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Sample records for bacteremia

  1. Recurrent Escherichia coli bacteremia.

    PubMed Central

    Maslow, J N; Mulligan, M E; Arbeit, R D

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common gram-negative organism associated with bacteremia. While recurrent E. coli urinary tract infections are well-described, recurrent E. coli bacteremia appears to be uncommon, with no episodes noted in multiple series of patients with gram-negative bacteremias. We report on 5 patients with recurrent bloodstream infections identified from a series of 163 patients with E. coli bacteremia. For each patient, the isolates from each episode were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and ribotyping and for the presence of E. coli virulence factors. For each of four patients, the index and recurrent episodes of bacteremia represented the same strain as defined by PFGE, and the strains were found to carry one or more virulence factors. The remaining patient, with two episodes of bloodstream infection separated by a 4-year interval, was infected with two isolates that did not carry any virulence factors and that were clonally related by ribotype analysis but differed by PFGE. All five patients had either a local host defense defect (three patients) or impaired systemic defenses (one patient) or both (one patient). Thus, recurrent E. coli bacteremia is likely to represent a multifactorial process that occurs in patients with impaired host defenses who are infected with virulent isolates. Images PMID:7910828

  2. Helicobacter fennelliae Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Sho; Tsukahara, Mika; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Kurai, Hanako

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Helicobacter fennelliae is a gram-negative, spiral bacillus that appears as thin-spread colonies on sheep blood agar and is similar to Helicobacter cinaedi. H fennelliae is diagnosed by genetic testing, which is not readily available in all laboratories. Therefore, H fennelliae bacteremia has only been reported sporadically, and little is known about its clinical characteristics. We describe 3 cases of H fennelliae bacteremia with gastrointestinal symptoms, including nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Isolates could be differentiated from H cinaedi by biochemical reaction testing, including nitrate reduction and alkaline phosphatase hydrolysis. We retrospectively reviewed 24 cases of H fennelliae bacteremia reported in the literature. Most of the patients had immunosuppressive backgrounds, including solid tumors, hematological malignancies, and autoimmune diseases. Although gastrointestinal symptoms were common, cellulitis was not often observed in patients with H fennelliae bacteremia. Clinicians should bear in mind that H fennelliae may be a differential diagnosis in patients with gastrointestinal manifestations and gram-negative, spiral bacilli. In addition, biochemical reactions, such as nitrate reduction and alkaline phosphatase hydrolysis, are useful in differentiating H fennelliae from H cinaedi. PMID:27149471

  3. Dietzia papillomatosis bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Rammer, Paul; Calum, Henrik; Moser, Claus; Björnsdóttir, Maria K; Smedegaard, Heidi; Høiby, Niels; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    The clinical significance of Dietzia papillomatosis is for the moment limited to the rare skin disease confluent and reticulated papillomatosis. We present a case of infection with D. papillomatosis in a 2-year-old boy with known syringomyelia. The microbiological diagnosis was done using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. This is the first report of bacteremia with D. papillomatosis. PMID:23536398

  4. Bacteremia Caused by Kerstersia gyiorum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cecelia; Manninen, Katja; Touchberry, Joanne; Greene, Shermalyn R.; Holland, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Kerstersia spp. are an unusual cause of human infections. We report the first known case of bacteremia and sepsis due to Kerstersia gyiorum, in a patient with chronic lower-extremity ulcers, and we review the literature on this uncommon pathogen. PMID:25809974

  5. Bacteremia caused by Desulfovibrio fairfieldensis.

    PubMed

    Urata, Teruo; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Hino, Taro; Yoda, Yusuke; Tamai, Kiyoko; Kodaira, Yoshiya; Hitomi, Shigemi

    2008-10-01

    Desulfovibrio species are anaerobic gram-negative, pleomorphic bacilli rarely causing infection in humans. In the present report, we describe a case of bacteremia caused by Desulfovibrio fairfieldensis. The patient, for whom biapenem was administered, rapidly improved without any sequelae. As far as we know, this is the first case report of infection by Desulfovibrio species in Japan. PMID:18936890

  6. Bacteriology of viridans streptococcal bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Chang, S C; Luh, K T; Deng, L J; Hsieh, W C

    1987-11-01

    In order to assess the species distribution and the antibiotic susceptibility of viridans streptococci in various human infections, we reviewed 164 cases of viridans streptococcal bacteremia seen at the National Taiwan University Hospital between May 1981 and April 1987. The organisms were isolated from 83 patients with endocarditis. Among 81 nonendocarditis patients, only 54 had clinically recognizable foci of suppurative inflammation. Mainly based on API 20 STREP system of species identification, S. sanguis II accounted for 24.4%; S. mitis, 20.7%; S. sanguis I, 20.1%; and S. milleri 2, 11.6% of the 164 cases studied. Of 83 endocarditis patients, 27.7% were S. sanguis I; 21.7%, S. sanguis II; and 16.9%, S. mitis. In nonendocarditis bacteremia with known suppurative lesions, 3 most often isolated organisms were S. sanguis II (24.0%), S. mitis (24.0%), and S. milleri 2 (24.0%). In nonendocarditis bacteremia without suppurative infection, the most frequent isolates were S. sanguis II (33.3%) and S. mitis (25.9%). In terms of relative frequency between endocarditis and nonendocarditis cases, S. mutan, S. sanguis I, and S. bovis had the highest frequency ratio of 7:1, 3.5:1, and 1.5:1, respectively. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin G, ampicillin, and cephalothin. Tetracycline resistance, however, were observed in 35.4% of the isolates; oxacillin resistance, 11.0%; and erythromycin resistance, 9.1%. PMID:3449320

  7. Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Latos, D L; Stone, W J; Alford, R H

    1977-01-01

    Fifteen male hemodialysis patients developed 21 episodes of S. aureus bacteremia. Infections involving vascular access were responsible for 65% of initial bacteremias. The arteriovenous fistula was the most prevalent type of access used, and thus was responsible for the majority of these illnesses. Phage typing indicated that recurrent episodes were due to reinfection rather than relapse. Complications included endocarditis, osteomyelitis, septic embolism, and pericarditis. One patient died of infectious complications. It is recommended that hemodialysis patients developing bacteremia due to S. aureus receive at least 6 weeks of beta lactamase-resistant antimicrobial therapy. PMID:608860

  8. Actinomyces turicensis Bacteremia Secondary to Pyometra.

    PubMed

    Hagiya, Hideharu; Ogawa, Hiroko; Takahashi, Yusuke; Kimura, Kosuke; Hasegawa, Kan; Otsuka, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    We herein present a rare case of Actinomyces turicensis bacteremia that was caused by pyometra. The patient was successfully treated with transvaginal drainage and antibiotic therapy. A literature review in MEDLINE showed that there have been only 8 previously reported cases of A. turicensis bacteremia. This infection frequently occurs in patients with visceral abscesses, and blood culture examinations usually reveal a polymicrobial pattern. However, the prognosis of such patients has been reported to generally be benign. Due to difficulties in performing bacterial identification and the wide-spectrum clinical pictures associated with this bacteremia, no comprehensive understanding of the clinical features of each Actinomyces species has yet been established. PMID:26521910

  9. Retrospective analysis of bacteremia because of Enterobacter cloacae compared with Escherichia coli bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Juanjuan, D; Zhiyong, Z; Xiaoju, L; Yali, X; Xihai, Z; Zhenzhen, L

    2007-04-01

    A total of 52 patients of Enterobacter cloacae bacteremia from a University hospital during the period from January 2000 to June 2005 were analysed and compared with a reference group comprising 52 patients of Escherichia coli bacteremia. Overall, E. cloacae ranked the tenth in all pathogens of bacteremia accounting for 2.8% of the total patients. Although the incidence of E. cloacae bacteremia was low, the attributable mortality rate till achieved 13.5%. Most patients (86.5%) with E. cloacae bacteremia were hospital-acquired. The overwhelming majority of patients (92.3%) were men, while almost half of the patients (48.1%) were from the Department of Urological Surgery with underlying diseases such as urinal obstruction, kidney transplantation and kidney tumours. Possible risks factors associated with E. cloacae bacteremia included immunocompromised status, long-term hospitalisation and invasive procedures or surgeries. E. cloacae bacteremia significantly differed from E. coli bacteremia in a number of clinical aspects, including underlying diseases, portal of entry, infection type, risks factors, laboratory findings and appropriateness of empirical antibiotic therapy. Besides the high prevalence of resistance to cephalosporins, most E. cloacae blood isolates were also resistant to ciprofloxacin (resistance rate, 67.3%), gentamicin (73.1%) and tobramycin (73.1%). Based on the findings of the present study, E. cloacae is probably an important pathogen of bacteremia occurring in male patients with underlying urinal system illnesses. PMID:17394432

  10. Bacteremia

    MedlinePlus

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  11. Bacteremia in Kenyan children presenting with malaria.

    PubMed

    Were, T; Davenport, G C; Hittner, J B; Ouma, C; Vulule, J M; Ong'echa, J M; Perkins, D J

    2011-02-01

    Since the etiologies and clinical outcomes of bacteremia in children with Plasmodium falciparum infections, particularly in areas of holoendemic malaria transmission, are largely unexplored, blood cultures and comprehensive clinical, laboratory, hematological, and nutritional parameters for malaria-infected children (aged 1 to 36 months, n = 585 patients) were investigated at a rural hospital in western Kenya. After the exclusion of contaminant microorganisms, the prevalence of bacteremia was 11.7% in the cohort (n = 506), with nontyphoidal Salmonella spp. being the most common isolates (42.4%). Bacteremia was found to occur in a significantly higher proportion of females than males and was associated with elevated blood glucose concentrations and lowered malaria parasite and hemoglobin (Hb) levels compared to those in abacteremic participants. In addition, the incidences of respiratory distress and severe malarial anemia (SMA; Hb level of <6.0 g/dl) were nonsignificantly greater in children with bacteremia. Mortality was 8.5-fold higher in children with bacteremia. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that bacteremia was significantly associated with reduced incidences of high-density parasitemia (HDP; ≥ 10,000/μl) and increased incidences of malnutrition (i.e., underweight; weight-for-age Z score of <-2 using the NCHS system). Since previous studies showed that bacteremia caused by Gram-negative organisms is associated with enhanced anemia and mortality, multivariate logistic regression was also performed separately for randomly age- and gender-matched children with bacteremia caused by Gram-negative organisms (n = 37) and for children found to be abacteremic (n = 74). These results revealed that the presence of bacteremia caused by Gram-negative organisms was significantly associated with reduced HDP, enhanced susceptibility to respiratory distress, SMA (Hb level of <6.0 g/dl), and being underweight (Z score, <-2). Data presented here from a

  12. Clinical Management of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Thomas L.; Arnold, Christopher; Fowler, Vance G.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Several management strategies may improve outcomes in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB). The strength of evidence supporting these management strategies, however, varies widely. Objective To perform a systematic review of the evidence for two unresolved questions involving management strategies for SAB: 1) is transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) necessary in all cases of SAB; and 2) what is the optimal antibiotic therapy for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia? Evidence acquisition A PubMed search from inception through May 2014 was performed to find studies that addressed the role of TEE in SAB. A second search of PubMed, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library from 1/1/1990 to 5/28/2014 was performed to find studies that addressed antibiotic treatment of MRSA bacteremia. Studies that reported outcomes of systemic antibiotic therapy for MRSA bacteremia were included. All searches were augmented by review of bibliographic references from included studies. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE system by consensus of independent evaluations by at least two authors. Results In 9 studies with a total of 3513 patients, use of TEE was associated with higher rates of diagnosis of endocarditis (14–25%) when compared with TTE (2–14%). Five studies proposed criteria to identify patients in whom TEE might safely be avoided. Only one high-quality trial of antibiotic therapy for MRSA bacteremia was identified from the 83 studies considered. Conclusions and relevance Most contemporary management strategies for SAB are based upon low quality evidence. TEE is indicated in most patients with SAB. It may be possible to identify a subset of SAB patients for whom TEE can be safely avoided. Vancomycin and daptomycin are the first-line antibiotic choices for MRSA bacteremia. Well-designed studies to address the management of SAB are desperately needed. PMID:25268440

  13. Catheter-related bacteremia by Cupriavidus metallidurans.

    PubMed

    D'Inzeo, Tiziana; Santangelo, Rosaria; Fiori, Barbara; De Angelis, Giulia; Conte, Viola; Giaquinto, Alessia; Palucci, Ivana; Scoppettuolo, Giancarlo; Di Florio, Viviana; Giani, Tommaso; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Spanu, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus bacteremia is a rare infection and identification of the pathogen is difficult. We present four cases of bacteremia by Cupriavidus metallidurans that were initially identified to the genus level by both Bruker and Vitek matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and later identified to the species level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. To our knowledge, these are the first cases of C. metallidurans catheter-related infections. Patients were successfully treated with antibiotic therapy and catheter removal. PMID:25446890

  14. Update on detection of bacteremia and fungemia.

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, L G; Wilson, M L; Weinstein, M P

    1997-01-01

    The presence of microorganisms in a patient's blood is a critical determinant of the severity of the patient's illness. Equally important, the laboratory isolation and identification of a microorganism present in blood determine the etiologic agent of infection, especially when the site of infection is localized and difficult to access. This review addresses the pathophysiology and clinical characteristics of bacteremia, fungemia, and sepsis; diagnostic strategies and critical factors in the detection of positive blood cultures; characteristics of manual and instrument approaches to bacteremia detection; approaches for isolating specific microorganisms associated with positive blood cultures; and rapid methods for the identification of microorganisms in blood cultures. PMID:9227861

  15. Presumed and definite bacteremia in extremely low gestational age newborns

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sonal; Dammann, Olaf; Martin, Camilia R.; Allred, Elizabeth N.; Leviton, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Aim To explore risk patterns for presumed and definite, early and late neonatal bacteremia. Methods We studied 1106 ELGANs who survived until postnatal day 28. We defined early definite bacteremia as a positive bacterial culture in the first week and definite late bacteremia as a positive bacterial culture in week 2, 3 or 4. Bacteremia was presumed if antibiotics were given for more than 72 hours despite negative blood cultures. Results Risk patterns did not differ much for presumed and definite bacteremia in the first postnatal month. While maternal and pregnancy characteristics were associated with early bacteremia, neonatal co-morbidities, especially NEC, were the main antecedents/correlates of late bacteremia. All four categories of bacteremia were associated with younger gestational age and lower birth weight. Infants with presumed and definite bacteremia had similar distributions of days of ventilation and oxygenation. Conclusion Definite and presumed late bacteremia have rather similar risk patterns, while those of early and late bacteremia differ appreciably. PMID:20712830

  16. Fatal Case of Listeria innocua Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Monique; Bemer, Michel; Delamare, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    Listeria innocua is widespread in the environment and in food. This species has to date never been described in association with human disease. We report a case of fatal bacteremia caused by L. innocua in a 62-year-old patient. PMID:14605191

  17. Pyelonephritis and Bacteremia from Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    PubMed Central

    DuPrey, Kevin M.; McCrea, Leon; Rabinowitch, Bonnie L.; Azad, Kamran N.

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacilli are normal colonizers of the oropharynx, gastrointestinal tract, and vagina. Infection is rare, but has been reported in individuals with predisposing conditions. Here we describe the case of a woman with pyelonephritis and bacteremia in which Lactobacillus delbrueckii was determined to be the causative agent. PMID:23056967

  18. Molecular Epidemiology of Enterococcal Bacteremia in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Julie C.; Daley, Denise A.; Le, Tam; Robinson, Owen J.; Gottlieb, Thomas; Howden, Benjamin P.; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Bennett, Catherine M.; Stinear, Timothy P.; Turnidge, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Enterococci are a major cause of health care-associated infections and account for approximately 10% of all bacteremias globally. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of enterococcal bacteremia isolates in Australia that are antimicrobial resistant, with particular emphasis on susceptibility to ampicillin and the glycopeptides, and to characterize the molecular epidemiology of the Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolates. From 1 January to 31 December 2011, 1,079 unique episodes of bacteremia were investigated, of which 95.8% were caused by either E. faecalis (61.0%) or E. faecium (34.8%). The majority of bacteremias were health care associated, and approximately one-third were polymicrobial. Ampicillin resistance was detected in 90.4% of E. faecium isolates but was not detected in E. faecalis isolates. Vancomycin nonsusceptibility was reported in 0.6% and 36.5% of E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates, respectively. Unlike Europe and the United States, where vancomycin resistance in E. faecium is predominately due to the acquisition of the vanA operon, 98.4% of E. faecium isolates harboring van genes carried the vanB operon, and 16.1% of the vanB E. faecium isolates had vancomycin MICs at or below the susceptible breakpoint of the CLSI. Although molecular typing identified 126 E. faecalis pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pulsotypes, >50% belonged to two pulsotypes that were isolated across Australia. E. faecium consisted of 73 pulsotypes from which 43 multilocus sequence types were identified. Almost 90% of the E. faecium isolates were identified as CC17 clones, of which approximately half were characterized as ST203, which was isolated Australia-wide. In conclusion, the Australian Enterococcal Sepsis Outcome Programme (AESOP) study has shown that although they are polyclonal, enterococcal bacteremias in Australia are frequently caused by ampicillin-resistant vanB E. faecium. PMID:24391201

  19. Systemic responses of preterm newborns with presumed or documented bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Leviton, Alan; O’Shea, T. Michael; Bednarek, Francis J.; Allred, Elizabeth N.; Fichorova, Raina N.; Dammann, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Aim To compare the frequency of elevated concentrations of inflammation-related proteins in the blood of infants born before the 28th week of gestation who had documented bacteremia to those who had presumed (antibiotic-treated but culture-negative) bacteremia to those who neither. Methods The subjects of this study are the 868 infants born at 14 institutions for whom information about protein measurements on at least two of the three protocol days (days 1, 7, and 14) was available and who did not have Bell stage 3 necrotizing enterocolitis or isolated bowel perforation, which were strongly associated with bacteremia in this sample. Results Newborns with presumed early (week 1) bacteremia had elevated concentrations of only a few inflammation-related proteins, while those who had presumed late (weeks 2–4) bacteremia did not have any elevations. In contrast, newborns who had documented early bacteremia had a moderately strong signal, while those who had documented late bacteremia had a stronger signal with more protein concentrations elevated on two separate occasions a week apart. Conclusions Culture-confirmed early and late bacteremia are accompanied/followed by systemic inflammatory responses not seen with presumed early and late bacteremia. PMID:22085230

  20. Clinical Implications of Species Identification in Monomicrobial Aeromonas Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chi-Jung; Chen, Po-Lin; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Chang, Ming-Chung; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Shih, Hsin-I; Wang, Hsuan-Chen; Chou, Pei-Hsin; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Background Advances in Aeromonas taxonomy have led to the reclassification of aeromonads. Hereon, we aimed to re-evaluate the characteristics of Aeromonas bacteremia, including those of a novel species, Aeromonas dhakensis. Methodology/Principal Findings A retrospective study of monomicrobial Aeromonas bacteremia at a medical center in southern Taiwan from 2004–2011 was conducted. Species identification was based on rpoB sequencing. Of bacteremia of 153 eligible patients, A. veronii (50 isolates, 32.7%), A. dhakensis (48, 31.4%), A. caviae (43, 28.1%), and A. hydrophila (10, 6.5%) were the principal causative species. A. dhakensis and A. veronii bacteremia were mainly community-acquired and presented as primary bacteremia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, or skin and soft-tissue infection, whereas A. caviae was associated with hospital-onset bacteremia. The distribution of the AmpC β-lactamase and metallo-β-lactamase genes was species-specific: blaAQU-1, blaMOX, or blaCepH was present in A. dhakensis, A. caviae, or A. hydrophila, respectively, and blaCphA was present in A. veronii, A. dhakensis, and A. hydrophila. The cefotaxime resistance rates of the A. caviae, A. dhakensis, and A. hydrophila isolates were higher than that of A. veronii (39.5%%, 25.0%, and 30% vs. 2%, respectively). A. dhakensis bacteremia was linked to the highest 14-day sepsis-related mortality rate, followed by A. hydrophila, A. veronii, and A. caviae bacteremia (25.5%, 22.2%, 14.0%, and 4.7%, respectively; P = 0.048). Multivariate analysis revealed that A. dhakensis bacteremia, active malignancies, and a Pitt bacteremia score ≥ 4 was an independent mortality risk factor. Conclusions/Significance Characteristics of Aeromonas bacteremia vary between species. A. dhakensis prevalence and its associated poor outcomes suggest it an important human pathogen. PMID:25679227

  1. Actinobaculum schaalii bacteremia: A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Non, Lemuel R; Nazinitsky, Allison; Gonzalez, Mark D; Burnham, Carey-Ann D; Patel, Rupa

    2015-08-01

    We report two cases of bacteremia with Actinobaculum schaalii, a rarely reported, anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium. The first case was a patient with renal cancer who developed pyelonephritis after cryoablation, and the second was a patient who developed sepsis after a urogenital procedure. Bacteremia resolved after administration of empiric antibiotic therapy. PMID:25881498

  2. The incidence and prognosis of patients with bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Stig Lønberg

    2015-07-01

    Bacteremia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, and ranks among the top seven causes of death in Europe and North America. The occurrence of bacteremia has increased for decades while short-term prognosis has remained unchanged or improved only slightly. Consequently, we are facing an increased number of bacteremia survivors for whom we know little about long-term survival and causes of death. Contemporary knowledge on the epidemiology and outcome of bacteremia is important to assess its impact on public health and is a prerequisite for any effective prevention and improvement of prognosis. This thesis is based on data from a bacteremia database (The Danish Observational Registry of Infectious Syndromes) comprising all bacteremias in Funen County, Denmark, between May 1999 and December 2008. Data on bacteremias were cross-linked with various administrative and research healthcare registries and we conducted 3 studies on adult bacteremia patients with the aims: to investigate the occurrence of and trends in first-time bacteremia and distribution of microorganisms in the general population; overall and by place of acquisition (study I), to investigate the overall and daily incidences of bacteremia among hospitalized patients (study II), to investigate and compare long-term mortality and causes of death after bacteremia with the general population (study III). Study I: In a population-based observational study, we identified 7786 residents of Funen County with first-time bacteremia for an overall incidence rate of 215.7 per 100,000 person years including 99.0 for community-acquired, 50.0 for healthcare-associated and 66.7 for nosocomial bacteremia. The overall incidence rate decreased by 23.3% (95% CI, 17.8%-28.4%) from year 2000 to 2008 (3.3% per year, p<.001) due to decreasing rates of community-acquired bacteremia (3.7% per year, p < <0.001) and nosocomial bacteremia (4.2% per year, p<0.001). The incidence rate of healthcare-associated bacteremia

  3. Clinical characteristics and significance of Streptococcus salivarius bacteremia and Streptococcus bovis bacteremia: a prospective 16-year study.

    PubMed

    Corredoira, J C; Alonso, M P; García, J F; Casariego, E; Coira, A; Rodriguez, A; Pita, J; Louzao, C; Pombo, B; López, M J; Varela, J

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical significance of Streptococcus salivarius isolates recovered from blood cultures and compare them with isolates of Streptococcus bovis biotypes I and II. Seventeen of the 52 (32%) S. salivarius isolates recovered were considered clinically significant, compared with 62 of the 64 (97%) S. bovis isolates (p<0.0001). Bacteremia caused by S. salivarius occurred mostly in patients who showed relevant disruption of the mucous membranes and/or serious underlying diseases. Patients with S. salivarius bacteremia were younger than those with S. bovis bacteremia (57 vs. 67 years; p<0.01). Patients with S. salivarius bacteremia and patients with S. bovis II bacteremia had similar rates of endocarditis, colon tumors, and non-colon cancer. On the other hand, when compared with S. bovis I bacteremia, S. salivarius bacteremia was associated with lower rates of endocarditis (18% vs. 74%, respectively) (p<0.01) and colon tumors (0% vs. 57%, respectively) (p<0.005) and higher rates of non-colon cancer (53% vs. 9.5%, respectively) (p<0.01). Bacteremia caused by S. bovis II had a hepatobiliary origin in 50% of the patients, while, in contrast, that due to S. salivarius or S. bovis I was less frequently associated with a hepatobiliary origin (12% and 5%, respectively) (p<0.00001). The rate of penicillin resistance was 31% among S. salivarius isolates and 0% among S. bovis isolates (p<0.0001). In conclusion, the clinical characteristics of S. salivarius bacteremia and S. bovis II bacteremia are similar, and the isolation of S. salivarius in blood should not be systematically regarded as contamination. PMID:15902530

  4. [Bacteremia by Kocuria rosea in an AIDS patient].

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; Villafañe, María F; Soto, Isabel; Palmieri, Omar; Callejo, Raquel

    2012-06-01

    Kocuria rosea is an uncommon pathogen may cause opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patient. We report a HIV patient, who presented bacteremia caused by Kocuria rosea. He was successfully treated with vancomycin and by catheter removal. PMID:23096480

  5. The comparison of bacteremia and amount of bleeding during septoplasty.

    PubMed

    Koc, Sema; Uysal, Ismail Onder; Uysal, Elif Bilge; Yenişehirli, Gülgün; Duygu, Fazilet

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the amount of bleeding and bacteremia during nasal septal surgery. Seventy-one patients undergoing septoplasty were enrolled in the present study. The amount of bleeding was measured and recorded for each patient. Preoperative and postoperative blood cultures were collected immediately after the induction of anesthesia and 20 min after the operation, respectively. While none of the blood cultures taken preoperatively were positive for any organism, the cultures obtained postoperatively were positive in 9 (12.7%) of 71 patients who underwent septoplasty, and bacteremia was more frequent among those with a greater amount of bleeding during the surgery. The results of this study suggest that although bacteremia had no clinical consequences for patients, patients with more bleeding have an increased risk of developing bacteremia which may cause complications in higher risk individuals. PMID:22037718

  6. Enterococcus hirae Bacteremia Associated with Acute Pancreatitis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V.; De Aguirre, Manuel; Divito, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Enterococcus hirae has rarely been reported in humans but is not uncommon in mammals and birds. We describe a case of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia associated with acute pancreatitis, acute cholecystitis, and septic shock responsive to antibiotic therapy and supportive critical care management. Unique aspects of this case of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia are its association with acute pancreatitis and its geographical origin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia occurring in a patient in the United States. Although human infection with this organism appears to be rare, all cases reported to date describe bacteremia associated with severe and life-threatening illness. Thus, physicians need to be cognizant of the clinical significance of this heretofore little recognized pathogen. PMID:26417465

  7. Clinical review: Bacteremia caused by anaerobic bacteria in children

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Itzhak

    2002-01-01

    This review describes the microbiology, diagnosis and management of bacteremia caused by anaerobic bacteria in children. Bacteroides fragilis, Peptostreptococcus sp., Clostridium sp., and Fusobacterium sp. were the most common clinically significant anaerobic isolates. The strains of anaerobic organisms found depended, to a large extent, on the portal of entry and the underlying disease. Predisposing conditions include: malignant neoplasms, immunodeficiencies, chronic renal insufficiency, decubitus ulcers, perforation of viscus and appendicitis, and neonatal age. Organisms identical to those causing anaerobic bacteremia can often be recovered from other infected sites that may have served as a source of persistent bacteremia. When anaerobes resistant to penicillin are suspected or isolated, antimicrobial drugs such as clindamycin, chloramphenicol, metronidazole, cefoxitin, a carbapenem, or the combination of a beta-lactamase inhibitor and a penicillin should be administered. The early recognition of anaerobic bacteremia and administration of appropriate antimicrobial and surgical therapy play a significant role in preventing mortality and morbidity in pediatric patients. PMID:12133179

  8. Incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of Fusobacterium species bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fusobacterium species (spp.) bacteremia is uncommon and has been associated with a variety of clinical presentations. We conducted a retrospective, population based study to determine the relative proportion of species in this genus causing bacteremia and the risk factors for infection and adverse clinical outcomes. Methods All cases of Fusobacterium spp. bacteremia detected at a regional microbiology laboratory serving outpatient and acute care for a population of approximately 1.3 million people over 11 years were identified from a computerized database. Clinical data on these cases was extracted from an administrative database and analyzed to determine underlying risk factors for and outcomes of infection. Results There were 72 incident cases of Fusobacterium spp. bacteremia over the study period (0.55 cases/100,000 population per annum). F. nucleatum was the most frequent species (61%), followed by F. necrophorum (25%). F. necrophorum bacteremia occurred in a younger population without underlying comorbidities and was not associated with mortality. F. nucleatum bacteremia was found in an older population and was associated with underlying malignancy or receiving dialysis. Death occurred in approximately 10% of F. nucleatum cases but causality was not established in this study. Conclusions Fusobacterium spp. bacteremia in our community is uncommon and occurs in approximately 5.5 cases per million population per annum. F. necrophorum occurred in an otherwise young healthy population and was not associated with any mortality. F. nucleatum was found primarily in older patients with chronic medical conditions and was associated with a mortality of approximately 10%. Bacteremias from other Fusobacterium spp. were rare. PMID:23734900

  9. Staphylococcus saprophyticus bacteremia after ESWL in an immunocompetent woman.

    PubMed

    Hofmans, M; Boel, A; Van Vaerenbergh, K; De Beenhouwer, H

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a well-known cause of uncomplicated urinary tract infections, especially in young and sexually active women. Presence in blood cultures is rare and often attributed to contamination. When bacteremia is significant, it occurs mostly in patients with hematologic malignancies and is predominantly catheter-related. However, we describe a case of significant bacteremia with S. saprophyticus associated with urinary tract infection after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy of an ureterolithiasis in an otherwise healthy patient. PMID:25523318

  10. Factors Associated with Non-typhoidal Salmonella Bacteremia versus Typhoidal Salmonella Bacteremia in Patients Presenting for Care in an Urban Diarrheal Disease Hospital in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Shahunja, K. M.; Leung, Daniel T.; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Ahmed, Dilruba; Qadri, Firdausi

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi bacteremia are the causes of significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is a paucity of data regarding NTS bacteremia in South Asia, a region with a high incidence of typhoidal bacteremia. We sought to determine clinical predictors and outcomes associated with NTS bacteremia compared with typhoidal bacteremia. Methodology We performed a retrospective age-matched case-control study of patients admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, between February 2009 and March 2013. We compared demographic, clinical, microbiological, and outcome variables of NTS bacteremic patients with age-matched S. Typhi bacteremic patients, and a separate comparison of patients with NTS bacteremia and patients with NTS gastroenteritis. Principal Findings Of 20 patients with NTS bacteremia, 5 died (25% case fatality), compared to none of 60 age-matched cases of S. Typhi bacteremia. In univariate analysis, we found that compared with S. Typhi bacteremia, cases of NTS bacteremia had more severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in children under five years of age, less often presented with a duration of fever ≥ 5 days, and were more likely to have co-morbidities on admission such as pneumonia and clinical signs of sepsis (p<0.05 in all cases). In multivariable logistic regression, SAM, clinical sepsis, and pneumonia were independent risk factors for NTS bacteremia compared with S. Typhi bacteremia (p<0.05 in all cases). Notably, we found marked differences in antibiotic susceptibilities, including NTS strains resistant to antibiotics commonly used for empiric therapy of patients suspected to have typhoid fever. Conclusions/Significance Diarrheal patients with NTS bacteremia more often presented with co-morbidities and had a higher case fatality rate compared to those with typhoidal bacteremia. Clinicians in regions where both typhoid and NTS

  11. Predictors of Mortality in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Slade O.; Vaska, Vikram L.; Espedido, Björn A.; Paterson, David L.; Gosbell, Iain B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is an important infection with an incidence rate ranging from 20 to 50 cases/100,000 population per year. Between 10% and 30% of these patients will die from SAB. Comparatively, this accounts for a greater number of deaths than for AIDS, tuberculosis, and viral hepatitis combined. Multiple factors influence outcomes for SAB patients. The most consistent predictor of mortality is age, with older patients being twice as likely to die. Except for the presence of comorbidities, the impacts of other host factors, including gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and immune status, are unclear. Pathogen-host interactions, especially the presence of shock and the source of SAB, are strong predictors of outcomes. Although antibiotic resistance may be associated with increased mortality, questions remain as to whether this reflects pathogen-specific factors or poorer responses to antibiotic therapy, namely, vancomycin. Optimal management relies on starting appropriate antibiotics in a timely fashion, resulting in improved outcomes for certain patient subgroups. The roles of surgery and infectious disease consultations require further study. Although the rate of mortality from SAB is declining, it remains high. Future international collaborative studies are required to tease out the relative contributions of various factors to mortality, which would enable the optimization of SAB management and patient outcomes. PMID:22491776

  12. Case of Clostridium perfringens bacteremia after routine colonoscopy and polypectomy.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Anjali N; Riera, Diana; Hickey, Patrick

    2009-10-01

    Bacteremia is an uncommon complication after polypectomy and colonoscopy. We report one of the first cases of Clostridium perfringens bacteremia after polypectomy. Our patient was a four years old boy with congenital polyposis, who underwent colonoscopy and polypectomy without complication. Approximately 12h later he developed a fever and tachycardia with no other clinical symptoms. His blood cultures grew out penicillin susceptible C. perfringens and Enterococcus faecalis. He responded to antibiotic therapy and remained clinically asymptomatic for the duration of his course. There are a few reports of bacteremia after routine polypectomy, but no reported cases of C. perfringens bacteremia in the pediatric population. Clostridial sp. bacteremia can be fatal with devastating consequences if appropriate antibiotics and/or surgical debridement are delayed. Polymicrobial infection, as illustrated in our patient, is also common and can be a poor prognostic risk factor. Therefore, for patients with a history of polypectomy and new onset fever, anaerobic infections should be considered and empiric antibiotic therapy should include coverage for these organisms. PMID:19324098

  13. Flavimonas oryzihabitans bacteremia: clinical features and microbiological characteristics of isolates.

    PubMed

    Lin, R D; Hsueh, P R; Chang, J C; Teng, L J; Chang, S C; Ho, S W; Hsieh, W C; Luh, K T

    1997-05-01

    Flavimonas oryzihabitans is rarely reported as a pathogen in humans. Twelve cases of F. oryzihabitans bacteremia were diagnosed at National Taiwan University Hospital over a 3-year period. The clinical features of these patients were analyzed, and antimicrobial susceptibilities and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) patterns of the 12 isolates were studied. Among these 12 patients, eight (67%) had underlying neoplastic diseases and all acquired F. oryzihabitans bacteremia while hospitalized. The clinical syndromes included primary bacteremia in 5 patients (42%), biliary tract infection in 3 (25%), and peritonitis, subdural empyema, infusion-related bacteremia, and pneumonia in 1 each. Polymicrobial bacteremia or concomitant fungemia was seen in three patients (25%). All the patients survived after antibiotic treatment. All isolates were susceptible to piperacillin, third-generation cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, and quinolones but resistant to cephalothin, cefuroxime, and trimethoprim. Susceptibility to aztreonam was variable (25%). The RAPD patterns differed among the isolates, indicating the epidemiological unrelatedness of these infections. F. oryzihabitans should be included as an etiology of severe nosocomial infection in patients with underlying debilitating diseases. PMID:9142784

  14. Clinical characteristics associated with mortality of patients with anaerobic bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Takumi; Hamada, Yukihiro; Yamagishi, Yuka; Suematsu, Hiroyuki; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-06-01

    The presence of anaerobes in the blood stream is known to be associated with a higher rate of mortality. However, few prognostic risk factor analyses examining whether a patient's background characteristics are associated with the prognosis have been reported. We performed a retrospective case-controlled study to assess the prognostic factors associated with death from anaerobic bacteremia. Seventy-four patients with anaerobic bacteremia were treated between January 2005 and December 2014 at Aichi Medical University Hospital. The clinical information included drug susceptibility was used for analysis of prognostic factors for 30-day mortality. Multivariate logistic analyses revealed an association between the 30-day mortality rate and malignancy (OR: 3.64, 95% CI: 1.08-12.31) and clindamycin resistance (OR: 7.93, 95% CI: 2.33-27.94). The result of Kaplan-Meier analysis of mortality showed that the 30-day survival rate was 83% in clindamycin susceptible and 38.1% in clindamycin resistant anaerobes causing bacteremia. The result of log-rank test also showed that susceptibility to clindamycin affected mortality (P < 0.001). Our results indicated that malignancy and clindamycin susceptibility could be used to identify subgroups of patients with anaerobic bacteremia with a higher risk of 30-day mortality. The results of this study are important for the early and appropriate management of patients with anaerobic bacteremia. PMID:26903282

  15. Rapid, Culture-Free Detection of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, Elliot L.; Flenker, Katie S.; Clark, Karen C.; Miguel, Jeff; Ince, Dilek; Winokur, Patricia; Ford, Bradley; McNamara, James O.

    2016-01-01

    S. aureus bacteremia (SAB) is a common condition with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Current methods used to diagnose SAB take at least a day, and often longer. Patients with suspected bacteremia must therefore be empirically treated, often unnecessarily, while assay results are pending. In this proof-of-concept study, we describe an inexpensive assay that detects SAB via the detection of micrococcal nuclease (an enzyme secreted by S. aureus) in patient plasma samples in less than three hours. In total, 17 patient plasma samples from culture-confirmed S. aureus bacteremic individuals were tested. 16 of these yielded greater nuclease assay signals than samples from uninfected controls or individuals with non-S. aureus bacteremia. These results suggest that a nuclease-detecting assay may enable the rapid and inexpensive diagnosis of SAB, which is expected to substantially reduce the mortality and morbidity that result from this condition. PMID:27305148

  16. Bacteremia due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: New Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Holubar, Marisa; Meng, Lina; Deresinski, Stan

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews recent clinical evidence for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia. Vancomycin remains the initial antibiotic of choice for the treatment of patients with MRSA bacteremia and endocarditis due to isolates with vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration ≤2 μg/mL, whereas daptomycin is an effective alternative, and ceftaroline seems promising. Treatment options for persistent MRSA bacteremia or bacteremia due to vancomycin-intermediate or vancomycin-resistant strains include daptomycin, ceftaroline, and combination therapies. There is a critical need for high-level evidence from clinical trials to allow optimally informed decisions in the treatment of MRSA bacteremia and endocarditis. PMID:27208769

  17. Risk factors for mortality in patients with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yong Duk; Jeong, Woo Yong; Kim, Moo Hyun; Jung, In Young; Ahn, Mi Young; Ann, Hea Won; Ahn, Jin Young; Han, Sang Hoon; Choi, Jun Yong; Song, Young Goo; Kim, June Myung; Ku, Nam Su

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a nosocomial pathogen associated with high morbidity and mortality, particularly in immunocompromised or critically ill patients. In this study, we investigated the risk factors for mortality in patients with S. maltophilia bacteremia. Retrospectively, medical records from all patients with S. maltophilia bacteremia between December 2005 and 2014 at Severance Hospital, a 2000-bed tertiary care hospital in Seoul, Korea, were reviewed. Analysis was performed to identify factors associated with 28-day mortality. In total, 142 bacteremia patients were enrolled in this study. The overall 28-day mortality rate was 36.6%. Based on the univariate analysis, hematologic malignancy (P = 0.015), Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (P < 0.001) and the removal of a central venous catheter (CVC) (P = 0.040) were significantly related to mortality. In the intensive care unit patients, the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (P = 0.001) also had significance. Based on the multivariate analysis, the SOFA score (odds ratio [OR] = 1.323; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.159, 1.509; P < 0.001) and removal of the CVC (OR = 0.330; 95% CI: 0.109, 0.996; P = 0.049) were independent factors associated with mortality. Our results suggest that removing a CVC may considerably reduce mortality in patients with S. maltophilia bacteremia. PMID:27495046

  18. Recurrent Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus Bacteremia in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Joshua R.; Leber, Amy; Velineni, Sridhar; Timoney, John F.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of an infant with recurrent bacteremia caused by Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus, likely transmitted from mother to infant. Our case highlights the importance of an epidemiological history and molecular diagnostics in ascertaining insights into transmission, pathogenesis, and optimal management. PMID:26179301

  19. A rabbit model of non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Aruna; Tatarov, Ivan; Masek, Billie Jo; Hardick, Justin; Crusan, Annabelle; Wakefield, Teresa; Carroll, Karen; Yang, Samuel; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Lipsky, Michael M.; McLeod, Charles G.; Levine, Myron M.; Rothman, Richard E.; Gaydos, Charlotte A.; DeTolla, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteremia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. In this study, we focused on the development of an animal model of bacteremia induced by non-typhoidal Salmonella. New Zealand White rabbits were inoculated with a human isolate of non-typhoidal Salmonella strain CVD J73 via the intra-peritoneal route. Blood samples were collected at specific time points and at euthanasia from infected rabbits. Additionally, tissue samples from the heart, lungs, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, liver and kidneys were obtained at euthanasia. All experimentally infected rabbits displayed clinical signs of disease (fever, dehydration, weight loss and lethargy). Tissues collected at necropsy from the animals exhibited histopathological changes indicative of bacteremia. Non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteria were detected in the blood and tissue samples of infected rabbits by microbiological culture and real-time PCR assays. The development of this animal model of bacteremia could prove to be a useful tool for studying how non-typhoidal Salmonella infections disseminate and spread in humans. PMID:25033732

  20. Rahnella aquatilis bacteremia from a suspected urinary source.

    PubMed

    Tash, Kaley

    2005-05-01

    A 76-year-old male with prostatic hyperplasia presented with acute pyelonephritis. Blood cultures yielded Rahnella aquatilis. Treatment with intravenous followed by oral levofloxacin resulted in cure. Important characteristics of this organism include its biochemical similarities to Enterobacter agglomerans, its apparent ability to cause bacteremia from a renal focus, and its response to quinolone therapy. PMID:15872303

  1. Eggerthella lenta Bacteremia Complicated by Spondylodiscitis, Psoas Abscess, and Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Korman, T. M.; Junckerstorff, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Eggerthella lenta bacteremia is uncommon and generally associated with abdominal sepsis. The organism and its clinical significance have not been well characterized due to historical difficulties with identification. We report a case of severe infection in a paraplegic man complicated by psoas abscess, osteomyelitis, and meningitis and discuss treatment challenges. PMID:24430458

  2. Central venous catheter-related Corynebacterium minutissimum bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Rupp, M E; Stiles, K G; Tarantolo, S; Goering, R V

    1998-10-01

    Although Corynebacterium minutissimum is well-known as the cause of erythrasma, it is noted as the etiologic agent of nondermatologic disease only rarely. We document this organism as a cause of central venous catheter-associated bacteremia and report the use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to characterize its molecular epidemiology. PMID:9801290

  3. Corynebacterium minutissimum bacteremia in an immunocompetent host with cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Granok, Alexander B; Benjamin, Patti; Garrett, Lee S

    2002-08-15

    Since its original description in 1961, Corynebacterium minutissimum, the causative agent of erythrasma, has rarely been associated with extracutaneous disease. We report a case of cellulitis and bacteremia due to C. minutissimum. We discuss the treatment of C. minutissimum infection and describe the clinical settings in which isolation of Corynebacterium species from blood cultures should be considered significant. PMID:12145741

  4. Bacteremia Caused by Arcobacter butzleri in an Immunocompromised Host

    PubMed Central

    Arguello, Esther; Otto, Caitlin C.; Mead, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Arcobacter butzleri is an emerging pathogen that has been implicated as the causative agent of persistent watery diarrhea. We describe a case involving a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia who developed invasive A. butzleri bacteremia. This case illustrates the unique challenges involved in diagnosing infections caused by emerging gastrointestinal pathogens. PMID:25673792

  5. Recurrent Aeromonas Bacteremia Due to Contaminated Well Water

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Morgan J.; Parrish, Nicole M.; Belani, Anusha; Shah, Maunank

    2015-01-01

    Although they are ubiquitous to aquatic environments, Aeromonas species have traditionally been considered nonvirulent; however, in the past 30 years, they have emerged as important human pathogens that can cause a wide spectrum of disease. In this study, we describe a case of recurrent Aeromonas bacteremia in an immunocompetent patient, and this exposure was linked to the patient's home well water supply. PMID:26495324

  6. BACTEREMIA NOT DETECTED DURING EXPERIMENTAL COLIFORM MASTITIS INFECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A bacteremia, caused by diverse species, was associated with about one third of acute coliform mastitis cases occurring in a field study report. However, blood is typically a very hostile environment for bacteria. Using blood from normal cows we demonstrate that when 2000 CFU of Escherichia coli o...

  7. Bacteremia in Children Hospitalized with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia-Grande, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Pinnock, Elli; Salas, Antonio; Fink, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background The risk of bacteremia is considered low in children with acute bronchiolitis. However the rate of occult bacteremia in infants with RSV infection is not well established. The aim was to determine the actual rate and predictive factors of bacteremia in children admitted to hospital due to confirmed RSV acute respiratory illness (ARI), using both conventional culture and molecular techniques. Methods A prospective multicenter study (GENDRES-network) was conducted between 2011–2013 in children under the age of two admitted to hospital because of an ARI. Among those RSV-positive, bacterial presence in blood was assessed using PCR for Meningococcus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus, in addition to conventional cultures. Results 66 children with positive RSV respiratory illness were included. In 10.6% patients, bacterial presence was detected: H. influenzae (n = 4) and S. pneumoniae (n = 2). In those patients with bacteremia, there was a previous suspicion of bacterial superinfection and had received empirical antibiotic treatment 6 out of 7 (85.7%) patients. There were significant differences in terms of severity between children with positive bacterial PCR and those with negative results: PICU admission (100% vs. 50%, P-value = 0.015); respiratory support necessity (100% vs. 18.6%, P-value < 0.001); Wood-Downes score (mean = 8.7 vs. 4.8 points, P-value < 0.001); GENVIP scale (mean = 17 vs. 10.1, P-value < 0.001); and length of hospitalization (mean = 12.1 vs. 7.5 days, P-value = 0.007). Conclusion Bacteremia is not frequent in infants hospitalized with RSV respiratory infection, however, it should be considered in the most severe cases. PMID:26872131

  8. Are incidence and epidemiology of anaerobic bacteremia really changing?

    PubMed

    Vena, A; Muñoz, P; Alcalá, L; Fernandez-Cruz, A; Sanchez, C; Valerio, M; Bouza, E

    2015-08-01

    Incidence, prognosis and need of performing blood cultures for anaerobic bacteria are under debate, mainly due to the belief that the presence of anaerobes in blood can be easily suspected on clinical basis. We aimed to assess these three points in a retrospective analysis of a 10-year experience in our tertiary hospital. All episodes of significant anaerobic bacteremia diagnosed from 2003 to 2012 were included. Risk factors for mortality and clinical predictability of anaerobic bacteremia were evaluated in 113 randomly selected episodes. Overall incidence of anaerobic bacteremia was 1.2 episodes/1000 admissions, with no significant changes during the 10-year study period. B. fragilis group (38.1 %) and Clostridium spp. (13.7 %) were the most frequent isolated microorganisms. As for the clinical study, 43.4 % of the patients had a comorbidity classified as ultimately fatal or rapidly fatal according to the McCabe and Jackson scale. Clinical manifestations suggestive of anaerobic involvement were present in only 55 % of the patients. Twenty-eight patients (24.8 %) died during the hospitalization. Independent predictive factors of mortality were a high Charlson's comorbidity index and presentation with septic shock, whereas, an adequate source control of the infection was associated with a better outcome. In our centre, incidence of anaerobic bacteremia remained stable during the last decade. The routine use of anaerobic BCs seems to be adequate, since in about half of the cases anaerobes could not be suspected on clinical bases. Moreover, prompt source control of infection is essential in order to reduce mortality of patients with anaerobic bacteremia. PMID:26017663

  9. Prevalence and Detection of Mixed-Population Enterococcal Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Andreacchio, Kathleen A.; Edelstein, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Mixed-population (heterogeneous) enterococcal bacteremia (MEB) is rarely reported. Based on one occasion in which Vitek2 missed a vancomycin-resistant subpopulation isolated from a patient, we developed a simple method to detect this subpopulation and determined MEB frequency. The four patients presented here had either Enterococcus faecium or Enterococcus faecalis bacteremia caused by both vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and vancomycin-susceptible enterococci (VSE). No prior common antibiotic therapy was observed, and bacteremia resolved with daptomycin, gentamicin, and/or linezolid treatment. In two cases, VRE presence was missed by Vitek2. To detect the VRE subpopulation, tryptic soy broth was inoculated from positive blood cultures and a saline suspension was inoculated to a vancomycin (6-μg/ml) (V6) plate. Two isolates from each patient were studied further. Relatedness was assessed by multilocus sequence typing, fitness was evaluated by growth curve and competition assays, and vanA presence was determined by PCR. MEB represented ∼5% of all enterococcal bacteremias. All VRE subpopulations grew on V6 plates but were missed in two instances by Vitek2. VRE and VSE isolates from each patient were closely related and did not differ in overall fitness. All four VRE isolates and 2/4 VSE isolates were vanA positive. MEBs occur regardless of prior antimicrobial therapy, are relatively common in our hospital, and are important to detect. As far as we know, this study is the first to report heterogeneous E. faecalis bacteremia. There is a simple method to detect VRE subpopulations that may be missed by Vitek2. PMID:24829233

  10. Prevalence and detection of mixed-population enterococcal bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Ana María; Andreacchio, Kathleen A; Edelstein, Paul H

    2014-07-01

    Mixed-population (heterogeneous) enterococcal bacteremia (MEB) is rarely reported. Based on one occasion in which Vitek2 missed a vancomycin-resistant subpopulation isolated from a patient, we developed a simple method to detect this subpopulation and determined MEB frequency. The four patients presented here had either Enterococcus faecium or Enterococcus faecalis bacteremia caused by both vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and vancomycin-susceptible enterococci (VSE). No prior common antibiotic therapy was observed, and bacteremia resolved with daptomycin, gentamicin, and/or linezolid treatment. In two cases, VRE presence was missed by Vitek2. To detect the VRE subpopulation, tryptic soy broth was inoculated from positive blood cultures and a saline suspension was inoculated to a vancomycin (6-μg/ml) (V6) plate. Two isolates from each patient were studied further. Relatedness was assessed by multilocus sequence typing, fitness was evaluated by growth curve and competition assays, and vanA presence was determined by PCR. MEB represented ∼5% of all enterococcal bacteremias. All VRE subpopulations grew on V6 plates but were missed in two instances by Vitek2. VRE and VSE isolates from each patient were closely related and did not differ in overall fitness. All four VRE isolates and 2/4 VSE isolates were vanA positive. MEBs occur regardless of prior antimicrobial therapy, are relatively common in our hospital, and are important to detect. As far as we know, this study is the first to report heterogeneous E. faecalis bacteremia. There is a simple method to detect VRE subpopulations that may be missed by Vitek2. PMID:24829233

  11. Rhodococcus Bacteremia in Cancer Patients Is Mostly Catheter Related and Associated with Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Al Akhrass, Fadi; Al Wohoush, Iba; Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Reitzel, Ruth; Jiang, Ying; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Tarrand, Jeffrey; Hachem, Ray; Raad, Issam

    2012-01-01

    Rhodococcus is an emerging cause of opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients, most commonly causing cavitary pneumonia. It has rarely been reported as a cause of isolated bacteremia. However, the relationship between bacteremia and central venous catheter is unknown. Between 2002 and 2010, the characteristics and outcomes of seventeen cancer patients with Rhodococcus bacteremia and indwelling central venous catheters were evaluated. Rhodococcus bacteremias were for the most part (94%) central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). Most of the bacteremia isolates were Rhodococcus equi (82%). Rhodococcus isolates formed heavy microbial biofilm on the surface of polyurethane catheters, which was reduced completely or partially by antimicrobial lock solution. All CLABSI patients had successful response to catheter removal and antimicrobial therapy. Rhodococcus species should be added to the list of biofilm forming organisms in immunocompromised hosts and most of the Rhodococcus bacteremias in cancer patients are central line associated. PMID:22427914

  12. A severe Morganella morganii endophthalmitis; followed by bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Demiray, Tayfur; Aydemir, Ozlem Akkaya; Koroglu, Mehmet; Ozbek, Ahmet; Altindis, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    Morganella morganii is rarely isolated from nosocomial infections. However, postoperative infections due to Morganella spp. were documented in literature and eye involvements of the infections usually result in severe sequels. We present a severe case infection, which was caused by M. morganii subsp. morganii, firstly appearing as conjunctivitis and complicated by bacteremia. The infectious agent isolated from both conjunctival and consecutive blood cultures. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed with the Vitek 2(®) automated system. The isolate was resistant to cephalosporins and carbapenems and it had ability to produce extended spectrum beta-lactamases. Patient was successfully treated with intravenous ciprofloxacin according to susceptibility test results. This is the first report of M. morganii infection detected as a local infection then complicated by bacteremia. PMID:27092227

  13. A severe Morganella morganii endophthalmitis; followed by bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Aydemir, Ozlem Akkaya; Koroglu, Mehmet; Ozbek, Ahmet; Altindis, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Morganella morganii is rarely isolated from nosocomial infections. However, postoperative infections due to Morganella spp. were documented in literature and eye involvements of the infections usually result in severe sequels. We present a severe case infection, which was caused by M. morganii subsp. morganii, firstly appearing as conjunctivitis and complicated by bacteremia. The infectious agent isolated from both conjunctival and consecutive blood cultures. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed with the Vitek 2® automated system. The isolate was resistant to cephalosporins and carbapenems and it had ability to produce extended spectrum beta-lactamases. Patient was successfully treated with intravenous ciprofloxacin according to susceptibility test results. This is the first report of M. morganii infection detected as a local infection then complicated by bacteremia. PMID:27092227

  14. Non catheter-related bacteremia caused by Pseudomonas oryzihabitans in a patient undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Hellou, Elias; Artul, Suheil; Omari, Sohaib; Taha, Mohamad; Armaly, Zaher; Nseir, William

    2014-07-01

    Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (P. orizyhabitans) has already been reported both as a human and a zoonotic pathogen. A few cases of P. orizyhabitans bacteremia have been reported among patients who underwent peritoneal dialysis. P. orizyhabitans bacteremia has never been reported among patients on hemodialysis. We report the first case of P. orizyhabitans bacteremia in a chronic hemodialysis patient; this patient did not have a central venous catheter angioaccess as a potential portal of entry. PMID:24612459

  15. Elizabethkingia anophelis bacteremia is associated with clinically significant infections and high mortality

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Susanna K. P.; Chow, Wang-Ngai; Foo, Chuen-Hing; Curreem, Shirly O. T.; Lo, George Chi-Shing; Teng, Jade L. L.; Chen, Jonathan H. K.; Ng, Ricky H. Y.; Wu, Alan K. L.; Cheung, Ingrid Y. Y.; Chau, Sandy K. Y.; Lung, David C.; Lee, Rodney A.; Tse, Cindy W. S.; Fung, Kitty S. C.; Que, Tak-Lun; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike Elizabethkingia meningoseptica, the clinical importance of E. anophelis is poorly understood. We determined the clinical and molecular epidemiology of bacteremia caused by Elizabethkingia-like species from five regional hospitals in Hong Kong. Among 45 episodes of Elizabethkingia-like bacteremia, 21 were caused by Elizabethkingia, including 17 E. anophelis, three E. meningoseptica and one E. miricola; while 24 were caused by other diverse genera/species, as determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Of the 17 cases of E. anophelis bacteremia, 15 (88%) were clinically significant. The most common diagnosis was pneumonia (n = 5), followed by catheter-related bacteremia (n = 4), neonatal meningitis (n = 3), nosocomial bacteremia (n = 2) and neutropenic fever (n = 1). E. anophelis bacteremia was commonly associated with complications and carried 23.5% mortality. In contrast, of the 24 episodes of bacteremia due to non-Elizabethkingia species, 16 (67%) were clinically insignificant. Compared to non-Elizabethkingia bacteremia, Elizabethkingia bacteremia was associated with more clinically significant infections (P < 0.01) and positive cultures from other sites (P < 0.01), less polymicrobial bacteremia (P < 0.01), and higher complication (P < 0.05) and mortality (P < 0.05) rates. Elizabethkingia bacteremia is predominantly caused by E. anophelis instead of E. meningoseptica. Elizabethkingia bacteremia, especially due to E. anophelis, carries significant morbidity and mortality, and should be considered clinically significant unless proven otherwise. PMID:27185741

  16. Chryseobacterium meningosepticum bacteremia in diabetic nephropathy patient on hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Dias, M.; Prashant, K.; Pai, R.; Scaria, B.

    2010-01-01

    The Chryseobacterium species are inhabitants of soil and water. In the hospital environment, they exist in water systems and wet surfaces. We report here a case of Chryseobacterium meningosepticum bacteremia in a diabetic nephropathy patient on hemodialysis. He was successfully treated with Vancomycin and ceftazidime for three weeks with good clinical outcome. This is the first case reported in dialysis patients from India. PMID:21206682

  17. Ralstonia pickettii bacteremia in hemodialysis patients: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Tejera, Darwin; Limongi, Gino; Bertullo, Mauricio; Cancela, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Ralstonia pickettii is a low-virulence gram-negative bacillus that may be associated with infections related to health care and may cause bacteremia. Ralstonia pickettii bacteremia is uncommon but is related to the contamination of medical products, mainly in immunodepressed patients. We present two cases of patients on chronic hemodialysis with Ralstonia pickettii bacteremia linked to contamination of the dialysis water. Similar cases have been published with links to intravenous fluid administration, medication ampules, and the use of extracorporeal oxygenation membranes, among other factors. The detection of Ralstonia pickettii bacteremia should provoke suspicion and a search for contaminated medical products, fluids, and/or medications. PMID:27410414

  18. Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein in differantiating to contamination from bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Oksuz, Lutfiye; Somer, Ayper; Salman, Nuran; Erk, Osman; Gurler, Nezahat

    2014-01-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are important biological markers used in the diagnosis of severe infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the consistency of blood culture with PCT and CRP in differentiating contamination and non-bacteremia from true bacteremia. In this study blood samples were obtained from 809 febrile patients and analyzed using BACTEC 9120 system. All of positive blood cultures were performed Gram staining. The microorganisms were identified with conventional methods and automated systems. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were made by disc diffusion. PCT levels were analyzed by mini VIDAS device and PCT kit. PCT and CRP levels were analyzed with blood cultures in same times. Kruskal Wallis test, Mann-Whitney U test, Spearman’s rho test and ROC curve were used for statistical analyses. The bacteremia group was found to be significantly different from non-bacteremia group and contamination group in terms of both PCT and CRP (p<0.0001). The p values of PCT and CRP in differentiating bacteremia from non-bacteremia were p<0.001 for PCT, p=0.002 for CRP and in differentiating bacteremia from contamination were p<0.001 for PCT, p<0.001 for CRP. PCT is a more useful marker than CRP in the differentiating of true bacteremia from contamination according to the results of this study. PMID:25763049

  19. Relapsing cellulitis associated with Campylobacter coli bacteremia in an agammaglobulinemic patient.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Koichi; Nishi, Junichiro; Miyanohara, Hiroaki; Sarantuya, Jav; Iwashita, Mayumi; Kamenosono, Akira; Hizukuri, Kazuko; Wakimoto, Naoko; Yoshinaga, Masao

    2004-06-01

    Campylobacter coli rarely causes bacteremia or extraintestinal infection. We report herein a case of agammaglobulinemia in which cellulitis associated with C. coli bacteremia relapsed after a disease-free interval of >5 years. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis revealed that the organisms in this patient were genetically identical, suggesting a latent C. coli infection. PMID:15194845

  20. Persistent Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in 3 Persons Who Inject Drugs, San Diego, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Gabrielle; Campbell, Wesley; Jenks, Jeffrey; Beesley, Cari; Katsivas, Theodoros; Hoffmaster, Alex; Mehta, Sanjay R; Reed, Sharon

    2016-09-01

    Bacillus cereus is typically considered a blood culture contaminant; however, its presence in blood cultures can indicate true bacteremia. We report 4 episodes of B. cereus bacteremia in 3 persons who inject drugs. Multilocus sequence typing showed that the temporally associated infections were caused by unrelated clones. PMID:27533890

  1. Persistent Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in 3 Persons Who Inject Drugs, San Diego, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Gabrielle; Campbell, Wesley; Jenks, Jeffrey; Beesley, Cari; Katsivas, Theodoros; Hoffmaster, Alex; Mehta, Sanjay R.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is typically considered a blood culture contaminant; however, its presence in blood cultures can indicate true bacteremia. We report 4 episodes of B. cereus bacteremia in 3 persons who inject drugs. Multilocus sequence typing showed that the temporally associated infections were caused by unrelated clones. PMID:27533890

  2. Bacteremia with Streptococcus bovis and Streptococcus salivarius: clinical correlates of more accurate identification of isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Ruoff, K L; Miller, S I; Garner, C V; Ferraro, M J; Calderwood, S B

    1989-01-01

    Two biotypes of Streptococcus bovis can be identified by laboratory testing and can be distinguished from the phenotypically similar organism Streptococcus salivarius. We assessed the clinical relevance of careful identification of these organisms in 68 patients with streptococcal bacteremia caused by these similar species. S. bovis was more likely to be clinically significant when isolated from blood (89%) than was S. salivarius (23%). There was a striking association between S. bovis I bacteremia and underlying endocarditis (94%) compared with that of S. bovis II bacteremia (18%). Bacteremia with S. bovis I was also highly correlated with an underlying colonic neoplasm (71% of patients overall, 100% of those with thorough colonic examinations) compared with bacteremia due to S. bovis II or S. salivarius (17% overall, 25% of patients with thorough colonic examinations). We conclude that careful identification of streptococcal bacteremic isolates as S. bovis biotype I provides clinically important information and should be more widely applied. PMID:2915024

  3. Anaerobic Bacteremia: Impact of Inappropriate Therapy on Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yangsoon; Park, Yongjung; Kim, Myungsook; Choi, Jun Yong; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Investigation on incidence and mortality of anaerobic bacteremia (AB) is clinically relevant in spite of its infrequent occurrence and not often explored, which report varies according to period and institutions. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the incidence and risk factors related to mortality and assess clinical outcomes of AB in current aspect. Materials and Methods Characteristics of AB patients and anaerobic bacteria from blood culture at a university hospital in 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. The correlation between risk factors and 28-day patient mortality was analyzed. Results A total of 70 non-duplicated anaerobic bacteria were isolated from blood of 70 bacteremia patients in 2012. The history of cardiovascular disease as host's risk factor was statistically significant (P = 0.0344) in univariate and multivariate analysis. Although the inappropriate therapy was not statistically significant in univariate and multivariate analysis, the survival rate of bacteremia was significantly worse in patients who had inappropriate therapy compared with those underwent appropriate therapy (hazard ratio, 5.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.7–6.9; P = 0.004). The most frequently isolated organism was Bacteroides fragilis (32 isolates, 46%), followed by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (10, 14%), and non-perfringens Clostridium (7, 10%). Conclusion The incidence of AB in 2012 was 2.3% (number of AB patients per 100 positive blood culture patients) and the mortality rate in patients with clinically significant AB was 21.4%. In addition, AB was frequently noted in patients having malignancy and the survival rate of AB was significantly worse in patients who received inappropriate therapy compared with those underwent appropriate therapy. PMID:27433379

  4. Pediatric bacteremia caused by Chromobacterium haemolyticum/Chromobacterium aquaticum.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Nicole; Mortensen, Joel E; Robinette, Eric; Powell, Eleanor A

    2016-09-01

    We present a case of pediatric bacteremia caused by Chromobacterium haemolyticum, a β-hemolytic, non-pigmented, Gram-negative bacilli recovered from a blood culture and initially identified as Chromobacterium violaceum using phenotypic and proteomic methods. 16S rRNA sequencing of the patient isolated demonstrated a high degree of sequence homology with the type strain of C. haemolyticum. The patient recovered following treatment with meropenem, gentamicin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. This case highlights the potential misidentification of C. haemolyticum as non-pigmented C. violaceum due to limitations of the currently available identification methodologies. PMID:27344541

  5. A Case of Liver Abscess with Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Koyano, Saho; Tatsuno, Keita; Okazaki, Mitsuhiro; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Sasaki, Takashi; Saito, Ryoichi; Okugawa, Shu; Moriya, Kyoji

    2015-01-01

    Desulfovibrio spp. are gram-negative, sulfate-reducing, and anaerobic bacteria found in the digestive tract of humans. Because Desulfovibrio spp. are infrequent causative agents of infectious diseases and are difficult to isolate and to identify from clinical specimens, the appropriate antibiotic therapy to infection with Desulfovibrio spp. has not been determined. We report the first case of liver abscess with bacteremia due to Desulfovibrio desulfuricans to show the clinical presentation and treatment. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous piperacillin-tazobactam and oral amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. PMID:25632357

  6. A Case of Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis Caused by Listeria monocytogenes Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Bunker, Daniel R; Sullivan, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Importance. Infections can cause leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Observations. We report the case of a patient with a left ventricular assist device who presented with acute kidney injury and biopsy proven leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Blood cultures grew Listeria monocytogenes. The patient's rash improved with treatment of the underlying Listeria infection. Conclusion. Clinicians should be aware that there are a number of broad categories of disease associated with the histologic finding of vasculitis, including infection. It is important to keep in mind the risk factors of a particular patient when formulating a differential diagnosis. This is the first reported case of Listeria bacteremia causing leukocytoclastic vasculitis. PMID:27313916

  7. A Case of Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis Caused by Listeria monocytogenes Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Importance. Infections can cause leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Observations. We report the case of a patient with a left ventricular assist device who presented with acute kidney injury and biopsy proven leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Blood cultures grew Listeria monocytogenes. The patient's rash improved with treatment of the underlying Listeria infection. Conclusion. Clinicians should be aware that there are a number of broad categories of disease associated with the histologic finding of vasculitis, including infection. It is important to keep in mind the risk factors of a particular patient when formulating a differential diagnosis. This is the first reported case of Listeria bacteremia causing leukocytoclastic vasculitis. PMID:27313916

  8. Brevundimonas diminuta bacteremia in a man with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huiling; Li, Min; Yang, Xuewen; Zhang, Chunbing

    2015-01-01

    Brevundimonas diminuta are ubiquitous in the environment, but are infrequently isolated from clinical samples. Here we report a case of B. diminuta bacteremia in a man with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) at a teaching hospital in China and review the previously reported cases. The organism was confirmed by culture and 16s rRNA sequence analysis with highly sensitivity to broad-spectrum antibiotics. Our report and other cases demonstrated that the optimal therapeutic duration for B. diminuta infections in various situations remains to be established. PMID:26275273

  9. Clinical predictors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia in patients admitted to the ED.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cheol-In; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2012-09-01

    The identification of clinical characteristics that could identify patients at high risk for Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia would aid clinicians in the appropriate management of these life-threatening conditions, especially in patients admitted to the emergency department (ED) with community-onset infections. To determine clinical risk factors for P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia in patients with community-onset gram-negative bacteremia (GNB), a post hoc analysis of a nationwide bacteremia surveillance database including patients with microbiologically documented GNB was performed. Ninety-six patients with P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia were compared with 1230 patients with Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia. A solid tumor or hematologic malignancy was more likely to be associated with P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia, whereas concurrent neurologic disease was less frequently seen. In regards to the site of infection, pneumonia was more common in P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia, whereas a urinary tract infection was less frequently seen. Factors associated with P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia in multivariate analysis included pneumonia (odds ratio [OR], 3.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.86-6.99), hematologic malignancy (OR, 2.71; 95% CI, 1.26-5.84), male sex (OR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.31-3.58), solid tumor (OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.15-3.12), and health-care-associated infection (OR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.48-2.41). Our data suggest that an initial empirical antimicrobial coverage of P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia should be seriously considered in patients with pneumonia, a hematologic malignancy, solid tumor, or health-care-associated infection, when GNB is suspected, even in community-onset infections. PMID:22030178

  10. Clostridium tertium Bacteremia in a Patient with Glyphosate Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    You, Myung-Jo; Shin, Gee-Wook; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 44 Final Diagnosis: Clostridium tertium bacteremia Symptoms: Fever Medication: Ertapenem • Metronidazole Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Infectious Disease Objective: Unknown etiology Background: Clostridium tertium is distributed in the soil and in animal and human gastrointestinal tracts. C. tertium has been isolated from patients with blood diseases, immune disorders, and abdominal surgeries. Glyphosate is toxic, causing cause eye and skin irritation, gastrointestinal pain, and vomiting. Ingestion of herbicides modifies the gastrointestinal environment, which stresses the living organisms. However, there has been little attention to cases of bacteremia in patients recovering from suicide attempt by ingesting herbicide. Case Report: Clostridium tertium was identified in a 44-year-old female who attempted suicide by glyphosate (a herbicide) ingestion. The 16S rRNA sequences from all colonies were 99% identical with that of C. tertium (AB618789) found on a BLAST search of the NCBI database. The bacterium was cultured on TSA under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests performed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions showed that the bacterium was susceptible to penicillin, a combination of β-lactamase inhibitor and piperacillin or amoxicillin, and first- and second- generation cephalosporins. However, it was resistant to third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins. Conclusions: Glyphosate herbicide might be a predisposing factor responsible for the pathogenesis of C. tertium. The results highlight the need for careful diagnosis and selection of antibiotics in the treatment of this organism. PMID:25577783

  11. Neurodevelopment of extremely preterm infants who had necrotizing enterocolitis with or without late bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Camilia R.; Dammann, Olaf; Allred, Elizabeth N.; Patel, Sonal; O’Shea, T. Michael; Kuban, Karl C. K.; Leviton, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate neurodevelopment following necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and late bacteremia, alone and together. Study design Sample included 1155 infants born at 23-27 weeks’ gestation. NEC was classified by the Modified Bell’s staging criteria and grouped as medical NEC or surgical NEC. Late bacteremia was defined as a positive blood culture after the first postnatal week. Neurodevelopment was assessed at 24 months corrected age. Multivariable models estimated the risk of developmental dysfunction and microcephaly associated with medical or surgical NEC with and without late bacteremia. Results Children who had surgical NEC unaccompanied by late bacteremia were at increased risk of Psychomotor Developmental Indices <70 [OR=2.7 (1.2, 6.4)], and children who had both surgical NEC and late bacteremia were at increased risk of diparetic cerebral palsy [OR=8.4 (1.9, 39)] and microcephaly [OR=9.3 (2.2, 40)]. In contrast, children who had medical NEC with or without late bacteremia were not at increased risk of any developmental dysfunction. Conclusion The risk of neurodevelopmental dysfunction and microcephaly is increased in children who had surgical NEC, especially if they also had late bacteremia. These observations support the hypothesis that bowel injury might initiate systemic inflammation potentially affecting the developing brain. PMID:20598317

  12. Corynebacterium minutissimum bacteremia and meningitis: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Aman; Likhi, Rishi

    2008-01-01

    Corynebacterium minutissimum, the causative agent of erythrasma, is a gram-positive, non-spore forming, aerobic or facultative anaerobic bacillus. It has rarely been associated with extracutaneous disease, since its description in 1961. A computerized medline search for review of literature was performed. To our knowledge, there have been 18 cases of C. minutissimum infections that caused conditions other than erythrasma. These include reports of cases of abscess formation, intravascular catheter-related bacteremias, ophthalmologic involvement, endocarditis, peritonitis, cutaneous granulomas, pyelonephritis in an infant and primary bacteremia with underlying hematologic malignancy. We report a rare case of bacteremia and meningitis due to C. minutissimum successfully treated with intravenous ampicillin. PMID:18036665

  13. Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in solid organ transplant recipients with bacteremias.

