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Sample records for background tuberculosis remains

  1. Human bovine tuberculosis - remains in the differential.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Shaukat; Iqbal, Mudassir; Murphy, Philip; Power, Joan

    2010-11-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is a pathogen of cattle. The unpasteurized milk of affected cattle is a source of infection in humans. Despite the screening of cattle and the pasteurization of milk, M bovis has not been eradicated. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed in symptomatic patients with a history of possible exposure. At risk groups include animal workers, farmers, meat packers, vets and zoo keepers. Humans are usually infected by the aerosol route. We present two cases of human bovine tuberculosis. One was a presumptive case and the second was a confirmed case. Both responded well to antituberculous therapy. In the confirmed case, there was evidence of transmission to the partner living in the same house. Rifampicin prophylaxis was given to the exposed case. The M. bovis from the confirmed case was isoniazid resistant, in addition to having the well known resistance to pyrazinamide. Isoniazid resistance has been described before in those who are immunocompromised. We describe it in an immunocompetent patient. PMID:20688950

  2. Tuberculosis remains a challenge despite economic growth in Panama.

    PubMed

    Tarajia, M; Goodridge, A

    2014-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease associated with inequality, and wise investment of economic resources is considered critical to its control. Panama has recently secured its status as an upper-middle-income country with robust economic growth. However, the prioritisation of resources for TB control remains a major challenge. In this article, we highlight areas that urgently require action to effectively reduce TB burden to minimal levels. Our conclusions suggest the need for fund allocation and a multidisciplinary approach to ensure prompt laboratory diagnosis, treatment assurance and workforce reinforcement, complemented by applied and operational research, development and innovation. PMID:24670562

  3. PCR diagnostics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in historic human long bone remains from 18th century burials in Kaiserebersdorf, Austria

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Lutz; Däubl, Barbara; Lindqvist, Charlotte; Kruckenhauser, Luise; Teschler-Nicola, Maria; Haring, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    Background In the present pilot study we applied recently published protocols for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human remains. We screened long bones from an 18th century cemetery and skulls from the anatomical "Weisbach collection" (19th century). In addition, besides the study of abundance of tuberculosis in inmates of the poorhouse itself, we were interested to test whether in this particular instance tuberculosis can be identified from cortical bones, which are rarely affected by tuberculosis, but mostly better preserved than the vertebral bodies or epiphyses. Method The DNA extractions from the bone samples were obtained following established ancient DNA protocols. Subsequently extracts were subjected to a series of PCR amplifications using primer pairs published previously [1,2]. PCR products of the expected size were subsequently sequenced. Results Only primers targeting the repetitive IS6110 insertion sequence yielded PCR products of appropriate size. In one sample only (skull sample WB354 of the "Weisbach collection") sequence analysis revealed an authentic M. tuberculosis sequence that matched to a reference sequence from GenBank. Conclusion With a variety of established PCR approaches we failed to detect M. tuberculosis DNA in historic human femurs from an 18th century cemetery relating to a poor house in Kaiserebersdorf, Austria. Our data may indicate that in this particular case, thoracic or lumbar vertebrae, i.e. bones that are severely affected by the disease, would be more suitable for molecular diagnostics than long bones. However, the unpredictable state of DNA preservation in bones from museum collections does not allow any general recommendation of any type of bone. PMID:18799009

  4. Genetically susceptible mice remain proportionally more susceptible to tuberculosis after vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Medina, E; North, R J

    1999-01-01

    DBA/2 mice are much more susceptible to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis than major histocompatibility complex-compatible BALB/c mice. It is shown here that, although vaccination provided mice of both strains with a capacity to reduce the level of infection in their lungs, vaccinated DBA/2 mice remained much more susceptible in this organ than vaccinated BALB/c mice. Consequently, the former mice developed more lung pathology and died much earlier than the latter. On the other hand, colony-forming unit counts and histology suggest that vaccination provided mice of both strains with an increased and equal ability to express immunity in the liver and spleen, thereby indicating that they possessed equal systemic levels of vaccine-induced immunity at the time of M. tuberculosis challenge. The results indicate that inefficient expression of immunity in the lungs is likely to prove an obstacle to successful vaccination against tuberculosis in resistant and susceptible mouse strains, but more so in the latter strains. PMID:10233673

  5. Assessing the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in unembalmed and embalmed human remains.

    PubMed

    Correia, J C; Steyl, J L; De Villiers, H C

    2014-04-01

    Anatomy and mortuary technical staff faces an ever existing risk of contracting an infectious disease, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), when exposed to human remains. The transfer and handling of a corpse expels air from the lungs of the diseased and this aerosolizes the bacilli. It is for this reason that personal protective equipment and work space precautions such as ultraviolet germicidal irradiation is a necessity. In this study, the authors explore the viability of MTB before and after embalming. Briefly, lung tissue samples, both apical and hilar, were obtained from 20 cadavers whose death certificate indicated MTB as cause of death. The first sample was taken before embalming and second set 3 weeks after embalming. Tissue was deposited into sterile specimen containers and transported for analysis which included Mycobacterium growth indicator tube cultures and polymerase chain reaction. Results demonstrated that both the apical and the perihilar sample tested positive prior to embalming, 36 days after death. After three weeks post-embalming none tested positive. The results demonstrated that MTB can remain viable after death for up to 36 days. This viability extends beyond the documented cases and highlights the need for precautionary measures and standard operating procedures in accordance with occupational health and safety guidelines. PMID:24343882

  6. Tuberculin Skin Test Reactivity Is Dependent on Host Genetic Background in Colombian Tuberculosis Household Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Cobat, Aurélie; Barrera, Luis F.; Henao, Hanna; Arbeláez, Patricia; Abel, Laurent; García, Luis F.; Schurr, Erwin

    2012-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) measures the intensity of antimycobacterial acquired immunity and is used to diagnose latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We report evidence for a codominant gene explaining ∼65% of the TST variability. Disregarding the host genetic background may lead to misclassifications of TST-based diagnosis of latent M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:22291100

  7. Old World tuberculosis: Evidence from human remains with a review of current research and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Charlotte A

    2015-06-01

    The evidence for TB in archaeological human remains for the Old World is reviewed in published and some unpublished sources. The evidence of Pott's disease was considered specific for TB, with other bone changes, such as rib lesions, as non-specific. Limitations of the data are discussed. Most evidence for TB comes from skeletons from the northern hemisphere, particularly in Europe in the late Medieval period (12(th)-16th centuries AD), but there is early evidence in the Near/Middle East and Egypt. Many parts of Africa, Asia and Australasia have very little or no evidence. aDNA analysis has provided data on species and strains of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms affecting people in the past. The extant data suggest the first epidemiological transition (Neolithic agriculture and permanent settlements) led to an increase in TB, with later increases in urban environments of the late Medieval period. A number of causative factors were at play. Future research, particularly using biomolecular analysis, has the potential to further contribute to our understanding of the origin and evolution of TB, thus merging the disciplines of palaeopathology and evolutionary medicine. PMID:25802030

  8. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dheda, Keertan; Barry, Clifton E; Maartens, Gary

    2016-03-19

    Although the worldwide incidence of tuberculosis has been slowly decreasing, the global disease burden remains substantial (∼9 million cases and ∼1·5 million deaths in 2013), and tuberculosis incidence and drug resistance are rising in some parts of the world such as Africa. The modest gains achieved thus far are threatened by high prevalence of HIV, persisting global poverty, and emergence of highly drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is also a major problem in health-care workers in both low-burden and high-burden settings. Although the ideal preventive agent, an effective vaccine, is still some time away, several new diagnostic technologies have emerged, and two new tuberculosis drugs have been licensed after almost 50 years of no tuberculosis drugs being registered. Efforts towards an effective vaccine have been thwarted by poor understanding of what constitutes protective immunity. Although new interventions and investment in control programmes will enable control, eradication will only be possible through substantial reductions in poverty and overcrowding, political will and stability, and containing co-drivers of tuberculosis, such as HIV, smoking, and diabetes. PMID:26377143

  9. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rinaggio, Joseph

    2003-07-01

    Approximately one-third of the world population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the organism that causes tuberculosis (TB). After a brief resurgence beginning in the mid-1980s, the incidence of TB is once again declining in the United States. Health care workers, including dentists and their staff, however, remain at risk for occupational acquisition of the disease. This risk can be managed by educating dental health care workers about the oral and systemic manifestations of TB and the mechanisms by which it is spread so that appropriate measures may be taken in the office to minimize the opportunity for disease transmission. PMID:12848459

  10. Tuberculosis in Late Neolithic-Early Copper Age human skeletal remains from Hungary.

    PubMed

    Pósa, Annamária; Maixner, Frank; Mende, Balázs Gusztáv; Köhler, Kitti; Osztás, Anett; Sola, Christophe; Dutour, Olivier; Masson, Muriel; Molnár, Erika; Pálfi, György; Zink, Albert

    2015-06-01

    Alsónyék-Bátaszék in Southern Hungary is one of the largest late Neolithic settlements and cemeteries excavated in Central Europe. In total, 2359 burials from the Late Neolithic - Early Copper Age Lengyel culture were found between 2006 and 2009 [1]. Anthropological investigations previously carried out on individuals from this site revealed an interesting paleopathological case of tuberculosis in the form of Pott's disease dated to the early 5(th) millennium BC. In this study, selected specimens from this osteoarcheological series were subjected to paleomicrobiological analysis to establish the presence of MTBC bacteria. As all individuals showing clear osteological signs of TB infection belonged to a single grave group, 38 individuals from this grave group were analysed. The sample included the case of Pott's disease as well as individuals both with and without osseous TB manifestations. The detection of TB DNA in the individual with Pott's disease provided further evidence for the occurrence of TB in Neolithic populations of Europe. Moreover, our molecular analysis indicated that several other individuals of the same grave group were also infected with TB, opening the possibility for further analyses of this unique Neolithic skeletal series. PMID:25857937

  11. Tackling the Remaining Attainment Gap between Students with and without Immigrant Background: An Investigation into the Equivalence of SES Constructs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenkeit, Jenny; Caro, Daniel H.; Strand, Steve

    2015-01-01

    In England, students with immigrant background exhibit lower educational attainment than those without immigrant background. Family socioeconomic status (SES) helps explain differences in educational attainment, but a gap remains that differs in size for students with different immigrant backgrounds. While the explanatory repertoire for the…

  12. Tackling the Remaining Attainment Gap between Students with and without Immigrant Background: An Investigation into the Equivalence of SES Constructs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenkeit, Jenny; Caro, Daniel H.; Strand, Steve

    2015-01-01

    In England, students with immigrant background exhibit lower educational attainment than those without immigrant background. Family socioeconomic status (SES) helps explain differences in educational attainment, but a gap remains that differs in size for students with different immigrant backgrounds. While the explanatory repertoire for the

  13. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lawn, Stephen D; Zumla, Alimuddin I

    2011-07-01

    Tuberculosis results in an estimated 1·7 million deaths each year and the worldwide number of new cases (more than 9 million) is higher than at any other time in history. 22 low-income and middle-income countries account for more than 80% of the active cases in the world. Due to the devastating effect of HIV on susceptibility to tuberculosis, sub-Saharan Africa has been disproportionately affected and accounts for four of every five cases of HIV-associated tuberculosis. In many regions highly endemic for tuberculosis, diagnosis continues to rely on century-old sputum microscopy; there is no vaccine with adequate effectiveness and tuberculosis treatment regimens are protracted and have a risk of toxic effects. Increasing rates of drug-resistant tuberculosis in eastern Europe, Asia, and sub-Saharan Africa now threaten to undermine the gains made by worldwide tuberculosis control programmes. Moreover, our fundamental understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease is inadequate. However, increased investment has allowed basic science and translational and applied research to produce new data, leading to promising progress in the development of improved tuberculosis diagnostics, biomarkers of disease activity, drugs, and vaccines. The growing scientific momentum must be accompanied by much greater investment and political commitment to meet this huge persisting challenge to public health. Our Seminar presents current perspectives on the scale of the epidemic, the pathogen and the host response, present and emerging methods for disease control (including diagnostics, drugs, biomarkers, and vaccines), and the ongoing challenge of tuberculosis control in adults in the 21st century. PMID:21420161

  14. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... PEPFAR’s Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria funds health initiatives and strengthens health systems worldwide ... secure better health outcomes for HIV, TB and malaria. Read about the Global Fund on the AIDS. ...

  15. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... resolves on its own when a child develops immunity over a 6- to 10-week period. But ... When conditions become favorable (for instance, a lowered immunity), the bacteria become active. Tuberculosis in older children ...

  16. Genetic background affects the expansion of macrophage subsets in the lungs of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected hosts.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Thais Barboza; de Souza, Alexandre Ignacio; Gembre, Ana Flávia; Piñeros, Annie Rocio; Prado, Rafael de Queiroz; Silva, João Santana; Ramalho, Leandra Naira Zambelli; Bonato, Vânia Luiza Deperon

    2016-05-01

    M1 macrophages are more effective in the induction of the inflammatory response and clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis than M2 macrophages. Infected C57BL/6 mice generate a stronger cellular immune response compared with BALB/c mice. We hypothesized that infected C57BL/6 mice would exhibit a higher frequency and function of M1 macrophages than infected BALB/c mice. Our findings show a higher ratio of macrophages to M2 macrophages in the lungs of chronically infected C57BL/6 mice compared with BALB/c mice. However, there was no difference in the functional ability of M1 and M2 macrophages for the two strains in vitro. In vivo, a deleterious role for M2 macrophages was confirmed by M2 cell transfer, which rendered the infected C57BL/6, but not the BALB/c mice, more susceptible and resulted in mild lung inflammation compared with C57BL/6 mice that did not undergo cell transfer. M1 cell transfer induced a higher inflammatory response, although not protective, in infected BALB/c mice compared with their counterparts that did not undergo cell transfer. These findings demonstrate that an inflammation mediated by M1 macrophages may not induce bacterial tolerance because protection depends on the host genetic background, which drives the magnitude of the inflammatory response against M. tuberculosis in the pulmonary microenvironment. The contribution of our findings is that although M1 macrophage is an effector leucocyte with microbicidal machinery, its dominant role depends on the balance of M1 and M2 subsets, which is driven by the host genetic background. PMID:26840507

  17. Tuberculosis caused by RDRio Mycobacterium tuberculosis is not associated with differential clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, C. de B.; Lazzarini, L. C. O.; Elias, A. R.; Leung, J. A. M.; Ribeiro, S. B.; da Silva, M. G.; Duarte, R. S.; Suffys, P.; Gomes, H. M.; Kritski, A. L.; Lapa e Silva, J. R.; Ho, J. L.; Boéchat, N.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND We recently described the Mycobacterium tuberculosis RDRio genotype, a clonally derived sublineage within the Latin American–Mediterranean (LAM) family. Genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis likely affects the clinical aspects of tuberculosis (TB). Prospective studies that address this issue are scarce and remain controversial. OBJECTIVE To determine the association of differential clinical features of pulmonary TB with the RDRio M. tuberculosis etiology. METHODS Culture-proven pulmonary TB patients (n = 272) were clinically evaluated, including history, physical examination, chest X-ray and anti-human immunodeficiency virus serology. Isolates were classified as RDRio or non-RDRio M. tuberculosis by multiplex polymerase chain reaction and further spoligotyped. Clinical and M. tuberculosis genotype data were analyzed. RESULTS RDRio M. tuberculosis caused disease in 26.5% (72/270) of all TB cases. The LAM genotype, of which RDRio strains are members, was responsible for 46.0% of the TB cases. Demographic data, major signs and symptoms, radiographic presentation, microbiological features and clinical outcomes were not significantly different among patients with TB caused by RDRio and non-RDRio strains. CONCLUSIONS Disease caused by M. tuberculosis RDRio strains was not clinically distinctive or more severe than disease caused by non-RDRio strains in this series of TB patients. Larger prospective studies specifically designed to disclose differential clinical characteristics of TB caused by specific M. tuberculosis lineages are needed. PMID:22863208

  18. Update on Veterinary Tuberculosis Vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this presentation, the participant will know the current status of veterinary tuberculosis vaccine research and development, and understand the challenges which remain for the future introduction of tuberculosis vaccines intended for wildlife and livestock...

  19. Impact of Previous ART and of ART Initiation on Outcome of HIV-Associated Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Girardi, Enrico; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Angeletti, Claudio; Vanacore, Paola; Matteelli, Alberto; Gori, Andrea; Carbonara, Sergio; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Background. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has progressively decreased mortality of HIV-associated tuberculosis .To date, however, limited data on tuberculosis treatment outcomes among coinfected patients who are not ART-naive at the time of tuberculosis diagnosis are available. Methods. A multicenter, observational study enrolled 246 HIV-infected patients diagnosed with tuberculosis, in 96 Italian infectious diseases hospital units, who started tuberculosis treatment. A polytomous logistic regression model was used to identify baseline factors associated with the outcome. A Poisson regression model was used to explain the effect of ART during tuberculosis treatment on mortality, as a time-varying covariate, adjusting for baseline characteristics. Results. Outcomes of tuberculosis treatment were as follows: 130 (52.8%) were successfully treated, 36 (14.6%) patients died in a median time of 2 months (range: 0–16), and 80 (32.6%) had an unsuccessful outcome. Being foreign born or injecting drug users was associated with unsuccessful outcomes. In multivariable Poisson regression, cART during tuberculosis treatment decreased the risk of death, while this risk increased for those who were not ART-naive at tuberculosis diagnosis. Conclusions. ART during tuberculosis treatment is associated with a substantial reduction of death rate among HIV-infected patients. However, patients who are not ART-naive when they develop tuberculosis remain at elevated risk of death. PMID:22489253

  20. Tuberculosis in children and adults

    PubMed Central

    Alcaïs, Alexandre; Fieschi, Claire; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2005-01-01

    Disseminated disease in children and pulmonary disease in adults constitute two major epidemiological and clinical forms of tuberculosis. Paradoxically, only a small fraction of infected individuals develop clinical tuberculosis, typically one form of the disease or the other. Mendelian and complex genetic predispositions to tuberculosis were reported recently in children and adults, respectively. Here, we argue that tuberculosis and its clinical expression largely reflect the underlying human genetic background. PMID:16365144

  1. [Primary infection and pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Toujani, S; Ben Salah, N; Cherif, J; Mjid, M; Ouahchy, Y; Zakhama, H; Daghfous, J; Beji, M; Mehiri-Ben Rhouma, N; Louzir, B

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem worldwide. Indeed, a third of the world population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and more than 8 million new cases of tuberculosis each year. Pulmonary tuberculosis is the most common location. Its diagnosis is difficult and often established with a delay causing a spread of infection. The diagnosis of tuberculosis infection is mainly based on immunological tests represented by the tuberculin skin test and detection of gamma interferon, while the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis is suspected on epidemiological context, lasting general and respiratory symptoms, contrasting usually with normal lung examination, and a chest radiography showing suggestive lesions. The radioclinical feature may be atypical in patients with extreme ages and in case of immunodeficiency. Confirmation of tuberculosis is bacteriological. Conventional bacteriological methods remain the reference. Innovative tests using the technique of molecular biology have improved the diagnosis of tuberculosis in terms of sensitivity and especially speed. However, those techniques are of limited use. PMID:25749628

  2. Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics > Tuberculosis > Research Tuberculosis Understanding TB Research Research Goals Basic Research Diagnostic Research Advances in Treatment Prevention: Vaccine Development Global Research NIAID Labs Networks, Consortia, and Partners ...

  3. Tuberculosis Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Tuberculosis > Understanding TB Tuberculosis Understanding TB Overview What is TB? TB in History Cause Transmission and Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Prevention TB ...

  4. The Detection of Airborne Transmission of Tuberculosis from HIV-Infected Patients, Using an In Vivo Air Sampling Model

    PubMed Central

    Escombe, A. Roderick; Oeser, Clarissa; Gilman, Robert H.; Navincopa, Marcos; Ticona, Eduardo; Martínez, Carlos; Caviedes, Luz; Sheen, Patricia; Gonzalez, Armando; Noakes, Catherine; Moore, David A. J.; Friedland, Jon S.; Evans, Carlton A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Nosocomial transmission of tuberculosis remains an important public health problem. We created an in vivo air sampling model to study airborne transmission of tuberculosis from patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and to evaluate environmental control measures. Methods An animal facility was built above a mechanically ventilated HIV-tuberculosis ward in Lima, Peru. A mean of 92 guinea pigs were continuously exposed to all ward exhaust air for 16 months. Animals had tuberculin skin tests performed at monthly intervals, and those with positive reactions were removed for autopsy and culture for tuberculosis. Results Over 505 consecutive days, there were 118 ward admissions by 97 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, with a median duration of hospitalization of 11 days. All patients were infected with HIV and constituted a heterogeneous group with both new and existing diagnoses of tuberculosis. There was a wide variation in monthly rates of guinea pigs developing positive tuberculin test results (0%–53%). Of 292 animals exposed to ward air, 159 developed positive tuberculin skin test results, of which 129 had laboratory confirmation of tuberculosis. The HIV-positive patients with pulmonary tuberculosis produced a mean of 8.2 infectious quanta per hour, compared with 1.25 for HIV-negative patients with tuberculosis in similar studies from the 1950s. The mean monthly patient infectiousness varied greatly, from production of 0–44 infectious quanta per hour, as did the theoretical risk for a health care worker to acquire tuberculosis by breathing ward air. Conclusions HIV-positive patients with tuberculosis varied greatly in their infectiousness, and some were highly infectious. Use of environmental control strategies for nosocomial tuberculosis is therefore a priority, especially in areas with a high prevalence of both tuberculosis and HIV infection. PMID:17443474

  5. Excessive Cytolytic Responses Predict Tuberculosis Relapse After Apparently Successful Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cliff, Jacqueline M.; Cho, Jang-Eun; Lee, Ji-Sook; Ronacher, Katharina; King, Elizabeth C.; van Helden, Paul; Walzl, Gerhard; Dockrell, Hazel M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Currently, there are no tools to accurately predict tuberculosis relapse. This study aimed to determine whether patients who experience tuberculosis relapse have different immune responses to mycobacteria in vitro than patients who remain cured for 2 years. Methods. Patients with an initial episode of pulmonary tuberculosis were recruited in South Africa. Diluted blood, collected at diagnosis and after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment, was cultured with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis for 6 days, and cellular RNA was frozen. Gene expression in samples from 10 patients who subsequently experienced relapse, confirmed by strain genotyping, was compared to that in samples from patients who remained cured, using microarrays. Results. At diagnosis, expression of 668 genes was significantly different in samples from patients who experienced relapse, compared with expression in patients who remained successfully cured; these differences persisted for at least 4 weeks. Gene ontology and biological pathways analyses revealed significant upregulation of genes involved in cytotoxic cell-mediated killing. Results were confirmed by real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis in a wider patient cohort. Conclusions. These data show that patients who will subsequently experience relapse exhibit altered immune responses, including excessively robust cytolytic responses to M. tuberculosis in vitro, at the time of diagnosis, compared with patients who will achieve durable cure. Together with microbiological and clinical indices, these differences could be exploited in drug development. PMID:26351358

  6. Genomics and the evolution, pathogenesis, and diagnosis of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Joel D.; Trevejo-Nuñez, Giraldina; Banaiee, Niaz

    2007-01-01

    Tuberculosis kills nearly 2 million people annually, and current approaches to tuberculosis control are expensive, have limited efficacy, and are vulnerable to being overcome by extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Determination of the genome sequence of M. tuberculosis has revolutionized tuberculosis research, contributed to major advances in the understanding of the evolution and pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis, and facilitated development of new diagnostic tests with increased specificity for tuberculosis. In this review, we describe some of the major progress in tuberculosis research that has resulted from knowledge of the genome sequence and note some of the problems that remain unsolved. PMID:17607348

  7. Cutaneous Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Amylynne; Penrose, Carolin

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis occurs rarely, despite a high and increasing prevalence of tuberculosis worldwide. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterrium bovis, and the Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccine can cause tuberculosis involving the skin. Cutaneous tuberculosis can be acquired exogenously or endogenously and present as a multitude of differing clinical morphologies. Diagnosis of these lesions can be difficult, as they resemble many other dermatological conditions that are often primarily considered. Further, microbiological confirmation is poor, despite scientific advances, such as the more frequent use of polymerase chain reaction. The authors report a case that illustrates the challenges faced by dermatologists when considering a diagnosis of cutaneous tuberculosis. PMID:20725570

  8. Ocular tuberculosis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Shakarchi, Faiz I

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization currently estimates that nearly two billion people, or one-third of the world’s population, are infected by tuberculosis, and that roughly 10% of the infected people are symptomatic. Tuberculosis affects the lungs in 80% of patients, while in the remaining 20% the disease may affect other organs, including the eye. Uveitis can be seen concurrently with tuberculosis, but a direct association is difficult to prove. Ocular tuberculosis is usually not associated with clinical evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis, as up to 60% of extrapulmonary tuberculosis patients may not have pulmonary disease. The diagnosis of tuberculous uveitis is often problematic and in nearly all reported cases, the diagnosis was only presumptive. Tuberculous uveitis is a great mimicker of various uveitis entities and it can be considered in the differential diagnosis of any type of intraocular inflammation. It is still unknown if ocular manifestations result from a direct mycobacterium infection or hypersensitivity reaction and this is reflected on the management of tuberculous uveitis. Prevalence of tuberculosis as an etiology of uveitis may reach up to 10% in endemic areas. Tuberculous uveitis is a vision-threatening disease that inevitably leads to blindness if not properly diagnosed and treated. The aim of this review is to illustrate the various clinical features and management of presumed tuberculous uveitis. The current review focuses on the diagnostic criteria, significance of tuberculin skin test, and use of systemic corticosteroids in the management of tuberculous uveitis as recommended in recent publications. PMID:26648690

  9. Bovine Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis (TB) in animals and humans may result from exposure to bacilli within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (i.e., M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum, M. pinnipedii, M. microti, M. caprae, or M. canetti). Mycobacterium bovis is the species most often isolated from tuberculous catt...

  10. Seasonality of Tuberculosis in the United States, 1993–2008

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Matthew D.; Winston, Carla A.; Heilig, Charles M.; Cain, Kevin P.; Walter, Nicholas D.; Mac Kenzie, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although seasonal variation in tuberculosis incidence has been described in several recent studies, the mechanism underlying this seasonality remains unknown. Seasonality of tuberculosis disease may indicate the presence of season-specific risk factors that could potentially be controlled if they were better understood. We conducted this study to determine whether tuberculosis is seasonal in the United States and to describe patterns of seasonality in specific populations. Methods We performed a time series decomposition analysis of tuberculosis cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 1993 through 2008. Seasonal amplitude of tuberculosis disease (the difference between the months with the highest and lowest mean case counts), was calculated for the population as a whole and for populations with select demographic, clinical, and epidemiologic characteristics. Results A total of 243 432 laboratory-confirmed tuberculosis cases were reported over a period of 16 years. A mean of 21.4% more cases were diagnosed in March, the peak month, compared with November, the trough month. The magnitude of seasonality did not vary with latitude. The greatest seasonal amplitude was found among children aged <5 years and in cases associated with disease clusters. Conclusions Tuberculosis is a seasonal disease in the United States, with a peak in spring and trough in late fall. The latitude independence of seasonality suggests that reduced winter sunlight exposure may not be a strong contributor to tuberculosis risk. Increased seasonality among young children and clustered cases suggests that disease that is the result of recent transmission is more influenced by season than disease resulting from activation of latent infection. PMID:22474225

  11. Molecular characterisation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in the First National Survey of Anti-tuberculosis Drug Resistance from Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Aristimuño, Liselotte; Armengol, Raimond; Cebollada, Alberto; España, Mercedes; Guilarte, Alexis; Lafoz, Carmen; Lezcano, María A; Revillo, María J; Martín, Carlos; Ramírez, Carmen; Rastogi, Nalin; Rojas, Janet; de Salas, Albina Vázques; Sola, Christophe; Samper, Sofía

    2006-01-01

    Background Molecular typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains has become a valuable tool in the epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB) by allowing detection of outbreaks, tracking of epidemics, identification of genotypes and transmission events among patients who would have remained undetected by conventional contact investigation. This is the first genetic biodiversity study of M. tuberculosis in Venezuela. Thus, we investigated the genetic patterns of strains isolated in the first survey of anti-tuberculosis drug-resistance realised as part of the Global Project of Anti-tuberculosis Drug Resistance Surveillance (WHO/IUATLD). Results Clinical isolates (670/873) were genotyped by spoligotyping. The results were compared with the international spoligotyping database (SpolDB4). Multidrug resistant (MDR) strains (14/18) were also analysed by IS6110-RFLP assays, and resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin was characterised. Spoligotyping grouped 82% (548/670) of the strains into 59 clusters. Twenty new spoligotypes (SITs) specific to Venezuela were identified. Eight new inter-regional clusters were created. The Beijing genotype was not found. The genetic network shows that the Latin American and Mediterranean family constitutes the backbone of the genetic TB population-structure in Venezuela, responsible of >60% of total TB cases studied. MDR was 0.5% in never treated patients and 13.5% in previously treated patients. Mutations in rpoB gene and katG genes were detected in 64% and 43% of the MDR strains, respectively. Two clusters were found to be identical by the four different analysis methods, presumably representing cases of recent transmission of MDR tuberculosis. Conclusion This study gives a first overview of the M. tuberculosis strains circulating in Venezuela during the first survey of anti-tuberculosis drug-resistance. It may aid in the creation of a national database that will be a valuable support for further studies. PMID:17032442

  12. Breast Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Thimmappa, Durganna; Mallikarjuna, M N; Vijayakumar, Abhishek

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis affects over a billion people worldwide. There is a raise in incidence of extrapulmonary tuberculosis in recent years. Mammary tuberculosis has been estimated to be 0.1 % of breast lesions examined histologically, and it constitutes about 3-4.5 % of surgically treated breast diseases in developing countries. Breast tuberculosis is paucibacillary and routine diagnostic tests such as microscopy, culture, and nucleic acid amplification tests such as polymerase chain reaction techniques do not have the same diagnostic utility as they do in pulmonary tuberculosis. Also, the histology resembles various other granulomatous mastitis. The coexistence of carcinoma and breast tuberculosis adds challenge to diagnosis. Correct diagnosis of tuberculous mastitis is important as the treatment of differential disease varies from steroid to surgery which can have devastating consequences in patients suffering from breast tuberculosis. PMID:27011568

  13. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells. PMID:24922567

  14. A Histomorphological Pattern Analysis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Lung Autopsy and Surgically Resected Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Flora D.; Adiga, Deepa Sowkur Anandarama

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis (TB) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Many cases are diagnosed on autopsy and a subset of patients may require surgical intervention either due to the complication or sequelae of TB. Materials and Methods. 40 cases of resected lung specimens following surgery or autopsy in which a diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis was made were included. Histopathological pattern analysis of pulmonary tuberculosis along with associated nonneoplastic changes and identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli was done. Results. The mean age of diagnosis was 41 years with male predominance (92.5%). Tuberculosis was suspected in only 12.1% of cases before death. Seven cases were operated upon due to associated complications or suspicion of malignancy. Tubercular consolidation was the most frequent pattern followed by miliary tuberculosis. The presence of necrotizing granulomas was seen in 33 cases (82.5%). Acid fast bacilli were seen in 57.5% cases on Ziehl-Neelsen stain. Conclusion. Histopathology remains one of the most important methods for diagnosing tuberculosis, especially in TB prevalent areas. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all respiratory diseases because of its varied clinical presentations and manifestations. PMID:27088035

  15. Diagnostics for pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cudahy, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading cause of human suffering and mortality despite decades of effective treatment being available. Accurate and timely diagnosis remains an unmet goal. The HIV epidemic has also led to new challenges in the diagnosis of TB. Several new developments in TB diagnostics have the potential to positively influence the global campaign against TB. We aim to review the performance of both established as well as new diagnostics for pulmonary TB in adults, and discuss the ongoing challenges. PMID:27005271

  16. Diagnostics for pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cudahy, Patrick; Shenoi, Sheela V

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading cause of human suffering and mortality despite decades of effective treatment being available. Accurate and timely diagnosis remains an unmet goal. The HIV epidemic has also led to new challenges in the diagnosis of TB. Several new developments in TB diagnostics have the potential to positively influence the global campaign against TB. We aim to review the performance of both established as well as new diagnostics for pulmonary TB in adults, and discuss the ongoing challenges. PMID:27005271

  17. Tuberculosis Data and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Epidemiology of Tuberculosis in Correctional Facilities, United States, 1993-2014 Prevention and Control of Tuberculosis in Correctional ... Epidemiology of Tuberculosis in Correctional Facilities, United States, 1993-2014 Epidemiology of Pediatric Tuberculosis in the United ...

  18. Genitourinary tuberculosis masquerading as a ureteral calculus

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Nathan; Hoag, Nathan A.; Jones, Edward C.; Rowley, Allen; McLoughlin, Martin G.; Paterson, Ryan F.

    2013-01-01

    The genitourinary tract is a common extrapulmonary site of tuberculosis infection, yet remains a rare clinical entity in North America. We report the case of a 37-year-old man who presented for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for a suspected ureteral stone on imaging. Further workup confirmed a diagnosis of genitourinary tuberculosis. Medical management was undertaken and, ultimately, nephrectomy performed. This case highlights the importance of maintaining a high index of clinical suspicion for genitourinary tuberculosis. PMID:23766841

  19. Pulmonary tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop symptoms of TB Your symptoms continue despite treatment New symptoms develop ... to your provider about how to prevent getting tuberculosis. Prompt treatment is very important in preventing the spread of ...

  20. Forecast analysis of the incidence of tuberculosis in the province of Quebec

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background While the overall population prevalence of tuberculosis in Quebec has been declining for many years, tuberculosis is still disproportionately more prevalent among the immigrant and Inuit communities. As such, the aim of this study was to forecast the incidence of tuberculosis in the Province of Quebec over time in order to examine the possible impact of future preventative and treatment programs geared to reducing such disparities. Methods A compartmental differential equation based on a Susceptible Exposed Latent Infectious Recovered (SELIR) model was simulated using the Euler method using Visual Basic for Applications in Excel. Demographic parameters were obtained from census data for the Province of Quebec and the model was fitted to past epidemiological data to extrapolate future values over the period 2015 to 2030. Results The trend of declining tuberculosis rates will continue in the general population, falling by 42% by 2030. The incidence among immigrants will decrease but never vanish, and may increase in the future. Among the Inuit, the incidence is expected to increase, reaching a maximum and then stabilizing, although if re-infection is taken into account it may continue to increase. Tuberculosis among non-indigenous Canadian born persons will continue to decline, with the disease almost eradicated in that group in the mid 21st century. Conclusions While the incidence of tuberculosis in the Province of Quebec is expected to decrease overall, certain populations will remain at risk. PMID:23621907

  1. Elevated ex vivo monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (CCL2) in pulmonary as compared with extra-pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Zahra; Zaidi, Irfan; Jamil, Bushra; Khan, M Aslam; Kanji, Akbar; Hussain, Rabia

    2005-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis causes 3 million deaths annually. The most common site of tuberculosis is pulmonary however; extra-pulmonary forms of the disease also remain prevalent. Restriction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis depends on effective recruitment and subsequent activation of T lymphocytes, mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells to the site of infection. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is essential for granuloma formation and is a potent activator of monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1, CCL2). CCL2 is essential for recruitment of monocytes and T cells and has been shown to play a role in protection against tuberculosis. Interleukin -8 (CXCL8) is a potent activator of neutrophils. Increased levels of CCL2, CXCL8 and TNFα are reported in tuberculosis but their significance in different forms of tuberculosis is as yet unclear. We have used an ex vivo assay to investigate differences in immune parameters in patients with either pulmonary or extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods Serum levels of CCL2, CXCL8 and TNFα were measured in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (N = 12), extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (N = 8) and BCG-vaccinated healthy volunteers (N = 12). Whole blood cells were stimulated with non-pathogenic Mycobacterium bovis bacille-Calmette Guerin (BCG) vaccine strain or bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and cyto/chemokines were monitored in supernatants. Results Circulating serum levels of CXCL8 and TNFα were raised in all tuberculosis patients, while CCL2 levels were not. There was no difference in spontaneous cytokine secretion from whole blood cells between patients and controls. M. bovis BCG-induced ex vivo CCL2 secretion was significantly greater in pulmonary as compared with both extra-pulmonary tuberculosis patients and endemic controls. In response to LPS stimulation, patients with pulmonary tuberculosis showed increased CCL2 and TNFα responses as compared with the extra-pulmonary group. BCG-, and LPS-induced CXCL8 secretion was comparable between patients and controls. Conclusion CCL2 is activated by TNFα and is essential for recruitment of monocytes and T cells to the site of mycobacterial infection. Increased CCL2 activation in pulmonary tuberculosis may result in a stronger cellular response as compared with extra-pulmonary tuberculosis patients, and this may contribute to the localization of infection to the pulmonary site. PMID:16001981

  2. A Case Report of Primary Duodenal Tuberculosis Mimicking a Malignant Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji Hye; Kim, Min Jeong; Cho, Young Kwan; Ahn, Sang Bong; Son, Byoung Kwan; Jo, Yun Ju; Park, Young Sook

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a serious infectious disease with primary features of pulmonary manifestation in Korea. However, duodenal tuberculosis is rare in gastrointestinal cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Here, we report a case of primary duodenal tuberculosis mistaken as a malignant tumor and diagnosed with QuantiFERON-TB GOLD (Cellestis Ltd.) in an immunocompetent male patient. PMID:25133123

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the host response

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.; Cole, Stewart T.; Mizrahi, Valerie; Rubin, Eric; Nathan, Carl

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Advances reported at a recent international meeting highlight insights and controversies in the genetics of M. tuberculosis and the infected host, the nature of protective immune responses, adaptation of the bacillus to host-imposed stresses, animal models, and new techniques. PMID:15939785

  4. Application of Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis for Study of Genetic Diversity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains Isolated From Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Azar Dokht; Vatani, Shideh; Feizabadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Abasi Montazeri, Effat; Jolodar, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotyping can effectively improve tuberculosis (TB) control programs by controlling disease transmission. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is a particularly powerful tool for determination of clonal identity of bacteria providing information for understanding and controlling the spread of disease. Objectives: The aim of present study was to investigate the genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis strains in Khuzestan province by the PFGE technique. Patients and Methods: In total, 80 M. tuberculosis positive cultures were obtained from tuberculosis patients. PFGE was performed on 60 PCR-confirmed isolates by using DraI and XbaI restriction enzymes according to standard protocols. Plugs containing digested DNA were then loaded on agarose gels and run using contour-clamped homogenous electric fields. Results: Fifty distinct DNA banding patterns were obtained by digestion of DNA with DraI and 38 DNA banding patterns by digestion with XbaI restriction enzymes. The patterns comprised of 17 different clusters in which cluster I was the major one, containing six strains. Three clusters contained three strains each and the 13 remaining clusters comprised of two strains each. Digestion with DraI yielded 15-20 DNA fragments with 50-485 kb size, while digestion by XbaI produced DNA fragments with a size smaller than 50-242 kb. Conclusions: Despite the ability of PFGE for study of genetic diversity of many mycobacterial species and it being considered as a robust and useful tool, in this study we only found a 15% epidemiological relationship amongst the isolates. Thus, for higher discrimination of genotypic clusters among M. tuberculosis clinical isolates, the application of more sophisticated complementary techniques is required. PMID:25147723

  5. Genotyping and drug resistance patterns of M. tuberculosis strains in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer, Mahnaz; Hasan, Zahra; Siddiqui, Amna R; Ali, Asho; Kanji, Akbar; Ghebremicheal, Solomon; Hasan, Rumina

    2008-01-01

    Background The incidence of tuberculosis in Pakistan is 181/100,000 population. However, information about transmission and geographical prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and their evolutionary genetics as well as drug resistance remains limited. Our objective was to determine the clonal composition, evolutionary genetics and drug resistance of M. tuberculosis isolates from different regions of the country. Methods M. tuberculosis strains isolated (2003–2005) from specimens submitted to the laboratory through collection units nationwide were included. Drug susceptibility was performed and strains were spoligotyped. Results Of 926 M. tuberculosis strains studied, 721(78%) were grouped into 59 "shared types", while 205 (22%) were identified as "Orphan" spoligotypes. Amongst the predominant genotypes 61% were Central Asian strains (CAS ; including CAS1, CAS sub-families and Orphan Pak clusters), 4% East African-Indian (EAI), 3% Beijing, 2% poorly defined TB strains (T), 2% Haarlem and LAM (0.2). Also TbD1 analysis (M. tuberculosis specific deletion 1) confirmed that CAS1 was of "modern" origin while EAI isolates belonged to "ancestral" strain types. Prevalence of CAS1 clade was significantly higher in Punjab (P < 0.01, Pearsons Chi-square test) as compared with Sindh, North West Frontier Province and Balochistan provinces. Forty six percent of isolates were sensitive to five first line antibiotics tested, 45% were Rifampicin resistant, 50% isoniazid resistant. MDR was significantly associated with Beijing strains (P = 0.01, Pearsons Chi-square test) and EAI (P = 0.001, Pearsons Chi-square test), but not with CAS family. Conclusion Our results show variation of prevalent M. tuberculosis strain with greater association of CAS1 with the Punjab province. The fact that the prevalent CAS genotype was not associated with drug resistance is encouraging. It further suggests a more effective treatment and control programme should be successful in reducing the tuberculosis burden in Pakistan. PMID:19108722

  6. Pancreatic tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S; Kumar, Amit; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic tuberculosis is very rare, but recently, there has been a spurt in the number of reports on pancreatic involvement by tuberculosis. It closely mimics pancreatic cancer, and before the advent of better imaging modalities it was often detected as a histological surprise in patients resected for a presumed pancreatic malignancy. The usual presentation involves abdominal pain, loss of appetite and weight, jaundice which can be associated with cholestasis, fever and night sweats, palpable abdominal lump, and peripheral lymphadenopathy. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen is an important tool for evaluation of patients with pancreatic tuberculosis. This CT imaging yields valuable information about the size and nature of tubercular lesions along with the presence of ascites and lymphadenopathy. However, there are no distinctive features on CT that distinguish it from pancreatic carcinoma. Endoscopic ultrasound provides high resolution images of the pancreatic lesions as well as an opportunity to sample these lesions for cytological confirmation. The presence of granulomas is the most common finding on histological/cytological examination with the presence of acid fast bacilli being observed only in minority of patients. As there are no randomized or comparative studies on treatment of pancreatic tuberculosis it is usually treated like other forms of tuberculosis. Excellent cure rates are reported with standard anti tubercular therapy given for 6-12 months. PMID:26414325

  7. Propellant-remaining modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgovitsky, S.

    1991-01-01

    A successful satellite mission is predicted upon the proper maintenance of the spacecraft's orbit and attitude. One requirement for planning and predicting the orbit and attitude is the accurate estimation of the propellant remaining onboard the spacecraft. Focuss is on the three methods that were developed for calculating the propellant budget: the errors associated with each method and the uncertainties in the variables required to determine the propellant remaining that contribute to these errors. Based on these findings, a strategy is developed for improved propellant-remaining estimation. The first method is based on Boyle's law, which related the values of pressure, volume, and temperature (PVT) of an ideal gas. The PVT method is used for the monopropellant and the bipropellant engines. The second method is based on the engine performance tests, which provide data that relate thrust and specific impulse associated with a propellant tank to that tank's pressure. Two curves representing thrust and specific impulse as functions of pressure are then generated using a polynomial fit on the engine performance data. The third method involves a computer simulation of the propellant system. The propellant flow is modeled by creating a conceptual model of the propulsion system configuration, taking into account such factors as the propellant and pressurant tank characteristics, thruster functionality, and piping layout. Finally, a thrust calibration technique is presented that uses differential correction with the computer simulation method of propellant-remaining modeling. Thrust calibration provides a better assessment of thruster performance and therefore enables a more accurate estimation of propellant consumed during a given maneuver.

  8. MULTIFOCAL TUBERCULOSIS VERRUCOSA CUTIS

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Jiby; Mathai, Ashok Thomas; Prasad, P V S; Kaviarasan, P K

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis has been a well-known affliction of human kind, since antiquity. Cutaneous tuberculosis constitutes only a small proportion of extra pulmonary tuberculosis and multifocal involvement of cutaneous tuberculosis is an even rarer manifestation. We report one such case of multifocal tuberculosis verrucosa cutis in a 17-year old male patient in the absence of any primary tuberculous focus. PMID:21772603

  9. Feasibility and effect of integrating tuberculosis screening and detection in postnatal care services: an operations research study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis still remains a major cause of maternal and newborn morbidity and mortality. Integrating tuberculosis screening and detection into postnatal care services ensures prompt and appropriate treatment for affected mothers and their babies. This study therefore examined the feasibility and effect of screening and referral for tuberculosis within postnatal care settings from the perspective of providers. Methods This operations research study used a pre- and post-intervention design without a comparison group. The study was implemented between March 2009 and August 2010 in five health facilities located in low-income areas of Nairobi, Kenya, which were suspected to have relatively high prevalence of both tuberculosis and HIV. Descriptive statistics and significance tests were employed to determine changes in the indicators of interest between baseline and endline. Results Among the 12,604 postnatal care clients screened, 14 tuberculosis cases were diagnosed. The proportion of clients screened for at least one cardinal sign of tuberculosis rose from 4% to 66%, and 21% of clients were screened for all six tracer signs and symptoms. A comparison of 10 quality of postnatal care and tuberculosis screening components at baseline and endline showed a highly significant effect on all 10 components. Conclusions The findings demonstrate that using postnatal care services as a platform for tuberculosis screening and detection is acceptable and feasible. In addition, linking clients identified through screening to further treatment significantly improved. However, the actual number of cases detected was low. A policy debate on whether to link tuberculosis screening with reproductive health services is recommended before full scale-up of this intervention. PMID:23496997

  10. Tuberculosis origin: The Neolithic scenario.

    PubMed

    Hershkovitz, Israel; Donoghue, Helen D; Minnikin, David E; May, Hila; Lee, Oona Y-C; Feldman, Michal; Galili, Ehud; Spigelman, Mark; Rothschild, Bruce M; Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila

    2015-06-01

    This paper follows the dramatic changes in scientific research during the last 20 years regarding the relationship between the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and its hosts - bovids and/or humans. Once the M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis genomes were sequenced, it became obvious that the old story of M. bovis evolving into the human pathogen should be reversed, as M. tuberculosis is more ancestral than M. bovis. Nevertheless, the timescale and geographical origin remained an enigma. In the current study human and cattle bone samples were examined for evidence of tuberculosis from the site of Atlit-Yam in the Eastern Mediterranean, dating from 9250 to 8160 (calibrated) years ago. Strict precautions were used to prevent contamination in the DNA analysis, and independent centers used to confirm authenticity of findings. DNA from five M. tuberculosis genetic loci was detected and had characteristics consistent with extant genetic lineages. High performance liquid chromatography was used as an independent method of verification and it directly detected mycolic acid lipid biomarkers, specific for the M. tuberculosis complex. These, together with pathological changes detected in some of the bones, confirm the presence of the disease in the Levantine populations during the Pre-pottery Neolithic C period, more than 8000 years ago. PMID:25726364

  11. Tuberculosis in the intensive care unit: A retrospective descriptive cohort study with determination of a predictive fatality score

    PubMed Central

    Valade, Sandrine; Raskine, Laurent; Aout, Mounir; Malissin, Isabelle; Brun, Pierre; Deye, Nicolas; Baud, Frédéric J; Megarbane, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite effective treatments, tuberculosis-related mortality remains high among patients requiring admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). OBJECTIVE: To determine prognostic factors of death in tuberculosis patients admitted to the ICU, and to develop a simple predictive scoring system. METHODS: A 10-year, retrospective study of 53 patients admitted consecutively to the Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Lariboisière (Paris, France) ICU with confirmed tuberculosis, was conducted. A multivariate analysis was performed to identify risk factors for death. A predictive fatality score was determined. RESULTS: Diagnoses included pulmonary tuberculosis (96%) and tuberculous encephalomeningitis (26%). Patients required mechanical ventilation (45%) and vasopressor infusion (28%) on admission. Twenty patients (38%) died, related to direct tuberculosis-induced organ failure (n=5), pulmonary bacterial coinfections (n=14) and pulmonary embolism (n=1). Using a multivariate analysis, three independent factors on ICU admission were predictive of fatality: miliary pulmonary tuberculosis (OR 9.04 [95% CI 1.25 to 65.30]), mechanical ventilation (OR 11.36 [95% CI 1.55 to 83.48]) and vasopressor requirement (OR 8.45 [95% CI 1.29 to 55.18]). A score generated by summing these three independent variables was effective at predicting fatality with an area under the ROC curve of 0.92 (95% CI 0.85 to 0.98). CONCLUSIONS: Fatalities remain high in patients admitted to the ICU with tuberculosis. Miliary pulmonary tuberculosis, mechanical ventilation and vasopressor requirement on admission were predictive of death. PMID:24294270

  12. Hyperendemic pulmonary tuberculosis in peri-urban areas of Karachi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Saeed; White, Franklin; Hasan, Rumina; Rozi, Shafquat; Younus, Mohammad; Ahmed, Faiza; Husain, Sara; Khan, Bilquis Sana

    2007-01-01

    Background Currently there are very limited empirical data available on the prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis among residents of marginalized settings in Pakistan. This study assessed the prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis through active case detection and evaluated predictors of pulmonary tuberculosis among residents of two peri-urban neighbourhoods of Karachi, Pakistan. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in two peri-urban neighbourhoods from May 2002 to November 2002. Systematic sampling design was used to select households for inclusion in the study. Consenting subjects aged 15 years or more from selected households were interviewed and, whenever possible, sputum samples were obtained. Sputum samples were subjected to direct microscopy by Ziehl-Neelson method, bacterial culture and antibiotic sensitivity tests. Results The prevalence (per 100,000) of pulmonary tuberculosis among the subjects aged 15 years or more, who participated in the study was 329 (95% confidence interval (CI): 195 – 519). The prevalence (per 100,000) of pulmonary tuberculosis adjusted for non-sampling was 438 (95% CI: 282 – 651). Other than cough, none of the other clinical variables was significantly associated with pulmonary tuberculosis status. Analysis of drug sensitivity pattern of 15 strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed that one strain was resistant to isoniazid alone, one to streptomycin alone and one was resistant to isoniazid and streptomycin. The remaining 12 strains were susceptible to all five drugs including streptomycin, isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide. Conclusion This study of previously undetected tuberculosis cases in an impoverished peri-urban setting reveals the poor operational performance of Pakistan's current approach to tuberculosis control; it also demonstrates a higher prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis than current national estimates. Public health authorities may wish to augment health education efforts aimed at prompting health-seeking behaviour to facilitate more complete and earlier case detection. Such efforts to improve passive case-finding, if combined with more accessible DOTS infra-structure for treatment of detected cases, may help to diminish the high tuberculosis-related morbidity and mortality in marginalized populations. The economics of implementing a more active approach to case finding in resource-constrained setting also deserve further study. PMID:17477870

  13. Miliary tuberculosis in an Indian lady: Looking beyond miliary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lakshman, Arjun; Dhir, Varun; Kumar, Narender; Singhal, Manphool

    2015-01-01

    Presence of miliary shadows in chest imaging in the appropriate clinical setting is often taken as a marker of miliary tuberculosis. If sputum is negative for acid -fast bacillus, empirical anti-tubercular therapy is given without securing a histological or microbiological diagnosis. We report a young female with human immunodeficiency virus infection who had miliary infiltrates on chest radiography. She was started on empirical anti-tubercular therapy. But an alternate diagnosis was achieved later with invasive sampling and ATT was stopped. This case illustrates the need for physicians to remain alert to diseases which mimic tuberculosis in presentation. PMID:26628767

  14. A randomized controlled trial of standard versus intensified tuberculosis diagnostics on treatment decisions by physicians in Northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Routine tuberculosis culture remains unavailable in many high-burden areas, including Tanzania. This study sought to determine the impact of providing mycobacterial culture results over standard of care [unconcentrated acid-fast (AFB) smears] on management of persons with suspected tuberculosis. Methods Adults and children with suspected tuberculosis were randomized to standard (direct AFB smear only) or intensified (concentrated AFB smear and tuberculosis culture) diagnostics and followed for 8 weeks. The primary endpoint was appropriate treatment (i.e. antituberculosis therapy for those with tuberculosis, no antituberculous therapy for those without tuberculosis). Results Seventy participants were randomized to standard (n = 37, 53%) or intensive (n = 33, 47%) diagnostics. At 8 weeks, 100% (n = 22) of participants in follow up randomized to intensive diagnostics were receiving appropriate care, vs. 22 (88%) of 25 participants randomized to standard diagnostics (p = 0.14). Overall, 18 (26%) participants died; antituberculosis therapy was associated with lower mortality (9% who received antiuberculosis treatment died vs. 26% who did not, p = 0.04). Conclusions Under field conditions in a high burden setting, the impact of intensified diagnostics was blunted by high early mortality. Enhanced availability of rapid diagnostics must be linked to earlier access to care for outcomes to improve. PMID:24552306

  15. [Tuberculosis. Future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Marques Gomes, M João

    2004-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major health problem around the world and its incidence is growing 0.4% each year. There are 2 billions of infected, 8.4 millions new cases every year and 16 million patients. The association of VIH and tuberculosis, the increasing number of multidrug resistance, failure of health systems, greater mobility of people, poverty, wars and social exclusion, are the major causes of the epidemiological situation. Faster, more specific and sensible diagnostic methods are being investigated. Some of them use molecular biology techniques, some uses radioisotopes and some others are based on colour and fluorescence modifications of dyes. New drugs, new routes of administration and ways for increasing compliance are under investigation. More potent drugs, with greater biodisponibility and adequate pharmacokinetics for shorter treatments for multidrug and latent forms of bacilli are needed. New vaccines are under investigations, namely Adjuvant Subunits Vaccines, DNA Vaccines DNA, no micobacterianos vectors, and attenuated living vaccines are being tested. Finally some considerations are made concerning the need of global committement to win the fight against tuberculosis in the near future. PMID:15202032

  16. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cytochrome P450 System

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Hugues; Johnston, Jonathan B.; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a leading cause of human mortality. The emergence of strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent, that are resistant to the major frontline antitubercular drugs increases the urgency for the development of new therapeutic agents. Sequencing of the M. tuberculosis genome revealed the existence of twenty cytochrome P450 enzymes, some of which are potential candidates for drug targeting. The recent burst of studies reporting microarray-based gene essentiality and transcriptome analyses under in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo conditions highlight the importance of selected P450 isoforms for M. tuberculosis viability and pathogenicity. Current knowledge of the structural and biochemical properties of the M. tuberculosis P450 enzymes and their putative redox partners is reviewed, with an emphasis on findings related to their physiological function(s) as well as their potential as drug targets. PMID:19635450

  17. Factors Associated with Patient's Delay in Tuberculosis Treatment in Bahir Dar City Administration, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gebeyehu, Endalew; Abeje, Gedefaw

    2014-01-01

    Background. Unknown proportions of tuberculosis cases remain undiagnosed and untreated as result of several factors which further increases the number of tuberculosis cases per index case. Objective. To identify factors associated with patient's delay in initiating treatment of tuberculosis. Methods. Cross-sectional study was employed from January to April, 2013, in Bahir Dar Ethiopia. A total of 360 patients were included. Data were collected from tuberculosis patients using a semistructured questionnaire. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 16 windows. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with patient delay. Results. Of all patients, 211 (62%) sought medical care after the WHO recommended period (21 days). The median patient delays of smear positive, smear negative, and extrapulmonary patients were 27 (IQR: 10–59), 30 (IQR: 9–65), and 31 (IQR: 10–150) days, respectively, with statistically significant variations among them (ANOVA: F = 5.96; P < 0.003). Place of residence and educational status were the predictors of patient delay. Conclusion. Around two-thirds of all patients and more than half of smear positive tuberculosis patients were delayed in seeking medical care within the recommended period. Provision of DOTS service in the vicinity and health education on TB may reduce patient delay and its consequences. PMID:24982901

  18. Tuberculosis and HIV at the National Level in Kenya: Results From the Second Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey

    PubMed Central

    Mbithi, Agneta; Gichangi, Anthony; Kim, Andrea A.; Katana, Abraham; Weyenga, Herman; Williamson, John; Robinson, Katherine; Oluoch, Tom; Maina, William K.; Kellogg, Timothy A.; De Cock, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Co-morbidity with tuberculosis and HIV is a common cause of mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. In the second Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey, we collected data on knowledge and experience of HIV and tuberculosis, as well as on access to and coverage of relevant treatment services and antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Kenya. Methods A national, population-based household survey was conducted from October 2012 to February 2013. Information was collected through household questionnaires, and blood samples were taken for HIV, CD4 cell counts, and HIV viral load testing at a central laboratory. Results Overall, 13,720 persons aged 15–64 years participated; 96.7% [95% confidence interval (CI): 96.3 to 97.1] had heard of tuberculosis, of whom 2.0% (95% CI: 1.7 to 2.2) reported having prior tuberculosis. Among those with laboratory-confirmed HIV infection, 11.6% (95% CI: 8.9 to 14.3) reported prior tuberculosis. The prevalence of laboratory-confirmed HIV infection in persons reporting prior tuberculosis was 33.2% (95% CI: 26.2 to 40.2) compared to 5.1% (95% CI: 4.5 to 5.8) in persons without prior tuberculosis. Among those in care, coverage of ART for treatment-eligible persons was 100% for those with prior tuberculosis and 88.6% (95% CI: 81.6 to 95.7) for those without. Among all HIV-infected persons, ART coverage among treatment-eligible persons was 86.9% (95% CI: 74.2 to 99.5) for persons with prior tuberculosis and 58.3% (95% CI: 47.6 to 69.0) for those without. Conclusions Morbidity from tuberculosis and HIV remain major health challenges in Kenya. Tuberculosis is an important entry point for HIV diagnosis and treatment. Lack of knowledge of HIV serostatus is an obstacle to access to HIV services and timely ART for prevention of HIV transmission and HIV-associated disease, including tuberculosis. PMID:24732814

  19. The Impact of Alcohol on BCG-Induced Immunity Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Porretta, Elizabeth; Happel, Kyle I.; Teng, Xu S.; Ramsay, Alistair; Mason, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Alcoholics are at heightened risk for developing active tuberculosis. This study evaluates chronic alcohol consumption in a murine model of vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis Bacille-Calmette Gurin (BCG) and subsequent pulmonary infection with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Methods BALB/c mice were administered the Lieber-DeCarli liquid ethanol diet (LED) or pair-fed the liquid control diet (LCD) for three weeks either before or after subcutaneous vaccination with M. bovis BCG. At least three weeks after BCG vaccination, groups of mice on the above diets were challenged with intratracheal infection with M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Lung mycobacterial burden, and lung and lung-associated lymph node CD4+ lymphocyte production of TB-specific interferon (IFN)-? were assayed. Popliteal lymph node lymphocytes from both dietary regimens undergoing BCG vaccination (in the absence of M. tuberculosis infection) were also evaluated for PPD-induced interferon (IFN)-? production by ELISpot assay. Results Mice begun on alcohol prior to vaccination with M. bovis BCG demonstrated impaired control of pulmonary challenge with virulent M. tuberculosis, as well as impaired lung CD4+ and popliteal lymph node T cell IFN-? responses. If BCG vaccination was delivered prior to initiation of alcohol feeding, the mice remained protected against a subsequent challenge with M. tuberculosis, and BCG-induced immunity was not impaired in either the lung or the popliteal lymph nodes. Conclusions Alcohol consumption blunts the development of the adaptive immune response to M. bovis BCG vaccination, which impairs the control of a secondary challenge with M. tuberculosis, but only if the alcohol exposure is begun prior to BCG vaccination. These results provide insight into mechanisms by which alcohol consumption impairs antimycobacterial immunity, including in response to vaccination and subsequent pathogenic challenge. PMID:22014229

  20. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in Singapore, 2006-2012

    PubMed Central

    Win, Wah; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Hsu, Li Yang; Mak, Estelle; Earnest, Arul; Ong, Marcus Eng-Hock; Cutter, Jeffery; Wang, Yee Tang

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis remains common in Singapore, increasing in incidence since 2008. We attempted to determine the molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) isolates locally, identifying major circulating genotypes and obtaining a glimpse of transmission dynamics. Methodology Non-duplicate MTC isolates archived between 2006 and 2012 at the larger clinical tuberculosis laboratory in Singapore were sampled for spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR typing, with case data obtained from the Singapore Tuberculosis Elimination Program registry database. Isolates between 2008 and 2012 were selected because of either multidrug-resistance or potential epidemiological linkage, whereas earlier isolates were randomly selected. Separate analyses were performed for the early (2006-2007) and later (2008-2012) study phases in view of potential selection bias. Principal Findings A total of 1,612 MTC isolates were typed, constituting 13.1% of all culture-positive tuberculosis cases during this period. Multidrug-resistance was present in 91 (5.6%) isolates – higher than the national prevalence in view of selection bias. The majority of isolates belonged to the Beijing (45.8%) and EAI (22.8%) lineages. There were 347 (30.7%) and 133 (27.5%) cases clustered by combined spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR typing from the earlier and later phases respectively. Patients within these clusters tended to be of Chinese ethnicity, Singapore resident, and have isolates belonging to the Beijing lineage. A review of prior contact investigation results for all patients with clustered isolates failed to reveal epidemiological links for the majority, suggesting either unknown transmission networks or inadequate specificity of the molecular typing methods in a country with a moderate incidence of tuberculosis. Conclusion Our work demonstrates that Singapore has a large and heterogeneous distribution of MTC strains, and with possible cross-transmission over the past few years based on our molecular typing results. A universal MTC typing program coupled with enhanced contact investigations may be useful in further understanding the transmission dynamics of tuberculosis locally. PMID:24367667

  1. Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ekinci, Safak; Tatar, Oner; Akpancar, Serkan; Bilgic, Serkan; Ersen, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis (TB) is a significant form of TB, causing spinal deformity and paralysis. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for avoiding multivertebral destruction and are critical for improving outcomes in spinal TB. We believe that appropriate treatment method should be implemented at the early stage of this disease and that the Gulhane Askeri Tıp Akademisi classification system can be considered a practical guide for spinal TB treatment planning in all countries. PMID:26609247

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis TlyA Protein Negatively Regulates T Helper (Th) 1 and Th17 Differentiation and Promotes Tuberculosis Pathogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Aejazur; Sobia, Parveen; Dwivedi, Ved Prakash; Bhawsar, Aakansha; Singh, Dhiraj Kumar; Sharma, Pawan; Moodley, Prashini; Van Kaer, Luc; Bishai, William R; Das, Gobardhan

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is an ancient pathogen and a major cause of death worldwide. Although various virulence factors of M. tuberculosis have been identified, its pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. TlyA is a virulence factor in several bacterial infections and is evolutionarily conserved in many Gram-positive bacteria, but its function in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we report that TlyA significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis. We show that a TlyA mutant M. tuberculosis strain induces increased IL-12 and reduced IL-1β and IL-10 cytokine responses, which sharply contrasts with the immune responses induced by wild type M. tuberculosis. Furthermore, compared with wild type M. tuberculosis, TlyA-deficient M. tuberculosis bacteria are more susceptible to autophagy in macrophages. Consequently, animals infected with the TlyA mutant M. tuberculosis organisms exhibited increased host-protective immune responses, reduced bacillary load, and increased survival compared with animals infected with wild type M. tuberculosis. Thus, M. tuberculosis employs TlyA as a host evasion factor, thereby contributing to its virulence. PMID:25847237

  3. Transmission of Tuberculosis in a South African Community With a High Prevalence of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Middelkoop, Keren; Mathema, Barun; Myer, Landon; Shashkina, Elena; Whitelaw, Andrew; Kaplan, Gilla; Kreiswirth, Barry; Wood, Robin; Bekker, Linda-Gail

    2015-01-01

    Background. In settings of high tuberculosis transmission, little is known of the interaction between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive and HIV-negative tuberculosis disease and of the impact of antiretroviral treatment (ART) programs on tuberculosis transmission dynamics. Methods. Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates were collected from patients with tuberculosis who resided in a South African township with a high burden of tuberculosis and HIV infection. Demographic and clinical data were extracted from clinic records. Isolates underwent IS6110-based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Patients with unique (nonclustered) M. tuberculosis genotypes and cluster index cases (ie, the first tuberculosis case in a cluster) were defined as having tuberculosis due to reactivation of latent M. tuberculosis infection. Secondary cases in clusters were defined as having tuberculosis due to recent M. tuberculosis infection. Results. Overall, 311 M. tuberculosis genotypes were identified among 718 isolates from 710 patients; 224 (31%) isolates were unique strains, and 478 (67%) occurred in 87 clusters. Cluster index cases were significantly more likely than other tuberculosis cases to be HIV negative. HIV-positive patients were more likely to be secondary cases (P = .001), including patients receiving ART (P = .004). Only 8% of cases of adult-adult transmission of tuberculosis occurred on shared residential plots. Conclusions. Recent infection accounted for the majority of tuberculosis cases, particularly among HIV-positive patients, including patients receiving ART. HIV-negative patients may be disproportionally responsible for ongoing transmission. PMID:25053739

  4. [Tuberculosis epidemiology in Mayotte Island].

    PubMed

    Woessner, J; Receveur, M C; Malvy, D; Taytard, A

    2008-10-01

    Mayotte is a French territory island, part of the Comoros Archipelago in the Indian Ocean with 200,000 inhabitants. The tuberculosis control program started in 1976, although available epidemiological data remains incomplete. We conducted a retrospective hospital-based survey in 202 outpatients and hospital medical records from the Hospital Centre of the main city to contribute to the epidemiological evaluation of tuberculosis patterns. The tuberculosis frequency remains unchanged since 2000. It affects a young population partly coming from the other neighbouring Comoro Islands (69%) with illegal immigrate status (53% in 2004). The systematic diagnostic screening efficiency of the condition appears marginal. Pulmonary involvement is the most frequent clinical manifestation (78%), although severe extrapulmonary manifestations are not exceptional. Co-infection with HIV and multi resistance to antituberculosis agents are not frequent. Up to 60% of cases have been proven to be bacteriologically linked. The notification rate remains critically low with an estimate of 39% of notifications to the local sanitary authorities in charge of secondary cases screening. The case coverage seems limited both by low socio-economical status and poor health facility accessibility The loss of follow up is dramatically high, 41% on the overall period, and up to 51% in 2004. Our results make mandatory the reinforcement of a tuberculosis survey and control involvement within the context of this French territory. Screening, care and follow up are to be implemented particularly for vulnerable and precarious groups and for patients. PMID:18956814

  5. Secular trends of tuberculosis in western Europe.

    PubMed Central

    Raviglione, M. C.; Sudre, P.; Rieder, H. L.; Spinaci, S.; Kochi, A.

