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Sample records for backscattered diffraction ebsd

  1. Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) Characterization of Uranium and Uranium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, Rodney J.; Kelly, Ann Marie; Clarke, Amy J.; Field, Robert D.; Wenk, H. R.

    2012-07-25

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to examine the microstructures of unalloyed uranium, U-6Nb, U-10Mo, and U-0.75Ti. For unalloyed uranium, we used EBSD to examine the effects of various processes on microstructures including casting, rolling and forming, recrystallization, welding, and quasi-static and shock deformation. For U-6Nb we used EBSD to examine the microstructural evolution during shape memory loading. EBSD was used to study chemical homogenization in U-10Mo, and for U-0.75Ti, we used EBSD to study the microstructure and texture evolution during thermal cycling and deformation. The studied uranium alloys have significant microstructural and chemical differences and each of these alloys presents unique preparation challenges. Each of the alloys is prepared by a sequence of mechanical grinding and polishing followed by electropolishing with subtle differences between the alloys. U-6Nb and U-0.75Ti both have martensitic microstructures and both require special care in order to avoid mechanical polishing artifacts. Unalloyed uranium has a tendency to rapidly oxidize when exposed to air and a two-step electropolish is employed, the first step to remove the damaged surface layer resulting from the mechanical preparation and the second step to passivate the surface. All of the alloying additions provide a level of surface passivation and different one and two step electropolishes are employed to create good EBSD surfaces. Because of its low symmetry crystal structure, uranium exhibits complex deformation behavior including operation of multiple deformation twinning modes. EBSD was used to observe and quantify twinning contributions to deformation and to examine the fracture behavior. Figure 1 shows a cross section of two mating fracture surfaces in cast uranium showing the propensity of deformation twinning and intergranular fracture largely between dissimilarly oriented grains. Deformation of U-6Nb in the shape memory regime occurs by the motion

  2. Advanced microstructural analysis of ferrite materials by means of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblischka-Veneva, A.; Koblischka, M. R.; Mücklich, F.

    2010-05-01

    The analysis of the achieved texture is of great importance for the performance of ferrite materials, either bulk or thin films. The recently developed electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique enables a spatially resolved study of the crystallographic orientations by means of recording of Kikuchi patterns. To our knowledge, such a thorough EBSD analysis was not yet performed in any oxidic magnetic material, and only very recently on magnetite thin films by us. A good surface polishing/cleaning is essential for this analysis, as the method requires an undisturbed surface area for a high image quality (IQ). This information is recorded to each measured Kikuchi pattern, together with a parameter describing the quality of indexation. Here, the spatially highly resolved EBSD mappings provide additional information as compared to the standard analysis techniques, which can contribute to an optimization of the growth process. Furthermore, an analysis of the grain aspect ratio is possible which provides further insight to the microstructural dependence of the magnetic properties of ferrites.

  3. Tackling pseudosymmetry problems in electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of perovskite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Elisabetta; Kaercher, Pamela; Mecklenburgh, Julian; Wheeler, John

    2016-04-01

    Perovskite minerals form an important mineral group that has applications in Earth science and emerging alternative energy technologies, however crystallographic quantification of these minerals with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is not accurate due to pseudosymmetry problems. The silicate perovskite Bridgmanite, (Mg,Fe)SiO3, is understood to be the dominant phase in the Earth's lower mantle. Gaining insight into its physical and rheological properties is therefore vital to understand the dynamics of the Earth's deep interior. Rock deformation experiments on analogue perovskite phases, for example (Ca,Sr)TiO3, combined with quantitative microstructural analyses of the recovered samples by EBSD, yield datasets that can reveal what deformation mechanisms may dominate the flow of perovskite in the lower mantle. Additionally, perovskite structures have important technological applications as new, suitable cathodes for the operation of more efficient and environmentally-friendly solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). In recent years they have also been recognised as a potential substitute for silicon in the next generation of photovoltaic cells for the construction of economic and energy efficient solar panels. EBSD has the potential to be a valuable tool for the study of crystal orientations achieved in perovskite substrates as crystal alignment has a direct control on the properties of these materials. However, perovskite structures currently present us with challenges during the automated indexing of Kikuchi bands in electron backscatter diffraction patterns (EBSPs). Such challenges are represented by the pseudosymmetric character of perovskites, where atoms are subtly displaced (0.005 nm to 0.05 nm) from their higher symmetry positions. In orthorhombic Pbnm perovskites, for example, pseudosymmetry may be evaluated from the c/a unit cell parameter ratio, which is very close to 1. Two main types of distortions from the higher symmetry structure are recognised: a

  4. An automated method of quantifying ferrite microstructures using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sachin L; Breen, Andrew J; Trimby, Patrick; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Ringer, Simon P; Cairney, Julie M

    2014-02-01

    The identification and quantification of the different ferrite microconstituents in steels has long been a major challenge for metallurgists. Manual point counting from images obtained by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is commonly used for this purpose. While classification systems exist, the complexity of steel microstructures means that identifying and quantifying these phases is still a great challenge. Moreover, point counting is extremely tedious, time consuming, and subject to operator bias. This paper presents a new automated identification and quantification technique for the characterisation of complex ferrite microstructures by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). This technique takes advantage of the fact that different classes of ferrite exhibit preferential grain boundary misorientations, aspect ratios and mean misorientation, all of which can be detected using current EBSD software. These characteristics are set as criteria for identification and linked to grain size to determine the area fractions. The results of this method were evaluated by comparing the new automated technique with point counting results. The technique could easily be applied to a range of other steel microstructures. PMID:24291695

  5. Orientations of Exsolved Magnetite Inclusions in Clinopyroxene and Plagioclase Determined With Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Wenk, H.; Scott, G. R.; Renne, P. R.

    2003-12-01

    Crystallographically oriented magnetite inclusions occur as subsolidus exsolution features in slowly cooled mafic rocks and are of interest to paleomagnetism because of their highly stable magnetic remanence. Many inclusions in both clinopyroxene and plagioclase exist as elongate laths with generalized dimensions of 1 μ m x 2 μ m x 50 μ m. Of initial interest is the formation temperature and orientation of these elongate inclusions with respect to their silicate hosts. In this study, the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique is used to determine orientation relationships across exsolution boundaries for magnetite inclusions > 0.5 μ m in diameter in host crystals of both clinopyroxene and plagioclase. Magnetite inclusions in clinopyroxenes from the Early Cretaceous Messum Complex of Namibia occur as two arrays growing within (010) of clinopyroxene and elongated subparallel to either the [100] or [001] axes. Inclusions subparallel to [100]cpx have [-110]mag // [010]cpx, (-1-11)mag // (-101)cpx, and [112]mag // [101]cpx. Inclusions subparallel to [001]cpx have [-110]mag // [010]cpx, (111)mag // (100)cpx, and [-1-12]mag // [001]cpx. Both arrays of inclusions are oriented such that planes of roughly close-packed oxygen atoms in both phases, \\{111\\} in magnetite and (-101) and (100) in clinopyroxene, are aligned. These EBSD-derived orientation relationships agree well with previous TEM and X-ray diffraction studies on similar materials, and are consistent with a high-temperature exsolution origin for the magnetite and coexistent amphibole. In contrast to clinopyroxene, the orientation relationships between plagioclase and its exsolved magnetite inclusions have so far been unexplored. Such inclusions are responsible for stable magnetic remanence in both layered intrusions and oceanic gabbros. Exsolved magnetite inclusions in plagioclase crystals from anorthosites in the Early Jurassic Freetown Complex of Sierra Leone have been investigated. Preliminary

  6. Phase Identification of Individual Crystalline Particles by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD)

    SciTech Connect

    SMALL,J.A.; MICHAEL,JOSEPH R.

    2000-06-12

    Recently, an EBSD system was developed that uses a 1024 x 1024 CCD camera coupled to a thin phosphor. This camera has been shown to produce excellent EBSD patterns. In this system, crystallographic information is determined from the EBSD pattern and coupled with the elemental information from energy or wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometry. Identification of the crystalline phase of a sample is then made through a link to a commercial diffraction database. To date, this system has been applied almost exclusively to conventional, bulk samples that have been polished to a flat surface. In this investigation, the authors report on the application of the EBSD system to the phase identification analysis (PIA) of individual micrometer and submicrometer particles rather than flat surfaces.

  7. Electron back-scattering diffraction (EBSD) measurements of antigorite lattice-preferred orientations (LPO).

    PubMed

    van de Moortèle, B; Bezacier, L; Trullenque, G; Reynard, B

    2010-09-01

    Lattice preferred orientations of serpentines induce a strong anisotropy of various properties in serpentine bearing-rocks. Lattice preferred orientations had so far been obtained only by X-ray diffraction techniques. We have applied electron back-scattering diffraction to the measurement of the lattice preferred orientations of antigorite in a naturally deformed high-pressure serpentinite. This technique is very sensitive to sample preparation that can lead to surface amorphization in the case of serpentine. A polishing procedure is described that avoids amorphization and allows accurate electron back-scattering diffraction measurements with optimized experimental conditions in a variable pressure scanning electron microscope. Results indicate that deformation leads to lattice preferred orientations characterized by extremely strong c-axis clustering perpendicular to the foliation, as expected for a layered silicate. In the foliation plane, a significant clustering of the a-axis is observed and tentatively attributed to intracrystalline deformation mechanisms. These data suggest that antigorite deforms mostly by gliding along the basal plane of the layered phyllosilicate structure, but that gliding may occur along directions favouring a-axis alignment. Electron back-scattering diffraction appears to be a reliable method for determining phyllosilicate lattice preferred orientations in deformed rocks, with potential applications for determining anisotropy of properties like seismic velocities or thermal and electrical conductivities. PMID:20701663

  8. Application of Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to Determine Texture, Microtexture, and Grain Boundary Energies in Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Rohrer, G.S.; Saylor, D.M.; Vedula, V.R.

    1999-05-19

    Crystallographic orientations in alumina (Al203) and magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl204) were obtained using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) patterns. The texture and mesotexture (grain boundary misorientations) were random and no special boundaries were observed. The relative grain boundary energies were determined by thermal groove geometries using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to identify relationships between the grain boundary energies and misorientations.

  9. Strain localization in granodiorite mylonites: a microstructural and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) study of the South Mountains core complex, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, R. M.; Miranda, E.

    2009-12-01

    The quantification of strain localization in detachment fault shear zones is essential to the study of continental core complex development and permits insight into continental crust rheology during extension. We present a microstructural and EBSD study of naturally deformed shear zone rocks from the footwall of the South Mountains, Arizona, core complex to interpret the deformation mechanisms that lead to strain localization along the detachment fault. The footwall of the South Mountains core complex is dominated by a Miocene composite pluton that exhibits Miocene extensional mylonitic fabrics associated with the structural development of the core complex. The composite pluton is composed of granodiorite, granite, and quartzolite, but the granodiorite is the most voluminous of the intrusive units. The detachment fault shear zone is developed within the granodiorite and quartzolite intrusive units. We conducted a microstructural and EBSD study of the Tertiary South Mountains granodiorite and quartzolite mylonites to determine the deformation mechanisms that promote strain localization. We hypothesize that the strength of quartz strongly influences strain localization in the naturally deformed granodiorite mylonites and quartzolite mylonites. The five samples were collected on an up-structure traverse through the ~60 meter thick mylonitic shear zone towards the interpreted detachment fault surface. Microstructural observation of quartz grains reveals the presence of elongate ‘ribbon grains’ with subgrain development along the rims of these grains, and irregular and sinuous sutured grain boundaries. We interpret these microstructures as evidence of Regimes 2 and 3 dynamic recrystallization. In contrast, the plagioclase feldspar and potassium feldspar crystals are microfractured with limited development of bulging grain boundaries on the rims of the feldspar grains, which we interpret as evidence of Regime 1 dynamic recrystallization. Up the traverse in the

  10. Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) Analysis and U-Pb Geochronology of the Oldest Lunar Zircon: Constraining Early Lunar Differentiation and Dating Impact-Related Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timms, Nick; Nemchin, Alexander; Grange, Marion; Reddy, Steve; Pidgeon, Bob; Geisler, Thorsten; Meyer, Chuck

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of the early moon was dominated by two processes (i) crystallization of the Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) and differentiation of potassium-rare earth element-phosphorous-rich residual magma reservoir referred to as KREEP, and (ii) an intense meteorite bombardment referred to as lunar cataclysm . The exact timing of these processes is disputed, and resolution relies on collection and interpretation of precise age data. This study examines the microstructure and geochronology of zircon from lunar impact breccias collected during the Apollo 17 mission. A large zircon clast within lunar breccia 72215,195 shows sector zoning in optical microscopy, cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging and Raman mapping, and indicates that it was a relict fragment of a much larger magmatic grain. Sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb analysis of the zircon shows that U and Th concentration correlate with sector zoning, with darkest CL domains corresponding with high-U and Th (approx.150 and approx.100 ppm respectively), and the brightest-CL sectors containing approx.30-50 ppm U and approx.10-20 ppm Th. This indicates that variations in optical CL and Raman properties correspond to differential accumulation of alpha-radiation damage in each sector. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) mapping shows that the quality of electron backscatter patterns (band contrast) varies with sector zoning, with the poorest quality patterns obtained from high-U and Th, dark-CL zones. EBSD mapping also reveals a deformation microstructure that is cryptic in optical, CL and Raman imaging. Two orthogonal sets of straight discrete and gradational low-angle boundaries accommodate approx.12 misorientation across the grain. The deformation bands are parallel to the crystallographic {a}-planes of the zircon, have misorientation axes parallel to the c-axis, and are geometrically consistent with formation by dislocation creep associated with <100>{010} slip. The deformation bands are unlike

  11. Strain Determination Using Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, M.; Graff, A.; Altmann, F.

    2010-11-24

    In the present paper we demonstrate the use of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) for high resolution elastic strain determination. Here, we focus on analysis methods based on determination of small shifts in EBSD pattern with respect to a reference pattern using cross-correlation algorithms. Additionally we highlight the excellent spatial and depth resolution of EBSD and introduce the use of simulated diffraction patterns based on dynamical diffraction theory for sensitivity estimation. Moreover the potential of EBSD for strain analysis of strained thin films with particular emphasis on appropriate target preparation which respect to occurring lattice defects is demonstrated.

  12. Electron Backscatter Diffraction in Low Vacuum Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    El-Dasher, B S; Torres, S G

    2008-07-17

    Most current scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) have the ability to analyze samples in a low vacuum mode, whereby a partial pressure of water vapor is introduced into the SEM chamber, allowing the characterization of nonconductive samples without any special preparation. Although the presence of water vapor in the chamber degrades electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns, the potential of this setup for EBSD characterization of nonconductive samples is immense. In this chapter we discuss the requirements, advantages and limitations of low vacuum EBSD (LV-EBSD), and present how this technique can be applied to a two-phase ceramic composite as well as hydrated biominerals as specific examples of when LV-EBSD can be invaluable.

  13. Quantitative metallography by electron backscattered diffraction.

    PubMed

    Humphreys

    1999-09-01

    Although electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) in the scanning electron microscope is used mainly to investigate the relationship between local textures and microstructures, the technique has now developed to the stage where it requires serious consideration as a tool for routine quantitative characterization of microstructures. This paper examines the application of EBSD to the characterization of phase distributions, grain and subgrain structures and also textures. Comparisons are made with the standard methods of quantitative metallography and it is shown that in many cases EBSD can produce more accurate and detailed measurements than the standard methods and that the data may sometimes be obtained more rapidly. The factors which currently limit the use of EBSD for quantitative microstructural characterization, including the speed of data acquisition and the angular and spatial resolutions, are discussed, and future developments are considered. PMID:10460682

  14. Defining Electron Backscatter Diffraction Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    El-Dasher, B S; Rollett, A D

    2005-02-07

    Automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) mapping systems have existed for more than 10 years [1,2], and due to their versatility in characterizing multiple aspects of microstructure, they have become an important tool in microscale crystallographic studies. Their increasingly widespread use however raises questions about their accuracy in both determining crystallographic orientations, as well as ensuring that the orientation information is spatially correct. The issue of orientation accuracy (as defined by angular resolution) has been addressed previously [3-5]. While the resolution of EBSD systems is typically quoted to be on the order of 1{sup o}, it has been shown that by increasing the pattern quality via acquisition parameter adjustment, the angular resolution can be improved to sub-degree levels. Ultimately, the resolution is dependent on how it is identified. In some cases it can be identified as the orientation relative to a known absolute, in others as the misorientation between nearest neighbor points in a scan. Naturally, the resulting values can be significantly different. Therefore, a consistent and universal definition of resolution that can be applied to characterize any EBSD system is necessary, and is the focus of the current study. In this work, a Phillips (FEI) XL-40 FEGSEM coupled to a TexSEM Laboratories OIM system was used. The pattern capturing hardware consisted of both a 512 by 512 pixel SIT CCD camera and a 1300 by 1030 pixel Peltier cooled CCD camera. Automated scans of various sizes, each consisting of 2500 points, were performed on a commercial-grade single crystal silicon wafer used for angular resolution measurements. To adequately quantify angular resolution for all possible EBSD applications we define two angular values. The first is {omega}{sub center}, the mean of the misorientation angle distribution between all scan points and the scan point coincident to the calibration source (typically the scan center). The {omega

  15. Validation of three-dimensional diffraction contrast tomography reconstructions by means of electron backscatter diffraction characterization

    PubMed Central

    Syha, Melanie; Trenkle, Andreas; Lödermann, Barbara; Graff, Andreas; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Weygand, Daniel; Gumbsch, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Microstructure reconstructions resulting from diffraction contrast tomography data of polycrystalline bulk strontium titanate were reinvestigated by means of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) characterization. Corresponding two-dimensional grain maps from the two characterization methods were aligned and compared, focusing on the spatial resolution at the internal interfaces. The compared grain boundary networks show a remarkably good agreement both morphologically and in crystallographic orientation. Deviations are critically assessed and discussed in the context of diffraction data reconstruction and EBSD data collection techniques. PMID:24046507

  16. Electron backscatter diffraction: applications for nuclear materials.

    PubMed

    Medevielle; Hugon; Dugne

    1999-09-01

    The diffraction of electrons was first observed in 1928 by Kikuchi. The phenomenon results in the formation of characteristic diagrams of the crystalline lattice and the orientation of the phase. Backscattered electrons are diffracted by the different crystallographic planes (hkl) according to the Bragg angle thetab. These describe, by symmetry, two cones of axes normal to the diffracting plane. Information is collected on a phosphor screen, leading to the acquisition of a diffraction pattern called a Kikuchi diagram. Several improvements now give a wide range of applications such as phase identification (carbides or complex compounds in a (U,Zr,O) structure), analysis of materials interfaces (ZrO2/UO2), as well as solidification studies and local texture determination (molybdenum sheets). In these applications, EBSD, as a type of quantitative metallography, is a powerful tool. PMID:10460689

  17. Towards high accuracy calibration of electron backscatter diffraction systems.

    PubMed

    Mingard, Ken; Day, Austin; Maurice, Claire; Quested, Peter

    2011-04-01

    For precise orientation and strain measurements, advanced Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) techniques require both accurate calibration and reproducible measurement of the system geometry. In many cases the pattern centre (PC) needs to be determined to sub-pixel accuracy. The mechanical insertion/retraction, through the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) chamber wall, of the electron sensitive part of modern EBSD detectors also causes alignment and positioning problems and requires frequent monitoring of the PC. Optical alignment and lens distortion issues within the scintillator, lens and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera combination of an EBSD detector need accurate measurement for each individual EBSD system. This paper highlights and quantifies these issues and demonstrates the determination of the pattern centre using a novel shadow-casting technique with a precision of ∼10μm or ∼1/3 CCD pixel. PMID:21396526

  18. Pattern matching approach to pseudosymmetry problems in electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Nolze, Gert; Winkelmann, Aimo; Boyle, Alan P

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate an approach to overcome Kikuchi pattern misindexing problems caused by crystallographic pseudosymmetry in electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Based on the quantitative comparison of experimentally measured Kikuchi patterns with dynamical electron diffraction simulations, the algorithm identifies the best-fit orientation from a set of pseudosymmetric candidates. Using measurements on framboidal pyrite (FeS2) as an example, we also show the improvement of the orientation precision using this approach. PMID:26517547

  19. Implementing Transmission Electron Backscatter Diffraction for Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Rice, Katherine P; Chen, Yimeng; Prosa, Ty J; Larson, David J

    2016-06-01

    There are advantages to performing transmission electron backscattering diffraction (tEBSD) in conjunction with focused ion beam-based specimen preparation for atom probe tomography (APT). Although tEBSD allows users to identify the position and character of grain boundaries, which can then be combined with APT to provide full chemical and orientation characterization of grain boundaries, tEBSD can also provide imaging information that improves the APT specimen preparation process by insuring proper placement of the targeted grain boundary within an APT specimen. In this report we discuss sample tilt angles, ion beam milling energies, and other considerations to optimize Kikuchi diffraction pattern quality for the APT specimen geometry. Coordinated specimen preparation and analysis of a grain boundary in a Ni-based Inconel 600 alloy is used to illustrate the approach revealing a 50° misorientation and trace element segregation to the grain boundary. PMID:27329309

  20. Orientation precision of electron backscatter diffraction measurements near grain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Wright, Stuart I; Nowell, Matthew M; de Kloe, René; Chan, Lisa

    2014-06-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) has become a common technique for measuring crystallographic orientations at spatial resolutions on the order of tens of nanometers and at angular resolutions <0.1°. In a recent search of EBSD papers using Google Scholar™, 60% were found to address some aspect of deformation. Generally, deformation manifests itself in EBSD measurements by small local misorientations. An increase in the local misorientation is often observed near grain boundaries in deformed microstructures. This may be indicative of dislocation pile-up at the boundaries but could also be due to a loss of orientation precision in the EBSD measurements. When the electron beam is positioned at or near a grain boundary, the diffraction volume contains the crystal lattices from the two grains separated by the boundary. Thus, the resulting pattern will contain contributions from both lattices. Such mixed patterns can pose some challenge to the EBSD pattern band detection and indexing algorithms. Through analysis of experimental local misorientation data and simulated pattern mixing, this work shows that some of the rise in local misorientation is an artifact due to the mixed patterns at the boundary but that the rise due to physical phenomena is also observed. PMID:24576405

  1. Bragg's Law diffraction simulations for electron backscatter diffraction analysis.

    PubMed

    Kacher, Josh; Landon, Colin; Adams, Brent L; Fullwood, David

    2009-08-01

    In 2006, Angus Wilkinson introduced a cross-correlation-based electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) texture analysis system capable of measuring lattice rotations and elastic strains to high resolution. A variation of the cross-correlation method is introduced using Bragg's Law-based simulated EBSD patterns as strain free reference patterns that facilitates the use of the cross-correlation method with polycrystalline materials. The lattice state is found by comparing simulated patterns to collected patterns at a number of regions on the pattern using the cross-correlation function and calculating the deformation from the measured shifts of each region. A new pattern can be simulated at the deformed state, and the process can be iterated a number of times to converge on the absolute lattice state. By analyzing an iteratively rotated single crystal silicon sample and recovering the rotation, this method is shown to have an angular resolution of approximately 0.04 degrees and an elastic strain resolution of approximately 7e-4. As an example of applications, elastic strain and curvature measurements are used to estimate the dislocation density in a single grain of a compressed polycrystalline Mg-based AZ91 alloy. PMID:19520512

  2. Present State of Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Prospective Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarzer, R A; Field, D P; Adams, B L; Kumar, M; Schwartz, A J

    2008-10-24

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), when employed as an additional characterization technique to a scanning electron microscope (SEM), enables individual grain orientations, local texture, point-to-point orientation correlations, and phase identification and distributions to be determined routinely on the surfaces of bulk polycrystals. The application has experienced rapid acceptance in metallurgical, materials, and geophysical laboratories within the past decade (Schwartz et al. 2000) due to the wide availability of SEMs, the ease of sample preparation from the bulk, the high speed of data acquisition, and the access to complementary information about the microstructure on a submicron scale. From the same specimen area, surface structure and morphology of the microstructure are characterized in great detail by the relief and orientation contrast in secondary and backscatter electron images, element distributions are accessed by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS), or cathodoluminescence analysis, and the orientations of single grains and phases can now be determined, as a complement, by EBSD.

  3. Many-beam dynamical simulation of electron backscatter diffraction patterns.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Aimo; Trager-Cowan, Carol; Sweeney, Francis; Day, Austin P; Parbrook, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We present an approach for the simulation of complete electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns where the relative intensity distributions in the patterns are accurately reproduced. The Bloch wave theory is applied to describe the electron diffraction process. For the simulation of experimental patterns with a large field of view, a large number of reflecting planes has to be taken into account. This is made possible by the Bethe perturbation of weak reflections. Very good agreement is obtained for simulated and experimental patterns of gallium nitride GaN{0001} at 20kV electron energy. Experimental features like zone-axis fine structure and higher-order Laue zone rings are accurately reproduced. We discuss the influence of the diffraction of the incident beam in our experiment. PMID:17126489

  4. Phase analysis on dual-phase steel using band slope of electron backscatter diffraction pattern.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun-Yun; Park, Seong-Jun; Moon, Man-Been

    2013-08-01

    A quantitative and automated phase analysis of dual-phase (DP) steel using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was attempted. A ferrite-martensite DP microstructure was produced by intercritical annealing and quenching. An EBSD map of the microstructure was obtained and post-processed for phase discrimination. Band slope (BS), which was a measure of pattern quality, exhibited much stronger phase contrast than another conventional one, band contrast. Owing to high sensitivity to lattice defect and little orientation dependence, BS provided handiness in finding a threshold for phase discrimination. Its grain average gave a superior result on the discrimination and volume fraction measurement of the constituent phases in the DP steel. PMID:23920165

  5. Assessing strain mapping by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy using wedge-indented Si.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Lawrence H; Vaudin, Mark D; Stranick, Stephan J; Stan, Gheorghe; Gerbig, Yvonne B; Osborn, William; Cook, Robert F

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) for small-scale strain mapping are assessed using the multi-axial strain field surrounding a wedge indentation in Si as a test vehicle. The strain field is modeled using finite element analysis (FEA) that is adapted to the near-indentation surface profile measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The assessment consists of (1) direct experimental comparisons of strain and deformation and (2) comparisons in which the modeled strain field is used as an intermediate step. Direct experimental methods (1) consist of comparisons of surface elevation and gradient measured by AFM and EBSD and of Raman shifts measured and predicted by CRM and EBSD, respectively. Comparisons that utilize the combined FEA-AFM model (2) consist of predictions of distortion, strain, and rotation for comparison with EBSD measurements and predictions of Raman shift for comparison with CRM measurements. For both EBSD and CRM, convolution of measurements in depth-varying strain fields is considered. The interconnected comparisons suggest that EBSD was able to provide an accurate assessment of the wedge indentation deformation field to within the precision of the measurements, approximately 2×10(-4) in strain. CRM was similarly precise, but was limited in accuracy to several times this value. PMID:26939030

  6. Misorientation mapping for visualization of plastic deformation via electron back-scattered diffraction.

    PubMed

    Brewer, L N; Othon, M A; Young, L M; Angeliu, T M

    2006-02-01

    The ability to map plastic deformation around high strain gradient microstructural features is central in studying phenomena such as fatigue and stress corrosion cracking. A method for the visualization of plastic deformation in electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) data has been developed and is described in this article. This technique is based on mapping the intragrain misorientation in polycrystalline metals. The algorithm maps the scalar misorientation between a local minimum misorientation reference pixel and every other pixel within an individual grain. A map around the corner of a Vickers indentation in 304 stainless steel was used as a test case. Several algorithms for EBSD mapping were then applied to the deformation distributions around air fatigue and stress corrosion cracks in 304 stainless steel. Using this technique, clear visualization of a deformation zone around high strain gradient microstructural features (crack tips, indentations, etc.) is possible with standard EBSD data. PMID:17481344

  7. Digital direct electron imaging of energy-filtered electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vespucci, S.; Winkelmann, A.; Naresh-Kumar, G.; Mingard, K. P.; Maneuski, D.; Edwards, P. R.; Day, A. P.; O'Shea, V.; Trager-Cowan, C.

    2015-11-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction is a scanning electron microscopy technique used to obtain crystallographic information on materials. It allows the nondestructive mapping of crystal structure, texture, and strain with a lateral and depth resolution on the order of tens of nanometers. Electron backscatter diffraction patterns (EBSPs) are presently acquired using a detector comprising a scintillator coupled to a digital camera, and the crystallographic information obtainable is limited by the conversion of electrons to photons and then back to electrons again. In this article we will report the direct acquisition of energy-filtered EBSPs using a digital complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor hybrid pixel detector, Timepix. We show results from a range of samples with different mass and density, namely diamond, silicon, and GaN. Direct electron detection allows the acquisition of EBSPs at lower (≤5 keV) electron beam energies. This results in a reduction in the depth and lateral extension of the volume of the specimen contributing to the pattern and will lead to a significant improvement in lateral and depth resolution. Direct electron detection together with energy filtering (electrons having energy below a specific value are excluded) also leads to an improvement in spatial resolution but in addition provides an unprecedented increase in the detail in the acquired EBSPs. An increase in contrast and higher-order diffraction features are observed. In addition, excess-deficiency effects appear to be suppressed on energy filtering. This allows the fundamental physics of pattern formation to be interrogated and will enable a step change in the use of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) for crystal phase identification and the mapping of strain. The enhancement in the contrast in high-pass energy-filtered EBSD patterns is found to be stronger for lighter, less dense materials. The improved contrast for such materials will enable the application of the EBSD

  8. Use of electropolishing for enhanced metallic specimen preparation for electron backscatter diffraction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wynick, G.L.; Boehlert, C.J. . E-mail: boehlert@egr.msu.edu

    2005-09-15

    The effects of mechanical polishing with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and colloidal SiO{sub 2} followed by electropolishing were studied for preparation of metal alloy specimens for Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). The alloys studied were Inconel 718, a commonly used nickel-based superalloy, and a Ti-Al-Nb alloy (nominally Ti-22Al-28Nb(at.%)). Atomic Force Microscopy was used to measure the surface topography to attempt to correlate nano-scale surface roughness with EBSD pattern quality. The results suggest that mechanically polishing with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} followed by electropolishing for a short time can produce EBSD pattern confidence indices and image quality values that are equal to or better than those produced by mechanically polishing with colloidal SiO{sub 2} alone. The data suggests that surface roughness on the scale considered here has much less effect on EBSD pattern quality than had been previously believed. The data suggests that removing the surface damage is more critical than reduction of topography for EBSD.

  9. Geometrically necessary dislocation densities in olivine obtained using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Wallis, David; Hansen, Lars N; Ben Britton, T; Wilkinson, Angus J

    2016-09-01

    Dislocations in geological minerals are fundamental to the creep processes that control large-scale geodynamic phenomena. However, techniques to quantify their densities, distributions, and types over critical subgrain to polycrystal length scales are limited. The recent advent of high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), based on diffraction pattern cross-correlation, offers a powerful new approach that has been utilised to analyse dislocation densities in the materials sciences. In particular, HR-EBSD yields significantly better angular resolution (<0.01°) than conventional EBSD (~0.5°), allowing very low dislocation densities to be analysed. We develop the application of HR-EBSD to olivine, the dominant mineral in Earth's upper mantle by testing (1) different inversion methods for estimating geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities, (2) the sensitivity of the method under a range of data acquisition settings, and (3) the ability of the technique to resolve a variety of olivine dislocation structures. The relatively low crystal symmetry (orthorhombic) and few slip systems in olivine result in well constrained GND density estimates. The GND density noise floor is inversely proportional to map step size, such that datasets can be optimised for analysing either short wavelength, high density structures (e.g. subgrain boundaries) or long wavelength, low amplitude orientation gradients. Comparison to conventional images of decorated dislocations demonstrates that HR-EBSD can characterise the dislocation distribution and reveal additional structure not captured by the decoration technique. HR-EBSD therefore provides a highly effective method for analysing dislocations in olivine and determining their role in accommodating macroscopic deformation. PMID:27337604

  10. Advanced characterization of twins using automated electron backscatter diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S. I.; Bingert, J. F.; Mason, T. A.; Larson, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes results obtained using an automated, crystallographically-based technique for twin identification. The technique is based on the automated collection of spatially specific orientation measurements by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The key features of the analysis are identification of potential twin boundaries by their misorientation character, identification of the distinct boundary planes among the symmetrically equivalent candidates, and validation of these boundaries through comparison with the boundary and twin plane traces in the sample cross section. Results on the application of this technique to deformation twins in zirconium are analyzed for the effect of twin type and amount and sense of uniaxial deformation. The accumulation of strain tends to increase the misorientation deviation at least to the degree of the trace deviation compared with recrystallization twins in nickel. In addition to the results on characterizing the twin character, results on extending the twin analysis to automated identification of parent and daughter material for structures exhibiting twin deformation are reported as well.

  11. Observation of ferroelectricity in a confined crystallite using electron-backscattered diffraction and piezoresponse force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, P.; Jain, H.; Williams, D. B.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Shin, J.; Jesse, S.; Baddorf, A. P.

    2005-10-01

    LaBGeO5 is a model transparent ferroelectric glass-ceramic (TFGC) material, developed as an inexpensive alternative to single-crystal nonlinear optical materials. The optical activity of the TFGC originates from the ferroelectric phase which remains under a hydrostatic pressure exerted by the surrounding glass matrix. A combination of two techniques, electron-backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), is employed to monitor the development of the ferroelectric phase. A method is proposed to theoretically construct PFM amplitude maps from EBSD orientation maps. The theoretical vertical piezoresponse map is compared with the experimental piezoresponse map from PFM. A good correlation between the theoretical and experimental maps is observed.

  12. Quantifying recrystallization by electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Jazaeri, H; Humphreys, F J

    2004-03-01

    The use of high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction in the scanning electron microscope to quantify the volume fraction of recrystallization and the recrystallization kinetics is discussed. Monitoring the changes of high-angle grain boundary (HAGB) content during annealing is shown to be a reliable method of determining the volume fraction of recrystallization during discontinuous recrystallization, where a large increase in the percentage of high-angle boundaries occurs during annealing. The results are shown to be consistent with the standard methods of studying recrystallization, such as quantitative metallography and hardness testing. Application of the method to a highly deformed material has shown that it can be used to identify the transition from discontinuous to continuous recrystallization during which there is no significant change in the percentage of HAGB during annealing. PMID:15009691

  13. Crystallographic mapping of ferroelectric thin films using piezoresponse force microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, M.; Hegarty, T.; Mingard, K.; Li, J.; Cain, M.

    2008-08-01

    Ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films have been analysed using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Grain orientation mapping has been demonstrated, showing that features smaller than 100 nm may be successfully indexed. In conjunction with piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), which was used to map and quantify the piezoelectric response from the same region of the films with a resolution of 10 nm, an analysis of the effects of grain orientation on the measured response at the nanoscale was possible. The microtexture of the film showed the presence of both mono- and multi-domains within grains exhibiting sizes of hundreds of nanometres.