    PubMed

    Wan, Q Q; Ye, Q F; Yuan, H

    2015-03-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) remain as life-threatening complications and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality among solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria can cause serious bacteremias in these recipients. Reviews have aimed to investigate MDR Gram-negative bacteremias; however, they were lacking in SOT recipients in the past. To better understand the characteristics of bacteremias due to MDR Gram-negative bacteria, optimize preventive and therapeutic strategies, and improve the outcomes of SOT recipients, this review summarize the epidemiology, clinical and laboratory characteristics, and explores the mechanisms, prevention, and treatment of MDR Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25388855

  14. Staphylococcus saprophyticus Bacteremia originating from Urinary Tract Infections: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anna; Hong, Jeongmin; Jo, Won-yong; Cho, Oh-Hyun; Kim, Sunjoo

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a common pathogen of acute urinary tract infection (UTI) in young females. However, S. saprophyticus bacteremia originating from UTI is very rare and has not been reported in Korea. We report a case of S. saprophyticus bacteremia from UTI in a 60-year-old female with a urinary stone treated successfully with intravenous ciprofloxacin, and review the cases of S. saprophyticus bacteremia reported in the literature. Thus, the microorganism may cause invasive infection and should be considered when S. saprophyticus is isolated from blood cultures in patients with UTI. PMID:27433385

  15. Staphylococcus saprophyticus Bacteremia originating from Urinary Tract Infections: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jaehyung; Lee, Anna; Hong, Jeongmin; Jo, Won-Yong; Cho, Oh-Hyun; Kim, Sunjoo; Bae, In-Gyu

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a common pathogen of acute urinary tract infection (UTI) in young females. However, S. saprophyticus bacteremia originating from UTI is very rare and has not been reported in Korea. We report a case of S. saprophyticus bacteremia from UTI in a 60-year-old female with a urinary stone treated successfully with intravenous ciprofloxacin, and review the cases of S. saprophyticus bacteremia reported in the literature. Thus, the microorganism may cause invasive infection and should be considered when S. saprophyticus is isolated from blood cultures in patients with UTI. PMID:27433385

  16. Bartonella spp. Bacteremia in Blood Donors from Campinas, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pitassi, Luiza Helena Urso; de Paiva Diniz, Pedro Paulo Vissotto; Scorpio, Diana Gerardi; Drummond, Marina Rovani; Lania, Bruno Grosselli; Barjas-Castro, Maria Lourdes; Gilioli, Rovilson; Colombo, Silvia; Sowy, Stanley; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.; Nicholson, William L.; Velho, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Bartonella species are blood-borne, re-emerging organisms, capable of causing prolonged infection with diverse disease manifestations, from asymptomatic bacteremia to chronic debilitating disease and death. This pathogen can survive for over a month in stored blood. However, its prevalence among blood donors is unknown, and screening of blood supplies for this pathogen is not routinely performed. We investigated Bartonella spp. prevalence in 500 blood donors from Campinas, Brazil, based on a cross-sectional design. Blood samples were inoculated into an enrichment liquid growth medium and sub-inoculated onto blood agar. Liquid culture samples and Gram-negative isolates were tested using a genus specific ITS PCR with amplicons sequenced for species identification. Bartonella henselae and Bartonella quintana antibodies were assayed by indirect immunofluorescence. B. henselae was isolated from six donors (1.2%). Sixteen donors (3.2%) were Bartonella-PCR positive after culture in liquid or on solid media, with 15 donors infected with B. henselae and one donor infected with Bartonella clarridgeiae. Antibodies against B. henselae or B. quintana were found in 16% and 32% of 500 blood donors, respectively. Serology was not associated with infection, with only three of 16 Bartonella-infected subjects seropositive for B. henselae or B. quintana. Bartonella DNA was present in the bloodstream of approximately one out of 30 donors from a major blood bank in South America. Negative serology does not rule out Bartonella spp. infection in healthy subjects. Using a combination of liquid and solid cultures, PCR, and DNA sequencing, this study documents for the first time that Bartonella spp. bacteremia occurs in asymptomatic blood donors. Our findings support further evaluation of Bartonella spp. transmission which can occur through blood transfusions. PMID:25590435

  17. Bartonella spp. bacteremia in blood donors from Campinas, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pitassi, Luiza Helena Urso; de Paiva Diniz, Pedro Paulo Vissotto; Scorpio, Diana Gerardi; Drummond, Marina Rovani; Lania, Bruno Grosselli; Barjas-Castro, Maria Lourdes; Gilioli, Rovilson; Colombo, Silvia; Sowy, Stanley; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Nicholson, William L; Velho, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Bartonella species are blood-borne, re-emerging organisms, capable of causing prolonged infection with diverse disease manifestations, from asymptomatic bacteremia to chronic debilitating disease and death. This pathogen can survive for over a month in stored blood. However, its prevalence among blood donors is unknown, and screening of blood supplies for this pathogen is not routinely performed. We investigated Bartonella spp. prevalence in 500 blood donors from Campinas, Brazil, based on a cross-sectional design. Blood samples were inoculated into an enrichment liquid growth medium and sub-inoculated onto blood agar. Liquid culture samples and Gram-negative isolates were tested using a genus specific ITS PCR with amplicons sequenced for species identification. Bartonella henselae and Bartonella quintana antibodies were assayed by indirect immunofluorescence. B. henselae was isolated from six donors (1.2%). Sixteen donors (3.2%) were Bartonella-PCR positive after culture in liquid or on solid media, with 15 donors infected with B. henselae and one donor infected with Bartonella clarridgeiae. Antibodies against B. henselae or B. quintana were found in 16% and 32% of 500 blood donors, respectively. Serology was not associated with infection, with only three of 16 Bartonella-infected subjects seropositive for B. henselae or B. quintana. Bartonella DNA was present in the bloodstream of approximately one out of 30 donors from a major blood bank in South America. Negative serology does not rule out Bartonella spp. infection in healthy subjects. Using a combination of liquid and solid cultures, PCR, and DNA sequencing, this study documents for the first time that Bartonella spp. bacteremia occurs in asymptomatic blood donors. Our findings support further evaluation of Bartonella spp. transmission which can occur through blood transfusions. PMID:25590435

  18. Campylobacter jejuni Bacteremia in a Patient With Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Anvarinejad, Mojtaba; Amin Shahidi, Maneli; Pouladfar, Gholam Reza; Dehyadegari, Mohammad Ali; Mardaneh, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Campylobacter jejuni is a slender, motile, non-spore-forming, helical-shaped, gram-negative bacterium. It is one of the most common causes of human gastroenteritis in the world. The aim of this study was to present a patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), who was infected with Campylobacter jejuni. Case Presentation We describe the medical records of a pediatric ALL patient with bacteremia caused by C. jejuni, who was diagnosed at Amir hospital, Shiraz, Iran. This 14-year-old male visited the emergency department of Amir hospital with night sweats, severe polar high-grade fever, reduced appetite, and nausea in August 2013. Given the suspected presence of an anaerobic or microaerophilic microorganism, aerobic and anaerobic blood cultures were performed using an automated blood cultivator, the BACTEC 9240 system. In order to characterize the isolate, diagnostic biochemical tests were used. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was done with the disk diffusion method. The primary culture was found to be positive for Campylobacter, and the subculture of the solid plate yielded a confluent growth of colonies typical for Campylobacter, which was identified as C. jejuni by morphological and biochemical tests. The isolate was resistant to ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime, cephalexin, piperacillin/tazobactam, nalidixic acid, aztreonam, cefuroxime, cefixime, ceftazidime, and tobramycin. Conclusions C. jejuni should be considered in the differential diagnosis as a potential cause of bacteremia in immunosuppressed patients. In cases where the BACTEC result is positive in aerobic conditions but the organism cannot be isolated, an anaerobic culture medium is suggested, especially in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27621914

  19. Bacteremia during dacryocystorhinostomy: results of intra-operative blood cultures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aims of the study are to assess the prevalence of bacteremia during dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) and to assess whether there is a need for post-operative prophylaxis. Prospective interventional study of 52 consecutive dacryocystorhinostomy performed in 50 patients over a period of 1 year from 2013 to 2014. Blood was drawn under strict aseptic conditions during two separate time points: fashioning of the nasal mucosal and creation of lacrimal sac flaps. The blood was inoculated into two blood culture bottles: the dual media as well as Columbia broth. Following withdrawal of blood, all patients received an intraoperative single dose of a cephalosporin antibiotic. Clean cases of primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstructions (PANDO) without any sac discharge upon marsupialization (22%, 11/50) were not prescribed routine post-operative prophylaxis, whereas the remaining were prescribed oral antibiotics for 5 days. Results The mean age of patients was 41 years (range, 4–61 years). The most common diagnosis (70%, 35/50) was primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction. Acute dacryocystitis was noted in 12% (6/50). External DCR was performed in 65% (34/52) and endoscopic DCR in 35% (18/52) of the cases. All the blood cultures were uniformly negative both in terms of abnormal physical changes in media as well subcultures; 22% (11/50) did not receive post-operative antibiotic prophylaxis. None of the patients developed any signs of wound infections. The anatomical and functional success rate was achieved in 98%. Conclusions This study did not find any intraoperative bacteremia during dacryocystorhinostomy and that none had wound infection irrespective of post-operative prophylaxis. PMID:25320650

  20. Neonatal mortality in puppies due to bacteremia by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae.

    PubMed

    Vela, Ana I; Falsen, Enevold; Simarro, Isabel; Rollan, Eduardo; Collins, Matthew D; Domínguez, Lucas; Fernandez-Garayzabal, Jose F

    2006-02-01

    We report a case of bacteremia in puppies caused by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae. Identification was achieved by phenotypic and molecular genetic methods. This is the first report of the recovery of S. dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae from dogs. PMID:16455943

  1. Bilateral mandibular pyogranulomatous lymphadenitis and pulmonary nodules in a dog with Bartonella henselae bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Melissa D.; Sellon, Rance K.; Tucker, Russell L.; Wills, Tamara B.; Simonsen, Andrea; Maggi, Ricardo G.; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a 2-year-old collie dog with pulmonary nodules, visualized by computed tomographic (CT) scan, with evidence of Bartonella henselae bacteremia and pyogranulomatous lymphadenitis. Clinical signs resolved with antimicrobial therapy. PMID:25320386

  2. Group A Streptococcal Bacteremia without a Source is Associated with Less Severe Disease in Children

    PubMed Central

    Gauguet, Stefanie; Ahmed, Asim A.; Zhou, Jing; Pfoh, Elizabeth R.; Ahnger-Pier, Kathryn K.; Harper, Marvin B.; Ozonoff, Al; Wessels, Michael R.; Lee, Grace M.

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed characteristics of 86 Group A streptococcal (GAS) bacteremia cases at Boston Children’s Hospital from 1992-2012. Twenty-three percent of children had severe disease, using ICU admission (18), disability (7), or death (2) as indicators. Children with bacteremia without a source (30% of cases) were less likely to have severe disease than children with focal infections in adjusted models. PMID:25319760

  3. Two cases with bacteremia suspected to be due to relatively rare Pseudomonas (Flavimonas) oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    Nei, Takahito; Sonobe, Kazunari; Onodera, Asaka; Itabashi, Toshikazu; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Maeda, Miho; Saito, Ryoichi

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (formerly Flavimonas oryzihabitans) is a glucose non-fermentative, Gram-negative bacillus which is rarely isolated from human specimens. When isolated, it is on very rare occasion as a causative pathogen of catheter-related bloodstream infection in an immunocompromised patient. Herein, we describe two hematological malignancy patients suspected to have P. oryzihabitans bacteremia. We also review cases with bacteremia due to this pathogen and its microbiological characteristics. PMID:26184853

  4. Molecular Epidemiological Characteristics of Klebsiella pneumoniae Associated with Bacteremia among Patients with Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Ryota; Shindo, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Ando, Masahiko; Jin, Wanchun; Wachino, Jun-ichi; Yamada, Keiko; Kimura, Kouji; Yagi, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Some important virulence factors have been elucidated in Klebsiella pneumoniae infections. We investigated the relationship between virulence factors and multilocus sequence types (STs) and assessed the risk factors for bacteremia in patients with pneumonia due to K. pneumoniae. From April 2004 through April 2012, a total of 120 K. pneumoniae isolates from patients with pneumonia (23 with bacteremia and 97 without bacteremia) were collected from 10 medical institutions in Japan. Additionally, 10 strains of K. pneumoniae serotype K2 that were isolated >30 years ago were included in this study. These isolates were characterized using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and the characteristics of their virulence factors, such as hypermucoviscosity phenotype and RmpA and aerobactin production between patients with and without bacteremia, were examined. MLST analysis was performed on the 120 isolates from patients with pneumonia, and some sequence type groups were defined as genetic lineages (GLs). GL65 was more prevalent among patients with bacteremia (21.7%) than in those without bacteremia (7.2%). The majority of the strains with serotype K2 were classified into GL14 or GL65, and rmpA and the gene for aerobactin were present in all GL65-K2 strains but absent in all GL14-K2 strains. In a multivariate analysis, the independent risk factors for bacteremia included GL65 (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 9.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.81 to 49.31), as well as neoplastic disease (AOR, 9.94; 95% CI, 2.61 to 37.92), immunosuppression (AOR, 17.85; 95% CI, 1.49 to 214.17), and hypoalbuminemia (AOR, 4.76; 95% CI, 1.29 to 17.61). GL65 was more prevalent among patients with bacteremia and was associated with the virulence factors of K. pneumoniae. PMID:25568434

  5. Risk factor analysis for long-term tunneled dialysis catheter-related bacteremias.

    PubMed

    Jean, G; Charra, B; Chazot, C; Vanel, T; Terrat, J C; Hurot, J M; Laurent, G

    2002-07-01

    Infection, mainly related to vascular access, is one of the main causes of morbidity and a preventable cause of death in hemodialysis patients. From January 1994 to April 1998 we conducted a prospective study to assess the incidence and risk factors of catheter-related bacteremia. One hundred and twenty-nine tunneled dual-lumen hemodialysis catheters were inserted percutaneously into the internal jugular vein in 89 patients. Bacteremia (n = 56) occurred at least once with 37 (29%) of the catheters (an incidence of 1.1/1,000 catheter-days); local infection (n = 45, 1/1,000 catheter-days) was associated with bacteremia in 18 cases. Death in 1 case was directly related to Staphylococcus aureus (SA) septic shock, and septicemia contributed to deaths in 2 additional cases. Catheters were removed in 48% of the bacteremic episodes. Treatment comprised intravenous double antimicrobial therapy for 15-20 days. Bacteriological data of bacteremia showed 55% involvement of SA. Nasal carriage of SA was observed in 35% of the patients with catheters. Bacteremic catheters were more frequently observed in patients with diabetes mellitus (p = 0.03), peripheral atherosclerosis (p = 0.001), a previous history of bacteremia (p = 0.05), nasal carriage of SA (p = 0.0001), longer catheter survival time (p = 0.001), higher total intravenous iron dose (p = 0.001), more frequent urokinase catheter infusion (p < 0.01), and local infection (p < 0.001) compared with non-bacteremic catheters. Monovariate survival analysis showed that significant initial risk factors for bacteremia were nasal carriage of SA (p = 0.00001), previous bacteremia (p = 0.0001), peripheral atherosclerosis (p = 0.005), and diabetes (p = 0.04). This study confirms the relatively high incidence of bacteremia with tunneled double-lumen silicone catheters and its potential complications. Possible preventive actions are discussed according to the risk factors. PMID:12119469

  6. In Vitro Adhesion and Platelet Aggregation Properties of Bacteremia-Associated Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Kirjavainen, Pirkka V.; Tuomola, Elina M.; Crittenden, Ross G.; Ouwehand, Arthur C.; Harty, Derek W. S.; Morris, Leone F.; Rautelin, Hilpi; Playne, Martin J.; Donohue, Diana C.; Salminen, Seppo J.

    1999-01-01

    Eight bacteremia-associated Lactobacillus strains were evaluated in vitro for the ability to adhere to human intestinal mucosa and to aggregate platelets. Adherence varied significantly among the strains, and platelet aggregation was induced by three strains. In conclusion, strong binding ability does not appear to be a prerequisite for the involvement of lactobacilli in bacteremia or to their ability to aggregate platelets. PMID:10225937

  7. Frequency, risk factors, and outcome for bacteremia after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Samore, M H; Wessolossky, M A; Lewis, S M; Shubrooks, S J; Karchmer, A W

    1997-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine bacteremias after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) with respect to incidence, outcome, and risk factors. Patients undergoing PTCA from January 1990 through April 1994 were studied; during this period a total of 4,217 PTCAs were performed in 3,473 patients. With use of predefined clinical and microbiologic criteria, bacteremias were divided into 3 categories according to the relation to the PTCA procedure: PTCA-related, unrelated, and indeterminate. Ninety-one patients with at least 1 positive blood culture during a 7-week period after PTCA were identified. The bacteremia was classified as unrelated to the PTCA procedure in 32 patients, PTCA-related in 27, and indeterminant in the remaining 32 patients. The attack rate of PTCA-related bacteremia during the 52-month period was 0.64%. The most common organisms causing PTCA-related bacteremia were Staphylococcus aureus (14 patients), coagulase-negative staphylococci (9 patients) and group B streptococci (6 patients). Septic complications, which included femoral artery mycotic aneurysm, septic arthritis, and septic thrombosis, occurred in 10 patients (0.24%). Independent risk factors for PTCA-related bacteremia included duration of procedure (odds ratio [OR] 2.9; p = 0.04), number of catheterizations at the same site (OR 4.0; p = 0.015), difficult vascular access (OR 14.9; p = 0.007), arterial sheath in place > 1 day (OR 6.8; p = 0.025), congestive heart failure (OR 43.3; p = 0.002). Thus, PTCA-related bacteremia is an infrequent complication of PTCA but can be associated with significant morbidity, particularly when the infecting organism is S. aureus. Four of the 5 risk factors for PTCA-related bacteremia appear to correlate directly with increased vascular injury or maintenance of the arterial entry for the procedure. PMID:9104897

  8. Predictive Factors for Metastatic Infection in Patients With Bacteremia Caused by Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Fumiya; Hosaka, Yumiko; Hoshina, Tokio; Tamura, Kumi; Nakaharai, Kazuhiko; Kato, Tetsuro; Nakazawa, Yasushi; Yoshida, Masaki; Hori, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Metastatic infections such as infective endocarditis and psoas abscess are serious complications of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia because failure to identify these infections may result in bacteremia relapse or poor prognosis. In the present study, we determined the predictive factors for metastatic infection due to methicillin-sensitive S. aureus bacteremia. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted among patients with methicillin-sensitive S. aureus bacteremia at the Jikei University Hospital between January 2008 and December 2012. Factors analyzed included the underlying disease, initial antimicrobial treatment and primary site of infection. Results: During the 5-year study period, 73 patients met the inclusion criteria and were assessed. The most common primary site of bacteremia was catheter-related bloodstream infection (25/73 [34.2%]). Metastatic infection occurred in 14 of 73 patients (19.2%) (infective endocarditis [3], septic pulmonary abscess [3], spondylitis [4], psoas abscess [4], epidural abscess [3] and septic arthritis [1]). Six patients had multiple metastatic infections. Multivariate analysis revealed that the predictive factors associated with the development of metastatic infection were a delay in appropriate antimicrobial treatment of >48 hours, persistent fever for >72 hours after starting antibiotic treatment and lowest C-reactive protein levels of >3 mg/dL during 2 weeks after the onset of bacteremia. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that additional diagnostic tests should be conducted to identify metastatic infection, particularly in patients with delayed antimicrobial treatment, persistent fever and persistently high C-reactive protein levels. PMID:25250988

  9. Mild Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection Improves the Course of Subsequent Endogenous S. aureus Bacteremia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Sanne; de Vogel, Corné P.; van Belkum, Alex; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus carriers with S. aureus bacteremia may have a reduced mortality risk compared to non-carriers. A role for the immune system is suggested. Here, we study in mice the effect of mild S. aureus skin infection prior to endogenous or exogenous S. aureus bacteremia, and evaluate protection in relation to anti-staphylococcal antibody levels. Skin infections once or twice by a clinical S. aureus isolate (isolate P) or S. aureus strain 8325-4 were induced in mice free of S. aureus and anti-staphylococcal antibodies. Five weeks later, immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels in blood against 25 S. aureus antigens were determined, and LD50 or LD100 bacteremia caused by S. aureus isolate P was induced. S. aureus skin infections led to elevated levels of anti-staphylococcal IgG in blood. One skin infection improved the course of subsequent severe endogenous bacteremia only. A second skin infection further improved animal survival rate, which was associated with increased pre-bacteremia IgG levels against Efb, IsaA, LukD, LukE, Nuc, PrsA and WTA. In conclusion, S. aureus isolate P skin infection in mice reduces the severity of subsequent endogenous S. aureus bacteremia only. Although cellular immune effects cannot be rules out, anti-staphylococcal IgG against specified antigens may contribute to this effect. PMID:26060995

  10. Clinical and Microbiological Characteristics of Eggerthella lenta Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Tai, A. Y.; Kotsanas, D.; Francis, M. J.; Roberts, S. A.; Ballard, S. A.; Junckerstorff, R. K.; Korman, T. M.

    2014-01-01

    Eggerthella lenta is an emerging pathogen that has been underrecognized due to historical difficulties with phenotypic identification. Until now, its pathogenicity, antimicrobial susceptibility profile, and optimal treatment have been poorly characterized. In this article, we report the largest cohort of patients with E. lenta bacteremia to date and describe in detail their clinical features, microbiologic characteristics, treatment, and outcomes. We identified 33 patients; the median age was 68 years, and there was no gender predominance. Twenty-seven patients (82%) had serious intra-abdominal pathology, often requiring a medical procedure. Of those who received antibiotics (28/33, 85%), the median duration of treatment was 21.5 days. Mortality from all causes was 6% at 7 days, 12% at 30 days, and 33% at 1 year. Of 26 isolates available for further testing, all were identified as E. lenta by both commercially available matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) systems, and none were found to harbor a vanA or vanB gene. Of 23 isolates which underwent susceptibility testing, all were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefoxitin, metronidazole, piperacillin-tazobactam, ertapenem, and meropenem, 91% were susceptible to clindamycin, 74% were susceptible to moxifloxacin, and 39% were susceptible to penicillin. PMID:25520446

  11. [A Case of Bacteremia Caused by Ochrobacterium intermedium].

    PubMed

    Hirai, Jun; Yamagishi, Yuka; Sakanashi, Daisuke; Koizumi, Yusuke; Suematsu, Hiroyuki; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-03-01

    We report herein on a case of bacteremia caused by Ochrobactrum intermedium (O. intermedium) identified with biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). An 86-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with paralysis of the right side of the body and dysphagia. He was diagnosed as having a pontine infarction based on the brain MRI findings and was admitted to hospital to have anti-platelet therapy. Three days after admission, he had a fever. Although he had redness and swelling at the peripheral venous catheter insertion site, he was diagnosed as having aspiration pneumonia, since he had fine crackles on auscultation. Soon after taking two sets of blood cultures and removal of the peripheral venous catheter, sulbactam/ampicillin (SBT/ABPC) was administrated. Fifty three hours after incubation, gram-negative bacilli was detected from an aerobic bottle and identified as O. intermedium with MALDI-TOF MS (Bruker MS). Antimicrobial chemotherapy was changed to meropenem (MEPM). He was treated for a total of seven days, and recovered without relapse. Infection caused by O. intermedium has been very uncommon, however, O. intermedium has been recognized as an emerging pathogen in immunodeficient and immunocompetent patients. Since identification of Ochrobactrum species by biochemical methods could be difficult, MALDI-TOF MS might be helpful to clarify Ochrobactrum species just as in the present case. PMID:27197440

  12. Simplified risk stratification criteria for identification of patients with MRSA bacteremia at low risk of infective endocarditis: implications for avoiding routine transesophageal echocardiography in MRSA bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Buitron de la Vega, P; Tandon, P; Qureshi, W; Nasr, Y; Jayaprakash, R; Arshad, S; Moreno, D; Jacobsen, G; Ananthasubramaniam, K; Ramesh, M; Zervos, M

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia with low risk of infective endocarditis (IE) who might not require routine trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE). We retrospectively evaluated 398 patients presenting with MRSA bacteremia for the presence of the following clinical criteria: intravenous drug abuse (IVDA), long-term catheter, prolonged bacteremia, intra-cardiac device, prosthetic valve, hemodialysis dependency, vertebral/nonvertebral osteomyelitis, cardio-structural abnormality. IE was diagnosed using the modified Duke criteria. Of 398 patients with MRSA bacteremia, 26.4 % of cases were community-acquired, 56.3 % were health-care-associated, and 17.3 % were hospital-acquired. Of the group, 44 patients had definite IE, 119 had possible IE, and 235 had a rejected diagnosis. Out of 398 patients, 231 were evaluated with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) or TEE. All 44 patients with definite IE fulfilled at least one criterion (sensitivity 100 %). Finally, a receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve was obtained to evaluate the total risk score of our proposed criteria as a predictor of the presence of IE, and this was compared to the ROC curve of a previously proposed criteria. The area under the ROC curve for our criteria was 0.710, while the area under the ROC curve for the criteria previously proposed was 0.537 (p < 0.001). The p-value for comparing those 2 areas was less than 0.001, indicating statistical significance. Patients with MRSA bacteremia without any of our proposed clinical criteria have very low risk of developing IE and may not require routine TEE. PMID:26676855

  13. Comparative Study of Plasma Endotoxin with Procalcitonin Levels in Diagnosis of Bacteremia in Intensive Care Unit Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Cui, Yun-Liang; Lin, Zhao-Fen; Chen, De-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Both procalcitonin (PCT) and plasma endotoxin levels cannot be solely used for a definite diagnosis of bacteremia or sepsis, and there has been few study comparing the values of the two biomarkers for the diagnosis of bacteremia. The aim of this study was to identify bacteria causing bacteremia and evaluate the role of the two biomarkers in the diagnosis of bacteremia in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Methods: The medical records of 420 patients in ICU were retrospectively reviewed. Patients (n = 241) who met the inclusion criteria were subjected to blood culture (BC) for the analysis of the endotoxin or PCT levels. The exclusion criteria included the presence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus and/or AIDS, neutropenia without sepsis, pregnancy, treatment with immunosuppressive therapies, or blood diseases such as hematological tumors. Patients’ BC episodes were divided into BC negative, Gram-negative (GN) bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungi groups. The PCT and plasma endotoxin levels were compared in the different groups. Results: A total of 241 patients with 505 episodes of BC were analyzed. The GN bacteria group showed higher levels of PCT and endotoxin than the BC negative, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungi groups. GN bacteremia was more prevalent than Gram-positive bacteremia. The GN bacteremia caused by non-Enterobacteriaceae infection presented higher endotoxin level than that by Enterobacteriaceae, but no significant difference in PCT levels was observed between the two groups. The plasma endotoxin significantly differed among different groups and was bacterial species dependent. Conclusions: Plasma endotoxin was more related to GN than to Gram-positive bacteremia, and that endotoxin level was species dependent, but PCT level remained relatively more stable within the GN bacteria caused bacteremia. Both GN and positive bacteria caused bacteremia in the ICU patients in different regions of China. And PCT is a more valuable

  14. Can procalcitonin differentiate Staphylococcus aureus from coagulase-negative staphylococci in clustered gram-positive bacteremia?

    PubMed

    Shomali, William; Hachem, Ray; Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Bahu, Ramez; Helou, Gilbert El; Jiang, Ying; Hanania, Alex; Reitzel, Ruth; Raad, Issam

    2013-06-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) and pro-adrenomedullin (ProADM) have been proposed as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of infection. Between July 2009 and January 2012, we studied the role of these biomarkers in 163 patients with clustered gram-positive and gram-negative bacteremia. PCT levels were significantly higher in patients with Staphylococcus aureus and gram-negative bacteremia than those with coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) isolated from blood cultures (P = 0.29 and <0.001, respectively). ProADM levels were only significantly higher in patients with gram-negative bacteremia (median 1.46 nmol/L) than those with CoNS (median 1.01 nmol/L) (P = 0.04). Among patients with CoNS, PCT, and ProADM, levels failed to differentiate blood contamination (medians 0.24 ng/mL and 0.97 nmol/L) from true bacteremia (medians 0.26 ng/mL and 1.14 nmol/L) (P = 0.51 and 0.57, respectively). In cancer patients, PCT (and to a lesser extent, ProADM) was useful in differentiating CoNS from S. aureus and gram-negative bacteremia. PMID:23578976

  15. Salmonella heidelberg enteritis and bacteremia. An epidemic on two pediatric wards.

    PubMed

    Rice, P A; Craven, C; Wells, J G

    1976-04-01

    Symptomatic infection with Salmonella heidelberg developed in 55 children after their admission to the pediatric wards of two adjacent hospiatls in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Many of these children had been hospitalized for the treatment of diarrhea of unidentified etiology. In 25 of these patients, Salmonella bacteremia was documented. Five had clinically unsuspected and untreated bacteremia with no evidence of complications during the follow-up period of four and a half months. The remaining 30 had "standard" symptomatic infection due to S. heidelberg. Eight children died; four of these proved to be bacteremic. The index patient, who also introduced the infection into one of the hospitals, was identified. Person to person spread perpetuated the outbreak within and between the two hospitals for nearly four months. Although neonates with salmonellosis had a higher rate of bacteremia than other children, no other specific predisposing factors for Salmonella bacteremia were identified. Laboratory studies of the epidemic strain revealed neither invasive nor enterotoxic properties of the organisms, nor enhanced virulence in laboratory mice. Cohort nursing and isolation of patients with positive cultures halted the epidemic. Nontyphoid Salmonella bacteremia, sometimes clinically unsuspected and self-limited, should be recognized as a frequent accompaniment of Salmonella enteritis in young hospitalized children. PMID:1274984

  16. Bacteremia Among Febrile Ugandan Children Treated with Antimalarials Despite a Negative Malaria Test.

    PubMed

    Kibuuka, Afizi; Byakika-Kibwika, Pauline; Achan, Jane; Yeka, Adoke; Nalyazi, Joan N; Mpimbaza, Arthur; Rosenthal, Philip J; Kamya, Moses R

    2015-08-01

    Bacteremia may be inappropriately treated as malaria in children admitted with a febrile illness in Africa. We determined the prevalence, clinical features, and spectrum of bacteremia among febrile children younger than 5 years of age admitted with a negative malaria test, but prescribed antimalarials at a referral hospital in Jinja, Uganda. After initial evaluation, a blood sample was drawn from 250 children for a complete blood count and bacterial culture. Of 250 samples cultured, 15 grew organisms presumed to be skin contaminants, and of the remaining 235 samples, 45 (19.1%) had bacteremia. Staphylococcus aureus (42%), non-typhoidal Salmonella (24%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (11%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (9%) were the most common bacterial isolates. On multivariate analysis, history of weight loss (odds ratio [OR] = 2.75; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.27-5.95), presence of pulmonary crackles (OR = 3.63; 95% CI = 1.40-9.45), and leukocytosis (OR = 2.21; 95% CI = 1.09-4.47) were independent predictors of bacteremia. At a referral hospital in Uganda, bacteremia was a remarkably common finding in children with febrile illness who were treated for malaria despite negative malaria test results. PMID:26055736

  17. Recent changes in bacteremia in patients with cancer: a systematic review of epidemiology and antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Montassier, E; Batard, E; Gastinne, T; Potel, G; de La Cochetière, M F

    2013-07-01

    Bacteremia remains a major cause of life-threatening complication in patients with cancer. Significant changes in the spectrum of microorganisms isolated from blood culture have been reported in cancer patients over the past years. The aim of our systematic review was to inventory the recent trends in epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of microorganisms causing bacteremia in cancer patients. Data for this review was identified by searches of Medline, Scopus and Cochrane Library for indexed articles and abstracts published in English since 2008. The principal search terms were: "antimicrobial resistance", "bacteremia", "bacterial epidemiology", "bloodstream infection", "cancer patients", "carbapenem resistance", "Escherichia coli resistance", "extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing E. coli", "febrile neutropenia", "fluoroquinolone resistance", "neutropenic cancer patient", "vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus", and "multidrug resistance". Boolean operators (NOT, AND, OR) were also used in succession to narrow and widen the search. Altogether, 27 articles were selected to be analyzed in the review. We found that Gram-negative bacteria were the most frequent pathogen isolated, particularly in studies with minimal use of antibiotic prophylaxis. Another important trend is the extensive emergence of antimicrobial-resistant strains associated with increased risk of morbidity, mortality and cost. This increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance has been reported in Gram-negative bacteria as well as in Gram-positive bacteria. This exhaustive review, reporting the recent findings in epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of bacteremia in cancer patients, highlights the necessity of local continuous surveillance of bacteremia and stringent enforcement of antibiotic stewardship programs in cancer patients. PMID:23354675

  18. Infection and T lymphocyte subpopulations: changes associated with bacteremia and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fishman, J A; Martell, K M; Rubin, R H

    1983-01-01

    Patients with bacteremia, bacterial endocarditis, or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were prospectively studied using monoclonal antibody reagents to assess alterations in T-lymphocyte subpopulations. Patients with endocarditis had significantly higher ratios of T-helper (OKT4+) to T-suppressor-cytotoxic (OKT8+) cells than did patients with bacteremia alone. Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis patients had a mean ratio of 8.49 (range 4.73-22.36) while S aureus bacteremia had a mean ratio of 2.75 (range 2.15 to 3.21). Similar results were found with Staphylococcus epidermidis endocarditis (mean 1.62) and bacteremia (mean 1.23). Klebsiella pneumoniae endocarditis (5.10) and sepsis (4.32), and E coli bacteremia (2.15). Nine male patients with AIDS had markedly depressed ratios (mean 0.25, range 0.04 to 0.67) while eight male homosexuals with unexplained lymphadenopathy ("pre-AIDS") had normal or increased ratios. Bacteremic infections are associated with an increased OKT4+/OKT8+ ratio with the degree of increase dependent upon virulence, location, and duration of infection. The immunomodulating effects of infection are manifested in changes in T-cell subsets, and these measurements can be useful in clinical management. PMID:6094086

  19. Detection and quantitation by lysis-filtration of bacteremia after different oral surgical procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Heimdahl, A; Hall, G; Hedberg, M; Sandberg, H; Söder, P O; Tunér, K; Nord, C E

    1990-01-01

    Patients with bacteremia after dental extraction, third-molar surgery, dental scaling, endodontic treatment, and bilateral tonsillectomy were studied by means of lysis-filtration of blood samples with subsequent aerobic and anaerobic incubation. Samples were obtained before, during, and 10 min after treatment. Bacteremia was observed in 100% of patients after dental extraction, 55% of patients after third-molar surgery, 70% of patients after dental scaling, 20% of patients after endodontic treatment, and 55% of patients after bilateral tonsillectomy. Anaerobic microorganisms were isolated more frequently than aerobic microorganisms were, and viridans group streptococci were the most commonly isolated bacteria. Ten minutes after treatment, the frequency as well as the magnitude of bacteremia showed pronounced reduction. PMID:2229342

  20. Cefepime Therapy for Cefepime-Susceptible Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruibin; Cosgrove, Sara E.; Tschudin-Sutter, Sarah; Han, Jennifer H.; Turnbull, Alison E.; Hsu, Alice J.; Avdic, Edina; Carroll, Karen C.; Tamma, Pranita D.

    2016-01-01

    The role of cefepime for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) bacteremia is unclear if susceptible in vitro. In a propensity score-matched study of patients with ESBL bacteremia, risk of death was 2.87 times higher for patients receiving cefepime compared with carbapenems (95% confidence interval [CI], .88–9.41). We compared 14-day mortality of patients with ESBL bacteremia receiving empiric cefepime versus empiric carbapenem therapy in a propensity score-matched cohort. There was a trend towards increased mortality in the cefepime group (hazard ratio, 2.87; 95% CI, .88–9.41), which enhances the existing literature suggesting that cefepime may be suboptimal for invasive ESBL infections.

  1. Efficacy of Tigecycline for Secondary Acinetobacter Bacteremia and Factors Associated with Treatment Failure

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Bo-Huang; Lee, Yi-Tzu; Liu, Po-Yu; Fung, Chang-Phone

    2015-01-01

    We describe the clinical outcome of 17 patients with secondary Acinetobacter bacteremia whose isolates had a tigecycline MIC of ≤2 mg/liter and who received tigecycline within 2 days of bacteremia onset. The 14-day mortality rate of the tigecycline cohort was 41.2% (7/17), which was significantly higher than that of those receiving other appropriate antimicrobial agents (13.8%, 9/65; P = 0.018). However, the percentages of end-stage renal disease and congestive heart failure were higher in the tigecycline cohort. The efficacy of tigecycline was contingent upon the illness severity and bacterial species. Tigecycline should be applied cautiously for treatment of Acinetobacter bacteremia. PMID:25824230

  2. Mycobacterium mucogenicum bacteremia in immune-compromised patients, 2008-2013.

    PubMed

    Abidi, M Z; Ledeboer, N; Banerjee, A; Hari, P

    2016-06-01

    Mycobacterium mucogenicum (MM) is a rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterium that may rarely cause bacteremia in immune-compromised hosts. All MM cases from 2008 to 2013 were analyzed across 4 risk groups: stem cell transplantation (SCT), hematologic malignancy, solid tumors, and others. Descriptive analysis was performed, as well as comparative analysis of neutropenic patients (absolute neutrophil count ≤1000/μL) with nonneutropenic patients. Of 39 MM cases, 27 patients had undergone SCT. Neutropenia was present in 12 patients. There was a significant difference in the presence of fever at the time of MM bacteremia between neutropenic and nonneutropenic groups (92% versus 42%; P=0.005). Central venous catheter (CVC) was present in 33 cases. All patients were treated with >1 antibiotic. Most frequently used combination antibiotic regimen involved clarithromycin and amikacin. Median duration of antibiotic treatment was 42days. Bacteremia resolved in all cases with CVC removal and combination antibiotic treatment. PMID:27117516

  3. Cefepime Therapy for Cefepime-Susceptible Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruibin; Cosgrove, Sara E; Tschudin-Sutter, Sarah; Han, Jennifer H; Turnbull, Alison E; Hsu, Alice J; Avdic, Edina; Carroll, Karen C; Tamma, Pranita D

    2016-09-01

    The role of cefepime for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) bacteremia is unclear if susceptible in vitro. In a propensity score-matched study of patients with ESBL bacteremia, risk of death was 2.87 times higher for patients receiving cefepime compared with carbapenems (95% confidence interval [CI], .88-9.41). We compared 14-day mortality of patients with ESBL bacteremia receiving empiric cefepime versus empiric carbapenem therapy in a propensity score-matched cohort. There was a trend towards increased mortality in the cefepime group (hazard ratio, 2.87; 95% CI, .88-9.41), which enhances the existing literature suggesting that cefepime may be suboptimal for invasive ESBL infections. PMID:27419191

  4. Epidemiology and Molecular Characterization of Bacteremia Due to Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, C. J.; Chen, L.; Shields, R. K.; Zhao, Y.; Cheng, S.; Chavda, K. D.; Hao, B.; Hong, J. H.; Doi, Y.; Kwak, E. J.; Silveira, F. P.; Abdel-Massih, R.; Bogdanovich, T.; Humar, A.; Perlin, D. S.; Kreiswirth, B. N.; Hong Nguyen, M.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective study of 17 transplant recipients with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia, and described epidemiology, clinical characteristics and strain genotypes. Eighty-eight percent (15/17) of patients were liver or intestinal transplant recipients. Outcomes were death due to septic shock (18%), cure (24%) and persistent (>7 days) or recurrent bacteremia (29% each). Thirty- and 90-day mortality was 18% and 47%, respectively. Patients who were cured received at least one active antimicrobial agent and underwent source control interventions. Forty-one percent (7/17) of patients had intra-abdominal infections; all except one developed persistent/recurrent bacteremia despite drainage. Two patients tolerated persistent bacteremia for >300 days. All patients except one were infected with sequence type 258 (ST258), K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-2-producing strains harboring a mutant ompK35 porin gene; the exception was infected with an ST37, KPC-3-producing strain. Seventy-one percent (12/17) of patients were infected with ST258 ompK36 mutant strains. In two patients, persistent bacteremia was caused by two strains with different ompK36 genotypes. Three ompK36 mutations were associated with significantly higher carbapenem minimum inhibitory concentrations than wild-type ompK36. Pulse-field gel electrophoresis identified a single ST258 lineage; serial strains from individual patients were indistinguishable. In conclusion, KPC-K. pneumoniae bacteremia exhibited highly diverse clinical courses following transplantation, and was caused by clonal ST258 strains with different ompK36 genotypes. PMID:24011185

  5. Importance of Molecular Methods to Determine Whether a Probiotic is the Source of Lactobacillus Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Aroutcheva, Alla; Auclair, Julie; Frappier, Martin; Millette, Mathieu; Lolans, Karen; de Montigny, Danielle; Carrière, Serge; Sokalski, Stephen; Trick, William E; Weinstein, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    There has been an increasing interest in the use of probiotic products for the prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Bio-K+(®) is a commercial probiotic product comprising three strains of lactobacilli--Lactobacillus acidophilus CL1285(®), Lact. casei LBC80R(®) and Lact. rhamnosus CLR2(®)--that have been applied to prevent CDI. Generally considered as safe, lactobacilli have potential to cause bacteremia, endocarditis and other infections. The source of Lactobacillus bacteremia can be normal human flora or lactobacilli-containing probiotic. The aim of this study was to assess whether probiotic lactobacilli caused bacteremia and to show the value of molecular identification and typing techniques to determine probiotic and patient strain relatedness. We report an episode of Lactobacillus bacteremia in a 69-year-old man admitted to a hospital with severe congestive heart failure. During his hospitalization, he required long-term antibiotic therapy. Additionally, the patient received Bio-K+(®) probiotic as part of a quality improvement project to prevent CDI. Subsequently, Lactobacillus bacteremia occurred. Two independent blinded laboratory evaluations, using pulse field gel electrophoresis, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and DNA fingerprint analysis (rep-PCR), were performed to determine whether the recovered Lact. acidophilus originated from the probiotic product. Ultimately, the patient strain was identified as Lact. casei and both laboratories found no genetic relation between the patient's strain and any of the probiotic lactobacilli. This clinical case of lactobacillus bacteremia in the setting of probiotic exposure demonstrates the value of using discriminatory molecular methods to clearly determine whether there were a link between the patient's isolate and the probiotic strains. PMID:26915093

  6. Successful Treatment of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia

    PubMed Central

    Aygun, Fatih; Cam, Halit

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious, life-threatening, systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. The ability of microorganism to form biofilm on biomedical devices can be responsible for catheter-related bloodstream infections. Other manifestations of severe disease are meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections. The most common feature in true bacteremia caused by Bacillus is the presence of an intravascular catheter. Herein, we report a case of catheter-related bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a patient with propionic acidemia. PMID:27195164

  7. Acute Pyelonephritis with Bacteremia Caused by Enterococcus hirae: A Rare Infection in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pãosinho, Ana; Azevedo, Telma; Alves, João V.; Costa, Isabel A.; Carvalho, Gustavo; Peres, Susana R.; Baptista, Teresa; Borges, Fernando; Mansinho, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Enterococci are one of the usual residents of the microflora in humans. In the last decade this genus has been reported as the third most common cause of bacteremia. We present the case of a 78-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency room because of nausea, lipothymia, and weakness. She was diagnosed with a pyelonephritis with bacteremia, with the isolation in blood and urine cultures of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus hirae. This last microorganism is a rarely isolated pathogen in humans. Currently it is estimated to represent 1–3% of all enterococcal species isolated in clinical practice. PMID:27127665

  8. Successful Treatment of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia.

    PubMed

    Aygun, Fatma Deniz; Aygun, Fatih; Cam, Halit

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious, life-threatening, systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. The ability of microorganism to form biofilm on biomedical devices can be responsible for catheter-related bloodstream infections. Other manifestations of severe disease are meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections. The most common feature in true bacteremia caused by Bacillus is the presence of an intravascular catheter. Herein, we report a case of catheter-related bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a patient with propionic acidemia. PMID:27195164

  9. Magnitude of Enterococcal Bacteremia in Trauma Patients Admitted for Intensive Trauma Care: A Tertiary Care Experience from South Asian Country

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumari, Nonika; Mathur, Purva; Thanbuana, Bariamtak; Sajan, Swaminathan; Misra, Mahesh C

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bloodstream infection (BSI) and bacteremias due to Enterococcus spp. are increasing worldwide with the current need to understand its causes among hospitalized trauma patients. Hence, the study was conducted. Methodology: A 3-year retrospective laboratory cum clinical based study was performed at a level I trauma center in India. Patients with health care associated enterococcal bacteremia were identified using the hospital database, their episodes of BSI/bacteremia calculated and their clinical records and treatment were noted. Results: A total of 104 nonrepetitive Enterococcus spp. was isolated of which Enterococcus faecium was the most common (52%). High-level resistance to gentamicin high-level aminoglycoside resistance was seen in all the Enterococcus spp. causing bacteremia, whereas a low resistance to vancomycin and teichoplanin was observed. Overall mortality was more in patients infected with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (5/11, 46%) compared to those with vancomycin sensitive Enterococcus (9/93, 10%); though no significant association of mortality with Enterococcus spp. bacteremia (P > 0.05) was seen. The rate of bacteremia due to Enterococcus spp. was 25.4 episodes/1,000 admissions (104/4,094) during the study period. Conclusion: Enterococcal bacteremia is much prevalent in trauma care facilities. Here, a microbiologist can act as a sentinel and help in preventing such infections. PMID:25949058

  10. Four Cases of Bacteremia Caused by Oscillibacter ruminantium, a Newly Described Species

    PubMed Central

    Arpi, Magnus; Klein, Kasper; Justesen, Ulrik S.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Oscillibacter has been known since 2007, but no association to human infection has been reported. Here, we present four cases of Oscillibacter ruminantium bacteremia from hospitals across Denmark from 2001 to 2010. Correct identification is now possible, as the 16S rRNA gene sequence was recently made publicly available. PMID:24501034

  11. First clinical description of Eggerthia catenaformis bacteremia in a patient with dental abscess.

    PubMed

    Kordjian, Hayarpi H; Schultz, Joyce D J H; Rosenvinge, Flemming Schønning; Møller, Jakob; Pedersen, Rune M

    2015-10-01

    We present a case of Eggerthia catenaformis bacteremia originating from a dental abscess and imitating necrotizing fasciitis in a previously healthy adult. The isolates were easily identified by MALDI-TOF MS. The clinical course, surgical and antibiotic treatment as well as the successful outcome are reported. PMID:26172397

  12. Campylobacter jejuni bacteremia and Helicobacter pylori in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    van den Bruele, T.; Mourad-Baars, P. E. C.; Claas, E. C. J.; van der Plas, R. N.; Kuijper, E. J.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a 15-year-old patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia who developed malabsorption and bacteremia due to infection of Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni. The Campylobacter bacteremia was only recognized after subculturing of blood culture bottles that failed to signal in the automated system. After 2 weeks of treatment with meropenem and erythromycin for 4 weeks, the patient developed a relapse of bacteremia 10 months later with a high level erythromycin resistant C. jejuni. Sequencing revealed an A2058C mutation in the 23 S rRNA gene associated with this resistance. Treatment with doxycycline for 4 weeks finally resulted in complete eradication. This case report illustrates the importance for physicians to use adapted culture methods and adequate prolonged therapy in patients with an immunodeficiency. A summary of published case reports and series of patients with hypogammaglobulinemia or agammaglobulinemia with Campylobacter or Helicobacter bacteremia is given. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10096-010-0999-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20556465

  13. Multidrug-Resistant Bacteroides fragilis Bacteremia in a US Resident: An Emerging Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Sunita; Siegfried, Justin; Dubrovskaya, Yanina; Rahimian, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of Bacteroides fragilis bacteremia associated with paraspinal and psoas abscesses in the United States. Resistance to b-lactam/b-lactamase inhibitors, carbapenems, and metronidazole was encountered despite having a recent travel history to India as the only possible risk factor for multidrug resistance. Microbiological cure was achieved with linezolid, moxifloxacin, and cefoxitin. PMID:27418986

  14. Nutritionally Variant Streptococci Bacteremia in Cancer Patients: A Retrospective Study, 1999–2014

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Abraham T.; Krishnan, Jayasree; Acevedo, Ileana M.; Halliday, Joseph; Greene, John N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nutritionally variant Streptococci (NVS), Abiotrophia and Granulicatella are implicated in causing endocarditis and blood stream infections more frequently than other sites of infection. Neutropenia and mucositis are the most common predisposing factors for infection with other pathogens in cancer patients. In this study, we investigated the clinical characteristics of NVS bacteremia in cancer patients and identified risk factors and outcomes associated with these infections. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed all cases of NVS bacteremia occurring from June 1999 to April 2014 at H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute. The computerized epidemiology report provided by the microbiology laboratory identified thirteen cancer patients with NVS bacteremia. We collected data regarding baseline demographics and clinical characteristics such as age, sex, underlying malignancy, neutropenic status, duration of neutropenia, treatment, and outcome. Results Thirteen patients were identified with positive NVS blood stream infection. Ten patients (77%) had hematologic malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)(1), multiple myeloma (MM)(1), acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)(4), and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL)(4). The non-hematologic malignancies included esophageal cancer(2) and bladder cancer (1). Conclusion NVS should be considered as a possible agent of bacteremia in cancer patients with neutropenia and a breach in oral, gastrointestinal and genitourinary mucosa (gingivitis/mucositis). PMID:25960858

  15. Catheter-Related Bacteremia Due to Kocuria kristinae in a Patient with Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Basaglia, G.; Carretto, E.; Barbarini, D.; Moras, L.; Scalone, S.; Marone, P.; De Paoli, P.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the first case of a catheter-related recurrent bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae, a gram-positive microorganism belonging to the family Micrococcaceae, in a 51-year-old woman with ovarian cancer. This unusual pathogen may cause opportunistic infections in patients with severe underlying diseases. PMID:11773142

  16. Catheter-related bacteremia due to Kocuria kristinae in a patient with ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Basaglia, G; Carretto, E; Barbarini, D; Moras, L; Scalone, S; Marone, P; De Paoli, P

    2002-01-01

    We report on the first case of a catheter-related recurrent bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae, a gram-positive microorganism belonging to the family Micrococcaceae, in a 51-year-old woman with ovarian cancer. This unusual pathogen may cause opportunistic infections in patients with severe underlying diseases. PMID:11773142

  17. Potential therapeutic failure of generic vancomycin in a liver transplant patient with MRSA peritonitis and bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Carlos A; Agudelo, Maria; Cataño, Juan C; Zuluaga, Andres F; Vesga, Omar

    2009-10-01

    We report a case of generic vancomycin treatment failure in a liver transplant patient with MRSA peritonitis and bacteremia, followed by a rapid sterilization of blood and peritoneal fluid after switching to the branded product. It raises concern about therapeutic equivalence of generic vancomycin. PMID:19698745

  18. Bacteremia Caused by Microbacterium binotii in a Patient with Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Sarah N.; Starlin, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Microbacterium species are non-spore-forming, Gram-positive rods rarely associated with human disease. In this report, we describe the first case of bacteremia caused by Microbacterium binotii in a patient with sickle cell anemia. The utility of using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis along with phenotypic methods for identification is shown. PMID:24197889

  19. Predicting abscesses in adults with community-onset monomicrobial Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia: microorganisms matters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Hsun; Lee, Ching-Chi; Hsieh, Chih-Chia; Hong, Ming-Yuan; Chi, Chih-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacteriaceae is a leading pathogen of community-onset bacteremia. This study aims to establish a predictive scoring algorithm to identify adults with community-onset Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia who are at risk for abscesses. Of the total 1262 adults, 152 (12.0%) with abscess occurrence were noted. The 6 risk factors significantly associated with abscess occurrence-liver cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, thrombocytopenia and high C-reactive protein (>100 mg/L) at bacteremic onset, delayed defervescence, and bacteremia-causing Klebsiella pneumoniae-were each assigned +1 point to form the scoring algorithm. In contrast, the elderly, fatal comorbidity (McCabe classification), and bacteremia-causing Escherichia coli were each assigned -1 point, owing to their negative associations with abscess occurrence. Using the proposed scoring algorithm, a cut-off value of +1 yielded a high sensitivity (85.5%) and an acceptable specificity (60.4%). Although the proposed predictive model needs further validation, this simple scoring algorithm may be useful for the early identification of abscesses by clinicians. PMID:26456388

  20. Cronobacter sakazakii bacteremia in a heart transplant patient with polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tamigniau, A; Vanhaecke, J; Saegeman, V

    2015-12-01

    Infections with Cronobacter sakazakii are mainly described among neonates and infants, with contaminated powdered infant formulas most often incriminated as the cause. We describe here a case of C. sakazakii bacteremia secondary to a suspected cyst infection in a heart-and-kidney transplant patient with polycystic kidney disease. PMID:26436411

  1. Meningitis and Bacteremia Due to Neisseria cinerea following a Percutaneous Rhizotomy of the Trigeminal Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Richter, H.; Bruderer, T.; Goldenberger, D.; Emonet, S.; Strahm, C.

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria cinerea is a human commensal. The first known case of meningitis and bacteremia due to Neisseria cinerea following percutaneous glycerol instillation of the trigeminal ganglion is reported. Conventional phenotypic methods and complete 16S RNA gene sequencing accurately identified the pathogen. Difficulties in differentiation from pathogenic neisseriae are discussed. PMID:26511743

  2. Sacroiliitis secondary to catheter-related bacteremia due to Mycobacterium abscessus (sensu stricto)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of sacroiliitis secondary to catheter-related bacteremia due to Mycobacterium abscessus (sensu stricto). This case confirms that MultiLocus sequence typing and variable-number tandem-repeat methods are very robust techniques to identify the pathogen species and to validate molecular epidemiological links among complex M. abscessus isolates. PMID:24479655

  3. Existing data sources for clinical epidemiology: The North Denmark Bacteremia Research Database

    PubMed Central

    Schønheyder, Henrik C; Søgaard, Mette

    2010-01-01

    Bacteremia is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Improving prevention and treatment requires better knowledge of the disease and its prognosis. However, in order to study the entire spectrum of bacteremia patients, we need valid sources of information, prospective data collection, and complete follow-up. In North Denmark Region, all patients diagnosed with bacteremia have been registered in a population-based database since 1981. The information has been recorded prospectively since 1992 and the main variables are: the patient’s unique civil registration number, date of sampling the first positive blood culture, date of admission, clinical department, date of notification of growth, place of acquisition, focus of infection, microbiological species, antibiogram, and empirical antimicrobial treatment. During the time from 1981 to 2008, information on 22,556 cases of bacteremia has been recorded. The civil registration number makes it possible to link the database to other medical databases and thereby build large cohorts with detailed longitudinal data that include hospital histories since 1977, comorbidity data, and complete follow-up of survival. The database is suited for epidemiological research and, presently, approximately 60 studies have been published. Other Danish departments of clinical microbiology have recently started to record the same information and a population base of 2.3 million will be available for future studies. PMID:20865114

  4. Comparative study of detection of bacteremia after different oral surgical procedures

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Tabishur; Ahmed, Syed S.; Khan, Harris M.; Hashmi, Ghulam S.; Rahman, Sajjad A.; Ansari, Kalim M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study is to compare the efficiency of culture methods in detecting microorganisms appearing in the bloodstream after various oral surgical procedures and effect of preoperative antibiotics and antiseptic rinses on bacteremia. Materials and Methods: The prevalence of bacteremia at various intervals of time (pre- and post-surgical) was studied in three different groups presenting with indications to surgical intervention. Two of the groups were given presurgical prophylaxis (systemic antibiotic and antiseptic rinse) while, in one group, no prophylactic measure was adopted. Blood samples were withdrawn from the subjects at specific pre- and post-surgical time intervals, and microbiological analysis was done. The findings were compared with a control group involving healthy individuals and a group involved in maxillofacial trauma where the breach of oral mucosal integrity was not surgically planned. Results: The presence of bacteremia was not observed in all five groups at baseline while postsurgery (30 min, 60 min, and 90 min) in only three groups (preoperative antibiotic, without prophylaxis, and 1% Povidone iodine rinse). At all postsurgery periods (30 min, 60 min and 90 min), the presence of bacteremia was evident highest in without prophylaxis group followed by 1% Povidone iodine rinse and preoperative antibiotic the least. PMID:26321844

  5. Corynebacterium minutissimum bacteremia in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis.

    PubMed

    Guarderas, J; Karnad, A; Alvarez, S; Berk, S L

    1986-11-01

    Serious infections and sepsis due to nondiphtheria Corynebacteria have been well described. A patient with chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis, who developed Corynebacterium minutissimum bacteremia, is described in this report. Corynebacterium minutissimum is the causative agent of erythrasma and to our knowledge, this is the first published report of septicemia due to this organism. PMID:3465494

  6. Impact of empirical antimicrobial therapy on the outcome of critically ill patients with Acinetobacter bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dorzi, Hasan M.; Asiri, Abdulaziz M.; Shimemri, Abdullah; Tamim, Hani M.; Al Johani, Sameera M.; Al Dabbagh, Tarek; Arabi, Yaseen M.

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: Empirical antimicrobial therapy (EAT) for Acinetobacter infections may not be appropriate as it tends to be multidrug-resistant. This study evaluated the relationship between appropriate EAT and the outcomes of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients with Acinetobacter bacteremia. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of patients admitted to a medical-surgical ICU (2005-2010) and developed Acinetobacter bacteremia during the stay. Patients were categorized according to EAT appropriateness, defined as administration of at least one antimicrobial agent to which the Acinetobacter was susceptible before susceptibility results were known. The relation between EAT appropriateness and outcomes was evaluated. RESULTS: Sixty patients developed Acinetobacter bacteremia in the 6-year period (age = 50 ± 19 years; 62% males; Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score = 28 ± 9; 98.3% with central lines; 67% in shock and 59% mechanically ventilated) on average on day 23 of ICU and day 38 of hospital stay. All isolates were resistant to at least three of the tested antimicrobials. Appropriate EAT was administered to 60% of patients, mostly as intravenous colistin. Appropriate EAT was associated with lower ICU mortality risk (odds ratio: 0.15; 95% confidence interval: 0.03-0.96) on multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: In this 6-year cohort, Acinetobacter bacteremia was related to multidrug-resistant strains. Appropriate EAT was associated with decreased ICU mortality risk. PMID:26664563

  7. Bacteremia caused by Brevundimonas species at a tertiary care hospital in Taiwan, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Lee, M R; Huang, Y T; Liao, C H; Chuang, T Y; Lin, C K; Lee, S W; Lai, C C; Yu, C J; Hsueh, P R

    2011-10-01

    We investigated clinical and microbiological characteristics of 30 patients with Brevundimonas bacteremia treated at a tertiary care hospital in Taiwan during 2000-2010. All the 30 bacteria isolates were confirmed to the species level by 16S rRNA sequencing analysis. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 11 antimicrobial agents against these isolates were determined by the agar dilution method. Seventeen (57%) patients had underlying malignancy, 12 (40%) had undergone central catheter placement, and 13 (43%) had received chemotherapy within the previous three months. Eight (27%) patients had community-acquired bacteremia and the remaining 22 patients (73%) had healthcare-associated bacteremia. The overall 14-day and 30-day mortality rates were 13% and 17%, respectively. Among the 30 isolates, B. vesicularis constituted most commonly (n = 22, 63%), followed by B. nasdae (n = 5) and B. diminuta (n = 3). All isolates were susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam and amikacin, while all were resistant to ciprofloxacin and colistin. Tigecycline (MICs at which 90% of isolates are inhibited [MIC(90)] was 0.12 mg/L) and doripenem (MIC(90) of 1 mg/L) both possessed good in vitro activities. In conclusions, Brevundimonas should be considered a pathogen that can cause bacteremia in immunocompromised hosts. Piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin, doripenem, and tigecycline exhibit good in vitro activities against these ciprofloxacin- and colistin-resistant Brevundimonas species. PMID:21461849

  8. Successful Treatment of Carbapenemase-Producing Pandrug-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Simkins, Jacques; Beduschi, Thiago; Tekin, Akin; Aragon, Laura; Pérez-Cardona, Armando; Prado, Clara E.; Morris, Michele I.; Abbo, Lilian M.

    2015-01-01

    New antibiotic options are urgently needed for the treatment of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infections. We report a 64-year-old female with prolonged hospitalization following an intestinal transplant who developed refractory bacteremia due to a serine carbapenemase-producing pandrug-resistant isolate of Klebsiella pneumoniae. After failing multiple antimicrobial regimens, the patient was successfully treated. PMID:26386029

  9. Cloacibacillus sp., a Potential Human Pathogen Associated with Bacteremia in Quebec and New Brunswick.

    PubMed

    Domingo, M-C; Yansouni, C; Gaudreau, C; Lamothe, F; Lévesque, S; Tremblay, C; Garceau, R

    2015-10-01

    Bacteremia due to Cloacibacillus species is poorly described. We present three cases involving either Cloacibacillus evryensis or Cloacibacillus porcorum. The isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and were susceptible to antibiotics commonly used for anaerobic infections. The clinical significance of these organisms as potential emerging pathogens is discussed. PMID:26224843

  10. Cloacibacillus sp., a Potential Human Pathogen Associated with Bacteremia in Quebec and New Brunswick

    PubMed Central

    Yansouni, C.; Gaudreau, C.; Lamothe, F.; Lévesque, S.; Tremblay, C.; Garceau, R.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteremia due to Cloacibacillus species is poorly described. We present three cases involving either Cloacibacillus evryensis or Cloacibacillus porcorum. The isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and were susceptible to antibiotics commonly used for anaerobic infections. The clinical significance of these organisms as potential emerging pathogens is discussed. PMID:26224843

  11. Low risk of bacteremia after endoscopic variceal therapy for esophageal varices: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yi; Dwivedi, Alok; Elhanafi, Sherif; Ortiz, Arleen; Othman, Mohamed; Zuckerman, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) and endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy (EVS) are the main therapeutic procedures for the emergency treatment and secondary prophylaxis of esophageal varices in cirrhotics. Post-endoscopic bacteremia has been reported after EVS and EVL, but data on the frequency of bacteremia are conflicting. This study aims to provide incidences of bacteremia after EVS and EVL in different settings through meta-analysis. Methods: Only prospective or randomized studies were included in this meta-analysis. Binomial distribution was used to compute variance for each study. Random effects models were used as the final model for estimating the effect size and 95 % confidence interval. Adjusted effects were obtained using meta-regression analysis. Results: Nineteen prospective studies involving 1001 procedures in 587 patients were included in the meta-analysis on the risk of bacteremia after EVS or EVL in cirrhotics with esophageal varices. The frequency of bacteremia after endoscopic variceal therapy was 13 %. The frequency of bacteremia after EVS (17 %) was higher than after EVL (6 %) with no statistically significant difference (P = 0.106). The frequency of bacteremia after elective EVS (14 %) was significantly less than after emergency EVS (22 %) (P < 0.001). The frequency of bacteremia after elective EVL (7.6 %) was not significantly different from after emergency EVL (3.2 %) (P = 0.850). Conclusions: The incidence of bacteremia is low in patients with cirrhosis and varices after esophageal variceal therapy. These results are consistent with our current guidelines that antibiotic prophylaxis before endoscopic variceal therapy is only necessary for bleeding patients. PMID:26528494

  12. Bartonella henselae bacteremia in a mother and son potentially associated with tick exposure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bartonella henselae is a zoonotic, alpha Proteobacterium, historically associated with cat scratch disease (CSD), but more recently associated with persistent bacteremia, fever of unknown origin, arthritic and neurological disorders, and bacillary angiomatosis, and peliosis hepatis in immunocompromised patients. A family from the Netherlands contacted our laboratory requesting to be included in a research study (NCSU-IRB#1960), designed to characterize Bartonella spp. bacteremia in people with extensive arthropod or animal exposure. All four family members had been exposed to tick bites in Zeeland, southwestern Netherlands. The mother and son were exhibiting symptoms including fatigue, headaches, memory loss, disorientation, peripheral neuropathic pain, striae (son only), and loss of coordination, whereas the father and daughter were healthy. Methods Each family member was tested for serological evidence of Bartonella exposure using B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii genotypes I-III, B. henselae and B. koehlerae indirect fluorescent antibody assays and for bacteremia using the BAPGM enrichment blood culture platform. Results The mother was seroreactive to multiple Bartonella spp. antigens and bacteremia was confirmed by PCR amplification of B. henselae DNA from blood, and from a BAPGM blood agar plate subculture isolate. The son was not seroreactive to any Bartonella sp. antigen, but B. henselae DNA was amplified from several blood and serum samples, from BAPGM enrichment blood culture, and from a cutaneous striae biopsy. The father and daughter were seronegative to all Bartonella spp. antigens, and negative for Bartonella DNA amplification. Conclusions Historically, persistent B. henselae bacteremia was not thought to occur in immunocompetent humans. To our knowledge, this study provides preliminary evidence supporting the possibility of persistent B. henselae bacteremia in immunocompetent persons from Europe. Cat or flea contact was considered an unlikely

  13. Cost Attributable to Nosocomial Bacteremia. Analysis According to Microorganism and Antimicrobial Sensitivity in a University Hospital in Barcelona

    PubMed Central

    Riu, Marta; Chiarello, Pietro; Terradas, Roser; Sala, Maria; Garcia-Alzorriz, Enric; Castells, Xavier; Grau, Santiago; Cots, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Aim To calculate the incremental cost of nosocomial bacteremia caused by the most common organisms, classified by their antimicrobial susceptibility. Methods We selected patients who developed nosocomial bacteremia caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These microorganisms were analyzed because of their high prevalence and they frequently present multidrug resistance. A control group consisted of patients classified within the same all-patient refined-diagnosis related group without bacteremia. Our hospital has an established cost accounting system (full-costing) that uses activity-based criteria to analyze cost distribution. A logistic regression model was fitted to estimate the probability of developing bacteremia for each admission (propensity score) and was used for propensity score matching adjustment. Subsequently, the propensity score was included in an econometric model to adjust the incremental cost of patients who developed bacteremia, as well as differences in this cost, depending on whether the microorganism was multidrug-resistant or multidrug-sensitive. Results A total of 571 admissions with bacteremia matched the inclusion criteria and 82,022 were included in the control group. The mean cost was € 25,891 for admissions with bacteremia and € 6,750 for those without bacteremia. The mean incremental cost was estimated at € 15,151 (CI, € 11,570 to € 18,733). Multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa bacteremia had the highest mean incremental cost, € 44,709 (CI, € 34,559 to € 54,859). Antimicrobial-susceptible E. coli nosocomial bacteremia had the lowest mean incremental cost, € 10,481 (CI, € 8,752 to € 12,210). Despite their lower cost, episodes of antimicrobial-susceptible E. coli nosocomial bacteremia had a major impact due to their high frequency. Conclusions Adjustment of hospital cost according to the organism causing bacteremia and antibiotic sensitivity could improve

  14. Risk Factors and Clinical Outcomes for Patients With Acinetobacter baumannii Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhenyang; Han, Yuliang; Meng, Taojiang; Zhao, Shasha; Zhao, Xiaoli; Gao, Chunji; Huang, Wenrong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acinetobacter (A.) baumannii, an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen that can cause significant morbidity and mortality, has emerged as a worldwide problem. This study aimed to analyze the clinical features and outcomes of patients with A. baumannii bacteremia and determine the factors influencing survival by using 14-day mortality as the primary endpoint. A 6-year retrospective study of 122 cases with monomicrobial A. baumannii bacteremia was conducted in Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) General Hospital from January 2008 to April 2014. Predictors of 14-day mortality were identified by logistic regression analysis. The overall 14-day mortality rate was 40.2% (49 of 122 patients). Multivariable analysis revealed that independent predictors of 14-day mortality included severity of illness defined by Pitt Bacteremia Score (PBS) (odds ratio [OR], 0.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.340–0.619; P < 0.001), neutropenia (OR, 18.02; 95% CI, 1.667–194.67; P = 0.017), and malignancy (OR, 4.63; 95% CI, 1.292–16.588; P = 0.019). The effect of malignancy was influenced by neutropenia (OR for interaction term, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.15–2.22; P = 0.005). A subgroup analysis revealed that 14-day mortality rate for patients with underlying hematological malignancies and solid tumors was 75% (12/16) and 40% (12/30), respectively. Survival analysis revealed that mortality in patients with hematological malignancies was higher than that in patients with solid tumors (P = 0.032). The outcomes of patients with A. baumannii bacteremia were related to PBS, neutropenia, and malignancy. Compared with solid tumors, patients with hematological malignancies had a higher mortality in the setting of A. baumannii bacteremia. PMID:26945403

  15. High Frequency of Clinically Significant Bacteremia in Adults Hospitalized With Falciparum Malaria.

    PubMed

    Nyein, Phyo Pyae; Aung, Ne Myo; Kyi, Tint Tint; Htet, Zaw Win; Anstey, Nicholas M; Kyi, Mar Mar; Hanson, Josh

    2016-01-01

    Background.  African children with severe falciparum malaria commonly have concomitant Gram-negative bacteremia, but co-infection has been thought to be relatively rare in adult malaria. Methods.  Adults with a diagnosis of falciparum malaria hospitalized at 4 tertiary referral hospitals in Myanmar had blood cultures collected at admission. The frequency of concomitant bacteremia and the clinical characteristics of the patients, with and without bacteremia, were explored. Results.  Of 67 adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria, 9 (13% [95% confidence interval, 5.3%-21.6%]) were also bacteremic on admission, 7 (78%) with Gram-negative enteric organisms (Escherichia coli [n = 3], typhoidal Salmonella species [n = 3], nontyphoidal Salmonella [n = 1]). Bacteremic adults had more severe disease (median Respiratory Coma Acidosis Malaria [RCAM] score 3; interquartile range [IQR], 1-4) than those without bacteremia (median RCAM score 1; IQR, 1-2) and had a higher frequency of acute kidney injury (50% vs 16%, P = .03). Although 35 (52%) were at high risk of death (RCAM score ≥2), all 67 patients in the study survived, 51 (76%) of whom received empirical antibiotics on admission. Conclusions.  Bacteremia was relatively frequent in adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria in Myanmar. Like children in high transmission settings, bacteremic adults in this low transmission setting were sicker than nonbacteremic adults, and were often difficult to identify at presentation. Empirical antibiotics may also be appropriate in adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria in low transmission settings, until bacterial infection is excluded. PMID:26989752

  16. High Frequency of Clinically Significant Bacteremia in Adults Hospitalized With Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Nyein, Phyo Pyae; Aung, Ne Myo; Kyi, Tint Tint; Htet, Zaw Win; Anstey, Nicholas M.; Kyi, Mar Mar; Hanson, Josh

    2016-01-01

    Background. African children with severe falciparum malaria commonly have concomitant Gram-negative bacteremia, but co-infection has been thought to be relatively rare in adult malaria. Methods. Adults with a diagnosis of falciparum malaria hospitalized at 4 tertiary referral hospitals in Myanmar had blood cultures collected at admission. The frequency of concomitant bacteremia and the clinical characteristics of the patients, with and without bacteremia, were explored. Results. Of 67 adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria, 9 (13% [95% confidence interval, 5.3%–21.6%]) were also bacteremic on admission, 7 (78%) with Gram-negative enteric organisms (Escherichia coli [n = 3], typhoidal Salmonella species [n = 3], nontyphoidal Salmonella [n = 1]). Bacteremic adults had more severe disease (median Respiratory Coma Acidosis Malaria [RCAM] score 3; interquartile range [IQR], 1–4) than those without bacteremia (median RCAM score 1; IQR, 1–2) and had a higher frequency of acute kidney injury (50% vs 16%, P = .03). Although 35 (52%) were at high risk of death (RCAM score ≥2), all 67 patients in the study survived, 51 (76%) of whom received empirical antibiotics on admission. Conclusions. Bacteremia was relatively frequent in adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria in Myanmar. Like children in high transmission settings, bacteremic adults in this low transmission setting were sicker than nonbacteremic adults, and were often difficult to identify at presentation. Empirical antibiotics may also be appropriate in adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria in low transmission settings, until bacterial infection is excluded. PMID:26989752

  17. Positive Predictive Value of True Bacteremia according to the Number of Positive Culture Sets in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kitaura, Tsuyoshi; Chikumi, Hiroki; Fujiwara, Hiromitsu; Okada, Kensaku; Hayabuchi, Tatsuya; Nakamoto, Masaki; Takata, Miyako; Yamasaki, Akira; Igishi, Tadashi; Burioka, Naoto; Shimizu, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Background Performing multiple blood culture sets simultaneously is a standard blood culture methodology, although it is often difficult to distinguish true bacteremia from contamination when only one of several blood culture sets is positive. This study clarified the relationship between the number of positive blood culture sets and clinical significance in patients with positive blood culture. Methods Patients aged 18 years and over with at least 1 positive blood culture were enrolled. Positive blood culture episodes were categorized from clinical records as true bacteremia, contamination, or unknown clinical significance. The associations among episodes of true bacteremia, isolated bacteria, the number of positive blood culture sets from among the performed sets, and the clinical background of patients were analyzed. Results Among a total of 407 episodes, 262, 67 and 78 were true bacteremia, contamination and unknown clinical significance, respectively. The positive predictive values (PPVs) of 1 out of 1, 1 out of 2 and 2 out of 2 positive sets in cases of Staphylococcus aureus, were 81.3%, 50% and 100% respectively; those in cases of coagulase-negative Staphylococci were 20.5%, 10.8% and 63.5%, respectively. Almost all cases of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella species and Candida species were true bacteremia. The probability of true bacteremia was strongly associated with recent surgery in multivariate analysis (P < 0.05). Conclusion The probability of true bacteremia based on the number of positive culture sets from among the performed sets varies by microorganism. Therefore, PPVs calculated using this method may help physicians distinguish true bacteremia from contamination. PMID:25901103

  18. Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal bacteremia in a patient with sickle cell anemia on penicillin prophylaxis.