    1993-01-01

    Deaths due to tuberculosis have decreased uniformly in all countries in Western Europe, and most have occurred among those aged > or = 65 years. In recent years, tuberculosis case notifications have continued to decline in Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, and Spain, and have levelled off in Sweden and the United Kingdom; increases have, however, been recorded in Austria, Denmark, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, and Switzerland. In Denmark, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and Switzerland an increasing number of cases of tuberculosis among foreign-born residents has resulted in a change from the expected downward trend. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection appears to contribute only marginally to the overall tuberculosis morbidity; however, it appears to be important in Paris and its surrounding areas, and tuberculosis is very common among HIV-infected persons in Italy and Spain. Despite these recent changes in the incidence of tuberculosis, there is currently no evidence of its increased transmission among the youngest age groups of the indigenous populations. Properly designed disease surveillance systems are critical for monitoring the tuberculosis trends so that each country can identify its own high-risk groups and target interventions to prevent, diagnose, and treat the disease. Tuberculosis remains a global disease and because of increasing human migrations, its elimination in Western Europe cannot be envisaged without concomitant improvements in its control in high-incidence, resource-poor countries. PMID:8324847

  6. Impaired Pulmonary Nitric Oxide Bioavailability in Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Association With Disease Severity and Delayed Mycobacterial Clearance With Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Anna P.; Yeo, Tsin W.; Salome, Cheryl M.; Waramori, Govert; Pontororing, Gysje J.; Kenangalem, Enny; Sandjaja; Tjitra, Emiliana; Lumb, Richard; Maguire, Graeme P.; Price, Ric N.; Chatfield, Mark D.; Kelly, Paul M.; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Nitric oxide (NO), a key macrophage antimycobacterial mediator that ameliorates immunopathology, is measurable in exhaled breath in individuals with pulmonary tuberculosis. We investigated relationships between fractional exhale NO (FENO) and initial pulmonary tuberculosis severity, change during treatment, and relationship with conversion of sputum culture to negative at 2 months. Methods. In Papua, we measured FENO in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis at baseline and serially over 6 months and once in healthy controls. Treatment outcomes were conversion of sputum culture results at 2 months and time to conversion of sputum microscopy results. Results. Among 200 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 88 controls, FENO was lower for patients with pulmonary tuberculosis at diagnosis (geometric mean FENO, 12.7 parts per billion [ppb]; 95% confidence interval [CI], 11.6–13.8) than for controls (geometric mean FENO, 16.6 ppb; 95% CI, 14.2–19.5; P = .002), fell further after treatment initiation (nadir at 1 week), and then recovered by 6 months (P = .03). Lower FENO was associated with more-severe tuberculosis disease, with FENO directly proportional to weight (P < .001) and forced vital-capacity (P = .001) and inversely proportional to radiological score (P = .03). People whose FENO increased or remained unchanged by 2 months were 2.7-fold more likely to achieve conversion of sputum culture than those whose FENO decreased (odds ratio, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.05–7.12; P = .04). Conclusions. Among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, impaired pulmonary NO bioavailability is associated with more-severe disease and delayed mycobacterial clearance. Measures to increase pulmonary NO warrant investigation as adjunctive tuberculosis treatments. PMID:23737604

  7. Hysterosalpingographic findings in women with genital tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Farrokh, Donya; Layegh, Parvaneh; Afzalaghaee, Monavvar; Mohammadi, Mohaddeseh; Fallah Rastegar, Yalda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genital tuberculosis (TB) is an important cause of infertility in the developing countries, where hysterosalpingography (HSG) remains an initial diagnostic procedure in the evaluation of tubal and peritoneal factors leading to infertility. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the HSG findings of genital TB in infertile women. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed HSG findings in 20 women with genital tuberculosis. HSG was performed in these women as part of infertility work up over 5 years. The other diagnostic procedures used included endometrial curettage and biopsy, histological examination, culture, laparoscopy, hysteroscopy and polymerase chain reaction. Results: The mean age of the participants was 30.5±8 years. All women had clinical history of infertility for at least 4 years. Women presented with pelvic abdominal pain (30-35%) and menstrual disturbances (20-25%). Reviewing 20 cases of female genital TB were encountered various presentations on HSG. Conclusion: HSG is an invaluable procedure in suggesting the diagnosis of genital TB in patients being investigated for infertility. PMID:26221129

  8. Use of T Cell-Based Diagnosis of Tuberculosis Infection to Optimize Interpretation of Tuberculin Skin Testing in Child Tuberculosis Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Bakir, Mustafa; Dosanjh, Davinder P S; Deeks, Jonathan J; Soysal, Ahmet; Millington, Kerry A; Efe, Serpil; Aslan, Yasemin; Polat, Dilek; Kodalli, Nihat; Yagci, Aysegul; Barlan, Isil; Bahceciler, Nerin; Demiralp, Emel E; Lalvani, Ajit

    2009-01-01

    Background Treatment of recent tuberculosis infection in children <2 years old is essential because of high risk of progression to disease, but diagnosis is hindered by the inaccuracy of the tuberculin skin test (TST). More accurate T cell-based tests for infection could enhance diagnosis by optimizing TST interpretation. Methods 979 child tuberculosis contacts in Istanbul underwent TST and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) testing. Using ELISpot results as a reference standard, we assessed the effect of age and BCG-vaccination on sensitivity and specificity of TST, and computed optimal TST cut-off points (OCPs) using receiver operator characteristic curves. Results Using a ≥10mm TST cut-off point, sensitivity of TST was 66% in children <2y, lower than in older children (p=0.006). Specificity was 75% in BCG-vaccinated children, compared with 92% in unvaccinated children (p=0.001). OCPs improved TST specificity in children with 1 BCG scar with little loss of sensitivity. Despite use of OCPs, sensitivity of TST remained <70% in children <2y, specificity remained <87% in BCG-vaccinated children >2y and overall accuracy was low in children with >1 BCG scar. Conclusions Negative TST results cannot exclude tuberculosis infection in child tuberculosis contacts <2 years old, supporting use of preventive therapy regardless of TST results in this age group. In children >2 years old, accuracy of TST can be improved by adjustment of cut-off points in BCG-vaccinated children but remains poor in children with >1 BCG scar. This methodology can define optimal TST cut-off points for diagnosis of tuberculosis infection tailored to target populations. PMID:19123864

  9. [Chest wall tuberculosis: report of 3 cases].

    PubMed

    Zidane, A; Bakzaza, O; Afandi, O; Baiz, Y; Chafik, A

    2015-10-01

    Despite the dramatic decline in the incidence of tuberculosis during the last decades, the disease remains a significant public health problem especially in developing countries. Chest wall tuberculosis is a very rare location. Clinically, it can present as a pyogenic abscess or soft tumor, making diagnosis difficult, particularly in the absence of warning signs. Optimal therapeutic management is controversial. Medical treatment alone in often insufficient and must be associated with a surgical excision or debridement. PMID:25725600

  10. Tuberculosis: Epidemiology and Control

    PubMed Central

    Sulis, Giorgia; Roggi, Alberto; Matteelli, Alberto; Raviglione, Mario C.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health concern worldwide: despite a regular, although slow, decline in incidence over the last decade, as many as 8.6 million new cases and 1.3 million deaths were estimated to have occurred in 2012. TB is by all means a poverty-related disease, mainly affecting the most vulnerable populations in the poorest countries. The presence of multidrug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis in most countries, with somewhere prevalence is high, is among the major challenges for TB control, which may hinder recent achievements especially in some settings. Early TB case detection especially in resource-constrained settings and in marginalized groups remains a challenge, and about 3 million people are estimated to remain undiagnosed or not notified and untreated. The World Health Organization (WHO) has recently launched a new global TB strategy for the “post-2015 era” aimed at “ending the global TB epidemic” by 2035. This strategy is based on the three pillars that emphasize patient-centred TB care and prevention, bold policies and supportive systems, and intensified research and innovation. This paper aims to provide an overview of the global TB epidemiology as well as of the main challenges that must be faced to eliminate the disease as a public health problem everywhere. PMID:25408856

  11. Assessment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission in Oxfordshire, UK, 2007–12, with whole pathogen genome sequences: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Timothy M; Lalor, Maeve K; Broda, Agnieszka; Ortega, Luisa Saldana; Morgan, Marcus; Parker, Lynne; Churchill, Sheila; Bennett, Karen; Golubchik, Tanya; Giess, Adam P; Del Ojo Elias, Carlos; Jeffery, Katie J; Bowler, Ian C J W; Laurenson, Ian F; Barrett, Anne; Drobniewski, Francis; McCarthy, Noel D; Anderson, Laura F; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Thomas, H Lucy; Monk, Philip; Smith, E Grace; Walker, A Sarah; Crook, Derrick W

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Patients born outside the UK have contributed to a 20% rise in the UK’s tuberculosis incidence since 2000, but their effect on domestic transmission is not known. Here we use whole-genome sequencing to investigate the epidemiology of tuberculosis transmission in an unselected population over 6 years. Methods We identified all residents with Oxfordshire postcodes with a Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture or a clinical diagnosis of tuberculosis between Jan 1, 2007, and Dec 31, 2012, using local databases and checking against the national Enhanced Tuberculosis Surveillance database. We used Illumina technology to sequence all available M tuberculosis cultures from identified cases. Sequences were clustered by genetic relatedness and compared retrospectively with contact investigations. The first patient diagnosed in each cluster was defined as the index case, with links to subsequent cases assigned first by use of any epidemiological linkage, then by genetic distance, and then by timing of diagnosis. Findings Although we identified 384 patients with a diagnosis of tuberculosis, country of birth was known for 380 and we sequenced isolates from 247 of 269 cases with culture-confirmed disease. 39 cases were genomically linked within 13 clusters, implying 26 local transmission events. Only 11 of 26 possible transmissions had been previously identified through contact tracing. Of seven genomically confirmed household clusters, five contained additional genomic links to epidemiologically unidentified non-household members. 255 (67%) patients were born in a country with high tuberculosis incidence, conferring a local incidence of 109 cases per 100 000 population per year in Oxfordshire, compared with 3·5 cases per 100 000 per year for those born in low-incidence countries. However, patients born in the low-incidence countries, predominantly UK, were more likely to have pulmonary disease (adjusted odds ratio 1·8 [95% CI 1·2–2·9]; p=0·009), social risk factors (4·4 [2·0–9·4]; p<0·0001), and be part of a local transmission cluster (4·8 [1·6–14·8]; p=0·006). Interpretation Although inward migration has contributed to the overall tuberculosis incidence, our findings suggest that most patients born in high-incidence countries reactivate latent infection acquired abroad and are not involved in local onward transmission. Systematic screening of new entrants could further improve tuberculosis control, but it is important that health care remains accessible to all individuals, especially high-risk groups, if tuberculosis control is not to be jeopardised. PMID:24717625

  12. Pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ortona, L; Federico, G

    1998-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis: primary tuberculosis, usually asymptomatic, represents the first infection and is shown by a parenchymal mostly mid-pulmonary focus and satellite lymphadenopathy. Postprimary pulmonary tuberculosis, mostly located in the upper fields may be caused by endogenous reinfection for reactivation of a hematogenous focus formed during primary infection or from exogenous reinfection. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis: it includes numerous forms mostly from hematogenous spread. Miliary tuberculosis may involve a number of organs and apparatus besides the lung. Tuberculous meningitis predominantly involves the base of the skull, the fluid is clear with hypoglycorrhachia and lymphocyte pleocytosis. Lymph node tuberculosis is generally unilateral and cervical. Tuberculous pleuritis is exudative or dry. Other forms of tuberculous serositis are pericarditis and peritonitis. Renal tuberculosis involves the medullaris and intestinal tuberculosis the ileocecum; tuberculous spondilitis (Pott's disease) involves the last dorsal vertebrae. Other forms are osteoarthritis, genital tract tuberculosis, pancreatitis, laryngitis, otitis. PMID:9673136

  13. Nosocomial tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, A

    1982-05-01

    Hospital employees are at risk of contracting tuberculosis from patients. The undiagnosed case with sputum-smear positive for acid-fast bacilli is the usual source case. However, even the smear-negative patient may pose a risk. This was documented by a high rate of skin test conversion in hospital staff exposed to a smear-negative, culture-positive patient in a respiratory intensive care unit. The patient required bronchoscopy, intubation, and assisted ventilation. Of susceptible hospital staff members who were exposed to the index case, 14 of 45 (31%) converted their PPD skin test. Ten of 13 (77%) susceptible hospital staff members present at the time of bronchoscopy converted, compared with 4 of 32 (12.5%) who were not present at bronchoscopy (Fischer's exact test p = 0.0006). Rough calculations suggest that during the bronchoscopy and intubation the index case generated at least 249 infectious units per hour. At the ventilation levels in this area, this resulted in 1 infectious unit of tuberculosis in each 68.9 cubic feet of air. Improved ventilation, high efficiency filters, and ultraviolet irradiation are effective recommended ways to clean the air of infectious particles. PMID:7081816

  14. Aggressive Regimens for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Reduce Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Molly F.; Appleton, Sasha C.; Mitnick, Carole D.; Furin, Jennifer J.; Bayona, Jaime; Chalco, Katiuska; Shin, Sonya; Murray, Megan; Becerra, Mercedes C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Recurrent tuberculosis disease occurs within 2 years in as few as 1% and as many as 29% of individuals successfully treated for multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis. A better understanding of treatment-related factors associated with an elevated risk of recurrent tuberculosis after cure is urgently needed to optimize MDR tuberculosis therapy. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among adults successfully treated for MDR tuberculosis in Peru. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to examine whether receipt of an aggressive MDR tuberculosis regimen for ≥18 months following sputum conversion from positive to negative was associated with a reduced rate of recurrent tuberculosis. Results. Among 402 patients, the median duration of follow-up was 40.5 months (interquartile range, 21.2–53.4). Receipt of an aggressive MDR tuberculosis regimen for ≥18 months following sputum conversion was associated with a lower risk of recurrent tuberculosis (hazard ratio, 0.40 [95% confidence interval, 0.17–0.96]; P = .04). A baseline diagnosis of diabetes mellitus also predicted recurrent tuberculosis (hazard ratio, 10.47 [95% confidence interval, 2.17–50.60]; P = .004). Conclusions. Individuals who received an aggressive MDR tuberculosis regimen for ≥18 months following sputum conversion experienced a lower rate of recurrence after cure. Efforts to ensure that an aggressive regimen is accessible to all patients with MDR tuberculosis, such as minimization of sequential ineffective regimens, expanded drug access, and development of new MDR tuberculosis compounds, are critical to reducing tuberculosis recurrence in this population. Patients with diabetes mellitus should be carefully managed during initial treatment and followed closely for recurrent disease. PMID:23223591

  15. Clinical Evaluation of Tuberculosis Viability Microscopy for Assessing Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sumona; Sherman, Jonathan M.; Bravard, Marjory A.; Valencia, Teresa; Gilman, Robert H.; Evans, Carlton A.

    2015-01-01

    Background.?It is difficult to determine whether early tuberculosis treatment is effective in reducing the infectiousness of patients' sputum, because culture takes weeks and conventional acid-fast sputum microscopy and molecular tests cannot differentiate live from dead tuberculosis. Methods.?To assess treatment response, sputum samples (n = 124) from unselected patients (n = 35) with sputum microscopypositive tuberculosis were tested pretreatment and after 3, 6, and 9 days of empiric first-line therapy. Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy with fluorescein diacetate, quantitative culture, and acid-fast auramine microscopy were all performed in triplicate. Results.?Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy predicted quantitative culture results such that 76% of results agreed within 1 logarithm (rS = 0.85; P < .0001). In 31 patients with non-multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis, viability and quantitative culture results approximately halved (both 0.27 log reduction, P < .001) daily. For patients with non-MDR tuberculosis and available data, by treatment day 9 there was a >10-fold reduction in viability in 100% (24/24) of cases and quantitative culture in 95% (19/20) of cases. Four other patients subsequently found to have MDR tuberculosis had no significant changes in viability (P = .4) or quantitative culture (P = .6) results during early treatment. The change in viability and quantitative culture results during early treatment differed significantly between patients with non-MDR tuberculosis and those with MDR tuberculosis (both P < .001). Acid-fast microscopy results changed little during early treatment, and this change was similar for non-MDR tuberculosis vs MDR tuberculosis (P = .6). Conclusions.?Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy is a simple test that within 1 hour predicted quantitative culture results that became available weeks later, rapidly indicating whether patients were responding to tuberculosis therapy. PMID:25537870

  16. Point Prevalence and Incidence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in captive elephants in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Melissa; Isaza, Ramiro; Prins, Cindy; Hernandez, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Background Captive elephants infected with tuberculosis are implicated as an occupational source of zoonotic tuberculosis. However, accurate estimates of prevalence and incidence of elephant tuberculosis from well-defined captive populations are lacking in the literature. Studies published in recent years contain a wide range of prevalence estimates calculated from summary data. Incidence estimates of elephant tuberculosis in captive elephants are not available. Objective This study estimated the annual point prevalence, annual incidence, cumulative incidence, and incidence density of tuberculosis in captive elephants within the USA during the past 52 years. Animals and Methods We combined existing elephant census records from captive elephants in the USA with tuberculosis culture results obtained from trunk washes or at necropsy. This data set included 15 years where each elephant was screened annually. Results Between 1960 and 1996, the annual point prevalence of tuberculosis complex mycobacteria for both species was 0. From 1997 through 2011, the median point prevalence within the Asian elephant population was 5.1%, with a range from 0.3% to 6.7%. The incidence density was 9.7 cases/1000 elephant years (95% CI: 7.0–13.4). In contrast, the annual point prevalence during the same time period within the African elephant population remained 0 and the incidence density was 1.5 cases/1000 elephant years (95% CI: 0.7–4.0). Conclusions The apparent increase in new cases noted after 1996 resulted from a combination of both index cases and the initiation of mandatory annual tuberculosis complex (MTBC) screening in 1997 for all the elephants. This study found lower annual point prevalence estimates than previously reported in the literature. These discrepancies in prevalence estimates are primarily due to differences in terminology and calculation methods. Using the same intensive testing regime, the incidence of tuberculosis differed significantly between Asian and African elephants. Clinical Importance Accurate and species specific knowledge of prevalence and incidence will inform our efforts to mitigate occupational risks associated with captive elephants in the USA. PMID:23477422

  17. Diagnosing Tuberculosis With a Novel Support Vector Machine-Based Artificial Immune Recognition System

    PubMed Central

    Saybani, Mahmoud Reza; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Golzari Hormozi, Shahram; Wah, Teh Ying; Aghabozorgi, Saeed; Pourhoseingholi, Mohamad Amin; Olariu, Teodora

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health problem, which has been ranked as the second leading cause of death from an infectious disease worldwide. Diagnosis based on cultured specimens is the reference standard, however results take weeks to process. Scientists are looking for early detection strategies, which remain the cornerstone of tuberculosis control. Consequently there is a need to develop an expert system that helps medical professionals to accurately and quickly diagnose the disease. Artificial Immune Recognition System (AIRS) has been used successfully for diagnosing various diseases. However, little effort has been undertaken to improve its classification accuracy. Objectives: In order to increase the classification accuracy of AIRS, this study introduces a new hybrid system that incorporates a support vector machine into AIRS for diagnosing tuberculosis. Patients and Methods: Patient epacris reports obtained from the Pasteur laboratory of Iran were used as the benchmark data set, with the sample size of 175 (114 positive samples for TB and 60 samples in the negative group). The strategy of this study was to ensure representativeness, thus it was important to have an adequate number of instances for both TB and non-TB cases. The classification performance was measured through 10-fold cross-validation, Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE), sensitivity and specificity, Youden’s Index, and Area Under the Curve (AUC). Statistical analysis was done using the Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis (WEKA), a machine learning program for windows. Results: With an accuracy of 100%, sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 100%, Youden’s Index of 1, Area Under the Curve of 1, and RMSE of 0, the proposed method was able to successfully classify tuberculosis patients. Conclusions: There have been many researches that aimed at diagnosing tuberculosis faster and more accurately. Our results described a model for diagnosing tuberculosis with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. This model can be used as an additional tool for experts in medicine to diagnose TBC more accurately and quickly. PMID:26023340

  18. Tuberculosis in Blacks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Epidemiology of Tuberculosis in Correctional Facilities, United States, 1993-2014 Prevention and Control of Tuberculosis in Correctional ... of death in the United States, but since 1993 the rates of TB in the country have ...

  19. [Control and prevention of tuberculosis in healthcare facilities].

    PubMed

    Sernia, Sabina; Arcaro, Paola; Ortis, Marina; La Torre, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains the leading cause of death by a single infectious agent. Healthcare workers who for professional reasons are exposed to infectious patients and to potentially contaminated materials are at high risk of infection. This article provides a review of existing regulations and summarizes national and international guidelines and operational protocols for tuberculosis surveillance in clinical settings. PMID:24316878

  20. Virulence factors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex

    PubMed Central

    Forrellad, Marina A.; Klepp, Laura I.; Gioffré, Andrea; Sabio y García, Julia; Morbidoni, Hector R.; Santangelo, María de la Paz; Cataldi, Angel A.; Bigi, Fabiana

    2013-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) consists of closely related species that cause tuberculosis in both humans and animals. This illness, still today, remains to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The mycobacteria enter the host by air, and, once in the lungs, are phagocytated by macrophages. This may lead to the rapid elimination of the bacillus or to the triggering of an active tuberculosis infection. A large number of different virulence factors have evolved in MTBC members as a response to the host immune reaction. The aim of this review is to describe the bacterial genes/proteins that are essential for the virulence of MTBC species, and that have been demonstrated in an in vivo model of infection. Knowledge of MTBC virulence factors is essential for the development of new vaccines and drugs to help manage the disease toward an increasingly more tuberculosis-free world. PMID:23076359

  1. Tuberculosis diagnostics: Challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Nema, Vijay

    2012-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has been a disease affecting almost all parts of the world since ages. Lot many efforts came in the past for improving diagnosis and treatment. Also, an effective vaccine has been sought after for long. With the emergence of resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causal organisms of tuberculosis, and complexities emerging due to other associated infections and disease conditions, there is a desperate need for further research input in the field. Be it the better medication and care or better resistance management, proper diagnostics holds the key to success. It has been observed that a high burden of the disease was accompanied by resource limitations and poor research set-up. The scenario remained like this for several decades. With the refreshed vision of resourceful countries and funding agencies, funding is being provided in many areas of research in tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment. This review has been written with an aim to bring forth the limitations of available methods in the field of diagnostics and making researchers aware about the changing scenario with better funding opportunities and support. The author visualizes an enthusiasm from all over the world for the development of better modalities and urges scientists to join the struggle at this very perfect time to take the challenge and come forward with innovations in this field. PMID:22919166

  2. Tuberculosis diagnostics: Challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Nema, Vijay

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has been a disease affecting almost all parts of the world since ages. Lot many efforts came in the past for improving diagnosis and treatment. Also, an effective vaccine has been sought after for long. With the emergence of resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causal organisms of tuberculosis, and complexities emerging due to other associated infections and disease conditions, there is a desperate need for further research input in the field. Be it the better medication and care or better resistance management, proper diagnostics holds the key to success. It has been observed that a high burden of the disease was accompanied by resource limitations and poor research set-up. The scenario remained like this for several decades. With the refreshed vision of resourceful countries and funding agencies, funding is being provided in many areas of research in tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment. This review has been written with an aim to bring forth the limitations of available methods in the field of diagnostics and making researchers aware about the changing scenario with better funding opportunities and support. The author visualizes an enthusiasm from all over the world for the development of better modalities and urges scientists to join the struggle at this very perfect time to take the challenge and come forward with innovations in this field. PMID:22919166

  3. Isoniazid-Resistant Tuberculosis in Children: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Courtney M.; Tolman, Arielle W.; Cohen, Ted; Parr, Jonathan B.; Keshavjee, Salmaan; Becerra, Mercedes C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Isoniazid resistance is an obstacle to the treatment of tuberculosis disease and latent tuberculosis infection in children. We aim to summarize the literature describing the risk of isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis among children with tuberculosis disease. Methods We did a systematic review of published reports of children with tuberculosis disease who had isolates tested for susceptibility to isoniazid. We searched PubMed, Embase and LILACS online databasesuptoJanuary 12, 2012. Results Our search identified 3,403 citations, of which 95 studies met inclusion criteria. These studies evaluated 8,351 children with tuberculosis disease for resistance to isoniazid. The median proportion of children found to have isoniazid-resistant strains was 8%; the distribution was right-skewed (25th percentile: 0% and 75th percentile: 18%). Conclusions High proportions of isoniazid resistance among pediatric tuberculosis patients have been reported in many settings suggesting that diagnostics detecting only rifampin resistance are insufficient to guide appropriate treatment in this population. Many children are likely receiving sub-standard tuberculosis treatment with empirical isoniazid-based regimens, and treating latent tuberculosis infection with isoniazid may not be effective in large numbers of children. Work is needed urgently to identify effective regimens for the treatment of children sick with or exposed to isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis and to better understand the scope of this problem. PMID:23348808

  4. Hysterosalpingographic Appearances of Female Genital Tract Tuberculosis: Part II: Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Firoozeh; Zafarani, Fatemeh; Shahrzad, Gholam Shahrzad

    2014-01-01

    Female genital tuberculosis remains as a major cause of tubal obstruction leading to infertility, especially in developing countries. The global prevalence of genital tuberculosis has increased during the past two decades due to increasing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Genital tuberculosis (TB) is commonly asymptomatic and it is diagnosed during infertility investigations. Despite of recent advances in imaging tools such as computed tomography (CT) scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasongraphy, hysterosalpinography has been considered as the standard screening test for evaluation of tubal infertility and as a valuable tool for diagnosis of female genital tuberculosis. Tuberculosis gives rise to various appearances on hysterosalpingography (HSG) from non-specific changes to specific findings. The present pictorial review illustrates and describes specific and non-specific radiographic features of female genital tuberculosis in two parts. Part I presents specific findings of tuberculosis related to tubes such as "beaded tube", "golf club tube", "pipestem tube", "cobble stone tube" and the "leopard skin tube". Part II will describe adverse effects of tuberculosis on structure of endometrium and radiological specific findings, such as "T-shaped" tuberculosis uterus, "pseudo-unicornuate "uterus, "collar-stud abscess" and "dwarfed" uterus with lymphatic intravasation and occluded tubes which have not been encountered in the majority of non-tuberculosis cases. PMID:24696765

  5. Co-evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Homo sapiens

    PubMed Central

    Brites, Daniela; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    The causative agent of human tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is an obligate pathogen that evolved to exclusively persist in human populations. For M. tuberculosis to transmit from person to person, it has to cause pulmonary disease. Therefore, M. tuberculosis virulence has likely been a significant determinant of the association between M. tuberculosis and humans. Indeed, the evolutionary success of some M. tuberculosis genotypes seems at least partially attributable to their increased virulence. The latter possibly evolved as a consequence of human demographic expansions. If co-evolution occurred, humans would have counteracted to minimize the deleterious effects of M. tuberculosis virulence. The fact that human resistance to infection has a strong genetic basis is a likely consequence of such a counter-response. The genetic architecture underlying human resistance to M. tuberculosis remains largely elusive. However, interactions between human genetic polymorphisms and M. tuberculosis genotypes have been reported. Such interactions are consistent with local adaptation and allow for a better understanding of protective immunity in TB. Future ‘genome-to-genome’ studies, in which locally associated human and M. tuberculosis genotypes are interrogated in conjunction, will help identify new protective antigens for the development of better TB vaccines. PMID:25703549

  6. [Tuberculosis as occupational disease].

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Ticona, Alberto

    2012-06-01

    There is enough evidence to declare tuberculosis as an occupational disease among healthcare workers. In Peru, there are regulations granting employment rights regarding tuberculosis as an occupational disease, such as healthcare coverage for temporary or permanent disability. However, these rights have not been sufficiently socialized. This study presents information on the risk of acquiring tuberculosis in the workplace, and a review of the evidence to declare tuberculosis as an occupational disease among health care workers, presenting the current Peruvian law related. PMID:22858771

  7. Multicentric Spinal Tuberculosis with Sternoclavicular Joint Involvement: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Umesh Kumar; Meena, Ramesh Chand

    2014-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis is a chronic disease which may have varied presentations. Though pulmonary tuberculosis is the commonest, extrapulmonary tuberculosis involving skeletal system is often seen. Individuals with poor nourishment and immunological status are especially susceptible for disseminated and multicentric tuberculosis. Case Report. We here present a case of tuberculosis involving multiple anatomical locations in an immune-competent patient which was diagnosed with radiological studies and confirmed with histological examination. Patient was put on multidrug antitubercular therapy and responded well to the treatment with improvement in clinical and radiological picture. Clinical Relevance. This report of a rare case makes us aware of the varied presentations which tuberculosis can present with. It should be kept as a differential diagnosis in patients with cough and fever but not responding to conventional treatment. This is even more important in countries with poor socioeconomic conditions. PMID:25389505

  8. Rigors in tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, C.; Eykyn, S.; Davidson, C.

    1993-01-01

    Rigors are not a recognized characteristic of miliary tuberculosis. We report two patients presenting with persistent rigors, thought to be suggestive of acute pyogenic infection, who were subsequently found to have miliary tuberculosis. In both cases, there was significant diagnostic delay. Miliary tuberculosis should therefore be included in the differential diagnosis of any patient presenting with unexplained rigors. PMID:8255841

  9. Differential influence of nutrient-starved Mycobacterium tuberculosis on adaptive immunity results in progressive tuberculosis disease and pathology.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Jes; Roy, Sugata; Rosenkrands, Ida; Lindenstrøm, Thomas; Filskov, Jonathan; Rasmussen, Erik Michael; Cassidy, Joseph; Andersen, Peter

    2015-12-01

    When infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, most individuals will remain clinically healthy but latently infected. Latent infection has been proposed to partially involve M. tuberculosis in a nonreplicating stage, which therefore represents an M. tuberculosis phenotype that the immune system most likely will encounter during latency. It is therefore relevant to examine how this particular nonreplicating form of M. tuberculosis interacts with the host immune system. To study this, we first induced a state of nonreplication through prolonged nutrient starvation of M. tuberculosis in vitro. This resulted in nonreplicating persistence even after prolonged culture in phosphate-buffered saline. Infection with either exponentially growing M. tuberculosis or nutrient-starved M. tuberculosis resulted in similar lung CFU levels in the first phase of the infection. However, between week 3 and 6 postinfection, there was a very pronounced increase in bacterial levels and associated lung pathology in nutrient-starved-M. tuberculosis-infected mice. This was associated with a shift from CD4 T cells that coexpressed gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) or IFN-γ, TNF-α, and interleukin-2 to T cells that only expressed IFN-γ. Thus, nonreplicating M. tuberculosis induced through nutrient starvation promotes a bacterial form that is genetically identical to exponentially growing M. tuberculosis yet characterized by a differential impact on the immune system that may be involved in undermining host antimycobacterial immunity and facilitate increased pathology and transmission. PMID:26416911

  10. Tuberculosis verrucosa cutis (TBVC)--foot with miliary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Padmavathy, L; Lakshmana Rao, L; Ethirajan, N; Ramakrishna Rao, M; Subrahmanyan, E N; Manohar, U

    2007-07-01

    Tuberculosis Verrucosa Cutis (TBVC) or warty tuberculosis is a variant of cutaneous tuberculosis in patients with good cell mediated immunity (CMI) to Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, while Miliary Tuberculosis is associated with very poor CMI. Two widely different clinical presentations in the same patient are very rare and being reported. PMID:17886704

  11. Synthetic Long Peptide Derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Latency Antigen Rv1733c Protects against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Mariateresa; van den Eeden, Susan J. F.; Wilson, Louis; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Responsible for 9 million new cases of active disease and nearly 2 million deaths each year, tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health threat of overwhelming dimensions. Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the only licensed vaccine available, fails to confer lifelong protection and to prevent reactivation of latent infection. Although 15 new vaccine candidates are now in clinical trials, an effective vaccine against TB remains elusive, and new strategies for vaccination are vital. BCG vaccination fails to induce immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis latency antigens. Synthetic long peptides (SLPs) combined with adjuvants have been studied mostly for therapeutic cancer vaccines, yet not for TB, and proved to induce efficient antitumor immunity. This study investigated an SLP derived from Rv1733c, a major M. tuberculosis latency antigen which is highly expressed by “dormant” M. tuberculosis and well recognized by T cells from latently M. tuberculosis-infected individuals. In order to assess its in vivo immunogenicity and protective capacity, Rv1733c SLP in CpG was administered to HLA-DR3 transgenic mice. Immunization with Rv1733c SLP elicited gamma interferon-positive/tumor necrosis factor-positive (IFN-γ+/TNF+) and IFN-γ+ CD4+ T cells and Rv1733c-specific antibodies and led to a significant reduction in the bacterial load in the lungs of M. tuberculosis-challenged mice. This was observed both in a pre- and in a post-M. tuberculosis challenge setting. Moreover, Rv1733c SLP immunization significantly boosted the protective efficacy of BCG, demonstrating the potential of M. tuberculosis latency antigens to improve BCG efficacy. These data suggest a promising role for M. tuberculosis latency antigen Rv1733c-derived SLPs as a novel TB vaccine approach, both in a prophylactic and in a postinfection setting. PMID:26202436

  12. Molecular diagnostics for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Noor, K M; Shephard, L; Bastian, I

    2015-04-01

    The phenotypic methods of smear microscopy, culture and indirect drug susceptibility testing (DST) remain the 'gold standard' diagnostics for tuberculosis (TB) in 2015. However, this review demonstrates that genotypic methods are in the ascendancy. Current-generation nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) are important supplementary tests for the rapid direct detection of (multidrug-resistant) TB in specific clinical settings. Genotypic detection is already the preferred method of detecting rifampicin and pyrazinamide resistance. Next-generation NAATs able to detect about 10 colony forming units/mL of sputum could replace culture as the initial test for detecting TB. Whole genome sequencing could also plausibly replace phenotypic DST but much work is required in method standardisation, database development and elucidation of all resistance gene determinants. The challenge then will be to rollout these increasingly complex and expensive diagnostics in the low-income countries where TB is prevalent. PMID:25719854

  13. Tuberculosis: Medico-Legal Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Vetrugno, G.; De-Giorgio, F.; D’Alessandro, F.; Scafetta, I.; Berloco, F.; Buonsenso, D.; Abbate, F.; Scalise, G.; Pascali, V.L.; Valentini, P

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a diffusive infectious disease whose typical behaviour differentiates it from other infectious diseases spread by human-to-human transmission (flu, chicken pox, cholera, etc.) that follow a classic epidemic pattern. Indeed, in the presence of a known source of Koch bacilli that is capable of spreading the bacteria by air, not all exposed individuals inhale the bacteria, not all those who inhale them absorb them, not all those who absorb the bacteria are unable to eliminate them, not all who are able to eliminate them do so using delayed hypersensitivity, not all those who react with delayed hypersensitivity suffer lasting tissue damage (among other things, minor), not all who suffer tissue damage have anatomical sequelae, and not all those who have anatomical sequelae, however minimal, become carriers of bacilli in the latent period. The vast majority (90–95%) of the latter – which are in any case a portion, not the totality of those exposed – remain asymptomatic throughout their lives and never develop active tuberculosis. Based on these biological characteristics and the legal concepts of “epidemic” and “disease,” it becomes highly problematic, if not impossible, to assert both that tuberculosis can cause events of sufficient magnitude to be associated with the crime of “epidemic,” and that the mere diagnosis of a latent tuberculosis infection is sufficient to assume the presence of an illness legally prosecutable in criminal proceedings or a disability prosecutable in civil proceedings. Furthermore, clinically apparent tuberculosis is a temporarily—and in some cases permanently—disabling condition, and in certain work environments, even with the difficulties caused by the lack of available effective diagnostic tools and the insidious behaviour of the disease in the early stages, targeted monitoring to identify other persons who may become ill is appropriate. PMID:24804006

  14. Tuberculosis: medico-legal aspects.

    PubMed

    Vetrugno, G; De-Giorgio, F; D'Alessandro, F; Scafetta, I; Berloco, F; Buonsenso, D; Abbate, F; Scalise, G; Pascali, V L; Valentini, P

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a diffusive infectious disease whose typical behaviour differentiates it from other infectious diseases spread by human-to-human transmission (flu, chicken pox, cholera, etc.) that follow a classic epidemic pattern. Indeed, in the presence of a known source of Koch bacilli that is capable of spreading the bacteria by air, not all exposed individuals inhale the bacteria, not all those who inhale them absorb them, not all those who absorb the bacteria are unable to eliminate them, not all who are able to eliminate them do so using delayed hypersensitivity, not all those who react with delayed hypersensitivity suffer lasting tissue damage (among other things, minor), not all who suffer tissue damage have anatomical sequelae, and not all those who have anatomical sequelae, however minimal, become carriers of bacilli in the latent period. The vast majority (90-95%) of the latter - which are in any case a portion, not the totality of those exposed - remain asymptomatic throughout their lives and never develop active tuberculosis. Based on these biological characteristics and the legal concepts of "epidemic" and "disease," it becomes highly problematic, if not impossible, to assert both that tuberculosis can cause events of sufficient magnitude to be associated with the crime of "epidemic," and that the mere diagnosis of a latent tuberculosis infection is sufficient to assume the presence of an illness legally prosecutable in criminal proceedings or a disability prosecutable in civil proceedings. Furthermore, clinically apparent tuberculosis is a temporarily-and in some cases permanently-disabling condition, and in certain work environments, even with the difficulties caused by the lack of available effective diagnostic tools and the insidious behaviour of the disease in the early stages, targeted monitoring to identify other persons who may become ill is appropriate. PMID:24804006

  15. [Childhood tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Hamzaoui, A

    2015-01-01

    Childhood TB is an indication of failing TB control in the community. It allows disease persistence in the population. Mortality and morbidity due to TB is high in children. Moreover, HIV co-infection and multidrug-resistant diseases are as frequent in children as in adults. Infection is more frequent in younger children. Disease risk after primary infection is greatest in infants younger than 2 years. In case of exposure, evidence of infection can be obtained using the tuberculin skin test (TST) or an interferon-gamma assay (IGRA). There is no evidence to support the use of IGRA over TST in young children. TB suspicion should be confirmed whenever possible, using new available tools, particularly in case of pulmonary and lymph node TB. Induced sputum, nasopharyngeal aspiration and fine needle aspiration biopsy provide a rapid and definitive diagnosis of mycobacterial infection in a large proportion of patients. Analysis of paediatric samples revealed higher sensitivity and specificity values of molecular techniques in comparison with the ones originated from adults. Children require higher drugs dosages than adults. Short courses of steroids are associated with TB treatment in case of respiratory distress, bronchoscopic desobstruction is proposed for severe airways involvement and antiretroviral therapy is mandatory in case of HIV infection. Post-exposure prophylaxis in children is a highly effective strategy to reduce the risk of TB disease. The optimal therapy for treatment of latent infection with a presumably multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain is currently not known. PMID:24932504

  16. [Smoking and tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Underner, Michel; Perriot, Jean

    2012-12-01

    Smoking and tuberculosis represent two major world health issues particularly in developing countries. Tobacco smoke increases risk of Mycobaterium tuberculosis infection by several means: alteration of muco-ciliary clearance, reduced alveolar macrophage activity; immune-depression of pulmonary lymphocytes, reduction of cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells, alteration of the activity of the pulmonary dendritic cells. Both active and passive smoking increases the risk of latent tubercular infection and of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. Active smoking increases the severity of pulmonary tuberculosis (gravity of radiological lesions). The diagnostic delay and recovery details are more important for smokers. Active smoking increases relapses of both pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis after treatment with or without the Directly Observed Treatment Short course (DOTS) with poor observance of treatment. The mortality risk from tuberculosis is heightened among smokers. Smoking cessation represents an essential means of controlling tuberculosis epidemics in developing countries. PMID:22465718

  17. Adjusting to a new home: Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene expression in response to an intracellular lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Richard W; Waddell, Simon J

    2009-12-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains the most significant single species of bacteria causing disease in mankind. The ability of M. tuberculosis to survive and replicate within host macrophages is a pivotal step in its pathogenesis. Understanding the microenvironments that M. tuberculosis encounters within the macrophage and the adaptations that the bacterium undergoes to facilitate its survival will lead to insights into possible therapeutic targets for improved treatment of tuberculosis. This is urgently needed with the emergence of multi- and extensively drug resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Significant advances have been made in understanding the macrophage response on encountering M. tuberculosis. Complementary information is also accumulating regarding the counter responses of M. tuberculosis during the various stages of its interactions with the host. As such, a picture is emerging delineating the gene expression of intracellular M. tuberculosis at different stages of the interaction with macrophages. PMID:19995191

  18. [Advantages and drawbacks of expectoration decontamination methods for tuberculosis and anti-tuberculosis drug resistance diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Zingué, Dezemon; Hien, Hervé; Méda, Nicolas; Zida, Sylvie; Kaboré, Antoinette; Sanou, Adama; Ouédraogo, Abdoul-Salam; Gomgnimbou, Michel; Diandé, Souba; Tarnagda, Zékiba; Godreuil, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    In the actual context of increasing tuberculosis and anti-tuberculosis drug resistance, the laboratory diagnosis of Mycobacterial infections remain the primordial objective of control and surveillance of human tuberculosis. The diagnosis and following of tuberculosis in resource limited settings are done by microscopy Ziehl-Neelsen method which is poor sensitive (20-53%) and have poor specificity because it's can't distinguish tuberculosis mycobacterium and atypical tuberculoid mycobacterium. Mycobacterium culture on solid media is the gold standard method for tuberculosis and anti-tuberculosis drug resistance diagnosis. Here, the challenge is that expectorations using for culture contain mycobacterium and others contaminating bacteria responsible of culture contamination. Many different methods of homogenization and decontamination of sputum specimens for culturing exist and each laboratory had to do a choice of the better method to optimize isolating of mycobacterium. This review is a summary of homogenization and decontamination methods described in literature and used by certain laboratories for diagnosis of TB by culture. However, it's essential for each laboratory to conduct evaluation of the different methods and do the choice of the appropriate one by taking into account factors such as the feasibility and cost effectively. Nine methods of decontaminations are described in this review taking account of their advantages, drawbacks and their feasibility in resource limited settings. PMID:23747665

  19. Attitudes about Tuberculosis Prevention in the Elimination Phase: A Survey among Physicians in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Vollrath, Oliver; Lange, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Background Targeted and stringent measures of tuberculosis prevention are necessary to achieve the goal of tuberculosis elimination in countries of low tuberculosis incidence. Methods We ascertained the knowledge about tuberculosis risk factors and stringency of tuberculosis prevention measures by a standardized questionnaire among physicians in Germany involved in the care of individuals from classical risk groups for tuberculosis. Results 510 physicians responded to the online survey. Among 16 risk factors immunosuppressive therapy, HIV-infection and treatment with TNF-antagonist were thought to be the most important risk factors for the development of tuberculosis in Germany. Exposure to a patient with tuberculosis ranked on the 10th position. In the event of a positive tuberculin-skin-test or interferon-γ release assay only 50%, 40%, 36% and 25% of physicians found that preventive chemotherapy was indicated for individuals undergoing tumor necrosis factor-antagonist therapy, close contacts of tuberculosis patients, HIV-infected individuals and migrants, respectively. Conclusions A remarkably low proportion of individuals with latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis belonging to classical risk groups for tuberculosis are considered candidates for preventive chemotherapy in Germany. Better knowledge about the risk for tuberculosis in different groups and more stringent and targeted preventive interventions will probably be necessary to achieve tuberculosis elimination in Germany. PMID:25393241

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound in mediastinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Ecka, Ruth Shifa; Somasundaram, Aravindh; Shoukat, Abid; Kirnake, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tubercular lymphadenitis is the commonest extra pulmonary manifestation in cervical and mediastinal locations. Normal characteristics of lymph nodes (LN) have been described on ultrasonography as well as by Endoscopic Ultrasound. Many ultrasonic features have been described for evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes. The inter and intraobserver agreement of the endosonographic features have not been uniformly established. Methods and Results: A total of 266 patients underwent endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration and 134 cases were diagnosed as mediastinal tuberculosis. The endoscopic ultrasound location and features of these lymph nodes are described. Conclusion: Our series demonstrates the utility of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration as the investigation of choice for diagnosis of mediastinal tuberculosis and also describes various endoscopic ultrasound features of such nodes. PMID:27051097

  1. Tuberculosis: a disease without boundaries.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Nicole

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) that usually affects the lungs leading to severe coughing, fever, and chest pains. Although current research in the past four years has provided valuable insight into TB transmission, diagnosis, and treatment, much remains to be discovered to effectively decrease the incidence of and eventually eradicate TB. The disease still puts a strain on public health, being only second to HIV/AIDS in causing high mortality rates. This review will highlight the history of TB as well as provide an overview of the current literature on epidemiology, pathogenesis and the immune response, treatment, and control of TB. In this race to combat a disease that knows no boundaries, it is necessary to have a conceptual and clear understanding of TB overall with the hope of providing better treatment through novel and collaborative research and public health efforts. PMID:26198113

  2. Novel Vaccination Strategies against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Peter; Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.

    2014-01-01

    The tuberculosis (TB) pandemic continues to rampage despite widespread use of the BCG (Bacillus Calmette–Guérin) vaccine. Novel vaccination strategies are urgently needed to arrest global transmission and prevent the uncontrolled development of multidrug-resistant forms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Over the last two decades, considerable progress has been made in the field of vaccine development with numerous innovative preclinical candidates and more than a dozen vaccines in clinical trials. These vaccines are developed either as boosters of the current BCG vaccine or as novel prime vaccines to replace BCG. Given the enormous prevalence of latent TB infection, vaccines that are protective on top of an already established infection remain a high priority and a significant scientific challenge. Here we discuss the current state of TB vaccine research and development, our understanding of the underlying immunology, and the requirements for an efficient TB vaccine. PMID:24890836

  3. [Immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Nowag, A; Hartmann, P

    2016-02-01

    Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) induce complex immune responses involving an orchestrated interplay of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Why the immune system fails to eradicate the pathogen and at best achieves control of infection in the latent stage, still remains an unsolved mystery even more than 100 years after the discovery of MTB by Robert Koch. This article provides an overview of the current state of the art in the constantly evolving field of tuberculosis (TB) immunology. This review focuses on a change of paradigm proposing that in the latent stage MTB is anything but dormant and that latent TB is not merely a state of bacterial stasis but a state of dynamic bacterial and immunological equilibrium. The understanding of these dynamics is crucial for the development of new drugs against MTB as well as vaccines that aim to provide effective protection against the disease. PMID:26838368

  4. Renal tuberculosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    TOCCACELI, S.; STELLA, L. PERSICO; DIANA, M.; TACCONE, A.; GIULIANI, G.; DE PAOLA, L.; VALVANO, M.; DE PADUA, C.; DI BIASIO, G.; RANUCCI, C.; ORSI, E.; LA TORRE, F.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis or TB (tubercle bacillus) remains a major public health problem in developing countries. Over the last decades extra-pulmonary locations of the disease have become more frequent due to the increased prevalence of acquired immune deficiency syndrome and the increase number of organ transplants. The urogenital localization represents about 27% of all extra-pulmonary localizations of TB and may be due either to a disseminated infection or to a primitive genitourinary localization. The majority of patients, has pyuria, sometimes with hematuria. The diagnosis of urinary tuberculosis is based on the finding of pyuria in the absence of infection by common bacteria. The initial medical treatment includes isoniazide, rifampicin, pyrazinami-de, ethambutol and streptomycin. This disease should be suspected in patients with unexplained urinary tract infections, especially if immunocompromised and/or coming from endemic areas. PMID:26017107

  5. Household Contact Screening Adherence among Tuberculosis Patients in Northern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gebregergs, Gebremedhin Berhe; Alemu, Wondmu Gebeyehu

    2015-01-01

    Background Household contacts of active tuberculosis cases are at high risk of getting tuberculosis disease. Tuberculosis detection rate among contacts of household members is high. Hence, this study investigated household contact screening adherence and associated factors among tuberculosis patients in Amhara region, Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from April 10 - June 30, 2013 in five urban districts of Amhara region, where 418 patients receiving treatment at tuberculosis clinic were interviewed. All patients were interviewed using structured and pre-tested questionnaire. Bringing at least one household contact to TB clinic was regarded as adherent to household contacts screening. Bivariate and multiple logistic regressions were used to investigate association. Results The overall adherence to household contact screening in Amhara region was 33.7%. Adherence was higher among Muslims than Christians. Adherence was high if patient took health education from Health Care Worker [AOR: 3.22, 95% CI: 1.88 to 5.51] and 2.17 times higher if patient had sufficient knowledge on tuberculosis [AOR: 2.17, 95% CI: 1.29 to 3.67] during interview. Relationship with contact was a significant [AOR: 0.4, 95% CI: 0.2 to 0.9] social related factor. Conclusion One third of tuberculosis patients adhered to household contact screening in health facilities during their treatment course. Promoting knowledge of tuberculosis in the community and continuous health education to tuberculosis patients are recommended. PMID:25955517

  6. Tuberculosis: evidence review for newly arriving immigrants and refugees

    PubMed Central

    Greenaway, Christina; Sandoe, Amelia; Vissandjee, Bilkis; Kitai, Ian; Gruner, Doug; Wobeser, Wendy; Pottie, Kevin; Ueffing, Erin; Menzies, Dick; Schwartzman, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Background: The foreign-born population bears a disproportionate health burden from tuberculosis, with a rate of active tuberculosis 20 times that of the non-Aboriginal Canadian-born population, and could therefore benefit from tuberculosis screening programs. We reviewed evidence to determine the burden of tuberculosis in immigrant populations, to assess the effectiveness of screening and treatment programs for latent tuberculosis infection, and to identify potential interventions to improve effectiveness. Methods: We performed a systematic search for evidence of the burden of tuberculosis in immigrant populations and the benefits and harms, applicability, clinical considerations, and implementation issues of screening and treatment programs for latent tuberculosis infection in the general and immigrant populations. The quality of this evidence was assessed and ranked using the GRADE approach (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation). Results: Chemoprophylaxis with isoniazid is highly efficacious in decreasing the development of active tuberculosis in people with latent tuberculosis infection who adhere to treatment. Monitoring for hepatotoxicity is required at all ages, but close monitoring is required in those 50 years of age and older. Adherence to screening and treatment for latent tuberculosis infection is poor, but it can be increased if care is delivered in a culturally sensitive manner. Interpretation: Immigrant populations have high rates of active tuberculosis that could be decreased by screening for and treating latent tuberculosis infection. Several patient, provider and infrastructure barriers, poor diagnostic tests, and the long treatment course, however, limit effectiveness of current programs. Novel approaches that educate and engage patients, their communities and primary care practitioners might improve the effectiveness of these programs. PMID:20634392

  7. Tuberculosis Facts - Testing for TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Testing for TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  8. Tuberculosis in the lung (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is caused by a group of organisms Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum and a few other rarer subtypes. Tuberculosis usually appears as a lung (pulmonary) infection. However, ...

  9. Tuberculosis Facts - Exposure to TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Exposure to TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  10. The interface between the national tuberculosis control programme and district hospitals in Cameroon: missed opportunities for strengthening the local health system –a multiple case study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. District hospitals (DHs) play a central role in district-based health systems, and their relation with vertical programmes is very important. Studies on the impact of vertical programmes on DHs are rare. This study aims to fill this gap. Its purpose is to analyse the interaction between the National Tuberculosis Control Programme (NTCP) and DHs in Cameroon, especially its effects on the human resources, routine health information system (HIS) and technical capacity at the hospital level. Methods We used a multiple case study methodology. From the Adamaoua Region, we selected two DHs, one public and one faith-based. We collected qualitative and quantitative data through document reviews, semi-structured interviews with district and regional staff, and observations in the two DHs. Results The NTCP trained and supervised staff, designed and provided tuberculosis data collection and reporting tools, and provided anti-tuberculosis drugs, reagents and microscopes to DHs. However, these interventions were limited to the hospital units designated as Tuberculosis Diagnostic and Treatment Centres and to staff dedicated to tuberculosis control activities. The NTCP installed a parallel HIS that bypassed the District Health Services. The DH that performs well in terms of general hospital care and that is well managed was successful in tuberculosis control. Based on the available resources, the two hospitals adapt the organisation of tuberculosis control to their settings. The management teams in charge of the District Health Services are not involved in tuberculosis control. In our study, we identified several opportunities to strengthen the local health system that have been missed by the NTCP and the health system managers. Conclusion Well-managed DHs perform better in terms of tuberculosis control than DHs that are not well managed. The analysis of the effects of the NTCP on the human resources, HIS and technical capacity of DHs indicates that the NTCP supports, rather than strengthens, the local health system. Moreover, there is potential for this support to be enhanced. Positive synergies between the NTCP and district health systems can be achieved if opportunities to strengthen the district health system are seized. The question remains, however, of why managers do not take advantage of the opportunities to strengthen the health system. PMID:23521866

  11. Toward Earlier Inclusion of Pregnant and Postpartum Women in Tuberculosis Drug Trials: Consensus Statements From an International Expert Panel.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amita; Mathad, Jyoti S; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M; Albano, Jessica D; Botgros, Radu; Brown, Vikki; Browning, Renee S; Dawson, Liza; Dooley, Kelly E; Gnanashanmugam, Devasena; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; Jean-Philippe, Patrick; Kim, Peter; Lyerly, Anne D; Mirochnick, Mark; Mofenson, Lynne M; Montepiedra, Grace; Piper, Jeanna; Sahin, Leyla; Savic, Radojka; Smith, Betsy; Spiegel, Hans; Swaminathan, Soumya; Watts, D Heather; White, Amina

    2016-03-15

    Tuberculosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in women of childbearing age (15-44 years). Despite increased tuberculosis risk during pregnancy, optimal clinical treatment remains unclear: safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic data for many tuberculosis drugs are lacking, and trials of promising new tuberculosis drugs exclude pregnant women. To advance inclusion of pregnant and postpartum women in tuberculosis drug trials, the US National Institutes of Health convened an international expert panel. Discussions generated consensus statements (>75% agreement among panelists) identifying high-priority research areas during pregnancy, including: (1) preventing progression of latent tuberculosis infection, especially in women coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus; (2) evaluating new agents/regimens for treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis; and (3) evaluating safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of tuberculosis drugs already in use during pregnancy and postpartum. Incorporating pregnant women into clinical trials would extend evidence-based tuberculosis prevention and treatment standards to this special population. PMID:26658057

  12. Chemotherapeutic Interventions Against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Neeraj; Garg, Gaurav; Agrawal, Babita; Kumar, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis is the second leading cause of infectious deaths globally. Many effective conventional antimycobacterial drugs have been available, however, emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) has overshadowed the effectiveness of the current first and second line drugs. Further, currently available agents are complicated by serious side effects, drug interactions and long-term administration. This has prompted urgent research efforts in the discovery and development of new anti-tuberculosis agent(s). Several families of compounds are currently being explored for the treatment of tuberculosis. This review article presents an account of the existing chemotherapeutics and highlights the therapeutic potential of emerging molecules that are at different stages of development for the management of tuberculosis disease. PMID:24281707

  13. Veterinary tuberculosis vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J F

    2000-06-01

    Tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis in domestic livestock and wildlife is a significant problem in many countries worldwide. Wildlife reservoirs of tuberculosis confound programs for tuberculosis eradication from domestic livestock. Successful vaccination against tuberculosis in domestic animals or wildlife could contribute to tuberculosis eradication. Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has been used as the prototype vaccine for domestic livestock and wildlife. The majority of studies have been carried out with BCG-vaccinated animals challenged experimentally with M. bovis. Although protection against disease has been evident in all these studies, protection against infection has rarely occurred. Results obtained with BCG vaccination of cattle, deer, ferrets, opossums, and rabbits are presented here and highlight the need for appropriate animal models for vaccination and control of the variables that influence the efficacy of BCG vaccine. Refinement of the existing animal models is essential for the advancement of tuberculosis vaccine research of relevance to animals and humans. PMID:10875788

  14. [Pharyngeal tuberculosis: Case report].

    PubMed

    Spini, Roxana Gabriela; Bordino, Lucas; Cohen, Daniela; Martins, Andrea; Ramírez, Zaida; González, Norma E

    2015-08-01

    Pharyngeal tuberculosis is a rare extrapulmonary manifestation. In Argentina, the number of cases of tuberculosis reported in children under 19 years in 2012 was 1752. Only 12.15% had extrapulmonary manifestation. A case of a 17 year old girl with pharyngeal tuberculosis is reported. The patient presented intermittent fever and swallowing pain for 6 months, without response to conventional antibiotic treatment. Chest X-ray showedbilateral micronodular infiltrate, so hospitalization was decided to study and treat. The sputum examination for acid-fast resistant bacilli was positive and treatment with four antituberculous drugs was started, with good evolution and disappearance of symptoms. Diagnostic confirmation with the isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum culture was obtained. The main symptoms of pharyngeal tuberculosis are sore throat and difficulty in swallowing of long evolution. It is important to consider tuberculosis as differential diagnosis in patients with chronic pharyngitis unresponsive to conventional treatment. PMID:26172025

  15. RAPID LATERAL-FLOW FOR BOVINE TUBERCULOSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine tuberculosis remains a costly disease in many countries despite extensive eradication and control efforts. Multiple wildlife reservoirs of Mycobacterium bovis infection found in recent decades in the US, Europe, New Zealand, and South Africa play important roles fuelling high rates of disease...

  16. Novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Pathogen, M. mungi

    PubMed Central

    Laver, Pete N.; Michel, Anita L.; Williams, Mark; van Helden, Paul D.; Warren, Robin M.; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C.

    2010-01-01

    Seven outbreaks involving increasing numbers of banded mongoose troops and high death rates have been documented. We identified a Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex pathogen, M. mungi sp. nov., as the causative agent among banded mongooses that live near humans in Chobe District, Botswana. Host spectrum and transmission dynamics remain unknown. PMID:20678329

  17. Pulmonary tuberculosis diagnostic delays in Chad: a multicenter, hospital-based survey in Ndjamena and Moundou

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in low-resource countries. One contagious patient can infect 10 to 20 contacts in these settings. Delays in diagnosing TB therefore contribute to the spread of the disease and sustain the epidemic. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess delays in diagnosing tuberculosis and the factors associated with these delays in the public hospitals in Moundou and Ndjamena, Chad. Methods A structured questionnaire was administered to 286 new tuberculosis patients to evaluate patient delay (time from the onset of symptoms to the first formal or informal care), health-care system delay (time from the first health care to tuberculosis treatment) and total delay (sum of the patient and system delays). Logistic regression was used to identify risk factors associated with long diagnostic delays (defined as greater than the median). Results and discussion The median [interquartile range] patient delay, system delay and total delay were 15 [730], 36 [1965] and 57.5 [3395] days, respectively. Low economic status (aOR [adjusted odds ratio] =2.38 [1.08-5.25]), not being referred to a health service (aOR?=?1.75 [1.02- 3.02]) and a secondary level education (aOR?=?0.33 [0.12-0.92]) were associated with a long patient delay. Risk factors for a long system delay were a low level of education (aOR?=?4.71 [1.34-16.51]) and the belief that traditional medicine and informal care can cure TB (aOR?=?5.46 [2.37-12.60]). Conclusion Targeted strengthening of the health-care system, including improving patient access, addressing deficiencies in health-related human resources, and improving laboratory networks and linkages as well as community mobilization will make for better outcomes in tuberculosis diagnosis. PMID:22776241

  18. [Standard therapy of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Otto-Knapp, R; Schenkel, K; Bauer, T

    2016-02-01

    Based on the results of studies from the 1960s-1980s the current four drug combination therapy was established as standard or short course tuberculosis therapy worldwide. The regional epidemiology and the often unique conditions within a national health system create the need for specific adjustments. Over the last years these were realized by the German central committee against tuberculosis (DZK) in the recommendations for tuberculosis therapy. Because of the recent development of migration into Germany from countries with higher tuberculosis incidences an increase in tuberculosis cases is to be expected. The expected increase in tuberculosis cases will lead to more contact with tuberculosis patients even in the outpatient setting. New S2k guidelines guided by the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften, AWMF) for the treatment of tuberculosis for children and adults are under development. Before the release of the comprehensive guidelines, practical evidence for the diagnosis and treatment of uncomplicated tuberculosis is summarized in this document to meet the challenges of the recent developments. PMID:26857258

  19. [Tuberculosis: yesterday, today, tomorrow].

    PubMed

    Khomenko, A G

    1997-01-01

    The historical aspects of phisiology are briefly outlined. The main factors that promote the prevalence of tuberculosis are characterized. The present-day tuberculosis epidemiological situation makes one to correct antituberculous measures and with the use of new investigations and developments to improve the identification of patients with tuberculosis, primarily those with contagious types of the disease, to introduce the currently available short-term regimens of 2-stage drug therapy, to design novel agents and depot formulations of the well known ones. Further investigations are required to search for a new tuberculosis vaccine. PMID:9503920

  20. TUBERCULOSIS COMO ENFERMEDAD OCUPACIONAL

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Ticona, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Existe evidencia suficiente para declarar a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional en diversos profesionales especialmente entre los trabajadores de salud. En el Perú están normados y reglamentados los derechos laborales inherentes a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional, como la cobertura por discapacidad temporal o permanente. Sin embargo, estos derechos aún no han sido suficientemente socializados. En este trabajo se presenta información sobre el riesgo de adquirir tuberculosis en el lugar de trabajo, se revisan las evidencias para declarar a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional en trabajadores de salud y se presenta la legislación peruana vigente al respecto. PMID:22858771

  1. Vitamin D and tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chocano-Bedoya, Patricia; Ronnenberg, Alayne G

    2009-05-01

    Tuberculosis is highly prevalent worldwide, accounting for nearly two million deaths annually. Vitamin D influences the immune response to tuberculosis, and vitamin D deficiency has been associated with increased tuberculosis risk in different populations. Genetic variability may influence host susceptibility to developing active tuberculosis and treatment response. Studies examining the association between genetic polymorphisms, particularly the gene coding for the vitamin D receptor (VDR), and TB susceptibility and treatment response are inconclusive. However, sufficient evidence is available to warrant larger epidemiologic studies that should aim to identify possible interactions between VDR polymorphisms and vitamin D status. PMID:19386033

  2. Tuberculosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Susanna; Tagliabue, Claudia; Bosis, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in children is a neglected aspect of the TB epidemic despite it constituting 20% or more of all TB cases in many countries with high TB incidence. Childhood TB is a direct consequence of adult TB but remains overshadowed by adult TB because it is usually smear-negative. Infants and young children are more likely to develop life-threatening forms of TB than older children and adults due to their immature immune systems. Therefore, prompt diagnoses are extremely important although difficult since clinical and radiological signs of TB can be non-specific and variable in children. Despite undeniable advances in identifying definite, probable, or possible TB markers, pediatricians still face many problems when diagnosing TB diagnosis. Moreover, curing TB can be difficult when treatment is delayed and when multi-drug resistant (MDR) pathogens are the cause of the disease. In these cases, the prognosis in children is particularly poor because MDR-TB treatment and treatment duration remain unclear. New studies of diagnostic tests and optimal treatment in children are urgently needed with the final goal of developing an effective anti-TB vaccine. PMID:24363879

  3. Increased Complement C1q Level Marks Active Disease in Human Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingxia; Liu, Haiying; Zhang, Guoliang; Deng, Qunyi; Huang, Jian; Gao, Zhiliang; Zhou, Boping; Feng, Carl G.; Chen, Xinchun

    2014-01-01

    Background Complement functions as an important host defense system and complement C5 and C7 have been implicated in immunopathology of tuberculosis. However, little is known about the role of other complement components in tuberculosis. Methods Complement gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of tuberculosis patients and controls were determined using whole genome transcriptional microarray assays. The mRNA and protein levels of three C1q components, C1qA, C1qB, and C1qC, were further validated by qRT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The percentages of C1q expression in CD14 positive cells were determined by flow cytometry. Finally, C1qC protein level was quantified in the pleural fluid of tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis pleurisy. Results C1q expression increases significantly in the peripheral blood of patients with active tuberculosis compared to healthy controls and individuals with latent TB infection. The percentage of C1q-expressing CD14 positive cells is significantly increased in active TB patients. C1q expression in the peripheral blood correlates with sputum smear positivity in tuberculosis patients and is reduced after anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy. Notably, receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that C1qC mRNA levels in peripheral blood efficiently discriminate active from latent tuberculosis infection and healthy controls. Additionally, C1qC protein level in pleural effusion shows improved power in discriminating tuberculosis from non-tuberculosis pleurisy when compared to other inflammatory markers, such as IL-6 and TNF-α. Conclusions C1q expression correlates with active disease in human tuberculosis. C1q could be a potential diagnostic marker to discriminate active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection as well as tuberculosis pleurisy from non-tuberculosis pleurisy. PMID:24647646

  4. Understanding Latent Tuberculosis: A Moving Target

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Philana Ling; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a threat to the health of people worldwide. Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis can result in active TB or, more commonly, latent infection. Latently infected persons, of which there are estimated to be ~2 billion in the world, represent an enormous reservoir of potential reactivation TB, which can spread to other people. The immunology of TB is complex and multifaceted. Identifying the immune mechanisms that lead to control of initial infection and prevent reactivation of latent infection is crucial to combating this disease. PMID:20562268

  5. Community Coauthoring: Whose Voice Remains?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Joanne; Webster, Stephanie; Hopper, Mindy

    2011-01-01

    This article examines how texts are collaboratively produced in community development work when coauthors come from multiple racial, ethnic, and class backgrounds as well as business and other work experiences. We found that the term "wordsmithing" became a discursive tool that limited resident input and shaped the Plan toward an external…

  6. Community Coauthoring: Whose Voice Remains?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Joanne; Webster, Stephanie; Hopper, Mindy

    2011-01-01

    This article examines how texts are collaboratively produced in community development work when coauthors come from multiple racial, ethnic, and class backgrounds as well as business and other work experiences. We found that the term "wordsmithing" became a discursive tool that limited resident input and shaped the Plan toward an external

  7. Content and Access Remain Key

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Linda B.

    2007-01-01

    It is impossible to review the year's outstanding government publication landscape without acknowledging that change remains paramount. Just as striking, however, is that these changes go hand in hand with some familiar constants. Within this shifting environment, there are the consistency and dependability of government information itself,…

  8. Mycobacterium bovis (Bovine Tuberculosis) in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    Mycobacterium bovis (Bovine Tuberculosis) in Humans What is Mycobacterium bovis ? In the United States, the majority of tuberculosis (TB) cases in people are caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( ...

  9. Risk of travel-associated tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rieder, H L

    2001-10-15

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis might be acquired at home or during travel. The risk is determined by exposure frequency to a source case and the duration of the exposure. Thus, whether travel increases the background risk depends on origin, destination, and duration of travel. Infection might be acquired indoors or outdoors, but the overall risk seems small, whatever the setting. Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination and preventive therapy have both been discussed as possible preventive interventions, but the disadvantages associated with both approaches appear to outweigh any benefits. Because the risk of acquisition of infection with M. tuberculosis is small, the most rational approach is likely to delay intervention until a traveler presents with clinically active tuberculosis, as is done with any other patient. PMID:11565081

  10. Granuloma Correlates of Protection Against Tuberculosis and Mechanisms of Immune Modulation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Smriti; Alvarez, Xavier; Didier, Peter J.; Doyle, Lara A.; Blanchard, James L.; Lackner, Andrew A.; Kaushal, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Background.?The BCG vaccine is ineffective against adult tuberculosis. Hence, new antituberculosis vaccines are needed. Correlates of protection against tuberculosis are not known. We studied the effects of BCG vaccination on gene expression in tuberculosis granulomas using macaques. Methods.?Macaques were BCG-vaccinated or sham-vaccinated and then challenged with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Lung lesions were used for comparative transcriptomics. Results.?Vaccinated macaques were protected with lower bacterial burden and immunopathology. Lesions from BCG-vaccinated nonhuman primates (NHPs) showed a better balance of ?- and ?-chemokine gene expression with higher levels of ?-chemokine expression relative to nonvaccinated animals. Consistent with this, sham-vaccinated macaques recruited fewer macrophages relative to neutrophils in their lungs. The expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), a known immunosuppressor, was significantly higher in both week 5 and 10 lesions from sham-vaccinated, relative to BCG-vaccinated, NHPs. IDO expression was primarily limited to the nonlymphocytic region of the lesions, within the inner ring structure surrounding the central necrosis. Conclusions.?Our study defines lung gene expression correlates of protective response against tuberculosis, relative to disease, which can potentially be employed to assess the efficacy of candidate antituberculosis vaccines. Mycobacterium tuberculosis may modulate protective immune responses using diverse mechanisms, including increased recruitment of inflammatory neutrophils and the concomitant use of IDO to modulate inflammation. PMID:23255564

  11. Comprehensive Tuberculosis Testing for the Dermatologist

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a noteworthy disease worldwide, rendering detection of latent tuberculosis of great importance. As healthcare workers, dermatologists should be aware of the available testing options and how they compare. In general, the tuberculin skin test has been around longer and, thus, there have been more studies performed on its sensitivity and specificity compared to interferon gamma release assays, which are newer to the market. The tuberculin skin test requires more office visits, takes longer to obtain results, is subject to healthcare worker bias, and can cause a booster phenomenon; whereas, interferon gamma release assays have a higher cost and less data available on their use in children under five years old. Both the tuberculin skin test and interferon gamma release assays fail to differentiate between recent and remote infections, have a low predictive value for active tuberculosis, and a lower sensitivity in people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:26060517

  12. Paleopathology of Human Tuberculosis and the Potential Role of Climate

    PubMed Central

    Nerlich, Andreas G.; Lösch, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Both origin and evolution of tuberculosis and its pathogens (Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex) are not fully understood. The paleopathological investigation of human remains offers a unique insight into the molecular evolution and spread including correlative data of the environment. The molecular analysis of material from Egypt (3000–500 BC), Sudan (200–600 AD), Hungary (600–1700 AD), Latvia (1200–1600 AD), and South Germany (1400–1800 AD) urprisingly revealed constantly high frequencies of tuberculosis in all different time periods excluding significant environmental influence on tuberculosis spread. The typing of various mycobacteria strains provides evidence for ancestral M. tuberculosis strains in Pre- to early Egyptian dynastic material (3500–2650 BC), while typical M. africanum signatures were detected in a Middle Kingdom tomb (2050–1650 BC). Samples from the New Kingdom to Late Period (1500–500 BC) indicated modern M. tuberculosis strains. No evidence was seen for M. bovis in Egyptian material while M. bovis signatures were first identified in Siberian biomaterial dating 2000 years before present. These results contraindicates the theory that M. tuberculosis evolved from M. bovis during early domestication in the region of the “Fertile Crescent,” but supports the scenario that M. tuberculosis probably derived from an ancestral progenitor strain. The environmental influence of this evolutionary scenario deserves continuing intense evaluation. PMID:19360109

  13. "Tuberculosis Case Management" Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knebel, Elisa; Kolodner, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    The need to isolated health providers with critical knowledge in tuberculosis (TB) case management prompted the development of "Tuberculosis Case Management" CD-ROM. Features include "Learning Center,""Examination Room," and "Library." The combination of audio, video, and graphics allows participants to practice acquired skills in a simulated…

  14. Global Tuberculosis Report 2015

    MedlinePlus

    ... Français Русский Español RSS Feed Youtube Twitter Facebook Google + iTunes Play Store Tuberculosis (TB) Menu Tuberculosis The End TB Strategy ... Follow WHO on Twitter WHO Facebook page WHO Google+ page WHO iTunes WHO Play Store © WHO 2016 Back to top Email Address Sign ...