  14. Non-marine radiaxial fibrous calcites—examples of speleothems proved by electron backscatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuser, R. D.; Richter, D. K.

    2007-02-01

    The occurrence of radiaxial fibrous calcites (RFC) in speleothems is documented for the first time using the new electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) method. Up to now, in speleothems these precipitates have only been observed as Mg-containing calcites in close association with aragonite, in caves of the temperate to cool Central European regions with mean annual temperatures between 4 and 16 °C. As the four studied occurrences are located in caves in dolomitic and/or ankeritic host rocks, magnesium is considered to be of particular importance for triggering the formation of radiaxial fibrous (Mg-) calcite.

  15. Electron Backscatter Diffraction: An Important Tool for Analyses of Structure-Property Relationships in Thin-Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Ras, D.; Kavalakkatt, J.; Nichterwitz, M.; Schäfer, N.; Harndt, S.; Wilkinson, A. J.; Tsyrulin, K.; Schulz, H.; Bauer, F.

    2013-09-01

    The present work gives an overview of the application of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in the field of thin-film solar cells, which consist of stacks of polycrystalline layers on various rigid or flexible substrates. EBSD provides access to grain-size and local-orientation distributions, film textures, and grain-boundary types. By evaluation of the EBSD patterns within individual grains of the polycrystalline solar cell layers, microstrain distributions also can be obtained. These microstructural properties are of considerable interest for research and development of thin-film solar cells. Moreover, EBSD may be performed three-dimensionally, by alternating slicing of cross sections in a focused ion-beam machine and EBSD acquisition. To relate the microstructural properties to the electrical properties of individual layers as well as to the device performances of corresponding solar cells, EBSD can be combined with electron-beam-induced current and cathodoluminescence measurements and with various scanning-probe microscopy methods such as Kelvin-probe force, scanning spreading resistance, or scanning capacitance microscopy on identical specimen positions. Together with standard device characterization of thin-film solar cells, these scanning microscopy measurements provide the means for extensive analysis of structure-property relationships in solar-cell stacks with polycrystalline layers.

  16. STRAIN CORRELATIONS IN ALLOY 690 MATERIALS USING ELECTRON BACKSCATTER DIFFRACTION AND VICKERS HARDNESS

    SciTech Connect

    Overman, Nicole R.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2014-03-09

    High chromium, nickel-base Alloy 690 exhibits an increased resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environments over lower chromium alloy 600. As a result, Alloy 690 has been used to replace Alloy 600 for steam generator tubing, reactor pressure vessel nozzles and other pressure boundary components. However, recent laboratory crack-growth testing has revealed that heavily cold-worked Alloy 690 materials can become susceptible to SCC. To evaluate reasons for this increased SCC susceptibility, detailed characterizations have been performed on as-received and cold-worked Alloy 690 materials using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and Vickers hardness measurements. Examinations were performed on cross sections of compact tension specimens that were used for SCC crack growth rate testing in simulated PWR primary water. Hardness and the EBSD integrated misorientation density could both be related to the degree of cold work for materials of similar grain size. However, a microstructural dependence was observed for strain correlations using EBSD and hardness which should be considered if this technique is to be used for gaining insight on SCC growth rates

  17. Dark-field imaging based on post-processed electron backscatter diffraction patterns of bulk crystalline materials in a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Demers, Hendrix; Gauvin, Raynald

    2015-01-01

    Dark-field (DF) images were acquired in the scanning electron microscope with an offline procedure based on electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns (EBSPs). These EBSD-DF images were generated by selecting a particular reflection on the electron backscatter diffraction pattern and by reporting the intensity of one or several pixels around this point at each pixel of the EBSD-DF image. Unlike previous studies, the diffraction information of the sample is the basis of the final image contrast with a pixel scale resolution at the EBSP providing DF imaging in the scanning electron microscope. The offline facility of this technique permits the selection of any diffraction condition available in the diffraction pattern and displaying the corresponding image. The high number of diffraction-based images available allows a better monitoring of deformation structures compared to electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) which is generally limited to a few images of the same area. This technique was applied to steel and iron specimens and showed its high capability in describing more rigorously the deformation structures around micro-hardness indents. Due to the offline relation between the reference EBSP and the EBSD-DF images, this new technique will undoubtedly greatly improve our knowledge of deformation mechanism and help to improve our understanding of the ECCI contrast mechanisms. PMID:25461589

  18. Characterization of ultrafine grained Cu-Ni-Si alloys by electron backscatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenberger, I.; Kuhn, H. A.; Gholami, M.; Mhaede, M.; Wagner, L.

    2014-08-01

    A combination of rotary swaging and optimized precipitation hardening was applied to generate ultra fine grained (UFG) microstructures in low alloyed high performance Cu-based alloy CuNi3Si1Mg. As a result, ultrafine grained (UFG) microstructures with nanoscopically small Ni2Si-precipitates exhibiting high strength, ductility and electrical conductivity can be obtained. Grain boundary pinning by nano-precipitates enhances the thermal stability. Electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) and especially electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) are predestined to characterize the evolving microstructures due to excellent resolution and vast crystallographic information. The following study summarizes the microstructure after different processing steps and points out the consequences for the most important mechanical and physical properties such as strength, ductility and conductivity.

  19. Electron backscatter diffraction applied to lithium sheets prepared by broad ion beam milling.

    PubMed

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Zaghib, Karim; Gauvin, Raynald

    2015-01-01

    Due to its very low hardness and atomic number, pure lithium cannot be prepared by conventional methods prior to scanning electron microscopy analysis. Here, we report on the characterization of pure lithium metallic sheets used as base electrodes in the lithium-ion battery technology using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray microanalysis using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) after the sheet surface was polished by broad argon ion milling (IM). No grinding and polishing were necessary to achieve the sufficiently damage free necessary for surface analysis. Based on EDS results the impurities could be characterized and EBSD revealed the microsctructure and microtexture of this material with accuracy. The beam damage and oxidation/hydration resulting from the intensive use of IM and the transfer of the sample into the microscope chamber was estimated to be <50 nm. Despite the fact that the IM process generates an increase of temperature at the specimen surface, it was assumed that the milling parameters were sufficient to minimize the heating effect on the surface temperature. However, a cryo-stage should be used if available during milling to guaranty a heating artefact free surface after the milling process. PMID:25280344

  20. Elastic strain tensor measurement using electron backscatter diffraction in the SEM.

    PubMed

    Dingley, David J; Wilkinson, Angus J; Meaden, Graham; Karamched, Phani S

    2010-08-01

    The established electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique for obtaining crystallographic information in the SEM has been adapted to permit elastic strain measurement. Basically, the displacement of crystallographic features in an EBSD pattern, such as zone axes, which result from strain in a crystal, is determined by comparing those same features as they appear in a pattern from an unstrained region of the crystal. The comparison is made by cross-correlation of selected regions in the two patterns. Tests show that the sensitivity to displacement measurement is 1 part in 10 000, which translates to a strain sensitivity of 2 parts in 10 000. Eight components of the strain tensor are determined directly and the ninth is calculated using the fact that the free surface of the sample is traction-free. Examples discussed are taken from studies of a lenticular fracture in germanium, the strain distribution surrounding a carbide precipitate in a nickel base alloy and grain boundary studies in another nickel base alloy. PMID:20634548

  1. A quantitative evaluation of microstructure by electron back-scattered diffraction pattern quality variations.

    PubMed

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Jin, Hyung-Ha; Jang, Jinsung; Choi, Yong Seok; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Foley, David C; Zhang, Xinghang

    2013-08-01

    Band contrast (BC) is a qualitative measure of electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD), which is derived from the intensity of the Kikuchi bands. The BC is dependent upon several factors including scanning electron microscope measurement parameters, EBSD camera setup, and the specimen itself (lattice defect and grain orientation). In this study, the effective factors for BC variations and the feasibility of using BC variations for the quantification of microstructure evolutions have been investigated. In addition, the effects of the lattice defect and the grain orientation on the BC variations are studied. Next, a shear-deformed microstructure of 316L stainless steel, which contains nanosized grains and a large portion of twin boundaries, is revealed by BC map and histogram. Recovery and recrystallization of shear-deformed 316L stainless steel are displayed by BC variations during isothermal annealing at 700 and 800°C, respectively. It is observed that the BC turns bright as the shear-deformed crystal structure is recovered or recrystallized. PMID:23920181

  2. Electron backscattered diffraction investigation of the texture of feathery crystals in aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, S.; Jouneau, P.H.; Rappaz, M.; Jarry, P.

    1997-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), metallographic observations, and automated electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) experiments were carried out on feathery crystals of a unidirectionally solidified (1D) Al-Cu alloy and of a direct-chill (DC) cast Al-Mg-Si alloy. The results clearly show that the feathery grains are made of twinned lamellae, which are parallel to a (111) twin plane. The contrast seen in the metallographic sections after a Barker etching or observed in an SEM is perfectly corroborated with the EBSD reconstructed microstructure. The lamellae are separated by an alternance of straight and wavy lines. Some equiaxed grains are also observed occasionally in the specimens. From the {l_angle}111{r_angle} pole figures of the various grains, it is concluded that the thermal gradient direction is close to, but not necessarily within, the (111) twin plane: its direction is in between a [01{bar 1}] and a [{bar 1}{bar 1}2] direction. Within a given feathery grain, small variations of the crystallographic orientations (subgrain boundaries) are observed. The lamellae of one grain can sometimes penetrate into another one. Based upon this information, the mechanism of feathery grain growth previously proposed by Eady and Hogan is ruled out. Although no other growth mechanism is proposed yet, it is believed that feathery grains are the result of a competition similar to that occurring in normal dendritic alloys, but with twinned dendrites.

  3. Advances in EBSD and EBSD/EDS integration for the characterization of mineralogical samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palasse, L.; Goran, D.; Schwager, T.

    2013-12-01

    Electron BackScatter Diffraction (EBSD) is a well-known powerful technique for petrofabric studies using Scanning Electron Microscope. By assessing the quantitative microstructural information, i.e. crystallographic orientation data, it allows a large variety of applications: understanding the deformation mechanisms, seismic properties, metamorphic processes; and more recently, performing phase identification and discrimination when combined with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS). However, it is known that for multiphase mineralogical samples, the information delivered either by EBSD or by EDS alone is not enough to successfully distinguish the present phases. Typical examples for EBSD related indexing issues are phases creating similar patterns; and for EDS technique alone, phases with similar chemical composition like calcite and aragonite, quartz and cristobalite. Recent software and hardware developments have significantly improved the data quality as well as the efficiency/productivity. This presentation aims to reveal the latest development in data processing that has transformed the combination of the two complementary techniques into a powerful tool for characterizing multiphase materials. Through geosciences application examples, we will present the advantages brought by this new approach which uses the quantified EDS results and EBSP to identify the correct phase, reducing the need of data cleaning, and without spending extra time at the SEM. We will also demonstrate how powerful EBSD indexing algorithm can overcome the limitation from sample preparation, with some examples of high hit rate achieved on polyphase mineralogical specimen and even on shock-metamorphosed minerals. Last but not least, recent developments also enable the investigation of nanostructured materials in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) by Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD). Through some mineralogical applications, we will demonstrate the high spatial resolution

  4. An experimental viewpoint on the information depth of EBSD.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Wolfgang; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-03-01

    This article contains a critical review of the literature concerning the information depth of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and a viewpoint on the topic is formulated. EBSD is applied to a crystal partially covered by a wedge of amorphous glass. EBSD-patterns of decreasing quality are obtained from a crystal covered by an increasingly thick layer of glass. The location of the last indexable EBSD-patterns is compared to the last discernible contrast in SEM-micrographs obtained from the same crystal using accelerating voltages of 2-20 kV. It is concluded that the information depth of EBSD is at least as large as that of an SEM-micrograph obtained with a voltage of 4 kV from a non-tilted sample. Concepts of the information depth and experimental approaches are discussed. SCANNING 38:164-171, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26248948

  5. EBSD analysis of MgB2 bulk superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblischka-Veneva, A.; Koblischka, M. R.; Schmauch, J.; Inoue, K.; Muralidhar, M.; Berger, K.; Noudem, J.

    2016-04-01

    The grain orientation, the texture and the grain boundary misorientations are important parameters for the understanding of the magnetic properties of the bulk MgB2 samples intended for super-magnet applications. Such data can be provided by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis. However, as the grain size (GS) of the MgB2 bulks is preferably in the 100-200 nm range, the common EBSD technique working in reflection operates properly only on highly dense samples. In order to achieve a reasonably good Kikuchi pattern quality on all samples, we apply here the newly developed transmission EBSD (t-EBSD) technique to several bulk MgB2 samples. This method requires the preparation of TEM slices by means of focused ion-beam milling, which are then analyzed within the SEM, operating with a specific sample holder. We present several EBSD mappings of samples prepared with different techniques and at various reaction temperatures.

  6. Advanced Characterization of Slags and Refractory Bricks Using Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    John Kay; Kurt Eylands

    2007-09-30

    Numerous studies have been conducted to determine changes that occur in slag that cause a rapid change in viscosity, but these studies have been limited by the inability to characterize/identify the phases present in the slag. Rapid freezing of slag in entrained gasifiers and slagging combustion systems can cause a shutdown of the system. The reactions occurring in slag that result in rapid freezing of slags are not well understood. It is believed that electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) can be used to analyze slags and aid in their characterization although its use has not been found in literature. The EBSD technique allows particle-by-particle mineralogy based on diffraction patterns generated by the electron beam when the sample is tilted to a high angle. The diffraction pattern (Kikuchi bands) can only come from crystalline phases, which makes this technique ideally suited to study crystal formation in slags where oftentimes the crystals are very small and a reasonable chemical analysis cannot be made by conventional energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) methods in the scanning electron microscope. The ability to have mineralogical data based on the crystalline structure of a phase rather than a chemical analysis by EDS allows much better interpretation of the temperature regimes in which specific phases tend to form. Knowing the type and relative amounts of a phase crystallizing in a slag is critical in predicting the viscosity of a slag at a given temperature. Six slag samples were selected based on the parent coal. Unfortunately, none of the slags appeared to have any crystalline material associated with them. The funding for this project was not adequate for generating more slags from the various coal types. For this reason, sample archives were searched for those containing slags that were not rapidly quenched. A slag from a bituminous coal was found to contain several dendritic crystals (10 {mu}m to 50 {mu}m in size) that formed near the edges of the

  7. High-quality cubic and hexagonal InN crystals studied by micro-Raman scattering and electron backscatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Jumpei; Ramsteiner, Manfred; Jahn, Uwe; Lu, Cheng-Ying James; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Kishino, Katsumi; Riechert, Henning

    2016-04-01

    Large InN microcrystals grown by molecular beam epitaxy are investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). High-quality (phonon linewidths between 1.5 and 2 cm-1) cubic and hexagonal crystals are identified with Raman mapping by the observation of the respective characteristic phonon modes. The unexpected occurrence of metastable cubic InN crystals is confirmed by EBSD measurements. The cubic microcrystals are revealed by EBSD to be single-crystalline and to exhibit  <1 1 1>  orientation. The transverse (TO) and longitudinal-optical (LO) zone-center phonon frequencies of cubic InN are found to be 463 and 584 cm-1, respectively. The bulk carrier density in the microcrystals lies in the range of 2-3  ×  1017 cm-3 as determined by the analysis of LO phonon-plasmon-coupled modes in the Raman spectra.

  8. Limits of simulation based high resolution EBSD.

    PubMed

    Alkorta, Jon

    2013-08-01

    High resolution electron backscattered diffraction (HREBSD) is a novel technique for a relative determination of both orientation and stress state in crystals through digital image correlation techniques. Recent works have tried to use simulated EBSD patterns as reference patterns to achieve the absolute orientation and stress state of crystals. However, a precise calibration of the pattern centre location is needed to avoid the occurrence of phantom stresses. A careful analysis of the projective transformation involved in the formation of EBSD patterns has permitted to understand these phantom stresses. This geometrical analysis has been confirmed by numerical simulations. The results indicate that certain combinations of crystal strain states and sample locations (pattern centre locations) lead to virtually identical EBSD patterns. This ambiguity makes the problem of solving the absolute stress state of a crystal unfeasible in a single-detector configuration. PMID:23676453

  9. Application of Electron Backscatter Diffraction to Phase Identification

    SciTech Connect

    El-Dasher, B S; Deal, A

    2008-07-16

    The identification of crystalline phases in solids requires knowledge of two microstructural properties: crystallographic structure and chemical composition. Traditionally, this has been accomplished using X-ray diffraction techniques where the measured crystallographic information, in combination with separate chemical composition measurements for specimens of unknown pedigrees, is used to deduce the unknown phases. With the latest microstructural analysis tools for scanning electron microscopes, both the crystallography and composition can be determined in a single analysis utilizing electron backscatter diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy, respectively. In this chapter, we discuss the approach required to perform these experiments, elucidate the benefits and limitations of this technique, and detail via case studies how composition, crystallography, and diffraction contrast can be used as phase discriminators.

  10. A method to correct coordinate distortion in EBSD maps

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.B. Elbrønd, A.; Lin, F.X.

    2014-10-15

    Drift during electron backscatter diffraction mapping leads to coordinate distortions in resulting orientation maps, which affects, in some cases significantly, the accuracy of analysis. A method, thin plate spline, is introduced and tested to correct such coordinate distortions in the maps after the electron backscatter diffraction measurements. The accuracy of the correction as well as theoretical and practical aspects of using the thin plate spline method is discussed in detail. By comparing with other correction methods, it is shown that the thin plate spline method is most efficient to correct different local distortions in the electron backscatter diffraction maps. - Highlights: • A new method is suggested to correct nonlinear spatial distortion in EBSD maps. • The method corrects EBSD maps more precisely than presently available methods. • Errors less than 1–2 pixels are typically obtained. • Direct quantitative analysis of dynamic data are available after this correction.

  11. Application of electron backscattered diffraction to cleavage fracture in duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Marrow, T.J.

    1999-05-21

    The mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel (DSS) are generally superior to conventional austenite or ferrite grades. DSSs can have yield strengths twice the austenite grades, while retaining good ductility and toughness properties. Commercial wrought duplex stainless steels, either plates or rod, are processed by hot rolling followed by a solution annealing treatment to optimize the austenite-ferrite ratio and dissolve any pre-existing secondary phases. Processing may lead to a significant anisotropy in mechanical properties. For example, the tensile properties in cold-rolled sheet of duplex stainless steel (22Cr5Ni) reveals anisotropy of strength, i.e., the transverse direction tensile strength is 7.3% higher than tensile strength in the rolling direction (RD). It was also shown in a study of the effect of crack orientation on the impact properties of the same steel, that when the crack was oriented parallel to the direction of elongation of the austenite phase, the crack could grow along the more brittle ferrite phase for a longer distance before encountering the more ductile austenite. This decreased impact toughness. These are examples of microstructure texture. Crystallographic texture may also have an effect on properties that are related to specific crystallographic planes; such as brittle cleavage and stress corrosion cracking. This paper describes the application of electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) to study cleavage fracture and crystal texture in age-hardened DSS.

  12. Distinguishing crystallographic misorientations of lanthanum zirconate epilayers on nickel substrates by electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Yinqi; Wei, Bin; Wang, Jianhong; Cheng, Yanling; Suo, Hongli

    2011-04-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used for distinguishing crystallographic orientations and local lattice misfits of a La(2)Zr(2)O(7) (LZO) buffer layer epitaxially grown on a cube textured Ni-5.%W (Ni-W) substrate for a YBCO superconductor film. Orientation data were obtained from the LZO epilayer using low energy primary electrons (5keV) and from the Ni-W substrate by increasing the voltage to 15keV. In-plane and out-of-plane orientations of the LZO epilayer were revealed with respect to its Ni-W substrate. A strong {100} 〈011〉 rotated-cube texture in the LZO epilayer was formed on the {100} 〈001〉 cube-textured Ni-W substrates. LZO and Ni in-plane crystallographic axes are related by an expected 45° rotation. The step-misorientations and the local misfit strains between the LZO epilayer and the substrate were also analyzed. PMID:21396525

  13. Analysis of Complex Steel Microstructures by High-Resolution EBSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isasti, Nerea; Jorge-Badiola, Denis; Alkorta, Jon; Uranga, Pello

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution electron backscattered diffraction (HR-EBSD) is a powerful tool to describe microstructures at the sub-micrometric scale that achieves a higher degree of angular accuracy compared with conventional EBSD. However, such an EBSD technique is time-consuming and requires data-intensive computing to save and postprocess the results obtained after each scan. In the current work, a simple strategy to transform conventional results into high-resolution results is put forward in an averaging statistical layout. This makes it possible to measure the misorientations more precisely and, subsequently, the geometrically necessary dislocations by lowering the typical noise generated from Hough transformation-based conventional EBSD. Different steel microstructures are analyzed in light of this strategy. The calculated dislocation densities for those microstructures are used as input values for evaluating the initial dislocation density contribution to the yield strength in a newly developed mechanical model.

  14. Electron Backscattered Diffraction Analysis Of Narrow Copper Interconnects In Cross-View To Investigate Scale Effect On Microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Galand, Romain; Clement, Laurent; Waltz, Patrice; Wouters, Yves

    2010-11-24

    In this article, we propose to use Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) to characterize microstructure of copper interconnects of thin metal level in top view and cross view. These two views give very complementary information about microstructure of copper and thus about recrystallization of copper during annealing. Moreover, for minimum width, as interconnect is two times thicker than wide; It will be easier to analyze smaller interconnect of 45 nm node technology in cross-section. We look for evolution of texture and microstructure of copper with line width in top view and in cross view. We highlight the presence of two recrystallization mechanisms and also the fact that transition from one to the other is progressive with competition of both mechanisms.

  15. Determination of pattern centre in EBSD using the moving-screen technique

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Dave; Carpenter, D. A.; Pugh, J. L.; Mooney, L. R.

    2007-09-01

    The 'moving-screen' or 'pattern magnification' method of calibration for electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was reformulated to develop a high-precision technique requiring no crystallographic knowledge of the specimen and no initial estimates of the calibration parameters. The technique depends upon the accurate displacement of the screen and camera assembly. Corresponding points are selected, interactively, from EBSD patterns. It is suggested that, as an alternative, the selection of points from the Hough transform could lead to a completely automated routine.

  16. Skeletal growth phases of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa shown by scanning electron microscope and electron backscatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouchi, Vincent; Vonlanthen, Pierre; Verrecchia, Eric P.; Crowley, Quentin G.

    2016-04-01

    Lophelia pertusa is a cold-water coral, which may form reefs by the association of multiple coralites within which a polyp lives. Each individual polyp builds an aragonite skeleton by an initial phase of early mineralization (traditionally referred to as centres of calcification) from which aragonite fibres grow in thickening deposits. The skeleton wall features successive optically opaque and translucent bands previously attributed to different regimes of growth as either uniform in crystal orientation (translucent bands) or with a chaotic organization (opaque bands). The processes involved in any organizational changes are still unknown. Microlayers in the coral wall, which represent separate periods of skeletal growth, have been recently identified and described. These growth patterns are readily visible under scanning electron microscope (SEM) after etching in dilute formic acid, but they do not necessarily form continuously visible structures. Here we present high quality SEM images and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) maps to study aragonite fibre orientation across the wall of L. pertusa. Both microlayers and opaque and translucent bands are compared to the crystallographic orientation of the aragonite fibres. EBSD maps and SEM images indicate that aragonite fibres do not exhibit a chaotic orientation, even in opaque bands. The absence of continuity of microlayers is partially explained by an association of multiple crystallographic preferred orientations of aragonite fibres. In the case of L. pertusa, careful textural characterisation is necessary prior to elemental or isotope analysis in order to select a skeletal transect representing a linear and continuous time period.

  17. Characterisation of plastic zones around crack-tips in pure single-crystal tungsten using electron backscatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, J. D.; Wilkinson, A. J.; Roberts, S. G.

    2009-07-01

    Plastic zones around crack-tips in tungsten were characterised by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Pre-cracks were made in ~1mm square cross section beams of pure single-crystal tungsten using a spark erosion method. The beams were loaded at different temperatures to a range of stress intensity factors below the fracture toughness. High resolution EBSD patterns were recorded in a two dimensional array in the vicinity of the crack-tip on sectioned samples. Cross-correlation based analysis of these patterns was used to determine lattice rotations associated with the plastic deformation near the cracks. Crystal rotations in the plane of observation were found to dominate over rotations in other planes. For all specimens deformed above the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature, plastic zones were found to extend from the crack tips on along narrow bands along {110} planes. The sizes of the plastic zones and their associated lattice rotations were determined as a function of loading history.

  18. Effects of focused ion beam milling on electron backscatter diffraction patterns in strontium titanate and stabilized zirconia.

    PubMed

    Saowadee, N; Agersted, K; Bowen, J R

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the effect of focused ion beam (FIB) current and accelerating voltage on electron backscatter diffraction pattern quality of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Nb-doped strontium titanate (STN) to optimize data quality and acquisition time for 3D-EBSD experiments by FIB serial sectioning. Band contrast and band slope were used to describe the pattern quality. The FIB probe currents investigated ranged from 100 to 5000 pA and the accelerating voltage was either 30 or 5 kV. The results show that 30 kV FIB milling induced a significant reduction of the pattern quality of STN samples compared to a mechanically polished surface but yielded a high pattern quality on YSZ. The difference between STN and YSZ pattern quality is thought to be caused by difference in the degree of ion damage as their backscatter coefficients and ion penetration depths are virtually identical. Reducing the FIB probe current from 5000 to 100 pA improved the pattern quality by 20% for STN but only showed a marginal improvement for YSZ. On STN, a conductive coating can help to improve the pattern quality and 5 kV polishing can lead to a 100% improvement of the pattern quality relatively to 30 kV FIB milling. For 3D-EBSD experiments of a material such as STN, it is recommended to combine a high kV FIB milling and low kV polishing for each slice in order to optimize the data quality and acquisition time. PMID:22582798

  19. A Dictionary Approach to Electron Backscatter Diffraction Indexing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu H; Park, Se Un; Wei, Dennis; Newstadt, Greg; Jackson, Michael A; Simmons, Jeff P; De Graef, Marc; Hero, Alfred O

    2015-06-01

    We propose a framework for indexing of grain and subgrain structures in electron backscatter diffraction patterns of polycrystalline materials. We discretize the domain of a dynamical forward model onto a dense grid of orientations, producing a dictionary of patterns. For each measured pattern, we identify the most similar patterns in the dictionary, and identify boundaries, detect anomalies, and index crystal orientations. The statistical distribution of these closest matches is used in an unsupervised binary decision tree (DT) classifier to identify grain boundaries and anomalous regions. The DT classifies a pattern as an anomaly if it has an abnormally low similarity to any pattern in the dictionary. It classifies a pixel as being near a grain boundary if the highly ranked patterns in the dictionary differ significantly over the pixel's neighborhood. Indexing is accomplished by computing the mean orientation of the closest matches to each pattern. The mean orientation is estimated using a maximum likelihood approach that models the orientation distribution as a mixture of Von Mises-Fisher distributions over the quaternionic three sphere. The proposed dictionary matching approach permits segmentation, anomaly detection, and indexing to be performed in a unified manner with the additional benefit of uncertainty quantification. PMID:26055190

  20. Three-Dimensional EBSD Analysis of YSZ, NiO-YSZ and Ni-Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2012-01-03

    In this report, a method is discussed to perform successive milling on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), NiO-YSZ and Ni-alloy at the intervals of 85 nm 50 nm and 100 nm, respectively using a focused ion beam (FIB) followed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis on each slice. The EBSD data is then reconstructed to generate 3D volume. The 3D-EBSD band quality data is superimposed on inverse pole figure (IPF) grain orientation analysis to get a correlation with quality of band indexing. For the NiO-YSZ case, grain orientations and band quality factors were matched for grains {approx}250 nm diameters producing a high resolution 3D-EBSD data. For this case, a pore space in 3D volume was visible due to nanocrystalline NiO-YSZ grain network. The advantages of 3D EBSD are discussed in the context of its applications to SOFC research community.

  1. A pseudo-3D approach based on electron backscatter diffraction and backscatter electron imaging to study the character of phase boundaries between Mg and long period stacking ordered phase in a Mg–2Y–Zn alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Afshar, Mehran Zaefferer, Stefan

    2015-03-15

    In Mg–2 at.% Y–1 at.% Zn alloys, the LPSO (Long Period Stacking Ordered) phase is important to improve mechanical properties of the material. The aim of this paper is to present a study on the phase boundary character in these two-phase alloys. Using EBSD pattern analysis it was found that the 24R structure is the dominant LPSO phase structure in the current alloy. The phase boundary character between the Mg matrix and the LPSO phase was investigated using an improved pseudo-3D EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction) technique in combination with BSE or SE (backscatter or secondary electron) imaging. A large amount of very low-angle phase boundaries was detected. The (0 0 0 2) plane in the Mg matrix which is parallel to the (0 0 0 24) plane in the LPSO phase was found to be the most frequent plane for these phase boundaries. This plane is supposed to be the habit plane of the eutectic co-solidification of the Mg matrix and the LPSO phase. - Highlights: • It is shown that for the investigated alloy the LPSO phase has mainly 24R crystal structure. • A new method is presented which allows accurate determination of the 5-parameter grain or phase boundary character. • It is found that the low-angle phase boundaries appearing in the alloy all have basal phase boundary planes.

  2. Surface Morphology and Microstructural Characterization of KCl Crystals Grown in Halite-Sylvite Brine Solutions by Electron Backscattered Diffraction Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podder, Jiban; Basu, Ritwik; Evitts, Richard William; Besant, Robert William

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a study on the ternary NaCl-KCl-H2O system was carried out by an extractive metallurgy technique from mixed brine solutions of different compositions at room temperature (23°C). The surface morphology and microstructure were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and an energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The presence of Na{ }+ was found to reduce the stability of the solutions and increase the crystallization induction period, interfacial energy, energy of formation of the nucleus and greatly reduce the nucleation rate of KCl crystal. The surface morphology of KCl crystals is significantly changed due to presence of 5 to 10% (w/w) of NaCl as impurities in the binary solutions and shows the formation of co-crystals of different crystallographic orientation of NaCl on the KCl surface. In addition X-ray diffraction studies performed on KCl crystals grown in halite-sylvite binary solutions reveals that these crystals are cubic in nature and its lattice constant is 6.2952 Å when the NaCl concentration is small.

  3. Grain Growth Orientation and Anisotropy in Cu6Sn5 Intermetallic: Nanoindentation and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Soud Farhan; Ladani, Leila

    2014-04-01

    As the size of joints in micro/nano-electronics diminishes, the role of intermetallic (IMC) layers becomes more significant. It was shown that solder joint strength is controlled largely by IMC strength at higher strain rates. Additionally, there is a possibility that very small joints are completely composed of IMCs. Further miniaturization of joints may result in statistical grain size effects. Therefore, it is essential to characterize IMC materials and understand their anisotropic mechanical properties. One of the most common types of IMCs in microelectronic joints is Cu6Sn5, which is formed in a variety of bonding materials with different compositions of Sn, Cu, and Ag. This work studies through nanoindentation elastic-plastic properties of a single grain of Cu6Sn5 IMC in a Sn-3.5Ag/Cu system with reflow soldering. Elastic properties such as elastic modulus and hardness were determined from the nanoindentation load-depth curve. The reverse analysis model described by Dao et al. was used to extract plastic properties such as yield strength and strain hardening exponent from nanoindentation data. Care was taken to achieve indentation of single grains with sufficient accuracy and repeatability. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) mapping was used to determine orientation of Cu6Sn5 grains and to relate the orientation with the load-depth curve results of nanoindentation and the corresponding elastic and plastic properties. The EBSD results indicated that the Cu6Sn5 crystal structure is hexagonal. Columnar growth of the Cu6Sn5 grains was observed as the grains mostly grew along the c-axis of the crystal. Indentation of different grains parallel to the basal plane showed no significant difference in mechanical properties.

  4. The effect of length scale on the determination of geometrically necessary dislocations via EBSD continuum dislocation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruggles, T J; Rampton, T M; Khosravani, A; Fullwood, D T

    2016-05-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) dislocation microscopy is an important, emerging field in metals characterization. Currently, calculation of geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) density is problematic because it has been shown to depend on the step size of the EBSD scan used to investigate the sample. This paper models the change in calculated GND density as a function of step size statistically. The model provides selection criteria for EBSD step size as well as an estimate of the total dislocation content. Evaluation of a heterogeneously deformed tantalum specimen is used to asses the method. PMID:26986021

  5. Oriented Nucleation of both Ge-Fresnoite and Benitoite/BaGe4O9 during the Surface Crystallisation of Glass Studied by Electron Backscatter Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Wolfgang; Patschger, Marek; Murdzheva, Steliana; Thieme, Christian; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Two glasses of the compositions 2 BaO - TiO2 - 2.75 GeO2 and 2 BaO - TiO2 -3.67 GeO2 (also known as BTG55) are annealed at temperatures from 680 to 970 °C to induce surface crystallization. The resulting samples are analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) including electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Ge-Fresnoite (Ba2TiGe2O8, BTG) is observed at the immediate surface of all samples and oriented nucleation is proven in both compositions. After a very fast kinetic selection, the crystal growth of BTG into the bulk occurs via highly oriented dendrites where the c-axes are oriented perpendicular to the surface. The growth of this oriented layer is finally blocked by dendritc BTG originating from bulk nucleation. The secondary phases BaTiGe3O9 (benitoite) and BaGe4O9 are also identified near the surface by XRD and localized by EBSD which additionally indicates orientation preferences for these phases. This behaviour is in contrast with previous reports from the Ba2TiSi2O8 as well as the Sr2TiSi2O8 systems. PMID:26853738

  6. Oriented Nucleation of both Ge-Fresnoite and Benitoite/BaGe4O9 during the Surface Crystallisation of Glass Studied by Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Wolfgang; Patschger, Marek; Murdzheva, Steliana; Thieme, Christian; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Two glasses of the compositions 2 BaO - TiO2 - 2.75 GeO2 and 2 BaO – TiO2 –3.67 GeO2 (also known as BTG55) are annealed at temperatures from 680 to 970 °C to induce surface crystallization. The resulting samples are analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) including electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Ge-Fresnoite (Ba2TiGe2O8, BTG) is observed at the immediate surface of all samples and oriented nucleation is proven in both compositions. After a very fast kinetic selection, the crystal growth of BTG into the bulk occurs via highly oriented dendrites where the c-axes are oriented perpendicular to the surface. The growth of this oriented layer is finally blocked by dendritc BTG originating from bulk nucleation. The secondary phases BaTiGe3O9 (benitoite) and BaGe4O9 are also identified near the surface by XRD and localized by EBSD which additionally indicates orientation preferences for these phases. This behaviour is in contrast with previous reports from the Ba2TiSi2O8 as well as the Sr2TiSi2O8 systems. PMID:26853738

  7. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis to determine the mechanisms that operated during dynamic recrystallisation of quartz-rich rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfpenny, Angela; Prior, David J.; Wheeler, John

    2012-03-01

    Determination of the controlling nucleation and recrystallisation mechanisms from a samples microstructure are essential for understanding how the microstructure formed and evolved through time. The aim of our research was to apply a quantified analytical approach to the identification of the controlling nucleation, recrystallisation and microstructural modification mechanisms. We used electron backscatter diffraction to quantify the microstructures of naturally deformed quartz-rich rocks which were deformed at various temperature and pressure conditions. Our results show that ratios of the recrystallised grain size to the subgrain size with values less than 1 (0.5-0.7 in the data presented here) suggest bulge nucleation, whereas ratios of ∼1 suggest subgrain rotation nucleation. Other supporting evidence for subgrain rotation nucleation is an increase in misorientation from the centre of an original protolith 'parent' grain to the edge. All samples show evidence for modification of the microstructure due to grain boundary sliding including increased misorientation angles between grains and movement of recrystallised grains between parent grains. By systematically analysing sample microstructures it is possible to separate out evidence to determine the controlling nucleation and recrystallisation mechanisms, as well as being able to identify microstructure modification mechanisms. Using microstructural quantification via EBSD allows a systematic methodology to analyse samples from any location from an objective viewpoint.

