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Sample records for background tuberculosis remains

  1. Detail of roofline with view of remaining cupola in background; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of roofline with view of remaining cupola in background; camera facing southwest. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Old Administrative Offices, Eighth Street, north side between Railroad Avenue & Walnut Avenue, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  2. PCR diagnostics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in historic human long bone remains from 18th century burials in Kaiserebersdorf, Austria

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Lutz; Däubl, Barbara; Lindqvist, Charlotte; Kruckenhauser, Luise; Teschler-Nicola, Maria; Haring, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    Background In the present pilot study we applied recently published protocols for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human remains. We screened long bones from an 18th century cemetery and skulls from the anatomical "Weisbach collection" (19th century). In addition, besides the study of abundance of tuberculosis in inmates of the poorhouse itself, we were interested to test whether in this particular instance tuberculosis can be identified from cortical bones, which are rarely affected by tuberculosis, but mostly better preserved than the vertebral bodies or epiphyses. Method The DNA extractions from the bone samples were obtained following established ancient DNA protocols. Subsequently extracts were subjected to a series of PCR amplifications using primer pairs published previously [1,2]. PCR products of the expected size were subsequently sequenced. Results Only primers targeting the repetitive IS6110 insertion sequence yielded PCR products of appropriate size. In one sample only (skull sample WB354 of the "Weisbach collection") sequence analysis revealed an authentic M. tuberculosis sequence that matched to a reference sequence from GenBank. Conclusion With a variety of established PCR approaches we failed to detect M. tuberculosis DNA in historic human femurs from an 18th century cemetery relating to a poor house in Kaiserebersdorf, Austria. Our data may indicate that in this particular case, thoracic or lumbar vertebrae, i.e. bones that are severely affected by the disease, would be more suitable for molecular diagnostics than long bones. However, the unpredictable state of DNA preservation in bones from museum collections does not allow any general recommendation of any type of bone. PMID:18799009

  3. Tuberculin skin test reactivity is dependent on host genetic background in Colombian tuberculosis household contacts.

    PubMed

    Cobat, Aurélie; Barrera, Luis F; Henao, Hanna; Arbeláez, Patricia; Abel, Laurent; García, Luis F; Schurr, Erwin; Alcaïs, Alexandre

    2012-04-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) measures the intensity of antimycobacterial acquired immunity and is used to diagnose latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We report evidence for a codominant gene explaining ∼65% of the TST variability. Disregarding the host genetic background may lead to misclassifications of TST-based diagnosis of latent M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:22291100

  4. Old World tuberculosis: Evidence from human remains with a review of current research and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Charlotte A

    2015-06-01

    The evidence for TB in archaeological human remains for the Old World is reviewed in published and some unpublished sources. The evidence of Pott's disease was considered specific for TB, with other bone changes, such as rib lesions, as non-specific. Limitations of the data are discussed. Most evidence for TB comes from skeletons from the northern hemisphere, particularly in Europe in the late Medieval period (12(th)-16th centuries AD), but there is early evidence in the Near/Middle East and Egypt. Many parts of Africa, Asia and Australasia have very little or no evidence. aDNA analysis has provided data on species and strains of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms affecting people in the past. The extant data suggest the first epidemiological transition (Neolithic agriculture and permanent settlements) led to an increase in TB, with later increases in urban environments of the late Medieval period. A number of causative factors were at play. Future research, particularly using biomolecular analysis, has the potential to further contribute to our understanding of the origin and evolution of TB, thus merging the disciplines of palaeopathology and evolutionary medicine. PMID:25802030

  5. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dheda, Keertan; Barry, Clifton E; Maartens, Gary

    2016-03-19

    Although the worldwide incidence of tuberculosis has been slowly decreasing, the global disease burden remains substantial (∼9 million cases and ∼1·5 million deaths in 2013), and tuberculosis incidence and drug resistance are rising in some parts of the world such as Africa. The modest gains achieved thus far are threatened by high prevalence of HIV, persisting global poverty, and emergence of highly drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is also a major problem in health-care workers in both low-burden and high-burden settings. Although the ideal preventive agent, an effective vaccine, is still some time away, several new diagnostic technologies have emerged, and two new tuberculosis drugs have been licensed after almost 50 years of no tuberculosis drugs being registered. Efforts towards an effective vaccine have been thwarted by poor understanding of what constitutes protective immunity. Although new interventions and investment in control programmes will enable control, eradication will only be possible through substantial reductions in poverty and overcrowding, political will and stability, and containing co-drivers of tuberculosis, such as HIV, smoking, and diabetes. PMID:26377143

  6. Tuberculosis in Late Neolithic-Early Copper Age human skeletal remains from Hungary.

    PubMed

    Pósa, Annamária; Maixner, Frank; Mende, Balázs Gusztáv; Köhler, Kitti; Osztás, Anett; Sola, Christophe; Dutour, Olivier; Masson, Muriel; Molnár, Erika; Pálfi, György; Zink, Albert

    2015-06-01

    Alsónyék-Bátaszék in Southern Hungary is one of the largest late Neolithic settlements and cemeteries excavated in Central Europe. In total, 2359 burials from the Late Neolithic - Early Copper Age Lengyel culture were found between 2006 and 2009 [1]. Anthropological investigations previously carried out on individuals from this site revealed an interesting paleopathological case of tuberculosis in the form of Pott's disease dated to the early 5(th) millennium BC. In this study, selected specimens from this osteoarcheological series were subjected to paleomicrobiological analysis to establish the presence of MTBC bacteria. As all individuals showing clear osteological signs of TB infection belonged to a single grave group, 38 individuals from this grave group were analysed. The sample included the case of Pott's disease as well as individuals both with and without osseous TB manifestations. The detection of TB DNA in the individual with Pott's disease provided further evidence for the occurrence of TB in Neolithic populations of Europe. Moreover, our molecular analysis indicated that several other individuals of the same grave group were also infected with TB, opening the possibility for further analyses of this unique Neolithic skeletal series. PMID:25857937

  7. Tackling the Remaining Attainment Gap between Students with and without Immigrant Background: An Investigation into the Equivalence of SES Constructs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenkeit, Jenny; Caro, Daniel H.; Strand, Steve

    2015-01-01

    In England, students with immigrant background exhibit lower educational attainment than those without immigrant background. Family socioeconomic status (SES) helps explain differences in educational attainment, but a gap remains that differs in size for students with different immigrant backgrounds. While the explanatory repertoire for the…

  8. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Teens > Tuberculosis Print A A A Text Size What's in ... Duration When to Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis TB Basics Tuberculosis (also known as "TB") is ...

  9. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body. TB spreads through the air when a person with ...

  10. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to address TB and HIV coinfection around the world? The President’s U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS ... of those suffering from HIV/AIDS around the world. PEPFAR’s Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and ...

  11. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tiruviluamala, Parvathi; Reichman, Lee B

    2002-01-01

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by bacteria in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Of these, the most common species to infect humans is M. tuberculosis. The TB bacillus is an extremely successful human pathogen, infecting two billion persons worldwide; an estimated 2 to 3 million people die from tuberculosis each year. In the United States, TB rates decreased steadily at the rate of 5% per year from 1953 until 1985 when the trend reversed, with the number of TB cases peaking in 1992. Outbreaks of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) were reported, and these cases were documented to be transmitted in nosocomial and congregate settings, including hospitals and prisons. AIDS patients infected with M. tb developed disease rapidly, and case-fatality rates of >80% were noted in those infected with multidrug-resistant M. tb. Intensive intervention, at enormous cost, caused the number of TB cases to decline. This article discusses factors that led to the increase in TB cases, their subsequent decline, and measures needed in the future if TB is to be eliminated in the United States. PMID:11910069

  12. Diabetes and tuberculosis: the impact of the diabetes epidemic on tuberculosis incidence

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Catherine R; Forouhi, Nita G; Roglic, Gojka; Williams, Brian G; Lauer, Jeremy A; Dye, Chirstopher; Unwin, Nigel

    2007-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major cause of mortality in developing countries, and in these countries diabetes prevalence is increasing rapidly. Diabetes increases the risk of TB. Our aim was to assess the potential impact of diabetes as a risk factor for incident pulmonary tuberculosis, using India as an example. Methods We constructed an epidemiological model using data on tuberculosis incidence, diabetes prevalence, population structure, and relative risk of tuberculosis associated with diabetes. We evaluated the contribution made by diabetes to both tuberculosis incidence, and to the difference between tuberculosis incidence in urban and rural areas. Results In India in 2000 there were an estimated 20.7 million adults with diabetes, and 900,000 incident adult cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. Our calculations suggest that diabetes accounts for 14.8% (uncertainty range 7.1% to 23.8%) of pulmonary tuberculosis and 20.2% (8.3% to 41.9%) of smear-positive (i.e. infectious) tuberculosis. We estimate that the increased diabetes prevalence in urban areas is associated with a 15.2% greater smear-positive tuberculosis incidence in urban than rural areas – over a fifth of the estimated total difference. Conclusion Diabetes makes a substantial contribution to the burden of incident tuberculosis in India, and the association is particularly strong for the infectious form of tuberculosis. The current diabetes epidemic may lead to a resurgence of tuberculosis in endemic regions, especially in urban areas. This potentially carries a risk of global spread with serious implications for tuberculosis control and the achievement of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. PMID:17822539

  13. Pancreatic Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Poras; Bhadana, Utsav; Arora, Mohinder P

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis of the pancreas is extremely rare and in most of the cases mimics pancreatic carcinoma. There are a number of case reports on pancreatic tuberculosis with various different presentations, but only a few case series have been published, and most of our knowledge about this disease comes from individual case reports. Patients of pancreatic tuberculosis may remain asymptomatic initially and manifest as an abscess or a mass involving local lymph nodes and usually present with non-specific features. Pancreatic tuberculosis may present with a wide range of imaging findings. It is difficult to diagnose tuberculosis of pancreas on imaging studies as they may present with masses, cystic lesions or abscesses and mass lesions in most of the cases mimic pancreatic carcinoma. As it is a rare entity, it cannot be recommended but suggested that pancreatic tuberculosis should be considered in cases with a large space occupying lesions associated with necrotic peripancreatic lymph nodes and constitutional symptoms. Ultrasonography/computed tomography/endosonography-guided biopsy is the recommended diagnostic technique. Most patients achieve complete cure with standard antituberculous therapy. The aims of this study are to review clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, and management of pancreatic tuberculosis and to present our experience of 5 cases of pancreatic tuberculosis. PMID:26884661

  14. The epidemiological advantage of preferential targeting of tuberculosis control to the poor

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Jason R.; Basu, Sanjay; Dowdy, David W.; Murray, Megan B.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains disproportionately concentrated among the poor, yet known determinants of tuberculosis reactivation may fail to explain observed disparities in disease rates according to wealth. Reviewing data on tuberculosis disparities in India and the wealth distribution of known tuberculosis risk factors, we describe how social mixing patterns could be contributing to tuberculosis disparities. Wealth-assortative mixing, wherein individuals are more likely to contact others from similar socioeconomic backgrounds, amplifies smaller differences in risk of tuberculosis, resulting in large population-level disparities. As disparities and assortativeness increase, tuberculosis becomes more difficult to control, an effect that is obscured by looking at population averages of epidemiological parameters, such as case detection rates. We illustrate how tuberculosis control efforts may benefit from preferential targeting toward the poor. In India, an equivalent-scale intervention could have a substantially greater impact if targeted to those living below the poverty line, compared with a population-wide strategy. In addition to potential efficiencies in targeting higher-risk populations, tuberculosis control efforts would reduce more secondary tuberculosis cases, per primary case diagnosed, if they were preferentially targeted to the poor. We highlight the need to collect programmatic data on tuberculosis disparities and explicitly incorporate equity considerations in tuberculosis control plans. PMID:25859990

  15. Update on Veterinary Tuberculosis Vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this presentation, the participant will know the current status of veterinary tuberculosis vaccine research and development, and understand the challenges which remain for the future introduction of tuberculosis vaccines intended for wildlife and livestock...

  16. Comprehensive Treatment of Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mitnick, Carole D.; Shin, Sonya S.; Seung, Kwonjune J.; Rich, Michael L.; Atwood, Sidney S.; Furin, Jennifer J.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Alcantara Viru, Felix A.; Appleton, Sasha C.; Bayona, Jaime N.; Bonilla, Cesar A.; Chalco, Katiuska; Choi, Sharon; Franke, Molly F.; Fraser, Hamish S.F.; Guerra, Dalia; Hurtado, Rocio M.; Jazayeri, Darius; Joseph, Keith; Llaro, Karim; Mestanza, Lorena; Mukherjee, Joia S.; Muñoz, Maribel; Palacios, Eda; Sanchez, Epifanio; Sloutsky, Alexander; Becerra, Mercedes C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis has been reported in 45 countries, including countries with limited resources and a high burden of tuberculosis. We describe the management of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and treatment outcomes among patients who were referred for individualized outpatient therapy in Peru. METHODS A total of 810 patients were referred for free individualized therapy, including drug treatment, resective surgery, adverse-event management, and nutritional and psychosocial support. We tested isolates from 651 patients for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and developed regimens that included five or more drugs to which the infecting isolate was not resistant. RESULTS Of the 651 patients tested, 48 (7.4%) had extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis; the remaining 603 patients had multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis had undergone more treatment than the other patients (mean [±SD] number of regimens, 4.2±1.9 vs. 3.2±1.6; P<0.001) and had isolates that were resistant to more drugs (number of drugs, 8.4±1.1 vs. 5.3±1.5; P<0.001). None of the patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis were coinfected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis received daily, supervised therapy with an average of 5.3±1.3 drugs, including cycloserine, an injectable drug, and a fluoroquinolone. Twenty-nine of these patients (60.4%) completed treatment or were cured, as compared with 400 patients (66.3%) with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (P=0.36). CONCLUSIONS Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis can be cured in HIV-negative patients through outpatient treatment, even in those who have received multiple prior courses of therapy for tuberculosis. PMID:18687637

  17. Urinary tuberculosis: modern issues.

    PubMed

    Wise, Gilbert J

    2009-07-01

    Tuberculosis remains an epidemic that affects one third of the world's population. The persistence of this disease is caused by a large pool of immune-compromised and lower socioeconomic populations. The advent of rapid transportation and migration has contributed to the persistence of this disease in developed and less developed nations. The emergence of drug-resistant strains has added an additional factor for the pervasiveness of tuberculosis. The genitourinary system is a primary target for hematogenous infections. This paper reviews the contemporary issues that affect the diagnosis and treatment of urinary tuberculosis. PMID:19570494

  18. Primary Isoniazid Prophylaxis against Tuberculosis in HIV-Exposed Children

    PubMed Central

    Madhi, Shabir A.; Nachman, Sharon; Violari, Avy; Kim, Soyeon; Cotton, Mark F.; Bobat, Raziya; Jean-Philippe, Patrick; McSherry, George; Mitchell, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Background The dual epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis is a major cause of sickness and death in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of preexposure isoniazid prophylaxis against tuberculosis in HIV-infected children and uninfected children exposed to HIV during the perinatal period. Methods We randomly assigned 548 HIV-infected and 804 HIV-uninfected infants (91 to 120 days of age) to isoniazid (10 to 20 mg per kilogram of body weight per day) or matching placebo for 96 weeks. All patients received bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccination against tuberculosis within 30 days after birth. HIV-infected children had access to antiretroviral therapy. The primary outcome measures were tuberculosis disease and death in HIV-infected children and latent tuberculosis infection, tuberculosis disease, and death in HIV-uninfected children within 96 to 108 weeks after randomization. Results Antiretroviral therapy was initiated in 98.9% of HIV-infected children during the study. Among HIV-infected children, protocol-defined tuberculosis or death occurred in 52 children (19.0%) in the isoniazid group and 53 (19.3%) in the placebo group (P = 0.93). Among HIV-uninfected children, there was no significant difference in the combined incidence of tuberculosis infection, tuberculosis disease, or death between the isoniazid group (39 children, 10%) and the placebo group (45 children, 11%; P = 0.44). The rate of tuberculosis was 121 cases per 1000 child-years (95% confidence interval [CI], 95 to 153) among HIV-infected children as compared with 41 per 1000 child-years (95% CI, 31 to 52) among HIV-uninfected children. There were no significant differences in clinical or severe laboratory toxic effects between treatment groups. Conclusions Primary isoniazid prophylaxis did not improve tuberculosis-disease–free survival among HIV-infected children or tuberculosis-infection–free survival among HIV

  19. Excessive Cytolytic Responses Predict Tuberculosis Relapse After Apparently Successful Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cliff, Jacqueline M.; Cho, Jang-Eun; Lee, Ji-Sook; Ronacher, Katharina; King, Elizabeth C.; van Helden, Paul; Walzl, Gerhard; Dockrell, Hazel M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Currently, there are no tools to accurately predict tuberculosis relapse. This study aimed to determine whether patients who experience tuberculosis relapse have different immune responses to mycobacteria in vitro than patients who remain cured for 2 years. Methods. Patients with an initial episode of pulmonary tuberculosis were recruited in South Africa. Diluted blood, collected at diagnosis and after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment, was cultured with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis for 6 days, and cellular RNA was frozen. Gene expression in samples from 10 patients who subsequently experienced relapse, confirmed by strain genotyping, was compared to that in samples from patients who remained cured, using microarrays. Results. At diagnosis, expression of 668 genes was significantly different in samples from patients who experienced relapse, compared with expression in patients who remained successfully cured; these differences persisted for at least 4 weeks. Gene ontology and biological pathways analyses revealed significant upregulation of genes involved in cytotoxic cell-mediated killing. Results were confirmed by real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis in a wider patient cohort. Conclusions. These data show that patients who will subsequently experience relapse exhibit altered immune responses, including excessively robust cytolytic responses to M. tuberculosis in vitro, at the time of diagnosis, compared with patients who will achieve durable cure. Together with microbiological and clinical indices, these differences could be exploited in drug development. PMID:26351358

  20. The return of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Fätkenheuer, G; Taelman, H; Lepage, P; Schwenk, A; Wenzel, R

    1999-06-01

    At the end of the 20th century, tuberculosis remains a major public health issue. In developing countries tuberculosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, and the spread of the HIV epidemic contributes significantly to the worsening of the situation. Coinfection with tuberculosis and HIV results in special diagnostic and therapeutic problems and uses up larger amounts of medical resources in developing countries. Outbreaks of multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) were first reported from US-American centers caring for HIV patients, but have now been observed in many other countries. In Western Europe the tuberculosis epidemic is under control, but increasing incidence rates in migrants raise new problems in these countries. Tuberculosis is uncontrolled in large parts of the former Soviet Union due to the socio-economic break-down in these countries. Only rigorous infection control measures on a world-wide scale will prevent further detoriation of this situation. Therefore, the extension of surveillance systems, and sufficient funding for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of tuberculosis by national governments and international organizations are all urgently needed. PMID:10354864

  1. Ocular tuberculosis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Shakarchi, Faiz I

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization currently estimates that nearly two billion people, or one-third of the world’s population, are infected by tuberculosis, and that roughly 10% of the infected people are symptomatic. Tuberculosis affects the lungs in 80% of patients, while in the remaining 20% the disease may affect other organs, including the eye. Uveitis can be seen concurrently with tuberculosis, but a direct association is difficult to prove. Ocular tuberculosis is usually not associated with clinical evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis, as up to 60% of extrapulmonary tuberculosis patients may not have pulmonary disease. The diagnosis of tuberculous uveitis is often problematic and in nearly all reported cases, the diagnosis was only presumptive. Tuberculous uveitis is a great mimicker of various uveitis entities and it can be considered in the differential diagnosis of any type of intraocular inflammation. It is still unknown if ocular manifestations result from a direct mycobacterium infection or hypersensitivity reaction and this is reflected on the management of tuberculous uveitis. Prevalence of tuberculosis as an etiology of uveitis may reach up to 10% in endemic areas. Tuberculous uveitis is a vision-threatening disease that inevitably leads to blindness if not properly diagnosed and treated. The aim of this review is to illustrate the various clinical features and management of presumed tuberculous uveitis. The current review focuses on the diagnostic criteria, significance of tuberculin skin test, and use of systemic corticosteroids in the management of tuberculous uveitis as recommended in recent publications. PMID:26648690

  2. Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Tuberculosis Research The New Challenge for TB Research NIAID ... HIV/AIDS Multidrug-Resistant and Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Research Agenda (PDF) TB Research at NIAID Research ...

  3. Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Tuberculosis (TB) Overview In developed countries, such as the ... thought to be infected with TB bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( Mtb ). TB is a chronic bacterial infection. It ...

  4. Identification and Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolated From Water and Soil Samples of a Metropolitan City

    PubMed Central

    Velayati, Ali Akbar; Farnia, Parissa; Mozafari, Mohadese; Malekshahian, Donya; Farahbod, Amir Masoud; Seif, Shima; Rahideh, Snaz

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The potential role of environmental Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the epidemiology of TB remains unknown. We investigated the transmission of M tuberculosis from humans to the environment and the possible transmission of M tuberculosis from the environment to humans. METHODS: A total of 1,500 samples were collected from three counties of the Tehran, Iran metropolitan area from February 2012 to January 2014. A total of 700 water samples (47%) and 800 soil samples (53%) were collected. Spoligotyping and the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats typing method were performed on DNA extracted from single colonies. Genotypes of M tuberculosis strains isolated from the environment were compared with the genotypes obtained from 55 patients with confirmed pulmonary TB diagnosed during the study period in the same three counties. RESULTS: M tuberculosis was isolated from 11 of 800 soil samples (1%) and 71 of 700 water samples (10%). T family (56 of 82, 68%) followed by Delhi/CAS (11 of 82, 13.4%) were the most frequent M tuberculosis superfamilies in both water and soil samples. Overall, 27.7% of isolates in clusters were related. No related typing patterns were detected between soil, water, and clinical isolates. The most frequent superfamily of M tuberculosis in clinical isolates was Delhi/CAS (142, 30.3%) followed by NEW-1 (127, 27%). The bacilli in contaminated soil (36%) and damp water (8.4%) remained reculturable in some samples up to 9 months. CONCLUSIONS: Although the dominant M tuberculosis superfamilies in soil and water did not correspond to the dominant M tuberculosis family in patients, the presence of circulating genotypes of M tuberculosis in soil and water highlight the risk of transmission. PMID:25340935

  5. Bovine Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis (TB) in animals and humans may result from exposure to bacilli within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (i.e., M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum, M. pinnipedii, M. microti, M. caprae, or M. canetti). Mycobacterium bovis is the species most often isolated from tuberculous catt...

  6. Seasonality of Tuberculosis in the United States, 1993–2008

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Matthew D.; Winston, Carla A.; Heilig, Charles M.; Cain, Kevin P.; Walter, Nicholas D.; Mac Kenzie, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although seasonal variation in tuberculosis incidence has been described in several recent studies, the mechanism underlying this seasonality remains unknown. Seasonality of tuberculosis disease may indicate the presence of season-specific risk factors that could potentially be controlled if they were better understood. We conducted this study to determine whether tuberculosis is seasonal in the United States and to describe patterns of seasonality in specific populations. Methods We performed a time series decomposition analysis of tuberculosis cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 1993 through 2008. Seasonal amplitude of tuberculosis disease (the difference between the months with the highest and lowest mean case counts), was calculated for the population as a whole and for populations with select demographic, clinical, and epidemiologic characteristics. Results A total of 243 432 laboratory-confirmed tuberculosis cases were reported over a period of 16 years. A mean of 21.4% more cases were diagnosed in March, the peak month, compared with November, the trough month. The magnitude of seasonality did not vary with latitude. The greatest seasonal amplitude was found among children aged <5 years and in cases associated with disease clusters. Conclusions Tuberculosis is a seasonal disease in the United States, with a peak in spring and trough in late fall. The latitude independence of seasonality suggests that reduced winter sunlight exposure may not be a strong contributor to tuberculosis risk. Increased seasonality among young children and clustered cases suggests that disease that is the result of recent transmission is more influenced by season than disease resulting from activation of latent infection. PMID:22474225

  7. A family cluster of tuberculosis cases, including a case of acquired multidrug resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Holden, Julie; Trachtman, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Although the number of tuberculosis cases in the US is at an all-time low, with progressive declines seen for the past 17 years, many goals in the tuberculosis elimination process remain unrealized. This report describes a cluster of four tuberculosis cases in a family, including one case of acquired multidrug resistant tuberculosis. It also underscores some important issues in tuberculosis control today, including significant disparities in the foreign-born population with multidrug resistant tuberculosis as a looming problem, as well as utilization of therapeutic drug level monitoring in complicated cases. PMID:22533114

  8. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells. PMID:24922567

  9. A Histomorphological Pattern Analysis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Lung Autopsy and Surgically Resected Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Flora D.; Adiga, Deepa Sowkur Anandarama

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis (TB) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Many cases are diagnosed on autopsy and a subset of patients may require surgical intervention either due to the complication or sequelae of TB. Materials and Methods. 40 cases of resected lung specimens following surgery or autopsy in which a diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis was made were included. Histopathological pattern analysis of pulmonary tuberculosis along with associated nonneoplastic changes and identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli was done. Results. The mean age of diagnosis was 41 years with male predominance (92.5%). Tuberculosis was suspected in only 12.1% of cases before death. Seven cases were operated upon due to associated complications or suspicion of malignancy. Tubercular consolidation was the most frequent pattern followed by miliary tuberculosis. The presence of necrotizing granulomas was seen in 33 cases (82.5%). Acid fast bacilli were seen in 57.5% cases on Ziehl-Neelsen stain. Conclusion. Histopathology remains one of the most important methods for diagnosing tuberculosis, especially in TB prevalent areas. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all respiratory diseases because of its varied clinical presentations and manifestations. PMID:27088035

  10. Tuberculosis in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Shobita

    2016-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the world's most lethal infectious diseases. Preventive and control strategies among other high-risk groups, such as the elderly population, continues to be a challenge. Clinical features of TB in older adults may be atypical and confused with age-related diseases. Diagnosis and management of TB in the elderly person can be difficult; treatment can be associated with adverse drug reactions. This article reviews the current global epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, management, and prevention of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in community-dwelling and institutionalized aging adults. PMID:27394018

  11. Expansion of Pathogen-Specific T-Helper 1 and T-Helper 17 Cells in Pulmonary Tuberculosis With Coincident Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Sridhar, Rathinam; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V.; Jawahar, Mohideen S.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2013-01-01

    Background. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major risk factor for the development of active pulmonary tuberculosis, although the immunological mechanisms underlying this interaction remain unexplored. The influence of poorly controlled diabetes on pathogen-specific T-helper 1 (Th1) and T-helper 17 (Th17) responses have not been examined. Methods. To identify the role of Th1 and Th17 cells in tuberculosis with coincident DM, we examined mycobacteria-specific immune responses in the whole blood of individuals who had tuberculosis with DM and compared them to those in individuals who had tuberculosis without DM. Results. Tuberculosis coincident with DM is characterized by elevated frequencies of monofunctional and dual-functional CD4+ Th1 cells following Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen stimulation and elevated frequencies of Th17 subsets at both baseline and following antigen stimulation. This was associated with increased systemic (plasma) levels of both Th1 and Th17 cytokines and decreased baseline frequencies of natural regulatory T cells but not interleukin 10 or transforming growth factor β. Conclusions. Therefore, our data reveal that tuberculosis in persons with DM is characterized by elevated frequencies of Th1 and Th17 cells, indicating that DM is associated with an alteration in the immune response to tuberculosis, leading to a biased induction of Th1- and Th17-mediated cellular responses and likely contributing to increased immune pathology in M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:23715661

  12. Health system delay in pulmonary tuberculosis treatment in a country with an intermediate burden of tuberculosis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Delayed diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis increase both the severity of the disease and the duration of infectivity. A number of studies have addressed the issue of health system delays in the treatment of tuberculosis, but mostly in countries with a high or low incidence of the disease. Our understanding of delay is quite limited in settings with an intermediate burden of tuberculosis. We explore the duration and factors associated with delays in the Croatian health system which has free health care and a sufficient network of health services providing tuberculosis diagnosis and care. Methods A total of 241 consecutive adults with culture-confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis were interviewed in seven randomly selected Croatian counties and their medical records were evaluated. A health system delay was defined as the number of days from the first consultation with a physician to the initiation of anti-tuberculosis treatment. A long delay was defined as a period exceeding the median delay, while an extreme delay was considered to be above the 75th percentile delay. Results The median health system delay was 15 days while the 75th percentile was 42 days (the 5th and 95th percentile being 1 and 105 days respectively). Almost 30% of tuberculosis patients remained undiagnosed for more than 30 days after the initial health care visit. Female patients (p = 0.005), patients with a negative sputum smear (p = 0.002) and patients having symptoms other than the usual ones (0.027) were found to be in significant correlation with a long delay. In a multivariate model, a long delay remained associated with the same variables (p = 0.008, p = 0.003, and p = 0.037, respectively). A significant association was demonstrated between both the female gender (p = 0.042) and a negative sputum smear (p < 0.001) and extreme delay, while only a negative sputum smear (p < 0.001) remained significant in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions Our

  13. Diagnostics for pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cudahy, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading cause of human suffering and mortality despite decades of effective treatment being available. Accurate and timely diagnosis remains an unmet goal. The HIV epidemic has also led to new challenges in the diagnosis of TB. Several new developments in TB diagnostics have the potential to positively influence the global campaign against TB. We aim to review the performance of both established as well as new diagnostics for pulmonary TB in adults, and discuss the ongoing challenges. PMID:27005271

  14. Diagnostics for pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cudahy, Patrick; Shenoi, Sheela V

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading cause of human suffering and mortality despite decades of effective treatment being available. Accurate and timely diagnosis remains an unmet goal. The HIV epidemic has also led to new challenges in the diagnosis of TB. Several new developments in TB diagnostics have the potential to positively influence the global campaign against TB. We aim to review the performance of both established as well as new diagnostics for pulmonary TB in adults, and discuss the ongoing challenges. PMID:27005271

  15. [Tuberculosis in compromised hosts].

    PubMed

    2003-11-01

    Recent development of tuberculosis in Japan tends to converge on a specific high risk group. The proportion of tuberculosis developing particularly from the compromised hosts in the high risk group is especially high. At this symposium, therefore, we took up diabetes mellitus, gastrectomy, dialysis, AIDS and the elderly for discussion. Many new findings and useful reports for practical medical treatment are submitted; why these compromised hosts are predisposed to tuberculosis, tuberculosis diagnostic and remedial notes of those compromised hosts etc. It is an important question for the future to study how to prevent tuberculosis from these compromised hosts. 1. Tuberculosis in diabetes mellitus: aggravation and its immunological mechanism: Kazuyoshi KAWAKAMI (Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Graduate School and Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus). It has been well documented that diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major aggravating factor in tuberculosis. The onset of this disease is more frequent in DM patients than in individuals with any underlying diseases. However, the precise mechanism of this finding remains to be fully understood. Earlier studies reported that the migration, phagocytosis and bactericidal activity of neutrophils are all impaired in DM patients, which is related to their reduced host defense to infection with extracellular bacteria, such as S. aureus and E. colli. Host defense to mycobacterial infection is largely mediated by cellular immunity, and Th1-related cytokines, such as IFN-gamma and IL-12, play a central role in this response. It is reported that serum level of these cytokines and their production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are reduced in tuberculosis patients with DM, and this is supposed to be involved in the high incidence of tuberculosis in DM. Our study observed similar findings and furthermore indicated that IFN-gamma and IL-12 production by BCG-stimulated PBMC was lower

  16. Tuberculosis (TB): Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Departments & Divisions Home Conditions Tuberculosis Treating Tuberculosis Treating Tuberculosis Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... bones is treated longer. NEXT: Preventive Treatment Diagnosing Tuberculosis History of TB Our Specialists Charles L. Daley, ...

  17. Genitourinary tuberculosis masquerading as a ureteral calculus

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Nathan; Hoag, Nathan A.; Jones, Edward C.; Rowley, Allen; McLoughlin, Martin G.; Paterson, Ryan F.