  15. "Tuberculosis Case Management" Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knebel, Elisa; Kolodner, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    The need to isolated health providers with critical knowledge in tuberculosis (TB) case management prompted the development of "Tuberculosis Case Management" CD-ROM. Features include "Learning Center,""Examination Room," and "Library." The combination of audio, video, and graphics allows participants to practice acquired skills in a simulated

  16. Combating Tuberculosis Infection: A Forbidding Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Tejal; Butani, Shital

    2016-01-01

    After 50 years drought, several drugs are looming from the pipeline to combat tuberculosis. They will serve as a boon to the field that has been burdened with primitive, inadequate treatments and drug-resistant bacterial strains. From the decades, due to lack of interest and resources, the field has suffered a lot. Learning from the flaws, scientists have renovated their approaches to the finding of new antitubercular drugs. The first line drugs take about six months or more for the entire treatment. The second line remedy for resistant-tuberculosis requires daily injections which carry severe side effects. Drug resistance remains a constant menace because patients stop the medication once they start feeling better. So new drugs are required to be explored which are effective against tuberculosis especially drug resistant tuberculosis. These drugs need to work well with other drugs as well as with antivirals used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus. It is also very important to be considered that the treatments need to be cheap, as tuberculosis primarily affects people more in the developing countries. Further, new drugs must cure the disease in short span of time than the current six to nine month regimen. Recently a few new and potent drugs such as bedaquiline, delamanid, teixobactin have been evolved which may serve as a nice step forward, with a better outcome. Teixobactin, a new antibiotic has been found to have promising action against resistant strains, is also under consideration. PMID:27168676

  17. Combating Tuberculosis Infection: A Forbidding Challenge.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Tejal; Butani, Shital

    2016-01-01

    After 50 years drought, several drugs are looming from the pipeline to combat tuberculosis. They will serve as a boon to the field that has been burdened with primitive, inadequate treatments and drug-resistant bacterial strains. From the decades, due to lack of interest and resources, the field has suffered a lot. Learning from the flaws, scientists have renovated their approaches to the finding of new antitubercular drugs. The first line drugs take about six months or more for the entire treatment. The second line remedy for resistant-tuberculosis requires daily injections which carry severe side effects. Drug resistance remains a constant menace because patients stop the medication once they start feeling better. So new drugs are required to be explored which are effective against tuberculosis especially drug resistant tuberculosis. These drugs need to work well with other drugs as well as with antivirals used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus. It is also very important to be considered that the treatments need to be cheap, as tuberculosis primarily affects people more in the developing countries. Further, new drugs must cure the disease in short span of time than the current six to nine month regimen. Recently a few new and potent drugs such as bedaquiline, delamanid, teixobactin have been evolved which may serve as a nice step forward, with a better outcome. Teixobactin, a new antibiotic has been found to have promising action against resistant strains, is also under consideration. PMID:27168676

  18. Spatial Analysis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Antananarivo Madagascar: Tuberculosis-Related Knowledge, Attitude and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Rakotosamimanana, Sitraka; Mandrosovololona, Vatsiharizandry; Rakotonirina, Julio; Ramamonjisoa, Joselyne; Ranjalahy, Justin Rasolofomanana; Randremanana, Rindra Vatosoa; Rakotomanana, Fanjasoa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis infection may remain latent, but the disease is nevertheless a serious public health issue. Various epidemiological studies on pulmonary tuberculosis have considered the spatial component and taken it into account, revealing the tendency of this disease to cluster in particular locations. The aim was to assess the contribution of Knowledge Attitude and Practice (KAP) to the distribution of tuberculosis and to provide information for the improvement of the National Tuberculosis Program. Methods We investigated the role of KAP to distribution patterns of pulmonary tuberculosis in Antananarivo. First, we performed spatial scanning of tuberculosis aggregation among permanent cases resident in Antananarivo Urban Township using the Kulldorff method, and then we carried out a quantitative study on KAP, involving TB patients. The KAP study in the population was based on qualitative methods with focus groups. Results The disease still clusters in the same districts identified in the previous study. The principal cluster covered 22 neighborhoods. Most of them are part of the first district. A secondary cluster was found, involving 18 neighborhoods in the sixth district and two neighborhoods in the fifth. The relative risk was respectively 1.7 (p<10−6) in the principal cluster and 1.6 (p<10−3) in the secondary cluster. Our study showed that more was known about TB symptoms than about the duration of the disease or free treatment. Knowledge about TB was limited to that acquired at school or from relatives with TB. The attitude and practices of patients and the population in general indicated that there is still a stigma attached to tuberculosis. Conclusion This type of survey can be conducted in remote zones where the tuberculosis-related KAP of the TB patients and the general population is less known or not documented; the findings could be used to adapt control measures to the local particularities. PMID:25386655

  19. Psychiatry and Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Fantl, Kurt

    1950-01-01

    Studies on the psychosomatic aspects of tuberculosis have not brought to light a clearcut correlation between a specific personality structure and susceptibility to the illness. The recommendation is made to look for several rather than for one personality type. It is suggested that people should be studied who react to stress with loss of appetite and loss of sleep. This character structure in contrast to that where the person withdraws into sleep and overeats might make a person prone to tuberculosis. The somatopsychic influence of tuberculosis needs to be interpreted in terms of the localization of the lesion as well as infectiousness and conspicuousness of the disease. Some common sociopsychological factors of tuberculosis have been mentioned. Reports on mental illness and tuberculosis and on diet were reviewed. PMID:14792351

  20. Association of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Diabetes in Mexico: Analysis of the National Tuberculosis Registry 2000–2012

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; García-García, Lourdes; Castellanos-Joya, Martín; Cruz-Hervert, Pablo; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Hernández, Andrés; Ortega-Baeza, Victor Manuel; Montero-Campos, Rogelio; Sulca, José Antonio; Martínez-Olivares, Ma. de Lourdes; Mongua-Rodríguez, Norma; Baez-Saldaña, Renata; González-Roldán, Jesús Felipe; López-Gatell, Hugo; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Jiménez-Corona, María Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) remains a public health problem in Mexico while the incidence of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM) has increased rapidly in recent years. Objective To describe the trends of incidence rates of pulmonary TB associated with DM and not associated with DM and to compare the results of treatment outcomes in patients with and without DM. Materials and Methods We analysed the National Tuberculosis Registry from 2000 to 2012 including patients with pulmonary TB among individuals older than 20 years of age. The association between DM and treatment failure was analysed using logistic regression, accounting for clustering due to regional distribution. Results In Mexico from 2000 to 2012, the incidence rates of pulmonary TB associated to DM increased by 82.64%, (p <0.001) in contrast to rates of pulmonary TB rate without DM, which decreased by 26.77%, (p <0.001). Patients with a prior diagnosis of DM had a greater likelihood of failing treatment (adjusted odds ratio, 1.34 (1.11–1.61) p <0.002) compared with patients who did not have DM. There was statistical evidence of interaction between DM and sex. The odds of treatment failure were increased in both sexes. Conclusion Our data suggest that the growing DM epidemic has an impact on the rates of pulmonary TB. In addition, patients who suffer from both diseases have a greater probability of treatment failure. PMID:26075393

  1. Laryngeal tuberculosis: an important issue.

    PubMed

    Hermani, Bambang; Sawitra, Diani

    2006-01-01

    In developing countries like Indonesia, pulmonary tuberculosis still ranks among the major health problems and the prevalence of laryngeal tuberculosis are therefore still high. It is important for physicians and otolaryngologist to recognize the cardinal sign and symptoms of laryngeal tuberculosis in order to make an early diagnosis. An illustration of four cases with laryngeal tuberculosis is reported. All cases presented with hoarseness and diagnosis of laryngeal and pulmonary tuberculosis were made at ENT department. PMID:16479029

  2. Faecal calprotectin levels differentiate intestinal from pulmonary tuberculosis: An observational study from Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Koticherry Thrivikrama; Ramasubramanian, Ramalingom; Thayumanavan, Lakshmikanthan; Balakumaran, Leena Kondarappassery; Bjune, Gunnar A; Moum, Bjørn A

    2014-01-01

    Background Current methods to establish the diagnosis of intestinal tuberculosis are inadequate. Objectives We aimed to determine the clinical features of intestinal tuberculosis and evaluate inflammatory biomarkers in intestinal as well as pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods We recruited 38 intestinal tuberculosis patients, 119 pulmonary tuberculosis patients and 91 controls with functional gastrointestinal disorders between October 2009 and July 2012 for the investigation of clinical features, C-reactive protein (CRP), faecal and serum calprotectin. Faecal calprotectin ≥200 µg/g was used as a cut-off to determine intestinal inflammation of clinical significance. Three patient categories were established: (a) pulmonary tuberculosis and faecal calprotectin <200 µg/g (isolated pulmonary tuberculosis); (b) pulmonary tuberculosis and faecal calprotectin ≥200 µg/g (combined pulmonary and intestinal tuberculosis); (c) isolated intestinal tuberculosis. Results Common clinical features of intestinal tuberculosis were abdominal pain, fatigue, weight loss and watery diarrhoea. Intestinal tuberculosis patients had elevated median CRP (10.7 mg/l), faecal calprotectin (320 µg/g) and serum calprotectin (5.7 µg/ml). Complete normalisation of CRP (1.0 mg/L), faecal calprotectin (16 µg/g) and serum calprotectin (1.4 µg/ml)) was seen upon clinical remission. Patients with combined pulmonary and intestinal tuberculosis had the highest levels of CRP (53.8 mg/l) and serum calprotectin (6.5 µg/ml) and presented with signs of more severe disease. Conclusion Calprotectin analysis reveals intestinal tuberculosis in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and pinpoints those in need of rigorous follow-up. PMID:25360318

  3. Tuberculosis in complex emergencies.

    PubMed

    Coninx, Rudi

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes the key factors and remaining challenges for tuberculosis (TB) control programmes in complex emergencies. A complex emergency is "a humanitarian crisis in a country, region or society where there is total or considerable breakdown of authority resulting from internal or external conflict and which requires an international response that goes beyond the mandate or capacity of any single agency and/or the ongoing United Nations country programme." Some 200 million people are believed to live in countries affected by complex emergencies; almost all of these are developing countries that also bear the main burden of TB. The effects of complex emergencies impact on TB control programmes, interfering with the goals of identifying and curing TB patients and possibly leading to the emergence of MDR-TB. There are many detailed descriptions of aid interventions during complex emergencies; yet TB control programmes are absent from most of these reports. If TB is neglected, it may quickly result in increased morbidity and mortality, as was demonstrated in Bosnia and Herzegovina and in Somalia. TB is a major disease in complex emergencies and requires an appropriate public health response. While there is no manual to cover complex emergencies, the interagency manual for TB control in refugee and displaced populations provides valuable guidance. These programmes contribute to the body of evidence needed to compile such a manual, and should ensure that the experiences of TB control in complex emergencies lead to the establishment of evidence-based programmes. PMID:17768523

  4. The production of consumption: addressing the impact of mineral mining on tuberculosis in southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; Gonsalves, Gregg; Lurie, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Background Miners in southern Africa experience incident rates of tuberculosis up to ten times greater than the general population. Migration to and from mines may be amplifying tuberculosis epidemics in the general population. Discussion Migration to and from mineral mines contributes to HIV risks and associated tuberculosis incidence. Health and safety conditions within mines also promote the risk of silicosis (a tuberculosis risk factor) and transmission of tuberculosis bacilli in close quarters. In the context of migration, current tuberculosis prevention and treatment strategies often fail to provide sufficient continuity of care to ensure appropriate tuberculosis detection and treatment. Reports from Lesotho and South Africa suggest that miners pose transmission risks to other household or community members as they travel home undetected or inadequately treated, particularly with drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis. Reducing risky exposures on the mines, enhancing the continuity of primary care services, and improving the enforcement of occupational health codes may mitigate the harmful association between mineral mining activities and tuberculosis incidence among affected communities. Summary Tuberculosis incidence appears to be amplified by mineral mining operations in southern Africa. A number of immediately-available measures to improve continuity of care for miners, change recruitment and compensation practices, and reduce the primary risk of infection may critically mitigate the negative association between mineral mining and tuberculosis. PMID:19785769

  5. Gender-related factors influencing tuberculosis control in shantytowns: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is evidence that female gender is associated with reduced likelihood of tuberculosis diagnosis and successful treatment. This study aimed to characterize gender-related barriers to tuberculosis control in Peruvian shantytowns. Methods We investigated attitudes and experiences relating gender to tuberculosis using the grounded theory approach to describe beliefs amongst key tuberculosis control stakeholders. These issues were explored in 22 semi-structured interviews and in four focus group discussions with 26 tuberculosis patients and 17 healthcare workers. Results We found that the tuberculosis program was perceived not to be gender discriminatory and provided equal tuberculosis diagnostic and treatment care to men and women. This contrasted with stereotypical gender roles in the broader community context and a commonly expressed belief amongst patients and healthcare workers that female health inherently has a lower priority than male health. This belief was principally associated with men's predominant role in the household economy and limited employment for women in this setting. Women were also generally reported to experience the adverse psychosocial and economic consequences of tuberculosis diagnosis more than men. Conclusions There was a common perception that women's tuberculosis care was of secondary importance to that of men. This reflected societal gender values and occurred despite apparent gender equality in care provision. The greatest opportunities for improving women's access to tuberculosis care appear to be in improving social, political and economic structures, more than tuberculosis program modification. PMID:20587044

  6. Heme Oxygenase-1 Regulates Inflammation and Mycobacterial Survival in Human Macrophages during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Scharn, Caitlyn R; Collins, Angela C; Nair, Vidhya R; Stamm, Chelsea E; Marciano, Denise K; Graviss, Edward A; Shiloh, Michael U

    2016-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is responsible for 1.5 million deaths annually. We previously showed that M. tuberculosis infection in mice induces expression of the CO-producing enzyme heme oxygenase (HO1) and that CO is sensed by M. tuberculosis to initiate a dormancy program. Further, mice deficient in HO1 succumb to M. tuberculosis infection more readily than do wild-type mice. Although mouse macrophages control intracellular M. tuberculosis infection through several mechanisms, such as NO synthase, the respiratory burst, acidification, and autophagy, how human macrophages control M. tuberculosis infection remains less well understood. In this article, we show that M. tuberculosis induces and colocalizes with HO1 in both mouse and human tuberculosis lesions in vivo, and that M. tuberculosis induces and colocalizes with HO1 during primary human macrophage infection in vitro. Surprisingly, we find that chemical inhibition of HO1 both reduces inflammatory cytokine production by human macrophages and restricts intracellular growth of mycobacteria. Thus, induction of HO1 by M. tuberculosis infection may be a mycobacterial virulence mechanism to enhance inflammation and bacterial growth. PMID:27183573

  7. Tuberculosis and subsequent risk of lung cancer in Xuanwei, China

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, E.A.; Shen, M.; Chapman, R.S.; Pfeiffer, R.M.; Yu, Y.Y.; He, X.Z.; Lan, Q.

    2009-03-15

    Tobacco and indoor air pollution from smoky coal are major causes of lung cancer in rural Xuanwei County, China. Tuberculosis has been suggested to increase lung cancer risk, but data from prior studies are limited. We conducted an analysis of data from a retrospective cohort study of 42,422 farmers in Xuanwei. In 1992, interviewers administered a standardized questionnaire that included lifetime medical history, including tuberculosis. Subjects were followed from 1976, with deaths from lung cancer ascertained through 1996. We used proportional hazards regression to assess the association between tuberculosis and subsequent lung cancer mortality. Tuberculosis was reported by 246 subjects (0.6%), and 2,459 (5.8%) died from lung cancer during follow-up. Lung cancer mortality was substantially higher in subjects with tuberculosis than in those without (25 vs. 3.1 per 1,000 person-years). The association was especially pronounced in the first 5 years after tuberculosis diagnosis (hazard ratios (HRs) ranging 6.7-13) but remained strong 5-9.9 years (HR 3.4, 95% CI 1.3-9.1) and 10+ years (HR 3.0, 95% CI 1.3-7.3) after tuberculosis. These associations were similar among men and women and among smoky coal users (70.5% of subjects). Adjustment for demographic characteristics, lung disease and tobacco use did not affect results. In Xuanwei, China, tuberculosis is an important risk factor for lung cancer. The increased lung cancer risk, persisting years after a tuberculosis diagnosis, could reflect the effects of chronic pulmonary inflammation and scarring arising from tuberculosis.

  8. Tapering off of tuberculosis among the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, J A

    1976-01-01

    Tuberculosis has long been prevalent among elderly people. When tubercle bacilli first enter human bodies they usually remain through the rest of their hosts' lives and are capable of causing clinical disease any time, even in old age. In 1900, a large percentage of people of all ages were harboring tubercle bacilli and high mortality and case rates obtained among elderly people. The only way to solve the problem among future old people was to protect infants, children, and youths from becoming infected and remain so throughout life. As far as possible that was accomplished by isolating and treating tuberculosis patients in sanatoriums and hospitals, with anti-tuberculosis drugs after 1946, and controlling the disease among cattle. In due time, large numbers of children entered adulthood uninfected. From year to year, they replaced those heavily infected as they advanced in years. By 1973 the mortality rate was only a fraction of 1.0 per 100,000 among people under 34 years but of those of 65 to 84 years it was 9.7. The case rate was 28.1 for those older than 45 years. Although tuberculosis among the elderly has tapered off phenomenally, much time and work are necessary to accomplish eradication. PMID:790983

  9. Tuberculosis Epidemiology and Selection in an Autochthonous Siberian Population from the 16th-19th Century

    PubMed Central

    Dabernat, Henri; Thèves, Catherine; Bouakaze, Caroline; Nikolaeva, Dariya; Keyser, Christine; Mokrousov, Igor; Géraut, Annie; Duchesne, Sylvie; Gérard, Patrice; Alexeev, Anatoly N.; Crubézy, Eric; Ludes, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of most ancient diseases affecting human populations. Although numerous studies have tried to detect pathogenic DNA in ancient skeletons, the successful identification of ancient tuberculosis strains remains rare. Here, we describe a study of 140 ancient subjects inhumed in Yakutia (Eastern Siberia) during a tuberculosis outbreak, dating from the 16th–19th century. For a long time, Yakut populations had remained isolated from European populations, and it was not until the beginning of the 17th century that first contacts were made with European settlers. Subsequently, tuberculosis spread throughout Yakutia, and the evolution of tuberculosis frequencies can be tracked until the 19th century. This study took a multidisciplinary approach, examining historical and paleo-epidemiological data to understand the impact of tuberculosis on ancient Yakut population. In addition, molecular identification of the ancient tuberculosis strain was realized to elucidate the natural history and host-pathogen co-evolution of human tuberculosis that was present in this population. This was achieved by the molecular detection of the IS6110 sequence and SNP genotyping by the SNaPshot technique. Results demonstrated that the strain belongs to cluster PGG2-SCG-5, evocating a European origin. Our study suggests that the Yakut population may have been shaped by selection pressures, exerted by several illnesses, including tuberculosis, over several centuries. This confirms the validity and necessity of using a multidisciplinary approach to understand the natural history of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease. PMID:24587092

  10. Is Mycobacterium tuberculosis stressed out? A critical assessment of the genetic evidence

    PubMed Central

    Stallings, Christina L.; Glickman, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an obligate human intracellular pathogen which remains a major killer worldwide. A remarkable feature of M. tuberculosis infection is the ability of the pathogen to persist within the host for decades despite an impressive onslaught of stresses. In this review we seek to outline the host inflicted stresses experienced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterial strategies used to withstand these stresses, and how this information should guide our efforts to combat this global pathogen. PMID:20691805

  11. Treatment of Tuberculosis. A Historical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Murray, John F; Schraufnagel, Dean E; Hopewell, Philip C

    2015-12-01

    Of all achievements in medicine, the successful treatment of tuberculosis has had one of the greatest impacts on society. Tuberculosis was a leading cause of disease and a mortal enemy of humanity for millennia. The first step in finding a cure was the discovery of the cause of tuberculosis by Robert Koch in 1882. The sanatorium movement that began shortly afterward in Europe, and soon spread to the United States, brought attention to the plight of afflicted persons, and catalyzed public health action. The antituberculosis benefit of streptomycin was announced in 1945, although application was limited by the rapid development of resistance. para-Aminosalicylic acid, also discovered in 1945, when combined with streptomycin was found to greatly reduce the occurrence of drug resistance. In 1952, isoniazid opened the modern era of treatment; it was inexpensive, well tolerated, and safe. In the early 1960s, ethambutol was shown to be effective and better tolerated than para-aminosalicylic acid, which it replaced. In the 1970s, rifampin found its place as a keystone in the therapy of tuberculosis. The use of rifampin enabled the course of treatment to be reduced to nine months. Incorporation of pyrazinamide into the first-line regimen led to a further reduction of treatment duration to six months. Treatment of multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis remains a difficult problem requiring lengthy treatment with toxic drugs. However, shortened regimens show promise, and two new drugs, bedaquiline and delamanid, have demonstrated effectiveness in preliminary studies and are being used for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:26653188

  12. CCL2 Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Are Associated with Disease Severity in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Zahra; Cliff, Jacqueline M.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Jamil, Bushra; Irfan, Muhammad; Ashraf, Mussarat; Hussain, Rabia

    2009-01-01

    Background Leucocyte activating chemokines such as CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL8 together with proinflammatory IFNγ, TNFα and downmodulatory IL10 play a central role in the restriction of M. tuberculosis infections, but is unclear whether these markers are indicative of tuberculosis disease severity. Methodology We investigated live M. tuberculosis- and M. bovis BCG- induced peripheral blood mononuclear cell responses in patients with tuberculosis (TB) and healthy endemic controls (ECs, n = 36). TB patients comprised pulmonary (PTB, n = 34) and extrapulmonary groups, subdivided into those with less severe localized extrapulmonary TB (L-ETB, n = 16) or severe disseminated ETB (D-ETB, n = 16). Secretion of CCL2, IFNγ, IL10 and CCL3, and mRNA expression of CCL2, TNFα, CCL3 and CXCL8 were determined. Results M. tuberculosis- and BCG- induced CCL2 secretion was significantly increased in both PTB and D-ETB (p<0.05, p<0.01) as compared with L-ETB patients. CCL2 secretion in response to M. tuberculosis was significantly greater than to BCG in the PTB and D-ETB groups. M. tuberculosis-induced CCL2 mRNA transcription was greater in PTB than L-ETB (p = 0.023), while CCL2 was reduced in L-ETB as compared with D-ETB (p = 0.005) patients. M. tuberculosis –induced IFNγ was greater in L-ETB than PTB (p = 0.04), while BCG-induced IFNγ was greater in L-ETB as compared with D-ETB patients (p = 0.036). TNFα mRNA expression was raised in PTB as compared with L-ETB group in response to M. tuberculosis (p = 0.02) and BCG (p = 0.03). Mycobacterium-induced CCL3 and CXCL8 was comparable between TB groups. Conclusions The increased CCL2 and TNFα in PTB patients may support effective leucocyte recruitment and M. tuberculosis localization. CCL2 alone is associated with severity of TB, possibly due to increased systemic inflammation found in severe disseminated TB or due to increased monocyte infiltration to lung parenchyma in pulmonary disease. PMID:20041183

  13. Tuberculosis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Introduction Untreated tuberculosis (TB) disease represents a greater hazard to a pregnant woman and her fetus than ... because the concentrations of these drugs in breast milk are too small to produce toxicity in the ...

  14. Tuberculosis and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Organization (WHO) and the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (the Union) have developed a collaborative framework to guide national programmes, clinicians and others engaged in care of ...

  15. Tuberculosis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... resolves on its own as a child develops immunity over a 6- to 10-week period. But ... conditions become favorable (for instance, due to lowered immunity), the bacteria become active. Tuberculosis in older kids ...

  16. Update on cutaneous tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Bernardes Filho, Fred; Quaresma, Maria Victória; Nascimento, Leninha Valério do; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Azulay, David Rubem

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis continues to draw special attention from health care professionals and society in general. Cutaneous tuberculosis is an infection caused by M. tuberculosis complex, M. bovis and bacillus Calmette-Guérin. Depending on individual immunity, environmental factors and the type of inoculum, it may present varied clinical and evolutionary aspects. Patients with HIV and those using immunobiological drugs are more prone to infection, which is a great concern in centers where the disease is considered endemic. This paper aims to review the current situation of cutaneous tuberculosis in light of this new scenario, highlighting the emergence of new and more specific methods of diagnosis, and the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate the parasite-host interaction. PMID:25387498

  17. Update on cutaneous tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Bernardes Filho, Fred; Quaresma, Maria Victória; do Nascimento, Leninha Valério; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Azulay, David Rubem

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis continues to draw special attention from health care professionals and society in general. Cutaneous tuberculosis is an infection caused by M. tuberculosis complex, M. bovis and bacillus Calmette-Guérin. Depending on individual immunity, environmental factors and the type of inoculum, it may present varied clinical and evolutionary aspects. Patients with HIV and those using immunobiological drugs are more prone to infection, which is a great concern in centers where the disease is considered endemic. This paper aims to review the current situation of cutaneous tuberculosis in light of this new scenario, highlighting the emergence of new and more specific methods of diagnosis, and the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate the parasite-host interaction. PMID:25387498

  18. Rapid Diagnosis of Tuberculosis by Real-Time High-Resolution Imaging of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Ghodbane, Ramzi; Asmar, Shady; Betzner, Marlena; Linet, Marie; Pierquin, Joseph; Raoult, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Culture remains the cornerstone of diagnosis for pulmonary tuberculosis, but the fastidiousness of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may delay culture-based diagnosis for weeks. We evaluated the performance of real-time high-resolution imaging for the rapid detection of M. tuberculosis colonies growing on a solid medium. A total of 50 clinical specimens, including 42 sputum specimens, 4 stool specimens, 2 bronchoalveolar lavage fluid specimens, and 2 bronchial aspirate fluid specimens were prospectively inoculated into (i) a commercially available Middlebrook broth and evaluated for mycobacterial growth indirectly detected by measuring oxygen consumption (standard protocol) and (ii) a home-made solid medium incubated in an incubator featuring real-time high-resolution imaging of colonies (real-time protocol). Isolates were identified by Ziehl-Neelsen staining and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry. Use of the standard protocol yielded 14/50 (28%) M. tuberculosis isolates, which is not significantly different from the 13/50 (26%) M. tuberculosis isolates found using the real-time protocol (P = 1.00 by Fisher's exact test), and the contamination rate of 1/50 (2%) was not significantly different from the contamination rate of 2/50 (4%) using the real-time protocol (P = 1.00). The real-time imaging protocol showed a 4.4-fold reduction in time to detection, 82 ± 54 h versus 360 ± 142 h (P < 0.05). These preliminary data give the proof of concept that real-time high-resolution imaging of M. tuberculosis colonies is a new technology that shortens the time to growth detection and the laboratory diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:26085608

  19. Rapid Diagnosis of Tuberculosis by Real-Time High-Resolution Imaging of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Colonies.

    PubMed

    Ghodbane, Ramzi; Asmar, Shady; Betzner, Marlena; Linet, Marie; Pierquin, Joseph; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Culture remains the cornerstone of diagnosis for pulmonary tuberculosis, but the fastidiousness of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may delay culture-based diagnosis for weeks. We evaluated the performance of real-time high-resolution imaging for the rapid detection of M. tuberculosis colonies growing on a solid medium. A total of 50 clinical specimens, including 42 sputum specimens, 4 stool specimens, 2 bronchoalveolar lavage fluid specimens, and 2 bronchial aspirate fluid specimens were prospectively inoculated into (i) a commercially available Middlebrook broth and evaluated for mycobacterial growth indirectly detected by measuring oxygen consumption (standard protocol) and (ii) a home-made solid medium incubated in an incubator featuring real-time high-resolution imaging of colonies (real-time protocol). Isolates were identified by Ziehl-Neelsen staining and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Use of the standard protocol yielded 14/50 (28%) M. tuberculosis isolates, which is not significantly different from the 13/50 (26%) M. tuberculosis isolates found using the real-time protocol (P = 1.00 by Fisher's exact test), and the contamination rate of 1/50 (2%) was not significantly different from the contamination rate of 2/50 (4%) using the real-time protocol (P = 1.00). The real-time imaging protocol showed a 4.4-fold reduction in time to detection, 82 ± 54 h versus 360 ± 142 h (P < 0.05). These preliminary data give the proof of concept that real-time high-resolution imaging of M. tuberculosis colonies is a new technology that shortens the time to growth detection and the laboratory diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:26085608

  20. Stigma against Tuberculosis Patients in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tadesse, Sebsibe

    2016-01-01

    Background Stigma attached to tuberculosis contributes to the limited effectiveness of current TB control approaches. However, there is a dearth of studies that explore the causes of stigma attached to tuberculosis and its effects on patients and tuberculosiscontrol programs in Ethiopia. Methods An institution-based qualitative study was conducted at St. Peter Tuberculosis Specialized Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia from July to August, 2015. Ten in-depth interviews and 6 key-informant interviews were carried out among tuberculosis patients and healthcare workers, respectively.The Open Code computer software package was used to analyze the data thematically. Results The study revealed that fear of infection and inappropriate health education messages by media were the main causes of tuberculosis stigma. The patients experienced isolation within their family and community, separation, and financial crisis. The stigma attached to tuberculosis may contribute to delayed healthcare seeking, poor treatment adherence, and poor prognosis. Conclusion Interventions thatreduce the stigma attached to tuberculosis should target on areas, such as creating community awareness, patient counseling on problem-solving and emotional skills, preparing culturally sensitive and scientifically sound media messages, providing financial support for the patients, and enhancing the qualities of the healthcare workers, such as empathy, concern, respect for the patient and cultural sensitivity. PMID:27054714

  1. Tuberculosis diagnostics in 2015: landscape, priorities, needs, and prospects.

    PubMed

    Pai, Madhukar; Schito, Marco

    2015-04-01

    In 2015, tuberculosis remains a major global health problem, and drug-resistant tuberculosis is a growing threat. Although tuberculosis diagnosis in many countries is still reliant on older tools, new diagnostics are changing the landscape. Stimulated, in part, by the success and roll out of Xpert MTB/RIF, there is now considerable interest in new technologies. The landscape looks promising, with a robust pipeline of new tools, particularly molecular diagnostics, and well over 50 companies actively engaged in product development. However, new diagnostics are yet to reach scale, and there needs to be greater convergence between diagnostics development and development of shorter-duration tuberculosis drug regimens. Another concern is the relative absence of non-sputum-based diagnostics in the pipeline for children and of biomarker tests for triage, cure, and progression of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Several initiatives, described in this supplement, have been launched to further stimulate product development and policy, including assessment of needs and priorities, development of target product profiles, compilation of data on resistance-associated mutations, and assessment of market size and potential for new diagnostics. Advocacy is needed to increase funding for tuberculosis research and development, and governments in high-burden countries must invest more in tuberculosis control to meet post-2015 targets for care, control, and prevention. PMID:25765103

  2. Endobronchial tuberculosis mimicking malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shahid M; Iyer, Aparna; Jayalakshmi, TK; Nair, Girija

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial tuberculosis has a very varied presentation. Diagnosis is often very challenging as typical radiological features are absent and sputum smear for acid-fast bacilli is often negative. However, detection is essential as it may lead to long-term sequelae such as bronchial stenosis. Bronchoscopy is a very useful investigation in such cases. Our case is a rare manifestation of endobronchial tuberculosis as it mimicked malignancy. PMID:26628772

  3. Tuberculosis: distribution, risk factors, mortality.

    PubMed

    Kochi, A

    1994-10-01

    About a century after Koch's discovery of the TB bacilli the tuberculosis epidemic which had appeared to be under control was again recognized as a major global health threat. The decline in the epidemic in this century had been largely through the improved living standards and, eventually, the availability and use of effective antibiotics. While tuberculosis gradually disappeared from the health agenda in the western world it remained a big killer throughout the century and in 1992 an estimated 2.7 million TB deaths occurred; 30 million will die from TB during the 1990s if current trends are not reversed. The annual number of new cases will increase from 7.5 million estimated in 1990 to more than 10 million in the year 2000. The main factors for this increase are demographic forces, population movements, the HIV epidemic and increasing drug resistance. The impact of the HIV epidemic is already felt in many sub-Saharan African countries and now threatens Asia where almost two-thirds of the world's TB infected population live and where HIV is spreading. Tuberculosis has also reemerged as a major public health problem in industrialized countries due to international migration, the breakdown of health services, including TB services etc. The control of the epidemic can only be through a concerted action to reinstate TB as priority among health concerns, reflected in national and international resources. A coalition of public and private supporters must be mobilized to support the effort to fight the disease. Governments, non-governmental organizations, the business community, refugee organizations, medical institutions, and other UN agencies are invited to join with WHO in this effort. PMID:7713546

  4. Nanoparticle Delivery of Anti-Tuberculosis Chemotherapy as a Potential Mediator Against Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jonathan Paul

    2011-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis is quickly emerging as one of the largest threats to the global health community. Current chemotherapy for tuberculosis dates back to the 1950s and is arduous, lengthy, and remains extremely difficult to complete in many of the highest burdened areas. This causes inadequate or incomplete treatment, resulting in genetic selection of drug-resistant strains. With a dearth of novel anti-TB drug candidates in the development pipeline, nanoparticle technology allows us to take current chemotherapies and deliver them more efficaciously, reducing the frequency and duration of treatment and increasing bioavailability. This approach can improve patient adherence, reduce pill burden, and shorten time to completion, all which are at the heart of drug resistance. This review examines the multiple advantages of nanoparticle drug delivery of tuberculosis chemotherapy and summarizes the challenges in implementation. PMID:22180674

  5. Polymorphisms of SP110 Are Associated with both Pulmonary and Extra-Pulmonary Tuberculosis among the Vietnamese

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Gregory J.; Sy, Dinh Ngoc; Nhung, Nguyen Viet; Yu, Bing; Ellis, Magda K.; Van Hung, Nguyen; Cuong, Nguyen Kim; Thi Lien, Luu; Marks, Guy B.; Saunders, Bernadette M.; Britton, Warwick J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease that remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, yet the reasons why only 10% of people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis go on to develop clinical disease are poorly understood. Genetically determined variation in the host immune response is one factor influencing the response to M. tuberculosis. SP110 is an interferon-responsive nuclear body protein with critical roles in cell cycling, apoptosis and immunity to infection. However association studies of the gene with clinical TB in different populations have produced conflicting results. Methods To examine the importance of the SP110 gene in immunity to TB in the Vietnamese we conducted a case-control genetic association study of 24 SP110 variants, in 663 patients with microbiologically proven TB and 566 unaffected control subjects from three tertiary hospitals in northern Vietnam. Results Five SNPs within SP110 were associated with all forms of TB, including four SNPs at the C terminus (rs10208770, rs10498244, rs16826860, rs11678451) under a dominant model and one SNP under a recessive model, rs7601176. Two of these SNPs were associated with pulmonary TB (rs10208770 and rs16826860) and one with extra-pulmonary TB (rs10498244). Conclusion SP110 variants were associated with increased susceptibility to both pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB in the Vietnamese. Genetic variants in SP110 may influence macrophage signaling responses and apoptosis during M. tuberculosis infection, however further research is required to establish the mechanism by which SP110 influences immunity to tuberculosis infection. PMID:25006821

  6. Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from New Pulmonary Tuberculosis Cases in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mihret, Adane; Bekele, Yonas; Loxton, Andre G.; Jordan, Annemie M.; Yamuah, Lawrence; Aseffa, Abraham; Howe, Rawleigh; Walzl, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is needed for a better understanding of the epidemiology of TB and could have implications for the development of new diagnostics, drugs, and vaccines. M. tuberculosis isolates were characterized using spoligotyping and were compared with the SpoIDB4 database of the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. A total of 53 different patterns were identified among 192 isolates examined. 169 of the isolates were classified into one of the 33 shared SITs, whereas the remaining 23 corresponded to 20 orphan patterns. 54% of the isolates were ascribed to the T family, a family which has not been well defined to date. Other prominent families were CAS, Haarlem, LAM, Beijing, and Unknown comprising 26%, 13%, 2.6%, 0.5%, and 2.1%, respectively. Among HIV-positive patients, 10 patterns were observed among 25 isolates. The T (38.5%), H (26.9%), and CAS (23.1%) families were the most common among HIV-positive individuals. The diversity of the M. tuberculosis strains found in this study is very high, and there was no difference in the distribution of families in HIV-positive and HIV-negative TB patients except the H family. Tuberculosis transmission in Addis Ababa is due to only the modern M. tuberculosis families (CAS, LAM, T, Beijing, Haarlem, and U). PMID:23227330

  7. The present and future of tuberculosis vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    The clinical, social, and economic burden of tuberculosis (TB) remains high worldwide, thereby highlighting the importance of TB prevention. The bacilli Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine that is currently available can protect younger children but is less effective in adults, the major source of TB transmission. In addition, the emergence of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strains and the high prevalence of HIV infection have significantly complicated TB prognosis and treatment. Together, these data highlight the need for new and more effective vaccines. Recently, several vaccines containing multiple antigens, including some of those specific for dormant Mtb strains, have been developed. These vaccines appear to be the best approach for satisfactory Mtb prevention. However, until a new vaccine is proven more effective and safe than BCG, BCG should remain part of the immunization schedules for neonates and children at risk for TB as a fundamental prophylactic measure. PMID:25458613

  8. Earlier versus Later Start of Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Infected Adults with Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, François-Xavier; Sok, Thim; Laureillard, Didier; Borand, Laurence; Rekacewicz, Claire; Nerrienet, Eric; Madec, Yoann; Marcy, Olivier; Chan, Sarin; Prak, Narom; Kim, Chindamony; Lak, Khemarin Kim; Hak, Chanroeurn; Dim, Bunnet; Sin, Chhun Im; Sun, Sath; Guillard, Bertrand; Sar, Borann; Vong, Sirenda; Fernandez, Marcelo; Fox, Lawrence; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis remains an important cause of death among patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Robust data are lacking with regard to the timing for the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in relation to the start of antituberculosis therapy. Methods We tested the hypothesis that the timing of ART initiation would significantly affect mortality among adults not previously exposed to antiretroviral drugs who had newly diagnosed tuberculosis and CD4+ T-cell counts of 200 per cubic millimeter or lower. After beginning the standard, 6-month treatment for tuberculosis, patients were randomly assigned to either earlier treatment (2 weeks after beginning tuberculosis treatment) or later treatment (8 weeks after) with stavudine, lamivudine, and efavirenz. The primary end point was survival. Results A total of 661 patients were enrolled and were followed for a median of 25 months. The median CD4+ T-cell count was 25 per cubic millimeter, and the median viral load was 5.64 log10 copies per milliliter. The risk of death was significantly reduced in the group that received ART earlier, with 59 deaths among 332 patients (18%), as compared with 90 deaths among 329 patients (27%) in the later-ART group (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI]; 0.44 to 0.86; P = 0.006). The risk of tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome was significantly increased in the earlier-ART group (hazard ratio, 2.51; 95% CI, 1.78 to 3.59; P<0.001). Irrespective of the study group, the median gain in the CD4+ T-cell count was 114 per cubic millimeter, and the viral load was undetectable at week 50 in 96.5% of the patients. Conclusions Initiating ART 2 weeks after the start of tuberculosis treatment significantly improved survival among HIV-infected adults with CD4+ T-cell counts of 200 per cubic millimeter or lower. (Funded by the French National Agency for Research on AIDS and Viral Hepatitis and the National Institutes of Health; CAMELIA ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01300481.) PMID:22010913

  9. Tuberculosis in Hispanics/Latinos

    MedlinePlus

    ... Epidemiology of Tuberculosis in Correctional Facilities, United States, 1993-2014 Prevention and Control of Tuberculosis in Correctional ... of death in the United States, but since 1993 the number and rates of TB in the ...

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Manipulator of Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Korb, Vanessa C.; Chuturgoon, Anil A.; Moodley, Devapregasan

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is one of the most successful pathogens in human history and remains a global health challenge. MTB has evolved a plethora of strategies to evade the immune response sufficiently to survive within the macrophage in a bacterial-immunological equilibrium, yet causes sufficient immunopathology to facilitate its transmission. This review highlights MTB as the driver of disease pathogenesis and presents evidence of the mechanisms by which MTB manipulates the protective immune response into a pathological productive infection. PMID:26927066

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Manipulator of Protective Immunity.

    PubMed

    Korb, Vanessa C; Chuturgoon, Anil A; Moodley, Devapregasan

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is one of the most successful pathogens in human history and remains a global health challenge. MTB has evolved a plethora of strategies to evade the immune response sufficiently to survive within the macrophage in a bacterial-immunological equilibrium, yet causes sufficient immunopathology to facilitate its transmission. This review highlights MTB as the driver of disease pathogenesis and presents evidence of the mechanisms by which MTB manipulates the protective immune response into a pathological productive infection. PMID:26927066

  12. 7. VIEW OF VESSEL FROM PORT BON, SHOWING REMAINS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF VESSEL FROM PORT BON, SHOWING REMAINS OF MAIN CABIN. AFT CABIN STILL STANDS ON STERN IN BACKGROUND - Motorized Sailing Vessel "Fox", Beached on East Bank ofBayou Lafourche, Larose, Lafourche Parish, LA

  13. Variable host-pathogen compatibility in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gagneux, Sebastien; DeRiemer, Kathryn; Van, Tran; Kato-Maeda, Midori; de Jong, Bouke C; Narayanan, Sujatha; Nicol, Mark; Niemann, Stefan; Kremer, Kristin; Gutierrez, M Cristina; Hilty, Markus; Hopewell, Philip C; Small, Peter M

    2006-02-21

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Studies have reported human pathogens to have geographically structured population genetics, some of which have been linked to ancient human migrations. However, no study has addressed the potential evolutionary consequences of such longstanding human-pathogen associations. Here, we demonstrate that the global population structure of M. tuberculosis is defined by six phylogeographical lineages, each associated with specific, sympatric human populations. In an urban cosmopolitan environment, mycobacterial lineages were much more likely to spread in sympatric than in allopatric patient populations. Tuberculosis cases that did occur in allopatric hosts disproportionately involved high-risk individuals with impaired host resistance. These observations suggest that mycobacterial lineages are adapted to particular human populations. If confirmed, our findings have important implications for tuberculosis control and vaccine development. PMID:16477032

  14. Issues Related to the Updated 2014 Korean Guidelines for Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health problem in South Korea. The Joint Committee for the Development of Korean Guidelines for Tuberculosis published the Korean Guidelines for Tuberculosis in 2011 to provide evidence-based practical recommendations to health care workers caring for patients with TB in South Korea. After reviewing recent national and international scientific data on TB, the committee updated the Korean guidelines for TB in 2014. This article presents some practical issues related to the 2014 updated guidelines: namely use of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis - polymerase chain reaction assay and the Xpert MTB/RIF assay in the diagnosis of TB, as well as medical treatment for patients with multidrug-resistant TB. PMID:26770228

  15. The Seasonality of Tuberculosis, Sunlight, Vitamin D, and Household Crowding

    PubMed Central

    Wingfield, Tom; Schumacher, Samuel G.; Sandhu, Gurjinder; Tovar, Marco A.; Zevallos, Karine; Baldwin, Matthew R.; Montoya, Rosario; Ramos, Eric S.; Jongkaewwattana, Chulanee; Lewis, James J.; Gilman, Robert H.; Friedland, Jon S.; Evans, Carlton A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Unlike other respiratory infections, tuberculosis diagnoses increase in summer. We performed an ecological analysis of this paradoxical seasonality in a Peruvian shantytown over 4 years. Methods. Tuberculosis symptom-onset and diagnosis dates were recorded for 852 patients. Their tuberculosis-exposed cohabitants were tested for tuberculosis infection with the tuberculin skin test (n = 1389) and QuantiFERON assay (n = 576) and vitamin D concentrations (n = 195) quantified from randomly selected cohabitants. Crowding was calculated for all tuberculosis-affected households and daily sunlight records obtained. Results. Fifty-seven percent of vitamin D measurements revealed deficiency (<50 nmol/L). Risk of deficiency was increased 2.0-fold by female sex (P < .001) and 1.4-fold by winter (P < .05). During the weeks following peak crowding and trough sunlight, there was a midwinter peak in vitamin D deficiency (P < .02). Peak vitamin D deficiency was followed 6 weeks later by a late-winter peak in tuberculin skin test positivity and 12 weeks after that by an early-summer peak in QuantiFERON positivity (both P < .04). Twelve weeks after peak QuantiFERON positivity, there was a midsummer peak in tuberculosis symptom onset (P < .05) followed after 3 weeks by a late-summer peak in tuberculosis diagnoses (P < .001). Conclusions. The intervals from midwinter peak crowding and trough sunlight to sequential peaks in vitamin D deficiency, tuberculosis infection, symptom onset, and diagnosis may explain the enigmatic late-summer peak in tuberculosis. PMID:24596279

  16. Low-Density Granulocytes Are Elevated in Mycobacterial Infection and Associated with the Severity of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qing; Huang, Zhikun; Peng, Yiping; Xiong, Guoliang; Guo, Yang; Jiang, Hong; Li, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global health problem caused by infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Numerous studies have established a close correlation between the development of tuberculosis and the roles of neutrophils. Recently, a distinct population of CD15+ granulocytes was found to be present in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) fraction in humans. This population of granulocytes, termed low-density granulocytes (LDGs), was reported to be elevated and associated with disease activity or severity in a number of different conditions including SLE, asthma and HIV infection. However, both the frequency and clinical significance of LDGs associated with tuberculosis are unclear. Here we determined LDG levels and made comparisons between subjects with active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and healthy controls, between PTB patients with mild-to-moderate disease and patients with advanced disease, and among PTB patients following anti-tuberculous therapy of varying durations. The direct correlation between M. tuberculosis infection and LDG levels was confirmed by in vitro infection of whole peripheral blood and isolated granulocytes with mycobacteria. Our results demonstrated that PBMCs in PTB patients contained significantly elevated percentages of LDGs compared with control subjects. LDGs in tuberculosis expressed higher levels of activation markers compared to normal-density granulocytes (NDGs). M. tuberculosis induced the generation of LDGs in both whole blood and isolated NDGs from control subjects, which suggests that LDGs associated with M. tuberculosis infection are likely to originate from in situ activation. Furthermore, our results revealed that the frequency of LDGs is associated with the severity of tuberculosis. PMID:27073889

  17. Urogenital tuberculosis: definition and classification

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To improve the approach to the diagnosis and management of urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB), we need clear and unique classification. UGTB remains an important problem, especially in developing countries, but it is often an overlooked disease. As with any other infection, UGTB should be cured by antibacterial therapy, but because of late diagnosis it may often require surgery. Methods Scientific literature dedicated to this problem was critically analyzed and juxtaposed with the author’s own more than 30 years’ experience in tuberculosis urology. Results The conception, terms and definition were consolidated into one system; classification stage by stage as well as complications are presented. Classification of any disease includes dispersion on forms and stages and exact definitions for each stage. Clinical features and symptoms significantly vary between different forms and stages of UGTB. A simple diagnostic algorithm was constructed. Conclusions UGTB is multivariant disease and a standard unified approach to it is impossible. Clear definition as well as unique classification are necessary for real estimation of epidemiology and the optimization of therapy. The term ‘UGTB’ has insufficient information in order to estimate therapy, surgery and prognosis, or to evaluate the epidemiology. PMID:25745561

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Success through dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Gengenbacher, Martin; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major health threat, killing near to 2 million individuals around this globe, annually. The sole vaccine developed almost a century ago, provides limited protection only during childhood. After decades without the introduction of new antibiotics, several candidates are currently undergoing clinical investigation. Curing TB requires prolonged combination chemotherapy with several drugs. Moreover, monitoring the success of therapy is questionable due to the lack of reliable biomarkers. To substantially improve the situation, a detailed understanding of the crosstalk between human host and the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is vital. Principally, Mtb’s enormous success is based on three capacities: First, reprogramming of macrophages after primary infection/phagocytosis in order to prevent its own destruction; second, initiating the formation of well-organized granulomas, comprising different immune cells to create a confined environment for the host–pathogen standoff; third, the capability to shut down its own central metabolism, terminate replication and thereby transit into a stage of dormancy rendering itself extremely resistant to host defense and drug treatment. Here we review the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes, draw conclusions in a working model of mycobacterial dormancy and highlight gaps in our understanding to be addressed in future research. PMID:22320122

  19. A case report of peritoneal tuberculosis with multiple miliary peritoneal deposits mimicking advanced ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Shahla; Sadeghi, Mahmod; Alijanpour, Abolhasan; Naeimi-rad, Mojgan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peritoneal tuberculosis accounts 1-2% of all forms of tuberculosis. Peritoneal tuberculosis is an important differential diagnosis for ovarian cancer in women with ascites, adnexal mass and elevated cancer antigen 125 (CA125) levels. We report a case of a 32- year -old woman with multiple miliary peritoneal deposits mimicking advanced ovarian carcinoma. Case Presentation: A 32-year-old drug addicted woman presented with menometrorrhagia, fever and shivering, ascites and pelvis mass. Ultrasonography revealed a 53×65 mm cyst in left ovary and ascites. Multiple miliary peritoneal deposits were observed during laparatomy without any mass, histologic examination confirmed tuberculosis of uterus, tubes, omentum, liver and external surfaces of small intestine. Finally, the patient recovered with anti-tuberculosis treatment. Conclusion: These findings highlight considering tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis of any patients with adnexal mass, ascitis and elevated serum CA125 even with negative cytology and bacteriology test results. PMID:26958336

  20. Aerosol Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Causes Rapid Loss of Diversity in Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shashank; Guo, Haidan; Fraser, Claire; Bishai, William

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an important human pathogen, and yet diagnosis remains challenging. Little research has focused on the impact of M. tuberculosis on the gut microbiota, despite the significant immunological and homeostatic functions of the gastrointestinal tract. To determine the effect of M. tuberculosis infection on the gut microbiota, we followed mice from M. tuberculosis aerosol infection until death, using 16S rRNA sequencing. We saw a rapid change in the gut microbiota in response to infection, with all mice showing a loss and then recovery of microbial community diversity, and found that pre-infection samples clustered separately from post-infection samples, using ecological beta-diversity measures. The effect on the fecal microbiota was observed as rapidly as six days following lung infection. Analysis of additional mice infected by a different M. tuberculosis strain corroborated these results, together demonstrating that the mouse gut microbiota significantly changes with M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:24819223

  1. Multiple Cytokines Are Released When Blood from Patients with Tuberculosis Is Stimulated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Kellar, Kathryn L.; Gehrke, Jennifer; Weis, Stephen E.; Mahmutovic-Mayhew, Aida; Davila, Blachy; Zajdowicz, Margan J.; Scarborough, Robin; LoBue, Philip A.; Lardizabal, Alfred A.; Daley, Charles L.; Reves, Randall R.; Bernardo, John; Campbell, Brandon H.; Whitworth, William C.; Mazurek, Gerald H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection may cause overt disease or remain latent. Interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) detect Mtb infection, both latent infection and infection manifesting as overt disease, by measuring whole-blood interferon gamma (IFN-γ) responses to Mtb antigens such as early secreted antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6), culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10), and TB7.7. Due to a lack of adequate diagnostic standards for confirming latent Mtb infection, IGRA sensitivity for detecting Mtb infection has been estimated using patients with culture-confirmed tuberculosis (CCTB) for whom recovery of Mtb confirms the infection. In this study, cytokines in addition to IFN-γ were assessed for potential to provide robust measures of Mtb infection. Methods Cytokine responses to ESAT-6, CFP-10, TB7.7, or combinations of these Mtb antigens, for patients with CCTB were compared with responses for subjects at low risk for Mtb infection (controls). Three different multiplexed immunoassays were used to measure concentrations of 9 to 20 different cytokines. Responses were calculated by subtracting background cytokine concentrations from cytokine concentrations in plasma from blood stimulated with Mtb antigens. Results Two assays demonstrated that ESAT-6, CFP-10, ESAT-6+CFP-10, and ESAT-6+CFP-10+TB7.7 stimulated the release of significantly greater amounts of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-8, MCP-1 and MIP-1β for CCTB patients than for controls. Responses to combination antigens were, or tended to be, greater than responses to individual antigens. A third assay, using whole blood stimulation with ESAT-6+CFP-10+TB7.7, revealed significantly greater IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IP-10, MCP-1, MIP-1β, and TNF-α responses among patients compared with controls. One CCTB patient with a falsely negative IFN-γ response had elevated responses with other cytokines. Conclusions Multiple cytokines are released when whole blood from patients with CCTB is stimulated with Mtb antigens. Measurement of multiple cytokine responses may improve diagnostic sensitivity for Mtb infection compared with assessment of IFN-γ alone. PMID:22132075

  2. Tuberculosis among Children in Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gessner, Bradford D.

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis among Alaskan children under 15 was more than twice the national rate, with Alaska Native children showing a much higher incidence. Children with household exposure to adults with active tuberculosis had a high risk of infection. About 22 percent of pediatric tuberculosis cases were identified through school…

  3. Tuberculosis: A Problem for Lifeguards?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaros, Susan

    1996-01-01

    Lifeguards run the risk of workplace infection by tuberculosis-carrying swimmers. Even if they work in ventilated, sunlit areas (which reduces risk), they can contract tuberculosis when performing respiratory resuscitation. Without appropriate precautions, lifeguards may be unnecessarily exposed. A tuberculosis infection control plan is needed in…

  4. Childhood Tuberculosis, Still with Us...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaulet, Pierre; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The first section of this report on childhood tuberculosis in developed and developing countries discusses the epidemiology of tuberculosis in children. Information is presented on: (1) sources and prevalence of infection; (2) risks, frequency, and types of tuberculosis; (3) mortality rates; and (4) the relation of poverty and AIDS to

  5. Tuberculosis: A Problem for Lifeguards?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaros, Susan

    1996-01-01

    Lifeguards run the risk of workplace infection by tuberculosis-carrying swimmers. Even if they work in ventilated, sunlit areas (which reduces risk), they can contract tuberculosis when performing respiratory resuscitation. Without appropriate precautions, lifeguards may be unnecessarily exposed. A tuberculosis infection control plan is needed in

  6. Tuberculosis among Children in Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gessner, Bradford D.

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis among Alaskan children under 15 was more than twice the national rate, with Alaska Native children showing a much higher incidence. Children with household exposure to adults with active tuberculosis had a high risk of infection. About 22 percent of pediatric tuberculosis cases were identified through school

  7. Childhood Tuberculosis, Still with Us...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaulet, Pierre; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The first section of this report on childhood tuberculosis in developed and developing countries discusses the epidemiology of tuberculosis in children. Information is presented on: (1) sources and prevalence of infection; (2) risks, frequency, and types of tuberculosis; (3) mortality rates; and (4) the relation of poverty and AIDS to…

  8. Tuberculosis-resistant transgenic cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis is a devastating disease that affects humans and many animal species. In humans, tuberculosis (TB) is mainly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, while most cases in cattle are caused by Mycobacterium bovis. However, Mb can also cause, albeit rarely, human TB. In this issue, Wu et al. ...

  9. Tuberculosis of the genitourinary system-Urinary tract tuberculosis: Renal tuberculosis-Part I

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Suleman; Bharati, Alpa; Merchant, Neesha

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a worldwide scourge and its incidence appears to be increasing due to various factors, such as the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The insidious onset and non-specific constitutional symptoms of genitourinary tuberculosis (GUTB) often lead to delayed diagnosis and rapid progression to a non-functioning kidney. Due to hematogenous dissemination of TB, there is a potential risk of involvement of the contralateral kidney too. Imaging plays an important role in the making of a timely diagnosis and in the planning of treatment, and thus helps to avoid complications such as renal failure. Imaging of GUTB still remains a challenge, mainly on account of the dearth of literature, especially related to the use of the newer modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This two-part article is a comprehensive review of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and imaging findings in renal TB. Various imaging features of GUTB are outlined, from the pathognomonic lobar calcification on plain film, to finer early changes such as loss of calyceal sharpness and papillary necrosis on intravenous urography (IVU); to uneven caliectasis and urothelial thickening, in the absence of renal pelvic dilatation, as well as the hitherto unreported ‘lobar caseation’ on ultrasonography (USG). Well-known complications of GUTB such as sinus tracts, fistulae and amyloidosis are described, along with the relatively less well-known complications such as tuberculous interstitial nephritis (TIN), which may remain hidden because of its ‘culture negative’ nature and thus lead to renal failure. The second part of the article reviews the computed tomography (CT) and MRI features of GUTB and touches upon future imaging techniques along with imaging of TB in transplant recipients and in immunocompromised patients. PMID:23986618

  10. CD8+ T Cells Provide an Immunologic Signature of Tuberculosis in Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Nyendak, Melissa; Kiguli, Sarah; Zalwango, Sarah; Mori, Tomi; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Balyejusa, Stephen; Null, Megan; Baseke, Joy; Mulindwa, Deo; Byrd, Laura; Swarbrick, Gwendolyn; Scott, Christine; Johnson, Denise F.; Malone, LaShaunda; Mudido-Musoke, Philipa; Boom, W. Henry; Lewinsohn, David M.; Lewinsohn, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: The immunologic events surrounding primary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and development of tuberculosis remain controversial. Young children who develop tuberculosis do so quickly after first exposure, thus permitting study of immune response to primary infection and disease. We hypothesized that M. tuberculosis–specific CD8+ T cells are generated in response to high bacillary loads occurring during tuberculosis. Objectives: To determine if M. tuberculosis–specific T cells are generated among healthy children exposed to M. tuberculosis and children with tuberculosis. Methods: Enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assays were used to measure IFN-γ production in response to M. tuberculosis–specific proteins ESAT-6/CFP-10 by peripheral blood mononuclear cells and CD8+ T cells isolated from Ugandan children hospitalized with tuberculosis (n = 96) or healthy tuberculosis contacts (n = 62). Measurements and Main Results: The proportion of positive CD8+ T-cell assays and magnitude of CD8+ T-cell responses were significantly greater among young (<5 yr) tuberculosis cases compared with young contacts (P = 0.02, Fisher exact test, P = 0.01, Wilcoxon rank-sum, respectively). M. tuberculosis–specific T-cell responses measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were equivalent between groups. Conclusions: Among young children, M. tuberculosis–specific CD8+ T cells develop in response to high bacillary loads, as occurs during tuberculosis, and are unlikely to be found after M. tuberculosis exposure. T-cell responses measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells are generated after M. tuberculosis exposure alone, and thus cannot distinguish exposure from disease. In young children, IFN-γ–producing M. tuberculosis–specific CD8+ T cells provide an immunologic signature of primary M. tuberculosis infection resulting in disease. PMID:22071329

  11. [Urogenital tuberculosis today].

    PubMed

    Zhukova, I I; Kul'chavenia, E V; Kholtobin, D P; Brizhatiuk, E V; Khomiakov, V T; Osadchiĭ, A V

    2013-01-01

    In order to analyze the structure of urogenital tuberculosis, retrospective analysis of medical records of 131 patients with newly diagnosed urogenital tuberculosis observed in the Novosibirsk Regional TB Dispensary from 2009 to 2011 was performed. The renal tuberculosis is main form in the structure is urotuberculosis, detected in 75% of patients, and widespread destructive forms of the disease were diagnosed in more than half of cases. Isolated nephrotuberculosis was more often diagnosed in women--56.8%. 15.9% of patients had asymptomatic nephrotuberculosis; one-third of patients complained of pain in the lumbar region and frequent painful urination (35.2 and 39.8%, respectively); symptoms of intoxication were present in 17% of patients, renal colic--in 9.1%, and gross hematuria--in 7.9% of patients. Mycobacteriuria in isolated nephrotuberculosis was detected in 31.8% of cases. Acute tuberculous orchiepididymitis developed in 35.7% of patients, hemospermia was observed in 7.1% of patients, dysuria was in 35.7% of patients. The pain in the perineum, frequent painful urination (both by 31.6%), hemospermia (26.3%) were main complaints in prostate tuberculosis. Mycobacteria was detected in 10.5% of cases. It was found that urogenital tuberculosis has no pathognomonic symptoms; the most alarming manifestations include long-term dysuria, hematuria, hemospermia. PMID:23662488

  12. [Tuberculosis pulmonum--"threaten us of epidemic"?].

    PubMed

    Chyczewska, Elzbieta

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a deadly infectious disease affecting millions of people worldwide with 95% of cases and 98% of deaths occuring in developing countries (9 milion new cases, 1 million deaths annually) vs.WHO. Tuberculosis is on the increase in developed countries, because of AIDS, the use of immunosuppresive drugs which depress the host defence mechanism, decreased socioeconomic conditions, as well as increased immigration of persons from areas of high endemicity. The major reason for this increase was because of rapid rise in cases from sub-Saharan Africa (due to AIDS) nad Russia. Incidense of tuberculosis in Poland 2007--the number of notified cases was 8014. Pulmonary cases represented 92.7% of total all TB cases and 628 cases of extrapulmonary TB. Chidren TB cases represented 0.9% (74 cases) of all cases notified in Poland. The incidence of tuberculosis increases with age from 1.1 in children do 41.2 among 65 and older. The incidence of men (31.5) was two times higher than in women--14.5 per 100 000 respectivly. There were 716 deaths due to pulmonary TB and 23 from extrapulmonary TB. Multidrug resistance (MDR) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major therapeutic problem, in the world, with a high mortality and occurs mainly in HIV-infected patients. The WHO estimates that around 50 million people are infected with MDR-TB! WHO suggest that a greater investment in the establishment treatment strategy of DOTS (Directly Observed Treatment Short-course) into all posible regions. PMID:22320031

  13. Tuberculosis in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Stable, E J; Pedraza, R O

    1984-09-01

    Tuberculosis is a significant public health problem in developing countries, despite the fact that the means for effective control have been available for more than 35 yr. Cuba is a developing country that has achieved control of tuberculosis comparable to that of the United States. The history of tuberculosis control in Cuba prior to 1959 is reviewed. The achievement of effective control during the past 24 yr results from the implementation of ambulatory, supervised chemotherapy at the primary care level and the priority set by the government. Case-finding strategies, chemotherapeutic regimens, prevention, and economic implications are discussed. A wider application of the successful Cuban experience is possible by providing an overall improvement in living conditions, a significant but modest investment in human resources, and a political commitment to improved health care. PMID:6476601

  14. CT of abdominal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, B.M.; Mann, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    Intraabdominal tuberculosis (TB) presents with a wide variety of clinical and radiologic features. Besides the reported computed tomographic (CT) finding of high-density ascites in tuberculous peritonitis, this report describes additional CT features highly suggestive of abdominal tuberculosis in eight cases: (1) irregular soft-tissue densities in the omental area; (2) low-density masses surrounded by thick solid rims; (3) a disorganized appearance of soft-tissue densities, fluid, and bowel loops forming a poorly defined mass; (4) low-density lymph nodes with a multilocular appearance after intravenous contrast administration; and (5) possibly high-density ascites. The differential diagnosis of these features include lymphoma, various forms of peritonitis, peritoneal carcinomatosis, and peritoneal mesothelioma. It is important that the CT features of intraabdominal tuberculosis be recognized in order that laparotomy be avoided and less invasive procedures (e.g., laparoscopy, biopsy, or a trial of antituberculous therapy) be instituted.

  15. [Tuberculosis and immigration].

