Sample records for bacteria biofilm formation

  1. Curli synthesis and biofilm formation in enteric bacteria are controlled by a dynamic small RNA

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Curli synthesis and biofilm formation in enteric bacteria are controlled by a dynamic small RNA-specific gene D transcription factor required for adhesion and biofilm production in enterobacteria. During biofilm formation by impairing curli synthesis. Inducing RydC early on in growth lowers CsgA, -B and -D

  2. Anaerobic bacteria grow within Candida albicans biofilms and induce biofilm formation in suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Fox, Emily P; Cowley, Elise S; Nobile, Clarissa J; Hartooni, Nairi; Newman, Dianne K; Johnson, Alexander D

    2014-10-20

    The human microbiome contains diverse microorganisms, which share and compete for the same environmental niches. A major microbial growth form in the human body is the biofilm state, where tightly packed bacterial, archaeal, and fungal cells must cooperate and/or compete for resources in order to survive. We examined mixed biofilms composed of the major fungal species of the gut microbiome, Candida albicans, and each of five prevalent bacterial gastrointestinal inhabitants: Bacteroides fragilis, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecalis. We observed that biofilms formed by C. albicans provide a hypoxic microenvironment that supports the growth of two anaerobic bacteria, even when cultured in ambient oxic conditions that are normally toxic to the bacteria. We also found that coculture with bacteria in biofilms induces massive gene expression changes in C. albicans, including upregulation of WOR1, which encodes a transcription regulator that controls a phenotypic switch in C. albicans, from the "white" cell type to the "opaque" cell type. Finally, we observed that in suspension cultures, C. perfringens induces aggregation of C. albicans into "mini-biofilms," which allow C. perfringens cells to survive in a normally toxic environment. This work indicates that bacteria and C. albicans interactions modulate the local chemistry of their environment in multiple ways to create niches favorable to their growth and survival. PMID:25308076

  3. Adhesion and biofilm formation on polystyrene by drinking water-isolated bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lúcia Chaves Simões; Manuel Simões; Maria João Vieira

    2010-01-01

    This study was performed in order to characterize the relationship between adhesion and biofilm formation abilities of drinking\\u000a water-isolated bacteria (Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Burkholderia cepacia, Methylobacterium sp., Mycobacterium mucogenicum, Sphingomonas capsulata and Staphylococcus sp.). Adhesion was assessed by two distinct methods: thermodynamic prediction of adhesion potential by quantifying hydrophobicity\\u000a and the free energy of adhesion; and by microtiter plate assays. Biofilms

  4. Convergent evolution of hyperswarming leads to impaired biofilm formation in pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    van Ditmarsch, Dave; Boyle, Kerry E.; Sakhtah, Hassan; Oyler, Jennifer E.; Nadell, Carey D.; Déziel, Éric; Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Xavier, Joao B.

    2013-01-01

    Most bacteria in nature live in surface-associated communities rather than planktonic populations. Nonetheless, how surface-associated environments shape bacterial evolutionary adaptation remains poorly understood. Here we show that subjecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa to repeated rounds of swarming, a collective form of surface migration, drives remarkable parallel evolution towards a hyperswarmer phenotype. In all independently evolved hyperswarmers, the reproducible hyperswarming phenotype is caused by parallel point mutations in a flagellar synthesis regulator, FleN, which locks the naturally mono-flagellated bacteria in a multi-flagellated state and confers a growth-rate independent advantage in swarming. Even though hyperswarmers outcompete the ancestral strain in swarming competitions, they are strongly outcompeted in biofilm formation, which is an essential trait for P. aeruginosa in environmental and clinical settings. The finding that evolution in swarming colonies reliably produces evolution of poor biofilm formers supports the existence of an evolutionary tradeoff between motility and biofilm formation. PMID:23954787

  5. Quorum sensing signalling and biofilm formation of brewery-derived bacteria, and inhibition of signalling by natural compounds.

    PubMed

    Priha, O; Virkajärvi, V; Juvonen, R; Puupponen-Pimiä, R; Nohynek, L; Alakurtti, S; Pirttimaa, M; Storgårds, E

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria use quorum sensing signalling in various functions, e.g. while forming biofilms, and inhibition of this signalling could be one way to control biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the production of signalling molecules and its correlation with the biofilm formation capability of bacteria isolated from brewery filling process. A further aim was to study berry extracts and wood-derived terpenes for their possible quorum sensing inhibitory effects. Out of the twenty bacteria studied, five produced short-chain and five long-chain AHL (acyl homoserine lactone) signalling molecules when tested with the Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 reporter bacterium. Production of AI-2 (autoinducer-2) signalling molecules was detected from nine strains with the Vibrio harveyi BB170 bioassay. Over half of the strains produced biofilm in the microtitre plate assay, but the production of AHL and AI-2 signalling molecules and biofilm formation capability did not directly correlate with each other. Out of the 13 berry extracts and wood-derived terpenes screened, four compounds decreased AHL signalling without effect on growth. These were betulin, raspberry extract and two cloudberry extracts. The effect of these compounds on biofilm formation of the selected six bacterial strains varied. The phenolic extract of freeze-dried cloudberry fruit caused a statistically significant reduction of biofilm formation of Obesumbacterium proteus strain. Further experiments should aim at identifying the active compounds and revealing whether quorum sensing inhibition causes structural changes in the biofilms formed. PMID:24944110

  6. Biofilm formation, communication and interactions of leaching bacteria during colonization of pyrite and sulfur surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bellenberg, Sören; Díaz, Mauricio; Noël, Nanni; Sand, Wolfgang; Poetsch, Ansgar; Guiliani, Nicolas; Vera, Mario

    2014-11-01

    Bioleaching of metal sulfides is an interfacial process where biofilm formation is considered to be important in the initial steps of this process. Among the factors regulating biofilm formation, molecular cell-to-cell communication such as quorum sensing is involved. A functional LuxIR-type I quorum sensing system is present in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. However, cell-to-cell communication among different species of acidophilic mineral-oxidizing bacteria has not been studied in detail. These aspects were the scope of this study with emphasis on the effects exerted by the external addition of mixtures of synthetic N-acyl-homoserine-lactones on pure and binary cultures. Results revealed that some mixtures had inhibitory effects on pyrite leaching. Some of them correlated with changes in biofilm formation patterns on pyrite coupons. We also provide evidence that A. thiooxidans and Acidiferrobacter spp. produce N-acyl-homoserine-lactones. In addition, the observation that A. thiooxidans cells attached more readily to pyrite pre-colonized by living iron-oxidizing acidophiles than to heat-inactivated or biofilm-free pyrite grains suggests that other interactions also occur. Our experiments show that pre-cultivation conditions influence A. ferrooxidans attachment to pre-colonized pyrite surfaces. The understanding of cell-to-cell communication may consequently be used to develop attempts to influence biomining/bioremediation processes. PMID:25172572

  7. Molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation by food-associated bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofilms are complex bacterial communities adhering to a surface, an interface, or to each other and enclosed in an extracellular polymeric matrix. Genomic studies show that gene expression patterns of bacteria in biofilms differ from those of non-biofilm cells, indicating that there is a differen...

  8. Inactivation of biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    LeChevallier, M W; Cawthon, C D; Lee, R G

    1988-01-01

    The current project was developed to examine inactivation of biofilm bacteria and to characterize the interaction of biocides with pipe surfaces. Unattached bacteria were quite susceptible to the variety of disinfectants tested. Viable bacterial counts were reduced 99% by exposure to 0.08 mg of hypochlorous acid (pH 7.0) per liter (1 to 2 degrees C) for 1 min. For monochloramine, 94 mg/liter was required to kill 99% of the bacteria within 1 min. These results were consistent with those found by other investigators. Biofilm bacteria grown on the surfaces of granular activated carbon particles, metal coupons, or glass microscope slides were 150 to more than 3,000 times more resistant to hypochlorous acid (free chlorine, pH 7.0) than were unattached cells. In contrast, resistance of biofilm bacteria to monochloramine disinfection ranged from 2- to 100-fold more than that of unattached cells. The results suggested that, relative to inactivation of unattached bacteria, monochloramine was better able to penetrate and kill biofilm bacteria than free chlorine. For free chlorine, the data indicated that transport of the disinfectant into the biofilm was a major rate-limiting factor. Because of this phenomenon, increasing the level of free chlorine did not increase disinfection efficiency. Experiments where equal weights of disinfectants were used suggested that the greater penetrating power of monochloramine compensated for its limited disinfection activity. These studies showed that monochloramine was as effective as free chlorine for inactivation of biofilm bacteria. The research provides important insights into strategies for control of biofilm bacteria. Images PMID:2849380

  9. The cariogenic characters of xylitol-resistant and xylitol-sensitive Streptococcus mutans in biofilm formation with salivary bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Bong-Kyu; Kim, Young-Jae

    2012-06-01

    Streptococcus mutans metabolize carbohydrates, such as glucose and sucrose, to produce acid and enhance biofilm formation with the early colonizing bacteria to induce dental caries. Xylitol has been used as a reliable substitute for carbohydrate to inhibit the acid production of S. mutans. However, long-term xylitol consumption leads to the emergence of xylitol-resistance in S. mutans. The aim of this study was to investigate the cariogenic trait of Xylitol-resistant (X(R)) S. mutans using biofilm formation and coaggregation of xylitol-sensitive (X(S)) and X(R) S. mutans with salivary bacteria and their glucosyltransferases expression. When X(S) or X(R) S. mutans were incubated in brain heart infusion broth with bacteria from human saliva, X(R)S. mutans exhibited reduction in biofilm formation in comparison to X(S) S. mutans. The coaggregation between X(R) S. mutans and S, gordonii, S. mitis, S. oralis or S. sanguinis was less pronounced than that of X(S) S. mutans in the presence of sucrose. However, there was no difference in the coaggregation between X(R) and X(S) S. mutans in the sucrose-free condition. The level of gtfB and gtfC mRNA expression of X(R) S. mutans was lower than that of X(S) S. mutans, whilst the level of gtfD mRNA expression did not differ between the two strains. The reduction of biofilm formation in X(S) S. mutans due to decrease in glucosyltransferases expression suggests that X(R) S. mutans may be less cariogenic than X(S) S. mutans. PMID:22218085

  10. Engineering biofilm formation and dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Thomas K.; Hong, Seok Hoon; Ma, Qun

    2011-01-01

    Anywhere water is in the liquid state, bacteria will exist as biofilms, which are complex communities of cells cemented together. Although frequently associated with disease and biofouling, biofilms are also important for engineering applications, such as bioremediation, biocatalysis and microbial fuel cells. Here we review approaches to alter genetic circuits and cell signaling toward controlling biofilm formation, and emphasize utilizing these tools for engineering applications. Based on a better understanding of the genetic basis of biofilm formation, we find that biofilms may be controlled by manipulating extracellular signals and that they may be dispersed using conserved intracellular signals and regulators. Biofilms could also be formed at specific locations where they might be engineered to make chemicals or treat human disease. PMID:21131080

  11. Calcium carbonate precipitation by heterotrophic bacteria isolated from biofilms formed on deteriorated ignimbrite stones: influence of calcium on EPS production and biofilm formation by these isolates.

    PubMed

    López-Moreno, Angélica; Sepúlveda-Sánchez, José David; Mercedes Alonso Guzmán, Elia Mercedes; Le Borgne, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrophic CaCO3-precipitating bacteria were isolated from biofilms on deteriorated ignimbrites, siliceous acidic rocks, from Morelia Cathedral (Mexico) and identified as Enterobacter cancerogenus (22e), Bacillus sp. (32a) and Bacillus subtilis (52g). In solid medium, 22e and 32a precipitated calcite and vaterite while 52g produced calcite. Urease activity was detected in these isolates and CaCO3 precipitation increased in the presence of urea in the liquid medium. In the presence of calcium, EPS production decreased in 22e and 32a and increased in 52g. Under laboratory conditions, ignimbrite colonization by these isolates only occurred in the presence of calcium and no CaCO3 was precipitated. Calcium may therefore be important for biofilm formation on stones. The importance of the type of stone, here a siliceous stone, on biological colonization is emphasized. This calcium effect has not been reported on calcareous materials. The importance of the effect of calcium on EPS production and biofilm formation is discussed in relation to other applications of CaCO3 precipitation by bacteria. PMID:24689777

  12. Effect of algae and plant lectins on planktonic growth and biofilm formation in clinically relevant bacteria and yeasts.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Carneiro, Victor Alves; Silva, Helton Colares; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda; Cavada, Benildo; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Henriques, Mariana; Pereira, Maria Olivia

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the abilities of plant and algae lectins to inhibit planktonic growth and biofilm formation in bacteria and yeasts. Initially, ten lectins were tested on Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and C. tropicalis at concentrations of 31.25 to 250? ? g/mL. The lectins from Cratylia floribunda (CFL), Vatairea macrocarpa (VML), Bauhinia bauhinioides (BBL), Bryothamnion seaforthii (BSL), and Hypnea musciformis (HML) showed activities against at least one microorganism. Biofilm formation in the presence of the lectins was also evaluated; after 24?h of incubation with the lectins, the biofilms were analyzed by quantifying the biomass (by crystal violet staining) and by enumerating the viable cells (colony-forming units). The lectins reduced the biofilm biomass and/or the number of viable cells to differing degrees depending on the microorganism tested, demonstrating the different characteristics of the lectins. These findings indicate that the lectins tested in this study may be natural alternative antimicrobial agents; however, further studies are required to better elucidate the functional use of these proteins. PMID:24982871

  13. Effect of Algae and Plant Lectins on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation in Clinically Relevant Bacteria and Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Carneiro, Victor Alves; Silva, Helton Colares; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda; Cavada, Benildo; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Henriques, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the abilities of plant and algae lectins to inhibit planktonic growth and biofilm formation in bacteria and yeasts. Initially, ten lectins were tested on Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and C. tropicalis at concentrations of 31.25 to 250??g/mL. The lectins from Cratylia floribunda (CFL), Vatairea macrocarpa (VML), Bauhinia bauhinioides (BBL), Bryothamnion seaforthii (BSL), and Hypnea musciformis (HML) showed activities against at least one microorganism. Biofilm formation in the presence of the lectins was also evaluated; after 24?h of incubation with the lectins, the biofilms were analyzed by quantifying the biomass (by crystal violet staining) and by enumerating the viable cells (colony-forming units). The lectins reduced the biofilm biomass and/or the number of viable cells to differing degrees depending on the microorganism tested, demonstrating the different characteristics of the lectins. These findings indicate that the lectins tested in this study may be natural alternative antimicrobial agents; however, further studies are required to better elucidate the functional use of these proteins. PMID:24982871

  14. Proteinaceous determinants of surface colonization in bacteria: bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation from a protein secretion perspective

    PubMed Central

    Chagnot, Caroline; Zorgani, Mohamed A.; Astruc, Thierry; Desvaux, Mickaël

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial colonization of biotic or abiotic surfaces results from two quite distinct physiological processes, namely bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. Broadly speaking, a biofilm is defined as the sessile development of microbial cells. Biofilm formation arises following bacterial adhesion but not all single bacterial cells adhering reversibly or irreversibly engage inexorably into a sessile mode of growth. Among molecular determinants promoting bacterial colonization, surface proteins are the most functionally diverse active components. To be present on the bacterial cell surface, though, a protein must be secreted in the first place. Considering the close association of secreted proteins with their cognate secretion systems, the secretome (which refers both to the secretion systems and their protein substrates) is a key concept to apprehend the protein secretion and related physiological functions. The protein secretion systems are here considered in light of the differences in the cell-envelope architecture between diderm-LPS (archetypal Gram-negative), monoderm (archetypal Gram-positive) and diderm-mycolate (archetypal acid-fast) bacteria. Besides, their cognate secreted proteins engaged in the bacterial colonization process are regarded from single protein to supramolecular protein structure as well as the non-classical protein secretion. This state-of-the-art on the complement of the secretome (the secretion systems and their cognate effectors) involved in the surface colonization process in diderm-LPS and monoderm bacteria paves the way for future research directions in the field. PMID:24133488

  15. Interactions of bacteria with different mechanisms for chitin degradation result in the formation of a mixed-species biofilm.

    PubMed

    Jagmann, Nina; von Rekowski, Katharina Styp; Philipp, Bodo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, interactions between bacteria possessing either released or cell-associated enzymes for polymer degradation were investigated. For this, a co-culture of Aeromonas hydrophila strain AH-1N as an enzyme-releasing bacterium and of Flavobacterium sp. strain 4D9 as a bacterium with cell-associated enzymes was set up with chitin embedded into agarose beads to account for natural conditions, under which polymers are usually embedded in organic aggregates. In single cultures, strain AH-1N grew with embedded chitin, while strain 4D9 did not. In co-cultures, strain 4D9 grew and outcompeted strain AH-1N in the biofilm fraction. Experiments with cell-free culture supernatants containing the chitinolytic enzymes of strain AH-1N revealed that growth of strain 4D9 in the co-culture was based on intercepting N-acetylglucosamine from chitin degradation. For this, strain 4D9 had to actively integrate into the biofilm of strain AH-1N. This study shows that bacteria using different chitin degradation mechanisms can coexist by formation of a mixed-species biofilm. PMID:22092834

  16. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, Mirian; García, Ernesto; Moscoso, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    Summary Biofilm?grown bacteria are refractory to antimicrobial agents and show an increased capacity to evade the host immune system. In recent years, studies have begun on biofilm formation by Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen, using a variety of in vitro model systems. The bacterial cells in these biofilms are held together by an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, proteins and, possibly, polysaccharide(s). Although neither the precise nature of these proteins nor the composition of the putative polysaccharide(s) is clear, it is known that choline?binding proteins are required for successful biofilm formation. Further, many genes appear to be involved, although the role of each appears to vary when biofilms are produced in batch or continuous culture. Prophylactic and therapeutic measures need to be developed to fight S.?pneumoniae biofilm formation. However, much care needs to be taken when choosing strains for such studies because different S.?pneumoniae isolates can show remarkable genomic differences. Multispecies and in vivo biofilm models must also be developed to provide a more complete understanding of biofilm formation and maintenance. PMID:21906265

  17. Hydrodynamics of catheter biofilm formation

    E-print Network

    Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar; Rodriguez-Perez, Daniel; Martinez-Escobar, Sergio; Fernandez-Barbero, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model is proposed to describe one of the most critical problems in intensive medical care units: the formation of biofilms inside central venous catheters. The incorporation of approximate solutions for the flow-limited diffusion equation leads to the conclusion that biofilms grow on the internal catheter wall due to the counter-stream diffusion of blood through a very thin layer close to the wall. This biological deposition is the first necessary step for the subsequent bacteria colonization.

  18. Biofilm formation by Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Dapa, Tanja; Unnikrishnan, Meera

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major healthcare-associated disease worldwide. Recurring infections and increasing antibiotic resistance have complicated treatment of CDI. While C. difficile spores are important for transmission and persistence of CDI, other factors such as gut colonization and formation of bacterial communities in the gut may also contribute to pathogenesis and persistence, but have not been well investigated. Recently, we reported that important clinical C. difficile strains are able to form composite biofilms in vitro. C. difficile biofilm formation is a complex process, modulated by several different factors, including cell surface components and regulators. We also reported that bacteria within biofilms are more resistant to high concentrations of vancomycin, the antibiotic of choice for treatment of CDI. Here we summarize our recent findings and discuss the implications of biofilm formation by this anaerobic gut pathogen in disease pathogenesis and treatment. PMID:23892245

  19. Molecular mechanisms of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Mack

    1999-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci, mainly Staphylococcus epidermidis, are the predominant cause of implanted medical-device related infections. The formation of adherent multilayered biofilms embedded into a glycocalyx composed of exopolysaccharides on implanted devices is believed to be essential for the pathogenesis of S. epidermidis infections. Biofilm formation may be separated into primary attachment of bacteria to native or modified polymer surfaces followed by

  20. Antibacterial effects of silver nanoparticles on gram-negative bacteria: influence on the growth and biofilms formation, mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Radzig, M A; Nadtochenko, V A; Koksharova, O A; Kiwi, J; Lipasova, V A; Khmel, I A

    2013-02-01

    Antibacterial action of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) on Gram-negative bacteria (planctonic cells and biofilms) is reported in this study. AgNP of 8.3 nm in diameter stabilized by hydrolyzed casein peptides strongly inhibited biofilms formation of Escherichia coli AB1157, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Serratia proteamaculans 94 in concentrations of 4-5 ?g/ml, 10 ?g/ml and 10-20 ?g/ml, respectively. The viability of E. coli AB1157 cells in biofilms was considerably reduced by AgNP concentrations above 100 to -150 ?g/ml. E. coli strains with mutations in genes responsible for the repair of DNA containing oxidative lesions (mutY, mutS, mutM, mutT, nth) were less resistant to AgNP than wild type strains. This suggests that these genes may be involved in the repair of DNA damage caused by AgNP. E. coli mutants deficient in excision repair, SOS-response and in the synthesis of global regulators RpoS, CRP protein and Lon protease present similar resistance to AgNP as wild type cells. LuxI/LuxR Quorum Sensing systems did not participate in the control of sensitivity to AgNP of Pseudomonas and Serratia. E. coli mutant strains deficient in OmpF or OmpC porins were 4-8 times more resistant to AgNP as compared to the wild type strain. This suggests that porins have an important function related AgNP antibacterial effects. PMID:23006569

  1. Emergent Bacteria in Cystic Fibrosis: In Vitro Biofilm Formation and Resilience under Variable Oxygen Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Susana P.; Azevedo, Nuno F.; Pereira, Maria O.

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent to conventional bacterial pathogens, unusual microbes are emerging from cystic fibrosis (CF) airways. Nonetheless, little is known about the contribution of these newly microbes to the resilience of CF-associated biofilms, particularly under variable-oxygen concentrations that are known to occur in vivo in the mucus of CF patients. Two CF-emergent bacterial species, Inquilinus limosus and Dolosigranulum pigrum, and the major pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa were studied in terms of biofilm development and antibiotic susceptibilities under in vitro atmospheres with different oxygen availabilities. All species were able to develop in vitro biofilms under different oxygen-available environments, with D. pigrum accumulating high amounts of biomass and respiratory activities. When established, biofilms were of difficult eradication, with antibiotics losing their effectiveness in comparison with the corresponding planktonic populations. Surprisingly, biofilms of each emergent organism displayed multidrug resistance under aerobic environments, enduring even in low-oxygen atmospheres. This study suggests a potential prospect on the impact of nonconventional organisms I. limosus and D. pigrum on CF lung infections, demonstrating capacity to adapt to biofilm mode of life under restricted-oxygen atmospheres resembling CF airways, which may ultimately endanger the efficacy of currently used antibiotic regimens. PMID:24868541

  2. Biofilm formation by vaginal Lactobacillus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ventolini, G; Mitchell, E; Salazar, M

    2015-05-01

    Biofilm formation by nonpathogenic bacteria is responsible for their stable maintenance in vivo ecosystems as it promotes long-term permanence on the host's vaginal mucosa. Biofilm formation by Lactobacilli has been reported in vitro but not in vivo. We hypothesize the presence of biofilm formation in vivo could be also documented by microscope photographs (MP) of wet mounts obtained from uninfected vaginal samples satisfying rigorous scientific identification criteria. We analyzed 400 MP from our database, and we were able to determine that 12 MP from 6 different patients contained clues of the formation of biofilm by Lactobacilli. The most probable lactobacillus involved is presumed to be Lactobacillus jensenii. The documentation of biofilm formation by vaginal Lactobacilli at fresh wet mount preparation is significant and has several important clinical preventive and therapeutic implications. PMID:25725906

  3. Antibiotic susceptibility of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from very low birth weight babies: comprehensive comparisons of bacteria at different stages of biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Coagulase-negative staphylococci are major causes of bloodstream infections in very low birth weight babies cared for in Neonatal Intensive Care Units. The virulence of these bacteria is mainly due to their ability to form biofilms on indwelling medical devices. Biofilm-related infections often fail to respond to antibiotic chemotherapy guided by conventional antibiotic susceptibility tests. Methods Coagulase-negative staphylococcal blood culture isolates were grown in different phases relevant to biofilm formation: planktonic cells at mid-log phase, planktonic cells at stationary phase, adherent monolayers and mature biofilms and their susceptibilities to conventional antibiotics were assessed. The effects of oxacillin, gentamicin, and vancomycin on preformed biofilms, at the highest achievable serum concentrations were examined. Epifluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy in combination with bacterial viability staining and polysaccharide staining were used to confirm the stimulatory effects of antibiotics on biofilms. Results Most coagulase-negative staphylococcal clinical isolates were resistant to penicillin G (100%), gentamicin (83.3%) and oxacillin (91.7%) and susceptible to vancomycin (100%), ciprofloxacin (100%), and rifampicin (79.2%). Bacteria grown as adherent monolayers showed similar susceptibilities to their planktonic counterparts at mid-log phase. Isolates in a biofilm growth mode were more resistant to antibiotics than both planktonic cultures at mid-log phase and adherent monolayers; however they were equally resistant or less resistant than planktonic cells at stationary phase. Moreover, for some cell-wall active antibiotics, concentrations higher than conventional MICs were required to prevent the establishment of planktonic cultures from biofilms. Finally, the biofilm-growth of two S. capitis isolates could be enhanced by oxacillin at the highest achievable serum concentration. Conclusion We conclude that the resistance of coagulase-negative staphylococci to multiple antibiotics initially remain similar when the bacteria shift from a planktonic growth mode into an early attached mode, then increase significantly as the adherent mode further develops. Furthermore, preformed biofilms of some CoNS are enhanced by oxacillin in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:20504376

  4. Regulation of flagellar motility during biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Sarah B.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Many bacteria swim in liquid or swarm over solid surfaces by synthesizing rotary flagella. The same bacteria that are motile also commonly form non-motile multicellular aggregates held together by an extracellular matrix called biofilms. Biofilms are an important part of the lifestyle of pathogenic bacteria and it is assumed that there is a motility-to-biofilm transition wherein the inhibition of motility promotes biofilm formation. The transition is largely inferred from regulatory mutants that reveal the opposite regulation of the two phenotypes. Here we review the regulation of motility during biofilm formation in Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Vibrio, and Escherichia, and we conclude that the motility-to-biofilm transition, if necessary, likely involves two steps. In the short term, flagella are functionally regulated to either inhibit rotation or modulate the basal flagellar reversal frequency. Over the long term, flagellar gene transcription is inhibited and in the absence of de novo synthesis, flagella are likely diluted to extinction through growth. Both short term and long term control is likely important to the motility-to-biofilm transition to stabilize aggregates and optimize resource investment. We emphasize the newly discovered classes of flagellar functional regulators and speculate that others await discovery in the context of biofilm formation. PMID:23480406

  5. Bacteria, biofilm and honey: a study of the effects of honey on 'planktonic' and biofilm-embedded chronic wound bacteria.

    PubMed

    Merckoll, Patricia; Jonassen, Tom Øystein; Vad, Marie Elisabeth; Jeansson, Stig L; Melby, Kjetil K

    2009-01-01

    Chronically infected wounds are a costly source of suffering. An important factor in the failure of a sore to heal is the presence of multiple species of bacteria, living cooperatively in highly organized biofilms. The biofilm protects the bacteria from antibiotic therapy and the patient's immune response. Honey has been used as a wound treatment for millennia. The components responsible for its antibacterial properties are now being elucidated. The study aimed to determine the effects of different concentrations of 'Medihoney' therapeutic honey and Norwegian Forest Honey 1) on the real-time growth of typical chronic wound bacteria; 2) on biofilm formation; and 3) on the same bacteria already embedded in biofilm. Reference strains of MRSE, MRSA, ESBL Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were incubated with dilution series of the honeys in microtitre plates for 20 h. Growth of the bacteria was assessed by measuring optical density every 10 min. Growth curves, biofilm formation and minimum bactericidal concentrations are presented. Both honeys were bactericidal against all the strains of bacteria. Biofilm was penetrated by biocidal substances in honey. Reintroduction of honey as a conventional wound treatment may help improve individual wound care, prevent invasive infections, eliminate colonization, interrupt outbreaks and thereby preserve current antibiotic stocks. PMID:19308800

  6. A new biofilm-associated colicin with increased efficiency against biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rendueles, Olaya; Beloin, Christophe; Latour-Lambert, Patricia; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2014-06-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilm communities leads to profound physiological modifications and increased physical and metabolic exchanges between bacteria. It was previously shown that bioactive molecules produced within the biofilm environment contribute to bacterial interactions. Here we describe new pore-forming colicin R, specifically produced in biofilms formed by the natural isolate Escherichia coli ROAR029 but that cannot be detected under planktonic culture conditions. We demonstrate that an increased SOS stress response within mature biofilms induces SOS-dependent colicin R expression. We provide evidence that colicin R displays increased activity against E. coli strains that have a reduced lipopolysaccharide length, such as the pathogenic enteroaggregative E. coli LF82 clinical isolate, therefore pointing to lipopolysaccharide size as an important determinant for resistance to colicins. We show that colicin R toxicity toward E. coli LF82 is increased under biofilm conditions compared with planktonic susceptibility and that release of colicin R confers a strong competitive advantage in mixed biofilms by rapidly outcompeting sensitive neighboring bacteria. This work identifies the first biofilm-associated colicin that preferentially targets biofilm bacteria. Furthermore, it indicates that the study of antagonistic molecules produced in biofilm and multispecies contexts could reveal unsuspected, ecologically relevant bacterial interactions influencing population dynamics in natural environments. PMID:24451204

  7. Spermine impairs biofilm formation by Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Goytia, Maira; Dhulipala, Vijaya L.; Shafer, William M.

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a strict human pathogen that causes the sexually transmitted infection termed gonorrhea. Recent reports indicate that gonococci can form a biofilm in vivo and under laboratory conditions. It is unclear, however, if formation of such biofilms or their dispersal are influenced by host factors that would be encountered during infection. In this respect, physiological levels of polyamines have been reported to influence biofilm structures formed by other Gram-negative bacteria as well those formed by Gram–positive bacteria and can cause dispersal of a biofilm formed by Bacillus subtilis. Based on these reports, we examined the influence of polyamines on gonococcal biofilm formation and their dispersal. We now report that physiological levels of certain polyamines, notably spermine, can significantly decrease the capacity of gonococci to form a biofilm, but do not cause dispersal of a pre-formed biofilm. In the context of natural gonococcal infection, the presence of physiological levels of spermine may be antagonistic for gonococci to form a biofilm and this may be of importance in the spread of the pathogen from a localized region. PMID:23506248

  8. Spermine impairs biofilm formation by Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Goytia, Maira; Dhulipala, Vijaya L; Shafer, William M

    2013-06-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a strict human pathogen that causes the sexually transmitted infection termed gonorrhea. Recent reports indicate that gonococci can form a biofilm in vivo and under laboratory conditions. It is unclear, however, if formation of such biofilms or their dispersal are influenced by host factors that would be encountered during infection. In this respect, physiological levels of polyamines have been reported to influence biofilm structures formed by other Gram-negative bacteria as well those formed by Gram-positive bacteria and can cause dispersal of a biofilm formed by Bacillus subtilis. Based on these reports, we examined the influence of polyamines on gonococcal biofilm formation and their dispersal. We now report that physiological levels of certain polyamines, notably spermine, can significantly decrease the capacity of gonococci to form a biofilm, but do not cause dispersal of a preformed biofilm. In the context of natural gonococcal infection, the presence of physiological levels of spermine may be antagonistic for gonococci to form a biofilm and this may be of importance in the spread of the pathogen from a localized region. PMID:23506248

  9. Dual-species biofilms formation by Escherichia coli O157:H7 and environmental bacteria isolated from fresh-cut processing plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofilm formation is a mechanism adapted by many microorganisms that enhances the survival in stressful environments. In food processing facilities, bacterial strains with strong biofilm forming capacities are more likely to survive the daily cleaning and disinfection. Foodborne bacterial pathogens,...

  10. Biofilm Formation by Candida dubliniensis

    PubMed Central

    Ramage, Gordon; Vande Walle, Kacy; Wickes, Brian L.; López-Ribot, José L.

    2001-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis is an opportunistic yeast closely related to Candida albicans that has been recently implicated in oropharyngeal candidiasis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Most manifestations of candidiasis are associated with biofilm formation, with cells in biofilms displaying properties dramatically different from free-living cells grown under normal laboratory conditions. Here, we report on the development of in vitro models of C. dubliniensis biofilms on the surfaces of biomaterials (polystyrene and acrylic) and on the characteristics associated with biofilm formation by this newly described species. Time course analysis using a formazan salt reduction assay to monitor metabolic activities of cells within the biofilm, together with microscopy studies, revealed that biofilm formation by C. dubliniensis occurred after initial focal adherence, followed by growth, proliferation, and maturation over 24 to 48 h. Serum and saliva preconditioning films enhanced the initial attachment of C. dubliniensis and subsequent biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal scanning laser microscopy were used to further characterize C. dubliniensis biofilms. Mature C. dubliniensis biofilms consisted of a dense network of yeasts cells and hyphal elements embedded within exopolymeric material. C. dubliniensis biofilms displayed spatial heterogeneity and an architecture showing microcolonies with ramifying water channels. Antifungal susceptibility testing demonstrated the increased resistance of sessile C. dubliniensis cells, including the type strain and eight different clinical isolates, against fluconazole and amphotericin B compared to their planktonic counterparts. C. dubliniensis biofilm formation may allow this species to maintain its ecological niche as a commensal and during infection with important clinical repercussions. PMID:11526156

  11. Spaceflight Promotes Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wooseong; Tengra, Farah K.; Young, Zachary; Shong, Jasmine; Marchand, Nicholas; Chan, Hon Kit; Pangule, Ravindra C.; Parra, Macarena; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Plawsky, Joel L.; Collins, Cynthia H.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the effects of spaceflight on microbial communities is crucial for the success of long-term, manned space missions. Surface-associated bacterial communities, known as biofilms, were abundant on the Mir space station and continue to be a challenge on the International Space Station. The health and safety hazards linked to the development of biofilms are of particular concern due to the suppression of immune function observed during spaceflight. While planktonic cultures of microbes have indicated that spaceflight can lead to increases in growth and virulence, the effects of spaceflight on biofilm development and physiology remain unclear. To address this issue, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured during two Space Shuttle Atlantis missions: STS-132 and STS-135, and the biofilms formed during spaceflight were characterized. Spaceflight was observed to increase the number of viable cells, biofilm biomass, and thickness relative to normal gravity controls. Moreover, the biofilms formed during spaceflight exhibited a column-and-canopy structure that has not been observed on Earth. The increase in the amount of biofilms and the formation of the novel architecture during spaceflight were observed to be independent of carbon source and phosphate concentrations in the media. However, flagella-driven motility was shown to be essential for the formation of this biofilm architecture during spaceflight. These findings represent the first evidence that spaceflight affects community-level behaviors of bacteria and highlight the importance of understanding how both harmful and beneficial human-microbe interactions may be altered during spaceflight. PMID:23658630

  12. Spaceflight promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wooseong; Tengra, Farah K; Young, Zachary; Shong, Jasmine; Marchand, Nicholas; Chan, Hon Kit; Pangule, Ravindra C; Parra, Macarena; Dordick, Jonathan S; Plawsky, Joel L; Collins, Cynthia H

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the effects of spaceflight on microbial communities is crucial for the success of long-term, manned space missions. Surface-associated bacterial communities, known as biofilms, were abundant on the Mir space station and continue to be a challenge on the International Space Station. The health and safety hazards linked to the development of biofilms are of particular concern due to the suppression of immune function observed during spaceflight. While planktonic cultures of microbes have indicated that spaceflight can lead to increases in growth and virulence, the effects of spaceflight on biofilm development and physiology remain unclear. To address this issue, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured during two Space Shuttle Atlantis missions: STS-132 and STS-135, and the biofilms formed during spaceflight were characterized. Spaceflight was observed to increase the number of viable cells, biofilm biomass, and thickness relative to normal gravity controls. Moreover, the biofilms formed during spaceflight exhibited a column-and-canopy structure that has not been observed on Earth. The increase in the amount of biofilms and the formation of the novel architecture during spaceflight were observed to be independent of carbon source and phosphate concentrations in the media. However, flagella-driven motility was shown to be essential for the formation of this biofilm architecture during spaceflight. These findings represent the first evidence that spaceflight affects community-level behaviors of bacteria and highlight the importance of understanding how both harmful and beneficial human-microbe interactions may be altered during spaceflight. PMID:23658630

  13. Interactions and transitions in biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Vernita; Colvin, Kelly; Conrad, Jacinta; Gibiansky, Maxsim; Jin, Fan; Parsek, Matthew; Wong, Gerard

    2010-10-01

    Biofilms are multicellular, interacting communities of intrinsically-unicellular organisms that grow on surfaces. As such, they are fascinating model systems for multicellularity. They are also of great practical importance, since biofilms damage a variety of industrial infrastructure and are the cause of most persistent, antibiotic-resistant infections. In natural settings, most bacteria are found in biofilms. To initiate a biofilm, planktonic, free-swimming bacteria attach to a surface and then undergo a series of phenotypic changes as that adhesion becomes irreversible and the surface is populated, first by discrete bacteria, and then bacteria growing in dense clusters, ``microcolonies.'' Both adhesion to a surface and adhesion to other cells are associated with adhesive properties of cell-produced extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs). Using laser tweezers to test cell aggregation and aggregate stability, in combination with gene expression assays and gene-knockouts, we show the importance of one EPS, pel, for early cell aggregation. We also use automated bacteria-identification and --tracking software algorithims to identify and quantify key transitions early in biofilm formation.

  14. Physics of biofilms: the initial stages of biofilm formation and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Guillaume; Bergman, Andrew; Zhang, Qiucen; Bortz, David; Austin, Robert

    2014-04-01

    One of the physiological responses of bacteria to external stress is to assemble into a biofilm. The formation of a biofilm greatly increases a bacterial population's resistance to a hostile environment by shielding cells, for example, from antibiotics. In this paper, we describe the conditions necessary for the emergence of biofilms in natural environments and relate them to the emergence of biofilm formation inside microfluidic devices. We show that competing species of Escherichia coli bacteria form biofilms to spatially segregate themselves in response to starvation stress, and use in situ methods to characterize the physical properties of the biofilms. Finally, we develop a microfluidic platform to study the inter-species interactions and show how biofilm-mediated genetic interactions can improve a species’ resistance to external stress.

  15. Cadmium modulates biofilm formation by Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xueqing; Santos, Regiane R; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of cadmium exposure on Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 35984) biofilm formation. Bacteria were cultured in the absence or presence of different concentrations (0-50 µM) of cadmium. Biofilm formation and bacterial viability were assessed. Quantitative Real Time-PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to determine the mRNA expression of molecular markers of S. epidermidis biofilm formation and dispersion. S. epidermidis biofilm formation was stimulated (p<0.001) by 1.56 and 3.13 µM cadmium. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis confirmed an increase in biofilm thickness (23 and 22 µm, versus 17.8 µm in the controls) after exposure to 1.56 or 3.13 µM cadmium, respectively. qRT-PCR was performed showing the up-regulation of atlE, embp, aap, icaA and icaB after exposure to 3.13 µM cadmium. Taken together, these findings show that cadmium at low, sub-toxic concentrations acts as inducer of S. epidermidis biofilm formation. PMID:25749322

  16. Oh What a Tangled Biofilm Web Bacteria Weave

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home Page Oh What a Tangled Biofilm Web Bacteria Weave By Elia Ben-Ari Posted May 1, ... a suitable surface, some water and nutrients, and bacteria will likely put down stakes and form biofilms. ...

  17. The Role of Exopolymers Produced by Sphingomonas paucimobilis in Biofilm Formation and Composition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joana Azeredo; Rosário Oliveira

    2000-01-01

    Exopolymers have been associated with the initial adhesion of bacteria, which is the primary step for biofilm formation. Moreover, the polymeric matrix of biofilms has a considerable influence on some of the most important physical and physiological properties of biofilms. The role of extracellular polymers in biofilm formation was studied using three mutants of Sphingomonas paucimobilis with increasing capabilities for

  18. IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda colonizes and degrades insoluble substrates. Major accomplishments of the project include: • Development of media containing dialysis tubing (described by the manufacturer as “regenerated cellulose”) as sole carbon and energy source and a nutritive surface for the growth of cellulolytic bacteria, and development of various microscopic methods to image biofilms on dialysis tubing. • Demonstration that cultures of C. phytofermentans, an obligate anaerobe, C. uda, a facultative aerobe, and T. fusca, a filamentous aerobe, formed microbial communities on the surface of dialysis tubing, which possessed architectural features and functional characteristics typical of biofilms. • Demonstration that biofilm formation on the nutritive surface, cellulose, involves a complex developmental processes, including colonization of dialysis tubing, formation of cell clusters attached to the nutritive surface, cell morphological changes, formation of complex structures embedded in extracellular polymeric matrices, and dispersal of biofilm communities as the nutritive surface is degraded. • Determination of surface specificity and regulatory aspects of biofilm formation by C. phytofermentans, C. uda, and T. fusca. • Demonstration that biofilm formation by T. fusca forms an integral part of the life cycle of this filamentous cellulolytic bacterium, including studies on the role of mycelial pellet formation in the T. fusca life cycle and a comparison of mycelial pellets to surface-attached T. fusca biofilms. • Characterization of T. fusca biofilm EPS, including demonstration of a functional role for EPS constituents. • Correlation of T. fusca developmental life cycle and cellulase gene expression.

  19. The effects of metabolite molecules produced by drinking water-isolated bacteria on their single and multispecies biofilms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lúcia Chaves Simões; Manuel Simões; Maria João Vieira

    2011-01-01

    The elucidation of the mechanisms by which diverse species survive and interact in drinking water (DW) biofilm communities may allow the identification of new biofilm control strategies. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of metabolite molecules produced by bacteria isolated from DW on biofilm formation. Six opportunistic bacteria, viz. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Burkholderia cepacia, Methylobacterium sp.,

  20. Vaginal Lactobacillus: biofilm formation in vivo – clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Ventolini, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal lactobacilli provide protection against intrusive pathogenic bacteria. Some Lactobacillus spp. produce in vitro a thick, protective biofilm. We report in vivo formation of biofilm by vaginal Lactobacillus jensenii. The biofilm formation was captured in fresh wet-mount microscopic samples from asymptomatic patients after treatment for recurrent bacterial vaginitis. In vivo documentation of biofilm formation is in our opinion noteworthy, and has significant clinical implications, among which are the possibility to isolate, grow, and therapeutically utilize lactobacilli to prevent recurrent vaginal infections and preterm labor associated with vaginal microbial pathogens. PMID:25733930

  1. Effects of biofilm formation on haemodialysis monitor disinfection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gianni Cappelli; Luisa Sereni; Maria Grazia Scialoja; Massimo Morselli; Salvatore Perrone; Angela Ciuffreda; Massimo Bellesia; Paola Inguaggiato; Alberto Albertazzi; Ciro Tetta

    2003-01-01

    Background. Biofilms are composed of communities of micro-organisms adhering to essentially any surface. We evaluated whether biofilm formation in the hy- draulic circuit of a purposely contaminated haemodial- ysis monitor would modify the efficacy of different disinfection modalities against bacteria and endotoxin concentrations. Methods. A water-borne Pseudomonas aeruginosa (109) suspension was recirculated for 1 h and was left standing for

  2. Ginger Extract Inhibits Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han-Shin; Park, Hee-Deung

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation can cause serious problems in clinical and industrial settings, which drives the development or screening of biofilm inhibitors. Some biofilm inhibitors have been screened from natural products or modified from natural compounds. Ginger has been used as a medicinal herb to treat infectious diseases for thousands of years, which leads to the hypothesis that it may contain chemicals inhibiting biofilm formation. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated ginger’s ability to inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 biofilm formation. A static biofilm assay demonstrated that biofilm development was reduced by 39–56% when ginger extract was added to the culture. In addition, various phenotypes were altered after ginger addition of PA14. Ginger extract decreased production of extracellular polymeric substances. This finding was confirmed by chemical analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, ginger extract formed noticeably less rugose colonies on agar plates containing Congo red and facilitated swarming motility on soft agar plates. The inhibition of biofilm formation and the altered phenotypes appear to be linked to a reduced level of a second messenger, bis-(3?-5?)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate. Importantly, ginger extract inhibited biofilm formation in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Also, surface biofilm cells formed with ginger extract detached more easily with surfactant than did those without ginger extract. Taken together, these findings provide a foundation for the possible discovery of a broad spectrum biofilm inhibitor. PMID:24086697

  3. Influence of Bacterial Presence on Biofilm Formation of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Su Jung; Han, Kyoung-Hee; Park, Joo Young; Choi, Sun Ju

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen that is commonly found in human microflora. Biofilm formation (BF) is known as a major virulence factor of C. albicans. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of bacterial presence on biofilm formation of C. albicans. Materials and Methods The BF of Candida was investigated when it was co-cultured with C. albicans (C. albicans 53, a yeast with a low BF ability, and C. albicans 163, a yeast with high BF ability) and bacteria. BF was assessed with XTT reduction assay. A scanning electron microscope was used to determine the structure of the biofilm, and real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify and quantify hyphae-associated genes. Results Co-culturing with two different types of bacteria increased the BF value. Co-culturing with C. albicans 53 and 163 also increased the BF value compared to the value that was obtained when the C. albicans was cultured individually. However, co-culturing with bacteria decreased the BF value of C. albicans, and the BF of C. albicans 163 was markedly inhibited. The expression of adherence and morphology transition related genes were significantly inhibited by co-culturing with live bacteria. Conclusion Bacteria have a negative effect on the formation of biofilm by C. albicans. This mechanism is the result of the suppression of genes associated with the hyphae transition of C. albicans, and bacteria particles physically affected the biofilm architecture and biofilm formation. PMID:24532517

  4. Biofilm formation of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus host-independent derivatives.

    PubMed

    Medina, Adrian A; Kadouri, Daniel E

    2009-04-01

    Bdellovibrios are Gram-negative predatory bacteria which are ubiquitous to many environmental niches, including natural biofilms. In this study, host-independent (HI) variants of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109J were isolated. Predation assays and genetic analysis confirmed that the selected HI variants are derivatives of B. bacteriovorus. When grown in microtiter plates, HI variants were able to form tenacious biofilms on the surface of the wells. HI biofilm formation on different surfaces, media and temperatures was examined. HI biofilm development was seen on all of the examined surfaces, with the most robust biofilm developing at 22 degrees C and in media supplemented with yeast extract. Biofilm detachment experiments revealed that the HI cells are firmly attached to the surface of the wells and are not easily removed by physical and chemical treatments. Treating the biofilm with proteinase K and DNase-I caused rapid detachment of the biofilm as well as inhibition of biofilm formation, suggesting that DNA and proteins are major components of the HI biofilm extracellular matrix. Our data suggest that under conditions that might favor the development of HI variants, such as a rich nutrient environment, Bdellovibrio facultative prey cells are capable of attaching to abiotic surfaces and forming biofilms. PMID:19223013

  5. Electron microscopic examination of wastewater biofilm formation and structural components.

    PubMed Central

    Eighmy, T T; Maratea, D; Bishop, P L

    1983-01-01

    This research documents in situ wastewater biofilm formation, structure, and physiochemical properties as revealed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Cationized ferritin was used to label anionic sites of the biofilm glycocalyx for viewing in thin section. Wastewater biofilm formation paralleled the processes involved in marine biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a dramatic increase in cell colonization and growth over a 144-h period. Constituents included a variety of actively dividing morphological types. Many of the colonizing bacteria were flagellated. Filaments were seen after primary colonization of the surface. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a dominant gram-negative cell wall structure in the biofilm constituents. At least three types of glycocalyces were observed. The predominant glycocalyx possessed interstices and was densely labeled with cationized ferritin. Two of the glycocalyces appeared to mediate biofilm adhesion to the substratum. The results suggest that the predominant glycocalyx of this thin wastewater biofilm serves, in part, to: (i) enclose the bacteria in a matrix and anchor the biofilm to the substratum and (ii) provide an extensive surface area with polyanionic properties. Images PMID:6881965

  6. Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and dispersion during colonization and disease

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Yashuan; Marks, Laura R.; Pettigrew, Melinda M.; Hakansson, Anders P.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a common colonizer of the human nasopharynx. Despite a low rate of invasive disease, the high prevalence of colonization results in millions of infections and over one million deaths per year, mostly in individuals under the age of 5 and the elderly. Colonizing pneumococci form well-organized biofilm communities in the nasopharyngeal environment, but the specific role of biofilms and their interaction with the host during colonization and disease is not yet clear. Pneumococci in biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and this phenotype can be recapitulated when pneumococci are grown on respiratory epithelial cells under conditions found in the nasopharyngeal environment. Pneumococcal biofilms display lower levels of virulence in vivo and provide an optimal environment for increased genetic exchange both in vitro and in vivo, with increased natural transformation seen during co-colonization with multiple strains. Biofilms have also been detected on mucosal surfaces during pneumonia and middle ear infection, although the role of these biofilms in the disease process is debated. Recent studies have shown that changes in the nasopharyngeal environment caused by concomitant virus infection, changes in the microflora, inflammation, or other host assaults trigger active release of pneumococci from biofilms. These dispersed bacteria have distinct phenotypic properties and transcriptional profiles different from both biofilm and broth-grown, planktonic bacteria, resulting in a significantly increased virulence in vivo. In this review we discuss the properties of pneumococcal biofilms, the role of biofilm formation during pneumococcal colonization, including their propensity for increased ability to exchange genetic material, as well as mechanisms involved in transition from asymptomatic biofilm colonization to dissemination and disease of otherwise sterile sites. Greater understanding of pneumococcal biofilm formation and dispersion will elucidate novel avenues to interfere with the spread of antibiotic resistance and vaccine escape, as well as novel strategies to target the mechanisms involved in induction of pneumococcal disease. PMID:25629011

  7. Effects of patterned topography on biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Ravikumar

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a population of bacteria attached to each other and irreversibly to a surface, enclosed in a matrix of self-secreted polymers, among others polysaccharides, proteins, DNA. Biofilms cause persisting infections associated with implanted medical devices and hospital acquired (nosocomial) infections. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are the most common type of nosocomial infections accounting for up to 40% of all hospital acquired infections. Several different strategies, including use of antibacterial agents and genetic cues, quorum sensing, have been adopted for inhibiting biofilm formation relevant to CAUTI surfaces. Each of these methods pertains to certain types of bacteria, processes and has shortcomings. Based on eukaryotic cell topography interaction studies and Ulva linza spore studies, topographical surfaces were suggested as a benign control method for biofilm formation. However, topographies tested so far have not included a systematic variation of size across basic topography shapes. In this study patterned topography was systematically varied in size and shape according to two approaches 1) confinement and 2) wetting. For the confinement approach, using scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy, orienting effects of tested topography based on staphylococcus aureus (s. aureus) (SH1000) and enterobacter cloacae (e. cloacae) (ATCC 700258) bacterial models were identified on features of up to 10 times the size of the bacterium. Psuedomonas aeruginosa (p. aeruginosa) (PAO1) did not show any orientational effects, under the test conditions. Another important factor in medical biofilms is the identification and quantification of phenotypic state which has not been discussed in the literature concerning bacteria topography characterizations. This was done based on antibiotic susceptibility evaluation and also based on gene expression analysis. Although orientational effects occur, phenotypically no difference was observed between the patterned topography tested. Another potential strategy for biofilm control through patterned topography is based on the design of robust non-wetting surfaces with undercut feature geometries, characterized by 1) breakthrough pressure and 2) triple phase contact line model. It was found that height and presence of undercut had statistically significant effects, directly proportional to breakthrough pressures, whereas extent of undercut did not. A predictive triple phase contact line model was also developed. (Full text of this dissertation may be available via the University of Florida Libraries web site. Please check http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/etd.html)

  8. Printed paper-based arrays as substrates for biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The suitability of paper-based arrays for biofilm formation studies by Staphylococcus aureus is demonstrated. Laboratory-coated papers with different physicochemical properties were used as substrates. The array platform was fabricated by patterning the coated papers with vinyl-substituted polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) -based ink. The affinity of bacteria onto the flexographically printed hydrophobic and smooth PDMS film was very low whereas bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation occurred preferentially on the unprinted areas, i.e. in the reaction arrays. The concentration of the attached bacteria was quantified by determining the viable colony forming unit (CFU/cm2) numbers. The distribution and the extent of surface coverage of the biofilms were determined by atomic force microscopy. In static conditions, the highest bacterial concentration and most highly organized biofilms were observed on substrates with high polarity. On a rough paper surface with low polarity, the biofilm formation was most hindered. Biofilms were effectively removed from a polar substrate upon exposure to (+)-dehydroabietic acid, an anti-biofilm compound. PMID:25006538

  9. Association Between Toxin-Antitoxin Systems and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Sajedeh; Ghafourian, Sobhan; Taheri Kalani, Morovat; Azizi Jalilian, Farid; Hemati, Saeed; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are found on the chromosomes and plasmids of many Bacteria such as Escherichia coli. The roles of TA systems in bacteria are enigmatic. Multiple biological functions of TA systems are proposed including growth modulation, persistence, and biofilm formation. Bio?lms of E. coli are cause of urinary tract infections, as well as bacteraemia. Objectives: The current study aimed to find the association between biofilm formation and toxin-antitoxin systems in clinical isolates of E. coli. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 E. coli isolates were evaluated for biofilm formation by Congo red agar medium (CRA) and microtiter plate assay and the presence of different TA systems including MazEF, RelBE, hipBA, ccdAB and MqsRA. Results: The results of the analysis revealed that 107 E. coli isolates were potent for biofilm formation by CRA. The findings by microtiter plates showed that 102 E. coli isolates were biofilm producers. The results indicated that 80%, 85%, 70%, 91% and 82% of the isolates possessed MazEF, RelBE, hipBA, ccdAB and MqsRA TA loci, respectively. Conclusions: The analysis recommended that TA genes are prevalent in clinical isolates of E. coli strains. The analysis revealed that hipBA TA system is associated with biofilm formation. PMID:25789127

  10. Boundaries for Biofilm Formation: Humidity and Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Else, Terry Ann; Pantle, Curtis R.; Amy, Penny S.

    2003-01-01

    Environmental conditions which define boundaries for biofilm production could provide useful ecological information for biofilm models. A practical use of defined conditions could be applied to the high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Data for temperature and humidity conditions indicate that decreases in relative humidity or increased temperature severely affect biofilm formation on three candidate canister metals. PMID:12902302

  11. Boundaries for biofilm formation: humidity and temperature.

    PubMed

    Else, Terry Ann; Pantle, Curtis R; Amy, Penny S

    2003-08-01

    Environmental conditions which define boundaries for biofilm production could provide useful ecological information for biofilm models. A practical use of defined conditions could be applied to the high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Data for temperature and humidity conditions indicate that decreases in relative humidity or increased temperature severely affect biofilm formation on three candidate canister metals. PMID:12902302

  12. COAGGREGATION OCCURS AMONGST BACTERIA WITHIN AND BETWEEN DOMESTIC SHOWERHEAD BIOFILMS

    PubMed Central

    Vornhagen, Jay; Stevens, Michael; McCormick, David; Dowd, Scot E.; Eisenberg, Joseph N.S.; Boles, Blaise R.; Rickard, Alexander H.

    2014-01-01

    Showerheads support the development multi-species biofilms that can be unsightly, produce malodor, and may harbor pathogens. The outer surface spray plates of many showerheads support visible biofilms that likely contain a mixture of bacteria from freshwater and potentially from human users. Coaggregation, a mechanism by which genetically distinct bacteria specifically recognize one another, may contribute to the retention and enrichment of different species within these biofilms. The aim of this work was to identify the bacterial composition of outer spray plate biofilms of three domestic shower heads and to determine the inter- and intra-biofilm coaggregation ability of each culturable isolate. The bacterial composition of the three biofilms was determined by using bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP) and by culturing on R2A medium. An average of 31 genera per biofilm were identified using bTEFAP and a total of 30 isolates were cultured. Even though the microbial diversity of each showerhead biofilm differed, every cultured isolate was able to coaggregate with at least one other isolate from the same or different showerhead biofilm. Promiscuous coaggregating isolates belonged to the genera Brevundimonas, Micrococcus, and Lysobacter. This work suggests that coaggregation may be a common feature of showerhead biofilms. Characterization of the mechanisms mediating coaggregation, and the inter-species interactions they facilitate, may allow for novel strategies to inhibit biofilm development. PMID:23194413

  13. Identification of Listeria monocytogenes Determinants Required for Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Regeimbal, James M.; Regan, Patrick M.; Higgins, Darren E.

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, food-borne pathogen of humans and animals. L. monocytogenes is considered to be a potential public health risk by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), as this bacterium can easily contaminate ready-to-eat (RTE) foods and cause an invasive, life-threatening disease (listeriosis). Bacteria can adhere and grow on multiple surfaces and persist within biofilms in food processing plants, providing resistance to sanitizers and other antimicrobial agents. While whole genome sequencing has led to the identification of biofilm synthesis gene clusters in many bacterial species, bioinformatics has not identified the biofilm synthesis genes within the L. monocytogenes genome. To identify genes necessary for L. monocytogenes biofilm formation, we performed a transposon mutagenesis library screen using a recently constructed Himar1 mariner transposon. Approximately 10,000 transposon mutants within L. monocytogenes strain 10403S were screened for biofilm formation in 96-well polyvinyl chloride (PVC) microtiter plates with 70 Himar1 insertion mutants identified that produced significantly less biofilms. DNA sequencing of the transposon insertion sites within the isolated mutants revealed transposon insertions within 38 distinct genetic loci. The identification of mutants bearing insertions within several flagellar motility genes previously known to be required for the initial stages of biofilm formation validated the ability of the mutagenesis screen to identify L. monocytogenes biofilm-defective mutants. Two newly identified genetic loci, dltABCD and phoPR, were selected for deletion analysis and both ?dltABCD and ?phoPR bacterial strains displayed biofilm formation defects in the PVC microtiter plate assay, confirming these loci contribute to biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes. PMID:25517120

  14. Identification of a Novel Benzimidazole That Inhibits Bacterial Biofilm Formation in a Broad-Spectrum Manner?

    PubMed Central

    Sambanthamoorthy, Karthik; Gokhale, Ankush A.; Lao, Weiwei; Parashar, Vijay; Neiditch, Matthew B.; Semmelhack, Martin F.; Lee, Ilsoon; Waters, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation causes significant industrial economic loss and high morbidity and mortality in medical settings. Biofilms are defined as multicellular communities of bacteria encased in a matrix of protective extracellular polymers. Because biofilms have a high tolerance for treatment with antimicrobials, protect bacteria from immune defense, and resist clearance with standard sanitation protocols, it is critical to develop new approaches to prevent biofilm formation. Here, a novel benzimidazole molecule, named antibiofilm compound 1 (ABC-1), identified in a small-molecule screen, was found to prevent bacterial biofilm formation in multiple Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, on a variety of different surface types. Importantly, ABC-1 itself does not inhibit the growth of bacteria, and it is effective at nanomolar concentrations. Also, coating a polystyrene surface with ABC-1 reduces biofilm formation. These data suggest ABC-1 is a new chemical scaffold for the development of antibiofilm compounds. PMID:21709104

  15. Wild mushroom extracts as inhibitors of bacterial biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Alves, Maria José; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Lourenço, Inês; Costa, Eduardo; Martins, Anabela; Pintado, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms can colonize a wide variety of medical devices, putting patients in risk for local and systemic infectious complications, including local-site infections, catheter-related bloodstream infections, and endocarditis. These microorganisms are able to grow adhered to almost every surface, forming architecturally complex communities termed biofilms. The use of natural products has been extremely successful in the discovery of new medicine, and mushrooms could be a source of natural antimicrobials. The present study reports the capacity of wild mushroom extracts to inhibit in vitro biofilm formation by multi-resistant bacteria. Four Gram-negative bacteria biofilm producers (Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii) isolated from urine were used to verify the activity of Russula delica, Fistulina hepatica, Mycena rosea, Leucopaxilus giganteus, and Lepista nuda extracts. The results obtained showed that all tested mushroom extracts presented some extent of inhibition of biofilm production. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the microorganism with the highest capacity of biofilm production, being also the most susceptible to the extracts inhibition capacity (equal or higher than 50%). Among the five tested extracts against E. coli, Leucopaxillus giganteus (47.8%) and Mycenas rosea (44.8%) presented the highest inhibition of biofilm formation. The extracts exhibiting the highest inhibitory effect upon P. mirabilis biofilm formation were Sarcodon imbricatus (45.4%) and Russula delica (53.1%). Acinetobacter baumannii was the microorganism with the lowest susceptibility to mushroom extracts inhibitory effect on biofilm production (highest inhibition-almost 29%, by Russula delica extract). This is a pioneer study since, as far as we know, there are no reports on the inhibition of biofilm production by the studied mushroom extracts and in particular against multi-resistant clinical isolates; nevertheless, other studies are required to elucidate the mechanism of action. PMID:25438017

  16. Wild Mushroom Extracts as Inhibitors of Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Maria José; Ferreira, Isabel C. F. R.; Lourenço, Inês; Costa, Eduardo; Martins, Anabela; Pintado, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms can colonize a wide variety of medical devices, putting patients in risk for local and systemic infectious complications, including local-site infections, catheter-related bloodstream infections, and endocarditis. These microorganisms are able to grow adhered to almost every surface, forming architecturally complex communities termed biofilms. The use of natural products has been extremely successful in the discovery of new medicine, and mushrooms could be a source of natural antimicrobials. The present study reports the capacity of wild mushroom extracts to inhibit in vitro biofilm formation by multi-resistant bacteria. Four Gram-negative bacteria biofilm producers (Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii) isolated from urine were used to verify the activity of Russula delica, Fistulina hepatica, Mycena rosea, Leucopaxilus giganteus, and Lepista nuda extracts. The results obtained showed that all tested mushroom extracts presented some extent of inhibition of biofilm production. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the microorganism with the highest capacity of biofilm production, being also the most susceptible to the extracts inhibition capacity (equal or higher than 50%). Among the five tested extracts against E. coli, Leucopaxillus giganteus (47.8%) and Mycenas rosea (44.8%) presented the highest inhibition of biofilm formation. The extracts exhibiting the highest inhibitory effect upon P. mirabilis biofilm formation were Sarcodon imbricatus (45.4%) and Russula delica (53.1%). Acinetobacter baumannii was the microorganism with the lowest susceptibility to mushroom extracts inhibitory effect on biofilm production (highest inhibition—almost 29%, by Russula delica extract). This is a pioneer study since, as far as we know, there are no reports on the inhibition of biofilm production by the studied mushroom extracts and in particular against multi-resistant clinical isolates; nevertheless, other studies are required to elucidate the mechanism of action. PMID:25438017

  17. Bacteria, Biofilms and Fluid Dynamics: Elementary Flows and Unexpected Phenomena

    E-print Network

    Fisher, Frank

    Bacteria, Biofilms and Fluid Dynamics: Elementary Flows and Unexpected Phenomena Wednesday February the migration of bacteria along surfaces when exposed to a shear flow. In particular, we identify an unusual response where flow produces a directed motion of twitching bacteria in the upstream direction. (ii) We

  18. Desiccation tolerance of iron bacteria biofilms on Mars regolith simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feyh, Nina; Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Iron oxidizing bacteria play an important role in the geological redox cycling of iron on earth. The redox change between Fe(II) and Fe(III) can be used for biological energy production [1]. Therefore iron oxidation in the iron rich martian soils may be or may have been microbially mediated. The microbial conversion of iron is considered to be an ancient form of metabolism [2], so it might have evolved on Mars as well. However, to exist in recent martian soils, bacteria must be able to endure dry and cold conditions. Neutrophilic iron oxidizers can be found in various iron rich aquatic environments, where they lead to the precipitation of insoluble ferric hydroxides. Some of these environments fall temporarily dry, what could have led to an adaptation to desiccation by bacteria, existing there. One strategy of iron bacteria to endure drought stress might be the formation of biofilms by excreting Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS). The deposition of iron hydroxides could enable them to endure dry conditions as well. For our experiments, neutrophilic iron oxidizing bacteria have been isolated from a creek in Bad Salzhausen/Hesse and temporarily drying out pools in Tierra del Fuego. Strains from aquatic environments in the national park "Unteres Odertal" and from water wells in Berlin/Brandenburg are included in the tests as well. In desiccation experiments, the capability of iron bacteria to tolerate dry conditions are investigated. The aim of our first experiment is the adaptation to dry conditions. Biofilms of 15 strains are grown on ceramic beads in liquid medium containing complexed Fe(II), established biofilms contain Fe(III) precipitates. The cultures are desiccated in a sterile airflow until the weight of the cultures remained constant. After a desiccation period of 9 h up to 7 d, the beads are transferred to fresh liquid medium. Adapted strains are used in further desiccation experiments, where biofilms are grown on two martian regolith simulants. These mineral mixtures were developed and produced by the Naturkundemuseum Berlin according to recent data of Mars research missions [3, 4, 5, 6, 7]. The minerals are attached to object slides with potassium silicate and biofilms are grown on the mineral surface. The biofilms are quantified by cell counting and the structure is evaluated by epifluorescence microscopy. After desiccation in a sterile airflow, the survival of cells is determined by fluorescence staining. Acknowledgements This research was supported by the Helmholtz Association through the research alliance "Planetary Evolution and Life". References [1] Weber, K. A. et al. (2006). Microorganisms pumping iron: anaerobic microbial iron oxidation and reduction. Nature Reviews Microbiology 4: 752-764. [2] Vargas, M. et al. (1998). Microbiological evidence for Fe(III) reduction on early Earth. Nature 395: 65-67. [3] Bibring, J.-P., Y. Langevin, et al. (2005). Mars surface diversity as revealed by the OMEGA/Mars express observations. Science 307(5715): 1576-1581. [4] Bibring, J.-P., S. W. Squyres, et al. (2006). Merging Views on Mars. Science 313(5795): 1899-1901. [5] Chevrier, V. and P. E. Mathé (2007). Mineralogy and evolution of the surface of Mars: A review. Planetary and Space Science 55(3): 289-314. [6] McCollom, T. M. and B. M. Hynek (2005). A volcanic environment for bedrock diagenesis at Meridiani Planum on Mars. Nature 438(7071): 1129-1131. [7] Poulet, F., J. P. Bibring, et al. (2005). Phyllosilicates on Mars and implications for early martian climate. Nature 438(7068): 623-627.