    2013-01-01

    The genitourinary tract is a common extrapulmonary site of tuberculosis infection, yet remains a rare clinical entity in North America. We report the case of a 37-year-old man who presented for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for a suspected ureteral stone on imaging. Further workup confirmed a diagnosis of genitourinary tuberculosis. Medical management was undertaken and, ultimately, nephrectomy performed. This case highlights the importance of maintaining a high index of clinical suspicion for genitourinary tuberculosis. PMID:23766841

  18. Determination of Urinary Neopterin/Creatinine Ratio to Distinguish Active Tuberculosis from Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhut, Michael; Hargreaves, Dougal S.; Scott, Anne; Housley, David; Walters, Andrew; Mulla, Rohinton

    2016-01-01

    Background. Biomarkers to distinguish latent from active Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis infection in clinical practice are lacking. The urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio can quantify the systemic interferon-gamma effect in patients with M. tuberculosis infection. Methods. In a prospective observational study, urinary neopterin levels were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with active tuberculosis, in people with latent M. tuberculosis infection, and in healthy controls and the urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio was calculated. Results. We included a total of 44 patients with M. tuberculosis infection and nine controls. 12 patients had active tuberculosis (8 of them culture-confirmed). The median age was 15 years (range 4.5 to 49). Median urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio in patients with active tuberculosis was 374.1 micromol/mol (129.0 to 1072.3), in patients with latent M. tuberculosis infection it was 142.1 (28.0 to 384.1), and in controls it was 146.0 (40.3 to 200.0), with significantly higher levels in patients with active tuberculosis (p < 0.01). The receiver operating characteristics curve had an area under the curve of 0.84 (95% CI 0.70 to 0.97) (p < 0.01). Conclusions. Urinary neopterin/creatinine ratios are significantly higher in patients with active tuberculosis compared to patients with latent infection and may be a significant predictor of active tuberculosis in patients with M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:27433370

  19. [Extrapulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Ketata, W; Rekik, W K; Ayadi, H; Kammoun, S

    2015-01-01

    Each year, there are more than eight million new cases of tuberculosis and 1.3 million deaths. There is a renewed interest in extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis as its relative frequency increases. Among extrapulmonary organs, pleura and lymph nodes are the most common. Their diagnosis is often difficult and is based on clinical, radiological, bacteriological and histological findings. Extrapulmonary lesions are paucibacillary and samplings, in most cases, difficult to obtain, so diagnosis is often simply presumptive. Nucleic acid amplification tests, which are fast and specific, have greatly facilitated the diagnosis of some forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. However, their sensitivity is poor and a negative test does not eliminate the diagnosis. Treatment is the same as for pulmonary forms, but its duration is nine to 12 months for central nervous system and for bone tuberculosis. Corticosteroids are indicated in meningeal and pericardial localizations. Complementary surgery is used for certain complicated forms. PMID:25131362

  20. [The immunology of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, T

    1989-02-01

    An introductory overview on the present state and future prospect of the immunology of tuberculosis is presented with the following six chapters. 1. Contribution of tuberculosis immunologists to the modern immunology. When one reminds Koch's phenomenon, Freund's adjuvant, and the findings or new ideas of, for instance, cell-mediated transfer of tuberculin allergy, test of MIF which was first described as "lymphokines", effector macrophages activated with immune lymphocytes against mycobacterial infection, MHC-restriction for presenting tuberculin-antigen from macrophages to T cells, everyone may agree with saying that the tuberculosis immunology contributed greatly to the opening and development of modern immunology. 2. Central dogma of tuberculosis immunology. Tuberculosis immunology possesses a central dogma : infection of tubercle bacilli----phagocytosis----antigen presentation----expansion of specific T cell clone----production of lymphokines----macrophage activation----killing of the bacilli. Recent knowledges from modern immunology have clarified many things in or around this immunological process. However, there remain many important questions. In the following chapters and subtitles, what have been clarified and what are still unsolved will be described. 3. Induction of tuberculosis immunity. (1) Mechanisms of phagocytosis with macrophages, and natural resistance. (2) Antigen presentation and sensitized T cells. 4. Expression of tuberculosis immunity. (1) Lymphokines. (2) Activation of macrophages. (3) Immune suppression. 5. Special characters of tubercle bacilli in relation to the host response. Biochemistry of cellular components of tubercle bacilli and their biological activities have been reported by many investigators already in this journal. Therefore, the following items only are discussed here. (1) Mycobacterial proteins produced by gene-technology. (2) Adjuvant active derivatives of MDP. (3) DNA from BCG and its biological activities. (4

  1. Elevated ex vivo monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (CCL2) in pulmonary as compared with extra-pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Zahra; Zaidi, Irfan; Jamil, Bushra; Khan, M Aslam; Kanji, Akbar; Hussain, Rabia

    2005-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis causes 3 million deaths annually. The most common site of tuberculosis is pulmonary however; extra-pulmonary forms of the disease also remain prevalent. Restriction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis depends on effective recruitment and subsequent activation of T lymphocytes, mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells to the site of infection. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is essential for granuloma formation and is a potent activator of monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1, CCL2). CCL2 is essential for recruitment of monocytes and T cells and has been shown to play a role in protection against tuberculosis. Interleukin -8 (CXCL8) is a potent activator of neutrophils. Increased levels of CCL2, CXCL8 and TNFα are reported in tuberculosis but their significance in different forms of tuberculosis is as yet unclear. We have used an ex vivo assay to investigate differences in immune parameters in patients with either pulmonary or extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods Serum levels of CCL2, CXCL8 and TNFα were measured in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (N = 12), extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (N = 8) and BCG-vaccinated healthy volunteers (N = 12). Whole blood cells were stimulated with non-pathogenic Mycobacterium bovis bacille-Calmette Guerin (BCG) vaccine strain or bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and cyto/chemokines were monitored in supernatants. Results Circulating serum levels of CXCL8 and TNFα were raised in all tuberculosis patients, while CCL2 levels were not. There was no difference in spontaneous cytokine secretion from whole blood cells between patients and controls. M. bovis BCG-induced ex vivo CCL2 secretion was significantly greater in pulmonary as compared with both extra-pulmonary tuberculosis patients and endemic controls. In response to LPS stimulation, patients with pulmonary tuberculosis showed increased CCL2 and TNFα responses as compared with the extra-pulmonary group. BCG-, and LPS-induced CXCL8 secretion was comparable

  2. Evaluation of the results of Mycobacterium tuberculosis direct test (MTD) and Mycobacterial culture in urine samples

    PubMed Central

    Sener, Asli Gamze; Kurultay, Nukhet; Afsar, Ilhan

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a public health problem in Turkey. Rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays a key role in control of infection. In this article, the Gen-Probe Amplified Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Direct Test (MTD) was evaluated for detection of M. tuberculosis in urine samples. The performance of the MTD was very good and appropriate for routine laboratory diagnosis. PMID:24031287

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the host response

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.; Cole, Stewart T.; Mizrahi, Valerie; Rubin, Eric; Nathan, Carl

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Advances reported at a recent international meeting highlight insights and controversies in the genetics of M. tuberculosis and the infected host, the nature of protective immune responses, adaptation of the bacillus to host-imposed stresses, animal models, and new techniques. PMID:15939785

  4. Genotyping and drug resistance patterns of M. tuberculosis strains in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer, Mahnaz; Hasan, Zahra; Siddiqui, Amna R; Ali, Asho; Kanji, Akbar; Ghebremicheal, Solomon; Hasan, Rumina

    2008-01-01

    Background The incidence of tuberculosis in Pakistan is 181/100,000 population. However, information about transmission and geographical prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and their evolutionary genetics as well as drug resistance remains limited. Our objective was to determine the clonal composition, evolutionary genetics and drug resistance of M. tuberculosis isolates from different regions of the country. Methods M. tuberculosis strains isolated (2003–2005) from specimens submitted to the laboratory through collection units nationwide were included. Drug susceptibility was performed and strains were spoligotyped. Results Of 926 M. tuberculosis strains studied, 721(78%) were grouped into 59 "shared types", while 205 (22%) were identified as "Orphan" spoligotypes. Amongst the predominant genotypes 61% were Central Asian strains (CAS ; including CAS1, CAS sub-families and Orphan Pak clusters), 4% East African-Indian (EAI), 3% Beijing, 2% poorly defined TB strains (T), 2% Haarlem and LAM (0.2). Also TbD1 analysis (M. tuberculosis specific deletion 1) confirmed that CAS1 was of "modern" origin while EAI isolates belonged to "ancestral" strain types. Prevalence of CAS1 clade was significantly higher in Punjab (P < 0.01, Pearsons Chi-square test) as compared with Sindh, North West Frontier Province and Balochistan provinces. Forty six percent of isolates were sensitive to five first line antibiotics tested, 45% were Rifampicin resistant, 50% isoniazid resistant. MDR was significantly associated with Beijing strains (P = 0.01, Pearsons Chi-square test) and EAI (P = 0.001, Pearsons Chi-square test), but not with CAS family. Conclusion Our results show variation of prevalent M. tuberculosis strain with greater association of CAS1 with the Punjab province. The fact that the prevalent CAS genotype was not associated with drug resistance is encouraging. It further suggests a more effective treatment and control programme should be successful in reducing the

  5. Childhood tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, R F; Eisenach, K D

    1993-01-01

    The dramatic resurgence and increase in the total number of cases of tuberculous infection and disease in children is alarming in the United States. With poverty, poor access to health care, overcrowding (predominantly in inner-city areas), and an increase in immigration from areas with high endemic rates of tuberculosis, the problem in children will continue to increase. If the impact of coinfection with HIV and M. tuberculosis becomes significant, as it has in adults in the United States, this increase in the total number of cases of tuberculous disease could be staggering. The impact of multiple drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis and the current crises in availability of effective antituberculous drugs will need to undergo basic and clinical research. Although the possibility for eradication of M. tuberculosis as a human pathogen in the United States still exists, clinicians must reeducate themselves regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnostic work-up, and effective treatment of children with tuberculosis in the current situation of increasing tuberculous disease and resistant organisms in children. PMID:8217004

  6. [PALEOPATHOLOGY OF HUMAN REMAINS].

    PubMed

    Minozzi, Simona; Fornaciari, Gino

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases induce alterations in the human skeleton, leaving traces of their presence in ancient remains. Paleopathological examination of human remains not only allows the study of the history and evolution of the disease, but also the reconstruction of health conditions in the past populations. This paper describes the most interesting diseases observed in skeletal samples from the Roman Imperial Age necropoles found in urban and suburban areas of Rome during archaeological excavations in the last decades. The diseases observed were grouped into the following categories: articular diseases, traumas, infections, metabolic or nutritional diseases, congenital diseases and tumours, and some examples are reported for each group. Although extensive epidemiological investigation in ancient skeletal records is impossible, the palaeopathological study allowed to highlight the spread of numerous illnesses, many of which can be related to the life and health conditions of the Roman population. PMID:27348992

  7. Propellant-remaining modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgovitsky, S.

    1991-01-01

    A successful satellite mission is predicted upon the proper maintenance of the spacecraft's orbit and attitude. One requirement for planning and predicting the orbit and attitude is the accurate estimation of the propellant remaining onboard the spacecraft. Focuss is on the three methods that were developed for calculating the propellant budget: the errors associated with each method and the uncertainties in the variables required to determine the propellant remaining that contribute to these errors. Based on these findings, a strategy is developed for improved propellant-remaining estimation. The first method is based on Boyle's law, which related the values of pressure, volume, and temperature (PVT) of an ideal gas. The PVT method is used for the monopropellant and the bipropellant engines. The second method is based on the engine performance tests, which provide data that relate thrust and specific impulse associated with a propellant tank to that tank's pressure. Two curves representing thrust and specific impulse as functions of pressure are then generated using a polynomial fit on the engine performance data. The third method involves a computer simulation of the propellant system. The propellant flow is modeled by creating a conceptual model of the propulsion system configuration, taking into account such factors as the propellant and pressurant tank characteristics, thruster functionality, and piping layout. Finally, a thrust calibration technique is presented that uses differential correction with the computer simulation method of propellant-remaining modeling. Thrust calibration provides a better assessment of thruster performance and therefore enables a more accurate estimation of propellant consumed during a given maneuver.

  8. Feasibility and effect of integrating tuberculosis screening and detection in postnatal care services: an operations research study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis still remains a major cause of maternal and newborn morbidity and mortality. Integrating tuberculosis screening and detection into postnatal care services ensures prompt and appropriate treatment for affected mothers and their babies. This study therefore examined the feasibility and effect of screening and referral for tuberculosis within postnatal care settings from the perspective of providers. Methods This operations research study used a pre- and post-intervention design without a comparison group. The study was implemented between March 2009 and August 2010 in five health facilities located in low-income areas of Nairobi, Kenya, which were suspected to have relatively high prevalence of both tuberculosis and HIV. Descriptive statistics and significance tests were employed to determine changes in the indicators of interest between baseline and endline. Results Among the 12,604 postnatal care clients screened, 14 tuberculosis cases were diagnosed. The proportion of clients screened for at least one cardinal sign of tuberculosis rose from 4% to 66%, and 21% of clients were screened for all six tracer signs and symptoms. A comparison of 10 quality of postnatal care and tuberculosis screening components at baseline and endline showed a highly significant effect on all 10 components. Conclusions The findings demonstrate that using postnatal care services as a platform for tuberculosis screening and detection is acceptable and feasible. In addition, linking clients identified through screening to further treatment significantly improved. However, the actual number of cases detected was low. A policy debate on whether to link tuberculosis screening with reproductive health services is recommended before full scale-up of this intervention. PMID:23496997

  9. Tuberculosis origin: The Neolithic scenario.

    PubMed

    Hershkovitz, Israel; Donoghue, Helen D; Minnikin, David E; May, Hila; Lee, Oona Y-C; Feldman, Michal; Galili, Ehud; Spigelman, Mark; Rothschild, Bruce M; Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila

    2015-06-01

    This paper follows the dramatic changes in scientific research during the last 20 years regarding the relationship between the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and its hosts - bovids and/or humans. Once the M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis genomes were sequenced, it became obvious that the old story of M. bovis evolving into the human pathogen should be reversed, as M. tuberculosis is more ancestral than M. bovis. Nevertheless, the timescale and geographical origin remained an enigma. In the current study human and cattle bone samples were examined for evidence of tuberculosis from the site of Atlit-Yam in the Eastern Mediterranean, dating from 9250 to 8160 (calibrated) years ago. Strict precautions were used to prevent contamination in the DNA analysis, and independent centers used to confirm authenticity of findings. DNA from five M. tuberculosis genetic loci was detected and had characteristics consistent with extant genetic lineages. High performance liquid chromatography was used as an independent method of verification and it directly detected mycolic acid lipid biomarkers, specific for the M. tuberculosis complex. These, together with pathological changes detected in some of the bones, confirm the presence of the disease in the Levantine populations during the Pre-pottery Neolithic C period, more than 8000 years ago. PMID:25726364

  10. Designing and Construction of a DNA Vaccine Encoding Tb10.4 Gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rashidian, Samira; Teimourpour, Roghayeh; Meshkat, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) remains as a major cause of death. Construction of a new vaccine against tuberculosis is an effective way to control it. Several vaccines against this disease have been developed. The aim of the present study was to cloning of tb10.4 gene in pcDNA3.1+ plasmid and evaluation of its expression in eukaryotic cells. Methods: Firstly, tb10.4 fragment was amplified by PCR and the PCR product was digested with restriction enzymes. Next, it was cloned into pcDNA3.1+ plasmid. Following that, pcDNA3.1+/tb10.4 recombinant plasmid was transfected into eukaryotic cells. Results: 5700 bp band for pcDNA3.1+/tb10.4 recombinant plasmid and 297 bp fragment for tb10.4 were observed. Cloning and transfection were successful. Conclusion: Successful cloning provides a basis for the development of new DNA vaccines against tuberculosis.

  11. [Tuberculosis in Iceland. 1976].

    PubMed

    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur

    2005-01-01

    ray examination was made in all cases where tuberculin examination had not been made or was incomplete. The negative reactors were not X rayed. The tuberculin tests were percutaneous, cutaneous and intracutaneous. The X ray examination during the first years was performed by means of fluoroscopy and roentgenograms were made in all doubtful cases. In 1945 when the survey of the capital city of Reykjavík was made and comprised a total of 43,595 persons photoroentgenograms were made. After 1948 only this method together with tuberculin testing was used in all the larger towns in the country. During the period 1940-1945 such surveys were carried out in 12 medical districts, or parts thereof and included 58,837 persons or 47 percent of the entire population. The attendance in these surveys ranged from 89.3 percent to 100 percent of those considered able to attend. In the capital city, Reykjavík, the attendance was 99.32 percent. The course and prevalence of tuberculosis in Iceland from 1911 to 1970 are traced on the basis of tuberculosis reporting registers, mortality records which were ordered by law in 1911, tuberculin surveys and post mortem examinations. The deficiencies of these sources are pointed out. Since 1939 the morbidity rates are accurate. The number of reported cases of tuberculosis increases steadily up to the year 1935, when 1.6 percent of the population is reported to have active tuberculosis at the end of that year. Thereafter it begins to decline gradually the first years but abruptly in 1939, then without doubt because of the revision of the tuberculosis legislation and more exact reporting regulations. After that year the fall is almost constant with rather small fluctuations as regards new cases, relapses and total number of reported cases remaining on register at the end of each year. In 1950 the new cases are down to 1.6 per thousand and at the end of the year the rate for those remaining on register is 6.9 per thousand. In the year 1954 there is

  12. Tuberculosis: General Information

    MedlinePlus

    TB Elimination Tuberculosis: General Information What is TB? Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by germs that are spread from person ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination CS227840_A What Does a Positive Test ...

  13. Global Tuberculosis Report 2015

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feed Youtube Twitter Facebook Google + iTunes Play Store Tuberculosis (TB) Menu Tuberculosis The End TB Strategy Areas ... data News, events and features About us Global tuberculosis report 2015 This is the twentieth global report ...

  14. Urinary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, P. R.

    1971-01-01

    The present incidence, clinical features and classification of urinary tuberculosis are discussed. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment. The indications for surgical intervention are reviewed and procedures briefly described. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:5169185

  15. [Tuberculosis--a neverending story].

    PubMed

    Dzieciołowska-Baran, Edyta; Gawlikowska-Sroka, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that over one third of the human population is now exposed or has been exposed in the past to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and new infections occur in the world at a rate of one per second. The history of tuberculosis is long and very interesting, because before the isolation of mycobacteria and the finding of a cure, the disease mercilessly killed thousands of people and deprived doctors of hope. Robert Koch's momentous discovery was a major breakthrough in the fight against tuberculosis. Unfortunately, the disease has never been fully controlled. Tuberculosis is a chronic infectious disease localized in 90-95% of cases in the lungs, and therefore it is extremely difficult to diagnose unequivocally in paleopathological material. Only the form of osteo-arthritis leaves traces in archaeological material. The earliest evidence of tuberculosis (the location of the spine, Pott's disease) in the form of fossils is dated to before 8000 BC. Another very old trace is considered to be human remains from the Neolithic period (ca 5000 BC), found near Heidelberg, where changes in the thoracic spine are typical for spondylitis in tuberculosa. Constant growth in the incidence of new cases in the world can be observed today. Not everyone infected will develop the full-blown disease. The infection may remain dormant. However, one in ten latent infections will subsequently be activated, leading, if not treated, to the death of almost half of the patients. PMID:25026769

  16. Genotyping and clinical characteristics of multidrug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in a tertiary care tuberculosis hospital in China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a lack of information on the clinical characteristics of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB in the Jiangxi Province of China; furthermore, data have not been reported on the utility of mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) analyses in genotyping Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated from this region. The aim of this study was to analyse the clinical features of patients with MDR and XDR TB from Jiangxi Province and to evaluate the discriminatory power of the 15-loci MIRU-VNTR method. Methods A retrospective study was conducted on patients diagnosed with MDR and XDR TB at the Jiangxi Chest Hospital from July 2010 to June 2011. The RD105 deletion-targeted multiplex PCR (DTM-PCR) and the 15-loci MIRU-VNTR method were used to determine the genetic background of the identified MDR and XDR M. tuberculosis clinical isolates. Results Of 804 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates, 159 (159/804, 19.8%) of the isolates were identified as MDR with first-line drug susceptibility testing. Of the 123 available MDR isolates, 13 (13/123, 10.6%) were XDR. The RD105 deletion-targeted multiplex PCR method identified 85 (85/110, 77.3%) MDR and 12 (12/13, 92.3%) XDR isolates as the Beijing genotype. MIRU-VNTR cluster analysis demonstrated that 101 MDR and 13 XDR strains had unique genotype patterns; the remaining 9 MDR strains were in 4 clusters, namely 1 cluster with 3 strains and 3 clusters with 2 strains, resulting in a low clustering rate (4.06%). The Hunter-Gaston discriminatory index (HGDI) of the 15-loci MIRU-VNTR method was as high as 0.992. In addition, clinical surveys showed that 87 (87/110, 79.1%) MDR TB patients and 10 (10/13, 76.9%) XDR TB patients had been previously treated. Diabetes mellitus was the most common comorbidity in both MDR TB (16/110, 14.5%) and XDR TB (2/13, 15.4%) patients. Conclusions Based on our preliminary data, the MDR and XDR M

  17. Integration of Antiretroviral Therapy with Tuberculosis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Grobler, Anneke; Padayatchi, Nesri; Baxter, Cheryl; Gray, Andrew L.; Gengiah, Tanuja; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Naidoo, Anushka; Jithoo, Niraksha; Nair, Gonasagrie; El-Sadr, Wafaa M.; Friedland, Gerald; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha

    2011-01-01

    Background We previously reported that integrating antiretroviral therapy (ART) with tuberculosis treatment reduces mortality. However, optimal time to initiate ART during tuberculosis treatment remains contentious. Methods To address this, we conducted a 3-arm, open-label randomized controlled trial in South Africa in acid-fast bacilli smear positive patients (n=642) with HIV and CD4+ counts <500 cells/mm3. Findings on the early therapy group (ART initiated within 4 weeks of tuberculosis treatment initiation, n=214) and late therapy group (ART initiated within the first 4 weeks of the continuation phase of tuberculosis treatment, n=215) are presented here. Results Median CD4+ count and viral load at baseline was 150 cells/mm3 and 161000 copies/ml, being similar in both groups. Incidence rate of AIDS or death was 6.9 (18/259.4) and 7.8 (19/244.2) per 100 person-years in the early and late therapy groups respectively (Incidence Rate Ratio (IRR)=0.89; 95%Confidence Interval (95%CI): 0.44,1.79; P=0.73). However, in patients with CD4+ counts <50 cells/mm3, the incidence rates of AIDS or death were 8.5 (early) and 26.3 (late) per 100 person-years (IRR=0.32; 95%CI: 0.07,1.13; P=0.06). Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) incidence rates were 20.2 (early) and 7.7 (late) per 100 person-years (IRR=2.62; 95%CI: 1.48,4.82; P<0.001). Adverse events requiring antiretroviral drug switches occurred in 10 (early) and 1 (late) patients (P=0.006). Conclusions The benefits of AIDS-free survival balanced against the risks of IRIS and ART-related adverse events, support early ART initiation in patients with CD4+ counts <50 cells/mm3 and deferred ART initiation to the continuation phase of tuberculosis treatment when CD4+ counts are higher. PMID:22010915

  18. [Tuberculosis. Future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Marques Gomes, M João

    2004-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major health problem around the world and its incidence is growing 0.4% each year. There are 2 billions of infected, 8.4 millions new cases every year and 16 million patients. The association of VIH and tuberculosis, the increasing number of multidrug resistance, failure of health systems, greater mobility of people, poverty, wars and social exclusion, are the major causes of the epidemiological situation. Faster, more specific and sensible diagnostic methods are being investigated. Some of them use molecular biology techniques, some uses radioisotopes and some others are based on colour and fluorescence modifications of dyes. New drugs, new routes of administration and ways for increasing compliance are under investigation. More potent drugs, with greater biodisponibility and adequate pharmacokinetics for shorter treatments for multidrug and latent forms of bacilli are needed. New vaccines are under investigations, namely Adjuvant Subunits Vaccines, DNA Vaccines DNA, no micobacterianos vectors, and attenuated living vaccines are being tested. Finally some considerations are made concerning the need of global committement to win the fight against tuberculosis in the near future. PMID:15202032

  19. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cytochrome P450 System

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Hugues; Johnston, Jonathan B.; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a leading cause of human mortality. The emergence of strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent, that are resistant to the major frontline antitubercular drugs increases the urgency for the development of new therapeutic agents. Sequencing of the M. tuberculosis genome revealed the existence of twenty cytochrome P450 enzymes, some of which are potential candidates for drug targeting. The recent burst of studies reporting microarray-based gene essentiality and transcriptome analyses under in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo conditions highlight the importance of selected P450 isoforms for M. tuberculosis viability and pathogenicity. Current knowledge of the structural and biochemical properties of the M. tuberculosis P450 enzymes and their putative redox partners is reviewed, with an emphasis on findings related to their physiological function(s) as well as their potential as drug targets. PMID:19635450

  20. Tuberculosis and HIV at the National Level in Kenya: Results From the Second Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey

    PubMed Central

    Mbithi, Agneta; Gichangi, Anthony; Kim, Andrea A.; Katana, Abraham; Weyenga, Herman; Williamson, John; Robinson, Katherine; Oluoch, Tom; Maina, William K.; Kellogg, Timothy A.; De Cock, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Co-morbidity with tuberculosis and HIV is a common cause of mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. In the second Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey, we collected data on knowledge and experience of HIV and tuberculosis, as well as on access to and coverage of relevant treatment services and antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Kenya. Methods A national, population-based household survey was conducted from October 2012 to February 2013. Information was collected through household questionnaires, and blood samples were taken for HIV, CD4 cell counts, and HIV viral load testing at a central laboratory. Results Overall, 13,720 persons aged 15–64 years participated; 96.7% [95% confidence interval (CI): 96.3 to 97.1] had heard of tuberculosis, of whom 2.0% (95% CI: 1.7 to 2.2) reported having prior tuberculosis. Among those with laboratory-confirmed HIV infection, 11.6% (95% CI: 8.9 to 14.3) reported prior tuberculosis. The prevalence of laboratory-confirmed HIV infection in persons reporting prior tuberculosis was 33.2% (95% CI: 26.2 to 40.2) compared to 5.1% (95% CI: 4.5 to 5.8) in persons without prior tuberculosis. Among those in care, coverage of ART for treatment-eligible persons was 100% for those with prior tuberculosis and 88.6% (95% CI: 81.6 to 95.7) for those without. Among all HIV-infected persons, ART coverage among treatment-eligible persons was 86.9% (95% CI: 74.2 to 99.5) for persons with prior tuberculosis and 58.3% (95% CI: 47.6 to 69.0) for those without. Conclusions Morbidity from tuberculosis and HIV remain major health challenges in Kenya. Tuberculosis is an important entry point for HIV diagnosis and treatment. Lack of knowledge of HIV serostatus is an obstacle to access to HIV services and timely ART for prevention of HIV transmission and HIV-associated disease, including tuberculosis. PMID:24732814

  1. [Tuberculosis control of urban areas in Japan].

    PubMed

    2000-10-01

    The rates of tuberculosis remain high in urban areas. The declining speed of tuberculosis incidence rate in urban areas has been slower than other areas. Efforts and resources to tuberculosis control must be concentrated on urban locations to eradicate tuberculosis in Japan. 1. Tuberculosis control in a public health center of urban area: Teru OGURA and Chiyo INOGUCHI (Toshima City, Ikebukuro Public Health Center, Tokyo Metropolitan) A wide range of TB control measures is implemented by public health centers, such as a patient registration, home-visit guidance, contact examination in urban areas. Directors of every health center have the direct responsibility for tuberculosis control measures in their jurisdiction. Ikebukuro is urban areas where there are many offices, shopping and amusement facilities. Urban people is often on the move looking for job, so public health centers are often not easy to carry out contact examinations as planned. In recent years, homelessness has been recognized as a growing urban social problem. Their incidence of tuberculosis is high. Special TB control program must be carried out in urban areas. 2. Tuberculosis Control in Tokyo Metropolitan: Kazumasa MATSUKI (Department of Infectious Diseases and Tuberculosis, Bureau of Public Health, Tokyo Metropolitan) There has been a steady decline in the TB wards. The beds for TB patients are running short and even smear positive TB cases cannot be put in a hospital without waiting several days. Staffs of an urban emergency department must protect tuberculosis infection by environmental controls of emergency room. Tokyo Metropolitan government supports the engineering improvements of emergency room to hospitals. Directly observed therapy for tuberculosis patients at a district has been implemented to complete their therapy. On DOT, a trained health worker observes the patient take anti-TB medication. 3. Usefulness of Molecular Epidemiologic approach on Tuberculosis Control: Atsushi HASE (Osaka

  2. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in Singapore, 2006-2012

    PubMed Central

    Win, Wah; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Hsu, Li Yang; Mak, Estelle; Earnest, Arul; Ong, Marcus Eng-Hock; Cutter, Jeffery; Wang, Yee Tang

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis remains common in Singapore, increasing in incidence since 2008. We attempted to determine the molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) isolates locally, identifying major circulating genotypes and obtaining a glimpse of transmission dynamics. Methodology Non-duplicate MTC isolates archived between 2006 and 2012 at the larger clinical tuberculosis laboratory in Singapore were sampled for spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR typing, with case data obtained from the Singapore Tuberculosis Elimination Program registry database. Isolates between 2008 and 2012 were selected because of either multidrug-resistance or potential epidemiological linkage, whereas earlier isolates were randomly selected. Separate analyses were performed for the early (2006-2007) and later (2008-2012) study phases in view of potential selection bias. Principal Findings A total of 1,612 MTC isolates were typed, constituting 13.1% of all culture-positive tuberculosis cases during this period. Multidrug-resistance was present in 91 (5.6%) isolates – higher than the national prevalence in view of selection bias. The majority of isolates belonged to the Beijing (45.8%) and EAI (22.8%) lineages. There were 347 (30.7%) and 133 (27.5%) cases clustered by combined spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR typing from the earlier and later phases respectively. Patients within these clusters tended to be of Chinese ethnicity, Singapore resident, and have isolates belonging to the Beijing lineage. A review of prior contact investigation results for all patients with clustered isolates failed to reveal epidemiological links for the majority, suggesting either unknown transmission networks or inadequate specificity of the molecular typing methods in a country with a moderate incidence of tuberculosis. Conclusion Our work demonstrates that Singapore has a large and heterogeneous distribution of MTC strains, and with possible cross-transmission over the past few years based on our

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis TlyA Protein Negatively Regulates T Helper (Th) 1 and Th17 Differentiation and Promotes Tuberculosis Pathogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Aejazur; Sobia, Parveen; Dwivedi, Ved Prakash; Bhawsar, Aakansha; Singh, Dhiraj Kumar; Sharma, Pawan; Moodley, Prashini; Van Kaer, Luc; Bishai, William R; Das, Gobardhan

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is an ancient pathogen and a major cause of death worldwide. Although various virulence factors of M. tuberculosis have been identified, its pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. TlyA is a virulence factor in several bacterial infections and is evolutionarily conserved in many Gram-positive bacteria, but its function in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we report that TlyA significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis. We show that a TlyA mutant M. tuberculosis strain induces increased IL-12 and reduced IL-1β and IL-10 cytokine responses, which sharply contrasts with the immune responses induced by wild type M. tuberculosis. Furthermore, compared with wild type M. tuberculosis, TlyA-deficient M. tuberculosis bacteria are more susceptible to autophagy in macrophages. Consequently, animals infected with the TlyA mutant M. tuberculosis organisms exhibited increased host-protective immune responses, reduced bacillary load, and increased survival compared with animals infected with wild type M. tuberculosis. Thus, M. tuberculosis employs TlyA as a host evasion factor, thereby contributing to its virulence. PMID:25847237

  4. Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ekinci, Safak; Tatar, Oner; Akpancar, Serkan; Bilgic, Serkan; Ersen, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis (TB) is a significant form of TB, causing spinal deformity and paralysis. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for avoiding multivertebral destruction and are critical for improving outcomes in spinal TB. We believe that appropriate treatment method should be implemented at the early stage of this disease and that the Gulhane Askeri Tıp Akademisi classification system can be considered a practical guide for spinal TB treatment planning in all countries. PMID:26609247

  5. Duration of Anti-Tuberculosis Therapy and Timing of Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation: Association with Mortality in HIV-Related Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Claudia P.; Wehbe, Firas H.; McGowan, Catherine C.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Duda, Stephany N.; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Gonzalez, Elsa; Carriquiry, Gabriela; Schechter, Mauro; Padgett, Denis; Cesar, Carina; Madero, Juan Sierra; Pape, Jean W.; Masys, Daniel R.; Sterling, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) decreases mortality risk in HIV-infected tuberculosis patients, but the effect of the duration of anti-tuberculosis therapy and timing of anti-tuberculosis therapy initiation in relation to ART initiation on mortality, is unclear. Methods We conducted a retrospective observational multi-center cohort study among HIV-infected persons concomitantly treated with Rifamycin-based anti-tuberculosis therapy and ART in Latin America. The study population included persons for whom 6 months of anti-tuberculosis therapy is recommended. Results Of 253 patients who met inclusion criteria, median CD4+ lymphocyte count at ART initiation was 64 cells/mm3, 171 (68%) received >180 days of anti-tuberculosis therapy, 168 (66%) initiated anti-tuberculosis therapy before ART, and 43 (17%) died. In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model that adjusted for CD4+ lymphocytes and HIV-1 RNA, tuberculosis diagnosed after ART initiation was associated with an increased risk of death compared to tuberculosis diagnosis before ART initiation (HR 2.40; 95% CI 1.15, 5.02; P = 0.02). In a separate model among patients surviving >6 months after tuberculosis diagnosis, after adjusting for CD4+ lymphocytes, HIV-1 RNA, and timing of ART initiation relative to tuberculosis diagnosis, receipt of >6 months of anti-tuberculosis therapy was associated with a decreased risk of death (HR 0.23; 95% CI 0.08, 0.66; P=0.007). Conclusions The increased risk of death among persons diagnosed with tuberculosis after ART initiation highlights the importance of screening for tuberculosis before ART initiation. The decreased risk of death among persons receiving > 6 months of anti-tuberculosis therapy suggests that current anti-tuberculosis treatment duration guidelines should be re-evaluated. PMID:24066096

  6. [Reconsideration of the admission and discharge criteria of tuberculosis patients in Japan].

    PubMed

    Masuyama, Hidenori; Igari, Hidetoshi

    2013-03-01

    without air conditioning which carries a potential risk of nosocomial transmission and reinfection. In order to establish effective TB control, suspected or confirmed TB patient should be isolated in a single room equipped with the capacity for airborne infection isolation during hospitalization, as long as sputum smear or culture remains positive. It is reasonable to discharge patients to home before sputum conversion if effective chemotherapy is provided and all household members have been previously exposed. Rapid drug sensitivity testing will be helpful in assuring the effectiveness of chemotherapy for prompt discharge and detecting multidrug-resistance immediately. 2. Reconsideration of admission and discharge criteria for tuberculosis patient in Japan : Taku NAKAGAWA, Kenji OGAWA (Department of Pulmonary Medicine, National Hospital Organization Higashi Nagoya National Hospital) Admission criteria for tuberculosis patient are based on the positive result of sputum AFB smear test in principle. But admission criteria should be applied flexibly depending on the extent and severity of illness, socioeconomic background of the patient, and adherence to treatment in cooperation with the public health center. The Japanese Tuberculosis Society published "Guidelines for Admission and Discharge of Tuberculosis Patient" in January 2005. This guideline was consistent with the notice from Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. Improvement of management of patients with tuberculosis is most important, but bacteriological conversion is not necessary to release isolation from the hospital. The patients treated with standard regimen over two weeks and having improvement of clinical symptoms may be able to go home back in the absence of compromised person. As a result of putting this guideline into practice, there were no problems about infectiousness for tuberculosis. But the modified notice from Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare based on bacteriological conversion was made

  7. Secular trends of tuberculosis in western Europe.

    PubMed Central

    Raviglione, M. C.; Sudre, P.; Rieder, H. L.; Spinaci, S.; Kochi, A.

    1993-01-01

    Deaths due to tuberculosis have decreased uniformly in all countries in Western Europe, and most have occurred among those aged > or = 65 years. In recent years, tuberculosis case notifications have continued to decline in Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, and Spain, and have levelled off in Sweden and the United Kingdom; increases have, however, been recorded in Austria, Denmark, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, and Switzerland. In Denmark, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and Switzerland an increasing number of cases of tuberculosis among foreign-born residents has resulted in a change from the expected downward trend. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection appears to contribute only marginally to the overall tuberculosis morbidity; however, it appears to be important in Paris and its surrounding areas, and tuberculosis is very common among HIV-infected persons in Italy and Spain. Despite these recent changes in the incidence of tuberculosis, there is currently no evidence of its increased transmission among the youngest age groups of the indigenous populations. Properly designed disease surveillance systems are critical for monitoring the tuberculosis trends so that each country can identify its own high-risk groups and target interventions to prevent, diagnose, and treat the disease. Tuberculosis remains a global disease and because of increasing human migrations, its elimination in Western Europe cannot be envisaged without concomitant improvements in its control in high-incidence, resource-poor countries. PMID:8324847

  8. Tuberculosis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Parents > Tuberculosis Print A A A Text Size What's in ... When to You Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis Tuberculosis (popularly known as "TB") is a disease ...

