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Sample records for bact lactis aerogenes

  1. Debunking BACT

    SciTech Connect

    Finto, K.; Harrison, C.; Lomax, S.

    2006-11-15

    The US Clean Air Act's provisions for the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) of air quality require a new major stationary source to obtain a preconstruction permit that specifies the Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for each regulated pollutant that may be emitted in amounts greater than major source thresholds. The PSD regulations also impose BACT requirements on modifications to existing major sources that result in significant net emissions increases. Rather than a specific technology, BACT is an achievable emissions limitation (or work practice) determined by the permitting authority on a case-by- case basis, taking into account available technologies and energy, environmental, and economic impacts. BACT determinations are generally made by a state environmental agency after an opportunity for public comment. Increasingly, advocacy groups are challenging BACT decisions in administrative and judicial proceedings. As a result, the permitting process has been substantially delayed, even for facilities that have agreed to install state-of-the-art emissions control technology. This article outlines the key statutory and regulatory elements of BACT, how to analyze alternative technologies and emissions limitations, and prepare an application for an appropriate and final BACT determination. It is based largely on the regulatory definition of BACT and recent Environmental Appeals Board (EAB) decisions. Case-by-case BACT analyses do not necessarily yield a single, objectively correct BACT determination. The permitting agency must exercise a high degree of technical judgment in any BACT analysis, particularly for coal-fired plants, which use a wide variety of coals, combustion techniques, and other site-specific factors. 12 refs.

  2. Serine utilization by Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Vining, L C; Magasanik, B

    1981-01-01

    Klebsiella aerogenes was found to contain a specific L-serine dehydrase that was induced by threonine, glycine or leucine, but not by its substrate. Cellular concentrations were sensitive to carbon rather than nitrogen sources in the growth medium. A nonspecific isoleucine-sensitive L-threonine dehydrase supplemented the specific L-serine dehydrase activity. K. aerogenes also contains a leucine-inducible L-threonine dehydrogenase which probably initiated a threonine-utilization pathway in which the serine-specific dehydrate participated. Strains that were altered in their ability to metabolize serine differed in either L-serine dehydrase or L-threonine dehydrase activity. Thus, K. aerogenes growing on L-serine as a sole nitrogen source relies upon two enzymes that metabolize the amino acid as subsidiary functions. PMID:6783624

  3. Dechlorination of DDT by Aerobacter aerogenes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1966-01-01

    Dechlorination of DDT to DDD in higher animals requires the presence of molecular oxygen, but in microorganisms the presence of oxygen hinders dechlorination. In cell-free preparations of Aerobacter aerogenes, the use of selected metabolic inhibitors indicated that reduced Fe(II) cytochrome oxidase was responsible for DDT dechlorination. This finding may possibly explain. the persistence of DDT residues in soils and sediments.

  4. The aerogen-π bonds involving π systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Meng; Cheng, Jianbo; Li, Wenzuo; Xiao, Bo; Li, Qingzhong

    2016-05-01

    Ab initio calculations have been performed to study the complexes of XeOF2 and a series of π systems including ethyne, ethene, benzene, pyrrole, furan, and thiophene. More than two structures were obtained for each complex with an aerogen-π bond. The configuration of complex has a significant effect on its stability. The strength of aerogen-π interaction is comparable with that of lone pair-aerogen interaction and conventional hydrogen bonds. A breakdown of the aerogen-π interaction attributes its stability to approximately equal parts electrostatic and polarization energies, with a relatively smaller contribution from dispersion energy.

  5. Ribitol Catabolic Pathway in Klebsiella aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Charnetzky, W. T.; Mortlock, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    In Klebsiella aerogenes W70, there is an inducible pathway for the catabolism of ribitol consisting of at least two enzymes, ribitol dehydrogenase (RDH) and d-ribulokinase (DRK). These two enzymes are coordinately controlled and induced in response to d-ribulose, an intermediate of the pathway. Whereas wild-type K. aerogenes W70 are unable to utilize xylitol as a carbon and energy source, mutants constitutive for the ribitol pathway are able to utilize RDH to oxidize the unusual pentitol, xylitol, to d-xylulose. These mutants are able to grow on xylitol, presumably by utilization of the d-xylulose produced. Mutants constitutive for l-fucose isomerase can utilize the isomerase to convert d-arabinose to d-ribulose. In the presence of d-ribulose, RDH and DRK are induced, and such mutants are thus able to phosphorylate the d-ribulose by using the DRK of the ribitol pathway. Derivatives of an l-fucose isomerase-constitutive mutant were plated on d-arabinose, ribitol, and xylitol to select and identify mutations in the ribitol pathway. Using the transducing phage PW52, we were able to demonstrate genetic linkage of the loci involved. Three-point crosses, using constitutive mutants as donors and RDH−, DRK− double mutants as recipients and selecting for DRK+ transductants on d-arabinose, resulted in DRK+RDH+-constitutive, DRK+RDH+-inducible, and DRK+RDH−-inducible transductants but no detectable DRK+RDH− constitutive transductants, data consistent with the order rbtC-rbtD-rbtK, where rbtC is a control site and rbtD and rbtK correspond to the sites for the sites for the enzymes RDH and DRK, respectively. PMID:4366025

  6. Transmission of Enterobacter aerogenes septicemia in healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Jha, Piyush; Kim, Choon-Mee; Kim, Dong-Min; Chung, Jong-Hoon; Yoon, Na-Ra; Jha, Babita; Kim, Seok Won; Jang, Sook Jin; Ahn, Young-Joon; Chung, Jae Keun; Jeon, Doo Young

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes is recognized as an important bacterial pathogen in hospital-acquired infections. This report describes two unusual cases of septicemia caused by E. aerogenes in immunocompetent healthcare workers. E. aerogenes was isolated from blood cultures of the two patients experiencing septicemia. The clinical isolates were initially identified as E. aerogenes using a VITEK II automated system and 16S rRNA sequence analysis, and; both isolates involved in the outbreak shared a common pulse-field gel electrophoresis pattern. The similarities between the two cases included the simultaneous development of gastroenteritis symptoms, severe sepsis and thrombocytopenia after taking intravenous injections of ketorolac tromethamine. A common source of normal saline, a 100 mL bottle, was used for diluting the analgesic in both cases. In addition to the general population, healthcare workers, especially those who are also intravenous drug abusers, should be considered subjects that could cause a transmission of Enterobacter infection. PMID:27610316

  7. Partial hydrolysis of dieldrin by Aerobacter aerogenes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, G.

    1968-01-01

    Although dieldrin (1,2,3 ,4,10,10-hexachloro- 6,7-epoxy-1 ,4 ,4a ,5 ,6 ,7 ,8, 8a-octahydro-1 ,4-endo, exo-5, 8-dimethanonaphthalene) metabolism by mammals (F. Korte and H. Arent, Life Sci. 4:2017, 1965) and insects (D. F. Heath and M. Vanderkar, Brit. J. Ind. Med. 21:269, 1964) has been reported, little is known about the degradation of this important pesticide by microorganisms. Korte et al. (Ann. Chem. Liebigs 656:135, 1962) and Chacko et al. (Science 154: 893, 1966) reported that a number of ubiquitous microorganisms were incapable of degrading dieldrin; however, more recently Matsumura and Boush (Science 156:959, 1967) isolated several species of Pseudomonas and Bacillus which could degrade dieldrin, from a number of soil samples having similar activity. They did not specifically attempt to identify the dieldrin metabolites formed, but they did suggest, on the basis of an identical RF value with an authentic control that 6,7-trans-dihydroxydihydroaldrin (aldrin diol) might be a major product. Work carried out concurrently in this laboratory has shown that another ubiquitous bacterium, Aerobacter aerogenes, converts dieldrin in vitro to a compound chromatographically

  8. Single-electron aerogen bonds: Do they exist?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Mohammadian-Sabet, Fariba; Solimannejad, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    A novel type of σ-hole interaction is characterized between some noble gas containing molecules (KrOF2, KrO3, XeOF2 and XeO3) and methyl (CH3) or ethyl (C2H5) radical by means of ab initio calculations. This interaction is named as single-electron aerogen bond (SEAB), in view of the concepts of aerogen bond and single-electron bond interactions. The properties of SEABs are studied by molecular electrostatic potential, quantum theory of atom in molecules, natural bonding orbital and noncovalent interaction index analyses. The formation of an O⋯H interaction tends to increase the strength of the SEAB, when they coexist in a ternary complex.

  9. Enterobacter aerogenes Needle Stick Leads to Improved Biological Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Johanson, Richard E.

    2004-08-01

    A laboratory worker who received a needle stick from a contaminated needle while working with a culture containing Enterobactor aerogenes developed a laboratory acquired infection. Although this organism has been shown to cause community and nosocomial infections, there have been no documented cases of a laboratory acquired infections. Lessons learned from the event led to corrective actions which included modification of lab procedures, development of a biological inventory tracking and risk identification system and the establishment of an effective biological safety program.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Strain YF11

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yuhui; Song, Lifu; Feng, Wenjing; Pei, Guangsheng; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Zhichao; Sun, Jibin

    2013-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain YF11 is a food preservative bacterium with a high capacity to produce nisin. Here, we announce the draft genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis YF11 (2,527,433 bp with a G+C content of 34.81%). PMID:23929487

  11. Biological Conversion of Glycerol to Ethanol by Enterobacter aerogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwachukwu, Raymond E. S.

    In a search to turn the economically and environmentally non-valuable "waste" streams of biodiesel production into a profitable byproduct, a mutant strain of Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 13048 was developed by six-tube subculturing technique. This technique is based on the principle of adaptive evolution, and involved subculturing the bacterium in a tryptic soy broth without dextrose (TSB) containing specific glycerol and ethanol concentration for six consecutive times. Then, the six consecutive subculturing was repeated in a fresh TSB of higher glycerol and ethanol concentrations. A new mutant strain, E. aerogenes S012, which could withstand a combination of 200 g/l glycerol and 30 g/l ethanol concentrations, was developed. The wild and mutant strains were used for the fermentation of pure (P-) and recovered (R-) glycerol. Taguchi and full factorial methods of design of experiments were used to screen and optimize the important process factors that influence the microbial production of ethanol. A statistically sound regression model was used to establish the mathematical relationship between the process variables and ethanol production. Temperature of 38°C, agitation speed of 200 rpm, pH of 6.3-6.6, and microaerobic condition were the optimum process conditions. Different pretreatment methods to recover glycerol from the crude glycerol and the subsequent fermentation method showed that direct acidification using 85% H3PO4 was the best. The R-glycerol contained 51% pure glycerol and 21% methanol. The wild strain, E. aerogenes ATCC 13048, produced only 12 g/l and 12.8 g/l ethanol from 20 g/l P- and R-glycerol respectively, and could not utilize higher glycerol concentrations. The mutant, E. aerogenes S012, produced ethanol amount and yield of 43 g/l and 1.12 mol/mol-glycerol from P-glycerol, respectively within 96 h. It also produced ethanol amount and yield of 26.8 g/l and 1.07 mol/mol-glycerol, respectively, from R-glycerol within the same duration. In a

  12. Enhancement of Nisin Production by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Dussault, Dominic; Vu, Khanh Dang; Lacroix, Monique

    2016-09-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis BSA (L. lactis BSA) was isolated from a commercial fermented product (BSA Food Ingredients, Montreal, Canada) containing mixed bacteria that are used as starter for food fermentation. In order to increase the bacteriocin production by L. lactis BSA, different fermentation conditions were conducted. They included different volumetric combinations of two culture media (the Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS) broth and skim milk), agitation level (0 and 100 rpm) and concentration of commercial nisin (0, 0.15, and 0.30 µg/ml) added into culture media as stimulant agent for nisin production. During fermentation, samples were collected and used for antibacterial evaluation against Lactobacillus sakei using agar diffusion assay. Results showed that medium containing 50 % MRS broth and 50 % skim milk gave better antibacterial activity as compared to other medium formulations. Agitation (100 rpm) did not improve nisin production by L. lactis BSA. Adding 0.15 µg/ml of nisin into the medium-containing 50 % MRS broth and 50 % skim milk caused the highest nisin activity of 18,820 AU/ml as compared to other medium formulations. This activity was 4 and ~3 times higher than medium containing 100 % MRS broth without added nisin (~4700 AU/ml) and 100 % MRS broth with 0.15 µg/ml of added nisin (~6650 AU/ml), respectively. PMID:27147536

  13. Exploring the Genome of Cheese Starter Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CECT 4433

    PubMed Central

    Tschoeke, Diogo Antonio; Moreira, Ana Paula B.; Chimetto Tonon, Luciane A.; de Mesquita, Milene Miranda A.; Gregoracci, Gustavo B.; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Valle, Rogério; Thompson, Cristiane C.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequences of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CECT 4433, a cheese fermentation starter strain. The genome provides further insight into the genomic plasticity, biocomplexity (including gene strain specifics), and evolution of these genera. PMID:25395632

  14. Exploring the Genome of Cheese Starter Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CECT 4433.

    PubMed

    Tschoeke, Diogo Antonio; Moreira, Ana Paula B; Chimetto Tonon, Luciane A; de Mesquita, Milene Miranda A; Gregoracci, Gustavo B; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Valle, Rogério; Thompson, Cristiane C; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequences of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CECT 4433, a cheese fermentation starter strain. The genome provides further insight into the genomic plasticity, biocomplexity (including gene strain specifics), and evolution of these genera. PMID:25395632

  15. Characterization of N-deoxyribosyltransferase from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yukiko; Masaki, Takeharu; Chohnan, Shigeru

    2007-10-01

    A nucleoside N-deoxyribosyltransferase-homologous gene was detected by homological search in the genomic DNA of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. The gene yejD is composed of 477 nucleotides encoding 159 amino acids with only 25% identity, which is low in comparison to the amino acid sequences of the N-deoxyribosyltransferases from other lactic acid bacteria, i.e. Lactobacillus leichmannii and Lactobacillus helveticus. The residues responsible for catalytic and substrate-binding sites in known enzymes are conserved at Gln49, Asp73, Asp93 (or Asp95), and Glu101, respectively. The recombinant YejD expressed in Escherichia coli shows a 2-deoxyribosyl transfer activity to and from both bases of purine and pyrimidine, showing that YejD should be categorized as a class II N-deoxyribosyltransferase. Interestingly, the base-exchange activity as well as the heat stability of YejD was enhanced by the presence of monovalent cations such as K(+), NH(4)(+), and Rb(+), indicating that the Lactococcus enzyme is a K(+)-activated Type II enzyme. However, divalent cations including Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) significantly inhibit the activity. Whether or not the yejD gene product actually participates in the nucleoside salvage pathway of Lc. lactis remains unclear, but the lactic acid bacterium possesses the gene coding for the nucleoside N-deoxyribosyltransferase activated by K(+) on its genome. PMID:17881307

  16. Bioconversion of glycerol to ethanol by a mutant Enterobacter aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to develop, by adaptive evolution, mutant strains of Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 13048 that are capable of withstanding high glycerol concentration as well as resisting ethanol-inhibition. The mutant will be used for high ethanol fermentation from glycerol feedstock. Ethanol production from pure (P-) and recovered (R-) glycerol using the stock was evaluated. A six-tube-subculture-generations method was used for developing the mutant. This involved subculturing the organism six consecutive times in tubes containing the same glycerol and ethanol concentrations at the same culture conditions. Then, the glycerol and/or ethanol concentration was increased and the six subculture generations were repeated. A strain capable of growing in 200 g/L glycerol and 30 g/L ethanol was obtained. The ability of this mutant, vis-à-vis the original strain, in utilizing glycerol in a high glycerol containing medium, with the concomitant ethanol yield, was assessed. Tryptic soy broth without dextrose (TSB) was used as the fermentation medium. Fermentation products were analyzed using HPLC. In a 20 g/L glycerol TSB, E. aerogenes ATCC 13048 converted 18.5 g/L P-glycerol and 17.8 g/L R-glycerol into 12 and 12.8 g/L ethanol, respectively. In a 50 g/L P-glycerol TSB, it utilized only 15.6 g/L glycerol; but the new strain used up 39 g/L, yielding 20 g/L ethanol after 120 h, an equivalence of 1.02 mol ethanol/mol-glycerol. This is the highest ethanol yield reported from glycerol bioconversion. The result of this P-glycerol fermentation can be duplicated using the R-glycerol from biodiesel production. PMID:22455837

  17. Isolation and characterization of a bacteriophage phiEap-2 infecting multidrug resistant Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Erna; Wei, Xiao; Ma, Yanyan; Yin, Zhe; Li, Huan; Lin, Weishi; Wang, Xuesong; Li, Chao; Shen, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Ruixiang; Yang, Huiying; Jiang, Aimin; Yang, Wenhui; Yuan, Jing; Zhao, Xiangna

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes (Enterobacteriaceae) is an important opportunistic pathogen that causes hospital-acquired pneumonia, bacteremia, and urinary tract infections. Recently, multidrug-resistant E. aerogenes have been a public health problem. To develop an effective antimicrobial agent, bacteriophage phiEap-2 was isolated from sewage and its genome was sequenced because of its ability to lyse the multidrug-resistant clinical E. aerogenes strain 3-SP. Morphological observations suggested that the phage belongs to the Siphoviridae family. Comparative genome analysis revealed that phage phiEap-2 is related to the Salmonella phage FSL SP-031 (KC139518). All of the structural gene products (except capsid protein) encoded by phiEap-2 had orthologous gene products in FSL SP-031 and Serratia phage Eta (KC460990). Here, we report the complete genome sequence of phiEap-2 and major findings from the genomic analysis. Knowledge of this phage might be helpful for developing therapeutic strategies against E. aerogenes. PMID:27320081

  18. Isolation and characterization of a bacteriophage phiEap-2 infecting multidrug resistant Enterobacter aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Erna; Wei, Xiao; Ma, Yanyan; Yin, Zhe; Li, Huan; Lin, Weishi; Wang, Xuesong; Li, Chao; Shen, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Ruixiang; Yang, Huiying; Jiang, Aimin; Yang, Wenhui; Yuan, Jing; Zhao, Xiangna

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes (Enterobacteriaceae) is an important opportunistic pathogen that causes hospital-acquired pneumonia, bacteremia, and urinary tract infections. Recently, multidrug-resistant E. aerogenes have been a public health problem. To develop an effective antimicrobial agent, bacteriophage phiEap-2 was isolated from sewage and its genome was sequenced because of its ability to lyse the multidrug-resistant clinical E. aerogenes strain 3-SP. Morphological observations suggested that the phage belongs to the Siphoviridae family. Comparative genome analysis revealed that phage phiEap-2 is related to the Salmonella phage FSL SP-031 (KC139518). All of the structural gene products (except capsid protein) encoded by phiEap-2 had orthologous gene products in FSL SP-031 and Serratia phage Eta (KC460990). Here, we report the complete genome sequence of phiEap-2 and major findings from the genomic analysis. Knowledge of this phage might be helpful for developing therapeutic strategies against E. aerogenes. PMID:27320081

  19. Further studies on the sources of Klebsiella aerogenes in hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, E. M.; Pool, R.; Brayson, J. C.; Edmondson, A. S.; Munro, M. E.; Shinebaum, R.

    1979-01-01

    We report an investigation into faecal carriage of Klebsiella aerogenes and the distribution of this organism in the environment of three wards. In all three wards faecal carriage rates were high (60-70%). The faecal carriage rate increased with antibiotic administration and with length of in-patient stay. K. aerogenes was widely distributed in the ward environment and was found on the hands of nursing staff. Clusters of isolations of K. aerogenes of the same serotype were demonstrated indicating either patient-to-patient transfer or a common source of infection. The results indicate that even under conditions in which there are no outbreaks of K. aerogenes infection, there is a large reservoir of this organism both in the bowel of patients and in the ward environment. PMID:390043

  20. Microbiota of Minas cheese as influenced by the nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05.

    PubMed

    Perin, Luana Martins; Dal Bello, Barbara; Belviso, Simona; Zeppa, Giuseppe; de Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes; Cocolin, Luca; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2015-12-01

    Minas cheese is a popular dairy product in Brazil that is traditionally produced using raw or pasteurized cow milk. This study proposed an alternative production of Minas cheese using raw goat milk added of a nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. An in situ investigation was carried on to evaluate the interactions between the L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 and the autochthonous microbiota of a Minas cheese during the ripening; production of biogenic amines (BAs) was assessed as a safety aspect. Minas cheese was produced in two treatments (A, by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05, and B, without adding this strain), in three independent repetitions (R1, R2, and R3). Culture dependent (direct plating) and independent (rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE) methods were employed to characterize the microbiota and to assess the possible interferences caused by L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. BA amounts were measured using HPLC. A significant decrease in coagulase-positive cocci was observed in the cheeses produced by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 (cheese A). The rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE highlighted the differences in the microbiota of both cheeses, separating them into two different clusters. Lactococcus sp. was found as the main microorganism in both cheeses, and the microbiota of cheese A presented a higher number of species. High concentrations of tyramine were found in both cheeses and, at specific ripening times, the BA amounts in cheese B were significantly higher than in cheese A (p<0.05). The interaction of nisin producer L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 was demonstrated in situ, by demonstration of its influence in the complex microbiota naturally present in a raw goat milk cheese and by controlling the growth of coagulase-positive cocci. L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 influenced also the production of BA determining that their amounts in the cheeses were maintained at acceptable levels for human consumption. PMID:26310130

  1. A hospital epidemic caused by gentamicin-resistant Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Curie, K; Speller, D C; Simpson, R A; Stephens, M; Cooke, D I

    1978-02-01

    In the 15 months, February 1976 to April 1977, more than 241 patients became colonized with a strain of Klebsiella aerogenes, capsular serotype K2, resistant to most antibiotics. Urinary tract infection was the most common clinical manifestation but bacteraemia and, occasionally, infections of other sites were encountered. The main reservoir of the epidemic klebsiella was the gut, urine and skin of colonized patients. Gut carriage among staff was very uncommon. The most susceptible patients were elderly males, with debilitating illnesses and urinary tract abnormalities, especially if they were catheterized or receiving antibiotics. Likely vehicles for spread were the hands of staff, and contaminated bedpans and urinals. Control measures were directed at these factors. At the end of April 1977 no new cases had occurred for 3 months in the ward in which the outbreak began, and which had been the main focus of infection, and only 5 patients in the affected hospitals were known to be colonized by the epidemic klebsiella. PMID:340580

  2. A hospital epidemic caused by gentamicin-resistant Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Curie, K.; Speller, D. C.; Simpson, R. A.; Stephens, M.; Cooke, D. I.

    1978-01-01

    In the 15 months, February 1976 to April 1977, more than 241 patients became colonized with a strain of Klebsiella aerogenes, capsular serotype K2, resistant to most antibiotics. Urinary tract infection was the most common clinical manifestation but bacteraemia and, occasionally, infections of other sites were encountered. The main reservoir of the epidemic klebsiella was the gut, urine and skin of colonized patients. Gut carriage among staff was very uncommon. The most susceptible patients were elderly males, with debilitating illnesses and urinary tract abnormalities, especially if they were catheterized or receiving antibiotics. Likely vehicles for spread were the hands of staff, and contaminated bedpans and urinals. Control measures were directed at these factors. At the end of April 1977 no new cases had occurred for 3 months in the ward in which the outbreak began, and which had been the main focus of infection, and only 5 patients in the affected hospitals were known to be colonized by the epidemic klebsiella. PMID:340580

  3. Methionine-to-Cysteine Recycling in Klebsiella aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Seiflein, Thomas A.; Lawrence, Jeffrey G.

    2001-01-01

    In the enteric bacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, sulfate is reduced to sulfide and assimilated into the amino acid cysteine; in turn, cysteine provides the sulfur atom for other sulfur-bearing molecules in the cell, including methionine. These organisms cannot use methionine as a sole source of sulfur. Here we report that this constraint is not shared by many other enteric bacteria, which can use either cysteine or methionine as the sole source of sulfur. The enteric bacterium Klebsiella aerogenes appears to use at least two pathways to allow the reduced sulfur of methionine to be recycled into cysteine. In addition, the ability to recycle methionine on solid media, where cys mutants cannot use methionine as a sulfur source, appears to be different from that in liquid media, where they can. One pathway likely uses a cystathionine intermediate to convert homocysteine to cysteine and is induced under conditions of sulfur starvation, which is likely sensed by low levels of the sulfate reduction intermediate adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate. The CysB regulatory proteins appear to control activation of this pathway. A second pathway may use a methanesulfonate intermediate to convert methionine-derived methanethiol to sulfite. While the transsulfurylation pathway may be directed to recovery of methionine, the methanethiol pathway likely represents a general salvage mechanism for recovery of alkane sulfide and alkane sulfonates. Therefore, the relatively distinct biosyntheses of cysteine and methionine in E. coli and Salmonella appear to be more intertwined in Klebsiella. PMID:11114934

  4. BACT Simulation User Guide (Version 7.0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the structure and operation of a simulation model of the Benchmark Active Control Technology (BACT) Wind-Tunnel Model. The BACT system was designed, built, and tested at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Benchmark Models Program and was developed to perform wind-tunnel experiments to obtain benchmark quality data to validate computational fluid dynamics and computational aeroelasticity codes, to verify the accuracy of current aeroservoelasticity design and analysis tools, and to provide an active controls testbed for evaluating new and innovative control algorithms for flutter suppression and gust load alleviation. The BACT system has been especially valuable as a control system testbed.

  5. [Finding of dairy yeasts Kluyveromyces lactis var. lactis in natural habitats].

    PubMed

    Naumov, G I; Naumova, E S; Glushakova, A M; Kachalkin, A V; Chernov, I Y

    2014-01-01

    Well-known yeasts Kluyveromyces lactis var. lactis, which are usually associated with dairy prod- ucts, were discovered in nature (in woodland park soil under Impatiens glandulifera Royle plants). Reliable identification of the yeasts was carried out using physiological criteria (lactose and maltose utilization) and molecular markers (nucleotide sequence of the 5.8S-ITS rDNA fragment, pulsed-field electrophoresis, and Southern hybridization of chromosomal DNA with the LAC4 probe). Ecology of KI. lactis var. lactis is discussed. PMID:25941717

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Putrescine-Producing Strain Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1AA59.

    PubMed

    Ladero, Victor; Del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M; Fernandez, María; Mayo, Baltasar; Martín, M Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    We report here the 2,576,542-bp genome annotated draft assembly sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1AA59. This strain-isolated from a traditional cheese-produces putrescine, one of the most frequently biogenic amines found in dairy products. PMID:26089428

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Putrescine-Producing Strain Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1AA59

    PubMed Central

    Ladero, Victor; del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M.; Fernandez, María; Mayo, Baltasar; Martín, M. Cruz

    2015-01-01

    We report here the 2,576,542-bp genome annotated draft assembly sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1AA59. This strain—isolated from a traditional cheese—produces putrescine, one of the most frequently biogenic amines found in dairy products. PMID:26089428

  8. Comparative Phenotypic and Molecular Genetic Profiling of Wild Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Strains of the L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris Genotypes, Isolated from Starter-Free Cheeses Made of Raw Milk▿

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Elena; Alegría, Ángel; Delgado, Susana; Martín, M. Cruz; Mayo, Baltasar

    2011-01-01

    Twenty Lactococcus lactis strains with an L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype isolated from five traditional cheeses made of raw milk with no added starters belonging to the L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris genotypes (lactis and cremoris genotypes, respectively; 10 strains each) were subjected to a series of phenotypic and genetic typing methods, with the aims of determining their phylogenetic relationships and suitability as starters. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of intact genomes digested with SalI and SmaI proved that all strains were different except for three isolates of the cremoris genotype, which showed identical PFGE profiles. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis using internal sequences of seven loci (namely, atpA, rpoA, pheS, pepN, bcaT, pepX, and 16S rRNA gene) revealed considerable intergenotype nucleotide polymorphism, although deduced amino acid changes were scarce. Analysis of the MLST data for the present strains and others from other dairy and nondairy sources showed that all of them clustered into the cremoris or lactis genotype group, by using both independent and combined gene sequences. These two groups of strains also showed distinctive carbohydrate fermentation and enzyme activity profiles, with the strains in the cremoris group showing broader profiles. However, the profiles of resistance/susceptibility to 16 antibiotics were very similar, showing no atypical resistance, except for tetracycline resistance in three identical cremoris genotype isolates. The numbers and concentrations of volatile compounds produced in milk by the strains belonging to these two groups were clearly different, with the cremoris genotype strains producing higher concentrations of more branched-chain, derived compounds. Together, the present results support the idea that the lactis and cremoris genotypes of phenotypic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis actually represent true subspecies. Some strains of the two subspecies

  9. Inorganic phosphate accumulation and cadmium detoxification in Klebsiella aerogenes NCTC 418 growing in continuous culture

    SciTech Connect

    Aiking, H.; Stijnman, A.; van Garderen, C.; van Heerikhuizen, H.; van Riet, J.

    1984-02-01

    Klebsiella aerogenes NCTC-418, growing in the presence of cadmium under glucose-, sulfate-, or phosphate-limited conditions in continuous culture, exhibits two different cadmium detoxifying mechanisms. In addition to sulfide formation, increased accumulation of P/sub i/ is demonstrated as a novel mechanism. Intracellular cadmium is always quantitatively counterbalanced by a concerted increase in both inorganic sulfide and P/sub i/ contents of the cells. This led to the conclusion that production of sulfide and accumulation of P/sub i/ are detoxification mechanisms present in K. aerogenes but that their relative importance is crucially dependent on the strain and the growth conditions employed.

  10. The Function of UreB in Klebsiella aerogenes Urease†

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Eric L.; Boer, Jodi L.; Farrugia, Mark A.; Flugga, Nicholas; Towns, Christopher L.; Hausinger, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    Urease from Klebsiella aerogenes is composed of three subunits (UreA, UreB, and UreC) which assemble into a (UreABC)3 quaternary structure. UreC harbors the dinuclear nickel active site, whereas the functions of UreA and UreB remain unknown. UreD and UreF accessory proteins previously were suggested to reposition UreB and increase exposure of the nascent urease active site, thus facilitating metallocenter assembly. In this study, cells were engineered to separately produce (UreAC)3 or UreB, and the purified proteins were characterized. Monomeric UreB spontaneously binds to the trimeric heterodimer of UreA plus UreC to form (UreABC*)3 apoprotein, as shown by gel filtration chromatography, integration of electrophoretic gel band intensities, and mass spectrometry. Similar to authentic urease apoprotein, active enzyme is produced by incubation of (UreABC*)3 with Ni2+ and bicarbonate. Conversely, UreBΔ1-19, lacking the 19 residue potential hinge and tether to UreC, does not form a complex with (UreAC)3 and yields negligible levels of active enzyme when incubated under activation conditions with (UreAC)3. Comparison of activities and nickel contents for (UreAC)3, (UreABC*)3, and (UreABC)3 samples treated with Ni2+ and bicarbonate and then desalted indicates that UreB facilitates efficient incorporation of the metal into the active site and protects the bound metal from chelation. Amylose resin pull-down studies reveal that MBP-UreD (a fusion of maltose binding protein with UreD) forms complexes with (UreABC)3, (UreAC)3, and UreB in vivo, but not in vitro. By contrast, MBP-UreD does not form an in vivo complex with UreBΔ1-19. The soluble MBP-UreD:UreF:UreG complex binds in vitro to (UreABC)3, but not to (UreAC)3 or UreB. Together these data demonstrate that UreB facilitates the interaction of urease with accessory proteins during metallocenter assembly, with the N-terminal hinge and tether region being specifically required for this process. In addition to its role in

  11. Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, Isolated from a Nonscalded Curd Pressed Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Velly, H.; Abraham, A.-L.; Loux, V.; Delacroix-Buchet, A.; Fonseca, F.; Bouix, M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium used in the production of many fermented foods, such as dairy products. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, isolated from nonscalded curd pressed cheese. This genome sequence provides information in relation to dairy environment adaptation. PMID:25377704

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis CRL264, a Citrate-Fermenting Strain

    PubMed Central

    Zuljan, Federico; Espariz, Martín; Blancato, Victor S.; Esteban, Luis; Alarcón, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis CRL264, a natural strain isolated from artisanal cheese from northwest Argentina. L. lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis is one of the most important microorganisms used as starter culture around the world. The CRL264 strain constitutes a model microorganism in the studies on the generation of aroma compounds (diacetyl, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol) by lactic acid bacteria. Our genome analysis shows similar genetic organization to other available genomes of L. lactis bv. diacetylactis strains. PMID:26847906

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis CRL264, a Citrate-Fermenting Strain.

    PubMed

    Zuljan, Federico; Espariz, Martín; Blancato, Victor S; Esteban, Luis; Alarcón, Sergio; Magni, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis CRL264, a natural strain isolated from artisanal cheese from northwest Argentina. L. lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis is one of the most important microorganisms used as starter culture around the world. The CRL264 strain constitutes a model microorganism in the studies on the generation of aroma compounds (diacetyl, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol) by lactic acid bacteria. Our genome analysis shows similar genetic organization to other available genomes of L. lactis bv. diacetylactis strains. PMID:26847906

  14. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: characterization of the bacteriocin.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Danielle N; Todorov, Svetoslav D; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T; Franco, Bernadette D G M

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi) was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its antimicrobial activity. The bacteriocin presented a broad spectrum of activity, was sensitive to proteolytic enzymes, resistant to heat and pH extremes, and not affected by the presence of SDS, Tween 20, Tween 80, EDTA or NaCl. Bacteriocin production was dependent on the components of the culture media, especially nitrogen source and salts. When tested by PCR, the bacteriocin gene presented 100% homology to nisin Z gene. These properties indicate that this L. lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality. PMID:25763065

  15. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: Characterization of the bacteriocin

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Danielle N.; Todorov, Svetoslav D.; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T.; Franco, Bernadette D.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi) was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its antimicrobial activity. The bacteriocin presented a broad spectrum of activity, was sensitive to proteolytic enzymes, resistant to heat and pH extremes, and not affected by the presence of SDS, Tween 20, Tween 80, EDTA or NaCl. Bacteriocin production was dependent on the components of the culture media, especially nitrogen source and salts. When tested by PCR, the bacteriocin gene presented 100% homology to nisin Z gene. These properties indicate that this L. lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality. PMID:25763065

  16. Enhanced Aerogen-π Interaction by a Cation-π Force.

    PubMed

    Miao, Junjian; Song, Bo; Gao, Yi

    2016-02-18

    The interaction between a noble gas atom and an aromatic π-electron system, which mainly originates from the London dispersion force, is very weak and has not attracted enough attention yet. Herein, we reported a type of notably enhanced aerogen-π interaction between cation-π systems and noble gas atoms. The binding strength of a divalent cation-π system with a xenon atom is comparable to a moderate hydrogen bond (up to ca. 7 kcal mol(-1)), whereas krypton and argon atoms produce slightly weaker interactions. Energy-decomposition analysis reveals that the induction interaction is responsible for the stabilization of divalent cation-π⋅Xe species besides the dispersion interaction. Our results might be helpful to increase the understanding of some unsolved mysteries of aerogens. PMID:26699400

  17. [Evaluation of aerogenic occupational health risk for workers engaged into periclase-carbon refractories production].

    PubMed

    Drugova, O G; Roslyĭ, O F

    2014-01-01

    The work is aimed to evaluate aerogenic occupational health risk for workers engaged into preparation and formation of technologic mass in periclase-carbon refractories production, using organic binding agent according to criteria R 2.2.2006-05 and R 2.2.1716-03. Occupational dust is a complicated chemical mixture containing manganum oxide, phenol, formaldehyde, aerosols containing silicon, benzpyrene (if "Carbores" binding agent used). Hygienic evaluation revealed occupational health risk due to occupational dust at workplaces of runners operator, press operator, batching feeder, crane operator. Aerogenic occupational risk at workplace of grinder operator is assessed as negligibly small (tolerable). Experimental and epidemiologic studies prove probable (proof category 1B) occupational risk of respiratory disease at the studied production. PMID:25282807

  18. Enhanced dark hydrogen fermentation by addition of ferric oxide nanoparticles using Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Richen; Cheng, Jun; Ding, Lingkan; Song, Wenlu; Liu, Min; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-05-01

    Ferric oxide nanoparticles (FONPs) were used to facilitate dark hydrogen fermentation using Enterobacter aerogenes. The hydrogen yield of glucose increased from 164.5±2.29 to 192.4±1.14mL/g when FONPs concentration increased from 0 to 200mg/L. SEM images of E. aerogenes demonstrated the existence of bacterial nanowire among cells, suggesting FONPs served as electron conduits to enhance electron transfer. TEM showed cellular internalization of FONPs, indicating hydrogenase synthesis and activity was potentially promoted due to the released iron element. When further increasing FONPs concentration to 400mg/L, the hydrogen yield of glucose decreased to 147.2±2.54mL/g. Soluble metabolic products revealed FONPs enhanced acetate pathway of hydrogen production, but weakened ethanol pathway. This shift of metabolic pathways allowed more nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide for reducing proton to hydrogen. PMID:26890796

  19. BACT analysis under the Clean Air Act's PCD program

    SciTech Connect

    Simms, P.; Walke, J.

