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1

Tuberculosis Exposure Control 1.0 BACKGROUND  

E-print Network

1 Tuberculosis Exposure Control 1.0 BACKGROUND Since 1985, the rate of new cases of tuberculosis, more than 26,000 new cases of active tuberculosis were reported in the US. In New York City alone, 3,700 cases of active tuberculosis were reported in 1991. Tuberculosis is a contagious disease that causes

de Lijser, Peter

2

Human bovine tuberculosis - remains in the differential.  

PubMed

Mycobacterium bovis is a pathogen of cattle. The unpasteurized milk of affected cattle is a source of infection in humans. Despite the screening of cattle and the pasteurization of milk, M bovis has not been eradicated. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed in symptomatic patients with a history of possible exposure. At risk groups include animal workers, farmers, meat packers, vets and zoo keepers. Humans are usually infected by the aerosol route. We present two cases of human bovine tuberculosis. One was a presumptive case and the second was a confirmed case. Both responded well to antituberculous therapy. In the confirmed case, there was evidence of transmission to the partner living in the same house. Rifampicin prophylaxis was given to the exposed case. The M. bovis from the confirmed case was isoniazid resistant, in addition to having the well known resistance to pyrazinamide. Isoniazid resistance has been described before in those who are immunocompromised. We describe it in an immunocompetent patient. PMID:20688950

Bilal, Shaukat; Iqbal, Mudassir; Murphy, Philip; Power, Joan

2010-11-01

3

PCR diagnostics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in historic human long bone remains from 18th century burials in Kaiserebersdorf, Austria  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: In the present pilot study we applied recently published protocols for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human remains. We screened long bones from an 18th century cemetery and skulls from the anatomical \\

Lutz Bachmann; Barbara Däubl; Charlotte Lindqvist; Luise Kruckenhauser; Maria Teschler-Nicola; Elisabeth Haring

2008-01-01

4

For personal use. Only reproduce with permission from The Lancet Publishing Group. Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a leading infectious  

E-print Network

For personal use. Only reproduce with permission from The Lancet Publishing Group. Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a leading infectious cause of morbidity and mortality. While antibiotic resistance-resistant phenotypes may or may not have a predictable effect on the fitness of drug-resistant tuberculosis strains

Cohen, Ted

5

Tuberculin Skin Test Reactivity Is Dependent on Host Genetic Background in Colombian Tuberculosis Household Contacts  

PubMed Central

The tuberculin skin test (TST) measures the intensity of antimycobacterial acquired immunity and is used to diagnose latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We report evidence for a codominant gene explaining ?65% of the TST variability. Disregarding the host genetic background may lead to misclassifications of TST-based diagnosis of latent M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:22291100

Cobat, Aurélie; Barrera, Luis F.; Henao, Hanna; Arbeláez, Patricia; Abel, Laurent; García, Luis F.; Schurr, Erwin

2012-01-01

6

Tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis remains a serious health problem worldwide, particularly affecting the poorest in both high-income and developing countries. It was declared a global emergency by the World Health Organization in 1993. Central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis is caused by mycobacteria belonging to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, and is acquired through inhalation of aerosolized droplet nuclei. Meningitis represents the most frequent and severe form of CNS tuberculosis. Parenchymal CNS involvement can occur in the form of tuberculoma or, more rarely, abscess. Also, damage of the spinal cord, roots, and spine can occur in the form of spinal meningitis, radiculomyelitis, spondylitis, or spinal cord infarction. Diagnosis remains a challenge due to the slow growth of the organisms and the low yield of cerebrospinal fluid cultures, as well as the frequent absence of evidence of infection elsewhere. This results in frequent empirical therapy, based on a combination of four drugs (isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol) for 2 months, followed by 10 additional months with two drugs (isoniazid and rifampicin) to a total duration of 12 months. Shorter regimens have also been successful, but there have been few controlled trials in patients with extrapulmonary disease. Corticoid therapy seems to be associated with a reduced risk of death, and is usually indicated. Evidence of multidrug resistance requires variable combinations of first- and second-line drugs; fortunately, resistance does not seem to represent a serious threat for CNS tuberculosis at present, but still requires the utmost vigilance. PMID:24365432

Garcia-Monco, Juan Carlos

2014-01-01

7

Tuberculosis  

MedlinePLUS

... Dynamic Stretching A Guy's Guide to Body Image Tuberculosis KidsHealth > Teens > Infections > Bacterial & Viral Infections > Tuberculosis Print ... Prevention Treatment Duration When to Call the Doctor TB Basics Tuberculosis (also known as "TB") is a ...

8

Tuberculosis  

MedlinePLUS

Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body. TB spreads through the air when a person with ...

9

Tuberculosis  

MedlinePLUS

... PEPFARâ??s Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria funds health initiatives and strengthens health systems worldwide ... secure better health outcomes for HIV, TB and malaria. Read about the Global Fund on the AIDS. ...

10

Tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis is still a leading cause of death in low-income and middle-income countries, especially those of sub-Saharan Africa where tuberculosis is an epidemic because of the increased susceptibility conferred by HIV infection. The effectiveness of the Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) vaccine is partial, and that of treatment of latent tuberculosis is unclear in high-incidence settings. The routine diagnostic methods that are used in many parts of the world are still very similar to those used 100 years ago. Multidrug treatment, within the context of structured, directly observed therapy, is a cost-effective control strategy. Nevertheless, the duration of treatment needed reduces its effectiveness, as does the emergence of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant disease; the latter has recently become widespread. The rapid expansion of basic, clinical, and operational research, in addition to increasing knowledge of tuberculosis, is providing new diagnostic, treatment, and preventive measures. The challenge is to apply these advances to the populations most at risk. The development of a comprehensive worldwide plan to stop tuberculosis might facilitate this process by coordinating the work of health agencies. However, massive effort, political will, and resources are needed for this plan to succeed. PMID:17719083

Maartens, Gary; Wilkinson, Robert J

2007-12-15

11

Tuberculosis  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This patient education program discusses latent and active tuberculosis infections. It also reviews the symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of tuberculosis. This resource is a MedlinePlus Interactive Health Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine, designed and developed by the Patient Education Institute. NOTE: This tutorial requires a special Flash plug-in, version 4 or above. If you do not have Flash, you will be prompted to obtain a free download of the software before you start the tutorial. You will also need an Acrobat Reader, available as a free download, in order to view the Reference Summary.

Patient Education Institute

12

Diabetes and tuberculosis: the impact of the diabetes epidemic on tuberculosis incidence  

E-print Network

Abstract Background Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major cause of mortality in developing countries, and in these countries diabetes prevalence is increasing rapidly. Diabetes increases the risk of TB. Our aim was to assess the potential impact...

Stevenson, Catherine R; Forouhi, Nita G; Roglic, Gojka; Williams, Brian G; Lauer, Jeremy A; Dye, Christopher; Unwin, Nigel

2007-09-06

13

PERSPECTIVE Candidate Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes  

E-print Network

PERSPECTIVE Candidate Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes targeted by human microRNAs WeiRui Guo1-wu@northwestern.edu (J. Y. Wu), weilp@mail.cbi.pku.edu.cn (L. Wei) Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major health issue in 1882, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), the causative agent for tuberculosis, remains one

Wu, Jane Y.

14

Creation of a Clinical Assay for Detection of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection as Well as Rifampin Resistance Using Linear-After-The-Exponential PCR (LATE-PCR)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The World Health Organization reports that in 2006 alone, there were approximately 9.2 million new cases and 1.7 million deaths from tuberculosis (TB). Approximately 98% of these tuberculosis related deaths occur in developing countries (WHO 9). Tuberculosis has beset the human population since recorded history and remains the infectious disease with the highest morbidity and mortality among human civilization

Kevin Soares

2008-01-01

15

Tuberculosis caused by RDRio Mycobacterium tuberculosis is not associated with differential clinical features  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND We recently described the Mycobacterium tuberculosis RDRio genotype, a clonally derived sublineage within the Latin American–Mediterranean (LAM) family. Genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis likely affects the clinical aspects of tuberculosis (TB). Prospective studies that address this issue are scarce and remain controversial. OBJECTIVE To determine the association of differential clinical features of pulmonary TB with the RDRio M. tuberculosis etiology. METHODS Culture-proven pulmonary TB patients (n = 272) were clinically evaluated, including history, physical examination, chest X-ray and anti-human immunodeficiency virus serology. Isolates were classified as RDRio or non-RDRio M. tuberculosis by multiplex polymerase chain reaction and further spoligotyped. Clinical and M. tuberculosis genotype data were analyzed. RESULTS RDRio M. tuberculosis caused disease in 26.5% (72/270) of all TB cases. The LAM genotype, of which RDRio strains are members, was responsible for 46.0% of the TB cases. Demographic data, major signs and symptoms, radiographic presentation, microbiological features and clinical outcomes were not significantly different among patients with TB caused by RDRio and non-RDRio strains. CONCLUSIONS Disease caused by M. tuberculosis RDRio strains was not clinically distinctive or more severe than disease caused by non-RDRio strains in this series of TB patients. Larger prospective studies specifically designed to disclose differential clinical characteristics of TB caused by specific M. tuberculosis lineages are needed. PMID:22863208

Barbosa, C. de B.; Lazzarini, L. C. O.; Elias, A. R.; Leung, J. A. M.; Ribeiro, S. B.; da Silva, M. G.; Duarte, R. S.; Suffys, P.; Gomes, H. M.; Kritski, A. L.; Lapa e Silva, J. R.; Ho, J. L.; Boéchat, N.

2013-01-01

16

Comprehensive Treatment of Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis has been reported in 45 countries, including countries with limited resources and a high burden of tuberculosis. We describe the management of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and treatment outcomes among patients who were referred for individualized outpatient therapy in Peru. METHODS A total of 810 patients were referred for free individualized therapy, including drug treatment, resective surgery, adverse-event management, and nutritional and psychosocial support. We tested isolates from 651 patients for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and developed regimens that included five or more drugs to which the infecting isolate was not resistant. RESULTS Of the 651 patients tested, 48 (7.4%) had extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis; the remaining 603 patients had multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis had undergone more treatment than the other patients (mean [±SD] number of regimens, 4.2±1.9 vs. 3.2±1.6; P<0.001) and had isolates that were resistant to more drugs (number of drugs, 8.4±1.1 vs. 5.3±1.5; P<0.001). None of the patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis were coinfected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis received daily, supervised therapy with an average of 5.3±1.3 drugs, including cycloserine, an injectable drug, and a fluoroquinolone. Twenty-nine of these patients (60.4%) completed treatment or were cured, as compared with 400 patients (66.3%) with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (P=0.36). CONCLUSIONS Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis can be cured in HIV-negative patients through outpatient treatment, even in those who have received multiple prior courses of therapy for tuberculosis. PMID:18687637

Mitnick, Carole D.; Shin, Sonya S.; Seung, Kwonjune J.; Rich, Michael L.; Atwood, Sidney S.; Furin, Jennifer J.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Alcantara Viru, Felix A.; Appleton, Sasha C.; Bayona, Jaime N.; Bonilla, Cesar A.; Chalco, Katiuska; Choi, Sharon; Franke, Molly F.; Fraser, Hamish S.F.; Guerra, Dalia; Hurtado, Rocio M.; Jazayeri, Darius; Joseph, Keith; Llaro, Karim; Mestanza, Lorena; Mukherjee, Joia S.; Muñoz, Maribel; Palacios, Eda; Sanchez, Epifanio; Sloutsky, Alexander; Becerra, Mercedes C.

2009-01-01

17

Impact of Previous ART and of ART Initiation on Outcome of HIV-Associated Tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Background. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has progressively decreased mortality of HIV-associated tuberculosis .To date, however, limited data on tuberculosis treatment outcomes among coinfected patients who are not ART-naive at the time of tuberculosis diagnosis are available. Methods. A multicenter, observational study enrolled 246 HIV-infected patients diagnosed with tuberculosis, in 96 Italian infectious diseases hospital units, who started tuberculosis treatment. A polytomous logistic regression model was used to identify baseline factors associated with the outcome. A Poisson regression model was used to explain the effect of ART during tuberculosis treatment on mortality, as a time-varying covariate, adjusting for baseline characteristics. Results. Outcomes of tuberculosis treatment were as follows: 130 (52.8%) were successfully treated, 36 (14.6%) patients died in a median time of 2 months (range: 0–16), and 80 (32.6%) had an unsuccessful outcome. Being foreign born or injecting drug users was associated with unsuccessful outcomes. In multivariable Poisson regression, cART during tuberculosis treatment decreased the risk of death, while this risk increased for those who were not ART-naive at tuberculosis diagnosis. Conclusions. ART during tuberculosis treatment is associated with a substantial reduction of death rate among HIV-infected patients. However, patients who are not ART-naive when they develop tuberculosis remain at elevated risk of death. PMID:22489253

Girardi, Enrico; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Angeletti, Claudio; Vanacore, Paola; Matteelli, Alberto; Gori, Andrea; Carbonara, Sergio; Ippolito, Giuseppe

2012-01-01

18

Background  

E-print Network

Efficiency of the EMDR procedure is based on a presumption of neuropsychological changes in therapeutic process.The aim of the investigation is to scann and give evidence of electroactivity changes, during the process of EMDR procedure and after finishing it. Materials and methods We have recorded a continual polygraph EEG, before, during and after EMDR therapy, in patient with combat-related PTSD. Results Before the treatment, EEG recorded basic activity of low voltage (attenuation) of 20 ?V, frequency of beta range (17-26 Hz), bioccipital, with no pathologic activity. Patient had prominent vegetative symptoms (anxiety, heart rate 100/min). Background activity immediately

Grozdanko Grbesa; Maja Simonovic; Dorjanka Jankovic

19

Pulmonary tuberculosis  

MedlinePLUS

Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) . You can get TB by breathing ... chap 332. Fitzgerald DW, Sterling TR, Haas DW. Mycobacterium tuberculosis . In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolan R, eds. ...

20

Orbital and adnexal tuberculosis: a case series from a South Indian population  

PubMed Central

Background Orbital tuberculosis (OTb) is rare and may be regarded as a manifestation of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. We report an interesting case series of six patients with varied presentations of orbital and adnexal tuberculosis in a South Indian patient population. Results A retrospective, interventional case series of six patients diagnosed with orbital and adnexal tuberculosis on the basis of clinical, radiological and histopathological evaluations between 2010 and 2013 was performed. Among the six patients with histopathologically proven OTb, five were women. The varied presentations included tubercular dacryoadenitis (two cases), classical periostitis (two cases), OTb with bone involvement (one case) and ocular adnexal tuberculosis (one case). Systemic involvement was seen in one case. All cases were treated with a regimen of antitubercular therapy (ATT). Conclusions OTb, though rare, should form a part of the differential diagnosis of orbital lesions in a high tuberculosis (TB) endemic country like ours. Biopsy still remains the mainstay of diagnosis. PMID:24940452

2014-01-01

21

Short communication How dormant is Mycobacterium tuberculosis during latency? A study  

E-print Network

Short communication How dormant is Mycobacterium tuberculosis during latency? A study integrating. Boulevard, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark 1. Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading infectious cause infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, people with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) represent

Rosenberg, Noah

22

Background  

E-print Network

Background: Although the outcomes of caustic ingestion differ between children and adults, it is unclear whether such outcomes differ among adults as a function of their age. This retrospective study was performed to ascertain whether the clinical outcomes of caustic ingestion differ significantly between elderly and non-elderly adults. Methods: Medical records of patients hospitalized for caustic ingestion between June 1999 and July 2009 were reviewed retrospectively. Three hundred eighty nine patients between the ages of 17 and 107 years were divided into two groups: non-elderly (ingestion, substance ingested, systemic and gastrointestinal complications, psychological and systemic comorbidities, severity of mucosal injury, and time to expiration. Results: The incidence of psychological comorbidities was higher for the non-elderly group. By contrast, the incidence of systemic comorbidities, the grade of severity of mucosal damage, and the incidence of systemic complications were higher for the elderly group. The percentages of ICU admissions and deaths in the ICU were higher and the cumulative survival rate was lower for the elderly group. Elderly subjects, those with systemic complications had the greatest mortality risk due to caustic ingestion. Conclusions: Caustic ingestion by subjects ?65 years of age is associated with poorer clinical outcomes as compared to subjects < 65 years of age; elderly subjects with systemic complications have the poorest clinical outcomes. The severity of gastrointestinal tract injury appears to have no impact on the survival of elderly subjects.

Jui-min Chang; Nai-jen Liu; Betty Chien-jung Pai; Yun-hen Liu; Ming-hung Tsai; Ching-song Lee; Yin-yi Chu; Chih-chuan Lin; Cheng-tang Chiu; Hao-tsai Cheng

23

Mycobacterium tuberculosis ecology in Venezuela: epidemiologic correlates of common spoligotypes and a large clonal cluster defined by MIRU-VNTR-24  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis remains an endemic public health problem, but the ecology of the TB strains prevalent, and their transmission, can vary by country and by region. We sought to investigate the prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in different regions of Venezuela. A previous study identified the most prevalent strains in Venezuela but did not show geographical distribution nor identify clonal

Edgar Abadía; Monica Sequera; Dagmarys Ortega; María Victoria Méndez; Arnelly Escalona; Omaira Da Mata; Elix Izarra; Yeimy Rojas; Rossana Jaspe; Alifiya S Motiwala; David Alland; Jacobus de Waard; Howard E Takiff

2009-01-01

24

Time Remains  

E-print Network

On one popular view, the general covariance of gravity implies that change is relational in a strong sense, such that all it is for a physical degree of freedom to change is for it to vary with regard to a second physical degree of freedom. At a quantum level, this view of "change as relative variation" leads to a "fundamentally timeless" formalism for quantum gravity. Here, we will show how one may avoid this acute `problem of time'. Under our view, duration is still regarded as relative, but temporal succession is taken to be absolute. Following our approach, which is presented in more formal terms in arXiv:1303.7139, it is possible to conceive of a genuinely dynamical theory of quantum gravity within which time, in a substantive sense, remains.

Sean Gryb; Karim Thebault

2014-08-12

25

Tuberculosis and Pregnancy  

MedlinePLUS

... the African-American Community Summit Background Slideset Slideset Text version Websites Children Correctional Facilities Table of Contents ... Tuberculosis Laboratory Aggregate Reports Slide Sets Core Curriculum Text- only version Self-Study Modules Module 1 (text ...

26

Global Tuberculosis (TB)  

MedlinePLUS

... the African-American Community Summit Background Slideset Slideset Text version Websites Children Correctional Facilities Table of Contents ... Tuberculosis Laboratory Aggregate Reports Slide Sets Core Curriculum Text- only version Self-Study Modules Module 1 (text ...

27

Comparison of Trends in Tuberculosis Incidence among Adults Living with HIV and Adults without HIV – Kenya, 1998–2012  

PubMed Central

Background In Kenya, the comparative incidences of tuberculosis among persons with and without HIV have not been described, and the differential impact of public health interventions on tuberculosis incidence in the two groups is unknown. Methods We estimated annual tuberculosis incidence stratified by HIV status during 2006–2012 based on the numbers of reported tuberculosis patients with and without HIV infection, the prevalence of HIV infection in the general population, and the total population. We also made crude estimates of annual tuberculosis incidence stratified by HIV status during 1998–2012 by assuming a constant ratio of HIV prevalence among tuberculosis patients compared to the general population. Results Tuberculosis incidence among both adults with HIV and adults without HIV increased during 1998–2004 then remained relatively stable until 2007. During 2007–2012, tuberculosis incidence declined by 28–44% among adults with HIV and by 11–26% among adults without HIV, concurrent with an increase in antiretroviral therapy uptake. In 2012, tuberculosis incidence among adults with HIV (1,839–1,936 cases/100,000 population) was still eight times as high as among adults without HIV (231–238 cases/100,000 population), and approximately one third of tuberculosis cases were attributable to HIV. Conclusions Although tuberculosis incidence has declined among adults with and without HIV, the persistent high incidence of tuberculosis among those with HIV and the disparity between the two groups are concerning. Early diagnosis of HIV, early initiation of antiretroviral therapy, regular screening for tuberculosis, and isoniazid preventive therapy among persons with HIV, as well as tuberculosis control in the general population, are required to address these issues. PMID:24937804

Yuen, Courtney M.; Weyenga, Herman O.; Kim, Andrea A.; Malika, Timothy; Muttai, Hellen; Katana, Abraham; Nganga, Lucy; Cain, Kevin P.; De Cock, Kevin M.

2014-01-01

28

Spinal tuberculosis: A review  

PubMed Central

Spinal tuberculosis is a destructive form of tuberculosis. It accounts for approximately half of all cases of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis is more common in children and young adults. The incidence of spinal tuberculosis is increasing in developed nations. Genetic susceptibility to spinal tuberculosis has recently been demonstrated. Characteristically, there is destruction of the intervertebral disk space and the adjacent vertebral bodies, collapse of the spinal elements, and anterior wedging leading to kyphosis and gibbus formation. The thoracic region of vertebral column is most frequently affected. Formation of a ‘cold’ abscess around the lesion is another characteristic feature. The incidence of multi-level noncontiguous vertebral tuberculosis occurs more frequently than previously recognized. Common clinical manifestations include constitutional symptoms, back pain, spinal tenderness, paraplegia, and spinal deformities. For the diagnosis of spinal tuberculosis magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive imaging technique than x-ray and more specific than computed tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging frequently demonstrates involvement of the vertebral bodies on either side of the disk, disk destruction, cold abscess, vertebral collapse, and presence of vertebral column deformities. Neuroimaging-guided needle biopsy from the affected site in the center of the vertebral body is the gold standard technique for early histopathological diagnosis. Antituberculous treatment remains the cornerstone of treatment. Surgery may be required in selected cases, e.g. large abscess formation, severe kyphosis, an evolving neurological deficit, or lack of response to medical treatment. With early diagnosis and early treatment, prognosis is generally good. PMID:22118251

Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Somvanshi, Dilip Singh

2011-01-01

29

Nocardia Co-Infection in Patients With Pulmonary Tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Background: Tuberculosis (TB) remains as one of the most serious infectious diseases in the world. Pulmonary tuberculosis can occur with other pulmonary diseases caused by opportunistic organisms such as Nocardia spp. particularly in immunocompromised patients. Therefore, diagnosis of co-infection at the early stage of the disease could be lifesaving. Objectives: The goal of this study was to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Nocardia spp. in sputum specimens in order to assess the concomitant nocardiosis and tuberculosis in patients with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis. Patients and Methods: From March 2011 to April 2012, 189 sputum specimens were obtained from patients who were suspected of having pulmonary tuberculosis. Out of 189 samples, 32 of the samples belonged to hospitalized HIV-infected patients. Samples were examined by Gram and Ziehl-Nelsen staining, culture and PCR methods. Results: From 157 sputum specimens, positive samples by acid fast staining, culture and PCR for M. tuberculosis were reported for 7.6% (12/157), 10.1% (16/157) and 7% (11/157) of samples, respectively. No results were obtained by the described methods for Nocardia spp. Among 32 samples of HIV-infected patients, four (12.5%) had positive results for acid fast staining, culture and PCR detecting M. tuberculosis while only two samples had positive results for Nocardia spp. by PCR and no results were reported by culture, Gram and acid fast staining for this organism. Conclusions: Concurrent pulmonary nocardiosis and tuberculosis is frequent in HIV-infected patients. Rapid and sensitive methods such as PCR are recommended for detection of such co-infections. PMID:25741428

Ekrami, Alireza; Khosravi, Azar Dokht; Samarbaf Zadeh, Ali Reza; Hashemzadeh, Mohammad

2014-01-01

30

Tuberculosis in the elderly  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary   Tuberculosis (TB) today remains one of the world’s most lethal infectious diseases. An estimated one-third of the world’s\\u000a population is infected with the tubercle bacillus-Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), and 7 to 8 million people develop TB disease each year (27). For purpose of clarity, TB infection (latent TB) is defined\\u000a as harboring Mtb without evidence of active infection, and TB

S. Rajagopalan; T. T. Yoshikawa

2000-01-01

31

Genomics and the evolution, pathogenesis, and diagnosis of tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis kills nearly 2 million people annually, and current approaches to tuberculosis control are expensive, have limited efficacy, and are vulnerable to being overcome by extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Determination of the genome sequence of M. tuberculosis has revolutionized tuberculosis research, contributed to major advances in the understanding of the evolution and pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis, and facilitated development of new diagnostic tests with increased specificity for tuberculosis. In this review, we describe some of the major progress in tuberculosis research that has resulted from knowledge of the genome sequence and note some of the problems that remain unsolved. PMID:17607348

Ernst, Joel D.; Trevejo-Nuñez, Giraldina; Banaiee, Niaz

2007-01-01

32

Unique transcriptome signature of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in pulmonary tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Although tuberculosis remains a substantial global threat, the mechanisms that enable mycobacterial persistence and replication within the human host are ill defined. This study represents the first genome-wide expression analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from clinical lung samples, which has enabled the identification of M. tuberculosis genes actively expressed during pulmonary tuberculosis. To obtain optimal information from our DNA array analyses, we analyzed the differentially expressed genes within the context of computationally inferred protein networks. Protein networks were constructed using functional linkages established by the Rosetta stone, phylogenetic profile, conserved gene neighbor, and operon computational methods. This combined approach revealed that during pulmonary tuberculosis, M. tuberculosis actively transcribes a number of genes involved in active fortification and evasion from host defense systems. These genes may provide targets for novel intervention strategies. PMID:16428773

Rachman, Helmy; Strong, Michael; Ulrichs, Timo; Grode, Leander; Schuchhardt, Johannes; Mollenkopf, Hans; Kosmiadi, George A; Eisenberg, David; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

2006-02-01

33

Unique Transcriptome Signature of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Pulmonary Tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Although tuberculosis remains a substantial global threat, the mechanisms that enable mycobacterial persistence and replication within the human host are ill defined. This study represents the first genome-wide expression analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from clinical lung samples, which has enabled the identification of M. tuberculosis genes actively expressed during pulmonary tuberculosis. To obtain optimal information from our DNA array analyses, we analyzed the differentially expressed genes within the context of computationally inferred protein networks. Protein networks were constructed using functional linkages established by the Rosetta stone, phylogenetic profile, conserved gene neighbor, and operon computational methods. This combined approach revealed that during pulmonary tuberculosis, M. tuberculosis actively transcribes a number of genes involved in active fortification and evasion from host defense systems. These genes may provide targets for novel intervention strategies. PMID:16428773

Rachman, Helmy; Strong, Michael; Ulrichs, Timo; Grode, Leander; Schuchhardt, Johannes; Mollenkopf, Hans; Kosmiadi, George A.; Eisenberg, David; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

2006-01-01

34

Population Aging and Migrant Workers: Bottlenecks in Tuberculosis Control in Rural China  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis is a serious global health problem. Its paradigms are shifting through time, especially in rapidly developing countries such as China. Health providers in China are at the forefront of the battle against tuberculosis; however, there are few empirical studies on health providers' perspectives on the challenges they face in tuberculosis control at the county level in China. This study was conducted among health providers to explore their experiences with tuberculosis control in order to identify bottlenecks and emerging challenges in controlling tuberculosis in rural China. Methods A qualitative approach was used. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 17 health providers working in various positions within the health system of one rural county (ZJG) of China. Data were analyzed based on thematic content analysis using MAXQDA 10 qualitative data analysis software. Results Health providers reported several problems in tuberculosis control in ZJG county. Migrant workers and the elderly were repeatedly documented as the main obstacles in effective tuberculosis control in the county. At a personal level, doctors showed their frustration with the lack of new drugs for treating tuberculosis patients, and their opinions varied regarding incentives for referring patients. Conclusion The results suggest that several problems still remain for controlling tuberculosis in rural China. Tuberculosis control efforts need to make reaching the most vulnerable populations a priority and encourage local health providers to adopt innovative practices in the local context based on national guidelines to achieve the best results. Considerable changes in China's National Tuberculosis Control Program are needed to tackle these emerging challenges faced by health workers at the county level. PMID:24498440

Lu, Hui; You, Hua; Fan, Hong; Huang, Lifang; Wang, Qungang; Shen, Hongbing; Wang, Jianming

2014-01-01

35

The Genotypic Population Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex from Moroccan Patients Reveals a  

E-print Network

The Genotypic Population Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex from Moroccan Patients: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major health problem in Morocco. Characterization of circulating Mycobacterium Population Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex from Moroccan Patients Reveals a Predominance

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

36

Tuberculosis Fluoroscopy  

Cancer.gov

Follow-up though Dec 31, 2002 has been completed for a study of site-specific cancer mortality among tuberculosis patients treated with artificial lung collapse therapy in Massachusetts tuberculosis sanatoria (1930-1950).

37

Tuberculosis (TB)  

MedlinePLUS

... JavaScript on. Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Tuberculosis (TB) Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content ... thought to be infected with TB bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( Mtb ). TB is a chronic bacterial infection. It ...

38

Tuberculosis Prevention  

MedlinePLUS

... JavaScript on. Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Tuberculosis (TB) Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content ... patients. Many people who are infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( Mtb ) do not get sick or spread the ...

39

76 FR 56635 - Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State and Zone Designations; Michigan  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...We are amending the bovine tuberculosis regulations to adjust...INFORMATION: Background Bovine tuberculosis is a contagious and...Budget has waived its review under Executive Order...split State status for bovine tuberculosis with an...

2011-09-14

40

Molecular characterisation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in the First National Survey of Anti-tuberculosis Drug Resistance from Venezuela  

PubMed Central

Background Molecular typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains has become a valuable tool in the epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB) by allowing detection of outbreaks, tracking of epidemics, identification of genotypes and transmission events among patients who would have remained undetected by conventional contact investigation. This is the first genetic biodiversity study of M. tuberculosis in Venezuela. Thus, we investigated the genetic patterns of strains isolated in the first survey of anti-tuberculosis drug-resistance realised as part of the Global Project of Anti-tuberculosis Drug Resistance Surveillance (WHO/IUATLD). Results Clinical isolates (670/873) were genotyped by spoligotyping. The results were compared with the international spoligotyping database (SpolDB4). Multidrug resistant (MDR) strains (14/18) were also analysed by IS6110-RFLP assays, and resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin was characterised. Spoligotyping grouped 82% (548/670) of the strains into 59 clusters. Twenty new spoligotypes (SITs) specific to Venezuela were identified. Eight new inter-regional clusters were created. The Beijing genotype was not found. The genetic network shows that the Latin American and Mediterranean family constitutes the backbone of the genetic TB population-structure in Venezuela, responsible of >60% of total TB cases studied. MDR was 0.5% in never treated patients and 13.5% in previously treated patients. Mutations in rpoB gene and katG genes were detected in 64% and 43% of the MDR strains, respectively. Two clusters were found to be identical by the four different analysis methods, presumably representing cases of recent transmission of MDR tuberculosis. Conclusion This study gives a first overview of the M. tuberculosis strains circulating in Venezuela during the first survey of anti-tuberculosis drug-resistance. It may aid in the creation of a national database that will be a valuable support for further studies. PMID:17032442

Aristimuño, Liselotte; Armengol, Raimond; Cebollada, Alberto; España, Mercedes; Guilarte, Alexis; Lafoz, Carmen; Lezcano, María A; Revillo, María J; Martín, Carlos; Ramírez, Carmen; Rastogi, Nalin; Rojas, Janet; de Salas, Albina Vázques; Sola, Christophe; Samper, Sofía

2006-01-01

41

Bovine Tuberculosis  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Tuberculosis (TB) in animals and humans may result from exposure to bacilli within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (i.e., M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum, M. pinnipedii, M. microti, M. caprae, or M. canetti). Mycobacterium bovis is the species most often isolated from tuberculous catt...

42

Tuberculosis Drug Resistance Mutation Database  

E-print Network

Tuberculosis (TB) remains the leading cause of death from a largely preventable and curable infectious disease, with an estimated 1.7 million deaths in 2006. Global prospects for TB control are challenged by the emergence ...

Church, George M.

43

Diagnostic Accuracy and Optimal Use of Three Tests for Tuberculosis in Live Badgers  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundAccurate diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) due to infection with Mycobacterium bovis is notoriously difficult in live animals, yet important if we are to understand the epidemiology of TB and devise effective strategies to limit its spread. Currently available tests for diagnosing TB in live Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) remain unvalidated against a reliable gold standard. The aim of the present

Julian A. Drewe; Alexandra J. Tomlinson; Neil J. Walker; Richard J. Delahay; T. Mark Doherty

2010-01-01

44

Tuberculosis Information for International Travelers  

MedlinePLUS

... the African-American Community Summit Background Slideset Slideset Text version Websites Children Correctional Facilities Table of Contents ... Tuberculosis Laboratory Aggregate Reports Slide Sets Core Curriculum Text- only version Self-Study Modules Module 1 (text ...

45

Tuberculosis in Hispanics/Latinos  

MedlinePLUS

... the African-American Community Summit Background Slideset Slideset Text version Websites Children Correctional Facilities Table of Contents ... Tuberculosis Laboratory Aggregate Reports Slide Sets Core Curriculum Text- only version Self-Study Modules Module 1 (text ...

46

Structural and functional characterization of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis uridine monophosphate  

E-print Network

Structural and functional characterization of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis uridine monophosphate drugs with original mechanism of action (1). This is par- ticularly the case for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which remains a major public health issue. Current treatment requires a therapy involving four

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

47

Tuberculosis (TB)  

MedlinePLUS

... JavaScript on. Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Tuberculosis (TB) Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content ... HIV/AIDS Multidrug-Resistant and Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Research Agenda (PDF) TB Research at NIAID Research ...

48

targetTB: A target identification pipeline for Mycobacterium tuberculosis through an interactome, reactome and genome-scale structural analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis still remains one of the largest killer infectious diseases, warranting the identification of newer targets and drugs. Identification and validation of appropriate targets for designing drugs are critical steps in drug discovery, which are at present major bottle-necks. A majority of drugs in current clinical use for many diseases have been designed without the knowledge of the targets,

Karthik Raman; Kalidas Yeturu; Nagasuma Chandra

2008-01-01

49

Detection and Molecular Characterization of 9000-Year-Old Mycobacterium tuberculosis from a Neolithic Settlement in the Eastern Mediterranean  

PubMed Central

Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the principal etiologic agent of human tuberculosis. It has no environmental reservoir and is believed to have co-evolved with its host over millennia. This is supported by skeletal evidence of the disease in early humans, and inferred from M. tuberculosis genomic analysis. Direct examination of ancient human remains for M. tuberculosis biomarkers should aid our understanding of the nature of prehistoric tuberculosis and the host/pathogen relationship. Methodology/Principal Findings We used conventional PCR to examine bone samples with typical tuberculosis lesions from a woman and infant, who were buried together in the now submerged site of Atlit-Yam in the Eastern Mediterranean, dating from 9250-8160 years ago. Rigorous precautions were taken to prevent contamination, and independent centers were used to confirm authenticity of findings. DNA from five M tuberculosis genetic loci was detected and had characteristics consistent with extant genetic lineages. High performance liquid chromatography was used as an independent method of verification and it directly detected mycolic acid lipid biomarkers, specific for the M. tuberculosis complex. Conclusions/Significance Human tuberculosis was confirmed by morphological and molecular methods in a population living in one of the first villages with evidence of agriculture and animal domestication. The widespread use of animals was not a source of infection but may have supported a denser human population that facilitated transmission of the tubercle bacillus. The similarity of the M. tuberculosis genetic signature with those of today gives support to the theory of a long-term co-existence of host and pathogen. PMID:18923677

Minnikin, David E.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Lee, Oona Y-C.; Gernaey, Angela M.; Galili, Ehud; Eshed, Vered; Greenblatt, Charles L.; Lemma, Eshetu; Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila; Spigelman, Mark

2008-01-01

50

Review article Classification of worldwide bovine tuberculosis risk factors  

E-print Network

Review article Classification of worldwide bovine tuberculosis risk factors in cattle: a stratified Tilman, Belgium 2 National and OIE/FAO Bovine Tuberculosis Reference Laboratories, Bacterial Zoonoses ­ The worldwide status of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) as a zoonosis remains of great concern. This article reviews

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

51

Origin, Spread and Demography of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex  

E-print Network

Origin, Spread and Demography of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Thierry Wirth1,2 *, Falk of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), one of the most successful groups of bacterial pathogens, remains that the MTBC consists of two independent clades, one composed exclusively of M. tuberculosis lineages from

Wirth, Thierry

52

High clustering rates of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotypes in Panama  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis continues to be one of the leading causes of death worldwide and in the American region. Although multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) remains a threat to TB control in Panama, few studies have focused in typing MDR-TB strains. The aim of our study was to characterize MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates using PCR-based genetic markers. Methods From 2002 to 2004, a total of 231 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from TB cases country-wide were screened for antibiotic resistance, and MDR-TB isolates were further genotyped by double repetitive element PCR (DRE-PCR), (GTG)5-PCR and spoligotyping. Results A total of 37 isolates (0.85%) were resistant to both isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RIF). Among these 37 isolates, only two (5.4%) were resistant to all five drugs tested. Dual genotyping using DRE-PCR and (GTG)5-PCR of MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates revealed eight clusters comprising 82.9% of the MDR-TB strain collection, and six isolates (17.1%) showed unique fingerprints. The spoligotyping of MDR-TB clinical isolates identified 68% as members of the 42 (LAM9) family genotype. Conclusion Our findings suggest that MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis is highly clustered in Panama’s metropolitan area corresponding to Panama City and Colon City, and our study reveals the genotype distribution across the country. PMID:24053690

2013-01-01

53

Forecast analysis of the incidence of tuberculosis in the province of Quebec  

PubMed Central

Background While the overall population prevalence of tuberculosis in Quebec has been declining for many years, tuberculosis is still disproportionately more prevalent among the immigrant and Inuit communities. As such, the aim of this study was to forecast the incidence of tuberculosis in the Province of Quebec over time in order to examine the possible impact of future preventative and treatment programs geared to reducing such disparities. Methods A compartmental differential equation based on a Susceptible Exposed Latent Infectious Recovered (SELIR) model was simulated using the Euler method using Visual Basic for Applications in Excel. Demographic parameters were obtained from census data for the Province of Quebec and the model was fitted to past epidemiological data to extrapolate future values over the period 2015 to 2030. Results The trend of declining tuberculosis rates will continue in the general population, falling by 42% by 2030. The incidence among immigrants will decrease but never vanish, and may increase in the future. Among the Inuit, the incidence is expected to increase, reaching a maximum and then stabilizing, although if re-infection is taken into account it may continue to increase. Tuberculosis among non-indigenous Canadian born persons will continue to decline, with the disease almost eradicated in that group in the mid 21st century. Conclusions While the incidence of tuberculosis in the Province of Quebec is expected to decrease overall, certain populations will remain at risk. PMID:23621907

2013-01-01

54

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Bayesian mapping of pulmonary tuberculosis in  

E-print Network

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Bayesian mapping of pulmonary tuberculosis in Antananarivo, Madagascar Bicout2 Abstract Background: Tuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis is endemic in Madagascar. The capital, Antananarivo is the most seriously affected area. TB had

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

55

Is Adipose Tissue a Place for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Persistence?  

E-print Network

Is Adipose Tissue a Place for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Persistence? Olivier Neyrolles1 of Electron Microscopy, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France Background. Mycobacterium tuberculosis a Place for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Persistence? PLoS ONE 1(1): e43. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0000043

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

56

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Molecular diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

E-print Network

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Molecular diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients with tuberculosis in Honduras Senia Rosales1,2,3* , Lelany Pineda-García1 , Solomon Ghebremichael3,4 , Nalin Rastogi5 , Sven E Hoffner3,4 Abstract Background: Tuberculosis persists as a public health problem

Boyer, Edmond

57

Understanding Tuberculosis  

MedlinePLUS

... expensive, and last longer. Learn more about symptoms, diagnosis and treatment for tuberculosis ... Top Stories More about Lung Disease Behind the Headlines: COPD February 27, 2015 Personalized Medicine: Don't Guess. ...

58

Detection and molecular characterization of 9,000-year-old Mycobacterium tuberculosis from a Neolithic settlement in the Eastern Mediterranean. PLoS One 3(10): e3426  

E-print Network

Background: Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the principal etiologic agent of human tuberculosis. It has no environmental reservoir and is believed to have co-evolved with its host over millennia. This is supported by skeletal evidence of the disease in early humans, and inferred from M. tuberculosis genomic analysis. Direct examination of ancient human remains for M. tuberculosis biomarkers should aid our understanding of the nature of prehistoric tuberculosis and the host/pathogen relationship. Methodology/Principal Findings: We used conventional PCR to examine bone samples with typical tuberculosis lesions from a woman and infant, who were buried together in the now submerged site of Atlit-Yam in the Eastern Mediterranean, dating from 9250-8160 years ago. Rigorous precautions were taken to prevent contamination, and independent centers were used to confirm authenticity of findings. DNA from five M tuberculosis genetic loci was detected and had characteristics consistent with extant genetic lineages. High performance liquid chromatography was used as an independent method of verification and it directly detected mycolic acid lipid biomarkers, specific for the M. tuberculosis complex. Conclusions/Significance: Human tuberculosis was confirmed by morphological and molecular methods in a population

Israel Hershkovitz; Helen D. Donoghue; David E. Minnikin; Gurdyal S. Besra; Oona Y-c. Lee; Angela M. Gernaey ¤a; Ehud Galili; Vered Eshed; Charles L. Greenblatt; Eshetu Lemma ¤b; Gila Kahila; Mark Spigelman

2008-01-01

59

Gender-related factors influencing tuberculosis control in shantytowns: a qualitative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: There is evidence that female gender is associated with reduced likelihood of tuberculosis diagnosis and successful treatment. This study aimed to characterize gender-related barriers to tuberculosis control in Peruvian shantytowns. METHODS: We investigated attitudes and experiences relating gender to tuberculosis using the grounded theory approach to describe beliefs amongst key tuberculosis control stakeholders. These issues were explored in 22

Dami A Onifade; Angela M Bayer; Rosario Montoya; Marie Haro; Jessica Alva; Jessica Franco; Rosario Sosa; Betty Valiente; Enit Valera; Carolyn M Ford; Colleen D Acosta; Carlton A Evans

2010-01-01

60

Challenges of tuberculosis prevention through early detection of latent tuberculosis infection in new immigrants to the State of Kuwait   

E-print Network

Introduction: Despite management advances worldwide, tuberculosis still remains a serious uncontrolled disease. The absence of either a ‘gold’ standard diagnostic test, or a conventional rapid ‘reference’ laboratory test ...

Al-Harbi, Adel Mohanna

2012-11-30

61

Molecular characterization of tlyA gene product, Rv1694 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A non-conventional hemolysin and a ribosomal RNA methyl transferase  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a virulent bacillus causing tuberculosis, a disease responsible for million deaths each year worldwide. In order to understand its mechanism of pathogenesis in humans and to help control tuberculosis, functions of numerous Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes are being characterized. In this study we report the dual functionality of tlyA gene product of Mycobacterium tuberculosis annotated as Rv1694,

Aejazur Rahman; Saumya S Srivastava; Amita Sneh; Neesar Ahmed; Musti V Krishnasastry

2010-01-01

62

The impact of antiretroviral therapy and isoniazid preventive therapy on tuberculosis incidence in HIV-infected patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Tuberculosis is a common complication and leading cause of death in HIV infection. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) lowers the risk of tuberculosis, but may not be sufficient to control HIV-related tuberculosis. Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) reduces tuberculosis incidence significantly, but is not widely used. Methods: We analysed tuberculosis incidence in 11 026 HIV-infected patients receiving medical care at 29 public

Jonathan E. Golub; Valeria Saraceni; Solange C. Cavalcante; Antonio G. Pacheco; Lawrence H. Moulton; Bonnie S. King; Anne Efron; Richard D. Moore; Richard E. Chaisson; Betina Durovni

2007-01-01

63

[Extrapulmonary tuberculosis].  

PubMed

Up to 25% of tuberculosis cases present extrapulmonary involvement. This is produced by haematogenous and lymphatic spread of the M. tuberculosis bacillus to other organs. The most common locations are the lymph nodes, pleura and the osteoarticular system. The problem with these types of tuberculosis is the difficulty in establishing a definitive diagnosis, since the clinical symptoms and results of imaging tests may be vague. It is often necessary to resort to invasive diagnostic testing such as ultrasound or CAT-guided FNAB, used to collect biological samples for diagnosis. Despite the growing use of and advances in recent years of molecular methods for early detection of mycobacteria DNA, cultures continue to be the gold standard that enable a firm microbiological diagnosis to be made. Treatment for these types of tuberculosis do not differ from treatment regimens for pulmonary forms of the same disease. The same antibiotic regimens for 6 months are recommended, and any extension of this period is advisable solely in tuberculosis affecting the central nervous system and in Pott's disease. PMID:25803112

Ramírez-Lapausa, M; Menéndez-Saldaña, A; Noguerado-Asensio, A

2015-06-01

64

Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR TB)  

MedlinePLUS

... the African-American Community Summit Background Slideset Slideset Text version Websites Children Correctional Facilities Table of Contents ... Tuberculosis Laboratory Aggregate Reports Slide Sets Core Curriculum Text- only version Self-Study Modules Module 1 (text ...

65

Tuberculosis deaths: are we measuring accurately?  

PubMed

Death among tuberculosis patients is one of the major reasons for non-attainment of 85% treatment success target set by World Health Organization. In this short paper, we evaluated whether the overall mortality rate in pulmonary tuberculosis is being affected by other comorbid conditions. All new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients (N =336), who started their treatment at the chest clinic of the Penang General Hospital, between March 2010 and February 2011, were followed-up until December 2011. Tuberculosis treatment outcomes were reported according to six treatment outcome categories recommended by World Health Organization. The outcome category 'died' was defined as 'a patient who died due to tuberculosis or other cause during tuberculosis treatment'. Our findings showed that out of 336 smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients, 59 (17.6%) died during treatment (mortality rate = 1.003 cases per 1000 person-days of follow-up). Among the deceased patients, the mean age was 55.8 years (SD =16.17) and 49 were male. According to the mortality review forms, 29 deaths were tuberculosis-related, while the remaining 30 patients died due to reasons other than tuberculosis. Cerebrovascular accident (n =7), septicaemia shock (n =4) and acute coronary syndrome (n =4) were the most common non-tuberculosis related reasons for mortality in the patients. If the 30 patients, for whom tuberculosis was incidental to death, are excluded from the final cohort, the proportion of patients in the 'died' outcome category could be reduced to 9.5%. The treatment outcome criterion (i.e., died) set by World Health Organization has limitations. Therefore, it requires improvement for more objective evaluation of the performance of the National Tuberculosis Program. PMID:25838918

Atif, Muhammad; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar Syed; Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Qamar Uz Zaman, Muhammad; Asif, Muhammad

2014-01-01

66

Growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Biofilms  

PubMed Central

Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of human tuberculosis, has an extraordinary ability to survive against environmental stresses including antibiotics. Although stress tolerance of M. tuberculosis is one of the likely contributors to the 6-month long chemotherapy of tuberculosis 1, the molecular mechanisms underlying this characteristic phenotype of the pathogen remain unclear. Many microbial species have evolved to survive in stressful environments by self-assembling in highly organized, surface attached, and matrix encapsulated structures called biofilms 2-4. Growth in communities appears to be a preferred survival strategy of microbes, and is achieved through genetic components that regulate surface attachment, intercellular communications, and synthesis of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) 5,6. The tolerance to environmental stress is likely facilitated by EPS, and perhaps by the physiological adaptation of individual bacilli to heterogeneous microenvironments within the complex architecture of biofilms 7. In a series of recent papers we established that M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis have a strong propensity to grow in organized multicellular structures, called biofilms, which can tolerate more than 50 times the minimal inhibitory concentrations of the anti-tuberculosis drugs isoniazid and rifampicin 8-10. M. tuberculosis, however, intriguingly requires specific conditions to form mature biofilms, in particular 9:1 ratio of headspace: media as well as limited exchange of air with the atmosphere 9. Requirements of specialized environmental conditions could possibly be linked to the fact that M. tuberculosis is an obligate human pathogen and thus has adapted to tissue environments. In this publication we demonstrate methods for culturing M. tuberculosis biofilms in a bottle and a 12-well plate format, which is convenient for bacteriological as well as genetic studies. We have described the protocol for an attenuated strain of M. tuberculosis, mc27000, with deletion in the two loci, panCD and RD1, that are critical for in vivo growth of the pathogen 9. This strain can be safely used in a BSL-2 containment for understanding the basic biology of the tuberculosis pathogen thus avoiding the requirement of an expensive BSL-3 facility. The method can be extended, with appropriate modification in media, to grow biofilm of other culturable mycobacterial species. Overall, a uniform protocol of culturing mycobacterial biofilms will help the investigators interested in studying the basic resilient characteristics of mycobacteria. In addition, a clear and concise method of growing mycobacterial biofilms will also help the clinical and pharmaceutical investigators to test the efficacy of a potential drug. PMID:22371116

Kulka, Kathleen; Hatfull, Graham; Ojha, Anil K.

2012-01-01

67

Living with Tuberculosis  

MedlinePLUS

... for ENews Home > Lung Disease > Tuberculosis Living With Tuberculosis You will need regular checkups to make sure ... breathes the air. View in depth resources for tuberculosis A A A Share Print State of Tobacco ...

68

Tuberculosis and Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

TUBERCULOSIS & DIABETES COLLABORATIVE FRAMEWORK FOR CARE AND CONTROL OF TUBERCULOSIS AND DIABETES © WHO Sept 2011 For more information: ... increase by 50% by 2030 THE LINKS BETWEEN TUBERCULOSIS AND DIABETES • People with a weak immune system, ...

69

A randomized controlled trial of standard versus intensified tuberculosis diagnostics on treatment decisions by physicians in Northern Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background Routine tuberculosis culture remains unavailable in many high-burden areas, including Tanzania. This study sought to determine the impact of providing mycobacterial culture results over standard of care [unconcentrated acid-fast (AFB) smears] on management of persons with suspected tuberculosis. Methods Adults and children with suspected tuberculosis were randomized to standard (direct AFB smear only) or intensified (concentrated AFB smear and tuberculosis culture) diagnostics and followed for 8 weeks. The primary endpoint was appropriate treatment (i.e. antituberculosis therapy for those with tuberculosis, no antituberculous therapy for those without tuberculosis). Results Seventy participants were randomized to standard (n?=?37, 53%) or intensive (n?=?33, 47%) diagnostics. At 8 weeks, 100% (n?=?22) of participants in follow up randomized to intensive diagnostics were receiving appropriate care, vs. 22 (88%) of 25 participants randomized to standard diagnostics (p?=?0.14). Overall, 18 (26%) participants died; antituberculosis therapy was associated with lower mortality (9% who received antiuberculosis treatment died vs. 26% who did not, p?=?0.04). Conclusions Under field conditions in a high burden setting, the impact of intensified diagnostics was blunted by high early mortality. Enhanced availability of rapid diagnostics must be linked to earlier access to care for outcomes to improve. PMID:24552306

2014-01-01

70

Community knowledge, attitudes and practices on pulmonary tuberculosis and their choice of treatment supervisor in Tigray, northern Ethiopia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background : We planned to raise public awareness and decentralize directly observed tuberculosis treatment at village level using volunteer community members in order to reduce prolonged delays in seeking care and improve compliance to tuberculosis treatment. We do not know the magnitude of tuberculosis knowledge gap and preferred modality of tuberculosis treatment supervision among the public in Tigray. Objectives :

Mengiste M Mesfin; Tesfay W Tasew; Israel G Tareke; Girmai WM Mulugeta; Madeley J Richard

71

[Analysis of tuberculosis mortality in Armenia].  