  9. Nutritional supplements for people being treated for active tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Grobler, Liesl; Nagpal, Sukrti; Sudarsanam, Thambu D; Sinclair, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis and malnutrition are linked in a complex relationship. Tuberculosis may cause undernutrition through increased metabolic demands and decreased intake, and nutritional deficiencies may worsen the disease, or delay recovery by depressing important immune functions. At present, there is no evidence-based nutritional guidance for adults and children being treated for tuberculosis. Objectives To assess the effects of oral nutritional supplements in people being treated with antituberculous drug therapy for active tuberculosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Issue 1, 2016), MEDLINE (from 1946 to 4 February 2016), EMBASE (from 1980 to 4 February 2016), LILACS (from 1982 to 4 February 2016), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT), the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and the Indian Journal of Tuberculosis up to 4 February 2016, and checked the reference lists of all included studies. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials that compared any oral nutritional supplement given for at least four weeks with no nutritional intervention, placebo, or dietary advice only for people being treated for active tuberculosis. The primary outcomes of interest were all-cause death, and cure at six and 12 months. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, and extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the included trials. We presented the results as risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous variables, and mean differences (MD) for continuous variables, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Where appropriate, we pooled data from trials with similar interventions and outcomes. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Main results Thirty-five trials

  10. T-Cell Immunophenotyping Distinguishes Active From Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Katrina M.; Whitworth, Hilary S.; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J.; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S.; Kapembwa, Moses S.; Kon, Onn M.; Sampson, Robert D.; Taylor, Graham P.; Lalvani, Ajit

    2013-01-01

    Background. Changes in the phenotype and function of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in response to stage of infection may allow discrimination between active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection. Methods. A prospective comparison of M. tuberculosis-specific cellular immunity in subjects with active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection, with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to measure CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subset phenotype and secretion of interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Results. Frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ cells secreting IFN-γ-only, TNF-α-only and dual IFN-γ/TNF-α were greater in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection. All M. tuberculosis-specific CD4+ subsets, with the exception of IL-2-only cells, switched from central to effector memory phenotype in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection, accompanied by a reduction in IL-7 receptor α (CD127) expression. The frequency of PPD-specific CD4+ TNF-α-only-secreting T cells with an effector phenotype accurately distinguished active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection with an area under the curve of 0.99, substantially more discriminatory than measurement of function alone. Conclusions. Combined measurement of T-cell phenotype and function defines a highly discriminatory biomarker of tuberculosis disease activity. Unlocking the diagnostic and monitoring potential of this combined approach now requires validation in large-scale prospective studies. PMID:23966657

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis wears what it eats

    PubMed Central

    Russell, David G.; VanderVen, Brian C.; Lee, Wonsik; Abramovitch, Robert B.; Kim, Mijeong; Homolka, Susanne; Niemann, Stefan; Rohde, Kyle H.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains one of the most pernicious of human pathogens. Current vaccines are ineffective and drugs, although efficacious, require prolonged treatment with constant medical oversight. Overcoming these problems requires a greater appreciation of M. tuberculosis in the context of its host. Upon infection of either macrophages in culture or animal models, the bacterium re-aligns its metabolism in response to the new environments it encounters. Understanding these environments, and the stresses that they place on M. tuberculosis, should provide insights invaluable for the development of new chemo- and immuno-therapeutic strategies. PMID:20638643

  12. [Chest wall tuberculosis: report of 3 cases].

    PubMed

    Zidane, A; Bakzaza, O; Afandi, O; Baiz, Y; Chafik, A

    2015-10-01

    Despite the dramatic decline in the incidence of tuberculosis during the last decades, the disease remains a significant public health problem especially in developing countries. Chest wall tuberculosis is a very rare location. Clinically, it can present as a pyogenic abscess or soft tumor, making diagnosis difficult, particularly in the absence of warning signs. Optimal therapeutic management is controversial. Medical treatment alone in often insufficient and must be associated with a surgical excision or debridement. PMID:25725600

  13. Tuberculosis: Epidemiology and Control

    PubMed Central

    Sulis, Giorgia; Roggi, Alberto; Matteelli, Alberto; Raviglione, Mario C.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health concern worldwide: despite a regular, although slow, decline in incidence over the last decade, as many as 8.6 million new cases and 1.3 million deaths were estimated to have occurred in 2012. TB is by all means a poverty-related disease, mainly affecting the most vulnerable populations in the poorest countries. The presence of multidrug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis in most countries, with somewhere prevalence is high, is among the major challenges for TB control, which may hinder recent achievements especially in some settings. Early TB case detection especially in resource-constrained settings and in marginalized groups remains a challenge, and about 3 million people are estimated to remain undiagnosed or not notified and untreated. The World Health Organization (WHO) has recently launched a new global TB strategy for the “post-2015 era” aimed at “ending the global TB epidemic” by 2035. This strategy is based on the three pillars that emphasize patient-centred TB care and prevention, bold policies and supportive systems, and intensified research and innovation. This paper aims to provide an overview of the global TB epidemiology as well as of the main challenges that must be faced to eliminate the disease as a public health problem everywhere. PMID:25408856

  14. Assessment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission in Oxfordshire, UK, 2007–12, with whole pathogen genome sequences: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Timothy M; Lalor, Maeve K; Broda, Agnieszka; Ortega, Luisa Saldana; Morgan, Marcus; Parker, Lynne; Churchill, Sheila; Bennett, Karen; Golubchik, Tanya; Giess, Adam P; Del Ojo Elias, Carlos; Jeffery, Katie J; Bowler, Ian C J W; Laurenson, Ian F; Barrett, Anne; Drobniewski, Francis; McCarthy, Noel D; Anderson, Laura F; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Thomas, H Lucy; Monk, Philip; Smith, E Grace; Walker, A Sarah; Crook, Derrick W

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Patients born outside the UK have contributed to a 20% rise in the UK’s tuberculosis incidence since 2000, but their effect on domestic transmission is not known. Here we use whole-genome sequencing to investigate the epidemiology of tuberculosis transmission in an unselected population over 6 years. Methods We identified all residents with Oxfordshire postcodes with a Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture or a clinical diagnosis of tuberculosis between Jan 1, 2007, and Dec 31, 2012, using local databases and checking against the national Enhanced Tuberculosis Surveillance database. We used Illumina technology to sequence all available M tuberculosis cultures from identified cases. Sequences were clustered by genetic relatedness and compared retrospectively with contact investigations. The first patient diagnosed in each cluster was defined as the index case, with links to subsequent cases assigned first by use of any epidemiological linkage, then by genetic distance, and then by timing of diagnosis. Findings Although we identified 384 patients with a diagnosis of tuberculosis, country of birth was known for 380 and we sequenced isolates from 247 of 269 cases with culture-confirmed disease. 39 cases were genomically linked within 13 clusters, implying 26 local transmission events. Only 11 of 26 possible transmissions had been previously identified through contact tracing. Of seven genomically confirmed household clusters, five contained additional genomic links to epidemiologically unidentified non-household members. 255 (67%) patients were born in a country with high tuberculosis incidence, conferring a local incidence of 109 cases per 100 000 population per year in Oxfordshire, compared with 3·5 cases per 100 000 per year for those born in low-incidence countries. However, patients born in the low-incidence countries, predominantly UK, were more likely to have pulmonary disease (adjusted odds ratio 1·8 [95% CI 1·2–2·9]; p=0·009), social

  15. Diagnosis of Childhood Tuberculosis and Host RNA Expression in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Banwell, Claire M.; Chagaluka, George; Crampin, Amelia C.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; French, Neil; Hamilton, Melissa S.; Hibberd, Martin L.; Kern, Florian; Langford, Paul R.; Ling, Ling; Mlotha, Rachel; Ottenhoff, Tom H.M.; Pienaar, Sandy; Pillay, Vashini; Scott, J. Anthony G.; Twahir, Hemed; Wilkinson, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Improved diagnostic tests for tuberculosis in children are needed. We hypothesized that transcriptional signatures of host blood could be used to distinguish tuberculosis from other diseases in African children who either were or were not infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS The study population comprised prospective cohorts of children who were undergoing evaluation for suspected tuberculosis in South Africa (655 children), Malawi (701 children), and Kenya (1599 children). Patients were assigned to groups according to whether the diagnosis was culture-confirmed tuberculosis, culture-negative tuberculosis, diseases other than tuberculosis, or latent tuberculosis infection. Diagnostic signatures distinguishing tuberculosis from other diseases and from latent tuberculosis infection were identified from genomewide analysis of RNA expression in host blood. RESULTS We identified a 51-transcript signature distinguishing tuberculosis from other diseases in the South African and Malawian children (the discovery cohort). In the Kenyan children (the validation cohort), a risk score based on the signature for tuberculosis and for diseases other than tuberculosis showed a sensitivity of 82.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 68.6 to 94.3) and a specificity of 83.6% (95% CI, 74.6 to 92.7) for the diagnosis of culture-confirmed tuberculosis. Among patients with cultures negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis who were treated for tuberculosis (those with highly probable, probable, or possible cases of tuberculosis), the estimated sensitivity was 62.5 to 82.3%, 42.1 to 80.8%, and 35.3 to 79.6%, respectively, for different estimates of actual tuberculosis in the groups. In comparison, the sensitivity of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay for molecular detection of M. tuberculosis DNA in cases of culture-confirmed tuberculosis was 54.3% (95% CI, 37.1 to 68.6), and the sensitivity in highly probable, probable, or possible cases was an estimated 25.0 to 35

  16. Clinical Evaluation of Tuberculosis Viability Microscopy for Assessing Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sumona; Sherman, Jonathan M.; Bravard, Marjory A.; Valencia, Teresa; Gilman, Robert H.; Evans, Carlton A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. It is difficult to determine whether early tuberculosis treatment is effective in reducing the infectiousness of patients' sputum, because culture takes weeks and conventional acid-fast sputum microscopy and molecular tests cannot differentiate live from dead tuberculosis. Methods. To assess treatment response, sputum samples (n = 124) from unselected patients (n = 35) with sputum microscopy–positive tuberculosis were tested pretreatment and after 3, 6, and 9 days of empiric first-line therapy. Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy with fluorescein diacetate, quantitative culture, and acid-fast auramine microscopy were all performed in triplicate. Results. Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy predicted quantitative culture results such that 76% of results agreed within ±1 logarithm (rS = 0.85; P < .0001). In 31 patients with non-multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis, viability and quantitative culture results approximately halved (both 0.27 log reduction, P < .001) daily. For patients with non-MDR tuberculosis and available data, by treatment day 9 there was a >10-fold reduction in viability in 100% (24/24) of cases and quantitative culture in 95% (19/20) of cases. Four other patients subsequently found to have MDR tuberculosis had no significant changes in viability (P = .4) or quantitative culture (P = .6) results during early treatment. The change in viability and quantitative culture results during early treatment differed significantly between patients with non-MDR tuberculosis and those with MDR tuberculosis (both P < .001). Acid-fast microscopy results changed little during early treatment, and this change was similar for non-MDR tuberculosis vs MDR tuberculosis (P = .6). Conclusions. Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy is a simple test that within 1 hour predicted quantitative culture results that became available weeks later, rapidly indicating whether patients were responding to tuberculosis therapy

  17. Aggressive Regimens for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Reduce Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Molly F.; Appleton, Sasha C.; Mitnick, Carole D.; Furin, Jennifer J.; Bayona, Jaime; Chalco, Katiuska; Shin, Sonya; Murray, Megan; Becerra, Mercedes C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Recurrent tuberculosis disease occurs within 2 years in as few as 1% and as many as 29% of individuals successfully treated for multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis. A better understanding of treatment-related factors associated with an elevated risk of recurrent tuberculosis after cure is urgently needed to optimize MDR tuberculosis therapy. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among adults successfully treated for MDR tuberculosis in Peru. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to examine whether receipt of an aggressive MDR tuberculosis regimen for ≥18 months following sputum conversion from positive to negative was associated with a reduced rate of recurrent tuberculosis. Results. Among 402 patients, the median duration of follow-up was 40.5 months (interquartile range, 21.2–53.4). Receipt of an aggressive MDR tuberculosis regimen for ≥18 months following sputum conversion was associated with a lower risk of recurrent tuberculosis (hazard ratio, 0.40 [95% confidence interval, 0.17–0.96]; P = .04). A baseline diagnosis of diabetes mellitus also predicted recurrent tuberculosis (hazard ratio, 10.47 [95% confidence interval, 2.17–50.60]; P = .004). Conclusions. Individuals who received an aggressive MDR tuberculosis regimen for ≥18 months following sputum conversion experienced a lower rate of recurrence after cure. Efforts to ensure that an aggressive regimen is accessible to all patients with MDR tuberculosis, such as minimization of sequential ineffective regimens, expanded drug access, and development of new MDR tuberculosis compounds, are critical to reducing tuberculosis recurrence in this population. Patients with diabetes mellitus should be carefully managed during initial treatment and followed closely for recurrent disease. PMID:23223591

  18. Point Prevalence and Incidence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in captive elephants in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Melissa; Isaza, Ramiro; Prins, Cindy; Hernandez, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Background Captive elephants infected with tuberculosis are implicated as an occupational source of zoonotic tuberculosis. However, accurate estimates of prevalence and incidence of elephant tuberculosis from well-defined captive populations are lacking in the literature. Studies published in recent years contain a wide range of prevalence estimates calculated from summary data. Incidence estimates of elephant tuberculosis in captive elephants are not available. Objective This study estimated the annual point prevalence, annual incidence, cumulative incidence, and incidence density of tuberculosis in captive elephants within the USA during the past 52 years. Animals and Methods We combined existing elephant census records from captive elephants in the USA with tuberculosis culture results obtained from trunk washes or at necropsy. This data set included 15 years where each elephant was screened annually. Results Between 1960 and 1996, the annual point prevalence of tuberculosis complex mycobacteria for both species was 0. From 1997 through 2011, the median point prevalence within the Asian elephant population was 5.1%, with a range from 0.3% to 6.7%. The incidence density was 9.7 cases/1000 elephant years (95% CI: 7.0–13.4). In contrast, the annual point prevalence during the same time period within the African elephant population remained 0 and the incidence density was 1.5 cases/1000 elephant years (95% CI: 0.7–4.0). Conclusions The apparent increase in new cases noted after 1996 resulted from a combination of both index cases and the initiation of mandatory annual tuberculosis complex (MTBC) screening in 1997 for all the elephants. This study found lower annual point prevalence estimates than previously reported in the literature. These discrepancies in prevalence estimates are primarily due to differences in terminology and calculation methods. Using the same intensive testing regime, the incidence of tuberculosis differed significantly between Asian and

  19. [The bacteriology of tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis mycobacterial infections].

    PubMed

    Wyplosz, B; Truffot-Pernot, C; Robert, J; Jarlier, V; Grosset, J

    1997-12-01

    Changing incidence and nature of mycobacterial infections subsequent to the historical regression of tuberculosis and the acquired human immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, as well as the development of new technical tools for molecular biology, have profoundly modified the methods used for the bacteriological diagnosis of mycobacteria infections. Although microscopic search for acid-fast bacilli, culture and antibiotic resistance tests on Löwenstein-Jensen medium remain the reference methods, more rapid and sophisticated methods are now available. Culture on radiolabeled media using the Bactec system has shortened the delay for positive culture and interpretable antibiotic sensitivity tests. Molecular techniques allow: 1) rapid identification of the most frequently isolated mycobacteria strains, including the most frequent laboratory contaminant M. gordonae, with genome probes; 2) genome typing of M. tuberculosis strains to trace interhuman transmission, detect recurrence or exogenous reinfection or demonstrate laboratory contamination; 3) rapid detection of rifampicin resistance; and 4) direct detection of M. tuberculosis and M. avium in pathological specimens. The role of mycobacteria in the environment causing opportunistic infections, atypical mycobacteria or non-tuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM), particularly the aviaire complex, has grown considerably. Isolation and identification relies on methods used to detect bacilli as well as blood cultures and analysis of fecal matter. NTM are naturally resistant to most of the antituberculosis antibiotics but are sometimes sensitive to aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones or new macrolides. PMID:9496590

  20. Diagnosing Tuberculosis With a Novel Support Vector Machine-Based Artificial Immune Recognition System

    PubMed Central

    Saybani, Mahmoud Reza; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Golzari Hormozi, Shahram; Wah, Teh Ying; Aghabozorgi, Saeed; Pourhoseingholi, Mohamad Amin; Olariu, Teodora

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health problem, which has been ranked as the second leading cause of death from an infectious disease worldwide. Diagnosis based on cultured specimens is the reference standard, however results take weeks to process. Scientists are looking for early detection strategies, which remain the cornerstone of tuberculosis control. Consequently there is a need to develop an expert system that helps medical professionals to accurately and quickly diagnose the disease. Artificial Immune Recognition System (AIRS) has been used successfully for diagnosing various diseases. However, little effort has been undertaken to improve its classification accuracy. Objectives: In order to increase the classification accuracy of AIRS, this study introduces a new hybrid system that incorporates a support vector machine into AIRS for diagnosing tuberculosis. Patients and Methods: Patient epacris reports obtained from the Pasteur laboratory of Iran were used as the benchmark data set, with the sample size of 175 (114 positive samples for TB and 60 samples in the negative group). The strategy of this study was to ensure representativeness, thus it was important to have an adequate number of instances for both TB and non-TB cases. The classification performance was measured through 10-fold cross-validation, Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE), sensitivity and specificity, Youden’s Index, and Area Under the Curve (AUC). Statistical analysis was done using the Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis (WEKA), a machine learning program for windows. Results: With an accuracy of 100%, sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 100%, Youden’s Index of 1, Area Under the Curve of 1, and RMSE of 0, the proposed method was able to successfully classify tuberculosis patients. Conclusions: There have been many researches that aimed at diagnosing tuberculosis faster and more accurately. Our results described a model for diagnosing tuberculosis with 100% sensitivity

  1. Pleural tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, B; Davies, P D O

    2006-03-01

    Pleural effusions in tuberculosis are commonly seen in young adults as an immunological phenomenon occurring soon after primary infection. However, the epidemiology and demographics of tuberculous pleurisy are changing due to the impact of HIV co-infection and the increasing number of pleural effusions seen as part of re-activation disease. Pleural biopsy for histology and culture is the mainstay of diagnosis with closed needle biopsy adequate in the majority of cases. Techniques such as PCR of biopsy specimens and the role of pleural fluid ADA are still being evaluated as a diagnostic aid. Tuberculous empyema is less commonly seen in the western world and the diagnostic yield from pleural fluid here is greater than in "primary" effusions. Treatment with appropriate antituberculous chemotherapy is generally successful though there is currently insufficient evidence to recommend the routine use of corticosteroids in this condition. PMID:16700190

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Copper: A Newly Appreciated Defense against an Old Foe?*

    PubMed Central

    Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Several independent studies have recently converged upon the conclusion that the human bacterial pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis encounters copper during infections. At least three independently regulated pathways respond to excess copper and are required for the full virulence of M. tuberculosis in animals. In this review, I will discuss the functions of the best-characterized copper-responsive proteins in M. tuberculosis, the potential sources of copper during an infection, and remaining questions about the interface between copper and tuberculosis. PMID:26055711

  3. Tuberculosis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contacts of Persons with Infectious TB Epidemiology of Pediatric Tuberculosis in the United States Targeted Tuberculosis Testing ... and unknown risks of second-line antituberculosis drugs. Breastfeeding Breastfeeding should not be discouraged for women being ...

  4. Tuberculosis and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    TUBERCULOSIS www.who.int/tb & DIABETES THE DUAL EPIDEMIC OF TB AND DIABETES DEADLY LINKAGES  People with ... higher risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis.  Diabetes triples a person’s risk of developing TB. ...

  5. Virulence factors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex

    PubMed Central

    Forrellad, Marina A.; Klepp, Laura I.; Gioffré, Andrea; Sabio y García, Julia; Morbidoni, Hector R.; Santangelo, María de la Paz; Cataldi, Angel A.; Bigi, Fabiana

    2013-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) consists of closely related species that cause tuberculosis in both humans and animals. This illness, still today, remains to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The mycobacteria enter the host by air, and, once in the lungs, are phagocytated by macrophages. This may lead to the rapid elimination of the bacillus or to the triggering of an active tuberculosis infection. A large number of different virulence factors have evolved in MTBC members as a response to the host immune reaction. The aim of this review is to describe the bacterial genes/proteins that are essential for the virulence of MTBC species, and that have been demonstrated in an in vivo model of infection. Knowledge of MTBC virulence factors is essential for the development of new vaccines and drugs to help manage the disease toward an increasingly more tuberculosis-free world. PMID:23076359

  6. Co-evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Homo sapiens

    PubMed Central

    Brites, Daniela; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    The causative agent of human tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is an obligate pathogen that evolved to exclusively persist in human populations. For M. tuberculosis to transmit from person to person, it has to cause pulmonary disease. Therefore, M. tuberculosis virulence has likely been a significant determinant of the association between M. tuberculosis and humans. Indeed, the evolutionary success of some M. tuberculosis genotypes seems at least partially attributable to their increased virulence. The latter possibly evolved as a consequence of human demographic expansions. If co-evolution occurred, humans would have counteracted to minimize the deleterious effects of M. tuberculosis virulence. The fact that human resistance to infection has a strong genetic basis is a likely consequence of such a counter-response. The genetic architecture underlying human resistance to M. tuberculosis remains largely elusive. However, interactions between human genetic polymorphisms and M. tuberculosis genotypes have been reported. Such interactions are consistent with local adaptation and allow for a better understanding of protective immunity in TB. Future ‘genome-to-genome’ studies, in which locally associated human and M. tuberculosis genotypes are interrogated in conjunction, will help identify new protective antigens for the development of better TB vaccines. PMID:25703549

  7. Rapid Differential Diagnosis between Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis and Focal Complications of Brucellosis Using a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Queipo-Ortuño, María Isabel; Colmenero, Juan D.; Bermudez, Pilar; Bravo, María José; Morata, Pilar

    2009-01-01

    Background Arduous to differ clinically, extrapulmonary tuberculosis and focal complications of brucellosis remain important causes of morbidity and mortality in many countries. We developed and applied a multiplex real-time PCR assay (M RT-PCR) for the simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and Brucella spp. Methodology Conventional microbiological techniques and M RT-PCR for M. tuberculosis complex and Brucella spp were performed on 45 clinical specimens from patients with focal complications of brucellosis or extrapulmonary tuberculosis and 26 control samples. Fragments of 207 bp and 164 bp from the conserved region of the genes coding for an immunogenic membrane protein of 31 kDa of B. abortus (BCSP31) and the intergenic region SenX3-RegX3 were used for the identification of Brucella and M. tuberculosis complex, respectively. Conclusions The detection limit of the M RT-PCR was 2 genomes per reaction for both pathogens and the intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were 0.44% and 0.93% for Brucella and 0.58% and 1.12% for Mycobacterium. M RT-PCR correctly identified 42 of the 45 samples from patients with tuberculosis or brucellosis and was negative in all the controls. Thus, the overall sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV values of the M RT PCR assay were 93.3%, 100%, 100% and 89.7%, respectively, with an accuracy of 95.8% (95% CI, 91.1%–100%). Since M RT-PCR is highly reproducible and more rapid and sensitive than conventional microbiological tests, this technique could be a promising and practical approach for the differential diagnosis between extrapulmonary tuberculosis and focal complications of brucellosis. PMID:19225565

  8. Tuberculosis diagnostics: Challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Nema, Vijay

    2012-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has been a disease affecting almost all parts of the world since ages. Lot many efforts came in the past for improving diagnosis and treatment. Also, an effective vaccine has been sought after for long. With the emergence of resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causal organisms of tuberculosis, and complexities emerging due to other associated infections and disease conditions, there is a desperate need for further research input in the field. Be it the better medication and care or better resistance management, proper diagnostics holds the key to success. It has been observed that a high burden of the disease was accompanied by resource limitations and poor research set-up. The scenario remained like this for several decades. With the refreshed vision of resourceful countries and funding agencies, funding is being provided in many areas of research in tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment. This review has been written with an aim to bring forth the limitations of available methods in the field of diagnostics and making researchers aware about the changing scenario with better funding opportunities and support. The author visualizes an enthusiasm from all over the world for the development of better modalities and urges scientists to join the struggle at this very perfect time to take the challenge and come forward with innovations in this field. PMID:22919166

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of tuberculosis in the southern ecological zones of Cameroon, as shown by genetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is a major cause of mortality and suffering worldwide, with over 95% of TB deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries. In recent years, molecular typing methods have been widely used in epidemiological studies to aid the control of TB, but this usage has not been the case with many African countries, including Cameroon. The aims of the present investigation were to identify and evaluate the diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) isolates circulating in two ecological zones of Cameroon, seven years after the last studies in the West Region, and after the re-organization of the National TB Control Program (NTBCP). These were expected to shed light also on the transmission of TB in the country. The study was conducted from February to July 2009. During this period, 169 patients with symptomatic disease and with sputum cultures that were positive for MTBC were randomly selected for the study from amongst 964 suspected patients in the savannah mosaic zone (West and North West regions) and the tropical rainforest zone (Central region). After culture and diagnosis, DNA was extracted from each of the MTBC isolates and transported to the BecA-ILRI Hub in Nairobi, Kenya for molecular analysis. Methods Genetic characterization was done by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit–variable number tandem repeat typing (MIRU-VNTR) and Spoligotyping. Results Molecular analysis showed that all TB cases reported in this study were caused by infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (98.8%) and Mycobacterium africanum (M. africanum) (1.2%) respectively. We did not detect any M. bovis. Comparative analyses using spoligotyping revealed that the majority of isolates belong to major clades of M. tuberculosis: Haarlem (7.6%), Latin American-Mediterranean (34.4%) and T clade (26.7%); the remaining isolates (31.3%) where distributed among the minor clades. The predominant group of isolates (34.4%) corresponded to spoligotype 61

  10. Differential influence of nutrient-starved Mycobacterium tuberculosis on adaptive immunity results in progressive tuberculosis disease and pathology.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Jes; Roy, Sugata; Rosenkrands, Ida; Lindenstrøm, Thomas; Filskov, Jonathan; Rasmussen, Erik Michael; Cassidy, Joseph; Andersen, Peter

    2015-12-01

    When infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, most individuals will remain clinically healthy but latently infected. Latent infection has been proposed to partially involve M. tuberculosis in a nonreplicating stage, which therefore represents an M. tuberculosis phenotype that the immune system most likely will encounter during latency. It is therefore relevant to examine how this particular nonreplicating form of M. tuberculosis interacts with the host immune system. To study this, we first induced a state of nonreplication through prolonged nutrient starvation of M. tuberculosis in vitro. This resulted in nonreplicating persistence even after prolonged culture in phosphate-buffered saline. Infection with either exponentially growing M. tuberculosis or nutrient-starved M. tuberculosis resulted in similar lung CFU levels in the first phase of the infection. However, between week 3 and 6 postinfection, there was a very pronounced increase in bacterial levels and associated lung pathology in nutrient-starved-M. tuberculosis-infected mice. This was associated with a shift from CD4 T cells that coexpressed gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) or IFN-γ, TNF-α, and interleukin-2 to T cells that only expressed IFN-γ. Thus, nonreplicating M. tuberculosis induced through nutrient starvation promotes a bacterial form that is genetically identical to exponentially growing M. tuberculosis yet characterized by a differential impact on the immune system that may be involved in undermining host antimycobacterial immunity and facilitate increased pathology and transmission. PMID:26416911

  11. Rigors in tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, C.; Eykyn, S.; Davidson, C.

    1993-01-01

    Rigors are not a recognized characteristic of miliary tuberculosis. We report two patients presenting with persistent rigors, thought to be suggestive of acute pyogenic infection, who were subsequently found to have miliary tuberculosis. In both cases, there was significant diagnostic delay. Miliary tuberculosis should therefore be included in the differential diagnosis of any patient presenting with unexplained rigors. PMID:8255841

  12. Global and Regional Burden of Isoniazid-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Courtney M.; Jenkins, Helen E.; Rodriguez, Carly A.; Keshavjee, Salmaan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Isoniazid has been the backbone of tuberculosis chemotherapy for 6 decades. Resistance to isoniazid threatens the efficacy of treatment of tuberculosis disease and infection. To inform policies around treatment of tuberculosis disease and infection in children, we sought to estimate both the proportion of child tuberculosis cases with isoniazid resistance and the number of incident isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis cases in children, by region. METHODS: We determined the relationship between rates of isoniazid resistance among child cases and among treatment-naive adult cases through a systematic literature review. We applied this relationship to regional isoniazid resistance estimates to estimate proportions of childhood tuberculosis cases with isoniazid resistance. We applied these proportions to childhood tuberculosis incidence estimates to estimate numbers of children with isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis. RESULTS: We estimated 12.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.8% to 14.8%) of all children with tuberculosis had isoniazid-resistant disease, representing 120 872 (95% CI 96 628 to 149 059) incident cases of isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis in children in 2010. The majority of these occurred in the Western Pacific and Southeast Asia regions; the European region had the highest proportion of child tuberculosis cases with isoniazid resistance, 26.1% (95% CI: 20.0% to 33.6%). CONCLUSIONS: The burden of isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis in children is substantial, and risk varies considerably by setting. The large number of child cases signals extensive ongoing transmission from adults with isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis. The risk of isoniazid resistance must be considered when evaluating treatment options for children with disease or latent infection to avoid inadequate treatment and consequent poor outcomes. PMID:26034243

  13. Tuberculosis verrucosa cutis (TBVC)--foot with miliary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Padmavathy, L; Lakshmana Rao, L; Ethirajan, N; Ramakrishna Rao, M; Subrahmanyan, E N; Manohar, U

    2007-07-01

    Tuberculosis Verrucosa Cutis (TBVC) or warty tuberculosis is a variant of cutaneous tuberculosis in patients with good cell mediated immunity (CMI) to Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, while Miliary Tuberculosis is associated with very poor CMI. Two widely different clinical presentations in the same patient are very rare and being reported. PMID:17886704

  14. Synthetic Long Peptide Derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Latency Antigen Rv1733c Protects against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Mariateresa; van den Eeden, Susan J. F.; Wilson, Louis; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Responsible for 9 million new cases of active disease and nearly 2 million deaths each year, tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health threat of overwhelming dimensions. Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the only licensed vaccine available, fails to confer lifelong protection and to prevent reactivation of latent infection. Although 15 new vaccine candidates are now in clinical trials, an effective vaccine against TB remains elusive, and new strategies for vaccination are vital. BCG vaccination fails to induce immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis latency antigens. Synthetic long peptides (SLPs) combined with adjuvants have been studied mostly for therapeutic cancer vaccines, yet not for TB, and proved to induce efficient antitumor immunity. This study investigated an SLP derived from Rv1733c, a major M. tuberculosis latency antigen which is highly expressed by “dormant” M. tuberculosis and well recognized by T cells from latently M. tuberculosis-infected individuals. In order to assess its in vivo immunogenicity and protective capacity, Rv1733c SLP in CpG was administered to HLA-DR3 transgenic mice. Immunization with Rv1733c SLP elicited gamma interferon-positive/tumor necrosis factor-positive (IFN-γ+/TNF+) and IFN-γ+ CD4+ T cells and Rv1733c-specific antibodies and led to a significant reduction in the bacterial load in the lungs of M. tuberculosis-challenged mice. This was observed both in a pre- and in a post-M. tuberculosis challenge setting. Moreover, Rv1733c SLP immunization significantly boosted the protective efficacy of BCG, demonstrating the potential of M. tuberculosis latency antigens to improve BCG efficacy. These data suggest a promising role for M. tuberculosis latency antigen Rv1733c-derived SLPs as a novel TB vaccine approach, both in a prophylactic and in a postinfection setting. PMID:26202436

  15. Molecular diagnostics for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Noor, K M; Shephard, L; Bastian, I

    2015-04-01

    The phenotypic methods of smear microscopy, culture and indirect drug susceptibility testing (DST) remain the 'gold standard' diagnostics for tuberculosis (TB) in 2015. However, this review demonstrates that genotypic methods are in the ascendancy. Current-generation nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) are important supplementary tests for the rapid direct detection of (multidrug-resistant) TB in specific clinical settings. Genotypic detection is already the preferred method of detecting rifampicin and pyrazinamide resistance. Next-generation NAATs able to detect about 10 colony forming units/mL of sputum could replace culture as the initial test for detecting TB. Whole genome sequencing could also plausibly replace phenotypic DST but much work is required in method standardisation, database development and elucidation of all resistance gene determinants. The challenge then will be to rollout these increasingly complex and expensive diagnostics in the low-income countries where TB is prevalent. PMID:25719854

  16. Tuberculosis: medico-legal aspects.

    PubMed

    Vetrugno, G; De-Giorgio, F; D'Alessandro, F; Scafetta, I; Berloco, F; Buonsenso, D; Abbate, F; Scalise, G; Pascali, V L; Valentini, P

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a diffusive infectious disease whose typical behaviour differentiates it from other infectious diseases spread by human-to-human transmission (flu, chicken pox, cholera, etc.) that follow a classic epidemic pattern. Indeed, in the presence of a known source of Koch bacilli that is capable of spreading the bacteria by air, not all exposed individuals inhale the bacteria, not all those who inhale them absorb them, not all those who absorb the bacteria are unable to eliminate them, not all who are able to eliminate them do so using delayed hypersensitivity, not all those who react with delayed hypersensitivity suffer lasting tissue damage (among other things, minor), not all who suffer tissue damage have anatomical sequelae, and not all those who have anatomical sequelae, however minimal, become carriers of bacilli in the latent period. The vast majority (90-95%) of the latter - which are in any case a portion, not the totality of those exposed - remain asymptomatic throughout their lives and never develop active tuberculosis. Based on these biological characteristics and the legal concepts of "epidemic" and "disease," it becomes highly problematic, if not impossible, to assert both that tuberculosis can cause events of sufficient magnitude to be associated with the crime of "epidemic," and that the mere diagnosis of a latent tuberculosis infection is sufficient to assume the presence of an illness legally prosecutable in criminal proceedings or a disability prosecutable in civil proceedings. Furthermore, clinically apparent tuberculosis is a temporarily-and in some cases permanently-disabling condition, and in certain work environments, even with the difficulties caused by the lack of available effective diagnostic tools and the insidious behaviour of the disease in the early stages, targeted monitoring to identify other persons who may become ill is appropriate. PMID:24804006

  17. [Childhood tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Hamzaoui, A

    2015-01-01

    Childhood TB is an indication of failing TB control in the community. It allows disease persistence in the population. Mortality and morbidity due to TB is high in children. Moreover, HIV co-infection and multidrug-resistant diseases are as frequent in children as in adults. Infection is more frequent in younger children. Disease risk after primary infection is greatest in infants younger than 2 years. In case of exposure, evidence of infection can be obtained using the tuberculin skin test (TST) or an interferon-gamma assay (IGRA). There is no evidence to support the use of IGRA over TST in young children. TB suspicion should be confirmed whenever possible, using new available tools, particularly in case of pulmonary and lymph node TB. Induced sputum, nasopharyngeal aspiration and fine needle aspiration biopsy provide a rapid and definitive diagnosis of mycobacterial infection in a large proportion of patients. Analysis of paediatric samples revealed higher sensitivity and specificity values of molecular techniques in comparison with the ones originated from adults. Children require higher drugs dosages than adults. Short courses of steroids are associated with TB treatment in case of respiratory distress, bronchoscopic desobstruction is proposed for severe airways involvement and antiretroviral therapy is mandatory in case of HIV infection. Post-exposure prophylaxis in children is a highly effective strategy to reduce the risk of TB disease. The optimal therapy for treatment of latent infection with a presumably multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain is currently not known. PMID:24932504

  18. Tuberculosis and nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Krishna Bihari; Gupta, Rajesh; Atreja, Atulya; Verma, Manish; Vishvkarma, Suman