    2006-11-15

    Before a company may build a new major industrial source of air pollution, or make modifications to an existing major source in the USA it must apply for and receive a Clean Air Act (CAA) Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) permit. State environmental agencies typically issue such permits, either under state law or by exercising delegated authority to implement the federal PSD program. To fully comply with the CAA, the emissions limits identified as BACT must incorporate consideration of more than just add-on emissions control technology, they must also reflect appropriate considerations of fuel quality (e.g. low-sulfur coal) and process changes (e.g. advanced combustion techniques) as a means of controlling emissions, and must consider the other environmental and public welfare benefits of the identified emissions control options. Several states including New Mexico and Illinois have already determined that innovated technologies, such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), must be considered in connection with the BACT analysis for new coal-fired power plants. Even the notion that BACT is categorically limited in scope to the general type of facility proposed is contrary to EPA precedent. For example, the Environmental Appeals Board (EAB) has explained that permitting authorities retain the discretion under the definition of BACT to require dramatically different facility designs (e.g. a natural gas plant instead of a coal-fired power plant). The best advice for any permit applicant is to include in the BACT analysis a careful and honest examination of better performing alternative processes and/or innovative combustion techniques and to aggressively pursue such options wherever feasible. 17 refs.

  20. Glutamine synthetase of Klebsiella aerogenes: properties of glnD mutants lacking uridylyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Foor, F; Cedergren, R J; Streicher, S L; Rhee, S G; Magasanik, B

    1978-01-01

    The glnD mutation of Klebsiella aerogenes is cotransducible by phage P1 with pan (requirement for pantothenate) and leads to a loss of uridylytransferase and uridylyl-removing enzyme, components of the glutamine synthetase adenylylation system. This defect results in an inability to deadenylylate glutamine synthetase rapidly and in a requirement for glutamine for normal growth. Suppression of the glnD mutation are located at the glutamine synthetase structural gene glnA. PMID:26659

  1. Biodegradation of 2-methylquinoline by Enterobacter aerogenes TJ-D isolated from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Li, Yongmei; Duan, Jingyuan

    2013-07-01

    Bacterial strain Enterobacter aerogenes TJ-D capable of utilizing 2-methylquinoline as the sole carbon and energy source was isolated from acclimated activated sludge under denitrifying conditions. The ability to degrade 2-methylquinoline by E. aerogenes TJ-D was investigated under denitrifying conditions. Under optimal conditions of temperature (35 degrees C) and initial pH 7, 2-methylquinoline of 100 mg/L was degraded within 176 hr. The degradation of 2-methylquinoline by E. aerogenes TJ-D could be well described by the Haldane model (R2 > 0.91). During the degradation period of 2-methylquinoline (initial concentration 100 mg/L), nitrate was almost completely consumed (the removal efficiency was 98.5%), while nitrite remained at low concentration (< 0.62 mg/L) during the whole denitrification period. 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydro-2-methylquinoline, 4-ethyl-benzenamine, N-butyl-benzenamine, N-ethyl-benzenamine and 2,6-diethyl-benzenamine were metabolites produced during the degradation. The degradation pathway of 2-methylquinoline by E. aerogenes TJ-D was proposed. 2-Methylquinoline is initially hydroxylated at C-4 to form 2-methyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline, and then forms 2-methyl-4-quinolinol as a result of tautomerism. Hydrogenation of the heterocyclic ring at positions 2 and 3 produces 2,3-dihydro-2-methyl-4-quinolinol. The carbon-carbon bond at position 2 and 3 in the heterocyclic ring may cleave and form 2-ethyl-N-ethyl-benzenamine. Tautomerism may result in the formation of 2,6-diethyl-benzenamine and N-butyl-benzenamine. 4-Ethyl-benzenamine and N-ethyl-benzenamine were produced as a result of losing one ethyl group from the above molecules. PMID:24218841

  2. Enterobacter aerogenes and Enterobacter cloacae; versatile bacterial pathogens confronting antibiotic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Davin-Regli, Anne; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes and E. cloacae have been reported as important opportunistic and multiresistant bacterial pathogens for humans during the last three decades in hospital wards. These Gram-negative bacteria have been largely described during several outbreaks of hospital-acquired infections in Europe and particularly in France. The dissemination of Enterobacter sp. is associated with the presence of redundant regulatory cascades that efficiently control the membrane permeability ensuring the bacterial protection and the expression of detoxifying enzymes involved in antibiotic degradation/inactivation. In addition, these bacterial species are able to acquire numerous genetic mobile elements that strongly contribute to antibiotic resistance. Moreover, this particular fitness help them to colonize several environments and hosts and rapidly and efficiently adapt their metabolism and physiology to external conditions and environmental stresses. Enterobacter is a versatile bacterium able to promptly respond to the antibiotic treatment in the colonized patient. The balance of the prevalence, E. aerogenes versus E. cloacae, in the reported hospital infections during the last period, questions about the horizontal transmission of mobile elements containing antibiotic resistance genes, e.g., the efficacy of the exchange of resistance genes Klebsiella pneumoniae to Enterobacter sp. It is also important to mention the possible role of antibiotic use in the treatment of bacterial infectious diseases in this E. aerogenes/E. cloacae evolution. PMID:26042091

  3. Most Enterobacter aerogenes Strains in France Belong to a Prevalent Clone

    PubMed Central

    Bosi, Claude; Davin-Regli, Anne; Bornet, Charleric; Mallea, Monique; Pages, Jean-Marie; Bollet, Claude

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the distribution in France of the Enterobacter aerogenes prevalent clone isolated in the hospitals of the Marseille area (A. Davin-Regli, D. Monnet, P. Saux, C. Bosi, R. Charrel, A. Barthelemy, and C. Bollet, J. Clin. Microbiol. 34:1474–1480, 1996). A total of 123 E. aerogenes isolates were collected from 23 hospital laboratories and analyzed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR to determine their epidemiological relatedness. Molecular typing revealed that 21 of the 23 laboratories had isolated this prevalent clone harboring the plasmid encoding for extended-spectrum β-lactamase of the TEM-24 type. Most isolates were susceptible only to imipenem and gentamicin. Their dissemination seems to be clonal and was probably the result of the general use of broad-spectrum cephalosporins and quinolones. Four isolates showed an alteration of their outer membrane proteins, causing decrease of susceptibility to third-generation cephalosporins and imipenem and leading to the critical situation of having no alternative therapeutic. The large dissemination of the E. aerogenes prevalent clone probably results from its good adaptation to the antibiotics administered in France and the hospital environment, particularly in intensive care units. PMID:10364580

  4. Complete genome sequence of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BLC1.

    PubMed

    Bottacini, Francesca; Dal Bello, Fabio; Turroni, Francesca; Milani, Christian; Duranti, Sabrina; Foroni, Elena; Viappiani, Alice; Strati, Francesco; Mora, Diego; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2011-11-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BLC1 is a probiotic bacterium that is widely exploited by food industries as the active ingredient of various functional foods. Here we report the complete genome sequence of B. animalis subsp. lactis BLC1, which is expected to provide insights into the biology of this health-promoting microorganism and improve our understanding of its phylogenetic relatedness with other members of the B. animalis subsp. lactis taxon. PMID:22038957

  5. Purification and characterization of the nickel-containing multicomponent urease from Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Todd, M J; Hausinger, R P

    1987-05-01

    Klebsiella aerogenes urease was purified 1,070-fold with a 25% yield by a simple procedure involving DEAE-Sepharose, phenyl-Sepharose, Mono Q, and Superose 6 chromatographies. The enzyme preparation was comprised of three polypeptides with estimated Mr = 72,000, 11,000, and 9,000 in a alpha 2 beta 4 gamma 4 quaternary structure. The three components remained associated during native gel electrophoresis, Mono Q chromatography, and Superose 6 chromatography despite the presence of thiols, glycols, detergents, and varied buffer conditions. The apparent compositional complexity of K. aerogenes urease contrasts with the simple well-characterized homohexameric structure for jack bean urease (Dixon, N. E., Hinds, J. A., Fihelly, A. K., Gazzola, C., Winzor, D. J., Blakeley, R. L., and Zerner, B. (1980) Can. J. Biochem. 58, 1323-1334); however, heteromeric subunit compositions were also observed for the enzymes from Proteus mirabilis, Sporosarcina ureae, and Selemonomas ruminantium. K. aerogenes urease exhibited a Km for urea of 2.8 +/- 0.6 mM and a Vmax of 2,800 +/- 200 mumol of urea min-1 mg-1 at 37 degrees C in 25 mM N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazineN'-2-ethanesulfonic acid, 5.0 mM EDTA buffer, pH 7.75. The enzyme activity was stable in 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate, 5% Triton X-100, 1 M KCl, and over a pH range from 5 to 10.5, with maximum activity observed at pH 7.75. Two active site groups were defined by their pKa values of 6.55 and 8.85. The amino acid composition of K. aerogenes urease more closely resembled that for the enzyme from Brevibacter ammoniagenes (Nakano, H., Takenishi, S., and Watanabe, Y. (1984) Agric. Biol. Chem. 48, 1495-1502) than those for plant ureases. Atomic absorption analysis was used to establish the presence of 2.1 +/- 0.3 mol of nickel per mol of 72,000-dalton subunit in K. aerogenes urease. PMID:3553184

  6. Novel antibacterial activity of lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis z11 isolated from zabady.

    PubMed

    Enan, Gamal; Abdel-Shafi, Seham; Ouda, Sahar; Negm, Sally

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to select and characterize a probiotic bacterium with distinctive antimicrobial activities. In this respect, Lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis Z11 (L. lactis Z11) isolated from Zabady (Arabian yoghurt) inhibited other strains of lactic acid bacteria and some food-born pathogens including Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus and staphylococcus aureus. The inhibitory activity of cell free supernatant (CFS) of L. lactis Z11 isolated from zabady was lost by proteolytic enzymes, heat resistant. Consequently, the active substance(s) of CFS was characterized as a bacteriocin. This bacteriocin has been shown to consist of protein but has no lipidic or glucidic moieties in its active molecule. Its activity was stable in the pH range 2.0 to 7.0 and was not affected by organic solvents. The L. lactis Z11 bacteriocin was produced in CFS throughout the mide to the late exponential phase of growth of the producer organism and maximum bacteriocin production was obtained at initial pH 6.5 at incubation temperature of about 30°C. PMID:24151453

  7. Novel Antibacterial Activity of Lactococcus Lactis Subspecies Lactis Z11 Isolated from Zabady

    PubMed Central

    Enan, Gamal; Abdel-Shafi, Seham; Ouda, Sahar; Negm, Sally

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to select and characterize a probiotic bacterium with distinctive antimicrobial activities. In this respect, Lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis Z11 (L. lactis Z11) isolated from Zabady (Arabian yoghurt) inhibited other strains of lactic acid bacteria and some food-born pathogens including Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus and staphylococcus aureus. The inhibitory activity of cell free supernatant (CFS) of L. lactis Z11 isolated from zabady was lost by proteolytic enzymes, heat resistant. Consequently, the active substance(s) of CFS was characterized as a bacteriocin. This bacteriocin has been shown to consist of protein but has no lipidic or glucidic moieties in its active molecule. Its activity was stable in the pH range 2.0 to 7.0 and was not affected by organic solvents. The L. lactis Z11 bacteriocin was produced in CFS throughout the mide to the late exponential phase of growth of the producer organism and maximum bacteriocin production was obtained at initial pH 6.5 at incubation temperature of about 30°C. PMID:24151453

  8. Antimicrobial potential of immobilized Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454 against selected bacteria.

    PubMed

    Millette, M; Smoragiewicz, W; Lacroix, M

    2004-06-01

    Immobilization of living cells of lactic acid bacteria could be an alternative or complementary method of immobilizing organic acids and bacteriocins and inhibit undesirable bacteria in foods. This study evaluated the inhibition potential of immobilized Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454 on selected bacteria by a modified method of the agar spot test. L. lactis was immobilized in calcium alginate (1 to 2%)-whey protein concentrate (0 and 1%) beads. The antimicrobial potential of immobilized L. lactis was evaluated in microbiological media against pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and Staphylococcus aureus) or Pseudomonas putida, a natural meat contaminant, and against seven gram-positive bacteria used as indicator strains. Results obtained in this study indicated that immobilized L. lactis inhibited the growth of S. aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Lactobacillus curvatus, Lactobacillus sakei, Kocuria varians, and Pediococcus acidilactici. Only 4 h of incubation at 35 degrees C resulted in a clear inhibition zone around the beads that increased with time. With the addition of 10 mM of a chelating agent (EDTA) to the media, results showed growth inhibition of E. coli; however, P. putida and Salmonella Typhi were unaffected by this treatment. These results indicate that immobilized lactic acid bacteria strains can be successfully used to produce nisin and inhibit bacterial growth in semisolid synthetic media. PMID:15222547

  9. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: evaluation of the probiotic potential.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Danielle N; Todorov, Svetoslav D; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T; Franco, Bernadette D G M

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi) was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its probiotic potential. Lc. lactis DF4Mi was resistant to acidic pH and oxbile, presented co-aggregation with Listeria monocytogenes, and was not affected by several drugs from different generic groups, being sensitive to most tested antibiotics. These properties indicate that this Lc. lactis strain can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality, in combination with potential probiotic properties. PMID:25477942

  10. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: Evaluation of the probiotic potential

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Danielle N.; Todorov, Svetoslav D.; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T.; Franco, Bernadette D.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi) was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its probiotic potential. Lc. lactis DF4Mi was resistant to acidic pH and oxbile, presented co-aggregation with Listeria monocytogenes, and was not affected by several drugs from different generic groups, being sensitive to most tested antibiotics. These properties indicate that this Lc. lactis strain can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality, in combination with potential probiotic properties. PMID:25477942

  11. Kefir-isolated Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis inhibits the cytotoxic effect of Clostridium difficile in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bolla, Patricia Araceli; Carasi, Paula; Serradell, María de los Angeles; De Antoni, Graciela Liliana

    2013-02-01

    Kefir is a dairy product obtained by fermentation of milk with a complex microbial population and several health-promoting properties have been attributed to its consumption. In this work, we tested the ability of different kefir-isolated bacterial and yeast strains (Lactobacillus kefir, Lb. plantarum, Lactococcus lactis subps. lactis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces marxianus) or a mixture of them (MM) to antagonise the cytopathic effect of toxins from Clostridium difficile (TcdA and TcdB). Cell detachment assays and F-actin network staining using Vero cell line were performed. Although incubation with microbial cells did not reduce the damage induced by C. difficile spent culture supernatant (SCS), Lc. lactis CIDCA 8221 and MM supernatants were able to inhibit the cytotoxicity of SCS to Vero cells. Fraction of Lc. lactis CIDCA 8221 supernatant containing components higher than 10 kDa were responsible for the inhibitory activity and heating of this fraction for 15 min at 100 °C completely abrogated this ability. By dot-blot assay with anti-TcdA or anti-TcdB antibodies, concentration of both toxins seems to be reduced in SCS treated with Lc. lactis CIDCA 8221 supernatant. However, protective effect was not affected by treatment with proteases or proteases-inhibitors tested. In conclusion, we demonstrated that kefir-isolated Lc. lactis CIDCA 8221 secreted heat-sensitive products able to protect eukaryotic cells from cytopathic effect of C. difficile toxins in vitro. Our findings provide new insights into the probiotic action of microorganisms isolated from kefir against virulence factors from intestinal pathogens. PMID:23217732

  12. Isolation of strong constitutive promoters from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis N8.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Duolong; Liu, Fulu; Xu, Haijin; Bai, Yanling; Zhang, Xiuming; Saris, Per Erik Joakim; Qiao, Mingqiang

    2015-08-01

    The synthesis of heterologous proteins in Lactococcus lactis is strongly influenced by the promoter selected for the expression. The nisin A promoter is commonly used for induced expression of proteins in L. lactis, whereas few constitutive promoters (P45 and the weaker P32) have been used for protein expression studies. In this study, eight different putative strong constitutive promoters were identified through transcriptional analysis of L. lactis N8 and were investigated for their capability to drive nisZ gene expression with promoters P45 and P32 as control. Four strong promoters (P8, P5, P3 and P2) were identified as having a transcriptional activity that was higher than that of P45 through RT-qPCR and agar-diffusion experiments. In addition, these four promoters were fused to the erythromycin resistant gene (ermC) with promoter P45 as control and inserted into the backbone of the pNZ8048 vector. The transcriptional efficiencies of promoters P8, P5, P2 and P3 were all higher than promoter P45 based on the obtained MIC50 values and they all showed different activity levels. In conclusion, four strong constitutive promoters with a wide range of promoter activities were identified and are suitable for protein production in L. lactis. PMID:26156144

  13. A Deficiency in Aspartate Biosynthesis in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C2 Causes Slow Milk Coagulation†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Yu, Weizhu; Coolbear, Tim; O’Sullivan, Dan; McKay, Larry L.

    1998-01-01

    A mutant of fast milk-coagulating (Fmc+) Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C2, designated L. lactis KB4, was identified. Although possessing the known components essential for utilizing casein as a nitrogen source, which include functional proteinase (PrtP) activity and oligopeptide, di- and tripeptide, and amino acid transport systems, KB4 exhibited a slow milk coagulation (Fmc−) phenotype. When the amino acid requirements of L. lactis C2 were compared with those of KB4 by use of a chemically defined medium, it was found that KB4 was unable to grow in the absence of aspartic acid. This aspartic acid requirement could also be met by aspartate-containing peptides. The addition of aspartic acid to milk restored the Fmc+ phenotype of KB4. KB4 was found to be defective in pyruvate carboxylase and thus was deficient in the ability to form oxaloacetate and hence aspartic acid from pyruvate and carbon dioxide. The results suggest that when lactococci are propagated in milk, aspartate derived from casein is unable to meet fully the nutritional demands of the lactococci, and they become dependent upon aspartate biosynthesis. PMID:9572935

  14. Dual role of alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Goupil-Feuillerat, N; Cocaign-Bousquet, M; Godon, J J; Ehrlich, S D; Renault, P

    1997-01-01

    The alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase gene aldB is clustered with the genes for the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. It can be transcribed with BCAA genes under isoleucine regulation or independently of BCAA synthesis under the control of its own promoter. The product of aldB is responsible for leucine sensibility under valine starvation. In the presence of more than 10 microM leucine, the alpha-acetolactate produced by the biosynthetic acetohydroxy acid synthase IlvBN is transformed to acetoin by AldB and, consequently, is not available for valine synthesis. AldB is also involved in acetoin formation in the 2,3-butanediol pathway, initiated by the catabolic acetolactate synthase, AlsS. The differences in the genetic organization, the expression, and the kinetics parameters of these enzymes between L. lactis and Klebsiella terrigena, Bacillus subtilis, or Leuconostoc oenos suggest that this pathway plays a different role in the metabolism in these bacteria. Thus, the alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase from L. lactis plays a dual role in the cell: (i) as key regulator of valine and leucine biosynthesis, by controlling the acetolactate flux by a shift to catabolism; and (ii) as an enzyme catalyzing the second step of the 2,3-butanediol pathway. PMID:9335274

  15. Detection and Viability of Lactococcus lactis throughout Cheese Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Cocolin, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidences highlighted the presence of Lactococcus lactis during late cheese ripening. For this reason, the role of this microorganism, well known as dairy starter, should be reconsidered throughout cheese manufacturing and ripening. Thus, the main objective of this study was to develop a RT-qPCR protocol for the detection, quantification and determination of the viability of L. lactis in ripened cheese samples by direct analysis of microbial nucleic acids. Standard curves were constructed for the specific quantification of L. lactis in cheese matrices and good results in terms of selectivity, correlation coefficient and efficiency were obtained. Thirty-three ripened cheeses were analyzed and, on the basis of RNA analysis, twelve samples showed 106 to 108 CFU of L. lactis per gram of product, thirteen from 103 to 105 CFU/g, and in eight cheeses, L. lactis was not detected. Traditional plating on M17 medium led to loads ranging from 105 to 109 CFU/g, including the cheese samples where no L. lactis was found by RT-qPCR. From these cheeses, none of the colonies isolated on M17 medium was identified as L. lactis species. These data could be interpreted as a lack of selectivity of M17 medium where colony growth is not always related to lactococcal species. At the same time, the absence or low abundance of L. lactis isolates on M17 medium from cheese where L. lactis was detected by RT-qPCR support the hypothesis that L. lactis starter populations are mainly present in viable but not culturable state during ripening and, for this reason, culture-dependent methods have to be supplemented with direct analysis of cheese. PMID:25503474

  16. Effect of Several Clay Minerals and Humic Acid on the Survival of Klebsiella aerogenes Exposed to Ultraviolet Irradiation1

    PubMed Central

    Bitton, Gabriel; Henis, Y.; Lahav, N.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of various clay minerals and humic acid on the survival of Klebsiella aerogenes exposed to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was investigated. A protective effect was observed and found to depend on the specific light absorption and light scattering properties of the clay minerals and the humic acid used. The higher the specific absorption, the better was the survival of K. aerogenes after UV irradiation. Bacterial survival was lower in clays saturated with divalent cations (Ca, Zn) than in those homoionic to monovalent cations (K). PMID:5031559

  17. Study of the role of anaerobic metabolism in succinate production by Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yoshinori; Kaida, Kenichi; Hayakawa, Atsushi; Fukui, Keita; Nishio, Yousuke; Hashiguchi, Kenichi; Fudou, Ryosuke; Matsui, Kazuhiko; Usuda, Yoshihiro; Sode, Koji

    2014-09-01

    Succinate is a core biochemical building block; optimizing succinate production from biomass by microbial fermentation is a focus of basic and applied biotechnology research. Lowering pH in anaerobic succinate fermentation culture is a cost-effective and environmentally friendly approach to reducing the use of sub-raw materials such as alkali, which are needed for neutralization. To evaluate the potential of bacteria-based succinate fermentation under weak acidic (pH <6.2) and anaerobic conditions, we characterized the anaerobic metabolism of Enterobacter aerogenes AJ110637, which rapidly assimilates glucose at pH 5.0. Based on the profile of anaerobic products, we constructed single-gene knockout mutants to eliminate the main anaerobic metabolic pathways involved in NADH re-oxidation. These single-gene knockout studies showed that the ethanol synthesis pathway serves as the dominant NADH re-oxidation pathway in this organism. To generate a metabolically engineered strain for succinate production, we eliminated ethanol formation and introduced a heterogeneous carboxylation enzyme, yielding E. aerogenes strain ΔadhE/PCK. The strain produced succinate from glucose with a 60.5% yield (grams of succinate produced per gram of glucose consumed) at pH <6.2 and anaerobic conditions. Thus, we showed the potential of bacteria-based succinate fermentation under weak acidic conditions. PMID:24962116

  18. Effect of nanocomposite packaging containing ZnO on growth of Bacillus subtilis and Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Esmailzadeh, Hakimeh; Sangpour, Parvaneh; Shahraz, Farzaneh; Hejazi, Jalal; Khaksar, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have opened new windows in active food packaging. Nano-sized ZnO is an inexpensive material with potential antimicrobial properties. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the antibacterial effect of low density Polyethylene (LDPE) containing ZnO nanoparticles on Bacillus subtilis and Enterobacter aerogenes. ZnO nanoparticles have been synthesized by facil molten salt method and have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nanocomposite films containing 2 and 4 wt.% ZnO nanoparticles were prepared by melt mixing in a twin-screw extruder. The growth of both microorganisms has decreased in the presence of ZnO containing nanocomposites compared with controls. Nanocomposites with 4 wt.% ZnO nanoparticles had stronger antibacterial effect against both bacteria in comparison with the 2 wt.% ZnO containing nanocomposites. B. subtilis as Gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive to ZnO containing nanocomposite films compared with E. aerogenes as Gram-negative bacteria. There were no significant differences between the migration of Zn ions from 2 and 4 wt.% ZnO containing nanocomposites and the released Zn ions were not significantly increased in both groups after 14 days compared with the first. Regarding the considerable antibacterial effects of ZnO nanoparticles, their application in active food packaging can be a suitable solution for extending the shelf life of food. PMID:26478403

  19. Enhancing hydrogen production of Enterobacter aerogenes by heterologous expression of hydrogenase genes originated from Synechocystis sp.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenlu; Cheng, Jun; Zhao, Jinfang; Zhang, Chuanxi; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-09-01

    The hydrogenase genes (hoxEFUYH) of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 were cloned and heterologously expressed in Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC13408 for the first time in this study, and the hydrogen yield was significantly enhanced using the recombinant strain. A recombinant plasmid containing the gene in-frame with Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST) gene was transformed into E. aerogenes ATCC13408 to produce a GST-fusion protein. SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis confirm the successful expression of the hox genes. The hydrogenase activity of the recombinant strain is 237.6±9.3ml/(g-DW·h), which is 152% higher than the wild strain. The hydrogen yield of the recombinant strain is 298.3ml/g-glucose, which is 88% higher than the wild strain. During hydrogen fermentation, the recombinant strain produces more acetate and butyrate, but less ethanol. This is corresponding to the NADH metabolism in the cell due to the higher hydrogenase activity with the heterologous expression of hox genes. PMID:27343449

  20. Membrane protein expression in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    King, Martin S; Boes, Christoph; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis has many properties that are ideal for the overproduction of membrane proteins in a functional form. Growth of lactococci is rapid, proceeds to high cell densities, and does not require aeration, which facilitates large-scale fermentation. The available promoter systems are strong and tightly regulated, allowing expression of toxic gene products in a controlled manner. Expressed membrane proteins are targeted exclusively to the cytoplasmic membrane, allowing the use of ionophores, ligands, and inhibitors to study activity of the membrane protein in whole cells. Constructed plasmids are stable and expression levels are highly reproducible. The relatively small genome size of the organism causes little redundancy, which facilitates complementation studies and allows for easier purification. The produced membrane proteins are often stable, as the organism has limited proteolytic capability, and they are readily solubilized from the membrane with mild detergents. Lactococci are multiple amino acid auxotrophs, allowing the incorporation of labels, such as selenomethionine. Among the few disadvantages are the low transformation frequency, AT-rich codon usage, and resistance to lysis by mechanical means, but these problems can be overcome fairly easily. We will describe in detail the protocols used to express membrane proteins in L. lactis, from cloning of the target gene to the isolation of membrane vesicles for the determination of expression levels. PMID:25857778

  1. Ornithine transport and exchange in Streptococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J

    1987-01-01

    Resting cells of Streptococcus lactis 133 appeared to accumulate [14C]ornithine to a high concentration in the absence of an exogenous energy source. However, analysis of intracellular amino acid pool constituents and results of transport experiments revealed that the accumulation of ornithine represented a homoexchange between extracellular [14C]ornithine and unlabeled ornithine in the cell. The energy-independent exchange of ornithine was not inhibited by proton-conducting uncouplers or by metabolic inhibitors. Intracellular [14C]ornithine was retained by resting cells after suspension in a buffered medium. However, addition of unlabeled ornithine to the suspension elicited rapid exit of labeled amino acid. The initial rate of exit of [14C]ornithine was dependent on the concentration of unlabeled ornithine in the medium, but this accelerative exchange diffusion process caused no net loss of amino acid. By contrast, the presence of a fermentable energy source caused a rapid expulsion of and net decrease in the concentration of intracellular ornithine. Kinetic analyses of amino acid transport demonstrated competitive inhibition between lysine and ornithine, and data obtained by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography established the heteroexchange of these basic amino acids. The effects of amino acids and of ornithine analogs on both entry and exit of [14C]ornithine have been examined. The data suggest that a common carrier mediates the entry and exchange of lysine, arginine, and ornithine in cells of S. lactis. Images PMID:3114235

  2. Ornithine transport and exchange in Streptococcus lactis

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.

    1987-09-01

    Resting cells of Streptococcus lactis 133 appeared to accumulate (/sup 14/C)ornithine to a high concentration in the absence of an exogenous energy source. However, analysis of intracellular amino acid pool constituents and results of transport experiments revealed that the accumulation of ornithine represented a homoexchange between extracellular (/sup 14/C)ornithine and unlabeled ornithine in the cell. The energy-independent exchange of ornithine was not inhibited by proton-conducting uncouplers or by metabolic inhibitors. Intracellular (/sup 14/C)ornithine was retained by resting cells after suspension in a buffered medium. However, addition of unlabeled ornithine to the suspension elicited rapid exit of labeled amino acid. The initial rate of exist of (/sup 14/C)ornithine was dependent on the concentration of unlabeled ornithine in the medium, but this accelerative exchange diffusion process caused no net loss of amino acid. By contrast, the presence of a fermentable energy source caused a rapid expulsion of and new decrease in the concentration of intracellular ornithine. Kinetic analyses of amino acid transport demonstrated competitive inhibition between lysine and ornithine, and data obtained by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography established the heteroexchange of these basic amino acids. The effects of amino acids and of ornithine analogs on both entry and exit of (/sup 14/C)ornithine have been examined. The data suggest that common carrier mediates the entry and exchange of lysine, arginine, and ornithine in cells of S. lactis.

  3. Cutaneous abscess caused by Corynebacterium lactis in a companion dog.

    PubMed

    Antunes, João Marcelo Azevedo de Paula; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Demoner, Larissa de Castro; Ramos, Juliana Nunes; Baio, Paulo Victor Pereira; Simpson-Louredo, Liliane; Santos, Cíntia Silva; Hirata, Raphael; Ferioli, Raquel Beneton; Romera, Adriana Resmond Cruz; Vieira, Verônica Viana; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2015-07-01

    Many new, emerging and re-emerging diseases of humans are caused by pathogens which originate from animals or products of animal origin. Corynebacterium lactis, a recently described species of the genus Corynebacterium, was first isolated from milk of asymptomatic cows. In the present study a cutaneous abscess caused by C. lactis in a dog was recognized by cytologic and histologic examination in addition to 16S rRNA gene analysis of the microorganism. Therefore, C. lactis should be included among other bacterial species recognized as emerging pathogens for companion animals. PMID:25937144

  4. Regulation of nitrogen metabolism in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella aerogenes: studies with the continuous-culture technique.

    PubMed Central

    Senior, P J

    1975-01-01

    Ammonia-nitrogen-limited continuous cultures of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella aerogenes contain induced levels of glutamine synthetase that is deadenylyated (i.e., fully active). In the presence of excess ammonia or glutamate in glucose-limited cultures of E. coli, glutamine synthetase is repressed and adenylylated (inactive). The average state of adenylylation (n) is a linear function of the specific growth rate. At low specific growth rates, glutamine synthetase is adenylylated; as the specific growth rate increases, n decreases, approaching 0 to 2 at rapid growth rates. The average state of adenylylation correlates well with the intracellular concentrations and ratios of alpha-ketoglutarate and glutamine, which are key effectors in the adenylylation-deadenylylation systems. E. coli and K. aerogenes differ markedly in their growth yields, growth rates, and enzymatic composition during nitrogen limitation. The data suggest that, unlike K. aerogenes, E. coli W uses glutamate dehydrogenase to incorporate ammonia during nitrogen limitation. In E. coli, glutamate dehydrogenase is progressively induced during nitrogen limitation when mu (growth rate) approaches mumax. In contrast, in K. aerogenes glutamate dehydrogenase is repressed during nitrogen limitation, whereas glutamate synthase, an alternative supplier of glutamate to the cell, is induced. Data are presented that support the regulatory schemes proposed for the control of glutamine synthetase activity by induction-repression phenomena and adenylylation-deadenylylation reaction. We propose that the intracellular ratio of alpha-ketoglutarate to glutamine may be the most important physiological parameter in determining the activity of glutamine synthetase. PMID:238954

  5. Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) Wing CFD Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.; Bartels, Robert E.

    2000-01-01

    The Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) wing test (see chapter 8E) provides data for the validation of aerodynamic, aeroelastic, and active aeroelastic control simulation codes. These data provide a rich database for development and validation of computational aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic methods. In this vein, high-level viscous CFD analyses of the BACT wing have been performed for a subset of the test conditions available in the dataset. The computations presented in this section investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of the rigid clean wing configuration as well as simulations of the wing with a static and oscillating aileron and spoiler deflection. Two computational aeroelasticity codes extensively used at NASA Langley Research Center are implemented in this simulation. They are the ENS3DAE and CFL3DAE computational aeroelasticity programs. Both of these methods solve the three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations for both rigid and flexible vehicles, but they use significantly different approaches to the solution 6f the aerodynamic equations of motion. Detailed descriptions of both methods are presented in the following section.

  6. Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype is a potential environmental host for Enterobacter aerogenes and Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acanthamoeba can interact with a wide range of microorganisms such as viruses, algae, yeasts, protists and bacteria including Legionella pneumophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Vibrio cholerae, Helicobacter pylori, Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium spp., and Escherichia coli. In this capacity, Acanthamoeba has been suggested as a vector in the transmission of bacterial pathogens to the susceptible hosts. Methods Here, we used a keratitis isolate of A. castellanii of the T4 genotype and studied its interactions with two bacterial genera which have not been tested before, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Aeromonas hydrophila, as well as E. coli. Assays were performed to determine bacterial association with and invasion of A. castellanii. Additionally, bacterial survival intracellular of A. castellanii trophozoites as well as cysts was determined. Results All three bacterial isolates tested, associated, invaded, and survived inside A. castellanii trophozoites as well as A. castellanii cysts. However, E. aerogenes and E. coli exhibited significantly reduced association with and invasion of A. castellanii as compared with A. hydrophila (P < 0.01 using paired T-test, one tail distribution). In the long term survival assays, all three bacterial isolates tested remained viable inside A. castellanii trophozoites, while amoeba remained intact; however A. hydrophila exhibited higher survival inside amoebae (14.54 ± 3.3 bacteria:amoeba ratio) compared with E. aerogenes (3.96 ± 0.7 bacteria:amoeba ratio) and E. coli (5.85 ± 1.1 bacteria:amoeba ratio). A. hydrophila, E. coli, and E. aerogenes remained viable during the encystment process and exhibited higher levels of recovery from mature cysts (14.13 ± 0.89 A. hydrophila:amoeba ratio, 10.13 ± 1.17 E. aerogenes:amoeba ratio, and 11.95 ± 0.7 E. coli:amoeba ratio). Conclusions A. hydrophila and E. aerogenes also joined the ranks of other bacteria that could benefit from A. castellanii

  7. Identification and characteristics of nisin Z-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis isolated from Kimchi.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Hee; Itoh, Kikuji; Kikuchi, Eisaku; Niwa, Hidekazu; Fujisawa, Tomohiko

    2003-05-01

    We isolated bacteriocin-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis from Kimchi. The bacteriocin inhibited strains of Clostridium perfringens, C. difficile, Listeria monocytogenes, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, and one out of four methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains, as well as some closely related lactic acid bacteria. In tricine-SDS-PAGE, the bacteriocin migrated with an apparent molecular weight of about 4 kDa to the same location as nisin A and crude nisin Z. The gene encoding this bacteriocin was found to be identical to that of nisin Z with direct PCR sequence methods. The inhibitory activity was stable against heat and pH, but it was lost at 100 degrees C for 1 h and at 121 degrees C for 15 min. The bacteriocin was inactivated by proteolytic enzymes, but was not affected by lysozyme, lipase, catalase, or beta-glucosidase. There were some differences in characteristics from those of nisins described previously. PMID:12732968

  8. Genetic transformation of intact Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis by high-voltage electroporation

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, D.A.; Harlander, S.K. )

    1989-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a system for electroporating intact cells of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis LM0230 (previously designated Streptococcus lactis LM0230) with a commercially available electroporation unit. Parameters which influenced the efficiency of transformation included growth phase and final concentration of cells, ionic strength of the suspending medium, concentration of plasmid DNA, and the amplitude and duration of the pulse. Washed suspensions of intact cells suspended in deionized distilled water were subjected to one high-voltage electric pulse varying in voltage (300 to 900 V corresponding to field strengths of 5 to 17 kV/cm) and duration (100 {mu}s to 1 s). Transformation efficiencies of 10{sup 3} transformants per {mu}g of DNA were obtained when dense suspensions (final concentration, 5 {times} 10{sup 10} CFU/ml) of stationary-phase cells were subjected to one pulse with a peak voltage of 900 V (field strength, 17 kV/cm) and a pulse duration of 5 ms in the presence of plasmid DNA. Dilution of porated cells in broth medium followed by an expression period of 2 h at 30{degree}C was beneficial in enhancing transformation efficiencies. Plasmids ranging in size from 9.8 to 30.0 kilobase pairs could be transformed by this procedure.