    PubMed

    Salas-Coronas, Joaquín; Rogado-González, M Cruz; Lozano-Serrano, Ana Belén; Cabezas-Fernández, M Teresa

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis worldwide is declining. However, in Western countries this decline is slower due to the impact of immigration. Tuberculosis in the immigrant population is related to health status in the country of origin and with overcrowding and poverty conditions in the host country. Immigrants with tuberculosis are younger, have a higher prevalence of extrapulmonary forms, greater proportion of drug resistance and higher treatment default rates than those of natives. New molecular techniques not only reduce diagnostic delay time but also allow the rapid identification of resistances and improve knowledge of transmission patterns. It is necessary to implement measures to improve treatment compliance in this population group like facilitating access to health card, the use of fixed-dose combination drugs, the participation of cultural mediators and community health workers and gratuity of drugs. PMID:26851978

  16. [Treatment of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Ben Amar, J; Dhahri, B; Aouina, H; Azzabi, S; Baccar, M A; El Gharbi, L; Bouacha, H

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to give practicing physicians a practical approach to the treatment of latent and active tuberculosis. Most patients follow TB standard treatment recommended by WHO that depend on category of patient. It is a combination of four essential tuberculosis drugs of the first group: isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamid and ethambutol; in some cases streptomycin can replace ethambutol. This initial phase of intensive treatment is followed by a consolidation phase. Drugs should be administered in the morning on an empty stomach one hour before meals. Treatment of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection is an important component of TB control programs. Preventive treatment can reduce the risk of developing active TB. PMID:25434510

  17. Tuberculosis and HIV Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Bruchfeld, Judith; Correia-Neves, Margarida; Källenius, Gunilla

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) constitute the main burden of infectious disease in resource-limited countries. In the individual host, the two pathogens, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and HIV, potentiate one another, accelerating the deterioration of immunological functions. In high-burden settings, HIV coinfection is the most important risk factor for developing active TB, which increases the susceptibility to primary infection or reinfection and also the risk of TB reactivation for patients with latent TB. M. tuberculosis infection also has a negative impact on the immune response to HIV, accelerating the progression from HIV infection to AIDS. The clinical management of HIV-associated TB includes the integration of effective anti-TB treatment, use of concurrent antiretroviral therapy (ART), prevention of HIV-related comorbidities, management of drug cytotoxicity, and prevention/treatment of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). PMID:25722472

  18. Population Structure among Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Realpe, Teresa; Correa, Nidia; Rozo, Juan Carlos; Ferro, Beatriz Elena; Gomez, Verónica; Zapata, Elsa; Ribon, Wellman; Puerto, Gloria; Castro, Claudia; Nieto, Luisa María; Diaz, Maria Lilia; Rivera, Oriana; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin; Arbelaez, Maria Patricia; Robledo, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Background Phylogeographic composition of M. tuberculosis populations reveals associations between lineages and human populations that might have implications for the development of strategies to control the disease. In Latin America, lineage 4 or the Euro-American, is predominant with considerable variations among and within countries. In Colombia, although few studies from specific localities have revealed differences in M. tuberculosis populations, there are still areas of the country where this information is lacking, as is a comparison of Colombian isolates with those from the rest of the world. Principal Findings A total of 414 M. tuberculosis isolates from adult pulmonary tuberculosis cases from three Colombian states were studied. Isolates were genotyped using IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), spoligotyping, and 24-locus Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units variable number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTRs). SIT42 (LAM9) and SIT62 (H1) represented 53.3% of isolates, followed by 8.21% SIT50 (H3), 5.07% SIT53 (T1), and 3.14% SIT727 (H1). Composite spoligotyping and 24-locus MIRU- VNTR minimum spanning tree analysis suggest a recent expansion of SIT42 and SIT62 evolved originally from SIT53 (T1). The proportion of Haarlem sublineage (44.3%) was significantly higher than that in neighboring countries. Associations were found between M. tuberculosis MDR and SIT45 (H1), as well as HIV-positive serology with SIT727 (H1) and SIT53 (T1). Conclusions This study showed the population structure of M. tuberculosis in several regions from Colombia with a dominance of the LAM and Haarlem sublineages, particularly in two major urban settings (Medellín and Cali). Dominant spoligotypes were LAM9 (SIT 42) and Haarlem (SIT62). The proportion of the Haarlem sublineage was higher in Colombia compared to that in neighboring countries, suggesting particular conditions of co-evolution with the corresponding human population that favor the success of this sublineage. PMID:24747767

  19. Spectrum of urogenital tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kulchavenya, Ekaterina; Zhukova, Irina; Kholtobin, Denis

    2013-10-01

    Urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB) plays an important role because its complications may be fatal, it significantly reduces quality of life, and it is often associated with AIDS. Diagnosis of UGTB is often delayed. We analyzed 131 case histories of UGTB patients from the years 2009-2011. Gender, age, and the clinical form and main features of the disease were taken into account. The most common form was kidney tuberculosis (74.8%). Isolated kidney tuberculosis (KTB) more often occurs in women: 56.8%. Patients of middle and old age more often showed the stage of cavernous KTB; younger patients had smaller forms. Among all cases, an asymptomatic course was seen in 12.2% and, among cases of KTB, in 15.9%. Every third patient complained of flank pain and dysuria (35.2% and 39.8%, respectively); 17% presented with toxicity symptoms, 9.1% with renal colic, and 7.9% with gross hematuria. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in urine was found in 31.8% of cases in all levels of isolated KTB. UGTB has no specific symptom; even sterile pyuria occurs only in 25%. The acute onset of tuberculous orchiepididymitis was seen in 35.7% of patients, hemospermia in 7.1%, and dysuria in 35.7%. The most common complaints for prostate tuberculosis were perineal pain (31.6%), dysuria (also 31.6%), and hemospermia (26.3%). MTB in prostate secretion/ejaculate was revealed in 10.5% of this group. All urogenital tract infections should be suspected as UGTB in patients who are living in a region with a high incidence rate, who have had contact with tuberculosis infection, and who have a recurrence of the disease that is resistant to standard therapy. PMID:23526041

  20. The Importance of First Impressions: Early Events in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Influence Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Cadena, Anthony M.; Fortune, Sarah M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tuberculosis remains a major health threat in much of the world. New vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis are essential for preventing infection, disease, and transmission. However, the host immune responses that need to be induced by an effective vaccine remain unclear. Increasingly, it has become clear that early events in infection are of major importance in the eventual outcome of the infection. Studying such events in humans is challenging, as they occur within the lung and thoracic lymph nodes, and any clinical signs of early infection are relatively nonspecific. Nonetheless, clinical studies and animal models of tuberculosis have provided new insights into the local events that occur in the first few weeks of tuberculosis. Development of an effective vaccine requires a clear understanding of the successful (and detrimental) early host responses against M. tuberculosis, with the goal to improve upon natural immune responses and prevent infection or disease. PMID:27048801

  1. Perspectives on Advances in Tuberculosis Diagnostics, Drugs, and Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Schito, Marco; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Fletcher, Helen A; McNerney, Ruth; Centis, Rosella; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Bates, Matthew; Kibiki, Gibson; Kapata, Nathan; Corrah, Tumena; Bomanji, Jamshed; Vilaplana, Cris; Johnson, Daniel; Mwaba, Peter; Maeurer, Markus; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2015-10-15

    Despite concerted efforts over the past 2 decades at developing new diagnostics, drugs, and vaccines with expanding pipelines, tuberculosis remains a global emergency. Several novel diagnostic technologies show promise of better point-of-care rapid tests for tuberculosis including nucleic acid-based amplification tests, imaging, and breath analysis of volatile organic compounds. Advances in new and repurposed drugs for use in multidrug-resistant (MDR) or extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis have focused on development of several new drug regimens and their evaluation in clinical trials and now influence World Health Organization guidelines. Since the failure of the MVA85A vaccine 2 years ago, there have been no new tuberculosis vaccine candidates entering clinical testing. The current status quo of the lengthy treatment duration and poor treatment outcomes associated with MDR/XDR tuberculosis and with comorbidity of tuberculosis with human immunodeficiency virus and noncommunicable diseases is unacceptable. New innovations and political and funder commitment for early rapid diagnosis, shortening duration of therapy, improving treatment outcomes, and prevention are urgently required. PMID:26409271

  2. Immunodiagnosis of tuberculosis: new questions, new tools conference 2008

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Human infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis exists as a spectrum of conditions ranging from asymptomatic infection to active disease. Novel, accurate tuberculosis immunodiagnostics have been introduced over the last decade, but it remains challenging to timely diagnose active disease and to accurately distinguish asymptomatic M. tuberculosis infection from immune memory resulting from a prior infection eradicated by the host response. The conference titled Immunodiagnosis of Tuberculosis: New Questions, New Tools, which was held on September 21-23, 2008 in Virginia Beach, Virginia, United States, brought together basic scientists and clinical experts to discuss recent progress in tuberculosis research and diagnosis. Global analyses of M. tuberculosis biology and the host immune response, with emphasis on systems approaches to the study of host-pathogen interactions, were presented. Moreover, conference participants discussed new tests in the pipeline and reviewed new technologies leading to novel assay formats. The discussion included technologies ranging from simple, inexpensive point-of-care tests to automated molecular platforms for detection of multiple infections based on the “lab on a chip” concept. It was also recognized that the utility of any new diagnostic relies on laboratory capacity, accessibility, costs, and test deployment. The conference included lessons from the field. For example, the application of existing technologies to neglected areas, such as diagnosis in children and HIV+ populations, was discussed. PMID:21172041

  3. The Singapore Tuberculosis Elimination Programme: the first five years.

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Cynthia B. E.; James, Lyn

    2003-01-01

    The Singapore Tuberculosis Elimination Programme (STEP) was launched in 1997 because the incidence of the disease had remained between 49 and 56 per 100,000 resident population for the preceding 10 years. STEP involves the following key interventions: directly observed therapy (DOT) in public primary health care clinics; monitoring of treatment progress and outcome for all cases by means of a National Treatment Surveillance Registry; and preventive therapy for recently infected close contacts of infectious tuberculosis cases. Among other activities are the revamping of the National Tuberculosis Notification Registry, the discontinuation of BCG revaccination for schoolchildren, the tightening up of defaulter tracing, and the education of the medical community and the public. Future plans include an outreach programme for specific groups of patients who are unable to attend their nearest public primary care clinics for DOT, the detention of infectious recalcitrant defaulters for treatment under the Infectious Diseases Act, the molecular fingerprinting of tuberculosis isolates, and targeted screening of high-risk groups. The incidence of tuberculosis fell from 57 per 100,000 population in 1998 to 48 per 100,000 in 1999 and continued to decline to 44 per 100,000 in 2001. With political will and commitment and the support of the medical community and the public it is hoped that STEP will achieve further progress towards the elimination of tuberculosis in Singapore. PMID:12764518

  4. Ruxolitinib Associated Tuberculosis Presenting as a Neck Lump

    PubMed Central

    Shamil, Eamon; Cunningham, David; Wong, Billy L. K.; Jani, Piyush

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is an opportunistic infection with protean clinical manifestations. We describe a case of Ruxolitinib induced miliary tuberculosis presenting as a neck lump. A 78-year-old female presented with a two-month history of right-sided neck lump associated with fever, night sweats, and significant weight loss. She had a past medical history that included myelofibrosis, being treated with Ruxolitinib. Examination demonstrated 4 × 4 cm right-sided cervical lymphadenopathy. A chest radiograph showed extensive shadowing in both lungs. CT scan demonstrated perilymphatic nodes in addition to the cervical mass. An ultrasound-guided biopsy of a cervical lymph node demonstrated confirmed Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. It was hypothesized that use of Ruxolitinib through its selective inhibition of Janus-activated kinases 1 and 2 resulted in immunosuppression and miliary tuberculosis in this patient. The medication was stopped and a 12-month regime of antituberculosis therapy commenced. She remained well at one-year follow-up with resolution of lung involvement. Clinicians should consider tuberculosis as a differential diagnosis for patients presenting with a neck lump, particularly in those taking immunosuppressant medication such as Ruxolitinib. A multidisciplinary approach is needed to promptly treat the tuberculosis and consider discontinuation of Ruxolitinib. PMID:26788384

  5. Pulmonary tuberculosis among people living with HIV/AIDS attending care and treatment in rural northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Ngowi, Bernard J; Mfinanga, Sayoki G; Bruun, Johan N; Morkve, Odd

    2008-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is the commonest opportunistic infection and the number one cause of death in HIV/AIDS patients in developing countries. To address the extent of the tuberculosis HIV coinfection in rural Tanzania we conducted a cross sectional study including HIV/AIDS patients attending care and treatment clinic from September 2006 to March 2007. Methods Sputum samples were collected for microscopy, culture and drug susceptibility testing. Chest X-ray was done for those patients who consented. Blood samples were collected for CD4+ T cells count. Results The prevalence of tuberculosis was 20/233 (8.5%). Twenty (8.5%) sputum samples were culture positive. Eight of the culture positive samples (40%) were smear positive. Fifteen (75%) of these patients neither had clinical symptoms nor chest X-ray findings suggestive of tuberculosis. Nineteen isolates (95%) were susceptible to rifampicin, isoniazid, streptomycin and ethambutol (the first line tuberculosis drugs). One isolate (5%) from HIV/tuberculosis coinfected patients was resistant to isoniazid. No cases of multi- drug resistant tuberculosis were identified. Conclusion We found high prevalence of tuberculosis disease in this setting. Chest radiograph suggestive of tuberculosis and clinical symptoms of fever and cough were uncommon findings in HIV/tuberculosis coinfected patients. Tuberculosis can occur at any stage of CD4+T cells depletion. PMID:18826574

  6. Unusual Clinical Presentation of Thoracic Tuberculosis: The Need for a Better Knowledge of Illness

    PubMed Central

    Manca, Sandra; Fois, Alessandro Giuseppe; Santoru, Luigi; Trisolini, Rocco; Polo, Maria Francesca; Ostera, Salvatore; Patelli, Marco; Pirina, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Bronchoesophageal fistula in endobronchial tuberculosis and mediastinal lymphadenopathy Symptoms: Nonproductive cough • weight loss Medication: Isoniazid • rifampin • pyrazinamide • ethambutol Clinical Procedure: Laser treatment Specialty: Pulmonology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), a highly contagious infectious disease, is a significant public health problem all over the world and remains an important cause of preventable death in the adult population. Endobronchial TB is an unusual form of thoracic TB that may be complicated by tracheobronchial stenosis, and bronchoesophageal fistula formation is a very rare complication. Tubercular lymphadenitis can also lead to fistula formation through a process of caseum necrosis and opening of a fistula between the bronchus and oesophagus. Case Report: We report an uncommon case of thoracic TB in an immunocompetent 73-year-old Caucasian man who presented several problems: bronchoesophageal fistula, endobronchial TB, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy in the absence of contemporary parenchymal consolidation. Furthermore, he presented a normal chest radiograph and mostly unclear and non-specific symptoms at onset. Conclusions: We emphasize the need for a better knowledge of this illness and awareness that it may have an unusual presentation. In these cases, diagnosis and proper treatment can be delayed, with severe complications for the patient. Pulmonary TB remains a real diagnostic challenge: a normal chest radiograph and nonspecific symptoms do not allow us to exclude this persistent infectious disease. PMID:25907152

  7. Counting Children with Tuberculosis: Why Numbers Matter

    PubMed Central

    Seddon, James A; Jenkins, Helen E; Liu, Li; Cohen, Ted; Black, Robert E; Becerra, Mercedes C.; Graham, Stephen M; Sismanidis, Charalambos; Dodd, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Summary In the last five years, childhood tuberculosis (TB) has received increasing attention from international organisations, national tuberculosis programmes, and academics. For the first time, a number of different groups are developing techniques to estimate the burden of childhood TB. We review the challenges in diagnosing TB in children and the reasons cases in children can go unreported. We discuss the importance of an accurate understanding of burden for identifying problems in programme delivery, targeting interventions, monitoring trends, setting targets, allocating resources appropriately and providing strong advocacy. We briefly review the estimates produced by new analytical methods, outline the reasons for recent improvements in our understanding, and potential future directions. We conclude that while innovation, collaboration and better data have improved our understanding of childhood TB burden, it remains substantially incomplete. PMID:26564535

  8. Descriptive review of tuberculosis surveillance systems across the circumpolar regions

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois, Annie-Claude; Zulz, Tammy; Soborg, Bolette; Koch, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is highly prevalent in many Arctic areas. Members of the International Circumpolar Surveillance Tuberculosis (ICS-TB) Working Group collaborate to increase knowledge about tuberculosis in Arctic regions. Objective To establish baseline knowledge of tuberculosis surveillance systems used by ICS-TB member jurisdictions. Design Three questionnaires were developed to reflect the different surveillance levels (local, regional and national); all 3 were forwarded to the official representative of each of the 15 ICS-TB member jurisdictions in 2013. Respondents self-identified the level of surveillance conducted in their region and completed the applicable questionnaire. Information collected included surveillance system objectives, case definitions, data collection methodology, storage and dissemination. Results Thirteen ICS-TB jurisdictions [Canada (Labrador, Northwest Territories, Nunavik, Nunavut, Yukon), Finland, Greenland, Norway, Sweden, Russian Federation (Arkhangelsk, Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous Okrug, Yakutia (Sakha Republic), United States (Alaska)] voluntarily completed the survey – representing 2 local, 7 regional and 4 national levels. Tuberculosis reporting is mandatory in all jurisdictions, and case definitions are comparable across regions. The common objectives across systems are to detect outbreaks, and inform the evaluation/planning of public health programmes and policies. All jurisdictions collect data on confirmed active tuberculosis cases and treatment outcomes; 11 collect contact tracing results. Faxing of standardized case reporting forms is the most common reporting method. Similar core data elements are collected; 8 regions report genotyping results. Data are stored using customized programmes (n=7) and commercial software (n=6). Nine jurisdictions provide monthly, bi-annual or annual reports to principally government and/or scientific/medical audiences. Conclusion This review successfully establishes baseline knowledge on similarities and differences among circumpolar tuberculosis surveillance systems. The similarity in case definitions will allow for description of the epidemiology of TB based on surveillance data in circumpolar regions, further study of tuberculosis trends across regions, and recommendation of best practices to improve surveillance activities. PMID:27121178

  9. Comparative analyses of the proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human genomes: Identification of potential tuberculosis drug targets.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Settu; Dash, Pallabini; Guruprasad, Kunchur

    2016-03-15

    Tuberculosis, one of the major infectious diseases affecting human beings is caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Increased resistance to known drugs commonly used for the treatment of tuberculosis has created an urgent need to identify new targets for validation and to develop drugs. In this study, we have used various bioinformatics tools, to compare the protein sequences from twenty-three M. tuberculosis genome strains along with the known human protein sequences, in order to identify the 'conserved' M. tuberculosis proteins absent in human. Further, based on the analysis of protein interaction networks, we selected one-hundred and forty proteins that were predicted as potential M. tuberculosis drug targets and prioritized according to the ranking of 'clusters' of interacting proteins. Comparison of the predicted 140 TB targets with literature indicated that 46 of them were previously reported, thereby increasing the confidence in our predictions of the remaining 94 targets too. The analyses of the structures and functions corresponding to the predicted potential TB drug targets indicated a diverse range of proteins that included ten 'druggable' targets with some of the known drugs. PMID:26762852

  10. Socioeconomic Factors Associated with Knowledge on Tuberculosis among Adults in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gelaw, Sifrash Meseret

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ethiopia is among highly tuberculosis affected countries. This might be related to low level of awareness on the disease in the population. The objective of the study was to determine the level of tuberculosis knowledge and socioeconomic factors associated with it. Methods. The 2011 Ethiopia health and demographic survey data were used. Overall tuberculosis knowledge score was computed to evaluate the outcome variable. Multivariable logistic regression was employed to identify independent socioeconomic factors associated with low tuberculosis knowledge. Results. The overall tuberculosis knowledge was low, 44.05% (95% CI: 42.05–46.24%) among women and 32.3% (95% CI: 30.34–34.32%) among men. Rural women (AOR = 1.22) and youth, no formal education (women: AOR = 3.28, men: AOR = 7.42), attending only primary education (women: AOR = 1.95, men: AOR = 3.49), lowest wealth quintiles (women: AOR = 1.4, Men: AOR = 1.28), unskilled female manual workers (AOR = 4.15), female agricultural employee (AOR = 2.28), and lack of access to media (women: AOR = 1.52, men: AOR = 1.71) are significantly associated with low tuberculosis knowledge. Conclusion. The level of tuberculosis knowledge among adults in Ethiopia is low and varied by socioeconomic groups. Tuberculosis control programs should consider appropriate strategies for tuberculosis education, promotion, communication, and social mobilization to address the rural women, youths, the poor, less educated people, and unskilled workers. PMID:26949546

  11. Socioeconomic Factors Associated with Knowledge on Tuberculosis among Adults in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Gelaw, Sifrash Meseret

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ethiopia is among highly tuberculosis affected countries. This might be related to low level of awareness on the disease in the population. The objective of the study was to determine the level of tuberculosis knowledge and socioeconomic factors associated with it. Methods. The 2011 Ethiopia health and demographic survey data were used. Overall tuberculosis knowledge score was computed to evaluate the outcome variable. Multivariable logistic regression was employed to identify independent socioeconomic factors associated with low tuberculosis knowledge. Results. The overall tuberculosis knowledge was low, 44.05% (95% CI: 42.05-46.24%) among women and 32.3% (95% CI: 30.34-34.32%) among men. Rural women (AOR = 1.22) and youth, no formal education (women: AOR = 3.28, men: AOR = 7.42), attending only primary education (women: AOR = 1.95, men: AOR = 3.49), lowest wealth quintiles (women: AOR = 1.4, Men: AOR = 1.28), unskilled female manual workers (AOR = 4.15), female agricultural employee (AOR = 2.28), and lack of access to media (women: AOR = 1.52, men: AOR = 1.71) are significantly associated with low tuberculosis knowledge. Conclusion. The level of tuberculosis knowledge among adults in Ethiopia is low and varied by socioeconomic groups. Tuberculosis control programs should consider appropriate strategies for tuberculosis education, promotion, communication, and social mobilization to address the rural women, youths, the poor, less educated people, and unskilled workers. PMID:26949546

  12. Tuberculosis case finding based on symptom screening among immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers in Rome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Italy the proportion of cases of tuberculosis in persons originating from high-prevalence countries has been increasing in the last decade. We designed a study to assess adherence to and yield of a tuberculosis screening programme based on symptom screening conducted at primary care centres for regular and irregular immigrants and refugees/asylum seekers. Methods Presence of symptoms suggestive of active tuberculosis was investigated by verbal screening in migrants presenting for any medical condition to 3 free primary care centres in the province of Rome. Individuals reporting at least one symptom were referred to a tuberculosis clinic for diagnostic workup. Results Among 2142 migrants enrolled, 254 (11.9%) reported at least one symptom suggestive of active tuberculosis and 176 were referred to the tuberculosis clinic. Of them, 80 (45.4%) did not present for diagnostic evaluation. Tuberculosis was diagnosed in 7 individuals representing 0.33% of those screened and 7.3% of those evaluated for tuberculosis. Conclusion The overall yield of this intervention was in the range reported for other tuberculosis screening programmes for migrants, although we recorded an unsatisfactory adherence to diagnostic workup. Possible advantages of this intervention include low cost and reduced burden of medical procedures for the screened population. Further evaluation of this approach appears to be warranted. PMID:24053349

  13. Disseminated tuberculosis after extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy in an AIDS patient presenting with urosepsis.

    PubMed

    Tourchi, Ali; Ebadi, Maryam; Hosseinzadeh, Alireza; Shabaninia, Mahsa

    2014-03-01

    Haematogenous dissemination of undiagnosed urinary tuberculosis after performing extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is extremely rare. Herein, we report a 41-year-old male who presented with urosepsis to the emergency room; catheterization was performed and retention resolved. He had a tattoo on his left arm and a five-year history of intravenous drug use. Blood tests indicated anaemia, leukocytosis, elevated CRP and ESR and mild hyponatraemia; haematuria, moderate bacteriuria and 2+ proteinuria on urinanalysis were observed. Chest X-ray revealed lesions suggestive of miliary tuberculosis, which was confirmed by chest CT scan. Brain CT and MRI suggested brain involvement in the setting of tuberculosis. On further investigations, HIV infection and hepatitis C seropositivity were detected and the patient remained in a coma for five days with a Glasgow Coma Scale of 6/15. Finally, the diagnosis of haematogenous dissemination of tuberculosis following lithotripsy was established. Anti-tuberculosis and anti-retroviral therapy were prescribed and monthly follow-up visits were scheduled. In conclusion, in a patient diagnosed with ureterolithiasis, a thorough history and physical examination, with specific attention to HIV and tuberculosis predisposing factors, should be carried out and preoperative screening tests considering the possibility of urinary tuberculosis are required. Finally, if urinary tuberculosis is detected, ESWL must be postponed until after appropriate treatment of tuberculosis. PMID:23970650

  14. The Effect of HIV-Related Immunosuppression on the Risk of Tuberculosis Transmission to Household Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chuan-Chin; Tchetgen, Eric Tchetgen; Becerra, Mercedes C.; Cohen, Ted; Hughes, Katherine C.; Zhang, Zibiao; Calderon, Roger; Yataco, Rosa; Contreras, Carmen; Galea, Jerome; Lecca, Leonid; Murray, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may modify the risk of transmitting tuberculosis. Some previous investigations suggest that patients coinfected with HIV and tuberculosis are less likely to transmit infection, whereas others do not support this conclusion. Here, we estimated the relative risk of tuberculosis transmission from coinfected patients compared to HIV-negative patients with tuberculosis. Methods. Between September 2009 and August 2012, we identified and enrolled 4841 household contacts of 1608 patients with drug-sensitive tuberculosis in Lima, Peru. We assessed the HIV status and CD4 counts of index patients, as well as other risk factors for infection specific to the index patient, the household, and the exposed individuals. Contacts underwent tuberculin skin testing to determine tuberculosis infection status. Results. After adjusting for covariates, we found that household contacts of HIV-infected tuberculosis patients with a CD4 count ≤250 cells/µL were less likely to be infected with tuberculosis (risk ratio = 0.49 [95% confidence interval, .24–.96]) than the contacts of HIV-negative tuberculosis patients. No children younger than 15 years who were exposed to HIV-positive patients with a CD4 count ≤250 cells/µL were infected with tuberculosis, compared to 22% of those exposed to non-HIV-infected patients. There was no significant difference in the risk of infection between contacts of HIV-infected index patients with CD4 counts >250 cells/µL and contacts of index patients who were not HIV-infected. Conclusions. We found a reduced risk of tuberculosis infection among the household contacts of patients with active tuberculosis who had advanced HIV-related immunosuppression, suggesting reduced transmission from these index patients. PMID:24368620

  15. [Surgery for thoracic tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kilani, T; Boudaya, M S; Zribi, H; Ouerghi, S; Marghli, A; Mestiri, T; Mezni, F

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is mainly a medical disease. Surgery has been the unique therapeutic tool for a long time before the advent of specific antituberculous drugs, and the role of surgery was then confined to the treatment of the sequelae of tuberculosis and their complications. The resurgence of tuberculosis and the emergence of multidrug-resistant TB combined to immunosuppressed patients represent a new challenge for tuberculosis surgery. Surgery may be indicated for a diagnostic purpose in patients with pulmonary, pleural, mediastinal or thoracic wall involvement, or with a therapeutic purpose (drainage, resection, residual cavity obliteration). Modern imaging techniques and the advent of video-assisted thoracic surgery allowed a new approach of this pathology; the majority of diagnostic interventions and selected cases requiring lung resection can be performed through a mini-invasive approach. Patients proposed for aggressive surgery may be treated with the best results thanks to a good evaluation of the thoracic lesions, of the patients' nutritional, infectious and general status combined with a good coordination between the specialized medical team for an optimal preparation to surgery. PMID:24894967

  16. Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Epidemiology of Tuberculosis in Correctional Facilities, United States, 1993-2014 Prevention and Control of Tuberculosis in Correctional ... cases of XDR TB have been reported between 1993 and 2011*. *The National Tuberculosis Surveillance System (NTSS) ...

  17. Tuberculosis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hortago Tibishada - af Soomaali (Somali) Bilingual PDF Harborview Medical Center Tuberculosis (TB) Qaaxada (TB) - af Soomaali (Somali) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Spanish (español) Tuberculosis Tagalog (Tagalog) Tuberculosis (TB) Tuberkulosis ( ...

  18. Measuring health-related quality of life in tuberculosis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Na; Marra, Fawziah; Marra, Carlo A

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem worldwide. In recent years, increasing efforts have been dedicated to assessing the health-related quality of life experienced by people infected with tuberculosis. The objectives of this study were to better understand the impact of tuberculosis and its treatment on people's quality of life, and to review quality of life instruments used in current tuberculosis research. Methods A systematic literature search from 1981 to 2008 was performed through a number of electronic databases as well as a manual search. Eligible studies assessed multi-dimensional quality of life in people with tuberculosis disease or infection using standardized instruments. Results of the included studies were summarized qualitatively. Results Twelve original studies met our criteria for inclusion. A wide range of quality of life instruments were involved, and the Short-Form 36 was most commonly used. A validated tuberculosis-specific quality of life instrument was not located. The findings showed that tuberculosis had a substantial and encompassing impact on patients' quality of life. Overall, the anti-tuberculosis treatment had a positive effect of improving patients' quality of life; their physical health tended to recover more quickly than the mental well-being. However, after the patients successfully completed treatment and were microbiologically 'cured', their quality of life remained significantly worse than the general population. Conclusion Tuberculosis has substantially adverse impacts on patients' quality of life, which persist after microbiological 'cure'. A variety of instruments were used to assess quality of life in tuberculosis and there has been no well-established tuberculosis-specific instrument, making it difficult to fully understand the impact of the illness. PMID:19224645

  19. Comparative proteomic analysis of sequential isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from a patient with pulmonary tuberculosis turning from drug sensitive to multidrug resistant

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amit; Gopinath, Krishnamoorthy; Sharma, Prashant; Bisht, Deepa; Sharma, Pawan; Singh, Niti; Singh, Sarman

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Tuberculosis is a major health problem in India, and the emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has further complicated the situation. Though several studies characterizing drug sensitive and drug resistant strains are available in literature, almost all studies are done on unrelated strains. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the proteomic data of four sequential isolates of Mtb from a single patient who developed MDR-TB during the course of anti-tuberculosis therapy (ATT). Methods: In this study, using two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, we compared and analyzed the cell lysate proteins of Mtb sequential clinical isolates from a patient undergoing anti-TB treatment. The mRNA expression levels of selected identified proteins were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results: The genotypes of all four isolates remained homologous, indicating no re-infection. The initial isolate (before treatment) was sensitive to all first-line drugs, but the consecutive isolates were found to be resistant to isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RIF) and developed mutations in the katG, inhA and rpoB. The intensities of 27 protein spots were found to be consistently overexpressed in INH and RIF resistant isolates. The most prominent and overexpressed proteins found during the development of drug resistance were GarA (Rv1827), wag31 (Rv2145c), Rv1437 and Rv2970c. Interpretation & conclusions: This preliminary proteomic study provides an insight about the proteins that are upregulated during drug resistance development. These upregulated proteins, identified here, could prove useful as immunodiagnostic and possibly drug resistant markers in future. However, more studies are required to confirm these findings. PMID:25857493

  20. A Mycobacterial Perspective on Tuberculosis in West Africa: Significant Geographical Variation of M. africanum and Other M. tuberculosis Complex Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Gehre, Florian; Kumar, Samrat; Kendall, Lindsay; Ejo, Mebrat; Secka, Oumie; Ofori-Anyinam, Boatema; Abatih, Emmanuel; Antonio, Martin; Berkvens, Dirk; de Jong, Bouke C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Phylogenetically distinct Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineages differ in their phenotypes and pathogenicity. Consequently, understanding mycobacterial population structures phylogeographically is essential for design, interpretation and generalizability of clinical trials. Comprehensive efforts are lacking to date to establish the West African mycobacterial population structure on a sub-continental scale, which has diagnostic implications and can inform the design of clinical TB trials. Methodology/Principal Findings We collated novel and published genotyping (spoligotyping) data and classified spoligotypes into mycobacterial lineages/families using TBLineage and Spotclust, followed by phylogeographic analyses using statistics (logistic regression) and lineage axis plot analysis in GenGIS, in which a phylogenetic tree constructed in MIRU-VNTRplus was analysed. Combining spoligotyping data from 16 previously published studies with novel data from The Gambia, we obtained a total of 3580 isolates from 12 countries and identified 6 lineages comprising 32 families. By using stringent analytical tools we demonstrate for the first time a significant phylogeographic separation between western and eastern West Africa not only of the two M. africanum (West Africa 1 and 2) but also of several major M. tuberculosis sensu stricto families, such as LAM10 and Haarlem 3. Moreover, in a longitudinal logistic regression analysis for grouped data we showed that M. africanum West Africa 2 remains a persistent health concern. Conclusions/Significance Because of the geographical divide of the mycobacterial populations in West Africa, individual research findings from one country cannot be generalized across the whole region. The unequal geographical family distribution should be considered in placement and design of future clinical trials in West Africa. PMID:26964059

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis evades host immunity by recruiting mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Raghuvanshi, Shilpa; Sharma, Pawan; Singh, Sarman; Van Kaer, Luc; Das, Gobardhan

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the cause of 2 million deaths each year, which is the second highest cause of mortality from a single infectious disease worldwide. Resistance of these organisms to drugs has emerged as an important health concern. Alternative approaches to the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis are therefore urgently needed. Despite the generation of robust host immune responses, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) successfully evades host immunity and establishes a persistent infection. The mechanism(s) by which M. tuberculosis manages to persist in the face of potent host immune responses remain(s) incompletely understood. Here, we demonstrate that M. tb suppresses T-lymphocyte responses by recruiting mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to the site of infection. We found that MSCs infiltrated tissues in mice containing M. tb organisms and T lymphocytes. We further demonstrate that MSCs suppressed T-cell responses by producing nitric oxide. Our findings reveal a key role of MSCs in the capacity of M. tb to evade host immune responses and identify these cells as unique targets for therapeutic intervention in tuberculosis. PMID:21135221

  2. Post-treatment change in Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha release in patients with active tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang Ho; Yoo, Seung Soo; Lee, Shin Yup; Cha, Seung Ick; Park, Jae Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Monitoring tuberculosis (TB) treatment response remains challenging due to lack of reliable laboratory markers. In recent years, increased efforts have been exerted toward development of new biomarkers reflecting treatment response appropriately. While performance of interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) to monitor anti-TB treatment has been extensively evaluated, there is no data about post-treatment changes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) antigen-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) release in active TB patients. Herein, we explored whether the MTB antigen-stimulated TNF-α release would be useful for monitoring responses to anti-TB treatment. Methods We compared unstimulated (TNF-αNil), MTB antigen-stimulated (TNF-αAg), and MTB antigen-stimulated minus unstimulated TNF-α levels (TNF-αAg-Nil) in supernatants from QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube tests before and after treatment in 16 active TB patients, 25 latent TB infection (LTBI) subjects, and 10 healthy controls (HC). Results TNF-αAg and TNF-αAg-Nil levels decreased significantly after treatment in patients with active TB. In addition, TNF-αNil, TNF-αAg, and TNF-αAg-Nil levels were significantly higher in untreated active TB patients compared to LTBI subjects and HC. Conclusions This finding cautiously suggests that MTB Ag-stimulated TNF-α response may be a potential adjunctive marker for monitoring treatment response in active TB patients. PMID:26101647

  3. Oral tuberculosis involving maxillary gingiva

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Rohit; Singh, Anil; Badni, Manjunath; Singh, Priyanka

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a communicable disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is transmitted by aerosolized saliva droplets among individuals in close contact with expelled sputum of a diseased patient. However, TB lesions of the oral cavity are often overlooked in the differential diagnosis. We report here a case of tuberculosis of oral cavity affecting the gingiva of a 24-year-old male. PMID:22639508

  4. Paradoxical response in spinal tuberculosis: Lessons learnt

    PubMed Central

    Velivela, Kiranchand; Rajesh, Alugolu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with spinal tuberculosis started on antituberculous treatment (ATT) empirically and showing increasing size of the lesion on follow-up are a treatment challenge. We describe our experience in managing such cases. Materials and Methods: We treated 80 patients with spinal tuberculosis at our institute from January 2012 to June 2014. Of these, 50 were managed by surgical intervention and the rest 30 were managed conservatively only on anti-tubercular drugs. Six patients out of these 30 patients, showed a paradoxical increase in the size of lesion without any neurological deficits after 3 months of starting ATT. Surgical intervention was done in three cases, whereas other three were managed by ultrasound-guided tapping of the lesion with continuation of ATT. Results: There was an improvement in the symptoms with weight gain and normalcy of appetite. However, all these patients had lymphopenia on differential leukocyte counts at the outset which normalized at 3 months. Conclusion: The mainstay of management of paradoxical response in spinal tuberculosis should be conservative with drainage or aspiration of abscesses along with the continuation of ATT. Surgical decompression and stabilization may be necessary in few cases who develop new neurological deficits or deformity or instability.

  5. Pulmonary drug delivery systems for tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Pham, Dinh-Duy; Fattal, Elias; Tsapis, Nicolas

    2015-01-30

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global health problem as it is the second leading cause of death from an infectious disease worldwide, after the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Conventional treatments fail either because of poor patient compliance to the drug regimen or due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The aim of this review is to give an update on the information available on tuberculosis, its pathogenesis and current antitubercular chemotherapies. Direct lung delivery of anti-TB drugs using pulmonary delivery systems is then reviewed since it appears as an interesting strategy to improve first and second line drugs. A particular focus is place on research performed on inhalable dry powder formulations of antitubercular drugs to target alveolar macrophages where the bacteria develop. Numerous studies show that anti-TB drugs can be incorporated into liposomes, microparticles or nanoparticles which can be delivered as dry powders to the deep lungs for instantaneous, targeted and/or controlled release. Treatments of infected animals show a significant reduction of the number of viable bacteria as well as a decrease in tissue damage. These new formulations appear as interesting alternatives to deliver directly drugs to the lungs and favor efficient TB treatment. PMID:25499020

  6. National survey of notifications of tuberculosis in England and Wales in 1988. Medical Research Council Cardiothoracic Epidemiology Group.

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A survey was undertaken to determine the distribution of tuberculosis in England and Wales and, by comparison with the findings of similar surveys in 1978-9 and 1983, to study trends in the incidence of the disease by ethnic group over the decade. METHODS: The survey included all cases of tuberculosis in England and Wales newly notified to the medical officers for environmental health during the six months from 2 January to 1 July 1988. Notification rates were calculated from population estimates from the 1988 Labour Force Survey. RESULTS: Clinical details were obtained from the clinician for 2149 (99.4%) of the 2163 newly notified and previously untreated patients. Over 90% were either white (53%) or of Indian, Pakistani, or Bangladeshi ethnic origin (39%). The notification rate in the white population was 4.7/100,000/year, a decline of 7.2% per year since 1978. The rate was 134.6/100,000/year in the population of Indian ethnic origin, and 100.5/100,000/year in that of Pakistani or Bangladeshi ethnic origin, a decline of 6% a year since 1978 for the two groups combined (standardised for age, country of birth, and length of time in the UK). In all ethnic groups rates of disease were much higher in the elderly than in the young. Bacteriological results were available in 1161 (80%) of the 1443 pulmonary cases. In 939 (81%) Mycobacterium tuberculosis was cultured; 614 cases (53%) also had positive smears, of which 424 (69%) were from white patients. CONCLUSIONS: Notification rates for tuberculosis in England and Wales declined over the decade, but major differences remained between ethnic groups. Images PMID:1481174

  7. Evaluation of the effect of Pulicaria gnaphalodes and Perovskia abrotanoides essential oil extracts against Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains

    PubMed Central

    Hozoorbakhsh, Fereshte; Esfahani, Bahram Nasr; Moghim, Sharareh; Asghari, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), which remains one of the major public health problems in the world. The increasing incidence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) worldwide highlights the urgent need to search for alternative antimycobacterial agents. More and more people in developing countries utilize traditional medicine for their major primary health care needs. It has been determined that the medicinal plants Pulicaria gnaphalodes and Perovskia abrotanoides possess strong antibacterial effect. Materials and Methods: In this study, the antimycobacterial effects of P. gnaphalodes and P. abrotanoides essential oil on MTB were examined. Essential oil was prepared from P. gnaphalodes aerial parts and P. abrotanoides flower. The effects of six different concentrations (20 μg/ml, 40 μg/ml, 80 μg/ml, 160 μg/ml, 320 μg/ml, and 640 μg/ml) were examined against sensitive isolates of MTB and MTB H37Rv (ATCC 27294). Results: The results showed that P. gnaphalodes and P. abrotanoides essential oil extracts have strong inhibitory effects on MTB. This activity for P. gnaphalodes was observed from very low (4%) to good (70.9%) effect; meanwhile, this activity for P. abrotanoides was observed from very low (4%) to strong (86%) effect. Conclusion: The mean of inhibition percentage for P. gnaphalodes and P. abrotanoides in 640 μg/ml was 58.1% and 76.2%, respectively. So, P. abrotanoides plant is more effective against MTB than P. gnaphalodes. Identification of the effective fraction against MTB is a further step to be studied. PMID:27195252

  8. Humoral response to HspX and GlcB to previous and recent infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rabahi, Marcelo Fouad; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula; dos Reis, Michelle Cristina Guerreiro; Oelemann, Walter; Conde, Marcus Barreto

    2007-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major world health problem. Around 2 billions of people are infected by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causal agent of this disease. This fact accounts for a third of the total world population and it is expected that 9 million people will become infected each year. Only approximately 10% of the infected people will develop disease. However, health care workers (HCW) are continually exposed to the bacilli at endemic sites presenting increased chance of becoming sick. The objective of this work was to identify LTBI (latent tuberculosis infection) among all asymptomatic HCW of a Brazilian Central Hospital, in a three year follow up, and evaluate the humoral response among HCW with previous and recent LTBI to recombinant HspX and GlcB from M. tuberculosis. Methods Four hundred and thirty seven HCW were screened and classified into three different groups according to tuberculin skin test (TST) status: uninfected, previous LTBI and recent LTBI. ELISA test were performed to determine the humoral immune response to HspX and GlcB. Results The levels of IgG and IgM against the HspX and GlcB antigens were the same among HCW with recent and previous LTBI, as well as among non infected HCW. However, the IgM levels to HspX was significantly higher among HCW with recent LTBI (OD = 1.52 ± 0.40) than among the uninfected (OD = 1.09 ± 0.50) or subjects with previous LTBI (OD = 0.96 ± 0.51) (p < 0.001). Conclusion IgG and IgM humoral responses to GlcB antigens were similar amongst all studied groups; nevertheless IgM levels against HspX were higher among the recent LTBI/HCW. PMID:18166139

  9. Investigation of geo-spatial hotspots for the occurrence of tuberculosis in Almora district, India, using GIS and spatial scan statistic

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Neeraj; Adhikari, CMS; Tewari, Ajoy; Kandpal, Vineeta

    2006-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization has declared tuberculosis a global emergency in 1993. It has been estimated that one third of the world population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis. The emergence of TB/HIV co-infection poses an additional challenge for the control of tuberculosis throughout the world. The World Health Organization is supporting many developing countries to eradicate tuberculosis. It is an agony that one fifth of the tuberculosis patients worldwide are in India. The eradication of tuberculosis is the greatest public health challenge for this developing country. The aim of the present population based study on Mycobacterium tuberculosis is to test a large set of tuberculosis cases for the presence of statistically significant geographical clusters. A spatial scan statistic is used to identify purely spatial and space-time clusters of tuberculosis. Results Significant (p < 0.05 for primary clusters and p < 0.1 for secondary clusters) high rate spatial and space-time clusters were identified in three areas of the district. Conclusion There is sufficient evidence about the existence of statistically significant tuberculosis clusters in Almora district of Uttaranchal, India. The spatial scan statistics methodology used in this study has a potential use in surveillance of tuberculosis for detecting the true clusters of the disease. PMID:16901341

  10. Does Non-Central Nervous System Tuberculosis Increase the Risk of Ischemic Stroke? A Population-Based Propensity Score-Matched Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chueh-Hung; Chen, Li-Sheng; Yen, Ming-Fang; Chiu, Yueh-Hsia; Fann, Ching-Yuan; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi; Pan, Shin-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies on the association between tuberculosis and the risk of developing ischemic stroke have generated inconsistent results. We therefore performed a population-based, propensity score-matched longitudinal follow-up study to investigate whether contracting non-central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis leads to an increased risk of ischemic stroke. Methods We used a logistic regression model that includes age, sex, pre-existing comorbidities and socioeconomic status as covariates to compute the propensity score. A total of 5804 persons with at least three ambulatory visits in 2001 with the principal diagnosis of non-CNS tuberculosis were enrolled in the tuberculosis group. The non-tuberculosis group consisted of 5804, propensity score-matched subjects without tuberculosis. The three-year ischemic stroke-free survival rates for these 2 groups were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The stratified Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate the effect of tuberculosis on the occurrence of ischemic stroke. Results During three-year follow-up, 176 subjects in the tuberculosis group (3.0%) and 207 in the non-tuberculosis group (3.6%) had ischemic stroke. The hazard ratio for developing ischemic stroke in the tuberculosis group was 0.92 compared to the non-tuberculosis group (95% confidence interval: 0.73–1.14, P = 0.4299). Conclusions Non-CNS tuberculosis does not increase the risk of subsequent ischemic stroke. PMID:25048551

  11. Molecular diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients with tuberculosis in Honduras

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis persists as a public health problem in Honduras. A better knowledge of the molecular characteristics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains will contribute to understand the transmission dynamics of the disease within the country. The aim of this study was to provide an insight of the genetic biodiversity of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates collected in Honduras between 1994 and 2002. Genotyping was performed using spoligotyping and RFLP. The spoligotypes obtained were compared with the SITVIT2 proprietary database of the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. Results Spoligotyping grouped 84% of the isolates into 27 clusters (2 to 43 strains per cluster). Of the 44 shared international types (SITs) identified among the Honduran stains, 8 SITs were newly identified either within the present study or after match with an orphan type previously identified in the SITVIT2 database. In addition, 16 patterns corresponded to orphan, previously unreported isolates. The Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) lineage was the most common in this study; 55% of the strains belonged to this family. Other genotypes found were Haarlem (16%), T (16%), X-clade (6%), Unknown signature (5%) and S (1%). Only one Beijing strain was identified (0.5%). We observed a high degree of diversity after characterizing the 43 isolates belonging to the main spoligotyping cluster (SIT 33, LAM3) with IS6110-RFLP. A total of 35 different RFLP-fingerprints were detected, of which 6 patterns corresponded to the same number of clusters comprising 14 strains. Conclusions The findings obtained in this study show that tuberculosis transmission in Honduras is due to modern M. tuberculosis lineages with high level of biodiversity. PMID:20678242

  12. Data for action: collection and use of local data to end tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Theron, Grant; Jenkins, Helen E; Cobelens, Frank; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Khan, Aamir J; Cohen, Ted; Dowdy, David W

    2015-12-01

    Accelerating progress in the fight against tuberculosis will require a drastic shift from a strategy focused on control to one focused on elimination. Successful disease elimination campaigns are characterised by locally tailored responses that are informed by appropriate data. To develop such a response to tuberculosis, we suggest a three-step process that includes improved collection and use of existing programmatic data, collection of additional data (eg, geographic information, drug resistance, and risk factors) to inform tailored responses, and targeted collection of novel data (eg, sequencing data, targeted surveys, and contact investigations) to improve understanding of tuberculosis transmission dynamics. Development of a locally targeted response for tuberculosis will require substantial investment to reconfigure existing systems, coupled with additional empirical data to evaluate the effectiveness of specific approaches. Without adoption of an elimination strategy that uses local data to target hotspots of transmission, ambitious targets to end tuberculosis will almost certainly remain unmet. PMID:26515676

  13. The competitive cost of antibiotic resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gagneux, Sebastien; Long, Clara Davis; Small, Peter M; Van, Tran; Schoolnik, Gary K; Bohannan, Brendan J M

    2006-06-30

    Mathematical models predict that the future of the multidrug-resistant tuberculosis epidemic will depend on the fitness cost of drug resistance. We show that in laboratory-derived mutants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, rifampin resistance is universally associated with a competitive fitness cost and that this cost is determined by the specific resistance mutation and strain genetic background. In contrast, we demonstrate that prolonged patient treatment can result in multidrug-resistant strains with no fitness defect and that strains with low- or no-cost resistance mutations are also the most frequent among clinical isolates. PMID:16809538

  14. Does M. tuberculosis genomic diversity explain disease diversity?

    PubMed Central

    Coscolla, Mireilla; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2010-01-01

    The outcome of tuberculosis infection and disease is highly variable. This variation has been attributed primarily to host and environmental factors, but better understanding of the global genomic diversity in the M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC) suggests that bacterial factors could also be involved. Review of nearly 100 published reports shows that MTBC strains differ in their virulence and immunogenicity in experimental models, but whether this phenotypic variation plays a role in human disease remains unclear. Given the complex interactions between the host, the pathogen and the environment, linking MTBC genotypic diversity to experimental and clinical phenotypes requires an integrated systems epidemiology approach embedded in a robust evolutionary framework. PMID:21076640

  15. Diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis: review of main techniques.

    PubMed

    Ramos, D F; Silva, P E A; Dellagostin, O A

    2015-11-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) remains an important economic and zoonotic problem in Latin America. Traditionally, the fight against BTB is initiated by the implementation of routine diagnostic tests for certification of free properties. The diagnosis of BTB can be made by direct and indirect methods, in which we can mention clinical, post mortem, histopathological, immunological, bacteriological and molecular methods. The renewal of scientific interest in tuberculosis in recent year has led to develop and improve methods of diagnosis, prevention, control and eradication of BTB. The aim of this review is to present and discuss different diagnosis methods of BTB. PMID:26675901

  16. Recombineering in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    van Kessel, Julia C; Hatfull, Graham F

    2007-02-01

    Genetic dissection of M. tuberculosis is complicated by its slow growth and its high rate of illegitimate recombination relative to homologous DNA exchange. We report here the development of a facile allelic exchange system by identification and expression of mycobacteriophage-encoded recombination proteins, adapting a strategy developed previously for recombineering in Escherichia coli. Identifiable recombination proteins are rare in mycobacteriophages, and only 1 of 30 genomically characterized mycobacteriophages (Che9c) encodes homologs of both RecE and RecT. Expression and biochemical characterization show that Che9c gp60 and gp61 encode exonuclease and DNA-binding activities, respectively, and expression of these proteins substantially elevates recombination facilitating allelic exchange in both M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis. Mycobacterial recombineering thus provides a simple approach for the construction of gene replacement mutants in both slow- and fast-growing mycobacteria. PMID:17179933

  17. Tuberculosis of spine

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vinod; Patgaonkar, P. R.; Nagariya, S. P.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the spine is one of the most common spine pathology in India. Over last 4 decades a lot has changed in the diagnosis, medical treatment and surgical procedures to treat this disorder. Further developments in diagnosis using molecular genetic techniques, more effective antibiotics and more aggressive surgical protocols have become essential with emergence of multidrug resistant TB. Surgical procedures such as single stage anterior and posterior stabilization, extrapleral dorsal spine anterior stabilization and endoscopic thoracoscopic surgeries have reduced the mortality and morbidity of the surgical procedures. is rapidly progressing. It is a challenge to treat MDR-TB Spine with late onset paraplegia and progressive deformity. Physicians must treat tuberculosis of spine on the basis of Culture and sensitivity. PMID:21572628

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and HIV Co-Infection among Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis Suspected Cases at the University of Gondar Hospital, Northwestern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Fanosie, Alemu; Gelaw, Baye; Tessema, Belay; Tesfay, Wogahta; Admasu, Aschalew; Yitayew, Gashaw

    2016-01-01

    Background Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis (EPTB) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are interrelated as a result of immune depression. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates and the burden of HIV co-infection among EPTB suspected patients. Method An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted among EPTB suspected patients at the University of Gondar Hospital. Socio-demographic characteristics and other clinical data were collected using a pretested questionnaire. GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay was performed to diagnosis Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and Rifampicin resistance. All samples were also investigated by cytology and culture. The HIV statuses of all patients were screened initially by KHB, and all positive cases were further re-tested by STAT-pack. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20 computer software and a P-value of < 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results A total of 141 extrapulmonary suspected patients were enrolled in this study. The overall prevalence of culture confirmed extrapulmonary tuberculosis infection was 29.8%, but the GeneXpert result showed a 26.2% prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex infection. The 78.4% prevalence of extrapulmonary tuberculosis infection was found to be higher among the adult population. The prevalence of HIV infection among EPTB suspected patients was 14.1%, while it was 32.4% among GeneXpert-confirmed extrapulmonary TB cases (12/37). Tuberculosis lymphadenitis was the predominant (78.4%) type of EPTB infection followed by tuberculosis cold abscess (10.7%). Adult hood, previous history of contact with known pulmonary tuberculosis patients, and HIV co-infection showed a statistically significant association with extrapulmonary tuberculosis infection (P<0.013). Conclusion The prevalence of culture confirmed-EPTB infection was high, and a higher EPTB-HIV co-infection was also observed. PMID:26950547

  19. Diagnostic Utility of QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G) in Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Ahmed; Hamdan, AL-Jahdali; Salim, Baharoon; Yosra, Ali; Hani, Mohamed; Abdullah, AL-Harbi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The utility of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-G) test in the diagnosis of tuberculosis disease has been validated in high and low tuberculosis-prevalent (TB) countries. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the performance of the QFT-G test in the diagnosis of tuberculosis disease among tuberculosis patients in an intermediate prevalent country. Setting and Design: A retrospective study at the King Abdulaziz Medical City-Riyadh (KAMC-R) Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all the patients with a diagnosis of pneumonia, including tuberculosis, admitted to KAMC-R between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013. We included only patients with an available result of the QFT-G test. A total of 142 tuberculosis cases and 226 pneumonia cases were studied, to assess the utility of the QFT-G test in diagnosing tuberculosis cases. Results: Among the tuberculosis (n = 142) cases, the QFT-G tested positive in 68.3%, negative in 23.2%, and indeterminate in 12 cases (8.5%). Of the 226 pneumonia cases, the QFT-G tested positive in only 20.4%, while a majority of 66.4% tested negative, with 30 cases (13.3%) being indeterminate. When we excluded 42 patients with indeterminate results, the QFT-G test achieved a sensitivity of 74.6% [95% CI: 66.09 to 81.65%] and specificity of 76.53 % [95% CI: 69.85 to 82.15%] in the diagnosis of tuberculosis cases. Conclusions: This study concludes that the QFT-G test is a useful tool for detecting tuberculosis disease when used as an adjunct tool for the diagnosis of active TB cases. It certainly cannot be used solely and indiscriminately, separate from other clinical and radiological information, in the diagnosis of active tuberculosis cases. PMID:26392718

  20. Epidemiological basis of tuberculosis eradication in an advanced country

    PubMed Central

    Groth-Petersen, E.; Knudsen, Jørgen; Wilbek, Erik

    1959-01-01

    The first section of the report provides a background for the long-range epidemiological studies being conducted by the Danish Tuberculosis Index. An outline is given of the main indices of tuberculosis and the changing tuberculosis situation in Denmark during the past several decades with respect to prevalence of infection, morbidity and mortality. Difficulties encountered in international comparisons are briefly discussed. The prevalence of tuberculous infection in children and the prevalence of bacillary cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in adults are suggested as the most valuable indices of eradication. The second section describes the nation-wide mass campaign of 1950-52, which was planned and conducted as a combined service and research programme under the direction of the Danish Tuberculosis Index. With a view to the follow-up studies, details are given of the results of tuberculin tests of the unvaccinated, the documented vaccinated and mixed groups in the population examined. A survey is made of the results of X-ray examination and of the relation between vaccination status, tuberculin reaction and X-ray findings. The results of the first follow-up period are analysed in the final section of the report in terms of new cases of pulmonary tuberculosis appearing in the adult population. Seventy-five per cent of the new cases appeared among the unvaccinated tuberculin-positive population, and among this population groups of persons with widely different risks of developing tuberculosis could be identified on the basis of X-ray findings and reactions to the intradermal 10 TU tuberculin test. A proposal is made to reduce the number of routine repetitive examinations for adults and to concentrate efforts on preventive measures for the high-risk groups. PMID:13829735

  1. Selection of Nucleic Acid Aptamers Specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mozioglu, Erkan; Gokmen, Ozgur; Tamerler, Candan; Kocagoz, Zuhtu Tanil; Akgoz, Muslum

    2016-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains to be a major global health problem, with about 9 million new cases and 1.4 million deaths in 2011. For the control of tuberculosis as well as other infectious diseases, WHO recommended "ASSURED" (Affordable, Sensitive, Specific, User-friendly, Rapid and robust, Equipment-free, and Deliverable to the end user) diagnostic tools that can easily be maintained and used in developing countries. Aptamers are promising tools for developing point-of-care diagnostic assays for TB. In this study, ssDNA aptamers that recognize Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra were selected by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). For this purpose, two different selection protocols, ultrafiltration and centrifugation, were applied. A total of 21 TB specific aptamers were selected. These aptamers exhibited "G-rich" regions on the 3' terminus of the aptamers, including a motif of "TGGGG," "GTGG," or "CTGG." Binding capability of selected aptamers were investigated by quantitative PCR and Mtb36 DNA aptamer was found the most specific aptamer to M. tuberculosis H37Ra. The dissociation constant (K d) of Mtb36 aptamer was calculated as 5.09 ± 1.43 nM in 95 % confidence interval. Relative binding ratio of Mtb36 aptamer to M. tuberculosis H37Ra over Mycobacterium bovis and Escherichia coli was also determined about 4 times and 70 times more, respectively. Mtb36 aptamer is highly selective for M. tuberculosis, and it can be used in an aptamer-based biosensor for the detection of M. tuberculosis. PMID:26541162

  2. CT of abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Epstein, B M; Mann, J H

    1982-11-01

    Intraabdominal tuberculosis (TB) presents with a wide variety of clinical and radiologic features. Besides the reported computed tomographic (CT) finding of high-density ascites in tuberculous peritonitis, this report describes additional CT features highly suggestive of abdominal tuberculosis in eight cases: (1)irregular soft-tissue densities in the omental area; (2) low-density masses surrounded by thick solid rims; (3) a disorganized appearance of soft-tissue densities, fluid, and bowel loops forming a disorganized appearance of soft-tissue densities, fluid, and bowel loops forming a poorly defined mass; (4) low-density lymph nodes with a multilocular appearance after intravenous contrast administration; and (5) possibly high-density ascites. The differential diagnosis of these features include lymphoma, various forms of peritonitis, peritoneal carcinomatosis, and peritoneal mesothelioma. It is important that the CT features of intraabdominal tuberculosis be recognized in order that laparotomy be avoided and less invasive procedures (e.g., laparoscopy, biopsy, or a trail of antituberculous therapy) be instituted. PMID:6981966

  3. Economic challenges associated with tuberculosis diagnostic development

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, Colleen F.; Shah, Maunank

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global health crisis in part due to underdiagnosis. Technological innovations are needed to improve diagnostic test accuracy and reduce the reliance on expensive laboratory infrastructure. However, there are significant economic challenges impeding the development and implementation of new diagnostics. The aim of this piece is to examine the current state of TB diagnostics, outline the unmet needs for new tests, and detail the economic challenges associated with development of new tests from the perspective of developers, policy makers and implementers. PMID:24766367

  4. Economic challenges associated with tuberculosis diagnostic development.

    PubMed

    Hanrahan, Colleen F; Shah, Maunank

    2014-08-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global health crisis in part due to underdiagnosis. Technological innovations are needed to improve diagnostic test accuracy and reduce the reliance on expensive laboratory infrastructure. However, there are significant economic challenges impeding the development and implementation of new diagnostics. The aim of this piece is to examine the current state of TB diagnostics, outline the unmet needs for new tests, and detail the economic challenges associated with development of new tests from the perspective of developers, policy makers and implementers. PMID:24766367

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a HIV-positive patient

    PubMed Central

    Montales, Maria Theresa; Beebe, Alexandria; Chaudhury, Arun; Patil, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection remains a global public health challenge. We report a 40 year old African American male who is a known HIV-positive patient, non-compliant with his antiretrovirals and developed pulmonary tuberculosis. His chief complaints were chronic cough, fever, night sweats and undocumented weight loss. He had a prior positive T-SPOT-TB test; however, chest radiograph and sputum smear examination revealed normal results. PCR-based GeneXPERT MTB/RIF assay was ordered and confirmed MTB infection. The sputum cultures grew MTB and sensitivities showed susceptibility to all primary anti-tuberculosis medications. A delay in diagnosis and initiation of MTB therapy, in the setting of HIV or AIDS, may result in rapid disease progression and worse clinical outcome. PMID:26744689

  6. Advances in Mycobacterium tuberculosis therapeutics discovery utlizing structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Chim, Nicholas; Owens, Cedric P.; Contreras, Heidi; Goulding, Celia W.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health threat and is exacerbated both by the emergence of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and its synergy with HIV infection. The waning effectiveness of current treatment regimens necessitates the development of new or repurposed anti-TB therapeutics for improved combination therapies against the disease. Exploiting atomic resolution structural information of proteins in complex with their substrates and/or inhibitors can facilitate structure-based rational drug design. Since our last review in 2009, there has been a wealth of new M. tuberculosis protein structural information. Once again, we have compiled the most promising structures with regards to potential anti-TB drug development and present them in this updated review. PMID:23167715

  7. Rapid Diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with Truenat MTB: A Near-Care Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nikam, Chaitali; Jagannath, Manjula; Narayanan, Manoj Mulakkapurath; Ramanabhiraman, Vinaya; Kazi, Mubin; Shetty, Anjali; Rodrigues, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Background Control of the global Tuberculosis (TB) burden is hindered by the lack of a simple and effective diagnostic test that can be utilized in resource-limited settings. Methods We evaluated the performance of Truenat MTB™, a chip-based nucleic acid amplification test in the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in clinical sputum specimens from 226 patients with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). The test involved sputum processing using Trueprep-MAG™ (nanoparticle-based protocol run on a battery-operated device) and real-time PCR performed on the Truelab Uno™ analyzer (handheld, battery-operated thermal cycler). Specimens were also examined for presence of MTB using smear microscopy, liquid culture and an in-house nested PCR protocol. Results were assessed in comparison to a composite reference standard (CRS) consisting of smear and culture results, clinical treatment and follow-up, and radiology findings. Results Based on the CRS, 191 patients had “Clinical-TB” (Definite and Probable-TB). Of which 154 patients are already on treatment, and 37 were treatment naïve cases. Remaining 35 were confirmed “Non-TB” cases which are treatment naïve cases. The Truenat MTB test was found to have sensitivity and specificity of 91.1% (CI: 86.1–94.7) and 100% (CI: 90.0–100) respectively, in comparison to 90.58% (CI: 85.5–94.3) and 91.43% (CI: 76.9–98.2) respectively for the in-house nested PCR protocol. Conclusion This preliminary study shows that the Truenat MTB test allows detection of TB in approximately one hour and can be utilized in near-care settings to provide quick and accurate diagnosis. PMID:23349670

  8. Scaling up interventions to achieve global tuberculosis control: progress and new developments.

    PubMed

    Raviglione, Mario; Marais, Ben; Floyd, Katherine; Lönnroth, Knut; Getahun, Haileyesus; Migliori, Giovanni B; Harries, Anthony D; Nunn, Paul; Lienhardt, Christian; Graham, Steve; Chakaya, Jeremiah; Weyer, Karin; Cole, Stewart; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2012-05-19

    Tuberculosis is still one of the most important causes of death worldwide. The 2010 Lancet tuberculosis series provided a comprehensive overview of global control efforts and challenges. In this update we review recent progress. With improved control efforts, the world and most regions are on track to achieve the Millennium Development Goal of decreasing tuberculosis incidence by 2015, and the Stop TB Partnership target of halving 1990 mortality rates by 2015; the exception is Africa. Despite these advances, full scale-up of tuberculosis and HIV collaborative activities remains challenging and emerging drug-resistant tuberculosis is a major threat. Recognition of the effect that non-communicable diseases--such as smoking-related lung disease, diet-related diabetes mellitus, and alcohol and drug misuse--have on individual vulnerability, as well as the contribution of poor living conditions to community vulnerability, shows the need for multidisciplinary approaches. Several new diagnostic tests are being introduced in endemic countries and for the first time in 40 years a coordinated portfolio of promising new tuberculosis drugs exists. However, none of these advances offer easy solutions. Achievement of international tuberculosis control targets and maintenance of these gains needs optimum national health policies and services, with ongoing investment into new approaches and strategies. Despite growing funding in recent years, a serious shortfall persists. International and national financial uncertainty places gains at serious risk. Perseverance and renewed commitment are needed to achieve global control of tuberculosis, and ultimately, its elimination. PMID:22608339

  9. 1. VIEW OF CRUSHING PLANT (FEATURE 19). THE REMAINS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF CRUSHING PLANT (FEATURE 19). THE REMAINS OF THE FINE ORE MILL (FEATURE 20) ARE IN THE BACKGROUND ON LEFT. CONCRETE RESERVOIR (FEATURE 22) IS SHOWN AT THE RIGHT EDGE OF PHOTOGRAPH FACING SOUTHWEST. - Copper Canyon Camp of the International Smelting & Refining Company, Crushing Plant, Copper Canyon, Battle Mountain, Lander County, NV

  10. SMS reminders to improve the tuberculosis cure rate in developing countries (TB-SMS Cameroon): a protocol of a randomised control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is a public health problem in Cameroon, just like in many other countries in the world. The National Tuberculosis Control Programme (PNLT) put in place by the state, aims to fight tuberculosis through the implementation of international directives (Directly Observed Treatment Short, DOTS). Despite the deployment of this strategy across the world, its implementation is difficult in the context of low-resource countries. Some expected results are not achieved. In Cameroon, the cure rate for patients with sputum positive pulmonary tuberculosis (TPM+) after 6 months is only about 65%, 20% below the target. This is mainly due to poor patient adherence to treatment. By relying on the potential of mobile Health, the objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of SMS reminders on the cure rate of TPM + patients, measured using 6-month bacilloscopy. Methods/design This is a blinded, randomised controlled multicentre study carried out in Cameroon. The research hypothesis is that sending daily SMS messages to remind patients to take their prescribed tuberculosis medication, together with the standard DOTS strategy, will increase the cure rate from 65% (control group: DOTS, no SMS intervention) to 85% (intervention group: DOTS, with SMS intervention) in a group of new TPM + patients. In accordance with each treatment centre, the participants will be randomly allocated into the two groups using a computer program: the intervention group and the control group. A member of the research team will send daily SMS messages. Study data will be collected by health professionals involved in the care of patients. Data analysis will be done by the intention-to-treat method. Discussion The achieving of expected outcomes by the PNLT through implementation of DOTS requires several challenges. Although it has been demonstrated that the DOTS strategy is effective in the fight against tuberculosis, its application remains difficult in developing countries. This study explores the potential of mHealth to support DOTS strategy. It will gather new evidence on the effectiveness of mHealth-based interventions and SMS reminders in the improvement of treatment adherence and the cure rate of tuberculosis patients, especially in a low-resource country such as Cameroon. Trial registration The trial is registered on the Pan-African Clinical Trials Registry (http://www.pactr.org) under unique identification number: PACTR201307000583416. PMID:24460827

  11. Noninvasive Test for Tuberculosis Detection among Primates

    PubMed Central

    Mugisha, Lawrence; Shoyama, Fernanda Miyagaki; O’Malley, Melanie J.; Flynn, JoAnne L.; Asiimwe, Benon; Travis, Dominic A.; Singer, Randall S.; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2015-01-01

    Traditional testing methods have limited epidemiologic studies of tuberculosis among free-living primates. PCR amplification of insertion element IS6110 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from fecal samples was evaluated as a noninvasive screening test for tuberculosis in primates. Active tuberculosis was detected among inoculated macaques and naturally exposed chimpanzees, demonstrating the utility of this test. PMID:25695329

  12. Bystander Macrophage Apoptosis after Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Deirdre M.; ten Bokum, Annemieke M. C.; O'Leary, Seonadh M.; O'Sullivan, Mary P.; Keane, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Human macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis may undergo apoptosis. Macrophage apoptosis contributes to the innate immune response against M. tuberculosis by containing and limiting the growth of mycobacteria and also by depriving the bacillus of its niche cell. Apoptosis of infected macrophages is well documented; however, bystander apoptosis of uninfected macrophages has not been described in the setting of M. tuberculosis. We observed that uninfected human macrophages underwent significant bystander apoptosis 48 and 96 h after they came into contact with macrophages infected with avirulent M. tuberculosis. The bystander apoptosis was significantly greater than the background apoptosis observed in uninfected control cells cultured for the same length of time. There was no evidence of the involvement of tumor necrosis factor alpha, Fas, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, transforming growth factor β, Toll-like receptor 2, or MyD88 in contact-mediated bystander apoptosis. This newly described phenomenon may further limit the spread of M. tuberculosis by eliminating the niche cells on which the bacillus relies. PMID:17954721

  13. Impact of the 1970 Reforms to Cuba's National Tuberculosis Control Program.

    PubMed

    Beldarraín, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    INTRODUCTION To reach the goal of eliminating tuberculosis as a public health problem in Cuba, the epidemiological evolution of the disease and of strategies designed to prevent and manage it to date must be well understood. In this context, in 1970, changes were introduced in Cuba's National Tuberculosis Control Program. OBJECTIVE Review background and evolution of Cuba's strategy for tuberculosis control, the changes implemented in the 1970 revision of the Program, and their impact on the subsequent evolution of the disease in Cuba. METHODS Published articles on the history of tuberculosis control in Cuba were reviewed, along with archival documents and medical records. Documents concerning the situation of pulmonary tuberculosis in Cuba, including measures adopted to address the disease and its extent, were selected for study, with an emphasis on the period of the Program. Interviews with key informants were conducted. RESULTS Cuba's fight against tuberculosis began in Santiago de Cuba, with the creation of a local Anti-Tuberculosis League in 1890. Strategic changes introduced by Cuba's public health sector, stressing health promotion and disease prevention, led to the 1959 creation of the Tuberculosis Department, which implemented Cuba's first National Tuberculosis Control Program in 1963. This Program was completely reorganized in 1970. The National Tuberculosis Control Program (1963) covered a network of 27 tuberculosis dispensaries, 8 sanatoriums and 24 bacteriology laboratories. Diagnosis was based on radiographic imaging criteria. Incidence was 52.6/100,000 in 1964 and reached 31.2 in 1970. The Program was updated in 1970 to include two major changes: the requirement for bacteriological confirmation of diagnosis and directly-observed outpatient treatment fully integrated into health services. By 1971, incidence was down to 17.8/100,000, and further reduced to 11.6 in 1979. The decrease is interpreted as the result of the greater specificity of microbiologic diagnosis. Tuberculosis control continued to make progress, reaching an incidence rate of 6.1/100,000 in 2012 and mortality rate of 0.3/100,000 in 2013. CONCLUSIONS Changes introduced in the National Tuberculosis Control Program in 1970 led to the successful results achieved in later decades, reducing tuberculosis incidence and mortality. These results also allowed health authorities to propose elimination of the disease in Cuba as a current objective. KEYWORDS History of medicine, tuberculosis, epidemiology, communicable disease control, public health, Cuba. PMID:26947156

  14. Tuberculosis, Fiji, 2002-2013.

    PubMed

    Pezzoli, Lorenzo; Gounder, Shakti; Tamani, Talatoka; Daulako, Mary Raori; Underwood, Frank; Mainawalala, Sakiusa; Nawadra-Taylor, Vasiti; Rafai, Eric; Gillini, Laura

    2016-03-01

    During 2002-2013, a total of 1,890 tuberculosis cases were recorded in Fiji. Notification rates per 100,000 population increased from 17.4 cases in 2002 to 28.4 in 2013. Older persons were most affected, but tuberculosis also increased sharply in persons 25-44 years of age. PMID:26890215

  15. Tuberculosis of the pubic symphysis

    PubMed Central

    Gothwal, Sudarshan; Varshney, Peeyush; Mathur, Shivank; Songra, Bhupen

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of India’s public health problems. It involves various systems of the body, including the skeletal system. Osteoarticular tuberculosis is the second most common form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis next to lymph nodes and constitutes about 13% of all extrapulmonary cases. It is generally accepted that osteoarticular tuberculosis is the result of a haematogenous or lymphatic spread from a reactivated latent focus, usually pulmonary; however, previous infection is not always encountered, and in only 40–50% of the cases, it is possible to demonstrate another active infection site. The commonest site for skeletal tuberculosis is the spine followed by the hip, knee and ankle joints. Tuberculosis can involve literally any bone or joint. Pubic symphysis is an uncommon site for tuberculosis in the case of the skeletal system. We present a rare case of pubic symphysis tuberculosis in a 25-year-old woman presented to the general surgical department with a swelling in the right thigh region. PMID:24515233

  16. Tuberculosis, Fiji, 2002–2013

    PubMed Central

    Gounder, Shakti; Tamani, Talatoka; Daulako, Mary Raori; Underwood, Frank; Mainawalala, Sakiusa; Nawadra-Taylor, Vasiti; Rafai, Eric; Gillini, Laura

    2016-01-01

    During 2002–2013, a total of 1,890 tuberculosis cases were recorded in Fiji. Notification rates per 100,000 population increased from 17.4 cases in 2002 to 28.4 in 2013. Older persons were most affected, but tuberculosis also increased sharply in persons 25–44 years of age. PMID:26890215

  17. Tuberculosis of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Iserì, Mete; Aydìner, Omer; Celìk, Levent; Peker, Onder

    2005-04-01

    Tuberculosis of the parotid gland is very rare and clinically indistinguishable from a neoplasm. Thus the diagnosis of parotid gland involvement with tuberculosis has traditionally been made after surgical resection. We present a case which was diagnosed on fine needle aspiration cytology and managed medically. PMID:15949089

  18. Resistance to cellular autophagy by Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Fazlul; Boonhok, Rachasak; Prammananan, Therdsak; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Utaisincharoen, Pongsak; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Palittapongarnpim, Prasit; Ponpuak, Marisa

    2015-10-01

    Autophagy represents a key pathway in innate immune defense to restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth inside host macrophages. Induction of autophagy has been shown to promote mycobacterial phagosome acidification and acquisition of lysosomal hydrolases, resulting in the elimination of intracellular M. tuberculosis reference strains such as H37Rv. The notorious Beijing genotype has been previously shown to be hyper-virulent and associated with increased survival in host cells and a high mortality rate in animal models, but the underlying mechanism that renders this family to have such advantages remains unclear. We hypothesize that autophagic control against M. tuberculosis Beijing strains may be altered. Here, we discovered that the Beijing strains can resist autophagic killing by host cells compared with that of the reference strain H37Rv and a strain belonging to the East African Indian genotype. Moreover, we have determined a possible underlying mechanism and found that the greater ability to evade autophagic elimination possessed by the Beijing strains stems from their higher capacity to inhibit autophagolysosome biogenesis upon autophagy induction. In summary, a previously unrecognized ability of the M. tuberculosis Beijing strains to evade host autophagy was identified, which may have important implications for tuberculosis treatment, especially in regions prevalent by the Beijing genotype. PMID:26160686

  19. Prehistoric tuberculosis in america: adding comments to a literature review.

    PubMed

    Gómez i Prat, Jordi; de Souza, Sheila M F Mendonça

    2003-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a prehistoric American human disease. This paper reviews the literature and discusses hypotheses for origins and epidemiological patterns of prehistoric tuberculosis. From the last decades, 24 papers about prehistoric tuberculosis were published and 133 cases were reviewed. In South America most are isolated case studies, contrary to North America where more skeletal series were analyzed. Disease was usually located at the deserts of Chile and Peru, Central Plains in USA, and Lake Ontario in Canada. Skeletal remains represent most of the cases, but 16 mummies have also been described. Thirty individuals had lung disease, 19 of them diagnosed by the ribs. More then 100 individuals had osseous tuberculosis and 26 also had it in other organs. As today, transmission of the infection and establishment of the disease were favored by cultural and life-style changes such as sedentarization, crowding, undernutrition, use of dark and insulated houses, and by the frequency of interpersonal contacts. The papers confirm that despite previous perceptions, tuberculosis seems to have occurred in America for millennia. It only had epidemiological expression when special conditions favored its expansion. Occurring as epidemic bursts or low endemic disease, it had differential impact on groups or social segments in America for at least two millennia. PMID:12687776

  20. Social and cultural factors in the successful control of tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rubel, A J; Garro, L C

    1992-01-01

    The burden of tuberculosis on the public health is staggering. Worldwide, annual incidence of new cases is estimated to be about 8 million. Almost 3 million deaths occur yearly. Early case identification and adherence to treatment regimens are the remaining barriers to successful control. In many nations, however, fewer than half those with active disease receive a diagnosis, and fewer than half those beginning treatment complete it. The twin problems of delay in seeking treatment and abandonment of a prescribed regimen derive from complex factors. People's confusion as to the implications of the tuberculosis symptoms, costs of transportation to clinic services, the social stigma that attaches to tuberculosis, the high cost of medication, organizational problems in providing adequate followup services, and patients' perception of clinic facilities as inhospitable all contribute to the complexity. Sociocultural factors are emphasized in this report because hitherto they have not been adequately explored. Salient among those sociocultural factors is the health culture of the patients. That is, the understanding and information people have from family, friends, and neighbors as to the nature of a health problem, its cause, and its implications. A knowledge of the health culture of their patients has become a critical tool if tuberculosis control programs are to be successful. Several anthropological procedures are recommended to help uncover the health culture of people served by tuberculosis clinics. PMID:1454974

  1. Integrated surveillance of pulmonary tuberculosis and paragonimiasis in Zamboanga del Norte, the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Belizario, Vicente; Totanes, Francis Isidore; Asuncion, Camille Ann; Leon, Winifreda De; Jorge, Manuel; Ang, Concepcion; Naig, June Rose

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and paragonimiasis remain as health problems in certain areas in the Philippines. Both share similar clinical manifestations, which include chronic productive cough, hemoptysis, dyspnea, fever, weight loss, and night sweats. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of PTB, paragonimiasis, and co-infections in Zamboanga del Norte, Philippines. Methods This study was conducted in selected villages in two municipalities in Zamboanga del Norte. Patients with chronic cough were interviewed, examined, and requested to submit two sputum samples which were processed using Ziehl–Neelsen method to detect acid-fast bacilli (AFB), and NaOH concentration technique for the detection of Paragonimus ova. Results A total of 836 patients submitted sputum samples for examination. Prevalence was 6.7% (2.5–12.7%) for paragonimiasis and 1.9% (0.9–6.3%) for PTB. Co-infection rate was 0.3%, with two identified cases. Positivity rates for males and females were 9.6 and 5.8% for paragonimiasis and 3.4 and 1.2% for PTB. Conclusion Pulmonary tuberculosis and paragonimiasis are co-endemic in Zamboanga del Norte, suggesting the need to integrate surveillance and control efforts. Strengthening local health systems through collaboration between different sectors is recommended for effective disease control. Development of more sensitive diagnostic tests is important for more accurate disease surveillance. PMID:24601907

  2. Student Pharmacists as Tuberculosis Screeners

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To develop, implement, and evaluate a targeted educational module on tuberculosis screening with second-year professional pharmacy students that improves their knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding tuberculosis screening. Design. A tuberculosis-screening educational module was developed in collaboration with the Washington State Pharmacy Association and Department of Health and incorporated in a core student pharmacist class. Students completed online didactic training and a live practicum, each lasting 90 minutes. Assessment. Students were assessed using a pre/postdidactic assessment, live practicum tuberculin skin testing (TST) administration and evaluation assessment, and postprogram written reflection. Student pre/postknowledge assessment scores improved in all areas except in documentation. Conclusion. The tuberculosis screening educational module significantly improved student knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding tuberculosis screening. PMID:27073277

  3. Transformative tools for tackling tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The world is in need of more effective approaches to controlling tuberculosis. The development of improved control strategies has been hampered by deficiencies in the tools available for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis and defining the dynamic consequences of the interaction of M. tuberculosis with its human host. Key needs include a highly sensitive, specific nonsputum diagnostic; biomarkers predictive of responses to therapy; correlates of risk for disease development; and host response–independent markers of M. tuberculosis infection. Tools able to sensitively detect and quantify total body M. tuberculosis burden might well be transformative across many needed use cases. Here, we review the current state of the field, paying particular attention to needed changes in experimental paradigms that would facilitate the discovery, validation, and development of such tools. PMID:26458772

  4. Transformative tools for tackling tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Jennifer L; Karp, Christopher L

    2015-10-19

    The world is in need of more effective approaches to controlling tuberculosis. The development of improved control strategies has been hampered by deficiencies in the tools available for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis and defining the dynamic consequences of the interaction of M. tuberculosis with its human host. Key needs include a highly sensitive, specific nonsputum diagnostic; biomarkers predictive of responses to therapy; correlates of risk for disease development; and host response-independent markers of M. tuberculosis infection. Tools able to sensitively detect and quantify total body M. tuberculosis burden might well be transformative across many needed use cases. Here, we review the current state of the field, paying particular attention to needed changes in experimental paradigms that would facilitate the discovery, validation, and development of such tools. PMID:26458772

  5. Where do those remains come from?

    PubMed

    Nociarová, Dominika; Adserias, M Jose; Malgosa, Assumpció; Galtés, Ignasi

    2014-10-14

    Part of the study of skeletal remains or corpses in advance decay located in the field involves determining their origin. They may be the result of criminal activity, accident, unearthed because of erosion, or they may also have originated from a cemetery. The discovery site, condition of the remains, and the associated artifacts, are factors that could be helpful for the forensic anthropologist to identify the origin of the remains. In order to contribute to this recognition, an analysis was made of the exhumations of 168 unclaimed human remains from the cemetery of Terrassa (Catalonia, Spain). This investigation presents a description of artifacts and conditions of remains that could indicate that the human remains may have originated from a cemetery. PMID:25459276

  6. Multi Drug and Other Forms of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis Are Uncommon among Treatment Naïve Tuberculosis Patients in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Nagu, Tumaini J.; Aboud, Said; Mwiru, Ramadhani; Matee, Mecky; Fawzi, Wafaie; Mugusi, Ferdinand

    2015-01-01

    Background Surveillance and effective management of drug resistance is important to sustaining tuberculosis (TB) control efforts. We aimed to determine resistance rates to first line anti tuberculosis drugs and to describe factors associated with the resistance to any of the first line anti tuberculosis drugs in Dar es Salaam Tanzania. Materials Newly diagnosed, TB patients with neither history of tuberculosis treatment nor isoniazid prophylaxis were included into the study. Sputum specimens were cultured on either mycobacteria growth indicator tube 960 (MGIT 960) or Lowenstein Jenstein (LJ) medium supplemented with either glycerol (GLJ) or pyruvate (PLJ). Drug susceptibility for isoniazid, rifampicin, streptomycin and ethambutol was determined by either Lowenstein–Jensen (LJ) medium or mycobacteria growth indicator tube 960 (MGIT 960). Results A total of 933 newly diagnosed TB patients, were included into the study. Multi drug resistance (MDR) tuberculosis was detected among 2 (0.2%) patients. Resistance to any of the four tested drugs was detected among 54 (5.8%) patients. Mono-resistance to isoniazid, rifampicin, streptomycin and ethambutol were 21(2.3%), 3 (0.3%), 13 (1.4%), 9 (1.0%) respectively. Conclusion Primary resistance to first line anti tuberculosis drugs is still low in this setting. Continued vigilance including periodic national surveillance of anti-tuberculosis resistance is recommended. PMID:25849784

  7. A Blueprint to Address Research Gaps in the Development of Biomarkers for Pediatric Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nicol, Mark Patrick; Gnanashanmugam, Devasena; Browning, Renee; Click, Eleanor S; Cuevas, Luis E; Detjen, Anne; Graham, Steve M; Levin, Michael; Makhene, Mamodikoe; Nahid, Payam; Perez-Velez, Carlos M; Reither, Klaus; Song, Rinn; Spiegel, Hans M L; Worrell, Carol; Zar, Heather J; Walzl, Gerhard

    2015-10-15

    Childhood tuberculosis contributes significantly to the global tuberculosis disease burden but remains challenging to diagnose due to inadequate methods of pathogen detection in paucibacillary pediatric samples and lack of a child-specific host biomarker to identify disease. Accurately diagnosing tuberculosis in children is required to improve case detection, surveillance, healthcare delivery, and effective advocacy. In May 2014, the National Institutes of Health convened a workshop including researchers in the field to delineate priorities to address this research gap. This blueprint describes the consensus from the workshop, identifies critical research steps to advance this field, and aims to catalyze efforts toward harmonization and collaboration in this area. PMID:26409279

  8. The Importance of First Impressions: Early Events in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Influence Outcome.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Anthony M; Flynn, JoAnne L; Fortune, Sarah M

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major health threat in much of the world. New vaccines againstMycobacterium tuberculosisare essential for preventing infection, disease, and transmission. However, the host immune responses that need to be induced by an effective vaccine remain unclear. Increasingly, it has become clear that early events in infection are of major importance in the eventual outcome of the infection. Studying such events in humans is challenging, as they occur within the lung and thoracic lymph nodes, and any clinical signs of early infection are relatively nonspecific. Nonetheless, clinical studies and animal models of tuberculosis have provided new insights into the local events that occur in the first few weeks of tuberculosis. Development of an effective vaccine requires a clear understanding of the successful (and detrimental) early host responses againstM. tuberculosis, with the goal to improve upon natural immune responses and prevent infection or disease. PMID:27048801

  9. Mechanism of ESAT-6 membrane interaction and its roles in pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiuli; Sun, Jianjun

    2016-06-15

    The 6-kDa early secreted antigenic target (ESAT-6; EsxA) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was first identified as a potent T-cell antigen, and it is now recognized as a pore-forming toxin that is essential for virulence of M. tuberculosis. ESAT-6 is secreted through the ESX-1 secretion system (Type VII) of M. tuberculosis and has been implicated to mediate mycobacterial cytosolic translocation within the host macrophages by rupturing the phagosomal membranes. Recent studies have made significant progresses in understanding of the mechanism of ESAT-6 membrane interaction and its role in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis, but important questions still remain to be answered. Here, we summarize the current progress in study of ESAT-6 membrane interaction and its roles in pathogenesis and discuss some of the key remaining questions for future investigation. PMID:26456678

  10. System-level strategies for studying the metabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Beste, Dany J. V.

    2010-01-01

    Despite decades of research many aspects of the biology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis remain unclear and this is reflected in the antiquated tools available to treat and prevent tuberculosis and consequently this disease remains a serious public health problem. Important discoveries linking M. tuberculosis's metabolism and pathogenesis have renewed interest in this area of research. Previous experimental studies were limited to the analysis of individual genes or enzymes whereas recent advances in computational systems biology and high throughput experimental technologies now allow metabolism to be studied on a genome scale. Here we discuss the progress being made in applying system level approaches to studying the metabolism of this important pathogen. The information from these studies will fundamentally change our approach to tuberculosis research and lead to new targets for therapeutic drugs and vaccines. PMID:20938502

  11. [Tuberculosis in Asia].