  19. Prevention of biofilm formation by polymer modification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B Jansen; W Kohnen

    1995-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation on synthetic polymers plays an important role in industry and in modern medicine, leading, for example, to difficult-to-treat infections caused by colonized foreign bodies. Prevention of biofilm formation is a necessary step in the successful prophylaxis of such infections. One approach is to inhibit bacterial adherence by polymer surface modification. We have investigated polymer modification by glow

  20. Environmental Stimuli Shape Biofilm Formation and the Virulence of Periodontal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Pöllänen, Marja T.; Paino, Annamari; Ihalin, Riikka

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis is a common inflammatory disease affecting the tooth-supporting structures. It is initiated by bacteria growing as a biofilm at the gingival margin, and communication of the biofilms differs in health and disease. The bacterial composition of periodontitis-associated biofilms has been well documented and is under continual investigation. However, the roles of several host response and inflammation driven environmental stimuli on biofilm formation is not well understood. This review article addresses the effects of environmental factors such as pH, temperature, cytokines, hormones, and oxidative stress on periodontal biofilm formation and bacterial virulence. PMID:23965982

  1. Importance of biofilm formation for corrosion inhibition of SAE 1018 steel by axenic aerobic biofilms.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, A; Cheng, E T; Earthman, J C; Wood, T K

    1997-06-01

    To investigate if corrosion inhibition by aerobic biofilms is a general phenomenon, carbon steel (SAE 1018) coupons were exposed to a complex liquid medium (Luria-Bertani) and seawater-mimicking medium (VNSS) containing fifteen different pure-culture bacterial suspensions representing seven genera. Compared to sterile controls, the mass loss in the presence of these bacteria (which are capable of developing a biofilm to various degrees) decreased by 2- to 15-fold. The extent of corrosion inhibition in LB medium depended on the nature of the biofilm: an increased proportion of live cells, observed with confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) and image analysis, decreased corrosion. Corrosion inhibition in LB medium was greatest with Pseudomonas putida (good biofilm formation), while metal coupons exposed to Streptomyces lividans in LB medium (poor biofilm formation) corroded in a manner similar to the sterile controls. Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 reduced corrosion the most in VNSS. It appears that only a small layer of active, respiring cells is required to inhibit corrosion, and the corrosion inhibition observed is due to the attached biofilm. PMID:9248069

  2. Candida species: new insights into biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; López-Romero, Everardo; Villagómez-Castro, Julio C; Ruiz-Baca, Estela

    2012-06-01

    Biofilms of Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis are associated with high indices of hospital morbidity and mortality. Major factors involved in the formation and growth of Candida biofilms are the chemical composition of the medical implant and the cell wall adhesins responsible for mediating Candida-Candida, Candida-human host cell and Candida-medical device adhesion. Strategies for elucidating the mechanisms that regulate the formation of Candida biofilms combine tools from biology, chemistry, nanoscience, material science and physics. This review proposes the use of new technologies, such as synchrotron radiation, to study the mechanisms of biofilm formation. In the future, this information is expected to facilitate the design of new materials and antifungal compounds that can eradicate nosocomial Candida infections due to biofilm formation on medical implants. This will reduce dissemination of candidiasis and hopefully improve the quality of life of patients. PMID:22702528

  3. The contribution of cell-cell signaling and motility to bacterial biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Shrout, Joshua D.; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael; Parsek, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    Many bacteria grow attached to a surface as biofilms. Several factors dictate biofilm formation, including responses by the colonizing bacteria to their environment. Here we review how bacteria use cell-cell signaling (also called quorum sensing) and motility during biofilm formation. Specifically, we describe quorum sensing and surface motility exhibited by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous environmental organism that acts as an opportunistic human pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. P. aeruginosa uses acyl-homoserine lactone signals during quorum sensing to synchronize gene expression important to the production of polysaccharides, rhamnolipid, and other virulence factors. Surface motility affects the assembly and architecture of biofilms, and some aspects of motility are also influenced by quorum sensing. While some genes and their function are specific to P. aeruginosa, many aspects of biofilm development can be used as a model system to understand how bacteria differentially colonize surfaces. PMID:22053126

  4. Biofilm formation in geometries with different surface curvature and oxygen availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Wen; Fragkopoulos, Alexandros A.; Marquez, Samantha M.; Kim, Harold D.; Angelini, Thomas E.; Fernández-Nieves, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria in the natural environment exist as interface-associated colonies known as biofilms . Complex mechanisms are often involved in biofilm formation and development. Despite the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation, it remains unclear how physical effects in standing cultures influence biofilm development. The topology of the solid interface has been suggested as one of the physical cues influencing bacteria-surface interactions and biofilm development. Using the model organism Bacillus subtilis, we study the transformation of swimming bacteria in liquid culture into robust biofilms in a range of confinement geometries (planar, spherical and toroidal) and interfaces (air/water, silicone/water, and silicone elastomer/water). We find that B. subtilis form submerged biofilms at both solid and liquid interfaces in addition to air-water pellicles. When confined, bacteria grow on curved surfaces of both positive and negative Gaussian curvature. However, the confinement geometry does affect the resulting biofilm roughness and relative coverage. We also find that the biofilm location is governed by oxygen availability as well as by gravitational effects; these compete with each other in some situations. Overall, our results demonstrate that confinement geometry is an effective way to control oxygen availability and subsequently biofilm growth.

  5. Evaluation of various metallic coatings on steel to mitigate biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Hideyuki; Ikigai, Hajime; Yoshitake, Michiko

    2009-02-01

    In marine environments and water systems, it is easy for many structures to form biofilms on their surfaces and to be deteriorated due to the corrosion caused by biofilm formation by bacteria. The authors have investigated the antibacterial effects of metallic elements in practical steels so far to solve food-related problems, using Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. However, from the viewpoint of material deterioration caused by bacteria and their antifouling measures, we should consider the biofilm behavior as aggregate rather than individual bacterium. Therefore, we picked up Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudoalteromonas carageenovara in this study, since they easily form biofilms in estuarine and marine environments. We investigated what kind of metallic elements could inhibit the biofilm formation at first and then discussed how the thin films of those inhibitory elements on steels could affect biofilm formation. The information would lead to the establishment of effective antifouling measures against corrosion in estuarine and marine environments. PMID:19333421

  6. Evaluation of Various Metallic Coatings on Steel to Mitigate Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kanematsu, Hideyuki; Ikigai, Hajime; Yoshitake, Michiko

    2009-01-01

    In marine environments and water systems, it is easy for many structures to form biofilms on their surfaces and to be deteriorated due to the corrosion caused by biofilm formation by bacteria. The authors have investigated the antibacterial effects of metallic elements in practical steels so far to solve food-related problems, using Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. However, from the viewpoint of material deterioration caused by bacteria and their antifouling measures, we should consider the biofilm behavior as aggregate rather than individual bacterium. Therefore, we picked up Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudoalteromonas carageenovara in this study, since they easily form biofilms in estuarine and marine environments. We investigated what kind of metallic elements could inhibit the biofilm formation at first and then discussed how the thin films of those inhibitory elements on steels could affect biofilm formation. The information would lead to the establishment of effective antifouling measures against corrosion in estuarine and marine environments. PMID:19333421

  7. Environmental and genetic factors that contribute to Escherichia coli K-12 biofilm formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Birgit M. Prüß; Karan Verma; Priyankar Samanta; Preeti Sule; Sunil Kumar; Jianfei Wu; David Christianson; Shelley M. Horne; Shane J. Stafslien; Alan J. Wolfe; Anne Denton

    2010-01-01

    Biofilms are communities of bacteria whose formation on surfaces requires a large portion of the bacteria’s transcriptional\\u000a network. To identify environmental conditions and transcriptional regulators that contribute to sensing these conditions,\\u000a we used a high-throughput approach to monitor biofilm biomass produced by an isogenic set of Escherichia coli K-12 strains grown under combinations of environmental conditions. Of the environmental combinations,

  8. Marine Biofilm Bacteria Evade Eukaryotic Predation by Targeted Chemical Defense

    E-print Network

    Mcilwain, Jenny

    Marine Biofilm Bacteria Evade Eukaryotic Predation by Targeted Chemical Defense Carsten Matz1 are defended from predation or herbivory by inhibitory secondary metabolites, which in the marine environment are very common among sessile organisms. Among bacteria, where there is the greatest metabolic potential

  9. A direct viable count method for the enumeration of attached bacteria and assessment of biofilm disinfection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, F. P.; Pyle, B. H.; McFeters, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the adaptation of an in situ direct viable count (in situ DVC) method in biofilm disinfection studies. The results obtained with this technique were compared to two other enumeration methods, the plate count (PC) and conventional direct viable count (c-DVC). An environmental isolate (Klebsiella pneumoniae Kp1) was used to form biofilms on stainless steel coupons in a stirred batch reactor. The in situ DVC method was applied to directly assess the viability of bacteria in biofilms without disturbing the integrity of the interfacial community. As additional advantages, the results were observed after 4 h instead of the 24 h incubation time required for colony formation and total cell numbers that remained on the substratum were enumerated. Chlorine and monochloramine were used to determine the susceptibilities of attached and planktonic bacteria to disinfection treatment using this novel analytical approach. The planktonic cells in the reactor showed no significant change in susceptibility to disinfectants during the period of biofilm formation. In addition, the attached cells did not reveal any more resistance to disinfection than planktonic cells. The disinfection studies of young biofilms indicated that 0.25 mg/l free chlorine (at pH 7.2) and 1 mg/l monochloramine (at pH 9.0) have comparable disinfection efficiencies at 25 degrees C. Although being a weaker disinfectant, monochloramine was more effective in removing attached bacteria from the substratum than free chlorine. The in situ DVC method always showed at least one log higher viable cell densities than the PC method, suggesting that the in situ DVC method is more efficient in the enumeration of biofilm bacteria. The results also indicated that the in situ DVC method can provide more accurate information regarding the cell numbers and viability of bacteria within biofilms following disinfection.

  10. Biofilm formation in an ice cream plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gulten Tiryaki Gunduz; Gunnur Tuncel

    2006-01-01

    The sites of biofilm formation in an ice cream plant were investigated by sampling both the production line and the environment. Experiments were carried out twice within a 20-day period. First, stainless steel coupons were fixed to surfaces adjacent to food contact surfaces, the floor drains and the doormat. They were taken for the analysis of biofilm at three different

  11. Colored moderately thermophilic bacteria in paper-machine biofilms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Kolari; J. Nuutinen; F. A. Rainey; M. S. Salkinoja-Salonen

    2003-01-01

      \\u000a Biofilms cause several problems in papermaking. This report describes a microbiological survey of colored biofilms in six\\u000a paper and board machines, including two case studies of outbreaks of colored slimes in which the causative bacteria were found.\\u000a A total of 95 pink-, red-, orange- or yellow-pigmented strains were isolated. Nearly all (99%) of the strains grew at 52 ?C,\\u000a 72%

  12. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopic methods for microbial ecology: analysis of bacteria, bacteria-polymer mixtures and biofilms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, P. D.; Henson, J. M.; Guckert, J. B.; Nivens, D. E.; White, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy has been used to rapidly and nondestructively analyze bacteria, bacteria-polymer mixtures, digester samples and microbial biofilms. Diffuse reflectance FT-IR (DRIFT) analysis of freeze-dried, powdered samples offered a means of obtaining structural information. The bacteria examined were divided into two groups. The first group was characterized by a dominant amide I band and the second group of organisms displayed an additional strong carbonyl stretch at approximately 1740 cm-1. The differences illustrated by the subtraction spectra obtained for microbes of the two groups suggest that FT-IR spectroscopy can be utilized to recognize differences in microbial community structure. Calculation of specific band ratios has enabled the composition of bacteria and extracellular or intracellular storage product polymer mixtures to be determined for bacteria-gum arabic (amide I/carbohydrate C-O approximately 1150 cm-1) and bacteria-poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate (amide I/carbonyl approximately 1740 cm-1). The key band ratios correlate with the compositions of the material and provide useful information for the application of FT-IR spectroscopy to environmental biofilm samples and for distinguishing bacteria grown under differing nutrient conditions. DRIFT spectra have been obtained for biofilms produced by Vibrio natriegens on stainless steel disks. Between 48 and 144 h, an increase in bands at approximately 1440 and 1090 cm-1 was seen in FT-IR spectra of the V. natriegens biofilm. DRIFT spectra of mixed culture effluents of anaerobic digesters show differences induced by shifts in input feedstocks. The use of flow-through attenuated total reflectance has permitted in situ real-time changes in biofilm formation to be monitored and provides a powerful tool for understanding the interactions within adherent microbial consortia.

  13. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl), pellicle Formation (Pel) and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides) that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation. PMID:25438014

  14. Original article Effects of growth conditions on biofilm formation

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Effects of growth conditions on biofilm formation by Actinobacillus 24 April 2009; accepted 8 September 2009) Abstract ­ Biofilm formation is an important virulence to form biofilm in vitro. In this study, we compared biofilm formation by the serotype 1 reference strain

  15. Multiple factors modulate biofilm formation by the anaerobic pathogen Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Ðapa, Tanja; Dapa, Tanja; Leuzzi, Rosanna; Ng, Yen K; Baban, Soza T; Adamo, Roberto; Kuehne, Sarah A; Scarselli, Maria; Minton, Nigel P; Serruto, Davide; Unnikrishnan, Meera

    2013-02-01

    Bacteria within biofilms are protected from multiple stresses, including immune responses and antimicrobial agents. The biofilm-forming ability of bacterial pathogens has been associated with increased antibiotic resistance and chronic recurrent infections. Although biofilms have been well studied for several gut pathogens, little is known about biofilm formation by anaerobic gut species. The obligate anaerobe Clostridium difficile causes C. difficile infection (CDI), a major health care-associated problem primarily due to the high incidence of recurring infections. C. difficile colonizes the gut when the normal intestinal microflora is disrupted by antimicrobial agents; however, the factors or processes involved in gut colonization during infection remain unclear. We demonstrate that clinical C. difficile strains, i.e., strain 630 and the hypervirulent strain R20291, form structured biofilms in vitro, with R20291 accumulating substantially more biofilm. Microscopic and biochemical analyses show multiple layers of bacteria encased in a biofilm matrix containing proteins, DNA, and polysaccharide. Employing isogenic mutants, we show that virulence-associated proteins, Cwp84, flagella, and a putative quorum-sensing regulator, LuxS, are all required for maximal biofilm formation by C. difficile. Interestingly, a mutant in Spo0A, a transcription factor that controls spore formation, was defective for biofilm formation, indicating a possible link between sporulation and biofilm formation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that bacteria in clostridial biofilms are more resistant to high concentrations of vancomycin, a drug commonly used for treatment of CDI. Our data suggest that biofilm formation by C. difficile is a complex multifactorial process and may be a crucial mechanism for clostridial persistence in the host. PMID:23175653

  16. Inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus salivarius on Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Wu, C-C; Lin, C-T; Wu, C-Y; Peng, W-S; Lee, M-J; Tsai, Y-C

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries arises from an imbalance of metabolic activities in dental biofilms developed primarily by Streptococcus mutans. This study was conducted to isolate potential oral probiotics with antagonistic activities against S. mutans biofilm formation from Lactobacillus salivarius, frequently found in human saliva. We analysed 64 L. salivarius strains and found that two, K35 and K43, significantly inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation with inhibitory activities more pronounced than those of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), a prototypical probiotic that shows anti-caries activity. Scanning electron microscopy showed that co-culture of S. mutans with K35 or K43 resulted in significantly reduced amounts of attached bacteria and network-like structures, typically comprising exopolysaccharides. Spot assay for S. mutans indicated that K35 and K43 strains possessed a stronger bactericidal activity against S. mutans than LGG. Moreover, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that the expression of genes encoding glucosyltransferases, gtfB, gtfC, and gtfD was reduced when S. mutans were co-cultured with K35 or K43. However, LGG activated the expression of gtfB and gtfC, but did not influence the expression of gtfD in the co-culture. A transwell-based biofilm assay indicated that these lactobacilli inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation in a contact-independent manner. In conclusion, we identified two L. salivarius strains with inhibitory activities on the growth and expression of S. mutans virulence genes to reduce its biofilm formation. This is not a general characteristic of the species, so presents a potential strategy for in vivo alteration of plaque biofilm and caries. PMID:24961744

  17. Inhibition of Biofilm Formation by T7 Bacteriophages Producing Quorum-Quenching Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Lamas-Samanamud, Gisella R.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial growth in biofilms is the major cause of recalcitrant biofouling in industrial processes and of persistent infections in clinical settings. The use of bacteriophage treatment to lyse bacteria in biofilms has attracted growing interest. In particular, many natural or engineered phages produce depolymerases to degrade polysaccharides in the biofilm matrix and allow access to host bacteria. However, the phage-produced depolymerases are highly specific for only the host-derived polysaccharides and may have limited effects on natural multispecies biofilms. In this study, an engineered T7 bacteriophage was constructed to encode a lactonase enzyme with broad-range activity for quenching of quorum sensing, a form of bacterial cell-cell communication via small chemical molecules (acyl homoserine lactones [AHLs]) that is necessary for biofilm formation. Our results demonstrated that the engineered T7 phage expressed the AiiA lactonase to effectively degrade AHLs from many bacteria. Addition of the engineered T7 phage to mixed-species biofilms containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli resulted in inhibition of biofilm formation. Such quorum-quenching phages that can lyse host bacteria and express quorum-quenching enzymes to affect diverse bacteria in biofilm communities may become novel antifouling and antibiofilm agents in industrial and clinical settings. PMID:24951790

  18. Chemotaxis in P. Aeruginosa Biofilm Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienvenu, Samuel; Strain, Shinji; Thatcher, Travis; Gordon, Vernita

    2010-10-01

    Pseudomonas biofilms form infections in the lungs of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients that damage lung tissue and lead to death. Previous work shows chemotaxis is important for Pseudomonas in CF lungs. The work studied swimming bacteria at high concentrations. In contrast, medically relevant biofilms initiate from sparse populations of surface-bound bacteria. The recent development of software techniques for automated, high-throughput bacteria tracking leaves us well-poised to quantitatively study these chemotactic conditions. We will develop experimental systems for such studies, focusing on L-Arginine (an amino acid), D-Galactose (a sugar present in lungs), and succinate and glucose (carbon sources for bacteria). This suite of chemoattractants will allow us to study how chemoattractant characteristics--size and diffusion behavior--change bacterial response; the interaction of competing chemoattractants; and, differences in bacterial behaviors, like motility modes, in response to different types of chemoattractions and varying neighbor cell density.

  19. Assessment of the in vivo formation of biofilm on external ventricular drainages.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, P; Gordón, M; Soriano, A; Gil-Perotin, S; Marti, V; Gonzalez-Barbera, E M; Sanchez-Aguilar, M T; Simal, J A; Bonastre, J

    2013-11-01

    Biofilm formation on external ventricular drainages (EVDs) has been postulated as the main pathogenic mechanism for EVD-associated ventriculitis. However, biofilm on EVDs has never been systematically studied and the in vivo effect of antibiotic-impregnated EVDs on biofilm has not been assessed. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of biofilm formation on EVDs and to analyze the influence of antibiotic-impregnated EVD on the risk of biofilm formation and ventriculitis. Consecutive patients with EVDs were included in the study. Surveillance cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures were performed twice a week. Withdrawn EVDs were cultured using standard bacteriologic techniques and examined under a scanning electron microscope. We collected 32 EVDs, 18 of which (56 %) were antibiotic-impregnated EVDs. Biofilm was present on 24 EVDs (75 %), ventriculitis was diagnosed in 6 patients (19 %), and colonization occurred in 12 patients (38 %). All cases of ventriculitis were due to Gram-negative bacteria. Biofilm was more frequent on EVDs originating from patients with ventriculitis or bacterial colonization. Impregnated EVDs did not avoid ventriculitis or colonization, but biofilm development on these devices depended on the time from insertion and varied from 67 % for those used for <7 days to 88 % for those used for ? 7 days (p?=?0.094). In conclusion, biofilm is a common phenomenon on EVDs. Currently available impregnated EVDs could not avoid ventriculitis due to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, but a trend of delayment of biofilm development was observed. PMID:23708953

  20. Marine Biofilm Bacteria Evade Eukaryotic Predation by Targeted Chemical Defense

    PubMed Central

    Matz, Carsten; Webb, Jeremy S.; Schupp, Peter J.; Phang, Shui Yen; Penesyan, Anahit; Egan, Suhelen; Steinberg, Peter; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    Many plants and animals are defended from predation or herbivory by inhibitory secondary metabolites, which in the marine environment are very common among sessile organisms. Among bacteria, where there is the greatest metabolic potential, little is known about chemical defenses against bacterivorous consumers. An emerging hypothesis is that sessile bacterial communities organized as biofilms serve as bacterial refuge from predation. By testing growth and survival of two common bacterivorous nanoflagellates, we find evidence that chemically mediated resistance against protozoan predators is common among biofilm populations in a diverse set of marine bacteria. Using bioassay-guided chemical and genetic analysis, we identified one of the most effective antiprotozoal compounds as violacein, an alkaloid that we demonstrate is produced predominately within biofilm cells. Nanomolar concentrations of violacein inhibit protozoan feeding by inducing a conserved eukaryotic cell death program. Such biofilm-specific chemical defenses could contribute to the successful persistence of biofilm bacteria in various environments and provide the ecological and evolutionary context for a number of eukaryote-targeting bacterial metabolites. PMID:18648491

  1. d-Amino acids do not inhibit biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sourav; Pires, Marcos M

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria can either exist in the planktonic (free floating) state or in the biofilm (encased within an organic framework) state. Bacteria biofilms cause industrial concerns and medical complications and there has been a great deal of interest in the discovery of small molecule agents that can inhibit the formation of biofilms or disperse existing structures. Herein we show that, contrary to previously published reports, d-amino acids do not inhibit biofilm formation of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), and Staphylococcus epidermis (S. epidermis) at millimolar concentrations. We evaluated a diverse set of natural and unnatural d-amino acids and observed no activity from these compounds in inhibiting biofilm formation. PMID:25658642

  2. Fractal analysis of Xylella fastidiosa biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, A. L. D.; Lorite, G. S.; Rodrigues, C. M.; Souza, A. A.; Cotta, M. A.

    2009-07-01

    We have investigated the growth process of Xylella fastidiosa biofilms inoculated on a glass. The size and the distance between biofilms were analyzed by optical images; a fractal analysis was carried out using scaling concepts and atomic force microscopy images. We observed that different biofilms show similar fractal characteristics, although morphological variations can be identified for different biofilm stages. Two types of structural patterns are suggested from the observed fractal dimensions Df. In the initial and final stages of biofilm formation, Df is 2.73±0.06 and 2.68±0.06, respectively, while in the maturation stage, Df=2.57±0.08. These values suggest that the biofilm growth can be understood as an Eden model in the former case, while diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) seems to dominate the maturation stage. Changes in the correlation length parallel to the surface were also observed; these results were correlated with the biofilm matrix formation, which can hinder nutrient diffusion and thus create conditions to drive DLA growth.

  3. Bacterial adherence and biofilm formation on medical implants: a review.

    PubMed

    Veerachamy, Suganthan; Yarlagadda, Tejasri; Manivasagam, Geetha; Yarlagadda, Prasad Kdv

    2014-10-01

    Biofilms are a complex group of microbial cells that adhere to the exopolysaccharide matrix present on the surface of medical devices. Biofilm-associated infections in the medical devices pose a serious problem to the public health and adversely affect the function of the device. Medical implants used in oral and orthopedic surgery are fabricated using alloys such as stainless steel and titanium. The biological behavior, such as osseointegration and its antibacterial activity, essentially depends on both the chemical composition and the morphology of the surface of the device. Surface treatment of medical implants by various physical and chemical techniques are attempted in order to improve their surface properties so as to facilitate bio-integration and prevent bacterial adhesion. The potential source of infection of the surrounding tissue and antimicrobial strategies are from bacteria adherent to or in a biofilm on the implant which should prevent both biofilm formation and tissue colonization. This article provides an overview of bacterial biofilm formation and methods adopted for the inhibition of bacterial adhesion on medical implants. PMID:25406229

  4. Streptococcus gordonii Modulates Candida albicans Biofilm Formation through Intergeneric Communication?

    PubMed Central

    Bamford, Caroline V.; d'Mello, Anita; Nobbs, Angela H.; Dutton, Lindsay C.; Vickerman, M. Margaret; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    2009-01-01

    The fungus Candida albicans colonizes human oral cavity surfaces in conjunction with a complex microflora. C. albicans SC5314 formed biofilms on saliva-coated surfaces that in early stages of development consisted of ?30% hyphal forms. In mixed biofilms with the oral bacterium Streptococcus gordonii DL1, hyphal development by C. albicans was enhanced so that biofilms consisted of ?60% hyphal forms. Cell-cell contact between S. gordonii and C. albicans involved Streptococcus cell wall-anchored proteins SspA and SspB (antigen I/II family polypeptides). Repression of C. albicans hyphal filament and biofilm production by the quorum-sensing molecule farnesol was relieved by S. gordonii. The ability of a luxS mutant of S. gordonii deficient in production of autoinducer 2 to induce C. albicans hyphal formation was reduced, and this mutant suppressed farnesol inhibition of hyphal formation less effectively. Coincubation of the two microbial species led to activation of C. albicans mitogen-activated protein kinase Cek1p, inhibition of Mkc1p activation by H2O2, and enhanced activation of Hog1p by farnesol, which were direct effects of streptococci on morphogenetic signaling. These results suggest that interactions between C. albicans and S. gordonii involve physical (adherence) and chemical (diffusible) signals that influence the development of biofilm communities. Thus, bacteria may play a significant role in modulating Candida carriage and infection processes in the oral cavity. PMID:19528215

  5. Pioneer colonizer microorganisms in biofilm formation on galvanized steel in a simulated recirculating cooling-water system.

    PubMed

    Do?ruöz, Nihal; Göksay, Duygu; Ilhan-Sungur, Esra; Cotuk, Ay?in

    2009-09-01

    Some bacteria have a higher tendency to produce biofilm than others. Especially, Pseudomonas and Aeromonas strains are acknowledged to be pioneer colonizers and are predominant in biofilm formation. We examined biofilm formation and first attachment maintance of biofilms of Pseudomonas spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aeromonas spp, sulphate reducing bacteria and filamentous fungi. A simulated recirculating cooling-water system was used. Heterotrophic bacteria counts on galvanized steel and glass surfaces rose during the tidy period of 720 hours. In addition, we determined that although Pseudomonas spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aeromonas spp. were the pioneer colonizers, they surprisingly could not be determined in the biofilms on both types of surface after 456 hours. Sulphate reducing bacteria were observed in biofilms on both surfaces from the outset of the experiments. Filamentous fungi were seen on the galvanized steel and glass surfaces after 0.5 h. PMID:19455520

  6. Marine Biofilm Bacteria Evade Eukaryotic Predation by Targeted Chemical Defense

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carsten Matz; Jeremy S. Webb; Peter J. Schupp; Shui Yen Phang; Anahit Penesyan; Suhelen Egan; Peter Steinberg; Staffan Kjelleberg; Craig R. McClain

    2008-01-01

    Many plants and animals are defended from predation or herbivory by inhibitory secondary metabolites, which in the marine environment are very common among sessile organisms. Among bacteria, where there is the greatest metabolic potential, little is known about chemical defenses against bacterivorous consumers. An emerging hypothesis is that sessile bacterial communities organized as biofilms serve as bacterial refuge from predation.

  7. Unexplored reservoirs of pathogenic bacteria: protozoa and biofilms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael R. W. Brown; John Barker

    1999-01-01

    In the natural, industrial, hospital and domestic environments, there are numerous phenotypes of pathogenic microorganisms, which vary considerably in chemical, physical and biological properties. A link exists between survival, resistance and virulence. In particular, surface-adherent biofilms and bacteria living within protozoa pose potential health problems that are unrecognized by conventional laboratory culture methods.

  8. Bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation in a vortical flow

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Shahrzad; Ardekani, Arezoo M.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial aggregation and patchiness play an important role in a variety of ecological processes such as competition, adaptation, epidemics, and succession. Here, we demonstrate that hydrodynamics of their environment can lead to their aggregation. This is specially important since microbial habitats are rarely at rest (e.g., ocean, blood stream, flow in porous media, and flow through membrane filtration processes). In order to study the dynamics of bacterial collection in a vortical flow, we utilize a microfluidic system to mimic some of the important microbial conditions at ecologically relevant spatiotemporal scales. We experimentally demonstrate the formation of “ring”-shaped bacterial collection patterns and subsequently the formation of biofilm streamers in a microfluidic system. Acoustic streaming of a microbubble is used to generate a vortical flow in a microchannel. Due to bacteria's finite-size, the microorganisms are directed to closed streamlines and trapped in the vortical flow. The collection of bacteria in the vortices occurs in a matter of seconds, and unexpectedly, triggers the formation of biofilm streamers within minutes. Swimming bacteria have a competitive advantage to respond to their environmental conditions. In order to investigate the role of bacterial motility on the rate of collection, two strains of Escherichia coli bacteria with different motilities are used. We show that the bacterial collection in a vortical flow is strongly pronounced for high motile bacteria. PMID:24339847

  9. Murine solid tumours as a novel model to study bacterial biofilm formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pawar, V; Crull, K; Komor, U; Kasnitz, N; Frahm, M; Kocijancic, D; Westphal, K; Leschner, S; Wolf, K; Loessner, H; Rohde, M; Häussler, S; Weiss, S

    2014-08-01

    Bacteria of many species are able to invade and colonize solid tumours in mice. We have focused on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Detailed analysis revealed that such tumour-invading Salmonella form biofilms, thus providing a versatile in vivo test system for studying bacterial phenotypes and host-pathogen interactions. It appears that biofilm formation by S. typhimurium is induced as a defence against the immune system of the host, and in particular against neutrophils. Further, we extended our work to the clinically more relevant biofilm infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The induction of P. aeruginosa biofilms in neoplastic tissue appears to be elicited as a reaction against the immune system. Reconstitution experiments reveal that T cells are responsible for biofilm induction. Isogenic mutants that are no longer able to form biofilms can be used for comparison studies to determine antimicrobial resistance, especially therapeutic efficacy against P. aeruginosa located in biofilms. PMID:24724621

  10. Inhibition of Staphylococcal Biofilm Formation by Nitrite? †

    PubMed Central

    Schlag, Steffen; Nerz, Christiane; Birkenstock, Timo A.; Altenberend, Florian; Götz, Friedrich

    2007-01-01

    Several environmental stresses have been demonstrated to increase polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) synthesis and biofilm formation by the human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. In this study we characterized an adaptive response of S. aureus SA113 to nitrite-induced stress and show that it involves concomitant impairment of PIA synthesis and biofilm formation. Transcriptional analysis provided evidence that nitrite, either as the endogenous product of respiratory nitrate reduction or after external addition, causes repression of the icaADBC gene cluster, mediated likely by IcaR. Comparative microarray analysis revealed a global change in gene expression during growth in the presence of 5 mM sodium nitrite and indicated a response to oxidative and nitrosative stress. Many nitrite-induced genes are involved in DNA repair, detoxification of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and iron homeostasis. Moreover, preformed biofilms could be eradicated by the addition of nitrite, likely the result of the formation of toxic acidified nitrite derivatives. Nitrite-mediated inhibition of S. aureus biofilm formation was abrogated by the addition of nitric oxide (NO) scavengers, suggesting that NO is directly or indirectly involved. Nitrite also repressed biofilm formation of S. epidermidis RP62A. PMID:17720780

  11. Implications of Biofilm Formation on Urological Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadieux, Peter A.; Wignall, Geoffrey R.; Carriveau, Rupp; Denstedt, John D.

    2008-09-01

    Despite millions of dollars and several decades of research targeted at their prevention and eradication, biofilm-associated infections remain the major cause of urological device failure. Numerous strategies have been aimed at improving device design, biomaterial composition, surface properties and drug delivery, but have been largely circumvented by microbes and their plethora of attachment, host evasion, antimicrobial resistance, and dissemination strategies. This is not entirely surprising since natural biofilm formation has been going on for millions of years and remains a major part of microorganism survival and evolution. Thus, the fact that biofilms develop on and in the biomaterials and tissues of humans is really an extension of this natural tendency and greatly explains why they are so difficult for us to combat. Firstly, biofilm structure and composition inherently provide a protective environment for microorganisms, shielding them from the shear stress of urine flow, immune cell attack and some antimicrobials. Secondly, many biofilm organisms enter a metabolically dormant state that renders them tolerant to those antibiotics and host factors able to penetrate the biofilm matrix. Lastly, the majority of organisms that cause biofilm-associated urinary tract infections originate from our own oral cavity, skin, gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts and therefore have already adapted to many of our host defenses. Ultimately, while biofilms continue to hold an advantage with respect to recurrent infections and biomaterial usage within the urinary tract, significant progress has been made in understanding these dynamic microbial communities and novel approaches offer promise for their prevention and eradication. These include novel device designs, antimicrobials, anti-adhesive coatings, biodegradable polymers and biofilm-disrupting compounds and therapies.

  12. Coexistence of Antibiotic-Producing and Antibiotic-Sensitive Bacteria in Biofilms Is Mediated by Resistant Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naoki Narisawa; Shin Haruta; Hiroyuki Arai; Masaharu Ishii; Yasuo Igarashi

    2008-01-01

    Antibiotic-sensitive bacteria have been found to coexist with antibiotic-producing bacteria in biofilms, but little is known about how the former develop in such an environment. Here we isolated pyocyanin-sensitive bacteria belonging to the genus Brevibacillus from a biofilm derived from soil extract and based on the preestablished biofilm of a pyocyanin producer, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain P1. In addition, pyocyanin- resistant

  13. A novel compound from the marine bacterium Bacillus pumilus S6-15 inhibits biofilm formation in Gram-positive and Gram-negative species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chari Nithya; Muthu Gokila Devi; Shunmugiah Karutha Pandian

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a critical problem in nosocomial infections and in the aquaculture industries and biofilms show high resistance to antibiotics. The aim of the present study was to reveal a novel anti-biofilm compound from marine bacteria against antibiotic resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative biofilms. The bacterial extract (50 ?g ml) of S6-01 (Bacillus indicus = MTCC 5559) showed 80–90% biofilm inhibition against Escherichia

  14. Resveratrol oligomers inhibit biofilm formation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Ryu, Shi Yong; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2014-01-24

    Biofilm formation is closely related to bacterial infection and is also a mechanism of antimicrobial resistance. Hence, the antibiofilm approach provides an alternative to an antibiotic strategy. In this study, the antibiofilm activities of resveratrol (1) and five of its oligomers, namely, ?-viniferin (2), suffruticosol A (3), suffruticosol B (4), vitisin A (5), and vitisin B (6), were investigated against enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14. Vitisin B (6), a stilbenoid tetramer, was found to inhibit biofilm formation by the two bacteria the most effectively and at 5 ?g/mL inhibited E. coli O157:H7 biofilm formation by more than 90%. PMID:24456071

  15. Effects of different osmolarities on bacterial biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Kavamura, Vanessa Nessner; de Melo, Itamar Soares

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm formation depends on several factors. The influence of different osmolarities on bacterial biofilm formation was studied. Two strains (Enterobacter sp. and Stenotrophomonas sp.) exhibited the most remarkable alterations. Biofilm formation is an important trait and its use has been associated to the protection of organisms against environmental stresses. PMID:25242950

  16. Cyclic di-GMP as an Intracellular Signal Regulating Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John M. Dow; Yvonne Fouhy

    Cyclic di-GMP is a novel second messenger in bacteria that was first described as an alloste- ric activator of cellulose synthase in Gluconacetobacter xylinus. It is now established that this nucleotide regulates a range of functions including developmental transitions, aggregative behavior, adhesion, biofilm formation and virulence in diverse bacteria. The level of cyclic di-GMP in bacterial cells is influenced by

  17. Chemically Specific Cellular Imaging of Biofilm Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Herberg, J L; Schaldach, C; Horn, J; Gjersing, E; Maxwell, R

    2006-02-09

    This document and the accompanying manuscripts summarize the technical accomplishments for our one-year LDRD-ER effort. Biofilm forming microbes have existed on this planet for billions of years and make up 60% of the biological mass on earth. Such microbes exhibit unique biochemical pathways during biofilm formation and play important roles in human health and the environment. Microbial biofilms have been directly implicated in, for example, product contamination, energy losses, and medical infection that cost the loss of human lives and billions of dollars. In no small part due to the lack of detailed understanding, biofilms unfortunately are resistant to control, inhibition, and destruction, either through treatment with antimicrobials or immunological defense mechanisms of the body. Current biofilm research has concentrated on the study of biofilms in the bulk. This is primarily due to the lack of analytical and physical tools to study biofilms non-destructively, in three dimensions, and on the micron or sub-micron scale. This has hindered the development of a clear understanding of either the early stage mechanisms of biofilm growth or the interactions of biofilms with their environment. Enzymatic studies have deduced a biochemical reaction that results in the oxidation of reduced sulfur species with the concomitant reduction of nitrate, a common groundwater pollutant, to dinitrogen gas by the bacterium, Thiobacillus denitrificans (TD). Because of its unique involvement in biologically relevant environmental pathways, TD is scheduled for genome sequencing in the near future by the DOE's Joint Genome Institute and is of interest to DOE's Genomes to Life Program. As our ecosystem is exposed to more and more nitrate contamination large scale livestock and agricultural practices, a further understanding of biofilm formation by organisms that could alleviate these problems is necessary in order to protect out biosphere. However, in order to study this complicated organism, we needed to first turn our attention to a well understood organism. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a well-studied organism and will be used to compare our results with others. Then, we will turn our attention to TD. It is expected that the research performed will provide key data to validate biochemical studies of TD and result in high profile publications in leading journals. For this project, our ultimate goal was to combine both Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experimental analysis with computer simulations to provide unique 3D molecular structural, dynamics, and functional information on the order of microns for this DOE mission relevant microorganism, T. denitrificans. For FY05, our goals were to: (1) Determine proper media for optimal growth of PA; growth rate measurements in that media and characterization of metabolite signatures during growth via {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, (2) Determine and build mineral, metal, and implant material surfaces to support growth of PA, (3) Implementing new MRI sequences to image biofilms more efficiently and increase resolution with new hardware design, (4) Develop further diffusion and flow MRI measurements of biofilms and biofilm formation with different MRI pulse sequences and different hardware design, and (5) Develop a zero dimension model of the rate of growth and the metabolite profiles of PA. Our major accomplishments are discussed in the following text. However, the bulk of this work is described in the attached manuscript entitled, ''NMR Metabolomics of Planktonic and Biofilm Modes of Growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa''. This paper will be submitted to the Journal of Bacteriology in coming weeks. In addition, this one-year effort has lead to our incorporation into the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign during FY05 for some proof-of-principle MRI measurements on polymers. We are currently using similar methods to evaluate these polymers. In addition, this work on MRI measurements on polymers has lead to a paper entitled, ''Characterization of local deformation in filled

  18. Derivatives of the Mouse Cathelicidin-Related Antimicrobial Peptide (CRAMP) Inhibit Fungal and Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    De Brucker, Katrijn; Delattin, Nicolas; Robijns, Stijn; Steenackers, Hans; Verstraeten, Natalie; Landuyt, Bart; Luyten, Walter; Schoofs, Liliane; Dovgan, Barbara; Fröhlich, Mirjam; Michiels, Jan; Vanderleyden, Jos; Thevissen, Karin

    2014-01-01

    We identified a 26-amino-acid truncated form of the 34-amino-acid cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) in the islets of Langerhans of the murine pancreas. This peptide, P318, shares 67% identity with the LL-37 human antimicrobial peptide. As LL-37 displays antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity, we tested antifungal and antibiofilm activity of P318 against the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. P318 shows biofilm-specific activity as it inhibits C. albicans biofilm formation at 0.15 ?M without affecting planktonic survival at that concentration. Next, we tested the C. albicans biofilm-inhibitory activity of a series of truncated and alanine-substituted derivatives of P318. Based on the biofilm-inhibitory activity of these derivatives and the length of the peptides, we decided to synthesize the shortened alanine-substituted peptide at position 10 (AS10; KLKKIAQKIKNFFQKLVP). AS10 inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation at 0.22 ?M and acted synergistically with amphotericin B and caspofungin against mature biofilms. AS10 also inhibited biofilm formation of different bacteria as well as of fungi and bacteria in a mixed biofilm. In addition, AS10 does not affect the viability or functionality of different cell types involved in osseointegration of an implant, pointing to the potential of AS10 for further development as a lead peptide to coat implants. PMID:24982087

  19. Quorum sensing and biofilm formation investigated using laser-trapped bacterial arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Vernita; Butler, John; Smalyukh, Ivan; Parsek, Matthew; Wong, Gerard

    2008-03-01

    Studies of individual, free-swimming (planktonic) bacteria have yielded much information about their genetic and phenotypic characteristics and about ``quorum sensing,'' the autoinducing process by which bacteria detect high concentrations of other bacteria. However, in most environments the majority of bacteria are not in the planktonic form but are rather in biofilms, which are highly-structured, dynamic communities of multiple bacteria that adhere to a surface and to each other using an extracellular polysaccharide matrix. Bacteria in biofilms are phenotypically very different from their genetically-identical planktonic counterparts. Among other characteristics, they are much more antibiotic-resistant and virulent. Such biofilms form persistent infections on medical implants and in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients, where Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms are the leading cause of lung damage and, ultimately, death. To understand the importance of different extracellular materials, motility mechanisms, and quorum sensing for biofilm formation and stability, we use single-gene knockout mutants and an infrared laser trap to create a bacterial aggregate that serves as a model biofilm and allows us to measure the importance of these factors as a function of trapping time, surface, and nutritional environment.

  20. Nickel Promotes Biofilm Formation by Escherichia coli K-12 Strains That Produce Curli?

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Claire; Briandet, Romain; Jubelin, Gregory; Lejeune, Philippe; Mandrand-Berthelot, Marie-Andrée; Rodrigue, Agnès; Dorel, Corinne

    2009-01-01

    The survival of bacteria exposed to toxic compounds is a multifactorial phenomenon, involving well-known molecular mechanisms of resistance but also less-well-understood mechanisms of tolerance that need to be clarified. In particular, the contribution of biofilm formation to survival in the presence of toxic compounds, such as nickel, was investigated in this study. We found that a subinhibitory concentration of nickel leads Escherichia coli bacteria to change their lifestyle, developing biofilm structures rather than growing as free-floating cells. Interestingly, whereas nickel and magnesium both alter the global cell surface charge, only nickel promotes biofilm formation in our system. Genetic evidence indicates that biofilm formation induced by nickel is mediated by the transcriptional induction of the adhesive curli-encoding genes. Biofilm formation induced by nickel does not rely on efflux mechanisms using the RcnA pump, as these require a higher concentration of nickel to be activated. Our results demonstrate that the nickel-induced biofilm formation in E. coli is an adaptational process, occurring through a transcriptional effect on genes coding for adherence structures. The biofilm lifestyle is obviously a selective advantage in the presence of nickel, but the means by which it improves bacterial survival needs to be investigated. PMID:19168650

  1. Nickel promotes biofilm formation by Escherichia coli K-12 strains that produce curli.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Claire; Briandet, Romain; Jubelin, Gregory; Lejeune, Philippe; Mandrand-Berthelot, Marie-Andrée; Rodrigue, Agnès; Dorel, Corinne

    2009-03-01

    The survival of bacteria exposed to toxic compounds is a multifactorial phenomenon, involving well-known molecular mechanisms of resistance but also less-well-understood mechanisms of tolerance that need to be clarified. In particular, the contribution of biofilm formation to survival in the presence of toxic compounds, such as nickel, was investigated in this study. We found that a subinhibitory concentration of nickel leads Escherichia coli bacteria to change their lifestyle, developing biofilm structures rather than growing as free-floating cells. Interestingly, whereas nickel and magnesium both alter the global cell surface charge, only nickel promotes biofilm formation in our system. Genetic evidence indicates that biofilm formation induced by nickel is mediated by the transcriptional induction of the adhesive curli-encoding genes. Biofilm formation induced by nickel does not rely on efflux mechanisms using the RcnA pump, as these require a higher concentration of nickel to be activated. Our results demonstrate that the nickel-induced biofilm formation in E. coli is an adaptational process, occurring through a transcriptional effect on genes coding for adherence structures. The biofilm lifestyle is obviously a selective advantage in the presence of nickel, but the means by which it improves bacterial survival needs to be investigated. PMID:19168650

  2. Identification of Small Molecules That Antagonize Diguanylate Cyclase Enzymes To Inhibit Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sambanthamoorthy, Karthik; Sloup, Rudolph E.; Parashar, Vijay; Smith, Joshua M.; Kim, Eric E.; Semmelhack, Martin F.; Neiditch, Matthew B.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation is responsible for numerous chronic infections, causing a severe health burden. Many of these infections cannot be resolved, as bacteria in biofilms are resistant to the host's immune defenses and antibiotic therapy. New strategies to treat biofilm-based infections are critically needed. Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a widely conserved second-messenger signal essential for biofilm formation. As this signaling system is found only in bacteria, it is an attractive target for the development of new antibiofilm interventions. Here, we describe the results of a high-throughput screen to identify small-molecule inhibitors of diguanylate cyclase (DGC) enzymes that synthesize c-di-GMP. We report seven small molecules that antagonize these enzymes and inhibit biofilm formation by Vibrio cholerae. Moreover, two of these compounds significantly reduce the total concentration of c-di-GMP in V. cholerae, one of which also inhibits biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a continuous-flow system. These molecules represent the first compounds described that are able to inhibit DGC activity to prevent biofilm formation. PMID:22850508

  3. Dynamics of Aerial Tower Formation in Bacillus subtilis Biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Naveen; Seminara, Agnese; Wilking, James; Brenner, Michael; Weitz, Dave

    2012-02-01

    Biofilms are highly-organized colonies of bacteria that form on surfaces. These colonies form sophisticated structures which make them robust and difficult to remove from environments such as catheters, where they pose serious infection problems. Previous work has shown that sub-mm sized aerial towers form on the surface of Bacillus subtilis colony biofilms. Spore-formation is located preferentially at the tops of these towers, known as fruiting bodies, which aid in the dispersal and propagation of the colony to new sites. The formation of towers is strongly affected by the quorum-sensing molecule surfactin and the cannibalism pathway of the bacteria. In the present work, we use confocal fluorescence microscopy to study the development of individual fruiting bodies, allowing us to visualize the time-dependent spatial distribution of matrix-forming and sporulating bacteria within the towers. With this information, we investigate the physical mechanisms, such as surface tension and polymer concentration gradients, that drive the formation of these structures.

  4. Density of founder cells affects spatial pattern formation and cooperation in Bacillus subtilis biofilms.

    PubMed

    van Gestel, Jordi; Weissing, Franz J; Kuipers, Oscar P; Kovács, Akos T

    2014-10-01

    In nature, most bacteria live in surface-attached sedentary communities known as biofilms. Biofilms are often studied with respect to bacterial interactions. Many cells inhabiting biofilms are assumed to express 'cooperative traits', like the secretion of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS). These traits can enhance biofilm-related properties, such as stress resilience or colony expansion, while being costly to the cells that express them. In well-mixed populations cooperation is difficult to achieve, because non-cooperative individuals can reap the benefits of cooperation without having to pay the costs. The physical process of biofilm growth can, however, result in the spatial segregation of cooperative from non-cooperative individuals. This segregation can prevent non-cooperative cells from exploiting cooperative neighbors. Here we examine the interaction between spatial pattern formation and cooperation in Bacillus subtilis biofilms. We show, experimentally and by mathematical modeling, that the density of cells at the onset of biofilm growth affects pattern formation during biofilm growth. At low initial cell densities, co-cultured strains strongly segregate in space, whereas spatial segregation does not occur at high initial cell densities. As a consequence, EPS-producing cells have a competitive advantage over non-cooperative mutants when biofilms are initiated at a low density of founder cells, whereas EPS-deficient cells have an advantage at high cell densities. These results underline the importance of spatial pattern formation for competition among bacterial strains and the evolution of microbial cooperation. PMID:24694715

  5. GENOMICS AND PROTEOMICS 5-Fluorouracil reduces biofilm formation

    E-print Network

    Wood, Thomas K.

    GENOMICS AND PROTEOMICS 5-Fluorouracil reduces biofilm formation in Escherichia coli K-12 through # Springer-Verlag 2009 Abstract The uracil analog, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), reduces virulence and biofilm); the mechanism by which it functions was also examined. 5-FU decreased biofilm formation in a dose- dependent

  6. Biofilm formation and local electrostatic force characteristics of Escherichia coli O157:H7 observed by electrostatic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Y. J.; Jo, W.; Yang, Y.; Park, S.

    2007-04-01

    The authors report growth media dependence of electrostatic force characteristics in Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilm through local measurement by electrostatic force microscopy (EFM). The difference values of electrostatic interaction between the bacterial surface and the abiotic surface show an exponential decay behavior during biofilm development. In the EFM data, the biofilm in the low nutrient media shows a faster decay than the biofilm in the rich media. The surface potential in the bacterial cells was changed from 957to149mV. Local characterization of extracellular materials extracted from the bacteria reveals the progress of the biofilm formation and functional complexities.

  7. Biofilm formation protects Escherichia coli against killing by Caenorhabditis elegans and Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    DePas, William H; Syed, Adnan K; Sifuentes, Margarita; Lee, John S; Warshaw, David; Saggar, Vinay; Csankovszki, Györgyi; Boles, Blaise R; Chapman, Matthew R

    2014-11-01

    Enteric bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, are exposed to a variety of stresses in the nonhost environment. The development of biofilms provides E. coli with resistance to environmental insults, such as desiccation and bleach. We found that biofilm formation, specifically production of the matrix components curli and cellulose, protected E. coli against killing by the soil-dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the predatory bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. Additionally, matrix-encased bacteria at the air-biofilm interface exhibited ?40-fold-increased survival after C. elegans and M. xanthus killing compared to the non-matrix-encased cells that populate the interior of the biofilm. To determine if nonhost Enterobacteriaceae reservoirs supported biofilm formation, we grew E. coli on media composed of pig dung or commonly contaminated foods, such as beef, chicken, and spinach. Each of these medium types provided a nutritional environment that supported matrix production and biofilm formation. Altogether, we showed that common, nonhost reservoirs of E. coli supported the formation of biofilms that subsequently protected E. coli against predation. PMID:25192998

  8. Biofilm formation by Chlorella vulgaris is affected by light quality.

    PubMed

    Hultberg, Malin; Asp, Håkan; Marttila, Salla; Bergstrand, Karl-Johan; Gustafsson, Susanne

    2014-11-01

    Formation of biofilm on surfaces is a common feature in aquatic environments. Major groups of inhabitants in conditions where light is present are photoautotrophic microorganisms, such as cyanobacteria and microalgae. This study examined the effect of light quality on growth and biofilm formation of the microalgal species Chlorella vulgaris. Dense biofilm formation and aggregated growth of cells were observed in treatments exposed to blue, purple and white light. Less dense biofilm formation and solitary growth of cells were observed in treatments exposed to red, yellow or green light. Microalgal biofilms are of high importance in many respects, not least from an economic perspective. One example is the intense efforts undertaken to control biofilm formation on technical surfaces such as ship hulls. The present study suggests that light quality plays a role in biofilm formation and that blue-light receptors may be involved. PMID:24985199

  9. [Biofilms of pathogenic bacteria and their role in chronization of infectious process. The search for the means to control biofilms].

    PubMed

    Romanova, Iu M; Didenko, L V; Tolordava, É R; Gintsburg, A L

    2011-01-01

    The role of biofilms in the environment and in the hosts of pathogenic bacteria has recently attracted much attention of researchers. Microorganisms form biofilms at any biotic and abiotic surfaces and thereby cause serious problems in medical practice and other areas of human activity. Biofilms have been shown to be pathogenetic factors responsible for chronization of infectious process. The data are presented illustrating ubiquitous nature of biofilms, their structural and functional characteristics, and modern methods for the study of microbial communities. The discussion is focused on the role of biofilms in chronization of infectious process, enhanced resistance of biofilm organisms to antibiotics and its underlying mechanisms. Approaches to the search for new means for biofilm control during chronic infections are considered. PMID:22168037

  10. NspS, a Predicted Polyamine Sensor, Mediates Activation of Vibrio cholerae Biofilm Formation by Norspermidine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ece Karatan; Tammi R. Duncan; Paula I. Watnick

    2005-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is both an environmental bacterium and a human intestinal pathogen. The attachment of bacteria to surfaces in biofilms is thought to be an important feature of the survival of this bacterium both in the environment and within the human host. Biofilm formation occurs when cell-surface and cell-cell contacts are formed to make a three-dimensional structure characterized by pillars

  11. Filaments in curved streamlines: rapid formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minyoung Kevin; Drescher, Knut; Pak, On Shun; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-06-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated conglomerates of bacteria that are highly resistant to antibiotics. These bacterial communities can cause chronic infections in humans by colonizing, for example, medical implants, heart valves, or lungs. Staphylococcus aureus, a notorious human pathogen, causes some of the most common biofilm-related infections. Despite the clinical importance of S. aureus biofilms, it remains mostly unknown how physical effects, in particular flow, and surface structure influence biofilm dynamics. Here we use model microfluidic systems to investigate how environmental factors, such as surface geometry, surface chemistry, and fluid flow affect biofilm development of S. aureus. We discovered that S. aureus rapidly forms flow-induced, filamentous biofilm streamers, and furthermore if surfaces are coated with human blood plasma, streamers appear within minutes and clog the channels more rapidly than if the channels are uncoated. To understand how biofilm streamer filaments reorient in flows with curved streamlines to bridge the distances between corners, we developed a mathematical model based on resistive force theory of slender filaments. Understanding physical aspects of biofilm formation of S. aureus may lead to new approaches for interrupting biofilm formation of this pathogen.

  12. Detection of Bacteria Bearing Resistant Biofilm Forms, by Using the Universal and Specific PCR is Still Unhelpful in the Diagnosis of Periprosthetic Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Zegaer, Batool H.; Ioannidis, Anastasios; Babis, George C.; Ioannidou, Vassiliki; Kossyvakis, Athanassios; Bersimis, Sotiris; Papaparaskevas, Joseph; Petinaki, Efthimia; Pliatsika, Paraskevi; Chatzipanagiotou, Stylianos

    2014-01-01

    Intraoperative conventional bacteriological cultures were compared with different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods in patients with total joint arthroplasties. The isolated bacteria were investigated for biofilm formation, and the biofilm forming strains, in their planktonic and biofilm forms, were further tested for their antimicrobial resistance against several clinically important antimicrobials. Forty four bone and joint samples were included and classified as infected or non-infected according to standard criteria for periprosthetic hip and knee infections. For the bacteriological diagnosis, conventional culture, two types of universal PCR and species specific PCR for three selected pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were applied. Biofilm formation determination was performed by the tissue culture plate method. Antimicrobial susceptibility of the planktonic bacteria was performed by the minimal inhibitory concentration determination and, of the biofilm forms, by the minimal inhibitory concentration for bacterial regrowth from the biofilm. Twenty samples were culture positive, with S. epidermidis, S. aureus, or P. aeruginosa. All PCR methods were very ineffective in detecting only one pathogen. All isolates were biofilm positive and their biofilm forms, were highly resistant. In this study, compared to PCR, culture remains the “gold standard.” The biofilm formation by the causative bacteria and the concomitant manifold increased antimicrobial resistance may explain the clinical failure of treatment in some cases and should be considered in the future for therapeutic planning. PMID:25593905

  13. Influence of attached bacteria and biofilm on double-layer capacitance during biofilm monitoring by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Taeyoung Kim; Junil Kang; Joon-Hee Lee; Jeyong Yoon

    2011-01-01

    Development of an effective strategy for biofilm control in water-related system has become a matter of significant concern nowadays. Electrochemical monitoring, especially electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), is one of the efficient approaches to dealing with biofilm-related issues. However, currently used EIS methods without a redox probe intend to detect all effects generated from media components, bacteria, and bacterial metabolites, which

  14. Extracellular DNA release confers heterogeneity in Candida albicans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Ranjith; Sherry, Leighann; Lappin, David F; Nile, Chris J; Smith, Karen; Williams, Craig; Munro, Carol A; Ramage, Gordon

    2014-12-01

    BackgroundBiofilm formation by Candida albicans has shown to be highly variable and is directly associated with pathogenicity and poor clinical outcomes in patients at risk. The aim of this study was to test the hypotheses that the extracellular DNA release by C. albicans is strain dependent and is associated with biofilm heterogeneity.ResultsInitially, biofilm formed by C. albicans high biofilm formers (HBF) or low biofilm formers (LBF) were treated with DNase to find whether eDNA play a role in their biofilm formation. Digestion of biofilm eDNA significantly reduced the HBF biofilm biomass by five fold compared to untreated controls. In addition, quantification of eDNA over the period of biofilm formation by SYBR green assay demonstrate a significantly higher level of 2 to 6 fold in HBF compared to LBF. Biochemical and transcriptional analyses showed that chitinase activity and mRNA levels of chitinase genes, a marker of autolysis, were upregulated in 24 h biofilm formation by HBF compared to LBF, indicating autolysis pathway possibly involved in causing variation. The biofilm biomass and eDNA release by single (¿cht2, ¿cht3) and double knockout (¿cht2/¿cht3) chitinase mutants were significantly less compared to their parental strain CA14, confirming the role of chitinases in eDNA release and biofilm formation. Correlation analysis found a positive correlation between chitinases and HWP1, suggesting eDNA may release during the hyphal growth. Finally, we showed a combinational treatment of biofilms with DNase or chitinase inhibitor (acetazolamide) plus amphotericin B significantly improved antifungal susceptibility by 2 to 8 fold.ConclusionsCollectively, these data show that eDNA release by C. albicans clinical isolates is variable and is associated with differential biofilm formation. Digestion of biofilm eDNA by DNase may provide a novel therapeutic strategies to destabilise biofilm growth and improves antifungal sensitivity. PMID:25476750

  15. Manganese Ion Increases LAB-yeast Mixed-species Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    NOZAKA, Soma; FURUKAWA, Soichi; SASAKI, Miwa; HIRAYAMA, Satoru; OGIHARA, Hirokazu; MORINAGA, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Remarkable LAB-yeast mixed-species biofilm was formed by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) Lactobacillus plantarum ML11-11 isolated from Fukuyama pot vinegar and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This mixed-species biofilm formation increased in proportion to the YPD medium concentration but decreased in proportion to the MRS medium concentration. The effect of MRS components on mixed-species biofilm formation was investigated in a YPD medium environment, and it was clarified that beef extract (one of the MRS medium components) decreased mixed-species biofilm formation. On the other hand, manganese sulfate (another component in MRS) remarkably increased both LAB single- and LAB-yeast mixed-species biofilm formation. LAB single- and mixed-species biofilm formation were increased in proportion to the manganese sulfate concentration up to 1?mM and 100 ?M, respectively. The growth of L. plantarum ML11-11 was increased significantly by the addition of 10 ?M manganese sulfate and was resistant to higher concentration of up to 100?mM, but growth of S. cerevisiae was sensitive to manganese ion above 100 ?M. These results suggested that mixed-species biofilm formation could be controlled artificially by controlling the manganese ion level. PMID:25003021

  16. Inhibition of Salmonella enterica biofilm formation using small-molecule adenosine mimetics.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Jacob A; Marshall, Joanna M; Bhatiya, Aditi; Eguale, Tadesse; Kwiek, Jesse J; Gunn, John S

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms have been widely implicated in chronic infections and environmental persistence of Salmonella enterica, facilitating enhanced colonization of surfaces and increasing the ability of the bacteria to be transmitted to new hosts. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi biofilm formation on gallstones from humans and mice enhances gallbladder colonization and bacterial shedding, while Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium biofilms facilitate long-term persistence in a number of environments important to food, medical, and farming industries. Salmonella regulates expression of many virulence- and biofilm-related processes using kinase-driven pathways. Kinases play pivotal roles in phosphorylation and energy transfer in cellular processes and possess an ATP-binding pocket required for their functions. Many other cellular proteins also require ATP for their activity. Here we test the hypothesis that pharmacological interference with ATP-requiring enzymes utilizing adenosine mimetic compounds would decrease or inhibit bacterial biofilm formation. Through the screening of a 3,000-member ATP mimetic library, we identified a single compound (compound 7955004) capable of significantly reducing biofilm formation by S. Typhimurium and S. Typhi. The compound was not bactericidal or bacteriostatic toward S. Typhimurium or cytotoxic to mammalian cells. An ATP-Sepharose affinity matrix technique was used to discover potential protein-binding targets of the compound and identified GroEL and DeoD. Compound 7955004 was screened against other known biofilm-forming bacterial species and was found to potently inhibit biofilms of Acinetobacter baumannii as well. The identification of a lead compound with biofilm-inhibiting capabilities toward Salmonella provides a potential new avenue of therapeutic intervention against Salmonella biofilm formation, with applicability to biofilms of other bacterial pathogens. PMID:25313216

  17. Coexistence of antibiotic-producing and antibiotic-sensitive bacteria in biofilms is mediated by resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Narisawa, Naoki; Haruta, Shin; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2008-06-01

    Antibiotic-sensitive bacteria have been found to coexist with antibiotic-producing bacteria in biofilms, but little is known about how the former develop in such an environment. Here we isolated pyocyanin-sensitive bacteria belonging to the genus Brevibacillus from a biofilm derived from soil extract and based on the preestablished biofilm of a pyocyanin producer, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain P1. In addition, pyocyanin-resistant strains belonging to the genus Raoultella were isolated from the same biofilm. Microbial relationships within biofilms were examined by using three strains, strain P1, Brevibacillus strain S1, and Raoultella strain R1, each of which individually formed a biofilm within 2 days in a flow cell. Strain S1 did not fully develop on the preestablished biofilm of strain P1 during 4 days of cultivation, whereas a mutant of strain P1 which was deficient in pyocyanin production allowed strain S1 to cocolonize within a biofilm. On the other hand, strain R1 developed on the biofilm of strain P1 regardless of pyocyanin production. When mixed 1:1 inocula of strains S1 and R1 were introduced into the strain P1 biofilm, all three species were found in the 4-day biofilm. In the mixed biofilm, strain S1 was surrounded by the layer of strain R1 and seemed to be separated from strain P1 and the outflow solution. However, strain S1 did not survive in a three-species mixed culture under planktonic conditions. These results indicate that the survival of sensitive bacteria in biofilm with a pyocyanin producer is achieved by covering them with a layer of resistant bacteria. We also evaluated the influence of antibiotic production on the producer. PMID:18441106

  18. Coexistence of Antibiotic-Producing and Antibiotic-Sensitive Bacteria in Biofilms Is Mediated by Resistant Bacteria? †

    PubMed Central

    Narisawa, Naoki; Haruta, Shin; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2008-01-01

    Antibiotic-sensitive bacteria have been found to coexist with antibiotic-producing bacteria in biofilms, but little is known about how the former develop in such an environment. Here we isolated pyocyanin-sensitive bacteria belonging to the genus Brevibacillus from a biofilm derived from soil extract and based on the preestablished biofilm of a pyocyanin producer, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain P1. In addition, pyocyanin-resistant strains belonging to the genus Raoultella were isolated from the same biofilm. Microbial relationships within biofilms were examined by using three strains, strain P1, Brevibacillus strain S1, and Raoultella strain R1, each of which individually formed a biofilm within 2 days in a flow cell. Strain S1 did not fully develop on the preestablished biofilm of strain P1 during 4 days of cultivation, whereas a mutant of strain P1 which was deficient in pyocyanin production allowed strain S1 to cocolonize within a biofilm. On the other hand, strain R1 developed on the biofilm of strain P1 regardless of pyocyanin production. When mixed 1:1 inocula of strains S1 and R1 were introduced into the strain P1 biofilm, all three species were found in the 4-day biofilm. In the mixed biofilm, strain S1 was surrounded by the layer of strain R1 and seemed to be separated from strain P1 and the outflow solution. However, strain S1 did not survive in a three-species mixed culture under planktonic conditions. These results indicate that the survival of sensitive bacteria in biofilm with a pyocyanin producer is achieved by covering them with a layer of resistant bacteria. We also evaluated the influence of antibiotic production on the producer. PMID:18441106

  19. Biofilm formation of Clostridium perfringens and its exposure to low-dose antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Charlebois, Audrey; Jacques, Mario; Archambault, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause food poisoning in humans and various enterotoxemia in animal species. Very little is known on the biofilm of C. perfringens and its exposure to subminimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials. This study was undertaken to address these issues. Most of the C. perfringens human and animal isolates tested in this study were able to form biofilm (230/277). Porcine clinical isolates formed significantly more biofilm than the porcine commensal isolates. A subgroup of clinical and commensal C. perfringens isolates was randomly selected for further characterization. Biofilm was found to protect C. perfringens bacterial cells from exposure to high concentrations of tested antimicrobials. Exposure to low doses of some of these antimicrobials tended to lead to a diminution of the biofilm formed. However, a few isolates showed an increase in biofilm formation when exposed to low doses of tylosin, bacitracin, virginiamycin, and monensin. Six isolates were randomly selected for biofilm analysis using scanning laser confocal microscopy. Of those, four produced more biofilm in presence of low doses of bacitracin whereas biofilms formed without bacitracin were thinner and less elevated. An increase in the area occupied by bacteria in the biofilm following exposure to low doses of bacitracin was also observed in the majority of isolates. Morphology examination revealed flat biofilms with the exception of one isolate that demonstrated a mushroom-like biofilm. Matrix composition analysis showed the presence of proteins, beta-1,4 linked polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, but no poly-beta-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This study brings new information on the biofilm produced by C. perfringens and its exposure to low doses of antimicrobials. PMID:24795711

  20. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Biofilm Formation in Different Environments Mehdi Shadmand1

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Biofilm Formation in Different Environments Mehdi Shadmand1 , Gregory G materials. These structures are called biofilms. The goal of this research is to isolate P. aeruginosa from several soil samples and determine whether they are able to form biofilms in those environments. Another

  1. Biofilms as sources of fecal bacteria contamination in the stormwater drainage system in Singapore

    E-print Network

    Burkhart, Tsung Hwa (Tsung Hwa Sophia)

    2013-01-01

    A study was performed to examine a possible source of fecal bacteria contamination originating from within the stormwater drainage system in Singapore. The extent of fecal bacteria presence in storm drain biofilms was ...

