combination were compared with the previously used system. The greatest radiation reduction using a mobile X-ray unit was 27%; based on sensitivity measurements, the theoretical reduction averaged 38%. The reduction in radiation exposure resulted from reduced attenuation by the Kevlar cassette.

  7. Identification of tumor-associated cassette exons in human cancer through EST-based computational prediction and experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many evidences report that alternative splicing, the mechanism which produces mRNAs and proteins with different structures and functions from the same gene, is altered in cancer cells. Thus, the identification and characterization of cancer-specific splice variants may give large impulse to the discovery of novel diagnostic and prognostic tumour biomarkers, as well as of new targets for more selective and effective therapies. Results We present here a genome-wide analysis of the alternative splicing pattern of human genes through a computational analysis of normal and cancer-specific ESTs from seventeen anatomical groups, using data available in AspicDB, a database resource for the analysis of alternative splicing in human. By using a statistical methodology, normal and cancer-specific genes, splice sites and cassette exons were predicted in silico. The condition association of some of the novel normal/tumoral cassette exons was experimentally verified by RT-qPCR assays in the same anatomical system where they were predicted. Remarkably, the presence in vivo of the predicted alternative transcripts, specific for the nervous system, was confirmed in patients affected by glioblastoma. Conclusion This study presents a novel computational methodology for the identification of tumor-associated transcript variants to be used as cancer molecular biomarkers, provides its experimental validation, and reports specific biomarkers for glioblastoma. PMID:20813049

  8. 21 CFR 892.1880 - Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1880 Wall-mounted radiographic cassette holder. (a)...

  9. 21 CFR 892.1870 - Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1870 Radiographic film/cassette changer programmer. (a)...

  10. How To Choose Audio and Video Tape and Cassettes That Best Fit Your Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Judson

    1978-01-01

    An audiovisual consultant presents a guide to selecting suitable and cost effective tape and cassettes. He describes and illustrates physical properties of tapes and includes a list of manufacturers and suppliers. (MF)

  11. The GoldenBricks assembly: A standardized one-shot cloning technique for complete cassette assembly

    E-print Network

    Pauthenier, Cyrille

    2012-11-05

    BBF RFC 92 proposes a new standard assembly method for the Parts Registry. The method makes one-shot cloning of a complete eukaryotic or prokaryotic cassette possible in one day while keeping compatibility with the BBF RFC ...

  12. COLLECTION EFFICIENCY OF FIELD SAMPLING CASSETTES: INTERAGENCY ENERGY/ENVIRONMENT R AND D PROGRAM REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Industrial hygiene particulate samples are often collected under anisokinetic sampling conditions and in crosswinds. Experiments were conducted to quantitate errors associated with sampling under these non-ideal conditions. Three types of field sampling cassetts were tested to de...

  13. ATP binding to a multisubunit enzyme: statistical thermodynamics analysis

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2012-01-01

    Due to inter-subunit communication, multisubunit enzymes usually hydrolyze ATP in a concerted fashion. However, so far the principle of this process remains poorly understood. In this study, from the viewpoint of statistical thermodynamics, a simple model is presented. In this model, we assume that the binding of ATP will change the potential of the corresponding enzyme subunit, and the degree of this change depends on the state of its adjacent subunits. The probability of enzyme in a given state satisfies the Boltzmann's distribution. Although it looks much simple, this model can fit the recent experimental data of chaperonin TRiC/CCT well. From this model, the dominant state of TRiC/CCT can be obtained. This study provided a new way to understand biophysical processes by statistical thermodynamics analysis.

  14. ATP binding to a multisubunit enzyme: statistical thermodynamics analysis

    E-print Network

    Yunxin Zhang

    2012-03-22

    Due to inter-subunit communication, multisubunit enzymes usually hydrolyze ATP in a concerted fashion. However, so far the principle of this process remains poorly understood. In this study, from the viewpoint of statistical thermodynamics, a simple model is presented. In this model, we assume that the binding of ATP will change the potential of the corresponding enzyme subunit, and the degree of this change depends on the state of its adjacent subunits. The probability of enzyme in a given state satisfies the Boltzmann's distribution. Although it looks much simple, this model can fit the recent experimental data of chaperonin TRiC/CCT well. From this model, the dominant state of TRiC/CCT can be obtained. This study provided a new way to understand biophysical processes by statistical thermodynamics analysis.

  15. Storing self-contained gel capillary cassettes for POC medical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Manage, Dammika P; Lauzon, Jana; Zahariadis, George; Pilarski, Linda M

    2013-10-21

    For effective clinical uptake of the lab on a chip/point of care technology (LOC-POC), in addition to cost advantages LOC-POC devices should offer multiple patient screening panels for related diseases as well as cold-chain transportation and storage abilities. We recently described a device that performs polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to simultaneously screen raw clinical samples from up to 16 patients for multiple infectious agents (Manage et al., Lab Chip, 2013, 13, 2576-2584). This cassette contains glass capillaries with desiccated semi-solid acrylamide gels that include all the reagents except for the sample, with integrated quality control. Here we report the development of protocols to store assembled PCR cassettes at room temperature, 4 °C or -20 °C as well as at +40 °C. We show that our cassettes are stable, with no loss of activity for at least 3 months at RT and at least 7 months at 4 °C and -20 °C. However, the activity of desiccated cassettes degrades when stored for more than 2 weeks at 40 °C, insufficient time for post-manufacture delivery and use of cassette PCR. To address this, we have evaluated two stage storage protocols. PCR cassettes can initially be stored at 4 °C and -20 °C for prolonged periods of time and removed for shorter term storage at RT, retaining activity for at least a month, which would facilitate transport to remote areas for testing. Effective use of cassette PCR in high temperature regions of the world, for experimental purposes defined here as 40 °C, appears to be feasible only after a first stage storage in the cold, followed by no more than 1 week at 40 °C. This should allow sufficient time for delivery by the manufacturer to a central area well served by power and refrigeration, for later ambient temperature transport and use in under-resourced areas that lack refrigeration. PMID:23966212

  16. Characterization of the phd-doc and ccd Toxin-Antitoxin Cassettes from Vibrio Superintegrons

    PubMed Central

    Guérout, Anne-Marie; Iqbal, Naeem; Mine, Natacha; Ducos-Galand, Magaly; Van Melderen, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems have been reported in the genomes of most bacterial species, and their role when located on the chromosome is still debated. TA systems are particularly abundant in the massive cassette arrays associated with chromosomal superintegrons (SI). Here, we describe the characterization of two superintegron cassettes encoding putative TA systems. The first is the phd-docSI system identified in Vibrio cholerae N16961. We determined its distribution in 36 V. cholerae strains and among five V. metschnikovii strains. We show that this cassette, which is in position 72 of the V. cholerae N16961 cassette array, is functional, carries its own promoter, and is expressed from this location. Interestingly, the phd-docSI system is unable to control its own expression, most likely due to the absence of any DNA-binding domain on the antitoxin. In addition, this SI system is able to cross talk with the canonical P1 phage system. The second cassette that we characterized is the ccdVfi cassette found in the V. fischeri superintegron. We demonstrate that CcdBVfi targets DNA-gyrase, as the canonical CcBF toxin, and that ccdVfi regulates its expression in a fashion similar to the ccdF operon of the conjugative plasmid F. We also establish that this cassette is functional and expressed in its chromosomal context in V. fischeri CIP 103206T. We tested its functional interactions with the ccdABF system and found that CcdAVfi is specific for its associated CcdBVfi and cannot prevent CcdBF toxicity. Based on these results, we discuss the possible biological functions of these TA systems in superintegrons. PMID:23475970

  17. A prototype stable RNA identification cassette for monitoring plasmids of genetically engineered microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedenstierna, K. O.; Lee, Y. H.; Yang, Y.; Fox, G. E.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype stable RNA identification cassette for monitoring genetically engineered plasmids carried by strains of Escherichia coli has been developed. The cassette consists of a Vibrio proteolyticus 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene surrounded by promoters and terminators from the rrnB operon of Escherischia coli. The identifier RNA is expressed and successfully processed so that approximately 30% of the 5S rRNA isolated from either whole cells or 70S ribosomes is of the V. proteolyticus type. Cells carrying the identifier are readily detectable by hybridization. Accurate measurements show that the identification cassette has little effect on fitness compared to a strain containing an analogous plasmid carrying wild type E. coli 5S rRNA, and the V. proteolyticus 5S rRNA gene is not inactivated after prolonged growth. These results demonstrate the feasibility of developing small standardized identification cassettes that can utilize already existing highly sensitive rRNA detection methods. Cassettes of this type could in principle be incorporated into either the engineered regions of recombinant plasmids or their hosts.

  18. Comparative genome analysis: selection pressure on the Borrelia vls cassettes is essential for infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Glöckner, Gernot; Schulte-Spechtel, Ulrike; Schilhabel, Markus; Felder, Marius; Sühnel, Jürgen; Wilske, Bettina; Platzer, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Background At least three species of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (Bbsl) cause tick-borne Lyme disease. Previous work including the genome analysis of B. burgdorferi B31 and B. garinii PBi suggested a highly variable plasmid part. The frequent occurrence of duplicated sequence stretches, the observed plasmid redundancy, as well as the mainly unknown function and variability of plasmid encoded genes rendered the relationships between plasmids within and between species largely unresolvable. Results To gain further insight into Borreliae genome properties we completed the plasmid sequences of B. garinii PBi, added the genome of a further species, B. afzelii PKo, to our analysis, and compared for both species the genomes of pathogenic and apathogenic strains. The core of all Bbsl genomes consists of the chromosome and two plasmids collinear between all species. We also found additional groups of plasmids, which share large parts of their sequences. This makes it very likely that these plasmids are relatively stable and share common ancestors before the diversification of Borrelia species. The analysis of the differences between B. garinii PBi and B. afzelii PKo genomes of low and high passages revealed that the loss of infectivity is accompanied in both species by a loss of similar genetic material. Whereas B. garinii PBi suffered only from the break-off of a plasmid end, B. afzelii PKo lost more material, probably an entire plasmid. In both cases the vls gene locus encoding for variable surface proteins is affected. Conclusion The complete genome sequences of a B. garinii and a B. afzelii strain facilitate further comparative studies within the genus Borrellia. Our study shows that loss of infectivity can be traced back to only one single event in B. garinii PBi: the loss of the vls cassettes possibly due to error prone gene conversion. Similar albeit extended losses in B. afzelii PKo support the hypothesis that infectivity of Borrelia species depends heavily on the evasion from the host response. PMID:16914037

  19. The Evolution of the Bacterial Luciferase Gene Cassette (lux) as a Real-Time Bioreporter

    PubMed Central

    Close, Dan; Xu, Tingting; Smartt, Abby; Rogers, Alexandra; Crossley, Robert; Price, Sarah; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux) is unique among bioluminescent bioreporter systems due to its ability to synthesize and/or scavenge all of the substrate compounds required for its production of light. As a result, the lux system has the unique ability to autonomously produce a luminescent signal, either continuously or in response to the presence of a specific trigger, across a wide array of organismal hosts. While originally employed extensively as a bacterial bioreporter system for the detection of specific chemical signals in environmental samples, the use of lux as a bioreporter technology has continuously expanded over the last 30 years to include expression in eukaryotic cells such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and even human cell lines as well. Under these conditions, the lux system has been developed for use as a biomedical detection tool for toxicity screening and visualization of tumors in small animal models. As the technologies for lux signal detection continue to improve, it is poised to become one of the first fully implantable detection systems for intra-organismal optical detection through direct marriage to an implantable photon-detecting digital chip. This review presents the basic biochemical background that allows the lux system to continuously autobioluminesce and highlights the important milestones in the use of lux-based bioreporters as they have evolved from chemical detection platforms in prokaryotic bacteria to rodent-based tumorigenesis study targets. In addition, the future of lux imaging using integrated circuit microluminometry to image directly within a living host in real-time will be introduced and its role in the development of dose/response therapeutic systems will be highlighted. PMID:22368493

  20. Performance and maintenance of storage phosphor plates and cassettes in digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steller Artz, Dorothy E.; Jafroudi, Hamid; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    1995-05-01

    Projection radiography, based on the storage phosphor (SP) imaging medium is a promising but challenging technology. SP plates consist of phosphor particles that are embedded in a polymer binder like film and then coated onto a flexible backing. Image quality is dependent not only on the performance of the plate, but also on the handling of the plate-cassette combination by the user and the reading system itself. The imaging plates included in this study are the 14' X 17' and 10' X 12' standard plates (ST-V) used for general radiography and the high resolution (HR-V) plates used in mammography and for extremity exams. The cassettes or image plate holders correspond to the plate sizes with the 14' X 17' being lead backed. Recorded downtime of the reader due to plate-cassette operation failures, diagnostic image quality affected by plate artifacts, and plate and cassette replacement rates are for a period of twelve months. Records are maintained through a detailed maintenance log, the image reader's internal record for plate use, and the system's internal error log for physical malfunctions. By keeping a detailed log on maintenance and performance of specific system components, communication to the vendor has been timely and effective in solving equipment failures. Plate-cassette maintenance must be an integral part of overall quality control (QC) that includes technologist training, physical plant (clinical environment) changes, and routine evaluation of the operation and performance of CR system components. Quality control combined with equipment improvements have minimized the downtime of the system, image artifacts and replacement rates of plates and cassettes.

  1. A self-excising beta-recombinase/six cassette for repetitive gene deletion and homokaryon purification in Neurospora crassa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a previous study we developed a cassette employing a bacterial beta-recombinase acting on six recognition sequences (beta-rec/six), which allowed repetitive site-specific gene deletion and marker recycling in Neurospora crassa. However, only one positive selection marker was used in the cassette...

  2. ATimer-Actuated, Immunoassay Cassette for Detecting Molecular Markers in Oral Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changchun; Qiu, Xianbo; Ongagna, Serge; Chen, Dafeng; Chen, Zongyuan; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L.A.M.; Bau, Haim H.

    2009-01-01

    An inexpensive, hand-held, point-of-care, disposable, self-contained, immunoassay cassette comprised of air pouches for pumping, a metering chamber, reagents storage chambers, a mixer, and a lateral flow strip was designed, constructed, and tested. The assay was carried out in a consecutive flow format. The detection was facilitated with up-converting, phosphor (UCP) reporter particles. The automated, timely pumping of the various reagents was driven by a spring-loaded timer. The utility of the cassette was demonstrated by detecting antibodies to HIV in saliva samples and further evaluated with a non-contagious, haptenized DNA assay. The cassette has several advantages over dip sticks such as sample preprocessing, integrated storage of reagents, and automated operation that reduces operator errors and training. The cassette and actuator described herein can readily be extended to detect biomarkers of other diseases in body fluids and other fluids at the point of care. The system is particularly suitable for resource poor countries, where funds and trained personnel are in short supply. PMID:19255658

  3. A novel cassette method for probe evaluation in the designed biochips.

    PubMed

    Zinkevich, Vitaly; Sapojnikova, Nelly; Mitchell, Julian; Kartvelishvili, Tamar; Asatiani, Nino; Alkhalil, Samia; Bogdarina, Irina; Al-Humam, Abdulmohsen A

    2014-01-01

    A critical step in biochip design is the selection of probes with identical hybridisation characteristics. In this article we describe a novel method for evaluating DNA hybridisation probes, allowing the fine-tuning of biochips, that uses cassettes with multiple probes. Each cassette contains probes in equimolar proportions so that their hybridisation performance can be assessed in a single reaction. The model used to demonstrate this method was a series of probes developed to detect TORCH pathogens. DNA probes were designed for Toxoplasma gondii, Chlamidia trachomatis, Rubella, Cytomegalovirus, and Herpes virus and these were used to construct the DNA cassettes. Five cassettes were constructed to detect TORCH pathogens using a variety of genes coding for membrane proteins, viral matrix protein, an early expressed viral protein, viral DNA polymerase and the repetitive gene B1 of Toxoplasma gondii. All of these probes, except that for the B1 gene, exhibited similar profiles under the same hybridisation conditions. The failure of the B1 gene probe to hybridise was not due to a position effect, and this indicated that the probe was unsuitable for inclusion in the biochip. The redesigned probe for the B1 gene exhibited identical hybridisation properties to the other probes, suitable for inclusion in a biochip. PMID:24897111

  4. STS-37 crewmembers watch Pilot Cameron juggle cassettes on OV-104's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-37 crewmembers watch Pilot Kenneth D. Cameron juggle cassette tapes on the middeck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Laughing at Cameron's stunt are Mission Specialist (MS) Linda M. Godwin (foreground), Commander Steven R. Nagel (behind Cameron), and MS Jerry L. Ross (at floor level). Ross snacks on chocolate candy during the performance.

  5. Video Cassettes: The Systems, the Market, the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Martin

    In its survey of the videocassette field, this book details the background, current status, problems, and potentials of the various systems designed to record and reproduce films and other audiovisual material through a conventional television set. The systems used by CBS (a miniaturized film format), Avco, Sony, Ampex (all magnetic tape formats),…

  6. Utilizing ARC EMCS Seedling Cassettes as Highly Versatile Miniature Growth Chambers for Model Organism Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, John L.; Steele, Marianne K.; Sun, Gwo-Shing; Heathcote, David; Reinsch, S.; DeSimone, Julia C.; Myers, Zachary A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our ground testing was to demonstrate the capability of safely putting specific model organisms into dehydrated stasis, and to later rehydrate and successfully grow them inside flight proven ARC EMCS seedling cassettes. The ARC EMCS seedling cassettes were originally developed to support seedling growth during space flight. The seeds are attached to a solid substrate, launched dry, and then rehydrated in a small volume of media on orbit to initiate the experiment. We hypothesized that the same seedling cassettes should be capable of acting as culture chambers for a wide range of organisms with minimal or no modification. The ability to safely preserve live organisms in a dehydrated state allows for on orbit experiments to be conducted at the best time for crew operations and more importantly provides a tightly controlled physiologically relevant growth experiment with specific environmental parameters. Thus, we performed a series of ground tests that involved growing the organisms, preparing them for dehydration on gridded Polyether Sulfone (PES) membranes, dry storage at ambient temperatures for varying periods of time, followed by rehydration. Inside the culture cassettes, the PES membranes were mounted above blotters containing dehydrated growth media. These were mounted on stainless steel bases and sealed with plastic covers that have permeable membrane covered ports for gas exchange. The results showed we were able to demonstrate acceptable normal growth of C.elegans (nematodes), E.coli (bacteria), S.cerevisiae (yeast), Polytrichum (moss) spores and protonemata, C.thalictroides (fern), D.discoideum (amoeba), and H.dujardini (tardigrades). All organisms showed acceptable growth and rehydration in both petri dishes and culture cassettes initially, and after various time lengths of dehydration. At the end of on orbit ISS European Modular Cultivation System experiments the cassettes could be frozen at ultra-low temperatures, refrigerated, or chemically preserved before being returned to Earth for analyses. Our results suggest that with protocol modifications and future verification testing we can utilize the versatile EMCS to conduct tightly controlled experiments inside our culture cassettes for a wide variety of organisms. These physiological experiments would be designed to answer questions at the molecular level about the specific stress responses of space flight.

  7. Ground Testing of the EMCS Seed Cassette for Biocompatibility with the Cellular Slime Mold, Dictyostelium Discoideum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanely, Julia C.; Reinsch, Sigrid; Myers, Zachary A.; Freeman, John; Steele, Marianne K.; Sun, Gwo-Shing; Heathcote, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The European Modular Cultivation System, EMCS, was developed by ESA for plant experiments. To expand the use of flight verified hardware for various model organisms, we performed ground experiments to determine whether ARC EMCS Seed Cassettes could be adapted for use with cellular slime mold for future space flight experiments. Dictyostelium is a cellular slime mold that can exist both as a single-celled independent organism and as a part of a multicellular colony which functions as a unit (pseudoplasmodium). Under certain stress conditions, individual amoebae will aggregate to form multicellular structures. Developmental pathways are very similar to those found in Eukaryotic organisms, making this a uniquely interesting organism for use in genetic studies. Dictyostelium has been used as a genetic model organism for prior space flight experiments. Due to the formation of spores that are resistant to unfavorable conditions such as desiccation, Dictyostelium is also a good candidate for use in the EMCS Seed Cassettes. The growth substratum in the cassettes is a gridded polyether sulfone (PES) membrane. A blotter beneath the PES membranes contains dried growth medium. The goals of this study were to (1) verify that Dictyostelium are capable of normal growth and development on PES membranes, (2) develop a method for dehydration of Dictyostelium spores with successful recovery and development after rehydration, and (3) successful mock rehydration experiments in cassettes. Our results show normal developmental progression in two strains of Dictyostelium discoideum on PES membranes with a bacterial food source. We have successfully performed a mock rehydration of spores with developmental progression from aggregation to slug formation, and production of morphologically normal spores within 9 days of rehydration. Our results indicate that experiments on the ISS using the slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum could potentially be performed in the flight verified hardware of the EMCS ARC Seed Cassettes.

  8. An integrated, self-contained microfluidic cassette for isolation, amplification, and detection of nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dafeng; Mauk, Michael; Qiu, Xianbo; Liu, Changchun; Kim, Jitae; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Ongagna, Serge; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L. A. M.

    2010-01-01

    A self-contained, integrated, disposable, sample-to-answer, polycarbonate microfluidic cassette for nucleic acid—based detection of pathogens at the point of care was designed, constructed, and tested. The cassette comprises on-chip sample lysis, nucleic acid isolation, enzymatic amplification (polymerase chain reaction and, when needed, reverse transcription), amplicon labeling, and detection. On-chip pouches and valves facilitate fluid flow control. All the liquids and dry reagents needed for the various reactions are pre-stored in the cassette. The liquid reagents are stored in flexible pouches formed on the chip surface. Dry (RT-)PCR reagents are pre-stored in the thermal cycling, reaction chamber. The process operations include sample introduction; lysis of cells and viruses; solid-phase extraction, concentration, and purification of nucleic acids from the lysate; elution of the nucleic acids into a thermal cycling chamber and mixing with pre-stored (RT-)PCR dry reagents; thermal cycling; and detection. The PCR amplicons are labeled with digoxigenin and biotin and transmitted onto a lateral flow strip, where the target analytes bind to a test line consisting of immobilized avidin-D. The immobilized nucleic acids are labeled with up-converting phosphor (UCP) reporter particles. The operation of the cassette is automatically controlled by an analyzer that provides pouch and valve actuation with electrical motors and heating for the thermal cycling. The functionality of the device is demonstrated by detecting the presence of bacterial B.Cereus, viral armored RNA HIV, and HIV I virus in saliva samples. The cassette and actuator described here can be used to detect other diseases as well as the presence of bacterial and viral pathogens in the water supply and other fluids. PMID:20401537

  9. Use of cassette dosing to enhance the throughput of rat brain microdialysis studies.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Gauri; Sun, Kefeng; Liederer, Bianca M; Ding, Xiao; Liu, Xingrong

    2015-07-01

    This study was designed to increase the throughput of rat brain microdialysis studies by administration of compounds as a cassette as opposed to discrete study. Eight compounds (carbamazepine, citalopram, desmethylclozapine, diphenhydramine, gabapentin, metoclopramide, naltrexone, and stavudine) were selected and administered as an intravenous bolus dose at 0.5-3.3 mg/kg each followed by an intravenous infusion at 1 mg/kg per hour for 6 hours in rats in a cassette or discrete dosing. The dialysate, plasma, brain, and cerebrospinal fluid were collected and analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The microdialysis probe recovery was determined by an in vitro gain method. The recovery between the cassette and discrete dosing was similar, with an average of 1.0 ± 0.10-fold difference. The stavudine interstitial fluid (ISF) concentration, as measured by brain microdialysis, was below the low limit of quantitation and was excluded from the analyses. The ratios of ISF concentration to unbound plasma concentration were within 2-fold for six of the remaining seven compounds, with an average of 0.92 ± 0.51-fold difference between the cassette and discrete methods. The ratios of ISF concentration to unbound brain concentration, as measured by the brain homogenate method, were also similar, with a 1.1 ± 0.7-fold difference. In addition, the ratios of ISF to cerebrospinal fluid concentrations were similar, with a 1.5 ± 0.6-fold difference. The results from this study support the use of a cassette dosing approach to enhance the throughput of rat brain microdialysis studies in drug discovery. PMID:25943358

  10. Expression of the Domain Cassette 8 Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 Is Associated with Cerebral Malaria in Benin

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Gwladys I.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Guillonneau, François; Doritchamou, Justin; Wang, Christian W.; Jespersen, Jakob S.; Ezimegnon, Sem; Fievet, Nadine; Alao, Maroufou J.; Lalya, Francis; Massougbodji, Achille; Ndam, Nicaise Tuikue; Theander, Thor G.; Deloron, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein-1 (PfEMP-1) is a highly polymorphic adherence receptor expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes. Based on sequence homology PfEMP-1 variants have been grouped into three major groups A-C, the highly conserved VAR2CSA variants, and semi-conserved types defined by tandem runs of specific domains (“domain cassettes” (DC)). The PfEMP-1 type expressed determines the adherence phenotype, and is associated with clinical outcome of infection. Methods Parasite isolates from Beninese children or women presenting with, respectively, CM or PAM were collected along with samples from patients with uncomplicated malaria (UM). We assessed the transcript level of var genes by RT-qPCR and the expression of PfEMP-1 proteins by LC-MS/MS. Results Var genes encoding DC8 and Group A PfEMP-1 were transcribed more often and at higher levels in cerebral malaria vs. uncomplicated malaria patients. LC-MS/MS identified peptides from group A, DC8 PfEMP-1 more frequently in cerebral malaria than in uncomplicated malaria and pregnancy-associated malaria samples. Conclusion This is the first study to show association between PfEMP-1 subtype and disease outcome by direct analysis of parasites proteome. The results corroborate that group A and specifically the PfEMP-1 types DC8 are universally associated with cerebral malaria. This is a crucial observation for promoting studies on malaria pathogenesis. PMID:23922654

  11. Light without substrate amendment: the bacterial luciferase gene cassette as a mammalian bioreporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Dan M.; Xu, Tingting; Smartt, Abby E.; Jegier, Pat; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-06-01

    Bioluminescent production represents a facile method for bioreporter detection in mammalian tissues. The lack of endogenous bioluminescent reactions in these tissues allows for high signal to noise ratios even at low signal strength compared to fluorescent signal detection. While the luciferase enzymes commonly employed for bioluminescent detection are those from class Insecta (firefly and click beetle luciferases), these are handicapped in that they require concurrent administration of a luciferin compound to elicit a bioluminescent signal. The bacterial luciferase (lux) gene cassette offers the advantages common to other bioluminescent proteins, but is simultaneously capable of synthesizing its own luciferin substrates using endogenously available cellular compounds. The longstanding shortcoming of the lux cassette has been its recalcitrance to function in the mammalian cellular environment. This paper will present an overview of the work completed to date to overcome this limitation and provide examples of mammalian lux-based bioreporter technologies that could provide the framework for advanced, biomedically relevant real-time sensor development.

  12. Checking of unit dose cassettes by pharmacy technicians at three Minnesota hospitals.

    PubMed

    Woller, T W; Stuart, J; Vrabel, R; Senst, B

    1991-09-01

    A pilot project in which pharmacy technicians were trained to check unit dose cassettes filled by other technicians is described. With the approval of the state board of pharmacy, the Minnesota Society of Hospital Pharmacists (MSHP) conducted the nine-month project in three hospitals with different types of unit dose drug distribution systems. Twenty-seven technicians underwent didactic and practical training and were then validated as checkers if they scored 99.8% accuracy in checking carts into which errors had been deliberately introduced by the pharmacist auditor. The performance of validated technicians was audited monthly, and failed audits had to be repeated. Participating technicians did not check the preparation of first doses or extemporaneously prepared doses. In 100,000 doses audited, 60 errors by the validated checkers were identified. Of six technicians who failed a monthly audit, five passed a repeat audit. Pharmacists at the participating hospitals documented time they spent on clinical activities that would have been spent checking cassettes. In December 1990 a one-year extension of the project, expanded to 10 hospitals, began. With strict quality control measures, specially selected and trained pharmacy technicians performed unit dose cassette checking with an accuracy of at least 99.94%. PMID:1928139

  13. Linear friction weld process monitoring of fixture cassette deformations using empirical mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, O. J.; Gibson, C.; Wilson, P.; Lohse, N.; Popov, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Due to its inherent advantages, linear friction welding is a solid-state joining process of increasing importance to the aerospace, automotive, medical and power generation equipment industries. Tangential oscillations and forge stroke during the burn-off phase of the joining process introduce essential dynamic forces, which can also be detrimental to the welding process. Since burn-off is a critical phase in the manufacturing stage, process monitoring is fundamental for quality and stability control purposes. This study aims to improve workholding stability through the analysis of fixture cassette deformations. Methods and procedures for process monitoring are developed and implemented in a fail-or-pass assessment system for fixture cassette deformations during the burn-off phase. Additionally, the de-noised signals are compared to results from previous production runs. The observed deformations as a consequence of the forces acting on the fixture cassette are measured directly during the welding process. Data on the linear friction-welding machine are acquired and de-noised using empirical mode decomposition, before the burn-off phase is extracted. This approach enables a direct, objective comparison of the signal features with trends from previous successful welds. The capacity of the whole process monitoring system is validated and demonstrated through the analysis of a large number of signals obtained from welding experiments.

