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Sample records for bact lactis aerogenes

  1. Debunking BACT

    SciTech Connect

    Finto, K.; Harrison, C.; Lomax, S.

    2006-11-15

    The US Clean Air Act's provisions for the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) of air quality require a new major stationary source to obtain a preconstruction permit that specifies the Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for each regulated pollutant that may be emitted in amounts greater than major source thresholds. The PSD regulations also impose BACT requirements on modifications to existing major sources that result in significant net emissions increases. Rather than a specific technology, BACT is an achievable emissions limitation (or work practice) determined by the permitting authority on a case-by- case basis, taking into account available technologies and energy, environmental, and economic impacts. BACT determinations are generally made by a state environmental agency after an opportunity for public comment. Increasingly, advocacy groups are challenging BACT decisions in administrative and judicial proceedings. As a result, the permitting process has been substantially delayed, even for facilities that have agreed to install state-of-the-art emissions control technology. This article outlines the key statutory and regulatory elements of BACT, how to analyze alternative technologies and emissions limitations, and prepare an application for an appropriate and final BACT determination. It is based largely on the regulatory definition of BACT and recent Environmental Appeals Board (EAB) decisions. Case-by-case BACT analyses do not necessarily yield a single, objectively correct BACT determination. The permitting agency must exercise a high degree of technical judgment in any BACT analysis, particularly for coal-fired plants, which use a wide variety of coals, combustion techniques, and other site-specific factors. 12 refs.

  2. ?-Hole aerogen bonding interactions.

    PubMed

    Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio

    2015-09-23

    In this manuscript we combine high level ab initio calculations (RI-MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ) and the analysis of several crystal structures to demonstrate the existence of ?-hole aerogen bonding interactions in Xe(iv) compounds. The ability of XeF4 and Xe(OMe)4 to interact with electron rich molecules is rationalized using several computational tools, including molecular electrostatic potential surfaces, energetic and geometric features of the complexes and "atoms in molecules" (AIM) and Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analyses. We have found support for the ?-hole interaction involving the xenon atom from the solid state architecture of several X-ray structures retrieved from the crystal structural depot. Particularly, ?-hole aerogen bonding interactions are quite common in the solid state of Xe(iv) compounds. PMID:26252726

  3. Aerogen Bonding Interaction: A New Supramolecular Force?

    PubMed

    Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio

    2015-06-15

    We report evidence of the favorable noncovalent interaction between a covalently bonded atom of Group?18 (known as noble gases or aerogens) and a negative site, for example, a lone pair of a Lewis base or an anion. It involves a region of positive electrostatic potential (?-hole), therefore it is a totally new and unexplored ?-hole-based interaction, namely aerogen bonding. We demonstrate for the first time the existence of ?-hole regions in aerogen derivatives by means of high-level ab?initio calculations. In addition, several crystal structures retrieved from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) give reliability to the calculations. Energetically, aerogen bonds are comparable to hydrogen bonds and other ?-hole-based interactions but less directional. They are expected to be important in xenon chemistry. PMID:25950423

  4. BACT analysis under the Clean Air Act's PCD program

    SciTech Connect

    Simms, P.; Walke, J.

    2006-11-15

    Before a company may build a new major industrial source of air pollution, or make modifications to an existing major source in the USA it must apply for and receive a Clean Air Act (CAA) Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) permit. State environmental agencies typically issue such permits, either under state law or by exercising delegated authority to implement the federal PSD program. To fully comply with the CAA, the emissions limits identified as BACT must incorporate consideration of more than just add-on emissions control technology, they must also reflect appropriate considerations of fuel quality (e.g. low-sulfur coal) and process changes (e.g. advanced combustion techniques) as a means of controlling emissions, and must consider the other environmental and public welfare benefits of the identified emissions control options. Several states including New Mexico and Illinois have already determined that innovated technologies, such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), must be considered in connection with the BACT analysis for new coal-fired power plants. Even the notion that BACT is categorically limited in scope to the general type of facility proposed is contrary to EPA precedent. For example, the Environmental Appeals Board (EAB) has explained that permitting authorities retain the discretion under the definition of BACT to require dramatically different facility designs (e.g. a natural gas plant instead of a coal-fired power plant). The best advice for any permit applicant is to include in the BACT analysis a careful and honest examination of better performing alternative processes and/or innovative combustion techniques and to aggressively pursue such options wherever feasible. 17 refs.

  5. Robust Multivariable Flutter Suppression for the Benchmark Active Control Technology (BACT) Wind-Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.

    1997-01-01

    The Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) project is part of NASA Langley Research Center s Benchmark Models Program for studying transonic aeroelastic phenomena. In January of 1996 the BACT wind-tunnel model was used to successfully demonstrate the application of robust multivariable control design methods (H and -synthesis) to flutter suppression. This paper addresses the design and experimental evaluation of robust multivariable flutter suppression control laws with particular attention paid to the degree to which stability and performance robustness was achieved.

  6. Ribitol Catabolic Pathway in Klebsiella aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Charnetzky, W. T.; Mortlock, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    In Klebsiella aerogenes W70, there is an inducible pathway for the catabolism of ribitol consisting of at least two enzymes, ribitol dehydrogenase (RDH) and d-ribulokinase (DRK). These two enzymes are coordinately controlled and induced in response to d-ribulose, an intermediate of the pathway. Whereas wild-type K. aerogenes W70 are unable to utilize xylitol as a carbon and energy source, mutants constitutive for the ribitol pathway are able to utilize RDH to oxidize the unusual pentitol, xylitol, to d-xylulose. These mutants are able to grow on xylitol, presumably by utilization of the d-xylulose produced. Mutants constitutive for l-fucose isomerase can utilize the isomerase to convert d-arabinose to d-ribulose. In the presence of d-ribulose, RDH and DRK are induced, and such mutants are thus able to phosphorylate the d-ribulose by using the DRK of the ribitol pathway. Derivatives of an l-fucose isomerase-constitutive mutant were plated on d-arabinose, ribitol, and xylitol to select and identify mutations in the ribitol pathway. Using the transducing phage PW52, we were able to demonstrate genetic linkage of the loci involved. Three-point crosses, using constitutive mutants as donors and RDH?, DRK? double mutants as recipients and selecting for DRK+ transductants on d-arabinose, resulted in DRK+RDH+-constitutive, DRK+RDH+-inducible, and DRK+RDH?-inducible transductants but no detectable DRK+RDH? constitutive transductants, data consistent with the order rbtC-rbtD-rbtK, where rbtC is a control site and rbtD and rbtK correspond to the sites for the sites for the enzymes RDH and DRK, respectively. PMID:4366025

  7. Amino acid utilization by Aerobacter aerogenes and Escherichia coli

    E-print Network

    Herrera, Rodolfo Eduardo

    1938-01-01

    A considerable amount of work has been done on the growth of A. aerogenes and E. coli in synthetic media, but little work has been undertaken on the utilization by these organisms of amino acids as comparative sources of ...

  8. BactQuant: An enhanced broad-coverage bacterial quantitative real-time PCR assay

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial load quantification is a critical component of bacterial community analysis, but a culture-independent method capable of detecting and quantifying diverse bacteria is needed. Based on our analysis of a diverse collection of 16?S rRNA gene sequences, we designed a broad-coverage quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay—BactQuant—for quantifying 16?S rRNA gene copy number and estimating bacterial load. We further utilized in silico evaluation to complement laboratory-based qPCR characterization to validate BactQuant. Methods The aligned core set of 4,938 16?S rRNA gene sequences in the Greengenes database were analyzed for assay design. Cloned plasmid standards were generated and quantified using a qPCR-based approach. Coverage analysis was performed computationally using >670,000 sequences and further evaluated following the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) guidelines. Results A bacterial TaqMan® qPCR assay targeting a 466?bp region in V3-V4 was designed. Coverage analysis showed that 91% of the phyla, 96% of the genera, and >80% of the 89,537 species analyzed contained at least one perfect sequence match to the BactQuant assay. Of the 106 bacterial species evaluated, amplification efficiencies ranged from 81 to 120%, with r2-value of >0.99, including species with sequence mismatches. Inter- and intra-run coefficient of variance was <3% and <16% for Ct and copy number, respectively. Conclusions The BactQuant assay offers significantly broader coverage than a previously reported universal bacterial quantification assay BactQuant in vitro performance was better than the in silico predictions. PMID:22510143

  9. Single-cell protein from methanol with Enterobacter aerogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Gnan, S.O.; Abodreheba, A.O.

    1987-02-20

    An identified Enterobacter aerogenes utilizing methanol as a sole carbon source was studied for the optimization of biomass production and the reduction of its nucleic acid content. Results indicated that the highest yield and conversion were obtained at 0.5% methanol. The addition of seawater as a source of trace elements has an adverse effect. However, the addition of urea as source of nitrogen enhanced the growth of E. aerogenes. Heat shock at 60 degrees C for one minute followed by incubation at 50 degrees C for 2 hours caused 72.6% reduction in the nucleic acid. 12 references.

  10. Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 2118, a GABA-Producing Strain

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Letícia C.; Saraiva, Tessália D. L.; Soares, Siomar C.; Ramos, Rommel T. J.; Sá, Pablo H. C. G.; Carneiro, Adriana R.; Miranda, Fábio; Freire, Matheus; Renan, Wendel; Júnior, Alberto F. O.; Santos, Anderson R.; Pinto, Anne C.; Souza, Bianca M.; Castro, Camila P.; Diniz, Carlos A. A.; Rocha, Clarissa S.; Mariano, Diego C. B.; de Aguiar, Edgar L.; Folador, Edson L.; Barbosa, Eudes G. V.; Aburjaile, Flavia F.; Gonçalves, Lucas A.; Guimarães, Luís C.; Azevedo, Marcela; Agresti, Pamela C. M.; Silva, Renata F.; Tiwari, Sandeep; Almeida, Sintia S.; Hassan, Syed S.; Pereira, Vanessa B.; Abreu, Vinicius A. C.; Pereira, Ulisses P.; Dorella, Fernanda A.; Carvalho, Alex F.; Pereira, Felipe L.; Leal, Carlos A. G.; Figueiredo, Henrique C. P.; Silva, Artur; Miyoshi, Anderson

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 2118 is a nondairy lactic acid bacterium, a xylose fermenter, and a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producer isolated from frozen peas. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of L. lactis NCDO 2118, a strain with probiotic potential activity. PMID:25278529

  11. Enterobacter aerogenes Needle Stick Leads to Improved Biological Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Johanson, Richard E.

    2004-08-01

    A laboratory worker who received a needle stick from a contaminated needle while working with a culture containing Enterobactor aerogenes developed a laboratory acquired infection. Although this organism has been shown to cause community and nosocomial infections, there have been no documented cases of a laboratory acquired infections. Lessons learned from the event led to corrective actions which included modification of lab procedures, development of a biological inventory tracking and risk identification system and the establishment of an effective biological safety program.

  12. Biochemical parameters of glutamine synthetase from Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, R A; Janssen, K A; Resnick, A D; Blumenberg, M; Foor, F; Magasanik, B

    1977-01-01

    The glutamine synthetase (GS) from Klebsiella aerogenes is similar to that from Escherichia coli in several respects: (i) it is repressed by high levels of ammonia in the growth medium; (ii) its biosynthetic activity is greatly reduced by adenylylation; and (iii) adenylylation lowers the pH optimum and alters the response of the enzymes to various inhibitors in the gamma-glutamyl transferase (gammaGT) assay. There are, however, several important differences: (i) the isoactivity point for the adenylylated and non-adenylylated forms in the gammaGT assay occurs at pH 7.55 in K. aerogenes and at pH 7.15 in E. coli; (ii) the non-adenylylated form of the GS from K. aerogenes is stimulated by 60 mM MgCl2 in the gammaGT assay at pH 7.15. A biosynthetic reaction assay that correlates well with number of non-adenylylated enzyme subunits, as determined by the method of Mg2+ inhibition of the gammaGT assay, is described. Finally, we have found that it is necessary to use special methods to harvest growing cells to prevent changes in the adenylylation state of GS from occurring during harvesting. PMID:14104

  13. Purification and properties of Klebsiella aerogenes D-arabitol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Neuberger, M S; Patterson, R A; Hartley, B S

    1979-01-01

    An Escherichia coli K12 strain was constructed that synthesized elevated quantities of Klebsiella aerogenes D-arabitol dehydrogenase; the enzyme accounted for about 5% of the soluble protein in this strain. Some 280 mg of enzyme was purified from 180 g of cell paste. The purified enzyme was active as a monomer of 46,000 mol.wt. The amino acid composition and kinetic constants of the enzyme for D-arabitol and D-mannitol are reported. The apparent Km for D-mannitol was more than 3-fold that for D-arabitol, whereas the maximum velocities with both substrates were indistinguishable. The enzyme purified from the E. coli K12 construct was indistinguishable by the criteria of molecular weight, electrophoretic mobility in native polyacrylamide gel and D-mannitol/D-arabitol activity ratio from D-arabitol dehydrogenase synthesized in wild-type K. aerogenes. Purified D-arabitol dehydrogenase showed no immunological cross-reaction with K. aerogenes ribitol dehydrogenase. During electrophoresis in native polyacrylamide gels, oxidation by persulphate catalysed the formation of inactive polymeric forms of the enzyme. Dithiothreitol and pre-electrophoresis protected against this polymerization. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:393250

  14. Microbiota of Minas cheese as influenced by the nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05.

    PubMed

    Perin, Luana Martins; Dal Bello, Barbara; Belviso, Simona; Zeppa, Giuseppe; Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes de; Cocolin, Luca; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2015-12-01

    Minas cheese is a popular dairy product in Brazil that is traditionally produced using raw or pasteurized cow milk. This study proposed an alternative production of Minas cheese using raw goat milk added of a nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. An in situ investigation was carried on to evaluate the interactions between the L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 and the autochthonous microbiota of a Minas cheese during the ripening; production of biogenic amines (BAs) was assessed as a safety aspect. Minas cheese was produced in two treatments (A, by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05, and B, without adding this strain), in three independent repetitions (R1, R2, and R3). Culture dependent (direct plating) and independent (rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE) methods were employed to characterize the microbiota and to assess the possible interferences caused by L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. BA amounts were measured using HPLC. A significant decrease in coagulase-positive cocci was observed in the cheeses produced by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 (cheese A). The rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE highlighted the differences in the microbiota of both cheeses, separating them into two different clusters. Lactococcus sp. was found as the main microorganism in both cheeses, and the microbiota of cheese A presented a higher number of species. High concentrations of tyramine were found in both cheeses and, at specific ripening times, the BA amounts in cheese B were significantly higher than in cheese A (p<0.05). The interaction of nisin producer L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 was demonstrated in situ, by demonstration of its influence in the complex microbiota naturally present in a raw goat milk cheese and by controlling the growth of coagulase-positive cocci. L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 influenced also the production of BA determining that their amounts in the cheeses were maintained at acceptable levels for human consumption. PMID:26310130

  15. Biological Conversion of Glycerol to Ethanol by Enterobacter aerogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwachukwu, Raymond E. S.

    In a search to turn the economically and environmentally non-valuable "waste" streams of biodiesel production into a profitable byproduct, a mutant strain of Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 13048 was developed by six-tube subculturing technique. This technique is based on the principle of adaptive evolution, and involved subculturing the bacterium in a tryptic soy broth without dextrose (TSB) containing specific glycerol and ethanol concentration for six consecutive times. Then, the six consecutive subculturing was repeated in a fresh TSB of higher glycerol and ethanol concentrations. A new mutant strain, E. aerogenes S012, which could withstand a combination of 200 g/l glycerol and 30 g/l ethanol concentrations, was developed. The wild and mutant strains were used for the fermentation of pure (P-) and recovered (R-) glycerol. Taguchi and full factorial methods of design of experiments were used to screen and optimize the important process factors that influence the microbial production of ethanol. A statistically sound regression model was used to establish the mathematical relationship between the process variables and ethanol production. Temperature of 38°C, agitation speed of 200 rpm, pH of 6.3-6.6, and microaerobic condition were the optimum process conditions. Different pretreatment methods to recover glycerol from the crude glycerol and the subsequent fermentation method showed that direct acidification using 85% H3PO4 was the best. The R-glycerol contained 51% pure glycerol and 21% methanol. The wild strain, E. aerogenes ATCC 13048, produced only 12 g/l and 12.8 g/l ethanol from 20 g/l P- and R-glycerol respectively, and could not utilize higher glycerol concentrations. The mutant, E. aerogenes S012, produced ethanol amount and yield of 43 g/l and 1.12 mol/mol-glycerol from P-glycerol, respectively within 96 h. It also produced ethanol amount and yield of 26.8 g/l and 1.07 mol/mol-glycerol, respectively, from R-glycerol within the same duration. In a fermentation to estimate hydrogen production using a respirometer, the hydrogen yield and volumetric rate of 1.06 mol/mol-glycerol and 217 ml/l/h, respectively were obtained from 6% P-glycerol in 72 h by E. aerogenes S012. The result was higher from R-glycerol, which produced hydrogen yield and productivity of 1.83 mol/mol-glycerol and 326 ml/l/h, respectively.

  16. METABOLISM OF PENTOSES AND PENTITOLS BY AEROBACTER AEROGENES I.

    PubMed Central

    Mortlock, R. P.; Wood, W. A.

    1964-01-01

    Mortlock, R. P. (Michigan State University, East Lansing) and W. A. Wood. Metabolism of pentoses and pentitols by Aerobacter aerogenes. I. Demonstration of pentose isomerase, pentulokinase, and pentitol dehydrogenase enzyme families. J. Bacteriol. 88:838–844. 1964.—Aerobacter aerogenes PRL-R3 is capable of utilizing as sole substrates for energy and growth seven of the eight aldopentoses and all of the four pentitols. Growth upon media containing either d-xylose, l-arabinose, d-ribose, d-arabitol, or ribitol occurred within 24 hr at 26 C. When d-arabinose or l-arabitol were used as growth substrates, growth was complete within 2 days; 4 days were required for growth on d-lyxose or xylitol, and 3 to 4 weeks for growth upon l-xylose. The versatility of this strain of A. aerogenes is due to an ability to synthesize in the presence of appropriate carbohydrates (inducers) families of enzymes which catalyze the metabolism of the carbohydrates (i.e., families of pentitol dehydrogenases, aldopentose isomerases, and pentulokinases). The specificity of induction for members of the enzyme families was found to vary, and cross induction of enzyme activity was common, especially among the pentitol dehydrogenases. Ribitol dehydrogenase activity was detected in extracts of cells grown on all of the above carbohydrates with the exception of d-xylose, l-arabinose, and d-ribose. The ribitol dehydrogenase activity of xylitol-grown cell extracts was fivefold higher than the activity in extracts of ribitol-grown cells. PMID:14219044

  17. Citrate uptake in membrane vesicles of Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C L; Cha, Y A; Stern, J R

    1975-01-01

    In whole cells of Klebsiella aerogenes grown anaerobically on citrate as sole carbon source, citrate uptake is followed by rapid catabolism of the substrate via the inducible citrate fermentation pathway. Membrane vesicles prepared from such cells take up citrate but do not catabolize it. Vesicles process d-lactate dehydrogenase and the Na+-requiring oxalacetate decarboxylase. Citrate is taken up in the presence of Na+, and other monovalent cations, such as NH4+, Rb+, Cs+, or K+, do not substitute for Na+. Li+ appears to act synergistically with Na+. Citrate uptake is inhibited by N-2, cyanide, azide, sulfhydryl reagents, dinitrophenol, fluorcitrate, and hydroxycitrate. PMID:1112775

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of the Putrescine-Producing Strain Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1AA59

    PubMed Central

    Ladero, Victor; del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M.; Fernandez, María; Mayo, Baltasar; Martín, M. Cruz

    2015-01-01

    We report here the 2,576,542-bp genome annotated draft assembly sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1AA59. This strain—isolated from a traditional cheese—produces putrescine, one of the most frequently biogenic amines found in dairy products. PMID:26089428

  19. Comparative Phenotypic and Molecular Genetic Profiling of Wild Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Strains of the L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris Genotypes, Isolated from Starter-Free Cheeses Made of Raw Milk?

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Elena; Alegría, Ángel; Delgado, Susana; Martín, M. Cruz; Mayo, Baltasar

    2011-01-01

    Twenty Lactococcus lactis strains with an L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype isolated from five traditional cheeses made of raw milk with no added starters belonging to the L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris genotypes (lactis and cremoris genotypes, respectively; 10 strains each) were subjected to a series of phenotypic and genetic typing methods, with the aims of determining their phylogenetic relationships and suitability as starters. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of intact genomes digested with SalI and SmaI proved that all strains were different except for three isolates of the cremoris genotype, which showed identical PFGE profiles. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis using internal sequences of seven loci (namely, atpA, rpoA, pheS, pepN, bcaT, pepX, and 16S rRNA gene) revealed considerable intergenotype nucleotide polymorphism, although deduced amino acid changes were scarce. Analysis of the MLST data for the present strains and others from other dairy and nondairy sources showed that all of them clustered into the cremoris or lactis genotype group, by using both independent and combined gene sequences. These two groups of strains also showed distinctive carbohydrate fermentation and enzyme activity profiles, with the strains in the cremoris group showing broader profiles. However, the profiles of resistance/susceptibility to 16 antibiotics were very similar, showing no atypical resistance, except for tetracycline resistance in three identical cremoris genotype isolates. The numbers and concentrations of volatile compounds produced in milk by the strains belonging to these two groups were clearly different, with the cremoris genotype strains producing higher concentrations of more branched-chain, derived compounds. Together, the present results support the idea that the lactis and cremoris genotypes of phenotypic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis actually represent true subspecies. Some strains of the two subspecies in this study appear to be good starter candidates. PMID:21666023

  20. Our understanding of how antibiotics induce bacte-rial cell death is centred on the essential bacterial cell

    E-print Network

    Collins, James J.

    Our understanding of how antibiotics induce bacte- rial cell death is centred on the essential bacterial cell function that is inhibited by the primary drug­target interaction. Antibiotics can. These efforts have greatly enhanced our clinical armamentarium. Antibiotic- mediated cell death, however

  1. Hydrogen production from biodiesel byproduct by immobilized Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Han, Jinmi; Lee, Dohoon; Cho, Jinku; Lee, Jeewon; Kim, Sangyong

    2012-01-01

    The recent rapid growth of the biodiesel industry has generated a significant amount of glycerol as a byproduct. As a result, the price of glycerol is currently relatively low, making it an attractive starting material for the production of chemicals with higher values. Crude glycerol can be directly converted through microbial fermentation into various chemicals such as hydrogen. In this study, we optimized immobilization of a facultative hydrogen producing microorganism, Enterobacter aerogenes, with the goal of developing biocatalysts that was appropriate for the continuous hydrogen production from glycerol. Several carriers were tested and agar was found to be the most effective. In addition, it was clearly shown that variables such as the carrier content and cell loading should be controlled for the immobilization of biocatalysts with high hydrogen productivity, stability, and reusability. After optimization of these variables, we were able to obtain reusable biocatalysts that could directly convert the byproduct stream from biodiesel processes into hydrogen in continuous processes. PMID:21915673

  2. Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, Isolated from a Nonscalded Curd Pressed Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Velly, H.; Abraham, A.-L.; Loux, V.; Delacroix-Buchet, A.; Fonseca, F.; Bouix, M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium used in the production of many fermented foods, such as dairy products. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, isolated from nonscalded curd pressed cheese. This genome sequence provides information in relation to dairy environment adaptation. PMID:25377704

  3. Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, Isolated from a Nonscalded Curd Pressed Cheese.

    PubMed

    Velly, H; Renault, P; Abraham, A-L; Loux, V; Delacroix-Buchet, A; Fonseca, F; Bouix, M

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium used in the production of many fermented foods, such as dairy products. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, isolated from nonscalded curd pressed cheese. This genome sequence provides information in relation to dairy environment adaptation. PMID:25377704

  4. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: Characterization of the bacteriocin

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Danielle N.; Todorov, Svetoslav D.; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T.; Franco, Bernadette D.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi) was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its antimicrobial activity. The bacteriocin presented a broad spectrum of activity, was sensitive to proteolytic enzymes, resistant to heat and pH extremes, and not affected by the presence of SDS, Tween 20, Tween 80, EDTA or NaCl. Bacteriocin production was dependent on the components of the culture media, especially nitrogen source and salts. When tested by PCR, the bacteriocin gene presented 100% homology to nisin Z gene. These properties indicate that this L. lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality. PMID:25763065

  5. Growth and Energy Generation by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis during Citrate Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hugenholtz, J; Perdon, L; Abee, T

    1993-12-01

    Growth of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis was observed on media with citrate as the only energy source. At pH 5.6, steady state was achieved in a chemostat on a citrate-containing medium in the absence of a carbohydrate. Under these conditions, pyruvate, acetate, and some acetoin and butanediol were the main fermentation products. This indicated that energy was conserved in L. lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis during citrate metabolism and presumably during the conversion of citrate into pyruvate. The presumed energy-conserving step, decarboxylation of oxaloacetate, was studied in detail. Oxaloacetate decarboxylase was purified to homogeneity and characterized. The enzyme has a native molecular mass of approximately 300 kDa and consists of three subunits of 52, 34, and 12 kDa. The enzyme is apparently not sodium dependent and does not contain a biotin moiety, and it seems to be different from the energy-generating oxaloacetate decarboxylase from Klebsiella pneumoniae. Energy-depleted L. lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis cells generated a membrane potential and a pH gradient immediately upon addition of citrate, whereas ATP formation was slow and limited. In contrast, lactose energization resulted in rapid ATP formation and gradual generation of a proton motive force. These data were confirmed during studies on amino acid uptake. alpha-Aminoisobutyrate uptake was rapid but glutamate uptake was slow in citrate-energized cells, whereas lactose-energized cells showed the reverse tendency. These data suggest that, in L. lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis, a proton motive force could be generated during citrate metabolism as a result of electrogenic citrate uptake or citrate/product exchange together with proton consumption by the intracellular oxaloacetate decarboxylase. PMID:16349120

  6. Growth and Energy Generation by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis during Citrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Perdon, Leo; Abee, Tjakko

    1993-01-01

    Growth of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis was observed on media with citrate as the only energy source. At pH 5.6, steady state was achieved in a chemostat on a citrate-containing medium in the absence of a carbohydrate. Under these conditions, pyruvate, acetate, and some acetoin and butanediol were the main fermentation products. This indicated that energy was conserved in L. lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis during citrate metabolism and presumably during the conversion of citrate into pyruvate. The presumed energy-conserving step, decarboxylation of oxaloacetate, was studied in detail. Oxaloacetate decarboxylase was purified to homogeneity and characterized. The enzyme has a native molecular mass of approximately 300 kDa and consists of three subunits of 52, 34, and 12 kDa. The enzyme is apparently not sodium dependent and does not contain a biotin moiety, and it seems to be different from the energy-generating oxaloacetate decarboxylase from Klebsiella pneumoniae. Energy-depleted L. lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis cells generated a membrane potential and a pH gradient immediately upon addition of citrate, whereas ATP formation was slow and limited. In contrast, lactose energization resulted in rapid ATP formation and gradual generation of a proton motive force. These data were confirmed during studies on amino acid uptake. ?-Aminoisobutyrate uptake was rapid but glutamate uptake was slow in citrate-energized cells, whereas lactose-energized cells showed the reverse tendency. These data suggest that, in L. lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis, a proton motive force could be generated during citrate metabolism as a result of electrogenic citrate uptake or citrate/product exchange together with proton consumption by the intracellular oxaloacetate decarboxylase. Images PMID:16349120

  7. A system to generate chromosomal mutations in Lactococcus lactis which allows fast analysis of targeted genes.

    PubMed Central

    Law, J; Buist, G; Haandrikman, A; Kok, J; Venema, G; Leenhouts, K

    1995-01-01

    A system for generating chromosomal insertions in lactococci is described. It is based on the conditional replication of lactococcal pWV01-derived Ori+ RepA- vector pORI19, containing lacZ alpha and the multiple cloning site of pUC19. Chromosomal AluI fragments of Lactococcus lactis were cloned in pORI19 in RepA+ helper strain Escherichia coli EC101. The frequency of Campbell-type recombinants, following introduction of this plasmid bank into L. lactis (RepA-), was increased by combining the system with temperature-sensitive pWV01 derivative pVE6007. Transformation of L. lactis MG1363 (pVE6007) with the pORI19 bank of lactococcal chromosomal fragments at the permissive temperature allowed replication of several copies of a recombinant plasmid from the bank within a cell because of the provision in trans of RepA-Ts from pVE6007. A temperature shift to 37 degrees C resulted in loss of pVE6007 and integration of the pORI19 derivatives at high frequencies. A bank of lactococcal mutants was made in this way and successfully screened for the presence of two mutations: one in the monocistronic 1.3-kb peptidoglycan hydrolase gene (acmA) and one in the hitherto uncharacterized maltose fermentation pathway. Reintroduction of pVE6007 into the Mal- mutant at 30 degrees C resulted in excision of the integrated plasmid and restoration of the ability of ferment maltose. The integration plasmid (pMAL) was rescued by using the isolated plasmid content of a restored Mal+ colony to transform E. coli EC101. Nucleotide sequencing of the 564-bp chromosomal fragment in pMAL revealed an internal part of an open reading frame of which the translated product showed significant homology with ATP-binding proteins MalK of E. coli, Salmonella typhimurium, and Enterobacter aerogenes and MsmK of Streptococcus mutans. This combined use of two types of conditional replicating pWV01-derived vectors represents a novel, powerful tool for chromosomal gene inactivation, targeting, cloning, and sequencing of the labelled gene. PMID:8522504

  8. An efficient ribitol-specific dehydrogenase from Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranjitha; Singh, Raushan; Kim, In-Won; Sigdel, Sujan; Kalia, Vipin C; Kang, Yun Chan; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2015-05-01

    An NAD(+)-dependent ribitol dehydrogenase from Enterobacter aerogenes KCTC 2190 (EaRDH) was cloned and successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. The complete 729-bp gene was amplified, cloned, expressed, and subsequently purified in an active soluble form using nickel affinity chromatography. The enzyme had an optimal pH and temperature of 11.0 and 45°C, respectively. Among various polyols, EaRDH exhibited activity only toward ribitol, with Km, Vmax, and kcat/Km values of 10.3mM, 185Umg(-1), and 30.9s(-1)mM(-1), respectively. The enzyme showed strong preference for NAD(+) and displayed no detectable activity with NADP(+). Homology modeling and sequence analysis of EaRDH, along with its biochemical properties, confirmed that EaRDH belongs to the family of NAD(+)-dependent ribitol dehydrogenases, a member of short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SCOR) family. EaRDH showed the highest activity and unique substrate specificity among all known RDHs. Homology modeling and docking analysis shed light on the molecular basis of its unusually high activity and substrate specificity. PMID:25837508

  9. Complete genome sequence of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BLC1.

    PubMed

    Bottacini, Francesca; Dal Bello, Fabio; Turroni, Francesca; Milani, Christian; Duranti, Sabrina; Foroni, Elena; Viappiani, Alice; Strati, Francesco; Mora, Diego; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2011-11-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BLC1 is a probiotic bacterium that is widely exploited by food industries as the active ingredient of various functional foods. Here we report the complete genome sequence of B. animalis subsp. lactis BLC1, which is expected to provide insights into the biology of this health-promoting microorganism and improve our understanding of its phylogenetic relatedness with other members of the B. animalis subsp. lactis taxon. PMID:22038957

  10. RACT/BACT/LAER clearinghouse: A compilation of control technology determinations. Fourth supplement to the 1990 edition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steigerwald, J.E.

    1994-06-01

    All RACT/BACT/LAER Clearinghouse (RBLC) supplements contain detailed information only for those permits entered into the Clearinghouse since the last published compilation or supplement. This edition also includes a comprehensive index of all permits entered into the system since June 1989. The 1994 edition adds 133 new determinations entered into the system from June 1993 to May 1994. Also since last year, incomplete determinations for the state of Washington have been deleted at the request of the submitting agency, Puget Sound Air Pollution Control Agency. In total, BLIS now contains 3,097 determinations from 50 states and three territories.

  11. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: Evaluation of the probiotic potential

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Danielle N.; Todorov, Svetoslav D.; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T.; Franco, Bernadette D.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi) was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its probiotic potential. Lc. lactis DF4Mi was resistant to acidic pH and oxbile, presented co-aggregation with Listeria monocytogenes, and was not affected by several drugs from different generic groups, being sensitive to most tested antibiotics. These properties indicate that this Lc. lactis strain can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality, in combination with potential probiotic properties. PMID:25477942

  12. Branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis genes in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Godon, J J; Chopin, M C; Ehrlich, S D

    1992-01-01

    The genes for biosynthesis of the branched-chain amino acids leucine, isoleucine, and valine in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO2118 were characterized by cloning, complementation in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, and nucleotide sequence analysis. Nine structural genes are clustered on a 12-kb DNA fragment in the order leuABCD ilvDBNCA. Upstream of these genes, the nucleotide sequence suggests the existence of regulation by transcriptional attenuation. Between the leuD and ilvD genes is an unexpected gene, encoding a protein which belongs to the ATP-binding cassette protein superfamily. PMID:1400210

  13. Detection and Viability of Lactococcus lactis throughout Cheese Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Cocolin, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidences highlighted the presence of Lactococcus lactis during late cheese ripening. For this reason, the role of this microorganism, well known as dairy starter, should be reconsidered throughout cheese manufacturing and ripening. Thus, the main objective of this study was to develop a RT-qPCR protocol for the detection, quantification and determination of the viability of L. lactis in ripened cheese samples by direct analysis of microbial nucleic acids. Standard curves were constructed for the specific quantification of L. lactis in cheese matrices and good results in terms of selectivity, correlation coefficient and efficiency were obtained. Thirty-three ripened cheeses were analyzed and, on the basis of RNA analysis, twelve samples showed 106 to 108 CFU of L. lactis per gram of product, thirteen from 103 to 105 CFU/g, and in eight cheeses, L. lactis was not detected. Traditional plating on M17 medium led to loads ranging from 105 to 109 CFU/g, including the cheese samples where no L. lactis was found by RT-qPCR. From these cheeses, none of the colonies isolated on M17 medium was identified as L. lactis species. These data could be interpreted as a lack of selectivity of M17 medium where colony growth is not always related to lactococcal species. At the same time, the absence or low abundance of L. lactis isolates on M17 medium from cheese where L. lactis was detected by RT-qPCR support the hypothesis that L. lactis starter populations are mainly present in viable but not culturable state during ripening and, for this reason, culture-dependent methods have to be supplemented with direct analysis of cheese. PMID:25503474

  14. Cutaneous abscess caused by Corynebacterium lactis in a companion dog.

    PubMed

    Antunes, João Marcelo Azevedo de Paula; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Demoner, Larissa de Castro; Ramos, Juliana Nunes; Baio, Paulo Victor Pereira; Simpson-Louredo, Liliane; Santos, Cíntia Silva; Hirata, Raphael; Ferioli, Raquel Beneton; Romera, Adriana Resmond Cruz; Vieira, Verônica Viana; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2015-07-01

    Many new, emerging and re-emerging diseases of humans are caused by pathogens which originate from animals or products of animal origin. Corynebacterium lactis, a recently described species of the genus Corynebacterium, was first isolated from milk of asymptomatic cows. In the present study a cutaneous abscess caused by C. lactis in a dog was recognized by cytologic and histologic examination in addition to 16S rRNA gene analysis of the microorganism. Therefore, C. lactis should be included among other bacterial species recognized as emerging pathogens for companion animals. PMID:25937144

  15. Genetic transformation of intact Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis by high-voltage electroporation

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, D.A.; Harlander, S.K. )

    1989-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a system for electroporating intact cells of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis LM0230 (previously designated Streptococcus lactis LM0230) with a commercially available electroporation unit. Parameters which influenced the efficiency of transformation included growth phase and final concentration of cells, ionic strength of the suspending medium, concentration of plasmid DNA, and the amplitude and duration of the pulse. Washed suspensions of intact cells suspended in deionized distilled water were subjected to one high-voltage electric pulse varying in voltage (300 to 900 V corresponding to field strengths of 5 to 17 kV/cm) and duration (100 {mu}s to 1 s). Transformation efficiencies of 10{sup 3} transformants per {mu}g of DNA were obtained when dense suspensions (final concentration, 5 {times} 10{sup 10} CFU/ml) of stationary-phase cells were subjected to one pulse with a peak voltage of 900 V (field strength, 17 kV/cm) and a pulse duration of 5 ms in the presence of plasmid DNA. Dilution of porated cells in broth medium followed by an expression period of 2 h at 30{degree}C was beneficial in enhancing transformation efficiencies. Plasmids ranging in size from 9.8 to 30.0 kilobase pairs could be transformed by this procedure.

  16. DNA Macroarray Profiling of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL1403 Gene Expression during Environmental Stresses†

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yi; Chou, Lan-szu; Cutler, Adele; Weimer, Bart

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the use of an oligonucleotide macroarray to profile the expression of 375 genes in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL1403 during heat, acid, and osmotic stress. A set of known stress-associated genes in IL1403 was used as the internal control on the array. Every stress response was accurately detected using the macroarray, compared to data from previous reports. As a group, the expression patterns of the investigated metabolic genes were significantly altered by heat, acid, and osmotic stresses. Specifically, 13 to 18% of the investigated genes were differentially expressed in each of the environmental stress treatments. Interestingly, the methionine biosynthesis pathway genes (metA-metB1 and metB2-cysK) were induced during heat shock, but methionine utilization genes, such as metK, were induced during acid stress. These data provide a possible explanation for the differences between acid tolerance mechanisms of L. lactis strains IL1403 and MG1363 reported previously. Several groups of transcriptional responses were common among the stress treatments, such as repression of peptide transporter genes, including the opt operon (also known as dpp) and dtpT. Reduction of peptide transport due to environmental stress will have important implications in the cheese ripening process. Although stress responses in lactococci were extensively studied during the last decade, additional information about this bacterium was gained from the use of this metabolic array. PMID:15528540

  17. Enterobacter aerogenes and Enterobacter cloacae; versatile bacterial pathogens confronting antibiotic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Davin-Regli, Anne; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes and E. cloacae have been reported as important opportunistic and multiresistant bacterial pathogens for humans during the last three decades in hospital wards. These Gram-negative bacteria have been largely described during several outbreaks of hospital-acquired infections in Europe and particularly in France. The dissemination of Enterobacter sp. is associated with the presence of redundant regulatory cascades that efficiently control the membrane permeability ensuring the bacterial protection and the expression of detoxifying enzymes involved in antibiotic degradation/inactivation. In addition, these bacterial species are able to acquire numerous genetic mobile elements that strongly contribute to antibiotic resistance. Moreover, this particular fitness help them to colonize several environments and hosts and rapidly and efficiently adapt their metabolism and physiology to external conditions and environmental stresses. Enterobacter is a versatile bacterium able to promptly respond to the antibiotic treatment in the colonized patient. The balance of the prevalence, E. aerogenes versus E. cloacae, in the reported hospital infections during the last period, questions about the horizontal transmission of mobile elements containing antibiotic resistance genes, e.g., the efficacy of the exchange of resistance genes Klebsiella pneumoniae to Enterobacter sp. It is also important to mention the possible role of antibiotic use in the treatment of bacterial infectious diseases in this E. aerogenes/E. cloacae evolution. PMID:26042091

  18. Enterobacter aerogenes and Enterobacter cloacae; versatile bacterial pathogens confronting antibiotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Davin-Regli, Anne; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes and E. cloacae have been reported as important opportunistic and multiresistant bacterial pathogens for humans during the last three decades in hospital wards. These Gram-negative bacteria have been largely described during several outbreaks of hospital-acquired infections in Europe and particularly in France. The dissemination of Enterobacter sp. is associated with the presence of redundant regulatory cascades that efficiently control the membrane permeability ensuring the bacterial protection and the expression of detoxifying enzymes involved in antibiotic degradation/inactivation. In addition, these bacterial species are able to acquire numerous genetic mobile elements that strongly contribute to antibiotic resistance. Moreover, this particular fitness help them to colonize several environments and hosts and rapidly and efficiently adapt their metabolism and physiology to external conditions and environmental stresses. Enterobacter is a versatile bacterium able to promptly respond to the antibiotic treatment in the colonized patient. The balance of the prevalence, E. aerogenes versus E. cloacae, in the reported hospital infections during the last period, questions about the horizontal transmission of mobile elements containing antibiotic resistance genes, e.g., the efficacy of the exchange of resistance genes Klebsiella pneumoniae to Enterobacter sp. It is also important to mention the possible role of antibiotic use in the treatment of bacterial infectious diseases in this E. aerogenes/E. cloacae evolution. PMID:26042091

  19. Partial purification and characterization of a novel histidine decarboxylase from Enterobacter aerogenes DL-1.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yu; Hu, Wenzhong; Jiang, Aili; Tian, Mixia

    2015-08-18

    Histidine decarboxylase (HDC) from Enterobacter aerogenes DL-1 was purified in a three-step procedure involving ammonium sulfate precipitation, Sephadex G-100, and DEAE-Sepharose column chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed a single protein band of 52.4 kD on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The optimum pH for HDC activity was 6.5, and the enzyme was stable between pH 4 and 8. Enterobacter aerogenes HDC had optimal activity at 40°C and retained most of its activity between 4 and 50°C. HDC activity was reduced in the presence of numerous tested compounds. Particularly with SDS, it significantly (p < 0.01) inhibited enzyme activity. Conversely, Ca(2+) and Mn(2+) showed prominent activation effects (p < 0.01) with activity increasing to 117.20% and 123.42%, respectively. The Lineweaver-Burk plot showed that K m and V max values of the enzyme for L-histidine were 0.21 mM and 71.39 µmol/min, respectively. In comparison with most HDCs from other microorganisms and animals, HDC from E. aerogenes DL-1 displayed higher affinity and greater reaction velocity toward L-histidine. PMID:25036745

  20. Inactivation of Enterobacter aerogenes in reconstituted skim milk by high- and low-frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shengpu; Hemar, Yacine; Lewis, Gillian D; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2014-11-01

    The inactivation of Enterobacter aerogenes in skim milk using low-frequency (20kHz) and high-frequency (850kHz) ultrasonication was investigated. It was found that low-frequency acoustic cavitation resulted in lethal damage to E. aerogenes. The bacteria were more sensitive to ultrasound in water than in reconstituted skim milk having different protein concentrations. However, high-frequency ultrasound was not able to inactivate E. aerogenes in milk even when powers as high as 50W for 60min were used. This study also showed that high-frequency ultrasonication had no influence on the viscosity and particle size of skim milk, whereas low-frequency ultrasonication resulted in the decrease in viscosity and particle size of milk. The decrease in particle size is believed to be due to the breakup of the fat globules, and possibly to the cleavage of the ?-casein present at the surface of the casein micelles. Whey proteins were also found to be slightly affected by low-frequency ultrasound, with the amounts of ?-lactalbumin and ?-lactoglobulin slightly decreasing. PMID:24394387

  1. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... bacterium Lactococcus lactis (previously named Streptococcus lactis). The preparation contains the...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis...Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1388 Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis...Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1388 Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis...Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1388 Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis...Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1388 Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis...Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1388 Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., nontoxicogenic yeast Kluyveromyces lactis (previously named Saccharomyces lactis). It contains the enzyme ?... prepared from yeast that has been grown in a pure culture fermentation and by using materials that...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., nontoxicogenic yeast Kluyveromyces lactis (previously named Saccharomyces lactis). It contains the enzyme ?... prepared from yeast that has been grown in a pure culture fermentation and by using materials that...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., nontoxicogenic yeast Kluyveromyces lactis (previously named Saccharomyces lactis). It contains the enzyme ?... prepared from yeast that has been grown in a pure culture fermentation and by using materials that...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., nontoxicogenic yeast Kluyveromyces lactis (previously named Saccharomyces lactis). It contains the enzyme ?... prepared from yeast that has been grown in a pure culture fermentation and by using materials that...

  11. Parameter Estimation of Actuators for Benchmark Active Control Technology (BACT) Wind Tunnel Model with Analysis of Wear and Aerodynamic Loading Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Fung, Jimmy

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the development of transfer function models for the trailing-edge and upper and lower spoiler actuators of the Benchmark Active Control Technology (BACT) wind tunnel model for application to control system analysis and design. A simple nonlinear least-squares parameter estimation approach is applied to determine transfer function parameters from frequency response data. Unconstrained quasi-Newton minimization of weighted frequency response error was employed to estimate the transfer function parameters. An analysis of the behavior of the actuators over time to assess the effects of wear and aerodynamic load by using the transfer function models is also presented. The frequency responses indicate consistent actuator behavior throughout the wind tunnel test and only slight degradation in effectiveness due to aerodynamic hinge loading. The resulting actuator models have been used in design, analysis, and simulation of controllers for the BACT to successfully suppress flutter over a wide range of conditions.

  12. Hydrogen peroxide-producing NADH oxidase (nox-1) from Lactococcus lactis

    E-print Network

    Hydrogen peroxide-producing NADH oxidase (nox-1) from Lactococcus lactis Rongrong Jiang and Andreas applied the sequence comparison-based approach to develop a novel hydrogen peroxide-forming NADH oxidase (nox-1) from Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) that reduces oxygen to hydrogen peroxide. The nox-1 gene

  13. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis IL1403

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Alexander; Wincker, Patrick; Mauger, Stéphane; Jaillon, Olivier; Malarme, Karine; Weissenbach, Jean; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Sorokin, Alexei

    2001-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a nonpathogenic AT-rich gram-positive bacterium closely related to the genus Streptococcus and is the most commonly used cheese starter. It is also the best-characterized lactic acid bacterium. We sequenced the genome of the laboratory strain IL1403, using a novel two-step strategy that comprises diagnostic sequencing of the entire genome and a shotgun polishing step. The genome contains 2,365,589 base pairs and encodes 2310 proteins, including 293 protein-coding genes belonging to six prophages and 43 insertion sequence (IS) elements. Nonrandom distribution of IS elements indicates that the chromosome of the sequenced strain may be a product of recent recombination between two closely related genomes. A complete set of late competence genes is present, indicating the ability of L. lactis to undergo DNA transformation. Genomic sequence revealed new possibilities for fermentation pathways and for aerobic respiration. It also indicated a horizontal transfer of genetic information from Lactococcus to gram-negative enteric bacteria of Salmonella-Escherichia group. [The sequence data described in this paper has been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession no. AE005176.] PMID:11337471

  14. Essential oils affect populations of some rumen bacteria in vitro as revealed by microarray (RumenBactArray) analysis.

    PubMed

    Patra, Amlan K; Yu, Zhongtang

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study origanum oil (ORO), garlic oil (GAO), and peppermint oil (PEO) were shown to effectively lower methane production, decrease abundance of methanogens, and change abundances of several bacterial populations important to feed digestion in vitro. In this study, the impact of these essential oils (EOs, at 0.50 g/L) on the rumen bacterial community composition and population was further examined using the recently developed RumenBactArray. Species richness (expressed as number of operational taxonomic units, OTUs) in the phylum Firmicutes, especially those in the class Clostridia, was decreased by ORO and GAO, but increased by PEO, while that in the phylum Bacteroidetes was increased by ORO and PEO. Species richness in the genus Butyrivibrio was lowered by all the EOs. Increases of Bacteroidetes OTUs mainly resulted from increases of Prevotella OTUs. Overall, 67 individual OTUs showed significant differences (P ? 0.05) in relative abundance across the EO treatments. The predominant OTUs affected by EOs were diverse, including those related to Syntrophococcus sucromutans, Succiniclasticum ruminis, and Lachnobacterium bovis, and those classified to Prevotella, Clostridium, Roseburia, Pseudobutyrivibrio, Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, Prevotellaceae, Bacteroidales, and Clostridiales. In total, 60 OTUs were found significantly (P ? 0.05) correlated with feed degradability, ammonia concentration, and molar percentage of volatile fatty acids. Taken together, this study demonstrated extensive impact of EOs on rumen bacterial communities in an EO type-dependent manner, especially those in the predominant families Prevotellaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and Ruminococcaceae. The information from this study may aid in understanding the effect of EOs on feed digestion and fermentation by rumen bacteria. PMID:25914694

  15. Essential oils affect populations of some rumen bacteria in vitro as revealed by microarray (RumenBactArray) analysis

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Amlan K.; Yu, Zhongtang

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study origanum oil (ORO), garlic oil (GAO), and peppermint oil (PEO) were shown to effectively lower methane production, decrease abundance of methanogens, and change abundances of several bacterial populations important to feed digestion in vitro. In this study, the impact of these essential oils (EOs, at 0.50 g/L) on the rumen bacterial community composition and population was further examined using the recently developed RumenBactArray. Species richness (expressed as number of operational taxonomic units, OTUs) in the phylum Firmicutes, especially those in the class Clostridia, was decreased by ORO and GAO, but increased by PEO, while that in the phylum Bacteroidetes was increased by ORO and PEO. Species richness in the genus Butyrivibrio was lowered by all the EOs. Increases of Bacteroidetes OTUs mainly resulted from increases of Prevotella OTUs. Overall, 67 individual OTUs showed significant differences (P ? 0.05) in relative abundance across the EO treatments. The predominant OTUs affected by EOs were diverse, including those related to Syntrophococcus sucromutans, Succiniclasticum ruminis, and Lachnobacterium bovis, and those classified to Prevotella, Clostridium, Roseburia, Pseudobutyrivibrio, Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, Prevotellaceae, Bacteroidales, and Clostridiales. In total, 60 OTUs were found significantly (P ? 0.05) correlated with feed degradability, ammonia concentration, and molar percentage of volatile fatty acids. Taken together, this study demonstrated extensive impact of EOs on rumen bacterial communities in an EO type-dependent manner, especially those in the predominant families Prevotellaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and Ruminococcaceae. The information from this study may aid in understanding the effect of EOs on feed digestion and fermentation by rumen bacteria. PMID:25914694

  16. Secretory expression of a heterologous nattokinase in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Lixin; Zhong, Jin; Huan, Liandong

    2007-05-01

    Nattokinase has been reported as an oral health product for the prevention of atherosclerosis. We developed a novel strategy to express a nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis in a live delivery vehicle, Lactococcus lactis. Promoter P( nisZ) and signal peptide SP(Usp) were used for inducible and secretory expression of nattokinase in L. lactis. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that nattokinase was successfully expressed, and about 94% of the enzyme was secreted to the culture. The recombinant nattokinase showed potent fibrinolytic activity, equivalent to 41.7 urokinase units per milliliter culture. Expression and delivery of such a fibrinolytic enzyme in the food-grade vehicle L. lactis would facilitate the widespread application of nattokinase in the control and prevention of thrombosis diseases. PMID:17225095

  17. Physiological function of exopolysaccharides produced by Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Looijesteijn, P J; Trapet, L; de Vries, E; Abee, T; Hugenholtz, J

    2001-02-28

    The physiological function of EPS produced by Lactococcus lactis was studied by comparing the tolerance of the non-EPS producing strain L. lactis ssp. cremoris MG1614 and an EPS producing isogenic variant of this strain to several anti-microbial factors. There was no difference in the sensitivity of the strains to increased temperatures, freezing or freeze-drying and the antibiotics, penicillin and vancomycin. A model system showed that EPS production did not affect the survival of L. lactis during passage through the gastrointestinal tract although the EPS itself was not degraded during this passage. The presence of cell associated EPS and EPS in suspension resulted in an increased tolerance to copper and nisin. Furthermore, cell associated EPS also protected the bacteria against bacteriophages and the cell wall degrading enzyme lysozyme. However, it has not been possible, so far, to increase EPS production using the presence of copper, nisin, lysozyme or bacteriophages as inducing factors. PMID:11252513

  18. Study of the role of anaerobic metabolism in succinate production by Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yoshinori; Kaida, Kenichi; Hayakawa, Atsushi; Fukui, Keita; Nishio, Yousuke; Hashiguchi, Kenichi; Fudou, Ryosuke; Matsui, Kazuhiko; Usuda, Yoshihiro; Sode, Koji

    2014-09-01

    Succinate is a core biochemical building block; optimizing succinate production from biomass by microbial fermentation is a focus of basic and applied biotechnology research. Lowering pH in anaerobic succinate fermentation culture is a cost-effective and environmentally friendly approach to reducing the use of sub-raw materials such as alkali, which are needed for neutralization. To evaluate the potential of bacteria-based succinate fermentation under weak acidic (pH <6.2) and anaerobic conditions, we characterized the anaerobic metabolism of Enterobacter aerogenes AJ110637, which rapidly assimilates glucose at pH 5.0. Based on the profile of anaerobic products, we constructed single-gene knockout mutants to eliminate the main anaerobic metabolic pathways involved in NADH re-oxidation. These single-gene knockout studies showed that the ethanol synthesis pathway serves as the dominant NADH re-oxidation pathway in this organism. To generate a metabolically engineered strain for succinate production, we eliminated ethanol formation and introduced a heterogeneous carboxylation enzyme, yielding E. aerogenes strain ?adhE/PCK. The strain produced succinate from glucose with a 60.5% yield (grams of succinate produced per gram of glucose consumed) at pH <6.2 and anaerobic conditions. Thus, we showed the potential of bacteria-based succinate fermentation under weak acidic conditions. PMID:24962116

  19. Studies of the Acetate Kinase-Phosphotransacetylase and the Butanediol-Forming Systems in Aerobacter aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Brown, T. D. K.; Pereira, C. R. S.; Størmer, F. C.

    1972-01-01

    Mutants of Aerobacter aerogenes devoid of acetate kinase and phosphotransacetylase activities were isolated by selection for resistance to fluoroacetate on lactate medium. The mutants were used to study the role of the acetate kinase-phosphotransacetylase system in growth on acetate and glucose. Acetate kinase-negative and phosphotransacetylase-negative mutants were unable to grow on acetate minimal medium. Their growth rates on glucose minimal medium were identical with that of the parent strain under aerobic conditions, but lower growth rates were observed in the mutant strains during anaerobic growth on glucose medium. The mutants were unable to incorporate [2-14C]-acetate rapidly while growing on glycerol. Variations in acetate kinase and phosphotransacetylase levels during growth on glucose were studied. The specific activities of the enzymes increased approximately fivefold during aerobic growth on glucose in batch culture. The enzyme levels were also studied during anaerobic growth on glucose at constant pH (pH 5.8 and 7.0). Smaller increases in specific activities were found under these conditions. The role of acetate in the induction of the diacetyl (acetoin) reductase was investigated using a mutant deficient in both acetate kinase and phosphotransacetylase. The effect of pH on the induction of this enzyme during growth on glucose under anaerobic conditions was tested. The data support the idea that free acetic acid is the inducer for the enzymes of the butanediol-forming pathway in A. aerogenes. PMID:4640502

  20. Effect of nanocomposite packaging containing ZnO on growth of Bacillus subtilis and Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Esmailzadeh, Hakimeh; Sangpour, Parvaneh; Shahraz, Farzaneh; Hejazi, Jalal; Khaksar, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have opened new windows in active food packaging. Nano-sized ZnO is an inexpensive material with potential antimicrobial properties. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the antibacterial effect of low density Polyethylene (LDPE) containing ZnO nanoparticles on Bacillus subtilis and Enterobacter aerogenes. ZnO nanoparticles have been synthesized by facil molten salt method and have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nanocomposite films containing 2 and 4wt.% ZnO nanoparticles were prepared by melt mixing in a twin-screw extruder. The growth of both microorganisms has decreased in the presence of ZnO containing nanocomposites compared with controls. Nanocomposites with 4wt.% ZnO nanoparticles had stronger antibacterial effect against both bacteria in comparison with the 2wt.% ZnO containing nanocomposites. B. subtilis as Gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive to ZnO containing nanocomposite films compared with E. aerogenes as Gram-negative bacteria. There were no significant differences between the migration of Zn ions from 2 and 4wt.% ZnO containing nanocomposites and the released Zn ions were not significantly increased in both groups after 14days compared with the first. Regarding the considerable antibacterial effects of ZnO nanoparticles, their application in active food packaging can be a suitable solution for extending the shelf life of food. PMID:26478403

  1. The purification, crystallization and preliminary diffraction of a glycerophosphodiesterase from Enterobacter aerogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Colin J.; Carr, Paul D.; Kim, Hye-Kyung; Liu, Jian-Wei; Ollis, David L.

    2006-07-01

    The metallo-glycerophosphodiesterase from E. aerogenes (GpdQ) has been cloned, expressed in E. coli and purified. Initial screening of crystallization conditions for this enzyme resulted in the identification of needles from one condition in a sodium malonate grid screen. Removal of the metals from the enzyme and subsequent optimization of these conditions led to crystals. The metallo-glycerophosphodiesterase from Enterobacter aerogenes (GpdQ) has been cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Initial screening of crystallization conditions for this enzyme resulted in the identification of needles from one condition in a sodium malonate grid screen. Removal of the metals from the enzyme and subsequent optimization of these conditions led to crystals that diffracted to 2.9 Å and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}3, with unit-cell parameter a = 164.1 Å. Self-rotation function analysis and V{sub M} calculations indicated that the asymmetric unit contains two copies of the monomeric enzyme, corresponding to a solvent content of 79%. It is intended to determine the structure of this protein utilizing SAD phasing from transition metals or molecular replacement.

  2. Dealing with different methods for Kluyveromyces lactis ?-galactosidase purification

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, M; Cerdãn, E

    1998-01-01

    Several micro-scale chromatography-based procedures for purification of the ?-galactosidase from the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis were assayed. Purified enzyme was suitable to be used as antigen to induce polyclonal antibodies production. Specific staining of non-denaturing PAGE gels with chromogenic substrates allowed the determination of the number of subunits forming the native enzyme. PMID:12734592

  3. Statistical optimization of cell disruption techniques for releasing intracellular X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidase from Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Üstün-Aytekin, Özlem; Ar?soy, Sevda; Aytekin, Ali Özhan; Y?ld?z, Ece

    2016-03-01

    X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidase (PepX) is an intracellular enzyme from the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis NRRL B-1821, and it has commercial importance. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of several cell disruption methods on the activity of PepX. Statistical optimization methods were performed for two cavitation methods, hydrodynamic (high-pressure homogenization) and acoustic (sonication), to determine the more appropriate disruption method. Two level factorial design (2FI), with the parameters of number of cycles and pressure, and Box-Behnken design (BBD), with the parameters of cycle, sonication time, and power, were used for the optimization of the high-pressure homogenization and sonication methods, respectively. In addition, disruption methods, consisting of lysozyme, bead milling, heat treatment, freeze-thawing, liquid nitrogen, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), Triton-X, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), chloroform, and antibiotics, were performed and compared with the high-pressure homogenization and sonication methods. The optimized values of high-pressure homogenization were one cycle at 130MPa providing activity of 114.47mUml(-1), while sonication afforded an activity of 145.09mUml(-1) at 28min with 91% power and three cycles. In conclusion, sonication was the more effective disruption method, and its optimal operation parameters were manifested for the release of intracellular enzyme from a L. lactis spp. lactis strain, which is a Gram-positive bacterium. PMID:26584994

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Heat-Tolerant Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis Strain GL2 from Algerian Dromedary Milk.

    PubMed

    Gabed, Noujoud; Yang, Manli; Bey Baba Hamed, Mohamed; Drici, Habiba; Gross, Roy; Dandekar, Thomas; Liang, Chunguang

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis GL2 is a moderately thermotolerant lactic acid bacterium isolated from dromedary raw milk. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of this potential new dairy starter strain, which combines thermotolerance and the capacity to metabolize lactose, casein, and citrate. PMID:26586883

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Heat-Tolerant Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis Strain GL2 from Algerian Dromedary Milk

    PubMed Central

    Gabed, Noujoud; Yang, Manli; Bey Baba Hamed, Mohamed; Drici, Habiba; Gross, Roy; Dandekar, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis GL2 is a moderately thermotolerant lactic acid bacterium isolated from dromedary raw milk. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of this potential new dairy starter strain, which combines thermotolerance and the capacity to metabolize lactose, casein, and citrate. PMID:26586883

  6. Polygalacturonase production by calcium alginate immobilized Enterobacter aerogenes NBO2 cells.

    PubMed

    Darah, I; Nisha, M; Lim, Sheh-Hong

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial cells of Enterobacter aerogenes NBO2 were entrapped in calcium alginate beads in order to enhance polygalacturonase production compared to free cells. The optimized condition of 5 % (w/v) sodium alginate concentration, agitation speed of 250 rpm, and 15 beads of calcium alginate with inoculum size of 4 % (v/v; 5.4 × 10(7) cells/ml) produced 23.48 U/mL of polygalacturonase compared to free cells of 18.54 U/ml. There was about 26.6 % increment in polygalaturonase production. However, in this study, there was 296.6 % of increment in polygalacturonase production after improvement parameters compared to before improvement parameters of calcium alginate bead immobilization cells (5.92 U/ml). This research has indicated that optimized physical parameters of calcium alginate bead immobilization cells have significantly enhanced the production of polygalacturonase. PMID:25547814

  7. Irreproducible and Uninterpretable Polymyxin B MICs for Enterobacter cloacae and Enterobacter aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Landman, David; Salamera, Julius

    2013-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacter species are emerging nosocomial pathogens. As with most multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens, the polymyxins are often the only therapeutic option. In this study involving clinical isolates of E. cloacae and E. aerogenes, susceptibility testing methods with polymyxin B were analyzed. All isolates underwent testing by the broth microdilution (in duplicate) and agar dilution (in duplicate) methods, and select isolates were examined by the Etest method. Selected isolates were also examined for heteroresistance by population analysis profiling. Using a susceptibility breakpoint of ?2 ?g/ml, categorical agreement by all four dilution tests (two broth microdilution and two agar dilution) was achieved in only 76/114 (67%) of E. cloacae isolates (65 susceptible, 11 resistant). Thirty-eight (33%) had either conflicting or uninterpretable results (multiple skip wells, i.e., wells that exhibit no growth although growth does occur at higher concentrations). Of the 11 consistently resistant isolates, five had susceptible MICs as determined by Etest. Heteroresistant subpopulations were detected in eight of eight isolates tested, with greater percentages in isolates with uninterpretable MICs. For E. aerogenes, categorical agreement between the four dilution tests was obtained in 48/56 (86%), with conflicting and/or uninterpretable results in 8/56 (14%). For polymyxin susceptibility testing of Enterobacter species, close attention must be paid to the presence of multiple skip wells, leading to uninterpretable results. Susceptibility also should not be assumed based on the results of a single test. Until the clinical relevance of skip wells is defined, interpretation of polymyxin susceptibility tests for Enterobacter species should be undertaken with extreme caution. PMID:24088860

  8. Irreproducible and uninterpretable Polymyxin B MICs for Enterobacter cloacae and Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Landman, David; Salamera, Julius; Quale, John

    2013-12-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacter species are emerging nosocomial pathogens. As with most multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens, the polymyxins are often the only therapeutic option. In this study involving clinical isolates of E. cloacae and E. aerogenes, susceptibility testing methods with polymyxin B were analyzed. All isolates underwent testing by the broth microdilution (in duplicate) and agar dilution (in duplicate) methods, and select isolates were examined by the Etest method. Selected isolates were also examined for heteroresistance by population analysis profiling. Using a susceptibility breakpoint of ?2 ?g/ml, categorical agreement by all four dilution tests (two broth microdilution and two agar dilution) was achieved in only 76/114 (67%) of E. cloacae isolates (65 susceptible, 11 resistant). Thirty-eight (33%) had either conflicting or uninterpretable results (multiple skip wells, i.e., wells that exhibit no growth although growth does occur at higher concentrations). Of the 11 consistently resistant isolates, five had susceptible MICs as determined by Etest. Heteroresistant subpopulations were detected in eight of eight isolates tested, with greater percentages in isolates with uninterpretable MICs. For E. aerogenes, categorical agreement between the four dilution tests was obtained in 48/56 (86%), with conflicting and/or uninterpretable results in 8/56 (14%). For polymyxin susceptibility testing of Enterobacter species, close attention must be paid to the presence of multiple skip wells, leading to uninterpretable results. Susceptibility also should not be assumed based on the results of a single test. Until the clinical relevance of skip wells is defined, interpretation of polymyxin susceptibility tests for Enterobacter species should be undertaken with extreme caution. PMID:24088860

  9. Cloning in Streptococcus lactis of plasmid-mediated UV resistance and effect on prophage stability

    SciTech Connect

    Chopin, M.C.; Chopin, A.; Rouault, A.; Simon, D.

    1986-02-01

    Plasmid pIL7 (33 kilobases) from Streptococcus lactis enhances UV resistance and prophage stability. A 5.4-kilobase pIL7 fragment carrying genes coding for both characters was cloned into S. lactis, using plasmid pHV1301 as the cloning vector. The recombinant plasmid was subsequently transferred to three other S. lactis strains by transformation or protoplast fusion. Cloned genes were expressed in all tested strains.

  10. Generation of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV-Inhibiting Peptides from ?-Lactoglobulin Secreted by Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Shigemori, Suguru; Oshiro, Kazushi; Wang, Pengfei; Yamamoto, Yoshinari; Wang, Yeqin; Sato, Takashi; Uyeno, Yutaka; Shimosato, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that hydrolysates of ?-lactoglobulin (BLG) prepared using gastrointestinal proteases strongly inhibit dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) activity in vitro. In this study, we developed a BLG-secreting Lactococcus lactis strain as a delivery vehicle and in situ expression system. Interestingly, trypsin-digested recombinant BLG from L. lactis inhibited DPP-IV activity, suggesting that BLG-secreting L. lactis may be useful in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25157356

  11. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) This enzyme preparation is derived from the nonpathogenic, nontoxicogenic yeast Kluyveromyces lactis... 683), which converts lactose to glucose and galactose. It is prepared from yeast that has been...

  12. Mobile CRISPR/Cas-Mediated Bacteriophage Resistance in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Anne M.; Horvath, Philippe; Boyaval, Patrick; Romero, Dennis A.