  2. A Movable Surface: Formation of Yersinia sp. Biofilms on Motile Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li; Darby, Creg

    2004-01-01

    Bubonic plague is transmitted by fleas whose feeding is blocked by a mass of Yersinia pestis in the digestive tract. Y. pestis and the closely related Y. pseudotuberculosis also block the feeding of Caenorhabditis elegans by forming a biofilm on the nematode head. C. elegans mutants with severe motility defects acquire almost no biofilm, indicating that normal animals accumulate the biofilm matrix as they move through a Yersinia lawn. Using the lectin wheat germ agglutinin as a probe, we show that the matrix on C. elegans contains carbohydrate produced by Yersinia. The carbohydrate is present in bacterial lawns prior to addition of nematodes, indicating that biofilm formation does not involve signaling between the two organisms. Furthermore, biofilm accumulation depends on continuous C. elegans exposure to a lawn of Yersinia bacteria. PMID:15262945

  3. Novel application for the prevention and treatment of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traba, Christian

    Formation of bacterial biofilms at solid-liquid interfaces creates numerous problems in both industrial and biomedical sciences. In this dissertation, the application of plasma from two very different facets was studied. In part one, the susceptibility of pre-formed Staphylococcus aureus biofilms on biomaterials to different plasmas was investigated. It was found that the distinct chemical/physical properties of plasmas generated from oxygen, nitrogen, and argon all demonstrated very potent but very different anti-biofilm mechanisms of action. An in depth analysis of these results show: 1) different reactive species produced in each plasma demonstrate specific activity, and 2) the commonly associated etching effect could be manipulated and even controlled, depending on experimental conditions and the discharge gas. These studies provide insights into the anti-biofilm mechanisms of plasma as well as the effects of different reactive species on biofilm inactivation. Under experimental parameters, bacterial cells in Staphylococcus aureus biofilms were killed (>99.9%) by plasmas within minutes of exposure and no bacteria nor biofilm re-growth from discharge gas treated biofilms was observed throughout the life-span of the re-growth experiment. The decontamination ability of plasmas for the treatment of biofilm related infections on biomedical materials was confirmed and novel applications involving the use of low power argon and oxygen for the treatment of biofilm contaminated biomaterials and indwelling devices is proposed. The second facet of this dissertation explores the interaction between biofilm forming Staphylococcus aureus bacteria on different antibacterial/anti-biofilm surfaces. The antibiotic-free anti-fouling surfaces constructed in this study were generated from the plasma-assisted graft polymerization technique. These sophisticated surfaces were stable, biocompatible and capable of preventing biofilm formation on biomaterials and medical devices. Under optimal experimental conditions, the antibacterial activities of these sophisticated surfaces had two distinct mechanisms: 1) reducing bacterial attachment and 2) eradicating adherent bacteria. The excellent antibacterial and anti-biofilm properties of these modified surfaces were initially tested in stationary cultures and later confirmed through a microfluidic cultivation system, which mimicked the in-vivo conditions of implanted catheters. Information gathered, suggests the graft polymerization of negatively charged monomers may be utilized to permanently prevent biofouling on inserted biomaterials, as well as implanted medical devices.

  4. Multi-Channel Microfluidic Biosensor Platform Applied for Online Monitoring and Screening of Biofilm Formation and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bruchmann, Julia; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Rapp, Bastian E.; Schwartz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial colonization of surfaces and interfaces has a major impact on various areas including biotechnology, medicine, food industries, and water technologies. In most of these areas biofilm development has a strong impact on hygiene situations, product quality, and process efficacies. In consequence, biofilm manipulation and prevention is a fundamental issue to avoid adverse impacts. For such scenario online, non-destructive biofilm monitoring systems become important in many technical and industrial applications. This study reports such a system in form of a microfluidic sensor platform based on the combination of electrical impedance spectroscopy and amperometric current measurement, which allows sensitive online measurement of biofilm formation and activity. A total number of 12 parallel fluidic channels enable real-time online screening of various biofilms formed by different Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains and complex mixed population biofilms. Experiments using disinfectant and antibiofilm reagents demonstrate that the biofilm sensor is able to discriminate between inactivation/killing of bacteria and destabilization of biofilm structures. The impedance and amperometric sensor data demonstrated the high dynamics of biofilms as a consequence of distinct responses to chemical treatment strategies. Gene expression of flagellar and fimbrial genes of biofilms grown inside the microfluidic system supported the detected biofilm growth kinetics. Thus, the presented biosensor platform is a qualified tool for assessing biofilm formation in specific environments and for evaluating the effectiveness of antibiofilm treatment strategies. PMID:25706987

  5. Multi-channel microfluidic biosensor platform applied for online monitoring and screening of biofilm formation and activity.

    PubMed

    Bruchmann, Julia; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Rapp, Bastian E; Schwartz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial colonization of surfaces and interfaces has a major impact on various areas including biotechnology, medicine, food industries, and water technologies. In most of these areas biofilm development has a strong impact on hygiene situations, product quality, and process efficacies. In consequence, biofilm manipulation and prevention is a fundamental issue to avoid adverse impacts. For such scenario online, non-destructive biofilm monitoring systems become important in many technical and industrial applications. This study reports such a system in form of a microfluidic sensor platform based on the combination of electrical impedance spectroscopy and amperometric current measurement, which allows sensitive online measurement of biofilm formation and activity. A total number of 12 parallel fluidic channels enable real-time online screening of various biofilms formed by different Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains and complex mixed population biofilms. Experiments using disinfectant and antibiofilm reagents demonstrate that the biofilm sensor is able to discriminate between inactivation/killing of bacteria and destabilization of biofilm structures. The impedance and amperometric sensor data demonstrated the high dynamics of biofilms as a consequence of distinct responses to chemical treatment strategies. Gene expression of flagellar and fimbrial genes of biofilms grown inside the microfluidic system supported the detected biofilm growth kinetics. Thus, the presented biosensor platform is a qualified tool for assessing biofilm formation in specific environments and for evaluating the effectiveness of antibiofilm treatment strategies. PMID:25706987

  6. Influence of attached bacteria and biofilm on double-layer capacitance during biofilm monitoring by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoung; Kang, Junil; Lee, Joon-Hee; Yoon, Jeyong

    2011-10-01

    Development of an effective strategy for biofilm control in water-related system has become a matter of significant concern nowadays. Electrochemical monitoring, especially electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), is one of the efficient approaches to dealing with biofilm-related issues. However, currently used EIS methods without a redox probe intend to detect all effects generated from media components, bacteria, and bacterial metabolites, which used to make the signals from the attached bacteria and biofilm weakened. In this study, we tried improved EIS measurement to monitor bacterial adhesion and biofilm maturation using a double-layer capacitance. In this improved method, we minimized background signal by subtracting the interference of electrolyte caused by bacterial metabolism. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 wild type and wspF mutant that form the biofilm of distinct nature were used for the model strains to test our method. During bacterial adhesion and biofilm maturation, EIS data were collected and equivalent circuit analysis was carried out to obtain constant phase element (CPE) values representing double-layer capacitance. Since the influence by the bacterial growth-related culture media condition was eliminated by adopting fresh electrolyte at the measurement, the contribution of attached bacteria and biofilm was exclusively measured. As a result, the bacterial adhesion at the early stage of biofilm development was specifically monitored from reduction in double-layer capacitance. Particularly, the plateau in double-layer capacitance appeared upon biofilm maturation, indicating that biofilm maturation could be expected beyond this point. In conclusion, this study found that measurement of double-layer capacitance based on EIS could provide a monitoring parameter suggesting bacterial adhesion and the initiation point of biofilm maturation. PMID:21762943

  7. Examining the Relationship Between Iron Corrosion and the Disinfection of Biofilm Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark W. LeChevallier; Cheryl D. Lowry; Ramon G. Lee; Donald L. Gibbon

    1993-01-01

    Previous research has shown a relationship between corrosion of an iron pipe and the protection of biofilm bacteria from disinfection. It is believed that the corrosion product reacts with chlorine disinfectants and prevents the biocide from penetrating the biofilm layer and inactivating the attached bacteria. The results of the current study show that even low levels of corrosion, i.e., <

  8. Comparative effect of chlorhexidine and some mouthrinses on bacterial biofilm formation on titanium surface.

    PubMed

    Baffone, Wally; Sorgente, Gianfranco; Campana, Raffaella; Patrone, Vania; Sisti, Davide; Falcioni, Tania

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) and commonly used mouthrinses to single- and poly-species biofilms by S. mutans, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, on titanium discs of grade IV. The formation of single- and poly-species biofilms at 16.5, 40.5 and 64.5-h incubation on titanium surface was evaluated by plate count (CFU ml?¹) before and after exposure to CHX and four mouthrinses (Curasept, Listerine, Meridol and Buccagel) and expressed as percentage of Inhibitory Activity (IA%). The application of the different anti-plaque formulations on biofilm can reduce the adhesion of bacteria to titanium surface with different degrees. The higher efficacy was observed for Listerine that shows IA% = 100 on the biofilm formed by S. mutans at 16.5 h. Log count of CFU was dependent to culture time and four mouthrinses for S. mutans and S. aureus, whilst was not dependent to culture time but to mouthrinses for P. aeruginosa. In general, the efficacy was particularly lesser to poly-species biofilms; no statistical differences were evidenced between all the mouthrinses and CHX as control group. The tested mouthrinses, compared to reference CHX 0.2%, have demonstrated a significant lower antibacterial activity than Listerine towards the experimental biofilms. This "in vitro" biofilm model should prove extremely useful for pre-clinical testing of anti-plaque agents, which inhibit biofilm formation, can prevent subsequent implant failure. PMID:20686768

  9. Gardnerella vaginalis outcompetes 29 other bacterial species isolated from patients with bacterial vaginosis, using in an in vitro biofilm formation model.

    PubMed

    Alves, Patrícia; Castro, Joana; Sousa, Cármen; Cereija, Tatiana B; Cerca, Nuno

    2014-08-15

    Despite the worldwide prevalence of bacterial vaginosis (BV), its etiology is still unknown. Although BV has been associated with the presence of biofilm, the ability of BV-associated bacteria to form biofilms is still largely unknown. Here, we isolated 30 BV-associated species and characterized their virulence, using an in vitro biofilm formation model. Our data suggests that Gardnerella vaginalis had the highest virulence potential, as defined by higher initial adhesion and cytotoxicity of epithelial cells, as well as the greater propensity to form a biofilm. Interestingly, we also demonstrated that most of the BV-associated bacteria had a tendency to grow as biofilms. PMID:24596283

  10. Mechanisms and regulation of surface interactions and biofilm formation in Agrobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Heindl, Jason E.; Wang, Yi; Heckel, Brynn C.; Mohari, Bitan; Feirer, Nathan; Fuqua, Clay

    2014-01-01

    For many pathogenic bacteria surface attachment is a required first step during host interactions. Attachment can proceed to invasion of host tissue or cells or to establishment of a multicellular bacterial community known as a biofilm. The transition from a unicellular, often motile, state to a sessile, multicellular, biofilm-associated state is one of the most important developmental decisions for bacteria. Agrobacterium tumefaciens genetically transforms plant cells by transfer and integration of a segment of plasmid-encoded transferred DNA (T-DNA) into the host genome, and has also been a valuable tool for plant geneticists. A. tumefaciens attaches to and forms a complex biofilm on a variety of biotic and abiotic substrates in vitro. Although rarely studied in situ, it is hypothesized that the biofilm state plays an important functional role in the ecology of this organism. Surface attachment, motility, and cell division are coordinated through a complex regulatory network that imparts an unexpected asymmetry to the A. tumefaciens life cycle. In this review, we describe the mechanisms by which A. tumefaciens associates with surfaces, and regulation of this process. We focus on the transition between flagellar-based motility and surface attachment, and on the composition, production, and secretion of multiple extracellular components that contribute to the biofilm matrix. Biofilm formation by A. tumefaciens is linked with virulence both mechanistically and through shared regulatory molecules. We detail our current understanding of these and other regulatory schemes, as well as the internal and external (environmental) cues mediating development of the biofilm state, including the second messenger cyclic-di-GMP, nutrient levels, and the role of the plant host in influencing attachment and biofilm formation. A. tumefaciens is an important model system contributing to our understanding of developmental transitions, bacterial cell biology, and biofilm formation. PMID:24834068

  11. Specific Inhibitors of Bacterial Adhesion: Observations From the Study of Gram-Positive Bacteria that Initiate Biofilm Formation on the Tooth Surface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. O. Cisar; Y. Takahashi; S. Ruhl; J. A. Donkersloot; A. L. Sandberg

    1997-01-01

    Oral surfaces are bathed in secretory antibodies and other salivary macromolecules that are potential inhibitors of specific microbial adhesion. Indigenous Gram-positive bacteria that colonize teeth, including viridans streptococci and actinomyces, may avoid inhibition of adhesion by host secretory molecules through various strategies that involve the structural design and binding properties of bacterial adhesins and receptors. Further studies to define the

  12. Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the virulence and pathogenesis of Francisella spp. has significantly advanced in recent years, including a new understanding that this organism can form biofilms. What is known so far about Francisella spp. biofilms is summarized here and future research questions are suggested. The molecular basis of biofilm production has begun to be studied, especially the role of extracellular carbohydrates and capsule, quorum sensing and two-component signaling systems. Further work has explored the contribution of amoebae, pili, outer-membrane vesicles, chitinases, and small molecules such as c-di-GMP to Francisella spp. biofilm formation. A role for Francisella spp. biofilm in feeding mosquito larvae has been suggested. As no strong role in virulence has been found yet, Francisella spp. biofilm formation is most likely a key mechanism for environmental survival and persistence. The significance and importance of Francisella spp.’s biofilm phenotype as a critical aspect of its microbial physiology is being developed. Areas for further studies include the potential role of Francisella spp. biofilms in the infection of mammalian hosts and virulence regulation. PMID:24225421

  13. Formation of biofilm by Staphylococcus xylosus.

    PubMed

    Planchon, S; Gaillard-Martinie, B; Dordet-Frisoni, E; Bellon-Fontaine, M N; Leroy, S; Labadie, J; Hébraud, M; Talon, R

    2006-05-25

    The ability of 12 Staphylococcus xylosus strains to form biofilm was determined through the study of different criteria. Eleven out of the 12 strains were able to form biofilm, 10 preferentially on hydrophilic support (glass) and one, S. xylosus C2a, on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic (polystyrene) supports. The determination of bacterial surface properties showed that all strains were negatively charged with five strains moderately hydrophobic and seven hydrophilic. The bap and icaA genes, important for biofilm formation of some staphylococci, were searched. All strains were bap positive but icaA negative. Furthermore, S. xylosus strain C2a was studied on two supports widely used in the food industry, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, hydrophobic) and stainless steel (hydrophilic) and appeared to adhere preferentially on stainless steel. Addition of 20 g/l of NaCl to Tryptic Soy Broth medium (TSB) did not improve significantly its adhesion but enhanced both bacterial growth and cell survival, which were optimum in this medium. Environmental scanning electron microscopy showed that S. xylosus C2a colonized the surface of stainless steel chips with intercellular spaces. The strain formed cell aggregates embedded in an amorphous polysaccharidic matrix. Indeed, synthesis of polysaccharides increased during growth on stainless steel chips in TSB. PMID:16503066

  14. Development of a flow system for studying biofilm formation on medical devices with microcalorimetry.

    PubMed

    Said, Jawal; Walker, Michael; Parsons, David; Stapleton, Paul; Beezer, Anthony E; Gaisford, Simon

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) is particularly suited to the study of microbiological samples in complex or heterogeneous environments because it does not require optical clarity of the sample and can detect metabolic activity from as few as 10(4)CFU/mL cells. While the use of IMC for studying planktonic cultures is well established, in the clinical environment bacteria are most likely to be present as biofilms. Biofilm prevention and eradication present a number of challenges to designers and users of medical devices and implants, since bacteria in biofilm colonies are usually more resistant to antimicrobial agents. Analytical tools that facilitate investigation of biofilm formation are therefore extremely useful. While it is possible to study pre-prepared biofilms in closed ampoules, better correlation with in vivo behaviour can be achieved using a system in which the bacterial suspension is flowing. Here, we discuss the potential of flow microcalorimetry for studying biofilms and report the development of a simple flow system that can be housed in a microcalorimeter. The use of the flow system is demonstrated with biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:25498003

  15. Beta- Lactam Antibiotics Stimulate Biofilm Formation in Non-Typeable Haemophilus influenzae by Up-Regulating Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Siva; Li, Xiaojin; Gunawardana, Manjula; Maguire, Kathleen; Guerrero-Given, Debbie; Schaudinn, Christoph; Wang, Charles; Baum, Marc M.; Webster, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a common acute otitis media pathogen, with an incidence that is increased by previous antibiotic treatment. NTHi is also an emerging causative agent of other chronic infections in humans, some linked to morbidity, and all of which impose substantial treatment costs. In this study we explore the possibility that antibiotic exposure may stimulate biofilm formation by NTHi bacteria. We discovered that sub-inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotic (i.e., amounts that partially inhibit bacterial growth) stimulated the biofilm-forming ability of NTHi strains, an effect that was strain and antibiotic dependent. When exposed to sub-inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotics NTHi strains produced tightly packed biofilms with decreased numbers of culturable bacteria but increased biomass. The ratio of protein per unit weight of biofilm decreased as a result of antibiotic exposure. Antibiotic-stimulated biofilms had altered ultrastructure, and genes involved in glycogen production and transporter function were up regulated in response to antibiotic exposure. Down-regulated genes were linked to multiple metabolic processes but not those involved in stress response. Antibiotic-stimulated biofilm bacteria were more resistant to a lethal dose (10 µg/mL) of cefuroxime. Our results suggest that beta-lactam antibiotic exposure may act as a signaling molecule that promotes transformation into the biofilm phenotype. Loss of viable bacteria, increase in biofilm biomass and decreased protein production coupled with a concomitant up-regulation of genes involved with glycogen production might result in a biofilm of sessile, metabolically inactive bacteria sustained by stored glycogen. These biofilms may protect surviving bacteria from subsequent antibiotic challenges, and act as a reservoir of viable bacteria once antibiotic exposure has ended. PMID:25007395

  16. Prevention of Biofilm Formation and Removal of Existing Biofilms by Extracellular DNases of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Helen L.; Reuter, Mark; Hanman, Kate; Betts, Roy P.; van Vliet, Arnoud H. M.

    2015-01-01

    The fastidious nature of the foodborne bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni contrasts with its ability to survive in the food chain. The formation of biofilms, or the integration into existing biofilms by C. jejuni, is thought to contribute to food chain survival. As extracellular DNA (eDNA) has previously been proposed to play a role in C. jejuni biofilms, we have investigated the role of extracellular DNases (eDNases) produced by C. jejuni in biofilm formation. A search of 2791 C. jejuni genomes highlighted that almost half of C. jejuni genomes contains at least one eDNase gene, but only a minority of isolates contains two or three of these eDNase genes, such as C. jejuni strain RM1221 which contains the cje0256, cje0566 and cje1441 eDNase genes. Strain RM1221 did not form biofilms, whereas the eDNase-negative strains NCTC 11168 and 81116 did. Incubation of pre-formed biofilms of NCTC 11168 with live C. jejuni RM1221 or with spent medium from a RM1221 culture resulted in removal of the biofilm. Inactivation of the cje1441 eDNase gene in strain RM1221 restored biofilm formation, and made the mutant unable to degrade biofilms of strain NCTC 11168. Finally, C. jejuni strain RM1221 was able to degrade genomic DNA from C. jejuni NCTC 11168, 81116 and RM1221, whereas strain NCTC 11168 and the RM1221 cje1441 mutant were unable to do so. This was mirrored by an absence of eDNA in overnight cultures of C. jejuni RM1221. This suggests that the activity of eDNases in C. jejuni affects biofilm formation and is not conducive to a biofilm lifestyle. These eDNases do however have a potential role in controlling biofilm formation by C. jejuni strains in food chain relevant environments. PMID:25803828

  17. Variation in sessile microflora during biofilm formation on AISI304 stainless steel coupons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F P de França; M T S Lutterbach

    1996-01-01

    Coupons of stainless steel type AISI-304 were exposed to the industrial cooling system of a petrochemical plant fed by seawater from the Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in order to study thein situ formation of biofilms. Bacteria, microalgae and fungi were detected on the coupons as soon as 48 h after exposure. Their respective numbers were determined at times

  18. Exopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Enables Mature Biofilm Formation on Abiotic Surfaces by Herbaspirillum seropedicae

    PubMed Central

    Balsanelli, Eduardo; de Baura, Válter Antonio; Pedrosa, Fábio de Oliveira; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Monteiro, Rose Adele

    2014-01-01

    H. seropedicae associates endophytically and epiphytically with important poaceous crops and is capable of promoting their growth. The molecular mechanisms involved in plant colonization by this microrganism are not fully understood. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) are usually necessary for bacterial attachment to solid surfaces, to other bacteria, and to form biofilms. The role of H. seropedicae SmR1 exopolysaccharide in biofilm formation on both inert and plant substrates was assessed by characterization of a mutant in the espB gene which codes for a glucosyltransferase. The mutant strain was severely affected in EPS production and biofilm formation on glass wool. In contrast, the plant colonization capacity of the mutant strain was not altered when compared to the parental strain. The requirement of EPS for biofilm formation on inert surface was reinforced by the induction of eps genes in biofilms grown on glass and polypropylene. On the other hand, a strong repression of eps genes was observed in H. seropedicae cells adhered to maize roots. Our data suggest that H. seropedicae EPS is a structural component of mature biofilms, but this development stage of biofilm is not achieved during plant colonization. PMID:25310013

  19. Cinnamon bark oil and its components inhibit biofilm formation and toxin production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Guy; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Soon-Il; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Lee, Jintae

    2015-02-16

    The long-term usage of antibiotics has resulted in the evolution of multidrug resistant bacteria, and pathogenic biofilms contribute to reduced susceptibility to antibiotics. In this study, 83 essential oils were initially screened for biofilm inhibition against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Cinnamon bark oil and its main constituent cinnamaldehyde at 0.05% (v/v) markedly inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. Furthermore, cinnamon bark oil and eugenol decreased the production of pyocyanin and 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone, the swarming motility, and the hemolytic activity of P. aeruginosa. Also, cinnamon bark oil, cinnamaldehyde, and eugenol at 0.01% (v/v) significantly decreased biofilm formation of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC). Transcriptional analysis showed that cinnamon bark oil down-regulated curli genes and Shiga-like toxin gene stx2 in EHEC. In addition, biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) film incorporating biofilm inhibitors was fabricated and shown to provide efficient biofilm control on solid surfaces. This is the first report that cinnamon bark oil and its components, cinnamaldehyde and eugenol, reduce the production of pyocyanin and PQS, the swarming motility, and the hemolytic activity of P. aeruginosa, and inhibit EHEC biofilm formation. PMID:25500277

  20. BIOFILMS AND ADHESION PROTEIN IN ANAEROBE BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM MEXICAN GAS PIPELINES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    The pipelines plugging, souring oil and corrosion by microorganisms are a big problem in the oil industry. The pipelines plugging is produced by bacterial consortium that can produce biofilms. In these attached microbial populations, aerobes bacteria growth in the superficial layers, and, anaerobes bacteria (fermenters, sulfate-reducing bacteria, tiosulfate-reducing bacteria, methanogen growth adhered to metal. In industrial areas, surfactants, emulsifiers and

  1. Burkholderia BcpA mediates biofilm formation independently of interbacterial contact dependent growth inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Erin C.; Anderson, Melissa S.; Hagar, Jon A.; Cotter, Peggy A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Contact dependent growth inhibition (CDI) is a phenomenon in which Gram-negative bacteria use the toxic C-terminus of a large surface-exposed exoprotein to inhibit the growth of susceptible bacteria upon cell-cell contact. Little is known about when and where bacteria express the genes encoding CDI system proteins and how these systems contribute to the survival of bacteria in their natural niche. Here we establish that, in addition to mediating interbacterial competition, the Burkholderia thailandensis CDI system exoprotein BcpA is required for biofilm development. We also provide evidence that the catalytic activity of BcpA and extracellular DNA are required for the characteristic biofilm pillars to form. We show using a bcpA-gfp fusion that within the biofilm, expression of the CDI system-encoding genes is below the limit of detection for the majority of bacteria and only a subset of cells express the genes strongly at any given time. Analysis of a strain constitutively expressing the genes indicates that native expression is critical for biofilm architecture. Although CDI systems have so far only been demonstrated to be involved in interbacterial competition, constitutive production of the system’s immunity protein in the entire bacterial population did not alter biofilm formation, indicating a CDI-independent role for BcpA in this process. We propose, therefore, that bacteria may use CDI proteins in cooperative behaviors, like building biofilm communities, and in competitive behaviors that prevent non-self bacteria from entering the community. PMID:23879629

  2. Sexual Biofilm Formation in Candida tropicalis Opaque Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephen K.; Hirakawa, Matthew P.; Bennett, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis are opportunistic fungal pathogens that can transition between white and opaque phenotypic states. White and opaque cells differ both morphologically and in their responses to environmental signals. In C. albicans, opaque cells respond to sexual pheromones by undergoing conjugation, while white cells are induced by pheromones to form sexual biofilms. Here, we show that sexual biofilm formation also occurs in C. tropicalis but, unlike C. albicans, biofilms are formed exclusively by opaque cells. C. tropicalis biofilm formation was dependent on the pheromone receptors Ste2 and Ste3, confirming the role of pheromone signaling in sexual biofilm development. Structural analysis of C. tropicalis sexual biofilms revealed stratified communities consisting of a basal layer of yeast cells and an upper layer of filamentous cells, together with an extracellular matrix. Transcriptional profiling showed that genes involved in pheromone signaling and conjugation were upregulated in sexual biofilms. Furthermore, FGR23, which encodes an agglutinin-like protein, was found to enhance both mating and sexual biofilm formation. Together, these studies reveal that C. tropicalis opaque cells form sexual biofilms with a complex architecture, and suggest a conserved role for sexual agglutinins in mediating mating, cell cohesion and biofilm formation. PMID:24612417

  3. Effects of Benzalkonium Chloride on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation by Animal Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Azizollah; Hemati, Majid; Shabanpour, Ziba; Habibian Dehkordi, Saeed; Bahadoran, Shahab; Lotfalian, Sharareh; Khubani, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Resistance toward quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) is widespread among a diverse range of microorganisms and is facilitated by several mechanisms such as biofilm formation. Objectives: In this study, the effects of benzalkonium chloride on planktonic growth and biofilm formation by some field isolates of animal bacterial pathogens were investigated. Materials and Methods: Forty clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Salmonella serotypes, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae (10 isolates of each) were examined for effects of benzalkonium chloride on biofilm formation and planktonic growth using microtiter plates. For all the examined strains in the presence of benzalkonium chloride, biofilm development and planktonic growth were affected at the same concentrations of disinfectant. Results: The means of strains growth increase after the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) were significant in all the bacteria (except for E. coli in 1/32 and S. agalactiae in of 1/8 MIC). Biofilm formation increased with decrease of antiseptics concentration; a significant increase was found in all the samples. The most turbidity related to S. aureus and the least to Salmonella. Conclusions: Bacterial resistance against quaternary ammonium compounds is increasing which can increase the bacterial biofilm formation.

  4. Effects of biofilm formation on the electrochemical behavior of AISI 304 SS in board machine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Carp, L.; Hakkarainen, T. [VTT Manufacturing Technology (Finland); Raaska, L. [VTT Biotechnology and Food Research (Finland)

    1999-11-01

    The electrochemical behavior of and biofilm formation on AISI 304 stainless steel were studied in board machine environment with natural bacteria population. Open circuit potentials, redox-potential as well as different electrochemical measurements were performed. The biofilms formed were analyzed by microbial cultivation and by epifluorescence microscopy. The results of the measurements were compared with those performed both in sterilized white water and in artificial white water. The anodic polarization behavior of just immersed specimens was very similar in biotic (real), artificial and abiotic (sterilized) white water. Pitting initiated at very low potentials and continued to very negative values. The initiation of pitting became more difficult when the immersion time increased to 7 or 8 days in real, artificial or sterilized water. When the immersion time further increased, the pitting nucleated more easily in sterilized white water as well as in artificial white water than in biotic white water. In the laboratory equipment it was possible to maintain the biofilm already formed in the board mill, but the amount of sulfate reducing bacteria decreased and the amount of biofilm did not further increase. The composition and structure of the biofilm formed in laboratory differed from that formed in board mill conditions. The preliminary results indicate that the formation of biofilm in biotic white water rather inhibits than enhances the pitting corrosion of type AISI 304 stainless steel.

  5. Assessment of inhibitory effects of fluoride-coated tubes on biofilm formation by using the in vitro dental unit waterline biofilm model.

    PubMed

    Yabune, Toshiaki; Imazato, Satoshi; Ebisu, Shigeyuki

    2008-10-01

    This study aimed to establish an in vitro model to simulate biofilms formed in dental unit waterlines (DUWLs) and to investigate the ability of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)-coated tubes to inhibit biofilm formation using this model. The water and biofilm samples were obtained from DUWLs which had been clinically used for 2.5 years, and the predominant bacteria were identified. A conventional polyurethane tube was incubated for 24 to 96 h in the mixed flora of isolated bacteria, and the optimal incubation conditions to simulate a clinically formed biofilm were determined by observation with a scanning electron microscope. Biofilm formation on a PVDF-coated tube was observed using this in vitro model, and the adherence of different bacterial species to conventional and PVDF-coated tubes was assessed. Sphingomonas paucimobilis, Acinetobacter haemolytics, and Methylobacterium mesophilicum were predominantly isolated from contaminated DUWLs. Incubation of the polyurethane tube with the mixed flora containing these three species for 96 h resulted in the formation of a mature biofilm similar to the one clinically observed. The PVDF-coated tube was significantly less adhesive to all three bacterial species than the polyurethane tube (P < 0.05 by the Mann-Whitney U test), and the attachment of small amounts of rods was observed even after incubation with the mixed flora for 96 h. In conclusion, an in vitro biofilm model was obtained by using a mixed flora of bacteria isolated from DUWLs, and the PVDF-coated tube was found to be effective in preventing biofilm formation using this model. PMID:18676694

  6. Lrs14 transcriptional regulators influence biofilm formation and cell motility of Crenarchaea

    PubMed Central

    Orell, Alvaro; Peeters, Eveline; Vassen, Victoria; Jachlewski, Silke; Schalles, Sven; Siebers, Bettina; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2013-01-01

    Like bacteria, archaea predominately exist as biofilms in nature. However, the environmental cues and the molecular mechanisms driving archaeal biofilm development are not characterized. Here we provide data suggesting that the transcriptional regulators belonging to the Lrs14-like protein family constitute a key regulatory factor during Sulfolobus biofilm development. Among the six lrs14-like genes encoded by Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, the deletion of three led to markedly altered biofilm phenotypes. Although ?saci1223 and ?saci1242 deletion mutants were impaired in biofilm formation, the ?saci0446 deletion strain exhibited a highly increased extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) production, leading to a robust biofilm structure. Moreover, although the expression of the adhesive pili (aap) genes was upregulated, the genes of the motility structure, the archaellum (fla), were downregulated rendering the ?saci0446 strain non-motile. Gel shift assays confirmed that Saci0446 bound to the promoter regions of fla and aap thus controlling the expression of both cell surface structures. In addition, genetic epistasis analysis using ?saci0446 as background strain identified a gene cluster involved in the EPS biosynthetic pathway of S. acidocaldarius. These results provide insights into both the molecular mechanisms that govern biofilm formation in Crenarchaea and the functionality of the Lrs14-like proteins, an archaea-specific class of transcriptional regulators. PMID:23657363

  7. An 18 kDa Scaffold Protein Is Critical for Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Decker, Rahel; Burdelski, Christoph; Zobiak, Melanie; Büttner, Henning; Franke, Gefion; Christner, Martin; Saß, Katharina; Zobiak, Bernd; Henke, Hanae A; Horswill, Alexander R; Bischoff, Markus; Bur, Stephanie; Hartmann, Torsten; Schaeffer, Carolyn R; Fey, Paul D; Rohde, Holger

    2015-03-01

    Virulence of the nosocomial pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis is crucially linked to formation of adherent biofilms on artificial surfaces. Biofilm assembly is significantly fostered by production of a bacteria derived extracellular matrix. However, the matrix composition, spatial organization, and relevance of specific molecular interactions for integration of bacterial cells into the multilayered biofilm community are not fully understood. Here we report on the function of novel 18 kDa Small basic protein (Sbp) that was isolated from S. epidermidis biofilm matrix preparations by an affinity chromatographic approach. Sbp accumulates within the biofilm matrix, being preferentially deposited at the biofilm-substratum interface. Analysis of Sbp-negative S. epidermidis mutants demonstrated the importance of Sbp for sustained colonization of abiotic surfaces, but also epithelial cells. In addition, Sbp promotes assembly of S. epidermidis cell aggregates and establishment of multilayered biofilms by influencing polysaccharide intercellular-adhesin (PIA) and accumulation associated protein (Aap) mediated intercellular aggregation. While inactivation of Sbp indirectly resulted in reduced PIA-synthesis and biofilm formation, Sbp serves as an essential ligand during Aap domain-B mediated biofilm accumulation. Our data support the conclusion that Sbp serves as an S. epidermidis biofilm scaffold protein that significantly contributes to key steps of surface colonization. Sbp-negative S. epidermidis mutants showed no attenuated virulence in a mouse catheter infection model. Nevertheless, the high prevalence of sbp in commensal and invasive S. epidermidis populations suggests that Sbp plays a significant role as a co-factor during both multi-factorial commensal colonization and infection of artificial surfaces. PMID:25799153

  8. Comparison of Biofilm Formation between Major Clonal Lineages of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Pirici, Daniel; Lammens, Christine; Hernalsteens, Jean-Pierre; De Greve, Henri; Kumar-Singh, Samir; Goossens, Herman; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Epidemic methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clones cause infections in both hospital and community settings. As a biofilm phenotype further facilitates evasion of the host immune system and antibiotics, we compared the biofilm-forming capacities of various MRSA clones. Methods Seventy-six MRSA classified into 13 clones (USA300, EMRSA-15, Hungarian/Brazilian etc.), and isolated from infections or from carriers were studied for biofilm formation under static and dynamic conditions. Static biofilms in microtitre plates were quantified colorimetrically. Dynamic biofilms (Bioflux 200, Fluxion, USA) were studied by confocal laser-scanning and time-lapse microscopy, and the total volume occupied by live/dead bacteria quantified by Volocity 5.4.1 (Improvision, UK). Results MRSA harbouring SCCmec IV produced significantly more biomass under static conditions than SCCmec I–III (P?=?0.003), and those harbouring SCCmec II significantly less than those harbouring SCCmec I or III (P<0.001). In the dynamic model, SCCmec I–III harbouring MRSA were significantly better biofilm formers than SCCmec IV (P?=?0.036). Only 16 strains successfully formed biofilms under both conditions, of which 13 harboured SCCmec IV and included all tested USA300 strains (n?=?3). However, USA300 demonstrated remarkably lower percentages of cell-occupied space (6.6%) compared to the other clones (EMRSA-15?=?19.0%) under dynamic conditions. Time-lapse microscopy of dynamic biofilms demonstrated that USA300 formed long viscoelastic tethers that stretched far from the point of attachment, while EMRSA-15 consisted of micro-colonies attached densely to the surface. Conclusions MRSA harbouring SCCmec types IV and I–III demonstrate distinct biofilm forming capacities, possibly owing to their adaptation to the community and hospital settings, respectively. USA300 demonstrated abundant biofilm formation under both conditions, which probably confers a competitive advantage, contributing to its remarkable success as a pathogen. PMID:25105505

  9. An 18 kDa Scaffold Protein Is Critical for Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zobiak, Melanie; Büttner, Henning; Franke, Gefion; Christner, Martin; Saß, Katharina; Zobiak, Bernd; Henke, Hanae A.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Bischoff, Markus; Bur, Stephanie; Hartmann, Torsten; Schaeffer, Carolyn R.; Fey, Paul D.; Rohde, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Virulence of the nosocomial pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis is crucially linked to formation of adherent biofilms on artificial surfaces. Biofilm assembly is significantly fostered by production of a bacteria derived extracellular matrix. However, the matrix composition, spatial organization, and relevance of specific molecular interactions for integration of bacterial cells into the multilayered biofilm community are not fully understood. Here we report on the function of novel 18 kDa Small basic protein (Sbp) that was isolated from S. epidermidis biofilm matrix preparations by an affinity chromatographic approach. Sbp accumulates within the biofilm matrix, being preferentially deposited at the biofilm–substratum interface. Analysis of Sbp-negative S. epidermidis mutants demonstrated the importance of Sbp for sustained colonization of abiotic surfaces, but also epithelial cells. In addition, Sbp promotes assembly of S. epidermidis cell aggregates and establishment of multilayered biofilms by influencing polysaccharide intercellular-adhesin (PIA) and accumulation associated protein (Aap) mediated intercellular aggregation. While inactivation of Sbp indirectly resulted in reduced PIA-synthesis and biofilm formation, Sbp serves as an essential ligand during Aap domain-B mediated biofilm accumulation. Our data support the conclusion that Sbp serves as an S. epidermidis biofilm scaffold protein that significantly contributes to key steps of surface colonization. Sbp-negative S. epidermidis mutants showed no attenuated virulence in a mouse catheter infection model. Nevertheless, the high prevalence of sbp in commensal and invasive S. epidermidis populations suggests that Sbp plays a significant role as a co-factor during both multi-factorial commensal colonization and infection of artificial surfaces. PMID:25799153

  10. Surface-mediated release of a small-molecule modulator of bacterial biofilm formation: a non-bactericidal approach to inhibiting biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Adam H; Breitbach, Anthony S; Frei, Reto; Blackwell, Helen E; Lynn, David M

    2013-07-01

    We report an approach to preventing bacterial biofilm formation that is based on the surface-mediated release of 5,6-dimethyl-2-aminobenzimidazole (DMABI), a potent and non-bactericidal small-molecule inhibitor of bacterial biofilm growth. Our results demonstrate that DMABI can be encapsulated in thin films of a model biocompatible polymer [poly(lactide-co-glycolide), PLG] and be released in quantities that inhibit the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms by up to 75-90% on surfaces that otherwise support robust biofilm growth. This approach enables the release of this new anti-biofilm agent for over one month, and it can be used to inhibit biofilm growth on both film-coated surfaces and other adjacent surfaces (e.g., on other uncoated surfaces and at air/water interfaces). Our results demonstrate a non-bactericidal approach to the prevention of biofilm growth and provide proof of concept using a clinically relevant human pathogen. In contrast to coatings designed to kill bacteria on contact, this approach should also permit the design of strategically placed depots that disseminate DMABI more broadly and exert inhibitory effects over larger areas. In a broader context, the non-bactericidal nature of DMABI could also provide opportunities to address concerns related to evolved resistance that currently face approaches based on the release of traditional microbicidal agents (e.g., antibiotics). Finally, the results of initial in vitro mammalian cell culture studies indicate that DMABI is not toxic to cells at concentrations required for strong anti-biofilm activity, suggesting that this new agent is well suited for further investigation in biomedical and personal care contexts. PMID:23335593

  11. Combined imaging of bacteria and oxygen in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Michael; Rickelt, Lars F; Thar, Roland

    2007-10-01

    Transparent sensors for microscopic O(2) imaging were developed by spin coating an ultrathin (<1- to 2-microm) layer of a luminescent O(2) indicator onto coverslips. The sensors showed (i) an ideal Stern-Volmer quenching behavior of the luminescence lifetime towards O(2) levels, (ii) homogeneous measuring characteristics over the sensor surface, and (iii) a linear decline of luminescence lifetime with increasing temperature. When a batch of such coverslip sensors has been characterized, their use is thus essentially calibration free at a known temperature. The sensors are easy to use in flow chambers and other growth devices used in microbiology. We present the first application for combined imaging of O(2) and bacteria in a biofilm flow chamber mounted on a microscope equipped with a spinning-disk confocal unit and a luminescence lifetime camera system. PMID:17704276

  12. Dynamics of biofilm formation during anaerobic digestion of organic waste.

    PubMed

    Langer, Susanne; Schropp, Daniel; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Othman, Maazuza; Kazda, Marian

    2014-10-01

    Biofilm-based reactors are effectively used for wastewater treatment but are not common in biogas production. This study investigated biofilm dynamics on biofilm carriers incubated in batch biogas reactors at high and low organic loading rates for sludge from meat industry dissolved air flotation units. Biofilm formation and dynamics were studied using various microscopic techniques. Resulting micrographs were analysed for total cell numbers, thickness of biofilms, biofilm-covered surface area, and the area covered by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Cell numbers within biofilms (10(11) cells ml(-1)) were up to one order of magnitude higher compared to the numbers of cells in the fluid reactor content. Further, biofilm formation and structure mainly correlated with the numbers of microorganisms present in the fluid reactor content and the organic loading. At high organic loading (45 kg VS m(-3)), the thickness of the continuous biofilm layer ranged from 5 to 160 ?m with an average of 51 ?m and a median of 26 ?m. Conversely, at lower organic loading (15 kg VS m(-3)), only microcolonies were detectable. Those microcolonies increased in their frequency of occurrence during ongoing fermentation. Independently from the organic loading rate, biofilms were embedded completely in EPS within seven days. The maturation and maintenance of biofilms changed during the batch fermentation due to decreasing substrate availability. Concomitant, detachment of microorganisms within biofilms was observed simultaneously with the decrease of biogas formation. This study demonstrates that biofilms of high cell densities can enhance digestion of organic waste and have positive effects on biogas production. PMID:24342346

  13. Effects of Aronia melanocarpa constituents on biofilm formation of Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Bräunlich, Marie; Økstad, Ole A; Slimestad, Rune; Wangensteen, Helle; Malterud, Karl E; Barsett, Hilde

    2013-01-01

    Many bacteria growing on surfaces form biofilms. Adaptive and genetic changes of the microorganisms in this structure make them resistant to antimicrobial agents. Biofilm-forming organisms on medical devices can pose serious threats to human health. Thus, there is a need for novel prevention and treatment strategies. This study aimed to evaluate the ability of Aronia melanocarpa extracts, subfractions and compounds to prevent biofilm formation and to inhibit bacterial growth of Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus in vitro. It was found that several aronia substances possessed anti-biofilm activity, however, they were not toxic to the species screened. This non-toxic inhibition may confer a lower potential for resistance development compared to conventional antimicrobials. PMID:24317526

  14. The Role of msa in Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karthik Sambanthamoorthy; Antony Schwartz; Vijayaraj Nagarajan; Mohamed O Elasri

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen that forms biofilms. The global regulator sarA is essential for biofilm formation. Since the modulator of sarA (msa) is required for full expression of sarA and regulates several virulence factors, we examined the capacity of the msa mutant to form biofilm. RESULTS: We found that mutation of msa results in reduced expression of

  15. Nucleases in Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus contribute towards efficient self-biofilm formation and eradication of preformed prey biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Carey; Sockett, R Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus are predatory bacteria that burrow into prey bacteria and degrade their cell contents, including DNA and RNA, to grow. Their genome encodes diverse nucleases, some with potential export sequences. Transcriptomic analysis determined two candidate-predicted nuclease genes (bd1244, bd1934) upregulated upon contact with prey, which we hypothesised, may be involved in prey nucleic acid degradation. RT-PCR on total RNA from across the predatory cycle confirmed that the transcription of these genes peaks shortly after prey cell invasion, around the time that prey DNA is being degraded. We deleted bd1244 and bd1934 both singly and together and investigated their role in predation of prey cells and biofilms. Surprisingly, we found that the nuclease-mutant strains could still prey upon planktonic bacteria as efficiently as wild type and still degraded the prey genomic DNA. The Bdellovibrio nuclease mutants were less efficient at (self-) biofilm formation, and surprisingly, they showed enhanced predatory clearance of preformed prey cell biofilms relative to wild-type Bdellovibrio. PMID:23297829

  16. Nucleases in Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus contribute towards efficient self-biofilm formation and eradication of preformed prey biofilms.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Carey; Sockett, R Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus are predatory bacteria that burrow into prey bacteria and degrade their cell contents, including DNA and RNA, to grow. Their genome encodes diverse nucleases, some with potential export sequences. Transcriptomic analysis determined two candidate-predicted nuclease genes (bd1244, bd1934) upregulated upon contact with prey, which we hypothesised, may be involved in prey nucleic acid degradation. RT-PCR on total RNA from across the predatory cycle confirmed that the transcription of these genes peaks shortly after prey cell invasion, around the time that prey DNA is being degraded. We deleted bd1244 and bd1934 both singly and together and investigated their role in predation of prey cells and biofilms. Surprisingly, we found that the nuclease-mutant strains could still prey upon planktonic bacteria as efficiently as wild type and still degraded the prey genomic DNA. The Bdellovibrio nuclease mutants were less efficient at (self-) biofilm formation, and surprisingly, they showed enhanced predatory clearance of preformed prey cell biofilms relative to wild-type Bdellovibrio. PMID:23297829

  17. In vivo biofilm formation on stainless steel bonded retainers during different oral health-care regimens.

    PubMed

    Jongsma, Marije A; van der Mei, Henny C; Atema-Smit, Jelly; Busscher, Henk J; Ren, Yijin

    2015-03-01

    Retention wires permanently bonded to the anterior teeth are used after orthodontic treatment to prevent the teeth from relapsing to pre-treatment positions. A disadvantage of bonded retainers is biofilm accumulation on the wires, which produces a higher incidence of gingival recession, increased pocket depth and bleeding on probing. This study compares in vivo biofilm formation on single-strand and multi-strand retention wires with different oral health-care regimens. Two-centimetre wires were placed in brackets that were bonded to the buccal side of the first molars and second premolars in the upper arches of 22 volunteers. Volunteers used a selected toothpaste with or without the additional use of a mouthrinse containing essential oils. Brushing was performed manually. Regimens were maintained for 1 week, after which the wires were removed and the oral biofilm was collected to quantify the number of organisms and their viability, determine the microbial composition and visualize the bacteria by electron microscopy. A 6-week washout period was employed between regimens. Biofilm formation was reduced on single-strand wires compared with multi-strand wires; bacteria were observed to adhere between the strands. The use of antibacterial toothpastes marginally reduced the amount of biofilm on both wire types, but significantly reduced the viability of the biofilm organisms. Additional use of the mouthrinse did not result in significant changes in biofilm amount or viability. However, major shifts in biofilm composition were induced by combining a stannous fluoride- or triclosan-containing toothpaste with the mouthrinse. These shifts can be tentatively attributed to small changes in bacterial cell surface hydrophobicity after the adsorption of the toothpaste components, which stimulate bacterial adhesion to the hydrophobic oil, as illustrated for a Streptococcus mutans strain. PMID:25572920

  18. Biofilm formation at warming temperature: acceleration of microbial colonization and microbial interactive effects.

    PubMed

    Diaz Villanueva, Veronica; Font, Jordi; Schwartz, Thomas; Romani, Anna M

    2011-01-01

    River biofilms that grow on wet benthic surface are mainly composed of bacteria, algae, cyanobacteria and protozoa embedded in a polysaccharide matrix. The effects of increased river water temperature on biofilm formation were investigated. A laboratory experiment was designed employing two temperatures (11.1-13.2°C, night-day; 14.7-16.0°C, night-day) and two nutrient levels (0.054 mg P l(-1), 0.75 mg N l(-1); 0.54 mg P l(-1), 7.5 mg N l(-1)). Biofilm formation at the higher temperature was faster, while the biomass of the mature biofilm was mainly determined by nutrient availability. The specific response of the three microbial groups that colonized the substrata (algae, bacteria and ciliates) was modulated by interactions between them. The greater bacterial growth rate and earlier bacterial colonization at the higher temperature and higher nutrient status was not translated into the accrual of higher bacterial biomass. This may result from ciliates grazing on the bacteria, as shown by an earlier increase in peritrichia at higher temperatures, and especially at high nutrient conditions. Temperature and ciliate grazing might determine the growth of a distinctive bacterial community under warming conditions. Warmer conditions also produced a thicker biofilm, while functional responses were much less evident (increases in the heterotrophic utilization of polysaccharides and peptides, but no increase in primary production and respiration). Increasing the temperature of river water might lead to faster biofilm recolonization after disturbances, with a distinct biofilm community structure that might affect the trophic web. Warming effects would be expected to be more relevant under eutrophic conditions. PMID:21113861

  19. Contribution of Cell Elongation to the Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during Anaerobic Respiration

    E-print Network

    Mi Young Yoon; Kang-mu Lee; Yongjin Park; Sang Sun Yoon

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a gram-negative bacterium of clinical importance, forms more robust biofilm during anaerobic respiration, a mode of growth presumed to occur in abnormally thickened mucus layer lining the cystic fibrosis (CF) patient airway. However, molecular basis behind this anaerobiosis-triggered robust biofilm formation is not clearly defined yet. Here, we identified a morphological change naturally accompanied by anaerobic respiration in P. aeruginosa and investigated its effect on the biofilm formation in vitro. A standard laboratory strain, PAO1 was highly elongated during anaerobic respiration compared with bacteria grown aerobically. Microscopic analysis demonstrated that cell elongation likely occurred as a consequence of defective cell division. Cell elongation was dependent on the presence of nitrite reductase (NIR) that reduces nitrite (NO2 2) to nitric oxide (NO) and was repressed in PAO1 in the presence of carboxy-PTIO, a NO antagonist, demonstrating that cell elongation involves a process to respond to NO, a spontaneous byproduct of the anaerobic respiration. Importantly, the non-elongated NIR-deficient mutant failed to form biofilm, while a mutant of nitrate reductase (NAR) and wild type PAO1, both of which were highly elongated, formed robust biofilm. Taken together, our data reveal a role of previously undescribed cell biological event in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and suggest NIR as a key

  20. Quorum Sensing in Biofilms: Why Bacteria Behave the Way They Do

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteria can attach to surfaces and form biofilms, which have a characteristic structure consisting of microcolonies enclosed in a hydrated matrix of microbially-produced proteins and polysaccharides. In this complex biofilm network, the cells act less as individual entities and more as a collectiv...

  1. Isolation of a Novel Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Serotype b Bacteriophage Capable of Lysing Bacteria within a Biofilm?†

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Ruiz, Mario; Vinés, Enrique D.; Montt, Camilo; Fernández, Jorge; Delgado, José Manuel; Hormazábal, Juan Carlos; Bittner, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    A bacteriophage specific for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans serotype b, able to kill the bacterium within a biofilm, was isolated. Random mutagenesis of this phage rendered a bacteriophage able to kill 99% of the bacteria within a biofilm. This is the first report of a biocontrol experiment against A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:21378052

  2. Effect of Cinnamon Oil on icaA Expression and Biofilm Formation by Staphylococcus epidermidis?

    PubMed Central

    Nuryastuti, Titik; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Iravati, Susi; Aman, Abu T.; Krom, Bastiaan P.

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is notorious for its biofilm formation on medical devices, and novel approaches to prevent and kill S. epidermidis biofilms are desired. In this study, the effect of cinnamon oil on planktonic and biofilm cultures of clinical S. epidermidis isolates was evaluated. Initially, susceptibility to cinnamon oil in planktonic cultures was compared to the commonly used antimicrobial agents chlorhexidine, triclosan, and gentamicin. The MIC of cinnamon oil, defined as the lowest concentration able to inhibit visible microbial growth, and the minimal bactericidal concentration, the lowest concentration required to kill 99.9% of the bacteria, were determined using the broth microdilution method and plating on agar. A checkerboard assay was used to evaluate the possible synergy between cinnamon oil and the other antimicrobial agents. The effect of cinnamon oil on biofilm growth was studied in 96-well plates and with confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM). Biofilm susceptibility was determined using a metabolic 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Real-time PCR analysis was performed to determine the effect of sub-MIC concentrations of cinnamon oil on expression of the biofilm-related gene, icaA. Cinnamon oil showed antimicrobial activity against both planktonic and biofilm cultures of clinical S. epidermidis strains. There was only a small difference between planktonic and biofilm MICs, ranging from 0.5 to 1% and 1 to 2%, respectively. CLSM images indicated that cinnamon oil is able to detach and kill existing biofilms. Thus, cinnamon oil is an effective antimicrobial agent to combat S. epidermidis biofilms. PMID:19749058

  3. Human secretory immunoglobulin A may contribute to biofilm formation in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Bollinger, R Randal; Everett, Mary Lou; Palestrant, Daniel; Love, Stephanie D; Lin, Shu S; Parker, William

    2003-01-01

    It is critical, both for the host and for the long-term benefit of the bacteria that colonize the gut, that bacterial overgrowth with subsequent bacterial translocation, which may lead to sepsis and death of the host, be avoided. Secretory IgA (sIgA) is known to be a key factor in this process, agglutinating bacteria and preventing their translocation in a process termed ‘immune exclusion’. To determine whether human sIgA might facilitate the growth of normal enteric bacteria under some conditions, the growth of human enteric bacteria on cultured, fixed human epithelial cells was evaluated in the presence of sIgA or various other proteins. Human sIgA was found to facilitate biofilm formation by normal human gut flora and by Escherichia coli on cultured human epithelial cell surfaces under conditions in which non-adherent bacteria were repeatedly washed away. In addition, the presence of sIgA resulted in a 64% increase in adherence of E. coli to live cultured epithelial cells over a 45-min period. Mucin, another defence factor thought to play a key role in immune exclusion, was found to facilitate biofilm formation by E. coli. Our findings suggest that sIgA may contribute to biofilm formation in the gut. PMID:12871226

  4. Molecular analysis of long-term biofilm formation on PVC and cast iron surfaces in drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruyin; Zhu, Junge; Yu, Zhisheng; Joshi, DevRaj; Zhang, Hongxun; Lin, Wenfang; Yang, Min

    2014-04-01

    To understand the impacts of different plumbing materials on long-term biofilm formation in water supply system, we analyzed microbial community compositions in the bulk water and biofilms on faucets with two different materials-polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and cast iron, which have been frequently used for more than10 years. Pyrosequencing was employed to describe both bacterial and eukaryotic microbial compositions. Bacterial communities in the bulk water and biofilm samples were significantly different from each other. Specific bacterial populations colonized on the surface of different materials. Hyphomicrobia and corrosion associated bacteria, such as Acidithiobacillus spp., Aquabacterium spp., Limnobacter thiooxidans, and Thiocapsa spp., were the most dominant bacteria identified in the PVC and cast iron biofilms, respectively, suggesting that bacterial colonization on the material surfaces was selective. Mycobacteria and Legionella spp. were common potential pathogenic bacteria occurred in the biofilm samples, but their abundance was different in the two biofilm bacterial communities. In contrast, the biofilm samples showed more similar eukaryotic communities than the bulk water. Notably, potential pathogenic fungi, i.e., Aspergillus spp. and Candida parapsilosis, occurred in similar abundance in both biofilms. These results indicated that microbial community, especially bacterial composition was remarkably affected by the different pipe materials (PVC and cast iron). PMID:25079417

  5. Effect of antibacterial dental adhesive on multispecies biofilms formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K; Wang, S; Zhou, X; Xu, H H K; Weir, M D; Ge, Y; Li, M; Wang, S; Li, Y; Xu, X; Zheng, L; Cheng, L

    2015-04-01

    Antibacterial adhesives have favorable prospects to inhibit biofilms and secondary caries. The objectives of this study were to investigate the antibacterial effect of dental adhesives containing dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) on different bacteria in controlled multispecies biofilms and its regulating effect on development of biofilm for the first time. Antibacterial material was synthesized, and Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus gordonii, and Streptococcus sanguinis were chosen to form multispecies biofilms. Lactic acid assay and pH measurement were conducted to study the acid production of controlled multispecies biofilms. Anthrone method and exopolysaccharide (EPS):bacteria volume ratio measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy were performed to determine the EPS production of biofilms. The colony-forming unit counts, scanning electron microscope imaging, and dead:live volume ratio decided by confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study the biomass change of controlled multispecies biofilms. The TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization imaging were used to study the proportion change in multispecies biofilms of different groups. The results showed that DMADDM-containing adhesive groups slowed the pH drop and decreased the lactic acid production noticeably, especially lactic acid production in the 5% DMADDM group, which decreased 10- to 30-fold compared with control group (P < 0.05). EPS was reduced significantly in 5% DMADDM group (P < 0.05). The DMADDM groups reduced the colony-forming unit counts significantly (P < 0.05) and had higher dead:live volume ratio in biofilms compared with control group (P < 0.05). The proportion of S. mutans decreased steadily in DMADDM-containing groups and continually increased in control group, and the biofilm had a more healthy development tendency after the regulation of DMADDM. In conclusion, the adhesives containing DMADDM had remarkable antimicrobial properties to serve as "bioactive" adhesive materials and revealed its potential value for antibiofilm and anticaries clinical applications. PMID:25715378

  6. Investigating Catalase Activity Through Hydrogen Peroxide Decomposition by Bacteria Biofilms in Real Time Using Scanning

    E-print Network

    Nishiguchi, Michele

    Investigating Catalase Activity Through Hydrogen Peroxide Decomposition by Bacteria Biofilms through hydrogen peroxide decomposition in a 1 mM bulk solution above Vibrio fischeri (-Protebacteria electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The catalase activity, in units of micromoles hydrogen peroxide decomposed per

  7. Virulence and pathogenicity of Candida albicans is enhanced in biofilms containing oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Yuri Wanderley; Morse, Daniel James; da Silva, Wander José; Del-Bel-Cury, Altair Antoninha; Wei, Xiaoqing; Wilson, Melanie; Milward, Paul; Lewis, Michael; Bradshaw, David; Williams, David Wynne

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the influence of bacteria on the virulence and pathogenicity of candidal biofilms. Mature biofilms (Candida albicans-only, bacteria-only, C. albicans with bacteria) were generated on acrylic and either analysed directly, or used to infect a reconstituted human oral epithelium (RHOE). Analyses included Candida hyphae enumeration and assessment of Candida virulence gene expression. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and Candida tissue invasion following biofilm infection of the RHOE were also measured. Candida hyphae were more prevalent (p < 0.05) in acrylic biofilms also containing bacteria, with genes encoding secreted aspartyl-proteinases (SAP4/SAP6) and hyphal-wall protein (HWP1) up-regulated (p < 0.05). Candida adhesin genes (ALS3/EPA1), SAP6 and HWP1 were up-regulated in mixed-species biofilm infections of RHOE. Multi-species infections exhibited higher hyphal proportions (p < 0.05), up-regulation of IL-18, higher LDH activity and tissue invasion. As the presence of bacteria in acrylic biofilms promoted Candida virulence, consideration should be given to the bacterial component when managing denture biofilm associated candidoses. PMID:25574582

  8. Effects of Norspermidine and Spermidine on Biofilm Formation by Potentially Pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica Wild-Type Strains.

    PubMed

    Nesse, Live L; Berg, Kristin; Vestby, Lene K

    2015-03-15

    Polyamines are present in all living cells. In bacteria, polyamines are involved in a variety of functions, including biofilm formation, thus indicating that polyamines may have potential in the control of unwanted biofilm. In the present study, the effects of the polyamines norspermidine and spermidine on biofilms of 10 potentially pathogenic wild-type strains of Escherichia coli serotype O103:H2, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium, and S. enterica serovar Agona were investigated. We found that exogenously supplied norspermidine and spermidine did not mediate disassembly of preformed biofilm of any of the E. coli and S. enterica strains. However, the polyamines did affect biofilm production. Interestingly, the two species reacted differently to the polyamines. Both polyamines reduced the amount of biofilm formed by E. coli but tended to increase biofilm formation by S. enterica. Whether the effects observed were due to the polyamines specifically targeting biofilm formation, being toxic for the cells, or maybe a combination of the two, is not known. However, there were no indications that the effect was mediated through binding to exopolysaccharides, as earlier suggested for E. coli. Our results indicate that norspermidine and spermidine do not have potential as inhibitors of S. enterica biofilm. Furthermore, we found that the commercial polyamines used contributed to the higher pH of the test medium. Failure to acknowledge and control this important phenomenon may lead to misinterpretation of the results. PMID:25595767

  9. Culturable bacterial diversity from a feed water of a reverse osmosis system, evaluation of biofilm formation and biocontrol using phages.

    PubMed

    Belgini, D R B; Dias, R S; Siqueira, V M; Valadares, L A B; Albanese, J M; Souza, R S; Torres, A P R; Sousa, M P; Silva, C C; De Paula, S O; Oliveira, V M

    2014-10-01

    Biofilm formation on reverse osmosis (RO) systems represents a drawback in the application of this technology by different industries, including oil refineries. In RO systems the feed water maybe a source of microbial contamination and thus contributes for the formation of biofilm and consequent biofouling. In this study the planktonic culturable bacterial community was characterized from a feed water of a RO system and their capacities were evaluated to form biofilm in vitro. Bacterial motility and biofilm control were also analysed using phages. As results, diverse Protobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were identified. Alphaproteobacteria was the predominant group and Brevundimonas, Pseudomonas and Mycobacterium the most abundant genera. Among the 30 isolates, 11 showed at least one type of motility and 11 were classified as good biofilm formers. Additionally, the influence of non-specific bacteriophage in the bacterial biofilms formed in vitro was investigated by action of phages enzymes or phage infection. The vB_AspP-UFV1 (Podoviridae) interfered in biofilm formation of most tested bacteria and may represent a good alternative in biofilm control. These findings provide important information about the bacterial community from the feed water of a RO system that may be used for the development of strategies for biofilm prevention and control in such systems. PMID:24980943

  10. Enterococcal Surface Protein, Esp, Enhances Biofilm Formation by Enterococcus faecalis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Preeti M. Tendolkar; Arto S. Baghdayan; Michael S. Gilmore; Nathan Shankar

    2004-01-01

    Enterococci play a dual role in human ecology. They serve as commensal organisms of the gastrointestinal tract and are also leading causes of multiple antibiotic-resistant hospital-acquired infection. Many nosocomial infections result from the ability of microorganisms to form biofilms. The molecular mechanisms involved in enterococcal biofilm formation are only now beginning to be understood. Enterococcal surface protein, Esp, has been

  11. Vaccination with SesC Decreases Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Shahrooei, Mohammad; Hira, Vishal; Khodaparast, Laleh; Khodaparast, Ladan; Stijlemans, Benoit; Kucharíková, So?a; Burghout, Peter; Hermans, Peter W. M.

    2012-01-01

    The increased use of medical implants has resulted in a concomitant rise in device-related infections. The majority of these infections are caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms. Immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy targeting in vivo-expressed, biofilm-associated, bacterial cell surface-exposed proteins are promising new approaches to prevent and treat biofilm-related infections, respectively. Using an in silico procedure, we identified 64 proteins that are predicted to be S. epidermidis surface exposed (Ses), of which 36 were annotated as (conserved) hypothetical. Of these 36 proteins, 5 proteins—3 LPXTG motif-containing proteins (SesL, SesB, and SesC) and 2 of the largest ABC transporters (SesK and SesM)—were selected for evaluation as vaccine candidates. This choice was based on protein size, number of antigenic determinants, or the established role in S. epidermidis biofilm formation of the protein family to which the candidate protein belongs. Anti-SesC antibodies exhibited the greatest inhibitory effect on S. epidermidis biofilm formation in vitro and on colonization and infection in a mouse jugular vein catheter infection model that includes biofilms and organ infections. Active vaccination with a recombinant truncated SesC inhibited S. epidermidis biofilm formation in a rat model of subcutaneous foreign body infection. Antibodies to SesC were shown to be opsonic by an in vitro opsonophagocytosis assay. We conclude that SesC is a promising target for antibody mediated strategies against S. epidermidis biofilm formation. PMID:22802343

  12. OmpA-mediated biofilm formation is essential for the commensal bacterium Sodalis glossinidius to colonize the tsetse fly gut.