  9. Glutamate dehydrogenase: genetic mapping and isolation of regulatory mutants of Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, R A; Macaluso, A; Magasanik, B

    1976-01-01

    The gene for glutamate dehydrogenase (gdhD) has been mapped in Klebsiella aerogenes by P1 transduction. It is linked to pyrF and trp with the order pyrF-trp-gdh. Complementation analysis using F' episomes from Escherichia coli suggests an analogous location in E. coli. Two mutants able to produce glutamate dehydrogenase in the presence of high levels of glutamine synthetase have been isolated. One, tightly linked to gdhD, shows normal repression control by glutamine synthetase but produces four times as much glutamate dehydrogenase activity as does the wild type under all conditions tested. The other revertant is not linked to gdhD or glnA. PMID:6429

  10. Biodegradation of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane: intermediates in dichlorodiphenylacetic acid metabolism by aerobacter aerogenes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary

    1967-01-01

    The final product of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) degradation by vertebrates is commonly considered to be dichlorodiphenylacetic acid, DDA. Recently, certain organisms have been found to degrade further DDA to dichlorobenzophenone (DBP), but the possibility that such degradation was due to microbial action could not be excluded. Significantly, dichlorobenzhydrol (DBH), dichlorophenylmethane (DPM), and dichlorodiphenylethylene (DDE) have been tentatively identified in rats fed DDA. Since DDA as well as DDT is degraded by the ubiquitous microorganism Aerobacter aerogenes, it seemed reasonable that the intestinal microflora might be involved in DBP formation, DPM and DBH being intermediates in its pathway from DDA. Since DDA is a (3,y-unsaturated acid, ketone formation via an alkene and an alcohol would be expected.

  11. Two different dihydroorotate dehydrogenases in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, P S; Jansen, P J; Hammer, K

    1994-01-01

    The pyrimidine de novo biosynthesis pathway has been characterized for a number of organisms. The general pathway consists of six enzymatic steps. In the characterization of the pyrimidine pathway of Lactococcus lactis, two different pyrD genes encoding dihydroorotate dehydrogenase were isolated. The nucleotide sequences of the two genes, pyrDa and pyrDb, have been determined. One of the deduced amino acid sequences has a high degree of homology to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, and the other resembles the dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis. It is possible to distinguish between the two enzymes in crude extracts by using different electron acceptors. We constructed mutants containing a mutated form of either one or the other or both of the pyrD genes. Only the double mutant is pyrimidine auxotrophic. Images PMID:8021180

  12. Characterization of two nisin-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strains isolated from a commercial sauerkraut fermentation.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, L J; Fleming, H P; Klaenhammer, T R

    1992-01-01

    Two Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strains, NCK400 and LJH80, isolated from a commercial sauerkraut fermentation were shown to produce nisin. LJH80 was morphologically unstable and gave rise to two stable, nisin-producing (Nip+) derivatives, NCK318-2 and NCK318-3. NCK400 and derivatives of LJH80 exhibited identical morphological and metabolic characteristics, but could be distinguished on the basis of plasmid profiles and genomic hybridization patterns to a DNA probe specific for the iso-ISS1 element, IS946. NCK318-2 and NCK318-3 harbored two and three plasmids, respectively, which hybridized with IS946. Plasmid DNA was not detected in NCK400, and DNA from this strain failed to hybridize with IS946. Despite the absence of detectable plasmid DNA in NCK400, nisin-negative derivatives (NCK402 and NCK403) were isolated after repeated transfer in broth at 37 degrees C. Nisin-negative derivatives concurrently lost the ability to ferment sucrose and became sensitive to nisin. A 4-kbp HindIII fragment containing the structural gene for nisin (spaN), cloned from L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454, was used to probe genomic DNA of NCK318-2, NCK318-3, NCK400, and NCK402 digested with EcoRI or HindIII. The spaN probe hybridized to an 8.8-kbp EcoRI fragment and a 10-kbp HindIII fragment in the Nip+ sauerkraut isolates, but did not hybridize to the Nip- derivative, NCK402. A different hybridization pattern was observed when the same probe was used against Nip+ L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454 and ATCC 7962. These phenotypic and genetic data confirmed that unique Nip+ L. lactis subsp. lactis strains were isolated from fermenting sauerkraut. Images PMID:1622214

  13. Bactériophages et phagothérapie: utilisation de virus naturels pour traiter les infections bactériennes

    PubMed Central

    Ravat, F.; Jault, P.; Gabard, J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary L’utilisation des bactériophages, prédateurs naturels des bactéries, est une technique pionnière efficace de lutte contre les infections bactériennes. Tombée dans l’oubli depuis un demi-siècle du coté occidental de l’ex-rideau de fer, elle fait toujours partie de l’arsenal thérapeutique des pays de l’ex-Europe de l’Est, au point de constituer une arme de choix dans la politique de santé publique de ces pays. l’émergence de bactéries multirésistantes et le risque de revenir à l’ère pré-antibiotique ont fait ressortir la phagothérapie de l’oubli injuste auquel elle avait été confinée. la biologie et la place du bactériophage dans la nature sont décrites ici. les tenants et les aboutissants de la phagothérapie et les conditions de son retour sur le devant de la scène sont explicitées. PMID:26668557

  14. Exploring "aerogen-hydride" interactions between ZOF2 (Z = Kr, Xe) and metal hydrides: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Mohammadian-Sabet, Fariba

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a new σ-hole interaction formed between ZOF2 (Z = Kr and Xe) as the Lewis acid and a series of metal-hydrides HMX (M = Be, Mg, Zn and X = H, F, CN, CH3) is reported. The nature of this interaction, called "aerogen-hydride" interaction, is unveiled by molecular electrostatic potential, non-covalent interaction, quantum theory of atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital analyses. Our results indicate that the aerogen-hydride interactions are quite strong and can be comparable in strength to other σ-hole bonds. An important charge-transfer interaction is also associated with the formation of OF2Z⋯HMX complexes.

  15. Random mutagenesis of pullulanase from Klebsiella aerogenes for studies of the structure and function of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, M; Kinoshita, T; Ihara, M; Mikawa, T; Murooka, Y

    1994-12-01

    To study the structure and function of pullulanase from Klebsiella aerogenes, a method involving random mutagenesis of the entire gene for pullulanase was used. Out of 50,000 clones screened at high temperature, seven genes for mutant proteins were identified by DNA sequencing. The amino acid substitutions in the seven mutant proteins were clustered on the NH2-terminal side of the four conserved regions found in alpha-amylases. These mutant pullulanases were classified into two types: those whose catalytic activity was altered and those whose thermal stability was increased. The results presented here and in previous reports suggest that pullulanase from K. aerogenes has similar active sites to those of alpha-amylases with the four conserved regions, as well as another substrate-binding site closer to the NH2-terminus. The plate assay method used for isolation of thermostable variants may be applicable to the generation of useful variants of other enzymes. PMID:7706211

  16. Robust Multivariable Flutter Suppression for the Benchmark Active Control Technology (BACT) Wind-Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.

    1997-01-01

    The Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) project is part of NASA Langley Research Center s Benchmark Models Program for studying transonic aeroelastic phenomena. In January of 1996 the BACT wind-tunnel model was used to successfully demonstrate the application of robust multivariable control design methods (H and -synthesis) to flutter suppression. This paper addresses the design and experimental evaluation of robust multivariable flutter suppression control laws with particular attention paid to the degree to which stability and performance robustness was achieved.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterobacter aerogenes, a DDE-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Strain Isolated from Cucurbita pepo

    PubMed Central

    Eevers, Nele; Van Hamme, Jonathan D.; Bottos, Eric M.; Weyens, Nele

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome of Enterobacter aerogenes, a Gram-negative bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae isolated from Cucurbita pepo root tissue. This bacterium shows 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene (DDE)-degrading potential and plant growth-promoting capacity. An analysis of its 4.5-Mb draft genome will enhance the understanding of DDE degradation pathways and phytoremediation applications for DDE-contaminated soils. PMID:25883299

  18. [Aerogenic microflora in animal husbandry and poultry breeding areas, criteria of its harmful effect and hygienic regulation].

    PubMed

    Erman, M I; Eglite, M E; Olefir, A I; Kalinina, L N

    1989-01-01

    In consequence of the analysis of workers' health status and microbic contamination of the working zone of animal and poultry husbandry production area the study established direct dependence of microorganism sensitization rate, incidence of infectious and allergic skin and respiratory diseases on microbic aerosol concentration. Feasibility of aerogenic microflora standardization was substantiated proceeding from the comparison of hygienic and clinical findings; MAC for microbic aerosol was set up for the working zone. PMID:2744566

  19. Impact of osmotic stress on protein diffusion in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Mika, Jacek T; Schavemaker, Paul E; Krasnikov, Victor; Poolman, Bert

    2014-11-01

    We measured translational diffusion of proteins in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane of the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis and probed the effect of osmotic upshift. For cells in standard growth medium the diffusion coefficients for cytosolic proteins (27 and 582 kDa) and 12-transmembrane helix membrane proteins are similar to those in Escherichia coli. The translational diffusion of GFP in L. lactis drops by two orders of magnitude when the medium osmolality is increased by ∼ 1.9 Osm, and the decrease in mobility is partly reversed in the presence of osmoprotectants. We find a large spread in diffusion coefficients over the full population of cells but a smaller spread if only sister cells are compared. While in general the diffusion coefficients we measure under normal osmotic conditions in L. lactis are similar to those reported in E. coli, the decrease in translational diffusion upon osmotic challenge in L. lactis is smaller than in E. coli. An even more striking difference is that in L. lactis the GFP diffusion coefficient drops much more rapidly with volume than in E. coli. We discuss these findings in the light of differences in turgor, cell volume, crowding and cytoplasmic structure of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25244659

  20. Variable volume fed-batch fermentation for nisin production by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis W28.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhaoliang; Wang, Lin; Jing, Yingjun; Li, Xueliang; Zhao, Yanli

    2009-03-01

    A feeding technology that was suitable for improving the nisin production by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis W28 was established. The effects of initial sucrose concentration (ISC) in the fermentation broth, feeding time, and feeding rate on the fermentation were studied. It was observed that a fed-batch culture (ISC = 10 g l(-1)) with 100 ml sucrose solution (190 g l(-1)) being evenly fed (9-10 ml h(-1)) into the fermenter after 3-h fermentation gave the best performance in terms of biomass and nisin yield. Under these conditions, the total biomass and the total nisin yield were approximately 23% and 51% higher than those in batch fermentation, respectively. When the sucrose concentration was controlled at 5-10 g l(-1) in variable volume intermittent fed-batch fermentation (VVIF) with ISC = 10 g l(-1), the total biomass and the total nisin yield were 29% and 60% above those in batch fermentation, respectively. The VVIF proved to be effective to eliminate the substrate inhibition by maintaining sucrose at appropriate levels. It is also easy to be scaled up, since various parameters involved in industrial production were taken into account. PMID:18712289

  1. Probiotic characterization of potential hydrolases producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis isolated from pickled yam.

    PubMed

    Bhanwar, Seema; Singh, Arashdeep; Ganguli, Abhijit

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize potential probiotic strain co-producing α-amylase and β-galactosidase. Sixty-three strains, isolated from pickle samples were screened for their hydrolase producing capacity by utilizing different starches as carbon source. One out of 63 strains, isolated from traditionally fermented pickled yam showing maximum hydrolase activity (α-amylase (36.9 U/ml) and β-galactosidase (42.6 U/ml)) within a period of 48 hours was identified as Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. Further, it was assessed for the probiotic characteristics under gastrointestinal conditions like acidic, alkaline, proteolytic enzymes, bile stress and found to exhibit tolerance to these stresses. The therapeutic potential of the isolate is implicated because of its antagonistic effect against enteric foodborne pathogens (Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Staphylococcus aureus, Yersinia enterocolitica and Aeromonas hydrophila). The results of this study entail a potential applicability of the isolate in developing future probiotic foods besides the production of industrially significant hydrolases. PMID:24020495

  2. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis IL1403

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Alexander; Wincker, Patrick; Mauger, Stéphane; Jaillon, Olivier; Malarme, Karine; Weissenbach, Jean; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Sorokin, Alexei

    2001-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a nonpathogenic AT-rich gram-positive bacterium closely related to the genus Streptococcus and is the most commonly used cheese starter. It is also the best-characterized lactic acid bacterium. We sequenced the genome of the laboratory strain IL1403, using a novel two-step strategy that comprises diagnostic sequencing of the entire genome and a shotgun polishing step. The genome contains 2,365,589 base pairs and encodes 2310 proteins, including 293 protein-coding genes belonging to six prophages and 43 insertion sequence (IS) elements. Nonrandom distribution of IS elements indicates that the chromosome of the sequenced strain may be a product of recent recombination between two closely related genomes. A complete set of late competence genes is present, indicating the ability of L. lactis to undergo DNA transformation. Genomic sequence revealed new possibilities for fermentation pathways and for aerobic respiration. It also indicated a horizontal transfer of genetic information from Lactococcus to gram-negative enteric bacteria of Salmonella-Escherichia group. [The sequence data described in this paper has been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession no. AE005176.] PMID:11337471

  3. Lactococcus lactis release from calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed Central

    Champagne, C P; Gaudy, C; Poncelet, D; Neufeld, R J

    1992-01-01

    Cell release during milk fermentation by Lactococcus lactis immobilized in calcium alginate beads was examined. Numbers of free cells in the milk gradually increased from 1 x 10(6) to 3 x 10(7) CFU/ml upon successive reutilization of the beads. Rinsing the beads between fermentations did not influence the numbers of free cells in the milk. Cell release was not affected by initial cell density within the beads or by alginate concentration, although higher acidification rates were achieved with increased cell loading. Coating alginate beads with poly-L-lysine (PLL) did not significantly reduce the release of cells during five consecutive fermentations. A double coating of PLL and alginate reduced cell release by a factor of approximately 50. However, acidification of milk with beads having the PLL-alginate coating was slower than that with uncoated beads. Immersing the beads in ethanol to kill cells on the periphery reduced cell release, but acidification activity was maintained. Dipping the beads in aluminum nitrate or a hot CaCl2 solution was not as effective as dipping them in ethanol. Ethanol treatment or heating of the beads appears to be a promising method for maintaining acidification activity while minimizing viable cell release due to loosely entrapped cells near the surface of the alginate beads. PMID:1622208

  4. Characterization of a cadmium resistance Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain by antioxidant assays and proteome profiles methods.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yao; Yang, Xuan; Lian, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Boyang; He, Xiaoyun; Xu, Wentao; Huang, Kunlun

    2016-09-01

    Heavy metal contamination poses a major threat to the environment and human health for their potential toxicity and non-biodegradable properties. At present, some probiotics bacteria are reported to have great potential to eliminate heavy metals from food and water. In this study, resistance properties of a newly isolated Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis for cadmium were studied by antioxidant assays and proteomics analysis. Antioxidant capacity of this strain was significantly activated under cadmium stress indicated by Fenton reaction, DPPH assay, SOD assay and GSH assay. Intracellular antioxidant enzyme systems, such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and catalase were suggested to play vital roles in the activated antioxidant capacity. The up-regulated cadA was associated with the activated P-type ATPases that plays an important role in cadmium resistance. Proteomics analysis identified 12 over-expressed proteins under 50mg/L cadmium stress and these proteins are abundant in oxidative stress response and energy metabolism regulation, which were considered as consequences as cadmium resistance of the strain. Thus, the probiotics Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis may resist cadmium stress through antioxidant approach and enhanced energy metabolism. The food grade lactis strain may be applied in metal decontamination in environment and food/feed. PMID:27522548

  5. Secretory expression of a heterologous nattokinase in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Lixin; Zhong, Jin; Huan, Liandong

    2007-05-01

    Nattokinase has been reported as an oral health product for the prevention of atherosclerosis. We developed a novel strategy to express a nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis in a live delivery vehicle, Lactococcus lactis. Promoter P( nisZ) and signal peptide SP(Usp) were used for inducible and secretory expression of nattokinase in L. lactis. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that nattokinase was successfully expressed, and about 94% of the enzyme was secreted to the culture. The recombinant nattokinase showed potent fibrinolytic activity, equivalent to 41.7 urokinase units per milliliter culture. Expression and delivery of such a fibrinolytic enzyme in the food-grade vehicle L. lactis would facilitate the widespread application of nattokinase in the control and prevention of thrombosis diseases. PMID:17225095

  6. Optimization of cultural conditions for conversion of glycerol to ethanol by Enterobacter aerogenes S012

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to optimize the cultural conditions for the conversion of glycerol to ethanol by Enterobacter aerogenes S012. Taguchi method was used to screen the cultural conditions based on their signal to noise ratio (SN). Temperature (°C), agitation speed (rpm) and time (h) were found to have the highest influence on both glycerol utilization and ethanol production by the organism while pH had the lowest. Full factorial design, statistical analysis, and regression model equation were used to optimize the selected cultural parameters for maximum ethanol production. The result showed that fermentation at 38°C and 200 rpm for 48 h would be ideal for the bacteria to produce maximum amount of ethanol from glycerol. At these optimum conditions, ethanol production, yield and productivity were 25.4 g/l, 0.53 g/l/h, and 1.12 mol/mol-glycerol, repectively. Ethanol production increased to 26.5 g/l while yield and productivity decreased to 1.04 mol/mol-glycerol and 0.37 g/l/h, respectively, after 72 h. Analysis of the fermentation products was performed using HPLC, while anaerobic condition was created by purging the fermentation vessel with nitrogen gas. PMID:23388539

  7. Optimization of cultural conditions for conversion of glycerol to ethanol by Enterobacter aerogenes S012.

    PubMed

    Nwachukwu, Raymond E S; Shahbazi, Abolghasem; Wang, Lijun; Worku, Mulumebet; Ibrahim, Salam; Schimmel, Keith

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to optimize the cultural conditions for the conversion of glycerol to ethanol by Enterobacter aerogenes S012. Taguchi method was used to screen the cultural conditions based on their signal to noise ratio (SN). Temperature (°C), agitation speed (rpm) and time (h) were found to have the highest influence on both glycerol utilization and ethanol production by the organism while pH had the lowest. Full factorial design, statistical analysis, and regression model equation were used to optimize the selected cultural parameters for maximum ethanol production. The result showed that fermentation at 38°C and 200 rpm for 48 h would be ideal for the bacteria to produce maximum amount of ethanol from glycerol. At these optimum conditions, ethanol production, yield and productivity were 25.4 g/l, 0.53 g/l/h, and 1.12 mol/mol-glycerol, repectively. Ethanol production increased to 26.5 g/l while yield and productivity decreased to 1.04 mol/mol-glycerol and 0.37 g/l/h, respectively, after 72 h. Analysis of the fermentation products was performed using HPLC, while anaerobic condition was created by purging the fermentation vessel with nitrogen gas. PMID:23388539

  8. Growth and heavy metal removal by Klebsiella aerogenes at different pH and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shahwani, M.F.; Jazrawi, S.F.; Al-Rawi, E.H.; Ayar, N.S.

    1984-01-01

    A strain of Klebsiella aerogenes isolated from Rustamiyah Station for treatment of wastewater was examined for its ability to grow in a media supplemented with maximum tolerance concentrations of Pb/sup + +/, Zn/sup + +/, Ni/sup + +/, and Cd/sup + +/, separately, at different temperatures and initial pH. The results indicated that at 28/sup 0/C during the first 24 hr, Pb/sup + +/ and Ni/sup + +/ had no effect on the growth of the bacteria, while the presence of Zn/sup + +/ and Cd/sup + +/ decreased the cell count. The growth reached a maximum level after the second day and started to decrease gradually. The bacterial count at 37/sup 0/C was less than that at 28/sup 0/C. No bacterial multiplication occurred at 44/sup 0/C. There was little difference between heavy metal removal at 28 and 37/sup 0/C. At 44/sup 0/C, little removal took place. In general, slightly acidic or neutral medium was better for both bacterial growth and metal removal.

  9. Detoxification of mercury, cadmium, and lead in Klebsiella aerogenes NCTC 418 growing in continuous culture

    SciTech Connect

    Aiking, H.; Govers, H.; van 'T Riet, J.

    1985-11-01

    Klebsiella aerogenes NCTC 418 growing in the presence of cadmium under glucose-, sulfate-, or phosphate-limited conditions in continuous culture exhibited sulfide formation and P/sub i/ accumulation as the only demonstrable detoxification mechanisms. In the presence of mercury under similar conditions only HgS formation could be confirmed, by an increased sensitivity to mercury under sulfate-limited conditions, among others. The fact that the cells were most sensitive to cadmium under conditions of phosphate limitation and most sensitive to mercury under conditions of sulfate limitation led to the hypothesis that these inorganic detoxification mechanisms generally depended on a kind of facilitated precipitation. The process was coined thus because heavy metals were probably accumulated and precipitated near the cell perimeter due to the relatively high local concentrations of sulfide and phosphate there. Depending on the growth-limiting nutrient, mercury proved to be 25-fold (phosphate limitation), 75-fold (glycerol limitation), or 150-fold (sulfate limitation) more toxic than cadmium to this organism. In the presence of lead, PbS formation was suggested. since no other detoxification mechanisms were detected, for example, rendering heavy metal ions innocuous as metallo-organic compounds, it was concluded that formation of heavy metal precipitates is crucially important to this organism. In addition, it was observed that several components of a defined mineral medium were able to reduce mercuric ions to elemental mercury. This abiotic mercury volatilization was studied in detail, and its general and environmental implications are discussed.

  10. Biodegradation of ichlorodiphenyltrichloroe-thane: Intermediates in dichlorodiphenylacetic acid metabolism by Aerobacter aerogenes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1967-01-01

    The final product of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) degradation by vertebrates is commonly considered to be dichlorodiphenylacetic acid, DDA (J. E. Peterson and W. H. Robison, Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 6:321, 1964). Recently, certain organisms (A. S. Perry, S. Miller, and A. J. Buckner. J. Agr. Food Chem. 11:457, 1963; J. D. Pinto, M. N. Comien, and M. S. Dunn. J. Biol. Chem. 240:2148, 1965) have been found to degrade further DDA to dichlorobenzophenone (DBP), but the possibility that such degradation was due to microbial action could not be excluded. Significantly, dichlorobenzhydrol (DBH), dichlorophenylmethane (DPM), and dichlorodiphenylethylene (DDE) have been tentatively identified in rats fed DDA (Pinto et al., J. Biol. Chem. 240:2148, 1965). Since DDA as well as DDT is degraded by the ubiquitous microorganism Aerobacter aerogenes (G. Wedemeyer, Appl. Microbiol. 15:569, 1967; J. L. Mendel, and M. S. Walton, Science 151:1527, 1966), it seemed reasonable that the intestinal microflora might be involved in DBP formation, DPM and DBH being intermediates in its pathway from DDA. Since DDA is a (3,y-unsaturated acid, ketone formation via an alkene and an alcohol would be expected (S. G. Waley, Mechanisms of Organic and Enzymatic Reactions, Oxford University Press, London, England 1962).

  11. Effect of Growth Rate on Histidine Catabolism and Histidase Synthesis in Aerobacter aerogenes1

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Donald E.; Neidhardt, Frederick C.

    1969-01-01

    A study was made of how the catabolism of a carbon and energy source is affected by the biosynthetic demands of growing bacterial cells. Cultures of Aerobacter aerogenes in l-histidine medium were grown in a chemostat at rates determined by the supply of either sulfate or a required amino acid, l-arginine. It was discovered that the rate at which these cells grow under a biosynthetic restriction determines both the rate and the pattern of histidine degradation. (i) Histidine catabolism is partially coupled to the growth rate. This coupling is achieved by catabolite repression of histidase (histidine ammonia lyase; EC 4.3.1.3.), and also by a slightly decreased in vivo function of this enzyme at low growth rates. (ii) The looseness of the coupling results in a direct relationship between growth rate and growth yield, and possibly is correlated with an altered pattern of carbon flow from histidine. (iii) Sudden decreases in growth rate cause total repression of histidase synthesis for substantial periods of time. (iv) Sudden release of biosynthetic restriction leads rapidly to an increase in the functioning of the cells' complement of histidase, an increase in the rate of synthesis of this enzyme, and an increase in the growth yield from histidine. PMID:5781570

  12. Genome-wide metabolic (re-) annotation of Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Even before having its genome sequence published in 2004, Kluyveromyces lactis had long been considered a model organism for studies in genetics and physiology. Research on Kluyveromyces lactis is quite advanced and this yeast species is one of the few with which it is possible to perform formal genetic analysis. Nevertheless, until now, no complete metabolic functional annotation has been performed to the proteins encoded in the Kluyveromyces lactis genome. Results In this work, a new metabolic genome-wide functional re-annotation of the proteins encoded in the Kluyveromyces lactis genome was performed, resulting in the annotation of 1759 genes with metabolic functions, and the development of a methodology supported by merlin (software developed in-house). The new annotation includes novelties, such as the assignment of transporter superfamily numbers to genes identified as transporter proteins. Thus, the genes annotated with metabolic functions could be exclusively enzymatic (1410 genes), transporter proteins encoding genes (301 genes) or have both metabolic activities (48 genes). The new annotation produced by this work largely surpassed the Kluyveromyces lactis currently available annotations. A comparison with KEGG’s annotation revealed a match with 844 (~90%) of the genes annotated by KEGG, while adding 850 new gene annotations. Moreover, there are 32 genes with annotations different from KEGG. Conclusions The methodology developed throughout this work can be used to re-annotate any yeast or, with a little tweak of the reference organism, the proteins encoded in any sequenced genome. The new annotation provided by this study offers basic knowledge which might be useful for the scientific community working on this model yeast, because new functions have been identified for the so-called metabolic genes. Furthermore, it served as the basis for the reconstruction of a compartmentalized, genome-scale metabolic model of Kluyveromyces lactis, which is

  13. Rapid PCR-Based Method Which Can Determine Both Phenotype and Genotype of Lactococcus lactis Subspecies

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Masaru; Kobayashi, Miho; Okamoto, Takashi

    2002-01-01

    A highly efficient, rapid, and reliable PCR-based method for distinguishing Lactococcus lactis subspecies (L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris) is described. Primers complementary to positions in the glutamate decarboxylase gene have been constructed. PCR analysis with extracted DNA or with cells of different L. lactis strains resulted in specific fragments. The length polymorphism of the PCR fragments allowed a clear distinction of the L. lactis subspecies. The amplified fragment length polymorphism with the primers and the restriction fragment length polymorphism of the amplified products agreed perfectly with the identification based on genotypic and phenotypic analyses, respectively. Isolates from cheese starters were investigated by this method, and amplified fragments of genetic variants were found to be approximately 40 bp shorter than the typical L. lactis subsp. cremoris fragments. PMID:11976090

  14. Subdural empyema due to Lactococcus lactis cremoris: case report.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Mizuho; Saito, Atsushi; Kon, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Hiroki; Koyama, Shinya; Haryu, Shinya; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Nishijima, Michiharu

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis cremoris (L. lactis cremoris) infections are very rare in humans. Only three case reports of brain abscess have been reported and the infectious routes and pathological features are still unknown. We experienced a subdural empyema due to L. lactis cremoris in an immunocompetent adult. A 33-year-old man was admitted with fever, right facial pain, left hemiparesis, and left hemianopsia. Computed tomography demonstrated low density fluid collection in the right falcotentorial subdural space. Magnetic resonance (MR) images revealed a high signal lesion on a diffusion-weighted image (DWI) and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images in the right paratentorial and parafalcine subdural space, right maxillary sinus, and bilateral ethmoidal sinus. He underwent two sequential open surgeries for removal and drainage of empyema and was treated with antibiotics including meropenem and ampicillin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of subdural empyema caused by L. lactis cremoris infection. We report the case and discuss the pathological features with the previous literature. PMID:24257498

  15. Lactose-mediated carbon catabolite repression of putrescine production in dairy Lactococcus lactis is strain dependent.

    PubMed

    del Rio, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Linares, Daniel M; Fernández, Maria; Martín, Maria Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-06-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the lactic acid bacterial (LAB) species most widely used as a primary starter in the dairy industry. However, several strains of L. lactis produce the biogenic amine putrescine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. We previously reported the putrescine biosynthesis pathway in L. lactis subsp. cremoris GE2-14 to be regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) via glucose but not lactose (Linares et al., 2013). The present study shows that both these sugars repress putrescine biosynthesis in L. lactis subsp. lactis T3/33, a strain isolated from a Spanish artisanal cheese. Furthermore, we demonstrated that both glucose and lactose repressed the transcriptional activity of the aguBDAC catabolic genes of the AGDI route. Finally, a screening performed in putrescine-producing dairy L. lactis strains determined that putrescine biosynthesis was repressed by lactose in all the L. lactis subsp. lactis strains tested, but in only one L. lactis subsp. cremoris strain. Given the obvious importance of the lactose-repression in cheese putrescine accumulation, it is advisable to consider the diversity of L. lactis in this sense and characterize consequently the starter cultures to select the safest strains. PMID:25791004

  16. Investigation and control of an outbreak of Enterobacter aerogenes bloodstream infection in a neonatal intensive care unit in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Swastika A; Kool, Jacob L; Vakololoma, Miriama; Steer, Andrew C; Mejia, Amelita; Drake, Anne; Jenney, Adam; Turton, Jane F; Kado, Joseph; Tikoduadua, Lisi

    2009-08-01

    Ten neonates developed blood stream infection with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacter aerogenes in a neonatal intensive care unit in Fiji. The source of the outbreak was traced to a bag of contaminated normal saline in the ward, which was used for multiple patients. All isolates recovered from patients were indistinguishable from the bacteria recovered from the normal saline by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The outbreak was controlled using simple infection control practices such as reinforcement of strict hand hygiene policy, provision of single use vials of normal saline, and strict aseptic technique for injections. PMID:19552517

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Heat-Tolerant Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis Strain GL2 from Algerian Dromedary Milk

    PubMed Central

    Gabed, Noujoud; Yang, Manli; Bey Baba Hamed, Mohamed; Drici, Habiba; Gross, Roy; Dandekar, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis GL2 is a moderately thermotolerant lactic acid bacterium isolated from dromedary raw milk. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of this potential new dairy starter strain, which combines thermotolerance and the capacity to metabolize lactose, casein, and citrate. PMID:26586883

  18. Cell Wall Anchoring of the Campylobacter Antigens to Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Kobierecka, Patrycja A.; Olech, Barbara; Książek, Monika; Derlatka, Katarzyna; Adamska, Iwona; Majewski, Paweł M.; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K.; Wyszyńska, Agnieszka K.

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of human food-borne gastroenteritis and chicken meat is the main source of infection. Recent studies showed that broiler chicken immunization against Campylobacter should be the most efficient way to lower the number of human infections by this pathogen. Induction of the mucosal immune system after oral antigen administration should provide protective immunity to chickens. In this work we tested the usefulness of Lactococcus lactis, the most extensively studied lactic acid bacterium, as a delivery vector for Campylobacter antigens. First we constructed hybrid protein – CjaA antigen presenting CjaD peptide epitopes on its surface. We showed that specific rabbit anti-rCjaAD serum reacted strongly with both CjaA and CjaD produced by a wild type C. jejuni strain. Next, rCjaAD and CjaA were fused to the C-terminus of the L. lactis YndF containing the LPTXG motif. The genes expressing these proteins were transcribed under control of the L. lactis Usp45 promoter and their products contain the Usp45 signal sequences. This strategy ensures a cell surface location of both analyzed proteins, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. In order to evaluate the impact of antigen location on vaccine prototype efficacy, a L. lactis strain producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD was also generated. Animal experiments showed a decrease of Campylobacter cecal load in vaccinated birds as compared with the control group and showed that the L. lactis harboring the surface-exposed rCjaAD antigen afforded greater protection than the L. lactis producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to employ Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) strains as a mucosal delivery vehicle for chicken immunization. Although the observed reduction of chicken colonization by Campylobacter resulting from vaccination was rather moderate, the experiments showed that LAB strains can be considered as an alternative vector to

  19. Cell Wall Anchoring of the Campylobacter Antigens to Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Kobierecka, Patrycja A; Olech, Barbara; Książek, Monika; Derlatka, Katarzyna; Adamska, Iwona; Majewski, Paweł M; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K; Wyszyńska, Agnieszka K

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of human food-borne gastroenteritis and chicken meat is the main source of infection. Recent studies showed that broiler chicken immunization against Campylobacter should be the most efficient way to lower the number of human infections by this pathogen. Induction of the mucosal immune system after oral antigen administration should provide protective immunity to chickens. In this work we tested the usefulness of Lactococcus lactis, the most extensively studied lactic acid bacterium, as a delivery vector for Campylobacter antigens. First we constructed hybrid protein - CjaA antigen presenting CjaD peptide epitopes on its surface. We showed that specific rabbit anti-rCjaAD serum reacted strongly with both CjaA and CjaD produced by a wild type C. jejuni strain. Next, rCjaAD and CjaA were fused to the C-terminus of the L. lactis YndF containing the LPTXG motif. The genes expressing these proteins were transcribed under control of the L. lactis Usp45 promoter and their products contain the Usp45 signal sequences. This strategy ensures a cell surface location of both analyzed proteins, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. In order to evaluate the impact of antigen location on vaccine prototype efficacy, a L. lactis strain producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD was also generated. Animal experiments showed a decrease of Campylobacter cecal load in vaccinated birds as compared with the control group and showed that the L. lactis harboring the surface-exposed rCjaAD antigen afforded greater protection than the L. lactis producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to employ Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) strains as a mucosal delivery vehicle for chicken immunization. Although the observed reduction of chicken colonization by Campylobacter resulting from vaccination was rather moderate, the experiments showed that LAB strains can be considered as an alternative vector to

  20. Biohydrogen and Bioethanol Production from Biodiesel-Based Glycerol by Enterobacter aerogenes in a Continuous Stir Tank Reactor.