  14. Genomic donor cassette sharing during VLRA and VLRC assembly in jawless vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Das, Sabyasachi; Li, Jianxu; Holland, Stephen J; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Hirano, Masayuki; Schorpp, Michael; Aravind, L; Cooper, Max D; Boehm, Thomas

    2014-10-14

    Lampreys possess two T-like lymphocyte lineages that express either variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) A or VLRC antigen receptors. VLRA(+) and VLRC(+) lymphocytes share many similarities with the two principal T-cell lineages of jawed vertebrates expressing the ?? and ?? T-cell receptors (TCRs). During the assembly of VLR genes, several types of genomic cassettes are inserted, in step-wise fashion, into incomplete germ-line genes to generate the mature forms of antigen receptor genes. Unexpectedly, the structurally variable components of VLRA and VLRC receptors often possess partially identical sequences; this phenomenon of module sharing between these two VLR isotypes occurs in both lampreys and hagfishes. By contrast, VLRA and VLRC molecules typically do not share their building blocks with the structurally analogous VLRB receptors that are expressed by B-like lymphocytes. Our studies reveal that VLRA and VLRC germ-line genes are situated in close proximity to each other in the lamprey genome and indicate the interspersed arrangement of isotype-specific and shared genomic donor cassettes; these features may facilitate the shared cassette use. The genomic structure of the VLRA/VLRC locus in lampreys is reminiscent of the interspersed nature of the TCRA/TCRD locus in jawed vertebrates that also allows the sharing of some variable gene segments during the recombinatorial assembly of TCR genes. PMID:25228758

  15. Ubiquitin promoter-terminator cassette promotes genetically stable expression of the taste-modifying protein miraculin in transgenic lettuce.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Tadayoshi; Shohael, Abdullah Mohammad; Kim, You-Wang; Yano, Megumu; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    Lettuce is a commercially important leafy vegetable that is cultivated worldwide, and it is also a target crop for plant factories. In this study, lettuce was selected as an alternative platform for recombinant miraculin production because of its fast growth, agronomic value, and wide availability. The taste-modifying protein miraculin is a glycoprotein extracted from the red berries of the West African native shrub Richadella dulcifica. Because of its limited natural availability, many attempts have been made to produce this protein in suitable alternative hosts. We produced transgenic lettuce with miraculin gene driven either by the ubiquitin promoter/terminator cassette from lettuce or a 35S promoter/nos terminator cassette. Miraculin gene expression and miraculin accumulation in both cassettes were compared by quantitative real-time PCR analysis, Western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression level of the miraculin gene and protein in transgenic lettuce was higher and more genetically stable in the ubiquitin promoter/terminator cassette than in the 35S promoter/nos terminator cassette. These results demonstrated that the ubiquitin promoter/terminator cassette is an efficient platform for the genetically stable expression of the miraculin protein in lettuce and hence this platform is of benefit for recombinant miraculin production on a commercial scale. PMID:21830129

  16. Characterization of integrons and their cassettes in Escherichia coli and Salmonella isolates from poultry in Korea.

    PubMed

    Dessie, Hirut Kidie; Bae, Dong Hwa; Lee, Young Ju

    2013-11-01

    Ninety-nine Escherichia coli and 33 Salmonella isolates were assessed for antimicrobial susceptibility (disc diffusion test). Sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes were identified through PCR, and class 1 and class 2 integrons with resistance gene cassettes were identified with PCR followed by sequencing. Salmonella (63.6%) and E. coli (85.8%) isolates were multidrug resistant (resistance to 3 or more antimicrobials), and the highest incidences of resistance were observed for tetracycline, nalidixic acid, and sulfamethoxazole. The sul1, sul2, tetA, and tetB resistance determinant genes were predominant in E. coli, whereas only sul2 and tetA were identified in Salmonella isolates. In the E. coli isolates, 54 (54.5%) class 1 integrons, 6 (6.1%) class 2 integrons, and 5 (5.1%) class 1 and class 2 integrons together were detected, whereas only 3 (9.1%) integrons were found in the Salmonella serovars. Around 87% of the integrons in E. coli harbored resistance gene cassettes conferring resistance to streptomycin/spectinomycin (aadA, aminoglycoside resistance gene), trimethoprim (dfrA, dihydrofolate reductase gene), streptothricin [sat1 and sat2 (streptothricin acetyltransferase), and estX (putative esterases)]. The most common gene cassettes were aadA1+dfrA1 and dfrA1+sat2+aadA1 in class 1 and class 2 integrons, respectively. Other cassettes including aadA5+dfrA7, dfrA12+aadA2, aadA2+aadA1+dfrA12, and aadA5+aadA2/dfrA7 were also identified. Among the Salmonella serovars, Salmonella Malmoe harbored aadA1+dfrA1 and dfrA12+sat2+aadA1 genes. The aadA1, aadA2, sat2, and dfrA1 had wide variation in similarity among themselves and from previously reported genes worldwide. The diverse gene cassettes could be responsible for the prominent resistance profiles observed and a potential source for dissemination of antimicrobial resistance determinants to other bacteria. PMID:24135609

  17. Introduction Background

    E-print Network

    Petta, Jason

    Research Conclusions #12;Background What is a hygrometer? VCSEL Chilled mirror hygrometer Why measure does a VCSEL hygrometer address these problems? 25Hz measurements Open source environment Low wind with chilled mirror hygrometer Pressure and Temperature effects #12;Calibration Techniques Removal of all

  18. Hygromycin B and Apramycin Antibiotic Resistance Cassettes for Use in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Andrew; Gaynor, Erin C.

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni genetic manipulation is restricted by the limited number of antibiotic resistance cassettes available for use in this diarrheal pathogen. In this study, two antibiotic resistance cassettes were developed, encoding for hygromycin B and apramycin resistance, for use in mutagenesis or for selection of gene expression and complementation constructs in C. jejuni. First, the marker genes were successfully modified to allow for insertional mutagenesis or deletion of a gene-of-interest, and were bracketed with restriction sites for the facilitation of site-specific cloning. These hygromycin B and apramycin markers are encoded by plasmids pAC1H and pAC1A, respectively. We also modified an insertional gene-delivery vector to create pRRH and pRRA, containing the hygromycin B and apramycin resistance genes, and 3 unique restriction sites for the directional introduction of genes into the conserved multi-copy rRNA gene clusters of the C. jejuni chromosome. We determined the effective antibiotic concentrations required for selection, and established that no harmful effects or fitness costs were associated with carrying hygromycin B or apramycin resistance under standard C. jejuni laboratory conditions. Using these markers, the arylsulfatase reporter gene astA was deleted, and the ability to genetically complement the astA deletion using pRRH and pRRA for astA gene insertion was demonstrated. Furthermore, the relative levels of expression from the endogenous astA promoter were compared to that of polycistronic mRNA expression from the constitutive promoter upstream of the resistance gene. The development of additional antibiotic resistance cassettes for use in Campylobacter will enable multiple gene deletion and expression combinations as well as more in-depth study of multi-gene systems important for the survival and pathogenesis of this important bacterium. PMID:24751825

  19. Coupling recombinase-mediated cassette exchange with somatic hypermutation for antibody affinity maturation in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuan; Li, Nan; Zhao, Yun; Hang, Haiying

    2016-01-01

    Heterologous expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) can induce somatic hypermutation (SHM) for genes of interest in various cells, and several research groups (including ours) have successfully improved antibody affinity in mammalian or chicken cells using AID-induced SHM. These affinity maturation systems are time-consuming and inefficient. In this study, we developed an antibody affinity maturation platform in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by coupling recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) with SHM. Stable CHO cell clones containing a single copy puromycin resistance gene (PuroR) expression cassette flanked by recombination target sequences (FRT and loxP) being able to highly express a gene of interest placed in the cassette were developed. The PuroR gene was replaced with an antibody gene by RMCE, and the antibody was displayed on the cell surface. Cells displaying antibodies on their membrane were transfected with the AID gene, and mutations of the antibody gene were accumulated by AID-mediated hypermutation during cell proliferation followed by flow cytometric cell sorting for cells bearing antibody mutants with improved affinity. Affinity improvements were detected after only one round of cell sorting and proliferation, mutant clones with 15-fold affinity improvement were isolated within five rounds of maturation (within 2 months). CHO cells are fast growing, stress-resistant and produce antibody with glycosylations suitable for therapy. Our antibody-evolution platform based on CHO cells makes antibody-affinity maturation more efficient and is especially convenient for therapeutic antibody affinity improvement. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 39-51. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26235363

  20. Recommended Method for Chromosome Exploitation: RMCE-based Cassette-exchange Systems in Animal Cell Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Oumard, André; Qiao, Junhua; Jostock, Thomas; Li, Jiandong; Bode, Juergen

    2006-03-01

    The availability of site-specific recombinases has revolutionized the rational construction of cell lines with predictable properties. Early efforts were directed to providing pre-characterized genomic loci with a single recombinase target site that served as an address for the integration of vectors carrying a compatible tag. Efficient procedures of this type had to await recombinases like PhiC31, which recombine attP and attB target sites in a one-way reaction - at least in the cellular environment of the higher eukaryotic cell. Still these procedures lead to the co-introduction of prokaryotic vector sequences that are known to cause epigenetic silencing. This review illuminates the actual status of the more advanced recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) techniques that have been developed for the major members of site-specific recombinases (SR), Flp, Cre and PhiC31. In RMCE the genomic address consists of a set of heterospecific recombinase target (RT-) sites permitting the exchange of the intervening sequence for the gene of interest (GOI), as part of a similar cassette. This process locks the GOI in place and it is 'clean' in the sense that it does not co-introduce prokaryotic vector parts nor does it leave behind a selection marker. PMID:19003073

  1. Plug-and-play genetic access to drosophila cell types using exchangeable exon cassettes.

    PubMed

    Diao, Fengqiu; Ironfield, Holly; Luan, Haojiang; Diao, Feici; Shropshire, William C; Ewer, John; Marr, Elizabeth; Potter, Christopher J; Landgraf, Matthias; White, Benjamin H

    2015-03-01

    Genetically encoded effectors are important tools for probing cellular function in living animals, but improved methods for directing their expression to specific cell types are required. Here, we introduce a simple, versatile method for achieving cell-type-specific expression of transgenes that leverages the untapped potential of "coding introns" (i.e., introns between coding exons). Our method couples the expression of a transgene to that of a native gene expressed in the cells of interest using intronically inserted "plug-and-play" cassettes (called "Trojan exons") that carry a splice acceptor site followed by the coding sequences of T2A peptide and an effector transgene. We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach in Drosophila using lines containing suitable MiMIC (Minos-mediated integration cassette) transposons and a palette of Trojan exons capable of expressing a range of commonly used transcription factors. We also introduce an exchangeable, MiMIC-like Trojan exon construct that can be targeted to coding introns using the Crispr/Cas system. PMID:25732830

  2. Changes in total CO2 measurement according to reagent cassette rotation in chemistry autoanalyzers.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hee-Jung; Lee, Woochang; Chun, Sail; Kang, So Young; Lee, Woo In; Park, Hae-Il; Min, Won-Ki

    2009-01-01

    The quality control (QC) failure rate in the serum total carbon dioxide (TCO(2)) test increases at a higher rate than in other tests over time after calibration. The causes of the increased QC failure rate in the TCO(2) test were examined. Using a TBA200RF analyzer (Toshiba Medical Systems), the TCO(2) of the QC material was measured at 2-hr intervals and was found to decrease by up to 16.5% at 10 hr after calibration. In contrast, using the P-module and D-module analyzers (Roche Diagnostics), the TCO(2) of the QC material did not change significantly during 10 hr after calibration. When the TCO(2) level of the QC material was measured hourly over 5 hr with the TBA200FR analyzer while the reagent bottle was rotated at 0, 80, 120, 160, or 200 rpm, the rate of decline of TCO(2), increased over time after calibration and with increasing reagent cassette rotation. Therefore, in a clinical laboratory using an automated analyzer with a rotating reagent cassette, it is necessary to set a limit to the calibration time interval in order to satisfy the QC goal. PMID:19429801

  3. Use of cassette-electrode microbial fuel cell for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Morio; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2013-02-01

    Cassette-electrode microbial fuel cells (CE-MFCs) have been developed for the conversion of biomass wastes into electric energy. The present study modified CE-MFC for its application to wastewater treatment and examined its utility in a long-term (240 days) experiment to treat a synthetic wastewater, containing starch, yeast extract, peptone, plant oil, and a detergent (approximately 500 mg of total chemical oxygen demand [COD] per liter). A test MFC reactor (1 l in capacity) was equipped with 10 cassette electrodes with total anode and cathode projection areas of 1440 cm(2), and the operation was initiated by inoculating with rice paddy-field soil. It was demonstrated that CE-MFC achieved COD removal rates of 80% at hydraulic-retention times of 6 h or greater, and electricity was generated at a maximum power density of 150 mW m(-2) and Coulombic efficiency of 20%. Microbial communities established on anodes of CEs were analyzed by pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, showing that Geobacter, Clostridium, and Geothrix were abundantly detected in anode biofilms. These results demonstrate the utility of CE-MFC for wastewater treatment, in which Geobacter and Geothrix would be involved in the electricity generation. PMID:23041137

  4. Fully Automated Data Collection Using PAM and the Development of PAM/SPACE Reversible Cassettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraki, Masahiko; Watanabe, Shokei; Chavas, Leonard M. G.; Yamada, Yusuke; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Fujihashi, Masahiro; Miki, Kunio; Baba, Seiki; Ueno, Go; Yamamoto, Masaki; Suzuki, Mamoru; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Tanaka, Isao

    2010-06-01

    To remotely control and automatically collect data in high-throughput X-ray data collection experiments, the Structural Biology Research Center at the Photon Factory (PF) developed and installed sample exchange robots PAM (PF Automated Mounting system) at PF macromolecular crystallography beamlines; BL-5A, BL-17A, AR-NW12A and AR-NE3A. We developed and installed software that manages the flow of the automated X-ray experiments; sample exchanges, loop-centering and X-ray diffraction data collection. The fully automated data collection function has been available since February 2009. To identify sample cassettes, PAM employs a two-dimensional bar code reader. New beamlines, BL-1A at the Photon Factory and BL32XU at SPring-8, are currently under construction as part of Targeted Proteins Research Program (TPRP) by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. However, different robots, PAM and SPACE (SPring-8 Precise Automatic Cryo-sample Exchanger), will be installed at BL-1A and BL32XU, respectively. For the convenience of the users of both facilities, pins and cassettes for PAM and SPACE are developed as part of the TPRP.

  5. Phototoxic Risk Assessments on Benzophenone Derivatives: Photobiochemical Assessments and Dermal Cassette-Dosing Pharmacokinetic Study.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yoshiki; Ohtake, Hiroto; Kato, Masashi; Onoue, Satomi

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to qualify photosafety screening on the basis of photochemical and pharmacokinetic (PK) data on dermally applied chemicals. Six benzophenone derivatives (BZPs) were selected as model compounds, and in vitro photochemical/phototoxic characterization and dermal cassette-dosing PK study were carried out. For comparison, an in vivo phototoxicity test was also conducted. All of the BZPs exhibited strong UVA/UVB absorption with molar extinction coefficients of over 2000 M(-1) × cm(-1), and benzophenone and ketoprofen exhibited significant reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation upon exposure to simulated sunlight (about 2.0 mW/cm(2)); however, ROS generation from sulisobenzone and dioxybenzone was negligible. To verify in vitro phototoxicity, a 3T3 neutral red uptake phototoxicity test was carried out, and benzophenone and ketoprofen were categorized to be phototoxic chemicals. The dermal PK parameters of ketoprofen were indicative of the highest dermal distribution of all BZPs tested. On the basis of its in vitro photochemical/phototoxic and PK data, ketoprofen was deduced to be highly phototoxic. The rank of predicted phototoxic risk of BZPs on the basis of the proposed screening strategy was almost in agreement with the results from the in vivo phototoxicity test. The combined use of photochemical and cassette-dosing PK data would provide reliable predictions of phototoxic risk for candidates with high productivity. PMID:26016852

  6. Recent advances on host plants and expression cassettes' structure and function in plant molecular pharming.

    PubMed

    Makhzoum, Abdullah; Benyammi, Roukia; Moustafa, Khaled; Trémouillaux-Guiller, Jocelyne

    2014-04-01

    Plant molecular pharming is a promising system to produce important recombinant proteins such as therapeutic antibodies, pharmaceuticals, enzymes, growth factors, and vaccines. The system provides an interesting alternative method to the direct extraction of proteins from inappropriate source material while offering the possibility to overcome problems related to product safety and source availability. Multiple factors including plant hosts, genes of interest, expression vector cassettes, and extraction and purification techniques play important roles in the plant molecular pharming. Plant species, as a biosynthesis platform, are a crucial factor in achieving high yields of recombinant protein in plant. The choice of recombinant gene and its expression strategy is also of great importance in ensuring a high amount of the recombinant proteins. Many studies have been conducted to improve expression, accumulation, and purification of the recombinant protein from molecular pharming systems. Re-engineered vectors and expression cassettes are also pivotal tools in enhancing gene expression at the transcription and translation level, and increasing protein accumulation, stability, retention and targeting of specific organelles. In this review, we report recent advances and strategies of plant molecular pharming while focusing on the choice of plant hosts and the role of some molecular pharming elements and approaches: promoters, codon optimization, signal sequences, and peptides used for upstream design, purification and downstream processing. PMID:23959796

  7. Cassettes for the PCR-mediated construction of regulatable alleles in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Gerami-Nejad, Maryam; Hausauer, Danielle; McClellan, Mark; Berman, Judith; Gale, Cheryl

    2004-04-15

    The recent availability of genome sequence information for the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans has greatly facilitated the ability to perform genetic manipulations in this organism. Two important molecular tools for studying gene function are regulatable promoters for generating conditional mutants and fluorescent proteins for determining the subcellular localization of fusion gene products. We describe a set of plasmids containing promoter-GFP cassettes (P(MET3)-GFP, P(GAL1)-GFP, and P(PCK1)-GFP), linked to a selectable nutritional marker gene (URA3). PCR-mediated gene modification generates gene-specific promoter, or gene-specific promoter-GFP, fusions at the 5'-end of the gene of interest. One set of primers can be used to generate three strains expressing a native protein of interest, or an amino-terminal GFP-tagged version, from three different regulatable promoters. Thus, these promoter cassette plasmids facilitate construction of conditional mutant strains, overexpression alleles and/or inducible amino-terminal GFP fusion proteins. PMID:15116343

  8. A comparison of aerosol sampling techniques: "open" versus "closed-face" filter cassettes.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, H J; Fidino, A V; Arlington, K L; Buchan, R M

    1980-10-01

    Accepted practice by most professional industrial hygienists in government and industry is to use "closed-face" filter cassette techniques as standard sampling procedures for the majority of aerosols. A two-phase, field study was conducted to determine whether a gravimetric bias exists between "open" and "closed-face" sampling methods. Phase I involved an in-depth analysis of the potential gravimetric viability as it applies to an industrial paint spray mist, and Phase II was a series of pilot studies, of small sample base, to determine if this phenomena exists over a range of aerosol types. Dusts of wood, grain, cellulose, Portland cement and perlite, welding fumes, and chromic acid mist were sampled in Phase II. Paired breathing zone samples, "open" and "closed-face", 37 mm, 3-piece filter cassettes were utilized in both phases of the study. In both phases of the study, "open-face" concentrations were consistently higher than "closed-face" concentrations, with the exception of cellulose dust. Based on the concentration for both sampling techniques, the data suggests that "closed-face" sampling techniques (4.0 mm inlet diameter) might be size selective against large particles. This could lead to an underestimation of a worker's total aerosol exposure. PMID:7435380

  9. Structural basis for functional cooperation between tandem helicase cassettes in Brr2-mediated remodeling of the spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Karine F.; Jovin, Sina Mozaffari; Weber, Gert; Pena, Vladimir; Lührmann, Reinhard; Wahl, Markus C.

    2012-01-01

    Assembly of a spliceosome, catalyzing precursor–messenger RNA splicing, involves multiple RNA–protein remodeling steps, driven by eight conserved DEXD/H-box RNA helicases. The 250-kDa Brr2 enzyme, which is essential for U4/U6 di-small nuclear ribonucleoprotein disruption during spliceosome catalytic activation and for spliceosome disassembly, is the only member of this group that is permanently associated with the spliceosome, thus requiring its faithful regulation. At the same time, Brr2 represents a unique subclass of superfamily 2 nucleic acid helicases, containing tandem helicase cassettes. Presently, the mechanistic and regulatory consequences of this unconventional architecture are unknown. Here we show that in human Brr2, two ring-like helicase cassettes intimately interact and functionally cooperate and how retinitis pigmentosa-linked Brr2 mutations interfere with the enzyme’s function. Only the N-terminal cassette harbors ATPase and helicase activities in isolation. Comparison with other helicases and mutational analyses show how it threads single-stranded RNA, and structural features suggest how it can load onto an internal region of U4/U6 di-snRNA. Although the C-terminal cassette does not seem to engage RNA in the same fashion, it binds ATP and strongly stimulates the N-terminal helicase. Mutations at the cassette interface, in an intercassette linker or in the C-terminal ATP pocket, affect this cross-talk in diverse ways. Together, our results reveal the structural and functional interplay between two helicase cassettes in a tandem superfamily 2 enzyme and point to several sites through which Brr2 activity may be regulated. PMID:23045696

  10. Evaluation of D-1 tape and cassette characteristics: Moisture content of Sony and Ampex D-1 tapes when delivered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashton, Gary

    1993-01-01

    Commercial D-1 cassette tapes and their associated recorders were designed to operate in broadcast studios and record in accordance with the International Radio Consultative Committee (CCIR) 607 digital video standards. The D-1 recorder resulted in the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) standards 224 to 228 and is the first digital video recorder to be standardized for the broadcast industry. The D-1 cassette and associated media are currently marketed for broadcast use. The recorder was redesigned for data applications and is in the early stages of being evaluated. The digital data formats used are specified in MIL-STD-2179 and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) X3.175-190 standard. In early 1990, the National Media Laboratory (NML) was asked to study the effects of time, temperature, and relative humidity on commercial D-1 cassettes. The environmental range to be studied was the one selected for the Advanced Tactical Air Reconnaissance System (ATARS) program. Several discussions between NML personnel, ATARS representatives, recorder contractors, and other interested parties were held to decide upon the experimental plan to be implemented. Review meetings were held periodically during the course of the experiment. The experiments were designed to determine the dimensional stability of the media and cassette since this is one of the major limiting factors of helical recorders when the media or recorders are subjected to non-broadcasting environments. Measurements were also made to characterize each sample of cassettes to give preliminary information on which purchase specifications could be developed. The actual tests performed on the cassettes and media before and after aging fall into the general categories listed.

  11. Copiers and Duplicators for Audio Tape Cassettes: Criteria for Selection, Laboratory Test Findings, Manufacturers' Data Reports. EPIE Report: Number 84e.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Products Information Exchange Inst., Stony Brook, NY.

    Because needs for cassette duplication equipment differ, the user must match his requirements to the capabilities of manufactured products, and the essential product characteristics. To help educators in choosing cassette duplicators, EPIE has gathered data from manufacturers and tested 11 units. The first section of the report explains the…

  12. A new variant of self-excising ?-recombinase/six cassette for repetitive gene deletion and homokaryon purification in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Edyta; Kasuga, Takao; Fan, Zhiliang

    2014-05-01

    In a previous study, we developed a cassette employing a bacterial ?-recombinase acting on six recognition sequences (?-rec/six), which allowed repetitive site-specific gene deletion and marker recycling in Neurospora crassa. However, only one positive selection marker was used in the cassette. A tedious subsequent procedure was needed to purify homokaryons due to the lack of a negative selection after cassette eviction. Additionally, the endoxylanase xylP promoter from Penicillium chrysogenum used in the construct was not strongly regulated in N. crassa, which led to low efficiency in cassette eviction. Herein we report an improved variant of the self-excising ?-recombinase/six cassette for repetitive gene deletions in N. crassa using a native endoxylanase gh10-2 promoter from N. crassa, plus the introduction of a bidirectional selection marker to facilitate homokaryon selection using a thymidine kinase (tk) gene (negative selection) in addition to the phosphinothricin resistance gene (bar(r)) (positive selection). PMID:24556286

  13. Consumer Education Resources Catalog: 16mm Films, Multi Media Kits, Video Cassettes, Simulations & Games, Printed Materials. 1978 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sandra; Neal, Kathy

    This consumer education resources catalog provides an annotated guide to 16mm films, multi-media kits, video cassettes, simulations and games, and printed materials related to consumer education available from Michigan Department of Education's Regional Education Media Centers. The first major section lists available media by specific subject…

  14. Consumer Education Resources Catalog. 1980 Supplement. 16mm Films, Multi Media Kits, Video Cassettes, Simulations & Games, Printed Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sandra

    This supplement to the Consumer Education Resources Catalog (see note) lists teaching-learning resources available for preview at the Michigan Consumer Education Center. A subject index to multi-media identifies titles of films, video cassettes, multi-media kits, and games under seven specific subjects. These are (1) Factors Affecting Consumer…

  15. Identification of antibiotic resistance cassettes in class 1 integrons in Aeromonas spp. strains isolated from fresh fish (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Sarria-Guzmán, Yohanna; López-Ramírez, María Patricia; Chávez-Romero, Yosef; Ruiz-Romero, Erick; Dendooven, Luc; Bello-López, Juan Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Forty-six Aeromonas spp. strains were isolated from fresh fish and investigated for their antimicrobial susceptibility, detection of Class 1 integrons by PCR, and arrangement of gene cassettes. Selected isolates were further characterized by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR. Twenty isolates were found to carry Class 1 integrons. Amplification of the variable regions of the integrons revealed diverse bands ranging in size from 150 to 1,958 pb. Sequence analysis of the variable regions revealed the presence of several gene cassettes, such as adenylyl transferases (aadA2 and aadA5), dihydrofolate reductases (dfrA17 and dfrA1), chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (catB3), ?-lactamase (oxa2), lincosamide nucleotidil transferase (linF), aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (apha15), and oxacillinase (bla OXA-10). Two open reading frames with an unknown function were identified as orfC and orfD. The aadA2 cassette was the most common integron found in this study. Interestingly, five integrons were detected in the plasmids that might be involved in the transfer of resistance genes to other bacteria. This is a first report of cassette encoding for lincosamides (linF) resistance in Aeromonas spp. Implications on the incidence of integrons in isolates of Aeromonas spp. from fresh fish for human consumption, and its possible consequences to human health are discussed. PMID:24370627

  16. Genome-wide Co-occurrence of Promoter Elements Reveals a cis-Regulatory Cassette of rRNA

    E-print Network

    Shamir, Ron

    Genome-wide Co-occurrence of Promoter Elements Reveals a cis-Regulatory Cassette of rRNA-occur most highly in the genome, primarily in the promoters of genes involved in rRNA transcription to the ATG than PAC in most promoters. Two additional rRNA-related motifs, mRRSE3 and mRRSE10, also co

  17. An Evaluative Directory to Producers and Distributors of Unabridged Books on Cassette Tape. Occasional Papers Number 184.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Preston Jones

    A study gathered information about producers and distributors of unabridged books on cassette tape for the use of librarians engaged in collection development. Questionnaires were distributed to 48 public libraries and 45 producers/distributors. This report includes an introduction covering the history of this medium and a rationale for collecting…

  18. Design, Syntheses and Biological Applications of Through-bond Energy Transfer Cassettes and Novel Non-covalently Cell Penetrating Peptides 

    E-print Network

    Han, Junyan

    2012-02-14

    A xanthene-BODIPY cassette is used as a ratiometric intracellular pH reporter for imaging protein-dye conjugates in living cells. A model was hypothesized to explain the pH-dependent energy transfer efficiencies from the donor to the acceptor based...