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, W.; Salah, H.; Khakoo, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Serious invasive bacterial infections, particularly those due to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Hemophilus influenzae, are a well-known complication in patients with sickle cell disease. Early penicillin prophylaxis has been shown to prevent these infections and also to improve survival. This article describes a child with sickle cell anemia who, while on penicillin prophylaxis, developed a group A streptococcal bacteremia, a pathogen not commonly associated with bacteremia in sickle cell disease. PMID:7783241

  19. A randomized Phase 2 trial of telavancin versus standard therapy in patients with uncomplicated Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: the ASSURE study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia is a common infection associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Telavancin is a bactericidal lipoglycopeptide active against Gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). We conducted a randomized, double-blind, Phase 2 trial in patients with uncomplicated S. aureus bacteremia. Methods Patients were randomized to either telavancin or standard therapy (vancomycin or anti-staphylococcal penicillin) for 14 days. Continuation criteria were set to avoid complicated S. aureus bacteremia. The primary end point was clinical cure at 84 days. Results In total, 60 patients were randomized and 58 received ≥1 study medication dose (all-treated), 31 patients fulfilled inclusion/exclusion and continuation criteria (all-treated target [ATT]) (telavancin 15, standard therapy 16), and 17 patients were clinically evaluable (CE) (telavancin 8, standard therapy 9). Mean age (ATT) was 60 years. Intravenous catheters were the most common source of S. aureus bacteremia and ~50% of patients had MRSA. A similar proportion of CE patients were cured in the telavancin (88%) and standard therapy (89%) groups. All patients with MRSA bacteremia were cured and one patient with MSSA bacteremia failed study treatment in each group. Although adverse events (AEs) were more common in the telavancin ATT group (90% vs. 72%), AEs leading to drug discontinuation were similar (7%) in both treatment arms. Potentially clinically significant increases in serum creatinine (≥1.5 mg/dl and at least 50% greater than baseline) were more common in the telavancin group (20% vs. 7%). Conclusions This study suggests that telavancin may have utility for treatment of uncomplicated S. aureus bacteremia; additional studies are warranted. (Telavancin for Treatment of Uncomplicated Staphylococcus Aureus Bacteremia (ASSURE); NCT00062647). PMID:24884578

  20. Comparative Study of Bacteremias Caused by Enterococcus spp. with and without High-Level Resistance to Gentamicin

    PubMed Central

    Caballero-Granado, Francisco Javier; Cisneros, J. M.; Luque, R.; Torres-Tortosa, M.; Gamboa, F.; Díez, F.; Villanueva, J. L.; Pérez-Cano, R.; Pasquau, J.; Merino, D.; Menchero, A.; Mora, D.; López-Ruz, M. A.; Vergara, A.; Infecciosas, for the Grupo Andaluz Para El Estudio De Las Enfermedades

    1998-01-01

    A prospective, multicenter study was carried out over a period of 10 months. All patients with clinically significant bacteremia caused by Enterococcus spp. were included. The epidemiological, microbiological, clinical, and prognostic features and the relationship of these features to the presence of high-level resistance to gentamicin (HLRG) were studied. Ninety-three patients with enterococcal bacteremia were included, and 31 of these cases were caused by HLRG (33%). The multivariate analysis selected chronic renal failure, intensive care unit stay, previous use of antimicrobial agents, and Enterococcus faecalis species as the independent risk factors that influenced the development of HLRG. The strains with HLRG showed lower levels of susceptibility to penicillin and ciprofloxacin. Clinical features (except for chronic renal failure) were similar in both groups of patients. HLRG did not influence the prognosis for patients with enterococcal bacteremia in terms of either the crude mortality rate (29% for patients with bacteremia caused by enterococci with HLRG and 28% for patients not infected with strains with HLRG) or the hospital stay after the acquisition of enterococcal bacteremia. Hemodynamic compromise, inappropriate antimicrobial therapy, and mechanical ventilation were revealed in the multivariate analysis to be the independent risk factors for mortality. Prolonged hospitalization was associated with the nosocomial acquisition of bacteremia and polymicrobial infections. PMID:9466769

  1. [Rare infection--prolonged A. naeslundii bacteremia caused by severe caries].

    PubMed

    Abozaid, Said; Peretz, Avi; Nasser, Wael; Zarfin, Yehoshua

    2013-07-01

    Actinomyces is an anaerobic, gram positive, rod shape bacteria that doesn't create spores. Actinomyces is part of the mouth, intestines, vagina and upper respiratory system flora. The infection appears mostly on the face, neck, abdomen and pelvis in cases of mucosa injury and most common in immunosuppressed patients. The spread of Actinomyces through the blood system is rare. In this article we present a 9 year old male patient with no history of diseases who was diagnosed with prolonged bacteremia of A. naeslundii without specific infection excluding severe caries. Characterization of bacteria from the blood culture was performed by molecular biology and the patient was treated with Ampicillin and tooth extraction that led to the disappearance of the bacteremia. PMID:23957079

  2. Flavimonas oryzihabitans (Pseudomonas oryzihabitans; CDC group Ve-2) bacteremia in the immunocompromised host.

    PubMed

    Decker, C F; Simon, G L; Keiser, J F

    1991-03-01

    Flavimonas oryzihabitans, known previously as Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, and a member of the Centers for Disease Control group Ve-2, is a gram-negative organism that has rarely been implicated as a human pathogen. Flavimonas oryzihabitans appears to be a soil and saprophytic organism that survives in moist environments and is indigenous to rice paddles. To our knowledge, only seven cases of human infection caused by this organism have been reported; they involved four patients with bacteremia and three patients with peritonitis who were receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. In this report, we describe three immunocompromised patients with catheter-associated bacteremia: a patient with cancer, a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and a patient with sickle cell disease. There is emerging clinical evidence that F oryzihabitans should be recognized as an organism that is capable of causing human disease, particularly in immunocompromised patients and with the increased usage of permanent catheters. PMID:2001143

  3. Investigation of bacteremia induced by removal of orthodontic mini-implants.

    PubMed

    Livas, Christos; Delli, Konstantina; Karapsias, Stergios; Pandis, Nikolaos; Ren, Yijin

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate potential occurrence of bacteremia in orthodontic patients after removal of miniscrews.The study group comprised 30 healthy subjects (17 males, 13 females) with a mean age of 24.1 years treated with self-ligating fixed appliances and mini-implant anchorage. Two 20 ml venous blood samples were obtained prior to and 30-60 seconds after miniscrew explantation following an aseptic technique. Blood culturing in aerobic and anaerobic conditions was carried out by means of the BACTEC blood culture analyzer. Microbiological analysis showed that none of the pre- and post-operative samples exhibited detectable bacteremia. Future research should be focused on determining the collective bacteremic effect of a sequence of orthodontic procedures including miniscrew placement or removal, typically performed during a single treatment session. PMID:23321850

  4. Empedobacter brevis Bacteremia in a Patient Infected with HIV: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bokhari, Syed; Abbas, Naeem; Singh, Manisha; Cindrich, Richard B.; Zeana, Cosmina

    2015-01-01

    Clinical disease caused by Empedobacter brevis (E. brevis) is very rare. We report the first case of E. brevis bacteremia in a patient with HIV and review the current literature. A 69-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and CD4 count of 319 presented with chief complaints of black tarry stools, nausea and vomiting for 2 days. Physical exam was significant for abdominal pain on palpation with no rebound or guarding. His total leukocyte count was 32,000 cells/μL with 82% neutrophils and 9% bands. Emergent colonoscopy and endoscopic esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed esophageal candidiasis, a nonbleeding gastric ulcer, and diverticulosis. Blood cultures drawn on days 1, 2, and 3 of hospitalization grew E. brevis. Patient improved with intravenous antibiotics. This case is unusual, raising the possibility of gastrointestinal colonization as a source of the patient's bacteremia. In conclusion, E. brevis is an emerging pathogen that can cause serious health care associated infections. PMID:26550499

  5. Case report: group B streptococcal bacteremia and sacroiliitis after mid-trimester dilation and evacuation.

    PubMed

    McKenna, T; O'Brien, K

    2009-09-01

    Group B streptococcal bacteremia with septic arthritis is a rare complication of second trimester dilation and evacuation, and may cause substantial post-operative morbidity. A 37-year-old gravida 4 para 1-0-2-1 presented with fever and right hip pain on post-operative day 11 from a second trimester dilation and evacuation for fetal trisomy 21. She was initially found to have septic arthritis involving the right sacroiliac joint and group B streptococcal bacteremia. Transesophageal echocardiogram showed a tricuspid valve, vegetation consistent with endocarditis. After prolonged parenteral antibiotic therapy, she developed septic pulmonary emboli that were successfully treated with anticoagulation therapy. Group B streptococcal infection is a potentially serious post-abortion complication that can cause sacroiliitis, endocarditis and septic pulmonary emboli. PMID:19710658

  6. Treating Central Catheter-Associated Bacteremia Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Beyond Vancomycin.

    PubMed

    Holt, Shannon; Thompson-Brazill, Kelly A; Sparks, E Ryan; Lipetzky, Juliana

    2016-08-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent cause of hospital-associated infections, including central catheter-associated bacteremia. Vancomycin has been the drug of choice for treating this type of bacteremia for decades in patients who have no contraindications to the antibiotic. However, resistance to vancomycin is an emerging problem. Newer antibiotics approved by the Food and Drug Administration have activity against methicillin-resistant S aureus Some of the antibiotics also have activity against strains of S aureus that are intermediately susceptible or resistant to vancomycin. This article uses a case study to highlight the clinical signs of vancomycin failure and describes the indications for and appropriate use of alternative antimicrobials such as ceftaroline, daptomycin, linezolid, tigecycline, and telavancin. (Critical Care Nurse 2016;36[4]:46-57). PMID:27481801

  7. Mortality attributable to carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia: a meta-analysis of cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Chen, Xiao-Li; Huang, Ai-Wei; Liu, Su-Ling; Liu, Wei-Jiang; Zhang, Ni; Lu, Xu-Zai

    2016-01-01

    Whether carbapenem resistance is associated with mortality in patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia is controversial. To address this issue, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis based on cohort studies. We searched PubMed and Embase databases to identify articles (up to April 2015). The DerSimonian and Laird random-effect model was used to generate a summary estimate of effect. Associations were evaluated in subgroups based on different patient characteristics and study quality criteria. Seven studies with a total of 1613 patients were finally included, of which 1 study had a prospective design, and the other 6 were retrospective. Our meta-analysis showed patients with carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa bacteremia were at a higher risk of death compared with those with carbapenem-susceptible P. aeruginosa bloodstream infections (pooled odds ratio (OR) from three studies reporting adjusted ORs: 3.07, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.60–5.89; pooled OR from 4 studies only reporting crude ORs: 1.46, 95% CI, 1.10–1.94). The results were robust across a number of stratified analyses and a sensitivity analysis. We also calculated that 8%–18.4% of deaths were attributable to carbapenem resistance in four studies assessing the outcome with 30-day mortality, and these were 3% and 14.6%, respectively, in two studies using 7-day mortality or mortality during bacteremia as an outcome of interest. Carbapenem resistance had a deleterious impact on the mortality of P. aeruginosa bacteremia; however, the results should be interpreted cautiously because only three studies reporting adjusted ORs were included. More large-scale, well-designed prospective cohorts, as well as mechanistic studies, are urgently needed in the future. PMID:27004762

  8. Gemella morbillorum Bacteremia after Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha as Acne Inversa Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vossen, Matthias G.; Gattringer, Klaus B.; Khalifeh, Neda; Koreny, Maria; Spertini, Verena; Mallouhi, Ammar; Willeit, Markus; Volc-Platzer, Beatrix; Asboth, Friederike; Graninger, Wolfgang; Thalhammer, Florian

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of fever, brain abscesses, and Gemella morbillorum bacteremia after anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) therapy in a 21-year-old acne inversa patient currently taking long-term dapsone. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing such a case. During antimicrobial therapy, the patient developed systemic varicella infection with severe thrombocytopenia. PMID:22189120

  9. Community Acquired Bacteremia in Young Children from Central Nigeria- A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Reports of the etiology of bacteremia in children from Nigeria are sparse and have been confounded by wide spread non-prescription antibiotic use and suboptimal laboratory culture techniques. We aimed to determine causative agents and underlying predisposing conditions of bacteremia in Nigerian children using data arising during the introduction of an automated blood culture system accessed by 7 hospitals and clinics in the Abuja area. Methods Between September 2008 and November 2009, we enrolled children with clinically suspected bacteremia at rural and urban clinical facilities in Abuja or within the Federal Capital Territory of Nigeria. Blood was cultured using an automated system with antibiotic removing device. We documented clinical features in all children and tested for prior antibiotic use in a random sample of sera from children from each site. Results 969 children aged 2 months-5 years were evaluated. Mean age was 21 ± 15.2 months. All children were not systematically screened but there were 59 (6%) children with established diagnosis of sickle cell disease and 42 (4.3%) with HIV infection. Overall, 212 (20.7%) had a positive blood culture but in only 105 (10.8%) were these considered to be clinically significant. Three agents, Staphylococcus aureus (20.9%), Salmonella typhi (20.9%) and Acinetobacter (12.3%) accounted for over half of the positive cultures. Streptococcus pneumoniae and non-typhi Salmonellae each accounted for 7.6%. Although not the leading cause of bacteremia, Streptococcus pneumoniae was the single leading cause of all deaths that occurred during hospitalization and after hospital discharge. Conclusion S. typhi is a significant cause of vaccine-preventable morbidity while S. pneumoniae may be a leading cause of mortality in this setting. This observation contrasts with reports from most other African countries where non-typhi Salmonellae are predominant in young children. Expanded surveillance is required to confirm the

  10. First Case of Pseudoclavibacter bifida Bacteremia in an Immunocompromised Host with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    De Baere, Thierry; Breyne, Joke; De Laere, Emmanuel; Mariën, Stan; Waets, Peter; Laffut, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Pseudoclavibacter spp. are Gram-positive, aerobic, catalase-positive, coryneform bacteria belonging to the family of Microbacteriaceae. Identification of these species with conventional biochemical assays is difficult. This case report of a Pseudoclavibacter bifida bacteremia occurring in an immunocompromised host diagnosed with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, with a lethal outcome, confirms that this organism may be a human pathogen. PMID:23536403

  11. Use of a Simple Criteria Set for Guiding Echocardiography in Nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Vance G.; Rieg, Siegbert; Peyerl-Hoffmann, Gabriele; Birkholz, Hanna; Hellmich, Martin; Kern, Winfried V.; Seifert, Harald

    2011-01-01

    (see the editorial commentary and Soriano and Mensa, on pages 10–12.) Background. Infective endocarditis (IE) is a severe complication in patients with nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB). We sought to develop and validate criteria to identify patients at low risk for the development of IE in whom transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) might be dispensable. Methods. Consecutive patients with nosocomial SAB from independent cohorts in Europe (Invasive S. aureus Infection Cohort [INSTINCT]) and North America (S. aureus Bacteremia Group [SABG]) were evaluated for the presence of clinical criteria predicting an increased risk for the development of IE (ie, prolonged bacteremia of >4 days' duration, presence of a permanent intracardiac device, hemodialysis dependency, spinal infection, and nonvertebral osteomyelitis). Patients were observed closely for clinical signs and symptoms of IE during hospitalization and a 3-month follow-up period. Results. IE was present in 13 (4.3%) of 304 patients in the INSTINCT cohort and in 40 (9.3%) of 432 patients in the SABG cohort. Within 14 days after the first positive blood culture result, echocardiography was performed in 39.8% and 57.4% of patients in the INSTINCT and SABG cohorts, respectively. In patients with IE, the most common clinical prediction criteria present were prolonged bacteremia (69.2% vs 90% for INSTINCT vs SABG, respectively) and presence of a permanent intracardiac device (53.8% vs 32.5%). In total, 13 of 13 patients in the INSTINCT cohort and 39 of 40 patients in the SABG cohort with documented IE fulfilled at least 1 criterion (sensitivity, 100% vs. 97.5%; negative predictive value, 100% vs 99.2%). Conclusions. A simple criteria set for patients with nosocomial SAB can identify patients at low risk of IE. Patients who meet these criteria may not routinely require TEE. PMID:21653295

  12. Catheter-related bacteremia caused by Kocuria salsicia: the first case.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Kyung Mok; Baek, Jin-Yang; Kim, So Hyun; Cheon, Shinhye; Kim, Yeon-Sook

    2015-04-01

    We report the first case of catheter-related bacteremia caused by Kocuria salsicia in a patient with short bowel syndrome. The pathogen was initially identified as Kocuria varians by a Vitek 2-based assessment, but its 16S rRNA gene sequence showed 100% similarity to K. salsicia. The patient was successfully treated with vancomycin and removal of the catheter. PMID:25497673

  13. Neurological Complications after Neonatal Bacteremia: The Clinical Characteristics, Risk Factors, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Shih-Ming; Hsu, Jen-Fu; Lee, Chiang-Wen; Lien, Reyin; Huang, Hsuan-Rong; Chiang, Ming-Chou; Fu, Ren-Huei; Tsai, Ming-Horng

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonates with bacteremia are at risk of neurologic complications. Relevant information warrants further elucidation. Study Design This was a retrospective cohort study of neonates with bacteremia-related neurologic complications (BNCs) in a tertiary-level neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). A systemic chart review was performed conducted to identify clinical characteristics and outcomes. A cohort of related conditions was constructed as the control group. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent risk factors for BNC. Results Of 1037 bacteremia episodes, 36 (3.5%) had BNCs. Twenty-four cases of BNCs were related to meningitis, five were presumed meningitis, and seven occurred after septic shock. The most common causative pathogens were Group B streptococcus (41.7%) and E. coli (16.7%). The major BNCs consisted of seizures (28), hydrocephalus (20), encephalomalacia (11), cerebral infarction (7), subdural empyema (6), ventriculitis (8), and abscess (4). Eight (22.8%) neonates died and six (16.7%) were discharged in critical condition when the family withdrew life-sustaining treatment. Among the 22 survivors, eight had neurologic sequelae upon discharge. After multivariate logistic regression analysis, neonates with meningitis caused by Group B streptococcus (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 8.90, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.20–36.08; p = 0.002) and combined meningitis and septic shock (OR, 5.94; 95% CI: 1.53–23.15; p = 0.010) were independently associated with BNCs. Conclusions Neonates with bacteremia-related neurologic complications are associated with adverse outcomes or sequelae. Better strategies aimed at early detection and reducing the emergence of neurologic complications and aggressive treatment of Group B streptococcus sepsis are needed in neonates with meningitis and septic shock. PMID:25364821

  14. Frequency of Susceptibility Testing for Patients with Persistent Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Giltner, Carmen L.; Kelesidis, Theodoros; Hindler, Janet A.; Bobenchik, April M.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, no standards exist for determining the optimal frequency of repeat antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) when an organism is recurrently isolated from the same specimen source. Although testing every 2 to 5 days is thought sufficient, we present three cases of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia where current laboratory protocol for repeating AST every 5 days was inadequate to identify resistant organisms. PMID:24153125

  15. Epidemiology of bacteremia in young hospitalized infants in Vientiane, Laos, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Margot; Luangxay, Khonesavanh; Sisouk, Kongkham; Vorlasan, Latdavan; Soumphonphakdy, Bandith; Sengmouang, Vanmaly; Chansamouth, Vilada; Phommasone, Koukeo; Van Dyke, Russell; Chong, Euming; Dance, David A B; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Newton, Paul N

    2014-02-01

    As data about the causes of neonatal sepsis in low-income countries are inadequate, we reviewed the etiology and antibiotic susceptibilities of bacteremia in young infants in Laos. As Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of bacteremia in Lao infants, we also examined risk factors for this infection, in particular the local practice of warming mothers during the first weeks postpartum with hot coals under their beds (hot beds). Clinical and laboratory data regarding infants aged 0-60 days evaluated for sepsis within 72 h of admission to Mahosot Hospital in Vientiane, Laos, were reviewed, and 85 of 1438 (5.9%) infants' blood cultures grew a clinically significant organism. Most common were S. aureus, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Whereas no methicillin-resistant S. aureus was found, only 18% of E. coli isolates were susceptible to ampicillin. A history of sleeping on a hot bed with mother was associated with S. aureus bacteremia (odds ratio 4.8; 95% confidence interval 1.2-19.0). PMID:23902672

  16. Severe Sepsis due to Clostridium perfringens Bacteremia of Urinary Origin: A Case Report and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Michael A.; McManus, Kathleen A.; Wispelwey, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens bacteremia is an uncommon yet serious clinical syndrome that typically arises from a gastrointestinal source. However, clinicians should consider nongastrointestinal sources as well. We present a rare case of C. perfringens bacteremia of urinary origin that required surgical intervention for definitive treatment. A 61-year-old male presented with acute nausea and vomiting, altered mental status, and chronic diarrhea. His physical exam revealed right costovertebral tenderness and his laboratory work-up revealed acute renal failure. Percutaneous blood cultures grew C. perfringens. Cross-sectional imaging revealed a right-sided ureteral stone with hydronephrosis, which required nephrostomy placement. On placement of the nephrostomy tube, purulent drainage was identified and Gram stain of the drainage revealed Gram-variable rods. A urinary source of C. perfringens was clinically supported. Although it is not a common presentation, nongastrointestinal sources such as a urinary source should be considered in C. perfringens bacteremia because failure to recognize a nongastrointestinal source can delay appropriate treatment, which may include surgical intervention. PMID:26998370

  17. [Case of Streptococcus salivarius bacteremia/meningoencephalitis leading to discovery of early gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Ijyuuin, Toshiro; Umehara, Fujio

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year old man was brought to our hospital because of acute onset of fever and consciousness disturbance. He had been hemodialyzed three times a week because of chronic renal failure since 13 years ago. Neurological examination revealed deteriorated consciousness and neck stiffness. A lumbar puncture yielded clouded fluid with a WBC 7,912/mm³ (polymorphonuclear cells 88%, mononuclear cells 12%), 786 mg/dl of protein and 4 mg/dl of glucose (blood glucose 118 mg/dl). Brain CT and MRI were unremarkable. He was treated with ceftriaxone and ampicillin. Streptococcus salivarius was isolated from the blood sample, but not from cerebrospinal fluid. The patient responded promptly to antibiotics therapy (ampicillin 3g/day, ceftriaxone 1g/day), and within several days he became lucid and afebrile. Isolated S. salivarius was sensitive for ampicillin and ceftriaxone. We diagnosed this case as S. salivarius bacteremia/meningoencephalitis. A gastrointestinal diagnostic workup revealed an asymptomatic gastric adenocarcinoma. S. salivarius is a common inhabitant of the oral mucosa that has been associated with infection in different sites. Meningeal infection by S. salivarius generally related to neoplasia of colon or iatrogenia, has been described on few occasions. This is the first report of S. salivarius bacteremia/meningoencephalitis associated with gastric neoplasm. Neurologist should be aware of the association of S. salivarius bacteremia/meningoencephalitis and gastrointestinal disease. PMID:22688117

  18. Beta Lactamase Producing Clostridium perfringens Bacteremia in an Elderly Man with Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rashmi; Duncalf, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens bacteremia is associated with adverse outcomes. Known risk factors include chronic kidney disease, malignancy, diabetes mellitus, and gastrointestinal disease. We present a 74-year-old man admitted with confusion, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Exam revealed tachycardia, hypotension, lethargy, distended abdomen, and cold extremities. He required intubation and aggressive resuscitation for septic shock. Laboratory data showed leukocytosis, metabolic acidosis, acute kidney injury, and elevated lipase. CT scan of abdomen revealed acute pancreatitis and small bowel ileus. He was started on vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam. Initial blood cultures were positive for C. perfringens on day five. Metronidazole and clindamycin were added to the regimen. Repeat CT (day 7) revealed pancreatic necrosis. The patient developed profound circulatory shock requiring multiple vasopressors, renal failure requiring dialysis, and bacteremia with vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Hemodynamic instability precluded surgical intervention and he succumbed to multiorgan failure. Interestingly, our isolate was beta lactamase producing. We review the epidemiology, risk factors, presentation, and management of C. perfringens bacteremia. This case indicates a need for high clinical suspicion for clostridial sepsis and that extended spectrum beta lactam antibiotic coverage may be inadequate and should be supplemented with use of clindamycin or metronidazole if culture is positive, until sensitivities are known. PMID:26904307

  19. Oral inflammation and bacteremia: implications for chronic and acute systemic diseases involving major organs.

    PubMed

    Hirschfeld, Josefine; Kawai, Toshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are both highly prevalent gum diseases characterized by an accumulation of a polymicrobial biofilm (dental plaque) around teeth and inflammation in adjacent soft tissues. During dental procedures, even tooth brushing, these bacteria and their components, such as endotoxin, can easily disseminate into the systemic circulation through minor or major gingival injuries. Particularly in immuno-compromised subjects or patients with preexisting pathologic conditions, bacteremia may lead to bacterial infection of distant organs, which may cause immunological reactions. Oral bacteria and endotoxins have been found in sepsis, infective endocarditis, lung infection, liver disease and many other potentially lethal disorders. This article presents a review of the possible pathologic consequences of bacteremia originating in the oral cavity and points out the most commonly affected organs as well as preventive and treatment measures. At the present time, plaque control by subjects and/or dental professionals is one of the most effective means to prevent the onset and progression of oral bacteremia-induced systemic diseases. PMID:25567334

  20. Bacillus cereus bacteremia and multiple brain abscesses during acute lymphoblastic leukemia induction therapy.

    PubMed

    Hansford, Jordan R; Phillips, Marianne; Cole, Catherine; Francis, Joshua; Blyth, Christopher C; Gottardo, Nicholas G

    2014-04-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious infections in immunosuppressed patients. This population may be susceptible to B. cereus pneumonia, bacteremia, cellulitis, and rarely cerebral abscess. Here we report an 8-year-old boy undergoing induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed multifocal B. cereus cerebral abscesses, highlighting the propensity for B. cereus to develop cerebral abscesses. A review of the literature over the past 25 years identified another 11 cases (3 children and 8 adults) of B. cereus cerebral abscess in patients undergoing cancer therapy. B. cereus cerebral abscesses were associated with a high mortality rate (42%) and significant morbidity. Notably, B. cereus bacteremia with concomitant cerebral abscess was associated with induction chemotherapy for acute leukemia in both children and adults (10 of 12 case reports). Our case report and review of the literature highlights the propensity for B. cereus to develop cerebral abscess(es). Therefore, early consideration for neuroimaging should be given for any neutropenic cancer patient identified with B. cereus bacteremia, in particular those with acute leukemia during induction therapy. PMID:23619116

  1. PBP-2 Negative Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus schleiferi Bacteremia from a Prostate Abscess: An Unusual Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Chandni; Villanueva, Daphne-Dominique; Lalani, Ishan; Eng, Margaret; Kang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp. schleiferi is a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus which has been described as a pathogen responsible for various nosocomial infections including bacteremia, brain abscess, and infection of intravenous pacemakers. Recently, such bacteria have been described to be found typically on skin and mucosal surfaces. It is also believed to be a part of the preaxillary human flora and more frequently found in men. It is very similar in its pathogenicity with Staphylococcus aureus group and expresses a fibronectin binding protein. Literature on this pathogen reveals that it commonly causes otitis among dogs because of its location in the auditory meatus of canines. Also, it has strong association with pyoderma in dogs. The prime concern with this organism is the antibiotic resistance and relapse even after appropriate treatment. Very rarely, if any, cases have been reported about prostatic abscess (PA) with this microbe. Our patient had a history of recurrent UTIs and subsequent PA resulting in S. schleiferi bacteremia in contrast to gram negative bacteremia commonly associated with UTI. This organism was found to be resistant to methicillin, in spite of being negative for PBP2, which is a rare phenomenon and needs further studies. PMID:27092283

  2. Severe Sepsis due to Clostridium perfringens Bacteremia of Urinary Origin: A Case Report and Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Millard, Michael A; McManus, Kathleen A; Wispelwey, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens bacteremia is an uncommon yet serious clinical syndrome that typically arises from a gastrointestinal source. However, clinicians should consider nongastrointestinal sources as well. We present a rare case of C. perfringens bacteremia of urinary origin that required surgical intervention for definitive treatment. A 61-year-old male presented with acute nausea and vomiting, altered mental status, and chronic diarrhea. His physical exam revealed right costovertebral tenderness and his laboratory work-up revealed acute renal failure. Percutaneous blood cultures grew C. perfringens. Cross-sectional imaging revealed a right-sided ureteral stone with hydronephrosis, which required nephrostomy placement. On placement of the nephrostomy tube, purulent drainage was identified and Gram stain of the drainage revealed Gram-variable rods. A urinary source of C. perfringens was clinically supported. Although it is not a common presentation, nongastrointestinal sources such as a urinary source should be considered in C. perfringens bacteremia because failure to recognize a nongastrointestinal source can delay appropriate treatment, which may include surgical intervention. PMID:26998370

  3. [Community-acquired bacteremia in adult patients attending the emergency service of a teaching hospital].

    PubMed

    Artico, Muriel J; Rocchi, Marta; Gasparotto, Ana; Ocaña Carrizo, Valeria; Navarro, Mercedes; Mollo, Valeria; Avilés, Natalia; Romero, Vanessa; Carrillo, Sonia; Monterisi, Aída

    2012-01-01

    Bacteremia is an important cause of morbimortality. This study describes the episodes of community-acquired bacteremia in adult patients registered at our hospital. Between January 2005, and December 2009, 271 episodes were studied. The diagnostic yield of blood cultures was 13.5 %. A total of 52 % of patients were male and 48 % female. The mean age was 60. The most frequent comorbidities were: diabetes (21 %), neoplasia (18 %), cardiopathy (11 %), and HIV infection (8 %). The focus was- respiratory (21 %), urinary (15 %), cutaneous (9 %), and others (13 %). Gram-positive bacteria prevailed (51.4%). The most frequent microorganisms were Escherichia coli (25 %), Streptococcus pneumoniae (22.9 %), and Staphylococcus aureus (12.3 %). Bacteremia was polymicrobial in 7 % of the cases. Thirty three percent of E. coli isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and 6 % to ceftazidime. Fourteen percent of S. aureus strains were resistant to oxacillin whereas only 7 % of S. pneumoniae expressed high resistance to penicillin with MICs = 2 ug/ml, according to meningitis breakpoints. PMID:22610291

  4. Case series of patients with Fusobacterium nucleatum bacteremia with emphasis on the presence of cancer.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Erlangga; Wybo, Ingrid; Piérard, Denis

    2016-06-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is anaerobic oral microbiota that might be associated with cancer. We reported 22 consecutive cases of patients (mean age of 63.8 years (range 34-89), 59.1% male) with F. nucleatum bacteremia that were admitted to a university hospital over a 10-year period. In 17 (77.2%) of these patients, F. nucleatum was the sole possible pathogen. Seven of the 22 patients (31.8%) had active cancer: esophagus carcinoma (n = 3), hematologic malignancies (n = 1), gastrointestinal stromal tumor (n = 1), melanoma (n = 1), and breast cancer (n = 1). In six out of seven patients (85.7%), the F. nucleatum was found within six months of the diagnosis of cancer. Four of seven (57.1%), patients with cancer were on chemotherapy. Three of 22 patients (13.4%) died within 1 month of F. nucleatum bacteremia due to cancer. In conclusion, F. nucleatum bacteremia occurs rarely and when it is found, it is often in patients with cancer, especially those with a recent diagnosis. PMID:26853831

  5. PBP-2 Negative Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus schleiferi Bacteremia from a Prostate Abscess: An Unusual Occurrence.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Chandni; Villanueva, Daphne-Dominique; Lalani, Ishan; Eng, Margaret; Kang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp. schleiferi is a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus which has been described as a pathogen responsible for various nosocomial infections including bacteremia, brain abscess, and infection of intravenous pacemakers. Recently, such bacteria have been described to be found typically on skin and mucosal surfaces. It is also believed to be a part of the preaxillary human flora and more frequently found in men. It is very similar in its pathogenicity with Staphylococcus aureus group and expresses a fibronectin binding protein. Literature on this pathogen reveals that it commonly causes otitis among dogs because of its location in the auditory meatus of canines. Also, it has strong association with pyoderma in dogs. The prime concern with this organism is the antibiotic resistance and relapse even after appropriate treatment. Very rarely, if any, cases have been reported about prostatic abscess (PA) with this microbe. Our patient had a history of recurrent UTIs and subsequent PA resulting in S. schleiferi bacteremia in contrast to gram negative bacteremia commonly associated with UTI. This organism was found to be resistant to methicillin, in spite of being negative for PBP2, which is a rare phenomenon and needs further studies. PMID:27092283

  6. Polymorphism in a lincRNA Associates with a Doubled Risk of Pneumococcal Bacteremia in Kenyan Children.

    PubMed

    Rautanen, Anna; Pirinen, Matti; Mills, Tara C; Rockett, Kirk A; Strange, Amy; Ndungu, Anne W; Naranbhai, Vivek; Gilchrist, James J; Bellenguez, Céline; Freeman, Colin; Band, Gavin; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Edkins, Sarah; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Gray, Emma; Dronov, Serge; Hunt, Sarah E; Langford, Cordelia; Pearson, Richard D; Su, Zhan; Vukcevic, Damjan; Macharia, Alex W; Uyoga, Sophie; Ndila, Carolyne; Mturi, Neema; Njuguna, Patricia; Mohammed, Shebe; Berkley, James A; Mwangi, Isaiah; Mwarumba, Salim; Kitsao, Barnes S; Lowe, Brett S; Morpeth, Susan C; Khandwalla, Iqbal; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A; Casas, Juan P; Corvin, Aiden; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz; Markus, Hugh S; Mathew, Christopher G; Palmer, Colin N A; Plomin, Robert; Sawcer, Stephen J; Trembath, Richard C; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Wood, Nicholas W; Deloukas, Panos; Peltonen, Leena; Williams, Thomas N; Scott, J Anthony G; Chapman, Stephen J; Donnelly, Peter; Hill, Adrian V S; Spencer, Chris C A

    2016-06-01

    Bacteremia (bacterial bloodstream infection) is a major cause of illness and death in sub-Saharan Africa but little is known about the role of human genetics in susceptibility. We conducted a genome-wide association study of bacteremia susceptibility in more than 5,000 Kenyan children as part of the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2 (WTCCC2). Both the blood-culture-proven bacteremia case subjects and healthy infants as controls were recruited from Kilifi, on the east coast of Kenya. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of bacteremia in Kilifi and was thus the focus of this study. We identified an association between polymorphisms in a long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) gene (AC011288.2) and pneumococcal bacteremia and replicated the results in the same population (p combined = 1.69 × 10(-9); OR = 2.47, 95% CI = 1.84-3.31). The susceptibility allele is African specific, derived rather than ancestral, and occurs at low frequency (2.7% in control subjects and 6.4% in case subjects). Our further studies showed AC011288.2 expression only in neutrophils, a cell type that is known to play a major role in pneumococcal clearance. Identification of this novel association will further focus research on the role of lincRNAs in human infectious disease. PMID:27236921

  7. Analysis of Comorbidity of the Patients Affected by Staphylococcal Bacteremia/Sepsis in the Last Ten Years

    PubMed Central

    Lukovac, Enra; Koluder-Cimic, Nada; Hadzovic-Cengic, Meliha; Baljic, Rusmir; Hadzic, Amir; Gojak, Refet

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY CONFLICT OF INTEREST: none declared. Introduction Staphylococcal bacteremia/sepsis is one of the most serious bacterial infections around the world. In individuals with pre-existing diseases, there is always an increased risk of infections occurring due to impaired immune system, a variety of drug therapy, exposure to a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure and frequent hospitalizations. Objectives To analyze the prevalence of comorbidity in a patient with the staphylococcal bacteremia/sepsis according to the diagnosis, the site of infection and according to the isolated agent. Patients and methods We analyzed the patients affected by the staphylococcal bacteremia/sepsis and treated in the Clinic for Infectious Diseases during a ten-year period. Results 87 patients were included, out of whom 20 (23%) with clinical signs of the bacteremia and 67 (77%) of sepsis. In the analyzed sample, in 36 (41.4%) were not registered comorbidity. Hospital infections are represented by the previous antibiotic, corticosteroid and chemo therapy, pressure ulcers, and different implants. In all comorbidity, the most common isolated bacteria was S. aureus primarily strain MSSA followed by MRSA strain which is more frequent in patients who were surgically treated (comorbidity–various implants). Conclusion The results suggest the importance of being mindful of the staphylococcal etiology of the bacteremia/sepsis in patients with comorbidities due to the selection of an adequate initial empirical therapy and reducing the risks of the septic shock. PMID:24493989

  8. International travel and the risk of hospitalization with non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteremia. A Danish population-based cohort study, 1999-2008

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Information is sparse regarding the association between international travel and hospitalization with non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteremia. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion, risk factors and outcomes of travel-related non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteremia. Methods We conducted a 10-year population-based cohort study of all patients hospitalized with non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteremia in three Danish counties (population 1.6 million). We used denominator data on Danish travellers to assess the risk per 100,000 travellers according to age and travel destination. We used patients contemporaneously diagnosed with travel-related Salmonella gastroenteritis as reference patients to estimate the relative risk of presenting with travel-related bacteremia as compared with gastroenteritis. To evaluate clinical outcomes, we compared patients with travel-related bacteremia and patients with domestically acquired bacteremia in terms of length of hospital stay, number of extraintestinal focal infections and mortality after 30 and 90 days. Results We identified 311 patients hospitalized with non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteremia of whom 76 (24.4%) had a history of international travel. The risk of travel-related bacteremia per traveller was highest in the age groups 15-24 years (0.8/100,000 travellers) and 65 years and above (1.2/100,000 travellers). The sex- and age-adjusted relative risk of presenting with bacteremia was associated with travel to Sub-Saharan Africa (odds ratio 18.4; 95% confidence interval [6.9-49.5]), the Middle East (10.6; [2.1-53.2]) and South East Asia (4.0; [2.2-7.5]). We found high-risk countries in the same three regions when estimating the risk per traveller according to travel destination. Patients hospitalized with travel-related bacteremia had better clinical outcomes than patients with domestically acquired bacteremia, they had a shorter length of hospital stay (8 vs. 11 days), less extraintestinal focal infections (5 vs

  9. Evaluation of six risk factors for the development of bacteremia in children with cancer and febrile neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Asturias, E.J.; Corral, J.E.; Quezada, J.

    2010-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia is a well-known entity in children with cancer, being responsible for the high risk for infection that characterizes this population. For this reason, cancer patients are hospitalized so that they can receive prophylactic care. Risk factors have been used to classify patients at a high risk for developing bacteremia. The present study evaluates whether those risk factors (C-reactive protein, hypotension, leukemia as the cancer type, thrombocytopenia, recent chemotherapy, and acute malnutrition) apply to patients at the Unidad Nacional de Oncología Pediátrica. We evaluated 102 episodes in 88 patients, in whom risk factors and blood cultures were tested. We observed no statistical relationship between the six risk factors and bacteremia. There was also no relationship between bacteremia and the simultaneous presence of two, three, or more risk factors. A significant relationship of C-reactive protein and platelet count with other outcome factors was observed. PMID:20404980

  10. Identifying Patients with Bacteremia in Community-Hospital Emergency Rooms: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Takeshima, Taro; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Noguchi, Yoshinori; Maki, Nobuyuki; Gibo, Koichiro; Tsugihashi, Yukio; Doi, Asako; Fukuma, Shingo; Yamazaki, Shin; Kajii, Eiji; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives (1) To develop a clinical prediction rule to identify patients with bacteremia, using only information that is readily available in the emergency room (ER) of community hospitals, and (2) to test the validity of that rule with a separate, independent set of data. Design Multicenter retrospective cohort study. Setting To derive the clinical prediction rule we used data from 3 community hospitals in Japan (derivation). We tested the rule using data from one other community hospital (validation), which was not among the three “derivation” hospitals. Participants Adults (age ≥ 16 years old) who had undergone blood-culture testing while in the ER between April 2011 and March 2012. For the derivation data, n = 1515 (randomly sampled from 7026 patients), and for the validation data n = 467 (from 823 patients). Analysis We analyzed 28 candidate predictors of bacteremia, including demographic data, signs and symptoms, comorbid conditions, and basic laboratory data. Chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression were used to derive an integer risk score (the “ID-BactER” score). Sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (i.e., the AUC) were computed. Results There were 241 cases of bacteremia in the derivation data. Eleven candidate predictors were used in the ID-BactER score: age, chills, vomiting, mental status, temperature, systolic blood pressure, abdominal sign, white blood-cell count, platelets, blood urea nitrogen, and C-reactive protein. The AUCs was 0.80 (derivation) and 0.74 (validation). For ID-BactER scores ≥ 2, the sensitivities for derivation and validation data were 98% and 97%, and specificities were 20% and 14%, respectively. Conclusions The ID-BactER score can be computed from information that is readily available in the ERs of community hospitals. Future studies should focus on developing a score with a higher specificity while maintaining the desired sensitivity

  11. Streptococcus salivarius bacteremia and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in liver transplantation candidates.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Manjushree; Chopra, Kapil B; Douglas, David D; Stewart, Rebecca A; Kusne, Shimon

    2007-11-01

    Bacterial infections are a serious complication of end-stage liver disease (ESLD) that occurs in 20% to 60% of patients. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of patients with ESLD who were identified by our microbiology laboratory as having Streptococcus salivarius bacteremia. Of 592 patients listed for transplantation between January 1998 and January 2006, 9 (1.5%) had 10 episodes of S salivarius bacteremia. Of 2 patients already receiving quinolone prophylaxis for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), 1 later presented with a second episode. The male-to-female ratio was 1:1.2. Medians for age, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score, and Child-Turcotte-Pugh score were 50 years, 17, and 10, respectively. Presenting symptoms and signs in 10 episodes of infection were ascites (in 8 episodes), elevated temperature (6), abdominal pain (5), and encephalopathy (4). Median laboratory values included: white blood cell count, 15.1 x 10(9)/L; creatinine, 0.9 mg/dL; albumin, 3.1 gm/dL; aspartate aminotransferase, 64 U/L; alanine aminotransferase, 52.5 U/L; ammonia, 67 mug/dL; and prothrombin time, 17.3 seconds. Ascitic fluid in patients with peritonitis showed a median white blood cell count of 466 cells/mm(3) (range, 250-12,822 cells/mm(3)), with 66% polymorphs, protein of 0.9 gm/dL, and albumin of 0.4 gm/dL. S salivarius may cause primary bacteremia and SBP in liver transplantation candidates despite quinolone prophylaxis. PMID:17969206

  12. The Management of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia in the United Kingdom and Vietnam: A Multi-Centre Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Thwaites, Guy E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia is a common and serious infection worldwide and although treatment guidelines exist, there is little consensus on optimal management. In this study we assessed the variation in management and adherence to treatment guidelines of S. aureus bacteremia. Methodology/Principal Findings We prospectively recorded baseline clinical characteristics, management, and in-hospital outcome of all adults with S. aureus bacteremia treated consecutively over one year in eight centres in the United Kingdom, three in Vietnam and one in Nepal. 630 adults were treated for S. aureus bacteremia: 549 in the UK (21% methicillin-resistant), 80 in Vietnam (19% methicillin-resistant) and 1 in Nepal. In the UK, 41% had a removable infection focus (50% intravenous catheter-related), compared to 12% in Vietnam. Significantly (p<0.001) higher proportions of UK than Vietnamese patients had an echocardiogram (50% versus 28%), received more than 14 days antibiotic therapy (84% versus 44%), and received >50% of treatment with oral antibiotics alone (25% versus 4%). UK centres varied significantly (p<0.01) in the proportions given oral treatment alone for >50% of treatment (range 12–40%), in those treated for longer than 28 days (range 13–54%), and in those given combination therapy (range 14–94%). 24% died during admission: older age, time in hospital before bacteremia, and an unidentified infection focus were independent predictors of in-hospital death (p<0.001). Conclusions/Significance The management of S. aureus bacteremia varies widely between the UK and Vietnam and between centres in the UK with little adherence to published guidelines. Controlled trials defining optimal therapy are urgently required. PMID:21179193

  13. A cluster of Bacillus cereus bacteremia cases among injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Benusic, Michael A; Press, Natasha M; Hoang, Linda MN; Romney, Marc G

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous spore-forming organism that is infrequently implicated in extraintestinal infections. The authors report three cases of B cereus bacteremia among injection drug users presenting within one month to an urban tertiary care hospital. Treatment with intravenous vancomycin was successful in all three cases. While temporal association suggested an outbreak, molecular studies of patient isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis did not suggest a common source. A review of the association of B cereus infections with heroin use and treatment of this pathogen is provided. PMID:26015795

  14. Hidden diagnosis of Tuberculous pleurisy masked by concomitant Pseudomonas oryzihabitans bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Lin, Te-Yu; Wu, Shih-Wei; Lin, Gen-Min; Chen, Yu-Guang

    2012-02-01

    The clinical presentations of tuberculous pleurisy are usually nonspecific and have an insidious course, thus resulting in diagnostic challenges. Pseudomonas oryzihabitans is a nonfermenting, oxidase-negative, catalase-positive, Gram-negative bacillus that has rarely been encountered as a human pathogen. We present the case of a 30-year-old male patient who exhibited intermittent fever despite antibiotic treatment for Pseudomonas oryzihabitans bacteremia for 6 days. Tuberculous pleurisy was finally diagnosed by histopathologic and microbiologic studies. He recovered after a 2-week antibiotic course and 6-month antituberculosis treatment. PMID:21762552

  15. Intravenous Drug Abuse by Patients Inside the Hospital: A Cause for Sustained Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Thyagarajan, Braghadheeswar

    2016-01-01

    Patients with history of intravenous drug abuse are noted to be at risk of several infections including HIV, endocarditis, and other opportunistic infections. We report the case of a patient with sustained Bacillus cereus bacteremia despite use of multiple antibiotic regimens during his inpatient stay. Our case highlights the importance of high suspicion for active drug use inside the hospital in such patients. This is important in order to minimize unnecessary diagnostic workup and provide adequate treatment and safe hospital stay for these patients. PMID:27433362

  16. Staphylococcus pettenkoferi bacteremia: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Hashi, Abdulaziz Ahmed; Delport, Johannes Andries; Elsayed, Sameer; Silverman, Michael Seth

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus pettenkoferi is a relatively recently described coagulase-negative staphylococci species first described in 2002. Since then, nine additional cases of infection caused by this species have been reported in various countries around the world, including Germany, Belgium, France, South Korea, Italy, Brazil and Mexico. The present report describes a case of S pettenkoferi peripheral line-associated bacteremia. To our knowledge, the present report is the first description of human infection caused by S pettenkoferi in Canada. The present report also provides an overview of the laboratory detection of uncommon coagulase-negative staphylococci. PMID:26744589

  17. Metastatic infectious disease and clinical outcome in Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus species bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Vos, Fidel J; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Sturm, Patrick D; Krabbe, Paul F M; van Dijk, Arie P J; Wanten, Geert J A; Oyen, Wim J G; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P

    2012-03-01

    Early detection of metastatic infection in patients with Gram-positive bacteremia is important as morbidity and mortality are higher in the presence of these foci, probably due to incomplete eradication of clinically silent foci during initial treatment. We performed a prospective study in 115 patients with Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus species bacteremia with at least 1 risk factor for the development of metastatic foci, such as community acquisition, treatment delay, persistently positive blood cultures for >48 hours, and persistent fever >72 hours after initiation of treatment. An intensive search for metastatic infectious foci was performed including ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in combination with low-dose computed tomography scanning for optimizing anatomical correlation (FDG-PET/CT) and echocardiography in the first 2 weeks of admission. Metastatic infectious foci were detected in 84 of 115 (73%) patients. Endocarditis (22 cases), endovascular infections (19 cases), pulmonary abscesses (16 cases), and spondylodiscitis (11 cases) were diagnosed most frequently. The incidence of metastatic infection was similar in patients with Streptococcus species and patients with S. aureus bacteremia. Signs and symptoms guiding the attending physician in the diagnostic workup were present in only a minority of cases (41%). An unknown portal of entry, treatment delay >48 hours, and the presence of foreign body material were significant risk factors for developing metastatic foci. Mean C-reactive protein levels on admission were significantly higher in patients with metastatic infectious foci (74 vs. 160 mg/L). FDG-PET/CT was the first technique to localize metastatic infectious foci in 35 of 115 (30%) patients. As only a minority of foci were accompanied by guiding signs or symptoms, the number of foci revealed by symptom-guided CT, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging remained low. Mortality tended to be lower in patients without

  18. A Case of Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis with Bacteremia Caused by Shewanella algae

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo Kyoung; Cho, Sung-Yeon; Kang, Borami; Kim, Il-Kyu; Byun, Ji-Hyun; Park, Chulmin

    2014-01-01

    Human infection caused by Shewanella algae is rare, which usually occurred after direct contact with seawater or ingestion of raw seafood in the immunocompromised host. There have been anecdotal reports about Shewanella infections in human, but their pathogenic role and microbiologic data are limited. Here, we report a fatal case of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis with bacteremia due to S. algae in a 57-year-old male with liver cirrhosis who had no history of exposure to seawater or raw seafood. Polymicrobial infection with Streptococcus mitis and Escherichia coli was combined and the patient died in spite of early appropriate antimicrobial therapy and early goal-directed therapy for sepsis. PMID:25566408

  19. A cluster of Bacillus cereus bacteremia cases among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Benusic, Michael A; Press, Natasha M; Hoang, Linda Mn; Romney, Marc G

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous spore-forming organism that is infrequently implicated in extraintestinal infections. The authors report three cases of B cereus bacteremia among injection drug users presenting within one month to an urban tertiary care hospital. Treatment with intravenous vancomycin was successful in all three cases. While temporal association suggested an outbreak, molecular studies of patient isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis did not suggest a common source. A review of the association of B cereus infections with heroin use and treatment of this pathogen is provided. PMID:26015795

  20. Procalcitonin Is a Marker of Gram-Negative Bacteremia in Patients With Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shun Yuan; Zhou, Yin; Hu, Qing Feng; Yao, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Prediction of the species of pathogen among patients with sepsis within hours would be helpful in accelerating proper treatment. As a potential method of shortening the time to identification, this study considered the usefulness of measuring procalcitonin (PCT) to predict blood culture (BC) results. Methods: The authors retrospectively analyzed the data of patients with a diagnosis of sepsis in their hospital from December 2012 to December 2013. The authors analyzed all diagnostic episodes consisting of BC and PCT concentration. The diagnostic performance of PCT to predict gram-negative bacteremia was tested using a receiver operative characteristic curve. Logistic regression was constructed using the presence of gram-negative bacteria as the dependent variable. Results: A total of 262 diagnostic episodes met the inclusion criteria. According to BC classifications, a significantly higher value of PCT was observed in bloodstream infections caused by gram-negative bacteria (26.7 ng/mL, 0.09–188.3) than that in bloodstream infections caused by gram-positive bacteria (0.84 ng/mL, 0.05–18.79) or Candida spp. (1.12 ng/mL, 0.07–49.68). A cutoff value of ≥3.39 ng/mL for PCT showed a sensitivity of 80%, a specificity of 71%, a positive predictive value of 35%, a negative predictive value of 91% and an area under the curve of 0.73 for gram-negative bacteremia identification by BC. Among the 122 diagnostic episodes with positive BC results, a cutoff value of ≥6.47 ng/mL for PCT yielded a sensitivity of 74%, a specificity of 81%, a positive predictive value of 82%, a negative predictive value of 75% and an area under the curve of 0.81 for gram-negative bacteremia identification. Conclusions: PCT may represent a useful tool for differentiating gram-positive from gram-negative bloodstream infection with a significantly higher PCT level indicating gram-negative bacteremia. PMID:25992537

  1. Intravenous Drug Abuse by Patients Inside the Hospital: A Cause for Sustained Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Goel, Noopur; Munshi, Lubna Bashir; Thyagarajan, Braghadheeswar

    2016-01-01

    Patients with history of intravenous drug abuse are noted to be at risk of several infections including HIV, endocarditis, and other opportunistic infections. We report the case of a patient with sustained Bacillus cereus bacteremia despite use of multiple antibiotic regimens during his inpatient stay. Our case highlights the importance of high suspicion for active drug use inside the hospital in such patients. This is important in order to minimize unnecessary diagnostic workup and provide adequate treatment and safe hospital stay for these patients. PMID:27433362

  2. Hepatic hemosiderosis and Klebsiella bacteremia in a green aracari (Pteroglossus viridis).

    PubMed

    Wilson, R B

    1994-01-01

    A green aracari (Pteroglossus viridis) was presented for necropsy after being found dead; no previous clinical signs had been noted. Microscopic examination revealed multifocal necrosis of the liver, spleen, and lung compatible with an acute bacteremia. Klebsiella pneumoniae was isolated from the liver, kidney, and intestine. Histopathological and toxicological findings also reflected a concurrent hepatopathy due to excess iron accumulation. Hepatic hemosiderosis has been reported in mynahs, birds of paradise, and quetzals but has not previously been reported in the green aracari. PMID:7832728

  3. Fatal case of bacteremia caused by an atypical strain of Corynebacterium mucifaciens.

    PubMed

    Cantarelli, Vlademir Vicente; Brodt, Teresa Cristina Z; Secchi, Carina; Inamine, Everton; Pereira, Fabiana de Souza; Pilger, Diogo Andre

    2006-12-01

    Corynebacterium species have often been considered normal skin flora or contaminants; however, in recent years they have been increasingly implicated in serious infections. Moreover, many new species have been discovered and old species renamed, especially after molecular biology techniques were introduced. Corynebacterium mucifaciens is mainly isolated from blood and from other normally-sterile body fluids; it forms slightly yellow, mucoid colonies on blood agar. We report a fatal case of bacteremia due to an atypical strain of C. mucifaciens. This strain had atypical colony morphology; analysis of the 16S rRNA gene was used to define the species. PMID:17420918

  4. First Report of Mycobacterium canariasense Catheter-Related Bacteremia in the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Ladutko, Lynn; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Wallace, Richard J.; Jakubiec, Wesley; Brecher, Stephen; Campbell, Sheldon

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium canariasense is a recently described late-pigmenting, rapidly growing mycobacterium linked to bacteremia in patients with underlying malignant diseases. We report a case of M. canariasense infection in a patient from Massachusetts with underlying diffuse B cell lymphoma, which was identified both by multilocus sequence typing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). To our knowledge, this is the first description after its original identification in Spain and the first report of this opportunistic pathogen in the Americas. PMID:24740075

  5. Ecthyma gangrenosum caused by Escherichia coli bacteremia: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jitendrakumar K; Perez, Oliver A; Viera, Martha H; Halem, Monica; Berman, Brian

    2009-11-01

    Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG) is a serious and well-recognized cutaneous condition. Development of EG is most commonly associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa septicemia. Other organisms, such as Escherichia coli, have been identified less often as the cause of EG. We describe a 50-year-old man previously diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) who developed an E coli-colonized EG lesion secondary to E coli bacteremia. This case represents the seventh of its kind in the literature and the first case in a patient with AML. In addition, a brief review of the etiopathology and management of EG is presented. PMID:20099619

  6. Differing Burden and Epidemiology of Non-Typhi Salmonella Bacteremia in Rural and Urban Kenya, 2006–2009

    PubMed Central

    Tabu, Collins; Breiman, Robert F.; Ochieng, Benjamin; Aura, Barrack; Cosmas, Leonard; Audi, Allan; Olack, Beatrice; Bigogo, Godfrey; Ongus, Juliette R.; Fields, Patricia; Mintz, Eric; Burton, Deron; Oundo, Joe; Feikin, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of non-Typhi Salmonella (NTS) bacteremia in Africa will likely evolve as potential co-factors, such as HIV, malaria, and urbanization, also change. Methods As part of population-based surveillance among 55,000 persons in malaria-endemic, rural and malaria-nonendemic, urban Kenya from 2006–2009, blood cultures were obtained from patients presenting to referral clinics with fever ≥38.0°C or severe acute respiratory infection. Incidence rates were adjusted based on persons with compatible illnesses, but whose blood was not cultured. Results NTS accounted for 60/155 (39%) of blood culture isolates in the rural and 7/230 (3%) in the urban sites. The adjusted incidence in the rural site was 568/100,000 person-years, and the urban site was 51/100,000 person-years. In both sites, the incidence was highest in children <5 years old. The NTS-to-typhoid bacteremia ratio in the rural site was 4.6 and in the urban site was 0.05. S. Typhimurium represented >85% of blood NTS isolates in both sites, but only 21% (urban) and 64% (rural) of stool NTS isolates. Overall, 76% of S. Typhimurium blood isolates were multi-drug resistant, most of which had an identical profile in Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis. In the rural site, the incidence of NTS bacteremia increased during the study period, concomitant with rising malaria prevalence (monthly correlation of malaria positive blood smears and NTS bacteremia cases, Spearman's correlation, p = 0.018 for children, p = 0.16 adults). In the rural site, 80% of adults with NTS bacteremia were HIV-infected. Six of 7 deaths within 90 days of NTS bacteremia had HIV/AIDS as the primary cause of death assigned on verbal autopsy. Conclusions NTS caused the majority of bacteremias in rural Kenya, but typhoid predominated in urban Kenya, which most likely reflects differences in malaria endemicity. Control measures for malaria, as well as HIV, will likely decrease the burden of NTS bacteremia in Africa. PMID

  7. Genetic and molecular predictors of high vancomycin MIC in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia isolates.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Natasha E; Turnidge, John D; Munckhof, Wendy J; Robinson, J Owen; Korman, Tony M; O'Sullivan, Matthew V N; Anderson, Tara L; Roberts, Sally A; Warren, Sanchia J C; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Tan, Hui-Leen; Gao, Wei; Johnson, Paul D R; Howden, Benjamin P

    2014-09-01

    An elevated vancomycin MIC is associated with poor outcomes in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) and is reported in patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) bacteremia in the absence of vancomycin treatment. Here, using DNA microarray and phenotype analysis, we investigated the genetic predictors and accessory gene regulator (agr) function and their relationship with elevated vancomycin MIC using blood culture isolates from a multicenter binational cohort of patients with SAB. Specific clonal complexes were associated with elevated (clonal complex 8 [CC8] [P < 0.001]) or low (CC22 [P < 0.001], CC88 [P < 0.001], and CC188 [P = 0.002]) vancomycin MIC. agr dysfunction (P = 0.014) or agr genotype II (P = 0.043) were also associated with an elevated vancomycin MIC. Specific resistance and virulence genes were also linked to an elevated vancomycin MIC, including blaZ (P = 0.002), sea (P < 0.001), clfA (P < 0.001), splA (P = 0.001), and the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) locus (P = 0.02). These data suggest that inherent organism characteristics may explain the link between elevated vancomycin MICs and poor outcomes in patients with SAB, regardless of the antibiotic treatment received. A consideration of clonal specificity should be included in future research when attempting to ascertain treatment effects or clinical outcomes. PMID:25031442

  8. Streptococcus intermedius Bacteremia and Liver Abscess following a Routine Dental Cleaning

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Lachara V.; Perez-Colon, Elimarys

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group of bacteria. This group is part of the normal flora of the oropharynx, genitourinary, and gastrointestinal tracts; however, they have been known to cause a variety of purulent infections including meningitis, endocarditis, and abscesses, even in immunocompetent hosts. In particular, S. intermedius has been associated with the development of liver and brain abscesses. There have been several case reports of S. intermedius liver abscesses with active periodontal infection. To our knowledge, however, there has not been a case following a routine dental procedure. In fact, the development of liver abscesses secondary to dental procedures is very rare in general, and there are only a few case reports in the literature describing this in relation to any pathogen. We present a rare case of S. intermedius bacteremia and liver abscess following a dental cleaning. This case serves to further emphasize that even routine dental procedures can place a patient at risk of the development of bacteremia and liver abscesses. For this reason, the clinician must be sure to perform a detailed history and careful examination. Timely diagnosis of pyogenic liver abscesses is vital, as they are typically fatal if left untreated. PMID:25197585

  9. Protection against gram-negative bacteremia and endotoxemia with human monoclonal IgM antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Teng, N N; Kaplan, H S; Hebert, J M; Moore, C; Douglas, H; Wunderlich, A; Braude, A I

    1985-01-01

    Hybridomas producing human monoclonal IgM antibodies (mAbs) against bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were generated by fusion of B lymphocytes from sensitized human spleen with heteromyeloma cells. The splenocytes were from patients undergoing splenectomy during staging for Hodgkin disease after vaccination with the J5 mutant of Escherichia coli, which is deficient in O antigenic side chains. This deficiency exposes the core oligosaccharide, common to LPS of all Gram-negative bacteria. The mAbs cross-reacted strongly with endotoxins from a wide range of unrelated species of Gram-negative bacteria. The mAbs also gave strong protection against LPS in the dermal Shwartzman reaction and against lethal Gram-negative bacteremia in mice. These findings indicate that monoclonal IgM against LPS endotoxin can neutralize its toxicity in vivo and might be valuable for treatment of patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. Analysis of one of the hybridoma clones, A6(H4C5), showed that the IgM mAb is directed against the covalently bound lipid A, which represents the most conservative and least variable structural element of LPS. Images PMID:3856860

  10. Genetic and Molecular Predictors of High Vancomycin MIC in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Turnidge, John D.; Munckhof, Wendy J.; Robinson, J. Owen; Korman, Tony M.; O'Sullivan, Matthew V. N.; Anderson, Tara L.; Roberts, Sally A.; Warren, Sanchia J. C.; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Tan, Hui-Leen; Gao, Wei; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Howden, Benjamin P.

    2014-01-01

    An elevated vancomycin MIC is associated with poor outcomes in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) and is reported in patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) bacteremia in the absence of vancomycin treatment. Here, using DNA microarray and phenotype analysis, we investigated the genetic predictors and accessory gene regulator (agr) function and their relationship with elevated vancomycin MIC using blood culture isolates from a multicenter binational cohort of patients with SAB. Specific clonal complexes were associated with elevated (clonal complex 8 [CC8] [P < 0.001]) or low (CC22 [P < 0.001], CC88 [P < 0.001], and CC188 [P = 0.002]) vancomycin MIC. agr dysfunction (P = 0.014) or agr genotype II (P = 0.043) were also associated with an elevated vancomycin MIC. Specific resistance and virulence genes were also linked to an elevated vancomycin MIC, including blaZ (P = 0.002), sea (P < 0.001), clfA (P < 0.001), splA (P = 0.001), and the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) locus (P = 0.02). These data suggest that inherent organism characteristics may explain the link between elevated vancomycin MICs and poor outcomes in patients with SAB, regardless of the antibiotic treatment received. A consideration of clonal specificity should be included in future research when attempting to ascertain treatment effects or clinical outcomes. PMID:25031442

  11. Helicobacter cinaedi kidney cyst infection and bacteremia in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mandai, Shintaro; Kasagi, Yuri; Kusaka, Keita; Shikuma, Satomi; Akita, Wataru; Kuwahara, Michio

    2014-11-01

    A 48-year-old man with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) was admitted to our hospital with a 5-day history of lower right back pain, high-grade fever, and arthralgia. He was diagnosed with right kidney cyst infection and bacteremia due to Helicobacter cinaedi (H. cinaedi) based on these symptoms, highly elevated CRP (32.25 mg/dL), abdominal magnetic resonance imaging findings, and the identification of H. cinaedi from blood cultures using PCR and sequence analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA gene. Intravenous cefotaxime 0.5 g twice daily followed by meropenem 0.5 g twice daily and ciprofloxacin 200 mg twice daily were partially effective; oral doxycycline added at 200 mg/day finally eradicated the infection. Total duration of antimicrobial therapy was 9 weeks. H. cinaedi infections typically present as bacteremia with or without cellulitis in immunocompromised patients such as those with AIDS or malignant disease. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing an ADPKD patient with H. cinaedi cyst infection. Although H. cinaedi infections are increasingly recognized, even in immunocompetent subjects, numerous cases may still be overlooked given that this bacterium is slow-growing, and is difficult to culture, be Gram-stained, and identify on phenotypic tests. Consideration of this bacterium as a possible pathogen and sufficient duration of incubation with molecular testing are necessary in treating ADPKD patients with cyst infection. PMID:25131293

  12. Bacteremia in narcotic addicts at the Detroit Medical Center. II. Infectious endocarditis: a prospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Levine, D P; Crane, L R; Zervos, M J

    1986-01-01

    For one year all narcotic addicts admitted to the Detroit Medical Center with infectious endocarditis (74 cases) were compared with a control group of bacteremic addicts who had other infections (106 cases). Endocarditis was caused by Staphylococcus aureus (60.8% of cases), streptococci (16.2%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (13.5%), mixed bacteria (8.1%), and Corynebacterium JK (1.4%). S. aureus endocarditis most frequently involved the tricuspid valve; streptococci infected left-sided valves significantly more often than other organisms (P = .001). Biventricular and multiple-valve infections were commonest in patients with pseudomonas endocarditis (P = .05). Two-dimensional echocardiography, when combined with an abnormal chest roentgenogram, was highly predictive of endocarditis. Bacteremia in the absence of endocarditis was associated with primary skin and soft tissue infection, mycotic aneurysm at the site of narcotic injection, septic arthritis, septic thrombophlebitis, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, mediastinal abscess, and unclassified infection. Polymicrobial bacteremia in the nonendocarditis group was associated with markedly increased morbidity. Mild hyponatremia occurred in 41% of all patients and was also associated with significantly increased morbidity. Analysis of the two groups disclosed similarities and differences with implications for the pathophysiology and treatment of addicts with bacteremic infection. PMID:3755255

  13. Age-related differences in symptoms, diagnosis and prognosis of bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Elderly patients are at particular risk for bacteremia and sepsis. Atypical presentation may complicate the diagnosis. We studied patients with bacteremia, in order to assess possible age-related effects on the clinical presentation and course of severe infections. Methods We reviewed the records of 680 patients hospitalized between 1994 and 2004. All patients were diagnosed with bacteremia, 450 caused by Escherichia coli and 230 by Streptococcus pneumoniae. Descriptive analyses were performed for three age groups (< 65 years, 65–84 years, ≥ 85 years). In multivariate analyses age was dichotomized (< 65, ≥ 65 years). Symptoms were categorized into atypical or typical. Prognostic sensitivity of CRP and SIRS in identifying early organ failure was studied at different cut-off values. Outcome variables were organ failure within one day after admission and in-hospital mortality. Results The higher age-groups more often presented atypical symptoms (p <0.001), decline in general health (p=0.029), and higher in-hospital mortality (p<0.001). The prognostic sensitivity of CRP did not differ between age groups, but in those ≥ 85 years the prognostic sensitivity of two SIRS criteria was lower than that of three criteria. Classical symptoms were protective for early organ failure (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.45-0.99), and risk factors included; age ≥ 65 years (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.09-2.49), comorbid illnesses (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.02-1.40 per diagnosis), decline in general health (OR 2.28, 95% CI 1.58-3.27), tachycardia (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.02-2.20), tachypnea (OR 3.86, 95% CI 2.64-5.66), and leukopenia (OR 4.16, 95% CI 1.59-10.91). Fever was protective for in-hospital mortality (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.24-0.89), and risk factors included; age ≥ 65 years (OR 15.02, 95% CI 3.68-61.29), ≥ 1 comorbid illness (OR 2.61, 95% CI 1.11-6.14), bacteremia caused by S. pneumoniae (OR 2.79, 95% CI 1.43-5.46), leukopenia (OR 4.62, 95% CI 1.88-11.37), and number of early

  14. Francisella philomiragia Bacteremia in a Patient with Acute Respiratory Insufficiency and Acute-on-Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Romney M.; Mattison, H. Reid; Miles, Jessica E.; Simpson, Edward R.; Corbett, Ian J.; Schmitt, Bryan H.; May, M.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella philomiragia is a very uncommon pathogen of humans. Diseases caused by it are protean and have been reported largely in near-drowning victims and those with chronic granulomatous disease. We present a case of F. philomiragia pneumonia with peripheral edema and bacteremia in a renal transplant patient and review the diverse reports of F. philomiragia infections. PMID:26400786

  15. Early vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) bacteremia after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is associated with a rapidly deteriorating clinical course.

    PubMed

    Avery, R; Kalaycio, M; Pohlman, B; Sobecks, R; Kuczkowski, E; Andresen, S; Mossad, S; Shamp, J; Curtis, J; Kosar, J; Sands, K; Serafin, M; Bolwell, B

    2005-03-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococcal (VRE) infection is a growing threat. We studied the incidence, risk factors, and clinical course of early-onset VRE bacteremia in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. We carried out a chart review of 281 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients from 1997-2003, including preparative regimen, diagnosis, status of disease, graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis, antimicrobial therapy, and survival. VRE bacteremia developed in 12/281 (4.3%) recipients; 10 (3.6%) were within 21 days of transplant. Diagnoses were acute leukemia (7), NHL (2), and MDS (1). In all, 70% had refractory/relapsed disease; 30% were in remission. In total, 50% had circulating blasts. Nine of 10 had matched unrelated donors (7/9 with CD8+ T-cell depletion). The average time to positive VRE cultures was 15 days; average WBC was 0.05, and 80% had concomitant infections. Despite treatment, all patients died within 73 days of VRE bacteremia. Intra-abdominal complications were common. Causes of death included bacterial or fungal infection, multiorgan failure, VOD, ARDS, and relapse. A total of 60% of patients engrafted neutrophils, but none engrafted platelets. Early VRE bacteremia after allogeneic bone marrow transplant is associated with a rapidly deteriorating clinical course, although not always directly due to VRE. Early VRE may be a marker for the critical condition of these high-risk patients at the time of transplant. PMID:15640812

  16. Impact of different antimicrobial therapies on clinical and fiscal outcomes of patients with bacteremia due to vancomycin-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kayoko; Martin, Emily T; Gudur, Uma Mahesh; Marchaim, Dror; Dalle, Dalia; Alshabani, Khaled; Muppavarapu, Kalyan Srinivas; Jaydev, Fnu; Bathina, Pradeep; Sundaragiri, Pranathi Rao; Rajuri, Shashi Dhar; Khatri, Jaikumar; Pogue, Jason M; Lephart, Paul R; Rybak, Michael J; Kaye, Keith S

    2014-07-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are a growing health problem, and uncertainties exist regarding the optimal therapy for bloodstream infection due to VRE. We conducted systematic comparative evaluations of the impact of different antimicrobial therapies on the outcomes of patients with bloodstream infections due to VRE. A retrospective study from January 2008 to October 2010 was conducted at Detroit Medical Center. Unique patients with blood cultures due to VRE were included and reviewed. Three major therapeutic classes were analyzed: daptomycin, linezolid, and β-lactams. Three multivariate models were conducted for each outcome, matching for a propensity score predicting the likelihood of receipt of one of the therapeutic classes. A total of 225 cases of bacteremia due to VRE were included, including 86 (38.2%) cases of VR Enterococcus faecalis and 139 (61.8%) of VR Enterococcus faecium. Bacteremia due to VR E. faecalis was more frequent among subjects treated with β-lactams than among those treated with daptomycin or linezolid. The median dose of daptomycin was 6 mg/kg of body weight (range, 6 to 12 mg/kg). After controlling for propensity score and bacteremia due to VR E. faecalis, differences in mortality were nonsignificant among the treatment groups. Therapy with daptomycin was associated with higher median variable direct cost per day than that for linezolid. This large study revealed the three therapeutic classes (daptomycin, linezolid, and β-lactams) are similarly efficacious in the treatment of bacteremia due to susceptible strains of VRE. PMID:24798267

  17. Isolation of Flavimonas oryzihabitans (CDC group Ve-2) from catheter-induced bacteremia in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Mutters, R; Köppler, H; Krause, T

    1990-12-01

    Bacteria of the newly proposed genus and combination Flavimonas oryzihabitans, previously known as CDC group Ve-2 or Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, are uncommon pathogens. We report here the first isolation of the organism in Germany from a case of bacteremia and describe the phenotypic characteristics of the strain. PMID:2091948

  18. Central venous catheter-related bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Kocuria species are unusual human pathogens isolated most commonly from immunocompromised hosts, such as transplant recipients and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, or from patients with chronic medical conditions. A case of catheter-related bacteremia with pulmonary septic emboli in a pregnant adult female without chronic medical conditions is described. A review of other reported Kocuria infections is provided. PMID:21864336

  19. Central venous catheter-related bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Ryan; Bares, Sara; David, Michael Z

    2011-01-01

    Kocuria species are unusual human pathogens isolated most commonly from immunocompromised hosts, such as transplant recipients and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, or from patients with chronic medical conditions. A case of catheter-related bacteremia with pulmonary septic emboli in a pregnant adult female without chronic medical conditions is described. A review of other reported Kocuria infections is provided. PMID:21864336

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Catabacter hongkongensis Type Strain HKU16T, Isolated from a Patient with Bacteremia and Intestinal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Jade L. L.; Huang, Yi; Curreem, Shirly O. T.; Tsui, Stephen K. W.

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Catabacter hongkongensis, a catalase-positive bacterium which causes bacteremia with high mortality. The 3.2-Mb genome contains 3,161 protein coding sequences, including putative catalase and motility-related proteins, and antibiotic resistance genes, which could be important for its virulence and adaptation to diverse environments. PMID:25999561

  1. Diarrhea, bacteremia and multiorgan dysfunction due to an extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli strain with enteropathogenic E. coli genes

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Robert; Nisa, Shahista; Hazen, Tracy H.; Horneman, Amy; Amoroso, Anthony; Rasko, David A.; Donnenberg, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    A 55-year-old man with well-controlled HIV had severe diarrhea for 3 weeks and developed multiorgan dysfunction and bacteremia due to Escherichia coli. The genome of the patient's isolate had features characteristic of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli and genes distantly related to those defining enteropathogenic E. coli. PMID:26410828

  2. Presence of the KPC carbapenemase gene in Enterobacteriaceae causing bacteremia, and the correlation with in vitro carbapenem susceptibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During six months, we obtained Enterobacteriaceae isolates from patients with Gram-negative bacteremia at a 1250-bed teaching hospital in St. Louis, Missouri, and compared carbapenem susceptibility with the presence of blaKPC, a transferable carbapenemase gene. Three (1.2%) out of 243 isolates were ...