    PubMed

    Maltz, Michele A; Weiss, Brian L; O'Neill, Michelle; Wu, Yineng; Aksoy, Serap

    2012-11-01

    Many bacteria successfully colonize animals by forming protective biofilms. Molecular processes that underlie the formation and function of biofilms in pathogenic bacteria are well characterized. In contrast, the relationship between biofilms and host colonization by symbiotic bacteria is less well understood. Tsetse flies (Glossina spp.) house 3 maternally transmitted symbionts, one of which is a commensal (Sodalis glossinidius) found in several host tissues, including the gut. We determined that Sodalis forms biofilms in the tsetse gut and that this process is influenced by the Sodalis outer membrane protein A (OmpA). Mutant Sodalis strains that do not produce OmpA (Sodalis ?OmpA mutants) fail to form biofilms in vitro and are unable to colonize the tsetse gut unless endogenous symbiotic bacteria are present. Our data indicate that in the absence of biofilms, Sodalis ?OmpA mutant cells are exposed to and eliminated by tsetse's innate immune system, suggesting that biofilms help Sodalis evade the host immune system. Tsetse is the sole vector of pathogenic African trypanosomes, which also reside in the fly gut. Acquiring a better understanding of the dynamics that promote Sodalis colonization of the tsetse gut may enhance the development of novel disease control strategies. PMID:22941073

  13. Unsaturated Fatty Acid, cis-2-Decenoic Acid, in Combination with Disinfectants or Antibiotics Removes Pre-Established Biofilms Formed by Food-Related Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sepehr, Shayesteh; Rahmani-Badi, Azadeh; Babaie-Naiej, Hamta; Soudi, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm formation by food-related bacteria and food-related pathogenesis are significant problems in the food industry. Even though much disinfection and mechanical procedure exist for removal of biofilms, they may fail to eliminate pre-established biofilms. cis-2 decenoic acid (CDA), an unsaturated fatty acid messenger produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is reportedly capable of inducing the dispersion of established biofilms by multiple types of microorganisms. However, whether CDA has potential to boost the actions of certain antimicrobials is unknown. Here, the activity of CDA as an inducer of pre-established biofilms dispersal, formed by four main food pathogens; Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella enterica and E. coli, was measured using both semi-batch and continuous cultures bioassays. To assess the ability of CDA combined biocides treatments to remove pre-established biofilms formed on stainless steel discs, CFU counts were performed for both treated and untreated cultures. Eradication of the biofilms by CDA combined antibiotics was evaluated using crystal violet staining. The effect of CDA combined treatments (antibiotics and disinfectants) on biofilm surface area and bacteria viability was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy, digital image analysis and LIVE/DEAD staining. MICs were also determined to assess the probable inhibitory effects of CDA combined treatments on the growth of tested microorganisms' planktonic cells. Treatment of pre-established biofilms with only 310 nM CDA resulted in at least two-fold increase in the number of planktonic cells in all cultures. While antibiotics or disinfectants alone exerted a trivial effect on CFU counts and percentage of surface area covered by the biofilms, combinational treatments with both 310 nM CDA and antibiotics or disinfectants led to approximate 80% reduction in biofilm biomass. These data suggests that combined treatments with CDA would pave the way toward developing new strategies to control biofilms with widespread applications in industry as well as medicine. PMID:25000301

  14. CcpA coordinates central metabolism and biofilm formation in Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Sadykov, Marat R.; Hartmann, Torsten; Mattes, Theodoric A.; Hiatt, Megan; Jann, Naja J.; Zhu, Yefei; Ledala, Nagender; Landmann, Regine; Herrmann, Mathias; Rohde, Holger; Bischoff, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is an opportunistic bacterium whose infections often involve the formation of a biofilm on implanted biomaterials. In S. epidermidis, the exopolysaccharide facilitating bacterial adherence in a biofilm is polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA), whose synthesis requires the enzymes encoded within the intercellular adhesin operon (icaADBC). In vitro, the formation of S. epidermidis biofilms is enhanced by conditions that repress tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity, such as growth in a medium containing glucose. In many Gram-positive bacteria, repression of TCA cycle genes in response to glucose is accomplished by catabolite control protein A (CcpA). CcpA is a member of the GalR–LacI repressor family that mediates carbon catabolite repression, leading us to hypothesize that catabolite control of S. epidermidis biofilm formation is indirectly regulated by CcpA-dependent repression of the TCA cycle. To test this hypothesis, ccpA deletion mutants were constructed in strain 1457 and 1457-acnA and the effects on TCA cycle activity, biofilm formation and virulence were assessed. As anticipated, deletion of ccpA derepressed TCA cycle activity and inhibited biofilm formation; however, ccpA deletion had only a modest effect on icaADBC transcription. Surprisingly, deletion of ccpA in strain 1457-acnA, a strain whose TCA cycle is inactive and where icaADBC transcription is derepressed, strongly inhibited icaADBC transcription. These observations demonstrate that CcpA is a positive effector of biofilm formation and icaADBC transcription and a repressor of TCA cycle activity. PMID:21964732

  15. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type III Translocon Is Required for Biofilm Formation at the Epithelial Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cindy S.; Rangel, Stephanie M.; Almblad, Henrik; Kierbel, Arlinet; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Hauser, Alan R.; Engel, Joanne N.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a deadly Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen of immunocompromised hosts, often involve the formation of antibiotic-resistant biofilms. Although biofilm formation has been extensively studied in vitro on glass or plastic surfaces, much less is known about biofilm formation at the epithelial barrier. We have previously shown that when added to the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells, P. aeruginosa rapidly forms cell-associated aggregates within 60 minutes of infection. By confocal microscopy we now show that cell-associated aggregates exhibit key characteristics of biofilms, including the presence of extracellular matrix and increased resistance to antibiotics compared to planktonic bacteria. Using isogenic mutants in the type III secretion system, we found that the translocon, but not the effectors themselves, were required for cell-associated aggregation on the surface of polarized epithelial cells and at early time points in a murine model of acute pneumonia. In contrast, the translocon was not required for aggregation on abiotic surfaces, suggesting a novel function for the type III secretion system during cell-associated aggregation. Supernatants from epithelial cells infected with wild-type bacteria or from cells treated with the pore-forming toxin streptolysin O could rescue aggregate formation in a type III secretion mutant, indicating that cell-associated aggregation requires one or more host cell factors. Our results suggest a previously unappreciated function for the type III translocon in the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms at the epithelial barrier and demonstrate that biofilms may form at early time points of infection. PMID:25375398

  16. Biofilm formation of mucosa-associated methanoarchaeal strains

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Corinna; Ehlers, Claudia; Orell, Alvaro; Prasse, Daniela; Spinner, Marlene; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    Although in nature most microorganisms are known to occur predominantly in consortia or biofilms, data on archaeal biofilm formation are in general scarce. Here, the ability of three methanoarchaeal strains, Methanobrevibacter smithii and Methanosphaera stadtmanae, which form part of the human gut microbiota, and the Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1 to grow on different surfaces and form biofilms was investigated. All three strains adhered to the substrate mica and grew predominantly as bilayers on its surface as demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy analyses, though the formation of multi-layered biofilms of Methanosphaera stadtmanae and Methanobrevibacter smithii was observed as well. Stable biofilm formation was further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy analysis. Methanosarcina mazei and Methanobrevibacter smithii also formed multi-layered biofilms in uncoated plastic ?-dishesTM, which were very similar in morphology and reached a height of up to 40 ?m. In contrast, biofilms formed by Methanosphaera stadtmanae reached only a height of 2 ?m. Staining with the two lectins ConA and IB4 indicated that all three strains produced relatively low amounts of extracellular polysaccharides most likely containing glucose, mannose, and galactose. Taken together, this study provides the first evidence that methanoarchaea can develop and form biofilms on different substrates and thus, will contribute to our knowledge on the appearance and physiological role of Methanobrevibacter smithii and Methanosphaera stadtmanae in the human intestine. PMID:25071757

  17. Inhibition of Serratia marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation by Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract

    SciTech Connect

    Lutfi, Zainal; Ahmad, Asmat [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Usup, Gires [School of Environmental and Natural Resources Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    Serratia marcescens biofilms are formed when they are bound to surfaces in aqueous environments. S. marcescens utilizes N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as its quorum sensing signal molecule. The accumulation of AHL indicates the bacteria to produce matrices to form biofilms. Prodigiosin (2-methyl-3-pentyl-6-methoxyprodigiosin), which causes red pigmentation in the colonies, are also produced when the AHL reaches a certain threshold. The Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract is believed to inhibit quorum sensing in the S. marcescens Smj-11 and, thus, impedes its biofilm formation ability. A. faecalis STN17 was grown in marine broth, and ethyl acetate extraction was carried out. The crude compound of A. faecalis STN17 was diluted at high concentration (0.2-6.4 mg/mL) and was taken to confirm anti-biofilm activity through the crystal violet method in 96-wells plate. Then, the crude extract underwent purification using simple solvents partitioning test to discern the respective compounds that had the anti-biofilm activity under the crystal violet method. The crystal violet test showed that the crude did have anti-biofilm activity on S. marcescens Smj-11, but did not kill the cells. This finding signifies that the suppression of biofilm formation in S. marcescens by A. faecalis STN17 has a strong correlation. The partitioning test showed that A. faecalis STN17 crude extract has several compounds and only the compound(s) in chloroform showed activities. In conclusion, the crude extract of A. faecalis STN17 has the ability to inhibit S. marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation.

  18. Inhibition of Serratia marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation by Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutfi, Zainal; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2014-09-01

    Serratia marcescens biofilms are formed when they are bound to surfaces in aqueous environments. S. marcescens utilizes N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as its quorum sensing signal molecule. The accumulation of AHL indicates the bacteria to produce matrices to form biofilms. Prodigiosin (2-methyl-3-pentyl-6-methoxyprodigiosin), which causes red pigmentation in the colonies, are also produced when the AHL reaches a certain threshold. The Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract is believed to inhibit quorum sensing in the S. marcescens Smj-11 and, thus, impedes its biofilm formation ability. A. faecalis STN17 was grown in marine broth, and ethyl acetate extraction was carried out. The crude compound of A. faecalis STN17 was diluted at high concentration (0.2-6.4 mg/mL) and was taken to confirm anti-biofilm activity through the crystal violet method in 96-wells plate. Then, the crude extract underwent purification using simple solvents partitioning test to discern the respective compounds that had the anti-biofilm activity under the crystal violet method. The crystal violet test showed that the crude did have anti-biofilm activity on S. marcescens Smj-11, but did not kill the cells. This finding signifies that the suppression of biofilm formation in S. marcescens by A. faecalis STN17 has a strong correlation. The partitioning test showed that A. faecalis STN17 crude extract has several compounds and only the compound(s) in chloroform showed activities. In conclusion, the crude extract of A. faecalis STN17 has the ability to inhibit S. marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation.

  19. Biofilm formation by Streptococcus agalactiae: influence of environmental conditions and implicated virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Rosini, Roberto; Margarit, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is an important human pathogen that colonizes the urogenital and/or the lower gastro-intestinal tract of up to 40% of healthy women of reproductive age and is a leading cause of sepsis and meningitis in the neonates. GBS can also infect the elderly and immuno-compromised adults, and is responsible for mastitis in bovines. Like other Gram-positive bacteria, GBS can form biofilm-like three-dimensional structures that could enhance its ability to colonize and persist in the host. Biofilm formation by GBS has been investigated in vitro and appears tightly controlled by environmental conditions. Several adhesins have been shown to play a role in the formation of GBS biofilm-like structures, among which are the protein components of pili protruding outside the bacterial surface. Remarkably, antibodies directed against pilus proteins can prevent the formation of biofilms. The implications of biofilm formation in the context of GBS asymptomatic colonization and dissemination to cause invasive disease remain to be investigated in detail. PMID:25699242

  20. On the role of extracellular polymeric substances during early stages of Xylella fastidiosa biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Lorite, Gabriela S; de Souza, Alessandra A; Neubauer, Daniel; Mizaikoff, Boris; Kranz, Christine; Cotta, Mônica A

    2013-02-01

    The structural integrity and protection of bacterial biofilms are intrinsically associated with a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by the bacteria cells. However, the role of these substances during biofilm adhesion to a surface remains largely unclear. In this study, the influence of EPS on Xylella fastidiosa biofilm formation was investigated. This bacterium is associated with economically important plant diseases; it presents a slow growth rate and thus allows us to pinpoint more precisely the early stages of cell-surface adhesion. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy show evidence of EPS production in such early stages and around individual bacteria cells attached to the substrate surface even a few hours after inoculation. In addition, EPS formation was investigated via attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). To this end, X. fastidiosa cells were inoculated within an ATR liquid cell assembly. IR-ATR spectra clearly reveal EPS formation already during the early stages of X. fastidiosa biofilm formation, thereby providing supporting evidence for the hypothesis of the relevance of the EPS contribution to the adhesion process. PMID:23164974

  1. Exoelectrogenic Biofilm as a Template for Sustainable Formation of a Catalytic

    E-print Network

    Exoelectrogenic Biofilm as a Template for Sustainable Formation of a Catalytic Mesoporous Structure synthesis techniques utilize expensive polymers and toxic chemicals. AGeobacter sulfurreducens biofilm for synthetic chemicals. The bulk of the biofilm material was removed by thermal treatments after nanoparticle

  2. Flagella-Mediated Adhesion and Extracellular DNA Release Contribute to Biofilm Formation and Stress Tolerance of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Sarah L.; Pryjma, Mark; Gaynor, Erin C.

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of foodbourne gastroenteritis, despite fragile behaviour under standard laboratory conditions. In the environment, C. jejuni may survive within biofilms, which can impart resident bacteria with enhanced stress tolerance compared to their planktonic counterparts. While C. jejuni forms biofilms in vitro and in the wild, it had not been confirmed that this lifestyle confers stress tolerance. Moreover, little is understood about molecular mechanisms of biofilm formation in this pathogen. We previously found that a ?cprS mutant, which carries a deletion in the sensor kinase of the CprRS two-component system, forms enhanced biofilms. Biofilms were also enhanced by the bile salt deoxycholate and contained extracellular DNA. Through more in-depth analysis of ?cprS and WT under conditions that promote or inhibit biofilms, we sought to further define this lifestyle for C. jejuni. Epistasis experiments with ?cprS and flagellar mutations (?flhA, ?pflA) suggested that initiation is mediated by flagellum-mediated adherence, a process which was kinetically enhanced by motility. Lysis was also observed, especially under biofilm-enhancing conditions. Microscopy suggested adherence was followed by release of eDNA, which was required for biofilm maturation. Importantly, inhibiting biofilm formation by removal of eDNA with DNase decreased stress tolerance. This work suggests the biofilm lifestyle provides C. jejuni with resilience that has not been apparent from observation of planktonic bacteria during routine laboratory culture, and provides a framework for subsequent molecular studies of C. jejuni biofilms. PMID:25166748

  3. Spatial & Temporal Geophysical Monitoring of Microbial Growth and Biofilm Formation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have examined the effect of biogenic gases and biomineralization on the acoustic properties of porous media. In this study, we investigated the spatiotemporal effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on compressional waves and complex conductivity in sand...

  4. Effect of Lactobacillus species on Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ayaz; Dachang, Wu; Lei, Zhou; Jianjun, Liu; Juanjuan, Qiu; Yi, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary pathogen responsible for initiating dental caries and decay. The presence of sucrose, stimulates S. mutans to produce insoluble glucans to form oral biofilm also known as dental plaque to initiate caries lesion. The GtfB and LuxS genes of S. mutans are responsible for formation and maturation of biofilm. Lactobacillus species as probiotic can reduces the count of S. mutans. In this study effect of different Lactobacillus species against the formation of S. mutans biofilm was observed. Growing biofilm in the presence of sucrose was detected using 96 well microtiter plate crystal violet assay and biofilm formation by S. mutans in the presence of Lactobacillus was detected. Gene expression of biofilm forming genes (GtfB and LuxS) was quantified through Real-time PCR. All strains of Lactobacillus potently reduced the formation of S. mutans biofilm whereas Lactobacillus acidophilus reduced the genetic expression by 60-80%. Therefore, probiotic Lactobacillus species can be used as an alternative instead of antibiotics to decrease the chance of dental caries by reducing the count of S. mutans and their gene expression to maintain good oral health. PMID:25176247

  5. Bacterial exopolysaccharide and biofilm formation stimulate chickpea growth and soil aggregation under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Qurashi, Aisha Waheed; Sabri, Anjum Nasim

    2012-07-01

    To compensate for stress imposed by salinity, biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide production are significant strategies of salt tolerant bacteria to assist metabolism. We hypothesized that two previously isolated salt-tolerant strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1) and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4) have an ability to improve plant growth, These strains can form biofilm and accumulate exopolysacharides at increasing salt stress. These results showed that bacteria might be involved in developing microbial communities under salt stress and helpful in colonizing of bacterial strains to plant roots and soil particles. Eventually, it can add to the plant growth and soil structure. We investigated the comparative effect of exopolysacharide and biofilm formation in two bacterial strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1) and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4) in response to varying salt stress. We found that biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide accumulation increased at higher salinity. To check the effect of bacterial inoculation on the plant (Cicer arietinum Var. CM-98) growth and soil aggregation, pot experiment was conducted by growing seedlings under salt stress. Inoculation of both strains increased plant growth at elevated salt stress. Weight of soil aggregates attached with roots and present in soil were added at higher salt concentrations compared to untreated controls. Soil aggregation was higher at plant roots under salinity. These results suggest the feasibility of using above strains in improving plant growth and soil fertility under salinity. PMID:24031943

  6. Bacterial exopolysaccharide and biofilm formation stimulate chickpea growth and soil aggregation under salt stress

    PubMed Central

    Qurashi, Aisha Waheed; Sabri, Anjum Nasim

    2012-01-01

    To compensate for stress imposed by salinity, biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide production are significant strategies of salt tolerant bacteria to assist metabolism. We hypothesized that two previously isolated salt-tolerant strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1) and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4) have an ability to improve plant growth, These strains can form biofilm and accumulate exopolysacharides at increasing salt stress. These results showed that bacteria might be involved in developing microbial communities under salt stress and helpful in colonizing of bacterial strains to plant roots and soil particles. Eventually, it can add to the plant growth and soil structure. We investigated the comparative effect of exopolysacharide and biofilm formation in two bacterial strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1) and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4) in response to varying salt stress. We found that biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide accumulation increased at higher salinity. To check the effect of bacterial inoculation on the plant (Cicer arietinum Var. CM-98) growth and soil aggregation, pot experiment was conducted by growing seedlings under salt stress. Inoculation of both strains increased plant growth at elevated salt stress. Weight of soil aggregates attached with roots and present in soil were added at higher salt concentrations compared to untreated controls. Soil aggregation was higher at plant roots under salinity. These results suggest the feasibility of using above strains in improving plant growth and soil fertility under salinity. PMID:24031943

  7. Modulation of Curli Assembly and Pellicle Biofilm Formation by Chemical and Protein Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Emma K.; Bengtsson, Christoffer; Evans, Margery L.; Chorell, Erik; Sellstedt, Magnus; Lindgren, Anders E.G.; Hufnagel, David A.; Bhattacharya, Moumita; Tessier, Peter M.; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Almqvist, Fredrik; Chapman, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Enteric bacteria assemble functional amyloid fibers, curli, on their surfaces that share structural and biochemical properties with disease-associated amyloids. Here, we test rationally designed 2-pyridone compounds for their ability to alter amyloid formation of the major curli subunit CsgA. We identified several compounds that discourage CsgA amyloid formation and several compounds that accelerate CsgA amyloid formation. The ability of inhibitor compounds to stop growing CsgA fibers was compared to the same property of the CsgA chaperone, CsgE. CsgE blocked CsgA amyloid assembly and arrested polymerization when added to actively polymerizing fibers. Additionally, CsgE and the 2-pyridone inhibitors prevented biofilm formation by Escherichia coli at the air-liquid interface of a static culture. We demonstrate that curli amyloid assembly and curli-dependent biofilm formation can be modulated not only by protein chaperones, but also by “chemical chaperones.” PMID:24035282

  8. Two quorum sensing systems control biofilm formation and virulence in members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex

    PubMed Central

    Suppiger, Angela; Schmid, Nadine; Aguilar, Claudio; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo

    2013-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) consists of 17 closely related species that are problematic opportunistic bacterial pathogens for cystic fibrosis patients and immunocompromised individuals. These bacteria are capable of utilizing two different chemical languages: N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) and cis-2-unsaturated fatty acids. Here we summarize the current knowledge of the underlying molecular architectures of these communication systems, showing how they are interlinked and discussing how they regulate overlapping as well as specific sets of genes. A particular focus is laid on the role of these signaling systems in the formation of biofilms, which are believed to be highly important for chronic infections. We review genes that have been implicated in the sessile lifestyle of this group of bacteria. The new emerging role of the intracellular second messenger cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) as a downstream regulator of the fatty acid signaling cascade and as a key factor in biofilm formation is also discussed. PMID:23799665

  9. Biofilm formation and control in a simulated spacecraft water system - Interim results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, John R.; Taylor, Robert D.; Flanagan, David T.; Gibbons, Randall E.; Brown, Harlan D.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1989-01-01

    The ability of iodine to control microbial contamination and biofilm formation in spacecraft water distribution systems is studied using two stainless steel water subsystems. One subsystem has an iodine level of 2.5 mg/L maintained by an iodinated ion-exchange resin. The other subsystem has no iodine added. Stainless steel coupons are removed from each system to monitor biofilm formation. Results from the first six months of operation indicate that 2.5 mg/L of iodine has limited the number of viable bacteria that can be recovered from the iodinated subsystem. Epifluorescence microscopy of the coupons taken from this subsystem, however, indicates some evidence of microbial colonization after 15 weeks of operation. Numerous bacteria have been continually removed from both the water samples and the coupons taken from the noniodinated subsystem after only 3 weeks of operation.

  10. The ?E Pathway Is Involved in Biofilm Formation by Crohn's Disease-Associated Adherent-Invasive Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Chassaing, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Ileal lesions of patients with Crohn's disease are colonized by adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) bacteria that are able to adhere to and invade intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), to replicate within macrophages, and to form biofilm. Clinical observations showed that bacterial biofilms were associated with the mucosa of inflammatory bowel disease patients. In the present study, we analyzed the relationship between AIEC colonization of the gut and the formation of biofilm, focusing on the involvement of the ?E pathway in the AIEC-IEC interaction. We observed that ?E pathway inhibition in AIEC reference strain LF82 led to an impaired ability to adhere to and invade IEC but also induced a large decrease in the abilities to colonize the intestinal mucosa and form biofilm. This indicates that targeting of the ?E pathway could be a very potent therapeutic strategy by which to interfere with the ability of AIEC to form biofilm on the gut mucosa of Crohn's disease patients. PMID:23104802

  11. The ?E pathway is involved in biofilm formation by Crohn's disease-associated adherent-invasive Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chassaing, Benoit; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2013-01-01

    Ileal lesions of patients with Crohn's disease are colonized by adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) bacteria that are able to adhere to and invade intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), to replicate within macrophages, and to form biofilm. Clinical observations showed that bacterial biofilms were associated with the mucosa of inflammatory bowel disease patients. In the present study, we analyzed the relationship between AIEC colonization of the gut and the formation of biofilm, focusing on the involvement of the ?(E) pathway in the AIEC-IEC interaction. We observed that ?(E) pathway inhibition in AIEC reference strain LF82 led to an impaired ability to adhere to and invade IEC but also induced a large decrease in the abilities to colonize the intestinal mucosa and form biofilm. This indicates that targeting of the ?(E) pathway could be a very potent therapeutic strategy by which to interfere with the ability of AIEC to form biofilm on the gut mucosa of Crohn's disease patients. PMID:23104802

  12. Importance of eps genes from Bacillus subtilis in biofilm formation and swarming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Nagórska; A. Ostrowski; K. Hinc; I. B. Holland; M. Obuchowski

    2010-01-01

    Unicellular organisms naturally form multicellular communities, differentiate into specialized cells, and synchronize their\\u000a behaviour under certain conditions. Swarming, defined as a movement of a large mass of bacteria on solid surfaces, is recognized\\u000a as a preliminary step in the formation of biofilms. The main aim of this work was to study the role of a group of genes involved\\u000a in

  13. The EpsE Flagellar Clutch Is Bifunctional and Synergizes with EPS Biosynthesis to Promote Bacillus subtilis Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Sarah B.; Blair, Kris M.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2010-01-01

    Many bacteria inhibit motility concomitant with the synthesis of an extracellular polysaccharide matrix and the formation of biofilm aggregates. In Bacillus subtilis biofilms, motility is inhibited by EpsE, which acts as a clutch on the flagella rotor to inhibit motility, and which is encoded within the 15 gene eps operon required for EPS production. EpsE shows sequence similarity to the glycosyltransferase family of enzymes, and we demonstrate that the conserved active site motif is required for EPS biosynthesis. We also screen for residues specifically required for either clutch or enzymatic activity and demonstrate that the two functions are genetically separable. Finally, we show that, whereas EPS synthesis activity is dominant for biofilm formation, both functions of EpsE synergize to stabilize cell aggregates and relieve selective pressure to abolish motility by genetic mutation. Thus, the transition from motility to biofilm formation may be governed by a single bifunctional enzyme. PMID:21170308

  14. The Impact of spgM, rpfF, rmlA Gene Distribution on Biofilm Formation in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Chao; Zhao, Qian-yu; Xiao, Shu-nian

    2014-01-01

    Background Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is emerging as one of the most frequently found bacteria in chronic pulmonary infection. Biofilm is increasingly recognized as a contributing factor to disease pathogenesis. In the present study, a total of 37 isolates of S. maltophilia obtained from chronic pulmonary infection patients were evaluated to the relationship between biofilm production and the relative genes expression. Methods The clonal relatedness of isolates was determined by pulse-field gel electrophoresis. Biofilm formation assays were performed by crystal violet assay, and confirmed by Electron microscopy analysis and CLSM analysis. PCR was employed to learn gene distribution and expression. Results Twenty-four pulsotypes were designated for 37 S. maltophilia isolates, and these 24 pulsotypes exhibited various levels of biofilm production, 8 strong biofilm-producing S. maltophilia strains with OD492 value above 0.6, 14 middle biofilm-producing strains with OD492 average value of 0.4 and 2 weak biofilm-producing strains with OD492 average value of 0.19. CLSM analysis showed that the isolates from the early stage of chronic infection enable to form more highly structured and multilayered biofim than those in the late stage. The prevalence of spgM, rmlA, and rpfF genes was 83.3%, 87.5%, and 50.0% in 24 S. maltophilia strains, respectively, and the presence of rmlA, spgM or rpfF had a close relationship with biofilm formation but did not significantly affect the mean amount of biofilm. Significant mutations of spgM and rmlA were found in both strong and weak biofilm-producing strains. Conclusion Mutations in spgM and rmlA may be relevant to biofilm formation in the clinical isolates of S. maltophilia. PMID:25285537

  15. Apple Flavonoid Phloretin Inhibits Escherichia coli O157:H7 Biofilm Formation and Ameliorates Colon Inflammation in Rats ? †

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Regmi, Sushil Chandra; Kim, Jung-Ae; Cho, Moo Hwan; Yun, Hyungdon; Lee, Chang-Soo; Lee, Jintae

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic biofilms have been associated with persistent infections due to their high resistance to antimicrobial agents, while commensal biofilms often fortify the host's immune system. Hence, controlling biofilm formation of both pathogenic bacteria and commensal bacteria is important in bacterium-related diseases. We investigated the effect of plant flavonoids on biofilm formation of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7. The antioxidant phloretin, which is abundant in apples, markedly reduced E. coli O157:H7 biofilm formation without affecting the growth of planktonic cells, while phloretin did not harm commensal E. coli K-12 biofilms. Also, phloretin reduced E. coli O157:H7 attachment to human colon epithelial cells. Global transcriptome analyses revealed that phloretin repressed toxin genes (hlyE and stx2), autoinducer-2 importer genes (lsrACDBF), curli genes (csgA and csgB), and dozens of prophage genes in E. coli O157:H7 biofilm cells. Electron microscopy confirmed that phloretin reduced fimbria production in E. coli O157:H7. Also, phloretin suppressed the tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced inflammatory response in vitro using human colonic epithelial cells. Moreover, in the rat model of colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS), phloretin significantly ameliorated colon inflammation and body weight loss. Taken together, our results suggest that the antioxidant phloretin also acts as an inhibitor of E. coli O157:H7 biofilm formation as well as an anti-inflammatory agent in inflammatory bowel diseases without harming beneficial commensal E. coli biofilms. PMID:21930760

  16. Role of galE on biofilm formation by Thermus spp.

    PubMed

    Niou, Yi-Kai; Wu, Wan-Ling; Lin, Ling-Chun; Yu, Mei-Shiuan; Shu, Hung-Yu; Yang, Hsueh-Hui; Lin, Guang-Huey

    2009-12-11

    Thermus thermophilus and Thermus aquaticus are thermophilic bacteria that are frequently found to attach to solid surfaces in hot springs to form biofilms. Uridine diphosphate (UDP)-galactose-4'-epimerase (GalE) is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of UDP-galactose to UDP-glucose, an important biochemical step in exopolysaccharide synthesis. We expressed GalE obtained from T. thermophilus HB8 in Escherichia coli and found that the enzyme is stable at 80 degrees C and can epimerize UDP-galactose to UDP-glucose and UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine (UDP-GalNAc) to UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc). Enzyme overexpression in T. thermophilus HB27 led to an increased capacity of biofilm production. Therefore, the galE gene is important to biofilm formation because of its involvement in epimerizing UDP-galactose and UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine for exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. PMID:19800315

  17. DNase I and proteinase K impair Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation and induce dispersal of pre-existing biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Uyen T; Burrows, Lori L

    2014-09-18

    Current sanitation methods in the food industry are not always sufficient for prevention or dispersal of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms. Here, we determined if prevention of adherence or dispersal of existing biofilms could occur if biofilm matrix components were disrupted enzymatically. Addition of DNase during biofilm formation reduced attachment (<50% of control) to polystyrene. Treatment of established 72h biofilms with 100?g/ml of DNase for 24h induced incomplete biofilm dispersal, with <25% biofilm remaining compared to control. In contrast, addition of proteinase K completely inhibited biofilm formation, and 72h biofilms-including those grown under stimulatory conditions-were completely dispersed with 100?g/ml proteinase K. Generally-regarded-as-safe proteases bromelain and papain were less effective dispersants than proteinase K. In a time course assay, complete dispersal of L. monocytogenes biofilms from both polystyrene and type 304H food-grade stainless steel occurred within 5min at proteinase K concentrations above 25?g/ml. These data confirm that both DNA and proteins are required for L. monocytogenes biofilm development and maintenance, and that these components of the biofilm matrix can be targeted for effective prevention and removal of biofilms. PMID:25043896

  18. Biofilm formation by Escherichia coli in hypertonic sucrose media.

    PubMed

    Kawarai, Taketo; Furukawa, Soichi; Narisawa, Naoki; Hagiwara, Chisato; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Yamasaki, Makari

    2009-06-01

    High osmotic environments produced by NaCl or sucrose have been used as reliable and traditional methods of food preservation. We tested, Escherichia coli as an indicator of food-contaminating bacterium, to determine if it can form biofilm in a hyperosmotic environment. E. coli K-12 IAM1264 did not form biofilm in LB broth that contained 1 M NaCl. However, the bacterium formed biofilm in LB broth that contained 1 M sucrose, although the planktonic growth was greatly suppressed. The biofilm, formed on solid surfaces, such as titer-plate well walls and glass slides, solely around the air-liquid interface. Both biofilm forming cells and planktonic cells in the hypertonic medium adopted a characteristic, fat and filamentous morphology with no FtsZ rings, which are a prerequisite for septum formation. Biofilm forming cells were found to be alive based on propidium iodide staining. The presence of 1 M sucrose in the food environment is not sufficient to prevent biofilm formation by E. coli. PMID:19447340

  19. Formation of biofilms by Listeria monocytogenes under various growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Moltz, Andrew G; Martin, Scott E

    2005-01-01

    Eight strains of Listeria monocytogenes (7644, 19112, 15313, Scott A, LCDC, 10403S, SLCC, and 1370) produce biofilms when grown on polyvinyl chloride microtiter well plates. The growth medium (tryptic soy broth [TSB] or modified Welshimer's broth [MWB] at 32 degrees C) influenced the amount of biofilm formed; maximum biofilms were formed in MWB by six strains and in TSB by the remaining two strains. This result suggests that the growth medium is critical in development of L. monocytogenes biofilm. This organism also produced biofilms on stainless steel chips. Biofilm formation on these chips was observed following growth in TSB at 4, 20, and 37 degrees C. After 20 h of incubation at 20 or 37 degrees C, the cell density was approximately 10(6) CFU per chip, and after 4 days incubation at 4 degrees C, the cell density was 10(5) CFU per chip. L. monocytogenes strain Scott A biofilm formation on stainless steel chips was visualized using scanning electron microscopy, which revealed dense aggregates of cells held together by meshlike webbing. PMID:15690808

  20. Antifouling potential of bacteria isolated from a marine biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Min; Wang, Ke; Su, Rongguo; Li, Xuzhao; Lu, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Marine microorganisms are a new source of natural antifouling compounds. In this study, two bacterial strains, Kytococcus sedentarius QDG-B506 and Bacillus cereus QDG-B509, were isolated from a marine biofilm and identified. The bacteria fermentation broth could exert inhibitory effects on the growth of Skeletonema costatum and barnacle larvae. A procedure was employed to extract and identify the antifouling compounds. Firstly, a toxicity test was conducted by graduated pH and liquid-liquid extraction to determine the optimal extraction conditions. The best extraction conditions were found to be pH 2 and 100% petroleum ether. The EC 50 value of the crude extract of K. sedentarius against the test microalgae was 236.7 ± 14.08 ?g mL-1, and that of B. cereus was 290.6 ± 27.11 ?g mL-1. Secondly, HLB SPE columns were used to purify the two crude extracts. After purification, the antifouling activities of the two extracts significantly increased: the EC 50 of the K. sedentarius extract against the test microalgae was 86.4 ± 3.71 ?g mL-1, and that of B. cereus was 92.6 ± 1.47 ?g mL-1. These results suggest that the metabolites produced by the two bacterial strains are with high antifouling activities and they should be fatty acid compounds. Lastly, GC-MS was used for the structural elucidation of the compounds. The results show that the antifouling compounds produced by the two bacterial strains are myristic, palmitic and octadecanoic acids.

  1. Cattle tick-associated bacteria exert anti-biofilm and anti-Tritrichomonas foetus activities.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, K R; Seixas, A; Conceição, J M; Zvoboda, D A; Barros, M P; Tasca, T; Macedo, A J; Termignoni, C

    2013-05-31

    Research on microbiota in cattle tick and the evaluation of its activity against other microorganisms can contribute to identify new molecules potentially useful to control infections caused by bacteria and protozoa. Biofilms pose increasing problems worldwide, mainly due to their resistance to antimicrobial therapies and host immune response. In this study we investigate the ability Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus-associated bacteria may exhibit to produce anti-biofilm and trichomonicidal compounds. Gut, ovary, salivary glands, and Gené organ were collected from engorged R. microplus female. Homogenates of each tissue were inoculated onto 15 distinct culture media. Anti-biofilm and trichomonicidal activities were analyzed by culturing each bacterium isolated in a liquid medium. Results showed that R. microplus cattle tick microflora varies for different tissues. Bacteria belonging to different genera (Aeromonas, Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Castelaniella, Comamonas, Kocuria, and Microbacterium) were identified. Interestingly, all bacterial species found displayed pronounced activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms, and also against the cattle pathogen Tritrichomonas foetus, confirming the hypothesis that cattle tick could be a source of bacteria active against pathogens. This is the first study showing that bacteria isolated from a tick exert anti-biofilm and trichomonicidal activities. PMID:23434012

  2. Deletion of ?54 (rpoN) Alters the Rate of Autolysis and Biofilm Formation in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Vijayalakshmi S.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription initiation is a critical step in bacterial gene regulation and is often controlled by transcription regulators. The alternate sigma factor (?54) is one such regulator that facilitates activator-dependent transcription initiation and thus modulates the expression of a variety of genes involved in metabolism and pathogenesis in bacteria. This study describes the role of ?54 in the nosocomial pathogen Enterococcus faecalis. Biofilm formation is one of the important pathogenic mechanisms of E. faecalis, as it elevates the organism's potential to cause surgical site and urinary tract infections. Lysis of bacterial cells within the population contributes to biofilm formation by providing extracellular DNA (eDNA) as a key component of the biofilm matrix. Deletion of rpoN rendered E. faecalis resistant to autolysis, which in turn impaired eDNA release. Despite the significant reduction in eDNA levels compared to the parental strain, the rpoN mutant formed more robust biofilms as observed using laser scanning confocal microscopy and Comstat analysis, indicating and emphasizing the presence of other matrix components. Initial adherence to a polystyrene surface was also enhanced in the mutant. Proteinase K treatment at early stages of biofilm development significantly reduced the accumulation of biofilm by the rpoN mutant. In conclusion, our data indicate that other factors in addition to eDNA might contribute to the overall composition of the enterococcal biofilm and that the regulatory role of ?54 governs the nature and composition of the biofilm matrix. PMID:22081387

  3. Enzymatic catalysis of mercury methylation by planktonic and biofilm cultures of sulfate- reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.; Kampalath, R.; Jay, J.

    2007-12-01

    While biofilms are now known to be the predominant form of microbial growth in nature, little is known about their role in environmental mercury (Hg) methylation. Due to its long-range atmospheric transport, Hg contamination of food chains is a worldwide problem, impacting even pristine areas. Among different forms of mercury species, methylmercury (MeHg) is an extremely neurotoxic and biomagnification-prone compound that can lead to severely adverse health effects on wildlife and humans. Considerable studies have shown that in the aquatic environment the external supply of MeHg is not sufficient to account for MeHg accumulation in biota and in situ biological MeHg formation plays a critical role in determining the amount of MeHg in food webs; moreover, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) has been identified as the principal Hg-methylating organisms in nature. In a wide range of aquatic systems wetlands are considered important sites for Hg methylation mostly because of the environmental factors that promote microbial activity within, and biofilms are especially important in wetland ecosystems due to large amount of submerged surfaces. Although recent work has focused on the environmental factors that control MeHg production and the conditions that affect the availability of inorganic Hg to SRB, much remains to be understood about the biochemical mechanism of the Hg methylation process in SRB, especially in the biofilm-growth of these microbes. Data from our previous study with SRB strains isolated from a coastal wetland suggested that the specific Hg methylation rate found was approximately an order of magnitude higher in biofilm cells than in planktonic cells. In order to investigate possible reasons for this observed difference, and to test if this phenomenon is observed in other strains, we conducted chloroform, fluroacetate and molybdate inhibition assays in both complete and incomplete-oxidizing SRB species (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans M8, Desulfococcus sp. Desulfobactor sp. BG8) grown in planktonic and biofilm form, as the acetyl- coenzyme A pathway involved with cobalamin has been hypothesized to be the pathway for Hg methylation. The purpose of this study was to probe whether differences in the enzymatically catalyzed process caused differential methylation rates between the species and also between the different forms of culture growth. Any attempts to control the environmentally undesirable Hg methylation process would benefit from a better understanding of the biochemical mechanism involved.

  4. Cationic amphipathic peptides KT2 and RT2 are taken up into bacterial cells and kill planktonic and biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed

    Anunthawan, Thitiporn; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Hancock, Robert E W; Klaynongsruang, Sompong

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of two tryptophan-rich antibacterial peptides (KT2 and RT2) obtained in a previous optimization screen for increased killing of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria pathogens. At their minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), these peptides completely killed cells of multidrug-resistant, enterohemorrhagic pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 within 1-5min. In addition, both peptides exhibited anti-biofilm activity at sub-MIC levels. Indeed, these peptides prevented biofilm formation and triggered killing of cells in mature E. coli O157:H7 biofilms at 1?M. Both peptides bound to bacterial surface LPS as assessed using the dansyl-polymyxin displacement assay, and were able to interact with the lipids of liposomes as determined by observing a tryptophan blue shift. Interestingly, even though these peptides were highly antimicrobial, they did not induce pore formation or aggregates in bacterial cell membranes. Instead these peptides readily penetrated into bacterial cells as determined by confocal microscopy of labeled peptides. DNA binding assays indicated that both peptides bound to DNA with higher affinity than the positive control peptide buforin II. We propose that cationic peptides KT2 and RT2 bind to negatively-charged LPS to enable self-promoted uptake and, subsequently interact with cytoplasmic membrane phospholipids through their hydrophobic domains enabling translocation across the bacterial membrane and entry into cells within minutes and binding to DNA and other cytoplasmic membrane. Due to their dual antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activities, these peptides may find use as an alternative to (or in conjunction with) conventional antibiotics to treat acute infections caused by planktonic bacteria and chronic, biofilm-related infections. PMID:25767037

  5. Relevance of Polymeric Matrix Enzymes During Biofilm Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anna M. Romaní; Katharina Fund; Joan Artigas; Thomas Schwartz; Sergi Sabater; Ursula Obst

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) contribute to biofilm stability and adhesion properties. The EPS matrix might also\\u000a be a site for free extracellular enzyme activity; however, little is known about participation of enzyme activity in EPS during\\u000a biofilm formation. In this study, we analyzed the activities of ?-glucosidase, leu-aminopeptidase, and ?-glucosaminidase during\\u000a the colonization of artificial substrata (glass tiles) in a

  6. Bactericidal Activity of N-Chlorotaurine against Biofilm-Forming Bacteria Grown on Metal Disks

    PubMed Central

    Ammann, Christoph G.; Fille, Manfred; Hausdorfer, Johann; Nogler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Many orthopedic surgeons consider surgical irrigation and debridement with prosthesis retention as a treatment option for postoperative infections. Usually, saline solution with no added antimicrobial agent is used for irrigation. We investigated the activity of N-chlorotaurine (NCT) against various biofilm-forming bacteria in vitro and thereby gained significant information on its usability as a soluble and well-tolerated active chlorine compound in orthopedic surgery. Biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus were grown on metal alloy disks and in polystyrene dishes for 48 h. Subsequently, they were incubated for 15 min to 7 h in buffered solutions containing therapeutically applicable concentrations of NCT (1%, 0.5%, and 0.1%; 5.5 to 55 mM) at 37°C. NCT inactivated the biofilm in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Scanning electron microscopy revealed disturbance of the biofilm architecture by rupture of the extracellular matrix. Assays with reduction of carboxanilide (XTT) showed inhibition of the metabolism of the bacteria in biofilms. Quantitative cultures confirmed killing of S. aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms on metal alloy disks by NCT. Clinical isolates were slightly more resistant than ATCC type strains, but counts of CFU were reduced at least 10-fold by 1% NCT within 15 min in all cases. NCT showed microbicidal activity against various bacterial strains in biofilms. Whether this can be transferred to the clinical situation should be the aim of future studies. PMID:24492358

  7. Kinetics of biofilm formation and desiccation survival of Listeria monocytogenes in single and dual species biofilms with Pseudomonas fluorescens, Serratia proteamaculans or Shewanella baltica on food-grade stainless steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar Alavi, Hessam Edin; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the dynamics of static biofilm formation (100% RH, 15 °C, 48-72 h) and desiccation survival (43% RH, 15 °C, 21 days) of Listeria monocytogenes, in dual species biofilms with the common spoilage bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Serratia proteamaculans and Shewanella baltica, on the surface of food grade stainless steel. The Gram-negative bacteria reduced the maximum biofilm population of L. monocytogenes in dual species biofilms and increased its inactivation during desiccation. However, due to the higher desiccation resistance of Listeria relative to P. fluorescens and S. baltica, the pathogen survived in greater final numbers. In contrast, S. proteamaculans outcompeted the pathogen during the biofilm formation and exhibited similar desiccation survival, causing the N21 days of Serratia to be ca 3 Log10(CFU cm(-2)) greater than that of Listeria in the dual species biofilm. Microscopy revealed biofilm morphologies with variable amounts of exopolymeric substance and the presence of separate microcolonies. Under these simulated food plant conditions, the fate of L. monocytogenes during formation of mixed biofilms and desiccation depended on the implicit characteristics of the co-cultured bacterium. PMID:24102145

  8. The Type II secretion system delivers matrix proteins for biofilm formation by Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tanya L; Fong, Jiunn C; Rule, Chelsea; Rogers, Andrew; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Sandkvist, Maria

    2014-12-01

    Gram-negative bacteria have evolved several highly dedicated pathways for extracellular protein secretion, including the type II secretion (T2S) system. Since substrates secreted via the T2S system include both virulence factors and degradative enzymes, this secretion system is considered a major survival mechanism for pathogenic and environmental species. Previous analyses revealed that the T2S system mediates the export of ? 20 proteins in Vibrio cholerae, a human pathogen that is indigenous to the marine environment. Here we demonstrate a new role in biofilm formation for the V. cholerae T2S system, since wild-type V. cholerae was found to secrete the biofilm matrix proteins RbmC, RbmA, and Bap1 into the culture supernatant, while an isogenic T2S mutant could not. In agreement with this finding, the level of biofilm formation in a static microtiter assay was diminished in T2S mutants. Moreover, inactivation of the T2S system in a rugose V. cholerae strain prevented the development of colony corrugation and pellicle formation at the air-liquid interface. In contrast, extracellular secretion of the exopolysaccharide VPS, an essential component of the biofilm matrix, remained unaffected in the T2S mutants. Our results indicate that the T2S system provides a mechanism for the delivery of extracellular matrix proteins known to be important for biofilm formation by V. cholerae. Because the T2S system contributes to the pathogenicity of V. cholerae by secreting proteins such as cholera toxin and biofilm matrix proteins, elucidation of the molecular mechanism of T2S has the potential to lead to the development of novel preventions and therapies. PMID:25266381

  9. Functional Analysis of the Protein Veg, Which Stimulates Biofilm Formation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Ying; Oshima, Taku; Ogasawara, Naotake

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm is a complex aggregate of cells that adhere to each other and produce an extracellular matrix. In Bacillus subtilis, an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) and amyloid fiber (TasA), synthesized by the epsA-epsO and tapA-sipW-tasA operons, respectively, are the primary components of the extracellular matrix. In the current study, we investigated the functional role of the previously uncharacterized veg gene in B. subtilis. Overproduction of Veg, a small protein highly conserved among Gram-positive bacteria, stimulated biofilm formation via inducing transcription of the tapA-sipW-tasA operon. Moreover, overproduced Veg restored the impairment of biofilm formation in mutants carrying a deletion of of sinI, slrA, or slrR, encoding an antirepressor of SinR that acts as the master regulator of biofilm formation, while biofilm morphology in the absence of SinR was not affected by either additional veg deletion or overproduction, indicating that Veg negatively regulates SinR activity independently of the known antirepressors. Expression of sinR was not affected in Veg-overproducing cells, and amounts of SinR were similar in cells expressing different levels of Veg, strongly suggesting that Veg modulates the repressor activity of SinR. Interestingly, the results of in vivo pulldown assays of the SinR complex indicate that Veg inhibits the interactions between SinR and SlrR. Based on these findings, we propose that Veg or a Veg-induced protein acts as an antirepressor of SinR to regulate biofilm formation. PMID:23378512

  10. Biofilm Formation among Clinical and Food Isolates of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Joana; Borges, Sandra; Camilo, Ruth; Magalhães, Rui; Ferreira, Vânia; Santos, Isabel; Silva, Joana; Almeida, Gonçalo; Teixeira, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Objective. A total of 725 Listeria monocytogenes isolates, 607 from various foods and 118 from clinical cases of listeriosis, were investigated concerning their ability to form biofilms, at 4°C during 5 days and at 37°C during 24?h. Methods. Biofilm production was carried out on polystyrene tissue culture plates. Five L. monocytogenes isolates were tested for biofilm formation after being exposed to acidic and osmotic stress conditions. Results. Significant differences (P < 0.01) between clinical and food isolates were observed. At 37°C for 24?h, most food isolates were classified as weak or moderate biofilm formers whereas all the clinical isolates were biofilm producers, although the majority were weak. At 4°C during 5 days, 65 and 59% isolates, from food and clinical cases, respectively, were classified as weak. After both sublethal stresses, at 37°C just one of the five isolates tested was shown to be more sensitive to subsequent acidic exposure. However, at 4°C both stresses did not confer either sensitivity or resistance. Conclusions. Significant differences between isolates origin, temperature, and sublethal acidic stress were observed concerning the ability to form biofilms. Strain, origin, and environmental conditions can determine the level of biofilm production by L. monocytogenes isolates. PMID:24489549

  11. Antibacterial activity of moxifloxacin on bacteria associated with periodontitis within a biofilm.

    PubMed

    Tsaousoglou, Phoebus; Nietzsche, Sandor; Cachovan, Georg; Sculean, Anton; Eick, Sigrun

    2014-02-01

    The activity of moxifloxacin was compared with ofloxacin and doxycycline against bacteria associated with periodontitis within a biofilm (single strain and mixed population) in vitro. MICs and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of moxifloxacin, ofloxacin and doxycyline were determined against single strains and mixed populations in a planktonic state. Single-species biofilms of two Porphyromonas gingivalis and two Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans strains and a multispecies biofilm consisting of 12 species were formed for 3 days. The minimal biofilm eradication concentrations (MBECs) were determined after exposing the biofilms to the antibacterials (0.002-512 µg ml(-1)) for 18 h, addition of nutrient broth for 3 days and subsequent subcultivation. Photographs were taken using confocal laser-scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The MICs and MBCs did not differ between ofloxacin and moxifloxacin against A. actinomycetemcomitans, whilst moxifloxacin was more active than the other tested antibacterials against anaerobes and the mixed population. The single-species biofilms were eradicated by moderate concentrations of the antibacterials, and the lowest MBECs were always found for moxifloxacin (2-8 µg ml(-1)). MBECs against the multispecies biofilms were 128, >512 and >512 µg ml(-1) for moxifloxacin, ofloxacin and doxycycline, respectively. In summary, moxifloxacin in a topical formulation may have potential as an adjunct to mechanical removal of the biofilms. PMID:24217128

  12. Biofilm streamer formation in a microfluidic porous media mimic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Aloke; Valiei, Amin; Mukherjee, Partha; Liu, Yang; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Biofilm formation in porous media is of significant importance in many environmental and industrial processes such as bioremediation, oil recovery, and wastewater treatment. Among different biological and environmental factors, hydrodynamics is considered an important determinant of the dynamics of biofilm formation. In the present study, we fabricated a microfluidic porous media mimic and investigated how fluid flow influences the formation of filamentous structures, known as streamers, between porous media structures. Streamers are viscoelastic materials composed of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and bacterial cells, and these filamentous structures are typically tethered at either one of both ends to surfaces. We studied evolution of streamers in different flow rates and identified a tangible link between hydrodynamic conditions and development of these filamentous structures. Our results show that hydrodynamic conditions not only determine the limit of the streamers formation, but also influence both temporal evolution and spatial organization of biofilm streamers.

  13. A Novel Cell Wall Lipopeptide Is Important for Biofilm Formation and Pathogenicity of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofilm formation by pathogenic bacteria plays a key role in their pathogenesis. Previously, the pstA gene was shown to be involved in the virulence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. ap), the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle and a potential risk factor for Crohn's d...

  14. Influence of curli expression on biofilm formation and attachment to plant surface by shiga toxigenic E. coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (STEC) outbreaks have been linked to consumption of fresh produce. Bacteria extracellular appendages, such as curli fibers and cellulose may play critical role in STEC biofilm formation and adherence to plant surface. We determined cellulose and curli product...

  15. Fibronectin-binding proteins are required for biofilm formation by community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain LAC.

    PubMed

    McCourt, Jennifer; O'Halloran, Dara P; McCarthy, Hannah; O'Gara, James P; Geoghegan, Joan A

    2014-04-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus of the USA300 lineage is emerging as an important cause of medical device-related infection. However, few factors required for biofilm accumulation by USA300 strains have been identified, and the processes involved are poorly understood. Here, we identify S. aureus proteins required for the USA300 isolate LAC to form biofilm. A mutant with a deletion of the fnbA and fnbB genes did not express the fibronectin-binding proteins FnBPA and FnBPB and lacked the ability to adhere to fibronectin or to form biofilm. Biofilm formation by the mutant LAC?fnbAfnbB could be restored by expression of FnBPA or FnBPB from a plasmid demonstrating that both of these proteins can mediate biofilm formation when expressed by LAC. Expression of FnBPA and FnBPB increased bacterial aggregation suggesting that fibronectin-binding proteins can promote the accumulation phase of biofilm. Loss of fibronectin-binding proteins reduced the initial adherence of bacteria, indicating that these proteins are also involved in primary attachment. In summary, these findings improve our understanding of biofilm formation by the USA300 strain LAC by demonstrating that the fibronectin-binding proteins are required. PMID:24628034

  16. Virstatin inhibits biofilm formation and motility of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen causing infections worldwide. One reason for this emergence is due to its natural ability to survive in the hospital environment, which may be explained by its capacity to form biofilms. Cell surface appendages are important determinants of the A. baumannii biofilm formation and as such constitute interesting targets to prevent the development of biofilm-related infections. A chemical agent called virstatin was recently described to impair the virulence of Vibrio cholerae by preventing the expression of its virulence factor, the toxin coregulated pilus (type IV pilus). The objective of this work was to investigate the potential effect of virstatin on A. baumannii biofilms. Results After a dose–response experiment, we determined that 100 ?M virstatin led to an important decrease (38%) of biofilms formed by A. baumannii ATCC17978 grown under static mode. We demonstrated that the production of biofilms grown under dynamic mode was also delayed and reduced. The biofilm susceptibility to virstatin was then tested for 40 clinical and reference A. baumannii strains. 70% of the strains were susceptible to virstatin (with a decrease of 10 to 65%) when biofilms grew in static mode, whereas 60% of strains respond to the treatment when their biofilms grew in dynamic mode. As expected, motility and atomic force microscopy experiments showed that virstatin acts on the A. baumannii pili biogenesis. Conclusions By its action on pili biogenesis, virstatin demonstrated a very promising antibiofilm activity affecting more than 70% of the A. baumannii clinical isolates. PMID:24621315

  17. Selected dietary (poly)phenols inhibit periodontal pathogen growth and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Muhammad; Millhouse, Emma; Culshaw, Shauna; Edwards, Christine A; Ramage, Gordon; Combet, Emilie

    2015-03-11

    Periodontitis (PD) is a chronic infectious disease mediated by bacteria in the oral cavity. (Poly)phenols (PPs), ubiquitous in plant foods, possess antimicrobial activities and may be useful in the prevention and management of periodontitis. The objective of this study was to test the antibacterial effects of selected PPs on periodontal pathogens, on both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. Selected PPs (n = 48) were screened against Streptococcus mitis (S. mitis), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). The antibacterial potential of each compound was evaluated in terms of planktonic minimum inhibitory concentration (PMIC) and planktonic minimum bactericidal concentration (PMBC) using standardized broth microdilution assays. The most active PPs were further tested for their effect on mono-species and multi-species biofilms using a colorimetric resazurin-based viability assay and scanning electron microscopy. Of the 48 PPs tested, 43 showed effective inhibition of planktonic growth of one or more test strains, of which curcumin was the most potent (PMIC range = 7.8-62.5 ?g mL(-1)), followed by pyrogallol (PMIC range = 2.4-2500 ?g mL(-1)), pyrocatechol (MIC range = 4.9-312.5 ?g mL(-1)) and quercetin (PMIC range = 31.2-500 ?g mL(-1)). At this concentration, adhesion of curcumin and quercetin to the substrate also inhibited adhesion of S. mitis, and biofilm formation and maturation. While both curcumin and quercetin were able to alter architecture of mature multi-species biofilms, only curcumin-treated biofilms displayed a significantly reduced metabolic activity. Overall, PPs possess antibacterial activities against periodontopathic bacteria in both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. Further cellular and in vivo studies are necessary to confirm their beneficial activities and potential use in the prevention and or treatment of periodontal diseases. PMID:25585200

  18. Conditioning film and initial biofilm formation on ceramics tiles in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Siboni, Nachshon; Lidor, Michal; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2007-09-01

    The formation of biofilm on surfaces in the marine environment is believed to be an important factor driving colonization and recruitment of some sessile invertebrate communities. The present study follows the process of biofilm buildup on unglazed ceramic tiles deployed into the marine environment in the northern Gulf of Eilat. PCR-DGGE of film eluted from the tile surface indicated the presence of bacteria as early as 2 h after deployment. The makeup of the biofilm bacterial community was dynamic. Bacterial presence was apparent microscopically 6 h after deployment, though a developed biofilm was not observed until 24 h following deployment. Total organic carbon (TOC) data suggest that a conditioning film was built within the first four hours following deployment. During this time period TOC reached the highest level possibly due to adhesion of organics (e.g., sugars, proteins and humic substances) from the water column. We suggest that the primary adhering bacteria, whilst still in the reversible stage of adhesion, utilize the conditioning film as food causing the decrease in TOC. Understanding the dynamics between these primary bacterial settlers is of importance, since they may play a role on the succession of invertebrate species settlement onto artificial surfaces. PMID:17578524

  19. Propionibacterium-Produced Coproporphyrin III Induces Staphylococcus aureus Aggregation and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wollenberg, Michael S.; Claesen, Jan; Escapa, Isabel F.; Aldridge, Kelly L.; Fischbach, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The majority of bacteria detected in the nostril microbiota of most healthy adults belong to three genera: Propionibacterium, Corynebacterium, and Staphylococcus. Among these staphylococci is the medically important bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. Almost nothing is known about interspecies interactions among bacteria in the nostrils. We observed that crude extracts of cell-free conditioned medium from Propionibacterium spp. induce S. aureus aggregation in culture. Bioassay-guided fractionation implicated coproporphyrin III (CIII), the most abundant extracellular porphyrin produced by human-associated Propionibacterium spp., as a cause of S. aureus aggregation. This aggregation response depended on the CIII dose and occurred during early stationary-phase growth, and a low pH (~4 to 6) was necessary but was not sufficient for its induction. Additionally, CIII induced plasma-independent S. aureus biofilm development on an abiotic surface in multiple S. aureus strains. In strain UAMS-1, CIII stimulation of biofilm depended on sarA, a key biofilm regulator. This study is one of the first demonstrations of a small-molecule-mediated interaction among medically relevant members of the nostril microbiota and the first description of a role for CIII in bacterial interspecies interactions. Our results indicate that CIII may be an important mediator of S. aureus aggregation and/or biofilm formation in the nostril or other sites inhabited by Propionibacterium spp. and S. aureus. PMID:25053784

  20. Inhibition of biofilm formation and antibacterial properties of a silver nano-coating on human dentine.

    PubMed

    Besinis, Alexandros; De Peralta, Tracy; Handy, Richard D

    2014-11-01

    The survival of pathogenic bacteria in the oral cavity depends on their successful adhesion to dental surfaces and their ability to develop into biofilms, known as dental plaque. Bacteria from the dental plaque are responsible for the development of dental caries, gingivitis, periodontitis, stomatitis and peri-implantitis. Certain metal nanoparticles have been suggested for infection control and the management of the oral biofilm. Here, it is shown that application of a silver nano-coating directly on dentine can successfully prevent the biofilm formation on dentine surfaces as well as inhibit bacterial growth in the surrounding media. This silver nano-coating was found to be stable (>98.8%) and to maintain its integrity in biological fluids. Its antibacterial activity was compared to silver nitrate and the widely used clinical antiseptic, chlorhexidine. The bacterial growth and cell viability were quantitatively assessed by measuring the turbidity, proportion of live and dead cells and lactate production. All three bioassays showed that silver nanoparticles and silver nitrate dentine coatings were equally highly bactericidal (>99.5%), while inhibiting bacterial adhesion. However, the latter caused significant dentine discolouration (?E* = 50.3). The chlorhexidine coating showed no antibacterial effect. Thus, silver nanoparticles may be a viable alternative to both chlorhexidine and silver nitrate, protecting from dental plaque and secondary caries when applied as a dentine coating, while they may provide the platform for creating anti-biofilm surfaces in medical devices and other biomedical applications. PMID:23875717

  1. Quercus cerris extracts limit Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Hobby, Gerren H.; Quave, Cassandra L.; Nelson, Katie; Compadre, Cesar M.; Beenken, Karen E.; Smeltzer, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Quercus cerris L., Fagaceae has been used in traditional Mediterranean medicine for numerous purposes, including anti-infective therapies for diarrhea and wound care. Aim of the study To evaluate the anti-staphylococcal activity of fractions of ethanolic extracts of Q. cerris leaf and stem/fruit samples in models for biofilm and growth inhibition. Materials and methods Ethanolic extracts of Q. cerris leaves and stems/fruits were prepared, resuspended in water and fractioned by successively partitioning with hexane, ethyl acetate and butanol. The ability of the fractions to inhibit Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation was tested using static crystal violet staining methods and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Growth studies were conducted to determine if the diminished capacity to form a biofilm was related to growth inhibition. Results The butanol extracts of both the leaf and stem/fruit samples were the most active, and at a dose of 200 ?g/ml, the capacity to form a biofilm was limited to a level equivalent to that of the sarA mutant controls. Further examination of the impact of these fractions on S. aureus growth revealed that biofilm inhibition by the leaf butanol fraction was due to its bacteriostatic activity. The stem/fruit butanol fraction, however, showed a limited impact on growth, thus demonstrating that biofilm inhibition in this case is not related to the bacteriostatic activity of the extract. Conclusion Our evaluation of a medicinal plant used in Mediterranean ethnotherapies for infectious disease has demonstrated significant activity in the inhibition of staphylococcal biofilm formation with a mechanism unrelated to staphylococcal growth inhibition. These results contribute towards validation of this botanical remedy and form the groundwork for future studies in the search for novel biofilm inhibiting drugs. PMID:23127649

  2. Spatial and temporal dynamics of cellulose degradation and biofilm formation by Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis and Clostridium thermocellum Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiwu [ORNL; Lee, Sueng-Hwan [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan; Elkins, James G [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose degradation is one of the major bottlenecks of a consolidated bioprocess that employs cellulolytic bacterial cells as catalysts to produce biofuels from cellulosic biomass. In this study, we investigated the spatial and temporal dynamics of cellulose degradation by Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis, which does not produce cellulosomes, and Clostridium thermocellum, which does produce cellulosomes. Results showed that the degradation of either regenerated or natural cellulose was synchronized with biofilm formation, a process characterized by the formation and fusion of numerous crater-like depressions on the cellulose surface. In addition, the dynamics of biofilm formation were similar in both bacteria, regardless of cellulosome production. Only the areas of cellulose surface colonized by microbes were significantly degraded, highlighting the essential role of the cellulolytic biofilm in cellulose utilization. After initial attachment, the microbial biofilm structure remained thin, uniform and dense throughout the experiment. A cellular automaton model, constructed under the assumption that the attached cells divide and produce daughter cells that contribute to the hydrolysis of the adjacent cellulose, can largely simulate the observed process of biofilm formation and cellulose degradation. This study presents a model, based on direct observation, correlating cellulolytic biofilm formation with cellulose degradation.