  19. Site-Specific Cassette Exchange Systems in the Aedes aegypti Mosquito and the Plutella xylostella Moth

    PubMed Central

    Haghighat-Khah, Roya Elaine; Scaife, Sarah; Martins, Sara; St John, Oliver; Matzen, Kelly Jean; Morrison, Neil; Alphey, Luke

    2015-01-01

    Genetically engineered insects are being evaluated as potential tools to decrease the economic and public health burden of mosquitoes and agricultural pest insects. Here we describe a new tool for the reliable and targeted genome manipulation of pest insects for research and field release using recombinase mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) mechanisms. We successfully demonstrated the established ?C31-RMCE method in the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, which is the first report of RMCE in mosquitoes. A new variant of this RMCE system, called iRMCE, combines the ?C31-att integration system and Cre or FLP-mediated excision to remove extraneous sequences introduced as part of the site-specific integration process. Complete iRMCE was achieved in two important insect pests, Aedes aegypti and the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, demonstrating the transferability of the system across a wide phylogenetic range of insect pests. PMID:25830287

  20. Comparison of a wipe method with and without a rinse to recover wall losses in closed face 37-mm cassettes used for sampling lead dust particulates

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, Diana; King, Bradley; Beaucham, Catherine; Brueck, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    Closed-face 37-millimeter (mm) polystyrene cassettes are often used for exposure monitoring of metal particulates. Several methods have been proposed to account for the wall loss in air sampling cassettes, including rinsing, wiping, within-cassette dissolution, and an internal capsule fused to the filter that could be digested with the filter. Until internal capsules replace filters, other methods for assessing wall losses may be considered. To determine if rinsing and wiping or wiping alone is adequate to determine wall losses on cassettes, we collected 54 full-shift area air samples at a battery recycling facility. We collected six replicate samples at three locations within the facility for 3 consecutive days. The wall losses of three replicate cassettes from each day-location were analyzed following a rinse and two consecutive wipes. The wall losses of the other three replicates from each day-location were analyzed following two consecutive wipes only. Mixed-cellulose ester membrane filter, rinse, and wipes were analyzed separately following NIOSH Method 7303. We found an average of 29% (range: 8%–54%) recovered lead from the cassette walls for all samples. We also found that rinsing prior to wiping the interior cassette walls did not substantially improve recovery of wall losses compared to wiping alone. A rinse plus one wipe recovered on average 23% (range: 13%–33%) of the lead, while one wipe alone recovered on average 21% (range: 16%–22%). Similarly we determined that a second wipe did not provide substantial additional recovery of lead (average: 4%, range: 0.4%–19%) compared to the first wipe disregarding the rinse (average: 18%, range: 4%–39%). We concluded that when an internal capsule is not used, wall losses of lead dust in air sampling cassettes can be adequately recovered by wiping the internal wall surfaces of the cassette with a single wipe. PMID:26125330

  1. Comparison of a Wipe Method With and Without a Rinse to Recover Wall Losses in Closed Face 37-mm Cassettes used for Sampling Lead Dust Particulates.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, Diana; King, Bradley; Beaucham, Catherine; Brueck, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    Closed-face 37-mm polystyrene cassettes are often used for exposure monitoring of metal particulates. Several methods have been proposed to account for the wall loss in air sampling cassettes, including rinsing, wiping, within-cassette dissolution, and an internal capsule fused to the filter that could be digested with the filter. Until internal capsules replace filters, other methods for assessing wall losses may be considered. To determine if rinsing and wiping or wiping alone is adequate to determine wall losses on cassettes, we collected 54 full-shift area air samples at a battery recycling facility. We collected six replicate samples at three locations within the facility for three consecutive days. The wall losses of three replicate cassettes from each day-location were analyzed following a rinse and two consecutive wipes. The wall losses of the other three replicates from each day-location were analyzed following two consecutive wipes only. Mixed-cellulose ester membrane filter, rinse, and wipes were analyzed separately following NIOSH Method 7303. We found an average of 29% (range: 8-54%) recovered lead from the cassette walls for all samples. We also found that rinsing prior to wiping the interior cassette walls did not substantially improve recovery of wall losses compared to wiping alone. A rinse plus one wipe recovered on average 23% (range: 13-33%) of the lead, while one wipe alone recovered on average 21% (range: 16-22%). Similarly, we determined that a second wipe did not provide substantial additional recovery of lead (average: 4%, range: 0.4-19%) compared to the first wipe disregarding the rinse (average: 18%, range: 4-39%). We concluded that when an internal capsule is not used, wall losses of lead dust in air sampling cassettes can be adequately recovered by wiping the internal wall surfaces of the cassette with a single wipe. PMID:26125330

  2. Targeting Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase by a Simple siRNA Expression Cassette in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Gong, Xia; Zhang, Hui Hui; Zhang, Qin; Zhao, Dandan; Peng, Jian Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) has become an ideal target for development of anticancer therapy. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are very powerful reagents for gene silencing and show promise for cancer gene therapy. However, only a small number of siRNAs have been demonstrated to be effective. For gene therapy targeting hTERT, it is essential to develop a robust system to fully explore the power of siRNAs. Objectives: We explored a siRNA expression cassette (SEC) to screen highly effective RNAi-targeted sequences for gene therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and Methods: An SEC was developed by flanking H1 and U6 promoters in opposite directions at the siRNA-encoding sequence. Eight SECs specific to hTERT were designed by overlap extension polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and transfected into HepG2 cells with calcium phosphate. The telomerase activity was determined by telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) silver staining and TRAP real-time PCR analysis. The mRNA and protein expression levels of hTERT were determined by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and western blot, respectively. Cell viability was determined by the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and cell apoptosis was measured by the annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI) assay coupled with flow cytometry. Results: Eight hTERT-specific SECs (SEC-1-8) were successfully constructed. In comparison to that of the negative control SEC, the hTERT-specific SECs, especially, SEC-4, SEC-5, SEC-7 and SEC-8 significantly reduced the activity of hTERT in HepG2 cells at 48 hours after transfection. Moreover, the mRNA and protein expression levels of hTERT as well as the cell viability were significantly reduced by SECs. Knockdown of hTERT by SECs in HepG2 cells led to cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Our developed simple SEC was a powerful strategy for screening highly effective RNAi-targeted sequences and showed promise for gene therapy of HCC. PMID:25861317

  3. Site-specific bacterial chromosome engineering: ?C31 integrase mediated cassette exchange (IMCE).

    PubMed

    Heil, John R; Cheng, Jiujun; Charles, Trevor C

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial chromosome may be used to stably maintain foreign DNA in the mega-base range. Integration into the chromosome circumvents issues such as plasmid replication, plasmid stability, plasmid incompatibility, and plasmid copy number variance. This method uses the site-specific integrase from the Streptomyces phage (?) C31. The ?C31 integrase catalyzes a direct recombination between two specific DNA sites: attB and attP (34 and 39 bp, respectively). This recombination is stable and does not revert. A "landing pad" (LP) sequence consisting of a spectinomycin-resistance gene, aadA (SpR), and the E. coli ß-glucuronidase gene (uidA) flanked by attP sites has been integrated into the chromosomes of Sinorhizobium meliloti, Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens in an intergenic region, the ampC locus, and the tetA locus, respectively. S. meliloti is used in this protocol. Mobilizable donor vectors containing attB sites flanking a stuffer red fluorescent protein (rfp) gene and an antibiotic resistance gene have also been constructed. In this example the gentamicin resistant plasmid pJH110 is used. The rfp gene may be replaced with a desired construct using SphI and PstI. Alternatively a synthetic construct flanked by attB sites may be sub-cloned into a mobilizable vector such as pK19mob. The expression of the ?C31 integrase gene (cloned from pHS62) is driven by the lac promoter, on a mobilizable broad host range plasmid pRK7813. A tetraparental mating protocol is used to transfer the donor cassette into the LP strain thereby replacing the markers in the LP sequence with the donor cassette. These cells are trans-integrants. Trans-integrants are formed with a typical efficiency of 0.5%. Trans-integrants are typically found within the first 500-1,000 colonies screened by antibiotic sensitivity or blue-white screening using 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-glucuronic acid (X-gluc). This protocol contains the mating and selection procedures for creating and isolating trans-integrants. PMID:22453661

  4. An automated system to mount cryo-cooled protein crystals on a synchrotron beam line, using compact sample cassettes and a small-scale robot

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Aina E.; Ellis, Paul J.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Deacon, Ashley M.; Phizackerley, R. Paul

    2014-01-01

    An automated system for mounting and dismounting pre-frozen crystals has been implemented at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). It is based on a small industrial robot and compact cylindrical cassettes, each holding up to 96 crystals mounted on Hampton Research sample pins. For easy shipping and storage, the cassette fits inside several popular dry-shippers and long-term storage Dewars. A dispensing Dewar holds up to three cassettes in liquid nitrogen adjacent to the beam line goniometer. The robot uses a permanent magnet tool to extract samples from, and insert samples into a cassette, and a cryo-tong tool to transfer them to and from the beam line goniometer. The system is simple, with few moving parts, reliable in operation and convenient to use. PMID:24899734

  5. Novel Cassette-Based Shuttle Vector System for Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Anton, Ana I.; Barry, Peter; Alfonso, Berenice; Fang, Yuan; Novick, Richard P.

    2004-01-01

    Our understanding of staphylococcal pathogenesis depends on reliable genetic tools for gene expression analysis and tracing of bacteria. Here, we have developed and evaluated a series of novel versatile Escherichia coli-staphylococcal shuttle vectors based on PCR-generated interchangeable cassettes. Advantages of our module system include the use of (i) staphylococcal low-copy-number, high-copy-number, thermosensitive and theta replicons and selectable markers (choice of erythromycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, or spectinomycin); (ii) an E. coli replicon and selectable marker (ampicillin); and (iii) a staphylococcal phage fragment that allows high-frequency transduction and an SaPI fragment that allows site-specific integration into the Staphylococcus aureus chromosome. The staphylococcal cadmium-inducible Pcad-cadC and constitutive PblaZ promoters were designed and analyzed in transcriptional fusions to the staphylococcal ?-lactamase blaZ, the Vibrio fischeri luxAB, and the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein reporter genes. The modular design of the vector system provides great flexibility and variety. Questions about gene dosage, complementation, and cis-trans effects can now be conveniently addressed, so that this system constitutes an effective tool for studying gene regulation of staphylococci in various ecosystems. PMID:15466553

  6. Novel cassette-based shuttle vector system for gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Anton, Ana I; Barry, Peter; Alfonso, Berenice; Fang, Yuan; Novick, Richard P

    2004-10-01

    Our understanding of staphylococcal pathogenesis depends on reliable genetic tools for gene expression analysis and tracing of bacteria. Here, we have developed and evaluated a series of novel versatile Escherichia coli-staphylococcal shuttle vectors based on PCR-generated interchangeable cassettes. Advantages of our module system include the use of (i) staphylococcal low-copy-number, high-copy-number, thermosensitive and theta replicons and selectable markers (choice of erythromycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, or spectinomycin); (ii) an E. coli replicon and selectable marker (ampicillin); and (iii) a staphylococcal phage fragment that allows high-frequency transduction and an SaPI fragment that allows site-specific integration into the Staphylococcus aureus chromosome. The staphylococcal cadmium-inducible P(cad)-cadC and constitutive P(blaZ) promoters were designed and analyzed in transcriptional fusions to the staphylococcal beta-lactamase blaZ, the Vibrio fischeri luxAB, and the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein reporter genes. The modular design of the vector system provides great flexibility and variety. Questions about gene dosage, complementation, and cis-trans effects can now be conveniently addressed, so that this system constitutes an effective tool for studying gene regulation of staphylococci in various ecosystems. PMID:15466553

  7. Distinct p53 acetylation cassettes differentially influence gene-expression patterns and cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Knights, Chad D.; Catania, Jason; Giovanni, Simone Di; Muratoglu, Selen; Perez, Ricardo; Swartzbeck, Amber; Quong, Andrew A.; Zhang, Xiaojing; Beerman, Terry; Pestell, Richard G.; Avantaggiati, Maria Laura

    2006-01-01

    The activity of the p53 gene product is regulated by a plethora of posttranslational modifications. An open question is whether such posttranslational changes act redundantly or dependently upon one another. We show that a functional interference between specific acetylated and phosphorylated residues of p53 influences cell fate. Acetylation of lysine 320 (K320) prevents phosphorylation of crucial serines in the NH2-terminal region of p53; only allows activation of genes containing high-affinity p53 binding sites, such as p21/WAF; and promotes cell survival after DNA damage. In contrast, acetylation of K373 leads to hyperphosphorylation of p53 NH2-terminal residues and enhances the interaction with promoters for which p53 possesses low DNA binding affinity, such as those contained in proapoptotic genes, leading to cell death. Further, acetylation of each of these two lysine clusters differentially regulates the interaction of p53 with coactivators and corepressors and produces distinct gene-expression profiles. By analogy with the “histone code” hypothesis, we propose that the multiple biological activities of p53 are orchestrated and deciphered by different “p53 cassettes,” each containing combination patterns of posttranslational modifications and protein–protein interactions. PMID:16717128

  8. Energy use of televisions and video cassette recorders in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Rosen, Karen

    1999-03-01

    In an effort to more accurately determine nationwide energy consumption, the U.S. Department of Energy has recently commissioned studies with the goal of improving its understanding of the energy use of appliances in the miscellaneous end-use category. This study presents an estimate of the residential energy consumption of two of the most common domestic appliances in the miscellaneous end-use category: color televisions (TVs) and video cassette recorders (VCRs). The authors used a bottom-up approach in estimating national TV and VCR energy consumption. First, they obtained estimates of stock and usage from national surveys, while TV and VCR power measurements and other data were recorded at repair and retail shops. Industry-supplied shipment and sales distributions were then used to minimize bias in the power measurement samples. To estimate national TV and VCR energy consumption values, ranges of power draw and mode usage were created to represent situations in homes with more than one unit. Average energy use values for homes with one unit, two units, etc. were calculated and summed to provide estimates of total national TV and VCR energy consumption.

  9. Cassette mutagenic analysis of the yeast invertase signal peptide: effects on protein translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Ngsee, J K; Hansen, W; Walter, P; Smith, M

    1989-01-01

    The coding sequence of the SUC2 locus was placed under the control of the constitutive ADH1 promoter and transcription terminator in a centromere-based yeast plasmid vector from which invertase is expressed in a Suc- strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutants in the signal peptide sequence were produced by replacing this region of the gene with synthetic oligonucleotide cassettes containing mixtures of nucleotides at several positions. The mutants could be divided into three classes on the basis of the ability to secrete invertase. Class I mutants produced secreted invertase but in reduced amount. The class II mutant, 4-55B, also exhibited reduced a level of invertase, but a significant fraction of the enzyme was intracellular. Class III mutants were partially defective in translocation from the cytoplasm to the endoplasmic reticulum and produced enzymatically active, unglycosylated preinvertase in the cytoplasm. Class III mutant preinvertases were also defective in translocation across canine pancreas microsomes. These results suggested that the reduced level of invertase resulted from proteolytic degradation of inefficiently transported intermediates. Comparison of the sequences of the mutant signal peptides indicated that amino acids at the extreme amino terminus and adjacent to the cleavage site play a crucial role in the secretory process when combined with a mutation within the hydrophobic core. Images PMID:2677671

  10. Construction of a novel expression cassette for increasing transgene expression in vivo in endothelial cells of large blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Dronadula, Nagadhara; Du, Liang; Flynn, Rowan; Buckler, Joshua; Kho, Jordan; Jiang, Zhilong; Tanaka, Shinji; Dichek, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The success of gene therapy hinges on achievement of adequate transgene expression. To ensure high transgene expression, many gene-therapy vectors include highly active virus-derived transcriptional elements. Other vectors include tissue-specific eukaryotic transcriptional elements, intended to limit transgene expression to specific cell types, avoid toxicity, and prevent immune responses. Unfortunately, tissue specificity is often accompanied by lower transgene expression. Here we use eukaryotic (murine) transcriptional elements and a virus-derived posttranscriptional element to build cassettes designed to express a potentially therapeutic gene (interleukin-10) in large vessel endothelial cells (EC) at levels as high as obtained with the CMV immediate-early promoter, while retaining EC-specificity. The cassettes were tested by incorporation into helper-dependent adenoviral vectors, and transduction into bovine aortic EC in vitro and rabbit carotid EC in vivo. The murine endothelin-1 promoter showed EC-specificity, but expressed only 3% as much IL-10 mRNA as CMV. Inclusion of precisely 4 copies of an EC-specific enhancer and a posttranscriptional regulatory element increased IL-10 expression to a level at or above the CMV promoter in vivo, while retaining—and possibly enhancing—EC specificity, as measured in vitro. The cassette reported here will likely be useful for maximizing transgene expression in large vessel EC, while minimizing systemic effects. PMID:21179172

  11. Targeted Integration of Single-Copy Transgenes in Drosophila melanogaster Tissue-Culture Cells Using Recombination-Mediated Cassette Exchange.

    PubMed

    Manivannan, Sathiya N; Jacobsen, Thomas L; Lyon, Peter; Selvaraj, Bhavani; Halpin, Peter; Simcox, Amanda

    2015-12-01

    Transfection of transgenes into Drosophila cultured cells is a standard approach for studying gene function. However, the number of transgenes present in the cell following transient transfection or stable random integration varies, and the resulting differences in expression level affect interpretation. Here we developed a system for Drosophila cell lines that allows selection of cells with a single-copy transgene inserted at a specific genomic site using recombination-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE). We used the ?C31 integrase and its target sites attP and attB for RMCE. Cell lines with an attP-flanked genomic cassette were transfected with donor plasmids containing a transgene of interest (UAS-x), a dihydrofolate reductase (UAS-DHFR) gene flanked by attB sequences, and a thymidine kinase (UAS-TK) gene in the plasmid backbone outside the attB sequences. In cells undergoing RMCE, UAS-x and UAS-DHFR were exchanged for the attP-flanked genomic cassette, and UAS-TK was excluded. These cells were selected using methotrexate, which requires DHFR expression, and ganciclovir, which causes death in cells expressing TK. Pure populations of cells with one copy of a stably integrated transgene were efficiently selected by cloning or mass culture in ?6 weeks. Our results show that RMCE avoids the problems associated with current methods, where transgene number is not controlled, and facilitates the rapid generation of Drosophila cell lines in which expression from a single transgene can be studied. PMID:26500255

  12. The electroneutral sodium/bicarbonate cotransporter containing an amino terminal 123-amino-acid cassette is expressed predominantly in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Deborah S.; Lee, Hye Jeong; Yang, Han Soo; Kippen, Joseph; Yun, C. Chris; Choi, Inyeong

    2006-01-01

    Summary In this study, we examined the tissue-specific expression of two electroneutral Na/HCO3 cotransporter (NBCn1) variants that differ from each other by the presence of the N-terminal 123 amino acids (cassette II). A rat Northern blot with the probe to nucleotides encoding cassette II detected a 9 kb NBCn1 mRNA strongly in the heart and weakly in skeletal muscles, but absent from most of the tissues including kidney, brain, and pancreas. In the rat heart, PCR with primers flanking cassette II preferentially amplified a DNA fragment that lacked cassette II. However, in the human heart, PCR preferentially amplified a fragment that contained cassette II. This larger PCR product was found virtually in all regions of the human cardiovascular system with strong amplification in the apex, atrium, and atrioventricular nodes. These findings indicate that the variant containing cassette II is almost absent in tissues including brain, kidney, and pancreas, where NBCn1 has been extensively examined. PMID:16547769

  13. A comparative proteomic study identified LRPPRC and MCM7 as putative actors in imatinib mesylate cross-resistance in Lucena cell line

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treatment has improved since the introduction of imatinib mesylate (IM), cases of resistance have been reported. This resistance has been associated with the emergence of multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype, as a BCR-ABL independent mechanism. The classic pathway studied in MDR promotion is ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family transporters expression, but other mechanisms that drive drug resistance are largely unknown. To better understand IM therapy relapse due to the rise of MDR, we compared the proteomic profiles of K562 and Lucena (K562/VCR) cells. Results The use of 2-DE coupled with a MS approach resulted in the identification of 36 differentially expressed proteins. Differential mRNA levels of leucine-rich PPR motif-containing (LRPPRC) protein, minichromosome maintenance complex component 7 (MCM7) and ATP-binding cassette sub-family B (MDR/TAP) member 1 (ABCB1) were capable of defining samples from CML patients as responsive or resistant to therapy. Conclusions Through the data presented in this work, we show the relevance of MDR to IM therapy. In addition, our proteomic approach identified candidate actors involved in resistance, which could lead to additional information on BCR-ABL-independent molecular mechanisms. PMID:22458888

  14. Alternatively spliced proline-rich cassettes link WNK1 to aldosterone action.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ankita; Al-Qusairi, Lama; Donnelly, Bridget F; Ronzaud, Caroline; Marciszyn, Allison L; Gong, Fan; Chang, Y P Christy; Butterworth, Michael B; Pastor-Soler, Núria M; Hallows, Kenneth R; Staub, Olivier; Subramanya, Arohan R

    2015-09-01

    The thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC) is important for renal salt handling and blood-pressure homeostasis. The canonical NCC-activating pathway consists of With-No-Lysine (WNK) kinases and their downstream effector kinases SPAK and OSR1, which phosphorylate NCC directly. The upstream mechanisms that connect physiological stimuli to this system remain obscure. Here, we have shown that aldosterone activates SPAK/OSR1 via WNK1. We identified 2 alternatively spliced exons embedded within a proline-rich region of WNK1 that contain PY motifs, which bind the E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-2. PY motif-containing WNK1 isoforms were expressed in human kidney, and these isoforms were efficiently degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system, an effect reversed by the aldosterone-induced kinase SGK1. In gene-edited cells, WNK1 deficiency negated regulatory effects of NEDD4-2 and SGK1 on NCC, suggesting that WNK1 mediates aldosterone-dependent activity of the WNK/SPAK/OSR1 pathway. Aldosterone infusion increased proline-rich WNK1 isoform abundance in WT mice but did not alter WNK1 abundance in hypertensive Nedd4-2 KO mice, which exhibit high baseline WNK1 and SPAK/OSR1 activity toward NCC. Conversely, hypotensive Sgk1 KO mice exhibited low WNK1 expression and activity. Together, our findings indicate that the proline-rich exons are modular cassettes that convert WNK1 into a NEDD4-2 substrate, thereby linking aldosterone and other NEDD4-2-suppressing antinatriuretic hormones to NCC phosphorylation status. PMID:26241057

  15. Sampling efficiency of modified 37-mm sampling cassettes using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Anthony, T Renée; Sleeth, Darrah; Volckens, John

    2016-02-01

    In the U.S., most industrial hygiene practitioners continue to rely on the closed-face cassette (CFC) to assess worker exposures to hazardous dusts, primarily because ease of use, cost, and familiarity. However, mass concentrations measured with this classic sampler underestimate exposures to larger particles throughout the inhalable particulate mass (IPM) size range (up to aerodynamic diameters of 100 ?m). To investigate whether the current 37-mm inlet cap can be redesigned to better meet the IPM sampling criterion, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were developed, and particle sampling efficiencies associated with various modifications to the CFC inlet cap were determined. Simulations of fluid flow (standard k-epsilon turbulent model) and particle transport (laminar trajectories, 1-116 ?m) were conducted using sampling flow rates of 10 L min(-1) in slow moving air (0.2 m s(-1)) in the facing-the-wind orientation. Combinations of seven inlet shapes and three inlet diameters were evaluated as candidates to replace the current 37-mm inlet cap. For a given inlet geometry, differences in sampler efficiency between inlet diameters averaged less than 1% for particles through 100 ?m, but the largest opening was found to increase the efficiency for the 116 ?m particles by 14% for the flat inlet cap. A substantial reduction in sampler efficiency was identified for sampler inlets with side walls extending beyond the dimension of the external lip of the current 37-mm CFC. The inlet cap based on the 37-mm CFC dimensions with an expanded 15-mm entry provided the best agreement with facing-the-wind human aspiration efficiency. The sampler efficiency was increased with a flat entry or with a thin central lip adjacent to the new enlarged entry. This work provides a substantial body of sampling efficiency estimates as a function of particle size and inlet geometry for personal aerosol samplers. PMID:26513395

  16. Alternatively spliced proline-rich cassettes link WNK1 to aldosterone action

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ankita; Al-Qusairi, Lama; Donnelly, Bridget F.; Ronzaud, Caroline; Marciszyn, Allison L.; Gong, Fan; Chang, Y.P. Christy; Butterworth, Michael B.; Pastor-Soler, Núria M.; Hallows, Kenneth R.; Staub, Olivier; Subramanya, Arohan R.

    2015-01-01

    The thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC) is important for renal salt handling and blood-pressure homeostasis. The canonical NCC-activating pathway consists of With-No-Lysine (WNK) kinases and their downstream effector kinases SPAK and OSR1, which phosphorylate NCC directly. The upstream mechanisms that connect physiological stimuli to this system remain obscure. Here, we have shown that aldosterone activates SPAK/OSR1 via WNK1. We identified 2 alternatively spliced exons embedded within a proline-rich region of WNK1 that contain PY motifs, which bind the E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-2. PY motif–containing WNK1 isoforms were expressed in human kidney, and these isoforms were efficiently degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system, an effect reversed by the aldosterone-induced kinase SGK1. In gene-edited cells, WNK1 deficiency negated regulatory effects of NEDD4-2 and SGK1 on NCC, suggesting that WNK1 mediates aldosterone-dependent activity of the WNK/SPAK/OSR1 pathway. Aldosterone infusion increased proline-rich WNK1 isoform abundance in WT mice but did not alter WNK1 abundance in hypertensive Nedd4-2 KO mice, which exhibit high baseline WNK1 and SPAK/OSR1 activity toward NCC. Conversely, hypotensive Sgk1 KO mice exhibited low WNK1 expression and activity. Together, our findings indicate that the proline-rich exons are modular cassettes that convert WNK1 into a NEDD4-2 substrate, thereby linking aldosterone and other NEDD4-2–suppressing antinatriuretic hormones to NCC phosphorylation status. PMID:26241057

  17. Comparison of lead and tin concentrations in air at a solder manufacturer from the closed-face 37-mm cassette with and without a custom cellulose-acetate cassette insert.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Chisholm, William P; Burns, Dru A; Nelson, John H; Kashon, Michael L; Harper, Martin

    2014-01-01

    A polyvinyl chloride (PVC) cassette insert with PVC filter (ACCU-CAP) in a 37-mm closed-face cassette (CFC) was designed for gravimetric analysis. A customized version of the ACCU-CAP, also to be used in the CFC, was manufactured from an acid-digestible cellulose-acetate cassette insert joined to a mixed cellulose ester (MCE) filter for wet chemical analysis. The aim of this study was to compare metal particle concentrations as sampled by the customized insert (CI) in a CFC sampler with the traditional sampling method using only a MCE filter in the CFC. Thirty-nine personal and 13 area samples were taken using paired filter-based CFC and the CI in CFC samplers at a solder manufacturing plant. The CI was removed from its CFC, and digested and analyzed as a whole. The MCE filter from the typical CFC was removed for analysis and then the interior of the cassette was wiped with Ghost Wipe for a separate analysis. The MCE filter only, Ghost Wipe, and CI were separately dissolved in heated nitric acid for ICP-MS analysis. Overall, the geometric mean concentration of the filter-only (FO) samples was considerably lower than that of the CI samples, by 53% for lead and 32% for tin. However, if the FO analysis was added to the corresponding Ghost Wipe analysis, i.e., filter+interior wipe (FW), the geometric mean concentrations of the FW results were similar to those of the CI results (by 113% for lead and 98% for tin). For both lead and tin the comparison of (log-transformed) metal concentrations between the FW and CI results showed no statistically significant difference (p-value = 0.3009 for lead and 0.800 for tin), while the comparison between the FO and CI results shows statistically significant differences (all p-values < 0.05). In conclusion, incorporating the sampler internal non-filter deposits by wiping or use of an internal filter capsule gave higher results than analyzing only the filter. Close agreement between the two methods of including non-filter deposits is an indication of general equivalency. PMID:24856841

  18. Inducible Overexpression of a Toxic Protein by an Adenovirus Vector with a Tetracycline-Regulatable Expression Cassette

    PubMed Central

    Massie, Bernard; Couture, France; Lamoureux, Linda; Mosser, Dick D.; Guilbault, Claire; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Bélanger, François; Langelier, Yves

    1998-01-01

    We have constructed two new adenovirus expression cassettes that expand both the range of genes which can be expressed with adenovirus vectors (AdV) and the range of cells in which high-level expression can be attained. By inclusion of a tetracycline-regulated promoter in the transfer vector pAdTR5, it is now possible to generate recombinant adenoviruses expressing proteins that are either cytotoxic or that interfere with adenovirus replication. We have used this strategy to generate a recombinant adenovirus encoding a deletion in the R1 subunit [R1(?2-357)] of the herpes simplex virus type 2 ribonucleotide reductase. Cell lines expressing the tetracycline-regulated transactivator (tTA) from an integrated vector or following infection with an AdV expressing tTA are able to produce ?R1 protein at a level approaching 10% total cell protein (TCP) when infected with Ad5TR5?R1 before they subsequently die. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the overexpression of a toxic gene product with AdV. We have also constructed a new constitutive adenovirus expression cassette based on an optimized cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter-enhancer that allows the expression of recombinant proteins at a level greater than 20% TCP in nonpermissive cell lines. Together, these new expression cassettes significantly improve the utility of the adenovirus system for high-level expression of recombinant proteins in animal cells and will undoubtedly find useful applications in gene therapy. PMID:9499088

  19. Crystal Structure of an Integron Gene Cassette-Associated Protein from Vibrio cholerae Identifies a Cationic Drug-Binding Module

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Boucher, Yan; Hassan, Karl A.; Di Leo, Rosa; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Savchenko, Alexei; Chang, Changsoo; Labbate, Maurizio; Paulsen, Ian T.; Stokes, H.W.; Curmi, Paul M.G.; Mabbutt, Bridget C.