  3. The neglected role of antibody in protection against bacteremia caused by nontyphoidal strains of Salmonella in African children

    PubMed Central

    MacLennan, Calman A.; Gondwe, Esther N.; Msefula, Chisomo L.; Kingsley, Robert A.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; White, Sarah A.; Goodall, Margaret; Pickard, Derek J.; Graham, Stephen M.; Dougan, Gordon; Hart, C. Anthony; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Drayson, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    Nontyphoidal strains of Salmonella (NTS) are a common cause of bacteremia among African children. Cell-mediated immune responses control intracellular infection, but they do not protect against extracellular growth of NTS in the blood. We investigated whether antibody protects against NTS bacteremia in Malawian children, because we found this condition mainly occurs before 2 years of age, with relative sparing of infants younger than 4 months old. Sera from all healthy Malawian children tested aged more than 16 months contained anti-Salmonella antibody and successfully killed NTS. Killing was mediated by complement membrane attack complex and not augmented in the presence of blood leukocytes. Sera from most healthy children less than 16 months old lacked NTS-specific antibody, and sera lacking antibody did not kill NTS despite normal complement function. Addition of Salmonella-specific antibody, but not mannose-binding lectin, enabled NTS killing. All NTS strains tested had long-chain lipopolysaccharide and the rck gene, features that resist direct complement-mediated killing. Disruption of lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis enabled killing of NTS by serum lacking Salmonella-specific antibody. We conclude that Salmonella-specific antibody that overcomes the complement resistance of NTS develops by 2 years of life in Malawian children. This finding and the age-incidence of NTS bacteremia suggest that antibody protects against NTS bacteremia and support the development of vaccines against NTS that induce protective antibody. PMID:18357343

  4. Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia with Bacteremia Caused by Herbaspirillum aquaticum or Herbaspirillum huttiense in an Immune-Competent Adult

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, Joanna; Smith, L. Patrick; Salzer, William

    2015-01-01

    Herbaspirillum spp. are Gram-negative bacteria that inhabit soil and water. Infections caused by these organisms have been reported in immunocompromised hosts. We describe severe community-acquired pneumonia and bacteremia caused by Herbaspirillum aquaticum or H. huttiense in an immunocompetent adult male. PMID:26179298

  5. Diarrhea, bacteremia and multiorgan dysfunction due to an extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli strain with enteropathogenic E. coli genes.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Robert; Nisa, Shahista; Hazen, Tracy H; Horneman, Amy; Amoroso, Anthony; Rasko, David A; Donnenberg, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    A 55-year-old man with well-controlled HIV had severe diarrhea for 3 weeks and developed multiorgan dysfunction and bacteremia due to Escherichia coli. The genome of the patient's isolate had features characteristic of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli and genes distantly related to those defining enteropathogenic E. coli. PMID:26410828

  6. Pregnancy Disorders Appear to Modify the Risk for Retinopathy of Prematurity Associated With Neonatal Hyperoxemia and Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jennifer W.; McElrath, Thomas; Chen, Minghua; Wallace, David K.; Allred, Elizabeth N.; Leviton, Alan; Dammann, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore (1) whether extremely low gestational age newborns exposed to inflammation-associated pregnancy disorders differ in retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) risk from infants exposed to placenta dysfunction-associated disorders, and (2) whether ROP risk associated with postnatal hyperoxemia and bacteremia differs among infants exposed to these disorders. Methods Pregnancy disorders resulting in preterm birth include inflammation-associated: preterm labor, prelabor premature rupture of membranes (pPROM), cervical insufficiency, and abruption and placenta dysfunction-associated: preeclampsia and fetal indication. The risk of severe ROP associated with pregnancy disorders was evaluated by multivariable analyses in strata defined by potential effect modifiers, postnatal hyperoxemia and bacteremia. Results Compared to preterm labor, infants delivered after pPROM were at reduced risk of plus disease (Odds ratio = 0.4, 95% confidence interval: 0.2–0.8) and prethreshold/threshold ROP (0.5, 0.3–0.8). Infants delivered after abruption had reduced risk of zone I ROP (0.2, 0.1–0.8) and prethreshold/threshold ROP (0.3, 0.1–0.7). In stratified analyses, infants born after placenta dysfunction had higher risks of severe ROP associated with subsequent postnatal hyperoxemia and bacteremia than infants born after inflammation-associated pregnancy disorders. Conclusion Infants exposed to placenta dysfunction have an increased risk of severe ROP following postnatal hyperoxemia and bacteremia compared to infants exposed to inflammation-associated pregnancy disorders. PMID:23297684

  7. Is 2 weeks of antibiotic therapy enough to treat elderly patients with nontyphoid Salmonella bacteremia? A case report of fatal endovascular infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Lin; Tsai, Liang-Miin; Kan, Chung-Dann; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2014-08-01

    Nontyphoid Salmonella (NTS) can cause invasive diseases in the elderly. Notably, the most feared complication of NTS bacteremia is endovascular infection. The risk factors for infected aortic aneurysm include old age and atherosclerosis. Extended use of antimicrobial therapy (> 2 weeks) for NTS bacteremia should be considered for those who demonstrate the risk factors for endovascular infection, even when a metastatic focus is clinically elusive. Herein, we report the case of a 75-year-old patient with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and myocardial infarction who died of an infected aortic aneurysm despite 3 weeks of antibiotic therapy that was administered to treat the initial NTS bacteremia. PMID:22575427

  8. Impact of Prior Healthcare-Associated Exposure on Clinical and Molecular Characterization of Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia: Results From a Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pao-Yu; Chuang, Yu-Chung; Wang, Jann-Tay; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract By virtue of medical advances and an aging society, people have increased opportunities for healthcare exposure. Little is known about the impact of healthcare exposure on the clinical features and molecular typing of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia. We classified the onset of MSSA bacteremia into 3 mutually exclusive categories according to the Centers for Disease Control definition, and conducted a retrospective cohort study to investigate the differences among patients with community-associated (CA), healthcare-associated community onset (HACO), and hospital onset (HO) MSSA bacteremia at a medical center from January 1, 2002 through December 31, 2011. Antibiotic susceptibilities and multilocus sequence typing of MSSA isolates were also determined. A total of 290 patients with MSSA bacteremia, including of 165 (56.9%), 91 (31.4%), and 34 (11.7%) of HACO, HO, and CA, respectively, were studied. ST188 (29.3%) was the most common sequence type regardless of classification. Patients with HACO bacteremia were significantly older, had more solid tumors, higher Charlson scores, and more catheter-related bloodstream infections than those with CA bacteremia. The proportions of osteoarticular infections among patients with both HACO and CA bacteremia were higher than that of patients with HO bacteremia. By univariate analysis, patients with HO bacteremia had significantly higher in-hospital mortality compared to those with CA or HACO bacteremia (31.9% vs 18.8% and 20.4%). Multivariate analysis showed that Charlson score (odds ratio [OR], 1.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10–1.52), septic shock (OR, 5.28; 95% CI, 2.37–11.78), liver cirrhosis (OR, 3.57; 95% CI, 1.14–11.24), receipt of β-lactams other than oxacillin and cefazolin as definitive therapy (OR, 9.27; 95% CI, 4.25–20.23), and higher oxacillin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) (≥0.5 mg/L) (OR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.05–5.25) of the causative pathogen were

  9. Comparative Exoproteomics and Host Inflammatory Response in Staphylococcus aureus Skin and Soft Tissue Infections, Bacteremia, and Subclinical Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Yun Khoon; Awang Hamat, Rukman; van Belkum, Alex; Chong, Pei Pei

    2015-01-01

    The exoproteome of Staphylococcus aureus contains enzymes and virulence factors that are important for host adaptation. We investigated the exoprotein profiles and cytokine/chemokine responses obtained in three different S. aureus-host interaction scenarios by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) and two-dimensional immunoblotting (2D-IB) combined with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and cytometric bead array techniques. The scenarios included S. aureus bacteremia, skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), and healthy carriage. By the 2-DGE approach, 12 exoproteins (the chaperone protein DnaK, a phosphoglycerate kinase [Pgk], the chaperone GroEL, a multisensor hybrid histidine kinase, a 3-methyl-2-oxobutanoate hydroxymethyltransferase [PanB], cysteine synthase A, an N-acetyltransferase, four isoforms of elongation factor Tu [EF-Tu], and one signature protein spot that could not be reliably identified by MS/MS) were found to be consistently present in more than 50% of the bacteremia isolates, while none of the SSTI or healthy-carrier isolates showed any of these proteins. By the 2D-IB approach, we also identified five antigens (methionine aminopeptidase [MetAPs], exotoxin 15 [Set15], a peptidoglycan hydrolase [LytM], an alkyl hydroperoxide reductase [AhpC], and a haptoglobin-binding heme uptake protein [HarA]) specific for SSTI cases. Cytokine and chemokine production varied during the course of different infection types and carriage. Monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was more highly stimulated in bacteremia patients than in SSTI patients and healthy carriers, especially during the acute phase of infection. MIG could therefore be further explored as a potential biomarker of bacteremia. In conclusion, 12 exoproteins from bacteremia isolates, MIG production, and five antigenic proteins identified during SSTIs should be further investigated for potential use as diagnostic markers. PMID:25809633

  10. agr Dysfunction Affects Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Type-Dependent Clinical Outcomes in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chang Kyung; Cho, Jeong Eun; Choi, Yoon Jeong; Jung, Younghee; Kim, Nak-Hyun; Kim, Chung-Jong; Kim, Taek Soo; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Choe, Pyoeng Gyun; Park, Wan Beom; Bang, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Eu Suk; Park, Kyoung Un; Park, Sang Won; Kim, Nam-Joong; Oh, Myoung-don

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmec) type-dependent clinical outcomes may vary due to geographical variation in the presence of virulence determinants. We compared the microbiological factors and mortality attributed to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia between SCCmec types II/III and type IV. All episodes of MRSA bacteremia in a tertiary-care hospital (South Korea) over a 4.5-year period were reviewed. We studied the microbiological factors associated with all blood MRSA isolates, including spa type, agr type, agr dysfunction, and the genes for Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and phenol-soluble modulin (PSM)-mec, in addition to SCCmec type. Of 195 cases, 137 involved SCCmec types II/III, and 58 involved type IV. The mortality attributed to MRSA bacteremia was less frequent among the SCCmec type IV (5/58) than that among types II/III (39/137, P = 0.002). This difference remained significant when adjusted for clinical factors (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.04 to 0.49; P = 0.002). Of the microbiological factors tested, agr dysfunction was the only significant factor that showed different positivity between the SCCmec types, and it was independently associated with MRSA bacteremia-attributed mortality (aOR, 4.71; 95% CI, 1.72 to 12.92; P = 0.003). SCCmec type IV is associated with lower MRSA bacteremia-attributed mortality than are types II/III, which might be explained by the high rate of agr dysfunction in SCCmec types II/III in South Korea. PMID:25779574

  11. Persistent Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Two Independent Cases of Bacteremia Display Increased Bacterial Fitness and Novel Immune Evasion Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Richards, R. L.; Haigh, R. D.; Pascoe, B.; Sheppard, S. K.; Price, F.; Jenkins, D.; Rajakumar, K.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia cases are complicated by bacterial persistence and treatment failure despite the confirmed in vitro susceptibility of the infecting strain to administered antibiotics. A high incidence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) bacteremia cases are classified as persistent and are associated with poorer patient outcomes. It is still unclear how S. aureus evades the host immune system and resists antibiotic treatment for the prolonged duration of a persistent infection. In this study, the genetic changes and associated phenotypic traits specific to S. aureus persistent bacteremia were identified by comparing temporally dispersed isolates from persistent infections (persistent isolates) originating from two independent persistent S. aureus bacteremia cases with the initial infection isolates and with three resolved S. aureus bacteremia isolates from the same genetic background. Several novel traits were associated specifically with both independent sets of persistent S. aureus isolates compared to both the initial isolates and the isolates from resolved infections (resolved isolates). These traits included (i) increased growth under nutrient-poor conditions; (ii) increased tolerance of iron toxicity; (iii) higher expression of cell surface proteins involved in immune evasion and stress responses; and (iv) attenuated virulence in a Galleria mellonella larva infection model that was not associated with small-colony variation or metabolic dormancy such as had been seen previously. Whole-genome sequence analysis identified different single nucleotide mutations within the mprF genes of all the isolates with the adaptive persistence traits from both independent cases. Overall, our data indicate a novel role for MprF function during development of S. aureus persistence by increasing bacterial fitness and immune evasion. PMID:26056388

  12. Clinical, Microbiological, and Genetic Characteristics of Heteroresistant Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia in a Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Di Gregorio, Sabrina; Perazzi, Beatriz; Ordoñez, Andrea Martinez; De Gregorio, Stella; Foccoli, Monica; Lasala, María Beatriz; García, Susana; Vay, Carlos; Famiglietti, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of vancomycin intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) and heterogeneous VISA (hVISA) is of major concern worldwide. Our objective was to investigate the prevalence, phenotypic and molecular features of hVISA strains isolated from bacteremic patients and to determine the clinical significance of the hVISA phenotype in patients with bacteremia. A total of 104 S. aureus blood isolates were collected from a teaching hospital of Argentina between August 2009 and November 2010. No VISA isolate was recovered, and 3 out of 92 patients (3.3%) were infected with hVISA, 2 of them methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) (4.5% of MRSA). Macro Etest and prediffusion method detected 3/3 and 2/3 hVISA respectively. Considering the type of bacteremia, the three cases were distributed as follows: two patients had suffered multiple episodes of bacteremia (both hVISA strains recovered in the second episode), while only one patient had suffered a single episode of bacteremia with hVISA infection. MRSA bloodstream isolates exhibiting the hVISA phenotype were related to HA-MRSA Cordobes clone (ST5-SCCmec I-spa t149) and MRSA Argentinean pediatric clone (ST100-SCCmec IVNV-spa t002), but not to CA-MRSA-ST30-SCCmec IV-spa t019 clone that was one of the most frequent in our country. Although still relatively infrequent in our hospital, hVISA strains were significantly associated with multiple episodes of bacteremia (p=0.037) and genetically unrelated. PMID:25535825

  13. Bacteremia due to Acinetobacter ursingii in infants: Reports of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Yakut, Nurhayat; Kepenekli, Eda Kadayifci; Karaaslan, Ayse; Atici, Serkan; Akkoc, Gulsen; Demir, Sevliya Ocal; Soysal, Ahmet; Bakir, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter ursingii is an aerobic, gram-negative, opportunistic microorganism which is rarely isolated among Acinetobacter species. We present two immunocompetent infants who developed bacteremia due to A. ursingii. The first patient is a two -month- old boy who had been hospitalized in pediatric surgery unit for suspected tracheo-esophageal fistula because of recurrent aspiration pneumonia unresponsive to antibiotic therapy. The second patient is a fourteen -month- old boy with prolonged vomiting and diarrhea. A. ursingii was isolated from their blood cultures. They were successfully treated with ampicillin-sulbactam. Although A. ursingii has recently been isolated from a clinical specimen; reports of infection with A. ursingii in children are rare. A. ursingii should be kept in mind as an opportunistic microorganism in children. PMID:27347282

  14. A Lethal Case of Sphingomonas paucimobilis Bacteremia in an Immunocompromised Patient.

    PubMed

    Hardjo Lugito, Nata Pratama; Cucunawangsih; Kurniawan, Andree

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonas paucimobilis is a yellow-pigmented, glucose nonfermenting, aerobic, Gram negative bacillus of low pathogenicity. This organism was found in the implantation of indwelling catheters, sterile intravenous fluid, or contaminated hospital environment such as tap and distilled water, nebulizer, ventilator, and hemodialysis device. A 55-year-old female was hospitalized for diabetic foot ulcer in the presence of multiple comorbidities: diabetes mellitus, colonic tuberculosis, end-stage renal disease, and indwelling catheters for central venous catheter and hemodialysis. The patient passed away on the 44th day of admission due to septic shock. The organism found on blood culture on the 29th day of admission was multidrug resistant S. paucimobilis. Severe infection and septic shock due to S. paucimobilis have been reported particularly in immunocompromised patients, but there has been only one reported case of death in a premature neonate with septic shock. This is the first reported lethal case of S. paucimobilis bacteremia in an adult patient. PMID:27088020

  15. A Lethal Case of Sphingomonas paucimobilis Bacteremia in an Immunocompromised Patient

    PubMed Central

    Hardjo Lugito, Nata Pratama; Cucunawangsih; Kurniawan, Andree

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonas paucimobilis is a yellow-pigmented, glucose nonfermenting, aerobic, Gram negative bacillus of low pathogenicity. This organism was found in the implantation of indwelling catheters, sterile intravenous fluid, or contaminated hospital environment such as tap and distilled water, nebulizer, ventilator, and hemodialysis device. A 55-year-old female was hospitalized for diabetic foot ulcer in the presence of multiple comorbidities: diabetes mellitus, colonic tuberculosis, end-stage renal disease, and indwelling catheters for central venous catheter and hemodialysis. The patient passed away on the 44th day of admission due to septic shock. The organism found on blood culture on the 29th day of admission was multidrug resistant S. paucimobilis. Severe infection and septic shock due to S. paucimobilis have been reported particularly in immunocompromised patients, but there has been only one reported case of death in a premature neonate with septic shock. This is the first reported lethal case of S. paucimobilis bacteremia in an adult patient. PMID:27088020

  16. The first cases of human bacteremia caused by Acinetobacter seifertii in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kishii, Kozue; Kikuchi, Ken; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Atsushi; Okuzumi, Katsuko; Moriya, Kyoji

    2016-05-01

    Acinetobacter seifertii, a novel species of Acinetobacter, was first reported in 2015. A. seifertii strains were isolated from human clinical specimens (blood, respiratory tract, and ulcer) and hospital environments. Here, we report the first cases of bacteremia caused by A. seifertii in patients with catheter-related bloodstream infection in Japan. The patients favorably recovered, without any complications, after removal of the peripheral intravenous catheters and administration of antibiotics. The pathogens were initially identified as Acinetobacter baumannii, using phenotypic methods and the MicroScan Walkaway System; however, rpoB gene sequence analysis indicated 99.54% similarity to A. seifertii. Moreover, antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed that one of the strains was not susceptible to gentamicin and ceftazidime. Our report shows that Acinetobacter species other than A. baumannii can also cause nosocomial infections and that accurate methods for the identification of causative agents should be developed. PMID:26778251

  17. Capnocytophaga (Capnocytophaga ochracea group) bacteremia in hematological patients with profound granulocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, B; Schønheyder, H C; Peterslund, N A; Rosthøj, S; Clausen, N; Frederiksen, W

    1995-01-01

    The clinical and microbiological features of 7 cases of bacteremia due to Capnocytophaga (Capnocytophaga ochracea group) are reported. They were diagnosed during 1991-93 at three hospital clinics. Five patients were < 10 years old and all had hematological disorders, 4 acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 1 each had aplastic anemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and myelodysplastic syndrome. All were profoundly granulocytopenic with an absolute granulocyte count < 0.13 x 10(9)/l, and all but 1 had oral lesions as a possible portal of entry. A favourable response to antibiotic therapy was recorded in all patients but one who, being profoundly granulocytopenic, rapidly succumbed to Pseudomonas aeruginosa septicemia. None of the isolates were beta-lactamase producers. In addition to penicillin the isolates were susceptible to broad-spectrum cephalosporins and ciprofloxacin, but resistant to aminoglycosides. PMID:7660080

  18. Successful Use of Daptomycin in a Preterm Neonate With Persistent Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There is limited information regarding the use of daptomycin in the neonatal population, and dosage adjustments for neonates with renal dysfunction. We report on the successful use of daptomycin in a 1-month-old, former 24-week gestation neonate with persistent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) bacteremia and impaired renal function. We also review the available literature supporting daptomycin use in the neonatal period. Daptomycin peak and trough serum levels were obtained immediately prior to and 60 minutes after the fifth dose. While vancomycin remains the drug of choice for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcal infections, due to increasing reports of treatment failures, alternative therapies are recommended. Based on mounting evidence, daptomycin may be considered an option in persistently bacteremic neonates who fail vancomycin therapy, although further investigation is warranted. PMID:25859172

  19. Association of Bartonella spp bacteremia with Chagas cardiomyopathy, endocarditis and arrhythmias in patients from South America.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, F G; Pontes, C L S; Verzola, R M M; Mateos, J C P; Velho, P E N F; Schijman, A G; Selistre-de-Araujo, H S

    2012-07-01

    Infection with Bartonella spp may cause cardiac arrhythmias, myocarditis and endocarditis in humans. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a possible association between Bartonella spp bacteremia and endocarditis, arrhythmia and Chagas cardiomyopathy in patients from Brazil and Argentina. We screened for the presence of bacterial 16S rRNA in human blood by PCR using oligonucleotides to amplify a 185-bp bacterial DNA fragment. Blood samples were taken from four groups of subjects in Brazil and Argentina: i) control patients without clinical disease, ii) patients with negative blood-culture endocarditis, iii) patients with arrhythmias, and iv) patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. PCR products were analyzed on 1.5% agarose gel to visualize the 185-bp fragment and then sequenced to confirm the identity of DNA. Sixty of 148 patients (40.5%) with cardiac disease and 1 of 56 subjects (1.8%) from the control group presented positive PCR amplification for Bartonella spp, suggesting a positive association of the bacteria with these diseases. Separate analysis of the four groups showed that the risk of a Brazilian patient with endocarditis being infected with Bartonella was 22 times higher than in the controls. In arrhythmic patients, the prevalence of infection was 45 times higher when compared to the same controls and 40 times higher for patients with Chagas cardiomyopathy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of the association between Bartonella spp bacteremia and Chagas disease. The present data may be useful for epidemiological and prevention studies in Brazil and Argentina. PMID:22584639

  20. First Korean Case of Robinsoniella peoriensis Bacteremia in a Patient with Aspiration Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yongbum; Kim, Taek Soo; Kim, Hong Bin; Song, Junghan; Kim, Eui Chong

    2012-01-01

    Robinsoniella peoriensis has recently been identified as a Gram-positive, spore-forming, anaerobic rod originally recovered from swine manure storage pits. To date, 6 cases of R. peoriensis infection have been reported, including 2 cases of bacteremia, 1 of abdominal fluid collection, and 3 of wound infection. In the present study, we report a 76-yr-old man with R. peoriensis bacteremia who developed aspiration pneumonia. Gram staining of a purified colony revealed Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria. Biochemical identification using API 20 A (bioMérieux, France) indicated presence of Clostridium spp. We performed both 500-bp and full-gene sequencing of 16S rRNA of the isolate. The sequence was analyzed with MicroSeq ID 16S rRNA Library v2.0 (Applied Biosystems, USA), GenBank Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank), and EzTaxon database v2.1 (http://www.eztaxon.org). The 500-bp 16S rRNA sequence of the blood culture isolate showed 99.16-99.79% similarity with R. peoriensis and the full-gene 16S rRNA sequence showed 98.87-99.50% similarity with R. peoriensis. The organism was confirmed as R. peoriensis by using all of the mentioned databases except for MicroSeq, which did not include the RNA sequence of this bacterium. This case suggests that identification of R. peoriensis might be challenging in clinical laboratories with no access to molecular methods, as certain commercial identification systems may not identify, or may misidentify, this organism. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation of R. peoriensis in Korea. PMID:22950075

  1. The outbreak of Serratia marcescens bacteremia in a pediatric ward, Siriraj Hospital 1997.

    PubMed

    Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Danchaivijitr, Somwang; Boonpragaigaew, Gorapin; Dhiraputra, Chertsak; Vanprapa, Nirun; Visitsunthorn, Nuananong; Trakulsomboon, Suwanna

    2002-08-01

    Between October 20 and November 11, 1997, Serratia marcescens bacteremia was identified in 8 patients in a pediatric ward at Siriraj Hospital. The organism was isolated from 17 blood and 3 bone marrow specimens. The only common associated factor in these patients was that they all had received an intravenous fluid infusion. In the attempt to investigate the source of S. marcescens implicated in the outbreak, 108 specimens of intravenous fluid, 3 intravenous fluid bottle caps, 4 specimens from intravenous fluid tubing sets, 21 specimens of antiseptics used on the ward, 28 specimens of rectal swabs from patients on the ward, 1 sample of blood culture media prepared by the hospital for routine use, and 62 environmental specimens including hand swabs of the medical personnel, refrigerator, air conditioning, milk samples, room air, water sink, wooden splint and adhesive tape used to immobilize the intravenous access. Of 227 specimens sent for culture, S. marcescens was isolated from only one specimen collected from the in-use intravenous fluid given to a patient with Serratia bacteremia. S. marcescens was not found in any other surveillance culture. The 8 patients were placed under quarantine in the same room with an exclusive nursing team. With the investigation and intervention including monitoring for meticulous hand washing of the ward staff, the outbreak was stopped within 7 days. Although the investigation failed to discover the environmental reservoir of S. marcescens in this outbreak, the data suggested that intravenous fluid was probably the route of transmission and the medical personnel played an important role in spreading the infection. PMID:12403246

  2. Association of Bartonella spp bacteremia with Chagas cardiomyopathy, endocarditis and arrythmias in patients from South America

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, F.G.; Pontes, C.L.S.; Verzola, R.M.M.; Mateos, J.C.P.; Velho, P.E.N.F.; Schijman, A.G.; Selistre-de-Araujo, H.S.

    2012-01-01

    Infection with Bartonella spp may cause cardiac arrhythmias, myocarditis and endocarditis in humans. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a possible association between Bartonella spp bacteremia and endocarditis, arrhythmia and Chagas cardiomyopathy in patients from Brazil and Argentina. We screened for the presence of bacterial 16S rRNA in human blood by PCR using oligonucleotides to amplify a 185-bp bacterial DNA fragment. Blood samples were taken from four groups of subjects in Brazil and Argentina: i) control patients without clinical disease, ii) patients with negative blood-culture endocarditis, iii) patients with arrhythmias, and iv) patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. PCR products were analyzed on 1.5% agarose gel to visualize the 185-bp fragment and then sequenced to confirm the identity of DNA. Sixty of 148 patients (40.5%) with cardiac disease and 1 of 56 subjects (1.8%) from the control group presented positive PCR amplification for Bartonella spp, suggesting a positive association of the bacteria with these diseases. Separate analysis of the four groups showed that the risk of a Brazilian patient with endocarditis being infected with Bartonella was 22 times higher than in the controls. In arrhythmic patients, the prevalence of infection was 45 times higher when compared to the same controls and 40 times higher for patients with Chagas cardiomyopathy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of the association between Bartonella spp bacteremia and Chagas disease. The present data may be useful for epidemiological and prevention studies in Brazil and Argentina. PMID:22584639

  3. Outcomes and Risk Factors for Mortality among Patients Treated with Carbapenems for Klebsiella spp. Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Biehle, Lauren R.; Cottreau, Jessica M.; Thompson, David J.; Filipek, Rachel L.; O’Donnell, J. Nicholas; Lasco, Todd M.; Mahoney, Monica V.; Hirsch, Elizabeth B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Extensive dissemination of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae has led to increased resistance among Klebsiella species. Carbapenems are used as a last resort against resistant pathogens, but carbapenemase production can lead to therapy failure. Identification of risk factors for mortality and assessment of current susceptibility breakpoints are valuable for improving patient outcomes. Aim The objective of this study was to evaluate outcomes and risk factors for mortality among patients treated with carbapenems for Klebsiella spp. bacteremia. Methods Patients hospitalized between 2006 and 2012 with blood cultures positive for Klebsiella spp. who received ≥ 48 hours of carbapenem treatment within 72 hours of positive culture were included in this retrospective study. Patient data were retrieved from electronic medical records. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for 30-day hospital mortality. Results One hundred seven patients were included. The mean patient age was 61.5 years and the median APACHE II score was 13 ± 6.2. Overall, 30-day hospital mortality was 9.3%. After adjusting for confounding variables, 30-day mortality was associated with baseline APACHE II score (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.01–1.35; P = 0.03), length of stay prior to index culture (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.00–1.06; P = 0.04), and carbapenem non-susceptible (imipenem or meropenem MIC > 1 mg/L) infection (OR, 9.08; 95% CI, 1.17–70.51; P = 0.04). Conclusions Baseline severity of illness and length of stay prior to culture were associated with 30-day mortality and should be considered when treating patients with Klebsiella bacteremia. These data support the change in carbapenem breakpoints for Klebsiella species. PMID:26618357

  4. Bacteremia complicating acute leukemia with special reference to its incidence and changing etiological patterns.

    PubMed

    Funada, H; Machi, T; Matsuda, T

    1988-09-01

    Over the 15-yr period, 1972-1986, 194 episodes of bacteremia occurred in 132 patients with acute leukemia at the Third Department of Medicine, Kanazawa University Hospital, giving an incidence of 478 episodes per 1,000 hospital admissions. This incidence was at least twice as high as that in patients with chronic leukemia, malignant lymphoma, multiple myeloma or aplastic anemia, and about 40-fold higher than that in patients with all other internal diseases. The rate of occurrence of bacteremia, whether unimicrobial or polymicrobial, remained almost unchanged throughout the study period. The frequency of gram-negative bacilli decreased significantly, however, from 81% of the total isolates for the first 10-yr period to 50% for the second 5-yr period. Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were isolated in markedly decreasing frequency, but Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae in relatively constant frequency. The majority of P. aeruginosa isolates belonged to a limited number of O-antigen groups, suggesting the possibility of nosocomial infection. On the other hand, the frequency of gram-positive cocci increased from 9 to 36%. Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus species, and Staphylococcus aureus emerged as important pathogens. Such a change in the spectrum of organisms was considered to coincide with the common use of the so-called second- and third-generation cephalosporins and central venous catheters. It is thus suggested that vancomycin be added to empiric antibiotic therapy, especially when gram-positive infections are clinically or microbiologically suspected, and that reducing the acquisition of P. aeruginosa from the hospital environment remains a priority in infection prevention. PMID:3411788

  5. Impact of virulence genes on sepsis severity and survival in Escherichia coli bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Rillo, Marta; Fernández-Romero, Natalia; Francisco, Carolina Navarro-San; Díez-Sebastián, Jesús; Romero-Gómez, Maria Pilar; Fernández, Francisco Arnalich; López, Jose Ramon Arribas; Mingorance, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) are a frequent cause of bacteremia and sepsis, but the role of ExPEC genetic virulence factors (VFs) in sepsis development and outcome is ill-defined. Prospective study including 120 adult patients with E. coli bacteremia to investigate the impact of bacterial and host factors on sepsis severity and mortality. Patients' clinical and demographic data were registered. Phylogenetic background of E. coli isolates was analyzed by SNP pyrosequencing and VFs by PCR. The E. coli isolates presented an epidemic population structure with 6 dominant clones making up to half of the isolates. VF gene profiles were highly diverse. Multivariate analysis for sepsis severity showed that the presence of cnf and blaTEM genes increased the risk of severe illness by 6.75 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.79–24.71) and 2.59 (95% CI 1.04–6.43) times respectively, while each point in the Pitt score increased the risk by 1.34 (95% CI 1.02–1.76) times. Multivariate analysis for mortality showed that active chemotherapy (OR 17.87, 95% CI 3.35–95.45), McCabe-Jackson Index (OR for rapidly fatal category 120.15, 95% CI 4.19–3446.23), Pitt index (OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.25–2.56) and presence of fyuA gene (OR 8.05, 95% CI 1.37–47.12) were associated to increased mortality while the presence of P fimbriae genes had a protective role (OR 0.094, 95%IC 0.018–0.494). Bacteremic E. coli had a high diversity of genetic backgrounds and VF gene profiles. Bacterial VFs and host determinants had an impact on disease evolution and mortality. PMID:25654604

  6. Comparison of Outcomes among Adult Patients with Nosocomial Bacteremia Caused by Methicillin-Susceptible and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jann-Tay; Hsu, Le-Yin; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling; Fan, Wen-Chien; Wang, Fu-Der

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown that patients with bacteremia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have worse outcomes than those with bacteremia caused by methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). However, only a limited number of studies have stratified the MRSA isolates into healthcare-associated (HA-) and community-associated (CA-) MRSA strains in such a comparison. This three-year retrospective cohort study, enrolling adult patients with nosocomial S. aureus bacteremia (SAB), was designed to investigate whether CA-MRSA and/or HA-MRSA strains were associated with different outcomes in comparison to MSSA in such a setting. The drug susceptibilities and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types were determined for all of the causative isolates available. The MRSA bacteremia was further categorized into those caused by CA-MRSA strains (CA-MRSA-S bacteremia) when the causative isolates carried the type IV or V SCCmec element, those caused by HA-MRSA strains (HA-MRSA-S bacteremia) when the isolates carried the type I, II, or III SCCmec element, or unclassified MRSA bacteremia when the isolates were not available. The relevant demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected by reviewing the patients’ charts. The primary outcome was all-cause in-hospital mortality. A total of 353 patients were studied. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 32.6%, with 23.3% in MSSA, 30.5% in CA-MRSA-S, 47.5% in HA-MRSA-S, and 35.3% in unclassified MRSA bacteremia, respectively. The multivariate analysis showed that HA-MRSA-S, but not CA-MRSA-S, bacteremia was associated with a significantly worse outcome compared with MSSA. The other risk factors independently associated with all-cause in-hospital mortality included the Charlson co-morbidity index, septic shock, thrombocytopenia, and persistent bacteremia. Resistance to linezolid and daptomycin was found among the MRSA isolates. The present study showed that bacteremia caused by HA

  7. The Impact of Reporting a Prior Penicillin Allergy on the Treatment of Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Erica S.; Huang, Mingshu; Kuhlen, James L.; Ware, Winston A.; Parker, Robert A.; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia is a morbid infection with mortality benefit from receipt of parenteral β-lactam therapy. A substantial portion of MSSA bacteremia patients report penicillin allergy, but infrequently have true allergy. Objective To determine the frequency and predictors of optimal and adequate therapy in patients with MSSA bacteremia. Design Retrospective cohort. Participants Adult inpatients with MSSA bacteremia, January 2009 through October 2013. Main Measures The primary measure was a trial of optimal therapy (OT), defined as ≥3 inpatient days or discharge on any first-line agents (nafcillin, oxacillin, cefazolin, or penicillin G, if susceptible). The secondary measure was completion of adequate therapy (AT), defined as ≥10 inpatient days or discharge on an agent appropriate for MSSA bacteremia. Data were electronically gathered with key variables manually validated through chart review. Log-binomial regression models were used to determine the frequency and predictors of outcomes. Key Results Of 456 patients, 346 (76%) received a trial of OT. Patients reporting penicillin allergy (13%) were less likely to receive OT trial than those without penicillin allergy (47% vs. 80%, p <0.001). Adjusting for other factors, penicillin allergy was the largest negative predictor of OT trial (RR 0.64 [0.49, 0.83]). Infectious Disease (ID) consultation was the largest positive predictor of OT trial across all patients (RR 1.34 [1.14, 1.57]). Allergy/Immunology consultation was the single most important predictor of OT trial among patients reporting penicillin allergy (RR 2.33 [1.44, 3.77]). Of 440 patients, 391 (89%) completed AT, with ID consultation the largest positive predictor of the outcome (RR 1.28 [1.15, 1.43]). Conclusions Nearly 25% of patients with MSSA bacteremia did not receive OT trial and about 10% did not receive AT completion. Reported penicillin allergy reduced, and ID consult increased, the

  8. Daily Chlorhexidine Bathing To Reduce Bacteremia in Critically Ill Children: a Multicenter, Cluster-Randomized, Two-Period Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Milstone, Aaron M.; Elward, Alexis; Song, Xiaoyan; Zerr, Danielle M.; Orscheln, Rachel; Speck, Kathleen; Obeng, Daniel; Reich, Nicholas G.; Coffin, Susan E; Perl, Trish M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacteremia is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill children. Our objective was to assess whether daily chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) bathing compared with standard bathing practices would reduce bacteremia in critically ill children. Methods In an unmasked, cluster-randomized, two-period crossover trial (Pediatric SCRUB), 10 pediatric intensive care units (ICUs) at 5 hospitals in the United States were randomly assigned to bathe patients > 2 months of age daily with a 2% CHG-impregnated cloth or with standard bathing practices for a six-month period. Units switched to the alternative bathing method during the second six-month period. Among 6,482 eligible patient admissions, 1521 were excluded due to a length of stay less than 2 days and 14 refused to participate. The primary outcome was an episode of bacteremia. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier: NCT00549393). Findings 4·947 patient admissions were eligible for analysis. In the intent to treat population, there was a non-statistically significant reduction in incidence of bacteremia among patients receiving daily CHG bathing (3·52 per 1,000 days, 95%CI 2·64–4·61) compared with patients receiving standard bathing practices (4·93 per 1,000 days, 95%CI 3·91–6·15) [adjusted incidence rate ratio (aIRR) 0·71, 95% CI 0·42–1·20]. In the per protocol population, the incidence of bacteremia was 36% lower among patients receiving daily CHG bathing (3·28 per 1,000 days, 95%CI 2·27–4·58)) compared with patients receiving standard bathing practices (4·93 per 1,000 days, 95%CI 3·91–6·15) [aIRR 0·64, 95% CI 0·42–0·98]. There were no serious study related adverse events, and the incidence of CHG-associated skin reactions was 1·2 per 1,000 days (95% CI 0·60–2·02). Interpretation Critically ill children receiving daily CHG bathing had a lower incidence of bacteremia, and the treatment was well tolerated. Funding Primarily by Sage

  9. Bacteremia as a Cause of Fever in Ambulatory, HIV-Infected Mozambican Adults: Results and Policy Implications from a Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Troy D.; Silva, Wilson P.; Buene, Manuel; Morais, Luís; Valverde, Emilio; Vermund, Sten H.; Brentlinger, Paula E.

    2013-01-01

    Fever is typically treated empirically in rural Mozambique. We examined the distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of bacterial pathogens isolated from blood-culture specimens, and clinical characteristics of ambulatory HIV-infected febrile patients with and without bacteremia. This analysis was nested within a larger prospective observational study to evaluate the performance of new Mozambican guidelines for fever and anemia in HIV-infected adults (clinical trial registration NCT01681914, www.clinicaltrials.gov); the guidelines were designed to be used by non-physician clinicians who attended ambulatory HIV-infected patients in very resource-constrained peripheral health units. In 2012 (April-September), we recruited 258 HIV-infected adults with documented fever or history of recent fever in three sites within Zambézia Province, Mozambique. Although febrile patients were routinely tested for malaria, blood culture capacity was unavailable in Zambézia prior to study initiation. We confirmed bacteremia in 39 (15.1%) of 258 patients. The predominant organisms were non-typhoid Salmonella, nearly all resistant to multiple first-line antibiotics (ampicillin, chloramphenicol, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). Features most associated with bacteremia included higher temperature, lower CD4+ T-lymphocyte count, lower hemoglobin, and headache. Introduction of blood cultures allowed us to: 1) confirm bacteremia in a substantial proportion of patients; 2) tailor specific antimicrobial therapy for confirmed bacteremia based on known susceptibilities; 3) make informed choices of presumptive antibiotics for patients with suspected bacteremia; and 4) construct a preliminary clinical profile to help clinicians determine who would most likely benefit from presumptive bacteremia treatment. Our findings demonstrate that in resource-limited settings, there is urgent need to expand local microbiologic capacity to better identify and treat cases of bacteremia in HIV

  10. Discontinuation of Systematic Surveillance and Contact Precautions for Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus (VRE) and Its Impact on the Incidence of VRE faecium Bacteremia in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Almyroudis, Nikolaos G; Osawa, Ryosuke; Samonis, George; Wetzler, M; Wang, Eunice S; McCarthy, Philip L; Segal, Brahm H

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the effect of discontinuation of systematic surveillance for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) and contact isolation of colonized patients on the incidence of VRE bacteremia SETTING A hematology-oncology unit with high prevalence of VRE colonization characterized by predominantly sporadic molecular epidemiology PARTICIPANTS Inpatients with hematologic malignancies and recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation METHODS The incidence of VRE bacteremia was measured prospectively during 2 different 3-year time periods; the first during active VRE surveillance and contact precautions and the second after discontinuation of these policies. We assessed the collateral impact of this policy change on the incidence of bacteremia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Clostridium difficile infection even though we maintained contact precautions for these organisms. Incidence of infectious events was measured as number of events per 1,000 patients days per month. Time series analysis was used to evaluate trends. RESULTS The incidence of VRE bacteremia remained stable after discontinuation of VRE surveillance and contact precautions. The incidence of MRSA bacteremia and Clostridium difficile infection for which we continued contact precautions also remained stable. Aggregated antibiotic utilization and nursing hours per patient days were similar between the 2 study periods. CONCLUSION Active surveillance and contact precautions for VRE colonization did not appear to prevent VRE bacteremia in patients with hematologic malignancies and recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with high prevalence of VRE characterized by predominantly sporadic molecular epidemiology. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2016;37(4):398-403. PMID:26750087

  11. Vertebral osteomyelitis caused by vancomycin-tolerant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: Experience with teicoplanin plus fosfomycin combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Sen; Chen, Yen-Chuo; Chen, Hung-Ping; Chen, Tso-Hsiao; Cheng, Chung-Yi

    2016-08-01

    An 85-year-old female presented with fever and consciousness disturbance for 3 days. The patient's blood culture subsequently revealed persistent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia despite the administration of vancomycin or teicoplanin monotherapy. Gallium inflammation scan and magnetic resonance image of the spine disclosed osteomyelitis and discitis at the level of L4-5. Surgical debridement was not feasible in this debilitated patient. Because of the creeping minimal inhibitory concentration of vancomycin of the causative isolate (1.5 μg/mL) and clinical failure with glycopeptide monotherapy, we changed the antibiotic therapy to a fosfomycin and teicoplanin combination therapy. The patient showed improved clinical response in terms of her enhanced consciousness as well as subsidence of persisted bacteremia. Despite the potential side effects of fosfomycin (such as diarrhea and hypernatremia), it combined with a glycopeptide may be an alternative therapy for invasive refractory MRSA infections. PMID:24269007

  12. Successful treatment of a neonate with persistent vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bacteremia with a daptomycin-containing regimen.

    PubMed

    Beneri, Christy A; Nicolau, David P; Seiden, Howard S; Rubin, Lorry G

    2008-01-01

    Infections caused by vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) may be difficult to treat because of the limited armamentarium of antimicrobial agents. The difficulty is compounded in pediatric patients in general and neonates in particular because many of the newer antimicrobials have not been studied or approved for children. We report a 3-week-old infant who developed enterococcal bacteremia on post-operative day 10 after a surgical palliation for complex congenital heart disease that was complicated by acute renal failure. Despite removal of vascular catheters and antimicrobial regimens that included linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, ampicillin/sulbactam, rifampin, and gentamicin, bacteremia persisted. It was not cleared until daptomycin (in combination with doxycycline) was started. This is the first case of successful treatment of probable endocarditis due to VRE in a neonate using a daptomycin-containing regimen. PMID:21694874

  13. Rapid detection of blaOXA in carbapenem-susceptible Acinetobacter radioresistens bacteremia leading to unnecessary antimicrobial administration.

    PubMed

    Brady, Adam C; Lewis, James S; Pfeiffer, Christopher D

    2016-08-01

    Rapid molecular techniques to identify resistant pathogens are revolutionizing antibiotic stewardship; however, it is important to recognize the limitations of these techniques. Herein we describe two cases of bacteremia that were both initially identified by genotypic testing as carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. and subsequently identified phenotypically as carbapenem-susceptible A. radioresistens. The genotypic results prompted unnecessary broad-spectrum antibiotic use and infection control concerns. PMID:27236714

  14. Comparison of cefazolin versus oxacillin for treatment of complicated bacteremia caused by methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Li, Julius; Echevarria, Kelly L; Hughes, Darrel W; Cadena, Jose A; Bowling, Jason E; Lewis, James S

    2014-09-01

    Contrary to prior case reports that described occasional clinical failures with cefazolin for methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infections, recent studies have demonstrated no difference in outcomes between cefazolin and antistaphylococcal penicillins for the treatment of MSSA bacteremia. While promising, these studies described low frequencies of high-inoculum infections, such as endocarditis. This retrospective study compares clinical outcomes of cefazolin versus oxacillin for complicated MSSA bacteremia at two tertiary care hospitals between January 2008 and June 2012. Fifty-nine patients treated with cefazolin and 34 patients treated with oxacillin were included. Osteoarticular (41%) and endovascular (20%) sources were the predominant sites of infection. The rates of clinical cure at the end of therapy were similar between cefazolin and oxacillin (95% versus 88%; P=0.25), but overall failure at 90 days was higher in the oxacillin arm (47% versus 24%; P=0.04). Failures were more likely to have received surgical interventions (63% versus 40%; P=0.05) and to have an osteoarticular source (57% versus 33%; P=0.04). Failures also had a longer duration of bacteremia (7 versus 3 days; P=0.0002), which was the only predictor of failure. Antibiotic selection was not predictive of failure. Rates of adverse drug events were higher in the oxacillin arm (30% versus 3%; P=0.0006), and oxacillin was more frequently discontinued due to adverse drug events (21% versus 3%; P=0.01). Cefazolin appears similar to oxacillin for the treatment of complicated MSSA bacteremia but with significantly improved safety. The higher rates of failure with oxacillin may have been confounded by other patient factors and warrant further investigation. PMID:24936596

  15. Comparison of Cefazolin versus Oxacillin for Treatment of Complicated Bacteremia Caused by Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Echevarria, Kelly L.; Hughes, Darrel W.; Cadena, Jose A.; Bowling, Jason E.; Lewis, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Contrary to prior case reports that described occasional clinical failures with cefazolin for methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infections, recent studies have demonstrated no difference in outcomes between cefazolin and antistaphylococcal penicillins for the treatment of MSSA bacteremia. While promising, these studies described low frequencies of high-inoculum infections, such as endocarditis. This retrospective study compares clinical outcomes of cefazolin versus oxacillin for complicated MSSA bacteremia at two tertiary care hospitals between January 2008 and June 2012. Fifty-nine patients treated with cefazolin and 34 patients treated with oxacillin were included. Osteoarticular (41%) and endovascular (20%) sources were the predominant sites of infection. The rates of clinical cure at the end of therapy were similar between cefazolin and oxacillin (95% versus 88%; P = 0.25), but overall failure at 90 days was higher in the oxacillin arm (47% versus 24%; P = 0.04). Failures were more likely to have received surgical interventions (63% versus 40%; P = 0.05) and to have an osteoarticular source (57% versus 33%; P = 0.04). Failures also had a longer duration of bacteremia (7 versus 3 days; P = 0.0002), which was the only predictor of failure. Antibiotic selection was not predictive of failure. Rates of adverse drug events were higher in the oxacillin arm (30% versus 3%; P = 0.0006), and oxacillin was more frequently discontinued due to adverse drug events (21% versus 3%; P = 0.01). Cefazolin appears similar to oxacillin for the treatment of complicated MSSA bacteremia but with significantly improved safety. The higher rates of failure with oxacillin may have been confounded by other patient factors and warrant further investigation. PMID:24936596

  16. Liofilchem® O.A. Listeria agar and direct CAMP test provided sooner Listeria monocytogenes identification from neonatal bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Savini, Vincenzo; Marrollo, Roberta; Serio, Annalisa; Paparella, Antonello; Argentieri, Angela Valentina; D’Antonio, Marianna; Coclite, Eleonora; Fusilli, Paola; Fazii, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes infection in pregnant women and newborns is a cause for serious concern, and invasive disease outcome strongly depends on prompt antibiotic therapy. To provide sooner identification from neonatal bacteremia we performed a CAMP test directly on positive blood aliquots and inoculated the Liofilchem® O.A. Listeria chromogenic agar as well, thus providing a 24-h turn-around time for response. PMID:24695762

  17. Risk factors for mortality among patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: a single-centre retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Jegatheswaran, Januvi; Pepe, Daniel Luke; Priestap, Fran; Delport, Johan; Haeryfar, S.M. Mansour; McCormick, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Given the paucity of recent Canadian data, we estimated the mortality rate associated with S. aureus bacteremia in a tertiary care hospital and identified risk factors associated with mortality. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of adults with S. aureus bacteremia admitted to a tertiary care centre in southwestern Ontario between 2008 and 2012. Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate associations between predictor variables and all-cause, in-hospital, and 90-day postdischarge mortality. Results Of the 925 patients involved in the study, 196 (21.2%) died in hospital and 62 (6.7%) died within 90 days after discharge. Risk factors associated with in-hospital and all-cause mortality included age, sepsis (adjusted hazard ratio [adjusted HR] 1.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08–2.06, p = 0.02), admission to the intensive care unit (adjusted HR 3.78, 95% CI 2.85–5.02, p < 0.0001), hepatic failure (adjusted HR 3.36, 95% CI 1.91–5.90, p < 0.0001) and metastatic cancer (adjusted HR 2.58, 95% CI 1.77–3.75, p < 0.0001). Methicillin resistance, hepatic failure, cerebrovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and metastatic cancer were associated with postdischarge mortality. Interpretation The all-cause mortality rate in our cohort was 27.9%. Identification of predictors of mortality may guide empiric therapy and provide prognostic clarity for patients with S. aureus bacteremia. PMID:25553328

  18. Failure of High-Dose Daptomycin for Bacteremia Caused by Daptomycin-Susceptible Enterococcus faecium Harboring LiaSR Substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Munita, Jose M.; Mishra, Nagendra N.; Alvarez, Danya; Tran, Truc T.; Diaz, Lorena; Panesso, Diana; Reyes, Jinnethe; Murray, Barbara E.; Adachi, Javier A.; Bayer, Arnold S.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2014-01-01

    High-dose daptomycin (DAP) therapy failed in a neutropenic patient with bloodstream infection caused by a DAP-susceptible Enterococcus faecium (minimum inhibitory concentration, 3 µg/mL) harboring genetic changes associated with DAP resistance, with persistent bacteremia and selection of additional resistances. Daptomycin monotherapy should be used cautiously against DAP-susceptible E. faecium strains with minimum inhibitory concentrations >2 µg/mL. PMID:25107294

  19. β-Lactams Enhance Vancomycin Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Compared to Vancomycin Alone

    PubMed Central

    Dilworth, Thomas J.; Ibrahim, Omar; Hall, Pamela; Sliwinski, Jora; Walraven, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Vancomycin (VAN) is often used to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia despite a high incidence of microbiological failure. Recent in vitro analyses of β-lactams in combination with VAN demonstrated synergistic activity against MRSA. The goal of this study was to examine the impact of combination therapy with VAN and a β-lactam (Combo) on the microbiological eradication of MRSA bacteremia compared to VAN alone. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with MRSA bacteremia who received Combo therapy or VAN alone. Microbiological eradication of MRSA, defined as a negative blood culture obtained after initiation of therapy, was used to evaluate the efficacy of each regimen. A total of 80 patients were included: 50 patients in the Combo group and 30 patients in the VAN-alone group. Microbiological eradication was achieved in 48 patients (96%) in the Combo group compared to 24 patients (80%) in the VAN-alone group (P = 0.021). In a multivariable model, the Combo treatment had a higher likelihood of achieving microbiological eradication (adjusted odds ratio, 11.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.7 to 144.3; P = 0.01). In patients with infective endocarditis (n = 22), 11/11 (100%) who received Combo therapy achieved microbiological eradication compared to 9/11 (81.8%) treated with VAN alone, but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.20). Patients with MRSA bacteremia who received Combo therapy were more likely to experience microbiological eradication of MRSA than patients who received VAN alone. PMID:24145519

  20. The Association of Streptococcus gallolyticus Subspecies pasteurianus Bacteremia with the Detection of Premalignant and Malignant Colonic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Shamban, Leonid; Forman, Adam; Sinha, Prabhat

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies (subsp.) gallolyticus (formerly bovis biotype I) bacteremia has been associated with colonic adenocarcinoma. The bovis species underwent reclassification in 2003. Subtypes of gallolyticus are associated with colonic malignancy but are less frequent, resulting in less awareness. A 71-year-old male admitted with worsening lower back pain and fevers. Initial vital signs and laboratory data were within normal limits. MRI revealed lumbosacral osteomyelitis and antibiotics were initiated. Blood cultures showed Streptococcus species, prompting a transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) revealing vegetations on the mitral and aortic valves. The etiology for his endocarditis was unclear. A colonoscopy was suggested, but his clinical instability made such a procedure intolerable. Final cultures revealed Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus (previously bovis biotype II). After antibiotic completion he underwent aortic grafting with valve replacements. Later, he was readmitted for Streptococcus bacteremia. After a negative TEE, colonoscopy revealed a 2.5 × 3 cm cecal tubulovillous adenoma with high-grade dysplasia suspicious for his origin of infection. Clinicians understand the link between Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus (bovis type I) and malignancy, but the new speciation may be unfamiliar. There are no guidelines for managing S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus bacteremia; therefore a colonoscopy should be considered when no source is identified. PMID:27555973

  1. Neither Single nor a Combination of Routine Laboratory Parameters can Discriminate between Gram-positive and Gram-negative Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Ratzinger, Franz; Dedeyan, Michel; Rammerstorfer, Matthias; Perkmann, Thomas; Burgmann, Heinz; Makristathis, Athanasios; Dorffner, Georg; Loetsch, Felix; Blacky, Alexander; Ramharter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Adequate early empiric antibiotic therapy is pivotal for the outcome of patients with bloodstream infections. In clinical practice the use of surrogate laboratory parameters is frequently proposed to predict underlying bacterial pathogens; however there is no clear evidence for this assumption. In this study, we investigated the discriminatory capacity of predictive models consisting of routinely available laboratory parameters to predict the presence of Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteremia. Major machine learning algorithms were screened for their capacity to maximize the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC) for discriminating between Gram-positive and Gram-negative cases. Data from 23,765 patients with clinically suspected bacteremia were screened and 1,180 bacteremic patients were included in the study. A relative predominance of Gram-negative bacteremia (54.0%), which was more pronounced in females (59.1%), was observed. The final model achieved 0.675 ROC-AUC resulting in 44.57% sensitivity and 79.75% specificity. Various parameters presented a significant difference between both genders. In gender-specific models, the discriminatory potency was slightly improved. The results of this study do not support the use of surrogate laboratory parameters for predicting classes of causative pathogens. In this patient cohort, gender-specific differences in various laboratory parameters were observed, indicating differences in the host response between genders. PMID:26522966

  2. Bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. urealyticus caused by infected pressure ulcer: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Soldera, Jonathan; Nedel, Wagner Luis; Cardoso, Paulo Ricardo Cerveira; d'Azevedo, Pedro Alves

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT Coagulase-negative staphylococci are common colonizers of the human skin and have become increasingly recognized as agents of clinically significant nosocomial infections. CASE REPORT The case of a 79-year-old male patient with multi-infarct dementia who presented systemic inflammatory response syndrome is reported. This was attributed to bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. urealyticus, which was grown on blood cultures originating from an infected pressure ulcer. The few cases of Staphylococcus cohnii infection reported in the literature consist of bacteremia relating to catheters, surgical prostheses, acute cholecystitis, brain abscess, endocarditis, pneumonia, urinary tract infection and septic arthritis, generally presenting a multiresistant profile, with nearly 90% resistance to methicillin. CONCLUSIONS The reported case is, to our knowledge, the first case of true bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii subsp. urealyticus caused by an infected pressure ulcer. It shows that this species may be underdiagnosed and should be considered in the differential diagnosis for community-acquired skin infections. PMID:23538597

  3. Bacteremia and resistant gram-negative pathogens among under-fives in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is one of the most serious public health concerns worldwide and is increasing at an alarming rate, making daily treatment decisions more challenging. This study is aimed at identifying local bacterial isolates and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns to avoid irrational antibiotic use, especially in settings where unguided management occurs and febrile illnesses are predominant. Material and methods A hospital-based prospective cross-sectional study was conducted from September 2011 to February 2012. Febrile children were serially recruited and demographic and clinical data were collected using a standardized data collection tool. A blood culture was performed and identification of the isolates was undertaken using in-house biochemical tests. Susceptibility to common antibiotics was investigated using the disc diffusion methods. Results Of the 1081 children admitted during the study period, 317 (29.3%) met the inclusion criteria and were recruited, of whom 195 (61.5%) and 122 (38.5%) were male and female respectively. The median age was 18 months with an interquartile range of 9 to 36 months. Of the 317 children, 251 (79.2%) were below or equal to 36 months of age. The prevalence of bacteremia was 6.6%. A higher prevalence of bacteraemia was observed in children below 36 months than in those ≥ 36 months (7.5% vs. 3.0%, p = 0.001). Predictors of bacteraemia were an axillary temperature of >38.5 °C (OR =7, 95% CI = 2.2 - 14.8, p-value = 0.0001), a positive malaria slide (OR =5, 95% CI = 3.0 - 21.2, p-value = 0.0001) and a high neutrophils’ count (OR =21 95% CI = 5.6 - 84, p-value = 0.0001). Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae accounted for 7 (33.3%) and 6 (28.6%) of all the isolates respectively. Others gram-negatives bacteria were Citrobacter spp 2 (9.5%), Enterobacter spp 1 (4.25%), Pseudomonas spp 2 (9.5%), Proteus spp 1 (4.25%) and Salmonella spp 1 (4.25%). These isolates

  4. Clinical features of enterococcal bacteremia due to ampicillin-susceptible and ampicillin-resistant enterococci: An eight-year retrospective comparison study.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yohei; Magarifuchi, Hiroki; Oho, Megumi; Kusaba, Koji; Nagasawa, Zenzo; Fukuoka, Mami; Yamakuchi, Hiroki; Urakami, Toshiharu; Aoki, Yosuke

    2015-07-01

    Enterococcus consists human bowel flora, but sometimes behave as an important nosocomial pathogen. In order to identify clinical characteristics that help discriminate between ampicillin-susceptible and ampicillin-resistant enterococcal bacteremia in advance for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, a retrospective eight-year study was carried out in patients with enterococcal bacteremia experienced in Saga University Hospital, Japan. A total of 143 patients were included in the analysis: 85 (59.4%) with bacteremia caused by ampicillin-susceptible enterococci and 58 (40.6%) by ampicillin-resistant strains. Hospital-acquired bacteremia was present in 79.0% (113/143) of patients. Abdominal infections, urinary tract infections, and unknown source were predominant foci for the two groups. Patients with ampicillin-resistant enterococcal bacteremia was significantly associated with hematological cancer, immunosuppressive therapy, prior use of antibiotics, and mucositis associated with febrile neutropenia. The 28-day mortality was significantly higher in ampicillin-resistant enterococcal bacteremia. On multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for ampicillin-resistant enterococci were as follows: prior exposures to penicillins and carbapenems, and bacteremia related to mucositis with febrile neutropenia. These findings would assist physicians in deciding whether glycopeptide antibiotics should be included as an empiric antibiotic therapy in patients with suspected enterococcal infections and also those with persistent neutropenic fever refractory to fourth generation cephalosporin. A few cases of MALDI-TOF MS-identified Enterococcus faecium that turned out ampicillin-sensitive were also described to emphasize the importance of taking epidemiological aspects of patients into considerations when deciding initial antimicrobial treatment. PMID:25935477

  5. Comparison of Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci Isolated from Blood Cultures as a True Bacteremia Agent and Contaminant in Terms of Slime Production and Methicillin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Uyanik, Muhammet Hamidullah; Yazgi, Halil; Ozden, Kemalettin; Erdil, Zeynep; Ayyildiz, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the species distribution, slime activity, and methicillin resistance of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) isolated from blood cultures as either contaminants or true bacteremia agents. Materials and Methods: In this study, 13.268 blood culture samples sent to our laboratory from various clinics during a two-year period were examined in terms of the presence of CoNS to clarify whether the isolates are true bacteremia agents, as defined by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria. The slime activities of true bacteremia agents (58 CoNS strains) and contaminants (50 randomly selected CoNS strains) were investigated by the Christensen method. The methicillin susceptibilities of the strains were determined by the disk diffusion method. Results: Although the frequency of slime production was 39.7% among the true bacteremia CoNS agents, it was 18% in CoNS that were judged to be contaminants (p<0.05). S. epidermidis was the most frequently isolated species for both the true bacteremia agent group (56.9%) and contaminant group (74%). Additionally, S. epidermidis was the bacterium most frequently characterized as slime producing in both groups. The methicillin resistance of slime-producing CoNS was determined to be 82.6% for the true bacteremia agent group and 77.8% for the contaminant group. Conclusion: The presence of slime activity in CoNS isolated from blood culture samples is supportive evidence that they are most likely the agents of true bacteremia cases. PMID:25610309

  6. Multicenter Evaluation of the Clinical Outcomes of Daptomycin with and without Concomitant β-Lactams in Patients with Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia and Mild to Moderate Renal Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Amodio-Groton, Maria; Rashid, Mohamad; Lamp, Kenneth C.; Hoffman-Roberts, Holly L.; Sakoulas, George; Yoon, Min J.; Schweitzer, Suzanne; Rastogi, Anjay

    2013-01-01

    Patients with underlying renal disease may be vulnerable to vancomycin-mediated nephrotoxicity and Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia treatment failure. In light of recent data demonstrating the successful use of β-lactam plus daptomycin in very difficult cases of S. aureus bacteremia, we examined safety and clinical outcomes for patients who received daptomycin with or without concomitant β-lactams. We identified 106 patients who received daptomycin for S. aureus bacteremia, had mild or moderate renal insufficiency according to FDA criteria, and enrolled in the Cubicin Outcomes Registry and Experience (CORE), a multicenter registry, from 2005 to 2009. Daptomycin treatment success was 81%. Overall treatment efficacy was slightly enhanced with the addition of a β-lactam (87% versus 78%; P = 0.336), but this trend was most pronounced for bacteremia associated with endocarditis or bone/joint infection or bacteremia from an unknown source (90% versus 57%; P = 0.061). Factors associated with reduced daptomycin efficacy (by logistic regression) were an unknown source of bacteremia (odds ratio [OR] = 7.59; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.55 to 37.2), moderate renal impairment (OR = 9.11; 95% CI = 1.46 to 56.8), and prior vancomycin failure (OR = 11.2; 95% CI = 1.95 to 64.5). Two patients experienced an increase in creatine phosphokinase (CPK) that resolved after stopping daptomycin. No patients developed worsening renal insufficiency related to daptomycin. In conclusion, daptomycin appeared to be effective and well tolerated in patients with S. aureus bacteremia and mild to moderate renal insufficiency. Daptomycin treatment efficacy might be enhanced with β-lactam combination therapy in primary endovascular and bone/joint infections. Additional studies will be necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:23254428

  7. Multicenter evaluation of the clinical outcomes of daptomycin with and without concomitant β-lactams in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and mild to moderate renal impairment.

    PubMed

    Moise, Pamela A; Amodio-Groton, Maria; Rashid, Mohamad; Lamp, Kenneth C; Hoffman-Roberts, Holly L; Sakoulas, George; Yoon, Min J; Schweitzer, Suzanne; Rastogi, Anjay

    2013-03-01

    Patients with underlying renal disease may be vulnerable to vancomycin-mediated nephrotoxicity and Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia treatment failure. In light of recent data demonstrating the successful use of β-lactam plus daptomycin in very difficult cases of S. aureus bacteremia, we examined safety and clinical outcomes for patients who received daptomycin with or without concomitant β-lactams. We identified 106 patients who received daptomycin for S. aureus bacteremia, had mild or moderate renal insufficiency according to FDA criteria, and enrolled in the Cubicin Outcomes Registry and Experience (CORE), a multicenter registry, from 2005 to 2009. Daptomycin treatment success was 81%. Overall treatment efficacy was slightly enhanced with the addition of a β-lactam (87% versus 78%; P = 0.336), but this trend was most pronounced for bacteremia associated with endocarditis or bone/joint infection or bacteremia from an unknown source (90% versus 57%; P = 0.061). Factors associated with reduced daptomycin efficacy (by logistic regression) were an unknown source of bacteremia (odds ratio [OR] = 7.59; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.55 to 37.2), moderate renal impairment (OR = 9.11; 95% CI = 1.46 to 56.8), and prior vancomycin failure (OR = 11.2; 95% CI = 1.95 to 64.5). Two patients experienced an increase in creatine phosphokinase (CPK) that resolved after stopping daptomycin. No patients developed worsening renal insufficiency related to daptomycin. In conclusion, daptomycin appeared to be effective and well tolerated in patients with S. aureus bacteremia and mild to moderate renal insufficiency. Daptomycin treatment efficacy might be enhanced with β-lactam combination therapy in primary endovascular and bone/joint infections. Additional studies will be necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:23254428

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility in gram-negative bacteremia: are nosocomial isolates really more resistant?

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, J E; Hall, E C; Parrott, P L

    1989-01-01

    Bloodstream isolates of gram-negative aerobic bacilli from nosocomial infections are more likely to be resistant to antimicrobial agents than isolates from community-acquired cases are. It is not clear, however, how much this is due to the markedly different distribution of organisms in the two groups. We compared the susceptibilities of organisms of a given species which caused community-acquired bacteremia with the susceptibilities of isolates from nosocomial cases. Nine antimicrobial agents were tested against 1,077 isolates which were obtained during a 4-year nonepidemic period. Marked differences in crude rates of resistance were noted for all isolates from nosocomial cases versus all isolates from cases acquired in the community. When results were adjusted for the different organism distributions in the two groups, statistically significant differences were found for only six drug-organism pairs; in each of these, resistance rates were higher in nosocomial isolates. However, when results were further adjusted for the effect of multiple analyses, no significant differences were seen. The major factor leading to the greater prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in our hospital organisms was the markedly different distribution of organisms in the nosocomial and community-acquired groups. For individual organisms, greater resistance in nosocomial strains was confined to certain drugs. Factors that influence differences in organism distribution may not be solely the result of antimicrobial use. PMID:2610495

  9. Comparative Efficacies of Amoxicillin, Clindamycin, and Moxifloxacin in Prevention of Bacteremia following Dental Extractions

    PubMed Central

    Diz Dios, P.; Tomás Carmona, I.; Limeres Posse, J.; Medina Henríquez, J.; Fernández Feijoo, J.; Álvarez Fernández, M.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacies of oral prophylactic treatment with amoxicillin (AMX), clindamycin (CLI), and moxifloxacin (MXF) in the prevention of bacteremia following dental extractions (BDE). Two hundred twenty-one adults who required dental extractions under general anesthesia were randomly assigned to a control group, an AMX group, a CLI group, and an MXF group (the individuals in the drug treatment groups received 2 g, 600 mg, and 400 mg, respectively, 1 to 2 h before anesthesia induction). Venous blood samples were collected from each patient at the baseline and 30 s, 15 min, and 1 h after the dental extractions. The samples were inoculated into BACTEC Plus aerobic and anaerobic blood culture bottles and were processed in a BACTEC 9240 instrument. Subculture and the further identification of the isolated bacteria were performed by conventional microbiological techniques. The prevalences of BDE in the control group, AMX group, CLI group, and MXF group were 96, 46, 85, and 57%, respectively, at 30 s; 64, 11, 70, and 24%, respectively, at 15 min; and 20, 4, 22, and 7%, respectively, at 1 h. Streptococcus spp. were the most frequently identified bacteria in all groups (44 to 68%), with the lowest percentage being detected in the AMX group (44%). AMX and MXF prophylaxis showed high efficacies in reducing the prevalence and duration of BDE, but CLI prophylaxis was noneffective. As a consequence, MXF prophylaxis is a promising antibiotic alternative for the prevention of BDE when beta-lactams are not indicated. PMID:16940094

  10. Brucella suis bacteremia misidentified as Ochrobactrum anthropi by the VITEK 2 system.

    PubMed

    Vila, Andrea; Pagella, Hugo; Vera Bello, Gonzalo; Vicente, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Ochrobactrum and Brucella are genetically related genera of the family Brucellaceae, sharing 98.8% rRNA similarity. Because of their phenotypic similarity, Ochrobactrum can be miscoded as Brucella by automated identification systems. The misidentification on blood cultures (BCs) of B. suis as O. anthropi by the VITEK 2 system is herein described. A 67-year-old male with a prosthetic mitral valve and fever was admitted with bacteremia due to a Gram-negative coccobacillus identified as O. anthropi by VITEK 2. The patient's fever persisted along with positive blood cultures despite specific antimicrobial treatment. Due to this adverse outcome, the patient was interrogated again and admitted having domestic swine. Serological tests were positive for acute brucellosis. Polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of BC strains identified B. suis biovar 1. Timely identification of Brucella is essential for providing proper treatment to the patient and for advising safe handling of laboratory cultures in biological safety cabinets to prevent laboratory-acquired infection. Countries where brucellosis is endemic must be aware of this possibility. PMID:27131010

  11. Helicobacter cinaedi bacteremia with cellulitis after ABO-incompatible living-donor liver transplantation: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Kohei; Obara, Hideaki; Sugita, Kayoko; Shinoda, Masahiro; Kitago, Minoru; Abe, Yuta; Hibi, Taizo; Yagi, Hiroshi; Matsubara, Kentaro; Mori, Takehiko; Takano, Yaoko; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Itano, Osamu; Hasegawa, Naoki; Iwata, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter cinaedi (H. cinaedi), a Gram-negative spiral-shaped bacterium, is an enterohepatic non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter species. We report the first case of H. cinaedi bacteremia with cellulitis after liver transplantation. A 48-year-old male, who had been a dog breeder for 15 years, underwent ABO-incompatible living-donor liver transplantation for hepatitis C virus-induced decompensated cirrhosis using an anti-hepatitis B core antibody-positive graft. The patient was preoperatively administered rituximab and underwent plasma exchange twice to overcome blood type incompatibility. After discharge, he had been doing well with immunosuppression therapy comprising cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroid according to the ABO-incompatible protocol of our institution. However, 7 mo after transplantation, he was admitted to our hospital with a diagnosis of recurrent cellulitis on the left lower extremity, and H. cinaedi was detected by both blood culture and polymerase chain reaction analysis. Antibiotics improved his symptoms, and he was discharged at day 30 after admission. Clinicians should be more aware of H. cinaedi in immunocompromised patients, such as ABO-incompatible transplant recipients. PMID:26167092

  12. Streptococcus suis causes septic arthritis and bacteremia: phenotypic characterization and molecular confirmation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hanah; Lee, Sang Hoon; Moon, Hee-Won; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Sun Hwa; Hur, Mina; Yun, Yeo-Min

    2011-04-01

    Streptococcus suis is a swine pathogen that causes meningitis, septicemia, pneumonia, and endocarditis. The first case of human S. suis infection was reported in Denmark in 1968, and since then, this infection with has been reported in many countries, especially in Southeast Asia because of the high density of pigs in this region. We report the case of a patient with septic arthritis and bacteremia caused by S. suis. Cases in which S. suis is isolated from the joint fluid are very rare, and to the best of our knowledge, this is first case report of S. suis infection in Korea. The identity of this organism was confirmed by phenotypic characterization and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. An 81-yr-old Korean woman who presented with fever, arthralgia, and headache was admitted to a secondary referral center in Korea. Culture of aspirated joint fluid and blood samples showed the growth of S. suis biotype II, which was identified by the Vitek2 GPI and API 20 Strep systems (bioMérieux, USA), and this organism was susceptible to penicillin G and vancomycin. The 16S rRNA sequences of the blood culture isolates showed 99% homology with those of S. suis subsp. suis, which are reported in GenBank. The patient's fever subsided, and blood and joint cultures were negative for bacterial growth after antibiotic therapy; however, the swelling and pain in her left knee joint persisted. She plans to undergo total knee replacement. PMID:21474987

  13. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Meningitis- and Bacteremia-Causing Pneumococci Identifies a Common Core Genome.