    2009-01-01

    Malnutrition and tuberculosis are both problems of considerable magnitude in most of the underdeveloped regions of the world. These two problems tend to interact with each other. Tuberculosis mortality rates in different economic groups in a community tend to vary inversely with their economic levels. Similarly, nutritional status is significantly lower in patients with active tuberculosis compared with healthy controls. Malnutrition can lead to secondary immunodeficiency that increases the host's susceptibility to infection. In patients with tuberculosis, it leads to reduction in appetite, nutrient malabsorption, micronutrient malabsorption, and altered metabolism leading to wasting. Both, protein-energy malnutrition and micronutrients deficiencies increase the risk of tuberculosis. It has been found that malnourished tuberculosis patients have delayed recovery and higher mortality rates than well-nourished patients. Nutritional status of patients improves during tuberculosis chemotherapy. High prevalence of human immunodeficiency (HIV) infection in the underdeveloped countries further aggravates the problem of malnutrition and tuberculosis. Effect of malnutrition on childhood tuberculosis and tuberculin skin test are other important considerations. Nutritional supplementation may represent a novel approach for fast recovery in tuberculosis patients. In addition, raising nutritional status of population may prove to be an effective measure to control tuberculosis in underdeveloped areas of world. PMID:20165588

  19. [Smoking and tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Underner, Michel; Perriot, Jean

    2012-12-01

    Smoking and tuberculosis represent two major world health issues particularly in developing countries. Tobacco smoke increases risk of Mycobaterium tuberculosis infection by several means: alteration of muco-ciliary clearance, reduced alveolar macrophage activity; immune-depression of pulmonary lymphocytes, reduction of cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells, alteration of the activity of the pulmonary dendritic cells. Both active and passive smoking increases the risk of latent tubercular infection and of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. Active smoking increases the severity of pulmonary tuberculosis (gravity of radiological lesions). The diagnostic delay and recovery details are more important for smokers. Active smoking increases relapses of both pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis after treatment with or without the Directly Observed Treatment Short course (DOTS) with poor observance of treatment. The mortality risk from tuberculosis is heightened among smokers. Smoking cessation represents an essential means of controlling tuberculosis epidemics in developing countries. PMID:22465718

  20. Interferon-Gamma Improves Macrophages Function against M. tuberculosis in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Humaira; Muhammad, Niaz; Abbas, Muhammad Nasser

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) that causes tuberculosis (TB) kills millions of infected people annually especially multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). On infection, macrophages recognize the mycobacteria by toll-like receptor (TLR) followed by phagocytosis and control of mycobacteria. In addition, macrophages also secrete IL-12 to induce IFN-γ production by T, which, in turn, increases the phagocytosis and oxidative burst. Individuals with defects in innate or adaptive immunity exhibit increased susceptibility to M. tuberculosis. Understanding these immunologic mechanisms will help in TB control. We aimed to investigate the immunopathologic mechanisms in MDR-TB and role of recombinant human interferon-gamma (rhIFN-γ). Study Design and Methods. Monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of MDR-TB patients and healthy subjects and were investigated for immunologic response by ELISA and flow cytometry. Results. Different functional and molecular anomalies were observed in macrophages. In addition, a defective immune response to M. tuberculosis from the patient's MDMs was characterized, which in turn improved by pretreatment with rhIFN-γ. Conclusion. This work highlights the fact that rhIFN-γ improves macrophages function against M. tuberculosis and treatment of patients with poor responsiveness to TB therapy may be needed in future to include IFN-γ as adjuvant therapy after the full characterization of pathological and molecular mechanisms in these and in other more multidrug-resistant TB patients. PMID:27478636

  1. Attitudes about Tuberculosis Prevention in the Elimination Phase: A Survey among Physicians in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Vollrath, Oliver; Lange, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Background Targeted and stringent measures of tuberculosis prevention are necessary to achieve the goal of tuberculosis elimination in countries of low tuberculosis incidence. Methods We ascertained the knowledge about tuberculosis risk factors and stringency of tuberculosis prevention measures by a standardized questionnaire among physicians in Germany involved in the care of individuals from classical risk groups for tuberculosis. Results 510 physicians responded to the online survey. Among 16 risk factors immunosuppressive therapy, HIV-infection and treatment with TNF-antagonist were thought to be the most important risk factors for the development of tuberculosis in Germany. Exposure to a patient with tuberculosis ranked on the 10th position. In the event of a positive tuberculin-skin-test or interferon-γ release assay only 50%, 40%, 36% and 25% of physicians found that preventive chemotherapy was indicated for individuals undergoing tumor necrosis factor-antagonist therapy, close contacts of tuberculosis patients, HIV-infected individuals and migrants, respectively. Conclusions A remarkably low proportion of individuals with latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis belonging to classical risk groups for tuberculosis are considered candidates for preventive chemotherapy in Germany. Better knowledge about the risk for tuberculosis in different groups and more stringent and targeted preventive interventions will probably be necessary to achieve tuberculosis elimination in Germany. PMID:25393241

  2. [Advantages and drawbacks of expectoration decontamination methods for tuberculosis and anti-tuberculosis drug resistance diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Zingué, Dezemon; Hien, Hervé; Méda, Nicolas; Zida, Sylvie; Kaboré, Antoinette; Sanou, Adama; Ouédraogo, Abdoul-Salam; Gomgnimbou, Michel; Diandé, Souba; Tarnagda, Zékiba; Godreuil, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    In the actual context of increasing tuberculosis and anti-tuberculosis drug resistance, the laboratory diagnosis of Mycobacterial infections remain the primordial objective of control and surveillance of human tuberculosis. The diagnosis and following of tuberculosis in resource limited settings are done by microscopy Ziehl-Neelsen method which is poor sensitive (20-53%) and have poor specificity because it's can't distinguish tuberculosis mycobacterium and atypical tuberculoid mycobacterium. Mycobacterium culture on solid media is the gold standard method for tuberculosis and anti-tuberculosis drug resistance diagnosis. Here, the challenge is that expectorations using for culture contain mycobacterium and others contaminating bacteria responsible of culture contamination. Many different methods of homogenization and decontamination of sputum specimens for culturing exist and each laboratory had to do a choice of the better method to optimize isolating of mycobacterium. This review is a summary of homogenization and decontamination methods described in literature and used by certain laboratories for diagnosis of TB by culture. However, it's essential for each laboratory to conduct evaluation of the different methods and do the choice of the appropriate one by taking into account factors such as the feasibility and cost effectively. Nine methods of decontaminations are described in this review taking account of their advantages, drawbacks and their feasibility in resource limited settings. PMID:23747665

  3. A cross-sectional and follow-up study of leukopenia in tuberculosis patients: prevalence, risk factors and impact of anti-tuberculosis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fei-Shen; Wu, Mei-Ying; Tu, Wen-Jun; Pan, Hong-Qiu; Zheng, Jian; Shi, Jun-Wei; Fei, Zhong-Ting; Zhang, Rui-Mei; Yan, Wei-Guo; Shang, Ming-Qun; Zheng, Qiang; Wang, Meng-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the prevalence of and risk factors for leukopenia in tuberculosis patients and the impact of anti-tuberculosis regimens on the occurrence of leukopenia in newly treated tuberculosis patients. Methods A total of 1,904 tuberculosis patients were included in the study. A cross-sectional survey of the prevalence of leukopenia was initially conducted, and then factors influencing leukopenia were identified using Logistic regression analysis. Non-treatment factors influencing peripheral blood leukocyte counts were analyzed using univariate COX proportional hazards models. Covariate analysis was used to assess the independent effect of different anti-tuberculosis regimens on peripheral blood leukocyte counts. Results Being female, advanced age and longer duration of previous anti-tuberculosis treatment (>6 month) were risk factors for leukopenia in tuberculosis patients, while secondary pulmonary tuberculosis, higher body mass index (BMI: 24−27.9 kg/m2), and higher degree of education (senior high school or above) were protective factors. Gender, vegetable consumption, drinking, pulmonary infection, other chronic diseases, and use of antibiotics were significantly associated with the development of leukopenia in patients on anti-tuberculosis treatment. In tuberculosis patients treated with anti-tuberculosis regimens not containing antibiotics, peripheral blood leukocyte levels gradually declined with the prolongation of treatment duration. In tuberculosis patients treated with anti-tuberculosis regimens containing antibiotics, peripheral blood leukocyte levels showed a declining trend. Conclusions Female patients, patients at advanced age and recurrent tuberculosis patients having longer previous anti-tuberculosis treatment are high-risk populations for leukopenia. Attention should be paid to the influence of vegetable consumption and drinking, co-morbidities and use of antibiotics during anti-tuberculosis treatment. PMID:26793345

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound in mediastinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Ecka, Ruth Shifa; Somasundaram, Aravindh; Shoukat, Abid; Kirnake, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tubercular lymphadenitis is the commonest extra pulmonary manifestation in cervical and mediastinal locations. Normal characteristics of lymph nodes (LN) have been described on ultrasonography as well as by Endoscopic Ultrasound. Many ultrasonic features have been described for evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes. The inter and intraobserver agreement of the endosonographic features have not been uniformly established. Methods and Results: A total of 266 patients underwent endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration and 134 cases were diagnosed as mediastinal tuberculosis. The endoscopic ultrasound location and features of these lymph nodes are described. Conclusion: Our series demonstrates the utility of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration as the investigation of choice for diagnosis of mediastinal tuberculosis and also describes various endoscopic ultrasound features of such nodes. PMID:27051097

  5. Novel Vaccination Strategies against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Peter; Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.

    2014-01-01

    The tuberculosis (TB) pandemic continues to rampage despite widespread use of the BCG (Bacillus Calmette–Guérin) vaccine. Novel vaccination strategies are urgently needed to arrest global transmission and prevent the uncontrolled development of multidrug-resistant forms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Over the last two decades, considerable progress has been made in the field of vaccine development with numerous innovative preclinical candidates and more than a dozen vaccines in clinical trials. These vaccines are developed either as boosters of the current BCG vaccine or as novel prime vaccines to replace BCG. Given the enormous prevalence of latent TB infection, vaccines that are protective on top of an already established infection remain a high priority and a significant scientific challenge. Here we discuss the current state of TB vaccine research and development, our understanding of the underlying immunology, and the requirements for an efficient TB vaccine. PMID:24890836

  6. Tuberculosis: a disease without boundaries.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Nicole

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) that usually affects the lungs leading to severe coughing, fever, and chest pains. Although current research in the past four years has provided valuable insight into TB transmission, diagnosis, and treatment, much remains to be discovered to effectively decrease the incidence of and eventually eradicate TB. The disease still puts a strain on public health, being only second to HIV/AIDS in causing high mortality rates. This review will highlight the history of TB as well as provide an overview of the current literature on epidemiology, pathogenesis and the immune response, treatment, and control of TB. In this race to combat a disease that knows no boundaries, it is necessary to have a conceptual and clear understanding of TB overall with the hope of providing better treatment through novel and collaborative research and public health efforts. PMID:26198113

  7. Tuberculosis as an Etiological Factor in Liver Abscess in Adults.

    PubMed

    Dey, Jaideep; Gautam, Hitender; Venugopal, Shwetha; Porwal, Chhavi; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan; Gupta, Naresh; Singh, Urvashi B

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis of the liver without active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis is considered as an uncommon diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to determine the etiological role of tuberculosis in adult patients presenting with features of liver abscess. Methods. A total of 40 patients with liver abscess were included in the study. The liver abscess aspirate was subjected to microscopy, culture, and polymerase chain reaction to determine the role of tuberculosis as an etiological factor in liver abscess. Results. Of the 40 patients enrolled, 25% (10/40) were diagnosed with having tubercular liver abscess. In a total of 40 specimens, 2.5% (1/40) were positive for acid fast bacilli by Ziehl-Neelsen method, while 10% (4/40) were positive for M. tuberculosis by culture using BACTEC 460 and the yield increased to 25% (10/40) by polymerase chain reaction for M. tuberculosis. Conclusion. 25% of the patients presenting with liver abscess had tubercular etiology without features of active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis. Liver can act as the primary site of involvement in the absence of activity elsewhere in the body. Tuberculosis should be considered as an important differential diagnosis of liver abscess irrespective of evidence of active tuberculosis elsewhere in the body. PMID:27595021

  8. Tuberculosis as an Etiological Factor in Liver Abscess in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Jaideep; Venugopal, Shwetha; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis of the liver without active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis is considered as an uncommon diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to determine the etiological role of tuberculosis in adult patients presenting with features of liver abscess. Methods. A total of 40 patients with liver abscess were included in the study. The liver abscess aspirate was subjected to microscopy, culture, and polymerase chain reaction to determine the role of tuberculosis as an etiological factor in liver abscess. Results. Of the 40 patients enrolled, 25% (10/40) were diagnosed with having tubercular liver abscess. In a total of 40 specimens, 2.5% (1/40) were positive for acid fast bacilli by Ziehl-Neelsen method, while 10% (4/40) were positive for M. tuberculosis by culture using BACTEC 460 and the yield increased to 25% (10/40) by polymerase chain reaction for M. tuberculosis. Conclusion. 25% of the patients presenting with liver abscess had tubercular etiology without features of active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis. Liver can act as the primary site of involvement in the absence of activity elsewhere in the body. Tuberculosis should be considered as an important differential diagnosis of liver abscess irrespective of evidence of active tuberculosis elsewhere in the body. PMID:27595021

  9. The interface between the national tuberculosis control programme and district hospitals in Cameroon: missed opportunities for strengthening the local health system –a multiple case study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. District hospitals (DHs) play a central role in district-based health systems, and their relation with vertical programmes is very important. Studies on the impact of vertical programmes on DHs are rare. This study aims to fill this gap. Its purpose is to analyse the interaction between the National Tuberculosis Control Programme (NTCP) and DHs in Cameroon, especially its effects on the human resources, routine health information system (HIS) and technical capacity at the hospital level. Methods We used a multiple case study methodology. From the Adamaoua Region, we selected two DHs, one public and one faith-based. We collected qualitative and quantitative data through document reviews, semi-structured interviews with district and regional staff, and observations in the two DHs. Results The NTCP trained and supervised staff, designed and provided tuberculosis data collection and reporting tools, and provided anti-tuberculosis drugs, reagents and microscopes to DHs. However, these interventions were limited to the hospital units designated as Tuberculosis Diagnostic and Treatment Centres and to staff dedicated to tuberculosis control activities. The NTCP installed a parallel HIS that bypassed the District Health Services. The DH that performs well in terms of general hospital care and that is well managed was successful in tuberculosis control. Based on the available resources, the two hospitals adapt the organisation of tuberculosis control to their settings. The management teams in charge of the District Health Services are not involved in tuberculosis control. In our study, we identified several opportunities to strengthen the local health system that have been missed by the NTCP and the health system managers. Conclusion Well-managed DHs perform better in terms of tuberculosis control than DHs that are not well managed. The analysis of the effects of the NTCP on the human

  10. Tuberculosis Facts - Testing for TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Testing for TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  11. Tuberculosis in the lung (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is caused by a group of organisms Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M bovis , M africanum and a few other rarer subtypes. Tuberculosis usually appears as a lung (pulmonary) infection. However, ...

  12. Tuberculosis Facts - Exposure to TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Exposure to TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  13. Tuberculosis in the lung (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is caused by a group of organisms Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum and a few other rarer subtypes. Tuberculosis usually appears as a lung (pulmonary) infection. However, ...

  14. Natural History of Tuberculosis: Duration and Fatality of Untreated Pulmonary Tuberculosis in HIV Negative Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Tiemersma, Edine W.; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Borgdorff, Martien W.; Williams, Brian G.; Nagelkerke, Nico J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prognosis, specifically the case fatality and duration, of untreated tuberculosis is important as many patients are not correctly diagnosed and therefore receive inadequate or no treatment. Furthermore, duration and case fatality of tuberculosis are key parameters in interpreting epidemiological data. Methodology and Principal Findings To estimate the duration and case fatality of untreated pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV negative patients we reviewed studies from the pre-chemotherapy era. Untreated smear-positive tuberculosis among HIV negative individuals has a 10-year case fatality variously reported between 53% and 86%, with a weighted mean of 70%. Ten-year case fatality of culture-positive smear-negative tuberculosis was nowhere reported directly but can be indirectly estimated to be approximately 20%. The duration of tuberculosis from onset to cure or death is approximately 3 years and appears to be similar for smear-positive and smear-negative tuberculosis. Conclusions Current models of untreated tuberculosis that assume a total duration of 2 years until self-cure or death underestimate the duration of disease by about one year, but their case fatality estimates of 70% for smear-positive and 20% for culture-positive smear-negative tuberculosis appear to be satisfactory. PMID:21483732

  15. Toward Earlier Inclusion of Pregnant and Postpartum Women in Tuberculosis Drug Trials: Consensus Statements From an International Expert Panel.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amita; Mathad, Jyoti S; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M; Albano, Jessica D; Botgros, Radu; Brown, Vikki; Browning, Renee S; Dawson, Liza; Dooley, Kelly E; Gnanashanmugam, Devasena; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; Jean-Philippe, Patrick; Kim, Peter; Lyerly, Anne D; Mirochnick, Mark; Mofenson, Lynne M; Montepiedra, Grace; Piper, Jeanna; Sahin, Leyla; Savic, Radojka; Smith, Betsy; Spiegel, Hans; Swaminathan, Soumya; Watts, D Heather; White, Amina

    2016-03-15

    Tuberculosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in women of childbearing age (15-44 years). Despite increased tuberculosis risk during pregnancy, optimal clinical treatment remains unclear: safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic data for many tuberculosis drugs are lacking, and trials of promising new tuberculosis drugs exclude pregnant women. To advance inclusion of pregnant and postpartum women in tuberculosis drug trials, the US National Institutes of Health convened an international expert panel. Discussions generated consensus statements (>75% agreement among panelists) identifying high-priority research areas during pregnancy, including: (1) preventing progression of latent tuberculosis infection, especially in women coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus; (2) evaluating new agents/regimens for treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis; and (3) evaluating safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of tuberculosis drugs already in use during pregnancy and postpartum. Incorporating pregnant women into clinical trials would extend evidence-based tuberculosis prevention and treatment standards to this special population. PMID:26658057

  16. [Pharyngeal tuberculosis: Case report].

    PubMed

    Spini, Roxana Gabriela; Bordino, Lucas; Cohen, Daniela; Martins, Andrea; Ramírez, Zaida; González, Norma E

    2015-08-01

    Pharyngeal tuberculosis is a rare extrapulmonary manifestation. In Argentina, the number of cases of tuberculosis reported in children under 19 years in 2012 was 1752. Only 12.15% had extrapulmonary manifestation. A case of a 17 year old girl with pharyngeal tuberculosis is reported. The patient presented intermittent fever and swallowing pain for 6 months, without response to conventional antibiotic treatment. Chest X-ray showedbilateral micronodular infiltrate, so hospitalization was decided to study and treat. The sputum examination for acid-fast resistant bacilli was positive and treatment with four antituberculous drugs was started, with good evolution and disappearance of symptoms. Diagnostic confirmation with the isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum culture was obtained. The main symptoms of pharyngeal tuberculosis are sore throat and difficulty in swallowing of long evolution. It is important to consider tuberculosis as differential diagnosis in patients with chronic pharyngitis unresponsive to conventional treatment. PMID:26172025

  17. Endobronchial Tuberculosis Mimicking Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Argun Baris, Serap; Onyilmaz, Tuğba; Basyigit, Ilknur; Boyaci, Hasim

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial tuberculosis (EBTB) is defined as tuberculosis infection of the tracheobronchial tree with microbial and histopathological evidence. The clinical symptoms of the diseases are nonspecific. Chronic cough is the major symptom of the disease. The diagnosis is often delayed due to its nonspecific presentation and misdiagnosed as bronchial asthma. This case is presented to recall the notion that the endobronchial tuberculosis can mimic asthma and the importance of bronchoscopic evaluation in a patient with chronic cough and treatment resistant asthma. PMID:26798513

  18. TUBERCULOSIS COMO ENFERMEDAD OCUPACIONAL

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Ticona, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Existe evidencia suficiente para declarar a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional en diversos profesionales especialmente entre los trabajadores de salud. En el Perú están normados y reglamentados los derechos laborales inherentes a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional, como la cobertura por discapacidad temporal o permanente. Sin embargo, estos derechos aún no han sido suficientemente socializados. En este trabajo se presenta información sobre el riesgo de adquirir tuberculosis en el lugar de trabajo, se revisan las evidencias para declarar a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional en trabajadores de salud y se presenta la legislación peruana vigente al respecto. PMID:22858771

  19. The Socioeconomic Factors and the Indigenous Component of Tuberculosis in Amazonas

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the availability of tuberculosis prevention and control services throughout Amazonas, high rates of morbidity and mortality from tuberculosis remain in the region. Knowledge of the social determinants of tuberculosis in Amazonas is important for the establishment of public policies and the planning of effective preventive and control measures for the disease. To analyze the relationship of the spatial distribution of the incidence of tuberculosis in municipalities and regions of Amazonas to the socioeconomic factors and indigenous tuberculosis component, from 2007 to 2013. An ecological study was conducted based on secondary data from the epidemiological surveillance of tuberculosis. A linear regression model was used to analyze the relationship of the annual incidence of tuberculosis to the socioeconomic factors, performance indicators of health services, and indigenous tuberculosis component. The distribution of the incidence of tuberculosis in the municipalities of Amazonas was positively associated with the Gini index and the population attributable fraction of tuberculosis in the indigenous peoples, but negatively associated with the proportion of the poor and the unemployment rate. The spatial distribution of tuberculosis in the different regions of Amazonas was heterogeneous and closely related with the socioeconomic factors and indigenous component of tuberculosis. PMID:27362428

  20. Increased Complement C1q Level Marks Active Disease in Human Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingxia; Liu, Haiying; Zhang, Guoliang; Deng, Qunyi; Huang, Jian; Gao, Zhiliang; Zhou, Boping; Feng, Carl G.; Chen, Xinchun

    2014-01-01

    Background Complement functions as an important host defense system and complement C5 and C7 have been implicated in immunopathology of tuberculosis. However, little is known about the role of other complement components in tuberculosis. Methods Complement gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of tuberculosis patients and controls were determined using whole genome transcriptional microarray assays. The mRNA and protein levels of three C1q components, C1qA, C1qB, and C1qC, were further validated by qRT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The percentages of C1q expression in CD14 positive cells were determined by flow cytometry. Finally, C1qC protein level was quantified in the pleural fluid of tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis pleurisy. Results C1q expression increases significantly in the peripheral blood of patients with active tuberculosis compared to healthy controls and individuals with latent TB infection. The percentage of C1q-expressing CD14 positive cells is significantly increased in active TB patients. C1q expression in the peripheral blood correlates with sputum smear positivity in tuberculosis patients and is reduced after anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy. Notably, receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that C1qC mRNA levels in peripheral blood efficiently discriminate active from latent tuberculosis infection and healthy controls. Additionally, C1qC protein level in pleural effusion shows improved power in discriminating tuberculosis from non-tuberculosis pleurisy when compared to other inflammatory markers, such as IL-6 and TNF-α. Conclusions C1q expression correlates with active disease in human tuberculosis. C1q could be a potential diagnostic marker to discriminate active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection as well as tuberculosis pleurisy from non-tuberculosis pleurisy. PMID:24647646

  1. Tuberculosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Susanna; Tagliabue, Claudia; Bosis, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in children is a neglected aspect of the TB epidemic despite it constituting 20% or more of all TB cases in many countries with high TB incidence. Childhood TB is a direct consequence of adult TB but remains overshadowed by adult TB because it is usually smear-negative. Infants and young children are more likely to develop life-threatening forms of TB than older children and adults due to their immature immune systems. Therefore, prompt diagnoses are extremely important although difficult since clinical and radiological signs of TB can be non-specific and variable in children. Despite undeniable advances in identifying definite, probable, or possible TB markers, pediatricians still face many problems when diagnosing TB diagnosis. Moreover, curing TB can be difficult when treatment is delayed and when multi-drug resistant (MDR) pathogens are the cause of the disease. In these cases, the prognosis in children is particularly poor because MDR-TB treatment and treatment duration remain unclear. New studies of diagnostic tests and optimal treatment in children are urgently needed with the final goal of developing an effective anti-TB vaccine. PMID:24363879

  2. Community Coauthoring: Whose Voice Remains?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Joanne; Webster, Stephanie; Hopper, Mindy

    2011-01-01

    This article examines how texts are collaboratively produced in community development work when coauthors come from multiple racial, ethnic, and class backgrounds as well as business and other work experiences. We found that the term "wordsmithing" became a discursive tool that limited resident input and shaped the Plan toward an external…

  3. Content and Access Remain Key

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Linda B.

    2007-01-01

    It is impossible to review the year's outstanding government publication landscape without acknowledging that change remains paramount. Just as striking, however, is that these changes go hand in hand with some familiar constants. Within this shifting environment, there are the consistency and dependability of government information itself,…

  4. Granuloma Correlates of Protection Against Tuberculosis and Mechanisms of Immune Modulation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Smriti; Alvarez, Xavier; Didier, Peter J.; Doyle, Lara A.; Blanchard, James L.; Lackner, Andrew A.; Kaushal, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Background. The BCG vaccine is ineffective against adult tuberculosis. Hence, new antituberculosis vaccines are needed. Correlates of protection against tuberculosis are not known. We studied the effects of BCG vaccination on gene expression in tuberculosis granulomas using macaques. Methods. Macaques were BCG-vaccinated or sham-vaccinated and then challenged with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Lung lesions were used for comparative transcriptomics. Results. Vaccinated macaques were protected with lower bacterial burden and immunopathology. Lesions from BCG-vaccinated nonhuman primates (NHPs) showed a better balance of α- and β-chemokine gene expression with higher levels of β-chemokine expression relative to nonvaccinated animals. Consistent with this, sham-vaccinated macaques recruited fewer macrophages relative to neutrophils in their lungs. The expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), a known immunosuppressor, was significantly higher in both week 5 and 10 lesions from sham-vaccinated, relative to BCG-vaccinated, NHPs. IDO expression was primarily limited to the nonlymphocytic region of the lesions, within the inner ring structure surrounding the central necrosis. Conclusions. Our study defines lung gene expression correlates of protective response against tuberculosis, relative to disease, which can potentially be employed to assess the efficacy of candidate antituberculosis vaccines. Mycobacterium tuberculosis may modulate protective immune responses using diverse mechanisms, including increased recruitment of inflammatory neutrophils and the concomitant use of IDO to modulate inflammation. PMID:23255564

  5. [Spinal tuberculosis or bone metastases? Case report].

    PubMed

    Dima-Cozma, Corina; Mitu, F; Rezuş, Elena; Arhire, Oana; Petcu, I; Grigoraş, C; Banu, Claudia; Cozma, S

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the most important infectious disease worldwide and skeletal form has an incidence between 3% and 10%, depending on geographic area. The thoracolumbar junction is the most commonly involved in vertebral tuberculosis; some radiologic features are specifics, but other could be indistinguishable from that of lymphoma or metastases. We discuss the case of a 80-year-old man presented with a 2-month history of thoracolumbar pain, fatigability and fever. The vertebral radiography showed narrowing of the intervertebral disc space between T1 and T12, adjacent irregularity, erosion and lisis of vertebres, features visibles also on computed tomography. After the exclusion of the other causes of osteolisis, we started a standard regimen of tuberculostatic treatment and after one month of treatment the symptoms of patient improved noticeably. Other problems of diagnostic and treatment modalities of spinal tuberculosis are discussed. PMID:20509287

  6. Portrait of a Pathogen: The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Proteome In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kruh, Nicole A.; Troudt, Jolynn; Izzo, Angelo; Prenni, Jessica; Dobos, Karen M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), is a facultative intracellular pathogen that can persist within the host. The bacteria are thought to be in a state of reduced replication and metabolism as part of the chronic lung infection. Many in vitro studies have dissected the hypothesized environment within the infected lung, defining the bacterial response to pH, starvation and hypoxia. While these experiments have afforded great insight, the picture remains incomplete. The only way to study the combined effects of these environmental factors and the mycobacterial response is to study the bacterial response in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings We used the guinea pig model of tuberculosis to examine the bacterial proteome during the early and chronic stages of disease. Lungs were harvested thirty and ninety days after aerosol challenge with Mtb, and analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. To date, in vivo proteomics of the tubercle bacillus has not been described and this work has generated the first large-scale shotgun proteomic data set, comprising over 500 unique protein identifications. Cell wall and cell wall processes, and intermediary metabolism and respiration were the two major functional classes of proteins represented in the infected lung. These classes of proteins displayed the greatest heterogeneity indicating important biological processes for establishment of a productive bacterial infection and its persistence. Proteins necessary for adaptation throughout infection, such as nitrate/nitrite reduction were found at both time points. The PE-PPE protein class, while not well characterized, represented the third most abundant category and showed the most consistent expression during the infection. Conclusions/Significance Cumulatively, the results of this work may provide the basis for rational drug design – identifying numerous Mtb proteins, from essential kinases to products involved in

  7. Paleopathology of human tuberculosis and the potential role of climate.

    PubMed

    Nerlich, Andreas G; Lösch, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Both origin and evolution of tuberculosis and its pathogens (Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex) are not fully understood. The paleopathological investigation of human remains offers a unique insight into the molecular evolution and spread including correlative data of the environment. The molecular analysis of material from Egypt (3000-500 BC), Sudan (200-600 AD), Hungary (600-1700 AD), Latvia (1200-1600 AD), and South Germany (1400-1800 AD) urprisingly revealed constantly high frequencies of tuberculosis in all different time periods excluding significant environmental influence on tuberculosis spread. The typing of various mycobacteria strains provides evidence for ancestral M. tuberculosis strains in Pre- to early Egyptian dynastic material (3500-2650 BC), while typical M. africanum signatures were detected in a Middle Kingdom tomb (2050-1650 BC). Samples from the New Kingdom to Late Period (1500-500 BC) indicated modern M. tuberculosis strains. No evidence was seen for M. bovis in Egyptian material while M. bovis signatures were first identified in Siberian biomaterial dating 2000 years before present. These results contraindicates the theory that M. tuberculosis evolved from M. bovis during early domestication in the region of the "Fertile Crescent," but supports the scenario that M. tuberculosis probably derived from an ancestral progenitor strain. The environmental influence of this evolutionary scenario deserves continuing intense evaluation. PMID:19360109

  8. Deprivation, immigration and tuberculosis incidence in Naples, 1996-2000.

    PubMed

    Ponticiello, Antonio; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M; Simonetti, Andrea; Ortolani, Rosanna; Malerba, Mario; Sanduzzi, Alessandro

    2005-01-01

    Most of the tuberculosis cases in Campania occur in Naples, the biggest city in the South of Italy with the highest unemployment and immigration rates. However, the occurrence of tuberculosis differs between the different neighbourhoods and it is not known whether these differences are associated with poverty or with immigration. We describe tuberculosis incidence and its association with socio-economic status and immigration in the city of Naples during the period 1996-2000. The basic design was an ecological study, correlating the incidence of tuberculosis which was calculated on the basis of notified tuberculosis cases to census data on immigration and socio-economic deprivation per neighbourhood. Immigrants had a high risk for tuberculosis (RR=34 for Africans) but the incidence of TB varied largely by districts and seemed independent of immigration. All socioeconomic factors increased the incidence of TB significantly. In a multivariate Poisson regression analysis only the rate of unemployment (p=0.02) and the population density (p=0.002) remained independently associated with tuberculosis incidence. In this study we showed that deprivation explained differences in tuberculosis incidence in Naples to a greater extent than immigration. PMID:16151887

  9. [Multifocal tuberculosis in immunocompetent patients].