    2012-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a biotechnological workhorse for food fermentations and potentially therapeutic products and is therefore widely consumed by humans. It is predominantly used as a starter microbe for fermented dairy products, and specialized strains have adapted from a plant environment through reductive evolution and horizontal gene transfer as evidenced by the association of adventitious traits with mobile elements. Specifically, L. lactis has armed itself with a myriad of plasmid-encoded bacteriophage defensive systems to protect against viral predation. This known arsenal had not included CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins), which forms a remarkable microbial immunity system against invading DNA. Although CRISPR/Cas systems are common in the genomes of closely related lactic acid bacteria (LAB), none was identified within the eight published lactococcal genomes. Furthermore, a PCR-based search of the common LAB CRISPR/Cas systems (Types I and II) in 383 industrial L. lactis strains proved unsuccessful. Here we describe a novel, Type III, self-transmissible, plasmid-encoded, phage-interfering CRISPR/Cas discovered in L. lactis. The native CRISPR spacers confer resistance based on sequence identity to corresponding lactococcal phage. The interference is directed at phages problematic to the dairy industry, indicative of a responsive system. Moreover, targeting could be modified by engineering the spacer content. The 62.8-kb plasmid was shown to be conjugally transferrable to various strains. Its mobility should facilitate dissemination within microbial communities and provide a readily applicable system to naturally introduce CRISPR/Cas to industrially relevant strains for enhanced phage resistance and prevention against acquisition of undesirable genes. PMID:23240053

  13. Physiological Studies of ?-Galactosidase Induction in Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Robert C.; Markin, Jennifer S.

    1980-01-01

    We examined the kinetics of ?-galactosidase (EC 3.2.1.23) induction in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. Enzyme activity began to increase 10 to 15 min, about 1/10 of a cell generation, after the addition of inducer and continued to increase linearly for from 7 to 9 cell generations before reaching a maximum, some 125- to 150-fold above the basal level of uninduced cells. Thereafter, as long as logarithmic growth was maintained, enzyme levels remained high, but enzyme levels dropped to a value only 5- to 10-fold above the basal level if cells entered stationary phase. Enzyme induction required the constant presence of inducer, since removal of inducer caused a reduction in enzyme level. Three nongratuitous inducers of ?-galactosidase activity, lactose, galactose, and lactobionic acid, were identified. Several inducers of the lac operon of Escherichia coli, including methyl-, isopropyl- and phenyl-1-thio-?-d-galactoside, and thioallolactose did not induce ?-galactosidase in K. lactis even though they entered the cell. The maximum rate of enzyme induction was only achieved with lactose concentrations of greater than 1 to 2 mM. The initial differential rate of ?-galactosidase appearance after induction was reduced in medium containing glucose, indicating transient carbon catabolite repression. However, glucose did not exclude lactose from K. lactis, it did not cause permanent carbon catabolite repression of ?-galactosidase synthesis, and it did not prevent lactose utilization. These three results are in direct contrast to those observed for lactose utilization in E. coli. Furthermore, these results, along with our observation that K. lactis grew slightly faster on lactose than on glucose, indicate that this organism has evolved an efficient system for utilizing lactose. PMID:6769910

  14. RAG4 gene encodes a glucose sensor in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Betina, S; Goffrini, P; Ferrero, I; Wésolowski-Louvel, M

    2001-01-01

    The rag4 mutant of Kluyveromyces lactis was previously isolated as a fermentation-deficient mutant, in which transcription of the major glucose transporter gene RAG1 was affected. The wild-type RAG4 was cloned by complementation of the rag4 mutation and found to encode a protein homologous to Snf3 and Rgt2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These two proteins are thought to be sensors of low and high concentrations of glucose, respectively. Rag4, like Snf3 and Rgt2, is predicted to have the transmembrane structure of sugar transporter family proteins as well as a long C-terminal cytoplasmic tail possessing a characteristic 25-amino-acid sequence. Rag4 may therefore be expected to have a glucose-sensing function. However, the rag4 mutation was fully complemented by one copy of either SNF3 or RGT2. Since K. lactis appears to have no other genes of the SNF3/RGT2 type, we suggest that Rag4 of K. lactis may have a dual function of signaling high and low concentrations of glucose. In rag4 mutants, glucose repression of several inducible enzymes is abolished. PMID:11404320

  15. KPC-2 carbapenemase and DHA-1 AmpC determinants carried on the same plasmid in Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Kuai, Shougang; Shao, Haifeng; Huang, Lihua; Pei, Hao; Lu, Zhonghua; Wang, Weiping; Liu, Jun

    2014-03-01

    This study was conducted to analyse the presence of a plasmid-mediated carbapenem resistance mechanism in a clinical Enterobacter aerogenes isolate from a patient from Jiangsu province, People's Republic of China. PCR and sequencing confirmed that the isolate harboured Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-2, DHA-1 and TEM-1 ?-lactamase genes. Both the KPC-2 and DHA-1 genes were transferred to Escherichia coli C600 by transconjugation, and Southern blotting confirmed that these two genes were located on the same plasmid, which was of approximately 56 kb in size. The Enterobacter aerogenes isolate was resistant to carbapenems and other tested antimicrobial agents. The Escherichia coli transconjugant showed reduced susceptibility but not resistance to carbapenems and other ?-lactams, indicating the presence of another, possibly permeability-related, resistance mechanism in the clinical isolate. PMID:24173427

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterobacter aerogenes, a DDE-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Strain Isolated from Cucurbita pepo.

    PubMed

    Eevers, Nele; Van Hamme, Jonathan D; Bottos, Eric M; Weyens, Nele; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome of Enterobacter aerogenes, a Gram-negative bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae isolated from Cucurbita pepo root tissue. This bacterium shows 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene (DDE)-degrading potential and plant growth-promoting capacity. An analysis of its 4.5-Mb draft genome will enhance the understanding of DDE degradation pathways and phytoremediation applications for DDE-contaminated soils. PMID:25883299

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterobacter aerogenes, a DDE-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Strain Isolated from Cucurbita pepo

    PubMed Central

    Eevers, Nele; Van Hamme, Jonathan D.; Bottos, Eric M.; Weyens, Nele

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome of Enterobacter aerogenes, a Gram-negative bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae isolated from Cucurbita pepo root tissue. This bacterium shows 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene (DDE)-degrading potential and plant growth-promoting capacity. An analysis of its 4.5-Mb draft genome will enhance the understanding of DDE degradation pathways and phytoremediation applications for DDE-contaminated soils. PMID:25883299

  18. Antihypertensive and hypolipidemic effect of milk fermented by specific Lactococcus lactis strains.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Figueroa, J C; González-Córdova, A F; Astiazaran-García, H; Hernández-Mendoza, A; Vallejo-Cordoba, B

    2013-07-01

    The antihypertensive and hypolipidemic effects of milk fermented by specific Lactococcus lactis strains in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were investigated. The SHR were fed ad libitum milk fermented by Lc. lactis NRRL B-50571, Lc. lactis NRRL B-50572, Captopril (40mg/kg of body weight, Sigma-Aldrich Co., St. Louis, MO) or purified water for 4 wk. Results suggested that Lc. lactis fermented milks presented a significant blood pressure-lowering effect. No significant difference was noted among milk fermented by Lc. lactis NRRL B-50571 and Captopril by the second and third week of treatment. Additionally, milk fermented by Lc. lactis strains modified SHR lipid profiles. Milk fermented by Lc. lactis NRRL B-50571 and B-50572 were able to reduce plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride contents. Thus, milk fermented by Lc. lactis strains may be a coadjuvant in the reduction of hypertension and hyperlipidemia and may be used as a functional food for better cardiovascular health. PMID:23628247

  19. Encapsulated Lactococcus lactis with enhanced gastrointestinal survival for the development of folate enriched functional foods.

    PubMed

    Divya, Jayakumar Beena; Nampoothiri, Kesavan Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    Two lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from cow's milk were identified as Lactococcus lactis strains and designated as L. lactis CM22 and L. lactis CM28. They were immobilised by co-encapsulation using alginate and mannitol and by hybrid entrapment with skim milk, glycerol, CaCO3 and alginate. The encapsulated cells survived better in simulated gastrointestinal conditions compared to the free cells. The percentage survival of probiotics encapsulated by hybrid entrapment method was 62.74% for L. lactis CM22 and 68% for L. lactis CM28. Studies to check their efficacy in fermentative fortification of skim milk and ice cream revealed an enhancement in folate level. PMID:25686721

  20. Optimization of cultural conditions for conversion of glycerol to ethanol by Enterobacter aerogenes S012

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to optimize the cultural conditions for the conversion of glycerol to ethanol by Enterobacter aerogenes S012. Taguchi method was used to screen the cultural conditions based on their signal to noise ratio (SN). Temperature (°C), agitation speed (rpm) and time (h) were found to have the highest influence on both glycerol utilization and ethanol production by the organism while pH had the lowest. Full factorial design, statistical analysis, and regression model equation were used to optimize the selected cultural parameters for maximum ethanol production. The result showed that fermentation at 38°C and 200 rpm for 48 h would be ideal for the bacteria to produce maximum amount of ethanol from glycerol. At these optimum conditions, ethanol production, yield and productivity were 25.4 g/l, 0.53 g/l/h, and 1.12 mol/mol-glycerol, repectively. Ethanol production increased to 26.5 g/l while yield and productivity decreased to 1.04 mol/mol-glycerol and 0.37 g/l/h, respectively, after 72 h. Analysis of the fermentation products was performed using HPLC, while anaerobic condition was created by purging the fermentation vessel with nitrogen gas. PMID:23388539

  1. Biodegradation of ichlorodiphenyltrichloroe-thane: Intermediates in dichlorodiphenylacetic acid metabolism by Aerobacter aerogenes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1967-01-01

    The final product of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) degradation by vertebrates is commonly considered to be dichlorodiphenylacetic acid, DDA (J. E. Peterson and W. H. Robison, Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 6:321, 1964). Recently, certain organisms (A. S. Perry, S. Miller, and A. J. Buckner. J. Agr. Food Chem. 11:457, 1963; J. D. Pinto, M. N. Comien, and M. S. Dunn. J. Biol. Chem. 240:2148, 1965) have been found to degrade further DDA to dichlorobenzophenone (DBP), but the possibility that such degradation was due to microbial action could not be excluded. Significantly, dichlorobenzhydrol (DBH), dichlorophenylmethane (DPM), and dichlorodiphenylethylene (DDE) have been tentatively identified in rats fed DDA (Pinto et al., J. Biol. Chem. 240:2148, 1965). Since DDA as well as DDT is degraded by the ubiquitous microorganism Aerobacter aerogenes (G. Wedemeyer, Appl. Microbiol. 15:569, 1967; J. L. Mendel, and M. S. Walton, Science 151:1527, 1966), it seemed reasonable that the intestinal microflora might be involved in DBP formation, DPM and DBH being intermediates in its pathway from DDA. Since DDA is a (3,y-unsaturated acid, ketone formation via an alkene and an alcohol would be expected (S. G. Waley, Mechanisms of Organic and Enzymatic Reactions, Oxford University Press, London, England 1962).

  2. Short communication: Genotypic and phenotypic identification of environmental streptococci and association of Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis with intramammary infections among different dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Werner, B; Moroni, P; Gioia, G; Lavín-Alconero, L; Yousaf, A; Charter, M E; Carter, B Moslock; Bennett, J; Nydam, D V; Welcome, F; Schukken, Y H

    2014-11-01

    Lactococcus species are counted among a large and closely related group of environmental streptococci and streptococci-like bacteria that include bovine mastitis pathogenic Streptococcus, Enterococcus, and Aerococcus species. Phenotypic and biochemical identification methods can be inaccurate and unreliable for species within this group, particularly for Lactococcus spp. As a result, the incidence of Lactococcus spp. on the farm may have been historically underreported and consequently little is known about the clinical importance of this genus as a mastitis pathogen. We used molecular genetic identification methods to accurately differentiate 60 environmental streptococci and streptococci-like bacteria isolated from cows with high somatic cell count and chronic intramammary infection (IMI; >2 somatic cell scores above 4) among 5 geographically distinct farms in New York and Minnesota that exhibited an observed increase in IMI. These isolates were phenotypically identified as Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus spp. Genetic methods identified 42 isolates (70%) as Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, including all 10 isolates originally phenotypically identified as Streptococcus uberis. Antibiotic inhibition testing of all Lc. lactis ssp. lactis showed that 7 isolates were resistant to tetracycline. In the present study, a predominance of Lc. lactis ssp. lactis was identified in association with chronic, clinical bovine IMI among all 5 farms and characterized antimicrobial resistance for treatment therapies. Routine use by mastitis testing labs of molecular identification methods for environmental streptococci and streptococci-like bacteria can further define the role and prevalence of Lc. lactis ssp. lactis in association with bovine IMI and may lead to more targeted therapies. PMID:25242419

  3. Engineering trehalose synthesis in Lactococcus lactis for improved stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana Lúcia; Cardoso, Filipa S; Bohn, Andreas; Neves, Ana Rute; Santos, Helena

    2011-06-01

    Trehalose accumulation is a common cell defense strategy against a variety of stressful conditions. In particular, our team detected high levels of trehalose in Propionibacterium freudenreichii in response to acid stress, a result that led to the idea that endowing Lactococcus lactis with the capacity to synthesize trehalose could improve the acid tolerance of this organism. To this end, we took advantage of the endogenous genes involved in the trehalose catabolic pathway of L. lactis, i.e., trePP and pgmB, encoding trehalose 6-phosphate phosphorylase and ?-phosphoglucomutase, respectively, which enabled the synthesis of trehalose 6-phosphate. Given that L. lactis lacks trehalose 6-phosphate phosphatase, the respective gene, otsB, from the food-grade organism P. freudenreichii was used to provide the required activity. The trehalose yield was approximately 15% in resting cells and in mid-exponential-phase cells grown without pH control. The intracellular concentration of trehalose reached maximal values of approximately 170 mM, but at least 67% of the trehalose produced was found in the growth medium. The viability of mutant and control strains was examined after exposure to heat, cold or acid shock, and freeze-drying. The trehalose-producing strains showed improved tolerance (5- to 10-fold-higher survivability) to acid (pH 3) and cold shock (4°C); there was also a strong improvement in cell survival in response to heat shock (45°C), and no protection was rendered against dehydration. The insight provided by this work may help the design of food-grade strains optimized for the dairy industry as well as for oral drug delivery. PMID:21515730

  4. An aminopeptidase P from Lactococcus lactis with original specificity.

    PubMed

    Mars, I; Monnet, V

    1995-02-23

    An aminopeptidase P (E.C. 3.4.11.9) that cleaves the Arg-1-Pro-2 bond of bradykinin has been isolated for the first time from Lactococcus lactis. The peptidase was purified to homogeneity in a 3-step procedure and characterized. It is a monomeric metalloenzyme with a 43 kDa molecular mass, activated by Mn2+ and inhibited by DTT. It differs from the majority of aminopeptidases P already described by displaying a specificity for X-Pro-Pro N-terminal and probably an extended binding site that could accommodate amino acid residues beyond the P'2 position of the substrate. PMID:7873564

  5. Oral Administration of Recombinant Lactococcus lactis Expressing the Cellulase Gene Increases Digestibility of Fiber in Geese.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haizhu; Gao, Yunhang; Gao, Guang; Lou, Yujie

    2015-12-01

    Enhancing cellulose digestibility in animals is important for improving the utilization of forage, which can decrease the amount of food used in animal production. The aim of the present study was to achieve recombinant expression of the cellulase gene in Lactococcus lactis and evaluate the effects of oral administration of the recombinant L. lactis on fiber digestibility in geese. Cellulase (Cell) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes were cloned into a L. lactis expression vector (pNZ8149) to construct the recombinant expression plasmid (pNZ8149-GFP-Cell). Then, the recombinant expression plasmid was transformed into L. lactis (NZ3900) competent cells by electroporation to obtain recombinant L. lactis (pNZ8149-GFP-Cell/NZ3900) in which protein expression was induced by Nisin. Expression of GFP and Cell by the recombinant L. lactis was confirmed using SDS-PAGE, fluorescence detection, and Congo red assays. A feeding experiment showed that oral administration of pNZ8149-GFP-Cell/NZ3900 significantly increased the digestibility of dietary fiber in geese fed either a maize stalk diet or a rice chaff diet. Therefore, oral administration of recombinant L. lactis cells expressing the cellulase gene increases fiber digestibility in geese, offering a way to increase the utilization of dietary fiber in geese. PMID:26341925

  6. Expression of Helicobacter pylori hspA Gene in Lactococcus lactis NICE System and Experimental Study on Its Immunoreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Juan; Feng, Shu-Ying; Li, Zhi-Tao; Feng, Yan-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to develop an oral Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) vaccine against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Methods. After L. lactis NZ3900/pNZ8110-hspA was constructed, growth curves were plotted to study whether the growth of recombinant L. lactis was affected after hspA was cloned into L. lactis and whether the growth of empty bacteria, empty plasmid bacteria, and recombinant L. lactis was affected by different concentrations of Nisin; SDS-PAGE and Western blot were adopted, respectively, to detect the HspA expressed by recombinant L. lactis and its immunoreactivity. Results. There was no effect observed from the growth curve after exogenous gene hspA was cloned into L. lactis NZ3900; different concentrations of Nisin did not affect the growth of NZ3900 and NZ3900/pNZ8110, while different concentrations of Nisin inhibited the growth of NZ3900/pNZ8110-hspA except 10?ng/mL Nisin. No HspA strip was observed from SDS-PAGE. Western blot analysis showed that HspA expressed by recombinant bacteria had favorable immunoreactivity. Conclusion. The growth of recombinant L. lactis was suppressed even though a small amount of HspA had been induced to express. Therefore recombinant L. lactis only express HspA which was not suitable to be oral vaccine against Helicobacter pylori. PMID:25977689

  7. L+-lactic acid production from starch by a novel amylolytic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis B84.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Kaloyan; Urshev, Zoltan; Petrova, Penka

    2008-06-01

    A new Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis B84, capable of utilizing starch as a sole carbon source and producing L(+)-lactate, was isolated from spontaneously fermented rye sourdough. Aiming at maximum lactic acid productivity, the components of the media and the cultivation conditions were varied. In MRS-starch medium (with absence of yeast and meat extracts), at 33 degrees C, agitation 200 rpm and pH 6.0 for 6 days complete starch hydrolysis occurred and 5.5 gl(-1) lactic acid were produced from 18 gl(-1) starch. The identification of strain B84 was based on genetic criteria. Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA), PCR with species-specific primers and sequencing of the 16S rDNA proved its species affiliation. Four genes for enzymes, involved in starch degradation were detected in B84 genome: amyL, amyY, glgP and apu, coding cytoplasmic and extracellular alpha-amylases, glycogen phosphorylase and amylopullulanase, respectively. Reverse transcription PCR experiments showed that both genes, encoding alpha-amylases (amyL and amyY) were expressed into mRNAs, whereas apu and glgP were not. Amylase activity assay was performed at different pH and temperatures. The cell-bond amylase proved to be the key enzyme, involved in the starch hydrolysis with maximum activity at 45 degrees C and pH 5.4. PMID:18456109

  8. Oral immunization with recombinant Streptococcus lactis carrying the Streptococcus mutans surface protein antigen gene.

    PubMed Central

    Iwaki, M; Okahashi, N; Takahashi, I; Kanamoto, T; Sugita-Konishi, Y; Aibara, K; Koga, T

    1990-01-01

    A recombinant Streptococcus lactis strain which carries the structural gene for a surface protein antigen (PAc) of 190,000 daltons from Streptococcus mutans serotype c was constructed for development of an oral vaccine against dental caries. The gene from S. mutans MT8148 joined to shuttle vector pSA3 was successfully transformed into S. lactis IL1403. A small amount of PAc was detected in the cell homogenate and cytoplasmic fraction of the recombinant S. lactis, but not in the culture supernatant of the recombinant, by Western immunoblotting and dot immunoblotting. The level of PAc-specific mRNA in the recombinant strain was lower than that in S. mutans MT8148. However, significant salivary immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G responses to PAc were induced in mice immunized orally with the recombinant S. lactis. Images PMID:2117575

  9. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus...GRAS § 184.1985 Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis. (a) Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation is derived from the...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2009-04-01 true Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus...GRAS § 184.1985 Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis. (a) Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation is derived from the...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus...GRAS § 184.1985 Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis. (a) Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation is derived from the...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus...GRAS § 184.1985 Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis. (a) Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation is derived from the...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus...GRAS § 184.1985 Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis. (a) Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation is derived from the...

  14. The transcriptional and gene regulatory network of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 during growth in milk.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Anne; Hansen, Morten E; Kuipers, Oscar P; Kilstrup, Mogens; Kok, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we examine the changes in the expression of genes of Lactococcus lactis subspecies cremoris MG1363 during growth in milk. To reveal which specific classes of genes (pathways, operons, regulons, COGs) are important, we performed a transcriptome time series experiment. Global analysis of gene expression over time showed that L. lactis adapted quickly to the environmental changes. Using upstream sequences of genes with correlated gene expression profiles, we uncovered a substantial number of putative DNA binding motifs that may be relevant for L. lactis fermentative growth in milk. All available novel and literature-derived data were integrated into network reconstruction building blocks, which were used to reconstruct and visualize the L. lactis gene regulatory network. This network enables easy mining in the chrono-transcriptomics data. A freely available website at http://milkts.molgenrug.nl gives full access to all transcriptome data, to the reconstructed network and to the individual network building blocks. PMID:23349698

  15. Comparative Genomics of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Reveals a Strict Monophyletic Bifidobacterial Taxon

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Christian; Duranti, Sabrina; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Bottacini, Francesca; Strati, Francesco; Arioli, Stefania; Foroni, Elena; Turroni, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-01-01

    Strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis are extensively exploited by the food industry as health-promoting bacteria, although the genetic variability of members belonging to this taxon has so far not received much scientific attention. In this article, we describe the complete genetic makeup of the B. animalis subsp. lactis Bl12 genome and discuss the genetic relatedness of this strain with other sequenced strains belonging to this taxon. Moreover, a detailed comparative genomic analysis of B. animalis subsp. lactis genomes was performed, which revealed a closely related and isogenic nature of all currently available B. animalis subsp. lactis strains, thus strongly suggesting a closed pan-genome structure of this bacterial group. PMID:23645200

  16. Biohydrogen and Bioethanol Production from Biodiesel-Based Glycerol by Enterobacter aerogenes in a Continuous Stir Tank Reactor.

    PubMed

    Jitrwung, Rujira; Yargeau, Viviane

    2015-01-01

    Crude glycerol from the biodiesel manufacturing process is being produced in increasing quantities due to the expanding number of biodiesel plants. It has been previously shown that, in batch mode, semi-anaerobic fermentation of crude glycerol by Enterobacter aerogenes can produce biohydrogen and bioethanol simultaneously. The present study demonstrated the possible scaling-up of this process from small batches performed in small bottles to a 3.6-L continuous stir tank reactor (CSTR). Fresh feed rate, liquid recycling, pH, mixing speed, glycerol concentration, and waste recycling were optimized for biohydrogen and bioethanol production. Results confirmed that E. aerogenes uses small amounts of oxygen under semi-anaerobic conditions for growth before using oxygen from decomposable salts, mainly NH4NO3, under anaerobic condition to produce hydrogen and ethanol. The optimal conditions were determined to be 500 rpm, pH 6.4, 18.5 g/L crude glycerol (15 g/L glycerol) and 33% liquid recycling for a fresh feed rate of 0.44 mL/min. Using these optimized conditions, the process ran at a lower media cost than previous studies, was stable after 7 days without further inoculation and resulted in yields of 0.86 mol H2/mol glycerol and 0.75 mol ethanol/mole glycerol. PMID:25970750

  17. Biohydrogen and Bioethanol Production from Biodiesel-Based Glycerol by Enterobacter aerogenes in a Continuous Stir Tank Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Jitrwung, Rujira; Yargeau, Viviane

    2015-01-01

    Crude glycerol from the biodiesel manufacturing process is being produced in increasing quantities due to the expanding number of biodiesel plants. It has been previously shown that, in batch mode, semi-anaerobic fermentation of crude glycerol by Enterobacter aerogenes can produce biohydrogen and bioethanol simultaneously. The present study demonstrated the possible scaling-up of this process from small batches performed in small bottles to a 3.6-L continuous stir tank reactor (CSTR). Fresh feed rate, liquid recycling, pH, mixing speed, glycerol concentration, and waste recycling were optimized for biohydrogen and bioethanol production. Results confirmed that E. aerogenes uses small amounts of oxygen under semi-anaerobic conditions for growth before using oxygen from decomposable salts, mainly NH4NO3, under anaerobic condition to produce hydrogen and ethanol. The optimal conditions were determined to be 500 rpm, pH 6.4, 18.5 g/L crude glycerol (15 g/L glycerol) and 33% liquid recycling for a fresh feed rate of 0.44 mL/min. Using these optimized conditions, the process ran at a lower media cost than previous studies, was stable after 7 days without further inoculation and resulted in yields of 0.86 mol H2/mol glycerol and 0.75 mol ethanol/mole glycerol. PMID:25970750

  18. Expanding the molecular toolbox for Lactococcus lactis: construction of an inducible thioredoxin gene fusion expression system

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The development of the Nisin Inducible Controlled Expression (NICE) system in the food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris represents a cornerstone in the use of Gram-positive bacterial expression systems for biotechnological purposes. However, proteins that are subjected to such over-expression in L. lactis may suffer from improper folding, inclusion body formation and/or protein degradation, thereby significantly reducing the yield of soluble target protein. Although such drawbacks are not specific to L. lactis, no molecular tools have been developed to prevent or circumvent these recurrent problems of protein expression in L. lactis. Results Mimicking thioredoxin gene fusion systems available for E. coli, two nisin-inducible expression vectors were constructed to over-produce various proteins in L. lactis as thioredoxin fusion proteins. In this study, we demonstrate that our novel L. lactis fusion partner expression vectors allow high-level expression of soluble heterologous proteins Tuc2009 ORF40, Bbr_0140 and Tuc2009 BppU/BppL that were previously insoluble or not expressed using existing L. lactis expression vectors. Over-expressed proteins were subsequently purified by Ni-TED affinity chromatography. Intact heterologous proteins were detected by immunoblotting analyses. We also show that the thioredoxin moiety of the purified fusion protein was specifically and efficiently cleaved off by enterokinase treatment. Conclusions This study is the first description of a thioredoxin gene fusion expression system, purposely developed to circumvent problems associated with protein over-expression in L. lactis. It was shown to prevent protein insolubility and degradation, allowing sufficient production of soluble proteins for further structural and functional characterization. PMID:21827702

  19. Lactococcus lactis Metabolism and Gene Expression during Growth on Plant Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have been isolated from living, harvested, and fermented plant materials; however, the adaptations these bacteria possess for growth on plant tissues are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated plant habitat-specific traits of Lactococcus lactis during growth in an Arabidopsis thaliana leaf tissue lysate (ATL). L. lactis KF147, a strain originally isolated from plants, exhibited a higher growth rate and reached 7.9-fold-greater cell densities during growth in ATL than the dairy-associated strain L. lactis IL1403. Transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) of KF147 identified 853 induced and 264 repressed genes during growth in ATL compared to that in GM17 laboratory culture medium. Genes induced in ATL included those involved in the arginine deiminase pathway and a total of 140 carbohydrate transport and metabolism genes, many of which are involved in xylose, arabinose, cellobiose, and hemicellulose metabolism. The induction of those genes corresponded with L. lactis KF147 nutrient consumption and production of metabolic end products in ATL as measured by gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS) untargeted metabolomic profiling. To assess the importance of specific plant-inducible genes for L. lactis growth in ATL, xylose metabolism was targeted for gene knockout mutagenesis. Wild-type L. lactis strain KF147 but not an xylA deletion mutant was able to grow using xylose as the sole carbon source. However, both strains grew to similarly high levels in ATL, indicating redundancy in L. lactis carbohydrate metabolism on plant tissues. These findings show that certain strains of L. lactis are well adapted for growth on plants and possess specific traits relevant for plant-based food, fuel, and feed fermentations. PMID:25384484

  20. Biochemical and Genetic Characterization of ?-Glucosidase Mutants in Saccharomyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Tingle, Marjorie; Halvorson, Harlyn O.

    1972-01-01

    Mutants with reduced activity for ?-glucosidase (?-d-glucoside glucohydrolase EC 3.2.1.21) were isolated from the haploid yeast Saccharomyces lactis. Tetrad analysis indicated that in each mutant a single genetic factor, closely linked or allelic to the structural gene for ?-glucosidase (B locus), is responsible for the decreased activity. ?-Glucosidases produced by wild-type and mutant strains are similar in molecular size and charge but differ in catalytic properties, thermal stability, and serological specificity, indicating that mutants are in the structural gene. All mutants retained their capacity to be induced by either methyl-?-d-glucoside or glucose. In all cases, the mutant phenotype was dominant in heterozygous diploids. PMID:5062915

  1. Lactose metabolism in Streptococcus lactis: studies with a mutant lacking glucokinase and mannose-phosphotransferase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.; Chassy, B.M.; Egan, W.

    1985-04-01

    A mutant of Streptococcus lactis 133 has been isolated that lacks both glucokinase and phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannose- phosphotransferase (mannose-PTS) activities. The double mutant S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- is unable to utilize either exogenously supplied or intracellularly generated glucose for growth. Fluorographic analyses of metabolites formed during the metabolism of (/sup 14/C)lactose labeled specifically in the glucose or galactosyl moiety established that the cells were unable to phosphorylate intracellular glucose. However, cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- readily metabolized intracellular glucose 6-phosphate, and the growth rates and cell yield of the mutant and parental strains on sucrose were the same. During growth on lactose, S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- fermented only the galactose moiety of the disaccharide, and 1 mol of glucose was generated per mol of lactose consumed. For an equivalent concentration of lactose, the cell yield of the mutant was 50% that of the wild type. The specific rate of lactose utilization by growing cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- was ca. 50% greater than that of the wild type, but the cell doubling times were 70 and 47 min, respectively. High-resolution /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lactose transport by starved cells of S. lactis 133 and S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- showed that the latter cells contained elevated lactose-PTS activity. Throughout exponential growth on lactose, the mutant maintained an intracellular steady-state glucose concentration of 100 mM.

  2. Function of Ubiquinone in Electron Transport from Reduced Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide to Nitrate and Oxygen in Aerobacter aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Knook, D. L.; Planta, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    The possible role of quinones in the electron transport system of Aerobacter aerogenes was investigated. The only quinone found in measurable amounts in bacteria grown in minimal media under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions was ubiquinone-8. Membrane-bound ubiquinone-8 could be removed by extraction with pentane, or destroyed by ultraviolet irradiation, with a concomitant loss of both reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) oxidase and NADH-linked respiratory nitrate reductase activity. In the extracted membrane preparations, these enzymatic activities could be restored, both to the same degree, by incorporation of ubiquinone-6, -8, or -10, but not by incorporation of menaquinones. The NADH oxidation and the nitrate reduction were sensitive to the respiratory inhibitors dicoumarol, lapachol, and cyanide. The results obtained indicate that ubiquinone-8 mediates the electron transport between NADH and oxygen as well as between NADH and nitrate. Branching of the electron transport chain to oxygen and nitrate occurs after an initial common pathway. PMID:4100202

  3. Function of ubiquinone in electron transport from reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide to nitrate and oxygen in Aerobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Knook, D L; Planta, R J

    1971-02-01

    The possible role of quinones in the electron transport system of Aerobacter aerogenes was investigated. The only quinone found in measurable amounts in bacteria grown in minimal media under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions was ubiquinone-8. Membrane-bound ubiquinone-8 could be removed by extraction with pentane, or destroyed by ultraviolet irradiation, with a concomitant loss of both reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) oxidase and NADH-linked respiratory nitrate reductase activity. In the extracted membrane preparations, these enzymatic activities could be restored, both to the same degree, by incorporation of ubiquinone-6, -8, or -10, but not by incorporation of menaquinones. The NADH oxidation and the nitrate reduction were sensitive to the respiratory inhibitors dicoumarol, lapachol, and cyanide. The results obtained indicate that ubiquinone-8 mediates the electron transport between NADH and oxygen as well as between NADH and nitrate. Branching of the electron transport chain to oxygen and nitrate occurs after an initial common pathway. PMID:4100202

  4. Regulation of Pentitol Metabolism by Aerobacter aerogenes I. Coordinate Control of Ribitol Dehydrogenase and d-Ribulokinase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Bisson, Theresa M.; Mortlock, Robert P.

    1968-01-01

    Induction studies on Aerobacter aerogenes strain PRL-R3, using ribitol as the inducer-substrate, indicated that two enzymes of ribitol catabolism, ribitol dehydrogenase and d-ribulokinase, are coordinately induced. The utilization of d-arabinose as a substrate resulted in the induction of ribitol dehydrogenase as well as d-ribulokinase. Mutants which were constitutive for ribitol dehydrogenase were also constitutive for d-ribulokinase. In contrast, d-xylulokinase and d-arabitol dehydrogenase did not appear to be coordinately controlled. Induction studies and examination of d-arabitol dehydrogenase constitutive mutants indicated that the three enzymes of the converging pathways for d-arabitol and d-xylose catabolism are under separate control. PMID:5643065

  5. Epidemiological study of an outbreak due to multidrug-resistant Enterobacter aerogenes in a medical intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Arpin, C; Coze, C; Rogues, A M; Gachie, J P; Bebear, C; Quentin, C

    1996-01-01

    In 1993, 63 isolates of Enterobacter aerogenes were collected from 41 patients in a medical intensive care unit (ICU). During the same period, only 46 isolates from 32 patients were collected in the rest of the hospital. All isolates were analyzed by antibiotic resistance phenotype, and 77 representative isolates were differentiated by plasmid restriction analysis, ribotyping, and arbitrarily primed (AP)-PCR. The extended-spectrum beta-lactamases produced by 22 strains were characterized by determination of their isoelectric points and by hybridization of plasmid DNA with specific probes. The isolates were divided into 25 antibiotic resistance phenotypes, either susceptible (group I) or resistant (group II) to aminoglycosides, and exhibited three phenotypes of resistance to beta-lactams: chromosomally derepressed cephalosporinase alone or associated with either extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (mainly of the SHV-4 type) or imipenem resistance. The results of the tests divided the 77 representative isolates (group I, n = 21; group II, n = 56) into 15 plasmid profiles, 14 ribotypes, and 15 AP-PCR patterns. Although the resistant isolates (group II) exhibited different plasmid profiles, ribotyping and AP-PCR analysis demonstrated an identical chromosomal pattern, indicating an epidemiological relatedness. They were mainly found in the medical ICU and occasionally in other units. The susceptible strains (group I) had various and distinct markers and were mainly isolated in units other than the medical ICU. In conclusion, the presence of a nosocomial outbreak in an ICU and the spread of a multidrug-resistant epidemic strain throughout the hospital was confirmed. Ribotyping and AP-PCR represent discriminatory tools for the investigation of nosocomial outbreaks caused by E. aerogenes. PMID:8862578

  6. The Prophylactic Effect of Probiotic Enterococcus lactis IW5 against Different Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nami, Yousef; Haghshenas, Babak; Haghshenas, Minoo; Abdullah, Norhafizah; Yari Khosroushahi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus lactis IW5 was obtained from human gut and the potential probiotic characteristics of this organism were then evaluated. Results showed that this strain was highly resistant to low pH and high bile salt and adhered strongly to Caco-2 human epithelial colorectal cell lines. The supernatant of E. lactis IW5 strongly inhibited the growth of several pathogenic bacteria and decreased the viability of different cancer cells, such as HeLa, MCF-7, AGS, HT-29, and Caco-2. Conversely, E. lactis IW5 did not inhibit the viability of normal FHs-74 cells. This strain did not generate toxic enzymes, including ?-glucosidase, ?-glucuronidase, and N-acetyl-?-glucosaminidase and was highly susceptible to ampicillin, gentamycin, penicillin, vancomycin, clindamycin, sulfamethoxazol, and chloramphenicol but resistant to erythromycin and tetracyclin. This study provided evidence for the effect of E. lactis IW5 on cancer cells. Therefore, E. lactis IW5, as a bioactive therapeutics, should be subjected to other relevant tests to verify the therapeutic suitability of this strain for clinical applications. PMID:26635778

  7. The Prophylactic Effect of Probiotic Enterococcus lactis IW5 against Different Human Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Nami, Yousef; Haghshenas, Babak; Haghshenas, Minoo; Abdullah, Norhafizah; Yari Khosroushahi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus lactis IW5 was obtained from human gut and the potential probiotic characteristics of this organism were then evaluated. Results showed that this strain was highly resistant to low pH and high bile salt and adhered strongly to Caco-2 human epithelial colorectal cell lines. The supernatant of E. lactis IW5 strongly inhibited the growth of several pathogenic bacteria and decreased the viability of different cancer cells, such as HeLa, MCF-7, AGS, HT-29, and Caco-2. Conversely, E. lactis IW5 did not inhibit the viability of normal FHs-74 cells. This strain did not generate toxic enzymes, including ?-glucosidase, ?-glucuronidase, and N-acetyl-?-glucosaminidase and was highly susceptible to ampicillin, gentamycin, penicillin, vancomycin, clindamycin, sulfamethoxazol, and chloramphenicol but resistant to erythromycin and tetracyclin. This study provided evidence for the effect of E. lactis IW5 on cancer cells. Therefore, E. lactis IW5, as a bioactive therapeutics, should be subjected to other relevant tests to verify the therapeutic suitability of this strain for clinical applications. PMID:26635778

  8. Lactococcus lactis as a live vector for mucosal delivery of therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G

    2009-04-01

    Food-grade lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been safely consumed by humans for centuries in fermented foods. Lactococcus lactis, a LAB widely used in the dairy industry as a starter, can be genetically engineered to efficiently produce a large variety of proteins. This feature has been recently exploited by scientists for the development of a new generation of vectors to deliver therapeutic proteins to the mucosal tissues. The successful Phase I clinical trial with a L. lactis strain secreting interleukin-10 for Crohn's disease has opened new horizons for the use of genetically engineered LAB as delivery vehicles. This commentary reviews the current advances made with L. lactis as live vector for the mucosal delivery of therapeutic proteins. PMID:19202351

  9. Structure and properties of the metastable bacteriocin Lcn972 from Lactococcus lactis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, David L.; Lamosa, Pedro; Rodríguez, Ana; Martínez, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IPLA 972 produces a polypeptide bacteriocin of 7.5 kDa which has a bactericidal effect on sensitive lactococci, inhibiting septum formation in dividing cells. The active form is a monomer that is metastable under normal conditions but is stabilised by glycerol. The NMR structure of Lcn972 shows a ?-sandwich comprising two three-stranded antiparallel ?-sheets. Detaching the final strand could allow the sandwich to open, and the irreversible unfolding leads to a loss of antibacterial activity. Covalent linkage of the final strand should increase the stability of Lcn972 and facilitate the study of its interaction with lipid II.

  10. Secretion of biologically active interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) by Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Villatoro-Hernandez, Julio; Loera-Arias, Maria J; Gamez-Escobedo, Anali; Franco-Molina, Moises; Gomez-Gutierrez, Jorge G; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Gutierrez-Puente, Yolanda; Saucedo-Cardenas, Odila; Valdes-Flores, Jesus; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Background Chemokines are a large group of chemotactic cytokines that regulate and direct migration of leukocytes, activate inflammatory responses, and are involved in many other functions including regulation of tumor development. Interferon-gamma inducible-protein-10 (IP-10) is a member of the C-X-C subfamily of the chemokine family of cytokines. IP-10 specifically chemoattracts activated T lymphocytes, monocytes, and NK cells. IP-10 has been described also as a modulator of other antitumor cytokines. These properties make IP-10 a novel therapeutic molecule for the treatment of chronic and infectious diseases. Currently there are no suitable live biological systems to produce and secrete IP-10. Lactococcus lactis has been well-characterized over the years as a safe microorganism to produce heterologous proteins and to be used as a safe, live vaccine to deliver antigens and cytokines of interest. Here we report a recombinant strain of L. lactis genetically modified to produce and secrete biologically active IP-10. Results The IP-10 coding region was isolated from human cDNA and cloned into an L. lactis expression plasmid under the regulation of the pNis promoter. By fusion to the usp45 secretion signal, IP-10 was addressed out of the cell. Western blot analysis demonstrated that recombinant strains of L. lactis secrete IP-10 into the culture medium. Neither degradation nor incomplete forms of IP-10 were detected in the cell or supernatant fractions of L. lactis. In addition, we demonstrated that the NICE (nisin-controlled gene expression) system was able to express IP-10 "de novo" even two hours after nisin removal. This human IP-10 protein secreted by L. lactis was biological active as demonstrated by Chemotaxis assay over human CD3+T lymphocytes. Conclusion Expression and secretion of mature IP-10 was efficiently achieved by L. lactis forming an effective system to produce IP-10. This recombinant IP-10 is biologically active as demonstrated by its ability to chemoattract human CD3+ T lymphocytes. This strain of recombinant L. lactis represents a potentially useful tool to be used as a live vaccine in vivo. PMID:18662403

  11. Yeast on the milky way: genetics, physiology and biotechnology of Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Rodicio, Rosaura; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2013-05-01

    The milk yeast Kluyveromyces lactis has a life cycle similar to that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and can be employed as a model eukaryote using classical genetics, such as the combination of desired traits, by crossing and tetrad analysis. Likewise, a growing set of vectors, marker cassettes and tags for fluorescence microscopy are available for manipulation by genetic engineering and investigating its basic cell biology. We here summarize these applications, as well as the current knowledge regarding its central metabolism, glucose and extracellular stress signalling pathways. A short overview on the biotechnological potential of K. lactis concludes this review. PMID:23576126

  12. Draft Genome Assemblies of Enterobacter aerogenes CDC 6003-71, Enterobacter cloacae CDC 442-68, and Pantoea agglomerans UA 0804-01.

    PubMed

    Minogue, T D; Daligault, H E; Davenport, K W; Bishop-Lilly, K A; Bruce, D C; Chain, P S; Coyne, S R; Chertkov, O; Freitas, T; Frey, K G; Jaissle, J; Koroleva, G I; Ladner, J T; Palacios, G F; Redden, C L; Xu, Y; Johnson, S L

    2014-01-01

    The Enterobacteriaceae are environmental and enteric microbes. We sequenced the genomes of two Enterobacter reference strains, E. aerogenes CDC 6003-71 and E. cloacae CDC 442-68, as well as one near neighbor used as an exclusionary reference for diagnostics, Pantoea agglomerans CDC UA0804-01. The genome sizes range from 4.72 to 5.55 Mbp and have G+C contents from 54.6 to 55.1%. PMID:25342683

  13. Integrated evaluation of aerogenic pollution by air-transported heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Ni, Zn, Mn and Cu) in the analysis of the main deposit media.

    PubMed

    Baltr?nait?, Edita; Baltr?nas, Pranas; Lietuvninkas, Arvydas; Serevi?ien?, Vaida; Zuokait?, Egl?

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the ambient air is constantly changing; therefore, the monitoring of ambient air quality to detect the changes caused by aerogenic pollutants makes the essential part of general environmental monitoring. To achieve more effective improvement of the ambient air quality, the Directive 2008/50/EC on 'Ambient Air Quality and Cleaner Air for Europe' was adopted by the European Parliament and the European Council. It informed the public and enterprises about a negative effect of pollution on humans, animals and plants, as well as about the need for monitoring aerogenic pollutants not only at the continuous monitoring stations but also by using indicator methods, i.e. by analysing natural deposit media. The problem of determining the relationship between the accumulation level of pollutants by a deposit medium and the level of air pollution and its risks is constantly growing in importance. The paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the response of the main four deposit media, i.e. snow cover, soil, pine bark and epigeic mosses, to the long-term pollution by aerogenic pollutants which can be observed in the area of oil refinery influence. Based on the quantitative expressions of the amounts of the accumulated pollutants in the deposit media, the territory of the oil refinery investigated in this paper has been referred to the areas of mild or moderate pollution. PMID:23933956

  14. Cross-protection of Lactococcus lactis-displayed HA2 subunit against homologous and heterologous influenza A viruses in mice.

    PubMed

    Lei, Han; Peng, Xiaojue; Zhao, Daxian; Jiao, Huifeng; Ouyang, Jiexiu

    2015-12-01

    Current influenza vaccines provide strain-specific protection against homologous subtypes and need to be updated annually. Therefore, it is essential to develop a universal vaccine that would induce broadly cross-protective immunity against homologous and heterologous influenza A viruses. The highly conserved HA2 subunit is a promising candidate for developing a universal influenza vaccine. Here, we hypothesized that the HA2 subunit could be displayed on the surface of Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis), using Spax as an anchor protein (L. lactis/pNZ8008-Spax-HA2) and that L. lactis/pNZ8008-Spax-HA2 would have immunogenicity by oral administration without the use of adjuvant in the mouse model. To address this hypothesis, we show that oral vaccination of mice with L. lactis/pNZ8008-Spax-HA2 elicited significant humoral and mucosal immune responses. Importantly, L. lactis/pNZ8008-Spax-HA2 provided 100 % protection against homologous H5N1 or heterologous H1N1 virus challenge. These results suggest that an HA2 subunit presented on the surface of L. lactis is an effective universal vaccine candidate against influenza A viruses in the poultry industry and in humans. PMID:26358264

  15. Short- and long-term dynamics in the intestinal microbiota following ingestion of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis GCL2505

    PubMed Central

    TANAKA, Yoshiyuki; TAKAMI, Kazuyo; NISHIJIMA, Tomohiko; AOKI, Ryo; MAWATARI, Takashi; IKEDA, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis GCL2505 (B. lactis GCL2505) is able to survive passage through the intestines and proliferate. The daily dynamics of the intestinal bifidobacteria following ingestion of probiotics are not yet clear. Moreover, the effects of long-term ingestion of probiotics on the intestinal microbiota have not been well studied. Two experiments were performed in the present study. In Experiment 1, 53 healthy female volunteers received B. lactis GCL2505; B. bifidum GCL2080, which can survive but not proliferate in the intestine; or yogurt fermented with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus for 2 weeks, and the daily dynamics of intestinal bifidobacteria were investigated. The number of fecal bifidobacteria significantly increased on day 1, and this was maintained until day 14 in the B. lactis GCL2505 ingestion group. However, no significant change in the number of fecal bifidobacteria was observed in the other groups throughout the ingestion period. In Experiment 2, 38 constipated volunteers received either B. lactis GCL2505 or a placebo for 8 weeks. Both the number of fecal bifidobacteria and the frequency of defecation significantly increased throughout the ingestion period in the B. lactis GCL2505 ingestion group. These results suggested that the proliferation of ingested bifidobacteria within the intestine contributed to a rapid increase in the amount of intestinal bifidobacteria and subsequent maintenance of these levels. Moreover, B. lactis GCL2505 improved the intestinal microbiota more effectively than non-proliferating bifidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria. PMID:26594607

  16. Short- and long-term dynamics in the intestinal microbiota following ingestion of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis GCL2505.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Takami, Kazuyo; Nishijima, Tomohiko; Aoki, Ryo; Mawatari, Takashi; Ikeda, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis GCL2505 (B. lactis GCL2505) is able to survive passage through the intestines and proliferate. The daily dynamics of the intestinal bifidobacteria following ingestion of probiotics are not yet clear. Moreover, the effects of long-term ingestion of probiotics on the intestinal microbiota have not been well studied. Two experiments were performed in the present study. In Experiment 1, 53 healthy female volunteers received B. lactis GCL2505; B. bifidum GCL2080, which can survive but not proliferate in the intestine; or yogurt fermented with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus for 2 weeks, and the daily dynamics of intestinal bifidobacteria were investigated. The number of fecal bifidobacteria significantly increased on day 1, and this was maintained until day 14 in the B. lactis GCL2505 ingestion group. However, no significant change in the number of fecal bifidobacteria was observed in the other groups throughout the ingestion period. In Experiment 2, 38 constipated volunteers received either B. lactis GCL2505 or a placebo for 8 weeks. Both the number of fecal bifidobacteria and the frequency of defecation significantly increased throughout the ingestion period in the B. lactis GCL2505 ingestion group. These results suggested that the proliferation of ingested bifidobacteria within the intestine contributed to a rapid increase in the amount of intestinal bifidobacteria and subsequent maintenance of these levels. Moreover, B. lactis GCL2505 improved the intestinal microbiota more effectively than non-proliferating bifidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria. PMID:26594607

  17. Use of a Genetically Enhanced, Pediocin-Producing Starter Culture, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MM217, To Control Listeria monocytogenes in Cheddar Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Buyong, Nurliza; Kok, Jan; Luchansky, John B.

    1998-01-01

    Cheddar cheese was prepared with Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MM217, a starter culture which contains pMC117 coding for pediocin PA-1. About 75 liters of pasteurized milk (containing ca. 3.6% fat) was inoculated with strain MM217 (ca. 106 CFU per ml) and a mixture of three Listeria monocytogenes strains (ca. 103 CFU per ml). The viability of the pathogen and the activity of pediocin in the cheese were monitored at appropriate intervals throughout the manufacturing process and during ripening at 8°C for 6 months. In control cheese made with the isogenic, non-pediocin-producing starter culture L. lactis subsp. lactis MM210, the counts of the pathogen increased to about 107 CFU per g after 2 weeks of ripening and then gradually decreased to about 103 CFU per g after 6 months. In the experimental cheese made with strain MM217, the counts of L. monocytogenes decreased to 102 CFU per g within 1 week of ripening and then decreased to about 10 CFU per g within 3 months. The average titer of pediocin in the experimental cheese decreased from approximately 64,000 arbitrary units (AU) per g after 1 day to 2,000 AU per g after 6 months. No pediocin activity (<200 AU per g) was detected in the control cheese. Also, the presence of pMC117 in strain MM217 did not alter the cheese-making quality of the starter culture, as the rates of acid production, the pH values, and the levels of moisture, NaCl, and fat of the control cheese and the experimental cheese were similar. Our data revealed that pediocin-producing starter cultures have significant potential for protecting natural cheese against L. monocytogenes. PMID:9835572

  18. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: Application in the control of Listeria monocytogenes in fresh Minas-type goat cheese

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Danielle N.; Todorov, Svetoslav D.; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T.; Franco, Bernadette D.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogen frequently found in dairy products. Its control in fresh cheeses is difficult, due to the psychrotrophic properties and salt tolerance. Bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with proven in vitro antilisterial activity can be an innovative technological approach but their application needs to be evaluated by means of in situ tests. In this study, a novel bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis strain ( Lc . lactis DF4Mi), isolated from raw goat milk, was tested for control of growth of L. monocytogenes in artificially contaminated fresh Minas type goat cheese during storage under refrigeration. A bacteriostatic effect was achieved, and counts after 10 days were 3 log lower than in control cheeses with no added LAB. However, this effect did not differ significantly from that obtained with a non-bacteriocinogenic Lc. lactis strain. Addition of nisin (12.5 mg/kg) caused a rapid decrease in the number of viable L. monocytogenes in the cheeses, suggesting that further studies with the purified bacteriocin DF4Mi may open new possibilities for this strain as biopreservative in dairy products. PMID:26221109

  19. Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris Mast36, a Strain Isolated from Bovine Mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Gazzola, Simona; Fontana, Cecilia; Bassi, Daniela; Cocconcelli, Pier-Sandro; von Wright, Atte

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris Mast36, isolated from bovine mastitis, is reported here. This strain was shown to be able to grow in milk and still possess genes of vegetable origin. The genome also contains a cluster of genes associated with pathogenicity. PMID:25999570

  20. Aerobic growth thermograms of Streptococcus lactis obtained with a complex medium containing glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Monk, P R

    1978-01-01

    With different culturing methods both simple and complex thermograms were obtained with Streptococcus lactis grown aerobically in a complex medium containing growth-limiting concentrations of glucose. The thermogram profiles have been interpreted in relation to growth rate, glucose degradation, and molar growth yields calculated for different time intervals during growth. PMID:98515

  1. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from... Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis. (a) Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from... Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis. (a) Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from... Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis. (a) Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from... Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis. (a) Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation...

  5. Secreted expression of Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucansucrase in Lactococcus lactis for the production of insoluble glucans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We expressed a glucansucrase, DsrI, from Leuconostoc mesenteroides that catalyzes formation of water-insoluble glucans from sucrose in Lactococcus lactis using a nisin-controlled gene expression system. Production of DsrI was optimized using several different background vectors, signal peptides, str...

  6. Disruption of lactate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase for increased hydrogen production and its effect on metabolic flux in Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongxin; Lu, Yuan; Wang, Liyan; Zhang, Chong; Yang, Cheng; Xing, Xinhui

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen production by Enterobacter aerogenes from glucose was enhanced by deleting the targeted ldhA and adh genes responsible for two NADH-consuming pathways which consume most NADH generated from glycolysis. Compared with the wild-type, the hydrogen yield of IAM1183-?ldhA increased 1.5 fold. Metabolic flux analysis showed both IAM1183-?ldhA and IAM1183-?adh exhibited significant changes in flux, including enhanced flux towards the hydrogen generation. The lactate production of IAM1183-?ldhA significantly decreased by 91.42%, while the alcohol yield of IAM1183-?adh decreased to 30%. The mutant IAM1183-?ldhA with better hydrogen-producing performance was selected for further investigation in a 5-L fermentor. The hydrogen production of IAM1183-?ldhA was 2.3 times higher than the wild-type. Further results from the fermentation process showed that the pH decreased to 5.39 levels, then gradually increased to 5.96, indicating that some acidic metabolites might be degraded or uptaken by cells. PMID:26188552

  7. Host-pathogen interactions in specific pathogen-free chickens following aerogenous infection with Chlamydia psittaci and Chlamydia abortus.

    PubMed

    Kalmar, Isabelle; Berndt, Angela; Yin, Lizi; Chiers, Koen; Sachse, Konrad; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2015-03-15

    Although Chlamydia (C.) psittaci infections are recognized as an important factor causing economic losses and impairing animal welfare in poultry production, the specific mechanisms leading to severe clinical outcomes are poorly understood. In the present study, we comparatively investigated pathology and host immune response, as well as systemic dissemination and expression of essential chlamydial genes in the course of experimental aerogeneous infection with C. psittaci and the closely related C. abortus, respectively, in specific pathogen-free chicks. Clinical signs appeared sooner and were more severe in the C. psittaci-infected group. Compared to C. abortus infection, more intense systemic dissemination of C. psittaci correlated with higher and faster infiltration of immune cells, as well as more macroscopic lesions and epithelial pathology, such as hyperplasia and erosion. In thoracic air sac tissue, mRNA expression of immunologically relevant factors, such as IFN-?, IL-1?, IL-6, IL-17, IL-22, LITAF and iNOS was significantly stronger up-regulated in C. psittaci- than in C. abortus-infected birds between 3 and 14 days post-infection. Likewise, transcription rates of the chlamydial genes groEL, cpaf and ftsW were consistently higher in C. psittaci during the acute phase. These findings illustrate that the stronger replication of C. psittaci in its natural host also evoked a more intense immune response than in the case of C. abortus infection. PMID:25638671

  8. Mutational analysis of the hyc-operon determining the relationship between hydrogenase-3 and NADH pathway in Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Pi, Jian; Jawed, Muhammad; Wang, Jun; Xu, Li; Yan, Yunjun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the hydrogenase-3 gene cluster (hycDEFGH) was isolated and identified from Enterobacter aerogenes CCTCC AB91102. All gene products were highly homologous to the reported bacterial hydrogenase-3 (Hyd-3) proteins. The genes hycE, hycF, hycG encoding the subunits of hydrogenase-3 were targeted for genetic knockout to inhibit the FHL hydrogen production pathway via the Red recombination system, generating three mutant strains AB91102-E (?hycE), AB91102-F (?hycF) and AB91102-G (?hycG). Deletion of the three genes affected the integrity of hydrogenase-3. The hydrogen production experiments with the mutant strains showed that no hydrogen was detected compared with the wild type (0.886mol/mol glucose), demonstrating that knocking out any of the three genes could inhibit NADH hydrogen production pathway. Meanwhile, the metabolites of the mutant strains were significantly changed in comparison with the wild type, indicating corresponding changes in metabolic flux by mutation. Additionally, the activity of NADH-mediated hydrogenase was found to be nil in the mutant strains. The chemostat experiments showed that the NADH/NAD(+) ratio of the mutant strains increased nearly 1.4-fold compared with the wild type. The NADH-mediated hydrogenase activity and NADH/NAD(+) ratio analysis both suggested that NADH pathway required the involvement of the electron transport chain of hydrogenase-3. PMID:26672442

  9. Phenolic compounds: Strong inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic hydrolysate for 2,3-butanediol production by Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Ju Hun; Yang, Xiaoguang; Kim, Sung Bong; Lee, Ja Hyun; Yoo, Hah Young; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Seung Wook

    2015-12-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass are attractive feedstocks for 2,3-butanediol production due to their abundant supply and low price. During the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass, various byproducts are formed and their effects on 2,3-butanediol production were not sufficiently studied compared to ethanol production. Therefore, the effects of compounds derived from lignocellulosic biomass (weak acids, furan derivatives and phenolics) on the cell growth, the 2,3-butanediol production and the enzymes activity involved in 2,3-butanediol production were evaluated using Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 29007. The phenolic compounds showed the most toxic effects on cell growth, 2,3-butanediol production and enzyme activity, followed by furan derivatives and weak acids. The significant effects were not observed in the presence of acetic acid and formic acid. Also, feasibility of 2,3-butanediol production from lignocellulosic biomass was evaluated using Miscanthus as a feedstock. In the fermentation of Miscanthus hydrolysate, 11.00 g/L of 2,3-butanediol was obtained from 34.62 g/L of reducing sugar. However, 2,3-butanediol was not produced when the concentration of total phenolic compounds in the hydrolysate increased to more than 1.5 g/L. The present study provides useful information to develop strategies for biological production of 2,3-butanediol and to establish biorefinery for biochemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:26479290

  10. Low-redundancy sequencing of the entire Lactococcus lactis IL1403 genome.

    PubMed

    Bolotin, A; Mauger, S; Malarme, K; Ehrlich, S D; Sorokin, A

    1999-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is an AT-rich gram positive bacterium phylogenetically close to the genus Streptococcus. Various strains of L. lactis are used in dairy industry as starters for cheese making. L. lactis is also one of the well characterized laboratory microorganisms, widely used for studies on physiology of lactic acid bacteria. We describe here a low redundancy sequence of the genome of the strain L. lactis IL1403. The strategy which we followed to determine the sequence consists of two main steps. First, a limited number of plasmids and lambda-phages that carry random segments of the genome were sequenced. Second, sequences of the inserts were used for production of novel sequencing templates by applying Multiplex Long Accurate PCR protocols. Using of these PCR products allowed to determine the sequence of the entire 2.35 Mb genome with a very low redundancy, close to 2. The error rate of the sequence is estimated to be below 1%. The correctness of the sequence assembly was confirmed by PCR amplification of the entire L. lactis IL1403 genome, using a set of 266 oligonucleotides. Anotation of the sequence was undertaken by using automatic gene prediction computer tools. This allowed to identify 1495 protein-encoding genes, to locate them on the genome map and to classify their functions on the basis of homology to known proteins. The function of about 700 genes expected to encode proteins that lack homologs in data bases cannot be reliably predicted in this way. The approach which we used eliminates high redundancy sequencing and mapping efforts, needed to obtain detailed and comprehensive genetic and physical maps of a bacterium. Availability of detailed genetic and physical maps of the L. lactis IL1403 genome provides many entries to study metabolism and physiology of bacteria from this group. The presence of 42 copies of five different IS elements in the IL1403 genome confirms the importance of these elements for genetic exchange in Lactococci. These include two previously unknown elements, present at seven and fifteen copies and designated IS1077 and IS983, respectively. Five potential or rudimentary prophages were identified in the genome by detecting clusters of phage-related genes. The metabolic and regulatory potential of L. lactis was evaluated by inspecting gene sets classified into different functional categories. L. lactis has the genetic potential to synthesise 20 standard amino acids, purine and pyrimidine nucleotides and at least four cofactors. Some of these metabolites, which are usually present in chemically defined media, can probably be omitted. About twenty compounds can be used by L. lactis as a sole carbon source. Some 83 regulators were revealed, indicating a regulatory potential close to that of Haemophilus influenzae, a bacterium with a similar genome size. Unexpectedly, L. lactis has a complete set of late competence genes, which may have concerted transcriptional regulation and unleadered polycistronic mRNAs. These findings open new possibilities for developing genetic tools, useful for studies of gene regulation in AT-rich gram positive bacteria and for engineering of new strains for the diary industry. PMID:10532372

  11. Evaluation of extrusion/spheronisation, layering and compaction for the preparation of an oral, multi-particulate formulation of viable, hIL-10 producing Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Huyghebaert, Nathalie; Vermeire, An; Neirynck, Sabine; Steidler, Lothar; Remaut, Eric; Remon, Jean Paul

    2005-01-01

    Three formulation techniques were compared in order to develop a multi-particulate formulation of viable, interleukin-10 producing Lactococcus lactis Thy12. First, freeze-dried L. lactis was compacted into mini-tablets. Next, liquid L. lactis culture was used as the granulation fluid for the production of pellets by extrusion/spheronisation. Finally, liquid L. lactis culture was layered on inert pellets as an alternative technique for the production of pellets. L. lactis viability and interleukin-10 production was evaluated. Viability dropped to 15.7% after compaction of freeze-dried L. lactis and to 1.0% after pelletisation of liquid L. lactis by extrusion/spheronisation. The viability in the mini-tablets and pellets, stored for 1 week at RT and 10% RH was reduced to 23 and 0.5% of initial viability, respectively. Storage for 1 week at RT and 60% RH resulted in complete loss of viability. Layering of L. lactis on inert pellets resulted in low viability (4.86%), but 1 week after storage at RT and 10% RH, 68% of initial viability was maintained. Increasing product temperature and cell density of L. lactis in the layering suspension did not significantly change viability after layering and storage. Interleukin-10 production capacity of L. lactis Thy12 was maintained after layering. PMID:15567296

  12. Secretory expression of a phospholipase A2 from Lactobacillus casei DSM20011 in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Guiyang

    2015-12-01

    The pla2 gene encoding a phospholipase A2 (EC 3.1.1.4) of Lactobacillus casei DSM20011 was cloned and expressed in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis GG799 successfully for the first time. The structural pla2 gene fused in frame with the K. lactis secretion signal ?-mating factor was integrated into the LAC4 locus and expressed under the control of the LAC4 promoter. sPLA2 activity was detected in the culture supernatant during shake flask culture of K. lactis/pKLAC1-pla2. In comparison with the control strain K. lactis/pKLAC1, SDS-PAGE analysis revealed a 17-kDa recombinant protein band in K. lactis/pKLAC1-pla2, which was consistent with the predicted molecular weight of the mature protein. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that the copy number of the integrated pla2 gene ranged from 2 to 6 and positively correlated with sPLA2 activity. When the inducer galactose was used as the carbon source, the sPLA2 activity in the culture supernatant of the recombinant that harbored six pla2 gene copies reached 1.96 ± 0.15 U/mL. The influence of the culture composition and conditions on the recombinant sPLA2 activity in shake flask culture were also studied. When the recombinant was cultured at 30°C in a YPD medium culture volume of 70 mL in a 250-mL shake flask with an initial pH of 7.0, the sPLA2 activity reached 2.16 ± 0.18 U/mL. PMID:26108160

  13. Proteomic Analyses To Reveal the Protective Role of Glutathione in Resistance of Lactococcus lactis to Osmotic Stress?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanhe; Zhang, Yanping; Zhu, Yan; Mao, Shaoming; Li, Yin

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that glutathione can protect Lactococcus lactis against oxidative stress and acid stress. In this study, we show that glutathione taken up by L. lactis SK11 can protect this organism against osmotic stress. When exposed to 5 M NaCl, L. lactis SK11 cells containing glutathione exhibited significantly improved survival compared to the control cells. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the integrity of L. lactis SK11 cells containing glutathione was maintained for at least 24 h, whereas autolysis of the control cells occurred within 2 h after exposure to this osmotic stress. Comparative proteomic analyses using SK11 cells containing or not containing glutathione that were exposed or not exposed to osmotic stress were performed. The results revealed that 21 of 29 differentially expressed proteins are involved in metabolic pathways, mainly sugar metabolism. Several glycolytic enzymes of L. lactis were significantly upregulated in the presence of glutathione, which might be the key for improving the general stress resistance of a strain. Together with the results of previous studies, the results of this study demonstrated that glutathione plays important roles in protecting L. lactis against multiple environmental stresses; thus, glutathione can be considered a general protectant for improving the robustness and stability of dairy starter cultures. PMID:20348298

  14. Expression of PprI from Deinococcus radiodurans Improves Lactic Acid Production and Stress Tolerance in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiangrong; Tian, Bing; Dai, Shang; Li, Tao; Guo, Linna; Tan, Zhongfang; Jiao, Zhen; Jin, Qingsheng; Wang, Yanping; Hua, Yuejin

    2015-01-01

    PprI is a general switch protein that regulates the expression of certain proteins involved in pathways of cellular resistance in the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. In this study, we transformed pprI into Lactococcus lactis strain MG1363 using the lactococcal shuttle vector pMG36e and investigated its effects on the tolerance and lactic acid production of L. lactis while under stress. PprI was stably expressed in L. lactis as confirmed by western blot assays. L. lactis expressing PprI exhibited significantly improved resistance to oxidative stress and high osmotic pressure. This enhanced cellular tolerance to stressors might be due to the regulation of resistance-related genes (e.g., recA, recO, sodA, and nah) by pprI. Moreover, transformed L. lactis demonstrated increased lactic acid production, attributed to enhanced lactate dehydrogenase activity. These results suggest that pprI can improve the tolerance of L. lactis to environmental stresses, and this transformed bacterial strain is a promising candidate for industrial applications of lactic acid production. PMID:26562776

  15. Effects of eliminating pyruvate node pathways and of coexpression of heterogeneous carboxylation enzymes on succinate production by Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Yoko; Fukui, Keita; Nishio, Yousuke; Hashiguchi, Kenichi; Usuda, Yoshihiro; Sode, Koji

    2015-02-01

    Lowering the pH in bacterium-based succinate fermentation is considered a feasible approach to reduce total production costs. Newly isolated Enterobacter aerogenes strain AJ110637, a rapid carbon source assimilator under weakly acidic (pH 5.0) conditions, was selected as a platform for succinate production. Our previous work showed that the ?adhE/PCK strain, developed from AJ110637 with inactivated ethanol dehydrogenase and introduced Actinobacillus succinogenes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK), generated succinate as a major product of anaerobic mixed-acid fermentation from glucose under weakly acidic conditions (pH <6.2). To further improve the production of succinate by the ?adhE/PCK strain, metabolically engineered strains were designed based on the elimination of pathways that produced undesirable products and the introduction of two carboxylation pathways from phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate to oxaloacetate. The highest production of succinate was observed with strain ES04/PCK+PYC, which had inactivated ethanol, lactate, acetate, and 2,3-butanediol pathways and coexpressed PCK and Corynebacterium glutamicum pyruvate carboxylase (PYC). This strain produced succinate from glucose with over 70% yield (gram per gram) without any measurable formation of ethanol, lactate, or 2,3-butanediol under weakly acidic conditions. The impact of lowering the pH from 7.0 to 5.5 on succinate production in this strain was evaluated under pH-controlled batch culture conditions and showed that the lower pH decreased the succinate titer but increased its yield. These findings can be applied to identify additional engineering targets to increase succinate production. PMID:25416770

  16. In Vivo Evolution of Bacterial Resistance in Two Cases of Enterobacter aerogenes Infections during Treatment with Imipenem.