  8. Growth Directions of Precipitates in the Al-Si-Mg-Hf Alloy Using Combined EBSD and FIB 3D-Reconstruction Techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueli; Xing, Yuan; Huang, Huilan; Li, Yanjun; Jia, Zhihong; Liu, Qing

    2015-06-01

    Nanobelt-like precipitates in an Al-Si-Mg-Hf alloy were studied using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and focused ion beam (FIB) scanning electron microscopy techniques. One grain of the Al matrix with a near [111] normal direction was identified by EBSD and the three-dimensional (3D) microstructure of nanobelt-like precipitates in this grain was studied using 3D-FIB. Ten growth directions of the nanobelt-like precipitates in the grain were identified. PMID:25951774

  9. Diffraction-controlled backscattering threshold and application to Raman gap

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Harvey A.; Mounaix, Philippe

    2011-04-15

    In most classic analytical models of linear stimulated scatter, light diffraction is omitted, a priori. However, modern laser optic typically includes a variant of the random phase plate [Y. Kato et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 1057 (1984)], resulting in diffraction limited laser intensity fluctuations - or localized speckles - which may result in explosive reflectivity growth as the average laser intensity approaches a critical value [H. A. Rose and D. F. DuBois, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 2883 (1994)]. Among the differences between stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scatter is that the SRS scattered light diffracts more strongly than the laser light with increase of electron density. This weakens the tendency of the SRS light to closely follow the most amplified paths, diminishing gain. Let G{sub 0} be the one-dimensional power gain exponent of the stimulated scatter. In this paper we show that differential diffraction gives rise to an increase of G{sub 0} at the SRS physical threshold with increase of electron density up to a drastic disruption of SRS as electron density approaches one fourth of its critical value from below. For three wave interaction lengths not small compared to a speckle length, this is a physically robust Raman gap mechanism.

  10. Dependence of the Electron Beam Energy and Types of Surface to Determine EBSD Indexing Reliability in Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2012-04-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a powerful technique for the surface microstructure analysis. EBSD analysis of cubic yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) in two and three dimensions (2-D, 3-D) is demonstrated using sequential slicing from a focused ion beam (FIB) followed by EBSD mapping to represent 3-D reconstructed high density grain structure with random orientation. The statistics related to accuracy of EBSD band detection shows that probability of accurate grain orientation detection increased significantly when the electron beam energy is increased from 10 kV to 30 kV. As a result of better sampling with increased interaction volume, a disparity between local and average grain orientation angle also exhibited the dependence of the electron beam energy to determine the accuracy of grain orientation. To study the accuracy and quality of EBSD band detection as a function of surface roughness and over layer formation, rapid EBSD measurement tests are performed on (a) YSZ surfaces ion-polished at ion beam energies of 65 nA at 30 kV and 1 nA at 30 kV and (b) carbon coated versus uncoated YSZ surfaces. The EBSD results at both 10 kV and 30 kV electron beam energies indicate that EBSD band detection accuracy is negatively affected by surface roughness and amorphous over layer formation.

  11. Determination of pattern centre in EBSD using the moving-screen technique.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, D A; Pugh, J L; Richardson, G D; Mooney, L R

    2007-09-01

    The 'moving-screen' or 'pattern magnification' method of calibration for electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was reformulated to develop a high-precision technique requiring no crystallographic knowledge of the specimen and no initial estimates of the calibration parameters. The technique depends upon the accurate displacement of the screen and camera assembly. Corresponding points are selected, interactively, from EBSD patterns. It is suggested that, as an alternative, the selection of points from the Hough transform could lead to a completely automated routine. PMID:17760619

  12. Phase Identification of Dual-Phase (DP980) Steels by Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Nanoindentation Techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Ruimi, Annie; Field, David P

    2016-02-01

    Phase identification of multi-phase materials provides essential information relating the material to its mechanical properties. In this study we selected DP980, a type of dual-phase steel, to investigate the content of martensite and ferrite grains. A combination of advanced techniques was used to provide detailed and precise information of the microstructure. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to provide observations of the sample surface at different scales. Martensite and ferrite phases of DP980 were further identified and characterized using electron backscatter diffraction and scanning probe microscopy. Results obtained with nanoindentation tests confirmed that the differences in nanohardness values in single-phase grains are martensite and ferrite with different surface heights shown by scanning probe microscopy. The similarity shown in the image quality map and scanning probe microscopy proves that a large fraction of martensite can be distinguished in this undeformed material using image quality parameters obtained during electron backscatter diffraction imaging. PMID:26781200

  13. Electron backscattering diffraction analysis of an ancient wootz steel blade from central India

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, M.R. Sullivan, A.; Balasubramaniam, R.

    2009-04-15

    The electron backscattering diffraction technique was used to analyse the nature of carbides present in an ancient wootz steel blade. Bulky carbides, pro-eutectoid carbide along the prior austenite grain boundaries and fine spheroidized carbides were detected. Electron backscattering diffraction was employed to understand the texture of these carbides. The orientations of the cementite frequently occur in clusters, which points to a common origin of the members of the cluster. For the bands of coarse cementite, the origin is probably large coarse particles formed during the original cooling of the wootz cake. Pearlite formed earlier in the forging process has led to groups of similarly oriented fine cementite particles. The crystallographic texture of the cementite is sharp whereas that of the ferrite is weak. The sharp cementite textures point to the longevity of the coarse cementite throughout the repeated forging steps and to the influence of existing textured cementite on the nucleation of new cementite during cooling.

  14. EBSD characterization of carbide-carbide boundaries in WC-Co composites.

    PubMed

    Farooq, M U; Klement, U

    2004-03-01

    A sample of WC-6wt%Co was investigated for grain boundary character distribution and occurrence of coincidence site lattice (CSL) boundaries on a statistical basis. For this purpose orientation measurements of the grains were carried out using electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD). The dominant misorientation relationships were determined by complementary EBSD data representation tools such as orientation maps, misorientation angle distribution histograms and the sectioned three-dimensional misorientation space. It was found that the grain boundary character distribution of the material is nearly random and the CSL boundaries are not present in statistically significant amounts. It was also found that the amount of binder phase does not play a role in the formation of special boundaries. The paper focuses on the methodology of characterizing grain boundaries in a hexagonal material using EBSD. PMID:15009698

  15. Phase analysis in duplex stainless steel: comparison of EBSD and quantitative metallography methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, J.; Chmiela, B.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the research was to work out the qualitative and quantitative analysis of phases in DSS in as-received state and after thermal aging. For quantitative purposes, SEM observations, EDS analyses and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) methods were employed. Qualitative analysis of phases was performed by two methods: EBSD and classical quantitative metallography. A juxtaposition of different etchants for the revealing of microstructure and brief review of sample preparation methods for EBSD studies were presented. Different ways of sample preparation were tested and based on these results a detailed methodology of DSS phase analysis was developed including: surface finishing, selective etching methods and image acquisition. The advantages and disadvantages of applied methods were pointed out and compared the accuracy of the analysis phase performed by both methods.

  16. Damage Assessment of Heat Resistant Steels through Electron BackScatter Diffraction Strain Analysis under Creep and Creep-Fatigue Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiyama, Kazunari; Kimachi, Hirohisa; Tsuboi, Toshiki; Hagiwara, Hiroyuki; Ogino, Shotaro; Mizutani, Yoshiki

    EBSD(Electron BackScatter Diffraction) analyses were conducted for studying the quantitative microstructural metrics of creep and creep-fatigue damage for austenitic SUS304HTB boiler tube steel and ferritic Mod.9Cr piping steel. KAM(Kernel Average Misorientation) maps and GOS(Grain Orientation Spread) maps were obtained for these samples and the area averaged values KAMave and GOSave were obtained. While the increasing trends of these misorientation metrics were observed for SUS304HTB steel, the decreasing trends were observed for damaged Mod.9Cr steel with extensive recovery of subgrain structure. To establish more universal parameter representing the accumulation of damage to compensate these opposite trends, the EBSD strain parameters were introduced for converting the misorientation changes into the quantities representing accumulated permanent strains during creep and creep-fatigue damage process. As KAM values were dependent on the pixel size (inversely proportional to the observation magnification) and the permanent strain could be expressed as the shear strain which was the product of dislocation density, Burgers vector and dislocation movement distance, two KAM strain parameters MεKAMnet and MεδKAMave were introduced as the sum of product of the noise subtracted KAMnet and the absolute change from initial value δKAMave with dislocation movement distance divided by pixel size. MεδKAMave parameter showed better relationship both with creep strain in creep tests and accumulated creep strain range in creep-fatigue tests. This parameter can be used as the strain-based damage evaluation and detector of final failure.

  17. ARPGE: a computer program to automatically reconstruct the parent grains from electron backscatter diffraction data

    PubMed Central

    Cayron, Cyril

    2007-01-01

    A computer program called ARPGE written in Python uses the theoretical results generated by the computer program GenOVa to automatically reconstruct the parent grains from electron backscatter diffraction data obtained on phase transition materials with or without residual parent phase. The misorientations between daughter grains are identified with operators, the daughter grains are identified with indexed variants, the orientations of the parent grains are determined, and some statistics on the variants and operators are established. Some examples with martensitic transformations in iron and titanium alloys were treated. Variant selection phenomena were revealed. PMID:19461849

  18. Utilizing Ebsd to Validate and Understand Nde Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essex, S. D.; Potter, M. D. G.; Vann, R.; Dixon, S.

    2009-03-01

    Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) is a destructive, surface-specific technique that measures accurately crystallographic orientations within a scanning electron microscope (SEM). From this data we can infer elastic properties, calculate levels of stress and measure microstructural properties such as the size and aspect ratios of grains. The Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer (EMAT) is a non-contact, ultrasonic transducer that is suitable for operation on electrically conducting materials such as Aluminium and Steel. This paper highlights some of the work carried out using EBSD as a technique to validate EMAT measurements on rolled sheet to determine microstructural properties such as grain size and aspect ratios via shear wave through-thickness attenuation, and other macroscopic properties like average crystallographic texture. Work is also presented on another application for EBSD, in that it can be used to confirm whether an NDE technique is in fact nondestructive. Here we look at the case of a Nd:Yag pulsed laser irradiating a sample, in the ablative/thermoelastic regime boundary.

  19. Effect of cold deformation on the recrystallization behavior of FePd alloy at the ordering temperature using electron backscatter diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hung-Pin; Chen, Yen-Chun; Chen, Delphic; Kuo, Jui-Chao

    2014-08-15

    In this study, the evolution of the recrystallization texture and microstructure was investigated after annealing of 50% and 90% cold-rolled FePd alloy at 530 °C. The FePd alloy was produced by vacuum arc melting in an atmosphere of 97% Ar and 3% H{sub 2}. The specimens were cold rolled to achieve 50% and 90% reduction in thickness. Electron backscatter diffraction measurements were performed on the rolling direction–normal direction section. With increased deformation from 50% to 90%, recrystallized texture transition occurs. For the 50% cold-rolled alloy, the preferred orientation is (0 1 0) [11 0 1], which is close to the cubic orientation after 400 h of annealing. For the 90% cold-rolled alloy, the orientation changes to (0 5 4) [22–4 5] after 16 h of annealing. - Highlights: • Texture and microstructure in cold-rolled FePd alloy was investigated during annealing using EBSD. • The recrystallized texture of 50% cold-rolled FePd is (0 1 0) [11 0 1] at 530 °C for 400 hours. • The recrystallized texture of 90% cold-rolled FePd is changed to (0 5 4) [22–4 5] at 530 °C after 16 hours.

  20. Effect of the surface preparation techniques on the EBSD analysis of a friction stir welded AA1100-B{sub 4}C metal matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.; Amira, S.; Gougeon, P.; Chen, X.-G.

    2011-09-15

    Aluminum based metal matrix composites (MMCs) have been used in various automobile, aerospace and military industries. Yet characterization of the microstructure in these materials remains a challenge. In the present work, the grain structure in the matrix of B{sub 4}C particulate reinforced MMCs and their friction stir welds is characterized by using optical metallography and the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. Optical metallography can partially reveal the grain structure in the matrix of AA1100-16 vol.% B{sub 4}C composite. The EBSD technique has been successfully applied to characterize the grain structure in the AA1100-16 vol.% B{sub 4}C friction stir welds, which provides a powerful tool to follow the microstructural evolution of MMC materials during friction stir welding (FSW). Both mechanical polishing and ion beam polishing are used for the EBSD sample preparation. The effect of the sample preparation on the EBSD data acquisition quality is studied. Some typical examples, such as the identification of grains and subgrains, grain size distribution, deformation fields and the texture components are given. - Highlights: {yields} EBSD has been used to characterize the grain structure of Al-B{sub 4}C MMCs. {yields} Mechanical and ion beam polishing are compared for EBSD sample preparation of MMCs. {yields} EBSD shows great advantages over optical microscopy for microtexture analysis of MMCs.

  1. Evaluation of macrozone dimensions by ultrasound and EBSD techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Moreau, Andre; Toubal, Lotfi; Bocher, Philippe; Humbert, Michel; Uta, Elena; Gey, Nathalie

    2013-01-15

    Titanium alloys are known to have texture heterogeneities, i.e. regions much larger than the grain dimensions, where the local orientation distribution of the grains differs from one region to the next. The electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) technique is the method of choice to characterize these macro regions, which are called macrozones. Qualitatively, the images obtained by EBSD show that these macrozones may be larger or smaller, elongated or equiaxed. However, often no well-defined boundaries are observed between the macrozones and it is very hard to obtain objective and quantitative estimates of the macrozone dimensions from these data. In the present work, we present a novel, non-destructive ultrasonic technique that provides objective and quantitative characteristic dimensions of the macrozones. The obtained dimensions are based on the spatial autocorrelation function of fluctuations in the sound velocity. Thus, a pragmatic definition of macrozone dimensions naturally arises from the ultrasonic measurement. This paper has three objectives: 1) to disclose the novel, non-destructive ultrasonic technique to measure macrozone dimensions, 2) to propose a quantitative and objective definition of macrozone dimensions adapted to and arising from the ultrasonic measurement, and which is also applicable to the orientation data obtained by EBSD, and 3) to compare the macrozone dimensions obtained using the two techniques on two samples of the near-alpha titanium alloy IMI834. In addition, it was observed that macrozones may present a semi-periodical arrangement. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discloses a novel, ultrasonic NDT technique to measure macrozone dimensions Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proposes a quantitative and objective definition of macrozone dimensions Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compares macrozone dimensions obtained using EBSD and ultrasonics on 2 Ti samples Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Observes that macrozones may have a semi

  2. Spectral Ellipsometry and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analyses of Silicon Surfaces Implanted with Silver Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazarov, V. V.; Nuzhdin, V. I.; Valeev, V. F.; Vorobev, V. V.; Osin, Yu. N.; Stepanov, A. L.

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) produced on surfaces of single-crystal substrates (c-Si) by low-energy low-dose implantation of silver ions is studied by spectral ellipsometry and electron backscatter diffraction. Implantation was done with an ion energy of 30 keV at a constant ion beam current density of 2 μA/cm2 and doses of 6.24·1012-1.25·1016 ions/cm2 on room temperature substrate targets. Irradiation was carried out with a current density of 0.1-5 μA/cm2 for implantation doses of 6.24·1013 and 1.87·1014 ions/cm2. It was found that spectral ellipsometry is an accurate andreliable method for monitoring low-dose ion implantation processes.

  3. Crack nucleation using combined crystal plasticity modelling, high-resolution digital image correlation and high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction in a superalloy containing non-metallic inclusions under fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tiantian; Britton, Ben; Shollock, Barbara; Dunne, Fionn

    2016-01-01

    A crystal plasticity finite-element model, which explicitly and directly represents the complex microstructures of a non-metallic agglomerate inclusion within polycrystal nickel alloy, has been developed to study the mechanistic basis of fatigue crack nucleation. The methodology is to use the crystal plasticity model in conjunction with direct measurement at the microscale using high (angular) resolution-electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) and high (spatial) resolution-digital image correlation (HR-DIC) strain measurement techniques. Experimentally, this sample has been subjected to heat treatment leading to the establishment of residual (elastic) strains local to the agglomerate and subsequently loaded under conditions of low cyclic fatigue. The full thermal and mechanical loading history was reproduced within the model. HR-EBSD and HR-DIC elastic and total strain measurements demonstrate qualitative and quantitative agreement with crystal plasticity results. Crack nucleation by interfacial decohesion at the nickel matrix/agglomerate inclusion boundaries is observed experimentally, and systematic modelling studies enable the mechanistic basis of the nucleation to be established. A number of fatigue crack nucleation indicators are also assessed against the experimental results. Decohesion was found to be driven by interface tensile normal stress alone, and the interfacial strength was determined to be in the range of 1270–1480 MPa. PMID:27279765

  4. Cryogenic EBSD reveals structure of directionally solidified ice–polymer composite

    SciTech Connect

    Donius, Amalie E.; Obbard, Rachel W.; Burger, Joan N.; Hunger, Philipp M.; Baker, Ian; Doherty, Roger D.; Wegst, Ulrike G.K.

    2014-07-01

    Despite considerable research efforts on directionally solidified or freeze-cast materials in recent years, little fundamental knowledge has been gained that links model with experiment. In this contribution, the cryogenic characterization of directionally solidified polymer solutions illustrates, how powerful cryo-scanning electron microscopy combined with electron backscatter diffraction is for the structural characterization of ice–polymer composite materials. Under controlled sublimation, the freeze-cast polymer scaffold structure is revealed and imaged with secondary electrons. Electron backscatter diffraction fabric analysis shows that the ice crystals, which template the polymer scaffold and create the lamellar structure, have a-axes oriented parallel to the direction of solidification and the c-axes perpendicular to it. These results indicate the great potential of both cryo-scanning electron microscopy and cryo-electron backscatter diffraction in gaining fundamental knowledge of structure–property–processing correlations. - Highlights: • Cryo-SEM of freeze-cast polymer solution reveals an ice-templated structure. • Cryo-EBSD reveals the ice crystal a-axis to parallel the solidification direction. • The honeycomb-like polymer phase favors columnar ridges only on one side. • Combining cryo-SEM with EBSD links solidification theory with experiment.

  5. Introduction and comparison of new EBSD post-processing methodologies.

    PubMed

    Wright, Stuart I; Nowell, Matthew M; Lindeman, Scott P; Camus, Patrick P; De Graef, Marc; Jackson, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) provides a useful means for characterizing microstructure. However, it can be difficult to obtain index-able diffraction patterns from some samples. This can lead to noisy maps reconstructed from the scan data. Various post-processing methodologies have been developed to improve the scan data generally based on correlating non-indexed or mis-indexed points with the orientations obtained at neighboring points in the scan grid. Two new approaches are introduced (1) a re-scanning approach using local pattern averaging and (2) using the multiple solutions obtained by the triplet indexing method. These methodologies are applied to samples with noise introduced into the patterns artificially and by the operational settings of the EBSD camera. They are also applied to a heavily deformed and a fine-grained sample. In all cases, both techniques provide an improvement in the resulting scan data, the local pattern averaging providing the most improvement of the two. However, the local pattern averaging is most helpful when the noise in the patterns is due to the camera operating conditions as opposed to inherent challenges in the sample itself. A byproduct of this study was insight into the validity of various indexing success rate metrics. A metric based given by the fraction of points with CI values greater than some tolerance value (0.1 in this case) was confirmed to provide an accurate assessment of the indexing success rate. PMID:26342553

  6. Use of EBSD data in mesoscale numerical analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R; Wiland, H

    2000-03-30

    Experimentation, theory, and modeling have all played vital roles in defining what is known about microstructural evolution and the effects of microstructure on material properties. Recently, technology has become an enabling factor, allowing significant advances to be made on several fronts. Experimental evidence of crystallographic slip and the basic theory of crystal plasticity were established in the early 20th century, and the theory and models evolved incrementally over the next 60 years. During this time, modeling was primarily concerned with the average response of polycrystalline aggregates. While some detailed finite element modeling (FEM) with crystal plasticity constitutive relations was performed in the early 1980's, such simulations over taxed the capacity of the available computer hardware. Advances in computer capabilities led to a flurry of activity in finite element modeling in the next 10 years, thus increasing understanding of lattice orientation evolution and generating detailed predictions of spatial orientation distributions that could not be readily validated with existing experimental characterization methods. Significant advancements in material characterization, particularly automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), have made it possible to conduct detailed validation studies of the FEM predictions. The data collected are extensive, and many questions about the evolution of microstructure and its role in determining mechanical properties can now be addressed. It is now possible to obtain a detailed map of lattice orientations on a fine size scale. This will allow detailed quantitative comparisons of experiments and newly emerging large scale continuum FEM simulations. This capability will facilitate model validation efforts aimed at predicting deformation induced structural features, such as shear bands and cell structures, as well as predictions of the effects of grain interactions. The insight gained from the coupling of EBSD

  7. Microstrain distribution mapping on CuInSe2 thin films by means of electron backscatter diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Norbert; Wilkinson, Angus J; Schmid, Thomas; Winkelmann, Aimo; Chahine, Gilbert A; Schülli, Tobias U; Rissom, Thorsten; Marquardt, Julien; Schorr, Susan; Abou-Ras, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    The investigation of the microstructure in functional, polycrystalline thin films is an important contribution to the enhanced understanding of structure-property relationships in corresponding devices. Linear and planar defects within individual grains may affect substantially the performance of the device. These defects are closely related to strain distributions. The present work compares electron and X-ray diffraction as well as Raman microspectroscopy, which provide access to microstrain distributions within individual grains. CuInSe2 thin films for solar cells are used as a model system. High-resolution electron backscatter diffraction and X-ray microdiffraction as well as Raman microspectroscopy were applied for this comparison. Consistently, microstrain values were determined of the order of 10(-4) by these three techniques. However, only electron backscatter diffraction, X-ray microdiffraction exhibit sensitivities appropriate for mapping local strain changes at the submicrometer level within individual grains in polycrystalline materials. PMID:27459269

  8. Determining the sputter yields of molybdenum in low-index crystal planes via electron backscattered diffraction, focused ion beam and atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.S.; Chiu, C.H.; Hong, I.T.; Tung, H.C.; Chien, F.S.-S.

    2013-09-15

    Previous literature has used several monocrystalline sputtering targets with various crystalline planes, respectively, to investigate the variations of the sputter yield of materials in different crystalline orientations. This study presents a method to measure the sputtered yields of Mo for the three low-index planes (100), (110), and (111), through using an easily made polycrystalline target. The procedure was firstly to use electron backscattered diffraction to identify the grain positions of the three crystalline planes, and then use a focused ion beam to perform the micro-milling of each identified grain, and finally the sputter yields were calculated from the removed volumes, which were measured by atomic force microscope. Experimental results showed that the sputter yield of the primary orientations for Mo varied as Y{sub (110)} > Y{sub (100)} > Y{sub (111)}, coincidental with the ranking of their planar atomic packing densities. The concept of transparency of ion in the crystalline substance was applied to elucidate these results. In addition, the result of (110) orientation exhibiting higher sputter yield is helpful for us to develop a Mo target with a higher deposition rate for use in industry. By changing the deformation process from straight rolling to cross rolling, the (110) texture intensity of the Mo target was significantly improved, and thus enhanced the deposition rate. - Highlights: • We used EBSD, FIB and AFM to measure the sputter yields of Mo in low-index planes. • The sputter yield of the primary orientations for Mo varied as Y{sub (110)} > Y{sub (100)} > Y{sub (111)}. • The transparency of ion was used to elucidate the differences in the sputter yield. • We improved the sputter rate of polycrystalline Mo target by adjusting its texture.

  9. Grain boundary studies of high temperature superconducting materials using electron backscatter Kikuchi diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, A.; Specht, E.D.; Wang, Z.L.; Kroeger, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    Grain Orientation and gain boundary misorientation distributions in high critical current density, high temperature superconductors were determined using electron backscatter Kikuchi diffraction. It is found that depending on the type of superconductor and the processing method used to fabricate it, there exist different scales of biaxial texture from no biaxial texture, local biaxial texture, to complete biaxial texture. Experimentally obtained grain boundary misorientation distributions (GBMDs) were found to be skewed significantly to low angles in comparison to what is expected on the basis of macroscopic texture alone, suggesting that minimization of energy may be a driving force during the processing of high critical current density materials. In addition, a higher than expected fraction of coincident-site lattice boundaries is observed. Examination of maps of grain boundary misorientations in spatially correlated gains, i.e. the grain boundary mesotexture, suggests the presence percolative paths of high critical current density. A combination of orientation measurements, theoretical modeling of GBMDs and modeling of percolative current flow through an assemblage of gain boundaries is performed to gain an insight into the important microstructural features dictating the transport properties of high temperature superconductors. It is found that maximization of low energy, in particular, low angle boundaries is essential for higher critical currents. The combination of experimental and analytical techniques employed are applicable to other materials where physical properties are dominated by interganular characteristics.

  10. Seismic anisotropy of the crust: electron-backscatter diffraction measurements from the Basin and Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdman, Monica E.; Hacker, Bradley R.; Zandt, George; Seward, Gareth

    2013-11-01

    Crystal preferred orientations were measured in a suite of rocks from three locations in the Basin and Range using electron-backscatter diffraction. Anisotropic velocities were calculated for all rocks using single-crystal stiffnesses, the Christoffel equation and Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging. Anisotropic velocities were calculated for all three crustal sections using these values combined with rock proportions as exposed in the field. One suite of rocks previously measured in the laboratory was used as a benchmark to evaluate the accuracy of the calculated velocities. Differences in the seismic anisotropy of the Funeral Mountains, Ruby Mountains and East Humboldt Range sections arise because of differences in mineralogy and strain, with the calc-silicate dominated Ruby Mountains section having higher P-wave speeds and VP/VS ratios because of the reduced quartz content. In all cases, the velocities show either transverse isotropy or nearly so, with a unique slow axis normal to the foliation. Velocity anisotropy can thus be used to infer the flow plane, but not the flow direction in typical crustal rocks. Areas with a subhorizontal foliation have minimal shear wave splitting for vertically propagating waves and are thus good places to measure mantle anisotropy using SKS-splitting.

  11. EBSD and Nanoindentation-Correlated Study of Delamination Fracture in Al-Li Alloy 2090

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayon, Wesley A.; Crooks, Roy E.; Domack, Marcia S.; Wagner, John A.; Elmustafa, A. A.

    2008-01-01

    Al-Li alloys offer attractive combinations of high strength and low density. However, a tendency for delamination fracture has limited their use. A better understanding of the delamination mechanisms may identify methods to control delaminations through processing modifications. A combination of new techniques has been used to evaluate delamination fracture in Al-Li alloys. Both high quality electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) information and valid nanoindentation measurements were obtained from fractured test specimens. Correlations were drawn between nano-scale hardness variations and local texture along delaminating boundaries. Intriguing findings were observed for delamination fracture through the combined analysis of grain orientation, Taylor factor, and kernel average misorientation.

  12. Absolute orientations from EBSD measurements - as easy as it seems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Rüdiger; Bestmann, Michel; Heilbronner, Renée

    2016-04-01

    In structural geology, some problems can be addressed by inspecting the crystal orientation of grains in a rock. Deriving shear senses, kinematics of flow, information on deformation processes and recrystallization are some examples. Usually, oriented samples are taken in the field and, if inspected in an universal stage, the researcher has full control over the procedure and can make sure that the derived orientation is related to our geographic reference frame - that it is an absolute orientation. Nowadays, usage of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) has greatly improved the information in the derived data (fully crystal orientations, mappings, etc…), and the speed of data acquisition. However, this comes to the price of having to rely on the vendor supplied software and machine setup. Recent benchmarks and comparison of reference data revealed that for various EBSD setups around the world, the orientation data defaults to the wrong absolute orientation. The absolute orientation is not correctly derived - it commonly suffer a 180 degree rotation around the normal of the sample surface. In this contribution we will discuss the implications of such erroneous measurements and what kind of interpretations derived by orientation and texture data will be affected.

  13. A novel EBSD-based finite-element wave propagation model for investigating seismic anisotropy: Application to Finero Peridotite, Ivrea-Verbano Zone, Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xin; Frehner, Marcel; Kunze, Karsten; Zappone, Alba

    2014-10-01

    A novel electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) -based finite-element (FE) wave propagation simulation is presented and applied to investigate seismic anisotropy of peridotite samples. The FE model simulates the dynamic propagation of seismic waves along any chosen direction through representative 2D EBSD sections. The numerical model allows separation of the effects of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) and shape preferred orientation (SPO). The obtained seismic velocities with respect to specimen orientation are compared with Voigt-Reuss-Hill estimates and with laboratory measurements. The results of these three independent methods testify that CPO is the dominant factor controlling seismic anisotropy. Fracture fillings and minor minerals like hornblende only influence the seismic anisotropy if their volume proportion is sufficiently large (up to 23%). The SPO influence is minor compared to the other factors. The presented FE model is discussed with regard to its potential in simulating seismic wave propagation using EBSD data representing natural rock petrofabrics.

  14. Investigation of phases and textures of binary V-Si coating deposited on vanadium-based alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti) using electron backscatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, P.; Ubhi, H. S.; Mathieu, S.

    2015-04-01

    Barrier coating consisting of binary silicide compounds SixVy were deposited on a V-4Cr-4Ti vanadium alloy substrate. Samples were cycled in a furnace for 122h at 650°C and 1100°C. The electron backscattered (EBSD) combine with X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) techniques were employed to identify the phases in the multi-layered coating and to determine growth texture for each phase. The microstructure evolutions occurringduring cycling at 1100°C in the protective coating and the crystal orientation relationships between SixVy were determined.

  15. Acoustic Attenuation and Backscatter Properties of a River Water Column Derived from Laser Diffraction Profiles of Particle Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Y. C.; Hanes, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    In a river column, does acoustic attenuation depend solely on fines while backscatter is determined by coarse grains alone? Does a single, monotonic relationship exist between acoustic backscatter and suspended sediment concentration in a bi-modal size distribution (PSD) at some sound frequency? These questions are addressed in this paper. In-situ vertical profiles of PSD, measured with a laser diffraction instrument LISST-SL are used to compute vertical profiles of acoustic attenuation and backscattering properties. Two sets of data taken one-year apart are examined. The data are from the Cowlitz river in Washington State. Data from one day in March, 2011 reveal a bi-modal PSD that is all washload at surface, but is dominated by Rouse-like suspended sand mode lower to bottom. In this case, at low frequencies, attenuation is indeed set by the washload, while scattering is determined by sand mode except near the surface. A monotonic relationship between backscatter and suspended sediment concentration is also found, offering a calibration for a single frequency system, and rendering inversion of acoustic profiles explicit. A year later, March 2012, the water column had very little wash load, instead only a Rouse-like suspended mode existed. In this uni-modal case, both attenuation and scattering profiles were determined by the suspended load, making inversions implicit. In this latter case, the backscatter-suspended concentration had a much tighter relationship than the bi-modal earlier case, associated with a narrow size distribution of sands. These views emphasize the dramatic variability of acoustic properties of a river column in different flow regimes.

  16. Tiny twists in time; exploring angular resolution of in situ EBSD orientation microstructures in solar system zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    Kikuchi discovered electron diffraction in samples of calcite in the 1920's, and orientation of lattice planes by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) is now routinely measured by automated camera systems at a spatial resolution of tens of nanometers using Field Emission Gun SEM. The current methodology is proving particularly powerful when measuring lattice orientation microstructure in U-Pb geochronology minerals such as zircon and baddeleyite that have experienced high temperature deformation or shock metamorphism. These are among the oldest preserved mineral phases in inner solar system materials, and we have been applying EBSD to rare samples of the Early Earth and grains from extraterrestrial environments such as the Moon and Mars. In these cases the EBSD orientation data are useful for identifying high diffusivity pathways that may have afforded isotopic and trace element disturbance, microstructural proxies for shock metamorphic pressures, as well as resolving glide plane systems in ductile zircon and shear twin mechanisms. Blanket estimates of angular resolution for automated EBSD misorientation measurements are often in the range of 0.5 degrees. In some cases strain giving rise to only a few degrees of lattice misorientation has facilitated 100% Pb-loss. In some cases, however, there is a spatial correlation between trace element or cathodoluminescence zoning in zircon and what appears to be low magnitudes misorientation close to the limits of resolution. Given the proven value of performing EBSD analysis on geochronology minerals, a more thorough exploration of the precision and accuracy of EBSD lattice misorientation measurements is warranted. In this talk the relative weighting of the factors that limit EBSD angular resolution will be investigated, focusing on U-Pb dating minerals such as zircon. These factors include; sample surface preparation, phase symmetry, pseudo-symmetry effects, degree of crystallinity, Kikuchi band contrast and indexing

  17. Segmentation of 3D EBSD data for subgrain boundary identification and feature characterization.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Andrew; Ferry, Michael; Bassman, Lori

    2016-02-01

    Subgrain structures formed during plastic deformation of metals can be observed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) but are challenging to identify automatically. We have adapted a 2D image segmentation technique, fast multiscale clustering (FMC), to 3D EBSD data using a novel variance function to accommodate quaternion data. This adaptation, which has been incorporated into the free open source texture analysis software package MTEX, is capable of segmenting based on subtle and gradual variation as well as on sharp boundaries within the data. FMC has been further modified to group the resulting closed 3D segment boundaries into distinct coherent surfaces based on local normals of a triangulated surface. We demonstrate the excellent capabilities of this technique with application to 3D EBSD data sets generated from cold rolled aluminum containing well-defined microbands, cold rolled and partly recrystallized extra low carbon steel microstructure containing three magnitudes of boundary misorientations, and channel-die plane strain compressed Goss-oriented nickel crystal containing microbands with very subtle changes in orientation. PMID:26630071

  18. Boundary identification in EBSD data with a generalization of fast multiscale clustering.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Cullen; Soe, Brian; Loeb, Andrew; Vemulkar, Ayyappa; Ferry, Michael; Bassman, Lori

    2013-10-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) studies of cellular or subgrain microstructures present problems beyond those in the study of coarse-grained polycrystalline aggregates. In particular, identification of boundaries delineating some subgrain structures, such as microbands, cannot be accomplished simply with pixel-to-pixel misorientation thresholding because many of the boundaries are gradual transitions in crystallographic orientation. Fast multiscale clustering (FMC) is an established data segmentation technique that is combined here with quaternion representation of orientation to segment EBSD data with gradual transitions. This implementation of FMC addresses a common problem with segmentation algorithms, handling data sets with both high and low magnitude boundaries, by using a novel distance function that is a modification of Mahalanobis distance. It accommodates data representations, such as quaternions, whose features are not necessarily linearly correlated but have known distance functions. To maintain the linear run time of FMC with such data, the method requires a novel variance update rule. Although FMC was originally an algorithm for two-dimensional data segmentation, it can be generalized to analyze three-dimensional data sets. As examples, several segmentations of quaternion EBSD data sets are presented. PMID:23751208

  19. Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Analysis of an Austenitic Stainless Steel Subjected to Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment and Plasma Nitriding.