    PubMed

    2002-10-01

    1. Philippines: The development, expansion and maintenance of pilot area activities: Cristina B. Giango (Technical Division, Cebu Provincial Health Office, the Philippines) In 1994, the Department of Health developed the new NTP policies based on WHO recommendations and started a pilot project in Cebu Province in collaboration with the Japan International Cooperation Agency. To test its feasibility and effectiveness, the new NTP policies were pre-tested in one city and one Rural Health Unit. The test showed a high rate of three sputum collection (90%), high positive rate (10%), and high cure rate (80%). Before the new guidelines were introduced, the new policy was briefed, a baseline survey of the facility was conducted, equipment was provided, and intensive training was given. Recording/Reporting forms and procedures were also developed to ensure accurate reporting. Supervision, an important activity to ensure effective performance, was institutionalized. Laboratory services were strengthened, and a quality-control system was introduced in 1995 to ensure the quality of the laboratory services. With the implementation of DOTS strategy, barangay health workers were trained as treatment partners. In partnership with the private sector, the TB Diagnostic Committee was organized to deliberate and assess sputum negative but X-ray positive cases. The implementation of the new NTP guidelines in Cebe Province has reached a satisfactory level, the cure rate and positive rate have increased, and laboratory services have improved. Because of its successful implementation, the new NTP guidelines are now being used nationwide. 2. Nepal: The DOTS Strategy in the area with hard geographic situation: Dirgh Singh Bam (National Tuberculosis Center, Nepal) Three groups of factors characterize the population of Nepal: 1) Socio-cultural factors, e.g. migration, poverty, language; 2) Environmental factors, e.g. geography and climate; and 3) Political factors, prisoners and refugee populations. These factors pose particular problems for implementing DOTS in various ways. Socio-cultural and environmental factors are particularly important in Nepal, and several measures have been developed to overcome these difficulties. One is active community participation through the DOTS committee. The committee consists of a group of motivated people, including social workers, political leaders, health services providers, journalists, teachers, students, representatives of local organizations, medical schools and colleges, industries, private practitioners, and TB patients. One DOTS committee is formed in every treatment center. A key role of the DOTS committee is to identify local problems and their solutions. It increases public awareness about TB and DOTS; supports people with TB in the community by providing treatment observers and tracing late patients; and encourages cooperation among health institutions, health workers, NGOs, and political leaders. The case finding rate is now 69%, and nearly 95% of diagnosed TB cases are being treated under DOTS. The treatment success rate of new smear-positive cases is nearly 90%. Thus, DOTS increases the case finding and treatment success. 3. Cambodia: HIV/TB and the health sector reform: Tan Eang Mao (National Center for Tuberculosis and Leprosy Control, Cambodia) Cambodia is one of the 23 high burden countries of tuberculosis in the world. Moreover, HIV/AIDS has been spreading rapidly since 1990s, which is worsening the tuberculosis epidemics. To cope with the burden, Cambodia has started implementation of DOTS in 1994 and has expanded it to most of public hospitals across the country by 1998. NTP of Cambodia is now enjoying high cure rate of more than 90%. However, due to the constraints such as weak infrastructure and the poverty, it is proved that many of TB sufferers do not have access to the TB services, resulting in still low case detection rate. It is for this reason that the NTP has decided to expand DOTS to health center and community level based on the new health system. Its pilot program that has been carried out in collaboration with JICA and WHO since 1999 has achieved promising results with high detection and cure rates. All of the over 900 health centers across the country will be involved in DOTS strategy by 2005. In the fight against TB/HIV, National Center for TB Control is providing free TB screening for PLWH (people living with HIV/AIDS), and it is developing a comprehensive plan of TB/HIV care including home delivery DOT services. 4. China: The World Bank Project and the Prevalence Survey in China: Hong Jin DuanMu (National Tuberculosis Control Center, China) Since 1992, China has utilized a World Bank loan to implement TB control projects among 560 million people in 13 provinces. Free diagnosis and treatment services have been provided to all patients, and a fully supervised standard short-course chemotherapy was applied to all diagnosed tuberculosis patients. In 1999, more than 190,000 smear-positive cases, ten times the number in 1992, were detected, and the registration rate of new cases reached 30 per 100,000 population. From 1992 to 1999, a total of 1.40 million smear-positive TB patients were discovered. The cure rate of smear-positive TB patients has been improved to an overall cure rate of 93.6%. The cure rates for the new cases and re-treatment patients were 95.1% and 89.6%, respectively. The fourth nationwide random survey for the epidemiology of tuberculosis was conducted in 2000. The prevalence of active tuberculosis was 367/100,000, the prevalence of infectious tuberculosis was 160/100,000, and the prevalence of smear-positive tuberculosis was 122/100,000. The tuberculosis mortality was 9.8/100,000. 5. Vietnam: The road to reaching the Global Target: Le Ba Tung (Pham Ngoc Thach Tuberculosis and Lung Disease Center, Vietnam) TB control activities started in 1957 and were reorganized in 1986 with the technical assistance of IUATLD, KNCV and material assistance of Medical Committee Netherlands Vietnam (MCNV). The New National TB Control Program follows the main directives of WHO and IUATLD's procedures of case-finding, chemotherapy and management. Passive case-findings are based on sputum smear. Chemotherapy with priority for smear positive cases is 3SHZ/6S2H2 for new cases and 3HRE/6H2R2E2 for retreated cases, which is undertaken with directly observed therapy (DOT strategy) mainly at commune health posts. Since 1989, DOTS strategy with 2SHRZ/6HE for new cases and 2SHRZE/1HRZE/5H3R3E3 for retreated cases has gradually been introduced in districts and communes of every province. In 1995, the government established the National and Provincial TB Control Steering Committees and has provided incentives for detected smear positive cases and cured smear positive cases. The government has also started strengthening the program of managerial and supervisory capacity for TB staff and has promoted the cooperation of all associated organizations of TB control. The WHO global surveillance and monitoring project reports that in 2000 Vietnam reached the global target, i.e., 99.8% population covered by DOTS with 80% of expected new smear positive cases being detected and a high cure rate ranging from 85.3% in 1989 to 90.3% in 1999. A distinguishing aspect of TB control in Vietnam is the effective international partnerships combined with high political commitment of the government nationally and provincially as well as active participation of all organizations in the community. PMID:12440145

  12. Fish mycobacteriosis (Tuberculosis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parisot, T.J.; Wood, J.W.

    1959-01-01

    The etiologic agent for the bacterial disease, "fish tuberculosis" (more correctly "mycobacteriosis"), was first observed in carp in 189& from a pond in France. Subsequently similar agents have been isolated from or observed in fish in fresh water, salt water, and brackish water, in fish in aquaria, hatcheries, and natural habitat~ (wild populations of fish). The disease has been recognized as an important infection among hatchery reared salmonid fishes on the West Coast of the United States, and in aquarium fishes such as the neon tetra, the Siamese fighting fish, and in salt water fish held in zoological displays.

  13. Tuberculosis mimicking lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hammen, I

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is well known as a diagnostic chameleon and can resemble malignancy. In thorax TB can be manifested as pulmonary infiltrates and/or mediastinal lymphadenopathy. In low incident countries with high incidence of lung cancer and varying clinical presentations, TB often gets misdiagnosed with the result of delayed treatment start and unnecessary diagnostic procedures. Our case report presents two patients, who were referred to the Thorax diagnostic centre at the Department of Respiratory Medicine, Odense University Hospital, with presumptive diagnosis of neoplasm and had proved lung TB with no evidence of malignancy instead. In the first case diagnosis was confirmed after thoracotomy, in the second case after bronchoscopy. PMID:26744652

  14. Tuberculosis in the AIDS era.

    PubMed Central

    Sepkowitz, K A; Raffalli, J; Riley, L; Kiehn, T E; Armstrong, D

    1995-01-01

    A resurgence of tuberculosis has occurred in recent years in the United States and abroad. Deteriorating public health services, increasing numbers of immigrants from countries of endemicity, and coinfection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have contributed to the rise in the number of cases diagnosed in the United States. Outbreaks of resistant tuberculosis, which responds poorly to therapy, have occurred in hospitals and other settings, affecting patients and health care workers. This review covers the pathogenesis, epidemiology, clinical presentation, laboratory diagnosis, and treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease. In addition, public health and hospital infection control strategies are detailed. Newer approaches to epidemiologic investigation, including use of restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, are discussed. Detailed consideration of the interaction between HIV infection and tuberculosis is given. We also review the latest techniques in laboratory evaluation, including the radiometric culture system, DNA probes, and PCR. Current recommendations for therapy of tuberculosis, including multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, are given. Finally, the special problem of prophylaxis of persons exposed to multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is considered. PMID:7621399

  15. The road to tuberculosis treatment in rural Nepal: A qualitative assessment of 26 journeys

    PubMed Central

    ten Asbroek, Augustinus HA; Bijlsma, Merijn W; Malla, Puspha; Shrestha, Binjwala; Delnoij, Diana MJ

    2008-01-01

    Background The fact that tuberculosis can be treated with the DOTS strategy (Directly Observed Treatment, Short-course) is not enough to control the disease. Patients have to find their way to tuberculosis treatment first. To better understand the route to tuberculosis treatment in rural Nepal we interviewed twenty-six patients under treatment. Methods In semi-structured interviews patients shared their disease history and health seeking behaviour. The analysis focused on the encounters with the health care system before enrolment in the tuberculosis treatment program. Results Patient routes often started in the medical shop and led via intricate routes with multiple providers to facilities with higher qualified and more competent staff where tuberculosis was diagnosed. Several factors influenced the route to tuberculosis treatment. Besides known patients factors (such as severity of complaints, the ability to pay for services, availability of services and peer support for choosing a provider) specific health services factors were also identified. These included the perceived quality, costs and service level of a provider, and lack of provider initiated referral. Self referral because of waned trust in the provider was very common. In contrast, once tuberculosis was considered a possible diagnosis, referral to diagnostic testing and tuberculosis treatment was prompt. Conclusion Patient routes towards tuberculosis treatment are characterised by self referral and include both private and public health care providers. Once tuberculosis is suspected referral for diagnosis and treatment is prompt. Given the importance of the private practitioners in the patient routes, quality improvement initiatives need to address not only the public sector but the private health care sector as well. PMID:18190698

  16. Phagosomal Rupture by Mycobacterium tuberculosis Results in Toxicity and Host Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Lippmann, Juliane; Bitter, Wilbert; Majlessi, Laleh; Brosch, Roland; Enninga, Jost

    2012-01-01

    Survival within macrophages is a central feature of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis. Despite significant advances in identifying new immunological parameters associated with mycobacterial disease, some basic questions on the intracellular fate of the causative agent of human tuberculosis in antigen-presenting cells are still under debate. To get novel insights into this matter, we used a single-cell fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based method to investigate the potential cytosolic access of M. tuberculosis and the resulting cellular consequences in an unbiased, quantitative way. Analysis of thousands of THP-1 macrophages infected with selected wild-type or mutant strains of the M. tuberculosis complex unambiguously showed that M. tuberculosis induced a change in the FRET signal after 3 to 4 days of infection, indicating phagolysosomal rupture and cytosolic access. These effects were not seen for the strains M. tuberculosisΔRD1 or BCG, both lacking the ESX-1 secreted protein ESAT-6, which reportedly shows membrane-lysing properties. Complementation of these strains with the ESX-1 secretion system of M. tuberculosis restored the ability to cause phagolysosomal rupture. In addition, control experiments with the fish pathogen Mycobacterium marinum showed phagolysosomal translocation only for ESX-1 intact strains, further validating our experimental approach. Most importantly, for M. tuberculosis as well as for M. marinum we observed that phagolysosomal rupture was followed by necrotic cell death of the infected macrophages, whereas ESX-1 deletion- or truncation-mutants that remained enclosed within phagolysosomal compartments did not induce such cytotoxicity. Hence, we provide a novel mechanism how ESX-1 competent, virulent M. tuberculosis and M. marinum strains induce host cell death and thereby escape innate host defenses and favor their spread to new cells. In this respect, our results also open new research directions in relation with the extracellular localization of M. tuberculosis inside necrotic lesions that can now be tackled from a completely new perspective. PMID:22319448

  17. Phagosomal rupture by Mycobacterium tuberculosis results in toxicity and host cell death.

    PubMed

    Simeone, Roxane; Bobard, Alexandre; Lippmann, Juliane; Bitter, Wilbert; Majlessi, Laleh; Brosch, Roland; Enninga, Jost

    2012-02-01

    Survival within macrophages is a central feature of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis. Despite significant advances in identifying new immunological parameters associated with mycobacterial disease, some basic questions on the intracellular fate of the causative agent of human tuberculosis in antigen-presenting cells are still under debate. To get novel insights into this matter, we used a single-cell fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based method to investigate the potential cytosolic access of M. tuberculosis and the resulting cellular consequences in an unbiased, quantitative way. Analysis of thousands of THP-1 macrophages infected with selected wild-type or mutant strains of the M. tuberculosis complex unambiguously showed that M. tuberculosis induced a change in the FRET signal after 3 to 4 days of infection, indicating phagolysosomal rupture and cytosolic access. These effects were not seen for the strains M. tuberculosisΔRD1 or BCG, both lacking the ESX-1 secreted protein ESAT-6, which reportedly shows membrane-lysing properties. Complementation of these strains with the ESX-1 secretion system of M. tuberculosis restored the ability to cause phagolysosomal rupture. In addition, control experiments with the fish pathogen Mycobacterium marinum showed phagolysosomal translocation only for ESX-1 intact strains, further validating our experimental approach. Most importantly, for M. tuberculosis as well as for M. marinum we observed that phagolysosomal rupture was followed by necrotic cell death of the infected macrophages, whereas ESX-1 deletion- or truncation-mutants that remained enclosed within phagolysosomal compartments did not induce such cytotoxicity. Hence, we provide a novel mechanism how ESX-1 competent, virulent M. tuberculosis and M. marinum strains induce host cell death and thereby escape innate host defenses and favor their spread to new cells. In this respect, our results also open new research directions in relation with the extracellular localization of M. tuberculosis inside necrotic lesions that can now be tackled from a completely new perspective. PMID:22319448

  18. Phage lysin to control the overgrowth of normal flora in processed sputum samples for the rapid and sensitive detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by luciferase reporter phage assay

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phage lysin, extracted from three bacteriophages was used in place of antibiotics to control the overgrowth of normal flora in processed sputum samples leading to the sensitive detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using diagnostic luciferase reporter phage assay (DLRPA). Methods A total of 129 sputum samples were processed by modified Petroff’s method. Two Lowenstein Jensen slopes were inoculated from the processed sputum deposit thus obtained. The remaining deposits were transferred to 7 ml of Middlebrook 7H9 complete medium supplemented with phage lysin and incubated at 37°C. DLRPA was done using phAE129 at days 7, 9, 14 and 21. At the end of day 21, the samples were centrifuged and the pellets were inoculated on to 2 more LJ slopes to validate DLRPA results. Results The sensitivity and specificity of DLRPA in detecting M. tuberculosis from sputum specimens was 90% and 81% respectively compared to conventional LJ culture. The agreement between the methods was 87%. The rate of contamination for DLRPA using phage lysin was 9.3%. Conclusion Phage lysin can be used to decontaminate sputum samples for the detection of M. tuberculosis by DLRPA directly from processed sputum specimens. PMID:23356428

  19. Whole genome sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals slow growth and low mutation rates during latent infections in humans.

    PubMed

    Colangeli, Roberto; Arcus, Vic L; Cursons, Ray T; Ruthe, Ali; Karalus, Noel; Coley, Kathy; Manning, Shannon D; Kim, Soyeon; Marchiano, Emily; Alland, David

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known about the growth and mutation rates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during latent infection in humans. However, studies in rhesus macaques have suggested that latent infections have mutation rates that are higher than that observed during active tuberculosis disease. Elevated mutation rates are presumed risk factors for the development of drug resistance. Therefore, the investigation of mutation rates during human latency is of high importance. We performed whole genome mutation analysis of M. tuberculosis isolates from a multi-decade tuberculosis outbreak of the New Zealand Rangipo strain. We used epidemiological and phylogenetic analysis to identify four cases of tuberculosis acquired from the same index case. Two of the tuberculosis cases occurred within two years of exposure and were classified as recently transmitted tuberculosis. Two other cases occurred more than 20 years after exposure and were classified as reactivation of latent M. tuberculosis infections. Mutation rates were compared between the two recently transmitted pairs versus the two latent pairs. Mean mutation rates assuming 20 hour generation times were 5.5 X 10(-10) mutations/bp/generation for recently transmitted tuberculosis and 7.3 X 10(-11) mutations/bp/generation for latent tuberculosis. Generation time versus mutation rate curves were also significantly higher for recently transmitted tuberculosis across all replication rates (p = 0.006). Assuming identical replication and mutation rates among all isolates in the final two years before disease reactivation, the u 20 hr mutation rate attributable to the remaining latent period was 1.6 × 10(-11) mutations/bp/generation, or approximately 30 fold less than that calculated during the two years immediately before disease. Mutations attributable to oxidative stress as might be caused by bacterial exposure to the host immune system were not increased in latent infections. In conclusion, we did not find any evidence to suggest elevated mutation rates during tuberculosis latency in humans, unlike the situation in rhesus macaques. PMID:24618815

  20. Immunometabolism in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lanbo; Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Subbian, Selvakumar

    2016-01-01

    Immunometabolism, the study of the relationship between bioenergetic pathways and specific functions of immune cells, has recently gained increasing appreciation. In response to infection, activation of the host innate and adaptive immune cells is accompanied by a switch in the bioenergetic pathway from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, a metabolic remodeling known as the Warburg effect, which is required for the production of antimicrobial and pro-inflammatory effector molecules. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the Warburg effect and discuss its association with the expression of host immune responses in tuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We also discuss potential mechanisms underlying the Warburg effect with a focus on the expression and regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α), the regulatory subunit of HIF-1, a major transcription regulator involved in cellular stress adaptation processes, including energy metabolism and antimicrobial responses. We also propose a novel hypothesis that Mtb perturbs the Warburg effect of immune cells to facilitate its survival and persistence in the host. A better understanding of the dynamics of metabolic states of immune cells and their specific functions during TB pathogenesis can lead to the development of immunotherapies capable of promoting Mtb clearance and reducing Mtb persistence and the emergence of drug resistant strains. PMID:27148269

  1. Cellular therapy in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Parida, Shreemanta K; Madansein, Rajhmun; Singh, Nalini; Padayatchi, Nesri; Master, Iqbal; Naidu, Kantharuben; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Cellular therapy now offer promise of potential adjunct therapeutic options for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). We review here the role of Mesenchymal stromal cells, (MSCs), as well as other immune effector cells in the therapy of infectious diseases with a focus on TB. MSCs represent a population of tissue-resident non-hematopoietic adult progenitor cells which home into injured tissues increase the proliferative potential of broncho-alveolar stem cells and restore lung epithelium. MSCs have been shown to be immune-modulatory and anti-inflammatory mediated via cell-cell contacts as well as soluble factors. We discuss the functional profile of MSCs and their potential use for adjunct cellular therapy of multi-drug resistant TB, with the aim of limiting tissue damage, and to convert unproductive inflammatory responses into effective anti-pathogen directed immune responses. Adjunct cellular therapy could potentially offer salvage therapy options for patients with drug-resistant TB, increase clinically relevant anti-M.tuberculosis directed immune responses and possibly shorten the duration of anti-TB therapy. PMID:25809753

  2. Clinical peculiarities of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing spread of tuberculosis (TB) in poor resource countries and the recently increasing incidence in high resource countries lead to the need of updated knowledge for clinicians, particularly for pediatricians. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview on the most important peculiarities of TB in children. Children are less contagious than adults, but the risk of progression to active disease is higher in infants and children as compared to the subsequent ages. Diagnosis of TB in children is more difficult than in adults, because few signs are associated with primary infection, interferon-gamma release assays and tuberculin skin test are less reliable in younger children, M. tuberculosis is more rarely detected in gastric aspirates than in smears in adults and radiological findings are often not specific. Treatment of latent TB is always necessary in young children, whereas it is recommended in older children, as well as in adults, only in particular conditions. Antimycobacterial drugs are generally better tolerated in children as compared to adults, but off-label use of second-line antimycobacterial drugs is increasing, because of spreading of multidrug resistant TB worldwide. Given that TB is a disease which often involves more than one member in a family, a closer collaboration is needed between pediatricians and clinicians who take care of adults. PMID:24564419

  3. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis among South African Gold Miners

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, James J.; Connors, Jeremy; Chihota, Violet N.; Shashkina, Elena; van der Meulen, Minty; Graviss, Edward A.; Ha, Ngan P.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Grant, Alison D.; Fielding, Katherine L.; Dorman, Susan E.; Churchyard, Gavin J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: HIV-associated tuberculosis remains a major health problem among the gold-mining workforce in South Africa. We postulate that high levels of recent transmission, indicated by strain clustering, are fueling the tuberculosis epidemic among gold miners. Objectives: To combine molecular and epidemiologic data to describe Mycobacterium tuberculosis genetic diversity, estimate levels of transmission, and examine risk factors for clustering. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of culture-positive M. tuberculosis isolates in 15 gold mine shafts across three provinces in South Africa. All isolates were subject IS6110-based restriction fragment length polymorphisms, and we performed spoligotyping analysis and combined it with basic demographic and clinical information. Measurements and Main Results: Of the 1,602 M. tuberculosis patient isolates, 1,240 (78%) had genotyping data available for analysis. A highly diverse bacillary population was identified, comprising a total of 730 discrete genotypes. Four genotypic families (Latin American Mediterranean spoligotype family; W-Beijing; AH or X; and T1–T4) accounted for over 50% of all strains. Overall, 45% (560/1,240) of strains were genotypically clustered. The minimum estimate for recent transmission (n − 1 method) was 32% (range, 27–34%). There were no individual-level risk factors for clustering, apart from borderline evidence for being non–South African and having self-reported HIV infection. Conclusions: The high M. tuberculosis genetic diversity and lack of risk factors for clustering are indicative of a universal risk for disease among gold miners and likely mixing with nonmining populations. Our results underscore the urgent need to intensify interventions to interrupt transmission across the entire gold-mining workforce in South Africa. PMID:25419914

  4. Allopatric tuberculosis host–pathogen relationships are associated with greater pulmonary impairment

    PubMed Central

    Pasipanodya, Jotam G.; Moonan, Patrick K.; Vecino, Edgar; Miller, Thaddeus L.; Fernandez, Michel; Slocum, Philip; Drewyer, Gerry; Weis, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Host pathogen relationships can be classified as allopatric, when the pathogens originated from separate, non-overlapping geographic areas from the host; or sympatric, when host and pathogen shared a common ancestral geographic location. It remains unclear if host–pathogen relationships, as defined by phylogenetic lineage, influence clinical outcome. We sought to examine the association between allopatric and sympatric phylogenetic Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineages and pulmonary impairment after tuberculosis (PIAT). Methods Pulmonary function tests were performed on patients 16 years of age and older who had received ≥20 weeks of treatment for culture-confirmed M. tuberculosis complex. Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 min (FEV1) ≥80%, Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) ≥80% and FEV1/FVC >70% of predicted were considered normal. Other results defined pulmonary impairment. Spoligotype and 12-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) were used to assign phylogenetic lineage. PIAT severity was compared between host–pathogen relationships which were defined by geography and ethnic population. We used multivariate logistic regression modeling to calculate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) between phylogenetic lineage and PIAT. Results Self-reported continental ancestry was correlated with Mycobacterium. tuberculosis lineage (p < 0.001). In multivariate analyses adjusting for phylogenetic lineage, age and smoking, the overall aOR for subjects with allopatric host–pathogen relationships and PIAT was 1.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1, 2.9) compared to sympatric relationships. Smoking >30 pack-years was also associated with PIAT (aOR: 3.2; 95% CI: 1.5, 7.2) relative to smoking <1 pack-years. Conclusions PIAT frequency and severity varies by host–pathogen relationship and heavy cigarette consumption, but not phylogenetic lineage alone. Patients who had disease resulting from allopatric–host–pathogen relationship were more likely to have PIAT than patients with disease from sympatric–host–pathogen relationship infection. Further study of this association may identify ways that treatment and preventive efforts can be tailored to specific lineages and racial/ethnic populations. PMID:23501297

  5. Delayed consultation among pulmonary tuberculosis patients: a cross sectional study of 10 DOTS districts of Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mesfin, Mengiste M; Newell, James N; Walley, John D; Gessessew, Amanuel; Madeley, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    Background Delays seeking care increase transmission of pulmonary tuberculosis and hence the burden of tuberculosis, which remains high in developing countries. This study investigates patterns of health seeking behavior and determines risk factors for delayed patient consultation at public health facilities in 10 districts of Ethiopia. Methods New pulmonary TB patients ≥ 15 years old were recruited at 18 diagnostic centres. Patients were asked about their health care seeking behaviour and the time from onset of symptoms to first consultation at a public health facility. First consultation at a public health facility 30 days or longer after onset of symptoms was regarded as prolonged patient delay. Results Interviews were held with 924 pulmonary patients. Of these, 537 (58%) were smear positive and 387 (42%) were smear negative; 413 (45%) were female; 451 (49%) were rural residents; and the median age was 34 years. Prior to their first consultation at a public health facility, patients received treatment from a variety of informal sources: the Orthodox Church, where they were treated with holy water (24%); private practitioners (13%); rural drug vendors (7%); and traditional healers (3%). The overall median patient delay was 30 days (mean = 60 days). Fifty three percent [95% Confidence Intervals (CI) (50%, 56%)] of patients had delayed their first consultation for ≥ 30 days. Patient delay for women was 54%; 95% CI (54%, 58%) and men 51%; 95% CI (47%, 55%). The delay was higher for patients who used informal treatment (median 31 days) than those who did not (15 days). Prolonged patient delay (≥ 30 days) was significantly associated with both patient-related and treatment-related factors. Significant patient-related factors were smear positive pulmonary disease [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 1.4; 95% CI (1.1 to 1.9)], rural residence [AOR 1.4; 95% CI (1.1 to 1.9)], illiteracy [AOR 1.7; 95% CI (1.2 to 2.4)], and lack of awareness/misperceptions of causes of pulmonary TB. Significant informal treatment-related factors were prior treatment with holy water [AOR 3.5; 95% CI (2.4 to 5)], treatment by private practitioners [AOR 1.7; 95% CI (1.1 to 2.6)] and treatment by drug vendors [AOR 1.9; 95% CI (1.1 to 3.5)]. Conclusion Nearly half of pulmonary tuberculosis patients delayed seeking health care at a public health facility while getting treatment from informal sources. The involvement of religious institutions and private practitioners in early referral of patients with pulmonary symptoms and creating public awareness about tuberculosis could help reduce delays in starting modern treatment. PMID:19203378

  6. Advances in tuberculosis diagnostics: the Xpert MTB/RIF assay and future prospects for a point-of-care test

    PubMed Central

    Lawn, Stephen D; Mwaba, Peter; Bates, Matthew; Piatek, Amy; Alexander, Heather; Marais, Ben J; Cuevas, Luis E; McHugh, Timothy D; Zijenah, Lynn; Kapata, Nathan; Abubakar, Ibrahim; McNerney, Ruth; Hoelscher, Michael; Memish, Ziad A; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Kim, Peter; Maeurer, Markus; Schito, Marco; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2015-01-01

    Rapid progress has been made in the development of new diagnostic assays for tuberculosis in recent years. New technologies have been developed and assessed, and are now being implemented. The Xpert MTB/RIF assay, which enables simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and rifampicin (RIF) resistance, was endorsed by WHO in December, 2010. This assay was specifically recommended for use as the initial diagnostic test for suspected drug-resistant or HIV-associated pulmonary tuberculosis. By June, 2012, two-thirds of countries with a high tuberculosis burden and half of countries with a high multidrug-resistant tuberculosis burden had incorporated the assay into their national tuberculosis programme guidelines. Although the development of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay is undoubtedly a landmark event, clinical and programmatic effects and cost-effectiveness remain to be defined. We review the rapidly growing body of scientific literature and discuss the advantages and challenges of using the Xpert MTB/RIF assay in areas where tuberculosis is endemic. We also review other prospects within the developmental pipeline. A rapid, accurate point-of-care diagnostic test that is affordable and can be readily implemented is urgently needed. Investment in the tuberculosis diagnostics pipeline should remain a major priority for funders and researchers. PMID:23531388

  7. [Risk groups for tuberculosis in Chile].

    PubMed

    Herrera, Tania

    2015-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global and national problem. In Chile the incidence rate has remained at 13 per 100,000 inhabitants for several years without tendency to the expected decline that would allow their elimination by 2020. As a low prevalence country, TB cases have been concentrated in risk groups, reaching 33% in 2013, and this proportion increases as younger people are analyzed. The main risk groups in Chile are HIV co-infection, foreigners and population of prisons. By 2013, the proportion of cases for these three groups was 8.7%, 8.4% and 3.9% respectively, and these percentages vary significantly when regional situation is analyzed. In addition, many of these patients have more than one risk factor, demons-rating the existence of clusters more vulnerable to TB. PMID:25860037

  8. Prevalence of self-reported tuberculosis, knowledge about tuberculosis transmission and its determinants among adults in India: results from a nation-wide cross-sectional household survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knowledge about symptoms and transmission of tuberculosis determines health seeking behavior and helps in prevention of tuberculosis transmission in the community. Such data is useful for policy makers to formulate information, education and communication strategies for tuberculosis control. Methods A secondary data analysis of India demographic and health survey, 2005/6 was carried out. Questions about self-reported tuberculosis, transmission and curability of tuberculosis were analysed. Correct knowledge (without misconceptions) about tuberculosis transmission was used as a dependant variable and the explanatory variables tested were: demographic data, education, wealth quintiles, frequency of exposure to media and the curability of tuberculosis. Determinants of correct knowledge without misconceptions were tested by univariate and multivariate analyses using national weighting factor to adjust for complex sampling design. Results A total of 109,070 households (response rate of 93.5%) and 198,718 participants (response rate of 91.6%) completed the survey. The samples of men and women interviewed were 74,360 and 124,358 respectively. Prevalence rate of self-reported tuberculosis was 445 per 100,000 usual household residents and 4.60 per 1,000 participants. The number of respondents who had “heard of an illness called tuberculosis” was 177,423 (89.3%). Of these 47,487 (26.8%) participants did not know and 55.5% knew about the correct mode of tuberculosis transmission i.e. “Through the air when coughing or sneezing”. The common misconceptions about transmission were “Through food” (32.4%), “Sharing utensils” (18.2%), and “Touching a person with tuberculosis” (12.3%). Only 52,617 (29.7%) participants had correct knowledge without misconceptions. Being male (aOR 1.17, 95% CIs 1.14, 1.21), being a Hindu (aOR 1.20, 95% CIs 1.14, 1.26) or Muslim (aOR 1.26, 95% CIs 1.18, 1.34), listening to radio (aOR 1.08, 95% CIs 1.04, 1.13) and “Tuberculosis can be cured” (aOR 1.47, 95% CIs 1.41, 1.53) were associated with correct knowledge without misconceptions. Conclusions Knowledge about tuberculosis transmission is very poor and misconceptions still exist. Among the traditional mass media, the frequency of listening to radio was associated with correct knowledge about tuberculosis transmission. Strategies to deliver information, education and communication campaigns could be improved. PMID:23324535

  9. Tuberculosis care: an evaluability study

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Ardigleusa Alves; Martiniano, Cláudia Santos; Brito, Ewerton Willian Gomes; Negrão, Oswaldo Gomes Corrêa; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre; Uchôa, Severina Alice da Costa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to verify whether the tuberculosis control program (TCP) is evaluable and to examine the feasibility of building an evaluation model in apriority municipality for the control of tuberculosis. METHOD: this evaluability study was conducted in a municipality in northeastern Brazil. For data collection, documental analysis and interviews with key informants were performed. For indicator validation, the nominal group technique was adopted. RESULTS: the details of TCP were described, and both the logical model and the classification framework for indicators were developed and agreed up on, with the goal of characterizing the structural elements of the program, defining the structure and process indicators, and formulating the evaluation questions. CONCLUSION: TCP is evaluable. Based on logical operational analysis, it was possible to evaluate the adequacy of the program goals for the control of tuberculosis. Therefore, the performance of a summative evaluation is recommended, with a focus on the analysis of the effects of tuberculosis control interventions on decreasing morbidity and mortality. PMID:25493675

  10. Constitutive expression of SMAR1 confers susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Bhawna; Malonia, Sunil K.; Majumdar, Subeer S.; Gupta, Pushpa; Wadhwa, Neerja; Badhwar, Archana; Gupta, Umesh D.; Katoch, Vishwa M.; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Studies involving animal models of experimental tuberculosis have elucidated the predominant role of cytokines secreted by T cells and macrophages to be an essential component of the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The immune activities of CD4+ T cells are mediated in part by Th1 cytokine interferon gamma (IFN-γ) which is produced primarily by T cells and natural killer (NK) cells and critical for initiating the immune response against intracellular pathogen such as M. tuberculosis. Nuclear matrix protein SMAR1 plays an important role in V(D)J recombination, T helper cell differentiation and inflammatory diseases. In this study a transgenic mouse model was used to study the role of SMAR1 in M. tuberculosis infection. Methods: Wild type BALB/c, C57BL/6, BALB/c-EGFP-SMAR1 and C57BL/6-SMAR1 transgenic mice were infected with M. tuberculosis (H37Rv). A dose of 100 bacilli was used for infection via respiratory route. Bacterial load in lung and spleen of infected mice was determined at 2, 4, 6 and 8 wk post-infection. Gene expression analysis for Th1 cytokines and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was performed in infected lung tissues by quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. Results: SMAR1 transgenic mice from both BALB/c and C57BL/6 genetic background displayed higher bacillary load and susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection compared to wild type mice. This susceptibility was attributed due to compromised of Th1 response exhibited by transgenic mice. Interpretation & conclusions: SMAR1 transgenic mice exhibited susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection in vivo irrespective of genetic background. This susceptibility was attributed to downregulation of Th1 response and its hallmark cytokine IFN-γ. Hence, SMAR1 plays an important role in modulating host immune response after M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:26831422

  11. Association between HIV/AIDS and Multi-Drug Resistance Tuberculosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mesfin, Yonatan Moges; Hailemariam, Damen; Biadglign, Sibhatu; Kibret, Kelemu Tilahun

    2014-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR) is emerging as major challenge facing tuberculosis control programs worldwide particularly in Asia and Africa. Findings from different studies on associations of HIV co-infection and drug resistance among patients with TB have been contradictory (discordant). Some institution based studies found strongly increased risks for multi-drug resistant TB (MDR TB) among patients co-infected with TB and HIV, whereas other studies found no increased risk (it remains less clear in community based studies. The aim was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between multi-drug resistant tuberculosis and HIV infection. Methods and findings Systematic review of the published literature of observational studies was conducted. Original studies were identified using databases of Medline/Pubmed, Google Scholar and HINARI. The descriptions of original studies were made using frequency and forest plot. Publication bias was assessed using Funnel plot graphically and Egger weighted and Begg rank regression tests statistically. Heterogeneity across studies was checked using Cochrane Q test statistic and I2. Pool risk estimates of MDR-TB and sub-grouping analysis were computed to analyze associations with HIV. Random effects of the meta-analysis of all 24 observational studies showed that HIV is associated with a marginal increased risk of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (estimated Pooled OR 1.24; 95%, 1.04–1.43). Subgroup analyses showed that effect estimates were higher (Pooled OR 2.28; 95%, 1.52–3.04) for primary multi-drug resistance tuberculosis and moderate association between HIV/AIDS and MDR-TB among population based studies and no significant association in institution settings. Conclusions This study demonstrated that there is association between MDR-TB and HIV. Capacity for diagnosis of MDR-TB and initiating and scale up of antiretroviral treatment, and collaborations between HIV and TB control programs need to be considered and strengthened. PMID:24416139

  12. The Genotypic Population Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex from Moroccan Patients Reveals a Predominance of Euro-American Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Lahlou, Ouafae; Millet, Julie; Chaoui, Imane; Sabouni, Radia; Filali-Maltouf, Abdelkarim; Akrim, Mohammed; El Mzibri, Mohammed; Rastogi, Nalin; El Aouad, Rajae

    2012-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major health problem in Morocco. Characterization of circulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotypic lineages, important to understand the dynamic of the disease, was hereby addressed for the first time at a national level. Methodology/Principal Findings Spoligotyping was performed on a panel of 592 M. tuberculosis complex strains covering a 2-year period (2004–2006). It identified 129 patterns: 105 (n = 568 strains) corresponded to a SIT number in the SITVIT2 database, while 24 patterns were labeled as orphan. A total of 523 (88.3%) strains were clustered vs. 69 or 11.7% unclustered. Classification of strains within 3 large phylogenetical groups was as follows: group 1– ancestral/TbD1+/PGG1 (EAI, Bovis, Africanum), group 2– modern/TbD1−/PGG1 group (Beijing, CAS), group 3– evolutionary recent/TbD1−/PGG2/3 (Haarlem, X, S, T, LAM; alternatively designated as the Euro-American lineage). As opposed to group 3 strains (namely LAM, Haarlem, and T) that predominated (86.5% of all isolates), 6 strains belonged to group 2 (Beijing n = 5, CAS n = 1), and 3 strains (BOV_1 n = 2, BOV_4-CAPRAE) belonged to ancestral group 1 (EAI and AFRI lineage strains were absent). 12-loci MIRU-VNTR typing of the Casablanca subgroup (n = 114 strains) identified 71 patterns: 48 MITs and 23 orphan patterns; it allowed to reduce the clustering rate from 72.8% to 29.8% and the recent transmission rate from 64% to 20.2%. Conclusion The M. tuberculosis population structure in Morocco is highly homogeneous, and is characterized by the predominance of the Euro-American lineages, namely LAM, Haarlem, and T, which belong to the “evolutionary recent” TbD1−/PGG2/3 phylogenetic group. The combination of spoligotyping and MIRUs decreased the clustering rate significantly, and should now be systematically applied in larger studies. The methods used in this study appear well suited to monitor the M. tuberculosis population structure for an enhanced TB management program in Morocco. PMID:23077552

  13. Biological functions of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific CD4+T cells were impaired by tuberculosis pleural fluid.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Li, Li; Liu, Yun; Fu, Xiaoying; Wang, Hui; Lao, Suihua; Yang, Binyan; Wu, Changyou

    2011-08-30

    The local milieu at the site of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection that modulates T-cell functions is the main battleground for the host to build counter-M. tuberculosis immune responses. CD4+T cells are enriched predominantly in tuberculosis pleurisy and their roles are of considerable importance, but their nature and functional profiles linked with local condition remain elusive. Here we evaluated the functions of M. tuberculosis-specific CD4+T cells from the major three profiles: cytokines production, cell activation and division. Results showed that pleural fluid (PF) from tuberculosis patients in a dose dependent manner inhibited the production of IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α by M. tuberculosis-specific peptides or BCG activated CD4+T cells from pleural fluid mononuclear cells (PFMCs). Surface staining for activation molecules indicated that PF could also blunt cell activation process. CFSE labeling showed that antigen-specific CD4+T cell division ceased following co-incubation with PF. Pre- or post-treatment with PF could disturb subsequent cell activities. The strong inhibitory effect mediated by PF on CD4+T cells was functional predominance. Moreover, application of inhibitors of IDO, adenosine, neutralizing Abs to IL-10 and TGF-β could partially reverse IFN-γ production. Our current research provided novel information that the functions of antigen-specific CD4+T cells coincubated with PF were apparently impaired, which were distinct from cells that cultured in fresh culture medium. We concluded that CD4+T cell mediated antigen-specific cellular immune response that occurred locally might be impaired by PF. PMID:21549757

  14. Inferring a protein interaction map of Mycobacterium tuberculosis based on sequences and interologs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an infectious bacterium posing serious threats to human health. Due to the difficulty in performing molecular biology experiments to detect protein interactions, reconstruction of a protein interaction map of M. tuberculosis by computational methods will provide crucial information to understand the biological processes in the pathogenic microorganism, as well as provide the framework upon which new therapeutic approaches can be developed. Results In this paper, we constructed an integrated M. tuberculosis protein interaction network by machine learning and ortholog-based methods. Firstly, we built a support vector machine (SVM) method to infer the protein interactions of M. tuberculosis H37Rv by gene sequence information. We tested our predictors in Escherichia coli and mapped the genetic codon features underlying its protein interactions to M. tuberculosis. Moreover, the documented interactions of 14 other species were mapped to the interactome of M. tuberculosis by the interolog method. The ensemble protein interactions were validated by various functional relationships, i.e., gene coexpression, evolutionary relationship and functional similarity, extracted from heterogeneous data sources. The accuracy and validation demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our framework. Conclusions A protein interaction map of M. tuberculosis is inferred from genetic codons and interologs. The prediction accuracy and numerically experimental validation demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our method. Furthermore, our methods can be straightforwardly extended to infer the protein interactions of other bacterial species. PMID:22595003

  15. Procollagen III N-terminal Propeptide and Desmosine are Released by Matrix Destruction in Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Seddon, Jo; Kasprowicz, Victoria; Walker, Naomi F.; Yuen, Ho Ming; Sunpath, Henry; Tezera, Liku; Meintjes, Graeme; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Bishai, William R.; Friedland, Jon S.; Elkington, Paul T.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis is transmitted by patients with pulmonary disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) drive lung destruction in tuberculosis but the resulting matrix degradation products (MDPs) have not been studied. We investigate the hypothesis that MMP activity generates matrix turnover products as correlates of lung pathology. Methods. Induced sputum and plasma were collected prospectively from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive and negative patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and controls. Concentrations of MDPs and MMPs were analyzed by ELISA and Luminex array in 2 patient cohorts. Results. Procollagen III N-terminal propeptide (PIIINP) was 3.8-fold higher in induced sputum of HIV-uninfected tuberculosis patients compared to controls and desmosine, released during elastin degradation, was 2.4-fold higher. PIIINP was elevated in plasma of tuberculosis patients. Plasma PIIINP correlated with induced sputum MMP-1 concentrations and radiological scores, demonstrating that circulating MDPs reflect lung destruction. In a second patient cohort of mixed HIV seroprevalence, plasma PIIINP concentration was increased 3.0-fold above controls (P < .001). Plasma matrix metalloproteinase-8 concentrations were also higher in tuberculosis patients (P = .001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis utilizing these 2 variables demonstrated an area under the curve of 0.832 (P < .001). Conclusions. In pulmonary tuberculosis, MMP-driven immunopathology generates matrix degradation products. PMID:23922364

  16. Tuberculosis associates with both airflow obstruction and low lung function: BOLD results

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, André F. S.; Coton, Sonia; Kato, Bernet; Tan, Wan C.; Studnicka, Michael; Janson, Christer; Gislason, Thorarinn; Mannino, David; Bateman, Eric D.; Buist, Sonia; Burney, Peter G. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background In small studies and cases series, a history of tuberculosis has been associated with both airflow obstruction, which is characteristic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and restrictive patterns on spirometry. Objective To assess the association between a history of tuberculosis and airflow obstruction and spirometric abnormalities in adults. Methods The study was performed in adults, aged 40 and above, who took part in the multicentre cross-sectional, general population-based, Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease study, had provided acceptable post-bronchodilator spirometry measurements and information on a history of tuberculosis. The associations between a history of tuberculosis and airflow obstruction and spirometric restriction were assessed within each participating centre, and estimates combined using meta-analysis. These estimates were stratified by high and low/middle income countries, according to gross national income. Results A self-reported history of tuberculosis was associated with airflow obstruction (adjusted odds ratio = 2.51, 95% confidence interval 1.83-3.42) and spirometric restriction (adjusted odds ratio = 2.13, 95% confidence interval 1.42-3.19). Conclusion A history of tuberculosis was associated with both airflow obstruction and spirometric restriction, and should be considered as a potentially important cause of obstructive disease and low lung function, particularly where tuberculosis is common. PMID:26113680

  17. Tuberculosis in ageing: high rates, complex diagnosis and poor clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo; García-García, Lourdes; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Bobadilla-del-Valle, Miriam; Cano-Arellano, Bulmaro; Canizales-Quintero, Sergio; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Báez-Saldaña, Renata; Téllez-Vázquez, Norma; Nava-Mercado, Ariadna; Juárez-Sandino, Luis; Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Fuentes-Leyra, César Alejandro; Montero-Campos, Rogelio; Martínez-Gamboa, Rosa Areli; Small, Peter M.; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Background: worldwide, the frequency of tuberculosis among older people almost triples that observed among young adults. Objective: to describe clinical and epidemiological consequences of pulmonary tuberculosis among older people. Methods: we screened persons with a cough lasting more than 2 weeks in Southern Mexico from March 1995 to February 2007. We collected clinical and mycobacteriological information (isolation, identification, drug-susceptibility testing and IS6110-based genotyping and spoligotyping) from individuals with bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis. Patients were treated in accordance with official norms and followed to ascertain treatment outcomes, retreatment, and vital status. Results: eight hundred ninety-three tuberculosis patients were older than 15 years of age; of these, 147 (16.5%) were 65 years of age or older. Individuals ≥65 years had significantly higher rates of recently transmitted and reactivated tuberculosis. Older age was associated with treatment failure (OR = 5.37; 95% CI: 1.06–27.23; P = 0.042), and death due to tuberculosis (HR = 3.52; 95% CI: 1.78–6.96; P < 0.001) adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical variables. Conclusions: community-dwelling older individuals participate in chains of transmission indicating that tuberculosis is not solely due to the reactivation of latent disease. Untimely and difficult diagnosis and a higher risk of poor outcomes even after treatment completion emphasise the need for specific strategies for this vulnerable group. PMID:22431155

  18. GSMN-TB: a web-based genome-scale network model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Beste, Dany JV; Hooper, Tracy; Stewart, Graham; Bonde, Bhushan; Avignone-Rossa, Claudio; Bushell, Michael E; Wheeler, Paul; Klamt, Steffen; Kierzek, Andrzej M; McFadden, Johnjoe

    2007-01-01

    Background An impediment to the rational development of novel drugs against tuberculosis (TB) is a general paucity of knowledge concerning the metabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, particularly during infection. Constraint-based modeling provides a novel approach to investigating microbial metabolism but has not yet been applied to genome-scale modeling of M. tuberculosis. Results GSMN-TB, a genome-scale metabolic model of M. tuberculosis, was constructed, consisting of 849 unique reactions and 739 metabolites, and involving 726 genes. The model was calibrated by growing Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette Guérin in continuous culture and steady-state growth parameters were measured. Flux balance analysis was used to calculate substrate consumption rates, which were shown to correspond closely to experimentally determined values. Predictions of gene essentiality were also made by flux balance analysis simulation and were compared with global mutagenesis data for M. tuberculosis grown in vitro. A prediction accuracy of 78% was achieved. Known drug targets were predicted to be essential by the model. The model demonstrated a potential role for the enzyme isocitrate lyase during the slow growth of mycobacteria, and this hypothesis was experimentally verified. An interactive web-based version of the model is available. Conclusion The GSMN-TB model successfully simulated many of the growth properties of M. tuberculosis. The model provides a means to examine the metabolic flexibility of bacteria and predict the phenotype of mutants, and it highlights previously unexplored features of M. tuberculosis metabolism. PMID:17521419

  19. A role for IL-18 in protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Bianca E.; Korbel, Daniel; Hagens, Kristine; Koch, Markus; Raupach, Bärbel; Enders, Jana; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Schaible, Ulrich E.

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains the most hazardous bacterial infection worldwide. The causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a facultative intracellular pathogen of resting MΦ. IFN-γ secreted by natural killer, CD4 Th 1 and CD8 T cells upon instruction by IL-12 and -18 activates MΦ to restrict mycobacterial growth. Production of both cytokines is induced by TLR signalling in DC and MΦ. Mice deficient for the TLR adaptor, MyD88, are highly susceptible to M. tuberculosis infection. Shared usage of MyD88 by signalling cascades for TLR and receptors for IL-1 and IL-18 prompted us to revisit the role of IL-18 during experimental infection with M. tuberculosis. We show that mice deficient for IL-18 and MyD88 but not for IL-18 receptor promptly succumbed to M. tuberculosis infection in contrast to WT or TLR-2/-4 double KO mice indicating that lack of IL-18 contributes to the high susceptibility of MyD88 KO mice to M. tuberculosis. Without IL-18, the protective Th1 response was decreased and hence, mycobacterial propagation was favoured. Neutrophil-driven lung immunopathology concomitant with unrestrained growth of tubercle bacilli are most likely responsible for the premature death of IL-18 KO mice. Thus, IL-18 plays a decisive role in protective immunity against tuberculosis. PMID:19950174

  20. Stable association between strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and their human host populations

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Aaron E.; Tsolaki, Anthony G.; DeRiemer, Kathryn; Feldman, Marcus W.; Small, Peter M.

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an important human pathogen in virtually every part of the world. Here we investigate whether distinct strains of M. tuberculosis infect different human populations and whether associations between host and pathogen populations are stable despite global traffic and the convergence of diverse strains of the pathogen in cosmopolitan urban centers. The recent global movement and transmission history of 100 M. tuberculosis isolates was inferred from a molecular epidemiologic study of tuberculosis that spans 12 years. Genetic relationships among these isolates were deduced from the distribution of large genomic deletions, which were identified by DNA microarray and confirmed by PCR and sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of these deletions indicates that they are unique event polymorphisms and that horizontal gene transfer is extremely rare in M. tuberculosis. In conjunction with the epidemiological data, phylogenies reveal three large phylogeographic regions. A host's region of origin is predictive of the strain of tuberculosis he or she carries, and this association remains strong even when transmission takes place in a cosmopolitan urban center outside of the region of origin. Approximate dating of the time since divergence of East Asian and Philippine clades of M. tuberculosis suggests that these lineages diverged centuries ago. Thus, associations between host and pathogen populations appear to be highly stable. PMID:15041743

  1. Characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolated from iranian and afghani patients by spoligotyping method

    PubMed Central

    Ramazanzadeh, Rashid; Farnia, Parisa; Amirmozafari, Nour

    2009-01-01

    Designing newer drugs, vaccines, and diagnostic techniques is dependent on better understanding of M. tuberculosis virulence mechanism. In this study the prevalence of pcaA gene was determined in M. tuberculosis strains typed by spoligotyping. The associated risk factors among patients with different nationalities residing in Iran were also determined. The isolated M. tuberculosis strains have been characterized by performing susceptibility tests against four first-line antituberculosis drugs and were then subjected to spoligotyping characterization. PCR was used for detection of pcaA gene and its nucleotide sequence was also determined. Spoligotyping of M. tuberculosis strains resulted in 140 different patterns. One hundred twenty two (87.1%) of these spoligotype isolates were unique and reported for the first time. The remaining18 (12.8%) spoligotype patterns were previously reported from other geographical regions of the world. Haarlem family was most prevalent than other genotype. Antibiotic resistances were higher in those isolated from the Iranian patients. The pcaA gene was detected in M. tuberculosis clinical isolates but not in saprophyte strains such as M. kansasi. The results showed that, spread of M. tuberculosis strains belonging to the Beijing family among Iranian patients has to be considered seriously. This study confirmed the widespread existence of pcaA gene in almost all the clinical isolates. It is also important to undertake studies to identify which factors are the most significant to consider in tuberculosis control program. PMID:24031364

  2. Identification of proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis missing in attenuated Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains.

    PubMed

    Mattow, J; Jungblut, P R; Schaible, U E; Mollenkopf, H J; Lamer, S; Zimny-Arndt, U; Hagens, K; Müller, E C; Kaufmann, S H

    2001-08-01

    A proteome approach, combining high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) with mass spectrometry, was used to compare the cellular protein composition of two virulent strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with two attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), in order to identify unique proteins of these strains. Emphasis was given to the identification of M. tuberculosis specific proteins, because we consider these proteins to represent putative virulence factors and interesting candidates for vaccination and diagnosis of tuberculosis. The genome of M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv comprises nearly 4000 predicted open reading frames. In contrast, the separation of proteins from whole mycobacterial cells by 2-DE resulted in silver-stained patterns comprising about 1800 distinct protein spots. Amongst these, 96 spots were exclusively detected either in the virulent (56 spots) or in the attenuated (40 spots) mycobacterial strains. Fifty-three of these spots were analyzed by mass spectrometry, of which 41 were identified, including 32 M. tuberculosis specific spots. Twelve M. tuberculosis specific spots were identified as proteins, encoded by genes previously reported to be deleted in M. bovis BCG. The remaining 20 spots unique for M. tuberculosis were identified as proteins encoded by genes that are not known to be missing in M. bovis BCG. PMID:11565788

  3. Imaging Spectrum of Extrathoracic Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Raut, Abhijit A; Naphade, Prashant S; Ramakantan, Ravi

    2016-05-01

    The incidence of extrathoracic tuberculosis (ETB) continues to increase slowly, especially in immunocompromised and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) patients. ETB manifests with nonspecific clinical symptoms, and being less frequent, is less familiar to most physicians. Imaging modalities of choice are computed tomography (lymphadenopathy and abdominal TB) and MR imaging (central nervous system and musculoskeletal system TB). ETB commonly involves multiple organ systems with characteristic imaging findings that permit accurate diagnosis and timely management. PMID:27153784

  4. Analysis of pathological and non-pathological human skeletal remains by FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Gergely; Lorand, Tamas; Patonai, Zoltan; Montsko, Gergely; Bajnoczky, Istvan; Marcsik, Antonia; Mark, Laszlo

    2008-02-25

    In this study, we report the chemical analyses of various non-pathological, tuberculosis and syphilis infected bone samples from different burial environments by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), in the framework of a general study of diagenesis. Dating human skeletal remains is one of the most important and yet unreliable aspects of forensic anthropology. In this paper, a new method has been suggested, using the crystallinity index and carbonate-phosphate index as a means of distinction between recent and archaeological, anthropological bone samples. Pathological bone samples were analyzed with the same method to see if changes in crystallinity interfere with the process of dating. PMID:17574360

  5. Engaging communities in tuberculosis research.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Renaud F; Seidel, Stephanie; Lessem, Erica; Pyne-Mercier, Lee; Williams, Sharon D; Mingote, Laia Ruiz; Scott, Cherise; Chou, Alicia Y; Lavery, James V

    2013-06-01

    According to a growing consensus among biomedical researchers, community engagement can improve the ethics and outcomes of clinical trials. Although successful efforts to develop community engagement practices in HIV/AIDS research have been reported, little attention has been given to engagement with the community in tuberculosis research. This article aims to draw attention to some existing community engagement initiatives in tuberculosis research and to resources that might help tuberculosis researchers to establish and implement community engagement programmes for their trials. One of these resources-the good participatory practice guidelines for tuberculosis drug trials-offers a conceptual framework and practical guidance for community engagement in tuberculosis research. To build momentum and to improve community engagement, lessons need to be shared, and formal assessment strategies for community engagement initiatives need to be developed. To build successfully on the promising activities described in this personal view, research funders and sponsors should show leadership in allocation of resources for the implementation and assessment of community engagement programmes in tuberculosis trials. PMID:23531390

  6. Factors associated with tuberculosis among patients attending a treatment centre in Zaria, North-west Nigeria, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Waziri, Ndadilnasiya Endie; Cadmus, Simeon; Nguku, Patrick; Fawole, Olufunmilayo; Owolodun, Olajide Adewale; Waziri, Hyelshilni; Ibrahim, Luka; Biya, Oladayo; Gidado, Saheed; Badung, Samuel; Kumbish, Peterside; Nsubuga, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis remains a global public health problem. In 2011, tuberculosis incidence was 133 per 100,000 in Nigeria. In Nigeria, little is known about the factors associated with tuberculosis, especially in the northern part and only few studies have characterized the Mycobacterium species that cause tuberculosis infection in humans. This study determined factors associated with tuberculosis and identified Mycobacterium species causing human tuberculosis in North-West, Nigeria. Methods We conducted a hospital based case control study between April and July 2010 in Zaria. Cases were newly diagnosed sputum smear-positive tuberculosis patients >15 years while controls were patients >15 years attending the hospital for other reasons but were negative for tuber-culosis. We used a structured questionnaire to obtain information on demographics, knowledge of transmission of tuberculosis, and exposure to some factors. We preformed descriptive, bivariate and backward elimination logistic regression. Sputa from cases were analyzed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on genomic regions of difference. Results The mean ages of the cases and controls were 36, standard deviation (SD) 9.0 and 36, SD 9.7 respectively. Only 10 (9.8%) and nine (8.8%) of cases and controls respectively had a good knowledge of the transmission of tuberculosis. Contact with a tuberculosis patient (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 12.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 5.2-28.8), consumption of unpasteurized milk (AOR 6.4, CI 2.4-17.2), keeping pets (AOR 5.6, CI 2.3-13.7), associating closely with cattle (AOR 5.6, CI 1.3-6.8), and overcrowding (AOR 4.8, CI 1.8-13.1) were significantly associated with tuberculosis. Of the 102 sputa analyzed, 91 (89%) were M. tuberculosis, 8 (7.8%) were M africanum. Conclusion We identified possible opportunities for intervention to limit the spread of tuberculosis. We recommend that the Nigeria tuberculosis control program consider some of these factors as a way to mitigate the spread of tuberculosis in Nigeria. PMID:25328624

  7. Pre-Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Strain Associated with Disseminated Tuberculosis in a Pet Dog

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, João; Canto, Ana; Albuquerque, Teresa; Leal, Nuno; Macedo, Rita; Portugal, Isabel; Cunha, Mónica V.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to isoniazid, ethambutol, and streptomycin was detected in a Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, belonging to the Beijing family lineage, isolated from two nodule exudates of a Yorkshire terrier with generalized tuberculosis. This report alerts medical practitioners to the risk of dissemination of pre-multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (preMDR-TB) through exposure to M. tuberculosis-shedding pets. PMID:24153119

  8. Pre-multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strain associated with disseminated tuberculosis in a pet dog.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Ana; Perdigão, João; Canto, Ana; Albuquerque, Teresa; Leal, Nuno; Macedo, Rita; Portugal, Isabel; Cunha, Mónica V

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to isoniazid, ethambutol, and streptomycin was detected in a Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, belonging to the Beijing family lineage, isolated from two nodule exudates of a Yorkshire terrier with generalized tuberculosis. This report alerts medical practitioners to the risk of dissemination of pre-multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (preMDR-TB) through exposure to M. tuberculosis-shedding pets. PMID:24153119

  9. Asymmetric cell division in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its unique features.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Srinivasan; Nagaraja, Mukkayyan; Sebastian, Jees; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2014-03-01

    Recently, several reports showed that about 80 % of mid-log phase Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium marinum, and Mycobacterium bovis BCG cells divide symmetrically with 5-10 % deviation in the septum position from the median. However, the mode of cell division of the pathogenic mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, remained unclear. Therefore, in the present study, using electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy of septum- and nucleoid-stained live and fixed cells, and live cell time-lapse imaging, we show the occurrence of asymmetric cell division with unusually deviated septum/constriction in 20 % of the 15 % septating M. tuberculosis cells in the mid-log phase population. The remaining 80 % of the 15 % septating cells divided symmetrically but with 2-5 % deviation in the septum/constriction position, as reported for M. smegmatis, M. marinum, and M. bovis BCG cells. Both the long and the short portions of the asymmetrically dividing M. tuberculosis cells with unusually deviated septum contained nucleoids, thereby generating viable short and long cells from each asymmetric division. M. tuberculosis short cells were acid fast positive and, like the long cells, further readily underwent growth and division to generate micro-colony, thereby showing that they were neither mini cells, spores nor dormant forms of mycobacteria. The freshly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients' sputum samples, which are known for the prevalence of oxidative stress conditions, also contained short cells at the same proportion as that in the mid-log phase population. The probable physiological significance of the generation of the short cells through unusually deviated asymmetric cell division is discussed. PMID:24481536

  10. Shell remains lone East Coast explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, R.

    1984-07-20

    Shell remains the only active operator off the US East Coast, and there are no signs of any stampede to join them. Drilling results off the New Jersey coast are given along with other prospects by major companies. The boundary dispute for petroleum and fishing rights between Canada and the US is also discussed.