    2012-02-15

    The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes. We report the 1.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators. Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  20. The Streptomyces ATP-binding component MsiK assists in cellobiose and maltose transport.

    PubMed Central

    Schlösser, A; Kampers, T; Schrempf, H

    1997-01-01

    Streptomyces reticuli harbors an msiK gene which encodes a protein with an amino acid identify of 90% to a corresponding protein previously identified in Streptomyces lividans. Immunological studies revealed that S. lividans and S. reticuli synthesize their highest levels of MsiK during growth with cellobiose, but not with glucose. Moreover, moderate amounts of MsiK are produced by both species in the course of growth with maltose, melibiose, and xylose and by S. lividans in the presence of xylobiose and raffinose. In contrast, a recently identified cellobiose-binding protein and its distantly related homolog were only found if S. reticuli or S. lividans, respectively, was cultivated with cellobiose. Uptake of cellobiose and maltose was tested and ascertained for S. reticuli and S. lividans, but not for an msiK S. lividans mutant. However, transformants of this mutant carrying the S. reticuli or S. lividans msiK gene on a multicopy plasmid had regained the ability to transport both sugars. The data show that MsiK assists two ABC transport systems. PMID:9068663

  1. TWO CONSERVED TRYPTOPHAN RESIDUES ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR INTRINSIC FLUORESCENCE ENHANCEMENT OF RUBISCO ACTIVASE UPON ATP BINDING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two species-invariant tryptophan residues at positions 109 and 250 were identified by site-directed mutagenesis of tobacco Rubisco activase as being responsible for the increase in intrinsic fluorescence of upon addition of ATP, which has been previously been attributed to an increased oligomerizati...

  2. Expression pattern of a single transgene cassette located in endogenous GLIS3 of cloned pigs; a nested situation.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Jannik Ejnar; Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz; Johansen, Marianne Gregers; Jørgensen, Arne Lund

    2012-07-10

    One of the main focus areas in transgenesis is the choice of a promoter driving stable expression over time of the gene of interest. Besides promoter identity, the genomic environment of the transgene plays a pivotal role in transcription regulation. Studies in higher mammals describing transgene expression from a defined locus are very limited. We set out to determine the expression pattern of two transgene promoters, the human PDGF? and the viral SV40, in a single cassette positioned in the largest intron of the porcine GLIS3 locus. The PDGF? promoter drives a variant of the amyloid precursor protein gene named APP695sw and the SV40 promoter drives the neomycin resistant gene, Neo. The nested gene scenario was investigated in three transgenic cloned pigs sacrificed at 3 months, 2 years and 3 years of age. With identical genetic make-up and same environment, the three individual pigs are considered representative of 3 year lifespan of a single pig. Selected organs from the pigs were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR for transgene promoter activity as well as endogenous GLIS3 promoter activity. No apparent effect of the transgene cassette was observed on endogenous GLIS3 expression. In addition, one year old homozygous pigs showed no phenotypic signs of dysfunctional GLIS3. Both transgene promoters showed and retained their tissue specificity with stable expression over time. Our study indicates that transgenes inserted in a nested situation might be applicable for faithful and long term transgene expression. PMID:22555020

  3. Revelation of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec types in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Thailand and Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Lawung, R; Chuong, L V; Cherdtrakulkiat, R; Srisarin, A; Prachayasittikul, V

    2014-12-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is highly prevalent, and its typing plays a crucial role in epidemiology and evolution in both health and community settings. Multiplex PCR and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing based on mec complexes and cassette chromosome recombinase (ccr) allotypes have been developed for MRSA identification. The first of these procedures can identify 4 mec classes (A, B, C1, and E) and 2 ccr allotypes (B2 and B4) in one tube, and the second can identify mecA, mec class C2, and 3 allotypes (A1, A3, and C). Our method offers a novel means to further differentiate between the main SCCmec types I through XI and is both highly sensitive (detectable up to 0.3?g DNA) and specific (100%). Several SCCmec types (I, III, IV, V and a non-typeable group) were found in 66 MRSA isolates obtained from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam and Nakhon Pathom, Thailand. SCCmec type III was highly predominant in both regions. The designed assay is rapid, convenient, flexible, and reliable. Therefore, this assay is suitable for the high-throughput screening of the main SCCmec types of MRSA isolates. PMID:25205542

  4. Broad 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase Inhibitor Herbicide Tolerance in Soybean with an Optimized Enzyme and Expression Cassette[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Siehl, Daniel L.; Tao, Yumin; Albert, Henrik; Dong, Yuxia; Heckert, Matthew; Madrigal, Alfredo; Lincoln-Cabatu, Brishette; Lu, Jian; Fenwick, Tamara; Bermudez, Ericka; Sandoval, Marian; Horn, Caroline; Green, Jerry M.; Hale, Theresa; Pagano, Peggy; Clark, Jenna; Udranszky, Ingrid A.; Rizzo, Nancy; Bourett, Timothy; Howard, Richard J.; Johnson, David H.; Vogt, Mark; Akinsola, Goke; Castle, Linda A.

    2014-01-01

    With an optimized expression cassette consisting of the soybean (Glycine max) native promoter modified for enhanced expression driving a chimeric gene coding for the soybean native amino-terminal 86 amino acids fused to an insensitive shuffled variant of maize (Zea mays) 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD), we achieved field tolerance in transgenic soybean plants to the HPPD-inhibiting herbicides mesotrione, isoxaflutole, and tembotrione. Directed evolution of maize HPPD was accomplished by progressively incorporating amino acids from naturally occurring diversity and novel substitutions identified by saturation mutagenesis, combined at random through shuffling. Localization of heterologously expressed HPPD mimicked that of the native enzyme, which was shown to be dually targeted to chloroplasts and the cytosol. Analysis of the native soybean HPPD gene revealed two transcription start sites, leading to transcripts encoding two HPPD polypeptides. The N-terminal region of the longer encoded peptide directs proteins to the chloroplast, while the short form remains in the cytosol. In contrast, maize HPPD was found almost exclusively in chloroplasts. Evolved HPPD enzymes showed insensitivity to five inhibitor herbicides. In 2013 field trials, transgenic soybean events made with optimized promoter and HPPD variant expression cassettes were tested with three herbicides and showed tolerance to four times the labeled rates of mesotrione and isoxaflutole and two times the labeled rates of tembotrione. PMID:25192697

  5. Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters mediate chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 secretion from reactive astrocytes: relevance to multiple sclerosis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kooij, Gijs; Mizee, Mark R; van Horssen, Jack; Reijerkerk, Arie; Witte, Maarten E; Drexhage, Joost A R; van der Pol, Susanne M A; van Het Hof, Bert; Scheffer, George; Scheper, Rik; Dijkstra, Christine D; van der Valk, Paul; de Vries, Helga E

    2011-02-01

    Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette efflux transporters are highly expressed at the blood-brain barrier and actively hinder passage of harmful compounds, thereby maintaining brain homoeostasis. Since, adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters drive cellular exclusion of potential neurotoxic compounds or inflammatory molecules, alterations in their expression and function at the blood-brain barrier may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuroinflammatory disorders, such as multiple sclerosis. Therefore, we investigated the expression pattern of different adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette efflux transporters, including P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated proteins-1 and -2 and breast cancer resistance protein in various well-characterized human multiple sclerosis lesions. Cerebrovascular expression of P-glycoprotein was decreased in both active and chronic inactive multiple sclerosis lesions. Interestingly, foamy macrophages in active multiple sclerosis lesions showed enhanced expression of multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 and breast cancer resistance protein, which coincided with their increased function of cultured foamy macrophages. Strikingly, reactive astrocytes display an increased expression of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 in both active and inactive multiple sclerosis lesions, which correlated with their enhanced in vitro activity on astrocytes derived from multiple sclerosis lesions. To investigate whether adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters on reactive astrocytes can contribute to the inflammatory process, primary cultures of reactive human astrocytes were generated through activation of Toll-like receptor-3 to mimic the astrocytic phenotype as observed in multiple sclerosis lesions. Notably, blocking adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter activity on reactive astrocytes inhibited immune cell migration across a blood-brain barrier model in vitro, which was due to the reduction of astrocytic release of the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2. Our data point towards a novel (patho)physiological role for adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters, suggesting that limiting their activity by dampening astrocyte activation may open therapeutic avenues to diminish tissue damage during multiple sclerosis pathogenesis. PMID:21183485

  6. Building Background Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Susan B.; Kaefer, Tanya; Pinkham, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    This article make a case for the importance of background knowledge in children's comprehension. It suggests that differences in background knowledge may account for differences in understanding text for low- and middle-income children. It then describes strategies for building background knowledge in the age of common core standards.

  7. Genome-wide co-occurrence of promoter elements reveals a cis-regulatory cassette of rRNA transcription motifs in S. cerevisiae

    E-print Network

    Church, George M.

    1 Genome-wide co-occurrence of promoter elements reveals a cis- regulatory cassette of rRNA- occur most highly in the genome, primarily in the promoters of genes involved in rRNA transcription to the ATG than PAC in most promoters. Two additional rRNA-related motifs, mRRSE3 and mRRSE10, also co- occur

  8. A Novel Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Type XI Primer for Detection of mecC-Harboring Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Directly from Screening Specimens.

    PubMed

    Petersdorf, Sabine; Herma, Miriam; Rosenblatt, Meike; Layer, Franziska; Henrich, Birgit

    2015-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screening using real-time PCR has decreased in sensitivity due to the emergence of variant staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmec) types. We have designed and validated a novel SCCmec XI primer, which enables for the first time the rapid detection of mecC-harboring MRSA directly from nasopharyngeal swabs without prior cultivation. PMID:26468503

  9. Isolated cerebellar variant of adrenoleukodystrophy with a de novo adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette D1 (ABCD1) gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joon Won; Lee, Sang Mi; Koo, Kyo Yeon; Lee, Young-Mock; Nam, Hyo Suk; Quan, Zhejiu; Kang, Hoon-Chul

    2014-07-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) shows a wide range of phenotypic expression, but clinical presentation as an isolated lesion of the cerebellar white matter and dentate nuclei has not been reported. We report an unusual presentation of X-ALD only with an isolated lesion of the cerebellar white matter and dentate nuclei. The proband, a 37-year-old man presented with bladder incontinence, slurred speech, dysmetria in all limbs, difficulties in balancing, and gait ataxia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed an isolated signal change of white matter around the dentate nucleus in cerebellum. With high level of very long chain fatty acid, gene study showed a de novo mutation in exon 1 at nucleotide position c.277_296dup20 (p.Ala100Cysfs*10) of the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette D1 gene. It is advised to consider X-ALD as a differential diagnosis in patients with isolated cerebellar degeneration symptoms. PMID:24954351

  10. Remote detection of human toxicants in real time using a human-optimized, bioluminescent bacterial luciferase gene cassette bioreporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Dan; Webb, James; Ripp, Steven; Patterson, Stacey; Sayler, Gary

    2012-06-01

    Traditionally, human toxicant bioavailability screening has been forced to proceed in either a high throughput fashion using prokaryotic or lower eukaryotic targets with minimal applicability to humans, or in a more expensive, lower throughput manner that uses fluorescent or bioluminescent human cells to directly provide human bioavailability data. While these efforts are often sufficient for basic scientific research, they prevent the rapid and remote identification of potentially toxic chemicals required for modern biosecurity applications. To merge the advantages of high throughput, low cost screening regimens with the direct bioavailability assessment of human cell line use, we re-engineered the bioluminescent bacterial luciferase gene cassette to function autonomously (without exogenous stimulation) within human cells. Optimized cassette expression provides for fully endogenous bioluminescent production, allowing continuous, real time monitoring of the bioavailability and toxicology of various compounds in an automated fashion. To access the functionality of this system, two sets of bioluminescent human cells were developed. The first was programed to suspend bioluminescent production upon toxicological challenge to mimic the non-specific detection of a toxicant. The second induced bioluminescence upon detection of a specific compound to demonstrate autonomous remote target identification. These cells were capable of responding to ?M concentrations of the toxicant n-decanal, and allowed for continuous monitoring of cellular health throughout the treatment process. Induced bioluminescence was generated through treatment with doxycycline and was detectable upon dosage at a 100 ng/ml concentration. These results demonstrate that leveraging autonomous bioluminescence allows for low-cost, high throughput direct assessment of toxicant bioavailability.

  11. Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 domain cassettes 8 and 13 are associated with severe malaria in children.

    PubMed

    Lavstsen, Thomas; Turner, Louise; Saguti, Fredy; Magistrado, Pamela; Rask, Thomas S; Jespersen, Jakob S; Wang, Christian W; Berger, Sanne S; Baraka, Vito; Marquard, Andrea M; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Willerslev, Eske; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Lusingu, John; Theander, Thor G

    2012-06-26

    The clinical outcome of Plasmodium falciparum infections ranges from asymptomatic parasitemia to severe malaria syndromes associated with high mortality. The virulence of P. falciparum infections is associated with the type of P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes to anchor these to the vascular lining. Although var2csa, the var gene encoding the PfEMP1 associated with placental malaria, was discovered in 2003, the identification of the var/PfEMP1 variants associated with severe malaria in children has remained elusive. To identify var/PfEMP1 variants associated with severe disease outcome, we compared var transcript levels in parasites from 88 children with severe malaria and 40 children admitted to the hospital with uncomplicated malaria. Transcript analysis was performed by RT-quantitative PCR using a set of 42 primer pairs amplifying var subtype-specific loci covering most var/PfEMP1 subtypes. In addition, we characterized the near-full-length sequence of the most prominently expressed var genes in three patients diagnosed with severe anemia and/or cerebral malaria. The combined analysis showed that severe malaria syndromes, including severe anemia and cerebral malaria, are associated with high transcript levels of PfEMP1 domain cassette 8-encoding var genes. Transcript levels of group A var genes, including genes encoding domain cassette 13, were also significantly higher in patients with severe syndromes compared with those with uncomplicated malaria. This study specifies the var/PfEMP1 types expressed in severe malaria in children, and thereby provides unique targets for future efforts to prevent and treat severe malaria infections. PMID:22619319

  12. Ultrathin wear-resistant coatings for the tape bearing surface of thin-film magnetic heads for digital compact cassette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieren, V.; Dejongh, M.; Vangroenou, A. Broese; Vanzon, J. B. A.; Lasinski, P.; Theunissen, G. S. A. M.

    1994-03-01

    The introduction of the digital compact cassette (DCC) system into the consumer market imposed some severe requirements on the durability of the thin-film heads used in this system. The reliability of the head's record and playback functions has to be maintained under a wide variety of climatic conditions and tape types, as a consequence of the system's backward compatibility with the analog compact cassette. This paper describes the results of several accelerated wear tests as well as of durability tests against tape, which were set-up to find the best material and process conditions for a wear-resistant coating on the tape bearing surface of a DCC head. This ultrathin coating (less than 75 nm) appeared to be the best solution as a safeguard against severe pole-tip recession, which would cause an unacceptable distance loss in the recording system. The first material which showed a very high wear resistance was CrN. As CrN fulfils all requirements for wear and corrosion resistance in the home application, this material is presently used in all DCC home decks. However, under extremely abrasive conditions, such as may be encountered in a car environment (e.g. cold start at -20 C), CrN is surpassed by an even more wear-resistant material, called SPL (super protective layer). Therefore, SPL is preferred as a coating on thin-film heads for car stereo (as well as portable) DCC apparatus. Both materials are characterized by their specific wear performance, which has a superior impact on the electrical (record and playback) properties of the head during its lifetime.

  13. Emergent and evolving antimicrobial resistance cassettes in community-associated fusidic acid and meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Ellington, Matthew J.; Reuter, Sandra; Harris, Simon R.; Holden, Matthew T.G.; Cartwright, Edward J.; Greaves, Daniel; Gerver, Sarah M.; Hope, Russell; Brown, Nicholas M.; Török, M. Estee; Parkhill, Julian; Köser, Claudio U.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2015-01-01

    Fusidic acid is a topical and systemic antimicrobial used for the treatment of staphylococcal infections in hospitals and the community. Sales of fusidic acid and resistance rates among meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) doubled between 1990 and 2001. For the following decade, fusidic acid resistance rates among isolates from Addenbrooke's Hospital (Cambridge, UK) were compared with national resistance rates from MRSA bacteraemia surveillance data and with antimicrobial sales data. Sales of fusidic acid remained relatively constant between 2002 and 2012, whilst fusidic acid resistance increased two- and four-fold in MRSA bacteraemias nationally and in MRSA isolates from Cambridge, respectively. A subgroup of MRSA resistant only to fusidic acid increased after 2006 by 5-fold amongst bacteraemias nationally and 17-fold (to 7.7% in 2012) amongst Cambridge MRSA isolates. All of the available local isolates from 2011 to 2012 (n = 23) were acquired in the community, were not related epidemiologically and belonged to multilocus sequence typing (MLST) groups ST1, 5, 8, 45 or 149 as revealed from analysis of whole-genome sequence data. All harboured the fusC gene on one of six distinct staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) elements, four of which were dual-resistance chimeras that encoded ?-lactam and fusidic acid resistance. In summary, fusidic acid-resistant MRSA increased in prevalence during the 2000s with notable rises after 2006. The development of chimeric cassettes that confer dual resistance to ?-lactams and fusidic acid demonstrates that the genetics underpinning resistance in community-associated MRSA are evolving. PMID:25769787

  14. The Cosmic Background Explorer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulkis, Samuel; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Outlines the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission to measure celestial radiation. Describes the instruments used and experiments involving differential microwave radiometers, and a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer. (YP)

  15. The IBEX background monitor

    E-print Network

    Crew, Geoffrey B.

    The IBEX Background Monitor (IBaM) provides a small and lightweight method for independently measuring IBEX’s high-energy proton background by integrating the flux of >~14 keV protons over a ~7° conical FOV. The IBaM is ...

  16. INDIAN BACKGROUNDS Patuxent Wildlife

    E-print Network

    INDIAN BACKGROUNDS of the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center |./«arine'a(Megical Laboratory NOV 19 of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife Circular 138 #12;#12;INDIAN BACKGROUNDS of the Patuxent Wildlife Research of Indian Relics The Indian artifacts on display in the C. Hart Merriam Laboratory were collected

  17. Correlators in nontrivial backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Stephanou, Michael

    2009-01-15

    Operators in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory with an R-charge of O(N{sup 2}) are dual to backgrounds which are asymtotically AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. In this article we develop efficient techniques that allow the computation of correlation functions in these backgrounds. We find that (i) contractions between fields in the string words and fields in the operator creating the background are the field theory accounting of the new geometry, (ii) correlation functions of probes in these backgrounds are given by the free field theory contractions but with rescaled propagators and (iii) in these backgrounds there are no open string excitations with their special end point interactions; we have only closed string excitations.

  18. The Cosmic Background Radiation

    E-print Network

    George Smoot; Douglas Scott

    1997-11-08

    We summarise the current status of cosmic microwave background spectrum and anisotropy measurements, and their theoretical interpretation. This is the update of the mini-review for the 1997 web-version of the Review of Particle Properties.

  19. Introduction Biological Background

    E-print Network

    Mahaffy, Joseph M.

    @mail.sdsu.eduUBC Biomath Seminar -- (1/39) #12;Introduction Biological Background Mathematical Models Conclusions Tunicate ­ Ciona intestinalis Ciona intestinalis ­ Tunicate ­ Sea Squirt Joseph M. Mahaffy, jmahaffy

  20. Proteomics: General Background

    E-print Network

    Grosu, Radu

    Proteomics: General Background Michael Hadjiargyrou Department of Biomedical Engineering #12;What is proteomics? · Study of the Proteome: Field that utilizes protein sequences, expression and structure, large scale manner · may also involve bioinformatic analysis and storage of data #12;Proteomics

  1. The Cosmic Microwave Background

    E-print Network

    Joseph Silk

    2002-12-12

    I review the discovery of the temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background radiation. The underlying theory and the implications for cosmology are reviewed, and I describe the prospects for future progress.

  2. Process for assembly and transformation into Saccharomyces cerevisiae of a synthetic yeast artificial chromosome containing a multigene cassette to express enzymes that enhance xylose utilization designed for an automated pla

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) containing a multigene cassette for expression of enzymes that enhance xylose utilization (xylose isomerase [XI] and xylulokinase [XKS]) was constructed and transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae to demonstrate feasibility as a stable protein expression system ...

  3. The Cosmic Background Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, Samuel; Lubin, Philip M.; Meyer, Stephan S.; Silverberg, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (CBE), NASA's cosmological satellite which will observe a radiative relic of the big bang, is discussed. The major questions connected to the big bang theory which may be clarified using the CBE are reviewed. The satellite instruments and experiments are described, including the Differential Microwave Radiometer, which measures the difference between microwave radiation emitted from two points on the sky, the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer, which compares the spectrum of radiation from the sky at wavelengths from 100 microns to one cm with that from an internal blackbody, and the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment, which searches for the radiation from the earliest generation of stars.

  4. Reproducible doxycycline-inducible transgene expression at specific loci generated by Cre-recombinase mediated cassette exchange

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ee Tsin; Kolman, John L; Li, Yao-Cheng; Mesner, Larry D; Hillen, Wolfgang; Berens, Christian; Wahl, Geoffrey M

    2005-01-01

    Comparative analysis of mutants using transfection is complicated by clones exhibiting variable levels of gene expression due to copy number differences and genomic position effects. Recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) can overcome these problems by introducing the target gene into pre-determined chromosomal loci, but recombination between the available recombinase targeting sites can reduce the efficiency of targeted integration. We developed a new LoxP site (designated L3), which when used with the original LoxP site (designated L2), allows highly efficient and directional replacement of chromosomal DNA with incoming DNA. A total of six independent LoxP integration sites introduced either by homologous recombination or retroviral delivery were analyzed; 70–80% of the clones analyzed in hamster and human cells were correct recombinants. We combined the RMCE strategy with a new, tightly regulated tetracycline induction system to produce a robust, highly reliable system for inducible transgene expression. We observed stable inducible expression for over 1 month, with uniform expression in the cell population and between clones derived from the same integration site. This system described should find significant applications for studies requiring high level and regulated transgene expression and for determining the effects of various stresses or oncogenic conditions in vivo and in vitro. PMID:16204450

  5. An Assessment of the Oral Bioavailability of Three Ca-Channel Blockers Using a Cassette-Microdose Study: A New Strategy for Streamlining Oral Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shinji; Kataoka, Makoto; Suzaki, Yuki; Imai, Hiromitsu; Morimoto, Takuya; Ohashi, Kyoichi; Inano, Akihiro; Togashi, Kazutaka; Mutaguchi, Kuninori; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2015-09-01

    A cassette-microdose (MD) clinical study was performed to demonstrate its usefulness for identifying the most promising compound for oral use. Three Ca-channel blockers (nifedipine, nicardipine, and diltiazem) were chosen as model drugs. In the MD clinical study, a cassette-dose method was employed in which three model drugs were administered simultaneously. Both intravenous (i.v.) and oral (p.o.) administration studies were conducted to calculate the oral bioavailability (BA). For comparison, p.o. studies with therapeutic dose (ThD) levels were also performed. In all studies, blood concentrations of each drug were successfully determined using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with the lower limit of quantification of 0.2-2.0 pg/mL. Oral BA of nifedipine in the MD study was approximately 50% and in the same range with that obtained in the ThD study, whereas other two drugs showed significantly lower BA in the MD study, indicating a dose-dependent absorption. In addition, compared with the ThD study, absorption of nicardipine was delayed in the MD study. As a result, nifedipine was considered to be most promising for oral use. In conclusion, a cassette-MD clinical study is of advantage for oral drug development that enables to identify the candidate having desired properties for oral use. PMID:26037531

  6. BACKGROUND RESEARCH SAMPLE CODE

    E-print Network

    Gray, Jeffrey G.

    . This type of diabetes is normally seen in children at a very young age. Type II diabetes, on the other handBACKGROUND RESEARCH SAMPLE CODE INTRODUCTION APPLICATION MATERIALS ABSTRACT PURPOSE Diabetes is when the body does not properly use or store the glucose (Mayoclinic). There are two types of diabetes

  7. China: Background Notes Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reams, Joanne Reppert

    Concise background information on the People's Republic of China is provided. The publication begins with a profile of the country, outlining the people, geography, economy, and membership in international organizations. The bulk of the document then discusses in more detail China's people, geography, history, government, education, economy, and…

  8. Monitored background radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruel, C.; Larouche, M.; Donato, M.

    1986-01-01

    The infrared (IR) testing of the Olympus thermal model has provided a capability to perform cost effective thermal balance testing of satellites and satellite components. A high-accuracy monitored background radiometer was developed for the measurement of absorbed radiation heat flux encountered during IR thermal vacuum testing of spacecraft. The design, development, and calibration of this radiometer is described.

  9. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, K. J.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Norman, E. B.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  10. PANDEMIC INFLUENZA background briefing

    E-print Network

    Rambaut, Andrew

    PANDEMIC INFLUENZA background briefing Biomedicine Forum 5 November 2008 compiled by David Evans, Dave Carr, David Lynn and Phil Green Transmission electron micrograph of Influenza A virus (Wellcome influenza!' Page 2 #12;Consequences of an influenza pandemic THE PANDEMIC THREAT DEATH If the next pandemic

  11. EBSD Images Theoretical Background

    E-print Network

    Psaltis, Demetri

    /s assuming a constant growth rate on the 20 first seconds. Bad quality welds were produced by adding grease-tomography. Figure 8 Transverse slice of the bad quality weld observed through X-ray micro- tomography. The poresMotivation EBSD Images Theoretical Background Defects in the Weld Grain Growth Low Speed Welding

  12. Building Background Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Ross, Donna; Grant, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Too often, students enter our classrooms with insufficient knowledge of physical science. As a result, they have a difficult time understanding content in texts, lectures, and laboratory activities. This lack of background knowledge can have an impact on their ability to ask questions and wonder--both key components of inquiry. In this article,…

  13. Effects of optional structural elements, including two alternative amino termini and a new splicing cassette IV, on the function of the sodium–bicarbonate cotransporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Qin, Xue; Wang, Deng-Ke; Guo, Yi-Min; Gill, Harindarpal S; Morris, Nathan; Parker, Mark D; Chen, Li-Ming; Boron, Walter F

    2013-01-01

    The SLC4A7 gene encodes the electroneutral sodium/HCO3 cotransporter NBCn1, which plays important physiological and pathophysiological roles in many cell types. Previous work identified six NBCn1 variants differing in the sequence of the extreme N terminus – MEAD in rat only, MERF in human only – as well as in the optional inclusion of cassettes I, II, and III. Earlier work also left open the question of whether optional structural elements (OSEs) affect surface abundance or intrinsic (per-molecule) transport activity. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that SLC4A7 from one species can express both MEAD- and MERF-NBCn1. We also identify a novel cassette IV of 20 aa, and extend by 10 the number of full-length NBCn1 variants. The alternative N termini and four cassettes could theoretically produce 32 major variants. Moreover, we identify a group of cDNAs predicted to encode just the cytosolic N-terminal domain (Nt) of NBCn1. A combination of electrophysiology and biotinylation shows that the OSEs can affect surface abundance and intrinsic HCO3? transport activity of NBCn1, as expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Specifically, MEAD tends to increase whereas novel cassette IV reduces surface abundance. Cassettes II, III and novel cassette IV all appear to increase the intrinsic activity of NBCn1. PMID:23959679

  14. Ligand, receptor, and cell type-dependent regulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1 mRNA in prostate cancer epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent evidence suggests that the liver X receptor (LXR) is a potential anti-cancer target in prostate carcinoma. There is little characterization, however, of how the two major isoforms LXRa or LXRß regulate the LXR-responsive genes ATP-binding cassette sub-family A 1 (ABCA1) and sub-family member ...