PubMed

The outpatient and patient histories were analyzed in 198 dead patients with tuberculosis. Particular concern is caused by an increase in mortality due to tuberculosis within a month after its detection. Clinically, there are predominant patients with progressive destructive forms of the disease. A total of 86.4% of the patients died directly from tuberculosis and its complications, the remaining (16.6%) patients died from other non-tuberculous diseases. The main cause of death from tuberculosis was its progression (50.1%), cardiopulmonary failure (34.3%), pulmonary hemorrhage (9%). A combination of several causes of death was noted in 33.1% of the patients who died from generalized tuberculosis. PMID:12164109

Safarian, M D; Nikolaian, L T

2002-01-01

72

Oesophageal tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

The case discussed is that of a previously healthy 48-year-old female who presented with a week long history of epigastric pain and continuing weight loss. A series of investigations and supporting literature alluded to a diagnosis of oesophageal tuberculosis (TB), and antituberculous medication was commenced accordingly. An accompanying discussion considers the incidence, differential diagnoses, pathogenesis, clinical features, investigations and aspects of management of oesophageal TB. PMID:22669888

Bonthala, Latha; Wood, Eleanor

2011-01-01

73

Tuberculosis: Epidemiology and Control  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health concern worldwide: despite a regular, although slow, decline in incidence over the last decade, as many as 8.6 million new cases and 1.3 million deaths were estimated to have occurred in 2012. TB is by all means a poverty-related disease, mainly affecting the most vulnerable populations in the poorest countries. The presence of multidrug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis in most countries, with somewhere prevalence is high, is among the major challenges for TB control, which may hinder recent achievements especially in some settings. Early TB case detection especially in resource-constrained settings and in marginalized groups remains a challenge, and about 3 million people are estimated to remain undiagnosed or not notified and untreated. The World Health Organization (WHO) has recently launched a new global TB strategy for the “post-2015 era” aimed at “ending the global TB epidemic” by 2035. This strategy is based on the three pillars that emphasize patient-centred TB care and prevention, bold policies and supportive systems, and intensified research and innovation. This paper aims to provide an overview of the global TB epidemiology as well as of the main challenges that must be faced to eliminate the disease as a public health problem everywhere. PMID:25408856

Sulis, Giorgia; Roggi, Alberto; Matteelli, Alberto; Raviglione, Mario C.

2014-01-01

74

Diagnosis of Childhood Tuberculosis and Host RNA Expression in Africa  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Improved diagnostic tests for tuberculosis in children are needed. We hypothesized that transcriptional signatures of host blood could be used to distinguish tuberculosis from other diseases in African children who either were or were not infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS The study population comprised prospective cohorts of children who were undergoing evaluation for suspected tuberculosis in South Africa (655 children), Malawi (701 children), and Kenya (1599 children). Patients were assigned to groups according to whether the diagnosis was culture-confirmed tuberculosis, culture-negative tuberculosis, diseases other than tuberculosis, or latent tuberculosis infection. Diagnostic signatures distinguishing tuberculosis from other diseases and from latent tuberculosis infection were identified from genomewide analysis of RNA expression in host blood. RESULTS We identified a 51-transcript signature distinguishing tuberculosis from other diseases in the South African and Malawian children (the discovery cohort). In the Kenyan children (the validation cohort), a risk score based on the signature for tuberculosis and for diseases other than tuberculosis showed a sensitivity of 82.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 68.6 to 94.3) and a specificity of 83.6% (95% CI, 74.6 to 92.7) for the diagnosis of culture-confirmed tuberculosis. Among patients with cultures negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis who were treated for tuberculosis (those with highly probable, probable, or possible cases of tuberculosis), the estimated sensitivity was 62.5 to 82.3%, 42.1 to 80.8%, and 35.3 to 79.6%, respectively, for different estimates of actual tuberculosis in the groups. In comparison, the sensitivity of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay for molecular detection of M. tuberculosis DNA in cases of culture-confirmed tuberculosis was 54.3% (95% CI, 37.1 to 68.6), and the sensitivity in highly probable, probable, or possible cases was an estimated 25.0 to 35.7%, 5.3 to 13.3%, and 0%, respectively; the specificity of the assay was 100%. CONCLUSIONS RNA expression signatures provided data that helped distinguish tuberculosis from other diseases in African children with and those without HIV infection. (Funded by the European Union Action for Diseases of Poverty Program and others). PMID:24785206

Banwell, Claire M.; Chagaluka, George; Crampin, Amelia C.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; French, Neil; Hamilton, Melissa S.; Hibberd, Martin L.; Kern, Florian; Langford, Paul R.; Ling, Ling; Mlotha, Rachel; Ottenhoff, Tom H.M.; Pienaar, Sandy; Pillay, Vashini; Scott, J. Anthony G.; Twahir, Hemed; Wilkinson, Robert J.

2014-01-01

75

Tuberculosis Epidemiology and Selection in an Autochthonous Siberian Population from the 16th  

E-print Network

Tuberculosis Epidemiology and Selection in an Autochthonous Siberian Population from the 16th -19th, Yakutsk, Russia Abstract Tuberculosis is one of most ancient diseases affecting human populations identification of ancient tuberculosis strains remains rare. Here, we describe a study of 140 ancient subjects

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

76

A wireless sensor network to measure the health care workers exposure to tuberculosis  

E-print Network

A wireless sensor network to measure the health care workers exposure to tuberculosis Guillaume Care Workers (HCWs) exposure to tuberculosis in their work environment. Despite the progresses in treatment and prevention, tuberculosis remains a disease in expansion and represents the third cause

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

77

RAPID TEST FOR SEROLOGICAL DETECTION OF TUBERCULOSIS IN MULTIPLE ANIMAL SPECIES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Tuberculosis remains a serious re-emerging disease in wildlife and zoo animals, as various species are susceptible to Mycobacterium bovis and/or M. tuberculosis. To improve tuberculosis control, new diagnostic tools that would be rapid, accurate, and host species-independent are needed. We propose n...

78

Research review paper Point-of-care assays for tuberculosis: Role of nanotechnology/microfluidics  

E-print Network

Research review paper Point-of-care assays for tuberculosis: Role of nanotechnology/microfluidics Keywords: Tuberculosis Point-of-care Nanotechnology Microfluidics Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the most for TB diagnosis, and highlight the recent advances in nanotechnology and microfluidics that potentially

Demirci, Utkan

79

Center for Treatment and Research on AIDS, Malaria, Tuberculosis and Other Epidemics  

E-print Network

1 TRAC Plus Center for Treatment and Research on AIDS, Malaria, Tuberculosis and Other Epidemics to achieve similar purposes remains. The Center for Treatment and Research on HIV/AIDS, Malaria, Tuberculosis Disease Control (CIDC), Center for Treatment and Research on HIV/AIDS, Malaria, Tuberculosis and other

Klein, Ophir

80

Gr1intCD11b+ Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis is one of the world’s leading killers, stealing 1.4 million lives and causing 8.7 million new and relapsed infections in 2011. The only vaccine against tuberculosis is BCG which demonstrates variable efficacy in adults worldwide. Human infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis results in the influx of inflammatory cells to the lung in an attempt to wall off bacilli by forming a granuloma. Gr1intCD11b+ cells are called myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and play a major role in regulation of inflammation in many pathological conditions. Although MDSC have been described primarily in cancer their function in tuberculosis remains unknown. During M. tuberculosis infection it is crucial to understand the function of cells involved in the regulation of inflammation during granuloma formation. Understanding their relative impact on the bacilli and other cellular phenotypes is necessary for future vaccine and drug design. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the bacterial burden, lung pathology and Gr1intCD11b+ myeloid-derived suppressor cell immune responses in M. tuberculosis infected NOS2-/-, RAG-/-, C3HeB/FeJ and C57/BL6 mice. Gr-1+ cells could be found on the edges of necrotic lung lesions in NOS2-/-, RAG-/-, and C3HeB/FeJ, but were absent in wild-type mice. Both populations of Gr1+CD11b+ cells expressed high levels of arginase-1, and IL-17, additional markers of myeloid derived suppressor cells. We then sorted the Gr1hi and Gr1int populations from M. tuberculosis infected NOS-/- mice and placed the sorted both Gr1int populations at different ratios with naïve or M. tuberculosis infected splenocytes and evaluated their ability to induce activation and proliferation of CD4+T cells. Our results showed that both Gr1hi and Gr1int cells were able to induce activation and proliferation of CD4+ T cells. However this response was reduced as the ratio of CD4+ T to Gr1+ cells increased. Our results illustrate a yet unrecognized interplay between Gr1+ cells and CD4+ T cells in tuberculosis. PMID:24224058

Obregón-Henao, Andrés; Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Orme, Ian M.; Ordway, Diane J.

2013-01-01

81

The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2540c DNA sequence encodes a bifunctional chorismate synthase  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The emergence of multi- and extensively-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains has created an urgent need for new agents to treat tuberculosis (TB). The enzymes of shikimate pathway are attractive targets to the development of antitubercular agents because it is essential for M. tuberculosis and is absent from humans. Chorismate synthase (CS) is the seventh enzyme of this route and

Fernanda Ely; José ES Nunes; Evelyn K Schroeder; Jeverson Frazzon; Mário S Palma; Diógenes S Santos; Luiz A Basso

2008-01-01

82

Vegetarian diet as a risk factor for tuberculosis in immigrant south London Asians  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND--In a previous retrospective study of tuberculosis in south London among Asian immigrants from the Indian subcontinent Hindu Asians were found to have a significantly increased risk for tuberculosis compared with Muslims. This finding has been further investigated by examining the role of socioeconomic and lifestyle variables, including diet, as risk factors for tuberculosis in Asian immigrants from the Indian

D P Strachan; K J Powell; A Thaker; F J Millard; J D Maxwell

1995-01-01

83

Epidemiology of Tuberculosis in a High HIV Prevalence Population Provided with Enhanced Diagnosis of Symptomatic Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundDirectly observed treatment short course (DOTS), the global control strategy aimed at controlling tuberculosis (TB) transmission through prompt diagnosis of symptomatic smear-positive disease, has failed to prevent rising tuberculosis incidence rates in Africa brought about by the HIV epidemic. However, rising incidence does not necessarily imply failure to control tuberculosis transmission, which is primarily driven by prevalent infectious disease. We

Elizabeth L. Corbett; Tsitsi Bandason; Yin Bun Cheung; Shungu Munyati; Peter Godfrey-Faussett; Richard Hayes; Gavin Churchyard; Anthony Butterworth; Peter Mason

2007-01-01

84

Surveillance of pyrazinamide susceptibility among multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Siriraj Hospital, Thailand  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Susceptibility testing of pyrazinamide (PZA) against Mycobacterium tuberculosis is difficult to perform because the acidity of culture medium that is required for drug activity also inhibits the growth of bacteria. In Thailand, very limited information has been generated on PZA resistance, particularly among multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) isolated from Thailand. Only two studies on PZA susceptibility among Thai M. tuberculosis

Jirarut Jonmalung; Therdsak Prammananan; Manoon Leechawengwongs; Angkana Chaiprasert

2010-01-01

85

Genetic Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Peru and Exploration of Phylogenetic Associations with Drug  

E-print Network

Genetic Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Peru and Exploration of Phylogenetic, et al. (2013) Genetic Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Peru and Exploration of Phylogenetic of America Abstract Background: There is limited available data on the strain diversity of M tuberculosis

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

86

Evolution and Diversity of Clonal Bacteria: The Paradigm of Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

E-print Network

Evolution and Diversity of Clonal Bacteria: The Paradigm of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Tiago Dos, Faculte´ de Me´dicine, Universite´ Paris V, Paris, France Background. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex Bacteria: The Paradigm of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PLoS ONE 3(2): e1538. doi:10.1371/journal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

87

Modeling the Impact of Tuberculosis Control Strategies in Highly Endemic Overcrowded Prisons  

E-print Network

Modeling the Impact of Tuberculosis Control Strategies in Highly Endemic Overcrowded Prisons Judith, Fundac¸a~o Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil Abstract Background: Tuberculosis (TB) in prisons (2008) Modeling the Impact of Tuberculosis Control Strategies in Highly Endemic Overcrowded Prisons. PLo

88

Identification of 2-Aminothiazole-4-Carboxylate Derivatives Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

E-print Network

tuberculosis H37Rv and the b-Ketoacyl-ACP Synthase mtFabH Qosay Al-Balas1 , Nahoum G. Anthony1 , Bilal Al of Birmingham, Edgebaston, Birmingham, United Kingdom Abstract Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease which. The difficulty in managing tuberculosis is the prolonged treatment duration, the emergence of drug resistance

89

Randomised trial of isoniazid versus rifampicin and pyrazinamide for prevention of tuberculosis in HIV1 infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Background Tuberculosis is a common complication of HIV-1 infection, especially in developing countries. Practical and effective chemoprophylaxis regimens for HIV-1-related tuberculosis are needed. Our aim was to test the efficacy of isoniazid versus rifampicin with pyrazinamide for prevention of tuberculosis in HIV-1- positive individuals. Methods We compared the efficacy of 6 months of isoniazid with 2 months of rifampicin

Neal A Halsey; Jacqueline S Coberly; Julio Desormeaux; Phyllis Losikoff; Joan Atkinson; Lawrence H Moulton; Mireil Contave; Michael Johnson; Homer Davis; Lawrence Geiter; Erica Johnson; Robin Huebner; Reginald Boulos; Richard E Chaisson

1998-01-01

90

Clinical Evaluation of Tuberculosis Viability Microscopy for Assessing Treatment Response  

PubMed Central

Background.?It is difficult to determine whether early tuberculosis treatment is effective in reducing the infectiousness of patients' sputum, because culture takes weeks and conventional acid-fast sputum microscopy and molecular tests cannot differentiate live from dead tuberculosis. Methods.?To assess treatment response, sputum samples (n = 124) from unselected patients (n = 35) with sputum microscopy–positive tuberculosis were tested pretreatment and after 3, 6, and 9 days of empiric first-line therapy. Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy with fluorescein diacetate, quantitative culture, and acid-fast auramine microscopy were all performed in triplicate. Results.?Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy predicted quantitative culture results such that 76% of results agreed within ±1 logarithm (rS = 0.85; P < .0001). In 31 patients with non-multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis, viability and quantitative culture results approximately halved (both 0.27 log reduction, P < .001) daily. For patients with non-MDR tuberculosis and available data, by treatment day 9 there was a >10-fold reduction in viability in 100% (24/24) of cases and quantitative culture in 95% (19/20) of cases. Four other patients subsequently found to have MDR tuberculosis had no significant changes in viability (P = .4) or quantitative culture (P = .6) results during early treatment. The change in viability and quantitative culture results during early treatment differed significantly between patients with non-MDR tuberculosis and those with MDR tuberculosis (both P < .001). Acid-fast microscopy results changed little during early treatment, and this change was similar for non-MDR tuberculosis vs MDR tuberculosis (P = .6). Conclusions.?Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy is a simple test that within 1 hour predicted quantitative culture results that became available weeks later, rapidly indicating whether patients were responding to tuberculosis therapy. PMID:25537870

Datta, Sumona; Sherman, Jonathan M.; Bravard, Marjory A.; Valencia, Teresa; Gilman, Robert H.; Evans, Carlton A.

2015-01-01

91

Characterisation of methionine adenosyltransferase from Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis remains a serious world-wide health threat which requires the characterisation of novel drug targets for the development of future antimycobacterials. One of the key obstacles in the definition of new targets is the large variety of metabolic alterations that occur between cells in the active growth and chronic/dormant phases of tuberculosis. The ideal biochemical target should be active in both growth phases. Methionine adenosyltransferase, which catalyses the formation of S-adenosylmethionine from methionine and ATP, is involved in polyamine biosynthesis during active growth and is also required for the methylation and cyclopropylation of mycolipids necessary for survival in the chronic phase. Results The gene encoding methionine adenosyltransferase has been cloned from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the model organism M. smegmatis. Both enzymes retained all amino acids known to be involved in catalysing the reaction. While the M. smegmatis enzyme could be functionally expressed, the M. tuberculosis homologue was insoluble and inactive under a large variety of expression conditions. For the M. smegmatis enzyme, the Vmax for S-adenosylmethionine formation was 1.30 ?mol/min/mg protein and the Km for methionine and ATP was 288 ?M and 76 ?M respectively. In addition, the enzyme was competitively inhibited by 8-azaguanine and azathioprine with a Ki of 4.7 mM and 3.7 mM respectively. Azathioprine inhibited the in vitro growth of M. smegmatis with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 500 ?M, while the MIC for 8-azaguanine was >1.0 mM. Conclusion The methionine adenosyltransferase from both organisms had a primary structure very similar those previously characterised in other prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. The kinetic properties of the M. smegmatis enzyme were also similar to known prokaryotic methionine adenosyltransferases. Inhibition of the enzyme by 8-azaguanine and azathioprine provides a starting point for the synthesis of higher affinity purine-based inhibitors. PMID:12809568

Berger, Bradley J; Knodel, Marvin H

2003-01-01

92

Tuberculosis diagnosis using immunodominant, secreted antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health concern in most low-income countries. Hence, rapid and sensitive TB diagnostics play an important role in detecting and preventing the disease. In addition to established diagnostic methods, several new approaches have been reported. Some techniques are simple but time-consuming, while others require complex instrumentation. One prominent and readily available approach is to detect proteins that Mycobacterium tuberculosis secretes, such as Mpt64, the 6-kDa early secreted antigenic target (Esat6), the 10-kDa culture filtrate protein (Cfp10), and the antigen 85 (Ag85) complex. Although their functions are not fully understood, a growing body of molecular evidence implicates them in M. tuberculosis virulence. Currently these biomarkers are either being used or investigated for use in skin patch tests, biosensor analyses, and immunochromatographic, immunohistochemical, polymerase chain reaction-based, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. This review provides a comprehensive discussion of the roles these immunodominant antigens play in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and compares diagnostic methods based on the detection of these proteins with more established tests for TB. PMID:23602700

Bekmurzayeva, Aliya; Sypabekova, Marzhan; Kanayeva, Damira

2013-07-01

93

Human gene expression profiles of susceptibility and resistance in tuberculosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tuberculosis (TB) still poses a profound burden on global health, owing to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although a fully functional immune system is essential for the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, the underlying mechanisms and reasons for failure in part of the infected population remain enigmatic. Here, whole-blood microarray gene expression analyses were performed in TB patients and in

J Maertzdorf; D Repsilber; S K Parida; T Roberts; G Black; G Walzl; S H E Kaufmann

2011-01-01

94

CD209 Genetic Polymorphism and Tuberculosis Disease  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. DC-SIGN, encoded by CD209, is a receptor capable of binding and internalizing Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Previous studies have reported that the CD209 promoter single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-336A/G exerts an effect on CD209 expression and is associated with human susceptibility to dengue, HIV-1 and tuberculosis in humans. The present study investigates the role of the CD209 -336A/G variant in susceptibility to tuberculosis in a large sample of individuals from sub-Saharan Africa. Methods and Findings A total of 2,176 individuals enrolled in tuberculosis case-control studies from four sub-Saharan Africa countries were genotyped for the CD209 -336A/G SNP (rs4804803). Significant overall protection against pulmonary tuberculosis was observed with the -336G allele when the study groups were combined (n?=?914 controls vs. 1262 cases, Mantel-Haenszel 2x2 ?2?=?7.47, P?=?0.006, odds ratio?=?0.86, 95%CI 0.77–0.96). In addition, the patients with -336GG were associated with a decreased risk of cavitory tuberculosis, a severe form of tuberculosis disease (n?=?557, Pearson's 2×2 ?2?=?17.34, P?=?0.00003, odds ratio?=?0.42, 95%CI 0.27–0.65). This direction of association is opposite to a previously observed result in a smaller study of susceptibility to tuberculosis in a South African Coloured population, but entirely in keeping with the previously observed protective effect of the -336G allele. Conclusion This study finds that the CD209 -336G variant allele is associated with significant protection against tuberculosis in individuals from sub-Saharan Africa and, furthermore, cases with -336GG were significantly less likely to develop tuberculosis-induced lung cavitation. Previous in vitro work demonstrated that the promoter variant -336G allele causes down-regulation of CD209 mRNA expression. Our present work suggests that decreased levels of the DC-SIGN receptor may therefore be protective against both clinical tuberculosis in general and cavitory tuberculosis disease in particular. This is consistent with evidence that Mycobacteria can utilize DC-SIGN binding to suppress the protective pro-inflammatory immune response. PMID:18167547

Vannberg, Fredrik O.; Tosh, Kerrie; Floyd, Sian; Jackson-Sillah, Dolly; Crampin, Amelia; Sichali, Lifted; Bah, Boubacar; Gustafson, Per; Aaby, Peter; McAdam, Keith P. W. J.; Bah-Sow, Oumou; Lienhardt, Christian; Sirugo, Giorgio; Fine, Paul; Hill, Adrian V. S.

2008-01-01

95

040. Management of patients with tuberculosis in pulmonary clinic of AUTH from June 2011 to September 2014  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the effectiveness of the standard regimen in tuberculosis treatment, in clinical practice modification and extension of the regimen is often required due to mycobacterial resistance and drug side effects. Objective Assessment of outcome and average duration of treatment of patients with tuberculosis in the out-patient clinic for tuberculosis, Pulmonary Clinic, AUTH. Methods A total of 101 patients with tuberculosis who were followed in the out-patient clinic for tuberculosis from June 2011 until September 2014 were included in the study. Treatment regimen, duration and outcome were recorded. Results Data on 70 men and 31 women with mean age ± SD of 48.9±19.4 years were analyzed. Regarding outcome, 33 patients were cured (32.7%), 37 (36.5%) are still under treatment, six patients died (three of them due to TB (3.0%) and three due to other reasons (3.0%), nine were transferred out (8.9%), 15 (14.9%) defaulted and one failed treatment (1.0%). Out of the 33 patients with successful treatment, 25 (75.76%) received first-line treatment with average duration 10.75 months and whereas in eight (24.24%) a modification of treatment was needed resulting in treatment duration of 18.37 months. The main reasons for prolongation of treatment beyond nine months were extended disease, bad adherence, resistance to first-line drugs and significant side-effects. Conclusions Based on these data, treatment of tuberculosis is more prolonged and complicated than initially anticipated. The rate of default was high and needs to be addressed in the context of public health services. In addition death from tuberculosis still remains a reality.

Kostanta, Soultana; Manika, Katerina; Papadaki, Eleni; Kipourou, Maria; Lada, Martha; Papaioannou, Maria; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kioumis, Ioannis

2015-01-01

96

Osteoarticular tuberculosis mimicking rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global burden despite extensive efforts to control it. TB arthritis commonly manifest as monoarthritis of weight-bearing joints. We report a rare presentation of osteoarticular TB involving multiple small joints of the hands, which mimicked rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Magnetic resonance imaging showed tenosynovitis. The patient was initially treated for seronegative RA but failed to respond. Subsequently, synovial biopsy led to the diagnosis. Antituberculosis treatment was given for 1 year. PMID:22399018

Seung, Ong Ping; Sulaiman, Wahinuddin

2012-11-01

97

Virulence factors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex  

PubMed Central

The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) consists of closely related species that cause tuberculosis in both humans and animals. This illness, still today, remains to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The mycobacteria enter the host by air, and, once in the lungs, are phagocytated by macrophages. This may lead to the rapid elimination of the bacillus or to the triggering of an active tuberculosis infection. A large number of different virulence factors have evolved in MTBC members as a response to the host immune reaction. The aim of this review is to describe the bacterial genes/proteins that are essential for the virulence of MTBC species, and that have been demonstrated in an in vivo model of infection. Knowledge of MTBC virulence factors is essential for the development of new vaccines and drugs to help manage the disease toward an increasingly more tuberculosis-free world. PMID:23076359

Forrellad, Marina A.; Klepp, Laura I.; Gioffré, Andrea; Sabio y García, Julia; Morbidoni, Hector R.; Santangelo, María de la Paz; Cataldi, Angel A.; Bigi, Fabiana

2013-01-01

98

Co-evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Homo sapiens  

PubMed Central

The causative agent of human tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is an obligate pathogen that evolved to exclusively persist in human populations. For M. tuberculosis to transmit from person to person, it has to cause pulmonary disease. Therefore, M. tuberculosis virulence has likely been a significant determinant of the association between M. tuberculosis and humans. Indeed, the evolutionary success of some M. tuberculosis genotypes seems at least partially attributable to their increased virulence. The latter possibly evolved as a consequence of human demographic expansions. If co-evolution occurred, humans would have counteracted to minimize the deleterious effects of M. tuberculosis virulence. The fact that human resistance to infection has a strong genetic basis is a likely consequence of such a counter-response. The genetic architecture underlying human resistance to M. tuberculosis remains largely elusive. However, interactions between human genetic polymorphisms and M. tuberculosis genotypes have been reported. Such interactions are consistent with local adaptation and allow for a better understanding of protective immunity in TB. Future ‘genome-to-genome’ studies, in which locally associated human and M. tuberculosis genotypes are interrogated in conjunction, will help identify new protective antigens for the development of better TB vaccines. PMID:25703549

Brites, Daniela; Gagneux, Sebastien

2015-01-01

99

Co-evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Homo sapiens.  

PubMed

The causative agent of human tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is an obligate pathogen that evolved to exclusively persist in human populations. For M. tuberculosis to transmit from person to person, it has to cause pulmonary disease. Therefore, M. tuberculosis virulence has likely been a significant determinant of the association between M. tuberculosis and humans. Indeed, the evolutionary success of some M. tuberculosis genotypes seems at least partially attributable to their increased virulence. The latter possibly evolved as a consequence of human demographic expansions. If co-evolution occurred, humans would have counteracted to minimize the deleterious effects of M. tuberculosis virulence. The fact that human resistance to infection has a strong genetic basis is a likely consequence of such a counter-response. The genetic architecture underlying human resistance to M. tuberculosis remains largely elusive. However, interactions between human genetic polymorphisms and M. tuberculosis genotypes have been reported. Such interactions are consistent with local adaptation and allow for a better understanding of protective immunity in TB. Future 'genome-to-genome' studies, in which locally associated human and M. tuberculosis genotypes are interrogated in conjunction, will help identify new protective antigens for the development of better TB vaccines. PMID:25703549

Brites, Daniela; Gagneux, Sebastien

2015-03-01

100

Tuberculosis (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Measles: What to Know Vaccines: FAQs ... Pregnancy Precautions Checkups: What to Expect Tuberculosis KidsHealth > Parents > Infections > Bacterial & Viral Infections > Tuberculosis Print A A ...

101

Tuberculosis (TB): Treatment  

MedlinePLUS

... Treating Tuberculosis Active TB Disease Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Latent TB Infection TB Preventive Treatment History of TB ... to cooperate fully in the therapy program. Both latent TB infection and active TB disease are treated ...

102

Tuberculosis in Blacks  

MedlinePLUS

... Share Compartir Fact Sheet ( PDF - 272k) Tuberculosis In Blacks Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by a ... cases were reported in the United States; however, blacks continue to have a disproportionate share of TB. ...

103

Play the Tuberculosis Game  

MedlinePLUS

... Questionnaire Tuberculosis Play Tuberculosis Experiments & Discoveries About the game Discover and experience some of the classic methods ... last will in Paris. Play the Blood Typing Game Try to save some patients and learn about ...

104

Multicentric Spinal Tuberculosis with Sternoclavicular Joint Involvement: A Rare Presentation  

PubMed Central

Background. Tuberculosis is a chronic disease which may have varied presentations. Though pulmonary tuberculosis is the commonest, extrapulmonary tuberculosis involving skeletal system is often seen. Individuals with poor nourishment and immunological status are especially susceptible for disseminated and multicentric tuberculosis. Case Report. We here present a case of tuberculosis involving multiple anatomical locations in an immune-competent patient which was diagnosed with radiological studies and confirmed with histological examination. Patient was put on multidrug antitubercular therapy and responded well to the treatment with improvement in clinical and radiological picture. Clinical Relevance. This report of a rare case makes us aware of the varied presentations which tuberculosis can present with. It should be kept as a differential diagnosis in patients with cough and fever but not responding to conventional treatment. This is even more important in countries with poor socioeconomic conditions. PMID:25389505

Meena, Umesh Kumar; Meena, Ramesh Chand

2014-01-01

105

Genetic Polymorphism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Patients with Chronic Multidrug?Resistant Tuberculosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a major public health problem because treatment is complicated, cure rates are well below those for drug-susceptible tuberculosis (TB), and patients may remain infectious for months or years, despite receiving the best available therapy. To gain a better understanding of MDR-TB, we characterized serial isolates recovered from 13 human immunodeficiency virus-negative patients with MDR- TB, by

Barun Mathema; Karen Shean; Elena Shashkina; Gilla Kaplan

2004-01-01

106

Primary Thyroid Tuberculosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In India, it is estimated that more than 40% of the adults are infected with tuberculosis bacilli and every year 2 million\\u000a people develop tuberculosis and nearly 500,000 die from it1. But, tuberculosis of the thyroid gland occurs only rarely. Since\\u000a extra-pulmonary tuberculosis is now seen relatively more frequently, the existence of this condition should be recognized\\u000a when goitres are

Sunita Sanehi; Chandrashekhar Dravid; Neena Chaudhary; A. K. Rai

2007-01-01

107

Molecular diagnostics for tuberculosis.  

PubMed

The phenotypic methods of smear microscopy, culture and indirect drug susceptibility testing (DST) remain the 'gold standard' diagnostics for tuberculosis (TB) in 2015. However, this review demonstrates that genotypic methods are in the ascendancy. Current-generation nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) are important supplementary tests for the rapid direct detection of (multidrug-resistant) TB in specific clinical settings. Genotypic detection is already the preferred method of detecting rifampicin and pyrazinamide resistance. Next-generation NAATs able to detect about 10 colony forming units/mL of sputum could replace culture as the initial test for detecting TB. Whole genome sequencing could also plausibly replace phenotypic DST but much work is required in method standardisation, database development and elucidation of all resistance gene determinants. The challenge then will be to rollout these increasingly complex and expensive diagnostics in the low-income countries where TB is prevalent. PMID:25719854

Noor, K M; Shephard, L; Bastian, I

2015-04-01

108

Prevalence of Tuberculosis, HIV and Respiratory Symptoms in Two Zambian Communities: Implications for Tuberculosis Control in the Era of HIV  

PubMed Central

Background The Stop TB Partnership target for tuberculosis is to have reduced the prevalence of tuberculosis by 50% comparing 2015 to 1990. This target is challenging as few prevalence surveys have been conducted, especially in high burden tuberculosis and HIV countries. Current tuberculosis control strategies in high HIV prevalent settings are therefore based on limited epidemiological evidence and more evidence is needed from community-based surveys to inform improved policy formulation. Methods and Findings 8044 adults were sampled from 2 sub-districts (wards) in Lusaka province, Zambia. Questionnaires were used to screen for symptoms, respiratory samples were obtained for culture and oral secretions collected for HIV testing. 79 individuals were found to have Mycobacterium tuberculosis in their sputum, giving an adjusted overall prevalence of tuberculosis of 870/100,000 (95% CI 570–1160/100,000). The adjusted overall prevalence of HIV was 28.61% (95% CI 26.04–31.19). HIV- infection was significantly associated with prevalent tuberculosis (Adj OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.42–3.74) and the population attributable fraction of HIV for prevalent tuberculosis was 36%. Symptoms such as prolonged cough (adj OR 12.72, 95% CI 7.05–22.94) and fever (Adj OR 2.04, 95%CI 1.23–3.39), were associated with prevalent tuberculosis, but 8 (10%) individuals with prevalent tuberculosis denied having any symptoms at all and only 34 (43%) would have been classified as a TB suspect by current guidelines. Conclusions Undiagnosed tuberculosis is a challenge for tuberculosis control and new approaches are needed if we are to reach international targets. Epidemiological studies can inform screening algorithms for both detection and prevention of active tuberculosis. PMID:19440346

Ayles, Helen; Schaap, Albertus; Nota, Amos; Sismanidis, Charalambos; De Haas, Petra; Muyoyeta, Monde; Beyers, Nulda

2009-01-01

109

Attitudes about Tuberculosis Prevention in the Elimination Phase: A Survey among Physicians in Germany  

PubMed Central

Background Targeted and stringent measures of tuberculosis prevention are necessary to achieve the goal of tuberculosis elimination in countries of low tuberculosis incidence. Methods We ascertained the knowledge about tuberculosis risk factors and stringency of tuberculosis prevention measures by a standardized questionnaire among physicians in Germany involved in the care of individuals from classical risk groups for tuberculosis. Results 510 physicians responded to the online survey. Among 16 risk factors immunosuppressive therapy, HIV-infection and treatment with TNF-antagonist were thought to be the most important risk factors for the development of tuberculosis in Germany. Exposure to a patient with tuberculosis ranked on the 10th position. In the event of a positive tuberculin-skin-test or interferon-? release assay only 50%, 40%, 36% and 25% of physicians found that preventive chemotherapy was indicated for individuals undergoing tumor necrosis factor-antagonist therapy, close contacts of tuberculosis patients, HIV-infected individuals and migrants, respectively. Conclusions A remarkably low proportion of individuals with latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis belonging to classical risk groups for tuberculosis are considered candidates for preventive chemotherapy in Germany. Better knowledge about the risk for tuberculosis in different groups and more stringent and targeted preventive interventions will probably be necessary to achieve tuberculosis elimination in Germany. PMID:25393241

Vollrath, Oliver; Lange, Christoph

2014-01-01

110

Editorial Immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

E-print Network

License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Currently, a third of the world’s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of TB, and annually there are 10 million new cases of clinical TB and approximately 2 million deaths [1]. TB kills more individuals each year than any other bacterial pathogen, and alarmingly, current control practices have not been able to significantly reduce the incidence of the disease over the past 15 years [1]. The current vaccine in use, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), has been unable to limit the transmission of the disease, and the problem is compounded by the HIV/AIDS pandemic and the emergence of multidrug resistant strains of M.

James A. Triccas; Nathalie Winter; Carl G. Feng; Nicholas P. West

111

Re-thinking global health sector efforts for HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control: promoting integration of programme activities within a strengthened health system  

PubMed Central

Background The global financial crisis threatens global health, particularly exacerbating diseases of inequality, e.g. HIV/AIDS, and diseases of poverty, e.g. tuberculosis. The aim of this paper is to reconsider established practices and policies for HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control, aiming at delivering better results and value for money. This may be achieved by promoting greater integration of HIV and tuberculosis control programme activities within a strengthened health system. Discussion HIV and tuberculosis share many similarities in terms of their disease burden and the recommended stratagems for their control. HIV and tuberculosis programmes implement similar sorts of control activities, e.g. case finding and treatment, which depend for success on generic health system issues, including vital registration, drug procurement and supply, laboratory network, human resources, and financing. However, the current health system approach to HIV and tuberculosis control often involves separate specialised services. Despite some recent progress, collaboration between the programmes remains inadequate, progress in obtaining synergies has been slow, and results remain far below those needed to achieve universal access to key interventions. A fundamental re-think of the current strategic approach involves promoting integrated delivery of HIV and tuberculosis programme activities as part of strengthened general health services: epidemiological surveillance, programme monitoring and evaluation, community awareness of health-seeking behavior, risk behaviour modification, infection control, treatment scale-up (first-line treatment regimens), drug-resistance surveillance, containing and countering drug-resistance (second-line treatment regimens), research and development, global advocacy and global partnership. Health agencies should review policies and progress in HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control, learn mutual lessons for policy development and scaling up interventions, and identify ways of joint planning and joint funding of integrated delivery as part of strengthened health systems. Summary As both a danger and an opportunity, the global financial crisis may entail disaster or recovery for global health sector efforts for HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control. Review of policies and progress in control paves the way for identification of synergies between the two programmes, within strengthened health services. The silver lining in the global economic crisis could be better control of the HIV and tuberculosis epidemics, better overall health system performance and outcomes, and better value for money. PMID:20602774

2010-01-01

112

Tuberculosis: The Connection between TB and HIV (the AIDS Virus)  

MedlinePLUS

... the African-American Community Summit Background Slideset Slideset Text version Websites Children Correctional Facilities Table of Contents ... Tuberculosis Laboratory Aggregate Reports Slide Sets Core Curriculum Text- only version Self-Study Modules Module 1 (text ...

113

High Tuberculosis Prevalence in a South African Prison: The Need for Routine Tuberculosis Screening  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis is a major health concern in prisons, particularly where HIV prevalence is high. Our objective was to determine the undiagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis (“undiagnosed tuberculosis”) prevalence in a representative sample of prisoners in a South African prison. In addition we investigated risk factors for undiagnosed tuberculosis, to explore if screening strategies could be targeted to high risk groups, and, the performance of screening tools for tuberculosis. Methods and Findings In this cross-sectional survey, male prisoners were screened for tuberculosis using symptoms, chest radiograph (CXR) and two spot sputum specimens for microscopy and culture. Anonymised HIV antibody testing was performed on urine specimens. The sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of symptoms and investigations were calculated, using Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated on sputum culture as the gold standard. From September 2009 to October 2010, 1046 male prisoners were offered enrolment to the study. A total of 981 (93.8%) consented (median age was 32 years; interquartile range [IQR] 27–37 years) and were screened for tuberculosis. Among 968 not taking tuberculosis treatment and with sputum culture results, 34 (3.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.4–4.9%) were culture positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. HIV prevalence was 25.3% (242/957; 95% CI 22.6–28.2%). Positive HIV status (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.0; 95% CI 1.0–4.2) and being an ex-smoker (aOR 2.6; 95% CI 1.2–5.9) were independently associated with undiagnosed tuberculosis. Compared to the gold standard of positive sputum culture, cough of any duration had a sensitivity of 35.3% and specificity of 79.6%. CXR was the most sensitive single screening modality (sensitivity 70.6%, specificity 92.2%). Adding CXR to cough of any duration gave a tool with sensitivity of 79.4% and specificity of 73.8%. Conclusions Undiagnosed tuberculosis and HIV prevalence was high in this prison, justifying routine screening for tuberculosis at entry into the prison, and intensified case finding among existing prisoners. PMID:24498059

Telisinghe, Lilanganee; Fielding, Katherine L.; Malden, Justin L.; Hanifa, Yasmeen; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Grant, Alison D.; Charalambous, Salome

2014-01-01

114

Tuberculosis Incidence Rates during 8 Years of Follow-Up of an Antiretroviral Treatment Cohort in South Africa: Comparison with Rates in the Community  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundAlthough antiretroviral therapy (ART) is known to be associated with time-dependent reductions in tuberculosis (TB) incidence, the long-term impact of ART on incidence remains imprecisely defined due to limited duration of follow-up and incomplete CD4 cell count recovery in existing studies. We determined TB incidence in a South African ART cohort with up to 8 years of follow-up and stratified

Ankur Gupta; Robin Wood; Richard Kaplan; Linda-Gail Bekker; Stephen D. Lawn

2012-01-01

115

Tuberculosis Facts - Exposure to TB  

MedlinePLUS

... STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Exposure to TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ...

116

Tuberculosis in the lung (image)  

MedlinePLUS

Tuberculosis is caused by a group of organisms Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum and a few other rarer subtypes. Tuberculosis usually appears as a lung (pulmonary) infection. However, ...

117

Tuberculosis Facts - Testing for TB  

MedlinePLUS

... STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Testing for TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ...

118

Women and tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis is the leading infectious cause of death in women worldwide. The disease poses a major threat to women's health security. Population growth, the HIV epidemic, increasing poverty and rising levels of drug resistance will inevitably increase the burden of this disease in women. Women are at increased risk of progression to disease during their reproductive years. However, in most low-income countries, twice as many men are notified with tuberculosis as women. Biological mechanisms may account for most of this difference but socioeconomic and cultural factors leading to barriers in accessing health care may cause under-notification in women. Tuberculosis control programmes should be sensitive to the constraints faced by women in accessing health care, in order to empower women to commence and complete treatment. The fear and stigma associated with tuberculosis have a greater impact on women than on men, often leaving them in a more precarious social and economic position. Tuberculosis in women creates orphans, impoverished families and reduces the economic development of society. Tuberculosis is a major cause of preventable suffering and death in women. WHO's recommended tuberculosis control strategy, DOTS, represents a cost-effective response to the problem of tuberculosis in women. Tuberculosis is a major women's health issue. It is a global health priority that tuberculosis treatment be made available to women, particularly to those in low-income countries who are bearing the brunt of this epidemic. PMID:9050189

Connolly, M; Nunn, P

1996-01-01

119

The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex transcriptome of attenuation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the deletion of RD1 is likely correlated to attenuation from virulence for members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) complex, the reasons for this phenotype remain to be fully explained. As genomic variation is responsible for at least a component of variability in gene expression, we looked to the in vitro global expression profile of the RD1 artificial knockout from

Serge Mostowy; Cynthia Cleto; David R. Sherman; Marcel A. Behr

2004-01-01

120

RAPID LATERAL-FLOW FOR BOVINE TUBERCULOSIS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Bovine tuberculosis remains a costly disease in many countries despite extensive eradication and control efforts. Multiple wildlife reservoirs of Mycobacterium bovis infection found in recent decades in the US, Europe, New Zealand, and South Africa play important roles fuelling high rates of disease...

121

Transmission of Specific Genotype Streptomycin Resistant Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area in Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: From 2003 through to 2004, an outbreak of tuberculosis was identified at a university campus in Yokohama City, located in the southern part of the Tokyo Metropolitan Area (TMA). All Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) strains detected with regards to this outbreak turned out to be Streptomycin resistant with matched patterns of 14 IS6110 bands of Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism

Akihiro Ohkado; Yoshiro Murase; Masaaki Mori; Naoki Hasegawa; Goro Otsuka; Michiko Nagamine; Hideo Maeda; Kazuhiro Uchimura; Masako Ohmori; Norio Yamada; Shinji Maeda; Seiya Kato; Toru Mori; Nobukatsu Ishikawa; S Kaguraoka; Y Tatsumi; H Maeda; S Kinoshita; K Tsukamoto; G Otuka; M Mashiko; M Fujiu; T Takahashi; H Hoshino; K Funayama; A Tsujimoto; M Mori; H Yamamoto; K Fujiwara; T Nishimura; I Horiguchi; E Marui; JDA Van Embden; JT Crawford; JW Dale; KD Eisenach; B Gicquel; P Hermans; C Martin; R McAdam; TM Shinnick; E Mazars; S Lesjean; AL Banuls; M Gilbert; V Vincent; M Tibayrenc; C Locht; P Supply; R Frothingham; WA Meeker-O'Connell; C Allix; M Cardoso-Oelemann; S Rusch-Gerdes; E Willery; E Savine; P De Haas; H Van Deutekom; S Roring; S Mitarai; I Sugawara; E Yokoyama; K Kishida; S Ichinohe; T Iwamoto; S Yoshida; K Suzuki; M Tomita; R Fujiyama; N Tanaka; Y Kawakami; M Ito; Allard De Witte; PJ Bifani; B Mathema; NE Kurepina; BN Kreiswirth; T Yoshiyama; M Aoki; Y Nakanishi; Y Oyama; M Takahashi; BB Plikaytis; K Stockbauer; X Pan; ML Lutfey; SL Moghazeh; W Eisner; TM Daniel; MH Kaplan

1996-01-01

122

First documented cure of a suggestive exogenous reinfection in polymyositis with same but multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the major cause of treatment failure in tuberculosis patients, especially in immunosuppressed. We described a young polymyositis patient on immunosuppressive therapy who was started with antituberculosis therapy as a susceptible strain of M. tuberculosis was isolated from a single cutaneous abscess in his neck and from regional lymph nodes. CASE PRESENTATION: He had non-reactive miliary

Chiranjoy Mukhopadhyay; Ankita Garg; Archana Ayyagari

2004-01-01

123

Pulmonary tuberculosis diagnostic delays in Chad: a multicenter, hospital-based survey in Ndjamena and Moundou  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in low-resource countries. One contagious patient can infect 10 to 20 contacts in these settings. Delays in diagnosing TB therefore contribute to the spread of the disease and sustain the epidemic. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess delays in diagnosing tuberculosis and the factors associated with these delays in the public hospitals in Moundou and Ndjamena, Chad. Methods A structured questionnaire was administered to 286 new tuberculosis patients to evaluate patient delay (time from the onset of symptoms to the first formal or informal care), health-care system delay (time from the first health care to tuberculosis treatment) and total delay (sum of the patient and system delays). Logistic regression was used to identify risk factors associated with long diagnostic delays (defined as greater than the median). Results and discussion The median [interquartile range] patient delay, system delay and total delay were 15 [7–30], 36 [19–65] and 57.5 [33–95] days, respectively. Low economic status (aOR [adjusted odds ratio] =2.38 [1.08-5.25]), not being referred to a health service (aOR?=?1.75 [1.02- 3.02]) and a secondary level education (aOR?=?0.33 [0.12-0.92]) were associated with a long patient delay. Risk factors for a long system delay were a low level of education (aOR?=?4.71 [1.34-16.51]) and the belief that traditional medicine and informal care can cure TB (aOR?=?5.46 [2.37-12.60]). Conclusion Targeted strengthening of the health-care system, including improving patient access, addressing deficiencies in health-related human resources, and improving laboratory networks and linkages as well as community mobilization will make for better outcomes in tuberculosis diagnosis. PMID:22776241

2012-01-01

124

Silent nucleotide polymorphisms and a phylogeny for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Much remains unknown of the phylogeny and evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an organism that kills 2 million people annually. Using a population-based approach that analyzes multiple loci around the chromosome, we demonstrate that neutral genetic variation in genes associated with antimicrobial drug resistance has sufficient variation to construct a robust phylogenetic tree for M. tuberculosis. The data describe a clonal population with a minimum of four distinct M. tuberculosis lineages, closely related to M. bovis. The lineages are strongly geographically associated. Nucleotide substitutions proven to cause drug resistance are distributed throughout the tree, whereas nonsynonymous base substitutions unrelated to drug resistance have a restricted distribution. The phylogenetic structure is concordant with all the previously described genotypic and phenotypic groupings of M. tuberculosis strains and provides a unifying framework for both epidemiologic and evolutionary analysis of M. tuberculosis populations. PMID:15498158

Baker, Lucy; Brown, Tim; Maiden, Martin C; Drobniewski, Francis

2004-09-01

125

Isolated pancreatic tuberculosis masquerading as pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) remains a rarity despite the high incidence of tuberculosis in many of the African and Asian countries. Presentation as discrete pancreatic mass often masquerades as pancreatic neoplasm and diagnosis may require histology. Extra-hepatic portal hypertension due to splenic vein thrombosis complicating pancreatic TB has been reported in the literature. We report here a case of isolated pancreatic TB with pancreatic head mass mimicking neoplasm with extra-hepatic portal hypertension. The possibility of TB should be considered in the list of differential diagnoses of pancreatic mass and an endoscopic, ultrasound-guided biopsy might help to clinch the diagnosis of this potentially curable disease. PMID:24759351

Zacharia, George S.; Antony, Rajany; Kolassery, Sandesh; Ramachandran, Thazhath M.

2014-01-01

126

Bilateral Parotid Tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis of parotid is a rare clinical entity, and cases of bilateral tubercular parotitis are even rarer. We present a case of bilateral primary parotid tuberculosis in a 49-year-old female. The patient received anti-tuberculosis treatment for six months, resulting in complete resolution of the disease. We also review the theories related to the pathogenesis of tubercular parotitis, and propose a novel hypothesis about greater involvement of parotid gland as compared to other salivary glands in primary tuberculosis. PMID:21887065

Thakur, JS; Thakur, A; Mohindroo, NK; Mohindroo, S; Sharma, DR

2011-01-01

127

Bilateral parotid tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis of parotid is a rare clinical entity, and cases of bilateral tubercular parotitis are even rarer. We present a case of bilateral primary parotid tuberculosis in a 49-year-old female. The patient received anti-tuberculosis treatment for six months, resulting in complete resolution of the disease. We also review the theories related to the pathogenesis of tubercular parotitis, and propose a novel hypothesis about greater involvement of parotid gland as compared to other salivary glands in primary tuberculosis. PMID:21887065

Thakur, Js; Thakur, A; Mohindroo, Nk; Mohindroo, S; Sharma, Dr

2011-07-01

128

Increased Complement C1q Level Marks Active Disease in Human Tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Background Complement functions as an important host defense system and complement C5 and C7 have been implicated in immunopathology of tuberculosis. However, little is known about the role of other complement components in tuberculosis. Methods Complement gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of tuberculosis patients and controls were determined using whole genome transcriptional microarray assays. The mRNA and protein levels of three C1q components, C1qA, C1qB, and C1qC, were further validated by qRT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The percentages of C1q expression in CD14 positive cells were determined by flow cytometry. Finally, C1qC protein level was quantified in the pleural fluid of tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis pleurisy. Results C1q expression increases significantly in the peripheral blood of patients with active tuberculosis compared to healthy controls and individuals with latent TB infection. The percentage of C1q-expressing CD14 positive cells is significantly increased in active TB patients. C1q expression in the peripheral blood correlates with sputum smear positivity in tuberculosis patients and is reduced after anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy. Notably, receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that C1qC mRNA levels in peripheral blood efficiently discriminate active from latent tuberculosis infection and healthy controls. Additionally, C1qC protein level in pleural effusion shows improved power in discriminating tuberculosis from non-tuberculosis pleurisy when compared to other inflammatory markers, such as IL-6 and TNF-?. Conclusions C1q expression correlates with active disease in human tuberculosis. C1q could be a potential diagnostic marker to discriminate active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection as well as tuberculosis pleurisy from non-tuberculosis pleurisy. PMID:24647646

Zhang, Mingxia; Liu, Haiying; Zhang, Guoliang; Deng, Qunyi; Huang, Jian; Gao, Zhiliang; Zhou, Boping; Feng, Carl G.; Chen, Xinchun

2014-01-01

129

Therapeutic management of endobronchial tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Endobronchial tuberculosis (EBTB) is defined as tuberculous infection of the tracheobronchial tree. Common symptoms are cough, haemoptysis, sputum production, wheezing, chest pain and fever in active disease and dyspnoea and wheezing in the fibrous stage. This form of tuberculosis is difficult to diagnose because the lesion is not evident in the chest radiograph, frequently delaying treatment. Computed tomography is very useful in evaluating bronchial lesions such as stenosis or obstruction. The most important goal of treatment in active EBTB is eradication of tubercle bacilli. The second most important goal is prevention of bronchial stenosis. Corticosteroid therapy for the prevention of bronchial stenosis in EBTB remains controversial. However, the healing time of ulcerous lesions was shorter and bronchial stenosis was less severe, in patients treated with aerosol therapy, consisting of streptomycin 100 mg, a corticosteroid (dexamethasone 0.5 mg) and naphazoline 0.1 mg administered twice-daily along with conventional oral therapy. In inactive disease, treatment to restore full patency is appropriate. As steroids or other medications are unable to reverse stenosis from fibrous disease, airway patency must be restored mechanically by surgery or endobronchial intervention. Effectiveness and complications remain important issues with the mechanical techniques as use and evaluation continue. Corticosteroid therapy for prevention of bronchial stenosis in EBTB remains controversial. Our observations suggest that progression of bronchial stenosis can be prevented in patients who are treated with aerosol therapy with corticosteroids. PMID:15212597

Rikimaru, Toru

2004-07-01

130

[Surgical urinary and male genital tuberculosis].  