    PubMed

    Philippe, Nadège; Maigre, Laure; Santini, Sébastien; Pinet, Elizabeth; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Davin-Régli, Anne-Véronique; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Masi, Muriel

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria are a major concern worldwide. Changes in membrane permeability, including decreased influx and/or increased efflux of antibiotics, are known as key contributors of bacterial MDR. Therefore, it is of critical importance to understand molecular mechanisms that link membrane permeability to MDR in order to design new antimicrobial strategies. In this work, we describe genotype-phenotype correlations in Enterobacter aerogenes, a clinically problematic and antibiotic resistant bacterium. To do this, series of clinical isolates have been periodically collected from two patients during chemotherapy with imipenem. The isolates exhibited different levels of resistance towards multiple classes of antibiotics, consistently with the presence or the absence of porins and efflux pumps. Transport assays were used to characterize membrane permeability defects. Simultaneous genome-wide analysis allowed the identification of putative mutations responsible for MDR. The genome of the imipenem-susceptible isolate G7 was sequenced to closure and used as a reference for comparative genomics. This approach uncovered several loci that were specifically mutated in MDR isolates and whose products are known to control membrane permeability. These were omp35 and omp36, encoding the two major porins; rob, encoding a global AraC-type transcriptional activator; cpxA, phoQ and pmrB, encoding sensor kinases of the CpxRA, PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems, respectively. This report provides a comprehensive analysis of membrane alterations relative to mutational steps in the evolution of MDR of a recognized nosocomial pathogen. PMID:26398358

  17. Close Genetic Linkage of the Determinants of the Ribitol and d-Arabitol Catabolic Pathways in Klebsiella aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Charnetzky, W. T.; Mortlock, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    Klebsiella aerogenes strain W70 has separate inducible pathways for the degradation of the pentitols ribitol and d-arabitol. These pathways are closely linked genetically as determined by transduction with phage PW52. There are two regulatory sites for the ribitol catabolic pathway as defined by loci for mutations to constitutive synthesis of ribitol dehydrogenase and d-ribulokinase, rbtB and rbtC. The two control sites are separated by a site represented by the dalB22 mutation. This mutation deprives the cell of the ability to induce synthesis of d-arabitol dehydrogenase and d-xylulokinase activities. Two additional regulatory mutations for the d-arabitol pathway, dalC31 and dalC37, map to the opposite side of rbtB13 relative to dalB22. The order of the genetic sites thus far determined for this region is dalK-dalD-dalC31, dalC37-rbtB13-dalB22-rbtC14-rbtD-rbtK, where dalK and dalD represent structural genes for the kinase and dehydrogenase of the d-arabitol pathway, respectively, and rbtK and rbtD represent the corresponding genes for the ribitol pathway. The two mutations that lead to constitutive synthesis of the d-arabitol-induced enzymes, dalC31 and dalC37, have different phenotypes with regard to their response to xylitol. The growth of dalC31 is inhibited by xylitol, but the toxicity can be reduced by increasing the levels of ribitol dehydrogenase either by induction with ribitol or by selection of a ribitol dehydrogenase-constitutive mutation. PMID:4366363

  18. In Vivo Evolution of Bacterial Resistance in Two Cases of Enterobacter aerogenes Infections during Treatment with Imipenem

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Sébastien; Pinet, Elizabeth; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Davin-Régli, Anne-Véronique; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Masi, Muriel

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria are a major concern worldwide. Changes in membrane permeability, including decreased influx and/or increased efflux of antibiotics, are known as key contributors of bacterial MDR. Therefore, it is of critical importance to understand molecular mechanisms that link membrane permeability to MDR in order to design new antimicrobial strategies. In this work, we describe genotype-phenotype correlations in Enterobacter aerogenes, a clinically problematic and antibiotic resistant bacterium. To do this, series of clinical isolates have been periodically collected from two patients during chemotherapy with imipenem. The isolates exhibited different levels of resistance towards multiple classes of antibiotics, consistently with the presence or the absence of porins and efflux pumps. Transport assays were used to characterize membrane permeability defects. Simultaneous genome-wide analysis allowed the identification of putative mutations responsible for MDR. The genome of the imipenem-susceptible isolate G7 was sequenced to closure and used as a reference for comparative genomics. This approach uncovered several loci that were specifically mutated in MDR isolates and whose products are known to control membrane permeability. These were omp35 and omp36, encoding the two major porins; rob, encoding a global AraC-type transcriptional activator; cpxA, phoQ and pmrB, encoding sensor kinases of the CpxRA, PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems, respectively. This report provides a comprehensive analysis of membrane alterations relative to mutational steps in the evolution of MDR of a recognized nosocomial pathogen. PMID:26398358

  19. Characterization of plasmid-encoded citrate permease (citP) genes from Leuconostoc species reveals high sequence conservation with the Lactococcus lactis citP gene.

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, E E; David, S; Harrington, A; Daly, C; Fitzgerald, G F; De Vos, W M

    1995-01-01

    The citrate permease determinant (citP) in several Leuconostoc strains was demonstrated to be plasmid encoded by curing experiments and hybridization studies with a DNA fragment containing the citP gene from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis NCDO176. Cloning and nucleotide sequence analysis of Leuconostoc lactis NZ6070 citP revealed almost complete identity to lactococcal citP. PMID:7487049

  20. Production of Recombinant Peanut Allergen Ara h 2 using Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Glenting, Jacob; Poulsen, Lars K; Kato, Kentaro; Madsen, Søren M; Frøkiær, Hanne; Wendt, Camilla; Sørensen, Helle W

    2007-01-01

    Background Natural allergen sources can supply large quantities of authentic allergen mixtures for use as immunotherapeutics. However, such extracts are complex, difficult to define, vary from batch to batch, which may lead to unpredictable efficacy and/or unacceptable levels of side effects. The use of recombinant expression systems for allergen production can alleviate some of these issues. Several allergens have been tested in high-level expression systems and in most cases show immunereactivity comparable to their natural counterparts. The gram positive lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis is an attractive microorganism for use in the production of protein therapeutics. L. lactis is considered food grade, free of endotoxins, and is able to secrete the heterologous product together with few other native proteins. Hypersensitivity to peanut represents a serious allergic problem. Some of the major allergens in peanut have been described. However, for therapeutic usage more information about the individual allergenic components is needed. In this paper we report recombinant production of the Ara h 2 peanut allergen using L. lactis. Results A synthetic ara h 2 gene was cloned into an L. lactis expression plasmid containing the P170 promoter and the SP310mut2 signal sequence. Flask cultures grown overnight showed secretion of the 17 kDa Ara h 2 protein. A batch fermentation resulted in 40 mg/L recombinant Ara h 2. Purification of Ara h 2 from the culture supernatant was done by hydrophobic exclusion and size separation. Mass spectrometry and N-terminal analysis showed a recombinant Ara h 2 of full length and correctly processed by the signal peptidase. The immunological activity of recombinant Ara h 2 was analysed by ELISA using antibodies specific for native Ara h 2. The recombinant Ara h 2 showed comparable immunereactivity to that of native Ara h 2. Conclusion Recombinant production of Ara h 2 using L. lactis can offer high yields of secreted, full length and immunologically active allergen. The L. lactis expression system can support recombinant allergen material for immunotherapy and component resolved allergen diagnostics. PMID:17711578

  1. Direct Identification of Staphylococcus aureus and Determination of Methicillin Susceptibility From Positive Blood-Culture Bottles in a Bact/ALERT System Using Binax Now S. aureus and PBP2a Tests

    PubMed Central

    Heraud, Sandrine; Freydiere, Anne-Marie; Doleans-Jordheim, Anne; Bes, Michèle; Tristan, Anne; Vandenesch, François; Laurent, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia is associated with high mortality and morbidity, requiring prompt and appropriate antimicrobial treatment. Therefore, it is important to detect methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) rapidly from blood cultures. Two immunochromatographic tests, BinaxNow S. aureus and BinaxNow PBP2a, were directly applied to 79 Bact/Alert bottles that were positive for Gram positive cocci in cluster aggregations. Sensitivity and specificity for the identification of S. aureus and determination of methicillin resistance were 94% and 87%, and 100% and 100%, respectively, with less than 30 min of performance time. These tests are efficient and rapid; these tests are valuable alternatives to more sophisticated and expensive methods used in the diagnosis of MRSA bacteremia. PMID:26131419

  2. Direct Identification of Staphylococcus aureus and Determination of Methicillin Susceptibility From Positive Blood-Culture Bottles in a Bact/ALERT System Using Binax Now S. aureus and PBP2a Tests.

    PubMed

    Heraud, Sandrine; Freydiere, Anne-Marie; Doleans-Jordheim, Anne; Bes, Michèle; Tristan, Anne; Vandenesch, François; Laurent, Frederic; Dauwalder, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia is associated with high mortality and morbidity, requiring prompt and appropriate antimicrobial treatment. Therefore, it is important to detect methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) rapidly from blood cultures. Two immunochromatographic tests, BinaxNow S. aureus and BinaxNow PBP2a, were directly applied to 79 Bact/Alert bottles that were positive for Gram positive cocci in cluster aggregations. Sensitivity and specificity for the identification of S. aureus and determination of methicillin resistance were 94% and 87%, and 100% and 100%, respectively, with less than 30 min of performance time. These tests are efficient and rapid; these tests are valuable alternatives to more sophisticated and expensive methods used in the diagnosis of MRSA bacteremia. PMID:26131419

  3. Alanine Catabolism in Klebsiella aerogenes: Molecular Characterization of the dadAB Operon and Its Regulation by the Nitrogen Assimilation Control Protein

    PubMed Central

    Janes, Brian K.; Bender, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Klebsiella aerogenes strains with reduced levels of d-amino acid dehydrogenase not only fail to use alanine as a growth substrate but also become sensitive to alanine in minimal media supplemented with glucose and ammonium. The inability of these mutant strains to catabolize the alanine provided in the medium interferes with both pathways of glutamate production. Alanine derepresses the nitrogen regulatory system (Ntr), which in turn represses glutamate dehydrogenase, one pathway of glutamate production. Alanine also inhibits the enzyme glutamine synthetase, the first enzyme in the other pathway of glutamate production. Therefore, in the presence of alanine, strains with mutations in dadA (the gene that codes for a subunit of the dehydrogenase) exhibit a glutamate auxotrophy when ammonium is the sole source of nitrogen. The alanine catabolic operon of Klebsiella aerogenes, dadAB, was cloned, and its DNA sequence was determined. The clone complemented the alanine defects of dadA strains. The operon has a high similarity to the dadAB operon of Salmonella typhimurium and the dadAX operon of Escherichia coli, each of which codes for the smaller subunit of d-amino acid dehydrogenase and the catabolic alanine racemase. Unlike the cases for E. coli and S. typhimurium, the dad operon of K. aerogenes is activated by the Ntr system, mediated in this case by the nitrogen assimilation control protein (NAC). A sequence matching the DNA consensus for NAC-binding sites is located centered at position ?44 with respect to the start of transcription. The promoter of this operon also contains consensus binding sites for the catabolite activator protein and the leucine-responsive regulatory protein. PMID:9457858

  4. Quantifying the effect of hand wash duration, soap use, ground beef debris, and drying methods on the removal of Enterobacter aerogenes on hands.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Dane A; Danyluk, Michelle D; Harris, Linda J; Schaffner, Donald W

    2015-04-01

    Hand washing is recognized as a crucial step in preventing foodborne disease transmission by mitigating crosscontamination among hands, surfaces, and foods. This research was undertaken to establish the importance of several keys factors (soap, soil, time, and drying method) in reducing microorganisms during hand washing. A nonpathogenic nalidixic acid-resistant Enterobacter aerogenes surrogate for Salmonella was used to assess the efficacy of using soap or no soap for 5 or 20 s on hands with or without ground beef debris and drying with paper towel or air. Each experiment consisted of 20 replicates, each from a different individual with ? 6 log CFU/ml E. aerogenes on their hands. A reduction of 1.0 ± 0.4 and 1.7 ± 0.8 log CFU of E. aerogenes was observed for a 5-s wash with no soap and a 20-s wash with soap, respectively. When there was no debris on the hands, there was no significant difference between washing with and without soap for 20 s (P > 0.05). Likewise, there was no significant difference in the reductions achieved when washing without soap, whether or not debris was on the hands (P > 0.05). A significantly greater reduction (P < 0.05) in E. aerogenes (0.5 log CFU greater reduction) was observed with soap when there was ground beef debris on the hands. The greatest difference (1.1 log CFU greater average reduction) in effectiveness occurred when ground beef debris was on the hands and a 20-s wash with water was compared with a 20-s wash with soap. Significantly greater (P < 0.05) reductions were observed with paper towel drying compared with air (0.5 log CFU greater reductions). Used paper towels may contain high bacterial levels (>4.0 log CFU per towel) when hands are highly contaminated. Our results support future quantitative microbial risk assessments needed to effectively manage risks of foodborne illness in which food workers' hands are a primary cause. PMID:25836392

  5. Plasmids of raw milk cheese isolate Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis DPC3901 suggest a plant-based origin for the strain.

    PubMed

    Fallico, Vincenzo; McAuliffe, Olivia; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Ross, R Paul

    2011-09-01

    The four-plasmid complement of the raw milk cheese isolate Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis DPC3901 was sequenced, and some genetic features were functionally analyzed. The complete sequences of pVF18 (18,977 bp), pVF21 (21,739 bp), pVF22 (22,166 bp), and pVF50 (53,876 bp) were obtained. Each plasmid contained genes not previously described for Lactococcus, in addition to genes associated with plant-derived lactococcal strains. Most of the novel genes were found on pVF18 and encoded functions typical of bacteria associated with plants, such as activities of plant cell wall modification (orf11 and orf25). In addition, a predicted high-affinity regulated system for the uptake of cobalt was identified (orf19 to orf21 [orf19-21]), which has a single database homolog on a plant-derived Leuconostoc plasmid and whose functionality was demonstrated following curing of pVF18. pVF21 and pVF22 encode additional metal transporters, which, along with orf19-21 of pVF18, could enhance host ability to uptake growth-limiting amounts of biologically essential ions within the soil. In addition, vast regions from pVF50 and pVF21 share significant homology with the plant-derived lactococcal plasmid pGdh442, which is indicative of extensive horizontal gene transfer and recombination between these plasmids and suggests a common plant niche for their hosts. Phenotypes associated with these regions include glutamate dehydrogenase activity and Na(+) and K(+) transport. The presence of numerous plant-associated markers in L. lactis DPC3901 suggests a plant origin for the raw milk cheese isolate and provides for the first time the genetic basis to support the concept of the plant-milk transition for Lactococcus strains. PMID:21803914

  6. Safety of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B. lactis) strain BB-12-supplemented yogurt in healthy adults on antibiotics: a phase I safety study.

    PubMed

    Merenstein, Daniel J; Tan, Tina P; Molokin, Aleksey; Smith, Keisha Herbin; Roberts, Robert F; Shara, Nawar M; Mete, Mihriye; Sanders, Mary Ellen; Solano-Aguilar, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that, when administered in sufficient doses, provide health benefits on the host. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires phase I safety studies for probiotics when the intended use of the product is as a drug. The purpose of the study was to determine the safety of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis (B. lactis) strain BB-12 (BB-12)-supplemented yogurt when consumed by a generally healthy group of adults who were prescribed a 10-day course of antibiotics for a respiratory infection. Secondary aims were to assess the ability of BB-12 to affect the expression of whole blood immune markers associated with cell activation and inflammatory response. A phase I, double-blinded, randomized controlled study was conducted in compliance with FDA guidelines for an Investigational New Drug (IND). Forty participants were randomly assigned to consume 4 ounces of either BB-12 -supplemented yogurt or non-supplemented control yogurt daily for 10 d. The primary outcome was to assess safety and tolerability, assessed by the number of reported adverse events. A total of 165 non-serious adverse events were reported, with no differences between the control and BB-12 groups. When compared to the control group, B lactis fecal levels were modestly higher in the BB-12-supplemented group. In a small subset of patients, changes in whole blood expression of genes associated with regulation and activation of immune cells were detected in the BB-12-supplemented group. BB-12-supplemented yogurt is safe and well tolerated when consumed by healthy adults concurrently taking antibiotics. This study will form the basis for future randomized clinical trials investigating the potential immunomodulatory effects of BB-12-supplemented yogurt in a variety of disease states. PMID:25569274

  7. Defined bacterial culture development for methane generation from lactose. [Streptococcus lactis; Clostridium formicoaceticum; Methanococcus mazei

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.T.; Tang, I.C.; Okos, M.R.

    1988-06-20

    The defined microbial cultures for methane generation from lactose were investigated. A mixed culture consisting of homolactic (Streptococcus lactis), homoacetic (Clostridium formicoaceticum), and acetate-utilizing methanogenic (Methanococcus mazei) bacteria was used to convert lactose and whey permeate to methane at mesophilic temperatures (35-37/sup 0/C) and a pH around 7.0. Lactose was first converted to lactic acid by S. lactis, then to acetic acid by C. formicoaceticum, and finally to methane and CO/sub 2/ by M. mazei. About 5.3 mol methane were obtained from each mole of lactose consumed, and the conversion of acetate to methane was the rate-limiting step for this mixed-culture fermentation.

  8. Secretion of biologically active human interleukin 22 (IL-22) by Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Loera-Arias, María J; Villatoro-Hernández, Julio; Parga-Castillo, Miguel A; Salcido-Montenegro, Alejandro; Barboza-Quintana, Oralia; Muñoz-Maldonado, Gerardo E; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, Roberto; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila

    2014-12-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) participates in the modulation of innate immunity and inflammation. This cytokine has important therapeutic potential, such as with ulcerative colitis, liver and lung injury, and infection, in different animal models. We generated a Lactococcus lactis strain that secretes human IL-22 under the regulation of the nisin-inducible promoter. Identification and secretion of this cytokine was demonstrated using western blots of culture supernatants from IL-22-expressing bacteria. The recombinant IL-22 protein produced by L. lactis was biologically active as determined by its ability to induce IL-10 secretion when co-cultured with a colon epithelial cell line in vitro. We consider this novel strain a promising live vaccine for various therapeutic applications. PMID:25214209

  9. A 7-base-pair sequence protects DNA from exonucleolytic degradation in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, I; Maguin, E; Ehrlich, S D; Gruss, A

    1995-01-01

    Linear DNA molecules are subject to degradation by various exonucleases in vivo unless their ends are protected. It has been demonstrated that a specific 8-bp sequence, 5'-GCTGGTGG-3', named Chi, can protect linear double-stranded DNA from the major Escherichia coli exonuclease RecBCD. Chi protects linear replication products of rolling-circle plasmids from RecBCD degradation in vivo, in agreement with observations in vitro. A unique 7-bp sequence, 5'-GCGCGTG-3', is shown to protect similar replication products from degradation in Lactococcus lactis strains but not in more distantly related Gram-positive bacteria. The properties of this sequence in L. lactis correspond to those of a Chi site. Linear plasmid replication products have been detected in numerous prokaryotes, suggesting the widespread existence of short species-specific sequences that preserve linear DNA from extensive degradation by host cell exonucleases. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7892255

  10. Experimental and steady-state analysis of the GAL regulatory system in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Pannala, Venkat R; Bhartiya, Sharad; Venkatesh, Kareenhalli V

    2010-07-01

    The galactose uptake mechanism in yeast is a well-studied regulatory network. The regulatory players in the galactose regulatory mechanism (GAL system) are conserved in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis, but the molecular mechanisms that occur as a result of the molecular interactions between them are different. The key differences in the GAL system of K. lactis relative to that of S. cerevisiae are: (a) the autoregulation of KlGAL4; (b) the dual role of KlGal1p as a metabolizing enzyme as well as a galactose-sensing protein; (c) the shuttling of KlGal1p between nucleus and cytoplasm; and (d) the nuclear confinement of KlGal80p. A steady-state model was used to elucidate the roles of these molecular mechanisms in the transcriptional response of the GAL system. The steady-state results were validated experimentally using measurements of beta-galactosidase to represent the expression for genes having two binding sites. The results showed that the autoregulation of the synthesis of activator KlGal4p is responsible for the leaky expression of GAL genes, even at high glucose concentrations. Furthermore, GAL gene expression in K. lactis shows low expression levels because of the limiting function of the bifunctional protein KlGal1p towards the induction process in order to cope with the need for the metabolism of lactose/galactose. The steady-state model of the GAL system of K. lactis provides an opportunity to compare with the design prevailing in S. cerevisiae. The comparison indicates that the existence of a protein, Gal3p, dedicated to the sensing of galactose in S. cerevisiae as a result of genome duplication has resulted in a system which metabolizes galactose efficiently. PMID:20528923

  11. Lactococcus lactis, an efficient cell factory for recombinant protein production and secretion.

    PubMed

    Morello, E; Bermúdez-Humarán, L G; Llull, D; Solé, V; Miraglio, N; Langella, P; Poquet, I

    2008-01-01

    The use of Gram-positive bacteria for heterologous protein production proves to be a useful choice due to easy protein secretion and purification. The lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis emerges as an attractive alternative to the Gram-positive model Bacillus subtilis. Here, we review recent work on the expression and secretion systems available for heterologous protein secretion in L. lactis, including promoters, signal peptides and mutant host strains known to overcome some bottlenecks of the process. Among the tools developed in our laboratory, inactivation of HtrA, the unique housekeeping protease at the cell surface, or complementation of the Sec machinery with B. subtilis SecDF accessory protein each result in the increase in heterologous protein yield. Furthermore, our lactococcal expression/secretion system, using both P(Zn)zitR, an expression cassette tightly controlled by environmental zinc, and a consensus signal peptide, SP(Exp4), allows efficient production and secretion of the staphylococcal nuclease, as evidenced by protein yields (protein amount/biomass) comparable to those obtained using NICE or P170 expression systems under similar laboratory conditions. Finally, the toolbox we are developing should contribute to enlarge the use of L. lactis as a protein cell factory. PMID:17957110

  12. Transcriptomic profile of aguR deletion mutant of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666

    PubMed Central

    del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M.; Redruello, Begoña; Martin, Maria Cruz; Fernandez, Maria; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Ladero, Victor; Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 (formerly GE2-14) is a dairy strain that catabolizes agmatine (a decarboxylated derivative of arginine) into the biogenic amine putrescine by the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway [1]. The AGDI cluster of L. lactis is composed by five genes aguR, aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC. The last four genes are responsible for the deamination of agmatine to putrescine and are co-transcribed as a single policistronic mRNA forming the catabolic operon aguBDAC[1]. aguR encodes a transmembrane protein that functions as a one-component signal transduction system that senses the agmatine concentration of the medium and accordingly regulates the transcription of aguBDAC[2], which is also transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) via glucose, but not by other sugars such as lactose and galactose [1], [3]. Here we report the transcriptional profiling of the aguR gene deletion mutant (L. lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 ?aguR) [2] compared to the wild type strain, both grown in M17 medium with galactose as carbon source and supplemented with agmatine. The transcriptional profiling data of AguR-regulated genes were deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession no. GSE59514.

  13. Distinctive features of homologous recombination in an 'old' microorganism, Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Quiberoni, A; Rezaïki, L; El Karoui, M; Biswas, I; Tailliez, P; Gruss, A

    2001-03-01

    Homologous recombination is needed to assure faithful inheritance of DNA material, especially under stress conditions. The same enzymes that repair broken chromosomes via recombination also generate biodiversity. Their activities may result in intrachromosomal rearrangements, assimilation of foreign DNA, or a combination of these events. It is generally supposed that homologous recombination systems are conserved, and function the same way everywhere as they do in Escherichia coli, the accepted paradigm. Studies in an 'older' microorganism, the gram-positive bacterium of the low GC branch Lactococcus lactis, confirm that many enzymes are conserved across species lines. However, the main components of the double strand break (DSB) repair system, an exonuclease/helicase (Exo/hel) and a short DNA modulator sequence Chi, differ markedly between bacteria, especially when compared to the gram-negative analogues. Based on our studies, a model is proposed for the functioning of the two-subunit Exo/hel of L. lactis and other gram-positive bacteria, which differs from that of the three-subunit E. coli enzyme. The differences between bacterial DSB repair systems may underlie a selection for diversity when dealing with DSB. These and other features of homologous recombination in L. lactis are discussed. PMID:11316366

  14. Microencapsulation of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis and Lactobacillus acidophilus in cocoa butter using spray chilling technology

    PubMed Central

    Pedroso, D.L.; Dogenski, M.; Thomazini, M.; Heinemann, R.J.B.; Favaro-Trindade, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the cells of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (BI-01) and Lactobacillus acidophilus (LAC-04) were encapsulated in cocoa butter using spray-chilling technology. Survival assays were conducted to evaluate the resistance of the probiotics to the spray-chilling process, their resistance to the simulated gastric and intestinal fluids (SGF and SIF), and their stability during 90 days of storage. The viability of the cells was not affected by microencapsulation. The free and encapsulated cells of B. animalis subsp. lactis were resistant to both SGF and SIF. The micro-encapsulated cells of L. acidophilus were more resistant to SGF and SIF than the free cells; the viability of the encapsulated cells was enhanced by 67%, while the free cells reached the detection limit of the method (103 CFU/g). The encapsulated probiotics were unstable when they were stored at 20 °C. The population of encapsulated L. acidophilus decreased drastically when they were stored at 7 °C; only 20% of cells were viable after 90 days of storage. The percentage of viable cells of the encapsulated B. animalis subsp.lactis, however, was 72% after the same period of storage. Promising results were obtained when the microparticles were stored at ?18 °C; the freeze granted 90 days of shelf life to the encapsulated cells. These results suggest that the spray-chilling process using cocoa butter as carrier protects L. acidophilus from gastrointestinal fluids. However, the viability of the cells during storage must be improved. PMID:24516445

  15. Production of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance by Bifidobacterium lactis in skim milk supplemented with additives.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Fabio Andres Castillo; Domínguez, José Manuel; Converti, Attilio; Oliveira, Ricardo Pinheiro de Souza

    2015-08-01

    Bacteriocins are natural compounds used as food biopreservatives instead of chemical preservatives. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (Bifid. lactis) was shown to produce a bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) able to inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes selected as an indicator microorganism. To enhance this production by the strain Bifid. lactis BL 04, skim milk (SM) was used as a fermentation medium either in the presence or in the absence of yeast extract, Tween 80 or inulin as stimulating additives, and the results in terms of bacterial growth and BLIS production were compared with those obtained in a traditional high cost complex medium such as Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS). To this purpose, all the cultivations were carried out in flasks at 200 rpm under anaerobic conditions ensured by a nitrogen flowrate of 1.0 L/min for 48 h, and BLIS production was quantified by means of a modified agar diffusion assay at low values of both temperature and concentration of List. monocytogenes. Although all these ingredients were shown to exert positive influence on BLIS production in both media, yeast extract and SM were by far the best ingredient and the best medium, respectively, allowing for a BLIS production at the late exponential phase of 2000 AU/ml. PMID:25850555

  16. A Virulent Phage Infecting Lactococcus garvieae, with Homology to Lactococcus lactis Phages.

    PubMed

    Eraclio, Giovanni; Tremblay, Denise M; Lacelle-Côté, Alexia; Labrie, Simon J; Fortina, Maria Grazia; Moineau, Sylvain

    2015-12-15

    A new virulent phage belonging to the Siphoviridae family and able to infect Lactococcus garvieae strains was isolated from compost soil. Phage GE1 has a prolate capsid (56 by 38 nm) and a long noncontractile tail (123 nm). It had a burst size of 139 and a latent period of 31 min. Its host range was limited to only two L. garvieae strains out of 73 tested. Phage GE1 has a double-stranded DNA genome of 24,847 bp containing 48 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Putative functions could be assigned to only 14 ORFs, and significant matches in public databases were found for only 17 ORFs, indicating that GE1 is a novel phage and its genome contains several new viral genes and encodes several new viral proteins. Of these 17 ORFs, 16 were homologous to deduced proteins of virulent phages infecting the dairy bacterium Lactococcus lactis, including previously characterized prolate-headed phages. Comparative genome analysis confirmed the relatedness of L. garvieae phage GE1 to L. lactis phages c2 (22,172 bp) and Q54 (26,537 bp), although its genome organization was closer to that of phage c2. Phage GE1 did not infect any of the 58 L. lactis strains tested. This study suggests that phages infecting different lactococcal species may have a common ancestor. PMID:26407890

  17. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Responses to Carbon Starvation in Nongrowing Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, Onur; Wels, Michiel; Smid, Eddy J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the transcriptional adaptations of nongrowing, retentostat cultures of Lactococcus lactis to starvation. Near-zero-growth cultures (? = 0.0001 h?1) obtained by extended retentostat cultivation were exposed to starvation by termination of the medium supply for 24 h, followed by a recovery period of another 24 h by reinitiating the medium supply to the retentostat culture. During starvation, the viability of the culture was largely retained, and the expression of genes involved in transcription and translational machineries, cell division, and cell membrane energy metabolism was strongly repressed. Expression of these genes was largely recovered following the reinitiation of the medium supply. Starvation triggered the elevated expression of genes associated with synthesis of branched-chain amino acids, histidine, purine, and riboflavin. The expression of these biosynthesis genes was found to remain at an elevated level after reinitiation of the medium supply. In addition, starvation induced the complete gene set predicted to be involved in natural competence in L. lactis KF147, and the elevated expression of these genes was sustained during the subsequent recovery period, but our attempts to experimentally demonstrate natural transformation in these cells failed. Mining the starvation response gene set identified a conserved cis-acting element that resembles the lactococcal CodY motif in the upstream regions of genes associated with transcription and translational machineries, purine biosynthesis, and natural transformation in L. lactis, suggesting a role for CodY in the observed transcriptome adaptations to starvation in nongrowing cells. PMID:25636846

  18. A comparative study on phosphotransferase activity of acid phosphatases from Raoultella planticola and Enterobacter aerogenes on nucleosides, sugars, and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Médici, Rosario; Garaycoechea, Juan I; Valino, Ana L; Pereira, Claudio A; Lewkowicz, Elizabeth S; Iribarren, Adolfo M

    2014-04-01

    Natural and modified nucleoside-5'-monophosphates and their precursors are valuable compounds widely used in biochemical studies. Bacterial nonspecific acid phosphatases (NSAPs) are a group of enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of phosphoester bonds, and some of them exhibit phosphotransferase activity. NSAP containing Enterobacter aerogenes and Raoultella planticola whole cells were evaluated in the phosphorylation of a wide range of nucleosides and nucleoside precursors using pyrophosphate as phosphate donor. To increase the productivity of the process, we developed two genetically modified strains of Escherichia coli which overexpressed NSAPs of E. aerogenes and R. planticola. These new recombinant microorganisms (E. coli BL21 pET22b-phoEa and E. coli BL21 pET22b-phoRp) showed higher activity than the corresponding wild-type strains. Reductions in the reaction times from 21 h to 60 min, from 4 h to 15 min, and from 24 h to 40 min in cases of dihydroxyacetone, inosine, and fludarabine, respectively, were obtained. PMID:23995227

  19. Occurrence and regulation of the ferric citrate transport system in Escherichia coli B, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Photorhabdus luminescens.

    PubMed

    Mahren, Susanne; Schnell, Heidrun; Braun, Volkmar

    2005-11-01

    In Escherichia coli K-12, transcription of the ferric citrate transport genes fecABCDE is initiated by binding of diferric dicitrate to the outer membrane protein FecA which elicits a signaling cascade from the cell surface to the cytoplasm. The FecI sigma factor is only active in the presence of FecR, which transfers the signal across the cytoplasmic membrane. In other bacteria, fecIRA homologues control iron transport gene transcription by siderophores other than citrate. However, in most cases, the FecI homologues are active in the absence of the FecR homologues, which might function as anti-sigma factors. Since not all E. coli strains contain a fec system, we determined the occurrence of fec genes in selected Enterobacteriaceae and the dependence of FecI activity on FecR. Incomplete FecIRA systems were chromosomally encoded in Enterobacter aerogenes strains and plasmid-encoded in K. pneumoniae. E. coli B, Photorhabdus luminescens and one of three Klebsiella pneumoniae strains had a functional FecIRA regulatory system as in E. coli K-12. The cytoplasmic N-terminal FecR fragments caused constitutive FecI activity in the absence of ferric citrate. The PCR-generated mutant FecI(D40G) was inactive and FecI(S15P) was partially active. FecR of E. coli K-12 activated FecI of all tested strains except FecI encoded on the virulence plasmid pLVPK of K. pneumoniae, which differed from E. coli K-12 FecI by having mutations in region 4, which is important for interaction with FecR. The C-terminally truncated FecR homologue of pLVPK was inactive. pLVPK-encoded FecA contains a 38-residue sequence in front of the signal sequence that did not prevent processing and proper integration of FecA into the outer membrane of E. coli and lacks the signaling sequence required for transcription initiation of the fec transport genes, making it induction-incompetent but transport-competent. The evidence indicates that fecIRABCDE genes are acquired by horizontal DNA transfer and can undergo debilitating mutations. PMID:16193283

  20. Mutagenesis of Klebsiella aerogenes UreG to probe nickel binding and interactions with other urease-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Boer, Jodi L; Quiroz-Valenzuela, Soledad; Anderson, Kimberly L; Hausinger, Robert P

    2010-07-20

    UreG is a GTPase required for assembly of the nickel-containing active site of urease. Herein, a Strep-tagged Klebsiella aerogenes UreG (UreG(Str)) and selected site-directed variants of UreG(Str) were constructed for studying the in vivo effects on urease activation in recombinant Escherichia coli cells, characterizing properties of the purified proteins, and analysis of in vivo and in vitro protein-protein interactions. Whereas the Strep tag had no effect on UreG's ability to activate urease, enzyme activity was essentially abolished in the K20A, D49A, C72A, H74A, D80A, and S111A UreG(Str) variants, with diminished activity also noted with E25A, C28A, and S115A proteins. Lys20 and Asp49 are likely to function in binding/hydrolysis of GTP and binding of Mg, respectively. UreG(Str) binds one nickel or zinc ion per monomer (K(d) approximately 5 microM for each metal ion) at a binding site that includes Cys72, as shown by a 12-fold increased K(d) for nickel ions using C72A UreG(Str) and by a thiolate-to-nickel charge-transfer band that is absent in the mutant protein. Based on UreG homology to HypB, a GTPase needed for hydrogenase assembly, along with the mutation results, His74 is likely to be an additional metal ligand. In vivo pull-down assays revealed Asp80 as critical for stabilizing UreG(Str) interaction with the UreABC-UreDF complex. In vitro pull-down assays demonstrated UreG binding to UreE, with the interaction enhanced by nickel or zinc ions. The metallochaperone UreE is suggested to transfer its bound nickel to UreG in the UreABC-UreDFG complex, with the metal ion subsequently transferring to UreD and then into the nascent active site of urease in a GTP-dependent process. PMID:20533838

  1. Characterization of the Klebsiella aerogenes urease accessory protein UreD in fusion with the maltose binding protein.

    PubMed

    Carter, Eric L; Hausinger, Robert P

    2010-05-01

    Assembly of the Klebsiella aerogenes urease metallocenter requires four accessory proteins, UreD, UreE, UreF, and UreG, to effectively deliver and incorporate two Ni2+ ions into the nascent active site of the urease apoprotein (UreABC). Each accessory protein has been purified and characterized with the exception of UreD due to its insolubility when it is overproduced in recombinant cells. In this study, a translational fusion was made between the maltose binding protein (MBP) and UreD, with the resulting MBP-UreD found to be soluble in Escherichia coli cell extracts and able to complement a DeltaureD-urease cluster in this host microorganism. MBP-UreD was purified as a large multimer (> 670 kDa) that bound approximately 2.5 Ni2+ ions (K(d) of approximately 50 microM, where K(d) is the dissociation constant) per UreD protomer according to equilibrium dialysis measurements. Zn2+ directly competes with 10-fold higher affinity (approximately 4 Zn2+ ions per protomer; K(d) of 5 microM) for the Ni2+ binding sites. MBP pulldown experiments demonstrated that the UreD domain of MBP-UreD formed in vivo complexes with UreF, UreG, UreF plus UreG, or UreABC when these proteins were overproduced in the same E. coli cells. In addition, a UreABC-(MBP-UreD)-UreFG complex was observed in cells producing all urease components. Comparative in vitro binding experiments with purified proteins demonstrated an approximate 1:1 binding ratio between the UreD domain of MBP-UreD and the UreF domain of the UreEF fusion, only weak or transient interaction between MBP-UreD and UreG, and no binding with UreABC. These studies are the first to describe the properties of purified UreD, and they extend our understanding of its binding partners both in vitro and in the cell. PMID:20207756

  2. Protective Vaccination against Infectious Bursal Disease Virus with Whole Recombinant Kluyveromyces lactis Yeast Expressing the Viral VP2 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Marina; Durairaj, Vijay; Mundt, Egbert; Schulze, Katja; Breunig, Karin D.; Behrens, Sven-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Here we report on vaccination approaches against infectious bursal disease (IBD) of poultry that were performed with complete yeast of the species Kluyveromyces lactis (K. lactis). Employing a genetic system that enables the rapid production of stably transfected recombinant K. lactis, we generated yeast strains that expressed defined quantities of the virus capsid forming protein VP2 of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Both, subcutaneous as well as oral vaccination regiments with the heat-inactivated but otherwise untreated yeast induced IBDV-neutralizing antibodies in mice and chickens. A full protection against a subsequent IBDV infection was achieved by subcutaneous inoculation of only milligram amounts of yeast per chicken. Oral vaccination also generated protection: while mortality was observed in control animals after virus challenge, none of the vaccinees died and ca. one-tenth were protected as indicated by the absence of lesions in the bursa of Fabricius. Recombinant K. lactis was thus indicated as a potent tool for the induction of a protective immune response by different applications. Subcutaneously applied K. lactis that expresses the IBDV VP2 was shown to function as an efficacious anti-IBD subunit vaccine. PMID:23024743

  3. Use of murine models to detect the allergenicity of genetically modified Lactococcus lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Shen-Shih; Liu, Chin-Feng; Ku, Ting-Wei; Mau, Jeng-Leun; Lin, Hsin-Tang; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2011-04-27

    By introducing aprN into Lactococcus lactis NZ9000, the genetically modified L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK successfully expressed the nattokinase. The safety assessment of this novel strain was based on allergenicity of pepsin digestion stability and murine model serologic identity. Subjecting to the GM strain and host to pepsin digestion, the soluble fractions and cell debris were fast degraded completely. Feeding with ovalbumin resulted in significantly higher production of IgG1 and IgE as compared to that of L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK or L. lactis NZ9000. Further, the serum IgG2a level increased dose-dependently at week 2 and induced immune reaction toward Th1 pathway. Secretion of cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 fed with lactococci was significantly lower than that of the OVA group. L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK did not increase the proliferation of type 2 helper T cells in spleen or induce allergenicity in BALB/c mice. On the basis of the results, the new GM lactic acid bacterium is regarded as safe to use. PMID:21410287

  4. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 Alleviates Food Allergic Manifestations in Sensitized Mice by Reducing IL-13 Expression Specifically in the Ileum

    PubMed Central

    Zuercher, Adrian W.; Weiss, Marietta; Holvoet, Sébastien; Moser, Mireille; Moussu, Hélène; van Overtvelt, Laurence; Horiot, Stéphane; Moingeon, Philippe; Nutten, Sophie; Prioult, Guénolée; Singh, Anurag; Mercenier, Annick

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Utilizing a food allergy murine model, we have investigated the intrinsic antiallergic potential of the Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 strain. Methods. BALB/c mice were sensitized at weekly intervals with ovalbumin (OVA) plus cholera toxin (CT) by the oral route for 7 weeks. In this model, an oral challenge with a high dose of OVA at the end of the sensitization period leads to clinical symptoms. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 was given to mice via the drinking water during sensitization (prevention phase) or after sensitization (management phase). Results. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 administration to sensitized mice strikingly reduced allergic manifestations in the management phase upon challenge, when compared to control mice. No preventive effect was observed with the strain. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 significantly decreased relative expression levels of the Th-2 cytokine, IL-13, and associated chemokines CCL11 (eotaxin-1) and CCL17 (TARC) in the ileum. No effect was observed in the jejunum. Conclusion/Significance. These results taken together designate Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 as a candidate probiotic strain appropriate in the management of allergic symptoms. PMID:21961022

  5. Lactococcus lactis V7 inhibits the cell invasion of bovine mammary epithelial cells by Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Assis, B Seridan; Germon, P; Silva, A M; Even, S; Nicoli, J R; Loir, Y Le

    2015-12-01

    Bovine mastitis, an inflammatory disease of the mammary gland often associated to bacterial infection, is the first cause of antibiotic use in dairy cattle. Because of the risk of antibioresistance emergence, alternative non-antibiotic strategies are needed to prevent or to cure bovine mastitis and reduce the antibiotic use in veterinary medicine. In this work, we investigated Lactococcus lactis V7, a strain isolated from the mammary gland, as a probiotic option against bovine mastitis. Using bovine mammary epithelial cell (bMEC) culture, and two representative strains for Escherichia coli and for Staphylococcus aureus, two major mastitis pathogens, we investigated L. lactis V7 ability to inhibit cell invasion (i.e. adhesion and internalization) of these pathogens into bMEC. L. lactis V7 ability to modulate the production of CXCL8, a key chemokine IL-8 responsible for neutrophil influx, in bMEC upon challenge with E. coli was investigated by an ELISA dosage of CXCL8 in bMEC culture supernatants. We showed that L. lactis V7 inhibited the internalisation of both E. coli and S. aureus strains into bMEC, whereas it inhibited the adhesion of only one out of the two S. aureus strains and of none of the E. coli strains tested. Investigation of the bMEC immune response showed that L. lactis V7 alone induced a slight increase in CXCL8 production in bMEC and that it increased the inflammatory response in bMEC challenged with the E. coli strains. Altogether these features of L. lactis V7 make it a potential promising candidate for a probiotic prevention strategy against bovine mastitis. PMID:26322541

  6. A Zn-Dependent Metallopeptidase Is Responsible for Sensitivity to LsbB, a Class II Leaderless Bacteriocin of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis BGMN1-5

    PubMed Central

    Uzelac, Gordana; Lozo, Jelena; Aleksandrzak-Piekarczyk, Tamara; Gabrielsen, Christina; Kristensen, Tom; Nes, Ingolf F.; Diep, Dzung B.; Topisirovic, Ljubisa

    2013-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis BGMN1-5 produces a leaderless class II bacteriocin called LsbB. To identify the receptor for LsbB, a cosmid library of the LsbB-sensitive strain BGMN1-596 was constructed. About 150 cosmid clones were individually isolated and transferred to LsbB-resistant mutants of BGMN1-596. Cosmid pAZILcos/MN2, carrying a 40-kb insert, was found to restore LsbB sensitivity in LsbB-resistant mutants. Further subcloning revealed that a 1.9-kb fragment, containing only one open reading frame, was sufficient to restore sensitivity. The fragment contains the gene yvjB coding for a Zn-dependent membrane-bound metallopeptidase, suggesting that this gene may serve as the receptor for LsbB. Further support for this notion derives from several independent experiments: (i) whole-genome sequencing confirmed that all LsbB-resistant mutants contain mutations in yvjB; (ii) disruption of yvjB by direct gene knockout rendered sensitive strains BGMN1-596 and IL1403 resistant to LsbB; and (iii) most compellingly, heterologous expression of yvjB in naturally resistant strains of other species, such as Lactobacillus paracasei and Enterococcus faecalis, also rendered them sensitive to the bacteriocin. To our knowledge, this is the first time a membrane-bound peptidase gene has been shown to be involved in bacteriocin sensitivity in target cells. We also demonstrated a novel successful approach for identifying bacteriocin receptors. PMID:24123824

  7. Stress response in Lactococcus lactis: cloning, expression analysis, and mutation of the lactococcal superoxide dismutase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, J W; Leenhouts, K J; Haandrikman, A J; Venema, G; Kok, J

    1995-01-01

    In an analysis of the stress response of Lactococcus lactis, three proteins that were induced under low pH culture conditions were detected. One of these was identified as the lactococcal superoxide dismutase (SodA) by N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis. The gene encoding this protein, designated sodA, was cloned by the complementation of a sodA sodB Escherichia coli strain. The deduced amino acid sequence of L. lactis SodA showed the highest degree of similarity to the manganese-containing Sod (MnSod) of Bacillus stearothermophilus. A promoter upstream of the sodA gene was identified by primer extension analysis, and an inverted repeat surrounding the -35 hexanucleotide of this promoter is possibly involved in the regulation of the expression of sodA. The expression of sodA was analyzed by transcriptional fusions with a promoterless lacZ gene. The induction of beta-galactosidase activity occurred in aerated cultures. Deletion experiments revealed that a DNA fragment of more than 130 bp surrounding the promoter was needed for the induction of lacZ expression by aeration. The growth rate of an insertion mutant of sodA did not differ from that of the wild type in standing cultures but was decreased in aerated cultures. PMID:7665513

  8. Adaptation of Lactococcus lactis to high growth temperature leads to a dramatic increase in acidification rate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Shen, Jing; Ingvar Hellgren, Lars; Ruhdal Jensen, Peter; Solem, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is essential for most cheese making, and this mesophilic bacterium has its growth optimum around 30 °C. We have, through adaptive evolution, isolated a mutant TM29 that grows well up to 39 °C, and continuous growth at 40 °C is possible if pre-incubated at a slightly lower temperature. At the maximal permissive temperature for the wild-type, 38 °C, TM29 grows 33% faster and has a 12% higher specific lactate production rate than its parent MG1363, which results in fast lactate accumulation. Genome sequencing was used to reveal the mutations accumulated, most of which were shown to affect thermal tolerance. Of the mutations with more pronounced effects, two affected expression of single proteins (chaperone; riboflavin transporter), two had pleiotropic effects (RNA polymerase) which changed the gene expression profile, and one resulted in a change in the coding sequence of CDP-diglyceride synthase. A large deletion containing 10 genes was also found to affect thermal tolerance significantly. With this study we demonstrate a simple approach to obtain non-GMO derivatives of the important L. lactis that possess properties desirable by the industry, e.g. thermal robustness and increased rate of acidification. The mutations we have identified provide a genetic basis for further investigation of thermal tolerance. PMID:26388459

  9. Antiviral Effects of Lactococcus lactis on Feline Calicivirus, A Human Norovirus Surrogate.

    PubMed

    Aboubakr, Hamada A; El-Banna, Amr A; Youssef, Mohammed M; Al-Sohaimy, Sobhy A A; Goyal, Sagar M

    2014-08-17

    Foodborne viruses, particularly human norovirus (NV) and hepatitis virus type A, are a cause of concern for public health making it necessary to explore novel and effective techniques for prevention of foodborne viral contamination, especially in minimally processed and ready-to-eat foods. This study aimed to determine the antiviral activity of a probiotic lactic acid bacterium (LAB) against feline calicivirus (FCV), a surrogate of human NV. Bacterial growth medium filtrate (BGMF) of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis LM0230 and its bacterial cell suspension (BCS) were evaluated separately for their antiviral activity against FCV grown in Crandell-Reese feline kidney (CRFK) cells. No significant antiviral effect was seen when CRFK cells were pre-treated with either BGMF (raw or pH 7-adjusted BGMF) or BCS. However, pre-treatment of FCV with BGMF and BCS resulted in a reduction in virus titers of 1.3 log10 tissue culture infectious dose (TCID)50 and 1.8 log10 TCID50, respectively. The highest reductions in FCV infectivity were obtained when CRFK cells were co-treated with FCV and pH 7-adjusted BGMF or with FCV and BCS (7.5 log10 TCID50 and 6.0 log10 TCID50, respectively). These preliminary results are encouraging and indicate the need for continued studies on the role of probiotics and LAB on inactivation of viruses in various types of foods. PMID:25129102

  10. Purification and characterization of a novel glucansucrase from Leuconostoc lactis EG001.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Mo; Yeon, Min Ji; Choi, Nack-Shick; Chang, Young-Hyo; Jung, Min Young; Song, Jae Jun; Kim, Joong Su

    2010-07-20

    A gene encoding glucansucrase was identified in Leuconostoc lactis EG001 isolated from lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in Kimchi, a traditional Korean fermented food. The L. lactis EG001 glucansucrase gene consists of 4503 bp open reading frame (ORF) and encodes an enzyme of 1500 amino acids with an apparent molecular mass of 165 kDa. The deduced amino-acid sequence showed the highest amino-acid sequence identity (75%) to that of dextransucrase of L. mesenteroides. The gene was cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli strain. The recombinant enzyme was purified via Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and its enzymatic properties were characterized. The enzyme exhibited optimum activity at 30 degrees C and pH 5.0. In addition, the enzyme was able to catalyze the glycosylation of l-ascorbic acid to l-ascorbic acid 2-glucoside. The glycosylated product via EG001 glucansucrase has the potential as an antioxidant in industrial applications. PMID:19853426

  11. Cyclopropane fatty acid synthase from Oenococcus oeni: expression in Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris and biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    To, Thi Mai Huong; Grandvalet, Cosette; Alexandre, Hervé; Tourdot-Maréchal, Raphaëlle

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial cyclopropane fatty acid synthases (CFA synthases) catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) to the double bond of a lipid chain, thereby forming a cyclopropane ring. CFAs contribute to resistance to acidity, dryness, and osmotic imbalance in many bacteria. This work describes the first biochemical characterization of a lactic acid bacterium CFA synthase. We have overexpressed Oenococcus oeni CFA synthase in E. coli in order to purify the enzyme. The optimum cyclopropanation activity was obtained at pH 5.6 and 35.8 °C. The high K m (AdoMet) value obtained (2.26 mM) demonstrates the low affinity of O. oeni enzyme toward the L. lactis subsp. cremoris unsaturated phospholipids. These results explain the partial complementation of the L. lactis subsp. cremoris cfa mutant by the O. oeni cfa gene and suggest a probable substrate specificity of the O. oeni enzyme. The current study reveals an essential hypothesis about the specificity of O. oeni CFA synthase which could play a key function in the acid tolerance mechanisms of this enological bacterium. PMID:26294376

  12. Heterologous expression of Mytilus californianus foot protein three (Mcfp-3) in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Platko, Joseph D; Deeg, Matthew; Thompson, Valery; Al-Hinai, Zaid; Glick, Hillary; Pontius, Kathryn; Colussi, Paul; Taron, Christopher; Kaplan, David L

    2008-01-01

    Mytilus californianus foot protein three (Mcfp-3) was successfully expressed in the yeast, Kluyveromyces lactis. The first nine amino acids (YPYDVPDYA) from the human-influenza-virus hemagglutinin (HA) protein were fused to the amino terminus of Mcfp-3 (HA-Mcfp-3) to facilitate identification and purification. HA-Mcfp-3 was purified to a concentration of 1mg/L using HA affinity chromatography. The recovered polypeptide was resolved by SDS-PAGE and migrated primarily at 36 kDa, an increase of approximately 29 kDa over the calculated molecular weight of a HA-Mcfp-3 monomer. Significantly, release of Mcfp-3 by enterokinase treatment coincided with the formation of high molecular weight complexes. It is noteworthy that the complexes mimicked the previously reported insolubility of Mcfps found in vivo to denaturing and reducing conditions. These data demonstrate the successful expression of Mcfp-3 in K. lactis and show an intrinsic ability of Mcfp-3 to self-assemble into stable, higher molecular weight forms. PMID:17923416

  13. The pyrimidine operon pyrRPB-carA from Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Martinussen, J; Schallert, J; Andersen, B; Hammer, K

    2001-05-01

    The four genes pyrR, pyrP, pyrB, and carA were found to constitute an operon in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MG1363. The functions of the different genes were established by mutational analysis. The first gene in the operon is the pyrimidine regulatory gene, pyrR, which is responsible for the regulation of the expression of the pyrimidine biosynthetic genes leading to UMP formation. The second gene encodes a membrane-bound high-affinity uracil permease, required for utilization of exogenous uracil. The last two genes in the operon, pyrB and carA, encode pyrimidine biosynthetic enzymes; aspartate transcarbamoylase (pyrB) is the second enzyme in the pathway, whereas carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase subunit A (carA) is the small subunit of a heterodimeric enzyme, catalyzing the formation of carbamoyl phosphate. The carA gene product is shown to be required for both pyrimidine and arginine biosynthesis. The expression of the pyrimidine biosynthetic genes including the pyrRPB-carA operon is subject to control at the transcriptional level, most probably by an attenuator mechanism in which PyrR acts as the regulatory protein. PMID:11292797

  14. The Carbohydrate Metabolism Signature of Lactococcus lactis Strain A12 Reveals Its Sourdough Ecosystem Origin

    PubMed Central

    Passerini, Delphine; Coddeville, Michèle; Le Bourgeois, Pascal; Loubière, Pascal; Ritzenthaler, Paul; Fontagné-Faucher, Catherine; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2013-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain A12 was isolated from sourdough. Combined genomic, transcriptomic, and phenotypic analyses were performed to understand its survival capacity in the complex sourdough ecosystem and its role in the microbial community. The genome sequence comparison of strain A12 with strain IL1403 (a derivative of an industrial dairy strain) revealed 78 strain-specific regions representing 23% of the total genome size. Most of the strain-specific genes were involved in carbohydrate metabolism and are potentially required for its persistence in sourdough. Phenotype microarray, growth tests, and analysis of glycoside hydrolase content showed that strain A12 fermented plant-derived carbohydrates, such as arabinose and ?-galactosides. Strain A12 exhibited specific growth rates on raffinose that were as high as they were on glucose and was able to release sucrose and galactose outside the cell, providing soluble carbohydrates for sourdough microflora. Transcriptomic analysis identified genes specifically induced during growth on raffinose and arabinose and reveals an alternative pathway for raffinose assimilation to that used by other lactococci. PMID:23872564

  15. Adaptation of Lactococcus lactis to high growth temperature leads to a dramatic increase in acidification rate

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Shen, Jing; Ingvar Hellgren, Lars; Ruhdal Jensen, Peter; Solem, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is essential for most cheese making, and this mesophilic bacterium has its growth optimum around 30?°C. We have, through adaptive evolution, isolated a mutant TM29 that grows well up to 39?°C, and continuous growth at 40?°C is possible if pre-incubated at a slightly lower temperature. At the maximal permissive temperature for the wild-type, 38?°C, TM29 grows 33% faster and has a 12% higher specific lactate production rate than its parent MG1363, which results in fast lactate accumulation. Genome sequencing was used to reveal the mutations accumulated, most of which were shown to affect thermal tolerance. Of the mutations with more pronounced effects, two affected expression of single proteins (chaperone; riboflavin transporter), two had pleiotropic effects (RNA polymerase) which changed the gene expression profile, and one resulted in a change in the coding sequence of CDP-diglyceride synthase. A large deletion containing 10 genes was also found to affect thermal tolerance significantly. With this study we demonstrate a simple approach to obtain non-GMO derivatives of the important L. lactis that possess properties desirable by the industry, e.g. thermal robustness and increased rate of acidification. The mutations we have identified provide a genetic basis for further investigation of thermal tolerance. PMID:26388459

  16. Secreted expression of Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucansucrase in Lactococcus lactis for the production of insoluble glucans.

    PubMed

    Skory, Christopher D; Côté, Gregory L

    2015-12-01

    We expressed a glucansucrase, DsrI, from Leuconostoc mesenteroides that catalyzes formation of water-insoluble glucans from sucrose using a nisin-controlled gene expression system in Lactococcus lactis. These polymers have potential for production of biodegradable gels, fibers, and films. We optimized production of DsrI using several different background vectors, signal peptides, strains, induction conditions, and bioreactor parameters to increase extracellular accumulation. Optimal production of the enzyme utilized a high-copy plasmid, pMSP3535H3, which contains a nisin immunity gene, L. lactis LM0230, and bioreactors maintained at pH 6.0 to stabilize the enzyme. We were able to significantly improve growth using the lactic acid inhibitor heme and by continuous removal of lactic acid with anion exchange resins, but enzyme production was less than the controls. The recombinant enzyme under optimized conditions accumulated in the culture medium to approximately 380 mg/L, which was over 150-fold higher compared to the native L. mesenteroides strain. Methods are also included for purification of DsrI utilizing the glucan-binding domain of the enzyme. PMID:26239071

  17. The targeted recognition of Lactococcus lactis phages to their polysaccharide receptors.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Orla; Spinelli, Silvia; Farenc, Carine; Labbé, Myriam; Tremblay, Denise; Blangy, Stéphanie; Oscarson, Stefan; Moineau, Sylvain; Cambillau, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Each phage infects a limited number of bacterial strains through highly specific interactions of the receptor-binding protein (RBP) at the tip of phage tail and the receptor at the bacterial surface. Lactococcus lactis is covered with a thin polysaccharide pellicle (hexasaccharide repeating units), which is used by a subgroup of phages as a receptor. Using L.?lactis and phage 1358 as a model, we investigated the interaction between the phage RBP and the pellicle hexasaccharide of the host strain. A core trisaccharide (TriS), derived from the pellicle hexasaccharide repeating unit, was chemically synthesised, and the crystal structure of the RBP/TriS complex was determined. This provided unprecedented structural details of RBP/receptor site-specific binding. The complete hexasaccharide repeating unit was modelled and found to aptly fit the extended binding site. The specificity observed in in vivo phage adhesion assays could be interpreted in view of the reported structure. Therefore, by combining synthetic carbohydrate chemistry, X-ray crystallography and phage plaquing assays, we suggest that phage adsorption results from distinct recognition of the RBP towards the core TriS or the remaining residues of the hexasacchride receptor. This study provides a novel insight into the adsorption process of phages targeting saccharides as their receptors. PMID:25708888

  18. A copper-induced quinone degradation pathway provides protection against combined copper/quinone stress in Lactococcus lactis IL1403.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Stefano; Abicht, Helge K; Gonskikh, Yulia; Solioz, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Quinones are ubiquitous in the environment. They occur naturally but are also in widespread use in human and industrial activities. Quinones alone are relatively benign to bacteria, but in combination with copper, they become toxic by a mechanism that leads to intracellular thiol depletion. Here, it was shown that the yahCD-yaiAB operon of Lactococcus lactis?IL1403 provides resistance to combined copper/quinone stress. The operon is under the control of CopR, which also regulates expression of the copRZA copper resistance operon as well as other L.?lactis genes. Expression of the yahCD-yaiAB operon is induced by copper but not by quinones. Two of the proteins encoded by the operon appear to play key roles in alleviating quinone/copper stress: YaiB is a flavoprotein that converts p-benzoquinones to less toxic hydroquinones, using reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) as reductant; YaiA is a hydroquinone dioxygenase that converts hydroquinone putatively to 4-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde in an oxygen-consuming reaction. Hydroquinone and methylhydroquinone are both substrates of YaiA. Deletion of yaiB causes increased sensitivity of L.?lactis to quinones and complete growth arrest under combined quinone and copper stress. Copper induction of the yahCD-yaiAB operon offers protection to copper/quinone toxicity and could provide a growth advantage to L.?lactis in some environments. PMID:25430846

  19. Genotypic and Phenotypic Analysis of Dairy Lactococcus lactis Biodiversity in Milk: Volatile Organic Compounds as Discriminating Markers

    PubMed Central

    Dhaisne, Amandine; Guellerin, Maeva; Laroute, Valérie; Laguerre, Sandrine; Le Bourgeois, Pascal; Loubiere, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The diversity of nine dairy strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis in fermented milk was investigated by both genotypic and phenotypic analyses. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing were used to establish an integrated genotypic classification. This classification was coherent with discrimination of the L. lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis lineage and reflected clonal complex phylogeny and the uniqueness of the genomes of these strains. To assess phenotypic diversity, 82 variables were selected as important dairy features; they included physiological descriptors and the production of metabolites and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Principal-component analysis (PCA) demonstrated the phenotypic uniqueness of each of these genetically closely related strains, allowing strain discrimination. A method of variable selection was developed to reduce the time-consuming experimentation. We therefore identified 20 variables, all associated with VOCs, as phenotypic markers allowing discrimination between strain groups. These markers are representative of the three metabolic pathways involved in flavor: lipolysis, proteolysis, and glycolysis. Despite great phenotypic diversity, the strains could be divided into four robust phenotypic clusters based on their metabolic orientations. Inclusion of genotypic diversity in addition to phenotypic characters in the classification led to five clusters rather than four being defined. However, genotypic characters make a smaller contribution than phenotypic variables (no genetic distances selected among the most contributory variables). This work proposes an original method for the phenotypic differentiation of closely related strains in milk and may be the first step toward a predictive classification for the manufacture of starters. PMID:23709512

  20. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CNRZ327, a Dairy Bacterium with Anti-Inflammatory Properties

    PubMed Central

    El Kafsi, Hela; Binesse, Johan; Loux, Valentin; Buratti, Julien; Boudebbouze, Samira; Dervyn, Rozenn; Hammani, Amal; Maguin, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CNRZ327 is a dairy bacterium with anti-inflammatory properties both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report the genome sequence of this bacterium, which appears to contain no less than 215 insertion sequence (IS) elements, an exceptionally high number regarding the small genome size of the strain. PMID:25035318

  1. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CNRZ327, a Dairy Bacterium with Anti-Inflammatory Properties.

    PubMed

    El Kafsi, Hela; Binesse, Johan; Loux, Valentin; Buratti, Julien; Boudebbouze, Samira; Dervyn, Rozenn; Hammani, Amal; Maguin, Emmanuelle; van de Guchte, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CNRZ327 is a dairy bacterium with anti-inflammatory properties both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report the genome sequence of this bacterium, which appears to contain no less than 215 insertion sequence (IS) elements, an exceptionally high number regarding the small genome size of the strain. PMID:25035318

  2. Identification and characterization of tetracycline resistance in Lactococcus lactis isolated from Polish raw milk and fermented artisanal products.

    PubMed

    Zycka-Krzesinska, Joanna; Boguslawska, Joanna; Aleksandrzak-Piekarczyk, Tamara; Jopek, Jakub; Bardowski, Jacek K

    2015-10-15

    To assess the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) in Polish raw milk and fermented artisanal products, a collection comprising 500 isolates from these products was screened. Among these isolates, six strains (IBB28, IBB160, IBB161, IBB224, IBB477 and IBB487) resistant to tetracycline were identified. The strains showing atypical tetracycline resistance were classified as Lactococcus lactis: three of them were identified as L. lactis subsp. cremoris (IBB224, IBB477 and IBB487) and the other three (IBB28, IBB160, IBB161) were identified as L. lactis subsp. lactis. The mechanism involving Ribosomal Protection Proteins (RPP) was identified as responsible for tetracycline resistance. Three of the tested strains (IBB28, IBB160 and IBB224) had genes encoding the TetS protein, whereas the remaining three (IBB161, IBB477 and IBB487) expressed TetM. The results also demonstrated that the genes encoding these proteins were located on genetic mobile elements. The tet(S) gene was found to be located on plasmids, whereas tet(M) was found within the Tn916 transposon. PMID:26204235

  3. Versatile vector suite for the extracytoplasmic production and purification of heterologous His-tagged proteins in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Neef, Jolanda; Milder, Fin J; Koedijk, Danny G A M; Klaassens, Marindy; Heezius, Erik C; van Strijp, Jos A G; Otto, Andreas; Becher, Dörte; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Buist, Girbe

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis can be exploited for the expression of heterologous proteins; however, a versatile set of vectors suitable for inducible extracellular protein production and subsequent purification of the expressed proteins by immobilized metal affinity chromatography was so far lacking. Here we describe three novel vectors that, respectively, facilitate the nisin-inducible production of N- or C-terminally hexa-histidine (His6)-tagged proteins in L. lactis. One of these vectors also encodes a tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease cleavage site allowing removal of the N-terminal His6-tag from expressed proteins. Successful application of the developed vectors for protein expression, purification and/or functional studies is exemplified with six different cell wall-bound or secreted proteins from Staphylococcus aureus. The results show that secretory production of S. aureus proteins is affected by the position, N- or C-terminal, of the His6-tag. This seems to be due to an influence of the His6-tag on protein stability. Intriguingly, the S. aureus IsdB protein, which is phosphorylated in S. aureus, was also found to be phosphorylated when heterologously produced in L. lactis, albeit not on the same Tyr residue. This implies that this particular post-translational protein modification is to some extent conserved in S. aureus and L. lactis. Altogether, we are confident that the present vector set combined with the L. lactis expression host has the potential to become a very useful tool in optimization of the expression, purification and functional analysis of extracytoplasmic bacterial proteins. PMID:26160391

  4. Host lysozyme-mediated lysis of Lactococcus lactis facilitates delivery of colitis-attenuating superoxide dismutase to inflamed colons.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Sonia A; Veiga, Patrick; Fenn, Kathrin; Michaud, Monia; Kim, Jason H; Gallini, Carey Ann; Glickman, Jonathan N; Quéré, Gaëlle; Garault, Peggy; Béal, Chloé; Derrien, Muriel; Courtin, Pascal; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan; Garrett, Wendy S

    2015-06-23

    Beneficial microbes that target molecules and pathways, such as oxidative stress, which can negatively affect both host and microbiota, may hold promise as an inflammatory bowel disease therapy. Prior work showed that a five-strain fermented milk product (FMP) improved colitis in T-bet(-/-) Rag2(-/-) mice. By varying the number of strains used in the FMP, we found that Lactococcus lactis I-1631 was sufficient to ameliorate colitis. Using comparative genomic analyses, we identified genes unique to L. lactis I-1631 involved in oxygen respiration. Respiration of oxygen results in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Also, ROS are produced at high levels during intestinal inflammation and cause tissue damage. L. lactis I-1631 possesses genes encoding enzymes that detoxify ROS, such as superoxide dismutase (SodA). Thus, we hypothesized that lactococcal SodA played a role in attenuating colitis. Inactivation of the sodA gene abolished L. lactis I-1631's beneficial effect in the T-bet(-/-) Rag2(-/-) model. Similar effects were obtained in two additional colonic inflammation models, Il10(-/-) mice and dextran sulfate sodium-treated mice. Efforts to understand how a lipophobic superoxide anion (O2 (-)) can be detoxified by cytoplasmic lactoccocal SodA led to the finding that host antimicrobial-mediated lysis is a prerequisite for SodA release and SodA's extracytoplasmic O2 (-) scavenging. L. lactis I-1631 may represent a promising vehicle to deliver antioxidant, colitis-attenuating SodA to the inflamed intestinal mucosa, and host antimicrobials may play a critical role in mediating SodA's bioaccessibility. PMID:26056274

  5. Host lysozyme-mediated lysis of Lactococcus lactis facilitates delivery of colitis-attenuating superoxide dismutase to inflamed colons

    PubMed Central

    Ballal, Sonia A.; Veiga, Patrick; Fenn, Kathrin; Michaud, Monia; Kim, Jason H.; Gallini, Carey Ann; Glickman, Jonathan N.; Quéré, Gaëlle; Garault, Peggy; Béal, Chloé; Derrien, Muriel; Courtin, Pascal; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan; Garrett, Wendy S.