    PubMed

    Proust, Gwénaëlle; Retraint, Delphine; Chemkhi, Mahdi; Roos, Arjen; Demangel, Clemence

    2015-08-01

    Austenitic 316L stainless steel can be used for orthopedic implants due to its biocompatibility and high corrosion resistance. Its range of applications in this field could be broadened by improving its wear and friction properties. Surface properties can be modified through surface hardening treatments. The effects of such treatments on the microstructure of the alloy were investigated here. Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment (SMAT) is a surface treatment that enhances mechanical properties of the material surface by creating a thin nanocrystalline layer. After SMAT, some specimens underwent a plasma nitriding process to further enhance their surface properties. Using electron backscatter diffraction, transmission Kikuchi diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, the microstructural evolution of the stainless steel after these different surface treatments was characterized. Microstructural features investigated include thickness of the nanocrystalline layer, size of the grains within the nanocrystalline layer, and depth of diffusion of nitrogen atoms within the material. PMID:26139391

  20. Alternate formulation of enhanced backscattering as phase conjugation and diffraction: derivation and experimental observation

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jeremy D.; Stoyneva, Valentina; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Mutyal, Nikhil N.; Pradhan, Prabhakar; Çapoğlu, İlker R.; Backman, Vadim

    2011-01-01

    Enhanced backscattering (EBS), also known as weak localization of light, is derived using the Huygens–Fresnel principle and backscattering is generally shown to be the sum of an incoherent baseline and a phase conjugated portion of the incident wave that forms EBS. The phase conjugated portion is truncated by an effective aperture described by the probability function P(s) of coherent path-pair separations. P(s) is determined by the scattering properties of the medium and so characterization of EBS can be used for metrology of scattering materials. A three dimensional intensity peak is predicted in free space at a point conjugate to the source and is experimentally observed. PMID:21716426

  1. Deformation Twin Nucleation and Growth Characterization in Magnesium Alloys Using Novel EBSD Pattern Analysis and Machine Learning Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampton, Travis M.

    Deformation twinning in Magnesium alloys both facilitates slip and forms sites for failure. Currently, basic studies of twinning in Mg are facilitated by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) which is able to extract a myriad of information relating to crystalline microstructures. Although much information is available via EBSD, various problems relating to deformation twinning have not been solved. This dissertation provides new insights into deformation twinning in Mg alloys, with particular focus on AZ31. These insights were gained through the development of new EBSD and related machine learning tools that extract more information beyond what is currently accessed. The first tool relating to characterization of deformed and twinned materials focuses on surface topography crack detection. The intensity map across EBSD images contains vital information that can be used to detect evolution of surface roughness and crack formation, which typically occurs at twin boundaries. The method of topography recovery resulted in reconstruction errors as low as 2% over a 500 microm length. The method was then applied to a 3 microm x 3 microm area of twinned Tantalum which experienced topographic alterations. The topography of Ta correlated with other measured changes in the microstructure. Additionally, EBSD images were used to identify the presence of cracks in Nickel microstructures. Several cracks were identified on the Ni specimen, demonstrating that cracks as thin as 34 nm could be measured. A further EBSD based tool developed for this study was used to identify thin compression twins in Mg; these are often missed in a traditional EBSD scan due to their size relative to the electron probe. This tool takes advantage of crystallographic relationships that exist between parent and twinned grains; common planes that exist in both grains lead to bands of consistent intensity as a scan crosses a twin. Hence, twin boundaries in a microstructure can be recognized, even when

  2. Inversion of calcite twin data for stress (2) : EBSD as a tool for data measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlangeau, Camille; Lacombe, Olivier; Brisset, Francois; Kohler, Eric; Daniel, Jean-Marc; Schueller, Sylvie

    2015-04-01

    Inversion of calcite twin data are known to be a powerful tool to reconstruct the past state(s) of stress in carbonate rocks of the crust, especially in fold-and-thrust belts and sedimentary basins. Twin data measurements have been for long carried out optically using a Universal-Stage. This data collection is time-consuming and suffers from limitations and bias related to measurements of twin planes oblique at low angle or parallel to the thin section, or the unambiguous evaluation of the twinned/untwinned character of collected twin data. EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction) is a well-known technique applied to characterize textures and microstructures of metals or deformed fine-grained rocks. The challenge is to define a strategy for measuring calcite-twin orientations that should be fast, without any loss of information, and which must reconcile (1) the need for a large amount of calcite twin data (3 mutually perpendicular thin sections and at least 30 crystals per thin section), (2) the spacing between EBSD spots, that should take into account (3) the small width of twin lamellae within grains deformed at low pressure and temperature and (4) the large size (usually several hundreds of microns) of twinned calcite grains used for stress analysis. To date, these multiple requirements preclude any (classical) automatic twin data acquisition but instead imply a preliminary definition of the areas of the thin section to be scanned by the EBSD spots, including grain boundaries, because the stress inversion technique requires to know for each grain the orientations of the C axis and of the 3 potential e twin planes. In order to reconcile a perfectly polished surface as required by EBSD and the recognition of grain boundaries, we adopted the double etching technique (Herwegh, 2000) to first reveal grain and twin boundaries. Then, with a SEM and a very fine coating sample, the section is scanned using secondary electrons bin; each spot of interest is visually defined

  3. Novel Techniques for Examining Detailed Microstructure of Two-phase Lower Mantle Mineral Analogs with SEM and EBSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, P. M.; Mariani, E.; Dawson, K.

    2015-12-01

    We examined deformation microstructures of an analog two-phase system of the lower mantle using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Halite (NaCl) and neighborite (NaMgF3) were used as analogs to lower mantle minerals ferropericlase (Mg,Fe)O and bridgmanite MgSiO3, respectively, and deformed to 30% strain at 4 GPa in the D-DIA. We have adapted techniques previously used for EBSD preparation of halite (NaCl) (e.g. Pennock et al. 2002, Journal of Microscopy, v205; Staiger et al. 2010, Materials Characterization, v61) to prepare halite and neighborite for EBSD. Because halite is soft and hydrophilic, it is tricky to prepare for high quality EBSD. On the other hand, neighborite is much harder than halite (with a bulk modulus 5 times that of halite) and requires high quality polishing for longer and through various polishing-medium sizes. EBSD maps were obtained by polishing with very fine colloidal alumina, followed by etching or a final polish in a precision ion polishing system (PIPS). Distribution of phases, grain size and shape, and crystallographic preferred orientation were examined to determine which phase controls the deformation and which deformation mechanisms dominate. Preliminary results show the softer halite is likely interconnected at just 25 volume % or less and controls the deformation through a mechanism that does not promote development of crystallographic preferred orientation. This suggests that periclase may control deformation in the lower mantle resulting in a weaker, more viscous lower mantle and may help to explain why the bulk of the lower mantle is mostly isotropic.

  4. Metallographic Preparation of Space Shuttle Reaction Control System Thruster Electron Beam Welds for Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, James

    2011-01-01

    A Space Shuttle Reaction Control System (RCS) thruster failed during a firing test at the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), Las Cruces, New Mexico. The firing test was being conducted to investigate a previous electrical malfunction. A number of cracks were found associated with the fuel closure plate/injector assembly (Fig 1). The firing test failure generated a flight constraint to the launch of STS-133. A team comprised of several NASA centers and other research institutes was assembled to investigate and determine the root cause of the failure. The JSC Materials Evaluation Laboratory was asked to compare and characterize the outboard circumferential electron beam (EB) weld between the fuel closure plate (Titanium 6Al-4V) and the injector (Niobium C-103 alloy) of four different RCS thrusters, including the failed RCS thruster. Several metallographic challenges in grinding/polishing, and particularly in etching were encountered because of the differences in hardness, ductility, and chemical resistance between the two alloys and the bimetallic weld. Segments from each thruster were sectioned from the outboard weld. The segments were hot-compression mounted using a conductive, carbon-filled epoxy. A grinding/polishing procedure for titanium alloys was used [1]. This procedure worked well on the titanium; but a thin, disturbed layer was visible on the niobium surface by means of polarized light. Once polished, each sample was micrographed using bright field, differential interference contrast optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using a backscatter electron (BSE) detector. No typical weld anomalies were observed in any of the cross sections. However, areas of large atomic contrast were clearly visible in the weld nugget, particularly along fusion line interfaces between the titanium and the niobium. This prompted the need to better understand the chemistry and microstructure of the weld (Fig 2). Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS

  5. Fluvial suspended sediment characteristics by high-resolution, surrogate metrics of turbidity, laser-diffraction, acoustic backscatter, and acoustic attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landers, Mark Newton

    Sedimentation is a primary and growing environmental, engineering, and agricultural issue around the world. However, collection of the data needed to develop solutions to sedimentation issues has declined by about three-fourths since 1983. Suspended-sediment surrogates have the potential to obtain sediment data using methods that are more accurate, of higher spatial and temporal resolution, and with less manually intensive, costly, and hazardous methods. The improved quality of sediment data from high-resolution surrogates may inform improved understanding and solutions to sedimentation problems. The field experiments for this research include physical samples of suspended sediment collected concurrently with surrogate metrics from instruments including 1.2, 1.5, and 3.0 megahertz frequency acoustic doppler current profilers, a nephelometric turbidity sensor, and a laser-diffraction particle size analyzer. This comprehensive data set was collected over five storms in 2009 and 2010 at Yellow River near Atlanta, Georgia. Fluvial suspended sediment characteristics in this study can be determined by high-resolution surrogate parameters of turbidity, laser-diffraction and acoustics with model errors 33% to 49% lower than traditional methods using streamflow alone. Hysteresis in sediment-turbidity relations for single storm events was observed and quantitatively related to PSD changes of less than 10 microns in the fine silt to clay size range. Suspended sediment particle size detection (PSD) is significantly correlated with ratios of measured acoustic attenuation at different frequencies; however the data do not fit the theoretical relations. Using both relative acoustic backscatter (RB) and acoustic attenuation as explanatory variables results in a significantly improved model of suspended sediment compared with traditional sonar equations using only RB. High resolution PSD data from laser diffraction provide uniquely valuable information; however the size detection

  6. EBSD study on crystallographic texture and microstructure development of cold-rolled FePd alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hung-Pin; Ng, Tin-San; Kuo, Jui-Chao; Chen, Yen-Chun; Chen, Chun-Liang; Ding, Shi-Xuan

    2014-07-01

    The crystallographic texture and microstructure of FePd alloy after cold-rolling deformation were investigated using electron backscatter diffraction. The major orientations of twin copper and copper after 50% thickness reduction were observed in face-centered cubic-disordered FePd alloy, whereas the main orientation was obtained from brass type after 90% cold rolling. Increase in cold rolling resulted in the change of preferred orientation from copper to brass. Decrease in orientation intensity of copper also increased that of Goss and brass. - Highlights: • The evolution of texture and microstructure in FePd alloy was investigated after cold rolling using EBSD. • Increasing in reduction leads to the change of texture from Copper-type to Brass-type. • The reduction of Copper orientation results in increasing in Goss and Brass orientations.

  7. Identification of sub-grains and low angle boundaries beyond the angular resolution of EBSD maps

    SciTech Connect

    Germain, L.; Kratsch, D.; Salib, M.; Gey, N.

    2014-12-15

    A new method called ALGrId (Anti-Leak GRain IDentification) is proposed for the detection of sub-grains beyond the relative angular resolution of Electron Backscatter Diffraction maps. It does not use any additional information such as Kikuchi Pattern Quality map nor need data filtering. It uses a modified Dijkstra algorithm which seeks the continuous set of boundaries having the highest average disorientation angle. - Highlights: • ALGrId is a new method to identify sub-grains and low angle boundaries in EBSD maps. • Unlike classical methods, ALGrId works even beyond the relative angular resolution. • If the orientation noise peaks at 0.7°, ALGrid detects 0.4°-boundaries correctly. • In the same example, the classical algorithm identifies 1.1°-boundaries only.

  8. Use of EBSD Data in Numerical Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R; Wiland, H

    2000-01-14

    Experimentation, theory and modeling have all played vital roles in defining what is known about microstructural evolution and the effects of microstructure on material properties. Recently, technology has become an enabling factor, allowing significant advances to be made on several fronts. Experimental evidence of crystallographic slip and the basic theory of crystal plasticity were established in the early 20th Century, and the theory and models evolved incrementally over the next 60 years. (Asaro provides a comprehensive review of the mechanisms and basic plasticity models.) During this time modeling was primarily concerned with the average response of polycrystalline aggregates. While some detailed finite element modeling (FEM) with crystal plasticity constitutive relations was done in the early 1980s, such simulations over taxed the capabilities of the available computer hardware. Advances in computer capability led to a flurry of activity in finite element modeling in the next 10 years, increasing understanding of microstructure evolution and pushing the limits of theories and material characterization. Automated Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) has produced a similar revolution in material characterization. The data collected is extensive and many questions about the evolution of microstructure and its role in determining mechanic properties can now be addressed. It is also now possible to obtain sufficient information about lattice orientations on a fine enough scale to allow detailed quantitative comparisons of experiments and newly emerging large scale numerical simulations. The insight gained from the coupling of EBSD and FEM studies will provide impetus for further development of microstructure models and theories of microstructure evolution. Early studies connecting EBSD data to finite element models used manual measurements to define initial orientations for the simulation. In one study, manual measurements of the deformed structure were also

  9. Lattice strain across Na-K interdiffusion fronts in alkali feldspar: an electron back-scatter diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäffer, Anne-Kathrin; Jäpel, Tom; Zaefferer, Stefan; Abart, Rainer; Rhede, Dieter

    2014-11-01

    Cation exchange experiments between gem quality sanidine and KCl melt produced chemical alteration of alkali feldspar starting at the grain surface and propagating inwards by highly anisotropic Na-K interdiffusion on the alkali sublattice. Diffusion fronts developing in b-direction are very sharp, while diffusion fronts within the a- c-plane are comparatively broad. Due to the composition dependence of the lattice parameters of alkali feldspar, the diffusion induced compositional heterogeneity induces coherency stress and elastic strain. Electron back-scatter diffraction combined with the cross-correlation technique was employed to determine the lattice strain distribution across the Na-K interdiffusion fronts in partially exchanged single crystals of alkali feldspar. The strain changes gradually across the broad fronts within the a- c-plane, with a successive extension primarily in a-direction conferring to the composition strain in unstressed alkali feldspar. In contrast, lattice strain characterised by pronounced extension in b-direction is localised at the sharp diffusion fronts parallel to b, followed by a slight expansion in a-direction in the orthoclase-rich rim. This strain pattern does not confer with the composition induced lattice strain in a stress-free alkali feldspar. It may rather be explained by the mechanical coupling of the exchanged surface layer and the mechanically strong substratum. The lattice distortion localised at the sharp diffusion front may have an influence on the diffusion process and appears to produce a self-sharpening feedback, leading to a local reduction of component mobilities.

  10. Characterization of Sputtered CdTe Thin Films with Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Correlation with Device Performance.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Matthew M; Scarpulla, Michael A; Paudel, Naba R; Wieland, Kristopher A; Compaan, Alvin D; Liu, Xiangxin

    2015-08-01

    The performance of polycrystalline CdTe photovoltaic thin films is expected to depend on the grain boundary density and corresponding grain size of the film microstructure. However, the electrical performance of grain boundaries within these films is not well understood, and can be beneficial, harmful, or neutral in terms of film performance. Electron backscatter diffraction has been used to characterize the grain size, grain boundary structure, and crystallographic texture of sputtered CdTe at varying deposition pressures before and after CdCl2 treatment in order to correlate performance with microstructure. Weak fiber textures were observed in the as-deposited films, with (111) textures present at lower deposition pressures and (110) textures observed at higher deposition pressures. The CdCl2-treated samples exhibited significant grain recrystallization with a high fraction of twin boundaries. Good correlation of solar cell efficiency was observed with twin-corrected grain size while poor correlation was found if the twin boundaries were considered as grain boundaries in the grain size determination. This implies that the twin boundaries are neutral with respect to recombination and carrier transport. PMID:26077102

  11. Preparation of samples with both hard and soft phases for electron backscatter diffraction: examples from gold mineralization.

    PubMed

    Halfpenny, Angela; Hough, Robert M; Verrall, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Preparation of high-quality polished sample surfaces is an essential step in the collection of microanalytical data on the microstructures of minerals and alloys. Poorly prepared samples can yield insufficient or inconsistent results and, in the case of gold, potentially no data due to the "beilby" layer. Currently, preparation of ore samples is difficult as they commonly contain both hard and soft mineral phases. The aim of our research is to produce suitably polished sample surfaces, on all phases, for electron backscatter diffraction analysis. A combination of chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) and broad ion-beam polishing (BIBP) was used to tackle the problem. Our results show that it is critical to perform CMP first, as it produces a suitable polish on the hard mineral phases but tends to introduce more damage to the soft mineral surfaces. BIBP is essential to produce a high-quality polish to the soft phases (gold). This is a highly efficient method of sample preparation and is important as it allows the complete quantification of ore textures and all constituent mineral phases, including soft alloys. PMID:23721665

  12. EBSD study of substrate-mediated growth of hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, J.; Kidambi, P. R.; Hofmann, S.; Ducati, C.

    2014-06-01

    Hexagonal Boron Nitride (h-BN) is a promising insulating material to complement and enable graphene electronics. Given the good lattice match to graphite, graphene/h-BN heterostructures may be grown with negligible amounts of strain and defect states, resulting in high carrier mobilities approaching values for suspended graphene. Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) has emerged as one of the preferred routes for the synthesis of 2D materials for electronic applications. Here we report on the growth of h-BN by low pressure CVD, using borazine as a precursor. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) in conjunction with topographic imaging in the scanning electron microscope are used to investigate the change in crystal structure and orientation of three metallic catalyst substrates: Co, Ni and Cu, by high temperature processing and the growth of nanoscale h-BN domains. The behaviour of the metal foils is interpreted in light of the prevalent growth models. EBSD and imaging conditions are optimized to allow efficient acquisitions for these composite and nanostructured specimens.

  13. EBSD and TEM investigation of the hot deformation substructure characteristics of a type 316L austenitic stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Cizek, P; Whiteman, J A; Rainforth, W M; Beynon, J H

    2004-03-01

    The evolution of crystallographic texture and deformation substructure was studied in a type 316L austenitic stainless steel, deformed in rolling at 900 degrees C to true strain levels of about 0.3 and 0.7. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used in the investigation and a comparison of the substructural characteristics obtained by these techniques was made. At the lower strain level, the deformation substructure observed by EBSD appeared to be rather poorly developed. There was considerable evidence of a rotation of the pre-existing twin boundaries from their original orientation relationship, as well as the formation of highly distorted grain boundary regions. In TEM, at this strain level, the substructure was more clearly revealed, although it appeared rather inhomogeneously developed from grain to grain. The subgrains were frequently elongated and their boundaries often approximated to traces of [111] slip planes. The corresponding misorientations were small and largely displayed a non-cumulative character. At the larger strain, the substructure within most grains became well developed and the corresponding misorientations increased. This resulted in better detection of sub-boundaries by EBSD, although the percentage of indexing slightly decreased. TEM revealed splitting of some sub-boundaries to form fine microbands, as well as the localized formation of microshear bands. The substructural characteristics observed by EBSD, in particular at the larger strain, generally appeared to compare well with those obtained using TEM. With increased strain level, the mean subgrain size became finer, the corresponding mean misorientation angle increased and both these characteristics became less dependent on a particular grain orientation. The statistically representative data obtained will assist in the development of physically based models of microstructural evolution during thermomechanical processing of austenitic

  14. Identifying deformation mechanisms in the NEEM ice core using EBSD measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, Ernst-Jan; Weikusat, Ilka; Drury, Martyn R.; Pennock, Gill M.; de Winter, Matthijs D. A.

    2015-04-01

    Deformation of ice in continental sized ice sheets determines the flow behavior of ice towards the sea. Basal dislocation glide is assumed to be the dominant deformation mechanism in the creep deformation of natural ice, but non-basal glide is active as well. Knowledge of what types of deformation mechanisms are active in polar ice is critical in predicting the response of ice sheets in future warmer climates and its contribution to sea level rise, because the activity of deformation mechanisms depends critically on deformation conditions (such as temperature) as well as on the material properties (such as grain size). One of the methods to study the deformation mechanisms in natural materials is Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD). We obtained ca. 50 EBSD maps of five different depths from a Greenlandic ice core (NEEM). The step size varied between 8 and 25 micron depending on the size of the deformation features. The size of the maps varied from 2000 to 10000 grid point. Indexing rates were up to 95%, partially by saving and reanalyzing the EBSP patterns. With this method we can characterize subgrain boundaries and determine the lattice rotation configurations of each individual subgrain. Combining these observations with arrangement/geometry of subgrain boundaries the dislocation types can be determined, which form these boundaries. Three main types of subgrain boundaries have been recognized in Antarctic (EDML) ice core¹². Here, we present the first results obtained from EBSD measurements performed on the NEEM ice core samples from the last glacial period, focusing on the relevance of dislocation activity of the possible slip systems. Preliminary results show that all three subgrain types, recognized in the EDML core, occur in the NEEM samples. In addition to the classical boundaries made up of basal dislocations, subgrain boundaries made of non-basal dislocations are also common. ¹Weikusat, I.; de Winter, D. A. M.; Pennock, G. M.; Hayles, M

  15. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy and electron backscatter diffraction analysis of isothermally aged SAF 2507 type superduplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobranszky, J.; Szabo, P. J.; Berecz, T.; Hrotko, V.; Portko, M.

    2004-10-01

    Due to thermal effects, several precipitation and segregation processes are known in duplex stainless steels. These microstructural changes influence both of the original phases, but in different ways. Isothermal ageing in a large range of temperature was performed on SAF 2507 type steel. The temperature range was 300-1000 °C, the ageing time was between 100 s and 24 h. This paper discusses the results of ageing at 900 °C. Microstructural changes were investigated by electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy and electron backscattered diffraction analysis. This technique allowed the determination of the microstructure of the secondary austenite and sigma phase and their mutual orientation properties. Beside this, thermoelectric power measurements were also performed, which gave information about the kinetics of the precipitation process. Results showed that sigma-phase precipitation started right after 200 s in the case of annealed steel, and faster than 100 s in the cold-rolled state. After 5000 s, the delta-ferrite disappeared. Chemical composition of sigma phase was independent on the ageing time. A small decrease in nickel content was observed with a slight increase of Cr content. Small amount of chi phase had also been observed on the ferrite-ferrite boundaries, but later they changed into sigma phase. Similarly to sigma phase, chi phase showed significant phosphorus enrichment. During ageing, small chrome nitride precipitates developed, which amount increased in time, and some vanadium could be measured in them. The orientation relationship between austenite and sigma phase deviated from Nenno-orientationship with about 24°, and seems to form a [110]‖[310] relationship, which was characteristic right from the beginning of the process, and remains more or less constant.

  16. EBSD Characterization of Dendrites in Synthetic and Natural Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J. E.; Tiley, J.; Shiveley, A.; Knox, S.; Viswanathan, G.

    2011-12-01

    Arborescent crystals in igneous rocks are associated with extreme crystallization environments: the protoplanary disk (chondrules), Earth's ultramafic Archean mantle (komatiite), and terrestrial submarine-erupted lavas (pillow basalts), although the role of morphological instabilities in more mundane settings such as magma reservoirs of modern oceanic islands is increasingly appreciated (see Welsch et al., V16). Fundamentals of dendrite formation are presumably well understood: branching morphologies belie crystal growth conditions in which the driving force for solidification produces a kinetic roughening transition, transforming an atomically smooth crystal-liquid interface into a rough, adhesive interface capable of extremely rapid advancement. However, not since photomicrograhic advances made possible close observations of snow crystals (Nakaya 1936), has there been a more promising set of analytical tools to characterize dendrites in natural and synthetic materials in pursuit of new insights. We are investigating clinopyroxene (cpx) in the quenched top of Fe-rich tholeiitic lava (Munro Township, Northeast Ontario; Fig. 1) and a synthetic basalt of similar character (Hammer 2006) with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), 3D reconstruction of optical serial sections, and TEM. Here we report intriguing phenomena observed with EBSD common to both samples. Severe thinning of dendrite trunks and repeated tip splitting destroys the self-similarity associated with classical dendrites and instead presages 'seaweed' morphology. Split tips manifest incremental trajectory deflections, producing gently arched trunks (Fig. 1A) as well as tightly curved (r<10 um) trunks. Crystals progressively rotate clockwise about cpx <010>, producing distinctive misorientation maps and pole figures (Fig. 1C). Parallel branches exhibit similar rotational trajectories, carving parallel arcs in the <010> pole figure. The high incidence of side branching and tip splitting is consistent

  17. Insights to Meteorites and Impact Processes provided by Advanced EBSD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palasse, Laurie; Berlin, Jana; Goran, Daniel; Tagle, Roald; Hamers, Maartje; Assis Fernandes, Vera; Deutsch, Alexander; Schulte, Peter; Salge, Tobias

    2013-04-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a powerful analytical technique for assessing the petrographic texture of rocks and the crystallographic orientation of minerals therein using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Innovations in EBSD technology include colour-coded forescattered electron (FSE) images, high resolution and highly sensitive EBSD detectors, together with advanced EDS integration. It allows to accurately identify and discriminate different phases, and to investigate microstructures related to shock metamorphism. As an example, shocked carbonates and shocked quartz reveal a complex thermal history during post-shock cooling. (A) EBSD studies of calcite ejecta particles from the Chicxulub impact event, at the K-Pg boundary of El Guayal, Mexico (~520 km SW of the Chicxulub crater centre) display various microstructures [1] and spherulitic calcite ejecta particles reveal a fibre texture of elongated crystals with a preferred orientation. This indicates the presence of carbonate melts which were ejected at T>1240°C and P>40 bar from upper target lithologies and crystallized at cooling rates of ~100´s °C/s [2]. The calcite particles of El Guayal and the K/Pg boundary of La Lajilla (~1000 km W of the crater centre) show distinct microstructures represented by unoriented, equiaxed crystals with random orientation distribution. It documents recrystallization upon impact induced thermal stress at T>550°C during prolonged atmospheric transport. (B) Combined EBSD, FSE and cathodoluminescence (CL) studies of semi-amorphous shocked quartz of Chicxulub, Ries and Popigai impactites, reveal various microstructures. Colour-coded FSE imaging reveal recrystallized/deformed bands in Ries and Popigai samples indicative of planar deformation features. EBSD studies of Popigai allow to distinguish twinned Qz, α-Qz and α-cristobalite along the transition zone between shocked gneiss clast and impact melt. Recrystallized Qz grains are associated with amorphous SiO2

  18. Electron backscatter diffraction study of deformation and recrystallization textures of individual phases in a cross-rolled duplex steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zaid, Md; Bhattacharjee, P.P.

    2014-10-15

    The evolution of microstructure and texture during cross-rolling and annealing was investigated by electron backscatter diffraction in a ferritic–austenitic duplex stainless steel. For this purpose an alloy with nearly equal volume fraction of the two phases was deformed by multi-pass cross-rolling process up to 90% reduction in thickness. The rolling and transverse directions were mutually interchanged in each pass by rotating the sample by 90° around the normal direction. In order to avoid deformation induced phase transformation and dynamic strain aging, the rolling was carried out at an optimized temperature of 898 K (625 °C) at the warm-deformation range. The microstructure after cross warm-rolling revealed a lamellar structure with alternate arrangement of the bands of two phases. Strong brass and rotated brass components were observed in austenite in the steel after processing by cross warm-rolling. The ferrite in the cross warm-rolling processed steel showed remarkably strong RD-fiber (RD//< 011 >) component (001)< 011 >. The development of texture in the two phases after processing by cross warm-rolling could be explained by the stability of the texture components. During isothermal annealing of the 90% cross warm-rolling processed material the lamellar morphology was retained before collapse of the lamellar structure to the mutual interpenetration of the phase bands. Ferrite showed recovery resulting in annealing texture similar to the deformation texture. In contrast, the austenite showed primary recrystallization without preferential orientation selection leading to the retention of deformation texture. The evolution of deformation and annealing texture in the two phases of the steel was independent of one another. - Highlights: • Effect of cross warm-rolling on texture formation is studied in duplex steel. • Brass texture in austenite and (001)<110 > in ferrite are developed. • Ferrite shows recovery during annealing retaining the (001

  19. The implications of laser-diffraction measurements of sediment size distributions in a river to the potential use of acoustic backscatter for sediment measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Y. C.; Hanes, D. M.

    2015-11-01

    We construct vertical profiles of the acoustic attenuation and back-scattering properties of a river column from measured particle concentration and size distribution profiles. The particle size and concentration data were collected in situ in the Cowlitz River in Washington, U.S., using a laser diffraction-instrument LISST-SL. The particle size distribution was bimodal, comprising a vertically well-mixed washload, and a suspended load that was similar to Rouse profiles. We then explore how well the results of converting these synthetic profiles to recover an acoustic equivalent sediment concentration and acoustic equivalent size compare with laser data in this bimodal environment. The acoustic scattering and attenuation properties are computed for four distinct frequencies: 0.5, 1, 3, and 5 MHz. It is seen that at the lowest frequency, 500 KHz, the acoustic attenuation throughout the water column is nearly constant and determined primarily by particles of size smaller than ˜30 microns, i.e., the washload. At the next higher frequency, 1 MHz, the suspended load also contributed to attenuation, but even so, attenuation remained nearly constant over the vertical profile. Thus, at the two lower frequencies, attenuation was decoupled from scattering, making the inverse problem explicit for inversion. In contrast, at the two highest frequencies, scattering of sound by the suspended mode became the dominant contributor to attenuation, and attenuation varied by an order of magnitude over river depth. As for backscatter, the computed acoustic backscatter strength was determined by a combination of the washload and suspended sediment mode at all four frequencies. A fairly narrow monotonic relationship was found between total sediment concentration and locally computed backscatter, effectively providing a calibration between local backscatter signal strength and suspended sediment concentration. Such a relationship existed throughout the water column, for every frequency

  20. Assessment of Creep Strain Distribution Across Base Metal of 316LN Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Joint by an EBSD-Based Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayanand, V. D.; Ganesan, V.; Ganesh Kumar, J.; Parameswaran, P.; Naveena; Laha, K.

    2015-11-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis has been used to estimate the accumulated strain in base metal region of 316LN austenitic stainless steel weld joints, creep tested at 923 K (650 °C), and at stresses of 175 and 225 MPa. The variation in strength of weld metal, heat-affected zone (HAZ), and base metal-induced stress and strain gradients across the weld joint under creep exposure. Finite element analysis (FEA) of von-Mises stress distribution across the joint has been carried out on incorporating strength of different constituents of the joint, derived by miniature specimen testing techniques. The FEA simulations revealed preferential accumulation of von-Mises stress in the base metal region near to HAZ. The variation in accumulated plastic strain across the base metal has been estimated using a `crystal deformation' ( C d) parameter which quantifies the orientation spread within a grain. This parameter was obtained by EBSD analysis carried out using a scanning electron microscope. The trend in variation of accumulated plastic strain across the base metal accounted well with the von-Mises stress variation, which causes plastic deformation. The plastic strain in the base metal in both the stress levels was found to accumulate preferentially near to the HAZ and reduced steadily toward the ridge at the end of specimen. Transmission electron microscopic study has been carried out to substantiate the findings of the EBSD investigation.

  1. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gazder, Azdiar A; Al-Harbi, Fayez; Spanke, Hendrik Th; Mitchell, David R G; Pereloma, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth. PMID:25126753

  2. An ultrahigh-density digital data read-out method based on grazing-angle incidence x-ray backscattering diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezirganyan, Hakob Akop P.; Bezirganyan, Hayk H., Jr.; Bezirganyan, Siranush E.; Bezirganyan, Petros H., Jr.; Mossikyan, Youri G.

    2005-10-01

    An ultrahigh-density x-ray optical data storage medium useful for terabyte-scale memory applications and named X-ROM is proposed. The X-ROM is a nanocrystalline semiconductor layer, in which non-diffracting nanosized reflectors of x-radiation are embedded. The procedure of digital data read-out from the X-ROM can be performed e.g. by the application of a grazing-angle incidence x-ray backscattering diffraction technique under conditions of specular vacuum wave suppression. The surface storage digital data density of the proposed device, with 20 nm/bit linear size of the single-bit domain, is higher by two orders of magnitude than the volumetric data density actually achieved for a three-dimensional optical data storage medium.

  3. Modeling of ultrasonic propagation in heavy-walled centrifugally cast austenitic stainless steel based on EBSD analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Luo, Zhongbing; Zhou, Quan; Zou, Longjiang; Lin, Li

    2015-05-01

    The ultrasonic inspection of heavy-walled centrifugally cast austenitic stainless steel (CCASS) is challenging due to the complex metallurgical structure. Numerical modeling could provide quantitative information on ultrasonic propagation and plays an important role in developing advanced and reliable ultrasonic inspection techniques. But the fundamental obstacle is the accurate description of the complex metallurgical structure. To overcome this difficulty, a crystal orientation map of a CCASS specimen in the 96 mm × 12 mm radial-axial cross section was acquired based on the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique and it was used to describe the coarse-grained structure and grain orientation. A model of ultrasonic propagation for CCASS was built according to the EBSD map. The ultrasonic responses of the CCASS sample were also tested. Some experimental phenomena such as structural noise and signal distortion were reproduced. The simulated results showed a good consistence with the experiments. The modeling method is expected to be effective for the precise interpretation of ultrasonic propagation in the polycrystalline structures of CCASS. PMID:25670411

  4. The use of combined cathodoluminescence and EBSD analysis: a case study investigating grain boundary migration mechanisms in quartz.