PubMed

A total of 209 and 188 patients with urogenital tuberculosis were operated on in 1985-1987 (Period 1) and in 2005-2007 (Period 2), respectively. The mean age of patients with nephrotuberculosis has increased by 10 years in the past 20 years. The total number of operations has retained as before: organ-removing operations have decreased from 61.1 to 27.3% and reconstructive plastic ones increased from 9.7 to 23%. Epididymectomy remains to be a major intervention for genital tuberculosis, with thrice-fold reduction in their number. The specific features of the course of tuberculosis of the kidney and upper urinary tract were studied in 158 patients. The disease complicated by obstructive uropathy takes a more severe course than the uncomplicated disease, which causes a rise in the number of nephrectomies from 25 to 40.5%. PMID:19227325

Zuban', O N; Volkov, A A; Sushchi?, E A; Murav'ev, A N

2008-01-01

131

TUBERCULOSIS 1 Tuberculosis in Aboriginal Populations in Canada  

E-print Network

TUBERCULOSIS 1 Tuberculosis in Aboriginal Populations in Canada: The Role of Health Care, PhD March 27, 2013 #12;TUBERCULOSIS 2 Abstract The persistent presence of infectious and increasingly). Tuberculosis is an infectious disease which is far more common in the Aboriginal population than the Canadian

Peak, Derek

132

Paleopathology of Human Tuberculosis and the Potential Role of Climate  

PubMed Central

Both origin and evolution of tuberculosis and its pathogens (Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex) are not fully understood. The paleopathological investigation of human remains offers a unique insight into the molecular evolution and spread including correlative data of the environment. The molecular analysis of material from Egypt (3000–500 BC), Sudan (200–600 AD), Hungary (600–1700 AD), Latvia (1200–1600 AD), and South Germany (1400–1800 AD) urprisingly revealed constantly high frequencies of tuberculosis in all different time periods excluding significant environmental influence on tuberculosis spread. The typing of various mycobacteria strains provides evidence for ancestral M. tuberculosis strains in Pre- to early Egyptian dynastic material (3500–2650 BC), while typical M. africanum signatures were detected in a Middle Kingdom tomb (2050–1650 BC). Samples from the New Kingdom to Late Period (1500–500 BC) indicated modern M. tuberculosis strains. No evidence was seen for M. bovis in Egyptian material while M. bovis signatures were first identified in Siberian biomaterial dating 2000 years before present. These results contraindicates the theory that M. tuberculosis evolved from M. bovis during early domestication in the region of the “Fertile Crescent,” but supports the scenario that M. tuberculosis probably derived from an ancestral progenitor strain. The environmental influence of this evolutionary scenario deserves continuing intense evaluation. PMID:19360109

Nerlich, Andreas G.; Lösch, Sandra

2009-01-01

133

Tuberculosis among American Indians of the contiguous United States.  

PubMed Central

Paleopathologic findings provide strong evidence for the existence of tuberculosis in Andean populations of pre-Columbian America. Indirect evidence is available also to suggest its possible endemicity among some American Indian tribes who lived within the present-day contiguous United States before the arrival of Europeans. The available data suggest that tuberculosis became a major health problem in some tribes with increased population density and cultural changes after increased contact with European civilization, paralleling the deterioration in living conditions after relocation of the tribes to reservations. By 1900, tuberculosis had become one of the most serious health problems among North American Indians. Tuberculosis control was hampered by the lack of a specific treatment, and only the advent of specific chemotherapy in an ambulatory setting brought a breakthrough. Mortality, morbidity, and risk of infection have all sharply decreased over the past three decades. However, tuberculosis incidence rates among American Indians remain well above rates in the white population. An intensified effort to identify those with tuberculosis and those at risk of tuberculosis as well as to develop compliance-enhancing strategies with treatment regimens will be necessary to eliminate tuberculosis from Indian reservations. PMID:2511601

Rieder, H L

1989-01-01

134

Prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus among Tuberculosis Patients in Urban Puducherry  

PubMed Central

Background: Diabetes and Tuberculosis often present together and complicate each other at many levels. A collaborative framework for care and control of diabetes and tuberculosis developed by World Health Organisation and International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases emphasizes routine bi-directional screening for the two diseases. Aims: The study was to assess the prevalence of diabetes in tuberculosis patients currently on treatment. Materials and Methods: This facility-based cross-sectional study was undertaken in four randomly selected peripheral health institutions providing directly observed treatment short-course, treatment for tuberculosis patients. All cases of tuberculosis, more than 18 years of age were screened for diabetes. Risk factors like age, sex, family history of diabetes, alcohol, smoking and obesity were assessed. Results: The prevalence of diabetes in tuberculosis patients was found to be 29% (known diabetics - 20.7%, new Diabetes cases - 8.3%). Diabetes was significantly associated with older age, family history of diabetes, consumption of alcohol and sputum positivity. Conclusions: Screening patients with Tuberculosis for fasting blood sugar estimation will help in early detection of diabetes PMID:24678474

Raghuraman, Soundararajan; Vasudevan, Kavita P; Govindarajan, S; Chinnakali, Palanivel; Panigrahi, Krishna Chandra

2014-01-01

135

High resolution computed tomographic findings in pulmonary tuberculosis.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Although chest radiographs usually provide adequate information for the diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis, minimal exudative tuberculosis can be overlooked on standard chest radiographs. The aim of the present study was to assess the findings of active pulmonary tuberculosis on high resolution computed tomographic (HRCT) scans, and to evaluate their possible use in determining disease activity. METHODS: Thirty two patients with newly diagnosed active pulmonary tuberculosis and 34 patients with inactive pulmonary tuberculosis were examined. The diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis was based on positive acid fast bacilli in sputum and bronchial washing smears or cultures and/or changes on serial radiographs obtained during treatment. RESULTS: With HRCT scanning centrilobular lesions (n = 29), "tree-in-bud" appearance (n = 23), and macronodules 5-8 mm in diameter (n = 22) were most commonly seen in cases of active pulmonary tuberculosis. HRCT scans showed fibrotic lesions (n = 34), distortion of bronchovascular structures (n = 32), emphysema (n = 28), and bronchiectasis (n = 24) in patients with inactive tuberculosis. CONCLUSIONS: Centrilobular densities in and around the small airways and "tree-in-bud" appearances were the most characteristic CT features of disease activity. HRCT scanning clearly differentiated old fibrotic lesions from new active lesions and demonstrated early bronchogenic spread. These findings may be of value in decisions on treatment. Images PMID:8733492

Hatipo?lu, O. N.; Osma, E.; Manisali, M.; Uçan, E. S.; Balci, P.; Akkoçlu, A.; Akpinar, O.; Karlikaya, C.; Yüksel, C.

1996-01-01

136

Spatial Analysis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Antananarivo Madagascar: Tuberculosis-Related Knowledge, Attitude and Practice  

PubMed Central

Introduction Tuberculosis infection may remain latent, but the disease is nevertheless a serious public health issue. Various epidemiological studies on pulmonary tuberculosis have considered the spatial component and taken it into account, revealing the tendency of this disease to cluster in particular locations. The aim was to assess the contribution of Knowledge Attitude and Practice (KAP) to the distribution of tuberculosis and to provide information for the improvement of the National Tuberculosis Program. Methods We investigated the role of KAP to distribution patterns of pulmonary tuberculosis in Antananarivo. First, we performed spatial scanning of tuberculosis aggregation among permanent cases resident in Antananarivo Urban Township using the Kulldorff method, and then we carried out a quantitative study on KAP, involving TB patients. The KAP study in the population was based on qualitative methods with focus groups. Results The disease still clusters in the same districts identified in the previous study. The principal cluster covered 22 neighborhoods. Most of them are part of the first district. A secondary cluster was found, involving 18 neighborhoods in the sixth district and two neighborhoods in the fifth. The relative risk was respectively 1.7 (p<10?6) in the principal cluster and 1.6 (p<10?3) in the secondary cluster. Our study showed that more was known about TB symptoms than about the duration of the disease or free treatment. Knowledge about TB was limited to that acquired at school or from relatives with TB. The attitude and practices of patients and the population in general indicated that there is still a stigma attached to tuberculosis. Conclusion This type of survey can be conducted in remote zones where the tuberculosis-related KAP of the TB patients and the general population is less known or not documented; the findings could be used to adapt control measures to the local particularities. PMID:25386655

Rakotosamimanana, Sitraka; Mandrosovololona, Vatsiharizandry; Rakotonirina, Julio; Ramamonjisoa, Joselyne; Ranjalahy, Justin Rasolofomanana; Randremanana, Rindra Vatosoa; Rakotomanana, Fanjasoa

2014-01-01

137

Vaccine against tuberculosis: what’s new?  

PubMed Central

Background one of the World Health Organization Millennium Development Goal is to reduce tuberculosis incidence by 2015. However, more of 8.5 million tuberculosis cases have been reported in 2011, with an increase of multidrug-resistant strains. Therefore, the World Health Organization target cannot be reach without the help of a vaccine able to limit the spread of tuberculosis. Nowadays, bacille Calmette-Guérin is the only vaccine available against tuberculosis. It prevents against meningeal and disseminated tuberculosis in children, but its effectiveness against pulmonary form in adolescents and adults is argued. Method a systematic review was performed by searches of Pubmed, references of the relevant articles and Aeras and ClinicalTrial.gov websites. Results 100 articles were included in this review. Three viral vectored booster vaccines, five protein adjuvant booster vaccines, two priming vaccines and two therapeutic vaccines have been analyzed. Conclusions Several vaccines are in the pipeline, but further studies on basic research, clinical trial and mass vaccination campaigns are needed to achieve the TB eradication target by 2050. PMID:24564340

2014-01-01

138

"Tuberculosis Case Management" Training.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The need to isolated health providers with critical knowledge in tuberculosis (TB) case management prompted the development of "Tuberculosis Case Management" CD-ROM. Features include "Learning Center,""Examination Room," and "Library." The combination of audio, video, and graphics allows participants to practice acquired skills in a simulated…

Knebel, Elisa; Kolodner, Jennifer

2001-01-01

139

Psychiatry and Tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Studies on the psychosomatic aspects of tuberculosis have not brought to light a clearcut correlation between a specific personality structure and susceptibility to the illness. The recommendation is made to look for several rather than for one personality type. It is suggested that people should be studied who react to stress with loss of appetite and loss of sleep. This character structure in contrast to that where the person withdraws into sleep and overeats might make a person prone to tuberculosis. The somatopsychic influence of tuberculosis needs to be interpreted in terms of the localization of the lesion as well as infectiousness and conspicuousness of the disease. Some common sociopsychological factors of tuberculosis have been mentioned. Reports on mental illness and tuberculosis and on diet were reviewed. PMID:14792351

Fantl, Kurt

1950-01-01

140

Evaluation of an immunochromatographic test for discrimination between Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex & non tuberculous mycobacteria in clinical isolates from extra-pulmonary tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Background & objectives: Accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) is crucial to facilitate early treatment of the patients, and to reduce its spread. Clinical presentation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and non tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) may or may not be the same, but the treatment regimen is always different for both the infections. Differentiation between MTBC and NTM by routine laboratory methods is time consuming and cumbersome. This study was aimed to evaluate an immunochromatographic test (ICT), based on mouse monoclonal anti-MPT64, for simple and rapid discrimination between MTBC and NTM in clinical isolates from extra-pulmonary tuberculosis cases. Methods: A total of 800 clinical samples were collected from patients suspected to have extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. Preliminary diagnosis has been done by direct Ziehl–Neelsen (ZN) staining followed by culture in BACTEC system. A total of 150 clinical isolates, which were found positive in BD 460 TB system during September 2009 to September 2010 were selected for the screening by ICT test. p-nitro-?-acetylamino- ?-hydroxy propiophenone (NAP) test was performed for differentiation of MTBC and NTM. M. tuberculosis complex was further confirmed by IS6110 PCR of BACTEC culture positive isolates, this served as the reference method for MTBC identification and comparative evaluation of the ICT kit. Results: Of the 150 BACTEC culture positive isolates tested by ICT kit, 101 (67.3%) were found positive for MTBC and remaining 49 (32.7%) were considered as NTM. These results were further confirmed by IS6110 PCR that served as the reference method for detection of MTBC. H37Rv reference strain was taken as a control for ICT test and IS6110 PCR. The reference strain showed the presence of MPT64 antigen band in the ICT test. Similar bands were formed in 101 of 102 MTBC isolates tested, proving 99.1 per cent sensitivity and no bands were detected in 48 (100%) NTM isolates tested, proving 100 per cent specificity of the ICT kit. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings show that ICT test can be used on direct culture positive specimens. It does not require any special equipment, is simple and less time consuming. It can easily discriminate between MTBC and NTM and thus can help in appropriate management of tuberculosis. PMID:22825610

Maurya, Anand Kumar; Nag, Vijaya Lakshmi; Kant, Surya; Kushwaha, Ram Aawadh Singh; Kumar, Manoj; Mishra, Vikas; Rahman, W.; Dhole, Tapan N.

2012-01-01

141

Faecal calprotectin levels differentiate intestinal from pulmonary tuberculosis: An observational study from Southern India  

PubMed Central

Background Current methods to establish the diagnosis of intestinal tuberculosis are inadequate. Objectives We aimed to determine the clinical features of intestinal tuberculosis and evaluate inflammatory biomarkers in intestinal as well as pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods We recruited 38 intestinal tuberculosis patients, 119 pulmonary tuberculosis patients and 91 controls with functional gastrointestinal disorders between October 2009 and July 2012 for the investigation of clinical features, C-reactive protein (CRP), faecal and serum calprotectin. Faecal calprotectin ?200?µg/g was used as a cut-off to determine intestinal inflammation of clinical significance. Three patient categories were established: (a) pulmonary tuberculosis and faecal calprotectin <200?µg/g (isolated pulmonary tuberculosis); (b) pulmonary tuberculosis and faecal calprotectin ?200?µg/g (combined pulmonary and intestinal tuberculosis); (c) isolated intestinal tuberculosis. Results Common clinical features of intestinal tuberculosis were abdominal pain, fatigue, weight loss and watery diarrhoea. Intestinal tuberculosis patients had elevated median CRP (10.7?mg/l), faecal calprotectin (320?µg/g) and serum calprotectin (5.7?µg/ml). Complete normalisation of CRP (1.0?mg/L), faecal calprotectin (16?µg/g) and serum calprotectin (1.4?µg/ml)) was seen upon clinical remission. Patients with combined pulmonary and intestinal tuberculosis had the highest levels of CRP (53.8?mg/l) and serum calprotectin (6.5?µg/ml) and presented with signs of more severe disease. Conclusion Calprotectin analysis reveals intestinal tuberculosis in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and pinpoints those in need of rigorous follow-up. PMID:25360318

Shenoy, Koticherry Thrivikrama; Ramasubramanian, Ramalingom; Thayumanavan, Lakshmikanthan; Balakumaran, Leena Kondarappassery; Bjune, Gunnar A; Moum, Bjørn A

2014-01-01

142

Best practice in the diagnosis and management of urogenital tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis (TB) is a current public health problem, remaining the most common worldwide cause of mortality from infectious diseases. Urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB) is the second most common form of extrapulmonary TB in countries with severe epidemic situations and the third most common form in regions with a low incidence of TB. In this article we present the terminology, epidemiology and classification of UGTB, as well as describing the laboratory findings and clinical features and approaches to chemotherapy as well as surgery. PMID:23730329

2013-01-01

143

Tuberculosis Epidemiology and Selection in an Autochthonous Siberian Population from the 16th-19th Century  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis is one of most ancient diseases affecting human populations. Although numerous studies have tried to detect pathogenic DNA in ancient skeletons, the successful identification of ancient tuberculosis strains remains rare. Here, we describe a study of 140 ancient subjects inhumed in Yakutia (Eastern Siberia) during a tuberculosis outbreak, dating from the 16th–19th century. For a long time, Yakut populations had remained isolated from European populations, and it was not until the beginning of the 17th century that first contacts were made with European settlers. Subsequently, tuberculosis spread throughout Yakutia, and the evolution of tuberculosis frequencies can be tracked until the 19th century. This study took a multidisciplinary approach, examining historical and paleo-epidemiological data to understand the impact of tuberculosis on ancient Yakut population. In addition, molecular identification of the ancient tuberculosis strain was realized to elucidate the natural history and host-pathogen co-evolution of human tuberculosis that was present in this population. This was achieved by the molecular detection of the IS6110 sequence and SNP genotyping by the SNaPshot technique. Results demonstrated that the strain belongs to cluster PGG2-SCG-5, evocating a European origin. Our study suggests that the Yakut population may have been shaped by selection pressures, exerted by several illnesses, including tuberculosis, over several centuries. This confirms the validity and necessity of using a multidisciplinary approach to understand the natural history of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease. PMID:24587092

Dabernat, Henri; Thèves, Catherine; Bouakaze, Caroline; Nikolaeva, Dariya; Keyser, Christine; Mokrousov, Igor; Géraut, Annie; Duchesne, Sylvie; Gérard, Patrice; Alexeev, Anatoly N.; Crubézy, Eric; Ludes, Bertrand

2014-01-01

144

Gender-related factors influencing tuberculosis control in shantytowns: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background There is evidence that female gender is associated with reduced likelihood of tuberculosis diagnosis and successful treatment. This study aimed to characterize gender-related barriers to tuberculosis control in Peruvian shantytowns. Methods We investigated attitudes and experiences relating gender to tuberculosis using the grounded theory approach to describe beliefs amongst key tuberculosis control stakeholders. These issues were explored in 22 semi-structured interviews and in four focus group discussions with 26 tuberculosis patients and 17 healthcare workers. Results We found that the tuberculosis program was perceived not to be gender discriminatory and provided equal tuberculosis diagnostic and treatment care to men and women. This contrasted with stereotypical gender roles in the broader community context and a commonly expressed belief amongst patients and healthcare workers that female health inherently has a lower priority than male health. This belief was principally associated with men's predominant role in the household economy and limited employment for women in this setting. Women were also generally reported to experience the adverse psychosocial and economic consequences of tuberculosis diagnosis more than men. Conclusions There was a common perception that women's tuberculosis care was of secondary importance to that of men. This reflected societal gender values and occurred despite apparent gender equality in care provision. The greatest opportunities for improving women's access to tuberculosis care appear to be in improving social, political and economic structures, more than tuberculosis program modification. PMID:20587044

2010-01-01

145

Tuberculosis and subsequent risk of lung cancer in Xuanwei, China  

SciTech Connect

Tobacco and indoor air pollution from smoky coal are major causes of lung cancer in rural Xuanwei County, China. Tuberculosis has been suggested to increase lung cancer risk, but data from prior studies are limited. We conducted an analysis of data from a retrospective cohort study of 42,422 farmers in Xuanwei. In 1992, interviewers administered a standardized questionnaire that included lifetime medical history, including tuberculosis. Subjects were followed from 1976, with deaths from lung cancer ascertained through 1996. We used proportional hazards regression to assess the association between tuberculosis and subsequent lung cancer mortality. Tuberculosis was reported by 246 subjects (0.6%), and 2,459 (5.8%) died from lung cancer during follow-up. Lung cancer mortality was substantially higher in subjects with tuberculosis than in those without (25 vs. 3.1 per 1,000 person-years). The association was especially pronounced in the first 5 years after tuberculosis diagnosis (hazard ratios (HRs) ranging 6.7-13) but remained strong 5-9.9 years (HR 3.4, 95% CI 1.3-9.1) and 10+ years (HR 3.0, 95% CI 1.3-7.3) after tuberculosis. These associations were similar among men and women and among smoky coal users (70.5% of subjects). Adjustment for demographic characteristics, lung disease and tobacco use did not affect results. In Xuanwei, China, tuberculosis is an important risk factor for lung cancer. The increased lung cancer risk, persisting years after a tuberculosis diagnosis, could reflect the effects of chronic pulmonary inflammation and scarring arising from tuberculosis.

Engels, E.A.; Shen, M.; Chapman, R.S.; Pfeiffer, R.M.; Yu, Y.Y.; He, X.Z.; Lan, Q. [NCI, Rockville, MD (USA). Infectious and Immunoepidemiology Branch

2009-03-15

146

Tuberculosis and leprosy in perspective.  

PubMed

Two of humankind's most socially and psychologically devastating diseases, tuberculosis and leprosy, have been the subject of intensive paleopathological research due to their antiquity, a presumed association with human settlement and subsistence patterns, and their propensity to leave characteristic lesions on skeletal and mummified remains. Despite a long history of medical research and the development of effective chemotherapy, these diseases remain global health threats even in the 21st century, and as such, their causative agents Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. leprae, respectively, have recently been the subject of molecular genetics research. The new genome-level data for several mycobacterial species have informed extensive phylogenetic analyses that call into question previously accepted theories concerning the origins and antiquity of these diseases. Of special note is the fact that all new models are in broad agreement that human TB predated that in other animals, including cattle and other domesticates, and that this disease originated at least 35,000 years ago and probably closer to 2.6 million years ago. In this work, we review current phylogenetic and biogeographic models derived from molecular biology and explore their implications for the global development of TB and leprosy, past and present. In so doing, we also briefly review the skeletal evidence for TB and leprosy, explore the current status of these pathogens, critically consider current methods for identifying ancient mycobacterial DNA, and evaluate coevolutionary models. PMID:19890861

Stone, Anne C; Wilbur, Alicia K; Buikstra, Jane E; Roberts, Charlotte A

2009-01-01

147

Indoor solid fuel use and tuberculosis in China: a matched case-control study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  China ranks second among the 22 high burden countries for tuberculosis. A modeling exercise showed that reduction of indoor\\u000a air pollution could help advance tuberculosis control in China. However, the association between indoor air pollution and\\u000a tuberculosis is not yet well established. A case control study was conducted in Anhui, China to investigate whether use of\\u000a solid fuel is associated

Xiaohong Kan; Chen-Yuan Chiang; Donald A Enarson; Wenhua Chen; Jianan Yang; Genwang Chen

2011-01-01

148

Tuberculosis in Thailand.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis (TB) was expected to be eradicated by the end of this century. However, an increasing incidence of tuberculosis in many parts of the world has led to renewed interest in the disease. The pandemic of HIV infection has changed TB, an endemic disease, to an epidemic worldwide. In Thailand, tuberculosis cases and deaths reduced year after year, until 1992 when the cases began to increase as a result of HIV infection. The annual risk of infection in 1997 was estimated at 1.4%, with approximately 100 000 new TB cases developing each year. Fifteen per cent of tuberculosis patients are seropositive for HIV infection. Increasing antituberculosis drug resistance has been correlated with the high prevalence of HIV infection in some parts of the country. In 1995, cure rate of this disease was approximately 50% and, since 1996, in order to cope with the worsening situation, the National Tuberculosis Programme (NTP) has adopted Directly Observed Treatment, Short-course (DOTS). Despite the current economic turmoil of the country, the programme has now been expanded to cover over 400 of the 810 districts of Thailand. Also, the economic effects of tuberculosis at the household level in Thailand were recently studied. Tuberculosis is a chronic disease that commonly affects the lower socioeconomic classes. Some patients were unable to follow the treatment regimens because of the financial burden. The low case detection and treatment completion rates are, in part, due to the inability of poor patients to cope with the expenditure. PMID:11264766

Palwatwichai, A

2001-03-01

149

Non-Adherence to Anti-Tuberculosis Treatment and Determinant Factors among Patients with Tuberculosis in Northwest Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background Non-adherence to anti tuberculosis treatment is one of the crucial challenges in improving tuberculosis cure-rates and reducing further healthcare costs. The poor adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment among patients with tuberculosis is a major problem in Ethiopia. Hence, this study assessed level of non-adherence to anti-tuberculosis therapy and associated factors among patients with tuberculosis in northwest Ethiopia. Methods An institution based cross-sectional survey was conducted among tuberculosis patients who were following anti-tuberculosis treatment in North Gondar zone from February 20 – March 30, 2013. Data were collected by trained data collectors using a structured and pre-tested questionnaire. Data were entered to EPI INFO version 3.5.3 and analyzed using statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) version 20. Multiple logistic regressions were fitted to identify associations and to control potential confounding variables. Odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval was calculated and p-values<0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results A total of 280 tuberculosis patients were interviewed; 55.7% were males and nearly three quarters (72.5%) were urban dwellers. The overall non-adherence for the last one month and the last four days before the survey were 10% and 13.6% respectively. Non-adherence was high if the patients had forgetfulness (AOR 7.04, 95% CI 1.40–35.13), is on the continuation phase of chemotherapy (AOR: 6.95, 95% CI 1.81–26.73), had symptoms of tuberculosis during the interview (AOR: 4.29, 95% CI 1.53–12.03), and had co-infection with HIV (AOR: 4.06, 95% CI 1.70–9.70). Conclusions Non-adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment was high. Forgetfulness, being in the continuation phases of chemotherapy, having symptoms of tuberculosis during the interview, and co-infected with HIV were significantly associated with non-adherence to anti-tuberculosis therapy. Special attention on adherence counseling should be given to symptomatic patients, TB/HIV co-infected patients, and those in the continuation phase of the tuberculosis therapy. PMID:24244364

Adane, Akilew Awoke; Alene, Kefyalew Addis; Koye, Digsu Negese; Zeleke, Berihun Megabiaw

2013-01-01

150

Risk of tuberculosis higher with monoclonal-antibody than with soluble-receptor anti-TNF therapy in the 3-year prospective French RATIO registry  

E-print Network

1 Risk of tuberculosis higher with monoclonal-antibody than with soluble- receptor anti-TNF therapy, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory chronic diseases Running head: Tuberculosis complicating anti-TNF therapy;60(7):1884-1894" DOI : 10.1002/art.24632 #12;2 ABSTRACT Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is associated with anti

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

151

Nanoparticle Delivery of Anti-Tuberculosis Chemotherapy as a Potential Mediator Against Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Drug-resistant tuberculosis is quickly emerging as one of the largest threats to the global health community. Current chemotherapy for tuberculosis dates back to the 1950s and is arduous, lengthy, and remains extremely difficult to complete in many of the highest burdened areas. This causes inadequate or incomplete treatment, resulting in genetic selection of drug-resistant strains. With a dearth of novel anti-TB drug candidates in the development pipeline, nanoparticle technology allows us to take current chemotherapies and deliver them more efficaciously, reducing the frequency and duration of treatment and increasing bioavailability. This approach can improve patient adherence, reduce pill burden, and shorten time to completion, all which are at the heart of drug resistance. This review examines the multiple advantages of nanoparticle drug delivery of tuberculosis chemotherapy and summarizes the challenges in implementation. PMID:22180674

Smith, Jonathan Paul

2011-01-01

152

Novel human recombinant antibodies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85B  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis is the leading cause of death due to bacterial infections worldwide, mainly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The antigen 85 complex comprises a set of major secreted proteins of M. tuberculosis, which are potential biomarkers for diagnostic. Results In this work, the first human single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies specific for the tuberculosis biomarker 85 B were selected by phage display from naïve antibody gene libraries (HAL7/8). Produced as scFv-Fc in mammalian cells, these antibodies were further characterized and analysed for specificity and applicability in different tuberculosis antigen detection assays. Sandwich detection of recombinant 85 B was successful in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), lateral flow immunoassay and immunoblot. Whereas detection of M. tuberculosis cell extracts and culture filtrates was only possible in direct ELISA and immunoblot assays. It was found that the conformation of 85 B, depending on sample treatment, influenced antigen detection. Conclusions Recombinant antibodies, selected by phage display, may be applicable for 85 B detection in various assays. These antibodies are candidates for the development of future point of care tuberculosis diagnostic kits. Using 85 B as a biomarker, the antigen conformation influenced by sample treatment is important. PMID:25033887

2014-01-01

153

Smoking increases the risk of relapse after successful tuberculosis treatment  

PubMed Central

Background Recent tobacco smoking has been identified as a risk factor for developing tuberculosis, and two studies which have investigated its association with relapse of tuberculosis after completion of treatment had conflicting results (and did not control for confounding). The objective of this study was to investigate risk factors for tuberculosis relapse, with emphasis on smoking. Methods A cohort of newly diagnosed TB cases was followed up from their discharge after completion of treatment (in 2001–2003) until October 2006 and relapses of tuberculosis ascertained during that period. A case of relapse was defined as a patient who started a second treatment during the follow up. Results Smoking (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.23–5.21) and living in an area where the family health program was not implemented (OR 3.61, 95% CI 1.46–8.93) were found to be independently associated with relapse of tuberculosis. Conclusions Our results establish that smoking is associated with relapse of tuberculosis even after adjustment for the socioeconomic variables. Smoking cessation support should be incorporated in the strategies to improve effectiveness of Tuberculosis Control Programs. PMID:18556729

d’Arc Lyra Batista, Joanna; de Fátima Pessoa Militão de Albuquerque, Maria; de Alencar Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes; Rodrigues, Laura Cunha

2008-01-01

154

Failure to Recognize Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Leads to Misdiagnosis of Chronic Pulmonary Tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Background Nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infections cause morbidity worldwide. They are difficult to diagnose in resource-limited regions, and most patients receive empiric treatment for tuberculosis (TB). Our objective here is to evaluate the potential impact of NTM diseases among patients treated presumptively for tuberculosis in Mali. Methods We re-evaluated sputum specimens among patients newly diagnosed with TB (naïve) and those previously treated for TB disease (chronic cases). Sputum microscopy, culture and Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug susceptibility testing were performed. Identification of strains was performed using molecular probes or sequencing of secA1 and/or 16S rRNA genes. Results Of 142 patients enrolled, 61 (43%) were clinically classified as chronic cases and 17 (12%) were infected with NTM. Eleven of the 142 (8%) patients had NTM disease alone (8 M. avium, 2 M. simiae and 1 M. palustre). All these 11 were from the chronic TB group, comprising 11/61 (18%) of that group and all were identified as candidates for second line treatment. The remaining 6/17 (35.30%) NTM infected patients had coinfection with M. tuberculosis and all 6 were from the TB treatment naïve group. These 6 were candidates for the standard first line treatment regimen of TB. M. avium was identified in 11 of the 142 (8%) patients, only 3/11 (27.27%) of whom were HIV positive. Conclusions NTM infections should be considered a cause of morbidity in TB endemic environments especially when managing chronic TB cases to limit morbidity and provide appropriate treatment. PMID:22615839

Diallo, Souleymane; Diarra, Bassirou; Traoré, Brehima; Shea, Yvonne R.; Zelazny, Adrian M.; Dembele, Bindongo P. P.; Goita, Drissa; Kassambara, Hamadoun; Hammond, Abdulrahman S.; Polis, Michael A.; Tounkara, Anatole

2012-01-01

155

Update on cutaneous tuberculosis*  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis continues to draw special attention from health care professionals and society in general. Cutaneous tuberculosis is an infection caused by M. tuberculosis complex, M. bovis and bacillus Calmette-Guérin. Depending on individual immunity, environmental factors and the type of inoculum, it may present varied clinical and evolutionary aspects. Patients with HIV and those using immunobiological drugs are more prone to infection, which is a great concern in centers where the disease is considered endemic. This paper aims to review the current situation of cutaneous tuberculosis in light of this new scenario, highlighting the emergence of new and more specific methods of diagnosis, and the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate the parasite-host interaction. PMID:25387498

Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Bernardes Filho, Fred; Quaresma, Maria Victória; do Nascimento, Leninha Valério; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Azulay, David Rubem

2014-01-01

156

Evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Genomic studies have provided a refined understanding of the genetic diversity within the Mycobacterium genus, and more specifically within Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These results have informed a new perspective on the macro- and micro-evolution of the tubercle bacillus. In the first step, a M. kansasii-like opportunistic pathogen acquired new genes, through horizontal gene transfer, that enabled it to better exploit an intracellular niche and ultimately evolve into a professional pathogen. In the second step, different subspecies and strains of the M. tuberculosis complex emerged through mutation and deletion of unnecessary DNA. Understanding the differences between M. tuberculosis and related less pathogenic mycobacteria is expected to reveal key bacterial virulence mechanisms and provide opportunities to understand host resistance to mycobacterial infection. Understanding differences within the M. tuberculosis complex and the evolutionary forces shaping these differences is important for investigating the basis of its success as both a symbiont and a pathogen. PMID:23468104

Behr, Marcel A

2013-01-01

157

Use of Isoniazid for Latent Tuberculosis Infection in a Public Health Clinic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Isoniazid is an efficacious treatment for latent tuberculosis. Con- cerns remain, however, regarding hepatotoxicity associated with this medication. In addition, adherence may be suboptimal because at least 6 months of treatment is required. We extracted information from our latent tuberculosis treatment database to determine ad- verse effects and treatment completion rates associated with the use of isoniazid at a county

Philip A. LoBue; Kathleen S. Moser

158

The impact of badger removal on the control of tuberculosis in cattle herds in Ireland  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Ireland, the herd prevalence of bovine tuberculosis has remained stable for several decades, and in common with several other countries, progress towards eradication has stalled. There is evidence in support of the potential role of infected badgers (Meles meles, a protected species) in bovine tuberculosis in Ireland and Britain. However, this evidence on its own has not been sufficient

J. M. Griffin; D. H. Williams; G. E. Kelly; T. A. Clegg; I. O’Boyle; J. D. Collins; S. J. More

2005-01-01

159

Community Coauthoring: Whose Voice Remains?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines how texts are collaboratively produced in community development work when coauthors come from multiple racial, ethnic, and class backgrounds as well as business and other work experiences. We found that the term "wordsmithing" became a discursive tool that limited resident input and shaped the Plan toward an external…

Larson, Joanne; Webster, Stephanie; Hopper, Mindy

2011-01-01

160

Multi Drug and Other Forms of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis Are Uncommon among Treatment Naïve Tuberculosis Patients in Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background Surveillance and effective management of drug resistance is important to sustaining tuberculosis (TB) control efforts. We aimed to determine resistance rates to first line anti tuberculosis drugs and to describe factors associated with the resistance to any of the first line anti tuberculosis drugs in Dar es Salaam Tanzania. Materials Newly diagnosed, TB patients with neither history of tuberculosis treatment nor isoniazid prophylaxis were included into the study. Sputum specimens were cultured on either mycobacteria growth indicator tube 960 (MGIT 960) or Lowenstein Jenstein (LJ) medium supplemented with either glycerol (GLJ) or pyruvate (PLJ). Drug susceptibility for isoniazid, rifampicin, streptomycin and ethambutol was determined by either Lowenstein–Jensen (LJ) medium or mycobacteria growth indicator tube 960 (MGIT 960). Results A total of 933 newly diagnosed TB patients, were included into the study. Multi drug resistance (MDR) tuberculosis was detected among 2 (0.2%) patients. Resistance to any of the four tested drugs was detected among 54 (5.8%) patients. Mono-resistance to isoniazid, rifampicin, streptomycin and ethambutol were 21(2.3%), 3 (0.3%), 13 (1.4%), 9 (1.0%) respectively. Conclusion Primary resistance to first line anti tuberculosis drugs is still low in this setting. Continued vigilance including periodic national surveillance of anti-tuberculosis resistance is recommended. PMID:25849784

Nagu, Tumaini J.; Aboud, Said; Mwiru, Ramadhani; Matee, Mecky; Fawzi, Wafaie; Mugusi, Ferdinand

2015-01-01

161

Indoleamides are active against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Responsible for nearly two million deaths each year, the infectious disease tuberculosis remains a serious global health challenge. The emergence of multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis confounds control efforts, and new drugs with novel molecular targets are desperately needed. Here we describe lead compounds, the indoleamides, with potent activity against both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis by targeting the mycolic acid transporter MmpL3. We identify a single mutation in mmpL3 which confers high resistance to the indoleamide class while remaining susceptible to currently used first- and second-line tuberculosis drugs, indicating a lack of cross-resistance. Importantly, an indoleamide derivative exhibits dose-dependent anti-mycobacterial activity when orally administered to M. tuberculosis-infected mice. The bioavailability of the indoleamides, combined with their ability to kill tubercle bacilli, indicates great potential for translational developments of this structure class for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:24352433

Lun, Shichun; Guo, Haidan; Onajole, Oluseye K.; Pieroni, Marco; Gunosewoyo, Hendra; Chen, Gang; Tipparaju, Suresh K.; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Bishai, William R.

2014-01-01

162

Computational genomics-proteomics and Phylogeny analysis of twenty one mycobacterial genomes (Tuberculosis & non Tuberculosis strains)  

PubMed Central

Background The genus Mycobacterium comprises different species, among them the most contagious and infectious bacteria. The members of the complex Mycobacterium tuberculosis are the most virulent microorganisms that have killed human and other mammals since millennia. Additionally, with the many different mycobacterial sequences available, there is a crucial need for the visualization and the simplification of their data. In this present study, we aim to highlight a comparative genome, proteome and phylogeny analysis between twenty-one mycobacterial (Tuberculosis and non tuberculosis) strains using a set of computational and bioinformatics tools (Pan and Core genome plotting, BLAST matrix and phylogeny analysis). Results Considerably the result of pan and core genome Plotting demonstrated that less than 1250 Mycobacterium gene families are conserved across all species, and a total set of about 20,000 gene families within the Mycobacterium pan-genome of twenty one mycobacterial genomes. Viewing the BLAST matrix a high similarity was found among the species of the complex Mycobacterium tuberculosis and less conservation is found with other slow growing pathogenic mycobacteria. Phylogeny analysis based on both protein conservation, as well as rRNA clearly resolve known relationships between slow growing mycobacteria. Conclusion Mycobacteria include important pathogenic species for human and animals and the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex is the most cause of death of the humankind. The comparative genome analysis could provide a new insight for better controlling and preventing these diseases. PMID:22929624

2012-01-01

163

In-Depth Molecular Characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from New Delhi - Predominance of Drug Resistant Isolates of the `Modern' (TbD1-) Type  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundIndia has the highest estimated burden of tuberculosis in the world, accounting for 21% of all tuberculosis cases world-wide. However, due to lack of systematic analysis using multiple markers the available information on the genomic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in India is limited.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsThus, 65 M. tuberculosis isolates from New Delhi, India were analyzed by spoligotyping, MIRU-VNTR, large deletion PCR

Ruth Stavrum; Vithal Prasad Myneedu; Virendra K. Arora; Niyaz Ahmed; Harleen M. S. Grewal; Geraldine Butler

2009-01-01

164

Fit for consumption: zebrafish as a model for tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Despite efforts to generate new vaccines and antibiotics for tuberculosis, the disease remains a public health problem worldwide. The zebrafish Danio rerio has emerged as a useful model to investigate mycobacterial pathogenesis and treatment. Infection of zebrafish with Mycobacterium marinum, the closest relative of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, recapitulates many aspects of human tuberculosis. The zebrafish model affords optical transparency, abundant genetic tools and in vivo imaging of the progression of infection. Here, we review how the zebrafish–M. marinum system has been deployed to make novel observations about the role of innate immunity, the tuberculous granuloma, and crucial host and bacterial genes. Finally, we assess how these findings relate to human disease and provide a framework for novel strategies to treat tuberculosis. PMID:24973748

Cronan, Mark R.; Tobin, David M.

2014-01-01

165

Variable host–pathogen compatibility in Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Studies have reported human pathogens to have geographically structured population genetics, some of which have been linked to ancient human migrations. However, no study has addressed the potential evolutionary consequences of such longstanding human–pathogen associations. Here, we demonstrate that the global population structure of M. tuberculosis is defined by six phylogeographical lineages, each associated with specific, sympatric human populations. In an urban cosmopolitan environment, mycobacterial lineages were much more likely to spread in sympatric than in allopatric patient populations. Tuberculosis cases that did occur in allopatric hosts disproportionately involved high-risk individuals with impaired host resistance. These observations suggest that mycobacterial lineages are adapted to particular human populations. If confirmed, our findings have important implications for tuberculosis control and vaccine development. PMID:16477032

Gagneux, Sebastien; DeRiemer, Kathryn; Van, Tran; Kato-Maeda, Midori; de Jong, Bouke C.; Narayanan, Sujatha; Nicol, Mark; Niemann, Stefan; Kremer, Kristin; Gutierrez, M. Cristina; Hilty, Markus; Hopewell, Philip C.; Small, Peter M.

2006-01-01

166

Nonlinear pattern of pulmonary tuberculosis among migrants at entry in Kuwait: 1997–2006  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: There is a paucity of published data on the pattern of pulmonary tuberculosis among migrant workers entering Middle Eastern countries particularly Kuwait. The objectives of this study were to use routine health surveillance data i) to estimate the prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis among migrant workers at entry in Kuwait and ii) to determine the occurrence of any time trends

Saeed Akhtar; Hameed GHH Mohammad

2008-01-01

167

Silymarin protects liver against toxic effects of anti-tuberculosis drugs in experimental animals  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The first line anti-tuberculosis drugs isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RIF) and pyrazinamide (PZA) continues to be the effective drugs in the treatment of tuberculosis, however, the use of these drugs is associated with toxic reactions in tissues, particularly in the liver, leading to hepatitis. Silymarin, a standard plant extract with strong antioxidant activity obtained from S. marianum, is known to

Sude Eminzade; Fikriye Uras; Fikret V Izzettin

2008-01-01

168

Mycobacterium tuberculosis activates the DNA-dependent cytosolic surveillance pathway within macrophages  

PubMed Central

Summary Cytosolic bacterial pathogens activate the cytosolic surveillance pathway (CSP) and induce innate immune responses, but how the host detects vacuolar pathogens like Mycobacterium tuberculosis is poorly understood. We show that M. tuberculosis also initiates the CSP upon macrophage infection via limited perforation of the phagosome membrane mediated by the ESX-1 secretion system. Although the bacterium remains within the phagosome, this permeabilization results in phagosomal and cytoplasmic mixing and allows extracellular mycobacterial DNA to access host cytosolic receptors, thus blurring the distinction between “vacuolar” and “cytosolic” pathogens. Activation of cytosolic receptors induces signaling through the STING/TBK1/IRF3 axis, resulting in IFN-? production. Surprisingly, IRF3?/? mice, which cannot respond to cytosolic DNA, are resistant to long-term M. tuberculosis infection, suggesting that the CSP promotes M. tuberculosis infection. Thus, cytosolic sensing of mycobacterial DNA plays a key role in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and likely contributes to the high type I IFN signature in tuberculosis. PMID:22607800

Manzanillo, Paolo S.; Shiloh, Michael U.; Portnoy, Daniel A.; Cox, Jeffery S.

2013-01-01

169

Pulmonary Disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a Horse: Zoonotic Concerns and Limitations of Antemortem Testing  

PubMed Central

A case of pulmonary tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in a horse. Clinical evaluation performed prior to euthanasia did not suggest tuberculosis, but postmortem examination provided pathological and bacteriological evidence of mycobacteriosis. In the lungs, multiple tuberculoid granulomas communicating with the bronchiolar lumen, pleural effusion, and a granulomatous lymphadenitis involving mediastinal and tracheobronchial lymph nodes were found. Serologic response to M. tuberculosis antigens was detected in the infected horse, but not in the group of 42 potentially exposed animals (18 horses, 14 alpacas, 6 donkeys, and 4 dogs) which showed no signs of disease. Diagnosis of tuberculosis in live horses remains extremely difficult. Four of 20 animal handlers at the farm were positive for tuberculous infection upon follow-up testing by interferon-gamma release assay, indicating a possibility of interspecies transmission of M. tuberculosis. PMID:22567544

Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.; Greenwald, Rena; Esfandiari, Javan; Lecu, Alexis; Waters, W. Ray; Posthaus, Horst; Bodmer, Thomas; Janssens, Jean-Paul; Aloisio, Fabio; Graubner, Claudia; Grosclaude, Eléonore; Piersigilli, Alessandra; Schiller, Irene

2012-01-01

170

Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Success through dormancy  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major health threat, killing near to 2 million individuals around this globe, annually. The sole vaccine developed almost a century ago, provides limited protection only during childhood. After decades without the introduction of new antibiotics, several candidates are currently undergoing clinical investigation. Curing TB requires prolonged combination chemotherapy with several drugs. Moreover, monitoring the success of therapy is questionable due to the lack of reliable biomarkers. To substantially improve the situation, a detailed understanding of the crosstalk between human host and the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is vital. Principally, Mtb’s enormous success is based on three capacities: First, reprogramming of macrophages after primary infection/phagocytosis in order to prevent its own destruction; second, initiating the formation of well-organized granulomas, comprising different immune cells to create a confined environment for the host–pathogen standoff; third, the capability to shut down its own central metabolism, terminate replication and thereby transit into a stage of dormancy rendering itself extremely resistant to host defense and drug treatment. Here we review the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes, draw conclusions in a working model of mycobacterial dormancy and highlight gaps in our understanding to be addressed in future research. PMID:22320122

Gengenbacher, Martin; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

2012-01-01

171

Urogenital tuberculosis: definition and classification  

PubMed Central

Objectives To improve the approach to the diagnosis and management of urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB), we need clear and unique classification. UGTB remains an important problem, especially in developing countries, but it is often an overlooked disease. As with any other infection, UGTB should be cured by antibacterial therapy, but because of late diagnosis it may often require surgery. Methods Scientific literature dedicated to this problem was critically analyzed and juxtaposed with the author’s own more than 30 years’ experience in tuberculosis urology. Results The conception, terms and definition were consolidated into one system; classification stage by stage as well as complications are presented. Classification of any disease includes dispersion on forms and stages and exact definitions for each stage. Clinical features and symptoms significantly vary between different forms and stages of UGTB. A simple diagnostic algorithm was constructed. Conclusions UGTB is multivariant disease and a standard unified approach to it is impossible. Clear definition as well as unique classification are necessary for real estimation of epidemiology and the optimization of therapy. The term ‘UGTB’ has insufficient information in order to estimate therapy, surgery and prognosis, or to evaluate the epidemiology.

2014-01-01

172

The Seasonality of Tuberculosis, Sunlight, Vitamin D, and Household Crowding  

PubMed Central

Background.?Unlike other respiratory infections, tuberculosis diagnoses increase in summer. We performed an ecological analysis of this paradoxical seasonality in a Peruvian shantytown over 4 years. Methods.?Tuberculosis symptom-onset and diagnosis dates were recorded for 852 patients. Their tuberculosis-exposed cohabitants were tested for tuberculosis infection with the tuberculin skin test (n = 1389) and QuantiFERON assay (n = 576) and vitamin D concentrations (n = 195) quantified from randomly selected cohabitants. Crowding was calculated for all tuberculosis-affected households and daily sunlight records obtained. Results.?Fifty-seven percent of vitamin D measurements revealed deficiency (<50 nmol/L). Risk of deficiency was increased 2.0-fold by female sex (P < .001) and 1.4-fold by winter (P < .05). During the weeks following peak crowding and trough sunlight, there was a midwinter peak in vitamin D deficiency (P < .02). Peak vitamin D deficiency was followed 6 weeks later by a late-winter peak in tuberculin skin test positivity and 12 weeks after that by an early-summer peak in QuantiFERON positivity (both P < .04). Twelve weeks after peak QuantiFERON positivity, there was a midsummer peak in tuberculosis symptom onset (P < .05) followed after 3 weeks by a late-summer peak in tuberculosis diagnoses (P < .001). Conclusions.?The intervals from midwinter peak crowding and trough sunlight to sequential peaks in vitamin D deficiency, tuberculosis infection, symptom onset, and diagnosis may explain the enigmatic late-summer peak in tuberculosis. PMID:24596279

Wingfield, Tom; Schumacher, Samuel G.; Sandhu, Gurjinder; Tovar, Marco A.; Zevallos, Karine; Baldwin, Matthew R.; Montoya, Rosario; Ramos, Eric S.; Jongkaewwattana, Chulanee; Lewis, James J.; Gilman, Robert H.; Friedland, Jon S.; Evans, Carlton A.

2014-01-01

173

Tuberculosis: Getting Healthy, Staying Healthy  

MedlinePLUS

Tuberculosis Getting Healthy, Staying Healthy U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Tuberculosis Getting Healthy, Staying Healthy U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH ...

174

Tuberculosis of the genitourinary system-Urinary tract tuberculosis: Renal tuberculosis-Part I  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis (TB) remains a worldwide scourge and its incidence appears to be increasing due to various factors, such as the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The insidious onset and non-specific constitutional symptoms of genitourinary tuberculosis (GUTB) often lead to delayed diagnosis and rapid progression to a non-functioning kidney. Due to hematogenous dissemination of TB, there is a potential risk of involvement of the contralateral kidney too. Imaging plays an important role in the making of a timely diagnosis and in the planning of treatment, and thus helps to avoid complications such as renal failure. Imaging of GUTB still remains a challenge, mainly on account of the dearth of literature, especially related to the use of the newer modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This two-part article is a comprehensive review of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and imaging findings in renal TB. Various imaging features of GUTB are outlined, from the pathognomonic lobar calcification on plain film, to finer early changes such as loss of calyceal sharpness and papillary necrosis on intravenous urography (IVU); to uneven caliectasis and urothelial thickening, in the absence of renal pelvic dilatation, as well as the hitherto unreported ‘lobar caseation’ on ultrasonography (USG). Well-known complications of GUTB such as sinus tracts, fistulae and amyloidosis are described, along with the relatively less well-known complications such as tuberculous interstitial nephritis (TIN), which may remain hidden because of its ‘culture negative’ nature and thus lead to renal failure. The second part of the article reviews the computed tomography (CT) and MRI features of GUTB and touches upon future imaging techniques along with imaging of TB in transplant recipients and in immunocompromised patients. PMID:23986618

Merchant, Suleman; Bharati, Alpa; Merchant, Neesha

2013-01-01

175

Direct molecular detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from clinical samples – An adjunct to cultural method of laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Background: Tuberculosis, a communicable disease with significant morbidity and mortality, is the leading cause of death in the world from bacterial infectious disease. Because of its public health importance, there is need for rapid and definitive method of detecting the causative organism. Several approaches have been attempted, but the molecular methods, especially Polymerase Chain Reaction assays are the most promising for rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from clinical samples. Aim: This study was aimed at using Polymerase Chain Reaction for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from clinical samples using universal sample processing methodology. Subjects and Methods: Two hundred clinical samples sent to Tuberculosis laboratories in Ibadan and Osogbo, Nigeria, were enrolled in this study. The samples were processed by universal sample processing methodology for PCR; smear microscopy was carried out on sputum samples by Ziehl Nelseen staining technique; and cultured on Middlebrook agar medium containing oleic acid albumin dextrose complex supplement after decontamination of samples. Results: Ninety six (48%) samples were detected positive for M. tuberculosis complex by polymerase chain reaction using the combination of boiling and vortexing and microscopy detected 72 (36%) samples positive for acid fast bacilli. Using culture method as gold standard, it was found that polymerase chain reaction assay was more sensitive (75.5%) and specific (94.8%) than microscopy (sensitivity of 48.5% and specificity of 85.7%) in detecting M. tuberculosis complex from clinical samples. There was significant difference in detecting M. tuberculosis from clinical samples when compared to microscopy (p<0.05). Conclusion: The study recommends that direct molecular detection of M. tuberculosis complex is sensitive and specific and polymerase chain reaction method should be used as an adjunct to other methods of laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis. PMID:22540099

Alli, Oyebode A. T.; Ogbolu, Olusoga D.; Alaka, Olubunmi O.

2011-01-01

176

Childhood Tuberculosis, Still with Us...  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The first section of this report on childhood tuberculosis in developed and developing countries discusses the epidemiology of tuberculosis in children. Information is presented on: (1) sources and prevalence of infection; (2) risks, frequency, and types of tuberculosis; (3) mortality rates; and (4) the relation of poverty and AIDS to…

Chaulet, Pierre; And Others

1992-01-01

177

Tuberculosis: A Problem for Lifeguards?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lifeguards run the risk of workplace infection by tuberculosis-carrying swimmers. Even if they work in ventilated, sunlit areas (which reduces risk), they can contract tuberculosis when performing respiratory resuscitation. Without appropriate precautions, lifeguards may be unnecessarily exposed. A tuberculosis infection control plan is needed in…

Skaros, Susan

1996-01-01

178

Tuberculosis among Children in Alaska.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The incidence of tuberculosis among Alaskan children under 15 was more than twice the national rate, with Alaska Native children showing a much higher incidence. Children with household exposure to adults with active tuberculosis had a high risk of infection. About 22 percent of pediatric tuberculosis cases were identified through school…

Gessner, Bradford D.