    PubMed

    Kulohoma, Benard W; Cornick, Jennifer E; Chaguza, Chrispin; Yalcin, Feyruz; Harris, Simon R; Gray, Katherine J; Kiran, Anmol M; Molyneux, Elizabeth; French, Neil; Parkhill, Julian; Faragher, Brian E; Everett, Dean B; Bentley, Stephen D; Heyderman, Robert S

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a nasopharyngeal commensal that occasionally invades normally sterile sites to cause bloodstream infection and meningitis. Although the pneumococcal population structure and evolutionary genetics are well defined, it is not clear whether pneumococci that cause meningitis are genetically distinct from those that do not. Here, we used whole-genome sequencing of 140 isolates of S. pneumoniae recovered from bloodstream infection (n = 70) and meningitis (n = 70) to compare their genetic contents. By fitting a double-exponential decaying-function model, we show that these isolates share a core of 1,427 genes (95% confidence interval [CI], 1,425 to 1,435 genes) and that there is no difference in the core genome or accessory gene content from these disease manifestations. Gene presence/absence alone therefore does not explain the virulence behavior of pneumococci that reach the meninges. Our analysis, however, supports the requirement of a range of previously described virulence factors and vaccine candidates for both meningitis- and bacteremia-causing pneumococci. This high-resolution view suggests that, despite considerable competency for genetic exchange, all pneumococci are under considerable pressure to retain key components advantageous for colonization and transmission and that these components are essential for access to and survival in sterile sites. PMID:26259813

  14. Increasing Incidence of Hospital-Acquired and Healthcare-Associated Bacteremia in Northeast Thailand: A Multicenter Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    Hongsuwan, Maliwan; Srisamang, Pramot; Kanoksil, Manas; Luangasanatip, Nantasit; Jatapai, Anchalee; Day, Nicholas P.; Peacock, Sharon J.; Cooper, Ben S.; Limmathurotsakul, Direk

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about the epidemiology of nosocomial bloodstream infections in public hospitals in developing countries. We evaluated trends in incidence of hospital-acquired bacteremia (HAB) and healthcare-associated bacteremia (HCAB) and associated mortality in a developing country using routinely available databases. Methods Information from the microbiology and hospital databases of 10 provincial hospitals in northeast Thailand was linked with the national death registry for 2004–2010. Bacteremia was considered hospital-acquired if detected after the first two days of hospital admission, and healthcare-associated if detected within two days of hospital admission with a prior inpatient episode in the preceding 30 days. Results A total of 3,424 patients out of 1,069,443 at risk developed HAB and 2,184 out of 119,286 at risk had HCAB. Of these 1,559 (45.5%) and 913 (41.8%) died within 30 days, respectively. Between 2004 and 2010, the incidence rate of HAB increased from 0.6 to 0.8 per 1,000 patient-days at risk (p<0.001), and the cumulative incidence of HCAB increased from 1.2 to 2.0 per 100 readmissions (p<0.001). The most common causes of HAB were Acinetobacter spp. (16.2%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (13.9%), and Staphylococcus aureus (13.9%), while those of HCAB were Escherichia coli (26.3%), S. aureus (14.0%), and K. pneumoniae (9.7%). There was an overall increase over time in the proportions of ESBL-producing E. coli causing HAB and HCAB. Conclusions This study demonstrates a high and increasing incidence of HAB and HCAB in provincial hospitals in northeast Thailand, increasing proportions of ESBL-producing isolates, and very high associated mortality. PMID:25310563

  15. Staphylococcus aureus and repeat bacteremia in febrile patients as early signs of sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sternal wound infection is a devastating complication of cardiothoracic surgery that carries high postoperative morbidity and mortality rates. We explored whether our current program of extensive bacteriological examination including repeat blood cultures may contribute to the early diagnosis of sternal wound infection. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 112 patients who were subjected to our bacteriological examination protocol including within 90 days after cardiothoracic surgery. Univariate and multivariate analyses were made in order to identify risk factors for sternal infection. Results The median patient age was 75 years, and 65 patients were male. In 35 cases (31.2%) the blood cultures showed the presence of bacterial infection with the following frequencies: Staphylococcus aureus, 18 cases; Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, 7 cases; other organisms, 10 cases. Eleven patients presented repeat bacteremia on at least 2 different occasions. Twenty patients (17.8%) presented sternal wound infections. There was no difference in operative mortality between the patients with and without sternal wound infection. Univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated that bilateral mammary artery use (OR, 13.68, 95% CI, 1.09-167.36, p = 0.043), positive blood culture for Staphylococcus aureus (OR, 19.51, 95% CI, 4.46-104.33, p < 0.0001), repeat bacteremia (OR, 17.98, 95% CI, 2.51-161.77, p = 0.004) were risk factors that were associated for sternal wound infection. Conclusion Repeat blood cultures in febrile patients appear to be useful for the early detection of Staphylococcus aureus and repeat bacteremia, and these were associated with sternal wound infection. Bilateral internal mammary artery use was another risk factor of sternal wound infection in febrile patients. These factors may identify patients suitable for expeditious radiological examination and aggressive treatments. PMID:24885820

  16. Usefulness of previous methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus screening results in guiding empirical therapy for S aureus bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Anthony D; Burry, Lisa; Showler, Adrienne; Steinberg, Marilyn; Ricciuto, Daniel; Fernandes, Tania; Chiu, Anna; Raybardhan, Sumit; Tomlinson, George A; Bell, Chaim M; Morris, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is an important infection. Methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) screening is performed on hospitalized patients for infection control purposes. OBJECTIVE: To assess the usefulness of past MRSA screening for guiding empirical antibiotic therapy for SAB. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study examined consecutive patients with confirmed SAB and previous MRSA screening swab from six academic and community hospitals between 2007 and 2010. Diagnostic test properties were calculated for MRSA screening swab for predicting methicillin resistance of SAB. RESULTS: A total of 799 patients underwent MRSA screening swabs before SAB. Of the 799 patients, 95 (12%) had a positive and 704 (88%) had a negative previous MRSA screening swab. There were 150 (19%) patients with MRSA bacteremia. Overall, previous MRSA screening swabs had a positive likelihood ratio of 33 (95% CI 18 to 60) and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.45 (95% CI 0.37 to 0.54). Diagnostic accuracy differed depending on mode of acquisition (ie, community-acquired, nosocomial or health care-associated infection) (P<0.0001) and hospital (P=0.0002). At best, for health care-associated infection, prior MRSA screening swab had a positive likelihood ratio of 16 (95% CI 9 to 28) and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.27 (95% CI 0.17 to 0.41). CONCLUSIONS: A negative prior MRSA screening swab cannot reliably rule out MRSA bacteremia and should not be used to guide empirical antibiotic therapy for SAB. A positive prior MRSA screening swab greatly increases likelihood of MRSA, necessitating MRSA coverage in empirical antibiotic therapy for SAB. PMID:26361488

  17. Natural mutations in a Staphylococcus aureus virulence regulator attenuate cytotoxicity but permit bacteremia and abscess formation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sudip; Lindemann, Claudia; Young, Bernadette C.; Muller, Julius; Österreich, Babett; Ternette, Nicola; Winkler, Ann-Cathrin; Paprotka, Kerstin; Reinhardt, Richard; Allen, Elizabeth; Flaxman, Amy; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Rollier, Christine S.; van Diemen, Pauline; Blättner, Sebastian; Remmele, Christian W.; Selle, Martina; Dittrich, Marcus; Müller, Tobias; Vogel, Jörg; Ohlsen, Knut; Crook, Derrick W.; Massey, Ruth; Wilson, Daniel J.; Rudel, Thomas; Wyllie, David H.; Fraunholz, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major bacterial pathogen, which causes severe blood and tissue infections that frequently emerge by autoinfection with asymptomatically carried nose and skin populations. However, recent studies report that bloodstream isolates differ systematically from those found in the nose and skin, exhibiting reduced toxicity toward leukocytes. In two patients, an attenuated toxicity bloodstream infection evolved from an asymptomatically carried high-toxicity nasal strain by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the transcription factor repressor of surface proteins (rsp). Here, we report that rsp knockout mutants lead to global transcriptional and proteomic reprofiling, and they exhibit the greatest signal in a genome-wide screen for genes influencing S. aureus survival in human cells. This effect is likely to be mediated in part via SSR42, a long-noncoding RNA. We show that rsp controls SSR42 expression, is induced by hydrogen peroxide, and is required for normal cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity. Rsp inactivation in laboratory- and bacteremia-derived mutants attenuates toxin production, but up-regulates other immune subversion proteins and reduces lethality during experimental infection. Crucially, inactivation of rsp preserves bacterial dissemination, because it affects neither formation of deep abscesses in mice nor survival in human blood. Thus, we have identified a spontaneously evolving, attenuated-cytotoxicity, nonhemolytic S. aureus phenotype, controlled by a pleiotropic transcriptional regulator/noncoding RNA virulence regulatory system, capable of causing S. aureus bloodstream infections. Such a phenotype could promote deep infection with limited early clinical manifestations, raising concerns that bacterial evolution within the human body may contribute to severe infection. PMID:27185949

  18. Natural mutations in a Staphylococcus aureus virulence regulator attenuate cytotoxicity but permit bacteremia and abscess formation.

    PubMed

    Das, Sudip; Lindemann, Claudia; Young, Bernadette C; Muller, Julius; Österreich, Babett; Ternette, Nicola; Winkler, Ann-Cathrin; Paprotka, Kerstin; Reinhardt, Richard; Förstner, Konrad U; Allen, Elizabeth; Flaxman, Amy; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Rollier, Christine S; van Diemen, Pauline; Blättner, Sebastian; Remmele, Christian W; Selle, Martina; Dittrich, Marcus; Müller, Tobias; Vogel, Jörg; Ohlsen, Knut; Crook, Derrick W; Massey, Ruth; Wilson, Daniel J; Rudel, Thomas; Wyllie, David H; Fraunholz, Martin J

    2016-05-31

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major bacterial pathogen, which causes severe blood and tissue infections that frequently emerge by autoinfection with asymptomatically carried nose and skin populations. However, recent studies report that bloodstream isolates differ systematically from those found in the nose and skin, exhibiting reduced toxicity toward leukocytes. In two patients, an attenuated toxicity bloodstream infection evolved from an asymptomatically carried high-toxicity nasal strain by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the transcription factor repressor of surface proteins (rsp). Here, we report that rsp knockout mutants lead to global transcriptional and proteomic reprofiling, and they exhibit the greatest signal in a genome-wide screen for genes influencing S. aureus survival in human cells. This effect is likely to be mediated in part via SSR42, a long-noncoding RNA. We show that rsp controls SSR42 expression, is induced by hydrogen peroxide, and is required for normal cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity. Rsp inactivation in laboratory- and bacteremia-derived mutants attenuates toxin production, but up-regulates other immune subversion proteins and reduces lethality during experimental infection. Crucially, inactivation of rsp preserves bacterial dissemination, because it affects neither formation of deep abscesses in mice nor survival in human blood. Thus, we have identified a spontaneously evolving, attenuated-cytotoxicity, nonhemolytic S. aureus phenotype, controlled by a pleiotropic transcriptional regulator/noncoding RNA virulence regulatory system, capable of causing S. aureus bloodstream infections. Such a phenotype could promote deep infection with limited early clinical manifestations, raising concerns that bacterial evolution within the human body may contribute to severe infection. PMID:27185949

  19. Reduced Parasite Burden in Children with Falciparum Malaria and Bacteremia Coinfections: Role of Mediators of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Gregory C.; Mukundan, Harshini; Fenimore, Paul W.; Hengartner, Nicolas W.; McMahon, Benjamin H.; Ong'echa, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteremia and malaria coinfection is a common and life-threatening condition in children residing in sub-Saharan Africa. We previously showed that coinfection with Gram negative (G[−]) enteric Bacilli and Plasmodium falciparum (Pf[+]) was associated with reduced high-density parasitemia (HDP, >10,000 parasites/μL), enhanced respiratory distress, and severe anemia. Since inflammatory mediators are largely unexplored in such coinfections, circulating cytokines were determined in four groups of children (n = 206, aged <3 yrs): healthy; Pf[+] alone; G[−] coinfected; and G[+] coinfected. Staphylococcus aureus and non-Typhi Salmonella were the most frequently isolated G[+] and G[−] organisms, respectively. Coinfected children, particularly those with G[−] pathogens, had lower parasite burden (peripheral and geometric mean parasitemia and HDP). In addition, both coinfected groups had increased IL-4, IL-5, IL-7, IL-12, IL-15, IL-17, IFN-γ, and IFN-α and decreased TNF-α relative to malaria alone. Children with G[−] coinfection had higher IL-1β and IL-1Ra and lower IL-10 than the Pf[+] group and higher IFN-γ than the G[+] group. To determine how the immune response to malaria regulates parasitemia, cytokine production was investigated with a multiple mediation model. Cytokines with the greatest mediational impact on parasitemia were IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, and IFN-γ. Results here suggest that enhanced immune activation, especially in G[−] coinfected children, acts to reduce malaria parasite burden. PMID:27418744

  20. Chlorhexidine-based antiseptic solutions effectively reduce catheter-related bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Onder, Ali Mirza; Chandar, Jayanthi; Billings, Anthony; Diaz, Rosa; Francoeur, Denise; Abitbol, Carolyn; Zilleruelo, Gaston

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate if the application of chlorhexidine-based solutions (ChloraPrep) to the exit site and the hub of long-term hemodialysis catheters could prevent catheter-related bacteremia (CRB) and prolong catheter survival when compared with povidone-iodine solutions. There were 20,784 catheter days observed. Povidone-iodine solutions (Betadine) were used in the first half of the study and ChloraPrep was used in the second half for all the patients. Both groups received chlorhexidine-impregnated dressings at the exit sites. The use of ChloraPrep significantly decreased the incidence of CRB (1.0 vs 2.2/1,000 catheter days, respectively, P = 0.0415), and hospitalization due to CRB (1.8 days vs 4.1 days/1,000 catheter days, respectively, P = 0.0416). The incidence of exit site infection was similar for the two groups. Both the period of overall catheter survival (207.6 days vs 161.1 days, P = 0.0535) and that of infection-free catheter survival (122.0 days vs 106.9 days, P = 0.1100) tended to be longer for the catheters cleansed with ChloraPrep, with no statistical significance. In conclusion, chlorhexidine-based solutions are more effective for the prevention of CRB than povidone-iodine solutions. This positive impact cannot be explained by decreased number of exit site infections. This study supports the notion that the catheter hub is the entry site for CRB. PMID:19296135

  1. Risk factors for long-term mortality of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Yahav, D; Yassin, S; Shaked, H; Goldberg, E; Bishara, J; Paul, M; Leibovici, L

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is a fatal disease. We aimed to describe risk factors for long-term mortality with SAB. We analyzed data from a retrospectively collected database including 1,692 patients with SAB. We considered variables of infection and background conditions for the analysis of long-term survival. The Kaplan-Meier procedure was used for analysis of long-term survival. Variables significantly associated with mortality were analyzed using a Cox regression model. We included 1,692 patients in the analysis. Patients were followed for up to 22 years. Within one year, 62% of patients died and within 5 years 72% died. A total of 82% of patients aged 65 years and older died within 5 years. Independent predictors of long-term mortality were older age (Hazard ratio 1.029, 95% confidence interval 1.022-1.036), female gender (HR 1.302, 95% CI 1.118-1.517), pneumonia or primary/ unknown source of infection (HR 1.441, 95% CI 1.230-1.689), dementia (HR 1.234, 95% CI 1.004-1.516), higher Charlson score (HR 1.155, 95% CI 1.115-1.196), shock at onset (HR 1.776, 95% CI 1.430-2.207) and arrival to hospitalization from an institution (HR 1.319, 95% CI 1.095-1.563). Long-term survival of patients older than 65 years and of women with SAB is severely curtailed. PMID:26873381

  2. Urinary Proteins, Vitamin D and Genetic Polymorphisms as Risk Factors for Febrile Urinary Tract Infection and Relation with Bacteremia: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    van der Starre, Willize E.; van Nieuwkoop, Cees; Thomson, Uginia; Zijderveld-Voshart, Marleen S. M.; Koopman, Jan Pieter R.; van der Reijden, Tanny J. K.; van Dissel, Jaap T.; van de Vosse, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Objective/Purpose Febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common bacterial disease that may lead to substantial morbidity and mortality especially among the elderly. Little is known about biomarkers that predict a complicated course. Our aim was to determine the role of certain urinary cytokines or antimicrobial proteins, plasma vitamin D level, and genetic variation in host defense of febrile UTI and its relation with bacteremia. Methods A case-control study. Out of a cohort of consecutive adults with febrile UTI (n = 787) included in a multi-center observational cohort study, 46 cases with bacteremic E.coli UTI and 45 cases with non-bacteremic E.coli UTI were randomly selected and compared to 46 controls. Urinary IL-6, IL-8, LL37, β-defensin 2 and uromodulin as well as plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured. In 440 controls and 707 UTI patients polymorphisms were genotyped in the genes CXCR1, DEFA4, DEFB1, IL6, IL8, MYD88, UMOD, TIRAP, TLR1, TLR2, TLR5 and TNF. Results IL-6, IL-8, and LL37 are different between controls and UTI patients, although these proteins do not distinguish between patients with and without bacteremia. While uromodulin did not differ between groups, inability to produce uromodulin is more common in patients with bacteremia. Most participants in the study, including the controls, had insufficient vitamin D and, at least in winter, UTI patients have lower vitamin D than controls. Associations were found between the CC genotype of IL6 SNP rs1800795 and occurrence of bacteremia and between TLR5 SNP rs5744168 and protection from UTI. The rare GG genotype of IL6 SNP rs1800795 was associated with higher β-defensin 2 production. Conclusion Although no biomarker was able to distinguish between UTI with or without bacteremia, two risk factors for bacteremia were identified. These were inability to produce uromodulin and an IL6 rs1800795 genotype. PMID:25807366

  3. Carbapenem Therapy Is Associated With Improved Survival Compared With Piperacillin-Tazobactam for Patients With Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Tamma, Pranita D.; Han, Jennifer H.; Rock, Clare; Harris, Anthony D.; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Hsu, Alice J.; Avdic, Edina; Cosgrove, Sara E.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The effectiveness of piperacillin-tazobactam (PTZ) for the treatment of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) bacteremia is controversial. We compared 14-day mortality of PTZ vs carbapenems as empiric therapy in a cohort of patients with ESBL bacteremia who all received definitive therapy with a carbapenem. Methods. Patients hospitalized between January 2007 and April 2014 with monomicrobial ESBL bacteremia were included. A decrease of >3 doubling dilutions in the minimum inhibitory concentration for third-generation cephalosporins tested in combination with 4 µg/mL of clavulanic acid was used to confirm ESBL status. The primary exposure was empiric therapy, defined as antibiotic therapy administered to a patient before ESBL status was known. Patients were excluded if they did not receive a carbapenem after ESBL production was identified. The primary outcome was time to death from the first day of bacteremia. Propensity scores using inverse probability of exposure weighting (IPW) were used to estimate the probability that a patient would receive PTZ vs carbapenems empirically. We calculated overall hazard ratios for mortality censored at 14 days using Cox proportional hazards models on an IPW-adjusted cohort. Results. A total of 331 unique patients with ESBL bacteremia were identified. One hundred three (48%) patients received PTZ empirically and 110 (52%) received carbapenems empirically. The adjusted risk of death was 1.92 times higher for patients receiving empiric PTZ compared with empiric carbapenem therapy (95% confidence interval, 1.07–3.45). Conclusions. PTZ appears inferior to carbapenems for the treatment of ESBL bacteremia. For patients at high risk of invasive ESBL infections, early carbapenem therapy should be considered. Our findings should not be extended to β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations in development, as limited clinical data are available for these agents. PMID:25586681

  4. Association between Accessory Gene Regulator Polymorphism and Mortality among Critically Ill Patients Receiving Vancomycin for Nosocomial MRSA Bacteremia: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Cechinel, Angélica; Machado, Denise P.; Turra, Eduardo; Pereira, Dariane; dos Santos, Rodrigo P.; Rosa, Regis G.; Goldani, Luciano Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Polymorphism of the accessory gene regulator group II (agr) in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is predictive of vancomycin failure therapy. Nevertheless, the impact of group II agr expression on mortality of patients with severe MRSA infections is not well established. Objective. The goal of our study was to evaluate the association between agr polymorphism and all-cause in-hospital mortality among critically ill patients receiving vancomycin for nosocomial MRSA bacteremia. Methods. All patients with documented bacteremia by MRSA requiring treatment in the ICU between May 2009 and November 2011 were included in the study. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to evaluate whether agr polymorphism was associated with all-cause in-hospital mortality. Covariates included age, APACHE II score, initial C-reactive protein plasma levels, initial serum creatinine levels, vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration, vancomycin serum levels, and time to effective antibiotic administration. Results. The prevalence of group I and group II agr expression was 52.4% and 47.6%, respectively. Bacteremia by MRSA group III or group IV agr was not documented in our patients. The mean APACHE II of the study population was 24.3 (standard deviation 8.5). The overall cohort mortality was 66.6% (14 patients). After multivariate analysis, initial plasma C-reactive protein levels (P = 0.01), initial serum creatinine levels (P = 0.008), and expression of group II agr (P = 0.006) were positively associated with all-cause in-hospital mortality. Patients with bacteremia by MRSA with group II agr expression had their risk of death increased by 12.6 times when compared with those with bacteremia by MRSA with group I agr expression. Conclusion. Group II agr polymorphism is associated with an increase in mortality in critically ill patients with bacteremia by MRSA treated with vancomycin. PMID:27366180

  5. Association between Accessory Gene Regulator Polymorphism and Mortality among Critically Ill Patients Receiving Vancomycin for Nosocomial MRSA Bacteremia: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Cechinel, Angélica; Machado, Denise P; Turra, Eduardo; Pereira, Dariane; Dos Santos, Rodrigo P; Rosa, Regis G; Goldani, Luciano Z

    2016-01-01

    Background. Polymorphism of the accessory gene regulator group II (agr) in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is predictive of vancomycin failure therapy. Nevertheless, the impact of group II agr expression on mortality of patients with severe MRSA infections is not well established. Objective. The goal of our study was to evaluate the association between agr polymorphism and all-cause in-hospital mortality among critically ill patients receiving vancomycin for nosocomial MRSA bacteremia. Methods. All patients with documented bacteremia by MRSA requiring treatment in the ICU between May 2009 and November 2011 were included in the study. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to evaluate whether agr polymorphism was associated with all-cause in-hospital mortality. Covariates included age, APACHE II score, initial C-reactive protein plasma levels, initial serum creatinine levels, vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration, vancomycin serum levels, and time to effective antibiotic administration. Results. The prevalence of group I and group II agr expression was 52.4% and 47.6%, respectively. Bacteremia by MRSA group III or group IV agr was not documented in our patients. The mean APACHE II of the study population was 24.3 (standard deviation 8.5). The overall cohort mortality was 66.6% (14 patients). After multivariate analysis, initial plasma C-reactive protein levels (P = 0.01), initial serum creatinine levels (P = 0.008), and expression of group II agr (P = 0.006) were positively associated with all-cause in-hospital mortality. Patients with bacteremia by MRSA with group II agr expression had their risk of death increased by 12.6 times when compared with those with bacteremia by MRSA with group I agr expression. Conclusion. Group II agr polymorphism is associated with an increase in mortality in critically ill patients with bacteremia by MRSA treated with vancomycin. PMID:27366180

  6. Non catheter-related bacteremia caused by Pseudomonas oryzihabitans in an adolescent with chronic renal failure undergoing peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Karampatakis, T; Sevastidou, A; Argyropoulou, E; Printza, N; Tsivitanidou, M; Siaka, E

    2012-01-01

    A Pseudomonas oryzihabitans clinical isolate was recovered from a blood sample. The patient, a 14-year-old-adolescent underwent parathyroidectomy due to secondary hyperparathyroidism. The patient had been going peritoneal dialysis because of chronic renal failure. According to the susceptibility testing conducted with phenotypic methods the microorganism was sensitive to the vast majority of the antibiotics. The isolation of this rare species of Pseudomonas combined with the patient's medical history stimulated as to focus on the causes of the bacteremia, which was non catheter-related. PMID:23930068

  7. Non catheter-related bacteremia caused by Pseudomonas oryzihabitans in an adolescent with chronic renal failure undergoing peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Karampatakis, T; Sevastidou, A; Argyropoulou, E; Printza, N; Tsivitanidou, M; Siaka, E

    2012-01-01

    A Pseudomonas oryzihabitans clinical isolate was recovered from a blood sample. The patient, a 14-year-old-adolescent underwent parathyroidectomy due to secondary hyperparathyroidism. The patient had been going peritoneal dialysis because of chronic renal failure. According to the susceptibility testing conducted with phenotypic methods the microorganism was sensitive to the vast majority of the antibiotics. The isolation of this rare species of Pseudomonas combined with the patient's medical history stimulated as to focus on the causes of the bacteremia, which was non catheter-related. PMID:23930068

  8. Multicenter Retrospective Study of Cefmetazole and Flomoxef for Treatment of Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Masaki; Nagao, Miki; Komori, Toshiaki; Fujita, Naohisa; Hayashi, Akihiko; Shimizu, Tsunehiro; Watanabe, Harumi; Doi, Shoichi; Tanaka, Michio; Takakura, Shunji; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of cefmetazole and flomoxef (CF) for the treatment of patients with extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) bacteremia (ESBL-CF group) was compared with that of carbapenem treatment for ESBL-EC patients (ESBL-carbapenem group) and with that of CF treatment in patients with non-ESBL-EC bacteremia (non-ESBL-CF group). Adult patients treated for E. coli bacteremia in four hospitals were retrospectively evaluated. The 30-day mortality rates in patients belonging to the ESBL-CF, ESBL-carbapenem, and non-ESBL-CF groups were compared as 2 (empirical and definitive therapy) cohorts. The adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) for mortality were calculated using Cox regression models with weighting according to the inverse probability of propensity scores for receiving CF or carbapenem treatment. The empirical-therapy cohort included 104 patients (ESBL-CF, 26; ESBL-carbapenem, 45; non-ESBL-CF, 33), and the definitive-therapy cohort included 133 patients (ESBL-CF, 59; ESBL-carbapenem, 54; non-ESBL-CF, 20). The crude 30-day mortality rates for patients in the ESBL-CF, ESBL-carbapenem, and non-ESBL-CF groups were, respectively, 7.7%, 8.9%, and 3.0% in the empirical-therapy cohort and 5.1%, 9.3%, and 5.0% in the definitve-therapy cohort. In patients without hematological malignancy and neutropenia, CF treatment for ESBL-EC patients was not associated with mortality compared with carbapenem treatment (empirical-therapy cohort: aHR, 0.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.11 to 6.52; definitive therapy cohort: aHR, 1.04; CI, 0.24 to 4.49). CF therapy may represent an effective alternative to carbapenem treatment for patients with ESBL-EC bacteremia for empirical and definitive therapy in adult patients who do not have hematological malignancy and neutropenia. PMID:26100708

  9. Characterization of the Humoral Immune Response during Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia and Global Gene Expression by Staphylococcus aureus in Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    den Reijer, Paul Martijn; Lemmens-den Toom, Nicole; Kant, Samantha; Snijders, Susan V.; Boelens, Hélène; Tavakol, Mehri; Verkaik, Nelianne J.; van Belkum, Alex; Verbrugh, Henri A.; van Wamel, Willem J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Attempts to develop an efficient anti-staphylococcal vaccine in humans have so far been unsuccessful. Therefore, more knowledge of the antigens that are expressed by Staphylococcus aureus in human blood and induce an immune response in patients is required. In this study we further characterize the serial levels of IgG and IgA antibodies against 56 staphylococcal antigens in multiple serum samples of 21 patients with a S. aureus bacteremia, compare peak IgG levels between patients and 30 non-infected controls, and analyze the expression of 3626 genes by two genetically distinct isolates in human blood. The serum antibody levels were measured using a bead-based flow cytometry technique (xMAP®, Luminex corporation). Gene expression levels were analyzed using a microarray (BµG@s microarray). The initial levels and time taken to reach peak IgG and IgA antibody levels were heterogeneous in bacteremia patients. The antigen SA0688 was associated with the highest median initial-to-peak antibody fold-increase for IgG (5.05-fold) and the second highest increase for IgA (2.07-fold). Peak IgG levels against 27 antigens, including the antigen SA0688, were significantly elevated in bacteremia patients versus controls (P≤0.05). Expression of diverse genes, including SA0688, was ubiquitously high in both isolates at all time points during incubation in blood. However, only a limited number of genes were specifically up- or downregulated in both isolates when cultured in blood, compared to the start of incubation in blood or during incubation in BHI broth. In conclusion, most staphylococcal antigens tested in this study, including many known virulence factors, do not induce uniform increases in the antibody levels in bacteremia patients. In addition, the expression of these antigens by S. aureus is not significantly altered by incubation in human blood over time. One immunogenic and ubiquitously expressed antigen is the putative iron-regulated ABC transporter SA0688. PMID

  10. A Case of Paenibacillus pasadenensis Bacteremia in a Patient with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after Microsurgical Clipping

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Hyung Woo

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of bacteremia by a novel Paenibacillus species, Paenibacillus pasadenensis, from a 55-year-old male patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome, following a microsurgical clipping procedure of a ruptured intracranial aneurysm. The bacterium was identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis, which was applied because current conventional methods employed in the clinical microbiology laboratory proved unsuccessful. Since this bacterium was first identified in 2006 and has never been reported elsewhere, we believe this report can provide practitioners with useful insight on the pathogenicity of this species. PMID:25844266

  11. Avoiding the Perfect Storm: The Biologic and Clinical Case for Reevaluating the 7-Day Expectation for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Before Switching Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Ellie J. C.; Kullar, Ravina; McKinnell, James A.; Sakoulas, George

    2014-01-01

    Persistent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia (MRSAB) is associated with poor outcomes and serious complications. The MRSA guidelines define treatment failure and persistent bacteremia as lasting ≥7 days; however, this definition requires reevaluation. Aggressively reducing the bacterial inoculum promptly is critical because factors already in place before clinical presentation are driving resistance to the few antibiotics that are available to treat MRSAB. Alternative approaches to treat MRSAB should be considered within 3–4 days of persistent MRSAB. With rapid molecular diagnostics emerging in clinical microbiology laboratories and biomarkers as a potential for early patient risk stratification, a future shorter threshold may become possible. PMID:25048852

  12. Risk and Prognostic Factors for Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii Complex Bacteremia: A Retrospective Study in a Tertiary Hospital of West China

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xinmiao; Li, Weijing; Zhong, Taiqing; Tang, Yin; Feng, Yulin; Tao, Chuanmin; Xie, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background The increasing prevalence and mortality of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii complex-associated infections, especially bacteremia, in health care settings poses a great threat to public health. We proceeded to investigate the risk and prognostic factors for MDR A. baumannii complex bacteremia in mainland China. Methods This retrospective study was conducted at West China Hospital from January 2009 to December 2013. Using a computer-assisted microbiology laboratory database, patients with MDR A. baumannii complex bacteremia were included as the case group, while those infected with non-MDR A. baumannii complex were selected as the control group. The clinical data were collected and analyzed. Results There were 241 non-duplicated A. baumannii complex blood isolates identified in our research, with the overall rate of multidrug resistance reaching 75.52% over the past five years. Using multivariate logistic analysis, being in the intensive care unit (ICU) (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 5.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.67-20.44), increased Pittsburgh bacteremia score (aOR, 6.55; 95% CI, 1.27-33.70) and use of carbapenem (aOR, 8.90; 95% CI, 1.71-46.30) were independent risk factors for MDR acquisition among patients with A. baumannii complex bacteremia. Older age (aOR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.00-1.04), being post-transplantation (aOR, 5.21; 95% CI, 1.13-24.04), having a higher Pittsburgh bacteremia score (aOR, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.08-4.47) and having a lower level of albumin (aOR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.88-0.99) were identified as independent risk factors for 30-day mortality in patients with MDR A. baumannii complex bacteremia. Conclusion In conclusion, our research revealed the risk factors associated with acquisition of and mortality from MDR A. baumannii complex bacteremia, which may be used to prioritize infection control practices and prognostic evaluations. PMID:26083415

  13. Clinical prediction rules in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia demonstrate the usefulness of reporting likelihood ratios in infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Bai, A D; Showler, A; Burry, L; Steinberg, M; Tomlinson, G A; Bell, C M; Morris, A M

    2016-09-01

    Infectious diseases specialists often use diagnostic tests to assess the probability of a disease based on knowledge of the diagnostic properties. It has become standard for published studies on diagnostic tests to report sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. Likelihood ratios are often omitted. We compared published clinical prediction rules in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia to illustrate the importance of likelihood ratios. We performed a narrative review comparing published clinical prediction rules used for excluding endocarditis in S. aureus bacteremia. Of nine published clinical prediction rules, only three studies reported likelihood ratios. Many studies concluded that the clinical prediction rule could safely exclude endocarditis based on high sensitivity and high negative predictive value. Of the studies with similar high sensitivity and high negative predictive value, calculated negative likelihood ratios were able to differentiate and identify the best clinical prediction rule for excluding endocarditis. Compared to sensitivity, specificity and predictive values, likelihood ratios can be more directly used to interpret diagnostic test results to assist in ruling in or ruling out a disease. Therefore, a new standard should be set to include likelihood ratios in reporting of diagnostic tests in infectious diseases research. PMID:27357965

  14. [Invasive pneumococcal disease in two non-vaccinated pediatric cases: pleural empyema and bacteremia].

    PubMed

    Kanık Yüksek, Saliha; Gülhan, Belgin; Tezer, Hasan; Özkaya Parlakay, Aslınur; Uzun Kenan, Bahriye; Sayed Oskovi, Hülya; Nar Ötgün, Selin

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, a gram-positive diplococcus, is the causative agent of invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPDs) characterized by severe infections such as bacteraemia, sepsis and meningitis. S.pneumoniae and IPDs are situated in the focus of the vaccine studies because of being encompassed of a significant burden of disease in the world, severe mortality and morbidities, and location in vaccine-preventable diseases group. Although S.pneumoniae has more than 90 defined serotypes, certain serotypes are often identified as the cause of IPDs. Individuals with comorbid and chronic diseases, primary or secondary immune deficiencies, and <2 years or >65 years of age are at increased risk for IPDs. Currently, a 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine and also 7, 10 and 13 valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccines (PCV) have been produced for pneumococci. Phase studies of protein based vaccines, which will provide protection independent of serotypes, and 15-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine are still ongoing. In Turkey, in November 2008 PCV7 and in April 2011 PCV13 have been implemented in the national immunization program. First case of the pneumococcal unvaccinated cases presented in this report was a 6-year-old girl patient with pneumonia and pleural empyema due to S.pneumoniae serotype 1, without any underlying risk factors. The other case is a 52-days-old male patient, who had a history of pneumococcal septicemia in the newborn period and was followed for bacteremia associated S.pneumoniae serotype 12B and diagnosed as complement deficiency on follow-up. S.pneumoniae serotype 1 is within serotypes covered by 10 and 13 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine that are in use today, and is a highly invasive strain often isolated in pneumococcal lobar pneumonia and empyema. S.pneumoniae serotype 12B is a non-vaccine serotype not included in any of conjugate and polysaccharide vaccines, and usually obtained in respiratory infections

  15. Case of recurrent Flavimonas oryzihabitans bacteremia associated with an implanted central venous catheter (Port-A-Cath): assessment of clonality by arbitrarily primed PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Verhasselt, B; Claeys, G; Elaichouni, A; Verschraegen, G; Laureys, G; Vaneechoutte, M

    1995-01-01

    Flavimonas oryzihabitans bacteremias, which occurred immediately after the flushing or use of an implanted central venous catheter (Port-A-Cath) in two patients at the same pediatric ward, were studied by arbitrarily primed PCR. We conclude that the colonization of the Port-A-Cath with F. oryzihabitans described here lasted for several months. PMID:8576374

  16. Impact of empirical treatment in extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. bacteremia. A multicentric cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to analyze the factors that are associated with the adequacy of empirical antibiotic therapy and its impact in mortality in a large cohort of patients with extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) - producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. bacteremia. Methods Cases of ESBL producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) bacteremia collected from 2003 through 2008 in 19 hospitals in Spain. Statistical analysis was performed using multivariate logistic regression. Results We analyzed 387 cases ESBL-E bloodstream infections. The main sources of bacteremia were urinary tract (55.3%), biliary tract (12.7%), intra-abdominal (8.8%) and unknown origin (9.6%). Among all the 387 episodes, E. coli was isolated from blood cultures in 343 and in 45.71% the ESBL-E was multidrug resistant. Empirical antibiotic treatment was adequate in 48.8% of the cases and the in hospital mortality was 20.9%. In a multivariate analysis adequacy was a risk factor for death [adjusted OR (95% CI): 0.39 (0.31-0.97); P = 0.04], but not in patients without severe sepsis or shock. The class of antibiotic used empirically was not associated with prognosis in adequately treated patients. Conclusion ESBL-E bacteremia has a relatively high mortality that is partly related with a low adequacy of empirical antibiotic treatment. In selected subgroups the relevance of the adequacy of empirical therapy is limited. PMID:23038999

  17. Combination Therapy With Lysin CF-301 and Antibiotic Is Superior to Antibiotic Alone for Treating Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus–Induced Murine Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Schuch, Raymond; Lee, Han M.; Schneider, Brent C.; Sauve, Karen L.; Law, Christina; Khan, Babar K.; Rotolo, Jimmy A.; Horiuchi, Yuki; Couto, Daniel E.; Raz, Assaf; Fischetti, Vincent A.; Huang, David B.; Nowinski, Robert C.; Wittekind, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Lysins are bacteriophage-derived enzymes that degrade bacterial peptidoglycans. Lysin CF-301 is being developed to treat Staphylococcus aureus because of its potent, specific, and rapid bacteriolytic effects. It also demonstrates activity on drug-resistant strains, has a low resistance profile, eradicates biofilms, and acts synergistically with antibiotics. CF-301 was bacteriolytic against 250 S. aureus strains tested including 120 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates. In time-kill studies with 62 strains, CF-301 reduced S. aureus by 3-log10 within 30 minutes compared to 6–12 hours required by antibiotics. In bacteremia, CF-301 increased survival by reducing blood MRSA 100-fold within 1 hour. Combinations of CF-301 with vancomycin or daptomycin synergized in vitro and increased survival significantly in staphylococcal-induced bacteremia compared to treatment with antibiotics alone (P < .0001). Superiority of CF-301 combinations with antibiotics was confirmed in 26 independent bacteremia studies. Combinations including CF-301 and antibiotics represent an attractive alternative to antibiotic monotherapies currently used to treat S. aureus bacteremia. PMID:24286983

  18. Factors Associated with Streptococcal Bacteremia in Diarrheal Children under Five Years of Age and Their Outcome in an Urban Hospital in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Abu Sadat Mohammad Sayeem Bin; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Shahunja, K. M.; Kabir, Senjuti; Chowdhury, Fahmida; Faruque, Abu Syeed Golam; Das, Sumon Kumar; Sarker, Mohammad Habibur Rahman; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer

    2016-01-01

    Background Although Streptococcal bacteremia is common in diarrheal children with high morbidity and mortality, no systematic data are available on Streptococcal bacteremia in diarrheal children. We sought to evaluate the factors associated with Streptococcal bacteremia in diarrheal children under five years of age and their outcome. Methods We used an unmatched case-control design to investigate the associated factors with Streptococcal bacteremia in all the diarrheal children under five years of age through electronic medical record system of Dhaka hospital of International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh. We had simultaneously used a retrospective cohort design to further evaluate the outcome of our study children. All the enrolled children had their blood culture done between January 2010 and December 2012. Comparison was made among the children with (cases = 26) and without Streptococcal bacteremia (controls = 78). Controls were selected randomly from hospitalized diarrheal children under five years of age. Results Cases had proportionately higher deaths compared to controls, but it was statistically insignificant (15% vs. 10%, p = 0.49). The cases more often presented with severe dehydration, fever, respiratory distress, severe sepsis, and abnormal mental status compared to the controls (for all p<0.05). In the logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, it has been found that Streptococcal bacteremia in diarrheal children under five years of age was independently associated with nutritional edema (OR: 5.86, 95% CI = 1.28–26.80), hypoxemia (OR: 19.39, 95% CI = 2.14–175.91), fever (OR: 4.44, 95% CI = 1.13–17.42), delayed capillary refill time (OR: 7.00, 95% CI = 1.36–35.93), and respiratory distress (OR: 2.69, 95% CI = 1.02–7.12). Conclusions and Significance The results of our analyses suggest that diarrheal children under five years of age presenting with nutritional edema, hypoxemia, fever, delayed

  19. Case Report: Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus: A New Cause of Human Infection, Inducing Bacteremia in a Patient on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Jie; Pei, Zhiheng; Lutwick, Larry; Dalal, Sharvari; Yang, Liying; Cassai, Nicholas; Sandhu, Kuldip; Hanna, Bruce; Wieczorek, Rosemary L.; Bluth, Martin; Pincus, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Paenibacilli are gram-positive, aerobic bacteria that are related to Bacilli but differ in the DNA encoding their 16S rRNA. Until recently, these organisms were not known to cause human disease. There are now several reports of human infection caused by a few members of this genus, most commonly by P. alvei. We report a human infection in a patient with a permacath for chronic hemodialysis who was found to have bacteremia caused by P. thiaminolyticus, which is an environmental bacterium that has never been found to cause human disease. We identified this bacterium by biochemical tests, cloning, sequencing the genomic DNA encoding its 16S rRNA, growth characteristics, and electron microscopic studies. This constitutes the first report of a human infection caused by this organism. PMID:18988935

  20. Functional polymorphisms in the gene encoding macrophage migration inhibitory factor are associated with Gram-negative bacteremia in older adults.

    PubMed

    Das, Rituparna; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Yang, Ivana V; van Duin, David; Levy, Rebecca; Piecychna, Marta; Leng, Lin; Montgomery, Ruth R; Shaw, Albert; Schwartz, David A; Bucala, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an immune mediator encoded in a functionally polymorphic locus. We found the genotype conferring low expression of MIF to be enriched in a cohort of 180 patients with gram-negative bacteremia, compared with 229 healthy controls (odds ratio [OR], 2.4; P = .04), an association that was more pronounced in older adults (OR, 4.6; P = .01). Among older subjects, those with low expression of MIF demonstrated 20% reduced MIF production from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood monocytes and 30% lower monocyte surface Toll-like receptor 4, compared with those with high expression. Our work suggests that older adults with low expression of MIF may be predisposed to hyporesponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide and gram-negative bacterial infection. PMID:24158957

  1. Functional Polymorphisms in the Gene Encoding Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Are Associated With Gram-Negative Bacteremia in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rituparna; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Yang, Ivana V.; van Duin, David; Levy, Rebecca; Piecychna, Marta; Leng, Lin; Montgomery, Ruth R.; Shaw, Albert; Schwartz, David A.; Bucala, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an immune mediator encoded in a functionally polymorphic locus. We found the genotype conferring low expression of MIF to be enriched in a cohort of 180 patients with gram-negative bacteremia, compared with 229 healthy controls (odds ratio [OR], 2.4; P = .04), an association that was more pronounced in older adults (OR, 4.6; P = .01). Among older subjects, those with low expression of MIF demonstrated 20% reduced MIF production from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood monocytes and 30% lower monocyte surface Toll-like receptor 4, compared with those with high expression. Our work suggests that older adults with low expression of MIF may be predisposed to hyporesponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide and gram-negative bacterial infection. PMID:24158957

  2. Emergence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in blood isolates causing bacteremia: molecular epidemiology and microbiologic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cha, Min Kyeong; Kang, Cheol-In; Kim, So Hyun; Cho, Sun Young; Ha, Young Eun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2016-06-01

    Among 127 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates causing bacteremia, 41 (32.3%) were nonsusceptible to levofloxacin, in which four sequence types and 24 diverse allelic profiles were detected. The most prevalent ST was ST77 (n = 8, 19.5%), followed by ST28 (n = 3, 7.3%). Amino acid substitutions were found in the gyrB and parC genes of 10 and 1 isolates, respectively. No amino acid substitutions were identified in gyrA. Twenty-three (56.1%) isolates showed amino acid substitutions in the parE gene. These results suggest that quinolone resistance-determining regions of parE may not be the primary targets, but an important determining factor of high levels of fluoroquinolone resistance. PMID:27117514

  3. Bacteremia due to Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides in a Patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Akiko; Fujieda, Atsushi; Katayama, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Leuconostoc species are vancomycin-resistant Gram-positive cocci. Infections due to Leuconostoc species have been reported in various immunocompromised patients, but little is known about such infection in patients with hematologic malignancies. We report a case of Leuconostoc infection in a 44-year-old woman with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The patient developed a high fever despite antimicrobial therapy with doripenem after induction chemotherapy. After an isolate from blood cultures was identified as L. pseudomesenteroides, we changed the antibiotics to piperacillin-tazobactam and gentamicin, after which the patient recovered from the infection. Physicians should be aware of Leuconostoc species as causative pathogen if they encounter Gram-positive cocci bacteremia resistant to standard antibiotics such as vancomycin and teicoplanin, especially in patients with hematologic malignancies.

  4. A Case of Acute Pyogenic Sacroiliitis and Bacteremia Caused by Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suyoung; Lee, Kang Lock; Baek, Hae Lim; Jang, Seung Jun; Moon, Song Mi

    2013-01-01

    Pyogenic sacroiliitis is a rare osteoarticular infection, occurring most frequently in children and young adults. Diagnosis of the disease is challenging because of a general lack of awareness of the disease and its nonspecific signs and symptoms. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common causative bacteria in pyogenic sacroiliitis. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has typically been considered a hospital-associated pathogen; however, community-acquired (CA)-MRSA infections are becoming increasingly common in Korea. We report the first domestic case of acute pyogenic sacroiliitis with abscess and bacteremia caused by CA-MRSA. The pathogen carried the type IV-A staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) without the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene, and was identified as sequence type (ST) 72 by multilocus sequence typing. PMID:24475359

  5. A case of bacteremia caused by Dialister pneumosintes and Slackia exigua in a patient with periapical abscess.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Young; Kim, Young Jin; Gu, Hyun Jung; Lee, Hee Joo

    2016-04-01

    Dialister pneumosintes and Slackia exigua are both obligatory anaerobe and known to be associated with periodontal diseases and other oral infection. We report a case of blood stream infection caused by D. pneumosintes and S. exigua. This occurred in a 78-year-old female patient that presented with general weakness and fever. We revealed that she had a periapical absecess. The blood culture was positive for D. pneumosintes and S. exigua; however, identifying them was challenging. Ultimately, 16S rRNA sequencing was used to identify the organisms. The patient recovered after being treated with ceftriaxone and clindamycin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of bacteremia caused by mixed infection of D. pneumosintes and S. exigua. PMID:26612007

  6. Glucocorticoid and antibiotic effects on hepatic microcirculation and associated host responses in lethal gram-negative bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Balis, J U; Paterson, J F; Shelley, S A; Larson, C H; Fareed, J; Gerber, L I

    1979-01-01

    Liver changes and associated host responses were evaluated in four groups of male rats, weighing 300 +/- 20 gm., which received intravenous injection of 2.2 times 10(9) live Escherichia coli. This bolus was given either without additional treatment (group A) or prior to the following regimens: intramuscular injection of gentamicin sulfate, 5 mg. per kg. (group B); intravenous injection of methylprednisolone sodium succinate, 40 mg. per kg. (group C); and intramuscular injection of gentamicin immediately after methylprednisolone sodium succinate treatment (group D). Rats given injections of saline or methylprednisolone sodium succinate served as controls. Survival rates at 10 and 20 hours were 25 per cent and 4 per cent for group A; 44 per cent and 28 per cent for group B; 94 per cent and 70 per cent for group C; 98 per cent and 98 per cent for group D, respectively. In rats of groups A and B, killed at 1, 2, 4, and 6 hours, progressive liver changes included intravascular sequestration of rapidly degranulating leukocytes, fibrinous deposits, and platelet aggregates in sinusoids as well as in spaces of Disse adjacent to subendothelial collagen, and extensive Kupffer cell disruption in association with severe midzonal necrosis. These alterations were accompanied by progressive hypoglycemia and elevations of serum enzymes, glutamic pyruvic transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, and glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase. Hematologic studies revealed that E. coli bacteremia results in rapid leukopenia and disseminated intravascular coagulation primarily due to activation of the intrinsic coagulation pathway. All above reactions were delayed and markedly reduced in rats treated with methylprednisolone sodium succinate. The results indicate that antibiotic treatment of lethal, Gram-negative bacteremia is effective only in conjunction with early steroid treatment. The protective effects of glucocorticoids on the liver microcirculation and polymorphonuclear leukocytes appear to

  7. Attenuation of Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Bacteremia by Human Mini-Antibodies Targeting the Complement Inhibitory Protein Efb.

    PubMed

    Georgoutsou-Spyridonos, Maria; Ricklin, Daniel; Pratsinis, Haris; Perivolioti, Eustathia; Pirmettis, Ioannis; Garcia, Brandon L; Geisbrecht, Brian V; Foukas, Periklis G; Lambris, John D; Mastellos, Dimitrios C; Sfyroera, Georgia

    2015-10-15

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause a broad range of potentially fatal inflammatory complications (e.g., sepsis and endocarditis). Its emerging antibiotic resistance and formidable immune evasion arsenal have emphasized the need for more effective antimicrobial approaches. Complement is an innate immune sensor that rapidly responds to bacterial infection eliciting C3-mediated opsonophagocytic and immunomodulatory responses. Extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) is a key immune evasion protein of S. aureus that intercepts complement at the level of C3. To date, Efb has not been explored as a target for mAb-based antimicrobial therapeutics. In this study, we have isolated donor-derived anti-Efb IgGs that attenuate S. aureus survival through enhanced neutrophil killing. A phage library screen yielded mini-Abs that selectively inhibit the interaction of Efb with C3 partly by disrupting contacts essential for complex formation. Surface plasmon resonance-based kinetic analysis enabled the selection of mini-Abs with favorable Efb-binding profiles as therapeutic leads. Mini-Ab-mediated blockade of Efb attenuated S. aureus survival in a whole blood model of bacteremia. This neutralizing effect was associated with enhanced neutrophil-mediated killing of S. aureus, increased C5a release, and modulation of IL-6 secretion. Finally, these mini-Abs afforded protection from S. aureus-induced bacteremia in a murine renal abscess model, attenuating bacterial inflammation in kidneys. Overall, these findings are anticipated to pave the way toward novel Ab-based therapeutics for S. aureus-related diseases. PMID:26342032

  8. Impact of Combination Antimicrobial Therapy on Mortality Risk for Critically Ill Patients with Carbapenem-Resistant Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Seth R.; Neuner, Elizabeth A.; Lam, Simon W.

    2015-01-01

    There are limited treatment options for carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative infections. Currently, there are suggestions in the literature that combination therapy should be used, which frequently includes antibiotics to which the causative pathogen demonstrates in vitro resistance. This case-control study evaluated risk factors associated with all-cause mortality rates for critically ill patients with carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteremia. Adult patients who were admitted to an intensive care unit with sepsis and a blood culture positive for Gram-negative bacteria resistant to a carbapenem were included. Patients with polymicrobial, recurrent, or breakthrough infections were excluded. Included patients were classified as survivors (controls) or nonsurvivors (cases) at 30 days after the positive blood culture. Of 302 patients screened, 168 patients were included, of whom 90 patients died (53.6% [cases]) and 78 survived (46.4% [controls]) at 30 days. More survivors received appropriate antibiotics (antibiotics with in vitro activity) than did nonsurvivors (93.6% versus 53.3%; P < 0.01). Combination therapy, defined as multiple appropriate agents given for 48 h or more, was more common among survivors than nonsurvivors (32.1% versus 7.8%; P < 0.01); however, there was no difference in multiple-agent use when in vitro activity was not considered (including combinations with carbapenems) (87.2% versus 80%; P = 0.21). After adjustment for baseline factors with multivariable logistic regression, combination therapy was independently associated with decreased risk of death (odds ratio, 0.19 [95% confidence interval, 0.06 to 0.56]; P < 0.01). These data suggest that combination therapy with multiple agents with in vitro activity is associated with improved survival rates for critically ill patients with carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteremia. However, that association is lost if in vitro activity is not considered. PMID:25845872

  9. Invasive pneumococcal bacteremia in a 9-year-old boy caused by serotype 1: course, treatment and costs.

    PubMed

    Jackowska, Teresa; Zaleska-Ponganis, Joanna; Dziurda, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacteremia, sepsis, meningitis, pneumonia, sinusitis, and acute otitis media in young children. Some serotypes are associated with particular disease syndromes, such as complicated pneumonias in children, or with higher rates of hospitalization in children and are consistently responsible for outbreaks in certain populations. In this report we describe a case of a nine-year-old boy who developed an abscess of pleura and invasive pneumococcal bacteremia. The boy was admitted to the hospital with abdominal pain and vomiting, accompanied by mild cough and fever. Chest X-ray revealed lower left lobe consolidation with pleural inflammation and chest CT showed extensive interstitial-alveolar changes in the left lung with atelectasis and pleural effusion causing a reduction in lung volume up to the fourth rib. From the 6(th) day of hospitalization on, suction drainage and intrapleural administration of alteplase were continued for 5 days. Intravenous antibiotics were administered for subsequent 32 days. The course of disease was complicated with labial herpes and acute adenoviral gastroenteritis. The costs of diagnosis (11.7%), pharmacotherapy (55.2%), hospitalization (30.7%) and additional procedures (2.4%) were about 4,444, while the cost of treatment from the perspective of the National Health Fund was only 1,508. The costs of treating the boy with sepsis caused by S. pneumoniae serotype 1 were thus about three times higher than those from the perspective of providers of the National Health Fund. Administration of a new pneumococcal conjugated vaccine containing serotype 1 (PHiD-CV10 or PCV13) could have prevented invasive pneumococcal disease in the described patient. PMID:22826075

  10. A retrospective cohort study of panipenem/betamipron for adult pneumococcal bacteremia at three teaching hospitals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiromichi; Tokuda, Yasuharu; Shichi, Daisuke; Hitomi, Shigemi; Ishikawa, Hiroichi; Maeno, Tetsuhiro; Nakamura, Hidenori

    2013-08-01

    Panipenem/betamipron (PAPM/BP) may be highly effective for life-threatening Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. However, the efficacy of PAPM/BP for S. pneumoniae infections has not been compared with that of other antimicrobial agents. We retrospectively compared PAPM/BP with other carbapenems for treatment of life-threatening infections in newly hospitalized adults with pneumococcal bacteremia. Clinical information for cases of pneumococcal bacteremia was collected from three teaching hospitals in Japan from January 2003 to December 2010. In total, 17 patients who received PAPM/BP therapy and 34 treated with other carbapenems (27 with meropenem, 4 with imipenem/cilastatin, and 3 with biapenem) were identified. The mean age (71 vs. 70 years old), sex distribution (women, 29 vs. 21 %), Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) (1.5 vs. 1.6), and rates of septic shock (29 vs. 38 %), and meningitis (5.9 vs. 8.8 %) did not differ significantly between the two groups. The inpatient mortality rates were lower in the PAPM/BP group (12 vs. 44 %, p = 0.03). Multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, CCI, and severe sepsis/septic shock showed that use of other carbapenems was associated with higher in-hospital mortality, with an odds ratio of 6.922 (95 % CI, 1.171-40.92) compared to PAPM/BP therapy. Initial PAPM/BP therapy might have a therapeutic advantage over other carbapenems in treatment of severe Streptococcus pneumoniae infections. PMID:23203218

  11. Evaluation of a simple blood culture amplification and antigen detection method for diagnosis of Salmonella enterica serovar typhi bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Castonguay-Vanier, Josée; Davong, Viengmon; Bouthasavong, Latsanyphone; Sengdetka, Davanh; Simmalavong, Manivone; Seupsavith, Amphayvanh; Dance, David A B; Baker, Stephen; Le Thi Phuong, Tu; Vongsouvath, Manivanh; Newton, Paul N

    2013-01-01

    In most areas where typhoid is endemic, laboratory diagnosis is not possible due to the lack of appropriate facilities. We investigated whether the combination of blood culture amplification of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi with an S. Typhi antigen rapid diagnostic test (RDT) could be an accurate and inexpensive tool for the accelerated diagnosis of patients with acute typhoid in Laos. For a panel of 23 Gram-negative reference pathogens, the Standard Diagnostics (catalog no. 15FK20; Kyonggi-do, South Korea) RDT gave positive results for S. Typhi NCTC 8385, S. Typhi NCTC 786 (Vi negative), Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (ATCC 13076), and Salmonella enterica serovar Ndolo NCTC 8700 (all group D). In a prospective study of 6,456 blood culture bottles from 3,028 patients over 15 months, 392 blood culture bottles (6.1%) from 221 (7.3%) patients had Gram-negative rods (GNRs) seen in the blood culture fluid. The sensitivity, negative predictive value, specificity, and positive predictive value were 96.7%, 99.5%, 97.9%, and 87.9%, respectively, for patients with proven S. Typhi bacteremia and 91.2%, 98.4%, 98.9%, and 93.9% for patients with group D Salmonella. The median (range) number of days between diagnosis by RDT and reference assays was 1 (-1 to +2) day for those with confirmed S. Typhi. The use of antigen-based pathogen detection in blood culture fluid may be a useful, relatively rapid, inexpensive, and accurate technique for the identification of important causes of bacteremia in the tropics. PMID:23100346

  12. Association of teichoic acid antibody with metastatic sequelae of catheter-associated Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: a failure of the two-week antibiotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, L L; Antopol, S C; Simberkoff, M S; Rahal, J J

    1979-02-01

    A patient with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia associated with an infected intravenous catheter was treated with oxacillin for two weeks. During that period all blood cultures were sterile, he rapidly became afebrile, and there were no signs of endocarditis or metastatic abscesses. However, serum antibodies against staphylococcal teichoic acid, initially undetectable by the agar gel immunodiffusion technic, became positive during the second week of treatment. Three weeks after discharge, the patient was readmitted to the hospital because of back pain and weakness in the lower extremities. Vertebral osteomyelitis and a spinal epidural abscess caused by Staph. aureus of the same phage type as the bacteremic isolate were demonstrated. This case illustrates the importance of careful follow-up of patients with Staph. aureus bacteremia and the potential value of serial measurement of teichoic acid antibodies in detecting clinically inapparent complications of infection. PMID:425975

  13. Bacteremia due to Pasteurella dagmatis acquired from a dog bite, with a review of systemic infections and challenges in laboratory identification

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jianhui; Krajden, Sigmund; Kus, Julianne V; Rawte, Prasad; Blondal, John; Downing, Mark; Zurawska, Urszula; Chapman, William

    2015-01-01

    A case of bacteremia in a 74-year-old man, which was caused by Pasteurella dagmatis and complicated by thrombocytopenia, is presented. Microorganism identification was performed by the provincial reference laboratory using traditional biochemical profiling, completmented with both the sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry; antibiotic-susceptibility testing was also performed. After treatment with the appropriate antibiotics, the patient fully recovered. Systemic infections attributed to this organism are rarely reported in the literature. Other reported cases of bacteremia due to P dagmatis are reviewed and compared with the present case. The challenges of relying on standard automatic identification are discussed, with alternative methodologies provided. PMID:26600817

  14. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Bacteremia without Endocarditis: Rapid Identification from Positive Blood Culture by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry. A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Principe, Luigi; Bracco, Silvia; Mauri, Carola; Tonolo, Silvia; Pini, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a Gram-positive bacillus that is infrequently responsible for infections in humans. Three forms have been classified: a localized cutaneous form (erysipeloid) caused by traumatic penetration of E. rhusiopathiae, a generalized cutaneous form and a septicemic form. The latter type of disease has been previously associated with a high incidence of endocarditis. Here we report a case of E. rhusiopathiae bacteremia in a 74-year-old man, probably started from an erysipeloid form, in which endocarditis did not develop. This case presents some particular and uncommon features: i) no correlation with animal source; ii) correlation between bacteremia and erysipeloid lesion; iii) absence of endocarditis. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry allowed to obtain a rapid identification (within 4 hours from bottle positivity) of E. rhusiopathiae. Together with direct antimicrobial susceptibility testing, this approach could improve the rate of appropriate therapy for bloodstream infections due to this fastidious pathogen. PMID:27103974

  15. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Bacteremia without Endocarditis: Rapid Identification from Positive Blood Culture by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry. A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Principe, Luigi; Bracco, Silvia; Mauri, Carola; Tonolo, Silvia; Pini, Beatrice; Luzzaro, Francesco

    2016-03-21

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a Gram-positive bacillus that is infrequently responsible for infections in humans. Three forms have been classified: a localized cutaneous form (erysipeloid) caused by traumatic penetration of E. rhusiopathiae, a generalized cutaneous form and a septicemic form. The latter type of disease has been previously associated with a high incidence of endocarditis. Here we report a case of E. rhusiopathiae bacteremia in a 74-year-old man, probably started from an erysipeloid form, in which endocarditis did not develop. This case presents some particular and uncommon features: i) no correlation with animal source; ii) correlation between bacteremia and erysipeloid lesion; iii) absence of endocarditis. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry allowed to obtain a rapid identification (within 4 hours from bottle positivity) of E. rhusiopathiae. Together with direct antimicrobial susceptibility testing, this approach could improve the rate of appropriate therapy for bloodstream infections due to this fastidious pathogen. PMID:27103974

  16. Seasonal Variation of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae Bacteremia According to Acquisition and Patient Characteristics: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Gradel, Kim Oren; Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Pedersen, Court; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Østergaard, Christian; Arpi, Magnus; Jensen, Thøger Gorm; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Søgaard, Mette; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Seasonal variation is a characteristic of many infectious diseases, but relatively little is known about determinants thereof. We studied the impact of place of acquisition and patient characteristics on seasonal variation of bacteremia caused by the 3 most common pathogens. DESIGN Seasonal variation analysis. METHODS In 3 Danish health regions (2.3 million total inhabitants), patients with bacteremia were identified from 2000 through 2011 using information from laboratory information systems. Analyses were confined to Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Additional data were obtained from the Danish National Hospital Registry for the construction of admission histories and calculation of the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). Bacteremias were categorized as community acquired, healthcare associated (HCA), and hospital acquired. We defined multiple subgroups by combining the following characteristics: species, acquisition, age group, gender, CCI level, and location of infection. Assuming a sinusoidal model, seasonal variation was assessed by the peak-to-trough (PTT) ratio with a 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULTS In total, we included 16,006 E. coli, 6,924 S. aureus, and 4,884 S. pneumoniae bacteremia cases. For E. coli, the seasonal variation was highest for community-acquired cases (PTT ratio, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.17-1.32), was diminished for HCA (PTT ratio, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.04-1.25), and was missing for hospital-acquired cases. No seasonal variation was observed for S. aureus. S. pneumoniae showed high seasonal variation, which did not differ according to acquisition (overall PTT ratio, 3.42; 95% CI, 3.10-3.83). CONCLUSIONS Seasonal variation was mainly related to the species although the place of acquisition was important for E. coli. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:946-953. PMID:27142942

  17. A Propensity Score Analysis Shows that Empirical Treatment with Linezolid Does Not Increase the Thirty-Day Mortality Rate in Patients with Gram-Negative Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Ternavasio-de la Vega, Hugo-Guillermo; Mateos-Díaz, Ana-María; Martinez, Jose-Antonio; Almela, Manel; Cobos-Trigueros, Nazaret; Morata, Laura; De-la-Calle, Cristina; Sala, Marta; Mensa, Josep; Soriano, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The role of linezolid in empirical therapy of suspected bacteremia remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of empirical use of linezolid or glycopeptides in addition to other antibiotics on the 30-day mortality rates in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. For this purpose, 1,126 patients with Gram-negative bacteremia in the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona from 2000 to 2012 were included in this study. In order to compare the mortality rates between patients who received linezolid or glycopeptides, the propensity scores on baseline variables were used to balance the treatment groups, and both propensity score matching and propensity-adjusted logistic regression were used to compare the 30-day mortality rates between the groups. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 16.0% during the study period. Sixty-eight patients received empirical treatment with linezolid, and 1,058 received glycopeptides. The propensity score matching included 64 patients in each treatment group. After matching, the mortality rates were 14.1% (9/64) in patients who received glycopeptides and 21.9% (14/64) in those who received linezolid, and a nonsignificant association between empirical linezolid treatment and mortality rate (odds ratio [OR], 1.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69 to 3.82; P = 0.275, McNemar's test) was found. This association remained nonsignificant when variables that remained unbalanced after matching were included in a conditional logistic regression model. Further, the stratified propensity score analysis did not show any significant relationship between empirical linezolid treatment and the mortality rate after adjustment by propensity score quintiles or other variables potentially associated with mortality. In conclusion, the propensity score analysis showed that empirical treatment with linezolid compared with that with glycopeptides was not associated with 30-day mortality rates in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. PMID:25199780

  18. Clinical Usefulness of the 2010 Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute Revised Breakpoints for Cephalosporin Use in the Treatment of Bacteremia Caused by Escherichia coli or Klebsiella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Nam Su; Chung, Hae-Sun; Choi, Jun Yong; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon; Kim, June Myung; Chong, Yunsop

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the clinical usefulness of the revised 2010 Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) breakpoints for Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. Of 2,623 patients with bacteremia caused by E. coli or Klebsiella spp., 573 who had been treated appropriately with cephalosporin based on the CLSI 2009 guidelines were enrolled. There were no differences in the rates of treatment failure or mortality between the appropriately and inappropriately treated groups according to the CLSI 2010 guidelines. Additionally, in the matched case-control analysis, the treatment failure rate was higher in bacteremic patients with extended-spectrum β-lactamase- (ESBL-) producing but cephalosporin-susceptible organisms than in those with ESBL-nonproducing isolates when patients with urinary tract infections were excluded (44% and 0%, resp., P = 0.026). In patients with bacteremia caused by E. coli or Klebsiella spp., the revised CLSI 2010 guidelines did not lead to poorer outcomes. However, ESBL production appeared to be associated with poor clinical outcomes in patients with bacteremia from sources other than the urinary tract. PMID:25793209

  19. Effect of neonatal gastrointestinal colonization with cross reacting Escherichia coli on anticapsular antibody production and bacteremia in experimental Haemophilus influenzae type b disease of rats.