    PubMed

    Rezgui, Amel; Fredj, Fatma Ben; Mzabi, Anis; Karmani, Monia; Laouani, Chadia

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal tuberculosis is defined as the presence of lesions affecting at least two extrapulmonary sites, with or without pulmonary involvement. This retrospective study of 10 cases aims to investigate the clinical and evolutionary characteristics of multifocal tuberculosis. It included 41 cases with tuberculosis collected between 1999 and 2013. Ten patients had multifocal tuberculosis (24%): 9 women and 1 man, the average age was 50 years (30-68 years). Our patients were correctly BCG vaccinated. The evaluation of immunodepression was negative in all patients. 7 cases had lymph node tuberculosis, 3 cases digestive tuberculosis, 2 cases pericardial tuberculosis, 2 cases osteoarticular tuberculosis, 1 case brain tuberculosis, 2 cases urinary tuberculosis, 4 cases urogenital tuberculosis, 1 case adrenal tuberculosis, 1 case cutaneous and 1 case muscle tuberculosis. All patients received anti-tuberculosis treatment for a mean duration of 10 months, with good evolution. Multifocal tuberculosis is difficult to diagnose. It can affect immunocompetent patients but often has good prognosis. Anti-tuberculosis therapy must be initiated as soon as possible to avoid sequelae. PMID:27583077

  10. Combating Tuberculosis Infection: A Forbidding Challenge.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Tejal; Butani, Shital

    2016-01-01

    After 50 years drought, several drugs are looming from the pipeline to combat tuberculosis. They will serve as a boon to the field that has been burdened with primitive, inadequate treatments and drug-resistant bacterial strains. From the decades, due to lack of interest and resources, the field has suffered a lot. Learning from the flaws, scientists have renovated their approaches to the finding of new antitubercular drugs. The first line drugs take about six months or more for the entire treatment. The second line remedy for resistant-tuberculosis requires daily injections which carry severe side effects. Drug resistance remains a constant menace because patients stop the medication once they start feeling better. So new drugs are required to be explored which are effective against tuberculosis especially drug resistant tuberculosis. These drugs need to work well with other drugs as well as with antivirals used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus. It is also very important to be considered that the treatments need to be cheap, as tuberculosis primarily affects people more in the developing countries. Further, new drugs must cure the disease in short span of time than the current six to nine month regimen. Recently a few new and potent drugs such as bedaquiline, delamanid, teixobactin have been evolved which may serve as a nice step forward, with a better outcome. Teixobactin, a new antibiotic has been found to have promising action against resistant strains, is also under consideration. PMID:27168676

  11. Combating Tuberculosis Infection: A Forbidding Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Tejal; Butani, Shital

    2016-01-01

    After 50 years drought, several drugs are looming from the pipeline to combat tuberculosis. They will serve as a boon to the field that has been burdened with primitive, inadequate treatments and drug-resistant bacterial strains. From the decades, due to lack of interest and resources, the field has suffered a lot. Learning from the flaws, scientists have renovated their approaches to the finding of new antitubercular drugs. The first line drugs take about six months or more for the entire treatment. The second line remedy for resistant-tuberculosis requires daily injections which carry severe side effects. Drug resistance remains a constant menace because patients stop the medication once they start feeling better. So new drugs are required to be explored which are effective against tuberculosis especially drug resistant tuberculosis. These drugs need to work well with other drugs as well as with antivirals used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus. It is also very important to be considered that the treatments need to be cheap, as tuberculosis primarily affects people more in the developing countries. Further, new drugs must cure the disease in short span of time than the current six to nine month regimen. Recently a few new and potent drugs such as bedaquiline, delamanid, teixobactin have been evolved which may serve as a nice step forward, with a better outcome. Teixobactin, a new antibiotic has been found to have promising action against resistant strains, is also under consideration. PMID:27168676

  12. Craniocervical junction tuberculosis: Usual pathology at an unusual site

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Biswaranjan; Patnaik, Sanjeev; Sahoo, Prafulla Kumar; Biswal, Debabrata

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) of the craniocervical junction is rare even where the condition is endemic. It poses problems in both diagnosis and management if not managed in time it may cause life-threatening complications. Case Description: An 18-year-old male patient presented with pain in the nape of the neck since 12 months duration which was not improving with medication. After magnetic resonance imaging of cervical spine, he was diagnosed as craniocervical junction TB. We did a transoral decompression of abscess with biopsy along with posterior decompression of cord and occipitocervical fusion. Biopsy of pathological material came as TB. He was advised for anti-tubercular therapy for 18 months. Conclusion: Although craniocervical junction TB is a rare disease, the outcome of treatment is good. Antituberculous drug therapy remains the mainstay of treatment after confirming the diagnosis. The surgical management options include transoral decompression with or without posterior fusion, depending upon the presence and persistence of atlantoaxial instability. PMID:26229730

  13. Pulmonary Paragonimiasis Mimicking Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kj; Basu, Arup; Khana, Shilpi; Wattal, Chand

    2015-08-01

    Paragonimiasis is a disease which is frequently misdiagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis. In the areas where people eat crab/crayfish this disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis to avoid antituberculosis treatment for a non-tubercular condition. We are reporting a case of pulmonary paragonimiasis who had been treated for tuberculosis. PMID:27604443

  14. "Tuberculosis Case Management" Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knebel, Elisa; Kolodner, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    The need to isolated health providers with critical knowledge in tuberculosis (TB) case management prompted the development of "Tuberculosis Case Management" CD-ROM. Features include "Learning Center,""Examination Room," and "Library." The combination of audio, video, and graphics allows participants to practice acquired skills in a simulated…

  15. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: Treatment and outcomes of 93 patients

    PubMed Central

    Brode, Sarah K; Varadi, Robert; McNamee, Jane; Malek, Nina; Stewart, Sharon; Jamieson, Frances B; Avendano, Monica

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading cause of death worldwide and the emergence of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) poses a threat to its control. There is scanty evidence regarding optimal management of MDR TB. The majority of Canadian cases of MDR TB are diagnosed in Ontario; most are managed by the Tuberculosis Service at West Park Healthcare Centre in Toronto. The authors reviewed 93 cases of MDR TB admitted from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2011. RESULTS: Eighty-nine patients were foreign born. Fifty-six percent had a previous diagnosis of TB and most (70%) had only pulmonary involvement. Symptoms included productive cough, weight loss, fever and malaise. The average length of inpatient stay was 126 days. All patients had a peripherally inserted central catheter for the intensive treatment phase because medications were given intravenously. Treatment lasted for 24 months after bacteriologic conversion, and included a mean (± SD) of 5±1 drugs. A successful outcome at the end of treatment was observed in 84% of patients. Bacteriological conversion was achieved in 98% of patients with initial positive sputum cultures; conversion occurred by four months in 91%. CONCLUSIONS: MDR TB can be controlled with the available anti-TB drugs. PMID:25493698

  16. Psychiatry and Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Fantl, Kurt

    1950-01-01

    Studies on the psychosomatic aspects of tuberculosis have not brought to light a clearcut correlation between a specific personality structure and susceptibility to the illness. The recommendation is made to look for several rather than for one personality type. It is suggested that people should be studied who react to stress with loss of appetite and loss of sleep. This character structure in contrast to that where the person withdraws into sleep and overeats might make a person prone to tuberculosis. The somatopsychic influence of tuberculosis needs to be interpreted in terms of the localization of the lesion as well as infectiousness and conspicuousness of the disease. Some common sociopsychological factors of tuberculosis have been mentioned. Reports on mental illness and tuberculosis and on diet were reviewed. PMID:14792351

  17. Association of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Diabetes in Mexico: Analysis of the National Tuberculosis Registry 2000–2012

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; García-García, Lourdes; Castellanos-Joya, Martín; Cruz-Hervert, Pablo; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Hernández, Andrés; Ortega-Baeza, Victor Manuel; Montero-Campos, Rogelio; Sulca, José Antonio; Martínez-Olivares, Ma. de Lourdes; Mongua-Rodríguez, Norma; Baez-Saldaña, Renata; González-Roldán, Jesús Felipe; López-Gatell, Hugo; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Jiménez-Corona, María Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) remains a public health problem in Mexico while the incidence of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM) has increased rapidly in recent years. Objective To describe the trends of incidence rates of pulmonary TB associated with DM and not associated with DM and to compare the results of treatment outcomes in patients with and without DM. Materials and Methods We analysed the National Tuberculosis Registry from 2000 to 2012 including patients with pulmonary TB among individuals older than 20 years of age. The association between DM and treatment failure was analysed using logistic regression, accounting for clustering due to regional distribution. Results In Mexico from 2000 to 2012, the incidence rates of pulmonary TB associated to DM increased by 82.64%, (p <0.001) in contrast to rates of pulmonary TB rate without DM, which decreased by 26.77%, (p <0.001). Patients with a prior diagnosis of DM had a greater likelihood of failing treatment (adjusted odds ratio, 1.34 (1.11–1.61) p <0.002) compared with patients who did not have DM. There was statistical evidence of interaction between DM and sex. The odds of treatment failure were increased in both sexes. Conclusion Our data suggest that the growing DM epidemic has an impact on the rates of pulmonary TB. In addition, patients who suffer from both diseases have a greater probability of treatment failure. PMID:26075393

  18. Tuberculosis lymphadenitis in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Biadglegne, Fantahun; Tesfaye, Weghata; Anagaw, Belay; Tessema, Belay; Debebe, Tewodrose; Anagaw, Berhanu; Mulu, Andargachew; Sack, Ulrich; Rodloff, Arne C

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most serious public health challenges in Ethiopia. Indeed, Ethiopia ranks 7th among 22 countries with a high burden of TB worldwide. Both pulmonary TB and extrapulmonary TB (EPTB) are issues of concern. Ethiopia ranks 3rd in terms of the number of EPTB patients worldwide, with TB lymphadenitis (TBL) being the most common. According to the World Health Organization's Global TB Report 2009, the estimated number of TB patients in Ethiopia was 314,267 in 2007, with an estimated incidence rate of 378 patients per 100,000 population. Furthermore, 36% patients suffered from EPTB, with TBL accounting for 80% of these patients. In Ethiopia, pathological services, culture, and drug susceptibility testing for mycobacterium species are not available as routine tests, not even for cases with suspected infection by drug-resistant strains. Therefore, the management of multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB in Ethiopia is currently unsatisfactory. Against this background, a high index of clinical doubt and timely use of diagnostic methods, prompt confirmation of diagnosis, and early initiation of specific anti-TB treatment are the key factors for the successful management of MDR-TB and TBL in Ethiopia. PMID:23883834

  19. Gender-related factors influencing tuberculosis control in shantytowns: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is evidence that female gender is associated with reduced likelihood of tuberculosis diagnosis and successful treatment. This study aimed to characterize gender-related barriers to tuberculosis control in Peruvian shantytowns. Methods We investigated attitudes and experiences relating gender to tuberculosis using the grounded theory approach to describe beliefs amongst key tuberculosis control stakeholders. These issues were explored in 22 semi-structured interviews and in four focus group discussions with 26 tuberculosis patients and 17 healthcare workers. Results We found that the tuberculosis program was perceived not to be gender discriminatory and provided equal tuberculosis diagnostic and treatment care to men and women. This contrasted with stereotypical gender roles in the broader community context and a commonly expressed belief amongst patients and healthcare workers that female health inherently has a lower priority than male health. This belief was principally associated with men's predominant role in the household economy and limited employment for women in this setting. Women were also generally reported to experience the adverse psychosocial and economic consequences of tuberculosis diagnosis more than men. Conclusions There was a common perception that women's tuberculosis care was of secondary importance to that of men. This reflected societal gender values and occurred despite apparent gender equality in care provision. The greatest opportunities for improving women's access to tuberculosis care appear to be in improving social, political and economic structures, more than tuberculosis program modification. PMID:20587044

  20. Heme Oxygenase-1 Regulates Inflammation and Mycobacterial Survival in Human Macrophages during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Scharn, Caitlyn R; Collins, Angela C; Nair, Vidhya R; Stamm, Chelsea E; Marciano, Denise K; Graviss, Edward A; Shiloh, Michael U

    2016-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is responsible for 1.5 million deaths annually. We previously showed that M. tuberculosis infection in mice induces expression of the CO-producing enzyme heme oxygenase (HO1) and that CO is sensed by M. tuberculosis to initiate a dormancy program. Further, mice deficient in HO1 succumb to M. tuberculosis infection more readily than do wild-type mice. Although mouse macrophages control intracellular M. tuberculosis infection through several mechanisms, such as NO synthase, the respiratory burst, acidification, and autophagy, how human macrophages control M. tuberculosis infection remains less well understood. In this article, we show that M. tuberculosis induces and colocalizes with HO1 in both mouse and human tuberculosis lesions in vivo, and that M. tuberculosis induces and colocalizes with HO1 during primary human macrophage infection in vitro. Surprisingly, we find that chemical inhibition of HO1 both reduces inflammatory cytokine production by human macrophages and restricts intracellular growth of mycobacteria. Thus, induction of HO1 by M. tuberculosis infection may be a mycobacterial virulence mechanism to enhance inflammation and bacterial growth. PMID:27183573

  1. Low level nitrogen laser therapy in pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, C.C.; Sharma, N.; Hemvani, N.; Chitnis, D.S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: WHO estimated 9 million new Tuberculosis cases and 1.5 million TB deaths in 2013. Globally 480000 Multi drug resistant tuberculosis cases were noted and majority of them were in India, China and Russian federation. Multi drug resistant tuberculosis cases are difficult to treat and have high mortality. Presently, it was aimed to assess prevalence of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis isolates in Central India, to check the in-vitro effect of N2 Laser on M. tuberculosis and to study the therapeutic effect of intra cavitary N2 laser on pulmonary Tuberculosis cases not responding to chemotherapy. Materials and methods: Drug sensitivity testing was carried out on 567 isolates of M. tuberculosis by proportion method. To check the effect of N2 laser on M. tuberculosis, suspension spread on LJ plate and part of the plate exposed to N2 laser for 10 min and plate incubated for 4 weeks to see the effect. For exposure to lung cavity a needle was introduced into the lung through which fiber was passed to the cavity for N2 laser irradiation for 10 min. Results: Only 12.8% isolates of M. tuberculosis were sensitive to all anti-Tubercular drugs and 21.5% were found to be resistant to Rifampicin qualifying definition of Multi drug resistant tuberculosis. Bactericidal effect for N2 laser was seen in-vitro on exposure to N2 laser. Clinical improvement occurred in 90% of the 96 patients; 60% of the patients showed improvement on their X-rays and 75% turned out to be Acid fast bacilli smear negative in 4 to 15 days. Conclusions: Intra-cavitory N2 laser therapy was found to have remarkable success as an adjunct to chemotherapy. PMID:26557736

  2. Procalcitonin as a Diagnostic and Prognostic Factor for Tuberculosis Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinseung; Kim, Si Eun; Park, Bong Soo; Shin, Kyong Jin; Ha, Sam Yeol; Park, JinSe; Kim, Sung Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We investigated the potential role of serum procalcitonin in differentiating tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial and viral meningitis, and in predicting the prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis. Methods This was a retrospective study of 26 patients with tuberculosis meningitis. In addition, 70 patients with bacterial meningitis and 49 patients with viral meningitis were included as the disease control groups for comparison. The serum procalcitonin level was measured in all patients at admission. Differences in demographic and laboratory data, including the procalcitonin level, were analyzed among the three groups. In addition, we analyzed the predictive factors for a prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) at discharge, and the correlation between the level of procalcitonin and the GCS score at discharge. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that a low level of procalcitonin (≤1.27 ng/mL) independently distinguished tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis. The sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis were 96.2% and 62.9%, respectively. However, the level of procalcitonin in patients with tuberculosis meningitis did not differ significantly from that in patients with viral meningitis. In patients with tuberculosis meningitis, a high level of procalcitonin (>0.4 ng/mL) was a predictor of a poor prognosis, and the level of procalcitonin was negatively correlated with the GCS score at discharge (r=-0.437, p=0.026). Conclusions We found that serum procalcitonin is a useful marker for differentiating tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis and is also valuable for predicting the prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis. PMID:27165424

  3. Tuberculosis and subsequent risk of lung cancer in Xuanwei, China

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Eric A.; Shen, Min; Chapman, Robert S.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Yu, Ying-Ying; He, Xingzhou; Lan, Qing

    2008-01-01

    Tobacco and indoor air pollution from smoky coal are major causes of lung cancer in rural Xuanwei County, China. Tuberculosis has been suggested to increase lung cancer risk, but data from prior studies are limited. We conducted an analysis of data from a retrospective cohort study of 42,422 farmers in Xuanwei. In 1992, interviewers administered a standardized questionnaire that included lifetime medical history, including tuberculosis. Subjects were followed from 1976, with deaths from lung cancer ascertained through 1996. We used proportional hazards regression to assess the association between tuberculosis and subsequent lung cancer mortality. Tuberculosis was reported by 246 subjects (0.6%), and 2459 (5.8%) died from lung cancer during follow-up. Lung cancer mortality was substantially higher in subjects with tuberculosis than in those without (25 vs. 3.1 per 1000 person-years). The association was especially pronounced in the first five years after tuberculosis diagnosis (hazard ratios [HRs] ranging 6.7–13) but remained strong 5–9.9 years (HR 3.4, 95%CI 1.3–9.1) and 10+ years (HR 3.0, 95%CI 1.3–7.3) after tuberculosis. These associations were similar among men and women, and among smoky coal users (70.5% of subjects). Adjustment for demographic characteristics, lung disease, and tobacco use did not affect results. In Xuanwei, China, tuberculosis is an important risk factor for lung cancer. The increased lung cancer risk, persisting years after a tuberculosis diagnosis, could reflect the effects of chronic pulmonary inflammation and scarring arising from tuberculosis. PMID:19058197

  4. Tuberculosis and subsequent risk of lung cancer in Xuanwei, China

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, E.A.; Shen, M.; Chapman, R.S.; Pfeiffer, R.M.; Yu, Y.Y.; He, X.Z.; Lan, Q.

    2009-03-15

    Tobacco and indoor air pollution from smoky coal are major causes of lung cancer in rural Xuanwei County, China. Tuberculosis has been suggested to increase lung cancer risk, but data from prior studies are limited. We conducted an analysis of data from a retrospective cohort study of 42,422 farmers in Xuanwei. In 1992, interviewers administered a standardized questionnaire that included lifetime medical history, including tuberculosis. Subjects were followed from 1976, with deaths from lung cancer ascertained through 1996. We used proportional hazards regression to assess the association between tuberculosis and subsequent lung cancer mortality. Tuberculosis was reported by 246 subjects (0.6%), and 2,459 (5.8%) died from lung cancer during follow-up. Lung cancer mortality was substantially higher in subjects with tuberculosis than in those without (25 vs. 3.1 per 1,000 person-years). The association was especially pronounced in the first 5 years after tuberculosis diagnosis (hazard ratios (HRs) ranging 6.7-13) but remained strong 5-9.9 years (HR 3.4, 95% CI 1.3-9.1) and 10+ years (HR 3.0, 95% CI 1.3-7.3) after tuberculosis. These associations were similar among men and women and among smoky coal users (70.5% of subjects). Adjustment for demographic characteristics, lung disease and tobacco use did not affect results. In Xuanwei, China, tuberculosis is an important risk factor for lung cancer. The increased lung cancer risk, persisting years after a tuberculosis diagnosis, could reflect the effects of chronic pulmonary inflammation and scarring arising from tuberculosis.

  5. A tuberculosis nationwide prevalence survey in Gambia, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Lindsay; Bashorun, Adedapo; Linda, Christopher; Omoleke, Semeeh; Jeffries, David; Maane, Rahmatulai; Alorse, Beatrice Dei; Alorse, William Dei; Okoi, Catherine Bi; Mlaga, Kodjovi D; Kinteh, Ma Ansu; Donkor, Simon; de Jong, Bouke C; Antonio, Martin; d’Alessandro, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the population prevalence of active pulmonary tuberculosis in Gambia. Methods Between December 2011 and January 2013, people aged ≥ 15 years participating in a nationwide, multistage cluster survey were screened for active pulmonary tuberculosis with chest radiography and for tuberculosis symptoms. For diagnostic confirmation, sputum samples were collected from those whose screening were positive and subjected to fluorescence microscopy and liquid tuberculosis cultures. Multiple imputation and inverse probability weighting were used to estimate tuberculosis prevalence. Findings Of 100 678 people enumerated, 55 832 were eligible to participate and 43 100 (77.2%) of those participated. A majority of participants (42 942; 99.6%) were successfully screened for symptoms and by chest X-ray. Only 5948 (13.8%) were eligible for sputum examination, yielding 43 bacteriologically confirmed, 28 definite smear-positive and six probable smear-positive tuberculosis cases. Chest X-ray identified more tuberculosis cases (58/69) than did symptoms alone (43/71). The estimated prevalence of smear-positive and bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis were 90 (95% confidence interval, CI: 53–127) and 212 (95% CI: 152–272) per 100 000 population, respectively. Tuberculosis prevalence was higher in males (333; 95% CI: 233–433) and in the 35–54 year age group (355; 95% CI: 219–490). Conclusion The burden of tuberculosis remains high in Gambia but lower than earlier estimates of 490 per 100 000 population in 2010. Less than half of all cases would have been identified based on smear microscopy results alone. Successful control efforts will require interventions targeting men, increased access to radiography and more accurate, rapid diagnostic tests. PMID:27274595

  6. Tuberculosis Epidemiology and Selection in an Autochthonous Siberian Population from the 16th-19th Century

    PubMed Central

    Dabernat, Henri; Thèves, Catherine; Bouakaze, Caroline; Nikolaeva, Dariya; Keyser, Christine; Mokrousov, Igor; Géraut, Annie; Duchesne, Sylvie; Gérard, Patrice; Alexeev, Anatoly N.; Crubézy, Eric; Ludes, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of most ancient diseases affecting human populations. Although numerous studies have tried to detect pathogenic DNA in ancient skeletons, the successful identification of ancient tuberculosis strains remains rare. Here, we describe a study of 140 ancient subjects inhumed in Yakutia (Eastern Siberia) during a tuberculosis outbreak, dating from the 16th–19th century. For a long time, Yakut populations had remained isolated from European populations, and it was not until the beginning of the 17th century that first contacts were made with European settlers. Subsequently, tuberculosis spread throughout Yakutia, and the evolution of tuberculosis frequencies can be tracked until the 19th century. This study took a multidisciplinary approach, examining historical and paleo-epidemiological data to understand the impact of tuberculosis on ancient Yakut population. In addition, molecular identification of the ancient tuberculosis strain was realized to elucidate the natural history and host-pathogen co-evolution of human tuberculosis that was present in this population. This was achieved by the molecular detection of the IS6110 sequence and SNP genotyping by the SNaPshot technique. Results demonstrated that the strain belongs to cluster PGG2-SCG-5, evocating a European origin. Our study suggests that the Yakut population may have been shaped by selection pressures, exerted by several illnesses, including tuberculosis, over several centuries. This confirms the validity and necessity of using a multidisciplinary approach to understand the natural history of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease. PMID:24587092

  7. Treatment of Tuberculosis. A Historical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Murray, John F; Schraufnagel, Dean E; Hopewell, Philip C

    2015-12-01

    Of all achievements in medicine, the successful treatment of tuberculosis has had one of the greatest impacts on society. Tuberculosis was a leading cause of disease and a mortal enemy of humanity for millennia. The first step in finding a cure was the discovery of the cause of tuberculosis by Robert Koch in 1882. The sanatorium movement that began shortly afterward in Europe, and soon spread to the United States, brought attention to the plight of afflicted persons, and catalyzed public health action. The antituberculosis benefit of streptomycin was announced in 1945, although application was limited by the rapid development of resistance. para-Aminosalicylic acid, also discovered in 1945, when combined with streptomycin was found to greatly reduce the occurrence of drug resistance. In 1952, isoniazid opened the modern era of treatment; it was inexpensive, well tolerated, and safe. In the early 1960s, ethambutol was shown to be effective and better tolerated than para-aminosalicylic acid, which it replaced. In the 1970s, rifampin found its place as a keystone in the therapy of tuberculosis. The use of rifampin enabled the course of treatment to be reduced to nine months. Incorporation of pyrazinamide into the first-line regimen led to a further reduction of treatment duration to six months. Treatment of multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis remains a difficult problem requiring lengthy treatment with toxic drugs. However, shortened regimens show promise, and two new drugs, bedaquiline and delamanid, have demonstrated effectiveness in preliminary studies and are being used for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:26653188

  8. CCL2 Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Are Associated with Disease Severity in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Zahra; Cliff, Jacqueline M.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Jamil, Bushra; Irfan, Muhammad; Ashraf, Mussarat; Hussain, Rabia

    2009-01-01

    Background Leucocyte activating chemokines such as CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL8 together with proinflammatory IFNγ, TNFα and downmodulatory IL10 play a central role in the restriction of M. tuberculosis infections, but is unclear whether these markers are indicative of tuberculosis disease severity. Methodology We investigated live M. tuberculosis- and M. bovis BCG- induced peripheral blood mononuclear cell responses in patients with tuberculosis (TB) and healthy endemic controls (ECs, n = 36). TB patients comprised pulmonary (PTB, n = 34) and extrapulmonary groups, subdivided into those with less severe localized extrapulmonary TB (L-ETB, n = 16) or severe disseminated ETB (D-ETB, n = 16). Secretion of CCL2, IFNγ, IL10 and CCL3, and mRNA expression of CCL2, TNFα, CCL3 and CXCL8 were determined. Results M. tuberculosis- and BCG- induced CCL2 secretion was significantly increased in both PTB and D-ETB (p<0.05, p<0.01) as compared with L-ETB patients. CCL2 secretion in response to M. tuberculosis was significantly greater than to BCG in the PTB and D-ETB groups. M. tuberculosis-induced CCL2 mRNA transcription was greater in PTB than L-ETB (p = 0.023), while CCL2 was reduced in L-ETB as compared with D-ETB (p = 0.005) patients. M. tuberculosis –induced IFNγ was greater in L-ETB than PTB (p = 0.04), while BCG-induced IFNγ was greater in L-ETB as compared with D-ETB patients (p = 0.036). TNFα mRNA expression was raised in PTB as compared with L-ETB group in response to M. tuberculosis (p = 0.02) and BCG (p = 0.03). Mycobacterium-induced CCL3 and CXCL8 was comparable between TB groups. Conclusions The increased CCL2 and TNFα in PTB patients may support effective leucocyte recruitment and M. tuberculosis localization. CCL2 alone is associated with severity of TB, possibly due to increased systemic inflammation found in severe disseminated TB or due to increased monocyte infiltration to lung parenchyma in pulmonary disease. PMID

  9. Silicon photonics: some remaining challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, G. T.; Topley, R.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Thompson, D. J.; Stanković, S.; Reynolds, S.; Chen, X.; Soper, N.; Mitchell, C. J.; Hu, Y.; Shen, L.; Martinez-Jimenez, G.; Healy, N.; Mailis, S.; Peacock, A. C.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Gardes, F. Y.; Soler Penades, J.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Ortega-Monux, A.; Wanguemert-Perez, G.; Molina-Fernandez, I.; Cheben, P.; Mashanovich, G. Z.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses some of the remaining challenges for silicon photonics, and how we at Southampton University have approached some of them. Despite phenomenal advances in the field of Silicon Photonics, there are a number of areas that still require development. For short to medium reach applications, there is a need to improve the power consumption of photonic circuits such that inter-chip, and perhaps intra-chip applications are viable. This means that yet smaller devices are required as well as thermally stable devices, and multiple wavelength channels. In turn this demands smaller, more efficient modulators, athermal circuits, and improved wavelength division multiplexers. The debate continues as to whether on-chip lasers are necessary for all applications, but an efficient low cost laser would benefit many applications. Multi-layer photonics offers the possibility of increasing the complexity and effectiveness of a given area of chip real estate, but it is a demanding challenge. Low cost packaging (in particular, passive alignment of fibre to waveguide), and effective wafer scale testing strategies, are also essential for mass market applications. Whilst solutions to these challenges would enhance most applications, a derivative technology is emerging, that of Mid Infra-Red (MIR) silicon photonics. This field will build on existing developments, but will require key enhancements to facilitate functionality at longer wavelengths. In common with mainstream silicon photonics, significant developments have been made, but there is still much left to do. Here we summarise some of our recent work towards wafer scale testing, passive alignment, multiplexing, and MIR silicon photonics technology.

  10. Tuberculosis in the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Bass, J B

    1995-02-01

    The steady decline in tuberculosis case rate reversed in the mid-1980s, and tuberculosis cases have increased dramatically since that time. Important factors contributing to this increase are the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic and tuberculosis occurring in foreign-born persons. Tuberculosis outbreaks have occurred in HIV clinics and wards, prisons, homeless shelters, nursing homes, and health care facilities. Some of the outbreaks have involved strains of tuberculosis resistant to multiple antituberculosis drugs. Recent recommendations for initial therapy of tuberculosis include the use of four drugs and directly observed therapy in an effort to prevent the emergence of further drug resistance. PMID:7771659

  11. Rapid Diagnosis of Tuberculosis by Real-Time High-Resolution Imaging of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Colonies.

    PubMed

    Ghodbane, Ramzi; Asmar, Shady; Betzner, Marlena; Linet, Marie; Pierquin, Joseph; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Culture remains the cornerstone of diagnosis for pulmonary tuberculosis, but the fastidiousness of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may delay culture-based diagnosis for weeks. We evaluated the performance of real-time high-resolution imaging for the rapid detection of M. tuberculosis colonies growing on a solid medium. A total of 50 clinical specimens, including 42 sputum specimens, 4 stool specimens, 2 bronchoalveolar lavage fluid specimens, and 2 bronchial aspirate fluid specimens were prospectively inoculated into (i) a commercially available Middlebrook broth and evaluated for mycobacterial growth indirectly detected by measuring oxygen consumption (standard protocol) and (ii) a home-made solid medium incubated in an incubator featuring real-time high-resolution imaging of colonies (real-time protocol). Isolates were identified by Ziehl-Neelsen staining and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Use of the standard protocol yielded 14/50 (28%) M. tuberculosis isolates, which is not significantly different from the 13/50 (26%) M. tuberculosis isolates found using the real-time protocol (P = 1.00 by Fisher's exact test), and the contamination rate of 1/50 (2%) was not significantly different from the contamination rate of 2/50 (4%) using the real-time protocol (P = 1.00). The real-time imaging protocol showed a 4.4-fold reduction in time to detection, 82 ± 54 h versus 360 ± 142 h (P < 0.05). These preliminary data give the proof of concept that real-time high-resolution imaging of M. tuberculosis colonies is a new technology that shortens the time to growth detection and the laboratory diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:26085608

  12. Rapid Diagnosis of Tuberculosis by Real-Time High-Resolution Imaging of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Ghodbane, Ramzi; Asmar, Shady; Betzner, Marlena; Linet, Marie; Pierquin, Joseph; Raoult, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Culture remains the cornerstone of diagnosis for pulmonary tuberculosis, but the fastidiousness of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may delay culture-based diagnosis for weeks. We evaluated the performance of real-time high-resolution imaging for the rapid detection of M. tuberculosis colonies growing on a solid medium. A total of 50 clinical specimens, including 42 sputum specimens, 4 stool specimens, 2 bronchoalveolar lavage fluid specimens, and 2 bronchial aspirate fluid specimens were prospectively inoculated into (i) a commercially available Middlebrook broth and evaluated for mycobacterial growth indirectly detected by measuring oxygen consumption (standard protocol) and (ii) a home-made solid medium incubated in an incubator featuring real-time high-resolution imaging of colonies (real-time protocol). Isolates were identified by Ziehl-Neelsen staining and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry. Use of the standard protocol yielded 14/50 (28%) M. tuberculosis isolates, which is not significantly different from the 13/50 (26%) M. tuberculosis isolates found using the real-time protocol (P = 1.00 by Fisher's exact test), and the contamination rate of 1/50 (2%) was not significantly different from the contamination rate of 2/50 (4%) using the real-time protocol (P = 1.00). The real-time imaging protocol showed a 4.4-fold reduction in time to detection, 82 ± 54 h versus 360 ± 142 h (P < 0.05). These preliminary data give the proof of concept that real-time high-resolution imaging of M. tuberculosis colonies is a new technology that shortens the time to growth detection and the laboratory diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:26085608

  13. Stigma against Tuberculosis Patients in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tadesse, Sebsibe

    2016-01-01

    Background Stigma attached to tuberculosis contributes to the limited effectiveness of current TB control approaches. However, there is a dearth of studies that explore the causes of stigma attached to tuberculosis and its effects on patients and tuberculosiscontrol programs in Ethiopia. Methods An institution-based qualitative study was conducted at St. Peter Tuberculosis Specialized Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia from July to August, 2015. Ten in-depth interviews and 6 key-informant interviews were carried out among tuberculosis patients and healthcare workers, respectively.The Open Code computer software package was used to analyze the data thematically. Results The study revealed that fear of infection and inappropriate health education messages by media were the main causes of tuberculosis stigma. The patients experienced isolation within their family and community, separation, and financial crisis. The stigma attached to tuberculosis may contribute to delayed healthcare seeking, poor treatment adherence, and poor prognosis. Conclusion Interventions thatreduce the stigma attached to tuberculosis should target on areas, such as creating community awareness, patient counseling on problem-solving and emotional skills, preparing culturally sensitive and scientifically sound media messages, providing financial support for the patients, and enhancing the qualities of the healthcare workers, such as empathy, concern, respect for the patient and cultural sensitivity. PMID:27054714

  14. Tuberculosis in tropical Africa

    PubMed Central

    Roelsgaard, E.; Iversen, E.; Bløcher, C.

    1964-01-01

    Up to the end of the nineteenth century the tubercle bacillus apparently had little opportunity of disseminating among the rather isolated tribes of tropical Africa. With the creation of large centres of trade and industry in the wake of European colonization, tuberculosis seems to have spread rapidly over the continent and is today found everywhere. In a number of tuberculosis prevalence surveys conducted by WHO during 1955-60, randomly selected population groups were tuberculin tested, X-rayed and had sputa examined by direct microscopy. The three methods of examination were applied independently of one another. Data collected during the surveys have been analysed with a view to discovering common epidemiological features of tuberculosis in tropical Africa, assessing the reliability of the diagnostic methods employed and discussing their usefulness in future tuberculosis control programmes. PMID:14178027

  15. Update on cutaneous tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Bernardes Filho, Fred; Quaresma, Maria Victória; do Nascimento, Leninha Valério; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Azulay, David Rubem

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis continues to draw special attention from health care professionals and society in general. Cutaneous tuberculosis is an infection caused by M. tuberculosis complex, M. bovis and bacillus Calmette-Guérin. Depending on individual immunity, environmental factors and the type of inoculum, it may present varied clinical and evolutionary aspects. Patients with HIV and those using immunobiological drugs are more prone to infection, which is a great concern in centers where the disease is considered endemic. This paper aims to review the current situation of cutaneous tuberculosis in light of this new scenario, highlighting the emergence of new and more specific methods of diagnosis, and the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate the parasite-host interaction. PMID:25387498

  16. Tuberculosis Data and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organization Chart Advisory Groups Federal TB Task Force Data and Statistics Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... United States publication. PDF [6 MB] Interactive TB Data Tool Online Tuberculosis Information System (OTIS) OTIS is ...

  17. Tuberculosis Diagnostics in 2015: Landscape, Priorities, Needs, and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Madhukar; Schito, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In 2015, tuberculosis remains a major global health problem, and drug-resistant tuberculosis is a growing threat. Although tuberculosis diagnosis in many countries is still reliant on older tools, new diagnostics are changing the landscape. Stimulated, in part, by the success and roll out of Xpert MTB/RIF, there is now considerable interest in new technologies. The landscape looks promising, with a robust pipeline of new tools, particularly molecular diagnostics, and well over 50 companies actively engaged in product development. However, new diagnostics are yet to reach scale, and there needs to be greater convergence between diagnostics development and development of shorter-duration tuberculosis drug regimens. Another concern is the relative absence of non–sputum-based diagnostics in the pipeline for children and of biomarker tests for triage, cure, and progression of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Several initiatives, described in this supplement, have been launched to further stimulate product development and policy, including assessment of needs and priorities, development of target product profiles, compilation of data on resistance-associated mutations, and assessment of market size and potential for new diagnostics. Advocacy is needed to increase funding for tuberculosis research and development, and governments in high-burden countries must invest more in tuberculosis control to meet post-2015 targets for care, control, and prevention. PMID:25765103

  18. [Mammary tuberculosis: two cases].