  3. fSpatial and temporal dynamics of cellulose degradation and biofilm formation by Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis and Clostridium thermocellum

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose degradation is one of the major bottlenecks of a consolidated bioprocess that employs cellulolytic bacterial cells as catalysts to produce biofuels from cellulosic biomass. In this study, we investigated the spatial and temporal dynamics of cellulose degradation by Caldicellulosiruptfor obsidiansis, which does not produce cellulosomes, and Clostridium thermocellum, which does produce cellulosomes. Results showed that the degradation of either regenerated or natural cellulose was synchronized with biofilm formation, a process characterized by the formation and fusion of numerous crater-like depressions on the cellulose surface. In addition, the dynamics of biofilm formation were similar in both bacteria, regardless of cellulosome production. Only the areas of cellulose surface colonized by microbes were significantly degraded, highlighting the essential role of the cellulolytic biofilm in cellulose utilization. After initial attachment, the microbial biofilm structure remained thin, uniform and dense throughout the experiment. A cellular automaton model, constructed under the assumption that the attached cells divide and produce daughter cells that contribute to the hydrolysis of the adjacent cellulose, can largely simulate the observed process of biofilm formation and cellulose degradation. This study presents a model, based on direct observation, correlating cellulolytic biofilm formation with cellulose degradation. PMID:21982458

  4. The Biocide Chlorine Dioxide Stimulates Biofilm Formation in Bacillus subtilis by Activation of the Histidine Kinase KinC? †

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, Moshe; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis forms biofilms in response to signals that remain poorly defined. We report that biofilm formation is stimulated by sublethal doses of chlorine dioxide (ClO2), an extremely effective and fast-acting biocide. ClO2 accelerated biofilm formation in B. subtilis as well as in other bacteria, suggesting that biofilm formation is a widely conserved response to sublethal doses of the agent. Biofilm formation depends on the synthesis of an extracellular matrix that holds the constituent cells together. We show that the transcription of the major operons responsible for the matrix production in B. subtilis, epsA-epsO and yqxM-sipW-tasA, was enhanced by ClO2, in a manner that depended on the membrane-bound kinase KinC. Activation of KinC appeared to be due to the ability of ClO2 to collapse the membrane potential. Importantly, strains unable to make a matrix were hypersensitive to ClO2, indicating that biofilm formation is a defensive response that helps protect cells from the toxic effects of the biocide. PMID:20971918

  5. Probiotic-mediated competition, exclusion and displacement in biofilm formation by food-borne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Woo, J; Ahn, J

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the inhibitory effect of probiotic strains on pathogenic biofilm formation in terms of competition, exclusion and displacement. Probiotic strains (Lactobacillus acidophilus KACC 12419, Lact. casei KACC 12413, Lact. paracasei KACC 12427 and Lact. rhamnosus KACC 11953) and pathogens (Salmonella Typhimurium KCCM 40253 and Listeria monocytogenes KACC 12671) were used to evaluate the auto-aggregation, hydrophobicity and biofilm formation inhibition. The highest auto-aggregation abilities were observed in Lact. rhamnosus (17·5%), Lact. casei (17·2%) and Lact. acidophilus (15·1%). Salm. Typhimurium had the highest affinity to xylene, showing the hydrophobicity of 53·7%. The numbers of L. monocytogenes biofilm cells during the competition, exclusion and displacement assays were effectively reduced by more than 3 log when co-cultured with Lact. paracasei and Lact. rhamnosus. The results suggest that probiotic strains can be used as alternative way to effectively reduce the biofilm formation in pathogenic bacteria through competition, exclusion and displacement. PMID:23362863

  6. Electroactivity of Phototrophic River Biofilms and Constitutive Cultivable Bacteria ? †

    PubMed Central

    Lyautey, Emilie; Cournet, Amandine; Morin, Soizic; Boulêtreau, Stéphanie; Etcheverry, Luc; Charcosset, Jean-Yves; Delmas, François; Bergel, Alain; Garabetian, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Electroactivity is a property of microorganisms assembled in biofilms that has been highlighted in a variety of environments. This characteristic was assessed for phototrophic river biofilms at the community scale and at the bacterial population scale. At the community scale, electroactivity was evaluated on stainless steel and copper alloy coupons used both as biofilm colonization supports and as working electrodes. At the population scale, the ability of environmental bacterial strains to catalyze oxygen reduction was assessed by cyclic voltammetry. Our data demonstrate that phototrophic river biofilm development on the electrodes, measured by dry mass and chlorophyll a content, resulted in significant increases of the recorded potentials, with potentials of up to +120 mV/saturated calomel electrode (SCE) on stainless steel electrodes and +60 mV/SCE on copper electrodes. Thirty-two bacterial strains isolated from natural phototrophic river biofilms were tested by cyclic voltammetry. Twenty-five were able to catalyze oxygen reduction, with shifts of potential ranging from 0.06 to 0.23 V, cathodic peak potentials ranging from ?0.36 to ?0.76 V/SCE, and peak amplitudes ranging from ?9.5 to ?19.4 ?A. These isolates were diversified phylogenetically (Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria) and exhibited various phenotypic properties (Gram stain, oxidase, and catalase characteristics). These data suggest that phototrophic river biofilm communities and/or most of their constitutive bacterial populations present the ability to promote electronic exchange with a metallic electrode, supporting the following possibilities: (i) development of electrochemistry-based sensors allowing in situ phototrophic river biofilm detection and (ii) production of microbial fuel cell inocula under oligotrophic conditions. PMID:21642402

  7. Role of Rhizobium endoglucanase CelC2 in cellulose biosynthesis and biofilm formation on plant roots and abiotic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The synthesis of cellulose is among the most important but poorly understood biochemical processes, especially in bacteria, due to its complexity and high degree of regulation. In this study, we analyzed both the production of cellulose by all known members of the Rhizobiaceae and the diversity of Rhizobium celABC operon predicted to be involved in cellulose biosynthesis. We also investigated the involvement in cellulose production and biofilm formation of celC gene encoding an endoglucanase (CelC2) that is required for canonical symbiotic root hair infection by Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii. Results ANU843 celC mutants lacking (ANU843?C2) or overproducing cellulase (ANU843C2+) produced greatly increased or reduced amounts of external cellulose micro fibrils, respectively. Calcofluor-stained cellulose micro fibrils were considerably longer when formed by ANU843?C2 bacteria rather than by the wild-type strain, in correlation with a significant increase in their flocculation in batch culture. In contrast, neither calcofluor-stained extracellular micro fibrils nor flocculation was detectable in ANU843C2+ cells. To clarify the role of cellulose synthesis in Rhizobium cell aggregation and attachment, we analyzed the ability of these mutants to produce biofilms on different surfaces. Alteration of wild-type CelC2 levels resulted in a reduced ability of bacteria to form biofilms both in abiotic surfaces and in planta. Conclusions Our results support a key role of the CelC2 cellulase in cellulose biosynthesis by modulating the length of the cellulose fibrils that mediate firm adhesion among Rhizobium bacteria leading to biofilm formation. Rhizobium cellulose is an essential component of the biofilm polysaccharidic matrix architecture and either an excess or a defect of this “building material” seem to collapse the biofilm structure. These results position cellulose hydrolytic enzymes as excellent anti-biofilm candidates. PMID:22970813

  8. Author's personal copy Phenazines affect biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in similar

    E-print Network

    Dietrich, Lars

    Author's personal copy Phenazines affect biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in similar to synthesize phenazines in flow cell and colony biofilms quantitatively. Although phenazine production does biofilms. These results indicate that phenazines affect biofilm development across a large range of scales

  9. The formation of green rust induced by tropical river biofilm components

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The formation of green rust induced by tropical river biofilm components Running title: Green rust from ferruginous biofilms 5 Frédéric Jorand, Asfaw Zegeye, Jaafar Ghanbaja, Mustapha Abdelmoula), a dense red biofilm grows on flooded15 surfaces. In order to characterize the iron oxides in this biofilm

  10. Biofilm Formation by Mycobacterium bovis: Influence of Surface Kind and Temperatures of Sanitizer Treatments on Biofilm Control

    PubMed Central

    Adetunji, Victoria O.; Kehinde, Aderemi O.; Bolatito, Olayemi K.; Chen, Jinru

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis causes classic bovine tuberculosis, a zoonosis which is still a concern in Africa. Biofilm forming ability of two Mycobacterium bovis strains was assessed on coupons of cement, ceramic, or stainless steel in three different microbiological media at 37°C with agitation for 2, 3, or 4 weeks to determine the medium that promotes biofilm. Biofilm mass accumulated on coupons was treated with 2 sanitizers (sanitizer A (5.5?mg?L?1 active iodine) and sanitizer B (170.6?g1 alkyl dimethylbenzyl ammonium chloride, 78?g?1 didecyldimethyl ammonium chloride, 107.25?g?L?1 glutaraldehyde, 146.25?g?L?1 isopropanol, and 20?g?L?1 pine oil) at 28 and 45°C and in hot water at 85°C for 5?min. Residual biofilms on treated coupons were quantified using crystal violet binding assay. The two strains had a similar ability to form biofilms on the three surfaces. More biofilms were developed in media containing 5% liver extract. Biofilm mass increased as incubation time increased till the 3rd week. More biofilms were formed on cement than on ceramic and stainless steel surfaces. Treatment with hot water at 85°C reduced biofilm mass, however, sanitizing treatments at 45°C removed more biofilms than at 28°C. However, neither treatment completely eliminated the biofilms. The choice of processing surface and temperatures used for sanitizing treatments had an impact on biofilm formation and its removal from solid surfaces. PMID:24991540

  11. Biofilm formation by coagulase-negative staphylococci: impact on the efficacy of antimicrobials and disinfectants commonly used on dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Yannick D N; Caron, Vincent; Blondeau, Andréanne; Messier, Serge; Jacques, Mario

    2014-08-27

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) have traditionally been considered minor mastitis pathogens and are the bacteria most frequently isolated from intramammary infection. Previously, our laboratory demonstrated that a majority of CNS isolated from Canadian milk were able to form biofilm and this was strongly and positively associated with days in milk. Biofilms offer protection against antibiotics and disinfectants, and the presence of CNS biofilms near the end of the lactation cycle could have an impact on the prevention and recurrence of CNS infections in the next lactation cycle. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of biofilm formation on efficacy of commonly used antibiotics and disinfectants against CNS. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) of several CNS isolates were determined using microdilution method and the MBEC device, respectively. Biofilm cells were more resistant to a penicillin G/novobiocin combination and to ceftiofur than their planktonic counterparts and the increase in resistance ranged from 4× to 2048×. For the disinfectants, we determined the minimum contact time required for different teat disinfectants to eradicated planktonic cells and biofilms. The chlorhexidine-based teat disinfectants eradicated planktonic cells and biofilms within 30s. For iodine-based teat disinfectants, it took 2-10× longer to eradicate the biofilms than planktonic cells. In conclusion, CNS biofilms were less susceptible to antibiotics; however, chlorhexidine-based teat disinfectants were still effective against CNS biofilms. This reinforces the use of post-milking teat disinfectants as a preventive measure of intramammary infections. PMID:24984943

  12. N-acetyl-L-cysteine affects growth, extracellular polysaccharide production, and bacterial biofilm formation on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Ann-Cathrin; Hermansson, Malte; Elwing, Hans

    2003-08-01

    N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) is used in medical treatment of patients with chronic bronchitis. The positive effects of NAC treatment have primarily been attributed to the mucus-dissolving properties of NAC, as well as its ability to decrease biofilm formation, which reduces bacterial infections. Our results suggest that NAC also may be an interesting candidate for use as an agent to reduce and prevent biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces in environments typical of paper mill plants. Using 10 different bacterial strains isolated from a paper mill, we found that the mode of action of NAC is chemical, as well as biological, in the case of bacterial adhesion to stainless steel surfaces. The initial adhesion of bacteria is dependent on the wettability of the substratum. NAC was shown to bind to stainless steel, increasing the wettability of the surface. Moreover, NAC decreased bacterial adhesion and even detached bacteria that were adhering to stainless steel surfaces. Growth of various bacteria, as monocultures or in a multispecies community, was inhibited at different concentrations of NAC. We also found that there was no detectable degradation of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) by NAC, indicating that NAC reduced the production of EPS, in most bacteria tested, even at concentrations at which growth was not affected. Altogether, the presence of NAC changes the texture of the biofilm formed and makes NAC an interesting candidate for use as a general inhibitor of formation of bacterial biofilms on stainless steel surfaces. PMID:12902275

  13. Purpurin Suppresses Candida albicans Biofilm Formation and Hyphal Development

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Paul Wai-Kei; Bandara, H. M. H. N.; Fong, Wing-Ping

    2012-01-01

    A striking and clinically relevant virulence trait of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans is its ability to grow and switch reversibly among different morphological forms. Inhibition of yeast-to-hypha transition in C. albicans represents a new paradigm for antifungal intervention. We have previously demonstrated the novel antifungal activity of purpurin against Candida fungi. In this study, we extended our investigation by examining the in vitro effect of purpurin on C. albicans morphogenesis and biofilms. The susceptibility of C. albicans biofilms to purpurin was examined quantitatively by 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfo-phenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide reduction assay. Hyphal formation and biofilm ultrastructure were examined qualitatively by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to evaluate the expression of hypha-specific genes and hyphal regulator in purpurin-treated fungal cells. The results showed that, at sub-lethal concentration (3 µg/ml), purpurin blocked the yeast-to-hypha transition under hypha-inducing conditions. Purpurin also inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation and reduced the metabolic activity of mature biofilms in a concentration-dependent manner. SEM images showed that purpurin-treated C. albicans biofilms were scanty and exclusively consisted of aggregates of blastospores. qRT-PCR analyses indicated that purpurin downregulated the expression of hypha-specific genes (ALS3, ECE1, HWP1, HYR1) and the hyphal regulator RAS1. The data strongly suggested that purpurin suppressed C. albicans morphogenesis and caused distorted biofilm formation. By virtue of the ability to block these two virulence traits in C. albicans, purpurin may represent a potential candidate that deserves further investigations in the development of antifungal strategies against this notorious human fungal pathogen in vivo. PMID:23226409

  14. Species specificity, surface exposure, protein expression, immunogenicity, and participation in biofilm formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis HmuY

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major etiological agent of chronic periodontitis. The aim of this study was to examine the species specificity, surface exposure, protein expression, immunogenicity, and participation in biofilm formation of the P. gingivalis heme-binding protein HmuY. Results HmuY is a unique protein of P. gingivalis since only low amino-acid sequence homology has been found to proteins encoded in other species. It is exposed on the cell surface and highly abundant in the outer membrane of the cell, in outer-membrane vesicles, and is released into culture medium in a soluble form. The protein is produced constitutively at low levels in bacteria grown under high-iron/heme conditions and at higher levels in bacteria growing under the low-iron/heme conditions typical of dental plaque. HmuY is immunogenic and elicits high IgG antibody titers in rabbits. It is also engaged in homotypic biofilm formation by P. gingivalis. Anti-HmuY antibodies exhibit inhibitory activity against P. gingivalis growth and biofilm formation. Conclusions Here it is demonstrated that HmuY may play a significant role not only in heme acquisition, but also in biofilm accumulation on abiotic surfaces. The data also suggest that HmuY, as a surface-exposed protein, would be available for recognition by the immune response during chronic periodontitis and the production of anti-HmuY antibodies may inhibit biofilm formation. PMID:20438645

  15. HmsB enhances biofilm formation in Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Nan; Qu, Shi; Yang, Huiying; Fang, Haihong; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Yiquan; Wang, Li; Han, Yanping; Zhou, Dongsheng; Yang, Ruifu

    2014-01-01

    The hmsHFRS operon is responsible for biosynthesis and translocation of biofilm matrix exopolysaccharide. Yersinia pestis expresses the two sole diguanylate cyclases HmsT and HmsD and the sole phosphodiesterase HmsP, which are specific for biosynthesis and degradation, respectively, of 3?,5?-cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), a second messenger promoting exopolysaccharide production. In this work, the phenotypic assays indicates that Y. pestis sRNA HmsB enhances the production of c-di-GMP, exopolysaccharide, and biofilm. Further gene regulation experiments disclose that HmsB stimulates the expression of hmsB, hmsCDE, hmsT, and hmsHFRS but represses that of hmsP. HmsB most likely acts as a major activator of biofilm formation in Y. pestis. This is the first report of regulation of Yersinia biofilm formation by a sRNA. Data presented here will promote us to gain a deeper understanding of the complex regulatory circuits controlling Yersinia biofilm formation. PMID:25566205

  16. Adhesion and formation of microbial biofilms in complex microfluidic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Aloke [ORNL; Karig, David K [ORNL; Neethirajan, Suresh [University of Guelph; Suresh, Anil K [ORNL; Srijanto, Bernadeta R [ORNL; Mukherjee, Partha P [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a metal reducing bacterium, which is of interest for bioremediation and clean energy applications. S. oneidensis biofilms play a critical role in several situations such as in microbial energy harvesting devices. Here, we use a microfluidic device to quantify the effects of hydrodynamics on the biofilm morphology of S. oneidensis. For different rates of fluid flow through a complex microfluidic device, we studied the spatiotemporal dynamics of biofilms, and we quantified several morphological features such as spatial distribution, cluster formation and surface coverage. We found that hydrodynamics resulted in significant differences in biofilm dynamics. The baffles in the device created regions of low and high flow in the same device. At higher flow rates, a nonuniform biofilm develops, due to unequal advection in different regions of the microchannel. However, at lower flow rates, a more uniform biofilm evolved. This depicts competition between adhesion events, growth and fluid advection. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that higher production of extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) occurred at higher flow velocities.

  17. EmbRS a new two-component system that inhibits biofilm formation and saves Rubrivivax gelatinosus from sinking

    PubMed Central

    Steunou, Anne Soisig; Liotenberg, Sylviane; Soler, Marie-Noêlle; Briandet, Romain; Barbe, Valérie; Astier, Chantal; Ouchane, Soufian

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthetic bacteria can switch from planktonic lifestyle to phototrophic biofilm in mats in response to environmental changes. The mechanisms of phototrophic biofilm formation are, however, not characterized. Herein, we report a two-component system EmbRS that controls the biofilm formation in a photosynthetic member of the Burkholderiales order, the purple bacterium Rubrivivax gelatinosus. EmbRS inactivation results in cells that form conspicuous bacterial veils and fast-sinking aggregates in liquid. Biofilm analyses indicated that EmbRS represses the production of an extracellular matrix and biofilm formation. Mapping of transposon mutants that partially or completely restore the wild-type (WT) phenotype allowed the identification of two gene clusters involved in polysaccharide synthesis, one fully conserved only in Thauera sp., a floc-forming wastewater bacterium. A second two-component system BmfRS and a putative diguanylate cyclase BdcA were also identified in this screen suggesting their involvement in biofilm formation in this bacterium. The role of polysaccharides in sinking of microorganisms and organic matter, as well as the importance and the evolution of such regulatory system in phototrophic microorganisms are discussed. PMID:23520142

  18. Type I and type IV pili of Xylella fastidiosa affect twitching motility, biofilm formation and cellcell

    E-print Network

    Meng, Yizhi

    Type I and type IV pili of Xylella fastidiosa affect twitching motility, biofilm formation and cell that type I and type IV pili of X. fastidiosa play different roles in twitching motility, biofilm formation and cell­cell aggregation. Type I pili are particularly important for biofilm formation and aggregation

  19. Connecting Quorum Sensing, c-di-GMP, Pel Polysaccharide, and Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas

    E-print Network

    Wood, Thomas K.

    Connecting Quorum Sensing, c-di-GMP, Pel Polysaccharide, and Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas on homoserine lactones was found to influence biofilm formation. Here we discern a mechanism by which quorum sensing controls biofilm formation by screening 5850 transposon mutants of P. aeruginosa PA14 for altered

  20. LuxU connects quorum sensing to biofilm formation in Vibrio fischeri

    E-print Network

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    LuxU connects quorum sensing to biofilm formation in Vibrio fischeri Valerie A. Ray and Karen L, USA. Summary Biofilm formation by Vibrio fischeri is a complex process involving multiple regulators polysaccha- ride (syp) locus. To identify other regulators of biofilm formation in V. fischeri, we screened

  1. Planktonic and biofilm-grown nitrogen-cycling bacteria exhibit different susceptibilities to copper nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Vincent C; Opot, Stephen O; Mahendra, Shaily

    2015-04-01

    Proper characterization of nanoparticle (NP) interactions with environmentally relevant bacteria under representative conditions is necessary to enable their sustainable manufacture, use, and disposal. Previous nanotoxicology research based on planktonic growth has not adequately explored biofilms, which serve as the predominant mode of bacterial growth in natural and engineered environments. Copper nanoparticle (Cu-NP) impacts on biofilms were compared with respective planktonic cultures of the ammonium-oxidizing Nitrosomonas europaea, nitrogen-fixing Azotobacter vinelandii, and denitrifying Paracoccus denitrificans using a suite of independent toxicity diagnostics. Median inhibitory concentration (IC50) values derived from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for Cu-NPs were lower in N. europaea biofilms (19.6?±?15.3?mg/L) than in planktonic cells (49.0?±?8.0?mg/L). However, in absorbance-based growth assays, compared with unexposed controls, N. europaea growth rates in biofilms were twice as resilient to inhibition than those in planktonic cultures. Similarly, relative to unexposed controls, growth rates and yields of P. denitrificans in biofilms exposed to Cu-NPs were 40-fold to 50-fold less inhibited than those in planktonic cells. Physiological evaluation of ammonium oxidation and nitrate reduction suggested that biofilms were also less inhibited by Cu-NPs than planktonic cells. Furthermore, functional gene expression for ammonium oxidation (amoA) and nitrite reduction (nirK) showed lower inhibition by NPs in biofilms relative to planktonic-grown cells. These results suggest that biofilms mitigate NP impacts, and that nitrogen-cycling bacteria in wastewater, wetlands, and soils might be more resilient to NPs than planktonic-based assessments suggest. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:887-897. © 2014 SETAC. PMID:25556815

  2. Molecular and microscopic identification of sulfate-reducing bacteria in multispecies biofilms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. I. Amann; J. Stromley; R. Devereux; D. A. Stahl

    1992-01-01

    The population architecture of sulfidogenic biofilms established in anaerobic fixed-bed bioreactors was characterized by selective polymerase chain reaction amplification and fluorescence microscopy. A region of the 16S rRNA common to resident sulfate-reducing bacteria was selectively amplified by the polymerase chain reaction. Sequences of amplification products, with reference to a collection of 16S rRNA sequences representing most characterized sulfate-reducing bacteria, were

  3. Effect of CaCO? particles and suspended bacteria on biofilm components and activity in the model recirculating cooling water system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Dong, Wenwen; Yang, Fei; Lu, Lei; Wang, Yongqiang; Yin, Xiaochen; Zhao, Chaocheng

    2012-03-01

    Biofilms are a serious problem in industrial recirculating cooling water systems. Biofilm formation and properties are affected by many factors, such as inorganic particles and suspended bacteria. In this research a laboratory model recirculating cooling water system was applied to investigate the effects of CaCO(3) concentration and suspended bacterial count on extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) content and dehydrogenase activity (DHA) in the attached biofilms. In addition, nutrient level was also the key factor when investigating the effect of suspended bacterial count. The results showed that EPS content and DHA first increased and then decreased with the increase of CaCO(3) concentration from 0 to 200 mg/l. At the low nutrient level, with the increase of suspended bacterial count from 4.04 to 5.78 log(10) c.f.u./ml, biofilm EPS content decreased firstly and then increased. However, biofilm DHA always gradually increased. At the medium nutrient level, biofilm EPS content increased firstly and then decreased and DHA always gradually decreased when suspended bacterial count ranged from 4.04 to 5.78 log(10) c.f.u./ml. At the high nutrient level, biofilm EPS content and DHA both showed the increasing trend with the increase of suspended bacterial count. This work provides the basis and reference for management strategies in actual recirculating cooling water systems. PMID:22805808

  4. Impact of TiO2 Nanoparticles on Growth, Biofilm Formation, and Flavin Secretion in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Maurer-Jones, Melissa A.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Meyer, Ben M.; Christenson, Cole J.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of nanoparticle impacts on critical bacteria functions allows us to gain a mechanistic understanding of toxicity and guides us towards design rules for creating safe nanomaterials. Herein and using analytical techniques, biofilm formation, a general bacteria function, and riboflavin secretion, a species-specific function, were monitored in Shewanella oneidensis, a metal reducing bacterium, following exposure to a variety of TiO2 nanoparticle types (synthesized, Aeroxide P25, and T-Eco). TEM images show that dosed nanoparticles are in close proximity to the bacteria but they are not internalized. Using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), it was revealed that S. oneidensis biofilm formation is slowed in the presence of nanoparticles. Though S. oneidensis grows more slowly in the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles, riboflavin secretion, a function related to the S. oneidensis metal reducing capacity, was increased significantly in a nanoparticle dose-dependent manner. Both changes in biofilm formation and riboflavin secretion are supported by changes in gene expression in nanoparticle-exposed S. oneidensis. This broad study of bacterial nanotoxicity, including use of sensitive analytical tools for functional assessments of biofilm formation, riboflavin secretion, and gene expression has implications for total ecosystem health as the use of engineered nanoparticles grows. PMID:23701037

  5. Influence of Calcium in Extracellular DNA Mediated Bacterial Aggregation and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Koop, Leena; Wong, Yie Kuan; Ahmed, Safia; Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail; Manefield, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) has an important structural role in guaranteeing the integrity of the outer lipopolysaccharide layer and cell walls of bacterial cells. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) being part of the slimy matrix produced by bacteria promotes biofilm formation through enhanced structural integrity of the matrix. Here, the concurrent role of Ca2+ and eDNA in mediating bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation was studied for the first time using a variety of bacterial strains and the thermodynamics of DNA to Ca2+ binding. It was found that the eDNA concentrations under both planktonic and biofilm growth conditions were different among bacterial strains. Whilst Ca2+ had no influence on eDNA release, presence of eDNA by itself favours bacterial aggregation via attractive acid-base interactions in addition, its binding with Ca2+ at biologically relevant concentrations was shown further increase in bacterial aggregation via cationic bridging. Negative Gibbs free energy (?G) values in iTC data confirmed that the interaction between DNA and Ca2+ is thermodynamically favourable and that the binding process is spontaneous and exothermic owing to its highly negative enthalpy. Removal of eDNA through DNase I treatment revealed that Ca2+ alone did not enhance cell aggregation and biofilm formation. This discovery signifies the importance of eDNA and concludes that existence of eDNA on bacterial cell surfaces is a key facilitator in binding of Ca2+ to eDNA thereby mediating bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation. PMID:24651318

  6. Potentials of Mouthwashes in Disinfecting Cariogenic Bacteria and Biofilms Leading to Inhibition of Caries

    PubMed Central

    Oyanagi, Takehiro; Tagami, Junji; Matin, Khairul

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of certain commercially available mouthwashes on cariogenic bacteria and biofilms, following the acquisition of inhibition potentials of caries. Materials and Methods: Mouthwashes containing I) chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG; 0.0005% w/v), II) benzethonium chloride (BTC; 0.01% w/v), III) an essential oil (Listerine), and IV) povidone-iodine (PVP-I; 0.035% w/v) were tested on planktonic cariogenic bacteria, biofilms, and an ex vivo caries model. Bacterial aliquots were inoculated with each solution separately and vortexed for 10 seconds at room temperature. Bacterial viability was subsequently investigated by fluorescence microscopy (FM) after staining with a BacLight viability kit and the number of colony-forming units (CFUs) was counted. Similarly, mouthwash solutions were applied to artificial cariogenic biofilms, and bacterial viability of the biofilms was investigated as stated above. Inhibition potentials of two selected mouthwashes of carious lesions were investigated using biofilm-induced caries and a secondary caries model. In all steps, a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution was included as a control. Results: Planktonic cariogenic bacteria and bacteria embedded in biofilms were killed in remarkably large numbers with Listerine and PVP-I treatment compared to PBS and other gargles. CFU counts also showed significant reduction after treatment with Listerine and PVP-I compared to other solutions (P<0.05). Listerine also displayed significant (P<0.05) inhibition effects in preventing the progression of demineralization. Conclusion: Bactericidal potencies of the mouthwashes varied significantly, suggesting that mouthwashes like Listerine can be useful for the prevention of caries and secondary caries. PMID:22303415

  7. Characterising the flux of carbon between calcium carbonate substrata, aqueous fluids, bacteria and a biofilm matrix

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. C. Rankin; D. A. Cooke; P. S. Handley; C. M. Merrifield; R. A. Wogelius

    2003-01-01

    Quantification of the flux of elements between minerals, biofilms and aqueous solutions is essential in order to fully elucidate the role of microorganisms in mass transfer processes. Bacteria play a fundamental role in nearly all life and environmental processes and are by far the most abundant organisms on the planet. Their main mode of growth is in the form of

  8. Pitting of Type 304 stainless steee in the presence of a biofilm containing sulphate reducing bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. Werner; C. A. Johnson; N. J. Laycock; P. T. Wilson; B. J. Webster

    1998-01-01

    The effects of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) on pitting corrosion of Type 304 stainless steel in nearneutral solutions based on 0.1 M NaCl have been studied at ambient temperature. SRB are considered to have at least two potentially corrosive effects: they create a biofilm having a crevice like geometry on the metal surface and they produce hydrogen sulphide. Slow potentiodynamic

  9. Characterising the flux of carbon between calcium carbonate substrata, aqueous fluids, bacteria and a biofilm matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, S. C.; Cooke, D. A.; Handley, P. S.; Merrifield, C. M.; Wogelius, R. A.

    2003-04-01

    Quantification of the flux of elements between minerals, biofilms and aqueous solutions is essential in order to fully elucidate the role of microorganisms in mass transfer processes. Bacteria play a fundamental role in nearly all life and environmental processes and are by far the most abundant organisms on the planet. Their main mode of growth is in the form of biofilms growing on surfaces and although extensive study has been carried out into the problems biofilms cause to humans, the effects of biofilms in the environment are still poorly understood. Much of the published research describing biofilm growth on geological substrata emphasises the species present rather than their effect on the substratum. Although previous studies have shown that the production of organic or mineral acids by microbial biofilms can cause dissolution of mineral substrata, there is little quantitative data on the specific flux of elements between minerals, microbial cells, biofilm matrix and aqueous solutions. With growing evidence that microbial life occurs in abundance in the subsurface, biofilm activity within buried rocks and sediments may have important implications for global geochemical cycling of specific elements. Results will be presented as part of an ongoing laboratory analog experiment which has been designed to quantify the flux of carbon between all matrices in a laboratory substratum-biofilm-aqueous system. Water collected from a limestone cave system (pH 7.5-8; viable count 4.7×10^3 - 2.0×10^4 cfu.ml-1{) is used as innoculum and nutrient source for growing mixed consortium biofilms on a natural calcite (CaCO_3) substratum in a flow-through reaction cell (24 days; 25^oC; 1ml.min^{-1). Portions of the biofilm are periodically removed for microbiological analysis and the mineral surface microscopically examined for extent of alteration. A parallel experiment utilises an isotopically labelled synthetic 13C-CaCO_3 substratum. This enables carbon to be traced from the substratum, through the biofilm and into the aqueous and gas phase by analysing 13C/12C isotopic ratios in all system components. Through this mass-balance approach it is possible to quantify, for the first time, the carbon fluxes into the biofilm and the aqueous solution from the carbonate mineral substrate.

  10. Biofilm in endodontics: A review.

    PubMed

    Jhajharia, Kapil; Parolia, Abhishek; Shetty, K Vikram; Mehta, Lata Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic disease is a biofilm-mediated infection, and primary aim in the management of endodontic disease is the elimination of bacterial biofilm from the root canal system. The most common endodontic infection is caused by the surface-associated growth of microorganisms. It is important to apply the biofilm concept to endodontic microbiology to understand the pathogenic potential of the root canal microbiota as well as to form the basis for new approaches for disinfection. It is foremost to understand how the biofilm formed by root canal bacteria resists endodontic treatment measures. Bacterial etiology has been confirmed for common oral diseases such as caries and periodontal and endodontic infections. Bacteria causing these diseases are organized in biofilm structures, which are complex microbial communities composed of a great variety of bacteria with different ecological requirements and pathogenic potential. The biofilm community not only gives bacteria effective protection against the host's defense system but also makes them more resistant to a variety of disinfecting agents used as oral hygiene products or in the treatment of infections. Successful treatment of these diseases depends on biofilm removal as well as effective killing of biofilm bacteria. So, the fundamental to maintain oral health and prevent dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis is to control the oral biofilms. From these aspects, the formation of biofilms carries particular clinical significance because not only host defense mechanisms but also therapeutic efforts including chemical and mechanical antimicrobial treatment measures have the most difficult task of dealing with organisms that are gathered in a biofilm. The aim of this article was to review the mechanisms of biofilms' formation, their roles in pulpal and periapical pathosis, the different types of biofilms, the factors influencing biofilm formation, the mechanisms of their antimicrobial resistance, techniques to identify biofilms. PMID:25767760

  11. Biofilm in endodontics: A review

    PubMed Central

    Jhajharia, Kapil; Parolia, Abhishek; Shetty, K Vikram; Mehta, Lata Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic disease is a biofilm-mediated infection, and primary aim in the management of endodontic disease is the elimination of bacterial biofilm from the root canal system. The most common endodontic infection is caused by the surface-associated growth of microorganisms. It is important to apply the biofilm concept to endodontic microbiology to understand the pathogenic potential of the root canal microbiota as well as to form the basis for new approaches for disinfection. It is foremost to understand how the biofilm formed by root canal bacteria resists endodontic treatment measures. Bacterial etiology has been confirmed for common oral diseases such as caries and periodontal and endodontic infections. Bacteria causing these diseases are organized in biofilm structures, which are complex microbial communities composed of a great variety of bacteria with different ecological requirements and pathogenic potential. The biofilm community not only gives bacteria effective protection against the host's defense system but also makes them more resistant to a variety of disinfecting agents used as oral hygiene products or in the treatment of infections. Successful treatment of these diseases depends on biofilm removal as well as effective killing of biofilm bacteria. So, the fundamental to maintain oral health and prevent dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis is to control the oral biofilms. From these aspects, the formation of biofilms carries particular clinical significance because not only host defense mechanisms but also therapeutic efforts including chemical and mechanical antimicrobial treatment measures have the most difficult task of dealing with organisms that are gathered in a biofilm. The aim of this article was to review the mechanisms of biofilmsformation, their roles in pulpal and periapical pathosis, the different types of biofilms, the factors influencing biofilm formation, the mechanisms of their antimicrobial resistance, techniques to identify biofilms.

  12. The exopolysaccharide Psl-eDNA interaction enables the formation of a biofilm skeleton in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiwei; Liu, Xi; Liu, Hongsheng; Zhang, Li; Guo, Yuan; Yu, Shan; Wozniak, Daniel J; Ma, Luyan Z

    2015-04-01

    A hallmark of bacterial biofilms is a self-produced extracellular matrix of exopolysaccharide, extracellular DNA (eDNA) and proteins that hold bacterial cells together in the community. However, interactions among matrix components and how the interactions contribute to the formation of matrix remain unclear. Here, we show the physical interaction between exopolysaccharide Psl and eDNA, the two key biofilm matrix components of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The interaction allows the two components to combine to form a web of eDNA-Psl fibres, which resembles a biofilm skeleton in the centre of pellicles to give bacteria structural support and capability against agents targeted on one matrix component. The web of eDNA-Psl fibres was also found in flow-cell biofilms at microcolonies initiation stage. The colocalization of eDNA or Psl fibres with bacterial cell membrane stain suggests that fibre-like eDNA is likely derived from the lysis of dead bacteria in biofilms. Psl can interact with DNA from diverse sources, suggesting that P.?aeruginosa has the ability to use DNA of other organisms (such as human neutrophils and other bacterial species) to form its own communities, which might increase the survival of P.?aeruginosa in multispecies biofilms or within a human host. PMID:25472701

  13. The role of conditioning film formation and surface chemical changes on Xylella fastidiosa adhesion and biofilm evolution.

    PubMed

    Lorite, Gabriela S; Rodrigues, Carolina M; de Souza, Alessandra A; Kranz, Christine; Mizaikoff, Boris; Cotta, Mônica A

    2011-07-01

    Biofilms are complex microbial communities with important biological functions including enhanced resistance against external factors like antimicrobial agents. The formation of a biofilm is known to be strongly dependent on substrate properties including hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, structure, and roughness. The adsorption of (macro)molecules on the substrate, also known as conditioning film, changes the physicochemical properties of the surface and affects the bacterial adhesion. In this study, we investigate the physicochemical changes caused by Periwinkle wilt (PW) culture medium conditioning film formation on different surfaces (glass and silicon) and their effect on X. fastidiosa biofilm formation. Contact angle measurements have shown that the film formation decreases the surface hydrophilicity degree of both glass and silicon after few hours. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show the glass surface roughness is drastically reduced with conditioning film formation. First-layer X. fastidiosa biofilm on glass was observed in the AFM liquid cell after a period of time similar to that determined for the hydrophilicity changes. In addition, attenuation total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy supports the AFM observation, since the PW absorption spectra increases with time showing a stronger contribution from the phosphate groups. Although hydrophobic and rough surfaces are commonly considered to increase bacteria cell attachment, our results suggest that these properties are not as important as the surface functional groups resulting from PW conditioning film formation for X. fastidiosa adhesion and biofilm development. PMID:21486669

  14. The effect of PDT on H. influenzae biofilm in vitro

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C.-K. Rhee; S. H. Bae; J. W. Lee; J. C. Ahn; J. Y. Jung; M.-W. Suh

    2009-01-01

    Biofilm formation has been demonstrated for many mucosal pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae. The presence of mucosal biofilms with chronic otitis media with effusion (COME) suggests that bacteria do not clear by antibiotics. Aim: To test the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) on H. influenzae biofilm in vitro. Methods: Sixteen biofilms of H. influenzae were maintained on culture chamber with

  15. Discovering Biofilms: Inquiry-Based Activities for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redelman, Carly V.; Marrs, Kathleen; Anderson, Gregory G.

    2012-01-01

    In nature, bacteria exist in and adapt to different environments by forming microbial communities called "biofilms." We propose simple, inquiry-based laboratory exercises utilizing a biofilm formation assay, which allows controlled biofilm growth. Students will be able to qualitatively assess biofilm growth via staining. Recently, we developed a…

  16. Effect of Honey on Streptococcus mutans Growth and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingyun

    2012-01-01

    Because of the tradition of using honey as an antimicrobial medicament, we investigated the effect of natural honey (NH) on Streptococcus mutans growth, viability, and biofilm formation compared to that of an artificial honey (AH). AH contained the sugars at the concentrations reported for NH. NH and AH concentrations were obtained by serial dilution with tryptic soy broth (TSB). Several concentrations of NH and AH were tested for inhibition of bacterial growth, viability, and biofilm formation after inoculation with S. mutans UA159 in 96-well microtiter plates to obtain absorbance and CFU values. Overall, NH supported significantly less (P < 0.05) bacterial growth than AH at 25 and 12.5% concentrations. At 50 and 25% concentrations, both honey groups provided significantly less bacterial growth and biofilm formation than the TSB control. For bacterial viability, the results for all honey concentrations except 50% NH were not significantly different from those for the TSB control. NH was able to decrease the maximum velocity of S. mutans growth compared to AH. In summary, NH demonstrated more inhibition of bacterial growth, viability, and biofilm formation than AH. This study highlights the potential antibacterial properties of NH and could suggest that the antimicrobial mechanism of NH is not solely due to its high sugar content. PMID:22038612

  17. BACTERIAL BIOFILM FORMATION UNDER MICROGRAVITY CONDITIONS. (R825503)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although biofilm formation is widely documented on Earth, it has not been demonstrated in the absence of gravity. To explore this possibility, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, suspended in sterile buffer, was flown in a commercial payload on space shuttle flight STS-95. During earth or...

  18. Tannins Possessing Bacteriostatic Effect Impair Pseudomonas aeruginosa Adhesion and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Trentin, Danielle S.; Silva, Denise B.; Amaral, Matheus W.; Zimmer, Karine R.; Silva, Márcia V.; Lopes, Norberto P.; Giordani, Raquel B.; Macedo, Alexandre J.

    2013-01-01

    Plants produce many compounds that are biologically active, either as part of their normal program of growth and development or in response to pathogen attack or stress. Traditionally, Anadenanthera colubrina, Commiphora leptophloeos and Myracrodruon urundeuva have been used by communities in the Brazilian Caatinga to treat several infectious diseases. The ability to impair bacterial adhesion represents an ideal strategy to combat bacterial pathogenesis, because of its importance in the early stages of the infectious process; thus, the search for anti-adherent compounds in plants is a very promising alternative. This study investigated the ability of stem-bark extracts from these three species to control the growth and prevent biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important opportunistic pathogen that adheres to surfaces and forms protective biofilms. A kinetic study (0–72 h) demonstrated that the growth of extract-treated bacteria was inhibited up to 9 h after incubation, suggesting a bacteriostatic activity. Transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy showed both viable and nonviable cells, indicating bacterial membrane damage; crystal violet assay and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that treatment strongly inhibited biofilm formation during 6 and 24 h and that matrix production remained impaired even after growth was restored, at 24 and 48 h of incubation. Herein, we propose that the identified (condensed and hydrolyzable) tannins are able to inhibit biofilm formation via bacteriostatic properties, damaging the bacterial membrane and hindering matrix production. Our findings demonstrate the importance of this abundant class of Natural Products in higher plants against one of the most challenging issues in the hospital setting: biofilm resilience. PMID:23776646

  19. Thiopeptide antibiotics stimulate biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Bleich, Rachel; Watrous, Jeramie D; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Bowers, Albert A; Shank, Elizabeth A

    2015-03-10

    Bacteria have evolved the ability to produce a wide range of structurally complex natural products historically called "secondary" metabolites. Although some of these compounds have been identified as bacterial communication cues, more frequently natural products are scrutinized for antibiotic activities that are relevant to human health. However, there has been little regard for how these compounds might otherwise impact the physiology of neighboring microbes present in complex communities. Bacillus cereus secretes molecules that activate expression of biofilm genes in Bacillus subtilis. Here, we use imaging mass spectrometry to identify the thiocillins, a group of thiazolyl peptide antibiotics, as biofilm matrix-inducing compounds produced by B. cereus. We found that thiocillin increased the population of matrix-producing B. subtilis cells and that this activity could be abolished by multiple structural alterations. Importantly, a mutation that eliminated thiocillin's antibiotic activity did not affect its ability to induce biofilm gene expression in B. subtilis. We go on to show that biofilm induction appears to be a general phenomenon of multiple structurally diverse thiazolyl peptides and use this activity to confirm the presence of thiazolyl peptide gene clusters in other bacterial species. Our results indicate that the roles of secondary metabolites initially identified as antibiotics may have more complex effects-acting not only as killing agents, but also as specific modulators of microbial cellular phenotypes. PMID:25713360

  20. Antibiotic-loaded synthetic calcium sulfate beads for prevention of bacterial colonization and biofilm formation in periprosthetic infections.

    PubMed

    Howlin, R P; Brayford, M J; Webb, J S; Cooper, J J; Aiken, S S; Stoodley, P

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic infection (PI) causes significant morbidity and mortality after fixation and joint arthroplasty and has been extensively linked to the formation of bacterial biofilms. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), as a cement or as beads, is commonly used for antibiotic release to the site of infection but displays variable elution kinetics and also represents a potential nidus for infection, therefore requiring surgical removal once antibiotics have eluted. Absorbable cements have shown improved elution of a wider range of antibiotics and, crucially, complete biodegradation, but limited data exist as to their antimicrobial and antibiofilm efficacy. Synthetic calcium sulfate beads loaded with tobramycin, vancomycin, or vancomycin-tobramycin dual treatment (in a 1:0.24 [wt/wt] ratio) were assessed for their abilities to eradicate planktonic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis relative to that of PMMA beads. The ability of the calcium sulfate beads to prevent biofilm formation over multiple days and to eradicate preformed biofilms was studied using a combination of viable cell counts, confocal microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy of the bead surface. Biofilm bacteria displayed a greater tolerance to the antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts. Antibiotic-loaded beads were able to kill planktonic cultures of 10(6) CFU/ml, prevent bacterial colonization, and significantly reduce biofilm formation over multiple days. However, established biofilms were harder to eradicate. These data further demonstrate the difficulty in clearing established biofilms; therefore, early preventive measures are key to reducing the risk of PI. Synthetic calcium sulfate loaded with antibiotics has the potential to reduce or eliminate biofilm formation on adjacent periprosthetic tissue and prosthesis material and, thus, to reduce the rates of periprosthetic infection. PMID:25313221

  1. Biofilm Formation by Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Skin and Soft Tissue Infections.

    PubMed

    Kwiecinski, Jakub; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Jin, Tao

    2015-05-01

    Many diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus are associated with biofilm formation. However, the ability of S. aureus isolates from skin and soft tissue infections to form biofilms has not yet been investigated. We tested 160 isolates from patients with various skin infections for biofilm-forming capacity in different growth media. All the isolates formed biofilms, the extent of which depended on the type of growth medium. The thickest biofilms were formed when both plasma and glucose were present in the broth; in this case, S. aureus incorporated host fibrin into the biofilm's matrix. There were no differences in the biofilm formation between isolates from different types of skin infections, except for a particularly good biofilm formation by isolates from diabetic wounds and a weaker biofilm formation by isolates from impetigo. In conclusion, biofilm formation is a universal behavior of S. aureus isolates from skin infections. In some cases, such as in diabetic wounds, a particularly strong biofilm formation most likely contributes to the chronic and recurrent character of the infection. Additionally, as S. aureus apparently uses host fibrin as part of the biofilm structure, we suggest that plasma should be included more frequently in in vitro biofilm studies. PMID:25586078

  2. Antibiotic Resistance Related to Biofilm Formation in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Vuotto, Claudia; Longo, Francesca; Balice, Maria Pia; Donelli, Gianfranco; Varaldo, Pietro E.

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen, Klebsiella pneumoniae, is responsible for causing a spectrum of community-acquired and nosocomial infections and typically infects patients with indwelling medical devices, especially urinary catheters, on which this microorganism is able to grow as a biofilm. The increasingly frequent acquisition of antibiotic resistance by K. pneumoniae strains has given rise to a global spread of this multidrug-resistant pathogen, mostly at the hospital level. This scenario is exacerbated when it is noted that intrinsic resistance to antimicrobial agents dramatically increases when K. pneumoniae strains grow as a biofilm. This review will summarize the findings about the antibiotic resistance related to biofilm formation in K. pneumoniae. PMID:25438022

  3. Effect of biofilm formation, and biocorrosion on denture base fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ergin, Alper; Ayyildiz, Simel; Cosgun, Erdal; Uzun, Gulay

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to investigate the destructive effects of biofilm formation and/or biocorrosive activity of 6 different oral microorganisms. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three different heat polymerized acrylic resins (Ivocap Plus, Lucitone 550, QC 20) were used to prepare three different types of samples. Type "A" samples with "V" type notch was used to measure the fracture strength, "B" type to evaluate the surfaces with scanning electron microscopy and "C" type for quantitative biofilm assay. Development and calculation of biofilm covered surfaces on denture base materials were accomplished by SEM and quantitative biofilm assay. According to normality assumptions ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis was selected for statistical analysis (?=0.05). RESULTS Significant differences were obtained among the adhesion potential of 6 different microorganisms and there were significant differences among their adhesion onto 3 different denture base materials. Compared to the control groups after contamination with the microorganisms, the three point bending test values of denture base materials decreased significantly (P<.05); microorganisms diffused at least 52% of the denture base surface. The highest median quantitative biofilm value within all the denture base materials was obtained with P. aeruginosa on Lucitone 550. The type of denture base material did not alter the diffusion potential of the microorganisms significantly (P>.05). CONCLUSION All the tested microorganisms had destructive effect over the structure and composition of the denture base materials. PMID:23755339

  4. Short communication Biofilm formation and the survival of Salmonella Typhimurium on parsley

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anat Lapidot; Ute Romling; Sima Yaron

    Although several studies provide evidence that the formation of biofilms by human pathogens on plant tissue is possible, to date there is no direct evidence that biofilms enhance the resistance of plant-associated pathogens to disinfectants or biocides. We hypothesized that biofilm formation would enhance the adhesion and survival of Salmonella on leafy vegetables. To test our hypothesis, we compared the

  5. Supporting Information for: Exoelectrogenic biofilm as a template for sustainable formation of a catalytic

    E-print Network

    1 Supporting Information for: Exoelectrogenic biofilm as a template for sustainable formation structure (55,000 ×). (C) TEM image of an ultra-microtomed (70 nm) G. sulfurreducens biofilm showing palladium reduction within the biofilm as a precursor for mesoporous structure formation. (D) Low

  6. Studies on Biofilm Formation and Interactions of Salmonella enterica with Romaine-Lettuce Leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The association between biofilm formation and the interactions of Salmonella enterica serovars with cut-Romaine-lettuce leaves was investigated. Biofilm formation by 8 S. enterica serovars was tested on polystyrene microtiter plates in the presence of different growth media. Maximal biofilm mass was...

  7. The essential role of hydrodynamic shear force in the formation of biofilm and granular sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu Liu; Joo-Hwa Tay

    2002-01-01

    Biofilm and granular sludge processes are promising biotechnology for wastewater treatment. The formation, structure and metabolism of immobilized microbial community are associated very closely with hydrodynamic shear force in reactors. Therefore, this paper attempts to review the essential role of shear force in the formation and performance of biofilm and granular sludge. More compact, stable and denser biofilms, aerobic and

  8. Streptococcus pyogenes biofilms—formation, biology, and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Tomas; Köller, Thomas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci, GAS) is an exclusive human bacterial pathogen. The virulence potential of this species is tremendous. Interactions with humans range from asymptomatic carriage over mild and superficial infections of skin and mucosal membranes up to systemic purulent toxic-invasive disease manifestations. Particularly the latter are a severe threat for predisposed patients and lead to significant death tolls worldwide. This places GAS among the most important Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. Many recent reviews have highlighted the GAS repertoire of virulence factors, regulators and regulatory circuits/networks that enable GAS to colonize the host and to deal with all levels of the host immune defense. This covers in vitro and in vivo studies, including animal infection studies based on mice and more relevant, macaque monkeys. It is now appreciated that GAS, like many other bacterial species, do not necessarily exclusively live in a planktonic lifestyle. GAS is capable of microcolony and biofilm formation on host cells and tissues. We are now beginning to understand that this feature significantly contributes to GAS pathogenesis. In this review we will discuss the current knowledge on GAS biofilm formation, the biofilm-phenotype associated virulence factors, regulatory aspects of biofilm formation, the clinical relevance, and finally contemporary treatment regimens and future treatment options. PMID:25717441

  9. Streptococcus pyogenes biofilms-formation, biology, and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Tomas; Köller, Thomas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci, GAS) is an exclusive human bacterial pathogen. The virulence potential of this species is tremendous. Interactions with humans range from asymptomatic carriage over mild and superficial infections of skin and mucosal membranes up to systemic purulent toxic-invasive disease manifestations. Particularly the latter are a severe threat for predisposed patients and lead to significant death tolls worldwide. This places GAS among the most important Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. Many recent reviews have highlighted the GAS repertoire of virulence factors, regulators and regulatory circuits/networks that enable GAS to colonize the host and to deal with all levels of the host immune defense. This covers in vitro and in vivo studies, including animal infection studies based on mice and more relevant, macaque monkeys. It is now appreciated that GAS, like many other bacterial species, do not necessarily exclusively live in a planktonic lifestyle. GAS is capable of microcolony and biofilm formation on host cells and tissues. We are now beginning to understand that this feature significantly contributes to GAS pathogenesis. In this review we will discuss the current knowledge on GAS biofilm formation, the biofilm-phenotype associated virulence factors, regulatory aspects of biofilm formation, the clinical relevance, and finally contemporary treatment regimens and future treatment options. PMID:25717441

  10. IscR Controls Iron-Dependent Biofilm Formation in Escherichia coli by Regulating Type I Fimbria Expression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yun Wu; F. Wayne Outten

    2009-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a complex developmental process regulated by multiple environmental signals. In addition to other nutrients, the transition metal iron can also regulate biofilm formation. Iron-dependent regulation of biofilm formation varies by bacterial species, and the exact regulatory pathways that control iron-dependent biofilm formation are often unknown or only partially characterized. To address this gap in our knowledge, we

  11. Pili in Gram-positive bacteria: assembly, involvement in colonization and biofilm development

    PubMed Central

    Mandlik, Anjali; Swierczynski, Arlene; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2010-01-01

    Various cell-surface multisubunit protein polymers, known as pili or fimbriae, have a pivotal role in the colonization of specific host tissues by many pathogenic bacteria. In contrast to Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria assemble pili by a distinct mechanism involving a transpeptidase called sortase. Sortase crosslinks individual pilin monomers and ultimately joins the resulting covalent polymer to the cell-wall peptidoglycan. Here we review current knowledge of this mechanism and the roles of Gram-positive pili in the colonization of specific host tissues, modulation of host immune responses and the development of bacterial biofilms. PMID:18083568

  12. Biofilm formation enhances fomite survival of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Marks, Laura R; Reddinger, Ryan M; Hakansson, Anders P

    2014-03-01

    Both Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae are widely thought to rapidly die outside the human host, losing infectivity following desiccation in the environment. However, to date, all literature investigating the infectivity of desiccated streptococci has used broth-grown, planktonic populations. In this study, we examined the impact of biofilm formation on environmental survival of clinical and laboratory isolates of S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae as both organisms are thought to colonize the human host as biofilms. Results clearly demonstrate that while planktonic cells that are desiccated rapidly lose viability both on hands and abiotic surfaces, such as plastic, biofilm bacteria remain viable over extended periods of time outside the host and remain infectious in a murine colonization model. To explore the level and extent of streptococcal fomite contamination that children might be exposed to naturally, direct bacteriologic cultures of items in a day care center were conducted, which demonstrated high levels of viable streptococci of both species. These findings raise the possibility that streptococci may survive in the environment and be transferred from person to person via fomites contaminated with oropharyngeal secretions containing biofilm streptococci. PMID:24371220

  13. From Nanowires to Biofilms: An Exploration of Novel Mechanisms of Uranium Transformation Mediated by Geobacter Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    REGUERA, GEMMA [Michigan State University

    2014-01-16

    One promising strategy for the in situ bioremediation of radioactive groundwater contaminants that has been identified by the SBR Program is to stimulate the activity of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms to reductively precipitate uranium and other soluble toxic metals. The reduction of U(VI) and other soluble contaminants by Geobacteraceae is directly dependent on the reduction of Fe(III) oxides, their natural electron acceptor, a process that requires the expression of Geobacter’s conductive pili (pilus nanowires). Expression of conductive pili by Geobacter cells leads to biofilm development on surfaces and to the formation of suspended biogranules, which may be physiological closer to biofilms than to planktonic cells. Biofilm development is often assumed in the subsurface, particularly at the matrix-well screen interface, but evidence of biofilms in the bulk aquifer matrix is scarce. Our preliminary results suggest, however, that biofilms develop in the subsurface and contribute to uranium transformations via sorption and reductive mechanisms. In this project we elucidated the mechanism(s) for uranium immobilization mediated by Geobacter biofilms and identified molecular markers to investigate if biofilm development is happening in the contaminated subsurface. The results provided novel insights needed in order to understand the metabolic potential and physiology of microorganisms with a known role in contaminant transformation in situ, thus having a significant positive impact in the SBR Program and providing novel concept to monitor, model, and predict biological behavior during in situ treatments.

  14. High-throughput screening of multispecies biofilm formation and quantitative PCR-based assessment of individual species proportions, useful for exploring interspecific bacterial interactions.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dawei; Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; de la Cruz-Perera, Claudia I; Bergmark, Lasse; Sørensen, Søren J; Burmølle, Mette

    2014-07-01

    Multispecies biofilms are predominant in almost all natural environments, where myriads of resident microorganisms interact with each other in both synergistic and antagonistic manners. The interspecies interactions among different bacteria are, despite the ubiquity of these communities, still poorly understood. Here, we report a rapid, reproducible and sensitive approach for quantitative screening of biofilm formation by bacteria when cultivated as mono- and multispecies biofilms, based on the Nunc-TSP lid system and crystal violet staining. The relative proportion of the individual species in a four-species biofilm was assessed using quantitative PCR based on SYBR Green I fluorescence with specific primers. The results indicated strong synergistic interactions in a four-species biofilm model community with a more than 3-fold increase in biofilm formation and demonstrated the strong dominance of two strains, Xanthomonas retroflexus and Paenibacillus amylolyticus. The developed approach can be used as a standard procedure for evaluating interspecies interactions in defined microbial communities. This will be of significant value in the quantitative study of the microbial composition of multispecies biofilms both in natural environments and infectious diseases to increase our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie cooperation, competition and fitness of individual species in mixed-species biofilms. PMID:24337804

  15. Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis: new insights into regulatory strategies and assembly mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Lynne S; Hobley, Laura; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a social behaviour that generates favourable conditions for sustained survival in the natural environment. For the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis the process involves the differentiation of cell fate within an isogenic population and the production of communal goods that form the biofilm matrix. Here we review recent progress in understanding the regulatory pathways that control biofilm formation and highlight developments in understanding the composition, function and structure of the biofilm matrix. PMID:24988880

  16. Capsaicin inhibits Porphyromonas gingivalis growth, biofilm formation, gingivomucosal inflammatory cytokine secretion, and in vitro osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Guan, X; Zhu, W; Liu, Z; Wang, X; Yu, H; Wang, H

    2014-02-01

    The prevention and treatment of periodontitis requires not only the control of causative pathogens, especially Porphyromonas gingivalis, but also the regulation of inflammatory immune response. Investigating auxiliary drugs for periodontitis during conventional treatments is, thus, quite important. Capsaicin, an agonist for the vanilloid receptor subtype 1 (TRPV1), due to its bacteriostatic activity against Gram-negative bacteria and anti-inflammatory effects, appears to be a promising drug. In this work, the antimicrobial activity of capsaicin against P. gingivalis and biofilm formation, inflammatory cytokine levels in experimental periodontitis, osteoclast precursor proliferation, and osteoclastogenesis in vitro were fully investigated. The results showed that capsaicin inhibited P. gingivalis growth with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and a minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 16 and 64 mg/l, respectively. Capsaicin also inhibited P. gingivalis biofilm formation, with minimum biofilm inhibition concentrations MBIC50 and MBIC90 of 16 and 32 mg/l, respectively, and reduced pre-formed biofilms' viability with a minimum biofilm reduction concentration MBRC50 of 64 mg/l, as demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. In experimental periodontitis, except for IL-10, TNF-?, IL-1?, IL-6, IL-12, and iNOS were depressed after capsaicin treatment. Moreover, capsaicin also suppressed osteoclast precursor proliferation and osteoclastogenesis, as demonstrated by NF-?B p65. However, this favorable effect was attenuated by the TRPV1 antagonist, camphor. It, thus, suggests that capsaicin is a potential drug for the auxiliary treatment of periodontitis. TRPV1 activation may involve in beneficial roles of capsaicin on periodontitis. PMID:23955115

  17. A green biocide enhancer for the treatment of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) biofilms on carbon steel surfaces using glutaraldehyde

    E-print Network

    Gu, Tingyue

    A green biocide enhancer for the treatment of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) biofilms on carbon steel surfaces using glutaraldehyde Jie Wen a , Kaili Zhao a , Tingyue Gu a,*, Issam I. Raad b: Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Biofilm treatment EDDS Glutaraldehyde MIC a b s t r a c t Generally speaking, a much

  18. Characterization of biofilm formation by Borrelia burgdorferi in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sapi, Eva; Bastian, Scott L; Mpoy, Cedric M; Scott, Shernea; Rattelle, Amy; Pabbati, Namrata; Poruri, Akhila; Burugu, Divya; Theophilus, Priyanka A S; Pham, Truc V; Datar, Akshita; Dhaliwal, Navroop K; MacDonald, Alan; Rossi, Michael J; Sinha, Saion K; Luecke, David F

    2012-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, has long been known to be capable of forming aggregates and colonies. It was recently demonstrated that Borrelia burgdorferi aggregate formation dramatically changes the in vitro response to hostile environments by this pathogen. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that these aggregates are indeed biofilms, structures whose resistance to unfavorable conditions are well documented. We studied Borrelia burgdorferi for several known hallmark features of biofilm, including structural rearrangements in the aggregates, variations in development on various substrate matrices and secretion of a protective extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix using several modes of microscopic, cell and molecular biology techniques. The atomic force microscopic results provided evidence that multilevel rearrangements take place at different stages of aggregate development, producing a complex, continuously rearranging structure. Our results also demonstrated that Borrelia burgdorferi is capable of developing aggregates on different abiotic and biotic substrates, and is also capable of forming floating aggregates. Analyzing the extracellular substance of the aggregates for potential exopolysaccharides revealed the existence of both sulfated and non-sulfated/carboxylated substrates, predominately composed of an alginate with calcium and extracellular DNA present. In summary, we have found substantial evidence that Borrelia burgdorferi is capable of forming biofilm in vitro. Biofilm formation by Borrelia species might play an important role in their survival in diverse environmental conditions by providing refuge to individual cells. PMID:23110225

  19. Muramidases found in the foregut microbiome of the Tammar wallaby can direct cell aggregation and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Phillip B; Totsika, Makrina; Aguirre de Carcer, Daniel; Schembri, Mark A; Morrison, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We describe here the role of muramidases present in clones of metagenomic DNA that result in cell aggregation and biofilm formation by Escherichia coli. The metagenomic clones were obtained from uncultured Lachnospiraceae-affiliated bacteria resident in the foregut microbiome of the Tammar wallaby. One of these fosmid clones (p49C2) was chosen for more detailed studies and a variety of genetic methods were used to delimit the region responsible for the phenotype to an open reading frame of 1425?bp. Comparative sequence analysis with other fosmid clones giving rise to the same phenotype revealed the presence of muramidase homologues with the same modular composition. Phylogenetic analysis of the fosmid sequence data assigned these fosmid inserts to recently identified, but uncultured, phylogroups of Lachnospiraceae believed to be numerically dominant in the foregut microbiome of the Tammar wallaby. The muramidase is a modular protein containing putative N-acetylmuramoyl--alanine amidase and an endo-?-N-acetylglucosaminidase catalytic module, with a similar organization and functional properties to some Staphylococcal autolysins that also confer adhesive properties and biofilm formation. We also show here that the cloned muramidases result in the production of extracellular DNA, which appears to be the key for biofilm formation and autoaggregation. Collectively, these findings suggest that biofilm formation and cell aggregation in gut microbiomes might occur via the concerted action of carbohydrate-active enzymes and the production of extracellular DNA to serve as a biofilm scaffold. PMID:20668486

  20. The influence of bacteria on struvite crystal habit and its importance in urinary stone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapham, L.; McLean, R. J. C.; Nickel, J. C.; Downey, J.; Costerton, J. W.

    1990-07-01

    Infection-induced urinary stones form as a result of a urinary tract infection by urease-producing bacteria. These stones are not totally crystalline in nature but rather consist of an agglomeration of bacteria, organic matrix, and crystal of struvite (MgNH 4PO 4· 6H 2O). Crystal formation is related to the ability of the bacteria to effect an increase in the urine pH. Another equally important bacterial role lies in their formation of a 'biofilm' which later becomes the organic matrix constituent of the stone. Results of the present in vitro study indicate that crystals are formed more readily if produced within the bacterial biofilm than in the surrounding urine. It is proposed that supersaturation, due in part to a bacterial-induced pH increase and in part to the metal binding tendency of the biofilm, leads to crystal formation via a gel growth mechanism within the biofilm itself. In time further bacterial cell division, microcolony.

  1. A Role for Amyloid in Cell Aggregation and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Melissa C.; Lee, Janis T.; Ramsook, Caleen B.; Alsteens, David; Dufrêne, Yves F.; Lipke, Peter N.

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans contain amyloid-forming sequences that are highly conserved. We have now used site-specific mutagenesis and specific peptide perturbants to explore amyloid-dependent activity in the Candida albicans adhesin Als5p. A V326N substitution in the amyloid-forming region conserved secondary structure and ligand binding, but abrogated formation of amyloid fibrils in soluble Als5p and reduced cell surface thioflavin T fluorescence. When displayed on the cell surface, Als5p with this substitution prevented formation of adhesion nanodomains and formation of large cellular aggregates and model biofilms. In addition, amyloid nanodomains were regulated by exogenous peptides. An amyloid-forming homologous peptide rescued aggregation and biofilm activity of Als5pV326N cells, and V326N substitution peptide inhibited aggregation and biofilm activity in Als5pWT cells. Therefore, specific site mutation, inhibition by anti-amyloid peturbants, and sequence-specificity of pro-amyloid and anti-amyloid peptides showed that amyloid formation is essential for nanodomain formation and activation. PMID:21408122

  2. Monitoring of biofilm formation on different material surfaces of medical devices using hyperspectral imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do-Hyun; Kim, Moon S.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2012-03-01

    Contamination of the inner surface of indwelling (implanted) medical devices by microbial biofilm is a serious problem. Some microbial bacteria such as Escherichia coli form biofilms that lead to potentially lifethreatening infections. Other types of medical devices such as bronchoscopes and duodenoscopes account for the highest number of reported endoscopic infections where microbial biofilm is one of the major causes for these infections. We applied a hyperspectral imaging method to detect biofilm contamination on the surface of several common materials used for medical devices. Such materials include stainless steel, titanium, and stainless-steeltitanium alloy. Potential uses of hyperspectral imaging technique to monitor biofilm attachment to different material surfaces are discussed.

  3. Biofilm formation by a biotechnologically important tropical marine yeast isolate, Yarrowia lipolytica NCIM 3589.

    PubMed

    Dusane, D H; Nancharaiah, Y V; Venugopalan, V P; Kumar, A R; Zinjarde, S S

    2008-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Yarrowia lipolytica, a biotechnologically important fungus in microtitre plates, on glass slide surfaces and in flow cell was investigated. In microtitre plates, there was a short lag phase of adhesion followed by a period of rapid biofilm growth. The fungus formed extensive biofilms on glass slides, whereas in flow-cells a multicellular, three-dimensional microcolony structure was observed. The isolate formed biofilms in seawater and in fresh water media at neutral pH when grown in microtitre plates. The carbon sources differentially affected formation of biofilms in microtitre plates. Lactic acid, erythritol, glycerol, glucose and edible oils supported the formation of biofilms, while alkanes resulted in sub-optimal biofilm development. A variation in the morphology of the fungus was observed with different carbon sources. The results point to the possible existence of highly structured biofilms in varied ecological niches from where the yeast is isolated. PMID:18845860

  4. Biofilm formation by a biotechnologically important tropical marine yeast isolate, Yarrowia lipolytica NCIM 3589.

    PubMed

    Dusane, D H; Nancharaiah, Y V; Venugopalan, V P; Kumar, A R; Zinjarde, S S

    2008-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Yarrowia lipolytica, a biotechnologically important fungus in microtitre plates, on glass slide surfaces and in flow cell was investigated. In microtitre plates, there was a short lag phase of adhesion followed by a period of rapid biofilm growth. The fungus formed extensive biofilms on glass slides, whereas in flow-cells a multicellular, three-dimensional microcolony structure was observed. The isolate formed biofilms in seawater and in fresh water media at neutral pH when grown in microtitre plates. The carbon sources differentially affected formation of biofilms in microtitre plates. Lactic acid, erythritol, glycerol, glucose and edible oils supported the formation of biofilms, while alkanes resulted in sub-optimal biofilm development. A variation in the morphology of the fungus was observed with different carbon sources. The results point to the possible existence of highly structured biofilms in varied ecological niches from where the yeast is isolated. PMID:19092226

  5. Human serum inhibits adhesion and biofilm formation in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Candida albicans can form biofilms on intravenous catheters; this process plays a key role in the pathogenesis of catheter infections. This study evaluated the effect of human serum (HS) on C. albicans biofilm formation and the expression of adhesion-related genes in vitro. A C. albicans laboratory strain (ATCC90028) and three clinical strains were grown for 24 h in RPMI 1640 supplemented with HS or RPMI 1640 alone (as a control). The growth of biofilm cells of four strains was monitored by a Live Cell Movie Analyzer, and by XTT reduction assay. The expression of the adhesion-related genes BCR1, ALS1, ALS3, HWP1 and ECE1 was analyzed by RT-PCR at three time points (60 min, 90 min, and 24 h). Results In the adhesion phase, C. albicans cells kept a Brownian movement in RPMI medium containing HS until a large number of germ tubes were formed. In the control group, C. albicans cells quickly adhered to the bottom of the reaction plate. Compared with RPMI 1640, medium supplemented with 3–50% HS caused a significant decrease in biofilm development (all p?biofilms (all p?>?0.05). Biofilm formation was also inhibited by heat-inactivated and proteinase K pre-treated HS. The presence of 50% HS did not significantly affect the planktonic growth of C. albicans (p?>?0.05). At three time points, HS inhibited expression of the ALS1 and ALS3 genes and promoted expression of the HWP1 and ECE1 genes. Significant up-regulation of BCR1 was observed only at the 90-min point. Conclusions Human serum reduces biofilm formation by inhibiting the adhesion of C. albicans cells. This response may be associated with the down-regulation of adhesion-related genes ALS1, ALS3 and BCR1. The inhibitory serum component is protease-resistant and heat stable. PMID:24673895

  6. Hydrogen sulfide-producing bacteria in tongue biofilm and their relationship with oral malodour.

    PubMed

    Washio, Jumpei; Sato, Takuichi; Koseki, Takeyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2005-09-01

    The aims of this study were to identify hydrogen sulfide (H2S)-producing bacteria among tongue biofilm microflora and to investigate the relationship between bacterial flora and H2S levels in mouth air. Oral malodour levels in 10 subjects (age 21-56 years) were assessed by gas chromatography, and Breathtron and organoleptic scores. Based on these assessments, subjects were divided into two groups: an odour group and a no/low odour group. Tongue coatings were sampled and spread onto Fastidious Anaerobe Agar plates containing 0.05% cysteine, 0.12% glutathione and 0.02% lead acetate, and were then incubated anaerobically at 37 degrees C for 2 weeks. Bacteria forming black or grey colonies were selected as H2S-producing phenotypes. The numbers of total bacteria (P<0.005) and H2S-producing bacteria (P<0.05) in the odour group were significantly larger than those in the no/low odour group. Bacteria forming black or grey colonies (126 isolates from the odour group; 242 isolates from the no/low odour group) were subcultured, confirmed as producing H2S and identified according to 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Species of Veillonella (38.1% in odour group; 46.3% in no/low odour group), Actinomyces (25.4%; 17.7%) and Prevotella (10.3%; 7.8%) were the predominant H2S-producing bacteria in both the odour and no/low odour groups. These results suggest that an increase in the number of H2S-producing bacteria in the tongue biofilm is responsible for oral malodour, although the bacterial composition of tongue biofilm was similar between the two groups. PMID:16091443

  7. Analyses of Spatial Distributions of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria and Their Activity in Aerobic Wastewater Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Satoshi; Itoh, Tsukasa; Satoh, Hisashi; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    1999-01-01

    The vertical distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in aerobic wastewater biofilms grown on rotating disk reactors was investigated by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes. To correlate the vertical distribution of SRB populations with their activity, the microprofiles of O2, H2S, NO2?, NO3?, NH4+, and pH were measured with microelectrodes. In addition, a cross-evaluation of the FISH and microelectrode analyses was performed by comparing them with culture-based approaches and biogeochemical measurements. In situ hybridization revealed that a relatively high abundance of the probe SRB385-stained cells (approximately 109 to 1010 cells per cm3 of biofilm) were evenly distributed throughout the biofilm, even in the oxic surface. The probe SRB660-stained Desulfobulbus spp. were found to be numerically important members of SRB populations (approximately 108 to 109 cells per cm3). The result of microelectrode measurements showed that a high sulfate-reducing activity was found in a narrow anaerobic zone located about 150 to 300 ?m below the biofilm surface and above which an intensive sulfide oxidation zone was found. The biogeochemical measurements showed that elemental sulfur (S0) was an important intermediate of the sulfide reoxidation in such thin wastewater biofilms (approximately 1,500 ?m), which accounted for about 75% of the total S pool in the biofilm. The contribution of an internal Fe-sulfur cycle to the overall sulfur cycle in aerobic wastewater biofilms was insignificant (less than 1%) due to the relatively high sulfate reduction rate. PMID:10543829

  8. Extracellular polysaccharides produced by cooling water tower biofilm bacteria and their possible degradation.

    PubMed

    Ceyhan, Nur; Ozdemir, Guven

    2008-01-01

    The extracellular polymers (EPS) of biofilm bacteria that can cause heat and mass transfer problems in cooling water towers in the petrochemical industry were investigated. In addition, these microorganisms were screened for their ability to grow and degrade their own EPS and the EPS of other species. Twelve bacteria producing the most EPS were isolated from cooling water towers and characterized biochemically by classic and commercial systems. These were species of Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, Aeromonas, Pasteurella, Pantoea, Alcaligenes and Sphingomonas. EPS of these species were obtained by propan-2-ol precipitation and centrifugation from bacterial cultures in media enriched with glucose, sucrose or galactose. EPS yields were of 1.68-4.95 g l(-1). These EPS materials were characterized for total sugar and protein contents. Their total sugar content ranged from 24 to 56% (g sugar g(-1) EPS), and their total protein content ranged from 10 to 28% (g protein g(-1) EPS). The monosaccharide compositions of EPS were determined by HPLC. Generally, these compositions were enriched in galactose and glucose, with lesser amounts of mannose, rhamnose, fructose and arabinose. All bacteria were investigated in terms of EPS degradation. Eight of the bacteria were able to utilize EPS from Burkholderia cepacia, seven of the bacteria were able to utilize EPS from Pseudomonas sp. and Sphingomonas paucimobilis. The greatest viscosity reduction of B. cepacia was obtained with Pseudomonas sp. The results show that the bacteria in this study are able to degrade EPS from biofilms in cooling towers. PMID:18256966

  9. Physicochemical changes of microbe and solid surface properties during biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfaelou, Stavroula; Vakros, John; Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.