    PubMed

    Jitrwung, Rujira; Yargeau, Viviane

    2015-01-01

    Crude glycerol from the biodiesel manufacturing process is being produced in increasing quantities due to the expanding number of biodiesel plants. It has been previously shown that, in batch mode, semi-anaerobic fermentation of crude glycerol by Enterobacter aerogenes can produce biohydrogen and bioethanol simultaneously. The present study demonstrated the possible scaling-up of this process from small batches performed in small bottles to a 3.6-L continuous stir tank reactor (CSTR). Fresh feed rate, liquid recycling, pH, mixing speed, glycerol concentration, and waste recycling were optimized for biohydrogen and bioethanol production. Results confirmed that E. aerogenes uses small amounts of oxygen under semi-anaerobic conditions for growth before using oxygen from decomposable salts, mainly NH4NO3, under anaerobic condition to produce hydrogen and ethanol. The optimal conditions were determined to be 500 rpm, pH 6.4, 18.5 g/L crude glycerol (15 g/L glycerol) and 33% liquid recycling for a fresh feed rate of 0.44 mL/min. Using these optimized conditions, the process ran at a lower media cost than previous studies, was stable after 7 days without further inoculation and resulted in yields of 0.86 mol H2/mol glycerol and 0.75 mol ethanol/mole glycerol. PMID:25970750

  1. Biohydrogen and Bioethanol Production from Biodiesel-Based Glycerol by Enterobacter aerogenes in a Continuous Stir Tank Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Jitrwung, Rujira; Yargeau, Viviane

    2015-01-01

    Crude glycerol from the biodiesel manufacturing process is being produced in increasing quantities due to the expanding number of biodiesel plants. It has been previously shown that, in batch mode, semi-anaerobic fermentation of crude glycerol by Enterobacter aerogenes can produce biohydrogen and bioethanol simultaneously. The present study demonstrated the possible scaling-up of this process from small batches performed in small bottles to a 3.6-L continuous stir tank reactor (CSTR). Fresh feed rate, liquid recycling, pH, mixing speed, glycerol concentration, and waste recycling were optimized for biohydrogen and bioethanol production. Results confirmed that E. aerogenes uses small amounts of oxygen under semi-anaerobic conditions for growth before using oxygen from decomposable salts, mainly NH4NO3, under anaerobic condition to produce hydrogen and ethanol. The optimal conditions were determined to be 500 rpm, pH 6.4, 18.5 g/L crude glycerol (15 g/L glycerol) and 33% liquid recycling for a fresh feed rate of 0.44 mL/min. Using these optimized conditions, the process ran at a lower media cost than previous studies, was stable after 7 days without further inoculation and resulted in yields of 0.86 mol H2/mol glycerol and 0.75 mol ethanol/mole glycerol. PMID:25970750

  2. Biohydrogen and polyhydroxyalkanoate co-production by Enterobacter aerogenes and Rhodobacter sphaeroides from Calophyllum inophyllum oil cake.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, A; Sandhya, M; Ponnusami, V

    2014-07-01

    The feasibility of coupled biohydrogen and polyhydroxyalkanoate production by Enterobacter aerogenes and Rhodobacter sphaeroides using Calophyllum inophyllum oil cake was studied under dark and photo fermentation conditions. The utilization of a non-edible acidic oil cake (C. inophyllum), and exploitation of a modified minimal salt media led to reduction in the cost of media. Cost of fermentation is reduced by implementation of alternate dark-photo fermentative periods and through the use of a co-culture consisting of a dark fermentative (E. aerogenes) and a photo fermentative (R. sphaeroides) bacterium. The biohydrogen and polyhydroxyalkanoate produced were 7.95 L H2/L media and 10.73 g/L media, respectively, under alternate dark and photo fermentation and were 3.23 L H2/L media and 5.6g/L media, respectively under complete dark fermentation. The characteristics of the oil cake and alternate dark (16 h) and photo (8h) fermentative conditions were found to be supportive in producing high biohydrogen and polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) yield. PMID:24859207

  3. Generation of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV-inhibiting peptides from β-lactoglobulin secreted by Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Shigemori, Suguru; Oshiro, Kazushi; Wang, Pengfei; Yamamoto, Yoshinari; Wang, Yeqin; Sato, Takashi; Uyeno, Yutaka; Shimosato, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that hydrolysates of β-lactoglobulin (BLG) prepared using gastrointestinal proteases strongly inhibit dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) activity in vitro. In this study, we developed a BLG-secreting Lactococcus lactis strain as a delivery vehicle and in situ expression system. Interestingly, trypsin-digested recombinant BLG from L. lactis inhibited DPP-IV activity, suggesting that BLG-secreting L. lactis may be useful in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25157356

  4. Cloning in Streptococcus lactis of plasmid-mediated UV resistance and effect on prophage stability

    SciTech Connect

    Chopin, M.C.; Chopin, A.; Rouault, A.; Simon, D.

    1986-02-01

    Plasmid pIL7 (33 kilobases) from Streptococcus lactis enhances UV resistance and prophage stability. A 5.4-kilobase pIL7 fragment carrying genes coding for both characters was cloned into S. lactis, using plasmid pHV1301 as the cloning vector. The recombinant plasmid was subsequently transferred to three other S. lactis strains by transformation or protoplast fusion. Cloned genes were expressed in all tested strains.

  5. Characterization of a Wild, Novel Nisin A-Producing Lactococcus Strain with an L. lactis subsp. cremoris Genotype and an L. lactis subsp. lactis Phenotype, Isolated from Greek Raw Milk

    PubMed Central

    Parapouli, Maria; Delbès-Paus, Céline; Kakouri, Athanasia; Koukkou, Anna-Irini; Montel, Marie-Christine

    2013-01-01

    Several molecular taxonomic studies have revealed that many natural (wild) Lactococcus lactis strains of dairy origin which are phenotypically representative of the L. lactis subspecies lactis cluster genotypically within subspecies cremoris and vice versa. Recently, we isolated two wild nisin-producing (Nis+) L. lactis strains, M78 and M104, of the lactis phenotype from Greek raw milk (J. Samelis, A. Lianou, A. Kakouri, C. Delbès, I. Rogelj, B. B. Matijašic, and M. C. Montel, J. Food Prot. 72:783–790, 2009); strain M78 possess a novel nisin A sequence (GenBank accession number HM219853). In this study, the actual subspecies identity of M78 and M104 isolates was elucidated, using 16S rRNA and acmA (encoding lactococcal N-acetylmuramidase) gene and histidine biosynthesis operon polymorphisms and 16S rRNA and ldh (encoding lactate dehydrogenase) gene phylogenies. Except the acmA gene analysis, molecular tools revealed that isolates M78 and M104 clustered with strains of the cremoris genotype, including the LMG 6897T strain, while they were distant from strains of the lactis genotype, including the LMG 6890T strain. The two wild isolates had identical repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR), randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), plasmid, and whole-cell protein profiles and shared high 16S rRNA (99.9%) and ldh (100%) gene sequence homologies. In contrast, they exhibited identical sugar fermentation and enzymatic patterns which were similar to those of the subspecies lactis LMG 6890T strain. To our knowledge, this is the first complete identification report on a wild L. lactis subsp. cremoris genotype of the lactis phenotype which is capable of nisin A production and, thus, has strong potential for use as a novel dairy starter and/or protective culture. PMID:23542625

  6. Proteomic Signature of Lactococcus lactis NCDO763 Cultivated in Milk†

    PubMed Central

    Gitton, Christophe; Meyrand, Mickael; Wang, Juhui; Caron, Christophe; Trubuil, Alain; Guillot, Alain; Mistou, Michel-Yves

    2005-01-01

    We have compared the proteomic profiles of L. lactis subsp. cremoris NCDO763 growing in the synthetic medium M17Lac, skim milk microfiltrate (SMM), and skim milk. SMM was used as a simple model medium to reproduce the initial phase of growth of L. lactis in milk. To widen the analysis of the cytoplasmic proteome, we used two different gel systems (pH ranges of 4 to 7 and 4.5 to 5.5), and the proteins associated with the cell envelopes were also studied by two-dimensional electrophoresis. In the course of the study, we analyzed about 800 spots and identified 330 proteins by mass spectrometry. We observed that the levels of more than 50 and 30 proteins were significantly increased upon growth in SMM and milk, respectively. The large redeployment of protein synthesis was essentially associated with an activation of pathways involved in the metabolism of nitrogenous compounds: peptidolytic and peptide transport systems, amino acid biosynthesis and interconversion, and de novo biosynthesis of purines. We also showed that enzymes involved in reactions feeding the purine biosynthetic pathway in one-carbon units and amino acids have an increased level in SMM and milk. The analysis of the proteomic data suggested that the glutamine synthetase (GS) would play a pivotal role in the adaptation to SMM and milk. The analysis of glnA expression during growth in milk and the construction of a glnA-defective mutant confirmed that GS is an essential enzyme for the development of L. lactis in dairy media. This analysis thus provides a proteomic signature of L. lactis, a model lactic acid bacterium, growing in its technological environment. PMID:16269754

  7. Genes but Not Genomes Reveal Bacterial Domestication of Lactococcus Lactis

    PubMed Central

    Passerini, Delphine; Beltramo, Charlotte; Coddeville, Michele; Quentin, Yves; Ritzenthaler, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background The population structure and diversity of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, a major industrial bacterium involved in milk fermentation, was determined at both gene and genome level. Seventy-six lactococcal isolates of various origins were studied by different genotyping methods and thirty-six strains displaying unique macrorestriction fingerprints were analyzed by a new multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. This gene-based analysis was compared to genomic characteristics determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Methodology/Principal Findings The MLST analysis revealed that L. lactis subsp. lactis is essentially clonal with infrequent intra- and intergenic recombination; also, despite its taxonomical classification as a subspecies, it displays a genetic diversity as substantial as that within several other bacterial species. Genome-based analysis revealed a genome size variability of 20%, a value typical of bacteria inhabiting different ecological niches, and that suggests a large pan-genome for this subspecies. However, the genomic characteristics (macrorestriction pattern, genome or chromosome size, plasmid content) did not correlate to the MLST-based phylogeny, with strains from the same sequence type (ST) differing by up to 230 kb in genome size. Conclusion/Significance The gene-based phylogeny was not fully consistent with the traditional classification into dairy and non-dairy strains but supported a new classification based on ecological separation between “environmental” strains, the main contributors to the genetic diversity within the subspecies, and “domesticated” strains, subject to recent genetic bottlenecks. Comparison between gene- and genome-based analyses revealed little relationship between core and dispensable genome phylogenies, indicating that clonal diversification and phenotypic variability of the “domesticated” strains essentially arose through substantial genomic flux within the dispensable genome

  8. Production of functionalized biopolyester granules by recombinant Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Mifune, Jun; Grage, Katrin; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2009-07-01

    Many bacteria are naturally capable of accumulating biopolyesters composed of 3-hydroxy fatty acids as intracellular inclusions, which serve as storage granules. Recently, these inclusions have been considered as nano-/microbeads with surface-attached proteins, which can be engineered to display various protein-based functions that are suitable for biotechnological and biomedical applications. In this study, the food-grade, generally-regarded-as-safe gram-positive organism Lactococcus lactis was engineered to recombinantly produce the biopolyester poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and the respective intracellular inclusions. The codon-optimized polyhydroxybutyrate biosynthesis operon phaCAB from Cupriavidus necator was expressed using the nisin-controlled gene expression system. Recombinant L. lactis accumulated up to 6% (wt/wt) poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) of cellular dry weight. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) granules were isolated and analyzed with respect to bound proteins using biochemical methods and with respect to shape/size using transmission electron microscopy. The immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding ZZ domain of Staphylococcus aureus protein A was chosen as an exemplary functionality to be displayed at the granule surface by fusing it to the N terminus of the granule-associated poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) synthase. The presence of the fusion protein at the surface of isolated granules was confirmed by peptide fingerprinting using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (mass spectrometry). The functionality of the ZZ domain-displaying granules was demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and IgG affinity purification. In both assays, the ZZ beads from recombinant L. lactis performed at least equally to ZZ beads from Escherichia coli. Overall, in this study it was shown that recombinant L. lactis can be used to manufacture endotoxin-free poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) beads with surface functionalities that are suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:19465535

  9. Mobile CRISPR/Cas-Mediated Bacteriophage Resistance in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Anne M.; Horvath, Philippe; Boyaval, Patrick; Romero, Dennis A.

    2012-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a biotechnological workhorse for food fermentations and potentially therapeutic products and is therefore widely consumed by humans. It is predominantly used as a starter microbe for fermented dairy products, and specialized strains have adapted from a plant environment through reductive evolution and horizontal gene transfer as evidenced by the association of adventitious traits with mobile elements. Specifically, L. lactis has armed itself with a myriad of plasmid-encoded bacteriophage defensive systems to protect against viral predation. This known arsenal had not included CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins), which forms a remarkable microbial immunity system against invading DNA. Although CRISPR/Cas systems are common in the genomes of closely related lactic acid bacteria (LAB), none was identified within the eight published lactococcal genomes. Furthermore, a PCR-based search of the common LAB CRISPR/Cas systems (Types I and II) in 383 industrial L. lactis strains proved unsuccessful. Here we describe a novel, Type III, self-transmissible, plasmid-encoded, phage-interfering CRISPR/Cas discovered in L. lactis. The native CRISPR spacers confer resistance based on sequence identity to corresponding lactococcal phage. The interference is directed at phages problematic to the dairy industry, indicative of a responsive system. Moreover, targeting could be modified by engineering the spacer content. The 62.8-kb plasmid was shown to be conjugally transferrable to various strains. Its mobility should facilitate dissemination within microbial communities and provide a readily applicable system to naturally introduce CRISPR/Cas to industrially relevant strains for enhanced phage resistance and prevention against acquisition of undesirable genes. PMID:23240053

  10. Kluyveromyces lactis genome harbours a functional linker histone encoding gene.

    PubMed

    Staneva, Dessislava; Georgieva, Milena; Miloshev, George

    2016-06-01

    Linker histones are essential components of chromatin in eukaryotes. Through interactions with linker DNA and nucleosomes they facilitate folding and maintenance of higher-order chromatin structures and thus delicately modulate gene activity. The necessity of linker histones in lower eukaryotes appears controversial and dubious. Genomic data have shown that Schizosaccharomyces pombe does not possess genes encoding linker histones while Kluyveromyces lactis has been reported to have a pseudogene. Regarding this controversy, we have provided the first direct experimental evidence for the existence of a functional linker histone gene, KlLH1, in K. lactis genome. Sequencing of KlLH1 from both genomic DNA and copy DNA confirmed the presence of an intact open reading frame. Transcription and splicing of the KlLH1 sequence as well as translation of its mRNA have been studied. In silico analysis revealed homology of KlLH1p to the histone H1/H5 protein family with predicted three domain structure characteristic for the linker histones of higher eukaryotes. This strongly proves that the yeast K. lactis does indeed possess a functional linker histone gene thus entailing the evolutionary preservation and significance of linker histones. The nucleotide sequences of KlLH1 are deposited in the GenBank under accession numbers KT826576, KT826577 and KT826578. PMID:27189369

  11. Isolation of Enterobacter aerogenes carrying blaTEM-1 and blaKPC-3 genes recovered from a hospital Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Pulcrano, Giovanna; Pignanelli, Salvatore; Vollaro, Adriana; Esposito, Matilde; Iula, Vita Dora; Roscetto, Emanuela; Soriano, Amata Amy; Catania, Maria Rosaria

    2016-06-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes has recently emerged as an important hospital pathogen. In this study, we showed the emergence of E. aerogenes isolates carrying the blaKPC gene in patients colonized by carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains. Two multiresistant E. aerogenes isolates were recovered from bronchial aspirates of two patients hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit at the "Santa Maria della Scaletta" Hospital, Imola. The antimicrobial susceptibility test showed the high resistance to carbapenems and double-disk synergy test confirmed the phenotype of KPC and AmpC production. Other investigation revealed that ESBL and blaKPC genes were carried on the conjugative pKpQIL plasmid. This is a relevant report in Italy that describes a nosocomial infection due to the production of KPC beta-lactamases by an E. aerogenes isolate in patients previously colonized by K. pneumoniae carbapenem-resistant. In conclusion, it's necessary a continuous monitoring of multidrug-resistant strains for the detection of any KPC-producing bacteria that could expand the circulation of carbapenem-resistant pathogens. PMID:27004836

  12. BactQuant: An enhanced broad-coverage bacterial quantitative real-time PCR assay

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial load quantification is a critical component of bacterial community analysis, but a culture-independent method capable of detecting and quantifying diverse bacteria is needed. Based on our analysis of a diverse collection of 16 S rRNA gene sequences, we designed a broad-coverage quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay—BactQuant—for quantifying 16 S rRNA gene copy number and estimating bacterial load. We further utilized in silico evaluation to complement laboratory-based qPCR characterization to validate BactQuant. Methods The aligned core set of 4,938 16 S rRNA gene sequences in the Greengenes database were analyzed for assay design. Cloned plasmid standards were generated and quantified using a qPCR-based approach. Coverage analysis was performed computationally using >670,000 sequences and further evaluated following the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) guidelines. Results A bacterial TaqMan® qPCR assay targeting a 466 bp region in V3-V4 was designed. Coverage analysis showed that 91% of the phyla, 96% of the genera, and >80% of the 89,537 species analyzed contained at least one perfect sequence match to the BactQuant assay. Of the 106 bacterial species evaluated, amplification efficiencies ranged from 81 to 120%, with r2-value of >0.99, including species with sequence mismatches. Inter- and intra-run coefficient of variance was <3% and <16% for Ct and copy number, respectively. Conclusions The BactQuant assay offers significantly broader coverage than a previously reported universal bacterial quantification assay BactQuant in vitro performance was better than the in silico predictions. PMID:22510143

  13. Multicenter evaluation of the MB/BACT system for susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Pascale; Bodmer, Thomas; Munzinger, Juerg; Perrin, Monique; Vincent, Véronique; Drugeon, Henri

    2004-03-01

    The reliability of the MB/BACT system for susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to pyrazinamide, rifampin, isoniazid, streptomycin, and ethambutol was compared to the BACTEC 460TB system. The proportion method was used to resolve discrepant results by an independent arbiter. Two interpretative methods were used, with an undiluted control (direct control) and a diluted control (10(-1) control). As no significant difference was observed between the two controls, the method with the direct control was adopted as the most accurate one. One hundred sixty-six strains were tested, with an overall agreement of 98.3%. After resolution of the 18 discrepant results by the proportion method, the sensitivity and specificity of the MB/BACT system were 100% for rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide. For ethambutol, sensitivity was 92.3% at the critical concentration and 33% at the high concentration, and specificity was 100% at both concentrations. For streptomycin, sensitivity was 100% at the critical concentration and 80% at the high concentration, and specificity was 98.6% at the critical concentration and 100% at the high concentration. The rifampin, isoniazid, streptomycin, and ethambutol susceptibility test results were obtained in 6.6 days with the MB/BACT versus 5 days with the BACTEC 460TB. The pyrazinamide susceptibility test results were obtained in 7.8 days with the MB/BACT, versus 6.7 days with the BACTEC 460TB. These data demonstrate that the fully automated MB/BACT system is a very reliable method for rapid susceptibility testing of M. tuberculosis against rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide. Sensitivity results have to be improved for ethambutol and streptomycin, especially at the high concentration. PMID:15004049

  14. Multicenter Evaluation of the MB/BACT System for Susceptibility Testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Pascale; Bodmer, Thomas; Munzinger, Juerg; Perrin, Monique; Vincent, Véronique; Drugeon, Henri

    2004-01-01

    The reliability of the MB/BACT system for susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to pyrazinamide, rifampin, isoniazid, streptomycin, and ethambutol was compared to the BACTEC 460TB system. The proportion method was used to resolve discrepant results by an independent arbiter. Two interpretative methods were used, with an undiluted control (direct control) and a diluted control (10−1 control). As no significant difference was observed between the two controls, the method with the direct control was adopted as the most accurate one. One hundred sixty-six strains were tested, with an overall agreement of 98.3%. After resolution of the 18 discrepant results by the proportion method, the sensitivity and specificity of the MB/BACT system were 100% for rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide. For ethambutol, sensitivity was 92.3% at the critical concentration and 33% at the high concentration, and specificity was 100% at both concentrations. For streptomycin, sensitivity was 100% at the critical concentration and 80% at the high concentration, and specificity was 98.6% at the critical concentration and 100% at the high concentration. The rifampin, isoniazid, streptomycin, and ethambutol susceptibility test results were obtained in 6.6 days with the MB/BACT versus 5 days with the BACTEC 460TB. The pyrazinamide susceptibility test results were obtained in 7.8 days with the MB/BACT, versus 6.7 days with the BACTEC 460TB. These data demonstrate that the fully automated MB/BACT system is a very reliable method for rapid susceptibility testing of M. tuberculosis against rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide. Sensitivity results have to be improved for ethambutol and streptomycin, especially at the high concentration. PMID:15004049

  15. Production, active staining and gas chromatography assay analysis of recombinant aminopeptidase P from Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis DSM 20481

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The aminopeptidase P (PepP, EC 3.4.11.9) gene from Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis DSM 20481 was cloned, sequenced and expressed recombinantly in E. coli BL21 (DE3) for the first time. PepP is involved in the hydrolysis of proline-rich proteins and, thus, is important for the debittering of protein hydrolysates. For accurate determination of PepP activity, a novel gas chromatographic assay was established. The release of L-leucine during the hydrolysis of L-leucine-L-proline-L-proline (LPP) was examined for determination of PepP activity. Sufficient recombinant PepP production was achieved via bioreactor cultivation at 16 °C, resulting in PepP activity of 90 μkatLPP Lculture-1. After automated chromatographic purification by His-tag affinity chromatography followed by desalting, PepP activity of 73.8 μkatLPP Lculture-1 was achieved. This was approximately 700-fold higher compared to the purified native PepP produced by Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis NCDO 763 as described in literature. The molecular weight of PepP was estimated to be ~ 40 kDa via native-PAGE together with a newly developed activity staining method and by SDS-PAGE. Furthermore, the kinetic parameters Km and Vmax were determined for PepP using three different tripeptide substrates. The purified enzyme showed a pH optimum between 7.0 and 7.5, was most active between 50°C and 60°C and exhibited reasonable stability at 0°C, 20°C and 37°C over 15 days. PepP activity could be increased 6-fold using 8.92 mM MnCl2 and was inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline and EDTA. PMID:22853547

  16. Transcriptome analysis of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis during milk acidification as affected by dissolved oxygen and the redox potential.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Nadja; Moslehi-Jenabian, Saloomeh; Werner, Birgit Brøsted; Jensen, Maiken Lund; Garrigues, Christel; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; Jespersen, Lene

    2016-06-01

    Performance of Lactococcus lactis as a starter culture in dairy fermentations depends on the levels of dissolved oxygen and the redox state of milk. In this study the microarray analysis was used to investigate the global gene expression of L. lactis subsp. lactis DSM20481(T) during milk acidification as affected by oxygen depletion and the decrease of redox potential. Fermentations were carried out at different initial levels of dissolved oxygen (dO2) obtained by milk sparging with oxygen (high dO2, 63%) or nitrogen (low dO2, 6%). Bacterial exposure to high initial oxygen resulted in overexpression of genes involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidation-reduction processes, biosynthesis of trehalose and down-regulation of genes involved in purine nucleotide biosynthesis, indicating that several factors, among them trehalose and GTP, were implicated in bacterial adaptation to oxidative stress. Generally, transcriptional changes were more pronounced during fermentation of oxygen sparged milk. Genes up-regulated in response to oxygen depletion were implicated in biosynthesis and transport of pyrimidine nucleotides, branched chain amino acids and in arginine catabolic pathways; whereas genes involved in salvage of nucleotides and cysteine pathways were repressed. Expression pattern of genes involved in pyruvate metabolism indicated shifts towards mixed acid fermentation after oxygen depletion with production of specific end-products, depending on milk treatment. Differential expression of genes, involved in amino acid and pyruvate pathways, suggested that initial oxygen might influence the release of flavor compounds and, thereby, flavor development in dairy fermentations. The knowledge of molecular responses involved in adaptation of L. lactis to the shifts of redox state and pH during milk fermentations is important for the dairy industry to ensure better control of cheese production. PMID:27015296

  17. Inactivation of the panE Gene in Lactococcus lactis Enhances Formation of Cheese Aroma Compounds

    PubMed Central

    de Cadiñanos, Luz P. Gómez; García-Cayuela, Tomás; Yvon, Mireille; Martinez-Cuesta, M. Carmen; Peláez, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyacid dehydrogenases limit the conversion of α-keto acids into aroma compounds. Here we report that inactivation of the panE gene, encoding the α-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase activity in Lactococcus lactis, enhanced the formation of 3-methylbutanal and 3-methylbutanol. L. lactis IFPL953ΔpanE was an efficient strain producing volatile compounds related to cheese aroma. PMID:23524675

  18. Genome Sequence of a Lactococcus lactis Strain Isolated from Salmonid Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Opazo, Rafael; Gajardo, Felipe; Ruiz, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a common inhabitant of the intestinal microbiota of salmonids, especially those in aquaculture systems. Here, we present a genome sequence of a Lactococcus lactis strain isolated from the intestinal contents of rainbow trout reared in Chile. PMID:27563049

  19. Genome Sequence of a Lactococcus lactis Strain Isolated from Salmonid Intestinal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Opazo, Rafael; Gajardo, Felipe; Ruiz, Mauricio; Romero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a common inhabitant of the intestinal microbiota of salmonids, especially those in aquaculture systems. Here, we present a genome sequence of a Lactococcus lactis strain isolated from the intestinal contents of rainbow trout reared in Chile. PMID:27563049

  20. Increasing the heme-dependent respiratory efficiency of Lactococcus lactis by inhibition of lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Arioli, Stefania; Zambelli, Daniele; Guglielmetti, Simone; De Noni, Ivano; Pedersen, Martin B; Pedersen, Per Dedenroth; Dal Bello, Fabio; Mora, Diego

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of heme-induced respiration in Lactococcus lactis has radically improved the industrial processes used for the biomass production of this species. Here, we show that inhibition of the lactate dehydrogenase activity of L. lactis during growth under respiration-permissive conditions can stimulate aerobic respiration, thereby increasing not only growth efficiency but also the robustness of this organism. PMID:23064338

  1. Vibrio furnissii (formerly aerogenic biogroup of Vibrio fluvialis), a new species isolated from human feces and the environment.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, D J; Hickman-Brenner, F W; Lee, J V; Steigerwalt, A G; Fanning, G R; Hollis, D G; Farmer, J J; Weaver, R E; Joseph, S W; Seidler, R J

    1983-01-01

    Strains formerly classified as the aerogenic (gas-producing) biogroup of Vibrio fluvialis were shown by DNA relatedness to be a separate species. The species was named Vibrio furnissii sp. nov. (type strain ATCC 35016 = CDC B3215). Three strains of V. furnissii were 79% or more related to the type strain of V. furnissii and about 50% related to the type strain of V. fluvialis. V. fluvialis strains were 40 to 64% related to the type strain of V. furnissii. Divergence in related sequences was only 0.0 to 1.5% among strains of V. furnissii and among strains of V. fluvialis but was 5.0 to 8.0% in interspecific reactions between V. fluvialis and V. furnissii. V. furnissii was aerogenic (produced gas from the fermentation of carbohydrates), whereas V. fluvialis was anaerogenic (did not produce gas from the fermentation of carbohydrates). Another test of some help in differentiating the two species was fermentation of L-rhamnose (57% positive for V. furnissii and negative for V. fluvialis). In addition to the reactions above, V. furnissii is distinguished from other salt-requiring vibrios on the basis of its positive reactions in tests for Møller L-arginine, L-arabinose, maltose, and D-mannitol and its negative reactions for Møller L-lysine and L-ornithine, lactose, and Voges-Proskauer. V. furnissii has been isolated from patients with acute gastroenteritis in at least two outbreaks of food poisoning; its role as a cause of diarrhea needs further study. PMID:6630464

  2. Vibrio furnissii (formerly aerogenic biogroup of Vibrio fluvialis), a new species isolated from human feces and the environment.

    PubMed

    Brenner, D J; Hickman-Brenner, F W; Lee, J V; Steigerwalt, A G; Fanning, G R; Hollis, D G; Farmer, J J; Weaver, R E; Joseph, S W; Seidler, R J

    1983-10-01

    Strains formerly classified as the aerogenic (gas-producing) biogroup of Vibrio fluvialis were shown by DNA relatedness to be a separate species. The species was named Vibrio furnissii sp. nov. (type strain ATCC 35016 = CDC B3215). Three strains of V. furnissii were 79% or more related to the type strain of V. furnissii and about 50% related to the type strain of V. fluvialis. V. fluvialis strains were 40 to 64% related to the type strain of V. furnissii. Divergence in related sequences was only 0.0 to 1.5% among strains of V. furnissii and among strains of V. fluvialis but was 5.0 to 8.0% in interspecific reactions between V. fluvialis and V. furnissii. V. furnissii was aerogenic (produced gas from the fermentation of carbohydrates), whereas V. fluvialis was anaerogenic (did not produce gas from the fermentation of carbohydrates). Another test of some help in differentiating the two species was fermentation of L-rhamnose (57% positive for V. furnissii and negative for V. fluvialis). In addition to the reactions above, V. furnissii is distinguished from other salt-requiring vibrios on the basis of its positive reactions in tests for Møller L-arginine, L-arabinose, maltose, and D-mannitol and its negative reactions for Møller L-lysine and L-ornithine, lactose, and Voges-Proskauer. V. furnissii has been isolated from patients with acute gastroenteritis in at least two outbreaks of food poisoning; its role as a cause of diarrhea needs further study. PMID:6630464

  3. Encapsulated Lactococcus lactis with enhanced gastrointestinal survival for the development of folate enriched functional foods.

    PubMed

    Divya, Jayakumar Beena; Nampoothiri, Kesavan Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    Two lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from cow's milk were identified as Lactococcus lactis strains and designated as L. lactis CM22 and L. lactis CM28. They were immobilised by co-encapsulation using alginate and mannitol and by hybrid entrapment with skim milk, glycerol, CaCO3 and alginate. The encapsulated cells survived better in simulated gastrointestinal conditions compared to the free cells. The percentage survival of probiotics encapsulated by hybrid entrapment method was 62.74% for L. lactis CM22 and 68% for L. lactis CM28. Studies to check their efficacy in fermentative fortification of skim milk and ice cream revealed an enhancement in folate level. PMID:25686721

  4. Lactococcal 936-species phage attachment to surface of Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Geller, B L; Ngo, H T; Mooney, D T; Su, P; Dunn, N

    2005-03-01

    The interactions of the 936-species phages sk1, jj50, and 64 with the cell surface of Lactococcus lactis LM0230 were analyzed. Cell envelopes (walls + plasma membrane), cell wall, or plasma membrane from L. lactis ssp. lactis LM0230 each inactivated the phages in vitro. However, other 936-species phages kh and P008, which do not infect strain LM0230, were not inactivated by any of the subcellular fractions. Treating cell walls or plasma membrane with the cell wall hydrolase mutanolysin eliminated inactivation of phage sk1. This suggested that intact cell wall fragments were required for inactivation. A role for plasma membrane in phage sk1 inactivation was further investigated. Boiling, washing in 2 M KCl, 8 M urea, or 0.1 M Na(2)CO(3)/pH 11, or treating the plasma membrane with proteases did not reduce adsorption or inactivation of phage. Adding lipoteichoic acid or antibodies to lipoteichoic acid did not reduce inactivation of phage in a mixture with membrane, suggesting that lipoteichoic acid was not involved. Inactivation by envelopes or cell wall correlated with ejection of DNA from the phage sk1 capsid. Although calcium is required for plaque formation, it was not required for adsorption, inactivation, or ejection of phage DNA by envelopes or cell wall. The results suggest that at least for phages sk1, jj50, and 64, adsorption and phage DNA injection into the host does not require a host membrane protein or lipoteichoic acid, and that cell wall components are sufficient for these initial steps of phage infection. PMID:15738223

  5. Rapid Fluorescence Assessment of the Viability of Stressed Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Bunthof, Christine J.; van den Braak, Sabina; Breeuwer, Pieter; Rombouts, Frank M.; Abee, Tjakko

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the use of the fluorescent probes carboxyfluorescein (cF) and propidium iodide (PI) for rapid assessment of viability, using Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ML3 exposed to different stress treatments. The cF labeling indicated the reproductive capacity of mixtures of nontreated cells and cells killed at 70°C very well. However, after treatment up to 60°C the fraction of cF-labeled cells remained high, whereas the survival decreased for cells treated at above 50°C and was completely lost for those treated at 60°C. In an extended series of experiments, cell suspensions were exposed to heating, freezing, low pH, or bile salts, after which the colony counts, acidification capacity, glycolytic activity, PI exclusion, cF labeling, and cF efflux were measured and compared. The acidification capacity corresponded with the number of CFU. The glycolytic activity, which is an indicator of vitality, was more sensitive to the stress conditions than the reproduction, acidification, and fluorescence parameters. The cF labeling depended on membrane integrity, as was confirmed by PI exclusion. The fraction of cF-labeled cells was not a general indicator of reproduction or acidification, nor was PI exclusion or cF labeling capacity (the internal cF concentration). When the cells were labeled by cF, a subsequent lactose-energized efflux assay was needed for decisive viability assessment. This novel assay proved to be a good and rapid indicator of the reproduction and acidification capacities of stressed L. lactis and has potential for physiological research and dairy applications related to lactic acid bacteria. PMID:10427066

  6. Oral Administration of Recombinant Lactococcus lactis Expressing the Cellulase Gene Increases Digestibility of Fiber in Geese.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haizhu; Gao, Yunhang; Gao, Guang; Lou, Yujie

    2015-12-01

    Enhancing cellulose digestibility in animals is important for improving the utilization of forage, which can decrease the amount of food used in animal production. The aim of the present study was to achieve recombinant expression of the cellulase gene in Lactococcus lactis and evaluate the effects of oral administration of the recombinant L. lactis on fiber digestibility in geese. Cellulase (Cell) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes were cloned into a L. lactis expression vector (pNZ8149) to construct the recombinant expression plasmid (pNZ8149-GFP-Cell). Then, the recombinant expression plasmid was transformed into L. lactis (NZ3900) competent cells by electroporation to obtain recombinant L. lactis (pNZ8149-GFP-Cell/NZ3900) in which protein expression was induced by Nisin. Expression of GFP and Cell by the recombinant L. lactis was confirmed using SDS-PAGE, fluorescence detection, and Congo red assays. A feeding experiment showed that oral administration of pNZ8149-GFP-Cell/NZ3900 significantly increased the digestibility of dietary fiber in geese fed either a maize stalk diet or a rice chaff diet. Therefore, oral administration of recombinant L. lactis cells expressing the cellulase gene increases fiber digestibility in geese, offering a way to increase the utilization of dietary fiber in geese. PMID:26341925

  7. Cloning, expression, and characterization of the Lactococcus lactis pfl gene, encoding pyruvate formate-lyase.

    PubMed Central

    Arnau, J; Jørgensen, F; Madsen, S M; Vrang, A; Israelsen, H

    1997-01-01

    The Lactococcus lactis pfl gene, encoding pyruvate formate-lyase (PFL), has been cloned and characterized. The deduced amino acid sequence of the L. lactis PFL. protein showed high similarity to those of other bacterial PFL proteins and included the conserved glycine residue involved in posttranslational activation of PFL. The genetic organization of the chromosomal pfl region in L. lactis showed differences from other characterized pfl loci, with an upstream open reading frame independently transcribed in the same orientation as the pfl gene. The gene coding for PFL-activase (act), normally found downstream of pfl, was not identified in L. lactis. Analysis of pfl expression showed a strong induction under anaerobiosis at the transcriptional level independent of the growth medium used. During growth with galactose, pfl showed the highest levels of expression. Constructed L. lactis pfl strains were unable to produce formate under anaerobic growth. Higher levels of diacetyl and acetoin were produced anaerobically in the constructed Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis pfl strain. PMID:9294449

  8. Functional Expression of an Orchid Fragrance Gene in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Adelene Ai Lian; Abdullah, Janna O.; Abdullah, Mohd Puad; Shafee, Norazizah; Rahim, Raha A.

    2012-01-01

    Vanda Mimi Palmer (VMP), an orchid hybrid of Vanda tesselata and Vanda Tan Chay Yan is a highly scented tropical orchid which blooms all year round. Previous studies revealed that VMP produces a variety of isoprenoid volatiles during daylight. Isoprenoids are well known to contribute significantly to the scent of most fragrant plants. They are a large group of secondary metabolites which may possess valuable characteristics such as flavor, fragrance and toxicity and are produced via two pathways, the mevalonate (MVA) pathway or/and the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. In this study, a sesquiterpene synthase gene denoted VMPSTS, previously isolated from a floral cDNA library of VMP was cloned and expressed in Lactococcus lactis to characterize the functionality of the protein. L. lactis, a food grade bacterium which utilizes the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid production was found to be a suitable host for the characterization of plant terpene synthases. Through recombinant expression of VMPSTS, it was revealed that VMPSTS produced multiple sesquiterpenes and germacrene D dominates its profile. PMID:22408409

  9. Functional expression of an orchid fragrance gene in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Song, Adelene Ai Lian; Abdullah, Janna O; Abdullah, Mohd Puad; Shafee, Norazizah; Rahim, Raha A

    2012-01-01

    Vanda Mimi Palmer (VMP), an orchid hybrid of Vanda tesselata and Vanda Tan Chay Yan is a highly scented tropical orchid which blooms all year round. Previous studies revealed that VMP produces a variety of isoprenoid volatiles during daylight. Isoprenoids are well known to contribute significantly to the scent of most fragrant plants. They are a large group of secondary metabolites which may possess valuable characteristics such as flavor, fragrance and toxicity and are produced via two pathways, the mevalonate (MVA) pathway or/and the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. In this study, a sesquiterpene synthase gene denoted VMPSTS, previously isolated from a floral cDNA library of VMP was cloned and expressed in Lactococcus lactis to characterize the functionality of the protein. L. lactis, a food grade bacterium which utilizes the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid production was found to be a suitable host for the characterization of plant terpene synthases. Through recombinant expression of VMPSTS, it was revealed that VMPSTS produced multiple sesquiterpenes and germacrene D dominates its profile. PMID:22408409

  10. Draft Genome Assemblies of Enterobacter aerogenes CDC 6003-71, Enterobacter cloacae CDC 442-68, and Pantoea agglomerans UA 0804-01.