    PubMed

    Piazolo, S; Prior, D J; Holness, M D

    2005-02-01

    Grain boundary migration is an important mechanism of microstructural modification both in rocks and in metals. Combining detailed cathodoluminescence (CL) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis offers the opportunity to relate directly changes in crystallographic orientation to migrating boundaries. We observe the following features in naturally heated quartz grains from the thermal aureole of the Ballachulish Igneous Complex (Scotland, U.K.): (a) propagation of substructures and twin boundaries in swept areas both parallel and at an angle to the growth direction, (b) development of slightly different crystallographic orientations and new twin boundaries at both the growth interfaces and within the swept area and (c) a gradual change in crystallographic orientation in the direction of growth. All these features are compatible with a growth mechanism in which single atoms are attached and detached both at random and at preferential sites, i.e. crystallographically controlled sites or kinks in boundary ledges. Additionally, strain fields caused by defects and/or trace element incorporation may facilitate nucleation sites for new crystallographic orientations at distinct growth interfaces but also at continuously migrating boundaries. This study illustrates the usefulness of combined CL and EBSD in microprocess analysis. Further work in this direction may provide detailed insight into both the mechanism of static grain growth and the energies and mobilities of boundaries in terms of misorientation and grain boundary plane orientation. PMID:15683412

  5. Examining Crystal Fabric Develoment in Ice: Cryo EBSD, Deformation Experiments and the Link to En-glacial Reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Matthew; Prior, David; Seidemann, Meike; Gorman, Andrew; Lilly, Kat; Langhorne, Pat; Easingwood, Richard; Golding, Narayana; Durham, Bill

    2014-05-01

    Over the past few years, cryogenic electron back-scatter diffraction (Cryo-EBSD) has been increasingly used to examine micro-structures in both natural and experimentally deformed ice samples on a micron-scale. Experiments that investigate grain size-sensitive behavior require working on fine-grained ice. These samples present a number of experimental challenges. Issues that present particular difficulties include stable mounting of ice samples, transport of mounted samples and producing a planar, frost-free and damage-free surface. Recent work at the new Otago Ice Deformation Lab has led to the development of a number of experimental methods that help overcome these challenges and enable routine EBSD analysis of fine-grained ice. A brief outline of these experimental methods and some EBSD results from variably deformed ice samples will be presented. Shear deformation experiments on polycrystalline ice are being conducted in order to further explore the relationships between deformation, processes of recrystallization, and the development of anisotropic fabrics that lead to en-glacial seismic reflections. Self-contained, refrigerated deformation units fitted with digital controllers and hardware have been designed for unconfined deformation experiments on polycrystalline synthetic ice. Methods of analysis, from time-lapse photography to random-point tracking, are being employed for monitoring strain in real time. Various methods have been explored for monitoring the development of anisotropic fabrics in ice during progressive deformation. Ultra-sonic transducers can be used to monitor wave velocity changes in various orientations in materials under strain. These experiments have been designed with the objective of quantifying the relationship between deformation fabrics and en-glacial seismic reflectivity observed in thick grounded ice sheets.

  6. An investigation into the use of electron back scattered diffraction to measure recrystallized fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Black, M.P.; Higginson, R.L. . Dept. of Engineering Materials)

    1999-06-18

    The Electron Back-Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) technique is in its infancy and is a highly promising area of development. Use of EBSD has been predominantly for the determination of crystallographic textures. Other applications have also been considered, which include: crystal structure determination, phase determination, grain boundary studies and both elastic and plastic deformation measurement. Although it has been acknowledged that an important use of the EBSD could be in the measurement of recrystallization and its kinetics there are a number of inherent problems with such measurements using EBSD. These problems include the ability of the system to index deformed microstructures even those on a fine scale, the difficulties of analyzing patterns in the region of grain boundaries and the problems of sample preparation which is critical in the quality of the diffraction patterns obtained. The aim of the present study is to determine whether it is possible to measure the volume fraction recrystallized using EBSP of partially recrystallized stainless steel. This has been done by investigation of the quality of matching between the observed and calculated diffraction patterns, and the quality of the observed patterns measured in terms of their contrast. The material used was stainless steel 316L.

  7. EBSD analysis of the Shergottite Meteorites: New developments within the technique and their implication on what we know about the preferred orientation of Martian minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, N.; Benedix, G. K.; Bland, P.; Berlin, J.; Salge, T.; Goran, D.

    2011-12-01

    What we know about the geology and mineralogy of the Martian surface has been characterised by both the use of remote sensing techniques and the analysis of Martian meteorites. Various techniques are employed to conduct these analyses including crystallographic, geochemical and spectral measurements, all of which enable us to infer a geological history for these rocks. Several references have been made to the potential for preferred orientation of crystals within the Shergottites [1] and their implication for the cooling history of the respective magmas on Mars [2]. We have already shown that a preferred orientation of the two pyroxenes, augite and pigeonite, can be seen in the Zagami meteorite using electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis [3]. However, when compared to previous modal studies of the same meteorites [4], it becomes apparent that the current EBSD datasets for Martian meteorites are incomplete. Indexing of some minerals can be hampered by the lack of available matches within library databases for EBSD, or become difficult to resolve between minerals where crystallographic differences between similar minerals fall below the technical limitations of the instrument [3]. Recent advances in EBSD technologies combined with the simultaneous acquisition of energy-dispersive spectra (EDS) however now allow us to determine a more comprehensive set of analyses in a much shorter period of time, fully resolving even similar minerals where areas have been left with no indexing previously [5]. Preliminary investigations suggest that the new technology can successfully index >90% of the sample. The most recent EBSD analyses potentially reveals previously unseen fabrics in the meteorites alongside the EDS hyper-spectral imaging helping to resolve any unknown or questionable phases within them. In this study we will present new data from an investigation using EDS alongside EBSD analysis on 2 Shergottite meteorites, SAU 005 and Zagami, to further resolve

  8. Identifying Planar Deformation Features Using EBSD and FIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickersgill, A. E.; Lee, M. R.

    2015-09-01

    Planar deformation features in quartz grains from the Gow Lake impact structure have been successfully identified and indexed using electron backscatter diffraction in combination with focused ion beam milling.

  9. Determination of particle-induced structural disorder depth profile in crystals using the grazing-angle incidence hard x-ray backscattering diffraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezirganyan, Hakob (Jacob P.; Bezirganyan, Siranush E.; Bezirganyan, Petros H., Jr.; Bezirganyan, Hayk H., Jr.

    2011-12-01

    In this theoretical paper, we propose an x-ray imaging method for determination of particle-induced structural disorder depth profile in the crystalline materials based on the extremely sensitive, high-resolution, and non-destructive grazing-angle incidence hard x-ray backscattering diffraction technique. A peculiar value of the Bragg angle is discovered within the specular beam suppression angular region for which the curve of x-ray reflectivity is very close to the profile of the corresponding structural disorder. The coincidence presents a unique opportunity for the direct registration of the structural disorder depth profile in particle-irradiated crystals. This paper is dedicated to Professor Dr Petros H Bezirganyan on the occasion of his 95th birthday on 15th December 2011.

  10. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis of gold nanoparticles on Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ}

    SciTech Connect

    Bochmann, A.; Teichert, S.; Katzer, C.; Schmidl, F.

    2015-06-07

    It has been shown recently that the incorporation of gold nanoparticles into Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} enhances the superconducting properties of this material in a significant way. Previous XRD and TEM investigations suggest different crystallographic relations of the gold nanoparticles with respect to the epitaxial Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ}. Here, detailed investigations of the crystal orientations for a large ensemble of gold nanoparticles with electron backscatter diffraction are reported. The average size of the gold nanoparticles is in the range of 60 nm–80 nm. We identified five different types of heteroepitaxial relationships between the gold nanoparticles and the superconductor film, resulting in complex pole figures. The observed different types of crystallographic orientations are discussed based on good lattice matching and the formation of low energy interfaces.

  11. Comparison of recrystallisation kinetics determined by stress relaxation, double hit, optical metallography and EBSD approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Dzubinsky, M.; Husain, Z.; Haaften, W.M. van

    2004-05-15

    A comparison of the recrystallisation kinetics determined by stress relaxation (SR), double-hit (DH), optical metallography and scanning electron microscope/electron backscattered diffraction (SEM/EBSD) mapping experimental approaches has been conducted. Two different types of steel were used as experimental material: C-Mn and interstitial-free (IF). Tests were carried out in the austenitic region for C-Mn steel and just above the Ar{sub 1} temperature for IF steel. Both steels were investigated in static and postdynamic recrystallisation (SRx and PDRx, respectively) regions. The work indicates that some differences exist between the results given by these methods. The biggest correction to the experimental results in the SRx region has to be performed on the 'raw data' obtained by the SR method. The SR method, owing to its continually applied stress, tends to accelerate the recrystallisation kinetics. The estimation of the recrystallised fraction in the PDRx region by the DH test gives even higher error because of dynamic changes of microstructure during the second hit.

  12. Calcite sealing in a fractured geothermal reservoir: Insights from combined EBSD and chemistry mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, David D.; Lister, Aaron; Prior, Dave J.

    2016-09-01

    Fractures play an important role as fluid flow pathways in geothermal resources hosted in indurated greywacke basement of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, including the Kawerau Geothermal Field. Over time, the permeability of such geothermal reservoirs can be degraded by fracture sealing as minerals deposit out of transported geothermal fluids. Calcite is one such fracture sealing mineral. This study, for the first time, utilises combined data from electron backscatter diffraction and chemical mapping to characterise calcite vein fill morphologies, and gain insight into the mechanisms of calcite fracture sealing in the Kawerau Geothermal Field. Two calcite sealing mechanisms are identified 1) asymmetrical syntaxial growth of calcite, inferred by the presence of single, twinned, calcite crystals spanning the entire fracture width, and 2) 3D, interlocking growth of bladed vein calcite into free space as determined from chemical and crystallographic orientation mapping. This study also identifies other potential uses of combined EBSD and chemical mapping to understand geothermal field evolution including, potentially informing on levels of fluid supersaturation from the study of calcite lattice distortion, and providing information on a reservoir's history of stress, strain, and deformation through investigation of calcite crystal deformation and twinning patterns.

  13. Matrix grain characterisation by electron backscattering diffraction of powder metallurgy aluminum matrix composites reinforced with MoSi{sub 2} intermetallic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Corrochano, J. Hidalgo, P.; Lieblich, M.; Ibanez, J.

    2010-11-15

    Research highlights: Six extruded PM AA6061/MoSi{sub 2}/15p were processed with and without ball milling {yields} EBSD was used to characterise matrix grain size and grain orientation. {yields} Ball milling decreases matrix grain size to submicrometric level. {yields} Ball milling produces a more equiaxed microstructure and larger misorientation. {yields} Increasing milling time produces matrix texture randomization.

  14. Detailed microstructure of two-phase lower mantle mineral analogs from SEM and EBSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, Pamela; Mariani, Elisabetta; Dawson, Karl

    2016-04-01

    The rheology and viscosity of the lower mantle influence convection, heat transport through the mantle, slab subduction, and many surface processes. Plastic flow in the lower mantle depends on the deformation mechanics of its constituent mineral phases - mostly bridgmanite, (Mg,Fe)SiO3, with a smaller percent of the rheologically weaker ferropericlase, (Mg,Fe)O. For deformation in a (mostly) two-phase system with large strength contrast, such as in the lower mantle, microstructure greatly influences deformation and rheology. We examined microstructures of an analog two-phase system of the lower mantle before and after deformation using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Halite (NaCl) and neighborite (NaMgF3) were used as analogs to lower mantle minerals ferropericlase (Mg,Fe)O and bridgmanite MgSiO3, respectively, and deformed up to 50% strain at 4 GPa confining pressure and average strain rates of 2×10‑3 s‑1in the D-DIA. One goal of our microstructural analysis is to help determine whether deformation in the bulk of the lower mantle occurs by diffusion creep or by dislocation creep, which has been long debated. Previous X-ray diffraction and microtomography studies of these samples (Kaercher et al. submitted) show the weaker NaCl is likely interconnected at just 15 percent volume and greatly reduces crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) in NaMgF3, while NaCl itself develops either very little or heterogeneous CPO. New SEM and EBSD results show that NaCl deforms primarily by subgrain rotation recrystallization (a recrystallization mechanism active during dislocation creep) at 200° C, resulting in drastically reduced grain sizes. While we have less information for the NaMgF3 due to difficulties polishing soft, hydrophilic NaCl and harder NaMgF3 together, it appears that NaMgF3 grains remain the same size. This suggests that periclase may control deformation in the lower mantle resulting in a weaker, more

  15. High-Resolution EBSD Study of Adiabatic Shear Band and Neighboring Grains After Dynamic Impact Loading of Mn-Steel Used in Vehicle Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskandari, M.; Mohtadi-Bonab, M. A.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.; Odeshi, A. G.; Szpunar, J. A.

    2016-04-01

    We report the results of the microstructural characterizations and micro-texture analysis of a lightweight austenitic steel deformed at high strain rate (1200 s-1) using a split Hopkinson pressure bar. Formation of adiabatic shear bands (ASB) and plastic deformation mechanisms within neighboring grains are investigated by high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD). HR-EBSD reveals formation of athermal ɛ-martensite and ά-martensite within the shear bands, resulting in the formation of a brittle intersection structure. Crack initiation and propagation is seen in intersection structure. The thermally induced ɛ-martensite follows Shoji-Nishiyama crystallographic orientation relationship with parent austenite phase, while ά-martensite shows Burgers relationship with ɛ-martensite. A detailed examination depicts the presence of deformation twins in grains adjacent to the ASB. Furthermore, strain-induced ɛ and ά martensite are formed in the neighboring grains of ASB. The micro-texture of martensite variants is discussed in ASB and in the neighboring grains.

  16. Strain analysis in quartzites with negative magnetic susceptibility using AMS and EBSD data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendraprasad Renjith, A.; Mamtani, Manish A.

    2016-04-01

    This study is being done with the objective of trying to understand whether the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) data can provide information about strain in quartzites with negative magnetic susceptibility. For this, nine quartzite samples have been collected from Rengali Province (located in the eastern part of India) with bulk magnetic susceptibility between -13.6 x 10-6 SI units and -3.06 x 10-6 SI units. Since these rocks did not show any visible foliation or lineation, AMS analysis was performed using KLY-4S Kappabridge and the orientation of three principal axes of the AMS ellipsoid (K1>K2>K3) were determined. Thin sections were prepared parallel to the K1K3 plane of the AMS ellipsoid (plane parallel to lineation and perpendicular to foliation), which is equivalent to the XZ plane of the strain ellipsoid. SEM based electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis, shape preferred orientation (SPO) analysis and strain analysis were carried out in these sections. Recently, Renjith et al. (2016) used the same samples to establish that the AMS in quartzites gives information about the SPO and not the CPO. To further evaluate the robustness of AMS in strain analysis, the authors have integrated the degree of magnetic anisotropy (Pj - a measure of the eccentricity of AMS ellipsoid; Tarling and Hrouda, 1993) with the intensity of SPO (κ ; Piazolo and Passchier, 2002), and the strain (E - calculated using AMOCADO; Gerik and Kruhl, 2009) from the same samples from Rengali. EBSD data were used as the basis for the above calculations. Whilst the orientation of long axis of quartz grains from EBSD statistical data was used to calculate κ , the grain boundary map generated from EBSD analysis was used as the basis to determine strain (E). It is found that the sample with minimum Pj also has a minimum κ and E, and vice-versa. Hence it is concluded that one-to-one correlation exists between the degree of magnetic anisotropy, strain and intensity of SPO in

  17. On capturing the grain-scale elastic and plastic anisotropy of alpha-Ti with spherical nanoindentation and electron back-scattered diffraction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Weaver, Jordan S.; Priddy, Matthew W.; McDowell, David L.; Kalidindi, Surya R.

    2016-09-15

    Here, spherical nanoindentation combined with electron back-scattered diffraction has been employed to characterize the grain-scale elastic and plastic anisotropy of single crystal alpha-Ti of two different compositions (in two different titanium alloys). Data analyses protocols needed to reliably extract the desired properties of interest are extended and demonstrated in this paper. Specifically, the grain-scale mechanical response is extracted in the form of indentation stress-strain curves for commercially pure (CP-Ti) alpha-Ti and alloyed (Ti-64) titanium from measurements on polycrystalline samples. The results are compared with responses of single crystals and nanoindentation tests (hardness and modulus) from the literature, and the measuredmore » indentation moduli are validated using crystal-elastic finite element simulations. The results obtained in this study show that (i) it is possible to characterize reliably the elastic and plastic anisotropy of alpha-Ti (hcp) of varying alloying contents with spherical nanoindentation stress-strain curves, (ii) the indentation modulus of alpha-Ti-64 is 5–10% less than CP-Ti, and (iii) the indentation yield strength of alpha-Ti-64 is 50–80% higher than CP-Ti.« less

  18. Dislocation and Elastic Strain in an InN Film Characterized by Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray Diffraction and Rutherford Backscattering/Channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Feng-Feng; Fa, Tao; Wang, Xin-Qiang; Yao, Shu-De

    2012-02-01

    Dislocation information and strain-related tetragonal distortion as well as crystalline qualities of a 2-μm-thick InN film grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are characterized by Rutherford backscattering/channeling (RBS/C) and synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction (SR-XRD). The minimum yield χmin = 2.5% deduced from the RBS/C results indicates a fairly good crystalline quality. From the SR-XRD results, we obtain the values of the screw and edge densities to be ρscrew = 7.0027 × 109 and ρedge = 8.6115 × 109 cm-2, respectively. The tetragonal distortion of the sample is found to be -0.27% by angular scans, which is close to the -0.28% derived by SR-XRD. The value of |e⊥/e∥| = 0.6742 implies that the InN layer is much stiffer along the a axis than that along the c axis, where e∥ is the parallel elastic strain, and e⊥ is the perpendicular elastic strain. Photoluminescence results reveal a main peak of 0.653 eV with the linewidth of 60 meV, additional shoulder band could be due to impurities and related defects.

  19. Crystallographic measurement of the β to α phase transformation and δ-hydride precipitation in a laser-welded Zircaloy-2 tube by electron backscattering diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Une, K.; Ishimoto, S.

    2009-06-01

    Crystallographic measurement of the β to α phase transformation and δ-hydride precipitation in a laser-welded Zircaloy-2 ferrule tube were carried out using an electron backscattering diffraction pattern (EBSP). A basket-weave structure with sub-micron lath width caused by quenching from the β to α phase was observed in the heat-affected and fusion zones, and mainly showed a grain boundary misorientation angle of 60° with an <1 1 2¯ 0> rotation axis. This result is consistent with the Burgers orientation relationship of {1 1 0} β//(0 0 0 1) α and <1 1 1> β//<1 1 2¯ 0> α for the β to α phase transformation. The texture of the quenched α' phase was strongly inherited from the original α phase, having a radial (0 0 0 1) basal pole and axial {1 1 2¯ 0} textures, even in the fusion zone. The primary hydride habit plane in the welded Zircaloy-2 was (0 0 0 1) α//{1 1 1} δ, matching previously obtained results for recrystallized cladding tubes. In addition to the primary habit plane, secondary habit planes were observed for the other low-index planes {1 0 1¯ 0} and {1 0 1¯ 1} in the fusion zone. The heterogeneous accumulation of hydrides in the transition zone between heat-affected and unaffected zones was mainly due to the residual stress distribution in the narrow region.

  20. Influence of Surface Preparation on Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of Cross Sections of CdTe/CdS Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Jiang, C. S.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2011-06-01

    In this work we investigated different methods to prepare cross sections of CdTe/CdS solar cells for EBSD and SKPM analyses. We observed that procedures used to prepare surfaces for EBSD are not suitable to prepare cross sections, and we were able to develop a process using polishing and ion-beam milling. This process resulted in very good results and allowed us to reveal important aspects of the cross section of the CdTe film. For SKPM, polishing and a light ion-beam milling resulted in cross sections that provided good data. We were able to observe the depletion region on the CdTe film and the p-n junction as well as the interdiffusion layer between CdTe and CdS. However, preparing good-quality cross sections for SKPM is not a reproducible process, and artifacts are often observed.

  1. Subgrain boundary analyses in deformed orthopyroxene by TEM/STEM with EBSD-FIB sample preparation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogure, Toshihiro; Raimbourg, Hugues; Kumamoto, Akihito; Fujii, Eiko; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution structure analyses using electron beam techniques have been performed for the investigation of subgrain boundaries (SGBs) in deformed orthopyroxene (Opx) in mylonite from Hidaka Metamorphic Belt, Hokkaido, Japan, to understand ductile deformation mechanism of silicate minerals in shear zones. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis of Opx porphyroclasts in the mylonitic rock indicated that the crystal orientation inside the Opx crystals gradually changes by rotation about the b-axis by SGBs and crystal folding. In order to observe the SGBs along the b-axis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning TEM (STEM), the following sample preparation protocol was adopted. First, petrographic thin sections were slightly etched with hydrofluoric acid to identify SGBs in SEM. The Opx crystals whose b-axes were oriented close to the normal of the surface were identified by EBSD, and the areas containing SGBs were picked and thinned for (S) TEM analysis with a focused ion beam instrument with micro-sampling system. High-resolution TEM imaging of the SGBs in Opx revealed various boundary structures from a periodic array of dissociated (100) [001] edge dislocations to partially or completely incoherent crystals, depending on the misorientation angle. Atomic-resolution STEM imaging clearly confirmed the formation of clinopyroxene (Cpx) structure between the dissociated partial dislocations. Moreover, X-ray microanalysis in STEM revealed that the Cpx contains a considerable amount of calcium replacing iron. Such chemical inhomogeneity may limit glide motion of the dislocation and eventually the plastic deformation of the Opx porphyroclasts at a low temperature. Chemical profiles across the high-angle incoherent SGB also showed an enrichment of the latter in calcium at the boundary, suggesting that SGBs are an efficient diffusion pathway of calcium out of host Opx grain during cooling.

  2. Localisation of shear in ice by recrystallisation on kinks and grain boundary networks: new EBSD data in old experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prior, D. J.; Golding, N.; Durham, W. B.; Seidemann, M.; Diebold, S.; De Bresser, J. H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Relatively high stress (>1MPa), low temperature (<258K) ice creep experiments, to significant strain, have been possible some decades, using a gas confining pressure to prevent sample failure. Imaging the microstructures that result from these experiments has been problematic, primarily because of the fine size of some or all of the grains. We have now developed protocols to enable electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in of fine-grained water ice with a very high (>95%) success rate and have quantified the microstructures of >50 confined medium experiments. The indium jackets of many confined media experiments have an irregular rumpled surface after deformation. The "rumples" have wavelengths and amplitudes larger than the starting grain size. EBSD maps show anastomosing traces along which fine recrystallised grains are developed. The traces follow some of the original grain boundaries - the scale of connectivity of the network of recrystallized grains is on the scale of several grains (or larger) and broadly corresponds to the wavelength of the rumples on the jacket. In some samples the original grains are kinked and recrystallized grains occur along kink traces. In samples where such recrystallisation is well-developed, these bands contribute of the anastomosing network. Recrystallised grain size describes a broad piezometer relationship that is consistent with much coarser recrystallized grain sizes from higher temperature, lower stress unconfined experiments. We suggest that the dynamic recrystallisation process is a mechanism that enables localization and weakening in ice. The high stress confined media experiments give some insight into processes that may occur in terrestrial ice sheets and cannot be accessed at natural conditions. Some preliminary modeling shows that a dynamic recrystallisation process is consistent with the magnitude of weakening on ice-stream margins in Antarctica.

  3. Microstructural of analysis by EBSD during deformation and annealing of ice Ih

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainprice, D.; Hidas, K.; Tommasi, A.; Chauve, T.; Barou, F.; Montagnat, M.

    2015-12-01

    Static recrystallization and grain growth take place during high-temperature annealing following deformation at lower temperature, and they reorganize grain and subgrain boundaries to produce entirely new, strain-free grains. These processes influence the microstructure and mechanical behavior of the material by reducing the level of long-range internal stress field. The non-linear flow law of ice Ih makes it an ideal analogue to model rock deformation, thus analyses of recrystallized ice textures contribute to understanding mechanisms which control the nucleation and grain growth deep in the Earth's interior. Water ice microstructures allow for the study of grain-scale processes including nucleation, grain growth, recovery and recrystallization. On the other hand, these mechanisms directly influence the behavior of terrestrial ice systems (e.g., glaciers and ice sheets) in response to deformation. Therefore, their understanding may help us to improve climatic signal interpretation and predictions, that are mostly based on ice dynamics. However, at present there are no data by which recovery, and strain energy-driven grain boundary migration rates in ice can be estimated. Here we present the results of annealing experiments of pre-deformed polycrystalline water ice together with microstructural analyses by means of Automatic Ice Texture Analyzer (AITA) and high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) crystal orientation maps. We performed constant load uniaxial compression creep experiments at -7°C on columnar samples, composed of mm-sized polycrystals, to attain 4% deformation and we applied post-deformational heat treatment at -5°C. We carried out a series of AITA and EBSD maps in representative time steps up to 25 hours of total annealing in order to study the microstructural evolution. In this contribution, we evaluate the stored energy distribution and the rate of grain boundary migration during post-dynamic and static recrystallization, that

  4. Structural investigations on iron containing natural Zincblende using EBSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zscheckel, Tilman; Kreher-Hartmann, Birgit; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-05-01

    A sample of natural zinc sulfide containing iron (from Portugal, Albergaria, Velha) was systematically investigated with respect to its microstructure using XRD (X-ray diffraction) and EBSD (electron back scatter diffraction). The habitus of the black sample suggests a hexagonal crystal structure, i.e. the occurrence of the Wurtzite phase. Nevertheless, using XRD and EBSD allowed only detecting and localizing the cubic Zincblende structure within the sample with the fibrous habitus while the expected hexagonal Wurtzite structure and possibly a hexagonal FeS structure were missed. The macroscopic fibrous structures consist of non-uniform and elongated grain structures which possess a preferred orientation with the <224>-direction parallel to the fiber direction. Inside the grains, twinning occurs (Σ3-Twinning) as well as grain fragmentation. Iron is not distributed homogeneously; instead areas with unique iron concentrations occurred. They were arranged like twins with iron concentrations from 4.1 up to 5.1 at% as detected and localized using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Fe2+ is incorporated in lattice sites of Zn2+. Although the phase diagram FeS-Zn-S is not yet completely determined in all composition ranges of interest, coexisting phases (zincblende and FeS) should be expected at room temperatures. The results may contribute to further insights into the growth mechanisms of natural zinc sulfide, respectively to the discussion about. Furthermore, it was shown, that the crystal habitus not always allows concluding on the crystals symmetry with certainty.

  5. Small area analysis using micro-diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect

    GOEHNER,RAYMOND P.; TISSOT JR.,RALPH G.; MICHAEL,JOSEPH R.

    2000-02-11

    An overall trend toward smaller electronic packages and devices makes it increasingly important and difficult to obtain meaningful diffraction information from small areas. X-ray micro-diffraction, electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) and Kossel are micro-diffraction techniques used for crystallographic analysis including texture, phase identification and strain measurements. X-ray micro-diffraction primarily is used for phase analysis and residual strain measurements. X-ray micro-diffraction primarily is used for phase analysis and residual strain measurements of areas between 10 {micro}m to 100 {micro}m. For areas this small glass capillary optics are used for producing a usable collimated x-ray beam. These optics are designed to reflect x-rays below the critical angle therefore allowing for larger solid acceptance angle at the x-ray source resulting in brighter smaller x-ray beams. The determination of residual strain using micro-diffraction techniques is very important to the semiconductor industry. Residual stresses have caused voiding of the interconnect metal which then destroys electrical continuity. Being able to determine the residual stress helps industry to predict failures from the aging effects of interconnects due to this stress voiding. Stress measurements would be impossible using a conventional x-ray diffractometer; however, utilizing a 30{micro}m glass capillary these small areas are readily assessable for analysis. Kossel produces a wide angle diffraction pattern from fluorescent x-rays generated in the sample by an e-beam in a SEM. This technique can yield very precise lattice parameters for determining strain. Fig. 2 shows a Kossel pattern from a Ni specimen. Phase analysis on small areas is also possible using an energy dispersive spectrometer (EBSD) and x-ray micro-diffraction techniques. EBSD has the advantage of allowing the user to observe the area of interest using the excellent imaging capabilities of the SEM. An EDS detector has

  6. Characterizing the microstructure of Arctica islandica shells using NanoSIMS and EBSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karney, Graeme B.; Butler, Paul G.; Speller, Susannah; Scourse, James D.; Richardson, Christopher A.; Schröder, Markus; Hughes, Gareth M.; Czernuszka, Jan T.; Grovenor, Chris R. M.

    2012-04-01

    The bivalve mollusc Arctica islandica has received considerable attention in recent years because of its potential as an archive of marine palaeoclimate, based on its annually resolved incremental shell growth, longevity, and synchronous growth within populations. The robust interpretation of the archive depends on a detailed understanding of the shell formation process, and this in turn requires a reliable understanding of the shell microstructure. Research into this aspect, however, has so far been relatively limited. This study uses secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) to examine the compositions of the two annually formed growth increments, i.e., a narrow band of relatively slow growth referred to as growth increment I (GI I) and a usually wider accretion called growth increment II (GI II). High resolution composition maps are presented which clearly show lower concentrations of the organic ions 12C14N- and 32S- in GI I relative to GI II. This is consistent with the growth of larger crystallites in GI I, which is clearly demonstrated using a novel analysis method involving focused ion beam (FIB) milling. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis is also presented, and demonstrates that the orientation of the aragonite c-axis is the same in both GI I and GI II, and that the a- and b-axes assume preferred orientations consistent with the known angle of twinning in aragonite. By analyzing individual crystallites it is deduced that the (001) plane is likely to be the mineralizing face in GI I, and that the (011) and (102) planes are low energy interfaces in GI II.

  7. Thermally-induced amphibole reaction rim development: EBSD insights into microlite orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, Sarah; Lavallée, Yan; Larsen, Jessica; Mariani, Elisabetta

    2014-05-01

    Amphibole is an important mineral present in many calc-alkaline volcanic deposits. A hydrous phase, volcanic amphibole is only stable at pressures greater than 100 MPa (approx. 4 km), temperature less than ~860-870 oC, and in melts containing at least 4 wt % H2O. When removed from their thermal and barometric stability field, amphiboles decompose to form aggregate rims of anhydrous minerals. The thickness, texture, and mineralogy of these rims are thought to be reflective of the process driving amphibole disequilibrium (e.g. heating, decompression, etc). However, significant overlap in rim thicknesses and microlite textures means that distinguishing between processes it not simple. This study employed backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to examine both experimental heating-indced amphibole reaction rims and natural amphibole reaction rim from Augustine Volcano. We collected crystal orientation maps of amphibole reaction rims to investigate if different types of disequilibrium produce different patterns of microlite orientation. We identified two types of reaction rim: Type 1- reaction rim microlites are generally oriented at random and share little or no systematic relationship with the crystallographic orientation of the host amphibole, and; Type 2- reaction rim microlites exhibit a topotactic relationship with the host amphibole (they share the same crystallographic orientation). Experimentally produced heating reaction rims are without exception Type 2. However the natural reaction rims are evenly distributed between Types 1 and 2. Further experimental data on decompression induced reaction rim formation is needed to investigate if Type 1 reaction rims resemble the breakdown of amphibole due to decompression. If so, reaction rim microlite orientation could provide a clear method for distinguishing between heating and decompression processes in amphibole bearing magmas.

  8. EBSD imaging of orientation relationships and variant groupings in different martensitic alloys and Widmanstätten iron meteorites

    SciTech Connect

    Cayron, Cyril

    2014-08-15

    An automatic method to colorize and quantify the classical Pitsch, Kurdjumov–Sachs, Greninger–Troiano and Nishiyama–Wasserman orientation relationships in the electron backscatter diffraction maps of martensitic/bainitic steels is detailed. Automatic analysis of variant grouping is also presented. The method was applied to low and high carbon steels, and to iron–nickel Widmanstätten meteorites. Many results of recent literature are confirmed. In low carbon steels the individual laths exhibit continuous orientation gradients between the classical orientation relationships, and the laths tend to be grouped by close-packed plane (morphological) packets. A crystallographic scenario describing the formation of the packets is proposed on the base of the one-step model. When the carbon content increases, the orientation spreading is reduced; and martensite tends to form plate groups and burst configurations. In iron–nickel meteorites, the centimeter long Widmanstätten laths do not exhibit continuous orientation gradients but are constituted of subgrains with uniform orientation relationship; the kamacite grains in the plessite regions are grouped into Bain zones, probably due to a recrystallization during the slow cooling of the meteorites. - Highlights: • Analysis of different low and high carbon steels and Widmanstätten meteorites • Automatic color mapping of the classical orientation relationships in EBSD maps • Quantification of variant pairing and grouping tendencies • Crystallographic scenario for the formation of morphological packets.

  9. A methodology to study crystal plasticity inside a compression test sample based on image correlation and EBSD

    SciTech Connect

    Rehrl, C.; Kleber, S.; Antretter, T.; Pippan, R.

    2011-08-15

    Modified compression tests in a coarse-grained austenitic stainless steel have been carried out in order to examine the crystal plasticity behavior for large plastic deformations. The measurements of local in-plane strains provide deeper insight into the deformation process on the local scale. These measurements are performed by digital image correlation technique (DIC) in combination with local crystal orientation measurements by using the electron backscatter diffraction technique (EBSD). Split test samples are prepared to track the strong microstructural changes during deformation, which is done incrementally in 10% steps up to 60% total macroscopic strain. The clear correlation of local strains with crystal orientation changes - e.g. in the case of mechanical twinning - permits to identify the acting deformation mechanisms. Such, experimentally determined local strain maps can be used for verification of crystal plasticity finite element method simulations (CPFEM). - Research Highlights: {yields} Method to study large strain crystal plasticity inside an austenitic FeCrNi-alloy. {yields} Correlation of local strain analyses with crystal orientation measurements. {yields} Deformation mechanism changes locally from dislocation glide to mechanical twinning. {yields} Suitable to study grain-grain interactions, slip system activation and grain boundary effects. {yields} Provide essential data for crystal plasticity FEM studies.

  10. Seismic properties and mineral crystallographic preferred orientations from EBSD data: Results from a crustal-scale detachment system, Aegean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossette, Élise; Schneider, David; Audet, Pascal; Grasemann, Bernhard; Habler, Gerlinde

    2015-05-01

    The crystallographic preferred orientations (CPOs) were measured on a suite of samples representative of different structural depths along the West Cycladic Detachment System, Greece. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses were conducted on calcitic and mica schists, impure quartzites, and a blueschist, and the average seismic properties of the rocks were calculated with the Voigt-Reuss-Hill average of the single minerals' elastic stiffness tensor. The calcitic and quartzitic rocks have P- and S-wave velocity anisotropies (AVp, AVs) averaging 8.1% and 7.1%, respectively. The anisotropy increases with depth represented by the blueschist, with AVp averaging 20.3% and AVs averaging 14.5%, due to the content of aligned glaucophane and mica, which strongly control the seismic properties of the rocks. Localised anisotropies of very high magnitudes are caused by the presence of mica schists as they possess the strongest anisotropies, with values of ~ 25% for AVp and AVs. The direction of the fast and slow P-wave velocities occurs parallel and perpendicular to the foliation, respectively, for most samples. The fast propagation has the same NE-SW orientation as the lithospheric stretching direction experienced in the Cyclades since the Late Oligocene. The maximum shear wave anisotropy is subhorizontal, similarly concordant with mineral alignment that developed during extension in the Aegean. Radial anisotropy in the Aegean mid-crust is strongly favoured to azimuthal anisotropy by our results.