  11. Odor analysis of decomposing buried human remains

    SciTech Connect

    Vass, Arpad Alexander; Smith, Rob R; Thompson, Cyril V; Burnett, Michael N; Dulgerian, Nishan; Eckenrode, Brian A

    2008-01-01

    This study, conducted at the University of Tennessee's Anthropological Research Facility (ARF), lists and ranks the primary chemical constituents which define the odor of decomposition of human remains as detected at the soil surface of shallow burial sites. Triple sorbent traps were used to collect air samples in the field and revealed eight major classes of chemicals which now contain 478 specific volatile compounds associated with burial decomposition. Samples were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and were collected below and above the body, and at the soil surface of 1.5-3.5 ft. (0.46-1.07 m) deep burial sites of four individuals over a 4-year time span. New data were incorporated into the previously established Decompositional Odor Analysis (DOA) Database providing identification, chemical trends, and semi-quantitation of chemicals for evaluation. This research identifies the 'odor signatures' unique to the decomposition of buried human remains with projected ramifications on human remains detection canine training procedures and in the development of field portable analytical instruments which can be used to locate human remains in shallow burial sites.

  12. Catholic Identity Remains a Public Relations Asset

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, Eileen

    2004-01-01

    The massive sex scandal that rocked the Roman Catholic Church raises a question as to whether Catholic identity remains an asset that the nation's 8,000 Catholic schools should continue to promote. This case study found that continuing to promote Catholic identity has had no adverse effect on recruitment and enrollment at four Omaha, Nebraska,…

  13. Predicting the remaining service life of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, J.F.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear power plants are providing, currently, about 17 percent of the U.S. electricity and many of these plants are approaching their licensed life of 40 years. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Laboratory are carrying out a program to develop a methodology for assessing the remaining safe-life of the concrete components and structures in nuclear power plants. This program has the overall objective of identifying potential structural safety issues, as well as acceptance criteria, for use in evaluations of nuclear power plants for continued service. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is contributing to this program by identifying and analyzing methods for predicting the remaining life of in-service concrete materials. This report examines the basis for predicting the remaining service lives of concrete materials of nuclear power facilities. Methods for predicting the service life of new and in-service concrete materials are analyzed. These methods include (1) estimates based on experience, (2) comparison of performance, (3) accelerated testing, (4) stochastic methods, and (5) mathematical modeling. New approaches for predicting the remaining service lives of concrete materials are proposed and recommendations for their further development given. Degradation processes are discussed based on considerations of their mechanisms, likelihood of occurrence, manifestations, and detection. They include corrosion, sulfate attack, alkali-aggregate reactions, frost attack, leaching, radiation, salt crystallization, and microbiological attack.

  14. Essential Qualities of Math Teaching Remain Unknown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2008-01-01

    According to a new federal report, the qualities of an effective mathematics teacher remain frustratingly elusive. The report of the National Mathematics Advisory Panel does not show what college math content and coursework are most essential for teachers. While the report offered numerous conclusions about math curriculum, cognition, and…

  15. A mobile health approach to tuberculosis contact tracing in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Ha, Yoonhee P; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Antwi, Cynthia; Seropola, Gorewang; Green, Rebecca S; Tesfalul, Martha A; Ho-Foster, Ari; Luberti, Anthony A; Holmes, John H; Steenhoff, Andrew P; Kovarik, Carrie L

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In 2011, there were 8.7 million new cases and 1.4 million deaths from the disease, with >95% of these deaths taking place in low- and middle-income countries [1]. Contact tracing prevents the spread of tuberculosis by identifying and screening a case's contacts and referring symptomatic individuals to health care providers. Traditionally, contact tracing has been conducted with paper forms, which can lead to considerable inefficiencies in data collection, storage, and retrieval. These inefficiencies are problematic as tuberculosis can continue to spread if disruption of disease transmission is delayed. Mobile health approaches to tuberculosis contact tracing remain largely unaddressed and limited to management and monitoring of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis [2].To address these limitations, a mobile health application that digitizes and automates contact tracing was developed. This poster presents work currently underway to evaluate this new approach in Botswana, which has the tenth highest incidence rate of tuberculosis in the world [3]. Operational considerations for implementing a mobile health approach to contact tracing in resource-limited settings are also presented. PMID:23920962

  16. Orchestration of pulmonary T cell immunity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: immunity interruptus

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Samuel M.; Carpenter, Stephen M.; Booty, Matthew G.; Barber, Daniel L.; Jayaraman, Pushpa

    2014-01-01

    Despite the introduction almost a century ago of Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG), an attenuated form of M. bovis that is used as a vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis remains a global health threat and kills more than 1.5 million people each year. This is mostly because BCG fails to prevent pulmonary disease – the contagious form of tuberculosis. Although there have been significant advances in understanding how the immune system responds to infection, the qualities that define protective immunity against M. tuberculosis remain poorly characterized. The ability to predict who will maintain control over the infection and who will succumb to clinical disease would revolutionize our approach to surveillance, control, and treatment. Here we review the current understanding of pulmonary T cell responses following M. tuberculosis infection. While infection elicits a strong immune response that contains infection, M. tuberculosis evades eradication. Traditionally, its intracellular lifestyle and alteration of macrophage function are viewed as the dominant mechanisms of evasion. Now we appreciate that chronic inflammation leads to T cell dysfunction. While this may arise as the host balances the goals of bacterial sterilization and avoidance of tissue damage, it is becoming clear that T cell dysfunction impairs host resistance. Defining the mechanisms that lead to T cell dysfunction is crucial as memory T cell responses are likely to be subject to the same subject to the same pressures. Thus, success of T cell based vaccines is predicated on memory T cells avoiding exhaustion while at the same time not promoting overt tissue damage. PMID:25311810

  17. Towards host-directed therapies for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus; Chakaya, Jeremiah; Hoelscher, Michael; Ntoumi, Francine; Rustomjee, Roxana; Vilaplana, Cristina; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Rasolof, Voahangy; Munderi, Paula; Singh, Nalini; Aklillu, Eleni; Padayatchi, Nesri; Macete, Eusebio; Kapata, Nathan; Mulenga, Modest; Kibiki, Gibson; Mfinanga, Sayoki; Nyirenda, Thomas; Maboko, Leonard; Garcia-Basteiro, Alberto; Rakotosamimanana, Niaina; Bates, Matthew; Mwaba, Peter; Reither, Klaus; Gagneux, Sebastien; Edwards, Sarah; Mfinanga, Elirehema; Abdulla, Salim; Cardona, Pere-Joan; Russell, James B W; Gant, Vanya; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Elkington, Paul; Bonnet, Maryline; Menendez, Clara; Dieye, Tandakha N; Diarra, Bassirou; Maiga, Almoustapha; Aseffa, Abraham; Parida, Shreemanta; Wejse, Christian; Petersen, Eskild; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Oliver, Matt; Craig, Gill; Corrah, Tumena; Tientcheu, Leopold; Antonio, Martin; Rao, Martin; McHugh, Timothy D; Sheikh, Aziz; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Ramjee, Gita; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Churchyard, Gavin; Steyn, Andrie; Grobusch, Martin; Sanne, Ian; Martinson, Neil; Madansein, Rajhmun; Wilkinson, Robert J; Mayosi, Bongani; Schito, Marco; Wallis, Robert S

    2015-08-01

    The treatment of tuberculosis is based on combinations of drugs that directly target Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A new global initiative is now focusing on a complementary approach of developing adjunct host-directed therapies. PMID:26184493

  18. 13C-Flux Spectral Analysis of Host-Pathogen Metabolism Reveals a Mixed Diet for Intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Beste, Dany J.V.; Nöh, Katharina; Niedenführ, Sebastian; Mendum, Tom A.; Hawkins, Nathaniel D.; Ward, Jane L.; Beale, Michael H.; Wiechert, Wolfgang; McFadden, Johnjoe

    2013-01-01

    Summary Whereas intracellular carbon metabolism has emerged as an attractive drug target, the carbon sources of intracellularly replicating pathogens, such as the tuberculosis bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which causes long-term infections in one-third of the world’s population, remain mostly unknown. We used a systems-based approach—13C-flux spectral analysis (FSA) complemented with manual analysis—to measure the metabolic interaction between M. tuberculosis and its macrophage host cell. 13C-FSA analysis of experimental data showed that M. tuberculosis obtains a mixture of amino acids, C1 and C2 substrates from its host cell. We experimentally confirmed that the C1 substrate was derived from CO2. 13C labeling experiments performed on a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mutant revealed that intracellular M. tuberculosis has access to glycolytic C3 substrates. These findings provide constraints for developing novel chemotherapeutics. PMID:23911587

  19. Utility of MPT64 Antigen Detection for Rapid Confirmation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Jyoti; Kumar, Gavish; Verma, Ajoy Kumar; Bhalla, Manpreet; Sarin, Rohit; Myneedu, Vithal Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rapid differentiation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and mycobacteria other than tuberculosis (MOTT) is crucial to facilitate early and effective treatment of the patients. Clinical presentation of MTBC and MOTT is not always very clear and routine conventional methods are time consuming. Materials and Methods: In the present study, the MPT64 protein detection-based immunochomatographic test (SD Bioline Kit, Standard Diagnostics, Inc., Korea) was compared with the conventional biochemical method. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive, and negative predictive values of the SD AgMPT64 kit were found to be 100, 96.4, 98.72, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results have demonstrated that the SD bioline kit is a rapid, reliable method and it can be used in the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program (RNTCP) of India, for the appropriate management of tuberculosis. PMID:26069425

  20. Primary oral tuberculosis in a patient with lepromatous leprosy: Diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Vithiya; Mandal, Jharna

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is the most common form of TB. Primary infection can also affect the pharynx, cervical lymph node, intestine, or oral mucosa. Historically, the observed incidence of concomitant infection with leprosy and TB is high. However, reports of concomitant infection in modern literature remain scarce. Most cases reported in the literature had borderline/lepromatous leprosy and pulmonary tuberculosis. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis is reported in only 3.2% of leprosy cases. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of primary oral tuberculosis of the tongue in a patient with lepromatous leprosy with Type 2 lepra reaction. The patient was referred to Directly Observed Treatment, Short-Course clinic and started on Category I treatment. She received oral prednisolone for lepra reaction, which was subsequently tapered and stopped, however, she continued to receive other antileprotic drugs (thalidomide and clofazimine). The patient's general condition improved and she is on regular follow up. PMID:26927999

  1. Triple valve endocarditis by mycobacterium tuberculosis. A case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Granulomas caused by Mycobacterium Tuberculosis have been observed at autopsy in the heart, pre-dominantly in the myocardium and endocardium, but rarely involving the coronary vessels and valvular structures. Mycobacterium tuberculosis valvular endocarditis is extremely rare, with most reports coming from autopsy series. Case presentation We report the case of a 17 year old immunocompetent girl who presented with history of fever, malaise, foot gangrene and a left sided hemiparesis. On investigation she was found to have infective endocarditis involving the aortic, mitral and tricuspid valves. She had developed a right middle cerebral artery stroke. She underwent dual valve replacement and tricuspid repair. The vegetations showed granulomatous inflammation but blood cultures and other biological specimen cultures were negative for any organisms. She was started on antituberculous treatment and anticoagulation. Conclusion This is the first reported case of triple valve endocarditis by Mycobacterium Tuberculosis in an immunocompetent host. Especially important is the fact that the right heart is involved which has been historically described in the setting of intravenous drug abuse. This implies that Tuberculosis should be considered in cases of culture negative endocarditis in endemic areas like Pakistan even in immunocompetent hosts. PMID:23013220

  2. Native New Zealand plants with inhibitory activity towards Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plants have long been investigated as a source of antibiotics and other bioactives for the treatment of human disease. New Zealand contains a diverse and unique flora, however, few of its endemic plants have been used to treat tuberculosis. One plant, Laurelia novae-zelandiae, was reportedly used by indigenous Maori for the treatment of tubercular lesions. Methods Laurelia novae-zelandiae and 44 other native plants were tested for direct anti-bacterial activity. Plants were extracted with different solvents and extracts screened for inhibition of the surrogate species, Mycobacterium smegmatis. Active plant samples were then tested for bacteriostatic activity towards M. tuberculosis and other clinically-important species. Results Extracts of six native plants were active against M. smegmatis. Many of these were also inhibitory towards M. tuberculosis including Laurelia novae-zelandiae (Pukatea). M. excelsa (Pohutukawa) was the only plant extract tested that was active against Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusions Our data provide support for the traditional use of Pukatea in treating tuberculosis. In addition, our analyses indicate that other native plant species possess antibiotic activity. PMID:20537175

  3. Forecasting Tuberculosis Incidence in Iran Using Box-Jenkins Models

    PubMed Central

    Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Nasehi, Mahshid; Bahrampour, Abbas; Khanjani, Narges; Sharafi, Saeed; Ahmadi, Shanaz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Predicting the incidence of tuberculosis (TB) plays an important role in planning health control strategies for the future, developing intervention programs and allocating resources. Objectives: The present longitudinal study estimated the incidence of tuberculosis in 2014 using Box-Jenkins methods. Materials and Methods: Monthly data of tuberculosis cases recorded in the surveillance system of Iran tuberculosis control program from 2005 till 2011 was used. Data was reviewed regarding normality, variance equality and stationary conditions. The parameters p, d and q and P, D and Q were determined, and different models were examined. Based on the lowest levels of AIC and BIC, the most suitable model was selected among the models whose overall adequacy was confirmed. Results: During 84 months, 63568 TB patients were recorded. The average was 756.8 (SD = 11.9) TB cases a month. SARIMA (0,1,1)(0,1,1)12 with the lowest level of AIC (12.78) was selected as the most adequate model for prediction. It was predicted that the total nationwide TB cases for 2014 will be about 16.75 per 100,000 people. Conclusions: Regarding the cyclic pattern of TB recorded cases, Box-Jenkins and SARIMA models are suitable for predicting its prevalence in future. Moreover, prediction results show an increasing trend of TB cases in Iran. PMID:25031852

  4. Biochemical and physiological characterization of the GTP-binding protein Obg of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Obg is a highly conserved GTP-binding protein that has homologues in bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. In bacteria, Obg proteins are essential for growth, and they participate in spore formation, stress adaptation, ribosome assembly and chromosomal partitioning. This study was undertaken to investigate the biochemical and physiological characteristics of Obg in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which causes tuberculosis in humans. Results We overexpressed M. tuberculosis Obg in Escherichia coli and then purified the protein. This protein binds to, hydrolyzes and is phosphorylated with GTP. An anti-Obg antiserum, raised against the purified Obg, detects a 55 kDa protein in immunoblots of M. tuberculosis extracts. Immunoblotting also discloses that cultured M. tuberculosis cells contain increased amounts of Obg in the late log phase and in the stationary phase. Obg is also associated with ribosomes in M. tuberculosis, and it is distributed to all three ribosomal fractions (30 S, 50 S and 70 S). Finally, yeast two-hybrid analysis reveals that Obg interacts with the stress protein UsfX, indicating that M. tuberculosis Obg, like other bacterial Obgs, is a stress related protein. Conclusions Although its GTP-hydrolyzing and phosphorylating activities resemble those of other bacterial Obg homologues, M. tuberculosis Obg differs from them in these respects: (a) preferential association with the bacterial membrane; (b) association with all three ribosomal subunits, and (c) binding to the stress protein UsfX, rather than to RelA. Generation of mutant alleles of Obg of M. tuberculosis, and their characterization in vivo, may provide additional insights regarding its role in this important human pathogen. PMID:21352546

  5. Tuberculosis Incidence Correlates with Sunshine: An Ecological 28-Year Time Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Gavin C. K. W.; Hawthorne, Gemma; Turner, Alice M.; Kunst, Heinke; Dedicoat, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background Birmingham is the largest UK city after London, and central Birmingham has an annual tuberculosis incidence of 80 per 100,000. We examined seasonality and sunlight as drivers of tuberculosis incidence. Hours of sunshine are seasonal, sunshine exposure is necessary for the production of vitamin D by the body and vitamin D plays a role in the host response to tuberculosis. Methods We performed an ecological study that examined tuberculosis incidence in Birmingham from Dec 1981 to Nov 2009, using publicly-available data from statutory tuberculosis notifications, and related this to the seasons and hours of sunshine (UK Meteorological Office data) using unmeasured component models. Results There were 9,739 tuberculosis cases over the study period. There was strong evidence for seasonality, with notifications being 24.1% higher in summer than winter (p<0.001). Winter dips in sunshine correlated with peaks in tuberculosis incidence six months later (4.7% increase in incidence for each 100 hours decrease in sunshine, p<0.001). Discussion and Conclusion A potential mechanism for these associations includes decreased vitamin D levels with consequent impaired host defence arising from reduced sunshine exposure in winter. This is the longest time series of any published study and our use of statutory notifications means this data is essentially complete. We cannot, however, exclude the possibility that another factor closely correlated with the seasons, other than sunshine, is responsible. Furthermore, exposure to sunlight depends not only on total hours of sunshine but also on multiple individual factors. Our results should therefore be considered hypothesis-generating. Confirmation of a potential causal relationship between winter vitamin D deficiency and summer peaks in tuberculosis incidence would require a randomized-controlled trial of the effect of vitamin D supplementation on future tuberculosis incidence. PMID:23483924

  6. Rapid Reagentless Detection of M. tuberculosis H37Ra in Respiratory Effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, K L; Steele, P T; Bogan, M J; Sadler, N M; Martin, S; Martin, A N; Frank, M

    2008-01-29

    Two similar mycobacteria, Mycobacteria tuberculosis H37Ra and Mycobacteria smegmatis are rapidly detected and identified within samples containing a complex background of respiratory effluents using Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS). M. tuberculosis H37Ra (TBa), an avirulent strain, is used as a surrogate for virulent tuberculosis (TBv); M. smegmatis (MSm) is utilized as a near neighbor confounder for TBa. Bovine lung surfactant and human exhaled breath condensate are used as first-order surrogates for infected human lung expirations from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. This simulated background sputum is mixed with TBa or MSm and nebulized to produce conglomerate aerosol particles, single particles that contain a bacterium embedded within a background respiratory matrix. Mass spectra of single conglomerate particles exhibit ions associated with both respiratory effluents and mycobacteria. Spectral features distinguishing TBa from MSm in pure and conglomerate particles are shown. SPAMS pattern matching alarm algorithms are able to distinguish TBa containing particles from background matrix and MSm for >50% of the test particles, which is sufficient to enable a high probability of detection and a low false alarm rate if an adequate number of such particles are present. These results indicate the potential usefulness of SPAMS for rapid, reagentless tuberculosis screening.

  7. Towards a new tuberculosis drug: pyridomycin – nature's isoniazid

    PubMed Central

    Hartkoorn, Ruben C; Sala, Claudia; Neres, João; Pojer, Florence; Magnet, Sophie; Mukherjee, Raju; Uplekar, Swapna; Boy-Röttger, Stefanie; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Cole, Stewart T

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis, a global threat to public health, is becoming untreatable due to widespread drug resistance to frontline drugs such as the InhA-inhibitor isoniazid. Historically, by inhibiting highly vulnerable targets, natural products have been an important source of antibiotics including potent anti-tuberculosis agents. Here, we describe pyridomycin, a compound produced by Dactylosporangium fulvum with specific cidal activity against mycobacteria. By selecting pyridomycin-resistant mutants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, whole-genome sequencing and genetic validation, we identified the NADH-dependent enoyl- (Acyl-Carrier-Protein) reductase InhA as the principal target and demonstrate that pyridomycin inhibits mycolic acid synthesis in M. tuberculosis. Furthermore, biochemical and structural studies show that pyridomycin inhibits InhA directly as a competitive inhibitor of the NADH-binding site, thereby identifying a new, druggable pocket in InhA. Importantly, the most frequently encountered isoniazid-resistant clinical isolates remain fully susceptible to pyridomycin, thus opening new avenues for drug development. PMID:22987724

  8. Understanding Rifampicin Resistance in Tuberculosis through a Computational Approach.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satish; Jena, Lingaraja

    2014-12-01

    The disease tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. The evolution of drug-resistant tuberculosis causes a foremost threat to global health. Most drug-resistant MTB clinical strains are showing resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin (RIF), the frontline anti-tuberculosis drugs. Mutation in rpoB, the beta subunit of DNA-directed RNA polymerase of MTB, is reported to be a major cause of RIF resistance. Amongst mutations in the well-defined 81-base-pair central region of the rpoB gene, mutation at codon 450 (S450L) and 445 (H445Y) is mainly associated with RIF resistance. In this study, we modeled two resistant mutants of rpoB (S450L and H445Y) using Modeller9v10 and performed a docking analysis with RIF using AutoDock4.2 and compared the docking results of these mutants with the wild-type rpoB. The docking results revealed that RIF more effectively inhibited the wild-type rpoB with low binding energy than rpoB mutants. The rpoB mutants interacted with RIF with positive binding energy, revealing the incapableness of RIF inhibition and thus showing resistance. Subsequently, this was verified by molecular dynamics simulations. This in silico evidence may help us understand RIF resistance in rpoB mutant strains. PMID:25705170

  9. Enhanced Specialized Transduction Using Recombineering in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tufariello, JoAnn M.; Malek, Adel A.; Vilchèze, Catherine; Cole, Laura E.; Ratner, Hannah K.; González, Pablo A.; Jain, Paras; Hatfull, Graham F.; Larsen, Michelle H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genetic engineering has contributed greatly to our understanding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis biology and has facilitated antimycobacterial and vaccine development. However, methods to generate M. tuberculosis deletion mutants remain labor-intensive and relatively inefficient. Here, methods are described that significantly enhance the efficiency (greater than 100-fold) of recovering deletion mutants by the expression of mycobacteriophage recombineering functions during the course of infection with specialized transducing phages delivering allelic exchange substrates. This system has been successfully applied to the CDC1551 strain of M. tuberculosis, as well as to a ΔrecD mutant generated in the CDC1551 parental strain. The latter studies were undertaken as there were precedents in both the Escherichia coli literature and mycobacterial literature for enhancement of homologous recombination in strains lacking RecD. In combination, these measures yielded a dramatic increase in the recovery of deletion mutants and are expected to facilitate construction of a comprehensive library of mutants with every nonessential gene of M. tuberculosis deleted. The findings also open up the potential for sophisticated genetic screens, such as synthetic lethal analyses, which have so far not been feasible for the slow-growing mycobacteria. PMID:24865558

  10. Bovine tuberculosis in Canadian wildlife: An updated history

    PubMed Central

    Wobeser, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis infection in wild animals attracted little attention in Canada until the disease was almost eliminated from domestic livestock. Tuberculosis was endemic in plains bison and occurred in elk, moose, and mule deer in Buffalo National Park (BNP), Alberta during the 1920s and 1930s. Bison were moved from BNP to Wood Buffalo National Park (WBNP), where tuberculosis became, and remains, endemic in bison, posing a risk to efforts to restore bison in northern Canada. Tuberculosis was found in a white-tailed deer in Ontario in 1959, and in an infected elk near Riding Mountain National Park (RMNP), Manitoba in 1992. Intense surveillance has resulted in detection of 40 elk, 8 white-tailed deer, and 7 cattle herds infected between 1997 and 2008 in the RMNP area. The strains of M. bovis in the RMNP area are different from strains tested from cattle and bison elsewhere in Canada. Management of tuberculosis in cattle and wild animals is challenging because of uncertainty about the ecology of the disease in various species, difficulty in obtaining samples and population data from wildlife, lack of validated tests, overlapping jurisdictions and authority, and conflicting values and opinions among stakeholders. PMID:20119541

  11. [Tuberculosis in 2015: From diagnosis to the detection of multiresistant cases].

    PubMed

    Hervé, C; Bergot, E; Veziris, N; Blanc, F-X

    2015-10-01

    Incidence of pulmonary tuberculosis, a contagious infectious disease, decreases in France with 4934 reported cases in 2013. Tuberculosis remains a global health problem as smear is positive in only 50% cases and culture methods require time. In such a context, genotypic diagnostic tools such as Xpert® MTB/RIF gained interest. This rapid and simple-to-use nucleic acid amplification test allows a diagnosis in two hours and prevents further invasive investigations in pulmonary and mediastinal tuberculosis. Because of its low sensitivity, it cannot be used in pleural fluid. Indirect immunologic tests are of no use to diagnose active tuberculosis disease. Another current area of interest is the emergence of resistant tuberculosis. In France, approximately 100 cases of multidrug resistant tuberculosis and a few extensively drug resistant tuberculosis have been reported in 2014. Even though these forms of tuberculosis are imported, it is crucial to identify hazardous situations and to optimize care of these patients. Xpert® MTB/RIF is again of marked interest here as it detects rifampin resistance with a 95% sensitivity and a 98% specificity. Interpretation of genotypic tests such as Genotype® MTBDR or Xpert® MTB/RIF depends on known detected mutations, although they do not always have a clinical or phenotypic expression. In multidrug resistant tuberculosis, the new drug bedaquiline obtained approval for temporarily use in combination with other molecules when there is no other treatment option. Results of bedaquiline are encouraging but adverse events like QT prolongation or the development of new specific drug resistance should convince clinicians to use it with caution. PMID:26169235

  12. Explosives remain preferred methods for platform abandonment

    SciTech Connect

    Pulsipher, A.; Daniel, W. IV; Kiesler, J.E.; Mackey, V. III

    1996-05-06

    Economics and safety concerns indicate that methods involving explosives remain the most practical and cost-effective means for abandoning oil and gas structures in the Gulf of Mexico. A decade has passed since 51 dead sea turtles, many endangered Kemp`s Ridleys, washed ashore on the Texas coast shortly after explosives helped remove several offshore platforms. Although no relationship between the explosions and the dead turtles was ever established, in response to widespread public concern, the US Minerals Management Service (MMS) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) implemented regulations limiting the size and timing of explosive charges. Also, more importantly, they required that operators pay for observers to survey waters surrounding platforms scheduled for removal for 48 hr before any detonations. If observers spot sea turtles or marine mammals within the danger zone, the platform abandonment is delayed until the turtles leave or are removed. However, concern about the effects of explosives on marine life remains.

  13. The cell envelope glycoconjugates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Angala, Shiva Kumar; Belardinelli, Juan Manuel; Huc-Claustre, Emilie; Wheat, William H.; Jackson, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the second most common cause of death due to a single infectious agent. The cell envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of the disease in humans, is a source of unique glycoconjugates and the most distinctive feature of the biology of this organism. It is the basis of much of Mtb pathogenesis and one of the major causes of its intrinsic resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. At the same time, the unique structures of Mtb cell envelope glycoconjugates, their antigenicity and essentiality for mycobacterial growth provide opportunities for drug, vaccine, diagnostic and biomarker development, as clearly illustrated by recent advances in all of these translational aspects. This review focuses on our current understanding of the structure and biogenesis of Mtb glycoconjugates with particular emphasis on one of most intriguing and least understood aspect of the physiology of mycobacteria: the translocation of these complex macromolecules across the different layers of the cell envelope. It further reviews the rather impressive progress made in the last ten years in the discovery and development of novel inhibitors targeting their biogenesis. PMID:24915502

  14. Human tuberculosis predates domestication in ancient Syria.

    PubMed

    Baker, Oussama; Lee, Oona Y-C; Wu, Houdini H T; Besra, Gurdyal S; Minnikin, David E; Llewellyn, Gareth; Williams, Christopher M; Maixner, Frank; O'Sullivan, Niall; Zink, Albert; Chamel, Bérénice; Khawam, Rima; Coqueugniot, Eric; Helmer, Daniel; Le Mort, Françoise; Perrin, Pascale; Gourichon, Lionel; Dutailly, Bruno; Pálfi, György; Coqueugniot, Hélène; Dutour, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    The question of pre-neolithic tuberculosis is still open in paleopathological perspective. One of the major interests is to explore what type of infection could have existed around the early stage of animal domestication. Paleopathological lesions evoking skeletal TB were observed on five human skeletons coming from two PPNB sites in Syria, which belongs to the geographical cradle of agriculture. These sites represent respectively pre-domestication phase (Dja'de el Mughara, Northern Syria, 8800-8300 BCE cal.) and early domestication phase (Tell Aswad, Southern Syria, 8200-7600 BCE cal.). MicroCT scan analyses were performed on two specimens (one per site) and revealed microscopic changes in favor of TB infection. Detection of lipid biomarkers is positive for two specimens (one per site). Initial molecular analysis further indicates the presence of TB in one individual from Dja'de. Interestingly, no morphological evidence of TB was observed on animal remains of wild and newly domesticated species, discovered in these sites. These observations strongly suggest the presence of human tuberculosis before domestication and at its early stages. PMID:25819157

  15. Macrophages in Tuberculosis: Friend or Foe

    PubMed Central

    Guirado, Evelyn; Schlesinger, Larry S.; Kaplan, Gilla

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the greatest threats to human health. The causative bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is acquired by the respiratory route. It is exquisitely human-adapted and a prototypic intracellular pathogen of macrophages, with alveolar macrophages (AMs) being the primary conduit of infection and disease. The outcome of primary infection is most often a latently infected healthy human host, in whom the bacteria are held in check by the host immune response. Such individuals can develop active TB later in life with impairment in the immune system. In contrast, in a minority of infected individuals, the host immune response fails to control the growth of bacilli, and progressive granulomatous disease develops, facilitating spread of the bacilli via infectious aerosols coughed out into the environment and inhaled by new hosts. The molecular details of the Mtb-macrophage interaction continue to be elucidated. However, it is clear that a number of complex processes are involved at the different stages of infection that may benefit either the bacterium or the host. Macrophages demonstrate tremendous phenotypic heterogeneity and functional plasticity which, depending on the site and stage of infection, facilitate the diverse outcomes. Moreover, host responses vary depending on the specific characteristics of the infecting Mtb strain. In this chapter, we describe a contemporary view of the behavior of AMs and their interaction with various Mtb strains in generating unique immunologic lung specific responses. PMID:23864058

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yeon

    2015-04-01

    Extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) constitutes about 20% of all cases of tuberculosis (TB) in Korea. Diagnosing EPTB remains challenging because clinical samples obtained from relatively inaccessible sites may be paucibacillary, thus decreasing the sensitivity of diagnostic tests. Whenever practical, every effort should be made to obtain appropriate specimens for both mycobacteriologic and histopathologic examinations. The measurement of biochemical markers in TB-affected serosal fluids (adenosine deaminase or gamma interferon) and molecular biology techniques such as polymerase chain reaction may be useful adjuncts in the diagnosis of EPTB. Although the disease usually responds to standard anti-TB drug therapy, the ideal regimen and duration of treatment have not yet been established. A paradoxical response frequently occurs during anti-TB therapy. It should be distinguished from other causes of clinical deterioration. Surgery is required mainly to obtain valid diagnostic specimens and to manage complications. Because smear microscopy or culture is not available to monitor patients with EPTB, clinical monitoring is the usual way to assess the response to treatment. PMID:25861336

  17. Will tuberculosis become resistant to all antibiotics?

    PubMed

    Dye, C; Espinal, M A

    2001-01-01

    The discovery of high prevalences of antibiotic resistance in some pathogens, in some parts of the world, has provoked fears of a widespread loss of drug efficacy. Here, we use a mathematical model to investigate the evolution of resistance to four major anti-tuberculosis drugs (isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and streptomycin) in 47 sites around the world. The model provides a new method of estimating the relative risk of treatment failure for patients carrying drug-resistant strains and the proportion of patients who develop resistance after failing treatment. Using estimates of these two quantities together with other published data, we reconstructed the epidemic spread of isoniazid resistance over the past 50 years. The predicted median prevalence of resistance among new cases today was 7.0% (range 0.9-64.3%), close to the 6.3% (range 0-28.1%) observed. Predicted and observed prevalences of resistance to isoniazid plus rifampicin (multidrug-resistant or MDR-TB) after 30 years of combined drug use were also similar, 0.9% (0.1-5.9%) and 1.0% (range 0-14.1%), respectively. With current data, and under prevailing treatment practices, it appears that MDR-TB will remain a localized problem, rather than becoming a global obstacle to tuberculosis control. To substantiate this result, further measurements are needed of the relative fitness of drug-resistant strains. PMID:12123297

  18. Imaging features of extraaxial musculoskeletal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Vanhoenacker, Filip M; Sanghvi, Darshana A; De Backer, Adelard I

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a public health problem in both developing and industrialized countries. TB can involve pulmonary as well as extrapulmonary sites. The musculoskeletal system is involved in 1–3% of patients with tuberculosis. Although musculoskeletal TB has become uncommon in the Western world, it remains a huge problem in Asia, Africa, and many developing countries. Tuberculous spondylitis is the most common form of musculoskeletal TB and accounts for approximately 50% of cases. Extraspinal musculoskeletal TB shows a predilection for large joints (hip and knee) and para-articular areas; isolated soft tissue TB is extremely rare. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment are mandatory to prevent serious destruction of joints and skeletal deformity. However, due to the nonspecific and often indolent clinical presentation, the diagnosis may be delayed. Radiological assessment is often the first step in the diagnostic workup of patients with musculoskeletal TB and further investigations are decided by the findings on radiography. Both the radiologist and the clinician should be aware of the possibility of this diagnosis. In this manuscript we review the imaging features of extraspinal bone, joint, and soft tissue TB. PMID:19881081

  19. [Professional confidentiality: speak out or remain silent? ].

    PubMed

    Daubigney, Jean-claude

    2014-01-01

    People who work with children, in their daily tasks, must choose whether to disclose information entrusted to them. However, they are subject to the law, which authorises or imposes speaking out or remaining silent. In terms of ethics, they can seek the best possible response while respecting professional secrecy when meeting an individual, in a situation, in a place or at a particular time. They must then take responsibility for that decision. PMID:25518248

  20. Direct Dating of Hominids Remains In Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Y.; Falguères, C.

    When archaeological sites are associated with human remains, it is relevant to be able to date those valuable remains for different reasons. The main one is that it avoids the stratigraphical problems which can be due to intrusive burials in the sequence. The other reason consists in the fact that human bones may be encountered out of established stratigraphical context. On the other hand, the majority of dating methods currently used are destructive and can not be applied on these precious samples particularly when they are older than 40,000 years and can not be dated by radiocarbon. Since several years, we have developped a completely non-destructive method which consists in the measurement of human remains using the gamma -ray spectrometry. This technique has been used recently by other laboratories. We present here two important cases for the knowledge of human evolution in Eurasia. The first example is Qafzeh site in Israel where many human skeletons have been unearthed from burials associated with fauna and lithic artefacts. This site has been dated by several independent radiometric methods. So, it was possible to compare our gamma results with the other results yielded by the different methods. The second case concerns the most evolved Homo erectus found in Java, Indonesia, at Ngandong site, close to the Solo river. A recent debate has been focused on the age of these fossils and their direct dating is of outmost importance for the knowledge of settlement of Modern Humans in South-East Asia.

  1. An Update on Global Tuberculosis (TB)

    PubMed Central

    Talip, Balkis A.; Sleator, Roy D.; Lowery, Colm J.; Dooley, James S.G.; Snelling, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis globally results in almost 2 million human deaths annually, with 1 in 4 deaths from tuberculosis being human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS)-related. Primarily a pathogen of the respiratory system, aerobic Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) infects the lungs via the inhalation of infected aerosol droplets generated by people with pulmonary disease through coughing. This review focuses on M. tuberculosis transmission, epidemiology, detection methods and technologies. PMID:24847176

  2. Clinical tuberculosis problems and management.

    PubMed

    Amin, Zulkifli

    2006-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic disease caused by M. tuberculosis. WHO (World Health Organization) 1993 has estimated that one third of world population has been infected by M. tuberculosis bacillus. It is also estimated that 8 million people contract the disease annually and two to three million deaths occur every year due to TB. Major factors that have aggravated the spread of TB are: 1) ineffective TB control programs, leading to the development of multi drug resistant bacilli, 2) co infection with HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) where TB progress rapidly and deadly,3) existence of other co-morbid that need higher expert (Internist etc). Vaccination with BCG does not seem to protect the adult population consistently and effectively from developing pulmonary TB, and has had no significant impact on the global TB epidemiology. Tuberculosis in Indonesia results in high death rate because it is the second highest infection with national prevalence rate of 0.24%. Effective medicine standard of anti-tuberculosis is available, but many obstacles in the program from lack of knowledge among health officers, low consciousness and compliances of person with tuberculosis to carry out the treatment schedule and so on make the success of TB eradication unsatisfied. Clinical appearances of TB are multiple with non-specific symptoms, the cases that are exposed to similar source of infection but will show different clinical consequence from mild to severe. Nevertheless, with the rise of multi drug resistance strains of M. tuberculosis, the spread of HIV infection and the variation of BCG efficacy, the search for more powerful drugs, more effective vaccines, better diagnostics and other intervention strategies have become an urgent goal worldwide. Also written here how to diagnose, choose of category of treatment, cocktail anti TB according the category and some clue in handling problems during treatment. PMID:16799215

  3. Rapid diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sarmiento, Jos Mauricio Hernndez; Restrepo, Natalia Builes; Meja, Gloria Isabel; Zapata, Elsa; Restrepo, Mary Alejandra; Robledo, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Introduction World Health Organization had estimated 9.4 million tuberculosis cases on 2009, with 1.7 million of deaths as consequence of treatment and diagnosis failures. Improving diagnostic methods for the rapid and timely detection of tuberculosis patients is critical to control the disease. The aim of this study was evaluating the accuracy of the cord factor detection on the solid medium Middlebrook 7H11 thin layer agar compared to the Lowenstein Jensen medium for the rapid tuberculosis diagnosis. Methods Patients with suspected tuberculosis were enrolled and their sputum samples were processed for direct smear and culture on Lowenstein Jensen and BACTEC MGIT 960, from which positive tubes were subcultured on Middlebrook 7H11 thin layer agar. Statistical analysis was performed comparing culture results from Lowenstein Jensen and the thin layer agar, and their corresponding average times for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The performance of cord factor detection was evaluated determining its sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value. Results 111 out of 260 patients were positive for M. tuberculosis by Lowenstein Jensen medium with an average time standard deviation for its detection of 22.3 8.5 days. 115 patients were positive by the MGIT system identifying the cord factor by the Middlebrook 7H11 thin layer agar which average time standard deviation was 5.5 2.6 days. Conclusion The cord factor detection by Middlebrook 7H11 thin layer agar allows early and accurate tuberculosis diagnosis during an average time of 5 days, making this rapid diagnosis particularly important in patients with negative sputum smear. PMID:25419279

  4. [Abdominal tuberculosis in CT imaging].

    PubMed

    Malíková, H; Míková, B

    2007-01-01

    According to WHO declaration, tuberculosis is considered the world health danger. Almost 1% of world population is infected by tuberculosis every year and up to 3 millions of new cases are registered in the south-east Asia only. Prevalence of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis is rising, which is probably caused by the rising prevalence of AIDS. Fifty eight years old man, the immigrant from south-east Asia was accepted in a subileous state at the department of Internal medicine. He had suffered for longer period from the torpidness, tabescence and other non-specific symptoms. Among results of laboratory tests, the higher erythrocyte sedimentation and elevation of liver tests were conspicuous. After the colonoscopy, suspicion on the Crohn's disease was expressed. CT examination revealed several segments of the infected intestine. Both the small and large intestine were affected with skip-lesions; short afflicted segments had not the passage impaired with no ring-like dilatations. Mesenterial, periportal and retroperitoneal lymph nodes were enlarged. In the small pelvis, between the intestine and at the dorsal margin of the liver, some free fluid was visible. Abdominal parenchymatose organs had no obvious focal afflictions. In the differential diagnose, the Crohn's disease and the malignant lymphoma were considered. The probatory laparoscopy gave the correct diagnosis of the abdominal tuberculosis. Prevalence of tuberculosis is rising in the whole world, and in western countries rare cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis can be found. A higher attention is necessary in cases of immuno-suppressed patients, who earlier lived in countries with endemic tuberculosis, or in cases of patients originating in those countries. PMID:17650598

  5. Paradoxical Tuberculosis Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (TB-IRIS) in HIV Patients with Culture Confirmed Pulmonary Tuberculosis in India and the Potential Role of IL-6 in Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Brian O.; Chandrasekhar, Chockalingam; Venkatesan, Perumal; Menon, Pradeep A.; Subramanian, Sudha; Anbalagan, Selvaraj; Bhavani, Kannabiran P.; Sekar, Sathiyavelu; Padmapriyadarshini, Chandrasekaran; Kumar, Satagopan; Ravichandran, Narayanan; Raja, Krishnaraj; Bhanu, Kesavamurthy; Mahilmaran, Ayyamperumal; Sekar, Lakshmanan; Sher, Alan; Sereti, Irini; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence, manifestations, outcome and clinical predictors of paradoxical TB-IRIS in patients with HIV and culture confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in India have not been studied prospectively. Methods HIV+ patients with culture confirmed PTB started on anti-tuberculosis therapy (ATT) were followed prospectively after anti-retroviral therapy (ART) initiation. Established criteria for IRIS diagnosis were used including decline in plasma HIV RNA at IRIS event. Pre-ART plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between baseline variables and IRIS. Results Of 57 patients enrolled, 48 had complete follow up data. Median ATT-ART interval was 28 days (interquartile range, IQR 14–47). IRIS events occurred in 26 patients (54.2%) at a median of 11 days (IQR: 7–16) after ART initiation. Corticosteroids were required for treatment of most IRIS events that resolved within a median of 13 days (IQR: 9–23). Two patients died due to CNS TB-IRIS. Lower CD4+ T-cell counts, higher plasma HIV RNA levels, lower CD4/CD8 ratio, lower hemoglobin, shorter ATT to ART interval, extra-pulmonary or miliary TB and higher plasma IL-6 and CRP levels at baseline were associated with paradoxical TB-IRIS in the univariate analysis. Shorter ATT to ART interval, lower hemoglobin and higher IL-6 and CRP levels remained significant in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Paradoxical TB–IRIS frequently complicates HIV-TB therapy in India. IL-6 and CRP may assist in predicting IRIS events and serve as potential targets for immune interventions. PMID:23691062

  6. Tuberculosis Facts - TB Can Be Treated

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB Can Be Treated What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination Page 1 of 2 TB Facts: TB ...

  7. 9 CFR 381.81 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 381.81 Section 381.81 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.81 Tuberculosis. Carcasses of poultry affected with tuberculosis shall be condemned....

  8. 38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on...) tuberculosis may receive compensation under 38 U.S.C. 1114(q) and 1156 as in effect before August 20,...

  9. Gene Regulatory Networks Activated during Chronic Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic tuberculosis represents a burden for most of world’s population. Several genes were found to be up-regulated at the late stage of chronic tuberculosis when DNA microarray protocol was used to analyze murine tuberculosis. Rv0348 is a potential transcriptional regulator that is highly expresse...

  10. 9 CFR 311.2 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 311.2 Section 311.2... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.2 Tuberculosis. The... pathogenesis of tuberculosis in swine, cattle, sheep, goats, and equines. (a) Carcasses condemned. The...

  11. 9 CFR 311.2 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 311.2 Section 311.2... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.2 Tuberculosis. The... pathogenesis of tuberculosis in swine, cattle, sheep, goats, and equines. (a) Carcasses condemned. The...

  12. 9 CFR 381.81 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 381.81 Section 381.81 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.81 Tuberculosis. Carcasses of poultry affected with tuberculosis shall be condemned....

  13. 9 CFR 381.81 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 381.81 Section 381.81 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.81 Tuberculosis. Carcasses of poultry affected with tuberculosis shall be condemned....

  14. 9 CFR 381.81 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 381.81 Section 381.81 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.81 Tuberculosis. Carcasses of poultry affected with tuberculosis shall be condemned....

  15. 9 CFR 381.81 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 381.81 Section 381.81 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.81 Tuberculosis. Carcasses of poultry affected with tuberculosis shall be condemned....

  16. 9 CFR 311.2 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 311.2 Section 311.2... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.2 Tuberculosis. The... pathogenesis of tuberculosis in swine, cattle, sheep, goats, and equines. (a) Carcasses condemned. The...

  17. 38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on...) tuberculosis may receive compensation under 38 U.S.C. 1114(q) and 1156 as in effect before August 20,...

  18. 38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on...) tuberculosis may receive compensation under 38 U.S.C. 1114(q) and 1156 as in effect before August 20,...

  19. 38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on...) tuberculosis may receive compensation under 38 U.S.C. 1114(q) and 1156 as in effect before August 20,...

  20. 38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on...) tuberculosis may receive compensation under 38 U.S.C. 1114(q) and 1156 as in effect before August 20,...

  1. Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Lepromatous Leprosy Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Sendrasoa, F. A.; Ranaivo, I. M.; Raharolahy, O.; Andrianarison, M.; Ramarozatovo, L. S.; Rapelanoro Rabenja, F.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous occurrence of leprosy and pulmonary tuberculosis is reported infrequently in the modern era. We report a case of pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosed in patient being treated with glucocorticoids for complications of leprosy (type II reaction). Physicians should recognize that the leprosy patients treated with glucocorticoid may develop tuberculosis. PMID:26504603

  2. Tuberculosis Facts - You Can Prevent TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts You Can Prevent TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one person ... Division of Tuberculosis Elimination TB Facts: You Can Prevent TB What should I do if I have ...

  3. Ins and outs of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPE family in pathogenesis and implications for novel measures against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wanyan; Xie, Jianping

    2012-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the most successful pathogen with multiple mechanisms to subvert host immune response, resulting in insidious disease. A unique Mycobacterium antigen family termed PPE (Pro-Pro-Glu) has long been widely speculated as "molecular mantra" to escape host immunity. Members of this family are characterized by a conserved N terminal and a variable C terminal. This family associated closely with ESAT-6(ESX) secretion system and largely located in cell wall or cell membrane. The expression of PPE protein is temporally regulated, and highly expressed during M. tuberculosis persistence. Importantly, the distribution of PPE family is so far limited to Mycobacterium genus, prevalent among pathogenic Mycobacterium species. It is tempting to explore this family due to its potential in the latency and reactivation of M. tuberculosis. The evolution, structure, and functions of most PPE proteins remain elusive. The understanding of these questions will deepen our appreciation of the pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis and accelerate novel anti-TB measures discovery. PMID:22275049

  4. A Broad Set of Different Llama Antibodies Specific for a 16 kDa Heat Shock Protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Trilling, Anke K.; de Ronde, Hans; Noteboom, Linda; van Houwelingen, Adèle; Roelse, Margriet; Srivastava, Saurabh K.; Haasnoot, Willem; Jongsma, Maarten A.; Kolk, Arend; Zuilhof, Han; Beekwilder, Jules

    2011-01-01

    Background Recombinant antibodies are powerful tools in engineering of novel diagnostics. Due to the small size and stable nature of llama antibody domains selected antibodies can serve as a detection reagent in multiplexed and sensitive assays for M. tuberculosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Antibodies for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) recognition were raised in Alpaca, and, by phage display, recombinant variable domains of heavy-chain antibodies (VHH) binding to M. tuberculosis antigens were isolated. Two phage display selection strategies were followed: one direct selection using semi-purified protein antigen, and a depletion strategy with lysates, aiming to avoid cross-reaction to other mycobacteria. Both panning methods selected a set of binders with widely differing complementarity determining regions. Selected recombinant VHHs were produced in E. coli and shown to bind immobilized lysate in direct Enzymelinked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) tests and soluble antigen by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis. All tested VHHs were specific for tuberculosis-causing mycobacteria (M. tuberculosis, M. bovis) and exclusively recognized an immunodominant 16 kDa heat shock protein (hsp). The highest affinity VHH had a dissociation constant (KD) of 4×10−10 M. Conclusions/Significance A broad set of different llama antibodies specific for 16 kDa heat shock protein of M. tuberculosis is available. This protein is highly stable and abundant in M. tuberculosis. The VHH that detect this protein are applied in a robust SPR sensor for identification of tuberculosis-causing mycobacteria. PMID:22046343

  5. Outbreak of Tuberculosis in a Colony of Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) after Possible Indirect Contact with a Human TB Patient.

    PubMed

    Mätz-Rensing, K; Hartmann, T; Wendel, G M; Frick, J S; Homolka, S; Richter, E; Munk, M H; Kaup, F-J

    2015-01-01

    Simian tuberculosis is one of the most important bacterial diseases of non-human primates. Outbreaks of tuberculosis have been reported in primate colonies almost as long as these animals have been used experimentally or kept in zoological gardens. Significant progress has been made in reducing the incidence of tuberculosis in captive non-human primates, but despite reasonable precautions, outbreaks continue to occur. The most relevant reason is the high incidence of tuberculosis (TB) amongst the human population, in which tuberculosis is regarded as an important re-emerging disease. Furthermore, many non-human primate species originate from countries with a high burden of human TB. Therefore, Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a significant threat in animals imported from countries with high rates of human infection. We report an outbreak of tuberculosis among a group of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) living in a closed, long-term colony. The outbreak coincided with reactivation of a TB infection in a co-worker who never had direct access to the animal house or laboratories. Eleven of 26 rhesus monkeys developed classical chronic active tuberculosis with typical caseous granulomata of varying size within different organs. The main organ system involved was the lung, suggesting an aerosol route of infection. Such an outbreak has significant economic consequences due to animal loss, disruption of research and costs related to disease control. Precautionary measures must be improved in order to avoid TB in non-human primate colonies. PMID:26166434

  6. 51-L Challenger Crew Remains Transferred

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Challenger crewmember remains are being transferred from 7 hearse vehicles to a MAC C-141 transport plane at the Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility for transport to Dover Air Force Base, Delaware. The STS-51L crew consisted of: Mission Specialist, Ellison S. Onizuka, Teacher in Space Participant Sharon Christa McAuliffe, Payload Specialist, Greg Jarvis and Mission Specialist, Judy Resnik. In the front row from left to right: Pilot Mike Smith, Commander, Dick Scobee and Mission Specialist, Ron McNair.

  7. [Tuberculosis control in Eastern Europe].

    PubMed

    van Olmen, J; Veen, J

    2002-02-01

    The annual incidence of tuberculosis in Eastern Europe has increased from an average of 40 per 100,000 in 1990 to 60 per 100,000 in 1998. In particular, the increase in multi-drug resistant tuberculosis, which is difficult to treat, is a great cause for concern due to increasing migration. The breakdown in the healthcare infrastructure, which has jeopardised medicine supplies, is largely to blame for this increased incidence. Eastern Europe has a long standing tuberculosis control system which is characterised by extensive and specialised knowledge about the disease, but also by a lack of knowledge concerning its control. A great deal of attention is paid to the number of medical procedures carried out, but the results are ignored. For a few years now, Western aid organisations have been involved in tuberculosis control in Eastern Europe and have introduced the WHO DOTS strategy ('directly observed treatment, short-course'), with emphasis on case detection by sputum smear microscopy, directly observed uninterrupted treatment with short-course intensive chemotherapy and evaluation of treatment outcome. The Netherlands play a prominent role in these activities. The DOTS strategy is only slowly becoming accepted in Eastern Europe, particularly in Russia. It is in Western Europe's interest to help Eastern Europe rebuild their tuberculosis control system. Education and training are important elements to prepare doctors for their new role, in which public health should be given greater emphasis. PMID:11851086

  8. Decomposition Technique for Remaining Useful Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Bhaskar (Inventor); Goebel, Kai F. (Inventor); Saxena, Abhinav (Inventor); Celaya, Jose R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic tool disclosed here decomposes the problem of estimating the remaining useful life (RUL) of a component or sub-system into two separate regression problems: the feature-to-damage mapping and the operational conditions-to-damage-rate mapping. These maps are initially generated in off-line mode. One or more regression algorithms are used to generate each of these maps from measurements (and features derived from these), operational conditions, and ground truth information. This decomposition technique allows for the explicit quantification and management of different sources of uncertainty present in the process. Next, the maps are used in an on-line mode where run-time data (sensor measurements and operational conditions) are used in conjunction with the maps generated in off-line mode to estimate both current damage state as well as future damage accumulation. Remaining life is computed by subtracting the instance when the extrapolated damage reaches the failure threshold from the instance when the prediction is made.

  9. Shotgun microbial profiling of fossil remains.

    PubMed

    Der Sarkissian, C; Ermini, L; Jónsson, H; Alekseev, A N; Crubezy, E; Shapiro, B; Orlando, L

    2014-04-01

    Millions to billions of DNA sequences can now be generated from ancient skeletal remains thanks to the massive throughput of next-generation sequencing platforms. Except in cases of exceptional endogenous DNA preservation, most of the sequences isolated from fossil material do not originate from the specimen of interest, but instead reflect environmental organisms that colonized the specimen after death. Here, we characterize the microbial diversity recovered from seven c. 200- to 13 000-year-old horse bones collected from northern Siberia. We use a robust, taxonomy-based assignment approach to identify the microorganisms present in ancient DNA extracts and quantify their relative abundance. Our results suggest that molecular preservation niches exist within ancient samples that can potentially be used to characterize the environments from which the remains are recovered. In addition, microbial community profiling of the seven specimens revealed site-specific environmental signatures. These microbial communities appear to comprise mainly organisms that colonized the fossils recently. Our approach significantly extends the amount of useful data that can be recovered from ancient specimens using a shotgun sequencing approach. In future, it may be possible to correlate, for example, the accumulation of postmortem DNA damage with the presence and/or abundance of particular microbes. PMID:24612293

  10. So close: remaining challenges to eradicating polio.

    PubMed

    Toole, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative, launched in 1988, is close to achieving its goal. In 2015, reported cases of wild poliovirus were limited to just two countries - Afghanistan and Pakistan. Africa has been polio-free for more than 18 months. Remaining barriers to global eradication include insecurity in areas such as Northwest Pakistan and Eastern and Southern Afghanistan, where polio cases continue to be reported. Hostility to vaccination is either based on extreme ideologies, such as in Pakistan, vaccination fatigue by parents whose children have received more than 15 doses, and misunderstandings about the vaccine's safety and effectiveness such as in Ukraine. A further challenge is continued circulation of vaccine-derived poliovirus in populations with low immunity, with 28 cases reported in 2015 in countries as diverse as Madagascar, Ukraine, Laos, and Myanmar. This paper summarizes the current epidemiology of wild and vaccine-derived poliovirus, and describes the remaining challenges to eradication and innovative approaches being taken to overcome them. PMID:26971523

  11. Towards an empowerment approach in tuberculosis treatment in Cape Town, South Africa: a qualitative analysis of programmatic change

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Salla; Lewin, Simon; Ringsberg, Karin C.; Thorson, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis rates in the world remain high, especially in low- and middle-income countries. International tuberculosis (TB) policy generally recommends the use of directly observed therapy (DOT) to ensure treatment adherence. Objective This article examines a change in TB treatment support that occurred in 2005 in South Africa, from DOT to the enhanced TB adherence programme (ETA). Design Seven key individuals representing academics, policy makers and service providers involved in the development of the ETA programme or knowledgeable about the issue were purposively sampled and interviewed, and participant observation was conducted at ETA programme steering group meetings. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data, drawing on the Kingdon model of agenda setting. This model suggests that three independent streams – problem, policy and politics – come together at a certain point, often facilitated by policy entrepreneurs, to provide an opportunity for an issue to enter the policy agenda. Results The results suggest the empowerment-oriented programme emerged through the presence of policy entrepreneurs with access to resources. Policy entrepreneurs were influenced by a number of simultaneously occurring challenges including problems within the existing programme; a perceived mismatch between patient needs and the existing TB treatment model; and the TB-HIV co-epidemic. Policy entrepreneurs saw the ART approach as a possible solution to these challenges. Conclusions The Kingdon model contributed to describing the process of policy change. Research evidence seemed to influence this change diffusely, through the interaction of policy entrepreneurs and academics. PMID:22902052

  12. International Monetary Fund Programs and Tuberculosis Outcomes in Post-Communist Countries

    PubMed Central

    Stuckler, David; King, Lawrence P; Basu, Sanjay

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous studies have indicated that International Monetary Fund (IMF) economic programs have influenced health-care infrastructure in recipient countries. The post-communist Eastern European and former Soviet Union countries experienced relatively similar political and economic changes over the past two decades, and participated in IMF programs of varying size and duration. We empirically examine how IMF programs related to changes in tuberculosis incidence, prevalence, and mortality rates among these countries. Methods and Findings We performed multivariate regression of two decades of tuberculosis incidence, prevalence, and mortality data against variables potentially influencing tuberculosis program outcomes in 21 post-communist countries for which comparative data are available. After correcting for confounding variables, as well as potential detection, selection, and ecological biases, we observed that participating in an IMF program was associated with increased tuberculosis incidence, prevalence, and mortality rates by 13.9%, 13.2%, and 16.6%, respectively. Each additional year of participation in an IMF program was associated with increased tuberculosis mortality rates by 4.1%, and each 1% increase in IMF lending was associated with increased tuberculosis mortality rates by 0.9%. On the other hand, we estimated a decrease in tuberculosis mortality rates of 30.7% (95% confidence interval, 18.3% to 49.5%) associated with exiting the IMF programs. IMF lending did not appear to be a response to worsened health outcomes; rather, it appeared to be a precipitant of such outcomes (Granger- and Sims-causality tests), even after controlling for potential political, socioeconomic, demographic, and health-related confounders. In contrast, non-IMF lending programs were connected with decreased tuberculosis mortality rates (−7.6%, 95% confidence interval, −1.0% to −14.1%). The associations observed between tuberculosis mortality and IMF programs were similar to those observed when evaluating the impact of IMF programs on tuberculosis incidence and prevalence. While IMF programs were connected with large reductions in generalized government expenditures, tuberculosis program coverage, and the number of physicians per capita, non-IMF lending programs were not significantly associated with these variables. Conclusions IMF economic reform programs are associated with significantly worsened tuberculosis incidence, prevalence, and mortality rates in post-communist Eastern European and former Soviet countries, independent of other political, socioeconomic, demographic, and health changes in these countries. Future research should attempt to examine how IMF programs may have related to other non-tuberculosis–related health outcomes. PMID:18651786

  13. How to optimize tuberculosis case finding: explorations for Indonesia with a health system model

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background A mathematical model was designed to explore the impact of three strategies for better tuberculosis case finding. Strategies included: (1) reducing the number of tuberculosis patients who do not seek care; (2) reducing diagnostic delay; and (3) engaging non-DOTS providers in the referral of tuberculosis suspects to DOTS services in the Indonesian health system context. The impact of these strategies on tuberculosis mortality and treatment outcome was estimated using a mathematical model of the Indonesian health system. Methods The model consists of multiple compartments representing logical movement of a respiratory symptomatic (tuberculosis suspect) through the health system, including patient- and health system delays. Main outputs of the model are tuberculosis death rate and treatment outcome (i.e. full or partial cure). We quantified the model parameters for the Jogjakarta province context, using a two round Delphi survey with five Indonesian tuberculosis experts. Results The model validation shows that four critical model outputs (average duration of symptom onset to treatment, detection rate, cure rate, and death rate) were reasonably close to existing available data, erring towards more optimistic outcomes than are actually reported. The model predicted that an intervention to reduce the proportion of tuberculosis patients who never seek care would have the biggest impact on tuberculosis death prevention, while an intervention resulting in more referrals of tuberculosis suspects to DOTS facilities would yield higher cure rates. This finding is similar for situations where the alternative sector is a more important health resource, such as in most other parts of Indonesia. Conclusion We used mathematical modeling to explore the impact of Indonesian health system interventions on tuberculosis treatment outcome and deaths. Because detailed data were not available regarding the current Indonesian population, we relied on expert opinion to quantify the parameters. The fact that the model output showed similar results to epidemiological data suggests that the experts had an accurate understanding of this subject, thereby reassuring the quality of our predictions. The model highlighted the potential effectiveness of active case finding of tuberculosis patients with limited access to DOTS facilities in the developing country setting. PMID:19505296

  14. HIV treatment cascade in tuberculosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Lessells, Richard J.; Swaminathan, Soumya; Godfrey-Faussett, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Globally, the number of deaths associated with tuberculosis (TB) and HIV coinfection remains unacceptably high. We review the evidence around the impact of strengthening the HIV treatment cascade in TB patients and explore recent findings about how best to deliver integrated TB/HIV services. Recent findings There is clear evidence that the timely provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces mortality in TB/HIV coinfected adults. Despite this, globally in 2013, only around a third of known HIV-positive TB cases were treated with ART. Although there is some recent evidence exploring the barriers to achieve high coverage of HIV testing and ART initiation in TB patients, our understanding of which factors are most important and how best to address these within different health systems remains incomplete. There are some examples of good practice in the delivery of integrated TB/HIV services to improve the HIV treatment cascade. However, evidence of the impact of such strategies is of relatively low quality for informing integrated TB/HIV programming more broadly. In most settings, there remain barriers to higher-level organizational and functional integration. Summary There remains a need for commitment to patient-centred integrated TB/HIV care in countries affected by the dual epidemic. There is a need for better quality evidence around how best to deliver integrated services to strengthen the HIV treatment cascade in TB patients, both at primary healthcare level and within community settings. PMID:26352390

  15. The Past and Future of Tuberculosis Research

    PubMed Central

    Comas, Iñaki; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2009-01-01

    Renewed efforts in tuberculosis (TB) research have led to important new insights into the biology and epidemiology of this devastating disease. Yet, in the face of the modern epidemics of HIV/AIDS, diabetes, and multidrug resistance—all of which contribute to susceptibility to TB—global control of the disease will remain a formidable challenge for years to come. New high-throughput genomics technologies are already contributing to studies of TB's epidemiology, comparative genomics, evolution, and host–pathogen interaction. We argue here, however, that new multidisciplinary approaches—especially the integration of epidemiology with systems biology in what we call “systems epidemiology”—will be required to eliminate TB. PMID:19855821

  16. Control of bovine tuberculosis by vaccination.

    PubMed

    Newell, D G; Hewinson, R G

    1995-05-01

    The control of bovine tuberculosis remains a significant problem in the United Kingdom, especially in the south west of England where the rising prevalence of the disease is attributed to a reservoir of Mycobacterium bovis infection in badgers. The possibility of controlling the disease by the vaccination of cattle has been unpopular with veterinarians largely because of the potential compromise of existing diagnostic tests. However, the vaccination of badgers to reduce the risk of transmission to cattle is an attractive option and has now been adopted as a potential control strategy. Recent research has led to important advances in the molecular genetics of mycobacteria and in the understanding of protective immune responses. These advances mean that it may be feasible to design and develop effective mycobacterial vaccines. This review summarises the current understanding of protective immunity against M bovis infection and discusses the possible strategies for the development of vaccines. PMID:7638934

  17. Counting children with tuberculosis: why numbers matter.

    PubMed

    Seddon, J A; Jenkins, H E; Liu, L; Cohen, T; Black, R E; Vos, T; Becerra, M C; Graham, S M; Sismanidis, C; Dodd, P J

    2015-12-01

    In the last 5 years, childhood tuberculosis (TB) has received increasing attention from international organisations, national TB programmes and academics. For the first time, a number of different groups are developing techniques to estimate the burden of childhood TB. We review the challenges in diagnosing TB in children and the reasons why cases in children can go unreported. We discuss the importance of an accurate understanding of burden for identifying problems in programme delivery, targeting interventions, monitoring trends, setting targets, allocating resources appropriately and providing strong advocacy. We briefly review the estimates produced by new analytical methods, and outline the reasons for recent improvements in our understanding and potential future directions. We conclude that while innovation, collaboration and better data have improved our understanding of the childhood TB burden, it remains substantially incomplete. PMID:26564535

  18. The Pregnane X Receptor in Tuberculosis Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Shehu, Amina I.; Li, Guangming; Xie, Wen; Ma, Xiaochao

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Among the infectious diseases, tuberculosis (TB) remains the second cause of death after HIV. TB treatment requires the combination of multiple drugs including the rifamycin class. However, rifamycins are activators of human pregnane X receptor (PXR), a transcription factor that regulates drug metabolism, drug resistance, energy metabolism, and immune response. Rifamycin-mediated PXR activation may affect the outcome of TB therapy. Areas covered This review describes the role of PXR in modulating metabolism, efficacy, toxicity, and resistance to anti-TB drugs; as well as polymorphisms of PXR that potentially affect TB susceptibility. Expert opinion The wide range of PXR functions aside mediating drug metabolism and toxicity in TB therapy is underappreciated and thus understudied. Further studies are needed to determine the overall impact of PXR activation on the outcome of TB therapy. PMID:26592418

  19. Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Juan Carlos; Martin, Anandi

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious public health problem worldwide. Its situation is worsened by the presence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of the disease. In recent years, even more serious forms of drug resistance have been reported. A better knowledge of the mechanisms of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and the relevant molecular mechanisms involved will improve the available techniques for rapid drug resistance detection and will help to explore new targets for drug activity and development. This review article discusses the mechanisms of action of anti-tuberculosis drugs and the molecular basis of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:27025748

  20. [Tuberculosis in refugees from foreign countries].

    PubMed

    Rybka, L N; Punga, V V

    1996-01-01

    Screening for tuberculosis has revealed active disease in 30 of 168 examinees. They have arrived in Russia as refugees from Somalia, Afghanistan, Angola and other countries. 24 refugees had pulmonary tuberculosis. Destruction of pulmonary tissues and massive discharge of M. tuberculosis were found in 10, 2 and 1 patients with infiltrative, disseminated and fibrous-cavernous tuberculosis. A specific therapy with 3-4 drugs stopped discharge of the bacteria with sputum. It is stated that refugees from foreign countries may constitute a great epidemiological threat of tuberculosis for contacting Russian population. PMID:8754866

  1. Crescentic Glomerulonephritis Associated with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Vanikar, A.V.; Patel, R.D.; Suthar, K. S.; Trivedi, H. L.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis of kidney and urinary tract is caused by members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Kidney is usually infected by haematogenous spread of bacilli from focus of infection in the lungs. Glomerular involvement in tuberculosis presenting as a rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis is a rare entity. We report a rare case of crescentic glomerulonephritis associated with pulmonary tuberculosis in a 26-year-old man. Patient was treated with corticosteroids, haemodialysis, intravenous immunoglobulin and four cycles of plasmapheresis. He did not respond to 4-drug anti-tuberculosis treatment for renal pathology and was switched over to maintenance haemodialysis. However, he responded to pulmonary TB. PMID:26894074

  2. Significance of nutrition in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kant, Surya; Gupta, Harshita; Ahluwalia, Savita

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition and tuberculosis are both problems mostly of the developing countries. Tuberculosis can lead to malnutrition and malnutrition may predispose to tuberculosis. Poor nutrition leads to protein-energy malnutrition and micronutrients deficiencies which lead to immunodeficiency. This secondary immunodeficiency increases the host's susceptibility to infection and hence increase the risk for developing tuberculosis. Tuberculosis itself leads to reduction in appetite, nutrient malabsorption, micronutrient malabsorption, and altered metabolism leading to wasting and poor nutritional status. Nutritional status and dietary intake and hence nutritional status of patients get improved during antituberculosis treatment. PMID:24915351

  3. Tuberculosis in wild birds: implications for captive birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Converse, K. A.; Dein, F. J.

    1990-01-01

    The geographic distribution of avian tuberculosis is widespread but the lack of visible epizootics makes assessment of its impact on wild birds difficult. Generally a low prevalence, widely-scattered, individual animal disease, avian tuberculosis is caused by the same agent in wild and domestic birds. Thus there exists the potential for disease transfer between these two groups in situations that result in direct contact such as wild animals newly captured or transferred from rehabilitation centers, and wild and captive animals intermingling in exhibit areas. During the past 7 yr, tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium avium, was diagnosed in 64 birds submitted to the National Wildlife Health Research Center from 16 states; avian tuberculosis was the primary diagnosis in 52 of the 64 birds, while the remaining 12 isolates were incidental findings. Twenty-eight of these birds were picked up during epizootics caused by other disease agents including avian cholera, botulism type C, and lead, organophosphorus compound, and cyanide poisoning. Twelve birds were found incidental to birds collected during disease monitoring programs and research projects, and 10 birds were collected by hunters or found sick and euthanatized. Tuberculosis lesions occurred (in order of decreasing frequency) in the liver, intestine, spleen, lung, and air sacs. Several unusual morphological presentations were observed in the gizzard, shoulder joint, jugular vein, face, nares and bill, ureter and bone marrow. Infected birds were collected during all 12 mo of the yr from a variety of species in the Anseriformes, Podicipediformes, Gruiformes, and Falconiformes. Nine of the 46 known age birds were immature indicating that lesions can develop during the first year.

  4. Diseases masking and delaying the diagnosis of urogenital tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kulchavenya, Ekaterina; Kholtobin, Denis

    2015-01-01

    As urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB) has no specific clinical features, it is often overlooked. To identify some of the reasons for misdiagnosing UGTB we performed a systematic review. We searched in Medline/PubMed papers with keywords ‘urogenital tuberculosis, rare’ and ‘urogenital tuberculosis, unusual’. ‘Urogenital tuberculosis, rare’ presented 230 articles and ‘urogenital tuberculosis, unusual’ presented 81 articles only, a total of 311 papers. A total of 34 papers were duplicated and so were excluded from the review. In addition, we excluded from the analysis 33 papers on epidemiological studies and literature reviews, papers describing non-TB cases and cases of TB another than urogenital organs (48 articles), cases of congenital TB (three articles), UGTB as a case of concomitant disease (16 articles), and UGTB as a complication of BCG-therapy (eight articles). We also excluded 22 articles dedicated to complications of the therapy, which made a total of 164 articles. Among the remaining 147 articles we selected 43 which described really unusual, difficult to diagnose cases. We also included in our review a WHO report from 2014, and one scientific monograph on TB urology. The most frequent reasons for delayed diagnosis were absence typical clinical features of UGTB, and the tendency of UGTB to hide behind the mask of another disease. We can conclude that actually UGTB is not rare disease, but it is often an overlooked disease. The main reasons for delayed diagnosis are vague, atypical clinical features and a low index of suspicion. PMID:26622318

  5. Transcriptional Profiling of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis During Infection: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Sarah K.; Abomoelak, Bassam; Marcus, Sarah A.; Talaat, Adel M.