    PubMed

    Minogue, T D; Daligault, H E; Davenport, K W; Bishop-Lilly, K A; Bruce, D C; Chain, P S; Coyne, S R; Chertkov, O; Freitas, T; Frey, K G; Jaissle, J; Koroleva, G I; Ladner, J T; Palacios, G F; Redden, C L; Xu, Y; Johnson, S L

    2014-01-01

    The Enterobacteriaceae are environmental and enteric microbes. We sequenced the genomes of two Enterobacter reference strains, E. aerogenes CDC 6003-71 and E. cloacae CDC 442-68, as well as one near neighbor used as an exclusionary reference for diagnostics, Pantoea agglomerans CDC UA0804-01. The genome sizes range from 4.72 to 5.55 Mbp and have G+C contents from 54.6 to 55.1%. PMID:25342683

  11. Les biofilms bactériens : leur importance en santé animale et en santé publique

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Yannick D.N.; Hathroubi, Skander; Jacques, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Résumé Les biofilms bactériens sont des amas structurés de cellules bactériennes enrobés d’une matrice polymérique et attachés à une surface. Le biofilm protège les bactéries et leur permet de survivre dans des conditions environnementales hostiles. Les bactéries du biofilm peuvent résister à la réponse immunitaire de l’hôte et sont beaucoup plus résistantes aux antibiotiques et aux désinfectants que les cellules bactériennes planctoniques. La capacité de former un biofilm est maintenant reconnue comme une caractéristique propre à plusieurs microorganismes. La présence de biofilms lors d’infections demande donc de nouvelles méthodes de prévention, de diagnostic et de traitement. De même, la présence de biofilms sur des surfaces retrouvées à la ferme, à l’abattoir ou à l’usine de transformation affectera l’efficacité du protocole de désinfection. De façon surprenante, la formation de biofilms chez les bactéries pathogènes des animaux et les bactéries zoonotiques est un sujet relativement peu étudié. Ce bref compte rendu a pour objectif de sensibiliser les intervenants en santé animale à l’importance des biofilms. PMID:24688172

  12. Integrated evaluation of aerogenic pollution by air-transported heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Ni, Zn, Mn and Cu) in the analysis of the main deposit media.

    PubMed

    Baltrėnaitė, Edita; Baltrėnas, Pranas; Lietuvninkas, Arvydas; Serevičienė, Vaida; Zuokaitė, Eglė

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the ambient air is constantly changing; therefore, the monitoring of ambient air quality to detect the changes caused by aerogenic pollutants makes the essential part of general environmental monitoring. To achieve more effective improvement of the ambient air quality, the Directive 2008/50/EC on 'Ambient Air Quality and Cleaner Air for Europe' was adopted by the European Parliament and the European Council. It informed the public and enterprises about a negative effect of pollution on humans, animals and plants, as well as about the need for monitoring aerogenic pollutants not only at the continuous monitoring stations but also by using indicator methods, i.e. by analysing natural deposit media. The problem of determining the relationship between the accumulation level of pollutants by a deposit medium and the level of air pollution and its risks is constantly growing in importance. The paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the response of the main four deposit media, i.e. snow cover, soil, pine bark and epigeic mosses, to the long-term pollution by aerogenic pollutants which can be observed in the area of oil refinery influence. Based on the quantitative expressions of the amounts of the accumulated pollutants in the deposit media, the territory of the oil refinery investigated in this paper has been referred to the areas of mild or moderate pollution. PMID:23933956

  13. An evaluation and partial characterization of a bacteriocin produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis ST1 isolated from goat milk.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Parinaz; Samadi, Nasrin; Ehsani, Mohammad Reza; Khoshayand, Mohammad Reza; Jamalifar, Hossein

    2012-10-01

    A bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance producing Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis strain, ST1, isolated from goat milk of Iranian origin and with broad spectrum of activity and desirable technical properties was used for evaluating some futures of bacteriocin inhibitory activity. Cell growth and bacteriocin production studies were carried out in MRS medium incubated statically under uncontrolled pH condition. The antibacterial activity presented a primary metabolite pattern and showed a rapid decrease at the stationary phase. Microaerobiosis and capnophily growth conditions resulted in higher bacteriocin production while aerobiosis showed negative effect on both cell growth and bacteriocin production. Bacteriocin production, on the other hand, was favored in MRS broth (pH; 6.5) inoculated with 0.1 ml l(-1) fresh culture when incubation was carried out at 30 °C. This indicated that the conditions resulted in higher levels of growth were frequently favoring bacteriocin production by ST1 as well. Decrease in activity, at the stationary growth phase, was much pronounced in favored growth condition. Nutrient depletion, deferent effect of low pH on bacteriocin production and/or protein degradation seemed more responsible for this phenomenon. The study also provided further data on new method for bacteriocin release from the cell wall of producer. It was clearly shown that both heating and ultrasound shock for 5 min at pH 2 could increase bacteriocin activity significantly. The release was more pronounced in the presence of 0.5% Tween80. PMID:24031976

  14. Genetic analysis of regions of the Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis plasmid pRS01 involved in conjugative transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, D A; Choi, C K; Dunny, G M; McKay, L L

    1994-01-01

    The genes responsible for conjugative transfer of the 48.4-kb Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ML3 plasmid pRS01 were localized by insertional mutagenesis. Integration of the IS946-containing plasmid pTRK28 into pRS01 generated a pool of stable cointegrates, including a number of plasmids altered in conjugative proficiency. Mapping of pTRK28 insertions and phenotypic analysis of cointegrate plasmids identified four distinct regions (Tra1, Tra2, Tra3, and Tra4) involved in pRS01 conjugative transfer. Tra3 corresponds closely to a region previously identified (D. G. Anderson and L. L. McKay, J. Bacteriol. 158:954-962, 1984). Another region (Tra4) was localized within an inversion sequence shown to correlate with a cell aggregation phenotype. Tra1 and Tra2, two previously unidentified regions, were located at a distance of 9 kb from Tra3. When provided in trans, a cloned portion of the Tra3 region complemented Tra3 mutants. PMID:7811081

  15. Antilisterial Activity of Nisin-Like Bacteriocin-Producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Isolated from Traditional Sardinian Dairy Products

    PubMed Central

    Cosentino, Sofia; Fadda, Maria Elisabetta; Deplano, Maura; Melis, Roberta; Pomata, Rita; Pisano, Maria Barbara

    2012-01-01

    With the aim of selecting LAB strains with antilisterial activity to be used as protective cultures to enhance the safety of dairy products, the antimicrobial properties of 117 Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis isolated from artisanal Sardinian dairy products were evaluated, and six strains were found to produce bacteriocin-like substances. The capacity of these strains to antagonize Listeria monocytogenes during cocultivation in skimmed milk was evaluated, showing a reduction of L. monocytogenes counts of approximately 4 log units compared to the positive control after 24 h of incubation. In order for a strain to be used as bioprotective culture, it should be carefully evaluated for the presence of virulence factors, to determine what potential risks might be involved in its use. None of the strains tested was found to produce biogenic amines or to possess haemolytic activity. In addition, all strains were sensitive to clinically important antibiotics such as ampicillin, tetracycline, and vancomycin. Our results suggest that these bac+ strains could be potentially applied in cheese manufacturing to control the growth of L. monocytogenes. PMID:22536018

  16. An evaluation and partial characterization of a bacteriocin produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis ST1 isolated from goat milk

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Parinaz; Samadi², Nasrin; Ehsani, Mohammad Reza; Khoshayand, Mohammad Reza; Jamalifar, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    A bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance producing Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis strain, ST1, isolated from goat milk of Iranian origin and with broad spectrum of activity and desirable technical properties was used for evaluating some futures of bacteriocin inhibitory activity. Cell growth and bacteriocin production studies were carried out in MRS medium incubated statically under uncontrolled pH condition. The antibacterial activity presented a primary metabolite pattern and showed a rapid decrease at the stationary phase. Microaerobiosis and capnophily growth conditions resulted in higher bacteriocin production while aerobiosis showed negative effect on both cell growth and bacteriocin production. Bacteriocin production, on the other hand, was favored in MRS broth (pH; 6.5) inoculated with 0.1 ml l-1 fresh culture when incubation was carried out at 30 °C. This indicated that the conditions resulted in higher levels of growth were frequently favoring bacteriocin production by ST1 as well. Decrease in activity, at the stationary growth phase, was much pronounced in favored growth condition. Nutrient depletion, deferent effect of low pH on bacteriocin production and/or protein degradation seemed more responsible for this phenomenon. The study also provided further data on new method for bacteriocin release from the cell wall of producer. It was clearly shown that both heating and ultrasound shock for 5 min at pH 2 could increase bacteriocin activity significantly. The release was more pronounced in the presence of 0.5% Tween80. PMID:24031976

  17. L+-lactic acid production from starch by a novel amylolytic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis B84.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Kaloyan; Urshev, Zoltan; Petrova, Penka

    2008-06-01

    A new Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis B84, capable of utilizing starch as a sole carbon source and producing L(+)-lactate, was isolated from spontaneously fermented rye sourdough. Aiming at maximum lactic acid productivity, the components of the media and the cultivation conditions were varied. In MRS-starch medium (with absence of yeast and meat extracts), at 33 degrees C, agitation 200 rpm and pH 6.0 for 6 days complete starch hydrolysis occurred and 5.5 gl(-1) lactic acid were produced from 18 gl(-1) starch. The identification of strain B84 was based on genetic criteria. Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA), PCR with species-specific primers and sequencing of the 16S rDNA proved its species affiliation. Four genes for enzymes, involved in starch degradation were detected in B84 genome: amyL, amyY, glgP and apu, coding cytoplasmic and extracellular alpha-amylases, glycogen phosphorylase and amylopullulanase, respectively. Reverse transcription PCR experiments showed that both genes, encoding alpha-amylases (amyL and amyY) were expressed into mRNAs, whereas apu and glgP were not. Amylase activity assay was performed at different pH and temperatures. The cell-bond amylase proved to be the key enzyme, involved in the starch hydrolysis with maximum activity at 45 degrees C and pH 5.4. PMID:18456109

  18. Antilisterial activity of nisin-like bacteriocin-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis isolated from traditional Sardinian dairy products.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Sofia; Fadda, Maria Elisabetta; Deplano, Maura; Melis, Roberta; Pomata, Rita; Pisano, Maria Barbara

    2012-01-01

    With the aim of selecting LAB strains with antilisterial activity to be used as protective cultures to enhance the safety of dairy products, the antimicrobial properties of 117 Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis isolated from artisanal Sardinian dairy products were evaluated, and six strains were found to produce bacteriocin-like substances. The capacity of these strains to antagonize Listeria monocytogenes during cocultivation in skimmed milk was evaluated, showing a reduction of L. monocytogenes counts of approximately 4 log units compared to the positive control after 24 h of incubation. In order for a strain to be used as bioprotective culture, it should be carefully evaluated for the presence of virulence factors, to determine what potential risks might be involved in its use. None of the strains tested was found to produce biogenic amines or to possess haemolytic activity. In addition, all strains were sensitive to clinically important antibiotics such as ampicillin, tetracycline, and vancomycin. Our results suggest that these bac+ strains could be potentially applied in cheese manufacturing to control the growth of L. monocytogenes. PMID:22536018

  19. Cloning of a gene encoding nisin resistance from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis M189 which is transcribed from an extended 210 promoter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Qiang; Harvey, Melissa L.; Dunn, Noel W.

    1997-04-01

    A 56-kb plasmid was identified in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis (L. lactis) M189 which encodes resistance to nisin (Nis(R)) following mobilization of the plasmid into L. lactis LM0230. The Nis(R) determinant was localized on a 1.6-kb HindIII fragment by DNA restriction fragment deletion and subcloning. An open reading frame (ORF) of 957 bases was identified by sequence analysis and its transcription start site was mapped by primer extension. The ORF is flanked by two regions which exhibit complete homology to parts of the inverted repeat sequences of IS981 and ISS1T. The promoter for transcription was found to consist of an extended -10 site (TgTGtTATAAT) that lacks a -35 site. Function of the extended -10 promoter was demonstrated by its ability to express the promoterless cat gene from Staphylococcus aureus. Base substitution analysis revealed that the TgTGt extension is essential for promoter efficiency in L. lactis. PMID:12501336

  20. Best available control technology (BACT) of VOC for PU (polyurethane) synthetic leather surface coating industry in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, K.P.; Lai, C.C.; Lin, S.S.; Wu, H.H.; Huang, J.J.; Wang, Y.M.; Chen, H.W.

    1999-07-01

    In Taiwan, the polyurethane (PU) synthetic leather surface coating industry produced about 61,400 tons of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, accounting for 11 % of total stationary emissions of VOC. The industry is the largest VOC emission source in Taiwan. Major pollutants are dimethyl formamide (DMF), toluene, and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK). To obtain the best available control technology (BACT) of VOC emissions for the PU synthetic leather surface coating industry, this study followed the BACT guidelines of US EPA. For DMF, the BACT was the wet scrubbing technology for exhaust gas treatment, followed by a solvent recovery system. The change of coating methods or solvents, e.g., the use of water-base instead of organic-base solvents, was found to be the BACT for toluene and MEK. Through computer simulation, a wet scrubber with three in-series packing towers was found to be the most effective and economic for DMF. Based on the simulation, a full scale of plant was built and the test results were presented in this study. Results showed that 99% removal efficiency of DMF was achieved and the annual operation cost could be retrieved through the recovery of DMF solvent. The regulation for the industry established based on the BACT was also described in this study.

  1. Riboflavin Production in Lactococcus lactis: Potential for In Situ Production of Vitamin-Enriched Foods

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Catherine; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; Sybesma, Wilbert; Hugenholtz, Jeroen; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the genetic analysis of the riboflavin (vitamin B2) biosynthetic (rib) operon in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strain NZ9000. Functional analysis of the genes of the L. lactis rib operon was performed by using complementation studies, as well as by deletion analysis. In addition, gene-specific genetic engineering was used to examine which genes of the rib operon need to be overexpressed in order to effect riboflavin overproduction. Transcriptional regulation of the L. lactis riboflavin biosynthetic process was investigated by using Northern hybridization and primer extension, as well as the analysis of roseoflavin-induced riboflavin-overproducing L. lactis isolates. The latter analysis revealed the presence of both nucleotide replacements and deletions in the regulatory region of the rib operon. The results presented here are an important step toward the development of fermented foods containing increased levels of riboflavin, produced in situ, thus negating the need for vitamin fortification. PMID:15466513

  2. Comparative genomics of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis reveals a strict monophyletic bifidobacterial taxon.

    PubMed

    Milani, Christian; Duranti, Sabrina; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Bottacini, Francesca; Strati, Francesco; Arioli, Stefania; Foroni, Elena; Turroni, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2013-07-01

    Strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis are extensively exploited by the food industry as health-promoting bacteria, although the genetic variability of members belonging to this taxon has so far not received much scientific attention. In this article, we describe the complete genetic makeup of the B. animalis subsp. lactis Bl12 genome and discuss the genetic relatedness of this strain with other sequenced strains belonging to this taxon. Moreover, a detailed comparative genomic analysis of B. animalis subsp. lactis genomes was performed, which revealed a closely related and isogenic nature of all currently available B. animalis subsp. lactis strains, thus strongly suggesting a closed pan-genome structure of this bacterial group. PMID:23645200

  3. The Transcriptional and Gene Regulatory Network of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 during Growth in Milk

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Anne; Hansen, Morten E.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kilstrup, Mogens; Kok, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we examine the changes in the expression of genes of Lactococcus lactis subspecies cremoris MG1363 during growth in milk. To reveal which specific classes of genes (pathways, operons, regulons, COGs) are important, we performed a transcriptome time series experiment. Global analysis of gene expression over time showed that L. lactis adapted quickly to the environmental changes. Using upstream sequences of genes with correlated gene expression profiles, we uncovered a substantial number of putative DNA binding motifs that may be relevant for L. lactis fermentative growth in milk. All available novel and literature-derived data were integrated into network reconstruction building blocks, which were used to reconstruct and visualize the L. lactis gene regulatory network. This network enables easy mining in the chrono-transcriptomics data. A freely available website at http://milkts.molgenrug.nl gives full access to all transcriptome data, to the reconstructed network and to the individual network building blocks. PMID:23349698

  4. Characterization of the genes of the 2,3-butanediol operons from Klebsiella terrigena and Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Blomqvist, K; Nikkola, M; Lehtovaara, P; Suihko, M L; Airaksinen, U; Stråby, K B; Knowles, J K; Penttilä, M E

    1993-01-01

    The genes involved in the 2,3-butanediol pathway coding for alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase, alpha-acetolactate synthase (alpha-ALS), and acetoin (diacetyl) reductase were isolated from Klebsiella terrigena and shown to be located in one operon. This operon was also shown to exist in Enterobacter aerogenes. The budA gene, coding for alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase, gives in both organisms a protein of 259 amino acids. The amino acid similarity between these proteins is 87%. The K. terrigena genes budB and budC, coding for alpha-ALS and acetoin reductase, respectively, were sequenced. The 559-amino-acid-long alpha-ALS enzyme shows similarities to the large subunits of the Escherichia coli anabolic alpha-ALS enzymes encoded by the genes ilvB, ilvG, and ilvI. The K. terrigena alpha-ALS is also shown to complement an anabolic alpha-ALS-deficient E. coli strain for valine synthesis. The 243-amino-acid-long acetoin reductase has the consensus amino acid sequence for the insect-type alcohol dehydrogenase/ribitol dehydrogenase family and has extensive similarities with the N-terminal and internal regions of three known dehydrogenases and one oxidoreductase. Images PMID:8444801

  5. Phenolic compounds: Strong inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic hydrolysate for 2,3-butanediol production by Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Ju Hun; Yang, Xiaoguang; Kim, Sung Bong; Lee, Ja Hyun; Yoo, Hah Young; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Seung Wook

    2015-12-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass are attractive feedstocks for 2,3-butanediol production due to their abundant supply and low price. During the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass, various byproducts are formed and their effects on 2,3-butanediol production were not sufficiently studied compared to ethanol production. Therefore, the effects of compounds derived from lignocellulosic biomass (weak acids, furan derivatives and phenolics) on the cell growth, the 2,3-butanediol production and the enzymes activity involved in 2,3-butanediol production were evaluated using Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 29007. The phenolic compounds showed the most toxic effects on cell growth, 2,3-butanediol production and enzyme activity, followed by furan derivatives and weak acids. The significant effects were not observed in the presence of acetic acid and formic acid. Also, feasibility of 2,3-butanediol production from lignocellulosic biomass was evaluated using Miscanthus as a feedstock. In the fermentation of Miscanthus hydrolysate, 11.00 g/L of 2,3-butanediol was obtained from 34.62 g/L of reducing sugar. However, 2,3-butanediol was not produced when the concentration of total phenolic compounds in the hydrolysate increased to more than 1.5 g/L. The present study provides useful information to develop strategies for biological production of 2,3-butanediol and to establish biorefinery for biochemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:26479290

  6. Mutational analysis of the hyc-operon determining the relationship between hydrogenase-3 and NADH pathway in Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Pi, Jian; Jawed, Muhammad; Wang, Jun; Xu, Li; Yan, Yunjun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the hydrogenase-3 gene cluster (hycDEFGH) was isolated and identified from Enterobacter aerogenes CCTCC AB91102. All gene products were highly homologous to the reported bacterial hydrogenase-3 (Hyd-3) proteins. The genes hycE, hycF, hycG encoding the subunits of hydrogenase-3 were targeted for genetic knockout to inhibit the FHL hydrogen production pathway via the Red recombination system, generating three mutant strains AB91102-E (ΔhycE), AB91102-F (ΔhycF) and AB91102-G (ΔhycG). Deletion of the three genes affected the integrity of hydrogenase-3. The hydrogen production experiments with the mutant strains showed that no hydrogen was detected compared with the wild type (0.886 mol/mol glucose), demonstrating that knocking out any of the three genes could inhibit NADH hydrogen production pathway. Meanwhile, the metabolites of the mutant strains were significantly changed in comparison with the wild type, indicating corresponding changes in metabolic flux by mutation. Additionally, the activity of NADH-mediated hydrogenase was found to be nil in the mutant strains. The chemostat experiments showed that the NADH/NAD(+) ratio of the mutant strains increased nearly 1.4-fold compared with the wild type. The NADH-mediated hydrogenase activity and NADH/NAD(+) ratio analysis both suggested that NADH pathway required the involvement of the electron transport chain of hydrogenase-3. PMID:26672442

  7. Dechlorination of 1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane by Aerobacter aerogenes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary

    1967-01-01

    Whole cells or cell-free extracts of Aerobacter aerogenes catalyze the degradation of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) in vitro to at least seven metabolites: 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (DDE); 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDD); 1-chloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (DDMU); 1-chloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDMS); unsym-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (DDNU); 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)acetate (DDA); and 4,4′-dichlorobenzophenone (DBP). The use of metabolic inhibitors together with pH and temperature studies indicated that discrete enzymes are involved. By use of the technique of sequential analysis, the metabolic pathway was shown to be: DDT → DDD →DDMU →DDMS → DDNU → DDA → DBP, or DDT → DDE. Dechlorination was marginally enhanced by light-activated flavin mononucleotide.

  8. Role of the nac gene product in the nitrogen regulation of some NTR-regulated operons of Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Macaluso, A; Best, E A; Bender, R A

    1990-12-01

    A positive, genetic selection against the activity of the nitrogen regulatory (NTR) system was used to isolate insertion mutations affecting nitrogen regulation in Klebsiella aerogenes. Two classes of mutation were obtained: those affecting the NTR system itself and leading to the loss of almost all nitrogen regulation, and those affecting the nac locus and leading to a loss of nitrogen regulation of a family of nitrogen-regulated enzymes. The set of these nac-dependent enzymes included histidase, glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamate synthase, proline oxidase, and urease. The enzymes shown to be nac independent included glutamine synthetase, asparaginase, tryptophan permease, nitrate reductase, the product of the nifLA operon, and perhaps nitrite reductase. The expression of the nac gene was itself highly nitrogen regulated, and this regulation was mediated by the NTR system. The loss of nitrogen regulation was found in each of the four insertion mutants studied, showing that loss of nitrogen regulation resulted from the absence of nac function rather than from an altered form of the nac gene product. Thus we propose two classes of nitrogen-regulated operons: in class I, the NTR system directly activates expression of the operon; in class II, the NTR system activates nac expression and the product(s) of the nac locus activates expression of the operon. PMID:1979323

  9. High-yield production of hydrogen by Enterobacter aerogenes mutants with decreased alpha-acetolactate synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takeshi; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Kakizono, Toshihide; Nishio, Naomichi

    2004-01-01

    To enhance hydrogen (H2) production from glucose by Enterobacter aerogenes HU-101, two mutants, strains VP-1 and VP-2, with decreased alpha-acetolactate synthase activity, were isolated using the Voges-Proskauer (VP) test. In pH-uncontrolled batch culture, both mutants showed a lower 2,3-butanediol yield for the glucose consumed than that shown by the wild-type strain, although glucose remained in the medium after 12 h of culture. In the same cultures, compared to the H2 yield of 0.80 mol/mol-glucose of the wild-type strain, strain VP-1 showed a high H2 yield of 1.8 mol/mol-glucose with decreased lactate and increased succinate yields, while strain VP-2 showed an H2 yield of 1.0 mol/mol-glucose with an increased lactate yield. Increasing the phosphate buffer concentration, which contributes to maintaining the pH in the medium, increased the glucose consumption by both strains. However, in a pH-controlled batch culture at neutral pH, the H2 yield of strain VP-1 was decreased to 1.2 mol/mol-glucose due to the accumulation of formate, an intermediate of the H2-producing pathway, with the yield of H2 plus formate being 1.7 mol/mol-glucose. PMID:16233620

  10. Fate of Lactococcus lactis starter cultures during late ripening in cheese models.

    PubMed

    Ruggirello, Marianna; Cocolin, Luca; Dolci, Paola

    2016-10-01

    The presence of Lactococcus lactis, commonly employed as starter culture, was, recently, highlighted and investigated during late cheese ripening. Thus, the main goal of the present study was to assess the persistence and viability of this microorganism throughout manufacturing and ripening of model cheeses. Eight commercial starters, constituted of L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris, were inoculated in pasteurized milk in order to manufacture miniature cheeses, ripened for six months. Samples were analysed at different steps (milk after inoculum, curd after cutting, curd after pressing and draining, cheese immediately after salting and cheese at 7, 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 days of ripening) and submitted to both culture-dependent (traditional plating on M17) and -independent analysis (reverse transcription-quantitative PCR). On the basis of direct RNA analysis, L. lactis populations were detected in all miniature cheeses up to the sixth month of ripening, confirming the presence of viable cells during the whole ripening process, including late stages. Noteworthy, L. lactis was detected by RT-qPCR in cheese samples also when traditional plating failed to indicate its presence. This discrepancy could be explain with the fact that lactococci, during ripening process, enter in a stressed physiological state (viable not culturable, VNC), which might cause their inability to grow on synthetic medium despite their viability in cheese matrix. Preliminary results obtained by "resuscitation" assays corroborated this hypothesis and 2.5% glucose enrichment was effective to recover L. lactis cells in VNC state. The capability of L. lactis to persist in late ripening, and the presence of VNC cells which are known to shift their catabolism to peptides and amino acids consumption, suggests a possible technological role of this microorganism in cheese ripening with a possible impact on flavour formation. PMID:27375251

  11. Inactivation of the ybdD Gene in Lactococcus lactis Increases the Amounts of Exported Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Morello, E.; Nouaille, S.; Cortes-Perez, N. G.; Blugeon, S.; Medina, L. F. C.; Azevedo, V.; Gratadoux, J. J.; Bermúdez-Humarán, L. G.; Le Loir, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Random insertional mutagenesis performed on a Lactococcus lactis reporter strain led us to identify L. lactis ybdD as a protein-overproducing mutant. In different expression contexts, the ybdD mutant shows increased levels of exported proteins and therefore constitutes a new and attractive heterologous protein production host. This study also highlights the importance of unknown regulatory processes that play a role during protein secretion. PMID:22843524

  12. Lactococcus lactis Metabolism and Gene Expression during Growth on Plant Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have been isolated from living, harvested, and fermented plant materials; however, the adaptations these bacteria possess for growth on plant tissues are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated plant habitat-specific traits of Lactococcus lactis during growth in an Arabidopsis thaliana leaf tissue lysate (ATL). L. lactis KF147, a strain originally isolated from plants, exhibited a higher growth rate and reached 7.9-fold-greater cell densities during growth in ATL than the dairy-associated strain L. lactis IL1403. Transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) of KF147 identified 853 induced and 264 repressed genes during growth in ATL compared to that in GM17 laboratory culture medium. Genes induced in ATL included those involved in the arginine deiminase pathway and a total of 140 carbohydrate transport and metabolism genes, many of which are involved in xylose, arabinose, cellobiose, and hemicellulose metabolism. The induction of those genes corresponded with L. lactis KF147 nutrient consumption and production of metabolic end products in ATL as measured by gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS) untargeted metabolomic profiling. To assess the importance of specific plant-inducible genes for L. lactis growth in ATL, xylose metabolism was targeted for gene knockout mutagenesis. Wild-type L. lactis strain KF147 but not an xylA deletion mutant was able to grow using xylose as the sole carbon source. However, both strains grew to similarly high levels in ATL, indicating redundancy in L. lactis carbohydrate metabolism on plant tissues. These findings show that certain strains of L. lactis are well adapted for growth on plants and possess specific traits relevant for plant-based food, fuel, and feed fermentations. PMID:25384484

  13. Effect of X-Prolyl Dipeptidyl Aminopeptidase Deficiency on Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Baltasar; Kok, Jan; Bockelmann, Wilhelm; Haandrikman, Alfred; Leenhouts, Kees J.; Venema, Gerard

    1993-01-01

    The genetic determinant (pepXP) of an X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidase (PepXP) has recently been cloned and sequenced from both Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris (B. Mayo, J. Kok, K. Venema, W. Bockelmann, M. Teuber, H. Reinke, and G. Venema, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:38-44, 1991) and L. lactis subsp. lactis (M. Nardi, M.-C. Chopin, A. Chopin, M.-M. Cals, and J.-C. Gripon, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:45-50, 1991). To examine the possible role of the enzyme in the breakdown of caseins required for lactococci to grow in milk, integration vectors have been constructed and used to specifically inactivate the pepXP gene. After inactivation of the gene in L. lactis subsp. lactis MG1363, which is Lac- and Prt-, the Lac+ Prt+ determinants were transferred by conjugation by using L. lactis subsp. lactis 712 as the donor. Since growth of the transconjugants relative to the PepXP+ strains was not retarded in milk, it was concluded that PepXP is not essential for growth in that medium. It was also demonstrated that the open reading frame ORF1, upstream of pepXP, was not required for PepXP activity in L. lactis. A marked difference between metenkephalin degradation patterns was observed after incubation of this pentapeptide with cell extracts obtained from wild-type lactococci and pepXP mutants. Therefore, altered expression of the pepXP-encoded general dipeptidyl aminopeptidase activity may change the peptide composition of fermented milk products. Images PMID:16348982

  14. Oral vaccination of mice against tetanus with recombinant Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, K; Chamberlain, L M; Schofield, K M; Wells, J M; Le Page, R W

    1997-07-01

    To determine whether a protective immune response could be elicited by oral delivery of a recombinant bacterial vaccine, tetanus toxin fragment C (TTFC) was expressed constitutively in Lactococcus lactis and administered orally to C57 BL/6 mice. The antibody titers elicited were lower than those following intranasal immunization (a route already known to result in high-level systemic anti-TTFC immune responses) but the protective efficacy was the same order of magnitude. The serum antibody isotypes elicited were predominantly IgG1 and IgG2a. TTFC-specific fecal IgA responses could be detected following oral or intranasal immunization. Chemically killed lactococci administered via the intranasal route were also able to elicit serum antibody responses of similar levels and kinetics to those induced by live bacteria. PMID:9219268

  15. A method for genetic transformation of nonprotoplasted Streptococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, M E; Nicholson, M A

    1987-01-01

    Plasmid transformation of whole cells of Streptococcus lactis LM0230 was demonstrated. The procedure required polyethylene glycol and incubation in hypertonic media, but did not require enzymatic cell wall digestion. Conditions were optimized, yielding 5 X 10(5) transformants per micrograms of pSA3 DNA. Variables tested for effect on transformation efficiency included molecular weight, concentration, and pH of polyethylene glycol; cell density; plating media; DNA concentration; heat shock; and incubation of cells in hypertonic buffer. DNAs transformed included pSA3, pVA856, pTV1, and c2 phi. Transformation from DNA-DNA ligation mixes, with DNA not purified through density gradients, and with previously frozen cells was also achieved. The method described here for transformation of nonprotoplasted cells of LM0230 is unique, and to date has not been applied successfully to other lactic acid bacteria. Images PMID:3116931

  16. Heterologous expression of Aspergillus terreus fructosyltransferase in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Spohner, Sebastian C; Czermak, Peter

    2016-06-25

    Fructo-oligosaccharides are prebiotic and hypocaloric sweeteners that are usually extracted from chicory. They can also be produced from sucrose using fructosyltransferases, but the only commercial enzyme suitable for this purpose is Pectinex Ultra, which is produced with Aspergillus aculeatus. Here we used the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis to express a secreted recombinant fructosyltransferase from the inulin-producing fungus Aspergillus terreus. A synthetic codon-optimised version of the putative β-fructofuranosidase ATEG 04996 (XP 001214174.1) from A. terreus NIH2624 was secreted as a functional protein into the extracellular medium. At 60°C, the purified A. terreus enzyme generated the same pattern of oligosaccharides as Pectinex Ultra, but at lower temperatures it also produced oligomers with up to seven units. We achieved activities of up to 986.4U/mL in high-level expression experiments, which is better than previous reports of optimised Aspergillus spp. fermentations. PMID:27084521

  17. Bifidobacterium lactis 420 and fish oil enhance intestinal epithelial integrity in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Mokkala, Kati; Laitinen, Kirsi; Röytiö, Henna

    2016-03-01

    Increased intestinal permeability is a predisposing factor for low-grade inflammation-associated conditions, including obesity and type 2 diabetes. Dietary components may influence intestinal barrier integrity. We hypothesized that the dietary supplements Bifidobacterium lactis 420, Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001, and fish oil have beneficial impacts on intestinal barrier integrity. In addition, we hypothesized that the coadministration of these components results in synergistic benefits to the integrity of the intestinal barrier. To study this, we investigated the impact of cell-free culture supernatant from dietary supplements B lactis 420 and L rhamnosus HN001, and fish oil, separately and in combination, on intestinal permeability in a CaCo-2 cell model. Administered separately, both B lactis 420 supernatant and fish oil significantly increased the integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier, as determined by an increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), whereas L rhamnosus did not. The TEER increase with B lactis 420 was dose dependent. Interestingly, a combination of B lactis 420 supernatant and fish oil negated the increase in TEER of the single components. mRNA expression of tight junction proteins, measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, was not altered, but the mRNA expression of myosin light chain kinase increased after fish oil treatment. To conclude, single dietary components, namely, B lactis 420 and fish oil, induced beneficial effects on intestinal barrier integrity in vitro, whereas a combination of 2 beneficial test compounds resulted in a null effect. PMID:26923511

  18. Protective effects of heat-killed Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis BF3, isolated from the intestine of chum salmon, in a murine model of DSS-induced inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Toru; Hirano, Shino; Yokota, Yasushi; Takahashi, Hajime; Kimura, Bon; Kuda, Takashi; Eto, Tadashi; Kato, Michiko

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered an etiological factor responsible for several symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In vitro anti-inflammatory activities of heat-killed Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis BF3 have been reported. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effect of these cells was examined using a dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced murine IBD model. Administration of heat-killed L. lactis BF3 via drinking water suppressed the IBD symptoms, such as shortening of colon length, damage to the colon mucosa as observed under the microscope, and spleen enlargement. This result suggests that heat-killed L. lactis BF3 has the potential to treat IBD. PMID:27508115

  19. Protective effects of heat-killed Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis BF3, isolated from the intestine of chum salmon, in a murine model of DSS-induced inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    NAKATA, Toru; HIRANO, Shino; YOKOTA, Yasushi; TAKAHASHI, Hajime; KIMURA, Bon; KUDA, Takashi; ETO, Tadashi; KATO, Michiko

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered an etiological factor responsible for several symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In vitro anti-inflammatory activities of heat-killed Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis BF3 have been reported. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effect of these cells was examined using a dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced murine IBD model. Administration of heat-killed L. lactis BF3 via drinking water suppressed the IBD symptoms, such as shortening of colon length, damage to the colon mucosa as observed under the microscope, and spleen enlargement. This result suggests that heat-killed L. lactis BF3 has the potential to treat IBD. PMID:27508115

  20. Genome shuffling of Lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis YF11 for improving nisin Z production and comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y F; Liu, S Y; Du, Y H; Feng, W J; Liu, J H; Qiao, J J

    2014-05-01

    Nisin has been widely used in the food industry as a safe and natural preservative to increase the shelf time of many foods. In this study, genome shuffling was applied to improve nisin Z production of Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis YF11 (YF11) via recursive protoplast fusion. Ultraviolet irradiation and diethyl sulfate mutagenesis were used to generate parental strains for genome shuffling. After 4 rounds of genome shuffling, the best-performing strain F44 was obtained, which showed dramatic improvements in tolerance to both glucose (ranging from 8 to 15% (wt/vol) and nisin (ranging from 5,000 to 14,000 IU/mL). Fed-batch fermentation showed that the nisin titer of F44 was up to 4,023 IU/mL, which was 2.4 times that of the starting strain YF11. Field emission scanning electron microscope micrographs of YF11 and F44 revealed the apparent differences in cell morphology. Whereas YF11 displayed long and thin cell morphology, F44 cells were short and thick and with a raised surface in the middle of the cell. With the increasing glucose and nisin content in the medium, cells of both YF11 and F44 tended to become shrunken; however, alterations in YF11 cells were more pronounced than those of F44 cells, especially when cultured in tolerance medium containing both nisin and glucose. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis demonstrated that the structure of nisin from YF11 and F44 was the same. Expression profiling of nisin synthesis related genes by real-time quantitative PCR showed that the transcription level of nisin structural gene nisZ and immunity gene nisI of F44 was 48 and 130% higher than that of the starting strain YF11, respectively. These results could provide valuable insights into the molecular basis underlying the nisin overproduction mechanism in L. lactis, thus facilitating the future construction of industrial strains for nisin production. PMID:24612797

  1. Evaluation of Lactococcus lactis Isolates from Nondairy Sources with Potential Dairy Applications Reveals Extensive Phenotype-Genotype Disparity and Implications for a Revised Species.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Daniel; Casey, Aidan; Altermann, Eric; Cotter, Paul D; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; McAuliffe, Olivia

    2015-06-15

    Lactococcus lactis is predominantly associated with dairy fermentations, but evidence suggests that the domesticated organism originated from a plant niche. L. lactis possesses an unusual taxonomic structure whereby strain phenotypes and genotypes often do not correlate, which in turn has led to confusion in L. lactis classification. A bank of L. lactis strains was isolated from various nondairy niches (grass, vegetables, and bovine rumen) and was further characterized on the basis of key technological traits, including growth in milk and key enzyme activities. Phenotypic analysis revealed all strains from nondairy sources to possess an L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype (lactis phenotype); however, seven of these strains possessed an L. lactis subsp. cremoris genotype (cremoris genotype), determined by two separate PCR assays. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed that strains with lactis and cremoris genotypes clustered together regardless of habitat, but it highlighted the increased diversity that exists among "wild" strains. Calculation of average nucleotide identity (ANI) and tetranucleotide frequency correlation coefficients (TETRA), using the JSpecies software tool, revealed that L. lactis subsp. cremoris and L. lactis subsp. lactis differ in ANI values by ∼14%, below the threshold set for species circumscription. Further analysis of strain TIFN3 and strains from nonindustrial backgrounds revealed TETRA values of <0.99 in addition to ANI values of <95%, implicating that these two groups are separate species. These findings suggest the requirement for a revision of L. lactis taxonomy. PMID:25841018

  2. Evaluation of Lactococcus lactis Isolates from Nondairy Sources with Potential Dairy Applications Reveals Extensive Phenotype-Genotype Disparity and Implications for a Revised Species

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, Daniel; Casey, Aidan; Altermann, Eric; Cotter, Paul D.; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is predominantly associated with dairy fermentations, but evidence suggests that the domesticated organism originated from a plant niche. L. lactis possesses an unusual taxonomic structure whereby strain phenotypes and genotypes often do not correlate, which in turn has led to confusion in L. lactis classification. A bank of L. lactis strains was isolated from various nondairy niches (grass, vegetables, and bovine rumen) and was further characterized on the basis of key technological traits, including growth in milk and key enzyme activities. Phenotypic analysis revealed all strains from nondairy sources to possess an L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype (lactis phenotype); however, seven of these strains possessed an L. lactis subsp. cremoris genotype (cremoris genotype), determined by two separate PCR assays. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed that strains with lactis and cremoris genotypes clustered together regardless of habitat, but it highlighted the increased diversity that exists among “wild” strains. Calculation of average nucleotide identity (ANI) and tetranucleotide frequency correlation coefficients (TETRA), using the JSpecies software tool, revealed that L. lactis subsp. cremoris and L. lactis subsp. lactis differ in ANI values by ∼14%, below the threshold set for species circumscription. Further analysis of strain TIFN3 and strains from nonindustrial backgrounds revealed TETRA values of <0.99 in addition to ANI values of <95%, implicating that these two groups are separate species. These findings suggest the requirement for a revision of L. lactis taxonomy. PMID:25841018

  3. Immune responses elicited in mice with recombinant Lactococcus lactis expressing F4 fimbrial adhesin FaeG by oral immunization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shujie; Li, Yongming; Xu, Ziwei; Wang, Yicheng

    2010-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major pathogenic agent causing piglet diarrhea. The major subunit and adhesin FaeG of F4(+) ETEC is an important virulence factor with strong immunogenicity. To determine whether Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) could effectively deliver FaeG to the mucosal immune system, recombinant L. lactis expressing FaeG was constructed, and immune responses in mice following oral route delivery of recombinant L. lactis were explored. The production of FaeG expressed in L. lactis was up to approximately 10% of soluble whole-cell proteins, and recombinant FaeG (rFaeG) possessed good immunoreactivity by Western blot analysis. Oral immunization with recombinant L. lactis expressing FaeG induced F4-specific mucosal and systemic immune responses in the mice. In addition, high dose recombinant L. lactis or co-administration of high dose recombinant L. lactis with CTB enhanced the immune responses. These results suggested that L. lactis expressing FaeG was a promising candidate vaccine against ETEC. PMID:20532816

  4. Properties of 2,3-Butanediol Dehydrogenases from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis in Relation to Citrate Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Vaughan L.