  11. EBSD analysis of (10–12) twinning activity in Mg–3Al–1Zn alloy during compression

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingshu; Deng, Liping; Guo, Ning; Xu, Zeren; Li, Qiang

    2014-12-15

    The (10–12) twinning activity of Mg–3Al–1Zn magnesium alloy during uniaxial compression at room temperature has been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction. The results indicated that the twinning activity was closely related with two angles: one was the angle between the c-axis and the compression direction and the other was the angle between the a-axis and the titling direction in the basal plane for a given relation between the c-axis and the compression direction. These two parameters can be used to explain which twinning variant will operate under the given strain path. For the grains containing a single (10–12) twinning variant, the (10–12) twinning variant occurred in a wide range of Schmid factor values (0 < Schmid factor < 0.5) and the Schmid factor rank of 1 or 2 was the most commonly observed. By contrast, for the grains containing two (10–12) twinning variants, the (10–12) twinning activity exhibited a stronger orientation dependence and the combinations of Schmid factor ranks 1–3 and 1–2 were the most commonly observed. - Highlights: • Twinning activity of AZ31 magnesium alloy was investigated by EBSD. • (10–12) twinning shows a strong orientation dependence. • Two angles can be used to explain which twin variant will operate.

  12. The Weighted Burgers Vector: a new quantity for constraining dislocation densities and types using electron backscatter diffraction on 2D sections through crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, J; Mariani, E; Piazolo, S; Prior, D J; Trimby, P; Drury, M R

    2009-03-01

    The Weighted Burgers Vector (WBV) is defined here as the sum, over all types of dislocations, of [(density of intersections of dislocation lines with a map) x (Burgers vector)]. Here we show that it can be calculated, for any crystal system, solely from orientation gradients in a map view, unlike the full dislocation density tensor, which requires gradients in the third dimension. No assumption is made about gradients in the third dimension and they may be non-zero. The only assumption involved is that elastic strains are small so the lattice distortion is entirely due to dislocations. Orientation gradients can be estimated from gridded orientation measurements obtained by EBSD mapping, so the WBV can be calculated as a vector field on an EBSD map. The magnitude of the WBV gives a lower bound on the magnitude of the dislocation density tensor when that magnitude is defined in a coordinate invariant way. The direction of the WBV can constrain the types of Burgers vectors of geometrically necessary dislocations present in the microstructure, most clearly when it is broken down in terms of lattice vectors. The WBV has three advantages over other measures of local lattice distortion: it is a vector and hence carries more information than a scalar quantity, it has an explicit mathematical link to the individual Burgers vectors of dislocations and, since it is derived via tensor calculus, it is not dependent on the map coordinate system. If a sub-grain wall is included in the WBV calculation, the magnitude of the WBV becomes dependent on the step size but its direction still carries information on the Burgers vectors in the wall. The net Burgers vector content of dislocations intersecting an area of a map can be simply calculated by an integration round the edge of that area, a method which is fast and complements point-by-point WBV calculations. PMID:19250469

  13. Evaluation of suspended sediment concentrations, sediment fluxes and sediment depositions along a reservoir by using laser diffraction and acoustic backscatter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizano, Laura; Haun, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Costa Rica was investigated where huge depositions have been recorded since the reservoir was built. The SSC's were measured with a LISST-SL (Laser In-Situ Scattering and Transmissometry instrument) which is based on the laser diffraction method and measures simultaneously the SSC as well as the particle size distribution. The measured SSC's were subsequently used to calculate the sediment fluxes within the transects, based on the intensity of backscattered sound from an acoustic measurement device. The total amount of deposited sediments could be calculated from the sediment fluxes, obtained by moving ADCP measurements (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) along chosen transects and so an image of the amount of settled sediments could be drawn. The results of this study show the advantage of using two highly sophisticated measurement devices in parallel to receive accurate numbers for sediment fluxes within reservoirs, which can in addition be used in further studies to develop management strategies to reduce sediment depositions.

  14. Infrared backscattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohren, Craig F.; Nevitt, Timothy J.; Singham, Shermila Brito

    1989-01-01

    All particles in the atmosphere are not spherical. Moreover, the scattering properties of randomly oriented nonspherical particles are not equivalent to those of spherical particles no matter how the term equivalent is defined. This is especially true for scattering in the backward direction and at the infrared wavelengths at which some atmospheric particles have strong absorption bands. Thus calculations based on Mie theory of infrared backscattering by dry or insoluble atmospheric particles are suspect. To support this assertion, it was noted that peaks in laboratory-measured infrared backscattering spectra show appreciable shifts compared with those calculated using Mie theory. One example is ammonium sulfate. Some success was had in modeling backscattering spectra of ammonium sulfate particles using a simple statistical theory called the continuous distribution of ellipsoids (CDE) theory. In this theory, the scattering properties of an ensemble are calculated. Recently a modified version of this theory was applied to measured spectra of scattering by kaolin particles. The particles were platelike, so the probability distribution of ellipsoidal shapes was chosen to reflect this. As with ammonium sulfate, the wavelength of measured peak backscattering is shifted longward of that predicted by Mie theory.

  15. EBSD characterization of high-temperature phase transformations in an Al-Si coating on Cr-Mo steel

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Wei-Jen Wang, Chaur-Jeng

    2012-02-15

    5Cr-0.5Mo steel was coated by hot-dipping in a molten bath containing Al-10 wt.% Si. The phase transformation in the aluminide layer during diffusion at 750 Degree-Sign C in static air was analyzed by electron backscatter diffraction. The results show the aluminide layer of the as-coated specimen consisted of an outer Al-Si topcoat, a middle layer formed of scattered {tau}{sub 5(C)}-Al{sub 7}(Fe,Cr){sub 2}Si particles and minor plate-shaped {tau}{sub 4}-Al{sub 4}FeSi{sub 2} and {tau}{sub 6}-Al{sub 4}FeSi phases in the Al-Si matrix and an inner continuous {tau}{sub 5(H)}-Al{sub 7}Fe{sub 2}Si layer, respectively from the coating surface to the steel substrate. The formation of FeAl{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} with {tau}{sub 1}-(Al,Si){sub 5}Fe{sub 3} precipitates can be observed with increasing exposure time at 750 Degree-Sign C. After 5 h of exposure, the Al-Si topcoat has been consumed, and the aluminide layer consisted of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and a few {tau}{sub 1}-(Al,Si){sub 5}Fe{sub 3} precipitates. The FeAl phase not only formed at the interface between Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and the steel substrate, but also transformed from {tau}{sub 1}-(Al,Si){sub 5}Fe{sub 3} after diffusion for 10 h. With prolonged exposure, the aluminide layer comprised only FeAl{sub 2} and FeAl. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EBSD can differentiate phases in aluminide layer with similar chemical compositions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mapping and EBSPs functions in EBSD provide a reliable phase identification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A phase transformation in the aluminide layer has been described in detail. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5 Fe-Al-Si and 4 Fe-Al intermetallic phases are performed during the diffusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cubic {tau}{sub 5(C)}-Al{sub 7} (Fe,Cr){sub 2}Si and hexagonal {tau}{sub 5(H)}-Al{sub 7}(Fe,Cr){sub 2}Si are identified.

  16. Hyperspectral Imaging at the Micro- and Nanoscale using Energy-dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) with Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) and EBSD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salge, T.; Goran, D.

    2010-12-01

    SDD systems have become state of the art technology in the field of EDS. The main characteristic of the SDDs is their extremely high pulse load capacity of up to 750,000 counts per second at good energy resolution (<123 eV Mn-Kα, <46 eV C-Kα at 100,000 counts per seconds). These properties in conjunction with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique and modern data processing allows not only high speed mapping but also hyperspectral analysis. Here, a database is created that contains an EDS spectrum and/or EBSD pattern for each pixel of the SEM image setting the stage for innovative analysis options: The Maximum Pixel Spectrum function [1] synthesizes a spectrum out of the EDS database, consisting of the highest count level found in each spectrum channel. Here, (trace) elements which occur in only one pixel can be detected qualitatively. Areas of similar EDS composition can be made visible with Autophase, a spectroscopic phase detection system. In cases where the crystallographic phase assessment by EBSD is problematic due to pattern similarity, the EDS signal can be used as additional information for phase separation. This paper presents geoscience applications with the QUANTAX system with EDS SDD and EBSD detector using the options described above: (1) Drill core analysis of a Chicxulub impact ejecta sequence from the K/Pg boundary at ODP leg 207 [2] using fast, high resolution element maps. (2) Detection of monazite in granite by the Maximum Pixel Spectrum function. (3) Distribution of elements with overlapping peaks by deconvolution at the example of rare earth elements in zoned monazite. (4) Spectroscopic phase analysis of a sulfate-carbonate-dominated impact matrix at borehole UNAM-7 from the Chicxulub impact crater [3]. (5) EBSD studies with examples of iron meteorites and impact-induced, recrystallized carbonate melts [4]. In addition, continuing technological advances require the elemental analysis of increasingly smaller structures in many

  17. Electromagnetic backscattering by corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, C. A.; Griesser, T.

    1986-01-01

    The Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD), which supplements Geometric Optics (GO), and the Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD), which supplements Physical Optics (PO), are used to predict the backscatter cross sections of dihedral corner reflectors which have right, obtuse, or acute included angles. These theories allow individual backscattering mechanisms of the dihedral corner reflectors to be identified and provide good agreement with experimental results in the azimuthal plane. The advantages and disadvantages of the geometrical and physical theories are discussed in terms of their accuracy, usefulness, and complexity. Numerous comparisons of analytical results with experimental data are presented. While physical optics alone is more accurate and more useful than geometrical optics alone, the combination of geometrical optics and geometrical diffraction seems to out perform physical optics and physical diffraction when compared with experimental data, especially for acute angle dihedral corner reflectors.

  18. Using transmission Kikuchi diffraction to study intergranular stress corrosion cracking in type 316 stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Meisnar, Martina; Vilalta-Clemente, Arantxa; Gholinia, Ali; Moody, Michael; Wilkinson, Angus J; Huin, Nicolas; Lozano-Perez, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    Transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD), also known as transmission-electron backscatter diffraction (t-EBSD) is a novel method for orientation mapping of electron transparent transmission electron microscopy specimen in the scanning electron microscope and has been utilized for stress corrosion cracking characterization of type 316 stainless steels. The main advantage of TKD is a significantly higher spatial resolution compared to the conventional EBSD due to the smaller interaction volume of the incident beam with the specimen. Two 316 stainless steel specimen, tested for stress corrosion cracking in hydrogenated and oxygenated pressurized water reactor chemistry, were characterized via TKD. The results include inverse pole figure (IPFZ) maps, image quality maps and misorientation maps, all acquired in very short time (<60 min) and with remarkable spatial resolution (up to 5 nm step size possible). They have been used in order to determine the location of the open crack with respect to the grain boundary, deformation bands, twinning and slip. Furthermore, TKD has been used to measure the grain boundary misorientation and establish a gauge for quantifying plastic deformation at the crack tip and other regions in the surrounding matrix. Both grain boundary migration and slip transfer have been detected as well. PMID:25974882

  19. Accurate analysis of EBSD data for phase identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palizdar, Y.; Cochrane, R. C.; Brydson, R.; Leary, R.; Scott, A. J.

    2010-07-01

    This paper aims to investigate the reliability of software default settings in the analysis of EBSD results. To study the effect of software settings on the EBSD results, the presence of different phases in high Al steel has been investigated by EBSD. The results show the importance of appropriate automated analysis parameters for valid and reliable phase discrimination. Specifically, the importance of the minimum number of indexed bands and the maximum solution error have been investigated with values of 7-9 and 1.0-1.5° respectively, found to be needed for accurate analysis.

  20. EBSD Imaging of Monazite: a Petrochronological Tool?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottram, C. M.; Cottle, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in in-situ U-Th/Pb monazite petrochronology allow ages obtained from micron-scale portions of texturally-constrained, individual crystals to be placed directly into a quantitative Pressure-Temperature framework. However, there remain major unresolved challenges in linking monazite ages to specific deformation events and discerning the effects of deformation on the isotopic and elemental tracers in these phases. Few studies have quantitatively investigated monazite microstructure, and these studies have largely focused only on crystals produced experimentally (e.g. Reddy et al., 2010). The dispersion in age data commonly yielded from monazite U-Th/Pb datasets suggest that monazite dynamically recrystallises during deformation. It remains unclear how this continual recrystallisation is reflected in the monazite crystal structure, and how this subsequently impacts the ages (or age ranges) yielded from single crystals. Here, combined laser ablation split-stream analysis of deformed monazite, EBSD imaging and Pressure-Temperature (P-T) phase equilibria modelling is used to quantify the influence of deformation on monazite (re)crystallisation mechanisms and its subsequent effect on the crystallographic structure, ages and trace-element distribution in individual grains. These data provide links between ages and specific deformation events, thus helping further our understanding of the role of dynamic recrystallisation in producing age variation within and between crystals in a deformed rock. These data provide a new dimension to the field of petrochronology, demonstrating the importance of fully integrating the Pressure-Temperature-time-deformation history of accessory phases to better interpret the meaningfulness of ages yielded from deformed rocks. Reddy, S. et al., 2010. Mineralogical Magazine 74: 493-506

  1. Use of EBSD to study electropulsing induced reverse phase transformations in a Zn-Al alloy (ZA22).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y H; To, S; Liu, X M

    2011-04-01

    Multi-phase identification and phase transformations in electropulsing treated Zn-Al based alloy wire specimens were studied using electron back-scattered diffraction, back-scattered scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. By using electron back-scattered diffraction, two phases: η'(S) and η'(T) with a small difference of about 1% in lattice parameters (c(0)/a(0) ) were identified, based on the determined lattice parameters of the phases, and the reverse eutectoid phase transformations: η'(T) +ɛ'(T) +α'(T) →η'(S) and ɛ+α→T'+η were successfully detected. Electron back-scattered diffraction appeared to be an effective technique for studying complex electropulsing induced phase transformations. PMID:21118233

  2. Visco-plasticity of polycrystalline olivine at high pressure and 900°C: fresh outcomes from high resolution EBSD and electron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demouchy, S. A.; Mussi, A.; Barou, F.; Tommasi, A.; Cordier, P.

    2013-12-01

    The rheology of olivine-rich rocks at lithospheric temperatures (<1000°C) remains poorly constrained, in contrast to the extensive experimental dataset on creep of olivine single crystals and aggregates at high temperature (T > 1200°C). Consequently, we have performed tri-axial compression experiments (in a Paterson's press) on two fine-grained polycrystalline olivine (San Carlos olivine) specimens at 900°C, under a confining pressure of 300 MPa. Two dense samples were deformed at constant strain rates of 1.0 × 10-5 s-1 and 3.4 × 10-5 s-1. Mechanical curves show continuous hardening, with a decrease of hardening rate with increasing strain. Both samples failed just before 10% of finite strain and yield final differential stresses of 930 and 1076 MPa. Recovered samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). High resolution EBSD maps (step size 0.15 and 0.2 microns) permit to quantify accurately the microstructure (grain size, shape, aspect ratio, and angle distribution of the grain ellipse relative to the compression axis). Weak crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) developed in the deformed olivine aggregates, where [010] axes are mostly parallel to the compression axis; [100] and [001] axes are more dispersed, but tend to be oriented at high angle to the compression axis. Misorientations across grain boundaries and sub-grain boundaries were analyzed as well, evidencing common subgrain boundaries parallel to (100) and rotations dominantly around [001], that is an ';ideal' tilt boundary of the [100](010) system. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy, involving electron tomography of dislocations has identified dislocations with [100] and [001] Burgers vectors gliding on multiple planes, evidence for cross-slip, and dislocation entanglements. These data permit to better constrain the active deformation mechanisms and slip systems involved in the

  3. Electromagnetic backscattering by corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, C. A.; Griesser, T.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of the backscatter cross section of a dihedral corner reflector, using Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) and Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD), is completed in the azimuthal plane, and very good agreement with experimental results is obtained. The advantages and limitations of the GTD and PTD techniques are discussed specifically for radar cross section applications. The utilization of GTD and PTD in oblique incidence diffraction from conducting targets is discussed. Results for equivalent current off-axis diffraction from the flat rectangular plate are presented using the equivalent currents of Knott, Senior, and Michaeli. The rectangular subdivision technique of Sikta, and its extension by Sunatara, alleviate some of the limitations of the equivalent techniques. As yet, neither technique can be used in bistatic scattering or for multiple scattering of a complex target.

  4. EBSD and TEM Characterization of High Burn-up Mixed Oxide Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, Melissa C.; Gorman, Brian P.; Miller, Brandon D.; King, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and studying the irradiation behavior of high burn-up oxide fuel is critical to licensing of future fast breeder reactors. Advancements in experimental techniques and equipment are allowing for new insights into previously irradiated samples. In this work dual column focused ion beam (FIB)/scanning electron microscope (SEM) was utilized to prepared transmission electron microscope samples from mixed oxide fuel with a burn-up of 6.7% FIMA. Utilizing the FIB/SEM for preparation resulted in samples with a dose rate of <0.5 mRem/h compared to approximately 1.1 R/h for a traditionally prepared TEM sample. The TEM analysis showed that the sample taken from the cooler rim region of the fuel pellet had approximately 2.5x higher dislocation density than that of the sample taken from the mid-radius due to the lower irradiation temperature of the rim. The dual column FIB/SEM was additionally used to prepared and serially slice approximately 25 um cubes. High quality electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) were collected from the face at each step, showing, for the first time, the ability to obtain EBSD data from high activity irradiated fuel.

  5. Three-dimensional EBSD characterization of thermo-mechanical fatigue crack morphology in compacted graphite iron

    SciTech Connect

    Pirgazi, Hadi; Ghodrat, Sepideh; Kestens, Leo A.I.

    2014-04-01

    In cylinder heads made of compacted graphitic iron (CGI), heating and cooling cycles can lead to localized cracking due to thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF). To meticulously characterize the complex crack path morphology of CGI under TMF condition, in relation to microstructural features and to find out how and by which mechanisms the cracks predominantly develop, three-dimensional electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) was employed. Based on the precise quantitative microstructural analysis, it is found that graphite particles not only play a crucial role in the crack initiation, but also are of primary significance for crack propagation, i.e. crack growth is enhanced by the presence of graphite particles. Furthermore, the density of graphite particles on the fracture plane is more than double as high as in any other arbitrary plane of the structure. The obtained results did not indicate a particular crystallographic preference of fracture plane, i.e. the crystal plane parallel to the fracture plane was nearly of random orientation. - Highlights: • Crystallographic features of a thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) crack were studied. • Wide-field 3D EBSD is used to characterize the TMF crack morphology. • Data processing was applied on a large length scale of the order of millimeters. • Graphite density in the fracture plane is much higher than any other random plane. • It is revealed that crack growth is enhanced by the presence of graphite particles.

  6. A simulation of recrystallization based on EBSD orientation microscopy data

    SciTech Connect

    Engler, O.

    1998-12-01

    The present paper introduces a novel stochastic two-dimensional model to simulate the evolution of microstructure and texture during recrystallization. The model is based on data derived by automated large-scale EBSD local texture analysis, i.e., by orientation microscopy. Each measured point is characterized by its coordinates x and y in the microstructure, its crystallographic orientation g and a parameter q describing the quality of the EBSD-pattern which is affected by lattice strain and hence discloses information on the dislocation density. The concurrent information on the local arrangement of orientations and dislocation densities is utilized to derive conclusions on the nucleation and subsequent growth of the new recrystallized grains. The principles of the model are outlined and three example are shown to illustrate the possibilities of the model to simulate the evolution of microstructure and texture during recrystallization.

  7. Interference phenomena at backscattering by ice crystals of cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Borovoi, Anatoli; Kustova, Natalia; Konoshonkin, Alexander

    2015-09-21

    It is shown that light backscattering by hexagonal ice crystals of cirrus clouds is formed within the physical-optics approximation by both diffraction and interference phenomena. Diffraction determines the angular width of the backscattering peak and interference produces the interference rings inside the peak. By use of a simple model for distortion of the pristine hexagonal shape, we show that the shape distortion leads to both oscillations of the scattering (Mueller) matrix within the backscattering peak and to a strong increase of the depolarization, color, and lidar ratios needed for interpretation of lidar signals. PMID:26406659

  8. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    PubMed Central

    Xu, M.

    2016-01-01

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation. PMID:26937296

  9. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeylikovich, I.; Xu, M.

    2016-02-01

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation.

  10. EBSD observations of dynamic recrystallization mechanisms in ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnat, Maurine; Chauve, Thomas; Barou, Fabrice; Beausir, Benoît; Fressengeas, Claude; Tommasi, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Dynamic recrystallization (DRX) strongly affects the evolution of microstructure (grain size and shape) and texture (crystal preferred orientation) in materials during deformation at high temperature. Since texturing leads to anisotropic physical properties, predicting the effect of DRX in metals is essential for industrial applications, in rocks for interpreting geophysical data and modeling geodynamic flows, or in ice for predicting ice sheet flow and climate evolution. Owing to its high viscoplastic anisotropy, ice has long been considered as a "model material". This happens to be particularly true in the case of the understanding of the fundamental of DRX mechanisms as they occur under a relatively easily controlled environment. Creep compression experiments were performed on polycrystalline ice samples in the laboratory in order to observe the evolution of the fabrics and microstructures during DRX. During the tests, performed at temperatures of -5°C and -7°C, under 0.8 MPa compressive stress, dynamic recrystallization was initiated after 1% macroscopic strain and could be followed up to 18% strain on separated samples. Fabrics and microstructures were analysed post-mortem using an Automatic Ice Texture Analyser (AITA, Russell-Head and Wilson 2001) and EBSD measurements with the Crystal Probe of Géosciences Montpellier. Both techniques enable high resolution observations, both in space and orientation (5 to 50 microns, EBSD: 0.7° - AITA: 3°), which is new for DRX observations in ice. While AITA provides only the c-axis orientations, EBSD provides full orientations (c- and a-axes). In particular, we could access to an estimate of a relative dislocation density (from the Nye tensor obtained with EBSD) and its evolution with strain. Fabric evolution with strain is very similar to what was measured by Jacka and Maccagnan (1984) with a strong strengthening toward a few maxima for c- and a-axes. The c-axes maxima are oriented about 30° from the compression

  11. Mechanisms of mafic magma emplacement at a mid-crustal level: insights from AMS, AARM and EBSD analyses on the Sondalo gabbroic complex (Alps, N-Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, Benoît; Mohn, Geoffroy; Skrzypek, Etienne; Mateeva, Tsvetomila; Robion, Philippe; Schulmann, Karel; Manatschal, Gianreto; Müntener, Othmar

    2016-04-01

    With the aim of assessing the mechanisms of mafic magma ascent and emplacement in the continental crust, we describe the magmatic and magnetic fabrics of the Sondalo gabbroic complex emplaced at a mid-crustal level (~15 km) during the Permian (Campo unit, Eastern Central Alps, N-Italy). Detailed mapping, field observations and petrological investigations enable to study the general structure of the Sondalo gabbroic complex. The pluton is concentrically zoned and composed of Ol-gabbros in the central zone surrounded by gabbros in the intermediate zone and diorites to granodiorites in a border zone of a variable thickness. We characterize the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) fabric of the intrusions. In order to detect potential abnormal (intermediate) magnetic fabrics with respect to the petrofabric, we refine the magnetic fabric characterization with anisotropy of anhysteretic remnant magnetization (AARM) measurements while the identification of magnetic mineralogy is investigated by coercivity-unblocking temperature spectra of ferromagnetic minerals. In addition, the petrofabric is evaluated by measuring the crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) in test sites with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Additional petrological and geochemical observations provide insights on the crystallization sequence of the magmatic rocks and facilitate the interpretation of the magnetic record. The bulk susceptibilities of the rocks range from 448 to 3540*10-6 SI with most of values below 10-3 SI, attesting of a mixed contribution to the AMS signal of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic minerals. Variation of the magnetic susceptibilities can be correlated to both the lithology and the magnetic mineralogy. Measured magnetic foliation orientations are remarkably similar to the observed macroscopic magmatic fabrics defined by the preferred orientation of magmatic plagioclase, pyroxene, hornblende and rarely biotite. In the central zone, the magmatic

  12. NOAA backscatter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, Madison J.

    1991-01-01

    In the past year, NOAA has measured and analyzed another year's worth of backscatter over Boulder, CO. The average profile was computed from 80 satellite observations of backscatter spread throughout the year, using NOAA's CO2 coherent lidar operating at a wavelength of 10.59 microns. The seasonal averages show a familiar trend (highest backscattering in spring, perhaps due to Asian dust or biomass burning, and lowest backscattering in fall). The 1990 average profile was not significantly different from the 1988 or 1989 profiles, except that it displays a slight increase in the upper troposphere, perhaps due to the Redoubt Volcano. The NOAA's backscatter processing program (BETA) was refined to enable the calculation of gaseous absorption effects based on rawinsonde measurements, as well as using atmospheric models. NOAA participated in two intercomparisons of aerosol measuring instruments near Boulder, called FRLAB (Front Range Lidar, Aircraft, and Balloon Experiment). Considerable effort was also put into developing a multiagency science proposal to NASA headquarters to work with both JPL and NASA-Marshall to produce an airborne Doppler lidar facility for the DC-8.

  13. Backscattering measurements of micron-sized spherical particles.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Brendan M; Heinson, Yuli W; Maughan, Justin B; Chakrabarti, Amitabha; Sorensen, Christopher M

    2016-04-20

    An apparatus was designed and assembled to measure scattered light in the range of 180°±6° where enhanced backscattering, the cause of a glory, occurs. The apparatus was calibrated and tested using Fraunhofer circular aperture diffraction, angle of incidence correction, and a diffuse reflector. Theory indicates that backscattering is strongly dependent on particle size, refractive index, and shape. Experimental measurements from polystyrene latex spheres of two sizes and water droplets showed good agreement with Mie theory, but also indicated the extreme sensitivity of the backscattering to particle parameters. The results presented should have use in the fields of particle scattering, particle metrology, and LIDAR. PMID:27140090

  14. Crystal orientation mapping via ion channeling: An alternative to EBSD.

    PubMed

    Langlois, C; Douillard, T; Yuan, H; Blanchard, N P; Descamps-Mandine, A; Van de Moortèle, B; Rigotti, C; Epicier, T

    2015-10-01

    A new method, which we name ion CHanneling ORientation Determination (iCHORD), is proposed to obtain orientation maps on polycrystals via ion channeling. The iChord method exploits the dependence between grain orientation and ion beam induced secondary electron image contrast. At each position of the region of interest, intensity profiles are obtained from a series of images acquired with different orientations with respect to the ion beam. The profiles are then compared to a database of theoretical profiles of known orientation. The Euler triplet associated to the most similar theoretical profile gives the orientation at that position. The proof-of-concept is obtained on a titanium nitride sample. The potentialities of iCHORD as an alternative to EBSD are then discussed. PMID:26094201

  15. A review of advances and challenges in EBSD strain mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, A. J.; Britton, T. B.; Jiang, J.; Karamched, P. S.

    2014-03-01

    High sensitivity cross-correlation based analysis of EBSD patterns was introduced by Wilkinson, Meaden and Dingley in 2006 [1, 2]. This paper will describe the basis of the method and the various modifications and improvements that have been made to it over the past few years. Strain sensitivity of ~ 10-4 is readily obtained and sensitivity to lower strains is achievable if signal to noise ratio in the patterns is improved by simple integration. The method allows maps of local stress and dislocation density distributions to be generated in parallel with information concerning grain orientation, grain boundary misorientation and the presence of other microstructural features. The method is illustrated by example maps from a Ni-based superalloy and deformed Cu.

  16. SEM-EBSD based Realistic Modeling and Crystallographic Homogenization FE Analyses of LDH Formability Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramae, Hiroyuki; Ngoc Tam, Nguyen; Nakamura, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Hidetoshi; Morimoto, Hideo; Nakamachi, Eiji

    2007-05-01

    Homogenization algorithm is introduced to the elastic/crystalline viscoplastic finite element (FE) procedure to develop multi-scale analysis code to predict the formability of sheet metal in macro scale, and simultaneously the crystal texture and hardening evolutions in micro scale. The isotropic and kinematical hardening lows are employed in the crystalline plasticity constitutive equation. For the multi-scale structure, two scales are considered. One is a microscopic polycrystal structure and the other a macroscopic elastic plastic continuum. We measure crystal morphologies by using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) with electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), and define a three dimensional representative volume element (RVE) of micro ploycrystal structure, which satisfy the periodicity condition of crystal orientation distribution. Since nonlinear multi-scale FE analysis requires large computation time, development of parallel computing technique is needed. To realize the parallel analysis on PC cluster system, the dynamic explicit FE formulations are employed. Applying the domain partitioning technique to FE mesh of macro continuum, homogenized stresses based on micro crystal structures are computed in parallel without solving simultaneous linear equation. The parallel FEM code is applied to simulate the limit dome height (LDH) test problem and hemispherical cup deep drawing problem of aluminum alloy AL6022, mild steel DQSK, high strength steel HSLA, and dual phase steel DP600 sheet metals. The localized distribution of thickness strain and the texture evolution are obtained.

  17. Diffraction-based study of fatigue crack initiation and propagation in aerospace aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vipul K.

    The crack initiation sites and microstructure-sensitive growth of small fatigue cracks are experimentally characterized in two precipitation-hardened aluminum alloys, 7075-T651 and 7050-T7451, stressed in ambient temperature moist-air (warm-humid) and -50°C dry N2 (cold-dry) environmental conditions. Backscattered electron imaging (BSE) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) of the fracture surfaces showed that Fe-Cu rich constituent particle clusters are the most common initiation sites within both alloys stressed in either environment. The crack growth within each alloy, on average, was observed to be slowed in the cold-dry environment than in the warm-humid environment, but only at longer crack lengths. Although no overwhelming effects of grain boundaries and grain orientations on small-crack growth were observed, crack growth data showed local fluctuations within individual grains. These observations are understood as crack propagation through the underlying substructure at the crack surface and frequent interaction with low/high-angle grain and subgrain boundaries, during cyclic loading, and, are further attributed to periodic changes in crack propagation path and multiple occurrences of crack-branching observed in the current study. SEM-based stereology in combination with electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) established fatigue crack surface crystallography within the region from ˜1 to 50 mum of crack initiating particle clusters. Fatigue crack facets were parallel to a wide variety of crystallographic planes, with pole orientations distributed broadly across the irreducible stereographic triangle between the {001} and {101}-poles within both warm-humid and cold-dry environments. The results indicate environmentally affected fatigue cracking in both cases, given the similarity between the observed morphology and crystallography with that of a variety of aerospace aluminum alloys cracked in the presence of moist-air. There was no evidence of

  18. Recrystallization phenomena in an IF steel observed by in situ EBSD experiments.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, H; Humphreys, F J; Brough, I

    2008-06-01

    In situ electron backscatter diffraction microstructural analysis of recrystallizing interstitial free steels deformed to strains of 0.75 and 1.6 has been carried out in a FEG-SEM. The experimental procedures are discussed, and it is shown that there is no degradation of the electron backscatter diffraction patterns at temperatures up to 800 degrees C. Analysis of the surface and interior microstructures of annealed samples shows only minor difference, which suggests that in situ annealing experiments are of value. In addition, it is shown that in situ measurements allow a detailed comparison between the same areas before and after annealing, thereby providing information about the recrystallization mechanisms. Sequential recrystallization phenomena, such as initiation and growth of new grains, are observed at temperatures over 740 degrees C, and depending on the deformation histories, different recrystallization behaviour is observed. It is found that {111} <123> recrystallized grains are preferentially formed in the highly deformed material, whereas no strong recrystallization texture is formed in the lower strained material. PMID:18503673

  19. EBSD and reconstruction of pre-transformation microstructures, examples and complexities in steels

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, Majid; Kim, Dong-Ik; Nelson, Tracy W.; Abbasi, Mehrdad

    2014-09-15

    Electron backscattered diffraction has provided a quantitative tool to study micro/nano-structures in large scales. A recent application of electron backscattered diffraction is the reconstruction of pre-transformed phases in polymorphic systems, especially when there is no retained pre-transformed phase at room temperature. This capability has been demonstrated by various researchers utilizing different approaches towards grain structure and orientation recovery. However, parameters affecting reconstruction have not been investigated systematically. Factors such as post-transformed microstructures (morphology and crystallography), lattice strain (deformation), pattern and sample quality are among the affecting factors. Two-dimensional datasets of different steels have been reconstructed along with a limited 3-dimensional dataset in the current paper. Preliminary results intended for large-scale automatic reconstructions have been presented. They indicate that the successfulness of reconstruction is strongly dependent on the post-transformed microstructure. Factors such as morphology, grain size, variant selection, and deformation play roles. Few examples of reconstruction complexity at prior austenite boundaries leading to uncertain results are presented. Lastly, reconstructions are discussed in terms of meaningfulness and if they correctly represent pre-transformed grains and orientations. - Highlights: • Parameters affecting parent phase reconstruction have been investigated • Successfulness of results strongly depends on post-transformed microstructures • Microstructures with higher number of variants facilitate reconstructions • Image quality evaluations assist detection of prior austenite grain boundaries • Transformed sequential twins in austenite were observed via the current approach.

  20. Radar backscatter modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaber, G. G.; Kozak, R. C.; Gurule, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The terrain analysis software package was restructured and documentation was added. A program was written to test Johnson Space Center's four band scatterometer data for spurious signals data. A catalog of terrain roughness statistics and calibrated four frequency multipolarization scatterometer data is being published to support the maintenance of Death Valley as a radar backscatter calibration test site for all future airborne and spacecraft missions. Test pits were dug through sand covered terrains in the Eastern Sahara to define the depth and character of subsurface interfaces responsible for either backscatter or specular response in SIR-A imagery. Blocky sandstone bedrock surfaces at about 1 m depth were responsible for the brightest SIR-A returns. Irregular very dense CaCO3 cemented sand interfaces were responsible for intermediate grey tones. Ancient river valleys had the weakest response. Reexamination of SEASAT l-band imagery of U.S. deserts continues.

  1. Application of combined EBSD and 3D-SEM technique on crystallographic facet analysis of steel at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, P; Solberg, J K; Karlsen, M; Akselsen, O M; Ostby, E

    2013-07-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction has been increasingly used to identify the crystallographic planes and orientation of cleavage facets with respect to the rolling direction in fracture surfaces. The crystallographic indices of cleavage planes can be determined either directly from the fracture surface or indirectly from metallographic sections perpendicular to the plane of the fracture surface. A combination of electron backscatter diffraction and 3D scanning electron microscopy imaging technique has been modified to determine crystallographic facet orientations. The main purpose of this work has been to identify the macroscopic crystallographic orientations of cleavage facets in the fracture surfaces of weld heat affected zones in a well-known steel fractured at low temperatures. The material used for the work was an American Petroleum Institute (API) X80 grade steel developed for applications at low temperatures, and typical heat affected zone microstructures were obtained by carrying out weld thermal simulation. The fracture toughness was measured at different temperatures (0°C, -30°C, -60°C and -90°C) by using Crack Tip Opening Displacement testing. Fracture surfaces and changes in microstructure were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy. Crystallographic orientations were identified by electron backscatter diffraction, indirectly from a polished section perpendicular to the major fracture surface of the samples. Computer assisted 3D imaging was used to measure the angles between the cleavage facets and the adjacent polished surface, and then these angles were combined with electron backscatter diffraction measurements to determine the macroscopic crystallographic planes of the facets. The crystallographic indices of the macroscopic cleavage facet planes were identified to be {100}, {110}, {211} and {310} at all temperatures. PMID:23692572

  2. Broadband stimulated Raman backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landgraf, B.; Aurand, B.; Lehmann, G.; Gangolf, T.; Schnell, M.; Kühl, T.; Spielmann, C.