1997-01-01

179

Development of Extensively Drug-resistant Tuberculosis during Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis Treatment  

E-print Network

Development of Extensively Drug-resistant Tuberculosis during Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; 6 Tomsk Oblast Tuberculosis Services, Tomsk, Russian Federation; 7 Siberia State Medical University, Tomsk, Russian Federation; 8 Tomsk Oblast Tuberculosis Hospital, Tomsk

Cohen, Ted

180

The Human Antibody Response to the Surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Background Vaccine-induced human antibodies to surface components of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumonia are correlated with protection. Monoclonal antibodies to surface components of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also protective in animal models. We have characterized human antibodies that bind to the surface of live M. tuberculosis. Methods Plasma from humans with latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (n?=?23), active TB disease (n?=?40), and uninfected controls (n?=?9) were assayed by ELISA for reactivity to the live M. tuberculosis surface and to inactivated M. tuberculosis fractions (whole cell lysate, lipoarabinomannan, cell wall, and secreted proteins). Results When compared to uninfected controls, patients with active TB disease had higher antibody titers to the surface of live M. tuberculosis (??=?0.72 log10), whole cell lysate (??=?0.82 log10), and secreted proteins (??=?0.62 log10), though there was substantial overlap between the two groups. Individuals with active disease had higher relative IgG avidity (??=?1.4 to 2.6) to all inactivated fractions. Surprisingly, the relative IgG avidity to the live M. tuberculosis surface was lower in the active disease group than in uninfected controls (??=?–1.53, p?=?0.004). Patients with active disease had higher IgG than IgM titers for all inactivated fractions (ratios, 2.8 to 10.1), but equal IgG and IgM titers to the live M. tuberculosis surface (ratio, 1.1). Higher antibody titers to the M. tuberculosis surface were observed in active disease patients who were BCG-vaccinated (??=?0.55 log10, p?=?0.008), foreign-born (??=?0.61 log10, p?=?0.004), or HIV-seronegative (??=?0.60 log10, p?=?0.04). Higher relative IgG avidity scores to the M. tuberculosis surface were also observed in active disease patients who were BCG-vaccinated (??=?1.12, p<0.001) and foreign-born (??=?0.87, p?=?0.01). Conclusions/Significance Humans with active TB disease produce antibodies to the surface of M. tuberculosis with low avidity and with a low IgG/IgM ratio. Highly-avid IgG antibodies to the M. tuberculosis surface may be an appropriate target for future TB vaccines. PMID:24918450

Perley, Casey C.; Frahm, Marc; Click, Eva M.; Dobos, Karen M.; Ferrari, Guido; Stout, Jason E.; Frothingham, Richard

2014-01-01

181

[Urogenital tuberculosis today].  

PubMed

In order to analyze the structure of urogenital tuberculosis, retrospective analysis of medical records of 131 patients with newly diagnosed urogenital tuberculosis observed in the Novosibirsk Regional TB Dispensary from 2009 to 2011 was performed. The renal tuberculosis is main form in the structure is urotuberculosis, detected in 75% of patients, and widespread destructive forms of the disease were diagnosed in more than half of cases. Isolated nephrotuberculosis was more often diagnosed in women--56.8%. 15.9% of patients had asymptomatic nephrotuberculosis; one-third of patients complained of pain in the lumbar region and frequent painful urination (35.2 and 39.8%, respectively); symptoms of intoxication were present in 17% of patients, renal colic--in 9.1%, and gross hematuria--in 7.9% of patients. Mycobacteriuria in isolated nephrotuberculosis was detected in 31.8% of cases. Acute tuberculous orchiepididymitis developed in 35.7% of patients, hemospermia was observed in 7.1% of patients, dysuria was in 35.7% of patients. The pain in the perineum, frequent painful urination (both by 31.6%), hemospermia (26.3%) were main complaints in prostate tuberculosis. Mycobacteria was detected in 10.5% of cases. It was found that urogenital tuberculosis has no pathognomonic symptoms; the most alarming manifestations include long-term dysuria, hematuria, hemospermia. PMID:23662488

Zhukova, I I; Kul'chavenia, E V; Kholtobin, D P; Brizhatiuk, E V; Khomiakov, V T; Osadchi?, A V

2013-01-01

182

Tuberculosis in Quebec: a Review of Trends  

PubMed Central

The aim of this research was to conduct a thorough review on the literature of tuberculosis in Canada and the Province of Quebec. To achieve this aim, an exhaustive literature review of tuberculosis in the Province of Quebec was undertaken. Data was collected with the goal of creating an epidemiological and public health evidence base to forecast the spread of tuberculosis. A keyword search strategy was used to find relevant articles from the peer-reviewed literature using the electronic search engine PubMed and a search of other relevant federal and provincial government databases. Twenty-nine peer-reviewed publications and twenty government reports containing information about the incidence or prevalence of tuberculosis in the Province of Quebec were included in the analysis. An analysis of the data revealed that while tuberculosis rates have been decreasing in both Canada and Quebec with an overall incidence below 3 per 100,000 of population in 2007, among immigrants and the Inuit communities in Quebec, the incidence and prevalence of the disease still remains high and reached 18 per 100,000 and 100 per 100,000, respectively in 2007. In general, while tuberculosis does not pose a significant burden to the general population, it does continue to affect certain sub-groups disproportionately, including select immigrants and Inuit communities in Quebec. Efforts to ensure that cost-effective healthcare interventions are delivered in a timely fashion should be pursued to reduce the associated morbidity and mortality of tuberculosis in the Province of Quebec. Acknowledgments Funding for this research was provided to Medmetrics Inc., by McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Génome Québec and the Ministère de Développement Economique, Innovation et Exportation du Gouvernement du Québec. The authors also wish to thank Drs. John White and Marcel Behr, both of McGill University and Dr Suneil Malik of the Infectious Disease Program in the Office of Biotechnology, Genomics and Population Health at the Public Health Agency of Canada for comments and suggestions on earlier drafts of this manuscript. PMID:25170460

Klotz, Alexander; Harouna, Abdoulaye; Smith, Andrew F.

2012-01-01

183

4. OVERALL VIEW OF ROUNDHOUSE: REMAINING FIVESTALL SECTION IN CENTER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. OVERALL VIEW OF ROUNDHOUSE: REMAINING FIVE-STALL SECTION IN CENTER BACKGROUND, RUBBLE OF DEMOLISHED SECTION IN FOREGROUND. VIEW TO EAST. - Colorado & Southern Railway Denver Roundhouse Complex, Seventh Street, East of South Platte River, Denver, Denver County, CO

184

Drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from tuberculosis lymphadenitis patients in Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background & objectives: The emergence of drug resistance tuberculosis (TB) is a significant challenge for TB control and prevention programmes, and the major problem is multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The present study was carried out to determine the frequency of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates among newly and retreated TB lymphadenitis patients and risk factors for acquiring this infection. Methods: Two hundred twenty five M. tuberculosis isolates from TB lymphadenitis patients who were diagnosed as new and retreated tuberculosis cases between April 2012 and May 2012 were included in this study. Isolates were tested for susceptibility to isoniazed (INH), rifampicin (RMP), streptomycin (SM), ethambutol (EMB) and pyrazinamide (PZA) using the BacT/AlerT 3D system protocol. Results: Among 225 isolates, 15 (6.7%) were resistant to at least one first line anti-TB drug. Three (1.3%) were MDR-TB. Resistance to INH, RMP, SM, and EMB was found in 8 (3.6%), 4 (1.8%), 10 (4.4%), and 4 (1.8%) isolates, respectively. Of the 212 new TB lymphadenitis cases three (1.4%) were MDR-TB. A rifampicin resistant M. tuberculosis isolate was diagnosed from smear and culture negative newly treated cases. All isolates were susceptible to PZA. Matted cervical lymph nodes were the prominent sites involved. Newly treated TB lymphadenitis patients had a greater risk for presenting resistance to anti-TB drugs (P=0.046). Interpretation & conclusions: Our study showed that TB lymphadenitis patients harboured drug resistant TB and MDR-TB, although at a low rate. Resistance was not associated with age, sex, patients’ education and contact history. Further research is required to determine transmission dynamics of drug resistant strains. PMID:25222786

Biadglegne, Fantahun; Tessema, Belay; Sack, Ulrich; Rodloff, Arne C.

2014-01-01

185

Epiregulin (EREG) variation is associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Although host genetics influences susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the human genes regulating pathogenesis remain largely unknown. We used M. tuberculosis-stimulated macrophage gene expression profiling in conjunction with a case–control genetic association study to discover epiregulin (EREG), as a novel candidate tuberculosis (TB) susceptibility gene. Using a genome-wide association study dataset, we found that among the 21 genes with greater than 50-fold induction, EREG had the most polymorphisms associated with TB. We genotyped haplotype-tagging polymorphisms in discovery (N = 337 cases, N = 380 controls) and validation (N = 332 cases) datasets and an EREG polymorphism (rs7675690) was associated with susceptibility to TB (genotypic comparison; corrected P = 0.00007). rs7675690 was also associated more strongly with infections caused by the Beijing lineage of M. tuberculosis when compared with non-Beijing strains (controls vs Beijing, OR 7.81, P = 8.7 × 10?5; non-Beijing, OR 3.13, P = 0.074). Furthermore, EREG expression was induced in monocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with M. tuberculosis as well as TLR4 and TLR2/1/6 ligands. In murine macrophages, EREG expression induced by M. tuberculosis was MYD88- and TLR2-dependent. Together, these data provide the first evidence for an important role for EREG as a susceptibility gene for human TB. PMID:22170233

Thuong, NTT; Hawn, TR; Chau, TTH; Bang, ND; Yen, NTB; Thwaites, GE; Teo, YY; Seielstad, M; Hibberd, M; Lan, NTN; Caws, M; Farrar, JJ; Dunstan, SJ

2013-01-01

186

The global emergency of tuberculosis: what is the cause?  

PubMed

The treatment of tuberculosis is cheap and highly effective, yet worldwide the disease remains a serious cause of illness and death; so serious as to have been declared a 'global emergency' in 1993. It is principally a disease of poverty, with 95% of cases and 98% of deaths occurring in developing countries. The incidence of tuberculosis is increasing worldwide, partly due to poverty and inequity and partly to the HIV/AIDS pandemic, which greatly increases the risk of infection proceeding to overt disease. Around 30% of AIDS-related deaths are due to tuberculosis. The emergence of multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) is an increasing threat to tuberculosis control. Although treatable with alternative drugs, the cost is enormous and, accordingly, not undertaken in many poor nations. While the overall global incidence of MDRTB is low, it occurs in certain 'hotspots' including Russian prisons. Due to adverse socio-economic factors, London has not escaped the general rise in incidence and, without the introduction of active control strategies, there could be a serious epidemic as occurred in New York City ten years ago which required an enormous financial outlay for its control. In view of the global emergency of tuberculosis, the WHO 'Stop TB' campaign has called for the universal adoption of its directly observed therapy, short course (DOTS) strategy. Also, though the Massive Effort Against Diseases of Poverty, several international agencies are urging the establishment of effective control programmes worldwide. London should take the lead and set an example. PMID:12134771

Grange, J M; Zumla, A

2002-06-01

187

Tuberculosis diagnosis: primary health care or emergency medical services?  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To assess primary health care and emergency medical services performance for tuberculosis diagnosis. METHODS Cross-sectional study were conducted with 90 health professionals from primary health care and 68 from emergency medical services, in Ribeirao Preto, SP, Southeastern Brazil, in 2009. A structured questionnaire based on an instrument of tuberculosis care assessment was used. The association between health service and the variables of structure and process for tuberculosis diagnosis was assessed by Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test (both with 5% of statistical significance) and multiple correspondence analysis. RESULTS Primary health care was associated with the adequate provision of inputs and human resources, as well as with the sputum test request. Emergencial medical services were associated with the availability of X-ray equipment, work overload, human resources turnover, insufficient availability of health professionals, unavailability of sputum collection pots and do not request sputum test. In both services, tuberculosis diagnosis remained as a physician's responsibility. CONCLUSIONS Emergencial medical services presented weaknesses in its structure to identify tuberculosis suspects. Gaps on the process were identified in both primary health care and emergencial medical services. This situation highlights the need for qualification of health services that are the main gateway to health system to meet sector reforms that prioritize the timely diagnosis of tuberculosis and its control. PMID:24626553

Andrade, Rubia Laine de Paula; Scatolin, Beatriz Estuque; Wysocki, Anneliese Domingues; Beraldo, Aline Ale; Monroe, Aline Aparecida; Scatena, Lúcia Marina; Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena

2013-01-01

188

American Experience: We Shall Remain  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Whether watching their TV shows on television or on the computer, PBS always provides a worthy presentation. With an extensive collection of PBS programs available online, the number of topics they cover be fully appreciated. The American Experience series titled "We Shall Remain" consists of five episodes "spanning three hundred years [that] tell the story of pivotal moments in U.S. history from the Native American perspective." The "Reel Native" and "Beyond Broadcast" tabs offer Native Americans telling their experiences and also provide activities for teachers. In addition to viewing the full episodes online, visitors to the website can go "Behind the Scenes" by clicking that tab, and can see such features as the "cast and crew", "featured videos", and "photo gallery". Furthermore, the "Get Involved" part of "Behind the Scenes" informs visitors of "native organizations and tribes, libraries, historical societies, museums, schools and other groups to plan and sponsor activities that promote understanding of local Native history and contemporary life." This area also provides an interactive map that allows a visitor to plot "shoot locations", "tribal colleges", "coalitions", and "native radio stations", by clicking on each corresponding tab.

189

Spectrum of urogenital tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB) plays an important role because its complications may be fatal, it significantly reduces quality of life, and it is often associated with AIDS. Diagnosis of UGTB is often delayed. We analyzed 131 case histories of UGTB patients from the years 2009-2011. Gender, age, and the clinical form and main features of the disease were taken into account. The most common form was kidney tuberculosis (74.8%). Isolated kidney tuberculosis (KTB) more often occurs in women: 56.8%. Patients of middle and old age more often showed the stage of cavernous KTB; younger patients had smaller forms. Among all cases, an asymptomatic course was seen in 12.2% and, among cases of KTB, in 15.9%. Every third patient complained of flank pain and dysuria (35.2% and 39.8%, respectively); 17% presented with toxicity symptoms, 9.1% with renal colic, and 7.9% with gross hematuria. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in urine was found in 31.8% of cases in all levels of isolated KTB. UGTB has no specific symptom; even sterile pyuria occurs only in 25%. The acute onset of tuberculous orchiepididymitis was seen in 35.7% of patients, hemospermia in 7.1%, and dysuria in 35.7%. The most common complaints for prostate tuberculosis were perineal pain (31.6%), dysuria (also 31.6%), and hemospermia (26.3%). MTB in prostate secretion/ejaculate was revealed in 10.5% of this group. All urogenital tract infections should be suspected as UGTB in patients who are living in a region with a high incidence rate, who have had contact with tuberculosis infection, and who have a recurrence of the disease that is resistant to standard therapy. PMID:23526041

Kulchavenya, Ekaterina; Zhukova, Irina; Kholtobin, Denis

2013-10-01

190

Various hysterosalpingography findings of female genital tuberculosis: A case series  

PubMed Central

Background: Genital tuberculosis is a chorionic disease and mostly occurs by haematogenous spread from extra genital source like lungs, peritoneum, lymph nodes and bones. Transmission through a sexual intercourse is also possible. Since the majority of patients are in reproductive ages, involvement of fallopian tubes and endometrium cause infertility in patients. Cases: Reviewing 4 cases of female genital tuberculosis, which referred to an infertility treatment center with various symptoms, we encountered various appearances on hysterosalpingography (HSG). Conclusion: The genitourinary tract is the most common site of extra pulmonary TB. The primary focus of genital tuberculosis is fallopian tubes, which are almost always affected bilaterally but not symmetrically. Because of common involvement of fallopian tubes and endometrial cavity, disease causes infertility. Diagnosis is not easy because genital tuberculosis has a wide range of clinical and radiological manifestations with slow growing symptoms. Detailed hysterosalpingography finding may be helpful in better diagnosis of the disease. This case series aims to depict the various hystrosalpingographic appearances and pathology produced by tuberculosis and related literatures are reviewed in order to establish a better diagnostic evaluation of genital tuberculosis. PMID:24639787

Afzali, Nargess; Ahmadi, Firoozeh; Akhbari, Farnaz

2013-01-01

191

Induced sputum and bronchoscopy in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Background: Previous studies suggest that bronchoscopy and a single induced sputum sample are equally effective for diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods: In a prospective study of subjects with possibly active pulmonary tuberculosis, the diagnostic yield of three induced sputum tests was compared with that of bronchoscopy. Subjects either produced no sputum or (acid fast) smear negative sputum. Bronchoscopy was only performed if at least two induced sputum samples were smear negative. Results: Of 129 subjects who completed all tests, 27 (21%) had smear negative and culture positive specimens, 14 (52%) on bronchoscopy and 26 (96%) on induced sputum (p<0.005). One patient was culture positive on bronchoscopy alone compared with 13 on induced sputum alone; 13 were culture positive on both tests. Induced sputum positivity was strikingly more prevalent when chest radiographic appearances showed any features of active tuberculosis (20/63, 32%) than when appearances suggested inactivity (1/44, 2%; p<0.005). Induced sputum costs were about one third those of bronchoscopy, and the ratio of costs of the two tests per case of tuberculosis diagnosed could be as much as 1:6. Conclusions: In subjects investigated for possibly active or inactive tuberculosis who produce no sputum or have smear negative sputum, the most cost effective strategy is to perform three induced sputum tests without bronchoscopy. Induced sputum testing carries a high risk of nosocomial tuberculosis unless performed in respiratory isolation conditions. The cost benefits shown could be lost if risk management measures are not observed. PMID:12454293

McWilliams, T; Wells, A; Harrison, A; Lindstrom, S; Cameron, R; Foskin, E

2002-01-01

192

A genome wide association study of pulmonary tuberculosis susceptibility in Indonesians  

E-print Network

Abstract Background There is reason to expect strong genetic influences on the risk of developing active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) among latently infected individuals. Many of the genome wide linkage and association studies (GWAS) to date have...

Png, Eileen; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Sahiratmadja, Edhyana; Marzuki, Sangkot; Nelwan, Ron; Balabanova, Yanina; Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Drobniewski, Francis; Nejentsev, Sergey; Adnan, Iskandar; van de Vosse, Esther; Hibberd, Martin L; van Crevel, Reinout; Ottenhoff, Tom HM; Seielstad, Mark

2012-01-13

193

An integrated machine learning approach for predicting DosR-regulated genes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

E-print Network

Abstract Background DosR is an important regulator of the response to stress such as limited oxygen availability in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Time course gene expression data enable us to dissect this response on the gene regulatory level. The m...

Zhang, Yi; Hatch, Kim A; Bacon, Joanna; Wernisch, Lorenz

2010-03-31

194

A Novel Murine Cytomegalovirus Vaccine Vector Protects against Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis remains a global health problem so that a more effective vaccine than bacillus Calmette–Guérin is urgently needed. Cytomegaloviruses persist lifelong in vivo and induce powerful immune and increasing (“inflationary”) responses, making them attractive vaccine vectors. We have used an m1–m16-deleted recombinant murine CMV (MCMV) expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ag 85A to show that infection of mice with this recombinant significantly reduces the mycobacterial load after challenge with M. tuberculosis, whereas control empty virus has a lesser effect. Both viruses induce immune responses to H-2d–restricted epitopes of MCMV pp89 and M18 Ags characteristic of infection with other MCMVs. A low frequency of 85A-specific memory cells could be revealed by in vivo or in vitro boosting or after challenge with M. tuberculosis. Kinetic analysis of M. tuberculosis growth in the lungs of CMV-infected mice shows early inhibition of M. tuberculosis growth abolished by treatment with NK-depleting anti–asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide Ab. Microarray analysis of the lungs of naive and CMV-infected mice shows increased IL-21 mRNA in infected mice, whereas in vitro NK assays indicate increased levels of NK activity. These data indicate that activation of NK cells by MCMV provides early nonspecific protection against M. tuberculosis, potentiated by a weak 85A-specific T cell response, and they reinforce the view that the innate immune system plays an important role in both natural and vaccine-induced protection against M. tuberculosis. PMID:25070842

Beverley, Peter C. L.; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Hey, Ariann; Hutchings, Claire; Boos, Simone; Bolinger, Beatrice; Marchi, Emanuele; O'Hara, Geraldine; Klenerman, Paul; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.

2014-01-01

195

High prevalence of childhood multi-drug resistant tuberculosis in Johannesburg, South Africa: a cross sectional study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: There are limited data on the prevalence of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), estimated at 0.6-6.7%, in African children with tuberculosis. We undertook a retrospective analysis of the prevalence of MDR-TB in children with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) at two hospitals in Johannesburg, South Africa. METHODS: Culture-confirmed cases of MTB in children under 14 years, attending two academic hospitals in Johannesburg,

Lee Fairlie; Natalie C Beylis; Gary Reubenson; David P Moore; Shabir A Madhi

2011-01-01

196

Measuring health-related quality of life in tuberculosis: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Introduction Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem worldwide. In recent years, increasing efforts have been dedicated to assessing the health-related quality of life experienced by people infected with tuberculosis. The objectives of this study were to better understand the impact of tuberculosis and its treatment on people's quality of life, and to review quality of life instruments used in current tuberculosis research. Methods A systematic literature search from 1981 to 2008 was performed through a number of electronic databases as well as a manual search. Eligible studies assessed multi-dimensional quality of life in people with tuberculosis disease or infection using standardized instruments. Results of the included studies were summarized qualitatively. Results Twelve original studies met our criteria for inclusion. A wide range of quality of life instruments were involved, and the Short-Form 36 was most commonly used. A validated tuberculosis-specific quality of life instrument was not located. The findings showed that tuberculosis had a substantial and encompassing impact on patients' quality of life. Overall, the anti-tuberculosis treatment had a positive effect of improving patients' quality of life; their physical health tended to recover more quickly than the mental well-being. However, after the patients successfully completed treatment and were microbiologically 'cured', their quality of life remained significantly worse than the general population. Conclusion Tuberculosis has substantially adverse impacts on patients' quality of life, which persist after microbiological 'cure'. A variety of instruments were used to assess quality of life in tuberculosis and there has been no well-established tuberculosis-specific instrument, making it difficult to fully understand the impact of the illness. PMID:19224645

Guo, Na; Marra, Fawziah; Marra, Carlo A

2009-01-01

197

Human phagosome processing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens is modulated by interferon-? and interleukin-10  

PubMed Central

Intracellular pathogens, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, reside in the phagosomes of macrophages where antigenic processing is initiated. Mycobacterial antigen–MHC class II complexes are formed within the phagosome and are then trafficked to the cell surface. Interferon-? (IFN-?) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) influence the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection; however, the role of these cytokines with regard to the formation of M. tuberculosis peptide–MHC-II complexes remains unknown. We analysed the kinetics and subcellular localization of M. tuberculosis peptide–MHC-II complexes in M. tuberculosis-infected human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) using autologous M. tuberculosis-specific CD4+ T cells. The MDMs were pre-treated with either IFN-? or IL-10 and infected with M. tuberculosis. Cells were mechanically homogenized, separated on Percoll density gradients and manually fractionated. The fractions were incubated with autologous M. tuberculosis -specific CD4+ T cells. Our results demonstrated that in MDMs pre-treated with IFN-?, M. tuberculosis peptide–MHC-II complexes were detected early mainly in the phagosomal fractions, whereas in the absence of IFN-?, the complexes were detected in the endosomal fractions. In MDMs pre-treated with IL-10, the M. tuberculosis peptide–MHC-II complexes were retained in the endosomal fractions, and these complexes were not detected in the plasma membrane fractions. The results of immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated the presence of Ag85B associated with HLA-DR at the cell surface only in the IFN-?-treated MDMs, suggesting that IFN-? may accelerate M. tuberculosis antigen processing and presentation at the cell membrane, whereas IL-10 favours the trafficking of Ag85B to vesicles that do not contain LAMP-1. Therefore, IFN-? and IL-10 play a role in the formation and trafficking of M. tuberculosis peptide–MHC-II complexes. PMID:22924705

Bobadilla, Karen; Sada, Eduardo; Jaime, Maria E; González, Yolanda; Ramachandra, Lakshmi; Rojas, Roxana E; Pedraza-Sánchez, Sigifredo; Michalak, Colette; González-Noriega, Alfonso; Torres, Martha

2013-01-01

198

The Effect of HIV-Related Immunosuppression on the Risk of Tuberculosis Transmission to Household Contacts  

PubMed Central

Background.?Coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may modify the risk of transmitting tuberculosis. Some previous investigations suggest that patients coinfected with HIV and tuberculosis are less likely to transmit infection, whereas others do not support this conclusion. Here, we estimated the relative risk of tuberculosis transmission from coinfected patients compared to HIV-negative patients with tuberculosis. Methods.?Between September 2009 and August 2012, we identified and enrolled 4841 household contacts of 1608 patients with drug-sensitive tuberculosis in Lima, Peru. We assessed the HIV status and CD4 counts of index patients, as well as other risk factors for infection specific to the index patient, the household, and the exposed individuals. Contacts underwent tuberculin skin testing to determine tuberculosis infection status. Results.?After adjusting for covariates, we found that household contacts of HIV-infected tuberculosis patients with a CD4 count ?250 cells/µL were less likely to be infected with tuberculosis (risk ratio = 0.49 [95% confidence interval, .24–.96]) than the contacts of HIV-negative tuberculosis patients. No children younger than 15 years who were exposed to HIV-positive patients with a CD4 count ?250 cells/µL were infected with tuberculosis, compared to 22% of those exposed to non-HIV-infected patients. There was no significant difference in the risk of infection between contacts of HIV-infected index patients with CD4 counts >250 cells/µL and contacts of index patients who were not HIV-infected. Conclusions.?We found a reduced risk of tuberculosis infection among the household contacts of patients with active tuberculosis who had advanced HIV-related immunosuppression, suggesting reduced transmission from these index patients. PMID:24368620

Huang, Chuan-Chin; Tchetgen, Eric Tchetgen; Becerra, Mercedes C.; Cohen, Ted; Hughes, Katherine C.; Zhang, Zibiao; Calderon, Roger; Yataco, Rosa; Contreras, Carmen; Galea, Jerome; Lecca, Leonid; Murray, Megan

2014-01-01

199

Pyrosequencing for rapid detection of Tuberculosis resistance in clinical isolates and Sputum samples from re-treatment Pulmonary Tuberculosis patients  

PubMed Central

Background Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a major public health problem. Early diagnosis of MDR-TB patients is essential for minimizing the risk of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) transmission. The conventional drug susceptibility testing (DST) methods for detection of drug-resistant M.tuberculosis are laborious and cannot provide the rapid detection for clinical practice. Methods The aim of this study was to develop a pyrosequencing approach for the simultaneous detection of resistance to rifampin (RIF), isoniazid (INH), ethambutol (EMB), streptomycin (SM), ofloxacin (OFL) and amikacin (AMK) in M. tuberculosis clinical isolates and sputum samples from re-treatment pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients. We identified the optimum conditions for detection mutation of rpoB, katG, rpsl, embB, gyrA and rrs gene by pyrosequencing. Then this approach was applied to detect 205 clinical isolates and 24 sputum samples of M. tuberculosis from re-treatment PTB patients. Results The mutations of rpoB and gyrA gene were detected by pyrosequencig with the SQA mode, and the mutations of katG, rpsl, embB, gyrA and rrs gene were detected by pyrosequencing with SNP mode. Compared with the Bactec MGIT 960 mycobacterial detection system, the accuracy of pyrosequencing for the detection of RIF, INH, EMB, SM, AMK and OFL resistance in clinical isolates was 95.0%, 79.2%, 70.3%, 84.5%, 96.5% and 91.1%, respectively. In sputum samples the accuracy was 83.3%, 83.3%, 60.9%, 83.3%, 87.5% and 91.7%, respectively. Conclusions The newly established pyrosequencing assay is a rapid and high-throughput method for the detection of resistance to RIF, INH, SM, EMB, OFL and AMK in M.tuberculosis. Pyrosequencing can be used as a practical molecular diagnostic tool for screening and predicting the resistance of re-treatment pulmonary tuberculosis patients. PMID:24725975

2014-01-01

200

Proteomic analysis of purified protein derivative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Background Purified protein derivative (PPD) has been used for more than half a century as an antigen for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection based on delayed type hypersensitivity. Although designated as “purified,” in reality, the composition of PPD is highly complex and remains ill-defined. In this report, high resolution mass spectrometry was applied to understand the complexity of its constituent components. A comparative proteomic analysis of various PPD preparations and their functional characterization is likely to help in short-listing the relevant antigens required to prepare a less complex and more potent reagent for diagnostic purposes. Results Proteomic analysis of Connaught Tuberculin 68 (PPD-CT68), a tuberculin preparation generated from M. tuberculosis, was carried out in this study. PPD-CT68 is the protein component of a commercially available tuberculin preparation, Tubersol, which is used for tuberculin skin testing. Using a high resolution LTQ-Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer, we identified 265 different proteins. The identified proteins were compared with those identified from PPD M. bovis, PPD M. avium and PPD-S2 from previous mass spectrometry-based studies. In all, 142 proteins were found to be shared between PPD-CT68 and PPD-S2 preparations. Out of the 354 proteins from M. tuberculosis–derived PPDs (i.e. proteins in either PPD-CT68 or PPD-S2), 37 proteins were found to be shared with M. avium PPD and 80 were shared with M. bovis PPD. Alignment of PPD-CT68 proteins with proteins encoded by 24 lung infecting bacteria revealed a number of similar proteins (206 bacterial proteins shared epitopes with 47 PPD-CT68 proteins), which could potentially be involved in causing cross-reactivity. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000377. Conclusions Proteomic and bioinformatics analysis of different PPD preparations revealed commonly and differentially represented proteins. This information could help in delineating the relevant antigens represented in various PPDs, which could further lead to development of a lesser complex and better defined skin test antigen with a higher specificity and sensitivity. PMID:23870090

2013-01-01

201

Tuberculosis Facts - You Can Prevent TB  

MedlinePLUS

... STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination Tuberculosis (TB) Facts You Can Prevent TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ...

202

Tuberculosis Facts - TB and HIV/AIDS  

MedlinePLUS

... STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB and HIV/AIDS What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ...

203

Tuberculosis Facts - TB Can Be Treated  

MedlinePLUS

... STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB Can Be Treated What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ...

204

[Tuberculosis in the elderly].  

PubMed

For people born in France, age is a major risk factor for developing tuberculosis.This curable pathology still has a high mortality rate which increases with age. Diagnosis difficulties, tolerance and compliance with treatment are issues specific to old age. An active policy of prevention, monitoring and training should enable the incidence of this pathology to continue to fall. PMID:22852503

Vétillard, Anne-Laure; Cudennec, Tristan; Teillet, Laurent

2012-01-01

205

High Incidence of Pulmonary Tuberculosis a Decade after Immigration, Netherlands  

PubMed Central

Incidence rates of pulmonary tuberculosis among immigrants from high incidence countries remain high for at least a decade after immigration into the Netherlands. Possible explanations are reactivation of old infections and infection transmitted after immigration. Control policies should be determined on the basis of the as-yet unknown main causes of the persistent high incidence. PMID:15200873

Meima, Abraham; Verver, Suzanne; Looman, Caspar W.N.; Bos, Vivian; Borgdorff, Martien W.; Habbema, J. Dik F.

2004-01-01

206

Combining COLD-PCR and high-resolution melt analysis for rapid detection of low-level, rifampin-resistant mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) remains a serious threat to public health. Mutational analysis of the gene encoding the beta subunit of RNA polymerase (rpoB) is an established and widely used surrogate marker for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The rpoB-based drug-resistant assay requires relatively less time to detect drug resistance in M. tuberculosis, yet it fails to detect low-level mutations in wild-type DNA. Here, we describe a low-level mutation detection method that combines co-amplification at lower denaturation temperature polymerase chain reaction (COLD-PCR) with high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis, aimed at detecting low-level, rifampin-resistant mutations in M. tuberculosis. Compared to conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), dilution experiments demonstrated a four- to eightfold improvement in selectivity using COLD-PCR/HRM to detect low-level, rifampin-resistant mutations. The mutation detection limit of conventional PCR/HRM was approximately 20%, whereas COLD-PCR/HRM had a mutation detection limit of 2.5%. Using traditional PCR/HRM and DNA sequencing, we found rpoB mutation in 110 rifampin-resistant isolates. The use of COLD-PCR/HRM allowed us to detect 10 low-level, rifampin-resistant mutations in 16 additional drug-resistant isolates. The sensitivity of COLD-PCR/HRM (95.2%) is significantly higher than that of PCR/HRM (87.3%). Our findings demonstrate that combined use of COLD-PCR with HRM can provide a sensitivity of at least 5% in detecting rpoB-mutated populations in a wild-type background, decreasing the delay in drug-resistant TB diagnosis and leading to faster, cheaper, more efficient, and more personalized antibiotic treatment, especially for low-level drug resistance mutations among the excess wild-type DNA. PMID:23396215

Pang, Yu; Liu, Guan; Wang, Yufeng; Zheng, Suhua; Zhao, Yan-Lin

2013-04-01

207

New diagnostics for tuberculosis: fulfilling patient needs first  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: An effective tuberculosis (TB) control programme requires early diagnosis and immediate initiation of treatment. Any delays in diagnosing TB not only impair a patient's prognosis, but also increase the risks of transmitting the disease within the community. Unfortunately, the most recent TB diagnostic tools still depend on high-infrastructure laboratories, making them poorly adapted for use in resource-limited settings.

Jean-François Lemaire; Martina Casenghi

2010-01-01

208

T-SPOT.TB responses during treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens could serve as surrogate markers of treatment response. METHODS: Using the T-SPOT.TB assay and frozen peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we enumerated ESAT-6- and CFP-10-specific IFN-?-producing T cells over time in pulmonary TB patients receiving directly observed treatment. T cell responses (measured as \\

Samantha Ribeiro; Kelly Dooley; Judith Hackman; Carla Loredo; Anne Efron; Richard E Chaisson; Marcus B Conde; Neio Boechat; Susan E Dorman

2009-01-01

209

The reduction of tuberculosis risks by smoking cessation  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Smoking is known to aggravate tuberculosis (TB), but such information has been ignored in clinical practice, as it was not thought to be relevant. The aim of this study is to assess the benefits of smoking cessation on TB mortality reduction. METHODS: The study attempts to quantify smokers' risks on subsequent TB mortality and the change in such risks

Chi-Pang Wen; Ta-Chien Chan; Hui-Ting Chan; Min-Kuang Tsai; Ting-Yuang Cheng; Shan-Pou Tsai

2010-01-01

210

Automatic identification of mycobacterium tuberculosis with conventional light microscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents an automatic identification method of mycobacterium tuberculosis with conventional microscopy images based on Red and Green color channels using global adaptive threshold segmentation. Differing from fluorescence microscopy, in the conventional microscopy the bacilli are not easily distinguished from the background. The key to the bacilli segmentation method employed in this work is the use of Red minus

Marly G. F. Costa; Cicero F. F. Costa Filho; Juliana F. Sena; Julia Salem; Mari O. de Lima

2008-01-01

211

Molecular epidemiology and transmission dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Northwest Ethiopia: new phylogenetic lineages found in Northwest Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background Although Ethiopia ranks seventh among the world’s 22 high-burden tuberculosis (TB) countries, little is known about strain diversity and transmission. In this study, we present the first in-depth analysis of the population structure and transmission dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from Northwest Ethiopia. Methods In the present study, 244 M. tuberculosis isolates where analysed by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit - variable number tandem repeat 24-loci typing and spoligotyping methods to determine phylogenetic lineages and perform cluster analysis. Clusters of strains with identical genotyping patterns were considered as an indicator for the recent transmission. Results Of 244 isolates, 59.0% were classified into nine previously described lineages: Dehli/CAS (38.9%), Haarlem (8.6%), Ural (3.3%), LAM (3.3%), TUR (2.0%), X-type (1.2%), S-type (0.8%), Beijing (0.4%) and Uganda II (0.4%). Interestingly, 31.6% of the strains were grouped into four new lineages and were named as Ethiopia_3 (13.1%), Ethiopia_1 (7.8%), Ethiopia_H37Rv like (7.0%) and Ethiopia_2 (3.7%) lineages. The remaining 9.4% of the isolates could not be assigned to the known or new lineages. Overall, 45.1% of the isolates were grouped in clusters, indicating a high rate of recent transmission. Conclusions This study confirms a highly diverse M. tuberculosis population structure, the presence of new phylogenetic lineages and a predominance of the Dehli/CAS lineage in Northwest Ethiopia. The high rate of recent transmission indicates defects of the TB control program in Northwest Ethiopia. This emphasizes the importance of strengthening laboratory diagnosis of TB, intensified case finding and treatment of TB patients to interrupt the chain of transmission. PMID:23496968

2013-01-01

212

APPLICATION OF MAPIA (MULTIPLE ANTIGEN PRINT IMMUNOASSAY) AND RAPID LATERAL FLOW TECHNOLOGY FOR TUBERCULOSIS TESTING OF ELEPHANTS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious re-emerging disease in wildlife and zoo animals. Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been isolated from 30 captive Asian elephant (Elephas maximus within 14 herds in the U.S. (1994-2004) and Mycobacterium bovis has been isolated from one African elephant (Loxodonta afr...

213

The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex transcriptome of attenuation.  

PubMed

Although the deletion of RD1 is likely correlated to attenuation from virulence for members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) complex, the reasons for this phenotype remain to be fully explained. As genomic variation is responsible for at least a component of variability in gene expression, we looked to the in vitro global expression profile of the RD1 artificial knockout from M. tuberculosis H37Rv (H37Rv:deltaRD1) for clues to elucidate its phenotypic shift towards attenuation. By comparing the transcriptome of H37Rv:deltaRD1 to that of virulent H37Rv, 15 regulated genes located in nine different regions outside of RD1 have been identified, capturing an effect of RD1's deletion on the rest of the genome. To assess whether these regulations are characteristic of attenuated MTB in general, expression profiles of natural RD1 mutants (BCG Russia, BCG Pasteur, and M. microti) as well as the 'avirulent' M. tuberculosis H37Ra, whose RD1 region is genomically intact, were obtained. Results indicate that attenuated strains lack the expression of RD1 genes including cfp10 and esat6, whether through deletion or reduced expression. Furthermore, comparative transcriptomics reveals the concurrent down-regulation of several gene neighborhoods beyond RD1. The potential relevance of these other expression changes towards MTB virulence is discussed. PMID:15207489

Mostowy, Serge; Cleto, Cynthia; Sherman, David R; Behr, Marcel A

2004-01-01

214

Killer Cell Lectin-Like Receptor G1 Deficiency Significantly Enhances Survival after Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection  

PubMed Central

The expression of T cell differentiation markers is known to increase during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, and yet the biological role of such markers remains unclear. We examined the requirement of the T cell differentiation marker killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1) during M. tuberculosis infection using mice deficient in KLRG1. KLRG1?/? mice had a significant survival extension after M. tuberculosis infection compared to wild-type controls, and maintained a significantly lower level of pulmonary M. tuberculosis throughout chronic infection. Improved control of M. tuberculosis infection was associated with an increased number of activated pulmonary CD4+ T cells capable of secreting gamma interferon (IFN-?). Our report is the first to show an in vivo impact of KLRG1 on disease control. PMID:23340310

Cyktor, Joshua C.; Carruthers, Bridget; Stromberg, Paul; Flaño, Emilio; Pircher, Hanspeter

2013-01-01

215

resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis poses a significant threat to the treatment of tuberculosis (TB). The current susceptibility testing for the first-line TB drug pyrazinamide (PZA) is not only time-consuming but also difficult, due to the requirement for acid pH for drug activity. Predominantly, resistance to PZA in M. tuberculosis is caused by mutations in the pncA gene, and the detection of

Ying Zhang; Steven Denkin; Dmitriy Volokhov; Vladimir Chizhikov

216

Does Non-Central Nervous System Tuberculosis Increase the Risk of Ischemic Stroke? A Population-Based Propensity Score-Matched Follow-Up Study  

PubMed Central

Background Previous studies on the association between tuberculosis and the risk of developing ischemic stroke have generated inconsistent results. We therefore performed a population-based, propensity score-matched longitudinal follow-up study to investigate whether contracting non-central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis leads to an increased risk of ischemic stroke. Methods We used a logistic regression model that includes age, sex, pre-existing comorbidities and socioeconomic status as covariates to compute the propensity score. A total of 5804 persons with at least three ambulatory visits in 2001 with the principal diagnosis of non-CNS tuberculosis were enrolled in the tuberculosis group. The non-tuberculosis group consisted of 5804, propensity score-matched subjects without tuberculosis. The three-year ischemic stroke-free survival rates for these 2 groups were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The stratified Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate the effect of tuberculosis on the occurrence of ischemic stroke. Results During three-year follow-up, 176 subjects in the tuberculosis group (3.0%) and 207 in the non-tuberculosis group (3.6%) had ischemic stroke. The hazard ratio for developing ischemic stroke in the tuberculosis group was 0.92 compared to the non-tuberculosis group (95% confidence interval: 0.73–1.14, P?=?0.4299). Conclusions Non-CNS tuberculosis does not increase the risk of subsequent ischemic stroke. PMID:25048551

Wu, Chueh-Hung; Chen, Li-Sheng; Yen, Ming-Fang; Chiu, Yueh-Hsia; Fann, Ching-Yuan; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi; Pan, Shin-Liang

2014-01-01

217

Prospects for a novel vaccine against tuberculosis.  

PubMed

The development of a new and improved vaccine against tuberculosis has in the last 10 years been accelerated tremendously from the completed Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome and the progress in molecular biology. This has resulted in the identification of a large number of antigens with potential in tuberculosis vaccines. The next phase of this work has now started--putting the most relevant molecules back together as fusion molecules and cocktails. This requires carefully monitoring of aspects as immunodominance, recognition in different populations as well as the influence of different adjuvants and delivery systems. The most advanced of these vaccines such as the fusion between ESAT6 and Ag85B have been evaluated in a range of animal models including non-human primates and are now entering into clinical trials. For these vaccines to be successfully implemented in future vaccination programmes it is necessary to understand the immunological background for the failure of BCG and optimize the vaccines for their ability to boost the immuno-response primed by BCG. PMID:16325357

Dietrich, Jes; Weldingh, Karin; Andersen, Peter

2006-02-25

218

Male genital tuberculosis in Siberians.  

PubMed

To study the epidemiology and the clinical picture of male genital tuberculosis in Siberia, Russia. Five hundred and fourteen patients with genitourinary tuberculosis were enrolled in the study: 414 had kidney tuberculosis only, 100 had genital involvement. The clinical picture and structure of genital tuberculosis were investigated: 42 had tuberculosis of scrotal organs and 58 had tuberculosis of the prostate. Urinary cultures, urinalysis, three-glass test, and investigation of the prostate secretion, Mycobacteria culture, and susceptibility testing were performed in all 514 patients. 33.6% of all patients earlier suffered from pulmonary or extrapulmonary tuberculosis and were successfully cured. In 61.9% nephrotuberculosis was diagnosed alongside with an orchiepididymitis. In 30.9% of patients bilateral epididymorchitis was diagnosed. Mycobacteriuria was present in 38.1%. Scrotal fistula was found in 11.9%. In 66.7% the symptoms appeared acutely. Half of the patients with prostate tuberculosis complained of dysuria, 23 (39.6%) had perineal pain, 34 (58.6%) had flank pain. Leucocytes in urine were present in 49 (84.5%) patients, and in prostatic secretion in 45 (77.6%) patients. Erythrocytes in urine were present in 31 (53.4%) patients, and in prostatic secretions in 17 (29.3%) patients. Male genital tuberculosis has no specific pathognomonic signs. Using a special algorithm for the management of patients with prostatitis or epididymitis is recommended. PMID:16429302

Kulchavenya, Ekaterina; Khomyakov, Victor

2006-02-01

219

Response to M. tuberculosis selected RD1 peptides in Ugandan HIV-infected patients with smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis: a pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB) is the most frequent co-infection in HIV-infected individuals still presenting diagnostic difficulties particularly in developing countries. Recently an assay based on IFN-gamma response to M. tuberculosis RD1 peptides selected by computational analysis was developed whose presence is detected during active TB disease. Objective of this study was to investigate the response to selected RD1 peptides in HIV-1-infected

Delia Goletti; Stefania Carrara; Harriet Mayanja-Kizza; Joy Baseke; Michael Angel Mugerwa; Enrico Girardi; Zahra Toossi

2008-01-01

220

An Unconventional Hexacoordinated Flavohemoglobin from Mycobacterium tuberculosis*  

PubMed Central

Being an obligate aerobe, Mycobacterium tuberculosis faces a number of energetic challenges when it encounters hypoxia and environmental stress during intracellular infection. Consequently, it has evolved innovative strategies to cope with these unfavorable conditions. Here, we report a novel flavohemoglobin (MtbFHb) from M. tuberculosis that exhibits unique features within its heme and reductase domains distinct from conventional FHbs, including the absence of the characteristic hydrogen bonding interactions within the proximal heme pocket and mutations in the FAD and NADH binding regions of the reductase domain. In contrast to conventional FHbs, it has a hexacoordinate low-spin heme with a proximal histidine ligand lacking imidazolate character and a distal heme pocket with a relatively low electrostatic potential. Additionally, MtbFHb carries a new FAD binding site in its reductase domain similar to that of d-lactate dehydrogenase (d-LDH). When overexpressed in Escherichia coli or Mycobacterium smegmatis, MtbFHb remained associated with the cell membrane and exhibited d-lactate:phenazine methosulfate reductase activity and oxidized d-lactate into pyruvate by converting the heme iron from Fe3+ to Fe2+ in a FAD-dependent manner, indicating electron transfer from d-lactate to the heme via FAD cofactor. Under oxidative stress, MtbFHb-expressing cells exhibited growth advantage with reduced levels of lipid peroxidation. Given the fact that d-lactate is a byproduct of lipid peroxidation and that M. tuberculosis lacks the gene encoding d-LDH, we propose that the novel d-lactate metabolizing activity of MtbFHb uniquely equips M. tuberculosis to balance the stress level by protecting the cell membrane from oxidative damage via cycling between the Fe3+/Fe2+ redox states. PMID:22437825

Gupta, Sanjay; Pawaria, Sudesh; Lu, Changyuan; Hade, Mangesh Dattu; Singh, Chaahat; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Dikshit, Kanak L.

2012-01-01

221

Long distance travelling and financial burdens discourage tuberculosis DOTs treatment initiation and compliance in Ethiopia: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Timely tuberculosis treatment initiation and compliance are the two key factors for a successful tuberculosis control program. However, studies to understand patents’ perspective on tuberculosis treatment initiation and compliance have been limited in Ethiopia. The aim of this study is to attempt to do that in rural Ethiopia. Methods This qualitative, phenomenological study conducted 26 in-depth interviews with tuberculosis patients. A thematic content analysis of the interviews was performed using the Open Code software version 3.1. Results We found that lack of geographic access to health facilities, financial burdens, use of traditional healing systems and delay in diagnosis by health care providers were the main reasons for not initiating tuberculosis treatment timely. Lack of geographic access to health facilities, financial burdens, quality of health services provided and social support were also identified as the main reasons for failing to fully comply with tuberculosis treatments. Conclusions This study highlighted complexities surrounding tuberculosis control efforts in Dabat District. Challenges of geographic access to health care facilities and financial burdens were factors that most influenced timely tuberculosis treatment initiation and compliance. Decentralization of tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment services to peripheral health facilities, including health posts is of vital importance to make progress toward achieving tuberculosis control targets in Ethiopia. PMID:23634650

2013-01-01

222

Molecular diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients with tuberculosis in Honduras  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis persists as a public health problem in Honduras. A better knowledge of the molecular characteristics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains will contribute to understand the transmission dynamics of the disease within the country. The aim of this study was to provide an insight of the genetic biodiversity of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates collected in Honduras between 1994 and 2002. Genotyping was performed using spoligotyping and RFLP. The spoligotypes obtained were compared with the SITVIT2 proprietary database of the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. Results Spoligotyping grouped 84% of the isolates into 27 clusters (2 to 43 strains per cluster). Of the 44 shared international types (SITs) identified among the Honduran stains, 8 SITs were newly identified either within the present study or after match with an orphan type previously identified in the SITVIT2 database. In addition, 16 patterns corresponded to orphan, previously unreported isolates. The Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) lineage was the most common in this study; 55% of the strains belonged to this family. Other genotypes found were Haarlem (16%), T (16%), X-clade (6%), Unknown signature (5%) and S (1%). Only one Beijing strain was identified (0.5%). We observed a high degree of diversity after characterizing the 43 isolates belonging to the main spoligotyping cluster (SIT 33, LAM3) with IS6110-RFLP. A total of 35 different RFLP-fingerprints were detected, of which 6 patterns corresponded to the same number of clusters comprising 14 strains. Conclusions The findings obtained in this study show that tuberculosis transmission in Honduras is due to modern M. tuberculosis lineages with high level of biodiversity. PMID:20678242

2010-01-01

223

Control and prevention of tuberculosis in the United Kingdom: Code of Practice 1994. Joint Tuberculosis Committee of the British Thoracic Society.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND--The guidelines on control and prevention of tuberculosis in the United Kingdom have been reviewed and updated. METHODS--A subcommittee was appointed by the Joint Tuberculosis Committee (JTC). Each member of this group drafted one or more sections of the guidelines, and drafts were made available to all members of the group. In the course of several meetings drafts were altered and incorporated into a final text. The guidelines were approved by the full JTC and by the Standards of Care Committee of the British Thoracic Society. In revising the guidelines the authors took account of new published evidence and recent concerns about drug resistance and possible effects of HIV on tuberculosis. CONCLUSIONS--(1) All cases of tuberculosis must be notified. (2) A few patients need hospital admission. (3) Patients with positive sputum smears and sensitive organisms should be considered infectious until they have received two weeks' chemotherapy. (4) Treatment of all tuberculosis patients should be supervised by a respiratory physician employing standard medication guidelines and monitoring compliance at least monthly. (5) Health care workers at risk should be protected by BCG vaccination and appropriate infection control measures, and evidence of infectious tuberculosis should be sought among prospective NHS staff, school teachers, and others. (6) Prison staff should be protected. (7) Tuberculosis should be considered in the elderly in long stay care with persistent chest symptoms. (8) Contact tracing should be vigorously pursued with chemoprophylaxis, BCG vaccination, or follow up where applicable. (9) Entrants to the UK from high risk countries (tuberculosis incidence more than 40/100,000 population per year) should be screened. (10) BCG vaccination should be offered where appropriate but not in subjects with known or suspected HIV infection. (11) The local organisation of tuberculosis services should be strengthened and should include adequate nursing and support staff. (12) Contracts between purchasers and providers should specify management of tuberculosis in line with this and other JTC guidelines. PMID:7878551

1994-01-01

224

Pyrazinamide-monoresistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the United States.  

PubMed

Mycobacterium bovis is naturally resistant to the antituberculosis drug pyrazinamide (PZA). To determine whether all Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates demonstrating PZA monoresistance were truly M. bovis, we examined the phenotype and genotype of isolates reported as PZA monoresistant in five counties in California from January 1996 through June 1999. Isolates reported by local laboratories to be PZA monoresistant were sent to the state reference laboratory for repeat susceptibility testing using the BACTEC radiometric method and to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for pncA sequencing and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the oxyR gene. Of 1,916 isolates, 14 were reported as PZA monoresistant and 11 were available for retesting. On repeat testing, 6 of the 11 isolates were identified as PZA-susceptible M. tuberculosis, 1 was identified as PZA-monoresistant M. bovis, and 1 was identified as M. bovis BCG. The three remaining isolates were identified as PZA-monoresistant M. tuberculosis. Sequencing of the pncA and oxyR genes genotypically confirmed the two M. bovis and the six susceptible M. tuberculosis species. Each of the three PZA-monoresistant M. tuberculosis isolates had different, previously unreported, pncA gene mutations: a 24-bp deletion in frame after codon 88, a base substitution at codon 104 (Ser104Cys), and a base substitution at codon 90 (Ile90Ser). This study demonstrates that PZA monoresistance is not an absolute marker of M. bovis species but may also occur in M. tuberculosis, associated with a number of different mutational events in the pncA gene. It is the first report of PZA-monoresistant M. tuberculosis in the United States. PMID:11158123

Hannan, M M; Desmond, E P; Morlock, G P; Mazurek, G H; Crawford, J T

2001-02-01

225

Treatment Outcome Among the Retreatment Tuberculosis (TB) Patients under RNTCP in Chandigarh, India  

PubMed Central

Background: ‘RETREATMENT’ for Tuberculosis (TB) has long been a neglected area in global TB control. While other components of the Stop TB Strategy have garnered appropriate focus and, increasingly, sufficient resources, issues related to the TB of patients previously treated for tuberculosis remain under examined and under-resourced. Methods: A longitudinal study was designed and the patients registered under Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) category II from June 2010 to December 2011.Out of total 607 patients registered during this period under category II of RNTCP in Chandigarh (India), 545 consented to participate in the study. These were followed up to September 2012 till the completion of treatment. Statistical Analysis: The analysis was done by using SPPS-18 statistical software package. Chi- square test was used for testing association of different characteristics. Results: Four Hundred Thirty (78.9%) of the patients had pulmonary TB and 115(21.1%) of the patients had extra pulmonary TB. In the study cohort of category II patients 264(48.4%) were relapse patients,167(30.6%) belonged to others category, 75(13.8%) were on treatment after default, 39(7.2%) were failure cases. The mean age of patients was 35.92 ± 15.42 (p = 0.928). Maximum patients belonged to age group of 25-34 years (25.3%). Seventy Three (13.4%) were Illiterate. In treatment after default group only 65.3% patients were cured. Maximum deaths 8% were seen in treatment after default group of patients. The overall default in the study was 5.9%. Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that it is essential to monitor re-treatment patients with same vigour to reduce default and improve their treatment outcome. PMID:24701481

Sarpal, Sandeep Singh; Goel, Naveen Krishan; Kumar, Dinesh; Janmeja, A.K.