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial microbes that target molecules and pathways, such as oxidative stress, which can negatively affect both host and microbiota, may hold promise as an inflammatory bowel disease therapy. Prior work showed that a five-strain fermented milk product (FMP) improved colitis in T-bet?/? Rag2?/? mice. By varying the number of strains used in the FMP, we found that Lactococcus lactis I-1631 was sufficient to ameliorate colitis. Using comparative genomic analyses, we identified genes unique to L. lactis I-1631 involved in oxygen respiration. Respiration of oxygen results in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Also, ROS are produced at high levels during intestinal inflammation and cause tissue damage. L. lactis I-1631 possesses genes encoding enzymes that detoxify ROS, such as superoxide dismutase (SodA). Thus, we hypothesized that lactococcal SodA played a role in attenuating colitis. Inactivation of the sodA gene abolished L. lactis I-1631’s beneficial effect in the T-bet?/? Rag2?/? model. Similar effects were obtained in two additional colonic inflammation models, Il10?/? mice and dextran sulfate sodium-treated mice. Efforts to understand how a lipophobic superoxide anion (O2?) can be detoxified by cytoplasmic lactoccocal SodA led to the finding that host antimicrobial-mediated lysis is a prerequisite for SodA release and SodA’s extracytoplasmic O2? scavenging. L. lactis I-1631 may represent a promising vehicle to deliver antioxidant, colitis-attenuating SodA to the inflamed intestinal mucosa, and host antimicrobials may play a critical role in mediating SodA’s bioaccessibility. PMID:26056274

  6. Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis as host for expression of the bacterial lipase: cloning and adaptation of the new lipase gene from Serratia sp.

    PubMed

    Šiekštel?, Rimantas; Veteikyt?, Aušra; Tvaska, Bronius; Matijošyt?, Inga

    2015-10-01

    Many microbial lipases have been successfully expressed in yeasts, but not in industrially attractive Kluyveromyces lactis, which among other benefits can be cultivated on a medium supplemented with whey--cheap and easily available industrial waste. A new bacterial lipase from Serratia sp. was isolated and for the first time expressed into the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis by heterologous protein expression system based on a strong promoter of Kluyveromyces marxianus triosephosphate isomerase gene and signal peptide of Kluyveromyces marxianus endopolygalacturonase gene. In addition, the bacterial lipase gene was synthesized de novo by taking into account a codon usage bias optimal for K. lactis and was expressed into the yeast K. lactis also. Both resulting strains were characterized by high output level of the target protein secreted extracellularly. Secreted lipases were characterized for activity and stability. PMID:26254038

  7. Decreased susceptibility to antifungals in respiratory-deficient Kluyveromyces lactis mutants.

    PubMed

    Sarinová, M; Straková, V; Balková, K; Gbelská, Y

    2007-01-01

    Decreased susceptibility of K. lactis mutants impaired in the function of cytochrome c, cytochrome c1 and cytochrome-c oxidase to fluconazole, bifonazole and amphotericin B in comparison with the isogenic wild-type strain was observed. Flow cytometry with rhodamine 6G did not show any changes in the accumulation of the dye in the mutant cells compared with the corresponding wild-type strain. Sterol analysis showed similar overall amount of sterols in both wild-type and mutant cells. Taking into account the increased amphotericin B resistance and significantly diminished susceptibility of mutant cells to lyticase digestion, the cell wall structure and/or composition may probably be responsible for the observed changes in the susceptibility of mutants to the antifungal compounds used. PMID:18298045

  8. Lactococcus lactis SpOx Spontaneous Mutants: a Family of Oxidative-Stress-Resistant Dairy Strains§

    PubMed Central

    Rochat, Tatiana; Gratadoux, Jean-Jacques; Corthier, Gérard; Coqueran, Bérard; Nader-Macias, Maria-Elena; Gruss, Alexandra; Langella, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Numerous industrial bacteria generate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which may inhibit the growth of other bacteria in mixed ecosystems. We isolated spontaneous oxidative-stress-resistant (SpOx) Lactococcus lactis mutants by using a natural selection method with milk-adapted strains on dairy culture medium containing H2O2. Three SpOx mutants displayed greater H2O2 resistance. One of them, SpOx3, demonstrated better behavior in different oxidative-stress situations: (i) higher long-term survival upon aeration in LM17 and milk and (ii) the ability to grow with H2O2-producing Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii strains. Furthermore, the transit kinetics of the SpOx3 mutant in the digestive tract of a human flora-associated mouse model was not affected. PMID:15870374

  9. Molecular Insights on the Recognition of a Lactococcus lactis Cell Wall Pellicle by the Phage 1358 Receptor Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Farenc, Carine; Spinelli, Silvia; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Tremblay, Denise; Blangy, Stéphanie; Sadovskaya, Irina

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis is used for the production of cheeses and other fermented dairy products. Accidental infection of L. lactis cells by virulent lactococcal tailed phages is one of the major risks of fermentation failures in industrial dairy factories. Lactococcal phage 1358 possesses a host range limited to a few L. lactis strains and strong genomic similarities to Listeria phages. We report here the X-ray structures of phage 1358 receptor binding protein (RBP) in complex with monosaccharides. Each monomer of its trimeric RBP is formed of two domains: a “shoulder” domain linking the RBP to the rest of the phage and a jelly roll fold “head/host recognition” domain. This domain harbors a saccharide binding crevice located in the middle of a monomer. Crystal structures identified two sites at the RBP surface, ?8 ? from each other, one accommodating a GlcNAc monosaccharide and the other accommodating a GlcNAc or a glucose 1-phosphate (Glc1P) monosaccharide. GlcNAc and GlcNAc1P are components of the polysaccharide pellicle that we identified at the cell surface of L. lactis SMQ-388, the host of phage 1358. We therefore modeled a galactofuranose (Galf) sugar bridging the two GlcNAc saccharides, suggesting that the trisaccharidic motif GlcNAc-Galf-GlcNAc (or Glc1P) might be common to receptors of genetically distinct lactococcal phages p2, TP091-1, and 1358. Strain specificity might therefore be elicited by steric clashes induced by the remaining components of the pellicle hexasaccharide. Taken together, these results provide a first insight into the molecular mechanism of host receptor recognition by lactococcal phages. IMPORTANCE Siphophages infecting the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis are sources of milk fermentation failures in the dairy industry. We report here the structure of the pellicle polysaccharide from L. lactis SMQ-388, the specific host strain of phage 1358. We determined the X-ray structures of the lytic lactococcal phage 1358 receptor binding protein (RBP) in complex with monosaccharides. The positions and nature of monosaccharides bound to the RBP are in agreement with the pellicle structure and suggest a general binding mode of lactococcal phages to their pellicle saccharidic receptor. PMID:24719416

  10. Computational analysis of the interaction between transcription factors and the predicted secreted proteome of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Brustolini, Otávio JB; Fietto, Luciano G; Cruz, Cosme D; Passos, Flávia ML

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein secretion is a cell translocation process of major biological and technological significance. The secretion and downstream processing of proteins by recombinant cells is of great commercial interest. The yeast Kluyveromyces lactis is considered a promising host for heterologous protein production. Because yeasts naturally do not secrete as many proteins as filamentous fungi, they can produce secreted recombinant proteins with few contaminants in the medium. An ideal system to address the secretion of a desired protein could be exploited among the native proteins in certain physiological conditions. By applying algorithms to the completed K. lactis genome sequence, such a system could be selected. To this end, we predicted protein subcellular locations and correlated the resulting extracellular secretome with the transcription factors that modulate the cellular response to a particular environmental stimulus. Results To explore the potential Kluyveromyces lactis extracellular secretome, four computational prediction algorithms were applied to 5076 predicted K. lactis proteins from the genome database. SignalP v3 identified 418 proteins with N-terminal signal peptides. From these 418 proteins, the Phobius algorithm predicted that 176 proteins have no transmembrane domains, and the big-PI Predictor identified 150 proteins as having no glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) modification sites. WoLF PSORT predicted that the K. lactis secretome consists of 109 putative proteins, excluding subcellular targeting. The transcription regulators of the putative extracellular proteins were investigated by searching for DNA binding sites in their putative promoters. The conditions to favor expression were obtained by searching Gene Ontology terms and using graph theory. Conclusion A public database of K. lactis secreted proteins and their transcription factors are presented. It consists of 109 ORFs and 23 transcription factors. A graph created from this database shows 134 nodes and 884 edges, suggesting a vast number of relationships to be validated experimentally. Most of the transcription factors are related to responses to stress such as drug, acid and heat resistance, as well as nitrogen limitation, and may be useful for inducing maximal expression of potential extracellular proteins. PMID:19555482

  11. How recombinant swollenin from Kluyveromyces lactis affects cellulosic substrates and accelerates their hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In order to generate biofuels, insoluble cellulosic substrates are pretreated and subsequently hydrolyzed with cellulases. One way to pretreat cellulose in a safe and environmentally friendly manner is to apply, under mild conditions, non-hydrolyzing proteins such as swollenin - naturally produced in low yields by the fungus Trichoderma reesei. To yield sufficient swollenin for industrial applications, the first aim of this study is to present a new way of producing recombinant swollenin. The main objective is to show how swollenin quantitatively affects relevant physical properties of cellulosic substrates and how it affects subsequent hydrolysis. Results After expression in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, the resulting swollenin was purified. The adsorption parameters of the recombinant swollenin onto cellulose were quantified for the first time and were comparable to those of individual cellulases from T. reesei. Four different insoluble cellulosic substrates were then pretreated with swollenin. At first, it could be qualitatively shown by macroscopic evaluation and microscopy that swollenin caused deagglomeration of bigger cellulose agglomerates as well as dispersion of cellulose microfibrils (amorphogenesis). Afterwards, the effects of swollenin on cellulose particle size, maximum cellulase adsorption and cellulose crystallinity were quantified. The pretreatment with swollenin resulted in a significant decrease in particle size of the cellulosic substrates as well as in their crystallinity, thereby substantially increasing maximum cellulase adsorption onto these substrates. Subsequently, the pretreated cellulosic substrates were hydrolyzed with cellulases. Here, pretreatment of cellulosic substrates with swollenin, even in non-saturating concentrations, significantly accelerated the hydrolysis. By correlating particle size and crystallinity of the cellulosic substrates with initial hydrolysis rates, it could be shown that the swollenin-induced reduction in particle size and crystallinity resulted in high cellulose hydrolysis rates. Conclusions Recombinant swollenin can be easily produced with the robust yeast K. lactis. Moreover, swollenin induces deagglomeration of cellulose agglomerates as well as amorphogenesis (decrystallization). For the first time, this study quantifies and elucidates in detail how swollenin affects different cellulosic substrates and their hydrolysis. PMID:21943248

  12. NDM-1 encoded by a pNDM-BJ01-like plasmid p3SP-NDM in clinical Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhong; Li, Hongxia; Feng, Jiao; Li, Yuxue; Chen, Xin; Guo, Xuemin; Chen, Weijun; Wang, Li; Lin, Lei; Yang, Huiying; Yang, Wenhui; Wang, Jie; Zhou, Dongsheng; Liu, Changting; Yin, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    A carbapenem-nonsusceptible Enterobacter aerogenes strain named 3-SP was isolated from a human case of pneumonia in a Chinese teaching hospital. NDM-1 carbapenemase is produced by a pNDM-BJ01-like conjugative plasmid designated p3SP-NDM to account for carbapenem resistance of 3-SP. p3SP-NDM was fully sequenced and compared with all publically available pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids. The genetic differences between p3SP-NDM and pNDM-BJ01 include only 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms, a 1 bp deletion and a 706 bp deletion. p3SP-NDM and pNDM-BJ01 harbor an identical Tn125 element organized as ISAba125, bla NDM-1, ble MBL, ?trpF, dsbC, cutA, ?groES, groEL, ISCR27, and ISAba125. The bla NDM-1 surrounding regions in these pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids have a conserved linear organization ISAba14-aphA6-Tn125-unknown IS, with considerable genetic differences identified within or immediately downstream of Tn125. All reported pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids are exclusively found in Acinetobacter, whereas this is the first report of identification of a pNDM-BJ01-like plasmid in Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:25926823

  13. Malonate-bound structure of the glycerophosphodiesterase from Enterobacter aerogenes (GpdQ) and characterization of the native Fe[supscript 2+] metal-ion preference

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Colin J.; Hadler, Kieran S.; Carr, Paul D.; Oakley, Aaron J.; Yip, Sylvia; Schenk, Gerhard; Ollis, David L.

    2010-09-20

    The structure of a malonate-bound form of the glycerophosphodiesterase from Enterobacter aerogenes, GpdQ, has been refined at a resolution of 2.2 {angstrom} to a final R factor of 17.1%. The structure was originally solved to 2.9 {angstrom} resolution using SAD phases from Zn{sup 2+} metal ions introduced into the active site of the apoenzyme [Jackson et al. (2007), J. Mol. Biol. 367, 1047-1062]. However, the 2.9 {angstrom} resolution was insufficient to discern significant details of the architecture of the binuclear metal centre that constitutes the active site. Furthermore, kinetic analysis revealed that the enzyme lost a significant amount of activity in the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, suggesting that it is unlikely to be a catalytically relevant metal ion. In this communication, a higher resolution structure of GpdQ is presented in which malonate is visibly coordinated in the active site and analysis of the native metal-ion preference is presented using atomic absorption spectroscopy and anomalous scattering. Catalytic implications of the structure and its Fe{sup 2+} metal-ion preference are discussed.

  14. Malonate-bound structure of the glycerophosphodiesterase from Enterobacter aerogenes (GpdQ) and characterization of the native Fe[superscript 2+] metal-ion preference

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Colin J.; Hadler, Kieran S.; Carr, Paul D.; Oakley, Aaron J.; Yip, Sylvia; Schenk, Gerhard; Ollis, David L.

    2011-09-28

    The structure of a malonate-bound form of the glycerophosphodiesterase from Enterobacter aerogenes, GpdQ, has been refined at a resolution of 2.2 {angstrom} to a final R factor of 17.1%. The structure was originally solved to 2.9 {angstrom} resolution using SAD phases from Zn{sup 2+} metal ions introduced into the active site of the apoenzyme [Jackson et al. (2007), J. Mol. Biol. 367, 1047-1062]. However, the 2.9 {angstrom} resolution was insufficient to discern significant details of the architecture of the binuclear metal centre that constitutes the active site. Furthermore, kinetic analysis revealed that the enzyme lost a significant amount of activity in the presence of Zn2+, suggesting that it is unlikely to be a catalytically relevant metal ion. In this communication, a higher resolution structure of GpdQ is presented in which malonate is visibly coordinated in the active site and analysis of the native metal-ion preference is presented using atomic absorption spectroscopy and anomalous scattering. Catalytic implications of the structure and its Fe{sup 2+} metal-ion preference are discussed.

  15. The structure of the extracellular teichoic acids from the allergy-protective bacterium Lactococcus lactis G121.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Kathleen; Vinogradov, Evgueny; Lindner, Buko; Heine, Holger; Holst, Otto

    2012-08-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis G121 is a farm isolate that protects mice from ovalbumin-induced asthma. To understand the molecular mechanisms of such allergy-protective properties, the isolation and characterization of cell envelope constituents is crucial. Here, structural analyses of the extracellular teichoic acid (EC TA) from L. lactis G121 are presented. Extraction with 0.9% saline afforded a crude TA fraction. Consecutive size exclusion chromatography on Biogel P60 and P10 matrix was performed to purify the sample. Chemical component analyses, high-resolution electrospray ionization Fourier-transformed ion cyclotron mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were conducted for structural elucidation. The EC TA was a poly(glycosylglycerol phosphate) molecule with a repeating unit of -6)-[?-D-Glcp-(1?3)-][?-D-GlcpNAc-(1?4)-]?-D-GalpNAc-(1?3)-?-D-GlcpNAc-(1?2)-glycerol-(1-P-). PMID:22944677

  16. On Lactococcus lactis UL719 competitivity and nisin (Nisaplin®) capacity to inhibit Clostridium difficile in a model of human colon

    PubMed Central

    Le Lay, Christophe; Fernandez, Benoit; Hammami, Riadh; Ouellette, Marc; Fliss, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most frequently identified enteric pathogen in patients with nosocomially acquired, antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. Although metronidazole and vancomycin were effective, an increasing number of treatment failures and recurrence of C. difficile infection are being reported. Use of probiotics, particularly metabolically active lactic acid bacteria, was recently proposed as an alternative for the medical community. The aim of this study was to assess a probiotic candidate, nisin Z-producer Lactococcus lactis UL719, competitivity and nisin (Nisaplin®) capacity to inhibit C. difficile in a model of human colon. Bacterial populations was enumerated by qPCR coupled to PMA treatment. L. lactis UL719 was able to survive and proliferate under simulated human colon, did not alter microbiota composition, but failed to inhibit C. difficile. While a single dose of 19 ?mol/L (5× the MIC) was not sufficient to inhibit C. difficile, nisin at 76 ?mol/L (20×the MIC) was effective at killing the pathogen. Nisin (at 76 ?mol/L) caused some temporary changes in the microbiota with Gram-positive bacteria being the mostly affected. These results highlight the capacity of L. lactis UL719 to survive under simulated human colon and the efficacy of nisin as an alternative in the treatment of C. difficile infections. PMID:26441942

  17. Identification of an essential gene responsible for D-Asp incorporation in the Lactococcus lactis peptidoglycan crossbridge.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Patrick; Piquet, Sandra; Maisons, Aurélie; Furlan, Sylviane; Courtin, Pascal; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Kulakauskas, Saulius

    2006-12-01

    Bacteria such as Lactococcus lactis have D-aspartate (D-Asp) or its amidated derivative D-asparagine (D-Asn), in their peptidoglycan (PG) interpeptide crossbridge. We performed a subtractive genome analysis to identify L. lactis gene yxbA, orthologues of which being present only in bacteria containing D-amino acids in their PG crossbridge, but absent from those that instead insert L-amino acids or glycine. Inactivation of yxbA required a complementing Streptococcus pneumoniae murMN genes, which express enzymes that incorporate L-Ser-L-Ala or L-Ala-L-Ala in the PG crossbridge. Our results show that (i) yxbA encodes D-Asp ligase responsible for incorporation of D-Asp in the PG crossbridge, and we therefore renamed it as aslA, (ii) it is an essential gene, which makes its product a potential target for specific antimicrobials, (iii) the absence of D-Asp may be complemented by L-Ser-L-Ala or L-Ala-L-Ala in the L. lactis PG, indicating that the PG synthesis machinery is not selective for the side-chain residues, and (iv) lactococcal strains having L-amino acids in their PG crossbridge display defects in cell wall integrity, but are able to efficiently anchor cell wall proteins, indicating relative flexibility of lactococcal transpeptidation reactions with respect to changes in PG sidechain composition. PMID:17083466

  18. Improved bioethanol production in an engineered Kluyveromyces lactis strain shifted from respiratory to fermentative metabolism by deletion of NDI1.

    PubMed

    González-Siso, María Isabel; Touriño, Alba; Vizoso, Ángel; Pereira-Rodríguez, Ángel; Rodríguez-Belmonte, Esther; Becerra, Manuel; Cerdán, María Esperanza

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we report the metabolic engineering of the respiratory yeast Kluyveromyces lactis by construction and characterization of a null mutant (?klndi1) in the single gene encoding a mitochondrial alternative internal dehydrogenase. Isolated mitochondria of the ?klndi1 mutant show unaffected rate of oxidation of exogenous NADH, but no oxidation of matrix NADH; this confirms that KlNdi1p is the only internal NADH dehydrogenase in K.?lactis mitochondria. Permeabilized cells of the ?klndi1 mutant do not show oxidation of matrix NADH, which suggests that shuttle systems to transfer the NADH from mitochondrial matrix to cytosol, for being oxidized by external dehydrogenases, are not functional. The ?klndi1 mutation decreases the chronological life span in absence of nutrients. The expression of KlNDI1 is increased by glutathione reductase depletion. The ?klndi1 mutation shifts the K.?lactis metabolism from respiratory to fermentative: the ?klndi1 strain shows reduced respiration rate and increased ethanol production from glucose, while it does not grow in non-fermentable carbon sources such as lactate. The biotechnological benefit of the ?klndi1 mutant for bioethanol production from waste cheese whey lactose was proved. PMID:25186243

  19. Optimized expression of Helicobacter pylori ureB gene in the Lactococcus lactis nisin-controlled gene expression (NICE) system and experimental study of its immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao Juan; Duan, Guangcai; Zhang, Rongguang; Fan, Qingtang

    2009-04-01

    In the development of an oral vaccine against Helicobacter pylori, H. pylori urease subunit B (UreB) was expressed in a food-grade delivery vehicle, Lactococcus lactis NZ3900. The ureB gene (Genbank accession no. FJ436980) was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from MEL-Hp27. The PCR-amplified ureB gene was cloned in the E. coli-L. lactis shuttle vector pNZ8110 and transformed into E. coli MC1061. After the transformant had been identified, the recombinant plasmid was purified and electrotransformed into L. lactis NZ3900. The conditions of UreB expression in the L. lactis transformant were optimized by orthogonal experiment. The maltose binding protein (MBP)-UreB fusion protein expressed by TB(1)/pMAL-c2X-ureB was used to cultivate mice polyclonal anti-UreB serum after purification by the amylose prepacked column. The Western blot method was adopted to confirm whether the UreB expressed by L. lactis transformant had immunoreactivity. The optimized conditions for UreB expression were as follows. Nisin 40 ng/ml was added to the medium when the recombinant grew to OD(600) approximately 0.30-0.40 and the induction time lasted 5 h. As a result, the maximum yield of UreB was 27.26 microg/mL of medium, and the maximum percentage of UreB in cell extracts of the L. lactis transformant reached its peak at 20.19%. Western blot analysis showed that the UreB protein expressed by L. lactis transformant had favorable immunoreactivity. All these results make an appealing case for construction of the food-grade vaccine for H. pylori. PMID:19238485

  20. Proteomic and Functional Consequences of Hexokinase Deficiency in Glucose-repressible Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Mates, Nadia; Kettner, Karina; Heidenreich, Falk; Pursche, Theresia; Migotti, Rebekka; Kahlert, Günther; Kuhlisch, Eberhard; Breunig, Karin D.; Schellenberger, Wolfgang; Dittmar, Gunnar; Hoflack, Bernard; Kriegel, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of glucose signaling in the Crabtree-positive eukaryotic model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has disclosed a dual role of its hexokinase ScHxk2, which acts as a glycolytic enzyme and key signal transducer adapting central metabolism to glucose availability. In order to identify evolutionarily conserved characteristics of hexokinase structure and function, the cellular response of the Crabtree-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis to rag5 null mutation and concomitant deficiency of its unique hexokinase KlHxk1 was analyzed by means of difference gel electrophoresis. In total, 2,851 fluorescent spots containing different protein species were detected in the master gel representing all of the K. lactis proteins that were solubilized from glucose-grown KlHxk1 wild-type and mutant cells. Mass spectrometric peptide analysis identified 45 individual hexokinase-dependent proteins related to carbohydrate, short-chain fatty acid and tricarboxylic acid metabolism as well as to amino acid and protein turnover, but also to general stress response and chromatin remodeling, which occurred as a consequence of KlHxk1 deficiency at a minimum 3-fold enhanced or reduced level in the mutant proteome. In addition, three proteins exhibiting homology to 2-methylcitrate cycle enzymes of S. cerevisiae were detected at increased concentrations, suggesting a stimulation of pyruvate formation from amino acids and/or fatty acids. Experimental validation of the difference gel electrophoresis approach by post-lysis dimethyl labeling largely confirmed the abundance changes detected in the mutant proteome via the former method. Taking into consideration the high proportion of identified hexokinase-dependent proteins exhibiting increased proteomic levels, KlHxk1 is likely to have a repressive function in a multitude of metabolic pathways. The proteomic alterations detected in the mutant classify KlHxk1 as a multifunctional enzyme and support the view of evolutionary conservation of dual-role hexokinases even in organisms that are less specialized than S. cerevisiae in terms of glucose utilization. PMID:24434903

  1. Proton motive force in growing Streptococcus lactis and Staphylococcus aureus cells under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kashket, E R

    1981-04-01

    Measurements of the electrochemical gradient of hydrogen ions, which gives rise to the proton motive force (PMF), were carried out with growing Streptococcus lactis and Staphylococcus aureus cells. The facultative anaerobe was chosen in order to compare the PMF of cells growing aerobically and anaerobically. It was expected that during aerobic growth the cells would have a higher PMF than during anaerobic growth, because the H+-translocating ATPase (BF0F1) operates in the direction of H+ influx and ATP synthesis during respiration, whereas under anaerobic conditions the BF0F1 hydrolyzes glycolytically generated ATP and establishes the proton gradient by extruding H+. The electrical component of the PMF, delta psi, and the chemical gradient of H+, delta pH, were measured with radiolabeled tetraphenylphosphonium and benzoate ions. In both S. lactis and S. aureus cells, the PMF was constant during the exponential phase of batch growth and decreased in the stationary phase. In both species of bacteria, the exponential-phase PMF was not affected by varying the growth rate by adding different sugars to the medium. The relative contributions of delta psi and delta pH to the PMF, however, depended on the pH of the medium. The internal pH of S. aureus was constant at pH 7.4 to 7.6 under all conditions of growth tested. Under aerobic conditions, the delta psi of exponential phase S. aureus remained fairly constant at 160 to 170 mV. Thus, the PMF was 250 to 270 mV in cells growing aerobically in media at pH 6 and progressively lower in media of higher pH, reaching 195 to 205 mV at pH 7. Under anaerobic conditions, the delta psi ranged from 100 to 120 mV in cells at pH 6.3 to 7, resulting in a PMF of 150 to 140 mV. Thus, the mode of energy metabolism (i.e., respiration versus fermentation) and the pH of the medium are the two important factors influencing the PMF of these gram-positive cells during growth. PMID:6260743

  2. Mutational and Computational Evidence That a Nickel-Transfer Tunnel in UreD Is Used for Activation of Klebsiella aerogenes Urease.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Mark A; Wang, Beibei; Feig, Michael; Hausinger, Robert P

    2015-10-20

    Nickel-containing urease from Klebsiella aerogenes requires four accessory proteins for proper active site metalation. The metallochaperone UreE delivers nickel to UreG, a GTPase that forms a UreD/UreF/UreG complex, which binds to urease apoprotein via UreD. Prior in silico analysis of the homologous, structurally characterized UreH/UreF/UreG complex from Helicobacter pylori identified a water tunnel originating at a likely nickel-binding motif in UreG, passing through UreF, and exiting UreH, suggestive of a role for the channel in providing the metal to urease apoprotein for its activation; however, no experimental support was reported for the significance of this tunnel. Here, specific variants were designed to disrupt a comparable 34.6 Å predicted internal tunnel, alternative channels, and surface sites for UreD. Cells producing a set of tunnel-disrupting variants of UreD exhibited greatly reduced urease specific activities, whereas other mutants had no appreciable effect on activity. Affinity pull-down studies of cell-free extracts from tunnel-disrupting mutant cultures showed no loss of UreD interactions with urease or UreF/UreG. The nickel contents of urease samples enriched from activity-deficient cultures were decreased, while zinc and iron incorporation increased. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed size restrictions in the internal channels of the UreD variants. These findings support the role of a molecular tunnel in UreD as a direct facilitator of nickel transfer into urease, illustrating a new paradigm in active site metallocenter assembly. PMID:26401965

  3. Proteinase PrtP impairs lactococcin LcnB activity in Lactococcus lactis BGMN1-501: new insights into bacteriocin regulation

    PubMed Central

    Vukotic, Goran; Mirkovic, Nemanja; Jovcic, Branko; Miljkovic, Marija; Strahinic, Ivana; Fira, Djordje; Radulovic, Zorica; Kojic, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Proteinases and bacteriocins are of great importance to the dairy industry, but their interactions have not been studied so far. Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis BGMN1-5 is a natural isolate from homemade semi-hard cheese which produces two bacteriocins (Lactococcin B and LsbB), as well as proteinase PrtP. A medium-dependent increase in the bacteriocin LcnB activity of L. lactis BGMN1-501, a derivate of L. lactis subsp. lactis BGMN1-5, was shown to be accompanied by a decrease in its promoter activity. A similar effect of media components on gene expression was reported for proteinase PrtP, whose gene is co-localized on the same plasmid as the lcnB gene. Thus, the PrtP-LcnB interplay was investigated. Single gene knockout mutants were constructed with disrupted prtP or lcnB genes. PrtP- mutants showed higher bacteriocin activity that had lost its growth medium dependence, which was in contrast to the original strain. When LcnB from this mutant was combined with proteinase from the LcnB- mutant in vitro, its activity was rendered to the original level, suggesting that proteinase reduces bacteriocin activity. We propose a new model of medium dependent expression of these genes with regard to the effects of their interaction in vivo. PMID:25713574

  4. Development of microparticulate systems for intestinal delivery of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium lactis.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Beatrice; Vitali, Beatrice; Passerini, Nadia; Cruciani, Federica; Di Sabatino, Marcello; Rodriguez, Lorenzo; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2010-07-11

    In the present study intestinal delivery systems resistant to gastric juice, loaded with the probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus LA14 and Bifidobacterium lactis BI07, were produced by the polyelectrolyte complexation. First, beads were prepared by the traditional extrusion method and nine formulations were developed using alginate as main carrier and the biopolymer, xanthan gum (XG), as hydrophilic retardant polymer or the cellulose derivative, cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP), as gastro-resistant polymer. The results showed that the incorporation of the 0.5% (w/v) of XG or the 1% (w/v) of CAP within the 3% (w/v) of alginate solution increased the survival of the probiotic bacteria in acid conditions from 63% of the freeze-dried bacteria up to 76%. Subsequently, these formula was used to prepare smaller microcapsules by means of an atomization device. Despite of the high viscosity of the biomass suspension, the spraying system produced spherical and non-aggregated microcapsules able to survive in harsh condition better than beads: the survival of the probiotic bacteria after acid incubation was 91%. The performance of the microcapsules in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) containing pepsin and in gut medium (GM) containing bile salts was excellent (viability>95%). Furthermore, the viability of probiotic bacteria was maintained after an incubation of 24h in GM. Finally, stability tests performed at 5 degrees C highlighted a bacterial viability of about 82% and 70% after 6 and 9 months, respectively. PMID:20420903

  5. Metabolic Behavior of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 in Microaerobic Continuous Cultivation at a Low Dilution Rate

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Niels Bang Siemsen; Melchiorsen, Claus Rix; Jokumsen, Kirsten Væver; Villadsen, John

    2001-01-01

    Minute amounts of oxygen were supplied to a continuous cultivation of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 grown on a defined glucose-limited medium at a dilution rate of 0.1 h?1. More than 80% of the carbon supplied with glucose ended up in fermentation products other than lactate. Addition of even minute amounts of oxygen increased the yield of biomass on glucose by more than 10% compared to that obtained under anaerobic conditions and had a dramatic impact on catabolic enzyme activities and hence on the distribution of carbon at the pyruvate branch point. Increasing aeration caused carbon dioxide and acetate to replace formate and ethanol as catabolic end products while hardly affecting the production of either acetoin or lactate. The negative impact of oxygen on the synthesis of pyruvate formate lyase was confirmed. Moreover, oxygen was shown to down regulate the protein level of alcohol dehydrogenase while increasing the enzyme activity levels of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, ?-acetolactate synthase, and the NADH oxidases. Lactate dehydrogenase and glyceraldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme activity levels were unaffected by aeration. PMID:11375180

  6. NMR resonance assignments of the lantibiotic immunity protein NisI from Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Carolin; Christ, Nina Alexandra; Duchardt-Ferner, Elke; Korn, Sophie; Berninger, Lucija; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Wöhnert, Jens

    2015-10-01

    The lantibiotic nisin is a small antimicrobial peptide which acts against a wide range of Gram-positive bacteria. Nisin-producing Lactococcus lactis strains express four genes for self-protection against their own antimicrobial compound. This immunity system consists of the lipoprotein NisI and the ABC transporter NisFEG. NisI is attached to the outside of the cytoplasmic membrane via a covalently linked diacylglycerol anchor. Both the lipoprotein and the ABC transporter are needed for full immunity but the exact immunity mechanism is still unclear. To gain insights into the highly specific immunity mechanism of nisin producing strains on a structural level we present here the backbone resonance assignment of NisI (25.8 kDa) as well as the virtually complete (1)H,(15)N,(13)C chemical shift assignments for the isolated 12.7 kDa N-terminal and 14.6 kDa C-terminal domains of NisI. PMID:25613223

  7. Molecular Clues To Understand the Aerotolerance Phenotype of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Lorena; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Ribbera, Angela; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.; Ventura, Marco; Sánchez, Borja

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen is one of the abiotic factors negatively affecting the survival of Bifidobacterium strains used as probiotics, mainly due to the induction of lethal oxidative damage. Aerobic conditions are present during the process of manufacture and storage of functional foods, and aerotolerance is a desired trait for bifidobacteria intended for use in industry. In the present study, the molecular response of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis IPLA4549 to aerobic conditions is presented. Molecular targets affected by oxygen were studied using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) and quantitative reverse transcriptase (qRT) PCR. Globally, oxygen stress induced a shift in the glycolytic pathway toward the production of acetic acid with a concomitant increase in ATP formation. Several changes in the expression of genes coding for enzymes involved in redox reactions were detected, although the redox ratio remained unaltered. Interestingly, cells grown under aerobic conditions were characterized by higher activity of coproporphyrinogen III oxidase, which can directly detoxify molecular oxygen, and by higher NADH oxidase specific activity, which can oxidize NADH using hydrogen peroxide. In turn, this is in agreement with the glycolytic shift toward acetate production, in that more NADH molecules may be available due to the lower level of lactic acid formation. These findings further our ability to elucidate the mechanisms by which B. animalis copes with an oxygen-containing atmosphere. PMID:22101052

  8. Oral immunization with recombinant hepatitis E virus antigen displayed on the Lactococcus lactis surface enhances ORF2-specific mucosal and systemic immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shenyang; Li, Dandan; Liu, Ying; Zha, Enhui; Zhou, Tiezhong; Yue, Xiqing

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) as a recognized zoonotic pathogen has posed global burden on public health, which is exacerbated by lack of efficient vaccine. In this study, we constructed a recombinant (inaQ-ORF2 gene fusion) Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) strain NZ3900 that expresses and displays the hepatitis E virus antigen ORF2 utilizing an ice uncleation protein-based anchor system. After oral vaccination of BALB/c mice, significantly higher levels of ORF2-specific mucosal IgA and serum IgG were detected and cellular immunity was also induced. These findings further support that L. lactis-based HEV antigen vaccines could be used for human and animal protection against infection. PMID:25445956

  9. Oral Administration of Recombinant Lactococcus lactis Expressing HSP65 and Tandemly Repeated P277 Reduces the Incidence of Type I Diabetes in Non-Obese Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yanjun; Liu, Jingjing; Hou, Jing; Dong, Yuankai; Lu, Yong; Jin, Liang; Cao, Rongyue; Li, Taiming; Wu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1) is an autoimmune disease that gradually destroys insulin-producing beta-cells. We have previously reported that mucosal administration of fusion protein of HSP65 with tandem repeats of P277 (HSP65-6P277) can reduce the onset of DM1 in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. To deliver large amounts of the fusion protein and to enhance long-term immune tolerance effects, in the present study, we investigated the efficacy of using orally administrated L. lactis expressing HSP65-6P277 to reduce the incidence of DM1 in NOD mice. L. lactis strain NZ9000 was engineered to express HSP65-6P277 either constitutively or by nisin induction. After immunization via gavage with the recombinant L. lactis strains to groups of 4-week old female NOD mice for 36 weeks, we observed that oral administration of recombinant L. Lactis resulted in the prevention of hyperglycemia, improved glucose tolerance and reduced insulitis. Immunologic analysis showed that treatment with recombinant L. lactis induced HSP65- and P277- specific T cell immuno-tolerance, as well as antigen-specific proliferation of splenocytes. The results revealed that the DM1-preventing function was in part caused by a reduction in the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-? and an increase in the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Orally administered recombinant L. lactis delivering HSP65-6P277 may be an effective therapeutic approach in preventing DM1. PMID:25157497

  10. Proteome analysis of a Lactococcus lactis strain overexpressing gapA suggests that the gene product is an auxiliary glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Willemoës, Martin; Kilstrup, Mogens; Roepstorff, Peter; Hammer, Karin

    2002-08-01

    The sequence of the genome from the Lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis strain IL1403 shows the presence of two reading frames, gapA and gapB, putatively encoding glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Previous proteomic analysis of the L. lactis subspecies cremoris strain MG1363 has revealed two neighbouring protein spots, GapBI and GapBII, with amino terminal sequences identical to the product of gapA from the L. lactis subspecies cremoris strain LM0230 and that of the two IL1403 sequences. In order to assign the two protein spots to their respective genes we constructed an L. lactis strain that overexpessed the gapA gene derived from MG1363 upon nisin induction. Compared to the wild-type, the overexpressing strain had a 3.4-fold elevated level of specific GAPDH activity when grown in the presence of nisin. In both MG1363 and the gapA overexpressing strain the GAPDH activity was specific for NAD. No NADP dependent activity was detected. Proteome analysis of the gapA overexpressing strain revealed two new protein spots, GapAI and GapAII, not previously detected in proteome analysis of MG1363. Results from mass spectrometry analysis of GapA and GapB and comparison with the deduced protein sequences for the GAPDH isozymes from the genome sequence of strain IL1403 allowed us to assign GapA and GapB to their apparent IL1403 homologues encoded by gapA and gapB, respectively. Furthermore, we suggest that a homologue of a gapB product, represented by GapB, is the main source of GAPDH activity in L. lactis during normal growth. PMID:12203899

  11. Effect of in ovo administration of inulin and Lactococcus lactis on immune-related gene expression in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    P?owiec, Arkadiusz; S?awi?ska, Anna; Siwek, Maria Z; Bednarczyk, Marek F

    2015-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of in ovo administration of inulin and Lactococcus lactis on immune-related gene expression in broiler chickens. ANIMALS 45 Ross broilers. PROCEDURES On day 12 of embryonic development, 360 eggs were equally allocated among 3 treatment groups and injected with 0.2 mL of a solution that contained 1.76 mg of inulin (prebiotic group) or 1.76 mg of inulin enriched with 1,000 CFUs of L lactis subsp lactis 2955 (synbiotic group), or they were injected with 0.2 mL of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (control). At 1, 14, and 35 days after hatching, 5 male birds from each group were euthanized, and the spleen and cecal tonsils were harvested for determination of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12p40, IL-18, cluster of differentiation 80, interferon-?, and interferon-? expression by means of a reverse transcription quantitative PCR assay. Gene expressions in the cecal tonsils and spleens of chickens in the prebiotic and synbiotic groups were compared with those of control chickens at each tissue collection time. RESULTS Compared with control birds, immune-related gene expression was downregulated in birds in the prebiotic and synbiotic groups, and the magnitude of that downregulation was more pronounced in the cecal tonsils than in the spleen and increased with age. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that in ovo administration of a prebiotic or synbiotic to broilers was associated with downregulation of immune-related gene expression in the cecal tonsils and spleen. The magnitude of that downregulation increased with age and was most likely caused by stabilization of the gastrointestinal microbiota. PMID:26512543

  12. Recombinant expressions of sweet plant protein mabinlin II in Escherichia coli and food-grade Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenliang; Xia, Qiyu; Yao, Jing; Fu, Shaoping; Guo, Jianchun; Hu, Xinwen

    2015-04-01

    Sweet plant proteins, which are safe, natural, low-calorie sweeteners, may be suitable replacements for sugars in the food and beverage industries. Mabinlin II, a sweet plant protein, shows the most pronounced heat stability and acid resistance of any of the six known types of plant sweet proteins. However, mabinlin II is difficult to extract from the Capparis masaikai plant, which is itself becoming increasingly scarce. This limits the use of naturally acquired mabinlin II. In this study, recombinant mabinlin II proteins were expressed and purified in Escherichia coli and in food-grade Lactococcus lactis. Recombinant mabinlin II proteins MBL-BH (containing the B-chains of mabinlin II downstream fused with His-tag) and MBL-ABH (containing the A- and B-chains of mabinlin II downstream fused with His-tag) were expressed in E. coli in the form of inclusion bodies. They were then purified and renatured. The refolded MBL-BH was found to be 100 times sweeter than sucrose by weight, but it was not heat-stable. Refolded MBL-ABH was neither sweet nor heat-stable. Recombinant mabinlin II proteins were secreted and expressed intracellularly in food-grade L. lactis, in which the concentrated cell samples and culture medium samples were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting analysis with anti-mabinlin II polyclonal antibody. This study demonstrated that the single B chain of mabinlin II has a sweet taste. The recombinant mabinlin II proteins have been successfully expressed in food-grade L. lactis, which is a crucial step in the production of mabinlin II through microorganism expression systems. PMID:25649203

  13. Crystal Structure of Hexokinase KlHxk1 of Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Kuettner, E. Bartholomeus; Kettner, Karina; Keim, Antje; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Volke, Daniela; Singer, David; Hoffmann, Ralf; Müller, Eva-Christina; Otto, Albrecht; Kriegel, Thomas M.; Sträter, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Crystal structures of the unique hexokinase KlHxk1 of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis were determined using eight independent crystal forms. In five crystal forms, a symmetrical ring-shaped homodimer was observed, corresponding to the physiological dimer existing in solution as shown by small-angle x-ray scattering. The dimer has a head-to-tail arrangement such that the small domain of one subunit interacts with the large domain of the other subunit. Dimer formation requires favorable interactions of the 15 N-terminal amino acids that are part of the large domain with amino acids of the small domain of the opposite subunit, respectively. The head-to-tail arrangement involving both domains of the two KlHxk1 subunits is appropriate to explain the reduced activity of the homodimer as compared with the monomeric enzyme and the influence of substrates and products on dimer formation and dissociation. In particular, the structure of the symmetrical KlHxk1 dimer serves to explain why phosphorylation of conserved residue Ser-15 may cause electrostatic repulsions with nearby negatively charged residues of the adjacent subunit, thereby inducing a dissociation of the homologous dimeric hexokinases KlHxk1 and ScHxk2. Two complex structures of KlHxk1 with bound glucose provide a molecular model of substrate binding to the open conformation and the subsequent classical domain closure motion of yeast hexokinases. The entirety of the novel data extends the current concept of glucose signaling in yeast and complements the induced-fit model by integrating the events of N-terminal phosphorylation and dissociation of homodimeric yeast hexokinases. PMID:20943665

  14. Evaluation of viability Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis LKM512 in dogs.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, A; Ohnishi, Y; Shirotori, K; Matsumoto, M

    2015-12-01

    In dogs, gastric acid is not neutralised even when a meal is present in the stomach. Moreover, dogs take longer to digest their meals than humans do. Accordingly, the most important characteristic of any probiotics considered for use in dogs is high acid tolerance. The probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis LKM512 (hereafter referred to as LKM512) not only exhibits potent acid tolerance, but also has the ability to adhere to intestinal mucin. The aim of the present study was to explore the potential of LKM512 as a probiotic in dogs. Specifically, we investigated whether LKM512 can survive in the large intestine in dogs. LKM512 preparations containing 10(10) cfu were administered daily for 14 days in five dogs. Faeces were collected on the day before administration (day 0) as well as on days 7 and 14, and 7 days after administration was halted (day 21). The numbers of viable LKM512 present in faeces were determined by both culture-based techniques and molecular analysis. Changes in intestinal bacterial populations were analysed by 16S rRNA gene semiconductor sequencing using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM). On days 7 and 14, the numbers of viable LKM512 that were detected in faeces by culture-based techniques and molecular analysis were greater than the original daily dosage. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis using the PGM indicated that relative proportions of Bifidobacterium spp. and Bifidobacteriaceae were significantly higher after administration than before. The present study demonstrated that LKM512 can survive strong gastric acid, and proliferate in the large intestine of dogs. Therefore, LKM512 may be a useful canine probiotic. PMID:26322543

  15. Evaporation induced self assembled microstructures of silica nanoparticles and Streptococcus lactis cells as sorbent for uranium (VI).

    PubMed

    Mishra, Archana; Melo, Jose Savio; Sen, Debasis; D'Souza, Stanislaus Francis

    2014-01-15

    An assembled microstructure of silica nanoparticles and Streptococcus lactis (S. lactis) cells has been synthesized by evaporation induced self assembly, with the objective of its application in bioremediation. Different morphologies have been realized by tuning the physico-chemical conditions of the assembly process. The potential of these microstructures in removal of uranium (VI) has been evaluated. Morphology dependent uptake has been demonstrated and maximum uptake was seen for the spray dried doughnut shaped microstructure (SDSM). For a fixed morphology, the variation in uptake varies with solution pH, contact time, temperature and initial uranium (VI) concentration. The U (VI) removal was significantly rapid, with more than 85 ± 2% of total uptake in 10 min. The maximum sorption capacity (qmax) of U (VI) at pH 5.0 and temperature 298 K was 169.5 mg/g using SDSM as sorbent. The kinetic data of adsorption of U (VI) are best described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Calculated thermodynamic parameters reveal an endothermic and a spontaneous adsorption process. The present work opens up the possibility of a means for the functionalization of silica microstructures through the incorporation of micro-organism and the potential for the use of these functionalized materials for bioremediation. PMID:24231081

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of hexokinase KlHxk1 from Kluyveromyces lactis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuettner, E. Bartholomeus; Kriegel, Thomas M.; Keim, Antje; Naumann, Manfred; Sträter, Norbert

    2007-05-01

    Crystals of the enzyme hexokinase 1 from the yeast K. lactis (KlHxk1) suitable for X-ray analysis were obtained in various space groups. Glucose acts as both a carbon source and a hormone-like regulator of gene expression in eukaryotic organisms from yeast to man. Phosphorylation of glucose is executed by hexokinases, which represent a class of multifunctional enzymes that, in addition to their contribution to the uptake and initiation of metabolism of glucose, fructose and mannose, are involved in glucose signalling. The genome of the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis encodes a single hexokinase (KlHxk1) and a single glucokinase (KlGlk1). KlHxk1 exists in a monomer–homodimer equilibrium which is presumed to play a role in metabolic regulation. In order to evaluate the physiological significance of KlHxk1 dimerization on a molecular level, the enzyme was crystallized and subjected to X-ray structure analysis. Crystallization employing ammonium sulfate, diammonium phosphate or polyethylene glycol 6000 at pH values of 8.0–9.5 gave seven different crystal forms of KlHxk1. Crystallographic data to 1.66 Å resolution were obtained using synchrotron radiation. Structure determination of KlHxk1 in various packing environments will reveal the full architecture of the homodimeric enzyme and complete our mechanistic understanding of the catalytic and regulatory functions of the enzyme.

  17. The carB gene encoding the large subunit of carbamoylphosphate synthetase from Lactococcus lactis is transcribed monocistronically.

    PubMed

    Martinussen, J; Hammer, K

    1998-09-01

    The biosynthesis of carbamoylphosphate is catalyzed by the heterodimeric enzyme carbamoylphosphate synthetase. The genes encoding the two subunits of this enzyme in procaryotes are normally transcribed as an operon, but the gene encoding the large subunit (carB) in Lactococcus lactis is shown to be transcribed as an isolated unit. Carbamoylphosphate is a precursor in the biosynthesis of both pyrimidine nucleotides and arginine. By mutant analysis, L. lactis is shown to possess only one carB gene; the same gene product is thus required for both biosynthetic pathways. Furthermore, arginine may satisfy the requirement for carbamoylphosphate in pyrimidine biosynthesis through degradation by means of the arginine deiminase pathway. The expression of the carB gene is subject to regulation at the level of transcription by pyrimidines, most probably by an attenuator mechanism. Upstream of the carB gene, an open reading frame showing a high degree of similarity to those of glutathione peroxidases from other organisms was identified. PMID:9721272

  18. Development of a new DNA vaccine based on mycobacterial ESAT-6 antigen delivered by recombinant invasive Lactococcus lactis FnBPA+.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Vanessa Bastos; Saraiva, Tessália Diniz Luerce; Souza, Bianca Mendes; Zurita-Turk, Meritxell; Azevedo, Marcela Santiago Pacheco; De Castro, Camila Prósperi; Mancha-Agresti, Pamela; Dos Santos, Janete Soares Coelho; Santos, Ana Cristina Gomes; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano; Leclercq, Sophie; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson

    2015-02-01

    The use of the food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis as a vehicle for the oral delivery of DNA vaccine plasmids constitutes a promising strategy for vaccination. The delivery of DNA plasmids into eukaryotic cells is of critical importance for subsequent DNA expression and effectiveness of the vaccine. In this context, the use of the recombinant invasive L. lactis FnBPA+ (fibronectin-binding protein A) strain for the oral delivery of the eukaryotic expression vector vaccination using lactic acid bacteria (pValac), coding for the 6-kDa early secreted antigenic target (ESAT-6) gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, could represent a new DNA vaccine strategy against tuberculosis. To this end, the ESAT-6 sequence was cloned into the pValac vector; the L. lactis fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA)+ (pValac:ESAT-6) strain was obtained, and its immunological profile was checked in BALB/c mice. This strain was able to significantly increase interferon gamma (IFN-?) production in spleen cells, showing a systemic T helper 1 (Th1) cell response. The mice also showed a significant increase in specific secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) production in colon tissue and fecal extracts. Thus, this is the first time that L. lactis has been used to deliver a plasmid DNA harboring a gene that encodes an antigen against tuberculosis through mucous membranes. PMID:25503506

  19. Growth phase-dependent proteomes of the Malaysian isolated Lactococcus lactis dairy strain M4 using label-free qualitative shotgun proteomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Yap, Theresa Wan Chen; Rabu, Amir; Abu Bakar, Farah Diba; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Illias, Rosli Md; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the most studied mesophilic fermentative lactic acid bacterium. It is used extensively in the food industry and plays a pivotal role as a cell factory and also as vaccine delivery platforms. The proteome of the Malaysian isolated L. lactis M4 dairy strain, obtained from the milk of locally bred cows, was studied to elucidate the physiological changes occurring between the growth phases of this bacterium. In this study, ultraperformance liquid chromatography nanoflow electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC- nano-ESI-MS(E)) approach was used for qualitative proteomic analysis. A total of 100 and 121 proteins were identified from the midexponential and early stationary growth phases, respectively, of the L. lactis strain M4. During the exponential phase, the most important reaction was the generation of sufficient energy, whereas, in the early stationary phase, the metabolic energy pathways decreased and the biosynthesis of proteins became more important. Thus, the metabolism of the cells shifted from energy production in the exponential phase to the synthesis of macromolecules in the stationary phase. The resultant proteomes are essential in providing an improved view of the cellular machinery of L. lactis during the transition of growth phases and hence provide insight into various biotechnological applications. PMID:24982972

  20. Cold shock proteins of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 are involved in cryoprotection and in the production of cold-induced proteins.

    PubMed

    Wouters, J A; Frenkiel, H; de Vos, W M; Kuipers, O P; Abee, T

    2001-11-01

    Members of the group of 7-kDa cold-shock proteins (CSPs) are the proteins with the highest level of induction upon cold shock in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis MG1363. By using double-crossover recombination, two L. lactis strains were generated in which genes encoding CSPs are disrupted: L. lactis NZ9000 Delta AB lacks the tandemly orientated cspA and cspB genes, and NZ9000 Delta ABE lacks cspA, cspB, and cspE. Both strains showed no differences in growth at normal and at low temperatures compared to that of the wild-type strain, L. lactis NZ9000. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that upon disruption of the cspAB genes, the production of remaining CspE at low temperature increased, and upon disruption of cspA, cspB, and cspE, the production of CspD at normal growth temperatures increased. Northern blot analysis showed that control is most likely at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, it was established by a proteomics approach that some (non-7-kDa) cold-induced proteins (CIPs) are not cold induced in the csp-lacking strains, among others the histon-like protein HslA and the signal transduction protein LlrC. This supports earlier observations (J. A. Wouters, M. Mailhes, F. M. Rombouts, W. M. De Vos, O. P. Kuipers, and T. Abee, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 66:3756-3763, 2000). that the CSPs of L. lactis might be directly involved in the production of some CIPs upon low-temperature exposure. Remarkably, the adaptive response to freezing by prior exposure to 10 degrees C was significantly reduced in strain NZ9000 Delta ABE but not in strain NZ9000 Delta AB compared to results with wild-type strain NZ9000, indicating a notable involvement of CspE in cryoprotection. PMID:11679342

  1. Increase of stress resistance in Lactococcus lactis via a novel food-grade vector expressing a shsp gene from Streptococcus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hongtao; Tan, Jianxin; Zhang, Lifang; Gu, Xinxi; Xu, Wentao; Guo, Xinghua; Luo, Yunbo

    2012-01-01

    The effects of the expression of a small heat shock protein (shsp) gene from Streptococcus thermophilus on stress resistance in Lactococcus lactis under different environmental stresses were investigated in this study. pMG36e-shsp, an expression vector, was first constructed by inserting a shsp open reading frame (ORF) cloned from S. thermophilus strain St-QC into pMG36e. Then, a food-grade expression vector, pMG-shsp, was generated by deleting the erythromycin resistance gene from pMG36e-shsp. The transformation rate of pMG-shsp was comparable to that of pMG36e-shsp when each of these two vectors was introduced into L. lactis. These results demonstrated that the shsp ORF could successfully used as a food-grade selection marker in both pMG-shsp and pMG36e-shsp. Furthermore, the growth characteristics were almost the same between L. lactis ML23 transformants harboring pMG36e or pMG-shsp. The survival rate of L. lactis ML23 expressing the shsp ORF were increased to 0.032%, 0.006%, 0.0027%, 0.03%, and 0.16% under the following environmental stresses: heat, acid, ethanol, bile salt and H2O2, respectively. These results indicated that the expression of the shsp gene in the food-grade vector pMG-shsp conferred resistance to environmental stresses without affecting the growth characteristics of L. lactis ML23. PMID:24031940

  2. Growth of infants fed formula supplemented with Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 or Lactobacillus GG: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Growth is an essential outcome measure for evaluating the safety of any new ingredients, including probiotics, added to infant formulae. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effects of supplementation of infant formulae with Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (B lactis) and/or Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) compared with unsupplemented formula on the growth of healthy infants. Methods The MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched in June 2013 for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in healthy term infants. Unpublished data were obtained from the manufacturer of B lactis-supplemented formula. The primary outcome measures were weight, length, and head circumference. Results Nine eligible trials were identified. Compared with unsupplemented controls, supplementation of infant formula with B lactis had no effect on weight gain [4 RCTs, n?=?266, mean difference (MD) 0.96 g/day, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.70 to 2.63)], length gain (4 RCTs, n?=?261, MD ?0.39 mm/month, 95% CI ?1.32 to 0.53), or head circumference gain (3 RCTs, n?=?207, MD 0.56 mm/month, 95% CI ?0.17 to 1.30). Data limited to one small (n?=?105) trial suggest that infants who received standard infant formula supplemented with LGG grew significantly better. No such effect was observed in infants fed hydrolyzed formula supplemented with LGG. Conclusions Supplementation of infant formula with B lactis results in growth similar to what is found in infants fed unsupplemented formula. Limited data do not allow one to reach a conclusion regarding the effect of LGG supplementation on infant growth. PMID:24215626

  3. Benchmarking various green fluorescent protein variants in Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Lactococcus lactis for live cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Overkamp, Wout; Beilharz, Katrin; Detert Oude Weme, Ruud; Solopova, Ana; Karsens, Harma; Kovács, Ákos T; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2013-10-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) offers efficient ways of visualizing promoter activity and protein localization in vivo, and many different variants are currently available to study bacterial cell biology. Which of these variants is best suited for a certain bacterial strain, goal, or experimental condition is not clear. Here, we have designed and constructed two "superfolder" GFPs with codon adaptation specifically for Bacillus subtilis and Streptococcus pneumoniae and have benchmarked them against five other previously available variants of GFP in B. subtilis, S. pneumoniae, and Lactococcus lactis, using promoter-gfp fusions. Surprisingly, the best-performing GFP under our experimental conditions in B. subtilis was the one codon optimized for S. pneumoniae and vice versa. The data and tools described in this study will be useful for cell biology studies in low-GC-rich Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23956387

  4. A Starter Culture Rotation Strategy Incorporating Paired Restriction/ Modification and Abortive Infection Bacteriophage Defenses in a Single Lactococcus lactis Strain

    PubMed Central

    Durmaz, E.; Klaenhammer, T. R.

    1995-01-01

    Three derivatives of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCK203, each with a different pair of restriction/ modification (R/M) and abortive infection (Abi) phage defense systems, were constructed and then rotated in repeated cycles of a milk starter culture activity test (SAT). The rotation proceeded successfully through nine successive SATs in the presence of phage and whey containing phage from previous cycles. Lactococcus cultures were challenged with 2 small isometric-headed phages, (phi)31 and ul36, in one rotation series and with a composite of 10 industrial phages in another series. Two native lactococcal R(sup+)/M(sup+) plasmids, pTRK68 and pTRK11, and one recombinant plasmid, pTRK308, harboring a third distinct R/M system were incorporated into three NCK203 derivatives constructed separately for the rotation. The R(sup+)/M(sup+) NCK203 derivatives were transformed with high-copy-number plasmids encoding four Abi genes, abiA, abiC, per31, and per50. Various Abi and R/M combinations constructed in NCK203 were evaluated for their effects on cell growth, level of phage resistance, and retardation of phage development during repeated cycles of the SAT. The three NCK203 derivatives chosen for use in the SAT exhibited additive effects of the R/M and Abi phenotypes against sensitive phages. In such combinations, phage escaping restriction are prevented from completing their infective cycle by an abortive response that kills the host cell. The rotation series successfully controlled modified, recombinant, and mutant phages which were resistant to any one of the individual defense systems by presenting a different set of R/M and Abi defenses in the next test of the rotation. PMID:16534987

  5. New insights into the complex regulation of the glycolytic pathway in Lactococcus lactis. I. Construction and diagnosis of a comprehensive dynamic model.

    PubMed

    Dolatshahi, Sepideh; Fonseca, Luis L; Voit, Eberhard O

    2016-01-15

    This article and the companion paper use computational systems modeling to decipher the complex coordination of regulatory signals controlling the glycolytic pathway in the dairy bacterium Lactococcus lactis. In this first article, the development of a comprehensive kinetic dynamic model is described. The model is based on in vivo NMR data that consist of concentration trends in key glycolytic metabolites and cofactors. The model structure and parameter values are identified with a customized optimization strategy that uses as its core the method of dynamic flux estimation. For the first time, a dynamic model with a single parameter set fits all available glycolytic time course data under anaerobic operation. The model captures observations that had not been addressed so far and suggests the existence of regulatory effects that had been observed in other species, but not in L. lactis. The companion paper uses this model to analyze details of the dynamic control of glycolysis under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. PMID:26609637

  6. Lytic Activity of LysH5 Endolysin Secreted by Lactococcus lactis Using the Secretion Signal Sequence of Bacteriocin Lcn972

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; Gutiérrez, Dolores; Martínez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophage endolysins have an interesting potential as antimicrobials. The endolysin LysH5, encoded by Staphylococcus aureus phage vB_SauS-phi-IPLA88, was expressed and secreted in Lactococcus lactis using the signal peptide of bacteriocin lactococcin 972 and lactococcal constitutive and inducible promoters. Up to 80 U/mg of extracellular active endolysin was detected in culture supernatants, but most of the protein (up to 323 U/mg) remained in the cell extracts. PMID:22344638

  7. Fermentation and aerobic metabolism of cellodextrins by yeasts. [Candida wickerhamii; C. guiliermondii; C. molischiana; Debaryomyces polymorphus; Pichia guilliermondii; Clavispora lusitaniae; Kluyveromyces lactis; Brettanomyces claussenii; Rhodotorula minuta; Dekkera intermedia

    SciTech Connect

    Freer, S.N. )

    1991-03-01

    The fermentation and aerobic metabolism of cellodextrins by 14 yeast species or strains was monitored. When grown aerobically, Candida wickerhamii, C. guilliermondii, and C. molischiana metabolized cellodextrins of degree of polymerization 3 to 6. C. wicherhamii and C. molischiana also fermented these substrates, while C. guilliermondii fermented only cellodextrins of degree of polymerization {<=} 3. Debaryomyces polymorphus, Pichia guilliermondii, Clavispora lusitaniae, and one of two strains of Kluyveromyces lactis metabolized glucose, cellobiose, and cellotriose when grown aerobically. These yeasts also fermented these substrates, except for K. lactis, which fermented only glucose and cellobiose. The remaining species/strains tested, K. lactis, Brettanomyces claussenii, Brettanomyces anomalus, Kluyveromyces dobzhanskii, Rhodotorula minuta, and Dekkera intermedia, both fermented and aerobically metabolized glucose and cellobiose. Crude enzyme preparations from all 14 yeast species or strains were tested for ability to hydrolyze cellotriose and cellotretose. Most of the yeasts produced an enzyme(s) capable of hydrolyzing cellotriose. However, with two exceptions, R. minuta and P. guilliermondii, only the yeasts that metabolized cellodextrins of degree of polymerization >3 produced an enzyme(s) that hydrolyzed cellotretose.

  8. Effect of yogurt containing polydextrose, Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019: a randomized, double-blind, controlled study in chronic constipation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Constipation is a frequent complaint and the combination of a prebiotic and probiotics could have a potentially synergic effect on the intestinal transit. The present study therefore aims to investigate the combination of polydextrose (Litesse®), L. acidophilus NCFM® and B. lactis HN019 in a yogurt on intestinal transit in subjects who suffer from constipation. Methods Patients with constipation were randomly divided into two groups, Control Group (CG) and Treatment Group (TG), and had to eat 180 ml of unflavored yogurt every morning for 14 days. Those in the CG received only yogurt, while the TG received yogurt containing polydextrose, L. acidophilus NCFM® (ATCC 700396) and B. lactis HN019 (AGAL NM97/09513). Results Favourable clinical response was assessed since Agachan score had a significant reduction at the end of the study in both groups and tended to be better in the TG. The subjects in the treatment group also had a shorter transit time at the end of the intervention compared to the control group (p?=?0.01). Conclusion The product containing yogurt with polydextrose, B. lactis HN019 and L. acidophilus NCFM® significantly shortened colonic transit time after two weeks in the TG compared to CG and may be an option for treatment of constipation. PMID:25056655

  9. Molecular characterization of promoters of the Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris temperate bacteriophage BK5-T and identification of a phage gene implicated in the regulation of promoter activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmidevi, G; Davidson, B E; Hillier, A J

    1990-01-01

    DNA fragments from the temperate lactococcal bacteriophage BK5-T were cloned into the promoter-detecting plasmid pMU1328. Five DNA fragments conferring promoter activity were selected by transformation of Streptococcus sanguis and were functional in Escherichia coli, S. sanguis, and Lactococcus lactis subspp. lactis and cremoris. The nucleotide sequences of these fragments were determined, and primer extension analysis was used to locate the site of initiation of transcription from each promoter in both E. coli and S. sanguis. Transcription was initiated from the same nucleotide in these two organisms, and the promoters contained -10 and -35 regions similar to the consensus sequence for E. coli promoters. The activities of three of the five promoters were decreased two- to threefold when a compatible plasmid containing a 3.8-kilobase-pair EcoRI fragment (EcoRI-f) of BK5-T was coresident with the promoter-containing plasmid in either L. lactis subsp. cremoris or E. coli. Data from Tn5 mutagenesis, subcloning experiments, and DNA sequence analysis indicate that this decrease in promoter activity requires a region of EcoRI-f that contains a 621-base-pair open reading frame. This region has been designated bpi (for BK5-T promoter inhibitor). PMID:2111118

  10. Establishing the Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis as an Expression Host for Production of the Saposin-Like Domain of the Aspartic Protease Cirsin

    PubMed Central

    Curto, Pedro; Lufrano, Daniela; Pinto, Cátia; Custódio, Valéria; Gomes, Ana Catarina; Trejo, Sebastián A.; Bakás, Laura; Vairo-Cavalli, Sandra; Faro, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Typical plant aspartic protease zymogens comprise a characteristic and plant-specific insert (PSI). PSI domains can interact with membranes, and a role as a defensive weapon against pathogens has been proposed. However, the potential of PSIs as antimicrobial agents has not been fully investigated and explored yet due to problems in producing sufficient amounts of these domains in bacteria. Here, we report the development of an expression platform for the production of the PSI domain of cirsin in the generally regarded as safe (GRAS) yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. We successfully generated K. lactis transformants expressing and secreting significant amounts of correctly processed and glycosylated PSI, as well as its nonglycosylated mutant. A purification protocol with protein yields of ?4.0 mg/liter was established for both wild-type and nonglycosylated PSIs, which represents the highest reported yield for a nontagged PSI domain. Subsequent bioactivity assays targeting phytopathogenic fungi indicated that the PSI of cirsin is produced in a biologically active form in K. lactis and provided clear evidence for its antifungal activity. This yeast expression system thereby emerges as a promising production platform for further exploring the biotechnological potential of these plant saposin-like proteins. PMID:24123748

  11. Biogenic amine production by Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains in the model system of Dutch-type cheese.