    2013-04-01

    Cell immobilization is a promising biotechnology process. For example, entrapment of bacteria cells on synthetic polymeric matrices such as biocarriers is widely used for wastewater treatment because they have strong mechanical strength and durability in contrast to natural polymers. This method is based on the formation of biofilm on the surface of the used carriers and combines two different processes; attached and suspended biomass in a hybrid system. Previous studies have shown that immobilized cell systems have the potential to degrade toxic chemicals faster than conventional wastewater treatment systems because high densities of specialized microorganisms are used in immobilized cell systems. The present study elucidates the surface charge and properties of activated sludge and their role in the formation of biofilm. This information can be used for the optimization of the formation of biofilms as well as for the study of the transport of microorganisms in different environments. The two types of biocarriers that were used in this study are polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-gel beads and Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) carriers. The sludge samples that were investigated were taken from the aeration tank of the wastewater treatment plant of University of Patras (Greece). Measurements of the surface charge of the sludge, the biocarriers and the formed biofilm, were performed using potentiometric mass titrations with different kinds of electrolytes (e.g. NaCl, NaNO3) and at pH ranging from 3 to 11. The determination of pzc and surface charge of activated sludge and biocarriers is significant, because it can provide new valuable informations about the interaction mechanisms and the formation of biofilms. In each case, the point of zero charge (pzc) was identified as the common intersection point of the potentiometric curve of the blank solution of the electrolyte with the corresponding curves of each material. The pzc value for the biofilm was 6.1 to 6.7 and 6.6 to 6.9 for PVA gel and MBBR, respectively. These values differ both from the pzc values found for PVA biocarriers (pzc = 9.4; no pzc value was obtained for MBBR as expected based on its hydrophobic nature and the absence of surface groups with acid-base behavior) and the pzc value of activated sludge (activated sludge mixed liquor: pzc = 8.0 to 8.2, solid activated sludge: pzc = 7.2 to 7.3). These results lead us to the conclusion that the formed biofilms have different acid-base behavior and properties in relation to the activated sludge and the biocarriers. This fact is in accordance to previous studies, where biofilm-associated cells can be differentiated from their suspended counterparts due to the generation of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix. One other possible explanation is that the complicated processes of the biofilm formation can alter the distribution of different cells in the sludge compared with the cell distribution in the suspended unsupported sludge.

  10. Influence of topography and hydrophilicity on initial oral biofilm formation on microstructured titanium surfaces in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Almaguer-Flores, A.; Olivares-Navarrete, R.; Wieland, M.; Ximénez-Fyvie, L. A.; Schwartz, Z.; Boyan, B. D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of the microtopography and hydrophilicity of titanium (Ti) substrates on initial oral biofilm formation. Materials and methods Nine bacterial species belonging to the normal oral microbiota, including: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Actinomyces israelii, Campylobacter rectus, Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Streptococcus sanguinis were tested on Ti surfaces: pretreatment (PT [Ra<0.2 ?m]), acid-etched (A [Ra<0.8 ?m]), A modified to be hydrophilic (modA), sand-blasted/acid-etched (SLA [Ra = 4 ?m]), and hydrophilic SLA (modSLA). Disks were incubated for 24 h in anaerobic conditions using a normal culture medium (CM) or human saliva (HS). The total counts of bacteria and the proportion of each bacterial species were analysed by checkerboard DNA–DNA hybridization. Results: Higher counts of bacteria were observed on all surfaces incubated with CM compared with the samples incubated with HS. PT, SLA, and modSLA exhibited higher numbers of attached bacteria in CM, whereas SLA and modSLA had a significant increase in bacterial adhesion in HS. The proportion of the species in the initial biofilms was also influenced by the surface properties and the media used: SLA and modSLA increased the proportion of species like A. actinomycetemcomitans and S. sanguinis in both media, while the adhesion of A. israelii and P. gingivalis on the same surfaces was affected in the presence of saliva. Conclusions The initial biofilm formation and composition were affected by the microtopography and hydrophilicity of the surface and by the media used. PMID:21492236

  11. Flow cell hydrodynamics and their effects on E. coli biofilm formation under different nutrient conditions and turbulent flow.

    PubMed

    Teodósio, J S; Simões, M; Melo, L F; Mergulhão, F J

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a major factor in the growth and spread of both desirable and undesirable bacteria as well as in fouling and corrosion. In order to simulate biofilm formation in industrial settings a flow cell system coupled to a recirculating tank was used to study the effect of a high (550 mg glucose l?¹) and a low (150 mg glucose l?¹) nutrient concentration on the relative growth of planktonic and attached biofilm cells of Escherichia coli JM109(DE3). Biofilms were obtained under turbulent flow (a Reynolds number of 6000) and the hydrodynamic conditions of the flow cell were simulated by using computational fluid dynamics. Under these conditions, the flow cell was subjected to wall shear stresses of 0.6 Pa and an average flow velocity of 0.4 m s?¹ was reached. The system was validated by studying flow development on the flow cell and the applicability of chemostat model assumptions. Full development of the flow was assessed by analysis of velocity profiles and by monitoring the maximum and average wall shear stresses. The validity of the chemostat model assumptions was performed through residence time analysis and identification of biofilm forming areas. These latter results were obtained through wall shear stress analysis of the system and also by assessment of the free energy of interaction between E. coli and the surfaces. The results show that when the system was fed with a high nutrient concentration, planktonic cell growth was favored. Additionally, the results confirm that biofilms adapt their architecture in order to cope with the hydrodynamic conditions and nutrient availability. These results suggest that until a certain thickness was reached nutrient availability dictated biofilm architecture but when that critical thickness was exceeded mechanical resistance to shear stress (ie biofilm cohesion) became more important. PMID:21082456

  12. Antibacterial activity of Thymoquinone, an active principle of Nigella sativa and its potency to prevent bacterial biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Thymoquinone is an active principle of Nigella sativa seed known as "Habbah Al-Sauda" in Arabic countries and "Sinouj" in Tunisia. Bacterial biofilms tend to exhibit significant tolerance to antimicrobials drugs during infections. Methods The antibacterial activity of Thymoquinone (TQ) and its biofilm inhibition potencies were investigated on 11 human pathogenic bacteria. The growth and development of the biofilm were assessed using the crystal violet (CV) and the 2, 3-bis [2-methyloxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) reduction assay. Results TQ exhibited a significant bactericidal activity against the majority of the tested bacteria (MICs values ranged from 8 to 32 ?g/ml) especially Gram positive cocci (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Staphylococcus epidermidis CIP 106510). Crystal violet assay demonstrated that the minimum biofilm inhibition concentration (BIC50) was reached with 22 and 60 ?g/ml for Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Staphylococcus epidermidis CIP 106510 respectively. In addition our data revealed that cells oxidative activity was influenced by TQ supplementation. In the same way, TQ prevented cell adhesion to glass slides surface. Conclusion The ability of TQ to prevent biofilm formation warrants further investigation to explore its use as bioactive substances with antibiofilm potential. PMID:21489272

  13. Sensitization of oral bacteria in biofilms to killing by light from a low-power laser.

    PubMed

    Dobson, J; Wilson, M

    1992-11-01

    Biofilms of Streptococcus sanguis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans were prepared on the surfaces of agar plates and a number of compounds were screened for their ability to sensitize bacteria in these biofilms to killing by light from a 7.3 mW Helium/Neon (He/Ne) laser. Toluidine blue O and methylene blue enabled detectable killing of all four target organisms after exposure to He/Ne light for 30 s. Aluminium disulphonated phthalocyanine, haematoporphyrin HCl and haematoporphyrin ester were effective photosensitizers of only some of the target organisms. These findings suggest that lethal photosensitization may be an effective means of eliminating periodontopathogenic bacteria from dental plaque. PMID:1334649

  14. Salmonella Biofilm Formation on Aspergillus niger Involves Cellulose – Chitin Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, Maria T.; Carter, Michelle Q.; Parker, Craig T.; Chapman, Matthew R.; Huynh, Steven; Zhou, Yaguang

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella cycles between host and nonhost environments, where it can become an active member of complex microbial communities. The role of fungi in the environmental adaptation of enteric pathogens remains relatively unexplored. We have discovered that S. enterica Typhimurium rapidly attaches to and forms biofilms on the hyphae of the common fungus, Aspergillus niger. Several Salmonella enterica serovars displayed a similar interaction, whereas other bacterial species were unable to bind to the fungus. Bacterial attachment to chitin, a major constituent of fungal cell walls, mirrored this specificity. Pre-incubation of S. Typhimurium with N-acetylglucosamine, the monomeric component of chitin, reduced binding to chitin beads by as much as 727-fold and inhibited attachment to A. niger hyphae considerably. A cellulose-deficient mutant of S. Typhimurium failed to attach to chitin beads and to the fungus. Complementation of this mutant with the cellulose operon restored binding to chitin beads to 79% of that of the parental strain and allowed for attachment and biofilm formation on A. niger, indicating that cellulose is involved in bacterial attachment to the fungus via the chitin component of its cell wall. In contrast to cellulose, S. Typhimurium curli fimbriae were not required for attachment and biofilm development on the hyphae but were critical for its stability. Our results suggest that cellulose–chitin interactions are required for the production of mixed Salmonella-A. niger biofilms, and support the hypothesis that encounters with chitinaceous alternate hosts may contribute to the ecological success of human pathogens. PMID:22003399

  15. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphate transport protein PstS plays a phosphate-independent role in biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Neznansky, Avi; Blus-Kadosh, Inna; Yerushalmi, Gal; Banin, Ehud; Opatowsky, Yarden

    2014-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a primary cause of nosocomial infections. A key element in PA pathogenicity is its ability to form biofilms that withstand eradication by antibiotics and the immune system. Biofilm formation is controlled by phosphate signaling and here we provide evidence that PstS, a subunit of the PA Pst phosphate transporter, has a surprising role in this process. Using X-ray crystallography, we characterized the unique underpinnings of PstS phosphate binding and identified an unusual 15-residue N' loop extension. Structure-based experiments showed that PstS-mediated phosphate uptake and biofilm formation are in fact two distinct functions. Specifically, a point mutation that abrogated phosphate binding did not eliminate biofilm formation; conversely, truncation of the N' loop diminished the ability of PA to form biofilms but had no effect on phosphate binding and uptake. This places PstS at a junction that separately controls phosphate sensing and uptake and the ultrastructure organization of bacteria. PMID:25223609

  16. Medicinal plants extracts affect virulence factors expression and biofilm formation by the uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wojnicz, Dorota; Kucharska, Alicja Z; Sokó?-??towska, Anna; Kicia, Marta; Tichaczek-Goska, Dorota

    2012-12-01

    Medicinal plants are an important source for the therapeutic remedies of various diseases including urinary tract infections. This prompted us to perform research in this area. We decided to focus on medicinal plants species used in urinary tract infections prevention. The aim of our study was to determine the influence of Betula pendula, Equisetum arvense, Herniaria glabra, Galium odoratum, Urtica dioica, and Vaccinium vitis-idaea extracts on bacterial survival and virulence factors involved in tissue colonization and biofilm formation of the uropathogenic Escherichia coli rods. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of plant extracts were performed. Antimicrobial assay relied on the estimation of the colony forming unit number. Hydrophobicity of cells was established by salt aggregation test. Using motility agar, the ability of bacteria to move was examined. The erythrocyte hemagglutination test was used for fimbriae P screening. Curli expression was determined using YESCA agar supplemented with congo red. Quantification of biofilm formation was carried out using a microtiter plate assay and a spectrophotometric method. The results of the study indicate significant differences between investigated extracts in their antimicrobial activities. The extracts of H. glabra and V. vitis-idaea showed the highest growth-inhibitory effects (p < 0.05). Surface hydrophobicity of autoaggregating E. coli strain changed after exposure to all plant extracts, except V. vitis-idaea (p > 0.05). The B. pendula and U. dioica extracts significantly reduced the motility of the E. coli rods (p < 0.05). All the extracts exhibited the anti-biofilm activity. PMID:22915095

  17. Voice prosthetic biofilm formation and Candida morphogenic conversions in absence and presence of different bacterial strains and species on silicone-rubber.

    PubMed

    van der Mei, Henny C; Buijssen, Kevin J D A; van der Laan, Bernard F A M; Ovchinnikova, Ekatarina; Geertsema-Doornbusch, Gésinda I; Atema-Smit, Jelly; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Busscher, Henk J

    2014-01-01

    Morphogenic conversion of Candida from a yeast to hyphal morphology plays a pivotal role in the pathogenicity of Candida species. Both Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis, in combination with a variety of different bacterial strains and species, appear in biofilms on silicone-rubber voice prostheses used in laryngectomized patients. Here we study biofilm formation on silicone-rubber by C. albicans or C. tropicalis in combination with different commensal bacterial strains and lactobacillus strains. In addition, hyphal formation in C. albicans and C. tropicalis, as stimulated by Rothia dentocariosa and lactobacilli was evaluated, as clinical studies outlined that these bacterial strains have opposite results on the clinical life-time of silicone-rubber voice prostheses. Biofilms were grown during eight days in a silicone-rubber tube, while passing the biofilms through episodes of nutritional feast and famine. Biofilms consisting of combinations of C. albicans and a bacterial strain comprised significantly less viable organisms than combinations comprising C. tropicalis. High percentages of Candida were found in biofilms grown in combination with lactobacilli. Interestingly, L. casei, with demonstrated favorable effects on the clinical life-time of voice prostheses, reduced the percentage hyphal formation in Candida biofilms as compared with Candida biofilms grown in absence of bacteria or grown in combination with R. dentocariosa, a bacterial strain whose presence is associated with short clinical life-times of voice prostheses. PMID:25111806

  18. Voice Prosthetic Biofilm Formation and Candida Morphogenic Conversions in Absence and Presence of Different Bacterial Strains and Species on Silicone-Rubber

    PubMed Central

    van der Mei, Henny C.; Buijssen, Kevin J. D. A.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Ovchinnikova, Ekatarina; Geertsema-Doornbusch, Gésinda I.; Atema-Smit, Jelly; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Busscher, Henk J.

    2014-01-01

    Morphogenic conversion of Candida from a yeast to hyphal morphology plays a pivotal role in the pathogenicity of Candida species. Both Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis, in combination with a variety of different bacterial strains and species, appear in biofilms on silicone-rubber voice prostheses used in laryngectomized patients. Here we study biofilm formation on silicone-rubber by C. albicans or C. tropicalis in combination with different commensal bacterial strains and lactobacillus strains. In addition, hyphal formation in C. albicans and C. tropicalis, as stimulated by Rothia dentocariosa and lactobacilli was evaluated, as clinical studies outlined that these bacterial strains have opposite results on the clinical life-time of silicone-rubber voice prostheses. Biofilms were grown during eight days in a silicone-rubber tube, while passing the biofilms through episodes of nutritional feast and famine. Biofilms consisting of combinations of C. albicans and a bacterial strain comprised significantly less viable organisms than combinations comprising C. tropicalis. High percentages of Candida were found in biofilms grown in combination with lactobacilli. Interestingly, L. casei, with demonstrated favorable effects on the clinical life-time of voice prostheses, reduced the percentage hyphal formation in Candida biofilms as compared with Candida biofilms grown in absence of bacteria or grown in combination with R. dentocariosa, a bacterial strain whose presence is associated with short clinical life-times of voice prostheses. PMID:25111806

  19. Combination of tigecycline and N-acetylcysteine reduces biofilm-embedded bacteria on vascular catheters.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Saima; Trautner, Barbara W; Ramanathan, Venkat; Darouiche, Rabih O

    2007-04-01

    To assess the efficacy of an antibiofilm/antimicrobial agent combination, we incubated catheter segments colonized with one of six studied bacterial organisms in N-acetylcysteine, tigecycline, N-acetylcysteine-tigecycline, or saline. Segments were washed, sonicated, and cultured. N-acetylcysteine-tigecycline significantly decreased all viable biofilm-associated bacteria and was synergistic for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. PMID:17220399

  20. Role of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC) in the biofilm formation of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Oh, Euna; Jeon, Byeonghwa

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm formation of Campylobacter jejuni, a major cause of human gastroenteritis, contributes to the survival of this pathogenic bacterium in different environmental niches; however, molecular mechanisms for its biofilm formation have not been fully understood yet. In this study, the role of oxidative stress resistance in biofilm formation was investigated using mutants defective in catalase (KatA), superoxide dismutase (SodB), and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC). Biofilm formation was substantially increased in an ahpC mutant compared to the wild type, and katA and sodB mutants. In contrast to the augmented biofilm formation of the ahpC mutant, a strain overexpressing ahpC exhibited reduced biofilm formation. A perR mutant and a CosR-overexpression strain, both of which upregulate ahpC, also displayed decreased biofilms. However, the introduction of the ahpC mutation to the perR mutant and the CosR-overexpression strain substantially enhanced biofilm formation. The ahpC mutant accumulated more total reactive oxygen species and lipid hydroperoxides than the wild type, and the treatment of the ahpC mutant with antioxidants reduced biofilm formation to the wild-type level. Confocal microscopy analysis showed more microcolonies were developed in the ahpC mutant than the wild type. These results successfully demonstrate that AhpC plays an important role in the biofilm formation of C. jejuni. PMID:24498070

  1. Role of Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase (AhpC) in the Biofilm Formation of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Euna; Jeon, Byeonghwa

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm formation of Campylobacter jejuni, a major cause of human gastroenteritis, contributes to the survival of this pathogenic bacterium in different environmental niches; however, molecular mechanisms for its biofilm formation have not been fully understood yet. In this study, the role of oxidative stress resistance in biofilm formation was investigated using mutants defective in catalase (KatA), superoxide dismutase (SodB), and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC). Biofilm formation was substantially increased in an ahpC mutant compared to the wild type, and katA and sodB mutants. In contrast to the augmented biofilm formation of the ahpC mutant, a strain overexpressing ahpC exhibited reduced biofilm formation. A perR mutant and a CosR-overexpression strain, both of which upregulate ahpC, also displayed decreased biofilms. However, the introduction of the ahpC mutation to the perR mutant and the CosR-overexpression strain substantially enhanced biofilm formation. The ahpC mutant accumulated more total reactive oxygen species and lipid hydroperoxides than the wild type, and the treatment of the ahpC mutant with antioxidants reduced biofilm formation to the wild-type level. Confocal microscopy analysis showed more microcolonies were developed in the ahpC mutant than the wild type. These results successfully demonstrate that AhpC plays an important role in the biofilm formation of C. jejuni. PMID:24498070

  2. Genetic Control of Conventional and Pheromone-Stimulated Biofilm Formation in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Hsuan; Kabrawala, Shail; Fox, Emily P.; Nobile, Clarissa J.; Johnson, Alexander D.; Bennett, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans can stochastically switch between two phenotypes, white and opaque. Opaque cells are the sexually competent form of C. albicans and therefore undergo efficient polarized growth and mating in the presence of pheromone. In contrast, white cells cannot mate, but are induced – under a specialized set of conditions – to form biofilms in response to pheromone. In this work, we compare the genetic regulation of such “pheromone-stimulated” biofilms with that of “conventional” C. albicans biofilms. In particular, we examined a network of six transcriptional regulators (Bcr1, Brg1, Efg1, Tec1, Ndt80, and Rob1) that mediate conventional biofilm formation for their potential roles in pheromone-stimulated biofilm formation. We show that four of the six transcription factors (Bcr1, Brg1, Rob1, and Tec1) promote formation of both conventional and pheromone-stimulated biofilms, indicating they play general roles in cell cohesion and biofilm development. In addition, we identify the master transcriptional regulator of pheromone-stimulated biofilms as C. albicans Cph1, ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ste12. Cph1 regulates mating in C. albicans opaque cells, and here we show that Cph1 is also essential for pheromone-stimulated biofilm formation in white cells. In contrast, Cph1 is dispensable for the formation of conventional biofilms. The regulation of pheromone- stimulated biofilm formation was further investigated by transcriptional profiling and genetic analyses. These studies identified 196 genes that are induced by pheromone signaling during biofilm formation. One of these genes, HGC1, is shown to be required for both conventional and pheromone-stimulated biofilm formation. Taken together, these observations compare and contrast the regulation of conventional and pheromone-stimulated biofilm formation in C. albicans, and demonstrate that Cph1 is required for the latter, but not the former. PMID:23637598

  3. Caenorhabditis elegans: Plague bacteria biofilm blocks food intake

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Creg Darby; Jennifer W. Hsu; Nafisa Ghori; Stanley Falkow

    2002-01-01

    Bubonic plague is transmitted to mammals, including humans, by the bites of fleas whose digestive tracts are blocked by a mass of the bacterium Yersinia pestis. In these fleas, the plague-causing bacteria are surrounded by an extracellular matrix of unknown composition, and the blockage depends on a group of bacterial genes known as the hmsHFRS operon. Here we show that

  4. A Novel Two-Component Response Regulator Links rpf with Biofilm Formation and Virulence of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tzu-Pi; Lu, Kuan-Min; Chen, Yu-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    Citrus bacterial canker caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is a serious disease that impacts citrus production worldwide, and X. axonopodis pv. citri is listed as a quarantine pest in certain countries. Biofilm formation is important for the successful development of a pathogenic relationship between various bacteria and their host(s). To understand the mechanisms of biofilm formation by X. axonopodis pv. citri strain XW19, the strain was subjected to transposon mutagenesis. One mutant with a mutation in a two-component response regulator gene that was deficient in biofilm formation on a polystyrene microplate was selected for further study. The protein was designated as BfdR for biofilm formation defective regulator. BfdR from strain XW19 shares 100% amino acid sequence identity with XAC1284 of X. axonopodis pv. citri strain 306 and 30–100% identity with two-component response regulators in various pathogens and environmental microorganisms. The bfdR mutant strain exhibited significantly decreased biofilm formation on the leaf surfaces of Mexican lime compared with the wild type strain. The bfdR mutant was also compromised in its ability to cause canker lesions. The wild-type phenotype was restored by providing pbfdR in trans in the bfdR mutant. Our data indicated that BfdR did not regulate the production of virulence-related extracellular enzymes including amylase, lipase, protease, and lecithinase or the expression of hrpG, rfbC, and katE; however, BfdR controlled the expression of rpfF in XVM2 medium, which mimics cytoplasmic fluids in planta. In conclusion, biofilm formation on leaf surfaces of citrus is important for canker development in X. axonopodis pv. citri XW19. The process is controlled by the two-component response regulator BfdR via regulation of rpfF, which is required for the biosynthesis of a diffusible signal factor. PMID:23626857

  5. A novel two-component response regulator links rpf with biofilm formation and virulence of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tzu-Pi; Lu, Kuan-Min; Chen, Yu-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    Citrus bacterial canker caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is a serious disease that impacts citrus production worldwide, and X. axonopodis pv. citri is listed as a quarantine pest in certain countries. Biofilm formation is important for the successful development of a pathogenic relationship between various bacteria and their host(s). To understand the mechanisms of biofilm formation by X. axonopodis pv. citri strain XW19, the strain was subjected to transposon mutagenesis. One mutant with a mutation in a two-component response regulator gene that was deficient in biofilm formation on a polystyrene microplate was selected for further study. The protein was designated as BfdR for biofilm formation defective regulator. BfdR from strain XW19 shares 100% amino acid sequence identity with XAC1284 of X. axonopodis pv. citri strain 306 and 30-100% identity with two-component response regulators in various pathogens and environmental microorganisms. The bfdR mutant strain exhibited significantly decreased biofilm formation on the leaf surfaces of Mexican lime compared with the wild type strain. The bfdR mutant was also compromised in its ability to cause canker lesions. The wild-type phenotype was restored by providing pbfdR in trans in the bfdR mutant. Our data indicated that BfdR did not regulate the production of virulence-related extracellular enzymes including amylase, lipase, protease, and lecithinase or the expression of hrpG, rfbC, and katE; however, BfdR controlled the expression of rpfF in XVM2 medium, which mimics cytoplasmic fluids in planta. In conclusion, biofilm formation on leaf surfaces of citrus is important for canker development in X. axonopodis pv. citri XW19. The process is controlled by the two-component response regulator BfdR via regulation of rpfF, which is required for the biosynthesis of a diffusible signal factor. PMID:23626857

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Promotes Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation in Nutrient-Limited Medium

    PubMed Central

    Culotti, Alessandro; Packman, Aaron I.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms have been implicated as an important reservoir for pathogens and commensal enteric bacteria such as Escherichia coli in natural and engineered water systems. However, the processes that regulate the survival of E. coli in aquatic biofilms have not been thoroughly studied. We examined the effects of hydrodynamic shear and nutrient concentrations on E. coli colonization of pre-established Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms, co-inoculation of E. coli and P. aeruginosa biofilms, and P. aeruginosa colonization of pre-established E. coli biofilms. In nutritionally-limited R2A medium, E. coli dominated biofilms when co-inoculated with P. aeruginosa, and successfully colonized and overgrew pre-established P. aeruginosa biofilms. In more enriched media, P. aeruginosa formed larger clusters, but E. coli still extensively overgrew and colonized the interior of P. aeruginosa clusters. In mono-culture, E. coli formed sparse and discontinuous biofilms. After P. aeruginosa was introduced to these biofilms, E. coli growth increased substantially, resulting in patterns of biofilm colonization similar to those observed under other sequences of organism introduction, i.e., E. coli overgrew P. aeruginosa and colonized the interior of P. aeruginosa clusters. These results demonstrate that E. coli not only persists in aquatic biofilms under depleted nutritional conditions, but interactions with P. aeruginosa can greatly increase E. coli growth in biofilms under these experimental conditions. PMID:25198725

  7. Abiotic and Microbiotic Factors Controlling Biofilm Formation by Thermophilic Sporeformers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu; Caspers, Martien P. M.; Metselaar, Karin I.; de Boer, Paulo; Roeselers, Guus; Moezelaar, Roy; Nierop Groot, Masja; Montijn, Roy C.; Abee, Tjakko

    2013-01-01

    One of the major concerns in the production of dairy concentrates is the risk of contamination by heat-resistant spores from thermophilic bacteria. In order to acquire more insight in the composition of microbial communities occurring in the dairy concentrate industry, a bar-coded 16S amplicon sequencing analysis was carried out on milk, final products, and fouling samples taken from dairy concentrate production lines. The analysis of these samples revealed the presence of DNA from a broad range of bacterial taxa, including a majority of mesophiles and a minority of (thermophilic) spore-forming bacteria. Enrichments of fouling samples at 55°C showed the accumulation of predominantly Brevibacillus and Bacillus, whereas enrichments at 65°C led to the accumulation of Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus species. Bacterial population analysis of biofilms grown using fouling samples as an inoculum indicated that both Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus preferentially form biofilms on surfaces at air-liquid interfaces rather than on submerged surfaces. Three of the most potent biofilm-forming strains isolated from the dairy factory industrial samples, including Geobacillus thermoglucosidans, Geobacillus stearothermophilus, and Anoxybacillus flavithermus, have been characterized in detail with respect to their growth conditions and spore resistance. Strikingly, Geobacillus thermoglucosidans, which forms the most thermostable spores of these three species, is not able to grow in dairy intermediates as a pure culture but appears to be dependent for growth on other spoilage organisms present, probably as a result of their proteolytic activity. These results underscore the importance of abiotic and microbiotic factors in niche colonization in dairy factories, where the presence of thermophilic sporeformers can affect the quality of end products. PMID:23851093

  8. Abiotic and microbiotic factors controlling biofilm formation by thermophilic sporeformers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Caspers, Martien P M; Metselaar, Karin I; de Boer, Paulo; Roeselers, Guus; Moezelaar, Roy; Nierop Groot, Masja; Montijn, Roy C; Abee, Tjakko; Kort, Remco

    2013-09-01

    One of the major concerns in the production of dairy concentrates is the risk of contamination by heat-resistant spores from thermophilic bacteria. In order to acquire more insight in the composition of microbial communities occurring in the dairy concentrate industry, a bar-coded 16S amplicon sequencing analysis was carried out on milk, final products, and fouling samples taken from dairy concentrate production lines. The analysis of these samples revealed the presence of DNA from a broad range of bacterial taxa, including a majority of mesophiles and a minority of (thermophilic) spore-forming bacteria. Enrichments of fouling samples at 55°C showed the accumulation of predominantly Brevibacillus and Bacillus, whereas enrichments at 65°C led to the accumulation of Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus species. Bacterial population analysis of biofilms grown using fouling samples as an inoculum indicated that both Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus preferentially form biofilms on surfaces at air-liquid interfaces rather than on submerged surfaces. Three of the most potent biofilm-forming strains isolated from the dairy factory industrial samples, including Geobacillus thermoglucosidans, Geobacillus stearothermophilus, and Anoxybacillus flavithermus, have been characterized in detail with respect to their growth conditions and spore resistance. Strikingly, Geobacillus thermoglucosidans, which forms the most thermostable spores of these three species, is not able to grow in dairy intermediates as a pure culture but appears to be dependent for growth on other spoilage organisms present, probably as a result of their proteolytic activity. These results underscore the importance of abiotic and microbiotic factors in niche colonization in dairy factories, where the presence of thermophilic sporeformers can affect the quality of end products. PMID:23851093

  9. Nitric oxide modulates bacterial biofilm formation through a multicomponent cyclic-di-GMP signaling network.

    PubMed

    Plate, Lars; Marletta, Michael A

    2012-05-25

    Nitric oxide (NO) signaling in vertebrates is well characterized and involves the heme-nitric oxide/oxygen-binding (H-NOX) domain of soluble guanylate cyclase as a selective NO sensor. In contrast, little is known about the biological role or signaling output of bacterial H-NOX proteins. Here, we describe a molecular pathway for H-NOX signaling in Shewanella oneidensis. NO stimulates biofilm formation by controlling the levels of the bacterial secondary messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). Phosphotransfer profiling was used to map the connectivity of a multicomponent signaling network that involves integration from two histidine kinases and branching to three response regulators. A feed-forward loop between response regulators with phosphodiesterase domains and phosphorylation-mediated activation intricately regulated c-di-GMP levels. Phenotypic characterization established a link between NO signaling and biofilm formation. Cellular adhesion may provide a protection mechanism for bacteria against reactive and damaging NO. These results are broadly applicable to H-NOX-mediated NO signaling in bacteria. PMID:22542454

  10. Chemoinformatics-assisted development of new anti-biofilm compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anna Dürig; Irene Kouskoumvekaki; Rebecca M. Vejborg; Per Klemm

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are associated with a large number of infections. Biofilm-dwelling bacteria are particularly resistant\\u000a to antibiotics, making it hard to eradicate biofilm-associated infections. Here, we use a novel cross-disciplinary approach\\u000a combining microbiology and chemoinformatics to identify new and efficient anti-biofilm drugs. We found that ellagic acid (present\\u000a in green tea) significantly inhibited biofilm formation of Streptococcus dysgalactiae. Based on

  11. Streptococcus parasanguis Fimbria-Associated Adhesin Fap1 Is Required for Biofilm Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    EUNICE H. FROELIGER; PAULA FIVES-TAYLOR

    2001-01-01

    The sanguis streptococci are primary colonizers of the tooth surface and thus form the foundation for the complex multiple species biofilm known as dental plaque. In addition, these bacteria can colonize native and prosthetic heart valves and are a common cause of endocarditis. Little is known about the molecular mech- anisms governing multiple or single species biofilm development within this

  12. Monitoring of biofilm formation on different material surfaces of medical devices using hyperspectral imaging method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of the inner surface of indwelling (implanted) medical devices by microbial biofilm is a serious problem. Some microbial bacteria such as Escherichia coli form biofilms that lead to potentially life-threatening infections. Other types of medical devices such as bronchoscopes and duod...

  13. Stilbenes reduce Staphylococcus aureus hemolysis, biofilm formation, and virulence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kayeon; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Ryu, Shi Yong; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2014-09-01

    Stilbenoids have a broad range of beneficial health effects. On the other hand, the emergence of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus presents a worldwide problem that requires new antibiotics or nonantibiotic strategies. S. aureus produces ?-hemolysin (a pore-forming cytotoxin) that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of sepsis and pneumonia. Furthermore, the biofilms formed by S. aureus constitute a mechanism of antimicrobial resistance. In this study, we investigated the hemolytic and antibiofilm activities of 10 stilbene-related compounds against S. aureus. trans-Stilbene and resveratrol at 10??g/mL were found to markedly inhibit human blood hemolysis by S. aureus, and trans-stilbene also inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation without affecting its bacterial growth. Furthermore, trans-stilbene and resveratrol attenuated S. aureus virulence in vivo in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which is normally killed by S. aureus. Transcriptional analysis showed that trans-stilbene repressed the ?-hemolysin hla gene and the intercellular adhesion locus (icaA and icaD) in S. aureus, and this finding was in line with observed reductions in virulence and biofilm formation. In addition, vitisin B, a stilbenoid tetramer, at 1??g/mL was observed to significantly inhibit human blood hemolysis by S. aureus. PMID:25007234

  14. Spatial & Temporal Geophysical Monitoring of Microbial Growth and Biofilm Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. A.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Atekwana, E. A.; Werkema, D. D.; Haugen, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    Previous studies have examined the effect of biogenic gases and biomineralization on the acoustic properties of porous media. In this study, we investigated the spatiotemporal effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on compressional waves and complex conductivity in sand columns. A control column (non-biostimulated) and a biostimulated column were studied in a 2D acoustic scanning apparatus, and a second set of columns were constructed with Ag-AgCl electrodes for complex conductivity measurements. At the completion of the 29-day experiment, compressional wave amplitudes and arrival times for the control column were observed to be relatively uniform over the scanned 2D region. However, the biostimulated sample exhibited a high degree of spatial variability within the column for both the amplitude and arrival times. Furthermore, portions of the sample exhibited increased attenuation (~ 80%) concurrent with an increase in the arrival times, while other portions exhibited decreased attenuation (~ 45%) and decreased arrival time. The acoustic amplitude and arrival times changed significantly in the biostimulated column between Days 5 and 7 of the experiment and are consistent with a peak in the imaginary conductivity (?”) values. The ?” response corresponds to different stages of biofilm development. That is, we interpret the peak ?” with the maximum biofilm thickness and decreasing ?” due to cell death or detachment. Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) imaging confirmed microbial cell attachment to sand surfaces in the biostimulated columns, showed apparent differences in the morphology of attached biomass between regions of increased and decreased attenuation, and indicated no mineral precipitation or biomineralization. The heterogeneity in the elastic properties arises from the differences in the morphology and structure of attached biofilms. These results suggest that combining acoustic imaging and complex conductivity techniques can provide a powerful tool for assessing microbial growth or biofilm formation and the associated changes in porous media, such as those that occur during bioremediation and microbial enhanced oil recovery. Furthermore, this study suggests microbial growth and biofilm development can yield a detectable geophysical response without biomineralization effects. Acknowledgments: This material is based in part on work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. OCE-0729642, EAR 0722410 (MRI), EAR 0525316, and REU Award # 0552918, and EPA Student Services Contract EP07D000660. LJPN would like to acknowledge support from Geosciences Research Program, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy (DEFG02-97ER14785 08).

  15. Lavage with Allicin in Combination with Vancomycin Inhibits Biofilm Formation by Staphylococcus epidermidis in a Rabbit Model of Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Haohan; Pan, Jianchao; Pang, En; Bai, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim The present anti-infection strategy for prosthetic joint infections (PJI) includes the use of antibiotics and surgical treatments, but the bacterial eradication rates are still low. One of the major challenges is the formation of biofilm causing poor bacterial eradication. Recently it has been reported that allicin (diallyl thiosulphinate), an antibacterial principle of garlic, can inhibit bacteria adherence and prevent biofilm formation in vitro. However, whether allicin could inhibit biofilm formation in vivo is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of allicin on biofilm formation, and whether allicin could potentiate the bactericidal effect of vancomycin in a rabbit PJI model. Methods A sterile stainless-steel screw with a sterile ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene washer was inserted into the lateral femoral condyle of the right hind knee joint of rabbit, and 1 mL inoculum containing 104 colony-forming units of Staphylococcus epidermidis was inoculated into the knee joint (n?=?32). Fourteen days later, rabbits randomly received one of the following 4 treatments using continuous lavages: normal saline, vancomycin (20 mcg/mL), allicin (4 mg/L), or allicin (4 mg/L) plus vancomycin (20 mcg/mL). Three days later, the washer surface biofilm formation was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The bacterial counts within the biofilm of implanted screws were determined by bacterial culture. Results The lowest number of viable bacterial counts of Staphylococcus epidermidis recovered from the biofilm was in the rabbits treated with allicin plus vancomycin (P<0.01 vs. all other groups). The biofilm formation was significantly reduced or undetectable by SEM in rabbits receiving allicin or allicin plus vancomycin. Conclusion Intra-articular allicincan inhibit biofilm formation and enhance the bactericidal effect of vancomycin on implant surface in vivo. Allicin in combination with vancomycin may be a useful anti-infection strategy for the treatment of PJI. PMID:25025650

  16. Staphylococcus aureus sarA regulates inflammation and colonization during central nervous system biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Jessica N; Beaver, Matt; Beenken, Karen; Smeltzer, Mark; Horswill, Alexander R; Kielian, Tammy

    2013-01-01

    Infection is a frequent and serious complication following the treatment of hydrocephalus with CSF shunts, with limited therapeutic options because of biofilm formation along the catheter surface. Here we evaluated the possibility that the sarA regulatory locus engenders S. aureus more resistant to immune recognition in the central nervous system (CNS) based on its reported ability to regulate biofilm formation. We utilized our established model of CNS catheter-associated infection, similar to CSF shunt infections seen in humans, to compare the kinetics of bacterial titers, cytokine production and inflammatory cell influx elicited by wild type S. aureus versus an isogenic sarA mutant. The sarA mutant was more rapidly cleared from infected catheters compared to its isogenic wild type strain. Consistent with this finding, several pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-17, CXCL1, and IL-1? were significantly increased in the brain following infection with the sarA mutant versus wild type S. aureus, in agreement with the fact that the sarA mutant displayed impaired biofilm growth and favored a planktonic state. Neutrophil influx into the infected hemisphere was also increased in the animals infected with the sarA mutant compared to wild type bacteria. These changes were not attributable to extracellular protease activity, which is increased in the context of SarA mutation, since similar responses were observed between sarA and a sarA/protease mutant. Overall, these results demonstrate that sarA plays an important role in attenuating the inflammatory response during staphylococcal biofilm infection in the CNS via a mechanism that remains to be determined. PMID:24386336

  17. Role of nanostructured gold surfaces on monocyte activation and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Sara; Forsberg, Magnus; Hulander, Mats; Vazirisani, Forugh; Palmquist, Anders; Lausmaa, Jukka; Thomsen, Peter; Trobos, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    The role of material surface properties in the direct interaction with bacteria and the indirect route via host defense cells is not fully understood. Recently, it was suggested that nanostructured implant surfaces possess antimicrobial properties. In the current study, the adhesion and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis and human monocyte adhesion and activation were studied separately and in coculture in different in vitro models using smooth gold and well-defined nanostructured gold surfaces. Two polystyrene surfaces were used as controls in the monocyte experiments. Fluorescent viability staining demonstrated a reduction in the viability of S. epidermidis close to the nanostructured gold surface, whereas the smooth gold correlated with more live biofilm. The results were supported by scanning electron microscopy observations, showing higher biofilm tower formations and more mature biofilms on smooth gold compared with nanostructured gold. Unstimulated monocytes on the different substrates demonstrated low activation, reduced gene expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and low cytokine secretion. In contrast, stimulation with opsonized zymosan or opsonized live S. epidermidis for 1 hour significantly increased the production of reactive oxygen species, the gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), interleukin-1? (IL-1?), IL-6, and IL-10, as well as the secretion of TNF-?, demonstrating the ability of the cells to elicit a response and actively phagocytose prey. In addition, cells cultured on the smooth gold and the nanostructured gold displayed a different adhesion pattern and a more rapid oxidative burst than those cultured on polystyrene upon stimulation. We conclude that S. epidermidis decreased its viability initially when adhering to nanostructured surfaces compared with smooth gold surfaces, especially in the bacterial cell layers closest to the surface. In contrast, material surface properties neither strongly promoted nor attenuated the activity of monocytes when exposed to zymosan particles or S. epidermidis. PMID:24550671

  18. Polyspecies biofilm formation on implant surfaces with different surface characteristics

    PubMed Central

    SCHMIDLIN, Patrick R.; MÜLLER, Phillip; ATTIN, Thomas; WIELAND, Marco; HOFER, Deborah; GUGGENHEIM, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the microbial adherence and colonization of a polyspecies biofilm on 7 differently processed titanium surfaces. Material and Methods: Six-species biofilms were formed anaerobically on 5-mm-diameter sterilized, saliva-preconditioned titanium discs. Material surfaces used were either machined, stained, acid-etched or sandblasted/acid-etched (SLA). Samples of the latter two materials were also provided in a chemically modified form, with increased wettability characteristics. Surface roughness and contact angles of all materials were determined. The discs were then incubated anaerobically for up to 16.5 h. Initial microbial adherence was evaluated after 20 min incubation and further colonization after 2, 4, 8, and 16.5 h using non-selective and selective culture techniques. Results at different time points were compared using ANOVA and Scheffé post hoc analysis. Results: The mean differences in microorganisms colonizing after the first 20 min were in a very narrow range (4.5 to 4.8 log CFU). At up to 16.5 h, the modified SLA surface exhibited the highest values for colonization (6.9±0.2 log CFU, p<0.05) but increasing growth was observed on all test surfaces over time. Discrepancies among bacterial strains on the differently crafted titanium surfaces were very similar to those described for total log CFU. F. nucleatum was below the detection limit on all surfaces after 4 h. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, surface roughness had a moderate influence on biofilm formation, while wettability did not seem to influence biofilm formation under the experimental conditions described. The modified SLA surface showed the highest trend for bacterial colonization. PMID:23559112

  19. Diversity assessment of Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation: impact of growth condition, serotype and strain origin.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Sachin R; den Besten, Heidy M W; van der Veen, Stijn; Zwietering, Marcel H; Moezelaar, Roy; Abee, Tjakko

    2013-08-01

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has the ability to produce biofilms in food-processing environments and then contaminate food products, which is a major concern for food safety. The biofilm forming behavior of 143 L. monocytogenes strains was determined in four different media that were rich, moderate or poor in nutrients at 12°C, 20°C, 30°C and 37°C. The biofilm formation was mostly influenced by temperature, resulting in decreased biofilm formation with decreasing temperature. Biofilm formation was enhanced in nutrient-poor medium rather than in nutrient-rich medium, and especially in nutrient-poor medium significantly enhanced biofilm production was observed early in biofilm maturation underlining the effect of medium on biofilm formation rate. Also serotype had a significant effect on biofilm formation and was influenced by medium used because strains from both serotype 1/2b and 1/2a formed more biofilm than serotype 4b strains in nutrient-rich medium at 20°C, 30°C and 37°C, whereas in nutrient-poor medium the biofilm production levels of serotype 1/2a and 4b strains were rather similar and lower than serotype 1/2b strains. The strains used originated from various origins, including dairy, meat, industrial environment, human and animal, and the level of biofilm formation was not significantly affected by the origin of isolation, irrespective of medium used and temperature tested. A linear model was used to correlate crystal violet staining of biofilm production to the number of viable cells within the biofilm. This showed that crystal violet staining was poorly correlated to the number of viable cells in nutrient-poor medium, and LIVE/DEAD staining and DNase I treatment revealed that this could be attributed to the presence of non-viable cells and extracellular DNA in the biofilm matrix. The significant impact of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on biofilm production of L. monocytogenes underlined that niche-specific features determine the levels of biofilm produced, and insights in biofilm formation characteristics will allow us to further optimize strategies to control the biofilm formation of L. monocytogenes. PMID:23800738

  20. Staphylococcus aureus clumping factor B mediates biofilm formation in the absence of calcium.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Nabil M; Jefferson, Kimberly K

    2012-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of nosocomial infections and a major cause of community-acquired infections. Biofilm formation is a key virulence determinant in certain types of S. aureus infection, especially those involving inserted medical devices. We found in a previous study that the calcium chelators sodium citrate and EGTA inhibit biofilm formation in certain strains of S. aureus but actually augment biofilm formation in other strains. Even two closely related strains, Newman and 10833, exhibited strikingly different biofilm phenotypes in the presence of calcium chelators, in that biofilm formation was inhibited in Newman but augmented in 10833. We also found that the surface protein clumping factor B (ClfB) plays a role in this phenomenon. In this study, we confirm that ClfB is required for biofilm formation under calcium-depleted conditions. We investigated the post-translational regulation of ClfB-mediated biofilm formation and found evidence that both calcium and the protease aureolysin disrupt established ClfB-dependent biofilms. Finally, we investigated the genetic basis for the biofilm-negative phenotype in strain Newman versus the biofilm-positive phenotype in strain 10833 under calcium-depleted conditions and found that strain 10833 contains a deletion that results in a stop codon within the aureolysin gene (aur). When 10833 expressed Newman aur, surface-associated ClfB and the ability to form a biofilm in chelating conditions was lost. Thus, the positive effect of chelating agents on biofilm formation in certain strains can be explained by increased ClfB activity in the absence of calcium and the discrepancy in the response of strains 10833 and Newman can be explained by point mutations in aur. This study reveals a previously unknown, to our knowledge, role for ClfB in biofilm formation and underscores the potential for striking phenotypic variability resulting from minor differences in strain background. PMID:22442307

  1. Polysaccharides and proteins added to flowing drinking water at microgram-per-liter levels promote the formation of biofilms predominated by bacteroidetes and proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Sack, Eveline L W; van der Wielen, Paul W J J; van der Kooij, Dick

    2014-04-01

    Biopolymers are important substrates for heterotrophic bacteria in (ultra)oligotrophic freshwater environments, but information about their utilization at microgram-per-liter levels by attached freshwater bacteria is lacking. This study aimed at characterizing biopolymer utilization in drinking-water-related biofilms by exposing such biofilms to added carbohydrates or proteins at 10 ?g C liter(-1) in flowing tap water for up to 3 months. Individually added amylopectin was not utilized by the biofilms, whereas laminarin, gelatin, and caseinate were. Amylopectin was utilized during steady-state biofilm growth with simultaneously added maltose but not with simultaneously added acetate. Biofilm formation rates (BFR) at 10 ?g C liter(-1) per substrate were ranked as follows, from lowest to highest: blank or amylopectin (?6 pg ATP cm(-2) day(-1)), gelatin or caseinate, laminarin, maltose, acetate alone or acetate plus amylopectin, and maltose plus amylopectin (980 pg ATP cm(-2) day(-1)). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses revealed that the predominant maltose-utilizing bacteria also dominated subsequent amylopectin utilization, indicating catabolic repression and (extracellular) enzyme induction. The accelerated BFR with amylopectin in the presence of maltose probably resulted from efficient amylopectin binding to and hydrolysis by inductive enzymes attached to the bacterial cells. Cytophagia, Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Sphingobacteriia grew during polysaccharide addition, and Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria, Cytophagia, Flavobacteriia, and Sphingobacteriia grew during protein addition. The succession of bacterial populations in the biofilms coincided with the decrease in the specific growth rate during biofilm formation. Biopolymers can clearly promote biofilm formation at microgram-per-liter levels in drinking water distribution systems and, depending on their concentrations, might impair the biological stability of distributed drinking water. PMID:24487544

  2. Characterization of the effect of serum and chelating agents on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation; chelating agents augment biofilm formation through clumping factor B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Nabil Mathew

    Staphylococcus aureus is the causative agent of a diverse array of acute and chronic infections, and some these infections, including infective endocarditis, joint infections, and medical device-associated bloodstream infections, depend upon its capacity to form tenacious biofilms on surfaces. Inserted medical devices such as intravenous catheters, pacemakers, and artificial heart valves save lives, but unfortunately, they can also serve as a substrate on which S. aureus can form a biofilm, attributing S. aureus as a leading cause of medical device-related infections. The major aim of this work was take compounds to which S. aureus would be exposed during infection and to investigate their effects on its capacity to form a biofilm. More specifically, the project investigated the effects of serum, and thereafter of catheter lock solutions on biofilm formation by S. aureus. Pre-coating polystyrene with serum is frequently used as a method to augment biofilm formation. The effect of pre-coating with serum is due to the deposition of extracellular matrix components onto the polystyrene, which are then recognized by MSCRAMMs. We therefore hypothesized that the major component of blood, serum, would induce biofilm formation. Surprisingly, serum actually inhibited biofilm formation. The inhibitory activity was due to a small molecular weight, heat-stable, non-proteinaceous component/s of serum. Serum-mediated inhibition of biofilm formation may represent a previously uncharacterized aspect of host innate immunity that targets the expression of a key bacterial virulence factor: the ability to establish a resistant biofilm. Metal ion chelators like sodium citrate are frequently chosen to lock intravenous catheters because they are regarded as potent inhibitors of bacterial biofilm formation and viability. We found that, while chelating compounds abolished biofilm formation in most strains of S. aureus, they actually augmented the phenotype in a subset of strains. We investigated the molecular basis of this phenomenon. Deletion and complementation analysis and thereafter antibody based inhibition assays confirmed a functional role for the surface adhesin clumping factor B as the causative determinant associated with the increased biofilm phenotype. Finally, we investigated the regulation of clumping factor B-mediated biofilm formation and the basis for the strain dependence. Regulation was determined to occur via two novel post-translational networks- one affecting ClfB activity, mediated by Ca2+ binding to the EF-Hand domain, and the other affecting protein stability, mediated by the enzymatic activity of the metalloprotease-aureolysin. Polymorphisms within the aureolysin gene sequence, between strains, was identified as the basis for some strains forming robust biofilms within chelated media versus other than do not exhibit this phenotype.

  3. Potential mechanisms for the effects of tea extracts on the attachment, biofilm formation and cell size of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Lee, Sui M; Dykes, Gary A

    2013-01-01

    Tea can inhibit the attachment of Streptococcus mutans to surfaces and subsequent biofilm formation. Five commercial tea extracts were screened for their ability to inhibit attachment and biofilm formation by two strains of S. mutans on glass and hydroxyapatite surfaces. The mechanisms of these effects were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and phytochemical screening. The results indicated that extracts of oolong tea most effectively inhibited attachment and extracts of pu-erh tea most effectively inhibited biofilm formation. SEM images showed that the S. mutans cells treated with extracts of oolong tea, or grown in medium containing extracts of pu-erh tea, were coated with tea components and were larger with more rounded shapes. The coatings on the cells consisted of flavonoids, tannins and indolic compounds. The ratio of tannins to simple phenolics in each of the coating samples was ?3:1. This study suggests potential mechanisms by which tea components may inhibit the attachment and subsequent biofilm formation of S. mutans on tooth surfaces, such as modification of cell surface properties and blocking of the activity of proteins and the structures used by the bacteria to interact with surfaces. PMID:23528127

  4. Inhibitory effects of 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-beta-D-glucopyranose on biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei-Hui; Chang, Fang-Rong; Hua, Mu-Yi; Wu, Yang-Chang; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2011-03-01

    1,2,3,4,6-Penta-O-galloyl-?-D-glucopyranose (PGG) is an active ingredient in plants that are commonly used in Chinese medicine to treat inflammation. We demonstrate here that PGG, at 6.25 ?M, does not inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, and yet it prevents biofilm formation on polystyrene and polycarbonate surfaces. At the same concentration, PGG is not toxic to human epithelial and fibroblast cells. PGG has an IB?? value, i.e., the PGG concentration that inhibits 50% biofilm formation, of 3.6 ?M. The value is substantially lower than that of N-acetylcysteine, iodoacetamide, and N-phenyl maleimide, which are known to inhibit biofilm formation by S. aureus. Biochemical and scanning electron microscopy results also reveal that PGG inhibits initial attachment of the bacteria to solid surface and the synthesis of polysaccharide intercellular adhesin, explaining how PGG inhibits biofilm formation. The results of this study demonstrate that coating PGG on polystyrene and silicon rubber surfaces with polyaniline prevents biofilm formation, indicating that PGG is highly promising for clinical use in preventing biofilm formation by S. aureus. PMID:21173176

  5. Membrane Vesicle Formation as a Multiple-Stress Response Mechanism Enhances Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E Cell Surface Hydrophobicity and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Baumgarten, Thomas; Sperling, Stefanie; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Steiniger, Frank; Wick, Lukas Y.

    2012-01-01

    Among the adaptive responses of bacteria to rapid changes in environmental conditions, those of the cell envelope are known to be the most crucial. Therefore, several mechanisms with which bacteria change their cell surface and membranes in the presence of different environmental stresses have been elucidated. Among these mechanisms, the release of outer membrane vesicles (MV) in Gram-negative bacteria has attracted particular research interest because of its involvement in pathogenic processes, such as that of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation in cystic fibrosis lungs. In this study, we investigated the role of MV formation as an adaptive response of Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E to several environmental stress factors and correlated it to the formation of biofilms. In the presence of toxic concentrations of long-chain alcohols, under osmotic stress caused by NaCl, in the presence of EDTA, and after heat shock, cells of this strain released MV within 10 min in the presence of a stressor. The MV formed showed similar size and charge properties, as well as comparable compositions of proteins and fatty acids. MV release caused a significant increase in cell surface hydrophobicity, and an enhanced tendency to form biofilms was demonstrated in this study. Therefore, the release of MV as a stress response could be put in a physiological context. PMID:22752175

  6. Tackling the minority: sulfate-reducing bacteria in an archaea-dominated subsurface biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Alexander J; Holman, Hoi-Ying N; DeSantis, Todd Z; Andersen, Gary L; Birarda, Giovanni; Bechtel, Hans A; Piceno, Yvette M; Sonnleitner, Maria; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Archaea are usually minor components of a microbial community and dominated by a large and diverse bacterial population. In contrast, the SM1 Euryarchaeon dominates a sulfidic aquifer by forming subsurface biofilms that contain a very minor bacterial fraction (5%). These unique biofilms are delivered in high biomass to the spring outflow that provides an outstanding window to the subsurface. Despite previous attempts to understand its natural role, the metabolic capacities of the SM1 Euryarchaeon remain mysterious to date. In this study, we focused on the minor bacterial fraction in order to obtain insights into the ecological function of the biofilm. We link phylogenetic diversity information with the spatial distribution of chemical and metabolic compounds by combining three different state-of-the-art methods: PhyloChip G3 DNA microarray technology, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy. The results of PhyloChip and FISH technologies provide evidence for selective enrichment of sulfate-reducing bacteria, which was confirmed by the detection of bacterial dissimilatory sulfite reductase subunit B (dsrB) genes via quantitative PCR and sequence-based analyses. We further established a differentiation of archaeal and bacterial cells by SR-FTIR based on typical lipid and carbohydrate signatures, which demonstrated a co-localization of organic sulfate, carbonated mineral and bacterial signatures in the biofilm. All these results strongly indicate an involvement of the SM1 euryarchaeal biofilm in the global cycles of sulfur and carbon and support the hypothesis that sulfidic springs are important habitats for Earth's energy cycles. Moreover, these investigations of a bacterial minority in an Archaea-dominated environment are a remarkable example of the great power of combining highly sensitive microarrays with label-free infrared imaging. PMID:23178669

  7. A systems-level approach for investigating Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaobin; Fang, Xin; Wood, Thomas K; Huang, Zuyi Jacky

    2013-01-01

    Prevention of the initiation of biofilm formation is the most important step for combating biofilm-associated pathogens, as the ability of pathogens to resist antibiotics is enhanced 10 to 1000 times once biofilms are formed. Genes essential to bacterial growth in the planktonic state are potential targets to treat biofilm-associated pathogens. However, the biofilm formation capability of strains with mutations in these essential genes must be evaluated, since the pathogen might form a biofilm before it is eliminated. In order to address this issue, this work proposes a systems-level approach to quantifying the biofilm formation capability of mutants to determine target genes that are essential for bacterial metabolism in the planktonic state but do not induce biofilm formation in their mutants. The changes of fluxes through the reactions associated with the genes positively related to biofilm formation are used as soft sensors in the flux balance analysis to quantify the trend of biofilm formation upon the mutation of an essential gene. The essential genes whose mutants are predicted not to induce biofilm formation are regarded as gene targets. The proposed approach was applied to identify target genes to treat Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. It is interesting to find that most essential gene mutants exhibit high potential to induce the biofilm formation while most non-essential gene mutants do not. Critically, we identified four essential genes, lysC, cysH, adk, and galU, that constitute gene targets to treat P. aeruginosa. They have been suggested by existing experimental data as potential drug targets for their crucial role in the survival or virulence of P. aeruginosa. It is also interesting to find that P. aeruginosa tends to survive the essential-gene mutation treatment by mainly enhancing fluxes through 8 metabolic reactions that regulate acetate metabolism, arginine metabolism, and glutamate metabolism. PMID:23451140

  8. Intra-Amoeba Multiplication Induces Chemotaxis and Biofilm Colonization and Formation for Legionella

    PubMed Central

    Bigot, Renaud; Bertaux, Joanne; Frere, Jacques; Berjeaud, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular bacterium, is the causative agent of legionellosis. In the environment this pathogenic bacterium colonizes the biofilms as well as amoebae, which provide a rich environment for the replication of Legionella. When seeded on pre-formed biofilms, L. pneumophila was able to establish and survive and was only found at the surface of the biofilms. Different phenotypes were observed when the L. pneumophila, used to implement pre-formed biofilms or to form mono-species biofilms, were cultivated in a laboratory culture broth or had grown intracellulary within the amoeba. Indeed, the bacteria, which developed within the amoeba, formed clusters when deposited on a solid surface. Moreover, our results demonstrate that multiplication inside the amoeba increased the capacity of L. pneumophila to produce polysaccharides and therefore enhanced its capacity to establish biofilms. Finally, it was shown that the clusters formed by L. pneumophila were probably related to the secretion of a chemotaxis molecular agent. PMID:24205008

  9. The R1 conjugative plasmid increases Escherichia coli biofilm formation through an envelope stress response.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaole; Ma, Qun; Wood, Thomas K

    2008-05-01

    Differential gene expression in biofilm cells suggests that adding the derepressed conjugative plasmid R1drd19 increases biofilm formation by affecting genes related to envelope stress (rseA and cpxAR), biofilm formation (bssR and cstA), energy production (glpDFK), acid resistance (gadABCEX and hdeABD), and cell motility (csgBEFG, yehCD, yadC, and yfcV); genes encoding outer membrane proteins (ompACF), phage shock proteins (pspABCDE), and cold shock proteins (cspACDEG); and phage-related genes. To investigate the link between the identified genes and biofilm formation upon the addition of R1drd19, 40 isogenic mutants were classified according to their different biofilm formation phenotypes. Cells with class I mutations (those in rseA, bssR, cpxA, and ompA) exhibited no difference from the wild-type strain in biofilm formation and no increase in biofilm formation upon the addition of R1drd19. Cells with class II mutations (those in gatC, yagI, ompC, cspA, pspD, pspB, ymgB, gadC, pspC, ymgA, slp, cpxP, cpxR, cstA, rseC, ompF, and yqjD) displayed increased biofilm formation compared to the wild-type strain but decreased biofilm formation upon the addition of R1drd19. Class III mutants showed increased biofilm formation compared to the wild-type strain and increased biofilm formation upon the addition of R1drd19. Cells with class IV mutations displayed increased biofilm formation compared to the wild-type strain but little difference upon the addition of R1drd19, and class V mutants exhibited no difference from the wild-type strain but increased biofilm formation upon the addition of R1drd19. Therefore, proteins encoded by the genes corresponding to the class I mutant phenotype are involved in R1drd19-promoted biofilm formation, primarily through their impact on cell motility. We hypothesize that the pili formed upon the addition of the conjugative plasmid disrupt the membrane (induce ompA) and activate the two-component system CpxAR as well as the other envelope stress response system, RseA-sigma(E), both of which, along with BssR, play a key role in bacterial biofilm formation. PMID:18344336

  10. Production of Indole from l-Tryptophan and Effects of These Compounds on Biofilm Formation by Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586 ?

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki-Imamura, Takako; Yano, Akira; Yoshida, Yasuo

    2010-01-01

    The l-tryptophan degradation product indole is a purported extracellular signaling molecule that influences biofilm formation in various bacteria. Here we analyzed the mechanisms of indole production in Fusobacterium nucleatum and the effects of tryptophan and indole on F. nucleatum planktonic and biofilm cells. The amino acid sequence deduced from the fn1943 gene in F. nucleatum ATCC 25586 was 28% identical to that deduced from tnaA in Escherichia coli, which encodes tryptophanase catalyzing the ?-elimination of l-tryptophan to produce indole. The fn1943 gene was cotranscribed with the downstream gene fn1944, which is a homolog of tnaB encoding low-affinity tryptophan permease. The transcript started at position ?68 or ?153 from the first nucleotide of the fn1943 translation initiation codon. Real-time quantitative PCR showed that much more F. nucleatum fn1943 transcripts were obtained from log-phase cells than from stationary-phase cells. Indole production by the purified recombinant protein encoded by fn1943 was examined using high-performance liquid chromatography. The Km and kcat of the enzyme were 0.26 ± 0.03 mM and 0.74 ± 0.04 s?1, respectively. F. nucleatum biofilm formation and the biofilm supernatant concentration of indole increased dose dependently with increasing tryptophan concentrations. Exogenous indole also increased F. nucleatum biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner. Even at very high concentrations, tryptophan did not affect fn1943 expression, whereas similar indole concentrations decreased expression. Thus, exogenous tryptophan and indole were suggested to increase F. nucleatum biofilms. PMID:20472741

  11. Modelling biofilm-induced formation damage and biocide treatment in subsurface geosystems

    PubMed Central

    Ezeuko, C C; Sen, A; Gates, I D

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm growth in subsurface porous media, and its treatment with biocides (antimicrobial agents), involves a complex interaction of biogeochemical processes which provide non-trivial mathematical modelling challenges. Although there are literature reports of mathematical models to evaluate biofilm tolerance to biocides, none of these models have investigated biocide treatment of biofilms growing in interconnected porous media with flow. In this paper, we present a numerical investigation using a pore network model of biofilm growth, formation damage and biocide treatment. The model includes three phases (aqueous, adsorbed biofilm, and solid matrix), a single growth-limiting nutrient and a single biocide dissolved in the water. Biofilm is assumed to contain a single species of microbe, in which each cell can be a viable persister, a viable non-persister, or non-viable (dead). Persisters describe small subpopulation of cells which are tolerant to biocide treatment. Biofilm tolerance to biocide treatment is regulated by persister cells and includes ‘innate’ and ‘biocide-induced’ factors. Simulations demonstrate that biofilm tolerance to biocides can increase with biofilm maturity, and that biocide treatment alone does not reverse biofilm-induced formation damage. Also, a successful application of biological permeability conformance treatment involving geologic layers with flow communication is more complicated than simply engineering the attachment of biofilm-forming cells at desired sites. PMID:23164434

  12. Impact of Helicobacter pylori Biofilm Formation on Clarithromycin Susceptibility and Generation of Resistance Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Yonezawa, Hideo; Osaki, Takako; Hanawa, Tomoko; Kurata, Satoshi; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori forms biofilms in vitro and in vivo. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of H. pylori biofilm formation in vitro on clarithromycin (CLR) susceptibility. CLR susceptibility of H. pylori intermediate (2-day) and mature (3-day) biofilms on glass coverslips was determined at concentrations from 0.03 to 0.5 µg/ml. H. pylori biofilm biomass was increased after treatment with CLR at minimum inhibitory concentration levels by up to 4-fold (2-day biofilm) and 16-fold (3-day biofilm). Minimum bactericidal concentrations of CLR against cells in a biofilm were higher (1.0 µg/ml) than that for planktonic cells (0.25 µg/ml). It was shown that the expression of efflux pump genes was significantly increased in biofilm cells. In addition, exposure of biofilms to CLR resulted in high level resistance generation compared to planktonic cells with increased resistance associated with the presence of a point mutation at either position 2142 or 2143 in the domain V loop of the 23S rRNA gene. These results demonstrate that H. pylori biofilm formation decreases the susceptibility to CLR and that H. pylori CLR resistance mutations are more frequently generated in biofilms than in planktonic cells. PMID:24039906

  13. Biofilm Formation by the Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans: Development, Architecture, and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Jyotsna; Kuhn, Duncan M.; Mukherjee, Pranab K.; Hoyer, Lois L.; McCormick, Thomas; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.

    2001-01-01

    Biofilms are a protected niche for microorganisms, where they are safe from antibiotic treatment and can create a source of persistent infection. Using two clinically relevant Candida albicans biofilm models formed on bioprosthetic materials, we demonstrated that biofilm formation proceeds through three distinct developmental phases. These growth phases transform adherent blastospores to well-defined cellular communities encased in a polysaccharide matrix. Fluorescence and confocal scanning laser microscopy revealed that C. albicans biofilms have a highly heterogeneous architecture composed of cellular and noncellular elements. In both models, antifungal resistance of biofilm-grown cells increased in conjunction with biofilm formation. The expression of agglutinin-like (ALS) genes, which encode a family of proteins implicated in adhesion to host surfaces, was differentially regulated between planktonic and biofilm-grown cells. The ability of C. albicans to form biofilms contrasts sharply with that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which adhered to bioprosthetic surfaces but failed to form a mature biofilm. The studies described here form the basis for investigations into the molecular mechanisms of Candida biofilm biology and antifungal resistance and provide the means to design novel therapies for biofilm-based infections. PMID:11514524

  14. Adhesion, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity, and antifungal planktonic susceptibility: relationship among Candida spp.

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Dias, Ana; Miranda, Isabel M.; Branco, Joana; Monteiro-Soares, Matilde; Pina-Vaz, Cidália; Rodrigues, Acácio G.

    2015-01-01

    We have performed the characterization of the adhesion profile, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and antifungal susceptibility of 184 Candida clinical isolates obtained from different human reservoirs. Adhesion was quantified using a flow cytometric assay and biofilm formation was evaluated using two methodologies: XTT and crystal violet assay. CSH was quantified with the microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons test while planktonic susceptibility was assessed accordingly the CLSI protocol for yeast M27-A3 S4. Yeast cells of non-albicans species exhibit increased ability to adhere and form biofilm. However, the correlation between adhesion and biofilm formation varied according to species and also with the methodology used for biofilm assessment. No association was found between strain's site of isolation or planktonic antifungal susceptibility and adhesion or biofilm formation. Finally CSH seemed to be a good predictor for biofilm formation but not for adhesion. Despite the marked variability registered intra and inter species, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis were the species exhibiting high adhesion profile. C. tropicalis, C. guilliermondii, and C. krusei revealed higher biofilm formation values in terms of biomass. C. parapsilosis was the species with lower biofilm metabolic activity.

  15. Archaeal type IV pili and their involvement in biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Pohlschroder, Mechthild; Esquivel, Rianne N.

    2015-01-01

    Type IV pili are ancient proteinaceous structures present on the cell surface of species in nearly all bacterial and archaeal phyla. These filaments, which are required for a diverse array of important cellular processes, are assembled employing a conserved set of core components. While type IV pilins, the structural subunits of pili, share little sequence homology, their signal peptides are structurally conserved allowing for in silico prediction. Recently, in vivo studies in model archaea representing the euryarchaeal and crenarchaeal kingdoms confirmed that several of these pilins are incorporated into type IV adhesion pili. In addition to facilitating surface adhesion, these in vivo studies also showed that several predicted pilins are required for additional functions that are critical to biofilm formation. Examples include the subunits of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius Ups pili, which are induced by exposure to UV light and promote cell aggregation and conjugation, and a subset of the Haloferax volcanii adhesion pilins, which play a critical role in microcolony formation while other pilins inhibit this process. The recent discovery of novel pilin functions such as the ability of haloarchaeal adhesion pilins to regulate swimming motility may point to novel regulatory pathways conserved across prokaryotic domains. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the functional roles played by archaeal type IV adhesion pili and their subunits, with particular emphasis on their involvement in biofilm formation.