    2010-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is considered one of the biggest infectious disease killers worldwide. A significant amount of attention has been directed toward revealing genes involved in the virulence and pathogenesis of this air-born pathogen. With the advances in technologies for transcriptional profiling, several groups, including ours, took advantage of DNA microarrays to identify transcriptional units differentially regulated by M. tuberculosis within a host. The main idea behind this approach is that pathogens tend to regulate their gene expression levels depending on the host microenvironment, and preferentially express those needed for survival. Identifying this class of genes will improve our understanding of pathogenesis. In our case, we identified an in vivo expressed genomic island that was preferentially active in murine lungs during early infection, as well as groups of genes active during chronic tuberculosis. Other studies have identified additional gene groups that are active during macrophage infection and even in human lungs. Despite all of these findings, one of the lingering questions remaining was whether in vivo expressed transcripts are relevant to the virulence, pathogenesis, and persistence of the organism. The work of our group and others addressed this question by examining the contribution of in vivo expressed genes using a strategy based on gene deletions followed by animal infections. Overall, the analysis of most of the in vivo expressed genes supported a role of these genes in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis. Further, these data suggest that in vivo transcriptional profiling is a valid approach to identify genes required for bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:21738523

  6. Some remaining problems in HCDA analysis. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.W.

    1981-01-01

    The safety assessment and licensing of liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) requires an analysis on the capability of the reactor primary system to sustain the consequences of a hypothetical core-disruptive accident (HCDA). Although computational methods and computer programs developed for HCDA analyses can predict reasonably well the response of the primary containment system, and follow up the phenomena of HCDA from the start of excursion to the time of dynamic equilibrium in the system, there remain areas in the HCDA analysis that merit further analytical and experimental studies. These are the analysis of fluid impact on reactor cover, three-dimensional analysis, the treatment of the perforated plates, material properties under high strain rates and under high temperatures, the treatment of multifield flows, and the treatment of prestressed concrete reactor vessels. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the structural mechanics of HCDA analysis in these areas where improvements are needed.

  7. Field Friendly Tuberculosis Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proper, N.; Scherman, M. S.; Jevsevar, K. L.; Stone, J.; McNeil, M. R.; Krapf, D.

    2009-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a fading threat in the United States, but in the developing world it is still a major health-care concern. Given the rising number of cases and lack of resources, there is a desperate need for an affordable, portable detection system. We are working towards the development of a field-friendly immunological biosensor that utilizes florescence microscopy to undertake this task. We observe fluorescently labeled antibodies/antigens as they bind to a glass slide treated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) in order to inhibit non-specific adsorption. Antibodies against the antigens of interest are bound to the PEGylated glass slides via biotin-streptavidin interactions. Then, fluorescently labeled antibodies are mixed with different concentrations of TB antigens and this solution is incubated on the treated glass slides for 30 minutes. The slides are thoroughly rinsed with water following the incubation period. The antigens are then detected by fluorescence using a low-cost biosensor. Our system includes a ``supermarket-scanner'' HeNe laser, home-built electronics, off-the-shelf optics and a Si photodiode. Work is underway to incorporate a flow-cell into the system, in a small portable box.

  8. Tuberculosis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Apuzzio, Joseph J.

    1996-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) during pregnancy and in the perinatal period was once considered to be an infrequent event in the United States. After a decade of steady decline, however, the disease has begun a resurgence. According to the CDC, a 20% increase in the number of reported cases occurred between 1985 and 1992. The factors associated with this increase are the emergence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the development of drug-resistant organisms, substance abuse, homelessness, and immigration. Environmental factors promoting transmission can be found in overcrowded areas such as correctional facilities, nursing homes, hospitals, and migrant-worker camps. For a large number of medically underserved women, the obstetrician is the only interface with medical care, as most of these patients do not have primary-care providers. It is important, therefore, that health-care providers recognize the clinical symptoms of TB and follow the recognized guidelines for antenatal screening for TB because the omission of these steps can lead to potentially disastrous sequelae in the fetus and neonate. PMID:18476074

  9. Risk Factors for Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Padmanesan; Wood, James; MacIntyre, Chandini Raina; Mathai, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    The risk of progression from exposure to the tuberculosis bacilli to the development of active disease is a two-stage process governed by both exogenous and endogenous risk factors. Exogenous factors play a key role in accentuating the progression from exposure to infection among which the bacillary load in the sputum and the proximity of an individual to an infectious TB case are key factors. Similarly endogenous factors lead in progression from infection to active TB disease. Along with well-established risk factors (such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), malnutrition, and young age), emerging variables such as diabetes, indoor air pollution, alcohol, use of immunosuppressive drugs, and tobacco smoke play a significant role at both the individual and population level. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors are also shown to increase the susceptibility to infection. Specific groups such as health care workers and indigenous population are also at an increased risk of TB infection and disease. This paper summarizes these factors along with health system issues such as the effects of delay in diagnosis of TB in the transmission of the bacilli. PMID:23476764

  10. Optimal intervention strategies for tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowong, Samuel; Aziz Alaoui, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    This paper deals with the problem of optimal control of a deterministic model of tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus). We first present and analyze an uncontrolled tuberculosis model which incorporates the essential biological and epidemiological features of the disease. The model is shown to exhibit the phenomenon of backward bifurcation, where a stable disease-free equilibrium co-exists with one or more stable endemic equilibria when the associated basic reproduction number is less than the unity. Based on this continuous model, the tuberculosis control is formulated and solved as an optimal control problem, indicating how control terms on the chemoprophylaxis and detection should be introduced in the population to reduce the number of individuals with active TB. Results provide a framework for designing the cost-effective strategies for TB with two intervention methods.

  11. What's new in tuberculosis vaccines?

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Ann M.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, tuberculosis (TB) vaccine development has resurged as an active area of investigation. The renewed interest has been stimulated by the recognition that, although BCG is delivered to approximately 90% of all neonates globally through the Expanded Programme on Immunization, Mycobacterium tuberculosis continues to cause over 8 million new cases of TB and over 2 million deaths annually. Over one hundred TB vaccine candidates have been developed, using different approaches to inducing protective immunity. Candidate vaccines are typically screened in small animal models of primary TB disease for their ability to protect against a virulent strain of M. tuberculosis. The most promising are now beginning to enter human safety trials, marking real progress in this field for the first time in 80 years. PMID:12132007

  12. Th2 cytokines in susceptibility to tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rook, Graham A W

    2007-05-01

    We need to understand what is different about susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB) in developing countries where most TB occurs, and where the current vaccine, Bacillus Calmette et Guérin (BCG) usually fails to protect. The presence of a background mixed IFN-gamma and Th2 response to mycobacterial antigens before infection with M. tuberculosis (Mtb), and the development of a large IL-4 response during progressive TB, are characteristics of individuals in the locations where BCG fails, which are also seen in animal models in the same countries. Recent data suggest that the background Th1 component in developing countries protects from low dose challenge with Mtb in mouse and man, but that following high dose challenge the pre-existing IL-4 component increases and blocks immunity unless the individual's immune system releases IL-4delta2, an antagonist of IL-4, which is raised in the blood of donors with stable latent TB. We outline how IL-4 (and IL-13) can undermine Th1-mediated immunity and drive inappropriate alternative activation of macrophages. The mechanisms of the effects of IL-4 include impaired antimicrobial activity due to reduced TNF-alpha-mediated apoptosis of infected cells, reduced activity of iNOS, increased availability of iron to intracellular Mtb, and increased proliferation of antigen-specific FOXP-3+ regulatory T cells. IL-4 also increases the toxicity of TNF-alpha and drives pulmonary fibrosis, thus enhancing immunopathology. The conclusion is that a vaccine that will work in developing countries might need to do more than enhance the existing Th1 response. In these environments it might be more important to block the Th2 component. PMID:17504117

  13. Burden of tuberculosis in Kampala, Uganda.

    PubMed Central

    Guwatudde, David; Zalwango, Sarah; Kamya, Moses R.; Debanne, Sara M.; Diaz, Mireya I.; Okwera, Alphonse; Mugerwa, Roy D.; King, Charles; Whalen, Christopher C.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and incidence of tuberculosis in one of Uganda's poor peri-urban areas. METHODS: Multi-stage sampling was used to select a sample of households whose members were evaluated for presence of signs and/or symptoms of active tuberculosis; history of tuberculosis treatment; and relevant demographic, socioeconomic, and household environment characteristics. Patients with suspected tuberculosis underwent standardized evaluation for active disease. FINDINGS: A sample of 263 households with 1142 individuals was evaluated. Nineteen people were classified as having had tuberculosis during the one-year reference period (May 2001-April 2002): nine (47%) cases already had been diagnosed through the health care system, while 10 cases (53%) were diagnosed through the survey. The prevalences for all forms of tuberculosis and for sputum smear-positive tuberculosis were 14.0 (95% confidence interval (CI) 7.8-20.3) and 4.4 (CI = 0.83-7.89) per thousand, respectively. The incidences for all forms of tuberculosis and for sputum smear-positive tuberculosis were 9.2 (CI = 3.97-14.4) and 3.7 (CI = 0.39-6.95) per thousand per year, respectively. CONCLUSION: The rate of tuberculosis in this peri-urban community was exceptionally high and may be underestimated by current surveillance systems. The need for interventions aimed at reducing tuberculosis transmission in this, and other similar communities with high case rates, is urgent. PMID:14758406

  14. Smears and cultures for diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in an asymptomatic immigrant population

    PubMed Central

    Assael, Roberto; Cervantes, Joaquin; Barrera, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization estimated in 2010 that 8.8 million new tuberculosis (TB) cases. About one-third of the world’s population is infected and 10% will develop active TB disease. While cultures remain the international gold standard for diagnosing TB disease, in many other low-income countries, sputum smears remain the only and most accessible tool with which to diagnose active TB disease. As a consequence, in patients with TB who have negative smears, their TB remains undetected. Aim The objective of the study reported here was to demonstrate the proportion of smear-positive/culture-positive cases compared with smear-negative/culture-positive TB cases in Mexican immigrants bound for the USA. Methods A retrospective study was undertaken of the medical records of 122 active TB cases diagnosed at a clinic in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, from 2009 to 2012. All cases were confirmed by culture, regardless of the sputum smear results. Results Of the cases, 80% (97 active TB cases) had negative sputum smears, while only 25 cases (20%) had at least one positive smear. All of the cultures were confirmed as positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Conclusion The fact that 80% of the TB cases were smear negative and 20% smear positive shows that there is a clear gap between the actual state of active TB disease within patients under screening conditions, meaning that eight out of ten actual cases are being missed when sputum smear is the only diagnostic tool in asymptomatic patients with abnormal chest X-rays. Based on these results, it is highly recommended that countries that have not standardized culturing as the gold standard for the diagnosis of active TB do so, so that TB cases – which may endanger global public health – are not missed. It is also recommended that further studies be undertaken to determine the clinical background of the patients diagnosed by smear and culture to identify a direct relationship between clinical signs and symptoms and the smear result. PMID:24072976

  15. AIDS, individual behaviour and the unexplained remaining variation.

    PubMed

    Katz, Alison

    2002-01-01

    From the start of the AIDS pandemic, individual behaviour has been put forward, implicitly or explicitly, as the main explanatory concept for understanding the epidemiology of HIV infection and in particular for the rapid spread and high prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa. This has had enormous implications for the international response to AIDS and has heavily influenced public health policy and strategy and the design of prevention and care interventions at national, community and individual level. It is argued that individual behaviour alone cannot possibly account for the enormous variation in HIV prevalence between population groups, countries and regions and that the unexplained remaining variation has been neglected by the international AIDS community. Biological vulnerability to HIV due to seriously deficient immune systems has been ignored as a determinant of the high levels of infection in certain populations. This is in sharp contrast to well proven public health approaches to other infectious diseases. In particular, it is argued that poor nutrition and co-infection with the myriad of other diseases of poverty including tuberculosis, malaria, leishmaniasis and parasitic infections, have been neglected as root causes of susceptibility, infectiousness and high rates of transmission of HIV at the level of populations. Vulnerability in terms of non-biological factors such as labour migration, prostitution, exchange of sex for survival, population movements due to war and violence, has received some attention but the solutions proposed to these problems are also inappropriately focused on individual behaviour and suffer from the same neglect of economic and political root causes. As the foundation for the international community's response to the AIDS pandemic, explanations of HIV/AIDS epidemiology in terms of individual behaviour are not only grossly inadequate, they are highly stigmatising and may in some cases, be racist. They have diverted attention from poverty and powerlessness as root causes of vulnerability to infection and as such they are a waste of scarce resources. A return to a basic needs approach to all the diseases of poverty is nothing more than proven public health wisdom and experience. A sustainable and meaningful response to AIDS is simultaneously a sustainable and meaningful response to all the diseases of poverty. The obstacles to the adoption of this approach are economic and political and must be confronted at the level of international financial institutions, the globalisation of neoliberal economic systems, the growing power imbalances between and within nations and the undermining of democracy and national sovereignty. An alternative strategy for AIDS and the other diseases of poverty would build on macroeconomic reforms for a fair, rational and sustainable international economic order so that democratically elected governments may meet their people's basic needs, including health, without external interference. PMID:25871816

  16. Tuberculosis in Healthcare Workers: A Matched Cohort Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sung-Ching; Chen, Yee-Chun; Wang, Jann-Yuan; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Lin, Hsien-Ho; Fang, Chi-Tai; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2015-01-01

    Background Proportional mortality ratio data indicate that healthcare workers (HCWs) have an elevated tuberculosis (TB) mortality. Whether this is caused by an increased TB incidence, a worse TB treatment outcome, or a combination of effects, remains unclear. To elucidate the hazard components of occupational TB, we assessed TB incidence and TB treatment outcome among HCWs in Taiwan. Methods We compared the incidence of active TB among HCWs at a major medical center in Taiwan with that of Taiwan general population in 2004–2012. We also compared the TB treatment outcome of HCWs with that of age/sex-matched non-HCW patients treated at the same hospital, as well as that of nationally registered TB patients. Results The standardized TB incidence ratio of the HCWs was 1.9 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2–2.9), compared with the general population. HCWs with pulmonary TB (n = 30) were less likely to have underlying diseases, delay in diagnosis, delay in treatment, or side effects of treatment, compared with age/sex-matched non-HCW TB patients (n = 120) (all Ps<0.05). The TB treatment outcome of HCWs was significantly better than that of non-HCW patients (TB-related mortality: 0.0% vs. 5.8%, P = 0.008, Mantel-Haenszel test). The standardized TB-related mortality rate was 1.08% [95% CI: 0.96% - 1.20%] for all of the nationally registered TB patients in Taiwan. Conclusions HCWs are at increased risk of active TB, compared with general population. To mitigate this occupational hazard, more efforts need to be directed towards the prevention of nosocomial TB transmission. Healthy worker effect, more rapid diagnosis, and less delay in treatment contribute to a lower TB-related mortality in HCWs. PMID:26679188

  17. Bacterial Thymidine Kinase as a Non-Invasive Imaging Reporter for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Live Animals

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Stephanie L.; Be, Nicholas A.; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Pomper, Martin G.; Bishai, William R.; Jain, Sanjay K.

    2009-01-01

    Background Bacteria can be selectively imaged in experimentally-infected animals using exogenously administered 1-(2?deoxy-2?-fluoro-?-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-[125I]-iodouracil ([125I]-FIAU), a nucleoside analog substrate for bacterial thymidine kinase (TK). Our goal was to use this reporter and develop non-invasive methods to detect and localize Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Methodology/Principal Findings We engineered a M. tuberculosis strain with chromosomally integrated bacterial TK under the control of hsp60 - a strong constitutive mycobacterial promoter. [125I]FIAU uptake, antimicrobial susceptibilities and in vivo growth characteristics were evaluated for this strain. Using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), M. tuberculosis Phsp60 TK strain was evaluated in experimentally-infected BALB/c and C3HeB/FeJ mice using the thigh inoculation or low-dose aerosol infection models. M. tuberculosis Phsp60 TK strain actively accumulated [125I]FIAU in vitro. Growth characteristics of the TK strain and susceptibility to common anti-tuberculous drugs were similar to the wild-type parent strain. M. tuberculosis Phsp60 TK strain was stable in vivo and SPECT imaging could detect and localize this strain in both animal models tested. Conclusion We have developed a novel tool for non-invasive assessment of M. tuberculosis in live experimentally-infected animals. This tool will allow real-time pathogenesis studies in animal models of TB and has the potential to simplify preclinical studies and accelerate TB research. PMID:19606217

  18. Cellular Immune Responses to Nine Mycobacterium tuberculosis Vaccine Candidates following Intranasal Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Sable, Suraj B.; Cheruvu, Mani; Nandakumar, Subhadra; Sharma, Sunita; Bandyopadhyay, Kakali; Kellar, Kathryn L.; Posey, James E.; Plikaytis, Bonnie B.; Amara, Rama Rao; Shinnick, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccines that elicit a protective immune response in the lungs is important for the development of an effective vaccine against tuberculosis. Methods and Principal Findings In this study, a comparison of intranasal (i.n.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) vaccination with the BCG vaccine demonstrated that a single moderate dose delivered intranasally induced a stronger and sustained M. tuberculosis-specific T-cell response in lung parenchyma and cervical lymph nodes of BALB/c mice than vaccine delivered subcutaneously. Both BCG and a multicomponent subunit vaccine composed of nine M. tuberculosis recombinant proteins induced strong antigen-specific T-cell responses in various local and peripheral immune compartments. Among the nine recombinant proteins evaluated, the alanine proline rich antigen (Apa, Rv1860) was highly antigenic following i.n. BCG and immunogenic after vaccination with a combination of the nine recombinant antigens. The Apa-induced responses included induction of both type 1 and type 2 cytokines in the lungs as evaluated by ELISPOT and a multiplexed microsphere-based cytokine immunoassay. Of importance, i.n. subunit vaccination with Apa imparted significant protection in the lungs and spleen of mice against M. tuberculosis challenge. Despite observed differences in the frequencies and location of specific cytokine secreting T cells both BCG vaccination routes afforded comparable levels of protection in our study. Conclusion and Significance Overall, our findings support consideration and further evaluation of an intranasally targeted Apa-based vaccine to prevent tuberculosis. PMID:21799939

  19. The path to impact of operational research on tuberculosis control policies and practices in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Probandari, Ari; Widjanarko, Bagoes; Mahendradhata, Yodi; Sanjoto, Hary; Cerisha, Ancila; Nungky, Saverina; Riono, Pandu; Simon, Sumanto; Farid, Muhammad Noor; Giriputra, Sardikin; Putra, Artawan Eka; Burhan, Erlina; Wahyuni, Chatarina U.; Mustikawati, Dyah; Widianingrum, Christina; Tiemersma, Edine W.; Alisjahbana, Bachti

    2016-01-01

    Background Operational research is currently one of the pillars of the global strategy to control tuberculosis. Indonesia initiated capacity building for operational research on tuberculosis over the last decade. Although publication of the research in peer-reviewed journals is an important indicator for measuring the success of this endeavor, the influence of operational research on policy and practices is considered even more important. However, little is known about the process by which operational research influences tuberculosis control policy and practices. Objective We aimed to investigate the influence of operational research on tuberculosis control policy and practice in Indonesia between 2004 and 2014. Design Using a qualitative study design, we conducted in-depth interviews of 50 researchers and 30 policy makers/program managers and performed document reviews. Transcripts of these interviews were evaluated while applying content analysis. Results Operational research contributed to tuberculosis control policy and practice improvements, including development of new policies, introduction of new practices, and reinforcement of current program policies and practices. However, most of these developments had limited sustainability. The path from the dissemination of research results and recommendations to policy and practice changes was long and complex. The skills, interests, and political power of researchers and policy makers, as well as health system response, could influence the process. Conclusions Operational research contributed to improving tuberculosis control policy and practices. A systematic approach to improve the sustainability of the impact of operational research should be explored. PMID:26928217

  20. Phosphoproteomics analysis of a clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing isolate: expanding the mycobacterial phosphoproteome catalog

    PubMed Central

    Fortuin, Suereta; Tomazella, Gisele G.; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Sampson, Samantha L.; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C.; Soares, Nelson C.; Wiker, Harald G.; de Souza, Gustavo A.; Warren, Robin M.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation, regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases, mediates a switch between protein activity and cellular pathways that contribute to a large number of cellular processes. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes 11 Serine/Threonine kinases (STPKs) which show close homology to eukaryotic kinases. This study aimed to elucidate the phosphoproteomic landscape of a clinical isolate of M. tuberculosis. We performed a high throughput mass spectrometric analysis of proteins extracted from an early-logarithmic phase culture. Whole cell lysate proteins were processed using the filter-aided sample preparation method, followed by phosphopeptide enrichment of tryptic peptides by strong cation exchange (SCX) and Titanium dioxide (TiO2) chromatography. The MaxQuant quantitative proteomics software package was used for protein identification. Our analysis identified 414 serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylated sites, with a distribution of S/T/Y sites; 38% on serine, 59% on threonine and 3% on tyrosine; present on 303 unique peptides mapping to 214 M. tuberculosis proteins. Only 45 of the S/T/Y phosphorylated proteins identified in our study had been previously described in the laboratory strain H37Rv, confirming previous reports. The remaining 169 phosphorylated proteins were newly identified in this clinical M. tuberculosis Beijing strain. We identified 5 novel tyrosine phosphorylated proteins. These findings not only expand upon our current understanding of the protein phosphorylation network in clinical M. tuberculosis but the data set also further extends and complements previous knowledge regarding phosphorylated peptides and phosphorylation sites in M. tuberculosis. PMID:25713560

  1. Membrane Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase Regulates Monocyte Migration and Collagen Destruction in Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sathyamoorthy, Tarangini; Tezera, Liku B; Walker, Naomi F; Brilha, Sara; Saraiva, Luisa; Mauri, Francesco A; Wilkinson, Robert J; Friedland, Jon S; Elkington, Paul T

    2015-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global pandemic and drug resistance is rising. Multicellular granuloma formation is the pathological hallmark of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP or MMP-14) is a collagenase that is key in leukocyte migration and collagen destruction. In patients with TB, induced sputum MT1-MMP mRNA levels were increased 5.1-fold compared with matched controls and correlated positively with extent of lung infiltration on chest radiographs (r = 0.483; p < 0.05). M. tuberculosis infection of primary human monocytes increased MT1-MMP surface expression 31.7-fold and gene expression 24.5-fold. M. tuberculosis-infected monocytes degraded collagen matrix in an MT1-MMP-dependent manner, and MT1-MMP neutralization decreased collagen degradation by 73%. In human TB granulomas, MT1-MMP immunoreactivity was observed in macrophages throughout the granuloma. Monocyte-monocyte networks caused a 17.5-fold increase in MT1-MMP surface expression dependent on p38 MAPK and G protein-coupled receptor-dependent signaling. Monocytes migrating toward agarose beads impregnated with conditioned media from M. tuberculosis-infected monocytes expressed MT1-MMP. Neutralization of MT1-MMP activity decreased this M. tuberculosis network-dependent monocyte migration by 44%. Taken together, we demonstrate that MT1-MMP is central to two key elements of TB pathogenesis, causing collagen degradation and regulating monocyte migration. PMID:26091717

  2. Ancient mycobacterial lipids: Key reference biomarkers in charting the evolution of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Minnikin, David E; Lee, Oona Y-C; Wu, Houdini H T; Besra, Gurdyal S; Bhatt, Apoorva; Nataraj, Vijayashankar; Rothschild, Bruce M; Spigelman, Mark; Donoghue, Helen D

    2015-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has a cell envelope incorporating a peptidoglycan-linked arabinogalactan esterified by long-chain mycolic acids. A range of "free" lipids are associated with the "bound" mycolic acids, producing an effective envelope outer membrane. The distribution of these lipids is discontinuous among mycobacteria and such lipids have proven potential for biomarker use in tracing the evolution of tuberculosis. A plausible evolutionary scenario involves progression from an environmental organism, such as Mycobacterium kansasii, through intermediate "smooth" tubercle bacilli, labelled "Mycobacterium canettii"; cell envelope lipid composition possibly correlates with such a progression. M. kansasii and "M. canettii" have characteristic lipooligosaccharides, associated with motility and biofilms, and glycosyl phenolphthiocerol dimycocerosates ("phenolic glycolipids"). Both these lipid classes are absent in modern M. tuberculosis sensu stricto, though simplified phenolic glycolipids remain in certain current biotypes. Dimycocerosates of the phthiocerol family are restricted to smaller phthiodiolone diesters in M. kansasii. Diacyl and pentaacyl trehaloses are present in "M. canettii" and M. tuberculosis, accompanied in the latter by related sulfated acyl trehaloses. In comparison with environmental mycobacteria, subtle modifications in mycolic acid structures in "M. canettii" and M. tuberculosis are notable. The probability of essential tuberculosis evolution taking place in Pleistocene megafauna, rather than Homo sapiens, is reemphasised. PMID:25736170

  3. LprG-Mediated Surface Expression of Lipoarabinomannan Is Essential for Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Antje; Bhamidi, Suresh; Gibbs, Sara; Jackson, Mary; Zare, Richard N.; Ehrt, Sabine; Ernst, Joel D.; Banaei, Niaz

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis employs various virulence strategies to subvert host immune responses in order to persist and cause disease. Interaction of M. tuberculosis with mannose receptor on macrophages via surface-exposed lipoarabinomannan (LAM) is believed to be critical for cell entry, inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion, and intracellular survival, but in vivo evidence is lacking. LprG, a cell envelope lipoprotein that is essential for virulence of M. tuberculosis, has been shown to bind to the acyl groups of lipoglycans but the role of LprG in LAM biosynthesis and localization remains unknown. Using an M. tuberculosis lprG mutant, we show that LprG is essential for normal surface expression of LAM and virulence of M. tuberculosis attributed to LAM. The lprG mutant had a normal quantity of LAM in the cell envelope, but its surface was altered and showed reduced expression of surface-exposed LAM. Functionally, the lprG mutant was defective for macrophage entry and inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion, was attenuated in macrophages, and was killed in the mouse lung with the onset of adaptive immunity. This study identifies the role of LprG in surface-exposed LAM expression and provides in vivo evidence for the essential role surface LAM plays in M. tuberculosis virulence. Findings have translational implications for therapy and vaccine development. PMID:25232742

  4. Linking the Transcriptional Profiles and the Physiological States of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during an Extended Intracellular Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, Kyle H.; Veiga, Diogo F. T.; Caldwell, Shannon; Balázsi, Gábor; Russell, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis have evolved strategies for coping with the pressures encountered inside host cells. The ability to coordinate global gene expression in response to environmental and internal cues is one key to their success. Prolonged survival and replication within macrophages, a key virulence trait of M. tuberculosis, requires dynamic adaptation to diverse and changing conditions within its phagosomal niche. However, the physiological adaptations during the different phases of this infection process remain poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, we have developed a multi-tiered approach to define the temporal patterns of gene expression in M. tuberculosis in a macrophage infection model that extends from infection, through intracellular adaptation, to the establishment of a productive infection. Using a clock plasmid to measure intracellular replication and death rates over a 14-day infection and electron microscopy to define bacterial integrity, we observed an initial period of rapid replication coupled with a high death rate. This was followed by period of slowed growth and enhanced intracellular survival, leading finally to an extended period of net growth. The transcriptional profiles of M. tuberculosis reflect these physiological transitions as the bacterium adapts to conditions within its host cell. Finally, analysis with a Transcriptional Regulatory Network model revealed linked genetic networks whereby M. tuberculosis coordinates global gene expression during intracellular survival. The integration of molecular and cellular biology together with transcriptional profiling and systems analysis offers unique insights into the host-driven responses of intracellular pathogens such as M. tuberculosis. PMID:22737072

  5. The role of Xpert MTB/RIF in diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis in post-mortem tissues

    PubMed Central

    García-Basteiro, Alberto L.; Ismail, Mamudo R.; Carrilho, Carla; Ussene, Esperança; Castillo, Paola; Chitsungo, Dércio; Rodríguez, Cristina; Lovane, Lucília; Vergara, Andrea; López-Varela, Elisa; Mandomando, Inacio; Lorenzoni, Cesaltina; Ordi, Jaume; Menéndez, Clara; Bassat, Quique; Martínez, Miguel J.

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which the Xpert MTB/RIF (Gene Xpert) contributes to tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis in samples other than sputum and cerebrospinal fluid remains uncertain. We aimed to assess the role of Xpert MTB/RIF for detecting M. tuberculosis in post-mortem tissues. We conducted a study among 30 complete diagnostic autopsies (CDA) performed at the Maputo Central Hospital (Mozambique). Lung tissues were screened for TB in all cases. In addition other tissues were tested when compatible lesions were identified in the histological exam. We used in-house real time PCR and LAMP assays to confirm the presence of M. tuberculosis DNA. The diagnosis of tuberculosis at death was established based on microbiological and histopathological results. Eight out of 30 cases (26.7%) were diagnosed of tuberculosis. Xpert had a sensitivity to detect TB in lung tissue of 87.5% (95% CI 47.3–99.7) and a specificity of 95.7% (95% CI: 78.1–99.9). In-house DNA amplification methods and Xpert showed 93.6% concordance for lung tissue and 100% concordance for brain and liver tissues. The final cause of death was attributable to tuberculosis in four cases. Xpert MTB/RIF may represent a valuable, easy-to perform technique for post-mortem TB diagnosis. PMID:26860394

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis promotes arthritis development through Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Kanagawa, Hiroya; Niki, Yasuo; Kobayashi, Tami; Sato, Yuiko; Katsuyama, Eri; Fujie, Atsuhiro; Hao, Wu; Miyamoto, Kana; Tando, Toshimi; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Morita, Mayu; Morioka, Hideo; Matsumoto, Morio; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a multifactorial disease caused by genetic and environmental factors: however, precise molecular mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis remain largely unknown. Treatment of RA patients with disease-modifying biological agents occasionally promotes Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection or recurrence of M. tuberculosis, although how infection promotes arthritis has not been characterized. Here, we found that arthritis phenotypes in a collagen-induced mouse model were evident only when killed M. tuberculosis was co-administered. Treatment of cultured macrophages with killed M. tuberculosis promoted production of IL-6, a major inflammatory cytokine in RA patients, while similar treatment of TLR2-deficient macrophages failed to induce IL-6 expression. Arthritis scores, joint destruction, and serum IL-6 levels were all significantly ameliorated in TLR2-deficient compared with wild-type mice, even in animals treated with killed M. tuberculosis. These results suggest that M. tuberculosis infection enhances arthritis development and that TLR2 could serve as a therapeutic target for some forms of the disease. PMID:24633489

  7. Development of a novel anti ESAT-6 monoclonal antibody for screening of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Jianhang; Ding, Yu; Shou, Chengmin; Wu, Zhigang; Zhuo, Guangchao; Wang, Keyi; Shen, Junya; Huang, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global public health problem with an estimated one-third of the world’s population infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, thus necessitating fast and accurate diagnosis of TB. However, the diagnosis of latent infection remains difficult due to the lack of a simple, reliable test for M. tuberculosis infection. The objective of the current study was to generate and characterize a novel monoclonal antibody (mAb) that specifically target the early secretory antigenic target 6 (ESAT-6) protein for tuberculosis (TB) immunological diagnosis. The BALB/c mice were immunized by a peptide with 13 amino acids (amino acid residues 24 to 36) of ESAT-6 protein. Stable hybridomas cell lines were established and mAb was identified by Western Blot, immunoprecipitation (IP) and Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, this mouse mAb was used to coat plates, and biotin-labelled polyclonal antibodies were used to detect the antigens. Finally, the antibody was verified in 280 patient sputum culture supernatants and pleural effusion aspirates. The positive detection rate of the generated ESAT-6 mAb was 91% in the clinical diagnosis of tuberculosis pleural effusion, and this mAb had a sensitivity of 92.4% and a specificity of 100% in all M. tuberculosis cases. Our data indicated that the mAb generated in this study can potentially serve as a tool in the laboratory diagnosis of TB. PMID:25550937

  8. The Endothelin System Has a Significant Role in the Pathogenesis and Progression of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Andre F.; Bailão, Alexandre M.; Bastos, Izabela M. D.; Orme, Ian M.; Soares, Célia M. A.; Kipnis, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global health problem, and although multiple studies have addressed the relationship between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the host on an immunological level, few studies have addressed the impact of host physiological responses. Proteases produced by bacteria have been associated with important alterations in the host tissues, and a limited number of these enzymes have been characterized in mycobacterial species. M. tuberculosis produces a protease called Zmp1, which appears to be associated with virulence and has a putative action as an endothelin-converting enzyme. Endothelins are a family of vasoactive peptides, of which 3 distinct isoforms exist, and endothelin 1 (ET-1) is the most abundant and the best-characterized isoform. The aim of this work was to characterize the Zmp1 protease and evaluate its role in pathogenicity. Here, we have shown that M. tuberculosis produces and secretes an enzyme with ET-1 cleavage activity. These data demonstrate a possible role of Zmp1 for mycobacterium-host interactions and highlights its potential as a drug target. Moreover, the results suggest that endothelin pathways have a role in the pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis infections, and ETA or ETB receptor signaling can modulate the host response to the infection. We hypothesize that a balance between Zmp1 control of ET-1 levels and ETA/ETB signaling can allow M. tuberculosis adaptation and survival in the lung tissues. PMID:25267836

  9. Tuberculosis cross-species transmission in Tanzania: towards a One-Health concept.

    PubMed

    Mbugi, Erasto V; Katale, Bugwesa Z; Kendall, Sharon; Good, Liam; Kibiki, Gibson S; Keyyu, Julius D; Godfrey-Faussett, Peter; Van Helden, Paul; Matee, Mecky I

    2012-01-01

    For centuries, tuberculosis, which is a chronic infection caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis has remained a global health problem. The global burden of tuberculosis has increased, particularly in the Southern African region, mainly due to HIV, and inadequate health systems which has in turn given rise to emergent drug resistant tuberculosis (TB) strains. Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) has also emerged as a significant disease with the tendency for inter-species spread. The extent of interspecies BTB transmission both in urban and rural communities has not been adequately assessed. The phenomenon is of particular importance in rural communities where people share habitats with livestock and wildlife (particularly in areas near national parks and game reserves). Aerosol and oral intake are the major routes of transmission from diseased to healthy individuals, with health care workers often contracting infection nosocomially. Although TB control has increasingly been achieved in high-income countries, the disease, like other poverty-related infections, has continued to be a disaster in countries with low income economies. Transmission of infections occurs not only amongst humans but also between animals and humans (and occasionally vice versa) necessitating assessment of the extent of transmission at their interface. This review explores tuberculosis as a disease of humans which can cross-transmit between humans, livestock and wildlife. The review also addresses issues underlying the use of molecular biology, genetic sequencing and bioinformatics as t tools to understand the extent of inter-species cross-transmission of TB in a 'One Health' context. PMID:23327386

  10. Population remains top priority for China.

    PubMed

    Li, H

    1998-04-01

    China, whose population was 430 million in 1840, is facing a population total of 1.3 billion in 2000. Population increased rapidly in the country during the 1950s, but early efforts at population control were abandoned from the start of the Cultural Revolution in 1966 until the 1970s. Today, the importance of family planning (FP) is recognized throughout Chinese society. With 20 million newborns adding 13 million people to the population each year, controlling the population increase will remain a top priority of China's population policy. Other priorities include 1) increasing the quality of life of the population by improving health, promoting literacy, and developing human resources; 2) facing the impact of population aging; 3) struggling to overcome the poverty experienced by 50 million people; and 4) dealing with the imbalanced sex ratio of newborns. China has been attempting to institute strategies to implement the Program of Action adopted by the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development and is attempting to adopt an integrated approach to population programs that combines FP with development measures and the delivery of multiple services to enhance reproductive health. Since 1984, China has worked with Japan's JOICFP on an Integrated Project that offers FP, maternal and child health services, and parasite control. PMID:12348548

  11. Turbidite plays` immaturity means big potential remains

    SciTech Connect

    Pettingill, H.S.

    1998-10-05

    The international exploration and production industry is increasingly focusing on deepwater plays. Turbidites are not the only reservoir type that occurs in deepwater frontiers, but they are the primary reservoir type of those plays. A worldwide data base assembled from published information on 925 fields and discoveries with deepwater clastic reservoirs (turbidites sensu lato) has been employed to investigate the large-scale exploration and production trends. Coverage of the Former Soviet Union, China, and the Indian subcontinent has been minor, but with the large data base of fields and discoveries from the rest of the world, the broad conclusions should remain valid. This article describes the global turbidite play in terms of: (1) basins of the world where turbidite fields have been discovered; (2) the five largest basins in terms of total discovered resources; and (3) a summary of trap type, which is a critical geological factor in turbidite fields. The second article will summarize a population of the world`s 43 largest turbidite fields and discoveries.

  12. Rapid DNA detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-towards single cell sensitivity in point-of-care diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Benjamin Y.C.; Wee, Eugene J.H.; West, Nicholas P.; Trau, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Although there have been many recent advances in Tuberculosis (TB) detection technologies, there still remains a major need to develop simpler point-of-care techniques. In an effort towards such a diagnostic test for resource-poor settings, we have designed a bioassay based on detecting amplified DNA via bridging flocculation. The assay is cheap, with a sensitivity approaching a single cell of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the potential for translation into broader applications.

  13. Transmitted Extended-Spectrum Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Beijing, China, with Discordant Whole-Genome Sequencing Analysis Results

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Kayani, Masood ur Rehman; Gu, Yunting; Wang, Xiaobo; Zhu, Ting; Duan, Hongfei; Ma, Yifeng

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance to tuberculosis remains a major public health threat. Here, we report two cases of extended-spectrum extensively drug-resistant (XXDR) tuberculosis showing resistance to most first- and second-line agents. The results of a correlation of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and phenotypic testing were discordant, suggesting that overreliance on WGS may miss clinically relevant resistance in extensively drug-resistant disease. PMID:26063862

  14. Acute Monoarthritis of the Wrist Joint: Tuberculosis or Not?

    PubMed

    Desikan, Prabha; Verma, Rahul; Tiwari, Karuna; Panwalkar, Nikita

    2016-03-01

    Background?Extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) is known to have many and varied presentations. However, isolated involvement of bone with tubercular infection is uncommon. The clinical features of such infections are known to mimic chronic pyogenic osteomyelitis, Brodie abscess, or tumors, but not acute monoarthritis. Case Description?We describe here an unusual case of tuberculous osteomyelitis that mimicked features of acute monoarthritis of the wrist joint. Literature Review?Extraspinal tuberculous osteomyelitis is rare and comprises only about 2 to 3% of all cases of osteoarticular tuberculosis, with the hip and knee joints being the most commonly involved. An extensive literature review did not show any published report of tuberculous osteomyelitis presenting as acute monoarthritis of the wrist joint. Clinical Relevance?This case underlines the importance of making EPTB an important differential diagnosis even in cases with clinical features that are completely inconsistent with tubercular infections. PMID:26855841

  15. Achievements in and Challenges of Tuberculosis Control in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Han; Yim, Jae-Joon

    2015-11-01

    After the Korean War (1950-1953), nearly 6.5% of South Korea's population had active tuberculosis (TB). In response, South Korea implemented the National Tuberculosis Program in 1962. From 1965 to 1995, the prevalence of bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary TB in South Korea decreased from 940 to 219 cases per 100,000 population. Astounding economic growth might have contributed to this result; however, TB incidence in South Korea remains the highest among high-income countries. The rate of decrease in TB incidence seems to have slowed over the past 15 years. A demographic shift toward an older population, many of whom have latent TB and various concurrent conditions, is challenging TB control efforts in South Korea. The increasing number of immigrants also plays a part in the prolonged battle against TB. A historical review of TB in South Korea provides an opportunity to understand national TB control efforts that are applicable to other parts of the world. PMID:26485188

  16. Multiple, large granulomas in a patient with extensive intestinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Massalis, Ioannis; Lampropoulos, Christos; Efthymiou, Giorgos; Papadima, Efi

    2012-01-01

    A 42-year-old patient presented with low-grade fever, pain of the right iliac fossa, constipation and tendency to vomit. Clinical examination revealed abdominal wall rigidity and rebound tenderness of the right iliac fossa. The patient was operated immediately because of an acute abdomen and the probable diagnosis of ruptured appendicitis. In laparotomy, terminal ileum, ileocaecal valve and the entire ascending colon, up to the right colic flexure, were occupied and distorted by multiple, large masses. In addition, many enlarged lymph nodes were scattered in the mesentery and the mesocolon. A right hemicolectomy was performed. Pathological examination of biopsy specimens revealed findings compatible with tuberculosis. The patient was started on empirical anti-tuberculosis treatment with a four-drug regimen. He was discharged 10 days later with marked improvement. Six months after surgery, the patient remains in very good condition without any symptoms. PMID:23234821

  17. Computational biology in anti-tuberculosis drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Dennis J; Brown, James R

    2009-06-01

    The resurgence of drug resistant tuberculosis (TB) is a major global healthcare problem. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), TB's causative agent, evades the host immune system and drug regimes by entering prolonged periods of nonproliferation or dormancy. The identification of genes essential to the bacterium in its dormancy phase infections is a key strategy in the development of new anti-TB therapeutics. The rapid expansion of TB-related genomic data sources including DNA sequences, transcriptomic and proteomic profiles, and genome-wide essentiality data, present considerable opportunities to apply advanced computational analyses to predict potential drug targets. However, the translation of in silico predictions to effective clinical therapies remains a significant challenge. PMID:19519485

  18. Higher Rate of Tuberculosis in Second Generation Migrants Compared to Native Residents in a Metropolitan Setting in Western Europe

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Florian M.; Fiebig, Lena; Hauer, Barbara; Brodhun, Bonita; Glaser-Paschke, Gisela; Haas, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Background In Western Europe, migrants constitute an important risk group for tuberculosis, but little is known about successive generations of migrants. We aimed to characterize migration among tuberculosis cases in Berlin and to estimate annual rates of tuberculosis in two subsequent migrant generations. We hypothesized that second generation migrants born in Germany are at higher risk of tuberculosis compared to native (non-migrant) residents. Methods A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted. All tuberculosis cases reported to health authorities in Berlin between 11/2010 and 10/2011 were eligible. Interviews were conducted using a structured questionnaire including demographic data, migration history of patients and their parents, and language use. Tuberculosis rates were estimated using 2011 census data. Results Of 314 tuberculosis cases reported, 154 (49.0%) participated. Of these, 81 (52.6%) were first-, 14 (9.1%) were second generation migrants, and 59 (38.3%) were native residents. The tuberculosis rate per 100,000 individuals was 28.3 (95CI: 24.0–32.6) in first-, 10.2 (95%CI: 6.1–16.6) in second generation migrants, and 4.6 (95%CI: 3.7–5.6) in native residents. When combining information from the standard notification variables country of birth and citizenship, the sensitivity to detect second generation migration was 28.6%. Conclusions There is a higher rate of tuberculosis among second generation migrants compared to native residents in Berlin. This may be explained by presumably frequent contact and transmission within migrant populations. Second generation migration is insufficiently captured by the surveillance variables country of birth and citizenship. Surveillance systems in Western Europe should allow for quantifying the tuberculosis burden in this important risk group. PMID:26061733

  19. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis, human immunodeficiency virus, and foreign birth in North Carolina, 1993 – 2006

    PubMed Central

    Kipp, Aaron M; Stout, Jason E; Hamilton, Carol Dukes; Van Rie, Annelies

    2008-01-01

    Background The proportion of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) reported in the United States has been gradually increasing. HIV infection and foreign birth are increasingly associated with tuberculosis and understanding their effect on the clinical presentation of tuberculosis is important. Methods Case-control study of 6,124 persons with tuberculosis reported to the North Carolina Division of Public health from January 1, 1993 to December 31, 2006. Multivariate logistic regression was used to obtain adjusted odds ratios measuring the associations of foreign birth region and US born race/ethnicity, by HIV status, with EPTB. Results Among all patients with tuberculosis, 1,366 (22.3%) had EPTB, 563 (9.2%) were HIV co-infected, and 1,299 (21.2%) were foreign born. Among HIV negative patients, EPTB was associated with being foreign born (adjusted ORs 1.36 to 5.09, depending on region of birth) and with being US born, Black/African American (OR 1.84; 95% CI 1.42, 2.39). Among HIV infected patients, EPTB was associated with being US born, Black/African American (OR 2.60; 95% CI 1.83, 3.71) and with foreign birth in the Americas (OR 5.12; 95% CI 2.84, 9.23). Conclusion Foreign born tuberculosis cases were more likely to have EPTB than US born tuberculosis cases, even in the absence of HIV infection. Increasing proportions of foreign born and HIV-attributable tuberculosis cases in the United States will likely result in a sustained burden of EPTB. Further research is needed to explore why the occurrence and type of EPTB differs by region of birth and whether host genetic and/or bacterial variation can explain these differences in EPTB. PMID:18394166

  20. Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Sputum Samples by Cepheid Xpert Assay: A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Neerja; Bansal, Renu; Arora, Shilpa

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the commonest opportunistic infection and the leading cause of death in HIV patients in developing countries. HIV infection is a well recognised risk factor for both activation of initial infection and reactivation of latent infection. This study was done to find out the co-prevalence and the trend of HIV infection among tuberculosis patients and to determine the prevalence of MDR Tuberculosis in HIV positive patients using Xpert MTB/RIF assay (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA, United States). Materials and Methods The sputum samples are received from five districts of Punjab. Sputum samples of the patients with symptoms suggestive of pulmonary tuberculosis including both new cases and on treatment are received from the various district and civil hospitals of five districts. Sputum specimen was processed for TB detection by Cartridge Based Nucleic Acid Amplification testing (CB-NAAT) using Xpert MTB/RiF assay technology. Results The study period is from October 2013 to September 2014. A total of 907 patients with symptoms suggestive of pulmonary tuberculosis including both new cases and on treatment. Out of these patients 733 were reported MTB detected. Out of these 907 patients 29 were reported HIV positive and out of 733 patients 19(2.5%) were reported positive for (HIV +TUBERCULOSIS). Of these 19 cases 16(84.21%) cases were sensitive to rifampicin (RIF) and 3(15.78%) cases were showing resistance to rifampicin (RIF) Drug. Conclusion Co-existence of HIV and tuberculosis is high and there is high Prevalence of MDR tuberculosis in HIV patients. PMID:26155475

  1. MODS for Tuberculosis Screening Prior to Isoniazid Preventive Therapy in HIV-Infected Persons

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Krishna P.; Brady, Mark F.; Gilman, Robert H.; Coronel, Jorge; Ñavincopa, Marcos; Ticona, Eduardo; Chavez, Gonzalo; Sánchez, Eduardo; Rojas, Christian; Solari, Lely; Valencia, Jorge; Pinedo, Yvett; Benites, Carlos; Friedland, Jon S.; Moore, David A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Active tuberculosis (TB) must be excluded before initiating isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) in HIV-infected persons, but currently used screening strategies suffer from poor sensitivity and specificity and high patient attrition rates. Liquid TB culture is now recommended for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in TB suspects. This study compared the efficacy, effectiveness and speed of the microscopic-observation drug-susceptibility (MODS) assay with currently used strategies for tuberculosis screening prior to IPT in HIV-infected persons. Methods 471 HIV-infected IPT candidates at three hospitals in Lima, Peru, were enrolled into a prospective comparison of tuberculosis screening strategies, including laboratory, clinical and radiographic assessments. Results Of 435 patients who provided two sputum samples, M. tuberculosis was detected in 27 (6.2%) by MODS, 22 (5.1%) by Lowenstein-Jensen culture and 7 (1.6%) by smear. Of patients with any positive microbiological test, a MODS culture was positive in 96% by 14 days and 100% by 21 days. MODS simultaneously detected multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in two patients. Screening strategies involving combinations of clinical assessment, chest radiograph and sputum smear were less effective than two liquid TB cultures in accurately diagnosing and excluding tuberculosis (p<0.01). Screening strategies that included non-culture tests had poor sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions MODS identified, and reliably excluded, cases of pulmonary tuberculosis more accurately than other screening strategies, while providing results significantly faster than Lowenstein-Jensen culture. The streamlining of TB rule-out through the use of liquid culture-based strategies could help facilitate the massive upscaling of IPT required to reduce HIV and TB morbidity and mortality. PMID:20192727

  2. British Infection Society guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis of the central nervous system in adults and children.

    PubMed

    Thwaites, Guy; Fisher, Martin; Hemingway, Cheryl; Scott, Geoff; Solomon, Tom; Innes, John

    2009-09-01

    SUMMARY AND KEY RECOMMENDATIONS: The aim of these guidelines is to describe a practical but evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of central nervous system tuberculosis in children and adults. We have presented guidance on tuberculous meningitis (TBM), intra-cerebral tuberculoma without meningitis, and tuberculosis affecting the spinal cord. Our key recommendations are as follows: 1. TBM is a medical emergency. Treatment delay is strongly associated with death and empirical anti-tuberculosis therapy should be started promptly in all patients in whom the diagnosis of TBM is suspected. Do not wait for microbiological or molecular diagnostic confirmation. 2. The diagnosis of TBM is best made with lumbar puncture and examination of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Suspect TBM if there is a CSF leucocytosis (predominantly lymphocytes), the CSF protein is raised, and the CSF:plasma glucose is <50%. The diagnostic yield of CSF microscopy and culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis increases with the volume of CSF submitted; repeat the lumbar puncture if the diagnosis remains uncertain. 3. Imaging is essential for the diagnosis of cerebral tuberculoma and tuberculosis involving the spinal cord, although the radiological appearances do not confirm the diagnosis. A tissue diagnosis (by histopathology and mycobacterial culture) should be attempted whenever possible, either by biopsy of the lesion itself, or through diagnostic sampling from extra-neural sites of disease e.g. lung, gastric fluid, lymph nodes, liver, bone marrow. 4. Treatment for all forms of CNS tuberculosis should consist of 4 drugs (isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, ethambutol) for 2 months followed by 2 drugs (isoniazid, rifampicin) for at least 10 months. Adjunctive corticosteroids (either dexamethasone or prednisolone) should be given to all patients with TBM, regardless of disease severity. 5. Children with CNS tuberculosis should ideally be managed by a paediatrician with familiarity and expertise in paediatric tuberculosis or otherwise with input from a paediatric infectious diseases unit. The Children's HIV Association of UK and Ireland (CHIVA) provide further guidance on the management of HIV-infected children (www.chiva.org.uk). 6. All patients with suspected or proven tuberculosis should be offered testing for HIV infection. The principles of CNS tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment are the same for HIV infected and uninfected individuals, although HIV infection broadens the differential diagnosis and anti-retroviral treatment complicates management. Tuberculosis in HIV infected patients should be managed either within specialist units by physicians with expertise in both HIV and tuberculosis, or in a combined approach between HIV and tuberculosis experts. The co-administration of anti-retroviral and anti-tuberculosis drugs should follow guidance issued by the British HIV association (www.bhiva.org). PMID:19643501

  3. A comparative examination of tuberculosis immigration medical screening programs from selected countries with high immigration and low tuberculosis incidence rates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) in migrants is an ongoing challenge in several low TB incidence countries since a large proportion of TB in these countries occurs in migrants from high incidence countries. To meet these challenges, several countries utilize TB screening programs. The programs attempt to identify and treat those with active and/or infectious stages of the disease. In addition, screening is used to identify and manage those with latent or inactive disease after arrival. Between nations, considerable variation exists in the methods used in migration-associated TB screening. The present study aimed to compare the TB immigration medical examination requirements in selected countries of high immigration and low TB incidence rates. Methods Descriptive study of immigration TB screening programs Results 16 out of 18 eligible countries responded to the written standardized survey and phone interview. Comparisons in specific areas of TB immigration screening programs included authorities responsible for TB screening, the primary objectives of the TB screening program, the yield of detection of active TB disease, screening details and aspects of follow up for inactive pulmonary TB. No two countries had the same approach to TB screening among migrants. Important differences, common practices, common problems, evidence or lack of evidence for program specifics were noted. Conclusions In spite of common goals, there is great diversity in the processes and practices designed to mitigate the impact of migration-associated TB among nations that screen migrants for the disease. The long-term goal in decreasing migration-related introduction of TB from high to low incidence countries remains diminishing the prevalence of the disease in those high incidence locations. In the meantime, existing or planned migration screening programs for TB can be made more efficient and evidenced based. Cooperation among countries doing research in the areas outlined in this study should facilitate the development of improved screening programs. PMID:21205318

  4. Building Background Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Susan B.; Kaefer, Tanya; Pinkham, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    This article make a case for the importance of background knowledge in children's comprehension. It suggests that differences in background knowledge may account for differences in understanding text for low- and middle-income children. It then describes strategies for building background knowledge in the age of common core standards.

  5. ‘Complex’ but coping: experience of symptoms of tuberculosis and health care seeking behaviours - a qualitative interview study of urban risk groups, London, UK

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis awareness, grounded in social cognition models of health care seeking behaviour, relies on the ability of individuals to recognise symptoms, assess their risk and access health care (passive case finding). There is scant published research into the health actions of ‘hard-to-reach’ groups with tuberculosis, who represent approximately 17% of the London TB caseload. This study aimed to analyse patients’ knowledge of tuberculosis, their experiences of symptoms and their health care seeking behaviours. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 participants, predominantly homeless and attending a major tuberculosis centre in London, UK. Most had complex medical and social needs including drug and alcohol use or immigration problems affecting entitlement to social welfare. Analytical frameworks aimed to reflect the role of broader social structures in shaping individual health actions. Results Although participants demonstrated some knowledge of tuberculosis their awareness of personal risk was low. Symptoms commonly associated with tuberculosis were either not recognised or were attributed to other causes for which participants would not ordinarily seek health care. Many accessed health care by chance and, for some, for health concerns other than tuberculosis. Conclusions Health education, based on increasing awareness of symptoms, may play a limited role in tuberculosis care for populations with complex health and social needs. The findings support the intensification of outreach initiatives to identify groups at risk of tuberculosis and the development of structured care pathways which support people into prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24943308

  6. Global Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis of TB Background General Considerations Research Needs Molecular Drug Susceptibility Tests (DSTs) Communication Plan for New ... Expert Panel Recommendations to ACET, CDC, DTBE Rapid Molecular Testing to Detect Drug-Resistant TB in the ...

  7. Reconstructing Tuberculosis Services after Major Conflict: Experiences and Lessons Learned in East Timor

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Nelson; Kelly, Paul M; Grace, Jocelyn A; Zwi, Anthony B

    2006-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem in developing countries. Following the disruption to health services in East Timor due to violent political conflict in 1999, the National Tuberculosis Control Program was established, with a local non-government organisation as the lead agency. Within a few months, the TB program was operational in all districts. Methods and Findings Using the East Timor TB program as a case study, we have examined the enabling factors for the implementation of this type of communicable disease control program in a post-conflict setting. Stakeholder analysis was undertaken, and semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2003 with 24 key local and international stakeholders. Coordination, cooperation, and collaboration were identified as major contributors to the success of the TB program. The existing local structure and experience of the local non-government organisation, the commitment among local personnel and international advisors to establishing an effective program, and the willingness of international advisers and local counterparts to be flexible in their approach were also important factors. This success was achieved despite major impediments, including mass population displacement, lack of infrastructure, and the competing interests of organisations working in the health sector. Conclusions Five years after the conflict, the TB program continues to operate in all districts with high notification rates, although the lack of a feeling of ownership by government health workers remains a challenge. Lessons learned in East Timor may be applicable to other post-conflict settings where TB is highly prevalent, and may have relevance to other disease control programs. PMID:16933956

  8. Implementing a Large-Scale Systematic Tuberculosis Screening Program in Correctional Facilities in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Zishiri, Vincent; Charalambous, Salome; Shah, Maunank R.; Chihota, Violet; Page-Shipp, Liesl; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Hoffmann, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis (TB) prevalence is high in correctional facilities in southern Africa. With support from local South African nongovernmental organizations, the South African Department of Correctional Services initiated a program of systematically screening newly admitted and current inmates for symptoms followed by GeneXpert Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)/rifampicin (Rif) for microbiologic testing of symptomatic inmates. Methods. We conducted a program evaluation during a 5-month window describing program reach, effectiveness, adoption within the facilities, cost, and opportunities for sustainability. This evaluation included 4 facilities (2 large and 2 smaller) with a total daily census of 20 700 inmates. Results. During the 5-month evaluation window from May to September 2013, 7426 inmates were screened at the 4 facilities. This represents screening 87% of all new admits (the remaining new admits were screened by correctional staff only and are not included in these statistics) and 23% of the daily inmate census, reaching 55% of the overall screening target as calculated per annum. The reach ranged from 57% screened during these 5 months at one of the smaller facilities to 13% at the largest facility. Two hundred one cases of pulmonary TB were diagnosed, representing 2.1% of the screened population; 93% had documented initiation of TB treatment. The cost per TB case identified was $1513, excluding treatment costs (with treatment costs it was $1880). Conclusions. We reached a large number of inmates with high-volume screening and effectively used GeneXpert MTB/Rif to diagnose pulmonary TB and rapidly initiate treatment. The cost was comparable to other screening programs. PMID:25884008

  9. Adherence with isoniazid for prevention of tuberculosis among HIV-infected adults in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Szakacs, Tom A; Wilson, Douglas; Cameron, D William; Clark, Michael; Kocheleff, Paul; Muller, F James; McCarthy, Anne E

    2006-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is the most common opportunistic infection in HIV-infected adults in developing countries. Isoniazid (INH) is recommended for treatment of latent TB infection, however non-adherence is common. The purpose of this study was to apply in-house prepared isoniazid (INH) urine test strips in a clinical setting, and identify predictors of positive test results in an adherence questionnaire in HIV-infected adults taking INH for prevention of TB. Methods Cross-sectional study of adherence using a questionnaire and urine test strips for detection of INH metabolites at two hospitals in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. Participants were aged at least 18 years, HIV positive, and receiving INH for prevention of tuberculosis disease. Univariate and multivariate analyses are used to identify factors relevant to adherence. Results 301 consecutive patients were recruited. 28% of participants had negative urine tests. 32 (37.2%, 95% CI25.4, 45.0) of the 86 patients who received INH from peripheral pharmacies said the pharmacy had run out of INH at some time, compared with central hospital pharmacies (p = 0.0001). In univariate analysis, a negative test was associated with self-reported missed INH doses (p = 0.043). Each 12-hour increment since last reported dose increased the likelihood of a negative test by 34% (p = 0.0007). Belief in INH safety was associated with a positive test (p = 0.021). In multivariate analysis, patients who believed INH is important for prevention of TB disease were more likely to be negative (p = 0.0086). Conclusion Adequate drug availability at peripheral pharmacies remains an important intervention for TB prevention. Key questions may identify potentially non-adherent patients. In-house prepared urine tests strips are an effective and cheap method of objectively assessing INH adherence, and could be used an important tool in TB control programs. PMID:16772037

  10. Comparative analysis of mycobacterium and related actinomycetes yields insight into the evolution of mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The sequence of the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strain H37Rv has been available for over a decade, but the biology of the pathogen remains poorly understood. Genome sequences from other Mtb strains and closely related bacteria present an opportunity to apply the power of comparative genomics to understand the evolution of Mtb pathogenesis. We conducted a comparative analysis using 31 genomes from the Tuberculosis Database (TBDB.org), including 8 strains of Mtb and M. bovis, 11 additional Mycobacteria, 4 Corynebacteria, 2 Streptomyces, Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, Nocardia farcinia, Acidothermus cellulolyticus, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Propionibacterium acnes, and Bifidobacterium longum. Results Our results highlight the functional importance of lipid metabolism and its regulation, and reveal variation between the evolutionary profiles of genes implicated in saturated and unsaturated fatty acid metabolism. It also suggests that DNA repair and molybdopterin cofactors are important in pathogenic Mycobacteria. By analyzing sequence conservation and gene expression data, we identify nearly 400 conserved noncoding regions. These include 37 predicted promoter regulatory motifs, of which 14 correspond to previously validated motifs, as well as 50 potential noncoding RNAs, of which we experimentally confirm the expression of four. Conclusions Our analysis of protein evolution highlights gene families that are associated with the adaptation of environmental Mycobacteria to obligate pathogenesis. These families include fatty acid metabolism, DNA repair, and molybdopterin biosynthesis. Our analysis reinforces recent findings suggesting that small noncoding RNAs are more common in Mycobacteria than previously expected. Our data provide a foundation for understanding the genome and biology of Mtb in a comparative context, and are available online and through TBDB.org. PMID:22452820

  11. Biomarkers on patient T cells diagnose active tuberculosis and monitor treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Adekambi, Toidi; Ibegbu, Chris C.; Cagle, Stephanie; Kalokhe, Ameeta S.; Wang, Yun F.; Hu, Yijuan; Day, Cheryl L.; Ray, Susan M.; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The identification and treatment of individuals with tuberculosis (TB) is a global public health priority. Accurate diagnosis of pulmonary active TB (ATB) disease remains challenging and relies on extensive medical evaluation and detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in the patient’s sputum. Further, the response to treatment is monitored by sputum culture conversion, which takes several weeks for results. Here, we sought to identify blood-based host biomarkers associated with ATB and hypothesized that immune activation markers on Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells would be associated with Mtb load in vivo and could thus provide a gauge of Mtb infection. METHODS. Using polychromatic flow cytometry, we evaluated the expression of immune activation markers on Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells from individuals with asymptomatic latent Mtb infection (LTBI) and ATB as well as from ATB patients undergoing anti-TB treatment. RESULTS. Frequencies of Mtb-specific IFN-γ+CD4+ T cells that expressed immune activation markers CD38 and HLA-DR as well as intracellular proliferation marker Ki-67 were substantially higher in subjects with ATB compared with those with LTBI. These markers accurately classified ATB and LTBI status, with cutoff values of 18%, 60%, and 5% for CD38+IFN-γ+, HLA-DR+IFN-γ+, and Ki-67+IFN-γ+, respectively, with 100% specificity and greater than 96% sensitivity. These markers also distinguished individuals with untreated ATB from those who had successfully completed anti-TB treatment and correlated with decreasing mycobacterial loads during treatment. CONCLUSION. We have identified host blood-based biomarkers on Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells that discriminate between ATB and LTBI and provide a set of tools for monitoring treatment response and cure. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Registration is not required for observational studies. FUNDING. This study was funded by Emory University, the NIH, and the Yerkes National Primate Center. PMID:25822019

  12. Increased Incidence of Tuberculosis in Zimbabwe, in Association with Food Insecurity, and Economic Collapse: An Ecological Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thistle, Paul; Katumbe, Lovemore; Jetha, Arif; Schwarz, Dan; Bolotin, Shelly; Barker, R. D.; Simor, Andrew; Silverman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Zimbabwe underwent a socioeconomic crisis and resultant increase in food insecurity in 2008–9. The impact of the crisis on Tuberculosis (TB) incidence is unknown. Methods Prospective databases from two mission hospitals, which were geographically widely separated, and remained open during the crisis, were reviewed. Results At the Howard Hospital (HH) in northern Zimbabwe, TB incidence increased 35% in 2008 from baseline rates in 2003–2007 (p<0.01) and remained at that level in 2009. Murambinda Hospital (MH) in Eastern Zimbabwe also demonstrated a 29% rise in TB incidence from 2007 to 2008 (p<0.01) and remained at that level in 2009. Data collected post-crisis at HH showed a decrease of 33% in TB incidence between 2009 to 2010 (p<0.001) and 2010/2011 TB incidence remained below that of the crisis years of 2008/2009 (p<0.01). Antenatal clinic HIV seroprevalence at HH decreased between 2001(23%) to 2011(11%) (p<0.001). Seasonality of TB incidence was analyzed at both MH and HH. There was a higher TB incidence in the dry season when food is least available (September-November) compared to post harvest (April-June) (p<0.001). Conclusion This study suggests that an epidemic of TB mirrored socioeconomic collapse and recovery in Zimbabwe. The seasonal data suggests that food security may have been associated with TB incidence both annually and during the crisis in this high HIV prevalence country. PMID:24505245

  13. Ciguatera: recent advances but the risk remains.

    PubMed

    Lehane, L; Lewis, R J

    2000-11-01

    Ciguatera is an important form of human poisoning caused by the consumption of seafood. The disease is characterised by gastrointestinal, neurological and cardiovascular disturbances. In cases of severe toxicity, paralysis, coma and death may occur. There is no immunity, and the toxins are cumulative. Symptoms may persist for months or years, or recur periodically. The epidemiology of ciguatera is complex and of central importance to the management and future use of marine resources. Ciguatera is an important medical entity in tropical and subtropical Pacific and Indian Ocean regions, and in the tropical Caribbean. As reef fish are increasingly exported to other areas, it has become a world health problem. The disease is under-reported and often misdiagnosed. Lipid-soluble, polyether toxins known as ciguatoxins accumulated in the muscles of certain subtropical and tropical marine finfish cause ciguatera. Ciguatoxins arise from biotransformation in the fish of less polar ciguatoxins (gambiertoxins) produced by Gambierdiscus toxicus, a marine dinoflagellate that lives on macroalgae, usually attached to dead coral. The toxins and their metabolites are concentrated in the food chain when carnivorous fish prey on smaller herbivorous fish. Humans are exposed at the end of the food chain. More than 400 species of fish can be vectors of ciguatoxins, but generally only a relatively small number of species are regularly incriminated in ciguatera. Ciguateric fish look, taste and smell normal, and detection of toxins in fish remains a problem. More than 20 precursor gambiertoxins and ciguatoxins have been identified in G. toxicus and in herbivorous and carnivorous fish. The toxins become more polar as they undergo oxidative metabolism and pass up the food chain. The main Pacific ciguatoxin (P-CTX-1) causes ciguatera at levels=0.1 microg/kg in the flesh of carnivorous fish. The main Caribbean ciguatoxin (C-CTX-1) is less polar and 10-fold less toxic than P-CTX-1. Ciguatoxins activate sodium ion (Na ) channels, causing cell membrane excitability and instability. Worldwide coral bleaching is now well documented, and there is a strong association between global warming and the bleaching and death of coral. This, together with natural environmental factors such as earthquakes and hurricanes, and man-made factors such as tourism, dock construction, sewage and eutrophication, may create more favourable environments for G. toxicus. While low levels of G. toxicus are found throughout tropical and subtropical waters, the presence of bloom numbers is unpredictable and patchy. Only certain genetic strains produce ciguatoxins, and environmental triggers for increasing toxin production are unknown. PMID:11078162

  14. Tuberculosis Prevention in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, Stephen J.; Bernardo, John; Daly, Jennifer S.; Husson, Robert

    2004-01-01

    To help college health services in all parts of the country improve their approach to latent tuberculosis, two Listservs were provided for them to post their questions on dealing with TB infection. In this article, the authors present some of the questions posted in the Listservs and their corresponding answers. In their answers, the authors have

  15. Tuberculosis Prevention in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, Stephen J.; Bernardo, John; Daly, Jennifer S.; Husson, Robert

    2004-01-01

    To help college health services in all parts of the country improve their approach to latent tuberculosis, two Listservs were provided for them to post their questions on dealing with TB infection. In this article, the authors present some of the questions posted in the Listservs and their corresponding answers. In their answers, the authors have…

  16. Epidemiological basis of tuberculosis eradication

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Ole; Payne, Penelope G.; Wilbek, Erik

    1966-01-01

    As knowledge of the epidemiology of tuberculosis in Greenland has increased, it has become evident that the majority of cases develop long after the primary infection and that it would therefore be valuable from the public health point of view if the disease rate among naturally infected persons could be reduced. To examine the possibility of achieving this, a double-blind drug trial with isoniazid and a placebo was conducted among some 70% of the adult population of western Greenland. The results show that throughout the six years of the study the incidence of tuberculosis was lower in the group treated with isoniazid and that this reduction occurred whether the initial X-rays pictures were normal or showed suspicious or healed lesions. It is concluded that chemoprophylaxis programmes should probably be administered only to selected groups of the population. The delimitation of such groups is discussed on the basis of their tuberculosis risk and of the expected yield in terms of reduction in tuberculosis prevalence. PMID:5335457

  17. HIV and tuberculosis in India.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Soumya; Nagendran, G

    2008-11-01

    The global impact of the converging dual epidemics of tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is one of the major public health challenges of our time. The World Health Organization (WHO) reports 9.2 million new cases of TB in 2006 of whom 7.7% were HIV-infected. Tuberculosis is the most common opportunistic infection in HIV-infected patients as well as the leading cause of death. Further,there has been an increase in rates of drug resistant tuberculosis, including multi-drug (MDRTB) and extensively drug resistant TB (XDRTB), which are difficult to treat and contribute to increased mortality. The diagnosis of TB is based on sputum smear microscopy, a 100-year old technique and chest radiography,which has problems of specificity. Extra-pulmonary, disseminated and sputum smear negative manifestations are more common in patients with advanced immunosuppression. Newer diagnostic tests are urgently required that are not only sensitive and specific but easy to use in remote and resourc-poor settings. Treatment of HIV-TB co-infection is complex and associated with high pill burden, overlapping drug toxicities,risk of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) and challenges related to adherence. From a programmatic point of view, screening of all HIV-infected persons for tuberculosis and vice-versa will help identify co-infected patients who require treatment for both infections. This requires good coordination and communication between the TB and AIDS control programs, in India. PMID:19208978

  18. Tuberculosis and Cardiovascular Disease: Linking the Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Huaman, Moises A.; Henson, David; Ticona, Eduardo; Sterling, Timothy R.; Garvy, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    The burden of tuberculosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is enormous worldwide. CVD rates are rapidly increasing in low- and middle-income countries. Public health programs have been challenged with the overlapping tuberculosis and CVD epidemics. Monocyte/macrophages, lymphocytes and cytokines involved in cellular mediated immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also main drivers of atherogenesis, suggesting a potential pathogenic role of tuberculosis in CVD via mechanisms that have been described for other pathogens that establish chronic infection and latency. Studies have shown a pro-atherogenic effect of antibody-mediated responses against mycobacterial heat shock protein-65 through cross reaction with self-antigens in human vessels. Furthermore, subsets of mycobacteria actively replicate during latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), and recent studies suggest that LTBI is associated with persistent chronic inflammation that may lead to CVD. Recent epidemiologic work has shown that the risk of CVD in persons who develop tuberculosis is higher than in persons without a history of tuberculosis, even several years after recovery from tuberculosis. Together, these data suggest that tuberculosis may play a role in the pathogenesis of CVD. Further research to investigate a potential link between tuberculosis and CVD is warranted. PMID:26835156

  19. Latent Tuberculosis in Pregnancy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Malhamé, Isabelle; Cormier, Maxime; Sugarman, Jordan; Schwartzman, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background In countries with low tuberculosis (TB) incidence, immigrants from higher incidence countries represent the major pool of individuals with latent TB infection (LTBI). The antenatal period represents an opportunity for immigrant women to access the medical system, and hence for potential screening and treatment of LTBI. However, such screening and treatment during pregnancy remains controversial. Objectives In order to further understand the prevalence, natural history, screening and management of LTBI in pregnancy, we conducted a systematic literature review addressing the screening and treatment of LTBI, in pregnant women without known HIV infection. Methods A systematic review of 4 databases (Embase, Embase Classic, Medline, Cochrane Library) covering articles published from January 1st 1980 to April 30th 2014. Articles in English, French or Spanish with relevant information on prevalence, natural history, screening tools, screening strategies and treatment of LTBI during pregnancy were eligible for inclusion. Articles were excluded if (1) Full text was not available (2) they were case series or case studies (3) they focused exclusively on prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of active TB (4) the study population was exclusively HIV-infected. Results Of 4,193 titles initially identified, 208 abstracts were eligible for review. Of these, 30 articles qualified for full text review and 22 were retained: 3 cohort studies, 2 case-control studies, and 17 cross-sectional studies. In the USA, the estimated prevalence of LTBI ranged from 14 to 48% in women tested, and tuberculin skin test (TST) positivity was associated with ethnicity. One study suggested that incidence of active TB was significantly increased during the 180 days postpartum (Incidence rate ratio, 1.95 (95% CI 1.24–3.07). There was a high level of adherence with both skin testing (between 90–100%) and chest radiography (93–100%.). In three studies from low incidence settings, concordance between TST and an interferon-gamma release assay was 77, 88 and 91% with kappa values ranging from 0.26 to 0.45. In low incidence settings, an IGRA may be more specific and less sensitive than TST, and results do not appear to be altered by pregnancy. The proportion of women who attended follow-up visits after positive tuberculin tests varied from 14 to 69%, while 5 to 42% of those who attended follow-up visits completed a minimum of 6 months of isoniazid treatment. One study raised the possibility of an association of pregnancy/post-partum state with INH hepatitis (risk ratio 2,5, 95% CI 0.8–8.2) and fatal hepatotoxicity (rate ratio 4.0, 95% CI 0.2–258). One study deemed INH safe during breastfeeding based on peak concentrations in plasma and breast milk after INH administration. Conclusion Pregnancy is an opportunity to screen for LTBI. Interferon-gamma release assays are likely comparable to tuberculin skin tests and may be used during pregnancy. Efforts should be made to improve adherence with follow-up and treatment post-partum. Further data are needed with respect to safety and feasibility of antepartum INH therapy, and with respect to alternative treatment regimens. PMID:27149116

  20. Bacterial Genetic Signatures of Human Social Phenomena among M. tuberculosis from an Aboriginal Canadian Population

    PubMed Central

    Pepperell, Caitlin; Hoeppner, Vernon H.; Lipatov, Mikhail; Wobeser, Wendy; Schoolnik, Gary K.; Feldman, Marcus W.