    PubMed

    Flasarová, Radka; Pachlová, Vendula; Bu?ková, Leona; Menšíková, Anna; Georgová, Nikola; Dráb, Vladimír; Bu?ka, František

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the biogenic amine production of two starter strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris (strains from the Culture Collection of Dairy Microorganisms - CCDM 824 and CCDM 946) with decarboxylase positive activity in a model system of Dutch-type cheese during a 90-day ripening period at 10°C. During ripening, biogenic amine and free amino acid content, microbiological characteristics and proximate chemical properties were observed. By the end of the ripening period, the putrescine content in both samples with the addition of the biogenic amine producing strain almost evened out and the concentration of putrescine was >800mg/kg. The amount of tyramine in the cheeses with the addition of the strain of CCDM 824 approached the limit of 400mg/kg by the end of ripening. In the cheeses with the addition of the strain of CCDM 946 it even exceeded 500mg/kg. In the control samples, the amount of biogenic amines was insignificant. PMID:26471528

  12. Polyphasic Screening, Homopolysaccharide Composition, and Viscoelastic Behavior of Wheat Sourdough from a Leuconostoc lactis and Lactobacillus curvatus Exopolysaccharide-Producing Starter Culture

    PubMed Central

    Palomba, Simona; Cavella, Silvana; Torrieri, Elena; Piccolo, Alessandro; Mazzei, Pierluigi; Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Ventorino, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    After isolation from different doughs and sourdoughs, 177 strains of lactic acid bacteria were screened at the phenotypic level for exopolysaccharide production on media containing different carbohydrate sources. Two exopolysaccharide-producing lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus curvatus 69B2 and Leuconostoc lactis 95A) were selected through quantitative analysis on solid media containing sucrose and yeast extract. The PCR detection of homopolysaccharide (gtf and lev) and heteropolysaccharide (epsA, epsB, epsD and epsE, and epsEFG) genes showed different distributions within species and strains of the lactic acid bacteria studied. Moreover, in some strains both homopolysaccharide and heteropolysaccharide genes were detected. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra suggest that Lactobacillus curvatus 69B2 and Leuconostoc lactis 95A produced the same exopolysaccharide, which was constituted by a single repeating glucopyranosyl unit linked by an ?-(1?6) glycosidic bond in a dextran-type carbohydrate. Microbial growth, acidification, and viscoelastic properties of sourdoughs obtained by exopolysaccharide-producing and nonproducing lactic acid bacterial strains were evaluated. Sourdough obtained after 15 h at 30°C with exopolysaccharide-producing lactic acid bacteria reached higher total titratable acidity as well as elastic and dissipative modulus curves with respect to the starter not producing exopolysaccharide, but they showed similar levels of pH and microbial growth. On increasing the fermentation time, no difference in the viscoelastic properties of exopolysaccharide-producing and nonproducing samples was observed. This study suggests that dextran-producing Leuconostoc lactis 95A and Lactobacillus curvatus 69B2 can be employed to prepare sourdough, and this would be particularly useful to improve the quality of baked goods while avoiding the use of commercially available hydrocolloids as texturizing additives. PMID:22307283

  13. Development of a rapid SNP-typing assay to differentiate Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis strains used in probiotic-supplemented dairy products.

    PubMed

    Lomonaco, Sara; Furumoto, Emily J; Loquasto, Joseph R; Morra, Patrizia; Grassi, Ausilia; Roberts, Robert F

    2015-02-01

    Identification at the genus, species, and strain levels is desirable when a probiotic microorganism is added to foods. Strains of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis (BAL) are commonly used worldwide in dairy products supplemented with probiotic strains. However, strain discrimination is difficult because of the high degree of genome identity (99.975%) between different genomes of this subspecies. Typing of monomorphic species can be carried out efficiently by targeting informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). Findings from a previous study analyzing both reference and commercial strains of BAL identified SNP that could be used to discriminate common strains into 8 groups. This paper describes development of a minisequencing assay based on the primer extension reaction (PER) targeting multiple SNP that can allow strain differentiation of BAL. Based on previous data, 6 informative SNP were selected for further testing, and a multiplex preliminary PCR was optimized to amplify the DNA regions containing the selected SNP. Extension primers (EP) annealing immediately adjacent to the selected SNP were developed and tested in simplex and multiplex PER to evaluate their performance. Twenty-five strains belonging to 9 distinct genomic clusters of B. animalis ssp. lactis were selected and analyzed using the developed minisequencing assay, simultaneously targeting the 6 selected SNP. Fragment analysis was subsequently carried out in duplicate and demonstrated that the assay yielded 8 specific profiles separating the most commonly used commercial strains. This novel multiplex PER approach provides a simple, rapid, flexible SNP-based subtyping method for proper characterization and identification of commercial probiotic strains of BAL from fermented dairy products. To assess the usefulness of this method, DNA was extracted from yogurt manufactured with and without the addition of B. animalis ssp. lactis BB-12. Extracted DNA was then subjected to the minisequencing protocol, resulting in a SNP profile matching the profile for the strain BB-12. PMID:25547309

  14. Oxygen-dependent transcriptional regulator Hap1p limits glucose uptake by repressing the expression of the major glucose transporter gene RAG1 in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Wei-Guo; Guiard, Bernard; Fang, Zi-An; Donnini, Claudia; Gervais, Michel; Passos, Flavia M Lopes; Ferrero, Iliana; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Bolotin-Fukuhara, Monique

    2008-11-01

    The HAP1 (CYP1) gene product of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is known to regulate the transcription of many genes in response to oxygen availability. This response varies according to yeast species, probably reflecting the specific nature of their oxidative metabolism. It is suspected that a difference in the interaction of Hap1p with its target genes may explain some of the species-related variation in oxygen responses. As opposed to the fermentative S. cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces lactis is an aerobic yeast species which shows different oxygen responses. We examined the role of the HAP1-equivalent gene (KlHAP1) in K. lactis. KlHap1p showed a number of sequence features and some gene targets (such as KlCYC1) in common with its S. cerevisiae counterpart, and KlHAP1 was capable of complementing the hap1 mutation. However, the KlHAP1 disruptant showed temperature-sensitive growth on glucose, especially at low glucose concentrations. At normal temperature, 28 degrees C, the mutant grew well, the colony size being even greater than that of the wild type. The most striking observation was that KlHap1p repressed the expression of the major glucose transporter gene RAG1 and reduced the glucose uptake rate. This suggested an involvement of KlHap1p in the regulation of glycolytic flux through the glucose transport system. The DeltaKlhap1 mutant showed an increased ability to produce ethanol during aerobic growth, indicating a possible transformation of its physiological property to Crabtree positivity or partial Crabtree positivity. Dual roles of KlHap1p in activating respiration and repressing fermentation may be seen as a basis of the Crabtree-negative physiology of K. lactis. PMID:18806211

  15. Characterization of Two GAS1 Genes and Their Effects on Expression and Secretion of Heterologous Protein Xylanase B in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Lian, Zhao; Jiang, Jing-Bo; Chi, Shuang; Guan, Guo-Hua; Li, Ying; Li, Ji-Lun

    2015-12-28

    ?-1,3-glucanosyltransferases play essential roles in cell wall biosynthesis in yeast. Kluyveromyces lactis has six putative ?-1,3-glucanosyltransferase genes. KlGAS1-1 and KlGAS1-2 are homologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene GAS1. RT-qPCR indicated the transcription level of KlGAS1-1 was significantly reduced while heterologous protein (thermostable xylanase B) secretion was enhanced during medium optimization. To evaluate if these two events were related, and to improve xylanase B secretion in K. lactis, we constructed KlGAS1-1 and KlGAS1-2 single deletion strains and double deletion strain, respectively. KlGAS1-1 gene deletion resulted in the highest xylanase B activity among the three mutants. Only the double deletion strain showed morphology similar to that of the GAS1 deletion mutant in S. cerevisiae. The two single deletion strains differed in terms of cell wall thickness and xylanase B secretion. Transcription levels of ?-1,3-glucanosyltransferase genes and genes related to protein secretion and transport were assayed. The ?-1,3-glucanosyltransferase genes displayed transcription complementation in the cell wall synthesis process. KlGAS1-1 and KlGAS1-2 affected transcription levels of secretion- and transport-related genes. Differences in protein secretion ratio among the three deletion strains were associated with changes of transcription levels of secretion- and transport-related genes. Our findings indicate that KlGAS1-1 deletion is an effective tool for enhancing industrial-scale heterologous protein secretion in K. lactis. PMID:26370802

  16. Improvement of LysM-Mediated Surface Display of Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins (DARPins) in Recombinant and Nonrecombinant Strains of Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Zadravec, Petra; Štrukelj, Borut

    2015-01-01

    Safety and probiotic properties make lactic acid bacteria (LAB) attractive hosts for surface display of heterologous proteins. Protein display on nonrecombinant microorganisms is preferred for therapeutic and food applications due to regulatory requirements. We displayed two designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins), each possessing affinity for the Fc region of human IgG, on the surface of Lactococcus lactis by fusing them to the Usp45 secretion signal and to the peptidoglycan-binding C terminus of AcmA, containing lysine motif (LysM) repeats. Growth medium containing a secreted fusion protein was used to test its heterologous binding to 10 strains of species of the genus Lactobacillus, using flow cytometry, whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and fluorescence microscopy. The fusion proteins bound to the surfaces of all lactobacilli; however, binding to the majority of bacteria was only 2- to 5-fold stronger than that of the control. Lactobacillus salivarius ATCC 11741 demonstrated exceptionally strong binding (32- to 55-fold higher than that of the control) and may therefore be an attractive host for nonrecombinant surface display. Genomic comparison of the species indicated the exopolysaccharides of Lb. salivarius as a possible reason for the difference. Additionally, a 15-fold concentration-dependent increase in nonrecombinant surface display on L. lactis was demonstrated by growing bacteria with sublethal concentrations of the antibiotics chloramphenicol and erythromycin. Nonrecombinant surface display on LAB, based on LysM repeats, was optimized by selecting Lactobacillus salivarius ATCC 11741 as the optimal host and by introducing antibiotics as additives for increasing surface display on L. lactis. Additionally, effective display of DARPins on the surfaces of nonrecombinant LAB has opened up several new therapeutic possibilities. PMID:25576617

  17. Preservation of functionality of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis INL1 after incorporation of freeze-dried cells into different food matrices.

    PubMed

    Vinderola, G; Zacarías, M F; Bockelmann, W; Neve, H; Reinheimer, J; Heller, K J

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate how production and freeze-drying conditions of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis INL1, a probiotic strain isolated from breast milk, affected its survival and resistance to simulated gastric digestion during storage in food matrices. The determination of the resistance of bifidobacteria to simulated gastric digestion was useful for unveiling differences in cell sensitivity to varying conditions during biomass production, freeze-drying and incorporation of the strain into food products. These findings show that bifidobacteria can become sensitive to technological variables (biomass production, freeze-drying and the food matrix) without this fact being evidenced by plate counts. PMID:22265312

  18. Lysis of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris SK110 and Its Nisin-Immune Transconjugant in Relation to Flavor Development in Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Wilco; van de Bunt, Bert; Twigt, Marja; de Jonge, Boudewijn; Smit, Gerrit; Hugenholtz, Jeroen

    1998-01-01

    To develop a nisin-producing cheese starter, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris SK110 was conjugated with transposon Tn5276-NI, which codes for nisin immunity but not for nisin production. Cheese made with transconjugant SK110::Tn5276-NI as the starter was bitter. The muropeptide of the transconjugant contained a significantly greater amount of tetrapeptides than the muropeptide of strain SK110, which could have decreased the susceptibility of the cells to lysis and thereby the release of intracellular debittering enzymes. PMID:9572979

  19. Growth performance of early-weaned pigs is enhanced by feeding epidermal growth factor-expressing Lactococcus lactis fermentation product.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Andrea; Huynh, Evanna; Fu, Molei; Zhu, Cuilan; Wey, Doug; de Lange, Cornelis; Li, Julang

    2014-03-10

    We have previously generated epidermal growth factor expressing Lactococcus lactis (EGF-LL) using bioengineering approach, and shown that feeding newly-weaned piglets EGF-LL improves digestive function. To address concerns over the use of genetically modified organisms (GMO), the objective of the current study was to investigate the effect of feeding the EGF-LL fermentation product, after removal of the genetically modified EGF-LL, on growth performance and intestine development of newly-weaned piglets. One hundred and twenty newly-weaned piglets were fed ad libitum according to a 2-phase feeding program. Four pens were assigned to each of three treatments: (1) complete EGF-LL fermentation product (Ferm), (2) supernatant of EGF-LL fermentation product, after removal of EGF-LL (Supern), or (3) blank M17GE media (Control). EGF-LL or its fermented supernatant was administrated to piglets in the first 3 weeks post-weaning; their growth performance was monitored throughout treatment, and for the following week. Daily body weight gain (254.8g vs. 200.5g) and Gain:Feed (0.541kg/kg vs. 0.454kg/kg) of pigs on the Supern group were significantly improved compared to that of Control, although no difference was observed between the Ferm and Control pigs. Intestinal sucrase activity was increased in Supern- compared to Control group (166.3±62.1 vs. 81.4±56.5nmol glucose released/mg protein; P<0.05). The lack of growth response with Ferm pigs may be attributed to an overload of bacteria (daily dose included 4.56×10(10)CFU/kg BW/day EGF-LL). These results suggest that GMO-free EGF-LL fermentation product is effective in increasing growth performance of early-weaned piglets. PMID:24445174

  20. Influence of cofermentation by amylolytic Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactococcus lactis strains on the fermentation process and rheology of sorghum porridge.

    PubMed

    Mukisa, Ivan M; Byaruhanga, Yusuf B; Muyanja, Charles M B K; Aijuka, Matthew; Schüller, Reidar B; Sahlstrøm, Stefan; Langsrud, Thor; Narvhus, Judith A

    2012-08-01

    Amylolytic lactic acid bacteria (ALAB) can potentially replace malt in reducing the viscosity of starchy porridges. However, the drawback of using ALAB is their low and delayed amylolytic activity. This necessitates searching for efficient ALAB and strategies to improve their amylolytic activity. Two ALAB, Lactobacillus plantarum MNC 21 and Lactococcus lactis MNC 24, isolated from Obushera, were used to ferment starches in MRS broth: sorghum, millet, sweet potato, and commercial soluble starch. The amylolytic activity of MNC 21 was comparable to that of the ALAB collection strain Lb. plantarum A6, while that of MNC 24 was extremely low. MNC 21, MNC 24, and their coculture were compared to A6 and sorghum malt for ability to ferment and reduce the viscosity of sorghum porridge (11.6% dry matter). ALAB and the coculture lowered the pH from 6.2 to <4.5 within 12 h, while malt as a carrier of wild starter took about 20 h. Coculturing increased lactic acid yield by 46% and 76.8% compared to the yields of MNC 21 and MNC 24 monocultures, respectively. The coculture accumulated significantly larger (P < 0.05) amounts of maltose and diacetyl than the monocultures. Sorghum malt control and the coculture hydrolyzed more starch in sorghum porridge than the monocultures. The coculture initiated changes in the rheological parameters storage modulus (G'), loss modulus (G?), phase angle (?), and complex viscosity (?*) earlier than its constituent monocultures. The shear viscosity of sorghum porridge was reduced significantly (P < 0.05) from 1950 cP to 110 cP (malt), 281 cP (coculture), 382 cP (MNC 21), 713 cP (MNC 24), and 722 cP (A6). Coculturing strong ALAB with weak ALAB or non-ALAB can be exploited for preparation of nutrient-dense weaning foods and increasing lactic acid yield from starchy materials. PMID:22610432

  1. Influence of Cofermentation by Amylolytic Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactococcus lactis Strains on the Fermentation Process and Rheology of Sorghum Porridge

    PubMed Central

    Byaruhanga, Yusuf B.; Muyanja, Charles M. B. K.; Aijuka, Matthew; Schüller, Reidar B.; Sahlstrøm, Stefan; Langsrud, Thor; Narvhus, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    Amylolytic lactic acid bacteria (ALAB) can potentially replace malt in reducing the viscosity of starchy porridges. However, the drawback of using ALAB is their low and delayed amylolytic activity. This necessitates searching for efficient ALAB and strategies to improve their amylolytic activity. Two ALAB, Lactobacillus plantarum MNC 21 and Lactococcus lactis MNC 24, isolated from Obushera, were used to ferment starches in MRS broth: sorghum, millet, sweet potato, and commercial soluble starch. The amylolytic activity of MNC 21 was comparable to that of the ALAB collection strain Lb. plantarum A6, while that of MNC 24 was extremely low. MNC 21, MNC 24, and their coculture were compared to A6 and sorghum malt for ability to ferment and reduce the viscosity of sorghum porridge (11.6% dry matter). ALAB and the coculture lowered the pH from 6.2 to <4.5 within 12 h, while malt as a carrier of wild starter took about 20 h. Coculturing increased lactic acid yield by 46% and 76.8% compared to the yields of MNC 21 and MNC 24 monocultures, respectively. The coculture accumulated significantly larger (P < 0.05) amounts of maltose and diacetyl than the monocultures. Sorghum malt control and the coculture hydrolyzed more starch in sorghum porridge than the monocultures. The coculture initiated changes in the rheological parameters storage modulus (G?), loss modulus (G?), phase angle (?), and complex viscosity (?*) earlier than its constituent monocultures. The shear viscosity of sorghum porridge was reduced significantly (P < 0.05) from 1950 cP to 110 cP (malt), 281 cP (coculture), 382 cP (MNC 21), 713 cP (MNC 24), and 722 cP (A6). Coculturing strong ALAB with weak ALAB or non-ALAB can be exploited for preparation of nutrient-dense weaning foods and increasing lactic acid yield from starchy materials. PMID:22610432

  2. Dispersive solid phase extraction combined with ion-pair ultra high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for quantification of nucleotides in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Magdenoska, Olivera; Martinussen, Jan; Thykaer, Jette; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2013-09-15

    Analysis of intracellular metabolites in bacteria is of utmost importance for systems biology and at the same time analytically challenging due to the large difference in concentrations, multiple negative charges, and high polarity of these compounds. To challenge this, a method based on dispersive solid phase extraction with charcoal and subsequent analysis with ion-pair liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was established for quantification of intracellular pools of the 28 most important nucleotides. The method can handle extracts where cells leak during the quenching. Using a Phenyl-Hexyl column and tributylamine as volatile ion-pair reagent, sufficient retention and separation was achieved for mono-, di-, and triphosphorylated nucleotides. Stable isotope labeled nucleotides were used as internal standards for some analytes. The method was validated by determination of the recovery, matrix effects, accuracy, linearity, and limit of detection based on spiking of medium blank as well as standard addition to quenched Lactococcus lactis samples. For standard addition experiments, the isotope-labeled standards needed to be added in similar or higher concentrations as the analytes. L. lactis samples had an energy charge of 0.97 ± 0.001 which was consistent with literature, whereas some differences were observed compared with legacy data based on ³³P labeling. PMID:23747533

  3. Cytokine-inducing lipoteichoic acids of the allergy-protective bacterium Lactococcus lactis G121 do not activate via Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Kathleen; Stein, Karina; Ulmer, Artur J; Lindner, Buko; Heine, Holger; Holst, Otto

    2011-12-01

    It was established in a mouse model that the cowshed Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis G121 modulates the immune system resulting in allergy protection. However, the molecules and mechanisms involved in this process have not been elucidated yet. Lipoteichoic acids (LTAs) represent one major cell envelope component of Gram-positive bacteria that is considered a pathogen-associated molecular pattern. In the investigations presented here, the isolation as well as the structural and functional analyses of the LTA of L. lactis G121 were performed. Extraction with butan-1-ol and purification by hydrophobic interaction chromatography yielded pure LTA. Structural investigations included chemical analytical methods, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high-resolution electrospray ionization Fourier-transformed ion cyclotron mass spectrometry. LTA comprised a heterogeneous mixture of molecules composed of a 1,3-linked poly(glycerol phosphate) backbone which was randomly substituted at C-2 by D-alanine and ?-D-galactopyranose. The lipid anchor constituents were kojibiose linked to a heterogeneous diglyceride comprising in total six different fatty acid compositions. This LTA preparation possesses Toll-like receptor 2- (TLR2) and TLR4-independent cytokine-inducing activities in human mononuclear cells. PMID:21666273

  4. Comparative genome-based identification of a cell wall-anchored protein from Lactobacillus plantarum increases adhesion of Lactococcus lactis to human epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Zuo, Fanglei; Yu, Rui; Zeng, Zhu; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion to host cells is considered important for Lactobacillus plantarum as well as other lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to persist in human gut and thus exert probiotic effects. Here, we sequenced the genome of Lt. plantarum strain NL42 originating from a traditional Chinese dairy product, performed comparative genomic analysis and characterized a novel adhesion factor. The genome of NL42 was highly divergent from its closest neighbors, especially in six large genomic regions. NL42 harbors a total of 42 genes encoding adhesion-associated proteins; among them, cwaA encodes a protein containing multiple domains, including five cell wall surface anchor repeat domains and an LPxTG-like cell wall anchor motif. Expression of cwaA in Lactococcus lactis significantly increased its autoaggregation and hydrophobicity, and conferred the new ability to adhere to human colonic epithelial HT-29 cells by targeting cellular surface proteins, and not carbohydrate moieties, for CwaA adhesion. In addition, the recombinant Lc. lactis inhibited adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli to HT-29 cells, mainly by exclusion. We conclude that CwaA is a novel adhesion factor in Lt. plantarum and a potential candidate for improving the adhesion ability of probiotics or other bacteria of interest. PMID:26370773

  5. Expression of avian infectious bronchitis virus multi-epitope based peptide EpiC in Lactococcus lactis for oral immunization of chickens.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hai-Peng; Wang, Hong-Ning; Zhang, An-Yun; Ding, Meng-Die; Liu, Si-Tong; Cheng, Han; Zhou, Ying-Shun; Li, Xin

    2012-01-01

    The avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) multi-epitope based peptide EpiC was found to be effective in inducing strong humoral and cellular responses against IBV. In this study, the gene EpiC was introduced into Lactococcus lactis NZ3900, and three recombinant strains expressing EpiC in intracellular and extracellular forms were constructed. SDS-PAGE and Western blot results indicated that EpiC was successfully expressed and had good immunoreactivity with chicken anti-IBV serum. Fusion of the signal pepitide gene SPusp45 and the nine-peptide LEISSTCDA encoding oligonucleotide to EpiC increased the secretion of EpiC, but reduced the total yields of EpiC. Oral immunization to specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens with recombinant strains induced significantly higher levels of humoral immune responses, and provided protection against lethal dose challenge by the IBV SAIBk strain. These results indicate that it is feasible to use L. lactis as an antigen delivery vehicle in developing oral vaccines against IBV infection. PMID:23047098

  6. AguR, a Transmembrane Transcription Activator of the Putrescine Biosynthesis Operon in Lactococcus lactis, Acts in Response to the Agmatine Concentration.

    PubMed

    Linares, Daniel M; Del Rio, Beatriz; Redruello, Begoña; Ladero, Victor; Martin, M Cruz; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Fernandez, Maria; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-09-01

    Dairy industry fermentative processes mostly use Lactococcus lactis as a starter. However, some dairy L. lactis strains produce putrescine, a biogenic amine that raises food safety and spoilage concerns, via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. The enzymatic activities responsible for putrescine biosynthesis in this bacterium are encoded by the AGDI gene cluster. The role of the catabolic genes aguB, aguD, aguA, and aguC has been studied, but knowledge regarding the role of aguR (the first gene in the cluster) remains limited. In the present work, aguR was found to be a very low level constitutively expressed gene that is essential for putrescine biosynthesis and is transcribed independently of the polycistronic mRNA encoding the catabolic genes (aguBDAC). In response to agmatine, AguR acts as a transcriptional activator of the aguB promoter (PaguB), which drives the transcription of the aguBDAC operon. Inverted sequences required for PaguB activity were identified by deletion analysis. Further work indicated that AguR is a transmembrane protein which might function as a one-component signal transduction system that senses the agmatine concentration of the medium and, accordingly, regulates the transcription of the aguBDAC operon through a C-terminal cytoplasmic DNA-binding domain typically found in LuxR-like proteins. PMID:26116671

  7. BIOFIOBACTERIUM LACTIS ENHANCES TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR (TLR) PATHWAY GENE EXPRESSION LOCALLY IN THE COLON AND ENHANCES GLUCOSE UPTAKE IN THE SMALL INTESTINE OF PIGS INFECTED WITH PARASITIC NEMATODE ASCARIS SUM.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The addition of probiotic bacteria to the diet is proposed to enhance healthy responses to allergic and infectious diseases in pediatric populations, but quantitative data is often lacking. An experimental model was developed to inoculate neonatal pigs from birth with B. lactis (Bb12), detect relati...

  8. Ineffective Phosphorylation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Hog1p in Response to High Osmotic Stress in the Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Zavala, Nancy; Rodríguez-González, Miriam; Navarro-Olmos, Rocío; Ongay-Larios, Laura; Kawasaki, Laura; Torres-Quiroz, Francisco; Coria, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    When treated with a hyperosmotic stimulus, Kluyveromyces lactis cells respond by activating the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) K. lactis Hog1 (KlHog1) protein via two conserved branches, SLN1 and SHO1. Mutants affected in only one branch can cope with external hyperosmolarity by activating KlHog1p by phosphorylation, except for single ?Klste11 and ?Klste50 mutants, which showed high sensitivity to osmotic stress, even though the other branch (SLN1) was intact. Inactivation of both branches by deletion of KlSHO1 and KlSSK2 also produced sensitivity to high salt. Interestingly, we have observed that in ?Klste11 and ?Klsho1 ?Klssk2 mutants, which exhibit sensitivity to hyperosmotic stress, and contrary to what would be expected, KlHog1p becomes phosphorylated. Additionally, in mutants lacking both MAPK kinase kinases (MAPKKKs) present in K. lactis (KlSte11p and KlSsk2p), the hyperosmotic stress induced the phosphorylation and nuclear internalization of KlHog1p, but it failed to induce the transcriptional expression of KlSTL1 and the cell was unable to grow in high-osmolarity medium. KlHog1p phosphorylation via the canonical HOG pathway or in mutants where the SHO1 and SLN1 branches have been inactivated requires not only the presence of KlPbs2p but also its kinase activity. This indicates that when the SHO1 and SLN1 branches are inactivated, high-osmotic-stress conditions activate an independent input that yields active KlPbs2p, which, in turn, renders KlHog1p phosphorylation ineffective. Finally, we found that KlSte11p can alleviate the sensitivity to hyperosmotic stress displayed by a ?Klsho1 ?Klssk2 mutant when it is anchored to the plasma membrane by adding the KlSho1p transmembrane segments, indicating that this chimeric protein can substitute for KlSho1p and KlSsk2p. PMID:26150414

  9. Phages of non-dairy lactococci: isolation and characterization of ?L47, a phage infecting the grass isolate Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris DPC6860

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, Daniel; Guinane, Caitriona M.; Neve, Horst; Coffey, Aidan; Ross, R. Paul; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; McAuliffe, Olivia

    2014-01-01

    Lactococci isolated from non-dairy sources have been found to possess enhanced metabolic activity when compared to dairy strains. These capabilities may be harnessed through the use of these strains as starter or adjunct cultures to produce more diverse flavor profiles in cheese and other dairy products. To understand the interactions between these organisms and the phages that infect them, a number of phages were isolated against lactococcal strains of non-dairy origin. One such phage, ?L47, was isolated from a sewage sample using the grass isolate L. lactis ssp. cremoris DPC6860 as a host. Visualization of phage virions by transmission electron microscopy established that this phage belongs to the family Siphoviridae and possesses a long tail fiber, previously unseen in dairy lactococcal phages. Determination of the lytic spectrum revealed a broader than expected host range, with ?L47 capable of infecting 4 industrial dairy strains, including ML8, HP and 310, and 3 additional non-dairy isolates. Whole genome sequencing of ?L47 revealed a dsDNA genome of 128, 546 bp, making it the largest sequenced lactococcal phage to date. In total, 190 open reading frames (ORFs) were identified, and comparative analysis revealed that the predicted products of 117 of these ORFs shared greater than 50% amino acid identity with those of L. lactis phage ?949, a phage isolated from cheese whey. Despite their different ecological niches, the genomic content and organization of ?L47 and ?949 are quite similar, with both containing 4 gene clusters oriented in different transcriptional directions. Other features that distinguish ?L47 from ?949 and other lactococcal phages, in addition to the presence of the tail fiber and the genome length, include a low GC content (32.5%) and a high number of predicted tRNA genes (8). Comparative genome analysis supports the conclusion that ?L47 is a new member of the 949 lactococcal phage group which currently includes the dairy ?949. PMID:24454309

  10. Surface Proteome Analysis of a Natural Isolate of Lactococcus lactis Reveals the Presence of Pili Able to Bind Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Meyrand, Mickael; Guillot, Alain; Goin, Mélodie; Furlan, Sylviane; Armalyte, Julija; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Cortes-Perez, Naima G.; Thomas, Ginette; Chat, Sophie; Péchoux, Christine; Dupres, Vincent; Hols, Pascal; Dufrêne, Yves F.; Trugnan, Germain; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Surface proteins of Gram-positive bacteria play crucial roles in bacterial adhesion to host tissues. Regarding commensal or probiotic bacteria, adhesion to intestinal mucosa may promote their persistence in the gastro-intestinal tract and their beneficial effects to the host. In this study, seven Lactococcus lactis strains exhibiting variable surface physico-chemical properties were compared for their adhesion to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. In this test, only one vegetal isolate TIL448 expressed a high-adhesion phenotype. A nonadhesive derivative was obtained by plasmid curing from TIL448, indicating that the adhesion determinants were plasmid-encoded. Surface-exposed proteins in TIL448 were analyzed by a proteomic approach consisting in shaving of the bacterial surface with trypsin and analysis of the released peptides by LC-MS/MS. As the TIL448 complete genome sequence was not available, the tryptic peptides were identified by a mass matching approach against a database including all Lactococcus protein sequences and the sequences deduced from partial DNA sequences of the TIL448 plasmids. Two surface proteins, encoded by plasmids in TIL448, were identified as candidate adhesins, the first one displaying pilin characteristics and the second one containing two mucus-binding domains. Inactivation of the pilin gene abolished adhesion to Caco-2 cells whereas inactivation of the mucus-binding protein gene had no effect on adhesion. The pilin gene is located inside a cluster of four genes encoding two other pilin-like proteins and one class-C sortase. Synthesis of pili was confirmed by immunoblotting detection of high molecular weight forms of pilins associated to the cell wall as well as by electron and atomic force microscopy observations. As a conclusion, surface proteome analysis allowed us to detect pilins at the surface of L. lactis TIL448. Moreover we showed that pili appendages are formed and involved in adhesion to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:24002364

  11. Bioengineering of a Nisin A?producing Lactococcus lactis to create isogenic strains producing the natural variants Nisin F, Q and Z

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Clare; Hill, Colin; Cotter, Paul D.; Ross, R. Paul

    2011-01-01

    Summary Nisin is the prototypical example of the lantibiotic family of antimicrobial peptides and has been employed as a food preservative for over half a century. It has also attracted attention due to its potency against a number of multidrug?resistant clinical pathogens. Nisin A is the originally isolated form of Nisin and a further five natural variants have been described which differ by up to 10 amino acids (of 34 in total in Nisin A). Nisins A, Z, F and Q are produced by Lactococcus lactis, while Nisins U and U2 are produced by Streptococcus sp. In this study we bioengineered the nisA gene of a Nisin A producer to generate genes encoding Nisins Z, F, Q, U and U2. We determined that while active Nisin Z, F and Q can be produced against this genetic background, active forms of Nisin U and U2 are not generated. Minimum inhibitory concentration studies with Nisin A, Z, F and Q variants against a series of different clinically significant pathogens establish differences in specific activities against selected targets. Nisin F was most impressive, being the most active, or one of the most active, against the MRSA strain ST 525, EC 676, EC 725, VISA 22900, VISA 22781, hVISA 35197, Staphylococcus aureus 8325?4 and L. lactis HP. Nisin Z was most active against ST 299, hVISA 32683 and, together with Nisin F, HP but had contrastingly poor activity against ST 525, EC 676 and 8325?4. Nisin F, Q and A exhibited similar potency against VISA 22900. This was the only target against which Nisin Q and Nisin A were among the most active variants. PMID:21375711

  12. Oral Immunization with a Recombinant Lactococcus lactis-Expressing HIV-1 Antigen on Group A Streptococcus Pilus Induces Strong Mucosal Immunity in the Gut.

    PubMed

    Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Jones, Andrew; Quigley, Bernard R; Scott, June R; Amara, Rama Rao

    2015-11-15

    The induction of a potent humoral and cellular immune response in mucosal tissue is important for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. Most of the current HIV vaccines under development use the i.m. route for immunization, which is relatively poor in generating potent and long-lived mucosal immune responses. In this article, we explore the ability of an oral vaccination with a probiotic organism, Lactococcus lactis, to elicit HIV-specific immune responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments of BALB/c mice. We expressed the HIV-1 Gag-p24 on the tip of the T3 pilus of Streptococcus pyogenes as a fusion to the Cpa protein (LL-Gag). After four monthly LL-Gag oral immunizations, we observed strong Gag-specific IgG and IgA responses in serum, feces, and vaginal secretions. However, the Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses in the blood were at or below our detection limit. After an i.m. modified vaccinia Ankara/Gag boost, we observed robust Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses both in systemic and in mucosal tissues, including intraepithelial and lamina propria lymphocytes of the small intestine, Peyer's patches, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Consistent with strong immunogenicity, the LL-Gag induced activation of CD11c(+) CD11b(+) dendritic cells in the Peyer's patches after oral immunization. Our results demonstrate that oral immunization with L. lactis expressing an Ag on the tip of the group A Streptococcus pilus serves as an excellent vaccine platform to induce strong mucosal humoral and cellular immunity against HIV. PMID:26482408

  13. The ltp gene of temperate Streptococcus thermophilus phage TP-J34 confers superinfection exclusion to Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactococcus lactis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xingmin . E-mail: Xingmin_Sun@brown.edu; Goehler, Andre; Heller, Knut J. . E-mail: knut.heller@bfel.de; Neve, Horst

    2006-06-20

    The ltp gene, located within the lysogeny module of temperate Streptococcus thermophilus phage TP-J34, has been shown to be expressed in lysogenic strain S. thermophilus J34. It codes for a lipoprotein, as demonstrated by inhibition of cleavage of the signal sequence by globomycin. Exposure of Ltp on the surface of Lactococcus lactis protoplasts bearing a plasmid-encoded copy of ltp has been demonstrated by immunogold labeling and electron microscopy. Expression of ltp in prophage- and plasmid-cured S. thermophilus J34-6f interfered with TP-J34 infection. While plating efficiency was reduced by a factor of about 40 and lysis of strain J34-6f in liquid medium was delayed considerably, phage adsorption was not affected at all. Intracellular accumulation of phage DNA was shown to be inhibited by Ltp. This indicates interference of Ltp with infection at the stage of triggering DNA release and injection into the cell, indicating a role of Ltp in superinfection exclusion. Expression of ltp in L. lactis Bu2-60 showed that the same superinfection exclusion mechanism was strongly effective against phage P008, a member of the lactococcal 936 phage species: no plaque-formation was detectable with even 10{sup 9} phage per ml applied, and lysis in liquid medium did not occur. In Lactococcus also, Ltp apparently inhibited phage DNA release and/or injection. Ltp appears to be a member of a family of small, secreted proteins with a 42 amino acids repeat structure encoded by genes of Gram-positive bacteria. Some of these homologous genes are part of the genomes of prophages.

  14. Two Uptake Systems for Fructose in Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris FD1 Produce Glycolytic and Gluconeogenic Fructose Phosphates and Induce Oscillations in Growth and Lactic Acid Formation

    PubMed Central

    Benthin, Stig; Nielsen, Jens; Villadsen, John

    1993-01-01

    Fructose transport in lactococci is mediated by two phosphotransferase systems (PTS). The constitutive mannose PTS has a broad specificity and may be used for uptake of fructose with a fructose saturation constant (KFru) of 0.89 mM, giving intracellular fructose 6-phosphate. The inducible fructose PTS has a very small saturation constant (KFru, <17 ?M), and the fructose 1-phosphate produced enters the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway as fructose 1,6-diphosphate. Growth in batch cultures of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris FD1 in a yeast extract medium with fructose as the only sugar is poor both with respect to specific growth rate and biomass yield, whereas the specific lactic acid production rate is higher than those in similar fermentations on other sugars metabolized via the EMP pathway, e.g., glucose. In fructose-limited chemostat cultures, the biomass concentration exhibits a strong correlation with the dilution rate, and starting a continuous culture at the end of a batch fermentation leads to large and persistent oscillations in the biomass concentration and specific lactic acid production rate. Two proposed mechanisms underlying this strange growth pattern follow. (i) Fructose transported via the fructose PTS cannot be converted into essential biomass precursors (glucose 6-phosphate or fructose 6-phosphate), because L. lactis subsp. cremoris FD1 is devoid of fructose 1,6-diphosphatase activity. (ii) The fructose PTS apparently produces a metabolite (presumably fructose 1-phosphate) which exerts catabolite repression of both mannose PTS and lactose PTS. Since the repressed mannose PTS and lactose PTS are shown to have identical maximum molar transport rates, the results indicate that it is the general PTS proteins which are repressed. PMID:16349061

  15. Inhibition kinetics of catabolic dehydrogenases by elevated moieties of ATP and ADP--implication for a new regulation mechanism in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Rong; Zeidan, Ahmad A; Rådström, Peter; van Niel, Ed W J

    2010-04-01

    ATP and ADP inhibit, in varying degrees, several dehydrogenases of the central carbon metabolism of Lactococcus lactis ATCC 19435 in vitro, i.e. glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Here we demonstrate mixed inhibition for GAPDH and competitive inhibition for LDH and ADH by adenine nucleotides in single inhibition studies. The nonlinear negative co-operativity was best modelled with Hill-type kinetics, showing greater flexibility than the usual parabolic inhibition equation. Because these natural inhibitors are present simultaneously in the cytoplasm, multiple inhibition kinetics was determined for each dehydrogenase. For ADH and LDH, the inhibitor combinations ATP plus NAD and ADP plus NAD are indifferent to each other. Model discrimination suggested that the weak allosteric inhibition of GAPDH had no relevance when multiple inhibitors are present. Interestingly, with ADH and GAPDH the combination of ATP and ADP exhibits lower dissociation constants than with either inhibitor alone. Moreover, the concerted inhibition of ADH and GAPDH, but not of LDH, shows synergy between the two nucleotides. Similar kinetics, but without synergies, were found for horse liver and yeast ADHs, indicating that dehydrogenases can be modulated by these nucleotides in a nonlinear manner in many organisms. The action of an elevated pool of ATP and ADP may effectively inactivate lactococcal ADH, but not GAPDH and LDH, providing leverage for the observed metabolic shift to homolactic acid formation in lactococcal resting cells on maltose. Therefore, we interpret these results as a regulation mechanism contributing to readjusting the flux of ATP production in L. lactis. PMID:20193044

  16. Purification and Characterization of Cystathionine (beta)-Lyase from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris B78 and Its Possible Role in Flavor Development in Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Alting, A. C.; Engels, W.; van Schalkwijk, S.; Exterkate, F. A.

    1995-01-01

    An enzyme that degrades sulfur-containing amino acids was purified from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris B78; this strain was isolated from a mixed-strain, mesophilic starter culture used for the production of Gouda cheese. The enzyme has features of a cystathionine (beta)-lyase (EC 4.4.1.8), a pyridoxal-5(prm1)-phosphate-dependent enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of methionine and catalyzing an (alpha),(beta)-elimination reaction. It is able to catalyze an (alpha),(gamma)-elimination reaction as well, which in the case of methionine, results in the production of methanethiol, a putative precursor of important flavor compounds in cheese. The native enzyme has a molecular mass of approximately 130 to 165 kDa and consists of four identical subunits of 35 to 40 kDa. The enzyme is relatively thermostable and has a pH optimum for activity around 8.0; it is still active under cheese-ripening conditions, viz., pH 5.2 to 5.4 and 4% (wt/vol) NaCl. A possible essential role of the enzyme in flavor development in cheese is suggested. PMID:16535166

  17. Endoglucanase V and a phosphatase from Trichoderma viride are able to act on modified exopolysaccharide from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris B40.

    PubMed

    van Casteren, W H; Kabel, M A; Dijkema, C; Schols, H A; Beldman, G; Voragen, A G

    1999-04-30

    EPS B40 from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris consists of a repeating unit of-->4)-beta-D-Glcp-(1-->4)-[alpha-L-Rhap-(1 -->2)][alpha-D-Galp-1-PO4-3]-beta-D-Galp-(1-->4)-beta-D-Glcp-(1-->. A phosphatase from Trichoderma viride was able to release phosphate, but only after removal of rhamnosyl and galactosyl residues by mild CF3CO2H treatment. Purified endoV from T. viride was able to act on the backbone of the polymer, but only if rhamnosyl substituents and phosphate had been removed. After complete removal of phosphate and partial removal of rhamnosyl residues by HF treatment, incubation with endoV resulted in a homologous series of oligomers. Purification of these oligomers and subsequent characterisation by NMR demonstrated that endoV was able to cleave the beta-(1-->4) linkage between two glucopyranosyl residues when the galactopyranosyl residue towards the nonreducing end is unsubstituted. The mode of action of endoV on HF-treated EPS B40 is discussed on the basis of the subsite model described for endoV [J.-P. Vincken, G. Beldman, A.G.J. Voragen, Carbohydr. Res., 298 (1997) 299-310]. PMID:10466211

  18. Functional relationship among TATA sequences, gene induction and transcription initiation in the beta-galactosidase, LAC4, gene from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Ficca, A G; Hollenberg, C P

    1989-04-01

    In the 5' non-coding region of the beta-galactosidase, LAC4, gene of Kluyveromyces lactis, three TATA-like sequences are present at -230, -170 and -142 from the ATG translation start site. By means of deletion mutations in the TATA region, at least two of these TATA sequences, those at -230 and -142, were shown to be required for normal gene expression. Evidence is presented for a functional hierarchy and cooperation between these TATA sequences. The deletion or a change in the position of the TATA sequences affects both beta-galactosidase induction and the location of RNA initiation sites. The TATA sequence at -230 alone is sufficient for correct gene induction when it is moved to a position 41 bp from the major RNA initiation sites located around -110; the -142 TATA alone contributes only partly to gene induction. We suggest a functional distinction between these two related regulatory sequences. This functional distinction might be established by sequence differences and/or targets of unlike specific DNA binding protein(s). A conformational analysis of the LAC4 promoter showed that under torsional stress the functional elements UAS, TATA boxes RNA initiation sites and ATG can be detected as P1-sensitive sites. Possible functions of DNA structural alterations on gene expression are discussed. PMID:2546684

  19. A Single Mutation in the Gene Responsible for the Mucoid Phenotype of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Confers Surface and Functional Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Cantabrana, Claudio; Sánchez, Borja; Álvarez-Martín, Pablo; López, Patricia; Martínez-Álvarez, Noelia; Delley, Michele; Martí, Marc; Varela, Encarna; Suárez, Ana; Antolín, María; Guarner, Francisco; Berger, Bernard; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Margolles, Abelardo

    2015-12-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) are extracellular carbohydrate polymers synthesized by a large variety of bacteria. Their physiological functions have been extensively studied, but many of their roles have not yet been elucidated. We have sequenced the genomes of two isogenic strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis that differ in their EPS-producing phenotype. The original strain displays a nonmucoid appearance, and the mutant derived thereof has acquired a mucoid phenotype. The sequence analysis of their genomes revealed a nonsynonymous mutation in the gene Balat_1410, putatively involved in the elongation of the EPS chain. By comparing a strain from which this gene had been deleted with strains containing the wild-type and mutated genes, we were able to show that each strain displays different cell surface characteristics. The mucoid EPS synthesized by the strain harboring the mutation in Balat_1410 provided higher resistance to gastrointestinal conditions and increased the capability for adhesion to human enterocytes. In addition, the cytokine profiles of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and ex vivo colon tissues suggest that the mucoid strain could have higher anti-inflammatory activity. Our findings provide relevant data on the function of Balat_1410 and reveal that the mucoid phenotype is able to alter some of the most relevant functional properties of the cells. PMID:26362981

  20. Comparison of killing of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria by pure singlet oxygen. [Salmonella typhimurium; Escherichia coli; Sarcina lutea; Staphylococcus aureus; Streptococcus lactis; Streptococcus faecalis

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, T.A.; Midden, W.R. ); Hartman, P.E. )

    1989-04-01

    Gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria were found to display different sensitivities to pure singlet oxygen generated outside of cells. Killing curves for Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli strains were indicative of multihit killing, whereas curves for Sarcina lutea, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus lactis, and Streptococcus faecalis exhibited single-hit kinetics. The S. typhimurium deep rough strain TA1975, which lacks nearly all of the cell wall lipopolysaccharide coat and manifests concomitant enhancement of penetration by some exogenous substances, responded to singlet oxygen with initially faster inactivation than did the S. typhimurium wild-type strain, although the maximum rates of killing appeared to be quite similar. The structure of the cell wall thus plays an important role in susceptibility to singlet oxygen. The outer membrane-lipopolysaccharide portion of the gram-negative cell wall initially protects the bacteria from extracellular singlet oxygen, although it may also serve as a source for secondary reaction products which accentuate the rates of cell killing. S. typhimurium and E. coli strains lacking the cellular antioxidant, glutathione, showed no difference from strains containing glutathione in response to the toxic effects of singlet oxygen. Strains of Sarcina lutea and Staphylococcus aureus that contained carotenoids, however, were far more resistant to singlet oxygen lethality than were both carotenoidless mutants of the same species and other gram-positive species lacking high levels of protective carotenoids.

  1. The extent of co-metabolism of glucose and galactose by Lactococcus lactis changes with the expression of the lacSZ operon from Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Solem, Christian; Koebmann, Brian; Jensen, Peter R

    2008-05-01

    The lactose transporter and beta-galactosidase from Streptococcus thermophilus, encoded by the lacSZ operon, were introduced into the lactose-negative strain Lactococcus lactis MG1363 and the expression of the lacSZ operon was modulated by substitution of the native promoter with randomized synthetic promoters. A series of strains with various expression levels of lacSZ were examined for their fermentation of lactose. Strains with a high expression level were found to metabolize lactose in a similar manner to S. thermophilus, i.e. the galactose moiety of lactose was excreted to the growth medium and only glucose was metabolized in glycolysis. Interestingly, strains with low expression of the operon showed a mixed acid metabolism and co-metabolism of galactose and glucose. The lactose flux increased gradually with increasing expression of the lacSZ operon until an optimum was observed at intermediate beta-galactosidase activities of 2000-3000 Miller units. At higher expression levels, the flux decreased. These strains had a glycolytic flux comparable with those of reference strains with the standard lactococcal PTS(lac) (lactose phosphotransferase transport system) lactose transporter, which indicates that lactose transport is not rate-limiting for glycolysis in Lactococcus. Finally, an additional ATP drain was introduced into the fastest growing strain, CS2004, to test whether the ATP demand controlled glycolysis under these conditions, but in fact no increase in glycolytic flux was observed. PMID:17822381

  2. Molecular analysis of UAS(E), a cis element containing stress response elements responsible for ethanol induction of the KlADH4 gene of Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, C; Santori, F; Saliola, M; Falcone, C

    2000-01-01

    KlADH4 is a gene of Kluyveromyces lactis encoding a mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogenase activity, which is specifically induced by ethanol and insensitive to glucose repression. In this work, we report the molecular analysis of UAS(E), an element of the KlADH4 promoter which is essential for the induction of KlADH4 in the presence of ethanol. UAS(E) contains five stress response elements (STREs), which have been found in many genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae involved in the response of cells to conditions of stress. Whereas KlADH4 is not responsive to stress conditions, the STREs present in UAS(E) seem to play a key role in the induction of the gene by ethanol, a situation that has not been observed in the related yeast S. cerevisiae. Gel retardation experiments showed that STREs in the KlADH4 promoter can bind factor(s) under non-inducing conditions. Moreover, we observed that the RAP1 binding site present in UAS(E) binds KlRap1p. PMID:10724480

  3. Purification and Characterization of Cystathionine (gamma)-Lyase from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris SK11: Possible Role in Flavor Compound Formation during Cheese Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Bruinenberg, P. G.; De Roo, G.; Limsowtin, G.

    1997-01-01

    A cystathionine (gamma)-lyase (EC 4.4.1.1) ((gamma)-CTL) was purified to homogeneity from a crude cell extract of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris SK11 by a procedure including anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration chromatography. The activity of SK11 (gamma)-CTL is pyridoxal-5(prm1)-phosphate dependent, and the enzyme catalyzes the (alpha),(gamma)-elimination reaction of L-cystathionine to produce L-cysteine, (alpha)-ketobutyrate, and ammonia. The native enzyme has a molecular mass of approximately 120 to 200 kDa and apparently consists of at least six identical subunits of 20 kDa. In this respect, the SK11 enzyme clearly differs from other bacterial cystathionine lyases, which are all tetrameric proteins with identical subunits of approximately 40 kDa. In addition, the specific activity of purified SK11 (gamma)-CTL toward L-cystathionine is relatively low compared with those reported for other bacterial cystathionine lyases. The SK11 enzyme shows a broad substrate specificity. In the case of L-methionine, the action of SK11 (gamma)-CTL results in the formation of methanethiol, a volatile sulfur compound known to be required in flavor development in cheddar cheese. The (alpha),(beta)-elimination reaction of L-cysteine is also efficiently catalyzed by the enzyme, resulting in the formation of hydrogen sulfide. Although the conditions are far from optimal, cystathionine (gamma)-lyase is still active under cheddar cheese-ripening conditions, namely, pH 5.0 to 5.4 and 5% (wt/vol) NaCl. The possible role of the enzyme in cheese flavor development is discussed. PMID:16535512

  4. Short-term, daily intake of yogurt containing Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bf-6 (LMG 24384) does not affect colonic transit time in women.

    PubMed

    Merenstein, Daniel J; D'Amico, Frank; Palese, Caren; Hahn, Alexander; Sparenborg, Jessy; Tan, Tina; Scott, Hillary; Polzin, Kayla; Kolberg, Lore; Roberts, Robert

    2014-01-28

    The present study investigated the effect of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bf-6 (LMG 24 384) (Bf-6)-supplemented yogurt on colonic transit time (CTT). A triple-blinded, randomised, placebo-controlled, two-period cross-over trial was conducted with sixty-eight women with a self-reported history of straining during bowel movements or hard or lumpy stools in the past 2 years. As per regulatory requirements for probiotic studies, eligible women were generally healthy and not actively constipated at the time of enrolment. Participants consumed both Bf-6 and placebo yogurts for 14 d each in a randomised order, with a 6-week washout period between the treatments. The primary outcome, CTT, was assessed via Sitz marker X-rays. The average CTT was 42·1 h for the active period and 43·3 h for the control period (mean difference 1·2 h, 95 % CI - 4·9, 7·4). Since the statistical tests for the cross-over study implied that the mean CTT for the active and control periods in period 2 were biased, the standard protocol suggests examining the results of only period 1 as a traditional randomised controlled trial. This showed that the mean CTT was 35·2 h for the active period v. 52·9 h for the control period (P= 0·015). Bootstrapping demonstrated that both the mean and median differences remained significant (P= 0·016 and P= 0·045, respectively). Few adverse events were noted, with no differences among the active and control periods. The paired analysis showed no differences between the active and control periods during the cross-over trial. Further trials should be conducted in populations with underlying problems associated with disordered transit to determine the potential value of probiotic supplementation more accurately. PMID:24103188

  5. Purification and characterization of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase A from Lactococcus lactis, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, F. S.; Rowland, P.; Larsen, S.; Jensen, K. F.

    1996-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the only organism known to contain two dihydroorotate dehydrogenases, i.e., the A- and B-forms. In this paper, we report the overproduction, purification, and crystallization of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase A. In solution, the enzyme is bright yellow. It is a dimer of subunits (34 kDa) that contain one molecule of flavin mononucleotide each. The enzyme shows optimal function in the pH range 7.5-9.0. It is specific for L-dihydroorotate as substrate and can use dichlorophenolindophenol, potassium hexacyanoferrate (III), and, to a lower extent, also molecular oxygen as acceptors of the reducing equivalents, whereas the pyridine nucleotide coenzymes (NAD+, NADP+) and the respiratory quinones (i.e., vitamins Q6, Q10 and K2) were inactive. The enzyme has been crystallized from solutions of 30% polyethylene glycol, 0.2 M sodium acetate, and 0.1 M Tris-HCl, pH 8.5. The resulting yellow crystals diffracted well and showed little sign of radiation damage during diffraction experiments. The crystals are monoclinic, space group P21 with unit cell dimensions a = 54.19 A, b = 109.23 A, c = 67.17 A, and beta = 104.5 degrees. A native data set has been collected with a completeness of 99.3% to 2.0 A and an Rsym value of 5.2%. Analysis of the solvent content and the self-rotation function indicates that the two subunits in the asymmetric unit are related by a noncrystallographic twofold axis perpendicular to the crystallographic b and c axes. PMID:8732756

  6. Shigella IpaB and IpaD displayed on L. lactis bacterium-like particles induce protective immunity in adult and infant mice.

    PubMed

    Heine, Shannon J; Franco-Mahecha, Olga L; Chen, Xiaotong; Choudhari, Shyamal; Blackwelder, William C; van Roosmalen, Maarten L; Leenhouts, Kees; Picking, Wendy L; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2015-08-01

    Shigella spp. are among the enteric pathogens with the highest attributable incidence of moderate-to-severe diarrhea in children under 5 years of age living in endemic areas. There are no vaccines available to prevent this disease. In this work, we investigated a new Shigella vaccine concept consisting of nonliving, self-adjuvanted, Lactococcus lactis bacterium-like particles (BLP) displaying Shigella invasion plasmid antigen (Ipa) B and IpaD and examined its immunogenicity and protective efficacy in adult and newborn/infant mice immunized via the nasal route. Unique advantages of this approach include the potential for broad protection due to the highly conserved structure of the Ipas and the safety and practicality of a probiotic-based mucosal/adjuvant delivery platform. Immunization of adult mice with BLP-IpaB and BLP-IpaD (BLP-IpaB/D) induced high levels of Ipa-specific serum IgG and stool IgA in a dose-dependent manner. Immune responses and protection were enhanced by BLP delivery. Vaccine-induced serum antibodies exhibited opsonophagocytic and cytotoxic neutralizing activity, and IpaB/D IgG titers correlated with increased survival post-challenge. Ipa-specific antibody secreting cells were detected in nasal tissue and lungs, as well as IgG in bronchoalveolar lavage. Bone marrow cells produced IpaB/D-specific antibodies and contributed to protection after adoptive transfer. The BLP-IpaB/D vaccine conferred 90% and 80% protection against S. flexneri and S. sonnei, respectively. Mice immunized with BLP-IpaB/D as newborns also developed IpaB and IpaD serum antibodies; 90% were protected against S. flexneri and 44% against S. sonnei. The BLP-IpaB/D vaccine is a promising candidate for safe, practical and potentially effective immunization of children against shigellosis. PMID:25776843

  7. KlAft, the Kluyveromyces lactis Ortholog of Aft1 and Aft2, Mediates Activation of Iron-Responsive Transcription Through the PuCACCC Aft-Type Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Conde e Silva, Natalia; Gonçalves, Isabelle R.; Lemaire, Marc; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Camadro, Jean Michel; Blaiseau, Pierre Louis

    2009-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in fungi is regulated at the transcriptional level by two different mechanisms. It is mediated by a conserved GATA-type repressor in most fungi except in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where it is controlled by the transcription activators Aft1 and Aft2. These activators are encoded by the paralogous genes AFT1 and AFT2, which result from the whole-genome duplication. Here, we explore regulation of iron homeostasis in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis that diverged from S. cerevisiae before this event. We identify an ortholog of AFT1/AFT2, designated KlAFT, whose deletion leads to the inability to grow under iron limitation. We show with quantitative real-time PCR analysis that KlAft activates the transcription of all homologs of the Aft1-target genes involved in the iron transport at the cell surface in response to iron limitation. However, homologs of Aft2-specific target genes encoding intracellular iron transporters are regulated neither by KlAft nor by iron. Both bioinformatic and DNA binding and transcription analyses demonstrate that KlAft activates iron-responsive gene expression through the PuCACCC Aft-type sequence. Thus, K. lactis is the first documented species with a positive iron-transcriptional control mediated by only one copy of the Aft-type regulator. This indicates that this function was acquired before the whole-genome duplication and was then diversified into two regulators in S. cerevisiae. PMID:19581449

  8. Identification of int and attP on the genome of lactococcal bacteriophage Tuc2009 and their use for site-specific plasmid integration in the chromosome of Tuc2009-resistant Lactococcus lactis MG1363.

    PubMed Central

    van de Guchte, M; Daly, C; Fitzgerald, G F; Arendt, E K

    1994-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the int-attP region of the small-isometric-headed lactococcal bacteriophage Tuc2009 is presented. In this region, an open reading frame, int, which potentially encodes a protein of 374 amino acids, representing the Tuc2009 integrase, was identified. The nucleotide sequence of the bacteriophage attachment site, attP, and the sequences of attB, attL, and attR in the lysogenic host Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris UC509 were determined. A sequence almost identical to the UC509 attB sequence was found to be present in the plasmid-free Tuc2009-resistant L. lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363. This site could be used for the site-specific integration of a plasmid carrying the Tuc2009 int-attP region in the chromosome of MG1363, thereby demonstrating that the application of chromosomal insertion vectors based on bacteriophage integration functions is not limited to the prophage-cured original host strain of the phage. Images PMID:8074513

  9. Phenotypical Analysis of the Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Fimbrial spaFED Operon: Surface Expression and Functional Characterization of Recombinant SpaFED Pili in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Ravi; Palva, Airi; von Ossowski, Ingemar

    2014-01-01

    A noticeable genomic feature of many piliated Gram-positive bacterial species is the presence of more than one pilus-encoding operon. Paradigmatically, the gut-adapted Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG strain contains two different fimbrial operons in its genome. However, whereas one of these operons (called spaCBA) is encoding for the functionally mucus-/collagen-binding SpaCBA pilus, for the other operon (called spaFED) any native expression of the SpaFED-called pili is still the subject of some uncertainty. Irrespective of such considerations, we decided it would be of relevance or interest to decipher the gross structure of this pilus type, and as well assess its functional capabilities for cellular adhesion and immunostimulation. For this, and by following the approach we had used previously to explicate the immuno-properties of SpaCBA pili, we constructed nisin-inducible expression clones producing either wild-type or SpaF pilin-deleted surface-assembled L. rhamnosus GG SpaFED pili on Lactococcus lactis cells. Using these piliated lactococcal constructs, we found that the pilin-polymerized architecture of a recombinant-produced SpaFED pilus coincides with sequence-based functional predictions of the related pilins, and in fact is prototypical of those other sortase-dependent pilus-like structures thus far characterized for piliated Gram-positive bacteria. Moreover, we confirmed that among the different pilin subunits encompassing spaFED operon-encoded pili, the SpaF pilin is a main adhesion determinant, and when present in the assembled structure can mediate pilus binding to mucus, certain extracellular matrix proteins, and different gut epithelial cell lines. However, somewhat unexpectedly, when recombinant SpaFED pili are surface-attached, we found that they could not potentiate the existing lactococcal cell-induced immune responses so elicited from intestinal- and immune-related cells, but rather instead, they could dampen them. Accordingly, we have now provided the first phenotypical description of a spaFED pilus operon, and with that furthered the functional understanding of surface piliation for a particular gut-commensalic genre of piliated Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:25415357

  10. Abstract We describe here aspects of the anatomy of two "Epulopiscium" morphotypes, unusually large bacte-

    E-print Network

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    of herbivorous surgeonfish (Acanthuri- dae), were collected around the Great Barrier Reef of Australia, preserved in surgeonfish from Australia's Great Barrier Reef (Clements et al. 1989). Electron microscopy of sections

  11. Isolation of Delta12 and omega3-fatty acid desaturase genes from the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis and their heterologous expression to produce linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kainou, Kumiko; Kamisaka, Yasushi; Kimura, Kazuyoshi; Uemura, Hiroshi

    2006-06-01

    Two clones with homology to known fatty acid desaturase genes were isolated from the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. The first gene, which we designate KlFAD2, consists of 411 amino acids with an overall identity of 73.0% to FAD2 from Saccharomyces kluyveri. It exhibited Delta12 fatty acid desaturase activity when expressed in S. cerevisiae under the control of ADH1 promoter and produced endogenous linoleic acid. The second clone, which we designate KlFAD3, consists of 415 amino acids with an overall identity of 79.3% to FAD3 from S. kluyveri. It exhibited omega3 fatty acid desaturase activity in S. cerevisiae when expressed under the control of ADH1 promoter in the presence of the exogenous substrate linoleic acid and produced alpha-linolenic acid. Co-expression of KlFAD2 and KlFAD3 resulted in the endogenous production of both linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids. The yield of alpha-linolenic acid reached 0.8% of total fatty acids and its production was not increased by adding exogenous oleic acid; alpha-linolenic acid reached 8.7% when exogenous linoleic acid was available. PMID:16823888

  12. Nisin Z Production by Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris WA2-67 of Aquatic Origin as a Defense Mechanism to Protect Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) Against Lactococcus garvieae.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Carlos; Muñoz-Atienza, Estefanía; Pérez-Sánchez, Tania; Poeta, Patrícia; Igrejas, Gilberto; Hernández, Pablo E; Herranz, Carmen; Ruiz-Zarzuela, Imanol; Cintas, Luis M

    2015-12-01

    Probiotics represent an alternative to chemotherapy and vaccination to control fish diseases, including lactococcosis caused by Lactococcus garvieae. The aims of this study were (i) to determine the in vitro probiotic properties of three bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris of aquatic origin, (ii) to evaluate in vivo the ability of L. cremoris WA2-67 to protect rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) against infection by L. garvieae, and (iii) to demonstrate the role of nisin Z (NisZ) production as an anti-infective mechanism. The three L. cremoris strains survived in freshwater at 18 °C for 7 days, withstood exposure to pH 3.0 and 10 % (v/v) rainbow trout bile, and showed different cell surface hydrophobicity (37.93-58.52 %). The wild-type NisZ-producer L. cremoris WA2-67 and its non-bacteriocinogenic mutant L. cremoris WA2-67 ?nisZ were administered orally (10(6) CFU/g) to rainbow trout for 21 days and, subsequently, fish were challenged with L. garvieae CLG4 by the cohabitation method. The fish fed with the bacteriocinogenic strain L. cremoris WA2-67 reduced significantly (p?

  13. Effect of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12®, on defecation frequency in healthy subjects with low defecation frequency and abdominal discomfort: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial.