  16. Different sensitivity levels to norspermidine on biofilm formation in clinical and commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis strains.

    PubMed

    Ramón-Peréz, Miriam L; Díaz-Cedillo, Francisco; Contreras-Rodríguez, Araceli; Betanzos-Cabrera, Gabriel; Peralta, Humberto; Rodríguez-Martínez, Sandra; Cancino-Diaz, Mario E; Jan-Roblero, Janet; Cancino Diaz, Juan C

    2015-02-01

    Biofilm formation on medical and surgical devices is the main virulence factor of Staphylococcus epidermidis. A recent study has shown that norspermidine inhibits and disassembles the biofilm in the wild-type Bacillus subtilis NCBI3610 strain. In this study, the effect of norspermidine on S. epidermidis biofilm formation of clinical or commensal strains was tested. Biofilm producing strains of S. epidermidis were isolated from healthy skin (HS; n = 3), healthy conjunctiva (HC; n = 9) and ocular infection (OI; n = 19). All strains were treated with different concentrations of norspermidine, spermidine, putrescine, and cadaverine (1, 10, 25, 50 and 100 ?M), and the biofilm formation was tested on microtiter plate. Besides, cell-free supernatants of S. epidermidis growth at 4 h and 40 h were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect norspermidine. Results showed that norspermidine at 25 ?M and 100 ?M prevented the biofilm formation in 45.16% (14/31) and 16.13% (5/31), respectively; only in one isolate from OI, norspermidine did not have effect. Other polyamines as spermidine, putrescine and cadaverine did not have effect on the biofilm formation of the strains tested. Norspermidine was also capable to disassemble a biofilm already formed. Norspermidine was detected in the 40 h cell-free supernatant of S. epidermidis by GC-MS. Norspermidine inhibited the biofilm development of S. epidermidis on the surface of contact lens. In this work, it was demonstrated that S. epidermidis produces and releases norspermidine causing an inhibitory effect on biofilm formation. Moreover, this is the first time showing that clinical S. epidermidis strains have different sensitivity to norspermidine, which suggest that the composition and structure of the biofilms is varied. We propose that norspermidine could potentially be used in the pre-treating of medical and surgical devices to inhibit the biofilm formation. PMID:25549879

  17. Chemical analysis, inhibition of biofilm formation and biofilm eradication potential of Euphorbia hirta L. against clinical isolates and standard strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The frequent occurrences of antibiotic-resistant biofilm forming pathogens have become global issue since various measures that had been taken to curb the situation led to failure. Euphorbia hirta, is a well-known ethnomedicinal plant of Malaysia with diverse biological activities. This plant has been used widely in traditional medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal, bronchial and respiratory ailments caused by infectious agents. Methods In the present study, chemical compositions of methanol extract of E. hirta L. aerial part was analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. A relevant in vitro model was developed to assess the potency of the E. hirta extract to inhibit the bacterial biofilm formation as well as to eradicate the established biofilms. Besides biofilm, E. hirta extract was also evaluated for the inhibition efficacy on planktonic cells using tetrazolium microplate assay. For these purposes, a panel of clinically resistant pathogens and American type culture collection (ATCC) strains were used. Results The methanolic extract of aerial part of E. hirta was predominantly composed of terpenoid (60.5%) which is often regarded as an active entity accountable for the membrane destruction and biofilm cell detachment. The highest antibacterial effect of crude E. hirta extract was observed in the clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 0.062 mg/ml. The extract also displayed potent biofilm inhibition and eradication activity against P. aeruginosa with minimum biofilm inhibition concentration (MBIC) and minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) values of 0.25 mg/ml and 0.5 mg/ml, respectively. Conclusions The crude methanol extract of E. hirta has proven to have interesting and potential anti-biofilm properties. The findings from this study will also help to establish a very promising anti-infective phytotherapeutical to be exploited in the pharmaceutical industries. PMID:24321370

  18. Physicochemical characteristics and microbial community evolution of biofilms during the start-up period in a moving bed biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Yan; Ren, Hong-Qiang; Geng, Jin-Ju; Xu, Ke; Huang, Hui; Ding, Li-Li

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate biofilm properties evolution coupled with different ages during the start-up period in a moving bed biofilm reactor system. Physicochemical characteristics including adhesion force, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), morphology as well as volatile solid and microbial community were studied. Results showed that the formation and development of biofilms exhibited four stages, including (I) initial attachment and young biofilm formation, (II) biofilms accumulation, (III) biofilm sloughing and updating, and (IV) biofilm maturation. During the whole start-up period, adhesion force was positively and significantly correlated with the contents of EPS, especially the content of polysaccharide. In addition, increased adhesion force and EPS were beneficial for biofilm retention. Gram-negative bacteria mainly including Sphaerotilus, Zoogloea and Haliscomenobacter were predominant in the initial stage. Actinobacteria was beneficial to resist sloughing. Furthermore, filamentous bacteria were dominant in maturation biofilm. PMID:25636169

  19. A Novel Model of Chronic Wounds: Importance of Redox Imbalance and Biofilm-Forming Bacteria for Establishment of Chronicity

    PubMed Central

    Dhall, Sandeep; Do, Danh; Garcia, Monika; Wijesinghe, Dayanjan Shanaka; Brandon, Angela; Kim, Jane; Sanchez, Antonio; Lyubovitsky, Julia; Gallagher, Sean; Nothnagel, Eugene A.; Chalfant, Charles E.; Patel, Rakesh P.; Schiller, Neal; Martins-Green, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wounds have a large impact on health, affecting ?6.5 M people and costing ?$25B/year in the US alone [1]. We previously discovered that a genetically modified mouse model displays impaired healing similar to problematic wounds in humans and that sometimes the wounds become chronic. Here we show how and why these impaired wounds become chronic, describe a way whereby we can drive impaired wounds to chronicity at will and propose that the same processes are involved in chronic wound development in humans. We hypothesize that exacerbated levels of oxidative stress are critical for initiation of chronicity. We show that, very early after injury, wounds with impaired healing contain elevated levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and, much like in humans, these levels increase with age. Moreover, the activity of anti-oxidant enzymes is not elevated, leading to buildup of oxidative stress in the wound environment. To induce chronicity, we exacerbated the redox imbalance by further inhibiting the antioxidant enzymes and by infecting the wounds with biofilm-forming bacteria isolated from the chronic wounds that developed naturally in these mice. These wounds do not re-epithelialize, the granulation tissue lacks vascularization and interstitial collagen fibers, they contain an antibiotic-resistant mixed bioflora with biofilm-forming capacity, and they stay open for several weeks. These findings are highly significant because they show for the first time that chronic wounds can be generated in an animal model effectively and consistently. The availability of such a model will significantly propel the field forward because it can be used to develop strategies to regain redox balance that may result in inhibition of biofilm formation and result in restoration of healthy wound tissue. Furthermore, the model can lead to the understanding of other fundamental mechanisms of chronic wound development that can potentially lead to novel therapies. PMID:25313558

  20. Biofilm Formation by the Fish Pathogen Flavobacterium columnare: Development and Parameters Affecting Surface Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wenlong; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Flavobacterium columnare is a bacterial fish pathogen that affects many freshwater species worldwide. The natural reservoir of this pathogen is unknown, but its resilience in closed aquaculture systems posits biofilm as the source of contagion for farmed fish. The objectives of this study were (i) to characterize the dynamics of biofilm formation and morphology under static and flow conditions and (ii) to evaluate the effects of temperature, pH, salinity, hardness, and carbohydrates on biofilm formation. Nineteen F. columnare strains, including representatives of all of the defined genetic groups (genomovars), were compared in this study. The structure of biofilm was characterized by light microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. F. columnare was able to attach to and colonize inert surfaces by producing biofilm. Surface colonization started within 6 h postinoculation, and microcolonies were observed within 24 h. Extracellular polysaccharide substances and water channels were observed in mature biofilms (24 to 48 h). A similar time course was observed when F. columnare formed biofilm in microfluidic chambers under flow conditions. The virulence potential of biofilm was confirmed by cutaneous inoculation of channel catfish fingerlings with mature biofilm. Several physicochemical parameters modulate attachment to surfaces, with the largest influence being exerted by hardness, salinity, and the presence of mannose. Maintenance of hardness and salinity values within certain ranges could prevent biofilm formation by F. columnare in aquaculture systems. PMID:23851087

  1. Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm Formation by Traditional Thai Herbal Recipes Used for Wound Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chusri, S.; Sompetch, K.; Mukdee, S.; Jansrisewangwong, S.; Srichai, T.; Maneenoon, K.; Limsuwan, S.; Voravuthikunchai, S. P.

    2012-01-01

    Development of biofilm is a key mechanism involved in Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence during device-associated infections. We aimed to investigate antibiofilm formation and mature biofilm eradication ability of ethanol and water extracts of Thai traditional herbal recipes including THR-SK004, THR-SK010, and THR-SK011 against S. epidermidis. A biofilm forming reference strain, S. epidermidis ATCC 35984 was employed as a model for searching anti-biofilm agents by MTT reduction assay. The results revealed that the ethanol extract of THR-SK004 (THR-SK004E) could inhibit the formation of S. epidermidis biofilm on polystyrene surfaces. Furthermore, treatments with the extract efficiently inhibit the biofilm formation of the pathogen on glass surfaces determined by scanning electron microscopy and crystal violet staining. In addition, THR-SK010 ethanol extract (THR-SK010E; 0.63–5??g/mL) could decrease 30 to 40% of the biofilm development. Almost 90% of a 7-day-old staphylococcal biofilm was destroyed after treatment with THR-SK004E (250 and 500??g/mL) and THR-SK010E (10 and 20??g/mL) for 24?h. Therefore, our results clearly demonstrated THR-SK004E could prevent the staphylococcal biofilm development, whereas both THR-SK004E and THR-SK010E possessed remarkable eradication ability on the mature staphylococcal biofilm. PMID:22919409

  2. Nickel and cadmium ions inhibit quorum sensing and biofilm formation without affecting viability in Burkholderia multivorans

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Nickel and cadmium ions inhibit quorum sensing and biofilm formation without affecting viability transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) assays, we show that sub-millimolar concentrations of nickel (Ni2þ ) and cadmium (Cd2þ ) inhibit biofilm formation by the bacterium Burkholderia multivorans through

  3. [38] Models for studying initial adhesion and surface growth in biofilm formation on surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bart Gottenbos; Henny C. van der Mei; Henk J. Busscher

    1999-01-01

    Microbial biofilms cause various problems in industry, waterworks, dentistry and medicine. In this chapter a parallel plate flow chamber system is described, with which different processes in bacterial biofilm formation, i.e. conditioning film formation, initial bacterial adhesion, bacterial surface growth and bacterial detachment can be modeled and monitored in situ. Examples are given of studies concerning the influence of a

  4. The Intercellular Adhesion (ica) Locus Is Present in Staphylococcus aureus and Is Required for Biofilm Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SARAH E. CRAMTON; CHRISTIANE GERKE; NORBERT F. SCHNELL; WRIGHT W. NICHOLS; FRIEDRICH GOTZ

    1999-01-01

    Nosocomial infections that result in the formation of biofilms on the surfaces of biomedical implants are a leading cause of sepsis and are often associated with colonization of the implants by Staphylococcus epidermidis. Biofilm formation is thought to require two sequential steps: adhesion of cells to a solid substrate followed by cell-cell adhesion, creating multiple layers of cells. Intercellular adhesion

  5. Cranberry-derived proanthocyanidins prevent formation of Candida albicans biofilms in artificial urine through biofilm- and adherence-specific mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rane, Hallie S.; Bernardo, Stella M.; Howell, Amy B.; Lee, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Candida albicans is a common cause of nosocomial urinary tract infections (UTIs) and is responsible for increased morbidity and healthcare costs. Moreover, the US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services no longer reimburse for hospital-acquired catheter-associated UTIs. Thus, development of specific approaches for the prevention of Candida urinary infections is needed. Cranberry juice-derived proanthocyanidins (PACs) have efficacy in the prevention of bacterial UTIs, partially due to anti-adherence properties, but there are limited data on their use for the prevention and/or treatment of Candida UTIs. Therefore, we sought to systematically assess the in vitro effect of cranberry-derived PACs on C. albicans biofilm formation in artificial urine. Methods C. albicans biofilms in artificial urine were coincubated with cranberry PACs at serially increasing concentrations and biofilm metabolic activity was assessed using the XTT assay in static microplate and silicone disc models. Results Cranberry PAC concentrations of ?16 mg/L significantly reduced biofilm formation in all C. albicans strains tested, with a paradoxical effect observed at high concentrations in two clinical isolates. Further, cranberry PACs were additive in combination with traditional antifungals. Cranberry PACs reduced C. albicans adherence to both polystyrene and silicone. Supplementation of the medium with iron reduced the efficacy of cranberry PACs against biofilms. Conclusions These findings indicate that cranberry PACs have excellent in vitro activity against C. albicans biofilm formation in artificial urine. We present preliminary evidence that cranberry PAC activity against C. albicans biofilm formation is due to anti-adherence properties and/or iron chelation. PMID:24114570

  6. Chicken Juice Enhances Surface Attachment and Biofilm Formation of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Helen L.; Reuter, Mark; Salt, Louise J.; Cross, Kathryn L.; Betts, Roy P.

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is primarily transmitted via the consumption of contaminated foodstuffs, especially poultry meat. In food processing environments, C. jejuni is required to survive a multitude of stresses and requires the use of specific survival mechanisms, such as biofilms. An initial step in biofilm formation is bacterial attachment to a surface. Here, we investigated the effects of a chicken meat exudate (chicken juice) on C. jejuni surface attachment and biofilm formation. Supplementation of brucella broth with ?5% chicken juice resulted in increased biofilm formation on glass, polystyrene, and stainless steel surfaces with four C. jejuni isolates and one C. coli isolate in both microaerobic and aerobic conditions. When incubated with chicken juice, C. jejuni was both able to grow and form biofilms in static cultures in aerobic conditions. Electron microscopy showed that C. jejuni cells were associated with chicken juice particulates attached to the abiotic surface rather than the surface itself. This suggests that chicken juice contributes to C. jejuni biofilm formation by covering and conditioning the abiotic surface and is a source of nutrients. Chicken juice was able to complement the reduction in biofilm formation of an aflagellated mutant of C. jejuni, indicating that chicken juice may support food chain transmission of isolates with lowered motility. We provide here a useful model for studying the interaction of C. jejuni biofilms in food chain-relevant conditions and also show a possible mechanism for C. jejuni cell attachment and biofilm initiation on abiotic surfaces within the food chain. PMID:25192991

  7. Pattern formation exhibited by biofilm formation within microfluidic chambers.

    PubMed

    Cogan, N G; Donahue, M R; Whidden, Mark; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2013-05-01

    This article investigates the dynamics of an important bacterial pathogen, Xylella fastidiosa, within artificial plant xylem. The bacterium is the causative agent of a variety of diseases that strike fruit-bearing plants including Pierce's disease of grapevine. Biofilm colonization within microfluidic chambers was visualized in a laboratory setting, showing robust, regular spatial patterning. We also develop a mathematical model, based on a multiphase approach that is able to capture the spacing of the pattern and points to the role of the exopolymeric substance as the main source of control of the pattern dynamics. We concentrate on estimating the attachment/detachment processes within the chamber because these are two mechanisms that have the potential to be engineered by applying various chemicals to prevent or treat the disease. PMID:23663829

  8. Proteins Exported via the PrsD-PrsE Type I Secretion System and the Acidic Exopolysaccharide Are Involved in Biofilm Formation by Rhizobium leguminosarum

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Daniela M.; Williams, Alan; Edwards, Anne; Posadas, Diana M.; Finnie, Christine; Dankert, Marcelo; Downie, J. Allan; Zorreguieta, Angeles

    2006-01-01

    The type I protein secretion system of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae encoded by the prsD and prsE genes is responsible for secretion of the exopolysaccharide (EPS)-glycanases PlyA and PlyB. The formation of a ring of biofilm on the surface of the glass in shaken cultures by both the prsD and prsE secretion mutants was greatly affected. Confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis of green-fluorescent-protein-labeled bacteria showed that during growth in minimal medium, R. leguminosarum wild type developed microcolonies, which progress to a characteristic three-dimensional biofilm structure. However, the prsD and prsE secretion mutants were able to form only an immature biofilm structure. A mutant disrupted in the EPS-glycanase plyB gene showed altered timing of biofilm formation, and its structure was atypical. A mutation in an essential gene for EPS synthesis (pssA) or deletion of several other pss genes involved in EPS synthesis completely abolished the ability of R. leguminosarum to develop a biofilm. Extracellular complementation studies of mixed bacterial cultures confirmed the role of the EPS and the modulation of the biofilm structure by the PrsD-PrsE secreted proteins. Protein analysis identified several additional proteins secreted by the PrsD-PrsE secretion system, and N-terminal sequencing revealed peptides homologous to the N termini of proteins from the Rap family (Rhizobium adhering proteins), which could have roles in cellular adhesion in R. leguminosarum. We propose a model for R. leguminosarum in which synthesis of the EPS leads the formation of a biofilm and several PrsD-PrsE secreted proteins are involved in different aspects of biofilm maturation, such as modulation of the EPS length or mediating attachment between bacteria. PMID:16740954

  9. Disruption of Biofilm Formation by the Human Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii Using Engineered Quorum-Quenching Lactonases

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Jeng Yeong; Yang, Yuanyong; Tay, Song Buck

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a major human pathogen associated with multidrug-resistant nosocomial infections; its virulence is attributed to quorum-sensing-mediated biofilm formation, and disruption of biofilm formation is an attractive antivirulence strategy. Here, we report the first successful demonstration of biofilm disruption in a clinical isolate of A. baumannii S1, using a quorum-quenching lactonase obtained by directed evolution; this engineered lactonase significantly reduced the biomass of A. baumannii-associated biofilms, demonstrating the utility of this antivirulence strategy. PMID:24379199

  10. Isolation of biofilm-forming bacteria from a fresh-cut processing plant and co-culturing with E. coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In produce processing plants, biofilms can theoretically provide a supporting environment for pathogenic bacteria that is resistant to cleaning and sanitizing efforts. The objective of this study was to recover bacteria from a commercial produce processing plant that have the ability to form biofilm...

  11. Biofilm formation on a TiO2 nanotube with controlled pore diameter and surface wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitha, V. C.; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Lee, Jintae; Narayan Banerjee, Arghya; Joo, Sang Woo; Min, Bong Ki

    2015-02-01

    Titania (TiO2) nanotube arrays (TNAs) with different pore diameters (140 ? 20 nm) are fabricated via anodization using hydrofluoric acid (HF) containing ethylene glycol (EG) by changing the HF-to-EG volume ratio and the anodization voltage. To evaluate the effects of different pore diameters of TiO2 nanotubes on bacterial biofilm formation, Shewanella oneidensis (S. oneidensis) MR-1 cells and a crystal-violet biofilm assay are used. The surface roughness and wettability of the TNA surfaces as a function of pore diameter, measured via the contact angle and AFM techniques, are correlated with the controlled biofilm formation. Biofilm formation increases with the decreasing nanotube pore diameter, and a 20 nm TiO2 nanotube shows the maximum biofilm formation. The measurements revealed that 20 nm surfaces have the least hydrophilicity with the highest surface roughness of ˜17 nm and that they show almost a 90% increase in the effective surface area relative to the 140 nm TNAs, which stimulate the cells more effectively to produce the pili to attach to the surface for more biofilm formation. The results demonstrate that bacterial cell adhesion (and hence, biofilm formation) can effectively be controlled by tuning the roughness and wettability of TNAs via controlling the pore diameters of TNA surfaces. This biofilm formation as a function of the surface properties of TNAs can be a potential candidate for both medical applications and as electrodes in microbial fuel cells.

  12. Signals, Regulatory Networks, and Materials That Build and Break Bacterial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Karatan, Ece; Watnick, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Biofilms are communities of microorganisms that live attached to surfaces. Biofilm formation has received much attention in the last decade, as it has become clear that virtually all types of bacteria can form biofilms and that this may be the preferred mode of bacterial existence in nature. Our current understanding of biofilm formation is based on numerous studies of myriad bacterial species. Here, we review a portion of this large body of work including the environmental signals and signaling pathways that regulate biofilm formation, the components of the biofilm matrix, and the mechanisms and regulation of biofilm dispersal. PMID:19487730

  13. Effect of the antimicrobial peptide D-Nal-Pac-525 on the growth of Streptococcus mutans and its biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Huajun; Cheng, Jya-Wei; Yu, Hui-Yuan; Xin, Yi; Tang, Li; Ma, Yufang

    2013-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary etiological agent of dental caries. The antimicrobial peptide D-Nal-Pac-525 was designed by replacing the tryptophans of the Trp-rich peptide Pac-525 with D-?-naphthyalanines. To assess the effect of D-Nal-Pac-525 on cariogenic bacteria, the activity of D-Nal-Pac-525 on the growth of S. mutans and its biofilm formation were examined. D-Nal- Pac-525 showed robust antimicrobial activity against S. mutans (minimum inhibitory concentration of 4 ?g/ml). Using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, it was shown that D-Nal-Pac-525 caused morphological changes and damaged the cell membrane of S. mutans. D-Nal-Pac-525 inhibited biofilm formation of S. mutans at 2 ?g/ml. The results of this study suggest that D-Nal-Pac-525 has great potential for clinical application as a dental caries-preventing agent. PMID:23711527

  14. Biofilm Matrix and Its Regulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qing; Ma, Luyan Z.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are communities of microorganisms embedded in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) matrix. Bacteria in biofilms demonstrate distinct features from their free-living planktonic counterparts, such as different physiology and high resistance to immune system and antibiotics that render biofilm a source of chronic and persistent infections. A deeper understanding of biofilms will ultimately provide insights into the development of alternative treatment for biofilm infections. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a model bacterium for biofilm research, is notorious for its ability to cause chronic infections by its high level of drug resistance involving the formation of biofilms. In this review, we summarize recent advances in biofilm formation, focusing on the biofilm matrix and its regulation in P. aeruginosa, aiming to provide resources for the understanding and control of bacterial biofilms. PMID:24145749

  15. Iron-binding compounds impair Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, especially under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    O'May, Che Y; Sanderson, Kevin; Roddam, Louise F; Kirov, Sylvia M; Reid, David W

    2009-06-01

    The success of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) and other chronic infections is largely attributed to its ability to grow in antibiotic-resistant biofilm communities. This study investigated the effects of limiting iron levels as a strategy for preventing/disrupting P. aeruginosa biofilms. A range of synthetic and naturally occurring iron-chelating agents were examined. Biofilm development by P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 and CF sputum isolates from chronically infected individuals was significantly decreased by iron removal under aerobic atmospheres. CF strains formed poor biofilms under anaerobic conditions. Strain PAO1 was also tested under anaerobic conditions. Biofilm formation by this model strain was almost totally prevented by several of the chelators tested. The ability of synthetic chelators to impair biofilm formation could be reversed by iron addition to cultures, providing evidence that these effective chelating compounds functioned by directly reducing availability of iron to P. aeruginosa. In contrast, the biological chelator lactoferrin demonstrated enhanced anti-biofilm effects as iron supplementation increased. Hence biofilm inhibition by lactoferrin appeared to occur through more complex mechanisms to those of the synthetic chelators. Overall, our results demonstrate the importance of iron availability to biofilms and that iron chelators have potential as adjunct therapies for preventing biofilm development, especially under low oxygen conditions such as encountered in the chronically infected CF lung. PMID:19429753

  16. Coryneform bacteria in human semen: inter-assay variability in species composition detection and biofilm production ability

    PubMed Central

    Türk, Silver; Mazzoli, Sandra; Štšepetova, Jelena; Kuznetsova, Julia; Mändar, Reet

    2014-01-01

    Background Coryneform bacteria constitute an important segment of male urogenital microbiota. They have been generally considered as saprophytes, although some species have been associated with prostatitis as well. At the same time, biofilm infections have been suspected as a cause of prostatitis. Objective To identify a set of coryneform bacteria isolated from semen of either healthy men or prostatitis patients applying different methods to reveal inter-assay variability and to determine their ability of adhesion and biofilm production. Design Coryneform bacteria were identified by API Coryne 2.0 biochemical identification system and 16S rDNA sequencing using different primer sets. Quantitative assessment of biofilm production was performed using crystal violet binding assay method. Results The most common species were Corynebacterium seminale, C. minutissimum, and Dermabacter hominis. Altogether 14 species and related genera were found. We observed the best inter-assay agreement when identifying C. seminale. Biofilm was observed in 7 out of 24 strains. The biofilm-producing strains belonged to Arthrobacter cumminsii, Dermabacter hominis, C. minutissimum, and Actinomyces neuii. No differences were found between the strains originating from prostatitis patients and healthy men. Dermabacter hominis strains were more potent biofilm producers than C. seminale strains (p=0.048). Conclusions We can conclude that a wide variety of coryneform bacteria can be found from the male genital tract, although their exact identification is problematic due to insufficient representation in databases. Nearly one third of the strains are able to form biofilm that may give them an advantage for surviving several host- and treatment-related conditions. PMID:24563649

  17. Complex regulatory network controls initial adhesion and biofilm formation in Escherichia coli via regulation of the csgD gene.

    PubMed

    Prigent-Combaret, C; Brombacher, E; Vidal, O; Ambert, A; Lejeune, P; Landini, P; Dorel, C

    2001-12-01

    The Escherichia coli OmpR/EnvZ two-component regulatory system, which senses environmental osmolarity, also regulates biofilm formation. Up mutations in the ompR gene, such as the ompR234 mutation, stimulate laboratory strains of E. coli to grow as a biofilm community rather than in a planktonic state. In this report, we show that the OmpR234 protein promotes biofilm formation by binding the csgD promoter region and stimulating its transcription. The csgD gene encodes the transcription regulator CsgD, which in turn activates transcription of the csgBA operon encoding curli, extracellular structures involved in bacterial adhesion. Consistent with the role of the ompR gene as part of an osmolarity-sensing regulatory system, we also show that the formation of biofilm by E. coli is inhibited by increasing osmolarity in the growth medium. The ompR234 mutation counteracts adhesion inhibition by high medium osmolarity; we provide evidence that the ompR234 mutation promotes biofilm formation by strongly increasing the initial adhesion of bacteria to an abiotic surface. This increase in initial adhesion is stationary phase dependent, but it is negatively regulated by the stationary-phase-specific sigma factor RpoS. We propose that this negative regulation takes place via rpoS-dependent transcription of the transcription regulator cpxR; cpxR-mediated repression of csgB and csgD promoters is also triggered by osmolarity and by curli overproduction, in a feedback regulation loop. PMID:11717281

  18. Self-produced exopolysaccharide is a signal that stimulates biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Yasuhiko; Borlee, Bradley R.; O’Connor, Jennifer R.; Hill, Preston J.; Harwood, Caroline S.; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Parsek, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria have a tendency to attach to surfaces and grow as structured communities called biofilms. Chronic biofilm infections are a problem because they tend to resist antibiotic treatment and are difficult to eradicate. Bacterial biofilms have an extracellular matrix that is usually composed of a mixture of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. This matrix has long been assumed to play a passive structural and protective role for resident biofilm cells. Here we show that this view is an oversimplification and that the biofilm matrix can play an active role in stimulating its own synthesis. Working with the model biofilm bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we found that Psl, a major biofilm matrix polysaccharide for this species, acts as a signal to stimulate two diguanylate cyclases, SiaD and SadC, to produce the intracellular secondary messenger molecule c-di-GMP. Elevated intracellular concentrations of c-di-GMP then lead to the increased production of Psl and other components of the biofilm. This mechanism represents a unique positive feedback regulatory circuit, where the expression of an extracellular polysaccharide promotes biofilm growth in a manner analogous to autocrine signaling in eukaryotes. PMID:23175784

  19. Formation of Magnetosomes in Magnetotactic Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dirk Schüler

    1999-01-01

    Abstract The ability of magnetotactic, bacteria ,to orient ,and migrate along ,geomagnetic ,field lines is based ,on intracellular magnetic structures, the magnetosomes, which comprise nano-sized, membrane bound crystals ofmagnetic,iron minerals. The formation ,of magnetosomes,is achieved by a biological mechanism that controls ,the accumulation ,of iron ,and ,the biomineralization of ,magnetic ,crystals ,with ,a characteristic size and morphology,within membrane vesicles. This

  20. The monitoring of biofilm formation in a mulch biowall barrier and its effect on performance

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Youngwoo; Bishop, Paul L.

    2008-01-01

    Lab scale mulch-biofilm biowall barriers were constructed and tested to monitor the effect of biofilm formation on the performance of the biobarrier. Naphthalene, a two-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), was used as the model compound. With column reactors, the amounts of viable naphthalene degraders and biofilm formation were monitored, as was the performance of the biobarrier. The sorption capacity of the mulch, the increase in biomass and the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) content of the biofilm created a strong affinity for naphthalene and induced an increase in the number of slowly growing hydrocarbon degraders, resulting in a higher degradation rate and more stable PAH removal. Concentration profiles of pore water naphthalene and electron acceptors indicated that dissolved oxygen (DO) was preferentially used as the electron acceptor, and the greatest removal occurred at the inlet to the column reactor where DO was highest. However, when using nitrate as an alternative electron acceptor, both biofilm formation and continual degradation of naphthalene also occurred. Microprofiles of DO in the biofilm revealed that oxygen transport in the biofilm was limited, and there might be sequential utilization of nitrate for naphthalene removal in the anoxic zones of the biofilm. These results provide insight into the distribution of viable biomass and biofilm EPS production in engineered permeable reactive mulch biobarriers. PMID:17681588

  1. Rapid direct methods for enumeration of specific, active bacteria in water and biofilms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFeters, G. A.; Pyle, B. H.; Lisle, J. T.; Broadaway, S. C.

    1999-01-01

    Conventional methods for detecting indicator and pathogenic bacteria in water may underestimate the actual population due to sublethal environmental injury, inability of the target bacteria to take up nutrients and other physiological factors which reduce bacterial culturability. Rapid and direct methods are needed to more accurately detect and enumerate active bacteria. Such a methodological advance would provide greater sensitivity in assessing the microbiological safety of water and food. The principle goal of this presentation is to describe novel approaches we have formulated for the rapid and simultaneous detection of bacteria plus the determination of their physiological activity in water and other environmental samples. The present version of our method involves the concentration of organisms by membrane filtration or immunomagnetic separation and combines an intracellular fluorochrome (CTC) for assessment of respiratory activity plus fluorescent-labelled antibody detection of specific bacteria. This approach has also been successfully used to demonstrate spatial and temporal heterogeneities of physiological activities in biofilms when coupled with cryosectioning. Candidate physiological stains include those capable of determining respiratory activity, membrane potential, membrane integrity, growth rate and cellular enzymatic activities. Results obtained thus far indicate that immunomagnetic separation can provide a high degree of sensitivity in the recovery of seeded target bacteria (Escherichia coli O157:H7) in water and hamburger. The captured and stained target bacteria are then enumerated by either conventional fluorescence microscopy or ChemScan(R), a new instrument that is very sensitive and rapid. The ChemScan(R) laser scanning instrument (Chemunex, Paris, France) provides the detection of individual fluorescently labelled bacterial cells using three emission channels in less than 5 min. A high degree of correlation has been demonstrated between results obtained with the ChemScan and traditional plate counts of mixed natural bacterial populations in water. The continuing evolution of these methods will be valuable in the rapid and accurate analysis of environmental samples.

  2. Ecophysiological Interaction between Nitrifying Bacteria and Heterotrophic Bacteria in Autotrophic Nitrifying Biofilms as Determined by Microautoradiography-Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tomonori Kindaichi; Tsukasa Ito; Satoshi Okabe

    2004-01-01

    Ecophysiological interactions between the community members (i.e., nitrifiers and heterotrophic bacteria) in a carbon-limited autotrophic nitrifying biofilm fed only NH4 as an energy source were investigated by using a full-cycle 16S rRNA approach followed by microautoradiography (MAR)-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Phylogenetic differentiation (identification) of heterotrophic bacteria was performed by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, and FISH probes were designed

  3. Formation and post-formation dynamics of bacterial biofilm streamers as highly viscous liquid jets

    PubMed Central

    Das, Siddhartha; Kumar, Aloke

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently reported that in presence of low Reynolds number (Re ? 1) transport, preformed bacterial biofilms, several hours after their formation, may degenerate in form of filamentous structures, known as streamers. In this work, we explain that such streamers form as the highly viscous liquid states of the intrinsically viscoelastic biofilms. Such “viscous liquid” state can be hypothesized by noting that the time of appearance of the streamers is substantially larger than the viscoelastic relaxation time scale of the biofilms, and this appearance is explained by the inability of a viscous liquid to withstand external shear. Further, by identifying the post formation dynamics of the streamers as that of a viscous liquid jet in a surrounding flow field, we can interpret several unexplained issues associated with the post-formation dynamics of streamers, such as the clogging of the flow passage or the exponential time growth of streamer dimensions. Overall our manuscript provides a biophysical basis for understanding the evolution of biofilm streamers in creeping flows. PMID:25410423

  4. Formation and post-formation dynamics of bacterial biofilm streamers as highly viscous liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Siddhartha; Kumar, Aloke

    2014-11-01

    It has been recently reported that in presence of low Reynolds number (Re << 1) transport, preformed bacterial biofilms, several hours after their formation, may degenerate in form of filamentous structures, known as streamers. In this work, we explain that such streamers form as the highly viscous liquid states of the intrinsically viscoelastic biofilms. Such ``viscous liquid'' state can be hypothesized by noting that the time of appearance of the streamers is substantially larger than the viscoelastic relaxation time scale of the biofilms, and this appearance is explained by the inability of a viscous liquid to withstand external shear. Further, by identifying the post formation dynamics of the streamers as that of a viscous liquid jet in a surrounding flow field, we can interpret several unexplained issues associated with the post-formation dynamics of streamers, such as the clogging of the flow passage or the exponential time growth of streamer dimensions. Overall our manuscript provides a biophysical basis for understanding the evolution of biofilm streamers in creeping flows.

  5. Formation and post-formation dynamics of bacterial biofilm streamers as highly viscous liquid jets.

    PubMed

    Das, Siddhartha; Kumar, Aloke

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently reported that in presence of low Reynolds number (Re ? 1) transport, preformed bacterial biofilms, several hours after their formation, may degenerate in form of filamentous structures, known as streamers. In this work, we explain that such streamers form as the highly viscous liquid states of the intrinsically viscoelastic biofilms. Such "viscous liquid" state can be hypothesized by noting that the time of appearance of the streamers is substantially larger than the viscoelastic relaxation time scale of the biofilms, and this appearance is explained by the inability of a viscous liquid to withstand external shear. Further, by identifying the post formation dynamics of the streamers as that of a viscous liquid jet in a surrounding flow field, we can interpret several unexplained issues associated with the post-formation dynamics of streamers, such as the clogging of the flow passage or the exponential time growth of streamer dimensions. Overall our manuscript provides a biophysical basis for understanding the evolution of biofilm streamers in creeping flows. PMID:25410423

  6. Compartmentalization and Organelle Formation in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Elias; Abreu, Nicole; Komeili, Arash

    2015-01-01

    A number of bacterial species rely on compartmentalization to gain specific functionalities that will provide them with a selective advantage. Here, we will highlight several of these modes of bacterial compartmentalization with an eye towards describing the mechanisms of their formation and their evolutionary origins. Spore formation in Bacillus subtilis, outer membrane biogenesis in Gram-negative bacteria and protein diffusion barriers of Caulobacter crescentus will be used to demonstrate the physical, chemical and compositional remodeling events that lead to compartmentalization. In addition, magnetosomes and carboxysomes will serve as models to examine the interplay between cytoskeletal systems and the subcellular positioning of organelles. PMID:24440431

  7. Orthopedics and biofilm – what do we know? A review

    PubMed Central

    Zoubos, Aristides B.; Galanakos, Spyridon P.; Soucacos, Panayotis N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bacteria have been found to grow predominantly in biofilms. The initial stage includes the attachment of bacteria to the substratum. Bacterial growth and division then leads to the colonization of the surrounding area and the formation of the biofilm. The environment in a biofilm is not homogeneous; the bacteria in a multispecies biofilm are not randomly distributed, but rather are organized to best meet their needs. Although there is an initial understanding on the mechanisms of biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance, this topic is still under investigation. A variety of approaches are being explored to overcome biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance. A greater understanding of biofilm processes should lead to novel, effective control strategies for biofilm control and a resulting improvement in patient management. PMID:22648264

  8. Biofilm formation and acyl homoserine lactone production in the Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    PubMed

    Conway, Barbara-Ann D; Venu, Vicnays; Speert, David P

    2002-10-01

    Acyl homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL)-mediated gene regulation has been shown to influence biofilm formation in one Burkholderia cepacia cystic fibrosis isolate, but it is not known whether this relationship is a consistent feature of the several genomic species that make up the B. cepacia complex (BCC). We screened strains belonging to genomovars I to V of the BCC for biofilm formation on an abiotic surface and for acyl-HSL synthesis. We determined that organisms from each of these genomovars were capable of biofilm formation. Similarly, acyl-HSL was synthesized by organisms from each of genomovars I to V, with most isolates producing octanoyl-HSL in greatest abundance. When biofilms were grown in Luria broth, acyl-HSL synthesis and biofilm formation appeared to be associated, but these phenotypes were independent when the biofilms were grown in basal salts containing citrate. Genomovar V strains synthesized the greatest quantities of acyl-HSL, and genomovar II and III-A strains elaborated the most abundant biofilms. Quorum sensing may play a role in BCC pathogenesis, but it may not regulate biofilm formation under all growth conditions. PMID:12270826

  9. Biofilm Formation and Acyl Homoserine Lactone Production in the Burkholderia cepacia Complex

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Barbara-Ann D.; Venu, Vicnays; Speert, David P.

    2002-01-01

    Acyl homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL)-mediated gene regulation has been shown to influence biofilm formation in one Burkholderia cepacia cystic fibrosis isolate, but it is not known whether this relationship is a consistent feature of the several genomic species that make up the B. cepacia complex (BCC). We screened strains belonging to genomovars I to V of the BCC for biofilm formation on an abiotic surface and for acyl-HSL synthesis. We determined that organisms from each of these genomovars were capable of biofilm formation. Similarly, acyl-HSL was synthesized by organisms from each of genomovars I to V, with most isolates producing octanoyl-HSL in greatest abundance. When biofilms were grown in Luria broth, acyl-HSL synthesis and biofilm formation appeared to be associated, but these phenotypes were independent when the biofilms were grown in basal salts containing citrate. Genomovar V strains synthesized the greatest quantities of acyl-HSL, and genomovar II and III-A strains elaborated the most abundant biofilms. Quorum sensing may play a role in BCC pathogenesis, but it may not regulate biofilm formation under all growth conditions. PMID:12270826

  10. [Bacterial biofilms: their importance in animal health and public health].

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Yannick D N; Hathroubi, Skander; Jacques, Mario

    2014-04-01

    Bacterial biofilms are structured communities of bacterial cells enclosed in a self-produced polymer matrix that is attached to a surface. Biofilms protect and allow bacteria to survive and thrive in hostile environments. Bacteria within biofilms can withstand host immune responses, and are much less susceptible to antibiotics and disinfectants when compared to their planktonic counterparts. The ability to form biofilms is now considered an attribute of many microorganisms. Diseases associated with biofilms require novel methods for their prevention, diagnosis and treatment; this is largely due to the properties of biofilms. Furthermore, the presence of biofilms on surfaces found at farms, slaughterhouses or food processing plants will have an impact on the efficacy of disinfection protocols. Surprisingly, biofilm formation by bacterial pathogens of veterinary or zoonotic importance has received relatively little attention. The objective of this brief Review article is to bring awareness about the importance of biofilms to animal health stakeholders.(Translated by the authors). PMID:24688172

  11. Reconfiguring the Quorum-Sensing Regulator SdiA of Escherichia coli To Control Biofilm Formation via Indole and N-Acylhomoserine Lactones? †

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jintae; Maeda, Toshinari; Hong, Seok Hoon; Wood, Thomas K.

    2009-01-01

    SdiA is a homolog of quorum-sensing regulators that detects N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) signals from other bacteria. Escherichia coli uses SdiA to reduce its biofilm formation in the presence of both AHLs and its own signal indole. Here we reconfigured SdiA (240 amino acids) to control biofilm formation using protein engineering. Four SdiA variants were obtained with altered biofilm formation, including truncation variants SdiA1E11 (F7L, F59L, Y70C, M94K, and K153X) and SdiA14C3 (W9R, P49T, N87T, frameshift at N96, and L123X), which reduced biofilm formation by 5- to 20-fold compared to wild-type SdiA in the presence of endogenous indole. Whole-transcriptome profiling revealed that wild-type SdiA reduced biofilm formation by repressing genes related to indole synthesis and curli synthesis compared to when no SdiA was expressed, while variant SdiA1E11 induced genes related to indole synthesis in comparison to wild-type SdiA. These results suggested altered indole metabolism, and corroborating the DNA microarray results in regard to indole synthesis, variant SdiA1E11 produced ninefold more indole, which led to reduced swimming motility and cell density. Also, wild-type SdiA decreased curli production and tnaA transcription, while SdiA1E11 increased tnaA transcription (tnaA encodes tryptophanase, which forms indole) compared to wild-type SdiA. Hence, wild-type SdiA decreased biofilm formation by reducing curli production and motility, and SdiA1E11 reduced biofilm formation via indole. Furthermore, an AHL-sensitive variant (SdiA2D10, having four mutations at E31G, Y42F, R116H, and L165Q) increased biofilm formation sevenfold in the presence of N-octanoyl-dl-homoserine lactone and N-(3-oxododecatanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone. Therefore, SdiA can be evolved to increase or decrease biofilm formation, and biofilm formation may be controlled by altering sensors rather than signals. PMID:19168658

  12. Bifidobacteria exhibit LuxS-dependent autoinducer 2 activity and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongke; He, Xiang; Brancaccio, Vincenzo F; Yuan, Jing; Riedel, Christian U

    2014-01-01

    Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) molecules are one class of signalling molecules involved in gene regulation dependent on population density in a mechanism commonly referred to as quorum sensing (QS). AI-2 is produced by the methylthioadenosine/S-adenosyl-homocysteine nucleosidase LuxS. In the present study, we characterise the function of bifidobacterial LuxS proteins to address the question whether these economically important bacteria are able to perform QS communication. All publically available genome sequences of bifidobacteria harbour putative luxS genes. The deduced amino acid sequences are well conserved in the genus and show good homology to the LuxS protein of the prototypical AI-2 producer Vibrio harveyi. The luxS genes of three bifidobacterial strains were successfully expressed in AI-2-negative Escherichia coli DH5?. Supernatants of these recombinant E. coli strains contained significant AI-2 activity. In initial experiments, we failed to detect AI-2 activity in supernatants of bifidobacteria grown in MRSc. High concentration of glucose as well as acidic pH had strong inhibitory effects on AI-2 activity. AI-2 activity could be detected when lower volumes of supernatants were used in the assay. Homologous overexpression of luxS in Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705 increased AI-2 levels in the supernatant. Furthermore, over-expression of luxS or supplementation with AI-2-containing supernatants enhanced biofilm formation of B. longum NCC2705. Collectively, these results suggest that bifidobacteria indeed harbour functional luxS genes that are involved in the production of AI-2-like molecules. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first report on AI-2 activity produced by bifidobacteria. Self-produced AI-2 activity as well as AI-2-like molecules of other bacteria of the intestinal tract may have a regulatory function in biofilm formation and host colonization by bifidobacteria. PMID:24505453

  13. Bifidobacteria Exhibit LuxS-Dependent Autoinducer 2 Activity and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongke; He, Xiang; Brancaccio, Vincenzo F.; Yuan, Jing; Riedel, Christian U.

    2014-01-01

    Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) molecules are one class of signalling molecules involved in gene regulation dependent on population density in a mechanism commonly referred to as quorum sensing (QS). AI-2 is produced by the methylthioadenosine/S-adenosyl-homocysteine nucleosidase LuxS. In the present study, we characterise the function of bifidobacterial LuxS proteins to address the question whether these economically important bacteria are able to perform QS communication. All publically available genome sequences of bifidobacteria harbour putative luxS genes. The deduced amino acid sequences are well conserved in the genus and show good homology to the LuxS protein of the prototypical AI-2 producer Vibrio harveyi. The luxS genes of three bifidobacterial strains were successfully expressed in AI-2-negative Escherichia coli DH5?. Supernatants of these recombinant E. coli strains contained significant AI-2 activity. In initial experiments, we failed to detect AI-2 activity in supernatants of bifidobacteria grown in MRSc. High concentration of glucose as well as acidic pH had strong inhibitory effects on AI-2 activity. AI-2 activity could be detected when lower volumes of supernatants were used in the assay. Homologous overexpression of luxS in Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705 increased AI-2 levels in the supernatant. Furthermore, over-expression of luxS or supplementation with AI-2-containing supernatants enhanced biofilm formation of B. longum NCC2705. Collectively, these results suggest that bifidobacteria indeed harbour functional luxS genes that are involved in the production of AI-2-like molecules. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first report on AI-2 activity produced by bifidobacteria. Self-produced AI-2 activity as well as AI-2-like molecules of other bacteria of the intestinal tract may have a regulatory function in biofilm formation and host colonization by bifidobacteria. PMID:24505453

  14. Importance of biofilm formation and dipeptidyl peptidase IV for the pathogenicity of clinical Porphyromonas gingivalis isolates.

    PubMed

    Clais, Sofie; Boulet, Gaëlle; Kerstens, Monique; Horemans, Tessa; Teughels, Wim; Quirynen, Marc; Lanckacker, Ellen; De Meester, Ingrid; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; Delputte, Peter; Maes, Louis; Cos, Paul

    2014-04-01

    The ability of Porphyromonas gingivalis to cause adult periodontitis is determined by its arsenal of virulence factors. Here, we investigated the importance of biofilm formation and bacterial dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) for the pathogenicity of clinical P. gingivalis isolates. In our study, the isolates with biofilm-forming capacity also showed high DPPIV activity in vitro. Moreover, DPPIV activity increased in P. gingivalis biofilms compared to planktonic cells. In a murine subcutaneous abscess model, the biofilm-forming isolates with high DPPIV activity proved to be pathogenic, while the nonbiofilm formers with low DPPIV activity did not induce abscesses. The biofilm-forming ATCC 33277 strain with low DPPIV activity was not pathogenic in mice either. Our results suggest that biofilm formation and DPPIV activity contribute to the pathogenic potential of P. gingivalis. Furthermore, we show that biofilm formation may enhance P. gingivalis virulence through an increased DPPIV activity. Because of their importance for bacterial colonization and growth, biofilm formation and DPPIV activity could present interesting therapeutic targets to tackle periodontitis. PMID:24532232

  15. The Effect of Carbon Source and Fluoride Concentrations in the "Streptococcus Mutans" Biofilm Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulino, Tony P.; Andrade, Ricardo O.; Bruschi-Thedei, Giuliana C. M.; Thedei, Geraldo, Jr.; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this class experiment is to show the influence of carbon source and of different fluoride concentrations on the biofilm formation by the bacterium "Streptococcus mutans." The observation of different biofilm morphology as a function of carbon source and fluoride concentration allows an interesting discussion regarding the…

  16. In Vitro Analysis of Finasteride Activity against Candida albicans Urinary Biofilm Formation and Filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-Dozal, Alba A.; Lown, Livia; Jahng, Maximillian; Walraven, Carla J.

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is the 3rd most common cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infections, with a strong propensity to form drug-resistant catheter-related biofilms. Due to the limited efficacy of available antifungals against biofilms, drug repurposing has been investigated in order to identify novel agents with activities against fungal biofilms. Finasteride is a 5-?-reductase inhibitor commonly used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia, with activity against human type II and III isoenzymes. We analyzed the Candida Genome Database and identified a C. albicans homolog of type III 5-?-reductase, Dfg10p, which shares 27% sequence identity and 41% similarity to the human type III 5-?-reductase. Thus, we investigated finasteride for activity against C. albicans urinary biofilms, alone and in combination with amphotericin B or fluconazole. Finasteride alone was highly effective in the prevention of C. albicans biofilm formation at doses of ?16 mg/liter and the treatment of preformed biofilms at doses of ?128 mg/liter. In biofilm checkerboard analyses, finasteride exhibited synergistic activity in the prevention of biofilm formation in a combination of 4 mg/liter finasteride with 2 mg/liter fluconazole. Finasteride inhibited filamentation, thus suggesting a potential mechanism of action. These results indicate that finasteride alone is highly active in the prevention of C. albicans urinary biofilms in vitro and has synergistic activity in combination with fluconazole. Further investigation of the clinical utility of finasteride in the prevention of urinary candidiasis is warranted. PMID:25049253

  17. Hha, YbaJ, and OmpA Regulate Escherichia coli K12 Biofilm Formation and Conjugation

    E-print Network

    Wood, Thomas K.

    Hha, YbaJ, and OmpA Regulate Escherichia coli K12 Biofilm Formation and Conjugation Plasmids hemolysin operon, and Hha and the contiguous YbaJ are both induced 30- fold in E. coli biofilms (Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 64:515, 2004). Here it is shown that Hha and YbaJ regulate biofilm formation since

  18. Bacterial inoculum enhances keratin degradation and biofilm formation in poultry compost.

    PubMed

    Ichida, J M; Krizova, L; LeFevre, C A; Keener, H M; Elwell, D L; Burtt, E H

    2001-11-01

    Native microbial populations can degrade poultry waste, but the process can be hastened by using feather-degrading bacteria. Strains of Bacillus licheniformis and a Streptomyces sp. isolated from the plumage of wild birds were grown in a liquid basal medium and used to inoculate feathers in compost bioreaction vessels. Control vessels had only basal medium added to the feathers, litter and straw. Temperature, ammonia, carbon and nitrogen were monitored for 4 weeks. Scanning electron microscopy of the feather samples showed more complete keratin-degradation, more structural damage, and earlier microbial biofilm formation on inoculated feathers than on uninoculated feathers. A diverse community of aerobic bacteria and fungi were cultured early, but declined rapidly. Thermophilic B. licheniformis and Streptomyces spp. were abundant throughout. Enteric gram-negative bacteria, (e.g., Salmonella, E. coli) originally found on waste feathers were not recovered after day 4. Vessel temperatures reached 64-71 degrees C within 36 h and stabilized at 50 degrees C. When tumble-mixed at day 14, renewed activity peaked at 59 degrees C and quickly dropped as available carbon was used. Feathers soaked in an inoculum of B. licheniformis and Streptomyces degraded more quickly and more completely than feathers that were not presoaked. Inoculation of feather waste could improve composting of the large volume of feather waste generated every year by poultry farms and processing plants. PMID:11576684

  19. Indole derivatives inhibited the formation of bacterial biofilm and modulated Ca2+ efflux in diatom.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cuiyun; Yu, Yanan; Sun, Wenjun; Xia, Chuanhai

    2014-11-15

    Marine biofouling is a serious environmental problem worldwide. As an effort to find environmental friendly antifoulants, indole derivatives were determined for their activities to inhibit the growth of bacteria and diatom. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of indole derivatives against bacteria were very low, especially for 6-chloroindole. It was proved that 6-chloroindole obviously inhibited the growth of bacteria, interfered with the formation of bacterial biofilm, destroyed bacterial cell morphology and also inhibited the growth of diatom Cylindrotheca sp. as well. By using noninvasive micro-test technique (NMT), 6-chloroindole triggered algal cellular Ca(2+) efflux. The highest value was 72.03 pmol cm(-2)s(-1), 10.6 times of the control group. The present studies indicated that indole derivatives might have the potential to be new antifouling agents because of their excellent antibacterial and anti-algal activities. At the same time, Ca(2+) efflux might be one of the mechanisms that indole derivatives inhibited the growth of diatom. PMID:25287229

  20. Biofilm formation is not required for early-phase transmission of Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, Sara M.; Eisen, Rebecca J.; Schotthoefer, Anna M.; Montenieri, John A.; Holmes, Jennifer L.; Bobrov, Alexander G.; Bearden, Scott W.; Perry, Robert D.; Gage, Kenneth L.

    2010-01-01

    Early-phase transmission (EPT) is a recently described model of plague transmission that explains the rapid spread of disease from flea to mammal host during an epizootic. Unlike the traditional blockage-dependent model of plague transmission, EPT can occur when a flea takes its first blood meal after initially becoming infected by feeding on a bacteraemic host. Blockage of the flea gut results from biofilm formation in the proventriculus, mediated by the gene products found in the haemin storage (hms) locus of the Yersinia pestis chromosome. Although biofilms are required for blockage-dependent transmission, the role of biofilms in EPT has yet to be determined. An artificial feeding system was used to feed Xenopsylla cheopis and Oropsylla montana rat blood spiked with the parental Y. pestis strain KIM5(pCD1)+, two different biofilm-deficient mutants (?hmsT, ?hmsR), or a biofilm-overproducer mutant (?hmsP). Infected fleas were then allowed to feed on naïve Swiss Webster mice for 1–4?days after infection, and the mice were monitored for signs of infection. We also determined the bacterial loads of each flea that fed upon naïve mice. Biofilm-defective mutants transmitted from X. cheopis and O. montana as efficiently as the parent strain, whereas the EPT efficiency of fleas fed the biofilm-overproducing strain was significantly less than that of fleas fed either the parent or a biofilm-deficient strain. Fleas infected with a biofilm-deficient strain harboured lower bacterial loads 4?days post-infection than fleas infected with the parent strain. Thus, defects in biofilm formation did not prevent flea-borne transmission of Y. pestis in our EPT model, although biofilm overproduction inhibited efficient EPT. Our results also indicate, however, that biofilms may play a role in infection persistence in the flea. PMID:20395271

  1. A green biocide enhancer for the treatment of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) biofilms on carbon steel surfaces using glutaraldehyde

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jie Wen; Kaili Zhao; Tingyue Gu; Issam I. Raad

    2009-01-01

    Generally speaking, a much higher concentration of biocide is needed to treat biofilms compared to the dosage used to for planktonic bacteria. With increasing restrictions of environmental regulations and safety concerns on large-scale biocide uses such as oil field applications, it is highly desirable to make more effective use of biocides. In this paper a green biocide enhancer ethylenediaminedisuccinate (EDDS)

  2. Modelling Co-Infection of the Cystic Fibrosis Lung by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia Reveals Influences on Biofilm Formation and Host Response

    PubMed Central

    Twomey, Kate B.; Pirone, Luisa; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Bianconi, Irene; Dalmastri, Claudia; Ryan, Robert P.; Bevivino, Annamaria

    2012-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia are opportunistic human pathogens that are responsible for severe nosocomial infections in immunocompromised patients and those suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). These two bacteria have been shown to form biofilms in the airways of CF patients that make such infections more difficult to treat. Only recently have scientists begun to appreciate the complicated interplay between microorganisms during polymicrobial infection of the CF airway and the implications they may have for disease prognosis and response to therapy. To gain insight into the possible role that interaction between strains of P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia may play during infection, we characterised co-inoculations of in vivo and in vitro infection models. Co-inoculations were examined in an in vitro biofilm model and in a murine model of chronic infection. Assessment of biofilm formation showed that B. cenocepacia positively influenced P. aeruginosa biofilm development by increasing biomass. Interestingly, co-infection experiments in the mouse model revealed that P. aeruginosa did not change its ability to establish chronic infection in the presence of B. cenocepacia but co-infection did appear to increase host inflammatory response. Taken together, these results indicate that the co-infection of P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia leads to increased biofilm formation and increased host inflammatory response in the mouse model of chronic infection. These observations suggest that alteration of bacterial behavior due to interspecies interactions may be important for disease progression and persistent infection. PMID:23284990

  3. A Bacillus subtilis Sensor Kinase Involved in Triggering Biofilm Formation on the Roots of Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Cao, Shugeng; Chai, Yunrong; Clardy, Jon; Kolter, Roberto; Guo, Jian-hua; Losick, Richard

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis is widely used in agriculture as a biocontrol agent able to protect plants from a variety of pathogens. Protection is thought to involve the formation of bacterial communities - biofilms - on the roots of the plants. Here we used confocal microscopy to visualize biofilms on the surface of the roots of tomato seedlings and demonstrated that biofilm formation requires genes governing the production of the extracellular matrix that holds cells together. We further show that biofilm formation was dependent on the sensor histidine kinase KinD and in particular on an extracellular CACHE domain implicated in small molecule sensing. Finally, we report that exudates of tomato roots strongly stimulated biofilm formation ex planta and that an abundant small molecule in the exudates, l-malic acid, was able to stimulate biofilm formation at high concentrations in a manner that depended on the KinD CACHE domain. We propose that small signaling molecules released by the roots of tomato plants are directly or indirectly recognized by KinD, triggering biofilm formation. PMID:22716461

  4. Sulphur bacteria mediated formation of Palaeoproterozoic phosphorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joosu, Lauri; Lepland, Aivo; Kirsimäe, Kalle

    2014-05-01

    Modern phosphorite formation is typically associated with high productivity in upwelling areas where apatite (Ca-phosphate) precipitation is mediated by sulphur oxidising bacteria [1]. They inhabit the oxic/anoxic interface within the upper few centimetres of sediment column, accumulating phosphate in their cells under oxic conditions and releasing it rapidly when conditions become anoxic. Sulphur bacteria are known to live in close association with a consortium of anaerobic methane oxidising archaea and syntrophic sulphate-reducing bacteria. Paleoproterozoic, c. 2.0 Ga Zaonega Formation in Karelia, Russia contains several P-rich intervals in the upper part of 1500 m thick succession of organic-rich sedimentary rocks interlayered with mafic tuffs and lavas. Apatite in these P-rich intervals forms impure laminae, lenses and round-oval nodules which diameters typically range from 300 to 1000 ?m. Individual apatite particles in P-rich laminae and nodules commonly occur as cylinders that are 1-8 ?m long and have diameters of 0.5-4 ?m. Cross-sections of best preserved cylindrical apatite particles reveal a thin outer rim whereas the internal parts consist of small anhedral elongated crystallites, intergrown with carbonaceous material. During recrystallization the outer rim thickens towards interior and cylinders may attain hexagonal crystal habit, but their size and shape remains largely unchanged [2]. The sizes of Zaonega nodules are similar to giant sulphide-oxidising bacteria known from modern and ancient settings [3, 4]. Individual apatite cylinders and aggregates have shapes and sizes similar to the methanotrophic archaea that inhabit microbial mats in modern seep/vent areas where they operate in close associations with sulphur-oxidising microbial communities [5]. Seep/vent influence during the Zaonega phosphogenesis is indicated by variable, though positive Eu anomaly, expected in magmatically active sedimentary environment experiencing several lava flows. Moreover, P-rich intervals in the Zaonega Formation are found in organic-rich sediments exhibiting strongly negative ?13Corg values (-37 to -34 per mil) which is interpreted to reflect the methanotrophic biomass. We conclude that modern-style phosphogenesis, mediated by sulphide-oxidising bacteria living in consortium with methanotrophs, was established at least 2 Ga ago. [1] Schulz and Schulz (2005) Science 307, 416-418 [2] Lepland, Joosu, Kirsimäe, Prave, Romashkin, ?rne, Martin, Fallick, Somelar, Üpraus, Mänd, Roberts, van Zuilen, Wirth, Schreiber (2014) Nature geoscience 7, 20-24 [3] Bailey, Joye, Kalanetra, Flood, and Corsetti (2007) Nature 445, 198-201 [4] Schulz, Brinkhoff, Ferdelman, Marine, Teske and Jorgensen (1999) Science 284, 493-495 [5] Knittel, Losekann, Boetius, Kort and Amann (2005) Applied and Environmental Microbiology 71, 467-479.

  5. Bacterial biofilms: from the Natural environment to infectious diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luanne Hall-Stoodley; J. William Costerton; Paul Stoodley

    2004-01-01

    Biofilms — matrix-enclosed microbial accretions that adhere to biological or non-biological surfaces — represent a significant and incompletely understood mode of growth for bacteria. Biofilm formation appears early in the fossil record (?3.25 billion years ago) and is common throughout a diverse range of organisms in both the Archaea and Bacteria lineages, including the 'living fossils' in the most deeply

  6. Community Structure and In Situ Activity of Nitrifying Bacteria in Phragmites Root-Associated Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Satoshi; Nakamura, Yoshiyuki; Satoh, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    The amount of oxygen released by Phragmites roots and the community structure and in situ activity of nitrifying bacteria in the root biofilms were analyzed by the combined use of 16S rRNA gene-cloning analysis, quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay and microelectrodes. Axial and radial O2 microprofiles were obtained for individual roots of Phragmites in a horizontal flow reactor fed with artificial medium continuously. Axial O2 profiles revealed that O2 was released at a rate of 0.21 ?mol O2 cm?2 (root surface area) h?1 only in the apical region (up to ca. 40 mm from the root apex), where there was a high abundance (107 to 108 copies g?1 biomass) of Nitrosomonas-like AOB and Nitrospira-like NOB. This abundance, however, sharply declined to the detection limit at positions more basal than 80 mm. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene identified strains related to Nitrosomonas oligotropha and Nitrosomonas cryotolerans as the predominant AOB and strains related to Nitrospira marina and Nitrospira moscoviensis as the predominant NOB in the root biofilms. Based on radial O2 microprofiles, the oxic region only extended about 0.5 mm into the surrounding sediment due to a high rate of O2 consumption in the rhizosphere. The net NH4+ and O2 consumption rates in the apical region were higher than those determined at the oxic sediment surface in which the abundance of AOB and NOB was one order of magnitude lower than in the rhizosphere. These results clearly indicated that Phragmites root biofilms played an important role in nitrification in the waterlogged anoxic sediment. PMID:22446303

  7. LuxS-Based Signaling in Streptococcus gordonii: Autoinducer 2 Controls Carbohydrate Metabolism and Biofilm Formation with Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    McNab, Roderick; Ford, Suzannah K.; El-Sabaeny, Azza; Barbieri, Bruno; Cook, Guy S.; Lamont, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    Communication based on autoinducer 2 (AI-2) is widespread among gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, and the AI-2 pathway can control the expression of genes involved in a variety of metabolic pathways and pathogenic mechanisms. In the present study, we identified luxS, a gene responsible for the synthesis of AI-2, in Streptococcus gordonii, a major component of the dental plaque biofilm. S. gordonii conditioned medium induced bioluminescence in an AI-2 reporter strain of Vibrio harveyi. An isogenic mutant of S. gordonii, generated by insertional inactivation of the luxS gene, was unaffected in growth and in its ability to form biofilms on polystyrene surfaces. In contrast, the mutant strain failed to induce bioluminescence in V. harveyi and was unable to form a mixed species biofilm with a LuxS-null strain of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. Complementation of the luxS mutation in S. gordonii restored normal biofilm formation with the luxS-deficient P. gingivalis. Differential display PCR demonstrated that the inactivation of S. gordonii luxS downregulated the expression of a number of genes, including gtfG, encoding glucosyltransferase; fruA, encoding extracellular exo-?-d-fructosidase; and lacD encoding tagatose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase. However, S. gordonii cell surface expression of SspA and SspB proteins, previously implicated in mediating adhesion between S. gordonii and P. gingivalis, was unaffected by inactivation of luxS. The results suggest that S. gordonii produces an AI-2-like signaling molecule that regulates aspects of carbohydrate metabolism in the organism. Furthermore, LuxS-dependent intercellular communication is essential for biofilm formation between nongrowing cells of P. gingivalis and S. gordonii. PMID:12486064

  8. Mutation of sarA in Staphylococcus aureus limits biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Beenken, Karen E; Blevins, Jon S; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2003-07-01

    Mutation of sarA resulted in a reduced capacity to form a biofilm in six of the eight Staphylococcus aureus strains we tested (UAMS-1, UAMS-601, SA113, SC-01, S6C, and DB). The exceptions were Newman, which formed a poor biofilm under all conditions, and RN6390, which consistently formed a biofilm only after mutation of agr. Mutation of agr in other strains had little impact on biofilm formation. In every strain other than Newman, including RN6390, simultaneous mutation of sarA and agr resulted in a phenotype like that observed with the sarA mutants. Complementation studies using a sarA clone confirmed that the defect in biofilm formation was due to the sarA mutation. PMID:12819120

  9. Mutation of sarA in Staphylococcus aureus Limits Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Beenken, Karen E.; Blevins, Jon S.; Smeltzer, Mark S.