  15. 1521-0111/88/1/8494$25.00 http://dx.doi.org/10.1124/mol.114.096792 MOLECULAR PHARMACOLOGY Mol Pharmacol 88:8494, July 2015

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    -(D-glucuronide) and doxorubicin efflux in AAV-293 cells. We quantified fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from GFP Therapeutics ATP­Binding Cassette Transporter Structure Changes Detected by Intramolecular Fluorescence Energy fluorescent protein (GFP) and TagRFP to MRP1 nucleotide­binding domains NBD1 and NBD2, respectively

  16. Transcriptome-based identification of ABC transporters in the western tarnished plant bug lygus hesperus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a large superfamily of proteins that mediate diverse physiological functions by coupling ATP hydrolysis with substrate transport across lipid membranes. In insects, these proteins play roles in metabolism, development, eye pigmentation, and xenobiotic cle...

  17. 76 FR 72713 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-25

    .... Combined gene therapy with adenovirus vectors containing CTLA4Ig and CD40Ig prolongs survival of composite... pair mutation in the ATP-binding cassette, sub-family B member 1 (ABCB1) gene. This gene encodes for... containing the mutant form of the canine ABCB1 gene (Yancy 1 line) and the other containing the canine...

  18. OLIGOPEPTIDE TRANSPORTERS AND THEIR ROLE IN FE(II)- AND FE(III)-NICOTIANAMINE TRANSPORT IN RICE (ORYZA SATIVA L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of organisms to transport small peptides (two to five amino acids) is wide-ranging, and is present in humans, bacteria, fungi, archaea, and plants. There are three major groups of peptide transporters, divided by their substrate specificity: the ATP binding cassette (ABC), the peptide tr...

  19. Gene-specific markers for the wheat gene Lr34/Yr18/Pm38 which confers resistance to multiple fungal pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The locus Lr34/Yr18/Pm38 confers partial and durable resistance against the devastating fungal pathogens leaf rust, stripe rust, and powdery mildew. In previous studies, this broad-spectrum resistance was shown to be controlled by a single gene which encodes a putative ATP-binding cassette transport...

  20. Steps toward discovering the function and expression of multiple drug resistance genes in "Arabidopsis thaliana"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily is the largest protein family identified in all organisms. It is a highly conserved domain responsible for the ATP-dependent transport of substances including ions, carbohydrates, xenobiotics, drugs, and peptides. Also, the subfamily, multidrug resistance...

  1. Tissue and developmental expression of a gene from Hessian fly encoding an ABC-active-transporter protein during interactions with wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report on the transcriptional patterns of a putative white (w) gene encoding an ABC-transporter protein during development in Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor. The deduced amino acid sequence for the Hessian fly white showed 77 to 74% similarities to white/ATP-binding-cassette proteins and 57 t...

  2. Drosophila ABC Transporter DmHMT-1 Confers Tolerance to Cadmium.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Half molecule ATP-binding cassette transporters of the HMT1(heavy metal tolerance factor 1)subfamily are required for Cd2+ tolerance in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Caenorhabditis elegans and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and have homologs in other species, including plants and humans. Based on studies i...

  3. Correction of Apolipoprotein A-I-mediated Lipid Efflux and High Density Lipoprotein Particle Formation in Human Niemann-Pick Type C Disease Fibroblasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Impaired cell cholesterol trafficking in Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease results in the first known instance of impaired regulation of the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), a lipid transporter mediating the rate-limiting step in high density lipoprotein (HDL) formation, as a cause of lo...

  4. Human and Rat ABC Transporter Efflux of Bisphenol A and Bisphenol A Glucuronide: Interspecies Comparison and Implications for Pharmacokinetic Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant interspecies differences exist between human and rodent with respect to absorption, distribution, and excretion of bisphenol A (BPA) and its primary metabolite, BPA-glucuronide (BPA-G). ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter enzymes play important roles in these physi...

  5. The ABCG5 Polymorphism Contributes to Individual Responses to Dietary Cholesterol and Carotenoids in Eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ATP binding cassette G5 (ABCG5) polymorphisms have been postulated to play a role in the response to dietary cholesterol. The objective of this study was to examine the contribution of the ABCG5 polymorphism on the plasma response to consumption of cholesterol and carotenoids from eggs. For this...

  6. The cosmic microwave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical investigations of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) are reviewed. Particular attention is given to spectral distortions and CMBR temperature anisotropies at large, intermediate, and small angular scales. The implications of the observations for inflationary cosmological models with curvature fluctuation are explored, and it is shown that the limits determined for intermediate-scale CMBR anisotropy almost rule out a baryon-dominated cosmology.

  7. Antiscalar cosmological background

    E-print Network

    Eduard G. Mychelkin; Maxim A. Makukov

    2015-06-11

    It is shown that the antiscalar approach to dark energy, whereby the energy-momentum tensor of the scalar field has the sign opposite to that of the rest of the matter, follows from the considerations of thermodynamic stability, as well as from the static limit of the Einstein-Maxwell equations. The same limit also demonstrates that the resulting background antiscalar field proves to be of quasi-electrostatic origin.

  8. Construction of Escherichia coli strains with chromosomally integrated expression cassettes for the synthesis of 2?-fucosyllactose

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The trisaccharide 2?-fucosyllactose (2?-FL) is one of the most abundant oligosaccharides found in human milk. Due to its prebiotic and anti-infective properties, 2?-FL is discussed as nutritional additive for infant formula. Besides chemical synthesis and extraction from human milk, 2?-FL can be produced enzymatically in vitro and in vivo. The most promising approach for a large-scale formation of 2?-FL is the whole cell biosynthesis in Escherichia coli by intracellular synthesis of GDP-L-fucose and subsequent fucosylation of lactose with an appropriate ?1,2-fucosyltransferase. Even though whole cell approaches have been demonstrated for the synthesis of 2?-FL, further improvements of the engineered E. coli host are required to increase product yields. Furthermore, an antibiotic-free method of whole cell synthesis of 2?-FL is desirable to simplify product purification and to avoid traces of antibiotics in a product with nutritional purpose. Results Here we report the construction of the first selection marker-free E. coli strain that produces 2?-FL from lactose and glycerol. To construct this strain, recombinant genes of the de novo synthesis pathway for GDP-L-fucose as well as the gene for the H. pylori fucosyltransferase futC were integrated into the chromosome of E. coli JM109 by using the ?-Red recombineering technique. Strains carrying additional copies of the futC gene and/or the gene fkp (from Bacteroides fragilis) for an additional salvage pathway for GDP-L-fucose production were used and shown to further improve production of 2?-FL in shake flask experiments. An increase of the intracellular GDP-L-fucose concentration by expression of fkp gene as well as an additional copy of the futC gene lead to an enhanced formation of 2?-FL. Using an improved production strain, feasibility of large scale 2?-FL production was demonstrated in an antibiotic-free fed-batch fermentation (13 l) with a final 2?-FL concentration of 20.28?±?0.83 g l-1 and a space-time-yield of 0.57 g l-1 h-1. Conclusions By chromosomal integration of recombinant genes, altering the copy number of these genes and analysis of 2?-FL and intracellular GDP-L-fucose levels, we were able to construct and improve the first selection marker-free E. coli strain which is capable to produce 2?-FL without the use of expression plasmids. Analysis of intracellular GDP-L-fucose levels identified the de novo synthesis pathway of GDP-L-fucose as one bottleneck in 2?-FL production. In antibiotic-free fed-batch fermentation with an improved strain, scale-up of 2?-FL could be demonstrated. PMID:23635327

  9. Plasmodium falciparum expressing domain cassette 5 type PfEMP1 (DC5-PfEMP1) bind PECAM1.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sanne S; Turner, Louise; Wang, Christian W; Petersen, Jens E V; Kraft, Maria; Lusingu, John P A; Mmbando, Bruno; Marquard, Andrea M; Bengtsson, Dominique B A C; Hviid, Lars; Nielsen, Morten A; Theander, Thor G; Lavstsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Members of the Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family expressed on the surface of malaria-infected erythrocytes mediate binding of the parasite to different receptors on the vascular lining. This process drives pathologies, and severe childhood malaria has been associated with the expression of particular subsets of PfEMP1 molecules. PfEMP1 are grouped into subtypes based on upstream sequences and the presence of semi-conserved PfEMP1 domain compositions named domain cassettes (DCs). Earlier studies have indicated that DC5-containing PfEMP1 (DC5-PfEMP1) are more likely to be expressed in children with severe malaria disease than in children with uncomplicated malaria, but these PfEMP1 subtypes only dominate in a relatively small proportion of the children with severe disease. In this study, we have characterised the genomic sequence characteristic for DC5, and show that two genetically different parasite lines expressing DC5-PfEMP1 bind PECAM1, and that anti-DC5-specific antibodies inhibit binding of DC5-PfEMP1-expressing parasites to transformed human bone marrow endothelial cells (TrHBMEC). We also show that antibodies against each of the four domains characteristic for DC5 react with native PfEMP1 expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes, and that some of these antibodies are cross-reactive between the two DC5-containing PfEMP1 molecules tested. Finally, we confirm that anti-DC5 antibodies are acquired early in life by individuals living in malaria endemic areas, that individuals having high levels of these antibodies are less likely to develop febrile malaria episodes and that the antibody levels correlate positively with hemoglobin levels. PMID:23874884

  10. Acid-Soluble Internal Capsules for Closed-Face Cassette Elemental Sampling and Analysis of Workplace Air

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Martin; Ashley, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Airborne particles that are collected using closed-face filter cassettes (CFCs), which are used widely in the sampling of workplace aerosols, can deposit in places other than on the filter and thereby may not be included in the ensuing analysis. A technique for ensuring that internal non-filter deposits are included in the analysis is to collect airborne particles within an acid-soluble internal capsule that, following sampling, can be dissolved along with the filter for subsequent elemental analysis. An interlaboratory study (ILS) was carried out to evaluate the use of cellulosic CFC capsule inserts for their suitability in the determination of trace elements in airborne samples. The ILS was performed in accordance with an applicable ASTM International standard practice, ASTM E691, which describes statistical procedures for investigating interlaboratory precision. Performance evaluation materials consisted of prototype cellulose acetate capsules attached to mixed-cellulose ester filters. Batches of capsules were dosed with Pb-containing materials (standard aqueous solutions, and certified reference material soil and paint). Also, aerosol samples containing nine target analyte elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mn, and Ni) were generated using a multiport sampler; various concentrations and sampling times were employed to yield samples fortified at desired loading levels. Triplicates of spiked capsules at three different loadings were conveyed to each volunteer laboratory; loading levels were unknown to the participants. The laboratories were asked to prepare the samples by acid dissolution and to analyze aliquots of extracted samples by atomic spectrometry in accordance with applicable ASTM International Standards. Participants were asked to report their results in units of ?g of each target element per sample. For the elements investigated, interlaboratory precision and recovery estimates from the participating laboratories demonstrated the utility of the cellulosic capsule inserts for the measurement of sampled trace elements. PMID:23548078

  11. The Effect of Regular Aerobic Exercise on Reverse Cholesterol Transport A1 and Apo Lipoprotein A-I Gene Expression in Inactive Women

    PubMed Central

    Tofighi, Asghar; Rahmani, Fatemeh; Jamali Qarakhanlou, Bahram; Babaei, Solmaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is currently a cause of mortality in some parts of the world. The ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter (ABCA1) gene prepares instructions to produce the ATP-binding cassette transporter protein whose operation is for export of phospholipids and cholesterol, outside cells where they are limited to Apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1). Increased ABCA1 activity could inhibit atherosclerosis. Objectives: In the present study, the effect of aerobic exercise was investigated on gene expression and biochemical parameters. Patients and Methods: The participants included 36 inactive women, which were randomly assigned to control (CON) and experimental (EX) groups. The EX group performed 12 weeks of aerobic exercise and the CON group remained inactive. Fasting blood samples were collected 24 hours before the first session and 48 hours after completion of the course. The ABCA1 and APOA1 gene expressions were measured using semi-quantitative-RT-PCR. Data were analyzed by the SPSS software (version 18). Results: A significant increase in blood ABCA1 (EX group P < 0.002, t = - 9.876) and Apo A-I (EX group P < 0.05, t = 2.76) gene expression was shown following the 12 weeks of training. Plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration increased (P < 0.001, t = 4.90 respectively) while plasma low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) concentration decreased (P < 0.001, t = 4.27) in the EX group compared with the CON group. Conclusions: Aerobic exercises can increase ABCA1 and APO-A1 gene expression. Induction of these genes can effectively prevent cardiovascular disease. PMID:26023346

  12. Cosmic microwave background theory.

    PubMed

    Bond, J R

    1998-01-01

    A long-standing goal of theorists has been to constrain cosmological parameters that define the structure formation theory from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy experiments and large-scale structure (LSS) observations. The status and future promise of this enterprise is described. Current band-powers in -space are consistent with a DeltaT flat in frequency and broadly follow inflation-based expectations. That the levels are approximately (10(-5))2 provides strong support for the gravitational instability theory, while the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) constraints on energy injection rule out cosmic explosions as a dominant source of LSS. Band-powers at 100 suggest that the universe could not have re-ionized too early. To get the LSS of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized fluctuations right provides encouraging support that the initial fluctuation spectrum was not far off the scale invariant form that inflation models prefer: e.g., for tilted Lambda cold dark matter sequences of fixed 13-Gyr age (with the Hubble constant H0 marginalized), ns = 1.17 +/- 0.3 for Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) only; 1.15 +/- 0.08 for DMR plus the SK95 experiment; 1.00 +/- 0.04 for DMR plus all smaller angle experiments; 1.00 +/- 0.05 when LSS constraints are included as well. The CMB alone currently gives weak constraints on Lambda and moderate constraints on Omegatot, but theoretical forecasts of future long duration balloon and satellite experiments are shown which predict percent-level accuracy among a large fraction of the 10+ parameters characterizing the cosmic structure formation theory, at least if it is an inflation variant. PMID:9419321

  13. Identification in Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus hominis of an Active Primordial Mobile Genetic Element for the Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Yuki; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Ito, Teruyo; Ma, Xiao Xue; Ui-Mizutani, Yoko; Kobayashi, Ichizo; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2003-01-01

    We previously reported that the methicillin resistance gene mecA is carried by a novel type of mobile genetic element, SCCmec (staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec), in the chromosome of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). These elements are precisely excised from the chromosome and integrated into a specific site on the recipient chromosome by a pair of recombinase proteins encoded by the cassette chromosome recombinase genes ccrA and ccrB. In the present work, we detected homologues of the ccr genes in Staphylococcus hominis type strain GIFU12263 (equivalent to ATCC 27844), which is susceptible to methicillin. Sequence determination revealed that the ccr homologues in S. hominis were type 1 ccr genes (ccrA1 and ccrB1) that were localized on a genetic element structurally very similar to SCCmec except for the absence of the methicillin-resistance gene, mecA. This genetic element had mosaic-like patterns of homology with extant SCCmec elements, and we designated it SCC12263 and considered it a type I staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC). The ccrB1 gene identified in the S. hominis strain is the first type 1 ccrB gene discovered to retain its function through the excision process as judged by two criteria: (i) SCC12263 was spontaneously excised during cultivation of the strain and (ii) introduction of the S. hominis ccrB1 into an MRSA strain carrying a type I SCCmec whose ccrB1 gene is inactive generated SCCmec excisants at a high frequency. The existence of an SCC without a mec determinant is indicative of a staphylococcal site-specific mobile genetic element that serves as a vehicle of transfer for various genetic markers between staphylococcal species. PMID:12700250

  14. A novel expression cassette delivers efficient production of exclusively tetrameric human butyrylcholinesterase with improved pharmacokinetics for protection against organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Terekhov, Stanislav; Smirnov, Ivan; Bobik, Tatiana; Shamborant, Olga; Zenkova, Marina; Chernolovskaya, Elena; Gladkikh, Danil; Murashev, Arkadii; Dyachenko, Igor; Palikov, Viktor; Palikova, Yulia; Knorre, Vera; Belogurov, Alexey; Ponomarenko, Natalie; Blackburn, G Michael; Masson, Patrick; Gabibov, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase is a stoichiometric bioscavenger against poisoning by organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents. The low level of expression and extremely rapid clearance of monomeric recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase (rhBChE) from bloodstream (t½?2 min) limits its pharmaceutical application. Recently (Ilyushin at al., PNAS, 2013) we described a long-acting polysialylated recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (rhBChE-CAO), stable in the bloodstream, that protects mice against 4.2 LD50 of VR. Here we report a set of modifications of the initial rhBChE expression vector to improve stability of the enzyme in the bloodstream and increase its production in CHO cells by introducing in the expression cassette: (i) the sequence of the natural human PRAD-peptide in frame with rhBChE gene via "self-processing" viral F2A peptide under control of an hEF/HTLV promoter, and (ii) previously predicted in silico MAR 1-68 and MAR X-29 sequences. This provides fully tetrameric rhBChE (4rhBChE) at 70 mg/l, that displays improved pharmacokinetics (t½ = 32 ± 1.2 h, MRT = 43 ± 2 h). 3D Fluorescent visualization and distribution of (125)I-labeled enzyme reveals similar low level 4rhBChE and rhBChE-CAO accumulation in muscle, fat, and brain. Administered 4rhBChE was mainly catabolized in the liver and breakdown products were excreted in kidney. Injection of 1.2 LD50 and 1.1 LD50 of paraoxon to BALB/c and knockout BChE-/- mice pre-treated with 4rhBChE (50 mg/kg) resulted in 100% and 78% survival, respectively, without perturbation of long-term behavior. In contrast, 100% mortality of non-pre-treated mice was observed. The high expression level of 4rhBChE in CHO cells permits consideration of this new expression system for manufacturing BChE as a biopharmaceutical. PMID:26239905

  15. Biological aerosol background characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatny, Janet; Fountain, Augustus W., III

    2011-05-01

    To provide useful information during military operations, or as part of other security situations, a biological aerosol detector has to respond within seconds or minutes to an attack by virulent biological agents, and with low false alarms. Within this time frame, measuring virulence of a known microorganism is extremely difficult, especially if the microorganism is of unknown antigenic or nucleic acid properties. Measuring "live" characteristics of an organism directly is not generally an option, yet only viable organisms are potentially infectious. Fluorescence based instruments have been designed to optically determine if aerosol particles have viability characteristics. Still, such commercially available biological aerosol detection equipment needs to be improved for their use in military and civil applications. Air has an endogenous population of microorganisms that may interfere with alarm software technologies. To design robust algorithms, a comprehensive knowledge of the airborne biological background content is essential. For this reason, there is a need to study ambient live bacterial populations in as many locations as possible. Doing so will permit collection of data to define diverse biological characteristics that in turn can be used to fine tune alarm algorithms. To avoid false alarms, improving software technologies for biological detectors is a crucial feature requiring considerations of various parameters that can be applied to suppress alarm triggers. This NATO Task Group will aim for developing reference methods for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to improve alarm algorithms for biological detection. Additionally, they will focus on developing reference standard methodology for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to reduce false alarm rates.

  16. Discovery of the Microwave Background Cosmic microwave background radiation

    E-print Network

    Barnes, Joshua Edward

    Discovery of the Microwave Background Cosmic microwave background radiation Signals from the early universe, or pigeon droppings? #12;Microwave Background Radiation The spectrum is a near- perfect match of a time when the entire universe was a black body with a temperature T 3000 K. Very uniform microwave

  17. Adenoviral-mediated, high-level, cell-specific transgene expression: a SYN1-WPRE cassette mediates increased transgene expression with no loss of neuron specificity.

    PubMed

    Glover, Colin P J; Bienemann, Alison S; Heywood, Darren J; Cosgrave, A Siobhan; Uney, James B

    2002-05-01

    Viral vectors are excellent tools for studying gene function in the brain, although a limitation has been the ability to effectively target transgene expression to specific neuronal populations. This generally cannot be overcome by the use of neuron-specific promoters, as most are too large to be used with current viral vectors and expression from these promoters is often relatively weak. We therefore developed a composite expression cassette, comprising 495 bp of the weak human SYN1 (synapsin-1) promoter and 800 bp of the woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranscriptional regulatory element (WPRE). Studies in hippocampal cultures, organotypic cultures, and in vivo showed that the 3' addition of the WPRE to the SYN1 element greatly increased enhanced green fluorescent protein expression levels with no loss of neuronal specificity. In vivo studies also showed that transgene expression was enhanced with no loss of neuronal specificity in dentate-gyrus neurons for at least 6 weeks following transfection. Therefore, unlike most powerful promoter systems, which mediate expression in neurons and glia, this SYN1-WPRE cassette can target powerful long-term transgene expression to central nervous system neurons when delivered at relatively low titers of adenovirus. Its use should therefore facilitate both gene therapy studies and investigations of neuronal gene function. PMID:11991741

  18. Integrated DNA and RNA extraction and purification on an automated microfluidic cassette from bacterial and viral pathogens causing community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Van Heirstraeten, Liesbet; Spang, Peter; Schwind, Carmen; Drese, Klaus S; Ritzi-Lehnert, Marion; Nieto, Benjamin; Camps, Marta; Landgraf, Bryan; Guasch, Francesc; Corbera, Antoni Homs; Samitier, Josep; Goossens, Herman; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Roeser, Tina

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of an automated sample preparation procedure for etiological agents of community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections (CA-LRTI). The consecutive assay steps, including sample re-suspension, pre-treatment, lysis, nucleic acid purification, and concentration, were integrated into a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip (LOC) cassette that is operated hands-free by a demonstrator setup, providing fluidic and valve actuation. The performance of the assay was evaluated on viral and Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial broth cultures previously sampled using a nasopharyngeal swab. Sample preparation on the microfluidic cassette resulted in higher or similar concentrations of pure bacterial DNA or viral RNA compared to manual benchtop experiments. The miniaturization and integration of the complete sample preparation procedure, to extract purified nucleic acids from real samples of CA-LRTI pathogens to, and above, lab quality and efficiency, represent important steps towards its application in a point-of-care test (POCT) for rapid diagnosis of CA-LRTI. PMID:24615272

  19. Introduction of an RNA stability element at the 5'-end of an antisense RNA cassette increases the inhibition of target RNA translation.

    PubMed

    Engdahl, H M; Lindell, M; Wagner, E G

    2001-02-01

    This communication describes improvement strategies used on a previously described two-unit antisense RNA cassette system. This cassette system encodes RNA with noncontiguous regions of complementarity to a bacterial target RNA, lacI mRNA. One of the units of complementarity was contained within an RNA stem-loop resembling that of the very efficient, naturally occurring antisense RNA CopA. As relatively low inhibitory activity was obtained previously, we tested variants in which several stem-loops were combined within one RNA, each of them directed against a different stretch of target RNA. One to four stem-loop RNAs were tested and found to be relatively ineffective, likely because of low metabolic stability. To increase the intracellular stability of these and other antisense RNAs, a stabilizer element (stem-loop derived from gene 32 mRNA of phage T4) was inserted at their 5'-ends. The results indicate that addition of this element indeed increased antisense RNA efficiency in vivo. As expected, this effect was primarily due to a longer antisense RNA half-life, as shown by RNA abundance (Northern analysis) and decay rates (rifampicin runout experiments). In summary, the results reported indicate that rational design of antisense RNA is feasible, but that the degree of inhibition (approximately 75% maximum inhibition) accomplished here could still be improved. PMID:11258619

  20. Fragment-Based Screening Maps Inhibitor Interactions in the ATP-Binding Site of Checkpoint Kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Santisteban, M. Cris; Westwood, Isaac M.; Boxall, Kathy; Brown, Nathan; Peacock, Sam; McAndrew, Craig; Barrie, Elaine; Richards, Meirion; Mirza, Amin; Oliver, Antony W.; Burke, Rosemary; Hoelder, Swen; Jones, Keith; Aherne, G. Wynne; Blagg, Julian; Collins, Ian; Garrett, Michelle D.; van Montfort, Rob L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2) is an important serine/threonine kinase in the cellular response to DNA damage. A fragment-based screening campaign using a combination of a high-concentration AlphaScreen™ kinase assay and a biophysical thermal shift assay, followed by X-ray crystallography, identified a number of chemically different ligand-efficient CHK2 hinge-binding scaffolds that have not been exploited in known CHK2 inhibitors. In addition, it showed that the use of these orthogonal techniques allowed efficient discrimination between genuine hit matter and false positives from each individual assay technology. Furthermore, the CHK2 crystal structures with a quinoxaline-based fragment and its follow-up compound highlight a hydrophobic area above the hinge region not previously explored in rational CHK2 inhibitor design, but which might be exploited to enhance both potency and selectivity of CHK2 inhibitors. PMID:23776527

  1. Deactivation of the Arabidopsis BRI1 receptor kinase by autophosphorylation within the glycine-rich loop involved in ATP binding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The activity of the dual-specificity brassinosteroid receptor kinase, BRI1, reflects the balance between phosphorylation-dependent activation and several potential mechanisms for deactivation of the receptor. In the present report, we identify regions of the juxtamembrane domain that are essential f...

  2. Synchronization of video recording and laser pulses including background light suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalshoven, Jr., James E. (Inventor); Tierney, Jr., Michael (Inventor); Dabney, Philip W. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus for and a method of triggering a pulsed light source, in particular a laser light source, for predictable capture of the source by video equipment. A frame synchronization signal is derived from the video signal of a camera to trigger the laser and position the resulting laser light pulse in the appropriate field of the video frame and during the opening of the electronic shutter, if such shutter is included in the camera. Positioning of the laser pulse in the proper video field allows, after recording, for the viewing of the laser light image with a video monitor using the pause mode on a standard cassette-type VCR. This invention also allows for fine positioning of the laser pulse to fall within the electronic shutter opening. For cameras with externally controllable electronic shutters, the invention provides for background light suppression by increasing shutter speed during the frame in which the laser light image is captured. This results in the laser light appearing in one frame in which the background scene is suppressed with the laser light being uneffected, while in all other frames, the shutter speed is slower, allowing for the normal recording of the background scene. This invention also allows for arbitrary (manual or external) triggering of the laser with full video synchronization and background light suppression.

  3. Integrable Background Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderbank, David M. J.

    2014-03-01

    This work has its origins in an attempt to describe systematically the integrable geometries and gauge theories in dimensions one to four related to twistor theory. In each such dimension, there is a nondegenerate integrable geometric structure, governed by a nonlinear integrable differential equation, and each solution of this equation determines a background geometry on which, for any Lie group G, an integrable gauge theory is defined. In four dimensions, the geometry is selfdual conformal geometry and the gauge theory is selfdual Yang-Mills theory, while the lower-dimensional structures are nondegenerate (i.e., non-null) reductions of this. Any solution of the gauge theory on a k-dimensional geometry, such that the gauge group H acts transitively on an ?-manifold, determines a (k+?)-dimensional geometry (k+??4) fibering over the k-dimensional geometry with H as a structure group. In the case of an ?-dimensional group H acting on itself by the regular representation, all (k+?)-dimensional geometries with symmetry group H are locally obtained in this way. This framework unifies and extends known results about dimensional reductions of selfdual conformal geometry and the selfdual Yang-Mills equation, and provides a rich supply of constructive methods. In one dimension, generalized Nahm equations provide a uniform description of four pole isomonodromic deformation problems, and may be related to the {SU}(?) Toda and dKP equations via a hodograph transformation. In two dimensions, the {Diff}(S^1) Hitchin equation is shown to be equivalent to the hyperCR Einstein-Weyl equation, while the {SDiff}(?^2) Hitchin equation leads to a Euclidean analogue of Plebanski's heavenly equations. In three and four dimensions, the constructions of this paper help to organize the huge range of examples of Einstein-Weyl and selfdual spaces in the literature, as well as providing some new ! ones. The nondegenerate reductions have a long ancestry. More ! recently , degenerate or null reductions have attracted increased interest. Two of these reductions and their gauge theories (arguably, the two most significant) are also described.

  4. Crystal structure of a catalytic intermediate of the maltose transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, Michael L.; Khare, Dheeraj; Quiocho, Florante A.; Davidson, Amy L.; Chen, Jue

    2008-08-20

    The maltose uptake system of Escherichia coli is a well-characterized member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. Here we present the 2.8-{angstrom} crystal structure of the intact maltose transporter in complex with the maltose-binding protein, maltose and ATP. This structure, stabilized by a mutation that prevents ATP hydrolysis, captures the ATP-binding cassette dimer in a closed, ATP-bound conformation. Maltose is occluded within a solvent-filled cavity at the interface of the two transmembrane subunits, about halfway into the lipid bilayer. The binding protein docks onto the entrance of the cavity in an open conformation and serves as a cap to ensure unidirectional translocation of the sugar molecule. These results provide direct evidence for a concerted mechanism of transport in which solute is transferred from the binding protein to the transmembrane subunits when the cassette dimer closes to hydrolyse ATP.