    PubMed

    Eskesen, Dorte; Jespersen, Lillian; Michelsen, Birgit; Whorwell, Peter J; Müller-Lissner, Stefan; Morberg, Cathrine M

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12®, on two primary end points - defecation frequency and gastrointestinal (GI) well-being - in healthy adults with low defecation frequency and abdominal discomfort. A total of 1248 subjects were included in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. After a 2-week run-in period, subjects were randomised to 1 or 10 billion colony-forming units/d of the probiotic strain BB-12® or a matching placebo capsule once daily for 4 weeks. Subjects completed a diary on bowel habits, relief of abdominal discomfort and symptoms. GI well-being, defined as global relief of abdominal discomfort, did not show significant differences. The OR for having a defecation frequency above baseline for ?50 % of the time was 1·31 (95 % CI 0·98, 1·75), P=0·071, for probiotic treatment overall. Tightening the criteria for being a responder to an increase of ?1 d/week for ?50 % of the time resulted in an OR of 1·55 (95 % CI 1·22, 1·96), P=0·0003, for treatment overall. A treatment effect on average defecation frequency was found (P=0·0065), with the frequency being significantly higher compared with placebo at all weeks for probiotic treatment overall (all P<0·05). Effects on defecation frequency were similar for the two doses tested, suggesting that a ceiling effect was reached with the one billion dose. Overall, 4 weeks' supplementation with the probiotic strain BB-12® resulted in a clinically relevant benefit on defecation frequency. The results suggest that consumption of BB-12® improves the GI health of individuals whose symptoms are not sufficiently severe to consult a doctor (ISRCTN18128385). PMID:26382580

  14. Human Gut-Commensalic Lactobacillus ruminis ATCC 25644 Displays Sortase-Assembled Surface Piliation: Phenotypic Characterization of Its Fimbrial Operon through In Silico Predictive Analysis and Recombinant Expression in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xia; Jaatinen, Annukka; Rintahaka, Johanna; Hynönen, Ulla; Lyytinen, Outi; Kant, Ravi; Åvall-Jääskeläinen, Silja; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Palva, Airi

    2015-01-01

    Sortase-dependent surface pili (or fimbriae) in Gram-positive bacteria are well documented as a key virulence factor for certain harmful opportunistic pathogens. However, it is only recently known that these multi-subunit protein appendages are also belonging to the "friendly" commensals and now, with this new perspective, they have come to be categorized as a niche-adaptation factor as well. In this regard, it was shown earlier that sortase-assembled piliation is a native fixture of two human intestinal commensalics (i.e., Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium bifidum), and correspondingly where the pili involved have a significant role in cellular adhesion and immunomodulation processes. We now reveal that intestinal indigenous (or autochthonous) Lactobacillus ruminis is another surface-piliated commensal lactobacillar species. Heeding to in silico expectations, the predicted loci for the LrpCBA-called pili are organized tandemly in the L. ruminis genome as a canonical fimbrial operon, which then encodes for three pilin-proteins and a single C-type sortase enzyme. Through electron microscopic means, we showed that these pilus formations are a surface assemblage of tip, basal, and backbone pilin subunits (respectively named LrpC, LrpB, and LrpA) in L. ruminis, and also when expressed recombinantly in Lactococcus lactis. As well, by using the recombinant-piliated lactococci, we could define certain ecologically relevant phenotypic traits, such as the ability to adhere to extracellular matrix proteins and gut epithelial cells, but also to effectuate an induced dampening on Toll-like receptor 2 signaling and interleukin-8 responsiveness in immune-related cells. Within the context of the intestinal microcosm, by wielding such niche-advantageous cell-surface properties the LrpCBA pilus would undoubtedly have a requisite functional role in the colonization dynamics of L. ruminis indigeneity. Our study provides only the second description of a native-piliated Lactobacillus species, but at the same time also involves the structural and functional characterization of a third type of lactobacillar pilus. PMID:26709916

  15. Homing of a group II intron from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ML3.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, D A; Manias, D A; McKay, L L; Dunny, G M

    1997-01-01

    Ll.ltrB is a functional group II intron located within a gene (ltrB) encoding a conjugative relaxase essential for transfer of the lactococcal element pRSO1. In this work, the Ll.ltrB intron was shown to be an independent mobile element capable of inserting into an intronless allele of the ltrB gene. Ll.ltrB was not observed to insert into a deletion derivative of the ltrB gene in which the intron splice site was removed. In contrast, a second vector containing a 271-nucleotide segment of ltrB spanning the Ll.ltrB splice site was shown to be a proficient recipient of intron insertion. Efficient homing was observed in the absence of a functional host homologous recombination system. This work demonstrates that the Ll.ltrB intron is a novel site-specific mobile element in lactococci and that group II intron self-transfer is a mechanism for intron dissemination among bacteria. PMID:9324259

  16. [Composting facilities. 2. Aerogenic microorganism content at different working areas of composting facilities].

    PubMed

    Jager, E; Rüden, H; Zeschmar-Lahl, B

    1994-12-01

    At two composting facilities (plants D and E), contamination of the air with total bacteria and mould fungi, and in addition with gram-negative bacteria (only at plant D) was analyzed at different indoor sites and outdoor in the vicinity. Statistical validity of the determination of contents of microorganisms in air samples was guaranteed by the collection and analysis of 30 parallel samples. At plant D, total bacteria concentrations in outdoor air ranged from 106 to 15,618 CFU/m3 air (median: 495 CFU/m3 air), gram-negative bacteria concentrations ranged up to 71 CFU/m3 air (median: below the detection limit of 35 CFU/m3 air), and mould fungi reached 7,138 CFU/m3 air (median: 141 CFU/m3 air). Highest concentrations of total bacteria above the upper detection limit (> 84,806 CFU/m3 air, sample volume: 28.3 l) and of mould fungi (38,940 CFU/m3 air) occurred at the place where three months old compost was mixed, highest concentrations of gram-negative bacteria (14,134 CFU/m3 air) were measured during mixing of fresh compost (younger than 8 days). Maximum and median values of the examined microorganisms ranged so high that special protective means for personnel working directly beneath the mixing process seem to be necessary under hygienic aspects. Raw and clean air at the composting filter at plant D showed highly significant differences concerning air concentration of gram-negative bacteria and mould fungi, indicating a good separation efficiency for these types of microorganisms. Maximum and median values of gram-negative bacteria and mould fungi concentrations (all < 1,000 CFU/m3 air) measured in clean air behind the composting filter lie in the range of normal outdoor air. Merely total bacteria show statistical significant differences to outdoor air with median values of clean air of 1,979 CFU/m3 air (edge of filter) resp. 3,110 CFU/m3 air (upside the filter) and with maximum values of above 30,000 CFU/m3 air in each case. In the outdoor air at plant E, total bacteria concentrations ranged from 362 to 7,633 CFU/m3 air (median: 1,312 CFU/m3 air), mould fungi ranged from 115 to 4,072 CFU/m3 air (median: 345 CFU/m3 air). Highest concentrations of total bacteria and mould fungi (all analyses above the upper detection limit of 21,201 CFU/m3 air; sample volume: 113,2 l) occurred during shredding of a mixture of kitchen and green wastes and of shrubs. During experimental shredding of separately collected panty diapers air concentrations of total bacteria ranged from about 19,000 CFU/m3 air to > 21,201 CFU/m3 air.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7748441

  17. Biotransformation of Ferulic acid to 4-Vinylguaiacol by Enterobacter soli and E. aerogenes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the conversion of ferulic acid to 4-vinylguaiacol (4-VG), vanillin, vanillyl alcohol and vanillic acid by five Enterobacter strains. These high-value chemicals are usually synthesized using chemical methods but biological synthesis adds value. Ferulic acid, a relatively inexpensive...

  18. Studies in organisms of colon-aerogenes group : Isolated from various sources /

    E-print Network

    Treece, Elbert Lee.

    . typhosus and B. dysentery, etc. RELATION OF G AS P RODUCTION IN 2$ PEPTONE GELATINE TO F ECAL AND N ON—FECAL STRAINS. In table # 1 it may be noted that all the cultures are nega­ tive Voges Proskauer, all are negative in adonite except one (# 29), all...

  19. Microbial diversity and dynamics during the production of May bryndza cheese.

    PubMed

    Pangallo, Domenico; Saková, Nikoleta; Kore?ová, Janka; Puškárová, Andrea; Kraková, Lucia; Valík, Lubomír; Kuchta, Tomáš

    2014-01-17

    Diversity and dynamics of microbial cultures were studied during the production of May bryndza cheese, a traditional Slovak cheese produced from unpasteurized ewes' milk. Quantitative culture-based data were obtained for lactobacilli, lactococci, total mesophilic aerobic counts, coliforms, E. coli, staphylococci, coagulase-positive staphylococci, yeasts, fungi and Geotrichum spp. in ewes' milk, curd produced from it and ripened for 0 - 10 days, and in bryndza cheese produced from the curd, in three consecutive batches. Diversity of prokaryotes and eukaryotes in selected stages of the production was studied by non-culture approach based on amplification of 16S rDNA and internal transcribed spacer region, coupled to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing. The culture-based data demonstrated an overall trend of growth of the microbial population contributing to lactic acid production and to ripening of the cheese, lactobacilli, lactococci and Geotrichum spp. growing up to densities of 10(8) CFU/g, 10(9) CFU/g and 10(5) CFU/g, respectively, in all three consecutive batches of bryndza cheese. The diversity of bacteria encompassed Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Acinetobacter guillouiae, Acinetobacter sp., Acinetobacter johnsonii, Citrobacter braakii, Clostridium bartlettii, Corynebacterium callunae, Corynebacterium maris, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterobacter asburiae, Enterobacter hormaechei, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus pallens, Escherichia coli, Haemophilus haemolyticus, Hafnia alvei, Kluyvera cryocrescens, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactococcus garvieae, Lc. lactis subsp. cremoris, Lc. lactis subsp. lactis, "Leuconostoc garlicum", Mannheimia glucosida, Mannheimia haemolytica, Pseudomonas sp., Ps. fluorescens, "Ps. reactans", Raoultella ornithinolytica, R. terrigena, "Rothia arfidiae", Staphylococcus aureus, Staph. epidermidis, Staph. felis, Staph. pasteuri, Staph. sciuri, Staph. xylosus, Streptococcus parauberis, Str. thermophilus and Variovorax paradoxus. The diversity of yeasts and fungi encompassed Alternaria alternata, "Ascomycete sp.", Aspergillus fumigatus, Beauveria brongniartii, Candida xylopsoci, C. inconspicua, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Debaromyces hansenii, Fomes fomentarius, Galactomyces candidus, Gymnoascus reesii, Chaetomium globosum, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Metarhizium anisopliae, Penicillium aurantiogriseum, P. camemberti, P. freii, P. polonicum, P. viridicatum, Pichia kudriavzevii, Sordaria alcina, Trichosporon lactis and Yarrowia lipolytica. PMID:24291178

  20. ISSN 1754-5692 Environmental Science

    E-print Network

    Angenent, Lars T.

    and Enterobacter aerogenes enhances current generation in bioelectrochemical systems #12;Metabolite-based mutualism between Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 and Enterobacter aerogenes enhances current generation stimulates mutually beneficial interactions between Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 and Enterobacter aerogenes

  1. Safety of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B. lactis) strain BB-12-supplemented yogurt in healthy adults on antibiotics: a phase I safety study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that, when administered in sufficient doses, provide health benefits on the host. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires phase I safety studies for probiotics when the intended use of the product is as a drug. The purpose of the study was to ...

  2. BIFIDOBACTERIUM LACTIS AFFECTS IMMUNE DEVELOPMENT OF NEONATAL PIGS: A MODEL FOR NUTRIENT CONDITIONING IN INFANTS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Probiotic bacteria such as Bifidobacterium have been used as a probiotic to enhance intestinal health and immune response. However, hypothesis-based testing of the activity of these and other probiotics is dependent on animal models for careful measurement of local changes in immune function associ...

  3. Biohydrogen production by co-fermentation of crude glycerol and apple pomace hydrolysate using co-culture of Enterobacter aerogenes and Clostridium butyricum.

    PubMed

    Pachapur, Vinayak Laxman; Sarma, Saurabh Jyoti; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Le Bihan, Yann; Buelna, Gerardo; Verma, Mausam

    2015-10-01

    Co-substrate utilization of various wastes with complementary characteristics can provide a complete medium for higher hydrogen production. This study evaluated potential of apple pomace hydrolysate (APH) co-fermented with crude glycerol (CG) for increased H2 production and decreased by-products formation. The central composite design (CCD) along with response surface methodology (RSM) was used as tool for optimization and 15 g/L of CG, 5 g/L of APH and 15% (v/v) inoculum were found to be optimum to produce as high as 26.07 ± 1.57 mmol H2/L of medium. The p-value of 0.0017 indicated that APH at lower concentration had a significant effect on H2 production. By using CG as sole carbon source, reductive pathway of glycerol metabolism was favored with 19.46 mmol H2/L. However, with APH, oxidative pathway was favored with higher H2 production (26.07 ± 1.57 mmol/L) and decrease in reduced by-products (1,3-propanediol and ethanol) formation. APH inclusion enhanced H2 production, and decreased substrate inhibition. PMID:26142996

  4. A Sequential Statistical Approach towards an Optimized Production of a Broad Spectrum Bacteriocin Substance from a Soil Bacterium Bacillus sp. YAS 1 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Embaby, Amira M.; Heshmat, Yasmin; Hussein, Ahmed; Marey, Heba S.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriocins, ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides, display potential applications in agriculture, medicine, and industry. The present study highlights integral statistical optimization and partial characterization of a bacteriocin substance from a soil bacterium taxonomically affiliated as Bacillus sp. YAS 1 after biochemical and molecular identifications. A sequential statistical approach (Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken) was employed to optimize bacteriocin (BAC YAS 1) production. Using optimal levels of three key determinants (yeast extract (0.48% (w/v), incubation time (62?hrs), and agitation speed (207?rpm)) in peptone yeast beef based production medium resulted in 1.6-fold enhancement in BAC YAS 1 level (470?AU/mL arbitrary units against Erwinia amylovora). BAC YAS 1 showed activity over a wide range of pH (1–13) and temperature (45–80°C). A wide spectrum antimicrobial activity of BAC YAS 1 against the human pathogens (Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Campylobacter jejuni, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterococcus sp., Proteus sp., Klebsiella sp., and Salmonella typhimurium), the plant pathogen (E. amylovora), and the food spoiler (Listeria innocua) was demonstrated. On top and above, BAC YAS 1 showed no antimicrobial activity towards lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus bulgaricus, L. casei, L. lactis, and L. reuteri). Promising characteristics of BAC YAS 1 prompt its commercialization for efficient utilization in several industries. PMID:25614886

  5. Complex microbiota of a Chinese "Fen" liquor fermentation starter (Fen-Daqu), revealed by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-Wei; Yan, Zheng; Han, Bei-Zhong; Zwietering, Marcel H; Samson, Robert A; Boekhout, Teun; Robert Nout, M J

    2012-09-01

    Daqu is a traditional fermentation starter that is used for Chinese liquor production. Although partly mechanized, its manufacturing process has remained traditional. We investigated the microbial diversity of Fen-Daqu, a starter for light-flavour liquor, using combined culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches (PCR-DGGE). A total of 190 microbial strains, comprising 109 bacteria and 81 yeasts and moulds, were isolated and identified on the basis of the sequences of their 16S rDNA (bacteria) and 26S rDNA and ITS regions (fungi). DGGE of DNA extracted from Daqu was used to complement the culture-dependent method in order to include non-culturable microbes. Both approaches revealed that Bacillus licheniformis was an abundant bacterial species, and Saccharomycopsis fibuligera, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, and Pichia kudriavzevii were the most common yeasts encountered in Fen-Daqu. Six genera of moulds (Absidia, Aspergillus, Mucor, Rhizopus, Rhizomucor and Penicillium) were found. The potential function of these microorganisms in starters for alcoholic fermentation is discussed. In general the culture-based findings overlapped with those obtained by DGGE by a large extent. However, Weissella cibaria, Weissella confusa, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterobacter aerogenes, Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis, Lactobacillus lactis, and Bacillus megaterium were only revealed by DGGE. PMID:22608236

  6. Antagonistic lactic acid bacteria isolated from goat milk and identification of a novel nisin variant Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The raw goat milk microbiota is considered a good source of novel bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains that can be exploited as an alternative for use as biopreservatives in foods. The constant demand for such alternative tools justifies studies that investigate the antimicrobial potential of such strains. Results The obtained data identified a predominance of Lactococcus and Enterococcus strains in raw goat milk microbiota with antimicrobial activity against Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7644. Enzymatic assays confirmed the bacteriocinogenic nature of the antimicrobial substances produced by the isolated strains, and PCR reactions detected a variety of bacteriocin-related genes in their genomes. Rep-PCR identified broad genetic variability among the Enterococcus isolates, and close relations between the Lactococcus strains. The sequencing of PCR products from nis-positive Lactococcus allowed the identification of a predicted nisin variant not previously described and possessing a wide inhibitory spectrum. Conclusions Raw goat milk was confirmed as a good source of novel bacteriocinogenic LAB strains, having identified Lactococcus isolates possessing variations in their genomes that suggest the production of a nisin variant not yet described and with potential for use as biopreservatives in food due to its broad spectrum of action. PMID:24521354

  7. Effects of fed-batch and continuous fermentations on human lysozyme production by Kluyveromyces lactis K7 in biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Duygu; Demirci, Ali

    2015-12-01

    Lysozyme is a lytic enzyme, which has antimicrobial activity. It has been used for food and pharmaceutical applications. This study was undertaken to evaluate fed-batch and continuous fermentations for the human lysozyme production in biofilm reactor. Results showed that addition of lactose the mid-log phase to make the concentration back to the initial level generates higher lysozyme production (177 U/ml) compared with lactose addition in late-log phase (174 U/ml) (p < 0.05). Moreover, fed-batch fermentation with glucose as initial carbon source and continuous addition of lactose with 0.6 ml/min for 10 h demonstrated significantly higher lysozyme production (187 U/ml) compared to the batch fermentation (173 U/ml) (p < 0.05). In continuous fermentation, biofilm reactor provided significantly higher productivity (7.5 U/ml/h) compared to the maximum productivity in suspended cell bioreactor (4 U/ml/h), because the biofilm reactor provided higher cell density at higher dilution rate compared to suspended cell reactor (p < 0.05). PMID:26458820

  8. Alcohol from whey permeate: strain selection, temperature, and medium optimization. [Candida pseudotropicalis, Kluyveromyces fragilis, and K. lactis

    SciTech Connect

    Vienne, P.; Von Stockar, U.

    1983-01-01

    A comparative study of shaken flask cultures of some yeast strains capable of fermenting lactose showed no significant differences in alcohol yield among the four best strains. Use of whey permeate concentrated three times did not affect the yields. An optimal growth temperature of 38/sup 0/C was determined for K. fragilis NRRL 665. Elemental analysis of both the permeate and the dry cell mass of two strains indicated the possibility of a stoichiometric limitation by nitrogen. Batch cultures in laboratory fermentors confirmed this finding and revealed in addition the presence of a limitation due to growth factors. Both types of limitations could be overcome by adding yeast extract. The maximum productivity of continuous cultures could thus be improved to 5.1 g/l-h. The maximum specific growth rate was of the order of 0.310 h/sup -1/. 15 references, 10 figures, 9 tables.

  9. Identification of a new genetic determinant for cell aggregation associated with lactose plasmid transfer in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    van der Lelie, D; Chavarri, F; Venema, G; Gasson, M J

    1991-01-01

    Derivatives of the lactose miniplasmid pMG820 were constructed in which a staphylococcal erm gene was inserted and in which this was accompanied by subsequent deletion of the lactose genes. The resulting plasmids were thus marked with both erythromycin resistance and lactose utilization genes in pF1132 or solely erythromycin resistance in pF1133. These plasmids retained the normal conjugation properties characteristic of lactose plasmid pLP712, including the generation by intermolecular rearrangement of high-frequency-transfer Clu+ derivatives which exhibited cell aggregation. The use of such Clu+ plasmids in a variety of mating experiments between different lactococcal strains and the observation of cell aggregation when particular mating mixtures were made led to the discovery of a new component of this conjugation system named Agg. A chromosomal gene agg was postulated to be present in some but not all strains of lactococci. High-frequency conjugation and cell aggregation thus depend on the presence of both Agg and Clu, although in a mating pair these components can be in the same or in separate strains. The Agg and Clu components may be analogous to the binding substance and aggregation substance that are involved in the hemolysin plasmid transfer system of Enterococcus faecalis, although control of their expression is different. PMID:1903626

  10. Functional Expression of the Thiolase Gene thl from Clostridium beijerinckii P260 in Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus buchneri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The first step of the butanol pathway involves an acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase (ACoAAT), which controls the key branching point from acetyl-CoA to butanol. ACoAAT, also known as thiolase (EC 2.3.1.9), is encoded by the thl gene and catalyzes ligation of 2 acetyl-CoA into acetoacetyl-CoA. Bioinform...

  11. Evaluation of culture media for counts of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb 12in yoghurt after refrigerated storage

    PubMed Central

    Fachin, Luciano; Moryia, Juliana; Neves Gândara, Ana Lourdes; Viotto, Walkiria Hanada

    2008-01-01

    The agar RCPB pH5 has been considered a good alternative for counts of Bifidobacterium in yoghurt. However, during the refrigerated storage of yoghurt it is extremely difficult to count this microorganism due to the size of the colonies, which are so small they require the aid of a stereoscope to count them. Another agar, MRS-LP, has been also recommended for counts of Bifidobacterium in the presence of yoghurt bacteria. This study evaluated the supplementation of RCPB pH5 agar with dehydrated liver extract and the salts KH2PO4, K2HPO4, FeSO47H2O, MnSO4H2O and MgSO47H2O, aiming at improving the differentiation of Bifidobacterium in yoghurt after refrigerated storage, and also evaluated the selective count of Bifidobacterium in yoghurt using the agar MRS-LP. The agar MRS-LP presented the same cell recovery as non-fortified RCPB pH5 agar, used as a standard medium, thus being considered a good option for counts of Bifidobacterium in yoghurt. The fortified RCPB pH5 also presented the same recovery as the standard RCPB pH5 medium, however, the addition of dehydrated liver extract to the RCPB pH5 agar considerably increased the size of the Bifidobacterium colonies after refrigerated storage, making differentiation of the colonies much easier and reliable when compared to the standard non-fortified RPCP pH5. The addition of the salts (KH2PO4, K2HPO4, FeSO47H2O, MnSO4H2O and MgSO47H2O) had no influence on the performance of the RCPB pH5 agar. PMID:24031230

  12. [The Austrian pediatrician Theodor Escherich as bacteriologist and social hygienist: The 100th anniversary of his death on February 15th, 1911].

    PubMed

    Flamm, Heinz

    2011-03-01

    Escherich was born on November 29, 1857 in Ansbach, Bavaria. He has been director of the children hospitals in Graz (Styria, Austria) from 1890 and Vienna (Austria) from 1902, started his bacteriological investigations in 1884 during a short stay in St. Anna Children Hospital in Vienna. This he continued it as an assistant in Munich and as clinic director in Graz. On the basis of his bacteriological findings in breast-milk, which proved to be sterile, he wanted to detect the physiological and pathogenetic role of the intestinal flora of breast-fed babies and of infants. In stained slides of meconium and milk-faeces he found cocci, bacilli with and without spores and yeasts. Among them he intensively investigated both the "Bacterium lactis aërogenes" (now: "Aerobacter aerogenes"), and the "Bacterium coli commune". In 1919, 8 years after his death, the name "Escherichia coli" was used for the first time and became the valid species name. This posthumous honour made Escherich worldwide known in the medical profession. Also for further enteric pathogens, the Campylobacter/Helicobacter group, which could not be cultured in Escherich's time he is looked upon as the first describer. In Graz and particularly in Vienna, Escherich's social-medical activities were concentrated on the baby and infant welfare. This was promoted by the construction of baby departments in hospitals, instructions of mothers, improvement of baby nutriments, and training of baby nurses and midwifes. The first great aim was the establishment of the "Reichsanstalt für Mutter- und Säuglingsfürsorge" (Imperial Institution for Mother and Baby Welfare) in Vienna which could come in action only during World War I in October 1915, thus 4 1/2 years after Escherich's death on February 15, 1911. PMID:21369861

  13. An Ecological Study of Lactococci Isolated from Raw Milk in the Camembert Cheese Registered Designation of Origin Area

    PubMed Central

    Corroler, D.; Mangin, I.; Desmasures, N.; Gueguen, M.

    1998-01-01

    The genetic diversity of lactococci isolated from raw milk in the Camembert cheese Registered Designation of Origin area was studied. Two seasonal samples (winter and summer) of raw milk were obtained from six farms in two areas (Bessin and Bocage Falaisien) of Normandy. All of the strains analyzed had a Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis phenotype, whereas the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique genotypically identified the strains as members of L. lactis subsp. lactis or L. lactis subsp. cremoris. The genotypes were confirmed by performing standard PCR with primers corresponding to a region of the histidine biosynthesis operon. The geographic distribution of each subspecies of L. lactis was determined; 80% of the Bocage Falaisien strains were members of L. lactis subsp. lactis, and 30.5% of the Bessin strains were members of L. lactis subsp. lactis. A dendrogram was produced from a computer analysis of the RAPD profiles in order to evaluate the diversity of the lactococci below the subspecies level. The coefficient of similarity for 117 of the 139 strains identified as members of L. lactis subsp. cremoris was as high as 66%. The L. lactis subsp. lactis strains were more heterogeneous and formed 10 separate clusters (the level of similarity among the clusters was 18%). Reference strains of L. lactis subsp. lactis fell into 2 of these 10 clusters, demonstrating that lactococcal isolates are clearly different. As determined by the RAPD profiles, some L. lactis subsp. lactis strains were specific to the farms from which they originated and were recovered throughout the year (in both summer and winter). Therefore, the typicality of L. lactis subsp. lactis strains was linked to the farm of origin rather than the area. These findings emphasize the significance of designation of origin and the specificity of “Camembert de Normandie” cheese. PMID:9835555

  14. 21 CFR 524.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride, polymyxin B sulfate ophthalmic ointment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... organisms. These infections include the following: Ocular infections due to streptococci, rickettsiae, E. coli, and A. aerogenes (such as conjunctivitis, keratitis, pinkeye, corneal ulcer, and blepharitis...

  15. 21 CFR 524.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride, polymyxin B sulfate ophthalmic ointment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... organisms. These infections include the following: Ocular infections due to streptococci, rickettsiae, E. coli, and A. aerogenes (such as conjunctivitis, keratitis, pinkeye, corneal ulcer, and blepharitis...

  16. 21 CFR 524.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride, polymyxin B sulfate ophthalmic ointment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... organisms. These infections include the following: Ocular infections due to streptococci, rickettsiae, E. coli, and A. aerogenes (such as conjunctivitis, keratitis, pinkeye, corneal ulcer, and blepharitis...

  17. 21 CFR 524.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride, polymyxin B sulfate ophthalmic ointment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... organisms. These infections include the following: Ocular infections due to streptococci, rickettsiae, E. coli, and A. aerogenes (such as conjunctivitis, keratitis, pinkeye, corneal ulcer, and blepharitis...

  18. Shewanella oneidensis in a lactate-fed pure-culture and a glucose-fed co-culture with Lactococcus lactis with an electrode as electron acceptor

    E-print Network

    Segrè, Daniel

    result from the breakdown of organic substrates, to the anode (i.e., anaerobic respiration with a solid into electricity. Ó 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction The ability to respire with solid treatment, bioremediation, and biosensing. All known mechanisms for microbial extracellular respiration

  19. Shewanella oneidensis in a lactate-fed pure-culture and a glucose-fed co-culture with Lactococcus lactis with an electrode as electron acceptor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) employing mixed microbial communities as biocatalysts are gaining importance as potential renewable energy, bioremediation, or biosensing devices. While we are beginning to understand how individual microbial species interact with an electrode as electron donor, li...

  20. Copyright 2006 by the Genetics Society of America DOI: 10.1534/genetics.105.054593

    E-print Network

    Lazzaro, Brian

    , Enterococcus faecalis and Lactococcus lactis, are gram positive. The third, Providencia burho- dogranaria explain .20% of the phenotypic variation in resistance to L. lactis and E. faecalis, respectively, most

  1. Teamwork in microbial fuels cells: symbiotic conversion of sugars into electricity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A binary culture of Lactococcus lactis and Shewanella oneidensis was studied for an efficient conversion of glucose into electricity in a continuously-operated chemostatic electrochemical reactor. The homolactic fermentation bacterium L. lactis fermented glucose almost exclusively to lactate – the ...

  2. Synergetic effects of microbial binary cultures on microbial fuel cell performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A binary culture of Lactococcus lactis and Shewanella oneidensis was studied for an efficient conversion of glucose into electricity in a continuously-operated chemostatic electrochemical reactor. The homolactic fermentation bacterium L. lactis fermented glucose almost exclusively to lactate – the ...

  3. PEDIOCIN PRODUCTION IN MILK BY PEDIOCOCCUS ACIDILACTICI IN CO-CULTURE WITH STREPTOCOCCUS THERMOPHILUS AND LACTOBACILLUS DELBRUECKII SUBSP. BULGARICUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The production of pediocin in milk by Pediococcus acidilactici was evaluated in co-culture with the dairy fermentation cultures Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. The cultures were tested singly or in different combinations...

  4. The diagnostic value of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and hepcidin in bacteria translocation of liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiangguo; Gong, Fengyun; Li, Ling; Zhao, Manzhi; Wu, Zhuhua; Song, Jianxin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Bacterial translocation (BT) or bacterial DNA (bactDNA) translocation is a critical pathogenesis mechanism of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Studies of BT or bactDNA translocation are limited in humans. Neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL) can efficiently distinguish bacterial and nonbacterial ascites in ascitic patients. Hepcidin is a useful marker of bacterial infection in the late-onset sepsis. However, the relationship between NGAL, hepcidin and BT was still unclear. In present study, the levels of NGAL, hepcidin and their relationship with BT or bactDNA translocation were investigated. Material and methods: Weekly doses of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) were given to induce liver cirrhosis in Sprague-Dawley rats. Trypticase (blood) soy agars were used to culture bacteria. BactDNA was sequenced by ABIPRISM 310 automated sequencer. The levels of NGAL and hepcidin were assessed by ELISA. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine the cut-off values and compare the diagnostic performance of NGAL and hepcidin. Results: 56 cirrhotic and 10 normal rats were included in this study. The levels of both two biomarkers were significantly higher in BT or bactDNA translocation group compared to non-translocation group. The area under ROC curve for the diagnosis of BT was 0.910 for serum NGAL, 0.858 for serum hepcidin and 0.940 for their combination, whereas that for the diagnosis of bactDNA translocation was 0.906 for NGAL, 0.779 for hepcidin and 0.950 for their combination, respectively. The combination of NGAL and hepcidin improved the ability to detect BT or bactDNA presence in MLNs and ascites. Conclusion: BT and the presence of bactDNA in MLNs were observed in a rat cirrhotic model. Serum NGAL and hepcidin can serve as sensitive and specific tests for diagnosis of BT or bactDNA translocation. NGAL in combination with hepcidin can improve the accuracy of diagnosis. PMID:26629169

  5. NOx emission constraints on high-temperature processes. Final report, April 1988-November 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.A.; Mason, H.B.; Nicholson, J.A.; Okoh, C.I.

    1990-11-01

    Current and emerging NOx emission regulations were reviewed to identify possible constraints on high-performance burner application in industrial furnaces. Industrial furnace regulations were evaluated for new and existing sources in air quality attainment and nonattainment areas. Processes emphasized were ferrous and nonferrous metals heating and heat-treating furnaces, glass melting furnaces, and mineral kilns. Regulation of best available control technology (BACT) for new sources is projected to impact process furnaces the most. Metal reheating furnaces, glass melting furnaces, and kilns will be the most susceptible to BACT. Nonferrous melting forging furnace and soaking pits will not be seriously constrained by BACT.

  6. Multirate Flutter Suppression System Design for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology Wing. Part 1; Theory and Design Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Gregory S.; Berg, Martin C.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2002-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of various control system design methodologies, the NASA Langley Research Center initiated the Benchmark Active Controls Project. In this project, the various methodologies were applied to design a flutter suppression system for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) Wing. This report describes a project at the University of Washington to design a multirate suppression system for the BACT wing. The objective of the project was two fold. First, to develop a methodology for designing robust multirate compensators, and second, to demonstrate the methodology by applying it to the design of a multirate flutter suppression system for the BACT wing.

  7. Conversion of rice straw to bio-based chemicals: an integrated process using Lactobacillus brevis

    E-print Network

    Kim, Jae-Han; Block, David E.; Shoemaker, Sharon P.; Mills, David A.

    2010-01-01

    lactic acid production largely relies on bacte- rial fermentationLactic acid concentration (g l -1 ) Enzyme stability during the fermentation33 h of fermentation. Production of lactic acid ceased at 38

  8. Bronchitis and Pneumonia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bronchitis is most often a bacte- rial or viral infection that causes swelling of the tubes (bronchioles) leading to the lungs. Pneumonia is an acute or chronic disease marked by in?ammation of the lungs and ...

  9. SURVIVAL OF SALMONELLA SPECIES IN RIVER WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The survival of four Salmonella strains in river water microcosms was monitored by culturing techniques, direct counts, whole-cell hybridization, scanning electron microscopy, and resuscitation techniques via the direct viable count method and flow cytometry. Plate counts of bact...

  10. 76 FR 43149 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Prevention of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ...raises issues related to Best Available Control Technology (BACT), New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for GHG, Carbon Capture Sequestration (CCS) and GHG Reporting and Cap and Trade issues. Response 5: This current rulemaking action...

  11. REACTIVATION AND REGROWTH OF INDICATOR ORGANISMS ASSOCIATED WITH ANAEROBICALLY DIGESTED AND DEWATERED BIOSOLIDS: EPA’S PERSPECTIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) recently published a report titled Examination of Reactivation and Regrowth of Fecal Coliforms in Anaerobically Digested Sludges. Seven full-scale publicly owned treatment facilities were sampled several times to determine if bacte...

  12. FECAL COLIFORM INCREASE AFTER CENTRIFUGATION: EPA PERSPECTIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) recently published a report titled Examination of Reactivation and Regrowth of Fecal Coliforms in Anaerobically Digested Sludges. Seven full-scale publicly owned treatment facilities were sampled several times to determine if bacte...

  13. FECAL COLIFORM INCREASE AFTER CENTRIFUGATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) recently published a report titled Examination of Reactivation and Regrowth of Fecal Coliforms in Anaerobically Digested Sludges. Seven full-scale publicly owned treatment facilities were sampled several times to determine if bacte...

  14. Payne and Wagner BMC Systems Biology 2014, 8:64 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1752-0509/8/64

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Andreas

    be easily accessed through a series of small genetic changes that preserve a circuit's main functions. Both the interpretation of morphogen gradients dur- ing embryogenesis in fruit flies [13], chemotaxis in bacte- ria [14

  15. 75 FR 55978 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Revisions to the New Source...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ...Land, Our Lives, Texas Protecting Our Land, Water and Environment...Consequently, Texas industrial facilities emit more pollution than similar facilities...where application of Texas' BACT definition resulted in less pollution control than...

  16. 77 FR 24845 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; South Dakota; Regional Haze State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ...mean or refer to the RACT/BACT/LAER Clearinghouse. The initials RP mean or refer to reasonable progress. The initials RPG mean or refer to reasonable progress goal. The initials SCR mean or refer to selective catalytic reduction. The...

  17. 78 FR 24777 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Air Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ...Complaint alleges that the Defendants modified various units at the Columbia, Edgewater...Defendants thereafter operated the plants, as modified, without complying with Best Available...Technology (``BACT'') requirements for sulfur dioxide (``SO 2 ''),...

  18. 76 FR 25177 - Determinations Concerning Need for Error Correction, Partial Approval and Partial Disapproval...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ...the consequences of its decision not to identify a specific...had several reasons for making that decision. These included its...determining BACT, the key element of a PSD permit for a...resources for use in making these...

  19. Effects of Hypoxia and Hypercapnic Hypoxia on the Localization and the Elimination of Vibrio campbellii

    E-print Network

    Burnett, Louis E.

    of culturable bacteria recovered from the hemo- lymph and tissues, suggesting an overall decrease in bacte). In addition, hypoxia often co-occurs with increased levels of CO2 (hypercapnia) produced by respiration

  20. Multirate Flutter Suppression System Design for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology Wing. Part 2; Methodology Application Software Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Gregory S.; Berg, Martin C.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2002-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of various control system design methodologies, the NASA Langley Research Center initiated the Benchmark Active Controls Project. In this project, the various methodologies were applied to design a flutter suppression system for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) Wing. This report describes the user's manual and software toolbox developed at the University of Washington to design a multirate flutter suppression control law for the BACT wing.

  1. 21 CFR 524.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride, polymyxin B sulfate ophthalmic ointment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...following: Ocular infections due to streptococci, rickettsiae, E. coli, and A. aerogenes (such as conjunctivitis, keratitis...reactions are severe. If new infections due to nonsensitive bacteria or fungi appear during therapy, appropriate measures...

  2. 21 CFR 524.1662b - Oxytetracycline and polymyxin B ophthalmic ointment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...including ocular infections due to streptococci, rickettsiae, E. coli, and A. aerogenes (such as conjunctivitis, keratitis...reactions are severe. If new infections due to nonsensitive bacteria or fungi appear during therapy, appropriate measures...

  3. 21 CFR 524.1662b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride, polymyxin B sulfate ophthalmic ointment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...following: Ocular infections due to streptococci, rickettsiae, E. coli, and A. aerogenes (such as conjunctivitis, keratitis...reactions are severe. If new infections due to nonsensitive bacteria or fungi appear during therapy, appropriate measures...

  4. DEGRADATION OF PROPANIL BY BACTERIAL ISOLATES AND MIXED POPULATIONS FROM A PRISTINE LAKE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The microbial transformation rates of propanil, a commonly used herbicide, were investigated using water from a pristine lake in northeast Georgia. Microbial degradation rates were measured using natural water microflora amended with five bacterial species (Aerobacter aerogenes, ...

  5. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from raw goat milk and effect of farming practices on the dominant species of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tormo, Hélène; Ali Haimoud Lekhal, Djamila; Roques, C

    2015-10-01

    Lactic acid bacteria, in particular Lactococcus lactis, play a decisive role in the cheese making process and more particularly in lactic cheeses which are primarily produced on goat dairy farms. The objective of this study was therefore to identify the main lactic acid bacteria found in raw goats' milk from three different regions in France and evaluate if certain farming practices have an effect on the distribution of species of lactic acid bacteria in the various milk samples. Identification at genus or species level was carried out using phenotypic tests and genotypic methods including repetitive element REP-PCR, species-specific PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The distribution of the main bacterial species in the milk samples varied depending on farms and their characteristics. Out of the 146 strains identified, L. lactis was the dominant species (60% of strains), followed by Enterococcus (38%) of which Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Within the species L. lactis, L. lactis subsp lactis was detected more frequently than L. lactis subsp cremoris (74% vs. 26%). The predominance of L. lactis subsp cremoris was linked to geographical area studied. It appears that the animals' environment plays a role in the balance between the dominance of L. lactis and enterococci in raw goats' milk. The separation between the milking parlor and the goat shed (vs no separation) and only straw in the bedding (vs straw and hay) seems to promote L. lactis in the milk (vs enterococci). PMID:26082325

  6. Safety and risk assessment of the genetically modified Lactococci on rats intestinal bacterial flora.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kai-Chien; Liu, Chin-Feng; Lin, Tzu-Hsing; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2010-08-15

    The interaction between Lactococcus lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK and intestinal microflora was evaluated as a method to assess safety of genetically modified microorganisms (GMMs). L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK is one kind of GMM and able to produce the intracellular subtilisin NAT (nattokinase) under induction with nisin. The host strain L. lactis NZ9000 was a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) microorganism. Six groups of Wistar rats were orally administered with L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK and L. lactis NZ9000 for 6 weeks. Fecal and cecal contents were collected to determine the number of L. lactis NZ9000, L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK, Lactobacillus, coliform bacteria, beneficial bacteria Bifidobacterium and harmful bacteria Clostridium perfringens. The liver, spleen, kidney and blood were evaluated for the bacterial translocation. After 6 weeks consumption with GM and non-GM Lactococcus, no adverse effects were observed on the rat's body weight, hematological or serum biochemical parameters, or intestinal microflora. The bacterial translocation test showed that L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK did not translocate to any organ or blood. Bifidobacterium was significantly increased in feces after administration of both Lactococcus strains (L. lactis NZ9000 and L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK), while C. perfringens remained undetectable during the experiment. These results suggested that L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK could be safe in animal experiments and monitoring of the interaction between test strains and intestinal microflora might be applied as a method for other GMM safety assessments. PMID:20619909

  7. Effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating system for control of airborne microorganisms in meat processing environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effectiveness of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating AirOcare equipment on the reduction of airborne bacteria in a meat processing environment was determined. Serratia marcescens and lactic acid bacteria (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum) were used to artificiall...

  8. The Evolution of Combinatorial Gene Regulation in Fungi

    E-print Network

    Li, Hao

    -cycle to mating. In Kluyveromyces lactis and Candida albicans, two other hemiascomycetes, we find that the Mcm1 in the K. lactis lineage. Another intriguing and very recent gain occurs in the C. albicans lineage, where(2): e38. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio. 0060038 Introduction The recent genome sequencing and annotation

  9. Multirate flutter suppression system design for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Martin C.; Mason, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of various control system design methodologies, the NASA Langley Research Center initiated the Benchmark Active Controls Project. In this project, the various methodologies will be applied to design a flutter suppression system for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) Wing (also called the PAPA wing). Eventually, the designs will be implemented in hardware and tested on the BACT wing in a wind tunnel. This report describes a project at the University of Washington to design a multirate flutter suppression system for the BACT wing. The objective of the project was two fold. First, to develop a methodology for designing robust multirate compensators, and second, to demonstrate the methodology by applying it to the design of a multirate flutter suppression system for the BACT wing. The contributions of this project are (1) development of an algorithm for synthesizing robust low order multirate control laws (the algorithm is capable of synthesizing a single compensator which stabilizes both the nominal plant and multiple plant perturbations; (2) development of a multirate design methodology, and supporting software, for modeling, analyzing and synthesizing multirate compensators; and (3) design of a multirate flutter suppression system for NASA's BACT wing which satisfies the specified design criteria. This report describes each of these contributions in detail. Section 2.0 discusses our design methodology. Section 3.0 details the results of our multirate flutter suppression system design for the BACT wing. Finally, Section 4.0 presents our conclusions and suggestions for future research. The body of the report focuses primarily on the results. The associated theoretical background appears in the three technical papers that are included as Attachments 1-3. Attachment 4 is a user's manual for the software that is key to our design methodology.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Hirschia baltica type strain (IFAM 1418T)

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Olga; Brown, Pamela J.B.; Kysela, David T.; De Pedro, Miguel A.; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, A; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Larimer, Frank W; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Tindall, Brian; Goker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Brun, Yves V.

    2011-01-01

    The family Hyphomonadaceae within the Alphaproteobacteria is largely comprised of bacte- ria isolated from marine environments with striking morphologies and an unusual mode of cell growth. Here, we report the complete genome sequence Hirschia baltica, which is only the second a member of the Hyphomonadaceae with a published genome sequence. H. bal- tica is of special interest because it has a dimorphic life cycle and is a stalked, budding bacte- rium. The 3,455,622 bp long chromosome and 84,492 bp plasmid with a total of 3,222 pro- tein-coding and 44 RNA genes were sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program CSP 2008.

  11. The conserved modular elements of the acyl carrier proteins of lipid synthesis are only partially interchangeable.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Cronan, John E

    2015-05-29

    Prior work showed that expression of acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) of a diverse set of bacteria replaced the function of Escherichia coli ACP in lipid biosynthesis. However, the AcpAs of Lactococcus lactis and Enterococcus faecalis were inactive. Both failed to support growth of an E. coli acpP mutant strain. This defect seemed likely because of the helix II sequences of the two AcpAs, which differed markedly from those of the proteins that supported growth. To test this premise, chimeric ACPs were constructed in which L. lactis helix II replaced helix II of E. coli AcpP and vice versa. Expression of the AcpP protein L. lactis AcpA helix II allowed weak growth, whereas the L. lactis AcpA-derived protein that contained E. coli AcpP helix II failed to support growth of the E. coli mutant strain. Replacement of the L. lactis AcpA helix II residues in this protein showed that substitution of valine for the phenylalanine residue four residues downstream of the phosphopanthetheine-modified serine gave robust growth and allowed modification by the endogenous AcpS phosphopantetheinyl transferase (rather than the promiscuous Sfp transferase required to modify the L. lactis AcpA and the chimera of L. lactis AcpA helix II in AcpP). Further chimera constructs showed that the lack of function of the L. lactis AcpA-derived protein containing E. coli AcpP helix II was due to incompatibility of L. lactis AcpA helix I with the downstream elements of AcpP. Therefore, the origins of ACP incompatibility can reside in either helix I or in helix II. PMID:25861991

  12. Cytotoxic, antibacterial and antioxidant activities of extracts of the bark of Melia azedarach (China Berry).

    PubMed

    Zahoor, Muhammad; Ahmed, Manzoor; Naz, Sumaira; Ayaz, Musarrat

    2015-01-01

    Nature provides a variety of drugs and medicinal agents derived from plants. This study was conducted to determine antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities of extracts of Melia azedarach bark with methanol/water (9:1 v/v), chloroform, butanol, hexane, water and ethyl acetate. For the determination of the antimicrobial activities, the agar well diffusion method was employed. Cytotoxicity was studied by brine shrimp lethality assay; antioxidant activities were measured using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl. The chloroform extract was active against Enterobacter aerogenes and Proteus mirabilis, the ethyl acetate extract had highest antibacterial spectrum against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the n-hexane extract had highest inhibition against E. aerogenes, the aqueous extract showed highest activities against P. mirabilis, the butanol fraction showed highest activities against E. aerogenes and the methanolic extract was highly active against P. mirabilis. PMID:25426766

  13. Microbial transformation of nucleosides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamba, S. S.

    1979-01-01

    A study involving the use of coulter counter in studying the effects of neomycin on E. coli, S. aureus and A. aerogenes was completed. The purpose of this was to establish proper technique for enumeration of cells per ml. It was found that inhibitory effects on growth of E. coli and A. aerogenes, both gram negative organisms, were directly related to the concentration of neomycin used. However, in case S. aureus, a gram positive organism, a decreased inhibition was noted at higher concentrations. A paper entitled, Use of Coulter Counter in Studying Effect of Drugs on Cells in Culture 1 - Effects of Neomycin on E. coli, S. aureus and A. aerogenes, is attached in the appendix. Laboratory procedures were also established to study the effects of nucleoside antibiotic cordycepin on He La cell grown in suspension cultures.

  14. Effective disinfection methods of kitchen sponges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogenic foodborne bacteria can be disseminated in households through the use of contaminated sponges. Several household disinfecting treatments to kill bacteria, yeasts and molds on sponges were evaluated. Sponges were incubated in a suspension of ground beef and tryptic soy broth to develop bact...

  15. GMOtrack: Generator of Cost-effective

    E-print Network

    Erjavec, TomaÂ?

    GMOtrack: Generator of Cost-effective GMO Testing Strategies -- Appendix Formal Problem Definition. The set X can be any, possibly empty, subset of A. GMO traceabil- ity requires that all the GMOs present being tested contains some bacte- rial or viral residue or an unexpected `unofficial' GMO outside A

  16. 75 FR 19467 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Texas; Revisions to the New Source Review (NSR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ... ``best available control technology (BACT)'' under 30 TAC 1161.10(3). 74 FR 48450, at 48463-48464. EPA is... in Texas's rules. See 74 FR 48450, at 48465-48466. EPA is not taking final action today on this... Texas NSR SIP. 74 FR 48450, at 48462; Section V.F.1. Regarding the State's use of minor source...

  17. Environmental factors affecting twitching motility, biofilm development, and aggregation by Xylella fastidiosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa causes many important plant diseases in different crops such as citrus, grapes, almond and coffee. While disease symptoms expressed by this pathogen are not completely understood, it is widely accepted that blockage of xylem vessels by aggregates of the bact...

  18. Taxonomic diversity of predominant bacteria associated with microaggregates from two different agroecosystems and their ability to aggregate soil in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contrary to soil macroaggregates (>250 µm) which are easily disrupted when wetted quickly, microaggregates (50- to 250 µm) are highly stable. There is little knowledge of functional groups of bacteria from microaggregates that can stabilize soil and their diversity. We isolated the predominant bacte...

  19. New emission controls for Missouri batch-type charcoal kilns

    SciTech Connect

    Yronwode, P.; Graf, W.J.

    1999-07-01

    Charcoal kilns have been exempted from air emission regulation in the state of Missouri. Today, 80% of US charcoal production takes place in Missouri. As a result of a petition filed by people in the area around an installation in southern Missouri, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) set up air monitors and measured ambient air levels at that charcoal manufacturing installation. These monitors yielded the highest particulate matter less than 10 micron (PM{sub 10}) levels ever recorded in the state. Earlier stack testing at another charcoal manufacturing installation indicated that toxics and carcinogens are present in charcoal kiln air emissions. A Charcoal Kiln Workgroup was formed to determine the Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for charcoal kilns and to draft a charcoal kiln rule that requires BACT. The BACT report determined that afterburners were suitable for controlling emissions from batch-type charcoal kilns. In addition, the charcoal industry supported incorporating the BACT limits and requirements into an enforceable state rule and submitting this rule to the EPA for federal approval. A consent agreement between the EPA and three major charcoal companies was signed with provisions to install, operate, and maintain emission control devices on charcoal kilns. This agreement was to settle complaints alleging that the three major charcoal producers had failed to report toxic air emissions to federal and state regulators. The agreement provided that industry would install control devices on a set schedule with some charcoal kilns being shut down.

  20. A MUTATION IN AN EXBD GENE REDUCES TAGETITOXIN PRODUCTION BY PSEUDOMONAS SYRINGAE PV TAGETIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to reduce the risks to the environment, water, and food supply from the use of synthetic chemicals, more efficacious biological control agents for weeds are needed. This purpose of this study was to identify genes required for the production of a phytotoxin, tagetitoxin, produced by a bact...

  1. 75 FR 56423 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Texas; Revisions to the New Source Review (NSR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... requirements. We proposed to disapprove the above SIP revision submittals on September 23, 2009 (74 FR 48467... severable definition of BACT under our action on Qualified Facilities. See 74 FR 48450, at 48463 (September... FR 16671), we inadvertently removed the explanation that states that this provision is not part...

  2. Suprastructures and Dynamic Properties of Mycobacterium tuberculosis FtsZ*S

    E-print Network

    Erickson, Harold P.

    Suprastructures and Dynamic Properties of Mycobacterium tuberculosis FtsZ*S Received and Technology Corporation, RIKEN Harima Institute at Spring 8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148, Japan, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601, Japan Tuberculosis causes the most death in humans by any bacte

  3. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA Vol. 96, pp. 49084913, April 1999

    E-print Network

    van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    to move. Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive intracellular bacte- rial pathogen that moves rapidly lamellipodia and filopodia and also at the surface of motile intracellular bacterial pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes. Local catalysis of actin filament polymerization is accomplished in L. monocytogenes

  4. Diet induced alterations in gastrointestinal bacterial populations affect memory and learning behavior in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of dietary manipulation to influence learning and behavior is well recognized. While the mechanism of action is almost exclusively interpreted as direct effects of dietary constituents on neural functioning within the central nervous system (CNS), the role of dietary modification on bact...

  5. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Oct. 1988, p. 2574-2577 Vol. 54, No. 10 0099-2240/88/102574-04$02.00/0

    E-print Network

    Hazen, Terry

    or transformation is feasible when rare wild-type strains or genetically engineered microorganisms are released, growth, and transfer of genetic information of model bacte- ria. Plasmid-containing wild-type bacterial of Pseudomonas aeru- ginosa was used as a model for genetically engineered strains. The plasmids in the wild

  6. Emissions from gas fired agricultural burners

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of the Federal Clean Air Act, the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) began defining Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for NOx emissions from cotton gin drying system gas fired burners in its jurisdiction. The NOx emission levels of conventionally used...

  7. The economics of air quality regulation: the true costs of increased PM2.5 regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potential best available control technologies (BACT) are being considered for promulgation by the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District and other jurisdictions in response to determinations of national ambient air quality standards non-attainment for ozone and PM2.5 by writing dairy-spec...

  8. Articledoi:10.1006/geno.2001.6616, available online at http://www.idealibrary.com on IDEAL INTRODUCTION

    E-print Network

    Cross, George

    sequences of bacte- ria, yeast, fruit fly, worm (Caenorhabditis elegans), mouse, and human genomes chromo- some (BAC) cloning system and the construction of repre- sentative genomic BAC libraries [1 of random clones. Furthermore, the routine gene-cloning strategy cannot be applied to the study

  9. Vol. 11, No. 12, 1998 / 1247 MPMI Vol. 11, No. 12, 1998, pp. 12471252. Publication no. M-1998-1007-01N. 1998 The American Phytopathological Society

    E-print Network

    /avirulence genes of animal- and plant- pathogenic bacteria with transposable elements and bacte- riophage sequences advantages to be maintained in bacteria. Indeed, pathogenicity/virulence func- tions in compatible, James R. Alfano, Alan Collmer, and Steven V. Beer Department of Plant Pathology, Cornell University

  10. Abstract Changes in Agrobacterium colony and cell morphology were observed following co-culture of the

    E-print Network

    Finer, John J.

    · Bacterial morphology Introduction Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a gram-negative, soil- borne plant pathogen-culture of the bacterium with a variety of different plant tissues. Bacte- rial colonies grown in the presence of plant often grow to fill an entire 100-mm-diameter petri dish. Ultrastructural ob- servations of the bacteria

  11. 76 FR 76762 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Air Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... Clean Air Act (``CAA''), 42 U.S.C. 7413(b) and 7477. Defendant produces nitric acid, which is used in the production of ammonium nitrate and other fertilizers and explosives. The nitric acid process... Defendants to achieve BACT level emissions for NO X , comply with the Nitric Acid NSPS, and incorporate...

  12. PLUS:PLUS: ANTIOXIDANT UPDATEANTIOXIDANT UPDATE nn CAMPAIGN FOR HEALTHY KIDSCAMPAIGN FOR HEALTHY KIDS nn SEER INSIGHTSSEER INSIGHTS MagaziNe of tHe geraLd j. aNd dorotHY r. friedMaN SCHooL of NUtritioN SCieNCe aNd poLiCY SPRING 2010 VOL. 11 NO. 2SPRING 20

    E-print Network

    Dennett, Daniel

    goes. i'll bet our ancestors never imagined that antibiotic-resistant bacte- ria and modern'sWho's driving the year's biggest food trends?biggest food trends? #12;to Peel or not? it's a Wash organic produce does not buy you contaminant immunity. organic foods can carry organic fertilizer residues

  13. 76 FR 38153 - California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards; Commercial Harbor Craft Regulations...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ...-HQ-OAR-2011-0549- 0002. For new harbor crafts, each propulsion and auxiliary diesel engine on the...\\ or by using a federal Tier 4 certified propulsion engine. \\8\\ BACT is the diesel emission control... standard. \\11\\ See 59 FR 36969 (July 20, 1994). In order to be consistent with section 209(a),...

  14. Redundant phenazine operons in Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibit environment-dependent expression

    E-print Network

    Dietrich, Lars

    Redundant phenazine operons in Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibit environment-dependent expression redundant operons in the adaptable bacte- rium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14. These operons, phzA1-G1 (phz1. aeruginosa physiology and act as virulence factors during opportunistic infections of plant and animal hosts

  15. Decontamination of airborne bacteria in meat processing plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effectiveness of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating AirOcare equipment on the reduction of airborne bacteria in a meat processing environment was determined. Bacterial strains found in ground beef were used to artificially contaminate the air using a 6-jet Collison nebulizer. Airborne bact...

  16. Submission to GenBank of full 16S rRNA gene sequence of novel anammox bacterium Candidatus "Brocadia caroliniensis" NRRL B-50286

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disclosed is a novel anammox bacteria isolate Candidatus Brocadia caroliniensis, having Accession Deposit Number NRRL B-50286, and the characteristics of oxidizing ammonia and releasing di-nitrogen under anaerobic conditions. Also disclosed are methods for treating wastewater using said anammox bact...

  17. encyclopedia of knowledge that can be drawn upon for formulating incisive experi-

    E-print Network

    Collins, James J.

    and manipulating genes were won while studying bacteria and bacte- riophages. Many other technologies got in simple models is turning up genes that play analogous roles in more complex organisms. Model organisms, and signaling pathways combine in the circuitry of gene regulation. The resulting comprehension of biological

  18. 40 CFR 63.41 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 CFR part 51 or 52, toxics—best available control technology (T-BACT), or MACT based on State air... Determinations for Major Sources in Accordance With Clean Air Act Sections, Sections 112(g) and 112(j) § 63.41... health and environmental impacts and energy requirements, determines is achievable by the constructed...

  19. 40 CFR 63.41 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 CFR part 51 or 52, toxics—best available control technology (T-BACT), or MACT based on State air... Determinations for Major Sources in Accordance With Clean Air Act Sections, Sections 112(g) and 112(j) § 63.41... health and environmental impacts and energy requirements, determines is achievable by the constructed...

  20. 30 CFR 250.302 - Definitions concerning air quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Section 250.302 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT... Protection Agency (EPA) has established, pursuant to section 109 of the Clean Air Act, national primary or... energy, environmental and economic impacts, and other costs. The BACT shall be verified on a...

  1. Many of us may re-member an outbreak of men-

    E-print Network

    Sorin, Eric J.

    clinic is Mondays and Tuesdays from 8:30 to 10:30 am · Hepatitis A · Hepatitis B · Flu · Measles the brain and spinal cord.1 There are two forms of meningitis- viral and bacte- rial. Within these types, there are several strains. Viral men- ingitis is more common, yet bacterial meningitis can be very serious

  2. Bacteria and yeast associated with sugar beet root rot at harvest in the Intermountain West

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An undescribed bacterial-like root rot has been observed in sugar beets at harvest time in the Intermountain West. This root rot was observed during surveys of recently harvested sugar beets in 2004 and 2005. Microorganisms recovered from 287 roots fell into the following groups: lactic acid bacte...

  3. JOURNAL OF BACTERIOLOGY, Jan. 2007, p. 611619 Vol. 189, No. 2 0021-9193/07/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/JB.01206-06

    E-print Network

    Oster, George

    Fruiting Body Formation in Myxococcus xanthus Is Driven by Reducing Cell Movement Oleksii Sliusarenko,1 starved, Myxococcus xanthus cells assemble themselves into aggregates of about 105 cells that grow the shape of these early fruiting bodies. Myxococcus xanthus is a rod-shaped gram-negative bacte- rium

  4. Preparation of a Lactobacillus plantarum starter culture for cucumber fermentations that can meet kosher guidelines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method is described for growth of a Lactobacillus plantarum starter culture in jars of commercially available pasteurized fresh-pack kosher dill cucumbers so that jars can be used to inoculate commercial scale cucumber fermentation tanks. A procedure is also described to transfer lactic acid bacte...

  5. Modeling the Benchmark Active Control Technology Wind-Tunnel Model for Application to Flutter Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the formulation of a model of the dynamic behavior of the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) wind-tunnel model for application to design and analysis of flutter suppression controllers. The model is formed by combining the equations of motion for the BACT wind-tunnel model with actuator models and a model of wind-tunnel turbulence. The primary focus of this paper is the development of the equations of motion from first principles using Lagrange's equations and the principle of virtual work. A numerical form of the model is generated using values for parameters obtained from both experiment and analysis. A unique aspect of the BACT wind-tunnel model is that it has upper- and lower-surface spoilers for active control. Comparisons with experimental frequency responses and other data show excellent agreement and suggest that simple coefficient-based aerodynamics are sufficient to accurately characterize the aeroelastic response of the BACT wind-tunnel model. The equations of motion developed herein have been used to assist the design and analysis of a number of flutter suppression controllers that have been successfully implemented.

  6. The use of dermal fibroblasts as a predictive tool of the TLR4 response pathway and its development in Holstein heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The innate immune system comprises the host’s first line of defense against invading pathogens, and variation in the magnitude of this response between animals has been shown to affect susceptibility to mastitis. The toll-like receptor (TLR) family of proteins initiates the response to invading bact...

  7. The effect of antibiotics on swimming and swarming motility of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Motile bacteria can employ one or more different strategies to move, including swimming, swarming, twitching, gliding, sliding, and darting. Swimming is considered the movement of individual bacteria through a liquid or semi-solid medium, while swarming is the concerted movement of a group of bacte...

  8. POPULATION ECOLOGY ELISA Versus Immunolocalization to Determine the Association of

    E-print Network

    cucumber beetle, Acalymma vittatum (F.) (Rand 1915). Rand and En- lows (1916) showed that A. vittatum between the incidence of bacte- rial wilt of cucumbers and population densities of A. vittatum under Þeld-term re- tention in A. vittatum fed on E. tracheiphila infected cucumber plants. Even in beetles fed

  9. 76 FR 28944 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... June 23, 1982 (47 FR 27065) and May 18, 1981 (46 FR 27115), respectively. The PCAPCD originally adopted...'s May 5, 2010 (75 FR 24409) reclassification as a severe ozone nonattainment area, the rules... EPA. (67 FR 80186) \\1\\ While the District uses the term BACT as the level of control required,...

  10. CONTROL OF SULFUR EMISSIONS FROM OIL SHALE RETORTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this study were to determine the best available control technology (BACT) for control of sulfur emissions from oil shale processing facilities and then to develop a design for a mobile slipstream pilot plant that could be used to test and demonstrate that techno...

  11. Epidemiology of food-borne salmonella in poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobial resistance is of global concern and first emerged in bacteria shortly after the introduction of penicillin. It is common to see resistance develop after new compounds (regardless of class) are released. However many factors influence the persistence and transmission of resistant bact...

  12. Reconstitution of infectious laryngotracheitis from a collection of overlapping cosmid clones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have generated overlapping cosmids that span the complete genome of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) and have used these clones in transfection experiments to reconstitute the virus. This is the first example of the use of large deoxyribose nucleic acid fragment(s) (cosmid, fosmid, bact...

  13. UNDERGRADUATE PROJECT ON VIRUS REMOVAL IN SLOW SAND FILTERS FOR RURAL MAYAN COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-Term Removal in Columns

    To simulate the normal operation of a biosand filter, 4 glass columns (Figure 1) packed with different iron orientations were charged daily with 1 PV of aquifer water containing ~108 pfu/mL of MS-2 bacte...

  14. Control Microbiano de la Palomilla de la Papa, Phthorimaea operculella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato tuber moth (PTM) is a serious pest of stored potato in most countries where potatoes are grown. Pathogens that are specific to insects offer promise as alternatives to broad spectrum insecticides for management of this pest. A diverse spectrum of microscopic and multicellular organisms (bact...

  15. FisB mediates membrane fission during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis

    E-print Network

    Rudner, David

    FisB mediates membrane fission during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis Thierry Doan,1,2 Jeff) that mediates membrane fission during the morphological process of spore formation in Bacillus subtilis the developmental process of spore formation in the bacte- rium Bacillus subtilis. From a topological perspective

  16. FtsEX is required for CwlO peptidoglycan hydrolase activity during cell wall elongation in Bacillus subtilis

    E-print Network

    Rudner, David

    insertion of new glycan strands between the existing ones. In the rod-shaped bacte- rium Bacillus subtilis for enlarging the cell wall during growth in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis have recently beenFtsEX is required for CwlO peptidoglycan hydrolase activity during cell wall elongation in Bacillus

  17. Plant Immunity Directly or Indirectly Restricts the Injection of Type III Effectors by the Pseudomonas

    E-print Network

    -induced injection restriction. A P. syringae pv tomato DC3000 mutant lacking about one-third of its T3E inventory proteins. The response induced by this recogni- tion is termed effector-triggered immunity (ETI; Jones plant pathogen is generally due to the recognition of bacte- rial type III effector (T3E) proteins

  18. 75 FR 82429 - Determinations Concerning Need for Error Correction, Partial Approval and Partial Disapproval...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ...interpreting, ignoring, or...consequences of its decision not to identify...reasons for making that decision...the key element of a PSD...engineers making BACT decisions. We well...revision and its decision not to identify...that EPA is making it as...

  19. 40 CFR 63.41 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 CFR part 51 or 52, toxics—best available control technology (T-BACT), or MACT based on State air... Determinations for Major Sources in Accordance With Clean Air Act Sections, Sections 112(g) and 112(j) § 63.41... health and environmental impacts and energy requirements, determines is achievable by the constructed...

  20. 40 CFR 63.41 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 CFR part 51 or 52, toxics—best available control technology (T-BACT), or MACT based on State air... Determinations for Major Sources in Accordance With Clean Air Act Sections, Sections 112(g) and 112(j) § 63.41... health and environmental impacts and energy requirements, determines is achievable by the constructed...

  1. 40 CFR 63.41 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 CFR part 51 or 52, toxics—best available control technology (T-BACT), or MACT based on State air... Determinations for Major Sources in Accordance With Clean Air Act Sections, Sections 112(g) and 112(j) § 63.41... health and environmental impacts and energy requirements, determines is achievable by the constructed...

  2. Mathematics of Sea Ice K. M. Golden

    E-print Network

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    the food chain to the top predators ­ killer whales, leopard seals, and polar bears. The brine and 1990's. While global climate models generally predict de- clines in the polar sea ice packs over the 21 extensive algal and bacte- rial communities which are essential for support- ing life in the polar oceans

  3. MULTIPLE RINSES OF EGGSHELLS FOR RECOVERY OF AEROBES AND ENTEROBACTERIACEAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been demonstrated that when broiler carcasses are rinsed repeatedly, specific bacterial species can be recovered on later rinses that were recovered on the initial rinse. Though eggshells are less convoluted than chicken skin, they do have numerous pores that are large enough to harbor bacte...

  4. Supplemental Material for Biased Brownian ratcheting leads to pre-mRNA

    E-print Network

    Walter, Nils G.

    saturated with biotin-IgG and free biotin. (b) Field of view showing the binding of the immunopurified Bact spliceosome (with Cef1- TAP) to the streptavidin on the slide surface saturated with free biotin and biotin) to the streptavidin on the slide surface saturated with free biotin in the absence of IgG-biotin. Left and right

  5. 78 FR 37752 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rescission of Federal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ...the deferral took effect, such as BACT limitations...shall remain in effect, unless and until...science related to net atmospheric impacts of biogenic...the regulation of greenhouse gases by the U...definition of ``greenhouse gases,'' Wyoming...of GHGs. The net effect of...

  6. Automatica 42 (2006) 11071119 www.elsevier.com/locate/automatica

    E-print Network

    Tan, Xiaobo

    2006-01-01

    University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA Received 16 April 2005; received in revised form 4 November 2005 or remote environments. In this paper, by an autonomous swarm, we mean a group of AUVs with potentially huge been inspired by the swarming behaviors demonstrated by bacte- ria, insects, and animals (Leonard

  7. 21 CFR 184.1848 - Starter distillate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... skim milk usually fortified with about 0.1 percent citric acid: Streptococcus lactis, S. cremoris, S... acetate, acetone, ethyl alcohol, 2-butanone, acetic acid, and acetoin. (b) The ingredient must be of...