    1990-01-01

    Two 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenases (enzymes 1 and 2; molecular weight of each, 170,000) have been partially purified from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis (Streptococcus diacetylactis) D10 and shown to have reductase activity with either diacetyl or acetoin as the substrate. However, the reductase activity with 10 mM diacetyl was far greater for both enzymes (7.0- and 4.7-fold for enzymes 1 and 2, respectively) than with 10 mM acetoin as the substrate. In contrast, when acetoin and diacetyl were present together, acetoin was the preferred substrate for both enzymes, with enzyme 1 showing the more marked preference for acetoin. meso-2,3-Butanediol was the only isomeric product, with enzyme 1 independent of the substrate combinations. For enzyme 2, both the meso and optical isomers of 2,3-butanediol were formed with acetoin as the substrate, but only the optical isomers were produced with diacetyl as the substrate. With batch cultures of strain D10 at or near the point of citrate exhaustion, the main isomers of 2,3-butanediol present were the optical forms. If the pH was sufficiently high (>pH 5), acetoin reduction occurred over time and was followed by diacetyl reduction, and meso-2,3-butanediol became the predominant isomer. Interconversion of the optical isomers into the meso isomer did occur. The properties of 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenases are consistent with diacetyl and acetoin removal and the appearance of the isomers of 2,3-butanediol. PMID:16348209

  5. In Vivo Evolution of Bacterial Resistance in Two Cases of Enterobacter aerogenes Infections during Treatment with Imipenem

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Sébastien; Pinet, Elizabeth; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Davin-Régli, Anne-Véronique; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Masi, Muriel

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria are a major concern worldwide. Changes in membrane permeability, including decreased influx and/or increased efflux of antibiotics, are known as key contributors of bacterial MDR. Therefore, it is of critical importance to understand molecular mechanisms that link membrane permeability to MDR in order to design new antimicrobial strategies. In this work, we describe genotype-phenotype correlations in Enterobacter aerogenes, a clinically problematic and antibiotic resistant bacterium. To do this, series of clinical isolates have been periodically collected from two patients during chemotherapy with imipenem. The isolates exhibited different levels of resistance towards multiple classes of antibiotics, consistently with the presence or the absence of porins and efflux pumps. Transport assays were used to characterize membrane permeability defects. Simultaneous genome-wide analysis allowed the identification of putative mutations responsible for MDR. The genome of the imipenem-susceptible isolate G7 was sequenced to closure and used as a reference for comparative genomics. This approach uncovered several loci that were specifically mutated in MDR isolates and whose products are known to control membrane permeability. These were omp35 and omp36, encoding the two major porins; rob, encoding a global AraC-type transcriptional activator; cpxA, phoQ and pmrB, encoding sensor kinases of the CpxRA, PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems, respectively. This report provides a comprehensive analysis of membrane alterations relative to mutational steps in the evolution of MDR of a recognized nosocomial pathogen. PMID:26398358

  6. Effects of eliminating pyruvate node pathways and of coexpression of heterogeneous carboxylation enzymes on succinate production by Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Yoko; Fukui, Keita; Nishio, Yousuke; Hashiguchi, Kenichi; Usuda, Yoshihiro; Sode, Koji

    2015-02-01

    Lowering the pH in bacterium-based succinate fermentation is considered a feasible approach to reduce total production costs. Newly isolated Enterobacter aerogenes strain AJ110637, a rapid carbon source assimilator under weakly acidic (pH 5.0) conditions, was selected as a platform for succinate production. Our previous work showed that the ΔadhE/PCK strain, developed from AJ110637 with inactivated ethanol dehydrogenase and introduced Actinobacillus succinogenes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK), generated succinate as a major product of anaerobic mixed-acid fermentation from glucose under weakly acidic conditions (pH <6.2). To further improve the production of succinate by the ΔadhE/PCK strain, metabolically engineered strains were designed based on the elimination of pathways that produced undesirable products and the introduction of two carboxylation pathways from phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate to oxaloacetate. The highest production of succinate was observed with strain ES04/PCK+PYC, which had inactivated ethanol, lactate, acetate, and 2,3-butanediol pathways and coexpressed PCK and Corynebacterium glutamicum pyruvate carboxylase (PYC). This strain produced succinate from glucose with over 70% yield (gram per gram) without any measurable formation of ethanol, lactate, or 2,3-butanediol under weakly acidic conditions. The impact of lowering the pH from 7.0 to 5.5 on succinate production in this strain was evaluated under pH-controlled batch culture conditions and showed that the lower pH decreased the succinate titer but increased its yield. These findings can be applied to identify additional engineering targets to increase succinate production. PMID:25416770

  7. Characterization of OpuA, a glycine-betaine uptake system of Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, J; Bordes, P; Romeo, Y; Fourçans, A; Bouvier, I; Gutierrez, C

    2000-04-01

    A Lactococcus lactis glycine-betaine transport system was identified by functional complementation of an Escherichia coli proP proU mutant with a gene library from L. lactis sbsp. cremoris. The cloned locus forms an operon highly homologous to opuA, encoding a glycine-betaine uptake system of Bacillus subtilis. Disruption of opuA in L. lactis abolished protection by glycine-betaine against elevated osmolarity. OpuA belongs to the so-called "ABC transporters" family, which comprise an extracellularly localized substrate-binding protein. In B. subtilis OpuA system, this binding protein is a lipoprotein, attached to the external face of the cytoplasmic membrane by its lipidic moiety. In contrast, in the L. lactis opuA operon, and in other gram-positive homologues as well, a fusion between the gene encoding the integral membrane protein and the substrate-binding protein components gave rise to a hybrid protein presumably attaching the substrate-binding protein to the surface of the cell via its covalent link to the integral membrane component. Mapping of L. lactis opuA transcription start identified one mRNA, more abundant in cells grown at elevated osmolarity. Construction of an opuA-gusA fusion confirmed that opuA transcription is directed by a promoter osmotically inducible in L. lactis. When recombined upstream from a lac transcriptional fusion in the chromosome of E. coli, the opuA promoter appeared as very strong, and only poorly stimulated by elevated osmotic pressure, suggesting the existence of a specific machinery involved in the osmotic signal transduction in L. lactis. PMID:10939245

  8. Lactose metabolism in Streptococcus lactis: studies with a mutant lacking glucokinase and mannose-phosphotransferase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.; Chassy, B.M.; Egan, W.

    1985-04-01

    A mutant of Streptococcus lactis 133 has been isolated that lacks both glucokinase and phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannose- phosphotransferase (mannose-PTS) activities. The double mutant S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- is unable to utilize either exogenously supplied or intracellularly generated glucose for growth. Fluorographic analyses of metabolites formed during the metabolism of (/sup 14/C)lactose labeled specifically in the glucose or galactosyl moiety established that the cells were unable to phosphorylate intracellular glucose. However, cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- readily metabolized intracellular glucose 6-phosphate, and the growth rates and cell yield of the mutant and parental strains on sucrose were the same. During growth on lactose, S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- fermented only the galactose moiety of the disaccharide, and 1 mol of glucose was generated per mol of lactose consumed. For an equivalent concentration of lactose, the cell yield of the mutant was 50% that of the wild type. The specific rate of lactose utilization by growing cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- was ca. 50% greater than that of the wild type, but the cell doubling times were 70 and 47 min, respectively. High-resolution /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lactose transport by starved cells of S. lactis 133 and S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- showed that the latter cells contained elevated lactose-PTS activity. Throughout exponential growth on lactose, the mutant maintained an intracellular steady-state glucose concentration of 100 mM.

  9. Quantifying the effect of hand wash duration, soap use, ground beef debris, and drying methods on the removal of Enterobacter aerogenes on hands.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Dane A; Danyluk, Michelle D; Harris, Linda J; Schaffner, Donald W

    2015-04-01

    Hand washing is recognized as a crucial step in preventing foodborne disease transmission by mitigating crosscontamination among hands, surfaces, and foods. This research was undertaken to establish the importance of several keys factors (soap, soil, time, and drying method) in reducing microorganisms during hand washing. A nonpathogenic nalidixic acid-resistant Enterobacter aerogenes surrogate for Salmonella was used to assess the efficacy of using soap or no soap for 5 or 20 s on hands with or without ground beef debris and drying with paper towel or air. Each experiment consisted of 20 replicates, each from a different individual with ∼ 6 log CFU/ml E. aerogenes on their hands. A reduction of 1.0 ± 0.4 and 1.7 ± 0.8 log CFU of E. aerogenes was observed for a 5-s wash with no soap and a 20-s wash with soap, respectively. When there was no debris on the hands, there was no significant difference between washing with and without soap for 20 s (P > 0.05). Likewise, there was no significant difference in the reductions achieved when washing without soap, whether or not debris was on the hands (P > 0.05). A significantly greater reduction (P < 0.05) in E. aerogenes (0.5 log CFU greater reduction) was observed with soap when there was ground beef debris on the hands. The greatest difference (1.1 log CFU greater average reduction) in effectiveness occurred when ground beef debris was on the hands and a 20-s wash with water was compared with a 20-s wash with soap. Significantly greater (P < 0.05) reductions were observed with paper towel drying compared with air (0.5 log CFU greater reductions). Used paper towels may contain high bacterial levels (>4.0 log CFU per towel) when hands are highly contaminated. Our results support future quantitative microbial risk assessments needed to effectively manage risks of foodborne illness in which food workers' hands are a primary cause. PMID:25836392

  10. High-Resolution Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Typing of Lactococcus lactis Strains Enables Identification of Genetic Markers for Subspecies-Related Phenotypes▿

    PubMed Central

    Kütahya, Oylum Erkus; Starrenburg, Marjo J. C.; Rademaker, Jan L. W.; Klaassen, Corné H. W.; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E. T.; Smid, Eddy J.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2011-01-01

    A high-resolution amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) methodology was developed to achieve the delineation of closely related Lactococcus lactis strains. The differentiation depth of 24 enzyme-primer-nucleotide combinations was experimentally evaluated to maximize the number of polymorphisms. The resolution depth was confirmed by performing diversity analysis on 82 L. lactis strains, including both closely and distantly related strains with dairy and nondairy origins. Strains clustered into two main genomic lineages of L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris type-strain-like genotypes and a third novel genomic lineage rooted from the L. lactis subsp. lactis genomic lineage. Cluster differentiation was highly correlated with small-subunit rRNA homology and multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) studies. Additionally, the selected enzyme-primer combination generated L. lactis subsp. cremoris phenotype-specific fragments irrespective of the genotype. These phenotype-specific markers allowed the differentiation of L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype from L. lactis subsp. cremoris phenotype strains within the same L. lactis subsp. cremoris type-strain-like genomic lineage, illustrating the potential of AFLP for the generation of phenotype-linked genetic markers. PMID:21666014

  11. Deciphering a unique biotin scavenging pathway with redundant genes in the probiotic bacterium Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huimin; Wang, Qingjing; Fisher, Derek J; Cai, Mingzhu; Chakravartty, Vandana; Ye, Huiyan; Li, Ping; Solbiati, Jose O; Feng, Youjun

    2016-01-01

    Biotin protein ligase (BPL) is widespread in the three domains of the life. The paradigm BPL is the Escherichia coli BirA protein, which also functions as a repressor for the biotin biosynthesis pathway. Here we report that Lactococcus lactis possesses two different orthologues of birA (birA1_LL and birA2_LL). Unlike the scenario in E. coli, L. lactis appears to be auxotrophic for biotin in that it lacks a full biotin biosynthesis pathway. In contrast, it retains two biotin transporter-encoding genes (bioY1_LL and bioY2_LL), suggesting the use of a scavenging strategy to obtain biotin from the environment. The in vivo function of the two L. lactis birA genes was judged by their abilities to complement the conditional lethal E. coli birA mutant. Thin-layer chromatography and mass spectroscopy assays demonstrated that these two recombinant BirA proteins catalyze the biotinylation reaction of the acceptor biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), through the expected biotinoyl-AMP intermediate. Gel shift assays were used to characterize bioY1_LL and BirA1_LL. We also determined the ability to uptake (3)H-biotin by L. lactis. Taken together, our results deciphered a unique biotin scavenging pathway with redundant genes present in the probiotic bacterium L. lactis. PMID:27161258

  12. Metabolic engineering of Lactococcus lactis influence of the overproduction of lipase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Raftari, Mohammad; Ghafourian, Sobhan; Bakar, Fatimah Abu

    2013-11-01

    The dairy industry uses lipase extensively for hydrolysis of milk fat. Lipase is used in the modification of the fatty acid chain length, to enhance the flavours of various chesses. Therefore finding the unlimited source of lipase is a concern of dairy industry. Due to the importance of lipase, this study was an attempt to express the lipase from Burkholderia cepacia in Lactococcus lactis. To achieve this, a gene associated with lipase transport was amplified and subcloned in inducible pNZ8148 vector, and subsequently transformed into Lc. lactis NZ9000. The enzyme assay as well as SDS-PAGE and western blotting were carried out to analysis the recombinant lipase expression. Nucleotide sequencing of the DNA insert from the clone revealed that the lipase activity corresponded to an open reading frame consisting of 1092 bp coding for a 37·5-kDa size protein. Blue colour colonies on nile blue sulphate agar and sharp band on 37·5-kD size on SDS-PAGE and western blotting results confirm the successful expression of lipase by Lc. lactis. The protein assay also showed high expression, approximately 152·2 μg/ml.h, of lipase by recombinant Lc. lactis. The results indicate that Lc. lactis has high potential to overproduce the recombinant lipase which can be used commercially for industrially purposes. PMID:24063299

  13. The Prophylactic Effect of Probiotic Enterococcus lactis IW5 against Different Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nami, Yousef; Haghshenas, Babak; Haghshenas, Minoo; Abdullah, Norhafizah; Yari Khosroushahi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus lactis IW5 was obtained from human gut and the potential probiotic characteristics of this organism were then evaluated. Results showed that this strain was highly resistant to low pH and high bile salt and adhered strongly to Caco-2 human epithelial colorectal cell lines. The supernatant of E. lactis IW5 strongly inhibited the growth of several pathogenic bacteria and decreased the viability of different cancer cells, such as HeLa, MCF-7, AGS, HT-29, and Caco-2. Conversely, E. lactis IW5 did not inhibit the viability of normal FHs-74 cells. This strain did not generate toxic enzymes, including β-glucosidase, β-glucuronidase, and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase and was highly susceptible to ampicillin, gentamycin, penicillin, vancomycin, clindamycin, sulfamethoxazol, and chloramphenicol but resistant to erythromycin and tetracyclin. This study provided evidence for the effect of E. lactis IW5 on cancer cells. Therefore, E. lactis IW5, as a bioactive therapeutics, should be subjected to other relevant tests to verify the therapeutic suitability of this strain for clinical applications. PMID:26635778

  14. Deciphering a unique biotin scavenging pathway with redundant genes in the probiotic bacterium Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huimin; Wang, Qingjing; Fisher, Derek J.; Cai, Mingzhu; Chakravartty, Vandana; Ye, Huiyan; Li, Ping; Solbiati, Jose O.; Feng, Youjun

    2016-01-01

    Biotin protein ligase (BPL) is widespread in the three domains of the life. The paradigm BPL is the Escherichia coli BirA protein, which also functions as a repressor for the biotin biosynthesis pathway. Here we report that Lactococcus lactis possesses two different orthologues of birA (birA1_LL and birA2_LL). Unlike the scenario in E. coli, L. lactis appears to be auxotrophic for biotin in that it lacks a full biotin biosynthesis pathway. In contrast, it retains two biotin transporter-encoding genes (bioY1_LL and bioY2_LL), suggesting the use of a scavenging strategy to obtain biotin from the environment. The in vivo function of the two L. lactis birA genes was judged by their abilities to complement the conditional lethal E. coli birA mutant. Thin-layer chromatography and mass spectroscopy assays demonstrated that these two recombinant BirA proteins catalyze the biotinylation reaction of the acceptor biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), through the expected biotinoyl-AMP intermediate. Gel shift assays were used to characterize bioY1_LL and BirA1_LL. We also determined the ability to uptake 3H-biotin by L. lactis. Taken together, our results deciphered a unique biotin scavenging pathway with redundant genes present in the probiotic bacterium L. lactis. PMID:27161258

  15. Complete Genome Sequences of Four Novel Lactococcus lactis Phages Distantly Related to the Rare 1706 Phage Species

    PubMed Central

    Vogensen, Finn K.; Heller, Knut J.; Sørensen, Søren J.; Hansen, Lars H.

    2014-01-01

    Lactoccocus lactis is a Gram-positive bacterium widely used in the dairy industry in the production of an array of cheeses and other fermented milk products. Here, we describe the sequencing and genome annotations of a set of four phages virulent to L. lactis and exhibiting similarities to phage 1706. PMID:25013130

  16. Lactococcus lactis subsp. tructae subsp. nov. isolated from the intestinal mucus of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Pérez, Tania; Balcázar, José Luis; Peix, Alvaro; Valverde, Angel; Velázquez, Encarna; de Blas, Ignacio; Ruiz-Zarzuela, Imanol

    2011-08-01

    The species Lactococcus lactis currently includes three subspecies; L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris, isolated from milk sources, and L. lactis subsp. hordniae, isolated from the leafhopper Hordnia circellata. In this study, three strains, designated L105(T), I3 and L101, were isolated from the intestinal mucus of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). These strains were closely related to members of the species Lactococcus lactis. Strain L105(T) showed 99.4 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to that of the type strains L. lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 604(T) and L. lactis subsp. hordniae NCDO 2181(T) and showed 99.9 % similarity to the type strain Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris NCDO 607(T). Analysis of two housekeeping genes, rpoB and recA, confirmed the close relationship between the novel strains and L. lactis subsp. cremoris with similarities of 99.3 and 99.7 %, respectively. The three strains could, however, be differentiated from their closest relatives on the basis of several phenotypic characteristics, as was the case for L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. hordniae, which were also closely related on the basis of 16S rRNA, rpoB and recA gene sequence similarities. The strains isolated in this study represent a new subspecies, for which the name Lactococcus lactis subsp. tructae subsp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is L105(T) ( = LMG 24662(T)  = DSM 21502(T)). PMID:20833888

  17. The organization and transcription of the galactose gene cluster of Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, T D; Dickson, R C

    1988-01-01

    The yeast Kluyveromyces lactis grows on galactose by inducing the Leloir pathway enzymes-kinase, epimerase, and transferase. To investigate the molecular mechanism for regulating expression of this metabolic pathway we isolated GAL1, GAL7, GAL10, which code for kinase, transferase, and epimerase, respectively, and characterized their size, organization, and transcriptional regulation. Our results indicate that induction of the Leloir pathway in K. lactis occurs at the level of transcription and that the organization and regulation of the GAL gene cluster in K. lactis is closely related to the homologous gene cluster in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Likewise, the Upstream Activator Sequences that regulate induction of the GAL genes are similar in base sequence, number and relative location in the two yeasts. Images PMID:3047676

  18. The Yeast Fungus Trichosporon lactis Found as an Epizoic Colonizer of Dung Beetle Exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Górz, Andrzej; Boroń, Piotr

    2016-02-01

    The study on the biology and biodiversity of coprophagous Scarabaeoidea carried out in the Polish Carpathians revealed the occurrence of unusual epizoic excrescences on various dung beetles species of the genus Onthophagus. The excrescences occur on the elytra, prothorax, and head of the studied beetles. Detailed research on this phenomenon determined that the fungus grew in the form of multicellular thalli. The ITS-based identification of fungal material collected from beetles' exoskeletons resulted in a 100 % match with Trichosporon lactis. Until now, only a yeast lifestyle/stage was known for this basidiomycete species. Therefore, in this paper, we describe a new substrate for growth of T. lactis and its unknown and intriguing relationship with dung beetles. The results obtained in this study open up numerous research possibilities on the new role of dung beetles in terrestrial ecosystems, as well as on using the physiological properties of T. lactis to restore soils. PMID:26385555

  19. Unity in organisation and regulation of catabolic operons in Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactococcus lactis and Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Ulrika; Molenaar, Douwe; Rådström, Peter; de Vos, Willem M

    2005-04-01

    Global regulatory circuits together with more specific local regulators play a notable role when cells are adapting to environmental changes. Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium abundant in nature fermenting most mono- and disaccharides. Comparative genomics analysis of the operons encoding the proteins and enzymes crucial for catabolism of lactose, maltose and threhalose revealed an obvious unity in operon organisation . The local regulator of each operon was located in a divergent transcriptional direction to the rest of the operon including the transport protein-encoding genes. Furthermore, in all three operons a catabolite responsive element (CRE) site was detected inbetween the gene encoding the local regulator and one of the genes encoding a sugar transport protein. It is evident that regardless of type of transport system and catabolic enzymes acting upon lactose, maltose and trehalose, respectively, Lc. lactis shows unity in both operon organisation and regulation of these catabolic operons. This knowledge was further extended to other catabolic operons in Lc. lactis and the two related bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum and Listeria monocytogenes. Thirty-nine catabolic operons responsible for degradation of sugars and sugar alcohols in Lc. lactis, Lb. plantarum and L. monocytogenes were investigated and the majority of those possessed the same organisation as the lactose, maltose and trehalose operons of Lc. lactis. Though, the frequency of CRE sites and their location varied among the bacteria. Both Lc. lactis and Lb. plantarum showed CRE sites in direct proximity to genes coding for proteins responsible for sugar uptake. However, in L. monocytogenes CRE sites were not frequently found and not in the vicinity of genes encoding transport proteins, suggesting a more local mode of regulation of the catabolic operons found and/or the use of inducer control in this bacterium. PMID:15900965

  20. Bioelectrochemical Mn(II) leaching from manganese ore by Lactococcus lactis SK071115.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Bo Young; Park, Doo Hyun

    2011-02-01

    L. lactis sk071115 has been shown to grow more actively and generate lower levels of lactate in glucose-defined medium with nitrate than in medium with Mn(IV). By adding Mn(IV) to a L. lactis culture, lactate production was relatively reduced in combination with Mn(II) production, but cell mass production levels did not increase. Both cell-free extract and intact L. lactis cells reacted electrochemically with Mn(IV) but did not react with Mn(II) upon cyclic voltammetry using neutral red (NR) as an electron mediator. A modified graphite felt cathode with NR (NR-cathode) was employed to induce electrochemical reducing equivalence for bacterial metabolism. Cell-free L. lactis extract catalyzed the reduction of Mn(IV) to Mn(II) under both control and electrochemical reduction conditions; however, the levels of Mn(II) generated under electrochemical reduction conditions were approximately 4 times those generated under control conditions. The levels of Mn(II) generated by the catalysis of L. lactis immobilized in the NR-cathode (L-NR-cathode) under electrochemical reduction conditions were more than 4 times that generated under control conditions. Mn(II) production levels were increased by approximately 2.5 and 4.5 times by the addition of citrate to the reactant under control and electrochemical reduction conditions, respectively. The cumulative Mn(II) produced from manganese ore by catalysis of the L-NR-cathode for 30 days reached levels of approximately 3,800 and 16,000 mg/l under control and electrochemical reduction conditions, respectively. In conclusion, the electrochemical reduction reaction generated by the NR-cathode activated the biochemical reduction of Mn(IV) to Mn(II) by L. lactis. PMID:21364297

  1. Lactococcus lactis M4, a potential host for the expression of heterologous proteins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many plasmid-harbouring strains of Lactococcus lactis have been isolated from milk and other sources. Plasmids of Lactococcus have been shown to harbour antibiotic resistance genes and those that express some important proteins. The generally regarded as safe (GRAS) status of L. lactis also makes it an attractive host for the production of proteins that are beneficial in numerous applications such as the production of biopharmaceutical and nutraceutical. In the present work, strains of L. lactis were isolated from cow's milk, plasmids were isolated and characterised and one of the strains was identified as a potential new lactococcal host for the expression of heterologous proteins. Results Several bacterial strains were isolated from cow's milk and eight of those were identified as Lactococcus lactis by 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Antibiotic susceptibility tests that were carried out showed that 50% of the isolates had almost identical antibiotic resistance patterns compared to the control strains MG1363 and ATCC 11454. Plasmid profiling results indicated the lack of low molecular weight plasmids for strain M4. Competent L. lactis M4 and MG1363 were prepared and electrotransformed with several lactococcal plasmids such as pMG36e, pAR1411, pAJ01 and pMG36e-GFP. Plasmid isolation and RE analyses showed the presence of these plasmids in both M4 and the control strain after several generations, indicating the ability of M4 to maintain heterologous plasmids. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analyses also confirmed the presence of GFP, demonstrating the potential of heterologous protein expression in M4. Conclusions Based on the 16S rRNA gene molecular analysis, eight Gram-positive cocci milk isolates were identified as L. lactis subsp. lactis. One of the strains, L. lactis M4 was able to maintain transformed low molecular weight plasmid vectors and expressed the GFP gene. This strain has the potential to be developed into a new lactococcal host for the expression

  2. Yeast on the milky way: genetics, physiology and biotechnology of Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Rodicio, Rosaura; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2013-05-01

    The milk yeast Kluyveromyces lactis has a life cycle similar to that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and can be employed as a model eukaryote using classical genetics, such as the combination of desired traits, by crossing and tetrad analysis. Likewise, a growing set of vectors, marker cassettes and tags for fluorescence microscopy are available for manipulation by genetic engineering and investigating its basic cell biology. We here summarize these applications, as well as the current knowledge regarding its central metabolism, glucose and extracellular stress signalling pathways. A short overview on the biotechnological potential of K. lactis concludes this review. PMID:23576126

  3. Cross-protection of Lactococcus lactis-displayed HA2 subunit against homologous and heterologous influenza A viruses in mice.

    PubMed

    Lei, Han; Peng, Xiaojue; Zhao, Daxian; Jiao, Huifeng; Ouyang, Jiexiu

    2015-12-01

    Current influenza vaccines provide strain-specific protection against homologous subtypes and need to be updated annually. Therefore, it is essential to develop a universal vaccine that would induce broadly cross-protective immunity against homologous and heterologous influenza A viruses. The highly conserved HA2 subunit is a promising candidate for developing a universal influenza vaccine. Here, we hypothesized that the HA2 subunit could be displayed on the surface of Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis), using Spax as an anchor protein (L. lactis/pNZ8008-Spax-HA2) and that L. lactis/pNZ8008-Spax-HA2 would have immunogenicity by oral administration without the use of adjuvant in the mouse model. To address this hypothesis, we show that oral vaccination of mice with L. lactis/pNZ8008-Spax-HA2 elicited significant humoral and mucosal immune responses. Importantly, L. lactis/pNZ8008-Spax-HA2 provided 100% protection against homologous H5N1 or heterologous H1N1 virus challenge. These results suggest that an HA2 subunit presented on the surface of L. lactis is an effective universal vaccine candidate against influenza A viruses in the poultry industry and in humans. PMID:26358264

  4. Short- and long-term dynamics in the intestinal microbiota following ingestion of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis GCL2505.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Takami, Kazuyo; Nishijima, Tomohiko; Aoki, Ryo; Mawatari, Takashi; Ikeda, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis GCL2505 (B. lactis GCL2505) is able to survive passage through the intestines and proliferate. The daily dynamics of the intestinal bifidobacteria following ingestion of probiotics are not yet clear. Moreover, the effects of long-term ingestion of probiotics on the intestinal microbiota have not been well studied. Two experiments were performed in the present study. In Experiment 1, 53 healthy female volunteers received B. lactis GCL2505; B. bifidum GCL2080, which can survive but not proliferate in the intestine; or yogurt fermented with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus for 2 weeks, and the daily dynamics of intestinal bifidobacteria were investigated. The number of fecal bifidobacteria significantly increased on day 1, and this was maintained until day 14 in the B. lactis GCL2505 ingestion group. However, no significant change in the number of fecal bifidobacteria was observed in the other groups throughout the ingestion period. In Experiment 2, 38 constipated volunteers received either B. lactis GCL2505 or a placebo for 8 weeks. Both the number of fecal bifidobacteria and the frequency of defecation significantly increased throughout the ingestion period in the B. lactis GCL2505 ingestion group. These results suggested that the proliferation of ingested bifidobacteria within the intestine contributed to a rapid increase in the amount of intestinal bifidobacteria and subsequent maintenance of these levels. Moreover, B. lactis GCL2505 improved the intestinal microbiota more effectively than non-proliferating bifidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria. PMID:26594607

  5. Development of Chemically Defined Media to Express Trp-Analog-Labeled Proteins in a Lactococcus lactis Trp Auxotroph.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jinfeng; Marcondes, Marcelo F M; Oliveira, Vitor; Broos, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    Chemically defined media for growth of Lactococcus lactis strains contain about 50 components, making them laborious and expensive growth media. However, they are crucial for metabolism studies as well as for expression of heterologous proteins labeled with unnatural amino acids. In particular, the L. lactis Trp auxotroph PA1002, overexpressing the tryptophanyl tRNA synthetase enzyme of L. lactis, is very suitable for the biosynthetic incorporation of Trp analogs in proteins because of its most relaxed substrate specificity reported towards Trp analogs. Here we present two much simpler defined media for L. lactis, which consist of only 24 or 31 components, respectively, and with which the L. lactis Trp auxotroph shows similar growth characteristics as with a 50-component chemically defined medium. Importantly, the expression levels of two recombinant proteins used for evaluation were up to 2-3 times higher in these new media than in the 50-component medium, without affecting the Trp analog incorporation efficiency. Taken together, the simplest chemically defined media reported so far for L. lactis are presented. Since L. lactis also shows auxotrophy for Arg, His, Ile, Leu Val, and Met, our simplified media may also be useful for the biosynthetic incorporation of analogs of these five amino acids. PMID:27172771

  6. Construction of a new shuttle vector for DNA delivery into mammalian cells using non-invasive Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Yagnik, Bhrugu; Padh, Harish; Desai, Priti

    2016-04-01

    Use of food grade Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) is fast emerging as a safe alternative for delivery of DNA vaccine. To attain efficient DNA delivery, L. lactis, a non-invasive bacterium is converted to invasive strain either by expressing proteins like Internalin A (InlA) or Fibronectin binding protein A (FnBPA) or through chemical treatments. However the safety status of invasive L. lactis is questionable. In the present report, we have shown that non-invasive L. lactis efficiently delivered the newly constructed reporter plasmid pPERDBY to mammalian cells without any chemical enhancers. The salient features of the vector are; I) Ability to replicate in two different hosts; Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB), II) One of the smallest reporter plasmid for DNA vaccine, III) Enhanced Green Fluorescence Protein (EGFP) linked to Multiple Cloning Site (MCS), IV) Immunostimulatory CpG motifs functioning as an adjuvant. Expression of EGFP in pPERDBY transfected CHO-K1 and Caco-2 cells demonstrates its functionality. Non-invasive r-L. lactis was found efficient in delivering pPERDBY to Caco-2 cells. The in vitro data presented in this article supports the hypothesis that in the absence of invasive proteins or relevant chemical treatment, L. lactis was found efficient in delivering DNA to mammalian cells. PMID:26655884

  7. Short- and long-term dynamics in the intestinal microbiota following ingestion of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis GCL2505

    PubMed Central

    TANAKA, Yoshiyuki; TAKAMI, Kazuyo; NISHIJIMA, Tomohiko; AOKI, Ryo; MAWATARI, Takashi; IKEDA, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis GCL2505 (B. lactis GCL2505) is able to survive passage through the intestines and proliferate. The daily dynamics of the intestinal bifidobacteria following ingestion of probiotics are not yet clear. Moreover, the effects of long-term ingestion of probiotics on the intestinal microbiota have not been well studied. Two experiments were performed in the present study. In Experiment 1, 53 healthy female volunteers received B. lactis GCL2505; B. bifidum GCL2080, which can survive but not proliferate in the intestine; or yogurt fermented with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus for 2 weeks, and the daily dynamics of intestinal bifidobacteria were investigated. The number of fecal bifidobacteria significantly increased on day 1, and this was maintained until day 14 in the B. lactis GCL2505 ingestion group. However, no significant change in the number of fecal bifidobacteria was observed in the other groups throughout the ingestion period. In Experiment 2, 38 constipated volunteers received either B. lactis GCL2505 or a placebo for 8 weeks. Both the number of fecal bifidobacteria and the frequency of defecation significantly increased throughout the ingestion period in the B. lactis GCL2505 ingestion group. These results suggested that the proliferation of ingested bifidobacteria within the intestine contributed to a rapid increase in the amount of intestinal bifidobacteria and subsequent maintenance of these levels. Moreover, B. lactis GCL2505 improved the intestinal microbiota more effectively than non-proliferating bifidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria. PMID:26594607