  5. First Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Containing a mecB-Carrying Gene Complex Independent of Transposon Tn6045 in a Macrococcus caseolyticus Isolate from a Canine Infection.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Schwendener, Sybille; Thomann, Andreas; Gobeli Brawand, Stefanie; Perreten, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    A methicillin-resistant mecB-positive Macrococcus caseolyticus (strain KM45013) was isolated from the nares of a dog with rhinitis. It contained a novel 39-kb transposon-defective complete mecB-carrying staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmecKM45013). SCCmecKM45013 contained 49 coding sequences (CDSs), was integrated at the 3' end of the chromosomal orfX gene, and was delimited at both ends by imperfect direct repeats functioning as integration site sequences (ISSs). SCCmecKM45013 presented two discontinuous regions of homology (SCCmec coverage of 35%) to the chromosomal and transposon Tn6045-associated SCCmec-like element of M. caseolyticus JCSC7096: (i) the mec gene complex (98.8% identity) and (ii) the ccr-carrying segment (91.8% identity). The mec gene complex, located at the right junction of the cassette, also carried the ?-lactamase gene blaZm (mecRm-mecIm-mecB-blaZm). SCCmecKM45013 contained two cassette chromosome recombinase genes, ccrAm2 and ccrBm2, which shared 94.3% and 96.6% DNA identity with those of the SCCmec-like element of JCSC7096 but shared less than 52% DNA identity with the staphylococcal ccrAB and ccrC genes. Three distinct extrachromosomal circularized elements (the entire SCCmecKM45013, ?SCCmecKM45013 lacking the ccr genes, and SCCKM45013 lacking mecB) flanked by one ISS copy, as well as the chromosomal regions remaining after excision, were detected. An unconventional circularized structure carrying the mecB gene complex was associated with two extensive direct repeat regions, which enclosed two open reading frames (ORFs) (ORF46 and ORF51) flanking the chromosomal mecB-carrying gene complex. This study revealed M. caseolyticus as a potential disease-associated bacterium in dogs and also unveiled an SCCmec element carrying mecB not associated with Tn6045 in the genus Macrococcus. PMID:25987634

  6. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  7. A genetic prion disease Background information:Background information

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    on homo- or heterozygosity · Genetic counseling ­ Prenatal and pre-implantation diagnosis for familyA genetic prion disease #12;Background information:Background information: About PrionsAbout Prions· Structure ­ Misfolded proteins ­ Not alive; no genetic material · Pathogenesis ­ Convert normal proteins

  8. The Development of a Pilot Library of Cassette Tapes Dealing with Recent Advances in the Strategies and Features of Educational Research. Final Report. Including a Report of an External Project Evaluation Conducted by Jerry L. Brown, Indiana University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popham, W. James

    A project was designed to develop and test a library of cassette audiotapes for improving the technical skills of educational researchers. Fourteen outstanding researchers from diverse fields were identified, and a short instructional tape was prepared by each. Subjects of the tapes included instructional objectives for intellectual skills,…

  9. Identification of multiresistance gene cfr in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from pigs: plasmid location and integration into a staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Dexi; Wu, Congming; Wang, Yang; Fan, Run; Schwarz, Stefan; Zhang, Suxia

    2015-01-01

    The multiresistance gene cfr was found in 8/231 porcine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates. They were characterized by multilocus sequence typing, spa typing, dru typing, and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing as ST627-t002-dt12w-IVb, ST6-t304-dt12w-IVb, ST9-t899-dt12w-IVb, ST9-t899-dt12ae-IVb, or ST63-t899-dt12v-IVb. Different cfr gene regions were detected on plasmids of ca. 35 kb in seven isolates. For the first time, an ISEnfa4-cfr-IS256 fragment was found to be inserted upstream of the ccr genes in a chromosomal SCCmec IVb element of the remaining isolate. PMID:25824234

  10. Efficient Recombinase-Mediated Cassette Exchange in hPSCs to Study the Hepatocyte Lineage Reveals AAVS1 Locus-Mediated Transgene Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ordovás, Laura; Boon, Ruben; Pistoni, Mariaelena; Chen, Yemiao; Wolfs, Esther; Guo, Wenting; Sambathkumar, Rangarajan; Bobis-Wozowicz, Sylwia; Helsen, Nicky; Vanhove, Jolien; Berckmans, Pieter; Cai, Qing; Vanuytsel, Kim; Eggermont, Kristel; Vanslembrouck, Veerle; Schmidt, Béla Z; Raitano, Susanna; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Nahmias, Yaakov; Cathomen, Toni; Struys, Tom; Verfaillie, Catherine M

    2015-11-10

    Tools for rapid and efficient transgenesis in "safe harbor" loci in an isogenic context remain important to exploit the possibilities of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). We created hPSC master cell lines suitable for FLPe recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) in the AAVS1 locus that allow generation of transgenic lines within 15 days with 100% efficiency and without random integrations. Using RMCE, we successfully incorporated several transgenes useful for lineage identification, cell toxicity studies, and gene overexpression to study the hepatocyte lineage. However, we observed unexpected and variable transgene expression inhibition in vitro, due to DNA methylation and other unknown mechanisms, both in undifferentiated hESC and differentiating hepatocytes. Therefore, the AAVS1 locus cannot be considered a universally safe harbor locus for reliable transgene expression in vitro, and using it for transgenesis in hPSC will require careful assessment of the function of individual transgenes. PMID:26455413

  11. Control of ethanol sensitivity of the glycine receptor ?3 subunit by transmembrane 2, the intracellular splice cassette and C-terminal domains.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Andrea; Yévenes, Gonzalo E; San Martin, Loreto; Burgos, Carlos F; Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Harvey, Robert J; Aguayo, Luis G

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that the effect of ethanol onglycine receptors (GlyRs) containing the a1 subunit is affected by interaction with heterotrimeric G proteins (G??). GlyRs containing the ?3 subunit are involved in inflammatory pain sensitization and rhythmic breathing and have received much recent attention. For example, it is unknown whether ethanol affects the function of this important GlyR subtype. Electrophysiologic experiments showed that GlyR ?3 subunits were not potentiated by pharmacologic concentrations of ethanol or by G??. Thus, we studied GlyR ?1–?3 chimeras and mutants to determine the molecular properties that confer ethanol insensitivity. Mutation of corresponding glycine 254 in transmembrane domain 2 (TM2) found in a1 in the ?3(A254G) –?1 chimera induced a glycine-evoked current that displayed potentiation during application of ethanol (46 ± 5%, 100 mM) and G?? activation (80 ± 17%). Interestingly,insertion of the intracellular ?3L splice cassette into GlyR ?1 abolished the enhancement of the glycine-activated current by ethanol (5 ± 6%) and activation by G?? (21 6 7%). In corporation of the GlyR ?1 C terminus into the ethanol-resistant ?3S(A254G) mutant produced a construct that displayed potentiation of the glycine-activated current with 100 mM ethanol (40 ± 6%)together with a current enhancement after G protein activation (68 ± 25%). Taken together, these data demonstrate that GlyR?3 subunits are not modulated by ethanol. Residue A254 in TM2, the ?3L splice cassette, and the C-terminal domain of ?3GlyRs are determinants for low ethanol sensitivity and form the molecular basis of subtype-selective modulation of GlyRs by alcohol. PMID:25589412

  12. Neutron Background at Boulby Mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Lightfoot, P. K.; McMillan, J. E.; Robinson, M.; Spooner, N. J. C.; Smith, P. F.; Smith, N. J. T.; Lewin, J. D.; Lüscher, R.; Liubarsky, I.

    2003-03-01

    The neutron background at the underground laboratory at Boulby - a site for several dark matter experiments - is discussed. Special emphasis is put on the neutron background produced by cosmic-ray muons. The most recent versions of the muon propagation code MUSIC, and particle transport code FLUKA are used to evaluate muon and neutron fluxes. The results of simulations are compared with experimental data.

  13. Cosmic Superstring Scattering in Backgrounds

    E-print Network

    Mark G. Jackson

    2006-09-27

    We generalize the calculation of cosmic superstring reconnection probability to non-trivial backgrounds. This is done by modeling cosmic strings as wound tachyon modes in the 0B theory, and the spacetime effective action is then used to couple this to background fields. Simple examples are given including trivial and warped compactifications. Generalization to $(p,q)$ strings is discussed.

  14. Background: Extratropical Cyclones and NWP

    E-print Network

    Froude, Lizzie

    Chapter 2 Background: Extratropical Cyclones and NWP 2.1 Introduction This chapter provides background information about extratropical cyclones, numerical weather prediction (NWP) and ensemble prediction. It is organised as follows. Section 2.2 discusses extratropical cyclones and begins with a brief

  15. Background reduction in cryogenic detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Daniel A.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  16. Lattice QCD in Background Fields

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Brian Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

    2009-06-01

    Electromagnetic properties of hadrons can be computed by lattice simulations of QCD in background fields. We demonstrate new techniques for the investigation of charged hadron properties in electric fields. Our current calculations employ large electric fields, motivating us to analyze chiral dynamics in strong QED backgrounds, and subsequently uncover surprising non-perturbative effects present at finite volume.

  17. Lattice QCD in Background Fields

    E-print Network

    William Detmold; Brian C. Tiburzi; Andre Walker-Loud

    2009-08-25

    Electromagnetic properties of hadrons can be computed by lattice simulations of QCD in background fields. We demonstrate new techniques for the investigation of charged hadron properties in electric fields. Our current calculations employ large electric fields, motivating us to analyze chiral dynamics in strong QED backgrounds, and subsequently uncover surprising non-perturbative effects present at finite volume.

  18. Computerized Placement Tests: Background Readings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Entrance Examination Board, Princeton, NJ.

    This document is a compilation of background readings for the user of Computerized Placement Tests (CPTs) developed by the College Board for student placement purposes. CPTs are computerized adaptive tests that test the individual abilities and backgrounds of examinees. CPTs are part of the ACCUPLACER student information management system. The…

  19. Background

    Cancer.gov

    The discovery that proteins and peptides are "leaked" by tumors into clinically accessible bodily fluids such as blood has led to the possibility of diagnosing cancer at an early stage or monitoring response to treatment by collecting these fluids and testing for the presence of cancer-related biomarkers. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) are examples of blood-borne cancer protein biomarkers that are currently being used in the clinic.

  20. Backgrounder

    Cancer.gov

    There may be more than 200 different types of cancer and many more subtypes, each caused by glitches in DNA that trigger the uncontrolled growth of cells. Identifying the changes in each cancer’s complete set of DNA - its genome - and understanding how such changes interact to drive the disease process will lay the foundation for an era of precision medicine in cancer care that treats each patient as a unique case.

  1. Background

    Cancer.gov

    Extensive evidence has demonstrated that 24-hour dietary recalls provide the highest quality, least biased dietary data. Traditional 24-hour recalls, however, are expensive and impractical for large-scale research because they rely on trained interviewers and multiple administrations to estimate usual intakes. As a result, researchers often make use of food frequency questionnaires, which are less expensive but contain substantial error.

  2. Low background counting at the LBNL low background facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Chan, Y. D.; Hurley, D. L.; Wang, B. S.

    2013-08-08

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to end-users in two unique facilities: locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory space; and a satellite underground station (600 m.w.e) in Oroville, CA. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic and anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via neutron activation analysis for specific applications. A general overview of the facilities, services, and capabilities will be discussed. Recent activities will also be presented, including the recent installation of a 3? muon veto at the surface facility, cosmogenic activation studies of TeO{sub 2} for CUORE, and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout.

  3. Aluminum as a source of background in low background experiments

    E-print Network

    B. Majorovits; I. Abt; M. Laubenstein; O. Volynets

    2011-05-18

    Neutrinoless double beta decay would be a key to understanding the nature of neutrino masses. The next generation of High Purity Germanium experiments will have to be operated with a background rate of better than 10^-5 counts/(kg y keV) in the region of interest around the Q value of the decay. Therefore, so far irrelevant sources of background have to be considered. The metalization of the surface of germanium detectors is in general done with aluminum. The background from the decays of 22Na, 26Al, 226Ra and 228Th introduced by this metalization is discussed. It is shown that only a special selection of aluminum can keep these background contributions acceptable.

  4. Structural Characterization of Two Metastable ATP-Bound States of P-Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    O’Mara, Megan L.; Mark, Alan E.

    2014-01-01

    ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters couple the binding and hydrolysis of ATP to the transport of substrate molecules across the membrane. The mechanism by which ATP binding and/or hydrolysis drives the conformational changes associated with substrate transport has not yet been characterized fully. Here, changes in the conformation of the ABC export protein P-glycoprotein on ATP binding are examined in a series of molecular dynamics simulations. When one molecule of ATP is placed at the ATP binding site associated with each of the two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs), the membrane-embedded P-glycoprotein crystal structure adopts two distinct metastable conformations. In one, each ATP molecule interacts primarily with the Walker A motif of the corresponding NBD. In the other, the ATP molecules interacts with both Walker A motif of one NBD and the Signature motif of the opposite NBD inducing the partial dimerization of the NBDs. This interaction is more extensive in one of the two ATP binding site, leading to an asymmetric structure. The overall conformation of the transmembrane domains is not altered in either of these metastable states, indicating that the conformational changes associated with ATP binding observed in the simulations in the absence of substrate do not lead to the outward-facing conformation and thus would be insufficient in themselves to drive transport. Nevertheless, the metastable intermediate ATP-bound conformations observed are compatible with a wide range of experimental cross-linking data demonstrating the simulations do capture physiologically important conformations. Analysis of the interaction between ATP and its cofactor Mg2+ with each NBD indicates that the coordination of ATP and Mg2+ differs between the two NBDs. The role structural asymmetry may play in ATP binding and hydrolysis is discussed. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our results are not heavily influenced by the crystal structure chosen for initiation of the simulations. PMID:24632881

  5. EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND Master of Arts

    E-print Network

    Wu, Mingshen

    EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND Master of Arts Graduate research in professional studies focused on the application of cognitive enhancement technologies to educational settings. This involved analyzingPaul University, Chicago, IL Bachelor of Science Undergraduate degree in Special Education included coursework

  6. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    E-print Network

    Eric Gawiser; Joseph Silk

    2000-02-02

    We summarize the theoretical and observational status of the study of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation. Its thermodynamic spectrum is a robust prediction of the Hot Big Bang cosmology and has been confirmed observationally. There are now 76 observations of Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropy, which we present in a table with references. We discuss the theoretical origins of these anisotropies and explain the standard jargon associated with their observation.

  7. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3? anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  8. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3? anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  9. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K)more »or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3? anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.« less

  10. Low Background Micromegas in CAST

    E-print Network

    J. G. Garza; S. Aune; D. Calvet; J. F. Castel; F. E. Christensen; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; T. Decker; E. Ferrer-Ribas; J. Galán; J. A. García; I. Giomataris; R. M. Hill; F. J. Iguaz; I. G. Irastorza; A. C. Jakobsen; D. Jourde; H. Mirallas; I. Ortega; T. Papaevangelou; M. J. Pivovaroff; J. Ruz; A. Tomás; T. Vafeiadis; J. K. Vogel

    2015-03-17

    Solar axions could be converted into x-rays inside the strong magnetic field of an axion helioscope, triggering the detection of this elusive particle. Low background x-ray detectors are an essential component for the sensitivity of these searches. We report on the latest developments of the Micromegas detectors for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), including technological pathfinder activities for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). The use of low background techniques and the application of discrimination algorithms based on the high granularity of the readout have led to background levels below 10$^{-6}$ counts/keV/cm$^2$/s, more than a factor 100 lower than the first generation of Micromegas detectors. The best levels achieved at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) are as low as 10$^{-7}$ counts/keV/cm$^2$/s, showing good prospects for the application of this technology in IAXO. The current background model, based on underground and surface measurements, is presented, as well as the strategies to further reduce the background level. Finally, we will describe the R&D paths to achieve sub-keV energy thresholds, which could broaden the physics case of axion helioscopes.

  11. Low Background Micromegas in CAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garza, J. G.; Aune, S.; Aznar, F.; Calvet, D.; Castel, J. F.; Christensen, F. E.; Dafni, T.; Davenport, M.; Decker, T.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Galán, J.; García, J. A.; Giomataris, I.; Hill, R. M.; Iguaz, F. J.; Irastorza, I. G.; Jakobsen, A. C.; Jourde, D.; Mirallas, H.; Ortega, I.; Papaevangelou, T.; Pivovaroff, M. J.; Ruz, J.; Tomás, A.; Vafeiadis, T.; Vogel, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    Solar axions could be converted into x-rays inside the strong magnetic field of an axion helioscope, triggering the detection of this elusive particle. Low background x-ray detectors are an essential component for the sensitivity of these searches. We report on the latest developments of the Micromegas detectors for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), including technological pathfinder activities for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). The use of low background techniques and the application of discrimination algorithms based on the high granularity of the readout have led to background levels below 10-6 counts/keV/cm2/s, more than a factor 100 lower than the first generation of Micromegas detectors. The best levels achieved at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) are as low as 10-7 counts/keV/cm2/s, showing good prospects for the application of this technology in IAXO. The current background model, based on underground and surface measurements, is presented, as well as the strategies to further reduce the background level. Finally, we will describe the R&D paths to achieve sub-keV energy thresholds, which could broaden the physics case of axion helioscopes.

  12. Background simulations and shielding calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.

    2011-04-27

    Key improvements in the sensitivity of the underground particle astrophysics experiments can only be achieved if the radiation causing background events in detectors is well understood and proper measures are taken to suppress it. The background radiation arising from radioactivity and cosmic-ray muons is discussed here together with the methods of its suppression. Different shielding designs are considered to attenuate gamma-rays and neutrons coming from radioactivity in rock and lab walls. Purity of materials used in detector construction is analysed and the background event rates due to the presence of radioactive isotopes in detector components are discussed. Event rates in detectors caused by muon-induced neutrons with and without active veto systems are presented leading to the requirements for the depth of an underground laboratory and the efficiency of the veto system.

  13. Detector Background at Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Physics goals of a Muon Collider (MC) can only be reached with appropriate design of the ring, interaction region (IR), high-field superconducting magnets, machine-detector interface (MDI) and detector. Results of the most recent realistic simulation studies are presented for a 1.5-TeV MC. It is shown that appropriately designed IR and MDI with sophisticated shielding in the detector have a potential to substantially suppress the background rates in the MC detector. The main characteristics of backgrounds are studied.

  14. Generative electronic background music system

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurowski, Lukasz

    2015-03-10

    In this short paper-extended abstract the new approach to generation of electronic background music has been presented. The Generative Electronic Background Music System (GEBMS) has been located between other related approaches within the musical algorithm positioning framework proposed by Woller et al. The music composition process is performed by a number of mini-models parameterized by further described properties. The mini-models generate fragments of musical patterns used in output composition. Musical pattern and output generation are controlled by container for the mini-models - a host-model. General mechanism has been presented including the example of the synthesized output compositions.

  15. Background music and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Angel, Leslie A; Polzella, Donald J; Elvers, Greg C

    2010-06-01

    The present experiment employed standardized test batteries to assess the effects of fast-tempo music on cognitive performance among 56 male and female university students. A linguistic processing task and a spatial processing task were selected from the Criterion Task Set developed to assess verbal and nonverbal performance. Ten excerpts from Mozart's music matched for tempo were selected. Background music increased the speed of spatial processing and the accuracy of linguistic processing. The findings suggest that background music can have predictable effects on cognitive performance. PMID:20865993

  16. The cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    A review the implications of the spectrum and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background for cosmology. Thermalization and processes generating spectral distortions are discussed. Anisotropy predictions are described and compared with observational constraints. If the evidence for large-scale power in the galaxy distribution in excess of that predicted by the cold dark matter model is vindicated, and the observed structure originated via gravitational instabilities of primordial density fluctuations, the predicted amplitude of microwave background anisotropies on angular scales of a degree and larger must be at least several parts in 10 exp 6.

  17. Mathematical background of Parrondo's paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrends, Ehrhard

    2004-05-01

    Parrondo's paradox states that there are losing gambling games which, when being combined stochastically or in a suitable deterministic way, give rise to winning games. Here we investigate the probabilistic background. We show how the properties of the equilibrium distributions of the Markov chains under consideration give rise to the paradoxical behavior, and we provide methods how to find the best a priori strategies.

  18. Low Background Micromegas in CAST

    E-print Network

    Garza, J G; Calvet, D; Castel, J F; Christensen, F E; Dafni, T; Davenport, M; Decker, T; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Galán, J; García, J A; Giomataris, I; Hill, R M; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Jakobsen, A C; Jourde, D; Mirallas, H; Ortega, I; Papaevangelou, T; Pivovaroff, M J; Ruz, J; Tomás, A; Vafeiadis, T; Vogel, J K

    2015-01-01

    Solar axions could be converted into x-rays inside the strong magnetic field of an axion helioscope, triggering the detection of this elusive particle. Low background x-ray detectors are an essential component for the sensitivity of these searches. We report on the latest developments of the Micromegas detectors for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), including technological pathfinder activities for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). The use of low background techniques and the application of discrimination algorithms based on the high granularity of the readout have led to background levels below 10$^{-6}$ counts/keV/cm$^2$/s, more than a factor 100 lower than the first generation of Micromegas detectors. The best levels achieved at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) are as low as 10$^{-7}$ counts/keV/cm$^2$/s, showing good prospects for the application of this technology in IAXO. The current background model, based on underground and surface measurements, is presented, as well as ...

  19. Regional Background Fine Particulate Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modeling system composed of the global model GEOS-Chem providing hourly lateral boundary conditions to the regional model CMAQ was used to calculate the policy relevant background level of fine particulate: matter. Simulations were performed for the full year of 2004 over the d...

  20. Teacher Pensions: A Background Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Janet S.

    2008-01-01

    Pensions are an important but comparatively unexamined component of human resource policies in education. In an increasingly competitive world where employees are more mobile than ever, pension policies that were designed in the last century may be out of step with the needs of both individuals and schools. This background paper aims to foster…

  1. Simulation of HEAO 3 background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, B. L.; Phlips, B. F.; Kroeger, R. A.; Kurfess, J. D.

    1997-05-01

    A Monte Carlo technique for modeling background in space-based gamma-ray telescopes has been developed. The major background components included in this modeling technique are the diffuse cosmic gamma-ray flux, the Earth's atmospheric flux, and decay of nuclei produced by spallation of cosmic rays, trapped protons and their secondaries, the decay of nuclei produced by neutron capture, and the de-excitation of excited states produced by inelastic scattering of neutrons. The method for calculating the nuclear activation and decay component of the background combines the low Earth orbit proton and neutron spectra, the spallation cross sections from Alice91 [2], nuclear decay data from the National Nuclear Data Center's (NNDC) Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) database [3], and three-dimensional gamma-ray and beta transport with Electron Gamma-ray Shower version 4 (EGS4) [4] using MORSE combinatorial geometry. This Monte Carlo code handles the following decay types: electron capture, ?-, ?+, meta-stable isotope and short lived intermediate states, and isotopes that have branchings to both ?- and ?+. Actual background from the HEAO 3 space instrument are used to validate the code.

  2. Teaching about Natural Background Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Karunakara, N.; Mustapha, Amidu O.

    2013-01-01

    Ambient gamma dose rates in air were measured at different locations (indoors and outdoors) to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of natural background radiation in the environment and to show that levels vary from one location to another, depending on the underlying geology. The effect of a lead shield on a gamma radiation field was also…

  3. Mutations in Intracellular Loops 1 and 3 Lead to Misfolding of Human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) That Can Be Rescued by Cyclosporine A, Which Reduces Its Association with Chaperone Hsp70*

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Khyati; Bhatnagar, Jaya; Chufan, Eduardo E.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2013-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP binding cassette transporter that effluxes a variety of structurally diverse compounds including anticancer drugs. Computational models of human P-gp in the apo- and nucleotide-bound conformation show that the adenine group of ATP forms hydrogen bonds with the conserved Asp-164 and Asp-805 in intracellular loops 1 and 3, respectively, which are located at the interface between the nucleotide binding domains and transmembrane domains. We investigated the role of Asp-164 and Asp-805 residues by substituting them with cysteine in a cysteine-less background. It was observed that the D164C/D805C mutant, when expressed in HeLa cells, led to misprocessing of P-gp, which thus failed to transport the drug substrates. The misfolded protein could be rescued to the cell surface by growing the cells at a lower temperature (27 °C) or by treatment with substrates (cyclosporine A, FK506), modulators (tariquidar), or small corrector molecules. We also show that short term (4–6 h) treatment with 15 ?m cyclosporine A or FK506 rescues the pre-formed immature protein trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum in an immunophilin-independent pathway. The intracellularly trapped misprocessed protein associates more with chaperone Hsp70, and the treatment with cyclosporine A reduces the association of mutant P-gp, thus allowing it to be trafficked to the cell surface. The function of rescued cell surface mutant P-gp is similar to that of wild-type protein. These data demonstrate that the Asp-164 and Asp-805 residues are not important for ATP binding, as proposed earlier, but are critical for proper folding and maturation of a functional transporter. PMID:24064216

  4. Pro Isomerization in MLL1 PHD3-Bromo Cassette Connects H3K4me Readout to CyP33 and HDAC-Mediated Repression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhanxin; Song, Jikui; Milne, Thomas A.; Wang, Gang G.; Li, Haitao; Allis, C. David; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The MLL1 gene is a frequent target for recurrent chromosomal translocations, resulting in transformation of hematopoietic precursors into leukemia stem cells. Here, we report on structure-function studies that elucidate molecular events in MLL1 binding of histone H3K4me3/2 marks and recruitment of the cyclophilin CyP33. CyP33 contains a PPIase and a RRM domain and regulates MLL1 function through HDAC recruitment. We find that the PPIase domain of CyP33 regulates the conformation of MLL1 through proline isomerization within the PHD3-Bromo linker, thereby disrupting the PHD3-Bromo interface and facilitating binding of the MLL1-PHD3 domain to the CyP33-RRM domain. H3K4me3/2 and CyP33-RRM target different surfaces of MLL1-PHD3 and can bind simultaneously to form a ternary complex. Furthermore, the MLL1-CyP33 interaction is required for repression of HOXA9 and HOXC8 genes in vivo. Our results highlight the role of PHD3-Bromo cassette as a regulatory platform, orchestrating MLL1 binding of H3K4me3/2 marks and cyclophilin-mediated repression through HDAC recruitment. PMID:20541251

  5. Homologous Recombination-Independent Large Gene Cassette Knock-in in CHO Cells Using TALEN and MMEJ-Directed Donor Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Tetsushi; Takenaga, Mitsumasa; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Nakamura, Takahiro; Kamihira, Masamichi; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Gene knock-in techniques have rapidly evolved in recent years, along with the development and maturation of genome editing technology using programmable nucleases. We recently reported a novel strategy for microhomology-mediated end-joining-dependent integration of donor DNA by using TALEN or CRISPR/Cas9 and optimized targeting vectors, named PITCh (Precise Integration into Target Chromosome) vectors. Here we describe TALEN and PITCh vector-mediated integration of long gene cassettes, including a single-chain Fv-Fc (scFv-Fc) gene, in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, with comparison of targeting and cloning efficiency among several donor design and culture conditions. We achieved 9.6-kb whole plasmid integration and 7.6-kb backbone-free integration into a defined genomic locus in CHO cells. Furthermore, we confirmed the reasonable productivity of recombinant scFv-Fc protein of the knock-in cells. Using our protocol, the knock-in cell clones could be obtained by a single transfection and a single limiting dilution using a 96-well plate, without constructing targeting vectors containing long homology arms. Thus, the study described herein provides a highly practical strategy for gene knock-in of large DNA in CHO cells, which accelerates high-throughput generation of cell lines stably producing any desired biopharmaceuticals, including huge antibody proteins. PMID:26473830

  6. Coexistence of heavy metal and antibiotic resistance within a novel composite staphylococcal cassette chromosome in a Staphylococcus haemolyticus isolate from bovine mastitis milk.