    PubMed

    Myerowitz, R L; Norden, C W

    1977-07-01

    Neonatal gastrointestinal colonization of newborn rats with Escherichia coli 075:K100:H5, cross-reactive with the capsular polysaccharide of Haemophilus influenzae type b, was harmless but failed to stimulated detectable ( greater than 200 ng/ml) serum anticapsular antibodies. Neonatally colonized rats, when challenged at age 13 weeks by intraperitoneal inoculation of H. influenzae b, showed no difference in the frequency, magnitude, or duration of bacteremia or in the postinfection anticapsular antibody response when compared with saline-fed controls. However, neonatally colonized rats challenged at age 4 weeks had a significantly decreased incidence of sustained bacteremia and/or endophthalmitis when compared with controls. This decreased frequency of disease correlated with a significant increase in postinfection serum anticapsular antibodies. Neonatal gastrointestinal colonization with cross-reacting E. coli appears to "prime" the young host to respond to infection with H. influenzae b with an anticapsular antibody response that protects against sustained H. influenzae b bacteremia and its complications. PMID:328398

  20. Acute abdomen due to group A streptococcus bacteremia caused by an isolate with a mutation in the csrS gene.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Masahiko; Maruta, Masaki; Shikata, Hisaharu; Hanayama, Masakazu; Ikebe, Tadayoshi

    2015-11-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) is an aerobic gram-positive coccus that causes infections ranging from non-invasive pharyngitis to severely invasive necrotizing fasciitis. Mutations in csrS/csrR and rgg, negative regulator genes of group A streptococcus, are crucial factors in the pathogenesis of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, which is a severe, invasive infection characterized by sudden onset of shock and multiorgan failure, resulting in a high mortality rate. Here we present a case of group A streptococcal bacteremia in a 28-year-old Japanese woman with no relevant previous medical history. The patient developed progressive abdominal symptoms that may have been due to spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, followed by a state of shock, which did not fulfill the proposed criteria for streptococcal toxic shock. The isolate was found to harbor a mutation in the negative regulator csrS gene, whereas the csrR and rgg genes were intact. It was noteworthy that this strain carrying a csrS mutation had caused group A streptococcal bacteremia characterized by acute abdomen as the presenting symptom in a young individual who had been previously healthy. This case indicates that group A streptococcus with csrS mutations has potential virulence factors that are associated with the onset of group A streptococcal bacteremia that does not meet the diagnostic criteria for streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. PMID:26231317

  1. Fatal bacteremia due to immotile Vibrio cholerae serogroup O21 in Vientiane, Laos – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Nakatsu, Masami; Arakawa, Eiji; Davong, Viengmone; Vongsouvath, Manivanh; Lattana, Olay; Moore, Catrin E; Nakamura, Satoshi; Newton, Paul N

    2008-01-01

    Background Human infections with non-O1, non-O139 V. cholerae have been described from Laos. Elsewhere, non cholera-toxin producing, non-O1, non-O139 V. cholerae have been described from blood cultures and ascitic fluid, although they are exceedingly rare isolates. Case presentation We describe a farmer who died with Vibrio cholerae O21 bacteremia and peritonitis in Vientiane, Laos, after eating partially cooked apple snails (Pomacea canaliculata) and mussels (Ligumia species). The cultured V. cholerae were non-motile. PCR detected ompW and toxR gene regions but not the ctxA, ompU, omp K and TCP gene regions. Although the organisms lacked flagellae on scanning electron microscopy, they possessed the Vibrio flagellin flaA gene. Conclusion Severe bacteremic non-O1, non-O139 V. cholerae is reported from Laos. The organisms were unusual in being non-motile. They possessed the Vibrio flagellin flaA gene. Further research to determine the reasons for the non-motility and virulence is required. PMID:18439249

  2. A recommendation to perform a blood culture before the administration of intravenous antibiotics increased the detection of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Jogenfors, A; Stark, L; Svefors, J; Löfgren, S; Malmvall, B-E; Matussek, A

    2014-05-01

    In 2004, the Surviving Sepsis Campaign was launched to increase awareness and improve the outcome of severe sepsis. Accordingly, in Jönköping County, Sweden, a strong recommendation to perform a blood culture before the start of intravenous antibiotic treatment was introduced in 2007. Moreover, a reminder was included in the laboratory report to consult an infectious disease specialist when Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from a blood culture. Retrospectively, patients with at least one blood culture growing S. aureus during 2002 through 2003 (pre intervention n = 58) or during 2008 through 2009 (post intervention n = 100) were included. Medical records were evaluated regarding clinical data and outcome. Blood culture isolates were characterized by antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) and S. aureus protein A (spa) gene typing. The annual incidence of S. aureus bacteremia (SAB) increased from 28 per 100,000 inhabitants at the pre intervention period to 45 per 100,000 at the post intervention period (p = 0.046). During post intervention, the SAB incidence was significantly higher in men (p = 0.009). The mortality rate during hospital stay was 14 % during pre intervention and 18 % during post intervention (p = 0.47). The most common spa types were t012 and t084. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign resulted in an increased number of detected cases of SAB. The mortality rate was the same before and after the intervention, and no spa type correlated to certain clinical manifestations or mortality. PMID:24249284

  3. Risk factors for vancomycin-resistant enterococcus bacteremia and its influence on survival after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tavadze, M; Rybicki, L; Mossad, S; Avery, R; Yurch, M; Pohlman, B; Duong, H; Dean, R; Hill, B; Andresen, S; Hanna, R; Majhail, N; Copelan, E; Bolwell, B; Kalaycio, M; Sobecks, R

    2014-10-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) is a well-known infectious complication among immunocompromised patients. We performed a retrospective analysis to identify risk factors for the development of VRE bacteremia (VRE-B) within 15 months after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) and to determine its prognostic importance for other post-transplant outcomes. Eight hundred consecutive adult patients who underwent alloHCT for hematologic diseases from 1997 to 2011 were included. Seventy-six (10%) developed VRE-B at a median of 46 days post transplant. Year of transplant, higher HCT comorbidity score, a diagnosis of ALL, unrelated donor and umbilical cord blood donor were all significant risk factors on multivariable analysis for the development of VRE-B. Sixty-seven (88%) died within a median of 1.1 months after VRE-B, but only four (6%) of these deaths were attributable to VRE. VRE-B was significantly associated with worse OS (hazard ratio 4.28, 95% confidence interval 3.23-5.66, P<0.001) in multivariable analysis. We conclude that the incidence of VRE-B after alloHCT has increased over time and is highly associated with mortality, although not usually attributable to VRE infection. Rather than being the cause, this may be a marker for a complicated post-transplant course. Strategies to further enhance immune reconstitution post transplant and strict adherence to infection prevention measures are warranted. PMID:25111516

  4. Controlled evaluation of the agar-slide and radiometric blood culture systems for the detection of bacteremia and fungemia.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, M P; Reller, L B; Mirrett, S; Stratton, C W; Reimer, L G; Wang, W L

    1986-01-01

    A commercially available agar-slide blood culture bottle (Septi-Chek; Roche Diagnostics, Div. Hoffman-La Roche, Inc., Nutley, N.J.) was compared with the radiometric blood culture system (BACTEC; Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.) in 8,544 paired blood cultures from adult patients. The systems were inoculated with equal volumes (10 ml) of blood. Overall, there was no statistically significant difference between the two systems in the recovery of clinically important microorganisms, but significantly more members of the family Enterobacteriaceae other than Escherichia coli were detected by the agar-slide system (P less than 0.005). The agar-slide system detected more fungi, and the BACTEC detected more anaerobic bacteria; however, small numbers of recovered organisms precluded statistical significance. When microorganisms grew in both systems, their presence was detected one or more days earlier in the BACTEC (P less than 0.001). More contaminants grew in the agar-slide system (P less than 0.001). Both systems performed well, and either system should provide high yield and prompt detection of positive blood cultures in patients with bacteremia and fungemia if used in an optimal way as recommended by the respective manufacturers. PMID:3517047

  5. The Incidence of Central Line–Associated Bacteremia After the Introduction of Midline Catheters in a Ventilator Unit Population

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rahul; Patel, Anish; Enuh, Hilary; Adekunle, Oluwaseyi; Shrisgantharajah, Vasanthy; Diaz, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis Our objective was to evaluate whether the use of midline venous catheters in place of central line venous catheters, when appropriate, decreased the overall incidence of central line–associated bacteremia in a ventilator unit. Methods The time interval between February 2012 and February 2013 was divided into 2 periods. Group A was the first half of the year, before the introduction of midline catheters, and group B was the second half of the year, 6 months after their introduction. Central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) was calculated using the equation: (total number of CLABSI/total number of catheter days) × 1000. The Z test was used for proportions between independent groups to compare the significance in the difference in CLABSI between groups A and B. Results There was a significant decrease in the total number of catheter days on the ventilator unit in group A from 2408 catheter days in 1 year (August 1, 2011, to July 31, 2012) before the introduction of midline catheters to 1521 catheter days in group B in the following year (November 1, 2012, to October 31, 2013; P < 0.05 for both groups). Conclusions Midline catheters in place of central lines decrease the rate of CLABSI in a ventilator unit. In addition, no bloodstream infections were associated with midline catheters. PMID:25972725

  6. Highly Drug-Resistant Pathogens Implicated in Burn-Associated Bacteremia in an Iraqi Burn Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Ronat, Jean-Baptiste; Kakol, Jabar; Khoury, Marwan N.; Berthelot, Mathilde; Yun, Oliver; Brown, Vincent; Murphy, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective In low- and middle-income countries, bloodstream infections are an important cause of mortality in patients with burns. Increasingly implicated in burn-associated infections are highly drug-resistant pathogens with limited treatment options. We describe the epidemiology of bloodstream infections in patients with burns in a humanitarian surgery project in Iraq. Methods We performed a retrospective, descriptive study of blood culture isolates identified between July 2008 and September 2009 among patients with burns in a single hospital in Iraq who developed sepsis. Results In 1169 inpatients admitted to the burn unit during the study period, 212 (18%) had suspected sepsis, and 65 (6%) had confirmed bacteremia. Sepsis was considered the primary cause of death in 198 patients (65%; 95% CI 65–70) of the 304 patients that died. The most commonly isolated organisms were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (22 isolates [34%]), Staphylococcus aureus (17 [26%]), Klebsiella pneumoniae (8 [12%]), Staphylococcus epidermidis (7 [11%]), Acinetobacter baumannii (6 [9%]), and Enterobacter cloacae (5 [8%]). A high proportion of Enterobacteriaceae strains produced extended-spectrum beta-lactamase and S. aureus isolates were uniformly methicillin-resistant. For gram-negative bacteria, the most reliably active antibiotics were imipenen and amikacin. Conclusions Burn patients with sepsis in Iraq were commonly found to have bloodstream pathogens resistant to most antibiotics available locally. Effective empirical therapy of burn sepsis in this region of Iraq would consist of vancomycin or teicoplanin and a carbapenem-class antibiotic with antipseudomonal activity. PMID:25111170

  7. Bacteremia with the bovis group streptococci: species identification and association with infective endocarditis and with gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Marmolin, Ea S; Hartmeyer, Gitte N; Christensen, Jens J; Nielsen, Xiaohui C; Dargis, Rimtas; Skov, Marianne N; Knudsen, Elisa; Kemp, Michael; Justesen, Ulrik S

    2016-06-01

    DNA sequencing of the intergenic spacer (ITS) region was used to identify 53 blood culture isolates that had previously been designated to the bovis group streptococci and clinical data was collected retrospectively from patients' records using a standardized protocol. ITS sequencing identified 19 (35.8%) isolates as Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus, 12 (22.6%) as S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus, two (3.8%) as S. gallolyticus subsp. macedonicus, seven (13.2%) as S. infantarius subsp. infantarius, 12 (22.6%) as S. lutetiensis and one (1.9%) as S. equinus. The association of S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus with colorectal neoplasia and with infective endocarditis and the association between S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus and pancreatic cancer were found to be clinically important. Also, a very high 1-year mortality rate with S. lutetiensis (66.7%) and S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus (58.7%) bacteremia calls for intensive investigation for underlying disease focusing on the pancreas and the hepatobiliary system. PMID:27117515

  8. A case report of bacteremia manifesting as an overwhelming postsplenectomy infection due to Streptococcus pneumoniae post vaccination.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Kosuke; Okabe, Hirohisa; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Ikegami, Toru; Harimoto, Norifumi; Itoh, Shinji; Kimura, Koichi; Baba, Hideo; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    A 62-year-old woman was admitted for acute epigastralgia and high-grade fever of over 39 °C. The patient had undergone splenectomy for idiopathic portal hypertension 1 year ago and vaccination against Streptococcus pneumoniae immediately post operation. She developed localized peritoneal irritation and abdominal distension. Her serum creatinine had increased to 1.5 mg/dL and procalcitonin was 12.5 ng/ml. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed edematous large intestine and increased ascites. From these results, the patient was considered to have spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). Vancomycin (VCM) and doripenem (DRPM) were administered to control the infection. Unexpectedly, S. pneumoniae was detected in the blood culture. Hence, ampicillin/sulbactam was administered after discontinuing VCM. The patient recovered without any life-threatening complications and was discharged after 10 days. In conclusion, overwhelming postsplenectomy infection (OPSI) due to S. pneumoniae could develop in patient with splenectomy even after vaccination. Although the bacteremia probably due to SBP and acute renal dysfunction was accompanied by OPSI, our patient recovered rapidly. PMID:27221131

  9. Impact of Molecular Epidemiology and Reduced Susceptibility to Glycopeptides and Daptomycin on Outcomes of Patients with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hao-Yuan; Chen, Chyi-Liang; Liu, Shu-Ying; Yan, Yu-Shan; Chang, Chee-Jen; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2015-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia was associated with high mortality, but the risk factors associated with mortality remain controversial. Methods A retrospective cohort study was designed. All patients with MRSA bacteremia admitted were screened and collected for their clinical presentations and laboratory characteristics. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type of bacterial isolates were determined. Risk factors for mortality were analyzed. Results Most MRSA isolates from the 189 enrolled patients showed reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, including MIC of vancomycin ≥ 1.5 mg/L (79.9%), teicoplanin ≥ 2 mg/L (86.2%), daptomycin ≥ 0.38 mg/L (73.0%) and linezolid ≥ 1.5 mg/L (64.0%). MRSA with vancomycin MIC ≥ 1.5 mg/L and inappropriate initial therapy were the two most important risk factors for mortality (both P < 0.05; odds ratio = 7.88 and 6.78). Hospital-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA), carrying SCCmec type I, II, or III, was associated with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin, teicoplanin or daptomycin and also with higher attributable mortality (all P < 0.05). Creeping vancomycin MIC was linked to higher MIC of teicoplanin and daptomycin (both P < 0.001), but not linezolid (P = 0.759). Conclusions Giving empirical broad-spectrum antibiotics for at least 5 days to treat catheter-related infections, pneumonia, soft tissue infection and other infections was the most important risk factor for acquiring subsequent HA-MRSA infection. Choice of effective anti-MRSA agents for treating MRSA bacteremia should be based on MIC of vancomycin, teicoplanin and daptomycin. Initiation of an effective anti-MRSA agent without elevated MIC in 2 days is crucial for reducing mortality. PMID:26295150

  10. Active Immunization with an Octa-Valent Staphylococcus aureus Antigen Mixture in Models of S. aureus Bacteremia and Skin Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Sanne; Koedijk, Dennis G. A. M.; Back, Jaap Willem; Neef, Jolanda; Dreisbach, Annette; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A. J. M.; Buist, Girbe

    2015-01-01

    Proteomic studies with different Staphylococcus aureus isolates have shown that the cell surface-exposed and secreted proteins IsaA, LytM, Nuc, the propeptide of Atl (pro-Atl) and four phenol-soluble modulins α (PSMα) are invariantly produced by this pathogen. Therefore the present study was aimed at investigating whether these proteins can be used for active immunization against S. aureus infection in mouse models of bacteremia and skin infection. To this end, recombinant His-tagged fusions of IsaA, LytM, Nuc and pro-Atl were isolated from Lactococcus lactis or Escherichia coli, while the PSMα1-4 peptides were chemically synthesized. Importantly, patients colonized by S. aureus showed significant immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses against all eight antigens. BALB/cBYJ mice were immunized subcutaneously with a mixture of the antigens at day one (5 μg each), and boosted twice (25 μg of each antigen) with 28 days interval. This resulted in high IgG responses against all antigens although the response against pro-Atl was around one log lower compared to the other antigens. Compared to placebo-immunized mice, immunization with the octa-valent antigen mixture did not reduce the S. aureus isolate P load in blood, lungs, spleen, liver, and kidneys in a bacteremia model in which the animals were challenged for 14 days with a primary load of 3 × 105 CFU. Discomfort scores and animal survival rates over 14 days did not differ between immunized mice and placebo-immunized mice upon bacteremia with S. aureus USA300 (6 × 105 CFU). In addition, this immunization did not reduce the S. aureus isolate P load in mice with skin infection. These results show that the target antigens are immunogenic in both humans and mice, but in the used animal models do not result in protection against S. aureus infection. PMID:25710376

  11. Assessing the diversity of the virulence potential of Escherichia coli isolated from bacteremia in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, A C M; Zidko, A C M; Pignatari, A C; Silva, R M

    2013-10-15

    Most of the knowledge of the virulence determinants of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) comes from studies with human strains causing urinary tract infections and neonatal meningitis and animal strains causing avian colibacillosis. In this research, we analyzed the phylogenetic background, the presence of 20 ExPEC virulence factors, and the intrinsic virulence potential of 74 E. coli strains isolated in São Paulo, Brazil, from 74 hospitalized patients (43 males and 31 females) with unknown-source bacteremia. Unlike other places in the world, the bacteremic strains originated equally from phylogroups B2 (35%) and D (30%). A great variability in the profiles of virulence factors was noted in this survey. Nevertheless, 61% of the strains were classified as ExPEC, meaning that they possessed intrinsic virulent potential. Accordingly, these strains presented high virulence factor scores (average of 8.7), and were positively associated with 12 of 17 virulence factors detected. On the contrary, the non-ExPEC strains, isolated from 39% of the patients, presented a generally low virulence capacity (medium virulence factor score of 3.1), and were positively associated with only the colicin cvaC gene. These results show the importance of discriminating E. coli isolates that possess characteristics of true pathogens from those that may be merely opportunistic in order to better understand the virulence mechanisms involved in extraintestinal E. coli infections. Such knowledge is essential for epidemiological purposes as well as for development of control measures aimed to minimize the incidence of these life-threatening and costly infections. PMID:24141553

  12. Assessing the diversity of the virulence potential of Escherichia coli isolated from bacteremia in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Santos, A.C.M.; Zidko, A.C.M.; Pignatari, A.C.; Silva, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Most of the knowledge of the virulence determinants of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) comes from studies with human strains causing urinary tract infections and neonatal meningitis and animal strains causing avian colibacillosis. In this research, we analyzed the phylogenetic background, the presence of 20 ExPEC virulence factors, and the intrinsic virulence potential of 74 E. coli strains isolated in São Paulo, Brazil, from 74 hospitalized patients (43 males and 31 females) with unknown-source bacteremia. Unlike other places in the world, the bacteremic strains originated equally from phylogroups B2 (35%) and D (30%). A great variability in the profiles of virulence factors was noted in this survey. Nevertheless, 61% of the strains were classified as ExPEC, meaning that they possessed intrinsic virulent potential. Accordingly, these strains presented high virulence factor scores (average of 8.7), and were positively associated with 12 of 17 virulence factors detected. On the contrary, the non-ExPEC strains, isolated from 39% of the patients, presented a generally low virulence capacity (medium virulence factor score of 3.1), and were positively associated with only the colicin cvaC gene. These results show the importance of discriminating E. coli isolates that possess characteristics of true pathogens from those that may be merely opportunistic in order to better understand the virulence mechanisms involved in extraintestinal E. coli infections. Such knowledge is essential for epidemiological purposes as well as for development of control measures aimed to minimize the incidence of these life-threatening and costly infections. PMID:24141553

  13. An affinity adsorption media that mimics heparan sulfate proteoglycans for the treatment of drug-resistant bacteremia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrea, Keith R.; Ward, Robert S.

    2016-06-01

    Removal of several drug-resistant bacteria from blood by affinity adsorption onto a heparin-functional media is reported. Heparin is a chemical analogue of heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans, found on transmembrane proteins of endothelial cells. Many blood-borne human pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi have been reported to target HS as an initial step in their pathogenesis. Here, we demonstrate the binding and removal of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Extended-Spectrum Betalactamase Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL), and two Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (both CRE Escherichia coli and CRE K. pneumoniae) using 300 μm polyethylene beads surface modified with end-point-attached heparin. Depending on the specific bacteria, the amount removed ranged between 39% (ESBL) and 99.9% (CRE). The total amount of bacteria adsorbed ranged between 2.8 × 105 and 8.6 × 105 colony forming units (CFU) per gram of adsorption media. Based on a polymicrobial challenge which showed no competitive binding, MRSA and CRE apparently utilize different binding sequences on the immobilized heparin ligand. Since the total circulating bacterial load during bacteremia seldom exceeds 5 × 105 CFUs, it appears possible to significantly reduce bacterial concentration in infected patients by multi-pass recirculation of their blood through a small extracorporeal affinity filter containing the heparin-functional adsorption media. This 'dialysis-like therapy' is expected to improve patient outcomes and reduce the cost of care, particularly when there are no anti-infective drugs available to treat the infection.

  14. Clinical and Molecular Characteristics of Extended-Spectrum- β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli Causing Bacteremia in the Rotterdam Area, Netherlands ▿

    PubMed Central

    van der Bij, Akke K.; Peirano, Gisele; Goessens, Wil H. F.; van der Vorm, Eric R.; van Westreenen, M.; Pitout, Johann D. D.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the clinical and molecular characteristics of bacteremia caused by extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli over a 2-year period (2008 to 2009) in the Rotterdam region (including 1 teaching hospital and 2 community hospitals) of Netherlands. The majority of patients presented with community onset urinary and intra-abdominal infections, with an increase in prevalence during 2009. The majority of E. coli isolates produced CTX-M-15, and 4 sequence types (ST38, ST131, ST405, and ST648) predominated. There were significant differences in clinical and molecular characteristics between the 2 community hospitals. PMID:21502612

  15. In vitro activities of 21 antimicrobial agents alone and in combination with aminoglycosides or fluoroquinolones against extended-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli isolates causing bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Cha, Min Kyeong; Kang, Cheol-In; Kim, So Hyun; Cho, Sun Young; Ha, Young Eun; Wi, Yu Mi; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the in vitro activity of various antimicrobials alone and in combination against 291 extended-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) isolates causing bacteremia in South Korean hospitals. Ceftazidime, cefepime, and piperacillin-tazobactam in combination with amikacin showed greater activity than found in combination with ciprofloxacin. In settings with a high prevalence of ESBL-producing pathogens, combination aminoglycoside antimicrobial therapy, especially with amikacin, may be considered for empirical therapy against suspected Gram-negative sepsis as a carbapenem-saving strategy. PMID:26124174

  16. Outcomes in Documented Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bacteremia Treated with Intermittent IV Infusion of Ceftazidime, Meropenem, or Piperacillin–Tazobactam: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kwee, Francine; Walker, Sandra A N; Elligsen, Marion; Palmay, Lesley; Simor, Andrew; Daneman, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one of the leading causes of nosocomial gram-negative bloodstream infections, is particularly difficult to treat because of its multiple resistance mechanisms combined with a lack of novel antipseudomonal antibiotics. Despite knowledge of time-dependent killing with ß-lactam antibiotics, most hospitals in Canada currently administer ß-lactam antibiotics by intermittent rather than extended infusions. Objectives: To determine clinical outcomes, microbiological outcomes, total hospital costs, and infection-related costs for patients with P. aeruginosa bacteremia who received intermittent IV administration of antipseudomonal ß-lactam antibiotics in a tertiary care institution. Methods: For this retrospective descriptive study, data were collected for patients who were admitted between March 1, 2005, and March 31, 2013, who had P. aeruginosa bacteremia during their admission, and who received at least 72 h of treatment with ceftazidime, meropenem, or piperacillin–tazobactam. Clinical and microbiological outcomes were determined, and total and infection-related hospital costs were calculated. Results: A total of 103 patients were included in the analysis, of whom 79 (77%) experienced clinical cure. In addition, bacterial eradication was achieved in 41 (87%) of the 47 patients with evaluable data for this outcome. Twenty-eight (27%) of the 103 patients died within 30 days of discontinuation of antipseudomonal ß-lactam antibiotic therapy. The median total cost of the hospital stay was $121 718, and the median infection-related cost was $29 697. Conclusions: P. aeruginosa bacteremia is a clinically significant nosocomial infection that continues to cause considerable mortality and health care costs. To the authors’ knowledge, no previous studies have calculated total and infection-related hospital costs for treatment of P. aeruginosa bacteremia with intermittent infusion of antipseudomonal ß-lactam antibiotics, with

  17. A synthetic M protein peptide synergizes with a CXC chemokine protease to induce vaccine-mediated protection against virulent streptococcal pyoderma and bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manisha; Langshaw, Emma; Hartas, Jon; Lam, Alfred; Batzloff, Michael R; Good, Michael F

    2015-06-15

    Infections caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) are highly prevalent in the tropics, in developing countries, and in the Indigenous populations of developed countries. These infections and their sequelae are responsible for almost 500,000 lives lost prematurely each year. A synthetic peptide vaccine (J8-DT) from the conserved region of the M protein has shown efficacy against disease that follows i.p. inoculation of bacteria. By developing a murine model for infection that closely mimics human skin infection, we show that the vaccine can protect against pyoderma and subsequent bacteremia caused by multiple GAS strains, including strains endemic in Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory of Australia. However, the vaccine was ineffective against a hypervirulent cluster of virulence responder/sensor mutant GAS strain; this correlated with the strain's ability to degrade CXC chemokines, thereby preventing neutrophil chemotaxis. By combining J8-DT with an inactive form of the streptococcal CXC protease, S. pyogenes cell envelope proteinase, we developed a combination vaccine that is highly effective in blocking CXC chemokine degradation and permits opsonic Abs to kill the bacteria. Mice receiving the combination vaccine were strongly protected against pyoderma and bacteremia, as evidenced by a 100-1000-fold reduction in bacterial burden following challenge. To our knowledge, a vaccine requiring Abs to target two independent virulence factors of an organism is unique. PMID:25980008

  18. Use of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry To Resolve Complex Clinical Cases of Patients with Recurrent Bacteremias

    PubMed Central

    Nori, Priya; Ostrowsky, Belinda; Dorokhova, Olena; Gialanella, Philip; Moy, Morgan; Muggia, Victoria; Grossberg, Robert; Kornblum, John; Lin, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption–ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a rapid and accurate method of identifying microorganisms. Throughout Europe, it is already in routine use but has not yet been widely implemented in the United States, pending FDA approval. Here, we describe two medically complex patients at a large tertiary-care academic medical center with recurring bacteremias caused by distinct but related species. Bacterial identifications were initially obtained using the Vitek-2 system with the GPI card for Enterococcus and the API system for staphylococci. Initial results misled clinicians as to the source and proper management of these patients. Retrospective investigation with MALDI-TOF MS clarified the diagnosis by identifying a single microorganism as the pathogen in each case. To our knowledge, this is one of the first reports in the United States demonstrating the use of MALDI-TOF MS to facilitate the clinical diagnosis in patients with recurrent bacteremias of unclear source. PMID:23536408

  19. Ongoing Horizontal and Vertical Transmission of Virulence Genes and papA Alleles among Escherichia coli Blood Isolates from Patients with Diverse-Source Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, James R.; O'Bryan, Timothy T.; Kuskowski, Michael; Maslow, Joel N.

    2001-01-01

    The phylogenetic distributions of multiple putative virulence factors (VFs) and papA (P fimbrial structural subunit) alleles among 182 Escherichia coli blood isolates from patients with diverse-source bacteremia were defined. Phylogenetic correspondence among these strains, the E. coli Reference (ECOR) collection, and other collections of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) was assessed. Although among the 182 bacteremia isolates phylogenetic group B2 predominated, exhibited the greatest concentration of individual VFs, and contained the largest number of familiar virulent clones, other phylogenetic groups exhibited greater concentrations of certain VFs than did group B2 and included several additional virulent clones. Certain of the newly detected VF genes, e.g., fyuA (yersiniabactin; 76%) and focG (F1C fimbriae; 25%), were as prevalent or more prevalent than their more familiar traditional counterparts, e.g., iut (aerobactin; 57%) and sfaS (S fimbriae; 14%), thus possibly offering additional useful targets for preventive interventions. Considerable diversity of VF profiles was observed at every level within the phylogenetic tree, including even within individual lineages. This suggested that many different pathways can lead to extraintestinal virulence in E. coli and that the evolution of ExPEC, which involves extensive horizontal transmission of VFs and continuous remodeling of pathogenicity-associated islands, is a highly active, ongoing process. PMID:11500406

  20. Predictive Value of C-Reactive Protein (CRP) in Identifying Fatal Outcome and Deep Infections in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Ruotsalainen, Eeva; Rintala, Esa M.; Järvinen, Asko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Clear cut-off levels could aid clinicians in identifying patients with a risk of fatal outcomes or complications such as deep infection foci in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB). Cut-off levels for widely used clinical follow-up parameters including serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and white blood cell counts (WBC) have not been previously studied. Methods 430 adult SAB patients in Finland took part in prospective multicentre study in which their CRP levels and WBC counts were measured on the day of the positive blood culture, every other day during the first week, twice a week during hospitalization and at 30 days. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the prognostic value of CRP and WBC on the day of the positive blood culture and at days 4, 7, and 14 in predicting mortality and the presence of deep infections at 30 days. Adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for CRP level and WBC count cut-off values for mortality were calculated by the Cox regression analysis and adjusted odds ratios (OR) for cut-off values to predict the presence of deep infection by the binary logistic regression analysis. Results The succumbing patients could be distinguished from the survivors, starting on day 4 after the positive blood culture, by higher CRP levels. Cut-off values of CRP for day 30 mortality in adjusted analysis, that significantly predicted fatal outcome were at day 4 CRP >103 mg/L with sensitivity of 77%, specificity of 55%, and HR of 3.5 (95% CI, 1.2–10.3; p = 0.024), at day 14 CRP >61 mg/L with a sensitivity of 82%, specificity of 80% and HR of 3.6 (95% CI, 1.1–10.3; p<0.039) and cut-off value of WBC at day 14 >8.6 x109/L was prognostic with sensitivity of 77%, specificity of 78% and HR of 8.2 (95% CI, 2.9–23.1; p<0.0001). Cut-off values for deep infection in adjusted analysis were on the day of the positive blood culture CRP >108 mg/L with sensitivity of 77%, specificity of 60%, and HR of 2.6 (95% CI, 1.3–4.9; p = 0

  1. A combination of tigecycline, colistin, and meropenem against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia in a renal transplant recipient: pharmacodynamic and microbiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Candel, F J; Calvo, N; Head, J; Sánchez, A; Matesanz, M; Culebras, E; Barrientos, A; Picazo, J

    2010-06-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii are emerging as the causal agents of healthcare-associated infections. We describe arenal transplant recipient who developed bacteremia caused by multiresistant A. baumannii, which received a combination of tigecycline, colistin, and meropenem in continuous infusion. The clinical outcome was favorable. In this article we made a molecular study of this multiresistant strain. Our analysis reveals the presence of abla-OXA-72 gene,a class D of oxacillinase belonging to bla-OXA-40-like group,which constitutes the most disseminated familiy of carbapenemases in Spain. Thus, we found different susceptibility patterns of A. baumannii when we used different Mueller-Hinton agars with different manganese concentrations. Lastly, we explain the combination of these three antibiotics administered to increase microbiologic and pharmacodynamic yield. PMID:20559610

  2. Relationship between pathogenic, clinical, and virulence factors of Staphylococcus aureus in infective endocarditis versus uncomplicated bacteremia: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-García, M M; Sánchez-Espín, G; Ivanova-Georgieva, R; Ruíz-Morales, J; Rodríguez-Bailón, I; Viñuela González, V; García-López, M V

    2016-05-01

    Pathogenic factors of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) in the development of infective endocarditis (IE) have not been sufficiently investigated. The purpose of this study was to analyze the pathogenesis and virulence factors of SA in patients with IE as compared to patients with uncomplicated bacteremia (un-BAC). This is a retrospective case-control study (2002-2014) performed at a tertiary hospital in Spain. Clinical and epidemiological factors were analyzed. We assessed the presence of toxin genes [toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (tst-1) and enterotoxins A (etA), B (etB), and D (etD)] and the potential relationship between accessory gene regulator (agr) groups and the development of IE confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Twenty-nine patients with IE were compared with 58 patients with uncomplicated S. aureus bacteremia (SAB). As many as 75.9 % of patients had community-acquired IE (p < 0.005). Multivariate analysis revealed that there is a significant relationship between community-acquired infection and severe sepsis or septic shock and IE. Also, a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin ≥1.5 μg/ml was found to be associated with IE. The agr group I was prevalent (55.2 % vs. 31.0 %; p = 0.030). No association was observed between toxin genes (tst-1, etA, etB, and etD) and IE. The superantigen (SAg) most frequently found in SA isolates was tst-1 (12.6 %). We found no association between toxin genes and IE, probably due to the small sample size. However, a direct relationship was found between agr I and the development of IE, which suggests that agr I strains may have more potential to cause IE. PMID:26951263

  3. Extensively drug-resistant bacteria are an independent predictive factor of mortality in 130 patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis or spontaneous bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulou, Alexandra; Vasilieva, Larisa; Agiasotelli, Danai; Siranidi, Kyriaki; Pouriki, Sophia; Tsiriga, Athanasia; Toutouza, Marina; Dourakis, Spyridon P

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the epidemiology and outcomes of culture-positive spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) and spontaneous bacteremia (SB) in decompensated cirrhosis. METHODS: We prospectively collected clinical, laboratory characteristics, type of administered antibiotic, susceptibility and resistance of bacteria to antibiotics in one hundred thirty cases (68.5% males) with positive ascitic fluid and/or blood cultures during the period from January 1, 2012 to May 30, 2014. All patients with SBP had polymorphonuclear cell count in ascitic fluid > 250/mm3. In patients with SB a thorough study did not reveal any other cause of bacteremia. The patients were followed-up for a 30-d period following diagnosis of the infection. The final outcome of the patients was recorded in the end of follow-up and comparison among 3 groups of patients according to the pattern of drug resistance was performed. RESULTS: Gram-positive-cocci (GPC) were found in half of the cases. The most prevalent organisms in a descending order were Escherichia coli (33), Enterococcus spp (30), Streptococcus spp (25), Klebsiella pneumonia (16), S. aureus (8), Pseudomanas aeruginosa (5), other Gram-negative-bacteria (GNB) (11) and anaerobes (2). Overall, 20.8% of isolates were multidrug-resistant (MDR) and 10% extensively drug-resistant (XDR). Health-care-associated (HCA) and/or nosocomial infections were present in 100% of MDR/XDR and in 65.5% of non-DR cases. Meropenem was the empirically prescribed antibiotic in HCA/nosocomial infections showing a drug-resistance rate of 30.7% while third generation cephalosporins of 43.8%. Meropenem was ineffective on both XDR bacteria and Enterococcus faecium (E. faecium). All but one XDR were susceptible to colistin while all GPC (including E. faecium) and the 86% of GNB to tigecycline. Overall 30-d mortality was 37.7% (69.2% for XDR and 34.2% for the rest of the patients) (log rank, P = 0.015). In multivariate analysis, factors adversely affecting outcome included

  4. Enhanced Diagnosis of Pneumococcal Bacteremia Using Antigen- and Molecular-Based Tools on Blood Specimens in Mali and Thailand: A Prospective Surveillance Study.

    PubMed

    Moïsi, Jennifer C; Moore, Matthew; Carvalho, Maria da Gloria; Sow, Samba O; Siludjai, Duangkamon; Knoll, Maria Deloria; Tapia, Milagritos; Baggett, Henry C

    2016-02-01

    Prior antibiotic use, contamination, limited blood volume, and processing delays reduce yield of blood cultures for detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We performed immunochromatographic testing (ICT) on broth from incubated blood culture bottles and real-time lytA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on broth and whole blood and compared findings to blood culture in patients with suspected bacteremia. We selected 383 patients in Mali and 586 patients in Thailand based on their blood culture results: 75 and 31 were positive for pneumococcus, 100 and 162 were positive for other pathogens, and 208 and 403 were blood culture negative, respectively. ICT and PCR of blood culture broth were at least 87% sensitive and 97% specific compared with blood culture; whole blood PCR was 75-88% sensitive and 96-100% specific. Pneumococcal yields in children < 5 years of age increased from 2.9% to 10.7% in Mali with > 99% of additional cases detected by whole blood PCR, and from 0.07% to 5.1% in Thailand with two-thirds of additional cases identified by ICT. Compared with blood culture, ICT and lytA PCR on cultured broth were highly sensitive and specific but their ability to improve pneumococcal identification varied by site. Further studies of these tools are needed before widespread implementation. PMID:26643535

  5. Malaria-associated L-arginine deficiency induces mast cell-associated disruption to intestinal barrier defenses against nontyphoidal Salmonella bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Chau, Jennifer Y; Tiffany, Caitlin M; Nimishakavi, Shilpa; Lawrence, Jessica A; Pakpour, Nazzy; Mooney, Jason P; Lokken, Kristen L; Caughey, George H; Tsolis, Renee M; Luckhart, Shirley

    2013-10-01

    Coinfection with malaria and nontyphoidal Salmonella serotypes (NTS) can cause life-threatening bacteremia in humans. Coinfection with malaria is a recognized risk factor for invasive NTS, suggesting that malaria impairs intestinal barrier function. Here, we investigated mechanisms and strategies for prevention of coinfection pathology in a mouse model. Our findings reveal that malarial-parasite-infected mice, like humans, develop L-arginine deficiency, which is associated with intestinal mastocytosis, elevated levels of histamine, and enhanced intestinal permeability. Prevention or reversal of L-arginine deficiency blunts mastocytosis in ileal villi as well as bacterial translocation, measured as numbers of mesenteric lymph node CFU of noninvasive Escherichia coli Nissle and Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, the latter of which is naturally invasive in mice. Dietary supplementation of malarial-parasite-infected mice with L-arginine or L-citrulline reduced levels of ileal transcripts encoding interleukin-4 (IL-4), a key mediator of intestinal mastocytosis and macromolecular permeability. Supplementation with L-citrulline also enhanced epithelial adherens and tight junctions in the ilea of coinfected mice. These data suggest that increasing L-arginine bioavailability via oral supplementation can ameliorate malaria-induced intestinal pathology, providing a basis for testing nutritional interventions to reduce malaria-associated mortality in humans. PMID:23690397

  6. The Performance of Direct Disk Diffusion for Community Acquired Bacteremia due to Gram-Negative Bacilli and Its Impact on Physician Treatment Decisions.

    PubMed

    Daley, Peter; Comerford, Adam; Umali, Jurgienne; Penney, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Background. Direct disk diffusion susceptibility testing provides faster results than standard microtitre susceptibility. The direct result may impact patient outcome in sepsis if it is accurate and if physicians use the information to promptly and appropriately change antibiotic treatment. Objective. To compare the performance of direct disk diffusion with standard susceptibility and to consider physician decisions in response to these early results, for community acquired bacteremia with Gram-negative Bacilli. Methods. Retrospective observational study of all positive blood cultures with Gram-negative Bacilli, collected over one year. Physician antibiotic treatment decisions were assessed by an infectious diseases physician based on information available to the physician at the time of the decision. Results. 89 bottles growing Gram-negative Bacilli were included in the analysis. Direct disk diffusion agreement with standard susceptibility varied widely. In 47 cases (52.8%), the physician should have changed to a narrower spectrum but did not, in 18 cases (20.2%), the physician correctly narrowed from appropriate broad coverage, and in 8 cases (9.0%), the empiric therapy was correct. Discussion. Because inoculum is not standardized, direct susceptibility results do not agree with standard susceptibility results for all drugs. Physicians do not act on direct susceptibility results. Conclusion. Direct susceptibility should be discontinued in clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:27366172

  7. Gram-negative bacteremia produces both severe systolic and diastolic cardiac dysfunction in a canine model that simulates human septic shock.

    PubMed Central

    Natanson, C; Fink, M P; Ballantyne, H K; MacVittie, T J; Conklin, J J; Parrillo, J E

    1986-01-01

    A canine sepsis model that simulates the human cardiovascular response to septic shock was produced in 10 conscious unsedated dogs by implanting an Escherichia coli-infected clot into the peritoneum, resulting in bacteremia. By employing serial, simultaneous measurements of radionuclide scan-determined left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) and thermodilution cardiac index (CI), the end-diastolic volume index (EDVI) was calculated (EDVI = stroke volume index divided by EF). By using three different methods of quantifying serial ventricular performance (EF, shifts in the Starling ventricular function curve using EDVI vs. stroke work index, and the ventricular function curve response to volume infusion), this study provides evidence (P less than 0.01) that septic shock produces a profound, but reversible, decrease in systolic ventricular performance. This decreased performance was not seen in controls and was associated with ventricular dilatation (P less than 0.01); the latter response was dependent on an adequate volume infusion. Further studies of EDVI and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure during diastole revealed a significant, though reversible, shift (P less than 0.001) in the diastolic volume/pressure (or compliance) relationship during septic shock. PMID:3722379

  8. Malaria-Associated l-Arginine Deficiency Induces Mast Cell-Associated Disruption to Intestinal Barrier Defenses against Nontyphoidal Salmonella Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Jennifer Y.; Tiffany, Caitlin M.; Nimishakavi, Shilpa; Lawrence, Jessica A.; Pakpour, Nazzy; Mooney, Jason P.; Lokken, Kristen L.; Caughey, George H.; Tsolis, Renee M.

    2013-01-01

    Coinfection with malaria and nontyphoidal Salmonella serotypes (NTS) can cause life-threatening bacteremia in humans. Coinfection with malaria is a recognized risk factor for invasive NTS, suggesting that malaria impairs intestinal barrier function. Here, we investigated mechanisms and strategies for prevention of coinfection pathology in a mouse model. Our findings reveal that malarial-parasite-infected mice, like humans, develop l-arginine deficiency, which is associated with intestinal mastocytosis, elevated levels of histamine, and enhanced intestinal permeability. Prevention or reversal of l-arginine deficiency blunts mastocytosis in ileal villi as well as bacterial translocation, measured as numbers of mesenteric lymph node CFU of noninvasive Escherichia coli Nissle and Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, the latter of which is naturally invasive in mice. Dietary supplementation of malarial-parasite-infected mice with l-arginine or l-citrulline reduced levels of ileal transcripts encoding interleukin-4 (IL-4), a key mediator of intestinal mastocytosis and macromolecular permeability. Supplementation with l-citrulline also enhanced epithelial adherens and tight junctions in the ilea of coinfected mice. These data suggest that increasing l-arginine bioavailability via oral supplementation can ameliorate malaria-induced intestinal pathology, providing a basis for testing nutritional interventions to reduce malaria-associated mortality in humans. PMID:23690397

  9. Infection of a ventriculoatrial shunt with phenotypically variable Staphylococcus epidermidis masquerading as polymicrobial bacteremia due to various coagulase-negative Staphylococci and Kocuria varians.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ami, Ronen; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Schwartz, David; Carmeli, Yehuda

    2003-06-01

    The diagnosis of bloodstream infection with coagulase-negative staphylococci is frequently based on the isolation of the same organism from more than one blood culture. Phenotypic variation is a common characteristic of pathogenic strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis which may affect species identification by the microbiology laboratory. We describe a patient with a new onset of nephritis and gram-positive bacteremia. Gram-positive cocci grew in multiple blood cultures and were identified by the Vitek 2 system as Kocuria varians, Staphylococcus hyicus, and S. epidermidis. Bacterial isolates grew on blood agar and Congo red agar plates as two distinct morphotypes and exhibited phenotypic variation. Neither morphotype could be identified by the API-Staph assay. Cellular fatty acid analysis identified one of the morphotypes as S. epidermidis but could not identify the other morphotype. All isolates were found to be identical by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and both colonial morphotypes were identified as S. epidermidis by 16S ribosomal gene sequencing. Phenotypic variation of S. epidermidis may affect identification to the species level by phenotype-based identification systems. Caution should be exercised when differentiating between true infection and contamination based on strain identification. PMID:12791862

  10. Infection of a Ventriculoatrial Shunt with Phenotypically Variable Staphylococcus epidermidis Masquerading as Polymicrobial Bacteremia Due to Various Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci and Kocuria varians

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ami, Ronen; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Schwartz, David; Carmeli, Yehuda

    2003-01-01

    The diagnosis of bloodstream infection with coagulase-negative staphylococci is frequently based on the isolation of the same organism from more than one blood culture. Phenotypic variation is a common characteristic of pathogenic strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis which may affect species identification by the microbiology laboratory. We describe a patient with a new onset of nephritis and gram-positive bacteremia. Gram-positive cocci grew in multiple blood cultures and were identified by the Vitek 2 system as Kocuria varians, Staphylococcus hyicus, and S. epidermidis. Bacterial isolates grew on blood agar and Congo red agar plates as two distinct morphotypes and exhibited phenotypic variation. Neither morphotype could be identified by the API-Staph assay. Cellular fatty acid analysis identified one of the morphotypes as S. epidermidis but could not identify the other morphotype. All isolates were found to be identical by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and both colonial morphotypes were identified as S. epidermidis by 16S ribosomal gene sequencing. Phenotypic variation of S. epidermidis may affect identification to the species level by phenotype-based identification systems. Caution should be exercised when differentiating between true infection and contamination based on strain identification. PMID:12791862

  11. Role of type 1 and S fimbriae in the pathogenesis of Escherichia coli O18:K1 bacteremia and meningitis in the infant rat.

    PubMed Central

    Saukkonen, K M; Nowicki, B; Leinonen, M

    1988-01-01

    The role of fimbriae in the pathogenesis of Escherichia coli infection was studied in the infant rat model. Rat pups were challenged intraperitoneally at the age of 5 days with E. coli K1 (strain IH3080, O18:K1:H7) and three different subpopulations (type 1, type S, or nonfimbriated) of it. All bacterial subpopulations were able to produce peritonitis, bacteremia, and meningitis. However, the type 1 fraction was the least virulent and the type S fraction was the most virulent, as judged by the bacterial counts in body fluids and by the mortality rates of the pups. Fimbrial phase variation to mainly the type-S-fimbriated forms was observed in all body fluids. An initially type-S-fimbriated inoculum remained predominantly type S fimbriated in the peritoneal fluid and blood. In the cerebrospinal fluid, however, about 50% of the bacteria were type S fimbriated and 50% were nonfimbriated 1 h after challenge with the type-S-fimbriated subpopulation; at later times the share of type-S-fimbriated bacteria also increased in the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:2894363

  12. Enhanced Diagnosis of Pneumococcal Bacteremia Using Antigen- and Molecular-Based Tools on Blood Specimens in Mali and Thailand: A Prospective Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    Moïsi, Jennifer C.; Moore, Matthew; da Gloria Carvalho, Maria; Sow, Samba O.; Siludjai, Duangkamon; Knoll, Maria Deloria; Tapia, Milagritos; Baggett, Henry C.

    2016-01-01

    Prior antibiotic use, contamination, limited blood volume, and processing delays reduce yield of blood cultures for detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We performed immunochromatographic testing (ICT) on broth from incubated blood culture bottles and real-time lytA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on broth and whole blood and compared findings to blood culture in patients with suspected bacteremia. We selected 383 patients in Mali and 586 patients in Thailand based on their blood culture results: 75 and 31 were positive for pneumococcus, 100 and 162 were positive for other pathogens, and 208 and 403 were blood culture negative, respectively. ICT and PCR of blood culture broth were at least 87% sensitive and 97% specific compared with blood culture; whole blood PCR was 75–88% sensitive and 96–100% specific. Pneumococcal yields in children < 5 years of age increased from 2.9% to 10.7% in Mali with > 99% of additional cases detected by whole blood PCR, and from 0.07% to 5.1% in Thailand with two-thirds of additional cases identified by ICT. Compared with blood culture, ICT and lytA PCR on cultured broth were highly sensitive and specific but their ability to improve pneumococcal identification varied by site. Further studies of these tools are needed before widespread implementation. PMID:26643535

  13. The Epidemiologic, Microbiologic and Clinical Picture of Bacteremia among Febrile Infants and Young Children Managed as Outpatients at the Emergency Room, before and after Initiation of the Routine Anti-Pneumococcal Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Leibovitz, Eugene; David, Nuphar; Ribitzky-Eisner, Haya; Abo Madegam, Mouner; Abuabed, Said; Chodick, Gabriel; Maimon, Michal; Fruchtman, Yariv

    2016-01-01

    We described the occult bacteremia (OB) and bacteremia with diagnosed focus (BwF) picture among children managed as outpatients at the pediatric emergency room (PER) in southern Israel, before and after the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) introduction in a retrospective study enrolling all three- to 36-month-old patients with fever >38.0 °C during 2005–2014. Of 511 (0.82% of all febrile patients) true bacteremias, 230 (45%) were managed as outpatients; 96 of 230 (41.7%) had OB and 134 (3.59%) had BwF. OB and BwF rates were 0.22% and 3.02%, respectively. A significant decrease was noted in OB and BwF rates (p = 0.0008 and p = 0.02, respectively). S. pneumoniae (SP, 37.5%), K. kingae (11.4%) and Brucella spp. (8.7%) were the most common OB pathogens and SP (29.8%), S. viridans (13.4%), and Brucella spp. (12.7%) were the most common in BwF patients. PCV13 serotypes were not found among the serotypes isolated post-PCV13 introduction. During 2010–2014 there was an increase in non-PCV13 serotype isolation (p = 0.005). SP was the main pathogen isolated among patients with pneumonia, acute otitis media (AOM) and periorbital cellulitis (62.5%, 33.3% and 60%, respectively). OB and BwF decreased following the introduction of PCVs and SP was the main pathogen in both conditions. Vaccine-SP serotypes were not isolated in OB after PCV13 introduction and non-vaccine serotypes increased significantly. PMID:27447651

  14. The Epidemiologic, Microbiologic and Clinical Picture of Bacteremia among Febrile Infants and Young Children Managed as Outpatients at the Emergency Room, before and after Initiation of the Routine Anti-Pneumococcal Immunization.

    PubMed

    Leibovitz, Eugene; David, Nuphar; Ribitzky-Eisner, Haya; Abo Madegam, Mouner; Abuabed, Said; Chodick, Gabriel; Maimon, Michal; Fruchtman, Yariv

    2016-01-01

    We described the occult bacteremia (OB) and bacteremia with diagnosed focus (BwF) picture among children managed as outpatients at the pediatric emergency room (PER) in southern Israel, before and after the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) introduction in a retrospective study enrolling all three- to 36-month-old patients with fever >38.0 °C during 2005-2014. Of 511 (0.82% of all febrile patients) true bacteremias, 230 (45%) were managed as outpatients; 96 of 230 (41.7%) had OB and 134 (3.59%) had BwF. OB and BwF rates were 0.22% and 3.02%, respectively. A significant decrease was noted in OB and BwF rates (p = 0.0008 and p = 0.02, respectively). S. pneumoniae (SP, 37.5%), K. kingae (11.4%) and Brucella spp. (8.7%) were the most common OB pathogens and SP (29.8%), S. viridans (13.4%), and Brucella spp. (12.7%) were the most common in BwF patients. PCV13 serotypes were not found among the serotypes isolated post-PCV13 introduction. During 2010-2014 there was an increase in non-PCV13 serotype isolation (p = 0.005). SP was the main pathogen isolated among patients with pneumonia, acute otitis media (AOM) and periorbital cellulitis (62.5%, 33.3% and 60%, respectively). OB and BwF decreased following the introduction of PCVs and SP was the main pathogen in both conditions. Vaccine-SP serotypes were not isolated in OB after PCV13 introduction and non-vaccine serotypes increased significantly. PMID:27447651

  15. Microbiological Analysis of Nontyphoidal Salmonella Strains Causing Distinct Syndromes of Bacteremia or Enteritis in HIV/AIDS Patients in San Diego, California

    PubMed Central

    Preziosi, Michael J.; Kandel, Sean M.; Guiney, Donald G.

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infection is an AIDS-defining illness that has become less common in the developed world in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), while it has emerged as a major public health problem in developing countries, particularly sub-Saharan Africa. We retrospectively analyzed Salmonella (NTS) infection in HIV/AIDS patients from June 2003 until December 2009 at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), Medical Center. Bacterial isolates from all patients were tested for selected microbiological properties, including major Salmonella (NTS) virulence loci rpoS, sodCI, spvB, and sseI. Fourteen percent of all Salmonella (NTS) cases recorded at the UCSD Medical Center during this period occurred in known HIV/AIDS patients. The clinical presentations in HIV patients fell into two distinct groups, bacteremia and enteritis. There was little clinical overlap between these two syndromes. All strains were positive for the presence of the rpoS and sodCI virulence loci, and 75% of strains were positive for the presence of the spvB and sseI loci. Antibiotic susceptibility assay showed that all strains were susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin. The clinical presentation did not have a clear relationship to the CD4+ cell count. Of the bacteremic isolates, all but one isolate, drawn from a patient with substantial enteric comorbidities, had all of the virulence genes tested, but 66% of nonbacteremic, enteritis strains also contained all the tested virulence loci. In conclusion, neither patients' CD4+ cell count nor bacterial strain properties necessarily predicted the clinical presentation of HIV/AIDS patients with Salmonella (NTS) infection, and AIDS patients can have episodes of Salmonella enteritis without dissemination. PMID:22933605

  16. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants in quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from patients with bacteremia in a university hospital in Taiwan, 2001–2015

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Cheng-Yen; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Lin, Wei-Hung; Tseng, Chin-Chung; Yan, Jing-Jou; Wang, Ming-Cheng; Teng, Ching-Hao; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from bacteremia in Taiwan in 2001–2015. During the study period, 248 (21.2%) of 1171 isolates were identified as levofloxacin-resistant. The results of phylogenetic group analysis showed that 38.7% of the FQ-resistant isolates belonged to phylogenetic group B2, 23.4% to group B1, 22.6% to groupA, 14.9% to group D, and 0.4% belonged to group F. FQ-resistant isolates were highly susceptible to cefepime (91.5%), imipenem (96.0%), meropenem (98.8%), amikacin (98.0%), and fosfomycin (99.6%), as determined by the agar dilution method. β-lactamases, including blaTEM (66.1%), blaCMY-2 (16.5%), blaCTX-M (5.2%), blaDHA-1 (1.6%), and blaSHV-12 (1.6%), were found in FQ-resistant isolates. The results of PCR and direct sequencing showed that 37 isolates (14.9%) harbored plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes. qnrB2, qnrB4, qnrS1, coexistence of qnrB4 and qnrS1, oqxAB, and aac(6′)-Ib-cr were found in 1, 4, 4, 1, 15, and 14 isolates, respectively. PMQR genes were successfully transfered for 11 (29.7%) of the 37 PMQR-harboring isolates by conjugation to E. coli C600. These findings indicate that qnr genes remained rare in E. coli but demonstrate the potential spread of oqxAB and aac(6′)-Ib-c in Taiwan. PMID:27573927

  17. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants in quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from patients with bacteremia in a university hospital in Taiwan, 2001-2015.

    PubMed

    Kao, Cheng-Yen; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Lin, Wei-Hung; Tseng, Chin-Chung; Yan, Jing-Jou; Wang, Ming-Cheng; Teng, Ching-Hao; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from bacteremia in Taiwan in 2001-2015. During the study period, 248 (21.2%) of 1171 isolates were identified as levofloxacin-resistant. The results of phylogenetic group analysis showed that 38.7% of the FQ-resistant isolates belonged to phylogenetic group B2, 23.4% to group B1, 22.6% to groupA, 14.9% to group D, and 0.4% belonged to group F. FQ-resistant isolates were highly susceptible to cefepime (91.5%), imipenem (96.0%), meropenem (98.8%), amikacin (98.0%), and fosfomycin (99.6%), as determined by the agar dilution method. β-lactamases, including blaTEM (66.1%), blaCMY-2 (16.5%), blaCTX-M (5.2%), blaDHA-1 (1.6%), and blaSHV-12 (1.6%), were found in FQ-resistant isolates. The results of PCR and direct sequencing showed that 37 isolates (14.9%) harbored plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes. qnrB2, qnrB4, qnrS1, coexistence of qnrB4 and qnrS1, oqxAB, and aac(6')-Ib-cr were found in 1, 4, 4, 1, 15, and 14 isolates, respectively. PMQR genes were successfully transfered for 11 (29.7%) of the 37 PMQR-harboring isolates by conjugation to E. coli C600. These findings indicate that qnr genes remained rare in E. coli but demonstrate the potential spread of oqxAB and aac(6')-Ib-c in Taiwan. PMID:27573927

  18. Non-typhoidal Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 isolates that cause bacteremia in humans stimulate less inflammasome activation than ST19 isolates associated with gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Carden, Sarah; Okoro, Chinyere; Dougan, Gordon; Monack, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella is an enteric pathogen that causes a range of diseases in humans. Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars such as Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium generally cause a self-limiting gastroenteritis whereas typhoidal serovars cause a systemic disease, typhoid fever. However, S. Typhimurium isolates within the multi-locus sequence type ST313 have emerged in sub-Saharan Africa as a major cause of bacteremia in humans. The S. Typhimurium ST313 lineage is phylogenetically distinct from classical S. Typhimurium lineages, such as ST19, that cause zoonotic gastroenteritis worldwide. Previous studies have shown that the ST313 lineage has undergone genome degradation when compared to the ST19 lineage, similar to that observed for typhoidal serovars. Currently, little is known about phenotypic differences between ST313 isolates and other NTS isolates. We find that representative ST313 isolates invade non-phagocytic cells less efficiently than the classical ST19 isolates that are more commonly associated with gastroenteritis. In addition, ST313 isolates induce less Caspase-1-dependent macrophage death and IL-1β release than ST19 isolates. ST313 isolates also express relatively lower levels of mRNA of the genes encoding the SPI-1 effector sopE2 and the flagellin, fliC, providing possible explanations for the decrease in invasion and inflammasome activation. The ST313 isolates have invasion and inflammatory phenotypes that are intermediate; more invasive and inflammatory than Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and less than ST19 isolates associated with gastroenteritis. This suggests that both phenotypically and at the genomic level ST313 isolates are evolving signatures that facilitate a systemic lifestyle in humans. PMID:25808600

  19. Multiphasic approach reveals genetic diversity of environmental and patient isolates of Mycobacterium mucogenicum and Mycobacterium phocaicum associated with an outbreak of bacteremias at a Texas hospital.

    PubMed

    Cooksey, Robert C; Jhung, Michael A; Yakrus, Mitchell A; Butler, W Ray; Adékambi, Toidi; Morlock, Glenn P; Williams, Margaret; Shams, Alicia M; Jensen, Bette J; Morey, Roger E; Charles, Nadege; Toney, Sean R; Jost, Kenneth C; Dunbar, Denise F; Bennett, Vickie; Kuan, Marcella; Srinivasan, Arjun

    2008-04-01

    Between March and May 2006, a Texas hospital identified five Mycobacterium mucogenicum bloodstream infections among hospitalized oncology patients using fluorescence high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of mycolic acids. Isolates from blood cultures were compared to 16 isolates from environmental sites or water associated with this ward. These isolates were further characterized by hsp65, 16S rRNA, and rpoB gene sequencing, hsp65 PCR restriction analysis, and molecular typing methods, including repetitive element PCR, random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of large restriction fragments. Three of five patient isolates were confirmed as M. mucogenicum and were in a single cluster as determined by all identification and typing methods. The remaining two patient isolates were identified as different strains of Mycobacterium phocaicum by rpoB sequence analysis. One of these matched an environmental isolate from a swab of a hand shower in the patient's room, while none of the clinical isolates of M. mucogenicum matched environmental strains. Among the other 15 environmental isolates, 11 were identified as M. mucogenicum and 4 as M. phocaicum strains, all of which were unrelated by typing methods. Although the 16S rRNA gene sequences matched for all 14 M. mucogenicum isolates, there were two each of the hsp65 and rpoB sequevars, seven PCR typing patterns, and 12 PFGE patterns. Among the seven M. phocaicum isolates were three 16S rRNA sequevars, two hsp65 sequevars, two rpoB sequevars, six PCR typing patterns, and six PFGE patterns. This outbreak represents the first case of catheter-associated bacteremia caused by M. phocaicum and the first report of clinical isolates from a U.S. hospital. The investigation highlights important differences in the available typing methods for mycobacteria and demonstrates the genetic diversity of these organisms even within narrow confines of time and space. PMID:18310417

  20. Edwardsiella tarda bacteremia. A rare but fatal water- and foodborne infection: Review of the literature and clinical cases from a single centre

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Yuji; Asahata-Tago, Sayaka; Ainoda, Yusuke; Fujita, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Ken

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Edwardsiella tarda bacteremia (ETB) can be a fatal disease in humans. OBJECTIVES: To determine the significant risk factors associated with death caused by ETB, and to examine the geographical, seasonal, environmental and dietary factors of the disease. METHODS: A retrospective, observational, case control study was performed. The PubMed MEDLINE and Japanese Medical Abstract Society (www.jamas.or.jp) databases were searched for ETB case reports and meeting abstracts. In additon, retrospective chart reviews of patients with ETB at the Tokyo Women’s Medical University Hospital (Tokyo, Japan) were conducted to evaluate the risk factors associated with death using multivariate analyses. RESULTS: The literature search yielded 46 publications, comprising 72 cases from the English (n=30), French (n=1), Spanish (n=1) and Japanese (n=14) literature. Five cases at the Tokyo Women’s Medical University Hospital were also included. Of the included 77 cases, the mean age was 61 years and 39% of patients were female; 77.2% of the cases occurred between June and November, and 45.5% were reported in Japan. Dietary factors (raw fish/meat exposure) were reported for 10.4% of patients and 12.9% reported environmental (ie, brackish water) exposure. The overall mortality rate was 44.6%; however, this rate increased to 61.1% for ETB patients with soft tissue infections. Liver cirrhosis was determined to be an independent risk factor associated with death (OR 12.0 [95% CI 2.46 to 58.6]; P=0.00213) using multivariate analyses. DISCUSSION: To our knowledge, the present analysis was the first and largest multi-language review of ETB. Clinical characteristics of ETB resemble those of Aeromonas, typhoid fever and Vibrio vulnificus infections, in addition to sharing similar risk factors. CONCLUSION: ETB should be categorized as a severe food- and waterborne infection, which results in high mortality for patients with liver cirrhosis. PMID:26744588

  1. Rapid Testing Using the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Nucleic Acid Test in Combination with Antimicrobial Stewardship Intervention against Gram-Negative Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Leekha, Surbhi; Heil, Emily L.; Zhao, LiCheng; Badamas, Rilwan; Johnson, J. Kristie

    2014-01-01

    Rapid identification of microorganisms and antimicrobial resistance is paramount for targeted treatment in serious bloodstream infections (BSI). The Verigene Gram-negative blood culture nucleic acid test (BC-GN) is a multiplex, automated molecular diagnostic test for identification of eight Gram-negative (GN) organisms and resistance markers from blood culture with a turnaround time of approximately 2 h. Clinical isolates from adult patients at the University Maryland Medical Center with GN bacteremia from 1 January 2012 to 30 June 2012 were included in this study. Blood culture bottles were spiked with clinical isolates, allowed to incubate, and processed by BC-GN. A diagnostic evaluation was performed. In addition, a theoretical evaluation of time to effective and optimal antibiotic was performed, comparing actual antibiotic administration times from chart review (“control”) to theoretical administration times based on BC-GN reporting and antimicrobial stewardship team (AST) review (“intervention”). For organisms detected by the assay, BC-GN correctly identified 95.6% (131/137), with a sensitivity of 97.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 90.7 to 98.4%) and a specificity of 99.5% (95% CI, 98.8 to 99.8%). CTX-M and OXA resistance determinants were both detected. Allowing 12 h from Gram stain for antibiotic implementation, the intervention group had a significantly shorter duration to both effective (3.3 versus 7.0 h; P < 0.01) and optimal (23.5 versus 41.8 h; P < 0.01) antibiotic therapy. BC-GN with AST intervention can potentially decrease time to both effective and optimal antibiotic therapy in GN BSI. PMID:25547353

  2. Clinical and Molecular Characteristics of Neonatal Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Gram-Negative Bacteremia: A 12-Year Case-Control-Control Study of a Referral Center in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Horng; Lee, I-Ta; Chu, Shih-Ming; Lien, Reyin; Huang, Hsuan-Rong; Chiang, Ming-Chou; Fu, Ren-Huei; Hsu, Jen-Fu; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-01-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Gram-negative bacteremia (GNB) in the neonatal intensive care unit was characterized by comparison with two control groups: a susceptible control group and a general base population group over 2001 to 2012. The influence of ESBL production on mortality was studied in all study subjects and ESBL-GNB isolates were microbiologically characterized. We identified 77 episodes of ESBL-GNB (14.2% of all neonatal late-onset GNB), which were caused by Klebsiella spp. (62.3%), E. coli (20.8%) and Enterobacter spp. (16.9%). Most ESBL-GNB strains were genetically unrelated and the SHV-type ESBLs were the most prevalent (67% of isolates). Comparison with both control groups disclosed previous usage of 3rd generation cephalosporin (odds ratio [OR], 4.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.03-10.97; P < 0.001), and underlying renal disease (OR, 4.07; 95% CI, 1.10-15.08; P = 0.035) as independent risk factors for ESBL-GNB. Inadequate empiric antibiotics, a higher illness severity, higher rates of infectious complications and sepsis-attributable mortality were more frequently seen in neonates with ESBL-GNB than those with non-ESBL GNB (20.8% and 15.6% vs. 9.2% and 7.9%, respectively; P = 0.008 and 0.049, respectively). Neonates with underlying secondary hypertension (OR, 7.22; 95% CI, 2.17-24.06) and infectious complications after bacteremia (OR, 6.66; 95% CI, 1.81-19.31) were identified as independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality. ESBL-GNB accounted for one-seventh of all neonatal gram-negative bacteremia, especially in neonates exposed to broad-spectrum cephalosporins. Neonates with ESBL-GNB bacteremia more frequently received inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy, which were associated with a higher rate of infectious complications and an adverse outcome. PMID:27505270

  3. Clinical and Molecular Characteristics of Neonatal Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Gram-Negative Bacteremia: A 12-Year Case-Control-Control Study of a Referral Center in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Shih-Ming; Lien, Reyin; Huang, Hsuan-Rong; Chiang, Ming-Chou; Fu, Ren-Huei; Hsu, Jen-Fu; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-01-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Gram-negative bacteremia (GNB) in the neonatal intensive care unit was characterized by comparison with two control groups: a susceptible control group and a general base population group over 2001 to 2012. The influence of ESBL production on mortality was studied in all study subjects and ESBL-GNB isolates were microbiologically characterized. We identified 77 episodes of ESBL-GNB (14.2% of all neonatal late-onset GNB), which were caused by Klebsiella spp. (62.3%), E. coli (20.8%) and Enterobacter spp. (16.9%). Most ESBL-GNB strains were genetically unrelated and the SHV-type ESBLs were the most prevalent (67% of isolates). Comparison with both control groups disclosed previous usage of 3rd generation cephalosporin (odds ratio [OR], 4.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.03–10.97; P < 0.001), and underlying renal disease (OR, 4.07; 95% CI, 1.10–15.08; P = 0.035) as independent risk factors for ESBL-GNB. Inadequate empiric antibiotics, a higher illness severity, higher rates of infectious complications and sepsis-attributable mortality were more frequently seen in neonates with ESBL-GNB than those with non-ESBL GNB (20.8% and 15.6% vs. 9.2% and 7.9%, respectively; P = 0.008 and 0.049, respectively). Neonates with underlying secondary hypertension (OR, 7.22; 95% CI, 2.17–24.06) and infectious complications after bacteremia (OR, 6.66; 95% CI, 1.81–19.31) were identified as independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality. ESBL-GNB accounted for one-seventh of all neonatal gram-negative bacteremia, especially in neonates exposed to broad-spectrum cephalosporins. Neonates with ESBL-GNB bacteremia more frequently received inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy, which were associated with a higher rate of infectious complications and an adverse outcome. PMID:27505270

  4. Alterations of OprD in Carbapenem-Intermediate and -Susceptible Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients with Bacteremia in a Spanish Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Cabot, Gabriel; Rodríguez, Cristina; Roman, Elena; Tubau, Fe; Macia, María D.; Moya, Bartolomé; Zamorano, Laura; Suárez, Cristina; Peña, Carmen; Domínguez, María A.; Moncalián, Gabriel; Oliver, Antonio; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the presence of OprD mutations in 60 strains of metallo-ß-lactamase-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa intermediately susceptible (IS [n = 12]; MIC = 8 μg/ml) or susceptible (S [n = 48]; MICs ≤ 1 to 4 μg/ml) to imipenem and/or meropenem that were isolated from patients with bacteremia in order to evaluate their impact on carbapenem susceptibility profiles. The presence of mutations in oprD was detected by sequencing analysis. OprD expression was assessed by both outer membrane protein (OMP) analysis and real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Fourteen (23%) isolates had an OprD identical to that of PAO1, and OprD modifications were detected in 46 isolates (77%). Isolates were classified as OprD “full-length types” (T1 [n = 40, including both wild-type OprD and variants showing several polymorphisms]) and OprD “deficient types” (T2 [n = 3 for OprD frameshift mutations] and T3 [n = 17 for premature stop codons in oprD]). RT-PCR showed that 5 OprD type T1 isolates presented reduced transcription of oprD (0.1- to 0.4-fold compared to PAO1), while oprD levels increased more than 2-fold over that seen with PAO1 in 4 OprD type T1 isolates. A total of 50% of the isolates belonging to OprD “deficient types” were susceptible to both carbapenems, and 40% were susceptible to meropenem and intermediately susceptible to imipenem. Only one isolate (5%) within this group was intermediately susceptible to both carbapenems, and one (5%) was susceptible to imipenem and intermediately susceptible to meropenem. We concluded that OprD inactivating mutations in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa are not restricted only to carbapenem-resistant isolates but are also found in isolates with imipenem or meropenem MICs of only 0.06 to 4 μg/ml. PMID:22290967

  5. Doripenem MICs and ompK36 Porin Genotypes of Sequence Type 258, KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae May Predict Responses to Carbapenem-Colistin Combination Therapy among Patients with Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Ryan K.; Potoski, Brian A.; Press, Ellen G.; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Clarke, Lloyd G.; Eschenauer, Gregory A.; Clancy, Cornelius J.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment failures of a carbapenem-colistin regimen among patients with bacteremia due to sequence type 258 (ST258), KPC-2-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae were significantly more likely if both agents were inactive in vitro, as defined by a colistin MIC of >2 μg/ml and the presence of either a major ompK36 porin mutation (guanine and alanine insertions at amino acids 134 and 135 [ins aa 134–135 GD], IS5 promoter insertion [P = 0.007]) or a doripenem MIC of >8 μg/ml (P = 0.01). Major ompK36 mutations among KPC-K. pneumoniae strains are important determinants of carbapenem-colistin responses in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25534733

  6. Antimicrobial Activities of Ceftaroline and Comparator Agents against Bacterial Organisms Causing Bacteremia in Patients with Skin and Skin Structure Infections in U.S. Medical Centers, 2008 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Sader, Helio S; Flamm, Robert K; Mendes, Rodrigo E; Farrell, David J; Jones, Ronald N

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the antimicrobial susceptibility of 1,454 organisms consecutively collected from patients with bacteremia associated with skin and skin structure infections. The most common organisms obtained wereStaphylococcus aureus(670 organisms [46.1%]),Escherichia coli(200 organisms [13.8%]), β-hemolytic streptococci (βHS) (138 organisms [9.5%]), andKlebsiella pneumoniae(109 organisms [7.5%]). The susceptibility rates for ceftaroline were 97.9% forS. aureus(95.9% among methicillin-resistantS. aureus[MRSA]), 100.0% for βHS, 86.5% forE. coli, and 89.0% forK. pneumoniae Ceftaroline and tigecycline provided the best overall coverage. PMID:26856825

  7. [Recommendations for prevention of community-acquired pneumonia with bacteremia as the leading form of invasive pneumococcal infections in the population of people over 50 years of age and risk groups above 19 years of age].

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Piotr; Antczak, Adam; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Skoczyńska, Anna; Radzikowski, Andrzej; Kedziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Bernatowska, Ewa; Stompór, Tomasz; Grodzicki, Tomasz; Gyrczuk, Ewa; Imiela, Jacek; Jedrzejczak, Wiesław; Windak, Adam

    2014-02-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is a main cause of mortality associated with pneumococcal infections. Although, IPD is regarding mainly small children and persons in the age > 65 years, the investigations showed that because of IPD exactly sick persons are burdened with the greatest mortality in the older age, rather than of children. The most frequent form of IPD is community acquired pneumonia (CAP) with the bacteremia. The presence of even a single additional risk factor is increasing the probability of the unfavorable descent of pneumococcal infection. The risk factors for IPD and/or pneumonia with bacteremia apart from the age are among others asthma (> 2 x), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), sarcoidosis (4 x), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (5 x), bronchiectases (2 x), allergic alveolitis (1.9 x) and pneumoconiosis (2 x), type 1 diabetes (4.4 x), type 2 diabetes (1.2 x), autoimmune diseases (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis (4.2 to 14.9 x), kidney failure with the necessity to dialysis (12 x), immunosuppression, cardiovascular disease, alcoholism and cancers. Examinations show that the best method of IPD and CAP preventing are pneumococcal vaccinations. On the market for ages 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) is available covering close the 90% of IPD triggering stereotypes. Her role in preventing CAP is uncertain and the immunological answer after vaccination at older persons and after revaccination is weak. Widely discussed disadvantageous effects of growing old of the immunological system show on the benefit from applying the immunization inducing the immunological memory, i.e. of conjugated vaccines which are activating the T-dependent reply and are ensuring the readiness for the effective secondary response. Examinations so far conducted with conjugated 7-valent and 13-valent (PCV13) vaccines at persons in the age > 50 years are confirming these expectations. Also sick persons can take benefits from PCV13 applying back from so-called IPD

  8. Pediatric Multicenter Evaluation of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Test for Rapid Detection of Inpatient Bacteremia Involving Gram-Negative Organisms, Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases, and Carbapenemases

    PubMed Central

    Deburger, B.; Roundtree, S. S.; Ventrola, C. A.; Blecker-Shelly, D. L.; Mortensen, J. E.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the investigational use only (IUO) version of the rapid Verigene Gram-negative blood culture test (BC-GN), a microarray that detects 9 genus/species targets (Acinetobacter spp., Citrobacter spp., Enterobacter spp., Escherichia coli/Shigella spp., Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Serratia marcescens) and 6 antimicrobial resistance determinants (blaCTX-M, blaKPC, blaNDM, blaVIM, blaIMP, and blaOXA) directly from positive blood cultures. BC-GN was performed on positive BacT/Alert Pediatric FAN and Bactec Peds Plus blood cultures with Gram-negative organisms at two tertiary pediatric centers. Vitek MS (bioMérieux, Durham, NC) was used to assign gold standard organism identification. The Check MDR CT-102 microarray (Check Points B.V., Wageningen, Netherlands) was used as an alternative method for detecting resistance determinants. In total, 104 organisms were isolated from 97 clinical blood cultures. BC-GN correctly detected 26/26 cultures with Acinetobacter spp., P. aeruginosa, and S. marcescens, 5/6 with Citrobacter spp., 13/14 with Enterobacter spp., 23/24 with E. coli, 2/3 with K. oxytoca, 16/17 with K. pneumoniae, and 0/1 with Proteus spp. BC-GN appropriately reported negative BC-GN results in 8/13 blood cultures that grew organisms that were not represented on the microarray but failed to detect targets in 3/5 cultures that grew multiple Gram-negative organisms. BC-GN detected 5/5 and 1/1 clinical blood cultures with blaCTX-M and blaVIM. All 6 results were corroborated by Check MDR CT-102 microarray testing. The Verigene BC-GN test has the potential to expedite therapeutic decision making in pediatric patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. Sensitivity was satisfactory but may be suboptimal in mixed Gram-negative blood cultures. PMID:24759724

  9. Characterization of Alpha-Toxin hla Gene Variants, Alpha-Toxin Expression Levels, and Levels of Antibody to Alpha-Toxin in Hemodialysis and Postsurgical Patients with Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuling; Tabor, David E.; Mok, Hoyin; Sellman, Bret R.; Jenkins, Amy; Yu, Li; Jafri, Hasan S.; Rude, Thomas H.; Ruffin, Felicia; Schell, Wiley A.; Park, Lawrence P.; Yan, Qin; Thaden, Joshua T.; Messina, Julia A.; Esser, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-toxin is a major Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor. This study evaluated potential relationships between in vitro alpha-toxin expression of S. aureus bloodstream isolates, anti-alpha-toxin antibody in serum of patients with S. aureus bacteremia (SAB), and clinical outcomes in 100 hemodialysis and 100 postsurgical SAB patients. Isolates underwent spa typing and hla sequencing. Serum anti-alpha-toxin IgG and neutralizing antibody levels were measured by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a red blood cell (RBC)-based hemolysis neutralization assay. Neutralization of alpha-toxin by an anti-alpha-toxin monoclonal antibody (MAb MEDI4893) was tested in an RBC-based lysis assay. Most isolates encoded hla (197/200; 98.5%) and expressed alpha-toxin (173/200; 86.5%). In vitro alpha-toxin levels were inversely associated with survival (cure, 2.19 μg/ml, versus failure, 1.09 μg/ml; P < 0.01). Both neutralizing (hemodialysis, 1.26 IU/ml, versus postsurgical, 0.95; P < 0.05) and IgG (hemodialysis, 1.94 IU/ml, versus postsurgical, 1.27; P < 0.05) antibody levels were higher in the hemodialysis population. Antibody levels were also significantly higher in patients infected with alpha-toxin-expressing S. aureus isolates (P < 0.05). Levels of both neutralizing antibodies and IgG were similar among patients who were cured and those not cured (failures). Sequence analysis of hla revealed 12 distinct hla genotypes, and all genotypic variants were susceptible to a neutralizing monoclonal antibody in clinical development (MEDI4893). These data demonstrate that alpha-toxin is highly conserved in clinical S. aureus isolates. Higher in vitro alpha-toxin levels were associated with a positive clinical outcome. Although patients infected with alpha-toxin-producing S. aureus exhibited higher anti-alpha-toxin antibody levels, these levels were not associated with a better clinical outcome in this study. PMID:25392350

  10. Mycoplasma penetrans bacteremia and primary antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Yáñez, A.; Cedillo, L.; Neyrolles, O.; Alonso, E.; Prévost, M. C.; Rojas, J.; Watson, H. L.; Blanchard, A.; Cassell, G. H.

    1999-01-01

    Mycoplasma penetrans, a rare bacterium so far only found in HIV-infected persons, was isolated in the blood and throat of a non-HIV-infected patient with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (whose etiology and pathogenesis are unknown). PMID:10081687

  11. Quality of Care Is Improved by Rapid Short Incubation MALDI-ToF Identification from Blood Cultures as Measured by Reduced Length of Stay and Patient Outcomes as Part of a Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Bacteremia in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Amanda; Schaus, David

    2016-01-01

    the patients where the empirical therapy was considered to be optimal were similar with respect to length of stay; 13.04 and 10.93 days (p = 0.34). In the 2012 group there was a significant increase in the length of stay in the group needing change in excess of 30 days (p = 0.02) compared to the group where empirical therapy was considered to be optimal, this clearly showed an improvement in the quality of care received after the rapid identification was instituted in 2014. The 2012 group had a four times overall increased sepsis associated mortality risk compared to the 2014 group and when empirical antibiotics needed to be optimized this risk was 7 times compared to the 2014 group. We conclude that rapid identification of bacterial pathogens in pediatric blood cultures with a rapid incubation MALDI-TOF identification protocol plays an important role in improving quality of care as part of a multidisciplinary approach to pediatric bacteremia and sepsis. PMID:27513860

  12. Bartonella clarridgeiae bacteremia detected in an asymptomatic blood donor.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Damiani, Gislaine; Diniz, Pedro Paulo Vissotto de Paiva; Pitassi, Luiza Helena Urso; Sowy, Stanley; Scorpio, Diana Gerardi; Lania, Bruno Grosselli; Drummond, Marina Rovani; Soares, Tânia Cristina Benetti; Barjas-Castro, Maria de Lourdes; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Nicholson, William L; Velho, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to Bartonella clarridgeiae has been reported only on the basis of antibody detection. We report for the first time an asymptomatic human blood donor infected with B. clarridgeiae, as documented by enrichment blood culture, PCR, and DNA sequencing. PMID:25392353

  13. Bartonella clarridgeiae Bacteremia Detected in an Asymptomatic Blood Donor

    PubMed Central

    Vieira-Damiani, Gislaine; Pitassi, Luiza Helena Urso; Sowy, Stanley; Scorpio, Diana Gerardi; Lania, Bruno Grosselli; Drummond, Marina Rovani; Soares, Tânia Cristina Benetti; Barjas-Castro, Maria de Lourdes; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.; Nicholson, William L.; Velho, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to Bartonella clarridgeiae has been reported only on the basis of antibody detection. We report for the first time an asymptomatic human blood donor infected with B. clarridgeiae, as documented by enrichment blood culture, PCR, and DNA sequencing. PMID:25392353

  14. Bacteremia secondary to Alloscardovia omnicolens urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yoshihiko; Koizumi, Akira; Kasahara, Kei; Lee, Sang-Tae; Yamada, Yuki; Nakano, Ryuichi; Yano, Hisakazu; Mikasa, Keiichi

    2016-06-01

    A 70-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with malaise, bilateral leg edema, and oliguria. She had a history of advanced uterine cancer. Bilateral double-J catheters were inserted because growth of intra-abdominal metastases led to bilateral ureteral stricture and hydronephrosis. Two days later, she suddenly developed high fever. Thin gram-positive bacilli of moderate length were detected in the anaerobic blood culture bottles. We performed 16S ribosomal RNA analysis of the isolate and it showed 100% match with Alloscardovia omnicolens DSM 21503(T). She was successfully treated with cefmetazole in addition to percutaneous nephrostomy. PMID:26829996

  15. Bacteremia and Antimicrobial Drug Resistance over Time, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Amuzu, Sylvarius K.; de Ciman, Ring; Kassimova, Iparkhan; Groß, Lisa; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Rosenberg, Ulrike; Schulze, Marco; Stich, August; Zimmermann, Ortrud

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial distribution and antimicrobial drug resistance were monitored in patients with bacterial bloodstream infections in rural hospitals in Ghana. In 2001–2002 and in 2009, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi was the most prevalent pathogen. Although most S. enterica serovar Typhi isolates were chloramphenicol resistant, all isolates tested were susceptible to ciprofloxacin. PMID:22000360

  16. Rapid diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteremia by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Folgueira, L; Delgado, R; Palenque, E; Aguado, J M; Noriega, A R

    1996-01-01

    A method based on DNA amplification and hybridization has been used for the rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in blood samples from 38 hospitalized patients (15 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] positive and 23 HIV negative) in whom localized or disseminated forms of tuberculosis were suspected. In 32 of these patients, the diagnosis of tuberculosis was eventually confirmed by conventional bacteriological or histological procedures. M. tuberculosis DNA was detected with the PCR technique in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 9 of 11 (82%) HIV-infected patients and in 7 of 21 (33%) HIV-negative patients (P < 0.01), while M. tuberculosis blood cultures were positive in 1 of 8 (12.5%) and 1 of 18 (5.5%) patients, respectively. PCR was positive in all cases with disseminated disease in both HIV-negative and HIV-positive patients and also in the HIV-positive patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Seven samples from patients with documented illness other than tuberculosis and 12 specimens from healthy volunteers, including seven volunteers with a recent positive purified protein derivative test, were used as controls and had a negative PCR. These results suggest that detection of M. tuberculosis DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells may be a useful tool for rapid diagnosis of disseminated and extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis, especially in an HIV-positive population. PMID:8904404

  17. Increased Sheep Lung Vascular Permeability Caused by Pseudomonas Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Brigham, Kenneth L.; Woolverton, William C.; Blake, Lynn H.; Staub, Norman C.