  8. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: Application in the control of Listeria monocytogenes in fresh Minas-type goat cheese

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Danielle N.; Todorov, Svetoslav D.; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T.; Franco, Bernadette D.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogen frequently found in dairy products. Its control in fresh cheeses is difficult, due to the psychrotrophic properties and salt tolerance. Bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with proven in vitro antilisterial activity can be an innovative technological approach but their application needs to be evaluated by means of in situ tests. In this study, a novel bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis strain ( Lc . lactis DF4Mi), isolated from raw goat milk, was tested for control of growth of L. monocytogenes in artificially contaminated fresh Minas type goat cheese during storage under refrigeration. A bacteriostatic effect was achieved, and counts after 10 days were 3 log lower than in control cheeses with no added LAB. However, this effect did not differ significantly from that obtained with a non-bacteriocinogenic Lc. lactis strain. Addition of nisin (12.5 mg/kg) caused a rapid decrease in the number of viable L. monocytogenes in the cheeses, suggesting that further studies with the purified bacteriocin DF4Mi may open new possibilities for this strain as biopreservative in dairy products. PMID:26221109

  9. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: Application in the control of Listeria monocytogenes in fresh Minas-type goat cheese.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Danielle N; Todorov, Svetoslav D; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T; Franco, Bernadette D G M

    2015-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogen frequently found in dairy products. Its control in fresh cheeses is difficult, due to the psychrotrophic properties and salt tolerance. Bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with proven in vitro antilisterial activity can be an innovative technological approach but their application needs to be evaluated by means of in situ tests. In this study, a novel bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis strain ( Lc . lactis DF4Mi), isolated from raw goat milk, was tested for control of growth of L. monocytogenes in artificially contaminated fresh Minas type goat cheese during storage under refrigeration. A bacteriostatic effect was achieved, and counts after 10 days were 3 log lower than in control cheeses with no added LAB. However, this effect did not differ significantly from that obtained with a non-bacteriocinogenic Lc. lactis strain. Addition of nisin (12.5 mg/kg) caused a rapid decrease in the number of viable L. monocytogenes in the cheeses, suggesting that further studies with the purified bacteriocin DF4Mi may open new possibilities for this strain as biopreservative in dairy products. PMID:26221109

  10. Profil clinique et bactériologique des infections néonatales bactériennes à l'Hôpital Laquintinie de Douala, Cameroun

    PubMed Central

    Kemeze, Sandrine; Moudze, Béatrice; Chiabi, Andreas; Eposse, Charlotte; Kaya, Alexis; Mbangue, Madeleine; Guifo, Odette; Kago, Innocent

    2016-01-01

    Introduction L'Organisation Mondiale de la Santé a estimé la survenue globale de décès néonatal à 2,8 millions en 2015, dont 47,6% étaient dues aux infections. Ces infections peuvent survenir chez un nouveau-né de 0 à un mois de vie, pouvant aller jusqu’à 3 mois. Méthodes C'est une étude prospective allant du 1er mars au 30 juin 2015 au Service de néonatologie de l'Hôpital Laquintinie de Douala. Etaient inclus tout nouveau-né symptomatique avec ou sans critère anamnestique et tout nouveau-né asymptomatique, présentant au moins un risque infectieux et ayant au moins une culture positive ou une anomalie de la numération formule sanguine ou une protéine C réactive positive. Résultats Des 310 nouveau-nés admis, 300 ont été retenus pour infection néonatale, soit une incidence de 96,8%. Nous avons réalisé 104 cultures dont 25 positives, soit une incidence de l'infection néonatale confirmée de 24%. Les facteurs associés à l'infection étaient la prématurité inexpliquée <35 semaines d'aménorrhée(45,1%) et la réanimation néonatale (34,8%). La fièvre (56%) et les troubles neurologiques (48,8%) étaient les manifestations cliniques les plus fréquentes. Les Gram négatifs étaient les germes les plus fréquents (56%). L'imipenème (95%) et l'amikacine (66,7%) étaient les antibiotiques les plusefficaces. L’évolution était favorable dans 66,4% des cas et le taux de décès était de 33,6%. Conclusion Cette étude révèle une forte prévalence de l'infection dans cet hôpital. L’écologie bactérienne est dominée par les Gram négatifs, on note une importante résistance aux antibiotiques usuels et une mortalité assez élevée. PMID:27222688

  11. Sugar metabolism, redox balance and oxidative stress response in the respiratory yeast Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    González-Siso, M Isabel; García-Leiro, Ana; Tarrío, Nuria; Cerdán, M Esperanza

    2009-01-01

    A lot of studies have been carried out on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an yeast with a predominant fermentative metabolism under aerobic conditions, which allows exploring the complex response induced by oxidative stress. S. cerevisiae is considered a eukaryote model for these studies. We propose Kluyveromyces lactis as a good alternative model to analyse variants in the oxidative stress response, since the respiratory metabolism in this yeast is predominant under aerobic conditions and it shows other important differences with S. cerevisiae in catabolic repression and carbohydrate utilization. The knowledge of oxidative stress response in K. lactis is still a developing field. In this article, we summarize the state of the art derived from experimental approaches and we provide a global vision on the characteristics of the putative K. lactis components of the oxidative stress response pathway, inferred from their sequence homology with the S. cerevisiae counterparts. Since K. lactis is also a well-established alternative host for industrial production of native enzymes and heterologous proteins, relevant differences in the oxidative stress response pathway and their potential in biotechnological uses of this yeast are also reviewed. PMID:19715615

  12. Diversity in Robustness of Lactococcus lactis Strains during Heat Stress, Oxidative Stress, and Spray Drying Stress

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Annereinou R.; Setyawati, Meily C.; Bayjanov, Jumamurat R.; Alkema, Wynand; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Hugenholtz, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    In this study we tested 39 Lactococcus lactis strains isolated from diverse habitats for their robustness under heat and oxidative stress, demonstrating high diversity in survival (up to 4 log units). Strains with an L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype generally displayed more-robust phenotypes than strains with an L. lactis subsp. cremoris phenotype, whereas the habitat from which the strains had been isolated did not appear to influence stress survival. Comparison of the stress survival phenotypes with already available comparative genomic data sets revealed that the absence or presence of specific genes, including genes encoding a GntR family transcriptional regulator, a manganese ABC transporter permease, a cellobiose phosphotransferase system (PTS) component, the FtsY protein, and hypothetical proteins, was associated with heat or oxidative stress survival. Finally, 14 selected strains also displayed diversity in survival after spray drying, ranging from 20% survival for the most robust strains, which appears acceptable for industrial application, to 0.1% survival for the least-tolerant strains. The high and low levels of survival upon spray drying correlated clearly with the combined robustness under heat and oxidative stress. These results demonstrate the relevance of screening culture collections for robustness under heat and oxidative stress on top of the typical screening for acidifying and flavor-forming properties. PMID:24212574

  13. Secreted expression of Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucansucrase in Lactococcus lactis for the production of insoluble glucans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We expressed a glucansucrase, DsrI, from Leuconostoc mesenteroides that catalyzes formation of water-insoluble glucans from sucrose in Lactococcus lactis using a nisin-controlled gene expression system. Production of DsrI was optimized using several different background vectors, signal peptides, str...

  14. Lactococcus lactis as a Cell Factory for High-Level Diacetyl Production

    PubMed Central

    Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Starrenburg, Marjo; Delcour, Jean; de Vos, Willem; Hols, Pascal

    2000-01-01

    We report the engineering of Lactococcus lactis for the efficient conversion of sugar into diacetyl by combining NADH-oxidase overproduction and α-acetolactate decarboxylase inactivation. Eighty percent of the carbon flux was found to be rerouted via α-acetolactate to the production of diacetyl by preloading the cells with NADH-oxidase before their use as a cell factory. PMID:10966436

  15. Lactococcus lactis Catherter-Related Bloodstream Infection in an Infant: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Karaaslan, Ayşe; Soysal, Ahmet; Sarmış, Abdurrahman; Kadayifci, Eda Kepenekli; Cerit, Kıvılcım; Atıcı, Serkan; Söyletir, Güner; Bakır, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a gram-positive coccus that is nonpathogenic in humans. Herein, we present the case of a 1-year-old boy with Down syndrome and Hirschprung's disease (HD) who developed a catheter-related bloodstream infection with L. lactis after gastrointestinal surgery. The patient had been hospitalized in the pediatric surgery unit from birth because of HD, and had undergone the Duhamel-Martin procedure which caused recurrent diarrhea episodes and feeding intolerance. On the infant's 430th day of life, he had an episode of gastroenteritis and feeding intolerance. Because of clinical suspiction of sepsis, blood cultures were taken both from the central venous catheter and peripheral vein, and evidence of a growing microorganism was detected in 2 different central venous catheter blood cultures taken 2 days apart. The colonies were then identified by both the Vitek 2 and Vitek MS systems (bioMérieux, Marseille, France) as L. lactis spp. lactis. The central venous catheter could not be removed because of the absence of a peripheral venous line, and the patient was subsequently successfully treated with vancomycin. Therefore, although Lactococcus species is generally thought to be nonpathogenic, it should still be kept in mind as a potential pathogen in infants. PMID:25672357

  16. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from... Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis. (a) Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1388 Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from... Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis. (a) Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1388 Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1388 Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the nonpathogenic, nontoxicogenic yeast Kluyveromyces...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from... Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis. (a) Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from... Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis. (a) Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation...

  3. Preferential localization of Lactococcus lactis cells entrapped in a caseinate/alginate phase separated system.

    PubMed

    Léonard, Lucie; Gharsallaoui, Adem; Ouaali, Fahima; Degraeve, Pascal; Waché, Yves; Saurel, Rémi; Oulahal, Nadia

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to entrap bioprotective lactic acid bacteria in a sodium caseinate/sodium alginate aqueous two-phase system. Phase diagram at pH=7 showed that sodium alginate and sodium caseinate were not miscible when their concentrations exceeded 1% (w/w) and 6% (w/w), respectively. The stability of the caseinate/alginate two-phase system was also checked at pH values of 6.0 and 5.5. Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis LAB3 cells were added in a 4% (w/w) caseinate/1.5% (w/w) alginate two-phase system at pH=7. Fluorescence microscopy allowed to observe that the caseinate-rich phase formed droplets dispersed in a continuous alginate-rich phase. The distribution of bacteria in such a system was observed by epifluorescence microscopy: Lc. lactis LAB3 cells stained with Live/Dead(®) Baclight kit™ were located exclusively in the protein phase. Since zeta-potential measurements indicated that alginate, caseinate and bacterial cells all had an overall negative charge at pH 7, the preferential adhesion of LAB cells was assumed to be driven by hydrophobic effect or by depletion phenomena in such biopolymeric systems. Moreover, LAB cells viability was significantly higher in the ternary mixture obtained in the presence of both caseinate and alginate than in single alginate solution. Caseinate/alginate phase separated systems appeared thus well suited for Lc. lactis LAB3 cells entrapment. PMID:23665092

  4. Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris Mast36, a Strain Isolated from Bovine Mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Gazzola, Simona; Fontana, Cecilia; Bassi, Daniela; Cocconcelli, Pier-Sandro; von Wright, Atte

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris Mast36, isolated from bovine mastitis, is reported here. This strain was shown to be able to grow in milk and still possess genes of vegetable origin. The genome also contains a cluster of genes associated with pathogenicity. PMID:25999570

  5. Effect of composite yogurt enriched with acacia fiber and Bifidobacterium lactis

    PubMed Central

    Min, Yang Won; Park, Sang Un; Jang, Yeon Sil; Kim, Young-Ho; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Ko, Seo Hyun; Joo, Nami; Kim, Sun Im; Kim, Cheol-Hyun; Chang, Dong Kyung

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether composite yogurt with acacia dietary fiber and Bifidobacterium lactis (B. lactis) has additive effects in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS: A total of 130 patients were randomly allocated to consume, twice daily for 8 wk, either the composite yogurt or the control product. The composite yogurt contained acacia dietary fiber and high-dose B. lactis together with two classic yogurt starter cultures. Patients were evaluated using the visual analog scale via a structured questionnaire administered at baseline and after treatment. RESULTS: Improvements in bowel habit satisfaction and overall IBS symptoms from baseline were significantly higher in the test group than in the control group (27.16 vs 15.51, P = 0.010, 64.2 ± 17.0 vs 50.4 ± 20.5, P < 0.001; respectively). In constipation-predominant IBS, improvement in overall IBS symptoms was significantly higher in the test group than in the control group (72.4 ± 18.4 vs 50.0 ± 21.8, P < 0.001). In patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS, improvement in bowel habit satisfaction from baseline was significantly higher in the test group than in the control group (32.90 vs 7.81, P = 0.006). CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that composite yogurt enriched with acacia fiber and B. lactis has greater therapeutic effects in patients with IBS than standard yogurt. PMID:22969230

  6. Deletion of the PDR16 gene influences the plasma membrane properties of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Toth Hervay, Nora; Goffa, Eduard; Svrbicka, Alexandra; Simova, Zuzana; Griac, Peter; Jancikova, Iva; Gaskova, Dana; Morvova, Marcela; Sikurova, Libusa; Gbelska, Yvetta

    2015-04-01

    The plasma membrane is the first line of cell defense against changes in external environment, thus its integrity and functionality are of utmost importance. The plasma membrane properties depend on both its protein and lipid composition. The PDR16 gene is involved in the control of Kluyveromyces lactis susceptibility to drugs and alkali metal cations. It encodes the homologue of the major K. lactis phosphatidylinositol transfer protein Sec14p. Sec14p participates in protein secretion, regulation of lipid synthesis, and turnover in vivo. We report here that the plasma membrane of the Klpdr16Δ mutant is hyperpolarized and its fluidity is lower than that of the parental strain. In addition, protoplasts prepared from the Klpdr16Δ cells display decreased stability when subjected to hypo-osmotic conditions. These changes in membrane properties lead to an accumulation of radiolabeled fluconazole and lithium cations inside mutant cells. Our results point to the fact that the PDR16 gene of K. lactis (KlPDR16) influences the plasma membrane properties in K. lactis that lead to subsequent changes in susceptibility to a broad range of xenobiotics. PMID:25742422

  7. Involvement of Sulfhydryl Groups in the β-Galactosidase of Streptococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    McFeters, G. A.; Sandine, W. E.; Elliker, P. R.

    1971-01-01

    Sulfhydryl oxidants and stabilizers caused changes demonstrating the sulfhydryl content of β-galactosidase for Streptococcus lactis 7962. Ammonium sulfate (0.85 m) rendered the enzyme insensitive to the oxidants. Titrations revealed 11.5 moles of sulfhydryl per mole of enzyme. PMID:5001210

  8. BactPepDB: a database of predicted peptides from a exhaustive survey of complete prokaryote genomes

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Julien; Deschavanne, Patrick; Tuffery, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    With the recent progress in complete genome sequencing, mining the increasing amount of genomic information available should in theory provide the means to discover new classes of peptides. However, annotation pipelines often do not consider small reading frames likely to be expressed. BactPepDB, available online at http://bactpepdb.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr, is a database that aims at providing an exhaustive re-annotation of all complete prokaryotic genomes—chromosomal and plasmid DNA—available in RefSeq for coding sequences ranging between 10 and 80 amino acids. The identified peptides are classified as (i) previously identified in RefSeq, (ii) entity-overlapping (intragenic) or intergenic, and (iii) potential pseudogenes—intergenic sequences corresponding to a portion of a previously annotated larger gene. Additional information is related to homologs within order, predicted signal sequence, transmembrane segments, disulfide bonds, secondary structure, and the existence of a related 3D structure in the Protein Databank. As a result, BactPepDB provides insights about candidate peptides, and provides information about their conservation, together with some of their expected biological/structural features. The BactPepDB interface allows to search for candidate peptides in the database, or to search for peptides similar to a query, according to the multiple properties predicted or related to genomic localization. Database URL: http://www.yeastgenome.org/ PMID:25377257

  9. An Export-Specific Reporter Designed for Gram-Positive Bacteria: Application to Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Poquet, Isabelle; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Gruss, Alexandra

    1998-01-01

    The identification of exported proteins by fusion studies, while well developed for gram-negative bacteria, is limited for gram-positive bacteria, in part due to drawbacks of available export reporters. In this work, we demonstrate the export specificity and use of the Staphylococcus aureus secreted nuclease (Nuc) as a reporter for gram-positive bacteria. Nuc devoid of its export signal (called ΔSPNuc) was used to create two fusions whose locations could be differentiated. Nuclease activity was shown to require an extracellular location in Lactococcus lactis, thus demonstrating the suitability of ΔSPNuc to report protein export. The shuttle vector pFUN was designed to construct ΔSPNuc translational fusions whose expression signals are provided by inserted DNA. The capacity of ΔSPNuc to reveal and identify exported proteins was tested by generating an L. lactis genomic library in pFUN and by screening for Nuc activity directly in L. lactis. All ΔSPNuc fusions displaying a strong Nuc+ phenotype contained a classical or a lipoprotein-type signal peptide or single or multiple transmembrane stretches. The function of some of the predicted signals was confirmed by cell fractionation studies. The fusions analyzed included long (up to 455-amino-acid) segments of the exported proteins, all previously unknown in L. lactis. Homology searches indicate that several of them may be implicated in different cell surface functions, such as nutrient uptake, peptidoglycan assembly, environmental sensing, and protein folding. Our results with L. lactis show that ΔSPNuc is well suited to report both protein export and membrane protein topology. PMID:9537391

  10. Sugar Utilization and Acid Production by Free and Entrapped Cells of Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis in a Whey Permeate Medium

    PubMed Central

    Audet, Pascal; Paquin, Celine; Lacroix, Christophe

    1989-01-01

    Cells of Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis entrapped in k-carrageenan-locust bean gum gel performed similarly to free cells in the conversion of lactose to lactic acid. Bead diameter influenced the fermentation rate. Cells entrapped in smaller beads (0.5 to 1.0 mm) showed higher release rates, higher lactose, glucose, and formic acid utilization, higher galactose accumulation, and higher lactic acid production than did cells entrapped in larger beads (1.0 to 2.0 mm). Values for smaller beads were comparable with those for free cells. Immobilization affected the fermentation rate of lactic acid bacteria, especially Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. Entrapped cells of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus demonstrated a lower lactic acid production than did free cells in batch fermentation. The kinetics of the production of formic and pyruvic acids by L. lactis subsp. lactis and S. salivarius subsp. thermophilus are presented. PMID:16347822

  11. L’infection bactérienne chez le patient brûlé

    PubMed Central

    Le Floch, R.; Naux, E.; Arnould, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary La mort d’un patient brûlé est le plus souvent causée par une infection, bactérienne dans la grande majorité des cas. La perte de la barrière cutanée, les dispositifs invasifs et l’immunodépression liée à la brûlure sont trois mécanismes concourant à la survenue de ces infections. Chez un patient inflammatoire, les signes infectieux généraux d’infection sont peu discriminants. Du fait de la gravité des infections chez ce patient, leur prévention est un paramètre essentiel de la prise en charge. En raison des particularités pharmacocinétiques des brûlés, les posologies d’antibiotiques doivent être adaptés et les dosages sanguins doivent être systématiques. A l’heure où les résistances deviennent préoccupantes, les recherches sur les thérapeutiques sur les alternatives thérapeutiques parmi lesquels les inhibiteurs de facteurs de virulence, les peptides antimicrobiens, les polyphénols, l’immunothérapie…) deviennent cruciales. L’une des possibilités thérapeutiques les plus prometteuses semble être la phagothérapie. PMID:27252607

  12. Profil bactériologique du pied diabétique et son impact sur le choix des antibiotiques

    PubMed Central

    Zemmouri, Adil; Tarchouli, Mohamed; Benbouha, Abdellatif; Lamkinsi, Tarik; Bensghir, Mustapha; Elouennass, Mostafa; Haimeur, Cherqui

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Analyse du profil bactériologique des pieds diabétiques pris en charge à l'hôpital militaire de Rabat et son influence sur l'antibiothérapie de première intention. Méthodes Etude prospective non randomisée étalée sur 18 mois, ayant concerné 105 patients. Après recueil des données et en attente des résultats bactériologiques nos patients ont été divisés en deux groupes: un groupe a été mis sous Amoxicilline + Acide clavulanique + Gentamycine (59 patients) et un groupe sous Ertapénème±Gentamycine (46 patients). Résultats L’étude a regroupé 85 hommes et 20 femmes (sexe ratio = 4.26). L’âge moyen est de 64.4 ans. La gangrène a été observée chez 79% des malades; elle était humide-donc surinfectée en principe- dans 43% des cas. Par ailleurs, 67% des malades ont un chiffre de globules blancs 12000 définissant une infection sévère. L'ostéolyse a été mise en évidence chez 27% de nos patients. Parmi les différentes techniques de prélèvements: 81% ont été profonds dont 21% de biopsie osseuse per opératoire et 14% de prélèvements combinés. 42% de ces prélèvements sont poly microbiens et 21% sont stériles. Les résultats bactériologiques viennent confirmer la prédominance des bactéries aérobies à Gram positif. Le taux de remplacement de l'Ertapénème est de 22% contre un taux de 50% pour l'Amoxiclav. Conclusion L'antibiothérapie ne doit être instaurée qu'en cas d'infection du pied diabétique diagnostiquée sur les critères cliniques établis par les consensus internationaux récents. Le respect des mesures de lutte contre la diffusion de la résistance bactérienne s'avère primordiale. PMID:27386024

  13. Mdt(A), a New Efflux Protein Conferring Multiple Antibiotic Resistance in Lactococcus lactis and Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Perreten, Vincent; Schwarz, Franziska V.; Teuber, Michael; Levy, Stuart B.

    2001-01-01

    The mdt(A) gene, previously designated mef214, from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis plasmid pK214 encodes a protein [Mdt(A) (multiple drug transporter)] with 12 putative transmembrane segments (TMS) that contain typical motifs conserved among the efflux proteins of the major facilitator superfamily. However, it also has two C-motifs (conserved in the fifth TMS of the antiporters) and a putative ATP-binding site. Expression of the cloned mdt(A) gene decreased susceptibility to macrolides, lincosamides, streptogramins, and tetracyclines in L. lactis and Escherichia coli, but not in Enterococcus faecalis or in Staphylococcus aureus. Glucose-dependent efflux of erythromycin and tetracycline was demonstrated in L. lactis and in E. coli. PMID:11257023

  14. Constructing a recombinant hyaluronic acid biosynthesis operon and producing food-grade hyaluronic acid in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Juzheng; Ling, Peixue; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-02-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural high molecular weight polysaccharide, is produced by Streptococcus zooepidemicus. However, Streptococcus has several drawbacks including its potential to produce exotoxins, so there is demand for an alternative HA source. Here, a recombinant HA biosynthesis operon, as well as the HA biosynthesis operon of S. zooepidemicus were introduced into L. lactis using the nisin-controlled expression system, respectively. HA was successfully synthesized by recombinant L. lactis. Furthermore, overexpression of the endogenous enzymes directing the synthesis of precursor sugars was effective at increasing HA production, and increasing the supply of UDP-activated monosaccharide donors aided synthesis of monodisperse HA polysaccharides. Besides GRAS host strain (L. lactis) and NICE system, the selecting marker (lacF gene) of the recombinant strain is also food grade. Therefore, HA produced by recombinant L. lactis overcomes the problems associated with Streptococcus and provides a source of food-grading HA appropriate for widespread biotechnological applications. PMID:25447786

  15. Promoter and signal sequence from filamentous fungus can drive recombinant protein production in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Aravind; Sukumaran, Rajeev K

    2014-08-01

    Cross-recognition of promoters from filamentous fungi in yeast can have important consequences towards developing fungal expression systems, especially for the rapid evaluation of their efficacy. A truncated 510bp inducible Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I (cbh1) promoter was tested for the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in Kluyveromyces lactis after disrupting its native β-galactosidase (lac4) promoter. The efficiency of the CBH1 secretion signal was also evaluated by fusing it to the lac4 promoter of the yeast, which significantly increased the secretion of recombinant protein in K. lactis compared to the native α-mating factor secretion signal. The fungal promoter is demonstrated to have potential to drive heterologous protein production in K. lactis; and the small sized T. reesei cbh1 secretion signal can mediate the protein secretion in K. lactis with high efficiency. PMID:24661814

  16. Lactococcus lactis expressing either Staphylococcus aureus fibronectin-binding protein A or Listeria monocytogenes internalin A can efficiently internalize and deliver DNA in human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Innocentin, Silvia; Guimarães, Valeria; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco; Langella, Philippe; Chatel, Jean-Marc; Lefèvre, François

    2009-07-01

    Lactococci are noninvasive bacteria frequently used as protein delivery vectors and, more recently, as in vitro and in vivo DNA delivery vehicles. We previously showed that a functional eukaryotic enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) expression plasmid vector was delivered in epithelial cells by Lactococcus lactis producing Listeria monocytogenes internalin A (L. lactis InlA(+)), but this strategy is limited in vivo to transgenic mice and guinea pigs. In this study, we compare the internalization ability of L. lactis InlA(+) and L. lactis producing either the fibronectin-binding protein A of Staphylococcus aureus (L. lactis FnBPA(+)) or its fibronectin binding domains C and D (L. lactis CD(+)). L. lactis FnBPA(+) and L. lactis InlA(+) showed comparable internalization rates in Caco-2 cells, while the internalization rate observed with L. lactis CD(+) was lower. As visualized by conventional and confocal fluorescence microscopy, large clusters of L. lactis FnBPA(+), L. lactis CD(+), and L. lactis InlA(+) were present in the cytoplasm of Caco-2 cells after internalization. Moreover, the internalization rates of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and of an NCFM mutant strain with the gene coding for the fibronectin-binding protein (fbpA) inactivated were also evaluated in Caco-2 cells. Similar low internalization rates were observed for both wild-type L. acidophilus NCFM and the fbpA mutant, suggesting that commensal fibronectin binding proteins have a role in adhesion but not in invasion. L. lactis FnBPA(+), L. lactis CD(+), and L. lactis InlA(+) were then used to deliver a eukaryotic eGFP expression plasmid in Caco-2 cells: flow cytometry analysis showed that the highest percentage of green fluorescent Caco-2 cells was observed after coculture with either L. lactis FnBPA(+) or L. lactis InlA(+). Analysis of the in vivo efficiency of these invasive recombinant strains is currently in progress to validate their potential as DNA vaccine delivery vehicles. PMID

  17. Reduced Binding of the Endolysin LysTP712 to Lactococcus lactis ΔftsH Contributes to Phage Resistance.

    PubMed

    Roces, Clara; Campelo, Ana B; Escobedo, Susana; Wegmann, Udo; García, Pilar; Rodríguez, Ana; Martínez, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Absence of the membrane protease FtsH in Lactococcus lactis hinders release of the bacteriophage TP712. In this work we have analyzed the mechanism responsible for the non-lytic phenotype of L. lactis ΔftsH after phage infection. The lytic cassette of TP712 contains a putative antiholin-pinholin system and a modular endolysin (LysTP712). Inducible expression of the holin gene demonstrated the presence of a dual start motif which is functional in both wildtype and L. lactis ΔftsH cells. Moreover, simulating holin activity with ionophores accelerated lysis of wildtype cells but not L. lactis ΔftsH cells, suggesting inhibition of the endolysin rather than a role of FtsH in holin activation. However, zymograms revealed the synthesis of an active endolysin in both wildtype and L. lactis ΔftsH TP712 lysogens. A reporter protein was generated by fusing the cell wall binding domain of LysTP712 to the fluorescent mCherry protein. Binding of this reporter protein took place at the septa of both wildtype and L. lactis ΔftsH cells as shown by fluorescence microscopy. Nonetheless, fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated that mutant cells bound 40% less protein. In conclusion, the non-lytic phenotype of L. lactis ΔftsH is not due to direct action of the FtsH protease on the phage lytic proteins but rather to a putative function of FtsH in modulating the architecture of the L. lactis cell envelope that results in a lower affinity of the phage endolysin to its substrate. PMID:26904011

  18. Reduced Binding of the Endolysin LysTP712 to Lactococcus lactis ΔftsH Contributes to Phage Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Roces, Clara; Campelo, Ana B.; Escobedo, Susana; Wegmann, Udo; García, Pilar; Rodríguez, Ana; Martínez, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Absence of the membrane protease FtsH in Lactococcus lactis hinders release of the bacteriophage TP712. In this work we have analyzed the mechanism responsible for the non-lytic phenotype of L. lactis ΔftsH after phage infection. The lytic cassette of TP712 contains a putative antiholin–pinholin system and a modular endolysin (LysTP712). Inducible expression of the holin gene demonstrated the presence of a dual start motif which is functional in both wildtype and L. lactis ΔftsH cells. Moreover, simulating holin activity with ionophores accelerated lysis of wildtype cells but not L. lactis ΔftsH cells, suggesting inhibition of the endolysin rather than a role of FtsH in holin activation. However, zymograms revealed the synthesis of an active endolysin in both wildtype and L. lactis ΔftsH TP712 lysogens. A reporter protein was generated by fusing the cell wall binding domain of LysTP712 to the fluorescent mCherry protein. Binding of this reporter protein took place at the septa of both wildtype and L. lactis ΔftsH cells as shown by fluorescence microscopy. Nonetheless, fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated that mutant cells bound 40% less protein. In conclusion, the non-lytic phenotype of L. lactis ΔftsH is not due to direct action of the FtsH protease on the phage lytic proteins but rather to a putative function of FtsH in modulating the architecture of the L. lactis cell envelope that results in a lower affinity of the phage endolysin to its substrate. PMID:26904011

  19. Oral immunization of mice with recombinant Lactococcus lactis expressing Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase of Brucella abortus triggers protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Darwin; Fernández, Pablo; Rivera, Alejandra; Andrews, Edilia; Oñate, Angel

    2012-02-01

    Brucella infections mainly occur through mucosal surfaces. Thus, the development of mucosal administered vaccines could be instrumental for the control of brucellosis. Here, we evaluated the usefulness of recombinant Lactococcus lactis secreting Brucella abortus Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) as oral antigen delivery system, when administered alone or in combination with L. lactis expressing IL-12. To this end, mice were vaccinated by oral route with L. lactis NZ9000 transformed with pSEC derivatives encoding for SOD (pSEC:SOD) and IL-12 (pSEC:scIL-12). In animals receiving L. lactis pSEC:SOD alone, anti-SOD-specific IgM antibodies were detected in sera at day 28 post-vaccination, together with an IgG2a dominated IgG response. SOD-specific sIgA was also detected in nasal and bronchoalveolar lavages. In addition, T-cell-proliferative responses upon re-stimulation with either recombinant SOD or crude Brucella protein extracts were observed up to 6 months after the last boost, suggesting the induction of long term memory. Vaccinated animals were also protected against challenge with the virulent B. abortus 2308 strain. Responses were mildly improved when L. lactis pSEC:SOD was co-administered with L. lactis pSEC:scIL-12. These results indicated that vaccines based on lactococci-derived live carriers are promising interventions against B. abortus infections. PMID:22222868

  20. Expression of PprI from Deinococcus radiodurans Improves Lactic Acid Production and Stress Tolerance in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiangrong; Tian, Bing; Dai, Shang; Li, Tao; Guo, Linna; Tan, Zhongfang; Jiao, Zhen; Jin, Qingsheng; Wang, Yanping; Hua, Yuejin

    2015-01-01

    PprI is a general switch protein that regulates the expression of certain proteins involved in pathways of cellular resistance in the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. In this study, we transformed pprI into Lactococcus lactis strain MG1363 using the lactococcal shuttle vector pMG36e and investigated its effects on the tolerance and lactic acid production of L. lactis while under stress. PprI was stably expressed in L. lactis as confirmed by western blot assays. L. lactis expressing PprI exhibited significantly improved resistance to oxidative stress and high osmotic pressure. This enhanced cellular tolerance to stressors might be due to the regulation of resistance-related genes (e.g., recA, recO, sodA, and nah) by pprI. Moreover, transformed L. lactis demonstrated increased lactic acid production, attributed to enhanced lactate dehydrogenase activity. These results suggest that pprI can improve the tolerance of L. lactis to environmental stresses, and this transformed bacterial strain is a promising candidate for industrial applications of lactic acid production. PMID:26562776

  1. Autolysis of Lactococcus lactis Is Increased upon d-Alanine Depletion of Peptidoglycan and Lipoteichoic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Anton; Palumbo, Emmanuelle; Deghorain, Marie; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro; Delcour, Jean; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kok, Jan; Buist, Girbe; Hols, Pascal

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding enzymes responsible for the incorporation of d-Ala into the cell wall of Lactococcus lactis affect autolysis. An L. lactis alanine racemase (alr) mutant is strictly dependent on an external supply of d-Ala to be able to synthesize peptidoglycan and to incorporate d-Ala in the lipoteichoic acids (LTA). The mutant lyses rapidly when d-Ala is removed at mid-exponential growth. AcmA, the major lactococcal autolysin, is partially involved in the increased lysis since an alr acmA double mutant still lyses, albeit to a lesser extent. To investigate the role of d-Ala on LTA in the increased cell lysis, a dltD mutant of L. lactis was investigated, since this mutant is only affected in the d-alanylation of LTA and not the synthesis of peptidoglycan. Mutation of dltD results in increased lysis, showing that d-alanylation of LTA also influences autolysis. Since a dltD acmA double mutant does not lyse, the lysis of the dltD mutant is totally AcmA dependent. Zymographic analysis shows that no degradation of AcmA takes place in the dltD mutant, whereas AcmA is degraded by the extracellular protease HtrA in the wild-type strain. In L. lactis, LTA has been shown to be involved in controlled (directed) binding of AcmA. LTA lacking d-Ala has been reported in other bacterial species to have an improved capacity for autolysin binding. Mutation of dltD in L. lactis, however, does not affect peptidoglycan binding of AcmA; neither the amount of AcmA binding to the cells nor the binding to specific loci is altered. In conclusion, d-Ala depletion of the cell wall causes lysis by two distinct mechanisms. First, it results in an altered peptidoglycan that is more susceptible to lysis by AcmA and also by other factors, e.g., one or more of the other (putative) cell wall hydrolases expressed by L. lactis. Second, reduced amounts of d-Ala on LTA result in decreased degradation of AcmA by HtrA, which results in increased lytic activity. PMID:15601695

  2. Genetic diversity and mycotoxin production of Fusarium lactis species complex isolates from sweet pepper.

    PubMed

    Van Poucke, Kris; Monbaliu, Sofie; Munaut, Françoise; Heungens, Kurt; De Saeger, Sarah; Van Hove, François

    2012-02-01

    An internal fruit rot disease of sweet peppers was first detected in Belgium in 2003. Research conducted mostly in Canada indicates that this disease is primarily caused by Fusarium lactis Pirotta. Ninety-eight Fusarium isolates obtained from diseased sweet peppers from Belgium, as well as from other countries (Canada, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) were identified by sequencing the translation elongation factor 1α (EF). Of these 98 isolates, 13 were identified as F. oxysporum Schltdl., nine as F. proliferatum (Matsush.) Nirenberg and two belonged to clade 3 of the F. solani species complex. Of the 74 remaining isolates, the EF sequence showed 97% to 98% similarity to F. lactis. Of these isolates, the β-tubulin (TUB), calmodulin (CAM) and the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPB2) genes were also sequenced. Analysis of the combined sequences revealed that the 74 isolates share nine combined sequences that correspond to nine multilocus sequence types (STs), while the F. lactis neotype strain and one other strain, both isolated from figs, form a separate ST. Together, these 10 STs represent a monophyletic F. lactis species complex (FLASC). An unusually high level of genetic diversity was observed between (groups of) these STs. Two of them (ST5 and ST6) fulfilled the criteria for species recognition based on genealogical exclusivity and together represent a new monophyletic species lineage (FLASC-1). The seven other STs, together with the F. lactis neotype ST, form a paraphyletic species lineage in the African clade of the Gibberella fujikuroi species complex (GFSC). From each of the 10 STs, the mycotoxin production was assessed using a multi-mycotoxin liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method. Out of the 27 analyzed mycotoxins, beauvericin and fumonisins were detected in sweet pepper tissue and in maize kernels. The 10 STs clearly differed in the amount of mycotoxin produced, but there was only limited congruence between the production

  3. Metabolic engineering of Kluyveromyces lactis for L-ascorbic acid (vitamin C) biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background L-ascorbic acid (L-AA) is naturally synthesized in plants from D-glucose by 10 steps pathway. The pathway branch to synthesize L-galactose, the key intermediate for L-ascorbic acid biosynthesis, has been recently elucidated. Budding yeast produces an 5-carbon ascorbic acid analogue Dehydro-D-arabinono 1,4-lactone (D-DAL), which is synthesized from D-arabinose. Yeast is able to synthesize L-ascorbic acid only if it is cultivated in the presence of one of its precursors: L-galactose, L-galactono 1,4-lactone, or L-gulono 1,4-lactone extracted from plants or animals. To avoid feeding the yeast culture with this “L” enantiomer, we engineered Kluyveromyces lactis with L-galactose biosynthesis pathway genes: GDP-mannose 3,5-epimerase (GME), GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (VTC2) and L-galactose-1-phosphate phosphatase (VTC4) isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Plasmids were constructed and modified such that the cloned plant genes were targeted to the K. lactis LAC4 Locus by homologous recombination and that the expression was associated to the growth on D-galactose or lactose. Upon K. lactis transformation, GME was under the control of the native LAC4 promoter whereas VTC2 and VTC4 were expressed from the S. cerevisiae promoters GPD1 and ADH1 respectively. The expression in K. lactis, of the L-galactose biosynthesis genes was determined by Reverse Transcriptase-PCR and western blotting. The recombinant yeasts were capable to produce about 30 mg.L-1 of L-ascorbic acid in 48 hours of cultivation when cultured on rich medium with 2% (w/v) D-galactose. We also evaluated the L-AA production culturing recombinant recombinant strains in cheese whey, a waste product during cheese production, as an alternative source of lactose. Conclusions This work is the first attempt to engineer K. lactis cells for L-ascorbic acid biosynthesis by a fermentation process without any trace of “L” isomers precursors in the culture medium. We have engineered K. lactis

  4. Secretion and properties of a hybrid Kluyveromyces lactis-Aspergillus niger β-galactosidase

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Ángel Pereira; Leiro, Rafael Fernández; Trillo, M Cristina; Cerdán, M Esperanza; Siso, M Isabel González; Becerra, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Background The β-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis is a protein of outstanding biotechnological interest in the food industry and milk whey reutilization. However, due to its intracellular nature, its industrial production is limited by the high cost associated to extraction and downstream processing. The yeast-system is an attractive method for producing many heterologous proteins. The addition of a secretory signal in the recombinant protein is the method of choice to sort it out of the cell, although biotechnological success is not guaranteed. The cell wall acting as a molecular sieve to large molecules, culture conditions and structural determinants present in the protein, all have a decisive role in the overall process. Protein engineering, combining domains of related proteins, is an alternative to take into account when the task is difficult. In this work, we have constructed and analyzed two hybrid proteins from the β-galactosidase of K. lactis, intracellular, and its Aspergillus niger homologue that is extracellular. In both, a heterologous signal peptide for secretion was also included at the N-terminus of the recombinant proteins. One of the hybrid proteins obtained has interesting properties for its biotechnological utilization. Results The highest levels of intracellular and extracellular β-galactosidase were obtained when the segment corresponding to the five domain of K. lactis β-galactosidase was replaced by the corresponding five domain of the A. niger β-galactosidase. Taking into account that this replacement may affect other parameters related to the activity or the stability of the hybrid protein, a thoroughly study was performed. Both pH (6.5) and temperature (40°C) for optimum activity differ from values obtained with the native proteins. The stability was higher than the corresponding to the β-galactosidase of K. lactis and, unlike this, the activity of the hybrid protein was increased by the presence of Ni2+. The affinity for

  5. Safety of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B. lactis) strain BB-12-supplemented yogurt in healthy adults on antibiotics: a phase I safety study

    PubMed Central

    Merenstein, Daniel J; Tan, Tina P; Molokin, Aleksey; Smith, Keisha Herbin; Roberts, Robert F; Shara, Nawar M; Mete, Mihriye; Sanders, Mary Ellen; Solano-Aguilar, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that, when administered in sufficient doses, provide health benefits on the host. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires phase I safety studies for probiotics when the intended use of the product is as a drug. The purpose of the study was to determine the safety of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis (B. lactis) strain BB-12 (BB-12)-supplemented yogurt when consumed by a generally healthy group of adults who were prescribed a 10-day course of antibiotics for a respiratory infection. Secondary aims were to assess the ability of BB-12 to affect the expression of whole blood immune markers associated with cell activation and inflammatory response. A phase I, double-blinded, randomized controlled study was conducted in compliance with FDA guidelines for an Investigational New Drug (IND). Forty participants were randomly assigned to consume 4 ounces of either BB-12 -supplemented yogurt or non-supplemented control yogurt daily for 10 d. The primary outcome was to assess safety and tolerability, assessed by the number of reported adverse events. A total of 165 non-serious adverse events were reported, with no differences between the control and BB-12 groups. When compared to the control group, B lactis fecal levels were modestly higher in the BB-12-supplemented group. In a small subset of patients, changes in whole blood expression of genes associated with regulation and activation of immune cells were detected in the BB-12-supplemented group. BB-12-supplemented yogurt is safe and well tolerated when consumed by healthy adults concurrently taking antibiotics. This study will form the basis for future randomized clinical trials investigating the potential immunomodulatory effects of BB-12-supplemented yogurt in a variety of disease states. PMID:25569274

  6. Intranasal immunization with live recombinant Lactococcus lactis combined with heat-labile toxin B subunit protects chickens from highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus.