    PubMed

    Xue, Huping; Wu, Zhaowei; Li, Longping; Li, Fan; Wang, Yiqing; Zhao, Xin

    2015-09-01

    The structure of a composite staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) carried by a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus (NW19A) isolated from a bovine milk sample was analyzed. The formation of the circular forms of both single SCC elements and composite SCC elements was detected in NW19A. Twenty heavy metal and antibiotic resistance-related genes coexisted in this composite SCC, suggesting that these genes might be coselected under environmental pressure. The mec gene complex in NW19A, designated type C3, is different from classic C1 or C2 gene complexes structurally and likely evolves differently. Furthermore, results from alignment of the SCC composite island of NW19A with 50 related sequences from different staphylococcal strains provided additional evidence to support the notion that coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are the original host of heavy metal resistance genes among staphylococci. Given that a SCC composite island could transfer freely among different staphylococcal species from different hosts, more attention should be paid to contamination with heavy metals and antibiotics in dairy farming environments, including wastewater, soil, feces, and feed. PMID:26169408

  7. Large genomic fragment deletion and functional gene cassette knock-in via Cas9 protein mediated genome editing in one-cell rodent embryos.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liren; Shao, Yanjiao; Guan, Yuting; Li, Liang; Wu, Lijuan; Chen, Fangrui; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Huaqing; Ma, Yanlin; Ma, Xueyun; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas RNA-guided system has versatile uses in many organisms and allows modification of multiple target sites simultaneously. Generating novel genetically modified mouse and rat models is one valuable application of this system. Through the injection of Cas9 protein instead of mRNA into embryos, we observed fewer off-target effects of Cas9 and increased point mutation knock-in efficiency. Large genomic DNA fragment (up to 95?kb) deletion mice were generated for in vivo study of lncRNAs and gene clusters. Site-specific insertion of a 2.7?kb CreERT2 cassette into the mouse Nfatc1 locus allowed labeling and tracing of hair follicle stem cells. In addition, we combined the Cre-Loxp system with a gene-trap strategy to insert a GFP reporter in the reverse orientation into the rat Lgr5 locus, which was later inverted by Cre-mediated recombination, yielding a conditional knockout/reporter strategy suitable for mosaic mutation analysis. PMID:26620761

  8. Large genomic fragment deletion and functional gene cassette knock-in via Cas9 protein mediated genome editing in one-cell rodent embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liren; Shao, Yanjiao; Guan, Yuting; Li, Liang; Wu, Lijuan; Chen, Fangrui; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Huaqing; Ma, Yanlin; Ma, Xueyun; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas RNA-guided system has versatile uses in many organisms and allows modification of multiple target sites simultaneously. Generating novel genetically modified mouse and rat models is one valuable application of this system. Through the injection of Cas9 protein instead of mRNA into embryos, we observed fewer off-target effects of Cas9 and increased point mutation knock-in efficiency. Large genomic DNA fragment (up to 95?kb) deletion mice were generated for in vivo study of lncRNAs and gene clusters. Site-specific insertion of a 2.7?kb CreERT2 cassette into the mouse Nfatc1 locus allowed labeling and tracing of hair follicle stem cells. In addition, we combined the Cre-Loxp system with a gene-trap strategy to insert a GFP reporter in the reverse orientation into the rat Lgr5 locus, which was later inverted by Cre-mediated recombination, yielding a conditional knockout/reporter strategy suitable for mosaic mutation analysis. PMID:26620761

  9. Construction and application of plasmid- and transposon-based promoter-probe vectors for Streptomyces spp. that employ a Vibrio harveyi luciferase reporter cassette.

    PubMed Central

    Sohaskey, C D; Im, H; Schauer, A T

    1992-01-01

    Several versatile promoter-probe vectors have been constructed for Streptomyces strains which utilize the production of blue-green light as a measure of transcription activity. Three plasmid vectors (two high and one low copy number) and two transposons are described. The multicopy plasmids pRS1106 and pRS1108 contain a transcription terminator and multiple-cloning polylinker upstream of promoterless luciferase (lux) and neomycin resistance reporter genes. Plasmid pHI90 is similar in structure to the pRS vectors except that its single copy number is an advantage for regulation studies or situations in which overexpression is otherwise toxic to the cell. The two transposons carry a promoterless lux cassette cloned such that transposition into a target DNA and fusion to the target's transcription unit occur simultaneously. Tn5351 was created by inserting the luciferase genes near the right end of the viomycin resistance transposon Tn4563. Tn5353 carries the luciferase genes near the right end of a neomycin resistance transposon derived from Tn4556. The size of Tn5353 was minimized by deleting nonessential transposon sequences, making this element small enough to be cloned into phi C31 bacteriophages for efficient transposon delivery to target cells of Streptomyces strains. The two Tnlux transposons have been used to generate Streptomyces coelicolor morphological mutants and to monitor transcription from chromosomal promoters during development. Images PMID:1309525

  10. Pro Isomerization in MLL1 PHD3-Bromo Cassette Connects H3K4me Readout to CyP33 and HDAC-Mediated Repression

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhanxin; Song, Jikui; Milne, Thomas A.; Wang, Gang G.; Li, Haitao; Allis, C. David; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2010-09-13

    The MLL1 gene is a frequent target for recurrent chromosomal translocations, resulting in transformation of hematopoietic precursors into leukemia stem cells. Here, we report on structure-function studies that elucidate molecular events in MLL1 binding of histone H3K4me3/2 marks and recruitment of the cyclophilin CyP33. CyP33 contains a PPIase and a RRM domain and regulates MLL1 function through HDAC recruitment. We find that the PPIase domain of CyP33 regulates the conformation of MLL1 through proline isomerization within the PHD3-Bromo linker, thereby disrupting the PHD3-Bromo interface and facilitating binding of the MLL1-PHD3 domain to the CyP33-RRM domain. H3K4me3/2 and CyP33-RRM target different surfaces of MLL1-PHD3 and can bind simultaneously to form a ternary complex. Furthermore, the MLL1-CyP33 interaction is required for repression of HOXA9 and HOXC8 genes in vivo. Our results highlight the role of PHD3-Bromo cassette as a regulatory platform, orchestrating MLL1 binding of H3K4me3/2 marks and cyclophilin-mediated repression through HDAC recruitment.

  11. A rev1-vpu polymorphism unique to HIV-1 subtype A and C strains impairs envelope glycoprotein expression from rev-vpu-env cassettes and reduces virion infectivity in pseudotyping assays

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Matthias H.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Shaw, Katharina S.; Decker, Julie M.; Keele, Brandon F.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Grayson, Truman; McPherson, David T.; Ping, Li-Hua; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Swanstrom, Ronald; Williamson, Carolyn; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2010-02-20

    Functional studies of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs) commonly include the generation of pseudoviruses, which are produced by co-transfection of rev-vpu-env cassettes with an env-deficient provirus. Here, we describe six Env constructs from transmitted/founder HIV-1 that were defective in the pseudotyping assay, although two produced infectious virions when expressed from their cognate proviruses. All of these constructs exhibited an unusual gene arrangement in which the first exon of rev (rev1) and vpu were in the same reading frame without an intervening stop codon. Disruption of the rev1-vpu fusion gene by frameshift mutation, stop codon, or abrogation of the rev initiation codon restored pseudovirion infectivity. Introduction of the fusion gene into wildtype Env cassettes severely compromised their function. The defect was not due to altered env and rev transcription or a dominant negative effect of the expressed fusion protein, but seemed to be caused by inefficient translation at the env initiation codon. Although the rev1-vpu polymorphism affects Env expression only in vitro, it can cause problems in studies requiring Env complementation, such as analyses of co-receptor usage and neutralization properties, since 3% of subtype A, 20% of subtype C and 5% of CRF01{sub A}/E viruses encode the fusion gene. A solution is to eliminate the rev initiation codon when amplifying rev-vpu-env cassettes since this increases Env expression irrespective of the presence of the polymorphism.

  12. Detection of integrons and Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome (SCCmec) types in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from burn and non-burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Namvar, Amirmorteza Ebrahimzadeh; Khodaei, Farzaneh; Bijari, Aslan; Lari, Abdolaziz Rastegar

    2015-01-01

    Background Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains have been recognized as an important reason of infections in health care units. Integrons role in antibiotic resistance box gene transfer has been well recognized which are found in Gram positive bacteria. Objective The aim of this study was analyzed of SCCmec typing and determine of integron classes in burn and non-burn specimens. Methodology A total of 110 S. aureus strains were isolated from burn and non-burn patients. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, detection of mecA gene, various SCCmec types and integrons classes were analyzed. Results In antimicrobial susceptibility test in burn patients, resistant to both gentamicin and oxacilin and in non-burn patients resistance to oxacilin and cefepime showed the highest ratio In PCR molecular test (80%) and (52.7%) of strains harbored the mecA gene. Therefore five different SCCmec types were recognized among our studied strains. Subsequently, integron class I was evaluated as (94.5%) in burn and (12.7%) in non-burn isolates by the multiplex PCR method. Conclusion Albeit MRSA strains have the hospital reservoir so may cause serious treats for hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients, hence clinical decision for prevention and treatment may develop due to, mecA gene, SCCmec elements and integrons detection in health care units. PMID:26715924

  13. Conductivity in the anisotropic background

    E-print Network

    Bum-Hoon Lee; Siyoung Nam; Da-Wei Pang; Chanyong Park

    2011-02-28

    By using the gauge/gravity duality, we investigate the dual field theories of the anisotropic backgrounds, which are exact solutions of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with a Liouville potential. When we turn on the bulk gauge field fluctuation $A_x$ with a non-trivial dilaton coupling, the AC conductivity of this dual field theory is proportional to the frequency with an exponent depending on parameters of the anisotropic background. In some parameter regions, we find that this conductivity can have the negative exponent like the strange metal. In addition, we also investigate another U(1) gauge field fluctuation, which is not coupled with a dilaton field. We classify all possible conductivities of this system and find that the exponent of the conductivity is always positive.

  14. Snapshots of the maltose transporter during ATP hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, Michael L.; Chen, Jue

    2011-12-05

    ATP-binding cassette transporters are powered by ATP, but the mechanism by which these transporters hydrolyze ATP is unclear. In this study, four crystal structures of the full-length wild-type maltose transporter, stabilized by adenosine 5{prime}-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate or ADP in conjunction with phosphate analogs BeF{sub 3}{sup -}, VO{sub 4}{sup 3-}, or AlF{sub 4}{sup -}, were determined to 2.2- to 2.4-{angstrom} resolution. These structures led to the assignment of two enzymatic states during ATP hydrolysis and demonstrate specific functional roles of highly conserved residues in the nucleotide-binding domain, suggesting that ATP-binding cassette transporters catalyze ATP hydrolysis via a general base mechanism.

  15. Mars Background Information General Information

    E-print Network

    Dennis, Robert G.

    Mars Background Information General Information Here are some quick facts about Mars in comparison with Earth: Mars Earth Atmosphere 95% CO2, 5% N2, Ar & trace gasses 0.007 atm pressure 78% N2, 21% O2, 1 successful fly-by Mariner 9 11/71 - 10/72 Orbit of Mars Viking 1&2 6/76 - 1987 Orbiter and First lander

  16. The isotropic radio background revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco; Lineros, Roberto A.

    2014-04-01

    We present an extensive analysis on the determination of the isotropic radio background. We consider six different radio maps, ranging from 22 MHz to 2.3 GHz and covering a large fraction of the sky. The large scale emission is modeled as a linear combination of an isotropic component plus the Galactic synchrotron radiation and thermal bremsstrahlung. Point-like and extended sources are either masked or accounted for by means of a template. We find a robust estimate of the isotropic radio background, with limited scatter among different Galactic models. The level of the isotropic background lies significantly above the contribution obtained by integrating the number counts of observed extragalactic sources. Since the isotropic component dominates at high latitudes, thus making the profile of the total emission flat, a Galactic origin for such excess appears unlikely. We conclude that, unless a systematic offset is present in the maps, and provided that our current understanding of the Galactic synchrotron emission is reasonable, extragalactic sources well below the current experimental threshold seem to account for the majority of the brightness of the extragalactic radio sky.

  17. The Cosmic Background Explorer /COBE/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, under study by NASA since 1976, will map the spectrum and the angular distribution of diffuse radiation from the universe over the entire wavelength range from 1 micron to 1.3 cm. It carries three instruments: a set of differential microwave radiometers (DMR) at 23.5, 31.4, 53, and 90GHz, a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer (FIRAS) covering 1 to 100 per cm, and a diffuse infrared background experiment (DIRBE) covering 1 to 300 microns. They will use the ideal space environment, a one year lifetime, and standard instrument techniques to achieve orders of magnitude improvements in sensitivity and accuracy, providing a fundamental data base for cosmology. The instruments are united by common purpose as well as similar environmental and orbital requirements. The data from all three experiments will be analyzed together, to distinguish nearby sources of radiation from the cosmologically interesting diffuse background radiations. Construction is planned to begin in 1982 for a launch in 1988.

  18. Attention to Background Strain Is Essential for Metabolic Research: C57BL/6 and the International Knockout Mouse Consortium.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Danielle A; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2016-01-01

    The International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) introduces its targeted constructs into C57BL/6N embryonic stem cells. However, breeding with a Cre-recombinase and/or Flp-recombinase mouse is required for the generation of a null allele with the IKMC cassette. Many recombinase strains are in the C57BL/6J background, resulting in knockout animals on a mixed strain background. This can lead to variability in metabolic data and the use of improper control groups. While C57BL/6N and C57BL/6J are derived from the same parental C57BL/6 strain, there are key genotypic and phenotypic differences between these substrains. Many researchers may not even be aware of these differences, as the shorthand C57BL/6 is often used to describe both substrains. We found that 58% of articles involving genetically modified mouse models did not completely address background strain. This review will describe these two substrains and highlight the importance of separate consideration in mouse model development. Our aim is to increase awareness of this issue in the diabetes research community and to provide practical strategies to enable researchers to avoid mixed strain animals when using IKMC knockout mice. PMID:26696638

  19. Background music as a risk factor for distraction among young-novice drivers.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Warren; Slor, Zack

    2013-10-01

    There are countless beliefs about the power of music during driving. The last thing one would think about is: how safe is it to listen or sing to music? Unfortunately, collisions linked to music devices have been known for some time; adjusting the radio controls, swapping tape-cassettes and compact-discs, or searching through MP3 files, are all forms of distraction that can result in a near-crash or crash. While the decrement of vehicular performance can also occur from capacity interference to central attention, whether or not music listening is a contributing factor to distraction is relatively unknown. The current study explored the effects of driver-preferred music on driver behavior. 85 young-novice drivers completed six trips in an instrumented Learners Vehicle. The study found that all participants committed at-least 3 driver deficiencies; 27 needed a verbal warning/command and 17 required a steering or braking intervention to prevent an accident. While there were elevated positive moods and enjoyment for trips with driver-preferred music, this background also produced the most frequent severe driver miscalculations and inaccuracies, violations, and aggressive driving. However, trips with music structurally designed to generate moderate levels of perceptual complexity, improved driver behavior and increased driver safety. The study is the first within-subjects on-road high-dose double-exposure clinical-trial investigation of musical stimuli on driver behavior. PMID:23896043

  20. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich Background

    E-print Network

    Gilbert Holder; Ian G. McCarthy; Arif Babul

    2007-02-27

    The cosmic background due to the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect is expected to be the largest signal at mm and cm wavelengths at a resolution of a few arcminutes. We investigate some simple statistics of SZ maps and their scaling with the normalization of the matter power spectrum, sigma_8, as well as the effects of the unknown physics of the intracluster medium on these statistics. We show that the SZ background provides a significant background for SZ cluster searches, with the onset of confusion occurring around 10^{14} h^{-1} solar masses in a cosmology-dependent way, where confusion is defined as typical errors in recovered flux larger than 20%. The confusion limit, corresponds to the mass at which there are roughly ten clusters per square degree, with this number nearly independent of cosmology and cluster gas physics. Typical errors grow quickly as lower mass objects are included in the catalog. We also point out that there is nothing in particular about the rms of the filtered map that makes it especially well-suited for capturing aspects of the SZ effect, and other indicators of the one-point SZ probability distribution function are at least as well suited for the task. For example, the full width at half maximum of the one point probability distribution has a field-to-field scatter that is about 60% that of the rms. The simplest statistics of SZ maps are largely unaffected by cluster physics such aspreheating, although the impact of preheating is clear by eye in the maps.Studies aimed at learning about the physics of the intracluster medium will apparently require more specialized statistical indicators.

  1. High background photon counting lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lentz, W. J.

    1992-01-01

    Photon counting with lidar returns is usually limited to low light levels, while wide dynamic range is achieved by counting for long times. The broad emission spectrum of inexpensive high-power semiconductor lasers makes receiver filters pass too much background light for traditional photon counting in daylight. Very high speed photon counting is possible, however, at more than 500 MHz which allows the construction of eyesafe lidar operating in the presence of bright clouds. Detector improvements are possible to count to 20 GHz producing a single shot dynamic range of ten decades.

  2. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10(exp -7), where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  3. Gauging the cosmic microwave background

    E-print Network

    J. P. Zibin; Douglas Scott

    2008-12-21

    We provide a new derivation of the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), and find an exact expression that can be readily expanded perturbatively. Close attention is paid to gauge issues, with the motivation to examine the effect of super-Hubble modes on the CMB. We calculate a transfer function that encodes the behaviour of the dipole, and examine its long-wavelength behaviour. We show that contributions to the dipole from adiabatic super-Hubble modes are strongly suppressed, even in the presence of a cosmological constant, contrary to claims in the literature. We also introduce a naturally defined CMB monopole, which exhibits closely analogous long-wavelength behaviour. We discuss the geometrical origin of this super-Hubble suppression, pointing out that it is a simple reflection of adiabaticity, and hence argue that it will occur regardless of the matter content.

  4. Texture induced microwave background anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Borrill, Julian; Copeland, Edmund J.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Stebbins, Albert; Veeraraghavan, Shoba

    1994-03-01

    We use numerical simulations to calculate the cosmic microwave background anisotropy induced by the evolution of a global texture field, with special emphasis on individual textures. Both spherically symmetric and general configurations are analyzed, and in the latter case we consider field configurations which exhibit unwinding events and also ones which do not. We compare the results given by evolving the field numerically under both the expanded core (XCORE) and non-linear sigma model (NLSM) approximations with the analytic predictions of the NLSM exact solution for a spherically symmetric self-similar (SSSS) unwinding. We find that the random unwinding configuration spots' typical peak height is 60-75\\% and angular size typically only 10% of those of the SSSS unwinding, and that random configurations without an unwinding event nonetheless may generate indistinguishable hot and cold spots. A brief comparison is made with other work.

  5. Deleterious Background Selection with Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, R. R.; Kaplan, N. L.

    1995-01-01

    An analytic expression for the expected nucleotide diversity is obtained for a neutral locus in a region with deleterious mutation and recombination. Our analytic results are used to predict levels of variation for the entire third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. The predictions are consistent with the low levels of variation that have been observed at loci near the centromeres of the third chromosome of D. melanogaster. However, the low levels of variation observed near the tips of this chromosome are not predicted using currently available estimates of the deleterious mutation rate and of selection coefficients. If considerably smaller selection coefficients are assumed, the low observed levels of variation at the tips of the third chromosome are consistent with the background selection model. PMID:8601498

  6. Low Background Counting At SNOLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Ian; Cleveland, Bruce

    2011-04-27

    It is a continuous and ongoing effort to maintain radioactivity in materials and in the environment surrounding most underground experiments at very low levels. These low levels are required so that experiments can achieve the required detection sensitivities for the detection of low-energy neutrinos, searches for dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. SNOLAB has several facilities which are used to determine these low background levels in the materials and the underground environment. This proceedings will describe the SNOLAB High Purity Germanium Detector which has been in continuous use for the past five years and give results of many of the items that have been counted over that period. Brief descriptions of SNOLAB's alpha-beta and electrostatic counters will be given, and the radon levels at SNOLAB will be discussed.

  7. The cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1981-01-01

    Because angular anisotropies and spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background radiation are judged to be inevitable at some level, in a realistic cosmological model, the evidence for spectral distortions and its theoretical implications are described. The evidence for anisotropy is then discussed, and theoretical predictions of radiation anisotropy are summarized and compared with the data available. It is found that spectral distortions at the 3-sigma level near the peak of the blackbody spectrum, although inconsistent with the predicted distortions due to Compton scattering in the early universe, are elegantly interpreted in terms of radiation from an early, pregalactic generation of massive stars which had been thermalized by a modest amount of dust at high redshift. The quadrupole anisotropy at the 4-sigma level is most simply interpreted in terms of the large-scale structure of the universe.

  8. Low background aspects of GERDA

    SciTech Connect

    Simgen, Hardy

    2011-04-27

    The GERDA experiment operates bare Germanium diodes enriched in {sup 76}Ge in an environment of pure liquid argon to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. A very low radioactive background is essential for the success of the experiment. We present here the research done in order to remove radio-impurities coming from the liquid argon, the stainless steel cryostat and the front-end electronics. We found that liquid argon can be purified efficiently from {sup 222}Rn. The main source of {sup 222}Rn in GERDA is the cryostat which emanates about 55 mBq. A thin copper shroud in the center of the cryostat was implemented to prevent radon from approaching the diodes. Gamma ray screening of radio-pure components for front-end electronics resulted in the development of a pre-amplifier with a total activity of less than 1 mBq {sup 228}Th.

  9. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W. (Los Alamos, NM); Allander, Krag S. (Ojo Caliente, NM); Bounds, John A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone.

  10. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1996-06-11

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone. 5 figs.

  11. Gauging the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Zibin, J. P.; Scott, Douglas

    2008-12-15

    We provide a new derivation of the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), and find an exact expression that can be readily expanded perturbatively. Close attention is paid to gauge issues, with the motivation to examine the effect of super-Hubble modes on the CMB. We calculate a transfer function that encodes the behavior of the dipole, and examine its long-wavelength behavior. We show that contributions to the dipole from adiabatic super-Hubble modes are strongly suppressed, even in the presence of a cosmological constant, contrary to claims in the literature. We also introduce a naturally defined CMB monopole, which exhibits closely analogous long-wavelength behavior. We discuss the geometrical origin of this super-Hubble suppression, pointing out that it is a simple reflection of adiabaticity, and hence argue that it will occur regardless of the matter content.

  12. The microwave background anisotropies: observations.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, D

    1998-01-01

    Most cosmologists now believe that we live in an evolving universe that has been expanding and cooling since its origin about 15 billion years ago. Strong evidence for this standard cosmological model comes from studies of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR), the remnant heat from the initial fireball. The CMBR spectrum is blackbody, as predicted from the hot Big Bang model before the discovery of the remnant radiation in 1964. In 1992 the cosmic background explorer (COBE) satellite finally detected the anisotropy of the radiation-fingerprints left by tiny temperature fluctuations in the initial bang. Careful design of the COBE satellite, and a bit of luck, allowed the 30 microK fluctuations in the CMBR temperature (2.73 K) to be pulled out of instrument noise and spurious foreground emissions. Further advances in detector technology and experiment design are allowing current CMBR experiments to search for predicted features in the anisotropy power spectrum at angular scales of 1 degrees and smaller. If they exist, these features were formed at an important epoch in the evolution of the universe--the decoupling of matter and radiation at a temperature of about 4,000 K and a time about 300,000 years after the bang. CMBR anisotropy measurements probe directly some detailed physics of the early universe. Also, parameters of the cosmological model can be measured because the anisotropy power spectrum depends on constituent densities and the horizon scale at a known cosmological epoch. As sophisticated experiments on the ground and on balloons pursue these measurements, two CMBR anisotropy satellite missions are being prepared for launch early in the next century. PMID:9419320

  13. Cosmic microwave?background?theory

    PubMed Central

    Bond, J. Richard

    1998-01-01

    A long-standing goal of theorists has been to constrain cosmological parameters that define the structure formation theory from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy experiments and large-scale structure (LSS) observations. The status and future promise of this enterprise is described. Current band-powers in ?-space are consistent with a ?T flat in frequency and broadly follow inflation-based expectations. That the levels are ?(10?5)2 provides strong support for the gravitational instability theory, while the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) constraints on energy injection rule out cosmic explosions as a dominant source of LSS. Band-powers at ? ? 100 suggest that the universe could not have re-ionized too early. To get the LSS of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized fluctuations right provides encouraging support that the initial fluctuation spectrum was not far off the scale invariant form that inflation models prefer: e.g., for tilted ? cold dark matter sequences of fixed 13-Gyr age (with the Hubble constant H0 marginalized), ns = 1.17 ± 0.3 for Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) only; 1.15 ± 0.08 for DMR plus the SK95 experiment; 1.00 ± 0.04 for DMR plus all smaller angle experiments; 1.00 ± 0.05 when LSS constraints are included as well. The CMB alone currently gives weak constraints on ? and moderate constraints on ?tot, but theoretical forecasts of future long duration balloon and satellite experiments are shown which predict percent-level accuracy among a large fraction of the 10+ parameters characterizing the cosmic structure formation theory, at least if it is an inflation variant. PMID:9419321

  14. Background Learning with Support Vectors: Efficient Foreground

    E-print Network

    Bebis, George

    Detection and Tracking 11.3 Non-Parametric Statistical Estimation of Pixel Distribution for Background11 Background Learning with Support Vectors: Efficient Foreground Detection and Tracking ................................. .... 11-2 Statistical Background Modeling · Analytical Learning of Background Pixel Models · Target

  15. Use of cassette dosing approach to examine the effects of P-glycoprotein on the brain and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations in wild-type and P-glycoprotein knockout rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingrong; Cheong, Jonathan; Ding, Xiao; Deshmukh, Gauri

    2014-04-01

    The study objectives were 1) to test the hypothesis that the lack of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and the inhibition of breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) at the blood-brain barrier after cassette dosing of potent P-gp and Bcrp inhibitors were due to low plasma concentrations of those inhibitors and 2) to examine the effects of P-gp on the unbound brain (C(u,brain)) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations (C(u,CSF)) of P-gp substrates in rats. In vitro inhibition of 11 compounds (amprenavir, citalopram, digoxin, elacridar, imatinib, Ko143 [(3S,6S,12aS)-1,2,3,4,6,7,12,12a-octahydro-9-methoxy-6-(2-methylpropyl)-1,4-dioxopyrazino[1',2':1,6]pyrido[3,4-b]indole-3-propanoic acid 1,1-dimethylethyl ester], loperamide, prazosin, quinidine, sulfasalazine, and verapamil) on P-gp and Bcrp was examined in P-gp- and Bcrp-expressing Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, respectively. An in vivo study was conducted in wild-type and Mdr1a(-/-) rats after subcutaneous cassette dosing of the 11 compounds at 1-3 mg/kg, and the brain, CSF, and plasma concentrations of these compounds were determined. At the maximal unbound concentrations observed in rats at 1-3 mg/kg, P-gp and Bcrp were not inhibited by a cassette of the 11 compounds. For non-P-gp/Bcrp substrates, similar C(u,brain), C(u,CSF), and unbound plasma concentrations (C(u,plasma)) were observed in wild-type and P-gp knockout rats. For P-gp/Bcrp substrates, C(u,brain) ? C(u,CSF) ? C(u,plasma) in wild-type rats, but C(u,brain) and C(u,CSF) increased in the P-gp knockout rats and were within 3-fold of C(u,plasma) for six of the seven P-gp substrates. These results indicate that P-gp and Bcrp inhibition at the blood-brain barrier is unlikely in cassette dosing and also suggest that P-gp and Bcrp activity at the blood-CSF barrier is functionally not important in determination of the CSF concentration for their substrates. PMID:24398459

  16. DarkLight radiation backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantarians, N.; Collaboration: DarkLight Collaboration

    2013-11-07

    We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-on, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW CW beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, field emission inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation.

  17. Neurobiological background of negative symptoms.

    PubMed

    Galderisi, Silvana; Merlotti, Eleonora; Mucci, Armida

    2015-10-01

    Studies investigating neurobiological bases of negative symptoms of schizophrenia failed to provide consistent findings, possibly due to the heterogeneity of this psychopathological construct. We tried to review the findings published to date investigating neurobiological abnormalities after reducing the heterogeneity of the negative symptoms construct. The literature in electronic databases as well as citations and major articles are reviewed with respect to the phenomenology, pathology, genetics and neurobiology of schizophrenia. We searched PubMed with the keywords "negative symptoms," "deficit schizophrenia," "persistent negative symptoms," "neurotransmissions," "neuroimaging" and "genetic." Additional articles were identified by manually checking the reference lists of the relevant publications. Publications in English were considered, and unpublished studies, conference abstracts and poster presentations were not included. Structural and functional imaging studies addressed the issue of neurobiological background of negative symptoms from several perspectives (considering them as a unitary construct, focusing on primary and/or persistent negative symptoms and, more recently, clustering them into factors), but produced discrepant findings. The examined studies provided evidence suggesting that even primary and persistent negative symptoms include different psychopathological constructs, probably reflecting the dysfunction of different neurobiological substrates. Furthermore, they suggest that complex alterations in multiple neurotransmitter systems and genetic variants might influence the expression of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. On the whole, the reviewed findings, representing the distillation of a large body of disparate data, suggest that further deconstruction of negative symptomatology into more elementary components is needed to gain insight into underlying neurobiological mechanisms. PMID:25797499

  18. BOOK REVIEW: The Cosmic Microwave Background The Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Peter

    2009-08-01

    With the successful launch of the European Space Agency's Planck satellite earlier this year the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is once again the centre of attention for cosmologists around the globe. Since its accidental discovery in 1964 by Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson, this relic of the Big Bang has been subjected to intense scrutiny by generation after generation of experiments and has gradually yielded up answers to the deepest questions about the origin of our Universe. Most recently, the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) has made a full-sky analysis of the pattern of temperature and polarization variations that helped establish a new standard cosmological model, confirmed the existence of dark matter and dark energy, and provided strong evidence that there was an epoch of primordial inflation. Ruth Durrer's book reflects the importance of the CMB for future developments in this field. Aimed at graduate students and established researchers, it consists of a basic introduction to cosmology and the theory of primordial perturbations followed by a detailed explanation of how these manifest themselves as measurable variations in the present-day radiation field. It then focuses on the statistical methods needed to obtain accurate estimates of the parameters of the standard cosmological model, and finishes with a discussion of the effect of gravitational lensing on the CMB and on the evolution of its spectrum. The book apparently grew out of various lecture notes on CMB anisotropies for graduate courses given by the author. Its level and scope are well matched to the needs of such an audience and the presentation is clear and well-organized. I am sure that this book will be a useful reference for more senior scientists too. If I have a criticism, it is not about what is in the book but what is omitted. In my view, one of the most exciting possibilities for future CMB missions, including Planck, is the possibility that they might discover physics beyond that which the current standard model can describe. 'Thinking outside the box' has become a cliché, but it is what graduate students should be encouraged to do. For example, the standard cosmological model entails the assumption, motivated by the simplest theories of inflation, that the primordial density fluctuations are described by Gaussian statistics. The detection of any deviations from Gaussian behaviour in the radiation field would therefore offer us an exciting window into the detailed physics of inflation or other departures from the standard model. Although primordial non-Gaussianity is an extremely active subject of contemporary cosmological research, it is barely mentioned in this book. This is a regrettable omission in an otherwise commendable volume.