2014-01-01

226

Prevalence of self-reported tuberculosis, knowledge about tuberculosis transmission and its determinants among adults in India: results from a nation-wide cross-sectional household survey  

PubMed Central

Background Knowledge about symptoms and transmission of tuberculosis determines health seeking behavior and helps in prevention of tuberculosis transmission in the community. Such data is useful for policy makers to formulate information, education and communication strategies for tuberculosis control. Methods A secondary data analysis of India demographic and health survey, 2005/6 was carried out. Questions about self-reported tuberculosis, transmission and curability of tuberculosis were analysed. Correct knowledge (without misconceptions) about tuberculosis transmission was used as a dependant variable and the explanatory variables tested were: demographic data, education, wealth quintiles, frequency of exposure to media and the curability of tuberculosis. Determinants of correct knowledge without misconceptions were tested by univariate and multivariate analyses using national weighting factor to adjust for complex sampling design. Results A total of 109,070 households (response rate of 93.5%) and 198,718 participants (response rate of 91.6%) completed the survey. The samples of men and women interviewed were 74,360 and 124,358 respectively. Prevalence rate of self-reported tuberculosis was 445 per 100,000 usual household residents and 4.60 per 1,000 participants. The number of respondents who had “heard of an illness called tuberculosis” was 177,423 (89.3%). Of these 47,487 (26.8%) participants did not know and 55.5% knew about the correct mode of tuberculosis transmission i.e. “Through the air when coughing or sneezing”. The common misconceptions about transmission were “Through food” (32.4%), “Sharing utensils” (18.2%), and “Touching a person with tuberculosis” (12.3%). Only 52,617 (29.7%) participants had correct knowledge without misconceptions. Being male (aOR 1.17, 95% CIs 1.14, 1.21), being a Hindu (aOR 1.20, 95% CIs 1.14, 1.26) or Muslim (aOR 1.26, 95% CIs 1.18, 1.34), listening to radio (aOR 1.08, 95% CIs 1.04, 1.13) and “Tuberculosis can be cured” (aOR 1.47, 95% CIs 1.41, 1.53) were associated with correct knowledge without misconceptions. Conclusions Knowledge about tuberculosis transmission is very poor and misconceptions still exist. Among the traditional mass media, the frequency of listening to radio was associated with correct knowledge about tuberculosis transmission. Strategies to deliver information, education and communication campaigns could be improved. PMID:23324535

2013-01-01

227

Household contact investigation for tuberculosis in Vietnam: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that continues to cause considerable morbidity and mortality globally. Only 65% of patients worldwide are currently diagnosed. Contact investigation is a strategy that aims to increase case detection and reduce transmission of tuberculosis, yet there is little evidence to show its effectiveness. Methods/Design We will conduct a cluster randomized controlled trial of contact investigation within the national tuberculosis control program of Vietnam. Household contacts of patients with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis will be invited to attend district tuberculosis units for symptom screening, examination, and chest radiography on four occasions over a two-year period. The primary endpoint is clinically confirmed tuberculosis among contacts during the 24 months of follow-up, ascertained using capture-recapture analysis. Microbiologically proven tuberculosis and treatment completion rates among contacts diagnosed with tuberculosis will be secondary endpoints. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio will be estimated. The study will have 80% power to detect a 50% increase in the primary endpoint in the active intervention arm compared with the control arm. The study will include 8,829 contacts in each of the active screening and control groups, within 70 districts in 8 provinces in Vietnam, in both rural and urban settings. Discussion The effectiveness of contact investigation as a tool for improved tuberculosis case finding has not been established. This cluster randomized trial will provide valuable operational information for national tuberculosis programs in high-prevalence countries, in order to select the most cost-effective strategies to improve tuberculosis case detection. Trial registration The ACT2 study has been registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12610000600044). PMID:24138766

2013-01-01

228

Comparative Clinical Study of Different Multiplex Real Time PCR Strategies for the Simultaneous Differential Diagnosis between Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis and Focal Complications of Brucellosis  

PubMed Central

Background Both brucellosis and tuberculosis are chronic-debilitating systemic granulomatous diseases with a high incidence in many countries in Africa, Central and South America, the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent. Certain focal complications of brucellosis and extrapulmonary tuberculosis are very difficult to differentiate clinically, biologically and radiologically. As the conventional microbiological methods for the diagnosis of the two diseases have many limitations, as well as being time-consuming, multiplex real time PCR (M RT-PCR) could be a promising and practical approach to hasten the differential diagnosis and improve prognosis. Methodology/Principal Findings We designed a SYBR Green single-tube multiplex real-time PCR protocol targeting bcsp31 and the IS711 sequence detecting all pathogenic species and biovars of Brucella genus, the IS6110 sequence detecting Mycobacterium genus, and the intergenic region senX3-regX3 specifically detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. The diagnostic yield of the M RT-PCR with the three pairs of resultant amplicons was then analyzed in 91 clinical samples corresponding to 30 patients with focal complications of brucellosis, 24 patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and 36 patients (Control Group) with different infectious, autoimmune or neoplastic diseases. Thirty-five patients had vertebral osteomyelitis, 21 subacute or chronic meningitis or meningoencephalitis, 13 liver or splenic abscess, eight orchiepididymitis, seven subacute or chronic arthritis, and the remaining seven samples were from different locations. Of the three pairs of amplicons (senX3-regX3+ bcsp3, senX3-regX3+ IS711 and IS6110+ IS711) only senX3-regX3+ IS711 was 100% specific for both the Brucella genus and M. tuberculosis complex. For all the clinical samples studied, the overall sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the M RT-PCR assay were 89.1%, 100%, 85.7% and 100%, respectively, with an accuracy of 93.4%, (95% CI, 88.3—96.5%). Conclusions/Significance In this study, a M RT-PCR strategy with species-specific primers based on senX3-regX3+IS711 sequences proved to be a sensitive and specific test, useful for the highly efficient detection of M. tuberculosis and Brucella spp in very different clinical samples. It thus represents an advance in the differential diagnosis between some forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and focal complications of brucellosis. PMID:24349599

Sanjuan-Jimenez, Rocio; Morata, Pilar; Bermúdez, Pilar; Bravo, M. José; Colmenero, Juan D.

2013-01-01

229

SMS reminders to improve the tuberculosis cure rate in developing countries (TB-SMS Cameroon): a protocol of a randomised control study  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis is a public health problem in Cameroon, just like in many other countries in the world. The National Tuberculosis Control Programme (PNLT) put in place by the state, aims to fight tuberculosis through the implementation of international directives (Directly Observed Treatment Short, DOTS). Despite the deployment of this strategy across the world, its implementation is difficult in the context of low-resource countries. Some expected results are not achieved. In Cameroon, the cure rate for patients with sputum positive pulmonary tuberculosis (TPM+) after 6 months is only about 65%, 20% below the target. This is mainly due to poor patient adherence to treatment. By relying on the potential of mobile Health, the objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of SMS reminders on the cure rate of TPM?+?patients, measured using 6-month bacilloscopy. Methods/design This is a blinded, randomised controlled multicentre study carried out in Cameroon. The research hypothesis is that sending daily SMS messages to remind patients to take their prescribed tuberculosis medication, together with the standard DOTS strategy, will increase the cure rate from 65% (control group: DOTS, no SMS intervention) to 85% (intervention group: DOTS, with SMS intervention) in a group of new TPM?+?patients. In accordance with each treatment centre, the participants will be randomly allocated into the two groups using a computer program: the intervention group and the control group. A member of the research team will send daily SMS messages. Study data will be collected by health professionals involved in the care of patients. Data analysis will be done by the intention-to-treat method. Discussion The achieving of expected outcomes by the PNLT through implementation of DOTS requires several challenges. Although it has been demonstrated that the DOTS strategy is effective in the fight against tuberculosis, its application remains difficult in developing countries. This study explores the potential of mHealth to support DOTS strategy. It will gather new evidence on the effectiveness of mHealth-based interventions and SMS reminders in the improvement of treatment adherence and the cure rate of tuberculosis patients, especially in a low-resource country such as Cameroon. Trial registration The trial is registered on the Pan-African Clinical Trials Registry (http://www.pactr.org) under unique identification number: PACTR201307000583416. PMID:24460827

2014-01-01

230

Economic challenges associated with tuberculosis diagnostic development.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis remains a global health crisis in part due to underdiagnosis. Technological innovations are needed to improve diagnostic test accuracy and reduce the reliance on expensive laboratory infrastructure. However, there are significant economic challenges impeding the development and implementation of new diagnostics. The aim of this piece is to examine the current state of TB diagnostics, outline the unmet needs for new tests, and detail the economic challenges associated with development of new tests from the perspective of developers, policy makers and implementers. PMID:24766367

Hanrahan, Colleen F; Shah, Maunank

2014-08-01

231

Bioaerosol Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Detection of Individual Airborne Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra Particles  

PubMed Central

Single-particle laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, in the form of bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS), was evaluated as a rapid detector for individual airborne, micron-sized, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra particles, comprised of a single cell or a small number of clumped cells. The BAMS mass spectral signatures for aerosolized M. tuberculosis H37Ra particles were found to be distinct from M. smegmatis, Bacillus atrophaeus, and B. cereus particles, using a distinct biomarker. This is the first time a potentially unique biomarker was measured in M. tuberculosis H37Ra on a single-cell level. In addition, M. tuberculosis H37Ra and M. smegmatis were aerosolized into a bioaerosol chamber and were sampled and analyzed using BAMS, an aerodynamic particle sizer, a viable Anderson six-stage sampler, and filter cassette samplers that permitted direct counts of cells. In a background-free environment, BAMS was able to sample and detect M. tuberculosis H37Ra at airborne concentrations of >1 M. tuberculosis H37Ra-containing particles/liter of air in 20 min as determined by direct counts of filter cassette-sampled particles, and concentrations of >40 M. tuberculosis H37Ra CFU/liter of air in 1 min as determined by using viable Andersen six-stage samplers. This is a first step toward the development of a rapid, stand-alone airborne M. tuberculosis particle detector for the direct detection of M. tuberculosis bioaerosols generated by an infectious patient. Additional instrumental development is currently under way to make BAMS useful in realistic environmental and respiratory particle backgrounds expected in tuberculosis diagnostic scenarios. PMID:16204525

Tobias, Herbert J.; Schafer, Millie P.; Pitesky, Maurice; Fergenson, David P.; Horn, Joanne; Frank, Matthias; Gard, Eric E.

2005-01-01

232

Epidemiological basis of tuberculosis eradication in an advanced country  

PubMed Central

The first section of the report provides a background for the long-range epidemiological studies being conducted by the Danish Tuberculosis Index. An outline is given of the main indices of tuberculosis and the changing tuberculosis situation in Denmark during the past several decades with respect to prevalence of infection, morbidity and mortality. Difficulties encountered in international comparisons are briefly discussed. The prevalence of tuberculous infection in children and the prevalence of bacillary cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in adults are suggested as the most valuable indices of eradication. The second section describes the nation-wide mass campaign of 1950-52, which was planned and conducted as a combined service and research programme under the direction of the Danish Tuberculosis Index. With a view to the follow-up studies, details are given of the results of tuberculin tests of the unvaccinated, the documented vaccinated and mixed groups in the population examined. A survey is made of the results of X-ray examination and of the relation between vaccination status, tuberculin reaction and X-ray findings. The results of the first follow-up period are analysed in the final section of the report in terms of new cases of pulmonary tuberculosis appearing in the adult population. Seventy-five per cent of the new cases appeared among the unvaccinated tuberculin-positive population, and among this population groups of persons with widely different risks of developing tuberculosis could be identified on the basis of X-ray findings and reactions to the intradermal 10 TU tuberculin test. A proposal is made to reduce the number of routine repetitive examinations for adults and to concentrate efforts on preventive measures for the high-risk groups. PMID:13829735

Groth-Petersen, E.; Knudsen, Jørgen; Wilbek, Erik

1959-01-01

233

Advances in Mycobacterium tuberculosis therapeutics discovery utlizing structural biology  

PubMed Central

In 2012, tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health threat and is exacerbated both by the emergence of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and its synergy with HIV infection. The waning effectiveness of current treatment regimens necessitates the development of new or repurposed anti-TB therapeutics for improved combination therapies against the disease. Exploiting atomic resolution structural information of proteins in complex with their substrates and/or inhibitors can facilitate structure-based rational drug design. Since our last review in 2009, there has been a wealth of new M. tuberculosis protein structural information. Once again, we have compiled the most promising structures with regards to potential anti-TB drug development and present them in this updated review. PMID:23167715

Chim, Nicholas; Owens, Cedric P.; Contreras, Heidi; Goulding, Celia W.

2013-01-01

234

Pathogen-derived biomarkers for active tuberculosis diagnosis  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by members of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Despite the availability of effective treatments, TB remains a major public health concern in most low and middle-income countries, representing worldwide the second leading cause of death from an infectious disease. Inadequate case detection and failures to classify the disease status hamper proper TB control. The limitations of the conventional diagnostic methods have encouraged much research activities in this field, but there is still an urgent need for an accurate point of care test for active TB diagnosis. A rapid, precise, and inexpensive TB diagnostic test would allow an earlier implementation of an appropriate treatment and the reduction of disease transmission. Pathogen-derived molecules present in clinical specimens of affected patients are being validated for that purpose. This short review aims to summarize the available data regarding biomarkers derived from M. tuberculosis, and their current usage in active TB diagnosis. PMID:25368609

Tucci, Paula; González-Sapienza, Gualberto; Marin, Monica

2014-01-01

235

[Adrenal tuberculosis: case report].  

PubMed

Isolated adrenal tuberculosis is rare, and represents between 1-2% of the etiologies of adrenal masses called incidentalomas. A 32-year-old woman, without notable medical history, was hospitalized for pain in the left hypochondrium, lasting for two months in a context of apyrexia and weight loss amounted to 5 kg. Clinical examination was normal, but abdominopelvic CT objectified bilateral adrenal hypertrophy predominantly left with bilateral linear calcifications. The chest radiograph was normal, adrenal hormones were normal. The research of BK in sputum and urine were negative on direct examination and culture. The tuberculin was 12 mm and HIV status was negative. A left adrenal biopsy was done and histopathological study of tuberculous lesions was found confirming caseofolliculaire adrenal tuberculosis. The patient has been treated with antibacillaire with favorable evolution. In light of this observation, the authors make the point on this rare disease. PMID:22206787

Ouarssani, A; Atoini, F; Ait Lhou, F; Rguibi, M I

2012-06-01

236

Current tuberculosis screening practices.  

PubMed Central

Health department officials in all 50 states and 14 major cities responded to a survey questionnaire designed to obtain information about current tuberculosis screening practices. Persons being screened fell into the groups designated as high risk by the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). The methods used for screening were generally those advocated by ATS, CDC, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), although chest radiographs continue to be overused. Screening in about one-half of the groups is mandated by law or regulation. There appears to be some confusion about the circumstances in which "two-step" tuberculin testing should be used. Data on the productivity and costs of screening activities were very limited. We encourage those responsible for tuberculosis screening programs to evaluate them, discontinue those which are unproductive, and intensify those which are productive. PMID:6507687

Snider, D E; Anderson, H R; Bentley, S E

1984-01-01

237

Scaling up interventions to achieve global tuberculosis control: progress and new developments.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis is still one of the most important causes of death worldwide. The 2010 Lancet tuberculosis series provided a comprehensive overview of global control efforts and challenges. In this update we review recent progress. With improved control efforts, the world and most regions are on track to achieve the Millennium Development Goal of decreasing tuberculosis incidence by 2015, and the Stop TB Partnership target of halving 1990 mortality rates by 2015; the exception is Africa. Despite these advances, full scale-up of tuberculosis and HIV collaborative activities remains challenging and emerging drug-resistant tuberculosis is a major threat. Recognition of the effect that non-communicable diseases--such as smoking-related lung disease, diet-related diabetes mellitus, and alcohol and drug misuse--have on individual vulnerability, as well as the contribution of poor living conditions to community vulnerability, shows the need for multidisciplinary approaches. Several new diagnostic tests are being introduced in endemic countries and for the first time in 40 years a coordinated portfolio of promising new tuberculosis drugs exists. However, none of these advances offer easy solutions. Achievement of international tuberculosis control targets and maintenance of these gains needs optimum national health policies and services, with ongoing investment into new approaches and strategies. Despite growing funding in recent years, a serious shortfall persists. International and national financial uncertainty places gains at serious risk. Perseverance and renewed commitment are needed to achieve global control of tuberculosis, and ultimately, its elimination. PMID:22608339

Raviglione, Mario; Marais, Ben; Floyd, Katherine; Lönnroth, Knut; Getahun, Haileyesus; Migliori, Giovanni B; Harries, Anthony D; Nunn, Paul; Lienhardt, Christian; Graham, Steve; Chakaya, Jeremiah; Weyer, Karin; Cole, Stewart; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Zumla, Alimuddin

2012-05-19

238

Integrated surveillance of pulmonary tuberculosis and paragonimiasis in Zamboanga del Norte, the Philippines  

PubMed Central

Background Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and paragonimiasis remain as health problems in certain areas in the Philippines. Both share similar clinical manifestations, which include chronic productive cough, hemoptysis, dyspnea, fever, weight loss, and night sweats. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of PTB, paragonimiasis, and co-infections in Zamboanga del Norte, Philippines. Methods This study was conducted in selected villages in two municipalities in Zamboanga del Norte. Patients with chronic cough were interviewed, examined, and requested to submit two sputum samples which were processed using Ziehl–Neelsen method to detect acid-fast bacilli (AFB), and NaOH concentration technique for the detection of Paragonimus ova. Results A total of 836 patients submitted sputum samples for examination. Prevalence was 6.7% (2.5–12.7%) for paragonimiasis and 1.9% (0.9–6.3%) for PTB. Co-infection rate was 0.3%, with two identified cases. Positivity rates for males and females were 9.6 and 5.8% for paragonimiasis and 3.4 and 1.2% for PTB. Conclusion Pulmonary tuberculosis and paragonimiasis are co-endemic in Zamboanga del Norte, suggesting the need to integrate surveillance and control efforts. Strengthening local health systems through collaboration between different sectors is recommended for effective disease control. Development of more sensitive diagnostic tests is important for more accurate disease surveillance. PMID:24601907

Belizario, Vicente; Totanes, Francis Isidore; Asuncion, Camille Ann; Leon, Winifreda De; Jorge, Manuel; Ang, Concepcion; Naig, June Rose

2014-01-01

239

Differences Between Pediatric Extra-Pulmonary and Pulmonary Tuberculosis: a Warning Sign for the Future  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global health problem. The childhood tuberculosis has some unique features different which makes the diagnosis more complicated. Here we described the epidemiologic, clinical and microbiologic features of children with extra pulmonary and pulmonary TB. Methods The data of the patients <14 years with active TB were collected and compared in pulmonary (PTB) and extrapulmonary TB (EXPTB) patients. Results A total of 128 cases was included. Forty-two cases occurred in children were < 5 years of age; 41 cases between 6–10 years and 45 cases > 10 years. PTB was present in 75,0% of the cases, and EXPTB was present in 25% of cases. There was no significant difference between the EXPTB and PTB by means of distribution of age groups (p=0,201). The rate of patients free of constitutional symptoms were significantly higher in EXPTB compared to PTB(p=0,000). There was no significant difference between EXPTB and PTB by means of sources detection(p=0,069). Conclusion TB is still a major public health problem. EXPTB has an insidious and silent onset without any constitutional symptoms, and both microbiological confirmation and the source by an adult are not frequently found. Moreover, detection of the adult source is mandatory for controlling the TB disease in children PMID:25237471

Devrim, ?lker; Aktürk, Hüseyin; Bayram, Nuri; Apa, Hur?it; Tulumo?lu, ?ener; Devrim, Fatma; Erdem, Tülin; Gulfidan, Gamze; Ayhan, Yüce; Tamsel, ?pek; Can, Demet; Alper, Hüdaver

2014-01-01

240

Tuberculosis and BCG  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Tuberculosis occurred in humans probably as early as 8,000 bc in its sporadic form. Indeed, it is mentioned in India’s Vedas, the most sacred texts of Hinduism, and later by Hippocrates,\\u000a Celse D’Aretée de Cappadoce (170 bc), and Avicene (Calmette 1923; Calmette et al. 1928). Recently, genetic studies of the tubercle bacillus have found its progenitor\\u000a to come into existence

Marina Gheorghiu; Micheline Lagranderie; Anne-Marie Balazuc

241

Sensing the Killer - Tuberculosis  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Thirty-fourth monthly installment of our "What A Year!" website project, introducing life science breakthroughs to middle and high school students and their teachers. About 2 billion people are walking around infected by tuberculosis. But they don't it, because they don't have any symptoms of this terrible disease. The trick with TB is to catch it early and prevent ever-widening circles of infection.

2010-01-04

242

Female genital tract tuberculosis presenting as ovarian cancer  

PubMed Central

Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major worldwide concern. There is no pathognomonic clinical feature or imaging findings for definite diagnosis of extra pulmonary TB. Therefore, TB involvement of Gastrointestinal or Genitourinary tract can be easily confused with peritoneal carcinomatosis and advanced ovarian carcinoma. Our aim is to emphasize the importance of considering the disease based upon the epidemiologic clues of the patients, while interpreting the positive results for a suspicious ovarian malignancy. Cases: This paper illustrates 8 cases of ovarian or peritoneal tuberculosis, whose initial diagnoses were malignant processes of the GU tract. Conclusion: Tuberculosis (TB) should be always being considered in the differential diagnosis of advanced ovarian cancer, especially in the regions that are endemic for the disease. PMID:24778675

Hasanzadeh, Malihe; Naderi, Hamid Reza; Hoshyar, Azamossadat Hoseine; Shabane, Shima; Shahidsales, Soodabeh

2014-01-01

243

Spoligotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates using hydrogel oligonucleotide microarrays.  

PubMed

Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. This circumstance underscores the relevance of population studies of tuberculosis for transmission dynamics control. In this study, we describe a conversion of the spoligotyping of M.tuberculosis complex isolates on a platform of custom designed hydrogel microarrays (biochips). An algorithm of automated data processing and interpretation of hybridization results using online database was proposed. In total, the 445 samples were tested. Initially, 97 samples representing multiple species of M.tuberculosis complex and nontuberculous mycobacteria were used for protocol optimization and cut-off settings. The developed assay was further evaluated on the out-group of the 348 mycobacterial samples. Results showed high concordance with the conventional membrane-based spoligotyping method. Diagnostic sensitivity and diagnostic specificity of the spoligo-biochip assay were 99.1% and 100%, respectively. The analytical sensitivity was determined to be 500 genomic equivalents of mycobacterial DNA. The high sensitivity and specificity, ease of operation procedures, and the automatic processing of measured data make the developed assay a useful tool for the rapid and accurate genotyping of M. tuberculosis. PMID:24815729

Bespyatykh, Julia A; Zimenkov, Danila V; Shitikov, Egor A; Kulagina, Elena V; Lapa, Sergey A; Gryadunov, Dmitry A; Ilina, Elena N; Govorun, Vadim M

2014-08-01

244

21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents... § 866.3370 Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents...Identification. Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent...

2011-04-01

245

21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents... § 866.3370 Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents...Identification. Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent...

2013-04-01

246

21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents... § 866.3370 Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents...Identification. Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent...

2012-04-01

247

21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents... § 866.3370 Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents...Identification. Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent...

2014-04-01

248

Tuberculosis in Tanzanian wildlife.  

PubMed

Bovine tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, is a pathogen of growing concern in free-ranging wildlife in Africa, but little is known about the disease in Tanzanian wildlife. Here, we report the infection status of Mycobacterium bovis in a range of wildlife species sampled from protected areas in northern Tanzania. M. bovis was isolated from 11.1% (2/18) migratory wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) and 11.1% (1/9) topi (Damaliscus lunatus) sampled systematically in 2000 during a meat cropping program in the Serengeti ecosystem, and from one wildebeest and one lesser kudu (Tragelaphus imberbis) killed by sport hunters adjacent to Tarangire National Park. A tuberculosis antibody enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was used to screen serum samples collected from 184 Serengeti lions (Panthera leo) and 19 lions from Ngorongoro Crater sampled between 1985 and 2000. Samples from 212 ungulates collected throughout the protected area network between 1998 and 2001 also were tested by EIA. Serological assays detected antibodies to M. bovis in 4% of Serengeti lions; one positive lion was sampled in 1984. Antibodies were detected in one of 17 (6%) buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in Tarangire and one of 41 (2%) wildebeest in the Serengeti. This study confirms for the first time the presence of bovine tuberculosis in wildlife of northern Tanzania, but further investigation is required to assess the impact on wildlife populations and the role of different wildlife species in maintenance and transmission. PMID:16107683

Cleaveland, S; Mlengeya, T; Kazwala, R R; Michel, A; Kaare, M T; Jones, S L; Eblate, E; Shirima, G M; Packer, C

2005-04-01

249

An autosomal dominant major gene confers predisposition to pulmonary tuberculosis in adults  

PubMed Central

The molecular basis of genetic predisposition to pulmonary tuberculosis in adults remains largely elusive. Few candidate genes have consistently been implicated in tuberculosis susceptibility, and no conclusive linkage was found in two previous genome-wide screens. We report here a genome-wide linkage study in a total sample of 96 Moroccan multiplex families, including 227 siblings with microbiologically and radiologically proven pulmonary tuberculosis. A genome-wide scan conducted in half the sample (48 families) identified five regions providing suggestive evidence (logarithm of the odds [LOD] score >1.17; P < 0.01) for linkage. These regions were then fine-mapped in the total sample of 96 families. A single region of chromosome 8q12-q13 was significantly linked to tuberculosis (LOD score = 3.49; P = 3 × 10?5), indicating the presence of a major tuberculosis susceptibility gene. Linkage was stronger (LOD score = 3.94; P = 10?5) in the subsample of 39 families in which one parent was also affected by tuberculosis, whereas it was much lower (LOD score = 0.79) in the 57 remaining families without affected parents, supporting a dominant mode of inheritance of the major susceptibility locus. These results provide direct molecular evidence that human pulmonary tuberculosis has a strong genetic basis, and indicate that the genetic component involves at least one major locus with a dominant susceptibility allele. PMID:16801399

Baghdadi, Jamila El; Orlova, Marianna; Alter, Andrea; Ranque, Brigitte; Chentoufi, Mohamed; Lazrak, Faouzia; Archane, Moulay Idriss; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Benslimane, Abdellah; Schurr, Erwin; Abel, Laurent

2006-01-01

250

Tuberculosis endometritis presenting as a leiomyoma.  

PubMed

Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common extrapulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis. Taking into consideration that genitourinary tuberculosis may be associated with a diversity of presentations, its diagnoses may be difficult. A young woman with an initial presumptive diagnosis of a uterine leiomyoma presented with abdominal pain and a pelvic mass that after further investigations, she was diagnosed with genital tuberculosis. PMID:25780530

Shirazi, Mahboobeh; Shahbazi, Fatemeh; Pirzadeh, Leila; Mohammadi, Seyed Rahim; Ghaffari, Parisa; Eftekhar, Tahereh

2015-01-01

251

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Mycobacterium tuberculosis secretory proteins  

E-print Network

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Mycobacterium tuberculosis secretory proteins CFP-10, ESAT-6 and the CFP10:ESAT6, Dinakar M Salunke2 and Pawan Sharma1 Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) causes death of 2­3 million people; lipopolysaccharide; NF-kB; ROS Tuberculosis is a global health problem caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb

Cai, Long

252

Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Molecular Perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis seriously threaten tuberculosis (TB) control and prevention efforts. Molecular studies of the mechanism of action of antitubercular drugs have elucidated the genetic basis of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. Drug resistance in M. tuberculosis is attributed primarily to the accumulation of mutations in the drug target genes; these mutations lead either to an altered target

Ashok Rattan; Awdhesh Kalia; Nishat Ahmad

1998-01-01

253

Schiffert Health Center TUBERCULOSIS RISK ASSESSMENT FORM  

E-print Network

Schiffert Health Center TUBERCULOSIS RISK ASSESSMENT FORM Name that tuberculosis skin testing (PPD) be performed on all individuals who may be at increased risk of tuberculosis tuberculosis · Use of illegal injected drugs · At risk of being infected with HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus

Virginia Tech

254

Tuberculosis Endometritis Presenting as A Leiomyoma  

PubMed Central

Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common extrapulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis. Taking into consideration that genitourinary tuberculosis may be associated with a diversity of presentations, its diagnoses may be difficult. A young woman with an initial presumptive diagnosis of a uterine leiomyoma presented with abdominal pain and a pelvic mass that after further investigations, she was diagnosed with genital tuberculosis.

Shirazi, Mahboobeh; Shahbazi, Fatemeh; Pirzadeh, Leila; Mohammadi, Seyed Rahim; Ghaffari, Parisa; Eftekhar, Tahereh

2015-01-01

255

Noninvasive Test for Tuberculosis Detection among Primates  

PubMed Central

Traditional testing methods have limited epidemiologic studies of tuberculosis among free-living primates. PCR amplification of insertion element IS6110 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from fecal samples was evaluated as a noninvasive screening test for tuberculosis in primates. Active tuberculosis was detected among inoculated macaques and naturally exposed chimpanzees, demonstrating the utility of this test. PMID:25695329

Mugisha, Lawrence; Shoyama, Fernanda Miyagaki; O’Malley, Melanie J.; Flynn, JoAnne L.; Asiimwe, Benon; Travis, Dominic A.; Singer, Randall S.; Sreevatsan, Srinand

2015-01-01

256

Tuberculosis: a problem with persistence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of most successful pathogens of mankind, infecting one-third of the global population and claiming two million lives every year. The ability of the bacteria to persist in the form of a long-term asymptomatic infection, referred to as latent tuberculosis, is central to the biology of the disease. The persistence of bacteria in superficially normal tissue was

Graham R. Stewart; Brian D. Robertson; Douglas B. Young

2003-01-01

257

Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis directly from sputum specimens & phenotypic drug resistance pattern of M. tuberculosis isolates from suspected tuberculosis patients in Chennai  

PubMed Central

Background & objectives: mRNA is more rapidly destroyed in cells than rRNA or genomic DNA, an assay targeting bacterial mRNA would provide a better guide to mycobacterial viability than amplification tests directed at DNA or rRNA targets. This study was carried out to standardize reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) targeting 85B gene for the rapid detection of viable Mycobacterium tuberculosis from sputum specimens of suspected TB patients at Chennai, South India and to detect MDR-TB circulating in this population. Methods: Sputum samples from clinically suspected tuberculosis patients (n=301) and 78 controls were included in the study. The sputum samples were collected in sterile diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC) treated containers and transported in ice to the laboratory within 2 h to prevent degradation of RNA. RT-PCR targeting 85B gene, mycobacterial culture and phenotypic drug susceptibility testing for the first line drugs streptomycin (S), isoniazid (H), rifampicin (R), ethambutol (E) and pyrazinamide (Z) were performed by BACTEC microMGIT culture system for all the sputum specimens. Results: All the 78 controls were negative for culture and RT-PCR. Among the 301 sputum specimens from patients, 231 (76.8%) were RT-PCR positive and 70 (23.2%) were negative. There were 166 M. tuberculosis isolates, of which 11 (2.9%) were MDR-TB, 33 (8.7%) were polyresistant, 31 (8.2%) were monoresistant and 91 (30.2%) were sensitive to all five first line anti-tuberculous drugs by phenotypic drug susceptibility testing. Monoresistance was higher with Z [20 (20.8%)], followed by S [6 (3%)]. Interpretation & conclusions: RT-PCR targeting 85B gene of M. tuberculosis was a specific, rapid, reliable technique to detect the M. tuberculosis directly from sputum specimens. Our results showed that 2.9 per cent of M. tuberculosis isolates in the study population of Chennai were MDR. PMID:22771612

Therese, K. Lily; Gayathri, R.; Dhanurekha, L.; Sridhar, R.; Meenakshi, N.; Madhavan, H. N.; Manoj, S. Edwin; Vinayagam, A. Kamala

2012-01-01

258

Tuberculosis in Sudan: a study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain genotype and susceptibility to anti-tuberculosis drugs  

PubMed Central

Background Sudan is a large country with a diverse population and history of civil conflict. Poverty levels are high with a gross national income per capita of less than two thousand dollars. The country has a high burden of tuberculosis (TB) with an estimated 50,000 incident cases during 2009, when the estimated prevalence was 209 cases per 100,000 of the population. Few studies have been undertaken on TB in Sudan and the prevalence of drug resistant disease is not known. Methods In this study Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from 235 patients attending three treatment centers in Sudan were screened for susceptibility to isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and streptomycin by the proportion method on Lowenstein Jensen media. 232 isolates were also genotyped by spoligotyping. Demographic details of patients were recorded using a structured questionnaire. Statistical analyses were conducted to examine the associations between drug resistance with risk ratios computed for a set of risk factors (gender, age, case status - new or relapse, geographic origin of the patient, spoligotype, number of people per room, marital status and type of housing). Results Multi drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), being resistance to at least rifampicin and isoniazid, was found in 5% (95% CI: 2,8) of new cases and 24% (95% CI: 14,34) of previously treated patients. Drug resistance was associated with previous treatment with risk ratios of 3.51 (95% CI: 2.69-4.60; p < 0.001) for resistance to any drug and 5.23 (95% CI: 2.30-11.90; p < 0.001) for MDR-TB. Resistance was also associated with the geographic region of origin of the patient, being most frequently observed in patients from the Northern region and least in the Eastern region with risk ratios of 7.43 (95%CI:3.42,16.18; p: < 0.001) and 14.09 (95%CI:1.80,110.53; p:0.026) for resistance to any drug and MDR-TB. The major genotype observed was of the Central Asia spoligotype family (CAS1_Delhi), representing 49% of the 232 isolates examined. Conclusions We conclude that emergence of drug resistant tuberculosis has the potential to be a serious public health problem in Sudan and that strengthened tuberculosis control and improved monitoring of therapy is needed. Further surveillance is required to fully ascertain the extent of the problem. PMID:21846389

2011-01-01

259

pncA Mutations in Pyrazinamide-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in Portugal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Portugal remains the country with the highest rate of noti- fied cases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the European Union. In 2002, the Portuguese Health Authorities reported a tuberculosis (TB) incidence of 39.5 cases per 100,000 people nationwide and that 2.3% of primary TB cases involved multi- drug resistance (MDR-TB cases) (Programa Nacional de Con- trolo da Tuberculose, Ponto da situacao

Isabel Portugal; Luís Barreiro; J. Moniz-Pereira; L. Brum

2004-01-01

260

Tuberculosis notifications in Australia, 2011.  

PubMed

The National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System received 1,385 tuberculosis (TB) notifications in 2011, representing a rate of 6.2 cases per 100,000 population. While Australia has maintained a rate of 5 to 6 cases per 100,000 for TB since the mid-1980s, there has been a steady increase in incidence over the past decade. In 2011, Australia's overseas-born population continued to represent the majority of TB notifications (88%) with a notification rate of 20.2 per 100,000. The incidence of TB in the Australian-born Indigenous population has fluctuated over the last decade and showed no clear trend; however, in 2011 the notification rate was 4.9 per 100,000, which is a notable decrease from the 7.5 per 100,000 recorded in 2010. The incidence of TB in the Australian-born non-Indigenous population has continued to remain low at 0.9 per 100,000. Australia continued to record only a small number of multi-drug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) cases nationally (n=25), all of which were identified in the overseas-born population. To ensure that Australia can retain its low TB rate and work toward reducing rates further, it is essential that Australia maintains good centralised national TB reporting to monitor trends and identify at-risk populations, and continues to contribute to global TB control initiatives. PMID:25631599

Bareja, Christina; Waring, Justin; Stapledon, Richard; Toms, Cindy; Douglas, Paul

2014-12-01

261

The tuberculosis vaccine candidate Bacillus Calmette-Guérin ?ureC::hly coexpressing human interleukin-7 or -18 enhances antigen-specific T cell responses in mice.  

PubMed

Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the only approved tuberculosis vaccine, provides only limited protection. Previously, we generated a recombinant derivative (BCG ?ureC::hly), which secretes the pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O (LLO) of Listeria monocytogenes. This vaccine shows superior protection against tuberculosis in preclinical models and is safe in humans. Here we describe two new vaccine strains which express human interleukin-7 (hIL)-7 or hIL-18 in the genetic background of BCG ?ureC::hly to modulate specific T cell immunity. Both strains exhibited an uncompromised in vitro growth pattern, while inducing a proinflammatory cytokine profile in human dendritic cells (DCs). Human DCs harbouring either strain efficiently promoted secretion of IL-2 by autologous T cells in a coculture system, suggesting superior immunogenicity. BALB/c mice vaccinated with BCG ?ureC::hly, BCG ?ureC::hly_hIL7 or BCG ?ureC::hly_hIL18 developed a more robust Th1 response than after vaccination with parental BCG. Both strains provided significantly better protection than BCG in a murine Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge model but efficacy remained comparable to that afforded by BCG ?ureC::hly. We conclude that expression of hIL-7 or hIL-18 enhanced specific T cell responses but failed to improve protection over BCG ?ureC::hly in mice. PMID:24236077

Rao, Martin; Vogelzang, Alexis; Kaiser, Peggy; Schuerer, Stefanie; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Gengenbacher, Martin

2013-01-01

262

The Tuberculosis Vaccine Candidate Bacillus Calmette-Guérin ?ureC::hly Coexpressing Human Interleukin-7 or -18 Enhances Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses in Mice  

PubMed Central

Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG), the only approved tuberculosis vaccine, provides only limited protection. Previously, we generated a recombinant derivative (BCG ?ureC::hly), which secretes the pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O (LLO) of Listeria monocytogenes. This vaccine shows superior protection against tuberculosis in preclinical models and is safe in humans. Here we describe two new vaccine strains which express human interleukin-7 (hIL)-7 or hIL-18 in the genetic background of BCG ?ureC::hly to modulate specific T cell immunity. Both strains exhibited an uncompromised in vitro growth pattern, while inducing a proinflammatory cytokine profile in human dendritic cells (DCs). Human DCs harbouring either strain efficiently promoted secretion of IL-2 by autologous T cells in a coculture system, suggesting superior immunogenicity. BALB/c mice vaccinated with BCG ?ureC::hly, BCG ?ureC::hly_hIL7 or BCG ?ureC::hly_hIL18 developed a more robust Th1 response than after vaccination with parental BCG. Both strains provided significantly better protection than BCG in a murine Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge model but efficacy remained comparable to that afforded by BCG ?ureC::hly. We conclude that expression of hIL-7 or hIL-18 enhanced specific T cell responses but failed to improve protection over BCG ?ureC::hly in mice. PMID:24236077

Rao, Martin; Vogelzang, Alexis; Kaiser, Peggy; Schuerer, Stefanie; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.; Gengenbacher, Martin

2013-01-01

263

Improved efficiency in detecting cellular immunity towards M. tuberculosis in patients receiving immunosuppressive drug therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Reactivation of a latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in immunocompromised individ- uals is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The limited sensitivity of the established tuberculin skin-test in identifying latently infected patients on immunosuppressive drug therapy repre- sents a major obstacle to better tuberculosis control after transplantation. Methods. In this study, a quantitative flow-cytometric whole-blood assay and the skin-test were

Urban Sester; Heike Junker; Tobias Hodapp; Alexandra Schutz; Bernhard Thiele; Andreas Meyerhans; Hans Kohler; Martina Sester

2006-01-01

264

Characterization of ?-isopropylmalate synthases containing different copy numbers of tandem repeats in Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Alpha-isopropylmalate synthase (?-IPMS) is the key enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step in the leucine biosynthetic pathway. The gene encoding ?-IPMS in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, leuA, is polymorphic due to the insertion of 57-bp repeat units referred to as Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTR). The role of the VNTR found within the M. tuberculosis genome is unclear. To

Wandee Yindeeyoungyeon; Supaporn Likitwiwattanawong; Prasit Palittapongarnpim

2009-01-01

265

EVALUATION OF AN INTERMITTENT SIX-MONTH REGIMEN IN NEW PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Background: The treatment of tuberculosis (TB) with category I regimen of the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) for patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) needs evaluation. Objective: To assess the cure and relapse rates in 3 years, among the new smear-positive TB patients with Type-2 DM (DMTB) treated with CAT-I regimen (2E3H3R3Z3\\/4R3H3) of RNTCP. Methodology: TB suspects attending the

Rani Balasubramanian; Usha Ramanathan; K. Thyagarajan; Rajeswari Ramachandran; K. Rajaram; D Bhaskar; R. S. Hariharan; P. R. Narayanan

266

Using affinity propagation for identifying subspecies among clonal organisms: lessons from M. tuberculosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Classification and naming is a key step in the analysis, understanding and adequate management of living organisms. However,\\u000a where to set limits between groups can be puzzling especially in clonal organisms. Within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC), the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB), experts have first identified several groups according to their\\u000a pattern at repetitive sequences, especially at the CRISPR

Claudio Borile; Mathieu Labarre; Silvio Franz; Christophe Sola; Guislaine Refrégier

2011-01-01

267

A Single-Step Sequencing Method for the Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Species  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) comprises closely related species responsible for strictly human and zoonotic tuberculosis. Accurate species determination is useful for the identification of outbreaks and epidemiological links. Mycobacterium africanum and Mycobacterium canettii are typically restricted to Africa and M. bovis is a re-emerging pathogen. Identification of these species is difficult and expensive.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsThe Exact Tandem Repeat D (ETR-D;

Zoheira Djelouadji; Didier Raoult; Mamadou Daffé; Michel Drancourt

2008-01-01

268

Evaluation of Molecular Tools for Detection and Drug Susceptibility Testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Stool Specimens from Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis ?  

PubMed Central

Pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosis is difficult when patients cannot produce sputum. Most sputum is swallowed, and tuberculosis DNA can survive intestinal transit. We therefore evaluated molecular testing of stool specimens for detecting tuberculosis originating from the lungs. Paired stool and sputum samples (n = 159) were collected from 89 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Control stool samples (n = 47) were collected from patients without tuberculosis symptoms. Two techniques for DNA extraction from stool samples were compared, and the diagnostic accuracy of the PCR in stool was compared with the accuracy of sputum testing by PCR, microscopy, and culture. A heminested IS6110-PCR was used for tuberculosis detection, and IS6110-PCR-positive stool samples then underwent rifampin sensitivity testing by universal heteroduplex generator PCR (heteroduplex-PCR) assay. For newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients, stool IS6110-PCR had 86% sensitivity and 100% specificity compared with results obtained by sputum culture, and stool PCR had similar sensitivities for HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients (P = 0.3). DNA extraction with commercially available spin columns yielded greater stool PCR sensitivity than DNA extraction with the in-house Chelex technique (P = 0.007). Stool heteroduplex-PCR had 98% agreement with the sputum culture determinations of rifampin resistance and multidrug resistance. Tuberculosis detection and drug susceptibility testing by stool PCR took 1 to 2 days compared with an average of 9 weeks to obain those results by traditional culture-based testing. Stool PCR was more sensitive than sputum microscopy and remained positive for most patients for more than 1 week of treatment. In conclusion, stool PCR is a sensitive, specific, and rapid technique for the diagnosis and drug susceptibility testing of pulmonary tuberculosis and should be considered when sputum samples are unavailable. PMID:20200293

Cordova, Julianna; Shiloh, Ron; Gilman, Robert H.; Sheen, Patricia; Martin, Laura; Arenas, Fanny; Caviedes, Luz; Kawai, Vivian; Soto, Giselle; Williams, Diana L.; Zimic, Mirko; Escombe, A. Roderick; Evans, Carlton A.

2010-01-01

269

A Bayesian Change point model for differential gene expression patterns of the DosR regulon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

E-print Network

Abstract Background Low oxygen availability has been shown previously to stimulate M. tuberculosis to establish non-replicative persistence in vitro. The two component sensor/regulator dosRS is a major mediator in the transcriptional response of M...

Zhang, Yi; Hatch, Kim A; Wernisch, Lorenz; Bacon, Joanna

2008-02-22

270

Background & Publications  

E-print Network

temperatures have remained in the mid 50's to low 60's. So far this season, we have accumulated 1230GDD base 42, including those orchards that have received fungicides. We are also continuing to see a high proportion per trap. We have not caught any cherry fruit fly in the past two weeks. We biofixed (full bloom

271

Background & Publications  

E-print Network

peach tree borer and American plum borer numbers remain low, with less than 10 per trap for the third fruit fly numbers continue to be a concern. Last week, we caught 86 flies, this week the traps. Brown rot and Alternaria has been observed in tart cherries. We have been observing high levels

272

Credit PSR. View looking north northeast (12°) across surface remains ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Credit PSR. View looking north northeast (12°) across surface remains of North Base swimming pool. The southeast edge of the pool appearing in the foreground may seem to be a sidewalk to the casual observer; the wavy inside edge of this walk matches the pool side visible in historic construction photos (See HAER photo CA-170-Q-2). The telephone pole in the midground of the view is inside the pool proper. Building 4312 (Liquid Oxygen Repair Facility) appears in left background, Building 4456 (Fire House No. 4) in middle background, and Building 4444 (Communications Building) in right background - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Swimming Pool, Second Street, Boron, Kern County, CA

273

Highly structured genetic diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis population in  

E-print Network

Highly structured genetic diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis population in Djibouti S, Djibouti Ville, Djibouti Abstract Djibouti is an East African country with a high tuberculosis incidence with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) were included. Genetic characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, using

Choisy, Marc

274

78 FR 1718 - Approved Tests for Bovine Tuberculosis in Cervids  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Approved Tests for Bovine Tuberculosis in Cervids AGENCY...antibodies to bovine tuberculosis in certain species...has waived its review under Executive...tests as official tuberculosis tests for captive...tuberculosis tests for bovine...