    PubMed

    Lei, Han; Peng, Xiaojue; Shu, Handing; Zhao, Daxian

    2015-01-01

    Development of safe and effective vaccines to prevent highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus infection is a challenging goal. Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) is an ideal delivery vector for vaccine development, and it has been shown previously that oral immunization of encapsulated secretory L. lactis-hemagglutinin (HA) could provide complete protection against homologous H5N1 virus challenge in the mice model. While intranasal immunization is an appealing approach, it is now reported that secretory L. lactis-HA combined with mucosal adjuvant heat-labile toxin B subunit (LTB) could provide protective immunity in the chicken model. As compared to intranasal immunization with L. lactis-HA alone, L. lactis-HA combined with LTB (L. lactis-HA + LTB) could elicit robust neutralizing antibody responses and mucosal IgA responses, as well as strong cellular immune responses in the vaccinated chickens. Importantly, intranasal immunization with L. lactis-HA + LTB could provide 100% protection against H5N1 virus challenge. Taken together, these results suggest that intranasal immunization with L. lactis-HA + LTB can be considered as an effective approach for preventing and controlling infection of H5N1 virus in poultry during an avian influenza A/H5N1 pandemic. PMID:24861477

  7. Secretion of biologically active human interleukin 22 (IL-22) by Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Loera-Arias, María J; Villatoro-Hernández, Julio; Parga-Castillo, Miguel A; Salcido-Montenegro, Alejandro; Barboza-Quintana, Oralia; Muñoz-Maldonado, Gerardo E; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, Roberto; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila

    2014-12-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) participates in the modulation of innate immunity and inflammation. This cytokine has important therapeutic potential, such as with ulcerative colitis, liver and lung injury, and infection, in different animal models. We generated a Lactococcus lactis strain that secretes human IL-22 under the regulation of the nisin-inducible promoter. Identification and secretion of this cytokine was demonstrated using western blots of culture supernatants from IL-22-expressing bacteria. The recombinant IL-22 protein produced by L. lactis was biologically active as determined by its ability to induce IL-10 secretion when co-cultured with a colon epithelial cell line in vitro. We consider this novel strain a promising live vaccine for various therapeutic applications. PMID:25214209

  8. Defined bacterial culture development for methane generation from lactose. [Streptococcus lactis; Clostridium formicoaceticum; Methanococcus mazei

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.T.; Tang, I.C.; Okos, M.R.

    1988-06-20

    The defined microbial cultures for methane generation from lactose were investigated. A mixed culture consisting of homolactic (Streptococcus lactis), homoacetic (Clostridium formicoaceticum), and acetate-utilizing methanogenic (Methanococcus mazei) bacteria was used to convert lactose and whey permeate to methane at mesophilic temperatures (35-37/sup 0/C) and a pH around 7.0. Lactose was first converted to lactic acid by S. lactis, then to acetic acid by C. formicoaceticum, and finally to methane and CO/sub 2/ by M. mazei. About 5.3 mol methane were obtained from each mole of lactose consumed, and the conversion of acetate to methane was the rate-limiting step for this mixed-culture fermentation.

  9. Nisin production from Lactococcus lactis A.T.C.C. 7962 using supplemented whey permeate.

    PubMed

    Flôres, S H; Alegre, R M

    2001-10-01

    The influence of pH control and aeration (20% dissolved oxygen) on nisin production in a supplemented cheese whey permeate was examined during batch fermentation with Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis A.T.C.C. 7962. A maximum nisin activity of 5280 i.u./ml of medium was observed in the raw extract of nisin after 9 h of fermentation with a constant pH at 4.9. However, the fermentation was continued until 24 h, when a decrease in the nisin activity was observed. The pH control did not influence the nisin production and aeration of the culture medium increased cell growth (biomass) but not nisin activity. The yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus, used as an alternative method to control pH, has not been efficient. PMID:11592916

  10. Construction and application of a food-grade expression system for Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenwei; Kong, Jian; Kong, Wentao

    2013-06-01

    A food-grade host/vector expression system for Lactococcus lactis was constructed using alanine racemase gene (alr) as the complementation marker. We obtained an alanine racemase auxotrophic mutant L. lactis NZ9000Δalr by double-crossover recombination using temperature-sensitive integration plasmid pG(+)host9 and a food-grade vector pALR with entirely lactococcal DNA elements, including lactococcal replicon, nisin-inducible promoter PnisA and the alr gene from Lactobacillus casei BL23 as a complementation marker. By using the new food-grade host/vector system, the green fluorescent protein and capsid protein of porcine circovirus type II were successfully overexpressed under the nisin induction. These results indicate that this food-grade host/vector expression system has application potential as an excellent antigen delivery vehicle, and is also suitable for the use in the manufacture of ingredients for the food industry. PMID:22674186

  11. Glycolic acid production in the engineered yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glycolic acid is a C2 hydroxy acid that is a widely used chemical compound. It can be polymerised to produce biodegradable polymers with excellent gas barrier properties. Currently, glycolic acid is produced in a chemical process using fossil resources and toxic chemicals. Biotechnological production of glycolic acid using renewable resources is a desirable alternative. Results The yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis are suitable organisms for glycolic acid production since they are acid tolerant and can grow in the presence of up to 50 g l-1 glycolic acid. We engineered S. cerevisiae and K. lactis for glycolic acid production using the reactions of the glyoxylate cycle to produce glyoxylic acid and then reducing it to glycolic acid. The expression of a high affinity glyoxylate reductase alone already led to glycolic acid production. The production was further improved by deleting genes encoding malate synthase and the cytosolic form of isocitrate dehydrogenase. The engineered S. cerevisiae strain produced up to about 1 g l-1 of glycolic acid in a medium containing d-xylose and ethanol. Similar modifications in K. lactis resulted in a much higher glycolic acid titer. In a bioreactor cultivation with d-xylose and ethanol up to 15 g l-1 of glycolic acid was obtained. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of engineering yeast to produce glycolic acid. Prior to this work glycolic acid production through the glyoxylate cycle has only been reported in bacteria. The benefit of a yeast host is the possibility for glycolic acid production also at low pH, which was demonstrated in flask cultivations. Production of glycolic acid was first shown in S. cerevisiae. To test whether a Crabtree negative yeast would be better suited for glycolic acid production we engineered K. lactis in the same way and demonstrated it to be a better host for glycolic acid production. PMID:24053654

  12. Production of a Particulate Hepatitis C Vaccine Candidate by an Engineered Lactococcus lactis Strain▿

    PubMed Central

    Parlane, Natalie A.; Grage, Katrin; Lee, Jason W.; Buddle, Bryce M.; Denis, Michel; Rehm, Bernd H. A.

    2011-01-01

    Vaccine delivery systems based on display of antigens on bioengineered bacterial polyester inclusions can stimulate cellular immune responses. The food-grade Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis was engineered to produce spherical polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) inclusions which abundantly displayed the hepatitis C virus core (HCc) antigen. In mice, the immune response induced by this antigen delivery system was compared to that induced by vaccination with HCc antigen displayed on PHB beads produced in Escherichia coli, to PHB beads without antigen produced in L. lactis or E. coli, or directly to the recombinant HCc protein. Vaccination site lesions were minimal in all mice vaccinated with HCc PHB beads or recombinant protein, all mixed in the oil-in-water adjuvant Emulsigen, while vaccination with the recombinant protein in complete Freund's adjuvant produced a marked inflammatory reaction at the vaccination site. Vaccination with the PHB beads produced in L. lactis and displaying HCc antigen produced antigen-specific cellular immune responses with significant release of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-17A (IL-17A) from splenocyte cultures and no significant antigen-specific serum antibody, while the PHB beads displaying HCc but produced in E. coli released IFN-γ and IL-17A as well as the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-6 and low levels of IgG2c antibody. In contrast, recombinant HCc antigen in Emulsigen produced a diverse cytokine response and a strong IgG1 antibody response. Overall it was shown that L. lactis can be used to produce immunogenic PHB beads displaying viral antigens, making the beads suitable for vaccination against viral infections. PMID:21984246

  13. Signal Peptide and Propeptide Optimization for Heterologous Protein Secretion in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Le Loir, Y.; Nouaille, S.; Commissaire, J.; Brétigny, L.; Gruss, A.; Langella, P.

    2001-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are food-grade microorganisms that are potentially good candidates for production of heterologous proteins of therapeutical or technological interest. We developed a model for heterologous protein secretion in Lactococcus lactis using the staphylococcal nuclease (Nuc). The effects on protein secretion of alterations in either (i) signal peptide or (ii) propeptide sequences were examined. (i) Replacement of the native Nuc signal peptide (SPNuc) by that of L. lactis protein Usp45 (SPUsp) resulted in greatly improved secretion efficiency (SE). Pulse-chase experiments showed that Nuc secretion kinetics was better when directed by SPUsp than when directed by SPNuc. This SPUsp effect on Nuc secretion is not due to a better antifolding activity, since SPUsp:Nuc precursor proteins display enzymatic activity in vitro, while SPNuc:Nuc precursor proteins do not. (ii) Deletion of the native Nuc propeptide dramatically reduces Nuc SE, regardless of which SP is used. We previously reported that a synthetic propeptide, LEISSTCDA, could efficiently replace the native Nuc propeptide to promote heterologous protein secretion in L. lactis (Y. Le Loir, A. Gruss, S. D. Ehrlich, and P. Langella, J. Bacteriol. 180:1895–1903, 1998). To determine whether the LEISSTCDA effect is due to its acidic residues, specific substitutions were introduced, resulting in neutral or basic propeptides. Effects of these two new propeptides and of a different acidic synthetic propeptide were tested. Acidic and neutral propeptides were equally effective in enhancing Nuc SE and also increased Nuc yields. In contrast, the basic propeptide strongly reduced both SE and the quantity of secreted Nuc. We have shown that the combination of the native SPUsp and a neutral or acidic synthetic propeptide leads to a significant improvement in SE and in the quantity of synthesized Nuc. These observations will be valuable in the production of heterologous proteins in L. lactis. PMID:11526014

  14. Acetate Utilization in Lactococcus lactis Deficient in Lactate Dehydrogenase: a Rescue Pathway for Maintaining Redox Balance

    PubMed Central

    Hols, Pascal; Ramos, Ana; Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Delcour, Jean; de Vos, Willem M.; Santos, Helena; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    1999-01-01

    Acetate was shown to improve glucose fermentation in Lactococcus lactis deficient in lactate dehydrogenase. 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance studies using [2-13C]glucose and [2-13C]acetate as substrates demonstrated that acetate was exclusively converted to ethanol. This novel pathway provides an alternative route for NAD+ regeneration in the absence of lactate dehydrogenase. PMID:10464231

  15. Enhance nisin yield via improving acid-tolerant capability of Lactococcus lactis F44.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Caiyin, Qinggele; Feng, Wenjing; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Bin; Zhao, Guangrong; Qiao, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, nisin was produced industrially by using Lactococcus lactis in the neutral fermentation process. However, nisin showed higher activity in the acidic environment. How to balance the pH value for bacterial normal growth and nisin activity might be the key problem. In this study, 17 acid-tolerant genes and 6 lactic acid synthetic genes were introduced in L. lactis F44, respectively. Comparing to the 2810 IU/mL nisin yield of the original strain F44, the nisin titer of the engineered strains over-expressing hdeAB, ldh and murG, increased to 3850, 3979 and 4377 IU/mL, respectively. These engineered strains showed more stable intracellular pH value during the fermentation process. Improvement of lactate production could partly provide the extra energy for the expression of acid tolerance genes during growth. Co-overexpression of hdeAB, murG, and ldh(Z) in strain F44 resulted in the nisin titer of 4913 IU/mL. The engineered strain (ABGL) could grow on plates with pH 4.2, comparing to the surviving pH 4.6 of strain F44. The fed-batch fermentation showed nisin titer of the co-expression L. lactis strain could reach 5563 IU/mL with lower pH condition and longer cultivation time. This work provides a novel strategy of constructing robust strains for use in industry process. PMID:27306587

  16. Biotechnological and safety characterization of Enterococcus lactis, a recently described species of dairy origin.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Stefano; Silvetti, Tiziana; Brasca, Milena

    2013-01-01

    The biotechnological and safety properties of a recently described enterococcal species, Enterococcus lactis, were investigated. With regard to the technological properties, in milk all the strains tested had weak acidifying and proteolytic activities, generally medium reduction activity over 24 h (-102 mV < Eh < -2 mV) and low lipolytic activity on tributyrin agar. The isolates were tested for resistance against 14 antibiotics and none of the studied strains were classified as resistant to clinically important antibiotics such as ampicillin, erythromycin, penicillin G, tetracycline and vancomycin. Furthermore, PCR-based detection did not identify any of the common genetic determinants for vancomycin, tetracycline and erythromycin resistance. The E. lactis strains showed good survival in simulated in vitro digestion and were able to inhibit the growth of Enterococcus durans, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Clostridium sporogenes, Clostridium tyrobutyricum and Pseudomonas syringae. Screening for enterocin structural genes showed that all isolates harboured the entP gene. The presence of nine virulence factor genes (cylA, asa1, gelE, hyl, esp, ace, efaA, hdc and tdc) was investigated by PCR and no virulence determinants were detected. This study highlights that the recently described E. lactis may be a potential source of novel strains with interesting features that could be used for fermented dairy foods. PMID:22961639

  17. Production of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance by Bifidobacterium lactis in skim milk supplemented with additives.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Fabio Andres Castillo; Domínguez, José Manuel; Converti, Attilio; Oliveira, Ricardo Pinheiro de Souza

    2015-08-01

    Bacteriocins are natural compounds used as food biopreservatives instead of chemical preservatives. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (Bifid. lactis) was shown to produce a bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) able to inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes selected as an indicator microorganism. To enhance this production by the strain Bifid. lactis BL 04, skim milk (SM) was used as a fermentation medium either in the presence or in the absence of yeast extract, Tween 80 or inulin as stimulating additives, and the results in terms of bacterial growth and BLIS production were compared with those obtained in a traditional high cost complex medium such as Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS). To this purpose, all the cultivations were carried out in flasks at 200 rpm under anaerobic conditions ensured by a nitrogen flowrate of 1.0 L/min for 48 h, and BLIS production was quantified by means of a modified agar diffusion assay at low values of both temperature and concentration of List. monocytogenes. Although all these ingredients were shown to exert positive influence on BLIS production in both media, yeast extract and SM were by far the best ingredient and the best medium, respectively, allowing for a BLIS production at the late exponential phase of 2000 AU/ml. PMID:25850555

  18. Excess of threonine compared with serine promotes threonine aldolase activity in Lactococcus lactis IL1403.

    PubMed

    Aller, Kadri; Adamberg, Kaarel; Reile, Indrek; Timarova, Veronica; Peebo, Karl; Vilu, Raivo

    2015-05-01

    Lactococcus lactis is an important lactic acid starter for food production as well as a cell factory for production of food grade additives, among which natural flavour production is one of the main interests of food producers. Flavour production is associated with the degradation of amino acids and comprehensive studies are required to elucidate mechanisms behind these pathways. In this study using chemically defined medium, labelled substrate and steady-state cultivation, new data for the catabolism of threonine in Lc. lactis have been obtained. The biosynthesis of glycine in this organism is associated with the catabolic pathways of glucose and serine. Nevertheless, if threonine concentration in the growth environment exceeds that of serine, threonine becomes the main source for glycine biosynthesis and the utilization of serine decreases. Also, the conversion of threonine to glycine was initiated by a threonine aldolase and this was the principal pathway used for threonine degradation. As in Streptococcus thermophilus, serine hydroxymethyltransferase in Lc. lactis may possess a secondary activity as threonine aldolase. Other catabolic pathways of threonine (e.g. threonine dehydrogenase and threonine dehydratase) were not detected. PMID:25743155

  19. Measuring Kinetic Dissociation/Association Constants Between Lactococcus lactis Bacteria and Mucins Using Living Cell Probes

    PubMed Central

    Le, Doan Thanh Lam; Guérardel, Yann; Loubière, Pascal; Mercier-Bonin, Muriel; Dague, Etienne

    2011-01-01

    In this work we focused on quantifying adhesion between Lactococcus lactis, the model for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and mucins. Interactions between two strains of L. lactis (IBB477 and MG1820 as control) and pig gastric mucin–based coating were measured and compared with the use of atomic force microscopy. Analysis of retraction force-distance curves shed light on the differential contributions of nonspecific and specific forces. An increased proportion of specific adhesive events was obtained for IBB477 (20% vs. 5% for the control). Blocking assays with free pig gastric mucin and its O-glycan moiety showed that oligosaccharides play a major (but not exclusive) role in L. lactis-mucins interactions. Specific interactions were analyzed in terms of kinetic constants. An increase in the loading rate of atomic force microscope tip led to a higher force between interacting biological entities, which was directly linked to the kinetic dissociation constant (Koff). Enhancing the contact time between the tip and the sample allowed an increase in the interaction probability, which can be related to the kinetic association constant (Kon). Variations in the loading rate and contact time enabled us to determine Kon (3.3 × 102 M−1·s−1) and Koff (0.46 s−1), and the latter was consistent with values given in the literature for sugar-protein interactions. PMID:22261074

  20. A virulent phage infecting Lactococcus garvieae, with homology to Lactococcus lactis phages.

    PubMed

    Eraclio, Giovanni; Tremblay, Denise M; Lacelle-Côté, Alexia; Labrie, Simon J; Fortina, Maria Grazia; Moineau, Sylvain

    2015-12-01

    A new virulent phage belonging to the Siphoviridae family and able to infect Lactococcus garvieae strains was isolated from compost soil. Phage GE1 has a prolate capsid (56 by 38 nm) and a long noncontractile tail (123 nm). It had a burst size of 139 and a latent period of 31 min. Its host range was limited to only two L. garvieae strains out of 73 tested. Phage GE1 has a double-stranded DNA genome of 24,847 bp containing 48 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Putative functions could be assigned to only 14 ORFs, and significant matches in public databases were found for only 17 ORFs, indicating that GE1 is a novel phage and its genome contains several new viral genes and encodes several new viral proteins. Of these 17 ORFs, 16 were homologous to deduced proteins of virulent phages infecting the dairy bacterium Lactococcus lactis, including previously characterized prolate-headed phages. Comparative genome analysis confirmed the relatedness of L. garvieae phage GE1 to L. lactis phages c2 (22,172 bp) and Q54 (26,537 bp), although its genome organization was closer to that of phage c2. Phage GE1 did not infect any of the 58 L. lactis strains tested. This study suggests that phages infecting different lactococcal species may have a common ancestor. PMID:26407890

  1. Bovine Rotavirus Nonstructural Protein 4 Produced by Lactococcus lactis Is Antigenic and Immunogenic

    PubMed Central

    Enouf, Vincent; Langella, Philippe; Commissaire, Jacqueline; Cohen, Jean; Corthier, Gérard

    2001-01-01

    Rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4) can induce diarrhea in mice. To get insight into the biological effects of NSP4, production of large quantities of this protein is necessary. We first tried to produce the protein in Escherichia coli, but the nsp4 gene proved to be unstable. The capacity of the generally regarded as safe organism Lactococcus lactis to produce NSP4 either intra- or extracellularly was then investigated by using the nisin-controlled expression system. Production of recombinant NSP4 (rNSP4) was observed in L. lactis for both locations. In spite of a very low secretion efficiency, the highest level of production was obtained with the fusion between a lactococcal signal peptide and rNSP4. Cultures of the rNSP4-secreting strain were injected into rabbits, and a specific immune response was elicited. The anti-rNSP4 antibodies produced in these rabbits recognized NSP4 in MA104 cells infected by rotavirus. We showed that L. lactis is able to produce antigenic and immunogenic rNSP4 and thus is a good organism for producing viral antigens. PMID:11282586

  2. Enhance nisin yield via improving acid-tolerant capability of Lactococcus lactis F44

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Caiyin, Qinggele; Feng, Wenjing; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Bin; Zhao, Guangrong; Qiao, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, nisin was produced industrially by using Lactococcus lactis in the neutral fermentation process. However, nisin showed higher activity in the acidic environment. How to balance the pH value for bacterial normal growth and nisin activity might be the key problem. In this study, 17 acid-tolerant genes and 6 lactic acid synthetic genes were introduced in L. lactis F44, respectively. Comparing to the 2810 IU/mL nisin yield of the original strain F44, the nisin titer of the engineered strains over-expressing hdeAB, ldh and murG, increased to 3850, 3979 and 4377 IU/mL, respectively. These engineered strains showed more stable intracellular pH value during the fermentation process. Improvement of lactate production could partly provide the extra energy for the expression of acid tolerance genes during growth. Co-overexpression of hdeAB, murG, and ldh(Z) in strain F44 resulted in the nisin titer of 4913 IU/mL. The engineered strain (ABGL) could grow on plates with pH 4.2, comparing to the surviving pH 4.6 of strain F44. The fed-batch fermentation showed nisin titer of the co-expression L. lactis strain could reach 5563 IU/mL with lower pH condition and longer cultivation time. This work provides a novel strategy of constructing robust strains for use in industry process. PMID:27306587

  3. Recyclable Strategy for the Production of High-Purity Galacto-oligosaccharides by Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huaisheng; You, Shengping; Wang, Mengfan; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2016-07-20

    A recyclable strategy for the production of high-purity (>95%) galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) was developed using Kluyveromyces lactis in both the synthesis and purification steps. For the synthesis of GOS, ethanol-permeabilized cells (p-cells) of K. lactis were used because the enhanced permeability facilitated the mass transfer of the substrate and the release of oligosaccharide products. For the purification of GOS, non-permeabilized K. lactis cells (np-cells) were preferred as a result of their intrinsic cell membrane barrier toward GOS, which led to the selective consumption of carbohydrate. In this way, undesired glucose, galactose, and lactose in the raw GOS solution can be completely removed. This strategy is recyclable not only because of the high stability and reusability of p-cells and np-cells but also because the ethanol, which is simultaneously generated during the purification, can be reused for the preparation of p-cells. The strategy proposed in this study is a promising candidate for the efficient production of high-purity GOS. PMID:27366924

  4. Transcriptomic profile of aguR deletion mutant of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666

    PubMed Central

    del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M.; Redruello, Begoña; Martin, Maria Cruz; Fernandez, Maria; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Ladero, Victor; Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 (formerly GE2-14) is a dairy strain that catabolizes agmatine (a decarboxylated derivative of arginine) into the biogenic amine putrescine by the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway [1]. The AGDI cluster of L. lactis is composed by five genes aguR, aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC. The last four genes are responsible for the deamination of agmatine to putrescine and are co-transcribed as a single policistronic mRNA forming the catabolic operon aguBDAC[1]. aguR encodes a transmembrane protein that functions as a one-component signal transduction system that senses the agmatine concentration of the medium and accordingly regulates the transcription of aguBDAC[2], which is also transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) via glucose, but not by other sugars such as lactose and galactose [1], [3]. Here we report the transcriptional profiling of the aguR gene deletion mutant (L. lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 ∆aguR) [2] compared to the wild type strain, both grown in M17 medium with galactose as carbon source and supplemented with agmatine. The transcriptional profiling data of AguR-regulated genes were deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession no. GSE59514. PMID:26697381

  5. Genome-wide transcriptional responses to carbon starvation in nongrowing Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Onur; Wels, Michiel; Smid, Eddy J; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the transcriptional adaptations of nongrowing, retentostat cultures of Lactococcus lactis to starvation. Near-zero-growth cultures (μ = 0.0001 h(-1)) obtained by extended retentostat cultivation were exposed to starvation by termination of the medium supply for 24 h, followed by a recovery period of another 24 h by reinitiating the medium supply to the retentostat culture. During starvation, the viability of the culture was largely retained, and the expression of genes involved in transcription and translational machineries, cell division, and cell membrane energy metabolism was strongly repressed. Expression of these genes was largely recovered following the reinitiation of the medium supply. Starvation triggered the elevated expression of genes associated with synthesis of branched-chain amino acids, histidine, purine, and riboflavin. The expression of these biosynthesis genes was found to remain at an elevated level after reinitiation of the medium supply. In addition, starvation induced the complete gene set predicted to be involved in natural competence in L. lactis KF147, and the elevated expression of these genes was sustained during the subsequent recovery period, but our attempts to experimentally demonstrate natural transformation in these cells failed. Mining the starvation response gene set identified a conserved cis-acting element that resembles the lactococcal CodY motif in the upstream regions of genes associated with transcription and translational machineries, purine biosynthesis, and natural transformation in L. lactis, suggesting a role for CodY in the observed transcriptome adaptations to starvation in nongrowing cells. PMID:25636846

  6. Transcriptomic profile of aguR deletion mutant of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M; Redruello, Begoña; Martin, Maria Cruz; Fernandez, Maria; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Ladero, Victor; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-12-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 (formerly GE2-14) is a dairy strain that catabolizes agmatine (a decarboxylated derivative of arginine) into the biogenic amine putrescine by the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway [1]. The AGDI cluster of L. lactis is composed by five genes aguR, aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC. The last four genes are responsible for the deamination of agmatine to putrescine and are co-transcribed as a single policistronic mRNA forming the catabolic operon aguBDAC[1]. aguR encodes a transmembrane protein that functions as a one-component signal transduction system that senses the agmatine concentration of the medium and accordingly regulates the transcription of aguBDAC[2], which is also transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) via glucose, but not by other sugars such as lactose and galactose [1], [3]. Here we report the transcriptional profiling of the aguR gene deletion mutant (L. lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 ∆aguR) [2] compared to the wild type strain, both grown in M17 medium with galactose as carbon source and supplemented with agmatine. The transcriptional profiling data of AguR-regulated genes were deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession no. GSE59514. PMID:26697381

  7. Molecular and Metabolic Adaptations of Lactococcus lactis at Near-Zero Growth Rates

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, Onur; Wels, Michiel; Smid, Eddy J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the molecular and metabolic adaptations of Lactococcus lactis during the transition from a growing to a near-zero growth state by using carbon-limited retentostat cultivation. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that metabolic patterns shifted between lactic- and mixed-acid fermentations during retentostat cultivation, which appeared to be controlled at the level of transcription of the corresponding pyruvate dissipation-encoding genes. During retentostat cultivation, cells continued to consume several amino acids but also produced specific amino acids, which may derive from the conversion of glycolytic intermediates. We identify a novel motif containing CTGTCAG in the upstream regions of several genes related to amino acid conversion, which we propose to be the target site for CodY in L. lactis KF147. Finally, under extremely low carbon availability, carbon catabolite repression was progressively relieved and alternative catabolic functions were found to be highly expressed, which was confirmed by enhanced initial acidification rates on various sugars in cells obtained from near-zero-growth cultures. The present integrated transcriptome and metabolite (amino acids and previously reported fermentation end products) study provides molecular understanding of the adaptation of L. lactis to conditions supporting low growth rates and expands our earlier analysis of the quantitative physiology of this bacterium at near-zero growth rates toward gene regulation patterns involved in zero-growth adaptation. PMID:25344239

  8. A Virulent Phage Infecting Lactococcus garvieae, with Homology to Lactococcus lactis Phages

    PubMed Central

    Eraclio, Giovanni; Tremblay, Denise M.; Lacelle-Côté, Alexia; Labrie, Simon J.; Fortina, Maria Grazia

    2015-01-01

    A new virulent phage belonging to the Siphoviridae family and able to infect Lactococcus garvieae strains was isolated from compost soil. Phage GE1 has a prolate capsid (56 by 38 nm) and a long noncontractile tail (123 nm). It had a burst size of 139 and a latent period of 31 min. Its host range was limited to only two L. garvieae strains out of 73 tested. Phage GE1 has a double-stranded DNA genome of 24,847 bp containing 48 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Putative functions could be assigned to only 14 ORFs, and significant matches in public databases were found for only 17 ORFs, indicating that GE1 is a novel phage and its genome contains several new viral genes and encodes several new viral proteins. Of these 17 ORFs, 16 were homologous to deduced proteins of virulent phages infecting the dairy bacterium Lactococcus lactis, including previously characterized prolate-headed phages. Comparative genome analysis confirmed the relatedness of L. garvieae phage GE1 to L. lactis phages c2 (22,172 bp) and Q54 (26,537 bp), although its genome organization was closer to that of phage c2. Phage GE1 did not infect any of the 58 L. lactis strains tested. This study suggests that phages infecting different lactococcal species may have a common ancestor. PMID:26407890

  9. The Nanomechanical Properties of Lactococcus lactis Pili Are Conditioned by the Polymerized Backbone Pilin

    PubMed Central

    Castelain, Mickaël; Duviau, Marie-Pierre; Canette, Alexis; Schmitz, Philippe; Loubière, Pascal; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Piard, Jean-Christophe; Mercier-Bonin, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Pili produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis are putative linear structures consisting of repetitive subunits of the major pilin PilB that forms the backbone, pilin PilA situated at the distal end of the pilus, and an anchoring pilin PilC that tethers the pilus to the peptidoglycan. We determined the nanomechanical properties of pili using optical-tweezers force spectroscopy. Single pili were exposed to optical forces that yielded force-versus-extension spectra fitted using the Worm-Like Chain model. Native pili subjected to a force of 0–200 pN exhibit an inextensible, but highly flexible ultrastructure, reflected by their short persistence length. We tested a panel of derived strains to understand the functional role of the different pilins. First, we found that both the major pilin PilB and sortase C organize the backbone into a full-length organelle and dictate the nanomechanical properties of the pili. Second, we found that both PilA tip pilin and PilC anchoring pilin were not essential for the nanomechanical properties of pili. However, PilC maintains the pilus on the bacterial surface and may play a crucial role in the adhesion- and biofilm-forming properties of L. lactis. PMID:27010408

  10. A bacteriocin gene cluster able to enhance plasmid maintenance in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lactococcus lactis is widely used as a dairy starter and has been extensively studied. Based on the acquired knowledge on its physiology and metabolism, new applications have been envisaged and there is an increasing interest of using L. lactis as a cell factory. Plasmids constitute the main toolbox for L. lactis genetic engineering and most rely on antibiotic resistant markers for plasmid selection and maintenance. In this work, we have assessed the ability of the bacteriocin Lactococcin 972 (Lcn972) gene cluster to behave as a food-grade post-segregational killing system to stabilize recombinant plasmids in L. lactis in the absence of antibiotics. Lcn972 is a non-lantibiotic bacteriocin encoded by the 11-kbp plasmid pBL1 with a potent antimicrobial activity against Lactococcus. Results Attempts to clone the full lcn972 operon with its own promoter (P972), the structural gene lcn972 and the immunity genes orf2-orf3 in the unstable plasmid pIL252 failed and only plasmids with a mutated promoter were recovered. Alternatively, cloning under other constitutive promoters was approached and achieved, but bacteriocin production levels were lower than those provided by pBL1. Segregational stability studies revealed that the recombinant plasmids that yielded high bacteriocin titers were maintained for at least 200 generations without antibiotic selection. In the case of expression vectors such as pTRL1, the Lcn972 gene cluster also contributed to plasmid maintenance without compromising the production of the fluorescent mCherry protein. Furthermore, unstable Lcn972 recombinant plasmids became integrated into the chromosome through the activity of insertion sequences, supporting the notion that Lcn972 does apply a strong selective pressure against susceptible cells. Despite of it, the Lcn972 gene cluster was not enough to avoid the use of antibiotics to select plasmid-bearing cells right after transformation. Conclusions Inserting the Lcn972 cluster into