    2016-07-01

    Broadband amplification employing stimulated Raman backscattering is demonstrated. Using seed pulses with a bandwidth of about 200 nm, we study the amplification in a wide spectral range in a single laser shot. With chirped pump pulses and a Ne gas jet, we observed under optimized conditions, amplification in a range of about 80 nm, which is sufficient to support the amplification of sub-20 fs pulses. This broad amplification range is also in excellent agreement with PIC simulations. The conversion efficiency is at certain wavelengths as high as 1.2% and was measured to be better than 6 × 10‑3 on average.

  3. An EBSD investigation of cryogenically-rolled Cu–30%Zn brass

    SciTech Connect

    Konkova, T.; Mironov, S.; Korznikov, A.; Korznikova, G.; Myshlyaev, M.M.; Semiatin, S.L.

    2015-03-15

    Electron backscatter diffraction was used to study grain structure development in heavily cryogenically-rolled Cu–30%Zn brass. The produced microstructure was found to be very inhomogeneous. At a relatively coarse scale, it consisted of texture bands having crystallographic orientations close to the α- and γ-fibers. The texture bands contained internal structure comprising shear bands, mechanical twins, and low-angle boundaries. Such features were more pronounced within the γ-fiber, and this resulted in a heterogeneous ultrafine grain structure. The cryogenic rolling was concluded to be not straightforward for production of nanocrystalline grain structure in Cu–30%Zn brass. - Highlights: • Cryogenic rolling produced an inhomogeneous ultrafine-grained microstructure. • Grain refinement was mainly related with twinning and shear banding. • Grain refinement preferentially occurred in (111) fiber texture.

  4. Aerosol backscatter studies supporting LAWS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry

    1989-01-01

    Optimized Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE), Laser True Airspeed System (LATAS) algorithm for low backscatter conditions was developed. The algorithm converts backscatter intensity measurements from focused continuous-wave (CW) airborne Doppler lidar into backscatter coefficients. The performance of optimized algorithm under marginal backscatter signal conditions was evaluated. The 10.6 micron CO2 aerosol backscatter climatologies were statistically analyzed. Climatologies reveal clean background aerosol mode near 10(exp -10)/kg/sq m/sr (mixing ratio units) through middle and upper troposhere, convective mode associated with planetary boundary layer convective activity, and stratospheric mode associated with volcanically-generated aerosols. Properties of clean background mode are critical to design and simulation studies of Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS), a MSFC facility Instrument on the Earth Observing System (Eos). Previous intercomparisons suggested correlation between aerosol backscatter at CO2 wavelength and water vapor. Field measurements of backscatter profiles with MSFC ground-based Doppler lidar system (GBDLS) were initiated in late FY-88 to coincide with independent program of local rawinsonde releases and overflights by Multi-spectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS), a multi-channel infrared radiometer capable of measuring horizontal and vertical moisture distributions. Design and performance simulation studies for LAWS would benefit from the existence of a relationship between backscatter and water vapor.

  5. Advancing FIB assisted 3D EBSD using a static sample setup.

    PubMed

    Guyon, Julien; Gey, Nathalie; Goran, Daniel; Chalal, Smail; Pérez-Willard, Fabián

    2016-02-01

    A new setup for automatic 3D EBSD data collection in static mode has been developed using a conventional FIB-SEM system. This setup requires no stage or sample movements between the FIB milling and EBSD mapping. Its capabilities were tested experimentally on a coherent twin boundary of an INCONEL sample. Our result demonstrates that this static setup holds many advantages in terms of data throughput and quality as compared with other ones requiring stage/sample movements. The most important advantages are the better slice alignment and an improved orientation precision in 3D space, both being prerequisite for a reliable grain boundary characterization. PMID:26686662

  6. Ultrasonic backscatter from cancellous bone: the apparent backscatter transfer function.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, Brent K; Mcpherson, Joseph A; Smathers, Morgan R; Spinolo, P Luke; Sellers, Mark E

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasonic backscatter techniques are being developed to detect changes in cancellous bone caused by osteoporosis. Many techniques are based on measurements of the apparent backscatter transfer function (ABTF), which represents the backscattered power from bone corrected for the frequency response of the measurement system. The ABTF is determined from a portion of the backscatter signal selected by an analysis gate of width τw delayed by an amount τd from the start of the signal. The goal of this study was to characterize the ABTF for a wide range of gate delays (1 μs ≤ τd ≤ 6 μs) and gate widths (1 μs ≤ τw ≤ 6 μs). Measurements were performed on 29 specimens of human cancellous bone in the frequency range 1.5 to 6.0 MHz using a broadband 5-MHz transducer. The ABTF was found to be an approximately linear function of frequency for most choices of τd and τw. Changes in τd and τw caused the frequency-averaged ABTF [quantified by apparent integrated backscatter (AIB)] and the frequency dependence of the ABTF [quantified by frequency slope of apparent backscatter (FSAB)] to change by as much as 24.6 dB and 6.7 dB/MHz, respectively. τd strongly influenced the measured values of AIB and FSAB and the correlation of AIB with bone density (-0.95 ≤ R ≤ +0.68). The correlation of FSAB with bone density was influenced less strongly by τd (-0.97 ≤ R ≤ -0.87). τw had a weaker influence than τd on the measured values of AIB and FSAB and the correlation of these parameters with bone density. PMID:26683412

  7. EBSD analysis of plastic deformation of copper foils by flexible pad laser shock forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Balasubramanian; Castagne, Sylvie; Wang, Zhongke; Zheng, H. Y.

    2015-11-01

    Flexible pad laser shock forming (FPLSF) is a new mold-free microforming process that induces high-strain-rate plastic deformation in thin metallic foils using laser-induced shock pressure and a hyperelastic flexible pad. This paper studies the plastic deformation behavior of copper foils formed through FPLSF by investigating surface hardness and microstructure. The microstructure of the foil surface before and after FPLSF is analyzed by electron backscatter diffraction technique using grain size distribution and grain boundary misorientation angle as analysis parameters. The surface hardness of the craters experienced a significant improvement after FPLSF; the top crater surface being harder than the bottom surface. The microstructure of the copper foil surface after FPLSF was found to be dominated by grain elongation, along with minor occurrences of subgrain formation, grain refinement, and high dislocation density regions. The results indicate that the prominent plastic deformation mechanism in FPLSF is strain hardening behavior rather than the typical adiabatic softening effect known to be occurring at high-strain-rates for processes such as electromagnetic forming, explosive forming, and laser shock forming. This significant difference in FPLSF is attributed to the concurrent reduction in plastic strain, strain rate, and the inertia effects, resulting from the FPLSF process configuration. Correspondingly, different deformation behaviors are experienced at top and bottom surfaces of the deformation craters, inducing the change in surface hardness and microstructure profiles.

  8. EBSDinterp 1.0: A MATLAB® Program to Perform Microstructurally Constrained Interpolation of EBSD Data.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Mark A

    2015-08-01

    EBSDinterp is a graphic user interface (GUI)-based MATLAB® program to perform microstructurally constrained interpolation of nonindexed electron backscatter diffraction data points. The area available for interpolation is restricted using variations in pattern quality or band contrast (BC). Areas of low BC are not available for interpolation, and therefore cannot be erroneously filled by adjacent grains "growing" into them. Points with the most indexed neighbors are interpolated first and the required number of neighbors is reduced with each successive round until a minimum number of neighbors is reached. Further iterations allow more data points to be filled by reducing the BC threshold. This method ensures that the best quality points (those with high BC and most neighbors) are interpolated first, and that the interpolation is restricted to grain interiors before adjacent grains are grown together to produce a complete microstructure. The algorithm is implemented through a GUI, taking advantage of MATLAB®'s parallel processing toolbox to perform the interpolations rapidly so that a variety of parameters can be tested to ensure that the final microstructures are robust and artifact-free. The software is freely available through the CSIRO Data Access Portal (doi:10.4225/08/5510090C6E620) as both a compiled Windows executable and as source code. PMID:26178688

  9. EBSD characterization of twinning in cold-rolled CP-Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Duan, Y.L.; Xu, G.F.; Peng, X.Y.; Dai, C.; Zhang, L.G.; Li, Z.

    2013-10-15

    This work presents the use of a mechanical testing system and the electron backscatter diffraction technique to study the mechanical properties and twinning systems of cold-rolled commercial purity titanium, respectively. The dependence of twinning on the matrix orientation is analyzed by the distribution map of Schmid factor. The results showed that the commercial purity titanium experienced strong strain hardening and had excellent formability during rolling. Both the (112{sup ¯}2)<112{sup ¯}3{sup ¯}> compressive twins and (101{sup ¯}2)<101{sup ¯}1{sup ¯}> tensile twins were dependent on the matrix orientation. The Schmid factor of a grain influenced the activation of a particular twinning system. The specific rolling deformation of commercial purity titanium controlled the number and species of twinning systems and further changed the mechanical properties. - Highlights: • CP-Ti experienced strain hardening and had excellent formability. • Twins were dependent on the matrix orientation. • Schmid factor of a grain influenced the activation of a twinning system. • Rolling deformation controlled twinning systems and mechanical properties.

  10. Effect of the cortex on ultrasonic backscatter measurements of cancellous bone

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmeister, Brent K.; Holt, Andrew P.; Kaste, Sue C.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic backscatter techniques offer a promising new approach for detecting changes in bone caused by osteoporosis. However, several challenges impede clinical implementation of backscatter techniques. This study examines how the dense outer surface of bone (the cortex) affects backscatter measurements of interior regions of porous (cancellous) bone tissue. Fifty-two specimens of bone were prepared from 13 human femoral heads so that the same region of cancellous bone could be ultrasonically interrogated through the cortex or along directions that avoided the cortex. Backscatter signals were analyzed over a frequency range of 0.8-3.0 MHz to determine two ultrasonic parameters: apparent integrated backscatter (AIB) and frequency slope of apparent backscatter (FSAB). The term “apparent” means that the parameters are sensitive to the frequency dependent effects of diffraction and attenuation. Significant (p < 0.001) changes in AIB and FSAB indicated that measurements through the cortex decreased the apparent backscattered power and increased the frequency dependence of the power. However, the cortex did not affect the correlation of AIB and FSAB with the x-ray bone mineral density of the specimens. This suggests that results from many previous in vitro backscatter studies of specimens of purely cancellous bone may be extrapolated with greater confidence to in vivo conditions. PMID:21896966

  11. X-ray backscatter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinca, Dan-Cristian; Schubert, Jeffrey R.; Callerame, J.

    2008-04-01

    In contrast to transmission X-ray imaging systems where inspected objects must pass between source and detector, Compton backscatter imaging allows both the illuminating source as well as the X-ray detector to be on the same side of the target object, enabling the inspection to occur rapidly and in a wide variety of space-constrained situations. A Compton backscatter image is similar to a photograph of the contents of a closed container, taken through the container walls, and highlights low atomic number materials such as explosives, drugs, and alcohol, which appear as especially bright objects by virtue of their scattering characteristics. Techniques for producing X-ray images based on Compton scattering will be discussed, along with examples of how these systems are used for both novel security applications and for the detection of contraband materials at ports and borders. Differences between transmission and backscatter images will also be highlighted. In addition, tradeoffs between Compton backscatter image quality and scan speed, effective penetration, and X-ray source specifications will be discussed.

  12. Investigation of SIBM driven recrystallization in alpha Zirconium based on EBSD data and Monte Carlo modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrychowski, M.; Bacroix, B.; Salman, O. U.; Tarasiuk, J.; Wronski, S.

    2015-08-01

    The work focuses on the influence of moderate plastic deformation on subsequent partial recrystallization of hexagonal zirconium (Zr702). In the considered case, strain induced boundary migration (SIBM) is assumed to be the dominating recrystallization mechanism. This hypothesis is analyzed and tested in detail using experimental EBSD-OIM data and Monte Carlo computer simulations. An EBSD investigation is performed on zirconium samples, which were channel-die compressed in two perpendicular directions: normal direction (ND) and transverse direction (TD) of the initial material sheet. The maximal applied strain was below 17%. Then, samples were briefly annealed in order to achieve a partly recrystallized state. Obtained EBSD data were analyzed in terms of texture evolution associated with a microstructural characterization, including: kernel average misorientation (KAM), grain orientation spread (GOS), twinning, grain size distributions, description of grain boundary regions. In parallel, Monte Carlo Potts model combined with experimental microstructures was employed in order to verify two main recrystallization scenarios: SIBM driven growth from deformed sub-grains and classical growth of recrystallization nuclei. It is concluded that simulation results provided by the SIBM model are in a good agreement with experimental data in terms of texture as well as microstructural evolution.

  13. Backscatter measurements for NIF ignition targets (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J. D.; Datte, P.; Krauter, K.; Bond, E.; Michel, P. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Divol, L.; Suter, L.; Meezan, N.; MacGowan, B. J.; Hibbard, R.; London, R.; Kilkenny, J.; Wallace, R.; Knittel, K.; Frieders, G.; Golick, B.; Ross, G.; Widmann, K.; Jackson, J.; and others

    2010-10-15

    Backscattered light via laser-plasma instabilities has been measured in early NIF hohlraum experiments on two beam quads using a suite of detectors. A full aperture backscatter system and near backscatter imager (NBI) instrument separately measure the stimulated Brillouin and stimulated Raman scattered light. Both instruments work in conjunction to determine the total backscattered power to an accuracy of {approx}15%. In order to achieve the power accuracy we have added time-resolution to the NBI for the first time. This capability provides a temporally resolved spatial image of the backscatter which can be viewed as a movie.

  14. Backscatter measurements for NIF ignition targets (invited).

    PubMed

    Moody, J D; Datte, P; Krauter, K; Bond, E; Michel, P A; Glenzer, S H; Divol, L; Niemann, C; Suter, L; Meezan, N; MacGowan, B J; Hibbard, R; London, R; Kilkenny, J; Wallace, R; Kline, J L; Knittel, K; Frieders, G; Golick, B; Ross, G; Widmann, K; Jackson, J; Vernon, S; Clancy, T

    2010-10-01

    Backscattered light via laser-plasma instabilities has been measured in early NIF hohlraum experiments on two beam quads using a suite of detectors. A full aperture backscatter system and near backscatter imager (NBI) instrument separately measure the stimulated Brillouin and stimulated Raman scattered light. Both instruments work in conjunction to determine the total backscattered power to an accuracy of ∼15%. In order to achieve the power accuracy we have added time-resolution to the NBI for the first time. This capability provides a temporally resolved spatial image of the backscatter which can be viewed as a movie. PMID:21033953

  15. Backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    McRae, Jr., Thomas G.

    1985-01-01

    A video imaging system for detecting hazardous gas leaks. Visual displays of invisible gas clouds are produced by radiation augmentation of the field of view of an imaging device by radiation corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. The field of view of an imager is irradiated by a laser. The imager receives both backscattered laser light and background radiation. When a detectable gas is present, the backscattered laser light is highly attenuated, producing a region of contrast or shadow on the image. A flying spot imaging system is utilized to synchronously irradiate and scan the area to lower laser power requirements. The imager signal is processed to produce a video display.

  16. Backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    McRae, T.G. Jr.

    A video imaging system for detecting hazardous gas leaks. Visual displays of invisible gas clouds are produced by radiation augmentation of the field of view of an imaging device by radiation corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. The field of view of an imager is irradiated by a laser. The imager receives both backscattered laser light and background radiation. When a detectable gas is present, the backscattered laser light is highly attenuated, producing a region of contrast or shadow on the image. A flying spot imaging system is utilized to synchronously irradiate and scan the area to lower laser power requirements. The imager signal is processed to produce a video display.

  17. Strong Bragg backscattering in reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusakov, E. Z.; Heuraux, S.; Popov, A. Yu

    2009-06-01

    The reflection of the probing microwave occurring in the vicinity of the backscattering Bragg resonance point (far from the cut-off) at a high enough density fluctuation level and leading to a large jump of the reflected wave phase and a corresponding time delay is described analytically using a 1D model. Explicit expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients are derived and compared against results of numerical modelling. The criteria for transition to the nonlinear regime of strong Bragg backscattering (BBS) is obtained for both O-mode and X-mode reflectometry. It is shown that a strong nonlinear regime of BBS may occur in ITER at the 0.5-2% relative density perturbation level both for the ordinary and extraordinary mode probing. The possibility of probing wave trapping leading to strong enhancement of the electric field and associated high phase variation of the reflected wave due to BBS is demonstrated.

  18. EBSD analysis of magnesium addition on inclusion formation in SS400 structural steel

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Sin-Jie; Su, Yen-Hao Frank; Lu, Muh-Jung; Kuo, Jui-Chao

    2013-08-15

    In this study, the effect of magnesium addition on the inclusion formation in SS400 steel was investigated. The experimental specimens with and without Mg addition treatment were compared. The microstructure was observed using optical microscopy after etching with 3% nital. The morphology and chemical composition of the inclusions were analyzed via scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry. The lattice structure and orientation of the inclusions were identified by electron backscattering diffraction. The average size of inclusions in SS400 was between 0.67 and 0.75 μm, and between 0.65 and 0.68 μm in SS400 + Mg. The 2 ppm Mg addition resulted in the oxide formation change from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to MgO·Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and in the inclusion formation change from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–MnS to MgO·Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–MnS. Moreover, a simple-phase MnS with an average grain size of 1 μm to 2 μm was observed in rod-like, globular, and polyhedron forms. - Highlights: • The effect of magnesium addition was investigated for SS400 steel. • 2 ppm Mg addition changes the inclusion formation from Al2O3-MnS to MgO·Al2O3-MnS. • MnS observed in inclusions exhibits rod-like, globular, and polyhedron forms.

  19. Higher order diffractions from a circular disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsland, Diane P.; Balanis, Constantine A.; Brumley, Stephen A.

    1987-01-01

    The backscattering from a circular disk is analyzed using the geometrical theory of diffraction. First-, second-, and third-order diffractions are included in the hard polarization analysis, while first-, second-, and third-order slope diffractions are included for soft polarization. Improvements in the prediction of the monostatic radar cross section over previous works are noted. For hard polarization, an excellent agreement is exhibited between experimental and theoretical results, while a very good agreement is noted for soft polarization. To further improve the soft polarization results for wide angles, a model for the creeping wave or circulating current on the edge of the disk is obtained and used to find an additional component of the backscattered field. The addition of this component significantly improves the results for wide angles, leading to excellent agreement for soft polarization also. An axial-caustic correction method using equivalent currents is also included in the analysis.

  20. EBSD investigation of the microstructure and texture characteristics of hot deformed duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Cizek, P; Wynne, B P; Rainforth, W M

    2006-05-01

    The microstructure and crystallographic texture characteristics were studied in a 22Cr-6Ni-3Mo duplex stainless steel subjected to plastic deformation in torsion at a temperature of 1000 degrees C using a strain rate of 1 s(-1). High-resolution EBSD was successfully used for precise phase and substructural characterization of this steel. The austenite/ferrite ratio and phase morphology as well as the crystallographic texture, subgrain size, misorientation angles and misorientation gradients corresponding to each phase were determined over large sample areas. The deformation mechanisms in each phase and the interrelationship between the two are discussed. PMID:16774517

  1. Dislocation Content Measured Via 3D HR-EBSD Near a Grain Boundary in an AlCu Oligocrystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggles, Timothy; Hochhalter, Jacob; Homer, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between dislocations and grain boundaries are poorly understood and crucial to mesoscale plasticity modeling. Much of our understanding of dislocation-grain boundary interaction comes from atomistic simulations and TEM studies, both of which are extremely limited in scale. High angular resolution EBSD-based continuum dislocation microscopy provides a way of measuring dislocation activity at length scales and accuracies relevant to crystal plasticity, but it is limited as a two-dimensional technique, meaning the character of the grain boundary and the complete dislocation activity is difficult to recover. However, the commercialization of plasma FIB dual-beam microscopes have made 3D EBSD studies all the more feasible. The objective of this work is to apply high angular resolution cross correlation EBSD to a 3D EBSD data set collected by serial sectioning in a FIB to characterize dislocation interaction with a grain boundary. Three dimensional high angular resolution cross correlation EBSD analysis was applied to an AlCu oligocrystal to measure dislocation densities around a grain boundary. Distortion derivatives associated with the plasma FIB serial sectioning were higher than expected, possibly due to geometric uncertainty between layers. Future work will focus on mitigating the geometric uncertainty and examining more regions of interest along the grain boundary to glean information on dislocation-grain boundary interaction.

  2. Averaging of Backscatter Intensities in Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, John J.; Pingitore, Nicholas E.; Westphal, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    Low uncertainty measurements on pure element stable isotope pairs demonstrate that mass has no influence on the backscattering of electrons at typical electron microprobe energies. The traditional prediction of average backscatter intensities in compounds using elemental mass fractions is improperly grounded in mass and thus has no physical basis. We propose an alternative model to mass fraction averaging, based of the number of electrons or protons, termed “electron fraction,” which predicts backscatter yield better than mass fraction averaging.

  3. Specimen Preparation for Metal Matrix Composites with a High Volume Fraction of Reinforcing Particles for EBSD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. S.; Belozerov, G. A.; Smirnova, E. O.; Konovalov, A. V.; Shveikin, V. P.; Muizemnek, O. Yu.

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with a procedure of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis of a metal matrix composite (MMC) with a high volume fraction of reinforcing particles. Unlike standard procedures of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis, the proposed procedure is iterative with consecutive application of mechanical and electrochemical polishing. This procedure significantly improves the results of an indexed MMC matrix in comparison with the standard procedure of specimen preparation. The procedure was verified on a MMC with pure aluminum (99.8% Al) as the matrix, SiC particles being used as reinforcing elements. The average size of the SiC particles is 14 μm, and their volume fraction amounts to 50% of the total volume of the composite. It has been experimentally found that, for making the EBSD analysis of a material matrix near reinforcing particles, the difference in height between the particles and the matrix should not exceed 2 µm.

  4. Specimen Preparation for Metal Matrix Composites with a High Volume Fraction of Reinforcing Particles for EBSD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. S.; Belozerov, G. A.; Smirnova, E. O.; Konovalov, A. V.; Shveikin, V. P.; Muizemnek, O. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    The paper deals with a procedure of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis of a metal matrix composite (MMC) with a high volume fraction of reinforcing particles. Unlike standard procedures of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis, the proposed procedure is iterative with consecutive application of mechanical and electrochemical polishing. This procedure significantly improves the results of an indexed MMC matrix in comparison with the standard procedure of specimen preparation. The procedure was verified on a MMC with pure aluminum (99.8% Al) as the matrix, SiC particles being used as reinforcing elements. The average size of the SiC particles is 14 μm, and their volume fraction amounts to 50% of the total volume of the composite. It has been experimentally found that, for making the EBSD analysis of a material matrix near reinforcing particles, the difference in height between the particles and the matrix should not exceed 2 µm.

  5. Mobile spectrometer measures radar backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gogineni, S.; Moore, R. K.; Onstott, R. G.; Kim, Y. S.; Bushnell, D.

    1984-01-01

    The present article is concerned with a helicopter-borne spectrometer (Heloscat), which has been developed to permit high-quality scattering measurements from a mobile platform at remote sites. The term 'spectrometer' referes to a class of scatterometers. The term 'scatterometer' is employed to denote a specialized radar for measuring scattering coefficients as a function of angle. A spectrometer, on the other hand, is a scatterometer which can measure backscatter at several frequencies. The Heloscat system is discussed, taking into account two antennas, RF hardware, and an externally mounted pendulum for angle encoding. A dual-antenna configuration is used for cross-polarized measurements, while a single-antenna system is used for like-polarized measurements. Attention is also given to oscillator characteristics, efficient data handling, and aspects of calibration.

  6. Beta Backscatter Measures the Hardness of Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrissey, E. T.; Roje, F. N.

    1986-01-01

    Nondestructive testing method determines hardness, on Shore scale, of room-temperature-vulcanizing silicone rubber. Measures backscattered beta particles; backscattered radiation count directly proportional to Shore hardness. Test set calibrated with specimen, Shore hardness known from mechanical durometer test. Specimen of unknown hardness tested, and radiation count recorded. Count compared with known sample to find Shore hardness of unknown.

  7. Thermal structure and radar backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topliss, B. J.; Stepanczak, M.; Guymer, Trevor H.; Cotton, David P.

    1994-12-01

    Infrared (IR) remote sensing from satellites is a well-proven technique for measuring sea surface temperature (SST) and for detecting and monitoring oceanographic features which have strong thermal contrast. Unfortunately, cloud cover often limits the continuity of the datasets and therefore their usefulness. There is some evidence that radar backscatter can be modified by sea surface temperature structure which raises the possibility that sensors such as synthetic aperture radar, scatterometers and altimeters could provide an all-weather complement to those operating in the IR. As a background, the results of a project which used coincident airborne radar and IR measurements of an eddy system in the Tyrrhenian Sea during October 1989 are briefly described. During a 5-day period, variations in radar backscatter of several dB occurred in a region where SST varied by 2 - 3 degree(s)C. The correlation between normalized radar cross section, sigma naught ((sigma) 0 or sigma-0) and SST appeared to depend on the ambient wind. Unfortunately, no satellite radar data were available during the experiment, since Geosat had just failed and ERS-1 was not due for launch until 1991. Building on this work, a study has commenced in which preliminary analyses of ERS-1 altimeter data, from tracks which repeat every 3 days, have been conducted for a section of the Gulf Stream after it has separated from the US coast. The along track variation of sigma naught has been compared with contemporaneous NOAA AVHRR-2 imagery and the relationship between SST structure and sigma naught for individual passes is discussed in terms of environmental parameters such as the local wind field and ocean currents. The possibility of the interaction of environmental parameters such as waves and currents are explored and some evidence for both wave enhancement and attenuation at the north wall of the Gulf Stream is illustrated. Tentative explanations for relationships observed by the various analysis

  8. Documenting Self Organization in Quartz: A combined EBSD and Laser Mass Spectrometer Investigation of Brazilian Agate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenk, H.; Grimsich, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    In this project two Brazilian agates were selected for study based upon their complex and variable crystallographic textures. In standard optical microscopy the samples show a variety of repeated oscillatory structures which develop in a regular fashion from rim-to-core as the agate crystallized. The patterns are thought to represent a cyclic form of self organization. The much work has been done, the mechanisms that control this system remain poorly understood. EBSD mapping of these structures offers significant new insight into the growth textures and crystallographic growth orientations. Historically, these structures have been categorized by relative c-axis orientation, representing alternating length fast (LF) and length slow (LS) domains. Detailed rim-to-core EBSD texture analysis shows oscillatory structures develop in pairs of preferred growth orientations. Our samples show a progression from LF (110) dominated growth, developing into LF-LS (110)-(011) oscillation and then to LS-LS (011)-(001) oscillation. The LS-LS oscillations are essentially invisible in polarized light, but dramatic and clear in EBSD scans. Each oscillation period lasts 10-20 cycles and individual cycles are on the order of 70-100 microns. Classic 'chevron' (twisted fiber) extinction bands follow and are uniquely characterized by a mixture of LF-LF (100)-(110) growth orientations. Chemical information linked to these crystallographic structures was obtained using laser ablation mass spectrometry. A continuous laser transect across the agate from rim-to-core provides spatially resolved trace element analysis at ppb sensitivity. 50 elements were analyzed. Preliminary results show well defined and in-phase oscillations of Al, Na and K in the areas that have oscillatory growth (both LF-LS (110)-(011) and LS-LS (011)-(001) oscillations), and not in other areas. Al concentrations are much lower and show no oscillatory behavior in later large macro-Qtz grains near the agate interior. One

  9. Discovering New Minerals at Micron to Nanoscales: A SEM-EBSD-EPMA Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.

    2014-12-01

    With high-resolution analytical field emission scanning electron microscope and electron probe microanalyzer, we are now capable to characterize Earth and planetary materials easier and faster down to nanoscales. Nanofeatures (such as inclusions, exsolution, zonation, coatings, pores) in minerals and rocks are being discovered. Nanominerals and nanoparticles are being revealed. New minerals and new materials are being identified. During our ongoing nanomineralogy investigation since 2006, more than twenty five new minerals have been discovered at micron to nanoscales. Fifteen of them are from the Allende meteorite, including new refractory minerals like allendeite, hexamolybdenum, tistarite, panguite and kangite, which are among the first solids formed in our solar system. Each of the new extraterrestrial minerals reveals distinctive forming environments, providing insights into nebula or parent-body processes. Presented here are a few nanomineralogy projects demonstrating how to find and characterize new minerals with an integrated SEM-EBSD-EPMA approach.

  10. Detector for high-energy photon backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Michael D.; Erker, Joseph W.; Duncan, Michael Z.; Hartford, Thomas J.; Sivers, E. A.; Hopkinson, James F.

    1993-12-01

    High energy photon backscatter uses pair production to probe deep beneath surfaces with single side accessibility or to image thick, radiographically opaque objects. At the higher photon energies needed to penetrate thick and/or highly attenuating objects, Compton backscatter becomes strongly forward peaked with relatively little backscatter flux. Furthermore, the downward energy shift of the backscattered photon makes it more susceptible to attenuation on its outbound path. Above 1.022 MeV, pair production is possible; at about 10 MeV, pari production crosses over Compton scatter as the dominant x-ray interaction mechanism. The backscattered photons can be hard x rays from the bremsstrahlung of the electrons and positrons or 0.511 MeV photons from the annihilation of the positron. Monte Carlo computer simulations of such a backscatter system were done to characterize the output signals and to optimize a high energy detector design. This paper touches on the physics of high energy backscatter imaging and describes at some length the detector design for tomographic and radiographic imaging.

  11. On observing acoustic backscattering from salinity turbulence.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Louis; Sastre-Cordova, Marcos M

    2011-08-01

    It has been hypothesized that at sufficiently high levels of oceanic salinity turbulence it should be possible to observe acoustic backscattering. However, there have been limited in situ measurements to confirm this hypothesis. Using an autonomous underwater vehicle equipped with upward and downward looking 1.2 MHz acoustic Doppler current profilers and with turbulence and fine scale sensors, measurements were performed in a region of intense turbulence and a strong salinity gradient. The approach taken was to correlate variations in the backscattered acoustic intensity, I, with a theoretical acoustic backscattering cross section per volume for salinity turbulence, σ(s), to obtain an estimated scattering cross section per volume, σ(e). Results indicated that of order 50% of the observed region was characterized by salinity turbulence induced backscattering. PMID:21877785

  12. Coherent microwave backscatter of natural snowpacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linlor, W. I.; Angelakos, D. J.; Clapp, F. D.; Smith, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The backscatter of natural snowpacks was measured using a swept-frequency system operating from 5.8 to 8.0 GHz. Snow layering produced sequences of maxima and minima in backscatter intensity, with typical peak-to-valley ratios of 15 db. Wetness produced in the upper portion of the snowpack by solar heat input enhanced the effect of layering. The layer response persisted for incidence exhibits predominantly coherent properties. Frequency modulation of the incident signal masked the layer response by averaging the unmodulated response over the bandwidth represented by the modulation. Further changes in backscatter were attributed to changes in wetness in the surface regions of the snowpack; for a fixed frequency of 13.5 GHz and incidence angle of 39 deg, the backscatter decreased typically 15 db between 11 A.M. and noon, and returned to approximately its initial level of overnight.

  13. C-band backscattering from corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Ranson, K. J.; Biehl, L. L.

    1991-01-01

    A frequency-modulatad continuous-wave C-band (4.8 GHz) scatterometer was mounted on an aerial lift truck, and backscatter coefficients of corn (Zea mays L.) were acquired as functions of polarizations, view angles, and row directions. As phytomass and green-leaf area index increased, the backscatter also increased. Near anthesis, when the canopies were fully developed, the major scattering elements were located in the upper 1 m of the 2.8 m tall canopy and little backscatter was measured below that level for view angles of 30 deg or greater. C-band backscatter data could provide information to monitor tillage operations at small view zenith angles and vegetation at large view zenith angles.

  14. Santa Barbara microwave backscattering model for woodlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Y.; Day, J.; Sun, G.

    1993-01-01

    The Santa Barbara microwave backscattering model for woodland vegetation with discontinuous tree canopies is described, with an emphasis on the construction of the model from probability-weighted sub-components. The modelling approach is to treat individual tree crowns as scatterers and attenuators, using the probabilities of scattering and attenuation to compute total backscatter. Four major model components are defined: surface backscattering, crown volume scattering, multi-path interactions between crown and ground, and double-bounce trunk-ground interactions. Each component is divided into subcomponents having distinct scattering and attenuation paths. The scattering of each subcomponent is computed and weighted by the probability of its occurrence. Total backscatter from a simulated woodland stand is computed by incoherent summation of the components. Recent revisions to the model have modified the subcomponent definitions and improved the probability formulation.

  15. Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging Using Acoustic Backscatter Coefficients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boote, Evan Jeffery

    Current clinical ultrasound scanners render images which have brightness levels related to the degree of backscattered energy from the tissue being imaged. These images offer the interpreter a qualitative impression of the scattering characteristics of the tissue being examined, but due to the complex factors which affect the amplitude and character of the echoed acoustic energy, it is difficult to make quantitative assessments of scattering nature of the tissue, and thus, difficult to make precise diagnosis when subtle disease effects are present. In this dissertation, a method of data reduction for determining acoustic backscatter coefficients is adapted for use in forming quantitative ultrasound images of this parameter. In these images, the brightness level of an individual pixel corresponds to the backscatter coefficient determined for the spatial position represented by that pixel. The data reduction method utilized rigorously accounts for extraneous factors which affect the scattered echo waveform and has been demonstrated to accurately determine backscatter coefficients under a wide range of conditions. The algorithms and procedures used to form backscatter coefficient images are described. These were tested using tissue-mimicking phantoms which have regions of varying scattering levels. Another phantom has a fat-mimicking layer for testing these techniques under more clinically relevant conditions. Backscatter coefficient images were also formed of in vitro human liver tissue. A clinical ultrasound scanner has been adapted for use as a backscatter coefficient imaging platform. The digital interface between the scanner and the computer used for data reduction are described. Initial tests, using phantoms are presented. A study of backscatter coefficient imaging of in vivo liver was performed using several normal, healthy human subjects.