  19. Comic Cassettes for Language Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Gerald

    The development of animated cartoon sequences showing various kinds of mime and gesture in humorous situations is recommended as a useful teaching aid in language learning. Humor as a significant element in the content of pictorial aids is stressed, and the appropriate types of humor are identified and illustrated. Some remarks are made about the…

  20. Tape Cassette Bacteria Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of an automatic bacteria detection system with a zero-g capability and based on the filter-capsule approach is described. This system is intended for monitoring the sterility of regenerated water in a spacecraft. The principle of detection is based on measuring the increase in chemiluminescence produced by the action of bacterial porphyrins (i.e., catalase, cytochromes, etc.) on a luminol-hydrogen peroxide mixture. Since viable as well as nonviable organisms initiate this luminescence, viable organisms are detected by comparing the signal of an incubated water sample with an unincubated control. Higher signals for the former indicate the presence of viable organisms. System features include disposable sealed sterile capsules, each containing a filter membrane, for processing discrete water samples and a tape transport for moving these capsules through a processing sequence which involves sample concentration, nutrient addition, incubation, a 4 Molar Urea wash and reaction with luminol-hydrogen peroxide in front of a photomultiplier tube. Liquids are introduced by means of a syringe needle which pierces a rubber septum contained in the wall of the capsule. Detection thresholds obtained with this unit towards E. coli and S. marcescens assuming a 400 ml water sample are indicated.

  1. Image segmentation by background extraction refinements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Arturo A.; Mitchell, O. Robert

    1990-01-01

    An image segmentation method refining background extraction in two phases is presented. In the first phase, the method detects homogeneous-background blocks and estimates the local background to be extracted throughout the image. A block is classified homogeneous if its left and right standard deviations are small. The second phase of the method refines background extraction in nonhomogeneous blocks by recomputing the shoulder thresholds. Rules that predict the final background extraction are derived by observing the behavior of successive background statistical measurements in the regions under the presence of dark and/or bright object pixels. Good results are shown for a number of outdoor scenes.

  2. Cosmic Microwave Background Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paykari, Paniez; Starck, Jean-Luc Starck

    2012-03-01

    About 400,000 years after the Big Bang the temperature of the Universe fell to about a few thousand degrees. As a result, the previously free electrons and protons combined and the Universe became neutral. This released a radiation which we now observe as the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The tiny fluctuations* in the temperature and polarization of the CMB carry a wealth of cosmological information. These so-called temperature anisotropies were predicted as the imprints of the initial density perturbations which gave rise to the present large-scale structures such as galaxies and clusters of galaxies. This relation between the present-day Universe and its initial conditions has made the CMB radiation one of the most preferred tools to understand the history of the Universe. The CMB radiation was discovered by radio astronomers Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson in 1965 [72] and earned them the 1978 Nobel Prize. This discovery was in support of the Big Bang theory and ruled out the only other available theory at that time - the steady-state theory. The crucial observations of the CMB radiation were made by the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite [86]- orbited in 1989-1996. COBE made the most accurate measurements of the CMB frequency spectrum and confirmed it as being a black-body to within experimental limits. This made the CMB spectrum the most precisely measured black-body spectrum in nature. The CMB has a thermal black-body spectrum at a temperature of 2.725 K: the spectrum peaks in the microwave range frequency of 160.2 GHz, corresponding to a 1.9mmwavelength. The results of COBE inspired a series of ground- and balloon-based experiments, which measured CMB anisotropies on smaller scales over the next decade. During the 1990s, the first acoustic peak of the CMB power spectrum (see Figure 5.1) was measured with increasing sensitivity and by 2000 the BOOMERanG experiment [26] reported that the highest power fluctuations occur at scales of about one degree. A number of ground-based interferometers provided measurements of the fluctuations with higher accuracy over the next three years, including the Very Small Array [16], Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI) [61], and the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) [78]. DASI was the first to detect the polarization of the CMB and the CBI provided the first E-mode polarization spectrum with compelling evidence that it is out of phase with the T-mode spectrum. In June 2001, NASA launched its second CMB mission (after COBE), Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Explorer (WMAP) [44], to make much more precise measurements of the CMB sky. WMAP measured the differences in the CMB temperature across the sky creating a full-sky map of the CMB in five different frequency bands. The mission also measured the CMB's E-mode and the foreground polarization. As of October 2010, the WMAP spacecraft has ended its mission after nine years of operation. Although WMAP provided very accurate measurements of the large angular-scale fluctuations in the CMB, it did not have the angular resolution to cover the smaller-scale fluctuations that had been observed by previous ground-based interferometers. A third space mission, the Planck Surveyor [1], was launched by ESA* in May 2009 to measure the CMB on smaller scales than WMAP, as well as making precise measurements of the polarization of CMB. Planck represents an advance over WMAP in several respects: it observes in higher resolution, hence allowing one to probe the CMB power spectrum to smaller scales; it has a higher sensitivity and observes in nine frequency bands rather than five, hence improving the astrophysical foreground models. The mission has a wide variety of scientific aims, including: (1) detecting the total intensity/polarization of the primordial CMB anisotropies; (2) creating a galaxy-cluster catalogue through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect [93]; (3) observing the gravitational lensing of the CMB and the integrated Sachs Wolfe (ISW) effect [82]; (4) observing br

  3. Inhibitory Action of Benzo[?]pyrene on Hepatic Lipoprotein Receptors In Vitro and on Liver Lipid Homeostasis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Layeghkhavidaki, Hamed; Lanhers, Marie-Claire; Akbar, Samina; Gregory-Pauron, Lynn; Oster, Thierry; Grova, Nathalie; Appenzeller, Brice; Jasniewski, Jordane; Feidt, Cyril; Corbier, Catherine; Yen, Frances T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dyslipidemia associated with obesity often manifests as increased plasma LDL and triglyceride-rich lipoprotein levels suggesting changes in hepatic lipoprotein receptor status. Persistent organic pollutants have been recently postulated to contribute to the obesity etiology by increasing adipogenesis, but little information is available on their potential effect on hepatic lipoprotein metabolism. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the common environmental pollutant, benzo[?]pyrene (B[?]P) on two lipoprotein receptors, the LDL-receptor and the lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) as well as the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) using cell and animal models. Results LSR, LDL-receptor as well as ABCA1 protein levels were significantly decreased by 26–48% in Hepa1-6 cells incubated (<2 h) in the presence of B[?]P (?1 µM). Real-time PCR analysis and lactacystin studies revealed that this effect was due primarily to increased proteasome, and not lysosomal-mediated degradation rather than decreased transcription. Furthermore, ligand blots revealed that lipoproteins exposed to 1 or 5 µM B[?]P displayed markedly decreased (42–86%) binding to LSR or LDL-receptor. B[?]P-treated (0.5 mg/kg/48 h, i.p. 15 days) C57BL/6J mice displayed higher weight gain, associated with significant increases in plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, and liver cholesterol content, and decreased hepatic LDL-receptor and ABCA1 levels. Furthermore, correlational analysis revealed that B[?]P abolished the positive association observed in control mice between the LSR and LDL-receptor. Interestingly, levels of other proteins involved in liver cholesterol metabolism, ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 and scavenger receptor-BI, were decreased, while those of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 1 and 2 were increased in B[?]P-treated mice. Conclusions B[?]P demonstrates inhibitory action on LSR and LDL-R, as well as ABCA1, which we propose leads to modified lipid status in B[?]P-treated mice, thus providing new insight into mechanisms underlying the involvement of pollutants in the disruption of lipid homeostasis, potentially contributing to dyslipidemia associated with obesity. PMID:25054229

  4. Microwave Background Anisotropies from Scaling Seed Perturbations

    E-print Network

    Durrer, Ruth

    Microwave Background Anisotropies from Scaling Seed Perturbations Ruth Durrer and Mairi, Switzerland Abstract We study microwave background anisotropies induced by scaling seed pertur- bations the perturbation equations on super- horizon scales, for CMB anisotropies triggered by generic gravitational seeds

  5. 25 CFR 556.4 - Background investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...LICENSES AND BACKGROUND INVESTIGATIONS FOR KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS...INVESTIGATIONS FOR PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS AND KEY EMPLOYEES § 556.4 Background investigations...primary management official and for each key employee of a gaming operation....

  6. 25 CFR 556.4 - Background investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...LICENSES AND BACKGROUND INVESTIGATIONS FOR KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS...INVESTIGATIONS FOR PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS AND KEY EMPLOYEES § 556.4 Background investigations...primary management official and for each key employee of a gaming operation....

  7. 25 CFR 556.4 - Background investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...LICENSES AND BACKGROUND INVESTIGATIONS FOR KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS...INVESTIGATIONS FOR PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS AND KEY EMPLOYEES § 556.4 Background investigations...primary management official and for each key employee of a gaming operation....

  8. 25 CFR 556.4 - Background investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...LICENSES AND BACKGROUND INVESTIGATIONS FOR KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS...INVESTIGATIONS FOR PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS AND KEY EMPLOYEES § 556.4 Background investigations...primary management official and for each key employee of a gaming operation....

  9. 25 CFR 556.4 - Background investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...LICENSES AND BACKGROUND INVESTIGATIONS FOR KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS...INVESTIGATIONS FOR PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS AND KEY EMPLOYEES § 556.4 Background investigations...primary management official and for each key employee of a gaming operation....

  10. 32 CFR 1292.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Background. 1292.3 Section 1292.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY MISCELLANEOUS SECURITY OF DLA ACTIVITIES AND RESOURCES § 1292.3 Background. Section 21 of the...

  11. 32 CFR 1292.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Background. 1292.3 Section 1292.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY MISCELLANEOUS SECURITY OF DLA ACTIVITIES AND RESOURCES § 1292.3 Background. Section 21 of the...

  12. Membrane in M5-branes Background

    E-print Network

    Wei-shui Xu; Ding-fang Zeng

    2007-05-30

    In this paper, we investigate the properties of a membrane in the M5-brane background. Through solving the classical equations of motion of the membrane, we can understand the classical dynamics of the membrane in this background.

  13. Functional variability of the Lr34 durable resistance gene in transgenic wheat.

    PubMed

    Risk, Joanna M; Selter, Liselotte L; Krattinger, Simon G; Viccars, Libby A; Richardson, Terese M; Buesing, Gabriele; Herren, Gerhard; Lagudah, Evans S; Keller, Beat

    2012-05-01

    Breeding for durable disease resistance is challenging, yet essential to improve crops for sustainable agriculture. The wheat Lr34 gene is one of the few cloned, durable resistance genes in plants. It encodes an ATP binding cassette transporter and has been a source of resistance against biotrophic pathogens, such as leaf rust (Puccinina triticina), for over 100?years. As endogenous Lr34 confers quantitative resistance, we wanted to determine the effects of transgenic Lr34 with specific reference to how expression levels affect resistance. Transgenic Lr34 wheat lines were made in two different, susceptible genetic backgrounds. We found that the introduction of the Lr34 resistance allele was sufficient to provide comparable levels of leaf rust resistance as the endogenous Lr34 gene. As with the endogenous gene, we observed resistance in seedlings after cold treatment and in flag leaves of adult plants, as well as Lr34-associated leaf tip necrosis. The transgene-based Lr34 resistance did not involve a hypersensitive response, altered callose deposition or up-regulation of PR genes. Higher expression levels compared to endogenous Lr34 were observed in the transgenic lines both at seedling as well as adult stage and some improvement of resistance was seen in the flag leaf. Interestingly, in one genetic background the transgenic Lr34-based resistance resulted in improved seedling resistance without cold treatment. These data indicate that functional variability in Lr34-based resistance can be created using a transgenic approach. PMID:22321563

  14. Gating of the CFTR Cl- channel by ATP-driven nucleotide-binding domain dimerisation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sheppard, David N

    2009-05-15

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) plays a fundamental role in fluid and electrolyte transport across epithelial tissues. Based on its structure, function and regulation, CFTR is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. These transporters are assembled from two membrane-spanning domains (MSDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). In the vast majority of ABC transporters, the NBDs form a common engine that utilises the energy of ATP hydrolysis to pump a wide spectrum of substrates through diverse transmembrane pathways formed by the MSDs. By contrast, in CFTR the MSDs form a pathway for passive anion flow that is gated by cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis by the NBDs. Here, we consider how the interaction of ATP with two ATP-binding sites, formed by the NBDs, powers conformational changes in CFTR structure to gate the channel pore. We explore how conserved sequences from both NBDs form ATP-binding sites at the interface of an NBD dimer and highlight the distinct roles that each binding site plays during the gating cycle. Knowledge of how ATP gates the CFTR Cl- channel is critical for understanding CFTR's physiological role, its malfunction in disease and the mechanism of action of small molecules that modulate CFTR channel gating. PMID:19332488

  15. The C2 Domain and Altered ATP-Binding Loop Phosphorylation at Ser³?? Mediate the Redox-Dependent Increase in Protein Kinase C-? Activity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jianli; Yao, Yongneng; Zhang, Pingbo; Udayasuryan, Barath; Komissarova, Elena V; Chen, Ju; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Steinberg, Susan F

    2015-05-01

    The diverse roles of protein kinase C-? (PKC?) in cellular growth, survival, and injury have been attributed to stimulus-specific differences in PKC? signaling responses. PKC? exerts membrane-delimited actions in cells activated by agonists that stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis. PKC? is released from membranes as a Tyr(313)-phosphorylated enzyme that displays a high level of lipid-independent activity and altered substrate specificity during oxidative stress. This study identifies an interaction between PKC?'s Tyr(313)-phosphorylated hinge region and its phosphotyrosine-binding C2 domain that controls PKC?'s enzymology indirectly by decreasing phosphorylation in the kinase domain ATP-positioning loop at Ser(359). We show that wild-type (WT) PKC? displays a strong preference for substrates with serine as the phosphoacceptor residue at the active site when it harbors phosphomimetic or bulky substitutions at Ser(359.) In contrast, PKC?-S359A displays lipid-independent activity toward substrates with either a serine or threonine as the phosphoacceptor residue. Additional studies in cardiomyocytes show that oxidative stress decreases Ser(359) phosphorylation on native PKC? and that PKC?-S359A overexpression increases basal levels of phosphorylation on substrates with both phosphoacceptor site serine and threonine residues. Collectively, these studies identify a C2 domain-pTyr(313) docking interaction that controls ATP-positioning loop phosphorylation as a novel, dynamically regulated, and physiologically relevant structural determinant of PKC? catalytic activity. PMID:25755284

  16. The C2 Domain and Altered ATP-Binding Loop Phosphorylation at Ser359 Mediate the Redox-Dependent Increase in Protein Kinase C-? Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jianli; Yao, Yongneng; Zhang, Pingbo; Udayasuryan, Barath; Komissarova, Elena V.; Chen, Ju; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    The diverse roles of protein kinase C-? (PKC?) in cellular growth, survival, and injury have been attributed to stimulus-specific differences in PKC? signaling responses. PKC? exerts membrane-delimited actions in cells activated by agonists that stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis. PKC? is released from membranes as a Tyr313-phosphorylated enzyme that displays a high level of lipid-independent activity and altered substrate specificity during oxidative stress. This study identifies an interaction between PKC?'s Tyr313-phosphorylated hinge region and its phosphotyrosine-binding C2 domain that controls PKC?'s enzymology indirectly by decreasing phosphorylation in the kinase domain ATP-positioning loop at Ser359. We show that wild-type (WT) PKC? displays a strong preference for substrates with serine as the phosphoacceptor residue at the active site when it harbors phosphomimetic or bulky substitutions at Ser359. In contrast, PKC?-S359A displays lipid-independent activity toward substrates with either a serine or threonine as the phosphoacceptor residue. Additional studies in cardiomyocytes show that oxidative stress decreases Ser359 phosphorylation on native PKC? and that PKC?-S359A overexpression increases basal levels of phosphorylation on substrates with both phosphoacceptor site serine and threonine residues. Collectively, these studies identify a C2 domain-pTyr313 docking interaction that controls ATP-positioning loop phosphorylation as a novel, dynamically regulated, and physiologically relevant structural determinant of PKC? catalytic activity. PMID:25755284

  17. Discovery of 4,5,6,7-Tetrahydrobenzo[1,2-d]thiazoles as Novel DNA Gyrase Inhibitors Targeting the ATP-Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Tomaši?, Tihomir; Katsamakas, Sotirios; Hodnik, Žiga; Ilaš, Janez; Brvar, Matjaž; Solmajer, Tom; Montalvão, Sofia; Tammela, Päivi; Banjanac, Mihailo; Ergovi?, Gabrijela; Anderluh, Marko; Peterlin Maši?, Lucija; Kikelj, Danijel

    2015-07-23

    Bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV are essential enzymes that control the topological state of DNA during replication and validated antibacterial drug targets. Starting from a library of marine alkaloid oroidin analogues, we identified low micromolar inhibitors of Escherichia coli DNA gyrase based on the 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroquinazoline and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[1,2-d]thiazole scaffolds. Structure-based optimization of the initial hits resulted in low nanomolar E. coli DNA gyrase inhibitors, some of which exhibited micromolar inhibition of E. coli topoisomerase IV and of Staphylococcus aureus homologues. Some of the compounds possessed modest antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacterial strains, while their evaluation against wild-type, impA and ?tolC E. coli strains suggests that they are efflux pump substrates and/or do not possess the physicochemical properties necessary for cell wall penetration. Our study provides a rationale for optimization of this class of compounds toward balanced dual DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV inhibitors with antibacterial activity. PMID:26098163

  18. Studies on the ATP Binding Site of Fyn Kinase for the Identification of New Inhibitors and Their Evaluation as Potential Agents against Tauopathies and Tumors.

    PubMed

    Tintori, Cristina; La Sala, Giuseppina; Vignaroli, Giulia; Botta, Lorenzo; Fallacara, Anna Lucia; Falchi, Federico; Radi, Marco; Zamperini, Claudio; Dreassi, Elena; Dello Iacono, Lucia; Orioli, Donata; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Garbelli, Mirko; Lossani, Andrea; Gasparrini, Francesca; Tuccinardi, Tiziano; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Angelucci, Adriano; Maga, Giovanni; Schenone, Silvia; Brullo, Chiara; Musumeci, Francesca; Desogus, Andrea; Crespan, Emmanuele; Botta, Maurizio

    2015-06-11

    Fyn is a member of the Src-family of nonreceptor protein-tyrosine kinases. Its abnormal activity has been shown to be related to various human cancers as well as to severe pathologies, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Herein, a structure-based drug design protocol was employed aimed at identifying novel Fyn inhibitors. Two hits from commercial sources (1, 2) were found active against Fyn with K(i) of about 2 ?M, while derivative 4a, derived from our internal library, showed a K(i) of 0.9 ?M. A hit-to-lead optimization effort was then initiated on derivative 4a to improve its potency. Slightly modifications rapidly determine an increase in the binding affinity, with the best inhibitors 4c and 4d having K(i)s of 70 and 95 nM, respectively. Both compounds were found able to inhibit the phosphorylation of the protein Tau in an Alzheimer's model cell line and showed antiproliferative activities against different cancer cell lines. PMID:25923950

  19. Hardware-based anti-Brownian electrokinetic trap (ABEL trap) for single molecules: Control loop simulations and application to ATP binding stoichiometry in multi-subunit enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yan; Wang, Quan; Cohen, Adam E.; Douglas, Nick; Frydman, Judith; Moerner, W. E.

    2009-01-01

    The hardware-based Anti-Brownian ELectrokinetic trap (ABEL trap) features a feedback latency as short as 25 µs, suitable for trapping single protein molecules in aqueous solution. The performance of the feedback control loop is analyzed to extract estimates of the position variance for various controller designs. Preliminary data are presented in which the trap is applied to the problem of determining the distribution of numbers of ATP bound for single chaperonin multi-subunit enzymes. PMID:19823693

  20. Hanford Site background: Part 1, Soil background for nonradioactive analytes. Revision 1, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Volume two contains the following appendices: Description of soil sampling sites; sampling narrative; raw data soil background; background data analysis; sitewide background soil sampling plan; and use of soil background data for the detection of contamination at waste management unit on the Hanford Site.

  1. Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) press kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    COBE, the Cosmic Background Explorer spacecraft, and its mission are described. COBE was designed to study the origin and dynamics of the universe including the theory that the universe began with a cataclysmic explosion referred to as the Big Bang. To this end, earth's cosmic background - the infrared radiation that bombards earth from every direction - will be measured by three sophisticated instruments: the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR), the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS), and the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE).

  2. 40 CFR 105.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS RECOGNITION AWARDS UNDER THE CLEAN WATER ACT General § 105.1 Background...Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Clean Water Act (CWA) Recognition Awards...

  3. Fiche Pratique: Concours TV 5--La television a l'ecole; Autre temps, autre temps; Cassette FDM frequence plus--l'invite; Science en francais (Practical Ideas: TV 5 Competition--Television in Schools; Once Again, Another Tense; The "FDM" Audiocassette Series--The Guest; Science in French).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuncea, Nicolae; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The language classroom activities described include work with TV programs (interviews, cooking demonstrations, scenes without soundtrack); exercises with passe compose and passe simple verb tenses; descriptions of available French cassette programs; and use of texts on scientific subjects to build reading for meaning. (CNP)

  4. 32 CFR 732.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Background. 732.1 Section 732.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NONNAVAL MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE General § 732.1 Background. When a U.S. Navy or Marine Corps member or a Canadian Navy or Marine Corps...

  5. 32 CFR 732.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Background. 732.1 Section 732.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NONNAVAL MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE General § 732.1 Background. When a U.S. Navy or Marine Corps member or a Canadian Navy or Marine Corps...

  6. 32 CFR 732.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Background. 732.1 Section 732.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NONNAVAL MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE General § 732.1 Background. When a U.S. Navy or Marine Corps member or a Canadian Navy or Marine Corps...

  7. Establishment of a Background Environmental Monitoring Station

    E-print Network

    Protection Agency ESRI Environmental Systems Research Institute FR Federal Register g gram(s) HMS HanfordPNNL-23930 Establishment of a Background Environmental Monitoring Station for the PNNL Campus of a Background Environmental Monitoring Station for the PNNL Campus BG Fritz LE Bisping SF Snyder JP Rishel JM

  8. 32 CFR 1292.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Background. 1292.3 Section 1292.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY MISCELLANEOUS SECURITY OF DLA ACTIVITIES AND RESOURCES § 1292.3 Background. Section 21 of the Internal Security Act of...

  9. 32 CFR 1292.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Background. 1292.3 Section 1292.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY MISCELLANEOUS SECURITY OF DLA ACTIVITIES AND RESOURCES § 1292.3 Background. Section 21 of the Internal Security Act of...

  10. 32 CFR 1292.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Background. 1292.3 Section 1292.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY MISCELLANEOUS SECURITY OF DLA ACTIVITIES AND RESOURCES § 1292.3 Background. Section 21 of the Internal Security Act of...

  11. 36 CFR 401.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Background. 401.3 Section 401.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION MONUMENTS AND MEMORIALS § 401.3 Background. Following World War I many American individuals, organizations and...

  12. 36 CFR 401.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Background. 401.3 Section 401.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION MONUMENTS AND MEMORIALS § 401.3 Background. Following World War I many American individuals, organizations and...

  13. 36 CFR 401.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Background. 401.3 Section 401.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION MONUMENTS AND MEMORIALS § 401.3 Background. Following World War I many American individuals, organizations and...

  14. Child Care: State Requirements for Background Checks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagnoni, Cynthia

    Background checks involve gathering information from state and federal databases to determine if child care providers have a history of child abuse or other criminal convictions that would make them unacceptable for working with children. Background checks include state criminal history checks, state child abuse registry checks, and Federal Bureau…

  15. 28 CFR 23.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Background. 23.2 Section 23.2 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS OPERATING POLICIES § 23.2 Background. It is... of intelligence data necessary to support control of serious criminal activity may...

  16. 28 CFR 23.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Background. 23.2 Section 23.2 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS OPERATING POLICIES § 23.2 Background. It is... of intelligence data necessary to support control of serious criminal activity may...

  17. 28 CFR 23.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Background. 23.2 Section 23.2 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS OPERATING POLICIES § 23.2 Background. It is... of intelligence data necessary to support control of serious criminal activity may...

  18. 32 CFR 1292.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Background. 1292.3 Section 1292.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY MISCELLANEOUS SECURITY OF DLA ACTIVITIES AND RESOURCES § 1292.3 Background. Section 21 of the Internal Security Act of...

  19. 32 CFR 1292.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Background. 1292.3 Section 1292.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY MISCELLANEOUS SECURITY OF DLA ACTIVITIES AND RESOURCES § 1292.3 Background. Section 21 of the Internal Security Act of...

  20. 47 CFR 32.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Background. 32.1 Section 32.1 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Preface § 32.1 Background. The revised Uniform System of Accounts (USOA) is a...

  1. 47 CFR 32.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Background. 32.1 Section 32.1 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Preface § 32.1 Background. The revised Uniform System of Accounts (USOA) is a...

  2. 47 CFR 201.0 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Background. 201.0 Section 201.0 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL EXECUTIVE POLICY § 201.0 Background. National policy with respect to the conservation, allocation and use of the...

  3. 47 CFR 32.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Background. 32.1 Section 32.1 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Preface § 32.1 Background. The revised Uniform System of Accounts (USOA) is a historical financial accounting...

  4. Definition and some backgrounds Combinatorial consequences

    E-print Network

    Andrews, Peter B.

    related backgrounds For cardinals , C. Weiss has defined the notion of a slender (, )-list, which generalizes the notion of a -tree. He also isolates the principle ISP(, ) which states that every slender Lowerbounds Some related backgrounds For cardinals , C. Weiss has defined the notion of a slender (, )-list

  5. 33 CFR 236.4 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Background. 236.4 Section 236.4 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE WATER RESOURCE POLICIES AND AUTHORITIES: CORPS OF ENGINEERS PARTICIPATION IN IMPROVEMENTS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY § 236.4 Background. (a) The role...

  6. 14 CFR 1217.102 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

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    E-print Network

    Keil, David M.

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

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    E-print Network

    L. Baudis; G. Heusser; B. Majorovits; Y. Ramachers; H. Strecker; H. V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus

    1998-11-11

    The potential of GENIUS as a dark matter detector is discussed. A study was performed to demonstrate the good behaviour of the proposed detector design of naked HPGe-crystals in liquid nitrogen. The expected background components were simulated and are discussed in some detail.With the obtained background GENIUS could cover a large part of the favoured MSSM parameter-space.

  12. The GENIUS Project Background and technical studies

    E-print Network

    Baudis, L; Majorovits, B; Ramachers, Y; Strecker, H; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H V

    1998-01-01

    The potential of GENIUS as a dark matter detector is discussed. A study was performed to demonstrate the good behaviour of the proposed detector design of naked HPGe-crystals in liquid nitrogen. The expected background components were simulated and are discussed in some detail.With the obtained background GENIUS could cover a large part of the favoured MSSM parameter-space.

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

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    E-print Network

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

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    E-print Network

    Ma, Lena

    Background Concentrations of Trace Metals in Florida Surface Soils April 1997 Lena Q. Ma Principal, 1996 March 14, 1997 PROJECT TITLE: Background Concentrations of Trace Metals in Florida Surface Soils of Florida CO-PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Willie Harris AFFILIATION: Soil Mineralogy, Soil and Water Sciences

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

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