    PubMed

    Hafidi, M R; Kouach, J; Hamidi, L A; Achenani, M; Benchakroun, K; Salek, G; Zoubir, Y; Moussaoui, R D; Dehayni, M

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the breast is a very rare infection, it occurs chiefly in women of childbearing potential, usually as an apparently primary infection and constitute a diagnosis and therapeutic challenge. Administration of antituberculous agents is the mainstay of therapy. Surgery is required in some cases. We report two cases of breast tuberculosis. The diagnosis was put on histology with good outcome under anti bacillary treatment. Through the literature data we recall the epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and treatment of this pathology. PMID:22765979

  19. Tuberculosis in children.

    PubMed

    Marais, Ben J; Schaaf, H Simon

    2014-09-01

    Many clinicians regard tuberculosis as an adult pulmonary disease, but tuberculosis (TB) is a major cause of disease, both pulmonary and extrapulmonary, and death in young children from TB-endemic countries, especially in areas affected by poverty, social disruption, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This article reviews the disease burden and the natural history of disease in children with TB. It also provides guidance regarding the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of TB in children. PMID:25037105

  20. Tuberculosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Marais, Ben J.; Schaaf, H. Simon

    2014-01-01

    Many clinicians regard tuberculosis as an adult pulmonary disease, but tuberculosis (TB) is a major cause of disease, both pulmonary and extrapulmonary, and death in young children from TB-endemic countries, especially in areas affected by poverty, social disruption, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This article reviews the disease burden and the natural history of disease in children with TB. It also provides guidance regarding the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of TB in children. PMID:25037105

  1. Tuberculosis: distribution, risk factors, mortality.

    PubMed

    Kochi, A

    1994-10-01

    About a century after Koch's discovery of the TB bacilli the tuberculosis epidemic which had appeared to be under control was again recognized as a major global health threat. The decline in the epidemic in this century had been largely through the improved living standards and, eventually, the availability and use of effective antibiotics. While tuberculosis gradually disappeared from the health agenda in the western world it remained a big killer throughout the century and in 1992 an estimated 2.7 million TB deaths occurred; 30 million will die from TB during the 1990s if current trends are not reversed. The annual number of new cases will increase from 7.5 million estimated in 1990 to more than 10 million in the year 2000. The main factors for this increase are demographic forces, population movements, the HIV epidemic and increasing drug resistance. The impact of the HIV epidemic is already felt in many sub-Saharan African countries and now threatens Asia where almost two-thirds of the world's TB infected population live and where HIV is spreading. Tuberculosis has also reemerged as a major public health problem in industrialized countries due to international migration, the breakdown of health services, including TB services etc. The control of the epidemic can only be through a concerted action to reinstate TB as priority among health concerns, reflected in national and international resources. A coalition of public and private supporters must be mobilized to support the effort to fight the disease. Governments, non-governmental organizations, the business community, refugee organizations, medical institutions, and other UN agencies are invited to join with WHO in this effort. PMID:7713546

  2. The history of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Thomas M

    2006-11-01

    Tuberculosis has claimed its victims throughout much of known human history. It reached epidemic proportions in Europe and North America during the 18th and 19th centuries, earning the sobriquet, "Captain Among these Men of Death." Then it began to decline. Understanding of the pathogenesis of tuberculosis began with the work of Théophile Laennec at the beginning of the 19th century and was further advanced by the demonstration of the transmissibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by Jean-Antoine Villemin in 1865 and the identification of the tubercle bacillus as the etiologic agent by Robert Koch in 1882. Clemens von Pirquet developed the tuberculin skin test in 1907 and 3 years later used it to demonstrate latent tuberculous infection in asymptomatic children. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries sanatoria developed for the treatment of patients with tuberculosis. The rest provided there was supplemented with pulmonary collapse procedures designed to rest infected parts of lungs and to close cavities. Public Health measures to combat the spread of tuberculosis emerged following the discovery of its bacterial cause. BCG vaccination was widely employed following World War I. The modern era of tuberculosis treatment and control was heralded by the discovery of streptomycin in 1944 and isoniazid in 1952. PMID:16949809

  3. Prevalence of Latent and Active Tuberculosis among Dairy Farm Workers Exposed to Cattle Infected by Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Gonzalez, Pedro; Soberanis-Ramos, Orbelin; Martinez-Gamboa, Areli; Chavez-Mazari, Barbara; Barrios-Herrera, Ma Teresa; Torres-Rojas, Martha; Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo; Garcia-Garcia, Lourdes; Singh, Mahavir; Gonzalez-Aguirre, Adrian; Ponce de Leon-Garduño, Alfredo; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Bobadilla-del-Valle, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Background Human tuberculosis caused by M. bovis is a zoonosis presently considered sporadic in developed countries, but remains a poorly studied problem in low and middle resource countries. The disease in humans is mainly attributed to unpasteurized dairy products consumption. However, transmission due to exposure of humans to infected animals has been also recognized. The prevalence of tuberculosis infection and associated risk factors have been insufficiently characterized among dairy farm workers (DFW) exposed in settings with poor control of bovine tuberculosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Tuberculin skin test (TST) and Interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) were administered to 311 dairy farm and abattoir workers and their household contacts linked to a dairy production and livestock facility in Mexico. Sputa of individuals with respiratory symptoms and samples from routine cattle necropsies were cultured for M. bovis and resulting spoligotypes were compared. The overall prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) was 76.2% (95% CI, 71.4–80.9%) by TST and 58.5% (95% CI, 53.0–64.0%) by IGRA. Occupational exposure was associated to TST (OR 2.72; 95% CI, 1.31–5.64) and IGRA (OR 2.38; 95% CI, 1.31–4.30) adjusting for relevant variables. Two subjects were diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis, both caused by M. bovis. In one case, the spoligotype was identical to a strain isolated from bovines. Conclusions We documented a high prevalence of latent and pulmonary TB among workers exposed to cattle infected with M. bovis, and increased risk among those occupationally exposed in non-ventilated spaces. Interspecies transmission is frequent and represents an occupational hazard in this setting. PMID:23638198

  4. Polymorphisms of SP110 Are Associated with both Pulmonary and Extra-Pulmonary Tuberculosis among the Vietnamese

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Gregory J.; Sy, Dinh Ngoc; Nhung, Nguyen Viet; Yu, Bing; Ellis, Magda K.; Van Hung, Nguyen; Cuong, Nguyen Kim; Thi Lien, Luu; Marks, Guy B.; Saunders, Bernadette M.; Britton, Warwick J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease that remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, yet the reasons why only 10% of people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis go on to develop clinical disease are poorly understood. Genetically determined variation in the host immune response is one factor influencing the response to M. tuberculosis. SP110 is an interferon-responsive nuclear body protein with critical roles in cell cycling, apoptosis and immunity to infection. However association studies of the gene with clinical TB in different populations have produced conflicting results. Methods To examine the importance of the SP110 gene in immunity to TB in the Vietnamese we conducted a case-control genetic association study of 24 SP110 variants, in 663 patients with microbiologically proven TB and 566 unaffected control subjects from three tertiary hospitals in northern Vietnam. Results Five SNPs within SP110 were associated with all forms of TB, including four SNPs at the C terminus (rs10208770, rs10498244, rs16826860, rs11678451) under a dominant model and one SNP under a recessive model, rs7601176. Two of these SNPs were associated with pulmonary TB (rs10208770 and rs16826860) and one with extra-pulmonary TB (rs10498244). Conclusion SP110 variants were associated with increased susceptibility to both pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB in the Vietnamese. Genetic variants in SP110 may influence macrophage signaling responses and apoptosis during M. tuberculosis infection, however further research is required to establish the mechanism by which SP110 influences immunity to tuberculosis infection. PMID:25006821

  5. Pulmonary Tuberculosis Diagnosis: Where We Are?

    PubMed Central

    Leylabadlo, Hamed Ebrahimzadeh; Yousefi, Mehdi; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, in spite of medical advancement, tuberculosis (TB) remains a worldwide health problem. Although many laboratory methods have been developed to expedite the diagnosis of TB, delays in diagnosis remain a major problem in the clinical practice. Because of the slow growth rate of the causative agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis, isolation, identification, and drug susceptibility testing of this organism and other clinically important mycobacteria can take several weeks or longer. During the past several years, many methods have been developed for direct detection, species identification, and drug susceptibility testing of TB. A good understanding of the effectiveness and practical limitations of these methods is important to improve diagnosis. This review summarizes the currently-used advances in nonmolecular and molecular diagnostics. PMID:27433173

  6. Earlier versus Later Start of Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Infected Adults with Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, François-Xavier; Sok, Thim; Laureillard, Didier; Borand, Laurence; Rekacewicz, Claire; Nerrienet, Eric; Madec, Yoann; Marcy, Olivier; Chan, Sarin; Prak, Narom; Kim, Chindamony; Lak, Khemarin Kim; Hak, Chanroeurn; Dim, Bunnet; Sin, Chhun Im; Sun, Sath; Guillard, Bertrand; Sar, Borann; Vong, Sirenda; Fernandez, Marcelo; Fox, Lawrence; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis remains an important cause of death among patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Robust data are lacking with regard to the timing for the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in relation to the start of antituberculosis therapy. Methods We tested the hypothesis that the timing of ART initiation would significantly affect mortality among adults not previously exposed to antiretroviral drugs who had newly diagnosed tuberculosis and CD4+ T-cell counts of 200 per cubic millimeter or lower. After beginning the standard, 6-month treatment for tuberculosis, patients were randomly assigned to either earlier treatment (2 weeks after beginning tuberculosis treatment) or later treatment (8 weeks after) with stavudine, lamivudine, and efavirenz. The primary end point was survival. Results A total of 661 patients were enrolled and were followed for a median of 25 months. The median CD4+ T-cell count was 25 per cubic millimeter, and the median viral load was 5.64 log10 copies per milliliter. The risk of death was significantly reduced in the group that received ART earlier, with 59 deaths among 332 patients (18%), as compared with 90 deaths among 329 patients (27%) in the later-ART group (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI]; 0.44 to 0.86; P = 0.006). The risk of tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome was significantly increased in the earlier-ART group (hazard ratio, 2.51; 95% CI, 1.78 to 3.59; P<0.001). Irrespective of the study group, the median gain in the CD4+ T-cell count was 114 per cubic millimeter, and the viral load was undetectable at week 50 in 96.5% of the patients. Conclusions Initiating ART 2 weeks after the start of tuberculosis treatment significantly improved survival among HIV-infected adults with CD4+ T-cell counts of 200 per cubic millimeter or lower. (Funded by the French National Agency for Research on AIDS and Viral Hepatitis and the National Institutes of

  7. Prevalence and characterization of opportunistic candidal infections among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Astekar, Madhusudan; Bhatiya, Priyanka Sharma; Sowmya, GV

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although Candida albicans remains the most common cause of human candidiasis, the frequency of infection attributed to other members of the genus is also increasing. Hence, the present study was carried out to know the prevalence of opportunistic candidal infection in tuberculosis, and if positive, the species of Candida that is most commonly associated. Materials and Methods: The present study comprised sixty pulmonary tuberculosis patients who were divided into (1) fresh or untreated group, (2A) chronic or treated group having no complications and (2B) having complications, comprising twenty patients each, respectively. The collected sputum samples were initially stained with Ziehl–Neelsen stain for confirmation of presence of tubercle Bacilli. Primary isolation was done on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA). The candidal colonies were confirmed microscopically for the presence of pseudohyphae. Further speciation of the positive candidal samples was carried out using ChromAgar. Result: The total fungal prevalence among 60 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis on SDA was 33 (55%) Candida and 3 (5%) Aspergillus. The prevalence of different candidal species on ChromAgar showed C. albicans as the predominant one, followed by Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei. Freshly diagnosed or untreated group was less commonly associated with pulmonary mycoses than chronic or treated group. The prevalence of Candida had increased with treatment, duration and age, and it was more in males than females. Conclusion: The present study confirms the phenomenon of opportunistic candidal infections in pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Rapid and reliable identification of Candida species is essential as they differ in their virulence and sensitivity to antifungal drugs. PMID:27601806

  8. The Epigenetic Modifications of Genes Associated with Tuberculosis Susceptibility and Implications for Epi-Drugs.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jie; Xie, Longxiang; Luo, Hongping; Xie, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetics of genes associated with tuberculosis susceptibility such as DNA methylation, posttranslational histone modifications, and non-coding RNA remain largely untapped field for better tuberculosis control. Many genes involved in tuberculosis susceptibility (e.g., NRAMP1 (SLC11A1), IFNG, NOS2A, VDR, ISG15, TACO, TLR1, TLR, IL18R1, chemokines, PADI, DUSP14, MBL, and MASP-2) have been subjected to epigenetic modification. Our summary of these modifications provides fresh insights into the pathogenesis of tuberculosis and inspires targets discovery for host-derived therapy. PMID:26559095

  9. Tuberculosis: Getting Healthy, Staying Healthy

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis Getting Healthy, Staying Healthy U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Tuberculosis Getting Healthy, Staying Healthy U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH ...

  10. [The new tools of microbiological diagnosis of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Guillet-Caruba, C; Martinez, V; Doucet-Populaire, F

    2014-12-01

    This review focuses on the role of new tools in the "modern" microbiological diagnosis of tuberculosis. Traditional techniques of microscopy and culture remain essential to diagnostic certainty, but some innovations replace daily the older techniques such as the identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by immunochromatography or mass spectrometry MALDI-TOF type from positive cultures, or susceptibility testing in liquid medium. New tools that use molecular techniques have become important. They all have in common to optimize the fight against tuberculosis by reducing diagnostic delay. They also allow rapid detection of drug resistance. However, the techniques of gene amplification directly from clinical samples are still less sensitive than culture. Bacteriological diagnosis of tuberculosis disease therefore still relies on the complementarities of different phenotypic and molecular techniques. PMID:25112804

  11. Issues Related to the Updated 2014 Korean Guidelines for Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health problem in South Korea. The Joint Committee for the Development of Korean Guidelines for Tuberculosis published the Korean Guidelines for Tuberculosis in 2011 to provide evidence-based practical recommendations to health care workers caring for patients with TB in South Korea. After reviewing recent national and international scientific data on TB, the committee updated the Korean guidelines for TB in 2014. This article presents some practical issues related to the 2014 updated guidelines: namely use of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis - polymerase chain reaction assay and the Xpert MTB/RIF assay in the diagnosis of TB, as well as medical treatment for patients with multidrug-resistant TB. PMID:26770228

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Manipulator of Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Korb, Vanessa C.; Chuturgoon, Anil A.; Moodley, Devapregasan

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is one of the most successful pathogens in human history and remains a global health challenge. MTB has evolved a plethora of strategies to evade the immune response sufficiently to survive within the macrophage in a bacterial-immunological equilibrium, yet causes sufficient immunopathology to facilitate its transmission. This review highlights MTB as the driver of disease pathogenesis and presents evidence of the mechanisms by which MTB manipulates the protective immune response into a pathological productive infection. PMID:26927066

  13. Low-Density Granulocytes Are Elevated in Mycobacterial Infection and Associated with the Severity of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yating; Ye, Jianqing; Luo, Qing; Huang, Zhikun; Peng, Yiping; Xiong, Guoliang; Guo, Yang; Jiang, Hong; Li, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global health problem caused by infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Numerous studies have established a close correlation between the development of tuberculosis and the roles of neutrophils. Recently, a distinct population of CD15+ granulocytes was found to be present in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) fraction in humans. This population of granulocytes, termed low-density granulocytes (LDGs), was reported to be elevated and associated with disease activity or severity in a number of different conditions including SLE, asthma and HIV infection. However, both the frequency and clinical significance of LDGs associated with tuberculosis are unclear. Here we determined LDG levels and made comparisons between subjects with active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and healthy controls, between PTB patients with mild-to-moderate disease and patients with advanced disease, and among PTB patients following anti-tuberculous therapy of varying durations. The direct correlation between M. tuberculosis infection and LDG levels was confirmed by in vitro infection of whole peripheral blood and isolated granulocytes with mycobacteria. Our results demonstrated that PBMCs in PTB patients contained significantly elevated percentages of LDGs compared with control subjects. LDGs in tuberculosis expressed higher levels of activation markers compared to normal-density granulocytes (NDGs). M. tuberculosis induced the generation of LDGs in both whole blood and isolated NDGs from control subjects, which suggests that LDGs associated with M. tuberculosis infection are likely to originate from in situ activation. Furthermore, our results revealed that the frequency of LDGs is associated with the severity of tuberculosis. PMID:27073889

  14. Low-Density Granulocytes Are Elevated in Mycobacterial Infection and Associated with the Severity of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qing; Huang, Zhikun; Peng, Yiping; Xiong, Guoliang; Guo, Yang; Jiang, Hong; Li, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global health problem caused by infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Numerous studies have established a close correlation between the development of tuberculosis and the roles of neutrophils. Recently, a distinct population of CD15+ granulocytes was found to be present in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) fraction in humans. This population of granulocytes, termed low-density granulocytes (LDGs), was reported to be elevated and associated with disease activity or severity in a number of different conditions including SLE, asthma and HIV infection. However, both the frequency and clinical significance of LDGs associated with tuberculosis are unclear. Here we determined LDG levels and made comparisons between subjects with active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and healthy controls, between PTB patients with mild-to-moderate disease and patients with advanced disease, and among PTB patients following anti-tuberculous therapy of varying durations. The direct correlation between M. tuberculosis infection and LDG levels was confirmed by in vitro infection of whole peripheral blood and isolated granulocytes with mycobacteria. Our results demonstrated that PBMCs in PTB patients contained significantly elevated percentages of LDGs compared with control subjects. LDGs in tuberculosis expressed higher levels of activation markers compared to normal-density granulocytes (NDGs). M. tuberculosis induced the generation of LDGs in both whole blood and isolated NDGs from control subjects, which suggests that LDGs associated with M. tuberculosis infection are likely to originate from in situ activation. Furthermore, our results revealed that the frequency of LDGs is associated with the severity of tuberculosis. PMID:27073889

  15. Proteome Analysis of the Plasma Membrane of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Shalini; Kosalai, K.; Namane, Abdelkader; Pym, Alex S.; Cole, Stewart T.

    2002-01-01

    The plasma membrane of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is likely to contain proteins that could serve as novel drug targets, diagnostic probes or even components of a vaccine against tuberculosis. With this in mind, we have undertaken proteome analysis of the membrane of M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Isolated membrane vesicles were extracted with either a detergent (Triton X114) or an alkaline buffer (carbonate) following two of the protocols recommended for membrane protein enrichment. Proteins were resolved by 2D-GE using immobilized pH gradient (IPG) strips, and identified by peptide mass mapping utilizing the M. tuberculosis genome database. The two extraction procedures yielded patterns with minimal overlap. Only two proteins, both HSPs, showed a common presence. MALDI–MS analysis of 61 spots led to the identification of 32 proteins, 17 of which were new to the M. tuberculosis proteome database. We classified 19 of the identified proteins as ‘membrane-associated’; 14 of these were further classified as ‘membrane-bound’, three of which were lipoproteins. The remaining proteins included four heat-shock proteins and several enzymes involved in energy or lipid metabolism. Extraction with Triton X114 was found to be more effective than carbonate for detecting ‘putative’ M. tuberculosis membrane proteins. The protocol was also found to be suitable for comparing BCG and M. tuberculosis membranes, identifying ESAT-6 as being expressed selectively in M. tuberculosis. While this study demonstrates for the first time some of the membrane proteins of M. tuberculosis, it also underscores the problems associated with proteomic analysis of a complex membrane such as that of a mycobacterium. PMID:18629250

  16. 53. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTH NORTHEAST SHOWING THE REMAINS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTH NORTHEAST SHOWING THE REMAINS OF A WOODEN SETTLING BOX IN THE BACKGROUND RIGHT. AMALGAMATING PANS IN THE FOREGROUND. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  17. 7. VIEW OF VESSEL FROM PORT BON, SHOWING REMAINS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF VESSEL FROM PORT BON, SHOWING REMAINS OF MAIN CABIN. AFT CABIN STILL STANDS ON STERN IN BACKGROUND - Motorized Sailing Vessel "Fox", Beached on East Bank ofBayou Lafourche, Larose, Lafourche Parish, LA

  18. A case report of peritoneal tuberculosis with multiple miliary peritoneal deposits mimicking advanced ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Shahla; Sadeghi, Mahmod; Alijanpour, Abolhasan; Naeimi-rad, Mojgan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peritoneal tuberculosis accounts 1-2% of all forms of tuberculosis. Peritoneal tuberculosis is an important differential diagnosis for ovarian cancer in women with ascites, adnexal mass and elevated cancer antigen 125 (CA125) levels. We report a case of a 32- year -old woman with multiple miliary peritoneal deposits mimicking advanced ovarian carcinoma. Case Presentation: A 32-year-old drug addicted woman presented with menometrorrhagia, fever and shivering, ascites and pelvis mass. Ultrasonography revealed a 53×65 mm cyst in left ovary and ascites. Multiple miliary peritoneal deposits were observed during laparatomy without any mass, histologic examination confirmed tuberculosis of uterus, tubes, omentum, liver and external surfaces of small intestine. Finally, the patient recovered with anti-tuberculosis treatment. Conclusion: These findings highlight considering tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis of any patients with adnexal mass, ascitis and elevated serum CA125 even with negative cytology and bacteriology test results. PMID:26958336

  19. Pulmonary Disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a Horse: Zoonotic Concerns and Limitations of Antemortem Testing

    PubMed Central

    Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.; Greenwald, Rena; Esfandiari, Javan; Lecu, Alexis; Waters, W. Ray; Posthaus, Horst; Bodmer, Thomas; Janssens, Jean-Paul; Aloisio, Fabio; Graubner, Claudia; Grosclaude, Eléonore; Piersigilli, Alessandra; Schiller, Irene

    2012-01-01

    A case of pulmonary tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in a horse. Clinical evaluation performed prior to euthanasia did not suggest tuberculosis, but postmortem examination provided pathological and bacteriological evidence of mycobacteriosis. In the lungs, multiple tuberculoid granulomas communicating with the bronchiolar lumen, pleural effusion, and a granulomatous lymphadenitis involving mediastinal and tracheobronchial lymph nodes were found. Serologic response to M. tuberculosis antigens was detected in the infected horse, but not in the group of 42 potentially exposed animals (18 horses, 14 alpacas, 6 donkeys, and 4 dogs) which showed no signs of disease. Diagnosis of tuberculosis in live horses remains extremely difficult. Four of 20 animal handlers at the farm were positive for tuberculous infection upon follow-up testing by interferon-gamma release assay, indicating a possibility of interspecies transmission of M. tuberculosis. PMID:22567544

  20. Pulmonary Disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a Horse: Zoonotic Concerns and Limitations of Antemortem Testing.

    PubMed

    Lyashchenko, Konstantin P; Greenwald, Rena; Esfandiari, Javan; Lecu, Alexis; Waters, W Ray; Posthaus, Horst; Bodmer, Thomas; Janssens, Jean-Paul; Aloisio, Fabio; Graubner, Claudia; Grosclaude, Eléonore; Piersigilli, Alessandra; Schiller, Irene

    2012-01-01

    A case of pulmonary tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in a horse. Clinical evaluation performed prior to euthanasia did not suggest tuberculosis, but postmortem examination provided pathological and bacteriological evidence of mycobacteriosis. In the lungs, multiple tuberculoid granulomas communicating with the bronchiolar lumen, pleural effusion, and a granulomatous lymphadenitis involving mediastinal and tracheobronchial lymph nodes were found. Serologic response to M. tuberculosis antigens was detected in the infected horse, but not in the group of 42 potentially exposed animals (18 horses, 14 alpacas, 6 donkeys, and 4 dogs) which showed no signs of disease. Diagnosis of tuberculosis in live horses remains extremely difficult. Four of 20 animal handlers at the farm were positive for tuberculous infection upon follow-up testing by interferon-gamma release assay, indicating a possibility of interspecies transmission of M. tuberculosis. PMID:22567544

  1. [Lymph node tuberculosis in adults].

    PubMed

    Pimentel, M; Follador, E C; Barbas, C S; Stávale, M L; Oliveira-Vianna, E dos S; Barbas Filho, J V; Leite, O M; de Carvalho, C R

    1991-01-01

    Tuberculous lymphadenitis is a form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis that was observed in 8.4% of all cases with tuberculosis in our series. In all instances the organism isolated was M. tuberculosis. There was a high rate of PPD positiveness. The chemotherapy yielded good results. The evolution was satisfactory in 75% of the patients treated for six months. PMID:1843715

  2. Childhood Tuberculosis, Still with Us...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaulet, Pierre; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The first section of this report on childhood tuberculosis in developed and developing countries discusses the epidemiology of tuberculosis in children. Information is presented on: (1) sources and prevalence of infection; (2) risks, frequency, and types of tuberculosis; (3) mortality rates; and (4) the relation of poverty and AIDS to…

  3. Tuberculosis among Children in Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gessner, Bradford D.

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis among Alaskan children under 15 was more than twice the national rate, with Alaska Native children showing a much higher incidence. Children with household exposure to adults with active tuberculosis had a high risk of infection. About 22 percent of pediatric tuberculosis cases were identified through school…

  4. Tuberculosis: A Problem for Lifeguards?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaros, Susan

    1996-01-01

    Lifeguards run the risk of workplace infection by tuberculosis-carrying swimmers. Even if they work in ventilated, sunlit areas (which reduces risk), they can contract tuberculosis when performing respiratory resuscitation. Without appropriate precautions, lifeguards may be unnecessarily exposed. A tuberculosis infection control plan is needed in…

  5. Tuberculosis-resistant transgenic cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis is a devastating disease that affects humans and many animal species. In humans, tuberculosis (TB) is mainly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, while most cases in cattle are caused by Mycobacterium bovis. However, Mb can also cause, albeit rarely, human TB. In this issue, Wu et al. ...

  6. Predicting tuberculosis among migrant groups.

    PubMed

    Watkins, R E; Plant, A J

    2002-12-01

    In industrialized countries migrants remain a high-risk group for tuberculosis (TB). Multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine the ability of indicators of TB incidence in the country of birth to predict the incidence of TB among migrants in Australia during 1997. World Health Organization total case notifications, new smear-positive case notifications and the estimated incidence of TB by country of birth explained 55, 69 and 87% of the variance in TB incidence in Australia, respectively. Gross national income of the country of birth and unemployment level in Australia were also significant predictors of TB in migrant groups. Indicators of the incidence of TB in the country of birth are the most important group-level predictors of the rate of TB among migrants in Australia. PMID:12558347

  7. [Tuberculosis pulmonum--"threaten us of epidemic"?].

    PubMed

    Chyczewska, Elzbieta

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a deadly infectious disease affecting millions of people worldwide with 95% of cases and 98% of deaths occuring in developing countries (9 milion new cases, 1 million deaths annually) vs.WHO. Tuberculosis is on the increase in developed countries, because of AIDS, the use of immunosuppresive drugs which depress the host defence mechanism, decreased socioeconomic conditions, as well as increased immigration of persons from areas of high endemicity. The major reason for this increase was because of rapid rise in cases from sub-Saharan Africa (due to AIDS) nad Russia. Incidense of tuberculosis in Poland 2007--the number of notified cases was 8014. Pulmonary cases represented 92.7% of total all TB cases and 628 cases of extrapulmonary TB. Chidren TB cases represented 0.9% (74 cases) of all cases notified in Poland. The incidence of tuberculosis increases with age from 1.1 in children do 41.2 among 65 and older. The incidence of men (31.5) was two times higher than in women--14.5 per 100 000 respectivly. There were 716 deaths due to pulmonary TB and 23 from extrapulmonary TB. Multidrug resistance (MDR) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major therapeutic problem, in the world, with a high mortality and occurs mainly in HIV-infected patients. The WHO estimates that around 50 million people are infected with MDR-TB! WHO suggest that a greater investment in the establishment treatment strategy of DOTS (Directly Observed Treatment Short-course) into all posible regions. PMID:22320031

  8. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in 100 Patients With Tuberculosis Using Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Pooideh, Mohammad; Jabbarzadeh, Ismail; Ranjbar, Reza; Saifi, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is a widespread infectious disease. Today, TB has created a public health crisis in the world. Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates is useful for surveying the dynamics of TB infection, identifying new outbreaks, and preventing the disease. Different molecular methods for clustering of M. tuberculosis isolates have been used. Objectives: During a one year study of genotyping, 100 M. tuberculosis isolates from patients referred to Pasteur Institute of Iran were collected and their genotyping was accomplished using pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) method. Materials and Methods: Identification of all M. tuberculosis isolates was accomplished using standard biochemical and species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using proportional method. After preparing PFGE plaques for each isolate of M. tuberculosis, XbaI restriction enzyme was applied for genome digestion. Finally, the digested DNA fragments were separated on 1% agarose gel and analyzed with GelCompar II software. Results: Genotyping of the studied isolates in comparison with the molecular weight marker revealed two common types; pulsotype A with 71 isolates and one multidrug resistant mycobacterium (MDR) case, and pulsotype B including 29 isolates and three MDR cases. No correlation between the antibiotypes and pulsotypes was observed. Conclusions: Molecular epidemiology studies of infectious diseases have been useful when bacterial isolates have been clustered in a period of time and in different geographical regions with variable antibiotic resistance patterns. In spite of high geographical differences and different antibiotic resistant patterns, low genetic diversity among the studied TB isolates may refer to the low rate of mutations in XbaI restriction sites in the mycobacterial genome. We also identified three MDR isolates in low-incidence pulsotype B, which could be disseminated and is highly

  9. [Tuberculosis and immigration].

    PubMed

    Salas-Coronas, Joaquín; Rogado-González, M Cruz; Lozano-Serrano, Ana Belén; Cabezas-Fernández, M Teresa

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis worldwide is declining. However, in Western countries this decline is slower due to the impact of immigration. Tuberculosis in the immigrant population is related to health status in the country of origin and with overcrowding and poverty conditions in the host country. Immigrants with tuberculosis are younger, have a higher prevalence of extrapulmonary forms, greater proportion of drug resistance and higher treatment default rates than those of natives. New molecular techniques not only reduce diagnostic delay time but also allow the rapid identification of resistances and improve knowledge of transmission patterns. It is necessary to implement measures to improve treatment compliance in this population group like facilitating access to health card, the use of fixed-dose combination drugs, the participation of cultural mediators and community health workers and gratuity of drugs. PMID:26851978

  10. Tuberculosis and HIV Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Bruchfeld, Judith; Correia-Neves, Margarida; Källenius, Gunilla

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) constitute the main burden of infectious disease in resource-limited countries. In the individual host, the two pathogens, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and HIV, potentiate one another, accelerating the deterioration of immunological functions. In high-burden settings, HIV coinfection is the most important risk factor for developing active TB, which increases the susceptibility to primary infection or reinfection and also the risk of TB reactivation for patients with latent TB. M. tuberculosis infection also has a negative impact on the immune response to HIV, accelerating the progression from HIV infection to AIDS. The clinical management of HIV-associated TB includes the integration of effective anti-TB treatment, use of concurrent antiretroviral therapy (ART), prevention of HIV-related comorbidities, management of drug cytotoxicity, and prevention/treatment of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). PMID:25722472

  11. The Importance of First Impressions: Early Events in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Influence Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Cadena, Anthony M.; Fortune, Sarah M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tuberculosis remains a major health threat in much of the world. New vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis are essential for preventing infection, disease, and transmission. However, the host immune responses that need to be induced by an effective vaccine remain unclear. Increasingly, it has become clear that early events in infection are of major importance in the eventual outcome of the infection. Studying such events in humans is challenging, as they occur within the lung and thoracic lymph nodes, and any clinical signs of early infection are relatively nonspecific. Nonetheless, clinical studies and animal models of tuberculosis have provided new insights into the local events that occur in the first few weeks of tuberculosis. Development of an effective vaccine requires a clear understanding of the successful (and detrimental) early host responses against M. tuberculosis, with the goal to improve upon natural immune responses and prevent infection or disease. PMID:27048801

  12. Tuberculosis diagnosis: primary health care or emergency medical services?

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Rubia Laine de Paula; Scatolin, Beatriz Estuque; Wysocki, Anneliese Domingues; Beraldo, Aline Ale; Monroe, Aline Aparecida; Scatena, Lúcia Marina; Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess primary health care and emergency medical services performance for tuberculosis diagnosis. METHODS Cross-sectional study were conducted with 90 health professionals from primary health care and 68 from emergency medical services, in Ribeirao Preto, SP, Southeastern Brazil, in 2009. A structured questionnaire based on an instrument of tuberculosis care assessment was used. The association between health service and the variables of structure and process for tuberculosis diagnosis was assessed by Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test (both with 5% of statistical significance) and multiple correspondence analysis. RESULTS Primary health care was associated with the adequate provision of inputs and human resources, as well as with the sputum test request. Emergencial medical services were associated with the availability of X-ray equipment, work overload, human resources turnover, insufficient availability of health professionals, unavailability of sputum collection pots and do not request sputum test. In both services, tuberculosis diagnosis remained as a physician's responsibility. CONCLUSIONS Emergencial medical services presented weaknesses in its structure to identify tuberculosis suspects. Gaps on the process were identified in both primary health care and emergencial medical services. This situation highlights the need for qualification of health services that are the main gateway to health system to meet sector reforms that prioritize the timely diagnosis of tuberculosis and its control. PMID:24626553

  13. The global emergency of tuberculosis: what is the cause?

    PubMed

    Grange, J M; Zumla, A

    2002-06-01

    The treatment of tuberculosis is cheap and highly effective, yet worldwide the disease remains a serious cause of illness and death; so serious as to have been declared a 'global emergency' in 1993. It is principally a disease of poverty, with 95% of cases and 98% of deaths occurring in developing countries. The incidence of tuberculosis is increasing worldwide, partly due to poverty and inequity and partly to the HIV/AIDS pandemic, which greatly increases the risk of infection proceeding to overt disease. Around 30% of AIDS-related deaths are due to tuberculosis. The emergence of multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) is an increasing threat to tuberculosis control. Although treatable with alternative drugs, the cost is enormous and, accordingly, not undertaken in many poor nations. While the overall global incidence of MDRTB is low, it occurs in certain 'hotspots' including Russian prisons. Due to adverse socio-economic factors, London has not escaped the general rise in incidence and, without the introduction of active control strategies, there could be a serious epidemic as occurred in New York City ten years ago which required an enormous financial outlay for its control. In view of the global emergency of tuberculosis, the WHO 'Stop TB' campaign has called for the universal adoption of its directly observed therapy, short course (DOTS) strategy. Also, though the Massive Effort Against Diseases of Poverty, several international agencies are urging the establishment of effective control programmes worldwide. London should take the lead and set an example. PMID:12134771

  14. The Singapore Tuberculosis Elimination Programme: the first five years.

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Cynthia B. E.; James, Lyn

    2003-01-01

    The Singapore Tuberculosis Elimination Programme (STEP) was launched in 1997 because the incidence of the disease had remained between 49 and 56 per 100,000 resident population for the preceding 10 years. STEP involves the following key interventions: directly observed therapy (DOT) in public primary health care clinics; monitoring of treatment progress and outcome for all cases by means of a National Treatment Surveillance Registry; and preventive therapy for recently infected close contacts of infectious tuberculosis cases. Among other activities are the revamping of the National Tuberculosis Notification Registry, the discontinuation of BCG revaccination for schoolchildren, the tightening up of defaulter tracing, and the education of the medical community and the public. Future plans include an outreach programme for specific groups of patients who are unable to attend their nearest public primary care clinics for DOT, the detention of infectious recalcitrant defaulters for treatment under the Infectious Diseases Act, the molecular fingerprinting of tuberculosis isolates, and targeted screening of high-risk groups. The incidence of tuberculosis fell from 57 per 100,000 population in 1998 to 48 per 100,000 in 1999 and continued to decline to 44 per 100,000 in 2001. With political will and commitment and the support of the medical community and the public it is hoped that STEP will achieve further progress towards the elimination of tuberculosis in Singapore. PMID:12764518

  15. Perspectives on Advances in Tuberculosis Diagnostics, Drugs, and Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Schito, Marco; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Fletcher, Helen A; McNerney, Ruth; Centis, Rosella; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Bates, Matthew; Kibiki, Gibson; Kapata, Nathan; Corrah, Tumena; Bomanji, Jamshed; Vilaplana, Cris; Johnson, Daniel; Mwaba, Peter; Maeurer, Markus; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2015-10-15

    Despite concerted efforts over the past 2 decades at developing new diagnostics, drugs, and vaccines with expanding pipelines, tuberculosis remains a global emergency. Several novel diagnostic technologies show promise of better point-of-care rapid tests for tuberculosis including nucleic acid-based amplification tests, imaging, and breath analysis of volatile organic compounds. Advances in new and repurposed drugs for use in multidrug-resistant (MDR) or extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis have focused on development of several new drug regimens and their evaluation in clinical trials and now influence World Health Organization guidelines. Since the failure of the MVA85A vaccine 2 years ago, there have been no new tuberculosis vaccine candidates entering clinical testing. The current status quo of the lengthy treatment duration and poor treatment outcomes associated with MDR/XDR tuberculosis and with comorbidity of tuberculosis with human immunodeficiency virus and noncommunicable diseases is unacceptable. New innovations and political and funder commitment for early rapid diagnosis, shortening duration of therapy, improving treatment outcomes, and prevention are urgently required. PMID:26409271