  16. Direct estimation of austenitic grain dimensions in heat affected zones of a martensitic steel from EBSD images.

    PubMed

    Altendorf, H; Faessel, M; Jeulin, D; Latourte, F

    2015-05-01

    In the context of automated analyses of electron-backscattered-diffraction images, we present in this paper a novel method to automatically extract morphological properties of prior austenitic grains in martensitic steels based on raw crystallographic orientation maps. This quantification includes the estimation of the mean chord length in specific directions, with in addition the reconstruction of the mean shape of austenitic grains inducing anisotropic shape properties. The approach is based on the morphological measure of covariance on a decision curve of grain fidelity per disorientation angle. These efforts have been motivated by the need of realistic microstructures to perform micromechanical studies of grain boundary localized damage phenomenons in steels, one example being the type IV fracture phenomenon occurring in welded joints of grade P91/P92 steel. This failure is attributed to a change of the microstructure due to thermal gradients arising during the welding process. To precisely capture the relationships between microstructural changes and mechanical fields localization in a polycrystalline aggregate, we first need to achieve a reasonable stochastic model of its microstructure, which relies on a detailed knowledge of the microstructural morphology. As martensitic steels possess multiscale microstructures composed of prior austenitic grains, packets and laths, a relevant modelling strategy has to be proposed to account for the observed hierarchies. With this objective, this paper focuses on the larger scale entities present in the microstructure, namely, the austenitic grains. PMID:25689129

  17. Evaluating Deformation-Induced Grain Orientation Change in a Polycrystal During In Situ Tensile Deformation using EBSD.

    PubMed

    Buchheit, Thomas E; Carroll, Jay D; Clark, Blythe G; Boyce, Brad L

    2015-08-01

    Using an in situ load frame within a scanning electron microscope, a microstructural section on the surface of an annealed tantalum (Ta) polycrystalline specimen was mapped at successive tensile strain intervals, up to ~20% strain, using electron backscatter diffraction. A grain identification and correlation technique was developed for characterizing the evolving microstructure during loading. Presenting the correlated results builds on the reference orientation deviation (ROD) map concept where individual orientation measurements within a grain are compared with a reference orientation associated with that grain. In this case, individual orientation measurements in a deformed grain are measured relative to a reference orientation derived from the undeformed (initial) configuration rather than the current deformed configuration as has been done for previous ROD schemes. Using this technique helps reveal the evolution of crystallographic orientation gradients and development of deformation-induced substructure within grains. Although overall crystallographic texture evolved slowly during deformation, orientation spread within grains developed quickly. In some locations, misorientation relative to the original orientation of a grain exceeded 20° by 15% strain. The largest orientation changes often appeared near grain boundaries suggesting that these regions were preferred locations for the initial development of subgrains. PMID:26189352

  18. EBSD and AFM observations of the microstructural changes induced by low temperature plasma carburising on AISI 316

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corujeira Gallo, Santiago; Dong, Hanshan

    2011-10-01

    Low temperature plasma carburising (LTPC) has been increasingly accepted as a hardening process for austenitic stainless steels because it produces a good combination of tribological and corrosion properties. The hardening mechanism is based on the supersaturation of the austenitic structure with carbon, which greatly hardens the material, significantly expands the fcc unit cell, produces high levels of compressive residual stresses and, ultimately, leads to the occurrence of deformation bands and rotation of the crystal lattice. The microstructural changes introduced during plasma carburising have a significant impact on the mechanical, tribological and corrosion performance and, for this reason, the microstructure of expanded austenite or S-phase has been extensively studied. However, modern surface characterisation techniques could provide new insights into the formation mechanism of S-phase layers. In this work, backscattered electron diffraction and atomic force microscopy were used to characterise the surface layers of expanded austenite produced by LTPC in an active screen furnace. Based on the experimental results, the plastic deformation, its dependence on crystallographic orientation, the evolution of grain boundaries, and their effects on mechanical, tribological and corrosion properties are discussed.

  19. EBSD as a tool to identify and quantify bainite and ferrite in low-alloyed Al-TRIP steels.

    PubMed

    Zaefferer, S; Romano, P; Friedel, F

    2008-06-01

    Bainite is thought to play an important role for the chemical and mechanical stabilization of metastable austenite in low-alloyed TRIP steels. Therefore, in order to understand and improve the material properties, it is important to locate and quantify the bainitic phase. To this aim, electron backscatter diffraction-based orientation microscopy has been employed. The main difficulty herewith is to distinguish bainitic ferrite from ferrite because both have bcc crystal structure. The most important difference between them is the occurrence of transformation induced geometrically necessary dislocations in the bainitic phase. To determine the areas with larger geometrically necessary dislocation density, the following orientation microscopy maps were explored: pattern quality maps, grain reference orientation deviation maps and kernel average misorientation maps. We show that only the latter allow a reliable separation of the bainitic and ferritic phase. The kernel average misorientation threshold value that separates both constituents is determined by an algorithm that searches for the smoothness of the boundaries between them. PMID:18503676

  20. Analysis of the Deformation and Damage Mechanisms of Pearlitic Steel by EBSD and "in-situ" SEM Tensile Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhom, Habib; Yahyaoui, H.; Braham, C.; Gonzalez, G.

    2015-07-01

    The processes governing the deformation and damage of C70 pearlitic steel were investigated in nanometer and micrometer scales using electron backscatter diffraction technique and "in-situ" scanning electron microscope tensile testing. The ferrite behavior was identified by "in-situ" x-ray tensile tests. Investigations were carried out on annealed microstructure with two interlamellar spacings of Sp = 170 and Sp = 230 nm. It is shown that pearlite yielding is controlled by the deformation mechanisms occurring in ferrite. Deformation and damage mechanisms were proposed. At low strain, pearlite deforms homogeneously with low misorientation (<5°) inside the pearlite colonies and elongates the cementite plates. At high strain, pearlite deforms heterogeneously in intense localized shear bands inside the more favorably oriented pearlite colonies. Misorientation reaches values up to 15°. Cementite deforms by an offset of lamella along the shear bands. The nucleation of these shear bands occurs at strain level of E 11 = 7% for coarse pearlite and at a higher value for fine pearlite. Damage occurs by brittle fracture of the elongated cementite lamellae parallel to the tensile axis and which are developed by shear micro-cracks along the slip bands. The plastic-induced damage is thus delayed by the fine pearlite structure.

  1. EBSD analysis of tungsten-filament carburization during the hot-wire CVD of multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Oliphant, Clive J; Arendse, Christopher J; Camagu, Sigqibo T; Swart, Hendrik

    2014-02-01

    Filament condition during hot-wire chemical vapor deposition conditions of multi-walled carbon nanotubes is a major concern for a stable deposition process. We report on the novel application of electron backscatter diffraction to characterize the carburization of tungsten filaments. During the synthesis, the W-filaments transform to W2C and WC. W-carbide growth followed a parabolic behavior corresponding to the diffusion of C as the rate-determining step. The grain size of W, W2C, and WC increases with longer exposure time and increasing filament temperature. The grain size of the recrystallizing W-core and W2C phase grows from the perimeter inwardly and this phenomenon is enhanced at filament temperatures in excess of 1,400°C. Cracks appear at filament temperatures >1,600°C, accompanied by a reduction in the filament operational lifetime. The increase of the W2C and recrystallized W-core grain size from the perimeter inwardly is ascribed to a thermal gradient within the filament, which in turn influences the hardness measurements and crack formation. PMID:24423105

  2. Coherent backscattering in the soft x-ray region

    SciTech Connect

    Matone, G.; Luccio, A.

    1986-06-01

    It is shown that coherent polarized soft x-rays can be produced by a combination of two techniques - stimulated amplification of laser light in a magnetic undulator, and Compton scattering of laser photons on an electron beam. In the combined technique, laser radiation is Compton scattered from a relativistic electron beam, whose current or charge density is periodically modulated. An electron beam and a laser beam propagate through an undulator along the same line. Inside the undulator, the laser electromagnetic waste produces a modulation of the electron energy. After some drift space, the modulation of the electron energy transforms into a modulation of the beam longitudinal charge density. The laser photons are reflected by a concave mirror against the electrons and are backscattered. In the process, their energy is greatly increased. If the electron and laser photon energy are matched properly, the modulated electron beam may act as a moving diffraction grating, and the backscattered x-rays show a high degree of coherence. The mechanism of modulation is described. The effects of electron beam energy spread, finite electron beam emittance, and undulator imperfections are discussed. The theory of scattering of a light wave by a bunched electron beam and the properties of the scattered radiation are examined. (LEW)

  3. Determining the Orientations of Ice Crystals Using Electron Backscatter Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliescu, D.; Baker, I.; Chang, H.

    2004-05-01

    The presentation will show how electron backscatter diffraction can be employed to determine crystal orientations in ice. The technique involves obtaining and indexing electron back-scatter patterns (EBSPs) from uncoated ice using a scanning electron microscope equipped with a custom-built cold-stage and an Orientation Imaging System. Unlike any of the currently-used methods, the EBSP-based technique has considerably higher angular and spatial resolution and is significantly faster. We also present an orientation image map of a muti-grain region in laboratory-grown ice constructed by automatically indexing the EBSPs using an HKL, Inc Channel 5 Orientation Imaging System and discuss possible applications of the technique to the study of natural ice. Primarily, the focus will be on the characterization of the microstructure of dynamically recrystallized glacier ice whose texture is intrinsically related the flow process. Other applications include obtaining orientation images from frozen water-containing materials, such as clathrate hydrates. This research was supported by Army Research Office grant DAAD 19-03-1-0110 and National Science Foundation grants OPP-9981379 and OPP-0221120.

  4. Time domain attenuation estimation method from ultrasonic backscattered signals

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Goutam; Oelze, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation is important not only as a parameter for characterizing tissue but also for compensating other parameters that are used to classify tissues. Several techniques have been explored for estimating ultrasonic attenuation from backscattered signals. In the present study, a technique is developed to estimate the local ultrasonic attenuation coefficient by analyzing the time domain backscattered signal. The proposed method incorporates an objective function that combines the diffraction pattern of the source/receiver with the attenuation slope in an integral equation. The technique was assessed through simulations and validated through experiments with a tissue mimicking phantom and fresh rabbit liver samples. The attenuation values estimated using the proposed technique were compared with the attenuation estimated using insertion loss measurements. For a data block size of 15 pulse lengths axially and 15 beamwidths laterally, the mean attenuation estimates from the tissue mimicking phantoms were within 10% of the estimates using insertion loss measurements. With a data block size of 20 pulse lengths axially and 20 beamwidths laterally, the error in the attenuation values estimated from the liver samples were within 10% of the attenuation values estimated from the insertion loss measurements. PMID:22779499

  5. Acoustic Microscopy and Polar Backscatter Broadband Ultrasonic Investigations of Anisotropic Inhomogeneous Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridal, Sharon Lorraine

    This thesis presents measurements of the frequency dependence of backscatter and attenuation from anisotropic cardiovascular tissue and composite materials and seeks to describe the physics underlying the interaction of ultrasound with these specimens. The effects of anisotropy and formalin fixation on the measured ultrasonic parameters in the 30 to 45 MHz bandwidth are examined in canine papillary muscle. Lower frequency work by this laboratory in canine myocardium is presented for side-by-side comparison with the higher frequency results in order to delineate long range frequency dependent behavior. Uniaxial graphite epoxy composite materials are examined at lower frequencies (5 to 10 MHz) using a technique known as polar backscatter. The frequency dependence of the spurious signals from the surface pattern of the composite is compared to the frequency dependence of the scattered field predicted from a 1-D diffraction grating model. Using this interpretation of the scattering from the surface, some separation of the surface effects and the useful scattering from the interior of the composite is achieved. The amplitude and frequency dependence of the differential backscatter cross section for isotropic scattering standards were predicted using the accurate scattering theory of Faran and compared with the results of experimental measurements in order to test the data acquisition and reduction methods used in the measurements of cardiovascular tissue. The backscatter coefficient was measured from anisotropic biological tissue (canine papillary muscles) both parallel and perpendicular to the predominant direction of myocardial fibers in a relatively high frequency bandwidth (30 to 45 MHz). Results from a simple diffraction grating model were compared to the spectra reflected from periodic surfaces of graphite/epoxy composites (5 to 10 MHz), and potential ways to reduce the impact of such surface effects on polar backscatter measurements were explored.

  6. A microwave backscattering model for precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermis, Seda

    A geophysical microwave backscattering model for space borne and ground-based remote sensing of precipitation is developed and used to analyze backscattering measurements from rain and snow type precipitation. Vector Radiative Transfer (VRT) equations for a multilayered inhomogeneous medium are applied to the precipitation region for calculation of backscattered intensity. Numerical solution of the VRT equation for multiple layers is provided by the matrix doubling method to take into account close range interactions between particles. In previous studies, the VRT model was used to calculate backscattering from a rain column on a sea surface. In the model, Mie scattering theory for closely spaced scatterers was used to determine the phase matrix for each sublayer characterized by a set of parameters. The scatterers i.e. rain drops within the sublayers were modelled as spheres with complex permittivities. The rain layer was bounded by rough boundaries; the interface between the cloud and the rain column as well as the interface between the sea surface and the rain were all analyzed by using the integral equation model (IEM). Therefore, the phase matrix for the entire rain column was generated by the combination of surface and volume scattering. Besides Mie scattering, in this study, we use T-matrix approach to examine the effect of the shape to the backscattered intensities since larger raindrops are most likely oblique in shape. Analyses show that the effect of obliquity of raindrops to the backscattered wave is related with size of the scatterers and operated frequency. For the ground-based measurement system, the VRT model is applied to simulate the precipitation column on horizontal direction. Therefore, the backscattered reflectivities for each unit range of volume are calculated from the backscattering radar cross sections by considering radar range and effective illuminated area of the radar beam. The volume scattering phase matrices for each range interval

  7. SAR backscatter from coniferous forest gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John L.; Davis, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    A study is in progress comparing Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) backscatter from coniferous forest plots containing gaps to backscatter from adjacent gap-free plots. Issues discussed are how do gaps in the range of 400 to 1600 sq m (approximately 4-14 pixels at intermediate incidence angles) affect forest backscatter statistics and what incidence angles, wavelengths, and polarizations are most sensitive to forest gaps. In order to visualize the slant-range imaging of forest and gaps, a simple conceptual model is used. This strictly qualitative model has led us to hypothesize that forest radar returns at short wavelengths (eg., C-band) and large incidence angles (e.g., 50 deg) should be most affected by the presence of gaps, whereas returns at long wavelengths and small angles should be least affected. Preliminary analysis of 1989 AIRSAR data from forest near Mt. Shasta supports the hypothesis. Current forest backscatter models such as MIMICS and Santa Barbara Discontinuous Canopy Backscatter Model have in several cases correctly predicted backscatter from forest stands based on inputs of measured or estimated forest parameters. These models do not, however, predict within-stand SAR scene texture, or 'intrinsic scene variability' as Ulaby et al. has referred to it. For instance, the Santa Barbara model, which may be the most spatially coupled of the existing models, is not truly spatial. Tree locations within a simulated pixel are distributed according to a Poisson process, as they are in many natural forests, but tree size is unrelated to location, which is not the case in nature. Furthermore, since pixels of a simulated stand are generated independently in the Santa Barbara model, spatial processes larger than one pixel are not modeled. Using a different approach, Oliver modeled scene texture based on an hypothetical forest geometry. His simulated scenes do not agree well with SAR data, perhaps due to the simple geometric model used. Insofar as texture

  8. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter: Estero Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartwell, Stephen R.; Finlayson, David P.; Dartnell, Peter; Johnson, Samuel Y.

    2013-01-01

    Between July 30 and August 9, 2012, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center (PCMSC), acquired bathymetry and acoustic-backscatter data from Estero Bay, San Luis Obispo, California, under PCMSC Field Activity ID S-05-12-SC. The survey was done using the R/V Parke Snavely outfitted with a multibeam sonar for swath mapping and highly accurate position and orientation equipment for georeferencing. This report provides these data in a number of different formats, as well as a summary of the mapping mission, maps of bathymetry and backscatter, and Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata.

  9. Signal processor architecture for backscatter radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, W. E.; Johnston, P.

    1983-01-01

    Real time signal processing for backscatter radars which requires computational throughput and I/O rates is discussed. The operations that are usually performed in real time are highly repetitive simple accumulations of samples or of products of samples. The control logic does not depend on the values of the data and general purpose computers are not required for the initial high speed processing. The implications of these facts on the architectures of preprocessors for backscatter radars are explored and applied to the design of the Radar Signal Compender.

  10. Low magnification EBSD mapping of texture distribution in a fine-grained matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Joseph; Mariani, Elisabetta; Wheeler, John

    2016-04-01

    The study of texture (CPO) in rocks is often restricted to individual phases within a given sample or specific area of said sample. Large scale EBSD mapping of the matrix of a greenschist facies albite mylonite has shown that an overall significant CPO within albite grains is strongly domainal, and each domain has a unique CPO that is independent of both common slip systems in plagioclase and the specimen geometry (i.e. foliation and lineation). Observational evidence suggests the metamorphic breakdown of plagioclase to albite (Ab) plus a Ca-bearing phase (clinozoisite, Cz) has produced a two phase mixture in which each phase has a contrasting solubility. New grains of albite are thought to nucleate epitaxially from original plagioclase as a reaction front passes through parent grains. A pseudomorphic region of Ab plus Cz after an original plagioclase crystal, protected from intense deformation by enclosure in a cm-scale augite clast, gives insight into pre-deformation daughter grain distributions. The albite in the region inherits a strong CPO and 180° misorientation peak from a relict twin pattern due to epitaxial growth while clinozoisite is randomly distributed and oriented (despite some grains nucleating from the plagioclase parent twin boundary). In the deformed matrix, daughter Ab is seen to be the more mobile phase, having undergone obvious dissolution, transport and reprecipitation into fractures and pressure shadows, whereas Cz grains are relatively insoluble and rotate into parallelism with the foliation, forming bands that anastamose around Cpx porphyroclasts. Despite this modification, albite in the matrix retains significant CPOs that comprise distinct domains with sharp boundaries. A 180° misorientation peak thought to be a signature of twinning inherited from parent plagioclase is also observed in each domain. Why a CPO should be preserved under these conditions (contrary to our traditional understanding that CPOs are a signature of dislocation

  11. Near-surface fault detection by migrating back-scattered surface waves with and without velocity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Han; Huang, Yunsong; Guo, Bowen

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that diffraction stack migration can be used to discover the distribution of near-surface faults. The methodology is based on the assumption that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. We first isolate the back-scattered surface waves by muting or FK filtering, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. We have also proposed a natural migration method that utilizes the intrinsic traveltime property of the direct and the back-scattered waves at faults. For the synthetic data sets and the land data collected in Aqaba, where surface wave velocity has unexpected perturbations, we migrate the back-scattered surface waves with both predicted velocity profiles and natural Green's function without velocity information. Because the latter approach avoids the need for an accurate velocity model in event summation, both the prestack and stacked migration images show competitive quality. Results with both synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. We believe applying this method to global or passive seismic data can open new opportunities in unveiling tectonic features.

  12. Multibeam Sonar Backscatter Data Acquisition and Processing: Guidelines and Recommendations from the GEOHAB Backscatter Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffron, E.; Lurton, X.; Lamarche, G.; Brown, C.; Lucieer, V.; Rice, G.; Schimel, A.; Weber, T.

    2015-12-01

    Backscatter data acquired with multibeam sonars are now commonly used for the remote geological interpretation of the seabed. The systems hardware, software, and processing methods and tools have grown in numbers and improved over the years, yet many issues linger: there are no standard procedures for acquisition, poor or absent calibration, limited understanding and documentation of processing methods, etc. A workshop organized at the GeoHab (a community of geoscientists and biologists around the topic of marine habitat mapping) annual meeting in 2013 was dedicated to seafloor backscatter data from multibeam sonars and concluded that there was an overwhelming need for better coherence and agreement on the topics of acquisition, processing and interpretation of data. The GeoHab Backscatter Working Group (BSWG) was subsequently created with the purpose of documenting and synthetizing the state-of-the-art in sensors and techniques available today and proposing methods for best practice in the acquisition and processing of backscatter data. Two years later, the resulting document "Backscatter measurements by seafloor-mapping sonars: Guidelines and Recommendations" was completed1. The document provides: An introduction to backscatter measurements by seafloor-mapping sonars; A background on the physical principles of sonar backscatter; A discussion on users' needs from a wide spectrum of community end-users; A review on backscatter measurement; An analysis of best practices in data acquisition; A review of data processing principles with details on present software implementation; and finally A synthesis and key recommendations. This presentation reviews the BSWG mandate, structure, and development of this document. It details the various chapter contents, its recommendations to sonar manufacturers, operators, data processing software developers and end-users and its implication for the marine geology community. 1: Downloadable at https://www.niwa.co.nz/coasts-and-oceans/research-projects/backscatter-measurement-guidelines

  13. Snowcover influence on backscattering from terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Abdelrazik, M.; Stiles, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of snowcover on the microwave backscattering from terrain in the 8-35 GHz region are examined through the analysis of experimental data and by application of a semiempirical model. The model accounts for surface backscattering contributions by the snow-air and snow-soil interfaces, and for volume backscattering contributions by the snow layer. Through comparisons of backscattering data for different terrain surfaces measured both with and without snowcover, the masking effects of snow are evaluated as a function of snow water equivalent and liquid water content. The results indicate that with dry snowcover it is not possible to discriminate between different types of ground surface (concrete, asphalt, grass, and bare ground) if the snow water equivalent is greater than about 20 cm (or a depth greater than 60 cm for a snow density of 0.3 g/cu cm). For the same density, however, if the snow is wet, a depth of 10 cm is sufficient to mask the underlying surface.

  14. Visualization of x-ray backscatter data

    SciTech Connect

    Greenawald, E.C.; Ham, Y.S.; Poranski, C.F. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    Of the several processes which occur when x-rays interact with matter, Compton scattering is dominant in the range of energies commonly used in industrial radiography. The Compton interaction between an x-ray photon and a free or outer shell electron causes the electron to recoil and the photon to be propagated in a new direction with a reduced energy. Regardless of the incident beam energy, some photons are always scattered in the backwards direction. The potential for determining material properties by the detection of x-ray backscatter has been recognized for years. Although work in this area has been eclipsed by the rapid development of computerized tomography (CT), a variety of industrial backscatter imaging techniques and applications have been demonstrated. Backscatter inspection is unique among x-ray methods in its applicability with access to only one side of the object. The authors are currently developing the application of x-ray backscatter tomography (XBT) to the inspection of steel-reinforced rubber sonar domes on US Navy vessels. In this paper, the authors discuss the visualization methods they use to interpret the XBT data. They present images which illustrate the capability of XBT as applied to sonar domes and a variety of other materials and objects. They also demonstrate and discuss the use of several data visualization software products.

  15. Incidence angle normalization of radar backscatter data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Passive Active (SMAP) satellite (~2014) will include a radar system that will provide L-band multi-polarization backscatter at a constant incidence angle of 40º. During the pre-launch phase of the project there is a need for observations that will support the radar-based soil mo...

  16. Window flaw detection by backscatter lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, L. K.; Minton, F. R.

    1978-01-01

    Portable fiber-optic probe detects tiny flaws in transparent materials. Probe transmits light through surface to illuminate interior of material by backscattering off its edges. Light-sensitive contact paper records scratch pattern. Technique can be used for rapid visual checks. Flexible fiber optics are safely used in explosive or flammable areas; they present no hazard of breakage or contamination in controlled environments.

  17. Backscattering of α-Quartz (0 6 10) for 14.4 keV Mössbauer Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Yasuhiko; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Zhang, Xiaowei; Kikuta, Seishi

    2007-01-01

    Backscattering of α-quartz (0 6 10) was investigated using 14.4 keV 57Fe Mössbauer photons from α-57Fe2O3 at nuclear resonant scattering beamline BL09XU, SPring-8. The α-quartz crystal was heated to around 353 K by an oven so that the Bragg angle of α-quartz 0 6 10 diffraction meats 90 degrees. Energy width of the reflection was measured by changing temperature of the oven. The measured bandwidth is 1.14(33) meV. Backscattering by a α-quartz crystal can be applied for high-energy-resolution monochromator or analyzer.

  18. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II: Electromagnetic backscattering model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xie; William, Perrie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-07-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, the Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service Program.

  19. Design and performance measurements of an airborne aerosol backscatter lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.; Tratt, David M.; Brothers, Alan M.; Dermenjian, Stephen H.; Esproles, Carlos

    1990-01-01

    The global winds measurement application of coherent Doppler lidar requires intensive study of the global climatology of atmospheric aerosol backscatter at infrared wavelengths. An airborne backscatter lidar is discussed, which has been developed to measure atmospheric backscatter profiles at CO2 laser wavelengths. The instrument characteristics and representative flight measurement results are presented.

  20. Flex - rigid behavior of quartzite and its mineralogical, microstructural and textural properties from EBSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorabiato Barbosa, Pamela; Ávila, Carlos Fernando; Evangelista Lagoeiro, Leonardo; Pinheiro Sampaio, Ney; Martins Graça, Leonardo

    2016-04-01

    It was investigated the mechanical properties of the quartzite found in the 'Moeda' Formation from the mineral province of the 'Quadrilátero Ferrífero', Brazil. Rocks with variations from flexible (in some portions) to completely rigid are rare and found only in some specific locations in the whole world. It's flexibility has been usually related to the presence of minerals with tabular habit, that act as structural support to the rock and regulates the flexibility. Besides, the intrinsic behavior of this type of rock is marked by their microstructures and the typical preferred crystallographic orientations. In order to characterize the causes of this unique mechanical property, oriented sections of these rocks with different behaviors, flexible and stiff, were prepared and investigated with EBSD. The results showed differences in grain sizes (with grain area as proxy) and grain boundary lengths for quartz grains, the spatial distribution of muscovite, as well as crystallographic fabrics. The boundaries of the quartz grains observed in the stiff sample are linear, while in the flexible sample they're irregular. Quartz grains with sizes smaller than 30 μm2 are 30% larger in the flexible quartzite than those of the rigid counterparts.. This relation reverses for grains with an area greater than 30,000 μm2. Muscovite occurs as isolated grains in the rigid samples while in the flexible ones grains more continuously distributed and interconnected.. When the directions of the samples are plotted in the crystal reference system a contrasting crystallographic texture arises. The X-directions of the sample concentrate in the axes of the quartz. For the rigid samples it is te Y-directions that show preference to align parallel to the poles of the positive rhomb ({01-12} = this is the acute rhomb; rhomb is {01-11]). The rigid quartzite showed a strong <21 ̅1 ̅0> () crystallographic fabric parallel to the macroscopic lineation, whereas for the flexible ones the

  1. Wave shadowing and modulation of microwave backscatter from the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, William J.; Farquharson, Gordon

    Shadowing and modulation of microwave backscatter by ocean waves are studied using coherent X-band radars. Two types of shadowing are investigated: geometric shadowing (complete blockage of incident rays) and partial shadowing (polarization-dependent diffraction combined with weak scatterers). We point out that the frequency of occurrence of zero signal-to-noise ratio samples cannot depend on the incident power level or the polarization if geometric shadowing occurs but can if partial shadowing exists. We then compare this behavior with observations, and show that the data do not support the hypothesis that geometric shadowing plays a significant role in low-grazing-angle microwave scattering from the ocean surface. Furthermore, our data indicate that partial shadowing only depends significantly on polarization for the steep waves found near shorelines. We also study the modulation of microwave backscatter by ocean waves using these data by looking at the phase differences between received power and scatterer velocity. These phase differences appear to be rather well explained by standard composite surface theory at VV polarization, having values that are positive looking up wave and negative looking down wave. For HH polarization, however, breaking effects come into play and overshadow composite surface effects of free waves. They cause the phase difference to be near zero for up wave looks and near 180° for down-wave looks. A simple model that involves both breaking and freely propagating waves but does not include any shadowing effects is shown to account for observed phase differences at both polarizations to within about 10°.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation studies of backscatter factors in mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, H.P.; Doi, K.

    1981-04-01

    Experimentally determined backscatter factors in mammography can contain significant systematic errors due to the energy response, dimensions, and location of the dosimeter used. In this study, the Monte Carlo method was applied to simulate photon scattering in tissue-equivalent media and to determine backscatter factors without the interference of a detector. The physical processes of measuring backscatter factors with a lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) and an ideal tissue-equivalent detector were also simulated. Computed results were compared with the true backscatter factors and with measured values reported by other investigators. It was found that the TLD method underestimated backscatter factors in mammography by as much as 10% at high energies.

  3. Aerosol backscatter lidar calibration and data interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, M. J.; Menzies, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    A treatment of the various factors involved in lidar data acquisition and analysis is presented. This treatment highlights sources of fundamental, systematic, modeling, and calibration errors that may affect the accurate interpretation and calibration of lidar aerosol backscatter data. The discussion primarily pertains to ground based, pulsed CO2 lidars that probe the troposphere and are calibrated using large, hard calibration targets. However, a large part of the analysis is relevant to other types of lidar systems such as lidars operating at other wavelengths; continuous wave (CW) lidars; lidars operating in other regions of the atmosphere; lidars measuring nonaerosol elastic or inelastic backscatter; airborne or Earth-orbiting lidar platforms; and lidars employing combinations of the above characteristics.

  4. Spectra of Particulate Backscattering in Natural Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Howard, R.; Lewis, Marlon R.; McLean, Scott D.; Twardowski, Michael S.; Freeman, Scott A.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Boynton, Chris G.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperspectral profiles of downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance in natural waters (oligotrophic and mesotrophic) are combined with inverse radiative transfer to obtain high resolution spectra of the absorption coefficient (a) and the backscattering coefficient (bb) of the water and its constituents. The absorption coefficient at the mesotrophic station clearly shows spectral absorption features attributable to several phytoplankton pigments (Chlorophyll a, b, c, and Carotenoids). The backscattering shows only weak spectral features and can be well represented by a power-law variation with wavelength (lambda): b(sub b) approx. Lambda(sup -n), where n is a constant between 0.4 and 1.0. However, the weak spectral features in b(sub b), suggest that it is depressed in spectral regions of strong particle absorption. The applicability of the present inverse radiative transfer algorithm, which omits the influence of Raman scattering, is limited to lambda < 490 nm in oligotrophic waters and lambda < 575 nm in mesotrophic waters.

  5. Microwave backscattering from an anisotropic soybean canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R. H.; Saatchi, S.; Levine, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    Electromagnetic backscattering from a soybean canopy is modeled in the L band region of the spectrum. Mature soybean plants are taken as an ensemble of leaves and stems which are represented by lossy dielectric disks and rods respectively. Field data indicated that leaves and stems are not distributed uniformly in the azimuth coordinate. The plant has a tendency to grow out into the area between the rows. The effects on backscattered radar waves was computed by the distorted Born approximation. Results for look directions along the rows and perpendicular to the rows show that only a modest difference occurs in the L band frequency range. The use of another nonuniform distribution, different from those observed experimentally, results in a significant effect due to vegetation asymmetry.

  6. Experiment and theory for backscattering enhancement and imaging in random media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimaru, Akira; Kuga, Yasuo

    1988-03-01

    When a wave is incident on a dense distribution of discrete scatterers, turbulent media, or rough surfaces, the backscattering is enhanced under certain conditions giving a sharp peak in the backward direction. It is shown experimentally and theoretically that the angular width of the peak is related to the transport coefficient and that the enhancement is caused by the constructive interference of two waves traveling through the same particles in opposite directions. This phenomenon is identified as the weak Anderson localization. The backscattering enhancement can occur from turbulence or rough surfaces which are caused by several mechanisms. A measure of the quality of the image transmission is expressed by the modulation transfer function (MTF). It is shown experimental and theoretical studies on MTF and speckle interferometry based on the fourth order and short-exposure MTF which can produce diffraction-limited images through random scatterers.

  7. Photoelectron diffraction and holography: Some new directions

    SciTech Connect

    Fadley, C.S. |

    1993-08-01

    Photoelectron diffraction has by now become a versatile and powerful technique for studying surface structures, with special capabilities for resolving chemical and magnetic states of atoms and deriving direct structural information from both forward scattering along bond directions and back-scattering path length differences. Further fitting experiment to theory can lead to structural accuracies in the {plus_minus}0.03 ){Angstrom} range. Holographic inversions of such diffraction data also show considerable promise for deriving local three-dimensional structures around a given emitter with accuracies of {plus_minus}0.2--0.3 {Angstrom}. Resolving the photoelectron spin in some way and using circularly polarized radiation for excitation provide added dimensions for the study of magnetic systems and chiral experimental geometries. Synchrotron radiation with the highest brightness and energy resolution, as well as variable polarization, is crucial to the full exploitation of these techniques.

  8. Backscattering Measurement From a Single Microdroplet

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungwoo; Chang, Jin Ho; Jeong, Jong Seob; Lee, Changyang; Teh, Shia-Yen; Lee, Abraham; Shung, K. Kirk

    2011-01-01

    Backscattering measurements for acoustically trapped lipid droplets were undertaken by employing a P[VDF-TrFE] broadband transducer of f-number = 1, with a bandwidth of 112%. The wide bandwidth allowed the transmission of the 45 MHz trapping signal and the 15 MHz sensing signal using the same transducer. Tone bursts at 45 MHz were first transmitted by the transducer to hold a single droplet at the focus (or the center of the trap) and separate it from its neighboring droplets by translating the transducer perpendicularly to the beam axis. Subsequently, 15 MHz probing pulses were sent to the trapped droplet and the backscattered RF echo signal received by the same transducer. The measured beam width at 15 MHz was measured to be 120 μm. The integrated backscatter (IB) coefficient of an individual droplet was determined within the 6-dB bandwidth of the transmit pulse by normalizing the power spectrum of the RF signal to the reference spectrum obtained from a flat reflector. The mean IB coefficient for droplets with a 64 μm average diameter (denoted as cluster A) was −107 dB, whereas it was −93 dB for 90-μm droplets (cluster B). The standard deviation was 0.9 dB for each cluster. The experimental values were then compared with those computed with the T-matrix method and a good agreement was found: the difference was as small as 1 dB for both clusters. These results suggest that this approach might be useful as a means for measuring ultrasonic backscattering from a single microparticle, and illustrate the potential of acoustic sensing for cell sorting. PMID:21507767

  9. Coherent Backscattering Reveals the Anderson Transition.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Delande, D; Miniatura, C; Cherroret, N

    2015-11-13

    We develop an accurate finite-time scaling analysis of the angular width of the coherent backscattering (CBS) peak for waves propagating in 3D random media. Applying this method to ultracold atoms in optical speckle potentials, we show how to determine both the mobility edge and the critical exponent of the Anderson transition from the temporal behavior of the CBS width. Our method could be used in experiments to fully characterize the 3D Anderson transition. PMID:26613427

  10. Coherent Backscattering Reveals the Anderson Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Delande, D.; Miniatura, C.; Cherroret, N.

    2015-11-01

    We develop an accurate finite-time scaling analysis of the angular width of the coherent backscattering (CBS) peak for waves propagating in 3D random media. Applying this method to ultracold atoms in optical speckle potentials, we show how to determine both the mobility edge and the critical exponent of the Anderson transition from the temporal behavior of the CBS width. Our method could be used in experiments to fully characterize the 3D Anderson transition.