    2010-01-01

    Despite a widespread global distribution and highly variable disease phenotype, there is little DNA sequence diversity among isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, many regional population genetic surveys have revealed a stereotypical structure in which a single clone, lineage, or clade makes up the majority of the population. It is often assumed that dominant clones are highly adapted, that is, the overall structure of M. tuberculosis populations is the result of positive selection. In order to test this assumption, we analyzed genetic data from extant populations of bacteria circulating in Aboriginal communities in Saskatchewan, Canada. Demographic parameters of the bacterial population were estimated from archival epidemiological data collected over ∼130 years since the onset of epidemic tuberculosis in the host communities. Bacterial genetic data were tested against neutral theory expectations and the local evolutionary history of M. tuberculosis investigated by phylogenetic analysis. Our findings are not consistent with positive selection on the bacterial population. Instead, we uncovered founder effects persisting over decades and barriers to gene flow within the bacterial population. Simulation experiments suggested that a combination of these neutral influences could result in the stereotypical structure of M. tuberculosis populations. Some aspects of population structure were suggestive of background selection, and data were on the whole consistent with combined effects of population bottlenecks, subdivision, and background selection. Neutral phenomena, namely, bottlenecks and partitions within populations, are prominent influences on the evolution of M. tuberculosis and likely contribute to restricted genetic diversity observed within this species. Given these influences, a complex evolutionary model will be required to define the relative fitness of different M. tuberculosis lineages and, ultimately, to uncover the genetic basis for its success as a pathogen. PMID:19861642

  1. Effects of Fluroquinolones in Newly Diagnosed, Sputum-Positive Tuberculosis Therapy: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dandan; Wang, Tiansheng; Shen, Su; Cheng, Sheng; Yu, Junxian; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Chao; Tang, Huilin

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is a major public health problem especially in developing countries, the comparative efficacy and safety of fluroquinolones (FQs) for adult patients with newly diagnosed, sputum-positive tuberculosis remains controversial. We aimed to investigate the benefits and risks of FQs-containing (addition/substitution) regimens in this population. Methods A network meta-analysis was performed to compare FQs (C: ciprofloxacin; O: ofloxacin; Lo: levofloxacin; M: moxifloxacin; G: gatifloxacin) addition/substitution regimen with standard HRZE regimen (ie isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol) in newly diagnosed, sputum-positive tuberculosis. Medline, Embase and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were systematically searched, randomized trials with duration longer than 8 weeks were included. The primary outcome was week-8 sputum negativity, and secondary outcomes included treatment failure, serious adverse events and death from all cause. Results Twelve studies comprising 6465 participants were included in the network meta-analysis. Löwenstein-Jensen culture method showed that HRZEM (OR 4.96, 95% CI 2.83–8.67), MRZE (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.19–1.84) and HRZM (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.08–1.62) had more sputum conversion than HRZE by the eighth week, whereas HRC (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.19–0.77) and HRZO (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.24–0.92) were worse than HRZE. Moxifloxacin-containing regimens showed more conversion than HRZE by liquid method at the end of two months. But by the end of treatment, FQs-containing regimens didn’t show superiority than HRZE on treatment failure. There were no significant differences between any regimens on other outcomes like serious adverse events and all-cause death. Conclusion This comprehensive network meta-analysis showed that compared with HRZE, moxifloxacin-containing regimens could significantly increase sputum conversion by the eighth week for patients with newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis while HRC and HRZO regimens were inferior. But all the FQs-containing regimens did not show superiority in other outcomes (such as treatment failure, serious adverse events and all-cause death). Thus, HRZE is still an effective regimen for this population. Although moxifloxacin-containing regimens have deomonstrated their potential, FQs-containing regimens should be used with great caution to avoid widespread FQs-resistance worldwide. PMID:26669635

  2. targetTB: A target identification pipeline for Mycobacterium tuberculosis through an interactome, reactome and genome-scale structural analysis

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Karthik; Yeturu, Kalidas; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2008-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis still remains one of the largest killer infectious diseases, warranting the identification of newer targets and drugs. Identification and validation of appropriate targets for designing drugs are critical steps in drug discovery, which are at present major bottle-necks. A majority of drugs in current clinical use for many diseases have been designed without the knowledge of the targets, perhaps because standard methodologies to identify such targets in a high-throughput fashion do not really exist. With different kinds of 'omics' data that are now available, computational approaches can be powerful means of obtaining short-lists of possible targets for further experimental validation. Results We report a comprehensive in silico target identification pipeline, targetTB, for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The pipeline incorporates a network analysis of the protein-protein interactome, a flux balance analysis of the reactome, experimentally derived phenotype essentiality data, sequence analyses and a structural assessment of targetability, using novel algorithms recently developed by us. Using flux balance analysis and network analysis, proteins critical for survival of M. tuberculosis are first identified, followed by comparative genomics with the host, finally incorporating a novel structural analysis of the binding sites to assess the feasibility of a protein as a target. Further analyses include correlation with expression data and non-similarity to gut flora proteins as well as 'anti-targets' in the host, leading to the identification of 451 high-confidence targets. Through phylogenetic profiling against 228 pathogen genomes, shortlisted targets have been further explored to identify broad-spectrum antibiotic targets, while also identifying those specific to tuberculosis. Targets that address mycobacterial persistence and drug resistance mechanisms are also analysed. Conclusion The pipeline developed provides rational schema for drug target identification that are likely to have high rates of success, which is expected to save enormous amounts of money, resources and time in the drug discovery process. A thorough comparison with previously suggested targets in the literature demonstrates the usefulness of the integrated approach used in our study, highlighting the importance of systems-level analyses in particular. The method has the potential to be used as a general strategy for target identification and validation and hence significantly impact most drug discovery programmes. PMID:19099550

  3. Epidemiology and clinical management of tuberculosis in children in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Shaun K; Demers, Anne-Marie; Lam, Ray; Pell, Lisa G; Giroux, Ryan JP; Kitai, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Although often regarded as a foreign disease, latent tuberculosis or tuberculosis disease will be encountered in many clinical situations by the Canadian child health practitioner. There are key differences between tuberculosis in children and adults. In the present article, the changing epidemiology of tuberculosis in children in Canada and around the world, the pathogenesis of infection, diagnostic tests, and clinical management of childhood latent tuberculosis and tuberculosis disease are reviewed. PMID:25838781

  4. Tuberculosis Incidence in Prisons: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Baussano, Iacopo; Williams, Brian G.; Nunn, Paul; Beggiato, Marta; Fedeli, Ugo; Scano, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    Background Transmission of tuberculosis (TB) in prisons has been reported worldwide to be much higher than that reported for the corresponding general population. Methods and Findings A systematic review has been performed to assess the risk of incident latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and TB disease in prisons, as compared to the incidence in the corresponding local general population, and to estimate the fraction of TB in the general population attributable (PAF%) to transmission within prisons. Primary peer-reviewed studies have been searched to assess the incidence of LTBI and/or TB within prisons published until June 2010; both inmates and prison staff were considered. Studies, which were independently screened by two reviewers, were eligible for inclusion if they reported the incidence of LTBI and TB disease in prisons. Available data were collected from 23 studies out of 582 potentially relevant unique citations. Five studies from the US and one from Brazil were available to assess the incidence of LTBI in prisons, while 19 studies were available to assess the incidence of TB. The median estimated annual incidence rate ratio (IRR) for LTBI and TB were 26.4 (interquartile range [IQR]: 13.0–61.8) and 23.0 (IQR: 11.7–36.1), respectively. The median estimated fraction (PAF%) of tuberculosis in the general population attributable to the exposure in prisons for TB was 8.5% (IQR: 1.9%–17.9%) and 6.3% (IQR: 2.7%–17.2%) in high- and middle/low-income countries, respectively. Conclusions The very high IRR and the substantial population attributable fraction show that much better TB control in prisons could potentially protect prisoners and staff from within-prison spread of TB and would significantly reduce the national burden of TB. Future studies should measure the impact of the conditions in prisons on TB transmission and assess the population attributable risk of prison-to-community spread. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:21203587

  5. Monitoring tuberculosis programs - National Tuberculosis Indicator Project, United States, 2002-2008.

    PubMed

    2010-03-19

    The National Tuberculosis Indicators Project (NTIP) is a secure, web-based monitoring system that uses routinely collected surveillance data on individual tuberculosis (TB) cases to measure the performance of state and local TB control programs, help programs to prioritize improvement efforts and focus on key TB control activities, and track progress toward national program objectives. Data are reported on a yearly basis and with frequent updates. This report summarizes NTIP results from the most recent 5 years for which data are available. Program performance was mixed, with general improvement for indicators related to TB case management (e.g., recommended initial therapy, genotyping data reported, human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] status reported, sputum culture reporting, and culture conversion documentation), but lower performance for indicators related to contact investigations of patients with infectious TB (e.g., contact elicitation, medical evaluation of contacts to infectious TB patients, and treatment initiation rate for persons diagnosed with latent TB infection [LTBI]). All performance indicators remained below the national performance targets for 2015. Starting in 2010, programs receiving CDC cooperative agreement funds for TB prevention and control will be required to use NTIP indicator data to describe their performance and formulate plans for improvement. PMID:20300056

  6. Impact of HIV Status on Treatment Outcome of Tuberculosis Patients Registered at Arsi Negele Health Center, Southern Ethiopia: A Six Year Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Gebremariam, Gebreslassie; Asmamaw, Getachew; Hussen, Muktar; Hailemariam, Mengistu Z.; Asegu, Demissie; Astatkie, Ayalew; Amsalu, Anteneh G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite implementation of different strategies, the burden and mortality of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated tuberculosis (TB) remains a challenge in Ethiopia. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of HIV status on treatment outcome of tuberculosis patients registered at Arsi Negele Health Center, Southern Ethiopia. Methods A six-year retrospective data (from September 2008 to August 2014) of tuberculosis patients (n = 1649) registered at the directly observed therapy short-course (DOTS) clinic of Arsi Negele Health Center was reviewed. Treatment outcome and tuberculosis type were categorized according to the national tuberculosis control program guideline. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to examine the effect of HIV status separately on default/failure and death in relation to those who were successfully treated. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were used to check the presence and strength of association between TB treatment outcome and HIV status and other independent variables. Results Out of the 1649 TB patients, 94.7% (1562) have been tested for HIV of whom 156(10%) were HIV co-infected. The mean (standard deviation) age of the patients was 28.5(15.5) years. The majority were new TB cases (96.7%), male (53.7%), urban (54.7%), and had smear negative pulmonary TB (44.1%). Overall, the treatment success rate of TB patients with or without HIV was 87.3%. Using cure/completion as reference, patients without known HIV status had significantly higher odds of default /failure [aOR, 4.26; 95%CI, 1.684–10.775] and transfer-out [aOR, 2.92; 95%CI, 1.545–5.521] whereas those who tested positive for HIV had a significantly higher odds of death [aOR, 6.72; 95%CI, 3.704–12.202] and transfer-out [aOR, 2.02; 95%CI, 1.111–3.680]. Conclusion Overall, treatment outcome and HIV testing coverage for TB patients is promising to reach the WHO target in the study area. However, default/failure among patients without known HIV status, and higher rate of mortality among HIV positive TB patients and transfer-out cases deserves concern. Therefore further prospective studies on quality of services, socioeconomics and psychology of this group should be conducted. PMID:27096159

  7. Impact of Co-Infections and BCG Immunisation on Immune Responses among Household Contacts of Tuberculosis Patients in a Ugandan Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Biraro, Irene A.; Egesa, Moses; Toulza, Frederic; Levin, Jonathan; Cose, Stephen; Joloba, Moses; Smith, Steven; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Katamba, Achilles; Elliott, Alison M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis incidence in resource poor countries remains high. We hypothesized that immune modulating co-infections such as helminths, malaria, and HIV increase susceptibility to latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), thereby contributing to maintaining the tuberculosis epidemic. Methods Adults with sputum-positive tuberculosis (index cases) and their eligible household contacts (HHCs) were recruited to a cohort study between May 2011 and January 2012. HHCs were investigated for helminths, malaria, and HIV at enrolment. HHCs were tested using the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFN) assay at enrolment and six months later. Overnight whole blood culture supernatants from baseline QFN assays were analyzed for cytokine responses using an 11-plex Luminex assay. Associations between outcomes (LTBI or cytokine responses) and exposures (co-infections and other risk factors) were examined using multivariable logistic and linear regression models. Results We enrolled 101 index cases and 291 HHCs. Among HHCs, baseline prevalence of helminths was 9% (25/291), malaria 16% (47/291), HIV 6% (16/291), and LTBI 65% (179/277). Adjusting for other risk factors and household clustering, there was no association between LTBI and any co-infection at baseline or at six months: adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval (CI); p-value) at baseline for any helminth, 1.01 (0.39–2.66; 0.96); hookworm, 2.81 (0.56–14.14; 0.20); malaria, 1.06 (0.48–2.35; 0.87); HIV, 0.74 (0.22–2.47; 0.63). HHCs with LTBI had elevated cytokine responses to tuberculosis antigens but co-infections had little effect on cytokine responses. Exploring other risk factors, Th1 cytokines among LTBI-positive HHCs with BCG scars were greatly reduced compared to those without scars: (adjusted geometric mean ratio) IFNγ 0.20 (0.09–0.42), <0.0001; IL-2 0.34 (0.20–0.59), <0.0001; and TNFα 0.36 (0.16–0.79), 0.01. Conclusions We found no evidence that co-infections increase the risk of LTBI, or influence the cytokine response profile among those with LTBI. Prior BCG exposure may reduce Th1 cytokine responses in LTBI. PMID:25372043

  8. Salvage therapy for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Seung, K J; Becerra, M C; Atwood, S S; Alcántara, F; Bonilla, C A; Mitnick, C D

    2014-05-01

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), defined as Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to both isoniazid and rifampicin, is challenging under the best of circumstances, and particularly in resource-limited settings. For patients who remain persistently sputum-culture-positive despite therapy with second-line TB drugs, treatment options are limited, especially if disease is too advanced for resective surgery. Salvage therapy refers to the design of a regimen combining new and previously used drugs in a final effort to attain sputum conversion before declaring treatment to have failed. We retrospectively evaluated the outcomes of salvage therapy in 213 Peruvian patients. Salvage regimens included a median of two new drugs (range 1-6) and nine (range 5-13) total (new plus previously used) drugs. The most frequently used new drug was moxifloxacin, followed by capreomycin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, kanamycin and clarithromycin. Culture conversion occurred in 65 (30.5%) patients. Salvage regimens that included moxifloxacin were significantly more likely to be followed by culture conversion (OR 2.2; p 0.02). Later-generation fluoroquinolones such as moxifloxacin should be used in salvage therapy but also in the initial treatment of MDR-TB, if the best clinical strategy is to use the most effective drugs when the patient has the best chance for cure. New TB drugs are most likely to be initially used in salvage patients, in conditions similar to those described here. Close bacteriological monitoring of these patients will be essential, as useful information about the best way to use these new drugs can be gained from analysis of salvage therapy cohorts. PMID:23991934

  9. Modulation of NKG2D Expression in Human CD8+ T Cells Corresponding with Tuberculosis Drug Cure

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Syeda S.; Cho, Jang-Eun; Akram, Muhammad; Fielding, Katherine L.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Cliff, Jacqueline M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Biomarkers predicting tuberculosis treatment response and cure would facilitate drug development. This study investigated expression patterns of the co-stimulation molecule NKG2D in human tuberculosis and treatment to determine its potential usefulness as a host biomarker of tuberculosis drug efficacy. Methods Tuberculosis patients (n = 26) were recruited in Lahore, Pakistan, at diagnosis and followed up during treatment. Household contacts (n = 24) were also recruited. NKG2D expression was measured by qRT-PCR in RNA samples both ex vivo and following overnight mycobacterial stimulation in vitro. Protein expression of NKG2D and granzyme B was measured by flow cytometry. Results NKG2D expression in newly diagnosed tuberculosis patients was similar to household contacts in ex vivo RNA, but was higher following in vitro stimulation. The NKG2D expression was dramatically reduced by intensive phase chemotherapy, in both ex vivo blood RNA and CD8+ T cell protein expression, but then reverted to higher levels after the continuation phase in successfully treated patients. Conclusion The changes in NKG2D expression through successful treatment reflect modulation of the peripheral cytotoxic T cell response. This likely reflects firstly in vivo stimulation by live Mycobacterium tuberculosis, followed by the response to dead bacilli, antigen-release and finally immunopathology resolution. Such changes in host peripheral gene expression, alongside clinical and microbiological indices, could be developed into a biosignature of tuberculosis drug-induced cure to be used in future clinical trials. PMID:23922903

  10. Differentiation of Mycobacterium kansasii infection from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: comparison of clinical features, radiological appearance, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Shitrit, D; Priess, R; Peled, N; Bishara, G; Shlomi, D; Kramer, M R

    2007-10-01

    This retrospective study sought to systematically identify clinical and radiological features differentiating Mycobacterium kansasii from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The sample included matched patients with a culture-positive diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection (n = 121) or M. kansasii infection (n = 62) derived from the databases of two tuberculosis centers. Data on patient background and clinical features were collected, and chest radiographs were analyzed. Sixty percent of the M. kansasii group were native Israelis compared to 15% of the M. tuberculosis group (p = 0.0001). M. tuberculosis infection was associated with a higher rate of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (p = 0.03) and M. kansasii infection with a higher rate of lung disease (p = 0.0001). M. tuberculosis infection was characterized by a higher likelihood of bilateral disease (p = 0.005), pleural effusions, and lymphadenopathy (p = 0.006 and p = 0.001, respectively). There were ten deaths, all in the M. tuberculosis group. On multivariate logistic regression, the presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and associated lung disease were significant predictors of M. kansasii infection. The findings show that there are group differences between the clinical features of the two infections. In the setting of pulmonary mycobacterial infection, the presence of coinfection with HIV, bilateral disease, pleural effusion, and lymphadenopathy make M. kansasii infection very unlikely. PMID:17629758

  11. [Increased IL-4 production in response to virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis in tuberculosis patients with advanced disease].

    PubMed

    Ordway, Diane J; Martins, Marta S; Costa, Leonor M; Freire, Mónica S; Arroz, Maria J; Dockrell, Hazel M; Ventura, Fernando A

    2005-01-01

    The study was designed to compare immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli and antigens in healthy Portuguese subjects and pulmonary tuberculosis patients (TB), and to correlate immune status with clinical severity of tuberculosis disease. PBMC were cultured and stimulated with live and killed M. tuberculosis H37Rv and purified protein derivative (PPD) and lymphoproliferation and production of IFN-gamma and IL-5/IL-4 by these cultures were evaluated by the use of ELISA and multi-parameter flow cytometry. PBMC from 30 tuberculosis patients demonstrated significantly reduced amounts of proliferation and IFN-gamma when stimulated with live M. tuberculosis compared the control group. Of 15 tuberculosis patients tested for intracellular IL-4 following stimulation with M. tuberculosis, 7 showed greatly increased IL-4 production in CD8+ and gammadelta+ T cells. Tuberculosis patients demonstrated an increase of intracellular IL-4 after PBMC were stimulated with live M. tuberculosis in the CD4+ phenotype, but more notably in CD8+ and gammadelta TCR+ subsets. Increased production of IL-4 in tuberculosis patients was primarily in individuals with advanced involvement of lung parenchymal with high bacterial loads in sputum. These results suggest that an alteration in type 1 and type 2 cytokine balance can occur in patients with tuberculosis at an advanced clinical stage of disease. PMID:16202332

  12. Epidemiological Characterization of Drug Resistance among Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolated from Patients in Northeast of Iran during 2012-2013

    PubMed Central

    Tavanaee Sani, Ashraf; Shakiba, Abolfazl; Bahrami Taghanaki, Hamid Reza; Ayati Fard, Seiedeh Fatemeh; Ghazvini, Kiarash

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Tuberculosis is still one of the most important health problems in developing countries and increasing drug resistance is the main concern for its treatment. This study was designed to characterize the drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from patients suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis in northeast of Iran. Method. In this cross-sectional study during 2012-2013, drug susceptibility testing was performed on Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated in northeast of Iran using proportional method. Epidemiological data concerning these strains were also analyzed. Results. Among 125 studied isolates, 25 mycobacteria (20%) were diagnosed as nontuberculosis mycobacteria. Among the remaining 100 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates, the resistance rates were 7%, 7%, 3%, and 9% against isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and streptomycin, respectively. Four isolates were resistant against both isoniazid and rifampin (MDR tuberculosis). The highest resistance rate was observed among 15–45-year-old patients. The MDR tuberculosis was much more prevalent among those who had previous history of treatment. Conclusion. Considering these findings, DOTS strategy should be emphasized and promptly used in order to prevent further resistance. Regarding the high rate of nontuberculosis mycobacteria, it is recommended that confirmatory tests were performed before any therapeutic decision. PMID:26064950

  13. Evaluation of ethanol vortex ELISA for detection of bovine tuberculosis in cattle and deer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background The use of serological assays for diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis (TB) has been intensively studied and use of specific antigens have aided in improving the diagnostic accuracy of the assays. In the present study, we report an in-house enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), developed...

  14. Mannosylated Lipoarabinomannan in serum as a biomarker candidate for subclinical bovine tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Early and unambiguous detection of bovine tuberculosis (bTB), a significant disease of cattle worldwide, is necessary to control the spread of infection to other animals and humans. Current testing strategies are laborious, time consuming and heavily reliant on host responses that do n...

  15. The Cosmic Background Explorer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulkis, Samuel; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Outlines the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission to measure celestial radiation. Describes the instruments used and experiments involving differential microwave radiometers, and a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer. (YP)

  16. The Calf Model of Immunity for Development of a Vaccine Against Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health threat and can be considered a reemerging disease due to many factors and is especially problematic in developing countries where co-infection with HIV significantly increases morbidity and mortality. Vaccination is a low cost and effective ...

  17. [Tuberculosis of the pancreas, an anatomoclinical case].

    PubMed

    Henríquez, M; Trejo, C; Ojeda, M; Benavides, A

    1992-10-01

    A 49 year old "mapuche" male patient was operated on and tuberculosis of the gallbladder was found. Later on, he developed evidence of meningeal and pulmonary involvement and elevated pancreatic enzyme levels. In spite of appropriate anti-tuberculosis therapy, the patient died. Autopsy revealed multiorgan involvement with pancreatic tuberculosis and areas of steatonecrosis. Immune deficiency related to the previous cholecystectomy may have facilitated the severe dissemination of the disease observed in this patient. PMID:1341779

  18. Monkey models of tuberculosis: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Peña, Juliet C; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2015-03-01

    The use of animal models has been invaluable for studying the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, as well as for testing the efficacy of vaccines and drug regimens for tuberculosis. Among the applied animal models, nonhuman primates, particularly macaques, share the greatest anatomical and physiological similarities with humans. As such, macaque models have been used for investigating tuberculosis pathogenesis and preclinical testing of drugs and vaccines. This review focuses on published major studies which illustrate how the rhesus and cynomolgus macaques have enriched and may continue to advance the field of global tuberculosis research. PMID:25547788

  19. [Oral blastomycosis, laryngeal papillomatosis and esophageal tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Montoya, Manuel; Chumbiraico, Robert; Ricalde, Melvin; Cazorla, Ernesto; Hernández-Córdova, Gustavo

    2012-06-01

    Esophageal involvement is an extremely rare complication of tuberculosis even in countries with high prevalence of infection. We report the case of a 57 year-old hiv-seronegative patient with simultaneous diagnoses of oral blastomycosis and laryngeal papillomatosis. Both were confirmed by anatomopathological analysis. The esophageal biopsy revealed granulomatous esophagitis with necrosis and ziehl-neelsen stain showed acid-fast alcohol resistant bacilli suggestive of tuberculosis. The patient's history included pulmonary tuberculosis twice and previous abandonment of therapy. Thus, it was necessary to use oral itraconazole combined with second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs administered through a gastrostomy tube. The clinical development was favorable. PMID:22858774

  20. Tuberculosis transmission in a large urban jail.

    PubMed

    King, L; Geis, G

    1977-02-21

    Following diagnosis of moderately advanced tuberculosis in an inmate of Cook County Jail, tuberculin testing was performed to assess the degree of transmission of tuberculosis within the jail. Twenty-three percent of inmates exposed to the index patient were initially found to be tuberculin positive. Subsequent tuberculin testing three months later demonstrated a 71% rate of skin-test conversion in previously tuberculin-negative inmates exposed to the index patient. The rate of infectivity of tuberculosis within a jail is analogous to a household situation. Despite major obstacles, modern programs of tuberculosis screening and treatment are essential in correctional institutions. PMID:576316

  1. Improving the tuberculosis drug development pipeline.

    PubMed

    Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios; McHugh, Timothy D

    2015-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is considered one of the most successful pathogens and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, a disease that urgently requires new chemical entities to be developed for treatment. There are currently several new molecules under clinical investigation in the tuberculosis (TB) drug development pipeline. However, the complex lifestyle of M. tuberculosis within the host presents a barrier to the development of new drugs. In this review, we highlight the reasons that make TB drug discovery and development challenging as well as providing solutions, future directions and alternative approaches to new therapeutics for TB. PMID:25772393

  2. Monkey Models of Tuberculosis: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Juliet C.

    2014-01-01

    The use of animal models has been invaluable for studying the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, as well as for testing the efficacy of vaccines and drug regimens for tuberculosis. Among the applied animal models, nonhuman primates, particularly macaques, share the greatest anatomical and physiological similarities with humans. As such, macaque models have been used for investigating tuberculosis pathogenesis and preclinical testing of drugs and vaccines. This review focuses on published major studies which illustrate how the rhesus and cynomolgus macaques have enriched and may continue to advance the field of global tuberculosis research. PMID:25547788

  3. Isolated hepatosplenic tuberculosis: a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Roumina; Kumar, Sandeep; Mathew, Mary; Kadavigere, Rajagopal

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis presents a major health challenge in endemic countries and spares no organ in the human body. This infection is a mimicker of various disease processes such as metastasis, lymphoproliferative diseases, and other granulomatous conditions such as sarcoidosis and fungal infections. The most challenging and important differential is metastasis, especially in the disseminated form of tuberculosis. We present a histopathologically proven case of isolated hepatosplenic tuberculosis that was provisionally diagnosed as lymphoma due to its unusual, restricted involvement of the liver and spleen. PMID:26153294

  4. A New Approach for Pyrazinamide Susceptibility Testing in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Loli, Sebastian; Gilman, Robert H.; Gutierrez, Andrés; Fuentes, Patricia; Cotrina, Milagros; Kirwan, Daniela; Sheen, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pyrazinamide (PZA) is an important drug in the treatment of tuberculosis. Microbiological methods of PZA susceptibility testing are controversial and have low reproducibility. After conversion of PZA into pyrazinoic acid (POA) by the bacterial pyrazinamidase enzyme, the drug is expelled from the bacteria by an efflux pump. Objective: To evaluate the rate of POA extrusion from Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a parameter to detect PZA resistance. Methods: The rate of POA extrusion and PZA susceptibility determined by BACTEC 460 were measured for 34 strains in a previous study. PZA resistance was modeled in a logistic regression with the pyrazinoic efflux rate. Result: POA efflux rate predicted PZA resistance with 70.83%–92.85% sensitivity and 100% specificity compared with BACTEC 460. Conclusion: POA efflux rate could be a useful tool for predicting PZA resistance in M. tuberculosis. Further exploration of this approach may lead to the development of new tools for diagnosing PZA resistance, which may be of public health importance. PMID:22372927

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in women with unexplained infertility

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Maryam; Pourmasumi, Soheila; Sabeti, Parvin; Aflatoonian, Abbas; Sheikhha, Mohammad Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genital tuberculosis (GTB) is an important cause of female infertility, especially in developing countries. The positive results of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in endometrial GTB in the absence of tubal damage raise the possibility of the detection of sub-clinical or latent disease, with doubtful benefits of treatment. Objective: To evaluate the mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in endometrial biopsy samples collected from unexplained infertile women attending Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility by using PCR techniques. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 144 infertile women with unexplained infertility aged 20-35 years old and normal Histro-saplango graphy findings were enrolled. Endometrial biopsy samples from each participant were tested for mycobacterium tuberculosis detecting by PCR. In 93 patients, peritoneal fluid was also taken for culture and PCR. Results: The PCR results of endometrial specimens were negative in all cases, demonstrating that there was no GTB infection among our patients. Conclusion: Our results showed that GTB could not be considered as a major problem in women with unexplained infertility. Although, studies have indicated that PCR is a useful method in diagnosing early GTB disease in infertile women with no demonstrable evidence of tubal or endometrial involvement.

  6. Association between neuromyelitis optica and tuberculosis in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A number of reports have described the presence of tuberculosis (TB) in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) patients. However, a definite association between the two conditions has not been conclusively demonstrated. Methods To investigate the association between NMO and TB in a Chinese population, we performed a retrospective review of hospital records of NMO patients, control patients and tuberculosis meningitis (TBM) patients from January 1, 1995 to December 31, 2011. Results The frequency of preceding/simultaneous active pulmonary TB (PTB) was not significantly different between NMO patients (1.1%) and control groups (2.3% in myasthenia gravis, 1.1% in polymyositis or dermatomyositis, zero in idiopathic facial palsy and viral meningitis/meningoencephalitis). NMO cases differed from TBM cases in terms of demographics, course (recurrent or monophasic), cerebrospinal fluid analysis and magnetic resonance images. Two TBM patients shared partial clinical features with NMO (one of the TBM patients had a longitudinal extensive spinal cord lesion involving the holocord, and the other had optic neuritis before anti-tuberculosis treatment). NMO antibodies were only detected in NMO patients and not in TBM patients with myelitis or optic neuritis. Conclusions We could not confirm previous suggestions of the association between PTB and NMO. Direct infection of the central nervous system by TB may mimic NMO in some respects, but whether NMO-like symptoms that develop during the course of TB should be considered and diagnosed as NMO is open to discussion. PMID:24555792

  7. Current tuberculosis diagnostic tools & role of urease breath test.

    PubMed

    Maiga, Mamoudou; Abaza, Ahmed; Bishai, William R

    2012-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a significant public health issue worldwide especially in developing countries, where the disease is endemic, and effective TB diagnostic as well as treatment-monitoring tools are serious barriers to defeating the disease. Detection of pathogen-specific metabolic pathways offers a potential alternative to current methods, which focus on bacterial growth, bacterial nucleic acid amplification, or detection of host immune response to the pathogen. Metabolic pathway detection may provide rapid and effective new tools for TB that can improve TB diagnostics for children and HIV infected patients. Metabolic breath tests are attractive because these are safe, and provide an opportunity for rapid point of care diagnostics and tool for drug efficacy evaluation during clinical trials. Our group has developed a rabbit urease breath test model to evaluate the sensitivity and the specificity of urease based detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. TB infected rabbits were given stable isotopically labelled urea as the substrate. The urea tracer was metabolized to 13 C-CO 2 and detected in exhaled breaths using portable infrared spectrometers. The signal correlated with bacterial load both for primary diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Clinical trials are currently ongoing to evaluate the value of the test in clinical management settings. Urea breath testing may provide a useful diagnostic and biomarker assay for tuberculosis and treatment response. PMID:22771606

  8. Origin, Spread and Demography of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Thierry; Hildebrand, Falk; Allix-Béguec, Caroline; Wölbeling, Florian; Kubica, Tanja; Kremer, Kristin; van Soolingen, Dick; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Locht, Camille; Brisse, Sylvain; Meyer, Axel

    2008-01-01

    The evolutionary timing and spread of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), one of the most successful groups of bacterial pathogens, remains largely unknown. Here, using mycobacterial tandem repeat sequences as genetic markers, we show that the MTBC consists of two independent clades, one composed exclusively of M. tuberculosis lineages from humans and the other composed of both animal and human isolates. The latter also likely derived from a human pathogenic lineage, supporting the hypothesis of an original human host. Using Bayesian statistics and experimental data on the variability of the mycobacterial markers in infected patients, we estimated the age of the MTBC at 40,000 years, coinciding with the expansion of “modern” human populations out of Africa. Furthermore, coalescence analysis revealed a strong and recent demographic expansion in almost all M. tuberculosis lineages, which coincides with the human population explosion over the last two centuries. These findings thus unveil the dynamic dimension of the association between human host and pathogen populations. PMID:18802459

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: ecology and evolution of a human bacterium.

    PubMed

    Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Sanou, Adama; Anh, Nguyen Thi Van; Godreuil, Sylvain

    2015-11-01

    Some species of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), particularly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which causes human tuberculosis (TB), are the first cause of death linked to a single pathogen worldwide. In the last decades, evolutionary studies have much improved our knowledge on MTBC history and have highlighted its long co-evolution with humans. Its ability to remain latent in humans, the extraordinary proportion of asymptomatic carriers (one-third of the entire human population), the deadly epidemics and the observed increasing level of resistance to antibiotics are proof of its evolutionary success. Many MTBC molecular signatures show not only that these bacteria are a model of adaptation to humans but also that they have influenced human evolution. Owing to the unbalance between the number of asymptomatic carriers and the number of patients with active TB, some authors suggest that infection by MTBC could have a protective role against active TB disease and also against other pathologies. However, it would be inappropriate to consider these infectious pathogens as commensals or symbionts, given the level of morbidity and mortality caused by TB. PMID:26385049

  10. Genotyping of ancient Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains reveals historic genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Romy; Roberts, Charlotte A.; Brown, Terence A.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary history of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) has previously been studied by analysis of sequence diversity in extant strains, but not addressed by direct examination of strain genotypes in archaeological remains. Here, we use ancient DNA sequencing to type 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms and two large sequence polymorphisms in the MTBC strains present in 10 archaeological samples from skeletons from Britain and Europe dating to the second–nineteenth centuries AD. The results enable us to assign the strains to groupings and lineages recognized in the extant MTBC. We show that at least during the eighteenth–nineteenth centuries AD, strains of M. tuberculosis belonging to different genetic groups were present in Britain at the same time, possibly even at a single location, and we present evidence for a mixed infection in at least one individual. Our study shows that ancient DNA typing applied to multiple samples can provide sufficiently detailed information to contribute to both archaeological and evolutionary knowledge of the history of tuberculosis. PMID:24573854

  11. Long-term Protection From Isoniazid Preventive Therapy for Tuberculosis in HIV-Infected Patients in a Medium-Burden Tuberculosis Setting: The TB/HIV in Rio (THRio) Study

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Jonathan E.; Cohn, Silvia; Saraceni, Valeria; Cavalcante, Solange C.; Pacheco, Antonio G.; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Durovni, Betina; Chaisson, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The duration of protection against tuberculosis provided by isoniazid preventive therapy is not known for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals living in settings of medium tuberculosis incidence. Methods. We conducted an individual-level analysis of participants in a cluster-randomized, phased-implementation trial of isoniazid preventive therapy. HIV-infected patients who had positive tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) were followed until tuberculosis diagnosis, death, or administrative censoring. Nelson–Aalen cumulative hazard plots were generated and hazards were compared using the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards models were fitted to investigate factors associated with tuberculosis diagnosis. Results. Between 2003 and 2009, 1954 patients with a positive TST were studied. Among these, 1601 (82%) initiated isoniazid. Overall tuberculosis incidence was 1.39 per 100 person-years (PY); 0.53 per 100 PY in those who initiated isoniazid and 6.52 per 100 PY for those who did not (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], .11–.25). Receiving antiretroviral therapy at time of a positive TST was associated with a reduced risk of tuberculosis (aHR, 0.69; 95% CI, .48–1.00). Nelson–Aalen plots of tuberculosis incidence showed a constant risk, with no acceleration in 7 years of follow-up for those initiating isoniazid preventive therapy. Conclusions. Isoniazid preventive therapy significantly reduced tuberculosis risk among HIV-infected patients with a positive TST. In a medium-prevalence setting, 6 months of isoniazid in HIV-infected patients with positive TST reduces tuberculosis risk over 7 years of follow-up, in contrast to results of studies in higher-burden settings in Africa. PMID:25365974

  12. T cells and adaptive immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans.

    PubMed

    Jasenosky, Luke D; Scriba, Thomas J; Hanekom, Willem A; Goldfeld, Anne E

    2015-03-01

    The adaptive immune response mediated by T cells is critical for control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infection in humans. However, the M. tuberculosis antigens and host T-cell responses that are required for an effective adaptive immune response to M. tuberculosis infection are yet to be defined. Here, we review recent findings on CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses to M. tuberculosis infection and examine the roles of distinct M. tuberculosis-specific T-cell subsets in control of de novo and latent M. tuberculosis infection, and in the evolution of T-cell immunity to M. tuberculosis in response to tuberculosis treatment. In addition, we discuss recent studies that elucidate aspects of M. tuberculosis-specific adaptive immunity during human immunodeficiency virus co-infection and summarize recent findings from vaccine trials that provide insight into effective adaptive immune responses to M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:25703553

  13. Navicular tuberculosis: A rare localization of bone tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lemnouer, Abdelhay; Frikh, Mohammed; Belfquih, Bouchra; Jaafar, Abdelwahab; Bouya, Ayoub; Jidal, Mohamed; Boussouga, Mustapha; Elouennass, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a global public health problem endemic to Morocco. While extrapulmonary TB uncommonly presents in osteoarticular anatomic locations, tarsal or metatarsal osteitis can occur when TB presents in the tarsal bones. Clinical symptoms are often insidious causing a delay in diagnosis that may lead to bone destruction. While diagnosis can be guided by X-ray imaging, bacteriologic and histologic examination of the tissue allows for pathogen isolation, identification of the bacillus and strain sensitivity to antibacillary treatment. We report a rare case of navicular osteitis associated with tarso-metatarsal arthritis caused by tuberculosis in a 68-year-old man. This case illustrates an exceptional location of osteoarticular TB and support diagnostic difficulties encountered: (i) imaging is not specific; (ii) lesions are paucibacillary which reduces conventional microbiological methods sensitivity and (iii) the peripheral location of the Koch bacillus within the lesion dictates surgical biopsy than percutaneous puncture. We recommend testing for tuberculosis in any case of chronic osteolysis and/or arthritis of the foot, especially in TB endemic countries. PMID:26793464

  14. Wasting among Uganda men with pulmonary tuberculosis is associated with linear regain in lean tissue mass during and after treatment in contrast to women with wasting who regain fat tissue mass: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nutritional changes during and after tuberculosis treatment have not been well described. We therefore determined the effect of wasting on rate of mean change in lean tissue and fat mass as measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and mean change in body mass index (BMI) during and after tuberculosis treatment. Methods In a prospective cohort study of 717 adult patients, BMI and height-normalized indices of lean tissue (LMI) and fat mass (FMI) as measured by BIA were assessed at baseline, 3, 12, and 24 months. Results Men with wasting at baseline regained LMI at a greater rate than FMI (4.55 kg/m2 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.26, 7.83 versus 3.16 (95% CI: 0.80, 5.52)) per month, respectively during initial tuberculosis therapy. In contrast, women with wasting regained FMI at greater rate than LMI (3.55 kg/m2 (95% CI: 0.40, 6.70) versus 2.07 (95% CI: -0.74, 4.88)), respectively. Men with wasting regained BMI at a rate of 6.45 kg/m2 (95% CI: 3.02, 9.87) in the first three months whereas women, had a rate of 3.30 kg/m2 (95% CI: -0.11, 6.72). There were minimal changes in body composition after month 3 and during months 12 to 24. Conclusion Wasted tuberculosis patients regain weight with treatment but the type of gain differs by gender and patients may remain underweight after the initial phase of treatment. PMID:24410970

  15. DR*W201/P65 Tetramer Visualization of Epitope-Specific CD4 T-Cell during M. tuberculosis Infection and Its Resting Memory Pool after BCG Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Huiyong; Wang, Richard; Yuan, Zhuqing; Chen, Crystal Y.; Huang, Dan; Halliday, Lisa; Zhong, Weihua; Zeng, Gucheng; Shen, Yun; Shen, Ling; Wang, Yunqi; Chen, Zheng W.

    2009-01-01

    Background In vivo kinetics and frequencies of epitope-specific CD4 T cells in lymphoid compartments during M. tuberculosis infection and their resting memory pool after BCG vaccination remain unknown. Methodology/Findings Macaque DR*W201 tetramer loaded with Ag85B peptide 65 was developed to directly measure epitope-specific CD4 T cells in blood and tissues form macaques after M. tuberculosis infection or BCG vaccination via direct staining and tetramer-enriched approach. The tetramer-based enrichment approach showed that P65 epitope-specific CD4 T cells emerged at mean frequencies of ∼500 and ∼4500 per 107 PBL at days 28 and 42, respectively, and at day 63 increased further to ∼22,000/107 PBL after M. tuberculosis infection. Direct tetramer staining showed that the tetramer-bound P65-specific T cells constituted about 0.2–0.3% of CD4 T cells in PBL, lymph nodes, spleens, and lungs at day 63 post-infection. 10-fold expansion of these tetramer-bound epitope-specific CD4 T cells was seen after the P65 peptide stimulation of PBL and tissue lymphocytes. The tetramer-based enrichment approach detected BCG-elicited resting memory P65-specific CD4 T cells at a mean frequency of 2,700 per 107 PBL. Significance Our work represents the first elucidation of in vivo kinetics and frequencies for tetramer-bound epitope-specific CD4 T cells in the blood, lymphoid tissues and lungs over times after M. tuberculosis infection, and BCG immunization. PMID:19730727

  16. Correlators in nontrivial backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Stephanou, Michael

    2009-01-15

    Operators in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory with an R-charge of O(N{sup 2}) are dual to backgrounds which are asymtotically AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. In this article we develop efficient techniques that allow the computation of correlation functions in these backgrounds. We find that (i) contractions between fields in the string words and fields in the operator creating the background are the field theory accounting of the new geometry, (ii) correlation functions of probes in these backgrounds are given by the free field theory contractions but with rescaled propagators and (iii) in these backgrounds there are no open string excitations with their special end point interactions; we have only closed string excitations.

  17. The Athena Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Luigi; Lotti, Simone; Macculi, Claudio; Molendi, Silvano; Eraerds, Tanja; Laurent, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Estimating, reducing and controlling the residual particle background is fundamental for achieving the objectives of several science topics of Athena, in particular those connected with background dominated observations of faint and/or diffuse sources. This requires assessing the particle environment in L2, propagating the various particle components throughout the mirror, spacecraft, and instruments via proper modelling and simulations of various physical processes, implementing design and h/w measures at instrument and mission level to reduce the un-rejected background and identifying proper calibration methods to control the background variations. Likewise, an adequate knowledge of the XRB, made of components that may vary spatially or temporally, is required as well. Here we will review the present status of the background knowledge, and summarize the activities on-going within Athena at various levels.

  18. Background-independence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belot, Gordon

    2011-10-01

    Intuitively speaking, a classical field theory is background-independent if the structure required to make sense of its equations is itself subject to dynamical evolution, rather than being imposed ab initio. The aim of this paper is to provide an explication of this intuitive notion. Background-independence is not a not formal property of theories: the question whether a theory is background-independent depends upon how the theory is interpreted. Under the approach proposed here, a theory is fully background-independent relative to an interpretation if each physical possibility corresponds to a distinct spacetime geometry; and it falls short of full background-independence to the extent that this condition fails.

  19. Tuberculosis notifications in Australia, 2012 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Toms, Cindy; Stapledon, Richard; Waring, Justin; Douglas, Paul

    2015-06-01

    The National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System received 1,317 tuberculosis (TB) notifications in 2012 and 1,263 notifications in 2013. This represents a rate of 5.8 per 100,000 population in 2012 and 5.5 per 100,000 population in 2013 and a reversal of the upward trend in TB incidence reported since 2007. In 2012 and 2013, Australia's overseas-born population continued to represent the majority of TB notifications with an incidence rate of 19.5 per 100,000 and 18.4 per 100,000 respectively. The incidence of TB in the Australian-born Indigenous population has fluctuated over the last decade; however, it remained reasonably steady in 2012 and 2013 with an incidence rate of 4.5 per 100,000 and 4.6 per 100,000 respectively. The incidence of TB in the Australian-born non-Indigenous population has continued to remain low at 0.7 per 100,000 in 2012 and 0.8 per 100,000 in 2013. Australia continued to record only a small number of multi-drug resistant TB cases nationally (2012: n=20; 2013: n=22) of which nearly all were identified in the overseas-born population. This report demonstrates excellent and sustained control of TB in Australia and reflects Australia's commitment to reducing the global burden of TB. PMID:26234258

  20. Biomarkers of tuberculosis: a research roadmap.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, Hilary S; Aranday-Cortes, Elihu; Lalvani, Ajit

    2013-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to represent a major public health problem worldwide. Prompt and accurate diagnosis and effective treatment are fundamental to reducing morbidity and mortality and curtailing spread of infection. Furthermore, tackling the large reservoir of latent infection is the cornerstone to TB control in many high income low TB incidence countries. However, our existing toolkit for prevention, diagnosis and treatment remains outdated and inadequate. Here, we discuss the key targets for biomarker research and discovery in TB and recent developments in the field. We focus on host biomarkers, in particular: correlates of vaccine efficacy and sterilizing immunity; biomarkers of latent TB infection, including diagnosis, risk of progression to active TB and response to treatment; and markers of active TB, including diagnosis, response to treatment and risk of relapse. Recent scientific and technological advances have contributed to significant recent progression in biomarker discovery. Although there are clear remaining paucities, continued efforts within scientific, translational and clinical studies are likely to yield a number of clinically useful biomarkers of TB in the foreseeable future. PMID:23734796

  1. The role of moxifloxacin in tuberculosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Stephen H

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global threat with more than 9 million new infections. Treatment remains difficult and there has been no change in the duration of the standard regimen since the early 1980s. Moreover, many patients are unable to tolerate this treatment and discontinue therapy, increasing the risk of resistance. There is a growing tide of multidrug resistance and few effective antibiotics to tackle the problem. Since the turn of the millennium there has been a surge in interest in developing new therapies for TB and a number of new drugs have been developed. In this review the repurposing of moxifloxacin, an 8-methoxy-fluoroquinolone, for TB treatment is discussed. The evidence that underpins the development of this agent is reviewed. The results of the recently completed phase III trials are summarised and the reasons for the unexpected outcome are explored. Finally, the design of new trials that incorporate moxifloxacin, and that address both susceptible disease and multidrug resistance, is described. PMID:26929417

  2. Intracellular activity of tedizolid phosphate and ACH-702 versus Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to the emergency of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is necessary the evaluation of new compounds. Findings Tedizolid, a novel oxazolidinone, and ACH-702, a new isothiazoloquinolone, were tested against M. tuberculosis infected THP-1 macrophages. These two compounds significantly decreased the number of intracellular mycobacteria at 0.25X, 1X, 4X and 16X the MIC value. The drugs were tested either in nanoparticules or in free solution. Conclusion Tedizolid and ACH-702 have a good intracellular killing activity comparable to that of rifampin or moxifloxacin. PMID:24708819

  3. Disseminated Penicillium marneffei mimicking paradoxical response and relapse in a non-HIV patient with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping-Huai; Wang, Hao-Chien; Liao, Chun-Hsing

    2015-04-01

    Clinical deterioration during the treatment of tuberculosis remains a diagnostic challenge. We describe the case of a 46-year-old man with a history of oral cancer status after a radical operation who had pulmonary tuberculosis with pleura and neck lymph node involvement. The clinical condition improved after antituberculosis therapy. However, the patient suffered from low-grade fever, progressive dyspnea, and cough after 7 weeks of the therapy. The findings of chest plain films were relapse and progression of left lung haziness. The deterioration was caused by disseminated Penicillium marneffei infection. Disseminated P. marneffei in a non-HIV patient with tuberculosis is rarely seen, and the manifestations are similar to a paradoxical response and relapse of pulmonary tuberculosis, thereby making it difficult to establish a diagnosis. PMID:25823679

  4. Eighteenth-century genomes show that mixed infections were common at time of peak tuberculosis in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Gemma L.; Sergeant, Martin J.; Zhou, Zhemin; Chan, Jacqueline Z.-M.; Millard, Andrew; Quick, Joshua; Szikossy, Ildikó; Pap, Ildikó; Spigelman, Mark; Loman, Nicholas J.; Achtman, Mark; Donoghue, Helen D.; Pallen, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) was once a major killer in Europe, but it is unclear how the strains and patterns of infection at ‘peak TB' relate to what we see today. Here we describe 14 genome sequences of M. tuberculosis, representing 12 distinct genotypes, obtained from human remains from eighteenth-century Hungary using metagenomics. All our historic genotypes belong to M. tuberculosis Lineage 4. Bayesian phylogenetic dating, based on samples with well-documented dates, places the most recent common ancestor of this lineage in the late Roman period. We find that most bodies yielded more than one M. tuberculosis genotype and we document an intimate epidemiological link between infections in two long-dead individuals. Our results suggest that metagenomic approaches usefully inform detection and characterization of historical and contemporary infections. PMID:25848958

  5. Expressions of Antimicrobial Peptides LL-37, Human Beta Defensin-2 and -3 in the Lesions of Cutaneous Tuberculosis and Tuberculids

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zheng; Mu, Zhang-Lei; Liu, Xi-Wan; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Jia, Jun; Cai, Lin; Zhang, Jian-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antimicrobial peptides, including cathelicidin LL-37, human beta defensin (HBD)-2, and HBD-3, are important elements of the innate immune response and involved in modulation of the adaptive immunity, and they also play an important role in cutaneous defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Methods: The fresh skin tissues and paraffin-embedded biopsy samples from three cutaneous tuberculosis, two tuberculids, and ten healthy individuals were collected. The expressions of LL-37, HBD-2, and HBD-3 mRNA in the lesions of three cutaneous tuberculosis and two tuberculids were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction; the protein expressions were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting methods. Results: The expressions of LL-37 mRNA and protein in the lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis and tuberculids were similar to that of normal skin. The expression of HBD-2 mRNA had an increasing trend in the lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis and tuberculids compared with that of normal skin; however, the expression of HBD-2 protein in the lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis had a decreasing trend compared with that of normal skin, and the expression of HBD-2 protein in the lesions of tuberculids was similar to that of normal skin. The expressions of HBD-3 mRNA and protein in lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis and tuberculids were similar to that of normal skin. Conclusions: Our study indicated that the expression of HBD-2 and HBD-3 mRNA and protein in lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis may be not consistent with that of tuberculids. However, an inherent limitation of the present study was that the sample size was small, and the roles and regulation mechanisms of LL-37, HBD-2, and HBD-3 in cutaneous tuberculosis and tuberculids need to be further investigated. PMID:26960373

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv0679c protein sequences involved in host-cell infection: Potential TB vaccine candidate antigen

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To date, the function of many hypothetical membrane proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is still unknown and their involvement in pathogen-host interactions has not been yet clearly defined. In this study, the biological activity of peptides derived from the hypothetical membrane protein Rv0679c of M. tuberculosis and their involvement in pathogen-host interactions was assessed. Transcription of the Rv0679c gene was studied in 26 Mycobacterium spp. Strains. Antibodies raised against putative B-cell epitopes of Rv0679c were used in Western blot and immunoelectron microscopy assays. Synthetic peptides spanning the entire length of the protein were tested for their ability to bind to A549 and U937 cells. High-activity binding peptides (HABPs) identified in Rv0679c were tested for their ability to inhibit mycobacterial invasion into cells. Results The gene encoding Rv0679c was detected in all strains of the M. tuberculosis complex (MTC), but was only transcribed in M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis H37Ra and M. africanum. Anti-Rv0679c antibodies specifically recognized the protein in M. tuberculosis H37Rv sonicate and showed its localization on mycobacterial surface. Four HABPs inhibited invasion of M. tuberculosis to target cells by up to 75%. Conclusions The results indicate that Rv0679c HABPs and in particular HABP 30979 could be playing an important role during M. tuberculosis invasion of host cells, and therefore could be interesting research targets for studies aimed at developing strategies to control tuberculosis. PMID:20388213

  7. Low nutrient intake among adult women and patients with severe tuberculosis disease in Uganda: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Information regarding dietary nutrient intake during tuberculosis disease is lacking. We established the relationship between disease severity or wasting during pulmonary tuberculosis and nutrient intake. Methods In a cross-sectional study of 131 adults with or without pulmonary tuberculosis were screened for human immune-deficiency virus (HIV), wasting, disease severity using 13 item validated clinical TBscore, and 24-hour dietary intake recall. Results Of the 131 participants, 61 were males and 70 females. Overall men and women had similar age. In average 24-hour nutrient intake, the following nutrients: energy, protein, total fat, carbohydrate, calcium, vitamin A, and folate were low among patients with severe tuberculosis disease. Patients with moderate-to-severe clinical TBscore had lower average energy intake than patients with mild TBscores (6.11 vs. 9.27 MJ, respectively) (p<0.05). The average 24-hour nutrient intakes between wasted and non-wasted tuberculosis patients were comparable. Nutrient intake among men was higher when compared to women regardless of wasting and severity of tuberculosis. Among those with wasting, men had higher average energy intake than women (8.87 vs. 5.81 MJ, respectively) (p<0.05). Among patients with mild disease, men had higher average energy intake than women with mild disease (12.83 vs. 7.49 kcal, respectively) (p<0.001). Conclusions Findings suggest that severity of pulmonary tuberculosis and female gender had reduced nutrient intake. Early tuberculosis diagnosis and nutritional support may be important in management of tuberculosis patients. PMID:23217171

  8. Detection of Tuberculosis Infection Hotspots Using Activity Spaces Based Spatial Approach in an Urban Tokyo, from 2003 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Kiyohiko; Ohkado, Akihiro; Uchimura, Kazuhiro; Murase, Yoshiro; Tatsumi, Yuriko; Kayebeta, Aya; Watanabe, Yu; Ishikawa, Nobukatsu

    2015-01-01

    Background Identifying ongoing tuberculosis infection sites is crucial for breaking chains of transmission in tuberculosis-prevalent urban areas. Previous studies have pointed out that detection of local accumulation of tuberculosis patients based on their residential addresses may be limited by a lack of matching between residences and tuberculosis infection sites. This study aimed to identify possible tuberculosis hotspots using TB genotype clustering statuses and a concept of “activity space”, a place where patients spend most of their waking hours. We further compared the spatial distribution by different residential statuses and describe urban environmental features of the detected hotspots. Methods Culture-positive tuberculosis patients notified to Shinjuku city from 2003 to 2011 were enrolled in this case-based cross-sectional study, and their demographic and clinical information, TB genotype clustering statuses, and activity space were collected. Spatial statistics (Global Moran’s I and Getis-Ord Gi* statistics) identified significant hotspots in 152 census tracts, and urban environmental features and tuberculosis patients’ characteristics in these hotspots were assessed. Results Of the enrolled 643 culture-positive tuberculosis patients, 416 (64.2%) were general inhabitants, 42 (6.5%) were foreign-born people, and 184 were homeless people (28.6%). The percentage of overall genotype clustering was 43.7%. Genotype-clustered general inhabitants and homeless people formed significant hotspots around a major railway station, whereas the non-clustered general inhabitants formed no hotspots. This suggested the detected hotspots of activity spaces may reflect ongoing tuberculosis transmission sites and were characterized by smaller residential floor size and a higher proportion of non-working households. Conclusions Activity space-based spatial analysis suggested possible TB transmission sites around the major railway station and it can assist in further comprehension of TB transmission dynamics in an urban setting in Japan. PMID:26382251

  9. Detection of Pulmonary tuberculosis: comparing MR imaging with HRCT

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Computer Tomography (CT) is considered the gold standard for assessing the morphological changes of lung parenchyma. Although novel CT techniques have substantially decreased the radiation dose, radiation exposure is still high. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been established as a radiation- free alternative to CT for several lung diseases, but its role in infectious diseases still needs to be explored further. Therefore, the purpose of our study was to compare MRI with high resolution CT (HRCT) for assessing pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods 50 patients with culture-proven pulmonary tuberculosis underwent chest HRCT as the standard of reference and were evaluated by MRI within 24 h after HRCT. Altogether we performed 60 CT and MRI examinations, because 10 patients were also examined by CT and MRI at follow- up. Pulmonary abnormalities, their characteristics, location and distribution were analyzed by two readers who were blinded to the HRCT results. Results Artifacts did not interfere with the diagnostic value of MRI. Both HRCT and MRI correctly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis and identified pulmonary abnormalities in all patients. There were no significant differences between the two techniques in terms of identifying the location and distribution of the lung lesions, though the higher resolution of MRI did allow for better identification of parenchymal dishomogeneity, caseosis, and pleural or nodal involvement. Conclusion Technical developments and the refinement of pulse sequences have improved the quality and speed of MRI. Our data indicate that in terms of identifying lung lesions in non-AIDS patients with non- miliary pulmonary tuberculosis, MRI achieves diagnostic performances comparable to those obtained by HRCT but with better and more rapid identification of pulmonary tissue abnormalities due to the excellent contrast resolution. PMID:21923910

  10. Immunogenic potential of latency associated antigens against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Swati; Saraav, Iti; Sharma, Sadhna

    2014-02-01

    Tuberculosis remains a great health threat to the world among infectious diseases particularly with the advent of human immunodeficiency virus and emergence of drug resistant strains. In the light of the inconsistent efficacy imparted by the only currently available pre-exposure vaccine bacillus Calmette-Guerin BCG, the development of an improved TB vaccine is a very high international research priority. Vaccine candidates currently in clinical trials are also pre-exposure vaccines that aim to prevent active tuberculosis during an individual's lifetime. According to World Health Organization approximately a third of the world's population is latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Dormancy or latency of Mycobacteria is associated with the formation of granuloma with poorly perfused interior leading to expression of genes which help them survive in this hostile environment. A group of about 50 genes belonging to the DosR regulon also known as latency antigens are expressed by Mycobacteria when they are persisting in the immuno-competent host. An understanding of the immunological effects produced by products of these latency induced genes may help in making a more potent vaccine. Incorporation of latency antigens into improved (live or subunit) vaccines may enhance the impact of these vaccines in which BCG priming can be followed by multisubunit protein boosting. These vaccines could act as post exposure vaccines for containment and prevention of latent TB activation. This heterologous boosting of BCG-primed immunity will be able to stimulate the known immune correlates of protective immunity against M. tuberculosis i.e. TH1 cells (CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells) mediated immune responses with cytokines such as IFN-γ and TNF-α⋅ In our review we have analysed and compared the immunogenic potential of various latency-associated antigens of the DosR regulon in line with the current strategy of developing a recombinant post exposure booster vaccine. PMID:24300592

  11. [Delays in diagnosing and treating tuberculosis in Croatia].

    PubMed

    Jurčev-Savičević, Anamarija; Popović-Grle, Sanja; Mulić, Rosanda; Smoljanović, Mladen; Miše, Kornelija

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine factors causing delay in tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment in Croatia. It included 240 adults with pulmonary tuberculosis, who were interviewed for demographics, socioeconomic, lifestyle, and personal health data. Total delay was defined as a number of days from the onset of symptoms to the initiation of therapy. The median and the 75th percentile of the total delay were 68 and 120 days, respectively: 16.7 % of the patients initiated treatment within the first month, 23.8 % within the second month, 23.3 % within the third month, 12.9 % within the fourth month, and 23.3 % more than four months after the symptoms appeared. Long delay (exceeding median delay) was strongly associated with drug abuse (p=0.021). Extreme delay (75th percentile of delay) was significantly associated with the lowest level of education (p=0.021), below minimal income (p=0.039), minimal to average income (p=0.020), current smoking (p=0.050), and co-morbidity (p=0.048). In the multivariate model, long delay remained associated with drug abuse, while extreme delay was associated with the lowest level of education (p=0.033) and current (p=0.017) and ex-smoking (p=0.045).In a setting with decreasing TB incidence, the reported delay can be reduced by increasing health education, not only about tuberculosis per se, but about health in general and attitudes towards prevention and early care. It is also important to increase tuberculosis knowledge among healthcare workers as well as their diagnostic skills. PMID:23152388

  12. Proteogenomic analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kelkar, Dhanashree S; Kumar, Dhirendra; Kumar, Praveen; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Yadav, Amit Kumar; Shrivastava, Priyanka; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Anand, Sridhar; Sundaram, Hema; Kingsbury, Reena; Harsha, H C; Nair, Bipin; Prasad, T S Keshava; Chauhan, Devendra Singh; Katoch, Kiran; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Kumar, Prahlad; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Dash, Debasis; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2011-12-01

    The genome sequencing of H37Rv strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was completed in 1998 followed by the whole genome sequencing of a clinical isolate, CDC1551 in 2002. Since then, the genomic sequences of a number of other strains have become available making it one of the better studied pathogenic bacterial species at the genomic level. However, annotation of its genome remains challenging because of high GC content and dissimilarity to other model prokaryotes. To this end, we carried out an in-depth proteogenomic analysis of the M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain using Fourier transform mass spectrometry with high resolution at both MS and tandem MS levels. In all, we identified 3176 proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis representing ~80% of its total predicted gene count. In addition to protein database search, we carried out a genome database search, which led to identification of ~250 novel peptides. Based on these novel genome search-specific peptides, we discovered 41 novel protein coding genes in the H37Rv genome. Using peptide evidence and alternative gene prediction tools, we also corrected 79 gene models. Finally, mass spectrometric data from N terminus-derived peptides confirmed 727 existing annotations for translational start sites while correcting those for 33 proteins. We report creation of a high confidence set of protein coding regions in Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome obtained by high resolution tandem mass-spectrometry at both precursor and fragment detection steps for the first time. This proteogenomic approach should be generally applicable to other organisms whose genomes have already been sequenced for obtaining a more accurate catalogue of protein-coding genes. PMID:21969609

  13. Tuberculosis 2004: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Glassroth, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues as a major public health challenge worldwide. HIV-TB coinfection is especially concerning as it accelerates progression of infection to active disease and amplifies spread of TB including drug resistant disease. Application of molecular biology and insights from classic microbiology to TB control have resulted in important innovations in diagnosis and treatment. Radiometric assay and, particularly, PCR, with nucleic acid probing, have reduced the time to diagnosis. Moreover, the sensitivity of these techniques is potentially log orders of magnitude more sensitive. Molecular techniques can be adapted to drug susceptibility testing. The differential activity and post-antibiotic effect of various drugs against TB have led to highly effective briefer regimens and to directly observed therapy. Insights into basic host defense against TB and description of the M. tuberculosis genome have created optimism for developing new treatments and effective vaccines in the years to come. PMID:16555622

  14. [Difficulty in diagnosing pediatric tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Losurdo, G; Natalizia, A R; Amisano, A; Bertoluzzo, L; Mantero, E; Giacchino, R

    2007-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in children is an important warning sign in a community, as it could signal recent infection of a cavitary form in an adult. Thus, while early diagnosis is crucial for effective treatment in children, it is also imperative for the control of tuberculosis at the public health level since it allows rapid identification of contagious adult cases. Here we report four cases of difficult and delayed diagnosis of TB in children. From this experience we highlight the need for an extensive medical history of the patient during diagnostic work-up. This includes: the positive history for contact with infected adults, especially for immigrant children; exclusion of TB diagnosis for persistent respiratory symptoms (2-3 weeks) after antibiotic therapy; and the need for high-definition CT scan when the radiological picture is not specific, especially for children under 5 years of age. PMID:18162739

  15. Tuberculosis in domestic animal species.

    PubMed

    Pesciaroli, M; Alvarez, J; Boniotti, M B; Cagiola, M; Di Marco, V; Marianelli, C; Pacciarini, M; Pasquali, P

    2014-10-01

    M. bovis and M. caprae, members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC), are the major causative agents of tuberculosis in domestic animals. Notably, M. bovis exhibits a wide host range; the infection has been reported in many domesticated animals and free or captive wildlife. Despite most of them acting as spill-over hosts in particular epidemiological scenarios, some domesticated species as pigs, camelids and goats may display high rates of infection and possibly play a role in the inter-species transmission of the disease. The aim of this review is to make an updated overview of the susceptibility and the role in the transmission of the disease of the most common domesticated animals species such as small ruminants, pigs, horses, camelids, dogs and cats. An overview of the diagnostic approaches to detect the infection in each of the species included in the review is also presented. PMID:25151859

  16. Macrophage immunoregulatory pathways in tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, Murugesan V.S.; Ni, Bin; Dodd, Claire E.; Schlesinger, Larry S.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages, the major host cells harboring Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), are a heterogeneous cell type depending on their tissue of origin and host they are derived from. Significant discord in macrophage responses to M.tb exists due to differences in M.tb strains and the various types of macrophages used to study tuberculosis (TB). This review will summarize current concepts regarding macrophage responses to M.tb infection, while pointing out relevant differences in experimental outcomes due to the use of divergent model systems. A brief description of the lung environment is included since there is increasing evidence that the alveolar macrophage (AM) has immunoregulatory properties that can delay optimal protective host immune responses. In this context, this review focuses on selected macrophage immunoregulatory pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), cytokines, negative regulators of inflammation, lipid mediators and microRNAs (miRNAs). PMID:25453226

  17. Copper Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaoshan; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is a trace element essential for the growth and development of almost all organisms, including bacteria. However, Cu overload in most systems is toxic. Studies show Cu accumulates in macrophage phagosomes infected with bacteria, suggesting Cu provides an innate immune mechanism to combat invading pathogens. To counteract the host-supplied Cu, increasing evidence suggests that bacteria have evolved Cu resistance mechanisms to