    1974-01-01

    In awake sheep, we compared the responses of lung lymph flow and lymph and plasma protein concentrations to steady state elevations of pulmonary vascular pressures made by inflating a left atrial balloon with those after an intravenous infusion of 105-1010Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Lymph flow increased when pressure was increased, but lymph-plasma protein concentration ratios always fell and lymph protein flow (lymph flow × lymph protein concentration) increased only slightly. After Pseudomonas, sheep had transient chills, fever, leukopenia, hypoxemia, increased pulmonary artery pressure and lymph flow and decreased left atrial pressure and lymph protein concentration, 3-5 h after Pseudomonas, when vascular pressures and lymph protein concentrations had returned to near base line, lymph flow increased further to 3-10 times base line and remained at a steady level for many hours. During this steady state period, lymph-plasma protein concentration ratios were similar to base line and lymph protein flow was higher than in the increased pressure studies. Two sheep died of pulmonary edema 7 and 9 h after Pseudomonas, but in 16 studies, five other sheep appeared well during the period of highest lymph flow and all variables returned to base line in 24-72 h. Six serial indicator dilution lung water studies in five sheep changed insignificantly from base line after Pseudomonas. Postmortem lung water was high in the two sheep dead of pulmonary edema and one other, but six sheep killed 1-6 h after Pseudomonas had normal lung water. Because of the clear difference between the effects of increased pressure and Pseudomonas on lymphplasma protein concentration ratios and lymph protein flow, we conclude that Pseudomonas causes a prolonged increase in lung vessel permeability to protein. Because we saw lung lymph flow as high as 10 times base line without pulmonary edema, we conclude that lung lymphatics are a sensitive high-capacity mechanism for removing excess filtered fluid. An equivalent pore model of sheep lung vessels suggests that the changes we saw after Pseudomonas could result from small changes in the structure of exchanging vessel walls. Images PMID:4430713

  18. Prolonged incubation period in neonatal Pasteurella multocida meningitis and bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Tamura, Takuya; Abe, Michiko; Ogiwara, Shigetoshi; Sai, Shuji; Kosugiyama, Kiyotaka; Sugihara, Akemi; Nagumo, Kiyoshi; Iwata, Seido; Kinugawa, Yoshikazu

    2014-12-01

    Pasteurella multocida, often found as part of the human oral flora and in finger/toenails, also exists in many animals, especially cats, dogs, and pigs. Although rare, pasteurella infection in neonates can cause serious systemic disease, such as meningitis. In this article, a 23-day-old girl presented with decreased appetite and irritability for >2 days. Eighteen days previously her pet cat had jumped onto the left side of her head while she was sleeping. On laboratory data C-reactive protein was high, and on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis leukocyte count was extremely high, with low glucose and high protein. P. multocida grew out of the blood and CSF cultures, and she was successfully treated with antibiotics for 3 weeks. Although pasteurellosis rarely occurs, it can sometimes lead to life-threatening situations, so parents should exercise caution when having pets around their children. PMID:25521988

  19. Fulminating bacteremia and pneumonia due to Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J M; Hair, J G; Hebert, M; Hebert, L; Roberts, F J; Weyant, R S

    1997-01-01

    We present two cases of rapidly progressing, fatal pneumonia caused by Bacillus cereus. These cases are interesting in that B. cereus, even from blood or sputum specimens, may often be considered a contaminant and receive inadequate attention. Also of interest was the fact that the two patients resided in the same area of the state, were welders by trade, and became ill within a few days of each other, yet there was no epidemiologic link between them. PMID:9003628

  20. Two Cases of Bacteremia Due to Roseomonas mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Kyung; Moon, Jung Suk; Song, Kyung Eun

    2016-01-01

    Roseomonas is a genus of pink-pigmented nonfermentative bacilli. These slow-growing, gram-negative cocobacilli form pink-colored colonies on sheep blood agar. They differ from other pink-pigmented nonfermenters, including Methylobacterium, in morphology, biochemical characteristics, and DNA sequence. Roseomonas strains are rarely isolated in clinical laboratories; therefore, we report two cases in order to improve our ability to identify these pathogens. We isolated two strains of Roseomonas mucosa from the venous blood cultures of two patients, an 84-yr-old woman with common bile duct obstruction and a 17-yr-old male with acute myeloid leukemia who had an indwelling central-venous catheter for chemotherapy. The isolated strains were confirmed as R. mucosa by 16S rRNA sequencing. PMID:27139611

  1. Bacteremia caused by Rothia mucilaginosa after pneumonia, in a patient with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bayhan, Cihangül; Karadag Oncel, Eda; Cengiz, Ali B; Oksüz, Ayça B; Aydin, Güzide B

    2016-10-01

    Rothia muciloginosa is a member of normal flora and rarely causes invasive disease. Immunosupressed patients have increased risk for severe infection. Here, we report a male patient with relapsed neuroblastoma hospitalized for pneumonia. After clinical improvement, patient's respiratory symptoms worsened again. Rothia muciloginosa was isolated from blood culture. The worsening of respiratory symptoms can be explained by hematogenous spread of bacteria. He was successfully treated with meropenem and vancomycin for 14 days. This rarely seen bacterium is known to have high mortality rates unless treated appropriately and should be considered especially in patients with malignancy due to their immunsupressed situation. PMID:27606659

  2. Direct detection and drug-resistance profiling of bacteremias using inertial microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Han Wei; Bhattacharyya, Roby P.; Hung, Deborah T.; Han, Jongyoon

    2015-01-01

    Detection of bacteria in bloodstream infections and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns is critical to guide therapeutic decision-making for optimal patient care. Current culture-based assays are too slow (>48 hrs), leading to excessive up-front use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and/or incorrect antibiotic choices due to resistant bacteria, each with deleterious consequences for patient care and public health. To approach this problem, we describe a method to rapidly isolate bacteria from whole blood using inertial microfluidics and directly determine pathogen identity and antibiotic susceptibility with hybridization-based RNA detection. Using the principle of Dean flow fractionation, bacteria are separated from host blood cells in a label-free separation method with efficient recovery of even low abundance bacteria. Ribosomal RNA detection can then be applied for direct identification of low abundance pathogens (~100/mL) from blood without culturing or enzymatic amplification. Messenger RNA detection of antibiotic-responsive transcripts after brief drug exposure permits rapid susceptibility determination from bacteria with minimal culturing (~105/mL). This unique coupling of microfluidic cell separation with RNA-based molecular detection techniques represents significant progress towards faster diagnostics (~8 hours) to guide antibiotic therapy. PMID:25882432

  3. Spondylodiscitis and bacteremia due to Staphylococcus hyicus in an immunocompetent man

    PubMed Central

    Foissac, Maud; Lekaditi, Maria; Loutfi, Bouchra; Ehrhart, Agnès; Dauchy, Frédéric-Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Staphylococcus hyicus is a coagulase-variable Staphylococcus spp. well-known by veterinarians since it is the major agent of a severe cutaneous infection in piglets called exudative epidermitis. In other species the symptoms of infection are quite different. Human cases are uncommon but seem to occur more frequently after repeated contacts with farm animals. Case report We report the case of a 58-year-old man suffering from debilitating subacute lumbar pain, in whom diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis was based on spine MRI and positive microbiological results. A strain of S. hyicus was surprisingly isolated from blood cultures and bone biopsy. Identification was confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS, Bruker, USA), and the patient was successfully cured with a six-week course of anti-staphylococcal antibiotic regimen. Conclusion The prevalence of S. hyicus in human clinical samples is very low, but may be underestimated. This pathogen may enter the bloodstream through a skin injury, and then induce various pyogenic manifestations in people working with farm animals. S. hyicus exfoliative toxins, responsible for dermatological lesions in piglets, seem unable to damage the human epidermis, explaining the absence of cutaneous blisters in the previously reported cases. Precise data about its pathogenicity in humans and the adequate therapy are lacking. PMID:27622163

  4. Impact of Inappropriate Empiric Antimicrobial Therapy on Mortality of Septic Patients with Bacteremia: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Lueangarun, Saoraya; Leelarasamee, Amorn

    2012-01-01

    Background. Inappropriate empiric antimicrobials could be a major cause of unfavorable mortality rates in co-morbid patients. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and impact of first-dose and 24-hour inappropriate antimicrobials on mortality rates of bacteremic septic patients. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was employed. Case record forms of patients diagnosed as sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock with positive hemoculture during 2009 were retrieved from the medical wards, Siriraj Hospital. Demographic data, antimicrobial use, types of bacteria isolated from blood and susceptibilities, patients' comorbidities, 28-day and overall mortality rates were collected and analyzed. Results. There were 229 cases, mean age (SD) of 63.5 (17.2) years and mean (SD) APACHE II score of 24.7 (6.8). The prevalence of first-dose and 24-hour inappropriate antimicrobials was 29.7% and 25.3%, respectively. The 28-day and overall mortality rates between first-dose inappropriate and appropriate antimicrobial were 67.6% versus 60.2% (P = 0.301) and 75.0% versus 68.3% (P = 0.345), consequently. Patients with septic shock and inappropriate first-dose antimicrobials significantly had higher 28-day mortality rate (61.6% versus 41.9%; P = 0.017). Conclusion. Higher mortality rates in bacteremic septic patients were substantially associated with inappropriate first-dose antimicrobials and 3-hour delayed antimicrobial administration after sepsis diagnosis. PMID:22919379

  5. DO TRANSPORTATION AND HOLDING INFLUENCE SALMONELLA BACTEREMIA AND POPULATION DIVERSITY OF CAMPYLOBACTER IN COMMERCIAL TURKEYS?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously reported a shift in the distribution of C. jejuni and C. coli in market weight turkeys based on cloacal swabs collected on-farm and after transport to the abattoir. In contrast, we previously found no difference in the Salmonella prevalence based on transport crate swabs. The ...

  6. Simple models do not explain early dynamics of H. influenzae bacteremia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xinxian; Levin, Bruce; Nemenman, Ilya

    2015-03-01

    There is an abundance of largely qualitative information about the physiological and molecular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis. However, little is known about population dynamic processes by which bacteria colonize hosts and invade cells and tissues and thereby cause disease. Classic experiment of Moxon and Murphy observed that, when inoculated intranasally with a mixture of equally virulent strains of Haemophilus influenzae type b(Hib), neonatal rats develop a bacteremic infection that often is dominated by only one random competing strain. A common qualitative explanation for this phenomenon is that the bacteria must switch stochastically into a rapidly growing phenotype to start the full-fledged invasion. Then the first bacterium to switch activates the host immune response, which in turn 'shuts the door' in front of the second strain. We implemented this model computationally and analytically, and we conclude that this model cannot explain the data, specifically, the observed dependence of the rate of infections on the inoculum size. New experiments are needed to identify mechanisms underlying the dependence.

  7. Unusual non-serogroup O1 Vibrio cholerae bacteremia associated with liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, R; Ghafoor, M A; Nasralah, A Y

    1989-01-01

    A 50-year-old woman and a 31-year-old man with underlying liver disease presented with fever and signs of liver failure. The blood cultures in both cases yielded non-serogroup O1 Vibrio cholerae strains which were biochemically identical except that one strain was nonmotile. Despite treatment with antibiotics, the older patient died; the other patient survived. Both strains were found to be susceptible to most antibiotics tested in vitro. No apparent source of infection could be identified in either case. PMID:2592546

  8. Reversion From Methicillin Susceptibility to Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus During Treatment of Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Proulx, Megan K; Palace, Samantha G; Gandra, Sumanth; Torres, Brenda; Weir, Susan; Stiles, Tracy; Ellison, Richard T; Goguen, Jon D

    2016-03-15

    Approximately 3% of Staphylococcus aureus strains that, according to results of conventional phenotypic methods, are highly susceptible to methicillin-like antibiotics also have polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results positive for mecA. The genetic nature of these mecA-positive methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strains has not been investigated. We report the first clearly defined case of reversion from methicillin susceptibility to methicillin resistance among mecA-positive MSSA within a patient during antibiotic therapy. We describe the mechanism of reversion for this strain and for a second clinical isolate that reverts at a similar frequency. The rates of reversion are of the same order of magnitude as spontaneous resistance to drugs like rifampicin. When mecA is detected by PCR in the clinical laboratory, current guidelines recommend that these strains be reported as resistant. Because combination therapy using both a β-lactam and a second antibiotic suppressing the small revertant population may be superior to alternatives such as vancomycin, the benefits of distinguishing between mecA-positive MSSA and MRSA in clinical reports should be evaluated. PMID:26503983

  9. Bacteremia in free-ranging Hawaiian green turtles, Chelonia mydas, with fibropapillomatosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.; Wolcott, M.; Morris, R.

    2003-01-01

    Past studies of free-ranging green turtles Chelonia mydas with fibropapillomatosis (FP) in Hawaii have shown that animals become immunosuppressed with increasing severity of this disease. Additionally, preliminary clinical examination of moribund turtles with FP revealed that some animals were also bacteraemic. We tested the hypothesis that bacteraemia in sea turtles is associated with the severity of FP. We captured free-ranging green turtles from areas in Hawaii where FP is absent, and areas where FP has been endemic since the late 1950s. Each turtle was given an FP severity score ranging from 0 (no tumours) to 3 (severely affected). A fifth category included turtles that were stranded ashore and moribund with FP. We found that the percentage of turtles with bacteraemia increased with the severity of FP, and that the majority of bacteria cultured were Vibrio spp. Turtles with severe FP were more susceptible to bactaeremia, probably in part due to immunosuppression. The pattern of bacteraemia in relation to severity of disease strengthens the hypothesis that immunosuppression is a sequel to FP.

  10. Ecthyma gangrenosum in the periorbital region in a previously healthy immunocompetent woman without bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Somenath; Patra, Arnab Kumar; Mondal, Madhumita

    2016-01-01

    Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG) is a cutaneous lesion classically associated with potentially fatal Pseudomonas septicemia in immunocompromised patients. Other bacterial and fungal pathogens have also been implicated. Although EG typically occurs in immunocompromised or neutropenic patients, it may occasionally affect a previously healthy person. The cutaneous findings are characteristic with small indurated papulovesicles progressing rapidly to necrotic ulcers with surrounding erythema and a central black Eschar. While lesions can occur at any site, most are commonly found over the buttocks, perineum, limbs, and axillae. We describe a case of EG in periorbital region in a previously healthy woman who responded to appropriate antibiotic treatment for Pseudomonas. It is very important to establish the diagnosis early so that appropriate systemic antibiotic therapy can be initiated to reduce morbidity and potential mortality. PMID:26955586

  11. Ecthyma gangrenosum in the periorbital region in a previously healthy immunocompetent woman without bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Somenath; Patra, Arnab Kumar; Mondal, Madhumita

    2016-01-01

    Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG) is a cutaneous lesion classically associated with potentially fatal Pseudomonas septicemia in immunocompromised patients. Other bacterial and fungal pathogens have also been implicated. Although EG typically occurs in immunocompromised or neutropenic patients, it may occasionally affect a previously healthy person. The cutaneous findings are characteristic with small indurated papulovesicles progressing rapidly to necrotic ulcers with surrounding erythema and a central black Eschar. While lesions can occur at any site, most are commonly found over the buttocks, perineum, limbs, and axillae. We describe a case of EG in periorbital region in a previously healthy woman who responded to appropriate antibiotic treatment for Pseudomonas. It is very important to establish the diagnosis early so that appropriate systemic antibiotic therapy can be initiated to reduce morbidity and potential mortality. PMID:26955586

  12. Plantar Purpura as the Initial Presentation of Viridians Streptococcal Shock Syndrome Secondary to Streptococcus gordonii Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chen-Yi; Su, Kuan-Jen; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Huang, Shu-Fang; Chin, Hsien-Kuo; Chang, Chin-Wen; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Ben, Ren-Jy; Yeh, Yen-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Viridians streptococcal shock syndrome is a subtype of toxic shock syndrome. Frequently, the diagnosis is missed initially because the clinical features are nonspecific. However, it is a rapidly progressive disease, manifested by hypotension, rash, palmar desquamation, and acute respiratory distress syndrome within a short period. The disease course is generally fulminant and rarely presents initially as a purpura over the plantar region. We present a case of a 54-year-old female hospital worker diagnosed with viridians streptococcal shock syndrome caused by Streptococcus gordonii. Despite aggressive antibiotic treatment, fluid hydration, and use of inotropes and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, the patient succumbed to the disease. Early diagnosis of the potentially fatal disease followed by a prompt antibiotic regimen and appropriate use of steroids are cornerstones in the management of this disease to reduce the risk of high morbidity and mortality. PMID:27366188

  13. Virulence factors profiles and ESBL production in Escherichia coli causing bacteremia in Peruvian children.

    PubMed

    Palma, Noemí; Gomes, Cláudia; Riveros, Maribel; García, Wilfredo; Martínez-Puchol, Sandra; Ruiz-Roldán, Lidia; Mateu, Judit; García, Coralith; Jacobs, Jan; Ochoa, Theresa J; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2016-09-01

    The presence of 25 virulence genes (VGs), genetic phylogroups, quinolone-resistance and Extended Spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-production was assessed in 65 Escherichia coli isolates from blood cultures in children <5 years in Peru. The most frequent VGs were fimA (89.2%), iutA (83.1%), agn43 (72.3%), iucA (67.7%), and fyuA (49.2%). The isolates belonged to D (47.7%), A (26.1%), B1 (21.5%), and B2 (4.6%) phylogroups. D + B2 isolates presented a high number of fimA, hly, papC, sat, and fyuA genes. Quinolone-susceptible (22 isolates - 33.8%) and ESBL-negative (31 isolates - 47.7%) isolates carried more VGs that their respective counterparts (5.7 vs. 4.7 and 5.3 vs. 4.4 respectively); the frequency of the fyuA, aat, aap, and hly genes significantly differed between quinolone-resistant and quinolone-susceptible isolates. Neonatal sepsis isolates tended to be more quinolone-resistant (P = 0.0697) and ESBL-producers (P = 0.0776). Early-onset neonatal sepsis isolates possessed a high number of VGs (5.2 VGs), especially in neonates of ≤1 day (5.9 VGs). PMID:27345125

  14. Bacteremia and vegetative endocarditis associated with a heart murmur in a blue-and-gold macaw.

    PubMed

    Isaza, R; Buergelt, C; Kollias, G V

    1992-01-01

    A 6-year-old male blue-and-gold macaw (Ara ararauna) was presented with severe weakness, anorexia, and weight loss of 2 weeks duration. Cardiac auscultation revealed a soft systolic murmur. Blood cultures collected both antemortem and postmortem yielded pure isolates of Enterobacter cloacae. At necropsy, vegetative endocarditis was found involving the left atrioventricular valve. Microscopically, the lesion on the valve was characterized by a mixture of necrotic material, colonies of gram-negative bacteria, fibrosis, and inflammatory infiltrate consisting primarily of heterophils. PMID:1485868

  15. The Forgotten One: Lemierre’s Syndrome Due to Gram-Negative Rods Prevotella Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Priyanka; Antony, Nishaal; Wardi, Miraie; Rodriguez-Castro, Carlos E.; Teleb, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 22 Final Diagnosis: Lemierre’s syndrome Symptoms: Dyspnea • chest pain • swelling Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Thoracentesis Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Lemierre’s syndrome (LS) is a rare syndrome caused by an acute oropharyngeal infection with metastatic spreading. It was described in 1939 as jugular vein septic thrombophlebitis associated with retropharyngeal infection. Different organisms can cause LS, such as Fusobacterium species, Peptostreptococcus, group B and C, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and Enterococcus species, but the most commonly isolated pathogen is Fusobacterium necrophorum, a common oral flora. Management depends on the initial presentation, type of pathogen isolated, and proper selection of antibiotics. Case Report: We report a case of a 22-year-old man with no past medical history, who presented with left jaw pain and progressive left facial area swelling associated with dyspnea. A final diagnosis of LS was made based on criteria of computed tomography (CT) of the neck and the clinical symptoms. The patient was started on broad-spectrum antibiotics. Subsequent imaging of the chest showed pleural effusion with septic emboli. He underwent thoracentesis and chest tube placement. Final blood cultures were remarkable for gram-negative rods – Prevotella anaerobes – which supported the diagnosis of LS. His condition improved, including the dyspnea, and he was discharged on the proper antibiotics coverage with outpatient follow-up. Conclusions: LS is a rare condition associated with metastatic infection spreading. This syndrome can be associated with further complications, such as pleural effusions and/or empyemas. Early recognition is important to prevent fatal complications and provide adequate antibiotics coverage. We report only the third case in the medical literature of Prevotella-induced LS with a secondary complication of pleural effusion. PMID:26751621

  16. A 34-Day-Old With Fever, Cerebrospinal Fluid Pleocytosis, and Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Horner, Kimberly; Yamada, Masaki; Zuccoli, Giulio; Rosenberg, Stacy; Greene, Stephanie; Vellody, Kishore; Zuckerbraun, Noel S

    2016-01-01

    A 34-day-old previously healthy boy born full term presented to the emergency department with fever at home (38.1°C), fussiness, and decreased oral intake for 1 day. He was difficult to console at home. He had decreased oral intake without emesis, diarrhea, or a change in urine output. He did not have rhinorrhea, cough, or increased work of breathing noted by parents. He lived at home with his parents and 13-year-old brother, did not attend day care, and had no sick contacts. On examination, he was fussy but consolable. He was febrile to 39.3°C, tachycardic (180 beats per minute), and tachypneic (64 breaths per minute), with mottling and a capillary refill of 3 seconds. The remainder of his examination was normal, without an infectious focus for his fever. A complete blood cell count with differential revealed leukocytosis. A basic metabolic panel was normal. A catheter urinalysis was normal. Cerebrospinal fluid examination yielded pleocytosis, low glucose, and elevated protein. Blood cultures were persistently positive with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, but cerebrospinal fluid cultures remained negative. We present his case, management, and ultimate diagnosis. PMID:26644490

  17. Fatal bacteremia by neisseria cinerea in a woman with myelodysplastic syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaofei; Li, Min; Cao, Huiling; Yang, Xuewen

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria cinerea has been rarely found in blood cultures. In this study, we are reporting a case of a Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) patient in whose blood Neisseria cinerea was found and led a fatal consequence. This case will call our attentions to the uncommon pathogens in the pathogenicity of end-stage patients. PMID:26131259

  18. Reduced Parasite Burden in Children with Falciparum Malaria and Bacteremia Coinfections: Role of Mediators of Inflammation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Davenport, Gregory C.; Hittner, James B.; Otieno, Vincent; Karim, Zachary; Mukundan, Harshini; Fenimore, Paul W.; Hengartner, Nicolas W.; McMahon, Benjamin H.; Kempaiah, Prakasha; Ong’echa, John M.; et al

    2016-01-01

    Bmore » acteremia and malaria coinfection is a common and life-threatening condition in children residing in sub-Saharan Africa. We previously showed that coinfection with Gram negative (G[−]) entericacilli and Plasmodium falciparum ( Pf [+]) was associated with reduced high-density parasitemia (HDP, >10,000 parasites/ μ L), enhanced respiratory distress, and severe anemia. Since inflammatory mediators are largely unexplored in such coinfections, circulating cytokines were determined in four groups of children ( n = 206 , aged <3 yrs): healthy; Pf [+] alone; G[−] coinfected; and G[+] coinfected. Staphylococcus aureus and non-Typhi Salmonella were the most frequently isolated G[+] and G[−] organisms, respectively. Coinfected children, particularly those with G[−] pathogens, had lower parasite burden (peripheral and geometric mean parasitemia and HDP). In addition, both coinfected groups had increased IL-4, IL-5, IL-7, IL-12, IL-15, IL-17, IFN- γ , and IFN- α and decreased TNF- α relative to malaria alone. Children with G[−] coinfection had higher IL-1 β and IL-1Ra and lower IL-10 than the Pf [+] group and higher IFN- γ than the G[+] group. To determine how the immune response to malaria regulates parasitemia, cytokine production was investigated with a multiple mediation model. Cytokines with the greatest mediational impact on parasitemia were IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, and IFN- γ . Results here suggest that enhanced immune activation, especially in G[−] coinfected children, acts to reduce malaria parasite burden.« less

  19. Enhanced Diagnostic Yields of Bacteremia and Candidemia in Blood Specimens by PCR-Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Laffler, Thomas G.; Cummins, Lendell L.; McClain, Colt M.; Quinn, Criziel D.; Toro, Michelle A.; Carolan, Heather E.; Toleno, Donna M.; Rounds, Megan A.; Eshoo, Mark W.; Stratton, Charles W.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Blyn, Lawrence B.; Ecker, David J.

    2013-01-01

    A prospective study was performed to determine the value of direct molecular testing of whole blood for detecting the presence of culturable and unculturable bacteria and yeasts in patients with suspected bloodstream infections. A total of 464 adult and pediatric patients with positive blood cultures matched with 442 patients with negative blood cultures collected during the same period were recruited during a 10-month study. PCR amplification coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR-ESI-MS) plus blood culture reached an overall agreement of 78.6% in the detection and species-level identification of bacterial and candidal pathogens. Of 33 culture-negative/PCR-ESI-MS-positive specimens, 31 (93.9%) were judged to be truly bacteremic and/or candidemic based on a medical chart review and analytical metrics. Among the 15 culture-positive specimens in which PCR-ESI-MS detected additional bacterial or yeast species, 66.7% and 20.0% of the additional positive specimens by PCR-ESI-MS were judged to be truly or possibly bacteremic and/or candidemic, respectively. Direct analysis of blood samples by PCR-ESI-MS rapidly detects bacterial and yeast pathogens in patients with bloodstream infections. When used in conjunction with blood culture, PCR-ESI-MS enhances the diagnostics of septicemia by shortening test turnaround time and improving yields. PMID:23966503

  20. Comparative evaluation of Oxoid Signal and BACTEC radiometric blood culture systems for the detection of bacteremia and fungemia

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, M.P.; Mirrett, S.; Reller, L.B.

    1988-05-01

    The Oxoid Signal blood culture system is a newly described, innovative method for visually detecting growth of microorganisms. We did 5,999 paired comparisons of equal volumes (10 ml) of blood in the Oxoid Signal and BACTEC radiometric blood culture systems at two university hospitals that use identical methods of obtaining and processing specimens. Overall, more microorganisms were detected in the BACTEC system (P less than 0.001), in particular, streptococci (P less than 0.01), fungi (P less than 0.001), and nonfermentative gram-negative rods, especially Acinetobacter species (P less than 0.001). Trends favoring the BACTEC system for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Haemophilus species, and Neisseria species were noted. There were no differences in the yield of staphylococci, members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, and anaerobic bacteria. When both systems detected sepsis, the BACTEC did so earlier (P less than 0.001). This advantage was most notable at 24 h (70% of BACTEC positives detected versus 48% of Oxoid positives). The proportion of positives detected after 48 h, however, was similar (BACTEC, 84%; Oxoid, 78%). Revisions in the Oxoid Signal system itself or in the processing of Oxoid bottles appear to be necessary to improve its performance in detecting certain microorganism groups, especially fungi.

  1. Whole-Genome Sequencing Identifies Emergence of a Quinolone Resistance Mutation in a Case of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Theodore R.; Altman, Deena R.; Attie, Oliver; Sebra, Robert; Hamula, Camille L.; Lewis, Martha; Deikus, Gintaras; Newman, Leah C.; Fang, Gang; Hand, Jonathan; Patel, Gopi; Wallach, Fran; Schadt, Eric E.; Huprikar, Shirish; van Bakel, Harm; Bashir, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome sequences for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia serial isolates from a bacteremic patient before and after development of levofloxacin resistance were assembled de novo and differed by one single-nucleotide variant in smeT, a repressor for multidrug efflux operon smeDEF. Along with sequenced isolates from five contemporaneous cases, they displayed considerable diversity compared against all published complete genomes. Whole-genome sequencing and complete assembly can conclusively identify resistance mechanisms emerging in S. maltophilia strains during clinical therapy. PMID:26324280

  2. Outbreak of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia among patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation: association with faulty replacement of handwashing soap.

    PubMed

    Klausner, J D; Zukerman, C; Limaye, A P; Corey, L

    1999-11-01

    Using molecular typing methods, we confirmed an outbreak of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia among bone marrow transplant patients. The likely source was a healthcare worker who may have washed with moisturizer instead of soap between patients. Hospital epidemiologists need to go beyond antibiograms when evaluating outbreaks and be vigilant about all aspects of hand washing. PMID:10580627

  3. Superantigens produced by catheter-associated Staphylococcus aureus elicit systemic inflammatory disease in the absence of bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jin-Won; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Karau, Melissa J; Tilahun, Ashenafi; Khaleghi, Shahryar Rostamkolaei; Chowdhary, Vaidehi R; David, Chella S; Patel, Robin; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2015-08-01

    SAgs, produced by Staphylococcus aureus, play a major role in the pathogenesis of invasive staphylococcal diseases by inducing potent activation of the immune system. However, the role of SAgs, produced by S. aureus, associated with indwelling devices or tissues, are not known. Given the prevalence of device-associated infection with toxigenic S. aureus in clinical settings and the potency of SAgs, we hypothesized that continuous exposure to SAgs produced by catheter-associated S. aureus could have systemic consequences. To investigate these effects, we established a murine in vivo catheter colonization model. One centimeter long intravenous catheters were colonized with a clinical S. aureus isolate producing SAgs or isogenic S. aureus strains, capable or incapable of producing SAg. Catheters were subcutaneously implanted in age-matched HLA-DR3, B6, and AE(o) mice lacking MHC class II molecules and euthanized 7 d later. There was no evidence of systemic infection. However, in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice, which respond robustly to SSAgs, the SSAg-producing, but not the nonproducing strains, caused a transient increase in serum cytokine levels and a protracted expansion of splenic CD4(+) T cells expressing SSAg-reactive TCR Vβ8. Lungs, livers, and kidneys from these mice showed infiltration with CD4(+) and CD11b(+) cells. These findings were absent in B6 and AE(o) mice, which are known to respond poorly to SSAgs. Overall, our novel findings suggest that systemic immune activation elicited by SAgs, produced by S. aureus colonizing foreign bodies, could have clinical consequences in humans. PMID:25979434

  4. Bacteremia due to Agrobacterium tumefaciens (radiobacter). Report of infection in a pregnant women and her stillborn fetus.

    PubMed

    Southern, P M

    1996-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens (radiobacter) is usually a plant pathogen, but is isolated occasionally from human clinical specimens, frequently along with other bacteria. Agrobacterium tumefaciens (radiobacter) has been isolated from blood, central intravenous catheters, peritoneal fluid, urine, and cellulitis aspirates, often in immunocompromised individuals. This report details the isolation of A. tumefaciens (radiobacter) from the blood of a pregnant woman, as well as from the blood of her stillborn, premature fetus. It is, to our knowledge, the first report of such an occurrence. PMID:8988763

  5. Usefulness of Multiplex Real-Time PCR for Simultaneous Pathogen Detection and Resistance Profiling of Staphylococcal Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yousun; Kim, Taek Soo; Min, Young Gi; Hong, Yun Ji; Park, Jeong Su; Hwang, Sang Mee; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Eu Suk; Park, Kyoung Un; Kim, Hong Bin; Song, Junghan; Kim, Eui-Chong

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci are the leading cause of nosocomial blood stream infections. Fast and accurate identification of staphylococci and confirmation of their methicillin resistance are crucial for immediate treatment with effective antibiotics. A multiplex real-time PCR assay that targets mecA, femA specific for S. aureus, femA specific for S. epidermidis, 16S rRNA for universal bacteria, and 16S rRNA specific for staphylococci was developed and evaluated with 290 clinical blood culture samples containing Gram-positive cocci in clusters (GPCC). For the 262 blood cultures identified to the species level with the MicroScan WalkAway system (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, USA), the direct real-time PCR assay of positive blood cultures showed very good agreement for the categorization of staphylococci into methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE), methicillin-susceptible S. epidermidis (MSSE), methicillin-resistant non-S. epidermidis CoNS (MRCoNS), and methicillin-susceptible non-S. epidermidis CoNS (MSCoNS) (κ = 0.9313). The direct multiplex real-time PCR assay of positive blood cultures containing GPCC can provide essential information at the critical point of infection with a turnaround time of no more than 4 h. Further studies should evaluate the clinical outcome of using this rapid real-time PCR assay in glycopeptide antibiotic therapy in clinical settings. PMID:27403436

  6. Deficiency of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 presenting as fatal Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia in two siblings.

    PubMed

    Stergiopoulou, Theodouli; Walsh, Thomas J; Seghaye, Marie-Christine; Netea, Mihai G; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Moutschen, Michel; Picard, Capucine

    2015-03-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK-4) deficiency is a primary immunodeficiency of innate immunity. This is the case of a previous healthy toddler and his sibling, who both died of fulminant sepsis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Subsequent genetic analysis demonstrated IRAK-4 deficiency with compound heterozygous splice mutations. Fulminant fatal P. aeruginosa sepsis may be the first manifestation of IRAK-4 deficiency. PMID:25232776

  7. Tree-Based Models for Predicting Mortality in Gram-Negative Bacteremia: Avoid Putting the CART before the Horse

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, J. Nicholas; Lizza, Bryan D.; McLaughlin, Milena M.; Esterly, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, infectious disease studies employ tree-based approaches, e.g., classification and regression tree modeling, to identify clinical thresholds. We present tree-based-model-derived thresholds along with their measures of uncertainty. We explored individual and pooled clinical cohorts of bacteremic patients to identify modified acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (II) (m-APACHE-II) score mortality thresholds using a tree-based approach. Predictive performance measures for each candidate threshold were calculated. Candidate thresholds were examined according to binary logistic regression probabilities of the primary outcome, correct classification predictive matrices, and receiver operating characteristic curves. Three individual cohorts comprising a total of 235 patients were studied. Within the pooled cohort, the mean (± standard deviation) m-APACHE-II score was 13.6 ± 5.3, with an in-hospital mortality of 16.6%. The probability of death was greater at higher m-APACHE II scores in only one of three cohorts (odds ratio for cohort 1 [OR1] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.99 to 1.34; OR2 = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.94 to 1.16; OR3 = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.38) and was greater at higher scores within the pooled cohort (OR4 = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.19). In contrast, tree-based models overcame power constraints and identified m-APACHE-II thresholds for mortality in two of three cohorts (P = 0.02, 0.1, and 0.008) and the pooled cohort (P = 0.001). Predictive performance at each threshold was highly variable among cohorts. The selection of any one predictive threshold value resulted in fixed sensitivity and specificity. Tree-based models increased power and identified threshold values from continuous predictor variables; however, sample size and data distributions influenced the identified thresholds. The provision of predictive matrices or graphical displays of predicted probabilities within infectious disease studies can improve the interpretation of tree-based model-derived thresholds. PMID:26596934

  8. Impact of microbiology cascade reporting on antibiotic de-escalation in cefazolin-susceptible Gram-negative bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L S; Patel, D; King, E A; Maslow, J N

    2016-07-01

    Cascade reporting (CR) involves reporting the susceptibilities of broad-spectrum agents only when the organism is resistant to more narrow-spectrum agents. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of CR on antibiotic de-escalation practices and to characterize the impact of CR on clinical outcomes. CR rules were implemented in the microbiology laboratory at Atlantic Health System (AHS) in June 2013. A retrospective chart review was conducted at two community teaching hospitals in adult patients who had a blood culture positive for a Gram-negative organism susceptible to cefazolin and who were empirically treated with broad-spectrum beta-lactam (BSBL) antibiotics. De-escalation practices were compared in the pre-CR (July 2012-December 2012) and post-CR (July 2013-December 2013) periods. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients whose BSBL agent was de-escalated to agents listed on the post-CR antibiotic susceptibility report within 48 h of the final report. Secondary endpoints include the difference in pre-CR and post-CR periods in terms of hospital length of stay, in-hospital mortality, 30-day readmission, Clostridium difficile infections, and re-initiation of a BSBL agent within 7 days. A total of 73 patients were included; 31 in the pre-CR and 42 in the post-CR period. Patients had similar baseline characteristics. Therapy was de-escalated in 48 % of pre-CR vs 71 % of post-CR patients (p = 0.043). No significant differences were observed in secondary endpoints between patients in the pre-CR and post-CR periods. CR resulted in significant improvements in de-escalation practices without affecting safety outcomes. PMID:27130036

  9. A Multischool Outbreak Due to Salmonella enterica serovar Napoli Associated with Elevated Rates of Hospitalizations and Bacteremia, Milan, Italy, 2014.

    PubMed

    Huedo, Pol; Gori, Maria; Amato, Ettore; Bianchi, Roberta; Valerio, Edgardo; Magnoli, Luigi; Pontello, Mirella

    2016-08-01

    A multischool outbreak of salmonellosis caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Napoli was investigated in the province of Milan from October to November 2014, following an increase in school absenteeism coinciding with two positive cases. Epidemiological studies detected 47 cases in four primary schools: 46 children and 1 adult woman (51.4% males and 48.6% females, median age 8.9). From these, 14 cases (29.8%) were severe and resulted in hospitalization, including 6 children (12.8%) who developed an invasive salmonellosis. The epidemic curve revealed an abnormally long incubation period, peaking 1 week after the first confirmed case. Twenty-five available isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showing an identical pattern. The isolate belongs to ST474, an ST composed exclusively of Salmonella Napoli human strains isolated in France and Italy. Antibiotic resistance analysis showed resistance to aminoglycosides, correlating with the presence of the aminoglycoside resistance gene aadA25 in its genome. Trace-back investigations strongly suggested contaminated ham as the most likely food vehicle, which was delivered by a common food center on 21 October. Nevertheless, this ingredient could not be retrospectively investigated since it was no longer available at the repository. This represents the largest Salmonella Napoli outbreak ever reported in Italy and provides a unique scenario for studying the outcome of salmonellosis caused by this emerging and potentially invasive nontyphoidal serotype. PMID:27148636

  10. Whole-genome sequencing identifies emergence of a quinolone resistance mutation in a case of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Pak, Theodore R; Altman, Deena R; Attie, Oliver; Sebra, Robert; Hamula, Camille L; Lewis, Martha; Deikus, Gintaras; Newman, Leah C; Fang, Gang; Hand, Jonathan; Patel, Gopi; Wallach, Fran; Schadt, Eric E; Huprikar, Shirish; van Bakel, Harm; Kasarskis, Andrew; Bashir, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Whole-genome sequences for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia serial isolates from a bacteremic patient before and after development of levofloxacin resistance were assembled de novo and differed by one single-nucleotide variant in smeT, a repressor for multidrug efflux operon smeDEF. Along with sequenced isolates from five contemporaneous cases, they displayed considerable diversity compared against all published complete genomes. Whole-genome sequencing and complete assembly can conclusively identify resistance mechanisms emerging in S. maltophilia strains during clinical therapy. PMID:26324280

  11. Usefulness of Multiplex Real-Time PCR for Simultaneous Pathogen Detection and Resistance Profiling of Staphylococcal Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yousun; Kim, Taek Soo; Min, Young Gi; Hong, Yun Ji; Park, Jeong Su; Hwang, Sang Mee; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Hong Bin; Song, Junghan; Kim, Eui-Chong

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci are the leading cause of nosocomial blood stream infections. Fast and accurate identification of staphylococci and confirmation of their methicillin resistance are crucial for immediate treatment with effective antibiotics. A multiplex real-time PCR assay that targets mecA, femA specific for S. aureus, femA specific for S. epidermidis, 16S rRNA for universal bacteria, and 16S rRNA specific for staphylococci was developed and evaluated with 290 clinical blood culture samples containing Gram-positive cocci in clusters (GPCC). For the 262 blood cultures identified to the species level with the MicroScan WalkAway system (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, USA), the direct real-time PCR assay of positive blood cultures showed very good agreement for the categorization of staphylococci into methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE), methicillin-susceptible S. epidermidis (MSSE), methicillin-resistant non-S. epidermidis CoNS (MRCoNS), and methicillin-susceptible non-S. epidermidis CoNS (MSCoNS) (κ = 0.9313). The direct multiplex real-time PCR assay of positive blood cultures containing GPCC can provide essential information at the critical point of infection with a turnaround time of no more than 4 h. Further studies should evaluate the clinical outcome of using this rapid real-time PCR assay in glycopeptide antibiotic therapy in clinical settings. PMID:27403436

  12. Impact of a Rapid Microarray-Based Assay for Identification of Positive Blood Cultures for Treatment Optimization for Patients with Streptococcal and Enterococcal Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Roshdy, Danya G.; Tran, Anthony; LeCroy, Nicholas; Zeng, Donglin; Ou, Fang-shu; Daniels, Lindsay M.; Weber, David J.; Alby, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Implementation of the Verigene Gram-positive blood culture test led to reductions in time to acceptable antibiotic overall (1.9 versus 13.2 h, respectively; P = 0.04) and time to appropriate antibiotic for patients with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (4.2 versus 43.7 h; P = 0.006) and viridans group Streptococcus (0.2 versus 7.1 h; P = 0.02). PMID:25673785

  13. Use of different molecular typing techniques for bacteriological follow-up in a clinical trial with AIDS patients with Mycobacterium avium bacteremia.

    PubMed Central

    Picardeau, M; Varnerot, A; Lecompte, T; Brel, F; May, T; Vincent, V

    1997-01-01

    One hundred ninety-six Mycobacterium avium isolates from blood samples recovered from 93 AIDS patients for several months were typed by serotyping, by IS1245 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and in some cases RFLP analysis with plasmids pVT2 and pLR7 as probes, and by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). PCR typing of single colonies was also used to detect polyclonal infections. Strains belonged mainly to serotypes 1, 4, and 8. pVT2- and pLR7-related plasmids were detected in strains from 49% of the patients. The IS1245 RFLP and PFGE analyses showed a 96.8% diversity of the M. avium strains from the 93 patients. The vast majority (95.2%) of infections were monoclonal, indicating that recent infection is unlikely, even at an advanced stage of AIDS. For one patient, sequential isolates gave divergent patterns of sensitivity and resistance to clarithromycin, but all were identified as the initial clone. RFLP analysis and PCR typing of single colonies allowed for the detection of three polyclonal infections during the bacteriological follow-up. Among strains from patients whose samples were positive by culture after treatment for 2 to 15 months, 97.4% were the same as the initial strain. In conclusion, relapses and failures were mostly due to the initial strain. These relapses and failures resulted either from the selection of resistant mutants or the reappearance of sensitive strains, suggesting the persistence of nonsterilized tissue reservoirs. PMID:9316897

  14. Effects of vancomycin versus nafcillin in enhancing killing of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus causing bacteremia by human cathelicidin LL-37.

    PubMed

    Le, J; Dam, Q; Schweizer, M; Thienphrapa, W; Nizet, V; Sakoulas, G

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that anti-staphylococcal beta-lactam antibiotics, like nafcillin, render methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) more susceptible to killing by innate host defense peptides (HDPs), such as cathelicidin LL-37. We compared the effects of growth in 1/4 minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nafcillin or vancomycin on the LL-37 killing of 92 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates. For three randomly selected strains among these, we examined the effects of nafcillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, or linezolid on LL-37 killing and autolysis. Growth in the presence of subinhibitory nafcillin significantly enhanced LL-37 killing of MSSA compared to vancomycin and antibiotic-free controls. Nafcillin also reduced MSSA production of the golden staphylococcal pigment staphyloxanthin in 39 % of pigmented strains vs. 14 % for vancomycin. Among the antibiotics tested, only nafcillin resulted in significantly increased MSSA autolysis. These studies point to additional mechanisms of anti-staphylococcal activity of nafcillin beyond direct bactericidal activity, properties that vancomycin and other antibiotic classes do not exhibit. The ability of nafcillin to enhance sensitivity to innate HDPs may contribute to its superior effectiveness against MSSA, as suggested by studies comparing clinical outcomes to vancomycin treatment. PMID:27234592

  15. Controlled evaluation of BacT/Alert standard aerobic and FAN aerobic blood culture bottles for detection of bacteremia and fungemia.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, M P; Mirrett, S; Reimer, L G; Wilson, M L; Smith-Elekes, S; Chuard, C R; Joho, K L; Reller, L B

    1995-01-01

    A new medium, FAN, designed to enhance the recovery of microorganisms, has been developed for the BacT/Alert blood culture system (Organon Teknika Corp., Durham, N.C.). We compared the yield and speed of detection of microorganisms in 6,847 adequately filled paired aerobic standard and FAN bottles at four university hospitals. Of 499 clinically significant microorganisms isolated from one or both bottles, significantly more Staphylococcus aureus isolates (P < 0.001), coagulase-negative staphylococci (P < 0.001), yeasts (P < 0.01), and all microorganisms combined (P < 0.001) were recovered from the FAN bottles. Overall, the speeds of detection of positive cultures did not differ between the two medium formulations; mean times to detection in the standard and FAN bottles were 16.1 and 16.0 h, respectively. When a subset of patients on antimicrobial therapy was evaluated, significantly enhanced yield from the FAN bottle was evident for staphylococci. Overall, the FAN bottle outperformed the standard aerobic BacT/Alert bottle. PMID:7790471

  16. Controlled Comparative Evaluation of BacT/Alert FAN and ESP 80A Aerobic Media as Means for Detecting Bacteremia and Fungemia

    PubMed Central

    Doern, Gary V.; Barton, Ann; Rao, Sudah

    1998-01-01

    During a one-year period, a total of 6,305 blood cultures were processed in a tertiary-care teaching hospital; 6 to 12 ml of blood was inoculated into both a BacT/Alert Fan aerobic bottle and an ESP 80A aerobic bottle. The FAN aerobic bottle contains an antimicrobial-absorbing material; the 80A aerobic bottle does not. Bottles were processed on their respective continuous-monitoring blood culture instruments for up to five days of incubation. Four hundred thirty-three cultures (6.9%) representing 301 septic episodes in 235 different patients yielded 490 bacteria or yeasts thought to be clinically significant. Two hundred seventy-five of the 433 presumed clinically significant positive cultures (63.5%) representing 195 septic episodes and yielding 301 isolates were positive in both FAN and 80A bottles. One hundred nine significant positive cultures (25.2%) (i.e., cultures positive with an organism judged to be of probable clinical significance) from 70 septic episodes yielded 126 isolates only in FAN bottles. Conversely, the 80A bottle was exclusively positive in 49 instances (11.3%), representing 36 septic episodes and yielding 63 isolates. The higher rates of significant positive blood cultures, numbers of septic episodes documented, and numbers of isolates recovered in FAN bottles versus 80A bottles were all statistically significant (P < 0.05). Enhanced rates of detection of presumed clinically significant isolates in FAN bottles were largely accounted for by Staphylococcus aureus, members of the Enterobacteriaceae, and non-Pseudomonas aeruginosa miscellaneous gram-negative bacilli from patients receiving antimicrobial therapy at the time blood cultures were obtained. Enhanced recovery of one organism group, the β-hemolytic streptococci, occurred in 80A. With one exception, detection times were essentially equivalent in the two systems. The single exception pertained to streptococci and enterococci, which were recovered significantly faster in 80A bottles. Three hundred thirty-eight of the 6,305 blood cultures evaluated in this study (5.4%) were judged likely to be contaminated. The percentages of probable contaminated cultures were as follows: 26.6% FAN and 80A; 42.3% FAN only; 31.1% 80A only (P < 0.05). Finally, the instrument false-positive rates for the two systems were 0.7% with FAN and 3.0% with 80A (P < 0.05). We conclude that while contamination rates were slightly higher with FAN than with 80A, use of FAN aerobic bottles in conjunction with the BacT/Alert system will yield significantly higher numbers of clinically significant blood culture isolates than 80A bottles and the ESP system. Furthermore, this enhanced detection is most conspicuous in patients receiving antimicrobial therapy at the time blood cultures are performed, probably due to the presence of an antimicrobial-absorbing material in FAN aerobic bottles. PMID:9705414

  17. Controlled clinical laboratory comparison of BACTEC plus aerobic/F resin medium with BacT/Alert aerobic FAN medium for detection of bacteremia and fungemia.

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, J H; Mirrett, S; McDonald, L C; Murray, P R; Weinstein, M P; Fune, J; Trippy, C W; Masterson, M; Reller, L B

    1997-01-01

    Blood specimens collected from adult patients with suspected sepsis in four medical centers were inoculated into BACTEC Plus/F and BacT/Alert FAN aerobic culture bottles. Both bottles of 7,401 bottle pairs contained the prescribed blood volume of 8 to 12 ml. Bottles were incubated in their respective instruments for a standard 7-day protocol or until the instruments signaled that they were positive. A total of 720 isolates that were judged to represent true infections were recovered from 338 patients; 451 isolates were recovered from both bottles, 143 were recovered from only the Plus/F bottle, and 126 were recovered from only the FAN bottle (P was not significant). Although more Histoplasma capsulatum isolates were recovered from Plus/F bottles (P < 0.005), there were no other statistically significant differences in recovery rates of individual species or groups of organisms between the two systems. Of 329 monomicrobic patient septic episodes, 244 episodes were detected by both blood culture systems, 40 were detected only by the BACTEC system, and 45 were detected only by the BacT/Alert system (P was not significant). There was no significant difference between the two systems in the detection of septic episodes among patients receiving antibiotic therapy at the time of blood cultures. Of the cultures found to be positive within the first 72 h of incubation, detection was on average earlier by the BACTEC system (16.9 h) than by the BacT/Alert system (18.7 h). Larger differences in average time to detection were seen with streptococci (10.7 h by the BACTEC system and 17.9 h by the BacT/Alert system) and yeasts (an average of 29.4 h by the BacT/Alert system versus 37.2 h by the BACTEC system). With the exception of the differences noted above, BACTEC Plus/F aerobic resin and BacT/Alert aerobic FAN blood culture bottles were comparable in their abilities to recover aerobic and facultative organisms. PMID:8968880

  18. Controlled evaluation of BacT/alert standard anaerobic and FAN anaerobic blood culture bottles for the detection of bacteremia and fungemia.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M L; Weinstein, M P; Mirrett, S; Reimer, L G; Feldman, R J; Chuard, C R; Reller, L B

    1995-01-01

    FAN medium was formulated to improve microbial recovery, particularly for fastidious microorganisms and for microorganisms causing sepsis in patients receiving antimicrobial therapy. In a controlled clinical evaluation performed at four university-affiliated hospitals, FAN anaerobic bottles were compared with standard anaerobic bottles for yield, speed of detection of microbial growth, and detection of septic episodes. A total of 10,431 blood culture sets were received; both anaerobic bottles of 7,694 blood culture sets were adequately filled with blood. Altogether, 925 isolates were recovered: 557 that were the cause of sepsis, 99 that were indeterminate as the cause of sepsis, and 269 contaminants. More Staphylococcus aureus (P < 0.001), coagulase-negative staphylococci (P < 0.001), Escherichia coli (P < 0.02), and all microorganisms combined (P < 0.005) were recovered from FAN bottles; more nonfermentative gram-negative bacilli (P < 0.05), Torulopsis glabrata (P < 0.001), and other yeasts (P < 0.01) were recovered from standard bottles. Growth of S. aureus (P < 0.001), coagulase-negative staphylococci (P < 0.001), Enterococcus faecalis (P < 0.025), streptococci other than Streptococcus pneumoniae (P < 0.01), and all microorganisms combined (P < 0.001) was detected earlier in standard bottles; growth of more isolates of E. coli (P < 0.05) and anaerobic bacteria (P < 0.01) was detected earlier in FAN bottles. The mean times to detection were 14.2 and 16.1 h for standard and FAN bottles, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7494013

  19. Inhalational anthrax (Ames aerosol) in naïve and vaccinated New Zealand rabbits: characterizing the spread of bacteria from lung deposition to bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Gutting, Bradford W.; Nichols, Tonya L.; Channel, Stephen R.; Gearhart, Jeffery M.; Andrews, George A.; Berger, Alan E.; Mackie, Ryan S.; Watson, Brent J.; Taft, Sarah C.; Overheim, Katie A.; Sherwood, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    There is a need to better understand inhalational anthrax in relevant animal models. This understanding could aid risk assessment, help define therapeutic windows, and provide a better understanding of disease. The aim here was to characterize and quantify bacterial deposition and dissemination in rabbits following exposure to single high aerosol dose (> 100 LD50) of Bacillus anthracis (Ames) spores immediately following exposure through 36 h. The primary goal of collecting the data was to support investigators in developing computational models of inhalational anthrax disease. Rabbits were vaccinated prior to exposure with the human vaccine (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed, AVA) or were sham-vaccinated, and were then exposed in pairs (one sham and one AVA) so disease kinetics could be characterized in equally-dosed hosts where one group is fully protected and is able to clear the infection (AVA-vaccinated), while the other is susceptible to disease, in which case the bacteria are able to escape containment and replicate uncontrolled (sham-vaccinated rabbits). Between 4–5% of the presented aerosol dose was retained in the lung of sham- and AVA-vaccinated rabbits as measured by dilution plate analysis of homogenized lung tissue or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. After 6 and 36 h, >80% and >96%, respectively, of the deposited spores were no longer detected in BAL, with no detectable difference between sham- or AVA-vaccinated rabbits. Thereafter, differences between the two groups became noticeable. In sham-vaccinated rabbits the bacteria were detected in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN) 12 h post-exposure and in the circulation at 24 h, a time point which was also associated with dramatic increases in vegetative CFU in the lung tissue of some animals. In all sham-vaccinated rabbits, bacteria increased in both TBLN and blood through 36 h at which point in time some rabbits succumbed to disease. In contrast, AVA-vaccinated rabbits showed small numbers of CFU in TBLN between 24 and 36 h post-exposure with small numbers of bacteria in the circulation only at 24 h post-exposure. These results characterize and quantify disease progression in naïve rabbits following aerosol administration of Ames spores which may be useful in a number of different research applications, including developing quantitative models of infection for use in human inhalational anthrax risk assessment. PMID:22919678

  20. Bacteremia in Preterm Infants Receiving Probiotics; Throbbing Headache Associated with Enoxaparin Use; DRESS Reaction Following Isoniazid Treatment; SIADH Associated with Glimepiride; Mania Associated with Bortezomib Administration

    PubMed Central

    Mancano, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this feature is to heighten awareness of specific adverse drug reactions (ADRs), discuss methods of prevention, and promote reporting of ADRs to the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) MedWatch program (800-FDA-1088). If you have reported an interesting, preventable ADR to MedWatch, please consider sharing the account with our readers. Write to Dr. Mancano at ISMP, 200 Lakeside Drive, Suite 200, Horsham, PA 19044 (phone: 215-707-4936; e-mail: mmancano@temple.edu). Your report will be published anonymously unless otherwise requested. This feature is provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) in cooperation with the FDA’s MedWatch program and Temple University School of Pharmacy. ISMP is an FDA MedWatch partner. PMID:26405333

  1. The detection of microbial DNA in the blood: a sensitive method for diagnosing bacteremia and/or bacterial translocation in surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kane, T D; Alexander, J W; Johannigman, J A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose was to determine the sensitivity of detecting microbial DNA in the blood of surgical patients as a measure for diagnosing systemic infection and/or translocation from the gut. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Microbial infections and translocation of intestinal bacteria are thought to contribute to multiple system organ failure, but bacterial cultures are often negative in patients with this complication. METHODS: DNA was extracted from the blood of 40 surgical patients and 20 healthy controls. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques were used to amplify genes from Escherichia coli, Bacteroides fragilis, and a region of 16S ribosomal RNA found in many gram-positive and -negative bacteria. RESULTS: Bacterial DNA genes were not detected in healthy volunteers but were found in all patients with positive blood cultures. All eight transplant patients receiving OKT3 therapy had microbial DNA in their blood, possibly indicating translocation from the gut. Sixty-four percent of critically ill patients had microbial DNA detected in their blood, but only 3 (14%) had positive blood cultures. CONCLUSIONS: The PCR method is more sensitive than blood cultures for detecting bacterial components in the blood of critically ill surgical patients and may detect microbial translocation from the intestine. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:9445103

  2. Anaplasma marginale infection with persistent high-load bacteremia induces a dysfunctional memory CD4+ T lymphocyte response but sustained high IgG titers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control of blood-borne infections is dependent on antigen-specific effector and memory T cells and high-affinity IgG responses. In chronic infections characterized by a high antigen load, it has been shown that antigen-specific T and B cells are vulnerable to downregulation and apoptosis. Anaplasma ...

  3. Potential Misclassification of Urinary Tract-Related Bacteremia Upon Applying the 2015 Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection Surveillance Definition From the National Healthcare Safety Network.

    PubMed

    Greene, M Todd; Ratz, David; Meddings, Jennifer; Fakih, Mohamad G; Saint, Sanjay

    2016-04-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently updated the surveillance definition of catheter-associated urinary tract infection to include only urine culture bacteria of at least 1×105 colony-forming units/mL. Our findings suggest that the new surveillance definition may fail to capture clinically meaningful catheter-associated urinary tract infections. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2016;37(4):469-471. PMID:26778287

  4. NADPH Oxidase Deficient Mice Develop Colitis and Bacteremia upon Infection with Normally Avirulent, TTSS-1- and TTSS-2-Deficient Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Slack, Emma Marie Caroline; Müller, Andreas J.; Kremer, Marcus; Van Maele, Laurye; Cayet, Delphine; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Sirard, Jean-Claude; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    Infections, microbe sampling and occasional leakage of commensal microbiota and their products across the intestinal epithelial cell layer represent a permanent challenge to the intestinal immune system. The production of reactive oxygen species by NADPH oxidase is thought to be a key element of defense. Patients suffering from chronic granulomatous disease are deficient in one of the subunits of NADPH oxidase. They display a high incidence of Crohn’s disease-like intestinal inflammation and are hyper-susceptible to infection with fungi and bacteria, including a 10-fold increased risk of Salmonellosis. It is not completely understood which steps of the infection process are affected by the NADPH oxidase deficiency. We employed a mouse model for Salmonella diarrhea to study how NADPH oxidase deficiency (Cybb−/−) affects microbe handling by the large intestinal mucosa. In this animal model, wild type S. Typhimurium causes pronounced enteropathy in wild type mice. In contrast, an avirulent S. Typhimurium mutant (S.Tmavir; invGsseD), which lacks virulence factors boosting trans-epithelial penetration and growth in the lamina propria, cannot cause enteropathy in wild type mice. We found that Cybb−/− mice are efficiently infected by S.Tmavir and develop enteropathy by day 4 post infection. Cell depletion experiments and infections in Cybb−/−Myd88−/− mice indicated that the S.Tmavir-inflicted disease in Cybb−/− mice hinges on CD11c+CX3CR1+ monocytic phagocytes mediating colonization of the cecal lamina propria and on Myd88-dependent proinflammatory immune responses. Interestingly, in mixed bone marrow chimeras a partial reconstitution of Cybb-proficiency in the bone marrow derived compartment was sufficient to ameliorate disease severity. Our data indicate that NADPH oxidase expression is of key importance for restricting the growth of S.Tmavir in the mucosal lamina propria. This provides important insights into microbe handling by the large intestinal mucosa and the role of NADPH oxidase in maintaining microbe-host mutualism at this exposed body surface. PMID:24143212

  5. NADPH oxidase deficient mice develop colitis and bacteremia upon infection with normally avirulent, TTSS-1- and TTSS-2-deficient Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Felmy, Boas; Songhet, Pascal; Slack, Emma Marie Caroline; Müller, Andreas J; Kremer, Marcus; Van Maele, Laurye; Cayet, Delphine; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Sirard, Jean-Claude; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    Infections, microbe sampling and occasional leakage of commensal microbiota and their products across the intestinal epithelial cell layer represent a permanent challenge to the intestinal immune system. The production of reactive oxygen species by NADPH oxidase is thought to be a key element of defense. Patients suffering from chronic granulomatous disease are deficient in one of the subunits of NADPH oxidase. They display a high incidence of Crohn's disease-like intestinal inflammation and are hyper-susceptible to infection with fungi and bacteria, including a 10-fold increased risk of Salmonellosis. It is not completely understood which steps of the infection process are affected by the NADPH oxidase deficiency. We employed a mouse model for Salmonella diarrhea to study how NADPH oxidase deficiency (Cybb (-/-)) affects microbe handling by the large intestinal mucosa. In this animal model, wild type S. Typhimurium causes pronounced enteropathy in wild type mice. In contrast, an avirulent S. Typhimurium mutant (S.Tm(avir); invGsseD), which lacks virulence factors boosting trans-epithelial penetration and growth in the lamina propria, cannot cause enteropathy in wild type mice. We found that Cybb (-/-) mice are efficiently infected by S.Tm(avir) and develop enteropathy by day 4 post infection. Cell depletion experiments and infections in Cybb (-/-) Myd88 (-/-) mice indicated that the S.Tm(avir)-inflicted disease in Cybb (-/-) mice hinges on CD11c(+)CX3CR1(+) monocytic phagocytes mediating colonization of the cecal lamina propria and on Myd88-dependent proinflammatory immune responses. Interestingly, in mixed bone marrow chimeras a partial reconstitution of Cybb-proficiency in the bone marrow derived compartment was sufficient to ameliorate disease severity. Our data indicate that NADPH oxidase expression is of key importance for restricting the growth of S.Tm(avir) in the mucosal lamina propria. This provides important insights into microbe handling by the large intestinal mucosa and the role of NADPH oxidase in maintaining microbe-host mutualism at this exposed body surface. PMID:24143212

  6. Recurrent Bacteremia Caused by a “Flexispira”-Like Organism in a Patient with X-Linked (Bruton’s) Agammaglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Susan; Cuccherini, Brenda; Whitney, Anne M.; Ray, Marsha L.; MacGregor, John P.; Steigerwalt, Arnold; Daneshvar, Maryam I.; Weyant, Robbin; Wray, Betty; Steele, John; Strober, Warren; Gill, Vee J.

    1999-01-01

    Helicobacter spp., except for Helicobacter cinaedi, have only rarely been reported in cases of septicemia. A patient with X-linked (Bruton’s) agammaglobulinemia was found to have persistent sepsis with a Helicobacter-like organism despite multiple courses of antibiotics. His periods of sepsis were associated with leg swelling thought to be consistent with cellulitis. The organism was fastidious and required a microaerophilic environment containing H2 for growth. Optimal growth was observed at 35 to 37°C on sheep blood, CDC anaerobe, and Bordet-Gengou agars. Serial subcultures every 4 to 5 days were required to maintain viability. The organism was strongly urease positive and showed highest relatedness to Helicobacter-like organisms with the vernacular name “Flexispira rappini” by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Genomic DNA hybridization studies, however, found 24 to 37% relatedness to “F. rappini” and even less to other Helicobacter spp. Although the organism phenotypically resembles “Flexispira” and Helicobacter, it is thought to represent a new taxon. The patient’s infection was eventually cleared with a prolonged (5-month) course of intravenous imipenem and gentamicin. PMID:10405381

  7. Mortality and Hospital Stay Associated with Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli Bacteremia: Estimating the Burden of Antibiotic Resistance in Europe

    PubMed Central

    de Kraker, Marlieke E. A.; Davey, Peter G.; Grundmann, Hajo

    2011-01-01

    Background The relative importance of human diseases is conventionally assessed by cause-specific mortality, morbidity, and economic impact. Current estimates for infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are not sufficiently supported by quantitative empirical data. This study determined the excess number of deaths, bed-days, and hospital costs associated with blood stream infections (BSIs) caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli (G3CREC) in 31 countries that participated in the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (EARSS). Methods and Findings The number of BSIs caused by MRSA and G3CREC was extrapolated from EARSS prevalence data and national health care statistics. Prospective cohort studies, carried out in hospitals participating in EARSS in 2007, provided the parameters for estimating the excess 30-d mortality and hospital stay associated with BSIs caused by either MRSA or G3CREC. Hospital expenditure was derived from a publicly available cost model. Trends established by EARSS were used to determine the trajectories for MRSA and G3CREC prevalence until 2015. In 2007, 27,711 episodes of MRSA BSIs were associated with 5,503 excess deaths and 255,683 excess hospital days in the participating countries, whereas 15,183 episodes of G3CREC BSIs were associated with 2,712 excess deaths and 120,065 extra hospital days. The total costs attributable to excess hospital stays for MRSA and G3CREC BSIs were 44.0 and 18.1 million Euros (63.1 and 29.7 million international dollars), respectively. Based on prevailing trends, the number of BSIs caused by G3CREC is likely to rapidly increase, outnumbering the number of MRSA BSIs in the near future. Conclusions Excess mortality associated with BSIs caused by MRSA and G3CREC is significant, and the prolongation of hospital stay imposes a considerable burden on health care systems. A foreseeable shift in the burden of antibiotic resistance from Gram-positive to Gram-negative infections will exacerbate this situation and is reason for concern. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:22022233

  8. Fatal Nocardia farcinica Bacteremia Diagnosed by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry in a Patient with Myelodysplastic Syndrome Treated with Corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Amedeo; Guercini, Francesco; Cardaccia, Angela; Furbetta, Leone; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Bistoni, Francesco; Mencacci, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Nocardia farcinica is a Gram-positive weakly acid-fast filamentous saprophytic bacterium, an uncommon cause of human infections, acquired usually through the respiratory tract, often life-threatening, and associated with different clinical presentations. Predisposing conditions for N. farcinica infections include hematologic malignancies, treatment with corticosteroids, and any other condition of immunosuppression. Clinical and microbiological diagnoses of N. farcinica infections are troublesome, and the isolation and identification of the etiologic agent are difficult and time-consuming processes. We describe a case of fatal disseminated infection in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome, treated with corticosteroids, in which N. farcinica has been isolated from blood culture and identified by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry. The patient died after 18 days of hospitalization in spite of triple antimicrobial therapy. Nocardia farcinica infection should be suspected in patients with history of malignancy, under corticosteroid therapy, suffering from subacute pulmonary infection,and who do not respond to conventional antimicrobial therapy. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry can be a valuable tool for rapid diagnosis of nocardiosis. PMID:23690786

  9. Interferon-γ and Proliferation Responses to Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi Proteins in Patients with S. Typhi Bacteremia in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Alaullah; Khanam, Farhana; Sayeed, Md. Abu; Rahman, Taibur; Pacek, Marcin; Hu, Yanhui; Rollins, Andrea; Bhuiyan, Md. Saruar; Rollins, Sean; Kalsy, Anuj; Arifuzzaman, Mohammad; Leung, Daniel T.; Sarracino, David A.; Krastins, Bryan; Charles, Richelle C.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Cravioto, Alejandro; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Harris, Jason B.; LaBaer, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi is a human-restricted intracellular pathogen and the cause of typhoid fever. Cellular immune responses are required to control and clear Salmonella infection. Despite this, there are limited data on cellular immune responses in humans infected with wild type S. Typhi. Methodology/Principal Findings For this work, we used an automated approach to purify a subset of S. Typhi proteins identified in previous antibody-based immuno-affinity screens and antigens known to be expressed in vivo, including StaF-putative fimbrial protein-STY0202, StbB-fimbrial chaperone-STY0372, CsgF-involved in curli production-STY1177, CsgD- putative regulatory protein-STY1179, OppA-periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein precursor-STY1304, PagC-outer membrane invasion protein-STY1878, and conserved hypothetical protein-STY2195; we also generated and analyzed a crude membrane preparation of S. Typhi (MP). In comparison to samples collected from uninfected Bangladeshi and North American participants, we detected significant interferon-γ responses in PBMCs stimulated with MP, StaF, StbB, CsgF, CsgD, OppA, STY2195, and PagC in patients bacteremic with S. Typhi in Bangladesh. The majority of interferon-γ expressing T cells were CD4 cells, although CD8 responses also occurred. We also assessed cellular proliferation responses in bacteremic patients, and confirmed increased responses in infected individuals to MP, StaF, STY2195, and PagC in convalescent compared to acute phase samples and compared to controls. StaF is a fimbrial protein homologous to E. coli YadK, and contains a Pfam motif thought to be involved in cellular adhesion. PagC is expressed in vivo under the control of the virulence-associated PhoP-regulon required for intra-macrophage survival of Salmonella. STY2195 is a conserved hypothetical protein of unknown function. Conclusion/Significance This is the first analysis of cellular immune responses to purified S. Typhi antigens in patients with typhoid fever. These results indicate that patients generate significant CD4 and CD8 interferon-γ responses to specific S. Typhi antigens during typhoid fever, and that these responses are elevated at the time of clinical presentation. These observations suggest that an interferon-γ based detection system could be used to diagnose individuals with typhoid fever during the acute stage of illness. PMID:21666798

  10. Roseomonas mucosa Isolated from Bloodstream of Pediatric Patient ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bard, J. Dien; Deville, J. G.; Summanen, P. H.; Lewinski, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of catheter-related bacteremia associated with Roseomonas mucosa isolated from an immunocompromised pediatric patient with a history of multiple episodes of urinary tract infection and bacteremia. PMID:20534804

  11. Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAIs) Data and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... and 2014 13 percent decrease in hospital-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia (bloodstream infections) between 2011 ... Clostridium difficile infections ( C. difficile ), and hospital-onset ... Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia (bloodstream infections). To read ...

  12. Bacteroides-associated pylephlebitis in a patient with strongyloidiasis.

    PubMed

    Stone, Neil R H; Martin, Thomas; Biswas, Jason; Barrett, Jessica; Hickish, Tom; Dasgupta, Dhruba; Newsholme, William

    2015-02-01

    Strongyloidiasis is associated with Gram-negative bacteremia. Septic portal vein thrombosis or pylephlebitis is a rare but serious complication of intra-abdominal infection, and it is often associated with Bacteroides bacteremia. We present the first report of pylephlebitis with Bacteroides bacteremia associated with underlying Strongyloides stercoralis infection and briefly review the management of septic portal vein thrombosis. PMID:25510718

  13. Telavancin Observational Use Registry (TOUR)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-13

    Hospital Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia; Complicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections; Ventilator Associated Bacterial Pneumonia; Gram Positive Infection; Complicated Bacteremia; Endocarditis; Bone and Joint Infections

  14. Group B Strep Infection in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bacteremia and sepsis (blood infections) symptoms include: Fever Chills Low alertness Pneumonia (lung infection) symptoms include: Fever and chills Cough Rapid breathing or difficulty breathing Chest pain ...

  15. Infections Caused by Unusual Methylobacterium Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chih-Cheng; Cheng, Aristine; Liu, Wei-Lun; Tan, Che-Kim; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Chung, Kuei-Pin; Lee, Meng-Rui; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2011-01-01

    We describe six patients with hospital-acquired bacteremia caused by Methylobacterium species, including M. radiotolerans (n = 2), M. thiocyanatum (n = 2), M. aminovorans (n = 1), and M. lusitanum (n = 1), which were confirmed to species level by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Among these patients, five had catheter-related bacteremia and all had favorable outcomes. PMID:21734032

  16. [Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with bacteriemia. Guidelines of the Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica].