  16. Clinical and Laboratory Diagnosis of Intestinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao-Chun; Zhang, Li-Fan; Zhang, Yue-Qiu; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Fei, Gui-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a worldwide problem. Intestinal TB (ITB) constitutes a major public health problem in developing countries and has been associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical, radiological, endoscopic, and pathological features of ITB and to define the strategy for establishing the diagnosis. Methods: A retrospective study (from January 2000 to June 2015) was carried out in Peking Union Medical College Hospital and all hospitalized cases were diagnosed as ITB during the study period were included. The relevant clinical information, laboratory results, microbiological, and radiological investigations were recorded. Results: Of the 85 cases, 61 cases (71.8%) were ranged from 20 to 50 years. The ileocecal region was involved in about 83.5% (71/85) of patients. About 41.2% (35/85) of patients had co-existing extra ITB, especially active pulmonary TB. Abdominal pain (82.4%) was the most common presenting symptom followed by weight loss (72.9%) and fever (64.7%). Both T-cell spot of TB test (T-SPOT.TB) and purified protein derivatives (PPD) tests were performed in 26 patients: 20 (76.9%) positive T-SPOT.TB and 13 (50.0%) positive PPD were detected, with a statistical significant difference (P = 0.046). Twenty cases (23.5%) were histopathology and/or pathogen confirmed TB; 27 cases (31.8%) were diagnosed by clinical manifestation consistent with ITB and evidence of active extra ITB; 38 cases (44.7%) were diagnosed by good response to diagnostic anti-TB therapy. Conclusions: ITB is difficult to diagnose even with modern medical techniques due to its nonspecific clinical and laboratory features. At present, combination of clinical, endoscopic, radiological, and pathological features continues to be the key to the diagnosis of ITB. PMID:27231171

  17. Unusual Clinical Presentation of Thoracic Tuberculosis: The Need for a Better Knowledge of Illness

    PubMed Central

    Manca, Sandra; Fois, Alessandro Giuseppe; Santoru, Luigi; Trisolini, Rocco; Polo, Maria Francesca; Ostera, Salvatore; Patelli, Marco; Pirina, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Bronchoesophageal fistula in endobronchial tuberculosis and mediastinal lymphadenopathy Symptoms: Nonproductive cough • weight loss Medication: Isoniazid • rifampin • pyrazinamide • ethambutol Clinical Procedure: Laser treatment Specialty: Pulmonology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), a highly contagious infectious disease, is a significant public health problem all over the world and remains an important cause of preventable death in the adult population. Endobronchial TB is an unusual form of thoracic TB that may be complicated by tracheobronchial stenosis, and bronchoesophageal fistula formation is a very rare complication. Tubercular lymphadenitis can also lead to fistula formation through a process of caseum necrosis and opening of a fistula between the bronchus and oesophagus. Case Report: We report an uncommon case of thoracic TB in an immunocompetent 73-year-old Caucasian man who presented several problems: bronchoesophageal fistula, endobronchial TB, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy in the absence of contemporary parenchymal consolidation. Furthermore, he presented a normal chest radiograph and mostly unclear and non-specific symptoms at onset. Conclusions: We emphasize the need for a better knowledge of this illness and awareness that it may have an unusual presentation. In these cases, diagnosis and proper treatment can be delayed, with severe complications for the patient. Pulmonary TB remains a real diagnostic challenge: a normal chest radiograph and nonspecific symptoms do not allow us to exclude this persistent infectious disease. PMID:25907152

  18. Descriptive review of tuberculosis surveillance systems across the circumpolar regions

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois, Annie-Claude; Zulz, Tammy; Soborg, Bolette; Koch, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is highly prevalent in many Arctic areas. Members of the International Circumpolar Surveillance Tuberculosis (ICS-TB) Working Group collaborate to increase knowledge about tuberculosis in Arctic regions. Objective To establish baseline knowledge of tuberculosis surveillance systems used by ICS-TB member jurisdictions. Design Three questionnaires were developed to reflect the different surveillance levels (local, regional and national); all 3 were forwarded to the official representative of each of the 15 ICS-TB member jurisdictions in 2013. Respondents self-identified the level of surveillance conducted in their region and completed the applicable questionnaire. Information collected included surveillance system objectives, case definitions, data collection methodology, storage and dissemination. Results Thirteen ICS-TB jurisdictions [Canada (Labrador, Northwest Territories, Nunavik, Nunavut, Yukon), Finland, Greenland, Norway, Sweden, Russian Federation (Arkhangelsk, Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous Okrug, Yakutia (Sakha Republic), United States (Alaska)] voluntarily completed the survey – representing 2 local, 7 regional and 4 national levels. Tuberculosis reporting is mandatory in all jurisdictions, and case definitions are comparable across regions. The common objectives across systems are to detect outbreaks, and inform the evaluation/planning of public health programmes and policies. All jurisdictions collect data on confirmed active tuberculosis cases and treatment outcomes; 11 collect contact tracing results. Faxing of standardized case reporting forms is the most common reporting method. Similar core data elements are collected; 8 regions report genotyping results. Data are stored using customized programmes (n=7) and commercial software (n=6). Nine jurisdictions provide monthly, bi-annual or annual reports to principally government and/or scientific/medical audiences. Conclusion This review successfully establishes baseline knowledge

  19. Counting Children with Tuberculosis: Why Numbers Matter

    PubMed Central

    Seddon, James A; Jenkins, Helen E; Liu, Li; Cohen, Ted; Black, Robert E; Becerra, Mercedes C.; Graham, Stephen M; Sismanidis, Charalambos; Dodd, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Summary In the last five years, childhood tuberculosis (TB) has received increasing attention from international organisations, national tuberculosis programmes, and academics. For the first time, a number of different groups are developing techniques to estimate the burden of childhood TB. We review the challenges in diagnosing TB in children and the reasons cases in children can go unreported. We discuss the importance of an accurate understanding of burden for identifying problems in programme delivery, targeting interventions, monitoring trends, setting targets, allocating resources appropriately and providing strong advocacy. We briefly review the estimates produced by new analytical methods, outline the reasons for recent improvements in our understanding, and potential future directions. We conclude that while innovation, collaboration and better data have improved our understanding of childhood TB burden, it remains substantially incomplete. PMID:26564535

  20. Socioeconomic Factors Associated with Knowledge on Tuberculosis among Adults in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gelaw, Sifrash Meseret

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ethiopia is among highly tuberculosis affected countries. This might be related to low level of awareness on the disease in the population. The objective of the study was to determine the level of tuberculosis knowledge and socioeconomic factors associated with it. Methods. The 2011 Ethiopia health and demographic survey data were used. Overall tuberculosis knowledge score was computed to evaluate the outcome variable. Multivariable logistic regression was employed to identify independent socioeconomic factors associated with low tuberculosis knowledge. Results. The overall tuberculosis knowledge was low, 44.05% (95% CI: 42.05–46.24%) among women and 32.3% (95% CI: 30.34–34.32%) among men. Rural women (AOR = 1.22) and youth, no formal education (women: AOR = 3.28, men: AOR = 7.42), attending only primary education (women: AOR = 1.95, men: AOR = 3.49), lowest wealth quintiles (women: AOR = 1.4, Men: AOR = 1.28), unskilled female manual workers (AOR = 4.15), female agricultural employee (AOR = 2.28), and lack of access to media (women: AOR = 1.52, men: AOR = 1.71) are significantly associated with low tuberculosis knowledge. Conclusion. The level of tuberculosis knowledge among adults in Ethiopia is low and varied by socioeconomic groups. Tuberculosis control programs should consider appropriate strategies for tuberculosis education, promotion, communication, and social mobilization to address the rural women, youths, the poor, less educated people, and unskilled workers. PMID:26949546

  1. Socioeconomic Factors Associated with Knowledge on Tuberculosis among Adults in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Gelaw, Sifrash Meseret

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ethiopia is among highly tuberculosis affected countries. This might be related to low level of awareness on the disease in the population. The objective of the study was to determine the level of tuberculosis knowledge and socioeconomic factors associated with it. Methods. The 2011 Ethiopia health and demographic survey data were used. Overall tuberculosis knowledge score was computed to evaluate the outcome variable. Multivariable logistic regression was employed to identify independent socioeconomic factors associated with low tuberculosis knowledge. Results. The overall tuberculosis knowledge was low, 44.05% (95% CI: 42.05-46.24%) among women and 32.3% (95% CI: 30.34-34.32%) among men. Rural women (AOR = 1.22) and youth, no formal education (women: AOR = 3.28, men: AOR = 7.42), attending only primary education (women: AOR = 1.95, men: AOR = 3.49), lowest wealth quintiles (women: AOR = 1.4, Men: AOR = 1.28), unskilled female manual workers (AOR = 4.15), female agricultural employee (AOR = 2.28), and lack of access to media (women: AOR = 1.52, men: AOR = 1.71) are significantly associated with low tuberculosis knowledge. Conclusion. The level of tuberculosis knowledge among adults in Ethiopia is low and varied by socioeconomic groups. Tuberculosis control programs should consider appropriate strategies for tuberculosis education, promotion, communication, and social mobilization to address the rural women, youths, the poor, less educated people, and unskilled workers. PMID:26949546

  2. Comparative analyses of the proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human genomes: Identification of potential tuberculosis drug targets.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Settu; Dash, Pallabini; Guruprasad, Kunchur

    2016-03-15

    Tuberculosis, one of the major infectious diseases affecting human beings is caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Increased resistance to known drugs commonly used for the treatment of tuberculosis has created an urgent need to identify new targets for validation and to develop drugs. In this study, we have used various bioinformatics tools, to compare the protein sequences from twenty-three M. tuberculosis genome strains along with the known human protein sequences, in order to identify the 'conserved' M. tuberculosis proteins absent in human. Further, based on the analysis of protein interaction networks, we selected one-hundred and forty proteins that were predicted as potential M. tuberculosis drug targets and prioritized according to the ranking of 'clusters' of interacting proteins. Comparison of the predicted 140 TB targets with literature indicated that 46 of them were previously reported, thereby increasing the confidence in our predictions of the remaining 94 targets too. The analyses of the structures and functions corresponding to the predicted potential TB drug targets indicated a diverse range of proteins that included ten 'druggable' targets with some of the known drugs. PMID:26762852

  3. Expression of TNF-Alpha-Dependent Apoptosis-Related Genes in the Peripheral Blood of Malagasy Subjects with Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rakotosamimanana, Niaina; Doherty, T. Mark; Andriamihantasoa, Lova H.; Richard, Vincent; Gicquel, Brigitte; Soares, Jean-Louis; Zumla, Alimuddin; Razanamparany, Voahangy Rasolofo

    2013-01-01

    The majority of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infections remain asymptomatic with only up to 10% progressing to clinical tuberculosis. However, the constituents of the effective “protective immunity” against tuberculosis responsible for containing most infections remain unknown. Evaluating gene transcriptional profiles in tuberculosis clinical cohorts is one approach to understanding the spectrum of tuberculosis progression. It is clear that apoptosis plays a role in the control of tuberculosis but the utility of apoptosis-related genes as surrogate markers of protection against tuberculosis has not been well investigated. To characterize potential surrogate markers that could discriminate different phases of the clinical tuberculosis spectrum, we investigated gene expression of several TNF-alpha dependent apoptotic genes (TNFR1, TNFR2, FLICE, FLIPs) by real-time RT-PCR of peripheral blood cells from cohorts of individuals with active tuberculosis or potential exposure to tuberculosis. Newly diagnosed tuberculosis patients (n = 23), their close household contacts (n = 80), and community controls (n = 46) were tested at intervals over a period of up to two years. Latent infection or previous Mtb contact was assessed by ELISPOT and TST and complete blood counts were performed during the follow up. Results showed significant upregulation of FLIPs expression by infected individuals regardless of clinical status at entry to the study. A higher percentage of lymphocytes was found in the infected household contacts that remained healthy. In contrast, in individuals with active TB, a significant upregulation of TNFR2 expression, a significantly higher percentage of monocytes and a significantly decreased lymphocyte count were seen, compared to subjects that remained healthy. Moreover, the household contacts who subsequently developed signs of TB also had a significantly high number of monocytes. These data suggest tuberculosis may be associated with

  4. Tuberculosis Facts - TB and HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB and HIV/AIDS What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  5. [Tuberculosis of ankle].

    PubMed

    Rubio Barbón, S; Rodríguez Cocina, B; Suárez del Villar Acebal, R; Calvo Rodríguez, C E; Villar López, A; Escalada Rodríguez, P; Torreblanca Gil, A

    2004-09-01

    The authors present a case of tuberculous arthritis of ankle with sinovial fluid and sputum aspirate Lowenstein positive (M. tuberculosis) in a patient non inmunocomprometid and review the clinical, diagnosis and treatment aspects of this entity, and show the difficult diagnosis in cases of radiology normal or low suspect. PMID:15476422

  6. Transcriptional Adaptation of Drug-tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis During Treatment of Human Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Nicholas D.; Dolganov, Gregory M.; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Worodria, William; Andama, Alfred; Musisi, Emmanuel; Ayakaka, Irene; Van, Tran T.; Voskuil, Martin I.; de Jong, Bouke C.; Davidson, Rebecca M.; Fingerlin, Tasha E.; Kechris, Katerina; Palmer, Claire; Nahid, Payam; Daley, Charles L.; Geraci, Mark; Huang, Laurence; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Strong, Michael; Schoolnik, Gary K.; Davis, John Lucian

    2015-01-01

    Background. Treatment initiation rapidly kills most drug-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but a bacterial subpopulation tolerates prolonged drug exposure. We evaluated drug-tolerant bacilli in human sputum by comparing messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of drug-tolerant bacilli that survive the early bactericidal phase with treatment-naive bacilli. Methods. M. tuberculosis gene expression was quantified via reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction in serial sputa from 17 Ugandans treated for drug-susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis. Results. Within 4 days, bacterial mRNA abundance declined >98%, indicating rapid killing. Thereafter, the rate of decline slowed >94%, indicating drug tolerance. After 14 days, 16S ribosomal RNA transcripts/genome declined 96%, indicating slow growth. Drug-tolerant bacilli displayed marked downregulation of genes associated with growth, metabolism, and lipid synthesis and upregulation in stress responses and key regulatory categories—including stress-associated sigma factors, transcription factors, and toxin-antitoxin genes. Drug efflux pumps were upregulated. The isoniazid stress signature was induced by initial drug exposure, then disappeared after 4 days. Conclusions. Transcriptional patterns suggest that drug-tolerant bacilli in sputum are in a slow-growing, metabolically and synthetically downregulated state. Absence of the isoniazid stress signature in drug-tolerant bacilli indicates that physiological state influences drug responsiveness in vivo. These results identify novel drug targets that should aid in development of novel shorter tuberculosis treatment regimens. PMID:25762787

  7. A Mycobacterial Perspective on Tuberculosis in West Africa: Significant Geographical Variation of M. africanum and Other M. tuberculosis Complex Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Gehre, Florian; Kumar, Samrat; Kendall, Lindsay; Ejo, Mebrat; Secka, Oumie; Ofori-Anyinam, Boatema; Abatih, Emmanuel; Antonio, Martin; Berkvens, Dirk; de Jong, Bouke C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Phylogenetically distinct Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineages differ in their phenotypes and pathogenicity. Consequently, understanding mycobacterial population structures phylogeographically is essential for design, interpretation and generalizability of clinical trials. Comprehensive efforts are lacking to date to establish the West African mycobacterial population structure on a sub-continental scale, which has diagnostic implications and can inform the design of clinical TB trials. Methodology/Principal Findings We collated novel and published genotyping (spoligotyping) data and classified spoligotypes into mycobacterial lineages/families using TBLineage and Spotclust, followed by phylogeographic analyses using statistics (logistic regression) and lineage axis plot analysis in GenGIS, in which a phylogenetic tree constructed in MIRU-VNTRplus was analysed. Combining spoligotyping data from 16 previously published studies with novel data from The Gambia, we obtained a total of 3580 isolates from 12 countries and identified 6 lineages comprising 32 families. By using stringent analytical tools we demonstrate for the first time a significant phylogeographic separation between western and eastern West Africa not only of the two M. africanum (West Africa 1 and 2) but also of several major M. tuberculosis sensu stricto families, such as LAM10 and Haarlem 3. Moreover, in a longitudinal logistic regression analysis for grouped data we showed that M. africanum West Africa 2 remains a persistent health concern. Conclusions/Significance Because of the geographical divide of the mycobacterial populations in West Africa, individual research findings from one country cannot be generalized across the whole region. The unequal geographical family distribution should be considered in placement and design of future clinical trials in West Africa. PMID:26964059

  8. Role of Interleukin 36γ in Host Defense Against Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Fadhil; Moura-Alves, Pedro; Guhlich-Bornhof, Ute; Klemm, Marion; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Maertzdorf, Jeroen

    2016-08-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major killer worldwide, not the least because of our incomplete knowledge of protective and pathogenic immune mechanism. The roles of the interleukin 1 (IL-1) and interleukin 18 pathways in host defense are well established, as are their regulation through the inflammasome complex. In contrast, the regulation of interleukin 36γ (IL-36γ), a recently described member of the IL-1 family, and its immunological relevance in host defense remain largely unknown. Here we show that Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of macrophages induces IL-36γ production in a 2-stage-regulated fashion. In the first stage, microbial ligands trigger host Toll-like receptor and MyD88-dependent pathways, leading to IL-36γ secretion. In the second stage, endogenous IL-1β and interleukin 18 further amplify IL-36γ synthesis. The relevance of this cytokine in the control of M. tuberculosis is demonstrated by IL-36γ-induced antimicrobial peptides and IL-36 receptor-dependent restriction of M. tuberculosis growth. Thus, we provide first insight into the induction and regulation of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-36γ during tuberculosis. PMID:27389350

  9. Post-treatment change in Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha release in patients with active tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang Ho; Yoo, Seung Soo; Lee, Shin Yup; Cha, Seung Ick; Park, Jae Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Monitoring tuberculosis (TB) treatment response remains challenging due to lack of reliable laboratory markers. In recent years, increased efforts have been exerted toward development of new biomarkers reflecting treatment response appropriately. While performance of interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) to monitor anti-TB treatment has been extensively evaluated, there is no data about post-treatment changes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) antigen-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) release in active TB patients. Herein, we explored whether the MTB antigen-stimulated TNF-α release would be useful for monitoring responses to anti-TB treatment. Methods We compared unstimulated (TNF-αNil), MTB antigen-stimulated (TNF-αAg), and MTB antigen-stimulated minus unstimulated TNF-α levels (TNF-αAg-Nil) in supernatants from QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube tests before and after treatment in 16 active TB patients, 25 latent TB infection (LTBI) subjects, and 10 healthy controls (HC). Results TNF-αAg and TNF-αAg-Nil levels decreased significantly after treatment in patients with active TB. In addition, TNF-αNil, TNF-αAg, and TNF-αAg-Nil levels were significantly higher in untreated active TB patients compared to LTBI subjects and HC. Conclusions This finding cautiously suggests that MTB Ag-stimulated TNF-α response may be a potential adjunctive marker for monitoring treatment response in active TB patients. PMID:26101647

  10. MUBII-TB-DB: a database of mutations associated with antibiotic resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is an infectious bacterial disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It remains a major health threat, killing over one million people every year worldwide. An early antibiotic therapy is the basis of the treatment, and the emergence and spread of multidrug and extensively drug-resistant mutant strains raise significant challenges. As these bacteria grow very slowly, drug resistance mutations are currently detected using molecular biology techniques. Resistance mutations are identified by sequencing the resistance-linked genes followed by a comparison with the literature data. The only online database is the TB Drug Resistance Mutation database (TBDReaM database); however, it requires mutation detection before use, and its interrogation is complex due to its loose syntax and grammar. Description The MUBII-TB-DB database is a simple, highly structured text-based database that contains a set of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutations (DNA and proteins) occurring at seven loci: rpoB, pncA, katG; mabA(fabG1)-inhA, gyrA, gyrB, and rrs. Resistance mutation data were extracted after the systematic review of MEDLINE referenced publications before March 2013. MUBII analyzes the query sequence obtained by PCR-sequencing using two parallel strategies: i) a BLAST search against a set of previously reconstructed mutated sequences and ii) the alignment of the query sequences (DNA and its protein translation) with the wild-type sequences. The post-treatment includes the extraction of the aligned sequences together with their descriptors (position and nature of mutations). The whole procedure is performed using the internet. The results are graphs (alignments) and text (description of the mutation, therapeutic significance). The system is quick and easy to use, even for technicians without bioinformatics training. Conclusion MUBII-TB-DB is a structured database of the mutations occurring at seven loci of major therapeutic value in tuberculosis management

  11. Diminished Systemic and Antigen-Specific Type 1, Type 17, and Other Proinflammatory Cytokines in Diabetic and Prediabetic Individuals With Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; George, Parakkal Jovvian; Kumaran, Paul; Dolla, Chandra Kumar; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2014-01-01

    Background. Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM) is known to be a major risk factor for the development of active tuberculosis, although its influence on latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (hereafter, “latent infection”) remains poorly characterized. Methods. We examined circulating plasma cytokine levels in individuals with latent infection with DM or pre-DM (ie, intermediate hyperglycemia) and compared them to levels in patients with latent infection and normal glycemic control. Results. In persons with DM or pre-DM, latent infection is characterized by diminished circulating levels of type 1 (interferon γ, interleukin 2, and tumor necrosis factor α) and type 17 (interleukin 17F) cytokines. This was associated with decreased systemic levels of other proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin 1β and interleukin 18) and the antiinflammatory cytokine interleukin 10 but not with decreased systemic levels of type 2 cytokines. Moreover, latently infected individuals with DM had diminished levels of spontaneous and M. tuberculosis antigen–specific levels of type 1 and type 17 cytokines when antigen-stimulated whole blood was examined. Finally, there was no significant correlation between the levels of any of the cytokines measured (with the exception of interleukin 22) with hemoglobin A1c levels. Conclusions. Our data reveal that latent infection in the presence of DM or pre-DM, is characterized by diminished production of cytokines, implicated in the control of M. tuberculosis activation, allowing for a potential immunological mechanism that could account for the increased risk of active tuberculosis in latently infected individuals with DM. PMID:24907382

  12. Parasitic infection may be associated with discordant responses to QuantiFERON and tuberculin skin test in apparently healthy children and adolescents in a tuberculosis endemic setting, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background M. tuberculosis remains one of the world’s deadliest pathogens in part because of its ability to establish persistent, latent infections, which can later reactivate to cause disease. In regions of the globe where disease is endemic, as much as 50% of the population is thought to be latently infected, complicating diagnosis and tuberculosis control. The tools most commonly used for diagnosis of latent M. tuberculosis infection are the tuberculin skin test and the newer interferon-gamma release assays, both of which rely on an antigen-specific memory response as an indicator of infection. It is clear that the two tests, do not always give concordant results, but the factors leading to this are only partially understood. Methods In this study we examined 245 healthy school children aged from 12 to 20 years from Addis Ababa, a tuberculosis-endemic region, characterised them with regard to response in the tuberculin skin test and QuantIFERON™ test and assessed factors that might contribute to discordant responses. Results Although concordance between the tests was generally fair (90% concordance), there was a subset of children who had a positive QuantIFERON™ result but a negative tuberculin skin test. After analysis of multiple parameters the data suggest that discordance was most strongly associated with the presence of parasites in the stool. Conclusions Parasitic gut infections are frequent in most regions where M. tuberculosis is endemic. This study, while preliminary, suggests that the tuberculin skin test should be interpreted with caution where this may be the case. PMID:23738853

  13. Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jassal, Mandeep; Bishai, William R

    2009-01-01

    Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis is defined as disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis with resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampicin, any fluoroquinolone, and at least one of three injectable second-line drugs (amikacin, capreomycin, or kanamycin). The definition has applicable clinical value and has allowed for more uniform surveillance in varied international settings. Recent surveillance data have indicated that the prevalence of tuberculosis drug resistance has risen to the highest rate ever recorded. The gold standard for drug-susceptibility testing has been the agar proportion method; however, this technique requires several weeks for results to be determined. More sensitive and specific diagnostic tests are still unavailable in resource-limited settings. Clinical manifestations, although variable in different settings and among different strains, have in general shown that XDR tuberculosis is associated with greater morbidity and mortality than non-XDR tuberculosis. The treatment of XDR tuberculosis should include agents to which the organism is susceptible, and should continue for a minimum of 18-24 months. However, treatment continues to be limited in tuberculosis-endemic countries largely because of weaknesses in national tuberculosis health-care models. The ultimate strategy to control drug-resistant tuberculosis is one that implements a comprehensive approach incorporating innovation from the political, social, economic, and scientific realms. PMID:18990610

  14. Maxillary sinusitis with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Rashmi; Prakash, Ved; Singh, Abhishek Bahadur; Saheer, S

    2014-01-01

    Tubercular infection of the nasal cavity is an infrequently encountered condition. More so, after the discovery of relevant antibiotics, nasal sinus tuberculosis is not commonly seen. Few cases have reported tuberculosis of the paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx and larynx. With the increasing incidence of HIV, these rare forms of infection have started re-emerging. We present a case of a middle aged man presenting with nasal cavity lesion along with pulmonary tuberculosis, which came to light only after the diagnosis of maxillary sinus tuberculosis. PMID:25085948

  15. Evaluation of the effect of Pulicaria gnaphalodes and Perovskia abrotanoides essential oil extracts against Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains

    PubMed Central

    Hozoorbakhsh, Fereshte; Esfahani, Bahram Nasr; Moghim, Sharareh; Asghari, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), which remains one of the major public health problems in the world. The increasing incidence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) worldwide highlights the urgent need to search for alternative antimycobacterial agents. More and more people in developing countries utilize traditional medicine for their major primary health care needs. It has been determined that the medicinal plants Pulicaria gnaphalodes and Perovskia abrotanoides possess strong antibacterial effect. Materials and Methods: In this study, the antimycobacterial effects of P. gnaphalodes and P. abrotanoides essential oil on MTB were examined. Essential oil was prepared from P. gnaphalodes aerial parts and P. abrotanoides flower. The effects of six different concentrations (20 μg/ml, 40 μg/ml, 80 μg/ml, 160 μg/ml, 320 μg/ml, and 640 μg/ml) were examined against sensitive isolates of MTB and MTB H37Rv (ATCC 27294). Results: The results showed that P. gnaphalodes and P. abrotanoides essential oil extracts have strong inhibitory effects on MTB. This activity for P. gnaphalodes was observed from very low (4%) to good (70.9%) effect; meanwhile, this activity for P. abrotanoides was observed from very low (4%) to strong (86%) effect. Conclusion: The mean of inhibition percentage for P. gnaphalodes and P. abrotanoides in 640 μg/ml was 58.1% and 76.2%, respectively. So, P. abrotanoides plant is more effective against MTB than P. gnaphalodes. Identification of the effective fraction against MTB is a further step to be studied. PMID:27195252

  16. Humoral response to HspX and GlcB to previous and recent infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rabahi, Marcelo Fouad; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula; dos Reis, Michelle Cristina Guerreiro; Oelemann, Walter; Conde, Marcus Barreto

    2007-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major world health problem. Around 2 billions of people are infected by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causal agent of this disease. This fact accounts for a third of the total world population and it is expected that 9 million people will become infected each year. Only approximately 10% of the infected people will develop disease. However, health care workers (HCW) are continually exposed to the bacilli at endemic sites presenting increased chance of becoming sick. The objective of this work was to identify LTBI (latent tuberculosis infection) among all asymptomatic HCW of a Brazilian Central Hospital, in a three year follow up, and evaluate the humoral response among HCW with previous and recent LTBI to recombinant HspX and GlcB from M. tuberculosis. Methods Four hundred and thirty seven HCW were screened and classified into three different groups according to tuberculin skin test (TST) status: uninfected, previous LTBI and recent LTBI. ELISA test were performed to determine the humoral immune response to HspX and GlcB. Results The levels of IgG and IgM against the HspX and GlcB antigens were the same among HCW with recent and previous LTBI, as well as among non infected HCW. However, the IgM levels to HspX was significantly higher among HCW with recent LTBI (OD = 1.52 ± 0.40) than among the uninfected (OD = 1.09 ± 0.50) or subjects with previous LTBI (OD = 0.96 ± 0.51) (p < 0.001). Conclusion IgG and IgM humoral responses to GlcB antigens were similar amongst all studied groups; nevertheless IgM levels against HspX were higher among the recent LTBI/HCW. PMID:18166139

  17. Antibiotics. Targeting DnaN for tuberculosis therapy using novel griselimycins.

    PubMed

    Kling, Angela; Lukat, Peer; Almeida, Deepak V; Bauer, Armin; Fontaine, Evelyne; Sordello, Sylvie; Zaburannyi, Nestor; Herrmann, Jennifer; Wenzel, Silke C; König, Claudia; Ammerman, Nicole C; Barrio, María Belén; Borchers, Kai; Bordon-Pallier, Florence; Brönstrup, Mark; Courtemanche, Gilles; Gerlitz, Martin; Geslin, Michel; Hammann, Peter; Heinz, Dirk W; Hoffmann, Holger; Klieber, Sylvie; Kohlmann, Markus; Kurz, Michael; Lair, Christine; Matter, Hans; Nuermberger, Eric; Tyagi, Sandeep; Fraisse, Laurent; Grosset, Jacques H; Lagrange, Sophie; Müller, Rolf

    2015-06-01

    The discovery of Streptomyces-produced streptomycin founded the age of tuberculosis therapy. Despite the subsequent development of a curative regimen for this disease, tuberculosis remains a worldwide problem, and the emergence of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis has prioritized the need for new drugs. Here we show that new optimized derivatives from Streptomyces-derived griselimycin are highly active against M. tuberculosis, both in vitro and in vivo, by inhibiting the DNA polymerase sliding clamp DnaN. We discovered that resistance to griselimycins, occurring at very low frequency, is associated with amplification of a chromosomal segment containing dnaN, as well as the ori site. Our results demonstrate that griselimycins have high translational potential for tuberculosis treatment, validate DnaN as an antimicrobial target, and capture the process of antibiotic pressure-induced gene amplification. PMID:26045430

  18. What steps do we need to take to improve diagnosis of tuberculosis in children?

    PubMed

    Venturini, Elisabetta; Remaschi, Giulia; Berti, Elettra; Montagnani, Carlotta; Galli, Luisa; de Martino, Maurizio; Chiappini, Elena

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis still represents a big global public health challenge. The diagnosis of tuberculosis and the differentiation between active and latent tuberculosis remain difficult, particularly in childhood, because of the lack of a gold standard test for diagnosis. In the last decade, novel diagnostic assays have been developed. Among immunologic tests, new assays based on the measurement of different cytokines released by specific T cells in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens, other than INF-γ, have been investigated. Promising results rely on nucleic acid amplification techniques, also able to detect drugs resistance. Innovative research fields studied the modifications of CD27 expression in T cells as well as different host gene expression in response to M. tuberculosis. Further studies are needed to assess the diagnostic value and the accuracy of these new assays. PMID:25938981

  19. Does M. tuberculosis genomic diversity explain disease diversity?

    PubMed Central

    Coscolla, Mireilla; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2010-01-01

    The outcome of tuberculosis infection and disease is highly variable. This variation has been attributed primarily to host and environmental factors, but better understanding of the global genomic diversity in the M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC) suggests that bacterial factors could also be involved. Review of nearly 100 published reports shows that MTBC strains differ in their virulence and immunogenicity in experimental models, but whether this phenotypic variation plays a role in human disease remains unclear. Given the complex interactions between the host, the pathogen and the environment, linking MTBC genotypic diversity to experimental and clinical phenotypes requires an integrated systems epidemiology approach embedded in a robust evolutionary framework. PMID:21076640

  20. Salmonella spondylodiscitis of the thoracic vertebrae mimicking spine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Muhamad Effendi, Ferdhany; Ibrahim, Mohd Ikraam; Mohd Miswan, Mohd Fairudz

    2016-01-01

    Extraintestinal Salmonella infection involving the thoracic spine is very rare. It commonly presents with non-specific chronic back pain and can occur with no gastrointestinal manifestation. Blood test results and imaging findings are often indistinguishable from more common chronic spine infections such as spine tuberculosis. Culture studies remain the key to establishing a definitive diagnosis and subsequently successful treatment. We report a case in which a patient presented with symptoms and signs suggestive of spine tuberculosis, yet the culture examination revealed otherwise. PMID:27381996

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and HIV Co-Infection among Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis Suspected Cases at the University of Gondar Hospital, Northwestern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Fanosie, Alemu; Gelaw, Baye; Tessema, Belay; Tesfay, Wogahta; Admasu, Aschalew; Yitayew, Gashaw

    2016-01-01

    Background Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis (EPTB) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are interrelated as a result of immune depression. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates and the burden of HIV co-infection among EPTB suspected patients. Method An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted among EPTB suspected patients at the University of Gondar Hospital. Socio-demographic characteristics and other clinical data were collected using a pretested questionnaire. GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay was performed to diagnosis Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and Rifampicin resistance. All samples were also investigated by cytology and culture. The HIV statuses of all patients were screened initially by KHB, and all positive cases were further re-tested by STAT-pack. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20 computer software and a P-value of < 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results A total of 141 extrapulmonary suspected patients were enrolled in this study. The overall prevalence of culture confirmed extrapulmonary tuberculosis infection was 29.8%, but the GeneXpert result showed a 26.2% prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex infection. The 78.4% prevalence of extrapulmonary tuberculosis infection was found to be higher among the adult population. The prevalence of HIV infection among EPTB suspected patients was 14.1%, while it was 32.4% among GeneXpert-confirmed extrapulmonary TB cases (12/37). Tuberculosis lymphadenitis was the predominant (78.4%) type of EPTB infection followed by tuberculosis cold abscess (10.7%). Adult hood, previous history of contact with known pulmonary tuberculosis patients, and HIV co-infection showed a statistically significant association with extrapulmonary tuberculosis infection (P<0.013). Conclusion The prevalence of culture confirmed-EPTB infection was high, and a higher EPTB-HIV co-infection was also observed. PMID:26950547

  2. Clinical Outcomes Among Persons With Pulmonary Tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates With Phenotypic Heterogeneity in Results of Drug-Susceptibility Tests