  8. 76 FR 27653 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ...). Most of the vectors proposed by NEB are plasmids derived from pGBN1, a K. lactis-Escherichia coli... Federal Register (75 FR 69687). No public comments were received regarding the proposal to certify...

  9. Cloning and sequencing of the gene for a lactococcal endopeptidase, an enzyme with sequence similarity to mammalian enkephalinase.

    PubMed Central

    Mierau, I; Tan, P S; Haandrikman, A J; Mayo, B; Kok, J; Leenhouts, K J; Konings, W N; Venema, G

    1993-01-01

    The gene specifying an endopeptidase of Lactococcus lactis, named pepO, was cloned from a genomic library of L. lactis subsp. cremoris P8-2-47 in lambda EMBL3 and was subsequently sequenced. pepO is probably the last gene of an operon encoding the binding-protein-dependent oligopeptide transport system of L. lactis. The inferred amino acid sequence of PepO showed that the lactococcal endopeptidase has a marked similarity to the mammalian neutral endopeptidase EC 3.4.24.11 (enkephalinase), whereas no obvious sequence similarity with any bacterial enzyme was found. By means of gene disruption, a pepO-negative mutant was constructed. Growth and acid production of the mutant strain in milk were not affected, indicating that the endopeptidase is not essential for growth of L. lactis in milk. Images PMID:8458851

  10. Selenite-stress selected mutant strains of probiotic bacteria for Se source production.

    PubMed

    Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Kovács, Szilvia; Pócsi, István; Prokisch, József

    2015-04-01

    Selenium deficiency is a major health problem worldwide for about 1 billion people. Bacterial cells usually possess low tolerance to selenite stress and also low ability to reduce high concentrations of toxic selenite. Here, high tolerance to selenite and selenium bioaccumulation capability were developed in mutated clones of probiotic and starter bacteria including Enterococcus faecium, Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis, Lactobacillus casei and Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis by food-level strain development process and clone selection. All mutant clones possessed increased glutathione concentration and glutathione reductase activity. The selenite treatment increased further these values in L. casei mutant strain pointing at a different selenite reduction pathway and/or stress response in this organism. Considerable conversion of selenite to cell bound selenium forms with a concomitant high biomass production was detected in E. faecium and B. animalis ssp. lactis cultures. Possible application of these strains as food and feed supplements is under investigation. PMID:25524403

  11. In ovo injection of prebiotics and synbiotics affects the digestive potency of the pancreas in growing chickens.

    PubMed

    Pruszynska-Oszmalek, E; Kolodziejski, P A; Stadnicka, K; Sassek, M; Chalupka, D; Kuston, B; Nogowski, L; Mackowiak, P; Maiorano, G; Jankowski, J; Bednarczyk, M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of 2 prebiotics and 2 synbiotics on the digestive potency of pancreas in 1-, 3-, 7-, 14-, 21-, and 34-day-old cockerels. Prebiotics (inulin and Bi²tos) and synbiotics (inulin + Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and Bi²tos + Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris) were injected in ovo into the air cell on the 12th d embryonic development. Their application increased the activity of amylase, lipase, and trypsin in the pancreas. The most pronounced changes were observed at the end of the investigated rearing period (d 34). The strongest stimulative effects on amylase were shown by both synbiotics, on lipase synbiotic Bi²tos + Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, and on trypsin all the used prebiotics and synbiotics. Simultaneously, neither the absolute nor the relative mass of the pancreas in comparison to control group were changed. Also, the injected in ovo compounds did not cause a deterioration in the posthatching condition of the chicken liver, as determined by measurement of the activity of marker enzymes in the blood (alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase). Treatment with the prebiotics and synbiotics did not change the feed conversion ratio but Bi²tos (galacto-oligosaccharide) and inulin (fructan) + Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis significantly increased final BW. PMID:26112038

  12. Volatiles produced by soil-borne endophytic bacteria increase plant pathogen resistance and affect tritrophic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ton, Jurriaan; Brandenburg, Anna; Karlen, Danielle; Zopfi, Jakob; Turlings, Ted C. J.

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by soil microorganisms influence plant growth and pathogen resistance. Yet, very little is known about their influence on herbivores and higher trophic levels. We studied the origin and role of a major bacterial VOC, 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD), on plant growth, pathogen and herbivore resistance, and the attraction of natural enemies in maize. One of the major contributors to 2,3-BD in the headspace of soil-grown maize seedlings was identified as Enterobacter aerogenes, an endophytic bacterium that colonizes the plants. The production of 2,3-BD by E. aerogenes rendered maize plants more resistant against the Northern corn leaf blight fungus Setosphaeria turcica. On the contrary, E. aerogenes-inoculated plants were less resistant against the caterpillar Spodoptera littoralis. The effect of 2,3-BD on the attraction of the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris was more variable: 2,3-BD application to the headspace of the plants had no effect on the parasitoids, but application to the soil increased parasitoid attraction. Furthermore, inoculation of seeds with E. aerogenes decreased plant attractiveness, whereas inoculation of soil with a total extract of soil microbes increased parasitoid attraction, suggesting that the effect of 2,3-BD on the parasitoid is indirect and depends on the composition of the microbial community. PMID:24127750

  13. Angiosarcoma of the Eyelid With Superimposed Enterobacter Infection.

    PubMed

    Hamill, Eric B; Agrawal, Megha; Diwan, A Hafeez; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marx, Douglas P

    2014-08-01

    Angiosarcoma is a rare, aggressive, malignant endothelial neoplasm with a variable clinical presentation. The authors describe a case of angiosarcoma involving the eyelid that was complicated by a superimposed Enterobacter infection. Following positive cultures for E. aerogenes and multiple biopsies suspicious but not definitive for angiosarcoma, a final biopsy was consistent with angiosarcoma. PMID:25098444

  14. Four carbapenem-resistant gram-negative species carrying distinct carbapenemases in a single patient.

    PubMed

    Ding, Baixing; Hu, Fupin; Yang, Yang; Guo, Qinglan; Huang, Jinwei; Wang, Minggui

    2015-03-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Acinetobacter baumannii were isolated from a single patient, each producing different carbapenemases (NDM-1, KPC-2, IMP, and OXA-23, respectively). The NDM-1-producing E. coli strain was preceded by a clonally related carbapenem-susceptible strain a month earlier, suggesting in vivo acquisition of blaNDM-1. PMID:25552359

  15. Early Events in the Pathogenesis of Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Cattle After Controlled Aerosol Exposure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this study was to identify the primary sites of replication of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in cattle subsequent to aerogenous inoculation. A novel aerosol inoculation method was developed to simulate natural, airborne transmission and thereby allow the identification of early rep...

  16. A Simple Alternative to the IMViC Test in Microbiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benathen, Isaiah A.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a singular alternative to the Indole Methyl-red Voges-Proskauer Citrate (IMViC) test that uses bile-esculin agar to distinguish between the Escherichia coli and Enterobacter aerogenes bacteria. Includes materials and methods, results, and conclusions for the test. (MDH)

  17. Volatiles produced by soil-borne endophytic bacteria increase plant pathogen resistance and affect tritrophic interactions.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Marco; Erb, Matthias; Ton, Jurriaan; Brandenburg, Anna; Karlen, Danielle; Zopfi, Jakob; Turlings, Ted C J

    2014-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by soil microorganisms influence plant growth and pathogen resistance. Yet, very little is known about their influence on herbivores and higher trophic levels. We studied the origin and role of a major bacterial VOC, 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD), on plant growth, pathogen and herbivore resistance, and the attraction of natural enemies in maize. One of the major contributors to 2,3-BD in the headspace of soil-grown maize seedlings was identified as Enterobacter aerogenes, an endophytic bacterium that colonizes the plants. The production of 2,3-BD by E.?aerogenes rendered maize plants more resistant against the Northern corn leaf blight fungus Setosphaeria turcica. On the contrary, E.?aerogenes-inoculated plants were less resistant against the caterpillar Spodoptera littoralis. The effect of 2,3-BD on the attraction of the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris was more variable: 2,3-BD application to the headspace of the plants had no effect on the parasitoids, but application to the soil increased parasitoid attraction. Furthermore, inoculation of seeds with E.?aerogenes decreased plant attractiveness, whereas inoculation of soil with a total extract of soil microbes increased parasitoid attraction, suggesting that the effect of 2,3-BD on the parasitoid is indirect and depends on the composition of the microbial community. PMID:24127750

  18. An outbreak of serious Klebsiella infections related to food blenders.

    PubMed

    Kiddy, K; Josse, E; Griffin, N

    1987-03-01

    An investigation, including environmental sampling, was undertaken after four leukaemic patients on the same hospital ward developed serious infections with Klebsiella aerogenes, capsular type K14. The source of this organism, common to all four patients, was found to be a food blender used for preparing milk-based drinks on the ward. PMID:2883228

  19. Comparison of Different Primer Sets for Use in Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis of Complex Bacterial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Cardinale, Massimiliano; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Quatrini, Paola; Borin, Sara; Puglia, Anna Maria; Rizzi, Aurora; Zanardini, Elisabetta; Sorlini, Claudia; Corselli, Cesare; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2004-01-01

    ITSF and ITSReub, constituting a new primer set designed for the amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacers, have been compared with primer sets consisting of 1406F and 23Sr (M. M. Fisher and E. W. Triplett, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 65:4630-4636, 1999) and S-D-Bact-1522-b-S-20 and L-D-Bact-132-a-A-18 (L. Ranjard et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 67:4479-4487, 2001), previously proposed for automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) of complex bacterial communities. An agricultural soil and a polluted soil, maize silage, goat milk, a small marble sample from the façade of the Certosa of Pavia (Pavia, Italy), and brine from a deep hypersaline anoxic basin in the Mediterranean Sea were analyzed with the three primer sets. The number of peaks in the ARISA profiles, the range of peak size (width of the profile), and the reproducibility of results were used as indices to evaluate the efficiency of the three primer sets. The overall data showed that ITSF and ITSReub generated the most informative (in term of peak number) and reproducible profiles and yielded a wider range of spacer sizes (134 to 1,387) than the other primer sets, which were limited in detecting long fragments. The minimum amount of DNA template and sensitivity in detection of minor DNA populations were evaluated with artificial mixtures of defined bacterial species. ITSF and ITSReub amplified all the bacteria at DNA template concentrations from 280 to 0.14 ng ?l?1, while the other primer sets failed to detect the spacers of one or more bacterial strains. Although the primer set consisting of ITSF and ITSReub and that of S-D-Bact-1522-b-S-20 and L-D-Bact-132-a-A-18 showed similar sensitivities for the DNA of Allorhizobium undicula mixed with the DNA of other species, the S-D-Bact-1522-b-S-20 and L-D-Bact-132-a-A-18 primer set failed to detect the DNA of Pseudomonas stutzeri. PMID:15466561

  20. Differences in Lactococcal Cell Wall Polysaccharide Structure Are Major Determining Factors in Bacteriophage Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ainsworth, Stuart; Sadovskaya, Irina; Vinogradov, Evguenii; Courtin, Pascal; Guerardel, Yann; Mahony, Jennifer; Grard, Thierry; Cambillau, Christian; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Analysis of the genetic locus encompassing a cell wall polysaccharide (CWPS) biosynthesis operon of eight strains of Lactococcus lactis, identified as belonging to the same CWPS type C genotype, revealed the presence of a variable region among the strains examined. The results allowed the identification of five subgroups of the C type named subtypes C1 to C5. This variable region contains genes encoding glycosyltransferases that display low or no sequence homology between the subgroups. In this study, we purified an acidic polysaccharide from the cell wall of L. lactis 3107 (subtype C2) and confirmed that it is structurally different from the previously established CWPS of subtype C1 L. lactis MG1363. The CWPS of L. lactis 3107 is composed of pentasaccharide repeating units linked by phosphodiester bonds with the structure 6-?-Glc-3-?-Galf-3-?-GlcNAc-2-?-Galf-6-?-GlcNAc-1-P. Combinations of genes from the variable region of subtype C2 were introduced into a mutant of subtype C1 L. lactis NZ9000 deficient in CWPS biosynthesis. The resulting recombinant mutant synthesized a polysaccharide with a composition characteristic of that of subtype C2 L. lactis 3107 and not wild-type C1 L. lactis NZ9000. By challenging the recombinant mutant with various lactococcal phages, we demonstrated that CWPS is the host cell surface receptor of tested bacteriophages of both the P335 and 936 groups and that differences between the CWPS structures play a crucial role in determining phage host range. PMID:24803515

  1. Characterization of plant-derived lactococci on the basis of their volatile compounds profile when grown in milk.

    PubMed

    Alemayehu, Debebe; Hannon, John A; McAuliffe, Olivia; Ross, R Paul

    2014-02-17

    A total of twelve strains of lactococci were isolated from grass and vegetables (baby corn and fresh green peas). Ten of the isolates were classified as Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and two as Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris based on 16S rDNA sequencing. Most of the plant-derived strains were capable of metabolising a wide range of carbohydrates in that they fermented D-mannitol, amygdalin, potassium gluconate, l-arabinose, d-xylose, sucrose and gentibiose. None of the dairy control strains (i.e. L. lactis subsp. cremoris HP, L. lactis subsp. lactis IL1403 and Lactococcus lactis 303) were able to utilize any of these carbohydrates. The technological potential of the isolates as flavour-producing lactococci was evaluated by analysing their growth in milk and their ability to produce volatile compounds using solid phase micro-extraction of the headspace coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME GC-MS). Principal component analysis (PCA) of the volatile compounds clearly separated the dairy strains from the plant derived strains, with higher levels of most flavour rich compounds. The flavour compounds produced by the plant isolates among others included; fatty acids such as 2- and 3-methylbutanoic acids, and hexanoic acid, several esters (e.g. butyl acetate and ethyl butanoate) and ketones (e.g. acetoin, diacetyl and 2-heptanone), all of which have been associated with desirable and more mature flavours in cheese. As such the production of a larger number of volatile compounds is a distinguishing feature of plant-derived lactococci and might be a desirable trait for the production of dairy products with enhanced flavour and/or aroma. PMID:24361833

  2. Proteolysis in goat "coalho" cheese supplemented with probiotic lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Taliana Kênia Alves; de Araujo, Ana Rita Ribeiro; do Nascimento, Edilza Santos; de Matos Paz, José Eduardo; Gadelha, Carlos Alberto; Gadelha, Tatiane Santi; Pacheco, Maria Teresa Bertoldo; do Egypto Queiroga, Rita de Cássia Ramos; de Oliveira, Maria Elieidy Gomes; Madruga, Marta Suely

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to analyse the proteolytic effects of adding isolated and combined probiotic strains to goat "coalho" cheese. The cheeses were: QS - with culture Start, composed by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris (R704); QLA - with Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA-5); QLP - with Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (L. casei 01); QB - with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (BB 12); and QC, co-culture with the three probiotic microorganisms. The cheeses were analysed during 28days of storage at 10°C. The probiotic cell count was higher than 6.5 and 7 log colony-forming units (CFU) g(-1) of cheese at the 1st and 28th days of storage, respectively. The addition of co-culture influenced (p<0.01) proteolysis in the cheese and resulted in a higher content of soluble protein and release of amino acids at the 1st day after processing. However, over all 28days, the cheese supplemented with Bifidobacterium lactis in its isolated form showed the highest proteolytic activity, particularly in the hydrolysis of the alpha-s2 and kappa-casein fractions. PMID:26593502

  3. Behaviour of Listeria monocytogenes in raw sausages (merguez) in presence of a bacteriocin-producing lactococcal strain as a protective culture.

    PubMed

    Benkerroum, Noreddine; Daoudi, Ahmed; Kamal, Meryem

    2003-04-01

    The effectiveness of a bacteriocin produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis M in reducing population level and growth of Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7644 in fermented merguez sausage was examined. Two different formulas (with or without added nitrites) were assayed and predetermined numbers of Listeria (ca 10(6) cfu g(-1)) were added to sausage mixture. The effect of in situ production of the bacteriocin by Lactococcus lactis M on Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7644 during fermentation and storage of merguez sausages at room (ca 22 °C) or at refrigeration (ca 7 °C) temperature was tested. Results indicated that counts of Listeria monocytogenes were decreased during fermentation of merguez samples fermented with either the bacteriocin-producing Lactococcus lactis M (Bac(+)) or a nonbacteriocin-producing Lactococcus lactis J (Bac(-)). However, reduction in Listeria cfu's was greater in samples fermented with the Bac(+) than in those fermented with the Bac(-) starter. In merguez sausage made without nitrites addition, the Bac(+) starter induced further decrease in Listeria counts by 1.5 log cycles compared with that induced by the Bac(-) starter. While in merguez samples with added nitrites (0.4%), the effect of the bacteriocin produced in situ was less important than in those made without nitrites addition. PMID:22062517

  4. Heterologous production of human papillomavirus type-16 L1 protein by a lactic acid bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Cortes-Perez, Naima G; Kharrat, Pascale; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G

    2009-01-01

    Background The expression of vaccine antigens in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a safe and cost-effective alternative to traditional expression systems. In this study, we investigated i) the expression of Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) L1 major capsid protein in the model LAB Lactococcus lactis and ii) the ability of the resulting recombinant strain to produce either capsomer-or virus-like particles (VLPs). Results and conclusion HPV-16 L1 gene was cloned into two vectors, pCYT and pSEC, designed for controlled intra- or extracellular heterologous expression in L. lactis, respectively. The capacity of L. lactis harboring either pCYT:L1 or pSEC:L1 plasmid to accumulate L1 in the cytoplasm and supernatant samples was confirmed by Western blot assays. Electron microscopy analysis suggests that, L1 protein produced by recombinant lactococci can self-assemble into structures morphologically similar to VLPs intracellularly. The presence of conformational epitopes on the L. lactis-derived VLPs was confirmed by ELISA using an anti-HPV16 L1 capsid antigen antibody. Our results support the feasibility of using recombinant food-grade LAB, such as L. lactis, for the production of L1-based VLPs and open the possibility for the development of a new safe mucosal vector for HPV-16 prophylactic vaccination. PMID:19703307

  5. Microbial evolution of traditional mountain cheese and characterization of early fermentation cocci for selection of autochtonous dairy starter strains.

    PubMed

    Carafa, Ilaria; Clementi, Francesca; Tuohy, Kieran; Franciosi, Elena

    2016-02-01

    The microbial population of Traditional Mountain (TM) cheese was investigated and characterized for the selection of cocci suitable for developing new starter cultures. Samples of milk, curd and cheese at different ripening times were enumerated in selective culture media and 640 colonies were isolated from curd and cheese after 24 h of ripening. The Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) isolated from M17 were clustered into 231 biotypes by RAPD-PCR analysis and identified as Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus and Enterococcus faecalis. Forty percent of enterococci showed the in vitro ability to inhibit raw milk resident coliforms, but they were excluded as possible starters due to the presence of associated risk factors. All lactococci and streptococci were tested for their technological properties; 4 Lc. lactis subsp. lactis and 2 Sc. thermophilus which were fast acidifiers and did not produce unpleasant flavours were subjected to the freeze-drying stability test. Lc. lactis subsp. lactis biotype 68 and Sc. thermophilus biotype 93 showed the best technological properties and may be appropriate for cheese production. This work gave evidence of the high biodiversity of TM-cheese autochthonous biotypes which could be used as starter cultures for the improvement of TM-cheese technology. PMID:26678135

  6. Modified Lactic Acid Bacteria Detect and Inhibit Multiresistant Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We designed Lactococcus lactis to detect Enterococcus faecalis. Upon detection, L. lactis produce and secrete antienterococcal peptides. The peptides inhibit enterococcal growth and reduce viability of enterococci in the vicinity of L. lactis. The enterococcal sex pheromone cCF10 serves as the signal for detection. Expression vectors derived from pCF10, a cCF10-responsive E. faecalis sex-pheromone conjugative plasmid, were engineered in L. lactis for the detection system. Recombinant host strains were engineered to express genes for three bacteriocins, enterocin A, hiracin JM79 and enterocin P, each with potent antimicrobial activity against E. faecalis. Sensitive detection and specific inhibition occur both in agar and liquid media. The engineered L. lactis also inhibited growth of multidrug-resistant E. faecium strains, when induced by cCF10. The presented vectors and strains can be components of a toolbox for the development of alternative antibiotic technologies targeting enterococci at the site of infection. PMID:24896372

  7. Characterizing Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus Strains with Various Mechanisms of Daptomycin Resistance Developed in an In Vitro Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model

    E-print Network

    Steed, Molly E.; Vidaillac, Celine; Rose, Warren E.; Winterfield, Patricia; Kaatz, Glenn W.; Rybak, Michael J.

    2011-10-01

    of DAP-resistant VRE is warranted. Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide antibiotic that has bacte- ricidal activity against a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and van- comycin...) recommenda- tions (8). Media. Mueller-Hinton broth II (Difco, Detroit, MI) with 25 mg/liter of calcium and 12.5 mg/liter magnesium (MHB) was used for vancomycin suscep- tibility testing. Due to its dependence on calcium for antimicrobial activity, MHB II...

  8. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS -TBACT- DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEMS SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    HAAS CC; KOVACH JL; KELLY SE; TURNER DA

    2010-06-24

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste through the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilizaiton Plant (WTP).

  9. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS (TBACT) DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEM SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY SE; HAASS CC; KOVACH JL; TURNER DA

    2010-06-03

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste throught the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  10. Modeling the Benchmark Active Control Technology Wind-Tunnel Model for Active Control Design Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the formulation of a model of the dynamic behavior of the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) wind tunnel model for active control design and analysis applications. The model is formed by combining the equations of motion for the BACT wind tunnel model with actuator models and a model of wind tunnel turbulence. The primary focus of this report is the development of the equations of motion from first principles by using Lagrange's equations and the principle of virtual work. A numerical form of the model is generated by making use of parameters obtained from both experiment and analysis. Comparisons between experimental and analytical data obtained from the numerical model show excellent agreement and suggest that simple coefficient-based aerodynamics are sufficient to accurately characterize the aeroelastic response of the BACT wind tunnel model. The equations of motion developed herein have been used to aid in the design and analysis of a number of flutter suppression controllers that have been successfully implemented.

  11. Metabolic profiling of potential probiotic or synbiotic cheeses by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Dina; Santos, Claudio H; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A P; Gomes, Ana M; Goodfellow, Brian J; Freitas, Ana C

    2011-05-11

    To assess ripening of potential probiotic cheeses (containing either Lactobacillus casei -01 or Bifidobacterium lactis B94) or synbiotic cheeses with fructooligosaccharides (FOS) or a 50:50 mix of FOS/inulin, metabolic profiles have been obtained via classical biochemical analyses and by NMR spectroscopy. The addition of prebiotics to the cheeses resulted in lower proteolysis indices, especially in those synbiotic cheeses inoculated with B. lactis B94. Among synbiotic cheeses the combination of FOS and inulin resulted in an increase in lipolytic activity. The metabolic profiles of the cheeses analyzed by NMR spectroscopy, combined with multivariate statistics, allowed profiles to be distinguished by maturation time, added probiotic bacteria, or, in the case of B. lactis B94 cheese, added prebiotic. The NMR results are in agreement with the biochemical analyses and demonstrate the potential of NMR for the study of metabolic processes in probiotic/synbiotic food matrices. PMID:21443163

  12. Enzymatic transesterification of Jatropha oil

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Annapurna; Mahapatra, Paramita; Garlapati, Vijay Kumar; Banerjee, Rintu

    2009-01-01

    Background Transesterification of Jatropha oil was carried out in t-butanol solvent using immobilized lipase from Enterobacter aerogenes. The presence of t-butanol significantly reduced the negative effects caused by both methanol and glycerol. The effects of various reaction parameters on transesterification of Jatropha oil were studied. Results The maximum yield of biodiesel was 94% (of which 68% conversion was achieved with respect to methyl oleate) with an oil:methanol molar ratio of 1:4, 50 U of immobilized lipase/g of oil, and a t-butanol:oil volume ratio of 0.8:1 at 55°C after 48 h of reaction time. There was negligible loss in lipase activity even after repeated use for seven cycles. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on biodiesel synthesis using immobilized E. aerogenes lipase. PMID:19144158

  13. Stereoselective synthesis, spectral and antimicrobial studies of some cyanoacetyl hydrazones of 3-alkyl-2,6-diarylpiperidin-4-ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velayutham Pillai, M.; Rajeswari, K.; Vidhyasagar, T.

    2014-11-01

    A series of novel cyanoacetyl hydrazones of 3-alkyl-2,6-diarylpiperidin-4-ones were synthesized stereoselectively and characterized by IR, Mass, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY and 1H-13C COSY spectra. The stereochemistry of the synthesized compounds was established using NMR spectra. Antimicrobial screening of the synthesized compounds revealed their antibacterial and antifungal potencies. Growth inhibition of Enterobacter Aerogenes by compound 15 was found to be superior to the standard drug.

  14. In Vitro Antibacterial Efficacy of 21 Indian Timber-Yielding Plants Against Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria Causing Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Monali P.; Padhy, Rabindra N.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To screen methanolic leaf extracts of 21 timber-yielding plants for antibacterial activity against nine species of uropathogenic bacteria isolated from clinical samples of a hospital (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Methods Bacterial strains were subjected to antibiotic sensitivity tests by the Kirby–Bauer's disc diffusion method. The antibacterial potentiality of leaf extracts was monitored by the agar-well diffusion method with multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of nine uropathogens. Results Two Gram-positive isolates, E. faecalis and S. aureus, were resistant to 14 of the 18 antibiotics used. Gram-negative isolates A. baumannii, C. freundii, E. aerogenes, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. mirabilis, and P. aeruginosa were resistant to 10, 12, 9, 11, 11, 10, and 11 antibiotics, respectively, of the 14 antibiotics used. Methanolic leaf extracts of Anogeissus acuminata had the maximum zone of inhibition size—29 mm against S. aureus and 28 mm against E. faecalis and P. aeruginosa. Cassia tora had 29 mm as the zone of inhibition size for E. faecalis, E. aerogenes, and P. aeruginosa. Based on the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values, the most effective 10 plants against uropathogens could be arranged in decreasing order as follows: C. tora > A. acuminata > Schleichera oleosa > Pterocarpus santalinus > Eugenia jambolana > Bridelia retusa > Mimusops elengi > Stereospermum kunthianum > Tectona grandis > Anthocephalus cadamba. The following eight plants had moderate control capacity: Artocarpus heterophyllus, Azadirachta indica, Dalbergia latifolia, Eucalyptus citriodora, Gmelina arborea, Pongamia pinnata, Pterocarpus marsupium, and Shorea robusta. E. coli, followed by A. baumannii, C. freundii, E. aerogenes, P. mirabilis, and P. aeruginosa were controlled by higher amounts/levels of leaf extracts. Phytochemicals of all plants were qualitatively estimated. Conclusions A majority of timber-yielding plants studied had in vitro control capacity against MDR uropathogenic bacteria. PMID:24524024

  15. Antimicrobial activity of human ?-defensins against lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Fang; Tian, Fei; Cao, Rui-Ming; Li, Jing; Wu, Sheng-Mei; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Chen, Tong-Xin

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated the antimicrobial activity of human ?-defensin-1 (hBD-1), human ?-defensin-2 (hBD-2) and human ?-defensin-3 (hBD-3) against three internationally common probiotic strains of lactic acid bacterium. Our results indicated that hBD-1, hBD-2 and hBD-3 at the range of 0.08-10 ?g/mL do not have obvious antimicrobial activity against these strains. Viability of Bifidobacterium longum JDM301 (B. longum JDM301), Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 (B. lactis HN019) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) were still very high even at concentration of 10 ?g hBD/mL. Then, we explored the mechanism of resistance by using carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) to inhibit efflux pumps. In the presence of CCCP, hBD-1, hBD-2 and hBD-3 exhibited enhanced antibacterial effect against B. longum JDM301 and B. lactis HN019, but not against LGG. Efflux pumps in B. longum JDM301 and B. lactis HN019 may partly contribute to their resistance to hBD-1, hBD-2, and hBD-3. PMID:25560646

  16. Loss of Lactose Metabolism in Lactic Streptococci1

    PubMed Central

    McKay, L. L.; Baldwin, K. A.; Zottola, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    Lactose-negative mutants occurred spontaneously in broth cultures of Streptococcus lactis C2F. Instability of lactose metabolism was noted in other strains of S. lactis, in strains of S. cremoris, and in S. diacetilactis. Colonies of S. lactis C2F grown with lactose as the carbohydrate source also possessed lac- cells. Treatment of lactic streptococci with the mutagen acriflavine (AF) increased the number of non-lactose-fermenting variants. The effect of AF on growth and on loss of lactose-fermenting ability in S. lactis C2F was consequently further examined. The presence of AF appears to favor competitively the growth of spontaneously occurring lactose-negative cells and appears to act in the conversion of lactose-positive to non-lactose-fermenting cells. The lactose-negative mutants partially revert to lactose-positive variants which remain defective in lactose metabolism and remain unable to coagulate milk. The lactose-negative cells become dominant in continuous culture growth and provide evidence that alterations in the characteristics of starter strains can be produced by continuous culture, in this case, the complete loss in ability to ferment lactose. PMID:4625340

  17. Genotype and Gene Expression Associations with Immune Function in Drosophila

    E-print Network

    Lazzaro, Brian

    , Providencia rettgeri, Enterococcus faecalis, and Lactococcus lactis in a panel of 94 third infection with E. faecalis and S. marcescens in lines from the phenotypic tails of the test panel. We of effector proteins is a significant predictor of bacterial load after infection with E. faecalis

  18. Species-specific factors mediate extensive heterogeneity of mRNA 3 ends in yeasts

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jianzhi

    cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces lactis, and Debaryomyces hansenii) are remark- ably heterogeneous. Instead of a fewSpecies-specific factors mediate extensive heterogeneity of mRNA 3 ends in yeasts Zarmik Moqtaderi1 sites at their 3 ends. Here we show that polyadenylated 3 termini in three yeast species (Saccharomyces

  19. Silage Inoculant Effects on In Vitro Rumen Fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four inoculants, B (Lactobacillus plantarum and Enterococcus faecium), C (Lactobacillus plantarum), D (Lactobacillus pentosus), E (Lactococcus lactis), were compared with an uninoculated treatment (A) on alfalfa (38% DM, AS), corn (36% DM, CS), and brown midrib corn (33% DM, BMR) silages. All inocul...

  20. Function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic ABC proteins in lipid transport Antje Pohla,b

    E-print Network

    Review Function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic ABC proteins in lipid transport Antje Pohla of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic origins are implicated in the transport of lipids. In humans, members as in prokaryotes such as Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis. Here, we review current information about

  1. Comparative Genomics Reveals Chd1 as a Determinant of Nucleosome Spacing in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Amanda L.; Rando, Oliver J.

    2015-01-01

    Packaging of genomic DNA into nucleosomes is nearly universally conserved in eukaryotes, and many features of the nucleosome landscape are quite conserved. Nonetheless, quantitative aspects of nucleosome packaging differ between species because, for example, the average length of linker DNA between nucleosomes can differ significantly even between closely related species. We recently showed that the difference in nucleosome spacing between two Hemiascomycete species—Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis—is established by trans-acting factors rather than being encoded in cis in the DNA sequence. Here, we generated several S. cerevisiae strains in which endogenous copies of candidate nucleosome spacing factors are deleted and replaced with the orthologous factors from K. lactis. We find no change in nucleosome spacing in such strains in which H1 or Isw1 complexes are swapped. In contrast, the K. lactis gene encoding the ATP-dependent remodeler Chd1 was found to direct longer internucleosomal spacing in S. cerevisiae, establishing that this remodeler is partially responsible for the relatively long internucleosomal spacing observed in K. lactis. By analyzing several chimeric proteins, we find that sequence differences that contribute to the spacing activity of this remodeler are dispersed throughout the coding sequence, but that the strongest spacing effect is linked to the understudied N-terminal end of Chd1. Taken together, our data find a role for sequence evolution of a chromatin remodeler in establishing quantitative aspects of the chromatin landscape in a species-specific manner. PMID:26175451

  2. 2007NaturePublishingGrouphttp://www.nature.com/naturemethods High-throughput cloning

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    -throughput cloning in bacteria that are less amenable to conventional DNA manipulations. The method involves ligation manipulations are the bottleneck for exploring the protein expression potential of new hosts, thereby preventing,6. But low efficiency of gene manipula- tions in the organism and the instability of L. lactis­E. coli

  3. Probiotic potential of selected lactic acid bacteria strains isolated from Brazilian kefir grains.

    PubMed

    Leite, A M O; Miguel, M A L; Peixoto, R S; Ruas-Madiedo, P; Paschoalin, V M F; Mayo, B; Delgado, S

    2015-06-01

    A total of 34 lactic acid bacteria isolates from 4 different Brazilian kefir grains were identified and characterized among a group of 150 isolates, using the ability to tolerate acidic pH and resistance to bile salts as restrictive criteria for probiotic potential. All isolates were identified by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and 16S rDNA sequencing of representative amplicons. Eighteen isolates belonged to the species Leuconostoc mesenteroides, 11 to Lactococcus lactis (of which 8 belonged to subspecies cremoris and 3 to subspecies lactis), and 5 to Lactobacillus paracasei. To exclude replicates, a molecular typing analysis was performed by combining repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR and random amplification of polymorphic DNA techniques. Considering a threshold of 90% similarity, 32 different strains were considered. All strains showed some antagonistic activity against 4 model food pathogens. In addition, 3 Lc. lactis strains and 1 Lb. paracasei produced bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances against at least 2 indicator organisms. Moreover, 1 Lc. lactis and 2 Lb. paracasei presented good total antioxidative activity. None of these strains showed undesirable enzymatic or hemolytic activities, while proving susceptible or intrinsically resistant to a series of clinically relevant antibiotics. The Lb. paracasei strain MRS59 showed a level of adhesion to human Caco-2 epithelial cells comparable with that observed for Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Taken together, these properties allow the MRS59 strain to be considered a promising probiotic candidate. PMID:25841972

  4. RESEARCH ARTICLE Role of group A Streptococcus HtrA in

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    ], Streptococcus pneumoniae [5], Bacillus sub- tilis [6], Staphylococcus aureus [7], Lactococcus lactis [8] and LisRESEARCH ARTICLE Role of group A Streptococcus HtrA in the maturation of SpeB protease Jason NP) of the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus; GAS) is localized to the Ex

  5. Separable Crossover-Promoting and Crossover-Constraining Aspects of Zip1 Activity during Budding Yeast Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Voelkel-Meiman, Karen; Johnston, Cassandra; Thappeta, Yashna; Subramanian, Vijayalakshmi V.; Hochwagen, Andreas; MacQueen, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis relies on the presence of crossover events distributed among all chromosomes. MutS? and MutL? homologs (Msh4/5 and Mlh1/3) facilitate the formation of a prominent group of meiotic crossovers that mature within the context of an elaborate chromosomal structure called the synaptonemal complex (SC). SC proteins are required for intermediate steps in the formation of MutS?-MutL? crossovers, but whether the assembled SC structure per se is required for MutS?-MutL?-dependent crossover recombination events is unknown. Here we describe an interspecies complementation experiment that reveals that the mature SC is dispensable for the formation of Mlh3-dependent crossovers in budding yeast. Zip1 forms a major structural component of the budding yeast SC, and is also required for MutS? and MutL?-dependent crossover formation. Kluyveromyces lactis ZIP1 expressed in place of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ZIP1 in S. cerevisiae cells fails to support SC assembly (synapsis) but promotes wild-type crossover levels in those nuclei that progress to form spores. While stable, full-length SC does not assemble in S. cerevisiae cells expressing K. lactis ZIP1, aggregates of K. lactis Zip1 displayed by S. cerevisiae meiotic nuclei are decorated with SC-associated proteins, and K. lactis Zip1 promotes the SUMOylation of the SC central element protein Ecm11, suggesting that K. lactis Zip1 functionally interfaces with components of the S. cerevisiae synapsis machinery. Moreover, K. lactis Zip1-mediated crossovers rely on S. cerevisiae synapsis initiation proteins Zip3, Zip4, Spo16, as well as the Mlh3 protein, as do the crossovers mediated by S. cerevisiae Zip1. Surprisingly, however, K. lactis Zip1-mediated crossovers are largely Msh4/Msh5 (MutS?)-independent. This separation-of-function version of Zip1 thus reveals that neither assembled SC nor MutS? is required for Mlh3-dependent crossover formation per se in budding yeast. Our data suggest that features of S. cerevisiae Zip1 or of the assembled SC in S. cerevisiae normally constrain MutL? to preferentially promote resolution of MutS?-associated recombination intermediates. PMID:26114667

  6. A comparison of two probiotic strains of bifidobacteria in premature infants

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Mark A; Kalanetra, Karen M; Bokulich, Nicholas A; Lewis, Zachery T; Mirmiran, Majid; Tancredi, Daniel J; Mills, David A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of two probiotic bifidobacteria on the fecal microbiota of premature infants fed either human milk or formula. Study design In the first of two phase 1 clinical trials, twelve premature infants receiving formula feedings were randomly assigned to receive either Bifidobacterium longum ssp infantis or Bifidobacterium animalis ssp lactis in increasing doses over a five week period. In the second, nine premature infants receiving their mother’s milk received each of the two bifidobacteria for two weeks separated by a one week wash out period. Serial stool specimens from each infant were analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and quantitative polymerase chain reaction for bacterial composition. Results Among the formula-fed infants, there was a greater increase in fecal bifidobacteria among infants receiving B. infantis than those receiving B. lactis. This difference was most marked at a dose of 1.4 × 109 cfu twice daily (p < 0.05). Bacterial diversity improved over dose/time in those infants receiving B. infantis. Among the human milk-fed infants, greater increases in fecal bifidobacteria and decreases in ?-Proteobacteria followed administration of B. infantis than B. lactis. The B. longum group (which includes B. infantis but not B. lactis) was the dominant bifidobacteria among the human milk-fed infants, regardless of the probiotic administered. Conclusions B. infantis was more effective at colonizing the fecal microbiota than B. lactis in both formula-fed and human milk-fed premature infants. The combination of human milk plus B. infantis resulted in the highest fecal levels of bifidobacteria. PMID:23993139

  7. Development of Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Reduced-Order Models Using the FUN3D Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Recent significant improvements to the development of CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic reduced-order models (ROMs) are implemented into the FUN3D unstructured flow solver. These improvements include the simultaneous excitation of the structural modes of the CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic system via a single CFD solution, minimization of the error between the full CFD and the ROM unsteady aero- dynamic solution, and computation of a root locus plot of the aeroelastic ROM. Results are presented for a viscous version of the two-dimensional Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) model and an inviscid version of the AGARD 445.6 aeroelastic wing using the FUN3D code.

  8. Predominance of KPC-3 in a survey for carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Manageiro, Vera; Ferreira, Eugénia; Almeida, Joana; Barbosa, Stephanie; Simões, Constança; Bonomo, Robert A; Caniça, Manuela

    2015-06-01

    Among the 2,105 Enterobacteriaceae tested in a survey done in Portugal, 165 were nonsusceptible to carbapenems, from which 35 (26 Klebsiella pneumoniae, 3 Escherichia coli, 2 Enterobacter aerogenes, and 3 Enterobacter cloacae isolates and 1 Klebsiella oxytoca isolate) were confirmed to be carbapenemase producers by the presence of 30 Tn4401d-blaKPC-3, 4 intI3-blaGES-5, and one intI1-blaVIM-2 gene, alone or in combination with other bla genes. The dissemination of blaKPC-3 gene carried by an IncF plasmid suggests lateral gene transfer as a major mechanism of dissemination. PMID:25779587

  9. Predominance of KPC-3 in a Survey for Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Manageiro, Vera; Ferreira, Eugénia; Almeida, Joana; Barbosa, Stephanie; Simões, Constança; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Among the 2,105 Enterobacteriaceae tested in a survey done in Portugal, 165 were nonsusceptible to carbapenems, from which 35 (26 Klebsiella pneumoniae, 3 Escherichia coli, 2 Enterobacter aerogenes, and 3 Enterobacter cloacae isolates and 1 Klebsiella oxytoca isolate) were confirmed to be carbapenemase producers by the presence of 30 Tn4401d-blaKPC-3, 4 intI3-blaGES-5, and one intI1-blaVIM-2 gene, alone or in combination with other bla genes. The dissemination of blaKPC-3 gene carried by an IncF plasmid suggests lateral gene transfer as a major mechanism of dissemination. PMID:25779587

  10. A new antimicrobial and radical-scavenging glycoside from Paullinia pinnata var. cameroonensis.

    PubMed

    Lunga, Paul-Keilah; Qin, Xu-Jie; Yang, Xing-Wei; Kuiate, Jules-Roger; Du, Zhi-Zhi; Gatsing, Donatien

    2015-01-01

    A new glycoside, pinnatoside A (1), together with two known compounds (2 and 3), were isolated from the stems of Paullinia pinnata. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis and chemical methods. Compound 1 showed significant antibacterial activity with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 1.56 ?g/mL against Escherichia coli, and 2 displayed significant antibacterial activity with a MIC value of 1.56 ?g/mL against Enterobacter aerogenes and E. coli. Equally, compound 1 exhibited the best radical-scavenging activity (RSa50 = 25.07 ± 0.49 ?g/mL). PMID:25563339

  11. Effect of lunar surface material on radiation damage in mice (investigation of biological action of lunar surface material returned to earth by Luna 16 automatic station)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antipov, V. V.; Davydov, B. I.; Gaydamakin, N. A.; Lvova, T. S.; Petrukhin, V. G.; Komarova, S. N.; Skvortsova, Y. B.

    1974-01-01

    The effect was studied of lunar surface material from the Sea of Fertility on the radiation reaction (damage) in mice caused by exposure to ionizing radiation. The material was administered to the organism in three ways -- aerogenically, through the esophagus, or peritoneally. It was shown that administering the lunar surface material did not appreciably affect the death of the animals and the reaction of the peripheral blood caused by the action of radiation. In mice which prior to irradiation had been administered inhalationally or peritoneally the lunar surface material, a lag in the increment of bodyweight was observed.

  12. Studies on Bacillus typhosus : a comparison of their cultural and serological relations

    E-print Network

    Downs, Cora Mitchell.

    devised by Treece*), al l strains except #5 and #7 gave a greenish black cloud around the stab. * Unpublished paper, A S ubstitute for Adonite in the Determination of Fecal and Non-Fecal Strains in the Colon-Aerogenes Group. TABLE II. Litmus 0 Mi.../2000 H/1000 :1/500 ;1/200 :l/lOO ; : 1/50 rt m : m ® B m. 9 » P ^ > :Organisms 2 3 .. . ITT 20 4 7 21 11 12 17 19 5 : T , TT TV , , from the stools of normal individuals in addition to his "Plosser" strain of which he does not give...

  13. Antimicrobial activity of essential oil from Schinus molle Linn.

    PubMed

    Gundidza, M

    1993-11-01

    The essential oil from the fresh leaves of Schinus molle isolated by hydrodistillation was tested for antibacterial activity using the hole plate diffusion method and for antifungal activity using the mycelium or single cell growth inhibition method. Results obtained showed that the volatile oil exhibited significant activity against the following bacterial species: Klebsiella pneumoniae, Alcaligenes faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Leuconostoc cremoris, Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus vulgaris, Clostridium sporogenes, Acinetobacter calcoacetica, Escherichia coli, Beneckea natriegens, Citrobacter freundii, Serratia marcescens, Bacillus subtilis and Brochothrix thermosphacata. The fungal species Aspergillus ochraceus, Aspergillus parasiticus, Fusarium culmorum and Alternaria alternata exhibited significant sensitivity to the volatile oil. PMID:8055554

  14. In vitro activity of florphenicol.

    PubMed

    Graham, R; Palmer, D; Pratt, B C; Hart, C A

    1988-10-01

    Florphenicol was active at a lower concentration than chloramphenicol against over half of 234 recent clinical bacterial isolates. The majority (98%) of the isolates were inhibited by florphenicol at a concentration of 8 mg/l or less. Florphenicol was particularly effective against chloramphenicol resistant strains of Haemophilus influenzae. Klebsiella aerogenes and Bacteroides spp. Florphenicol was bacteristatic for salmonellae and Escherichia coli but bactericidal for Haemophilus influenzae. Florphenicol was slightly more active than chloramphenicol against Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma hominis and Mycoplasma pneumoniae but less active against Ureaplasma urealyticum. PMID:3143587

  15. Dynamic Contacts of U2, RES, Cwc25, Prp8 and Prp45 Proteins with the Pre-mRNA Branch-Site and 3' Splice Site during Catalytic Activation and Step 1 Catalysis in Yeast Spliceosomes

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Cornelius; Agafonov, Dmitry E.; Schmitzová, Jana; Hartmuth, Klaus; Fabrizio, Patrizia; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about contacts in the spliceosome between proteins and intron nucleotides surrounding the pre-mRNA branch-site and their dynamics during splicing. We investigated protein-pre-mRNA interactions by UV-induced crosslinking of purified yeast Bact spliceosomes formed on site-specifically labeled pre-mRNA, and analyzed their changes after conversion to catalytically-activated B* and step 1 C complexes, using a purified splicing system. Contacts between nucleotides upstream and downstream of the branch-site and the U2 SF3a/b proteins Prp9, Prp11, Hsh49, Cus1 and Hsh155 were detected, demonstrating that these interactions are evolutionarily conserved. The RES proteins Pml1 and Bud13 were shown to contact the intron downstream of the branch-site. A comparison of the Bact crosslinking pattern versus that of B* and C complexes revealed that U2 and RES protein interactions with the intron are dynamic. Upon step 1 catalysis, Cwc25 contacts with the branch-site region, and enhanced crosslinks of Prp8 and Prp45 with nucleotides surrounding the branch-site were observed. Cwc25’s step 1 promoting activity was not dependent on its interaction with pre-mRNA, indicating it acts via protein-protein interactions. These studies provide important insights into the spliceosome's protein-pre-mRNA network and reveal novel RNP remodeling events during the catalytic activation of the spliceosome and step 1 of splicing. PMID:26393790

  16. [Fructose transporter in yeasts].

    PubMed

    Lazar, Zbigniew; Dobrowolski, Adam; Robak, Ma?gorzata

    2014-01-01

    Study of hexoses transporter started with discovery of galactose permease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Glucose, fructose and mannose assimilation is assumed by numerous proteins encoded by different genes. To date over 20 hexoses transporters, belonging to Sugar Porter family and to Major Facilitator Superfamily, were known. Genome sequence analysis of Candida glabrata, Kluyveromyces lactis, Yarrowia lipolytica, S. cerevisaie and Debaryomyces hansenii reveled potential presence of 17-48 sugar porter proteins. Glucose transporters in S. cerevisiae have been already characterized. In this paper, hexoses transporters, responsible for assimilation of fructose by cells, are presented and compared. Fructose specific transporter are described for yeasts: Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, Zygosaccharomyces bailli, K. lactis, Saccharomyces pastorianus, S. cerevisiae winemaking strain and for fungus Botritys cinerea and human (Glut5p). Among six yeasts transporters, five are fructose specific, acting by facilitated diffusion or proton symport. Yeasts monosaccharides transporter studies allow understanding of sugars uptake and metabolism important aspects, even in higher eukaryotes cells. PMID:25033548

  17. Structures and host-adhesion mechanisms of lactococcal siphophages

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Silvia; Veesler, David; Bebeacua, Cecilia; Cambillau, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The Siphoviridae family of bacteriophages is the largest viral family on earth and comprises members infecting both bacteria and archaea. Lactococcal siphophages infect the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis, which is widely used for industrial milk fermentation processes (e.g., cheese production). As a result, lactococcal phages have become one of the most thoroughly characterized class of phages from a genomic standpoint. They exhibit amazing and intriguing characteristics. First, each phage has a strict specificity toward a unique or a handful of L. lactis host strains. Second, most lactococcal phages possess a large organelle at their tail tip (termed the baseplate), bearing the receptor binding proteins (RBPs) and mediating host adsorption. The recent accumulation of structural and functional data revealed the modular structure of their building blocks, their different mechanisms of activation and the fine specificity of their RBPs. These results also illustrate similarities and differences between lactococcal Siphoviridae and Gram-negative infecting Myoviridae. PMID:24474948

  18. Improved method for quantification of the bacteriocin nisin.

    PubMed

    Wolf, C E; Gibbons, W R

    1996-04-01

    Nisin, a bacteriocin produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, is used in some types of food preservation due to its inhibitory action on Gram-positive bacteria and their spores. A commonly used agar diffusion bioassay technique for quantification of nisin in food samples was modified to increase its sensitivity, accuracy and precision. Several variables were evaluated. Results showed Micrococcus luteus as the most sensitive organism tested, a lower agar concentration (0 x 75% compared 1 x 5%) increased the sensitivity of the assay (21% improvement over standard method), and incorporation of 1% Na2HPO4 buffer into the bioassay agar made it possible to prevent false inhibitory zones from developing due to the low pH of the test solutions. This resulted in a 57% improvement in accuracy and a 12% improvement in precision compared to the standard method. PMID:8849648

  19. Identification of peptides in functional Scamorza ovine milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Albenzio, M; Santillo, A; Marino, R; Della Malva, A; Caroprese, M; Sevi, A

    2015-12-01

    Ovine bulk milk was used to produce Scamorza cheese with probiotics: either a mix of Bifidobacterium longum and Bifidobacterium lactis or Lactobacillus acidophilus as the probiotic strains. Peptides obtained from reverse phase-HPLC water-soluble extract of Scamorza cheeses were analyzed using a quadrupole time-of-flight liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system. Identified fragments were derived from casein hydrolysis or probiotic bacterial enzymes; some of the fragments showed encrypted peptide sequences that shared structural homology with previously described bioactive peptides in ovine milk and dairy products. Bifidobacterium longum and B. lactis showed greater proteolytic potential both in terms of level of pH 4.6 water-soluble nitrogen extract and ability to generate peptides with potential biofunctionality. Fragments deriving from microbial enzymes may be regarded as tracing fragments useful for monitoring probiotic activity in functional Scamorza cheese. PMID:26409967

  20. Characterization of yeasts isolated from artisanal short-ripened cows' cheeses produced in Galicia (NW Spain).

    PubMed

    Atanassova, M R; Fernández-Otero, C; Rodríguez-Alonso, P; Fernández-No, I C; Garabal, J I; Centeno, J A

    2016-02-01

    A total of 143 presumptive yeast isolates were obtained from the predominant microflora of 21 short-ripened starter-free raw cow's milk cheeses made in Galicia (NW Spain), and the following 68 isolates were identified by both genotyping and sequencing methods: Yarrowia lipolytica (21 isolates), Kluyveromyces lactis (18), Debaryomyces hansenii (11), Pichia guilliermondii (11), Pichia fermentans (4) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (3). Of these, Y. lipolytica and K. lactis displayed the strongest extracellular proteolytic activity on skim milk agar, and none of the D. hansenii isolates showed any activity on this medium. Y. lipolytica also displayed the highest lipolytic activity on Tween 80 and on tributyrin. This species, which was characterized by production of butanoic acid, free fatty acid esters and sulfur compounds in pasteurized whole milk, was responsible for rancid and cheesy flavors. K. lactis mainly produced acetaldehyde, ethanol, branched chain aldehydes and alcohols, and acetic acid esters, which were responsible for alcoholic, fruity and acetic notes. The volatile profiles of D. hansenii were rather limited and characterized by high levels of methyl ketones. Most of the yeast isolates were described as tryptamine producers, although low concentrations of histamine were produced by five Y. lipolytica and two P. fermentans isolates. We conclude that selected Y. lipolytica strains could be used as adjunct cultures in the manufacture of Arzúa-Ulloa and Tetilla cheeses, and selected K. lactis strains could be used as co-starters in the manufacture of acid curd Cebreiro cheese, thus contributing to the sensory quality and typicality of the cheeses. PMID:26678145

  1. Three-phase succession of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria to reach a stable ecosystem within 7 days of natural bamboo shoot fermentation as revealed by different molecular approaches.

    PubMed

    Romi, Wahengbam; Ahmed, Giasuddin; Jeyaram, Kumaraswamy

    2015-07-01

    Microbial community structure and population dynamics during spontaneous bamboo shoot fermentation for production of 'soidon' (indigenous fermented food) in North-east India were studied using cultivation-dependent and cultivation-independent molecular approaches. Cultivation-dependent analyses (PCR-amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and rRNA gene sequencing) and cultivation-independent analyses (PCR-DGGE, qPCR and Illumina amplicon sequencing) were conducted on the time series samples collected from three independent indigenous soidon fermentation batches. The current findings revealed three-phase succession of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria to attain a stable ecosystem within 7 days natural fermentation of bamboo shoots. Weissella spp. (Weissella cibaria, uncultured Weissella ghanensis) and Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris predominated the early phase (1-2 days) which was joined by Leuconostoc citreum during the mid-phase (3 days), while Lactobacillus brevis and Lactobacillus plantarum emerged and became dominant in the late phase (5-7 days) with concurrent disappearance of W. cibaria and L. lactis subsp. cremoris. Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and uncultured Lactobacillus acetotolerans were predominantly present throughout the fermentation with no visible dynamics. The above identified dominant bacterial species along with their dynamics can be effectively utilized for designing a starter culture for industrialization of soidon production. Our results showed that a more realistic view on the microbial ecology of soidon fermentation could be obtained by cultivation-dependent studies complemented with cultivation-independent molecular approaches. Moreover, the critical issues to be considered for reducing methodological biases while studying the microbial ecology of traditional food fermentation were also highlighted with this soidon fermentation model. PMID:25963776

  2. The composition of Camembert cheese-ripening cultures modulates both mycelial growth and appearance.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Marie-Hélène; Bélanger, Gaétan; St-Gelais, Daniel; Labrie, Steve

    2012-03-01

    The fungal microbiota of bloomy-rind cheeses, such as Camembert, forms a complex ecosystem that has not been well studied, and its monitoring during the ripening period remains a challenge. One limitation of enumerating yeasts and molds on traditional agar media is that hyphae are multicellular structures, and colonies on a petri dish rarely develop from single cells. In addition, fungi tend to rapidly invade agar surfaces, covering small yeast colonies and resulting in an underestimation of their number. In this study, we developed a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) method using TaqMan probes to quantify a mixed fungal community containing the most common dairy yeasts and molds: Penicillium camemberti, Geotrichum candidum, Debaryomyces hansenii, and Kluyveromyces lactis on soft-cheese model curds (SCMC). The qPCR method was optimized and validated on pure cultures and used to evaluate the growth dynamics of a ripening culture containing P. camemberti, G. candidum, and K. lactis on the surface of the SCMC during a 31-day ripening period. The results showed that P. camemberti and G. candidum quickly dominated the ecosystem, while K. lactis remained less abundant. When added to this ecosystem, D. hansenii completely inhibited the growth of K. lactis in addition to reducing the growth of the other fungi. This result was confirmed by the decrease in the mycelium biomass on SCMC. This study compares culture-dependent and qPCR methods to successfully quantify complex fungal microbiota on a model curd simulating Camembert-type cheese. PMID:22247164

  3. Evaluation of probiotic potential of yeasts isolated from traditional cheeses manufactured in Serbia and Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Živkovi?, Milica; ?adež, Neža; Uroi?, Ksenija; Miljkovi?, Marija; Tolina?ki, Maja; Doušova, Petra; Kos, Blaženka; Šuškovi?, Jagoda; Raspor, Peter; Topisirovi?, Ljubiša; Goli?, Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro probiotic potential of dairy yeast isolates from artisanal cheeses manufactured in Serbia and Croatia. Materials and Methods: Twelve yeast strains isolated from artisanal fresh soft and white brined cheeses manufactured in Serbia and Croatia were used in the study. Survival in chemically-simulated gastrointestinal conditions, adherence to epithelial intestinal cells and proliferation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) cells were evaluated. Results: The results revealed that two strains of Kluyvereomyces lactis ZIM 2408 and ZIM 2453 grew above one log unit (? log CFU/ml) in the complex colonic medium during 24 h of cultivation, while Torulaspora delbrueckii ZIM 2460 was the most resistant isolate in chemically-simulated conditions of gastric juice and upper intestinal tract. It was demonstrated that the strains K. lactis ZIM 2408 and ZIM2441 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae ZIM 2415 were highly adhesive to Caco-2 cells, while strains K. lactis ZIM 2408 and Debaryomyces hansenii ZIM 2415 exhibit the highest adhesion percentage to HT29-MTX cells. All strains significantly (P < 0.0001) decreased the proliferation of GALT cells, suggesting the possible strain-specific immunomodulatory potential of the isolates. Conclusion: The dairy yeast isolates exhibit strain-specific probiotic properties, particularly the strain K. lactis ZIM 2408, which appears to be the best probiotic candidate in terms of all three criteria. Taking into account their immunomodulatory potential, the yeast isolates could be further tested for specific probiotic applications and eventually included in functional food formulated for patients suffering from diseases associated with an increased inflammatory status. PMID:26401378

  4. Effect of in ovo-delivered prebiotics and synbiotics on lymphoid-organs' morphology in chickens.

    PubMed

    Madej, J P; Stefaniak, T; Bednarczyk, M

    2015-06-01

    Prebiotics and probiotics, either alone or together (synbiotics), can influence the intestinal microbiota and modulate the immune response. We aimed to investigate the effects of prebiotic and synbiotic administration during the early stage of development on the histological structures of central (bursa of Fabricius and thymus) and peripheral (spleen) lymphatic organs in broilers. We used 800 hatching eggs from meat-type hens (Ross 308). Prebiotics and synbiotics were administered in ovo into the air chamber of chicken eggs at d 12 incubation, as follows: prebiotic inulin (Pre1), Bi2tos (Pre2), a synbiotic composed of inulin and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IBB SL1 (Syn1), a synbiotic composed of Bi2tos and L. lactis subsp. cremoris IBB SC1 (Syn2), or physiological saline (control group, C). In ovo delivery of prebiotics and synbiotics had no adverse effect on the development of the immune system in exposed chickens. Administration of Bi2tos with L. lactis subsp. cremoris (Syn2) decreased the cortex/medulla ratio in the thymus and slowed the development of the cortex in bursal follicles on d 21 posthatching, with consequent impacts on the primary lymphatic organs. The above treatment also stimulated germinal centers' formation in the spleens of 21- and 35-day-old chickens, indicating enhanced B-cell proliferation in secondary lymphatic organs. Syn2 also caused an age-dependent increase in the spleen/bursa of Fabricius ratio. In conclusion, the in ovo administration of pre- and synbiotics at d 12 incubation can modulate the central and peripheral lymphatic organ development in broilers. This effect is more pronounced after synbiotic treatment than in prebiotic-treated groups. PMID:25877410

  5. Reduction by competitive bacteria of Listeria monocytogenes in biofilms and Listeria bacteria in floor drains in a ready-to-eat poultry processing plant.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tong; Podtburg, Teresa C; Zhao, Ping; Chen, Dong; Baker, David A; Cords, Bruce; Doyle, Michael P

    2013-04-01

    The ability of Listeria monocytogenes and two competitive exclusion (CE) bacteria, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain C-1-92 and Enterococcus durans strain 152, to form biofilms on coupons composed of different materials (stainless steel, plastic, rubber, glass, and silicone) was determined at 4 and 8 °C. Biofilm characteristics were determined by scanning electron microscopy. L. monocytogenes produced well-formed biofilms within 24 h at 37 °C on coupon surfaces. Treating Listeria-laden biofilms with the CE isolates individually at either 4 or 8 °C for 3 weeks substantially reduced or eliminated listeriae in the biofilms. Treatment with L. lactis subsp. lactis strain C-1-92 and E. durans strain 152 at 4 °C for 3 weeks reduced the population of L. monocytogenes in a biofilm from 7.1 to 7.7 log CFU/cm2 to 3.0 to 4.5 log CFU/cm2 and to 3.1 to 5.2 log CFU/cm2 , respectively, and treatment at 8 °C for 3 weeks reduced L. monocytogenes from 7.5 to 8.3 log CFU/cm2 to 2.4 to 3.5 log CFU/cm2 and to 3.8 to 5.2 log CFU/cm2, respectively, depending on the coupon composition. These two CE isolates were combined and evaluated for control of Listeria bacteria in floor drains of a ready-to-eat poultry processing plant. The results revealed that treating the floor drains with CE four times in the first week eliminated detectable Listeria bacteria from five of six drains, and the drains remained free of detectable Listeria bacteria for 13 weeks following the first four treatments. These studies indicate that CE can effectively reduce Listeria contamination in biofilms and in flow drains of a plant producing ready-to-eat poultry products. PMID:23575121

  6. The dominant microbial community associated with fermentation of Obushera (sorghum and millet beverages) determined by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods.

    PubMed

    Mukisa, Ivan M; Porcellato, Davide; Byaruhanga, Yusuf B; Muyanja, Charles M B K; Rudi, Knut; Langsrud, Thor; Narvhus, Judith A

    2012-11-01

    Obushera includes four fermented cereal beverages from Uganda namely: Obutoko, Enturire, Ekitiribita and Obuteire, whose microbial diversity has not hitherto been fully investigated. Knowledge of the microbial diversity and dynamics in these products is crucial for understanding their safety and development of appropriate starter cultures for controlled industrial processing. Culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques including denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and mixed DNA sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified ribosomal RNA genes were used to study the bacteria and yeast diversity of Obushera. The pH dropped from 6.0-4.6 to 3.5-4.0 within 1-2 days for Obutoko, Enturire and Obuteire whereas that of Ekitiribita decreased to 4.4 after 4 days. Counts of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) increased from 5.0 to 11.0 log cfug(-1) and yeasts increased from 3.4 to 7.1 log cfug(-1) while coliform counts decreased from 2.0 to <1 log cfug(-1) during four days of fermentation. LAB and yeast isolates were identified by rRNA gene sequence analysis. LAB isolates included: Enterococcus spp., Lactobacillus (Lb.) plantarum, Lb. fermentum, Lb. delbrueckii, Lactococcus lactis, Leuconostoc lactis, Streptococcus (S.) infantarius subsp. infantarius, Pediococcus pentosaceus and Weisella (W.) confusa. DGGE indicated predominance of S. gallolyticus, S. infantarius subsp. infantarius, Lb. fermentum, Lb. delbrueckii, W. confusa, Lb. reuteri, Fructobacillus spp., L. lactis and L. lactis. Yeast isolates included Clavispora lusitaniae, Cyberlindnera fabianii, Issatchenkia orientalis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. DGGE indicated predominance of S. cerevisiae in Obutoko, Enturire and Obuteire and also detected Pichia spp. and I. orientalis in Obutoko. Obushera produced in the laboratory was initially dominated by Enterobacteriaceae and later by Lactococcus spp. Enterobacteriaceae and Bacillus spp. were also detected in Ekitiribita. Development of starters for Obushera may require combinations of LAB and S. cerevisiae for Obutoko, Enturire and Obuteire and LAB for Ekitiribita. PMID:23141639

  7. Diversity in proteinase specificity of thermophilic lactobacilli as revealed by hydrolysis of dairy and vegetable proteins.

    PubMed

    Pescuma, Micaela; Espeche Turbay, María Beatriz; Mozzi, Fernanda; Font de Valdez, Graciela; Savoy de Giori, Graciela; Hebert, Elvira María

    2013-09-01

    Ability of industrially relevant species of thermophilic lactobacilli strains to hydrolyze proteins from animal (caseins and ?-lactoglobulin) and vegetable (soybean and wheat) sources, as well as influence of peptide content of growth medium on cell envelope-associated proteinase (CEP) activity, was evaluated. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis (CRL 581 and 654), L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (CRL 454 and 656), Lactobacillus acidophilus (CRL 636 and 1063), and Lactobacillus helveticus (CRL 1062 and 1177) were grown in a chemically defined medium supplemented or not with 1 % Casitone. All strains hydrolyzed mainly ?-casein, while degradation of ?s-caseins was strain dependent. Contrariwise, ?-Casein was poorly degraded by the studied lactobacilli. ?-Lactoglobulin was mainly hydrolyzed by CRL 656, CRL 636, and CRL 1062 strains. The L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis strains, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 656, and L. helveticus CRL 1177 degraded gliadins in high extent, while the L. acidophilus and L. helveticus strains highly hydrolyzed soy proteins. Proteinase production was inhibited by Casitone, the most affected being the L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis species. This study highlights the importance of proteolytic diversity of lactobacilli for rational strain selection when formulating hydrolyzed dairy or vegetable food products. PMID:23832109

  8. Solid-state fermentation of whole oats to yield a synbiotic food rich in lactic acid bacteria and prebiotics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Li, Dan; Zhang, XiQing; Shi, Yan; Wang, HaiKuan

    2015-08-01

    This study developed a synbiotic food through the fermentation of whole oat flour with Lactobacillus plantarum TK9 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis V9. The physicochemical properties, changes in ingredients and peptide molecular weight distributions were determined during the whole oat fermentation. The highest viable counts of the fermented oats were 2.85 × 10(9) CFU g(-1) (L. plantarum TK9) and 3.17 × 10(8) CFU g(-1) (Bif. animalis subsp. lactis V9), with the titratable acidity increased to 10.01 and 8.40 mL at the end of the fermentation. By comparing the nutrition compositions between the fermented and non-fermented oat flour, we found that there was almost no change in the soluble dietary fiber and ?-glucan content. However, the amounts of free amino nitrogen increased from 110.84 to 154.62 mg per 100 g (L. plantarum TK9) and 82.16 to 104.83 mg per 100 g (Bif. animalis subsp. lactis V9). The levels of oat peptides with molecular weights less than 6000 Da increased by 4.4 and 5.96%, respectively. The results suggest that the fermented whole oat flour has good potential for application in the production of a novel synbiotic food rich in lactic acid bacteria and ?-glucan prebiotics. PMID:26130143

  9. L-Lactic acid production from raw cassava starch in a circulating loop bioreactor with cells immobilized in loofa (Luffa cylindrica).