    PubMed

    Cisneros-Herreros, José Miguel; Cobo-Reinoso, Javier; Pujol-Rojo, Miquel; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Salavert-Lletí, Miguel

    2007-02-01

    Bacteremia is a complex clinical syndrome in constant transformation that is an important, growing cause of morbidity and mortality. Even though there is a great deal of specific information about bacteremia, few comprehensive reviews integrate this information with a practical AIM. The main objective of these Guidelines, which target hospital physicians, is to improve the clinical care provided to patients with bacteremia by integrating blood culture results with clinical data, and optimizing the use of diagnostic procedures and antimicrobial testing. The document is structured into sections that cover the epidemiology and etiology of bacteremia, stratified according to the various patient populations, and the diagnostic work-up, therapy, and follow-up of patients with bacteremia. Diagnostic and therapeutic decisions are presented as recommendations based on the grade of available scientific evidence. PMID:17288909

  17. Comparison of computed tomography findings between bacteremic and non-bacteremic acute pyelonephritis due to Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seon Jung; Je, Bo-Kyung; Lee, Seung Hwa; Choi, Won Seok; Hong, Doran; Kim, Sung-Bum

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify computed tomography (CT) findings that are associated with the presence of bacteremia in patients with acute pyelonephritis (APN) due to Escherichia coli (E. coli). METHODS: The clinical data and contrast-enhanced CT findings of 128 patients who were diagnosed with APN due to E. coli and showed renal abnormality on contrast-enhanced CT between January 2003 and November 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of bacteremia: The bacteremia group and the non-bacteremia group. The abnormality on contrast-enhanced CT were categorized into 5 renal and 4 extrarenal CT findings and compared between the two groups using the χ2 test and multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: Among the 128 patients, 34 patients (26.6%) were classified into the bacteremia group and 94 patients (73.4%) into the non-bacteremia group. There was no statistically significant difference in gender between the two groups (P = 0.09), but the age of the patients in the bacteremia group was higher than that of the patients in the non-bacteremia group (P < 0.01). Compared to the non-bacteremia group, 1 renal CT finding such as urothelial thickening and 3 extrarenal CT findings such as diffuse peritoneal thickening, cystitis and pulmonary congestion were more frequently observed in the bacteremia group with statistical significance. The logistic regression analysis revealed that CT findings, including urothelial thickening, diffuse peritoneal thickening, cystitis and pulmonary congestion were suggested as the predictive CT findings of bacteremic APN. CONCLUSION: On CT, urothelial thickening, diffuse peritoneal thickening, cystitis, and pulmonary congestion are more frequently observed in patients with bacteremic APN due to E. coli. PMID:27158427

  18. An Extraordinary Cause of the Sucking Difficulty: Ecthyma Gangrenosum

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Nihat; Kocaman, Selami; Peker, Erdal; Tuncer, Oğuz

    2016-01-01

    Ecthyma gangrenosum is a cutaneous lesion often associated with pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia, even though it may develop without bacteremia and may originate from other bacterial and fungal organisms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia or sepsis, which mainly affects immunocompromised patients, frequently occurs in hospitals. This lesion typically occurs on the extremities and gluteal and perineal regions. In this report we present a case of ecthyma gangrenosum in a premature newborn occurring secondary to pseudomonas sepsis causing sucking dysfunction due to tissue loss in the lip, soft palate, and tongue. PMID:27143976

  19. Septicemia

    MedlinePlus

    Blood poisoning; Bacteremia with sepsis ... Shapiro NI, Zimmer GD, Barkin AZ. Sepsis syndromes. In: Marx, JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  20. What Is Infective Endocarditis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... brief bacteremia is common after many routine daily activities such as: • tooth brushing and flossing. • use of wooden toothpicks. • use of water picks. • chewing food. It can also result after certain surgical and ...

  1. Blood culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of a serious infection, also known as sepsis . Symptoms of sepsis can include high fever, chills, rapid breathing and ... is bacteremia. This can be the result of sepsis. Sepsis is a medical emergency and you will ...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5320 - Properdin factor B immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... corresponding depression in the amount of properdin factor B in serum and other body fluids is evidence of the... include rheumatoid arthritis, sickle cell anemia, and gram-negative bacteremia. (b) Classification....

  3. Bloodstream Infection Due to Brachyspira pilosicoli in a Patient with Multiorgan Failure▿

    PubMed Central

    Prim, Núria; Pericas, Roser; Español, Montse; Rivera, Alba; Mirelis, Beatriz; Coll, Pere

    2011-01-01

    Brachyspira pilosicoli is an etiological agent of human intestinal spirochetosis. Bloodstream infection due to this microorganism is rare. We report a case of B. pilosicoli bacteremia in a 70-year-old patient who presented with multiorgan failure. PMID:21832021

  4. Successful Use of High-dose Daptomycin in a Child With Staphylococcus aureus Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Prabhudesai, Sumant; Kanjani, Amruta; Nambi, P Senthur; Gnanasambandam, S; Ramachandran, Bala

    2016-05-01

    We report the successful use of daptomycin in a child with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis with persistent bacteremia and clinical deterioration, despite treatment with vancomycin and rifampicin. She had acute kidney injury, requiring daptomycin dosage adjustment. PMID:27074655

  5. Spondylodiscitis and an aortic aneurysm due to Campylobacter coli.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Xavier; Dehecq, Caroline; Cattoen, Christian; Garnier, Laurence Destrieux; Bournet, Béatrice Sarraz; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Senneville, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Campylobacter coli is a rare cause of bacteremia. We report here the first case of C.coli spondylodiscitis complicated by an aortic aneurysm. Outcome was favourable with surgery and antibiotic therapy. PMID:20132561

  6. Persistence of a multiresistant clone of Staphylococcus epidermidis in a neonatal intensive-care unit for a four-year period.

    PubMed

    Lyytikäinen, O; Saxén, H; Ryhänen, R; Vaara, M; Vuopio-Varkila, J

    1995-01-01

    A cluster of cases of Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteremia in a neonatal intensive-care unit (NICU) during 1991 raised the question of whether these infections were caused by a single strain. Sixty-seven isolates of S. epidermidis from blood cultures of 56 neonates treated in the NICU between 1986 and 1992 and 54 control strains from other patients with bacteremia were characterized by three typing methods: antibiogram, plasmid profile, and ribotype. Plasmid profiles and ribotype patterns indicated that 11 (16%) of the 67 episodes of S. epidermidis bacteremia in the NICU were caused by a single strain. Although this epidemic strain did not account entirely for the increase in the incidence of bacteremia in the NICU, it did persist for 4 years during the study period. Other clones responsible for smaller outbreaks were also found. These results suggest that S. epidermidis cross-infections are very common in the NICU setting. PMID:7727665

  7. Blood Cultures for Persistent Fever in Neutropenic Pediatric Patients Are of Low Diagnostic Yield.

    PubMed

    Neemann, Kari; Yonts, Alexandra B; Qiu, Fang; Simonsen, Kari; Lowas, Stefanie; Freifeld, Alison

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of bacteremia at the onset of pediatric febrile neutropenia (FN) at 2 academically linked institutions was 9.84%, and subsequent blood cultures performed for children with persistent FN yielded an incidence of 4.21%. Until the risk factors for new-onset bacteremia in patients being treated for FN can be identified and diagnostic methods can be improved, compliance with national guidelines is recommended. PMID:27199474

  8. Native-valve bacterial endocarditis caused by Lactococcus garvieae.

    PubMed

    Vinh, Donald C; Nichol, Kimberly A; Rand, Fern; Embil, John M

    2006-09-01

    We report a case of definite Lactococcus garvieae native-valve endocarditis. The diagnosis was suspected in a patient presenting with congestive heart failure and found to have Enterococcus hirae bacteremia, with a history of L. garvieae bacteremia 1 month prior. Diagnosis was confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the 2 isolates and the demonstration of aortic valve vegetations. PMID:16650958

  9. Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Placement Is an Underrecognized Source of Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Eloise D.; Sullivan, Sean B.; Whittier, Susan; Lowy, Franklin D.; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the risks of peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVs) as sources for Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB), a life-threatening complication. We identified 34 PIV-related infections (7.6%) in a cohort of 445 patients with SAB. Peripheral intravenous catheter-related SAB was associated with significantly longer bacteremia duration and thrombophlebitis at old PIV sites rather than current PIVs. PMID:27191005

  10. Fatal cerebritis and brain abscesses following a nontraumatic subdural hematoma in a chronic hemodialyzed patient.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Maria; Damry, Nasroolla; Gazagnes, Marie D

    2008-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of bacteremia in hemodialysis-dependent patients that can lead to metastatic abscesses with poor outcome. We report a case of a 65-year-old chronic hemodialyzed male patient who developed cerebritis and brain abscesses complicating a spontaneous subdural hematoma, following Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia related to infected arteriovenous fistula. In spite of adequate antibiotherapy and several surgical brain drainages, our patient did not survive. Prevention of S. aureus is highly important in hemodialysis patients. PMID:19090864

  11. Bloodstream Infections Are an Improbable Cause of Positive Serum (1,3)-β-d-Glucan in Hematology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mikulska, M.; Del Bono, V.; Guolo, F.; Minetto, P.; Gobbi, M.; Ghiso, A.; Bacigalupo, A.; Viscoli, C.

    2014-01-01

    Ninety-one serum samples from 51 hematology patients with bacteremia infections were tested for (1,3)-β-d-glucan (BG). Eleven samples (15%) from 7 patients (14%) were positive for BG. Of these 7 patients with positive BG results, 4 (8%) had invasive aspergillosis and 3 (6%) had no invasive fungal disease. Bacteremia was an unlikely cause of the false-positive BG results. PMID:24990906

  12. Enterococcus faecalis endophthalmitis as a metastatic complication of hemodialysis vascular access-related sepsis: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Osman Zikrullah; Kara, Ekrem; Belice, Tahir; Ayaz, Teslime; Baydur Sahin, Serap; Ozturk, Cinar; Yildirim, Safak; Metin, Yavuz; Sahutoglu, Tuncay

    2016-07-01

    Catheter and/or arteriovenous (A-V) graft-related bacteremia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among hemodialysis (HD) patients. Endocarditis, septic arthritis, epidural abscess, septic embolism, and osteomyelitis are the most common complications of catheter and/or A-V graft-related bacteremia; however, endogenous endophthalmitis is rarely seen. To the best of our knowledge, Enterococcus faecalis is the first case report in this population. We hereby report a case of endogenous endophthalmitis caused by E. faecalis as a complication of catheter and/or A-V graft-related bacteremia in a diabetic patient, who was undergoing HD for 5 years. We also discuss the etiology, clinical features, and outcomes of endogenous endophthalmitis in HD patients with a brief review of the literature. Although broad-spectrum parenteral (intravenous and intravitreal) antibiotics were used for 4 weeks, evisceration of the left eye could not be avoided. Endogenous endophthalmitis is a rare but rapidly blinding complication of catheter and/or A-V graft-related bacteremia in HD patients. It can develop as a result of silent catheter and/or A-V graft infections, which may lead to recurrent bacteremia. E. faecalis should be considered as a pathogen in this population who had recent history of catheter or A-V graft procedure. PMID:26346615

  13. Difference in time to positivity is useful for the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infection in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Abdelkefi, A; Achour, W; Ben Othman, T; Torjman, L; Ladeb, S; Lakhal, A; Hsaïri, M; Kammoun, L; Ben Hassen, A; Ben Abdeladhim, A

    2005-02-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections are associated with recognized morbidity and mortality. Accurate diagnosis of such infections results in proper management of patients and in reducing unnecessary removal of catheters. We carried out a prospective study in a bone marrow transplant unit to assess the validity of a test based on the earlier positivity of central venous blood cultures in comparison with peripheral blood cultures for predicting catheter-related bacteremia. Between May 2002 and June 2004, 38 bloodstream infections with positive simultaneous central venous catheter and peripheral vein blood cultures were included. A total of 22 patients had catheter-related bacteremias and 16 had noncatheter-related bacteremias, using the catheter-tip culture/clinical criteria as the criterion standard to define catheter-related bacteremia. Differential time to positivity of 120 min or more was associated with 86% sensitivity and 87% specificity. In conclusion, differential time to positivity of 120 min or more is sensitive and specific for catheter-related bacteremia in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients who have nontunnelled short-term catheters. PMID:15640824

  14. Salmonella enterica bacteraemia: a multi-national population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica is an important emerging cause of invasive infections worldwide. However, population-based data are limited. The objective of this study was to define the occurrence of S. enterica bacteremia in a large international population and to evaluate temporal and regional differences. Methods We conducted population-based laboratory surveillance for all salmonella bacteremias in six regions (annual population at risk 7.7 million residents) in Finland, Australia, Denmark, and Canada during 2000-2007. Results A total of 622 cases were identified for an annual incidence of 1.02 per 100,000 population. The incidence of typhoidal (serotypes Typhi and Paratyphi) and non-typhoidal (other serotypes) disease was 0.21 and 0.81 per 100,000/year. There was major regional and moderate seasonal and year to year variability with an increased incidence observed in the latter years of the study related principally to increasing rates of non-typhoidal salmonella bacteremias. Advancing age and male gender were significant risk factors for acquiring non-typhoidal salmonella bacteremia. In contrast, typhoidal salmonella bacteremia showed a decreasing incidence with advancing age and no gender-related excess risk. Conclusions Salmonella enterica is an important emerging pathogen and regional determinants of risk merits further investigation. PMID:20398281

  15. Neonatal bacteriemia isolates and their antibiotic resistance pattern in neonatal insensitive care unit (NICU) at Beasat Hospital, Sanandaj, Iran.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Parvin; Kalantar, Enayatollah; Bahmani, Nasrin; Fatemi, Adel; Naseri, Nima; Ghotbi, Nahid; Naseri, Mohammad Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Bacteremia continues to result in significant morbidity and mortality, particularly among neonates. There is scarce data on neonatal bacteremia in among Iranian neonates. In this study, we determined neonatal bacteremia isolates and their antibiotic resistance pattern in neonatal insensitive care unit at Beasat hospital, Sanandaj, Iran. During one year, all neonates admitted to the NICU were evaluated. Staphylococcal isolates were subjected to determine the prevalence of MRS and mecA gene. A total of 355 blood cultures from suspected cases of sepsis were processed, of which 27 (7.6%) were positive for bacterial growth. Of the 27 isolates, 20 (74%) were Staphylococcus spp as the leading cause of bacteremia. The incidence of Gram negative bacteria was 04 (14.8%). The isolated bacteria were resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Maximum resistance among Staphylococcus spp was against Penicillin, and Ampicillin. In our study, the isolated bacteria were 7.5 % Vancomycin and Ciprofloxacin sensitive. Oxacillin disk diffusion and PCR screened 35% and 30% mec a positive Staphylococcus spp. The spectrum of neonatal bacteremia as seen in NICU at Beasat hospital confirmed the importance of pathogens such as Staphylococcus spp. Penicillin, Ampicillin and Cotrimoxazol resistance was high in theses isolates with high mecA gene carriage, probably due to antibiotic selection. PMID:24902012

  16. Metabolomic Profiling of Plasma from Melioidosis Patients Using UHPLC-QTOF MS Reveals Novel Biomarkers for Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lau, Susanna K P; Lee, Kim-Chung; Lo, George C S; Ding, Vanessa S Y; Chow, Wang-Ngai; Ke, Tony Y H; Curreem, Shirly O T; To, Kelvin K W; Ho, Deborah T Y; Sridhar, Siddharth; Wong, Sally C Y; Chan, Jasper F W; Hung, Ivan F N; Sze, Kong-Hung; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2016-01-01

    To identify potential biomarkers for improving diagnosis of melioidosis, we compared plasma metabolome profiles of melioidosis patients compared to patients with other bacteremia and controls without active infection, using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the metabolomic profiles of melioidosis patients are distinguishable from bacteremia patients and controls. Using multivariate and univariate analysis, 12 significant metabolites from four lipid classes, acylcarnitine (n = 6), lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LysoPE) (n = 3), sphingomyelins (SM) (n = 2) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) (n = 1), with significantly higher levels in melioidosis patients than bacteremia patients and controls, were identified. Ten of the 12 metabolites showed area-under-receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) >0.80 when compared both between melioidosis and bacteremia patients, and between melioidosis patients and controls. SM(d18:2/16:0) possessed the largest AUC when compared, both between melioidosis and bacteremia patients (AUC 0.998, sensitivity 100% and specificity 91.7%), and between melioidosis patients and controls (AUC 1.000, sensitivity 96.7% and specificity 100%). Our results indicate that metabolome profiling might serve as a promising approach for diagnosis of melioidosis using patient plasma, with SM(d18:2/16:0) representing a potential biomarker. Since the 12 metabolites were related to various pathways for energy and lipid metabolism, further studies may reveal their possible role in the pathogenesis and host response in melioidosis. PMID:26927094

  17. Dissemination of Periodontal Pathogens in the Bloodstream after Periodontal Procedures: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestini; Chambrone, Leandro; Foz, Adriana Moura; Artese, Hilana Paula Carillo; Rabelo, Mariana de Sousa; Pannuti, Cláudio Mendes; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Background To date, there is no compilation of evidence-based information associating bacteremia and periodontal procedures. This systematic review aims to assess magnitude, duration, prevalence and nature of bacteremia caused by periodontal procedures. Study Design Systematic Review Types of Studies Reviewed MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS databases were searched in duplicate through August, 2013 without language restriction. Observational studies were included if blood samples were collected before, during or after periodontal procedures of patients with periodontitis. The methodological quality was assessed in duplicate using the modified Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS). Results Search strategy identified 509 potentially eligible articles and nine were included. Only four studies demonstrated high methodological quality, whereas five were of medium or low methodological quality. The study characteristics were considered too heterogeneous to conduct a meta-analysis. Among 219 analyzed patients, 106 (49.4%) had positive bacteremia. More frequent bacteria were S. viridans, A. actinomycetemcomitans P. gingivalis, M. micros and species Streptococcus and Actinomyces, although identification methods of microbiologic assays were different among studies. Clinical Implications Although half of the patients presented positive bacteremia after periodontal procedures, accurate results regarding the magnitude, duration and nature of bacteremia could not be confidentially assessed. PMID:24870125

  18. Metabolomic Profiling of Plasma from Melioidosis Patients Using UHPLC-QTOF MS Reveals Novel Biomarkers for Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Susanna K. P.; Lee, Kim-Chung; Lo, George C. S.; Ding, Vanessa S. Y.; Chow, Wang-Ngai; Ke, Tony Y. H.; Curreem, Shirly O. T.; To, Kelvin K. W.; Ho, Deborah T. Y.; Sridhar, Siddharth; Wong, Sally C. Y.; Chan, Jasper F. W.; Hung, Ivan F. N.; Sze, Kong-Hung; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    To identify potential biomarkers for improving diagnosis of melioidosis, we compared plasma metabolome profiles of melioidosis patients compared to patients with other bacteremia and controls without active infection, using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the metabolomic profiles of melioidosis patients are distinguishable from bacteremia patients and controls. Using multivariate and univariate analysis, 12 significant metabolites from four lipid classes, acylcarnitine (n = 6), lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LysoPE) (n = 3), sphingomyelins (SM) (n = 2) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) (n = 1), with significantly higher levels in melioidosis patients than bacteremia patients and controls, were identified. Ten of the 12 metabolites showed area-under-receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) >0.80 when compared both between melioidosis and bacteremia patients, and between melioidosis patients and controls. SM(d18:2/16:0) possessed the largest AUC when compared, both between melioidosis and bacteremia patients (AUC 0.998, sensitivity 100% and specificity 91.7%), and between melioidosis patients and controls (AUC 1.000, sensitivity 96.7% and specificity 100%). Our results indicate that metabolome profiling might serve as a promising approach for diagnosis of melioidosis using patient plasma, with SM(d18:2/16:0) representing a potential biomarker. Since the 12 metabolites were related to various pathways for energy and lipid metabolism, further studies may reveal their possible role in the pathogenesis and host response in melioidosis. PMID:26927094

  19. The clustering of disorders in infants born before the 28th week of gestation

    PubMed Central

    Leviton, Alan; Dammann, Olaf; Engelke, Stephen; Allred, Elizabeth; Kuban, Karl C. K.; O’Shea, T. Michael; Paneth, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Aim To see if disorders prevalent in infants born extremely preterm cluster. Design Observational cohort study Setting University-affiliated newborn intensive care nurseries Subjects 1223 infants born before the 28th week of gestation who survived until 36 weeks when the diagnosis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) could be made. Interventions None Main outcome measures An echolucent lesion of the cerebral white matter, moderate or severe ventriculomegaly on a protocol cranial ultrasound scan, BPD, retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), and early and late bacteremia. Results After adjustment for gestational age, children who had severe NEC (Bell stage IIIb) were at increased risk of severe ROP (stage 3+), severe BPD (defined as both oxygen and ventilator dependent), and late bacteremia. Children who had early bacteremia were at increased risk of late bacteremia and severe ROP. Those who had late bacteremia were at increased risk of severe ROP, while children who had severe ROP were at increased risk of severe BPD. Conclusions NEC is the disorder common to most of the clusters, but we do not know if its onset occurred before the others. Organ-damage-promoting substances, however, have been found in the circulation of newborn animals with bowel inflammation, supporting the view that NEC contributes to the damage of other organs. PMID:20712837

  20. Assessment of a new hub design and the semiquantitative catheter culture method using an in vivo experimental model of catheter sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Segura, M; Alía, C; Valverde, J; Franch, G; Torres Rodríguez, J M; Sitges-Serra, A

    1990-01-01

    An in vivo model of hub-related catheter sepsis in rabbits is reported. The model was used to investigate the protection offered by a new hub design against external contamination by Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus epidermidis and to reassess the diagnostic value of the semiquantitative culture method in bacteremia of endoluminal origin. Contamination of conventional Luer-Lock connectors was followed by clinical sepsis, positive catheter segment cultures, or both, whereas contamination of the new hub was followed by complete protection. Clinical and bacteriological discrepancies observed between contamination with P. aeruginosa and S. epidermidis suggest that the virulence of microorganisms may account for differences in the natural history of hub-originated catheter sepsis. The semiquantitative extraluminal method for catheter culture yielded less than 15 CFU in three animals with proven bacteremia and should not be used as the "gold standard" to define catheter-related bacteremia. PMID:2254430

  1. Clindamycin plus gentamicin as expectant therapy for presumed mixed infections.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, A. W.; Ota, J. K.; Guze, L. B.

    1976-01-01

    The prevalence of obligate anaerobes was studied prospectively in 60 patients with severe sepsis of intra-abdominal, soft tissue, female genital or oropulmonary origin. In addition, the efficacy of clindamycin (for anaerobes) plus gentamicin (for aerobic bacteria, especially coliforms) as initial empiric therapy in these patients was evaluated. Among 54 patients with cultural proof of infection, anaerobic pathogens were recovered from 52%. Nineteen patients had bacteremia; Bacteroides fragilis and Klebsiella pneumoniae were the most prevalent pathogens, being isolated in five patients each. Infection was eradicated in 56 of the 60 patients (93%). Mortality related to sepsis was 7% in the entire group, 16% in patients with bacteremia and 2% in patients without bacteremia. Eighty-five percent of aerobic isolates tested were susceptible in vitro to either gentamicin or clindamycin; 97% of anaerobic isolates were inhibited by 5 mug/ml of clindamycin. PMID:1000457

  2. [Emphasize the diagnosis and treatment of infective endocarditis in patients with severe burn].

    PubMed

    Huan, Jingning

    2016-02-01

    The incidence and mortality of infective endocarditis (IE) in patients with severe burn remain high, which are attributed to invasive procedures, bacteremia, and wound infection after burns. Clinical clues for IE in burns are usually masked by burn-related manifestations, so the diagnosis of IE may be delayed or missed. For burned patients with persistent bacteremia of unknown source, especially Staphylococcus aureus-induced bacteremia, the diagnosis of IE should be considered according to the Duke criteria, and early echocardiography performance is particularly important. Antibiotic therapy is the mainstay initial management, and early surgical intervention is strongly recommended once IE is clearly diagnosed in patients with burns. In order to lower the incidence and mortality of IE in burns, it is very important to take prophylactic procedures along with the whole course of burn management. PMID:26902272

  3. Ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella septicemia and osteomyelitis in sickle cell disease adults.

    PubMed

    Morgan, James S; Laber, Damian A

    2006-06-01

    The majority of data evaluating Salmonella infections in sickle cell anemia (SCD) comes from studies performed in children. We report a SCD adult who presented with ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella bacteremia. After appropriate initial therapy, persistent back pain prompted evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging of the spine, which revealed osteomyelitis and a psoas abscess. The patient responded to percutaneous drainage and antibiotics. This report summarizes some of the findings of large SCD studies evaluating Salmonella bacteremia and osteomyelitis, focusing on adults. Our case exemplifies the need for antibiotic coverage for Salmonella species in adult SCD patients with septicemia. We argue that imaging studies looking for osteomyelitis should be done routinely in SCD patients with Salmonella bacteremia. PMID:16800421

  4. Population pharmacokinetics of arbekacin in different infectious disease settings and evaluation of dosing regimens.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Mao; Kato, Hideo; Hamada, Yukihiro; Hirai, Jun; Sakanashi, Daisuke; Suematsu, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Naoya; Koizumi, Yusuke; Yamagishi, Yuka; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-07-01

    The efficacy of arbekacin in patients with MRSA infections is influenced by the peak concentration (Cpeak)/MIC ratio (≧8). A daily arbekacin dose of 4-6 mg/kg is primarily used for the treatment of MRSA infection. However, clinical pharmacokinetic studies of arbekacin that evaluate changes in patients with different infectious diseases have been limited. This study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of arbekacin in different infectious diseases and to evaluate its dosing regimens. This work describes a single-centre, retrospective study. The pharmacokinetic parameters of arbekacin were calculated from individual serum-concentration data using WinNonlin ver. 6.3. A total of 331 serum samples were obtained from 170 patients. Our drug concentration-time data were well described by a two-compartment open model. The final model showed that drug clearance was related to creatinine clearance and that the total distribution volume (Vd) was related to actual body weight and the presence of bacteremia. The individual Vd in bacteremia patients was significantly higher than those of other patients (bacteremia: 29.7 ± 0.5 L, pneumonia: 20.8 ± 0.4 L, other infections: 21.4 ± 0.4 L; p < 0.05). Additionally, Monte Carlo simulation showed that target (Cpeak/MIC ≧ 8) attainment was only 10.1%, even at a dose of 6 mg/kg, especially for MRSA bacteremia patients with an arbekacin MIC = 2 μg/mL. In conclusion, our study revealed that the Vd may be higher in bacteremia patients than in patients with other infectious diseases. Therefore, an increase in the daily dose of arbekacin should be considered for bacteremia patients. PMID:27260679

  5. First description of Bartonella bovis in cattle herds in Israel.

    PubMed

    Rudoler, Nir; Rasis, Michal; Sharir, Benny; Novikov, Anna; Shapira, Gregory; Giladi, Michael

    2014-09-17

    Bartonella bovis has been described in beef and dairy cattle worldwide, however the reported prevalence rates are inconsistent, with large variability across studies (0-89%). This study describes the first isolation and characterization of B. bovis among cattle herds in the Middle East. Blood samples from two beef cattle herds (each sampled thrice) and one dairy herd (sampled twice) in Israel were collected during a 16-months period. Overall, 71 of 95 blood samples (75%) grew Bartonella sp., with prevalence of 78% and 59% in beef and dairy cattle, respectively. High level bacteremia (≥100,000 colony forming units/mL) was detected in 25 specimens (26%). Such high-level bacteremia has never been reported in cattle. Two dairy cows and one beef cow remained bacteremic when tested 60 or 120 days apart, respectively, suggesting that cattle may have persistent bacteremia. One third of animals were infested with ticks. Sequence analysis of a gltA fragment of 32 bacterial isolates from 32 animals revealed 100% homology to B. bovis. Species identification was confirmed by sequence analysis of the rpoB gene. Phylogenetic analysis based on the concatenated sequences of gltA and rpoB demonstrated that the isolates described herein form a monophyletic group with B. bovis strains originating from cattle worldwide. Taken together, the high prevalence of bacteremia, including high-level bacteremia, in beef and dairy cattle, the potential to develop prolonged bacteremia, the exposure of cattle to arthropod vectors, and proximity of infected animals to humans, make B. bovis a potential zoonotic agent. PMID:25096531

  6. Endocarditis due to ampicillin-resistant nontyphoid Salmonella: cure with a third-generation cephalosporin.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, C; Olcoz, M T; Izquierdo, G; Moreno, S

    1990-01-01

    A case of ampicillin-resistant salmonella bacteremia complicated by endocarditis in a 78-year-old man is presented. Previous rheumatic valvular heart disease and the lack of response to initial treatment with chloramphenicol prompted us to consider this diagnosis. There was a good clinical response after treatment with ceftriaxone alone and corresponding improvement on the echocardiogram. This case demonstrates the possible endovascular complications of salmonella bacteremia in elderly people and that endocarditis should be included among the invasive infections due to ampicillin-resistant Salmonella that could potentially be treated with the newer cephalosporins. PMID:2237123

  7. Native Valve Endocarditis due to Ralstonia pickettii: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Orme, Joseph; Rivera-Bonilla, Tomas; Loli, Akil; Blattman, Negin N

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia pickettii is a rare pathogen and even more rare in healthy individuals. Here we report a case of R. pickettii bacteremia leading to aortic valve abscess and complete heart block. To our knowledge this is the first case report of Ralstonia species causing infective endocarditis with perivalvular abscess. PMID:25648998

  8. Native Valve Endocarditis due to Ralstonia pickettii: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Orme, Joseph; Rivera-Bonilla, Tomas; Loli, Akil; Blattman, Negin N.

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia pickettii is a rare pathogen and even more rare in healthy individuals. Here we report a case of R. pickettii bacteremia leading to aortic valve abscess and complete heart block. To our knowledge this is the first case report of Ralstonia species causing infective endocarditis with perivalvular abscess. PMID:25648998

  9. Case report of Streptomyces endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve.

    PubMed Central

    Mossad, S B; Tomford, J W; Stewart, R; Ratliff, N B; Hall, G S

    1995-01-01

    We describe the first case of prosthetic valve endocarditis due to a Streptomyces sp. The patient presented with fever, cutaneous embolic lesions, and bacteremia 3 months after aortic valve replacement. Treatment required valve replacement and a long course of parenteral imipenem. PMID:8586732

  10. Pneumococcal Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Epidural Injection: A Rare Event.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tamara M; Chitturi, Chandrika; Lange, Michael; Suh, Jin S; Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae vertebral infections have rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with paraspinal and epidural abscesses as well as concomitant bacteremia following epidural injection. This will be the second case in the literature reporting pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis related to epidural manipulation. PMID:27621563

  11. Discontinuation of Reflex Testing of Stool Samples for Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci Resulted in Increased Prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Bodily, Mandy; McMullen, Kathleen M.; Russo, Anthony J.; Kittur, Nupur D.; Hoppe-Bauer, Joan; Warren, David K.

    2015-01-01

    Discontinuation of reflex testing stool submitted for Clostridium difficile testing for vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) led to an increase of patients with healthcare-associated VRE bacteremia and bacteriuria (2.1 versus 3.6 per 10,000 patient days; p<0.01 ). Cost-benefit analysis showed reflex screening and isolation of VRE reduced hospital costs. PMID:23838226

  12. Malassezia pachydermatis fungemia in an adult with multibacillary leprosy.

    PubMed

    Roman, Jorge; Bagla, Prabhava; Ren, Ping; Blanton, Lucas S; Berman, Megan A

    2016-06-01

    Malassezia pachydermatis is a relatively rare agent of bloodstream infections. We describe an unusual case of Malassezia fungemia in an adult patient hospitalized for Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia who was also found to have multibacillary leprosy. Treatment of the patient required extensive medical management but resulted in a good outcome. PMID:27354932

  13. First Report of Human Infection by Agromyces mediolanus, a Gram-Positive Organism Found in Soil.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Siddharth; Wang, Angela Y M; Chan, Jasper F W; Yip, Cyril C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-10-01

    We report the first human infection by a member of the Agromyces genus, a group of Gram-positive bacteria found in soil. A patient with a long-term venous catheter developed bacteremia due to a non-vancomycin-susceptible isolate of Agromyces mediolanus. Rapid identification was possible by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. PMID:26202108

  14. Bacterial infection and human fetal wastage.

    PubMed

    Lessing, J B; Amster, R; Berger, S A; Peyser, M R

    1989-12-01

    Twenty-eight of 57 fetuses delivered after intrauterine death were found to have a variety of aerobic and facultative bacteria in the heart, anus, placenta, brain and cerebrospinal fluid. Subclinical maternal bacteremia, possibly originating in the urinary tract, appears to be a common cause of second- and third-trimester fetal demise. PMID:2695648

  15. Rapid identification and classification of Staphylococcus aureus by attenuated total reflectance fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important bacterium that can cause serious infections in humans such as pneumonia and bacteremia. Rapid detection of this pathogen is crucial in food industries and clinical laboratories to control S. aureus food poisoning and human infections. In this study, fourier tran...

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium wolinskyi, a Rapid-Growing Species of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Perry, K. Allison; Lawsin, Adrian; Coulliette, Angela D.; Jensen, Bette; Toney, Nadege C.; Limbago, Brandi M.; Noble-Wang, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium wolinskyi is a nonpigmented, rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterium species that is associated with bacteremia, peritonitis, infections associated with implants/prostheses, and skin and soft tissue infections often following surgical procedures in humans. Here, we report the first functionally annotated draft genome sequence of M. wolinskyi CDC_01. PMID:26988052

  17. The fecal microbiome in pediatric patients with short bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in the intestinal microbiome of patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) are thought to significantly affect clinical outcome. These changes may not only delay enteral diet advancement but may also predispose patients to bacterial translocation, bacteremia, and liver disease. Patients with S...

  18. Vertebral Osteomyelitis Caused by Helicobacter cinaedi

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizaki, Aisa; Takegawa, Hiroshi; Doi, Asako; Mizuno, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter cinaedi causes bacteremia, cellulitis, and gastroenteritis. We report the first case of vertebral osteomyelitis caused by H. cinaedi in an elderly man with low back pain and fever. The pathogen was detected in blood and lumbar disc, and the infection was successfully treated with oral doxycycline for 11 weeks. PMID:26109448

  19. Nalidixic Acid-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi Presenting as a Primary Psoas Abscess: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Shakespeare, William A.; Davie, Daniel; Tonnerre, Claude; Rubin, Michael A.; Strong, Michael; Petti, Cathy A.

    2005-01-01

    We report an unusual case of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi presenting as a primary psoas abscess. The isolate tested susceptible to ciprofloxacin but resistant to nalidixic acid in vitro, a pattern associated with fluoroquinolone therapeutic failures. We review the literature for serovar Typhi psoas abscess in the absence of bacteremia and discuss the importance of identifying isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. PMID:15695728

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of the Clinical Streptococcus salivarius Strain CCHSS3 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Delorme, Christine; Guédon, Eric; Pons, Nicolas; Cruaud, Corinne; Couloux, Arnaud; Loux, Valentin; Chiapello, Hélène; Poyart, Claire; Gautier, Céline; Sanchez, Nicolas; Almeida, Mathieu; Kennedy, Sean P.; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Gibrat, Jean-François; Wincker, Patrick; Renault, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a commensal species commonly found in the human oral cavity and digestive tract, although it is also associated with human infections such as meningitis, endocarditis, and bacteremia. Here, we report the complete sequence of S. salivarius strain CCHSS3, isolated from human blood. PMID:21742894

  1. Complete genome sequence of the clinical Streptococcus salivarius strain CCHSS3.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Christine; Guédon, Eric; Pons, Nicolas; Cruaud, Corinne; Couloux, Arnaud; Loux, Valentin; Chiapello, Hélène; Poyart, Claire; Gautier, Céline; Sanchez, Nicolas; Almeida, Mathieu; Kennedy, Sean P; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Gibrat, Jean-François; Wincker, Patrick; Renault, Pierre

    2011-09-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a commensal species commonly found in the human oral cavity and digestive tract, although it is also associated with human infections such as meningitis, endocarditis, and bacteremia. Here, we report the complete sequence of S. salivarius strain CCHSS3, isolated from human blood. PMID:21742894

  2. Cefmenoxime therapy of serious bacterial infections.

    PubMed Central

    Gombert, M E; Glasser, L A; Eng, R H

    1984-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of cefmenoxime was evaluated in 50 patients with serious bacterial infections. These included 26 pneumonias, 18 urinary tract infections, 2 soft tissue infections, 2 bacteremias, 1 renal abscess, and 1 peritonitis. A satisfactory clinical response was seen in 47 patients (94%). Eosinophilia and thrombocytosis were seen in several patients but were generally mild and transient. PMID:6329082

  3. Multi-omics approaches to deciphering a hypervirulent strain of Campylobacter jejuni

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Campylobacter jejuni clone SA recently emerged as the predominant cause of sheep abortion in the U.S. and is also associated with foodborne gastroenteritis in humans. A distinct phenotype of this clone is its ability to induce bacteremia and abortion. To facilitate understanding the path...

  4. Daptomycin non-susceptible, vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis treated with ceftaroline and daptomycin: case report and brief review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Baxi, Sanjiv M; Chan, Dominic; Jain, Vivek

    2015-12-01

    We report a case of clearance of persistent bacteremia due to daptomycin non-susceptible, vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus native mitral valve endocarditis with a combination of ceftaroline and daptomycin, in an 81-year-old medically complex patient who was not an operative candidate. PMID:25805524

  5. Isolation of Bordetella bronchiseptica from Blood and a Pancreatic Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Bunce, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a respiratory pathogen rarely encountered in human hosts. We describe a case of bacteremia and pancreatic abscess caused by this organism. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of B. bronchiseptica causing intra-abdominal infection in the form of an abscess. PMID:25740781

  6. Antimicrobial development in the era of emerging resistance.

    PubMed

    Sorlozano, Antonio; Carrasco, Cristina; Cabeza, Jose; Villegas, Enrique; Gutierrez, Jose

    2009-07-01

    Antibiotics currently under study by the Food and Drugs Administration include: faropenem (for treatment of sinusitis, bronchitis, and community-acquired pneumonia), dalbavancin (for catheter infections), telavancin (for treatment of nosocomial pneumonia), oritavancin (for bacteremia), ceftobiprole and iclaprim (for pneumonias). Moreover, all of them would be useful for skin and soft tissue infections. PMID:19601889

  7. First Report of Human Infection by Agromyces mediolanus, a Gram-Positive Organism Found in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Siddharth; Wang, Angela Y. M.; Chan, Jasper F. W.; Yip, Cyril C. Y.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-01-01

    We report the first human infection by a member of the Agromyces genus, a group of Gram-positive bacteria found in soil. A patient with a long-term venous catheter developed bacteremia due to a non-vancomycin-susceptible isolate of Agromyces mediolanus. Rapid identification was possible by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry. PMID:26202108

  8. Pneumococcal Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Epidural Injection: A Rare Event

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tamara M; Chitturi, Chandrika; Lange, Michael; Suh, Jin S; Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae vertebral infections have rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with paraspinal and epidural abscesses as well as concomitant bacteremia following epidural injection. This will be the second case in the literature reporting pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis related to epidural manipulation. PMID:27621563

  9. Enhanced susceptibility of mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes to type II group B streptococcal infection.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, M S; Fuselier, P A

    1983-01-01

    Since diabetes mellitus predisposes adults to group B streptococcal (GBS) bacteremia, a murine model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes and type II GBS bacteremia was developed to assess certain immune factors which might influence susceptibility to infection. In diabetic mice, the 50% lethal dose for two strains of type II GBS was significantly lower (greater than 1 log10 decrease in CFU per milliliter) than in control animals. This enhanced virulence of GBS for diabetic animals was associated with prolonged bacteremia, persistent sequestration of organisms in the splanchnic reticuloendothelial system, and a shift from splenic to hepatic clearance. Although immunization of control and diabetic animals resulted in high concentrations of type-specific serum antibody, it had no effect on late reticuloendothelial system sequestration in diabetics. In contrast, depletion of complement by treatment of mice with cobra venom factor blocked reticuloendothelial system clearance and resulted in fatal infection in both diabetic and control mice. These results indicate that neither type-specific antibody nor an intact complement system is adequate for effective clearance of type II GBS bacteremia in mice with experimentally induced diabetes. This clearance deficit could be the result of a defect in hepatocyte membrane receptors necessary for removal of this encapsulated microorganism. PMID:6339383

  10. Food-borne bacteremic illnesses in febrile neutropenic children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anselm Chi-Wai; Siao-Ping Ong, Nellie Dawn

    2011-08-31

    Bacteremia following febrile neutropenia is a serious complication in children with malignancies. Preventive measures are currently targeted at antimicrobial prophylaxis, amelioration of drug-induced neutropenia, and nosocomial spread of pathogens, with little attention to community-acquired infections. A retrospective study was conducted at a pediatric oncology center during a 3-year period to identify probable cases of food-borne infections with bacteremia. Twenty-one bacteremic illnesses affecting 15 children receiving chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were reviewed. Three (14%) episodes were highly suspected of a food-borne origin: a 17-year-old boy with osteosarcoma contracted Sphingomonas paucimobilis septicemia after consuming nasi lemak bought from a street hawker; a 2-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed Chryseobacterium meningosepticum septicemia after a sushi dinner; a 2-year-old girl was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Lactobacillus bacteremia suspected to be of probiotic origin. All of them were neutropenic at the time of the infections and the bacteremias were cleared with antibiotic treatment. Food-borne sepsis may be an important, but readily preventable, cause of bloodstream infections in pediatric oncology patients, especially in tropical countries with an abundance of culinary outlets. PMID:22184532

  11. Food-borne bacteremic illnesses in febrile neutropenic children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anselm Chi-wai; Siao-ping Ong, Nellie Dawn

    2011-01-01

    Bacteremia following febrile neutropenia is a serious complication in children with malignancies. Preventive measures are currently targeted at antimicrobial prophylaxis, amelioration of drug-induced neutropenia, and nosocomial spread of pathogens, with little attention to community-acquired infections. A retrospective study was conducted at a pediatric oncology center during a 3-year period to identify probable cases of food-borne infections with bacteremia. Twenty-one bacteremic illnesses affecting 15 children receiving chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were reviewed. Three (14%) episodes were highly suspected of a food-borne origin: a 17-year-old boy with osteosarcoma contracted Sphingomonas paucimobilis septicemia after consuming nasi lemak bought from a street hawker; a 2-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed Chryseobacterium meningosepticum septicemia after a sushi dinner; a 2-year-old girl was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Lactobacillus bacteremia suspected to be of probiotic origin. All of them were neutropenic at the time of the infections and the bacteremias were cleared with antibiotic treatment. Food-borne sepsis may be an important, but readily preventable, cause of bloodstream infections in pediatric oncology patients, especially in tropical countries with an abundance of culinary outlets. PMID:22184532

  12. Blood culture isolates from children admitted to Medical Unit III, Yangon Children's Hospital, 1998.

    PubMed

    Shwe, Than Nu; Nyein, Mar Mar; Yi, Wut; Mon, Aung

    2002-12-01

    A one year study (August 1998-July 1999) of bacteremia in febrile children was carried out in the Medical Unit (III), Yangon Children's Hospital (YCH), Myanmar, to determine: (1) the bacteria responsible for fever of five days or more in children; (2) the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of these bacteria. Children aged one month to 12 years who had fever for five days or more and who did not receive antibiotics within the first 48 hours irrespective of the diagnosis were included in this study. A total of 120 patients fulfilled the criteria. Bacteria could be isolated from 65 cases (54.2%). The commonest organism isolated was Salmonella typhi (43.1%). Others included Escherichia coli (12.3%), Staphylococcus aureus (7.7%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (7.7%); Streptococcus, Shigella, Diplococcus, Klebsiella and Acinetobacter were also isolated. The Salmonella typhi were resistant to conventional antibiotics (ampicillin, amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, and co-trimoxazole); however, they were sensitive to amikacin, netilmicin, nalidixic acid, and cephalothin. A cluster of enteric fever cases from Mingalartaungnyunt township was noticed and was reported to the Directorate of Health. Changes in the incidence and etiology of bacteremia in hospitals are well documented. Sentinel surveys of bacteremia in major hospitals should be carried out in order to detect the changing patterns of bacteremia and antibiotic sensitivity; such surveys will be of great help in establishing local antibiotic policies. PMID:12757224

  13. [Community-acquired pneumonia in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Füri, Julia; Oestmann, Andreas; Repond, Fernand

    2016-04-13

    We report the case of a 88 years old patient with cough and new onset confusion. Delirium was caused by a necrotizing Methicillin-sensible staphylococcus aureus pneumonia with bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy for several weeks and fall of inflammatory markers the patient died from consequences of delirium. PMID:27078731

  14. Prospective Nationwide Study of Aeromonas Infections in France▿

    PubMed Central

    Lamy, Brigitte; Kodjo, Angeli; Laurent, Frédéric

    2009-01-01

    We report a systematic prospective multicenter nationwide study of clinical Aeromonas infections in France. During 6 months (May to October 2006), 78 cases of aeromonosis were reviewed for risk factors and clinical, microbiological, and antimicrobial susceptibility data. They included wound infections (44%), bacteremia (26%), enteritis (19%), respiratory tract infections (6%), and miscellaneous (5%) infections. PMID:19244464

  15. Japanese Macaques (Macaca fuscata) as Natural Reservoir of Bartonella quintana.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shingo; Kabeya, Hidenori; Yoshino, Aika; Sekine, Wataru; Suzuki, Kazuo; Tamate, Hidetoshi B; Yamazaki, Shouki; Chomel, Bruno B; Maruyama, Soichi

    2015-12-01

    Bartonella quintana bacteremia was detected in 6 (13.3%) of 45 wild-caught Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata). Multilocus sequence typing of the isolates revealed that Japanese macaques were infected with a new and specific B. quintana sequence type. Free-ranging Japanese macaques thus represent another natural reservoir of B. quintana. PMID:26584238

  16. Adhesion, biofilm and genotypic characteristics of antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli isolates

    PubMed Central

    Cergole-Novella, Maria C.; Pignatari, Antonio C.C.; Guth, Beatriz E.C.

    2015-01-01

    Aggregative adherence to human epithelial cells, most to renal proximal tubular (HK-2) cells, and biofilm formation was identified among antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli strains mainly isolated from bacteremia. The importance of these virulence properties contributing to host colonization and infection associated with multiresistant E. coli should not be neglected. PMID:26221104

  17. Complete Genome Sequences of Aerococcus christensenii CCUG 28831T, Aerococcus sanguinicola CCUG 43001T, Aerococcus urinae CCUG 36881T, Aerococcus urinaeequi CCUG 28094T, Aerococcus urinaehominis CCUG 42038 BT, and Aerococcus viridans CCUG 4311T.

    PubMed

    Carkaci, Derya; Dargis, Rimtas; Nielsen, Xiaohui Chen; Skovgaard, Ole; Fuursted, Kurt; Christensen, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Strains belonging to the genus Aerococcus are causative agents of human and animal infections, including urogenital infections, bacteremia/septicemia, and infective endocarditis. This study reports the first fully closed and complete genome sequences of six type strains belonging to the genus Aerococcus using a combination of Illumina HiSeq and PacBio sequencing technologies. PMID:27103727

  18. A Spontaneous Joint Infection with Corynebacterium striatum▿

    PubMed Central

    Scholle, David

    2007-01-01

    Corynebacterium striatum is a ubiquitous saprophyte with the potential to cause bacteremia in immunocompromised patients. Until now, spontaneous infection of a natural joint has not been reported. When phenotyping failed, gene sequencing was used to identify the species. The isolate demonstrated high-level resistance to most antibiotics. PMID:17151206

  19. Complete Genome Sequences of Aerococcus christensenii CCUG 28831T, Aerococcus sanguinicola CCUG 43001T, Aerococcus urinae CCUG 36881T, Aerococcus urinaeequi CCUG 28094T, Aerococcus urinaehominis CCUG 42038 BT, and Aerococcus viridans CCUG 4311T

    PubMed Central

    Carkaci, Derya; Dargis, Rimtas; Skovgaard, Ole; Fuursted, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Strains belonging to the genus Aerococcus are causative agents of human and animal infections, including urogenital infections, bacteremia/septicemia, and infective endocarditis. This study reports the first fully closed and complete genome sequences of six type strains belonging to the genus Aerococcus using a combination of Illumina HiSeq and PacBio sequencing technologies. PMID:27103727

  20. [Candida catheter related-blood stream infection].

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Masako; Shimono, Nobuyuki

    2014-02-01

    Candida catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is a biofilm-related disease, which is usually refractory because antifungals show limited effect. With medical development and increase in number of compromised hosts, CRBSI became more frequent. Candida, which is one of the opportunistic pathogens, ranks the fourth causative organism of bacteremia. The onset of bacteremia is greatly associated with the presence of catheter. Repeated blood cultures and the central venous catheter (CVC) tip culture are done for the definitive diagnosis of Candida CRBSI. Additionally serological examinations such as (1 --> 3)-beta-D-glucan and mannan antigen are also useful for early diagnosis. It is important for the appropriate treatment to remove CVC, which is an artificial contaminated material, and administer antifungals promptly. As to the choice of antifungals, we should also take into account the ability of antibiofilm effect of antifungals as well as immunological state of host including neutropenia, prior administration of azoles, isolated or estimated Candida species, sensitivity against antifungals, administration route, pharmacokinetics (bioavailability, metabolic and excretion pathway, distribution) and drug interaction. As to complication of Candida bacteremia, first we should check endophthalmitis, which occurs frequently and leads to the loss of eyesight, as well as infective endocarditis, arthritis, metastatic infections such as embolic pneumonia and suppurative thrombotic phlebitis of catheter insertion site. Lastly we emphasize that the appropriate treatment based on the character of Candida bacteremia and biofilm leads to favorable prognosis. PMID:24809204

  1. Infected Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Helicobacter cinaedi

    PubMed Central

    Iwasawa, Takamasa; Tamura, Atsushi; Lefor, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter cinaedi is a rare human pathogen which has various clinical manifestations such as cellulitis, bacteremia, arthritis, meningitis, and infectious endocarditis. We report an abdominal aortic aneurysm infected with Helicobacter cinaedi, treated successfully with surgical repair and long-term antimicrobial therapy. PMID:26885430

  2. An unusual complication of transradial coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    McEntegart, Margaret B; Dalzell, Jonathan R; Lindsay, M Mitchell

    2009-05-01

    We report the first case of extensive cellulitis and staphylococcal bacteremia with the subsequent development of a remote mycotic pseudoaneurysm in the ipsilateral brachial artery following right transradial coronary angiography in a diabetic patient with previous right axillary node clearance. The potential for serious complication should be borne in mind when deciding on the site of vascular access in such patients. PMID:19411734

  3. Pneumococcal Disease: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... bacteremia and sepsis are blood infections. Symptoms include: Fever Chills Low alertness Pneumococcus bacteria causes up to half of middle ear infections (otitis media). Symptoms include: Ear pain A red, swollen ear drum Fever Sleepiness  Top of Page Complications Some pneumococcal ...

  4. Ecthyma gangrenosum caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a patient with astrocytoma treated with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Filip Yves Francine Léon; Middelburg, Tom Alexander; Seynaeve, Caroline; de Jonge, Maja J A

    2010-02-01

    Ecthyma gangrenosum, presenting as embolic lesions caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, has distinct pathognomonic features and a high mortality rate in patients with bacteremia, but when recognized early is easily treated. In this case report we describe this disseminated infection in an adult patient treated with chemotherapy for an astrocytoma. PMID:20054603

  5. Clinical Indicators for Bacterial Co-Infection in Ghanaian Children with P. falciparum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Maja Verena; Amemasor, Solomon; Agyekum, Alex; Loag, Wibke; Marks, Florian; Sarpong, Nimako; Dekker, Denise; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; May, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of infectious causes in severely ill children is essential but challenging in sub- Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to determine clinical indicators that are able to identify bacterial co-infections in P. falciparum infected children in rural Ghana. In total, 1,915 severely ill children below the age of 15 years were recruited at Agogo Presbyterian Hospital in Ghana between May 2007 and February 2011. In 771 (40%) of the children malaria parasites were detected. This group was analyzed for indicators of bacterial co-infections using bivariate and multivariate regression analyses with 24 socio-economic variables, 16 terms describing medical history and anthropometrical information and 68 variables describing clinical symptoms. The variables were tested for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value. In 46 (6.0%) of the children with malaria infection, bacterial co-infection was detected. The most frequent pathogens were non-typhoid salmonellae (45.7%), followed by Streptococcus spp. (13.0%). Coughing, dehydration, splenomegaly, severe anemia and leukocytosis were positively associated with bacteremia. Domestic hygiene and exclusive breastfeeding is negatively associated with bacteremia. In cases of high parasitemia (>10,000/μl), a significant association with bacteremia was found for splenomegaly (OR 8.8; CI 1.6–48.9), dehydration (OR 18.2; CI 2.0–166.0) and coughing (OR 9.0; CI 0.7–118.6). In children with low parasitemia, associations with bacteremia were found for vomiting (OR 4.7; CI 1.4–15.8), severe anemia (OR 3.3; CI 1.0–11.1) and leukocytosis (OR 6.8 CI 1.9–24.2). Clinical signs of impaired microcirculation were negatively associated with bacteremia. Ceftriaxone achieved best coverage of isolated pathogens. The results demonstrate the limitation of clinical symptoms to determine bacterial co-infections in P. falciparum infected children. Best clinical indicators are dependent on the

  6. Sepsis Caused by Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL)-Positive K. pneumoniae and E. coli: Comparison of Severity of Sepsis, Delay of Anti-Infective Therapy and ESBL Genotype.

    PubMed

    Sakellariou, Christian; Gürntke, Stephan; Steinmetz, Ivo; Kohler, Christian; Pfeifer, Yvonne; Gastmeier, Petra; Schwab, Frank; Kola, Axel; Deja, Maria; Leistner, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    Infections with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) are associated with increased mortality. Outcome differences due to various species of ESBL-E or ESBL genotypes are not well investigated. We conducted a cohort study to assess risk factors for mortality in cases of ESBL-E bacteremia (K. pneumoniae or E. coli) and the risk factors for sepsis with organ failure. All consecutive patients of our institution from 2008 to 2011 with bacteremia due to ESBL-E were included. Basic epidemiological data, underlying comorbidities, origin of bacteremia, severity of sepsis and delay of appropriate anti-infective treatment were collected. Isolates were PCR-screened for the presence of ESBL genes and plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamases. Cox proportional hazard regression on mortality and multivariable logistic regression on risk factors for sepsis with organ failure was conducted. 219 cases were included in the analysis: 73.1% due to E. coli, 26.9% due to K. pneumoniae. There was no significant difference in hospital mortality (ESBL-E. coli, 23.8% vs. ESBL-K. pneumoniae 27.1%, p = 0.724). However, the risk of sepsis with organ failure was associated in cases of K. pneumoniae bacteremia (OR 4.5, p<0.001) and patients with liver disease (OR 3.4, p = 0.004) or renal disease (OR 6.8, p<0.001). We found significant differences in clinical presentation of ESBL-E bacteremia due to K. pneumoniae compared to E. coli. As K. pneumoniae cases showed a more serious clinical presentation as E. coli cases and were associated with different risk factors, treatment and prevention strategies should be adjusted accordingly. PMID:27442425

  7. Sepsis Caused by Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL)-Positive K. pneumoniae and E. coli: Comparison of Severity of Sepsis, Delay of Anti-Infective Therapy and ESBL Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Ivo; Kohler, Christian; Pfeifer, Yvonne; Gastmeier, Petra; Schwab, Frank; Kola, Axel; Deja, Maria; Leistner, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    Infections with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) are associated with increased mortality. Outcome differences due to various species of ESBL-E or ESBL genotypes are not well investigated. We conducted a cohort study to assess risk factors for mortality in cases of ESBL-E bacteremia (K. pneumoniae or E. coli) and the risk factors for sepsis with organ failure. All consecutive patients of our institution from 2008 to 2011 with bacteremia due to ESBL-E were included. Basic epidemiological data, underlying comorbidities, origin of bacteremia, severity of sepsis and delay of appropriate anti-infective treatment were collected. Isolates were PCR-screened for the presence of ESBL genes and plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamases. Cox proportional hazard regression on mortality and multivariable logistic regression on risk factors for sepsis with organ failure was conducted. 219 cases were included in the analysis: 73.1% due to E. coli, 26.9% due to K. pneumoniae. There was no significant difference in hospital mortality (ESBL-E. coli, 23.8% vs. ESBL-K. pneumoniae 27.1%, p = 0.724). However, the risk of sepsis with organ failure was associated in cases of K. pneumoniae bacteremia (OR 4.5, p<0.001) and patients with liver disease (OR 3.4, p = 0.004) or renal disease (OR 6.8, p<0.001). We found significant differences in clinical presentation of ESBL-E bacteremia due to K. pneumoniae compared to E. coli. As K. pneumoniae cases showed a more serious clinical presentation as E. coli cases and were associated with different risk factors, treatment and prevention strategies should be adjusted accordingly. PMID:27442425

  8. Passive immunization does not provide protection against experimental infection with Mycoplasma haemofelis.

    PubMed

    Sugiarto, Sarah; Spiri, Andrea M; Riond, Barbara; Novacco, Marilisa; Oestmann, Angelina; de Miranda, Luisa H Monteiro; Meli, Marina L; Boretti, Felicitas S; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Willi, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma haemofelis (Mhf) is the most pathogenic feline hemotropic mycoplasma. Cats infected with Mhf that clear bacteremia are protected from Mhf reinfection, but the mechanisms of protective immunity are unresolved. In the present study we investigated whether the passive transfer of antibodies from Mhf-recovered cats to naïve recipient cats provided protection against bacteremia and clinical disease following homologous challenge with Mhf; moreover, we characterized the immune response in the recipient cats. Ten specified pathogen-free (SPF) cats were transfused with pooled plasma from cats that had cleared Mhf bacteremia; five control cats received plasma from naïve SPF cats. After homologous challenge with Mhf, cats were monitored for 100 days using quantitative PCR, hematology, blood biochemistry, Coombs testing, flow cytometry, DnaK ELISA, and red blood cell (RBC) osmotic fragility (OF) measurement. Passively immunized cats were not protected against Mhf infection but, compared to control cats, showed significantly higher RBC OF and B lymphocyte (CD45R/B220(+)) counts and occasionally higher lymphocyte, monocyte and activated CD4(+) T lymphocyte (CD4(+)CD25(+)) counts; they also showed higher bilirubin, total protein and globulin levels compared to those of control cats. At times of peak bacteremia, a decrease in eosinophils and lymphocytes, as well as subsets thereof (B lymphocytes and CD5(+), CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes), and an increase in monocytes were particularly significant in the passively immunized cats. In conclusion, passive immunization does not prevent bacteremia and clinical disease following homologous challenge with Mhf, but enhances RBC osmotic fragility and induces a pronounced immune response. PMID:27496124

  9. A study of the epidemiology of an endemic strain of staphylococcus haemolyticus (TOR-35) in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Kazembe, P; Simor, A E; Swarney, A E; Yap, L G; Kreiswirth, B; Ng, J; Low, D E

    1993-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are among the most prevalent microorganisms that colonize and cause sepsis in neonatal intensive care units (NICU). We had previously identified a strain of CNS, Staphylococcus haemolyticus (TOR-35), in the NICU at Mount Sinai Hospital, that had been repeatedly isolated from blood cultures from neonates. We therefore carried out a prospective study to determine the frequency and time of colonization and the frequency of bacteremia in neonates over a 3.5 month period. This was accomplished by obtaining surface swabs within 1 h of birth and on days 3, 5, and 7 and by characterizing all blood culture isolates of CNS. We also determined what percentage of neonatal CNS bacteremias were due to this strain, between January 1, 1987 and December 31, 1990, by retrieving and typing all stock cultures of CNS from that period. All isolates were typed by species identification and antimicrobial susceptibility profile code. There were 76 (38%) neonates that became colonized with the TOR-35 strain at some time during their NICU stay. Lower birth weight was associated with colonization (p < 0.001), as was lower gestational age (p < 0.001). Only 1 neonate had a positive blood culture isolate for the TOR-35 strain during the prospective study. Of the 4 years of neonatal bacteremias that were studied retrospectively, there were 252 episodes of CNS bacteremia, of which 27 (11%) were due to the TOR-35 strain. The TOR-35 strain has become endemic in our NICU and appears to selectively colonize premature, low birth weight newborn infants, but only infrequently causes bacteremia. PMID:8248752

  10. Utility of Sepsis Biomarkers and the Infection Probability Score to Discriminate Sepsis and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome in Standard Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ratzinger, Franz; Schuardt, Michael; Eichbichler, Katherina; Tsirkinidou, Irene; Bauer, Marlene; Haslacher, Helmuth; Mitteregger, Dieter; Binder, Michael; Burgmann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Physicians are regularly faced with severely ill patients at risk of developing infections. In literature, standard care wards are often neglected, although their patients frequently suffer from a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) of unknown origin. Fast identification of patients with infections is vital, as they immediately require appropriate therapy. Further, tools with a high negative predictive value (NPV) to exclude infection or bacteremia are important to increase the cost effectiveness of microbiological examinations and to avoid inappropriate antibiotic treatment. In this prospective cohort study, 2,384 patients with suspected infections were screened for suffering from two or more SIRS criteria on standard care wards. The infection probability score (IPS) and sepsis biomarkers with discriminatory power were assessed regarding their capacity to identify infection or bacteremia. In this cohort finally consisting of 298 SIRS-patients, the infection prevalence was 72%. Bacteremia was found in 25% of cases. For the prediction of infection, the IPS yielded 0.51 ROC-AUC (30.1% sensitivity, 64.6% specificity). Among sepsis biomarkers, lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) was the best parameter with 0.63 ROC-AUC (57.5% sensitivity, 67.1% specificity). For the prediction of bacteremia, the IPS performed slightly better with a ROC-AUC of 0.58 (21.3% sensitivity, 65% specificity). Procalcitonin was the best discriminator with 0.78 ROC-AUC, 86.3% sensitivity, 59.6% specificity and 92.9% NPV. Furthermore, bilirubin and LBP (ROC-AUC: 0.65, 0.62) might also be considered as useful parameters. In summary, the IPS and widely used infection parameters, including CRP or WBC, yielded a poor diagnostic performance for the detection of infection or bacteremia. Additional sepsis biomarkers do not aid in discriminating inflammation from infection. For the prediction of bacteremia procalcitonin, and bilirubin were the most promising parameters, which might be

  11. Microvascular changes explain the "two-hit" theory of multiple organ failure.

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, R N; Spain, D A; Wilson, M A; Keelen, P A; Harris, P D

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to determine intestinal microvascular endothelial cell control after sequential hemorrhage and bacteremia. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Sepsis that follows severe hemorrhagic shock often results in multiple system organ failure (MSOF) and death. The sequential nature of this clinical scenario has led to the idea of a "two-hit" theory for the development of MSOF, the hallmark of which is peripheral vasodilation and acidosis. Acute bacteremia alone results in persistent intestinal vasoconstriction and mucosal hypoperfusion. Little experimental data exist to support the pathogenesis of vascular dysregulation during sequential physiologic insults. We postulate that hemorrhagic shock followed by bacteremia results in altered microvascular endothelial cell control of dilation and blood flow. METHODS: Rats underwent volume hemorrhage and resuscitation. A sham group underwent the vascular cannulation without hemorrhage and resuscitation, and controls had no surgical manipulation. After 24 and 72 hours, the small intestine microcirculation was visualized by in vivo videomicroscopy. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, arteriolar diameters, and A1 flow by Doppler velocimetry were measured. Endothelial-dependent dilator function was determined by the topical application of acetylcholine (ACh). After 1 hour of Escherichia coil bacteremia, ACh dose responses were again measured. Topical nitroprusside was then applied to assess direct smooth muscle dilation (endothelial-independent dilator function) in all groups. Vascular reactivity to ACh was compared among the groups. RESULTS: Acute bacteremia, with or without prior hemorrhage, caused significant large-caliber A1 arteriolar constriction with a concomitant decrease in blood flow. This constriction was blunted at 24 hours after hemorrhage but was restored to control values by 72 hours. There was a reversal of the response to bacteremia in the premucosal A3 vessels, with a marked dilation both at 24 and

  12. [Invasive Campylobacter jejuni/coli Infections: 9 Case Reports at a Single Center between 2000 and 2015, and a Review of Literature Describing Japanese Patients].

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Keiji; Matsubara, Kousaku; Nigami, Hiroyuki; Iwata, Aya; Isome, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Go

    2016-05-01

    There have been few coherent reports on extraintestinal infection or bacteremia caused by Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) or C. coli in Japan. To clarify the clinical and microbiological characteristics of invasive infections caused by these two species, we retrospectively analyzed the records of patients from whom these pathogens had been isolated from sterile sites between 2000 and 2015. During this study period, we identified 9 patients. The clinical syndrome of all of these patients was bacteremia. Three patients had underlying diseases with both liver cirrhosis and malignant neoplasm, and all of these patients were aged 60 years or older. The remaining 6 patients were immunocompetent and younger than 40 years of age. All 9 patients had a fever of 38.5 degrees C or higher. The proportion of patients with gastrointestinal symptoms was lower for the 3 patients with underlying diseases, compared with the 6 patients without underlying diseases (1/3 cases vs, 4/6 cases). Of the 8 strains evaluated for antimicrobial susceptibility, all were susceptible to imipenem/cilastatin, kanamycin and erythromycin, and 2 were resistant to levofloxacin. Antimicrobial treatment was administered to 8 patients, but one spontaneously recovered without any treatment. We were able to follow the outcomes of 8 patients, and all of these patients completely recovered without relapses. We also reviewed 14 Japanese patients reported in the Japanese and English literature and found similar clinical features consisting of a high-grade fever and an association with underlying diseases and gastrointestinal symptoms. Of note, 3 agammaglobulinemic patients presented with bacteremia and extraintestinal infections and had multiple relapses. Based on the findings of our 9 cases and previous reports, the affected patients were divided into two groups according to clinical syndrome and therapeutic intervention. One group consisted of previously healthy children or young adults showing bacteremia

  13. Caudal anesthesia in a patient with peritonitis: Is it safe??

    PubMed Central

    Kako, H; Hakim, M; Kundu, A; Tobias, TD

    2016-01-01

    Neuraxial anesthesia combined with general anesthesia has become a widely accepted method of providing effective postoperative analgesia and decreasing intraoperative anesthetic needs in the pediatric population. In clinical practice, there still appears to be hesitancy for the use of a neuraxial technique (spinal or epidural) in patients at risk for bacteremia or with an on-going systemic infection. However, evidence-based medicine lacks any data to support an increase in the risk of infectious complications following neuraxial anesthesia. We present two pediatric patients with intra-abdominal infectious processes who received caudal epidural blockade for postoperative operative analgesia. The use of neuraxial techniques in patients at risk for bacteremia is reviewed, evidence-based medicine regarding the risks of infection discussed, and the potential favorable effects of neuraxial blockade on the neurohumoral response to sepsis and the systemic inflammatory responses presented. PMID:27051378

  14. Gastrointestinal variant of Lemierre's syndrome complicating ruptured appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Akhrass, Fadi Al; Abdallah, Lina; Berger, Steven; Sartawi, Rami

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a non-spore-forming, obligate anaerobic, filamentous, gramnegative bacillus that frequently colonizes the human oral cavity, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. Fusobacterium species have rarely been implicated in cases of gastrointestinal variant of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe a case of F. necrophorum bacteremia associated with suppurative porto-mesenteric vein thrombosis (PVT) following acute ruptured appendicitis. In addition, we list the documented twelve cases of Fusobacterium pylephlebitis. Recanalization of the porto-mesenteric veins and relief of the extrahepatic portal hypertension were achieved with early empiric antibiotic and local thrombolytic therapy. Our patient's case underscores the importance of recognizing Fusobacterium bacteremia as a possible cause of suppurative PVT after disruption of the gastrointestinal mucosa following an acute intraabdominal infectious process. Early treatment of this condition using anticoagulation and endovascular thrombolysis as adjunctive therapies may prevent PVT complications. PMID:26793462

  15. Intestinal colonization and competitive exclusion of Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni in young chicks.

    PubMed

    Soerjadi, A S; Snoeyenbos, G H; Weinack, O M

    1982-01-01

    Colonization of Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni was investigated in monoxenic and holoxenic chicks. In monoxenic chicks, major colonization was found in the crop and ceca, with populations in the ceca consistently reaching 10(9) colony-forming-units/ml of cecal contents over the 28-day test period. Bacteremia was found in most chicks, but no significant gross pathological lesions were detected. In holoxenic chicks, major colonization occurred only in the ceca, and no evidence of bacteremia was detected. Colonization by native gut microflora sharply reduced subsequent colonization by C. fetus subsp. jejuni. The protective mechanism is perhaps the same as that protective against paratyphoid salmonellae and pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli. PMID:7150145

  16. Endovascular infection with Salmonella group C – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Arbune, Manuela; Ciobotaru, Roxana; Voinescu, Doina Carina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The risk of secondary endovascular infections after bacteremia with Salmonella spp. is augmented by preexisting atherosclerotic arterial lesions. Over the age of 50, the incidence varies between 25 and 35%. Case report A 57-year-old male, smoker, alcohol user, in poor social condition, was hospitalized for fever, malaise, left leg persistent thrombophlebitis, coxofemoral and back pain. His medical history was significant for recent sepsis with Salmonella group C, and a recent diagnosis of hepatitis C. During the antibiotic treatment, he complained of a left inguinal tumor, corresponding to a paravertebral image along the left psoas muscle identified by abdominal computed tomography. A paravertebral hematoma and an aneurysm of the left aortoiliac junction were repaired by surgery. The culture of the aneurysm was positive for Salmonella group C. Conclusion The differential diagnosis of lower limb persistent thrombophlebitis should consider the compression by abdominal aneurysm, consequent to a vascular complication from bacteremia with Salmonella spp. PMID:26405678

  17. Streptococcus constellatus Causing Septic Thrombophlebitis of the Right Ovarian Vein with Extension into the Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Haidar, Abdallah; Haddad, Amy; Naqvi, Amir; Onyesoh, Ngozi U.; Malik, Rushdah; Williams, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Streptococcus constellatus collectively with Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus intermedius constitute the Streptococcus anginosus (formerly Streptococcus milleri) group. Though they are commonly associated with abscesses, bacteremia with subsequent septic thrombophlebitis is extremely rare, and resulting mortality is infrequent. Case Presentation. We report a case of a previously healthy 60-year-old African American female who presented with Streptococcus constellatus bacteremia associated with septic thrombophlebitis to the right ovarian vein extending into the inferior vena cava. She was urgently treated with antibiotics and anticoagulation. Conclusion. Septic thrombophlebitis has a clinical presentation that is often misleading. Therefore, a high clinical index of suspicion and the use of appropriate imaging modalities (computed tomography) are essential in recognizing and confirming this diagnosis. Prompt treatment is warranted. Surgical thrombectomies have been successfully replaced by a combination of antibiotics and anticoagulation therapy. PMID:26171262

  18. Direct Identification of Staphylococcus aureus and Determination of Methicillin Susceptibility From Positive Blood-Culture Bottles in a Bact/ALERT System Using Binax Now S. aureus and PBP2a Tests

    PubMed Central

    Heraud, Sandrine; Freydiere, Anne-Marie; Doleans-Jordheim, Anne; Bes, Michèle; Tristan, Anne; Vandenesch, François; Laurent, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia is associated with high mortality and morbidity, requiring prompt and appropriate antimicrobial treatment. Therefore, it is important to detect methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) rapidly from blood cultures. Two immunochromatographic tests, BinaxNow S. aureus and BinaxNow PBP2a, were directly applied to 79 Bact/Alert bottles that were positive for Gram positive cocci in cluster aggregations. Sensitivity and specificity for the identification of S. aureus and determination of methicillin resistance were 94% and 87%, and 100% and 100%, respectively, with less than 30 min of performance time. These tests are efficient and rapid; these tests are valuable alternatives to more sophisticated and expensive methods used in the diagnosis of MRSA bacteremia. PMID:26131419

  19. EDIN-B Promotes the Translocation of Staphylococcus aureus to the Bloodstream in the Course of Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Courjon, Johan; Munro, Patrick; Benito, Yvonne; Visvikis, Orane; Bouchiat, Coralie; Boyer, Laurent; Doye, Anne; Lepidi, Hubert; Ghigo, Eric; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Vandenesch, François; Lemichez, Emmanuel

    2015-10-01

    It is crucial to define risk factors that contribute to host invasion by Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we demonstrate that the chromosomally encoded EDIN-B isoform from S. aureus contributes to the onset of bacteremia during the course of pneumonia. Deletion of edinB in a European lineage community-acquired methicillin resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strain (ST80-MRSA-IV) dramatically decreased the frequency and magnitude of bacteremia in mice suffering from pneumonia. This deletion had no effect on the bacterial burden in both blood circulation and lung tissues. Re-expression of wild-type EDIN-B, unlike the catalytically inactive mutant EDIN-R185E, restored the invasive characteristics of ST80-MRSA-IV. PMID:26501320

  20. A rare case of listeriosis, acute cholecystitis and multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Thais O; Alothman, Sara; Depaz, Hector; Ramcharan, Alexius

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is an aerobic, motile, intracellular gram-positive bacterium. Most invasive systemic infections caused by LM are commonly seen in patients at both extremes of age, during pregnancy or in immunocompromised hosts. Common clinical manifestations of LM infection in immunocompromised adults are bacteremia, infections of central nervous system, such as meningitis, and self-limiting febrile gastroenteritis. Focal infections of listeria are rare, especially cholecystitis, with only few cases reported in the last 33 years. A 62-year-old man presented with multiple myeloma, cholecystitis and LM bacteremia. Due to prompt surgical treatment and antibiotics (amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid and gentamycin), this high-risk patient recovered without any complications. PMID:27170703