    PubMed Central

    Zetola, Nicola M.; Modongo, Chawangwa; Moonan, Patrick K.; Ncube, Ronald; Matlhagela, Keikantse; Sepako, Enoch; Collman, Ronald G.; Bisson, Gregory P.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Patients with multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis may have phenotypic heterogeneity in results of drug-susceptibility tests (DSTs). However, the impact of this on clinical outcomes among patients treated for MDR tuberculosis is unknown. Methods. Phenotypic DST heterogeneity was defined as presence of at least 1 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolate susceptible to rifampicin and isoniazid recovered <3 months after MDR tuberculosis treatment initiation from a patient with previous documented tuberculosis due to M. tuberculosis resistant to at least rifampicin and isoniazid. The primary outcome was defined as good (ie, cure or treatment completion) or poor (ie, treatment failure, treatment default, or death). A secondary outcome was time to culture conversion. Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine the association between phenotypic DST heterogeneity and outcomes. Results. Phenotypic DST heterogeneity was identified in 33 of 475 patients (7%) with MDR tuberculosis. Poor outcome occurred in 126 patients (28%). Overall, patients with MDR tuberculosis who had phenotypic DST heterogeneity were at greater risk of poor outcome than those with MDR tuberculosis but no phenotypic DST heterogeneity (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2–3.6). Among HIV-infected patients with MDR tuberculosis, the adjusted hazard for a poor outcome for those with phenotypic DST heterogeneity was 2.4 (95% CI, 1.3–4.2) times that for those without phenotypic DST heterogeneity, whereas among HIV-negative patients with MDR tuberculosis, the adjusted hazard for those with phenotypic DST heterogeneity was 1.5 (95% CI, .5–4.3) times that for those without phenotypic DST heterogeneity. HIV-infected patients with MDR tuberculosis with phenotypic DST heterogeneity also had a longer time to culture conversion than with HIV-infected patients with MDR tuberculosis without phenotypic DST heterogeneity (aHR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.4–6

  3. Genetic Variants in MARCO Are Associated with the Susceptibility to Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Mai-Juan; Wang, Hai-Bing; Li, Hao; Yang, Jun-Hai; Yan, Yan; Xie, Lan-Pin; Qi, Ying-Cheng; Li, Jun-Lian; Chen, Mei-Juan; Liu, Wei; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Background Susceptibility to tuberculosis is not only determined by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, but also by the genetic component of the host. Macrophage receptor with a collagenous structure (MARCO) is essential components required for toll like receptor-signaling in macrophage response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which may contribute to tuberculosis risk. Principal Findings To specifically investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in MARCO gene are associated with pulmonary tuberculosis in Chinese Han population. By selecting tagging SNPs in MARCO gene, 17 tag SNPs were identified and genotyped in 923 pulmonary tuberculosis patients and 1033 healthy control subjects using a hospital based case-control association study. Single-point and haplotype analysis revealed an association in intron and exon region of MARCO gene. One SNP (rs17009726) was associated with susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis, where the carriers of the G allele had a 1.65 fold (95% CI = 1.32–2.05, pcorrected = 9.27E–5) increased risk of pulmonary tuberculosis. Haplotype analysis revealed that haplotype GC containing G allele of 17009726 and haplotype TGCC (rs17795618T/A, rs1371562G/T, rs6761637T/C, rs2011839C/T) were also associated with susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis (pcorrected = 0.0001 and 0.029, respectively). Conclusions Our study suggested that genetic variants in MARCO gene were associated with pulmonary tuberculosis susceptibility in Chinese Han population, and the findings emphasize the importance of MARCO mediated immune responses in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis. PMID:21886847

  4. Bacteremic Disseminated Tuberculosis in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Crump, John A.; Ramadhani, Habib O.; Morrissey, Anne B.; Saganda, Wilbrod; Mwako, Mtumwa S.; Yang, Lan-Yan; Chow, Shein-Chung; Njau, Boniface N.; Mushi, Godfrey S.; Maro, Venance P.; Reller, L. Barth; Bartlett, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Disseminated tuberculosis is a major health problem in countries where generalized human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection epidemics coincide with high tuberculosis incidence rates; data are limited on patient outcomes beyond the inpatient period. Methods. We enrolled consecutive eligible febrile inpatients in Moshi, Tanzania, from 10 March 2006 through 28 August 2010; those with Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteremia were followed up monthly for 12 months. Survival, predictors of bacteremic disseminated tuberculosis, and predictors of death were assessed. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) and tuberculosis treatment were provided. Results. A total of 508 participants were enrolled; 29 (5.7%) had M. tuberculosis isolated by blood culture. The median age of all study participants was 37.4 years (range, 13.6–104.8 years). Cough lasting >1 month (odds ratio [OR], 13.5; P < .001), fever lasting >1 month (OR, 7.8; P = .001), weight loss of >10% (OR, 10.0; P = .001), lymphadenopathy (OR 6.8; P = .002), HIV infection (OR, undefined; P < .001), and lower CD4 cell count and total lymphocyte count were associated with bacteremic disseminated tuberculosis. Fifty percent of participants with M. tuberculosis bacteremia died within 36 days of enrollment. Lower CD4 cell count (OR, 0.88; P = .049) and lower total lymphocyte count (OR, 0.76; P = .050) were associated with death. Magnitude of mycobacteremia tended to be higher among those with lower CD4 cell counts, but did not predict death. Conclusions. In the era of free ART and access to tuberculosis treatment, almost one half of patients with M. tuberculosis bacteremia may die within a month of hospitalization. Simple clinical assessments can help to identify those with the condition. Advanced immunosuppression predicts death. Efforts should focus on early diagnosis and treatment of HIV infection, tuberculosis, and disseminated disease. PMID:22511551

  5. Diagnostic Utility of QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G) in Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Ahmed; Hamdan, AL-Jahdali; Salim, Baharoon; Yosra, Ali; Hani, Mohamed; Abdullah, AL-Harbi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The utility of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-G) test in the diagnosis of tuberculosis disease has been validated in high and low tuberculosis-prevalent (TB) countries. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the performance of the QFT-G test in the diagnosis of tuberculosis disease among tuberculosis patients in an intermediate prevalent country. Setting and Design: A retrospective study at the King Abdulaziz Medical City-Riyadh (KAMC-R) Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all the patients with a diagnosis of pneumonia, including tuberculosis, admitted to KAMC-R between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013. We included only patients with an available result of the QFT-G test. A total of 142 tuberculosis cases and 226 pneumonia cases were studied, to assess the utility of the QFT-G test in diagnosing tuberculosis cases. Results: Among the tuberculosis (n = 142) cases, the QFT-G tested positive in 68.3%, negative in 23.2%, and indeterminate in 12 cases (8.5%). Of the 226 pneumonia cases, the QFT-G tested positive in only 20.4%, while a majority of 66.4% tested negative, with 30 cases (13.3%) being indeterminate. When we excluded 42 patients with indeterminate results, the QFT-G test achieved a sensitivity of 74.6% [95% CI: 66.09 to 81.65%] and specificity of 76.53 % [95% CI: 69.85 to 82.15%] in the diagnosis of tuberculosis cases. Conclusions: This study concludes that the QFT-G test is a useful tool for detecting tuberculosis disease when used as an adjunct tool for the diagnosis of active TB cases. It certainly cannot be used solely and indiscriminately, separate from other clinical and radiological information, in the diagnosis of active tuberculosis cases. PMID:26392718

  6. Tuberculosis of spine

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vinod; Patgaonkar, P. R.; Nagariya, S. P.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the spine is one of the most common spine pathology in India. Over last 4 decades a lot has changed in the diagnosis, medical treatment and surgical procedures to treat this disorder. Further developments in diagnosis using molecular genetic techniques, more effective antibiotics and more aggressive surgical protocols have become essential with emergence of multidrug resistant TB. Surgical procedures such as single stage anterior and posterior stabilization, extrapleral dorsal spine anterior stabilization and endoscopic thoracoscopic surgeries have reduced the mortality and morbidity of the surgical procedures. is rapidly progressing. It is a challenge to treat MDR-TB Spine with late onset paraplegia and progressive deformity. Physicians must treat tuberculosis of spine on the basis of Culture and sensitivity. PMID:21572628

  7. Epidemiological basis of tuberculosis eradication in an advanced country

    PubMed Central

    Groth-Petersen, E.; Knudsen, Jørgen; Wilbek, Erik

    1959-01-01

    The first section of the report provides a background for the long-range epidemiological studies being conducted by the Danish Tuberculosis Index. An outline is given of the main indices of tuberculosis and the changing tuberculosis situation in Denmark during the past several decades with respect to prevalence of infection, morbidity and mortality. Difficulties encountered in international comparisons are briefly discussed. The prevalence of tuberculous infection in children and the prevalence of bacillary cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in adults are suggested as the most valuable indices of eradication. The second section describes the nation-wide mass campaign of 1950-52, which was planned and conducted as a combined service and research programme under the direction of the Danish Tuberculosis Index. With a view to the follow-up studies, details are given of the results of tuberculin tests of the unvaccinated, the documented vaccinated and mixed groups in the population examined. A survey is made of the results of X-ray examination and of the relation between vaccination status, tuberculin reaction and X-ray findings. The results of the first follow-up period are analysed in the final section of the report in terms of new cases of pulmonary tuberculosis appearing in the adult population. Seventy-five per cent of the new cases appeared among the unvaccinated tuberculin-positive population, and among this population groups of persons with widely different risks of developing tuberculosis could be identified on the basis of X-ray findings and reactions to the intradermal 10 TU tuberculin test. A proposal is made to reduce the number of routine repetitive examinations for adults and to concentrate efforts on preventive measures for the high-risk groups. PMID:13829735

  8. John Keats and tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Radetsky, M

    2001-05-01

    John Keats was trained as an apothecary, the general practitioner of the day. Precocious in his sensibilities and fluent in his imagery, he also was the model of the romantic poet. That he was a physician and a poet makes his early death from tuberculosis poignant and revealing. This history traces his life and death against the backdrop of medicine at the turn of the 19th century. PMID:11368115

  9. Tuberculosis control learning games.

    PubMed

    Smith, I

    1993-07-01

    In teaching health workers about tuberculosis (TB) control we frequently concentrate on the technological aspects, such as diagnosis, treatment and recording. Health workers also need to understand the sociological aspects of TB control, particularly those that influence the likelihood of diagnosis and cure. Two games are presented that help health workers comprehend the reasons why TB patients often delay in presenting for diagnosis, and why they then frequently default from treatment. PMID:8356734

  10. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Not Due to Noncompliance but to Between-Patient Pharmacokinetic Variability

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shashikant; Pasipanodya, Jotam G.; Meek, Claudia; Leff, Richard

    2011-01-01

    (See the editorial commentary by Dartois, on pages 1827–9.) Background. It is believed that nonadherence is the proximate cause of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-tuberculosis) emergence. The level of nonadherence associated with emergence of MDR-tuberculosis is unknown. Performance of a randomized controlled trial in which some patients are randomized to nonadherence would be unethical; therefore, other study designs should be utilized. Methods. We performed hollow fiber studies for both bactericidal and sterilizing effect, with inoculum spiked with 0.5% rifampin- and isoniazid-resistant isogenic strains in some experiments. Standard therapy was administered daily for 28–56 days, with extents of nonadherence varying between 0% and 100%. Sizes of drug-resistant populations were compared using analysis of variance. We also explored the effect of pharmacokinetic variability on MDR-tuberculosis emergence using computer-aided clinical trial simulations of 10 000 Cape Town, South Africa, tuberculosis patients. Results. Therapy failure was only encountered at extents of nonadherence ≥60%. Surprisingly, isoniazid- and rifampin-resistant populations did not achieve ≥1% proportion in any experiment and did not achieve a higher proportion with nonadherence. However, clinical trial simulations demonstrated that approximately 1% of tuberculosis patients with perfect adherence would still develop MDR-tuberculosis due to pharmacokinetic variability alone. Conclusions. These data, based on a preclinical model, demonstrate that nonadherence alone is not a sufficient condition for MDR-tuberculosis emergence. PMID:22021624

  11. Laboratory Diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection and Disease in Children.

    PubMed

    Dunn, James J; Starke, Jeffrey R; Revell, Paula A

    2016-06-01

    Diagnosis of tuberculosis in children is challenging; even with advanced technologies, the diagnosis is often difficult to confirm microbiologically in part due to the paucibacillary nature of the disease. Clinical diagnosis lacks standardization, and traditional and molecular microbiologic methods lack sensitivity, particularly in children. Immunodiagnostic tests may improve sensitivity, but these tests cannot distinguish tuberculosis disease from latent infection and some lack specificity. While molecular tools like Xpert MTB/RIF have advanced our ability to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis and to determine antimicrobial resistance, decades old technologies remain the standard in most locales. Today, the battle against this ancient disease still poses one of the primary diagnostic challenges in pediatric laboratory medicine. PMID:26984977

  12. Bilateral psoas abscess: atypical presentation of spinal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Goni, Vijay; Thapa, Babu Ram; Vyas, Sameer; Gopinathan, Nirmal Raj; Rajan Manoharan, Sakthivel; Krishnan, Vibhu

    2012-04-01

    Three patients who came to the surgical outpatient department of 'Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research', Chandigarh, India with features suggestive of acute abdomen are presented. On thorough evaluation, they had bilateral psoas abscess and on detailed investigations, tuberculosis was found to be the etiological factor. They were treated conservatively with good follow-up results. Psoas abscess may be clinically difficult to diagnose because of its rarity, insidious onset of the disease, and non-specific clinical presentation which can cause diagnostic delays resulting in high morbidity. Early diagnosis and appropriate management remains a challenge for clinicians. All three patients presented here have recovered following detailed investigation and appropriate management. The diagnosis of spinal tuberculosis should be considered in patients with vertebral osteomyelitis, psoas abscess, and appropriate risk factors such as a history of previous exposure in both developed and developing countries, as tuberculosis is re-emerging as an important etiological factor in spinal pathologies. PMID:22424047

  13. Advances in Mycobacterium tuberculosis therapeutics discovery utlizing structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Chim, Nicholas; Owens, Cedric P.; Contreras, Heidi; Goulding, Celia W.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health threat and is exacerbated both by the emergence of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and its synergy with HIV infection. The waning effectiveness of current treatment regimens necessitates the development of new or repurposed anti-TB therapeutics for improved combination therapies against the disease. Exploiting atomic resolution structural information of proteins in complex with their substrates and/or inhibitors can facilitate structure-based rational drug design. Since our last review in 2009, there has been a wealth of new M. tuberculosis protein structural information. Once again, we have compiled the most promising structures with regards to potential anti-TB drug development and present them in this updated review. PMID:23167715

  14. Economic challenges associated with tuberculosis diagnostic development

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, Colleen F.; Shah, Maunank

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global health crisis in part due to underdiagnosis. Technological innovations are needed to improve diagnostic test accuracy and reduce the reliance on expensive laboratory infrastructure. However, there are significant economic challenges impeding the development and implementation of new diagnostics. The aim of this piece is to examine the current state of TB diagnostics, outline the unmet needs for new tests, and detail the economic challenges associated with development of new tests from the perspective of developers, policy makers and implementers. PMID:24766367

  15. SMS reminders to improve the tuberculosis cure rate in developing countries (TB-SMS Cameroon): a protocol of a randomised control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is a public health problem in Cameroon, just like in many other countries in the world. The National Tuberculosis Control Programme (PNLT) put in place by the state, aims to fight tuberculosis through the implementation of international directives (Directly Observed Treatment Short, DOTS). Despite the deployment of this strategy across the world, its implementation is difficult in the context of low-resource countries. Some expected results are not achieved. In Cameroon, the cure rate for patients with sputum positive pulmonary tuberculosis (TPM+) after 6 months is only about 65%, 20% below the target. This is mainly due to poor patient adherence to treatment. By relying on the potential of mobile Health, the objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of SMS reminders on the cure rate of TPM + patients, measured using 6-month bacilloscopy. Methods/design This is a blinded, randomised controlled multicentre study carried out in Cameroon. The research hypothesis is that sending daily SMS messages to remind patients to take their prescribed tuberculosis medication, together with the standard DOTS strategy, will increase the cure rate from 65% (control group: DOTS, no SMS intervention) to 85% (intervention group: DOTS, with SMS intervention) in a group of new TPM + patients. In accordance with each treatment centre, the participants will be randomly allocated into the two groups using a computer program: the intervention group and the control group. A member of the research team will send daily SMS messages. Study data will be collected by health professionals involved in the care of patients. Data analysis will be done by the intention-to-treat method. Discussion The achieving of expected outcomes by the PNLT through implementation of DOTS requires several challenges. Although it has been demonstrated that the DOTS strategy is effective in the fight against tuberculosis, its application remains difficult in developing countries

  16. Impact of the 1970 Reforms to Cuba's National Tuberculosis Control Program.

    PubMed

    Beldarraín, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    INTRODUCTION To reach the goal of eliminating tuberculosis as a public health problem in Cuba, the epidemiological evolution of the disease and of strategies designed to prevent and manage it to date must be well understood. In this context, in 1970, changes were introduced in Cuba's National Tuberculosis Control Program. OBJECTIVE Review background and evolution of Cuba's strategy for tuberculosis control, the changes implemented in the 1970 revision of the Program, and their impact on the subsequent evolution of the disease in Cuba. METHODS Published articles on the history of tuberculosis control in Cuba were reviewed, along with archival documents and medical records. Documents concerning the situation of pulmonary tuberculosis in Cuba, including measures adopted to address the disease and its extent, were selected for study, with an emphasis on the period of the Program. Interviews with key informants were conducted. RESULTS Cuba's fight against tuberculosis began in Santiago de Cuba, with the creation of a local Anti-Tuberculosis League in 1890. Strategic changes introduced by Cuba's public health sector, stressing health promotion and disease prevention, led to the 1959 creation of the Tuberculosis Department, which implemented Cuba's first National Tuberculosis Control Program in 1963. This Program was completely reorganized in 1970. The National Tuberculosis Control Program (1963) covered a network of 27 tuberculosis dispensaries, 8 sanatoriums and 24 bacteriology laboratories. Diagnosis was based on radiographic imaging criteria. Incidence was 52.6/100,000 in 1964 and reached 31.2 in 1970. The Program was updated in 1970 to include two major changes: the requirement for bacteriological confirmation of diagnosis and directly-observed outpatient treatment fully integrated into health services. By 1971, incidence was down to 17.8/100,000, and further reduced to 11.6 in 1979. The decrease is interpreted as the result of the greater specificity of

  17. Tuberculosis Endometritis Presenting as A Leiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Mahboobeh; Shahbazi, Fatemeh; Pirzadeh, Leila; Mohammadi, Seyed Rahim; Ghaffari, Parisa; Eftekhar, Tahereh

    2015-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common extrapulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis. Taking into consideration that genitourinary tuberculosis may be associated with a diversity of presentations, its diagnoses may be difficult. A young woman with an initial presumptive diagnosis of a uterine leiomyoma presented with abdominal pain and a pelvic mass that after further investigations, she was diagnosed with genital tuberculosis. PMID:25780530

  18. Noninvasive Test for Tuberculosis Detection among Primates

    PubMed Central

    Mugisha, Lawrence; Shoyama, Fernanda Miyagaki; O’Malley, Melanie J.; Flynn, JoAnne L.; Asiimwe, Benon; Travis, Dominic A.; Singer, Randall S.; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2015-01-01

    Traditional testing methods have limited epidemiologic studies of tuberculosis among free-living primates. PCR amplification of insertion element IS6110 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from fecal samples was evaluated as a noninvasive screening test for tuberculosis in primates. Active tuberculosis was detected among inoculated macaques and naturally exposed chimpanzees, demonstrating the utility of this test. PMID:25695329

  19. Genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from central India

    PubMed Central

    Desikan, Prabha; Chauhan, D.S.; Sharma, Pragya; Panwalkar, Nikita; Chourey, Manju; Patidar, Mohan Lal; Yadav, Priyanka; Chandrasekaran, V.; Ohri, B.S.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: There is a paucity of data available on genetic biodiversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from central India. The present study was carried out on isolates of M. tuberculosis cultured from diagnostic clinical samples of patients from Bhopal, central India, using spoligotyping as a method of molecular typing. Methods: DNA was extracted from 340 isolates of M. tuberculosis from culture, confirmed as M. tuberculosis by molecular and biochemical methods and subjected to spoligotyping. The results were compared with the international SITVIT2 database. Results: Sixty five different spoligo international type (SIT) patterns were observed. A total of 239 (70.3%) isolates could be clustered into 25 SITs. The Central Asian (CAS) and East African Indian (EAI) families were found to be the two major circulating families in this region. SIT26/CAS1_DEL was identified as the most predominant type, followed by SIT11/EAI3_IND and SIT288/CAS2. Forty (11.8%) unique (non-clustered) and 61 (17.9%) orphan isolates were identified in the study. There was no significant association of clustering with clinical and demographic characteristics of patients. Interpretation & conclusions: Well established SITs were found to be predominant in our study. SIT26/CAS1_DEL was the most predominant type. However, the occurrence of a substantial number of orphan isolates may indicate the presence of active spatial and temporal evolutionary dynamics within the isolates of M. tuberculosis. PMID:27377505

  20. Bystander Macrophage Apoptosis after Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Deirdre M.; ten Bokum, Annemieke M. C.; O'Leary, Seonadh M.; O'Sullivan, Mary P.; Keane, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Human macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis may undergo apoptosis. Macrophage apoptosis contributes to the innate immune response against M. tuberculosis by containing and limiting the growth of mycobacteria and also by depriving the bacillus of its niche cell. Apoptosis of infected macrophages is well documented; however, bystander apoptosis of uninfected macrophages has not been described in the setting of M. tuberculosis. We observed that uninfected human macrophages underwent significant bystander apoptosis 48 and 96 h after they came into contact with macrophages infected with avirulent M. tuberculosis. The bystander apoptosis was significantly greater than the background apoptosis observed in uninfected control cells cultured for the same length of time. There was no evidence of the involvement of tumor necrosis factor alpha, Fas, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, transforming growth factor β, Toll-like receptor 2, or MyD88 in contact-mediated bystander apoptosis. This newly described phenomenon may further limit the spread of M. tuberculosis by eliminating the niche cells on which the bacillus relies. PMID:17954721

  1. TUBERCULOSIS AND LUNG CANCER.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Atsuhisa

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and lung cancer as comorbidities has been extensively discussed in many studies. In the past, it was well known that lung cancer is a specific epidemiological successor of PTB and that lung cancer often develops in scars caused by PTB. In recent years, the relevance of the two diseases has drawn attention in terms of the close epidemiological connection and chronic inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. In Japanese case series studies, most lung cancer patients with tuberculous sequelae received supportive care alone in the past, but more recently, the use of aggressive lung cancer treatment is increasing. Many studies on PTB and lung cancer as comorbidities have revealed that active PTB is noted in 2-5% of lung cancer cases, whereas lung cancer is noted in 1-2% of active PTB cases. In such instances of comorbidity, many active PTB cases showed Type II (non-extensively cavitary disease) and Spread 2-3 (intermediate-extensive diseases) on chest X-rays, but standard anti-tuberculosis treatment easily eradicates negative conversion of sputum culture for M. tuberculosis; lung cancer cases were often stage III- IV and squamous cell carcinoma predominant, and the administration of aggressive treatment for lung cancer is increasing. The major clinical problems associated with PTB and lung cancer as comorbidities include delay in diagnosis (doctor's delay) and therapeutic limitations. The former involves two factors of radiographic interpretation: the principles of parsimony (Occam's razor) and visual search; the latter involves three factors of lung cancer treatment: infectivity of M.tuberculosis, anatomical limitation due to lung damage by tuberculosis, and drug-drug interactions between rifampicin and anti-cancer drugs, especially molecularly targeted drugs. The comorbidity of these two diseases is an important health-related issue in Japan. In the treatment of PTB, the possibility of concurrent lung cancer should be kept

  2. Social and cultural factors in the successful control of tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rubel, A J; Garro, L C

    1992-01-01

    The burden of tuberculosis on the public health is staggering. Worldwide, annual incidence of new cases is estimated to be about 8 million. Almost 3 million deaths occur yearly. Early case identification and adherence to treatment regimens are the remaining barriers to successful control. In many nations, however, fewer than half those with active disease receive a diagnosis, and fewer than half those beginning treatment complete it. The twin problems of delay in seeking treatment and abandonment of a prescribed regimen derive from complex factors. People's confusion as to the implications of the tuberculosis symptoms, costs of transportation to clinic services, the social stigma that attaches to tuberculosis, the high cost of medication, organizational problems in providing adequate followup services, and patients' perception of clinic facilities as inhospitable all contribute to the complexity. Sociocultural factors are emphasized in this report because hitherto they have not been adequately explored. Salient among those sociocultural factors is the health culture of the patients. That is, the understanding and information people have from family, friends, and neighbors as to the nature of a health problem, its cause, and its implications. A knowledge of the health culture of their patients has become a critical tool if tuberculosis control programs are to be successful. Several anthropological procedures are recommended to help uncover the health culture of people served by tuberculosis clinics. PMID:1454974

  3. Resistance to cellular autophagy by Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Fazlul; Boonhok, Rachasak; Prammananan, Therdsak; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Utaisincharoen, Pongsak; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Palittapongarnpim, Prasit; Ponpuak, Marisa

    2015-10-01

    Autophagy represents a key pathway in innate immune defense to restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth inside host macrophages. Induction of autophagy has been shown to promote mycobacterial phagosome acidification and acquisition of lysosomal hydrolases, resulting in the elimination of intracellular M. tuberculosis reference strains such as H37Rv. The notorious Beijing genotype has been previously shown to be hyper-virulent and associated with increased survival in host cells and a high mortality rate in animal models, but the underlying mechanism that renders this family to have such advantages remains unclear. We hypothesize that autophagic control against M. tuberculosis Beijing strains may be altered. Here, we discovered that the Beijing strains can resist autophagic killing by host cells compared with that of the reference strain H37Rv and a strain belonging to the East African Indian genotype. Moreover, we have determined a possible underlying mechanism and found that the greater ability to evade autophagic elimination possessed by the Beijing strains stems from their higher capacity to inhibit autophagolysosome biogenesis upon autophagy induction. In summary, a previously unrecognized ability of the M. tuberculosis Beijing strains to evade host autophagy was identified, which may have important implications for tuberculosis treatment, especially in regions prevalent by the Beijing genotype. PMID:26160686

  4. A systematic review of economic evaluations of chemoprophylaxis for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Shraddha; Newlands, David; Smith, Cairns

    2011-01-01

    Since treatment of active disease remains the priority for tuberculosis control, donors and governments need to be convinced that investing resources in chemoprophylaxis provides health benefits and is good value for money. The limited evidence of cost effectiveness has often been presented in a fragmentary and inconsistent fashion. Objective. This review is aimed at critically reviewing the evidence of cost effectiveness of chemoprophylaxis against tuberculosis, identifying the important knowledge gaps and the current issues which confront policy makers. Methods. A systematic search on economic evaluations for chemoprophylaxis against tuberculosis was carried out, and the selected studies were checked for quality assessment against a standard checklist. Results. The review provides evidence of the cost effectiveness of chemoprophylaxis for all age groups which suggests that current policy should be amended to include a focus on older adults. Seven of the eight selected studies were undertaken wholly in high income countries but there are considerable doubts about the transferability of the findings of the selected studies to low and middle income countries which have the greatest incidence of latent tuberculosis infection. Conclusion. There is a pressing need to expand the evidence base to low and middle income countries where the vast majority of sufferers from tuberculosis live. PMID:22131996

  5. Tuberculosis of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Iserì, Mete; Aydìner, Omer; Celìk, Levent; Peker, Onder

    2005-04-01

    Tuberculosis of the parotid gland is very rare and clinically indistinguishable from a neoplasm. Thus the diagnosis of parotid gland involvement with tuberculosis has traditionally been made after surgical resection. We present a case which was diagnosed on fine needle aspiration cytology and managed medically. PMID:15949089

  6. Tuberculosis of the pubic symphysis

    PubMed Central

    Gothwal, Sudarshan; Varshney, Peeyush; Mathur, Shivank; Songra, Bhupen

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of India’s public health problems. It involves various systems of the body, including the skeletal system. Osteoarticular tuberculosis is the second most common form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis next to lymph nodes and constitutes about 13% of all extrapulmonary cases. It is generally accepted that osteoarticular tuberculosis is the result of a haematogenous or lymphatic spread from a reactivated latent focus, usually pulmonary; however, previous infection is not always encountered, and in only 40–50% of the cases, it is possible to demonstrate another active infection site. The commonest site for skeletal tuberculosis is the spine followed by the hip, knee and ankle joints. Tuberculosis can involve literally any bone or joint. Pubic symphysis is an uncommon site for tuberculosis in the case of the skeletal system. We present a rare case of pubic symphysis tuberculosis in a 25-year-old woman presented to the general surgical department with a swelling in the right thigh region. PMID:24515233

  7. Ghost Remains After Black Hole Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has found a cosmic "ghost" lurking around a distant supermassive black hole. This is the first detection of such a high-energy apparition, and scientists think it is evidence of a huge eruption produced by the black hole. This discovery presents astronomers with a valuable opportunity to observe phenomena that occurred when the Universe was very young. The X-ray ghost, so-called because a diffuse X-ray source has remained after other radiation from the outburst has died away, is in the Chandra Deep Field-North, one of the deepest X-ray images ever taken. The source, a.k.a. HDF 130, is over 10 billion light years away and existed at a time 3 billion years after the Big Bang, when galaxies and black holes were forming at a high rate. "We'd seen this fuzzy object a few years ago, but didn't realize until now that we were seeing a ghost", said Andy Fabian of the Cambridge University in the United Kingdom. "It's not out there to haunt us, rather it's telling us something - in this case what was happening in this galaxy billions of year ago." Fabian and colleagues think the X-ray glow from HDF 130 is evidence for a powerful outburst from its central black hole in the form of jets of energetic particles traveling at almost the speed of light. When the eruption was ongoing, it produced prodigious amounts of radio and X-radiation, but after several million years, the radio signal faded from view as the electrons radiated away their energy. HDF 130 Chandra X-ray Image of HDF 130 However, less energetic electrons can still produce X-rays by interacting with the pervasive sea of photons remaining from the Big Bang - the cosmic background radiation. Collisions between these electrons and the background photons can impart enough energy to the photons to boost them into the X-ray energy band. This process produces an extended X-ray source that lasts for another 30 million years or so. "This ghost tells us about the black hole's eruption long after

  8. Ghost Remains After Black Hole Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has found a cosmic "ghost" lurking around a distant supermassive black hole. This is the first detection of such a high-energy apparition, and scientists think it is evidence of a huge eruption produced by the black hole. This discovery presents astronomers with a valuable opportunity to observe phenomena that occurred when the Universe was very young. The X-ray ghost, so-called because a diffuse X-ray source has remained after other radiation from the outburst has died away, is in the Chandra Deep Field-North, one of the deepest X-ray images ever taken. The source, a.k.a. HDF 130, is over 10 billion light years away and existed at a time 3 billion years after the Big Bang, when galaxies and black holes were forming at a high rate. "We'd seen this fuzzy object a few years ago, but didn't realize until now that we were seeing a ghost", said Andy Fabian of the Cambridge University in the United Kingdom. "It's not out there to haunt us, rather it's telling us something - in this case what was happening in this galaxy billions of year ago." Fabian and colleagues think the X-ray glow from HDF 130 is evidence for a powerful outburst from its central black hole in the form of jets of energetic particles traveling at almost the speed of light. When the eruption was ongoing, it produced prodigious amounts of radio and X-radiation, but after several million years, the radio signal faded from view as the electrons radiated away their energy. HDF 130 Chandra X-ray Image of HDF 130 However, less energetic electrons can still produce X-rays by interacting with the pervasive sea of photons remaining from the Big Bang - the cosmic background radiation. Collisions between these electrons and the background photons can impart enough energy to the photons to boost them into the X-ray energy band. This process produces an extended X-ray source that lasts for another 30 million years or so. "This ghost tells us about the black hole's eruption long after

  9. Profiling the Proteome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Dormancy and Reactivation.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Vipin; Raghunandanan, Sajith; Gomez, Roshna Lawrence; Jose, Leny; Surendran, Arun; Ramachandran, Ranjit; Pushparajan, Akhil Raj; Mundayoor, Sathish; Jaleel, Abdul; Kumar, Ramakrishnan Ajay

    2015-08-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, still remains a major global health problem. The main obstacle in eradicating this disease is the ability of this pathogen to remain dormant in macrophages, and then reactivate later under immuno-compromised conditions. The physiology of hypoxic nonreplicating M. tuberculosis is well-studied using many in vitro dormancy models. However, the physiological changes that take place during the shift from dormancy to aerobic growth (reactivation) have rarely been subjected to a detailed investigation. In this study, we developed an in vitro reactivation system by re-aerating the virulent laboratory strain of M. tuberculosis that was made dormant employing Wayne's dormancy model, and compared the proteome profiles of dormant and reactivated bacteria using label-free one-dimensional LC/MS/MS analysis. The proteome of dormant bacteria was analyzed at nonreplicating persistent stage 1 (NRP1) and stage 2 (NRP2), whereas that of reactivated bacteria was analyzed at 6 and 24 h post re-aeration. Proteome of normoxially grown bacteria served as the reference. In total, 1871 proteins comprising 47% of the M. tuberculosis proteome were identified, and many of them were observed to be expressed differentially or uniquely during dormancy and reactivation. The number of proteins detected at different stages of dormancy (764 at NRP1, 691 at NRP2) and reactivation (768 at R6 and 983 at R24) was very low compared with that of the control (1663). The number of unique proteins identified during normoxia, NRP1, NRP2, R6, and R24 were 597, 66, 56, 73, and 94, respectively. We analyzed various biological functions during these conditions. Fluctuation in the relative quantities of proteins involved in energy metabolism during dormancy and reactivation was the most significant observation we made in this study. Proteins that are up-regulated or uniquely expressed during reactivation from dormancy offer to be attractive targets for therapeutic

  10. Profiling the Proteome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Dormancy and Reactivation*

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Vipin; Raghunandanan, Sajith; Gomez, Roshna Lawrence; Jose, Leny; Surendran, Arun; Ramachandran, Ranjit; Pushparajan, Akhil Raj; Mundayoor, Sathish; Jaleel, Abdul; Kumar, Ramakrishnan Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, still remains a major global health problem. The main obstacle in eradicating this disease is the ability of this pathogen to remain dormant in macrophages, and then reactivate later under immuno-compromised conditions. The physiology of hypoxic nonreplicating M. tuberculosis is well-studied using many in vitro dormancy models. However, the physiological changes that take place during the shift from dormancy to aerobic growth (reactivation) have rarely been subjected to a detailed investigation. In this study, we developed an in vitro reactivation system by re-aerating the virulent laboratory strain of M. tuberculosis that was made dormant employing Wayne's dormancy model, and compared the proteome profiles of dormant and reactivated bacteria using label-free one-dimensional LC/MS/MS analysis. The proteome of dormant bacteria was analyzed at nonreplicating persistent stage 1 (NRP1) and stage 2 (NRP2), whereas that of reactivated bacteria was analyzed at 6 and 24 h post re-aeration. Proteome of normoxially grown bacteria served as the reference. In total, 1871 proteins comprising 47% of the M. tuberculosis proteome were identified, and many of them were observed to be expressed differentially or uniquely during dormancy and reactivation. The number of proteins detected at different stages of dormancy (764 at NRP1, 691 at NRP2) and reactivation (768 at R6 and 983 at R24) was very low compared with that of the control (1663). The number of unique proteins identified during normoxia, NRP1, NRP2, R6, and R24 were 597, 66, 56, 73, and 94, respectively. We analyzed various biological functions during these conditions. Fluctuation in the relative quantities of proteins involved in energy metabolism during dormancy and reactivation was the most significant observation we made in this study. Proteins that are up-regulated or uniquely expressed during reactivation from dormancy offer to be attractive targets for therapeutic