    2003-01-01

    Mutation of sarA resulted in a reduced capacity to form a biofilm in six of the eight Staphylococcus aureus strains we tested (UAMS-1, UAMS-601, SA113, SC-01, S6C, and DB). The exceptions were Newman, which formed a poor biofilm under all conditions, and RN6390, which consistently formed a biofilm only after mutation of agr. Mutation of agr in other strains had little impact on biofilm formation. In every strain other than Newman, including RN6390, simultaneous mutation of sarA and agr resulted in a phenotype like that observed with the sarA mutants. Complementation studies using a sarA clone confirmed that the defect in biofilm formation was due to the sarA mutation. PMID:12819120

  10. The influence of subminimal inhibitory concentrations of benzalkonium chloride on biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Sagrario; López, Victoria; Martínez-Suárez, Joaquín V

    2014-10-17

    Disinfectants, such as benzalkonium chloride (BAC), are commonly used to control Listeria monocytogenes and other pathogens in food processing plants. Prior studies have demonstrated that the resistance to BAC of L. monocytogenes was associated with the prolonged survival of three strains of molecular serotype 1/2a in an Iberian pork processing plant. Because survival in such environments is related to biofilm formation, we hypothesised that the influence of BAC on the biofilm formation potential of L. monocytogenes might differ between BAC-resistant strains (BAC-R, MIC?10mg/L) and BAC-sensitive strains (BAC-S, MIC?2.5mg/L). To evaluate this possibility, three BAC-R strains and eight BAC-S strains, which represented all of the molecular serotype 1/2a strains detected in the sampled plant, were compared. Biofilm production was measured using the crystal violet staining method in 96-well microtitre plates. The BAC-R strains produced significantly (p<0.05) less biofilm than the BAC-S in the absence of BAC, independent of the rate of planktonic growth. In contrast, when the biofilm values were measured in the presence of BAC, one BAC-R strain (S10-1) was able to form biofilm at 5mg/L of BAC, which prevented biofilm formation among the rest of the strains. A genetic determinant of BAC resistance recently described in L. monocytogenes (Tn6188) was detected in S10-1. When a BAC-S strain and its spontaneous mutant BAC-R derivative were compared, resistance to BAC led to biofilm formation at 5mg/L of BAC and to a significant (p<0.05) stimulation of biofilm formation at 1.25mg/L of BAC, which significantly (p<0.05) reduced the biofilm level in the parent BAC-S strain. Our results suggest that the effect of subminimal inhibitory concentrations of BAC on biofilm production by L. monocytogenes might differ between strains with different MICs and even between resistant strains with similar MICs but different genetic determinants of BAC resistance. For BAC-R strains similar to S10-1, subminimal inhibitory BAC may represent an advantage, compensating for the weak biofilm formation level that might be associated with resistance. Biofilm formation in the presence of increased subminimal inhibitory concentrations of the disinfectant may represent an important attribute among certain resistant and persistent strains of L. monocytogenes. PMID:25136789

  11. Pilus Biogenesis in Lactococcus lactis: Molecular Characterization and Role in Aggregation and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Oxaran, Virginie; Ledue-Clier, Florence; Dieye, Yakhya; Herry, Jean-Marie; Péchoux, Christine; Meylheuc, Thierry; Briandet, Romain; Juillard, Vincent; Piard, Jean-Christophe

    2012-01-01

    The genome of Lactococcus lactis strain IL1403 harbors a putative pilus biogenesis cluster consisting of a sortase C gene flanked by 3 LPxTG protein encoding genes (yhgD, yhgE, and yhhB), called here pil. However, pili were not detected under standard growth conditions. Over-expression of the pil operon resulted in production and display of pili on the surface of lactococci. Functional analysis of the pilus biogenesis machinery indicated that the pilus shaft is formed by oligomers of the YhgE pilin, that the pilus cap is formed by the YhgD pilin and that YhhB is the basal pilin allowing the tethering of the pilus fibers to the cell wall. Oligomerization of pilin subunits was catalyzed by sortase C while anchoring of pili to the cell wall was mediated by sortase A. Piliated L. lactis cells exhibited an auto-aggregation phenotype in liquid cultures, which was attributed to the polymerization of major pilin, YhgE. The piliated lactococci formed thicker, more aerial biofilms compared to those produced by non-piliated bacteria. This phenotype was attributed to oligomers of YhgE. This study provides the first dissection of the pilus biogenesis machinery in a non-pathogenic Gram-positive bacterium. Analysis of natural lactococci isolates from clinical and vegetal environments showed pili production under standard growth conditions. The identification of functional pili in lactococci suggests that the changes they promote in aggregation and biofilm formation may be important for the natural lifestyle as well as for applications in which these bacteria are used. PMID:23236417

  12. Biological Filtration Limits Carbon Availability and Affects Downstream Biofilm Formation and Community Structure†

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Chee Meng; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2006-01-01

    Carbon removal strategies have gained popularity in the mitigation of biofouling in water reuse processes, but current biofilm-monitoring practices based on organic-carbon concentrations may not provide an accurate representation of the in situ biofilm problem. This study evaluated a submerged microtiter plate assay for direct and rapid monitoring of biofilm formation by subjecting the plates to a continuous flow of either secondary effluent (SE) or biofilter-treated secondary effluent (BF). This method was very robust, based on a high correlation (R2 = 0.92) between the biomass (given by the A600 in the microtiter plate assay) and the biovolume (determined from independent biofilms developed on glass slides under identical conditions) measurements, and revealed that the biomasses in BF biofilms were consistently lower than those in SE biofilms. The influence of the organic-carbon content on the biofilm community composition and succession was further evaluated using molecular tools. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S rRNA genes revealed a group of pioneer colonizers, possibly represented by Sphingomonadaceae and Caulobacter organisms, to be common in both SE and BF biofilms. However, differences in organic-carbon availabilities in the two water samples eventually led to the selection of distinct biofilm communities. Alphaproteobacterial populations were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization to be enriched in SE biofilms, while Betaproteobacteria were dominant in BF biofilms. Cloning analyses further demonstrated that microorganisms adapted for survival under low-substrate conditions (e.g., Aquabacterium, Caulobacter, and Legionella) were preferentially selected in the BF biofilm, suggesting that carbon limitation strategies may not achieve adequate biofouling control in the long run. PMID:16957184

  13. dsrAB-based analysis of sulphate-reducing bacteria in moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Kristi; Taylor, Michael W; Turner, Susan J

    2014-08-01

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are important members of the sulphur cycle in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In this study, we investigate the diversity and activity of SRB within the developing and established biofilm of two moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems treating municipal wastewater in New Zealand. The larger of the two WWTPs (Moa Point) generates high levels of sulphide relative to the smaller Karori plant. Clone libraries of the dissimilatory (bi)sulphite reductase (dsrAB) genes and quantitative real-time PCR targeting dsrA transcripts were used to compare SRB communities between the two WWTPs. Desulfobulbus (35-53 % of total SRB sequences) and genera belonging to the family Desulfobacteraceae (27-41 %) dominated the SRB fraction of the developing biofilm on deployed plastic carriers at both sites, whereas Desulfovibrio and Desulfomicrobium were exclusively found at Moa Point. In contrast, the established biofilms from resident MBBR carriers were largely dominated by Desulfomonile tiedjei-like organisms (58-100 % of SRB sequences). The relative transcript abundance of dsrA genes (signifying active SRBs) increased with biofilm weight yet remained low overall, even in the mature biofilm stage. Our results indicate that although SRB are both present and active in the microbial community at both MBBR study sites, differences in the availability of sulphate may be contributing to the observed differences in sulphide production at these two plants. PMID:24788329

  14. Investigating catalase activity through hydrogen peroxide decomposition by bacteria biofilms in real time using scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Abucayon, Erwin; Ke, Neng; Cornut, Renaud; Patelunas, Anthony; Miller, Douglas; Nishiguchi, Michele K; Zoski, Cynthia G

    2014-01-01

    Catalase activity through hydrogen peroxide decomposition in a 1 mM bulk solution above Vibrio fischeri (?-Protebacteria-Vibrionaceae) bacterial biofilms of either symbiotic or free-living strains was studied in real time by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The catalase activity, in units of micromoles hydrogen peroxide decomposed per minute over a period of 348 s, was found to vary with incubation time of each biofilm in correlation with the corresponding growth curve of bacteria in liquid culture. Average catalase activity for the same incubation times ranging from 1 to 12 h was found to be 0.28 ± 0.07 ?mol H2O2/min for the symbiotic biofilms and 0.31 ± 0.07 ?mol H2O2/min for the free-living biofilms, suggesting similar catalase activity. Calculations based on Comsol Multiphysics simulations in fitting experimental biofilm data indicated that approximately (3 ± 1) × 10(6) molecules of hydrogen peroxide were decomposed by a single bacterium per second, signifying the presence of a highly active catalase. A 2-fold enhancement in catalase activity was found for both free-living and symbiotic biofilms in response to external hydrogen peroxide concentrations as low as 1 nM in the growth media, implying a similar mechanism in responding to oxidative stress. PMID:24328342

  15. APPLIED GENETICS AND MOLECULAR BIOTECHNOLOGY PA2663 (PpyR) increases biofilm formation in Pseudomonas

    E-print Network

    Wood, Thomas K.

    several acute and chronic infections (Filiatrault et al. 2006) in humans, animals, insects, nematodes confirmed that PA2663 is related to biofilm formation by restoring the wild-type phenotype by complementing

  16. Acoustic and Electrical Property Changes Due to Microbial Growth and Biofilm Formation in Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on compressional waves, and complex conductivity during stimulated microbial growth. Over the 29 day duration of the experiment, compressional wave amplitudes and arrival times f...

  17. INVESTIGATING THE EFFECT OF MICROBIAL GROWTH AND BIOFILM FORMATION ON SEISMIC WAVE PROPAGATION IN SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous laboratory investigations have demonstrated that the seismic methods are sensitive to microbially-induced changes in porous media through the generation of biogenic gases and biomineralization. The seismic signatures associated with microbial growth and biofilm formation...

  18. Some possibilities to reduce the biofilm formation on transparent siloxane coatings.

    PubMed

    Akuzov, D; Brümmer, F; Vladkova, T

    2013-04-01

    Presence of biofilms is a significant problem to a variety of industrial areas, underwater sensors, shipping, etc. Therefore solutions are sought to inhibit biofilm formation and to permit biofilm removal. Surface modification by suitable coating could be one of them. The present study reports the potential of new transparent biocides-free siloxane antifouling coatings, containing low toxic additives, such as TiO(2) nanoparticles, surfactants and antioxidants, to reduce biofilm formation in mimicking marine environment, laboratory conditions. As evaluated with several parameters: chlorophyll content, carotenoids content, total protein and total dry mass, the biofilm formation was most sharply reduced by the composition coatings containing non-ionic surfactant, super spreader Y17112, followed by those containing antioxidant, ?-tocopherol. Depending on the amount of the super spreader (0.1-1.0 wt.%) and the tested parameter, approximately 3-8-fold reduction was observed in the biofilm formation. It is supposed, that the effect of the studied additives, both surfactant and antioxidant, is due to some inhibition of the adhesive extra cellular substances cross-linking with impact onto the biofilm cohesion strength and its adhesion. PMID:23333915

  19. Twitching motility and biofilm formation are associated with tonB1 in Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Cursino, Luciana; Li, Yaxin; Zaini, Paulo A; De La Fuente, Leonardo; Hoch, Harvey C; Burr, Thomas J

    2009-10-01

    A mutation in the Xylella fastidiosa tonB1 gene resulted in loss of twitching motility and in significantly less biofilm formation as compared with a wild type. The altered motility and biofilm phenotypes were restored by complementation with a functional copy of the gene. The mutation affected virulence as measured by Pierce's disease symptoms on grapevines. The role of TonB1 in twitching and biofilm formation appears to be independent of the characteristic iron-uptake function of this protein. This is the first report demonstrating a functional role for a tonB homolog in X. fastidiosa. PMID:19735464

  20. Iron-Regulated Biofilm Formation in Staphylococcus aureus Newman Requires ica and the Secreted Protein Emp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miranda Johnson; Alan Cockayne; Julie A. Morrissey

    2008-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation is induced in iron-restricted growth conditions in vitro. In this study, we showed that Emp and Eap play important roles in low-iron-induced biofilm formation of S. aureus Newman. Eap and Emp are secreted proteins which are non-covalently attached to the S. aureus cell surface and have previously been implicated in a number of aspects of S.

  1. Biofilm formation on surface characterized micro-implants for skeletal anchorage in orthodontics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mervyn Y. H. Chin; Andrew Sandham; Joop de Vries; Henny C. van der Mei; Henk J. Busscher

    2007-01-01

    Micro-implants are increasingly popular in clinical orthodontics to effect skeletal anchorage. However, biofilm formation on their surfaces and subsequent infection of peri-implant tissues can result in either exfoliation or surgical removal of these devices. The present study aimed to assess biofilm formation on five commercially available, surface characterized micro-implant systems in vitro. The elemental surface compositions of as-received and autoclave-sterilized

  2. Enhanced antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammtory, and antiangiogenic due to its unique properties such as physical, chemical, and biological properties. The present study was aimed to investigate antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles alone and in combination with conventional antibiotics against various human pathogenic bacteria. Here, we show that a simple, reliable, cost effective and green method for the synthesis of AgNPs by treating silver ions with leaf extract of Allophylus cobbe. The A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs (AgNPs) was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity of antibiotics or AgNPs, or combinations of AgNPs with an antibiotic was evaluated using a series of assays: such as in vitro killing assay, disc diffusion assay, biofilm inhibition, and reactive oxygen species generation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumonia. The results suggest that, in combination with antibiotics, there were significant antimicrobial and anti-biofilm effects at lowest concentration of AgNPs using a novel plant extract of A. cobbe, otherwise sublethal concentrations of the antibiotics. The significant enhancing effects were observed for ampicillin and vancomycin against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. These data suggest that combining antibiotics and biogenic AgNPs can be used therapeutically for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria. This study presented evidence of antibacterial and anti-biofilm effects of A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs and their enhanced capacity against various human pathogenic bacteria. These results suggest that AgNPs could be used as an adjuvant for the treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:25136281

  3. Enhanced antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammtory, and antiangiogenic due to its unique properties such as physical, chemical, and biological properties. The present study was aimed to investigate antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles alone and in combination with conventional antibiotics against various human pathogenic bacteria. Here, we show that a simple, reliable, cost effective and green method for the synthesis of AgNPs by treating silver ions with leaf extract of Allophylus cobbe. The A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs (AgNPs) was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity of antibiotics or AgNPs, or combinations of AgNPs with an antibiotic was evaluated using a series of assays: such as in vitro killing assay, disc diffusion assay, biofilm inhibition, and reactive oxygen species generation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumonia. The results suggest that, in combination with antibiotics, there were significant antimicrobial and anti-biofilm effects at lowest concentration of AgNPs using a novel plant extract of A. cobbe, otherwise sublethal concentrations of the antibiotics. The significant enhancing effects were observed for ampicillin and vancomycin against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. These data suggest that combining antibiotics and biogenic AgNPs can be used therapeutically for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria. This study presented evidence of antibacterial and anti-biofilm effects of A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs and their enhanced capacity against various human pathogenic bacteria. These results suggest that AgNPs could be used as an adjuvant for the treatment of infectious diseases.

  4. Controlling biofilm formation by hydrogen peroxide and silver combined disinfectant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Armon; N. Laot; O. Lev; H. Shuval; B. Fattal

    2000-01-01

    Controlling biofilm growth in drinking and wastewater pipelines has attracted considerable scientific and technological attention over recent years. In this work, we have examined the biofilm control effectivity of a combined disinfectant comprised of hydrogen peroxide and silver ions. The performance of the combined disinfectant was compared to the effectivity of each of the ingredients alone and to the effectivity

  5. Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation on silver ion impregnated cutting boards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes is a human pathogen that can be a member of a biofilm community attached to surfaces in poultry processing plants. When present as a biofilm on product contact surfaces, this organism can effectively cross contaminate fully cooked ready-to-eat meat. Plastic cutting boards ca...

  6. Inhibitors of biofilm formation by biofuel fermentation contaminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofuel fermentation contaminants such as Lactobacillus sp. may persist in production facilities by forming recalcitrant biofilms. In this study, biofilm-forming strains of Lactobacillus brevis, L. fermentum, and L. plantarum were isolated and characterized from a dry-grind fuel ethanol plant. A var...

  7. Listeria monocytogenes Biofilm Formation on Silver Ion Impregnated Cutting Boards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes is a human pathogen that can be a member of a biofilm community attached to surfaces in poultry processing plants. When present as a biofilm on product contact surfaces, this organism can effectively cross contaminate fully cooked ready-to-eat meat. Plastic cutting boards ca...

  8. SaeRS-Dependent Inhibition of Biofilm Formation in Staphylococcus aureus Newman

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Mei G.; Blevins, Jon S.; Smeltzer, Mark S.; Lee, Chia Y.

    2015-01-01

    The SaeRS two-component regulatory system of Staphylococcus aureus is known to affect the expression of many genes. The SaeS protein is the histidine kinase responsible for phosphorylation of the response regulator SaeR. In S. aureus Newman, the sae system is constitutively expressed due to a point mutation in saeS, relative to other S. aureus strains, which results in substitution of proline for leucine at amino acid 18. Strain Newman is unable to form a robust biofilm and we report here that the biofilm-deficient phenotype is due to the saeSP allele. Replacement of the Newman saeSP with saeSL, or deletion of saeRS, resulted in a biofilm-proficient phenotype. Newman culture supernatants were observed to inhibit biofilm formation by other S. aureus strains, but did not affect biofilm formation by S. epidermidis. Culture supernatants of Newman saeSL or Newman ?saeRS had no significant effect on biofilm formation. The inhibitory factor was inactivated by incubation with proteinase K, but survived heating, indicating that the inhibitory protein is heat-stable. The inhibitory protein was found to affect the attachment step in biofilm formation, but had no effect on preformed biofilms. Replacement of saeSL with saeSP in the biofilm-proficient S. aureus USA300 FPR3757 resulted in the loss of biofilm formation. Culture supernatants of USA300 FPR3757 saeSP, did not inhibit biofilm formation by other staphylococci, suggesting that the inhibitory factor is produced but not secreted in the mutant strain. A number of biochemical methods were utilized to isolate the inhibitory protein. Although a number of candidate proteins were identified, none were found to be the actual inhibitor. In an effort to reduce the number of potential inhibitory genes, RNA-Seq analyses were done with wild-type strain Newman and the saeSL and ?saeRS mutants. RNA-Seq results indicated that sae regulates many genes that may affect biofilm formation by Newman. PMID:25853849

  9. Biofilm-defective mutants of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Chagneau, Claudia; Saier, Milton H

    2004-01-01

    Many bacteria can adopt organized, sessile, communal lifestyles. The gram-positive bacterium, Bacillus subtilis,forms biofilms on solid surfaces and at air-liquid interfaces, and biofilm development is dependent on environmental conditions. We demonstrate that biofilm formation by B. subtilis strain JH642 can be either activated or repressed by glucose, depending on the growth medium used, and that these glucose effects are at least in part mediated by the catabolite control protein, CcpA. Starting with a chromosomal Tn917-LTV3 insertional library, we isolated mutants that are defective for biofilm formation. The biofilm defects of these mutants were observable in both rich and minimal media, and both on polyvinylchloride abiotic surfaces and in borosilicate tubes. Two mutants were defective in flagellar synthesis. Chemotaxis was shown to be less important for biofilm formation than was flagellar-driven motility. Although motility is known to be required for biofilm formation in other bacteria, this had not previously been demonstrated for B. subtilis. In addition, our study suggests roles for glutamate synthase, GltAB, and an aminopeptidase, AmpS. The loss of these enzymes did not decrease growth or cellular motility but had dramatic effects on biofilm formation under all conditions assayed. The effect of the gltAB defect on biofilm formation could not be due to a decrease in poly-gamma-glutamate synthesis since this polymer proved to be nonessential for robust biofilm formation. High exogenous concentrations of glutamate, aspartate, glutamine or proline did not override the glutamate synthase requirement. This is the first report showing that glutamate synthase and a cytoplasmic aminopeptidase play roles in bacterial biofilm formation. Possible mechanistic implications and potential roles of biofilm formation in other developmental processes are discussed. PMID:16088219

  10. Development of a poly(ether urethane) system for the controlled release of two novel anti-biofilm agents based on gallium or zinc and its efficacy to prevent bacterial biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongyan; Darmawan, Erica T; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Lei; Bryers, James D

    2013-12-28

    Traditional antibiotic therapy to control medical device-based infections typically fails to clear biofilm infections and may even promote the evolution of antibiotic resistant species. We report here the development of two novel antibiofilm agents; gallium (Ga) or zinc (Zn) complexed with protoporphyrin IX (PP) or mesoprotoporphyrin IX (MP) that are both highly effective in negating suspended bacterial growth and biofilm formation. These chelated gallium or zinc complexes act as iron siderophore analogs, supplanting the natural iron uptake of most bacteria. Poly (ether urethane) (PEU; Biospan®) polymer films were fabricated for the controlled sustained release of the Ga- or Zn-complexes, using an incorporated pore-forming agent, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). An optimum formulation containing 8% PEG (MW=1450) in the PEU polymer effectively sustained drug release for at least 3months. All drug-loaded PEU films exhibited in vitro ? 90% reduction of Gram-positive (Staphylococcus epidermidis) and Gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria in both suspended and biofilm culture versus the negative control PEU films releasing nothing. Cytotoxicity and endotoxin evaluation demonstrated no adverse responses to the Ga- or Zn-complex releasing PEU films. Finally, in vivo studies further substantiate the anti-biofilm efficacy of the PEU films releasing Ga- or Zn- complexes. PMID:24140747

  11. Development of a poly (ether urethane) system for the controlled release of two novel anti-biofilm agents based on gallium or zinc and its efficacy to prevent bacterial biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongyan; Darmawan, Erica T.; Zhang, Min; Zhange, Lei; Bryers, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional antibiotic therapy to control medical device-based infections typically fails to clear biofilm infections and may even promote the evolution of antibiotic resistant species. We report here the development of two novel antibiofilm agents; gallium (Ga) or zinc (Zn) complexed with protoporphyrin IX (PP) or mesoprotoporphyrin IX (MP) that are both highly effective in negating suspended bacterial growth and biofilm formation. These chelated gallium or zinc complexes act as iron siderophore analogs, surplanting the natural iron uptake of most bacteria. Poly (ether urethane) (PEU; Biospan®) polymer films were fabricated for the controlled sustained release of the Ga- or Zn-complexes, using an incorporated pore-forming agent, poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG). An optimum formulation containing 8% PEG (MW=1450) in the PEU polymer effectively sustained drug release for at least 3 months. All drug-loaded PEU films exhibited in vitro ? 90% reduction of Gram-positive (Staphylococcus epidermidis) and Gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria in both suspended and biofilm culture versus the negative control PEU films releasing nothing. Cytotoxicity and endotoxin evaluation demonstrated no adverse responses to the Ga- or Zn-complex releasing PEU films. Finally, in vivo studies further substantiate the anti-biofilm efficacy of the PEU films releasing Ga- or Zn- complexes. PMID:24140747

  12. A novel cell wall lipopeptide is important for biofilm formation and pathogenicity of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-wei; Schmoller, Shelly K; Bannantine, John P; Eckstein, Torsten M; Inamine, Julia M; Livesey, Michael; Albrecht, Ralph; Talaat, Adel M

    2009-04-01

    Biofilm formation by pathogenic bacteria plays a key role in their pathogenesis. Previously, the pstA gene was shown to be involved in the virulence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. ap), the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle and a potential risk factor for Crohn's disease. Scanning electron microscopy and colonization levels of the M. ap mutant indicated that the pstA gene significantly contributes to the ability of M. ap to form biofilms. Digital measurements taken during electron microscopy identified a unique morphology for the DeltapstA mutant, which consisted of significantly shorter bacilli than the wild type. Analysis of the lipid profiles of the mycobacterial strains identified a novel lipopeptide that was present in the cell wall extracts of wild-type M. ap, but missing from the DeltapstA mutant. Interestingly, the calf infection model suggested that pstA contributes to intestinal invasion of M. ap. Furthermore, immunoblot analysis of peptides encoded by pstA identified a specific and significant level of immunogenicity. Taken together, our analysis revealed a novel cell wall component that could contribute to biofilm formation and to the virulence and immunogenicity of M. ap. Molecular tools to better control M. ap infections could be developed utilizing the presented findings. PMID:19490829

  13. Evaluation of ultrasound technology for the disinfection of process water and the prevention of biofilm formation in a pilot plant.

    PubMed

    Lambert, N; Rediers, H; Hulsmans, A; Joris, K; Declerck, P; De Laedt, Y; Liers, S

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the use of ultrasound for the disinfection of process water as an alternative for more traditional techniques, like chlorination and UV-irradiation. A pilot plant was constructed to mimic circulating process water in industrial environments. The disinfection efficiency of ultrasound was assessed and compared to UV-treatment and chlorination. In addition, the operational costs for the different technologies were evaluated. Based on disinfection efficiency and operational costs, the pilot plant experiments indicate that chlorination is the method of preference to treat bacteria in suspension. In the prevention of biofilm formation, the results of UV irradiation and ultrasound are comparable, with a slightly higher energy consumption for the ultrasonic treatment. Finally, the use of ultrasound to prevent biofilms was also evaluated in an industrial environment (case study). The results obtained from the case study are in agreement with the results obtained from the pilot plant study. To our knowledge, this is the first study that evaluates the use of ultrasound technology for prevention of biofilm formation in realistic circumstances as encountered in an industrial environment. PMID:20220229

  14. The pgaABCD Locus of Escherichia coli Promotes the Synthesis of a Polysaccharide Adhesin Required for Biofilm Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xin Wang; James F. Preston III; Tony Romeo

    2004-01-01

    Production of a polysaccharide matrix is a hallmark of bacterial biofilms, but the composition of matrix polysaccharides and their functions are not widely understood. Previous studies of the regulation of Escherichia coli biofilm formation suggested the involvement of an unknown adhesin. We now establish that the pgaABCD (formerly ycdSRQP) locus affects biofilm development by promoting abiotic surface binding and intercellular

  15. Calcium Increases Xylella fastidiosa Surface Attachment, Biofilm Formation, and Twitching Motility

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Luisa F.; Cobine, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a plant-pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms inside xylem vessels, a process thought to be influenced by the chemical composition of xylem sap. In this work, the effect of calcium on the production of X. fastidiosa biofilm and movement was analyzed under in vitro conditions. After a dose-response study with 96-well plates using eight metals, the strongest increase of biofilm formation was observed when medium was supplemented with at least 1.0 mM CaCl2. The removal of Ca by extracellular (EGTA, 1.5 mM) and intracellular [1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N?,N?-tetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA/AM), 75 ?M] chelators reduced biofilm formation without compromising planktonic growth. The concentration of Ca influenced the force of adhesion to the substrate, biofilm thickness, cell-to-cell aggregation, and twitching motility, as shown by assays with microfluidic chambers and other assays. The effect of Ca on attachment was lost when cells were treated with tetracycline, suggesting that Ca has a metabolic or regulatory role in cell adhesion. A double mutant (fimA pilO) lacking type I and type IV pili did not improve biofilm formation or attachment when Ca was added to the medium, while single mutants of type I (fimA) or type IV (pilB) pili formed more biofilm under conditions of higher Ca concentrations. The concentration of Ca in the medium did not significantly influence the levels of exopolysaccharide produced. Our findings indicate that the role of Ca in biofilm formation may be related to the initial surface and cell-to-cell attachment and colonization stages of biofilm establishment, which rely on critical functions by fimbrial structures. PMID:22194297

  16. Calcium increases Xylella fastidiosa surface attachment, biofilm formation, and twitching motility.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Luisa F; Cobine, Paul A; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2012-03-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a plant-pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms inside xylem vessels, a process thought to be influenced by the chemical composition of xylem sap. In this work, the effect of calcium on the production of X. fastidiosa biofilm and movement was analyzed under in vitro conditions. After a dose-response study with 96-well plates using eight metals, the strongest increase of biofilm formation was observed when medium was supplemented with at least 1.0 mM CaCl(2). The removal of Ca by extracellular (EGTA, 1.5 mM) and intracellular [1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA/AM), 75 ?M] chelators reduced biofilm formation without compromising planktonic growth. The concentration of Ca influenced the force of adhesion to the substrate, biofilm thickness, cell-to-cell aggregation, and twitching motility, as shown by assays with microfluidic chambers and other assays. The effect of Ca on attachment was lost when cells were treated with tetracycline, suggesting that Ca has a metabolic or regulatory role in cell adhesion. A double mutant (fimA pilO) lacking type I and type IV pili did not improve biofilm formation or attachment when Ca was added to the medium, while single mutants of type I (fimA) or type IV (pilB) pili formed more biofilm under conditions of higher Ca concentrations. The concentration of Ca in the medium did not significantly influence the levels of exopolysaccharide produced. Our findings indicate that the role of Ca in biofilm formation may be related to the initial surface and cell-to-cell attachment and colonization stages of biofilm establishment, which rely on critical functions by fimbrial structures. PMID:22194297

  17. Biofilm formation by virulent and non-virulent strains of Haemophilus parasuis.

    PubMed

    Bello-Ortí, Bernardo; Deslandes, Vincent; Tremblay, Yannick D N; Labrie, Josée; Howell, Kate J; Tucker, Alexander W; Maskell, Duncan J; Aragon, Virginia; Jacques, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is a commensal bacterium of the upper respiratory tract of healthy pigs. It is also the etiological agent of Glässer's disease, a systemic disease characterized by polyarthritis, fibrinous polyserositis and meningitis, which causes high morbidity and mortality in piglets. The aim of this study was to evaluate biofilm formation by well-characterized virulent and non-virulent strains of H. parasuis. We observed that non-virulent strains isolated from the nasal cavities of healthy pigs formed significantly (p < 0.05) more biofilms than virulent strains isolated from lesions of pigs with Glässer's disease. These differences were observed when biofilms were formed in microtiter plates under static conditions or formed in the presence of shear force in a drip-flow apparatus or a microfluidic system. Confocal laser scanning microscopy using different fluorescent probes on a representative subset of strains indicated that the biofilm matrix contains poly-N-acetylglucosamine, proteins and eDNA. The biofilm matrix was highly sensitive to degradation by proteinase K. Comparison of transcriptional profiles of biofilm and planktonic cells of the non-virulent H. parasuis F9 strain revealed a significant number of up-regulated membrane-related genes in biofilms, and genes previously identified in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae biofilms. Our data indicate that non-virulent strains of H. parasuis have the ability to form robust biofilms in contrast to virulent, systemic strains. Biofilm formation might therefore allow the non-virulent strains to colonize and persist in the upper respiratory tract of pigs. Conversely, the planktonic state of the virulent strains might allow them to disseminate within the host. PMID:25428823

  18. Biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Maíra Maciel Mattos; Brugnera, Danilo Florisvaldo; Alves, Eduardo; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf

    2010-01-01

    An experimental model was proposed to study biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 on AISI 304 (#4) stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential during this process. In this model, biofilm formation was conducted on the surface of stainless steel coupons, set on a stainless steel base with 4 divisions, each one supporting 21 coupons. Trypic Soy Broth was used as bacterial growth substrate, with incubation at 37 °C and stirring of 50 rpm. The number of adhered cells was determined after 3, 48, 96, 144, 192 and 240 hours of biofilm formation and biotransfer potential from 96 hours. Stainless steel coupons were submitted to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) after 3, 144 and 240 hours. Based on the number of adhered cells and SEM, it was observed that L. monocytogenes adhered rapidly to the stainless steel surface, with mature biofilm being formed after 240 hours. The biotransfer potential of bacterium to substrate occurred at all the stages analyzed. The rapid capacity of adhesion to surface, combined with biotransfer potential throughout the biofilm formation stages, make L. monocytogenes a potential risk to the food industry. Both the experimental model developed and the methodology used were efficient in the study of biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential. PMID:24031469

  19. The Carbon Monoxide Releasing Molecule CORM-2 Attenuates Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation

    E-print Network

    Dietrich, Lars

    . aeruginosa causes chronic infection in patients with underlying lung disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF maturation and killing bacteria within the established biofilm. CORM-2 treatment has an additive effect when, for both mucoid and non-mucoid strains. While CORM-2 treatment increased the production of reactive oxygen

  20. Application of chimeric glucanase comprising mutanase and dextranase for prevention of dental biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Ryoko; Imai, Susumu; Murata, Takatoshi; Nomura, Yoshiaki; Okamoto, Masaaki; Tsumori, Hideaki; Kakuta, Erika; Hanada, Nobuhiro; Momoi, Yasuko

    2015-01-01

    Water-insoluble glucan (WIG) produced by mutans streptococci, an important cariogenic pathogen, plays an important role in the formation of dental biofilm and adhesion of biofilm to tooth surfaces. Glucanohydrolases, such as mutanase (?-1,3-glucanase) and dextranase (?-1,6-glucanase), are able to hydrolyze WIG. The purposes of this study were to construct bi-functional chimeric glucanase, composed of mutanase and dextranase, and to examine the effects of this chimeric glucanase on the formation and decomposition of biofilm. The mutanase gene from Paenibacillus humicus NA1123 and the dextranase gene from Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 were cloned and ligated into a pE-SUMOstar Amp plasmid vector. The resultant his-tagged fusion chimeric glucanase was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and partially purified. The effects of chimeric glucanase on the formation and decomposition of biofilm formed on a glass surface by Streptococcus sobrinus 6715 glucosyltransferases were then examined. This biofilm was fractionated into firmly adherent, loosely adherent, and non-adherent WIG fractions. Amounts of WIG in each fraction were determined by a phenol-sulfuric acid method, and reducing sugars were quantified by the Somogyi-Nelson method. Chimeric glucanase reduced the formation of the total amount of WIG in a dose-dependent manner, and significant reductions of WIG in the adherent fraction were observed. Moreover, the chimeric glucanase was able to decompose biofilm, being 4.1 times more effective at glucan inhibition of biofilm formation than a mixture of dextranase and mutanase. These results suggest that the chimeric glucanase is useful for prevention of dental biofilm formation. PMID:25411090

  1. Sesqui- and triterpenoids from the liverwort Lepidozia chordulifera inhibitors of bacterial biofilm and elastase activity of human pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gilabert, M; Marcinkevicius, K; Andujar, S; Schiavone, M; Arena, M E; Bardón, A

    2015-01-15

    Five dammarane-type triterpenoids, five pentacyclic triterpenoids (three of them carrying a carboxylic acid group), and two aromadendrane-type sesquiterpenoids were isolated from an Argentinian collection of the liverwort Lepidozia chordulifera. Compounds were characterized by comparison of their spectral data with those previously reported and tested in their ability to control bacterial growth, biofilm formation, bacterial Quorum Sensing process (QS), and elastase activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as bacterial growth and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus. The key role played by biofilm and elastase activity in bacterial virulence make them a potential target for the development of antibacterial agents. The aromadendrane-type sesquiterpenoid viridiflorol was the most potent biofilm formation inhibitor, producing 60% inhibition in P. aeruginosa and 40% in S. aureus at 50µg/ml. Ursolic and betulinic acids (two of the pentacyclic triterpenoids isolated) were able to reduce 96 and 92% the elastase activity of P. aeruginosa at 50µg/ml, respectively. Among the analyzed triterpenoids, those that carry a dammarane skeleton were the most potent inhibitors of the P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and were active against both P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. Subsequently, a computer-assisted study of the triterpenoid compounds was carried out for a better understanding of the structure-activity relationships. PMID:25636875

  2. LitR Is a Repressor of syp Genes and Has a Temperature-Sensitive Regulatory Effect on Biofilm Formation and Colony Morphology in Vibrio (Aliivibrio) salmonicida

    PubMed Central

    Bjelland, Ane Mohn; Ronessen, Maria; Robertsen, Espen; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio (Aliivibrio) salmonicida is the etiological agent of cold water vibriosis, a disease in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) that is kept under control due to an effective vaccine. A seawater temperature below 12°C is normally required for disease development. Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell density-regulated communication system that bacteria use to coordinate activities involved in colonization and pathogenesis, and we have previously shown that inactivation of the QS master regulator LitR attenuates the V. salmonicida strain LFI1238 in a fish model. We show here that strain LFI1238 and a panel of naturally occurring V. salmonicida strains are poor biofilm producers. Inactivation of litR in the LFI1238 strain enhances medium- and temperature-dependent adhesion, rugose colony morphology, and biofilm formation. Chemical treatment and electron microscopy of the biofilm identified an extracellular matrix consisting mainly of a fibrous network, proteins, and polysaccharides. Further, by microarray analysis of planktonic and biofilm cells, we identified a number of genes regulated by LitR and, among these, were homologues of the Vibrio fischeri symbiosis polysaccharide (syp) genes. The syp genes were regulated by LitR in both planktonic and biofilm lifestyle analyses. Disruption of syp genes in the V. salmonicida ?litR mutant alleviated adhesion, rugose colony morphology, and biofilm formation. Hence, LitR is a repressor of syp transcription that is necessary for expression of the phenotypes examined. The regulatory effect of LitR on colony morphology and biofilm formation is temperature sensitive and weak or absent at temperatures above the bacterium's upper threshold for pathogenicity. PMID:24973072

  3. LitR is a repressor of syp genes and has a temperature-sensitive regulatory effect on biofilm formation and colony morphology in vibrio (Aliivibrio) salmonicida.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Hilde; Bjelland, Ane Mohn; Ronessen, Maria; Robertsen, Espen; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2014-09-01

    Vibrio (Aliivibrio) salmonicida is the etiological agent of cold water vibriosis, a disease in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) that is kept under control due to an effective vaccine. A seawater temperature below 12°C is normally required for disease development. Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell density-regulated communication system that bacteria use to coordinate activities involved in colonization and pathogenesis, and we have previously shown that inactivation of the QS master regulator LitR attenuates the V. salmonicida strain LFI1238 in a fish model. We show here that strain LFI1238 and a panel of naturally occurring V. salmonicida strains are poor biofilm producers. Inactivation of litR in the LFI1238 strain enhances medium- and temperature-dependent adhesion, rugose colony morphology, and biofilm formation. Chemical treatment and electron microscopy of the biofilm identified an extracellular matrix consisting mainly of a fibrous network, proteins, and polysaccharides. Further, by microarray analysis of planktonic and biofilm cells, we identified a number of genes regulated by LitR and, among these, were homologues of the Vibrio fischeri symbiosis polysaccharide (syp) genes. The syp genes were regulated by LitR in both planktonic and biofilm lifestyle analyses. Disruption of syp genes in the V. salmonicida ?litR mutant alleviated adhesion, rugose colony morphology, and biofilm formation. Hence, LitR is a repressor of syp transcription that is necessary for expression of the phenotypes examined. The regulatory effect of LitR on colony morphology and biofilm formation is temperature sensitive and weak or absent at temperatures above the bacterium's upper threshold for pathogenicity. PMID:24973072

  4. A Novel Regulatory Protein Governing Biofilm Formation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Frances; Kearns, Daniel B.; McLoon, Anna; Chai, Yunrong; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Production of an extracellular matrix is a hallmark of biofilm formation. In the spore-forming bacterium Bacillus subtilis, the matrix consists of an exopolysaccharide, which is specified by the epsA-O operon, and a secreted protein TasA, which is encoded by the yqxM-sipW-tasA operon. Past and present evidence establish that the epsA-O and yqxM-sipW-tasA operons are controlled by the repressor proteins SinR and AbrB. Here, we report the identification of a novel regulatory protein Slr that promotes transcription of the yqxM-sipW-tasA operon but is not needed for expression of the epsA-O operon. We further show that the gene for Slr is itself under the negative control of SinR and AbrB. These findings reveal that matrix production is governed by an intricate network involving the interplay of negatively- and positively-acting regulatory proteins. PMID:18430133

  5. A comparative study of the effect of probiotics on cariogenic biofilm model for preventing dental caries.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Jae

    2014-08-01

    Dental caries is induced by oral biofilm containing Streptococcus mutans. Probiotic bacteria were mainly studied for effect on the gastrointestinal tract and have been known to promote human health. However, the information of probiotics for oral health has been lack yet. In this study, we investigated influence of various probiotics on oral bacteria or cariogenic biofilm and evaluated candidate probiotics for dental caries among them. The antimicrobial activity of the spent culture medium of probiotics for oral streptococci was performed. Probiotics were added during the biofilm formation with salivary bacteria including S. mutans. The oral biofilms were stained with a fluorescent dye and observed using the confocal laser scanning microscope. To count bacteria in the biofilm, the bacteria were plated on MSB and BHI agar plates after disrupting the biofilm and cultivated. Glucosyltransferases (gtfs) expression of S. mutans and integration of lactobacilli into the biofilm were evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Among probiotics, Lactobacillus species strongly inhibited growth of oral streptococci. Moreover, Lactobacillus species strongly inhibited formation of cariogenic biofilm model. The expression of gtfs was significantly reduced by Lactobacillus rhamnosus. The integration of L. rhamnosus into the biofilm model did not exhibit. However, L. acidophilus and L casei integrated into the biofilm model. These results suggest that L. rhamnosus may inhibit oral biofilm formation by decreasing glucan production of S. mutans and antibacterial activity and did not integrate into oral biofilm, which can be a candidate for caries prevention strategy. PMID:24919536

  6. Elucidating the Genetic Basis of Crystalline Biofilm Formation in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Holling, N.; Lednor, D.; Tsang, S.; Bissell, A.; Campbell, L.; Nzakizwanayo, J.; Dedi, C.; Hawthorne, J. A.; Hanlon, G.; Ogilvie, L. A.; Salvage, J. P.; Patel, B. A.; Barnes, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis forms extensive crystalline biofilms on urethral catheters that occlude urine flow and frequently complicate the management of long-term-catheterized patients. Here, using random transposon mutagenesis in conjunction with in vitro models of the catheterized urinary tract, we elucidate the mechanisms underpinning the formation of crystalline biofilms by P. mirabilis. Mutants identified as defective in blockage of urethral catheters had disruptions in genes involved in nitrogen metabolism and efflux systems but were unaffected in general growth, survival in bladder model systems, or the ability to elevate urinary pH. Imaging of biofilms directly on catheter surfaces, along with quantification of levels of encrustation and biomass, confirmed that the mutants were attenuated specifically in the ability to form crystalline biofilms compared with that of the wild type. However, the biofilm-deficient phenotype of these mutants was not due to deficiencies in attachment to catheter biomaterials, and defects in later stages of biofilm development were indicated. For one blocking-deficient mutant, the disrupted gene (encoding a putative multidrug efflux pump) was also found to be associated with susceptibility to fosfomycin, and loss of this system or general inhibition of efflux pumps increased sensitivity to this antibiotic. Furthermore, homologues of this system were found to be widely distributed among other common pathogens of the catheterized urinary tract. Overall, our findings provide fundamental new insight into crystalline biofilm formation by P. mirabilis, including the link between biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance in this organism, and indicate a potential role for efflux pump inhibitors in the treatment or prevention of P. mirabilis crystalline biofilms. PMID:24470471

  7. Studies of protein adsorption on implant materials in relation to biofilm formation I. Activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on Polypropylene and High density Polyethylene in presence of serum albumin

    E-print Network

    Sinha, S Dutta; Maity, P K; Tarafdar, S; Moulik, S P

    2014-01-01

    The surface of biomaterials used as implants are highly susceptible to bacterial colonization and subsequent infection. The amount of protein adsorption on biomaterials, among other factors, can affect the nature and quality of biofilms formed on them. The variation in the adsorption time of the protein on the biomaterial surface produces a phenotypic change in the bacteria by alteration of the production of EPS (exoplysaccharide) matrix. Knowledge of the effects of protein adsorption on implant infection will be very useful in understanding the chemistry of the biomaterial surfaces, which can deter the formation of biofilms. It is observed that the adsorption of BSA on the biomaterial surfaces increases with time and concentration, irrespective of their type and the nature of the EPS matrix of the bacterial biofilm is dependent on the amount of protein adsorbed on the biomaterial surface. The adsorption of protein (BSA) on the biomaterials, polypropylene (PP) and high density polyethylene (HDPE) has been stu...

  8. Bacterial community structure and activity of sulfate reducing bacteria in a membrane aerated biofilm analyzed by microsensor and molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Tan, Shuying; Sheng, Zhiya; Liu, Yang; Yu, Tong

    2014-11-01

    The activities and vertical spatial distribution of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) in an oxygen (O2 )-based membrane aerated biofilm (MAB) were investigated using microsensor (O2 and H2 S) measurements and molecular techniques (polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis [PCR-DGGE] and fluorescence in situ hybridization [FISH]). The O2 concentration profile revealed that O2 penetrated from the bottom (substratum) of the gas permeable membrane, and was gradually consumed within the biofilm until it was completely depleted near the biofilm/bulk liquid interface, indicating oxic and anoxic zone in the MAB. The H2 S concentration profile showed that H2 S production was found in the upper 285?µm of the biofilm, indicating a high activity of SRB in this region. The results from DGGE of the PCR-amplified dissimilatory sulfite reductase subunit B (dsrB) gene and FISH showed an uneven spatial distribution of SRB. The maximum SRB biomass was located in the upper biofilm. The information from the molecular analysis can be supplemented with that from microsensor measurements to better understand the microbial community and activity of SRB in the MAB. PMID:24890472

  9. Biofilm Development with an Emphasis on Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, K. P.; Earl, A. M.; Vlamakis, H. C.; Aguilar, C.; Kolter, R.

    2008-01-01

    Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation has increased tremendously in recent years. From research on diverse bacteria, a general model of bacterial biofilm development has emerged. This model can be adjusted to fit either of two common modes of unicellular existence: nonmotile and motile. Here we provide a detailed review of what is currently known about biofilm formation by the motile bacterium Bacillus subtilis. While the ability of bacteria to form a biofilm appears to be almost universal and overarching themes apply, the combination of molecular events necessary varies widely, and this is reflected in the other chapters of this book. PMID:18453269

  10. In Vitro Biofilm Formation of Commensal and Pathogenic Escherichia coli Strains: Impact of Environmental and Genetic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Reisner, Andreas; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Klein, Bjarke M.; Zechner, Ellen L.; Molin, Søren

    2006-01-01

    Our understanding of Escherichia coli biofilm formation in vitro is based on studies of laboratory K-12 strains grown in standard media. However, pathogenic E. coli isolates differ substantially in their genetic repertoire from E. coli K-12 and are subject to heterogeneous environmental conditions. In this study, in vitro biofilm formation of 331 nondomesticated E. coli strains isolated from healthy (n = 105) and diarrhea-afflicted children (n = 68), bacteremia patients (n = 90), and male patients with urinary tract infections (n = 68) was monitored using a variety of growth conditions and compared to in vitro biofilm formation of prototypic pathogenic and laboratory strains. Our results revealed remarkable variation among the capacities of diverse E. coli isolates to form biofilms in vitro. Notably, we could not identify an association of increased biofilm formation in vitro with a specific strain collection that represented pathogenic E. coli strains. Instead, analysis of biofilm data revealed a significant dependence on growth medium composition (P < 0.05). Poor correlation between biofilm formation in the various media suggests that diverse E. coli isolates respond very differently to changing environmental conditions. The data demonstrate that prevalence and expression of three factors known to strongly promote biofilm formation in E. coli K-12 (F-like conjugative pili, aggregative adherence fimbriae, and curli) cannot adequately account for the increased biofilm formation of nondomesticated E. coli isolates in vitro. This study highlights the complexity of genetic and environmental effectors of the biofilm phenotype within the species E. coli. PMID:16672611

  11. Dual Role for Pilus in Adherence to Epithelial Cells and Biofilm Formation in Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Duménil, Guillaume; Caliot, Elise; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Dramsi, Shaynoor

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a common human commensal and a major life-threatening pathogen in neonates. Adherence to host epithelial cells is the first critical step of the infectious process. Pili have been observed on the surface of several gram-positive bacteria including S. agalactiae. We previously characterized the pilus-encoding operon gbs1479-1474 in strain NEM316. This pilus is composed of three structural subunit proteins: Gbs1478 (PilA), Gbs1477 (PilB), and Gbs1474 (PilC), and its assembly involves two class C sortases (SrtC3 and SrtC4). PilB, the bona fide pilin, is the major component; PilA, the pilus associated adhesin, and PilC, are both accessory proteins incorporated into the pilus backbone. We first addressed the role of the housekeeping sortase A in pilus biogenesis and showed that it is essential for the covalent anchoring of the pilus fiber to the peptidoglycan. We next aimed at understanding the role of the pilus fiber in bacterial adherence and at resolving the paradox of an adhesive but dispensable pilus. Combining immunoblotting and electron microscopy analyses, we showed that the PilB fiber is essential for efficient PilA display on the surface of the capsulated strain NEM316. We then demonstrated that pilus integrity becomes critical for adherence to respiratory epithelial cells under flow-conditions mimicking an in vivo situation and revealing the limitations of the commonly used static adherence model. Interestingly, PilA exhibits a von Willebrand adhesion domain (VWA) found in many extracellular eucaryotic proteins. We show here that the VWA domain of PilA is essential for its adhesive function, demonstrating for the first time the functionality of a prokaryotic VWA homolog. Furthermore, the auto aggregative phenotype of NEM316 observed in standing liquid culture was strongly reduced in all three individual pilus mutants. S. agalactiae strain NEM316 was able to form biofilm in microtiter plate and, strikingly, the PilA and PilB mutants were strongly impaired in biofilm formation. Surprisingly, the VWA domain involved in adherence to epithelial cells was not required for biofilm formation. PMID:19424490

  12. Nitric oxide modulates bacterial biofilm formation through a multi-component cyclic-di-GMP signaling network

    PubMed Central

    Plate, Lars; Marletta, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Nitric oxide (NO) signaling in vertebrates is well characterized and involves the Heme-Nitric oxide/OXygen binding (H-NOX) domain of soluble guanylate cyclase as a selective NO sensor. In contrast, little is known about the biological role or signaling output of bacterial H-NOX proteins. Here, we describe a molecular pathway for H-NOX signaling in Shewanella oneidensis. NO stimulates biofilm formation by controlling the levels of the bacterial secondary messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). Phosphotransfer profiling was used to map the connectivity of a multi-component signaling network that involves integration from two histidine kinases and branching to three response regulators. A feed-forward loop between response regulators with phosphodiesterase domains and phosphorylation-mediated activation intricately regulated c-di-GMP levels. Phenotypic characterization established a link between NO signaling and biofilm formation. Cellular adhesion may provide a protection mechanism for bacteria against reactive and damaging NO. These results are broadly applicable to H-NOX-mediated NO signaling in bacteria. PMID:22542454

  13. Polyphenols from olive mill waste affect biofilm formation and motility in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Carraro, Lisa; Fasolato, Luca; Montemurro, Filomena; Martino, Maria Elena; Balzan, Stefania; Servili, Maurizio; Novelli, Enrico; Cardazzo, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Olive mill wastes are sources of phenolic compounds with a wide array of biological activities, including antimicrobial effects. A potential option for bioremediation to overcome ecological problems is the reutilization of these natural compounds in food production. The aim of this work was to gain a better understanding of the antimicrobial mode of action of a phenols extract from olive vegetation water (PEOVW) at molecular level by studying Escherichia coli as a model microorganism. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis was performed on E.?coli?K-12 exposed to PEOVW. The repression of genes for flagellar synthesis and the involvement of genes linked to biofilm formation and stress response were observed. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of PEOVW significantly decreased biofilm formation, swarming and swimming motility, thus confirming the gene expression data. This study provides interesting insights on the molecular action of PEOVW on E.?coli?K-12. Given these anti-biofilm properties and considering that biofilm formation is a serious problem for the food industry and human health, PEOVW has proved to be a high-value natural product. Olive mill wastes are sources of phenolic compounds with a wide array of biological activities, including antimicrobial effects. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis was performed on E. coli K-12 exposed to phenols extract from olive vegetation water (PEOVW). Sub-inhibitory concentrations of PEOVW significantly decreased biofilm formation, swarming and swimming motility. Given these anti-biofilm properties PEOVW has proved to be a high-value natural product. PMID:24628798

  14. Roles of the spiA gene from Salmonella enteritidis in biofilm formation and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongyan; Zhang, Xiaorong; Geng, Shizhong; Liu, Xiufan

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enteritidis has emerged as one of the most important food-borne pathogens for humans, and the formation of biofilms by this species may improve its resistance to disadvantageous conditions. The spiA gene of Salmonella typhimurium is essential for its virulence in host cells. However, the roles of the spiA gene in biofilm formation and virulence of S. enteritidis remain unclear. In this study we constructed a spiA gene mutant with a suicide plasmid. Phenotypic and biological analysis revealed that the mutant was similar to the wild-type strain in growth rate, morphology, and adherence to and invasion of epithelial cells. However, the mutant showed reduced biofilm formation in a quantitative microtitre assay and by scanning electron microscopy, and significantly decreased curli production and intracellular proliferation of macrophages during the biofilm phase. In addition, the spiA mutant was attenuated in a mouse model in both the exponential growth and biofilm phases. These data indicate that the spiA gene is involved in both biofilm formation and virulence of S. enteritidis. PMID:21415117

  15. cspA Influences Biofilm Formation and Drug Resistance in Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhongqi; Li, Zhe; Xu, Zongge; Li, Hongyan; Li, Lixiang; Ning, Cong; Ma, Lin; Xie, Xiangli; Wang, Guangyi; Yu, Huimei

    2015-01-01

    The microbial cell wall plays a crucial role in biofilm formation and drug resistance. cspA encodes a repeat-rich glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored cell wall protein in the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. To determine whether cspA has a significant impact on biofilm development and sensitivity to antifungal drugs in A. fumigatus, a ?cspA mutant was constructed by targeted gene disruption, and we then reconstituted the mutant to wild type by homologous recombination of a functional cspA gene. Deletion of cspA resulted in a rougher conidial surface, reduced biofilm formation, decreased resistance to antifungal agents, and increased internalization by A549 human lung epithelial cells, suggesting that cspA not only participates in maintaining the integrity of the cell wall, but also affects biofilm establishment, drug response, and invasiveness of A. fumigatus. PMID:25821832

  16. Biofilm formation by Candida albicans isolated from intrauterine devices.

    PubMed

    Lal, Priyanka; Agarwal, Vishnu; Pruthi, Parul; Pereira, Ben M J; Kural, M R; Pruthi, Vikas

    2008-12-01

    Our survey revealed that infected intrauterine devices (IUDs) recovered from patients suffering from reproductive tract infections (RTIs) were tainted with Candida biofilm composed of a single or multiple species. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of C. albicans biofilm topography showed that it consists of a dense network of mono- or multilayer of cells embedded within the matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) images depicted that C. albicans biofilms have a highly heterogeneous architecture composed of cellular and noncellular elements with EPS distributed in the cell-surface periphery or at cell-cell interface. Biochemical analysis showed that EPS produced by C. albicans biofilm contained significantly reduced total carbohydrate (40%), protein (5%) and enhanced amount of hexosamine (4%) in contrast to its planktonic counterparts. The in vitro activity of antifungal agents amphotericin B, nystatin, fluconazole and chlorhexidine against pre-formed C. albicans biofilm, assessed using XTT (2,3-bis[2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide) reduction assay revealed increased resistance of these infectious biofilm (50% reduction in metabolic activity at a concentration of 8, 16, 64, 128 ?g/ml respectively) in comparison to its planktonic form. PMID:23100744

  17. Inhibitors of biofilm formation by biofuel fermentation contaminants.

    PubMed

    Leathers, Timothy D; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Rich, Joseph O; Price, Neil P J; Manitchotpisit, Pennapa; Nunnally, Melinda S; Anderson, Amber M

    2014-10-01

    Biofuel fermentation contaminants such as Lactobacillus sp. may persist in production facilities by forming recalcitrant biofilms. In this study, biofilm-forming strains of Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Lactobacillus plantarum were isolated and characterized from a dry-grind fuel ethanol plant. A variety of potential biofilm inhibitors were tested, including microbial polysaccharides, commercial enzymes, ferric ammonium citrate, liamocins, phage endolysin, xylitol, and culture supernatants from Bacillus sp. A commercial enzyme mixture (Novozyme 188) and culture supernatants from Bacillus subtilis strains ALT3A and RPT-82412 were identified as the most promising biofilm inhibitors. In biofilm flow cells, these inhibitors reduced the density of viable biofilm cells by 0.8-0.9 log cfu/cm(2). Unlike B. subtilis strain RPT-82412, B. subtilis strain ALT3A and Novozyme 188 did not inhibit planktonic growth of Lactobacillus sp. MALDI-TOF mass spectra showed the production of surfactin-like molecules by both B. subtilis strains, and the coproduction of iturin-like molecules by strain RPT-82412. PMID:25022836

  18. Tina wooden vat biofilm: a safe and highly efficient lactic acid bacteria delivering system in PDO Ragusano cheese making.

    PubMed

    Lortal, Sylvie; Di Blasi, Annalisa; Madec, Marie-Noëlle; Pediliggieri, Concetta; Tuminello, Laura; Tanguy, Gaëlle; Fauquant, Jacques; Lecuona, Yohan; Campo, Patrizia; Carpino, Stefania; Licitra, Giuseppe

    2009-06-01

    In the Sicilian PDO Ragusano cheese making, raw milk is placed in a wooden vat called a Tina. As no starter is added, lactic acid is produced by milk flora and flora released from the Tina biofilm. The aim of this work was to assess the safety and efficiency of this natural inoculation system. From 15 Tinas' biofilms, bacteria total counts varied from 10(3) to 10(6) CFU/cm(2), with the predominance of thermophilic lactic acid bacteria. Low counts of yeasts and moulds were found in a few Tinas. Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7 were totally absent, as assessed by conventional plating and the Bax detection system after enrichment, highlighting the safety of the system. From four Tinas out of the 15, micropieces of wood were observed by confocal and scanning electron microscopy. The biofilm entrapped in a matrix covered almost entirely the surface of the wood. Polysaccharides were detected in the four Tinas. In three of the latter, cocci were predominant in the ecosystem whereas in the other one, cocci, bacilli, yeasts and moulds were observed. Fifty litres of microfiltrated milk (<10 CFU/mL) were poured in the four Tinas for 10 min of contact. Enumeration of lactic acid bacteria, yeasts and enterococci were performed in the milk after contact. Depending on the Tina, from 5.10(4) to 10(6) CFU/mL of Streptococcus thermophilus were released into the milk, and from 10(4) to 10(5) CFU/mL of thermophilic lactobacilli. Spontaneous acidification after contact confirmed the high efficiency of biofilm lactic acid bacteria delivery. PMID:19361876

  19. The Enterococcal Surface Protein, Esp, Is Involved in Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ALEJANDRO TOLEDO-ARANA; JAIONE VALLE; CRISTINA SOLANO; MARIA JESUS ARRIZUBIETA; CARME CUCARELLA; MARTA LAMATA; BEATRIZ AMORENA; J. Leiva; J. R. Penades; I. Lasa

    2001-01-01

    The enterococcal surface protein, Esp, is a high-molecular-weight surface protein of unknown function whose frequency is significantly increased among infection-derived Enterococcus faecalis isolates. In this work, a global structural similarity was found between Bap, a biofilm-associated protein of Staphylococcus aureus, and Esp. Analysis of the relationship between the presence of the Esp-encoding gene (esp) and the biofilm formation capacity in

  20. In vivo resistance to bacterial biofilm formation on tympanostomy tubes as a function of tube material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    IYAD S SAIDI; JOHN F BIEDLINGMAIER; PHILIP WHELAN

    1999-01-01

    Adherent bacterial biofilms have been implicated in the irreversible contamination of implanted medical devices. We evaluated the resistance of various tympanostomy (pressure equalization [PE]) tube materials to biofilm formation using an in vivo model. PE tubes of silicone, silver oxide–impregnated silicone, fluoroplastic, silver oxide–impregnated fluoroplastic, and ion-bombarded silicone were inserted into the tympanic membranes of 18 Hartley guinea pigs. Staphylococcus

  1. Filamentous Fungi in Drinking Water, Particularly in Relation to Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Virgínia M.; Oliveira, Helena M. B.; Santos, Cledir; Paterson, R. Russell M.; Gusmão, Norma B.; Lima, Nelson

    2011-01-01

    The presence of filamentous fungi in drinking water has become an area worthy of investigation with various studies now being published. The problems associated with fungi include blockage of water pipes, organoleptic deterioration, pathogenic fungi and mycotoxins. Fungal biofilm formation is a less developed field of study. This paper updates the topic and introduces novel methods on fungal biofilm analysis, particularly from work based in Brazil. Further recommendations for standard methodology are provided. PMID:21556196

  2. Extracellular products as mediators of the formation and detachment of Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David G Allison; Begoña Ruiz; Carmen SanJose; Almudena Jaspe; Peter Gilbert

    1998-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens B52 produces substantial biofilms at the air\\/liquid\\/solid interface of glass coverslips clamped vertically and partly submerged in liquid medium at 21°C. Biofilm formation was maximal ca. 20–50 h after inoculation of the liquid medium and, as indicated by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), contained large numbers of bacterial cells that were embedded within an extensive exopolymeric matrix. Incubation

  3. Prevention of Candida albicans Biofilm Formation by Covalently Bound Dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate and Polyethylenimine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristof De Prijck; Nele De Smet; Tom Coenye; Etienne Schacht; Hans J. Nelis

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans biofilms are a major cause of voice prosthesis deterioration in laryngectomized patients. The aim of this study was to produce\\u000a a surface capable of inhibiting C. albicans biofilm formation. Dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate (DMAEMA) and polyethylenimine (PEI) moieties were covalently bound to the\\u000a surface of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) or polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and subsequently quaternized. Physicochemical characterization\\u000a of the grafted surfaces was carried

  4. A Role for the Mannose-Sensitive Hemagglutinin in Biofilm Formation by Vibrio cholerae El Tor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PAULA I. WATNICK; KARLA JEAN FULLNER; ROBERTO KOLTER

    1999-01-01

    While much has been learned regarding the genetic basis of host-pathogen interactions, less is known about the molecular basis of a pathogen's survival in the environment. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces represents a survival strategy utilized by many microbes. Here it is shown that Vibrio cholerae El Tor does not use the virulence-associated toxin-coregulated pilus to form biofilms on borosilicate

  5. Evaluation of Zosteric Acid for Mitigating Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas putida Isolated from a Membrane Bioreactor System

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Andrea; Foladori, Paola; Ponti, Benedetta; Bettinetti, Roberta; Gambino, Michela; Villa, Federica; Cappitelli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    This study provides data to define an efficient biocide-free strategy based on zosteric acid to counteract biofilm formation on the membranes of submerged bioreactor system plants. 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis showed that gammaproteobacteria was the prevalent taxa on fouled membranes of an Italian wastewater plant. Pseudomonas was the prevalent genus among the cultivable membrane-fouler bacteria and Pseudomonas putida was selected as the target microorganism to test the efficacy of the antifoulant. Zosteric acid was not a source of carbon and energy for P. putida cells and, at 200 mg/L, it caused a reduction of bacterial coverage by 80%. Biofilm experiments confirmed the compound caused a significant decrease in biomass (?97%) and thickness (?50%), and it induced a migration activity of the peritrichous flagellated P. putida over the polycarbonate surface not amenable to a biofilm phenotype. The low octanol-water partitioning coefficient and the high water solubility suggested a low bioaccumulation potential and the water compartment as its main environmental recipient and capacitor. Preliminary ecotoxicological tests did not highlight direct toxicity effects toward Daphnia magna. For green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata an effect was observed at concentrations above 100 mg/L with a significant growth of protozoa that may be connected to a concurrent algal growth inhibition. PMID:24879523

  6. Role of efflux pumps in the antibiotic resistance of bacteria embedded in a biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Sara M.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are complex microbial associations anchored to abiotic or biotic surfaces, embedded in extracellular matrix produced by the biofilms themselves where they interact with each other and the environment. One of the main properties of biofilms is their capacity to be more resistant to antimicrobial agents than planktonic cells. Efflux pumps have been reported as one of the mechanisms responsible for the antimicrobial resistance in biofilm structures. Evidence of the role of efflux pump in biofilm resistance has been found in several microorganisms such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. However, in spite of the studies on the importance of efflux pumps in biofilm growth and about their relevance in antimicrobial resistance forming biofilm, the exact role of these efflux systems has not been determined as yet. PMID:23380871

  7. Differential Biofilm Formation and Chemical Disinfection Resistance of Sessile Cells of Listeria monocytogenes Strains under Monospecies and Dual-Species (with Salmonella enterica) Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kostaki, Maria; Chorianopoulos, Nikos; Braxou, Elli; Nychas, George-John

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible influence of bacterial intra- and interspecies interactions on the ability of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica to develop mixed-culture biofilms on an abiotic substratum, as well as on the subsequent resistance of sessile cells to chemical disinfection. Initially, three strains from each species were selected and left to attach and form biofilms on stainless steel (SS) coupons incubated at 15°C for 144 h, in periodically renewable tryptone soy broth (TSB), under either monoculture or mixed-culture (mono-/dual-species) conditions. Following biofilm formation, mixed-culture sessile communities were subjected to 6-min disinfection treatments with (i) benzalkonium chloride (50 ppm), (ii) sodium hypochlorite (10 ppm), (iii) peracetic acid (10 ppm), and (iv) a mixture of hydrogen peroxide (5 ppm) and peracetic acid (5 ppm). Results revealed that both species reached similar biofilm counts (ca. 105 CFU cm?2) and that, in general, interspecies interactions did not have any significant effect either on the biofilm-forming ability (as this was assessed by agar plating enumeration of the mechanically detached biofilm bacteria) or on the antimicrobial resistance of each individual species. Interestingly, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis clearly showed that the three L. monocytogenes strains did not contribute at the same level either to the formation of mixed-culture sessile communities (mono-/dual species) or to their antimicrobial recalcitrance. Additionally, the simultaneous existence inside the biofilm structure of S. enterica cells seemed to influence the occurrence and resistance pattern of L. monocytogenes strains. In sum, this study highlights the impact of microbial interactions taking place inside a mixed-culture sessile community on both its population dynamics and disinfection resistance. PMID:22307304

  8. In-situ biofilm characterization in membrane systems using Optical Coherence Tomography: formation, structure, detachment and impact of flux change.

    PubMed

    Dreszer, C; Wexler, A D; Drusová, S; Overdijk, T; Zwijnenburg, A; Flemming, H-C; Kruithof, J C; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-12-15

    Biofouling causes performance loss in spiral wound nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane operation for process and drinking water production. The development of biofilm formation, structure and detachment was studied in-situ, non-destructively with Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in direct relation with the hydraulic biofilm resistance and membrane performance parameters: transmembrane pressure drop (TMP) and feed-channel pressure drop (FCP). The objective was to evaluate the suitability of OCT for biofouling studies, applying a membrane biofouling test cell operated at constant crossflow velocity (0.1 m s(-1)) and permeate flux (20 L m(-2)h(-1)). In time, the biofilm thickness on the membrane increased continuously causing a decline in membrane performance. Local biofilm detachment was observed at the biofilm-membrane interface. A mature biofilm was subjected to permeate flux variation (20 to 60 to 20 L m(-2)h(-1)). An increase in permeate flux caused a decrease in biofilm thickness and an increase in biofilm resistance, indicating biofilm compaction. Restoring the original permeate flux did not completely restore the original biofilm parameters: After elevated flux operation the biofilm thickness was reduced to 75% and the hydraulic resistance increased to 116% of the original values. Therefore, after a temporarily permeate flux increase the impact of the biofilm on membrane performance was stronger. OCT imaging of the biofilm with increased permeate flux revealed that the biofilm became compacted, lost internal voids, and became more dense. Therefore, membrane performance losses were not only related to biofilm thickness but also to the internal biofilm structure, e.g. caused by changes in pressure. Optical Coherence Tomography proved to be a suitable tool for quantitative in-situ biofilm thickness and morphology studies which can be carried out non-destructively and in real-time in transparent membrane biofouling monitors. PMID:25282092

  9. Biofilm formation by enteric pathogens and its role in plant colonization and persistence

    PubMed Central

    Yaron, Sima; Römling, Ute

    2014-01-01

    The significant increase in foodborne outbreaks caused by contaminated fresh produce, such as alfalfa sprouts, lettuce, melons, tomatoes and spinach, during the last 30 years stimulated investigation of the mechanisms of persistence of human pathogens on plants. Emerging evidence suggests that Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli, which cause the vast majority of fresh produce outbreaks, are able to adhere to and to form biofilms on plants leading to persistence and resistance to disinfection treatments, which subsequently can cause human infections and major outbreaks. In this review, we present the current knowledge about host, bacterial and environmental factors that affect the attachment to plant tissue and the process of biofilm formation by S. enterica and E. coli, and discuss how biofilm formation assists in persistence of pathogens on the plants. Mechanisms used by S. enterica and E. coli to adhere and persist on abiotic surfaces and mammalian cells are partially similar and also used by plant pathogens and symbionts. For example, amyloid curli fimbriae, part of the extracellular matrix of biofilms, frequently contribute to adherence and are u