2013-01-09

275

Well defined symptoms are of value in the diagnosis of childhood pulmonary tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Background: The diagnosis of childhood pulmonary tuberculosis presents a major challenge as symptoms traditionally associated with tuberculosis are extremely common in children from endemic areas. The natural history of tuberculosis in children shows that progressive disease is associated with symptoms which have a persistent, non-remitting character. The aims of this study were to investigate whether improved symptom definition is possible in a clinical setting, and whether use of these well defined symptoms has improved value in the diagnosis of childhood pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods: A prospective, community based study was conducted in two suburbs of Cape Town, South Africa. All children (<13 years) presenting to the local community clinic with a cough of >2 weeks duration, were referred to the investigator. Parents completed a symptom based questionnaire, whereafter reported symptoms were characterised in a standard fashion. Results: Of the 151 children enrolled, 21 (15.6%) reported symptoms with a persistent, non-remitting character. Tuberculosis was diagnosed in 16 (10.5%) children, all of whom reported these symptom characteristics. A persistent, non-remitting cough was reported in 15/16 (93.8%) children with tuberculosis and in 2/135 (1.5%) children without tuberculosis, indicating a specificity of 98.5% (135/137). Persistent fatigue of recent onset was also sensitive (13/16, 81.3%) and specific (134/135, 99.3%). Persistent fever and/or chest pain were exclusively reported in children with tuberculosis, but were present in only 4/16 (25.0%) children with tuberculosis. Conclusion: The use of well defined symptoms is feasible, even in resource limited settings, and may offer significantly improved value in the diagnosis of childhood pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:16131501

Marais, B; Gie, R; Obihara, C; Hesseling, A; Schaaf, H; Beyers, N

2005-01-01

276

Influence of HTLV-1 on the clinical, microbiologic and immunologic presentation of tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Background HTLV-1 is associated with increased susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and severity of tuberculosis. Although previous studies have shown that HTLV-1 infected individuals have a low frequency of positive tuberculin skin test (TST) and decreasing in lymphoproliferative responses compared to HTLV-1 uninfected persons, these studies were not performed in individuals with history of tuberculosis or evidence of M. tuberculosis infection. Therefore the reasons why HTLV-1 infection increases susceptibility to infection and severity of tuberculosis are not understood.The aim of this study was to evaluate how HTLV-1 may influence the clinical, bacteriologic and immunologic presentation of tuberculosis. Methods The study prospectively enrolled and followed 13 new cases of tuberculosis associated with HTLV-1 (cases) and 25 patients with tuberculosis without HTLV-1 infection (controls). Clinical findings, bacterial load in the sputum, x-rays, immunological response and death were compared in the two groups. Results There were no differences in the demographic, clinical and TST response between the two study groups. IFN-? and TNF-? production was higher in unstimulated cultures of mononuclear cells of case than in control patients (p?tuberculosis infection in HTLV-1 infected subjects may be related to impairment in TNF-? production, the severity of tuberculosis in co-infected patients may be due to the enhancement of the Th1 inflammatory response, rather than in their decreased ability to control bacterial growth. PMID:22925731

2012-01-01

277

Re-thinking global health sector efforts for HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control: promoting integration of programme activities within a strengthened health system  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The global financial crisis threatens global health, particularly exacerbating diseases of inequality, e.g. HIV\\/AIDS, and diseases of poverty, e.g. tuberculosis. The aim of this paper is to reconsider established practices and policies for HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control, aiming at delivering better results and value for money. This may be achieved by promoting greater integration of HIV and tuberculosis

Dermot Maher

2010-01-01

278

Genome-wide Mycobacterium tuberculosis variation (GMTV) database: a new tool for integrating sequence variations and epidemiology  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis (TB) poses a worldwide threat due to advancing multidrug-resistant strains and deadly co-infections with Human immunodeficiency virus. Today large amounts of Mycobacterium tuberculosis whole genome sequencing data are being assessed broadly and yet there exists no comprehensive online resource that connects M. tuberculosis genome variants with geographic origin, with drug resistance or with clinical outcome. Description Here we describe a broadly inclusive unifying Genome-wide Mycobacterium tuberculosis Variation (GMTV) database, (http://mtb.dobzhanskycenter.org) that catalogues genome variations of M. tuberculosis strains collected across Russia. GMTV contains a broad spectrum of data derived from different sources and related to M. tuberculosis molecular biology, epidemiology, TB clinical outcome, year and place of isolation, drug resistance profiles and displays the variants across the genome using a dedicated genome browser. GMTV database, which includes 1084 genomes and over 69,000 SNP or Indel variants, can be queried about M. tuberculosis genome variation and putative associations with drug resistance, geographical origin, and clinical stages and outcomes. Conclusions Implementation of GMTV tracks the pattern of changes of M. tuberculosis strains in different geographical areas, facilitates disease gene discoveries associated with drug resistance or different clinical sequelae, and automates comparative genomic analyses among M. tuberculosis strains. PMID:24767249

2014-01-01

279

Treatment Outcome of Tuberculosis Patients Registered at DOTS Centre in Ogbomoso, Southwestern Nigeria: A 4-Year Retrospective Study  

PubMed Central

Background Information. Monitoring outcome of tuberculosis treatment and understanding the specific reasons for unsuccessful treatment outcome are important in evaluating the effectiveness of tuberculosis control program. This study investigated tuberculosis treatment outcomes and predictors for unsuccessful treatment outcome in Ogbomoso town, Southwestern Nigeria. Methodology. Medical records of all tuberculosis patients registered from January 2008 to December 2011 in 5 Local Government areas, Ogbomoso, Southwestern Nigeria, were reviewed. Treatment outcome and tuberculosis type were categorized according to the national tuberculosis control guideline. Bivariate analysis was used to analyse the association between treatment outcome and potential predictor variables. Results. Out of the 965 total TB patients (579 males and 386 females) with mean age 42.4 ± 1.9 years, 866 (89.74%) were categorized as pulmonary tuberculosis and 109 (11.30%) as extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Treatment outcome among total 914 subjects was as follows: 304 (33.26%) patients got cured, 477 (52.19%) completed treatment, 87 (9.52%) died, 9 (0.98%) defaulted, and 1 (0.11%) failed treatment while 36 (3.94%) were transferred out. Higher treatment success rate was associated with those on Category 1 treatment (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The treatment success rate of tuberculosis patients was high (85.45%) compared to national target. However, certain proportion of patients died (9.52%) and defaulted (0.98%), which is a serious public health concern that needs to be addressed urgently. PMID:25328702

Sunday, Olarewaju; Oladimeji, Olanrewaju; Ebenezer, Folorunso; Akintunde, Babatunde; Abiola, Temitayo-Oboh; Saliu, Abdulsalam; Abiodun, Oluwatoyin

2014-01-01

280

Increase in the Number of Tuberculosis Cases Treated following Tuberculin Skin Testing in First-Year Schoolchildren in Madagascar  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis continues to cause unacceptably high levels of disease and death worldwide. Active preventive strategies are required to improve tuberculosis control and to increase the number of cases treated in developing countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of the tuberculin skin test (TST) in first-year schoolchildren as a means of increasing the number of tuberculosis cases detected through the screening of close contacts. Methods All members of the households of 90 schoolchildren assigned to three groups on the basis of TST category (?5 mm, [5–15)mm, ?15 mm) were screened for sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis. The percentage detection of tuberculosis in close contacts was compared between TST categories. Results We identified 433 close contacts of the 90 schoolchildren, who were then evaluated for tuberculosis. We identified 11 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis among the close contacts (7 already on treatment and 4 previously undiagnosed): 0 in TST category ?5 mm, 3 in TST category [5–15) mm and 8 in TST category ?15 mm). This approach increased the detection of tuberculosis cases by a factor of 1.6 in first-year schoolchildren of the TST ?5 mm group. Conclusion TST in first-year schoolchildren is a potentially effective method for improving the detection of tuberculosis in close contacts. PMID:24743554

Ratovoson, Rila; Raharimanga, Voamalala; Rakotosamimanana, Niaina; Ravaloson, B.; Ratsitorahina, Maherisosa; Randremanana, Rindra; Ramarokoto, Herimanana; Rajatonirina, Soatiana; Rasolofo, Voahangy; Richard, Vincent

2014-01-01

281

The prevalence of symptoms associated with pulmonary tuberculosis in randomly selected children from a high burden community  

PubMed Central

Background: Diagnosis of childhood tuberculosis is problematic and symptom based diagnostic approaches are often promoted in high burden settings. This study aimed (i) to document the prevalence of symptoms associated with tuberculosis among randomly selected children living in a high burden community, and (ii) to compare the prevalence of these symptoms in children without tuberculosis to those in children with newly diagnosed tuberculosis. Methods: A cross sectional, community based survey was performed on a 15% random sample of residential addresses. A symptom based questionnaire and tuberculin skin test (TST) were completed in all children. Chest radiographs were performed according to South African National Tuberculosis Control Program guidelines. Results: Results were available in 1415 children of whom 451 (31.9%) were TST positive. Tuberculosis was diagnosed in 18 (1.3%) children. Of the 1397 children without tuberculosis, 253 (26.4%) reported a cough during the preceding 3 months. Comparison of individual symptoms (cough, dyspnoea, chest pain, haemoptysis, anorexia, weight loss, fatigue, fever, night sweats) in children with and without tuberculosis revealed that only weight loss differed significantly (OR = 4.5, 95% CI 1.5 to 12.3), while the combination of cough and weight loss was most significant (OR = 5.4, 95% CI 1.7 to 16.9). Children with newly diagnosed tuberculosis reported no symptoms in 50% of cases. Conclusion: Children from this high burden community frequently reported symptoms associated with tuberculosis. These symptoms had limited value to differentiate children diagnosed with tuberculosis from those without tuberculosis. Improved case definitions and symptom characterisation are required when evaluating the diagnostic value of symptoms. PMID:16243872

Marais, B; Obihara, C; Gie, R; Schaaf, H; Hesseling, A; Lombard, C; Enarson, D; Bateman, E; Beyers, N

2005-01-01

282

Energy Metabolism and Drug Efflux in Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

The inherent drug susceptibility of microorganisms is determined by multiple factors, including growth state, the rate of drug diffusion into and out of the cell, and the intrinsic vulnerability of drug targets with regard to the corresponding antimicrobial agent. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), remains a significant source of global morbidity and mortality, further exacerbated by its ability to readily evolve drug resistance. It is well accepted that drug resistance in M. tuberculosis is driven by the acquisition of chromosomal mutations in genes encoding drug targets/promoter regions; however, a comprehensive description of the molecular mechanisms that fuel drug resistance in the clinical setting is currently lacking. In this context, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that active extrusion of drugs from the cell is critical for drug tolerance. M. tuberculosis encodes representatives of a diverse range of multidrug transporters, many of which are dependent on the proton motive force (PMF) or the availability of ATP. This suggests that energy metabolism and ATP production through the PMF, which is established by the electron transport chain (ETC), are critical in determining the drug susceptibility of M. tuberculosis. In this review, we detail advances in the study of the mycobacterial ETC and highlight drugs that target various components of the ETC. We provide an overview of some of the efflux pumps present in M. tuberculosis and their association, if any, with drug transport and concomitant effects on drug resistance. The implications of inhibiting drug extrusion, through the use of efflux pump inhibitors, are also discussed. PMID:24614376

Black, Philippa A.; Warren, Robin M.; Louw, Gail E.; van Helden, Paul D.; Victor, Thomas C.

2014-01-01

283

Molecular diagnostics in tuberculosis: basis and implications for therapy.  

PubMed

The processing of clinical specimens in the mycobacterial diagnostic laboratory has undergone remarkable improvements during the last decade. While microscopy and culture are still the major backbone for laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis on a worldwide basis, new methods including molecular diagnostic tests have evolved over the last two decades. The majority of molecular tests have been focused on (i) detection of nucleic acids, both DNA and RNA, that are specific to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, by amplification techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR); and (ii) detection of mutations in the genes that are associated with resistance to antituberculosis drugs by sequencing or nucleic acid hybridization. Recent developments in direct and rapid detection of mycobacteria, with emphasis on M. tuberculosis species identification by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis or oligohybridization and strain typing, as well as detection of drug susceptibility patterns, all contribute to these advances. Generally, the balance between genome instability and genome maintenance as the basis for evolutionary development, strain diversification and resistance development is important, because it cradles the resulting M. tuberculosis phenotype. At the same time, semi-automated culture systems have contributed greatly to the increased sensitivity and reduced turnaround time in the mycobacterial analysis of clinical specimens. Collectively, these advances are particularly important for establishing the diagnosis of tuberculosis in children. More basic and operational research to appraise the impact and cost effectiveness of new diagnostic technologies must, however, be carried out. Furthermore, the design and quality of clinical trials evaluating new diagnostics must be improved to allow clinical and laboratory services that would provide rapid response to test results. Thus, important work remains before the new diagnostic tools can be meaningfully integrated into national tuberculosis control programs of high-burden countries. PMID:19650669

Balasingham, Seetha V; Davidsen, Tonje; Szpinda, Irena; Frye, Stephan A; Tønjum, Tone

2009-01-01

284

Molecular diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Mozambique  

PubMed Central

Background Mozambique is one of the countries with the highest burden of tuberculosis (TB) in Sub-Saharan Africa, and information on the predominant genotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis circulating in the country are important to better understand the epidemic. This study determined the predominant strain lineages that cause TB in Mozambique. Results A total of 445 M. tuberculosis isolates from seven different provinces of Mozambique were characterized by spoligotyping and resulting profiles were compared with the international spoligotyping database SITVIT2. The four most predominant lineages observed were: the Latin-American Mediterranean (LAM, n = 165 or 37%); the East African-Indian (EAI, n = 132 or 29.7%); an evolutionary recent but yet ill-defined T clade, (n = 52 or 11.6%); and the globally-emerging Beijing clone, (n = 31 or 7%). A high spoligotype diversity was found for the EAI, LAM and T lineages. Conclusions The TB epidemic in Mozambique is caused by a wide diversity of spoligotypes with predominance of LAM, EAI, T and Beijing lineages. PMID:20663126

2010-01-01

285

Tuberculosis - Nobel Prize Educational Game  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Tuberculosis educational game and related reading, are based on the 1905 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, which was awarded for investigations and discoveries concerning the disease tuberculosis, "TB". In this game you will try to repeat Robert Koch's remarkable successes. Carry out your own experiments using Koch's methods and discover the bacteria causing tuberculosis. Rather than scoring points and doing things quickly, this game rewards figuring out what to do in the correct order to allow you to move on and reach the end!

2009-01-01

286

The Genotypic Population Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex from Moroccan Patients Reveals a Predominance of Euro-American Lineages  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major health problem in Morocco. Characterization of circulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotypic lineages, important to understand the dynamic of the disease, was hereby addressed for the first time at a national level. Methodology/Principal Findings Spoligotyping was performed on a panel of 592 M. tuberculosis complex strains covering a 2-year period (2004–2006). It identified 129 patterns: 105 (n?=?568 strains) corresponded to a SIT number in the SITVIT2 database, while 24 patterns were labeled as orphan. A total of 523 (88.3%) strains were clustered vs. 69 or 11.7% unclustered. Classification of strains within 3 large phylogenetical groups was as follows: group 1– ancestral/TbD1+/PGG1 (EAI, Bovis, Africanum), group 2– modern/TbD1?/PGG1 group (Beijing, CAS), group 3– evolutionary recent/TbD1?/PGG2/3 (Haarlem, X, S, T, LAM; alternatively designated as the Euro-American lineage). As opposed to group 3 strains (namely LAM, Haarlem, and T) that predominated (86.5% of all isolates), 6 strains belonged to group 2 (Beijing n?=?5, CAS n?=?1), and 3 strains (BOV_1 n?=?2, BOV_4-CAPRAE) belonged to ancestral group 1 (EAI and AFRI lineage strains were absent). 12-loci MIRU-VNTR typing of the Casablanca subgroup (n?=?114 strains) identified 71 patterns: 48 MITs and 23 orphan patterns; it allowed to reduce the clustering rate from 72.8% to 29.8% and the recent transmission rate from 64% to 20.2%. Conclusion The M. tuberculosis population structure in Morocco is highly homogeneous, and is characterized by the predominance of the Euro-American lineages, namely LAM, Haarlem, and T, which belong to the “evolutionary recent” TbD1?/PGG2/3 phylogenetic group. The combination of spoligotyping and MIRUs decreased the clustering rate significantly, and should now be systematically applied in larger studies. The methods used in this study appear well suited to monitor the M. tuberculosis population structure for an enhanced TB management program in Morocco. PMID:23077552

Lahlou, Ouafae; Millet, Julie; Chaoui, Imane; Sabouni, Radia; Filali-Maltouf, Abdelkarim; Akrim, Mohammed; El Mzibri, Mohammed; Rastogi, Nalin; El Aouad, Rajae

2012-01-01

287

New tools and emerging technologies for the diagnosis of tuberculosis: part I. Latent tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Nearly a third of the world's population is estimated to be infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This enormous pool of latently infected individuals poses a major hurdle for global tuberculosis (TB) control. Currently, diagnosis of latent TB infection (LTBI) relies on the tuberculin skin test (TST), a century-old test with known limitations. In this review, the first of a two-part series on new tools for TB diagnosis, recent advances in the diagnosis of LTBI are described. The biggest advance in recent years has been the development of in vitro T-cell-based interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) that use antigens more specific to M. tuberculosis than the purified protein derivative used in the TST. Available research evidence on IGRAs suggests they have higher specificity than TST, better correlation with surrogate markers of exposure to M. tuberculosis in low-incidence settings, and less cross-reactivity due to BCG vaccination than the TST. IGRAs also appear to be at least as sensitive as the purified protein derivative-based TST for active TB. In the absence of a gold standard for LTBI, sensitivity and specificity for LTBI are not well defined. Besides high specificity, other potential advantages of IGRAs include logistical convenience, avoidance of poorly reproducible measurements, such as skin induration, need for fewer patient visits and the ability to perform serial testing without inducing the boosting phenomenon. Overall, due to its high specificity, IGRAs may be useful in low-endemic, high-income settings where cross-reactivity due to BCG might adversely impact the utility of TST. However, despite the growing evidence supporting the use of IGRAs, several unresolved and unexplained issues remain. The review concludes by highlighting areas where evidence is lacking, and provides an agenda for future research. Active TB and drug resistance are discussed in Part II; 423-432 of this issue. PMID:16706743

Pai, Madhukar; Kalantri, Shriprakash; Dheda, Keertan

2006-05-01

288

Immunology of Tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

MTB ranks as the first worldwide pathogen latently infecting one third of the population and the second leading cause of death from a single infectious agent, after the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The development of vigorous and apparently appropriate immune response upon infection with M. tuberculosis in humans and experimental animals conflict with failure to eradicate the pathogen itself and with its ability to undergo clinical latency from which it may exit. From a clinical standpoint, our views on MTB infection may take advantage from updating the overall perspective, that has quite changed over the last decade, following remarkable advances in our understanding of the manipulation of the immune system by M. tuberculosis and of the role of innate components of the immune response, including macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells and NK cells in the initial spread of MTB and its exit from latency. Scope of this review is to highlight the major mechanisms of MTB escape from immune control and to provide a supplementary translational perspective for the interpretation of innate immune mechanisms with particular impact on clinical aspects. PMID:24804000

Bozzano, Federica; Marras, Francesco; De Maria, Andrea

2014-01-01

289

Clinical peculiarities of tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

The ongoing spread of tuberculosis (TB) in poor resource countries and the recently increasing incidence in high resource countries lead to the need of updated knowledge for clinicians, particularly for pediatricians. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview on the most important peculiarities of TB in children. Children are less contagious than adults, but the risk of progression to active disease is higher in infants and children as compared to the subsequent ages. Diagnosis of TB in children is more difficult than in adults, because few signs are associated with primary infection, interferon-gamma release assays and tuberculin skin test are less reliable in younger children, M. tuberculosis is more rarely detected in gastric aspirates than in smears in adults and radiological findings are often not specific. Treatment of latent TB is always necessary in young children, whereas it is recommended in older children, as well as in adults, only in particular conditions. Antimycobacterial drugs are generally better tolerated in children as compared to adults, but off-label use of second-line antimycobacterial drugs is increasing, because of spreading of multidrug resistant TB worldwide. Given that TB is a disease which often involves more than one member in a family, a closer collaboration is needed between pediatricians and clinicians who take care of adults. PMID:24564419

2014-01-01

290

cor, a Novel Carbon Monoxide Resistance Gene, Is Essential for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Pathogenesis  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, remains a devastating human infectious disease, causing two million deaths annually. We previously demonstrated that M. tuberculosis induces an enzyme, heme oxygenase (HO1), that produces carbon monoxide (CO) gas and that M. tuberculosis adapts its transcriptome during CO exposure. We now demonstrate that M. tuberculosis carries a novel resistance gene to combat CO toxicity. We screened an M. tuberculosis transposon library for CO-susceptible mutants and found that disruption of Rv1829 (carbon monoxide resistance, Cor) leads to marked CO sensitivity. Heterologous expression of Cor in Escherichia coli rescued it from CO toxicity. Importantly, the virulence of the cor mutant is attenuated in a mouse model of tuberculosis. Thus, Cor is necessary and sufficient to protect bacteria from host-derived CO. Taken together, this represents the first report of a role for HO1-derived CO in controlling infection of an intracellular pathogen and the first identification of a CO resistance gene in a pathogenic organism. PMID:24255121

Zacharia, Vineetha M.; Manzanillo, Paolo S.; Nair, Vidhya R.; Marciano, Denise K.; Kinch, Lisa N.; Grishin, Nick V.; Cox, Jeffery S.; Shiloh, Michael U.

2013-01-01

291

Use of PCR in routine diagnosis of treated and untreated pulmonary tuberculosis.  

PubMed Central

AIMS--To assess the routine use of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in expectorated sputum specimens. METHODS--A pair of primers (20-mer) were designed to amplify the 38 kilodalton protein of M tuberculosis. The specificity of the assay was evaluated in 31 M tuberculosis strains, 15 atypical mycobacterium species, and several commensal bacteria of the upper respiratory tract. The assay was subsequently applied to 519 sputum specimens from 85 inpatients of a chest hospital in Hong Kong. RESULTS--An amplified product of 239 base pairs was found in all M tuberculosis strains, standard strains of M bovis, and M africanum but not in the other bacterial strains tested. For the 51 patients with pulmonary radiographic lesions, the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis was subsequently confirmed by both culture and PCR in 41 of them. Five patients who were treated before admission were positive by PCR alone. All but one patient in the control group (patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive airway diseases) or those with atypical mycobacterial diseases were PCR negative. The PCR remained positive after four weeks of anti-tuberculosis treatment in 29 patients, 16 of whom had become culture negative. CONCLUSION--This PCR assay is a useful technique for the diagnosis of untreated and recently treated cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. Images PMID:8496388

Yuen, K Y; Chan, K S; Chan, C M; Ho, B S; Dai, L K; Chau, P Y; Ng, M H

1993-01-01

292

Differential Expression of Host Biomarkers in Saliva and Serum Samples from Individuals with Suspected Pulmonary Tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

The diagnosis of tuberculosis remains challenging in individuals with difficulty in providing good quality sputum samples such as children. Host biosignatures of inflammatory markers may be valuable in such cases, especially if they are based on more easily obtainable samples such as saliva. To explore the potential of saliva as an alternative sample in tuberculosis diagnostic/biomarker investigations, we evaluated the levels of 33 host markers in saliva samples from individuals presenting with pulmonary tuberculosis symptoms and compared them to those obtained in serum. Of the 38 individuals included in the study, tuberculosis disease was confirmed in 11 (28.9%) by sputum culture. In both the tuberculosis cases and noncases, the levels of most markers were above the minimum detectable limit in both sample types, but there was no consistent pattern regarding the ratio of markers in serum/saliva. Fractalkine, IL-17, IL-6, IL-9, MIP-1?, CRP, VEGF, and IL-5 levels in saliva and IL-6, IL-2, SAP, and SAA levels in serum were significantly higher in tuberculosis patients (P < 0.05). These preliminary data indicate that there are significant differences in the levels of host markers expressed in saliva in comparison to those expressed in serum and that inflammatory markers in both sample types are potential diagnostic candidates for tuberculosis disease. PMID:24327799

Phalane, Khutso G.; Kriel, Magdalena; Loxton, Andre G.; Menezes, Angela; Stanley, Kim; van der Spuy, Gian D.; Walzl, Gerhard; Chegou, Novel N.

2013-01-01

293

Background stratospheric aerosol layer  

SciTech Connect

Balloonborne aerosol particle counter measurements are used in studying the stratospheric sulfate layer at Laramie, Wyoming, during 1978 and 1979, a 2-year volcanically quiescent period in which the layer appears to have been in a near equilibrium background state. Subtracting the background aerosol concentration from data obtained during an earlier volcanically active period indicates that the actual decay rate of volcanic aerosol is over 30% faster than one would obtain without this correction. At background, the aerosol size distribution is found to remain remarkably constant between the tropopause and an altitude of approx.25 km, with a sudden transition to a distribution dominated by smaller particles above this altitude. The observations, in some respects, compare favorably with equilibrium one-dimensional stratospheric aerosol models and thus to some extent support the concept of relatively inert tropospheric sulfurous gases, such as carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide, as the main background stratospheric aerosol sulfur source. Models which incorporate sulfur chemistry are apparently not able to predict the observed variation of particle size with altitude. The 2-year background period is not long enough in itself to establish long-term trends. The eruption of Mt. St. Helens in May 1980 has considerably disrupted the background stratospheric aerosol which will probably not recover for several years. A comparison of the 1978--79 observations with Junge's original measurements made some 20 years earlier, also during a period void of volcanic perturbations, does not preclude a long-term increase in the background stratospheric aerosol level.

Hofmann, D.J.; Rosen, J.M.

1981-01-01

294

Mycobacterium tuberculosis Induces an Atypical Cell Death Mode to Escape from Infected Macrophages  

PubMed Central

Background Macrophage cell death following infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays a central role in tuberculosis disease pathogenesis. Certain attenuated strains induce extrinsic apoptosis of infected macrophages but virulent strains of M. tuberculosis suppress this host response. We previously reported that virulent M. tuberculosis induces cell death when bacillary load exceeds ?20 per macrophage but the precise nature of this demise has not been defined. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed the characteristics of cell death in primary murine macrophages challenged with virulent or attenuated M. tuberculosis complex strains. We report that high intracellular bacillary burden causes rapid and primarily necrotic death via lysosomal permeabilization, releasing hydrolases that promote Bax/Bak-independent mitochondrial damage and necrosis. Cell death was independent of cathepsins B or L and notable for ultrastructural evidence of damage to lipid bilayers throughout host cells with depletion of several host phospholipid species. These events require viable bacteria that can respond to intracellular cues via the PhoPR sensor kinase system but are independent of the ESX1 system. Conclusions/Significance Cell death caused by virulent M. tuberculosis is distinct from classical apoptosis, pyroptosis or pyronecrosis. Mycobacterial genes essential for cytotoxicity are regulated by the PhoPR two-component system. This atypical death mode provides a mechanism for viable bacilli to exit host macrophages for spreading infection and the eventual transition to extracellular persistence that characterizes advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:21483832

Lee, Jinhee; Repasy, Teresa; Papavinasasundaram, Kadamba; Sassetti, Christopher; Kornfeld, Hardy

2011-01-01

295

Procollagen III N-terminal Propeptide and Desmosine are Released by Matrix Destruction in Pulmonary Tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Background.?Tuberculosis is transmitted by patients with pulmonary disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) drive lung destruction in tuberculosis but the resulting matrix degradation products (MDPs) have not been studied. We investigate the hypothesis that MMP activity generates matrix turnover products as correlates of lung pathology. Methods.?Induced sputum and plasma were collected prospectively from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive and negative patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and controls. Concentrations of MDPs and MMPs were analyzed by ELISA and Luminex array in 2 patient cohorts. Results.?Procollagen III N-terminal propeptide (PIIINP) was 3.8-fold higher in induced sputum of HIV-uninfected tuberculosis patients compared to controls and desmosine, released during elastin degradation, was 2.4-fold higher. PIIINP was elevated in plasma of tuberculosis patients. Plasma PIIINP correlated with induced sputum MMP-1 concentrations and radiological scores, demonstrating that circulating MDPs reflect lung destruction. In a second patient cohort of mixed HIV seroprevalence, plasma PIIINP concentration was increased 3.0-fold above controls (P < .001). Plasma matrix metalloproteinase-8 concentrations were also higher in tuberculosis patients (P = .001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis utilizing these 2 variables demonstrated an area under the curve of 0.832 (P < .001). Conclusions.?In pulmonary tuberculosis, MMP-driven immunopathology generates matrix degradation products. PMID:23922364

Seddon, Jo; Kasprowicz, Victoria; Walker, Naomi F.; Yuen, Ho Ming; Sunpath, Henry; Tezera, Liku; Meintjes, Graeme; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Bishai, William R.; Friedland, Jon S.; Elkington, Paul T.

2013-01-01

296

Factors associated with tuberculosis among patients attending a treatment centre in Zaria, North-west Nigeria, 2010  

PubMed Central

Introduction Tuberculosis remains a global public health problem. In 2011, tuberculosis incidence was 133 per 100,000 in Nigeria. In Nigeria, little is known about the factors associated with tuberculosis, especially in the northern part and only few studies have characterized the Mycobacterium species that cause tuberculosis infection in humans. This study determined factors associated with tuberculosis and identified Mycobacterium species causing human tuberculosis in North-West, Nigeria. Methods We conducted a hospital based case control study between April and July 2010 in Zaria. Cases were newly diagnosed sputum smear-positive tuberculosis patients >15 years while controls were patients >15 years attending the hospital for other reasons but were negative for tuber-culosis. We used a structured questionnaire to obtain information on demographics, knowledge of transmission of tuberculosis, and exposure to some factors. We preformed descriptive, bivariate and backward elimination logistic regression. Sputa from cases were analyzed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on genomic regions of difference. Results The mean ages of the cases and controls were 36, standard deviation (SD) 9.0 and 36, SD 9.7 respectively. Only 10 (9.8%) and nine (8.8%) of cases and controls respectively had a good knowledge of the transmission of tuberculosis. Contact with a tuberculosis patient (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 12.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 5.2-28.8), consumption of unpasteurized milk (AOR 6.4, CI 2.4-17.2), keeping pets (AOR 5.6, CI 2.3-13.7), associating closely with cattle (AOR 5.6, CI 1.3-6.8), and overcrowding (AOR 4.8, CI 1.8-13.1) were significantly associated with tuberculosis. Of the 102 sputa analyzed, 91 (89%) were M. tuberculosis, 8 (7.8%) were M africanum. Conclusion We identified possible opportunities for intervention to limit the spread of tuberculosis. We recommend that the Nigeria tuberculosis control program consider some of these factors as a way to mitigate the spread of tuberculosis in Nigeria. PMID:25328624

Waziri, Ndadilnasiya Endie; Cadmus, Simeon; Nguku, Patrick; Fawole, Olufunmilayo; Owolodun, Olajide Adewale; Waziri, Hyelshilni; Ibrahim, Luka; Biya, Oladayo; Gidado, Saheed; Badung, Samuel; Kumbish, Peterside; Nsubuga, Peter

2014-01-01

297

Tuberculosis care: an evaluability study  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: to verify whether the tuberculosis control program (TCP) is evaluable and to examine the feasibility of building an evaluation model in apriority municipality for the control of tuberculosis. METHOD: this evaluability study was conducted in a municipality in northeastern Brazil. For data collection, documental analysis and interviews with key informants were performed. For indicator validation, the nominal group technique was adopted. RESULTS: the details of TCP were described, and both the logical model and the classification framework for indicators were developed and agreed up on, with the goal of characterizing the structural elements of the program, defining the structure and process indicators, and formulating the evaluation questions. CONCLUSION: TCP is evaluable. Based on logical operational analysis, it was possible to evaluate the adequacy of the program goals for the control of tuberculosis. Therefore, the performance of a summative evaluation is recommended, with a focus on the analysis of the effects of tuberculosis control interventions on decreasing morbidity and mortality. PMID:25493675

Coelho, Ardigleusa Alves; Martiniano, Cláudia Santos; Brito, Ewerton Willian Gomes; Negrão, Oswaldo Gomes Corrêa; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre; Uchôa, Severina Alice da Costa

2014-01-01

298

Health Care Workers and Tuberculosis  

MedlinePLUS

... which patients might have tuberculosis (also known as “TB”). You could catch this disease by breathing in ... infection. When the immune system does its job, TB often stays dormant for years. Unfortunately, it can ...

299

Adequate Expression of Protective Immunity in the Absence of Granuloma Formation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Infected Mice with a Disruption in the Intracellular Adhesion Molecule 1 Gene  

Microsoft Academic Search

It remains unknown whether the expression of cell-mediated protective immunity and the capacity to mount a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction in tuberculosis infection represent two manifestations of a basic response or are dissociable events. In this study, we present data in favor of the latter hypothesis, by showing that tuberculosis infection in the lungs of mice possessing only a truncated

CHRISTINE M. JOHNSON; ANDREA M. COOPER; ANTHONY A. FRANK; IAN M. ORME

1998-01-01

300

Drug Tolerance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although Mycobacterium tuberculosis is eradicated rapidly during therapy in some patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, it can persist for many months in others. This study examined the relationship between myco- bacterial drug tolerance (delayed killing in vitro), persistence, and relapse. It was performed with 39 fully drug-susceptible isolates from a prospective trial of standard short-course antituberculous therapy with sputum smear-positive, human

ROBERT S. WALLIS; SHRIPAD PATIL; SEON-HEE CHEON; KAY EDMONDS; MANIJEH PHILLIPS; MARK D. PERKINS; MOSES JOLOBA; ALICE NAMALE; JOHN L. JOHNSON; LUCILEIA TEIXEIRA; REYNALDO DIETZE; SALMAN SIDDIQI; ROY D. MUGERWA; KATHLEEN EISENACH

301

HIV and tuberculosis in Durban, South Africa: adherence to two medication regimens.  

PubMed

Given that antiretroviral (ARV) medication adherence has been shown to be high in resource-limited countries, the question remains as to whether adherence will remain at that level as medications become more widely available. Comparing adherence to tuberculosis (TB) medications, which have been readily available, and ARV medications may help to indicate the likely future adherence to ARVs as access to these medications becomes more widespread. This study examined sense of coherence, social support, symptom status, quality of life, and adherence to medications in two samples of individuals being treated either for TB or human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) at clinics in Durban, South Africa. Findings revealed the distinctive socio-economic backgrounds of the two cohorts. Although there were significant differences with regard to the psychosocial variables, there were no significant differences by the two samples in adherence to medications as well as adherence to appointments. Given the self-selected nature of the participants in this study, namely those able to attend clinic, as well as those likely to be adherent to ARVs, there is every reason for caution in the interpretations of these findings. As access to ARV medications becomes more widely available in South Africa, the question remains as to whether such high adherence will be maintained given the constraints of access to food and other basic necessities. PMID:20024769

Corless, Inge B; Wantland, Dean; Bhengu, Busi; McInerney, Patricia; Ncama, Busi; Nicholas, Patrice K; McGibbon, Chris; Wong, Emily; Davis, Sheila M

2009-09-01

302

Orchestration of pulmonary T cell immunity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: immunity interruptus.  

PubMed

Despite the introduction almost a century ago of Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG), an attenuated form of M. bovis that is used as a vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis remains a global health threat and kills more than 1.5 million people each year. This is mostly because BCG fails to prevent pulmonary disease--the contagious form of tuberculosis. Although there have been significant advances in understanding how the immune system responds to infection, the qualities that define protective immunity against M. tuberculosis remain poorly characterized. The ability to predict who will maintain control over the infection and who will succumb to clinical disease would revolutionize our approach to surveillance, control, and treatment. Here we review the current understanding of pulmonary T cell responses following M. tuberculosis infection. While infection elicits a strong immune response that contains infection, M. tuberculosis evades eradication. Traditionally, its intracellular lifestyle and alteration of macrophage function are viewed as the dominant mechanisms of evasion. Now we appreciate that chronic inflammation leads to T cell dysfunction. While this may arise as the host balances the goals of bacterial sterilization and avoidance of tissue damage, it is becoming clear that T cell dysfunction impairs host resistance. Defining the mechanisms that lead to T cell dysfunction is crucial as memory T cell responses are likely to be subject to the same subject to the same pressures. Thus, success of T cell based vaccines is predicated on memory T cells avoiding exhaustion while at the same time not promoting overt tissue damage. PMID:25311810

Behar, Samuel M; Carpenter, Stephen M; Booty, Matthew G; Barber, Daniel L; Jayaraman, Pushpa

2014-12-01

303

Vitamin D levels in Indian children with intrathoracic tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Background & objectives: Deficiency of vitamin D, an immunomodulator agent, is associated with increased susceptibility to tuberculosis in adults, but only limited studies are available in the paediatric age group, especially regarding association of vitamin D with type and outcome of tuberculosis. We conducted this study to determine the baseline 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels in children suffering from intrathoracic tuberculosis and its association with type and outcome of tuberculosis. Methods: Children with intrathoracic tuberculosis, diagnosed on the basis of clinico-radiological criteria, were enrolled as part of a randomized controlled trial on micronutrient supplementation in paediatric tuberculosis patients. Levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D were measured in serum samples collected prior to starting antitubercular therapy by chemiluminescent immunoassay technology. Results: Two hundred sixty six children (mean age of 106.9 ± 43.7 months; 57.1% girls) were enrolled. Chest X-ray was suggestive of primary pulmonary complex, progressive disease and pleural effusion in 81 (30.5%), 149 (56%) and 36 (13.5%) subjects, respectively. Median serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D level was 8 ng/ml (IQR 5, 12). One hundred and eighty six (69.9%) children were vitamin D deficient (serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D <12 ng/ml), 55 (20.7%) were insufficient (12 to <20 ng/ml) and 25 (9.4%) were vitamin D sufficient (? 20 ng/ml). Levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D were similar in all three types of intrathoracic tuberculosis, and in microbiologically confirmed and probable cases. Levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D did not significantly affect outcome of the disease. Children who were deficient or insufficient were less likely to convert (become smear/culture negative) at two months as compared to those who were 25-hydroxy vitamin D sufficient (P<0.05). Interpretation & conclusions: Majority of Indian children with newly diagnosed intrathoracic tuberculosis were deficient in vitamin D. Type of disease or outcome was not affected by 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels in these children. However, children who did not demonstrate sputum conversion after intensive phase of antitubercular therapy had lower baseline 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels as compared to those who did. PMID:25488448

Khandelwal, Deepchand; Gupta, Nandita; Mukherjee, Aparna; Lodha, Rakesh; Singh, Varinder; Grewal, Harleen M.S.; Bhatnagar, Shinjini; Singh, Sarman; Kabra, S.K.

2014-01-01

304

Mixed-Strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections and the Implications for Tuberculosis Treatment and Control  

E-print Network

Mixed-Strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections and the Implications for Tuberculosis Treatment Tuberculosis Research/MRC Centre for Molecular and Cellular Biology, Division of Molecular Biology and Human of Medicine, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, and Tuberculosis Section, Health

Cohen, Ted

305

High Rates of Potentially Infectious Tuberculosis and Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) among  

E-print Network

High Rates of Potentially Infectious Tuberculosis and Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR, Massachusetts, United States of America, 3 KwaZulu-Natal Research Institute for Tuberculosis and HIV Research (K) and multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB) tuberculosis at Church of Scotland Hospital (CoSH), in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN

Cohen, Ted

306

Psoriatic Disease and Tuberculosis Nowadays  

PubMed Central

Psoriasis is a chronic, relapsing and remitting inflammatory skin and joint disease that has a prevalence of 2-3% in the world's population, whereas of 1–2% in Europe. The traditional concept of psoriasis as the “healthy people's” disease has been recently revised because of ever-increasing reports of associations with various pathological conditions (hypertension, Crohn's disease, type II diabetes mellitus, obesity, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome, infectious conditions). Particularly, advances in psoriasis therapies have introduced biologic agents. All the tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors are associated with an increased risk of developing active disease in patients with latent tuberculosis infection, because of TNF-? key role against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. For this reason, exclusion of active tuberculosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection are clinical imperatives prior to starting this therapy. Moreover active surveillance for a history of untreated or partially treated tuberculosis or latent form has already been shown to be effective in reducing the number of incident tuberculosis cases. PMID:22645622

Balato, Nicola; Di Costanzo, Luisa; Ayala, Fabio; Balato, Anna; Sanduzzi, Alessandro; Bocchino, Marialuisa

2012-01-01

307

Novel insights into Mycobacterium antigen Ag85 biology and implications in countermeasures for M. tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis remains one of the most prevalent and deadly infectious diseases, largely due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant and extensive drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, especially the coinfection with HIV. Mycobacterium Ag85 complex (Ag85A, B, and C), with a carboxylesterase consensus sequence and conserved surface catalysis residues, involves in cell wall biosynthesis and the trigger of the host immune response. The physiological function, structures, distributions, and molecular mechanisms of regulations as well as their implications in novel vaccines and diagnostics against tuberculosis are summarized. Special focus is the regulation underlying the Ag85 expression. This will facilitate in-depth understanding of the role of Ag85 and developing better novel measures against M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:23140159

Tang, XieMei; Deng, Wanyan; Xie, Jianping

2012-01-01

308

A review of tuberculosis: reflections on the past, present and future of a global epidemic disease.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis remains the leading cause of death worldwide from a single infectious organism. Approximately 32% of the world's population is infected and an estimated two million people die annually from this treatable disease. Over the past 50 years, with medical treatment and standard public health practices, tuberculosis diminished in developed countries and resulted in a loss of interest and funding for research in improving diagnostic and treatment options. In developing countries, efforts including BCG vaccination have failed to control tuberculosis and the disease continues to spread as the world becomes more globalized. At the same time, multidrug resistant tuberculosis has emerged, challenging even the most advance treatment centers. Better diagnostic techniques, control measures and treatment options are desperately needed but advances require worldwide commitment to battle this age-old disease. PMID:15482144

Smith, Kim Connelly; Armitige, Lisa; Wanger, Audrey

2003-10-01

309

First insights into the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from HIV-infected Mexican patients and mutations causing multidrug resistance  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The prevalence of infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) species in HIV-infected patients in Mexico is unknown. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of MTb and NTM species in HIV-infected patients from Mexico City, to evaluate the genotypic diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains, to determine their drug resistance profiles by

Rocio Lopez-Alvarez; Claudia Badillo-Lopez; Jorge F Cerna-Cortes; Ivan Castillo-Ramirez; Sandra Rivera-Gutierrez; Addy C Helguera-Repetto; Diana Aguilar; Rogelio Hernandez-Pando; Sofia Samper; Jorge A Gonzalez-y-Merchand

2010-01-01

310

The non-clonality of drug resistance in Beijing-genotype isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the Western Cape of South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The Beijing genotype of M. tuberculosis is a virulent strain that is disseminating worldwide and has a strong association with drug resistance. In the Western Cape of South Africa, epidemiological studies have identified the R220 cluster of the Beijing genotype as a major contributor to a recent outbreak of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Although the outbreak is considered to be due

Thomas R Ioerger; Yicheng Feng; Xiaohua Chen; Karen M Dobos; Thomas C Victor; Elizabeth M Streicher; Robin M Warren; Nicolaas C Gey van Pittius; Paul D Van Helden; James C Sacchettini

2010-01-01

311

[Evaluation of the management of tuberculosis in children in Madagascar. Results of a multicentric study].  

PubMed

In Madagascar, tuberculosis remains an important cause of morbidity and letality with a Risk of Annual Tubercular Infection about 1% in 1996 in spite of a vaccination rate of 82.6% and tubercular drugs free of charge. In 1995, the National Tubercular Control Program detected 7,000 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis and expected more than 12,000 cases per year. This study was carried out in order to review the management and the treatment of the child tuberculosis in Madagascar. This retrospective study was conducted in four pediatric units of the General hospital of Befelatanana (A and B), Ambohimiandra Hospital and Regional Hospital Centre of Toliara for a twenty four months period from January 1997 to December 1998. All the less than 15-year-old children medical files were consulted. 214 cases were suspected of tuberculosis. 133 of them were treated upon clinical presumption basis and/or radiological exams (33 bacteriological and/or histopathological exams were only realized). 56% of the cases were vaccinated by BCG vaccine. Respiratory diseases with fever motive 46% of hospitalization. The majority of these children are living in poor conditions and 38% of them had malnutrition. Were found as clinical manifestations: 47% of pulmonary tuberculosis (among them 20% were smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis), 12% had ganglionar tuberculosis, 10% peritoneal tuberculosis, 8% a tubercular meningitis, 5% a Pott-disease and 2% a miliary-disease. Mortality increases with suffocation. 18% of cases died, especially infants and in tubercular meningitis. The authors conclude that management and treatment of tuberculosis need an early diagnosis. But the diagnosis is difficult in front of non specific clinical manifestations in children and due to lack of means and national agreement which settle up diagnosis and therapy. A scoring system based upon clinical signs in agreement with complementary medical tests is desirable. PMID:12478966

Rasamoelisoa, J M; Tovone, X G; Razoeliarinoro, H V; Rakotoarimanana, D R

1999-01-01

312

Molecular Biology of Drug Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis (TB) has become a curable disease thanks to the discovery of antibiotics. However, it has remained one of the most difficult infections to treat. Most current TB regimens consist of six to nine months of daily doses of four drugs that are highly toxic to patients. The purpose of these lengthy treatments is to completely eradicate Mycobacterium tuberculosis, notorious for its ability to resist most antibacterial agents, thereby preventing the formation of drug resistant mutants. On the contrary, the prolonged therapies have led to poor patient adherence. This, together with a severe limit of drug choices, has resulted in the emergence of strains that are increasingly resistant to the few available antibiotics. Here we review our current understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the profound drug resistance of M. tuberculosis. This knowledge is essential for the development of more effective antibiotics that not only are potent against drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains but also help shorten the current treatment courses required for drug susceptible TB. PMID:23179675

Smith, Tasha; Wolff, Kerstin A.; Nguyen, Liem

2014-01-01

313

Enhanced Specialized Transduction Using Recombineering in Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Genetic engineering has contributed greatly to our understanding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis biology and has facilitated antimycobacterial and vaccine development. However, methods to generate M. tuberculosis deletion mutants remain labor-intensive and relatively inefficient. Here, methods are described that significantly enhance the efficiency (greater than 100-fold) of recovering deletion mutants by the expression of mycobacteriophage recombineering functions during the course of infection with specialized transducing phages delivering allelic exchange substrates. This system has been successfully applied to the CDC1551 strain of M. tuberculosis, as well as to a ?recD mutant generated in the CDC1551 parental strain. The latter studies were undertaken as there were precedents in both the Escherichia coli literature and mycobacterial literature for enhancement of homologous recombination in strains lacking RecD. In combination, these measures yielded a dramatic increase in the recovery of deletion mutants and are expected to facilitate construction of a comprehensive library of mutants with every nonessential gene of M. tuberculosis deleted. The findings also open up the potential for sophisticated genetic screens, such as synthetic lethal analyses, which have so far not been feasible for the slow-growing mycobacteria. PMID:24865558

Tufariello, JoAnn M.; Malek, Adel A.; Vilchèze, Catherine; Cole, Laura E.; Ratner, Hannah K.; González, Pablo A.; Jain, Paras; Hatfull, Graham F.; Larsen, Michelle H.

2014-01-01

314

Molecular genetics of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis (TB) is the single largest killer among infectious diseases. The recent resurgence of TB together with outbreaks of multidrug resistant tuberculosis has focused attention on understanding the mechanisms of such drug resistance. Because of the relative neglect of TB research in the past and late arrival of mycobacterial genetic tools, the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance in TB remained largely unknown until very recently. In this paper we review recent progress on the mechanisms of resistance to three major anti-TB drugs; isoniazid, rifampicin and streptomycin. While the resistance mechanisms for rifampicin and streptomycin are similar to those found in other bacteria, isoniazid susceptibility and resistance is unique to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. So far, mutations in two chromosomal loci, katG and inhA have been found to be involved in isoniazid resistance in TB. Identification and characterization of mutations responsible for resistance opens up new possibilities for rapid detection of drug resistant strains. Molecular understanding of drug resistance and drug action in M. tuberculosis may eventually lead to rational design of new anti-TB drugs. PMID:7829406

Zhang, Y; Young, D

1994-09-01

315

Bovine tuberculosis in Canadian wildlife: An updated history  

PubMed Central

Mycobacterium bovis infection in wild animals attracted little attention in Canada until the disease was almost eliminated from domestic livestock. Tuberculosis was endemic in plains bison and occurred in elk, moose, and mule deer in Buffalo National Park (BNP), Alberta during the 1920s and 1930s. Bison were moved from BNP to Wood Buffalo National Park (WBNP), where tuberculosis became, and remains, endemic in bison, posing a risk to efforts to restore bison in northern Canada. Tuberculosis was found in a white-tailed deer in Ontario in 1959, and in an infected elk near Riding Mountain National Park (RMNP), Manitoba in 1992. Intense surveillance has resulted in detection of 40 elk, 8 white-tailed deer, and 7 cattle herds infected between 1997 and 2008 in the RMNP area. The strains of M. bovis in the RMNP area are different from strains tested from cattle and bison elsewhere in Canada. Management of tuberculosis in cattle and wild animals is challenging because of uncertainty about the ecology of the disease in various species, difficulty in obtaining samples and population data from wildlife, lack of validated tests, overlapping jurisdictions and authority, and conflicting values and opinions among stakeholders. PMID:20119541

Wobeser, Gary

2009-01-01

316

Towards a new tuberculosis drug: pyridomycin – nature's isoniazid  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis, a global threat to public health, is becoming untreatable due to widespread drug resistance to frontline drugs such as the InhA-inhibitor isoniazid. Historically, by inhibiting highly vulnerable targets, natural products have been an important source of antibiotics including potent anti-tuberculosis agents. Here, we describe pyridomycin, a compound produced by Dactylosporangium fulvum with specific cidal activity against mycobacteria. By selecting pyridomycin-resistant mutants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, whole-genome sequencing and genetic validation, we identified the NADH-dependent enoyl- (Acyl-Carrier-Protein) reductase InhA as the principal target and demonstrate that pyridomycin inhibits mycolic acid synthesis in M. tuberculosis. Furthermore, biochemical and structural studies show that pyridomycin inhibits InhA directly as a competitive inhibitor of the NADH-binding site, thereby identifying a new, druggable pocket in InhA. Importantly, the most frequently encountered isoniazid-resistant clinical isolates remain fully susceptible to pyridomycin, thus opening new avenues for drug development. PMID:22987724

Hartkoorn, Ruben C; Sala, Claudia; Neres, João; Pojer, Florence; Magnet, Sophie; Mukherjee, Raju; Uplekar, Swapna; Boy-Röttger, Stefanie; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Cole, Stewart T

2012-01-01

317

Urogenital tuberculosis in a patient with AIDS: an unusual presentation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background A 38-year-old man with AIDS presented to hospital with a 3-month history of fevers, bilateral lumbar pain, dysuria and increased urinary frequency. Six years earlier he had received 6 months' treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis. At presentation, he was on antiretroviral therapy with a combination of efavirenz, stavudine and lamivudine.Investigations Physical examination, evaluation of HIV viral load, CD4 count, measurement

Antonio M Lucon; Diego S Ikejiri; Renato Falci; Miguel Srougi; André A Figueiredo

2008-01-01

318

Unsuspected and extensive transmission of a drug-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain  

PubMed Central

Background A large and unsuspected tuberculosis outbreak involving 18.7% of the total of the tuberculosis cases studied, was detected in a population-based molecular epidemiological study performed in Zaragoza (Spain) from 2001 to 2004. Methods The Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug-susceptible strain, named MTZ strain, was genetically characterized by IS6110-RFLP, Spoligotyping and by MIRU-VNTR typing and the genetic patterns obtained were compared with those included in international databases. The characteristics of the affected patients, in an attempt to understand why the MTZ strain was so highly transmitted among the population were also analyzed. Results The genetic profile of the MTZ strain was rare and not widely distributed in our area or elsewhere. The patients affected did not show any notable risk factor for TB. Conclusion The M. tuberculosis strain MTZ, might have particular transmissibility or virulence properties, and we believe that greater focus should be placed on stopping its widespread dissemination. PMID:19144198

López-Calleja, Ana Isabel; Gavín, Patricia; Lezcano, Ma Antonia; Vitoria, Ma Asunción; Iglesias, Ma José; Guimbao, Joaquín; Lázaro, Ma Ángeles; Rastogi, Nalin; Revillo, Ma José; Martín, Carlos; Samper, Sofia

2009-01-01

319

A Functional Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism in the Promoter of the Gene Encoding Interleukin 6 Is Associated With Susceptibility to Tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Background Genetic variation influences susceptibility or resistance to tuberculosis. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) contributes to protection against tuberculosis in mice. However, its role in regulating susceptibility or resistance to tuberculosis in humans is unclear. Methods Genotyping of polymorphisms in IL-6 and IL-6R (CD126) genes was performed in 2 independent cohorts, an experimental population (495 cases and 358 controls) and a validation population (1383 cases and 1149 controls). The associations of the variants with tuberculosis were tested using 2 case-control association studies. In addition, the regulatory effects of single-nucleotide polymorphism rs1800796 (-572C > G) on IL-6 production in plasma and CD14+ monocyte cultures stimulated with a Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) product were assessed. Results The rs1800796 polymorphism is associated with increased resistance to tuberculosis (odds ratio [OR], 0.771; 95% confidential interval, .684–.870). The rs1800796GG genotype is strongly associated with reduced risk to tuberculosis (OR, 0.621; 95% CI, .460–.838). Interestingly, CD14+ monocytes isolated from individuals with rs1800796GG genotype produced significantly less IL-6 in response to M. tuberculosis 19-kDa lipoprotein than those with CC or CG genotype. Conclusions We identified a genetic polymorphism in the IL-6 promoter that regulates cytokine production and host resistance to pulmonary tuberculosis in Chinese populations. PMID:22457277

Zhang, Guoliang; Zhou, Boping; Wang, Wenfei; Zhang, Mingxia; Zhao, Yahua; Wang, Zheng; Yang, Lin; Zhai, Jingnan; Feng, Carl G.; Wang, Junwen; Chen, Xinchun

2012-01-01

320

[Tuberculosis in Asia].  

PubMed

1. Philippines: The development, expansion and maintenance of pilot area activities: Cristina B. Giango (Technical Division, Cebu Provincial Health Office, the Philippines) In 1994, the Department of Health developed the new NTP policies based on WHO recommendations and started a pilot project in Cebu Province in collaboration with the Japan International Cooperation Agency. To test its feasibility and effectiveness, the new NTP policies were pre-tested in one city and one Rural Health Unit. The test showed a high rate of three sputum collection (90%), high positive rate (10%), and high cure rate (80%). Before the new guidelines were introduced, the new policy was briefed, a baseline survey of the facility was conducted, equipment was provided, and intensive training was given. Recording/Reporting forms and procedures were also developed to ensure accurate reporting. Supervision, an important activity to ensure effective performance, was institutionalized. Laboratory services were strengthened, and a quality-control system was introduced in 1995 to ensure the quality of the laboratory services. With the implementation of DOTS strategy, barangay health workers were trained as treatment partners. In partnership with the private sector, the TB Diagnostic Committee was organized to deliberate and assess sputum negative but X-ray positive cases. The implementation of the new NTP guidelines in Cebe Province has reached a satisfactory level, the cure rate and positive rate have increased, and laboratory services have improved. Because of its successful implementation, the new NTP guidelines are now being used nationwide. 2. Nepal: The DOTS Strategy in the area with hard geographic situation: Dirgh Singh Bam (National Tuberculosis Center, Nepal) Three groups of factors characterize the population of Nepal: 1) Socio-cultural factors, e.g. migration, poverty, language; 2) Environmental factors, e.g. geography and climate; and 3) Political factors, prisoners and refugee populations. These factors pose particular problems for implementing DOTS in various ways. Socio-cultural and environmental factors are particularly important in Nepal, and several measures have been developed to overcome these difficulties. One is active community participation through the DOTS committee. The committee consists of a group of motivated people, including social workers, political leaders, health services providers, journalists, teachers, students, representatives of local organizations, medical schools and colleges, industries, private practitioners, and TB patients. One DOTS committee is formed in every treatment center. A key role of the DOTS committee is to identify local problems and their solutions. It increases public awareness about TB and DOTS; supports people with TB in the community by providing treatment observers and tracing late patients; and encourages cooperation among health institutions, health workers, NGOs, and political leaders. The case finding rate is now 69%, and nearly 95% of diagnosed TB cases are being treated under DOTS. The treatment success rate of new smear-positive cases is nearly 90%. Thus, DOTS increases the case finding and treatment success. 3. Cambodia: HIV/TB and the health sector reform: Tan Eang Mao (National Center for Tuberculosis and Leprosy Control, Cambodia) Cambodia is one of the 23 high burden countries of tuberculosis in the world. Moreover, HIV/AIDS has been spreading rapidly since 1990s, which is worsening the tuberculosis epidemics. To cope with the burden, Cambodia has started implementation of DOTS in 1994 and has expanded it to most of public hospitals across the country by 1998. NTP of Cambodia is now enjoying high cure rate of more than 90%. However, due to the constraints such as weak infrastructure and the poverty, it is proved that many of TB sufferers do not have access to the TB services, resulting in still low case detection rate. It is for this reason that the NTP has decided to expand DOTS to health center and community level based on the new health system. Its pilot program that has been

2002-10-01

321

Rapid Reagentless Detection of M. tuberculosis H37Ra in Respiratory Effluents  

SciTech Connect

Two similar mycobacteria, Mycobacteria tuberculosis H37Ra and Mycobacteria smegmatis are rapidly detected and identified within samples containing a complex background of respiratory effluents using Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS). M. tuberculosis H37Ra (TBa), an avirulent strain, is used as a surrogate for virulent tuberculosis (TBv); M. smegmatis (MSm) is utilized as a near neighbor confounder for TBa. Bovine lung surfactant and human exhaled breath condensate are used as first-order surrogates for infected human lung expirations from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. This simulated background sputum is mixed with TBa or MSm and nebulized to produce conglomerate aerosol particles, single particles that contain a bacterium embedded within a background respiratory matrix. Mass spectra of single conglomerate particles exhibit ions associated with both respiratory effluents and mycobacteria. Spectral features distinguishing TBa from MSm in pure and conglomerate particles are shown. SPAMS pattern matching alarm algorithms are able to distinguish TBa containing particles from background matrix and MSm for >50% of the test particles, which is sufficient to enable a high probability of detection and a low false alarm rate if an adequate number of such particles are present. These results indicate the potential usefulness of SPAMS for rapid, reagentless tuberculosis screening.