    PubMed

    Roble, Noel D; Ogbonna, James C; Tanaka, Hideo

    2003-07-01

    L-Lactic acid was produced from raw cassava starch, by simultaneous enzyme production, starch saccharification and fermentation in a circulating loop bioreactor with Aspergillus awamori and Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis immobilized in loofa sponge. A. awamori was immobilized directly in cylindrical loofa sponge while the L. lactis was immobilized in a loofa sponge alginate gel cube. In the loofa sponge alginate gel cube, the sponge serves as skeletal support for the gel with the cells. The alginate gel formed a hard outer layer covering the soft porous gel inside. By controlling the rate and frequency of broth circulation between the riser and downcomer columns, the riser could be maintained under aerobic condition while the downcomer was under anaerobic condition. Repeated fed-batch L-lactic acid production was performed for more than 400 h and the average lactic acid yield and productivity from raw cassava starch were 0.76 g lactic acid g(-1) starch and 1.6 g lactic acid l(-1) h(-1), respectively. PMID:12889820

  10. Effects of oral intake of plasmacytoid dendritic cells-stimulative lactic acid bacterial strain on pathogenesis of influenza-like illness and immunological response to influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Sugimura, Tetsu; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Jounai, Kenta; Ohshio, Konomi; Kanayama, Masaya; Tazumi, Kyoko; Tanihata, Yoko; Miura, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Norio

    2015-09-14

    Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis JCM5805 has been shown to be a rare lactic acid bacterium that can activate plasmacytoid dendritic cells in both murine and human species. In this study, we carried out a randomised placebo-controlled double-blind experiment to evaluate its effect on the pathogenesis of influenza-like illness during the winter season. A total of 213 volunteers were divided into two groups, which received either yogurt made with L. lactis JCM5805 or a placebo beverage daily for 10 weeks. In the JCM5805 group, the cumulative incidence days of 'cough' and 'feverishness', which are defined as major symptoms of an influenza-like illness, were significantly decreased compared with the placebo group. In addition, peripheral blood mononuclear cells prepared from volunteers were cultured in the presence of inactivated human influenza virus A/H1N1 (A/PR/8/34). IFN-? elicited by A/H1N1 tended to be higher in the JCM5805 group compared with the placebo group, and an IFN-?-inducible antiviral factor, interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15), elicited by A/H1N1 was significantly higher in the JCM5805 group compared with the placebo group after the intake period. These results suggest that intake of JCM5805 is able to prevent the pathogenesis of an influenza-like illness via enhancement of an IFN-?-mediated response to the influenza virus. PMID:26234407

  11. The telomere and telomerase: how do they interact?

    PubMed

    Blackburn, E; Bhattacharyya, A; Gilley, D; Kirk, K; Krauskopf, A; McEachern, M; Prescott, J; Ware, T

    1997-01-01

    The tandemly repeated DNA sequence of telomeres is typically specified by the ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase. Telomerase copies part of its intrinsic RNA moiety to make one strand of the telomeric repeat DNA. Recent work has led to the concept of a telomere homeostasis system. We have been studying two key physical components of this system: the telomere itself and telomerase. Mutating the template sequence of telomerase RNA caused various phenotypes: (1) mutating specific residues in the ciliate Tetrahymena and two yeasts showed that they are required for critical aspects of telomerase action; (2) certain mutated telomeric sequences caused a previously unreported phenotype, i.e. a strong anaphase block in Tetrahymena micronuclei; and (3) certain template mutations in the telomerase RNA gene of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis led to unregulated telomere elongation, which in some cases was directly related to loss of binding to K. lactis Rap1p. Using K. lactis carrying alterations in the genes for Rap1p and other silencing components, we proposed a general model for telomere length homeostasis: namely, that the structure and DNA length of the DNA-protein complex that comprises the telomere are key determinants of telomerase access, and hence the frequency of action of telomerase, at the telomere. PMID:9524748

  12. Isolation and identification of symbiotic bacteria from the skin, mouth, and rectum of wild and captive tree shrews.

    PubMed

    Li, Gui; Lai, Ren; Duan, Gang; Lyu, Long-Bao; Zhang, Zhi-Ye; Liu, Huang; Xiang, Xun

    2014-11-18

    Endosymbionts influence many aspects of their hosts' health conditions, including physiology, development, immunity, metabolism, etc. Tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) have attracted increasing attention in modeling human diseases and therapeutic responses due to their close relationship with primates. To clarify the situation of symbiotic bacteria from their body surface, oral cavity, and anus, 12 wild and 12 the third generation of captive tree shrews were examined. Based on morphological and cultural characteristics, physiological and biochemical tests, as well as the 16S rDNA full sequence analysis, 12 bacteria strains were isolated and identified from the wild tree shrews: body surface: Bacillus subtilis (detection rate 42%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (25%), Staphlococcus aureus (33%), S. Epidermidis (75%), Micrococcus luteus (25%), Kurthia gibsonii (17%); oral cavity: Neisseria mucosa (58%), Streptococcus pneumonia (17%); anus: Enterococcus faecalis (17%), Lactococus lactis (33%), Escherichia coli (92%), Salmonella typhosa (17%); whereas, four were indentified from the third generation captive tree shrews: body surface: S. epidermidis (75%); oral cavity: N.mucosa (67%); anus: L. lactis (33%), E. coli (100%). These results indicate that S. epidermidis, N. mucosa, L. lactis and E. coli were major bacteria in tree shrews, whereas, S. aureus, M. luteus, K. gibsonii, E. faecalis and S. typhosa were species-specific flora. This study facilitates the future use of tree shrews as a standard experimental animal and improves our understanding of the relationship between endosymbionts and their hosts. PMID:25465085

  13. Development of Chemically Defined Media Supporting High-Cell-Density Growth of Lactococci, Enterococci, and Streptococci? †

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guiying; Mills, David A.; Block, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis IL1403 was used as an experimental strain to develop a chemically defined medium for study of the physiology and metabolic pathways of lactococci. An experimental leave-one-out technique was employed to determine the necessity of each of the 57 chemical components used in medium development. A statistical experimental design approach including three fractional factorial designs and a central composite design was used to optimize the fermentation process with 21 variables composed of 19 nutritional factors grouped from the 57 components and two environmental factors (initial pH and temperature). For L. lactis IL1403, the maximum biomass concentrations obtained with the two optimal chemically defined media developed in this study (ZMB1 and ZMB2) were generally 3.5- to 4-fold higher than the maximum biomass concentrations obtained with the previously described best synthetic media (SA) and 50% to 68% higher than the maximum biomass concentrations obtained with M17, a complex medium commonly used for lactococci. The new chemically defined media support high-cell-density growth of numerous strains of L. lactis, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus thermophilus. PMID:19074601

  14. Lactose Hydrolysis in Milk and Dairy Whey Using Microbial ?-Galactosidases

    PubMed Central

    Dutra Rosolen, Michele; Gennari, Adriano; Volpato, Giandra; Volken de Souza, Claucia Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed at evaluating the influence of enzyme concentration, temperature, and reaction time in the lactose hydrolysis process in milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate, using two commercial ?-galactosidases of microbial origins. We used Aspergillus oryzae (at temperatures of 10 and 55°C) and Kluyveromyces lactis (at temperatures of 10 and 37°C) ?-galactosidases, both in 3, 6, and 9?U/mL concentrations. In the temperature of 10°C, the K. lactis ?-galactosidase enzyme is more efficient in the milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate lactose hydrolysis when compared to A. oryzae. However, in the enzyme reaction time and concentration conditions evaluated, 100% lactose hydrolysis was not reached using the K. lactis ?-galactosidase. The total lactose hydrolysis in whey and permeate was obtained with the A. oryzae enzyme, when using its optimum temperature (55°C), at the end of a 12?h reaction, regardless of the enzyme concentration used. For the lactose present in milk, this result occurred in the concentrations of 6 and 9?U/mL, with the same time and temperature conditions. The studied parameters in the lactose enzymatic hydrolysis are critical for enabling the application of ?-galactosidases in the food industry. PMID:26587283

  15. A weak adaptive response to alkylation damage in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, P; Sedgwick, B

    1991-01-01

    An efficient adaptive response to alkylation damage was observed in several enterobacterial species, including Klebsiella aerogenes, Shigella sonnei, Shigella boydii, Escherichia alkalescens, Escherichia hermanii, and Escherichia fergusonii. Increased O6-methylguanine-DNA and methylphosphotriester-DNA methyltransferase activities correlated with the induction of a 39-kDa protein recognized by monoclonal antibodies raised against the Escherichia coli Ada protein. Induced methyltransferase activities were similarly observed in Aerobacter aerogenes and Citrobacter intermedius, although no antigenically cross-reacting material was present. Weak induction of a 39-kDa protein immunologically related to the E. coli Ada protein occurred in Salmonella typhimurium. This protein encoded by the cloned S. typhimurium ada gene was shown to be an active methyltransferase which repaired O6-methylguanine and methylphosphotriesters in DNA as efficiently as did the E. coli Ada protein. However, the mehtyltransferase activity of the weakly induced 39-kDa protein in S. typhimurium was not detected, apparently because it was self-methylated and thus inactivated during the adaptive N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine pretreatment. In contrast, the E. coli ada gene on a low-copy-number plasmid was efficiently induced in S. typhimurium, and high methyltransferase activities were observed. We concluded that the inefficient induction of the adaptive response in S. typhimurium results from weak transcriptional activation of its ada gene by the self-methylated protein. Images PMID:2050626

  16. Laboratory scale bioremediation of diesel hydrocarbon in soil by indigenous bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anjana; Rehman, Meenal Budholia

    2009-09-01

    In vitro experiment was performed by taking petrol pump soils and diesel in flasks with the micronutrients and macronutrients supplements. Cemented bioreactors having sterilized soil and diesel was used for in vivo analysis of diesel hydrocarbon degradation. There were two sets of experiments, first having three bioreactors (1) inoculated by KI. pneumoniae subsp. aerogenes with soil and diesel; (2) with addition of NH4NO3; and (3) served as control. In second set, one bioreactor was inoculated by bacterial consortium containing Moraxella saccharolytica, Alteromonas putrefaciens, KI. pneumoniae subsp. aerogenes and Pseudomonas fragi along with soil and diesel. The remaining two bioreactors (having NH4NO3 and control) were similar to the first set. The experiments were incubated for 30 days. Ability of bacterial inoculum to degrade diesel was analyzed through GC-MS. Smaller chain compounds were obtained after experimental period of 30 days. Rate of diesel degradation was better with the present bacterial consortium than individual bacteria. Present bacterial consortium can be a better choice for faster and complete remediation of contaminated hydrocarbon soils. PMID:19957891

  17. Identification and inhibition of histamine-forming bacteria in blue scad (Decapterus maruadsi) and chub mackerel (Scomber japonicus).

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia-Wei; Cao, Min-Jie; Guo, Shun-Cai; Zhang, Ling-Jing; Su, Wen-Jin; Liu, Guang-Ming

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the differences in histamine accumulation between blue scad and chub mackerel and methods of inhibiting histamine-forming bacteria and controlling histamine accumulation in fish. The free histidine contents in blue scad and chub mackerel were 1.45 and 2.75 mg/g, respectively. The histamine-forming bacteria isolated from them were identified as Citrobacter freundii, Citrobacter braakii, and Enterobacter aerogenes using 16S rDNA sequence analysis, the VITEK 2 Compact system, and MALDI-TOF MS. The histamine-producing capacities of C. freundii, C. braakii, and E. aerogenes were 470, 1,057, and 4,213 mg/liter, respectively, after culture at 37°C for 48 h. Among the different antimicrobials and preservatives tested, potassium sorbate and sodium diacetate effectively inhibited the histamine-forming bacteria and their histamine production. After chub mackerel was dipped into 0.5% potassium sorbate or sodium diacetate, its histamine content increased more slowly at room temperature. Therefore, a potassium sorbate or sodium diacetate dipping treatment could effectively control histamine accumulation in fish. PMID:25710155

  18. The deconjugation ability of bacteria isolated from the jejunal fluids in the blind loop syndrome with high sup 14 CO sub 2 excretion. Using the breath analysis technique and thin-layer chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Shindo, K.; Yamazaki, R.; Mizuno, T.; Shionoiri, H.; Sugiyama, M. )

    1989-01-01

    Five patients with blind loop syndrome (Billroth II) were examined by measuring {sup 14}CO{sub 2} specific activity of expired breath samples taken at intervals after a meal containing glycine-1-{sup 14}C cholate. The 5 patients tested showed a marked increase of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} specific activity. Furthermore, the ability of deconjugation of bacteria isolated from the jejunal fluids in the efferent loop of these patients was tested by thin-layer chromatography. The bacterial species identified from the samples were as follows: enterococcus, Lactobacillus buchneri, L. bifidus, L. brevis, Eubacterium lentum, Bacteroides vulgaricus, B. filamentosum, Corynebacterium granulosum, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Aerobacter aerogenes. These species of bacteria, except E. coli and A. aerogenes, showed the deconjugation ability by which conjugated bile acids in ox gall was hydrolyzed. Administration of chloramphenicol to the 5 patients reduced {sup 14}CO{sub 2} specific activity significantly. On the other hand, 9 healthy men who were tested showed a flat curve, and 8 of the 9 had no growth of bacteria isolated from the jejunal fluids. The remaining healthy man showed an over growth of E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but the species did not have the ability of deconjugation.

  19. Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, and Cytotoxic Properties of Vasicine Acetate Synthesized from Vasicine Isolated from Adhatoda vasica L.

    PubMed Central

    Duraipandiyan, V.; Al-Dhabi, N. A.; Balachandran, C.; Ignacimuthu, S.; Sankar, C.; Balakrishna, K.

    2015-01-01

    Adhatoda vasica (L.) (Acanthaceae) is used in the indigenous system of medicine in India. The alkaloid Vasicine was isolated from ethanolic extract of the leaves of A. vasica using column chromatography. Vasicine acetate was obtained by acetylation of Vasicine. Vasicine acetate exhibited good zone of inhibition against bacteria: 10?mm against E. aerogenes, 10?mm against S. epidermidis, and 10?mm against P. aeruginosa. Vasicine acetate showed minimum inhibitory concentration values against bacteria: M. luteus (125??g/mL), E. aerogenes (125??g/mL), S. epidermidis (125??g/mL), and P. aeruginosa (125??g/mL). The radical scavenging activity of Vasicine acetate was the maximum at 1000??g/mL (66.15%). The compound showed prominent cytotoxic activity in vitro against A549 lung adenocarcinoma cancer cell line. Quantification of Vasicine and Vasicine acetate by HPLC-DAD analysis showed their contents to be 0.2293% and 0.0156%, respectively, on dry weight basis of the leaves. Vasicine acetate could be probed further in drug discovery programme. PMID:25632399

  20. Antimicrobial disinfection effect of a laundering procedure for hospital textiles against various indicator bacteria and fungi using different substrates for simulating human excrements.

    PubMed

    Fijan, S; Koren, S; Cencic, A; Sostar-Turk, S

    2007-03-01

    Recent studies confirm the increase of nosocomial infections and microbial resistance. One of the possible causes is infected textiles due to inappropriate laundering procedures. Most Slovenian laundries use thermal laundering procedures with high energy and water consumption to disinfect hospital textiles. In addition to this fact, there is an increasing number of hospital textiles composed of cotton/polyester blends that cannot endure high temperatures of thermal disinfection. On the other hand, decreasing the temperature of laundering procedures enhances the possibility of pathogenic microorganisms to survive the laundering procedure. In our research, we determined the antimicrobic laundering effect by simulating a common laundering procedure for hospital textiles in the laboratory washing machine at different temperatures by the use of bioindicators. Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Mycobacterium terrae, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used for determining the antibacterial laundering effect. Candida albicans was used for determining the antifungal laundering effect. Swine blood, artificial sweat, and swine fat were used as substrates for simulating human excrements and were inoculated together with the chosen microorganisms onto cotton pieces to simulate real laundering conditions. It was found that E. faecium, S. aureus, E. aerogenes, and P. aeruginosa survived at 60 degrees C, but no microorganisms were found at 75 degrees C. PMID:17046191

  1. Growth of Pasteurella multocida in Vaccinated and Normal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Collins, F. M.

    1973-01-01

    Specific pathogen-free CD-1 mice are highly susceptible to infection by Pasteurella multocida strain 5A whether introduced intravenously, intraperitoneally, subcutaneously, or aerogenically. The growth of the challenge organism in the blood, liver, spleen, lung, and peritoneal cavity was quantitated hourly for up to 12 h. Unvaccinated mice died 9 to 12 h after intravenous challenge due to the uncontrolled growth of the organism in all tissues tested. The rate of removal of the bacteria from the blood and of phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages was extremely slow. In the absence of specific opsonins, more than 90% of the unopsonized challenge inoculum remained in the extracellular growth phase throughout the challenge period. Vaccination of mice with two doses of 108 heat-killed (60 C for 60 min) P. multocida given 7 days apart protected the mice against 100 to 1,000 lethal challenge doses. Survival data and growth curves obtained for both actively and passively immunized mice indicated that a humorally mediated immune mechanism was involved. Peak resistance to challenge occurred 21 to 28 days after the mice received the second dose of antigen, and this correlated with an 8- to 16-fold increase in specific agglutinin titers over the same time. Resistance to aerogenic challenge by vaccinated mice was less effective than when other routes of infection were used. The significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:4784885

  2. Prevalence of bovine subclinical mastitis, its etiology and diagnosis of antibiotic resistance of dairy farms in four municipalities of a tropical region of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Pérez, Jaime; Kholif, Ahmed Eid; Rojas-Hernández, Saul; Elghandour, Mona Mohamed Mohamed Yasseen; Salem, Abdelfattah Zeidan Mohamed; Bastida, Adrian Zaragoza; Velázquez-Reynoso, David; Cipriano-Salazar, Moisés; Camacho-Díaz, Luis Miguel; Alonso-Fresán, María Uxúa; DiLorenzo, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    A region-wide survey was conducted in the tropical area of Tierra Caliente, State of Guerrero, Mexico to estimate the prevalence of subclinical bovine mastitis (SCM), distribution of mastitis pathogens, and in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of different mastitis pathogens in dairy farms. In total, 1036 quarter milk samples were obtained from 259 cows at 87 different dairy farms. Collected quarter milk samples were submitted for California Mastitis Test (CMT), bacteriological examination, and testing for antimicrobial susceptibility. Overall prevalence of SCM in the studied area was 20.5 %. Prevalence in the different regions was as follows: 28 % in Arcelia municipality, 21 % in Tlalchapa municipality, 19.4 % in Pungarabato municipality, and 14.3 % in Finch Cutzamala municipality. Of all positive isolates, 97.5 % were Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, of all positive isolates, 37.5 % were Proteus vulgaris, 25 % Salmonella spp., 12.5 % Enterobacter aerogenes, and 10 % Escherichia coli. Klebsiella pneumonia and E. coli were sensitive for netilmicin antimicrobial. However, E. coli was sensitive for pefloxacin and gentamicin with a sensitivity for pefloxacin for E. aerogenes, while Staphylococci were sensitive for gentamicin and dicloxacillin. It could be concluded that practices such as the implementation of mastitis control programs, improved milking hygiene together with an intramammary treatment with netilmicin, pefloxacin, and gentamicin antimicrobials should be considered for mastitis prevention in the study area of Tierra Caliente, in the tropical area of Guerrero, Mexico. PMID:26255183

  3. Divergent Evolution of the Transcriptional Network Controlled by Snf1-Interacting Protein Sip4 in Budding Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Mehlgarten, Constance; Krijger, Jorrit-Jan; Lemnian, Ioana; Gohr, André; Kasper, Lydia; Diesing, Anne-Kathrin; Grosse, Ivo; Breunig, Karin D.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular responses to starvation are of ancient origin since nutrient limitation has always been a common challenge to the stability of living systems. Hence, signaling molecules involved in sensing or transducing information about limiting metabolites are highly conserved, whereas transcription factors and the genes they regulate have diverged. In eukaryotes the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) functions as a central regulator of cellular energy homeostasis. The yeast AMPK ortholog SNF1 controls the transcriptional network that counteracts carbon starvation conditions by regulating a set of transcription factors. Among those Cat8 and Sip4 have overlapping DNA-binding specificity for so-called carbon source responsive elements and induce target genes upon SNF1 activation. To analyze the evolution of the Cat8-Sip4 controlled transcriptional network we have compared the response to carbon limitation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to that of Kluyveromyces lactis. In high glucose, S. cerevisiae displays tumor cell-like aerobic fermentation and repression of respiration (Crabtree-positive) while K. lactis has a respiratory-fermentative life-style, respiration being regulated by oxygen availability (Crabtree-negative), which is typical for many yeasts and for differentiated higher cells. We demonstrate divergent evolution of the Cat8-Sip4 network and present evidence that a role of Sip4 in controlling anabolic metabolism has been lost in the Saccharomyces lineage. We find that in K. lactis, but not in S. cerevisiae, the Sip4 protein plays an essential role in C2 carbon assimilation including induction of the glyoxylate cycle and the carnitine shuttle genes. Induction of KlSIP4 gene expression by KlCat8 is essential under these growth conditions and a primary function of KlCat8. Both KlCat8 and KlSip4 are involved in the regulation of lactose metabolism in K. lactis. In chromatin-immunoprecipitation experiments we demonstrate binding of both, KlSip4 and KlCat8, to selected CSREs and provide evidence that KlSip4 counteracts KlCat8-mediated transcription activation by competing for binding to some but not all CSREs. The finding that the hierarchical relationship of these transcription factors differs between K. lactis and S. cerevisiae and that the sets of target genes have diverged contributes to explaining the phenotypic differences in metabolic life-style. PMID:26440109

  4. Complete genome sequence of Allochromatium vinosum DSM 180T

    SciTech Connect

    Weissgerber, Thomas; Zigann, Renate; Bruce, David; Chang, Yun-Juan; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Land, Miriam L; Munk, Christine; Tapia, Roxanne; Dahl, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    Allochromatium vinosum formerly Chromatium vinosum is a mesophilic purple sulfur bacte- rium belonging to the family Chromatiaceae in the bacterial class Gammaproteobacteria. The genus Allochromatium contains currently five species. All members were isolated from fresh- water, brackish water or marine habitats and are predominately obligate phototrophs. Here we describe the features of the organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the Chromatiaceae within the purple sulfur bacteria thriving in globally occurring habitats. The 3,669,074 bp ge- nome with its 3,302 protein-coding and 64 RNA genes was sequenced within the Joint Ge- nome Institute Community Sequencing Program.

  5. The use of emissions trading to meet post '87 attainment goals

    SciTech Connect

    Palmisano, J. )

    1987-01-01

    Approximately 70 metropolitan areas are expected to fail to meet the ozone air quality standards by December 31, 1987. As a result of this failure, extra regulatory actions will be required to obtain hydrocarbon emission reductions. These actions might include introducing new RACT requirements for existing stationary sources, new controls for mobile sources, new BACT/LAER requirements, new enforcement techniques, greater offset ratios, and lower de minimis levels. All of these strategies are continuations of traditional regulatory programs. Many of these potential remedies are plagued by economic inefficiencies and inequities. One remedy breaks out of the traditional mold and utilizes the energy of the private sector, is efficient and equitable, can be developed and implemented quickly and is institutionally viable. This strategy has been called TERA for Transferable Emission Reduction Assessments. TERA is presented in this paper.

  6. An Elasticity-Based Mesh Scheme Applied to the Computation of Unsteady Three-Dimensional Spoiler and Aeroelastic Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a modification of the spring analogy scheme which uses axial linear spring stiffness with selective spring stiffening/relaxation. An alternate approach to solving the geometric conservation law is taken which eliminates the need for storage of metric Jacobians at previous time steps. Efficiency and verification are illustrated with several unsteady 2-D airfoil Euler computations. The method is next applied to the computation of the turbulent flow about a 2-D airfoil and wing with two and three- dimensional moving spoiler surfaces, and the results compared with Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) experimental data. The aeroelastic response at low dynamic pressure of an airfoil to a single large scale oscillation of a spoiler surface is computed. This study confirms that it is possible to achieve accurate solutions with a very large time step for aeroelastic problems using the fluid solver and aeroelastic integrator as discussed in this paper.

  7. Unusual fungal sepsis of Alternaria alternata in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Jain, S; Tarai, B; Tuli, P; Das, P

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of unusual fungal sepsis of Alternaria alternata in a patient of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in 62-year-old male who presented with complaints of 'off and on' fever with decreased oral intake. On evaluation, haemogram showed low platelet count and 68% blast cells in peripheral blood. On flow cytometry of peripheral blood, the gated blasts (approximately 55%) highly express CD45, CD10, CD19, CD22 and condition was diagnosed as acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. He was started on standard induction treatment along with supportive therapies. During the course of treatment, two sets of paired blood cultures were sent 48 h apart. All of blood cultures were done on Bac-T alert 3D system. All of them yielded fungus. The fungus was then grown on Sabouraud's Dextrose agar media. It was identified as A. alternata. The patient condition worsened and later had cardiac arrest in ICU and could not be revived. PMID:26470977

  8. Complete genome sequence of the halophilic bacterium Spirochaeta africana type strain (Z-7692T) from the alkaline Lake Magadi in the East African Rift

    SciTech Connect

    Liolios, Konstantinos; Abt, Birte; Scheuner, Carmen; Teshima, Hazuki; Held, Brittany; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Detter, J. Chris; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2013-01-01

    Spirochaeta africana Zhilina et al. 1996 is an anaerobic, aerotolerant, spiral-shaped bacte- rium that is motile via periplasmic flagella. The type strain of the species, Z-7692T, was iso- lated in 1993 or earlier from a bacterial bloom in the brine under the trona layer in a shallow lagoon of the alkaline equatorial Lake Magadi in Kenya. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. Considering the pending reclassification of S. caldaria to the genus Treponema, S. africana is only the second 'true' member of the genus Spirochaeta with a genome-sequenced type strain to be pub- lished. The 3,285,855 bp long genome of strain Z-7692T with its 2,817 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  9. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and PuEDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Xun, Luying

    2005-06-01

    Although our goal is to isolate anaerobic EDTA degraders, we initiated the experiments to include nitrilotriacetate (NTA), which is a structure homologue of EDTA. All the aerobic EDTA degraders can degrade NTA, but the isolated NTA degraders cannot degrade EDTA. Since NTA is a simpler structure homologue, it is likely that EDTA-degrading ability is evolved from NTA degradation. This hypothesis is further supported from our characterization of EDTA and NTA-degrading enzymes and genes (J. Bact. 179:1112-1116; and Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 67:688-695). The EDTA monooxygenase and NTA monooxygenase are highly homologous. EDTA monooxygenase can use both EDTA and NTA as substrates, but NTA monooxygenase can only use NTA as a substrate. Thus, we put our effort to isolate both NTA and EDTA degraders. In case, an anaerobic EDTA degrader is not immediately enriched, we will try to evolve the NTA degraders to use EDTA. Both aerobic and anaerobic enrichment cultures were set.

  10. Test Cases for the Benchmark Active Controls: Spoiler and Control Surface Oscillations and Flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Robert M.; Scott, Robert C.; Wieseman, Carol D.

    2000-01-01

    As a portion of the Benchmark Models Program at NASA Langley, a simple generic model was developed for active controls research and was called BACT for Benchmark Active Controls Technology model. This model was based on the previously-tested Benchmark Models rectangular wing with the NACA 0012 airfoil section that was mounted on the Pitch and Plunge Apparatus (PAPA) for flutter testing. The BACT model had an upper surface spoiler, a lower surface spoiler, and a trailing edge control surface for use in flutter suppression and dynamic response excitation. Previous experience with flutter suppression indicated a need for measured control surface aerodynamics for accurate control law design. Three different types of flutter instability boundaries had also been determined for the NACA 0012/PAPA model, a classical flutter boundary, a transonic stall flutter boundary at angle of attack, and a plunge instability near M = 0.9. Therefore an extensive set of steady and control surface oscillation data was generated spanning the range of the three types of instabilities. This information was subsequently used to design control laws to suppress each flutter instability. There have been three tests of the BACT model. The objective of the first test, TDT Test 485, was to generate a data set of steady and unsteady control surface effectiveness data, and to determine the open loop dynamic characteristics of the control systems including the actuators. Unsteady pressures, loads, and transfer functions were measured. The other two tests, TDT Test 502 and TDT Test 5 18, were primarily oriented towards active controls research, but some data supplementary to the first test were obtained. Dynamic response of the flexible system to control surface excitation and open loop flutter characteristics were determined during Test 502. Loads were not measured during the last two tests. During these tests, a database of over 3000 data sets was obtained. A reasonably extensive subset of the data sets from the first two tests have been chosen for Test Cases for computational comparisons concentrating on static conditions and cases with harmonically oscillating control surfaces. Several flutter Test Cases from both tests have also been included. Some aerodynamic comparisons with the BACT data have been made using computational fluid dynamics codes at the Navier-Stokes level (and in the accompanying chapter SC). Some mechanical and active control studies have been presented. In this report several Test Cases are selected to illustrate trends for a variety of different conditions with emphasis on transonic flow effects. Cases for static angles of attack, static trailing-edge and upper-surface spoiler deflections are included for a range of conditions near those for the oscillation cases. Cases for trailing-edge control and upper-surface spoiler oscillations for a range of Mach numbers, angle of attack, and static control deflections are included. Cases for all three types of flutter instability are selected. In addition some cases are included for dynamic response measurements during forced oscillations of the controls on the flexible mount. An overview of the model and tests is given, and the standard formulary for these data is listed. Some sample data and sample results of calculations are presented. Only the static pressures and the first harmonic real and imaginary parts of the pressures are included in the data for the Test Cases, but digitized time histories have been archived. The data for the Test Cases are also available as separate electronic files.

  11. Evaluation of the reactivity of sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus against the human MCP1.

    PubMed

    Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa; Nóvoa, Ana; Teixeira, Natércia; Vasconcelos, Carlos Silva; Cerveira, Conceição; Castro e Melo, João; Carvalho, Manuel Cirne

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluates metaphase chromosome protein 1 (MCP1), a nuclear antigen, as a diagnostic marker for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Reactivity of sera from 114 Portuguese patients with autoimmune rheumatic disease or from healthy blood donors (HBD), against MCP1, produced in bacteria (bact-MCP1) or in its native form (native-MCP1), was determined by immunoblotting. Predictive and discriminative power of MCP1 reactivity for SLE diagnosis in disease-control groups was evaluated by logistic regression, its diagnostic value determined by receiver-operating characteristic analysis and compared with similar analysis of antinuclear antibody and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). We demonstrated that native-MCP1, in contrast to bact-MCP1, reacts with SLE sera with significant predictive and discriminative power versus other autoimmune diseases (odds ratio [OR] ?3.537 and ?3.265; area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve [AUC] ?0.643 and ?0.636) or versus HBD (OR?=?5.006; AUC?=?0.671), showing a good diagnostic power with high specificity (82.1% versus HBD) and low sensitivity for SLE, similar to those of dsDNA. The reactivity of SLE sera with native-MCP1 was shown to be dependent on the presence of phosphorylated residues. Native-MCP1 was shown to have diagnostic value as a specific marker for SLE diagnosis and, therefore, is a suitable substrate for a new antibody test. The widely reported importance of phosphorylated epitopes as targets for autoantibodies in SLE could also be confirmed for native-MCP1. PMID:22371290

  12. Vaccines Displaying Mycobacterial Proteins on Biopolyester Beads Stimulate Cellular Immunity and Induce Protection against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Parlane, Natalie A.; Grage, Katrin; Mifune, Jun; Basaraba, Randall J.; Wedlock, D. Neil; Rehm, Bernd H. A.

    2012-01-01

    New improved vaccines are needed for control of both bovine and human tuberculosis. Tuberculosis protein vaccines have advantages with regard to safety and ease of manufacture, but efficacy against tuberculosis has been difficult to achieve. Protective cellular immune responses can be preferentially induced when antigens are displayed on small particles. In this study, Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis were engineered to produce spherical polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) inclusions which displayed a fusion protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, antigen 85A (Ag85A)–early secreted antigenic target 6-kDa protein (ESAT-6). L. lactis was chosen as a possible production host due its extensive use in the food industry and reduced risk of lipopolysaccharide contamination. Mice were vaccinated with PHB bead vaccines with or without displaying Ag85A–ESAT-6, recombinant Ag85A–ESAT-6, or M. bovis BCG. Separate groups of mice were used to measure immune responses and assess protection against an aerosol M. bovis challenge. Increased amounts of antigen-specific gamma interferon, interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha were produced from splenocytes postvaccination, but no or minimal IL-4, IL-5, or IL-10 was produced, indicating Th1- and Th17-biased T cell responses. Decreased lung bacterial counts and less extensive foci of inflammation were observed in lungs of mice receiving BCG or PHB bead vaccines displaying Ag85A–ESAT-6 produced in either E. coli or L. lactis compared to those observed in the lungs of phosphate-buffered saline-treated control mice. No differences between those receiving wild-type PHB beads and those receiving recombinant Ag85A–ESAT-6 were observed. This versatile particulate vaccine delivery system incorporates a relatively simple production process using safe bacteria, and the results show that it is an effective delivery system for a tuberculosis protein vaccine. PMID:22072720

  13. Comparative inhibitory effects of Thymus vulgaris L. essential oil against Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes and mesophilic starter co-culture in cheese-mimicking models.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Rayssa Julliane; de Souza, Geanny Targino; Honório, Vanessa Gonçalves; de Sousa, Jossana Pereira; da Conceição, Maria Lúcia; Maganani, Marciane; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we assessed the effects of Thymus vulgaris L. essential oil (TVEO) on Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes, pathogenic bacteria frequently associated with fresh or low-ripened cheeses (e.g., Brazilian coalho cheese), and on a starter co-culture comprising Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris, which are commonly used for the production of different cheeses. To measure these effects, we determined the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and assessed bacterial cell viability over time in (coalho) cheese-based broth and in a semi-solid (coalho) cheese model at 10 °C. The MIC for TVEO was 2.5 ?L/mL against S. aureus and L. monocytogenes, while the MIC was 1.25 ?L/mL against the starter co-culture. The TVEO (5 and 2.5 ?L/mL) sharply reduced the viable counts of all assayed bacteria in cheese broth over 24 h; although, at 5 ?L/mL, TVEO more severely affected the viability of the starter co-culture compared with pathogenic bacteria. The addition of 1.25 ?L/g of TVEO in the semi-solid cheese model did not reduce the viable counts of all assayed bacteria. At 2.5 ?L/g, TVEO slightly decreased the viable counts of S. aureus, L. monocytogenes and Lactococcus spp. in the semi-solid cheese model over 72 h. The final counts of Lactococcus spp. in a semi-solid cheese model containing 2.5 ?L/mL TVEO were lower than those of pathogenic bacteria under the same conditions. These results suggest that the doses of TVEO used to control pathogenic bacteria in fermented dairy products, especially in low-ripened cheeses, should be cautiously considered for potential negative effects on the growth and survival of starter cultures. PMID:26338117

  14. Regulation of the Activity of Lactate Dehydrogenases from Four Lactic Acid Bacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Feldman-Salit, Anna; Hering, Silvio; Messiha, Hanan L.; Veith, Nadine; Cojocaru, Vlad; Sieg, Antje; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Wade, Rebecca C.; Fiedler, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Despite high similarity in sequence and catalytic properties, the l-lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs) in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) display differences in their regulation that may arise from their adaptation to different habitats. We combined experimental and computational approaches to investigate the effects of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), phosphate (Pi), and ionic strength (NaCl concentration) on six LDHs from four LABs studied at pH 6 and pH 7. We found that 1) the extent of activation by FBP (Kact) differs. Lactobacillus plantarum LDH is not regulated by FBP, but the other LDHs are activated with increasing sensitivity in the following order: Enterococcus faecalis LDH2 ? Lactococcus lactis LDH2 < E. faecalis LDH1 < L. lactis LDH1 ? Streptococcus pyogenes LDH. This trend reflects the electrostatic properties in the allosteric binding site of the LDH enzymes. 2) For L. plantarum, S. pyogenes, and E. faecalis, the effects of Pi are distinguishable from the effect of changing ionic strength by adding NaCl. 3) Addition of Pi inhibits E. faecalis LDH2, whereas in the absence of FBP, Pi is an activator of S. pyogenes LDH, E. faecalis LDH1, and L. lactis LDH1 and LDH2 at pH 6. These effects can be interpreted by considering the computed binding affinities of Pi to the catalytic and allosteric binding sites of the enzymes modeled in protonation states corresponding to pH 6 and pH 7. Overall, the results show a subtle interplay among the effects of Pi, FBP, and pH that results in different regulatory effects on the LDHs of different LABs. PMID:23720742

  15. Novel high-performance metagenome ?-galactosidases for lactose hydrolysis in the dairy industry.

    PubMed

    Erich, Sarah; Kuschel, Beatrice; Schwarz, Thilo; Ewert, Jacob; Böhmer, Nico; Niehaus, Frank; Eck, Jürgen; Lutz-Wahl, Sabine; Stressler, Timo; Fischer, Lutz

    2015-09-20

    The industrially utilised ?-galactosidases from Kluyveromyces spp. and Aspergillus spp. feature undesirable kinetic properties in praxis, such as an unsatisfactory lactose affinity (KM) and product inhibition (KI) by galactose. In this study, a metagenome library of about 1.3 million clones was investigated with a three-step activity-based screening strategy in order to find new ?-galactosidases with more favourable kinetic properties. Six novel metagenome ?-galactosidases (M1-M6) were found with an improved lactose hydrolysis performance in original milk when directly compared to the commercial ?-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis (GODO-YNL2). The best metagenome candidate, called "M1", was recombinantly produced in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) in a bioreactor (volume 35 L), resulting in a total ?-galactosidase M1 activity of about 1100 ?katoNPGal,37 °C L(-1). Since milk is a sensitive and complex medium, it has to be processed at 5-10 °C in the dairy industry. Therefore, the ?-galactosidase M1 was tested at 8 °C in milk and possessed a good stability (t1/2=21.8 d), a desirably low apparent KM,lactose,8 °C value of 3.8±0.7 mM and a high apparent KI,galactose,8 °C value of 196.6±55.5 mM. A lactose hydrolysis process (milk, 40 nkatlactose mLmilk,8 °C(-1)) was conducted at a scale of 0.5L to compare the performance of M1 with the commercial ?-galactosidase from K. lactis (GODO-YNL2). Lactose was completely (>99.99%) hydrolysed by M1 and to 99.6% (w/v) by K. lactis ?-galactosidase after 25 h process time. Thus, M1 was able to achieve the limit of <100 mg lactose per litre milk, which is recommended for dairy products labelled as "lactose-free". PMID:26122513

  16. Diffusion of solutes inside bacterial colonies immobilized in model cheese depends on their physicochemical properties: a time-lapse microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Floury, Juliane; El Mourdi, Ilham; Silva, Juliana V. C.; Lortal, Sylvie; Thierry, Anne; Jeanson, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    During cheese processing and ripening, bacteria develop as colonies. Substrates and metabolites must then diffuse either from or into the colonies. Exploring how the inner cells of the colony access the substrates or get rid of the products leads to study the diffusion of solutes inside bacterial colonies immobilized in cheese. Diffusion limitations of substrates within the bacterial colony could lead to starvation for the cells in the center of the colony. This study aimed at better understands ripening at the colony level, by investigating how diffusion phenomena inside colonies vary depending on both the physicochemical properties of the solutes and Lactococcus lactis strain. Dextrans (4, 70, and 155 kDa) and milk proteins (BSA, lactoferrin and ?S1-casein) of different sizes and physicochemical properties were chosen as model of diffusing solutes, and two L. lactis strains presenting different surface properties were immobilized as colonies in a model cheese. Diffusion of solutes inside and around colonies was experimentally followed by time-lapse confocal microscopy. Dextran solutes diffused inside both lactococci colonies with a non-significantly different effective diffusion coefficient, which depended mainly on size of the solute. However, whereas flexible and neutral hydrophilic polymers such as dextran can diffuse inside colonies whatever its size, none of the three proteins investigated in this study could penetrate inside lactococci colonies. Therefore, the diffusion behavior of macromolecules through bacterial colonies immobilized in a model cheese did not only depends on the size of the diffusing solutes, but also and mainly on their physicochemical properties. Milk caseins are probably first hydrolyzed by the cell wall proteases of L. lactis and/or other proteases present in the cheese, and then the generated peptides diffuse inside colonies to be further metabolized into smaller peptides and amino acids by all the cells located inside the colonies. PMID:25983724

  17. Yeast Interspecies Comparative Proteomics Reveals Divergence in Expression Profiles and Provides Insights into Proteome Resource Allocation and Evolutionary Roles of Gene Duplication.

    PubMed

    Kito, Keiji; Ito, Haruka; Nohara, Takehiro; Ohnishi, Mihoko; Ishibashi, Yuko; Takeda, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Omics analysis is a versatile approach for understanding the conservation and diversity of molecular systems across multiple taxa. In this study, we compared the proteome expression profiles of four yeast species (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces mikatae, Kluyveromyces waltii, and Kluyveromyces lactis) grown on glucose- or glycerol-containing media. Conserved expression changes across all species were observed only for a small proportion of all proteins differentially expressed between the two growth conditions. Two Kluyveromyces species, both of which exhibited a high growth rate on glycerol, a nonfermentative carbon source, showed distinct species-specific expression profiles. In K. waltii grown on glycerol, proteins involved in the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis were expressed in high abundance. In K. lactis grown on glycerol, the expression of glycolytic and ethanol metabolic enzymes was unexpectedly low, whereas proteins involved in cytoplasmic translation, including ribosomal proteins and elongation factors, were highly expressed. These marked differences in the types of predominantly expressed proteins suggest that K. lactis optimizes the balance of proteome resource allocation between metabolism and protein synthesis giving priority to cellular growth. In S. cerevisiae, about 450 duplicate gene pairs were retained after whole-genome duplication. Intriguingly, we found that in the case of duplicates with conserved sequences, the total abundance of proteins encoded by a duplicate pair in S. cerevisiae was similar to that of protein encoded by nonduplicated ortholog in Kluyveromyces yeast. Given the frequency of haploinsufficiency, this observation suggests that conserved duplicate genes, even though minor cases of retained duplicates, do not exhibit a dosage effect in yeast, except for ribosomal proteins. Thus, comparative proteomic analyses across multiple species may reveal not only species-specific characteristics of metabolic processes under nonoptimal culture conditions but also provide valuable insights into intriguing biological principles, including the balance of proteome resource allocation and the role of gene duplication in evolutionary history. PMID:26560065

  18. Elatumic acid: a new ursolic acid congener from Omphalocarpum elatum Miers (Sapotaceae).

    PubMed

    Sandjo, Louis P; Fru, Chi G; Kuete, Victor; Nana, Frederic; Yeboah, Samuel O; Mapitse, Renameditswe; Abegaz, Berhanu M; Efferth, Thomas; Opatz, Till; Ngadjui, Bonaventure T

    2014-01-01

    A new triterpene diastereomer, 1, of the previously reported 3beta,6beta,19alpha-trihydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oic acid-24-carboxylic acid methyl ester was obtained from the stem bark of Omphalocarpum elatum Miers (Sapotaceae) along with a-amyrin acetate (2), spinasterol (3), spinasterol 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (4), and tormentic acid (5). The structures of the isolates were established on the basis of NMR and mass spectrometric data and by comparison with those previously reported in the literature. Compound 1 showed weak antibacterial activity against E. aerogenes ATCC13048 and EA3, K. pneumoniae ATCC29916, and P aeruginosa; it also displayed moderate cytotoxicity against CCRF-CEM, CEM/ADR5000, and MDA-MB231 cells. PMID:25265847

  19. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of Lavandula coronopifolia essential oil against antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ait Said, L; Zahlane, K; Ghalbane, I; El Messoussi, S; Romane, A; Cavaleiro, C; Salgueiro, L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the composition of the essential oil (EO) of Lavandula coronopifolia from Morocco and to evaluate its in vitro antibacterial activity against antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from clinical infections. The antimicrobial activity was assessed by a broth micro-well dilution method using multiresistant clinical isolates of 11 pathogenic bacteria: Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae, Klebsiella ornithinolytica, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Providencia rettgeri, Citrobacter freundii, Hafnia alvei, Salmonella spp., Acinetobacter baumannii and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The main compounds of the oil were carvacrol (48.9%), E-caryophyllene (10.8%) and caryophyllene oxide (7.7%). The oil showed activity against all tested strains with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging between 1% and 4%. For most of the strains, the MIC value was equivalent to the minimal bactericidal concentration value, indicating a clear bactericidal effect of L. coronopifolia EO. PMID:25174508

  20. Chemical composition and antimicrobial evaluation of the essential oils of Bocageopsis pleiosperma Maas.

    PubMed

    Soares, Elzalina R; da Silva, Felipe M A; de Almeida, Richardson A; de Lima, Bruna R; Koolen, Hector H F; Lourenço, Caroline C; Salvador, Marcos J; Flach, Adriana; da Costa, Luiz Antonio M A; de Souza, Antonia Q L; Pinheiro, Maria L B; de Souza, Afonso D L

    2015-01-01

    Essential oils from the leaves, twigs and barks of Bocageopsis pleiosperma Maas were obtained by using hydrodistillation and analysed by using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Several compounds (51) were detected and identified, being ?-bisabolene the main component in all aerial parts of the plant, with higher concentration in the leaves (55.77%), followed by barks (38.53%) and twigs (34.37%). In order to increase the biological knowledge about the essential oil of Bocageopsis species, antimicrobial activities were evaluated against the microorganisms Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterobacter aerogenes, Candida tropicalis, Candida dubliniensis, Candida glabrata and Candida albicans. The essential oil obtained from the barks exhibited a moderate effect against S. epidermidis ATCC 1228 (MIC = 250 ?g/mL), while the other oils did not exhibit antimicrobial activity. These results represent the first report about the chemical composition of B. pleiosperma and the first antimicrobial evaluation with a Bocageopsis species. PMID:25562370

  1. Phagocytic and chemiluminescent responses of mouse peritoneal macrophages to living and killed Salmonella typhimurium and other bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, T.; Blumenstock, E.; Kanegasaki, S.

    1981-06-01

    In the presence of luminol, resident as well as thioglycolate-induced and immunized macrophages emitted chemiluminescence more efficiently when the cells were exposed to living Salmonella typhimurium than when they were exposed to the same bacterium killed by ultraviolet light or heat. This phenomenon was observed whether or not the bacterium was opsonized. The different response to living and killed bacteria was also found with Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus morganii, and Enterobacter aerogenes, but not with Shigella sonnei, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Propionibacterium acnes. The results suggest that macrophages respond better to living, motile bacteria than to nonmotile or killed bacteria. The experimental results obtained with motility mutants of S. typhimurium, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa confirm that macrophages exposed to the motile bacteria emit chemiluminescence more efficiently and ingest the motile bacteria at a much faster rate than the nonmotile bacteria.

  2. Pleural effusion Due to Streptococcus milleri: Case descriptions.

    PubMed

    Madrid-Carbajal, Claudia Janeth; Molinos, Luis; García-Clemente, Marta; Pando-Sandoval, Ana; Fleites, Ana; Casan-Clarà, Pere

    2014-09-01

    In this study we analyzed the characteristics of patients with pleural effusion secondary to Streptococcus milleri studied retrospectively between January and March 2013 and found seven patients with a mean age of 60 years, 43% of which were smokers and 57% with a drinking habit. The most common associated factors were alcoholism, previous pneumonia and diabetes. Other bacteria were identified as Enterobacter aerogenes, Bacteroides and Prevotella intermedia capillosus in two patients. The mean duration of antibiotic therapy was 28 days; six patients underwent pleural drainage by chest tube and one patient needed surgery due to poor clinical progress. The mean duration of hospitalization was 30 days with satisfactory outcome in all cases, despite some changes in residual function. PMID:24439468

  3. Antioxidant and antibacterial potential of pomegranate peel extracts.

    PubMed

    Malviya, Shalini; Arvind; Jha, Alok; Hettiarachchy, Navam

    2014-12-01

    Pomegranate peels of Ganesh variety were subjected to extraction using different solvents viz. water, methanol and ethanol either alone or in combination with water. The extraction yield, antioxidant activity (DPPH and ABTS inhibition) and total phenolic contents were evaluated. Highest yield was obtained from 50 % ethanol: 50 % water (16.3?±?1.99 %). The DPPH and ABTS inhibition activity was found to be the highest for methanol and 70 % ethanol: 30 % water extract (79.5?±?6.5; 94.6?±?6.10), respectively. The phenolic content was the highest in the aqueous extract (438.3?±?14.15). The antibacterial activity of peel extracts was tested against four bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes, Salmonella typhi and Klebsiella pneumoniae and the extracts demonstrated remarkable antibacterial activities against all the tested bacterial strains. The 70 % ethanol: 30 % water and 100 % water extract had a higher antioxidant activity and phenolic content and has the potential for nutraceutical application. PMID:25477693

  4. Biosynthesis, characterization and antimicrobial activity of copper oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) produced using brown alga extract ( Bifurcaria bifurcata)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, Y.; Saffaj, T.; Chagraoui, A.; El Bouari, A.; Brouzi, K.; Tanane, O.; Ihssane, B.

    2014-06-01

    Recently, biosynthesis of nanoparticles has attracted scientists' attention because of the necessity to develop new clean, cost-effective and efficient synthesis techniques. In particular, metal oxide nanoparticles are receiving increasing attention in a large variety of applications. However, up to now, the reports on the biopreparation and characterization of nanocrystalline copper oxide are relatively few compared to some other metal oxides. In this paper, we report for the first time the use of brown alga ( Bifurcaria bifurcata) in the biosynthesis of copper oxide nanoparticles of dimensions 5-45 nm. The synthesized nanomaterial is characterized by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectrum analysis. X-ray diffraction confirms the formation and the crystalline nature of copper oxide nanomaterial. Further, these nanoparticles were found to exhibit high antibacterial activity against two different strains of bacteria Enterobacter aerogenes (Gram negative) and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram positive).

  5. Activity of eravacycline against Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii, including multidrug-resistant isolates, from New York City.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Marie; Olafisoye, Olawole; Cortes, Christopher; Urban, Carl; Landman, David; Quale, John

    2015-03-01

    Eravacycline demonstrated in vitro activity against a contemporary collection of more than 4,000 Gram-negative pathogens from New York City hospitals, with MIC50/MIC90 values, respectively, for Escherichia coli of 0.12/0.5 ?g/ml, Klebsiella pneumoniae of 0.25/1 ?g/ml, Enterobacter aerogenes of 0.25/1 ?g/ml, Enterobacter cloacae 0.5/1 ?g/ml, and Acinetobacter baumannii of 0.5/1 ?g/ml. Activity was retained against multidrug-resistant isolates, including those expressing KPC and OXA carbapenemases. For A. baumannii, eravacycline MICs correlated with increased expression of the adeB gene. PMID:25534744

  6. [Emphysematous cystitis: Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Vera A, Nicolás; Zwanzger M, Christian; Troncoso C, Pablo

    2015-03-01

    Emphysematous cystitis is found in diabetic patients and in individuals with urinary stasis and immunosuppression. We report a 58-year-old male with hypertension, type 2 Diabetes on insulin treatment and central nervous system vasculitis on immunosuppressive therapy. He was admitted with weight loss and gait instability. A PET-CT showed a circumscribed image of air in the bladder contour without involving the upper urinary tract, suggesting emphysematous cystitis. Re-interrogated, the patient referred pneumaturia, dysuria and febrile sensation one week before admission. Urine culture showed Enterobacter aerogenes. He was treated with a urinary catheter, metabolic control and parenteral antimicrobials. The patient was discharged without symptoms 21 days after admission, with the bladder catheter. PMID:26005827

  7. Cathepsin G in Experimental Tuberculosis: Relevance for Antibacterial Protection and Potential for Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Walter, Kerstin; Steinwede, Kathrin; Aly, Sahar; Reinheckel, Thomas; Bohling, Jennifer; Maus, Ulrich A; Ehlers, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Neutrophil serine proteases, such as cathepsin G (CG) and neutrophil elastase (NE), have been implicated in the protective response against infections, including experimental mycobacterial infections. The goal of this study was to explore the role of CG in immunocompetent mice challenged aerogenically with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We used genetically CG- or CG/NE-deficient mice to define the importance of these neutrophil serine proteases for antibacterial protection, granulomatous response, and survival. In addition, we explored the effect of intratracheally delivered liposomally encapsulated CG/NE as a therapeutic approach early during M. tuberculosis infection. Our data show that the presence of CG or CG/NE prolongs survival in M. tuberculosis-infected mice. However, CG is not directly involved in antibacterial defenses, and exogenous intratracheal administration of CG combined with NE does not reduce bacterial loads in the lungs of M. tuberculosis-infected mice. PMID:26320257

  8. Differentiation of bacterial colonies and temporal growth patterns using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrübeoglu, Mehrube; Buck, Gregory W.; Livingston, Daniel W.

    2014-09-01

    Detection and identification of bacteria are important for health and safety. Hyperspectral imaging offers the potential to capture unique spectral patterns and spatial information from bacteria which can then be used to detect and differentiate bacterial species. Here, hyperspectral imaging has been used to characterize different bacterial colonies and investigate their growth over time. Six bacterial species (Pseudomonas fluorescens, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Salmonella enterica, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes) were grown on tryptic soy agar plates. Hyperspectral data were acquired immediately after, 24 hours after, and 96 hours after incubation. Spectral signatures from bacterial colonies demonstrated repeatable measurements for five out of six species. Spatial variations as well as changes in spectral signatures were observed across temporal measurements within and among species at multiple wavelengths due to strengthening or weakening reflectance signals from growing bacterial colonies based on their pigmentation. Between-class differences and within-class similarities were the most prominent in hyperspectral data collected 96 hours after incubation.

  9. Synthesis, Spectral, and In Vitro Antibacterial Studies of Organosilicon(IV) Complexes with Schiff Bases Derived from Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Har Lal; Singh, Jangbhadur; Mukherjee, A.

    2013-01-01

    The present work stems from our interest in the synthesis, characterization, and antibacterial evaluation of organosilicon(IV) complexes of a class of amino-acid-based Schiff base which have been prepared by the interaction of ethoxytrimethylsilane with the Schiff bases (N OH) in 1?:?1 molar ratio. These complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, and spectroscopic studies including electronic IR and NMR (1H, 13C, and 29Si) spectroscopy. The analytical and spectral data suggest trigonal bipyramidal geometry around the silicon atom in the resulting complexes. The ligands and their organosilicon complexes have also been evaluated for in vitro antimicrobial activity against bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Nocardia spp., E. aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., and Staphylococcus spp.). The complexes were found to be more potent as compared to the ligands. PMID:23983671

  10. Study of dynamical process of heat denaturation in optically trapped single microorganisms by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Changan; Li, Yong-qing; Tang, Wei; Newton, Ronald J.

    2003-11-01

    The development of laser traps has made it possible to investigate single cells and record real-time Raman spectra during a heat-denaturation process when the temperature of the surrounding medium is increased. Large changes in the phenylalanine band (1004 cm-1) of near-infrared spectra between living and heat-treated cells were observed in yeast and Escerichia coli and Enterobacter aerogenes bacteria. This change appears to reflect the change in environment of phenylalanine as proteins within the cells unfold as a result of increasing temperatures. As a comparison, we measured Raman spectra of native and heat-denatured solutions of bovine serum albumin proteins, and a similar change in the phenylalanine band of spectra was observed. In addition, we measured Raman spectra of native and heat-treated solutions of pure phenylalanine molecules; no observable difference in vibrational spectra was observed. These findings may make it possible to study conformational changes in proteins within single cells.

  11. FIRST REPORT OF METALLO-?-LACTAMASES PRODUCING Enterobacter spp. STRAINS FROM VENEZUELA

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Dianny; Rodulfo, Hectorina E.; Rodríguez, Lucy; Caña, Luisa E.; Medina, Belkis; Guzman, Militza; Carreño, Numirin; Marcano, Daniel; Donato, Marcos De

    2014-01-01

    Clinical strains of Enterobacter were isolated from Cumana's Central Hospital in Venezuela, and classified as E. cloacae (21), E. aerogenes (7), E. intermedium (1), E. sakazakii (1) and three unclassified. The strains showed high levels of resistance, especially to SXT (58.1%), CRO (48.8%), CAZ (46.6%), PIP (46.4%), CIP (45.2%) and ATM (43.3%). This is the first report for South America of bla VIM-2 in two E. cloacae and one Enterobacter sp., which also showed multiple mechanisms of resistance. Both E. cloacae showed bla TEM-1, but only one showed bla CTX-M-15 gene, while no bla SHV was detected. PMID:24553611

  12. Biosynthesis of Silver Nanoparticles from Marine Seaweed Sargassum cinereum and their Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mohandass, C.; Vijayaraj, A. S.; Rajasabapathy, R.; Satheeshbabu, S.; Rao, S. V.; Shiva, C.; De-Mello, I.

    2013-01-01

    Seaweed extracts of Sargassum cinereum was used as a reducing agent in the eco-friendly extracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticles from an aqueous solution of silver nitrate (AgNO3). High conversion of silver ions to silver nanoparticles was achieved with a reaction temperature of 100° and a seaweed extract concentration of 10% with a residential time of 3 h. Formation of silver nanoparticles was characterised by spectrophotometry and the scanning electron microscope. The average particles size was ranging from 45 to 76 nm. Antimicrobial activities indicate the minimum inhibitory concentration of biologically synthesised nanoparticles tested against the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus with 2.5 ?l (25 ?g/disc). High inhibitions over the growth of Enterobacter aerogenes, Salmonella typhi and Proteus vulgaris were witnessed against the concentrations of 100 ?g/disc. Promising potential and the future prospects of S. cinereum nanoparticles in pharmaceutical research are the highlights in this paper. PMID:24403664

  13. Preflight and postflight microbiological results from 25 space shuttle crews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Bassinger, Virginia J.; Molina, Thomas C.; Gunter, Emelie G.; Groves, Theron O.; Cioletti, Louis J.; Mishra, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    Clinical-microbiological investigations are an important aspect of the crew health stabilization program. To ensure that space crews have neither active nor latent infections, clinical specimens, including throat and nasal swabs and urine samples, are collected at 10 days (L-10) and 2days (L-2) before launch, and immediately after landing (L+0). All samples are examined for the presence of bacteria and fungi. In addition, fecal samples are collected at L-10 and examined for bacteria, fungi and parasites. This paper describes clinical-microbiological findings from 144 astronauts participating in 25 Space Shuttle missions spanning Space Transportation System (STS)-26 to STS-50. The spectrum of microbiological findings from the specimens included 25 bacterial and 11 fungal species. Among the bacteria isolated most frequently were Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis and Streptococcus agalactiae. Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated fungal pathogen.

  14. Decoction, infusion and hydroalcoholic extract of cultivated thyme: antioxidant and antibacterial activities, and phenolic characterisation.

    PubMed

    Martins, Natália; Barros, Lillian; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Silva, Sónia; Henriques, Mariana; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2015-01-15

    Bioactivity of thyme has been described, but mostly related to its essential oils, while studies with aqueous extracts are scarce. Herein, the antioxidant and antibacterial properties of decoction, infusion and hydroalcoholic extract, as also their phenolic compounds, were evaluated and compared. Decoction showed the highest concentration of phenolic compounds (either phenolic acids or flavonoids), followed by infusion and hydroalcoholic extract. In general, the samples were effective against gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus aerogenes, Proteus vulgaris and Enterobacter sakazakii) bacteria, with decoction presenting the most pronounced effect. This sample also displayed the highest radical scavenging activity and reducing power. Data obtained support the idea that compounds with strong antioxidant and antibacterial activities are also water-soluble. Furthermore, the use of thyme infusion and decoction, by both internal and external use, at recommended doses, is safe and no adverse reactions have been described. PMID:25148969

  15. Newbouldiaquinone A: A naphthoquinone-anthraquinone ether coupled pigment, as a potential antimicrobial and antimalarial agent from Newbouldia laevis.

    PubMed

    Eyong, Kenneth Oben; Folefoc, Gabriel Ngosong; Kuete, Victor; Beng, Veronique Penlap; Krohn, Karsten; Hussain, Hidayat; Nkengfack, Augustin Ephram; Saeftel, Michael; Sarite, Salem Ramadan; Hoerauf, Achim

    2006-03-01

    The study of the chemical constituents of the roots of Newbouldia laevis (Bignoniaceae) has resulted in the isolation and characterization of a naphthoquinone-anthraquinone coupled pigment named newbouldiaquinone A (1) together with 14 known compounds: apigenin, chrysoeriol, newbouldiaquinone, lapachol, 2-methylanthraquinone, 2-acetylfuro-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone, oleanolic acid, canthic acid, 2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl triacontanoate, newbouldiamide, 5,7-dihydroxydehydroiso-alpha-lapachone, beta-sitosterol, and beta-sitosterol glucopyranoside. The structure elucidation of the isolated compounds was established based on spectroscopic studies, notably of the 2D NMR spectra. The antimalarial activity of compound (1) against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro shows moderate chemo suppression of parasitic growth. Its antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms was 13- and 24-fold more active against Candida gabrata and Enterobacter aerogens than the reference antibiotics nystatin and gentamycin. PMID:16442576

  16. Chemical composition, antifungal and antibacterial activity of the essential oil of Chamaecyparis nootkatensis from Spain.

    PubMed

    Palá-Paúl, Jesús; Usano-Alemany, Jaime; Granda, Elena; Soria, Ana-Cristina

    2009-07-01

    The chemical composition of the oil of Chamaecyparis nootkatensis (D. Don) Spach. has been analysed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 34 compounds were identified representing more than 90% of the total oil. The oil was richer in monoterpenes than in sesquiterpenes, the major constituents being limonene (53.2%), 6-3-carene (21.0%) and a-pinene (12.2%). The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the oil were also tested against Candida albicans, Bacillus subtilis, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella sp. and Serratia marcescens. Only two of these, Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans, were sensitive to the treatment, inhibition zones of 11 and 14 mm diameter being obtained, respectively. As far as we know, this is the first report of the antifungal and antibacterial activity of this species. PMID:19731613

  17. Antimicrobial activity of two wild mushrooms Clitocybe alexandri (Gill.) Konr. and Rhizopogon roseolus (Corda) T.M. Fries collected from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Solak, M Halil; Kalmis, Erbil; Saglam, Husniye; Kalyoncu, Fatih

    2006-12-01

    Two edible wild mushrooms, namely Clitocybe alexandri (Gill.) Konr. (Tricholomataceae) and Rhizopogon roseolus (Corda) T.M. Fries (Rhizopogonaceae), collected from the southwest of Turkey, were tested for their antimicrobial activity by using the disc diffusion method. The ethanol, methanol, diethyl ether, water, ethylacetate and n-hexane extracts from the fruit bodies of mushrooms were assayed against 13 microorganisms. In comparison with the test antibiotics penicillin, novobiocin, nalidixic acid and ampicillin, the methanol extract obtained from the two mushrooms presented significant activity against E. coli, Bacillus subtilis and Enterobacter aerogenes. On the other hand, the ethylacetate extract from C. alexandri was found to be active against Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, whereas the ethanol extract of Rhizopogon roseolus was active against Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This research has shown that various extracts obtained from two macrofungi could be used in vitro to inhibit the growth of some important bacteria and fungi. PMID:17009205

  18. Molecular identification of aiiA homologous gene from endophytic Enterobacter species and in silico analysis of putative tertiary structure of AHL-lactonase.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P S; Rai, V Ravishankar

    2014-01-01

    The aiiA homologous gene known to encode AHL- lactonase enzyme which hydrolyze the N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) quorum sensing signaling molecules produced by Gram negative bacteria. In this study, the degradation of AHL molecules was determined by cell-free lysate of endophytic Enterobacter species. The percentage of quorum quenching was confirmed and quantified by HPLC method (p<0.0001). Amplification and sequence BLAST analysis showed the presence of aiiA homologous gene in endophytic Enterobacter asburiae VT65, Enterobacter aerogenes VT66 and Enterobacter ludwigii VT70 strains. Sequence alignment analysis revealed the presence of two zinc binding sites, "HXHXDH" motif as well as tyrosine residue at the position 194. Based on known template available at Swiss-Model, putative tertiary structure of AHL-lactonase was constructed. The result showed that novel endophytic strains of Enterobacter genera encode the novel aiiA homologous gene and its structural importance for future study. PMID:24309109

  19. A pH 7 Buffer Devoid of Nitrogen, Sulfur, and Phosphorus for Use in Bacteriological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mallette, M. F.

    1967-01-01

    Apparent pK values were determined for a series of commercially available carboxylic acids in a search for a buffer suitable for bacterial studies at pH 7 in media free from nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus. Of the compounds possessing pK? values near pH 7,3,6-endomethylene-1,2,3,6-tetrahydrophthalic acid (EMTA) was chosen as possessing suitable physical properties, cost, and purity for biological use. Aerobacter aerogenes and Escherichia coli grew normally in its presence but did not utilize it as a sole source and energy. Although good turbidimetric data could not be obtained, Pseudomonas aeruginosa responded in the same qualitative way. Therefore, EMTA promises to be useful in work on endogenous metabolism and in nutritional studies. PMID:5341860

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of ferredoxin in different electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabaev, Nikolay K.; Lemak, A. S.

    1993-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation of bacterial ferredoxin (Peptococcus aerogenes) at constant temperature have been performed. There are two iron-sulfur Fe4S4 clusters in the protein molecule of ferredoxin, which can be in various charge states. After the protein was changed instantaneously from oxidized state in reduced one, the unexpected behavior of the distance between clusters had been observed. Strong coupling of negative charged clusters to the protein matrix provides the clusters come closer together by approximately 0.5 angstroms when the charge on one of them have been increased, even though this charge change leads to an increase in the intercluster repulsion. The molecular dynamics trajectory have been used to specify a quasi-harmonical model to describe a low frequency motions of the protein. In the model each of amino acids and each of iron-sulfur clusters appears as an elementary unit.