Adams, K L; Steele, P T; Bogan, M J; Sadler, N M; Martin, S; Martin, A N; Frank, M

2008-01-29

322

Spatial dependency of tuberculosis incidence in Taiwan.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis (TB) disease can be caused by either recent transmission from infectious patients or reactivation of remote latent infection. Spatial dependency (correlation between nearby geographic areas) in tuberculosis incidence is a signature for chains of recent transmission with geographic diffusion. To understand the contribution of recent transmission in the TB endemic in Taiwan, where reactivation has been assumed to be the predominant mode of pathogenesis, we used spatial regression analysis to examine whether there was spatial dependency between the TB incidence in each township and in its neighbors. A total of 90,661 TB cases from 349 townships in 2003-2008 were included in this analysis. After adjusting for the effects of confounding socioeconomic variables, including the percentages of aboriginals and average household income, the results show that the spatial lag parameter remains positively significant (0.43, p<0.001), which indicates that the TB incidences of neighboring townships had an effect on the TB incidence in each township. Townships with substantial spatial spillover effects were mainly located in the northern, western and eastern parts of Taiwan. Spatial dependency implies that recent transmission plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of TB in Taiwan. Therefore, in addition to the current focus on improving the cure rate under directly observed therapy programs, more resource need to be allocated to active case finding in order to break the chain of transmission. PMID:23226371

Ng, In-Chan; Wen, Tzai-Hung; Wang, Jann-Yuan; Fang, Chi-Tai

2012-01-01

323

Macrophages in Tuberculosis: Friend or Foe  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the greatest threats to human health. The causative bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is acquired by the respiratory route. It is exquisitely human-adapted and a prototypic intracellular pathogen of macrophages, with alveolar macrophages (AMs) being the primary conduit of infection and disease. The outcome of primary infection is most often a latently infected healthy human host, in whom the bacteria are held in check by the host immune response. Such individuals can develop active TB later in life with impairment in the immune system. In contrast, in a minority of infected individuals, the host immune response fails to control the growth of bacilli, and progressive granulomatous disease develops, facilitating spread of the bacilli via infectious aerosols coughed out into the environment and inhaled by new hosts. The molecular details of the Mtb-macrophage interaction continue to be elucidated. However, it is clear that a number of complex processes are involved at the different stages of infection that may benefit either the bacterium or the host. Macrophages demonstrate tremendous phenotypic heterogeneity and functional plasticity which, depending on the site and stage of infection, facilitate the diverse outcomes. Moreover, host responses vary depending on the specific characteristics of the infecting Mtb strain. In this chapter, we describe a contemporary view of the behavior of AMs and their interaction with various Mtb strains in generating unique immunologic lung specific responses. PMID:23864058

Guirado, Evelyn; Schlesinger, Larry S.; Kaplan, Gilla

2013-01-01

324

Diagnosis and treatment of extrapulmonary tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) constitutes about 20% of all cases of tuberculosis (TB) in Korea. Diagnosing EPTB remains challenging because clinical samples obtained from relatively inaccessible sites may be paucibacillary, thus decreasing the sensitivity of diagnostic tests. Whenever practical, every effort should be made to obtain appropriate specimens for both mycobacteriologic and histopathologic examinations. The measurement of biochemical markers in TB-affected serosal fluids (adenosine deaminase or gamma interferon) and molecular biology techniques such as polymerase chain reaction may be useful adjuncts in the diagnosis of EPTB. Although the disease usually responds to standard anti-TB drug therapy, the ideal regimen and duration of treatment have not yet been established. A paradoxical response frequently occurs during anti-TB therapy. It should be distinguished from other causes of clinical deterioration. Surgery is required mainly to obtain valid diagnostic specimens and to manage complications. Because smear microscopy or culture is not available to monitor patients with EPTB, clinical monitoring is the usual way to assess the response to treatment. PMID:25861336

Lee, Ji Yeon

2015-04-01

325

Diagnosis and Treatment of Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) constitutes about 20% of all cases of tuberculosis (TB) in Korea. Diagnosing EPTB remains challenging because clinical samples obtained from relatively inaccessible sites may be paucibacillary, thus decreasing the sensitivity of diagnostic tests. Whenever practical, every effort should be made to obtain appropriate specimens for both mycobacteriologic and histopathologic examinations. The measurement of biochemical markers in TB-affected serosal fluids (adenosine deaminase or gamma interferon) and molecular biology techniques such as polymerase chain reaction may be useful adjuncts in the diagnosis of EPTB. Although the disease usually responds to standard anti-TB drug therapy, the ideal regimen and duration of treatment have not yet been established. A paradoxical response frequently occurs during anti-TB therapy. It should be distinguished from other causes of clinical deterioration. Surgery is required mainly to obtain valid diagnostic specimens and to manage complications. Because smear microscopy or culture is not available to monitor patients with EPTB, clinical monitoring is the usual way to assess the response to treatment. PMID:25861336

2015-01-01

326

Macrophages in tuberculosis: friend or foe.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the greatest threats to human health. The causative bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is acquired by the respiratory route. It is exquisitely human adapted and a prototypic intracellular pathogen of macrophages, with alveolar macrophages (AMs) being the primary conduit of infection and disease. The outcome of primary infection is most often a latently infected healthy human host, in whom the bacteria are held in check by the host immune response. Such individuals can develop active TB later in life with impairment in the immune system. In contrast, in a minority of infected individuals, the host immune response fails to control the growth of bacilli, and progressive granulomatous disease develops, facilitating spread of the bacilli via infectious aerosols coughed out into the environment and inhaled by new hosts. The molecular details of the Mtb-macrophage interaction continue to be elucidated. However, it is clear that a number of complex processes are involved at the different stages of infection that may benefit either the bacterium or the host. Macrophages demonstrate tremendous phenotypic heterogeneity and functional plasticity which, depending on the site and stage of infection, facilitate the diverse outcomes. Moreover, host responses vary depending on the specific characteristics of the infecting Mtb strain. In this chapter, we describe a contemporary view of the behavior of AMs and their interaction with various Mtb strains in generating unique immunologic lung-specific responses. PMID:23864058

Guirado, Evelyn; Schlesinger, Larry S; Kaplan, Gilla

2013-09-01

327

Renal Tuberculosis in the Modern Era  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The disease remains as an important public health problem in developing countries. Extrapulmonary TB became more common with the advent of infection with human immunodeficiency virus and by the increase in the number of organ transplantation, which also leads to immunosuppression of thousand of persons. Urogenital TB represents 27% of extrapulmonary cases. Renal involvement in TB can be part of a disseminated infection or a localized genitourinary disease. Renal involvement by TB infection is underdiagnosed in most health care centers. Most patients with renal TB have sterile pyuria, which can be accompanied by microscopic hematuria. The diagnosis of urinary tract TB is based on the finding of pyuria in the absence of common bacterial infection. The first choice drugs include isoniazide, rifampicin, pirazinamide, ethambutol, and streptomycin. Awareness of renal TB is urgently needed by physicians for suspecting this disease in patients with unexplained urinary tract abnormalities, mainly in those with any immunosuppression and those coming from TB-endemic areas. PMID:23303798

De Francesco Daher, Elizabeth; Bezerra da Silva Junior, Geraldo; Barros, Elvino José Guardão

2013-01-01

328

Paradoxical Tuberculosis Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (TB-IRIS) in HIV Patients with Culture Confirmed Pulmonary Tuberculosis in India and the Potential Role of IL-6 in Prediction  

PubMed Central

Background The incidence, manifestations, outcome and clinical predictors of paradoxical TB-IRIS in patients with HIV and culture confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in India have not been studied prospectively. Methods HIV+ patients with culture confirmed PTB started on anti-tuberculosis therapy (ATT) were followed prospectively after anti-retroviral therapy (ART) initiation. Established criteria for IRIS diagnosis were used including decline in plasma HIV RNA at IRIS event. Pre-ART plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between baseline variables and IRIS. Results Of 57 patients enrolled, 48 had complete follow up data. Median ATT-ART interval was 28 days (interquartile range, IQR 14–47). IRIS events occurred in 26 patients (54.2%) at a median of 11 days (IQR: 7–16) after ART initiation. Corticosteroids were required for treatment of most IRIS events that resolved within a median of 13 days (IQR: 9–23). Two patients died due to CNS TB-IRIS. Lower CD4+ T-cell counts, higher plasma HIV RNA levels, lower CD4/CD8 ratio, lower hemoglobin, shorter ATT to ART interval, extra-pulmonary or miliary TB and higher plasma IL-6 and CRP levels at baseline were associated with paradoxical TB-IRIS in the univariate analysis. Shorter ATT to ART interval, lower hemoglobin and higher IL-6 and CRP levels remained significant in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Paradoxical TB–IRIS frequently complicates HIV-TB therapy in India. IL-6 and CRP may assist in predicting IRIS events and serve as potential targets for immune interventions. PMID:23691062

Porter, Brian O.; Chandrasekhar, Chockalingam; Venkatesan, Perumal; Menon, Pradeep A.; Subramanian, Sudha; Anbalagan, Selvaraj; Bhavani, Kannabiran P.; Sekar, Sathiyavelu; Padmapriyadarshini, Chandrasekaran; Kumar, Satagopan; Ravichandran, Narayanan; Raja, Krishnaraj; Bhanu, Kesavamurthy; Mahilmaran, Ayyamperumal; Sekar, Lakshmanan; Sher, Alan; Sereti, Irini; Swaminathan, Soumya

2013-01-01

329

Complications of Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation in Hospitalised Patients with HIV-Associated Tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Background HIV-associated tuberculosis is a common coinfection in Sub-Saharan Africa, which causes high morbidity and mortality. A sub-set of HIV-associated tuberculosis patients require prolonged hospital admission, during which antiretroviral therapy initiation may be required. The aim of this study was to document the causes of clinical deterioration of hospitalised patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis starting antiretroviral therapy in order to inform healthcare practice in low- to middle-income countries. Methods Prospective, observational cohort study of adult inpatients with HIV-associated tuberculosis starting antiretroviral therapy in a dedicated tuberculosis hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. Causes of clinical deterioration and outcome were recorded in the first 12 weeks of antiretroviral therapy. Patients with rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis were excluded. Results Between May 2009 and November 2010, 112 patients (60% female), with a median age of 32 years were enrolled. At baseline the median CD4 count was 55 cells/mm3 (IQR 31–106) and HIV viral load 5.6 log copies/mL. All patients had significant comorbidity: 82% were bed-bound, 65% had disseminated tuberculosis and 27% had central nervous system tuberculosis. Seventy six patients (68%) developed 144 clinical events after starting antiretroviral therapy. TB-IRIS, hospital-acquired infections and significant drug toxicities occurred in 42%, 20.5% and 15% of patients respectively. A new opportunistic disease occurred in 15% of patients and a thromboembolic event in 8%. Mortality during the 12 week period was 10.6%. Conclusions High rates of TB-IRIS, hospital-acquired infections and drug toxicities complicate the course of patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis starting antiretroviral therapy in hospital. Despite the high morbidity, mortality was relatively low. Careful clinical management and adequate resources are needed in hospitalised HIV-TB patients in the 1st three months following ART initiation. PMID:23408935

van der Plas, Helen; Meintjes, Graeme; Schutz, Charlotte; Goliath, Rene; Myer, Landon; Baatjie, Dorothea; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Maartens, Gary; Mendelson, Marc

2013-01-01

330

Tuberculosis Incidence Correlates with Sunshine: An Ecological 28-Year Time Series Study  

PubMed Central

Background Birmingham is the largest UK city after London, and central Birmingham has an annual tuberculosis incidence of 80 per 100,000. We examined seasonality and sunlight as drivers of tuberculosis incidence. Hours of sunshine are seasonal, sunshine exposure is necessary for the production of vitamin D by the body and vitamin D plays a role in the host response to tuberculosis. Methods We performed an ecological study that examined tuberculosis incidence in Birmingham from Dec 1981 to Nov 2009, using publicly-available data from statutory tuberculosis notifications, and related this to the seasons and hours of sunshine (UK Meteorological Office data) using unmeasured component models. Results There were 9,739 tuberculosis cases over the study period. There was strong evidence for seasonality, with notifications being 24.1% higher in summer than winter (p<0.001). Winter dips in sunshine correlated with peaks in tuberculosis incidence six months later (4.7% increase in incidence for each 100 hours decrease in sunshine, p<0.001). Discussion and Conclusion A potential mechanism for these associations includes decreased vitamin D levels with consequent impaired host defence arising from reduced sunshine exposure in winter. This is the longest time series of any published study and our use of statutory notifications means this data is essentially complete. We cannot, however, exclude the possibility that another factor closely correlated with the seasons, other than sunshine, is responsible. Furthermore, exposure to sunlight depends not only on total hours of sunshine but also on multiple individual factors. Our results should therefore be considered hypothesis-generating. Confirmation of a potential causal relationship between winter vitamin D deficiency and summer peaks in tuberculosis incidence would require a randomized-controlled trial of the effect of vitamin D supplementation on future tuberculosis incidence. PMID:23483924

Koh, Gavin C. K. W.; Hawthorne, Gemma; Turner, Alice M.; Kunst, Heinke; Dedicoat, Martin

2013-01-01

331

Forecasting Tuberculosis Incidence in Iran Using Box-Jenkins Models  

PubMed Central

Background: Predicting the incidence of tuberculosis (TB) plays an important role in planning health control strategies for the future, developing intervention programs and allocating resources. Objectives: The present longitudinal study estimated the incidence of tuberculosis in 2014 using Box-Jenkins methods. Materials and Methods: Monthly data of tuberculosis cases recorded in the surveillance system of Iran tuberculosis control program from 2005 till 2011 was used. Data was reviewed regarding normality, variance equality and stationary conditions. The parameters p, d and q and P, D and Q were determined, and different models were examined. Based on the lowest levels of AIC and BIC, the most suitable model was selected among the models whose overall adequacy was confirmed. Results: During 84 months, 63568 TB patients were recorded. The average was 756.8 (SD = 11.9) TB cases a month. SARIMA (0,1,1)(0,1,1)12 with the lowest level of AIC (12.78) was selected as the most adequate model for prediction. It was predicted that the total nationwide TB cases for 2014 will be about 16.75 per 100,000 people. Conclusions: Regarding the cyclic pattern of TB recorded cases, Box-Jenkins and SARIMA models are suitable for predicting its prevalence in future. Moreover, prediction results show an increasing trend of TB cases in Iran. PMID:25031852

Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Nasehi, Mahshid; Bahrampour, Abbas; Khanjani, Narges; Sharafi, Saeed; Ahmadi, Shanaz

2014-01-01

332

Native New Zealand plants with inhibitory activity towards Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Background Plants have long been investigated as a source of antibiotics and other bioactives for the treatment of human disease. New Zealand contains a diverse and unique flora, however, few of its endemic plants have been used to treat tuberculosis. One plant, Laurelia novae-zelandiae, was reportedly used by indigenous Maori for the treatment of tubercular lesions. Methods Laurelia novae-zelandiae and 44 other native plants were tested for direct anti-bacterial activity. Plants were extracted with different solvents and extracts screened for inhibition of the surrogate species, Mycobacterium smegmatis. Active plant samples were then tested for bacteriostatic activity towards M. tuberculosis and other clinically-important species. Results Extracts of six native plants were active against M. smegmatis. Many of these were also inhibitory towards M. tuberculosis including Laurelia novae-zelandiae (Pukatea). M. excelsa (Pohutukawa) was the only plant extract tested that was active against Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusions Our data provide support for the traditional use of Pukatea in treating tuberculosis. In addition, our analyses indicate that other native plant species possess antibiotic activity. PMID:20537175

2010-01-01

333

Phospholipase C in Beijing strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

E-print Network

Background and Objectives: Phospholipase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays an important role in pathogenesis through breaking up phospholipids and production of diacylglycerol. In this study, we examined the Beijing strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from Iranian patients for the genes encoding this enzyme. Materials and Methods: DNA extraction was performed using CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) from positive culture specimens in tuberculosis patients. PCR was then used to amplify the plcA, plcB, plcC genes of Beijing strain, and non-Beijing strains were identified by spoligotyping. Results: Of 200 specimens, 19 (9.5%) were Beijing strain and 181 (90.5%) were non-Beijing strains. The results of PCR for Beijing strains were as follows: 16 strains (84.2%) were positive for plcA, 17 (89.4%) were positive for plcB and 17 (89.4%) were positive for plcC genes. The standard strain (H37RV) was used as control. Conclusion: The majority of Beijing strains have phospholipase C genes which can contribute to their pathogenesis but we need complementary studies to confirm the role of phospholipase C in pathogenecity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

Goudarzi H; Mirsamadi Es; Farnia P; Jahani Sherafat S; Esfahani M; Faramarzi N

2010-01-01

334

Predictors of tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus co-infection: a case-control study  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis co-infection is a major global challenge. It is not clear why some HIV-positive people are co-infected with tuberculosis (TB) while others are not. This study addressed that question. METHODS: This case-control study was conducted in Tehran, Iran in June 2004, enrolling 2,388 HIV-positive people. Cases were selected from those who were co-infected with TB and controls from those without TB. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the association between M. tuberculosis/HIV co-infection and several predictors. Odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. RESULTS: In this study, 241 cases were compared with 2,147 controls. Sex, age, marital status, educational level, imprisonment, smoking, narcotic use, route of HIV transmission, previous TB infection, isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT), antiretroviral therapy (ART), and low CD4 count (<350 cells/mm3) were independently associated with M. tuberculosis/HIV co-infection (p<0.001). However, after adjusting for all other variables in the model, only the association between M. tuberculosis/HIV co-infection and the following predictors remained statistically significant: imprisonment (odds ratio [OR], 3.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.11-6.90), previous TB infection (OR, 5.54; 95% CI, 1.99-15.39), IPT (OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.06-0.31), ART (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.26-2.61), and CD4 count <350 cells/mm3 (OR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.36-4.02). CONCLUSIONS: Several predictors are associated with M. tuberculosis/HIV co-infection, but only a few indicators were significantly associated with M. tuberculosis/HIV co-infection. It is estimated that a number of predictors of M. tuberculosis/HIV co-infection remain unknown and require further investigation. PMID:25358465

Molaeipoor, Leila; Poorolajal, Jalal; Mohraz, Minoo; Esmailnasab, Nader

2014-01-01

335

A case of isolated splenic tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

There are few cases of isolated splenic tuberculosis reported in the literature internationally, and nearly none from western medical centers. The incidence of tuberculosis has declined in the United States since the 1950s, with 11,585 reported cases in 2009, 21% of which were exclusively extrapulmonary. Splenic tuberculosis occurs mostly as part of miliary tuberculosis in immunocompromised patients. Isolated splenic tuberculosis is extremely rare, particularly in the immunocompetent patient. Patients susceptible to acquiring splenic tuberculosis usually have one of the following risk factors: immunosuppression, preceding pyogenic infections, splenic abnormalities, prior trauma to the spleen, sickle cell disease and other hemopathies, and in the immunocompetent patient another body site infected by M. tuberculosis. In this report we present the case of a young immunocompetent male with no other significant past medical history with isolated splenic tuberculosis. PMID:25667987

Basa, Johanna V.; Singh, Lilly; Jaoude, Wassim Abi; Sugiyama, Gainosuke

2014-01-01

336

Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)  

MedlinePLUS

Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

337

Anemia at the Initiation of Tuberculosis Therapy Is Associated with Delayed Sputum Conversion among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background Pulmonary tuberculosis and anemia are both prevalent in Tanzania. There is limited and inconsistent literature on the association between anemia and sputum conversion following tuberculosis treatment. Methods Newly diagnosed sputum smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients aged ?15 years initiating on standard anti tuberculosis therapy were recruited from 14 of 54 tuberculosis clinics in Dar es Salaam. Patients were receiving medication according to the recommended short course Directly Observed Therapy (DOT) strategy and were followed up prospectively until completion of treatment (six months). Patients were evaluated before initiation of TB treatment by performing the following; clinical history, physical examination, complete blood counts, serum biochemistry and sputum microscopy. Sputum smears were re-examined at two months of anti-tuberculosis therapy for presence of acid fast bacilli. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin <13 g/dl (males) or <12 g/dl (females). Log-binomial regression was used to assess the association between anemia and sputum conversion at two months. Results Of the 1245 patients included in the study, 86% were anemic and 7% were sputum smear positive at two months of anti-tuberculosis therapy. Anemic patients were three times more likely to have sputum positive smear as compared to non-anemic patients at two months (RR?=?3.05; 95% CI 1.11–8.40) p?=?0.03. The risk for sputum positive smear results increased with severity of anemia (P for trend <0.01). Conclusion Baseline anemia is associated with increased risk for persistent positive sputum smears at two months of tuberculosis treatment. Future studies should evaluate the mechanisms for TB-associated anemia as well as the role of intervention for anemia among TB patients. PMID:24642636

Nagu, Tumaini J.; Spiegelman, Donna; Hertzmark, Ellen; Aboud, Said; Makani, Julie; Matee, Mecky I.; Fawzi, Wafaie; Mugusi, Ferdinand

2014-01-01

338

High accuracy mass spectrometry analysis as a tool to verify and improve gene annotation using Mycobacterium tuberculosis as an example  

PubMed Central

Background While the genomic annotations of diverse lineages of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex are available, divergences between gene prediction methods are still a challenge for unbiased protein dataset generation. M. tuberculosis gene annotation is an example, where the most used datasets from two independent institutions (Sanger Institute and Institute of Genomic Research-TIGR) differ up to 12% in the number of annotated open reading frames, and 46% of the genes contained in both annotations have different start codons. Such differences emphasize the importance of the identification of the sequence of protein products to validate each gene annotation including its sequence coding area. Results With this objective, we submitted a culture filtrate sample from M. tuberculosis to a high-accuracy LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer analysis and applied refined N-terminal prediction to perform comparison of two gene annotations. From a total of 449 proteins identified from the MS data, we validated 35 tryptic peptides that were specific to one of the two datasets, representing 24 different proteins. From those, 5 proteins were only annotated in the Sanger database. In the remaining proteins, the observed differences were due to differences in annotation of transcriptional start sites. Conclusion Our results indicate that, even in a less complex sample likely to represent only 10% of the bacterial proteome, we were still able to detect major differences between different gene annotation approaches. This gives hope that high-throughput proteomics techniques can be used to improve and validate gene annotations, and in particular for verification of high-throughput, automatic gene annotations. PMID:18597682

de Souza, Gustavo A; Målen, Hiwa; Søfteland, Tina; Sælensminde, Gisle; Prasad, Swati; Jonassen, Inge; Wiker, Harald G

2008-01-01

339

Role of Serine140 in the mode of action of Mycobacterium tuberculosis ?-ketoacyl-ACP Reductase (MabA)  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis (TB) still remains one of the most deadly infectious diseases in the world. Mycobacterium tuberculosis ?-ketoacyl-ACP Reductase (MabA) is a member of the fatty acid elongation system type II, providing precursors of mycolic acids that are essential to the bacterial cell growth and survival. MabA has been shown to be essential for M. tuberculosis survival and to play a role in intracellular signal transduction of bacilli. Findings Here we describe site-directed mutagenesis, recombinant protein expression and purification, steady-state kinetics, fluorescence spectroscopy, and molecular modeling for S140T and S140A mutant MabA enzymes. No enzyme activity could be detected for S140T and S140A. Although the S140T protein showed impaired NADPH binding, the S140A mutant could bind to NADPH. Computational predictions for NADPH binding affinity to WT, S140T and S140A MabA proteins were consistent with fluorescence spectroscopy data. Conclusions The results suggest that the main role of the S140 side chain of MabA is in catalysis. The S140 side chain appears to also play an indirect role in NADPH binding. Interestingly, NADPH titrations curves shifted from sigmoidal for WT to hyperbolic for S140A, suggesting that the S140 residue may play a role in displacing the pre-existing equilibrium between two forms of MabA in solution. The results here reported provide a better understanding of the mode of action of MabA that should be useful to guide the rational (function-based) design of inhibitors of MabA enzyme activity which, hopefully, could be used as lead compounds with anti-TB action. PMID:23006410

2012-01-01

340

Incidence of HIV-Associated Tuberculosis among Individuals Taking Combination Antiretroviral Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Knowledge of tuberculosis incidence and associated factors is required for the development and evaluation of strategies to reduce the burden of HIV-associated tuberculosis. Methods Systematic literature review and meta-analysis of tuberculosis incidence rates among HIV-infected individuals taking combination antiretroviral therapy. Results From PubMed, EMBASE and Global Index Medicus databases, 42 papers describing 43 cohorts (32 from high/intermediate and 11 from low tuberculosis burden settings) were included in the qualitative review and 33 in the quantitative review. Cohorts from high/intermediate burden settings were smaller in size, had lower median CD4 cell counts at study entry and fewer person-years of follow up. Tuberculosis incidence rates were higher in studies from Sub-Saharan Africa and from World Bank low/middle income countries. Tuberculosis incidence rates decreased with increasing CD4 count at study entry and duration on combination antiretroviral therapy. Summary estimates of tuberculosis incidence among individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy were higher for cohorts from high/intermediate burden settings compared to those from the low tuberculosis burden settings (4.17 per 100 person-years [95% Confidence Interval (CI) 3.39–5.14 per 100 person-years] vs. 0.4 per 100 person-years [95% CI 0.23–0.69 per 100 person-years]) with significant heterogeneity observed between the studies. Conclusions Tuberculosis incidence rates were high among individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy in high/intermediate burden settings. Interventions to prevent tuberculosis in this population should address geographical, socioeconomic and individual factors such as low CD4 counts and prior history of tuberculosis. PMID:25393281

Kufa, Tendesayi; Mabuto, Tonderai; Muchiri, Evans; Charalambous, Salome; Rosillon, Dominique; Churchyard, Gavin; Harris, Rebecca C.

2014-01-01

341

Tuberculosis Prevention in South Africa  

PubMed Central

Background South Africa has one of the highest per capita rates of tuberculosis (TB) incidence in the world. In 2012, the South African government produced a National Strategic Plan (NSP) to control the spread of TB with the ambitious aim of zero new TB infections and deaths by 2032, and a halving of the 2012 rates by 2016. Methods We used a transmission model to investigate whether the NSP targets could be reached if immediate scale up of control methods had happened in 2014. We explored the potential impact of four intervention portfolios; 1) “NSP” represents the NSP strategy, 2) “WHO” investigates increasing antiretroviral therapy eligibility, 3) “Novel Strategies” considers new isoniazid preventive therapy strategies and HIV “Universal Test and Treat” and 4) “Optimised” contains the most effective interventions. Findings We find that even with this scale-up, the NSP targets are unlikely to be achieved. The portfolio that achieved the greatest impact was “Optimised”, followed closely by “NSP”. The “WHO” and “Novel Strategies” had little impact on TB incidence by 2050. Of the individual interventions explored, the most effective were active case finding and reductions in pre-treatment loss to follow up which would have a large impact on TB burden. Conclusion Use of existing control strategies has the potential to have a large impact on TB disease burden in South Africa. However, our results suggest that the South African TB targets are unlikely to be reached without new technologies. Despite this, TB incidence could be dramatically reduced by finding and starting more TB cases on treatment. PMID:25849558

Grant, Alison D.; Fielding, Katherine L.; Churchyard, Gavin J.; White, Richard G.

2015-01-01

342

Evidence of presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in bovine tissue samples by multiplex PCR: possible relevance to reverse zoonosis.  

PubMed

Bovine tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, remains one of the most important zoonotic health concerns worldwide. The transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from humans to animals also occurs especially in countries where there is close interaction of humans with the animals. In the present study, thirty bovine lung tissue autopsy samples from an organized dairy farm located in North India were screened for the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by smear microscopy, histopathological findings and PCR. Differential diagnosis of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis was made based on the deletion of mce-3 operon in M. bovis. The present study found eight of these samples positive for M. tuberculosis by multiplex PCR. Sequencing was performed on two PCR-positive representative samples and on annotation, and BLAST analysis confirmed the presence of gene fragment specific to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The presence of M. tuberculosis in all the positive samples raises the possibility of human-to-cattle transmission and possible adaptation of this organism in bovine tissues. This study accentuates the importance of screening and differential diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in humans and livestock for adopting effective TB control and eradication programmes. PMID:24456326

Mittal, M; Chakravarti, S; Sharma, V; Sanjeeth, B S; Churamani, C P; Kanwar, N S

2014-04-01

343

Abdominal tuberculosis mimicking Crohn’s disease’s exacerbation: A clinical, diagnostic and surgical dilemma. A case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Tuberculosis in Europe is a health public problem, which has increased constantly over the last few decades. The most common clinical manifestation of tuberculosis is pulmonary. The diagnosis of extrapulmonary tuberculosis can be challenging and clinical manifestations of gastrointestinal tuberculosis are unspecific and can mimic other pathologies. Presentation of case A young Chinese man, who had recently been diagnosed with Crohn’s disease, was admitted to the emergency room of our hospital with a one-month history of diffuse abdominal pain and weight loss. The patient initially presented with epigastric pain, which had been constantly increasing over the last 48 h. Other symptoms included diarrhea, nausea, and fever. The patient was then admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn’s disease exacerbation, and a treatment with corticosteroids, azathioprine, mesalazine, adalimumab, and antibiotic therapy was started. The symptoms were due to an initially misdiagnosed case of abdominal tuberculosis. Discussion Intestinal tuberculosis is mainly localized at the ileocecal level in 85% of patients. Medical therapy is the treatment of choice and surgery is not required if it is diagnosed at an early stage.? Conclusion The diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis still remains a challenge for both internists and surgeons. Before starting a therapy with adalimumab, every patient should be tested for latent tuberculosis infection. PMID:25528041

Papis, Davide; Branchi, Vittorio; Gomez, Luis; Herrerias, Fernando; Vilardell, Felip; Gonzalez, Marta; Olsina, Jorge J

2014-01-01

344

9 CFR 311.2 - Tuberculosis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 311.2 Section 311.2 Animals...ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.2 Tuberculosis. The following principles shall...the difference in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis in swine, cattle, sheep,...

2010-01-01

345

38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959 Section 3.959 Pensions...Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on August...for active or inactive (arrested) tuberculosis may receive compensation under...

2011-07-01

346

9 CFR 311.2 - Tuberculosis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 311.2 Section 311.2 Animals...ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.2 Tuberculosis. The following principles shall...the difference in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis in swine, cattle, sheep,...

2011-01-01

347

38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959 Section 3.959 Pensions...Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on August...for active or inactive (arrested) tuberculosis may receive compensation under...

2010-07-01

348

Mechanisms of latency in Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mycobacterium tuberculosis can persist within the human host for years without causing disease, in a syndrome known as latent tuberculosis (TB). As one-third of the world population has latent TB, placing them at risk for active TB, the mechanisms by which M. tuberculosis establishes a latent metabolic state, eludes immune surveillance and responds to triggers that stimulate reactivation are a

Nikki M Parrish; James D Dick; William R Bishai

1998-01-01

349

9 CFR 311.2 - Tuberculosis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 311.2 Section 311.2 Animals...ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.2 Tuberculosis. The following principles shall...the difference in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis in swine, cattle, sheep,...

2012-01-01

350

Mycobacterium tuberculosis as viewed through a computer  

E-print Network

Mycobacterium tuberculosis as viewed through a computer Denise Kirschner and Simeone Marino of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the immune system. Different mathematical models were formulated on the basis that contribute to the success of M. tuberculosis as a human pathogen. Our goal is to stimulate experimentation

Kirschner, Denise

351

38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959 Section 3.959 Pensions...Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on August...for active or inactive (arrested) tuberculosis may receive compensation under...

2014-07-01

352

www.elsevierhealth.com/journals/tube Tuberculosis  

E-print Network

www.elsevierhealth.com/journals/tube Tuberculosis Visualization of microarray results to assist on Mycobacterium tuberculosis were used to develop and evaluate the visualization tool and initiate the development. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.tube.2003.12.012 Tuberculosis (2004) 84, 275­281 #12;define

Sergot, Marek

353

38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959 Section 3.959 Pensions...Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on August...for active or inactive (arrested) tuberculosis may receive compensation under...

2012-07-01

354

9 CFR 311.2 - Tuberculosis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 311.2 Section 311.2 Animals...ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.2 Tuberculosis. The following principles shall...the difference in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis in swine, cattle, sheep,...

2013-01-01

355

www.elsevierhealth.com/journals/tube Tuberculosis  

E-print Network

www.elsevierhealth.com/journals/tube Tuberculosis Direct lung delivery of para-aminosalicylic acid potentially be used for the delivery of additional anti- tuberculosis agents such as rifampicin, aminoglucosides or fluoroquinolones. & 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. KEYWORDS Tuberculosis treatment

356

9 CFR 311.2 - Tuberculosis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 311.2 Section 311.2 Animals...ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.2 Tuberculosis. The following principles shall...the difference in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis in swine, cattle, sheep,...

2014-01-01

357

38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959 Section 3.959 Pensions...Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on August...for active or inactive (arrested) tuberculosis may receive compensation under...

2013-07-01

358

A case of tuberculosis of the prostate.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis of the prostate is uncommon. However, the number of patients with tuberculosis has once again recently been gradually increasing in Japan. The number of immunocompromised hosts, such as those with AIDS, is also increasing, suggesting that this rare infectious disease may increase in frequency in the near future. We present a case of tuberculosis of the prostate. PMID:10515092

Fujikawa, K; Matsui, Y; Fukuzawa, S; Soeda, A; Takeuchi, H

1999-08-01

359

Transmission of Tuberculosis Among the Urban Homeless  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conclusions.\\\\p=m-\\\\Theminimum percentage of cases due to primary tuberculosis in the homeless was estimated to be 53%, compared with the traditional estimate of 10% in the general population. The results suggest that primary tuberculosis caused the majority of tuberculosis cases in this population of the urban homeless in central Los Angeles. (JAMA. 1996;275:305-307)

Peter F. Barnes; Hiyam El-Hajj; Susan Preston-Martin; M. Donald Cave; Brenda E. Jones; Michiko Otaya; Janice Pogoda; Kathleen D. Eisenach

2010-01-01

360

Hepatosplenic tuberculosis with hypersplenism: CT evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hepatosplenic tuberculosis of macronodular form is extremely rare. We present one case of hepatosplenic tuberculosis with its appearance on computed tomography (CT). The CT findings of hepatosplenic tuberculosis were multiple, well-defined, round or ovoid, low-density masses with a range of +35 to +45 HU. Lymphadenopathy in the abdominal and mediastinal area and pleural effusion were also found. Although CT does

Byung Ihn Choi; Jung-Gi Im; Man Chung Han; Hyo Suk Lee

1989-01-01

361

INTRODUCTION CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE remains the leading cause  

E-print Network

. The newly formed HAEC mono- layer stained positive for von Willebrand factor whereas collagen- and calponinINTRODUCTION CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE remains the leading cause of mortality in the United States

Yang, Jian

362

Newer diagnostic modalities for tuberculosis.  

PubMed

The gold standard for diagnosis of tuberculosis is demonstration of mycobacteria from various body fluids. This is often not possible in children due to pauci-bacillary nature of illness. Significant improvement in understanding of molecular biology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has led to development of newer diagnostic techniques of tuberculosis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an emerging diagnostic tool for diagnosis of TB in children. However, its role in day-to-day clinical practice needs to be defined. A negative PCR never eliminates possibility of tuberculosis, and a positive result is not always confirmatory. The PCR may be useful in evaluating children with significant pulmonary disease when diagnosis is not readily established by other means, and in evaluating immunocompromised children (HIV infection) with pulmonary disease. In the absence of good diagnostic methods for tuberculosis, a lot of interest has been generated in serodiagnosis. ELISA has been used to detect antibodies to various purified or complex antigens of M. tuberculosis in children. Despite a large number of studies published over the past several years, serology has found little place in the routine diagnosis of tuberculosis in children, even though it is rapid and does not require specimen from the site of disease. Sensitivity and specificity depend on the antigen used, gold standard for the diagnosis of tuberculosis and the type of tubercular infection. Though most of these tests have high specificity, their sensitivity is poor. In addition, these tests may be influenced by factors such as age, prior BCG vaccination and exposure to environmental mycobacteria. The serological tests, theoretically, may not be able to differentiate between infection and disease. At present, serodiagnosis does not appear to have any role in diagnosis of childhood pulmonary tuberculosis. A new test (QuantiFERON-TB or QFT) that measures the release of interferon-gamma in whole blood in response to stimulation by purified protein derivative is comparable with the tuberculin skin testing to detect latent tubercular infection, and is less affected by BCG vaccination. It can also discriminate responses due to nontuberculous mycobacteria, and avoids variability and subjectivity associated with placing and reading the tuberculin skin test. Polymerase chain reaction based test for identification of katG and rpoB mutation which are associated with isoniazid and rifampicin resistance may help in early identification of drug resistance in mycobacterium. PMID:15080409

Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, S K

2004-03-01

363

Tuberculosis in wild birds: implications for captive birds  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The geographic distribution of avian tuberculosis is widespread but the lack of visible epizootics makes assessment of its impact on wild birds difficult. Generally a low prevalence, widely-scattered, individual animal disease, avian tuberculosis is caused by the same agent in wild and domestic birds. Thus there exists the potential for disease transfer between these two groups in situations that result in direct contact such as wild animals newly captured or transferred from rehabilitation centers, and wild and captive animals intermingling in exhibit areas. During the past 7 yr, tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium avium, was diagnosed in 64 birds submitted to the National Wildlife Health Research Center from 16 states; avian tuberculosis was the primary diagnosis in 52 of the 64 birds, while the remaining 12 isolates were incidental findings. Twenty-eight of these birds were picked up during epizootics caused by other disease agents including avian cholera, botulism type C, and lead, organophosphorus compound, and cyanide poisoning. Twelve birds were found incidental to birds collected during disease monitoring programs and research projects, and 10 birds were collected by hunters or found sick and euthanatized. Tuberculosis lesions occurred (in order of decreasing frequency) in the liver, intestine, spleen, lung, and air sacs. Several unusual morphological presentations were observed in the gizzard, shoulder joint, jugular vein, face, nares and bill, ureter and bone marrow. Infected birds were collected during all 12 mo of the yr from a variety of species in the Anseriformes, Podicipediformes, Gruiformes, and Falconiformes. Nine of the 46 known age birds were immature indicating that lesions can develop during the first year.

Converse, K. A.; Dein, F. J.

1990-01-01

364

Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:24839445

Saif, Muhammad Wasif

2014-01-01

365

Primary resistence of mycobacteria in tuberculosis patients.  

PubMed

Primary mycobactria resistance especially in some countries may be a serious obstacle to a successful therapy and the number of patients carrier of primary resistant mycobacteria remains almost at the same level in spite of the chemotherapeutic treatments and the usually rapid recover of the newly diagnosed cases. This may probably be attributed to the fact that the number of chronic patients, spitting resistant tubercle bacilli has remained almost the same, because these patients are eliminated little by little. In our country there is a constant regression of the morbidity, but not so rapid as expected, The newly diagnosed patients are generally young and, if well treated, they heal quickly and well; moreover, they are usually not so richly bacillised as they used to be once and the severity of their disease, globally evaluated, appears also reduced. The cultural positivity at the first admission into hospital is also diminishing. From all the above facts it is obvious that in order to eradicate tuberculosis it is necessary: First - to avoid creatin chronic patients; in order to reach this goal the treatment must be the most effective possible from the very beginning: INH and Rifampin. Second - to try to cure the chronic patients and to render them abacillary of, at least, to treat them intensively, with the purpose of inducing in the infecting flora a polyresistance which reners the mycobacteria hypovirulent, especially if it includes a R/AMP resistance over 40-gamma. Third - the role of the primary resistance in the epidemiology and the evolution of tuberculosis in the various countries and in the single patients, may be very different. PMID:828501

Daddi, G; Giobbi, A; Lucchesi, M

1976-03-01

366

Revisiting the essentiality of glutamate racemase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Glutamate racemase (MurI) converts l-glutamate into d-glutamate which is an essential component of peptidoglycan in bacteria. The gene encoding glutamate racemase, murI has been shown to be essential for the growth of a number of bacterial species including Escherichia coli. However, in some Gram-positive species d-amino acid transaminase (Dat) can also convert l-glutamate into d-glutamate thus rendering MurI non-essential for growth. In a recent study the murI gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was shown to be non-essential. As d-glutamate is an essential component of peptidoglycan of M. tuberculosis, either Dat or MurI has to be essential for its survival. Since, a Dat encoding gene has not been reported in M. tuberculosis genome sequence, the reported non-essentiality of murI was unexplainable. In order to resolve this dilemma we tried to knockout murI in the presence of single and two copies of murI, in wild type and merodiploid strains respectively. It was found that murI could not be inactivated in the wild type background indicating that it could be an essential gene. Also, inactivation of murI could not be achieved in the presence of externally supplied d-glutamate in 7H9 medium suggesting that M. tuberculosis is unable to take up d-glutamate under the conditions tested. However we could generate murI knockout strains at high frequency when two copies of the gene were present indicating that at least one murI gene is required for cellular viability. The essential nature of MurI in M. tuberculosis H37Rv suggests that it could be a potential drug target. PMID:25447907

Morayya, Sapna; Awasthy, Disha; Yadav, Reena; Ambady, Anisha; Sharma, Umender

2015-01-25

367

Significance of nutrition in pulmonary tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Malnutrition and tuberculosis are both problems mostly of the developing countries. Tuberculosis can lead to malnutrition and malnutrition may predispose to tuberculosis. Poor nutrition leads to protein-energy malnutrition and micronutrients deficiencies which lead to immunodeficiency. This secondary immunodeficiency increases the host's susceptibility to infection and hence increase the risk for developing tuberculosis. Tuberculosis itself leads to reduction in appetite, nutrient malabsorption, micronutrient malabsorption, and altered metabolism leading to wasting and poor nutritional status. Nutritional status and dietary intake and hence nutritional status of patients get improved during antituberculosis treatment. PMID:24915351

Kant, Surya; Gupta, Harshita; Ahluwalia, Savita

2015-06-01

368

Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in children: evidence from global surveillance.  

PubMed

Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) can affect persons of any age, but it remains unknown whether children are more or less likely than adults to have MDR-TB. Representative drug resistance surveillance data reported to the World Health Organization between 1994 and 2011 were analysed to test the association between MDR-TB and age group (children aged <15 years versus adults aged ? 15 years), using odds ratios derived by logistic regression with robust standard errors. Of 85 countries with data from nationwide surveys or surveillance systems, 35 reported at least one paediatric MDR-TB case. Aggregated data on age and drug susceptibility testing for 323 046 tuberculosis cases notified in these 35 countries were analysed. Odds ratios for MDR-TB in children compared to adults varied widely between countries. In Germany, Namibia, South Africa, the UK and the USA, MDR-TB was positively associated with age <15 years. In the remaining countries no association was established. Despite the limitations intrinsic to the use of surveillance data and to the challenges of diagnosing childhood tuberculosis, our analysis suggests that proportions of MDR-TB in children and adults are similar in many settings. Of particular concern is the association found between age <15 years and MDR-TB in southern African countries with high HIV prevalence. PMID:23222872

Zignol, Matteo; Sismanidis, Charalambos; Falzon, Dennis; Glaziou, Philippe; Dara, Masoud; Floyd, Katherine

2013-09-01

369

Diagnosis & treatment of tuberculosis in HIV co-infected patients  

PubMed Central

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global public health challenge, with an estimated 1.4 million patients worldwide. Co-infection with HIV leads to challenges in both the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis. Further, there has been an increase in rates of drug resistant tuberculosis, including multi-drug (MDR-TB) and extensively drug resistant TB (XDRTB), which are difficult to treat and contribute to increased mortality. Because of the poor performance of sputum smear microscopy in HIV-infected patients, newer diagnostic tests are urgently required that are not only sensitive and specific but easy to use in remote and resource-constrained settings. The treatment of co-infected patients requires antituberculosis and antiretroviral drugs to be administered concomitantly; challenges include pill burden and patient compliance, drug interactions, overlapping toxic effects, and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Also important questions about the duration and schedule of anti-TB drug regimens and timing of antiretroviral therapy remain unanswered. From a programmatic point of view, screening of all HIV-infected persons for TB and vice-versa requires good co-ordination and communication between the TB and AIDS control programmes. Linkage of co-infected patients to antiretroviral treatment centres is critical if early mortality is to be prevented. We present here an overview of existing diagnostic strategies, new tests in the pipeline and recommendations for treatment of patients with HIV-TB dual infection. PMID:22310818

Padmapriyadarsini, C.; Narendran, G.; Swaminathan, Soumya

2011-01-01

370

Optimal intervention strategies for tuberculosis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper deals with the problem of optimal control of a deterministic model of tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus). We first present and analyze an uncontrolled tuberculosis model which incorporates the essential biological and epidemiological features of the disease. The model is shown to exhibit the phenomenon of backward bifurcation, where a stable disease-free equilibrium co-exists with one or more stable endemic equilibria when the associated basic reproduction number is less than the unity. Based on this continuous model, the tuberculosis control is formulated and solved as an optimal control problem, indicating how control terms on the chemoprophylaxis and detection should be introduced in the population to reduce the number of individuals with active TB. Results provide a framework for designing the cost-effective strategies for TB with two intervention methods.

Bowong, Samuel; Aziz Alaoui, A. M.

2013-06-01

371

LprG-Mediated Surface Expression of Lipoarabinomannan Is Essential for Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Mycobacterium tuberculosis employs various virulence strategies to subvert host immune responses in order to persist and cause disease. Interaction of M. tuberculosis with mannose receptor on macrophages via surface-exposed lipoarabinomannan (LAM) is believed to be critical for cell entry, inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion, and intracellular survival, but in vivo evidence is lacking. LprG, a cell envelope lipoprotein that is essential for virulence of M. tuberculosis, has been shown to bind to the acyl groups of lipoglycans but the role of LprG in LAM biosynthesis and localization remains unknown. Using an M. tuberculosis lprG mutant, we show that LprG is essential for normal surface expression of LAM and virulence of M. tuberculosis attributed to LAM. The lprG mutant had a normal quantity of LAM in the cell envelope, but its surface was altered and showed reduced expression of surface-exposed LAM. Functionally, the lprG mutant was defective for macrophage entry and inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion, was attenuated in macrophages, and was killed in the mouse lung with the onset of adaptive immunity. This study identifies the role of LprG in surface-exposed LAM expression and provides in vivo evidence for the essential role surface LAM plays in M. tuberculosis virulence. Findings have translational implications for therapy and vaccine development. PMID:25232742

Blumenthal, Antje; Bhamidi, Suresh; Gibbs, Sara; Jackson, Mary; Zare, Richard N.; Ehrt, Sabine; Ernst, Joel D.; Banaei, Niaz

2014-01-01

372

Proteome-wide lysine acetylation profiling of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis.  

PubMed

N(?)-Acetylation of lysine residues represents a pivotal post-translational modification used by both eukaryotes and prokaryotes to modulate diverse biological processes. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of tuberculosis, one of the most formidable public health threats. Many aspects of the biology of M. tuberculosis remain elusive, in particular the extent and function of N(?)-lysine acetylation. With a combination of anti-acetyllysine antibody-based immunoaffinity enrichment with high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified 1128 acetylation sites on 658 acetylated M. tuberculosis proteins. GO analysis of the acetylome showed that acetylated proteins are involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes including metabolism and protein synthesis. Six types of acetylated peptide sequence motif were revealed from the acetylome. Twenty lysine-acetylated proteins showed homology with acetylated proteins previously identified from Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Bacillus subtilis and Streptomyces roseosporus, with several acetylation sites highly conserved among four or five bacteria, suggesting that acetylated proteins are more conserved. Notably, several proteins including isocitrate lyase involved in the persistence, virulence and antibiotic resistance are acetylated, and site-directed mutagenesis of isocitrate lyase acetylation site to glutamine led to a decrease of the enzyme activity, indicating major roles of KAc in these proteins engaged cellular processes. Our data firstly provides a global survey of M. tuberculosis acetylation, and implicates extensive regulatory role of acetylation in this pathogen. This may serve as an important basis to address the roles of lysine acetylation in M. tuberculosis metabolism, persistence and virulence. PMID:25456444

Xie, Longxiang; Wang, Xiaobo; Zeng, Jie; Zhou, Mingliang; Duan, Xiangke; Li, Qiming; Zhang, Zhen; Luo, Hongping; Pang, Lei; Li, Wu; Liao, Guojian; Yu, Xia; Li, Yunxu; Huang, Hairong; Xie, Jianping

2015-02-01

373

The Effect of Hyperglycaemia on In Vitro Cytokine Production and Macrophage Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Type 2 diabetes mellitus is an established risk factor for tuberculosis but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We examined the effects of hyperglycaemia, a hallmark of diabetes, on the cytokine response to and macrophage infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Increasing in vitro glucose concentrations from 5 to 25 mmol/L had marginal effects on cytokine production following stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with M. tuberculosis lysate, LPS or Candida albicans, while 40 mmol/L glucose increased production of TNF-?, IL-1?, IL-6 and IL-10, but not of IFN-?, IL-17A and IL-22. Macrophage differentiation under hyperglycaemic conditions of 25 mmol/L glucose was also associated with increased cytokine production upon stimulation with M. tuberculosis lysate and LPS but in infection experiments no differences in M. tuberculosis killing or outgrowth was observed. The phagocytic capacity of these hyperglycaemic macrophages also remained unaltered. The fact that only very high glucose concentrations were able to significantly influence cytokine production by macrophages suggests that hyperglycaemia alone cannot fully explain the increased susceptibility of diabetes mellitus patients to tuberculosis. PMID:25664765

Wilson, Louis G.; Joosten, Simone A.; Netea, Mihai G.; Ottenhoff, Tom H.; van Crevel, Reinout

2015-01-01

374

Development of a novel anti ESAT-6 monoclonal antibody for screening of Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global public health problem with an estimated one-third of the world’s population infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, thus necessitating fast and accurate diagnosis of TB. However, the diagnosis of latent infection remains difficult due to the lack of a simple, reliable test for M. tuberculosis infection. The objective of the current study was to generate and characterize a novel monoclonal antibody (mAb) that specifically target the early secretory antigenic target 6 (ESAT-6) protein for tuberculosis (TB) immunological diagnosis. The BALB/c mice were immunized by a peptide with 13 amino acids (amino acid residues 24 to 36) of ESAT-6 protein. Stable hybridomas cell lines were established and mAb was identified by Western Blot, immunoprecipitation (IP) and Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, this mouse mAb was used to coat plates, and biotin-labelled polyclonal antibodies were used to detect the antigens. Finally, the antibody was verified in 280 patient sputum culture supernatants and pleural effusion aspirates. The positive detection rate of the generated ESAT-6 mAb was 91% in the clinical diagnosis of tuberculosis pleural effusion, and this mAb had a sensitivity of 92.4% and a specificity of 100% in all M. tuberculosis cases. Our data indicated that the mAb generated in this study can potentially serve as a tool in the laboratory diagnosis of TB. PMID:25550937

Leng, Jianhang; Ding, Yu; Shou, Chengmin; Wu, Zhigang; Zhuo, Guangchao; Wang, Keyi; Shen, Junya; Huang, Sheng

2014-01-01

375

Phosphoproteomics analysis of a clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing isolate: expanding the mycobacterial phosphoproteome catalog  

PubMed Central

Reversible protein phosphorylation, regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases, mediates a switch between protein activity and cellular pathways that contribute to a large number of cellular processes. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes 11 Serine/Threonine kinases (STPKs) which show close homology to eukaryotic kinases. This study aimed to elucidate the phosphoproteomic landscape of a clinical isolate of M. tuberculosis. We performed a high throughput mass spectrometric analysis of proteins extracted from an early-logarithmic phase culture. Whole cell lysate proteins were processed using the filter-aided sample preparation method, followed by phosphopeptide enrichment of tryptic peptides by strong cation exchange (SCX) and Titanium dioxide (TiO2) chromatography. The MaxQuant quantitative proteomics software package was used for protein identification. Our analysis identified 414 serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylated sites, with a distribution of S/T/Y sites; 38% on serine, 59% on threonine and 3% on tyrosine; present on 303 unique peptides mapping to 214 M. tuberculosis proteins. Only 45 of the S/T/Y phosphorylated proteins identified in our study had been previously described in the laboratory strain H37Rv, confirming previous reports. The remaining 169 phosphorylated proteins were newly identified in this clinical M. tuberculosis Beijing strain. We identified 5 novel tyrosine phosphorylated proteins. These findings not only expand upon our current understanding of the protein phosphorylation network in clinical M. tuberculosis but the data set also further extends and complements previous knowledge regarding phosphorylated peptides and phosphorylation sites in M. tuberculosis. PMID:25713560

Fortuin, Suereta; Tomazella, Gisele G.; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Sampson, Samantha L.; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C.; Soares, Nelson C.; Wiker, Harald G.; de Souza, Gustavo A.; Warren, Robin M.

2015-01-01

376

[Tuberculosis in healthcare workers].  

PubMed

Tuberculosis (TB) is an occupational risk hazard that explains 5 to 5.361 additional cases of TB per 100.000 individuals among healthcare workers (HCW) in relation to general population in developing countries. For each clinical case a number of additional infections are occurring, that can be detected by tuberculin skin test conversion among non-BCG vaccinated HCW or by interferon-gamma testing. Risk factors for HCW infection include number of TB patients examined, job characteristics and place of work, delay in diagnostic suspicion, patients with multidrug resistant strains, limited access to appropriate ventilation systems, non-compliance with aerosol dissemination precautions, immune suppressed and/or malnourished HCW. Molecular studies suggest that only 32 to 42% of TB cases among HCW are related to occupational exposure. Useful measures to prevent occupational TB acquisition include a number of administrative-, infrastructure- and personal-related measures that have proven to be successful in reducing occurrence of new infections including clinical TB cases among HCW. In Chile, two official government sponsored guidelines are currently available for preventing TB infection among HCW, issued by the national TBC Control Program and by the National Nosocomial infection Control Program. Major differences in recommendations between these guidelines indicate that an update is urgently needed. PMID:18769770

Fica C, Alberto; Cifuentes D, Marcela; Ajenjo H, M Cristina; Jemenao P, M Irene; Zambrano O, Alejandra; Febré V, Naldy; Delpiano M, Luis; Diomedi P, Alexis; Ramonda C, Paulina

2008-08-01

377

Field Friendly Tuberculosis Biosensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tuberculosis (TB) is a fading threat in the United States, but in the developing world it is still a major health-care concern. Given the rising number of cases and lack of resources, there is a desperate need for an affordable, portable detection system. We are working towards the development of a field-friendly immunological biosensor that utilizes florescence microscopy to undertake this task. We observe fluorescently labeled antibodies/antigens as they bind to a glass slide treated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) in order to inhibit non-specific adsorption. Antibodies against the antigens of interest are bound to the PEGylated glass slides via biotin-streptavidin interactions. Then, fluorescently labeled antibodies are mixed with different concentrations of TB antigens and this solution is incubated on the treated glass slides for 30 minutes. The slides are thoroughly rinsed with water following the incubation period. The antigens are then detected by fluorescence using a low-cost biosensor. Our system includes a ``supermarket-scanner'' HeNe laser, home-built electronics, off-the-shelf optics and a Si photodiode. Work is underway to incorporate a flow-cell into the system, in a small portable box.

Proper, N.; Scherman, M. S.; Jevsevar, K. L.; Stone, J.; McNeil, M. R.; Krapf, D.

2009-10-01

378

Central nervous system tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis (TB) has shown a resurgence in nonendemic populations in recent years and accounts for 8 million deaths annually in the world. Central nervous system involvement is one of the most serious forms of this infection, acting as a prominent cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. The rising number of cases in developed countries is mostly attributed to factors such as the pandemic of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and increased migration in a globalized world. Mycobacterium TB is responsible for almost all cases of tubercular infection in the central nervous system. It can manifest in a variety of forms as tuberculous meningitis, tuberculoma, and tubercular abscess. Spinal infection may result in spondylitis, arachnoiditis, and/or focal intramedullary tuberculomas. Timely diagnosis of central nervous system TB is paramount for the early institution of appropriate therapy, because delayed treatment is associated with severe morbidity and mortality. It is therefore important that physicians and radiologists understand the characteristic patterns, distribution, and imaging manifestations of TB in the central nervous system. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered the imaging modality of choice for the study of patients with suspected TB. Advanced imaging techniques including magnetic resonance perfusion and diffusion tensor imaging may be of value in the objective assessment of therapy and to guide the physician in the modulation of therapy in these patients. PMID:24887691

Torres, Carlos; Riascos, Roy; Figueroa, Ramon; Gupta, Rakesh K

2014-06-01

379

Tuberculosis in Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis (TB) during pregnancy and in the perinatal period was once considered to be an infrequent event in the United States. After a decade of steady decline, however, the disease has begun a resurgence. According to the CDC, a 20% increase in the number of reported cases occurred between 1985 and 1992. The factors associated with this increase are the emergence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the development of drug-resistant organisms, substance abuse, homelessness, and immigration. Environmental factors promoting transmission can be found in overcrowded areas such as correctional facilities, nursing homes, hospitals, and migrant-worker camps. For a large number of medically underserved women, the obstetrician is the only interface with medical care, as most of these patients do not have primary-care providers. It is important, therefore, that health-care providers recognize the clinical symptoms of TB and follow the recognized guidelines for antenatal screening for TB because the omission of these steps can lead to potentially disastrous sequelae in the fetus and neonate. PMID:18476074

Apuzzio, Joseph J.

1996-01-01

380

Fighting tuberculosis: an old disease with new challenges.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a leading cause of mortality worldwide into 21st century. The mortality and spread of this disease has further been aggravated because of synergy of this disease with HIV. A number of anti-TB drugs are ineffective against this disease because of development of resistance strains. Internationally efforts are being made to develop new anti-tubercular agents. A number of drug targets from cell wall biosynthesis, nucleic acid biosynthesis, and many other biosynthetic pathways are being unraveled throughout the world and are being utilized for drug development. In this review, socioeconomic problems in developing countries, efforts to control this disease in different individuals, the targets (known already and newly discovered), existing anti-tubercular agents including natural products and lead molecules, and the future prospects to develop new anti-TB agents are described. PMID:15389729

Tripathi, Rama P; Tewari, Neetu; Dwivedi, Namrata; Tiwari, Vinod K

2005-01-01

381

Field assessment of a model tuberculosis outbreak response plan for low-incidence areas  

PubMed Central

Background For a regional project in four low-incidence states, we designed a customizable tuberculosis outbreak response plan. Prior to dissemination of the plan, a tuberculosis outbreak occurred, presenting an opportunity to perform a field assessment of the plan. The purpose of the assessment was to ensure that the plan included essential elements to help public health professionals recognize and respond to outbreaks. Methods We designed a semi-structured questionnaire and interviewed all key stakeholders involved in the response. We used common themes to assess validity of and identify gaps in the plan. A subset of participants provided structured feedback on the plan. Results We interviewed 11 public health and six community stakeholders. The assessment demonstrated that (1) almost all of the main response activities were reflected in the plan; (2) the plan added value by providing a definition of a tuberculosis outbreak and guidelines for communication and evaluation. These were areas that lacked written protocols during the actual outbreak response; and (3) basic education about tuberculosis and the interpretation and use of genotyping data were important needs. Stakeholders also suggested adding to the plan questions for evaluation and a section for specific steps to take when an outbreak is suspected. Conclusion An interactive field assessment of a programmatic tool revealed the value of a systematic outbreak response plan with a standard definition of a tuberculosis outbreak, guidelines for communication and evaluation, and response steps. The assessment highlighted the importance of education and training for tuberculosis in low-incidence areas. PMID:17963502

Freimanis Hance, Laura; Steingart, Karen R; Hahn, Christine G; Pascopella, Lisa; Nolan, Charles M

2007-01-01

382

The Factors Associated with Tuberculosis Recurrence in the Northwest and West of Iran  

PubMed Central

Background: Identifying the factors associated with the recurrence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) can help in tuberculosis disease prevention and reducing the burden on the health care system. This study was designed to identify the factors associated with recurrence in MTB patients in five border provinces of Iran. Methods: In a cross-sectional study (2010 to 2012), clinical, economic, and social factors associated with the recurrence of tuberculosis were evaluated. The data were collected by a questionnaire and survey of medical records. Simple and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed using SPSS V.18. Results: A total of 300 patients with an average age of 51.9 years (SD 24.2) were randomly selected. Overall, 7.2% of the patients were diagnosed with a recurrence of tuberculosis. Sixty-four percent (n = 151) of the patients were in a low-income class. The migration from a village to a city (OR = 8.4) and weight loss (OR = 1.5) were significantly associated with an increased chance of recurrence. Conclusion: In this study, the selected provinces of Iran had moderate rates of tuberculosis recurrence in comparison to global reports. Further studies on the relationship of both weight loss and the immigration from a village to a city with tuberculosis recurrence are necessary.

SAHEBI, Leyla; ANSARIN, Khalil; Maryam, SEYYEDI; MONFAREDAN, Amir; SABBGH JADID, Hamed

2014-01-01

383

Audiologic monitoring of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis patients on aminoglycoside treatment with long term follow-up  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis has emerged as a significant problem with the resurfacing of tuberculosis and thus the need to use the second line drugs with the resultant increased incidence of adverse effects. We discuss the effect of second line aminoglycoside anti-tubercular drugs on the hearing status of MDR-TB patients. METHODS: Sixty four patients were put on second line aminoglycoside

Prahlad Duggal; Malay Sarkar

2007-01-01

384

Predictors of persistently positive Mycobacterium-tuberculosis-specific interferon-gamma responses in the serial testing of health care workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Data on the performance of Mycobacterium-tuberculosis-specific interferon-(IFN)-? release assays (IGRAs) in the serial testing of health care workers (HCWs) is limited. The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency of IGRA conversions and reversions and to identify predictors of persistent IGRA positivity among serially tested German HCWs in the absence of recent extensive tuberculosis (TB) exposure.

Felix C Ringshausen; Albert Nienhaus; Anja Schablon; Stephan Schlösser; Gerhard Schultze-Werninghaus; Gernot Rohde

2010-01-01

385

Unusual clinical presentation of thoracic tuberculosis: the need for a better knowledge of illness.  

PubMed

Background Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), a highly contagious infectious disease, is a significant public health problem all over the world and remains an important cause of preventable death in the adult population. Endobronchial TB is an unusual form of thoracic TB that may be complicated by tracheobronchial stenosis, and bronchoesophageal fistula formation is a very rare complication. Tubercular lymphadenitis can also lead to fistula formation through a process of caseum necrosis and opening of a fistula between the bronchus and oesophagus. Case Report We report an uncommon case of thoracic TB in an immunocompetent 73-year-old Caucasian man who presented several problems: bronchoesophageal fistula, endobronchial TB, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy in the absence of contemporary parenchymal consolidation. Furthermore, he presented a normal chest radiograph and mostly unclear and non-specific symptoms at onset. Conclusions We emphasize the need for a better knowledge of this illness and awareness that it may have an unusual presentation. In these cases, diagnosis and proper treatment can be delayed, with severe complications for the patient. Pulmonary TB remains a real diagnostic challenge: a normal chest radiograph and nonspecific symptoms do not allow us to exclude this persistent infectious disease. PMID:25907152

Manca, Sandra; Fois, Alessandro Giuseppe; Santoru, Luigi; Trisolini, Rocco; Polo, Maria Francesca; Ostera, Salvatore; Patelli, Marco; Pirina, Pietro

2015-01-01

386

A web-based laboratory information system to improve quality of care of tuberculosis patients in Peru: functional requirements, implementation and usage statistics  

E-print Network

Background: Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis patients in resource-poor settings experience large delays in starting appropriate treatment and may not be monitored appropriately due to an overburdened laboratory system, ...

Shin, Sonya S.

387

Antigen 85C inhibition restricts Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth through disruption of cord factor biosynthesis.  

PubMed

The antigen 85 (Ag85) protein family, consisting of Ag85A, -B, and -C, is vital for Mycobacterium tuberculosis due to its role in cell envelope biogenesis. The mycoloyl transferase activity of these proteins generates trehalose dimycolate (TDM), an envelope lipid essential for M. tuberculosis virulence, and cell wall arabinogalactan-linked mycolic acids. Inhibition of these enzymes through substrate analogs hinders growth of mycobacteria, but a link to mycolic acid synthesis has not been established. In this study, we characterized a novel inhibitor of Ag85C, 2-amino-6-propyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1-benzothiophene-3-carbonitrile (I3-AG85). I3-AG85 was isolated from a panel of four inhibitors that exhibited structure- and dose-dependent inhibition of M. tuberculosis division in broth culture. I3-AG85 also inhibited M. tuberculosis survival in infected primary macrophages. Importantly, it displayed an identical MIC against the drug-susceptible H37Rv reference strain and a panel of extensively drug-resistant/multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated binding of I3-AG85 to Ag85C, similar to its binding to the artificial substrate octylthioglucoside. Quantification of mycolic acid-linked lipids of the M. tuberculosis envelope showed a specific blockade of TDM synthesis. This was accompanied by accumulation of trehalose monomycolate, while the overall mycolic acid abundance remained unchanged. Inhibition of Ag85C activity also disrupted the integrity of the M. tuberculosis envelope. I3-AG85 inhibited the division of and reduced TDM synthesis in an M. tuberculosis strain deficient in Ag85C. Our results indicate that Ag85 proteins are promising targets for novel antimycobacterial drug design. PMID:22290959

Warrier, Thulasi; Tropis, Marielle; Werngren, Jim; Diehl, Anne; Gengenbacher, Martin; Schlegel, Brigitte; Schade, Markus; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Daffe, Mamadou; Hoffner, Sven; Eddine, Ali Nasser; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

2012-04-01

388

The Mycobacterium tuberculosis SecA2 System Subverts Phagosome Maturation To Promote Growth in Macrophages  

PubMed Central

The ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to grow in macrophages is critical to the virulence of this important pathogen. One way M. tuberculosis is thought to maintain a hospitable niche in macrophages is by arresting the normal process of phagosomes maturing into acidified phagolysosomes. The process of phagosome maturation arrest by M. tuberculosis is not fully understood, and there has remained a need to firmly establish a requirement for phagosome maturation arrest for M. tuberculosis growth in macrophages. Other intracellular pathogens that control the phagosomal environment use specialized protein export systems to deliver effectors of phagosome trafficking to the host cell. In M. tuberculosis, the accessory SecA2 system is a specialized protein export system that is required for intracellular growth in macrophages. In studying the importance of the SecA2 system in macrophages, we discovered that SecA2 is required for phagosome maturation arrest. Shortly after infection, phagosomes containing a ?secA2 mutant of M. tuberculosis were more acidified and showed greater association with markers of late endosomes than phagosomes containing wild-type M. tuberculosis. We further showed that inhibitors of phagosome acidification rescued the intracellular growth defect of the ?secA2 mutant, which demonstrated that the phagosome maturation arrest defect of the ?secA2 mutant is responsible for the intracellular growth defect. This study demonstrates the importance of phagosome maturation arrest for M. tuberculosis growth in macrophages, and it suggests there are effectors of phagosome maturation that are exported into the host environment by the accessory SecA2 system. PMID:22215736

Sullivan, Jonathan Tabb; Young, Ellen F.; McCann, Jessica R.

2012-01-01

389

Antigen 85C Inhibition Restricts Mycobacterium tuberculosis Growth through Disruption of Cord Factor Biosynthesis  

PubMed Central

The antigen 85 (Ag85) protein family, consisting of Ag85A, -B, and -C, is vital for Mycobacterium tuberculosis due to its role in cell envelope biogenesis. The mycoloyl transferase activity of these proteins generates trehalose dimycolate (TDM), an envelope lipid essential for M. tuberculosis virulence, and cell wall arabinogalactan-linked mycolic acids. Inhibition of these enzymes through substrate analogs hinders growth of mycobacteria, but a link to mycolic acid synthesis has not been established. In this study, we characterized a novel inhibitor of Ag85C, 2-amino-6-propyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1-benzothiophene-3-carbonitrile (I3-AG85). I3-AG85 was isolated from a panel of four inhibitors that exhibited structure- and dose-dependent inhibition of M. tuberculosis division in broth culture. I3-AG85 also inhibited M. tuberculosis survival in infected primary macrophages. Importantly, it displayed an identical MIC against the drug-susceptible H37Rv reference strain and a panel of extensively drug-resistant/multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated binding of I3-AG85 to Ag85C, similar to its binding to the artificial substrate octylthioglucoside. Quantification of mycolic acid-linked lipids of the M. tuberculosis envelope showed a specific blockade of TDM synthesis. This was accompanied by accumulation of trehalose monomycolate, while the overall mycolic acid abundance remained unchanged. Inhibition of Ag85C activity also disrupted the integrity of the M. tuberculosis envelope. I3-AG85 inhibited the division of and reduced TDM synthesis in an M. tuberculosis strain deficient in Ag85C. Our results indicate that Ag85 proteins are promising targets for novel antimycobacterial drug design. PMID:22290959

Warrier, Thulasi; Tropis, Marielle; Werngren, Jim; Diehl, Anne; Gengenbacher, Martin; Schlegel, Brigitte; Schade, Markus; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Daffe, Mamadou; Hoffner, Sven; Eddine, Ali Nasser

2012-01-01

390

[Submitting to disease, controlling disease, industrialization and medical technology: the case of tuberculosis].  

PubMed

This article presents an overview of the research work undertaken in France and Algeria on tuberculosis and the application of tuberculosis treatments. Tuberculosis is one of the best medical pointers to social inequality. The disease is seen here as typical of the links between industrialization and health, with regard to the evolution of the epidemiological model and the influence of innovational+ treatments, based on chemotherapy, on the organization of care for tubercular patients, together with the socio-economic and cultural changes that have affected both French and Algerian society during the twentieth century. The first part of the article shows how the epidemiology of tuberculosis tends to vary in accordance with the dynamic evolution of social relationships as industrialization occurs in each country, and how world-wide epidemiological trends are one of the best medical pointers to the North-South divide. The second part of the article is given over to a study of the way in which the application of tuberculosis treatments in both France and Algeria is a function of the organization of the health system in each country, of the status and power of the medical profession within society, and of the impact of technical innovations on the changing forms of care for tubercular patients in both countries. In France, it can be seen that the structure of the system set up to combat tuberculosis in the inter-war years has tended to remain unchanged, despite the opportunities for re-organization of tuberculosis treatment and for making therapy less onerous which have arisen as the incidence of the disease has dropped and antibiotics have been introduced. This resistance to change seems due primarily to the difficulty of achieving redeployment of medical staff, and the inertia caused by the rigid structure of tuberculosis care within the French socio-medical system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4048999

Thebaud, A; Lert, F

1985-01-01

391

Comparative analysis of mycobacterium and related actinomycetes yields insight into the evolution of mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis  

PubMed Central

Background The sequence of the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strain H37Rv has been available for over a decade, but the biology of the pathogen remains poorly understood. Genome sequences from other Mtb strains and closely related bacteria present an opportunity to apply the power of comparative genomics to understand the evolution of Mtb pathogenesis. We conducted a comparative analysis using 31 genomes from the Tuberculosis Database (TBDB.org), including 8 strains of Mtb and M. bovis, 11 additional Mycobacteria, 4 Corynebacteria, 2 Streptomyces, Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, Nocardia farcinia, Acidothermus cellulolyticus, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Propionibacterium acnes, and Bifidobacterium longum. Results Our results highlight the functional importance of lipid metabolism and its regulation, and reveal variation between the evolutionary profiles of genes implicated in saturated and unsaturated fatty acid metabolism. It also suggests that DNA repair and molybdopterin cofactors are important in pathogenic Mycobacteria. By analyzing sequence conservation and gene expression data, we identify nearly 400 conserved noncoding regions. These include 37 predicted promoter regulatory motifs, of which 14 correspond to previously validated motifs, as well as 50 potential noncoding RNAs, of which we experimentally confirm the expression of four. Conclusions Our analysis of protein evolution highlights gene families that are associated with the adaptation of environmental Mycobacteria to obligate pathogenesis. These families include fatty acid metabolism, DNA repair, and molybdopterin biosynthesis. Our analysis reinforces recent findings suggesting that small noncoding RNAs are more common in Mycobacteria than previously expected. Our data provide a foundation for understanding the genome and biology of Mtb in a comparative context, and are available online and through TBDB.org. PMID:22452820

2012-01-01

392

Reconstructing Tuberculosis Services after Major Conflict: Experiences and Lessons Learned in East Timor  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem in developing countries. Following the disruption to health services in East Timor due to violent political conflict in 1999, the National Tuberculosis Control Program was established, with a local non-government organisation as the lead agency. Within a few months, the TB program was operational in all districts. Methods and Findings Using the East Timor TB program as a case study, we have examined the enabling factors for the implementation of this type of communicable disease control program in a post-conflict setting. Stakeholder analysis was undertaken, and semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2003 with 24 key local and international stakeholders. Coordination, cooperation, and collaboration were identified as major contributors to the success of the TB program. The existing local structure and experience of the local non-government organisation, the commitment among local personnel and international advisors to establishing an effective program, and the willingness of international advisers and local counterparts to be flexible in their approach were also important factors. This success was achieved despite major impediments, including mass population displacement, lack of infrastructure, and the competing interests of organisations working in the health sector. Conclusions Five years after the conflict, the TB program continues to operate in all districts with high notification rates, although the lack of a feeling of ownership by government health workers remains a challenge. Lessons learned in East Timor may be applicable to other post-conflict settings where TB is highly prevalent, and may have relevance to other disease control programs. PMID:16933956

Martins, Nelson; Kelly, Paul M; Grace, Jocelyn A; Zwi, Anthony B

2006-01-01

393

Epitope-specific CD4(+) , but not CD8(+) , T-cell responses induced by recombinant influenza A viruses protect against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis remains a global health problem, in part due to failure of the currently available vaccine, BCG, to protect adults against pulmonary forms of the disease. We explored the impact of pulmonary delivery of recombinant influenza A viruses (rIAVs) on the induction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis)-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses and the resultant protection against M. tuberculosis infection in C57BL/6 mice. Intranasal infection with rIAVs expressing a CD4(+) T-cell epitope from the Ag85B protein (PR8.p25) or CD8(+) T-cell epitope from the TB10.4 protein (PR8.TB10.4) generated strong T-cell responses to the M. tuberculosis-specific epitopes in the lung that persisted long after the rIAVs were cleared. Infection with PR8.p25 conferred protection against subsequent M. tuberculosis challenge in the lung, and this was associated with increased levels of poly-functional CD4(+) T cells at the time of challenge. By contrast, infection with PR8.TB10.4 did not induce protection despite the presence of IFN-?-producing M. tuberculosis-specific CD8(+) T cells in the lung at the time of challenge and during infection. Therefore, the induction of pulmonary M. tuberculosis epitope-specific CD4(+) , but not CD8(+) T cells, is essential for protection against acute M. tuberculosis infection in the lung. PMID:25430701

Flórido, Manuela; Pillay, Roman; Gillis, Caitlin M; Xia, Yingju; Turner, Stephen J; Triccas, James A; Stambas, John; Britton, Warwick J

2015-03-01

394

Tuberculosis Disease Diagnosis Using Artificial Immune Recognition System  

PubMed Central

Background: There is a high risk of tuberculosis (TB) disease diagnosis among conventional methods. Objectives:This study is aimed at diagnosing TB using hybrid machine learning approaches. Materials and Methods: Patient epicrisis reports obtained from the Pasteur Laboratory in the north of Iran were used. All 175 samples have twenty features. The features are classified based on incorporating a fuzzy logic controller and artificial immune recognition system. The features are normalized through a fuzzy rule based on a labeling system. The labeled features are categorized into normal and tuberculosis classes using the Artificial Immune Recognition Algorithm. Results:Overall, the highest classification accuracy reached was for the 0.8 learning rate (?) values. The artificial immune recognition system (AIRS) classification approaches using fuzzy logic also yielded better diagnosis results in terms of detection accuracy compared to other empirical methods. Classification accuracy was 99.14%, sensitivity 87.00%, and specificity 86.12%. PMID:24688316

Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Hessam, Somayeh; Javidnia, Hossein; Amiribesheli, Mohsen; Vahdat, Shaghayegh; Petkovi?, Dalibor; Gani, Abdullah; Kiah, Miss Laiha Mat

2014-01-01

395

Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Mycobacteria as Amoeba-Resistant Organisms  

E-print Network

Background: Most environmental non-tuberculous mycobacteria have been demonstrated to invade amoebal trophozoites and cysts, but such relationships are largely unknown for members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. An environmental source has been proposed for the animal Mycobacterium bovis and the human Mycobacterium canettii. Methodology/Principal Findings: Using optic and electron microscopy and co-culture methods, we observed that 8960.6 % of M. canettii, 12.460.3 % of M. tuberculosis, 11.762 % of M. bovis and 11.260.5 % of Mycobacterium avium control organisms were phagocytized by Acanthamoeba polyphaga, a ratio significantly higher for M. canettii (P = 0.03), correlating with the significantly larger size of M. canetti organisms (P = 0.035). The percentage of intraamoebal mycobacteria surviving

Felix Mba Medie; Ar Ben Salah; Bernard Henrissat; Didier Raoult; Michel Drancourt

396

MODS for Tuberculosis Screening Prior to Isoniazid Preventive Therapy in HIV-Infected Persons  

PubMed Central

Background Active tuberculosis (TB) must be excluded before initiating isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) in HIV-infected persons, but currently used screening strategies suffer from poor sensitivity and specificity and high patient attrition rates. Liquid TB culture is now recommended for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in TB suspects. This study compared the efficacy, effectiveness and speed of the microscopic-observation drug-susceptibility (MODS) assay with currently used strategies for tuberculosis screening prior to IPT in HIV-infected persons. Methods 471 HIV-infected IPT candidates at three hospitals in Lima, Peru, were enrolled into a prospective comparison of tuberculosis screening strategies, including laboratory, clinical and radiographic assessments. Results Of 435 patients who provided two sputum samples, M. tuberculosis was detected in 27 (6.2%) by MODS, 22 (5.1%) by Lowenstein-Jensen culture and 7 (1.6%) by smear. Of patients with any positive microbiological test, a MODS culture was positive in 96% by 14 days and 100% by 21 days. MODS simultaneously detected multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in two patients. Screening strategies involving combinations of clinical assessment, chest radiograph and sputum smear were less effective than two liquid TB cultures in accurately diagnosing and excluding tuberculosis (p<0.01). Screening strategies that included non-culture tests had poor sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions MODS identified, and reliably excluded, cases of pulmonary tuberculosis more accurately than other screening strategies, while providing results significantly faster than Lowenstein-Jensen culture. The streamlining of TB rule-out through the use of liquid culture-based strategies could help facilitate the massive upscaling of IPT required to reduce HIV and TB morbidity and mortality. PMID:20192727

Reddy, Krishna P.; Brady, Mark F.; Gilman, Robert H.; Coronel, Jorge; Ñavincopa, Marcos; Ticona, Eduardo; Chavez, Gonzalo; Sánchez, Eduardo; Rojas, Christian; Solari, Lely; Valencia, Jorge; Pinedo, Yvett; Benites, Carlos; Friedland, Jon S.; Moore, David A.J.

2010-01-01

397

Coal remains a hot commodity for Australia  

SciTech Connect

Based largely on analyses by the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics in late 2005 and early 2006, the article looks at the recent and near future export market for Australian coal. Demand in Asia is growing; European demand remains steady. Developments existing and new mines in Queensland are summarised in the article. 3 tabs.

Bram, L.

2006-02-15

398

Predicting the remaining service life of concrete  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power plants are providing, currently, about 17 percent of the U.S. electricity and many of these plants are approaching their licensed life of 40 years. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Laboratory are carrying out a program to develop a methodology for assessing the remaining safe-life of the concrete components and structures in nuclear power plants. This program has the overall objective of identifying potential structural safety issues, as well as acceptance criteria, for use in evaluations of nuclear power plants for continued service. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is contributing to this program by identifying and analyzing methods for predicting the remaining life of in-service concrete materials. This report examines the basis for predicting the remaining service lives of concrete materials of nuclear power facilities. Methods for predicting the service life of new and in-service concrete materials are analyzed. These methods include (1) estimates based on experience, (2) comparison of performance, (3) accelerated testing, (4) stochastic methods, and (5) mathematical modeling. New approaches for predicting the remaining service lives of concrete materials are proposed and recommendations for their further development given. Degradation processes are discussed based on considerations of their mechanisms, likelihood of occurrence, manifestations, and detection. They include corrosion, sulfate attack, alkali-aggregate reactions, frost attack, leaching, radiation, salt crystallization, and microbiological attack.

Clifton, J.F.

1991-11-01

399

Juveniles' Motivations for Remaining in Prostitution  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Qualitative data from in-depth interviews were collected in 1990-1991, 1992, and 2000 with 49 prostituted juveniles remanded to two rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. These data are analyzed to explore Taiwanese prostituted juveniles' feelings about themselves and their work, their motivations for remaining in prostitution, and their difficulties…

Hwang, Shu-Ling; Bedford, Olwen

2004-01-01

400

Russian questions remain after space station review  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Following the project's first major design review, some unresolved technical issues, mainly centered on details of how to integrate Russian hardware into the U.S./international space station, remain. No 'show stoppers' were found in the review. Specific open technical issues are discussed in this article.

Asker, James R.

1994-01-01

401

Odor analysis of decomposing buried human remains  

SciTech Connect

This study, conducted at the University of Tennessee's Anthropological Research Facility (ARF), lists and ranks the primary chemical constituents which define the odor of decomposition of human remains as detected at the soil surface of shallow burial sites. Triple sorbent traps were used to collect air samples in the field and revealed eight major classes of chemicals which now contain 478 specific volatile compounds associated with burial decomposition. Samples were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and were collected below and above the body, and at the soil surface of 1.5-3.5 ft. (0.46-1.07 m) deep burial sites of four individuals over a 4-year time span. New data were incorporated into the previously established Decompositional Odor Analysis (DOA) Database providing identification, chemical trends, and semi-quantitation of chemicals for evaluation. This research identifies the 'odor signatures' unique to the decomposition of buried human remains with projected ramifications on human remains detection canine training procedures and in the development of field portable analytical instruments which can be used to locate human remains in shallow burial sites.

Vass, Arpad Alexander [ORNL; Smith, Rob R [ORNL; Thompson, Cyril V [ORNL; Burnett, Michael N [ORNL; Dulgerian, Nishan [ORNL; Eckenrode, Brian A [ORNL

2008-01-01

402

Tuberculosis and Stigma: Predictors of Prejudice Against People with Tuberculosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tuberculosis is a main cause of mortality and morbidity in developing countries. Although diagnostic and curative means are well known, they are not always available and affordable. Also, the disease has a worldwide stigma, which adds to the suffering. A survey exploring the correlates of prejudice, as an attitudinal component of this stigma, was carried out in Cali, Colombia. Results

Ernesto Jaramillo

1999-01-01

403

‘Complex’ but coping: experience of symptoms of tuberculosis and health care seeking behaviours - a qualitative interview study of urban risk groups, London, UK  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis awareness, grounded in social cognition models of health care seeking behaviour, relies on the ability of individuals to recognise symptoms, assess their risk and access health care (passive case finding). There is scant published research into the health actions of ‘hard-to-reach’ groups with tuberculosis, who represent approximately 17% of the London TB caseload. This study aimed to analyse patients’ knowledge of tuberculosis, their experiences of symptoms and their health care seeking behaviours. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 participants, predominantly homeless and attending a major tuberculosis centre in London, UK. Most had complex medical and social needs including drug and alcohol use or immigration problems affecting entitlement to social welfare. Analytical frameworks aimed to reflect the role of broader social structures in shaping individual health actions. Results Although participants demonstrated some knowledge of tuberculosis their awareness of personal risk was low. Symptoms commonly associated with tuberculosis were either not recognised or were attributed to other causes for which participants would not ordinarily seek health care. Many accessed health care by chance and, for some, for health concerns other than tuberculosis. Conclusions Health education, based on increasing awareness of symptoms, may play a limited role in tuberculosis care for populations with complex health and social needs. The findings support the intensification of outreach initiatives to identify groups at risk of tuberculosis and the development of structured care pathways which support people into prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24943308

2014-01-01

404

Association between vitamin D insufficiency and tuberculosis in a vietnamese population  

PubMed Central

Background Recent in vitro evidence suggests a link between vitamin D status and the risk of tuberculosis (TB). This study sought to examine the association between vitamin D status, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and the risk of TB in a Vietnamese population. Methods The study was designed as a matched case-control study, which involved 166 TB patients (113 men and 53 women), who were age-and-sex matched with 219 controls (113 men and 106 women). The average age of men and women was 49 and 50, respectively. TB was diagnosed by the presence of acid-fast bacilli on smears from sputum, and the isolation of M. tuberculosis. All patients were hospitalized for treatment in a TB specialist hospital. Controls were randomly drawn from the general community within the Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam. 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and PTH was measured prior to treatment by an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA) on a Roche Elecsys. A serum level of 25(OH)D below 30 ng/mL was deemed to be vitamin D insufficient. Results The prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency was 35.4% in men with TB and 19.5% in controls (P = 0.01). In women, there were no significant differences in serum 25(OH)D and serum PTH levels between TB patients and controls. The prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in women with TB (45.3%) was not significantly different from those without TB (47.6%; P = 0.91). However, in both genders, serum calcium levels in TB patients were significantly lower than in non-TB individuals. Smoking (odds ratio [OR] 1.25; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10 - 14.7), reduced 25(OH)D (OR per standard deviation [SD]: 1.14; 95% CI 1.07 - 10.7) and increased PTH (OR per SD 1.13; 95% CI 1.05 - 10.4) were independently associated with increased risk of TB in men. Conclusion These results suggest that vitamin D insufficiency was a risk factor for tuberculosis in men, but not in women. However, it remains to be established whether the association is a causal relationship. PMID:20973965

2010-01-01

405

Bacterial Genetic Signatures of Human Social Phenomena among M. tuberculosis from an Aboriginal Canadian Population  

PubMed Central

Despite a widespread global distribution and highly variable disease phenotype, there is little DNA sequence diversity among isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, many regional population genetic surveys have revealed a stereotypical structure in which a single clone, lineage, or clade makes up the majority of the population. It is often assumed that dominant clones are highly adapted, that is, the overall structure of M. tuberculosis populations is the result of positive selection. In order to test this assumption, we analyzed genetic data from extant populations of bacteria circulating in Aboriginal communities in Saskatchewan, Canada. Demographic parameters of the bacterial population were estimated from archival epidemiological data collected over ?130 years since the onset of epidemic tuberculosis in the host communities. Bacterial genetic data were tested against neutral theory expectations and the local evolutionary history of M. tuberculosis investigated by phylogenetic analysis. Our findings are not consistent with positive selection on the bacterial population. Instead, we uncovered founder effects persisting over decades and barriers to gene flow within the bacterial population. Simulation experiments suggested that a combination of these neutral influences could result in the stereotypical structure of M. tuberculosis populations. Some aspects of population structure were suggestive of background selection, and data were on the whole consistent with combined effects of population bottlenecks, subdivision, and background selection. Neutral phenomena, namely, bottlenecks and partitions within populations, are prominent influences on the evolution of M. tuberculosis and likely contribute to restricted genetic diversity observed within this species. Given these influences, a complex evolutionary model will be required to define the relative fitness of different M. tuberculosis lineages and, ultimately, to uncover the genetic basis for its success as a pathogen. PMID:19861642

Pepperell, Caitlin; Hoeppner, Vernon H.; Lipatov, Mikhail; Wobeser, Wendy; Schoolnik, Gary K.; Feldman, Marcus W.

2010-01-01

406

Time to Culture Conversion and Regimen Composition in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Treatment  

PubMed Central

Sputum cultures are an important tool in monitoring the response to tuberculosis treatment, especially in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. There has, however, been little study of the effect of treatment regimen composition on culture conversion. Well-designed clinical trials of new anti-tuberculosis drugs require this information to establish optimized background regimens for comparison. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to assess whether the use of an aggressive multidrug-resistant tuberculosis regimen was associated with more rapid sputum culture conversion. We conducted Cox proportional-hazards analyses to examine the relationship between receipt of an aggressive regimen for the 14 prior consecutive days and sputum culture conversion. Sputum culture conversion was achieved in 519 (87.7%) of the 592 patients studied. Among patients who had sputum culture conversion, the median time to conversion was 59 days (IQR: 31–92). In 480 patients (92.5% of those with conversion), conversion occurred within the first six months of treatment. Exposure to an aggressive regimen was independently associated with sputum culture conversion during the first six months of treatment (HR: 1.36; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.69). Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HR 3.36; 95% CI: 1.47, 7.72) and receiving less exposure to tuberculosis treatment prior to the individualized multidrug-resistant tuberculosis regimen (HR: 1.58; 95% CI: 1.28, 1.95) were also independently positively associated with conversion. Tachycardia (HR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.61, 0.98) and respiratory difficulty (HR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.62, 0.97) were independently associated with a lower rate of conversion. This study is the first demonstrating that the composition of the multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment regimen influences the time to culture conversion. These results support the use of an aggressive regimen as the optimized background regimen in trials of new anti-TB drugs. PMID:25238411

Tierney, Dylan B.; Franke, Molly F.; Becerra, Mercedes C.; Alcántara Virú, Félix A.; Bonilla, César A.; Sánchez, Epifanio; Guerra, Dalia; Muñoz, Maribel; Llaro, Karim; Palacios, Eda; Mestanza, Lorena; Hurtado, Rocío M.; Furin, Jennifer J.; Shin, Sonya; Mitnick, Carole D.

2014-01-01

407

[Zoonotic tuberculosis in Argentina].  

PubMed

There are significant achievements in the control of animal tuberculosis (tB) in Argentina. the percentage of bovines with apparent tB lesions at the slaughterhouse inspection decreased from 6.7% to 0.6% between 1969 and 2011. on the other hand, the mean percentage of human tB cases due to M. bovis among all those bacteriologically confirmed, was in Santa Fe, an agro-industrial province, 2.3% in the period 1977-2001. It fell to 1.6% by 2011. In the Cetrángolo Hospital (Buenos Aires), it was 0.34% in the period 2001-2005, and 0.36% in 2006-2011. At the Muñiz Hospital, these percentages decreased from 1.75% in 1971 to 0.22% in 2006. Frequency of HIV infection among M. bovis cases varied from 5.9% in santa Fe to 11.1% and 20.5% respectively, in Cetrángolo and Muñiz Hospitals (a reference institution for aids) in Buenos Aires. According to these data M. bovis infection predominates in agro-industrial/ rural areas, showing a slow decrease there as well as in Buenos Aires. Co-infection with HIV is more frequent among patients with M. bovis that in all cases of tB. The situation of M. bovis in Argentina is here compared with that in USA and in several European and Latin American countries. Trends followed by tB in cattle, in humans, and the percentages of M. bovis among them, are not always closely related to move towards the common goal of eradicating tB; the employment of appropriate strategies and the strengthening of control measures are critical in both programs. PMID:23241296

Kantor, Isabel N de; Torres, Pedro M; Morcillo, Nora; Imaz, María S; Sequeira, María D

2012-01-01

408

76 FR 26239 - Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis; Public Meetings  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Docket No. APHIS-2011-0044] Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis; Public Meetings AGENCY...framework being developed for the bovine tuberculosis and brucellosis programs in the United...revisions to its programs regarding bovine tuberculosis (TB) and bovine brucellosis in...

2011-05-06

409

45 CFR 96.127 - Requirements regarding tuberculosis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Requirements regarding tuberculosis. 96.127 Section 96.127 Public...96.127 Requirements regarding tuberculosis. (a) States shall require...with the State Department of Health/Tuberculosis Control Officer, which address how...

2010-10-01

410

45 CFR 96.127 - Requirements regarding tuberculosis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Requirements regarding tuberculosis. 96.127 Section 96.127 Public...96.127 Requirements regarding tuberculosis. (a) States shall require...with the State Department of Health/Tuberculosis Control Officer, which address how...

2011-10-01

411

76 FR 38602 - Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis; Program Framework  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Docket No. APHIS-2011-0044] Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis; Program Framework...framework being developed for the bovine tuberculosis and brucellosis programs in the United...revisions to its programs regarding bovine tuberculosis (TB) and bovine brucellosis in...

2011-07-01

412

Forum in immunology Live attenuated mutants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

E-print Network

Forum in immunology Live attenuated mutants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as candidate vaccines against tuberculosis Vasan K. Sambandamurthy, William R. Jacobs Jr. * Department of Microbiology to manipulate Mycobacterium tuberculosis have led to the construction of defined mutants and to the study

413

Truman State University Student Health Center Tuberculosis Screening Form  

E-print Network

Truman State University Student Health Center Tuberculosis Screening Form Name been exposed to Tuberculosis since your last TB skin test? Yes No If yes, when and where did the exposure occur? ________________________________________ Have you ever been treated for Tuberculosis? Yes

Gering, Jon C.

414

Explosives remain preferred methods for platform abandonment  

SciTech Connect

Economics and safety concerns indicate that methods involving explosives remain the most practical and cost-effective means for abandoning oil and gas structures in the Gulf of Mexico. A decade has passed since 51 dead sea turtles, many endangered Kemp`s Ridleys, washed ashore on the Texas coast shortly after explosives helped remove several offshore platforms. Although no relationship between the explosions and the dead turtles was ever established, in response to widespread public concern, the US Minerals Management Service (MMS) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) implemented regulations limiting the size and timing of explosive charges. Also, more importantly, they required that operators pay for observers to survey waters surrounding platforms scheduled for removal for 48 hr before any detonations. If observers spot sea turtles or marine mammals within the danger zone, the platform abandonment is delayed until the turtles leave or are removed. However, concern about the effects of explosives on marine life remains.

Pulsipher, A.; Daniel, W. IV [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Kiesler, J.E. [Kiesler (James E.), Morgan City, LA (United States); Mackey, V. III [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-05-06

415

High Prevelance of Rifampin-Monoresistant Tuberculosis: A Retrospective Analysis among Iranian Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients  

PubMed Central

We determined the prevalence of rifampin-monoresistant tuberculosis (RMR-TB) in Iran. Because development of RMR-TB is not common, we also identified the major risk factors associated with RMR-TB reported from different provinces of Iran. Data for 3,020 TB patients who remained or became smear positive after two, four, six, and nine months of standard first-line chemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Of 3,020 patients, 1,242 patients (41.1%) were culture and DNA positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Of these patients, 73 (7.4%) patients had monoresistant isolates to rifampin, which was significantly higher than that for multidrug-resistant TB (5.8%). The average rate of RMR-TB in the studied population ranged from 5% to 10%. Classical investigation showed that 33.6% of patients had either a previous or family history of TB. Molecular epidemiology methods (i.e., spoligotyping and Mycobacterium intespersed repetitive unit–variable number tandem repeat), defined transmission link in three clusters (13%). These results outline the urgent need for a comprehensive plan for detection and treatment of RMR-TB cases. PMID:24189362

Velayati, Ali Akbar; Farnia, Parissa; Mozafari, Mohadese; Sheikholeslami, Maryam Fatemeh; Karahrudi, Mona Afraei; Tabarsi, Payam; Hoffner, Sven

2014-01-01

416

High prevelance of rifampin-monoresistant tuberculosis: a retrospective analysis among Iranian pulmonary tuberculosis patients.  

PubMed

We determined the prevalence of rifampin-monoresistant tuberculosis (RMR-TB) in Iran. Because development of RMR-TB is not common, we also identified the major risk factors associated with RMR-TB reported from different provinces of Iran. Data for 3,020 TB patients who remained or became smear positive after two, four, six, and nine months of standard first-line chemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Of 3,020 patients, 1,242 patients (41.1%) were culture and DNA positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Of these patients, 73 (7.4%) patients had monoresistant isolates to rifampin, which was significantly higher than that for multidrug-resistant TB (5.8%). The average rate of RMR-TB in the studied population ranged from 5% to 10%. Classical investigation showed that 33.6% of patients had either a previous or family history of TB. Molecular epidemiology methods (i.e., spoligotyping and Mycobacterium interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat), defined transmission link in three clusters (13%). These results outline the urgent need for a comprehensive plan for detection and treatment of RMR-TB cases. PMID:24189362

Velayati, Ali Akbar; Farnia, Parissa; Mozafari, Mohadese; Sheikholeslami, Maryam Fatemeh; Karahrudi, Mona Afraei; Tabarsi, Payam; Hoffner, Sven

2014-01-01

417

Tuberculosis Prevention in College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To help college health services in all parts of the country improve their approach to latent tuberculosis, two Listservs were provided for them to post their questions on dealing with TB infection. In this article, the authors present some of the questions posted in the Listservs and their corresponding answers. In their answers, the authors have…

Lerman, Stephen J.; Bernardo, John; Daly, Jennifer S.; Husson, Robert

2004-01-01

418

Childhood tuberculosis in general practice.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis (TB) in children is a common cause of morbidity. Diagnosis is difficult because of paucibacillary nature of illness and difficulty in obtaining appropriate samples. Children presenting with poor weight gain, fever with or without cough for more than two weeks or contact with an adult in family with pulmonary tuberculosis should be investigated for TB. In all suspected cases of tuberculosis initial investigations include radiograph of chest (CXR) and Mantoux test. If CXR is suggestive of TB, an ambulatory gastric aspirate and induced sputum for acid fast bacilli (AFB) smear may be carried out in two days. Children with AFB positive or abnormal CXR with positive Mantoux test should be started on Antitubercular therapy (ATT). Rest of the patients require more investigations and should be referred to a specialist. All children with newly diagnosed tuberculosis should be treated with 6 mo of ATT (two months with 4 drugs, followed by four months with 2 drugs). Children on ATT should be monitored for improvement in symptoms and weight gain along with side effects of medications. CXR should be done after completion of treatment. PMID:25280927

Kumar, Prawin; Kumar, Amber; Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, S K

2015-04-01

419

Advances in the diagnosis of tuberculosis: current status and future prospects.  

PubMed

Lack of diagnosis and diagnostic capacity remain barriers to tuberculosis (TB) control. This review describes recent advances in TB diagnostics, the current TB diagnostic landscape, and some of the key challenges in the quest for accurate, simple diagnostic tests that have meaningful impact on the health of individual patients and on TB epidemiology. PMID:25868017

Dorman, S

2015-05-01

420

Tumor necrosis factor-? is required in the protective immune response against mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding the immunological mechanisms of protection and pathogenesis in tuberculosis remains problematic. We have examined the extent to which tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF?) contributes to this disease using murine models In which the action of TNF? is inhibited. TNFa was neutralized In vivo by monoclonal antibody; in addition, a mouse strain with a disruption in the gene for the 55

JoAnne L. Flynn; Marsha M. Goldstein; John Chan; Karla J. Triebold; Klaus Pfeffer; Charles J. Lowenstein; Robert Schrelber; Tak W. Mak; Barry R. Bloom

1995-01-01

421

The Calf Model of Immunity for Development of a Vaccine Against Tuberculosis  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Abstract: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health threat and can be considered a reemerging disease due to many factors and is especially problematic in developing countries where co-infection with HIV significantly increases morbidity and mortality. Vaccination is a low cost and effective ...

422

Effect of Standard Tuberculosis Treatment on Plasma Cytokine Levels in Patients with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Background Sputum Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) culture is commonly used to assess response to antibiotic treatment in individuals with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Such techniques are constrained by the slow growth rate of Mtb, and more sensitive methods to monitor Mtb clearance are needed. The goal of this study was to evaluate changes in plasma cytokines in patients undergoing treatment for TB as a means of identifying candidate host markers associated with microbiologic response to therapy. Methods Twenty-four plasma cytokines/chemokines were measured in 42 individuals diagnosed with active pulmonary TB, 52% were HIV co-infected. Individuals, undergoing a 26-week standard TB treatment, were followed longitudinally over 18 months and measurements were associated with HIV status and rates of sputum culture conversion. Results Plasma concentrations of interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were significantly reduced upon TB treatment, regardless of HIV status. By the end of treatment, IP-10 concentrations were significantly lower in HIV negative individuals when compared to HIV-positive individuals (p?=?0.02). Moreover, in HIV negative patients, plasma VEGF concentrations, measured as early as 2-weeks post TB treatment initiation, positively correlated with the time of sputum conversion (p?=?0.0017). No significant changes were observed in other studied immune mediators. Conclusions These data suggest that VEGF plasma concentration, measured during early TB treatment, could represent a surrogate marker to monitor sputum culture conversion in HIV uninfected individuals. PMID:22606304

Riou, Catherine; Perez Peixoto, Blas; Roberts, Lindi; Ronacher, Katharina; Walzl, Gerhard; Manca, Claudia; Rustomjee, Roxana; Mthiyane, Thuli; Fallows, Dorothy

2012-01-01

423

Function and Potentials of M. tuberculosis Epitopes  

PubMed Central

Study of the function of epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens contributed significantly toward better understanding of the immunopathogenesis and to efforts for improving infection and disease control. Characterization of genetically permissively presented immunodominant epitopes has implications for the evolution of the host–parasite relationship, development of immunodiagnostic tests, and subunit prophylactic vaccines. Knowledge of the determinants of cross-sensitization, relevant to other pathogenic or environmental mycobacteria and to host constituents has advanced. Epitope-defined IFN? assay kits became established for the specific detection of infection with tubercle bacilli both in humans and cattle. The CD4 T-cell epitope repertoire was found to be more narrow in patients with active disease than in latently infected subjects. However, differential diagnosis of active TB could not be made reliably merely on the basis of epitope recognition. The mechanisms by which HLA polymorphism can influence the development of multibacillary tuberculosis (TB) need further analysis of epitopes, recognized by Th2 helper cells for B-cell responses. Future vaccine development would benefit from better definition of protective epitopes and from improved construction and formulation of subunits with enhanced immunogenicity. Epitope-defined serology, due to its operational advantages is suitable for active case finding in selected high disease incidence populations, aiming for an early detection of infectious cases and hence for reducing the transmission of infection. The existing knowledge of HLA class I binding epitopes could be the basis for the construction of T-cell receptor-like ligands for immunotherapeutic application. Continued analysis of the functions of mycobacterial epitopes, recognized by T cells and antibodies, remains a fertile avenue in TB research. PMID:24715888

Ivanyi, Juraj

2014-01-01

424

Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection: its impact on quality of life  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND-: Very little is known about the quality of life of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV co-infected patients. In this study in Ethiopia, we compared the quality of life HIV positive patients with and without TB. METHODS-: A cross sectional study was conducted from February to April, 2009 in selected hospitals in Oromiya Regional state, Ethiopia. The study population consisted of

Amare Deribew; Markos Tesfaye; Yohannes Hailmichael; Nebiyu Negussu; Shallo Daba; Ajeme Wogi; Tefera Belachew; Ludwig Apers; Robert Colebunders

2009-01-01